Science.gov

Sample records for ice storm damage

  1. Fertilization increases the risk of loblolly pine to ice storm damage.

    SciTech Connect

    Aubrey, D P; Coleman, M D; Coyle, D R

    2006-05-25

    Winter storms resulting in substantial ice accumulation occur with periodic frequency in the southeastern United States and they have potential to severely damage softwood plantations. Loblolly pine is one of the most important crop tree species in this region and a combined understanding of initial damage and subsequent growth and recovery may allow for more productive utilization of these stands following severe ice storms. In January 2004 a severe ice storm deposited approximately 2 cm of ice on an intensively managed four-year old loblolly pine plantation in South Carolina . The existing treatments within this plantation presented an opportunity to examine the effects of irrigation and fertilization on ice damage and recovery.

  2. Historic and Future Ice Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klima, K.; Morgan, M. G.

    2014-12-01

    Ice storm losses from business interruption as well as transportation and health damages can range into billions of dollars. For instance, the December 2008 New England and Upstate New York ice storm caused four deaths and monetary damages between 2.5 and 3.7 billion, and the 2008 Chinese winter storms resulted in over 130 deaths and over 20 billion in damages. Informal discussions with ice storm experts indicate that due to competing temperature and precipitation effects as well as local topographic effects, it is unclear how exactly climate change will affect ice storms. Here we ask how incident frequencies might change in a future climate at four weather stations prone to ice storms. Using historical atmospheric soundings, we conduct a thought experiment where we perturb the temperatures as might be expected in a future climate. We then discuss changes in monthly frequency of ice storms.

  3. Ice Storm Supercomputer

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    "A new Idaho National Laboratory supercomputer is helping scientists create more realistic simulations of nuclear fuel. Dubbed 'Ice Storm,' this 2048-processor machine allows researchers to model and predict the complex physics behind nuclear reactor behavior. And with a new visualization lab, the team can see the results of its simulations on the big screen." For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  4. Ice Storm Supercomputer

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    "A new Idaho National Laboratory supercomputer is helping scientists create more realistic simulations of nuclear fuel. Dubbed 'Ice Storm,' this 2048-processor machine allows researchers to model and predict the complex physics behind nuclear reactor behavior. And with a new visualization lab, the team can see the results of its simulations on the big screen." For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  5. Synoptic and Mesoscale Aspects of Ice Storms in the Northeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, C.; Bosart, L. F.; Keyser, D.; Quinlan, J.; Lipton, K.

    2012-12-01

    Ice storms are among the most hazardous, disruptive, and costly meteorological phenomena in the United States. The accretion of freezing rain during ice storms endangers human lives, undermines public infrastructure, and adversely impacts local and regional economies. Previous studies have demonstrated that the northeastern U.S. is especially susceptible to damaging ice storms. Furthermore, ice storms present a major operational forecast challenge due to the combined influence of synoptic, mesoscale, and microphysical processes on precipitation type. In consideration of these societal impacts and forecast issues, we have constructed a 17-cool-season climatology (Oct 1993-April 2010) of ice storms in the northeastern U.S., and performed composite and case study analyses to: 1) determine antecedent environments conducive to ice storms, and 2) identify dynamical mechanisms responsible for freezing rain. Using the National Climatic Data Center's Storm Events Database, we established a history of ice storms affecting 14 National Weather Service (NWS) county warning areas (CWAs) within the domain of the Northeast Regional Climate Center. First, we evaluated the temporal and spatial variability of ice storms during the 1993-2010 period. Next, we generated synoptic composites from NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data and examined how large-scale circulation patterns and associated quasi-geostrophic (QG) forcing, thermal boundaries, and moisture transport establish environments favorable for freezing rain in each NWS CWA. For the purpose of this presentation, we have only included the composite analysis of events impacting the Albany, NY, CWA. Although freezing rain typically occurs under preferred synoptic conditions, mesoscale processes determine the persistence of freezing rain events by modifying synoptic-scale circulations and associated QG forcing on regional and local scales. Therefore, a multiscale analysis is necessary to diagnose important synoptic-mesoscale circulation

  6. Storm-Related Postmortem Damage to Skeletal Remains.

    PubMed

    Maijanen, Heli; Wilson-Taylor, Rebecca J; Jantz, Lee Meadows

    2016-05-01

    In April 2011, human skeletons were exposed to heavy storms at the outdoor Anthropology Research Facility (ARF) in Knoxville, Tennessee. Of the approximate 125 skeletons at the ARF in April 2011, 30 donations exhibited postmortem damage that could be attributed to the storms. At least 20 of the affected donations exhibit postmortem damage clearly associated with hailstones due to the oval shape and similar small size of the defects observed. The irregular shape and larger size of other defects may be a product of other falling objects (e.g., tree branches) associated with the storms. Storm-related damage was observed throughout the skeleton, with the most commonly damaged skeletal elements being the scapula and ilium, but more robust elements (i.e., femora and tibiae) also displayed characteristic features of hailstone damage. Thus, hailstone damage should be considered when forensic practitioners observe unusual postmortem damage in skeletal remains recovered from the outdoor context.

  7. Forecasting severe ice storms using numerical weather prediction: the March 2010 Newfoundland event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosek, J.; Musilek, P.; Lozowski, E.; Pytlak, P.

    2011-02-01

    The northeast coast of North America is frequently hit by severe ice storms. These freezing rain events can produce large ice accretions that damage structures, frequently power transmission and distribution infrastructure. For this reason, it is highly desirable to model and forecast such icing events, so that the consequent damages can be prevented or mitigated. The case study presented in this paper focuses on the March 2010 ice storm event that took place in eastern Newfoundland. We apply a combination of a numerical weather prediction model and an ice accretion algorithm to simulate a forecast of this event. The main goals of this study are to compare the simulated meteorological variables to observations, and to assess the ability of the model to accurately predict the ice accretion load for different forecast horizons. The duration and timing of the freezing rain event that occurred between the night of 4 March and the morning of 6 March was simulated well in all model runs. The total precipitation amounts in the model, however, differed by up to a factor of two from the observations. The accuracy of the model air temperature strongly depended on the forecast horizon, but it was acceptable for all simulation runs. The simulated accretion loads were also compared to the design values for power delivery structures in the region. The results indicated that the simulated values exceeded design criteria in the areas of reported damage and power outages.

  8. The ice storm of the century: how affected hospitals and communities dealt with the challenges of a unique, prolonged emergency.

    PubMed

    1998-04-01

    A huge ice storm in early January 1998 caused severe damage in northern New York and parts of Maine and Canada. The storm, which lasted in some areas for several weeks and is being called the "storm of the century," led to 30 deaths (many from carbon monoxide poisoning); closed roads and schools; downed thousand of trees and power lines; and left hundreds of thousands without electricity. In this report, we'll present details on how hospitals in these three locations which were declared disaster areas were affected by the storm as well as the measures that they and their security departments took to help patients, staff, and their communities.

  9. Impact of the 2008 Ice Storm on Moso Bamboo plantations in southeast China

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Dr. Benzhi; Li, Zhengcai; Cao, Yonghui; An, Yanfei; Deng, Dr. Zongfu; Wang, Gang; Gu, Lianhong

    2011-01-01

    A massive ice and snow storm occurred in early 2008 in South China and caused extensive damage to forests. Thirty-six plots of moso bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens) plantation were established following the ice storm in the central growth area of moso bamboo, Fenyi, Jiangxi province, China. The topographical condition and stand attributes, and the ice storm impact on moso bamboo plantations were investigated. We found that an average of 54.48% ( 17.58%) bamboo culms was damaged. The damage patterns included bending, snapping and uprooting, which accounted for 17.01% ( 7.28%), 22.37% ( 11.58%) and 15.11% ( 11.54%) of the total respectively. An average of 16.42 ( 7.09) tons per hectare dead dry biomass was produced, accounting for 37.73% ( 14.41%) of total aboveground biomass. A mean value of 8.21 ( 3.55) Mg C per hectare was shifted from living biomass to dead. Stand level analysis showed a significant increase in damage level and dead biomass production at north-oriented slopes, and with high stand density (between 3000 and 4500 culm/ha). High altitude caused a higher proportion of snapped culms but a lower proportion of uprooted. Analysis at individual culm level suggested that the susceptibility for a culm to break or uproot due to ice storm would rise as its diameter increased, while the susceptibility to bend would decline. The young (one year old) culm was more susceptible to snapping or bending while over-mature (>5 years old) culm was more susceptible to uprooting, implying it is a good managing practice to harvest mature culm timely.

  10. 98. DETAIL VIEW OF STORM DAMAGE AND EXPOSED SUBSTRUCTURE, NORTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    98. DETAIL VIEW OF STORM DAMAGE AND EXPOSED SUBSTRUCTURE, NORTHWEST SIDE OF 4TH TEE, LOOKING WEST - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  11. Coastal Storm Events and Property Damages Associated with Winter Storms in the Tri-State Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimkus, C.; Ting, M.; Adamo, S. B.; Madajewicz, M.; Kushnir, Y.; Booth, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    Winter storms pose a number of hazards to coastal communities in the U.S. Northeast including heavy rain and/or snow, strong wind, cold temperatures, as well as coastal and fresh water flooding. In combination and as separate "events", these hazards threaten infrastructure and can cause millions of dollars of property damage in one state from one storm alone. A study of the impacts of several recent winter storms from 2005-2012 on 4 coastal counties in Connecticut, 15 in New Jersey, and 13 in New York underscores the significant economic consequences the climate can have on private and public property. Data on events and associated property damage from the National Climatic Data Center Storm Events Database indicates that flood and wind events were documented most frequently for these winter storms and were responsible for the highest damages overall. Although New Jersey experienced the most events and property damage, there is no discernable connection between the number of events that afflict a county or state and the level of damage they face. For example, the data shows that a low number of flood events, both coastal and freshwater, accounted for the largest losses. Furthermore, the study reveals that winter storms may affect suburban property more than urban infrastructure since suburban New Jersey suffered the most property damage while urban counties in New York sustained little to no costs in comparison. An examination of the relationship between property damage from the recent storms and each county's coastal land area and population below 3 meters suggests that the amount of damage reported is related to the land area at lower elevations but there is no direct link between losses and the population density below 3 meters.

  12. Storm-induced sea-ice breakup and the implications for ice extent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohout, A. L.; Williams, M. J. M.; Dean, S. M.; Meylan, M. H.

    2014-05-01

    The propagation of large, storm-generated waves through sea ice has so far not been measured, limiting our understanding of how ocean waves break sea ice. Without improved knowledge of ice breakup, we are unable to understand recent changes, or predict future changes, in Arctic and Antarctic sea ice. Here we show that storm-generated ocean waves propagating through Antarctic sea ice are able to transport enough energy to break sea ice hundreds of kilometres from the ice edge. Our results, which are based on concurrent observations at multiple locations, establish that large waves break sea ice much farther from the ice edge than would be predicted by the commonly assumed exponential decay. We observed the wave height decay to be almost linear for large waves--those with a significant wave height greater than three metres--and to be exponential only for small waves. This implies a more prominent role for large ocean waves in sea-ice breakup and retreat than previously thought. We examine the wider relevance of this by comparing observed Antarctic sea-ice edge positions with changes in modelled significant wave heights for the Southern Ocean between 1997 and 2009, and find that the retreat and expansion of the sea-ice edge correlate with mean significant wave height increases and decreases, respectively. This includes capturing the spatial variability in sea-ice trends found in the Ross and Amundsen-Bellingshausen seas. Climate models fail to capture recent changes in sea ice in both polar regions. Our results suggest that the incorporation of explicit or parameterized interactions between ocean waves and sea ice may resolve this problem.

  13. Storm-induced sea-ice breakup and the implications for ice extent.

    PubMed

    Kohout, A L; Williams, M J M; Dean, S M; Meylan, M H

    2014-05-29

    The propagation of large, storm-generated waves through sea ice has so far not been measured, limiting our understanding of how ocean waves break sea ice. Without improved knowledge of ice breakup, we are unable to understand recent changes, or predict future changes, in Arctic and Antarctic sea ice. Here we show that storm-generated ocean waves propagating through Antarctic sea ice are able to transport enough energy to break sea ice hundreds of kilometres from the ice edge. Our results, which are based on concurrent observations at multiple locations, establish that large waves break sea ice much farther from the ice edge than would be predicted by the commonly assumed exponential decay. We observed the wave height decay to be almost linear for large waves--those with a significant wave height greater than three metres--and to be exponential only for small waves. This implies a more prominent role for large ocean waves in sea-ice breakup and retreat than previously thought. We examine the wider relevance of this by comparing observed Antarctic sea-ice edge positions with changes in modelled significant wave heights for the Southern Ocean between 1997 and 2009, and find that the retreat and expansion of the sea-ice edge correlate with mean significant wave height increases and decreases, respectively. This includes capturing the spatial variability in sea-ice trends found in the Ross and Amundsen-Bellingshausen seas. Climate models fail to capture recent changes in sea ice in both polar regions. Our results suggest that the incorporation of explicit or parameterized interactions between ocean waves and sea ice may resolve this problem.

  14. Synoptic and mesoscale aspects of ice storms in the northeastern U.S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, Christopher M.

    Ice storms are among the most hazardous, disruptive, and costly meteorological phenomena in the northeastern United States. The accretion of freezing rain during ice storms endangers human safety, compromises public infrastructure, and causes economic losses on local and regional scales. Furthermore, ice storms present a major operational forecast challenge due to the combined influence of synoptic, mesoscale, and microphysical processes on precipitation type. In consideration of these socioeconomic impacts and forecast issues, we have identified three primary objectives for this thesis: 1) create long-term climatologies of freezing rain and ice storms in the northeastern U.S., 2) identify antecedent environments conducive to ice storms and dynamical mechanisms responsible for freezing rain, and 3) increase situational awareness of the synoptic and mesoscale processes that govern the evolution of ice storms. The climatology portion of this thesis examines the temporal and spatial variability of freezing rain and ice storms during the 1975-2010 and 1993-2010 periods, respectively. Individual ice storms are also partitioned by five characteristic synoptic-scale weather patterns. Synoptic composite maps for the two most common event types (Type G and Type BC) illustrate how large-scale circulation patterns and associated quasi-geostrophic (QG) forcing, thermal boundaries, and moisture transport establish environments favorable for freezing rain. Composite cross sections also offer critical insights into synoptic-mesoscale linkages that influence the duration and intensity of freezing rain. The composite analysis for both event types suggests that ice storms occur in association with QG ascent and low-level frontogenetical forcing beneath the equatorward entrance region of an upper-level jet. Moreover, low- to midlevel warm advection and moisture transport, in conjunction with near-surface ageostrophic cold advection on the poleward side of a surface warm front, helps

  15. Quebec's ice storm '98: "all cards wild, all rules broken" in Quebec's shell-shocked hospitals.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, J

    1998-02-24

    The remarkable ice storm that brought life to a standstill in most of Eastern Ontario and Quebec in January had a huge impact on medical services. Hospitals that lost power found themselves serving as shelters not only for patients but also for staff members and nearby residents. Doctors' offices were forced to close and a large number of operations were cancelled. The 2 articles that follow detail the huge impact the "ice storm of the century" had on health care.

  16. Tree species traits but not diversity mitigate stem breakage in a subtropical forest following a rare and extreme ice storm.

    PubMed

    Nadrowski, Karin; Pietsch, Katherina; Baruffol, Martin; Both, Sabine; Gutknecht, Jessica; Bruelheide, Helge; Heklau, Heike; Kahl, Anja; Kahl, Tiemo; Niklaus, Pascal; Kröber, Wenzel; Liu, Xiaojuan; Mi, Xiangcheng; Michalski, Stefan; von Oheimb, Goddert; Purschke, Oliver; Schmid, Bernhard; Fang, Teng; Welk, Erik; Wirth, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Future climates are likely to include extreme events, which in turn have great impacts on ecological systems. In this study, we investigated possible effects that could mitigate stem breakage caused by a rare and extreme ice storm in a Chinese subtropical forest across a gradient of forest diversity. We used Bayesian modeling to correct stem breakage for tree size and variance components analysis to quantify the influence of taxon, leaf and wood functional traits, and stand level properties on the probability of stem breakage. We show that the taxon explained four times more variance in individual stem breakage than did stand level properties; trees with higher specific leaf area (SLA) were less susceptible to breakage. However, a large part of the variation at the taxon scale remained unexplained, implying that unmeasured or undefined traits could be used to predict damage caused by ice storms. When aggregated at the plot level, functional diversity and wood density increased after the ice storm. We suggest that for the adaption of forest management to climate change, much can still be learned from looking at functional traits at the taxon level.

  17. Tree Species Traits but Not Diversity Mitigate Stem Breakage in a Subtropical Forest following a Rare and Extreme Ice Storm

    PubMed Central

    Nadrowski, Karin; Pietsch, Katherina; Baruffol, Martin; Both, Sabine; Gutknecht, Jessica; Bruelheide, Helge; Heklau, Heike; Kahl, Anja; Kahl, Tiemo; Niklaus, Pascal; Kröber, Wenzel; Liu, Xiaojuan; Mi, Xiangcheng; Michalski, Stefan; von Oheimb, Goddert; Purschke, Oliver; Schmid, Bernhard; Fang, Teng; Welk, Erik; Wirth, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Future climates are likely to include extreme events, which in turn have great impacts on ecological systems. In this study, we investigated possible effects that could mitigate stem breakage caused by a rare and extreme ice storm in a Chinese subtropical forest across a gradient of forest diversity. We used Bayesian modeling to correct stem breakage for tree size and variance components analysis to quantify the influence of taxon, leaf and wood functional traits, and stand level properties on the probability of stem breakage. We show that the taxon explained four times more variance in individual stem breakage than did stand level properties; trees with higher specific leaf area (SLA) were less susceptible to breakage. However, a large part of the variation at the taxon scale remained unexplained, implying that unmeasured or undefined traits could be used to predict damage caused by ice storms. When aggregated at the plot level, functional diversity and wood density increased after the ice storm. We suggest that for the adaption of forest management to climate change, much can still be learned from looking at functional traits at the taxon level. PMID:24879434

  18. Using Satellite Remote Sensing to Assist the National Weather Service (NWS) in Storm Damage Surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Lori A.; Molthan, Andrew; McGrath, Kevin; Bell, Jordan; Cole, Tony; Burks, Jason

    2016-01-01

    In the United States, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Weather Service (NWS) is charged with performing damage assessments when storm or tornado damage is suspected after a severe weather event. This has led to the development of the Damage Assessment Toolkit (DAT), an application for smartphones, tablets and web browsers that allows for the collection, geolocation, and aggregation of various damage indicators collected during storm surveys.

  19. Early 2016 Winter Storm Melts Arctic Sea Ice

    NASA Video Gallery

    Arctic sea ice grows during the winter months, reaching its largest extent sometime in March. When something disrupts the cold, dry, winter Arctic atmosphere, sea ice can feel the effects, and thes...

  20. Use of Remote Sensing Data to Enhance NWS Storm Damage Toolkit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedlove, Gary J.; Molthan, Andrew L.; White, Kris; Burks, Jason; Stellman, Keith; Smith, Mathew

    2012-01-01

    In the wake of a natural disaster such as a tornado, the National Weather Service (NWS) is required to provide a very detailed and timely storm damage assessment to local, state and federal homeland security officials. The Post ]Storm Data Acquisition (PSDA) procedure involves the acquisition and assembly of highly perishable data necessary for accurate post ]event analysis and potential integration into a geographic information system (GIS) available to its end users and associated decision makers. Information gained from the process also enables the NWS to increase its knowledge of extreme events, learn how to better use existing equipment, improve NWS warning programs, and provide accurate storm intensity and damage information to the news media and academia. To help collect and manage all of this information, forecasters in NWS Southern Region are currently developing a Storm Damage Assessment Toolkit (SDAT), which incorporates GIS ]capable phones and laptops into the PSDA process by tagging damage photography, location, and storm damage details with GPS coordinates for aggregation within the GIS database. However, this tool alone does not fully integrate radar and ground based storm damage reports nor does it help to identify undetected storm damage regions. In many cases, information on storm damage location (beginning and ending points, swath width, etc.) from ground surveys is incomplete or difficult to obtain. Geographic factors (terrain and limited roads in rural areas), manpower limitations, and other logistical constraints often prevent the gathering of a comprehensive picture of tornado or hail damage, and may allow damage regions to go undetected. Molthan et al. (2011) have shown that high resolution satellite data can provide additional valuable information on storm damage tracks to augment this database. This paper presents initial development to integrate satellitederived damage track information into the SDAT for near real ]time use by forecasters

  1. The ice storm of the century: how hospitals met the challenge.

    PubMed

    Appelbaum, A

    1999-01-01

    A huge ice storm in January 1998 affected hospitals and communities in northern New York State and parts of Maine and Canada. This article discusses how some of the region's health facilities and their security departments helped patients, staff, and their communities deal with the unique and prolonged emergency.

  2. Living with a Chronic Disabling Illness and Then Some: Data from the 1998 Ice Storm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gignac, Monique A. M.; Cott, Cheryl A.; Badley, Elizabeth M.

    2003-01-01

    This study examined the impact of the 1998 Canadian ice storm on the physical and psychological health of older adults (age greater than 55 years) living with a chronic physical illness, namely osteoarthritis and/or osteoporosis. Although disasters are relatively rare, they are a useful means of examining the impact of a single stressor on a group…

  3. Does public education reduce ice storm-related carbon monoxide exposure?

    PubMed

    Lin, George; Conners, Gregory P

    2005-11-01

    Public education to prevent carbon monoxide exposure during ice storms has been recommended; its effects remain unexamined. We compared patients seen for carbon monoxide inhalation at the area's only academic Emergency Department during 1991 and 2003 ice storms; educational efforts were more intense in 2003. There were fewer patients during the second storm (45 vs. 55); all recovered fully. The percentage of Caucasian patients rose (from 57% to 89%) whereas that of African-American patients fell (from 39% to 7%). Indoor grill use, associated with 11% of 1991 cases, was eliminated in 2003. Indoor gas generators remain the most common source. Carboxyhemoglobin levels correlate poorly with ambient carbon monoxide levels. Enhanced public education had a modest effect, especially in reducing the proportion of African-American patients and those from indoor grill use. Research on more effective public health education targeted at gas generator users and combined with physical interventions should be considered.

  4. Observations of ice nuclei and heterogeneous freezing in a Western Pacific extratropical storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stith, J. L.; Twohy, C. H.; Demott, P. J.; Baumgardner, D.; Campos, T.; Gao, R.; Anderson, J.

    2011-07-01

    In situ airborne sampling of refractory black carbon (rBC) particles and Ice Nuclei (IN) was conducted in and near an extratropical cyclonic storm in the western Pacific Ocean during the Pacific Dust Experiment, PACDEX, in the spring of 2007. Airmass origins were from Eastern Asia. Clouds associated primarily with the warm sector of the storm were sampled at various locations and altitudes. Cloud hydrometeors were evaporated by a counterflow virtual impactor (CVI) and the residuals were sampled by a single particle soot photometer (SP2) instrument, a continuous flow diffusion chamber ice nucleus detector (CFDC) and collected for electron microscope analysis. In clouds containing large ice particles, multiple residual particles were observed downstream of the CVI for each ice particle sampled on average. The fraction of rBC compared to total particles in the residual particles increased with decreasing condensed water content, while the fraction of IN compared to total particles did not, suggesting that the scavenging process for rBC is different than for IN. In the warm sector storm midlevels at temperatures where heterogeneous freezing is expected to be significant (here -24 to -29 °C), IN concentrations from ice particle residuals generally agreed with simultaneous measurements of total ice concentrations or were higher in regions where aggregates of crystals were found, suggesting heterogeneous freezing as the dominant ice formation process in the mid levels of these warm sector clouds. Lower in the storm, at warmer temperatures, ice concentrations were affected by aggregation and were somewhat less than measured IN concentrations at colder temperatures. The results are consistent with ice particles forming at storm mid-levels by heterogeneous freezing on IN, followed by aggregation and sedimentation to lower altitudes. Compositional analysis of the aerosol and back trajectories of the air in the warm sector suggested a possible biomass burning source for much

  5. National Economic Development Procedures Manual. Coastal Storm Damage and Erosion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    information on precipitation, temperature and river levels is more institutionalized than gathering and recording of coastal storm events. Coastal events may...be linked to a combination of events such as local wind-driven 9 waves, ocean swells, extremely high tides, and high river flows in adjacent coastal...streams. D. EROSION LOSSES OF A SINGLE EVENT - River bank erosion is often not storm- or flood-related. Bank erosion in meandering streams, for example

  6. An outbreak of carbon monoxide poisoning after a major ice storm in Maine.

    PubMed

    Daley, W R; Smith, A; Paz-Argandona, E; Malilay, J; McGeehin, M

    2000-01-01

    Unintentional carbon monoxide (CO) exposure kills over 500 people in the U.S. annually. Outbreaks of CO poisoning have occurred after winter storms. The objective of this study was to describe clinical features and identify important risk factors of a CO poisoning outbreak occurring after a major ice storm. The study design included a case series of CO poisoning patients, a telephone survey of the general community, and a case-controlled study of households using specific CO sources. The setting was the primary service area of four hospital emergency departments located in the heavily storm-impacted interior region of Maine. Participants included all patients with a laboratory-confirmed diagnosis of CO poisoning during the 2 weeks after the storm onset, and a population-based comparison group of 522 households selected by random digit dialing. There were 100 cases identified, involving 42 common-source exposure incidents, most of them during the first week. Though classic CO symptoms of headache, dizziness, and nausea predominated, 9 patients presented with chest pain and 10 were asymptomatic. One patient died and 5 were transferred for hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Gasoline-powered electric generators were a CO source in 30 incidents, kerosene heaters in 8, and propane heaters in 4. In the community, 31.4% of households used a generator after the ice storm. The strongest risk factor for poisoning was locating a generator in a basement or an attached structure such as a garage. Cases of CO poisoning with various presentations can be expected in the early aftermath of a severe ice storm. Generators are a major CO source and generator location an important risk factor for such disasters.

  7. On the 2012 record low Arctic sea ice cover: Combined impact of preconditioning and an August storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, Claire L.; Comiso, Josefino C.

    2013-04-01

    A new record low Arctic sea ice extent for the satellite era, 3.4 × 106 km2, was reached on 13 September 2012; and a new record low sea ice area, 3.0 × 106 km2, was reached on the same date. Preconditioning through decades of overall ice reductions made the ice pack more vulnerable to a strong storm that entered the central Arctic in early August 2012. The storm caused the separation of an expanse of 0.4 × 106 km2 of ice that melted in total, while its removal left the main pack more exposed to wind and waves, facilitating the main pack's further decay. Future summer storms could lead to a further acceleration of the decline in the Arctic sea ice cover and should be carefully monitored.

  8. Storm-induced damages along the Catalan coast (NW Mediterranean) during the period 1958-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, José A.; Sancho-García, Amanda; Bosom, Eva; Valdemoro, Herminia I.; Guillén, Jorge

    2012-03-01

    The temporal and spatial patterns of storm-induced damage along the Catalan coast (NW Mediterranean) during the last 50 years have been analyzed to identify main climatic and non-climatic forcings. In the absence of systematic data, a storm-induced damage database compiled from press news has been built, which together with an intensity scale has allowed us to characterize the frequency and intensity of damage. Although no temporal trend has been detected in storm-induced hazards, coastal damage has increased at a rate of about 40% per decade during the last 50 years along the Catalan coast. The main non-climatic factors identified controlling this trend were the urban growth along the coastal fringe and the generalized erosive behavior of beaches. The first one increased values at risk and the second one increased their exposure to storm-induced hazards. In spite of the importance of non-climatic factors to modulate coastal damage, an exponential dependence of damages on storm-induced inundation and erosion was detected. In addition to this, storm-induced geomorphic changes along the Ebro delta coast have also been analyzed. During the period analyzed, "harmful" storms seem to be clustered, with most of the events being present in the late 1990s and especially from 2001 to 2004, resulting in frequent events of intense beach/barrier breaching, massive overwash and flooding. They are mainly expressed in sensitive areas which are subject to long-term erosional processes and comprise a low-lying profile and a narrow beach. This reflects the role of coastal morphology in controlling the intensity of storm-induced hazards along the deltaic coast. Shoreline evolution rates calculated during this period were significantly larger than the previously recorded ones, reflecting a pulsating erosion behavior where large pulses occur during stormy periods and are reduced during post-storm periods. Under the present scenario of maximum coastal development, storm-induced damage

  9. Case-based damage assessment of storm events in near real-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möhrle, Stella; Mühr, Bernhard

    2015-04-01

    Damage assessment in times of crisis is complex due to a highly dynamic environment and uncertainty in respect of available information. In order to assess the extent of a disaster in near real-time, historic events and their consequences may facilitate first estimations. Events of the past, which are in the same category or which have similar frame conditions like imminent or just occurring storms, might give preliminary information about possible damages. The challenge here is to identify useful historic events based on little information regarding the current event. This work investigates the potential of drawing conclusions about a current event based on similar historic disasters, exemplarily for storm events in Germany. Predicted wind speed and area affected can be used for roughly classifying a storm event. For this purpose, a grid of equidistant points can be used to split up the area of Germany. In combination with predicted wind speed at these points and the predicted number of points affected, respectively, a storm can be categorized in a fast manner. In contrast to investigate only data taken by the observation network, the grid approach is more objective, since stations are not equally distributed. Based on model data, the determined storm class provides one key factor for identifying similar historic events. Further aspects, such as region or specific event characteristics, complete knowledge about the potential storm scale and result in a similarity function, which automatically identifies useful events from the past. This work presents a case-based approach to estimate damages in the event of an extreme storm event in Germany. The focus in on the similarity function, which is based on model storm classes, particularly wind speed and area affected. In order to determine possible damages more precisely, event specific characteristics and region will be included. In the frame of determining similar storm events, neighboring storm classes will be

  10. Orographic influence on storm damage to forests in mountain areas by the example of windstorm 'Lothar'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmoeckel, J.; Kottmeier, Ch.

    2003-04-01

    The extraordinary strong storm 'LOTHAR' on December 26, 1999 caused large damage in the forests of France, Switzerland and Germany. In Germany, specially the Black Forest (Schwarzwald) was concerned. In this contribution an empirical analysis of storm damage in the northern Black Forest is given. The aim is to derive the orographical influence on the windfield from the damage pattern. This is recorded approx. 5 months after the desaster by an airborne survey with a digital line scanner. From these data highly resolved, georeferenced distributions of the vegetation index are calculated (2 m x 2 m pixel size). The damaged forest areas appear with a lower vegetation index than areas with intact vegetation. Demarcation between damaged forest areas and populated or differently used areas is given by a landuse model. Mapping of the storm damages and their combination with a digital elevation model and landuse data is performed in a GIS. It is shown that the damage pattern is significantly affected by orographic factors. Large damage occurred e.g. at the location of saddles between single mountains, on mountain flanks facing to the North and Northwest, and at the windward (west) flanks of extended mountain ridges. Little damage is found in areas that presumably were protected against the wind, i.e. on the leeside (eastern) mountain flanks, in dells and niches as well as in valleys perpendicular to the mean west to southwest winds. To explain the spatially complex distribution of damages more fully, an analysis is made where characteristics of the forest and of the soil are taken into account. The knowledge gained can be profitable for future afforestation in mountain areas to stabilize forests against severe storms.

  11. 112. Photocopied August 1978. DAMAGED ICE RACK, SEPTEMBER 27, 1917. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    112. Photocopied August 1978. DAMAGED ICE RACK, SEPTEMBER 27, 1917. THIS RACK, INSTALLED TO INTERCEPT FLOTAGE BEFORE IT COULD REACH THE TURBINES, WAS A CONSTANT HEADACHE. ITS RESISTANCE TO THE FLOW OF WATER COST THE COMPANY AROUND 0.2 FEET OF HEAD, AND WHEN LARGE AMOUNTS OF FLOTAGE DID ENTER THE CANAL, THE RACK WAS OFTEN SERIOUSLY DAMAGED. THE DAMAGE ILLUSTRATED HERE OCCURRED WHEN LARGE AMOUNTS OF PULP WOOD ENTERED THE CANAL IN 1916. THE PLANT WAS SHUT DOWN BRIEFLY IN 1917 TO REPAIR THE DAMAGE. (862) - Michigan Lake Superior Power Company, Portage Street, Sault Ste. Marie, Chippewa County, MI

  12. Monitoring Forest Change and Ice Storm Disturbance to Forest Structure Using Echidna° Ground-Based Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, T.; Strahler, A. H.; Schaaf, C.; Yang, X.; zhao, F.; Woodcock, C. E.; Jupp, D. L.; Culvenor, D.; Lovell, J.; Newnham, G.; Li, X.; Wang, J.

    2011-12-01

    The ground-based, upward-scanning, near-infrared (1064 nm), full-waveform lidar, the Echidna° Validation Instrument (EVI), built by CSIRO Australia, is used to monitor forest change over a 2- or 3-year time period through changes in retrievals of mean stem diameter, stem density, basal area, above-ground standing biomass, leaf area index, foliage profile, and canopy height. The changes were validated by comparison with direct field measurements, or in the case of canopy height, with data from the Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS). Site-level EVI-retrieved values of mean DBH, stem count density, basal area and above-ground biomass matched the field measurements well, with R2 values of 0.84, 0.97, 0.96 and 0.98 respectively. Furthermore, the changes in EVI retrievals had the same trend as the change in field measurements over these 2-3 year periods. Based on five scans within each 1-ha plot, we focused on detecting forest change over a 2- or 3-year period at three New England forest stands: a second-growth conifer stand thinned as a shelterwood, an aging hemlock plantation, and a young second-growth hardwood stand. The first stand provided the opportunity to look for change in a stand containing many co-dominant and intermediate trees recently released by removal of selected over-story trees, while the other two stands suffered significant damage in an ice storm during the change period. At the shelterwood conifer site at Howland Experimental Forest, mean DBH, aboveground biomass, and leaf area index (LAI) all increased between 2007 and 2009. An ice storm struck the Harvard Forest in December, 2008, providing the opportunity to detect damage between 2007 and 2009 or 2010 with EVI scans at two sites : hemlock and hardwood. Retrieved leaf area index (LAI) was 13 percent lower in the hemlock site in 2009 and 10 percent lower in the hardwood site in 2010 as compared to 2007. The decrease of LAI quantifies a loss of biomass from the canopy, and broken tops were both

  13. Devices prevent ice damage to trusses of semi

    SciTech Connect

    Marthinsen, A.

    1985-04-01

    Much exploration drilling is done in subarctic waters around the world, and this will be important in the future. Special demands will be made on the drilling structures to enable them to withstand collisions with drifting ice. A Newfoundland Certificate of Fitness, for example, says a vessel must be able to tolerate collision with the largest iceberg that can be undetectable by radar, with out the danger of platform collapse. The iceberg in this case is defined as having a weight of 5000 tons and a drifting velocity of 2 meters/second. Devices to prevent ice damage to the trusses of semisubmersibles are discussed.

  14. DNA Methylation Signatures Triggered by Prenatal Maternal Stress Exposure to a Natural Disaster: Project Ice Storm

    PubMed Central

    Cao-Lei, Lei; Massart, Renaud; Suderman, Matthew J.; Machnes, Ziv; Elgbeili, Guillaume; Laplante, David P.; Szyf, Moshe; King, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Background Prenatal maternal stress (PNMS) predicts a wide variety of behavioral and physical outcomes in the offspring. Although epigenetic processes may be responsible for PNMS effects, human research is hampered by the lack of experimental methods that parallel controlled animal studies. Disasters, however, provide natural experiments that can provide models of prenatal stress. Methods Five months after the 1998 Quebec ice storm we recruited women who had been pregnant during the disaster and assessed their degrees of objective hardship and subjective distress. Thirteen years later, we investigated DNA methylation profiling in T cells obtained from 36 of the children, and compared selected results with those from saliva samples obtained from the same children at age 8. Results Prenatal maternal objective hardship was correlated with DNA methylation levels in 1675 CGs affiliated with 957 genes predominantly related to immune function; maternal subjective distress was uncorrelated. DNA methylation changes in SCG5 and LTA, both highly correlated with maternal objective stress, were comparable in T cells, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and saliva cells. Conclusions These data provide first evidence in humans supporting the conclusion that PNMS results in a lasting, broad, and functionally organized DNA methylation signature in several tissues in offspring. By using a natural disaster model, we can infer that the epigenetic effects found in Project Ice Storm are due to objective levels of hardship experienced by the pregnant woman rather than to her level of sustained distress. PMID:25238154

  15. The ice storm in eastern Canada 1998 KAMEDO-Report No. 74.

    PubMed

    Riddex, L; Dellgar, U

    2001-01-01

    This is a report of the impact of the ice storm that struck eastern Canada on 04-09 January 1998. The storm deposited ice some 100 mm thick on the ground and on the electric power lines and eventually left 1.4 million households and much of the infrastructure without electrical power. Data were obtained through non-structured interviews of those involved. Most of the larger hospitals were equipped with emergency generating equipment and were able to provide most essential services. For most hospitals, non-emergency services were compromised. Many other medical facilities, including clinics had to be shut down, and smaller hospitals were forced to transfer some patients to larger institutions. In addition, hospitals experienced a marked increase in the number of emergency department visits including an increase in the number of persons with injuries, respiratory tract infections, or heart problems. A marked increase in carbon-monoxide intoxication was observed: 50 persons required the use of hyperbaric oxygen and six persons died of CO poisoning. Prehospital services not only experienced a marked increase in the number of emergency responses, but also were utilized to provide transportation of non-ill or injured persons, equipment, and supplies. Home care was interrupted and many patients dependent upon power had to be transported to hospitals. Many hospitals opened their buildings to provide shelter to the families of many of their employees and medical staff. This helped to keep staffing at a better level than if they had to find shelter and essential services elsewhere. The transmission and sharing of information was severely limited due in part to the loss of power and inability to access television. This led to the distribution of misleading or incorrect information. This storm was exemplary of our dependence upon electrical power and that we are not prepared to cope with the loss of electricity.

  16. Saturn's Great Storm of 2010-2011: Cloud particles containing ammonia and water ices indicate a deep convective origin. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sromovsky, L. A.; Baines, K. H.; Fry, P.

    2013-12-01

    Saturn's Great Storm of 2010-2011 was first detected by amateur astronomers in early December 2010 and later found in Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) images taken on 5 December, when it took the form of a 1000 km wide bright spot. Within a week the head of the storm grew by a factor of ten in width and within a few months created a wake that encircled the planet. This is the sixth Great Saturn Storm in recorded history, all having appeared in the northern hemisphere, and most near northern summer solstice at intervals of roughly 30 years (Sanchez-Lavega et al. 1991, Nature 353, 397-401). That the most recent storm appeared 10 years early proved fortunate because Cassini was still operating in orbit around Saturn and was able to provide unique observations from which we could learn much more about these rare and enormous events. Besides the dramatic dynamical effects displayed at the visible cloud level by high-resolution imaging observations (Sayanagi et al. 2013, Icarus 223, 460-478), dramatic thermal changes also occurred in the stratosphere above the storm (Fletcher et al. 2011, Science 332, 1413), and radio measurements of lightning (Fischer et al., 2011, Nature 475, 75-77) indicated strong convective activity at deeper levels. Numerical models of Saturn's Giant storms (Hueso and Sanchez-Lavega 2004, Icarus 172, 255-271) suggest that they are fueled by water vapor condensation beginning at the 10-12 bar level, some 250 km below the visible cloud tops. That idea is also supported by our detection of water ice near the cloud tops (Sromovsky et al. 2013, Icarus 226, 402-418). From Cassini VIMS spectral imaging taken in February 2011, we learned that the storm's cloud particles are strong absorbers of sunlight at wavelengths from 2.8 to 3.1 microns. Such absorption is not seen on Saturn outside of storm regions, implying a different kind of cloud formation process as well as different cloud composition inside the storm region. We found compelling evidence

  17. Historical reconstruction of storms in the West of France in the early Little Ice Age.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athimon, Emmanuelle; Maanan, Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    This research offers to : 1) identify, as accurately as possible, the storms and the coastal flooding in the early Little Ice Age, 2) expose their impacts on the environment and populations, 3) query the « resilience » and adaptation of medieval and modern coastal societies in the West of France by presenting their perceptions and reactions. The space-time frame of the study is located in France, from Brittany to Gascony, between the xivth and the xvith century. Sensitive and brittle, this area is regularly battered by violent winds. It also undergoes episodic sea flooding that can cause ruptures of balance. Hence, the historical reconstruction and analysis of storms and coastal flooding in a long period appear fundamental. A thorough knowledge of past meteo-marine hazards allows to recreate a link with the territory, particularly through the (re)construction of an effective memory of these phenomena. This process is essential however difficult because of many documentary gaps. They are due to historical contingencies such as wars, French Revolution, or archival disasters like the fire of the Chamber of Accounts in Paris in 1737. Many limits must also be taken into account and discussed as inaccurate dates, exaggerated or undervalued descriptions, strict spatial demarcation almost impossible to achieve for the xivth-xvith centuries. Furthermore, during this period, no death toll, material and economic balance was done after a climate disaster. Yet, many historical records - especially narrative sources, books of accounts or cities repairs - expose the impacts of storms and marine submersion on agriculture, environment, infrastructures, etc. For instance, a violent storm hit the coast on June 24th 1452. It washed away part of the roof of a castle on Noirmoutier island and knocked down the bell towers of two churches in Angers. Storms and sea flooding have affected activities, constructions and populations' lives. They have therefore forced societies to adapt

  18. Storm Damage Reduction Project Design for Wallops Island, Virginia, Version 1.01

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    nor’easter caused extensive damage along the eastern seaboard from New York to North Carolina and is considered one of the ten worst storms in the United...ADCIRC (ADvanced CIRCulation model) as described in Melby et al. (2005). The ADCIRC grid covered the eastern seaboard from North Carolina to New Jersey...attributed to the construction will be less than the variability in the change rate caused by yearly changes in the wave climate . That is, stormy years

  19. Project Ice Storm: Prenatal Maternal Stress Affects Cognitive and Linguistic Functioning in 5 1/2-Year-Old Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laplante, David P.; Brunet, Alain; Schmitz, Norbert; Ciampi, Antonio; King, Suzanne

    2008-01-01

    The study used data from Project Ice Storm to determine the extent to which exposure to prenatal maternal stress due to a natural disaster can explain variance in the intellectual and language performance of offspring at age 5 1/2.

  20. Modelling the wind damage probability in forests in Southwestern Germany for the 1999 winter storm 'Lothar'.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Dirk; Grebhan, Karin; Albrecht, Axel; Schönborn, Jochen

    2009-11-01

    The wind damage probability (P (DAM)) in the forests in the federal state of Baden-Wuerttemberg (Southwestern Germany) was calculated using weights of evidence (WofE) methodology and a logistic regression model (LRM) after the winter storm 'Lothar' in December 1999. A geographic information system (GIS) was used for the area-wide spatial prediction and mapping of P (DAM). The combination of the six evidential themes forest type, soil type, geology, soil moisture, soil acidification, and the 'Lothar' maximum gust field predicted wind damage best and was used to map P (DAM) in a 50 x 50 m resolution grid. GIS software was utilised to produce probability maps, which allowed the identification of areas of low, moderate, and high P (DAM) across the study area. The highest P (DAM) values were calculated for coniferous forest growing on acidic, fresh to moist soils on bunter sandstone formations-provided that 'Lothar' maximum gust speed exceeded 35 m s(-1) in the areas in question. One of the most significant benefits associated with the results of this study is that, for the first time, there is a GIS-based area-wide quantification of P (DAM) in the forests in Southwestern Germany. In combination with the experience and expert knowledge of local foresters, the probability maps produced can be used as an important tool for decision support with respect to future silvicultural activities aimed at reducing wind damage. One limitation of the P (DAM)-predictions is that they are based on only one major storm event. At the moment it is not possible to relate storm event intensity to the amount of wind damage in forests due to the lack of comprehensive long-term tree and stand damage data across the study area.

  1. Investigation of Stinson Beach Park storm damage and evaluation of alternative shore protection measures

    SciTech Connect

    Ecker, R.M.; Whelan, G.

    1984-07-01

    An investigation was made of storm damage during the winter of 1982-83 to the National Park Service's Stinson Beach Park. The investigation included an assessment of the storm damage, evaluation of physical processes contributing to the damage, subsequent beach recovery, and the feasibility of implementing shoreline protection measure to reduce future risk. During the winter of 1982-83, the beach was almost completely denuded of sand, wave overwash damaged the foredune, vegetation on the foredune was destroyed, and backshore flooding occurred. Two structures and a parking lot were endangered as the shoreline receded. Subsequent recovery of the park beach was rapid. By January 1982 sand had moved back onshore and a beach berm was beginning to reform. The foredune and dune vegetation received the only permanent damage. Four shoreline protection alternatives were evaluated. These include no action, dune development/enhancement, construction of a rock riprap revetment, and offshore installation of artificial seaweed. The first costs (estimated costs, excluding maintenance) range from about $90,000 to $475,000. The least-cost protection measure is riprap revetment, which protects the two structures and parking lot endangered during the 1982-83 winter storms. Construction of a foredune along the entire park beach is the highest cost protection measure. If no shore protection action measures are implemented, wave overwash of the foredune can be expected to occur on the average of every 2 to 3 years, and beach degradation, similar to that during the 1982-83 winter, can be expected to occur on the average of every 10 to 12 years. 12 references, 19 figures, 18 tables.

  2. The Great 2008 Chinese ice storm, its socioeconomic-ecological impact, and sustainability lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Dr. Benzhi; Gu, Lianhong; Ding, Yihui; Wu, Zhongmin; Shao, Lan; An, Yanfei; Cao, Yonghui; Duan, Aiguo; Kong, Weijian; Li, Changzhu; Li, Zhengcai; Sun, Honggang; Wang, Shengkun; Wang, Xiaoming; Wang, Xu; Yang, Xiaosheng; Yu, Mukui; Zeng, Bingshan

    2011-01-01

    . Extreme events often expose vulnerabilities of socioeconomic infrastructures and point to directions of much-needed policy change. Integrated impact assessment of such events can lead to finding of sustainability principles. Southern and central China has for decades been undergoing a breakneck pace of socioeconomic development. In early 2008, a massive ice storm struck this region, immobilizing millions of people. The storm was a consequence of sustained convergence between tropical maritime and continental polar air masses, caused by an anomalously stable atmospheric general circulation pattern in both low and high latitudes. Successive waves of freezing rain occurred during a month period, coating southern and central China with a layer of ice 50 to 160mm in thickness. We conducted an integrated impact assessment of this event to determine whether and how the context of socioeconomic and human-disturbed natural systems may affect the transition of natural events into human disasters. We found: 1) without contingency plans, advanced technologies dependent on interrelated energy supplies can create worse problems during extreme events, 2) the weakest link in disaster response lies between science and decision making, 3) biodiversity is a form of long-term insurance for sustainable forestry against extreme events, 4) sustainable extraction of non-timber goods and services is essential to risk planning for extreme events in forest resources use, 5) extreme events can cause food shortage directly by destroying crops and indirectly by disrupting food distribution channels, 6) concentrated economic development increases societal vulnerability to extreme events, and 7) formalized institutional mechanisms are needed to ensure that unexpected opportunities to learn lessons from weather disasters are not lost in distracting circumstances.

  3. Agricultural damages and losses from ARkStorm scenario flooding in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wein, Anne; David Mitchell,; Peters, Jeff; John Rowden,; Johnny Tran,; Alessandra Corsi,; Dinitz, Laura B.

    2016-01-01

    Scientists designed the ARkStorm scenario to challenge the preparedness of California communities for widespread flooding with a historical precedence and increased likelihood under climate change. California is an important provider of vegetables, fruits, nuts, and other agricultural products to the nation. This study analyzes the agricultural damages and losses pertaining to annual crops, perennial crops, and livestock in California exposed to ARkStorm flooding. Statewide, flood damage is incurred on approximately 23% of annual crop acreage, 5% of perennial crop acreage, and 5% of livestock, e.g., dairy, feedlot, and poultry, acreage. The sum of field repair costs, forgone income, and product replacement costs span $3.7 and $7.1 billion (2009) for a range of inundation durations. Perennial crop loss estimates dominate, and the vulnerability of orchards and vineyards has likely increased with recent expansion. Crop reestablishment delays from levee repair and dewatering more than double annual crop losses in the delta islands, assuming the fragile system does not remain permanently flooded. The exposure of almost 200,000 dairy cows to ARkStorm flooding poses livestock evacuation challenges. Read More: http://ascelibrary.org/doi/abs/10.1061/%28ASCE%29NH.1527-6996.0000174

  4. Altered dynamics of broad-leaved tree species in a Chinese subtropical montane mixed forest: the role of an anomalous extreme 2008 ice storm episode.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jielin; Xiong, Gaoming; Wang, Zhixian; Zhang, Mi; Zhao, Changming; Shen, Guozhen; Xu, Wenting; Xie, Zongqiang

    2015-04-01

    Extreme climatic events can trigger gradual or abrupt shifts in forest ecosystems via the reduction or elimination of foundation species. However, the impacts of these events on foundation species' demography and forest dynamics remain poorly understood. Here we quantified dynamics for both evergreen and deciduous broad-leaved species groups, utilizing a monitoring permanent plot in a subtropical montane mixed forest in central China from 2001 to 2010 with particular relevance to the anomalous 2008 ice storm episode. We found that both species groups showed limited floristic alterations over the study period. For each species group, size distribution of dead individuals approximated a roughly irregular and flat shape prior to the ice storm and resembled an inverse J-shaped distribution after the ice storm. Furthermore, patterns of mortality and recruitment displayed disequilibrium behaviors with mortality exceeding recruitment for both species groups following the ice storm. Deciduous broad-leaved species group accelerated overall diameter growth, but the ice storm reduced evergreen small-sized diameter growth. We concluded that evergreen broad-leaved species were more susceptible to ice storms than deciduous broad-leaved species, and ice storm events, which may become more frequent with climate change, might potentially threaten the perpetuity of evergreen-dominated broad-leaved forests in this subtropical region in the long term. These results underscore the importance of long-term monitoring that is indispensible to elucidate causal links between forest dynamics and climatic perturbations.

  5. Storm-damaged saline-contaminated boreholes as a means of aquifer contamination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carlson, D.A.; Van Biersel, T. P.; Milner, L.R.

    2008-01-01

    Saline water from a storm surge can flow down storm-damaged submerged water supply wells and contaminate boreholes and surrounding aquifers. Using data from conventional purging techniques, aquifer test response analysis, chemical analysis, and regression analysis of chloride/silica (Cl/Si) ratio, equations were derived to estimate the volume of saline water intrusion into a well and a porous media aquifer, the volume of water needed to purge a well shortly following an intrusion event, and the volume of water needed after delay of several or more months, when the saline plume has expanded. Purging time required is a function of volume of water and pumping rate. The study site well is located within a shoreline community of Lake Pontchartrain, St. Tammany Parish, in southeastern Louisiana, United States, which was impacted by two hurricane storm surges and had neither been rehabilitated nor chlorinated prior to our study. Chemical analysis of water samples in fall 2005 and purging of well and aquifer in June 6, 2006, indicated saline water had intruded the well in 2005 and the well and aquifer in 2006. The volume of water needed to purge the study well was approximately 200 casing volumes, which is significantly greater than conventionally used during collection of water samples for water quality analyses. ?? 2007 National Ground Water Association.

  6. Modeling fresh water lens damage and recovery on atolls after storm-wave washover.

    PubMed

    Chui, Ting Fong May; Terry, James P

    2012-01-01

    The principal natural source of fresh water on scattered coral atolls throughout the tropical Pacific Ocean is thin unconfined groundwater lenses within islet substrates. Although there are many threats to the viability of atoll fresh water lenses, salinization caused by large storm waves washing over individual atoll islets is poorly understood. In this study, a mathematical modeling approach is used to examine the immediate responses, longer-term behavior, and subsequent (partial) recovery of a Pacific atoll fresh water lens after saline damage caused by cyclone-generated wave washover under different scenarios. Important findings include: (1) the saline plume formed by a washover event mostly migrates downward first through the top coral sand and gravel substrate, but then exits the aquifer to the ocean laterally through the more permeable basement limestone; (2) a lower water table position before the washover event, rather than a longer duration of storm washover, causes more severe damage to the fresh water lens; (3) relatively fresher water can possibly be found as a preserved horizon in the deeper part of an aquifer after disturbance, especially if the fresh water lens extends into the limestone under normal conditions; (4) post-cyclone accumulation of sea water in the central depression (swamp) of an atoll islet prolongs the later stage of fresh water lens recovery.

  7. Critical storm thresholds for significant morphological changes and damage along the Emilia-Romagna coastline, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armaroli, Clara; Ciavola, Paolo; Perini, Luisa; Calabrese, Lorenzo; Lorito, Samantha; Valentini, Andrea; Masina, Marinella

    2012-03-01

    The definition of storm morphological thresholds along the coast of the Emilia-Romagna Region strictly depends on its configuration and variability. The region is located in northern Italy, facing the Adriatic Sea. The coastline is characterised by very different levels of economic development, ranging from natural zones with dunes to highly developed stretches protected by breakwaters and groynes. The Integrated Coastal Zone Management effort is mainly concentrated on preserving urban areas that generate significant income for the regional economy. Natural areas, while small in comparison to the urbanised zone, are important for environment preservation. Because of such a multiplicity of issues at stake, it was decided to produce two different thresholds: one for the morphological impact on natural sectors and another for inundation and damage to structures along urbanised zones. The "forcing" component of the threshold definition for natural areas was calculated by summing the effects of surge + tide + waves (run-up elevation) to find the Maximum Water Level (MWL) reached by the sea during one, ten and one-hundred year storm return periods. For urbanised zones, historical storm information was collected starting from the 1960s in order to identify the forcing conditions causing real damages. Each storm was classified in terms of wave height, period, direction and surge level. Morphological information were obtained from Lidar flights performed in 2003 and 2004 and from direct surveys undertaken in September 2008 and February 2009 as part of the monitoring programme for the MICORE Project. The computed MWL for each return period was then compared to beach elevations along natural areas in order to calculate the Dune Stability Factor (DSF), an index that accounts for the eroded sediment volume above the MWL during a storm. Based on analysis along 41 profile lines at a 500 m spacing, it was found that the 1-in-1 year return period wave height + 1-in-1 year return

  8. A Storm-by-Storm Analysis of Alpine and Regional Precipitation Dynamics at the Mount Hunter Ice Core Site, Denali National Park, Central Alaska Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saylor, P. L.; Osterberg, E. C.; Kreutz, K. J.; Wake, C. P.; Winski, D.

    2014-12-01

    In May-June 2013, an NSF-funded team from Dartmouth College and the Universities of Maine and New Hampshire collected two 1000-year ice cores to bedrock from the summit plateau of Mount Hunter in Denali National Park, Alaska (62.940291, -151.087616, 3912 m). The snow accumulation record from these ice cores will provide key insight into late Holocene precipitation variability in central Alaska, and compliment existing precipitation paleorecords from the Mt. Logan and Eclipse ice cores in coastal SE Alaska. However, correct interpretation of the Mt. Hunter accumulation record requires an understanding of the relationships between regional meteorological events and micrometeorological conditions at the Mt. Hunter ice core collection site. Here we analyze a three-month window of snow accumulation and meteorological conditions recorded by an Automatic Weather Station (AWS) at the Mt. Hunter site during the summer of 2013. Snow accumulation events are identified in the Mt. Hunter AWS dataset, and compared on a storm-by-storm basis to AWS data collected from the adjacent Kahiltna glacier 2000 m lower in elevation, and to regional National Weather Service (NWS) station data. We also evaluate the synoptic conditions associated with each Mt. Hunter accumulation event using NWS surface maps, NCEP-NCAR Reanalysis data, and the NOAA HYSPLIT back trajectory model. We categorize each Mt. Hunter accumulation event as pure snow accumulation, drifting, or blowing snow events based on snow accumulation, wind speed and temperature data using the method of Knuth et al (2009). We analyze the frequency and duration of events within each accumulation regime, in addition to the overall contribution of each event to the snowpack. Preliminary findings indicate that a majority of Mt. Hunter accumulation events are of pure accumulation nature (55.5%) whereas drifting (28.6%) and blowing (15.4%) snow events play a secondary role. Our results will characterize the local accumulation dynamics on

  9. 75 FR 17132 - Intent To Prepare a Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Hurricane and Storm Damage Reduction...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-05

    ... Hurricane and Storm Damage Reduction for South Ponte Vedra Beach, Vilano Beach, and Summer Haven Beach... Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for evaluation of the feasibility of providing hurricane and... in the interest of beach erosion control, hurricane protection and related purposes, provided...

  10. Recrystallization and damage of ice in winter sports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seymour-Pierce, Alexandra; Lishman, Ben; Sammonds, Peter

    2017-02-01

    Ice samples, after sliding against a steel runner, show evidence of recrystallization and microcracking under the runner, as well as macroscopic cracking throughout the ice. The experiments that produced these ice samples are designed to be analogous to sliding in the winter sport of skeleton. Changes in the ice fabric are shown using thick and thin sections under both diffuse and polarized light. Ice drag is estimated as 40-50% of total energy dissipation in a skeleton run. The experimental results are compared with visual inspections of skeleton tracks, and to similar behaviour in rocks during sliding on earthquake faults. The results presented may be useful to athletes and designers of winter sports equipment. This article is part of the themed issue 'Microdynamics of ice'.

  11. Recrystallization and damage of ice in winter sports.

    PubMed

    Seymour-Pierce, Alexandra; Lishman, Ben; Sammonds, Peter

    2017-02-13

    Ice samples, after sliding against a steel runner, show evidence of recrystallization and microcracking under the runner, as well as macroscopic cracking throughout the ice. The experiments that produced these ice samples are designed to be analogous to sliding in the winter sport of skeleton. Changes in the ice fabric are shown using thick and thin sections under both diffuse and polarized light. Ice drag is estimated as 40-50% of total energy dissipation in a skeleton run. The experimental results are compared with visual inspections of skeleton tracks, and to similar behaviour in rocks during sliding on earthquake faults. The results presented may be useful to athletes and designers of winter sports equipment.This article is part of the themed issue 'Microdynamics of ice'.

  12. Fracture of summer perennial sea ice by ocean swell as a result of Arctic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asplin, Matthew G.; Galley, Ryan; Barber, David G.; Prinsenberg, Simon

    2012-06-01

    The Arctic summer minimum sea ice extent has experienced a decreasing trend since 1979, with an extreme minimum extent of 4.27 × 106 km2 in September 2007, and a similar minimum in 2011. Large expanses of open water in the Siberian, Laptev, Chukchi, and Beaufort Seas result from declining summer sea ice cover, and consequently introduce long fetch within the Arctic Basin. Strong winds from migratory cyclones coupled with increasing fetch generate large waves which can propagate into the pack ice and break it up. On 06 September 2009, we observed the intrusion of large swells into the multiyear pack ice approximately 250 km from the ice edge. These large swells induced nearly instantaneous widespread fracturing of the multiyear pack ice, reducing the large, (>1 km diameter) parent ice floes to small (100-150 m diameter) floes. This process increased the total ice floe perimeter exposed to the open ocean, allowing for more efficient distribution of energy from ocean heat fluxes, and incoming radiation into the floes, thereby enhancing lateral melting. This process of sea ice decay is therefore presented as a potential positive feedback process that will accelerate the loss of Arctic sea ice.

  13. Avian responses to an extreme ice storm are determined by a combination of functional traits, behavioural adaptations and habitat modifications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Hong, Yongmi; Zou, Fasheng; Zhang, Min; Lee, Tien Ming; Song, Xiangjin; Rao, Jiteng

    2016-03-01

    The extent to which species' traits, behavior and habitat synergistically determine their response to extreme weather events (EWE) remains poorly understood. By quantifying bird and vegetation assemblages before and after the 2008 ice storm in China, combined with interspecific interactions and foraging behaviours, we disentangled whether storm influences avian reassembly directly via functional traits (i.e. behavioral adaptations), or indirectly via habitat variations. We found that overall species richness decreased, with 20 species detected exclusively before the storm, and eight species detected exclusively after. These shifts in bird relative abundance were linked to habitat preferences, dietary guild and flocking behaviours. For instance, forest specialists at higher trophic levels (e.g. understory-insectivores, woodpeckers and kingfishers) were especially vulnerable, whereas open-habitat generalists (e.g. bulbuls) were set to benefit from potential habitat homogenization. Alongside population fluctuations, we found that community reassembly can be rapidly adjusted via foraging plasticity (i.e. increased flocking propensity and reduced perching height). And changes in preferred habitat corresponded to a variation in bird assemblages and traits, as represented by intact canopy cover and high density of large trees. Accurate predictions of community responses to EWE are crucial to understanding ecosystem disturbances, thus linking species-oriented traits to a coherent analytical framework.

  14. Avian responses to an extreme ice storm are determined by a combination of functional traits, behavioural adaptations and habitat modifications

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiang; Hong, Yongmi; Zou, Fasheng; Zhang, Min; Lee, Tien Ming; Song, Xiangjin; Rao, Jiteng

    2016-01-01

    The extent to which species’ traits, behavior and habitat synergistically determine their response to extreme weather events (EWE) remains poorly understood. By quantifying bird and vegetation assemblages before and after the 2008 ice storm in China, combined with interspecific interactions and foraging behaviours, we disentangled whether storm influences avian reassembly directly via functional traits (i.e. behavioral adaptations), or indirectly via habitat variations. We found that overall species richness decreased, with 20 species detected exclusively before the storm, and eight species detected exclusively after. These shifts in bird relative abundance were linked to habitat preferences, dietary guild and flocking behaviours. For instance, forest specialists at higher trophic levels (e.g. understory-insectivores, woodpeckers and kingfishers) were especially vulnerable, whereas open-habitat generalists (e.g. bulbuls) were set to benefit from potential habitat homogenization. Alongside population fluctuations, we found that community reassembly can be rapidly adjusted via foraging plasticity (i.e. increased flocking propensity and reduced perching height). And changes in preferred habitat corresponded to a variation in bird assemblages and traits, as represented by intact canopy cover and high density of large trees. Accurate predictions of community responses to EWE are crucial to understanding ecosystem disturbances, thus linking species-oriented traits to a coherent analytical framework. PMID:26929387

  15. Comparison of wave propagation through ice covers in calm and storm conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingkai; Kohout, Alison L.; Shen, Hayley H.

    2015-07-01

    Motivated by a dramatic reduction in Arctic sea ice cover, interest in the field of wave-ice interaction has accelerated over the past few years. Recent observations have identified that large waves (>3 m) have a linear attenuation rate, rather than the previously assumed exponential rate that is found for small waves. This suggests that waves penetrate further into the ice cover than previously expected. To explore this further we tested two exponentially decaying wave models. Contributions from nonlinear and wind generation source terms enabled both models to reproduce the observed regime shift. Essentially, the accumulation of nonlinear and wind energy contributions to long (and thus higher amplitude) waves can offset the ice damping, thus reducing the apparent attenuation. This study highlights the relevance of considering frequency dependence when analyzing wave attenuation in sea ice field data.

  16. CO2 Emission Increases with Damage Severity in Moso Bamboo Forests Following a Winter Storm in Southern China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sheng; Xu, Hangmei; Ding, Jiuming; Chen, Han Y. H.; Wang, Jiashe; Xu, Zikun; Ruan, Honghua; Chen, Yuwei

    2016-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of disturbances in forests, the effects of disturbances on soil carbon processes are not fully understood. We examined the influences of a winter storm on soil respiration and labile soil organic carbon (SOC) of a Moso Bamboo (Phyllostachys heterocycle) plantation in the Wuyi Mountains in Southern China from May 2008 to May 2009. We sampled stands that were damaged at heavy, moderate, and light levels, which yielded aboveground biomass inputs to the soil at 22.12 ± 0.73 (mean ± 1 s.e.m.), 10.40 ± 1.09, and 5.95 ± 0.73 Mg per hectare, respectively. We found that soil respiration rate and annual cumulative CO2 emissions were significantly higher in heavily damaged sites than moderately and lightly damaged sites. Soil temperature was the most important environmental factor affecting soil respiration rate across all studied stands. However, soil respiration sensitivity to temperature (Q10) decreased in heavily damaged sites. Microbial biomass carbon and its proportion to total SOC increased with damage intensity. Soil respiration rate was positively correlated to microbial biomass carbon and soil moisture. Our results indicated that the increase of soil respiration following canopy disturbance from winter storm resulted from increased microbial biomass carbon, soil moisture, and temperature. PMID:27468803

  17. CO2 Emission Increases with Damage Severity in Moso Bamboo Forests Following a Winter Storm in Southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sheng; Xu, Hangmei; Ding, Jiuming; Chen, Han Y. H.; Wang, Jiashe; Xu, Zikun; Ruan, Honghua; Chen, Yuwei

    2016-07-01

    Despite the prevalence of disturbances in forests, the effects of disturbances on soil carbon processes are not fully understood. We examined the influences of a winter storm on soil respiration and labile soil organic carbon (SOC) of a Moso Bamboo (Phyllostachys heterocycle) plantation in the Wuyi Mountains in Southern China from May 2008 to May 2009. We sampled stands that were damaged at heavy, moderate, and light levels, which yielded aboveground biomass inputs to the soil at 22.12 ± 0.73 (mean ± 1 s.e.m.), 10.40 ± 1.09, and 5.95 ± 0.73 Mg per hectare, respectively. We found that soil respiration rate and annual cumulative CO2 emissions were significantly higher in heavily damaged sites than moderately and lightly damaged sites. Soil temperature was the most important environmental factor affecting soil respiration rate across all studied stands. However, soil respiration sensitivity to temperature (Q10) decreased in heavily damaged sites. Microbial biomass carbon and its proportion to total SOC increased with damage intensity. Soil respiration rate was positively correlated to microbial biomass carbon and soil moisture. Our results indicated that the increase of soil respiration following canopy disturbance from winter storm resulted from increased microbial biomass carbon, soil moisture, and temperature.

  18. Studies of images of short-lived events using ERTS data. [forest fires, oil spills, vegetation damage, volcanoes, storm ridges, earthquakes, and floods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutschman, W. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Detection of short-lived events has continued. Forest fires, oil spills, vegetation damage, volcanoes, storm ridges, earthquakes, and floods have been detected and analyzed.

  19. Blasim: A computational tool to assess ice impact damage on engine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, E. S.; Abumeri, G. H.; Chamis, C. C.

    1993-04-01

    A portable computer called BLASIM was developed at NASA LeRC to assess ice impact damage on aircraft engine blades. In addition to ice impact analyses, the code also contains static, dynamic, resonance margin, and supersonic flutter analysis capabilities. Solid, hollow, superhybrid, and composite blades are supported. An optional preprocessor (input generator) was also developed to interactively generate input for BLASIM. The blade geometry can be defined using a series of airfoils at discrete input stations or by a finite element grid. The code employs a coarse, fixed finite element mesh containing triangular plate finite elements to minimize program execution time. Ice piece is modeled using an equivalent spherical objective that has a high velocity opposite that of the aircraft and parallel to the engine axis. For local impact damage assessment, the impact load is considered as a distributed force acting over a region around the impact point. The average radial strain of the finite elements along the leading edge is used as a measure of the local damage. To estimate damage at the blade root, the impact is treated as an impulse and a combined stress failure criteria is employed. Parametric studies of local and root ice impact damage, and post-impact dynamics are discussed for solid and composite blades.

  20. Blasim: A computational tool to assess ice impact damage on engine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, E. S.; Abumeri, G. H.; Chamis, C. C.

    1993-01-01

    A portable computer called BLASIM was developed at NASA LeRC to assess ice impact damage on aircraft engine blades. In addition to ice impact analyses, the code also contains static, dynamic, resonance margin, and supersonic flutter analysis capabilities. Solid, hollow, superhybrid, and composite blades are supported. An optional preprocessor (input generator) was also developed to interactively generate input for BLASIM. The blade geometry can be defined using a series of airfoils at discrete input stations or by a finite element grid. The code employs a coarse, fixed finite element mesh containing triangular plate finite elements to minimize program execution time. Ice piece is modeled using an equivalent spherical objective that has a high velocity opposite that of the aircraft and parallel to the engine axis. For local impact damage assessment, the impact load is considered as a distributed force acting over a region around the impact point. The average radial strain of the finite elements along the leading edge is used as a measure of the local damage. To estimate damage at the blade root, the impact is treated as an impulse and a combined stress failure criteria is employed. Parametric studies of local and root ice impact damage, and post-impact dynamics are discussed for solid and composite blades.

  1. Comparisons Between Total Lightning Data, Mesocyclone Strength, and Storm Damage Associated with the Florida Tornado Outbreak of February 23, 1998

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodanish, S; Sharp, D.; Williams, E.; Boldi, B.; Goodman, Steven J.; Raghavan, R.; Matlin, A.; Weber, M.

    1998-01-01

    During the early morning hours of February 23 1998, the worst tornado outbreak ever recorded occurred over the central Florida peninsula. At least 7 confirmed tornadoes, associated with 4 supercells, developed, with 3 of the tornadoes reaching F3 intensity. Many of the tornadoes where on the ground for tens of miles, uncommon for the state of Florida. A total of 42 people were killed, with over 250 people injured. During the outbreak, National Weather Service Melbourne, in collaboration with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology was collecting data from a unique lightning observing system called Lightning Imaging Sensor Data Applications Display (LISDAD, Boldi et.al., this conference). This system marries radar data collected from the KMLB WSR-88D, cloud to ground data collected from the National Lightning Detection Network, and total lightning data collected from NASKs Lightning Detection And Ranging system. This poster will display, concurrently, total lightning data (displayed in 1 minute increments), time/height storm relative velocity products from the KMLB WSR-88D, and damage information (tornado/hail/wind) from each of the supercell thunderstorms. The primary objective of this poster presentation is to observe how total lightning activity changes as the convective storm intensifies, and how the lightning activity changes with respect to mesocyclone strength (vortex stretching) and damaging weather on the ground.

  2. Pregnant women's cognitive appraisal of a natural disaster affects DNA methylation in their children 13 years later: Project Ice Storm

    PubMed Central

    Cao-Lei, L; Elgbeili, G; Massart, R; Laplante, D P; Szyf, M; King, S

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal maternal stress (PNMS) can impact a variety of outcomes in the offspring throughout childhood and persisting into adulthood as shown in human and animal studies. Many of the effects of PNMS on offspring outcomes likely reflect the effects of epigenetic changes, such as DNA methylation, to the fetal genome. However, no animal or human research can determine the extent to which the effects of PNMS on DNA methylation in human offspring is the result of the objective severity of the stressor to the pregnant mother, or her negative appraisal of the stressor or her resulting degree of negative stress. We examined the genome-wide DNA methylation profile in T cells from 34 adolescents whose mothers had rated the 1998 Québec ice storm's consequences as positive or negative (that is, cognitive appraisal). The methylation levels of 2872 CGs differed significantly between adolescents in the positive and negative maternal cognitive appraisal groups. These CGs are affiliated with 1564 different genes and with 408 different biological pathways, which are prominently featured in immune function. Importantly, there was a significant overlap in the differentially methylated CGs or genes and biological pathways that are associated with cognitive appraisal and those associated with objective PNMS as we reported previously. Our study suggests that pregnant women's cognitive appraisals of an independent stressor may have widespread effects on DNA methylation across the entire genome of their unborn children, detectable during adolescence. Therefore, cognitive appraisals could be an important predictor variable to explore in PNMS research. PMID:25710121

  3. Pregnant women's cognitive appraisal of a natural disaster affects DNA methylation in their children 13 years later: Project Ice Storm.

    PubMed

    Cao-Lei, L; Elgbeili, G; Massart, R; Laplante, D P; Szyf, M; King, S

    2015-02-24

    Prenatal maternal stress (PNMS) can impact a variety of outcomes in the offspring throughout childhood and persisting into adulthood as shown in human and animal studies. Many of the effects of PNMS on offspring outcomes likely reflect the effects of epigenetic changes, such as DNA methylation, to the fetal genome. However, no animal or human research can determine the extent to which the effects of PNMS on DNA methylation in human offspring is the result of the objective severity of the stressor to the pregnant mother, or her negative appraisal of the stressor or her resulting degree of negative stress. We examined the genome-wide DNA methylation profile in T cells from 34 adolescents whose mothers had rated the 1998 Québec ice storm's consequences as positive or negative (that is, cognitive appraisal). The methylation levels of 2872 CGs differed significantly between adolescents in the positive and negative maternal cognitive appraisal groups. These CGs are affiliated with 1564 different genes and with 408 different biological pathways, which are prominently featured in immune function. Importantly, there was a significant overlap in the differentially methylated CGs or genes and biological pathways that are associated with cognitive appraisal and those associated with objective PNMS as we reported previously. Our study suggests that pregnant women's cognitive appraisals of an independent stressor may have widespread effects on DNA methylation across the entire genome of their unborn children, detectable during adolescence. Therefore, cognitive appraisals could be an important predictor variable to explore in PNMS research.

  4. Enhanced Tools and Techniques to Support Debris Management in Disaster Response Missions (Flood and Coastal Storm Damage Reduction Research and Development Program)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    Debris Management in Disaster Response Missions Mike Channell, Mark R. Graves, Victor F. Medina, Agnes B. Morrow, Dennis Brandon, and...Storm Damage Reduction Research and Development Program ERDC/EL TR-09-12 May 2009 Enhanced Tools and Techniques to Support Debris Management in...Damage Reduction R&D Program Washington, DC 20314-1000 Under Debris Management Work Unit Monitored by U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development

  5. Use of Remote Sensing Data to Enhance the National Weather Service (NWS) Storm Damage Toolkit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedlovec, Gary; Molthan, Andrew; White, Kris; Burks, Jason; Stellman, Keith; Smith, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    SPoRT is improving the use of near real-time satellite data in response to severe weather events and other diasters. Supported through NASA s Applied Sciences Program. Planned interagency collaboration to support NOAA s Damage Assessment Toolkit, with spinoff opportunities to support other entities such as USGS and FEMA.

  6. Ice crystal damage in frozen thin sections: freezing effects and their restoration.

    PubMed

    Frederik, P M; Busing, W M

    1981-02-01

    Thin sections of unfixed kidney, fast frozen without cryoprotectants, were fixed in osmium tetroxide vapour directly after freeze drying or after 30 min in a moist atmosphere. Dry sections fixed in vapour showed ice crystal damage characteristic for the freezing procedure. This was demonstrated with freeze fracture replicas from the same preparation. Ice crystal holes were obscured in serial sections which were freeze dried and allowed to rehydrate in a moist atmosphere. The same ultrastructural appearance was observed in frozen sections brought to room temperature immediately after cutting. Frozen thin sections from unfixed tissue, if freeze dried, are very sensitive to atmospheric conditions and need some form of stabilization (e.g. osmium vapour fixation, sealing with an evaporated carbon film) before electron microscope images can be interpreted as representative for the frozen state. Restoration of ice crystal damage can occur by melting frozen sections or by rehydration of freeze dried frozen sections. Restoration phenomena will impair studies aimed at the localization of diffusible substances by autoradiography or X-ray microanalysis.

  7. Building resilient power grids from integrated risk governance perspective: A lesson learned from china's 2008 Ice-Snow Storm disaster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Qian

    2014-10-01

    In the past three decades, the electric energy industry made great contribution to support rapid social and economic development in China, and meanwhile has been grown at the highest rate in the human history owing to the economic reform. In its new national development plan, more investment has been put into installation of both electricity generating capacity and transmitting capacity in order to meet fast growing demand of electric energy. However, energy resources, both fossil fuel and renewable types, and energy consumption and load centers in China are not evenly distributed in both spatial and temporal dimensions. Moreover, dominated by coal as its primary energy source, the whole eastern China is now entering an environmental crisis in which pollutants emitted by coal power plants contribute a large part. To balance the regional differences in energy sources and energy consumption while meeting the steadily increasing demands for electric energy for the whole country, in addition to increase electric generating capacity, building large-scale, long-distance ultra high voltage power grids is the top priority for next five years. China is a country prone to almost all kinds of natural disasters due to its vast, complex geographical and climatic conditions. In recent years, frequent natural disasters, especially extreme weather and climate events, have threatened the safety, reliability and stability of electric energy system in China. Unfortunately, with fast growth rate but lacking of risk assessing and prevention mechanism, many infrastructure constructions, including national power grids, are facing integrated and complex economic, social, institutional and ecological risks. In this paper, based on a case analysis of the Great Ice Storm in southern China in January 2008, risks of building a resilient power grid to deal with increasing threats from extreme weathers are discussed. The paper recommends that a systematic approach based on the social

  8. GIS-based estimation of the winter storm damage probability in forests: a case study from Baden-Wuerttemberg (Southwest Germany).

    PubMed

    Schindler, Dirk; Grebhan, Karin; Albrecht, Axel; Schönborn, Jochen; Kohnle, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Data on storm damage attributed to the two high-impact winter storms 'Wiebke' (28 February 1990) and 'Lothar' (26 December 1999) were used for GIS-based estimation and mapping (in a 50 × 50 m resolution grid) of the winter storm damage probability (P(DAM)) for the forests of the German federal state of Baden-Wuerttemberg (Southwest Germany). The P(DAM)-calculation was based on weights of evidence (WofE) methodology. A combination of information on forest type, geology, soil type, soil moisture regime, and topographic exposure, as well as maximum gust wind speed field was used to compute P(DAM) across the entire study area. Given the condition that maximum gust wind speed during the two storm events exceeded 35 m s(-1), the highest P(DAM) values computed were primarily where coniferous forest grows in severely exposed areas on temporarily moist soils on bunter sandstone formations. Such areas are found mainly in the mountainous ranges of the northern Black Forest, the eastern Forest of Odes, in the Virngrund area, and in the southwestern Alpine Foothills.

  9. Numerical Simulation on the Damage Characteristics of Ice Targets by Projectile Hypervelocity Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zhang; Gang, Wei; Zhong-Cheng, Mu; Chang, Liu

    2009-12-01

    Interpretation of cratering records on planetary surfaces including the Earth has primarily been concerned with rocky surfaces, most notably the lunar surface and more recently Mars and Venus. Recently, the survey of craters on icy surfaces in the Solar System has been augmented by data from spacecraft close encounters, such as the Galileo mission to the Jovian system. To fully understand these cratering records, the physics of hypervelocity impacts needs to be understood. The numerical simulation on the damage characteristics of ice targets by projectile normal hypervelocity impact has been performed using the hydro-code AUTODYN. The 1 mm spherical projectile is aluminum 2017 alloy. The targets are water ice. The simulation velocities were in the range of 1 km/s-10 km/s. The damage characteristics include peak ejection angle, maximum crater depth and diameter etc. The simulation results are given and compared with the experimental results of Shrine et al. 2002. The simulation results are consistent with the experimental results.

  10. Numerical Simulation on the Damage Characteristics of Ice Targets by Projectile Hypervelocity Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Wei, Gang; Mu, Zhong-Cheng

    2009-06-01

    Interpretation of cratering records on planetary surfaces including the Earth has primarily been concerned with rocky surfaces, most notably the lunar surface and more recently Mars and Venus. Recently, the survey of craters on icy surfaces in the Solar System has been augmented by data from spacecraft close encounters, such as the Galileo mission to the jovian system. To fully understand these cratering records, the physics of hypervelocity impacts needs to be understood. The numerical simulation on the damage characteristics of ice targets by projectile normally hypervelocity impact has been performed using the hydro-code AUTODYN. The 1mm spherical projectile is aluminum 2017 alloy. The targets are water ice. The simulation velocities were in the range of 1km/s-10km/s. The material models are consisted of Tillotson and Polynomial equation of state, Mohr-Coulomb and Johnson-Holmqiust strength model and Johnson-Holmqiust and principle stress failure model. The damage characteristics include peak ejection angle, peak temperature and pressure, maximum crater depth and diameter etc. The simulation results are given and compared with the experimental results of Burchell 2002. The simulation results are consistent very well with the experimental results.

  11. Impacts of Asian dust storm associated with the stratosphere-to-troposphere transport in the spring of 2001 and 2002 on dust and tritium variations in Mount Wrangell ice core, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasunari, Teppei J.; Yamazaki, Koji

    The relation of interannual connection between Asian dust outbreaks and stratosphere-to-troposphere transport (STT) in spring was suggested by the dust and tritium variations in the Mount Wrangell ice core, Alaska in [Yasunari, T.J., Shiraiwa, T., Kanamori, S., Fujii, Y., Igarashi, M., Yamazaki, K., Benson, C.S., Hondoh, T., 2007. Intra-annual variations in atmospheric dust and tritium in the North Pacific region detected from an ice core from Mount Wrangell, Alaska. J. Geophys. Res., 112, D10208. doi: 10.1029/2006JD008121]. However, these impacts on the ice core site in each event scale have not been investigated. Hence, the present paper focuses on the material transport and deposition processes for further understanding these impacts on the ice core. The variations in dust and tritium concentrations in spring in an ice core taken at Mt. Wrangell, Alaska are explained by meteorological analysis and simulation of trajectories associated with Asian dust outbreaks and STT. Material transport and deposition at Mt. Wrangell are examined in two contrasting years (2001 and 2002). Dust and tritium concentrations both reached peak values in the early spring of 2002, while the dust peak occurred in early spring and the tritium peak occurred in late spring in 2001. Six severe East Asian transpacific dust storms over this period are modeled by forward trajectory and meteorologically analyzed. It is found that 5 of 6 events contributed to the ice core record in Alaska. Stratospheric air is also transported to the ice core site in most cases. Tritium deposition is found to have been suppressed in the cases of the 2001 dust storms due to lack of snowfall at appropriate times. Taken the detailed transport and deposition processes after the severe dust storms with atmospheric circulations into account, we can well explain spring dust and tritium variations in the Mount Wrangell ice core.

  12. A trajectory-based classification of ERA-Interim ice clouds in the region of the North Atlantic storm track

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wernli, Heini; Boettcher, Maxi; Joos, Hanna; Miltenberger, Annette K.; Spichtinger, Peter

    2016-06-01

    A two-type classification of ice clouds (cirrus) is introduced, based on the liquid and ice water content, LWC and IWC, along air parcel backward trajectories from the clouds. In situ cirrus has no LWC along the trajectory segment containing IWC; it forms via nucleation from the gas phase. In contrast, liquid-origin cirrus has both LWC and IWC along their backward trajectories; it forms via lifting from the lower troposphere and freezing of mixed-phase clouds. This classification is applied to 12 years of ERA-Interim ice clouds in the North Atlantic region. Between 400 and 500 hPa more than 50% are liquid-origin cirrus, whereas this frequency decreases strongly with altitude (<10% at 200 hPa). The relative frequencies of the two categories vary only weakly with season. More than 50% of in situ cirrus occur on top of liquid-origin cirrus, indicating that they often form in response to the strong lifting accompanying the formation of liquid-origin cirrus.

  13. Shrinking Sea Ice, Thawing Permafrost, Bigger Storms, and Extremely Limited Data - Addressing Information Needs of Stakeholders in Western Alaska Through Participatory Decisions and Collaborative Science.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, K. A.; Reynolds, J.

    2015-12-01

    Communities, Tribes, and decision makers in coastal western Alaska are being impacted by declining sea ice, sea level rise, changing storm patterns and intensities, and increased rates of coastal erosion. Relative to their counterparts in the contiguous USA, their ability to plan for and respond to these changes is constrained by the region's generally meager or non-existent information base. Further, the information needs and logistic challenges are of a scale that perhaps can be addressed only through strong, strategic collaboration. Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCCs) are fundamentally about applied science and collaboration, especially collaborative decision making. The Western Alaska LCC has established a process of participatory decision making that brings together researchers, agency managers, local experts from Tribes and field specialists to identify and prioritize shared information needs; develop a course of action to address them by using the LCC's limited resources to catalyze engagement, overcome barriers to progress, and build momentum; then ensure products are delivered in a manner that meets decision makers' needs. We briefly review the LCC's activities & outcomes from the stages of (i) collaborative needs assessment (joint with the Alaska Climate Science Center and the Alaska Ocean Observing System), (ii) strategic science activities, and (iii) product refinement and delivery. We discuss lessons learned, in the context of our recent program focused on 'Changes in Coastal Storms and Their Impacts' and current collaborative efforts focused on delivery of Coastal Resiliency planning tools and results from applied science projects. Emphasis is given to the various key interactions between scientists and decision makers / managers that have been promoted by this process to ensure alignment of final products to decision maker needs.

  14. Childhood body mass index at 5.5 years mediates the effect of prenatal maternal stress on daughters' age at menarche: Project Ice Storm.

    PubMed

    Duchesne, A; Liu, A; Jones, S L; Laplante, D P; King, S

    2017-04-01

    Early pubertal timing is known to put women at greater risk for adverse physiological and psychological health outcomes. Of the factors that influence girls' pubertal timing, stress experienced during childhood has been found to advance age at menarche (AAM). However, it is not known if stress experienced by mothers during or in the months before conception can be similarly associated with earlier pubertal timing. Prenatal maternal stress (PNMS) is associated with metabolic changes, such as increased childhood adiposity and risk of obesity, that have been associated with earlier menarchal age. Using a prospective longitudinal design, the present study tested whether PNMS induced by a natural disaster is either directly associated with earlier AAM, or whether there is an indirect association mediated through increased girls' body mass index (BMI) during childhood. A total of 31 girls, whose mothers were exposed to the Quebec's January 1998 ice storm during pregnancy were followed from 6 months to 5 1/2 to 5.5 years of age. Mother's stress was measured within 6 months of the storm. BMI was measured at 5.5 years, and AAM was assessed through teen's self-report at 13.5 and 15.5 years of age. Results revealed that greater BMI at 5.5 years mediated the effect of PNMS on decreasing AAM [B=-0.059, 95% confidence intervals (-0.18, -0.0035)]. The present study is the first to demonstrate that maternal experience of stressful conditions during pregnancy reduces AAM in the offspring through its effects on childhood BMI. Future research should consider the impact of AAM on other measures of reproductive ability.

  15. A Hybrid Icebreaking Resistance Model to Accommodate Damage to the Ice Sheet

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    overall ship design and mechanical process to break ice is essentially the same today as it was back then. Despite this similitude , the icebreaker...Bazant et al., “Part-through bending cracks in sea ice plates: Mathematical modeling,” Ice Mech. 1995, vol. 207, pp. 97–105, 1995, pp. 97-105. [12...Port Ocean Eng. Arctic Cond. 2011, pp. 1-12. [19] M. Lau et al., “ Mathematical modeling of ice-hull interaction for ship maneuvering in ice

  16. A Study in Use and Management of De/Anti-Icing Constituents with Regard to New Storm Water Legislation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    2NH3 + 302 --- (Nitrosomonas) --- > 2NO2- +2H+ +2H20 2wO2- + 02 --- (Nitro bacteria)-> 2NO3- (36:123). The breakdown of urea to amonia is highly...the real-time temperatures of both runways and aircraft. For pavements, Runway Ice Detection Systems (RIDS) utilize flush-mounted sensors , central...combination with sensor data to create a "pavement temperature forecast" (29). This can be critical since the pavement temperature can vary from the

  17. DNA methylation mediates the impact of exposure to prenatal maternal stress on BMI and central adiposity in children at age 13½ years: Project Ice Storm.

    PubMed

    Cao-Lei, Lei; Dancause, Kelsey N; Elgbeili, Guillaume; Massart, Renaud; Szyf, Moshe; Liu, Aihua; Laplante, David P; King, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal maternal stress (PNMS) in animals and humans predicts obesity and metabolic dysfunction in the offspring. Epigenetic modification of gene function is considered one possible mechanism by which PNMS results in poor outcomes in offspring. Our goal was to determine the role of maternal objective exposure and subjective distress on child BMI and central adiposity at 13½ years of age, and to test the hypothesis that DNA methylation mediates the effect of PNMS on growth. Mothers were pregnant during the January 1998 Quebec ice storm. We assessed their objective exposure and subjective distress in June 1998. At age 13½ their children were weighed and measured (n = 66); a subsample provided blood samples for epigenetic studies (n = 31). Objective and subjective PNMS correlated with central adiposity (waist-to-height ratio); only objective PNMS predicted body mass index (BMI). Bootstrapping analyses showed that the methylation level of genes from established Type-1 and -2 diabetes mellitus pathways showed significant mediation of the effect of objective PNMS on both central adiposity and BMI. However, the negative mediating effects indicate that, although greater objective PNMS predicts greater BMI and adiposity, this effect is dampened by the effects of objective PNMS on DNA methylation, suggesting a protective role of the selected genes from Type-1 and -2 diabetes mellitus pathways. We provide data supporting that DNA methylation is a potential mechanism involved in the long-term adaptation and programming of the genome in response to early adverse environmental factors.

  18. Short-Term Responses of Ground-Dwelling Beetles to Ice Storm-Induced Treefall Gaps in a Subtropical Broad-Leaved Forest in Southeastern China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao-Dong; Liu, Chong-Ling; Lü, Liang; Luo, Tian-Hong; Zhou, Hong-Zhang

    2016-02-01

    Periodic natural disturbances shape the mosaic character of many landscapes and influence the distribution and abundance of organisms. In this study, we tested the effect of ice storm-induced treefall gaps on ground-dwelling beetle assemblages in different-aged successional stands of subtropical broad-leaved forest in southeastern China. We evaluated the relative importance of gap-phase microhabitat type (within gap, gap edge, and interior shaded) within different stand ages (regenerating stands and mature stands) as determinants of changes in beetle diversity and community structure. At 18 replicate sites sampled during 2009-2010, no significant differences were found in species richness and the abundances of the most common beetle species captured in pitfall traps among the three gap-phase microhabitat types, but the abundances of total beetles, as well as fungivorous and phytophagous species groups, were significantly lower in gap microhabitats than in interior shaded microhabitats in mature stands. Beetle assemblage composition showed no significant differences among the three microhabitat types, and only the fauna of gap plots slightly diverged from those of edge and shaded plots in mature stands. Cover of shrubs and stand age significantly affected beetle assemblage structure. Our results suggest that beetle responses to gap-phase dynamics in early successional forests are generally weak, and that effects are more discernible in the mature stands, perhaps due to the abundance responses of forest-specialist species.

  19. Prenatal maternal stress predicts reductions in CD4+ lymphocytes, increases in innate-derived cytokines, and a Th2 shift in adolescents: Project Ice Storm.

    PubMed

    Veru, Franz; Dancause, Kelsey; Laplante, David P; King, Suzanne; Luheshi, Giamal

    2015-05-15

    The relationship between psychological stress and immunity is well established, but it is not clear if prenatal maternal stress (PNMS) affects the development of the immune system in humans. Our objective was to determine the extent of this influence in a sample of teenagers whose mothers were pregnant during the 1998 Quebec ice storm. As part of a longitudinal study of PNMS, we measured the objective stress exposure and subjective distress of the women soon after the disaster. We obtained blood samples from 37 of their children when they were 13years old to measure cell population percentages and mitogen-induced cytokine production. We found that the mothers' objective degree of PNMS exposure significantly predicted reductions in total and CD4+ lymphocyte proportions, increases in TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 levels, and an enhancement of the Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-13. Sex and timing of PNMS exposure during gestation were also associated with some outcomes. These results show that PNMS is a programming factor that can produce long-lasting consequences on immunity, potentially explaining non-genetic variability in immune-related disorders. This information contributes to the understanding of the mechanisms underlying the influence of PNMS on immune-mediated disorders in humans.

  20. DNA methylation mediates the impact of exposure to prenatal maternal stress on BMI and central adiposity in children at age 13½ years: Project Ice Storm

    PubMed Central

    Cao-Lei, Lei; Dancause, Kelsey N; Elgbeili, Guillaume; Massart, Renaud; Szyf, Moshe; Liu, Aihua; Laplante, David P; King, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal maternal stress (PNMS) in animals and humans predicts obesity and metabolic dysfunction in the offspring. Epigenetic modification of gene function is considered one possible mechanism by which PNMS results in poor outcomes in offspring. Our goal was to determine the role of maternal objective exposure and subjective distress on child BMI and central adiposity at 13½ years of age, and to test the hypothesis that DNA methylation mediates the effect of PNMS on growth. Mothers were pregnant during the January 1998 Quebec ice storm. We assessed their objective exposure and subjective distress in June 1998. At age 13½ their children were weighed and measured (n = 66); a subsample provided blood samples for epigenetic studies (n = 31). Objective and subjective PNMS correlated with central adiposity (waist-to-height ratio); only objective PNMS predicted body mass index (BMI). Bootstrapping analyses showed that the methylation level of genes from established Type-1 and -2 diabetes mellitus pathways showed significant mediation of the effect of objective PNMS on both central adiposity and BMI. However, the negative mediating effects indicate that, although greater objective PNMS predicts greater BMI and adiposity, this effect is dampened by the effects of objective PNMS on DNA methylation, suggesting a protective role of the selected genes from Type-1 and -2 diabetes mellitus pathways. We provide data supporting that DNA methylation is a potential mechanism involved in the long-term adaptation and programming of the genome in response to early adverse environmental factors. PMID:26098974

  1. Meteorology, Macrophysics, Microphysics, Microwaves, and Mesoscale Modeling of Mediterranean Mountain Storms: The M8 Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, David O. (Technical Monitor); Smith, Eric A.

    2002-01-01

    Comprehensive understanding of the microphysical nature of Mediterranean storms can be accomplished by a combination of in situ meteorological data analysis and radar-passive microwave data analysis, effectively integrated with numerical modeling studies at various scales, from synoptic scale down through the mesoscale, the cloud macrophysical scale, and ultimately the cloud microphysical scale. The microphysical properties of and their controls on severe storms are intrinsically related to meteorological processes under which storms have evolved, processes which eventually select and control the dominant microphysical properties themselves. This involves intense convective development, stratiform decay, orographic lifting, and sloped frontal lifting processes, as well as the associated vertical motions and thermodynamical instabilities governing physical processes that affect details of the size distributions and fall rates of the various types of hydrometeors found within the storm environment. Insofar as hazardous Mediterranean storms, highlighted in this study by three mountain storms producing damaging floods in northern Italy between 1992 and 2000, developing a comprehensive microphysical interpretation requires an understanding of the multiple phases of storm evolution and the heterogeneous nature of precipitation fields within a storm domain. This involves convective development, stratiform transition and decay, orographic lifting, and sloped frontal lifting processes. This also involves vertical motions and thermodynamical instabilities governing physical processes that determine details of the liquid/ice water contents, size disi:ributions, and fall rates of the various modes of hydrometeors found within hazardous storm environments.

  2. Templates of Change: Storms and Shoreline Hazards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolan, Robert; Hayden, Bruce

    1980-01-01

    Presents results of research designed to assess and predict the storm-related hazards of living on the coast. Findings suggest that certain sections of coastline are more vulnerable than others to storm damage. (WB)

  3. A Double-Moment Multiple-Phase Four-Class Bulk Ice Scheme. Part II: Simulations of Convective Storms in Different Large-Scale Environments and Comparisons with other Bulk Parameterizations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenberg Ferrier, Brad; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Simpson, Joanne

    1995-04-01

    Part I of this study described a detailed four-class bulk ice scheme (4ICE) developed to simulate the hydro-meteor profiles of convective and stratiform precipitation associated with mesoscale convective systems. In Part II, the 4ICE scheme is incorporated into the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model and applied without any `tuning' to two squall lines occurring in widely different environments, namely, one over the `Pica) ocean in the Global Atmospheric Research Program's (GARP) Atlantic Tropical Experiment (GATE) and the other over a midlatitude continent in the Cooperative Huntsville Meteorological Experiment (COHMEX). Comparisons were made both with earlier three-class ice formulations and with observations. In both cases, the 4ICE scheme interacted with the dynamics so as to resemble the observations much more closely than did the model runs with either of the three-class ice parameterizations. The following features were well simulated in the COHMEX case: a lack of stratiform rain at the surface ahead of the storm, reflectivity maxima near 60 dBZ in the vicinity of the melting level, and intense radar echoes up to near the tropopause. These features were in strong contrast with the GATE simulation, which showed extensive trailing stratiform precipitation containing a horizontally oriented radar bright band. Peak reflectivities were below the melting level, rarely exceeding 50 dBz, with a steady decrease in reflectivity with height above. With the other bulk formulations, the large stratiform rain areas were not reproduced in the GATE conditions.The microphysical structure of the model clouds in both environments were more realistic than that of earlier modeling efforts. Number concentrations of ice of O(100 L1) occurred above 6 km in the GATE model clouds as a result of ice enhancement and rime splintering in the 4ICE runs. These processes were more effective in the GATE simulation, because near the freezing level the weaker updrafts were comparable in

  4. Storm-Substorm Relations Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Joe

    2006-06-01

    Magnetic storms in the magnetosphere can cause damage to communication satellites and large-scale power outages. The concept that a magnetic storm is a compilation of a series of substorms was proposed by Akasofu [1968]. However, Kamide [1992] showed that substorms are not a necessary condition for the occurrence of a magnetic storm. This controversy initiated a new era of research on the storm-substorm relation, which was the subject of a recent workshop in Banff, Alberta, Canada. The main topics discussed during the meeting included a brief overview of what a substorm is, how quasiperiodic substorm events and steady magnetospheric convection (SMC) events without substorms contribute to storms, and how plasma flows enhanced by magnetic reconnection in the plasma sheet contribute to substorms and storms.

  5. Defining Coastal Storm and Quantifying Storms Applying Coastal Storm Impulse Parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudpour, Nader

    2014-05-01

    What defines a storm condition and what would initiate a "storm" has not been uniquely defined among scientists and engineers. Parameters that have been used to define a storm condition can be mentioned as wind speed, beach erosion and storm hydrodynamics parameters such as wave height and water levels. Some of the parameters are storm consequential such as beach erosion and some are not directly related to the storm hydrodynamics such as wind speed. For the purpose of the presentation, the different storm conditions based on wave height, water levels, wind speed and beach erosion will be discussed and assessed. However, it sounds more scientifically to have the storm definition based on the hydrodynamic parameters such as wave height, water level and storm duration. Once the storm condition is defined and storm has initiated, the severity of the storm would be a question to forecast and evaluate the hazard and analyze the risk in order to determine the appropriate responses. The correlation of storm damages to the meteorological and hydrodynamics parameters can be defined as a storm scale, storm index or storm parameter and it is needed to simplify the complexity of variation involved developing the scale for risk analysis and response management. A newly introduced Coastal Storm Impulse (COSI) parameter quantifies storms into one number for a specific location and storm event. The COSI parameter is based on the conservation of linear, horizontal momentum to combine storm surge, wave dynamics, and currents over the storm duration. The COSI parameter applies the principle of conservation of momentum to physically combine the hydrodynamic variables per unit width of shoreline. This total momentum is then integrated over the duration of the storm to determine the storm's impulse to the coast. The COSI parameter employs the mean, time-averaged nonlinear (Fourier) wave momentum flux, over the wave period added to the horizontal storm surge momentum above the Mean High

  6. On extreme geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cid, Consuelo; Palacios, Judith; Saiz, Elena; Guerrero, Antonio; Cerrato, Yolanda

    2014-10-01

    Extreme geomagnetic storms are considered as one of the major natural hazards for technology-dependent society. Geomagnetic field disturbances can disrupt the operation of critical infrastructures relying on space-based assets, and can also result in terrestrial effects, such as the Quebec electrical disruption in 1989. Forecasting potential hazards is a matter of high priority, but considering large flares as the only criterion for early-warning systems has demonstrated to release a large amount of false alarms and misses. Moreover, the quantification of the severity of the geomagnetic disturbance at the terrestrial surface using indices as Dst cannot be considered as the best approach to give account of the damage in utilities. High temporal resolution local indices come out as a possible solution to this issue, as disturbances recorded at the terrestrial surface differ largely both in latitude and longitude. The recovery phase of extreme storms presents also some peculiar features which make it different from other less intense storms. This paper goes through all these issues related to extreme storms by analysing a few events, highlighting the March 1989 storm, related to the Quebec blackout, and the October 2003 event, when several transformers burnt out in South Africa.

  7. Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctic Ice and Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    In this view of Antarctic ice and clouds, (56.5S, 152.0W), the Ross Ice Shelf of Antarctica is almost totally clear, showing stress cracks in the ice surface caused by wind and tidal drift. Clouds on the eastern edge of the picture are associated with an Antarctic cyclone. Winds stirred up these storms have been known to reach hurricane force.

  8. Magnetic Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Gonzalez, Walter D.

    1998-01-01

    One of the oldest mysteries in geomagnetism is the linkage between solar and geomagnetic activity. The 11-year cycles of both the numbers of sunspots and Earth geomagnetic storms were first noted by Sabine. A few years later, speculation on a causal relationship between flares and storms arose when Carrington reported that a large magnetic storm followed the great September 1859 solar flare. However, it was not until this century that a well-accepted statistical survey on large solar flares and geomagnetic storms was performed, and a significant correlation between flares and geomagnetic storms was noted. Although the two phenomena, one on the Sun and the other on the Earth, were statistically correlated, the exact physical linkage was still an unknown at this time. Various hypotheses were proposed, but it was not until interplanetary spacecraft measurements were available that a high-speed plasma stream rich in helium was associated with an intense solar flare. The velocity of the solar wind increased just prior to and during the helium passage, identifying the solar ejecta for the first time. Space plasma measurements and Skylab's coronagraph images of coronal mass elections (CMES) from the Sun firmly established the plasma link between the Sun and the Earth. One phenomenon associated with magnetic storms is brilliant "blood" red auroras, as shown.

  9. Effects of ice storm on forest ecosystem of southern China in 2008 Shaoqiang Wang1, Lei Zhou1, Weimin Ju2, Kun Huang1 1Key Lab of Ecosystem Network Observation and Modeling, Institute of Geographical Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Beijing, 10010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shaoqiang

    2014-05-01

    Evidence is mounting that an increase in extreme climate events has begun to occur worldwide during the recent decades, which affect biosphere function and biodiversity. Ecosystems returned to its original structures and functions to maintain its sustainability, which was closely dependent on ecosystem resilience. Understanding the resilience and recovery capacity of ecosystem to extreme climate events is essential to predicting future ecosystem responses to climate change. Given the overwhelming importance of this region in the overall carbon cycle of forest ecosystems in China, south China suffered a destructive ice storm in 2008. In this study, we used the number of freezing day and a process-based model (Boreal Ecosystem Productivity Simulator, BEPS) to characterize the spatial distribution of ice storm region in southeastern China and explore the impacts on carbon cycle of forest ecosystem over the past decade. The ecosystem variables, i.e. Net primary productivity (NPP), Evapotranspiration (ET), and Water use efficiency (WUE, the ratio of NPP to ET) from the outputs of BEPS models were used to detect the resistance and resilience of forest ecosystem in southern China. The pattern of ice storm-induced forest productivity widespread decline was closely related to the number of freezing day during the ice storm period. The NPP of forest area suffered heavy ice storm returned to normal status after five months with high temperature and ample moisture, indicated a high resilience of subtropical forest in China. The long-term changes of forest WUE remain stable, behaving an inherent sensitivity of ecosystem to extreme climate events. In addition, ground visits suggested that the recovery of forest productivity was attributed to rapid growth of understory. Understanding the variability and recovery threshold of ecosystem following extreme climate events help us to better simulate and predict the variability of ecosystem structure and function under current and

  10. Observing storm surges from satellite altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Guoqi

    2016-07-01

    Storm surges can cause catastrophic damage to properties and loss of life in coastal communities. Thus it is important to enhance our capabilities of observing and forecasting storm surges for mitigating damage and loss. In this presentation we show examples of observing storm surges around the world using nadir satellite altimetry, during Hurricane Sandy, Igor, and Isaac, as well as other cyclone events. The satellite observations are evaluated against tide-gauge observations and discussed for dynamic mechanisms. We also show the potential of a new wide-swath altimetry mission, the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT), for observing storm surges.

  11. Research on Historical Records of Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakhina, G. S.; Alex, S.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Gonzalez, W. D.

    In recent times, there has been keen interest in understanding Sun-Earth connection events, such as solar flares, CMEs and concomitant magnetic storms. Magnetic storms are the most dramatic and perhaps important component of space weather effects on Earth. Super-intense magnetic storms (defined here as those with Dst < -500 nT, where Dst stands for the disturbance storm time index that measures the strength of the magnetic storm) although relatively rare, have the largest societal and technological relevance. Such storms can cause life-threatening power outages, satellite damage, communication failures and navigational problems. However, the data for such magnetic storms is rather scarce. For example, only one super-intense magnetic storm has been recorded (Dst=-640 nT, March 13, 1989) during the space-age (since 1958), although such storms may have occurred many times in the last 160 years or so when the regular observatory network came into existence. Thus, research on historical geomagnetic storms can help to create a good data base for intense and super-intense magnetic storms. From the application of knowledge of interplanetary and solar causes of storms gained from the spaceage observations applied to the super-intense storm of September 1-2, 1859, it has been possible to deduce that an exceptionally fast (and intense) magnetic cloud was the interplanetary cause of this geomagnetic storm with a Dst -1760 nT, nearly 3 times as large as that of March 13, 1989 super-intense storm. The talk will focus on super-intense storms of September 1-2, 1859, and also discuss the results in the context of some recent intense storms.

  12. Arctic Cyclone Breaks Up Sea Ice

    NASA Video Gallery

    A powerful storm wreaked havoc on the Arctic sea ice cover in August 2012. This visualization shows the strength and direction of the winds and their impact on the ice: the red vectors represent th...

  13. Tropical Storm Erin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Location: The Atlantic Ocean 210 miles south of Galveston, Texas Categorization: Tropical Storm Sustained Winds: 40 mph (60 km/hr)

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Infrared ImageMicrowave Image

    Infrared Images Because infrared radiation does not penetrate through clouds, AIRS infrared images show either the temperature of the cloud tops or the surface of the Earth in cloud-free regions. The lowest temperatures (in purple) are associated with high, cold cloud tops that make up the top of the storm. In cloud-free areas the AIRS instrument will receive the infrared radiation from the surface of the Earth, resulting in the warmest temperatures (orange/red).

    Microwave Images In the AIRS microwave imagery, deep blue areas in storms show where the most precipitation occurs, or where ice crystals are present in the convective cloud tops. Outside of these storm regions, deep blue areas may also occur over the sea surface due to its low radiation emissivity. On the other hand, land appears much warmer due to its high radiation emissivity.

    Microwave radiation from Earth's surface and lower atmosphere penetrates most clouds to a greater or lesser extent depending upon their water vapor, liquid water and ice content. Precipitation, and ice crystals found at the cloud tops where strong convection is taking place, act as barriers to microwave radiation. Because of this barrier effect, the AIRS microwave sensor detects only the radiation arising at or above their location in the atmospheric column. Where these barriers are not present, the microwave sensor detects radiation arising throughout the air column and down to the surface. Liquid surfaces (oceans, lakes and rivers) have 'low emissivity' (the signal isn't as strong) and their radiation brightness temperature is therefore low. Thus the ocean also appears 'low temperature' in the AIRS microwave images and is assigned the color blue

  14. Geomagnetic storms: historical perspective to modern view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakhina, Gurbax S.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.

    2016-12-01

    The history of geomagnetism is more than 400 years old. Geomagnetic storms as we know them were discovered about 210 years ago. There has been keen interest in understanding Sun-Earth connection events, such as solar flares, CMEs, and concomitant magnetic storms in recent times. Magnetic storms are the most important component of space weather effects on Earth. We give an overview of the historical aspects of geomagnetic storms and the progress made during the past two centuries. Super magnetic storms can cause life-threatening power outages and satellite damage, communication failures and navigational problems. The data for such super magnetic storms that occurred in the last 50 years during the space era is sparce. Research on historical geomagnetic storms can help to create a database for intense and super magnetic storms. New knowledge of interplanetary and solar causes of magnetic storms gained from spaceage observations will be used to review the super magnetic storm of September 1-2, 1859. We discuss the occurrence probability of such super magnetic storms, and the maximum possible intensity for the effects of a perfect ICME: extreme super magnetic storm, extreme magnetospheric compression, and extreme magnetospheric electric fields.

  15. Springtime North Polar Dust Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-321, 12 December 2002

    As on the Earth, many severe storms brew in the martian polar regions. Here, temperature contrasts between the cold carbon dioxide ('dry ice') seasonal frost cap and the warm ground adjacent to it--combined with a flow of cool polar air evaporating off the cap--sweeps up dust and funnels it into swirling dust storms along the cap edge. The dust storms shown here were observed during the recent northern spring by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) in May 2002. The picture is a mosaic of daily global images from the MOC wide angle cameras. The north polar cap is the bright, frosty surface at the top.

  16. Severe storm identification with satellite microwave radiometry: An initial investigation with Nimbus-7 SMMR data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, R. W.; Howland, M. R.

    1984-01-01

    The severe weather characteristics of convective storms as observed by the Nimbus 7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) are investigated. Low 37 GHz brightness temperatures (due to scattering of upwelling radiation by precipitation size ice) are related to the occurrence of severe weather (large hail, strong winds or wind damage, tornadoes and funnel clouds) within one hour of the satellite observation time. During 1979 and 1980 over the United States there were 263 storms which had very cold 37 GHz signatures. Of these storms 15% were severe. The SMMR detected hail, wind, and tornadic storms equally well. Critical Success Indices (CSI's) of 0.32, 0.48, and 0.38 are achieved for the thresholding of severe vs. nonsevere low brightness temperature events during 1979, 1980, and the two years combined, respectively. Such scores are comparable to skill scores for early radar detection methods. These results suggest that a future geostationary passive microwave imaging capability at 37 GHz, with sufficient spatial and temporal resolution, would allow the detection of severe convective storms. This capability would provide a useful complement to radar, especially in areas not covered by radar.

  17. Clouds and Dust Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 2 July 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth.

    Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms.

    This image was acquired during mid-spring near the North Pole. The linear water-ice clouds are now regional in extent and often interact with neighboring cloud system, as seen in this image. The bottom of the image shows how the interaction can destroy the linear nature. While the surface is still visible through most of the clouds, there is evidence that dust is also starting to enter the atmosphere.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 68.4, Longitude 180 East (180 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with

  18. Radar image interpretation techniques applied to sea ice geophysical problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carsey, F. D.

    1983-01-01

    The geophysical science problems in the sea ice area which at present concern understanding the ice budget, where ice is formed, how thick it grows and where it melts, and the processes which control the interaction of air-sea and ice at the ice margins is discussed. The science problems relate to basic questions of sea ice: how much is there, thickness, drift rate, production rate, determination of the morphology of the ice margin, storms feeling for the ice, storms and influence at the margin to alter the pack, and ocean response to a storm at the margin. Some of these questions are descriptive and some require complex modeling of interactions between the ice, the ocean, the atmosphere and the radiation fields. All involve measurements of the character of the ice pack, and SAR plays a significant role in the measurements.

  19. Major coastal impact induced by a 1000-year storm event

    PubMed Central

    Fruergaard, Mikkel; Andersen, Thorbjørn J.; Johannessen, Peter N.; Nielsen, Lars H.; Pejrup, Morten

    2013-01-01

    Extreme storms and storm surges may induce major changes along sandy barrier coastlines, potentially causing substantial environmental and economic damage. We show that the most destructive storm (the 1634 AD storm) documented for the northern Wadden Sea within the last thousand years both caused permanent barrier breaching and initiated accumulation of up to several metres of marine sand. An aggradational storm shoal and a prograding shoreface sand unit having thicknesses of up to 8 m and 5 m respectively were deposited as a result of the storm and during the subsequent 30 to 40 years long healing phase, on the eroded shoreface. Our results demonstrate that millennial-scale storms can induce large-scale and long-term changes on barrier coastlines and shorefaces, and that coastal changes assumed to take place over centuries or even millennia may occur in association with and be triggered by a single extreme storm event.

  20. Bacterial ice crystal controlling proteins.

    PubMed

    Lorv, Janet S H; Rose, David R; Glick, Bernard R

    2014-01-01

    Across the world, many ice active bacteria utilize ice crystal controlling proteins for aid in freezing tolerance at subzero temperatures. Ice crystal controlling proteins include both antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins. Antifreeze proteins minimize freezing damage by inhibiting growth of large ice crystals, while ice nucleation proteins induce formation of embryonic ice crystals. Although both protein classes have differing functions, these proteins use the same ice binding mechanisms. Rather than direct binding, it is probable that these protein classes create an ice surface prior to ice crystal surface adsorption. Function is differentiated by molecular size of the protein. This paper reviews the similar and different aspects of bacterial antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins, the role of these proteins in freezing tolerance, prevalence of these proteins in psychrophiles, and current mechanisms of protein-ice interactions.

  1. Bacterial Ice Crystal Controlling Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lorv, Janet S. H.; Rose, David R.; Glick, Bernard R.

    2014-01-01

    Across the world, many ice active bacteria utilize ice crystal controlling proteins for aid in freezing tolerance at subzero temperatures. Ice crystal controlling proteins include both antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins. Antifreeze proteins minimize freezing damage by inhibiting growth of large ice crystals, while ice nucleation proteins induce formation of embryonic ice crystals. Although both protein classes have differing functions, these proteins use the same ice binding mechanisms. Rather than direct binding, it is probable that these protein classes create an ice surface prior to ice crystal surface adsorption. Function is differentiated by molecular size of the protein. This paper reviews the similar and different aspects of bacterial antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins, the role of these proteins in freezing tolerance, prevalence of these proteins in psychrophiles, and current mechanisms of protein-ice interactions. PMID:24579057

  2. Components of the ice age circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rind, D.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of ice age boundary conditions on atmospheric dynamics and regional climate patterns are investigated using four GCM simulations. Particular consideration is given to sea surface temperature-sea ice distribution, the appearance of land ice, and the increased elevation of land ice. It is observed that the ice-age sea surface temperature stabilizes the atmosphere over the oceans, increases the frequency of storm tracking through central North America, and amplifies transient eddy energy without increasing baroclinic generation. It is detected that low-elevation ice generates low pressure over eastern North America and southern Europe in winter, while increasing cloud cover and cooling the land in summer. Elevation of the ice sheets cools the land in winter, further intensifies storms off northeastern North America, induces subsidence warming downstream of the European ice sheets in summer, and increases the transient and stationary eddy energy through increased baroclinicity.

  3. Effects of the exxon valdez oil spill on fork-tailed storm-petrels breeding in the Barren Islands, Alaska. Bird study number 7. Exxon Valdez oil spill state/federal natural resource damage assessment final report

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimoto, M.; Byrd, G.V.

    1993-04-01

    We evaluated fork-tailed storm-petrels (Oceanodroma furcata) at East Amatuli Island, Barren Islands, the largest storm-petrel breeding colony within the trajectory of the oil slick, to determine whether there was evidence of adverse effects, following the 1989 Exxon Valdex oil spill. Although we were unable to measure all possible indicators, we found insufficient evidence to conclude that there were significant adverse impacts to breeding storm-petrels in 1989.

  4. Aerial rapid assessment of hurricane damages to northern Gulf coastal habitats: Chapter 5A in Science and the storms-the USGS response to the hurricanes of 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Michot, Thomas C.; Wells, Christopher J.; Chadwick, Paul C.

    2007-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina made landfall in southeast Louisiana on August 29, 2005, and Hurricane Rita made landfall in southwest Louisiana on September 24, 2005. Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) flew aerial surveys to assess damages to natural resources and to lands owned and managed by the U.S. Department of the Interior and other agencies. Flights were made on eight dates from August 27 through October 4, including one pre-Katrina, three post-Katrina, and four post-Rita surveys. The geographic area surveyed extended from Galveston, Tex., to Gulf Shores, Ala., and from the Gulf of Mexico shoreline inland 5-75 mi (8-121 km). Impacts to barrier island habitats were severe, especially at the Chandeleur Islands, which were reduced in land area by roughly 50 percent. Marsh impacts varied but were greatest in St. Bernard and Cameron Parishes, where much emergent vegetation was scoured or killed. Forested wetlands were impacted heavily, especially in the Pearl River basin and on the cheniers of southwest Louisiana.

  5. The Snow Must Go On: Ground Ice Encasement, Snow Compaction and Absence of Snow Differently Cause Soil Hypoxia, CO2 Accumulation and Tree Seedling Damage in Boreal Forest.

    PubMed

    Martz, Françoise; Vuosku, Jaana; Ovaskainen, Anu; Stark, Sari; Rautio, Pasi

    2016-01-01

    At high latitudes, the climate has warmed at twice the rate of the global average with most changes observed in autumn, winter and spring. Increasing winter temperatures and wide temperature fluctuations are leading to more frequent rain-on-snow events and freeze-thaw cycles causing snow compaction and formation of ice layers in the snowpack, thus creating ice encasement (IE). By decreasing the snowpack insulation capacity and restricting soil-atmosphere gas exchange, modification of the snow properties may lead to colder soil but also to hypoxia and accumulation of trace gases in the subnivean environment. To test the effects of these overwintering conditions changes on plant winter survival and growth, we established a snow manipulation experiment in a coniferous forest in Northern Finland with Norway spruce and Scots pine seedlings. In addition to ambient conditions and prevention of IE, we applied three snow manipulation levels: IE created by artificial rain-on-snow events, snow compaction and complete snow removal. Snow removal led to deeper soil frost during winter, but no clear effect of IE or snow compaction done in early winter was observed on soil temperature. Hypoxia and accumulation of CO2 were highest in the IE plots but, more importantly, the duration of CO2 concentration above 5% was 17 days in IE plots compared to 0 days in ambient plots. IE was the most damaging winter condition for both species, decreasing the proportion of healthy seedlings by 47% for spruce and 76% for pine compared to ambient conditions. Seedlings in all three treatments tended to grow less than seedlings in ambient conditions but only IE had a significant effect on spruce growth. Our results demonstrate a negative impact of winter climate change on boreal forest regeneration and productivity. Changing snow conditions may thus partially mitigate the positive effect of increasing growing season temperatures on boreal forest productivity.

  6. The Snow Must Go On: Ground Ice Encasement, Snow Compaction and Absence of Snow Differently Cause Soil Hypoxia, CO2 Accumulation and Tree Seedling Damage in Boreal Forest

    PubMed Central

    Vuosku, Jaana; Ovaskainen, Anu; Stark, Sari; Rautio, Pasi

    2016-01-01

    At high latitudes, the climate has warmed at twice the rate of the global average with most changes observed in autumn, winter and spring. Increasing winter temperatures and wide temperature fluctuations are leading to more frequent rain-on-snow events and freeze-thaw cycles causing snow compaction and formation of ice layers in the snowpack, thus creating ice encasement (IE). By decreasing the snowpack insulation capacity and restricting soil-atmosphere gas exchange, modification of the snow properties may lead to colder soil but also to hypoxia and accumulation of trace gases in the subnivean environment. To test the effects of these overwintering conditions changes on plant winter survival and growth, we established a snow manipulation experiment in a coniferous forest in Northern Finland with Norway spruce and Scots pine seedlings. In addition to ambient conditions and prevention of IE, we applied three snow manipulation levels: IE created by artificial rain-on-snow events, snow compaction and complete snow removal. Snow removal led to deeper soil frost during winter, but no clear effect of IE or snow compaction done in early winter was observed on soil temperature. Hypoxia and accumulation of CO2 were highest in the IE plots but, more importantly, the duration of CO2 concentration above 5% was 17 days in IE plots compared to 0 days in ambient plots. IE was the most damaging winter condition for both species, decreasing the proportion of healthy seedlings by 47% for spruce and 76% for pine compared to ambient conditions. Seedlings in all three treatments tended to grow less than seedlings in ambient conditions but only IE had a significant effect on spruce growth. Our results demonstrate a negative impact of winter climate change on boreal forest regeneration and productivity. Changing snow conditions may thus partially mitigate the positive effect of increasing growing season temperatures on boreal forest productivity. PMID:27254100

  7. Dust storm off Western Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The impacts of Saharan dust storms reach far beyond Africa. Wind-swept deserts spill airborne dust particles out over the Atlantic Ocean where they can enter trade winds bound for Central and North America and the Caribbean. This Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image shows a dust storm casting an opaque cloud of cloud across the Canary Islands and the Atlantic Ocean west of Africa on June 30, 2002. In general it takes between 5 and 7 days for such an event to cross the Atlantic. The dust has been shown to introduce foreign bacteria and fungi that have damaged reef ecosystems and have even been hypothesized as a cause of increasing occurrences of respiratory complaints in places like Florida, where the amount of Saharan dust reaching the state has been increasing over the past 25 years.

  8. Pacific Northwest Storms Situation Report # 1

    SciTech Connect

    2006-12-15

    Severe wind and snow storms hit the Pacific Northwest region on December 14 – 15, 2006, following severe flooding during the past few days. The severe weather resulted in major power outages through the region. At peak there were 1.8 million customers without power which included BC Hydro in Canada. Currently, there are over 1.5 million outages in the region as a result of the Pacific Northwest Storms. This represents about 42 percent of customers in affected utility service areas in Oregon and Washington. See table below. Because the current wind and snow storms are coming on the heels of extensive flooding in the region, electric utilities are experiencing damage. Wind gusts reached close to 100 mph in some areas of the region. The storm is expected to bring its strong winds and heavy snow into Idaho, Montana and Wyoming Friday and into the weekend. There are currently no reported major impacts to the petroleum and natural gas infrastructure.

  9. The effects of storms and storm-generated currents on sand beaches in Southern Maine, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, H.W.; Kelley, J.T.; Belknap, D.F.; Dickson, S.M.

    2004-01-01

    Storms are one of the most important controls on the cycle of erosion and accretion on beaches. Current meters placed in shoreface locations of Saco Bay and Wells Embayment, ME, recorded bottom currents during the winter months of 2000 and 2001, while teams of volunteers profiled the topography of nearby beaches. Coupling offshore meteorological and beach profile data made it possible to determine the response of nine beaches in southern Maine to various oceanographic and meteorological conditions. The beaches selected for profiling ranged from pristine to completely developed and permitted further examination of the role of seawalls on the response of beaches to storms. Current meters documented three unique types of storms: frontal passages, southwest storms, and northeast storms. In general, the current meter results indicate that frontal passages and southwest storms were responsible for bringing sediment towards the shore, while northeast storms resulted in a net movement of sediment away from the beach. During the 1999-2000 winter, there were a greater percentage of frontal passages and southwest storms, while during the 2000-2001 winter, there were more northeast storms. The sediment that was transported landward during the 1999-2000 winter was reworked into the berm along moderately and highly developed beaches during the next summer. A northeast storm on March 5-6, 2001, resulted in currents in excess of 1 m s-1 and wave heights that reached six meters. The storm persisted over 10 high tides and caused coastal flooding and property damage. Topographic profiles made before and after the storm demonstrate that developed beaches experienced a loss of sediment volume during the storm, while sediment was redistributed along the profile on moderately developed and undeveloped beaches. Two months after the storm, the profiles along the developed beaches had not reached their pre-storm elevation. In comparison, the moderately developed and undeveloped beaches

  10. Tropical Storm Ernesto over Cuba

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Microwave Image

    These infrared, microwave, and visible images were created with data retrieved by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on NASA's Aqua satellite.

    Infrared Image Because infrared radiation does not penetrate through clouds, AIRS infrared images show either the temperature of the cloud tops or the surface of the Earth in cloud-free regions. The lowest temperatures (in purple) are associated with high, cold cloud tops that make up the top of the storm. In cloud-free areas the AIRS instrument will receive the infrared radiation from the surface of the Earth, resulting in the warmest temperatures (orange/red).

    Microwave Image In the AIRS microwave imagery, deep blue areas in storms show where the most precipitation occurs, or where ice crystals are present in the convective cloud tops. Outside of these storm regions, deep blue areas may also occur over the sea surface due to its low radiation emissivity. On the other hand, land appears much warmer due to its high radiation emissivity.

    Microwave radiation from Earth's surface and lower atmosphere penetrates most clouds to a greater or lesser extent depending upon their water vapor, liquid water and ice content. Precipitation, and ice crystals found at the cloud tops where strong convection is taking place, act as barriers to microwave radiation. Because of this barrier effect, the AIRS microwave sensor detects only the radiation arising at or above their location in the atmospheric column. Where these barriers are not present, the microwave sensor detects radiation arising throughout the air column and down to the surface. Liquid surfaces (oceans, lakes and rivers) have 'low emissivity' (the signal isn't as strong) and their radiation brightness temperature is therefore low. Thus the ocean also appears 'low temperature' in the AIRS microwave images and is assigned the color blue. Therefore deep blue areas in storms show where the most

  11. Tropical storm tracks in a global tide and storm surge reanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verlaan, Martin; Winsemius, Hessel; Vatvani, Deepak; Muis, Sanne; Ward, Philip

    2016-04-01

    Flooding due to tides and storm surges causes massive societal impacts and the largest economic damage of all flood hazards. To adequately estimate and counteract upon their risk, sound global scientific information on hazards due to storm surges and tides is required. Recently, a first global tide and storm surge reanalysis (GTSR) has been prepared (Muis et al., 2015) that provides a 36 year time series of sea levels, along with extreme value statistics. The GTSR is established using a physically based model, forced by meteorological reanalysis data. Validation of GTSR showed that tropical storms are underrepresented, firstly, due to the fact that they occur rarely and then only affect a limited area, and secondly, because the spatio-temporal resolution of reanalysis wind and pressure fields is too low to accurately represent the strong spatio-temporal variability of tropical storms. In this contribution, we show the GTSR as well as its recent advancements by contributing a large amount of historical tropical storm tracks into the analysis. This advancement is seen as a first step to accommodate tropical storms in the reanalysis. We estimate how the statistics of the meteorological extremes in pressure and wind are changing, and consequently, how this translates into new statistics of storm surge extremes.

  12. Tropical Storm Track representation in a Global Tide and Storm Surge Reanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winsemius, H.; Verlaan, M.; Vatvani, D.; Muis, S.; Ward, P.

    2015-12-01

    Flooding due to tides and storm surges causes massive societal impacts and the largest economic damage of all flood hazards. To adequately estimate and counteract upon their risk, sound global scientific information on hazards due to storm surges and tides is required. Recently, a first global tide and storm surge reanalysis (GTSR) has been prepared (Muis et al., 2015) that provides a 36 year time series of sea levels, along with extreme value statistics. The GTSR is established using a physically based model, forced by meteorological reanalysis data. Validation of GTSR showed that tropical storms are underrepresented, firstly, due to the fact that they occur rarely and then only affect a limited area, and secondly, because the spatio-temporal resolution of reanalysis wind and pressure fields is too low to accurately represent the strong spatio-temporal variability of tropical storms. In this contribution, we are improving GTSR by contributing a large amount of historical tropical storm tracks into the analysis as a first step to accommodate tropical storms in the reanalysis. We estimate how the statistics of the meteorological extremes in pressure and wind are changing, and consequently, how this translates into new statistics of storm surge extremes.

  13. Characterizing Extreme Ionospheric Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, L.; Komjathy, A.; Altshuler, E.

    2011-12-01

    Ionospheric storms consist of disturbances of the upper atmosphere that generate regions of enhanced electron density typically lasting several hours. Depending upon the storm magnitude, gradients in electron density can sometimes become large and highly localized. The existence of such localized, dense irregularities is a major source of positioning error for users of the Global Positioning System (GPS). Consequently, satellite-based augmentation systems have been implemented to improve the accuracy and to ensure the integrity of user position estimates derived from GPS measurements. Large-scale irregularities generally do not pose a serious threat to estimate integrity as they can be readily detected by such systems. Of greater concern, however, are highly localized irregularities that interfere with the propagation of a signal detected by a user measurement but are poorly sampled by the receivers in the system network. The most challenging conditions have been found to arise following disturbances of large magnitude that occur only rarely over the course of a solar cycle. These extremely disturbed conditions exhibit behavior distinct from moderately disturbed conditions and, hence, have been designated "extreme storms". In this paper we examine and compare the behavior of the extreme ionospheric storms of solar cycle 23 (or, more precisely, extreme storms occurring between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2008), as represented in maps of vertical total electron content. To identify these storms, we present a robust means of quantifying the regional magnitude of an ionospheric storm. Ionospheric storms are observed frequently to occur in conjunction with magnetic storms, i.e., periods of geophysical activity as measured by magnetometers. While various geomagnetic indices, such as the disturbance storm time (Dst) and the planetary Kp index, have long been used to rank the magnitudes of distinct magnetic storms, no comparable, generally recognized index exists for

  14. Coastal Storm Model.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-04-30

    MILL IBARS I ~ 1022.8. 0 SEA I LND 0’ 100 A-STORM TRACK 200 :km. NORTH; B-STORM TRACK 0_____. T% WO - X00 SHORE SITEI C-STORM TRACK 300 SOU 00 .) -400 0...SCOTIA CANADA PRUF. C. . A. M._KING D PARTMENT IF GFOGRAPHY JR. H. J. SCHOEMAKER _1,NIVELSITY UF NOTT INGHAM . ... W ATFRLOUPKUNDIG LARIORATORIUM TE

  15. Arctic Summer Ice Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, Benjamin

    1999-01-01

    The primary objective of this study is to estimate the flux of heat and freshwater resulting from sea ice melt in the polar seas. The approach taken is to examine the decay of sea ice in the summer months primarily through the use of spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery. The improved understanding of the dynamics of the melt process can be usefully combined with ice thermodynamic and upper ocean models to form more complete models of ice melt. Models indicate that more heat is absorbed in the upper ocean when the ice cover is composed of smaller rather than larger floes and when there is more open water. Over the course of the summer, floes disintegrate by physical forcing and heating, melting into smaller and smaller sizes. By measuring the change in distribution of floes together with open water over a summer period, we can make estimates of the amount of heating by region and time. In a climatic sense, these studies are intended to improve the understanding of the Arctic heat budget which can then be eventually incorporated into improved global climate models. This work has two focus areas. The first is examining the detailed effect of storms on floe size and open water. A strong Arctic low pressure storm has been shown to loosen up the pack ice, increase the open water concentration well into the pack ice, and change the distribution of floes toward fewer and smaller floes. This suggests episodic melting and the increased importance of horizontal (lateral) melt during storms. The second focus area is related to an extensive ship-based experiment that recently took place in the Arctic called Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA). An icebreaker was placed purposely into the older pack ice north of Alaska in September 1997. The ship served as the base for experimenters who deployed extensive instrumentation to measure the atmosphere, ocean, and ice during a one-year period. My experiment will be to derive similar measurements (floe size, open

  16. De-Icing Salts and the Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts Audubon Society, Lincoln.

    Reported is an examination of the use and effects of chlorides as de-icing products for removal of snow and ice from roads immediately following storms. Increasing evidence of detrimental side effects led to a closer look and more careful evaluation of the overall significance of the so-called "bare pavement maintenance." The side…

  17. Ice-Nucleating Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obata, Hitoshi

    Since the discovery of ice-nucleating bacteria in 1974 by Maki et al., a large number of studies on the biological characteristics, ice-nucleating substance, ice nucleation gene and frost damage etc. of the bacteria have been carried out. Ice-nucleating bacteria can cause the freezing of water at relatively warm temperature (-2.3°C). Tween 20 was good substrates for ice-nucleating activity of Pseudomonas fluorescens KUIN-1. Major fatty acids of Isolate (Pseudomonas fluorescens) W-11 grown at 30°C were palmitic, cis-9-hexadecenoic and cis-11-octadecenoic which amounted to 90% of the total fatty acids. Sequence analysis shows that an ice nucleation gene from Pseudomonas fluorescens is related to the gene of Pseudomonas syringae.

  18. Winter 1994 Weather and Ice Conditions for the Laurentian Great Lakes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assel, Raymond A.; Janowiak, John E.; Young, Sharolyn; Boyce, Daron

    1996-01-01

    The Laurentian Great Lakes developed their most extensive ice cover in over a decade during winter 1994 [December-February 1993/94 (DJF 94)]. Extensive midlake ice formation started the second half of January, about 2 weeks earlier than normal. Seasonal maximal ice extent occurred in early February, again about 2 weeks earlier than normal. Winter 1994 maximum (normal) ice coverages on the Great Lakes are Lake Superior 96% (75%), Lake Michigan 78% (45%), Lake Huron 95% (68%), Lake Erie 97% (90%), and Lake Ontario 67% (24%). Relative to the prior 31 winters (1963-93), the extent of seasonal maximal ice cover for winter 1994 for the Great Lakes taken as a unit is exceeded by only one other winter (1979); however, other winters for individual Great Lakes had similar maximal ice covers.Anomalously strong anticyclonic circulation over the central North Pacific (extending to the North Pole) and an abnormally strong polar vortex centered over northern Hudson Bay combined to produce a circulation pattern that brought frequent air masses of Arctic and polar origin to the eastern third of North America. New records were set for minimum temperatures on 19 January 1994 at many locations in the Great Lakes region. A winter severity index consisting of the average November-February air temperatures averaged over four sites on the perimeter of the Great Lakes (Duluth, Minnesota; Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan; Detroit, Michigan; and Buffalo, New York) indicates that winter 1994 was the 21st coldest since 1779. The unseasonably cold air temperatures produced much-above-normal ice cover over the Great Lakes and created problems for lake shipping. Numerous fatalities and injuries were attributed to the winter weather, which included several ice and snow storms. The much-below-normal air temperatures resulted in enhanced lake-effect snowfall along downwind lake shores, particularly during early to midwinter, prior to extensive ice formation in deeper lake areas. The low air temperatures

  19. Dust storms: recent developments.

    PubMed

    Goudie, Andrew S

    2009-01-01

    Dust storms have a number of impacts upon the environment including radiative forcing, and biogeochemical cycling. They transport material over many thousands of kilometres. They also have a range of impacts on humans, not least on human health. In recent years the identification of source areas for dust storms has been an important area or research, with the Sahara (especially Bodélé) and western China being recognised as the strongest sources globally. Another major development has been the recognition of the degree to which dust storm activity has varied at a range of time scales, millennial, century, decadal, annual and seasonal.

  20. Hazards of geomagnetic storms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herzog, D.C.

    1992-01-01

    Geomagnetic storms are large and sometimes rapid fluctuations in the Earth's magnetic field that are related to disturbances on the Sun's surface. Although it is not widely recognized, these transient magnetic disturbances can be a significant hazard to people and property. Many of us know that the intensity of the auroral lights increases during magnetic storms, but few people realize that these storms can also cause massive power outages, interrupt radio communications and satellite operations, increase corrosion in oil and gas pipelines, and lead to spuriously high rejection rates in the manufacture of sensitive electronic equipment. 

  1. Flood Losses Associated with Winter Storms in the U.S. Northeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, M.; Shimkus, C.

    2015-12-01

    Winter storms pose a number of hazards to coastal communities in the U.S. Northeast including heavy rain, snow, strong wind, cold temperatures, and flooding. These hazards can cause millions in property damages from one storm alone. This study addresses the impacts of winter storms from 2001 - 2012 on coastal counties in the U.S. Northeast and underscores the significant economic consequences extreme winter storms have on property. The analysis on the types of hazards (floods, strong wind, snow, etc.) and associated damage from the National Climatic Data Center Storm Events Database indicates that floods were responsible for the highest damages. This finding suggests that winter storm vulnerability could grow in the future as precipitation intensity increases and sea level rise exacerbate flood losses. Flood loss maps are constructed based on damage amount, which can be compared to the flood exposure maps constructed by the NOAA Office of Coastal Management. Interesting agreements and discrepancies exist between the two methods, which warrant further examination. Furthermore, flood losses often came from storms characterized as heavy precipitation storms and strong surge storms, and sometimes both, illustrating the compounding effect of flood risks in the region. While New Jersey counties experienced the most damage per unit area, there is no discernable connection between population density and damage amount, which suggests that societal impacts may rely less on population characteristics and more on infrastructure types and property values, which vary throughout the region.

  2. Ice, Ice, Baby!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, C.

    2008-12-01

    The Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS) has developed an outreach program based on hands-on activities called "Ice, Ice, Baby". These lessons are designed to teach the science principles of displacement, forces of motion, density, and states of matter. These properties are easily taught through the interesting topics of glaciers, icebergs, and sea level rise in K-8 classrooms. The activities are fun, engaging, and simple enough to be used at science fairs and family science nights. Students who have participated in "Ice, Ice, Baby" have successfully taught these to adults and students at informal events. The lessons are based on education standards which are available on our website www.cresis.ku.edu. This presentation will provide information on the activities, survey results from teachers who have used the material, and other suggested material that can be used before and after the activities.

  3. 2001 Leonid Meteoroid Storm

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    and discuss their possible consequences and mitigation strategies. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Meteors , Leonids, Meteoroids, Spacecraft, Meteor showers , Impact...release; distribution unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT We present the latest predictions about the November 2001 Leonid Meteor storms

  4. Powerful Midwest Storm System

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of imagery from NOAA’s GOES-13 satellite shows themovement of storm systems in the south central United States on May 20,2013. Warm, moist gulf air flowing across Texas, Oklahoma...

  5. Tropical Storm Faxai

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA/JAXA's TRMM Satellite provided data of developing Tropical Storm Faxai to make this 3-D image that showed some towering thunderstorms in the area were reaching altitudes of up to 15.5km/~9.6 m...

  6. Tropical Storm Don

    NASA Video Gallery

    GOES-13 data was compiled into an animation by the NASA GOES Project at NASA Goddard that shows the development of Tropical Storm Don in the southern Gulf of Mexico, west of Cuba. The animation run...

  7. Tropical Storm Dolly Develops

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation from NOAA's GOES-East satellite from Aug. 31-Sept. 2 shows the movement of a low pressure area from the western Caribbean Sea over the Yucatan Peninsula as it becomes Tropical Storm ...

  8. Storm morphology and electrification from CHUVA-GLM Vale do Paraiba field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, R. I.; Morales, C.; Lima, W. F.; Biscaro, T. S.; Mello, I. B.

    2013-12-01

    CHUVA [Cloud processes of tHe main precipitation systems in Brazil: A contribUtion to cloud resolVing modeling and to the GPM (GlobAl Precipitation Measurement)] Project is a series of itinerant field campaigns with the objective of characterizing the main precipitating systems observed in Brazil as a support for Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission. The fourth field campaign was conducted at Vale do Paraiba in São Paulo, Brazil, from 1 November 2011 to 31 March 2012. For this specific field experiment, several lightning location systems (LLS) were deployed as part of GOES-R Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) and MTG Lightning Imager (LI) pre-launch activities, resulting in a joint effort between INPE, USP, NOAA, NASA, EUMETSAT and several vendors of operational LLS for network intercomparison and GLM and LI proxy data generation. Among these networks, 4 of them detect total (intra-cloud and cloud-to-ground) lightning, including a Lightning Mapping Array (LMA), allowing a detailed description of the cloud electrification. To depict precipitating weather systems, CHUVA uses a mobile XPOL Doppler Radar, micro-rain radars, disdrometers, rain gauges, microwave radiometer, Lidar, and a GPS network for water vapor retrievals. Also, Vale do Paraíba and São Paulo are covered by 3 operational S-band radars. The precipitation data collected by these radars and the lightning detected by the LLS were grouped in a structure of storm features built by tracking the precipitating systems and its associated lightning. This storm feature database makes it easier to group similar convective systems and compare them in terms of area, lifetime, rainfall and convection intensity, lightning activity, and more. During this field experiment a large variety of cloud systems were sampled: cold fronts, squall lines, the South Atlantic Convergence Zone (SACZ) and local convective systems. Microphysical characteristics (such as hydrometeor identification and ice/water mass) of

  9. Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnard, Patrick; Erikson, Li; Foxgrover, Amy; Herdman, Liv; Limber, Patrick W; O'Neill, Andrea; Vitousek, Sean

    2015-01-01

    The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) makes detailed predictions (meter-scale) over large geographic scales (100s of kilometers) of storm-induced coastal flooding and erosion for both current and future SLR scenarios, as well as long-term shoreline change and cliff retreat. CoSMoS v3.0 for Southern California shows projections for future climate scenarios (sea-level rise and storms) to provide emergency responders and coastal planners with critical storm-hazards information that can be used to increase public safety, mitigate physical damages, and more effectively manage and allocate resources within complex coastal settings. Phase I data for Southern California includes 100-year storm flood hazard information for the coast from the Mexican Border to Pt. Conception. Flood projection data in the initial November release is limited to coastal areas within Los Angeles, San Diego, and Orange counties.

  10. Storm Surge Simulation and Ensemble Forecast for Hurricane Irene (2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, N.; Emanuel, K.

    2012-12-01

    Hurricane Irene, raking the U.S. East Coast during the period of 26-30 August 2011, caused widespread damage estimated at $15.8 billion and was responsible for 49 direct deaths (Avila and Cangialosi, 2011). Although the most severe impact in the northeastern U.S. was catastrophic inland flooding, with its unusually large size, Irene also generated high waves and storm surges and caused moderate to major coastal flooding. The most severe surge damage occurred between Oregon Inlet and Cape Hatteras in North Carolina (NC). Significant storm surge damage also occurred along southern Chesapeake Bay, and moderate and high surges were observed along the coast from New Jersey (NJ) northward. A storm surge of 0.9-1.8 m caused hundreds of millions of dollars in property damage in New York City (NYC) and Long Island, despite the fact that the storm made landfall to the west of NYC with peak winds of no more than tropical storm strength. Making three U.S. landfalls (in NC, NJ, and NY), Hurricane Irene provides a unique case for studying storm surge along the eastern U.S. coastline. We apply the hydrodynamic model ADCIRC (Luettich et al. 1992) to conduct surge simulations for Pamlico Sound, Chesapeake Bay, and NYC, using best track data and parametric wind and pressure models. The results agree well with tidal-gauge observations. Then we explore a new methodology for storm surge ensemble forecasting and apply it to Irene. This method applies a statistical/deterministic hurricane model (Emanuel et al. 2006) to generate large numbers of storm ensembles under the storm environment described by the 51 ECMWF ensemble members. The associated surge ensembles are then generated with the ADCIRC model. The numerical simulation is computationally efficient, making the method applicable to real-time storm surge ensemble forecasting. We report the results for NYC in this presentation. The ADCIRC simulation using the best track data generates a storm surge of 1.3 m and a storm tide of 2.1 m

  11. Severe Local Storms Cultural Heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladich, I.; Gallai, I.; Giaiotti, D. B.; Morgan, G. M.; Stel, F.

    2009-09-01

    Local storms always had a deep impact on people communities, mainly because of the severe damage caused, because of their unpredictability and, up to a few years ago, even because of the lack of knowledge and awareness on their physical origin. Because of this large impact on real life and on imagination, people needed and wanted to describe and report the occurrence of these events, giving them suited names. Often, these nouns are related to the myth developed to explain the cause of the events. In this work, a short presentation and description of the popular nouns used to describe severe local storm events in different areas of the World is given. Countries taken into account span from Italy, moving toward Africa and reaching a few communities of Native Americans. The etymology of the names gives interesting information, useful even under the anthropological point of view, on the Culture and Believes of the peoples who adopted them. This research work is the result of an underground activity carried out in the last ten years by the authors, during their contacts with students and researchers coming from different Countries and mainly met at the International Center for Theoretical Physics in Trieste.

  12. Reducing uncertainty - responses for electricity utilities to severe solar storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaunt, Charles Trevor

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, electricity utilities in mid- and low-latitude regions believed that solar storms had no (or only insignificant) effect on their power systems. Then it was noticed that the onset of damage in several large transformers, leading to their failure, correlated very closely with the Halloween storm of 2003. Since then engineers have started to appreciate that a very severe storm could have serious consequences outside the high-latitude regions. There are many uncertainties in predicting the effects of solar storms on electrical systems. The severity and time of arrival of a storm are difficult to model; so are the geomagnetically induced currents (GICs) expected to flow in the power networks. Published information about the responses of different types of transformers to GICs is contradictory. Measurements of the abnormal power flows in networks during solar storms generally do not take into account the effects of the current distortion and unbalance, potentially giving misleading signals to the operators. The normal requirement for optimum system management, while allowing for the possibility of faults caused by lightning, birds and other causes, limits the capacity of system operators to respond to the threats of GICs, which are not assessed easily by the N - 1 reliability criterion. A utility's response to the threat of damage by GICs depends on the expected frequency and magnitude of solar storms. Approaches to formulating a response are located in a system model incorporating space physics, network analysis, transformer engineering, network reliability and decision support and the benefits are identified. Approaches adopted in high-latitude regions might not be appropriate where fewer storms are expected to reach damaging levels. The risks of an extreme storm cannot be ignored, and understanding the response mechanisms suitable for low-latitude regions has the capacity to inform and reduce the uncertainty for power systems planners and operators

  13. Facilitating Adaptation to Changing Storm Surge Patterns in Western Alaska.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, K. A.; Holman, A.; Reynolds, J.

    2014-12-01

    Coastal regions of North America are already experiencing the effects of climate change and the consequences of new storm patterns and sea level rise. These climate change effects are even more pronounced in western Alaska where the loss of sea ice in early winter and spring are exposing the coast to powerful winter storms that are visibly altering the landscape, putting coastal communities at risk, and are likely impacting important coastal wildlife habitat in ways we don't yet understand. The Western Alaska Landscape Conservation Cooperative has funded a suite of projects to improve the information available to assist managers and communities to adapt changes in coastal storms and their impacts. Projects range from modeling tide, wave and storm surge patters, to ShoreZone and NHD mapping, to bathymetry mapping, community vulnerability assessments and risks to important wildlife habitat. This group of diverse projects has helped stimulate momentum among partners which will lead to better tools for communities to respond to dangerous storms. For example, the State of Alaska and NOAA are working together to compile a series of community-scale maps that utilize best-available datasets to streamline communication about forecasted storm surges, local elevations and potentially impacted infrastructure during storm events that may lead to coastal flooding.

  14. European Winter Storms in the ECMWF Ensemble Prediction System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osinski, Robert; Lorenz, Philip; Kruschke, Tim; Leckebusch, Gregor C.; Ulbrich, Uwe

    2013-04-01

    As European winter storms can provoke very large damages, estimations of the probability of occurrence are of economical and sociological importance. The estimations of return periods for the strongest events underlie large uncertainties, which arise from the limited available data, available from historical meteorological records or reanalysis data. A gain of information can be obtained from ensemble forecasts. In this work the Ensemble Prediction System (EPS) from the European Center of Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) is analyzed for its suitability to improve the estimates of return periods of very rare and severe events. The EPS dataset contains up to 51 ensemble members, starting twice a day and each integrated over 10 days. The storm systems are identified and characterized using a wind field tracking algorithm developed by Leckebusch et al. (2008). Exceedances of the local 98th percentile of 10m wind speed are used, and calculating the cube of these exceedances, accumulated spatially and temporally, an objective storm severity measure (SSI) is determined. Taking the distribution of values into account, the measure of storm severity relates to storm damages. Using ERA-Interim as a reference dataset, it is shown that the general distributions of storm properties in the EPS are realistic. The EPS representations of a single ERA-Interim storm show a wide range of variability in terms of size, duration and severity. Hence better estimations of return periods of winter storms are possible using the EPS, as well as studies of general aspects of storms, like the correlation between intensification and storm duration. Nevertheless for an estimation of return periods, it must be taken into account, that the simulated events in the EPS are not independent of each other.

  15. Total Lightning and Radar Storm Characteristics Associated with Severe Storms in Central Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Steven J; Raghavan, R.; Buechler, Dennis; Hodanish, S.; Sharp, D.; Williams, E.; Boldi, B.; Matlin, A.; Weber, M.

    1998-01-01

    This paper examines the three dimensional characteristics of lightning flashes and severe storms observed in Central Florida during 1997-1998. The lightning time history of severe and tornadic storms were captured during the on-going ground validation campaign supporting the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) experiment on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). The ground validation campaign is a collaborative experiment that began in 1997 and involves scientists at the Global Hydrology and Climate Center, MIT/Lincoln Laboratories, and the NWS Forecast Office at Melbourne, FL. Lightning signatures that may provide potential early warning of severe storms are being evaluated by the forecasters at the NWS/MLB office. Severe storms with extreme flash rates sometimes exceeding 300 per minute and accompanying rapid increases in flash rate prior to the onset of the severe weather (hall, damaging winds, tornadoes) have been reported by Hodanish et al. and Williams et al. (1998-this conference). We examine the co-evolving changes in storm structure (mass, echo top, shear, latent heat release) and kinematics associated with these extreme and rapid flash rate changes over time. The flash frequency and density are compared with the three dimensional radar reflectivity structure of the storm to help interpret the possible mechanisms producing the extreme and rapidly increasing flash rates. For two tornadic storms examined thus far, we find the burst of lightning is associated with the development of upper level rotation in the storm. In one case, the lightning burst follows the formation of a bounded weak echo region (BWER). The flash rates diminish with time as the rotation develops to the ground in conjunction with the decent of the reflectivity core. Our initial findings suggest the dramatic increase of flash rates is associated with a sudden and dramatic increase in storm updraft intensity which we hypothesize is stretching vertical vorticity as well as enhancing the

  16. Assessment of Storm Surge Forecasting Methods Used During Typhoon Haiyan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahar Francisco Lagmay, Alfredo; Malano, Vicente

    2014-05-01

    On 8 November 2013, Super Typhoon Haiyan made landfall in the central part of the Philippines. Considered one of the most powerful typhoons ever to make landfall in recorded history with 315 kph one-minute maximum sustained winds according to the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC), Haiyan brought widespread devastation in its path. Strong winds, heavy rainfall, and storm surges caused massive loss of lives and extensive damage to property. Storm surges were primarily responsible for the 6,201 dead, 1,785 missing and 28,626 injured in Haiyan's aftermath. This study documents the Haiyan storm surge simulations which were used as basis for the warnings provided to the public. The storm tide -- storm surge added to astronomical tide levels -- forecasts were made using the Japan Meteorological Agency's (JMA) Storm Surge Model and WXTide software. Storm surge maps for the entire Philippines and time series plots for observation points in areas along the path of the typhoon were produced. Storm tide heights between one and five meters were also predicted for 68 coastal areas two days prior to Haiyan's landfall. A storm surge inundation map showing the extent of coastal flooding for Tacloban City, Leyte, one of the most severely affected areas by the typhoon, was generated using FLO-2D software. This was validated using field data such as high water marks, eyewitness accounts from locals, and information from media coverage. This map can be used as reference to determine danger zones and safe evacuation sites during similar events. Typhoon Haiyan generated one of the biggest and most devastating storm surge events in several decades, exacting a high death toll despite its early prediction. Lessons learned from this calamity and information contained in this work may serve as useful reference to mitigate the heavy impact of future storm surge events in the Philippines and elsewhere.

  17. Overview of the ARkStorm scenario

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Porter, Keith; Wein, Anne; Alpers, Charles; Baez, Allan; Barnard, Patrick L.; Carter, James; Corsi, Alessandra; Costner, James; Cox, Dale; Das, Tapash; Dettinger, Mike; Done, James; Eadie, Charles; Eymann, Marcia; Ferris, Justin; Gunturi, Prasad; Hughes, Mimi; Jarrett, Robert; Johnson, Laurie; Le-Griffin, Hanh Dam; Mitchell, David; Morman, Suzette; Neiman, Paul; Olsen, Anna; Perry, Suzanne; Plumlee, Geoffrey; Ralph, Martin; Reynolds, David; Rose, Adam; Schaefer, Kathleen; Serakos, Julie; Siembieda, William; Stock, Jonathan; Strong, David; Wing, Ian Sue; Tang, Alex; Thomas, Pete; Topping, Ken; Wills, Chris; Jones, Lucile

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, Multi Hazards Demonstration Project (MHDP) uses hazards science to improve resiliency of communities to natural disasters including earthquakes, tsunamis, wildfires, landslides, floods and coastal erosion. The project engages emergency planners, businesses, universities, government agencies, and others in preparing for major natural disasters. The project also helps to set research goals and provides decision-making information for loss reduction and improved resiliency. The first public product of the MHDP was the ShakeOut Earthquake Scenario published in May 2008. This detailed depiction of a hypothetical magnitude 7.8 earthquake on the San Andreas Fault in southern California served as the centerpiece of the largest earthquake drill in United States history, involving over 5,000 emergency responders and the participation of over 5.5 million citizens. This document summarizes the next major public project for MHDP, a winter storm scenario called ARkStorm (for Atmospheric River 1,000). Experts have designed a large, scientifically realistic meteorological event followed by an examination of the secondary hazards (for example, landslides and flooding), physical damages to the built environment, and social and economic consequences. The hypothetical storm depicted here would strike the U.S. West Coast and be similar to the intense California winter storms of 1861 and 1862 that left the central valley of California impassible. The storm is estimated to produce precipitation that in many places exceeds levels only experienced on average once every 500 to 1,000 years. Extensive flooding results. In many cases flooding overwhelms the state's flood-protection system, which is typically designed to resist 100- to 200-year runoffs. The Central Valley experiences hypothetical flooding 300 miles long and 20 or more miles wide. Serious flooding also occurs in Orange County, Los Angeles County, San Diego, the San Francisco Bay area, and other

  18. Great magnetic storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Lee, Yen T.; Gonzalez, Walter D.; Tang, Frances

    1992-01-01

    The five largest magnetic storms that occurred between 1971 to 1986 are studied to determine their solar and interplanetary causes. All of the events are found to be associated with high speed solar wind streams led by collisionless shocks. The high speed streams are clearly related to identifiable solar flares. It is found that: (1) it is the extreme values of the southward interplanetary magnetic fields rather than solar wind speeds that are the primary causes of great magnetic storms, (2) shocked and draped sheath fields preceding the driver gas (magnetic cloud) are at least as effective in causing the onset of great magnetic storms (3 of 5 events) as the strong fields within the driver gas itself, and (3) precursor southward fields ahead of the high speed streams allow the shock compression mechanism (item 2) to be particularly geoeffective.

  19. Storms and Moons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) took this 2-millisecond exposure of Jupiter at 04:41:04 UTC on January 24, 2007. The spacecraft was 57 million kilometers (35.3 million miles) from Jupiter, closing in on the giant planet at 41,500 miles (66,790 kilometers) per hour. At right are the moons Io (bottom) and Ganymede; Ganymede's shadow creeps toward the top of Jupiter's northern hemisphere.

    Two of Jupiter's largest storms are visible; the Great Red Spot on the western (left) limb of the planet, trailing the Little Red Spot on the eastern limb, at slightly lower latitude. The Great Red Spot is a 300-year old storm more than twice the size of Earth. The Little Red Spot, which formed over the past decade from the merging of three smaller storms, is about half the size of its older and 'greater' counterpart.

  20. Storm Warning Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A Huntsville meteorologist of Baron Services, Inc. has formed a commercial weather advisory service. Weather information is based on data from Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) collected from antennas in Alabama and Tennessee. Bob Baron refines and enhances MSFC's real time display software. Computer data is changed to audio data for radio transmission, received by clients through an antenna and decoded by computer for display. Using his service, clients can monitor the approach of significant storms and schedule operations accordingly. Utilities and emergency management officials are able to plot a storm's path. A recent agreement with two other companies will promote continued development and marketing.

  1. Meteorology: dusty ice clouds over Alaska.

    PubMed

    Sassen, Kenneth

    2005-03-24

    Particles lofted into the atmosphere by desert dust storms can disperse widely and affect climate directly through aerosol scattering and absorption. They can also affect it indirectly by changing the scattering properties of clouds and, because desert dusts are particularly active ice-forming agents, by affecting the formation and thermodynamic phase of clouds. Here I show that dust storms that occurred in Asia early in 2004 created unusual ice clouds over Alaska at temperatures far warmer than those expected for normal cirrus-cloud formation.

  2. Canadian Atlantic Storms Program: Progress and Plans of the Meteorological Component.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Ronald E.

    1991-03-01

    The Canadian Atlantic Storms Program (CASP) field project was conducted from 15 January to 15 March 1986 over Atlantic Canada in conjunction with the American Genesis of Atlantic Lows Experiment (GALE). The goals of CASP were to begin the process of understanding and eventually better predicting the mesoscale structure of East Coast storms as well as the storms themselves. Conceptual models of the storms have been formulated, the nature of cyclogenesis and the structure of frontal surfaces have been investigated, and precipitation regions and precipitation type transitions have been studied. Numerical weather simulations have been used to better understand critical parameters affecting storm behavior and improvements in instrumentation have been made. Future research activities are needed to better understand the interaction of the storms with surface features such as coastlines and sea ice.

  3. Principles of major geomagnetic storms forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagnetko, Alexander; Applbaum, David; Dorman, Lev; Pustil'Nik, Lev; Sternlieb, Abraham; Zukerman, Igor

    According to NOAA Space Weather Scales, geomagnetic storms of scales G5 (3-hour index of geomagnetic activity Kp=9), G4 (Kp=8) and G3 (Kp=7) are dangerous for people technology and health (influence on power systems, on spacecraft operations, on HF radio-communications and others). To prevent these serious damages will be very important to forecast dangerous geomagnetic storms. In many papers it was shown that in principle for this forecasting can be used data on CR intensity and CR anisotropy changing before SC of major geomagnetic storms accompanied by sufficient Forbush-decreases (e.g., Dorman et al., 1995, 1999). In this paper we consider all types of observed precursor effects in CR what can be used for forecasting of great geomagnetic storms and possible mechanisms of these precursor effects origin. REFERENCES: Dorman L.I., et al. "Cosmic-ray forecasting features for big Forbush-decreases". Nuclear Physics B, 49A, 136-144 (1995). L.I.Dorman, et al, "Cosmic ray Forbush-decrease as indicators of space dangerous phenomenon and possible use of cosmic ray data for their pre-diction", Proc. of 26-th Intern. Cosmic Ray Conference, Salt Lake City, 6, 476-479 (1999).

  4. Tropical Storm Lee to Newfoundland

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video shows Tropical Storm Lee as it made landfall in Louisiana and Mississippi on September 4, 2011. This storm produced flooding and tornadoes to the southern states all the way to flooding ...

  5. Wind damage and salinity effects of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita on coastal baldcypress forests of Louisiana: Chapter 6F in Science and the storms-the USGS response to the hurricanes of 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doyle, Thomas W.; Conner, William H.; Day, Richard H.; Krauss, Ken W.; Swarzenski, Christopher M.

    2007-01-01

    The frequency of hurricane landfall in a given coastal stretch may play a more important role in the ecology of coastal forests than previously thought because of direct and indirect impacts of fallen trees and the introduction of salt water that lingers long after the storm passes. Findings show that surge events can inundate interior freshwater forests many miles from the coast and elevate soil salinities twofold to threefold. These elevated salinities may contribute to delayed mortality of certain tree species and set the stage for eventual forest decline and dieback.

  6. California's Perfect Storm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacon, David

    2010-01-01

    The United States today faces an economic crisis worse than any since the Great Depression of the 1930s. Nowhere is it sharper than in the nation's schools. Last year, California saw a perfect storm of protest in virtually every part of its education system. K-12 teachers built coalitions with parents and students to fight for their jobs and their…

  7. Tropical Storm Katrina

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... Because air currents are influenced by the Coriolis force (caused by the rotation of the Earth), Northern Hemisphere hurricanes are ... nadir (vertical-viewing) camera. Both the counter-clockwise motion for the lower-level storm clouds and the clockwise motion for the upper ...

  8. STORM INLET FILTRATION DEVICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Five field tests were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the Storm and Groundwater Enhancement Systems (SAGES) device for removing contaminants from stormwater. The SAGES device is a three-stage filtering system that could be used as a best management practices (BMP) retr...

  9. Recovery from major storms

    SciTech Connect

    Holeman, J.S.

    1980-01-01

    Public Service Company of Oklahoma's transmission and distribution system is in tornado alley, and it seems the number of tornados hitting some part of the system is increasing each year. In the past 30 years, Tulsa his been hit 7 times, and experienced 3 very wide and destructive tornado storm systems between 1971 and 1975.

  10. Anticipating environmental and environmental-health implications of extreme storms: ARkStorm scenario

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Alpers, Charles N.; Morman, Suzette A.; San Juan, Carma A.

    2016-01-01

    The ARkStorm Scenario predicts that a prolonged winter storm event across California would cause extreme precipitation, flooding, winds, physical damages, and economic impacts. This study uses a literature review and geographic information system-based analysis of national and state databases to infer how and where ARkStorm could cause environmental damages, release contamination from diverse natural and anthropogenic sources, affect ecosystem and human health, and cause economic impacts from environmental-remediation, liability, and health-care costs. Examples of plausible ARkStorm environmental and health concerns include complex mixtures of contaminants such as petroleum, mercury, asbestos, persistent organic pollutants, molds, and pathogens; adverse physical and contamination impacts on riverine and coastal marine ecosystems; and increased incidences of mold-related health concerns, some vector-borne diseases, and valley fever. Coastal cities, the San Francisco Bay area, the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, parts of the Central Valley, and some mountainous areas would likely be most affected. This type of screening analysis, coupled with follow-up local assessments, can help stakeholders in California and disaster-prone areas elsewhere better plan for, mitigate, and respond to future environmental disasters.

  11. Flood early warning along the East Coast of Scotland and the Storm of December 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cranston, Michael; Hu, Keming

    2013-04-01

    Flood warning is at the heart of improved approaches to flood risk management in Scotland. The Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA) is committed to reducing the impact of coastal flooding through the provision of reliable and timely flood warnings. They have specifically set out a programme of enhancing coastal flood forecasting through modelling and improved understanding of coastal flooding processes and improved approaches to wind and wave forecasting in coastal and tidal waters. In 2011, SEPA commissioned a project to develop a flood forecasting and warning system for the Firths of Forth and Tay along Scotland's North East coast. The new approach to flood forecasting has just been implemented into the Flood Early Warning System (FEWS) (Cranston and Tavendale, 2012) to contribute to the real-time flood forecasting and warning service from November 2012. The new system enables the prediction of coastal and tidal flooding and allows SEPA to warn people about potential flooding, using the latest advances in coastal modelling. The approach to the forecasting system includes: the transformation of tidal surge forecasts from Leith to 28 flood warning sites along the coast and inside the Firths of Forth and Tay; the transformation of offshore wave forecasts to inshore locations including the Firths of Forth and Tay; and the transformation of inshore wave forecasts to mean wave overtopping forecasts at six key communities at risk. In December 2012, some communities along the east coast of Scotland experienced their most severe storm damage since the Great 1953 Storm. This paper will discuss how the flood forecasting system was developed and how the system was utilised in real time during the recent storm. References Cranston, M. D. and Tavendale, A. C. W. (2012) Advances in operational flood forecasting in Scotland. Proceedings of the ICE - Water Management, 165, 2, 79-87.

  12. The Value of Wetlands in Protecting Southeast Louisiana from Hurricane Storm Surges

    PubMed Central

    Barbier, Edward B.; Georgiou, Ioannis Y.; Enchelmeyer, Brian; Reed, Denise J.

    2013-01-01

    The Indian Ocean tsunami in 2004 and Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005 have spurred global interest in the role of coastal wetlands and vegetation in reducing storm surge and flood damages. Evidence that coastal wetlands reduce storm surge and attenuate waves is often cited in support of restoring Gulf Coast wetlands to protect coastal communities and property from hurricane damage. Yet interdisciplinary studies combining hydrodynamic and economic analysis to explore this relationship for temperate marshes in the Gulf are lacking. By combining hydrodynamic analysis of simulated hurricane storm surges and economic valuation of expected property damages, we show that the presence of coastal marshes and their vegetation has a demonstrable effect on reducing storm surge levels, thus generating significant values in terms of protecting property in southeast Louisiana. Simulations for four storms along a sea to land transect show that surge levels decline with wetland continuity and vegetation roughness. Regressions confirm that wetland continuity and vegetation along the transect are effective in reducing storm surge levels. A 0.1 increase in wetland continuity per meter reduces property damages for the average affected area analyzed in southeast Louisiana, which includes New Orleans, by $99-$133, and a 0.001 increase in vegetation roughness decreases damages by $24-$43. These reduced damages are equivalent to saving 3 to 5 and 1 to 2 properties per storm for the average area, respectively. PMID:23536815

  13. The value of wetlands in protecting southeast louisiana from hurricane storm surges.

    PubMed

    Barbier, Edward B; Georgiou, Ioannis Y; Enchelmeyer, Brian; Reed, Denise J

    2013-01-01

    The Indian Ocean tsunami in 2004 and Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005 have spurred global interest in the role of coastal wetlands and vegetation in reducing storm surge and flood damages. Evidence that coastal wetlands reduce storm surge and attenuate waves is often cited in support of restoring Gulf Coast wetlands to protect coastal communities and property from hurricane damage. Yet interdisciplinary studies combining hydrodynamic and economic analysis to explore this relationship for temperate marshes in the Gulf are lacking. By combining hydrodynamic analysis of simulated hurricane storm surges and economic valuation of expected property damages, we show that the presence of coastal marshes and their vegetation has a demonstrable effect on reducing storm surge levels, thus generating significant values in terms of protecting property in southeast Louisiana. Simulations for four storms along a sea to land transect show that surge levels decline with wetland continuity and vegetation roughness. Regressions confirm that wetland continuity and vegetation along the transect are effective in reducing storm surge levels. A 0.1 increase in wetland continuity per meter reduces property damages for the average affected area analyzed in southeast Louisiana, which includes New Orleans, by $99-$133, and a 0.001 increase in vegetation roughness decreases damages by $24-$43. These reduced damages are equivalent to saving 3 to 5 and 1 to 2 properties per storm for the average area, respectively.

  14. Weathering a Perfect Storm from Space

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, Jeffrey J.

    2016-01-01

    Extreme space-weather events — intense solar and geomagnetic storms — have occurred in the past: most recently in 1859, 1921 and 1989. So scientists expect that, sooner or later, another extremely intense spaceweather event will strike Earth again. Such storms have the potential to cause widespread interference with and damage to technological systems. A National Academy of Sciences study projects that an extreme space-weather event could end up costing the American economy more than $1 trillion. The question now is whether or not we will take the actions needed to avoid such expensive consequences. Let’s assume that we do. Below is an imagined scenario of how, sometime in the future, an extreme space-weather event might play out.

  15. Mapping Hurricane Inland-Storm Tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turco, M.; East, J. W.; Dorsey, M. E.; McGee, B. D.; McCallum, B. E.; Pearman, J. L.; Sallenger, A. H.; Holmes, R. R.; Berembrock, C. E.; Turnipseed, D. P.; Mason, R. R.

    2008-12-01

    Historically, hurricane-induced storm-tides were documented through analysis of structural or vegetative damage and high-water marks. However, these sources rarely provided quantitative information about the timing of the flooding, the sequencing of multiple paths by which the storm-surge waters arrived, or the magnitude of waves and wave run-up comprising floodwaters. In response to these deficiencies, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) developed and deployed an experimental mobile storm-surge network to provide detailed time-series data for selected hurricane landfalls. The USGS first deployed the network in September 2005 as Hurricane Rita approached the Texas and Louisiana coasts. The network for Rita consisted of 32 water-level and 14 barometric-pressure monitoring sites. Sensors were located at distances ranging from a few hundred feet to approximately 30 miles inland and sampled 4,000 square miles. Deployments have also occurred for Hurricanes Wilma, Gustav, and Ike. For Hurricane Gustav, more than 100 water level sensors were deployed. Analysis of the water-level data enable construction of maps depicting surge topography through time and space, essentially rendering elements of a 3-dimensional view of the storm-surge dome as it moves on- shore, as well as a map of maximum water-level elevations. The USGS also acquired LIDAR topographic data from coasts impacted by hurricanes. These data reveal extreme changes to the beaches and barrier islands that arise from hurricane storm surge and waves. By better understanding where extreme changes occur along our coasts, we will be able to position coastal structures away from hazards.

  16. Extreme Geomagnetic Storms - 1868 - 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vennerstrom, S.; Lefevre, L.; Dumbović, M.; Crosby, N.; Malandraki, O.; Patsou, I.; Clette, F.; Veronig, A.; Vršnak, B.; Leer, K.; Moretto, T.

    2016-05-01

    We present the first large statistical study of extreme geomagnetic storms based on historical data from the time period 1868 - 2010. This article is the first of two companion papers. Here we describe how the storms were selected and focus on their near-Earth characteristics. The second article presents our investigation of the corresponding solar events and their characteristics. The storms were selected based on their intensity in the aa index, which constitutes the longest existing continuous series of geomagnetic activity. They are analyzed statistically in the context of more well-known geomagnetic indices, such as the Kp and Dcx/Dst index. This reveals that neither Kp nor Dcx/Dst provide a comprehensive geomagnetic measure of the extreme storms. We rank the storms by including long series of single magnetic observatory data. The top storms on the rank list are the New York Railroad storm occurring in May 1921 and the Quebec storm from March 1989. We identify key characteristics of the storms by combining several different available data sources, lists of storm sudden commencements (SSCs) signifying occurrence of interplanetary shocks, solar wind in-situ measurements, neutron monitor data, and associated identifications of Forbush decreases as well as satellite measurements of energetic proton fluxes in the near-Earth space environment. From this we find, among other results, that the extreme storms are very strongly correlated with the occurrence of interplanetary shocks (91 - 100 %), Forbush decreases (100 %), and energetic solar proton events (70 %). A quantitative comparison of these associations relative to less intense storms is also presented. Most notably, we find that most often the extreme storms are characterized by a complexity that is associated with multiple, often interacting, solar wind disturbances and that they frequently occur when the geomagnetic activity is already elevated. We also investigate the semiannual variation in storm occurrence

  17. Watershed Evaluation and Habitat Response to Recent Storms : Annual Report for 1998.

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, Jonathan J.; Huntington, Charles W.

    1999-01-01

    Large and powerful storm systems moved through the Pacific Northwest during the wet season of 1995-96, triggering widespread flooding, mass erosion, and, possibly altering salmon habitats in affected watersheds. This project study was initiated to assess whether watershed conditions are causing damage, triggered by storm events, to salmon habitat on public lands in the Snake River basin.

  18. Storm Surge Flood Hazards of Hurricane Katrina 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Daneshvaran, S.; Jakubowski, S.

    2008-05-01

    . Flooding due to hurricane storm surge is one of the most damaging natural disasters in tropical and sub-tropical coastal regions. Storm surge peril can cause catastrophic loss to coastal properties and loss of life. Estimated hurricane flood risk is often statistically-based and relies on historical data. It provides catastrophic loss and risk information for the event as a whole, but lacks geographical detail. The purpose of this study is to analyze hurricane-induced storm surge flood damage using a grid-based numerical model. Storm surge flood damage due to Hurricane Katrina 2005 is presented as a case study. In order to analyze the resulting hazard from Hurricane Katrina, the United States National Weather Service's operational storm surge model, SLOSH (Sea, Lake and Overland Surges from Hurricanes) was used to predict the maximum storm surge surface using track data from meteorological observations. Local inundation is computed using the flood water depth with the ground elevation above the mean sea level. Residential exposure is estimated using total number of housing units damaged by flood water in each US census block in a grid of 0.01 by 0.01 degrees for hurricane Katrina in 2005. The modeled results for the storm surge inundation and the estimated number of housing units damaged by hurricane Katrina are compared with the extensive field observations by US Geological Survey and FEMA in the counties along the Gulf Coast in the three impacted states of Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana. The modeled surge results are compared and contrasted with high water mark observations, where available. Storm surge losses in residential construction are highly sensitive to location and are best evaluated at a fine spatial resolution. This paper presents the analysis of the catastrophic flood risk based on the magnitude of hurricane storm surge flood depth on a local scale of US census blocks. The framework presented here is analytically-derived and can be used to

  19. Dust Storm, Aral Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Aral Sea has shrunk to less than half its size since 1985. The Aral Sea receives little water (sometimes no water) from the two major rivers that empty into it-the Syr Darya and Amu Darya. Instead, the river water is diverted to support irrigation for the region's extensive cotton fields. Recently, water scarcity has increased due to a prolonged drought in Central Asia. As the Aral Sea recedes, its former sea bed is exposed. The Aral's sea bed is composed of fine sediments-including fertilizers and other agricultural chemicals-that are easily picked up by the region's strong winds, creating thick dust storms. The International Space Station crew observed and recorded a large dust storm blowing eastward from the Aral Sea in late June 2001. This image illustrates the strong coupling between human activities (water diversions and irrigation), and rapidly changing land, sea and atmospheric processes-the winds blow across the

  20. Severe storm electricity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, R. T.; Rust, W. D.

    1984-01-01

    Successful ground truth support of U-2 overflights was been accomplished. Data have been reduced for 4 June 1984 and some of the results have been integrated into some of MSFC's efforts. Staccato lightning (multiply branched, single stroke flash with no continuing current) is prevalent within the rainfree region around the main storm updraft and this is believed to be important, i.e., staccato flashes might be an important indicator of severe storm electrification. Results from data analysis from two stations appear to indicate that charge center heights can be estimated from a combination of intercept data with data from the fixed laboratory at NSSL. An excellent data base has been provided for determining the sight errors and efficiency of NSSL's LLP system. Cloud structures, observable in a low radar reflectivity region and on a scale smaller than is currently resolved by radar, which appear to be related to electrical activity are studied.

  1. Severe storm electricity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, W. D.; Macgorman, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    During FY-85, Researchers conducted a field program and analyzed data. The field program incorporated coordinated measurements made with a NASA U2. Results include the following: (1) ground truth measurements of lightning for comparison with those obtained by the U2; (2) analysis of dual-Doppler radar and dual-VHF lightning mapping data from a supercell storm; (3) analysis of synoptic conditions during three simultaneous storm systems on 13 May 1983 when unusually large numbers of positive cloud-to-ground (+CG) flashes occurred; (4) analysis of extremely low frequency (ELF) wave forms; and (5) an assessment of a cloud -ground strike location system using a combination of mobile laboratory and fixed-base TV video data.

  2. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 storm-hazard projections

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnard, Patrick; Erikson, Li; O'Neill, Andrea; Foxgrover, Amy; Herdman, Liv

    2017-01-01

    The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) makes detailed predictions (meter-scale) over large geographic scales (100s of kilometers) of storm-induced coastal flooding and erosion for both current and future SLR scenarios, as well as long-term shoreline change and cliff retreat.  Resulting projections for future climate scenarios (sea-level rise and storms) provide emergency responders and coastal planners with critical storm-hazards information that can be used to increase public safety, mitigate physical damages, and more effectively manage and allocate resources within complex coastal settings. Several versions of CoSMoS have been implemented for areas of the California coast, including Southern California, Central California, and San Francisco Bay, and further versions will be incorporated as additional regions and improvements are developed.

  3. September 2013 Storm and Flood Assessment Report

    SciTech Connect

    Walterscheid, J. C.

    2015-12-21

    Between September 10 and 17, 2013, New Mexico and Colorado received a historically large amount of precipitation (Figure 1). This report assesses the damage caused by flooding along with estimated costs to repair the damage at Los Alamos National Laboratory (the Laboratory) on the Pajarito Plateau. Los Alamos County, New Mexico, received between 200% and 600% of the normal precipitation for this time period (Figure 2), and the Laboratory received approximately 450% percent of its average precipitation for September (Figure 3). As a result, the Laboratory was inundated with rain, including the extremely large, greater-than-1000-yr return period event that occurred between September 12 and 13 (Table 1). With saturated antecedent soil conditions from the September 10 storm, when the September 12 to September 13 storm hit, the flooding was disastrous to the Laboratory’s environmental infrastructure, including access roads, gage stations, watershed controls, control measures installed under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Permit (hereafter, the Individual Permit), and groundwater monitoring wells (Figures 4 through 21). From September 16 to October 1, 2013, the Laboratory completed field assessments of environmental infrastructure and generated descriptions and estimates of the damage, which are presented in spreadsheets in Attachments 1 to 4 of this report. Section 2 of this report contains damage assessments by watershed, including access roads, gage stations, watershed controls, and control measures installed under the Individual Permit. Section 3 contains damage assessments of monitoring wells by the groundwater monitoring groups as established in the Interim Facility-Wide Groundwater Monitoring Plan for Monitoring Year 2014. Section 4 addresses damage and loss of automated samplers. Section 5 addresses sediment sampling needs, and Section 6 is the summary of estimated recovery costs from the significant rain and flooding during September 2013.

  4. Sea Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, Claire L.; Cavalieri, Donald J.

    2005-01-01

    Sea ice covers vast areas of the polar oceans, with ice extent in the Northern Hemisphere ranging from approximately 7 x 10(exp 6) sq km in September to approximately 15 x 10(exp 6) sq km in March and ice extent in the Southern Hemisphere ranging from approximately 3 x 10(exp 6) sq km in February to approximately 18 x 10(exp 6) sq km in September. These ice covers have major impacts on the atmosphere, oceans, and ecosystems of the polar regions, and so as changes occur in them there are potential widespread consequences. Satellite data reveal considerable interannual variability in both polar sea ice covers, and many studies suggest possible connections between the ice and various oscillations within the climate system, such as the Arctic Oscillation, North Atlantic Oscillation, and Antarctic Oscillation, or Southern Annular Mode. Nonetheless, statistically significant long-term trends are also apparent, including overall trends of decreased ice coverage in the Arctic and increased ice coverage in the Antarctic from late 1978 through the end of 2003, with the Antarctic ice increases following marked decreases in the Antarctic ice during the 1970s. For a detailed picture of the seasonally varying ice cover at the start of the 21st century, this chapter includes ice concentration maps for each month of 2001 for both the Arctic and the Antarctic, as well as an overview of what the satellite record has revealed about the two polar ice covers from the 1970s through 2003.

  5. Over Ice

    NASA Video Gallery

    All about NASA's IceBridge P-3B plane and its IceBridge retrofit. Upgraded with 21st century "special modifications", the aircraft is less a cold war relic and more like the Space Agency's Millenni...

  6. On the Storm Surge and Sea Level Rise Projections for Infrastructure Risk Analysis and Adaptation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Storm surge can cause coastal hydrology changes, flooding, water quality changes, and even inundation of low-lying terrain. Strong wave actions and disruptive winds can damage water infrastructure and other environmental assets (hazardous and solid waste management facilities, w...

  7. Thresholds for storm impacts on an exposed sandy coastal area in southern Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, L. P.; Vousdoukas, M. V.; Ferreira, Ó.; Rodrigues, B. A.; Matias, A.

    2012-03-01

    Storms are one of the most important phenomena responsible for coastal erosion. Their destructive power presents major challenges for coastal management, and knowledge of their characteristics and associated consequences is therefore of paramount importance. In this study, thresholds for storm impacts are defined for a sandy coast in southern Portugal (Faro beach, Ria Formosa) using two different approaches: i) hydrodynamic conditions associated with historical storm impacts (i.e., infrastructural damage); and (ii) computed maximum wave run-up values (RHIGH) compared with beach morphology. Damage thresholds are defined as limits above which the action of a storm exceeds beach front response capability and starts to act directly on human infrastructures. According to method (i), four different thresholds were defined. For individual storms directed from the SW the threshold is a significant wave height of 4.7 m with a storm duration of 2 days, and for storms directed from the SE is a significant wave height of 6 m with a storm duration of at least 2 days. Regarding storm groups, for those directed from the SW the threshold is 2 storms lasting at least 2 days each with significant wave heights greater than 3.5 m, whilst for those directed from the SE the threshold is 3 short storms (lasting 1 day each) with significant wave height over 3.9 m. The return period for the SW storm group threshold is just 1.7 years. For method (ii), beach morphological parameters (DHIGH — highest elevation of the frontal dune; DLOW — elevation of the dune base; and tanβf — foreshore slope) were determined for five chosen cross-shore profiles along the study area, and RHIGH computed for different hydrodynamic conditions. Results were validated through field observations of storm impacts. The lowest thresholds for overwash are along the central part of the study area where a dune crest is absent due to human occupation. The highest thresholds for overwash are on those profiles where

  8. Desert Shield/Storm Logistics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-15

    Wc This document may not be retee for open publiarion until it has bm deaed by the Vproprnite military service or gmeanen agency. DESERT SHIELD /STORM...capture what had occurred during Operations DESERT SHIELD and STORM, the commanders of the Division Support Command of the 24th Infantry Division...Mechanized) held a ful. day of discussion centering on what occurted during Operation DESERT STORM and its preceding operation, DESERT SHIELD . The entire

  9. The Cause of Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatsuma, T.

    2001-12-01

    Although the cause of magnetic storms is important issue, the exact mechanism of the storm development is still controversial. Two mechanisms of storm development are considered. One is that the frequent substorm activity injects high-energy particles to the inner magnetosphere; the other is that the enhanced convection plays a role. Further, Iyermori and Rao [1996] shows that the substorm reduces the development of storms. On the contrary, magnetospheric convections and magnetic storms correspond different solar wind parameter. It is well known that the variations of the magnetospheric convection correspond to merging electric field (Em) by Kan and Lee [1979]. However, the variations of the magenetic storm correspond Ey [e.g. Burton et al., 1975]. This suggests that magnetospheric convection and magnetic storm are independent phenomena. However, we cannot discuss the independency of two phenomena since the difference between Em and Ey is small, under usual solar wind condition. We have analyzed Nov. 8, 1998 storm event, since the big difference between Em and Ey exists during 6 hours. The enhancement of Ey terminates first, and Em continues to enhance more than 6 hours after that. Although the variation of the storm estimated from SYM-H(Dst) index corresponds to Ey, that of the magnetospheric convection estimated from PC index corresponds to Em. This shows that the development of the storm terminate although the magnetospheric convection still enhances. This result suggests that the development of magnetic storms is independent from enhanced convection and the magnetic storm is directly caused by the enhancement of Ey in the solar wind.

  10. Anticipating Future Sea Level Rise and Coastal Storms in New York City (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, R. M.; Gornitz, V.; Bader, D.; Little, C. M.; Oppenheimer, M.; Patrick, L.; Orton, P. M.; Rosenzweig, C.; Solecki, W.

    2013-12-01

    Hurricane Sandy caused 43 fatalities in New York City and 19 billion in damages. Mayor Michael Bloomberg responded by convening the second New York City Panel on Climate Change (NPCC2), to provide up-to-date climate information for the City's Special Initiative for Rebuilding and Resiliency (SIRR). The Mayor's proposed 20 billion plan aims to strengthen the City's resilience to coastal inundation. Accordingly, the NPCC2 scientific and technical support team generated a suite of temperature, precipitation, and sea level rise and extreme event projections through the 2050s. The NPCC2 sea level rise projections include contributions from ocean thermal expansion, dynamic changes in sea surface height, mass changes in glaciers, ice caps, and ice sheets, and land water storage. Local sea level changes induced by changes in ice mass include isostatic, gravitational, and rotational effects. Results are derived from CMIP5 model-based outputs, expert judgment, and literature surveys. Sea level at the Battery, lower Manhattan, is projected to rise by 7-31 in (17.8-78.7cm) by the 2050s relative to 2000-2004 (10 to 90 percentile). As a result, flood heights above NAVD88 for the 100-year storm (stillwater plus waves) would rise from 15.0 ft (0.71 m) in the 2000s to 15.6-17.6 ft (4.8-5.4 m) by the 2050s (10-90 percentile). The annual chance of today's 100-year flood would increase from 1 to 1.4-5.0 percent by the 2050s.

  11. Effects of Storms on Coastal Vulnerability Through Revisiting Sites Impacted by Super Storm Sandy Offshore Long Island, New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, P.; McHugh, C.; Christensen, B. A.; Yong, W. Y.; Delligatti, M.

    2015-12-01

    Recent models indicate that due to climate change storm activity can intensify. Sea level rise as a result of climate change can lead to storm flooding and coastal damage in low-lying populated areas such as NE, USA. The New York metropolitan area experienced one of the highest storm surges in its history during Hurricane Sandy. The peak storm-tide elevation measured by USGS in Jamaica Bay was about 3.5 m, 1.4 m higher than historical measurements in the same area. As part of a National Science Foundation Rapid Response we surveyed from the R/V Pritchard and sampled the bays and inlets along the southern shore of Long Island after Super Storm Sandy in January 2013 and during June 2014 for assessing the impact of the storm. Short-lived radioisotopes, heavy metals and grain size variability were used to track the path of the storm. In 2013 high concentrations of metals (Pb 184 ppm) were deposited on the landward side of barrier islands and were tracked offshore for10 km. In 2014, we revisited the 2013 locations. The offshore, metal enriched mud layer was seen as small inclusions in sand and not present at the surface suggestive that natural processes are cleansing the sea-floor. Inland the cores showed three facies. From the base upwards: 1) coarse sand with low Pb 99 ppm. Interpreted as either sand transported landwards by the storm or in situ; 2) fine-grained, organic rich sediment with the high Pb 443 ppm and interpreted as seaward transport by the storm; 3) organic rich mud with lower Pb 200 ppm was found in the core tops. Most importantly the sea-floor was colonized by tubeworms suggestive that the environment is returning to normal conditions. These results coupled to other regional studies indicate that the storm was catastrophic and resulted in significant sediment transport. The surge brought sand inland modifying channel and inlet depths but most damaging was the seaward surge that brought contaminants offshore. It appears that the bays and inlets are

  12. Empirical STORM-E Model. [I. Theoretical and Observational Basis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mertens, Christopher J.; Xu, Xiaojing; Bilitza, Dieter; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Russell, James M., III

    2013-01-01

    Auroral nighttime infrared emission observed by the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument onboard the Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite is used to develop an empirical model of geomagnetic storm enhancements to E-region peak electron densities. The empirical model is called STORM-E and will be incorporated into the 2012 release of the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI). The proxy for characterizing the E-region response to geomagnetic forcing is NO+(v) volume emission rates (VER) derived from the TIMED/SABER 4.3 lm channel limb radiance measurements. The storm-time response of the NO+(v) 4.3 lm VER is sensitive to auroral particle precipitation. A statistical database of storm-time to climatological quiet-time ratios of SABER-observed NO+(v) 4.3 lm VER are fit to widely available geomagnetic indices using the theoretical framework of linear impulse-response theory. The STORM-E model provides a dynamic storm-time correction factor to adjust a known quiescent E-region electron density peak concentration for geomagnetic enhancements due to auroral particle precipitation. Part II of this series describes the explicit development of the empirical storm-time correction factor for E-region peak electron densities, and shows comparisons of E-region electron densities between STORM-E predictions and incoherent scatter radar measurements. In this paper, Part I of the series, the efficacy of using SABER-derived NO+(v) VER as a proxy for the E-region response to solar-geomagnetic disturbances is presented. Furthermore, a detailed description of the algorithms and methodologies used to derive NO+(v) VER from SABER 4.3 lm limb emission measurements is given. Finally, an assessment of key uncertainties in retrieving NO+(v) VER is presented

  13. Communicating Storm Surge Forecast Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troutman, J. A.; Rhome, J.

    2015-12-01

    When it comes to tropical cyclones, storm surge is often the greatest threat to life and property along the coastal United States. The coastal population density has dramatically increased over the past 20 years, putting more people at risk. Informing emergency managers, decision-makers and the public about the potential for wind driven storm surge, however, has been extremely difficult. Recently, the Storm Surge Unit at the National Hurricane Center in Miami, Florida has developed a prototype experimental storm surge watch/warning graphic to help communicate this threat more effectively by identifying areas most at risk for life-threatening storm surge. This prototype is the initial step in the transition toward a NWS storm surge watch/warning system and highlights the inundation levels that have a 10% chance of being exceeded. The guidance for this product is the Probabilistic Hurricane Storm Surge (P-Surge) model, which predicts the probability of various storm surge heights by statistically evaluating numerous SLOSH model simulations. Questions remain, however, if exceedance values in addition to the 10% may be of equal importance to forecasters. P-Surge data from 2014 Hurricane Arthur is used to ascertain the practicality of incorporating other exceedance data into storm surge forecasts. Extracting forecast uncertainty information through analyzing P-surge exceedances overlaid with track and wind intensity forecasts proves to be beneficial for forecasters and decision support.

  14. Aerodynamic investigations to determine possible ice flight paths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgsmueller, W.; Frenz, H.; May, P.; Anders, G.

    1982-01-01

    After flights with the VFW 614 under severe icing conditions, damage to the engine was found. In wind tunnel tests a determination of the origin of this ice was made; it is supposed that the damage was caused by this ice. On the modified flight test model of the VFW 614 on a 1:15 scale, measurements were conducted in the VFW-Fokker wind tunnel with exposed particles which represented the free ice. The results of this testing are presented.

  15. Impacts on Coralligenous Outcrop Biodiversity of a Dramatic Coastal Storm

    PubMed Central

    Teixidó, Núria; Casas, Edgar; Cebrián, Emma; Linares, Cristina; Garrabou, Joaquim

    2013-01-01

    Extreme events are rare, stochastic perturbations that can cause abrupt and dramatic ecological change within a short period of time relative to the lifespan of organisms. Studies over time provide exceptional opportunities to detect the effects of extreme climatic events and to measure their impacts by quantifying rates of change at population and community levels. In this study, we show how an extreme storm event affected the dynamics of benthic coralligenous outcrops in the NW Mediterranean Sea using data acquired before (2006–2008) and after the impact (2009–2010) at four different sites. Storms of comparable severity have been documented to occur occasionally within periods of 50 years in the Mediterranean Sea. We assessed the effects derived from the storm comparing changes in benthic community composition at sites exposed to and sheltered from this extreme event. The sites analyzed showed different damage from severe to negligible. The most exposed and impacted site experienced a major shift immediately after the storm, represented by changes in the species richness and beta diversity of benthic species. This site also showed higher compositional variability immediately after the storm and over the following year. The loss of cover of benthic species resulted between 22% and 58%. The damage across these species (e.g. calcareous algae, sponges, anthozoans, bryozoans, tunicates) was uneven, and those with fragile forms were the most impacted, showing cover losses up to 50 to 100%. Interestingly, small patches survived after the storm and began to grow slightly during the following year. In contrast, sheltered sites showed no significant changes in all the studied parameters, indicating no variations due to the storm. This study provides new insights into the responses to large and rare extreme events of Mediterranean communities with low dynamics and long-lived species, which are among the most threatened by the effects of global change. PMID:23326496

  16. Impacts on coralligenous outcrop biodiversity of a dramatic coastal storm.

    PubMed

    Teixidó, Núria; Casas, Edgar; Cebrián, Emma; Linares, Cristina; Garrabou, Joaquim

    2013-01-01

    Extreme events are rare, stochastic perturbations that can cause abrupt and dramatic ecological change within a short period of time relative to the lifespan of organisms. Studies over time provide exceptional opportunities to detect the effects of extreme climatic events and to measure their impacts by quantifying rates of change at population and community levels. In this study, we show how an extreme storm event affected the dynamics of benthic coralligenous outcrops in the NW Mediterranean Sea using data acquired before (2006-2008) and after the impact (2009-2010) at four different sites. Storms of comparable severity have been documented to occur occasionally within periods of 50 years in the Mediterranean Sea. We assessed the effects derived from the storm comparing changes in benthic community composition at sites exposed to and sheltered from this extreme event. The sites analyzed showed different damage from severe to negligible. The most exposed and impacted site experienced a major shift immediately after the storm, represented by changes in the species richness and beta diversity of benthic species. This site also showed higher compositional variability immediately after the storm and over the following year. The loss of cover of benthic species resulted between 22% and 58%. The damage across these species (e.g. calcareous algae, sponges, anthozoans, bryozoans, tunicates) was uneven, and those with fragile forms were the most impacted, showing cover losses up to 50 to 100%. Interestingly, small patches survived after the storm and began to grow slightly during the following year. In contrast, sheltered sites showed no significant changes in all the studied parameters, indicating no variations due to the storm. This study provides new insights into the responses to large and rare extreme events of Mediterranean communities with low dynamics and long-lived species, which are among the most threatened by the effects of global change.

  17. Severe storm electricity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, W. D.; Macgorman, D. R.; Taylor, W.; Arnold, R. T.

    1984-01-01

    Severe storms and lightning were measured with a NASA U2 and ground based facilities, both fixed base and mobile. Aspects of this program are reported. The following results are presented: (1) ground truth measurements of lightning for comparison with those obtained by the U2. These measurements include flash type identification, electric field changes, optical waveforms, and ground strike location; (2) simultaneous extremely low frequency (ELF) waveforms for cloud to ground (CG) flashes; (3) the CG strike location system (LLP) using a combination of mobile laboratory and television video data are assessed; (4) continued development of analog-to-digital conversion techniques for processing lightning data from the U2, mobile laboratory, and NSSL sensors; (5) completion of an all azimuth TV system for CG ground truth; (6) a preliminary analysis of both IC and CG lightning in a mesocyclone; and (7) the finding of a bimodal peak in altitude lightning activity in some storms in the Great Plains and on the east coast. In the forms on the Great Plains, there was a distinct class of flash what forms the upper mode of the distribution. These flashes are smaller horizontal extent, but occur more frequently than flashes in the lower mode of the distribution.

  18. A study of severe storm electricity via storm intercept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Roy T.; Horsburgh, Steven D.; Rust, W. David; Burgess, Don

    1985-01-01

    Storm electricity data, radar data, and visual observations were used both to present a case study for a supercell thunderstorm that occurred in the Texas Panhandle on 19 June 1980 and to search for insight into how lightning to ground might be related to storm dynamics in the updraft/downdraft couplet in supercell storms. It was observed that two-thirds of the lightning ground-strike points in the developing and maturing stages of a supercell thunderstorm occurred within the region surrounding the wall cloud (a cloud feature often characteristic of a supercell updraft) and on the southern flank of the precipitation. Electrical activity in the 19 June 1980 storm was atypical in that it was a right-mover. Lightning to ground reached a peak rate of 18/min and intracloud flashes were as frequent as 176/min in the final stages of the storm's life.

  19. Stability of a coral reef fish community following a catastrophic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, William J.

    1983-08-01

    In January 1980, a severe 3 day storm struck the normally protected leeward coral reefs of Kona, Hawaii. Waves generated by the storm, which was estimated to be a once in 20 40 year occurrence, were in excess of 6 m and caused extensive reef destruction and shoreline alteration. Shallow nearshore areas were denuded of most bottom cover and marine life. Damage to corals was extensive with broken colonies of the coral Porites compressa occurring down to depths of 27 m. Pronounced algal blooms occurred in a clearly defined sequence subsequent to the storm. The patterns of both coral destruction and algal succession were similar to those described on other storm damaged reefs. Fish mortality directly attributable to the storm was slight and the few dead fishes noted were either surge zone or tide pool species. After the storm the shallow reef flat was devoid of resident fishes while deeper areas contained many fishes which had moved from shallower water. This habitat shift substantially reduced the immediate impact of the storm on the fish community. Despite considerable habitat destruction that resulted from the storm, there were no decreases in species or population abundances on five 25 m2 quadrats monitored for 23 months before and 16 months after the storm. Similarly, the numbers of triggerfish sheltering within an area increased even though the storm reduced the number of available shelter holes. The shelter and space-related carrying capacity of these areas prior to the storm may therefore not have been reached. Recolonization of evacuated areas by fishes began shortly after the storm and within 16 months many areas had regained their prestorm appearances. Large numbers of individuals remained however, in their shifted locations.

  20. Critical storm thresholds for morphological changes in the western Black Sea coastal zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifonova, Ekaterina V.; Valchev, Nikolay N.; Andreeva, Nataliya K.; Eftimova, Petya T.

    2012-03-01

    Storms are one of the phenomena determining the short-term evolution of coasts by influencing the erosion and accretion patterns of the beaches. Some severe storms could cause loss of beach sediments, partial or complete destruction of coastal structures and even threaten human life and occupation. Bearing this in mind, it is essential to comprehend, which storms could evoke transient, although in some instances, significant morphological changes, and which could be considered as hazardous and result in catastrophic damage. This issue implies establishment of a set of critical thresholds for storm impact on coastal morphology. The paper presents a regional scale analysis of the near-shore morphological response of five beaches to storms of varying intensity. The analysis is accomplished by coupling of offshore wave and cross-shore profile data obtained for the Bulgarian Black sea coast. The historical storm pattern is reconstructed through hindcast using a coupled wave model system, while resulting morphological changes, such as shoreline alteration and cross-shore profile evolution, are estimated by analysis of long-term series of coastal measurements performed in 1970-1977 and 2008-2010. The storm impact thresholds are set in terms of integral wave energy taking into account both storm pattern and duration. It was found that the morphological response to storm impact is site specific and single-value thresholds are difficult to be established even at regional scale. Nevertheless, a range of critical storm thresholds is proposed. Thus, storms with integral wave energy varying within threshold values 0.4-0.7 × 106 J m-2 are regarded as capable of significant morphological changes, while less energetic events are supposed to influence predominately the seasonal beach dynamics. Furthermore, storms with integral wave energy higher than 0.7 × 106 J m-2 represent potentially destructive events that can change irreversibly the beach pattern or damage impact.

  1. Automated dust storm detection using satellite images. Development of a computer system for the detection of dust storms from MODIS satellite images and the creation of a new dust storm database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Ossta, Esam Elmehde Amar

    Dust storms are one of the natural hazards, which have increased in frequency in the recent years over Sahara desert, Australia, the Arabian Desert, Turkmenistan and northern China, which have worsened during the last decade. Dust storms increase air pollution, impact on urban areas and farms as well as affecting ground and air traffic. They cause damage to human health, reduce the temperature, cause damage to communication facilities, reduce visibility which delays both road and air traffic and impact on both urban and rural areas. Thus, it is important to know the causation, movement and radiation effects of dust storms. The monitoring and forecasting of dust storms is increasing in order to help governments reduce the negative impact of these storms. Satellite remote sensing is the most common method but its use over sandy ground is still limited as the two share similar characteristics. However, satellite remote sensing using true-colour images or estimates of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and algorithms such as the deep blue algorithm have limitations for identifying dust storms. Many researchers have studied the detection of dust storms during daytime in a number of different regions of the world including China, Australia, America, and North Africa using a variety of satellite data but fewer studies have focused on detecting dust storms at night. The key elements of this present study are to use data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometers on the Terra and Aqua satellites to develop more effective automated method for detecting dust storms during both day and night and generate a MODIS dust storm database..

  2. Ionospheric redistribution during geomagnetic storms.

    PubMed

    Immel, T J; Mannucci, A J

    2013-12-01

    [1]The abundance of plasma in the daytime ionosphere is often seen to grow greatly during geomagnetic storms. Recent reports suggest that the magnitude of the plasma density enhancement depends on the UT of storm onset. This possibility is investigated over a 7year period using global maps of ionospheric total electron content (TEC) produced at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The analysis confirms that the American sector exhibits, on average, larger storm time enhancement in ionospheric plasma content, up to 50% in the afternoon middle-latitude region and 30% in the vicinity of the high-latitude auroral cusp, with largest effect in the Southern Hemisphere. We investigate whether this effect is related to the magnitude of the causative magnetic storms. Using the same advanced Dst index employed to sort the TEC maps into quiet and active (Dst<-100 nT) sets, we find variation in storm strength that corresponds closely to the TEC variation but follows it by 3-6h. For this and other reasons detailed in this report, we conclude that the UT-dependent peak in storm time TEC is likely not related to the magnitude of external storm time forcing but more likely attributable to phenomena such as the low magnetic field in the South American region. The large Dst variation suggests a possible system-level effect of the observed variation in ionospheric storm response on the measured strength of the terrestrial ring current, possibly connected through UT-dependent modulation of ion outflow.

  3. Waterway Ice Thickness Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The ship on the opposite page is a U. S. Steel Corporation tanker cruising through the ice-covered waters of the Great Lakes in the dead of winter. The ship's crew is able to navigate safely by plotting courses through open water or thin ice, a technique made possible by a multi-agency technology demonstration program in which NASA is a leading participant. Traditionally, the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway System is closed to shipping for more than three months of winter season because of ice blockage, particularly fluctuations in the thickness and location of ice cover due to storms, wind, currents and variable temperatures. Shippers have long sought a system of navigation that would allow year-round operation on the Lakes and produce enormous economic and fuel conservation benefits. Interrupted operations require that industrial firms stockpile materials to carry them through the impassable months, which is costly. Alternatively, they must haul cargos by more expensive overland transportation. Studies estimate the economic benefits of year-round Great Lakes shipping in the hundreds of millions of dollars annually and fuel consumption savings in the tens of millions of gallons. Under Project Icewarn, NASA, the U.S. Coast Guard and the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration collaborated in development and demonstration of a system that permits safe year-round operations. It employs airborne radars, satellite communications relay and facsimile transmission to provide shippers and ships' masters up-to-date ice charts. Lewis Research Center contributed an accurate methods of measuring ice thickness by means of a special "short-pulse" type of radar. In a three-year demonstration program, Coast Guard aircraft equipped with Side-Looking Airborne Radar (SLAR) flew over the Great Lakes three or four times a week. The SLAR, which can penetrate clouds, provided large area readings of the type and distribution of ice cover. The information was supplemented by short

  4. Thyroid storm: an updated review.

    PubMed

    Chiha, Maguy; Samarasinghe, Shanika; Kabaker, Adam S

    2015-03-01

    Thyroid storm, an endocrine emergency first described in 1926, remains a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. No laboratory abnormalities are specific to thyroid storm, and the available scoring system is based on the clinical criteria. The exact mechanisms underlying the development of thyroid storm from uncomplicated hyperthyroidism are not well understood. A heightened response to thyroid hormone is often incriminated along with increased or abrupt availability of free hormones. Patients exhibit exaggerated signs and symptoms of hyperthyroidism and varying degrees of organ decompensation. Treatment should be initiated promptly targeting all steps of thyroid hormone formation, release, and action. Patients who fail medical therapy should be treated with therapeutic plasma exchange or thyroidectomy. The mortality of thyroid storm is currently reported at 10%. Patients who have survived thyroid storm should receive definite therapy for their underlying hyperthyroidism to avoid any recurrence of this potentially fatal condition.

  5. Dynamic Crush Characterization of Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Boitnott, Richard L.; Kellas, Sotiris

    2006-01-01

    During the space shuttle return-to-flight preparations following the Columbia accident, finite element models were needed that could predict the threshold of critical damage to the orbiter's wing leading edge from ice debris impacts. Hence, an experimental program was initiated to provide crushing data from impacted ice for use in dynamic finite element material models. A high-speed drop tower was configured to capture force time histories of ice cylinders for impacts up to approximately 100 ft/s. At low velocity, the force-time history depended heavily on the internal crystalline structure of the ice. However, for velocities of 100 ft/s and above, the ice fractured on impact, behaved more like a fluid, and the subsequent force-time history curves were much less dependent on the internal crystalline structure.

  6. Anchor ice, seabed freezing, and sediment dynamics in shallow arctic seas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reimnitz, E.; Kempema, E.W.; Barnes, P.W.

    1987-01-01

    Diving investigations confirm previous circumstantial evidence of seafloor freezing and anchor ice accretion during freeze-up storms in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea. These related bottom types were found to be continuous from shore to 2 m depth and spotty to 4.5 m depth. The concretelike nature of frozen bottom, where present, should prohibit sediment transport by any conceivable wave or current regime during the freezing storm. But elsewhere, anchor ice lifts coarse material off the bottom and incorporates it into the ice canopy, thereby leading to significant ice rafting of shallow shelf sediment and likely sediment loss to the deep sea. -from Authors

  7. Design and quantification of an extreme winter storm scenario for emergency preparedness and planning exercises in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dettinger, M.D.; Martin, Ralph F.; Hughes, M.; Das, T.; Neiman, P.; Cox, D.; Estes, G.; Reynolds, D.; Hartman, R.; Cayan, D.; Jones, L.

    2012-01-01

    The USGS Multihazards Project is working with numerous agencies to evaluate and plan for hazards and damages that could be caused by extreme winter storms impacting California. Atmospheric and hydrological aspects of a hypothetical storm scenario have been quantified as a basis for estimation of human, infrastructure, economic, and environmental impacts for emergency-preparedness and flood-planning exercises. In order to ensure scientific defensibility and necessary levels of detail in the scenario description, selected historical storm episodes were concatentated to describe a rapid arrival of several major storms over the state, yielding precipitation totals and runoff rates beyond those occurring during the individual historical storms. This concatenation allowed the scenario designers to avoid arbitrary scalings and is based on historical occasions from the 19th and 20th Centuries when storms have stalled over the state and when extreme storms have arrived in rapid succession. Dynamically consistent, hourly precipitation, temperatures, barometric pressures (for consideration of storm surges and coastal erosion), and winds over California were developed for the so-called ARkStorm scenario by downscaling the concatenated global records of the historical storm sequences onto 6- and 2-km grids using a regional weather model of January 1969 and February 1986 storm conditions. The weather model outputs were then used to force a hydrologic model to simulate ARkStorm runoff, to better understand resulting flooding risks. Methods used to build this scenario can be applied to other emergency, nonemergency and non-California applications. ?? 2011 The Author(s).

  8. Dust storm in Chad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Lake Chad (lower left) and the surrounding wetlands are under increasing pressure from desertification. The encroachment of the Sahara occurs with creeping sand dunes and major dust storms, such as the one pictured in this MODIS image from October 28, 2001. The amount of open water (lighter green patch within the darker one) has declined markedly over the last decades and the invasion of dunes is creating a rippled effect through the wetlands that is all too clear in the high-resolution images. Growing population and increasing demands on the lake give it an uncertain future. The loss of such an important natural resource will have profound effects on the people who depend on the rapidly diminishing source of fresh water. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  9. Meteoroids and Meteor Storms: A Threat to Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, B. Jeffrey

    1999-01-01

    Robust system design is the best protection against meteoroid damage. Impacts by small meteoroids are common on satellite surfaces, but impacts by meteoroids large enough to damage well designed systems are very rare. Estimating the threat from the normal meteoroid environment is difficult. Estimates for the occasional "storm" are even more uncertain. Common sense precautions are in order for the 1999 Leonids, but wide-spread catastrophic damage is highly unlikely. Strong Leonid showers are also expected in 2000 and 2001, but these pose much less threat than 1999.

  10. Sea Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perovich, D.; Gerland, S.; Hendricks, S.; Meier, Walter N.; Nicolaus, M.; Richter-Menge, J.; Tschudi, M.

    2013-01-01

    During 2013, Arctic sea ice extent remained well below normal, but the September 2013 minimum extent was substantially higher than the record-breaking minimum in 2012. Nonetheless, the minimum was still much lower than normal and the long-term trend Arctic September extent is -13.7 per decade relative to the 1981-2010 average. The less extreme conditions this year compared to 2012 were due to cooler temperatures and wind patterns that favored retention of ice through the summer. Sea ice thickness and volume remained near record-low levels, though indications are of slightly thicker ice compared to the record low of 2012.

  11. Onset of frequent dust storms in northern China at ~AD 1100

    PubMed Central

    He, Yuxin; Zhao, Cheng; Song, Mu; Liu, Weiguo; Chen, Fahu; Zhang, Dian; Liu, Zhonghui

    2015-01-01

    Dust storms in northern China strongly affect the living and health of people there and the dusts could travel a full circle of the globe in a short time. Historically, more frequent dust storms occurred during cool periods, particularly the Little Ice Age (LIA), generally attributed to the strengthened Siberian High. However, limited by chronological uncertainties in proxy records, this mechanism may not fully reveal the causes of dust storm frequency changes. Here we present a late Holocene dust record from the Qaidam Basin, where hydrological changes were previously reconstructed, and examine dust records from northern China, including the ones from historical documents. The records, being broadly consistent, indicate the onset of frequent dust storms at ~AD 1100. Further, peaked dust storm events occurred at episodes of high total solar irradiance or warm-dry conditions in source regions, superimposed on the high background of frequent dust storms within the cool LIA period. We thus suggest that besides strong wind activities, the centennial-scale dust storm events over the last 1000 years appear to be linked to the increased availability of dust source. With the anticipated global warming and deteriorating vegetation coverage, frequent occurrence of dust storms in northern China would be expected to persist. PMID:26607033

  12. Onset of frequent dust storms in northern China at ~AD 1100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yuxin; Zhao, Cheng; Song, Mu; Liu, Weiguo; Chen, Fahu; Zhang, Dian; Liu, Zhonghui

    2015-11-01

    Dust storms in northern China strongly affect the living and health of people there and the dusts could travel a full circle of the globe in a short time. Historically, more frequent dust storms occurred during cool periods, particularly the Little Ice Age (LIA), generally attributed to the strengthened Siberian High. However, limited by chronological uncertainties in proxy records, this mechanism may not fully reveal the causes of dust storm frequency changes. Here we present a late Holocene dust record from the Qaidam Basin, where hydrological changes were previously reconstructed, and examine dust records from northern China, including the ones from historical documents. The records, being broadly consistent, indicate the onset of frequent dust storms at ~AD 1100. Further, peaked dust storm events occurred at episodes of high total solar irradiance or warm-dry conditions in source regions, superimposed on the high background of frequent dust storms within the cool LIA period. We thus suggest that besides strong wind activities, the centennial-scale dust storm events over the last 1000 years appear to be linked to the increased availability of dust source. With the anticipated global warming and deteriorating vegetation coverage, frequent occurrence of dust storms in northern China would be expected to persist.

  13. Biological ice nucleation initiates hailstone formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaud, Alexander B.; Dore, John E.; Leslie, Deborah; Lyons, W. Berry; Sands, David C.; Priscu, John C.

    2014-11-01

    Cloud condensation and ice nuclei in the troposphere are required precursors to cloud and precipitation formation, both of which influence the radiative balance of Earth. The initial stage of hailstone formation (i.e., the embryo) and the subsequent layered growth allow hail to be used as a model for the study of nucleation processes in precipitation. By virtue of the preserved particle and isotopic record captured by hailstones, they represent a unique form of precipitation that allows direct characterization of the particles present during atmospheric ice nucleation. Despite the ecological and economic consequences of hail storms, the dynamics of hailstone nucleation, and thus their formation, are not well understood. Our experiments show that hailstone embryos from three Rocky Mountain storms contained biological ice nuclei capable of freezing water at warm, subzero (°C) temperatures, indicating that biological particles can act as nucleation sites for hailstone formation. These results are corroborated by analysis of δD and δ18O from melted hailstone embryos, which show that the hailstones formed at similarly warm temperatures in situ. Low densities of ice nucleation active abiotic particles were also present in hailstone embryos, but their low concentration indicates they were not likely to have catalyzed ice formation at the warm temperatures determined from water stable isotope analysis. Our study provides new data on ice nucleation occurring at the bottom of clouds, an atmospheric region whose processes are critical to global climate models but which has challenged instrument-based measurements.

  14. Moments of catchment storm area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eagleson, P. S.; Wang, Q.

    1985-01-01

    The portion of a catchment covered by a stationary rainstorm is modeled by the common area of two overlapping circles. Given that rain occurs within the catchment and conditioned by fixed storm and catchment sizes, the first two moments of the distribution of the common area are derived from purely geometrical considerations. The variance of the wetted fraction is shown to peak when the catchment size is equal to the size of the predominant storm. The conditioning on storm size is removed by assuming a probability distribution based upon the observed fractal behavior of cloud and rainstorm areas.

  15. Centralized Storm Information System (CSIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    A final progress report is presented on the Centralized Storm Information System (CSIS). The primary purpose of the CSIS is to demonstrate and evaluate real time interactive computerized data collection, interpretation and display techniques as applied to severe weather forecasting. CSIS objectives pertaining to improved severe storm forecasting and warning systems are outlined. The positive impact that CSIS has had on the National Severe Storms Forecast Center (NSSFC) is discussed. The benefits of interactive processing systems on the forecasting ability of the NSSFC are described.

  16. ICE911 Research: Preserving and Rebuilding Reflective Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, L. A.; Chetty, S.; Manzara, A.; Venkatesh, S.

    2014-12-01

    We have developed a localized surface albedo modification technique that shows promise as a method to increase reflective multi-year ice using floating materials, chosen so as to have low subsidiary environmental impact. It is now well-known that multi-year reflective ice has diminished rapidly in the Arctic over the past 3 decades and this plays a part in the continuing rapid decrease of summer-time ice. As summer-time bright ice disappears, the Arctic is losing its ability to reflect summer insolation, and this has widespread climatic effects, as well as a direct effect on sea level rise, as oceans heat and once-land-based ice melts into the sea. We have tested the albedo modification technique on a small scale over six Winter/Spring seasons at sites including California's Sierra Nevada Mountains, a Canadian lake, and a small man-made lake in Minnesota, using various materials and an evolving array of instrumentation. The materials can float and can be made to minimize effects on marine habitat and species. The instrumentation is designed to be deployed in harsh and remote locations. Localized snow and ice preservation, and reductions in water heating, have been quantified in small-scale testing. We have continued to refine our material and deployment approaches, and we have had laboratory confirmation by NASA. In the field, the materials were successfully deployed to shield underlying snow and ice from melting; applications of granular materials remained stable in the face of local wind and storms. We are evaluating the effects of snow and ice preservation for protection of infrastructure and habitat stabilization, and we are concurrently developing our techniques to aid in water conservation. Localized albedo modification options such as those being studied in this work may act to preserve ice, glaciers, permafrost and seasonal snow areas, and perhaps aid natural ice formation processes. If this method is deployed on a large enough scale, it could conceivably

  17. Ice911 Research: Preserving and Rebuilding Multi-Year Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, L. A.; Chetty, S.; Manzara, A.

    2013-12-01

    A localized surface albedo modification technique is being developed that shows promise as a method to increase multi-year ice using reflective floating materials, chosen so as to have low subsidiary environmental impact. Multi-year ice has diminished rapidly in the Arctic over the past 3 decades (Riihela et al, Nature Climate Change, August 4, 2013) and this plays a part in the continuing rapid decrease of summer-time ice. As summer-time ice disappears, the Arctic is losing its ability to act as the earth's refrigeration system, and this has widespread climatic effects, as well as a direct effect on sea level rise, as oceans heat, and once-land-based ice melts into the sea. We have tested the albedo modification technique on a small scale over five Winter/Spring seasons at sites including California's Sierra Nevada Mountains, a Canadian lake, and a small man-made lake in Minnesota, using various materials and an evolving array of instrumentation. The materials can float and can be made to minimize effects on marine habitat and species. The instrumentation is designed to be deployed in harsh and remote locations. Localized snow and ice preservation, and reductions in water heating, have been quantified in small-scale testing. Climate modeling is underway to analyze the effects of this method of surface albedo modification in key areas on the rate of oceanic and atmospheric temperature rise. We are also evaluating the effects of snow and ice preservation for protection of infrastructure and habitat stabilization. This paper will also discuss a possible reduction of sea level rise with an eye to quantification of cost/benefit. The most recent season's experimentation on a man-made private lake in Minnesota saw further evolution in the material and deployment approach. The materials were successfully deployed to shield underlying snow and ice from melting; applications of granular materials remained stable in the face of local wind and storms. Localized albedo

  18. Shelter from the Storm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Corey; Metz, John

    2001-01-01

    Discusses why most schools need to upgrade the spaces they use to protect students and staff from tornadoes. School building areas commonly used as safe havens during tornadoes are assessed, followed by information on disaster damage reimbursements and Federal Emergency Management Agency guidelines (FEMA 361) for building tornado and hurricane…

  19. Clustering of European winter storms: A multi-model perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renggli, Dominik; Buettner, Annemarie; Scherb, Anke; Straub, Daniel; Zimmerli, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The storm series over Europe in 1990 (Daria, Vivian, Wiebke, Herta) and 1999 (Anatol, Lothar, Martin) are very well known. Such clusters of severe events strongly affect the seasonally accumulated damage statistics. The (re)insurance industry has quantified clustering by using distribution assumptions deduced from the historical storm activity of the last 30 to 40 years. The use of storm series simulated by climate models has only started recently. Climate model runs can potentially represent 100s to 1000s of years, allowing a more detailed quantification of clustering than the history of the last few decades. However, it is unknown how sensitive the representation of clustering is to systematic biases. Using a multi-model ensemble allows quantifying that uncertainty. This work uses CMIP5 decadal ensemble hindcasts to study clustering of European winter storms from a multi-model perspective. An objective identification algorithm extracts winter storms (September to April) in the gridded 6-hourly wind data. Since the skill of European storm predictions is very limited on the decadal scale, the different hindcast runs are interpreted as independent realizations. As a consequence, the available hindcast ensemble represents several 1000 simulated storm seasons. The seasonal clustering of winter storms is quantified using the dispersion coefficient. The benchmark for the decadal prediction models is the 20th Century Reanalysis. The decadal prediction models are able to reproduce typical features of the clustering characteristics observed in the reanalysis data. Clustering occurs in all analyzed models over the North Atlantic and European region, in particular over Great Britain and Scandinavia as well as over Iberia (i.e. the exit regions of the North Atlantic storm track). Clustering is generally weaker in the models compared to reanalysis, although the differences between different models are substantial. In contrast to existing studies, clustering is driven by weak

  20. Neonatal thyroid storm accompanied with severe anaemia.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lu-Ying; Wei, Hong; Wang, Zheng-Li

    2015-07-01

    Neonatal thyroid storm is rare; the diagnostic criteria and management of neonatal thyroid storm have not been well established. In this paper, we report a preterm infant diagnosed with neonatal hyperthyroidism secondary to maternal Graves' disease who was discharged after therapy. Unfortunately, he was rehospitalised for neonatal thyroid storm. We will discuss the diagnosis and general therapy of neonatal thyroid storm.

  1. Predicting September sea ice: Ensemble skill of the SEARCH Sea Ice Outlook 2008-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroeve, Julienne; Hamilton, Lawrence C.; Bitz, Cecilia M.; Blanchard-Wrigglesworth, Edward

    2014-04-01

    Since 2008, the Study of Environmental Arctic Change Sea Ice Outlook has solicited predictions of September sea-ice extent from the Arctic research community. Individuals and teams employ a variety of modeling, statistical, and heuristic approaches to make these predictions. Viewed as monthly ensembles each with one or two dozen individual predictions, they display a bimodal pattern of success. In years when observed ice extent is near its trend, the median predictions tend to be accurate. In years when the observed extent is anomalous, the median and most individual predictions are less accurate. Statistical analysis suggests that year-to-year variability, rather than methods, dominate the variation in ensemble prediction success. Furthermore, ensemble predictions do not improve as the season evolves. We consider the role of initial ice, atmosphere and ocean conditions, and summer storms and weather in contributing to the challenge of sea-ice prediction.

  2. The Radiation Belt Storm Probes

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Radiation Belt Storm Probe mission (RBSP) will explore the Van Allen Radiation Belts in the Earth's magnetosphere. The charge particles in these regions can be hazardous to both spacecraft and ...

  3. Storm Water Management Model (SWMM)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's Storm Water Management Model (SWMM) is used throughout the world for planning, analysis and design related to stormwater runoff, combined and sanitary sewers, and other drainage systems in urban areas.

  4. Cloudsat Dissects Tropical Storm Ileana

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's CloudSat satellite's Cloud Profiling Radar captured a sideways look across Tropical Storm Ileana on Aug. 27 at 20:40 UTC. The colors indicate intensity of reflected radar energy. The blue ar...

  5. Satellite Animation Shows California Storms

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of visible and infrared imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite shows a series of moisture-laden storms affecting California from Jan. 6 through Jan. 9, 2017. TRT: 00:36 Credit: NASA...

  6. Tropical Storm Faxai's Rainfall Rates

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows Tropical Storm Faxai's rainfall rates on March 2 from a TRMM TMI/PR rainfall analysis being faded in over infrared cloud data from the TRMM VIRS instrument. Credit: SSAI/NASA, ...

  7. Winter Storms and Extreme Cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... Us Social Media Contact Us FAQS Publications Emergency Alerts Home Search × Close Search Enter Search Term(s): Languages × ... take when you receive a winter weather storm alert from the National Weather Service for your local ...

  8. Climatic aspects of the variability of extreme storm occurrence and intensity in the western Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valchev, Nikolay; Trifonova, Ekaterina; Andreeva, Nataliya; Eftimova, Petya

    2010-05-01

    The study considers potential changes in the storm occurrence and intensity over the western Black Sea through analysis of long term series of wind and wave conditions simulated with relatively high resolution. It is a result of coupling of atmospheric and wave models and spans period of more than 62 years (1948-2009). The wave hincast is driven with the global reanalysis data produced by ECMWF and NCEP/NCAR. The continuous dataset is reduced to a series of storms of considerable intensity and/or destructive potential through application of thresholds for filtration of weak seas. They are primarily based on storm impact on the coastal environment and principles for statistical representativeness. The climatic variability of occurrence and intensity of the selected extreme events is analyzed using different criteria such as number of stormy days, wind speed and wave height extremes. Particular consideration is paid to the mean wave energy per storm season and specific storm energy that are found to be more indicative for understanding of the storm pattern variability. Despite of the overall tendency for storminess decrease, there are no incontestable evidences corroborating a marked reduction of the storm intensity. While the total number of stormy hours diminishes, an increase of the mean wave energy is discernible. This is found to be caused by a change of the storm pattern: storms with short growth stage, energetic stage of full development and fast decay are more frequently observed. This storm type still provides significant energy input in the coastal zone and is able of producing considerable morphological impact, including damages. Such storms develop abruptly, therefore, timely prediction and mitigation of hazard effects become more complex to tackle with. Hence, little potential seems to exist for reducing the vulnerability to storms in the western Black Sea. That means the societies must begin to take such far-reaching implications into serious

  9. Storm and Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Yesterday's storm front was moving westward, today's moves eastward. Note the thick cloud cover and beautifully delineated cloud tops.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 72.1, Longitude 308.3 East (51.7 West). 40 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  10. Riding the storm out

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurman, Josh

    2009-04-01

    I am standing on a bridge near the North Carolina coast. There is a light breeze, and I am enjoying some hazy sunshine. But this calm is an illusion: in a few minutes winds of up to 45ms-1 (100 mph) will sweep in again. The approaches to my section of the bridge are already drowned under 2.5 m of water, and my companions on this island are an eclectic mix of traumatized animals, including snakes, rats, wounded pelicans and frogs. Earlier, one of the snakes flew through the air past my truck. The animals and I have been drawn to this bridge by Hurricane Isabel, which has just slammed into the coastal islands of North Carolina, and at the moment we are in the calm, sunny eye of the storm. The animals are just trying to survive on the area's only dry ground. But I have come to the bridge with a radar system on a truck and have spent a night and a day on it because I want to know what is happening inside this hurricane.

  11. Ionospheric redistribution during geomagnetic storms

    PubMed Central

    Immel, T J; Mannucci, A J

    2013-01-01

    [1]The abundance of plasma in the daytime ionosphere is often seen to grow greatly during geomagnetic storms. Recent reports suggest that the magnitude of the plasma density enhancement depends on the UT of storm onset. This possibility is investigated over a 7year period using global maps of ionospheric total electron content (TEC) produced at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The analysis confirms that the American sector exhibits, on average, larger storm time enhancement in ionospheric plasma content, up to 50% in the afternoon middle-latitude region and 30% in the vicinity of the high-latitude auroral cusp, with largest effect in the Southern Hemisphere. We investigate whether this effect is related to the magnitude of the causative magnetic storms. Using the same advanced Dst index employed to sort the TEC maps into quiet and active (Dst<−100 nT) sets, we find variation in storm strength that corresponds closely to the TEC variation but follows it by 3–6h. For this and other reasons detailed in this report, we conclude that the UT-dependent peak in storm time TEC is likely not related to the magnitude of external storm time forcing but more likely attributable to phenomena such as the low magnetic field in the South American region. The large Dst variation suggests a possible system-level effect of the observed variation in ionospheric storm response on the measured strength of the terrestrial ring current, possibly connected through UT-dependent modulation of ion outflow. PMID:26167429

  12. Magnetic storms and induction hazards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, Jeffrey J.; Rigler, E. Joshua; Pulkkinen, Antti; Balch, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic storms are potentially hazardous to the activities and technological infrastructure of modern civilization. This reality was dramatically demonstrated during the great magnetic storm of March 1989, when surface geoelectric fields, produced by the interaction of the time-varying geomagnetic field with the Earth's electrically conducting interior, coupled onto the overlying Hydro-Québec electric power grid in Canada. Protective relays were tripped, the grid collapsed, and about 9 million people were temporarily left without electricity [Bolduc, 2002].

  13. CoSMoS Southern California v3.0 Phase 1 (100-year storm) storm hazard projections

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnard, Patrick; Erikson, Li; Foxgrover, Amy; O'Neill, Andrea; Herdman, Liv

    2016-01-01

    The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) makes detailed predictions (meter-scale) over large geographic scales (100s of kilometers) of storm-induced coastal flooding and erosion for both current and future sea-level rise (SLR) scenarios. CoSMoS v3.0 for Southern California shows projections for future climate scenarios (sea-level rise and storms) to provide emergency responders and coastal planners with critical storm-hazards information that can be used to increase public safety, mitigate physical damages, and more effectively manage and allocate resources within complex coastal settings. Phase I data for Southern California include flood-hazard information for the coast from the Mexican Border to Pt. Conception for a 100-year storm scenario and sea-level rise 0 - 2 m. Changes from previous data releases may be reflected in some areas. Data are complete for the information presented but are considered preliminary; changes may be reflected in the full data release (Phase II) in summer 2016.

  14. North-south variations of tropical storm genesis locations in the Western Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunzai; Wang, Lei; Wang, Xin; Wang, Dongxiao; Wu, Lixin

    2016-11-01

    In the Western Hemisphere, tropical storms or hurricanes form in the North Atlantic and eastern North Pacific. Previous studies have focused on storm variability in the frequency, duration, and intensity in each basin. Here we find that the tropical storm genesis location in one ocean basin ties to the other one. On both interannual and multidecadal time scales, a northward (southward) shift of the tropical storm genesis location is associated with a southward (northward) variation in the other ocean basin. The change of cross-Central America wind in the upper troposphere, which induces an out-of-phase relation of vertical wind shear, bridges storm activity in the two ocean basins. Sea surface temperatures in both the tropical Pacific and North Atlantic can induce the zonal wind change across Central America. An implication of this study is that hurricane outlooks can be improved by considering the two ocean basins together, and thus helping reduce the damage caused by hurricane landfall.

  15. Microphysics, Meteorology, Microwave and Modeling of Mediterranean Storms: The M(sup 5) Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Eric A.; Fiorino, Steven; Mugnai, Alberto; Panegrossi, Giulia; Tripoli, Gregory; Starr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Comprehensive understanding of the microphysical nature of Mediterranean storms requires a combination of in situ meteorological data analysis and radar-passive microwave data analysis, effectively integrated with numerical modeling studies at various scales, particularly from synoptic scale down to mesoscale. The microphysical properties of and their controls on severe storms are intrinsically related to meteorological processes under which storms have evolved, processes which eventually select and control the dominant microphysical properties themselves. Insofar as hazardous Mediterranean storms, highlighted by the September 25-28/1992 Genova flood event, the October 5-7/1998 Friuli flood event, and the October 13-15/2000 Piemonte flood event (all taking place in northern Italy), developing a comprehensive microphysical interpretation requires an understanding of the multiple phases of storm evolution and the heterogeneous nature of precipitation fields within the storm domains. This involves convective development, stratiform transition and decay, orographic lifting, and sloped frontal lifting proc esses. This also involves vertical motions and thermodynamical instabilities governing physical processes that determine details of the liquid/ice water contents, size distributions, and fall rates of the various modes of hydrometeors found within the storm environments. This paper presents detailed 4-dimensional analyses of the microphysical elements of the three severe Mediterranean storms identified above, investigated with the aid of SSM/I and TRMM satellite measurements (and other remote sensing measurements). The analyses are guided by nonhydrostatic mesoscale model simulations at high resolution of the intense rain producing portions of the storm environments. The results emphasize how meteorological controls taking place at the large scale, coupled with localized terrain controls, ultimately determine the most salient features of the bulk microphysical

  16. State of Arctic Sea Ice North of Svalbard during N-ICE2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rösel, Anja; King, Jennifer; Gerland, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    The N-ICE2015 cruise, led by the Norwegian Polar Institute, was a drift experiment with the research vessel R/V Lance from January to June 2015, where the ship started the drift North of Svalbard at 83°14.45' N, 21°31.41' E. The drift was repeated as soon as the vessel drifted free. Altogether, 4 ice stations where installed and the complex ocean-sea ice-atmosphere system was studied with an interdisciplinary Approach. During the N-ICE2015 cruise, extensive ice thickness and snow depth measurements were performed during both, winter and summer conditions. Total ice and snow thickness was measured with ground-based and airborne electromagnetic instruments; snow depth was measured with a GPS snow depth probe. Additionally, ice mass balance and snow buoys were deployed. Snow and ice thickness measurements were performed on repeated transects to quantify the ice growth or loss as well as the snow accumulation and melt rate. Additionally, we collected independent values on surveys to determine the general ice thickness distribution. Average snow depths of 32 cm on first year ice, and 52 cm on multi-year ice were measured in January, the mean snow depth on all ice types even increased until end of March to 49 cm. The average total ice and snow thickness in winter conditions was 1.92 m. During winter we found a small growth rate on multi-year ice of about 15 cm in 2 months, due to above-average snow depths and some extraordinary storm events that came along with mild temperatures. In contrast thereto, we also were able to study new ice formation and thin ice on newly formed leads. In summer conditions an enormous melt rate, mainly driven by a warm Atlantic water inflow in the marginal ice zone, was observed during two ice stations with melt rates of up to 20 cm per 24 hours. To reinforce the local measurements around the ship and to confirm their significance on a larger scale, we compare them to airborne thickness measurements and classified SAR-satellite scenes. The

  17. Mass Balance of Arctic Sea Ice North of Svalbard during N-ICE2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rösel, A.; Gerland, S.; King, J.; Itkin, P.

    2015-12-01

    The N-ICE2015 cruise, led by the Norwegian Polar Institute, was a drift experiment with the research vessel R/V Lancefrom January to June 2015, where the ship started the drift North of Svalbard at 83°14.45' N, 21°31.41' E. The drift was repeated as soon as the vessel drifted free. Altogether during the 6 month, 4 ice stations where installed and the complex ocean-sea ice-atmosphere system was studied with an interdisciplinary approach. During the N-ICE2015 cruise, extensive ice thickness and snow depth measurements were performed during both, winter and summer conditions. Total ice and snow thickness was measured with ground-based and airborne electromagnetic instruments like EM31, GEM, and EM-bird; snow depth was measured with a GPS snow depth probe. Additionally, ice mass balance and snow buoys were deployed. Snow and ice thickness measurements were performed on repeated transects to quantify the ice growth or loss as well as the snow accumulation and melt rate. Additionally, we collected independent values on surveys to determine the general ice thickness distribution. In terms of mass balance, average snow depths of 32 cm on first year ice, and 52 cm on multiyear ice were measured in January, the mean snow depth on all ice types even increased until end of March to 49 cm. The average total ice and snow thickness in winter conditions was 1.92 cm. During winter, we found an unusual small growth rate on multiyear ice of about 15 cm in 2 months, due to above-average snow depths and some extraordanary storm events that came along with mild temperatures. In contrast thereto, we were also able to study new ice formation and thin ice on refrozen leads. In summer conditions an enormous melt rate, mainly driven by a warm Atlantic water inflow in the marginal ice zone, was observed during two ice stations with melt rates of up to 20 cm per 24 hours. The here presented dataset is a mandatory parameter for understanding the ocean-ice-atmosphere interactions, for

  18. Current understanding of magnetic storms: Storm-substorm relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Kamide, Y.; Gonzalez, W.D.; Baumjohann, W.; Daglis, I.A.; Grande, M.; Joselyn, J.A.; Singer, H.J.; McPherron, R.L.; Phillips, J.L.; Reeves, E.G.; Rostoker, G.; Sharma, A.S.; Tsurutani, B.T.

    1998-08-01

    This paper attempts to summarize the current understanding of the storm/substorm relationship by clearing up a considerable amount of controversy and by addressing the question of how solar wind energy is deposited into and is dissipated in the constituent elements that are critical to magnetospheric and ionospheric processes during magnetic storms. (1) Four mechanisms are identified and discussed as the primary causes of enhanced electric fields in the interplanetary medium responsible for geomagnetic storms. It is pointed out that in reality, these four mechanisms, which are not mutually exclusive, but interdependent, interact differently from event to event. Interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) and corotating interaction regions (CIRs) are found to be the primary phenomena responsible for the main phase of geomagnetic storms. The other two mechanisms, i.e., HILDCAA (high-intensity, long-duration, continuous auroral electrojet activity) and the so-called Russell-McPherron effect, work to make the ICME and CIR phenomena more geoeffective. The solar cycle dependence of the various sources in creating magnetic storms has yet to be quantitatively understood. (2) A serious controversy exists as to whether the successive occurrence of intense substorms plays a direct role in the energization of ring current particles or whether the enhanced electric field associated with southward IMF enhances the effect of substorm expansions. While most of the {ital Dst} variance during magnetic storms can be solely reproduced by changes in the large-scale electric field in the solar wind and the residuals are uncorrelated with substorms, recent satellite observations of the ring current constituents during the main phase of magnetic storms show the importance of ionospheric ions. This implies that ionospheric ions, which are associated with the frequent occurrence of intense substorms, are accelerated upward along magnetic field lines, contributing to the energy density of

  19. Hindcast storm events in the Bering Sea for the St. Lawrence Island and Unalakleet Regions, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erikson, Li H.; McCall, Robert T.; van Rooijen, Arnold; Norris, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    This study provides viable estimates of historical storm-induced water levels in the coastal communities of Gambell and Savoonga situated on St. Lawrence Island in the Bering Sea, as well as Unalakleet located at the head of Norton Sound on the western coast of Alaska. Gambell, Savoonga, and Unalakleet are small Native Villages that are regularly impacted by coastal storms but where little quantitative information about these storms exists. The closest continuous water-level gauge is at Nome, located more than 200 kilometers from both St. Lawrence Island and Unalakleet. In this study, storms are identified and quantified using historical atmospheric and sea-ice data and then used as boundary conditions for a suite of numerical models. The work includes storm-surge (temporary rise in water levels due to persistent strong winds and low atmospheric pressures) modeling in the Bering Strait region, as well as modeling of wave runup along specified sections of the coast in Gambell and Unalakleet. Modeled historical water levels are used to develop return periods of storm surge and storm surge plus wave runup at key locations in each community. It is anticipated that the results will fill some of the data void regarding coastal flood data in western Alaska and be used for production of coastal vulnerability maps and community planning efforts.

  20. The geological effects of hurricanes on coral reefs and the interpretation of storm deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scoffin, T. P.

    1993-11-01

    Hurricanes occur in belts 7° to 25° north and south of the equator. Reefs growing in these belts suffer periodic damage from hurricane-generated waves and storm surge. Corals down to 20m depth may be broken and removed, branching colonies being much more susceptible to breakage than upright massive forms. Sand cays may be washed away and former storm ridges may migrate to leeward across reef flats to link with islands. Reef crest and reef front coral debris accumulate as talus at the foot of the fore-reef slope, on submarine terraces and grooves, on the intertidal reef flat as storm ridges of shingle or boulders and isolated blocks of reef framework, as accreting beach ridges of leeward migrating shingle, as lobes and wedges of debris in back-reef lagoons, as drapes of carbonate sand and mud in deep off-reef locations in the fore-reef and lagoonal areas. In addition to the coarse debris deposited, other features may aid the recognition of former hurricane events, including the assemblage of reef biota, its species composition and the structure of the skeletons; graded internal sediments in framework cavities; characteristic sequences of encrusting organisms; characteristic shapes of reef flat microatoll corals; and submarine cement crusts over truncated reef surfaces. The abundance of reef flat storm deposits whose ages cluster around 3000 4000 y BP in certain parts of the world most likely relate to a slight fall in relative sea level rather than an increase in storminess during that period. A higher frequency of storms need not result in more reef flat storm deposits. The violence of the storm relative to normal fair-weather conditions influences the extent of damage; the length of time since the previous major storm influences the amount of coral debris created; the length of time after the hurricane, and before a subsequent storm influences the degree of stabilization of reef-top storm deposits and hence their chances of preservation.

  1. Morphological response and coastal dynamics associated with major storm events along the Gulf of Lions Coastline, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gervais, M.; Balouin, Y.; Belon, R.

    2012-03-01

    Along the coast, anticipating the different morphological responses induced by storm events is crucial for managers to evaluate coastal risks and to develop the best measures to mitigate them. In this paper, a methodology is developed to determine the best storm intensity parameter to derive storm thresholds for different morphological responses. The methodology is applied to the northern part of the Gulf of Lions coastline where storm events can induce important morphological changes. These include shoreline retreat, beach and dune erosion, significant migration of nearshore bars, overwashes and even breaches of coastal barriers, as well as damage to coastal defences and coastal infrastructure. In order to evaluate historical storm characteristics and impact, an extensive review was undertaken to obtain quantitative datasets (beach profiles, wave records), aerial photographs and more qualitative information on morphological evolution and coastal damage. Re-analysis of hydrodynamic and morphology data was undertaken, and hindcast wave modelling results were used to characterised storm intensities. The methodology developed to evaluate storm thresholds consists of obtaining morphological evolution indicators (evidence of breaching, overwash processes, volume variations and migration of morphological patterns) that can be directly linked to a storm event and its characteristics. Results demonstrate that in such a quasi-non-tidal wave-dominated environment, with intermediate double-barred beach shoreface morphology, major coastal changes occur following the maximum significant wave height reached during the storm, or else according to maximum wave run-up elevation regarding upper beach impact, a wave height dependant parameter. Inversely storm surge (and water level) alone, as well as total storm energy, do not explain any storm impact scale. Storm-specific datasets indicate that important morphological evolution is observed during moderate storm events (significant

  2. USGS Multi-Hazards Winter Storm Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, D. A.; Jones, L. M.; Perry, S. C.

    2008-12-01

    The USGS began an inter-disciplinary effort, the Multi Hazards Demonstration Project (MHDP), in 2007 to demonstrate how hazards science can improve a community's resiliency to natural disasters including earthquakes, tsunamis, wildfires, landslides, floods and coastal erosion. The project engages the user community in setting research goals and directs efforts towards research products that can be applied to loss reduction and improved resiliency. The first public product of the MHDP was the ShakeOut Earthquake Scenario published in May 2008. It detailed the realistic outcomes of a hypothetical, but plausible, magnitude 7.8 earthquake on the San Andreas Fault in southern California. Over 300 scientist and experts contributed to designing the earthquake and understanding the impacts of such a disaster, including the geotechnical, engineering, social, cultural, environmental, and economic consequences. The scenario advanced scientific understanding and exposed numerous vulnerabilities related to emergency response and lifeline continuity management. The ShakeOut Scenario was the centerpiece of the Nation's largest-ever emergency response exercise in November 2008, dubbed "The Great Southern California ShakeOut" (www.shakeout.org). USGS Multi-Hazards is now preparing for its next major public project, a Winter Storm Scenario. Like the earthquake scenario, experts will be brought together to examine in detail the possibility, cost and consequences of a winter storm disaster including floods, landslides, coastal erosion and inundation; debris flows; biologic consequences like extirpation of endangered species; physical damages like bridge scour, road closures, dam failure, property loss, and water system collapse. Consideration will be given to the vulnerabilities associated with a catastrophic disruption to the water supply to southern California; the resulting impacts on ground water pumping, seawater intrusion, water supply degradation, and land subsidence; and a

  3. Satellite remote sensing and cloud modeling of St. Anthony, Minnesota storm clouds and dew point depression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Tsao, Y. D.

    1988-01-01

    Rawinsonde data and geosynchronous satellite imagery were used to investigate the life cycles of St. Anthony, Minnesota's severe convective storms. It is found that the fully developed storm clouds, with overshooting cloud tops penetrating above the tropopause, collapsed about three minutes before the touchdown of the tornadoes. Results indicate that the probability of producing an outbreak of tornadoes causing greater damage increases when there are higher values of potential energy storage per unit area for overshooting cloud tops penetrating the tropopause. It is also found that there is less chance for clouds with a lower moisture content to be outgrown as a storm cloud than clouds with a higher moisture content.

  4. Mapping and Visualization of Storm-Surge Dynamics for Hurricane Katrina and Hurricane Rita

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gesch, Dean B.

    2009-01-01

    The damages caused by the storm surges from Hurricane Katrina and Hurricane Rita were significant and occurred over broad areas. Storm-surge maps are among the most useful geospatial datasets for hurricane recovery, impact assessments, and mitigation planning for future storms. Surveyed high-water marks were used to generate a maximum storm-surge surface for Hurricane Katrina extending from eastern Louisiana to Mobile Bay, Alabama. The interpolated surface was intersected with high-resolution lidar elevation data covering the study area to produce a highly detailed digital storm-surge inundation map. The storm-surge dataset and related data are available for display and query in a Web-based viewer application. A unique water-level dataset from a network of portable pressure sensors deployed in the days just prior to Hurricane Rita's landfall captured the hurricane's storm surge. The recorded sensor data provided water-level measurements with a very high temporal resolution at surveyed point locations. The resulting dataset was used to generate a time series of storm-surge surfaces that documents the surge dynamics in a new, spatially explicit way. The temporal information contained in the multiple storm-surge surfaces can be visualized in a number of ways to portray how the surge interacted with and was affected by land surface features. Spatially explicit storm-surge products can be useful for a variety of hurricane impact assessments, especially studies of wetland and land changes where knowledge of the extent and magnitude of storm-surge flooding is critical.

  5. Storm tracks near marginal stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambaum, Maarten; Novak, Lenka

    2015-04-01

    The variance of atmospheric storm tracks is characterised by intermittent bursts of activity interspersed with relatively quiescent periods. Most of the poleward heat transport by storm tracks is due to a limited number of strong heat flux events, which occur in a quasi-periodic fashion. This behaviour is in contradiction with the usual conceptual model of the storm tracks, which relies on high growth rate background flows which then spawn weather systems that grow in an exponential or non-normal fashion. Here we present a different conceptual model of the atmospheric storm tracks which is built on the observation that, when including diabatic and other dissipative effects, the storm track region is in fact most of the time marginally stable. The ensuing model is a nonlinear oscillator, very similar to Volterra-Lotka predator-prey models. We demonstrate the extensions of this model to a stochastically driven nonlinear oscillator. The model produces quasi-periodic behaviour dominated by intermittent heat flux events. Perhaps most surprisingly, we will show strong evidence from re-analysis data for our conceptual model: the re-analysis data produces a phase-space plot that is very similar indeed to the phase-space plot for our nonlinear oscillator model.

  6. Tropical Storms Bud and Dera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Like dancers pirouetting in opposite directions, the rotational patterns of two different tropical storms are contrasted in this pair of MISR nadir-camera images.

    The left-hand image is of Tropical Storm Bud, acquired on June 17, 2000 (Terra orbit 2656) as the storm was dissipating. Bud was situated in the eastern Pacific Ocean between Socorro Island and the southern tip of Baja California. South of the storm's center is a vortex pattern caused by obstruction of the prevailing flow by tiny Socorro Island. Sonora, Mexico and Baja California are visible at the top of the image.

    The right-hand image is of Tropical Cyclone Dera, acquired on March 12, 2001 (Terra orbit 6552). Dera was located in the Indian Ocean, south of Madagascar. The southern end of this large island is visible in the top portion of this image.

    Northern hemisphere tropical storms, like Bud, rotate in a counterclockwise direction, whereas those in the southern hemisphere, such as Dera, rotate clockwise. The opposite spins are a consequence of Earth's rotation.

    Each image covers a swath approximately 380 kilometers wide.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  7. Tropical Storms Bud and Dera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Like dancers pirouetting in opposite directions, the rotational patterns of two different tropical storms are contrasted in this pair of Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) nadir-camera images. The left-hand image is of Tropical Storm Bud, acquired on June 17, 2000 (Terra orbit 2656) as the storm was dissipating. Bud was situated in the eastern Pacific Ocean between Socorro Island and the southern tip of Baja California. South of the storm's center is a vortex pattern caused by obstruction of the prevailing flow by tiny Socorro Island. Sonora, Mexico and Baja California are visible at the top of the image. The right-hand image is of Tropical Cyclone Dera, acquired on March 12, 2001. Dera was located in the Indian Ocean, south of Madagascar. The southern end of this large island is visible in the top portion of this image. Northern hemisphere tropical storms, like Bud, rotate in a counterclockwise direction, whereas those in the southern hemisphere, such as Dera, rotate clockwise. The opposite spins are a consequence of Earth's rotation. Each image covers a swath approximately 380 kilometers wide. Image courtesy NASA/JPL/GSFC/LaRC, MISR Team

  8. Economic costs of extratropical storms under climate change: An application of FUND

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narita, D.; Tol, R.; Anthoff, D.

    2009-12-01

    Extratropical cyclones have attracted some attention in climate policy circles as a possible significant damage factor of climate change. This study conducts an assessment of economic impacts of increased storm activities under climate change with the integrated assessment model FUND 3.5. FUND is a model that calculates damages of climate change for 16 regions by making use of exogenous scenarios of socioeconomic variables (for details of our estimation approach, see our working paper whose URL is indicated below). Our estimation shows that in the base case, the direct economic damage of enhanced storms due to climate change amounts to $2.8 billion globally (approximately 38% of the total economic loss of storms at present) at the year 2100, while the ratio to the world GDP is 0.0009%. The regional results (Figure 1) indicate that the economic effect of extratropical storms with climate change would have relatively minor importance for the US (USA): The enhanced extratropical storm damage (less than 0.001% of GDP for the base case) is one order of magnitude lower than the tropical cyclone damage (roughly 0.01% GDP) calculated by the same version of FUND. In the regions without strong tropical cyclone influence, such as Western Europe (WEU) and Australia and New Zealand (ANZ), the extratropical storms might have some more significance as a possible damage factor of climate change. Especially for the latter, the direct economic damage could amount to more than 0.006% of GDP. Still, the impact is small relative to the income growth expected in these regions. Figure 1. Increased direct economic loss at the year 2100 for selected regions (results are shown for the three different baselines: the years 1986-2005, 1976-2005, and 1996-2005). US - USA; Canada - CAN; Western Europe - WEU; Australia and New Zealand - ANZ.

  9. A High Density Storm Surge Monitoring Network: Evaluating the Ability of Wetland Vegetation to Reduce Storm Surge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawler, S.; Denton, M.; Ferreira, C.

    2013-12-01

    Recent tropical storm activity in the Chesapeake Bay and a potential increase in the predicted frequency and magnitude of weather systems have drawn increased attention to the need for improved tools for monitoring, modeling and predicting the magnitude of storm surge, coastal flooding and the respective damage to infrastructure and wetland ecosystems. Among other forms of flood protection, it is believed that coastal wetlands and vegetation can act as a natural barrier that slows hurricane flooding, helping to reduce the impact of storm surge. However, quantifying the relationship between the physical process of storm surge and its attenuation by wetland vegetation is an active area of research and the deployment of in-situ measuring devices is crucial to data collection efforts in this field. The United States Geological Survey (USGS) mobile storm-surge network has already successfully provided a framework for evaluating hurricane induced storm surge water levels on a regional scale through the use of in-situ devices installed in areas affected by storm surge during extreme events. Based on the success of the USGS efforts, in this study we adapted the monitoring network to cover relatively small areas of wetlands and coastal vegetation with an increased density of sensors. Groups of 6 to 10 water level sensors were installed in sites strategically selected in three locations on the Virginia coast of the lower Chesapeake Bay area to monitor different types of vegetation and the resulting hydrodynamic patterns (open coast and inland waters). Each group of sensors recorded time series data of water levels for both astronomical tide circulation and meteorological induced surge. Field campaigns were carried out to survey characteristics of vegetation contributing to flow resistance (i.e. height, diameter and stem density) and mapped using high precision GPS. A geodatabase containing data from field campaigns will support the development and calibration of

  10. Agents to reduce cytokine storm.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Herwig

    2016-01-01

    The increasing insight into pathomechanisms of dysregulated host response in several inflammatory diseases led to the implementation of the term "cytokine storm" in the literature more than 20 years ago. Direct toxic effects as well as indirect immunomodulatory mechanisms during cytokine storm have been described and were the basis for the rationale to use several substances and devices in life-threatening infections and hyperinflammatory states. Clinical trials have been performed, most of them in the form of minor, investigator-initiated protocols; major clinical trials focused mostly on sepsis and septic shock. The following review tries to summarize the background, pathophysiology, and results of clinical investigations that had implications for the development of therapeutic strategies and international guidelines for the management of hyperinflammation during syndromes of cytokine storm in adult patients, predominantly in septic shock.

  11. Storm-driven Mixing and Potential Impact on the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Jiayan; Comiso, Josefino; Walsh, David; Krishfield, Richard; Honjo, Susumu; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Observations of the ocean, atmosphere, and ice made by Ice-Ocean Environmental Buoys (IOEBs) indicate that mixing events reaching the depth of the halocline have occurred in various regions in the Arctic Ocean. Our analysis suggests that these mixing events were mechanically forced by intense storms moving across the buoy sites. In this study, we analyzed these mixing events in the context of storm developments that occurred in the Beaufort Sea and in the general area just north of Fram Strait, two areas with quite different hydrographic structures. The Beaufort Sea is strongly influenced by inflow of Pacific water through Bering Strait, while the area north of Fram Strait is directly affected by the inflow of warm and salty North Atlantic water. Our analyses of the basin-wide evolution of the surface pressure and geostrophic wind fields indicate that the characteristics of the storms could be very different. The buoy-observed mixing occurred only in the spring and winter seasons when the stratification was relatively weak. This indicates the importance of stratification, although the mixing itself was mechanically driven. We also analyze the distribution of storms, both the long-term climatology as well as the patterns for each year in the last two decades. The frequency of storms is also shown to be correlated- (but not strongly) to Arctic Oscillation indices. This study indicates that the formation of new ice that leads to brine rejection is unlikely the mechanism that results in the type of mixing that could overturn the halocline. On the other hand, synoptic-scale storms can force mixing deep enough to the halocline and thermocline layer. Despite a very stable stratification associated with the Arctic halocline, the warm subsurface thermocline water is not always insulated from the mixed layer.

  12. Klaus, an exceptional winter storm over Northern Iberia and Southern France - a comparison between storm diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberato, M. L. R.; Pinto, J. G.; Trigo, I. F.; Trigo, R. M.

    2010-05-01

    The synoptic evolution and dynamical characteristics of storm "Klaus" (23 and 24 January 2009) are analysed. "Klaus" was an extratropical cyclone which developed over the subtropical North Atlantic Ocean on the 21st January 2009, then moved eastward embedded in the strong westerly flow and experienced a notorious strengthening on the 23rd January. The storm moved into the Bay of Biscay and deepened further before hitting Northern Spain and Southwestern France with gusts of up to 198 km/h. Afterwards, it steered southeastwards across Southern France into Northern Italy and the Adriatic. "Klaus" was the most intense and damaging wind storm in the region in a decade, provoked more than 20 casualties and insured losses of several billion Euros. The evolution of "Klaus" is analysed using two standard cyclone detecting and tracking schemes: a) the vorticity maxima based algorithm originally developed by Murray and Simmonds [1991], adapted for Northern Hemisphere cyclone characteristics [Pinto et al. 2005]; and b) the pressure minima based algorithm first developed for the Mediterranean region [Trigo et al. 1999; 2002] and later extended to a larger Euro-Atlantic region [Trigo 2006]. Additionally, the synoptic and mesoscale features of the storm are analysed. The vorticity based method detects the storm earlier than the pressure minima one. Results show that both tracks exhibited similar features and positions throughout almost all of their lifecycles, with minor discrepancies being probably related to different ways of both methods handling the spatio-temporal evolution of multiple candidates for cyclonic centres. In its strengthening phase, "Klaus" presents deepening rates above 37 hPa/24h, a value that after geostrophically adjusted to the reference latitude of 60°N increases to 44 hPa/24h, implying an exceptional event with bomb characteristics. During maximum intensity change within 24 hours was 1.165hPa/(deglat)2. References: Murray RJ, Simmonds I (1991) Aust

  13. Mesoscale aspects of convective storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujita, T. T.

    1981-01-01

    The structure, evolution and mechanisms of mesoscale convective disturbances are reviewed and observation techniques for "nowcasting" their nature are discussed. A generalized mesometeorological scale is given, classifying both low and high pressure systems. Mesoscale storms are shown often to induce strong winds, but their wind speeds are significantly less than those accompanied by submesoscale disturbances, such as tornadoes, downbursts, and microbursts. Mesoscale convective complexes, severe storm wakes, and flash floods are considered. The understanding of the evolution of supercells is essential for improving nowcasting capabilities and a very accurate combination of radar and satellite measurements is required.

  14. National Severe Storms Forecast Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The principal mission of the National Severe Storms Forecast Center (NSSFC) is to maintain a continuous watch of weather developments that are capable of producing severe local storms, including tornadoes, and to prepare and issue messages designated as either Weather Outlooks or Tornado or Severe Thunderstorm Watches for dissemination to the public and aviation services. In addition to its assigned responsibility at the national level, the NSSFC is involved in a number of programs at the regional and local levels. Subsequent subsections and paragraphs describe the NSSFC, its users, inputs, outputs, interfaces, capabilities, workload, problem areas, and future plans in more detail.

  15. Major storm periods and climate forcing in the Western Mediterranean during the Late Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degeai, Jean-Philippe; Devillers, Benoît; Dezileau, Laurent; Oueslati, Hamza; Bony, Guénaëlle

    2015-12-01

    Big storm events represent a major risk for populations and infrastructures settled on coastal lowlands. In the Western Mediterranean, where human societies colonized and occupied the coastal areas since the Ancient times, the variability of storm activity for the past three millennia was investigated with a multi-proxy sedimentological and geochemical study from a lagoonal sequence. Mappings of the geochemistry and magnetic susceptibility of detrital sources in the watershed of the lagoon and from the coastal barriers were undertaken in order to track the terrestrial or coastal/marine origin of sediments deposited into the lagoon. The multi-proxy analysis shows that coarser material, low magnetic susceptibility, and high strontium content characterize the sedimentological signature of the paleostorm levels identified in the lagoonal sequence. A comparison with North Atlantic and Western Mediterranean paleoclimate proxies shows that the phases of high storm activity occurred during cold periods, suggesting a climatically-controlled mechanism for the occurrence of these storm periods. Besides, an in-phase storm activity pattern is found between the Western Mediterranean and Northern Europe. Spectral analyses performed on the Sr content revealed a new 270-year solar-driven pattern of storm cyclicity. For the last 3000 years, this 270-year cycle defines a succession of ten major storm periods (SP) with a mean duration of 96 ± 54 yr. Periods of higher storm activity are recorded from >680 to 560 cal yr BC (SP10, end of the Iron Age Cold Period), from 140 to 820 cal yr AD (SP7 to SP5) with a climax of storminess between 400 and 800 cal yr AD (Dark Ages Cold Period), and from 1230 to >1800 cal yr AD (SP3 to SP1, Little Ice Age). Periods of low storm activity occurred from 560 cal yr BC to 140 cal yr AD (SP9 and SP8, Roman Warm Period) and from 820 to 1230 cal yr AD (SP4, Medieval Warm Period).

  16. GPM Sees Powerful Storms in Tropical Storm Hermine

    NASA Video Gallery

    This is a 3-D animated flyby of Tropical Storm Hermine created using radar data from the GPM core satellite. On Aug. 31 at 4 p.m. EDT GPM found rainfall occurring at a rate of over 9.9 inches (251 ...

  17. Operation IceBridge: Sea Ice Interlude

    NASA Video Gallery

    Sea ice comes in an array of shapes and sizes and has its own ephemeral beauty. Operation IceBridge studies sea ice at both poles, and also runs across interesting formations en route to other targ...

  18. Cumulative impacts of hurricanes on Florida mangrove ecosystems: Sediment deposition, storm surges and vegetation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, T. J.; Anderson, G.H.; Balentine, K.; Tiling, G.; Ward, G.A.; Whelan, K.R.T.

    2009-01-01

    Hurricanes have shaped the structure of mangrove forests in the Everglades via wind damage, storm surges and sediment deposition. Immediate effects include changes to stem size-frequency distributions and to species relative abundance and density. Long-term impacts to mangroves are poorly understood at present. We examine impacts of Hurricane Wilma on mangroves and compare the results to findings from three previous storms (Labor Day, Donna, Andrew). Surges during Wilma destroyed ??? 1,250 ha of mangroves and set back recovery that started following Andrew. Data from permanent plots affected by Andrew and Wilma showed no differences among species or between hurricanes for stem mortality or basal area lost. Hurricane damage was related to hydro-geomorphic type of forest. Basin mangroves suffered significantly more damage than riverine or island mangroves. The hurricane by forest type interaction was highly significant. Andrew did slightly more damage to island mangroves. Wilma did significantly more damage to basin forests. This is most likely a result of the larger and more spatially extensive storm surge produced by Wilma. Forest damage was not related to amount of sediment deposited. Analyses of reports from Donna and the Labor Day storm indicate that some sites have recovered following catastrophic disturbance. Other sites have been permanently converted into a different ecosystem, namely intertidal mudflats. Our results indicate that mangroves are not in a steady state as has been recently claimed. ?? 2009 The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  19. Ice VI freezing of meat: supercooling and ultrastructural studies.

    PubMed

    Molina-García, Antonio D; Otero, Laura; Martino, Miriam N; Zaritzky, Noemí E; Arabas, Jacek; Szczepek, Janusz; Sanz, Pedro D

    2004-03-01

    While "classical" freezing (to ice I) is disruptive to the microstructure of meat, freezing to ice VI has been found to preserve it. Ice VI freeze-substitution microscopy showed no traces of structural alteration on muscle fibres compared with the extensive damage caused by ice I freezing. The different signs of the freezing volume changes associated with these two ice phases is the most likely explanation for the above effects. Ice VI exists only at high pressure (632.4-2216 MPa) but can be formed and kept at room temperature. It was found that its nucleation requires a higher degree of supercooling than ice I freezing does, both for pure water and meat. Monitoring of the freezing process (by temperature and/or pressure measurements) is, thus, essential. The possible applications of ice VI freezing for food and other biological materials and the nucleation behaviour of this ice phase are discussed.

  20. Triaxial Testing of First-Year Sea Ice,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-12-01

    sheet varied from 2.0 to 2.05 in. southwesterly winds during the latter part of Octo- ber. This storm caused the young sheet of fast ice Structure to...confined compression tests performed with the ex- confinement ratios (Or/Ga), strain ".. tensometers mounted on the shaft of the triaxial rates and

  1. A sensitivity study of storm cyclones with a mesoscale model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radtke, K. S.; Tetzlaff, G.

    2003-04-01

    Extra tropical storms caused noticeable damages in the last decades. The evolution of strong cyclones is investigated by simulations with the nonhydrostatic limited area model 'Lokal Modell' (LM) of the German Weather Service (DWD). Which Conditions become important to distinguish an common cyclone from an storm-cyclone? Intense cyclones are mostly characterised by two typical large-scale features: high baroclinicity along the track of the low pressure system and a region of high equivalent potential temperature. For this purpose the observed values of the horizontal temperature gradient and the distribution of air moisture are varied and were used as forcing data, in such a way the development of storms was modified. The forcing data for the LM were generated by the global model of the DWD. Therefore data of real cyclones, such as the low Ginger, which occurred in 2000, were used. As the LM simulates only a limited area, the lateral bounds become problematic because of the manipulated forcing data. A procedure is tested, in order to prevent these problems. In this manner ensembles of storm scenarios were produced. The effects of various conditions were studied. Here in particular the changes in the surface velocity field were of interest. In the case of Ginger, an increase of the temperature gradient about 10 K causes an increasing of the maximum velocity about 3 m/s.

  2. New insights on geomagnetic storms from observations and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Jordanova, Vania K

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the response at Earth of the Sun's varying energy output and forecasting geomagnetic activity is of central interest to space science, since intense geomagnetic storms may cause severe damages on technological systems and affect communications. Episodes of southward (Bzstorms representative of each interplanetary condition with our kinetic ring current atmosphere interactions model (RAM), and investigate the mechanisms responsible for trapping particles and for causing their loss. We find that periods of increased magnetospheric convection coinciding with enhancements of plasma sheet density are needed for strong ring current buildup. During the HSS-driven storm the convection potential is highly variable and causes small sporadic injections into the ring current. The long period of enhanced convection during the CME-driven storm causes a continuous ring current injection penetrating to lower L shells and stronger ring current buildup.

  3. Tropical Storm Debby Moves into Atlantic

    NASA Video Gallery

    An animation of satellite observations shows the progression of Tropical Storm Debby from June 25-27, 2012. The animation shows that Tropical Storm Debby's center move from the northeastern Gulf of...

  4. Satellite View of 2 Trop. Storms

    NASA Video Gallery

    System 98L exploded into Tropical Storm Irene on Saturday, August 20. This GOES-13 Video shows Tropical Storm Harvey making landfall in Belize (just beneath the Yucatan Peninsula) and moving into t...

  5. On the Impact of Extratropical Systems and Tropical Storms in the Characterization of Flood Risk for the Eastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villarini, Gabriele; Smith, James; Vecchi, Gabriel; Baeck, Mary Lynn

    2010-05-01

    Flooding in the eastern US reflects a mixture of flood generating mechanisms, with landfalling tropical cyclones and extratropical systems playing central roles. These precipitation systems represent a major risk for insured property and can lead to extensive damage through storm surge flooding, inland flooding and heavy rainfall, or extreme windspeeds. The focus of this work revolves around two main issues: 1) For a given extratropical system or landfalling tropical storm, what is the extent of the inland flooding? 2) What is the rainfall distribution and storm evolution for flood events in the eastern US? Results are presented using case studies of both extratropical systems and landfalling tropical storms in the eastern US. The results of this study could be used to feed into the next generation of cat-models and assist in the calculation of damages from inland flood damage and heavy rainfall.

  6. A-Train Observations of Deep Convective Storm Tops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Setvak, Martin; Bedka, Kristopher; Lindsey, Daniel T.; Sokol, Alois; Charvat, Zdenek; Stastka, Jindrich; Wang, Pao K.

    2013-01-01

    The paper highlights simultaneous observations of tops of deep convective clouds from several space-borne instruments including the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) of the Aqua satellite, Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) of the CloudSat satellite, and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) flown on the CALIPSO satellite. These satellites share very close orbits, thus together with several other satellites they are referred to as the "A-Train" constellation. Though the primary responsibility of these satellites and their instrumentation is much broader than observations of fine-scale processes atop convective storms, in this study we document how data from the A-Train can contribute to a better understanding and interpretation of various storm-top features, such as overshooting tops, cold-U/V and cold ring features with their coupled embedded warm areas, above anvil ice plumes and jumping cirrus. The relationships between MODIS multi-spectral brightness temperature difference (BTD) fields and cloud top signatures observed by the CPR and CALIOP are also examined in detail to highlight the variability in BTD signals across convective storm events.

  7. Massive Solar Storms Inflict Little Damage on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Sarah

    2003-11-01

    The face of the Sun had been peaceful and blemish-free for much of 2003. But space weather forecasters knew trouble was brewing on 24 October when Jupiter-sized sunspot 486 rotated into full view. Combined with two other unusually large spots, number 486 would kick up the most intense solar activity in 30 years according to several NOAA and NASA officials who were interviewed during the accompanying flurry of media coverage.

  8. ENSO and winter storms in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cayan, D.R.; Bromirski, Peter

    2003-01-01

    The frequency and intensity of North Pacific winter storms that penetrate the California coast drives the winds, sea level, precipitation and streamflow that are crucial influences on coastal processes. There is considerable variability of these storm characteristics, in large part owing to the El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO} phenomenon. There is a great contrast of the storm characteristics during the El Nino phase vs. the La Nina phase, with the largest scale, southerly extensive winter storms generated during El Nino.

  9. Rain from Tropical Storm Noel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Though not the most powerful storm of the 2007 Atlantic Hurricane season, Tropical Storm Noel was among the most deadly. Only Category 5 Hurricane Felix and its associated flooding had a higher toll. The slow-moving Tropical Storm Noel inundated the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Jamaica, Cuba, and the Bahamas with heavy rain between October 28 and November 1, 2007. The resulting floods and mudslides left at least 115 dead and thousands homeless throughout the Caribbean, reported the Associated Press on November 2, 2007. This image shows the distribution of the rainfall that made Noel a deadly storm. The image shows rainfall totals as measured by the Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (MPA) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center from October 26 through November 1, 2007. The analysis is based on measurements taken by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite. The heaviest rainfall fell in the Dominican Republic and the Bahamas, northeast of Noel's center. Areas of dark red show that rainfall totals over the south-central Dominican Republic and parts of the Bahamas were over 551 millimeters (21 inches). Much of eastern Hispaniola, including both the Dominican Republic and Haiti received at least 200 mm (about 8 inches) of rain, shown in yellow. Rainfall totals over Haiti and Cuba were less, with a range of at least 50 mm (2 inches) to over 200 mm (8 inches).

  10. Storm Water Management Model (SWMM)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stormwater discharges continue to cause impairment of our Nation’s waterbodies. Regulations that require the retention and/or treatment of frequent, small storms that dominate runoff volumes and pollutant loads are becoming more common. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (E...

  11. Springtime Dust Storm Swirls at Martian North Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Two Hubble Space Telescope images of Mars, taken about a month apart on September 18 and October 15, 1996, reveal a state-sized dust storm churning near the edge of the Martian north polar cap. The polar storm is probably a consequence of large temperature differences between the polar ice and the dark regions to the south, which are heated by the springtime sun. The increased sunlight also causes the dry ice in the polar cap to sublime and shrink.

    Mars is famous for large, planet-wide dust storms. Smaller storms resembling the one seen here were observed in other regions by Viking orbiters in the late 1970s. However, this is the first time that such an event has been caught near the receding north polar cap. The Hubble images provide valuable new insights into the behavior of localized dust storms on Mars, which are typically below the resolution of ground-based telescopes. This kind of advanced planetary 'weather report' will be invaluable for aiding preparation for the landing of NASA's Pathfinder spacecraft in July 1997 and the arrival of Mars Global Surveyor orbiter in September 1997.

    Top (September 18, 1996) - The salmon colored notch in the white north polar cap is a 600-mile (1,000 kilometer) long storm -- nearly the width of Texas. The bright dust can also be seen over the dark surface surrounding the cap, where it is caught up in the Martian jet stream and blown easterly. The white clouds at lower latitudes are mostly associated with major Martian volcanos such as Olympus Mons. This image was taken when Mars was more than 186 million miles (300 million kilometers) from Earth, and the planet was smaller in angular size than Jupiter's Great Red Spot!

    Bottom (October 15, 1996) - Though the storm has dissipated by October, a distinctive dust-colored comma-shaped feature can be seen curving across the ice cap. The shape is similar to cold fronts on Earth, which are associated with low pressure systems. Nothing quite like this feature has been seen

  12. Some physical drivers of changes in the winter storm tracks over the North Atlantic and Mediterranean during the Holocene.

    PubMed

    Brayshaw, David James; Hoskins, Brian; Black, Emily

    2010-11-28

    The winter climate of Europe and the Mediterranean is dominated by the weather systems of the mid-latitude storm tracks. The behaviour of the storm tracks is highly variable, particularly in the eastern North Atlantic, and has a profound impact on the hydroclimate of the Mediterranean region. A deeper understanding of the storm tracks and the factors that drive them is therefore crucial for interpreting past changes in Mediterranean climate and the civilizations it has supported over the last 12 000 years (broadly the Holocene period). This paper presents a discussion of how changes in climate forcing (e.g. orbital variations, greenhouse gases, ice sheet cover) may have impacted on the 'basic ingredients' controlling the mid-latitude storm tracks over the North Atlantic and the Mediterranean on intermillennial time scales. Idealized simulations using the HadAM3 atmospheric general circulation model (GCM) are used to explore the basic processes, while a series of timeslice simulations from a similar atmospheric GCM coupled to a thermodynamic slab ocean (HadSM3) are examined to identify the impact these drivers have on the storm track during the Holocene. The results suggest that the North Atlantic storm track has moved northward and strengthened with time since the Early to Mid-Holocene. In contrast, the Mediterranean storm track may have weakened over the same period. It is, however, emphasized that much remains still to be understood about the evolution of the North Atlantic and Mediterranean storm tracks during the Holocene period.

  13. 46 CFR 169.329 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Storm rails. 169.329 Section 169.329 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction and Arrangement Rails and Guards § 169.329 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must...

  14. 46 CFR 116.920 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Storm rails. 116.920 Section 116.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE THAN 150... and Guards § 116.920 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must be installed where...

  15. 46 CFR 116.920 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Storm rails. 116.920 Section 116.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE THAN 150... and Guards § 116.920 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must be installed where...

  16. 46 CFR 127.320 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Storm rails. 127.320 Section 127.320 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENTS Rails and Guards § 127.320 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails must be installed in each passageway and...

  17. 46 CFR 116.920 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Storm rails. 116.920 Section 116.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE THAN 150... and Guards § 116.920 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must be installed where...

  18. 46 CFR 108.221 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Storm rails. 108.221 Section 108.221 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Rails § 108.221 Storm rails. Each unit must have a storm rail in the...

  19. 46 CFR 169.329 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Storm rails. 169.329 Section 169.329 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction and Arrangement Rails and Guards § 169.329 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must...

  20. 46 CFR 169.329 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Storm rails. 169.329 Section 169.329 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction and Arrangement Rails and Guards § 169.329 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must...

  1. 46 CFR 127.320 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Storm rails. 127.320 Section 127.320 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENTS Rails and Guards § 127.320 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails must be installed in each passageway and...

  2. 46 CFR 108.221 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Storm rails. 108.221 Section 108.221 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Rails § 108.221 Storm rails. Each unit must have a storm rail in the...

  3. 46 CFR 127.320 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Storm rails. 127.320 Section 127.320 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENTS Rails and Guards § 127.320 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails must be installed in each passageway and...

  4. 46 CFR 177.920 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Storm rails. 177.920 Section 177.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 177.920 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must...

  5. 46 CFR 177.920 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Storm rails. 177.920 Section 177.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 177.920 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must...

  6. 46 CFR 127.320 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Storm rails. 127.320 Section 127.320 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENTS Rails and Guards § 127.320 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails must be installed in each passageway and...

  7. 46 CFR 169.329 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Storm rails. 169.329 Section 169.329 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction and Arrangement Rails and Guards § 169.329 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must...

  8. 46 CFR 108.221 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Storm rails. 108.221 Section 108.221 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Rails § 108.221 Storm rails. Each unit must have a storm rail in the...

  9. 46 CFR 116.920 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Storm rails. 116.920 Section 116.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE THAN 150... and Guards § 116.920 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must be installed where...

  10. 46 CFR 116.920 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Storm rails. 116.920 Section 116.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE THAN 150... and Guards § 116.920 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must be installed where...

  11. 46 CFR 169.329 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Storm rails. 169.329 Section 169.329 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction and Arrangement Rails and Guards § 169.329 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must...

  12. 46 CFR 127.320 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Storm rails. 127.320 Section 127.320 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENTS Rails and Guards § 127.320 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails must be installed in each passageway and...

  13. 46 CFR 108.221 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Storm rails. 108.221 Section 108.221 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Rails § 108.221 Storm rails. Each unit must have a storm rail in the...

  14. 46 CFR 177.920 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Storm rails. 177.920 Section 177.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 177.920 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must...

  15. 46 CFR 177.920 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Storm rails. 177.920 Section 177.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 177.920 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must...

  16. 46 CFR 108.221 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Storm rails. 108.221 Section 108.221 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Rails § 108.221 Storm rails. Each unit must have a storm rail in the...

  17. 46 CFR 177.920 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Storm rails. 177.920 Section 177.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 177.920 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must...

  18. Interactive modeling of storm impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rooijen, A.; Baart, F.; Roelvink, J. A.; Donchyts, G.; Scheel, F.; de Boer, W.

    2014-12-01

    In the past decades the impact of storms on the coastal zone has increasingly drawn the attention of policy makers and coastal planners, engineers and researchers. The mean reason for this interest is the high density of the world's population living near the ocean, in combination with climate change. Due to sea level rise and extremer weather conditions, many of the world's coastlines are becoming more vulnerable to the potential of flooding. Currently it is common practice to predict storm impact using physics-based numerical models. The numerical model utilizes several inputs (e.g. bathymetry, waves, surge) to calculate the impact on the coastline. Traditionally, the numerical modeller takes the following three steps: schematization/model setup, running and post-processing. This process generally has a total feedback time in the order of hours to days, and is suitable for so-called confirmatory modelling.However, often models are applied as an exploratory tool, in which the effect of e.g. different hydraulic conditions, or measures is investigated. The above described traditional work flow is not the most efficient method for exploratory modelling. Interactive modelling lets users adjust a simulation while running. For models typically used for storm impact studies (e.g. XBeach, Delft3D, D-Flow FM), the user can for instance change the storm surge level, wave conditions, or add a measure such as a nourishment or a seawall. The model will take the adjustments into account immediately, and will directly compute the effect. Using this method, tools can be developed in which stakeholders (e.g. coastal planners, policy makers) are in control and together evaluate ideas by interacting with the model. Here we will show initial results for interactive modelling with a storm impact model.

  19. Beating the storm. [Procedures of Marathon Oil Co

    SciTech Connect

    Stelzer, D.A.

    1983-01-01

    In this article, Mr. Stelzer describes the activities of management and crews when weather advisories dictate emergency shutdown of Marathon's western Gulf of Mexico drilling activities. The Lafayette, LA office monitors the atmospheric disturbances (seeds of potential hurricanes) and, eventually, the growing storm, and alerts all Marathon platforms in Sector 2 of the western Gulf to prepare for possible shutdown. In the example described here, management gave the order at 7:00 AM to shut down all Marathon platforms and shore bases in the vicinity of the western Gulf as Hurricane Alicia built up eastward. Within minutes, a well-practed series of exercises was put in motion - lowering and chaining down lengths of drill pipe, securing anything else that could be chained down, and starting the orderly evacuation of the platform workers (by helicopter, when possible). By 5:35 PM, just 10.5 hours after the alert, all personnel from the 13 Marathon platforms had been safely transported to Lafayette and Lake Charles, LA. The shore bases themselves were then secured and vacated to await the storm's fury. Alicia eventually slammed ashore, wreaking extensive storm damage in Galveston, Houston, and Texas City; a Marathon refinery in the latter sustained heavy property loss and interruption of work. Offshore, there was very little damage aboard the Marathon platforms; and, within hours, all platforms were back in operation.

  20. Flashover tests of artificially iced insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Charneski, M.D.; Gaibrois, G.L.; Whitney, B.F.

    1982-08-01

    Test apparatus and procedures were developed to test energized, non-contaminated, 120 kV system insulators under simulated freezing rain conditions. The flashover performances were compared between non-ceramic composite transmission line insulators and standard porcelain 5 3/4 x 10 inch suspension insulators. Standard and long leak Multicone porcelain insulators were also compared in the icing tests to standard porcelain station post insulators. Icing tests at several voltage stresses provided the full flashover range of the insulators from the minimum or zero flashovers in ten trials up to the maximum or 10 flashovers in 10 trials. Using the desired insulator voltage stress flashover curve for specific insulator types and the voltage stress applied to the insulator, the comparative probability of flashover due to ice storms on the system can be evaluated for 120 kV, 230 kV and 345 kV systems.

  1. Impact of mesoscale ocean currents on sea ice in high-resolution Arctic ice and ocean simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuxia; Maslowski, Wieslaw; Semtner, Albert J.

    1999-08-01

    A high-resolution sea ice model is designed for simulating the Arctic. The grid resolution is ˜18 km, and the domain contains the main Arctic Ocean, Nordic Seas, Canadian Archipelago, and the subpolar North Atlantic. The model is based on a widely used dynamic and thermodynamic model with more efficient numerics. The oceanic forcing is from an Arctic Ocean model with the same horizontal resolution as the ice model and 30 levels. The atmospheric forcing is from 3-day average 1990-1994 European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts operational data. Results from the ice model are compared against satellite passive-microwave observations and drifting buoys. The model realistically simulates ice tongues and eddies in the Greenland Sea. The mesoscale ocean eddies along the East Greenland Current (EGC) are demonstrated to be responsible for the presence of ice eddies and tongues out of the Greenland Sea ice edge. Large shear and divergence associated with the mesoscale ice eddies and strong ice drift, such as the one above the EGC, result in thinner and less compact ice. The mesoscale ocean eddies along the Alaskan Chukchi shelf break, the Northwind Ridge, and the Alpha-Mendeleyev Ridge are major contributors to mesoscale reduction of ice concentration, in addition to atmospheric storms which usually lead to a broad-scale reduction of ice concentration. The existence of mesoscale ocean eddies greatly increases nonuniformity of ice motion, which means stronger ice deformation and more open water. An eddy-resolving coupled ice-ocean model is highly recommended to adequately simulate the small but important percentage of open water in the Arctic pack ice, which can significantly change the heat fluxes from ocean to atmosphere and affect the global climate.

  2. Towards Resolving the Paradox of Antarctic Sea Ice: A New Integrated Framework for Observing the Antarctic Marginal Ice Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, G. D.

    2014-12-01

    Antarctic sea ice distribution, a canary in the coal mine for climate change in the Southern Hemisphere, is controlled by the marginal ice zone (MIZ). The MIZ is the dynamic outer part of the sea-ice zone, where it interacts with the high-energy open ocean and is strongly affected by waves and storms. As an interface between ocean and atmosphere with extreme vertical and horizontal temperature gradients and large variations in mechanical properties, the MIZ is a complex system that evolves with, and impacts upon, the advancing/receding ice edge. More than a zone, it is a migratory transition in 'phase space' that biannually passes across the entire Antarctic SIZ. During the advance phase of sea-ice seasonality, and under freezing conditions, wave-induced pancake-ice formation can lead to rapid ice-edge advance. During the retreat phase, the dynamic break-up and modification of sea ice by passing storms, winds and waves greatly modifies the floe-size distribution within the MIZ, to create smaller floes that melt more rapidly and accelerate sea-ice retreat as spring progresses. Inspired by the current Arctic MIZ efforts, new fieldwork is proposed to resolve the key characteristics of the Antarctic MIZ and the processes controlling its extent. Combining new autonomous observation technology with ship-based techniques, integrated experiments are being designed to advance our understanding of the MIZ and its role in driving seasonal sea ice advance and retreat around Antarctica. The proposed project provides a unique opportunity to develop an observational, analytical, and science-policy framework for coordinated monitoring of sea ice in both the northern and southern hemispheres, with implications for forecasting, monitoring, and prediction that are essential with increasingly dynamic and variable polar climate systems.

  3. Polarimetric radar characteristics of storms with and without lightning activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattos, Enrique V.; Machado, Luiz A. T.; Williams, Earle R.; Albrecht, Rachel I.

    2016-12-01

    This paper analyzes the cloud microphysics in different layers of storms as a function of three-dimensional total lightning density. A mobile X-band polarimetric radar and very high frequency (VHF) sources from Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) observations during the 2011/2012 Brazil spring-summer were used to determine the microphysical signatures of radar vertical profiles and lightning density. This study quantified the behavior of 5.3 million vertical profiles of the horizontal reflectivity (ZH), differential reflectivity (ZDR), specific differential phase (KDP), and correlation coefficient (ρHV). The principal changes in the polarimetric variables occurred only for VHF source rate density greater than 14 VHF sources per km2 in 4 min. These storms showed an enhanced positive KDP in the mixed 1 layer (from 0 to -15°C) probably associated with supercooled liquid water signatures, whereas regions with negative ZDR and KDP and moderate ZH in the mixed 2 layer (from -15 to -40°C) were possibly associated with the presence of conical graupel. The glaciated (above -40°C) and upper part of the mixed 2 layers showed a significant trend to negative KDP with an increase in lightning density, in agreement with vertical alignment of ice particle by the cloud electric field. A conceptual model that presents the microphysical signatures in storms with and without lightning activity was constructed. The observations documented in this study provide an understanding of how the combinations of polarimetric variables could help to identify storms with different lightning density and vice versa.

  4. Identification of Storm Surge Vulnerable Areas in the Philippines Through Simulations of Typhoon Haiyan-Induced Storm Surge Using Tracks of Historical Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapidez, John Phillip; Suarez, John Kenneth; Tablazon, Judd; Dasallas, Lea; Gonzalo, Lia Anne; Santiago, Joy; Cabacaba, Krichi May; Ramos, Michael Marie Angelo; Mahar Francisco Lagmay, Alfredo; Malano, Vicente

    2014-05-01

    Super Typhoon Haiyan entered the Philippine Area of Responsibility (PAR) 07 November 2013, causing tremendous damage to infrastructure and loss of lives mainly due to the typhoon's storm surge and strong winds. Storm surges up to a height of 7 meters were reported in the hardest hit areas. The threat imposed by this kind of natural calamity compelled researchers of the Nationwide Operational Assessment of Hazards, the flagship disaster mitigation program of the Department of Science and Technology, Government of the Philippines, to undertake a study to determine the vulnerability of all Philippine coastal communities to storm surges of the same magnitude as those generated by Haiyan. This study calculates the maximum probable storm surge height for every coastal locality by running simulations of Haiyan-type conditions but with tracks of tropical cyclones that entered PAR from 1948-2013. DOST-Project NOAH used the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) Storm Surge Model, a numerical code that simulates and predicts storm surges spawned by tropical cyclones. Input parameters for the storm surge model include bathymetric data, storm track, central atmospheric pressure, and maximum wind speed. The simulations were made using Haiyan's pressure and wind speed as the forcing parameters. The simulated storm surge height values were added to the maximum tide level obtained from WXTide, software that contains a catalogue of worldwide astronomical tides, to come up with storm tide levels. The resulting water level was used as input to FLO-2D to generate the storm tide inundation maps. One product of this study is a list of the most vulnerable coastal areas that can be used as basis for choosing priority sites for further studies to implement appropriate site-specific solutions. Another product is the storm tide inundation maps that the local government units can use to develop a Risk-Sensitive Land Use Plan for identifying appropriate areas to build residential buildings

  5. Large Geomagnetic Storms: Introduction to Special Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.

    2010-01-01

    Solar cycle 23 witnessed the accumulation of rich data sets that reveal various aspects of geomagnetic storms in unprecedented detail both at the Sun where the storm causing disturbances originate and in geospace where the effects of the storms are directly felt. During two recent coordinated data analysis workshops (CDAWs) the large geomagnetic storms (Dst < or = -100 nT) of solar cycle 23 were studied in order to understand their solar, interplanetary, and geospace connections. This special section grew out of these CDAWs with additional contributions relevant to these storms. Here I provide a brief summary of the results presented in the special section.

  6. Dust storms - Great Plains, Africa, and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woiceshyn, P. M.; Krauss, R.; Minzner, R.; Shenk, W.

    1977-01-01

    Dust storms in the Great Plains of North America and in the Sahara Desert are analyzed on the basis of imagery from the geostationary Synchronous Meteorological Satellite. The onset time, location and areal extent of the dust storms are studied. Over land surfaces, contrast enhancement techniques are needed to obtain an adequate picture of dust storm development. In addition, infrared imagery may provide a means of monitoring the strong horizontal temperature gradients characteristic of dust cloud boundaries. Analogies between terrestrial dust storms and the airborne rivers of dust created by major Martian dust storms are also drawn.

  7. Storm Impacts on Potential Pathogens in Estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fries, J. Stephen; Noble, Rachel T.; Kelly, Ginger M.; Hsieh, Jennifer L.

    2007-02-01

    Estuarine and coastal environments are susceptible to a variety of changes driven by tropical storms and hurricanes. The 2005 Atlantic hurricane season impressed upon the public the devastating impacts of storms on coastal populations and the possible social and public health costs. Storm surges and subsequent flooding have the potential to redistribute water and associated contaminants, including a wide range of chemicals and microorganisms. While this impact is difficult to observe through monitoring during larger storms, smaller storms provide opportunities to observe the mechanisms responsible for contaminant and microbial transport.

  8. Relating the current science of ion-defect behavior in ice to a plausible mechanism for directional charge transfer during ice particle collisions.

    PubMed

    Devlin, J Paul

    2011-11-28

    A melding of modern experimental results descriptive of fundamental ion defect properties of ice is presented as a logical basis of a mechanism for the preferential transfer of positive charge from large to small colliding ice particles. The result may relate to the electrification of storm clouds. It is broadly agreed that such localized charge transfer during collision of small upwardly mobile ice particles with falling ice granules (i.e., graupel/hail) can lead to macroscopic charge separation capable of initiating lightning strikes during the expansion stage of a storm cell. Though the larger particles are thought to become negatively charged during the collisions neither a generally favored charge-exchange agent nor a preferred mechanism for the directional particle-to-particle charge transfer exists. Nevertheless, should ionic point defects of ice play a key role, the fundamental properties of ice defects considered here must apply. They include: (1) above 140 K protons move readily within and on the surface of ice while hydroxide ions are orders-of-magnitude less mobile, (2) whether generated by dissociation of HCl buried in ice, during neat ice particle growth, or at platinum-ice interfaces, interior protons move to and apparently collect at the ice-vacuum interface, and (3) proton activity and populations are orders-of-magnitude greater at the surface of ice films and free-standing ice particles than in the interior. From these fundamentals an untested argument is developed that within an ensemble of free floating ice particles the proton density at the surface is greater for larger particles. This implies a plausible proton-based mechanism that is consistent with current concepts of ice particle charging through collisions.

  9. Mass Balance Changes and Ice Dynamics of Greenland and Antarctic Ice Sheets from Laser Altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babonis, G. S.; Csatho, B.; Schenk, T.

    2016-06-01

    During the past few decades the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets have lost ice at accelerating rates, caused by increasing surface temperature. The melting of the two big ice sheets has a big impact on global sea level rise. If the ice sheets would melt down entirely, the sea level would rise more than 60 m. Even a much smaller rise would cause dramatic damage along coastal regions. In this paper we report about a major upgrade of surface elevation changes derived from laser altimetry data, acquired by NASA's Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite mission (ICESat) and airborne laser campaigns, such as Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) and Land, Vegetation and Ice Sensor (LVIS). For detecting changes in ice sheet elevations we have developed the Surface Elevation Reconstruction And Change detection (SERAC) method. It computes elevation changes of small surface patches by keeping the surface shape constant and considering the absolute values as surface elevations. We report about important upgrades of earlier results, for example the inclusion of local ice caps and the temporal extension from 1993 to 2014 for the Greenland Ice Sheet and for a comprehensive reconstruction of ice thickness and mass changes for the Antarctic Ice Sheets.

  10. Maine coastal storm and flood of February 2, 1976

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrill, Richard Arthur; Chin, Edwin H.; Richardson, W.S.

    1979-01-01

    A business section of Bangor, Maine, was flooded with 12 feet (3.7 m) of water on February 2, 1976. The water surface elevation reached 17.46 feet (5.32 m) above national geodetic vertical datum of 1929 (NGVD), approximately 10.5 feet (3.2 m) above the predicted astronomical tide at Bangor. The unusually high water resulted from a tidal storm surge caused by prolonged strong, south-southeasterly winds which occurred near the time of astronomical high tide. Winds exceeded 64 knots off the New England coast. The resulting flood was the third highest since 1846 and is the first documented tidal flood at Bangor. This report documents the meteorological and hydrologic conditions associated with the flooding and also contains a brief description of storm damage from Eastport to Brunswick, Maine. Included are flood elevations in the city of Bangor and along the coast of Maine east of the Kennebec River. (Kosco-USGS)

  11. Impact of hurricanes storm surges on the groundwater resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Biersel, T. P.; Carlson, D.A.; Milner, L.R.

    2007-01-01

    Ocean surges onto coastal lowlands caused by tropical and extra tropical storms, tsunamis, and sea level rise affect all coastal lowlands and present a threat to drinking water resources of many coastal residents. In 2005, two such storms, Hurricanes Katrina and Rita struck the Gulf Coast of the US. Since September 2005, water samples have been collected from water wells impacted by the hurricanes' storm surges along the north shore of Lake Pontchartrain in southeastern Louisiana. The private and public water wells tested were submerged by 0.6-4.5 m of surging saltwater for several hours. The wells' casing and/or the associated plumbing were severely damaged. Water samples were collected to determine if storm surge water inundated the well casing and, if so, its effect on water quality within the shallow aquifers of the Southern Hills Aquifer System. In addition, the samples were used to determine if the impact on water quality may have long-term implication for public health. Laboratory testing for several indicator parameters (Ca/Mg, Cl/Si, chloride, boron, specific conductance and bacteria) indicates that surge water entered water wells' casing and the screened aquifer. Analysis of the groundwater shows a decrease in the Ca/Mg ratio right after the storm and then a return toward pre-Katrina values. Chloride concentrations were elevated right after Katrina and Rita, and then decreased downward toward pre-Katrina values. From September 2005 to June 2006, the wells showed improvement in all the saltwater intrusion indicators. ?? 2007 Springer-Verlag.

  12. Extreme Lightning Flash Rates as an Early Indicator of Severe Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Steven J.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Extreme lightning flash rates are proving to be an early indicator of intensifying storms capable of producing tornadoes, damaging winds and hail. Most of this lightning is in the cloud, where the naked eye can not see it. Recent global observations of thunderstorms from space indicate that giant electrical storms (supercells and convective complexes) with flash rates on the order of 1 flash per second are most common over the land masses of the America sub-tropics and equatorial Congo Basin. Within the United States, the average tornado warning lead time on a national basis is about 11 min. The real-time observation of extreme flash rates and the rapid increase in the in-cloud flash rate, signalling the intensification of the storm updraft, may provide as much as a 50% increase in severe storm warning lead time.

  13. Assessing storm events for energy meteorology: using media and scientific reports to track a North Sea autumn storm.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettle, Anthony

    2016-04-01

    Important issues for energy meteorology are to assess meteorological conditions for normal operating conditions and extreme events for the ultimate limit state of engineering structures. For the offshore environment in northwest Europe, energy meteorology encompasses weather conditions relevant for petroleum production infrastructure and also the new field of offshore wind energy production. Autumn and winter storms are an important issue for offshore operations in the North Sea. The weather in this region is considered as challenging for extreme meteorological events as the Gulf of Mexico with its attendant hurricane risk. The rise of the Internet and proliferation of digital recording devices has placed a much greater amount of information in the public domain than was available to national meteorological agencies even 20 years ago. This contribution looks at reports of meteorology and infrastructure damage from a storm in the autumn of 2006 to trace the spatial and temporal record of meteorological events. Media reports give key information to assess the events of the storm. The storm passed over northern Europe between Oct.31-Nov. 2, 2006, and press reports from the time indicate that its most important feature was a high surge that inundated coastal areas. Sections of the Dutch and German North Sea coast were affected, and there was record flooding in Denmark and East Germany in the southern Baltic Sea. Extreme wind gusts were also reported that were strong enough to damage roofs and trees, and there was even tornado recorded near the Dutch-German border. Offshore, there were a series of damage reports from ship and platforms that were linked with sea state, and reports of rogue waves were explicitly mentioned. Many regional government authorities published summaries of geophysical information related to the storm, and these form part of a regular series of online winter storm reports that started as a public service about 15 years ago. Depending on the

  14. Thyroid storm precipitated by duodenal ulcer perforation.

    PubMed

    Natsuda, Shoko; Nakashima, Yomi; Horie, Ichiro; Ando, Takao; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid storm is a rare and life-threatening complication of thyrotoxicosis that requires prompt treatment. Thyroid storm is also known to be associated with precipitating events. The simultaneous treatment of thyroid storm and its precipitant, when they are recognized, in a patient is recommended; otherwise such disorders, including thyroid storm, can exacerbate each other. Here we report the case of a thyroid storm patient (a 55-year-old Japanese male) complicated with a perforated duodenal ulcer. The patient was successfully treated with intensive treatment for thyroid storm and a prompt operation. Although it is believed that peptic ulcer rarely coexists with hyperthyroidism, among patients with thyroid storm, perforation of a peptic ulcer has been reported as one of the causes of fatal outcome. We determined that surgical intervention was required in this patient, reported despite ongoing severe thyrotoxicosis, and reported herein a successful outcome.

  15. [Diagnosis and treatment of thyroid storm].

    PubMed

    Akamizu, Takashi

    2012-11-01

    Thyrotoxic storm is a life-threatening condition requiring emergency treatment. Neither its epidemiological data nor diagnostic criteria have been fully established. We clarified the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of thyroid storm using nationwide surveys and then formulate diagnostic criteria for thyroid storm. To perform the nationwide survey on thyroid storm, we first developed tentative diagnostic criteria for thyroid storm, mainly based upon the literature (the first edition). We analyzed the relationship of the major features of thyroid storm to mortality and to certain other features. Finally, based upon the findings of these surveys, we revised the diagnostic criteria. Thyrotoxic storm is still a life-threatening disorder with over 10% mortality in Japan.

  16. Thermospheric storms and related ionospheric effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, S.; Spencer, N. W.

    1976-01-01

    A comparative study of thermospheric storms for equinox and winter conditions is presented based on neutral-composition measurements from the Aeros-A neutral-atmosphere temperature experiment. The main features of the two storms as inferred from changes in N2, Ar, He, and O are described, and their implications for current theories of thermospheric storms are discussed. On the basis of the study of the F-region critical frequency measured from a chain of ground-based ionospheric stations during the two storm periods, the general characteristics of the ionospheric storms and the traveling ionospheric disturbances are described. It is suggested that the positive and negative phases of ionospheric storms are different manifestations of thermospheric storms.

  17. An overview of shed ice impact studies in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britton, Randall K.; Bond, Thomas H.

    1993-01-01

    One of the areas of active research in commercial and military rotorcraft is directed toward developing the capability of sustained flight in icing conditions. The emphasis to date has been on the accretion and subsequent shedding of ice in an icing environment, where the shedding may be natural or induced. Historically, shed-ice particles have been a problem for aircraft, particularly rotorcraft. Because of the high particle velocities involved, damage to a fuselage or other airframe component from a shed-ice impact can be significant. Design rules for damage tolerance from shed-ice impact are not well developed because of a lack of experimental data. Thus, NASA Lewis (LeRC) has begun an effort to develop a database of impact force and energy resulting from shed ice. This effort consisted of a test of NASA LeRC's Model Rotor Test Rig (MRTR) in the Icing Research Tunnel (IRT). Both natural shedding and forced shedding were investigated. Forced shedding was achieved by fitting the rotor blades with Small Tube Pneumatic (STP) deicer boots manufactured by BF Goodrich. A detailed description of the test is given as well as the design of a new impact sensor which measures the force-time history of an impacting ice fragment. A brief discussion of the procedure to infer impact energy from a force-time trace are required for the impact-energy calculations. Recommendations and future plans for this research area are also provided.

  18. An overview of shed ice impact in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, Thomas H.; Britton, Randall K.

    1993-01-01

    One of the areas of active research in commercial and military rotorcraft is directed toward developing the capability of sustained flight in icing conditions. The emphasis to date has been on the accretion and subsequent shedding of ice in an icing environment, where the shedding may be natural or induced. Historically, shed-ice particles have been a problem for aircraft, particularly rotorcraft. Because of the high particle velocities involved, damage to a fuselage or other airframe component from a shed-ice impact can be significant. Design rules for damage tolerance from shed-ice impact are not well developed because of a lack of experimental data. Thus, NASA Lewis (LeRC) has begun an effort to develop a database of impact force and energy resulting from shed ice. This effort consisted of a test of NASA LeRC's Model Rotor Test Rig (MRTR) in the Icing Research Tunnel (IRT). Both natural shedding and forced shedding were investigated. Forced shedding was achieved by fitting the rotor blades with Small Tube Pneumatic (STP) deicer boots manufactured by BF Goodrich. A detailed description of the test is given as well as the design of a new impact sensor which measures the force-time history of an impacting ice fragment. A brief discussion of the procedure to infer impact energy from a force-time trace are required for the impact-energy calculations. Recommendations and future plans for this research area are also provided.

  19. Tropical and Extratropical Cyclone Damages under Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranson, M.; Kousky, C.; Ruth, M.; Jantarasami, L.; Crimmins, A.; Tarquinio, L.

    2014-12-01

    This paper provides the first quantitative synthesis of the rapidly growing literature on future tropical and extratropical cyclone losses under climate change. We estimate a probability distribution for the predicted impact of changes in global surface air temperatures on future storm damages, using an ensemble of 296 estimates of the temperature-damage relationship from twenty studies. Our analysis produces three main empirical results. First, we find strong but not conclusive support for the hypothesis that climate change will cause damages from tropical cyclones and wind storms to increase, with most models (84 and 92 percent, respectively) predicting higher future storm damages due to climate change. Second, there is substantial variation in projected changes in losses across regions. Potential changes in damages are greatest in the North Atlantic basin, where the multi-model average predicts that a 2.5°C increase in global surface air temperature would cause hurricane damages to increase by 62 percent. The ensemble predictions for Western North Pacific tropical cyclones and European wind storms (extratropical cyclones) are approximately one third of that magnitude. Finally, our analysis shows that existing models of storm damages under climate change generate a wide range of predictions, ranging from moderate decreases to very large increases in losses.

  20. Microwave radiometric observations near 19.35, 92 and 183 GHz of precipitation in tropical storm Cora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilheit, T. T.; Chang, A. T.; King, J. L.; Rodgers, E. B.; Nieman, R. A.; Krupp, B. M.; Milman, A. S.; Stratigos, J. S.; Siddalingaih, H.

    1982-01-01

    Observations of rain cells in the remains of a decaying tropical storm were made by Airborne Microwave Radiometers at 19.35,92 and three frequencies near 183 GHz. Extremely low brightness temperatures, as low as 140 K were noted in the 92 and 183 GHz observations. These can be accounted for by the ice often associated with raindrop formation. Further, 183 GHz observations can be interpreted in terms of the height of the ice. The brightness temperatures observed suggest the presence of precipitation sized ice as high as 9 km or more.

  1. Regional characteristics of dust storms in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Weihong; Tang, Xu; Quan, Linsheng

    2004-09-01

    Regional characteristics of dust storms in northern China are analyzed using a rotated empirical orthogonal function (REOF), based on the annual days of dust storms from 1954 to 1998. The relationships between regional dust storms corresponding to other factors such as precipitation and temperature are explored. The results show that five leading modes of dust storms exist in the following areas: the Taklamakan Desert (Tarim Basin) over the Xinjiang region (far northwestern China), the eastern part of Inner Mongolia (North China), the Tsaidam Basin, the Tibetan Plateau, and the upper reaches of the Yellow River (Gobi Desert). These areas are associated with an arid climate and frequent winds. For the first mode in the Tarim Basin, most dust storms appear in the 1980s, while dust storms become less frequent in the 1990s. The second mode (North China) shows the highest frequency of dust storms in the mid-1960s but the frequency decreases afterward. The third mode indicates a decreasing trend of annual dust storms after the mid-1960s but with a high interannual variability. The fourth mode also shows a decreasing trend but with a low interannual variability. The fifth mode displays a high frequency of dust storms in the 1970s followed by a decreasing trend. For the five modes of dust storm distribution, four of the centers are located in desert regions. The annual dust storms of a selected station in each mode region are shown to compare the coefficient time series of these modes. The negative correlation between the prior winter temperature and dust storm frequency is identified for most stations. There is no consistency in the correlation between the dust storm frequency and the annual rainfall as well as the prior winter rainfall at these stations. The activity of dust storms in northern China are directly linked to the cyclone activity, especially for the interdecadal variability.

  2. Agents to reduce cytokine storm

    PubMed Central

    Gerlach, Herwig

    2016-01-01

    The increasing insight into pathomechanisms of dysregulated host response in several inflammatory diseases led to the implementation of the term “cytokine storm” in the literature more than 20 years ago. Direct toxic effects as well as indirect immunomodulatory mechanisms during cytokine storm have been described and were the basis for the rationale to use several substances and devices in life-threatening infections and hyperinflammatory states. Clinical trials have been performed, most of them in the form of minor, investigator-initiated protocols; major clinical trials focused mostly on sepsis and septic shock. The following review tries to summarize the background, pathophysiology, and results of clinical investigations that had implications for the development of therapeutic strategies and international guidelines for the management of hyperinflammation during syndromes of cytokine storm in adult patients, predominantly in septic shock. PMID:28105327

  3. Storm Warnings on Lake Balaton,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-06

    Vorhergesagt1 _ ___ !, ( SSZ . LI). (331, K _. )___ : 2 !daenkmmuflg 3 ja 4__ ’%ein %ZtLron S-0 6 j. a 3 10 24 126 B 88% A N in 4 13 173 186 B, 60% SZu...15 24 15 14 13 14 13 12 16 7 7 4 5 5 % 12 12 7 It 7 7 S 7 6 6 7 3 3 2 2 2 Key: 1-duration 2-number of storms 3-hours and one-third of storms last only...16-18 August 1959 and on 11- 13 June 1958, with a duration of 49.9 hours. Table 4 provides information about the frequency distribution of the maximum

  4. Impact of early and late winter icing events on sub-arctic dwarf shrubs.

    PubMed

    Preece, C; Phoenix, G K

    2014-01-01

    Polar regions are predicted to undergo large increases in winter temperature and an increased frequency of freeze-thaw cycles, which can cause ice layers in the snow pack and ice encasement of vegetation. Early or late winter timing of ice encasement could, however, modify the extent of damage caused to plants. To determine impacts of the date of ice encasement, a novel field experiment was established in sub-arctic Sweden, with icing events simulated in January and March 2008 and 2009. In the subsequent summers, reproduction, phenology, growth and mortality, as well as physiological indicators of leaf damage were measured in the three dominant dwarf shrubs: Vaccinium uliginosum, Vaccinium vitis-idaea and Empetrum nigrum. It was hypothesised that January icing would be more damaging compared to March icing due to the longer duration of ice encasement. Following 2 years of icing, E. nigrum berry production was 83% lower in January-iced plots compared to controls, and V. vitis-idaea electrolyte leakage was increased by 69%. Conversely, electrolyte leakage of E. nigrum was 25% lower and leaf emergence of V. vitis-idaea commenced 11 days earlier in March-iced plots compared to control plots in 2009. There was no effect of icing on any of the other parameters measured, indicating that overall these study species have moderate to high tolerance to ice encasement. Even much longer exposure under the January icing treatment does not clearly increase damage.

  5. Severe storms observing satellite study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwens, R. P.; Stern, D. A.

    1976-01-01

    Payload distribution and the attitude control system for the multi-mission modular spacecraft/StormSat configuration are discussed. The design of the advanced atmospheric sounder and imaging radiometer (AASIR) gimbal drive and its servomechanism is described. Onboard data handling, data downlink communications, and ground data handling systems are developed. Additional topics covered include: magnetic unloading at synchronous altitude, north-south stationkeeping, and the feasibility and impact of flying the microwave atmospheric sounding radiometer (MASR) as an additional payload.

  6. Magnetosphere-associated storms and the autonomous storms in the ionosphere-plasmasphere environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulyaeva, T. L.; Stanislawska, I.

    2010-01-01

    Global GPS-derived ionosphere maps (GIM) of total electron content (TEC) were transformed into magnetic latitude (MLAT) versus magnetic local time (MLT) frame. TEC enhancement or depletion marked by W index show dominant electron content depressions and the ionosphere-plasmasphere storms increasing by nighttime, at high magnetic latitudes and over the crests of equatorial anomaly. Based on W maps, the planetary Wp index was produced and used for derivation of a catalogue of more than 140 TEC storms during 1999-2009. In total 33 space weather intense storms and 35 moderate storms are revealed with four series of indices (AE, Ap, Dst and Wp) but more than half Wp storms were either partially overlapping in time with magnetic storm or observed autonomously under non-storm magnetosphere conditions. Relation between an annual number of intense Dst storms and Wp storms has been used for their prediction towards the peak of the forthcoming 24th solar cycle.

  7. Dust Storm in Southern California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Along historic Route 66, just southeast of the little town of Amboy, California, lies a dried-up lake. Dry lakebeds are good sources of two things: salt and dust. In this image, the now-parched Bristol Lake offers up both. On April 12, 2007, dust storms menaced the area around Amboy. To the northwest, near Newberry Springs, California, dust hampered visibility and led to a multi-car collision on Interstate 40, killing two people and injuring several others. The same day, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite captured this image of a dust storm in the dry remains of Bristol Lake. Many small dust clouds boil up from the ground surface, casting their shadows to the northwest. A bright white cloud floating over the dust also throws its shadow onto the ground below. East of the dust storm are salt works that stand out from the surrounding landscape thanks to their straight lines and sharp angles. Dark ground surfaces alternate with mined white salt in a network of stripes. When lakes evaporate, chemicals that had been dissolved in the water stay behind, making dry lake beds an ideal place to find heavy concentrations of minerals, including salt. Besides the salt works, something else appears in stark contrast to this arid place. Lush green fields of irrigated crops appear in the east. Besides their color, their orderly arrangement reveals their human-made origin.

  8. Assessing Tropical Cyclone Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Done, J.; Czajkowski, J.

    2012-12-01

    Landfalling tropical cyclones impact large coastal and inland areas causing direct damage due to winds, storm-surge flooding, tornadoes, and precipitation; as well as causing substantial indirect damage such as electrical outages and business interruption. The likely climate change impact of increased tropical cyclone intensity, combined with increases in exposure, bring the possibility of increased damage in the future. A considerable amount of research has focused on modeling economic damage due to tropical cyclones, and a series of indices have been developed to assess damages under climate change. We highlight a number of ways this research can be improved through a series of case study analyses. First, historical loss estimates are revisited to properly account for; time, impacted regions, the source of damage by type, and whether the damage was direct/indirect and insured/uninsured. Second, the drivers of loss from both the socio-economic and physical side are examined. A case is made to move beyond the use of maximum wind speed to more stable metrics and the use of other characteristics of the wind field such as direction, degree of gustiness, and duration is explored. A novel approach presented here is the potential to model losses directly as a function of climate variables such as sea surface temperature, greenhouse gases, and aerosols. This work is the first stage in the development of a tropical cyclone loss model to enable projections of losses under scenarios of both socio-economic change (such as population migration or altered policy) and physical change (such as shifts in tropical cyclone activity one from basin to another or within the same basin).

  9. The acute whole effluent toxicity of storm water from an international airport

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.J.; Turley, S.D.; Turley, B.S.; Yonkos, L.T.; Ziegler, G.P.; Knott, M.H.

    1995-06-01

    In October 1990, the US Environmental Protection Agency promulgated application requirements with deadlines for storm-water discharges associated with industrial activity and certain municipal systems. Major airports have a number of hydrocarbon-based contaminants that could appear in storm-water runoff. In addition, ethylene, diethylene, and propylene glycol deicing and anti-icing mixtures are used during freezing and near-freezing weather. The objective of this study was to characterize the potential acute impact on aquatic life from industrial storm-water discharges from an international airport. Samples from winter storm events caused acute toxicity to both the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and the daphnid (Daphnia magna), with LC50 values for both species as low as 1.0 and 2.0% effluent. The toxicity of the samples was due to the various glycol-based deicer/anti-icer mixtures used during these events. High oxygen demands and elevated total nitrogen levels are other potential problems during anti-icing/deicing activities. Samples from rain events during the nonwinter months at the airport did not cause acute toxicity unless associated with fuel spills. As a result of this study, a new discharge permit has been issued for this airport, requiring the implementation of plans for the collection and recycling and/or disposal of the deicer/anti-icer mixtures.

  10. Calculation of the size of ice hummocks

    SciTech Connect

    Kozitskii, I.E.

    1985-03-01

    Ice hummocks are often seen during the breakup of water bodies and are the result of shifting of the ice cover during spring movements and are confined both to the shore slope, or exposed stretches of the bottom, and to shallow waters. At the same time, the shore is often used for needs of construction, transportation, power engineering and economic purposes, and cases of damage to structures and disruption of operations by ice hummocks are known. The authors therefore study here the character and extent of the phenomenon as it affects the design of shore engineering structures. They add that existing standards do not fully reflect the composition of ice loads on structures, in connection with which it is expedient to theorize as regards the expected size of ice hummocks.

  11. Numerical Experiments for Storm Surge Inundation in Korean Coastal Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, J.; Shim, J.; Jun, K.

    2012-12-01

    Sea-level rising due to climate change following the global warming and the increased intensity of typhoon are magnifying inundation hazards up to the unpredictable level, resulting from the typhoon surge in Korea and other coastal states around the world. Typhoon is the most serious natural disaster in Korean coastal area. Many people died by storm surge inundation every year. And typhoon caused a lot of damage to property. Climate changes due to global warming are producing a stronger natural disaster. Coastal zones have been damaged by typhoons and accompanying storm surge. Especially, the most serious loss of life and terrible property damage caused by typhoon Maemi in 2003. The typhoon Maemi invaded Korean Peninsula leaving property loss of $ 4 Billion and killing 131 people. After then, there has been an increased interest in these coastal zone problems. If storm surges coincide with high tides, the loss of life and property damage due to high waters arc even worse. Therefore it is desirable to accurately forecast the amount water level increase. In this study, using a numerical model FVCOM(finite volume coastal circulation model, Chen et al.,2004), storm surge was simulated to examine its fluctuation characteristics for the coastal area behind Masan, Yeosu and Busan city in Korea. In the numerical model, a moving boundary condition(wet-dry treatment) was incorporated to explain wave inundation. To simulate the inundation scenario, the model grids were extended up to the area inside the lowland in application of the digital elevation data(DEM) made by precisely combining the aero-LiDAR survey data and bathymetry data for the 3 demonstration regions of Busan, Masan and Yeosu. Minimum grid of 300 m unstructured triangular mesh applied to calculate the storm surge was adopted as a grid system. And the minimum grid size of 30 m was built near Busan, Masan and Yeosu area which are the fine coastal regions and where the inundation is simulated. Numerically

  12. Assessing Flood Risk from Hurricane-induced Precipitation and Storm Surge: A Bayesian Network Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian, A.; Dupuits, E. J. C.; Morales-Napoles, O.

    2015-12-01

    Hurricanes pose a major flood hazard to communities on the U.S. Atlantic and Gulf Coasts. Over the past decade, the economic costs associated with hurricane flood damages have escalated and recent studies indicate that a large percentage of flood damages are occurring outside of FEMA-designated flood hazard areas. While FEMA recently upgraded coastal flood hazard maps using the Advanced CIRCulation (ADCIRC) Model, these maps do not consider the flood hazard resulting from the joint occurrence of precipitation over the watershed and storm surge at the coast. Instead, the two individual hazards are mapped separately, ignoring the floodplain resulting from their interaction.In this study, a risk assessment methodology was developed to predict the damages associated with hurricane-induced flooding in the Houston Galveston Bay Area. Historical hurricanes were analyzed to derive probability distributions for storm surge height, cumulative precipitation, hurricane landfall, wind speed, angle of approach, radius to maximum winds, and forward speed. A Bayesian Network was built and used to simulate a large number of synthetic storms. The resulting 1% combinations of storm surge and precipitation were applied as boundary conditions to a hydraulic modeled and the maximum extent of flooding was compared to the FEMA-designated flood hazard areas. A high resolution GIS-based model was used to predict damages.

  13. Effects of Hurricane Katrina’s storm surge on the quality of shallow aquifers near the northern shoreline of Lake Pontchartrain, southeastern Louisiana: Chapter 7D in Science and the storms-the USGS response to the hurricanes of 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tomaszewski, Dan J.; Lovelace, John K.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) sampled 13 wells on the northern shoreline of Lake Pontchartrain to determine the effect of Hurricane Katrina-induced storm surge water on the shallow groundwater resources. Surge water entering damaged wells did not contaminate the entire aquifer; however, contamination did occur locally at well sites. Because the storm surge from Katrina lasted only a few hours, surge water entering the aquifer will probably have only a short-term effect.

  14. Sea ice trends and cyclone activity in the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coggins, Jack; McDonald, Adrian; Rack, Wolfgang; Dale, Ethan

    2015-04-01

    Significant trends in the extent of Southern Hemisphere sea ice have been noted over the course of the satellite record, with highly variable trends between different seasons and regions. In this presentation, we describe efforts to assess the impact of cyclones on these trends. Employing a maximum cross-correlation method, we derive Southern Ocean ice-motion vectors from daily gridded SSMI 85.5 GHz brightness temperatures. We then derive a sea ice budget from the NASA-Team 25 km square daily sea ice concentrations. The budget quantifies the total daily change in sea ice area, and includes terms representing the effects of ice advection and divergence. A residual term represents the processes of rafting, ridging, freezing and thawing. We employ a cyclone tracking algorithm developed at the University of Canterbury to determine the timing, location, size and strength of Southern Hemisphere cyclones from mean sea-level pressure fields of the ERA-Interim reanalysis. We then form composites of the of sea ice budget below the location of cyclones. Unsurprisingly, we find that clockwise atmospheric flow around Southern Hemisphere cyclones exerts a strong influence on the movement of sea ice, an effect which is visible in the advection and divergence terms. Further, we assess the climatological importance of cyclones by comparing seasons of sea ice advance for periods with varying numbers of cyclones. This analysis is performed independently for each sea ice concentration pixel, thus affording us insight into the geographical importance of storm systems. We find that Southern Hemisphere sea ice extent is highly sensitive to the presence of cyclones in the periphery of the pack in the advance season. Notably, the sensitivity is particularly high in the northern Ross Sea, an area with a marked positive trend in sea ice extent. We discuss whether trends in cyclone activity in the Southern Ocean may have contributed to sea ice extent trends in this region.

  15. Tropical storm Sandy was a 1-in-700-year event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2013-07-01

    On 29 October 2012 tropical storm Sandy slammed into the New Jersey shoreline, bringing wind and water that killed more than 100 people and caused tens of billions of dollars in damage. Though its wind speeds were only equivalent to those of a low-level hurricane, Sandy caused record-breaking flooding in New Jersey, New York, and elsewhere. In lower Manhattan, water levels hit 4.28 meters above the mean low water level—the highest flood waters in the region since sensors were installed in 1920.

  16. Space Transportation System (STS)-117 External Tank (ET)-124 Hail Damage Repair Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Timmy R.; Gentz, Steven J.; Barth, Timothy S.; Minute, Stephen A.; Flowers, Cody P.; Hamilton, David A.; Null, Cynthia H.; Schafer, Charles F.

    2009-01-01

    Severe thunderstorms with associated hail and high winds struck the STS-117 stack on February 26, 2007. Peak winds were recorded at 62 knots with hail sizes ranging from 0.3 inch to 0.8 inch in diameter. As a result of the storm, the North Carolina Foam Institute (NCFI) type 24-124 Thermal Protection System (TPS) foam on the liquid oxygen (LO2) ogive acreage incurred significant impact damage. The NCFI on the ET intertank and the liquid hydrogen (LH2) acreage sustained hail damage. The Polymer Development Laboratory (PDL)-1034 foam of the LO2 ice frost ramps (IFRs) and the Super-Lightweight Ablator (SLA) of the LO2 cable tray also suffered minor damage. NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) was asked to assess the technical feasibility of repairing the ET TPS, the reasonableness of conducting those repairs with the vehicle in a vertical, integrated configuration at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Vehicle Assemble Building (VAB), and to address attendant human factors considerations including worker fatigue and the potential for error. The outcome of the assessment is recorded in this document.

  17. Disappearing Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    These images were acquired by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Surface Stereo Imager on the 21st and 25th days of the mission, or Sols 20 and 24 (June 15 and 18, 2008).

    These images show sublimation of ice in the trench informally called 'Dodo-Goldilocks' over the course of four days.

    In the lower left corner, lumps disappear, similar to the process of evaporation.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  18. Upper-Level Structure of Oklahoma Tornadic Storms on 2 May 1979. I: Radar and Satellite Observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Blackmer, Roy H., Jr.; Schotz, Steven

    1983-07-01

    This paper discusses the observational characteristics of the upper level structure of severe tornadic storms in Oklahoma on 2 May 1979 during SESAME. The data analyzed consist of limited-scan GOES-East and West visible, infrared (11 m), and stereo satellite data, dual-Doppler radar observations, and special storm scale soundings. The time-histories of stereo cloud top height, minimum equivalent blackbody temperature (TBB) and radar reflectivity are followed for three severe storms over a several hour period; two of the storms are tornadic. Cloud top IR growth rates and vertical velocities of the storms are computed and found to have maxima which fall into Adler and Fenn's severe storm classification. For one of the storms there is an interesting coupling between cloud top parameters and low-level radar echoes; the other tornadic storm showed no unique relationship. Hail damage began shortly after tropopause penetration by thee storms. Two major IR cold areas associated with the leading downwind storm (i.e., Lahoma storm), are both about 10°C lower than the minimum (tropopause) temperature in an upwind sounding. One is displaced upwind about 15 km from the visible cloud top and the inferred updraft position from radar; the other is located about 15 km to the south of the visible cloud top. A `V' pattern of lower TBB with embedded higher temperature (warm areas) developed after tropopause penetration by the Lahoma storm. Composites of stereo height contours on IR images indicated that TBB is not uniquely related to height.The warm areas are deduced to be of two types: one called the `close-in' warm am is located about 10-20 km downwind of the cloud top of the Lahoma storm, and the other called the `distant' warm area is about 50-75 km downwind. The close-in warm area has a motion similar to that of the storms and appears to be dynamically linked to the leading storm. A model is proposed to explain this warm area based on mixing processes and subsidence near cloud

  19. The danger to satellites from meteor storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beech, M.; Brown, P.; Jones, J.; Webster, A. R.

    During past meteor storms impact probabilities of between 1 and 0.01 percent have be realized per 50m^2 of exposed surface area at altitudes corresponding to both GEO and LEO. The most likely meteoroid stream to yield a storm in the near future is that of the Leonids. Numerical simulations of the orbital evolution of hypothetical Leonid stream meteoroids suggest that storms may occur in the years 1999 and 2000.

  20. Dust-infused baroclinic cyclone storm clouds: The evidence, meteorology, and some implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromm, Michael; Kablick, George; Caffrey, Peter

    2016-12-01

    Desert mineral dust is a critical yet still poorly understood component of atmospheric composition, weather, and climate. Long-range transport of dust is well known, yet uncertainty persists regarding the pathway from the desert floor to the free troposphere. Here we will show that a recurrent pathway for dust into the uppermost troposphere involves passage through an extratropical baroclinic cyclonic storm. The evidence derives from a synergistic use of satellite-based, multispectral nadir-image data and lidar. The dust-infused baroclinic storm (DIBS) exhibits peculiar cirrus cloud top reflected and emitted radiance from the UV through thermal IR, involving positive UV absorbing aerosol index, muted visible reflectivity, visible cumuliform texture, and systematically intense visible lidar backscatter on a synoptic scale. Proof that the DIBS is microphysically impacted by storm-scale dust infusion is the occurrence of anomalously large daytime 3.9-11μm brightness temperature difference indicative of small ice crystals. We present multispectral snapshots of two DIBS, over two desert source regions, in comparison with a pristine baroclinic storm cloud. Each storm snapshot is presented in the context of the baroclinic cyclone's lifetime and dust source region (the Gobi desert and the Sahara). These and other cases discussed show that the DIBS is a recurring conduit for long-range transport and a natural experiment in dust-related aerosol indirect effects.

  1. The observed clustering of damaging extratropical cyclones in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cusack, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    The clustering of severe European windstorms on annual timescales has substantial impacts on the (re-)insurance industry. Our knowledge of the risk is limited by large uncertainties in estimates of clustering from typical historical storm data sets covering the past few decades. Eight storm data sets are gathered for analysis in this study in order to reduce these uncertainties. Six of the data sets contain more than 100 years of severe storm information to reduce sampling errors, and observational errors are reduced by the diversity of information sources and analysis methods between storm data sets. All storm severity measures used in this study reflect damage, to suit (re-)insurance applications. The shortest storm data set of 42 years provides indications of stronger clustering with severity, particularly for regions off the main storm track in central Europe and France. However, clustering estimates have very large sampling and observational errors, exemplified by large changes in estimates in central Europe upon removal of one stormy season, 1989/1990. The extended storm records place 1989/1990 into a much longer historical context to produce more robust estimates of clustering. All the extended storm data sets show increased clustering between more severe storms from return periods (RPs) of 0.5 years to the longest measured RPs of about 20 years. Further, they contain signs of stronger clustering off the main storm track, and weaker clustering for smaller-sized areas, though these signals are more uncertain as they are drawn from smaller data samples. These new ultra-long storm data sets provide new information on clustering to improve our management of this risk.

  2. On the watch for geomagnetic storms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Green, Arthur W.; Brown, William M.

    1997-01-01

    Geomagnetic storms, induced by solar activity, pose significant hazards to satellites, electrical power distribution systems, radio communications, navigation, and geophysical surveys. Strong storms can expose astronauts and crews of high-flying aircraft to dangerous levels of radiation. Economic losses from recent geomagnetic storms have run into hundreds of millions of dollars. With the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) as the lead agency, an international network of geomagnetic observatories monitors the onset of solar-induced storms and gives warnings that help diminish losses to military and commercial operations and facilities.

  3. Numerical Simulations of 1990 Saturn's Giant Storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Melendo, E.; Sanchez-Lavega, A.

    2015-12-01

    We present here a study of the Saturn's 1990 equatorial major storm based on numerical simulations. Six planetary scale storms, nicknamed as Great White Spots (GWS) have been observed since the nineteenth century, three of them at the equatorial region in 1876 (~ +8º), 1933 (~ +2º), and 1990 (+12º), on the broad prograde equatorial jet where equatorial dynamics dominated producing a storm nucleus, with rapid expansion to the east and west to become a planetary-scale disturbance (Sánchez-Lavega, CHAOS 4, 341-353, 1994). We have detailed information, ground-based CCD imaging and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data, for the 1990 event. Numerical experiments on the 1990 storm indicate that the onset of the storm can only be reproduced if the Voyager era background zonal flow is used, which suggests that it dominated the circulation dynamics at the storm's outbreak region at that time. We review the possible impact of the 1990 storm on the equatorial jet, storm dynamics, and how it relates to the observed storm morphology and zonal wind measurements derived from HST observations (Barnet et al., Icarus 100, 499-511, 1992). Observations also describe the formation of equatorial planetary waves and instabilities during the disturbance. We discuss the impact of major energy and mass injection by a planetary-scale convective event on the equatorial dynamics following our simulation results.

  4. A Personal Storm Warning Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Although lightning detection systems operated by government agencies, utilities and other businesses provide storm warnings, this information often does not reach the public until some time after the observations have been made. A low-cost personal lightning detector offers a significant safety advantage to private flyers, boaters, golfers and others. Developed by Airborne Research Associates, the detectors originated in Space Shuttle tests of an optical lightning detection technique. The commercial device is pointed toward a cloud to detect invisible intracloud lightning by sensing subtle changes in light presence. The majority of the sales have been to golf courses. Additional products and more advanced applications are in progress.

  5. Norwegian Young Sea Ice Experiment (N-ICE) Field Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    Walden, V. P.; Hudson, S. R.; Cohen, L.

    2016-03-01

    The Norwegian Young Sea Ice (N-ICE) experiment was conducted aboard the R/V Lance research vessel from January through June 2015. The primary purpose of the experiment was to better understand thin, first-year sea ice. This includes understanding of how different components of the Arctic system affect sea ice, but also how changing sea ice affects the system. A major part of this effort is to characterize the atmospheric conditions throughout the experiment. A micropulse lidar (MPL) (S/N: 108) was deployed from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility as part of the atmospheric suite of instruments. The MPL operated successfully throughout the entire experiment, acquiring data from 21 January 2015 through 23 June 2015. The MPL was the essential instrument for determining the phase (water, ice or mixed) of the lower-level clouds over the sea ice. Data obtained from the MPL during the N-ICE experiment show large cloud fractions over young, thin Arctic sea ice from January through June 2015 (north of Svalbard). The winter season was characterized by frequent synoptic storms and large fluctuations in the near-surface temperature. There was much less synoptic activity in spring and summer as the near-surface temperature rose to 0 C. The cloud fraction was lower in winter (60%) than in the spring and summer (80%). Supercooled liquid clouds were observed for most of the deployment, appearing first in mid-February. Spring and summer clouds were characterized by low, thick, uniform clouds.

  6. Changes in snow distribution and surface topography following a snowstorm on Antarctic sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Ernesto; Leonard, Katherine; Maksym, Ted; Lehning, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Snow distribution over sea ice is an important control on sea ice physical and biological processes. We combine measurements of the atmospheric boundary layer and blowing snow on an Antarctic sea ice floe with terrestrial laser scanning to characterize a typical storm and its influence on the spatial patterns of snow distribution at resolutions of 1-10 cm over an area of 100 m × 100 m. The pre-storm surface exhibits multidirectional elongated snow dunes formed behind aerodynamic obstacles. Newly deposited dunes are elongated parallel to the predominant wind direction during the storm. Snow erosion and deposition occur over 62% and 38% of the area, respectively. Snow deposition volume is more than twice that of erosion (351 m3 versus 158 m3), resulting in a modest increase of 2 ± 1 cm in mean snow depth, indicating a small net mass gain despite large mass relocation. Despite significant local snow depth changes due to deposition and erosion, the statistical distributions of elevation and the two-dimensional correlation functions remain similar to those of the pre-storm surface. Pre-storm and post-storm surfaces also exhibit spectral power law relationships with little change in spectral exponents. These observations suggest that for sea ice floes with mature snow cover features under conditions similar to those observed in this study, spatial statistics and scaling properties of snow surface morphology may be relatively invariant. Such an observation, if confirmed for other ice types and conditions, may be a useful tool for model parameterizations of the subgrid variability of sea ice surfaces.

  7. Impacts on the deep-sea ecosystem by a severe coastal storm.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Vidal, Anna; Canals, Miquel; Calafat, Antoni M; Lastras, Galderic; Pedrosa-Pàmies, Rut; Menéndez, Melisa; Medina, Raúl; Company, Joan B; Hereu, Bernat; Romero, Javier; Alcoverro, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Major coastal storms, associated with strong winds, high waves and intensified currents, and occasionally with heavy rains and flash floods, are mostly known because of the serious damage they can cause along the shoreline and the threats they pose to navigation. However, there is a profound lack of knowledge on the deep-sea impacts of severe coastal storms. Concurrent measurements of key parameters along the coast and in the deep-sea are extremely rare. Here we present a unique data set showing how one of the most extreme coastal storms of the last decades lashing the Western Mediterranean Sea rapidly impacted the deep-sea ecosystem. The storm peaked the 26(th) of December 2008 leading to the remobilization of a shallow-water reservoir of marine organic carbon associated with fine particles and resulting in its redistribution across the deep basin. The storm also initiated the movement of large amounts of coarse shelf sediment, which abraded and buried benthic communities. Our findings demonstrate, first, that severe coastal storms are highly efficient in transporting organic carbon from shallow water to deep water, thus contributing to its sequestration and, second, that natural, intermittent atmospheric drivers sensitive to global climate change have the potential to tremendously impact the largest and least known ecosystem on Earth, the deep-sea ecosystem.

  8. Impacts of sand and dust storms on agriculture and potential agricultural applications of a SDSWS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanski, R.; Sivakumar, M. V. K.

    2009-03-01

    This paper will give an overview of the various impacts of sand and dust storms on agriculture and then address the potential applications of a Sand and Dust Storm Warning System (SDSWS) for agricultural users. Sand and dust storms have many negative impacts on the agricultural sector including: reducing crop yields by burial of seedlings under sand deposits, the loss of plant tissue and reduced photosynthetic activity as a result of sandblasting, delaying plant development, increasing end-of-season drought risk, causing injury and reduced productivity of livestock, increasing soil erosion and accelerating the process of land degradation and desertification, filling up irrigation canals with sediments, covering transportation routes, affecting water quality of rivers and streams, and affecting air quality. One positive impact is the fertilization of soil minerals to terrestrial ecosystems. There are several potential agricultural applications of a SDSWS. The first is to alert agricultural communities farmers to take preventive action in the near-term such as harvesting maturing crops (vegetables, grain), sheltering livestock, and strengthening infrastructure (houses, roads, grain storage) for the storm. Also, the products of a SDSWS could be used in for monitoring potential locust movement and post-storm crop damage assessments. An archive of SDSWS products (movement, amount of sand and dust) could be used in researching plant and animal pathogen movement and the relationship of sand and dust storms to disease outbreaks and in developing improved soil erosion and land degradation models.

  9. Impacts on the Deep-Sea Ecosystem by a Severe Coastal Storm

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Vidal, Anna; Canals, Miquel; Calafat, Antoni M.; Lastras, Galderic; Pedrosa-Pàmies, Rut; Menéndez, Melisa; Medina, Raúl; Company, Joan B.; Hereu, Bernat; Romero, Javier; Alcoverro, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Major coastal storms, associated with strong winds, high waves and intensified currents, and occasionally with heavy rains and flash floods, are mostly known because of the serious damage they can cause along the shoreline and the threats they pose to navigation. However, there is a profound lack of knowledge on the deep-sea impacts of severe coastal storms. Concurrent measurements of key parameters along the coast and in the deep-sea are extremely rare. Here we present a unique data set showing how one of the most extreme coastal storms of the last decades lashing the Western Mediterranean Sea rapidly impacted the deep-sea ecosystem. The storm peaked the 26th of December 2008 leading to the remobilization of a shallow-water reservoir of marine organic carbon associated with fine particles and resulting in its redistribution across the deep basin. The storm also initiated the movement of large amounts of coarse shelf sediment, which abraded and buried benthic communities. Our findings demonstrate, first, that severe coastal storms are highly efficient in transporting organic carbon from shallow water to deep water, thus contributing to its sequestration and, second, that natural, intermittent atmospheric drivers sensitive to global climate change have the potential to tremendously impact the largest and least known ecosystem on Earth, the deep-sea ecosystem. PMID:22295084

  10. The observed clustering of damaging extra-tropical cyclones in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cusack, S.

    2015-12-01

    The clustering of severe European windstorms on annual timescales has substantial impacts on the re/insurance industry. Management of the risk is impaired by large uncertainties in estimates of clustering from historical storm datasets typically covering the past few decades. The uncertainties are unusually large because clustering depends on the variance of storm counts. Eight storm datasets are gathered for analysis in this study in order to reduce these uncertainties. Six of the datasets contain more than 100~years of severe storm information to reduce sampling errors, and the diversity of information sources and analysis methods between datasets sample observational errors. All storm severity measures used in this study reflect damage, to suit re/insurance applications. It is found that the shortest storm dataset of 42 years in length provides estimates of clustering with very large sampling and observational errors. The dataset does provide some useful information: indications of stronger clustering for more severe storms, particularly for southern countries off the main storm track. However, substantially different results are produced by removal of one stormy season, 1989/1990, which illustrates the large uncertainties from a 42-year dataset. The extended storm records place 1989/1990 into a much longer historical context to produce more robust estimates of clustering. All the extended storm datasets show a greater degree of clustering with increasing storm severity and suggest clustering of severe storms is much more material than weaker storms. Further, they contain signs of stronger clustering in areas off the main storm track, and weaker clustering for smaller-sized areas, though these signals are smaller than uncertainties in actual values. Both the improvement of existing storm records and development of new historical storm datasets would help to improve management of this risk.

  11. In the Eye of the Storm: A Participatory Course on Coastal Storms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Storm disasters are amplified in the coastal environment due to population pressures and the power of the sea. The upper-division/graduate university course "Coastal Storms" was designed to equip future practitioners with the skills necessary to understand, respond to, and mitigate for these natural disasters. To accomplish this, "Coastal Storms"…

  12. Rapid Response Measurements of Hurricane Waves and Storm Surge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravois, U.

    2010-12-01

    Andrew (1992), Katrina (2005), and Ike (2008) are recent examples of extensive damage that resulted from direct hurricane landfall. Some of the worst damages from these hurricanes are caused by wind driven waves and storm surge flooding. The potential for more hurricane disasters like these continues to increase as a result of population growth and real estate development in low elevation coastal regions. Observational measurements of hurricane waves and storm surge play an important role in future mitigation efforts, yet permanent wave buoy moorings and tide stations are more sparse than desired. This research has developed a rapid response method using helicopters to install temporary wave and surge gauges ahead of hurricane landfall. These temporary installations, with target depths from 10-15 m and 1-7 km offshore depending on the local shelf slope, increase the density of measurement points where the worst conditions are expected. The method has progressed to an operational state and has successfully responded to storms Ernesto (2006), Noel (2007), Fay (2008), Gustav (2008), Hanna (2008) and Ike (2008). The temporary gauges are pressure data loggers that measure at 1 Hz continuously for 12 days and are post-processed to extract surge and wave information. For the six storms studied, 45 out of 49 sensors were recovered by boat led scuba diver search teams, with 43 providing useful data for an 88 percent success rate. As part of the 20 sensor Hurricane Gustav response, sensors were also deployed in lakes and bays inLouisiana, east of the Mississippi river delta. Gustav was the largest deployment to date. Generally efforts were scaled back for storms that were not anticipated to be highly destructive. For example, the cumulative total of sensors deployed for Ernesto, Noel, Fay and Hanna was only 20. Measurement locations for Gustav spanned over 800 km of exposed coastline from Louisiana to Florida with sensors in close proximity to landfall near Cocodrie

  13. Microbial genesis, life and death in glacial ice.

    PubMed

    Price, P Buford

    2009-01-01

    Arguments are given that terrestrial RNA and DNA may have originated in a frozen environment more than 4 billion years ago. Scenarios are developed for atmospheric transport of microbes onto glacial ice, their adaptation to subzero temperatures in the ice, and their incorporation into one of three habitats - liquid veins, mineral grain surfaces, or isolated inside 1 of the crystals that make up polycrystalline ice. The Arrhenius dependence of microbial metabolic rate on temperature is shown to match that required to repair damage owing to spontaneous DNA depurination and amino acid racemization. Even for the oldest glacial ice, microbial lifetime is shown not to be shortened by radiation damage from 238U, 232Th, or 40K in mineral dust in ice, by phage-induced lysis, or by penetrating cosmic radiation. Instead, death of those cells adapted to the hostile conditions in glacial ice is probably due to exhaustion of available nutrients. By contrast, in permafrost microbial death is more likely due to alpha-particle radiation damage from U and Th in the soil and rocks intermixed with ice. For residence times in ice longer than a million years, spore formers may be unable to compete in longevity with vegetative cells that are able to repair DNA damage via survival metabolism.

  14. Coastal storm monitoring in Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wicklein, Shaun M.; Bennett, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Coastal communities in Virginia are prone to flooding, particularly during hurricanes, nor’easters, and other coastal low-pressure systems. These weather systems affect public safety, personal and public property, and valuable infrastructure, such as transportation, water and sewer, and electric-supply networks. Local emergency managers, utility operators, and the public are tasked with making difficult decisions regarding evacuations, road closures, and post-storm recovery efforts as a result of coastal flooding. In coastal Virginia these decisions often are made on the basis of anecdotal knowledge from past events or predictions based on data from monitoring sites located far away from the affected area that may not reflect local conditions. Preventing flood hazards, such as hurricane-induced storm surge, from becoming human disasters requires an understanding of the relative risks that flooding poses to specific communities. The risk to life and property can be very high if decisions about evacuations and road closures are made too late or not at all.

  15. Scrambled Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This complex area on the side of Europa which faces away from Jupiter shows several types of features which are formed by disruptions of Europa's icy crust. North is to the top of the image, taken by NASA's Galileo spacecraft, and the Sun illuminates the surface from the left. The prominent wide, dark bands are up to 20 kilometers (12 miles) wide and over 50 kilometers (30 miles) long. They are believed to have formed when Europa's icy crust fractured, separated and filled in with darker, 'dirtier' ice or slush from below. A relatively rare type of feature on Europa is the 15-kilometer-diameter (9.3-mile) impact crater in the lower left corner. The small number of impact craters on Europa's surface is an indication of its relatively young age. A region of chaotic terrain south of this impact crater contains crustal plates which have broken apart and rafted into new positions. Some of these 'ice rafts' are nearly 1 kilometer (about half a mile) across. Other regions of chaotic terrain are visible and indicate heating and disruption of Europa's icy crust from below. The youngest features in this scene are the long, narrow cracks in the ice which cut across all other features. One of these cracks is about 30 kilometers (18 miles) to the right of the impact crater and extends for hundreds of miles from the top to the bottom of the image.

    The image, centered near 23 degrees south latitude and 179 degrees longitude, covers an area about 240 by 215 kilometers (150 by 130 miles) across. The finest details that can be discerned in this picture are about 460 meters (500 yards) across. The image was taken as Galileo flew by Europa on March 29, 1998. The image was taken by the onboard solid state imaging system camera from an altitude of 23,000 kilometers (14,000 miles).

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech

  16. New technology and tool prepared for communication against storm surges.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letkiewicz, Beata

    2010-05-01

    The aim of the presentation is description of the new technology and tool prepared for communication, information and issue of warnings against storm surges. The Maritime Branch of the Institute of Meteorology and Water Management is responsible for preparing the forecast as warning, where the end users are Government Officials and Public. The Maritime Branch carry out the project "Strengthening the administrative capacity in order to improve the management of Polish coastal zone environment" (supported by a grant from Norway through the Norwegian Financial Mechanism). The expected final result of the project is web site www.baltyk.pogodynka.pl. One of the activities of the project is - set up of information website www.baltyk.pogodynka.pl, giving public access to the complied data. Information on web site: - meta data - marine data (on-line measurement: sea level, water temperature, salinity, oxygen concentration); - data bases of mathematical model outputs - forecast data (sea level, currents); - ice conditions of the Baltic Sea, - instructions, information materials with information of polish coastal zone. The aim of set up of the portal is development of communication between users of the system, exchange of the knowledge of marine environment and natural hazards such as storm surges, improving the ability of the region in the scope of the data management about the sea environment and the coastal zone.

  17. Severe Autumn storms in future Western Europe with a warmer Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baatsen, Michiel; Haarsma, Reindert J.; Van Delden, Aarnout J.; de Vries, Hylke

    2014-09-01

    Simulations with a very high resolution (~25 km) global climate model indicate that more severe Autumn storms will impact Europe in a warmer future climate. The observed increase is mainly attributed to storms with a tropical origin, especially in the later part of the twentyfirst century. As their genesis region expands, tropical cyclones become more intense and their chances of reaching Europe increase. This paper investigates the properties and evolution of such storms and clarifies the future changes. The studied tropical cyclones feature a typical evolution of tropical development, extratropical transition and a re-intensification. A reduction of the transit area between regions of tropical and extratropical cyclogenesis increases the probability of re-intensification. Many of the modelled storms exhibit hybrid properties in a considerable part of their life cycle during which they exhibit the hazards of both tropical and extratropical systems. In addition to tropical cyclones, other systems such as cold core extratropical storms mainly originating over the Gulf Stream region also increasingly impact Western Europe. Despite their different history, all of the studied storms have one striking similarity: they form a warm seclusion. The structure, intensity and frequency of storms in the present climate are compared to observations using the MERRA and IBTrACS datasets. Damaging winds associated with the occurrence of a sting jet are observed in a large fraction of the cyclones during their final stage. Baroclinic instability is of great importance for the (re-)intensification of the storms. Furthermore, so-called atmospheric rivers providing tropical air prove to be vital for the intensification through diabatic heating and will increase considerably in strength in the future, as will the associated flooding risks.

  18. Severe Autumn storms in future Western Europe with a warmer Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baatsen, Michiel; Haarsma, Reindert J.; Van Delden, Aarnout J.; de Vries, Hylke

    2015-08-01

    Simulations with a very high resolution (~25 km) global climate model indicate that more severe Autumn storms will impact Europe in a warmer future climate. The observed increase is mainly attributed to storms with a tropical origin, especially in the later part of the twentyfirst century. As their genesis region expands, tropical cyclones become more intense and their chances of reaching Europe increase. This paper investigates the properties and evolution of such storms and clarifies the future changes. The studied tropical cyclones feature a typical evolution of tropical development, extratropical transition and a re-intensification. A reduction of the transit area between regions of tropical and extratropical cyclogenesis increases the probability of re-intensification. Many of the modelled storms exhibit hybrid properties in a considerable part of their life cycle during which they exhibit the hazards of both tropical and extratropical systems. In addition to tropical cyclones, other systems such as cold core extratropical storms mainly originating over the Gulf Stream region also increasingly impact Western Europe. Despite their different history, all of the studied storms have one striking similarity: they form a warm seclusion. The structure, intensity and frequency of storms in the present climate are compared to observations using the MERRA and IBTrACS datasets. Damaging winds associated with the occurrence of a sting jet are observed in a large fraction of the cyclones during their final stage. Baroclinic instability is of great importance for the (re-)intensification of the storms. Furthermore, so-called atmospheric rivers providing tropical air prove to be vital for the intensification through diabatic heating and will increase considerably in strength in the future, as will the associated flooding risks.

  19. Icing conditions over Northern Eurasia in changing climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulygina, Olga N.; Arzhanova, Natalia M.; Groisman, Pavel Ya

    2015-02-01

    Icing conditions, particularly in combination with wind, affect greatly the operation of overhead communication and transmission lines causing serious failures, which result in tremendous economic damage. Icing formation is dangerous to agriculture, forestry, high seas fishery, for land and off coast man-made infrastructure. Quantitative icing characteristics such as weight, thickness, and duration are very important for the economy and human wellbeing when their maximum values exceed certain thresholds. Russian meteorological stations perform both visual and instrumental monitoring of icing deposits. Visual monitoring is ocular estimation of the type and intensity of icing and the date of ice appearance and disappearance. Instrumental monitoring is performed by ice accretion indicator that in addition to the type, intensity and duration of ice deposits reports also their weight and size. We used observations at 958 Russian stations for the period 1977-2013 to analyze changes in the ice formation frequency at individual meteorological stations and on the territory of quasi-homogeneous climatic regions in Russia. It was found that hoar frosts are observed in most parts of Russia, but icing only occurs in European Russia and the Far East. On the Arctic coast of Russia, this phenomenon can even be observed in summer months. Statistically significant decreasing trends in occurrence of icing and hoar frost events are found over most of Russia. An increasing trend in icing weights (IWs) was found in the Atlantic Arctic region in autumn. Statistically significant large negative trends in IWs were found in the Pacific Arctic in winter and spring.

  20. The NASA F-106B Storm Hazards Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neely, W. R., Jr.; Fisher, B. D.

    1983-01-01

    During the NASA LRC Storm Hazards Program, 698 thunderstorm precipitations were made from 1980 to 1983 with an F-106B aircraft in order to record direct lightning strike data and the associated flight conditions. It was found that each of the three composite fin caps tested experienced multiple lightning attachments with only minor cosmetic damage. The maximum current level was only 20 ka, which is well below the design standard of 200 ka; however, indications are that the current rate of rise standard has been approached and may be exceeded in a major strike. The peak lightning strike rate occurred at ambient temperatures between -40 and -45 C, while most previously reported strikes have occurred at or near the freezing level. No significant operational difficulties or major aircraft damage resulting from the thunderstorm penetrations have been found.

  1. NASA's 3-D Animation of Tropical Storm Ulika from Space

    NASA Video Gallery

    An animated 3-D flyby of Tropical Storm Ulika using GPM's Radar data showed some strong convective storms inside the tropical storm were dropping precipitation at a rate of over 187 mm (7.4 inches)...

  2. Severe storms and local weather research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Developments in the use of space related techniques to understand storms and local weather are summarized. The observation of lightning, storm development, cloud development, mesoscale phenomena, and ageostrophic circulation are discussed. Data acquisition, analysis, and the development of improved sensor and computer systems capability are described. Signal processing and analysis and application of Doppler lidar data are discussed. Progress in numerous experiments is summarized.

  3. The evaluation and management of electrical storm.

    PubMed

    Eifling, Michael; Razavi, Mehdi; Massumi, Ali

    2011-01-01

    Electrical storm is an increasingly common and life-threatening syndrome that is defined by 3 or more sustained episodes of ventricular tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation, or appropriate shocks from an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator within 24 hours. The clinical presentation can be dramatic. Electrical storm can manifest itself during acute myocardial infarction and in patients who have structural heart disease, an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator, or an inherited arrhythmic syndrome. The presence or absence of structural heart disease and the electrocardiographic morphology of the presenting arrhythmia can provide important diagnostic clues into the mechanism of electrical storm. Electrical storm typically has a poor outcome.The effective management of electrical storm requires an understanding of arrhythmia mechanisms, therapeutic options, device programming, and indications for radiofrequency catheter ablation. Initial management involves determining and correcting the underlying ischemia, electrolyte imbalances, or other causative factors. Amiodarone and β-blockers, especially propranolol, effectively resolve arrhythmias in most patients. Nonpharmacologic treatment, including radiofrequency ablation, can control electrical storm in drug-refractory patients. Patients who have implantable cardioverter-defibrillators can present with multiple shocks and may require drug therapy and device reprogramming. After the acute phase of electrical storm, the treatment focus should shift toward maximizing heart-failure therapy, performing revascularization, and preventing subsequent ventricular arrhythmias. Herein, we present an organized approach for effectively evaluating and managing electrical storm.

  4. RECOVERY OF MONTEREY BAY BEACHES AFTER THE WINTER STORMS OF 1982-83.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dingler, John R.; Anima, Roberto J.; Clifton, H. Edward

    1985-01-01

    The El Nino conditions of 1982 and 1983 produced unusually frequent and intense storms along the central California coast. These storms produced much greater than normal beach erosion in Monterey Bay, causing extensive damage to coastal structures, erosion of coastal cliffs, and loss of sand from coastal dunes. The beaches accreted during the summer of 1983 and eroded again the next winter. Every beach, however, showed its own pattern of rebuilding; the eigenfunction analysis showed that the beaches did not all reach either their maximum or minimum volumes at the same time.

  5. Modern Airfoil Ice Accretions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Potapczuk, Mark G.; Sheldon, David W.

    1997-01-01

    This report presents results from the first icing tests performed in the Modem Airfoils program. Two airfoils have been subjected to icing tests in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel (IRT). Both airfoils were two dimensional airfoils; one was representative of a commercial transport airfoil while the other was representative of a business jet airfoil. The icing test conditions were selected from the FAR Appendix C envelopes. Effects on aerodynamic performance are presented including the effects of varying amounts of glaze ice as well as the effects of approximately the same amounts of glaze, mixed, and rime ice. Actual ice shapes obtained in these tests are also presented for these cases. In addition, comparisons are shown between ice shapes from the tests and ice shapes predicted by the computer code, LEWICE for similar conditions. Significant results from the tests are that relatively small amounts of ice can have nearly as much effect on airfoil lift coefficient as much greater amounts of ice and that glaze ice usually has a more detrimental effect than either rime or mixed ice. LEWICE predictions of ice shapes, in general, compared reasonably well with ice shapes obtained in the IRT, although differences in details of the ice shapes were observed.

  6. Development of Inundation Map for Bantayan Island, Cebu Using Delft3D-Flow Storm Surge Simulations of Typhoon Haiyan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuadra, Camille; Suarez, John Kenneth; Biton, Nophi Ian; Cabacaba, Krichi May; Lapidez, John Phillip; Santiago, Joy; Mahar Francisco Lagmay, Alfredo; Malano, Vicente

    2014-05-01

    On average, 20 typhoons enter the Philippine area of responsibility annually, making it vulnerable to different storm hazards. Apart from the frequency of tropical cyclones, the archipelagic nature of the country makes it particularly prone to storm surges. On 08 November 2013, Haiyan, a Category 5 Typhoon with maximum one-minute sustained wind speed of 315 kph, hit the central region of the Philippines. In its path, the howler devastated Bantayan Island, a popular tourist destination. The island is located north of Cebu City, the second largest metropolis of the Philippines in terms of populace. Having been directly hit by Typhoon Haiyan, Bantayan Island was severely damaged by strong winds and storm surges, with more than 11,000 houses totally destroyed while 5,000 more suffered minor damage. The adverse impacts of possible future storm surge events in the island can only be mitigated if hazard maps that depict inundation of the coastal areas of Bantayan are generated. To create such maps, Delft3D-Flow, a hydrodynamic model was used to simulate storm surges. These simulations were made over a 10-m per pixel resolution Digital Elevation Model (DEM) and the General Bathymetric Chart of the Oceans (GEBCO) bathymetry. The results of the coastal inundation model for Typhoon Haiyan's storm surges were validated using data collected from field work and local government reports. The hydrodynamic model of Bantayan was then calibrated using the field data and further simulations were made with varying typhoon tracks. This was done to generate scenarios on the farthest possible inland incursion of storm surges. The output of the study is a detailed storm surge inundation map that depicts safe zones for development of infrastructure near coastal areas and for construction of coastal protection structures. The storm surge inundation map can also be used as basis for disaster preparedness plans of coastal communities threatened by approaching typhoons.

  7. Wet scavenging of soluble gases in DC3 deep convective storms using WRF-Chem simulations and aircraft observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bela, Megan M.; Barth, Mary C.; Toon, Owen B.; Fried, Alan; Homeyer, Cameron R.; Morrison, Hugh; Cummings, Kristin A.; Li, Yunyao; Pickering, Kenneth E.; Allen, Dale J.; Yang, Qing; Wennberg, Paul O.; Crounse, John D.; St. Clair, Jason M.; Teng, Alex P.; O'Sullivan, Daniel; Huey, L. Gregory; Chen, Dexian; Liu, Xiaoxi; Blake, Donald R.; Blake, Nicola J.; Apel, Eric C.; Hornbrook, Rebecca S.; Flocke, Frank; Campos, Teresa; Diskin, Glenn

    2016-04-01

    We examine wet scavenging of soluble trace gases in storms observed during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) field campaign. We conduct high-resolution simulations with the Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) of a severe storm in Oklahoma. The model represents well the storm location, size, and structure as compared with Next Generation Weather Radar reflectivity, and simulated CO transport is consistent with aircraft observations. Scavenging efficiencies (SEs) between inflow and outflow of soluble species are calculated from aircraft measurements and model simulations. Using a simple wet scavenging scheme, we simulate the SE of each soluble species within the error bars of the observations. The simulated SEs of all species except nitric acid (HNO3) are highly sensitive to the values specified for the fractions retained in ice when cloud water freezes. To reproduce the observations, we must assume zero ice retention for formaldehyde (CH2O) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and complete retention for methyl hydrogen peroxide (CH3OOH) and sulfur dioxide (SO2), likely to compensate for the lack of aqueous chemistry in the model. We then compare scavenging efficiencies among storms that formed in Alabama and northeast Colorado and the Oklahoma storm. Significant differences in SEs are seen among storms and species. More scavenging of HNO3 and less removal of CH3OOH are seen in storms with higher maximum flash rates, an indication of more graupel mass. Graupel is associated with mixed-phase scavenging and lightning production of nitrogen oxides (NOx), processes that may explain the observed differences in HNO3 and CH3OOH scavenging.

  8. An analysis of uncertainties and skill in forecasts of winter storm losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardowitz, Tobias; Osinski, Robert; Kruschke, Tim; Ulbrich, Uwe

    2016-11-01

    This paper describes an approach to derive probabilistic predictions of local winter storm damage occurrences from a global medium-range ensemble prediction system (EPS). Predictions of storm damage occurrences are subject to large uncertainty due to meteorological forecast uncertainty (typically addressed by means of ensemble predictions) and uncertainties in modelling weather impacts. The latter uncertainty arises from the fact that local vulnerabilities are not known in sufficient detail to allow for a deterministic prediction of damages, even if the forecasted gust wind speed contains no uncertainty. Thus, to estimate the damage model uncertainty, a statistical model based on logistic regression analysis is employed, relating meteorological analyses to historical damage records. A quantification of the two individual contributions (meteorological and damage model uncertainty) to the total forecast uncertainty is achieved by neglecting individual uncertainty sources and analysing resulting predictions. Results show an increase in forecast skill measured by means of a reduced Brier score if both meteorological and damage model uncertainties are taken into account. It is demonstrated that skilful predictions on district level (dividing the area of Germany into 439 administrative districts) are possible on lead times of several days. Skill is increased through the application of a proper ensemble calibration method, extending the range of lead times for which skilful damage predictions can be made.

  9. Interactions Between Convective Storms and Their Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddox, R. A.; Hoxit, L. R.; Chappell, C. F.

    1979-01-01

    The ways in which intense convective storms interact with their environment are considered for a number of specific severe storm situations. A physical model of subcloud wind fields and vertical wind profiles was developed to explain the often observed intensification of convective storms that move along or across thermal boundaries. A number of special, unusually dense, data sets were used to substantiate features of the model. GOES imagery was used in conjunction with objectively analyzed surface wind data to develop a nowcast technique that might be used to identify specific storm cells likely to become tornadic. It was shown that circulations associated with organized meso-alpha and meso-beta scale storm complexes may, on occasion, strongly modify tropospheric thermodynamic patterns and flow fields.

  10. A rare case of thyroid storm.

    PubMed

    McMillen, Brock; Dhillon, Manvinder Shelley; Yong-Yow, Sabrina

    2016-04-18

    Thyroid storm is a rare and life-threatening state of thyroid hormone excess. Rapid recognition of thyroid storm is key to decreasing the morbidity and mortality of this condition. Clinical manifestations of thyroid storm include unexplained weight loss, hyperactivity and irritability. The most common causes of thyrotoxicosis are Graves' disease, toxic multinodular goitre and toxic adenoma. We present a rare case of thyroid storm induced by dual nivolumab and ipilimumab immunotherapy in a patient receiving treatment for advanced melanoma. In this case, our patient was admitted for thyroid storm 1 month after initiating treatment with nivolumab and ipilimumab immunotherapy. The patient was treated with β-blockers, antithyroid medications and systemic steroids resulting in an improvement in thyroid function testing and symptoms.

  11. Icing: Accretion, Detection, Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinmann, John J.

    1994-01-01

    The global aircraft industry and its regulatory agencies are currently involved in three major icing efforts: ground icing; advanced technologies for in-flight icing; and tailplane icing. These three major icing topics correspondingly support the three major segments of any aircraft flight profile: takeoff; cruise and hold; and approach and land. This lecture addressess these three topics in the same sequence as they appear in flight, starting with ground deicing, followed by advanced technologies for in-flight ice protection, and ending with tailplane icing.

  12. Determining the Return Period of Storm Surge Events in the Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago, Joy; Suarez, John Kenneth; Lapidez, John Phillip; Mendoza, Jerico; Caro, Carl Vincent; Tablazon, Judd; Ladiero, Christine; Mahar Francisco Lagmay, Alfredo

    2015-04-01

    The devastating damages generated by the Tropical Cyclone Haiyan storm surges in Eastern Samar, Philippines prompted the Department of Science and Technology-Project NOAH (Nationwide Operational Assessment of Hazards) to calculate the return period and storm surge exceedance probability of these events. The recurrence interval or the period of return of a storm surge event is the estimated likelihood that that event would occur again. Return periods are measured through historical data denoting the interval of recurrence in average over a period of time. The exceedance probability however, is a graphical representation that describes the probability that some various levels of loss will be exceeded over a future time period or will be surpassed over a given time. DOST-Project NOAH simulates storm surge height time series using JMA storm surge model which is a numerical model based on shallow water equations. To determine the period of recurrence of storm surges with this type of intensity, the agency intends to compute the estimation of storm surge heights generated by tropical cyclones for 2-year, 5-year, 10-year, 25-year, 50-year and 100-year return periods for the Philippine coast. The storm surge time series generated from JMA combined with WXTide simulation, a software containing archives/catalogues of world-wide astronomical tides, and 5-meter resolution DEM were used as input parameters for the inundation model, which shows probable extent of flooding at a specific storm surge return period. Flo-2D two-dimensional flood routing model, a GIS integrated software tool that facilitates the creation of the flood model grid system, was used for flood hazard model. It is a simple volume conservation model composed of processor program that facilitate graphical editing and mapping of flooding details which uses continuity equation and the dynamic wave momentum equations. The measurements of storm surge return period and probable extent of coastal flooding in the

  13. Sea ice loss enhances wave action at the Arctic coast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Overeem, I.; Anderson, R. Scott; Wobus, C.W.; Clow, G.D.; Urban, F.E.; Matell, N.

    2011-01-01

    Erosion rates of permafrost coasts along the Beaufort Sea accelerated over the past 50 years synchronously with Arctic-wide declines in sea ice extent, suggesting a causal relationship between the two. A fetch-limited wave model driven by sea ice position and local wind data from northern Alaska indicates that the exposure of permafrost bluffs to seawater increased by a factor of 2.5 during 1979-2009. The duration of the open water season expanded from ???45 days to ???95 days. Open water expanded more rapidly toward the fall (???0.92 day yr-1), when sea surface temperatures are cooler, than into the mid-summer (???0.71 days yr-1).Time-lapse imagery demonstrates the relatively efficient erosive action of a single storm in August. Sea surface temperatures have already decreased significantly by fall, reducing the potential impact of thermal erosion due to fall season storm waves. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. Processes causing electrification of ice crystals in thunderclouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vonnegut, B.; Moore, C. B.

    Jayaratne and Saunders (1991) have performed a useful service by reporting their laboratory experiments demonstrating, contrary to the findings of Odencrantz and Buecher (1967), that ice crystal charging does not take place in an unmixed cloud of ice crystals. Jayaratne and Saunders' further cold box experiments showing that the ice crystals become electrified when a fan in the cold box is turned on, support their view that an ice-ice charging process takes place on the surfaces of the moving ice-covered fan-blades. Their conclusion, that this phenomenon might be capable of producing each second the several coulombs of charged cloud particles necessary to maintain the electrification of a thundercloud, appears justified. However, because their paper is lacking in experimental details and because it is unknown whether the conditions in their cold chamber accurately duplicate those in a thunderstorm, this point is not possible to resolve. There is good reason to doubt J and S's final conclusion, that "… in thunderstorms, ice crystal charges are similarly acquired by collision processes RATHER THAN BY ANY OTHER MECHANISM". It is puzzling to understand why the authors have chosen to ignore ion attachment, an important ice crystal charging process that does not involve collisions between ice crystals. Beginning with Gish and Wait (1950), numerous investigators have demonstrated that ion currents flow to the tops of thunderclouds as predicted by Wilson (1920). Marshall et al. (1989) and Byrne et al. (1989) have found that ice particles at cloud top carry appreciable charges that appear to be derived from the Wilson current. In an average storm there can be little doubt that this mechanism too could be producing charged ice crystals at the required rate of about a coulomb per second (Vonnegut, 1990).

  15. Ice Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Heavy water ice clouds almost completely obscure the surface in Vastitas Borealis.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 69.5, Longitude 283.6 East (76.4 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  16. Arctic ice islands

    SciTech Connect

    Sackinger, W.M.; Jeffries, M.O.; Lu, M.C.; Li, F.C.

    1988-01-01

    The development of offshore oil and gas resources in the Arctic waters of Alaska requires offshore structures which successfully resist the lateral forces due to moving, drifting ice. Ice islands are floating, a tabular icebergs, up to 60 meters thick, of solid ice throughout their thickness. The ice islands are thus regarded as the strongest ice features in the Arctic; fixed offshore structures which can directly withstand the impact of ice islands are possible but in some locations may be so expensive as to make oilfield development uneconomic. The resolution of the ice island problem requires two research steps: (1) calculation of the probability of interaction between an ice island and an offshore structure in a given region; and (2) if the probability if sufficiently large, then the study of possible interactions between ice island and structure, to discover mitigative measures to deal with the moving ice island. The ice island research conducted during the 1983-1988 interval, which is summarized in this report, was concerned with the first step. Monte Carlo simulations of ice island generation and movement suggest that ice island lifetimes range from 0 to 70 years, and that 85% of the lifetimes are less then 35 years. The simulation shows a mean value of 18 ice islands present at any time in the Arctic Ocean, with a 90% probability of less than 30 ice islands. At this time, approximately 34 ice islands are known, from observations, to exist in the Arctic Ocean, not including the 10-meter thick class of ice islands. Return interval plots from the simulation show that coastal zones of the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas, already leased for oil development, have ice island recurrences of 10 to 100 years. This implies that the ice island hazard must be considered thoroughly, and appropriate safety measures adopted, when offshore oil production plans are formulated for the Alaskan Arctic offshore. 132 refs., 161 figs., 17 tabs.

  17. HST/WFC3 Observations of Uranus' 2014 Storm Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwin, Patrick Gerard Joseph; Simon, Amy A.; Wong, Michael H.; Orton, Glenn S.; Toledo, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    In November 2014 Uranus was observed with the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) instrument of the Hubble Space Telescope as part of the Hubble 2020: Outer Planet Atmospheres Legacy program, OPAL. OPAL annually maps Jupiter, Uranus and Neptune (and also Saturn from 2018) in several visible/near-IR wavelength filters. The Uranus 2014 OPAL observations were made on the 8 - 9th November at a time when a huge convective storm system, first observed by amateur astronomers, was present at 30 - 40°N. The entire visible atmosphere, including the storm system, was imaged in seven filters spanning 467 - 924 nm, capturing variations in the coloration of Uranus' clouds and also vertical distribution due to wavelength dependent changes in Rayleigh scattering and methane absorption. Here we analyse these new HST observations with the NEMESIS radiative-transfer and retrieval code, in multiple-scattering mode, to determine the vertical cloud structure in and around the convective storm cloud system.The same storm system was also observed in the H-band (1.4 - 1.9 µm) with the SINFONI Integral Field Unit Spectrometer on the Very Large Telescope (VLT) on 31st October and 11th November (Irwin et al., 2016, 10.1016/j.icarus.2015.09.010). To constrain better the cloud particle sizes and scattering properties over a wide wavelength range we also conducted a limb-darkening analysis of the background cloud structure in the 30 - 40°N latitude band by simultaneously fitting: a) these HST/OPAL observations at a range of zenith angles; b) the VLT/SINFONI observations at a range of zenith angles; and c) IRTF/SpeX observations of this latitude band made in 2009 at a single zenith angle of 23°, spanning the wavelength range 0.8 - 1.8 µm (Irwin et al., 2015, 10.1016/j.icarus.2014.12.020).We find that the HST observations and the combined HST/VLT/IRTF observations are well modeled with a three-component cloud comprised of: 1) a thin 'deep' cloud at a pressure of ~2 bars; 2) a methane-ice cloud at the

  18. Storms in Ancient Egypt: the Examples of Historical Natural Disasters Impacts on the Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, Anastasia

    2013-04-01

    Though rain storms are infrequent in Egypt, which is normally a rainless country, some Ancient Egyptian texts give accounts of violent storms and rains. Actually, even small amounts of rain in that area could cause huge impact, as none of the water was absorbed by soil, and, running off, it could create dangerous torrents. The Tempest stele, circa 1550 BC, recounts a highly destructive storm happened during the reign of Ahmose I, the king of Egypt's 18 dynasty. The catastrophy is described in details, including the specific noise, overall darkness, torrent so that no torch could be lit. Many houses were washed into the river, temples, tombs and pyramids damaged and collapsed. The stele commemorates the restoration works made by the king who was able to cope with this great disaster and "re-establish the Two Lands". Some egyptologists believe that this event is related to the Minoan eruption of Thera, but this is unlikely given the description in the stele.

  19. Probability of occurrence of planetary ionosphere storms associated with the magnetosphere disturbance storm time events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulyaeva, T. L.; Arikan, F.; Stanislawska, I.

    2014-11-01

    The ionospheric W index allows to distinguish state of the ionosphere and plasmasphere from quiet conditions (W = 0 or ±1) to intense storm (W = ±4) ranging the plasma density enhancements (positive phase) or plasma density depletions (negative phase) regarding the quiet ionosphere. The global W index maps are produced for a period 1999-2014 from Global Ionospheric Maps of Total Electron Content, GIM-TEC, designed by Jet Propulson Laboratory, converted from geographic frame (-87.5:2.5:87.5° in latitude, -180:5:180° in longitude) to geomagnetic frame (-85:5:85° in magnetic latitude, -180:5:180° in magnetic longitude). The probability of occurrence of planetary ionosphere storm during the magnetic disturbance storm time, Dst, event is evaluated with the superposed epoch analysis for 77 intense storms (Dst ≤ -100 nT) and 230 moderate storms (-100 < Dst ≤ -50 nT) with start time, t0, defined at Dst storm main phase onset. It is found that the intensity of negative storm, iW-, exceeds the intensity of positive storm, iW+, by 1.5-2 times. An empirical formula of iW+ and iW- in terms of peak Dst is deduced exhibiting an opposite trends of relation of intensity of ionosphere-plasmasphere storm with regard to intensity of Dst storm.

  20. Storm Sudden Commencements Without Interplanetary Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Wooyeon; Lee, Jeongwoo; Yi, Yu; Ssessanga, Nicholas; Oh, Suyeon

    2015-09-01

    Storm sudden commencements (SSCs) occur due to a rapid compression of the Earth's magnetic field. This is generally believed to be caused by interplanetary (IP) shocks, but with exceptions. In this paper we explore possible causes of SSCs other than IP shocks through a statistical study of geomagnetic storms using SYM-H data provided by the World Data Center for Geomagnetism ? Kyoto and by applying a superposed epoch analysis to simultaneous solar wind parameters obtained with the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) satellite. We select a total of 274 geomagnetic storms with minimum SYM-H of less than ?30nT during 1998-2008 and regard them as SSCs if SYM-H increases by more than 10 nT over 10 minutes. Under this criterion, we found 103 geomagnetic storms with both SSC and IP shocks and 28 storms with SSC not associated with IP shocks. Storms in the former group share the property that the strength of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), proton density and proton velocity increase together with SYM-H, implying the action of IP shocks. During the storms in the latter group, only the proton density rises with SYM-H. We find that the density increase is associated with either high speed streams (HSSs) or interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs), and suggest that HSSs and ICMEs may be alternative contributors to SSCs.

  1. long duration dust storm sequences on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.

    2012-12-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Observer Camera (MOC) and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) Mars Color Imager (MARCI) Mars daily global maps have revealed new characteristics for long duration dust storm sequences. These dust storm sequences have long histories of more than a week, travel long distances out of their origination region, and influence large areas in different regions of the planet. During the Ls = 180 - 360 season, except for global dust storms which involve multiple remote dust lifting centers and generally expand explosively from the southern hemisphere northward, other long-lived dust storm sequences usually travel southward through the Acidalia-Chryse, Utopia-Isidis or Arcadia-Amazonis channels with subsequent dust lifting along the way. Sometimes, they penetrate remarkably deep to the southern high latitudes, producing fantastic display of dust band. During the rest of the year, long duration dust storm sequences usually originate from the Argyre/Solis, Hellas/Noachis, or Cimmeria/Sirenum area and travel northward toward the southern low latitudes. Each route exhibits its own peculiar characteristics. We will present our results about these long duration dust storm sequences summarized from the complete archive of MGS MOC daily global maps and two years of MRO MARCI daily global maps. The systematic daily nearly global coverage of these maps makes it feasible to reconstruct the history of long duration dust storm sequences with detail.

  2. In Brief: Cassini images Saturn storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, Sarah

    2006-11-01

    The Cassini spacecraft has spotted an 8000-kilometer-wide, hurricane-like storm around Saturn's South Pole, NASA announced on 9 November. The storm has a dark `eye' at the South Pole along with eye-wall clouds and spiral arms, but it is not known if moist convection-the driver of hurricanes on Earth-drives the Saturn storm. A movie taken by Cassini's camera indicates that the winds are blowing clockwise at about 560 kilometers per hour. Although large storms have been observed on other planets in the past-most notably, Jupiter's Great Red Spot-this is the first storm found to have eye-wall clouds and a relatively calm center. Andrew Ingersoll, a member of Cassini's imaging team at the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, said the storm looks like a hurricane but is not behaving like one. ``Whatever it is, we are going to focus on the eye of this storm and find out why it is there.''

  3. Stability of subsea pipelines during large storms

    PubMed Central

    Draper, Scott; An, Hongwei; Cheng, Liang; White, David J.; Griffiths, Terry

    2015-01-01

    On-bottom stability design of subsea pipelines transporting hydrocarbons is important to ensure safety and reliability but is challenging to achieve in the onerous metocean (meteorological and oceanographic) conditions typical of large storms (such as tropical cyclones, hurricanes or typhoons). This challenge is increased by the fact that industry design guidelines presently give no guidance on how to incorporate the potential benefits of seabed mobility, which can lead to lowering and self-burial of the pipeline on a sandy seabed. In this paper, we demonstrate recent advances in experimental modelling of pipeline scour and present results investigating how pipeline stability can change in a large storm. An emphasis is placed on the initial development of the storm, where scour is inevitable on an erodible bed as the storm velocities build up to peak conditions. During this initial development, we compare the rate at which peak near-bed velocities increase in a large storm (typically less than 10−3 m s−2) to the rate at which a pipeline scours and subsequently lowers (which is dependent not only on the storm velocities, but also on the mechanism of lowering and the pipeline properties). We show that the relative magnitude of these rates influences pipeline embedment during a storm and the stability of the pipeline. PMID:25512592

  4. Physiological and ecological significance of biological ice nucleators.

    PubMed

    Lundheim, Rolv

    2002-07-29

    When a pure water sample is cooled it can remain in the liquid state at temperatures well below its melting point (0 degrees C). The initiation of the transition from the liquid state to ice is called nucleation. Substances that facilitate this transition so that it takes place at a relatively high sub-zero temperature are called ice nucleators. Many living organisms produce ice nucleators. In some cases, plausible reasons for their production have been suggested. In bacteria, they could induce frost damage to their hosts, giving the bacteria access to nutrients. In freeze-tolerant animals, it has been suggested that ice nucleators help to control the ice formation so that it is tolerable to the animal. Such ice nucleators can be called adaptive ice nucleators. There are, however, also examples of ice nucleators in living organisms where the adaptive value is difficult to understand. These ice nucleators might be structures with functions other than facilitating ice formation. These structures might be called incidental ice nucleators.

  5. Storm Physics and Lightning Properties over Northern Alabama during DC3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthee, R.; Carey, L. D.; Bain, A. L.

    2013-12-01

    The Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) experiment seeks to examine the relationship between deep moist convection (DMC) and the production of nitrogen oxides (NOx) via lightning (LNOx). The focus of this study will be to examine integrated storm microphysics and lightning properties of DMC across northern Alabama (NA) during the DC3 campaign through use of polarimetric radar [UAHuntsville's Advanced Radar for Meteorological and Operational Radar (ARMOR)] and lightning mapping [National Aeronautical and Space Administration's (NASA) north Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NA LMA)] platforms. Specifically, ARMOR and NA LMA are being used to explore the ability of radar inferred microphysical (e.g., ice mass, graupel volume) measurements to parameterize flash rates (F) and flash area for estimation of LNOX production in cloud resolving models. The flash area was calculated by using the 'convex hull' method. This method essentially draws a polygon around all the sources that comprise a flash. From this polygon, the convex hull area that describes the minimum polygon that circumscribes the flash extent is calculated. Two storms have been analyzed so far; one on 21 May 2012 (S1) and another on 11 June 2012 (S2), both of which were aircraft-penetrated during DC3. For S1 and S2, radar reflectivity (Z) estimates of precipitation ice mass (M) within the mixed-phase zone (-10°C to -40°C) were well correlated to the trend of lightning flash rate. However, a useful radar-based F parameterization must provide accurate quantification of rates in addition to proper trends. The difference reflectivity was used to estimate Z associated with ice and then a single Z-M relation was employed to calculate M in the mixed-phase zone. Using this approach it was estimated that S1 produced an order of magnitude greater M, but produced about a third of the total amount of flashes compared to S2. Expectations based on the non-inductive charging (NIC) theory suggest that the M

  6. Sea ice ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Arrigo, Kevin R

    2014-01-01

    Polar sea ice is one of the largest ecosystems on Earth. The liquid brine fraction of the ice matrix is home to a diverse array of organisms, ranging from tiny archaea to larger fish and invertebrates. These organisms can tolerate high brine salinity and low temperature but do best when conditions are milder. Thriving ice algal communities, generally dominated by diatoms, live at the ice/water interface and in recently flooded surface and interior layers, especially during spring, when temperatures begin to rise. Although protists dominate the sea ice biomass, heterotrophic bacteria are also abundant. The sea ice ecosystem provides food for a host of animals, with crustaceans being the most conspicuous. Uneaten organic matter from the ice sinks through the water column and feeds benthic ecosystems. As sea ice extent declines, ice algae likely contribute a shrinking fraction of the total amount of organic matter produced in polar waters.

  7. Iced-airfoil aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragg, M. B.; Broeren, A. P.; Blumenthal, L. A.

    2005-07-01

    Past research on airfoil aerodynamics in icing are reviewed. This review emphasizes the time period after the 1978 NASA Lewis workshop that initiated the modern icing research program at NASA and the current period after the 1994 ATR accident where aerodynamics research has been more aircraft safety focused. Research pre-1978 is also briefly reviewed. Following this review, our current knowledge of iced airfoil aerodynamics is presented from a flowfield-physics perspective. This article identifies four classes of ice accretions: roughness, horn ice, streamwise ice, and spanwise-ridge ice. For each class, the key flowfield features such as flowfield separation and reattachment are discussed and how these contribute to the known aerodynamic effects of these ice shapes. Finally Reynolds number and Mach number effects on iced-airfoil aerodynamics are summarized.

  8. Stochastic ice stream dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantelli, Elisa; Bertagni, Matteo Bernard; Ridolfi, Luca

    2016-08-01

    Ice streams are narrow corridors of fast-flowing ice that constitute the arterial drainage network of ice sheets. Therefore, changes in ice stream flow are key to understanding paleoclimate, sea level changes, and rapid disintegration of ice sheets during deglaciation. The dynamics of ice flow are tightly coupled to the climate system through atmospheric temperature and snow recharge, which are known exhibit stochastic variability. Here we focus on the interplay between stochastic climate forcing and ice stream temporal dynamics. Our work demonstrates that realistic climate fluctuations are able to (i) induce the coexistence of dynamic behaviors that would be incompatible in a purely deterministic system and (ii) drive ice stream flow away from the regime expected in a steady climate. We conclude that environmental noise appears to be crucial to interpreting the past behavior of ice sheets, as well as to predicting their future evolution.

  9. Sea Ice Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrigo, Kevin R.

    2014-01-01

    Polar sea ice is one of the largest ecosystems on Earth. The liquid brine fraction of the ice matrix is home to a diverse array of organisms, ranging from tiny archaea to larger fish and invertebrates. These organisms can tolerate high brine salinity and low temperature but do best when conditions are milder. Thriving ice algal communities, generally dominated by diatoms, live at the ice/water interface and in recently flooded surface and interior layers, especially during spring, when temperatures begin to rise. Although protists dominate the sea ice biomass, heterotrophic bacteria are also abundant. The sea ice ecosystem provides food for a host of animals, with crustaceans being the most conspicuous. Uneaten organic matter from the ice sinks through the water column and feeds benthic ecosystems. As sea ice extent declines, ice algae likely contribute a shrinking fraction of the total amount of organic matter produced in polar waters.

  10. Stochastic ice stream dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Bertagni, Matteo Bernard; Ridolfi, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Ice streams are narrow corridors of fast-flowing ice that constitute the arterial drainage network of ice sheets. Therefore, changes in ice stream flow are key to understanding paleoclimate, sea level changes, and rapid disintegration of ice sheets during deglaciation. The dynamics of ice flow are tightly coupled to the climate system through atmospheric temperature and snow recharge, which are known exhibit stochastic variability. Here we focus on the interplay between stochastic climate forcing and ice stream temporal dynamics. Our work demonstrates that realistic climate fluctuations are able to (i) induce the coexistence of dynamic behaviors that would be incompatible in a purely deterministic system and (ii) drive ice stream flow away from the regime expected in a steady climate. We conclude that environmental noise appears to be crucial to interpreting the past behavior of ice sheets, as well as to predicting their future evolution. PMID:27457960

  11. Top Sounder Ice Penetration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, D. L.; Goemmer, S. A.; Sweeney, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Ice draft measurements are made as part of normal operations for all US Navy submarines operating in the Arctic Ocean. The submarine ice draft data are unique in providing high resolution measurements over long transects of the ice covered ocean. The data has been used to document a multidecadal drop in ice thickness, and for validating and improving numerical sea-ice models. A submarine upward-looking sonar draft measurement is made by a sonar transducer mounted in the sail or deck of the submarine. An acoustic beam is transmitted upward through the water column, reflecting off the bottom of the sea ice and returning to the transducer. Ice thickness is estimated as the difference between the ship's depth (measured by pressure) and the acoustic range to the bottom of the ice estimated from the travel time of the sonar pulse. Digital recording systems can provide the return off the water-ice interface as well as returns that have penetrated the ice. Typically, only the first return from the ice hull is analyzed. Information regarding ice flow interstitial layers provides ice age information and may possibly be derived with the entire return signal. The approach being investigated is similar to that used in measuring bottom sediment layers and will involve measuring the echo level from the first interface, solving the reflection loss from that transmission, and employing reflection loss versus impedance mismatch to ascertain ice structure information.

  12. Towards robust optimal design of storm water systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquez Calvo, Oscar; Solomatine, Dimitri

    2015-04-01

    In this study the focus is on the design of a storm water or a combined sewer system. Such a system should be capable to handle properly most of the storm to minimize the damages caused by flooding due to the lack of capacity of the system to cope with rain water at peak times. This problem is a multi-objective optimization problem: we have to take into account the minimization of the construction costs, the minimization of damage costs due to flooding, and possibly other criteria. One of the most important factors influencing the design of storm water systems is the expected amount of water to deal with. It is common that this infrastructure is developed with the capacity to cope with events that occur once in, say 10 or 20 years - so-called design rainfall events. However, rainfall is a random variable and such uncertainty typically is not taken explicitly into account in optimization. Rainfall design data is based on historical information of rainfalls, but many times this data is based on unreliable measures; or in not enough historical information; or as we know, the patterns of rainfall are changing regardless of historical information. There are also other sources of uncertainty influencing design, for example, leakages in the pipes and accumulation of sediments in pipes. In the context of storm water or combined sewer systems design or rehabilitation, robust optimization technique should be able to find the best design (or rehabilitation plan) within the available budget but taking into account uncertainty in those variables that were used to design the system. In this work we consider various approaches to robust optimization proposed by various authors (Gabrel, Murat, Thiele 2013; Beyer, Sendhoff 2007) and test a novel method ROPAR (Solomatine 2012) to analyze robustness. References Beyer, H.G., & Sendhoff, B. (2007). Robust optimization - A comprehensive survey. Comput. Methods Appl. Mech. Engrg., 3190-3218. Gabrel, V.; Murat, C., Thiele, A. (2014

  13. The Newfoundland ice extent and the solar cycle from 1860 to 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, B.T.; Jones, S.J. )

    1990-04-15

    Sea ice conditions off the east coast of Newfoundland for the last 130 years are presented, forming what is believed to be the longest ice record for the northwestern Atlantic. Because of differenced in how these data were originally collected, the series is divided into two sets, before and after 1920. Time series for solar activity and air temperature at St. John's have also been compiled and correlation coefficients between the various data sets determined. The relationships between the sea ice extent and solar activity are discussed in the contest of the Iceland ice index and recent findings in the atmosphere-ocean-ice system in the northern hemisphere. The association with the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) and the similarity with the fluctuating trends of sea levels, sea surface temperatures, and storms in the North Atlantic are noted. Predictions for the sea ice extent are made for the next few years based on the relationship with solar activity.

  14. Reduced Baroclinicity During Martian Global Dust Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battalio, Joseph; Szunyogh, Istvan; Lemmon, Mark

    2015-11-01

    The eddy kinetic energy equation is applied to the Mars Analysis Correction Data Assimilation (MACDA) dataset during the pre-winter solstice period for the northern hemisphere of Mars. Traveling waves are triggered by geopotential flux convergence, grow baroclinically, and decay barotropically. Higher optical depth increases the static stability, which reduces vertical and meridional heat fluxes. Traveling waves during a global dust storm year develop a mixed baroclinic/barotropic growth phase before decaying barotropically. Baroclinic energy conversion is reduced during the global dust storm, but eddy intensity is undiminished. Instead, the frequency of storms is reduced due to a stabilized vertical profile.

  15. Desert Shield and Desert Storm Emerging Observations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-10-07

    becomes much more apparent over relatively flat terrain. d. Recommended or Ongoing Action. The M577 CPV is scheduled to yo through a system conversion to...STORM Vehicle exchange policy at maintenanfce points. 9? 40115 4f996 (0017?) DESERT STORM Fretracide, peor ommunication. poor flank ceerdihutien. 24...02413 fll% yo (00M) DEIil SIONM Distribut ion of Wcom arM Iaf amon units 4??44 INAI8 (002 n) TILSll STORM Pro-combat trainfig V4 14145 U’,411 (00276

  16. Measured winter performance of storm windows

    SciTech Connect

    Klems, Joseph H.

    2002-08-23

    Direct comparison measurements were made between various prime/storm window combinations and a well-weatherstripped, single-hung replacement window with a low-E selective glazing. Measurements were made using an accurate outdoor calorimetric facility with the windows facing north. The doublehung prime window was made intentionally leaky. Nevertheless, heat flows due to air infiltration were found to be small, and performance of the prime/storm combinations was approximately what would be expected from calculations that neglect air infiltration. Prime/low-E storm window combinations performed very similarly to the replacement window. Interestingly, solar heat gain was not negligible, even in north-facing orientation.

  17. Detection Of Tornado Damage Tracks With EOS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedlovec, Gary J.; Nair, Udaysankar; Haines, Stephanie L.

    2005-01-01

    The damage surveys conducted by the NWS in the aftermath of a reported tornadic event are used to document the location of the tornado ground damage track (path length and width) and an estimation of the tornado intensity. This study explored the possibility of using near real-time medium and high-resolution satellite imagery from the NASA EOS satellites to provide additional information for the surveys. MODIS and ASTER data were used to study the damage tracks from three tornadic storms; the La Plata, Maryland storm of 28 April 2002 and the Carter-Butler Counties and Madison County Missouri storms of 24 April 2002. These storms varied in intensity (from F0-F4) and occurred over regions with different land use. It was found that, depending on the nature of land use, tornado damage tracks from intense storms (F2 or greater) may be evident in both ASTER and MODIS satellite imagery. In areas of dense vegetation the scar patterns show up very clearly, while in areas of grassland and regions with few trees, scar patterns are not at all obvious in the satellite imagery. The detection of previously unidentified segments of a damage track caused by the 24 April 2004 Madison County, Missouri tornado demonstrates the utility of satellite imagery for damage surveys. However, the capability to detect tornado tracks in satellite imagery appears to be as much dependent on the nature of the underlying surface and land use as on the severity of the tornadic storm. The imaging sensors on the NPOESS operational satellites to be launched in 2006 will continue the unique observing capabilities of the EOS instruments.

  18. Effects of the May 5-6, 1973, storm in the Greater Denver area, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, Wallace R.

    1973-01-01

    Rain began falling on the Greater Denver area the evening of Saturday, May 5, 1973, and continued through most of Sunday, May 6. Below about 7,000 feet altitude, the precipitation was mostly rain; above that altitude, it was mostly snow. Although the rate of fall was moderate, at least 4 inches of rain or as much as 4 feet of snow accumulated in some places. Sustained precipitation falling at a moderate rate thoroughly saturated the ground and by midday Sunday sent most of the smaller streams into flood stage. The South Platte River and its major tributaries began to flood by late Sunday evening and early Monday morning. Geologic and hydrologic processes activated by the May 5-6 storm caused extensive damage to lands and to manmade structures in the Greater Denver area. Damage was generally most intense in areas where man had modified the landscape--by channel constrictions, paving, stripping of vegetation and topsoil, and oversteepening of hillslopes. Roads, bridges, culverts, dams, canals, and the like were damaged or destroyed by erosion and sedimentation. Streambanks and structures along them were scoured. Thousands of acres of croplands, pasture, and developed urban lands were coated with mud and sand. Flooding was intensified by inadequate storm sewers, blocked drains, and obstructed drainage courses. Saturation of hillslopes along the Front Range caused rockfalls, landslides, and mudflows as far west as Berthoud Pass. Greater attention to geologic conditions in land-use planning, design, and construction would minimize storm damage in the future.

  19. The use of weather radars to estimate hail damage to automobiles: an exploratory study in Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohl, Roman; Schiesser, Hans-Heinrich; Knepper, Ingeborg

    As the first of its kind, this study presents damage functions between two damage variables of hail-damaged automobiles and radar-derived hail kinetic energy for a total of 12 severe hailstorms that have occurred over the Swiss Mittelland (1992-1998). Hail kinetic energy is calculated from C-band Doppler radar CAPPIs at low storm level (1.5 km MSL) and is integrated per radar element ( EKINPIX) for entire hail cells. Hail damage claim data were available per Swiss community on a daily basis and transformed (Delaunay triangulation) along with EKINPIX to a regular 3×3 km grid, thereafter allowing cross-correlation between the variables. The results show nonlinear relationships between EKINPIX and both loss ratios and mean damages per hail-damaged car, differing between high hail season storms (15 June-15 August) and storms that occurred during the low season (before and after). A weighted logistic function provides correlation coefficients between EKINPIX and loss ratios of 0.71 (0.79) for high (low) season storms and 0.76 (0.40) for mean damages of high (low) season hailstorms. Maximally possible loss ratios reach 60% (40%) in high (low) season storms with maximum mean damages of CHF 6000 (CHF 3000) and average values around CHF 3100 (CHF 2100). Seasonal differences in hailfall intensities are discussed in terms of atmospheric conditions favoring convective activity and the likelihood of higher numbers of large hailstones (>20 mm in diameter) that induce more severe damage to cars during the high storm season. The results suggest that radar-derived hail kinetic energy could be used by insurance companies in the future to (1) assess hail damage to cars immediately after a storm has passed over a radar observation area and (2) to estimate potential maximal hail losses to car portfolios for parts of central Europe.

  20. Passive nutrient addition for the biodegradation of ethylene glycol in storm water.

    PubMed

    Safferman, Steven I; Azar, Roger A; Sigler, Stephanie

    2002-01-01

    This laboratory proof-of-concept research examined the feasibility of adding solid, slow-release macronutrients to a biofilm reactor system to achieve the effective biodegradation of a predominately organic polluted storm water. The target scenario was treating ethylene glycol in storm water, representing the runoff of airport deicing and anti-icing fluids. However, the results can also be generalized for any water polluted with a predominately carbonaceous material. The use of a solid, slow-release nutrient source, compared to amending with a soluble solution in proportion to influent flow, would be ideal for storm water applications and other specialized wastewater flows when maintenance requirements and operational support must be minimized. Several commercially available fertilizers were preliminarily examined to determine which had the best potential to provide the required amount of nutrients. A time-released, polymer-coated granular fertilizer was ultimately selected. Based on laboratory studies, it was found that this fertilizer could provide a controllable source of macronutrients that enabled treatment to a similar degree as if the macronutrients had been dissolved in the influent. The only major operational problem was reduced nutrient delivery from the fertilizer after it became coated with a thick biofilm. However, the inherent intermittent nature of storm water production resulting in wet/dry cycles may minimize the development of a thick biofilm.

  1. Dual-Polarization Radar Observations of Upward Lightning-Producing Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lueck, R.; Helsdon, J. H.; Warner, T.

    2013-12-01

    The Upward Lightning Triggering Study (UPLIGHTS) seeks to determine how upward lightning, which originates from the tips of tall objects, is triggered by nearby flash activity. As a component of this study we analyze standard and dual-polarization weather radar data. The Correlation Coefficient (CC) in particular can be used to identify and quantify the melting layer associated with storms that produce upward lightning. It has been proposed that positive charge generation due to aggregate shedding at the melting layer results in a positive charge region just above the cloud base. This positive charge region may serve as a positive potential well favorable for negative leader propagation, which initiate upward positive leaders from tall objects. We characterize the horizontal coverage, thickness and height of the melting layer in addition to cloud base heights when upward lightning occurs to determine trends and possible threshold criteria relating to upward lightning production. Furthermore, we characterize storm type and morphology using relevant schemes as well as precipitation type using the Hydrometer Classification Algorithm (HCA) for upward lightning-producing storms. Ice-phase hydrometeors have been shown to be a significant factor in thunderstorm electrification. Only a small fraction of storms produce upward lightning, so null cases will be examined and compared as well.

  2. Advances in Understanding the Role of Aerosols on Ice Clouds from the Fifth International Ice Nucleation (FIN) Workshops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cziczo, D. J.; Moehler, O.; DeMott, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    The relationship of ambient aerosol particles to the formation of ice-containing clouds is one of the largest uncertainties in understanding climate. This is due to several poorly understood processes including the microphysics of how particles nucleate ice, the number of effective heterogeneous ice nuclei and their atmospheric distribution, the role of anthropogenic activities in producing or changing the behavior of ice forming particles and the interplay between effective heterogeneous ice nuclei and homogeneous ice formation. Our team recently completed a three-part international workshop to improve our understanding of atmospheric ice formation. Termed the Fifth International Ice Nucleation (FIN) Workshops, our motivation was the limited number of measurements and a lack of understanding of how to compare data acquired by different groups. The first activity, termed FIN1, addressed the characterization of ice nucleating particle size, number and chemical composition. FIN2 addressed the determination of ice nucleating particle number density. Groups modeling ice nucleation joined FIN2 to provide insight on measurements critically needed to model atmospheric ice nucleation and to understand the performance of ice chambers. FIN1 and FIN2 took place at the Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) chamber at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. A particular emphasis of FIN1 and FIN2 was the use of 'blind' intercomparisons using a highly characterized, but unknown to the instrument operators, aerosol sample. The third activity, FIN3, took place at the Desert Research Institute's Storm Peak Laboratory (SPL). A high elevation site not subject to local emissions, SPL allowed for a comparison of ice chambers and subsequent analysis of the ice residuals under the challenging conditions of low particle loading, temperature and pressure found in the atmosphere. The presentation focuses on the improvement in understanding how mass spectra from different

  3. Development of Storm Surge Hazard Maps and Advisory System for the Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caro, C. V. C.; Santiago, J. T.; Suarez, J. K. B.; Tablazon, J. P.; Dasallas, L. L.; Lagmay, A. M. F. A.

    2015-12-01

    Being located in north pacific basin which is the most active region of cyclogenesis in the world, the Philippines is frequently visited by tropical cyclones (TC). An average of 20 TC per year enter the Philippine area of responsibility (PAR), around 9 of which make landfall. Tropical cyclone enhances monsoons which cause heavy rainfall, bring in strong winds that are capable of destroying properties. This strong wind also causes storm surges that inundate the coastal portions of the country. Typhoon Haiyan is one of the most recent and devastating events, which left the Philippines with 6,293 deaths and 2 billion USD worth of damages. In this regard, the Department of Science and Technology - Nationwide Operational Assessment of Hazards (DOST - Project NOAH) started a project to quantify, identify and map the storm surge hazards in the country. The Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) storm surge model is used to simulate 721 TCs that enter PAR. The JMA storm surge model yields time series plots for each observation point that has been defined by the team. Maximum tide levels are identified using the WXtide software, and are added to the resulting storm surge time series for each observation point. The storm tide levels are then categorized into 4 groups which is based on its peak height, this is done to create a storm surge advisory (SSA) based on the probable storm tide height. The 4 groups are SSA 1 (0.01m to 2m), SSA 2 (2.01m to 3m), SSA 3 (3.01m to 4m), and SSA 4 (4m and above). A time series plot for each advisory is used as an input data in Flo2D flood modelling software. This software is a grid developer system software that has maps with topographies and creates models based on the grid topographies, boundaries, and tides. This modelling software can produce the probable extent,depth of inundation and its corresponding hazard level of storm surge. The storm surge advisory improves the capabilities of the country in mitigating disasters. Through this advisory

  4. Health effects of coastal storms and flooding in urban areas: a review and vulnerability assessment.

    PubMed

    Lane, Kathryn; Charles-Guzman, Kizzy; Wheeler, Katherine; Abid, Zaynah; Graber, Nathan; Matte, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Coastal storms can take a devastating toll on the public's health. Urban areas like New York City (NYC) may be particularly at risk, given their dense population, reliance on transportation, energy infrastructure that is vulnerable to flood damage, and high-rise residential housing, which may be hard-hit by power and utility outages. Climate change will exacerbate these risks in the coming decades. Sea levels are rising due to global warming, which will intensify storm surge. These projections make preparing for the health impacts of storms even more important. We conducted a broad review of the health impacts of US coastal storms to inform climate adaptation planning efforts, with a focus on outcomes relevant to NYC and urban coastal areas, and incorporated some lessons learned from recent experience with Superstorm Sandy. Based on the literature, indicators of health vulnerability were selected and mapped within NYC neighborhoods. Preparing for the broad range of anticipated effects of coastal storms and floods may help reduce the public health burden from these events.

  5. Health Effects of Coastal Storms and Flooding in Urban Areas: A Review and Vulnerability Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Charles-Guzman, Kizzy; Matte, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Coastal storms can take a devastating toll on the public's health. Urban areas like New York City (NYC) may be particularly at risk, given their dense population, reliance on transportation, energy infrastructure that is vulnerable to flood damage, and high-rise residential housing, which may be hard-hit by power and utility outages. Climate change will exacerbate these risks in the coming decades. Sea levels are rising due to global warming, which will intensify storm surge. These projections make preparing for the health impacts of storms even more important. We conducted a broad review of the health impacts of US coastal storms to inform climate adaptation planning efforts, with a focus on outcomes relevant to NYC and urban coastal areas, and incorporated some lessons learned from recent experience with Superstorm Sandy. Based on the literature, indicators of health vulnerability were selected and mapped within NYC neighborhoods. Preparing for the broad range of anticipated effects of coastal storms and floods may help reduce the public health burden from these events. PMID:23818911

  6. Using Wind Setdown and Storm Surge on Lake Erie to Calibrate the Air-Sea Drag Coefficient

    PubMed Central

    Drews, Carl

    2013-01-01

    The air-sea drag coefficient controls the transfer of momentum from wind to water. In modeling storm surge, this coefficient is a crucial parameter for estimating the surge height. This study uses two strong wind events on Lake Erie to calibrate the drag coefficient using the Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Wave Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system and the the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS). Simulated waves are generated on the lake with Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN). Wind setdown provides the opportunity to eliminate wave setup as a contributing factor, since waves are minimal at the upwind shore. The study finds that model results significantly underestimate wind setdown and storm surge when a typical open-ocean formulation without waves is used for the drag coefficient. The contribution of waves to wind setdown and storm surge is 34.7%. Scattered lake ice also increases the effective drag coefficient by a factor of 1.1. PMID:23977309

  7. Using wind setdown and storm surge on Lake Erie to calibrate the air-sea drag coefficient.

    PubMed

    Drews, Carl

    2013-01-01

    The air-sea drag coefficient controls the transfer of momentum from wind to water. In modeling storm surge, this coefficient is a crucial parameter for estimating the surge height. This study uses two strong wind events on Lake Erie to calibrate the drag coefficient using the Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Wave Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system and the the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS). Simulated waves are generated on the lake with Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN). Wind setdown provides the opportunity to eliminate wave setup as a contributing factor, since waves are minimal at the upwind shore. The study finds that model results significantly underestimate wind setdown and storm surge when a typical open-ocean formulation without waves is used for the drag coefficient. The contribution of waves to wind setdown and storm surge is 34.7%. Scattered lake ice also increases the effective drag coefficient by a factor of 1.1.

  8. Fundamental Ice Crystal Accretion Physics Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currie, Tom; Knezevici, Danny; Fuleki, Dan; Struk, Peter M.; Broeren, Andy P.; Tsao, Jen-ching; Vargas, Mario; Wright, William

    2011-01-01

    Due to numerous engine power-loss events associated with high-altitude convective weather, ice accretion within an engine due to ice-crystal ingestion is being investigated. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada are starting to examine the physical mechanisms of ice accretion on surfaces exposed to ice-crystal and mixed-phase conditions. In November 2010, two weeks of testing occurred at the NRC Research Altitude Facility utilizing a single wedge-type airfoil designed to facilitate fundamental studies while retaining critical features of a compressor stator blade or guide vane. The airfoil was placed in the NRC cascade wind tunnel for both aerodynamic and icing tests. Aerodynamic testing showed excellent agreement compared with CFD data on the icing pressure surface and allowed calculation of heat transfer coefficients at various airfoil locations. Icing tests were performed at Mach numbers of 0.2 to 0.3, total pressures from 93 to 45 kPa, and total temperatures from 5 to 15 C. Ice and liquid water contents ranged up to 20 and 3 grams per cubic meter, respectively. The ice appeared well adhered to the surface in the lowest pressure tests (45 kPa) and, in a particular case, showed continuous leading-edge ice growth to a thickness greater than 15 millimeters in 3 minutes. Such widespread deposits were not observed in the highest pressure tests, where the accretions were limited to a small area around the leading edge. The suction surface was typically ice-free in the tests at high pressure, but not at low pressure. The icing behavior at high and low pressure appeared to be correlated with the wet-bulb temperature, which was estimated to be above 0 C in tests at 93 kPa and below 0 C in tests at lower pressure, the latter enhanced by more evaporative cooling of water. The authors believe that the large ice accretions observed in the low pressure tests would undoubtedly cause the aerodynamic

  9. Fundamental Ice Crystal Accretion Physics Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struk, Peter M.; Broeren, Andy P.; Tsao, Jen-Ching; Vargas, Mario; Wright, William B.; Currie, Tom; Knezevici, Danny; Fuleki, Dan

    2012-01-01

    Due to numerous engine power-loss events associated with high-altitude convective weather, ice accretion within an engine due to ice crystal ingestion is being investigated. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada are starting to examine the physical mechanisms of ice accretion on surfaces exposed to ice-crystal and mixed-phase conditions. In November 2010, two weeks of testing occurred at the NRC Research Altitude Facility utilizing a single wedge-type airfoil designed to facilitate fundamental studies while retaining critical features of a compressor stator blade or guide vane. The airfoil was placed in the NRC cascade wind tunnel for both aerodynamic and icing tests. Aerodynamic testing showed excellent agreement compared with CFD data on the icing pressure surface and allowed calculation of heat transfer coefficients at various airfoil locations. Icing tests were performed at Mach numbers of 0.2 to 0.3, total pressures from 93 to 45 kPa, and total temperatures from 5 to 15 C. Ice and liquid water contents ranged up to 20 and 3 g/m3, respectively. The ice appeared well adhered to the surface in the lowest pressure tests (45 kPa) and, in a particular case, showed continuous leading-edge ice growth to a thickness greater than 15 mm in 3 min. Such widespread deposits were not observed in the highest pressure tests, where the accretions were limited to a small area around the leading edge. The suction surface was typically ice-free in the tests at high pressure, but not at low pressure. The icing behavior at high and low pressure appeared to be correlated with the wet-bulb temperature, which was estimated to be above 0 C in tests at 93 kPa and below 0 C in tests at lower pressure, the latter enhanced by more evaporative cooling of water. The authors believe that the large ice accretions observed in the low pressure tests would undoubtedly cause the aerodynamic performance of a compressor component

  10. Landslides, Floods, and Marine Effects of the Storm of January 3-5, 1982, in the San Francisco Bay Region, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellen, Stephen D.; Wieczorek, Gerald F.

    1988-01-01

    A catastrophic rainstorm in central California on January 3-5,1982, dropped as much as half the mean annual precipitation within a period of about 32 hours, triggering landslides and floods throughout 10 counties in the vicinity of the San Francisco Bay. More than 18,000 of the slides induced by the storm transformed into debris flows that swept down hillslopes or drainages with little warning. Debris flows damaged at least 100 homes, killed 14 residents, and carried a 15th victim into a creek. Shortly after rainfall ceased, more than 459,000 m3 of earth and rock slid from a mountainside above the community of Love Creek in Santa Cruz County, burying 10 people in their homes. Throughout the bay region, thousands of people vacated homes in hazardous areas, entire communities were isolated as roads were blocked, public water systems were destroyed, and power and telephone services were disrupted. Altogether, the storm damaged 6,300 homes, 1,500 businesses, and tens of kilometers of roads, bridges, and communication lines. Preliminary rough estimates of total storm damage, compiled for emergency purposes within 2 weeks of the storm, exceeded $280 million. Carefully documented direct costs from landslides exceeded $66 million; total costs from landslides certainly were greater and probably constituted a much larger proportion of the total storm damage than suggested by these disparate figures. Landslides accounted for 25 of the 33 deaths attributed to the storm.

  11. Storm-induced hazards and vulnerability along the Catalan coast (NW Mediterranean) (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, J. A.

    2009-12-01

    standard deviation. Spatial variability in coastal geomorphology will control variations in hazard intensity for a given storm-class along the coast. For the probabilistic approach, hazards time series are built by calculating the coastal response to each individual storm along the coast. The so estimated hazard time series are fitted to an extreme probability distribution. With this, we can assess the magnitude of a given hazard associated to a given probability at a given location. Finally, to assess the coastal vulnerability (defined as the potential of a coastal stretch to be harmed by the impact of a storm) we have to account the capacity of the beach to cope with the estimated hazards. This requires a specific indicator for each considered process/hazard combining the intensity of the process and a relevant variable characterizing the beach response. The coastal vulnerability was assessed for each storm class and for the calculated hazard extreme probability distributions. In the first case, we obtain a measure of the expected harm along the coast under the impact of a storm of a given category. In the second case, we obtain the expected harm along the coast associated to a given probability. The developed methodology has been verified by comparing the estimated hazards’ intensity and vulnerability with recorded damages during the last 50 years.

  12. 46 CFR 72.40-10 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Storm rails. 72.40-10 Section 72.40-10 Shipping COAST... and Guards § 72.40-10 Storm rails. (a) Suitable storm rails shall be installed in all passageways and at the deckhouse sides where passengers or crew might have normal access. Storm rails shall...

  13. 46 CFR 72.40-10 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Storm rails. 72.40-10 Section 72.40-10 Shipping COAST... and Guards § 72.40-10 Storm rails. (a) Suitable storm rails shall be installed in all passageways and at the deckhouse sides where passengers or crew might have normal access. Storm rails shall...

  14. 46 CFR 72.40-10 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Storm rails. 72.40-10 Section 72.40-10 Shipping COAST... and Guards § 72.40-10 Storm rails. (a) Suitable storm rails shall be installed in all passageways and at the deckhouse sides where passengers or crew might have normal access. Storm rails shall...

  15. 46 CFR 72.40-10 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Storm rails. 72.40-10 Section 72.40-10 Shipping COAST... and Guards § 72.40-10 Storm rails. (a) Suitable storm rails shall be installed in all passageways and at the deckhouse sides where passengers or crew might have normal access. Storm rails shall...

  16. 46 CFR 72.40-10 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Storm rails. 72.40-10 Section 72.40-10 Shipping COAST... and Guards § 72.40-10 Storm rails. (a) Suitable storm rails shall be installed in all passageways and at the deckhouse sides where passengers or crew might have normal access. Storm rails shall...

  17. The 1973 dust storm on Mars: Maps from hourly photographs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, L. J.

    1975-01-01

    The hourly progress of the 1973 major Martian storm was mapped using photographic images from the International Planetary Patrol. Two series of 20 daily maps show the semi-hourly positions of the storm brightenings in red light and blue light. The maps indicate that the 1973 storm had many similarities to the 1971 storm.

  18. Laser-induced plasma cloud interaction and ice multiplication under cirrus cloud conditions.

    PubMed

    Leisner, Thomas; Duft, Denis; Möhler, Ottmar; Saathoff, Harald; Schnaiter, Martin; Henin, Stefano; Stelmaszczyk, Kamil; Petrarca, Massimo; Delagrange, Raphaëlle; Hao, Zuoqiang; Lüder, Johannes; Petit, Yannick; Rohwetter, Philipp; Kasparian, Jérôme; Wolf, Jean-Pierre; Wöste, Ludger

    2013-06-18

    Potential impacts of lightning-induced plasma on cloud ice formation and precipitation have been a subject of debate for decades. Here, we report on the interaction of laser-generated plasma channels with water and ice clouds observed in a large cloud simulation chamber. Under the conditions of a typical storm cloud, in which ice and supercooled water coexist, no direct influence of the plasma channels on ice formation or precipitation processes could be detected. Under conditions typical for thin cirrus ice clouds, however, the plasma channels induced a surprisingly strong effect of ice multiplication. Within a few minutes, the laser action led to a strong enhancement of the total ice particle number density in the chamber by up to a factor of 100, even though only a 10(-9) fraction of the chamber volume was exposed to the plasma channels. The newly formed ice particles quickly reduced the water vapor pressure to ice saturation, thereby increasing the cloud optical thickness by up to three orders of magnitude. A model relying on the complete vaporization of ice particles in the laser filament and the condensation of the resulting water vapor on plasma ions reproduces our experimental findings. This surprising effect might open new perspectives for remote sensing of water vapor and ice in the upper troposphere.

  19. Laser-induced plasma cloud interaction and ice multiplication under cirrus cloud conditions

    PubMed Central

    Leisner, Thomas; Duft, Denis; Möhler, Ottmar; Saathoff, Harald; Schnaiter, Martin; Henin, Stefano; Stelmaszczyk, Kamil; Petrarca, Massimo; Delagrange, Raphaëlle; Hao, Zuoqiang; Lüder, Johannes; Petit, Yannick; Rohwetter, Philipp; Kasparian, Jérôme; Wolf, Jean-Pierre; Wöste, Ludger

    2013-01-01

    Potential impacts of lightning-induced plasma on cloud ice formation and precipitation have been a subject of debate for decades. Here, we report on the interaction of laser-generated plasma channels with water and ice clouds observed in a large cloud simulation chamber. Under the conditions of a typical storm cloud, in which ice and supercooled water coexist, no direct influence of the plasma channels on ice formation or precipitation processes could be detected. Under conditions typical for thin cirrus ice clouds, however, the plasma channels induced a surprisingly strong effect of ice multiplication. Within a few minutes, the laser action led to a strong enhancement of the total ice particle number density in the chamber by up to a factor of 100, even though only a 10−9 fraction of the chamber volume was exposed to the plasma channels. The newly formed ice particles quickly reduced the water vapor pressure to ice saturation, thereby increasing the cloud optical thickness by up to three orders of magnitude. A model relying on the complete vaporization of ice particles in the laser filament and the condensation of the resulting water vapor on plasma ions reproduces our experimental findings. This surprising effect might open new perspectives for remote sensing of water vapor and ice in the upper troposphere. PMID:23733936

  20. Radiation Belt Storm Probe Mission Trailer

    NASA Video Gallery

    With launch scheduled for 2012, the Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) are two identical spacecraft that will investigate the doughnut shaped Van Allen radiation belts, the first discovery of the sp...

  1. Rainfall Totals Over Storm Life of Matthew

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows the amount of rainfall dropped by Hurricane Matthew over the life and track of the storm/ IMERG real time data covering the period from Sept. 28 through Oct. 10, 2016 show rain...

  2. Satellite Movie Sees Southern California Storms

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation NOAA's GOES-West satellite imagery from Jan. 5 through Jan 7 shows the progression of storm systems in the Eastern Pacific Ocean that hit southern California and generated flooding a...

  3. Satellite Sees Birth of Tropical Storm Gordon

    NASA Video Gallery

    An animation of satellite observations from August 13-16, 2012, shows the birth of the Atlantic Ocean hurricane season's eighth tropical depression that strengthens into Tropical Storm Gordon. This...

  4. GMI Rainfall Data on Tropical Storm Adjali

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows GMI rainfall data on Tropical Storm Adjali on Nov. 19, 2014 combined with cloud data from the METEOSAT-7 satellite. Rainfall was found to be falling at a rate of over 69 mm/hr ...

  5. Quantifying Power Grid Risk from Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homeier, N.; Wei, L. H.; Gannon, J. L.

    2012-12-01

    We are creating a statistical model of the geophysical environment that can be used to quantify the geomagnetic storm hazard to power grid infrastructure. Our model is developed using a database of surface electric fields for the continental United States during a set of historical geomagnetic storms. These electric fields are derived from the SUPERMAG compilation of worldwide magnetometer data and surface impedances from the United States Geological Survey. This electric field data can be combined with a power grid model to determine GICs per node and reactive MVARs at each minute during a storm. Using publicly available substation locations, we derive relative risk maps by location by combining magnetic latitude and ground conductivity. We also estimate the surface electric fields during the August 1972 geomagnetic storm that caused a telephone cable outage across the middle of the United States. This event produced the largest surface electric fields in the continental U.S. in at least the past 40 years.

  6. GPM Flyby of Tropical Storm Dineo

    NASA Video Gallery

    This flyby animation of rainfall data within Tropical Cyclone Dineo was taken from NASA/JAXA's GPM satellite on Feb.16. Storms over Swaziland were dropping precipitation at a rate of over 86 mm (3....

  7. Tropical Storm Wali Seen by GOESWest

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of infrared and visible imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite from July 15 to 18 shows the birth of Tropical Storm Wali southeast of the Big Island of Hawaii on July 17. Credit: NA...

  8. Tropical Storm Gil - July 31, 2013

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's TRMM satellite traveled above intensifying Tropical Storm Gil on July 31 at 12:55 a.m. EDT. The TRMM satellite pass showed that Gil was already very well organized with intense bands of rain...

  9. Tropical Storm Gilma in Eastern Pacific

    NASA Video Gallery

    An animation of satellite observations shows the progression of Tropical Storm Gilma from August 7-10, 2012, along the coast of the Eastern Pacific Ocean. This visualization was created by the NASA...

  10. TRMM Sees California Storm Move East

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation from Feb. 28 to Mar. 3 shows the movement of the rain associated with the storm system that soaked California. On March 3, precipitation (yellow) and snow cover (white/yellow) spread...

  11. GOES Movie of Tropical Storm Danielle

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation NOAA's GOES-East satellite imagery from June 18 to 20 shows the development and movement Tropical Storm Danielle from the western Caribbean Sea into the Bay of Campeche/Gulf of Mexic...

  12. The Surprising Power of Solar Storms

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA-funded researchers say a flurry of solar storms from March 8-10, 2012 dumped enough energy in Earth's upper atmosphere (our thermosphere absorbed 26 billion kWh of energy) to power every resid...

  13. GOES video of Tropical Storm Andrea

    NASA Video Gallery

    This NOAA GOES-East satellite animation shows the development of System 91L into Tropical Storm Andrea over the course of 3 days from June 4 to June 6, just after Andrea was officially designated a...

  14. GOES Satellite Movie of 2014 Winter Storms

    NASA Video Gallery

    This new animation of NOAA's GOES-East satellite imagery shows the movement of winter storms from January 1 to March 24 making for a snowier-than-normal winter along the U.S. East coast and Midwest...

  15. Storm sudden commencements and earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrov, Ivan; Sobisevich, Aleksey; Guglielmi, Anatol

    2015-03-01

    We have investigated statistically the problem of possible impact of the geomagnetic storm sudden com-mencement (SSC) on the global seismic activity. SSC are used as reference points for comparative analysis of seismicity by the method of superposed epoch. We selected 405 earthquakes from 1973 to 2010 with M˜5 magnitudes from a representative part of USGS Catalog. The comparative analysis of seismicity was carried out at the intervals of ˜60 min relative to the reference point. With a high degree of reliability, it was found that before the reference point the number of earthquakes is noticeably greater than after it. In other words, the global seismicity is suppressed by SSC. We refer to some studies in which the chemical, thermal and force mechanisms of the electromagnetic field action on rocks are discussed. We emphasize the incompleteness of the study concerning the correlation between SSC and earthquakes because we still do not succeed in understanding and interpreting the relationship in terms of physics and mathematics. The study need to be continued to solve this problem of interest and importance.

  16. Satellite Microwave Radar Observations of Antarctic Sea Ice. Chapter 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drinkwater, Mark R.

    1998-01-01

    Historical data on Antarctic sea ice extent and concentration have traditionally been derived from visible and near-infrared images acquired by the polar-orbiting National Oceanic and Atmospheric Agency's (NOAA) meteorological satellites, using the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), and more recently by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's Operational Linescan System (OLS). The limitation of these systems is that the majority of energy imparted to the Antarctic sea-ice system is transferred during b6y fast-moving low pressure systems. Since the Southern Ocean sea-ice cover is completely bounded at its lower latitude limit by open ocean, these "polar lows" transport large amounts of moisture (contained in warm air masses) over the outer ice cover. The result is that most, if not all, noteworthy periods of wind- and temperature-driven dynamic changes in the ice cover are accompanied by periods where the region is blanketed by cloud, and when the atmosphere is inherently more electromagnetically opaque. During storms, the probability with which the area is cloud covered is extremely high, thereby ruling out use of visible or near-infrared images as a practical method of monitoring the associated changes in ice conditions. Instead, Nimbus-7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) and DMSP Special Sensor Microwave/imager (SSM/I) have been the primary workhorses to build up a microwave record of Antarctic sea-ice characteristics. Similar problems, however, occur in passive microwave retrievals of sea-ice concentration, and the algorithms are called into question during these periods of change. The influence of water vapor in the atmosphere alone can modify the ice concentration retrievals by fractions exceeding 105, and that retrievals of ice concentration must compensate for the atmospheric water vapor and liquid water contents.

  17. Tropical Storm Alberto, Seen Through New 'Eyes'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    NASA's new CloudSat satellite captured its first tropical storm, Alberto, as it spun over the Gulf of Mexico the morning of June 12, 2006. This image comparison shows how CloudSat 'sees' such storms differently than conventional weather satellites. The CloudSat image (top of this page and bottom of figure 1) is compared with images obtained at nearly the same time from two National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Weather Service tools that are mainstays for monitoring the development and movement of tropical cyclones: the NEXRAD storm detection radar, which maps out precipitation patterns for that portion of the storm that comes into its range, and the GOES-12 (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite) infrared imager, which is presented here to indicate the scale of the storm and the location where CloudSat overflies it. CloudSat sees the storm outside the range of NEXRAD and provides significantly greater vertical detail compared to the GOES satellite. NEXRAD, for example, can only see out to about 402 kilometers (250 nautical miles), and so could not see the portion of the storm that CloudSat was flying over at the time. GOES-12 only sees the very top of the clouds, and cannot provide any detail about what is being seen beneath the cloud tops.

    The CloudSat data show a storm that reaches about 16 kilometers (10 miles) in height and extends perhaps 1,000 kilometers (621 miles) in scale. The green line at the bottom of the CloudSat image is the radar echo of the Earth's surface. Where this line starts to disappear (change color) under the storm is where the rainfall is heaviest. Very heavy rainfall can be seen over about 400 kilometers (249 miles) of the satellite track. Cirrus clouds can also been seen out ahead of the storm (near letter A) -- this is also evident in the GOES-12 image. A smaller thunderstorm is visible in the CloudSat image under that cirrus cloud

  18. Semiannual variations of great geomagnetic storms: Solar sources of great storms. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Cliver, E.W.; Crooker, N.U.; Cane, H.V.

    1992-01-01

    The authors report preliminary results of an investigation of the solar sources of 25 great geomagnetic storms with D sub st < or = {minus}250 nT occurring from 1957-1990. These storms exhibit a clear semiannual variation with 14 events occurring within {+-} 30 days of the equinoxes vs. 5 storms within {+-} 30 days of the solstices. This seasonal variation appears to result from a variable threshold for the size of a solar event required to produce a great geomagnetic storm, in the sense that weaker solar events, such as disappearing solar filaments, are more likely to produce great storms at the equinoxes than near the solstices. The great problem storms of the last four solar cycles, i.e., those storms lacking commensurate preceding solar activity, are all found to occur relatively near the equinoxes. Conversely, four of the five great storms that occurred near the solstices were preceded by truly outstanding solar flares. About half (11/25) of the great storms had obvious precursor geomagnetic activity, i.e., periods of approximately > 1 day with D sub st approximately < {minus}30 nT. The precursors can enable some weaker solar events to be more geoeffective than would otherwise be the case in two ways: (1) compression and amplification of pre-existing southward (precursor) fields by the transient shock, and (2) establishment of a lower D sub st baseline , making it easier for transient events to drive D sub st to values < or = {minus}250 nT.

  19. Geomagnetic storms, super-storms, and their impacts on GPS-based navigation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astafyeva, E.; Yasyukevich, Yu.; Maksikov, A.; Zhivetiev, I.

    2014-07-01

    Using data of GPS receivers located worldwide, we analyze the quality of GPS performance during four geomagnetic storms of different intensity: two super-storms and two intense storms. We show that during super-storms the density of GPS Losses-of-Lock (LoL) increases up to 0.25% at L1 frequency and up to 3% at L2 frequency, and up to 0.15% (at L1) and 1% (at L2) during less intense storms. Also, depending on the intensity of the storm time ionospheric disturbances, the total number of total electron content (TEC) slips can exceed from 4 to 40 times the quiet time level. Both GPS LoL and TEC slips occur during abrupt changes of SYM-H index of geomagnetic activity, i.e., during the main phase of geomagnetic storms and during development of ionospheric storms. The main contribution in the total number of GPS LoL was found to be done by GPS sites located at low and high latitudes, whereas the area of numerous TEC slips seemed to mostly correspond to the boundary of the auroral oval, i.e., region with intensive ionospheric irregularities. Our global maps of TEC slips show where the regions with intense irregularities of electron density occur during geomagnetic storms and will let us in future predict appearance of GPS errors for geomagnetically disturbed conditions.

  20. Impact of geomagnetic storm on fine and global structures of the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przepiorka, D.; Gromadzki, M.; Grzesiak, M.; Slominska, E.; Rothkaehl, H.; Space Plasma Group

    2011-12-01

    We have analyzed Demeter micro-satellite data, in particular from ISL, IAP and ICE experiments to study 3 magnetic storm events on January 2005: 7-8, 17-19 and 21-22. The most direct impact on ionosphere is situated at auroral zone but it also affects the dynamics of the ionosphere-thermosphere system at lower latitudes. In effect one can observe changes in the plasma parameters on the global scale. In this study we have analyzed plasma processes related to magnetic storm events and their impact on large scale ionospheric structures such as ionospheric trough. The aim of this study was to establish relation between large scale plasma inhomogeneities and small scale processes. We have produced diurnal global maps for electron density and temperature, ion temperature and ion concentrations. We also analyzed dynamics of the electric field distribution at ULF, ELF, VLF frequency ranges.

  1. EVIDENCE FOR COMET STORMS IN METEORITE AGES

    SciTech Connect

    Perlmutter, S.; Muller, R.A.

    1987-10-01

    Clustering of cosmic-ray exposure ages of H chondritic meteorites occurs at 7 {+-} 3 and 30 {+-} 6 Myr ago. There is independent evidence that comet storms have occurred at the same times, based on the fossil record of family and genus extinctions, impact craters and glass, and geomagnetic reversals. We suggest that H chondrites were formed by the impact of shower comets on asteroids. The duration of the most recent comet shower was {le} 4 Myr, in agreement with storm theory.

  2. Ionospheric F-Region Storms: Unsolved Problems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    the largest solar - terrestrial storms ever observed, with an X17/4B flare on October 28, a solar wind velocity of nearly 2000 km/s and a minimum Dst...disturbance dynamo effects over low and equatorial lat- itude F-region, in Recurrent Magnetic Storms: Corotating Solar Wind Streams (B.T. Tsurutani, R.L...some of the more prominent anomalies observed in this region, including the heating effect below the magne- tospheric cusp, the subauroral electron

  3. Dust Storm, Red Sea and Saudi Arabia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Outlined against the dark blue water of the Red Sea, a prominent dust storm is making its way across the Red Sea into Saudi Arabia (22.0N, 39.0E) between the Islamic holy cities of Medinah and Mecca. Funneled through a gap in the coastal ranges of southern Sudan near the Ethiopian border, dust storms frequently will blow counter to the prevailing tropical easterly winds of the region.

  4. Ionospheric storm effects at subauroral latitudes - A case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proelss, G. W.; Brace, L. H.; Mayr, H. G.; Carignan, G. R.; Killeen, T. L.

    1991-01-01

    An attempt is made to classify ionospheric storm effects at subauroral latitudes according to their presumed origin. The storm of December 7/8, 1982, serves as an example. It is investigated using ionosonde, electron content, and DE 2 satellite data. The following effects are distinguished: (1) positive storm effects caused by traveling atmospheric disturbances, (2) positive storm effects caused by changes in the large-scale thermospheric wind circulation, (3) positive storm effects caused by the expansion of the polar ionization enhancement, (4) negative storm effects caused by perturbations of the neutral gas composition, and (5) negative storm effects caused by the equatorward displacement of the trough region.

  5. Ionospheric storm effects at subauroral latitudes: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Proelss, G.W. ); Brace, L.H.; Mayr, H.G. ); Carignan, G.R.; Killeen, T.L. ); Klobuchar, J.A. )

    1991-02-01

    An attempt is made to classify ionospheric storm effects at subauroral latitudes according to their presumed origin. The storm of December 7/8, 1982, serves as an example. It is investigated using ionosonde, electron content, and DE 2 satellite data. The following effects are distinguished: (1) positive storm effects caused by traveling atmospheric disturbances, (2) positive storm effects caused by changes in the large-scale thermospheric wind circulation, (3) positive storm effects caused by the expansion of the polar ionization enhancement, (4) negative storm effects caused by perturbations of the neutral gas composition, and (5) negative storm effects caused by the equatorward displacement of the trough region.

  6. Implications of Sea Ice on Southern Ocean Microseisms Detected by a Seismic Array in West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, Martin J.; Wiens, Douglas A.; Winberry, J. Paul; Anandakrishnan, Sridhar; Euler, Garrett G.

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARYThe proximity of Southern Ocean <span class="hlt">storms</span> coupled with seasonal variation in sea <span class="hlt">ice</span> make Antarctica ideal for the study of microseism sources. We explore frequency-dependent beamforming results using a short-duration, 60 km aperture, broadband seismic array located on the Whillans <span class="hlt">Ice</span> Stream, West Antarctica. Locations of single-frequency microseism (13-16 s period) generation are in regions where the continental shelf is <span class="hlt">ice</span>-free, consistent with previous studies, and show Rayleigh wave sources remaining at consistent back azimuths throughout the duration of the array. Beamforming analysis of daily noise correlations shows that long-period double-frequency microseisms (9-11 s) consist predominantly of Rayleigh waves excited by <span class="hlt">storms</span> in the Southern Ocean. Modelling of source locations based on wave-wave interaction provides a good fit to our data at these periods. We show that short-period double-frequency microseisms (5-7 s) in Antarctica consist of crustal phase Lg and body waves. Lg arrivals propagate through regions of continental crust and our data show that the Lg energy is generated when <span class="hlt">storm</span> systems interact with the sea <span class="hlt">ice</span>-free continental shelf during austral summers. Ultra-short-period (0.3-2 s) microseismic body waves back project to regions that correlate with oceanic <span class="hlt">storm</span> systems in both the Southern and Northern Hemispheres.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010pcms.confE..45K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010pcms.confE..45K"><span>Mediterranean <span class="hlt">Storms</span>: An Integrated Approach of Risk Management</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Karageorgou, H.; Riza, E.; Linos, A.; Papanikolaou, D.</p> <p>2010-09-01</p> <p> response. The available and applied science and technology in prediction and early warning systems rely on the close collaboration between scientists and policy makers to achieve effective disaster prevention of human life and mitigation of <span class="hlt">damages</span>. Developing agencies approach risk management as an integral part of development and encourage activities and measures to reduce the exposure and vulnerability to natural hazards through early warning systems, building codes, land use plans and disaster sensitive development plans. The human settlement and investment in high risk floodplains place greater numbers of people and economic assets in danger of being affected by <span class="hlt">storms</span> and floods. Disasters and development are highly inter-related. Recurrent disasters and frequent localized disasters erode development and conversely the development processes can reduce disaster risk, or create new risks. The private sector participation in risk reduction efforts can help local communities mitigate disasters and increases the benefits of the businesses. The private insurance sector is highly involved in the prevention of disaster caused by natural hazards especially <span class="hlt">storms</span> and floods. The collaboration between academic community and the insurance sector indicates the linkages between the mutual insurance actions and risk culture. Also tourism industry and private critical infrastructure sector get involved in prevention measures and activities against <span class="hlt">storm</span> and flood risks to build sustainable functionality and keep public trust. NGOs focus on social, cultural, environmental, educational, or health issues in disaster management and their members are educated and experienced on their area of operations. The staff of local and national NGOs is familiar with culture, languages, governance structures, social networks, climate and geography of the affected area and holds a unique understanding of the specific problems of the affected population. Additionally, NGO’s operations do not</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.4945H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.4945H"><span>Use of historical information in extreme <span class="hlt">storm</span> surges frequency analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hamdi, Yasser; Duluc, Claire-Marie; Deville, Yves; Bardet, Lise; Rebour, Vincent</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>The prevention of <span class="hlt">storm</span> surge flood risks is critical for protection and design of coastal facilities to very low probabilities of failure. The effective protection requires the use of a statistical analysis approach having a solid theoretical motivation. Relating extreme <span class="hlt">storm</span> surges to their frequency of occurrence using probability distributions has been a common issue since 1950s. The engineer needs to determine the <span class="hlt">storm</span> surge of a given return period, i.e., the <span class="hlt">storm</span> surge quantile or design <span class="hlt">storm</span> surge. Traditional methods for determining such a quantile have been generally based on data from the systematic record alone. However, the statistical extrapolation, to estimate <span class="hlt">storm</span> surges corresponding to high return periods, is seriously contaminated by sampling and model uncertainty if data are available for a relatively limited period. This has motivated the development of approaches to enlarge the sample extreme values beyond the systematic period. The nonsystematic data occurred before the systematic period is called historical information. During the last three decades, the value of using historical information as a nonsystematic data in frequency analysis has been recognized by several authors. The basic hypothesis in statistical modeling of historical information is that a perception threshold exists and that during a giving historical period preceding the period of tide gauging, all exceedances of this threshold have been recorded. Historical information prior to the systematic records may arise from high-sea water marks left by extreme surges on the coastal areas. It can also be retrieved from archives, old books, earliest newspapers, <span class="hlt">damage</span> reports, unpublished written records and interviews with local residents. A plotting position formula, to compute empirical probabilities based on systematic and historical data, is used in this communication paper. The objective of the present work is to examine the potential gain in estimation accuracy with the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GDXq8Oa5d5Q','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GDXq8Oa5d5Q"><span>Greenland <span class="hlt">Ice</span> Flow</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/videogallery/index.html">NASA Video Gallery</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Greenland looks like a big pile of snow seen from space using a regular camera. But satellite radar interferometry helps us detect the motion of <span class="hlt">ice</span> beneath the snow. <span class="hlt">Ice</span> starts flowing from the fl...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/960430','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/960430"><span>Field Evaluation of Low-E <span class="hlt">Storm</span> Windows</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Drumheller, S. Craig; Kohler, Christian; Minen, Stefanie</p> <p>2007-07-11</p> <p>A field evaluation comparing the performance of low emittance (low-e) <span class="hlt">storm</span> windows with both standard clear <span class="hlt">storm</span> windows and no <span class="hlt">storm</span> windows was performed in a cold climate. Six homes with single-pane windows were monitored over the period of one heating season. The homes were monitored with no <span class="hlt">storm</span> windows and with new <span class="hlt">storm</span> windows. The <span class="hlt">storm</span> windows installed on four of the six homes included a hard coat, pyrolitic, low-e coating while the <span class="hlt">storm</span> windows for the other two homeshad traditional clear glass. Overall heating load reduction due to the <span class="hlt">storm</span> windows was 13percent with the clear glass and 21percent with the low-e windows. Simple paybacks for the addition of the <span class="hlt">storm</span> windows were 10 years for the clear glass and 4.5 years forthe low-e <span class="hlt">storm</span> windows.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20160005965','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20160005965"><span>Diagnosing Aircraft <span class="hlt">Icing</span> Potential from Satellite Cloud Retrievals</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Smith, William L., Jr.; Minnis, Patrick; Fleeger, Cecilia; Spangenberg, Douglas</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The threat for aircraft <span class="hlt">icing</span> in clouds is a significant hazard that routinely impacts aviation operations. Accurate diagnoses and forecasts of aircraft <span class="hlt">icing</span> conditions requires identifying the location and vertical distribution of clouds with super-cooled liquid water (SLW) droplets, as well as the characteristics of the droplet size distribution. Traditional forecasting methods rely on guidance from numerical models and conventional observations, neither of which currently resolve cloud properties adequately on the optimal scales needed for aviation. Satellite imagers provide measurements over large areas with high spatial resolution that can be interpreted to identify the locations and characteristics of clouds, including features associated with adverse weather and <span class="hlt">storms</span>. This paper describes new techniques for interpreting cloud products derived from satellite data to infer the flight <span class="hlt">icing</span> threat to aircraft. For unobscured low clouds, the <span class="hlt">icing</span> threat is determined using empirical relationships developed from correlations between satellite imager retrievals of liquid water path and droplet size with <span class="hlt">icing</span> conditions reported by pilots (PIREPS). For deep <span class="hlt">ice</span> over water cloud systems, <span class="hlt">ice</span> and liquid water content (IWC and LWC) profiles are derived by using the imager cloud properties to constrain climatological information on cloud vertical structure and water phase obtained apriori from radar and lidar observations, and from cloud model analyses. Retrievals of the SLW content embedded within overlapping clouds are mapped to the <span class="hlt">icing</span> threat using guidance from an airfoil modeling study. Compared to PIREPS and ground-based <span class="hlt">icing</span> remote sensing datasets, the satellite <span class="hlt">icing</span> detection and intensity accuracies are approximately 90% and 70%, respectively, and found to be similar for both low level and deep <span class="hlt">ice</span> over water cloud systems. The satellite-derived <span class="hlt">icing</span> boundaries capture the reported altitudes over 90% of the time. Satellite analyses corresponding to</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.A41B0036B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.A41B0036B"><span>Evaluation of the Importance of Wet Scavenging for the may 29, 2012 DC3 Severe <span class="hlt">Storm</span> Case Using Results from Wrf-Chem Simulations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bela, M. M.; Barth, M. C.; Toon, O.; Fried, A.; Morrison, H.; Pickering, K. E.; Cummings, K.; Li, Y.; Allen, D. J.; Manning, K.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>Deep convective thunderstorms affect the vertical distribution of chemical species through vertical transport, lightning-production of NOx, wet scavenging of soluble species as well as aqueous and <span class="hlt">ice</span> chemistry. This work focuses on the May 29 Oklahoma thunderstorm from the DC3 (Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry) field campaign. WRF-Chem simulations at cloud parameterizing scales (dx=15km) and cloud resolving scales (dx=3 and 1km) are conducted to investigate wet scavenging of soluble trace gases. Two different wet scavenging schemes are coupled to the Morrison microphysics scheme and MOZART chemistry. The first, based on Neu and Prather (ACP, 2012), tracks dissolved species in cloud droplets and precipitation and releases species to the gas phase from evaporating precipitation. However, it does not distinguish between precipitating liquid and <span class="hlt">ice</span>, and species are completely retained upon hydrometeor freezing. The second, described in Barth et al. (JGR, 2001), tracks solute in individual liquid and frozen hydrometeors, and a new capability to specify the fraction of each species that is retained in <span class="hlt">ice</span> upon hydrometeor freezing is added. The simulated meteorology, evaluated with the NEXRAD radar reflectivity, is shown to represent the structure and evolution of the <span class="hlt">storm</span>, although the simulated <span class="hlt">storm</span> triggers about an hour early, has a larger area of high reflectivity and extends further north than observed in NEXRAD. Vertical distributions of trace gases with varying solubilities within the <span class="hlt">storm</span> and immediately surrounding the <span class="hlt">storm</span> are compared with observations from the GV and DC-8 aircraft in <span class="hlt">storm</span> inflow and outflow regions. Using the Neu and Prather scheme or using the Barth scheme with zero or complete <span class="hlt">ice</span> retention, observed mean vertical profiles of some soluble species in outflow are better represented in the model with scavenging, while others are overly scavenged. Finally, sensitivity studies are conducted to determine <span class="hlt">ice</span> retention factors for each</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70156891','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70156891"><span>Mapping Hurricane Rita inland <span class="hlt">storm</span> tide</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Berenbrock, Charles; Mason, Jr., Robert R.; Blanchard, Stephen F.; Simonovic, Slobodan P.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Flood-inundation data are most useful for decision makers when presented in the context of maps of effected communities and (or) areas. But because the data are scarce and rarely cover the full extent of the flooding, interpolation and extrapolation of the information are needed. Many geographic information systems (GIS) provide various interpolation tools, but these tools often ignore the effects of the topographic and hydraulic features that influence flooding. A barrier mapping method was developed to improve maps of <span class="hlt">storm</span> tide produced by Hurricane Rita. Maps were developed for the maximum <span class="hlt">storm</span> tide and at 3-hour intervals from midnight (0000 hour) through noon (1200 hour) on September 24, 2005. The improved maps depict <span class="hlt">storm</span>-tide elevations and the extent of flooding. The extent of <span class="hlt">storm</span>-tide inundation from the improved maximum <span class="hlt">storm</span>-tide map was compared to the extent of flood-inundation from a map prepared by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). The boundaries from these two maps generally compared quite well especially along the Calcasieu River. Also a cross-section profile that parallels the Louisiana coast was developed from the maximum <span class="hlt">storm</span>-tide map and included FEMA high-water marks.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=PIA03173&hterms=scientist&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3Dscientist','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=PIA03173&hterms=scientist&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3Dscientist"><span>Scientists Track 'Perfect <span class="hlt">Storm</span>' on Mars</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>Two dramatically different faces of our Red Planet neighbor appear in these comparison images showing how a global dust <span class="hlt">storm</span> engulfed Mars with the onset of Martian spring in the Southern Hemisphere. When NASA's Hubble Space Telescope imaged Mars in June, the seeds of the <span class="hlt">storm</span> were caught brewing in the giant Hellas Basin (oval at 4 o'clock position on disk) and in another <span class="hlt">storm</span> at the northern polar cap.<p/>When Hubble photographed Mars in early September, the <span class="hlt">storm</span> had already been raging across the planet for nearly two months obscuring all surface features. The fine airborne dust blocks a significant amount of sunlight from reaching the Martian surface. Because the airborne dust is absorbing this sunlight, it heats the upper atmosphere. Seasonal global Mars dust <span class="hlt">storms</span> have been observed from telescopes for over a century, but this is the biggest <span class="hlt">storm</span> ever seen in the past several decades.<p/>Mars looks gibbous in the right photograph because it is 26 million miles farther from Earth than in the left photo (though the pictures have been scaled to the same angular size), and our viewing angle has changed. The left picture was taken when Mars was near its closest approach to Earth for 2001 (an event called opposition); at that point the disk of Mars was fully illuminated as seen from Earth because Mars was exactly opposite the Sun.<p/>Both images are in natural color, taken with Hubble's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70035743','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70035743"><span>Mapping hurricane rita inland <span class="hlt">storm</span> tide</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Berenbrock, C.; Mason, R.R.; Blanchard, S.F.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Flood-inundation data are most useful for decision makers when presented in the context of maps of affected communities and (or) areas. But because the data are scarce and rarely cover the full extent of the flooding, interpolation and extrapolation of the information are needed. Many geographic information systems provide various interpolation tools, but these tools often ignore the effects of the topographic and hydraulic features that influence flooding. A barrier mapping method was developed to improve maps of <span class="hlt">storm</span> tide produced by Hurricane Rita. Maps were developed for the maximum <span class="hlt">storm</span> tide and at 3-h intervals from midnight (00:00 hours) through noon (12:00 hours) on 24 September 2005. The improved maps depict <span class="hlt">storm</span>-tide elevations and the extent of flooding. The extent of <span class="hlt">storm</span>-tide inundation from the improved maximum <span class="hlt">storm</span>-tide map was compared with the extent of flood inundation from a map prepared by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). The boundaries from these two maps generally compared quite well especially along the Calcasieu River. Also a cross-section profile that parallels the Louisiana coast was developed from the maximum <span class="hlt">storm</span>-tide map and included FEMA high-water marks. ?? 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008cosp...37..374B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008cosp...37..374B"><span>Solar <span class="hlt">storm</span> effects on the Martian atmosphere</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Brain, David; Lillis, Robert; Peticolas, Laura; Luhmann, Janet G.</p> <p></p> <p>Solar <span class="hlt">storms</span>, including solar flares, solar energetic particles (SEPs), and coronal mass ejections (CMEs), may have a profound influence on planetary atmospheres left unprotected by global magnetic fields, such as Mars and Venus. Energy deposited in the upper atmosphere by photons and charged particles during <span class="hlt">storms</span> should contribute to ionization and heating, driving chemistry and dynamics over periods of hours or days. There is observational evidence that the escape rate of planetary ions from the Venus atmosphere can increase by an order of magnitude during a <span class="hlt">storm</span>. The planetary plasma environment may also change considerably during a <span class="hlt">storm</span> (for example compressing during a passing CME and leading to a strongly magnetized ionosphere). We will present observations and model calculations of the influence of solar energetic particle events and CMEs on the atmosphere of Mars, focusing on three areas. First, we will present a correlation between the energy of auroral-like electron distributions observed by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft and the presence of solar energetic particles. We will use an electron transport model to calculate the influence of these electron distributions on the nightside atmosphere. Second, we will present an analysis of electron pitch angle distributions recorded by MGS during solar <span class="hlt">storms</span>, showing a substantial increase in ionization resulting from SEP impact. Third, we will present model calculations of the atmospheric energy deposition by solar energetic particles during a <span class="hlt">storm</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10177955','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10177955"><span>Non-<span class="hlt">storm</span> water discharges technical report</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Mathews, S.</p> <p>1994-07-01</p> <p>Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) submitted a Notice of Intent to the California State Water Resources Control Board (hereafter State Board) to discharge <span class="hlt">storm</span> water associated with industrial activities under the California General Industrial Activity <span class="hlt">Storm</span> Water National Pollutant Elimination System Discharge Permit (hereafter General Permit). As required by the General Permit, LLNL provided initial notification of non-<span class="hlt">storm</span> water discharges to the Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board (hereafter Regional Board) on October 2, 1992. Additional findings and progress towards corrective actions were reported in subsequent annual monitoring reports. LLNL was granted until March 27, 1995, three years from the Notice of Intent submission date, to eliminate or permit the non-<span class="hlt">storm</span> water discharges. On May 20, 1994, the Regional Board issued Waste Discharge Requirements (WDR Board Order No. 94-131, NPDES No. CA0081396) to LLNL for discharges of non-contact cooling tower wastewater and <span class="hlt">storm</span> water related to industrial activities. As a result of the issuance of WDR 94-131, LLNL rescinded its coverage under the General Permit. WDR 94-131 allowed continued non-<span class="hlt">storm</span> water discharges and requested a technical report describing the discharges LLNL seeks to permit. For the described discharges, LLNL anticipates the Regional Board will either waive Waste Discharge Requirements as allowed for in The Water Quality Control Plan for the California Regional Water Quality Control Board, Central Valley Region (hereafter Basin Plan) or amend Board Order 94-131 as appropriate.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFMPP51B2285L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFMPP51B2285L"><span>The Roosevelt Island Climate Evolution (RICE) <span class="hlt">ice</span> core: climate and <span class="hlt">ice</span> dynamics of the Ross Sea, West Antarctica</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lee, J. E.; Brook, E.; Blunier, T.; Severinghaus, J. P.; Bertler, N. A. N.; Waddington, E. D.; Vallelonga, P. T.; Conway, H.; Dahl-Jensen, D.; Buizert, C.; Fudge, T. J.; Parrenin, F.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Ice</span> cores drilled in Antarctica have proven to be remarkable archives of past climate, but most have been recovered from the remote Antarctic interior. In contrast, little is known about the climate history of coastal <span class="hlt">ice</span> domes despite their relevance to ocean-<span class="hlt">ice</span> interaction and sea level rise. The Roosevelt Island Climate Evolution project (RICE) recovered a 763 m <span class="hlt">ice</span> core in 2013 from Roosevelt Island, West Antarctica. Located at the edge of the Ross <span class="hlt">Ice</span> Shelf and grounded below sea level, Roosevelt Island is sensitive to oceanic forcing and may provide new information about potential drivers of abrupt interhemispheric climate connections and its location is ideal for exploring the retreat of the West Antarctic <span class="hlt">Ice</span> Sheet (WAIS) from its glacial maximum through the Ross Sea. Here we present a continuous chronology for the RICE <span class="hlt">Ice</span> Core covering the last 40,000 years with additional evidence of <span class="hlt">ice</span> dating to at least 80,000 years near the bottom of the core. Both the depth-age relationship and reconstructed profile of annual layer thicknesses can be used to infer changes in climate and the glacial history of the East Ross Sea Embayment. The most striking feature of the record occurred during the Antarctic Cold Reversal. At this time a combination of data including thin annual layers, abrupt lowering of δ15N of N2 and δ40Ar in trapped air, and strongly depleted δD of <span class="hlt">ice</span> suggest either a pronounced change in cyclonic activity and regional <span class="hlt">storm</span> tracks and/or adjustment in the configuration of the Ross <span class="hlt">Ice</span> Sheet during this period of rapid climate change and sea level rise.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6032336','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6032336"><span><span class="hlt">Ice</span> electrode electrolytic cell</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Glenn, D.F.; Suciu, D.F.; Harris, T.L.; Ingram, J.C.</p> <p>1993-04-06</p> <p>This invention relates to a method and apparatus for removing heavy metals from waste water, soils, or process streams by electrolytic cell means. The method includes cooling a cell cathode to form an <span class="hlt">ice</span> layer over the cathode and then applying an electric current to deposit a layer of the heavy metal over the <span class="hlt">ice</span>. The metal is then easily removed after melting the <span class="hlt">ice</span>. In a second embodiment, the same <span class="hlt">ice</span>-covered electrode can be employed to form powdered metals.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/868726','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/868726"><span><span class="hlt">Ice</span> electrode electrolytic cell</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Glenn, David F.; Suciu, Dan F.; Harris, Taryl L.; Ingram, Jani C.</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>This invention relates to a method and apparatus for removing heavy metals from waste water, soils, or process streams by electrolytic cell means. The method includes cooling a cell cathode to form an <span class="hlt">ice</span> layer over the cathode and then applying an electric current to deposit a layer of the heavy metal over the <span class="hlt">ice</span>. The metal is then easily removed after melting the <span class="hlt">ice</span>. In a second embodiment, the same <span class="hlt">ice</span>-covered electrode can be employed to form powdered metals.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_22 --> <div id="page_23" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="441"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70037385','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70037385"><span>Holocene landscape response to seasonality of <span class="hlt">storms</span> in the Mojave Desert</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Miller, D.M.; Schmidt, K.M.; Mahan, S.A.; McGeehin, J.P.; Owen, L.A.; Barron, J.A.; Lehmkuhl, F.; Lohrer, R.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>New optically stimulated and radiocarbon ages for alluvial fan and lake deposits in the Mojave Desert are presented, which greatly improves the temporal resolution of surface processes. The new Mojave Desert climate-landscape record is particularly detailed for the late Holocene. Evidence from ephemeral lake deposits and landforms indicates times of sustained stream flow during a wet interval of the latter part of the Medieval Warm Period at ca. AD 1290 and during the Little <span class="hlt">Ice</span> Age at ca. AD 1650. The former lakes postdate megadroughts of the Medieval Warm Period, whereas the latter match the Maunder Minimum of the Little <span class="hlt">Ice</span> Age. Periods of alluvial fan aggradation across the Mojave Desert are 14-9 cal ka and 6-3 cal ka. This timing largely correlates to times of increased sea-surface temperatures in the Gulf of California and enhanced warm-season monsoons. This correlation suggests that sustained alluvial fan aggradation may be driven by intense summer-season <span class="hlt">storms</span>. These data suggest that the close proximity of the Mojave Desert to the Pacific Ocean and the Gulf of California promotes a partitioning of landscape-process responses to climate forcings that vary with seasonality of the dominant <span class="hlt">storms</span>. Cool-season Pacific frontal <span class="hlt">storms</span> cause river flow, ephemeral lakes, and fan incision, whereas periods of intense warm-season <span class="hlt">storms</span> cause hillslope erosion and alluvial fan aggradation. The proposed landscape-process partitioning has important implications for hazard mitigation given that climate change may increase sea-surface temperatures in the Gulf of California, which indirectly could increase future alluvial fan aggradation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70160464','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70160464"><span>CoSMoS Southern California v3.0 Phase 1 (100-year <span class="hlt">storm</span>) flood hazard projections: Los Angeles, San Diego and Orange counties</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Barnard, Patrick; Erikson, Li; Foxgrover, Amy; O'Neill, Andrea; Herdman, Liv</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The Coastal <span class="hlt">Storm</span> Modeling System (CoSMoS) makes detailed predictions (meter-scale) over large geographic scales (100s of kilometers) of <span class="hlt">storm</span>-induced coastal flooding and erosion for both current and future sea-level rise (SLR) scenarios. CoSMoS v3.0 for Southern California shows projections for future climate scenarios (sea-level rise and <span class="hlt">storms</span>) to provide emergency responders and coastal planners with critical <span class="hlt">storm</span>-hazards information that can be used to increase public safety, mitigate physical <span class="hlt">damages</span>, and more effectively manage and allocate resources within complex coastal settings. Phase I data for Southern California include flood-hazard information for the coast from the Mexican Border to Pt. Conception for a 100-year <span class="hlt">storm</span> scenario. Data are complete for the information presented but are considered preliminary; changes may be reflected in the full data release (Phase II) in summer 2016.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AGUFMPP43A1228C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AGUFMPP43A1228C"><span>Preliminary Record of Holocene <span class="hlt">Storm</span> Events in the Finger Lakes, NY</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Curtin, T. M.; Morgan, C. K.; Petrick, B. F.; Davin, L. I.; Rogers, C. E.; Crocker, M. L.; Loddengaard, K.; Baker, A. P.</p> <p>2006-12-01</p> <p>Terrigenous sediment deposited in three of the Finger Lakes of New York, Seneca, Keuka, and Canandaigua, preserve evidence for major <span class="hlt">storm</span> events over the past ~13 ka. A combination of analytical techniques was used for ten cores, including visual inspection, magnetic susceptibility, loss-on-ignition, and grain size to identify these <span class="hlt">storm</span> events. <span class="hlt">Storm</span> layers are characterized by coincident coarse siliciclastic mean grain size, high % sand content, and more terrestrial plant macrofossils than the surrounding mud. The combination of sedimentological analyses with radiocarbon dating allows for development of a paleostorm chronology for each lake and comparison of the timing of the <span class="hlt">storm</span> layers to determine if they were deposited synchronously or not. The number (10-31), thickness (0.1-6 cm), and grain size characteristics (1-37% sand) of the layers present in each core varies widely. As a result, single <span class="hlt">storm</span>-related event deposition does not appear to have been synchronous among the three lake basins. However, there is temporal clustering of events. The greatest number of <span class="hlt">storm</span> layers occurs in two distinct intervals, between ~13 and ~8.2 ka and ~4.6 and 0 ka. During the early to mid-Holocene, the number of events was high. We infer that a period of increased storminess occurred when the average climate of the region became warmer and wetter. Between ~8.2 and ~4.6 ka, when the average climate in North America was warm and dry, the number, thickness, and average mean grain size of the terrigenous layers decreased. After ~4.6 ka, the number of <span class="hlt">storms</span> appears to have gradually increased as a result of a shift in the southern extent of the jet stream. The thickest, sandiest layers were deposited beginning at ~700 yrs BP and is associated with the climate of the Little <span class="hlt">Ice</span> Age and Medieval Warming Period. The increase in the number, thickness, and sand content is especially apparent at ~290 yrs BP and is coincident the onset of widespread erosion due to deforestation</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20140011607','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20140011607"><span>Physical and Dynamical Linkages between Lightning Jumps and <span class="hlt">Storm</span> Conceptual Models</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Schultz, Christopher J.; Carey, Lawrence D.; Schultz, Elise V.; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Goodman, Steven J.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The presence and rates of total lightning are both correlated to and physically dependent upon <span class="hlt">storm</span> updraft strength, mixed phase precipitation volume and the size of the charging zone. The updraft modulates the ingredients necessary for electrification within a thunderstorm, while the updraft also plays a critical role in the development of severe and hazardous weather. Therefore utilizing this relationship, the monitoring of lightning rates and jumps provides an additional piece of information on the evolution of a thunderstorm, more often than not, at higher temporal resolution than current operational radar systems. This correlation is the basis for the total lightning jump algorithm that has been developed in recent years. Currently, the lightning jump algorithm is being tested in two separate but important efforts. Schultz et al. (2014; this conference) is exploring the transition of the algorithm from its research based formulation to a fully objective algorithm that includes <span class="hlt">storm</span> tracking, Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) Proxy data and the lightning jump algorithm. Chronis et al. (2014; this conference) provides context for the transition to current operational forecasting using lightning mapping array based products. However, what remains is an end-to-end physical and dynamical basis for coupling total lightning flash rates to severe <span class="hlt">storm</span> manifestation, so the forecaster has a reason beyond simple correlation to utilize the lightning jump algorithm within their severe <span class="hlt">storm</span> conceptual models. Therefore, the physical basis for the lightning jump algorithm in relation to severe <span class="hlt">storm</span> dynamics and microphysics is a key component that must be further explored. Many radar studies have examined flash rates and their relationship to updraft strength, updraft volume, precipitation-sized <span class="hlt">ice</span> mass, etc.; however, their relationship specifically to lightning jumps is fragmented within the literature. Thus the goal of this study is to use multiple Doppler and</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20140011691','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20140011691"><span>Physical and Dynamical Linkages Between Lightning Jumps and <span class="hlt">Storm</span> Conceptual Models</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Schultz, Christopher J.; Carey, Lawrence D.; Schultz, Elise V.; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Goodman, Steven J.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The presence and rates of total lightning are both correlated to and physically dependent upon <span class="hlt">storm</span> updraft strength, mixed phase precipitation volume and the size of the charging zone. The updraft modulates the ingredients necessary for electrification within a thunderstorm, while the updraft also plays a critical role in the development of severe and hazardous weather. Therefore utilizing this relationship, the monitoring of lightning rates and jumps provides an additional piece of information on the evolution of a thunderstorm, more often than not, at higher temporal resolution than current operational radar systems. This correlation is the basis for the total lightning jump algorithm that has been developed in recent years. Currently, the lightning jump algorithm is being tested in two separate but important efforts. Schultz et al. (2014; this conference) is exploring the transition of the algorithm from its research based formulation to a fully objective algorithm that includes <span class="hlt">storm</span> tracking, Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) Proxy data and the lightning jump algorithm. Chronis et al. (2014) provides context for the transition to current operational forecasting using lightning mapping array based products. However, what remains is an end-to-end physical and dynamical basis for coupling total lightning flash rates to severe <span class="hlt">storm</span> manifestation, so the forecaster has a reason beyond simple correlation to utilize the lightning jump algorithm within their severe <span class="hlt">storm</span> conceptual models. Therefore, the physical basis for the lightning jump algorithm in relation to severe <span class="hlt">storm</span> dynamics and microphysics is a key component that must be further explored. Many radar studies have examined flash rates and their relationship to updraft strength, updraft volume, precipitation-sized <span class="hlt">ice</span> mass, etc.; however, their relationship specifically to lightning jumps is fragmented within the literature. Thus the goal of this study is to use multiple Doppler and polarimetric</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20030001737','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20030001737"><span>Technology for <span class="hlt">Ice</span> Rinks</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1983-01-01</p> <p>Ron Urban's International <span class="hlt">Ice</span> Shows set up portable <span class="hlt">ice</span> rinks for touring troupes performing on temporary rinks at amusement parks, sports arenas, dinner theaters, shopping malls and civic centers. Key to enhanced rink portability, fast freezing and maintaining <span class="hlt">ice</span> consistency is a mat of flexible tubing called ICEMAT, an offshoot of a solar heating system developed by Calmac, Mfg. under contract with Marshall.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Antarctic+AND+climate&id=EJ321613','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Antarctic+AND+climate&id=EJ321613"><span>The Antarctic <span class="hlt">Ice</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Radok, Uwe</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>The International Antarctic Glaciological Project has collected information on the East Antarctic <span class="hlt">ice</span> sheet since 1969. Analysis of <span class="hlt">ice</span> cores revealed climatic history, and radar soundings helped map bedrock of the continent. Computer models of the <span class="hlt">ice</span> sheet and its changes over time will aid in predicting the future. (DH)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19930094528','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19930094528"><span><span class="hlt">Ice</span> Formation on Wings</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Ritz, L</p> <p>1939-01-01</p> <p>This report makes use of the results obtained in the Gottingen <span class="hlt">ice</span> tunnel in which the atmospheric conditions are simulated and the process of <span class="hlt">ice</span> formation photographed. The effect of <span class="hlt">ice</span> formation is threefold: 1) added weight to the airplane; 2) a change in the lift and drag forces; 3) a change in the stability characteristics.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/ice-cream-headaches/basics/definition/CON-20024906?p=1','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/ice-cream-headaches/basics/definition/CON-20024906?p=1"><span><span class="hlt">Ice</span> Cream Headaches</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Diseases and Conditions <span class="hlt">Ice</span> cream headaches By Mayo Clinic Staff <span class="hlt">Ice</span> cream headaches are brief, stabbing headaches that can happen when you eat, drink or inhale something cold. Digging into an <span class="hlt">ice</span> cream cone is a common trigger, but eating or ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22reduce+sodium%22+OR+%22replace+sodium%22+OR+%22sodium+replacer%22+OR+salty+OR+saltiness+OR+%22taste+receptor%22+OR+%22taste+receptors%22&pg=2&id=EJ721524','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22reduce+sodium%22+OR+%22replace+sodium%22+OR+%22sodium+replacer%22+OR+salty+OR+saltiness+OR+%22taste+receptor%22+OR+%22taste+receptors%22&pg=2&id=EJ721524"><span><span class="hlt">Ice</span> Versus Rock</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Rule, Audrey C.; Olson, Eric A.; Dehm, Janet</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>During a snow bank exploration, students noticed "<span class="hlt">ice</span> caves," or pockets, in some of the larger snow banks, usually below darker layers. Most of these caves had many icicles hanging inside. Students offered reasonable explanations of <span class="hlt">ice</span> cave formation--squirrels, kids, snow blowers--and a few students came close to the true <span class="hlt">ice</span> cave-formation…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Size-dependences+AND+dielectric+AND+ferroelectric+AND+properties+AND+BaTiO3+AND+%2fpolyvinylidene+AND+fluoride+AND+nanocomposite&id=EJ196723','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Size-dependences+AND+dielectric+AND+ferroelectric+AND+properties+AND+BaTiO3+AND+%2fpolyvinylidene+AND+fluoride+AND+nanocomposite&id=EJ196723"><span>Experiments in <span class="hlt">Ice</span> Physics.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Martin, P. F.; And Others</p> <p>1978-01-01</p> <p>Describes experiments in <span class="hlt">ice</span> physics that demonstrate the behavior and properties of <span class="hlt">ice</span>. Show that <span class="hlt">ice</span> behaves as an ionic conductor in which charge is transferred by the movement of protons, its electrical conductivity is highly temperature-dependent, and its dielectric properties show dramatic variation in the kilohertz range. (Author/GA)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003SPIE.4890..569Y','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003SPIE.4890..569Y"><span>Influence of a dust <span class="hlt">storm</span> on young cotton plants in the Hetian region of northwest China</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Yuan, Chunqiong; Guo, Qingyu; Aniwiar, A.; Pan, Xiaoling</p> <p>2003-07-01</p> <p>Microclimate observation at 2 heights (10 and 50 centimeters) in young cotton plants fields with both normal windbreak and non-normal windbreak were carried out when a dust <span class="hlt">storm</span> took place in May 1998. Meteorological indices on the intensity of <span class="hlt">damage</span> to the young cotton plants were obtained. These results were shown that 5% young cotton plants were <span class="hlt">damaged</span> slightly when average velocities at the 2 heights were 1.5m/s, 2.6m/s respectively; 10% young cotton plants were <span class="hlt">damaged</span> when these velocities were 1.6m/s, 2.9m/s respectively; 20% young cotton plants were <span class="hlt">damaged</span> when these velocities were 1.8m/s, 2.9m/s respectively; 35% young cotton plants were <span class="hlt">damaged</span> seriously when these velocities were 2.3m/s, 3.4m/s respectively. Economical evaluation on these plants" <span class="hlt">damages</span> caused by the dust <span class="hlt">storm</span> was also conducted. The above indices were tested to be suitable in Hetian region. It is suggested that normal windbreak should be built in Hetian region in future.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22657839','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22657839"><span>Local <span class="hlt">ice</span> melting by an antifreeze protein.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Calvaresi, Matteo; Höfinger, Siegfried; Zerbetto, Francesco</p> <p>2012-07-09</p> <p>Antifreeze proteins, AFP, impede freezing of bodily fluids and <span class="hlt">damaging</span> of cellular tissues by low temperatures. Adsorption-inhibition mechanisms have been developed to explain their functioning. Using in silico Molecular Dynamics, we show that type I AFP can also induce melting of the local <span class="hlt">ice</span> surface. Simulations of antifreeze-positive and antifreeze-negative mutants show a clear correlation between melting induction and antifreeze activity. The presence of local melting adds a function to type I AFPs that is unique to these proteins. It may also explain some apparently conflicting experimental results where binding to <span class="hlt">ice</span> appears both quasipermanent and reversible.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25756189','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25756189"><span>Ultrasonic emissions during <span class="hlt">ice</span> nucleation and propagation in plant xylem.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Charrier, Guillaume; Pramsohler, Manuel; Charra-Vaskou, Katline; Saudreau, Marc; Améglio, Thierry; Neuner, Gilbert; Mayr, Stefan</p> <p>2015-08-01</p> <p>Ultrasonic acoustic emission analysis enables nondestructive monitoring of <span class="hlt">damage</span> in dehydrating or freezing plant xylem. We studied acoustic emissions (AE) in freezing stems during <span class="hlt">ice</span> nucleation and propagation, by combining acoustic and infrared thermography techniques and controlling the <span class="hlt">ice</span> nucleation point. Ultrasonic activity in freezing samples of Picea abies showed two distinct phases: the first on <span class="hlt">ice</span> nucleation and propagation (up to 50 AE s(-1) ; reversely proportional to the distance to <span class="hlt">ice</span> nucleation point), and the second (up to 2.5 AE s(-1) ) after dissipation of the exothermal heat. Identical patterns were observed in other conifer and angiosperm species. The complex AE patterns are explained by the low water potential of <span class="hlt">ice</span> at the <span class="hlt">ice</span>-liquid interface, which induced numerous and strong signals. <span class="hlt">Ice</span> propagation velocities were estimated via AE (during the first phase) and infrared thermography. Acoustic activity ceased before the second phase probably because the exothermal heating and the volume expansion of <span class="hlt">ice</span> caused decreasing tensions. Results indicate cavitation events at the <span class="hlt">ice</span> front leading to AE. Ultrasonic emission analysis enabled new insights into the complex process of xylem freezing and might be used to monitor <span class="hlt">ice</span> propagation in natura.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009EGUGA..11.7734B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009EGUGA..11.7734B"><span>The role of conditional symmetric instability in Sting Jet <span class="hlt">storms</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Baker, L. H.; Martinez-Alvarado, O.; Gray, S. L.; Clark, P. A.</p> <p>2009-04-01</p> <p>The aim of this project is to determine the mechanisms that lead to sting jets in extreme windstorms and develop diagnostics for predicting their formation and development. Extratropical cyclones often produce strong surface winds, mostly associated with low-level jets along the warm and cold fronts. Some severe extratropical cyclones have been found to produce an additional area of localised strong, and potentially very <span class="hlt">damaging</span>, surface winds during a certain part of their development. These strong winds are associated with air that originates within the cloud head, exiting at the tip of the cloud head and descending rapidly from there to the surface. This rapidly descending air associated with the strong surface winds is known as a sting jet. One significant feature of sting jet <span class="hlt">storms</span> is mesoscale slantwise circulations in the cloud head, which have been speculated to be due to the release of conditional symmetric instability (CSI). Analyses of two very different proposed sting jet <span class="hlt">storms</span> will be presented. In both cases, a sting jet feature has been identified and examined using two diagnostics for CSI: SCAPE (slantwise convective available potential energy) and moist potential vorticity (MPV). SCAPE and negative MPV exist near the tip of the cloud heads and SCAPE decreases during the time of the descent of the sting jets, indicating that CSI may be being released.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21845165','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21845165"><span>Assessment of vulnerability to extreme flash floods in design <span class="hlt">storms</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kim, Eung Seok; Choi, Hyun Il</p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>There has been an increase in the occurrence of sudden local flooding of great volume and short duration caused by heavy or excessive rainfall intensity over a small area, which presents the greatest potential danger threat to the natural environment, human life, public health and property, etc. Such flash floods have rapid runoff and debris flow that rises quickly with little or no advance warning to prevent flood <span class="hlt">damage</span>. This study develops a flash flood index through the average of the same scale relative severity factors quantifying characteristics of hydrographs generated from a rainfall-runoff model for the long-term observed rainfall data in a small ungauged study basin, and presents regression equations between rainfall characteristics and the flash flood index. The aim of this study is to develop flash flood index-duration-frequency relation curves by combining the rainfall intensity-duration-frequency relation and the flash flood index from probability rainfall data in order to evaluate vulnerability to extreme flash floods in design <span class="hlt">storms</span>. This study is an initial effort to quantify the flash flood severity of design <span class="hlt">storms</span> for both existing and planned flood control facilities to cope with residual flood risks due to extreme flash floods that have ocurred frequently in recent years.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3155336','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3155336"><span>Assessment of Vulnerability to Extreme Flash Floods in Design <span class="hlt">Storms</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Kim, Eung Seok; Choi, Hyun Il</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>There has been an increase in the occurrence of sudden local flooding of great volume and short duration caused by heavy or excessive rainfall intensity over a small area, which presents the greatest potential danger threat to the natural environment, human life, public health and property, etc. Such flash floods have rapid runoff and debris flow that rises quickly with little or no advance warning to prevent flood <span class="hlt">damage</span>. This study develops a flash flood index through the average of the same scale relative severity factors quantifying characteristics of hydrographs generated from a rainfall-runoff model for the long-term observed rainfall data in a small ungauged study basin, and presents regression equations between rainfall characteristics and the flash flood index. The aim of this study is to develop flash flood index-duration-frequency relation curves by combining the rainfall intensity-duration-frequency relation and the flash flood index from probability rainfall data in order to evaluate vulnerability to extreme flash floods in design <span class="hlt">storms</span>. This study is an initial effort to quantify the flash flood severity of design <span class="hlt">storms</span> for both existing and planned flood control facilities to cope with residual flood risks due to extreme flash floods that have ocurred frequently in recent years. PMID:21845165</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA168096','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA168096"><span>Chemically Induced <span class="hlt">Damage</span> to the Hippocampal Formation,</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>1986-05-01</p> <p>31-42. Siesj0, B K (1981): Cell <span class="hlt">damage</span> in the brain: A speculative synthe i, J Cereb Blood Flow Metabol 1, 155-85. Stefanis, C (1964): Hippocampal... serotonin effects on central neurons, Advanc Pharmacol 6A, 414-18. <span class="hlt">Storm</span>-Mathisen, J (1972): Glutamate decarboxylase in the rat hippo- campal region...and chro- nic toluene inhalation on behavior and [ H]- serotonin binding in rat, Life Sciences 30, 1997-2002. Zimmer, L, Woolley, D and Chang, L (1985</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20130001849','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20130001849"><span>The Kinematic and Microphysical Control of <span class="hlt">Storm</span> Integrated Lightning Flash Extent</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Carey, Lawrence; Koshak, William; Petersen, Harold; Schultz, Elise; Schultz, Chris; Matthee, Retha; Bain, Lamont</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The objective of this preliminary study is to investigate the kinematic and microphysical control of lightning properties, particularly those that may govern the production of nitrogen oxides (NOx) in thunderstorms, such as flash rate, type and extent. The mixed-phase region is where the noninductive charging (NIC) process is thought to generate most <span class="hlt">storm</span> electrification during rebounding collisions between <span class="hlt">ice</span> particles in the presence of supercooled water. As a result, prior radar-based studies have demonstrated that lightning flash rate is well correlated to kinematic and microphysical properties in the mixed-phase region of thunderstorms such as updraft volume, graupel mass, or <span class="hlt">ice</span> mass flux. There is also some evidence that lightning type is associated with the convective state. Intracloud (IC) lightning tends to dominate during the updraft accumulation of precipitation <span class="hlt">ice</span> mass while cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning is more numerous during the downdraft-driven descent of radar echo associated with graupel and hail. More study is required to generalize these relationships, especially regarding lightning type, in a wide variety of <span class="hlt">storm</span> modes and meteorological conditions. Less is known about the co-evolving relationship between <span class="hlt">storm</span> kinematics, microphysics, morphology and three-dimensional flash extent, despite its importance for lightning NOx production. To address this conceptual gap, the NASA MSFC Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) is applied to North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA) and Vaisala National Lightning Detection NetworkTM (NLDN) observations following ordinary convective cells through their lifecycle. LNOM provides estimates of flash type, channel length distributions, lightning segment altitude distributions (SADs) and lightning NOx production profiles. For this study, LNOM is applied in a Lagrangian sense to well isolated convective cells on 3 April 2007 (single cell and multi-cell hailstorm, non-severe multicell) and 6 July 2007</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFMAE23B0326C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFMAE23B0326C"><span>The Kinematic and Microphysical Control of <span class="hlt">Storm</span> Integrated Lightning Flash Extent</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Carey, L. D.; Koshak, W. J.; Peterson, H. S.; Schultz, E. V.; Matthee, R.; Schultz, C. J.; Petersen, W. A.; Bain, L.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>The objective of this preliminary study is to investigate the kinematic and microphysical control of lightning properties, particularly those that may govern the production of nitrogen oxides (NOx) in thunderstorms, such as flash rate, type and extent. The mixed-phase region is where the noninductive charging (NIC) process is thought to generate most <span class="hlt">storm</span> electrification during rebounding collisions between <span class="hlt">ice</span> particles in the presence of supercooled water. As a result, prior radar-based studies have demonstrated that lightning flash rate is well correlated to kinematic and microphysical properties in the mixed-phase region of thunderstorms such as updraft volume, graupel mass, or <span class="hlt">ice</span> mass flux. There is also some evidence that lightning type is associated with the convective state. Intracloud (IC) lightning tends to dominate during the updraft accumulation of precipitation <span class="hlt">ice</span> mass while cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning is more numerous during the downdraft-driven descent of radar echo associated with graupel and hail. More study is required to generalize these relationships, especially regarding lightning type, in a wide variety of <span class="hlt">storm</span> modes and meteorological conditions. Less is known about the co-evolving relationship between <span class="hlt">storm</span> kinematics, microphysics, morphology and three-dimensional flash extent, despite its importance for lightning NOx production. To address this conceptual gap, the NASA MSFC Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) is applied to North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA) and Vaisala National Lightning Detection NetworkTM (NLDN) observations following ordinary convective cells through their lifecycle. LNOM provides estimates of flash type, channel length distributions, lightning segment altitude distributions (SADs) and lightning NOx production profiles. For this study, LNOM is applied in a Lagrangian sense to well isolated convective cells on 3 April 2007 (single cell and multi-cell hailstorm, non-severe multi-cell) and 6 July 2007</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_23 --> <div id="page_24" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="461"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002EGSGA..27.4454P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002EGSGA..27.4454P"><span>Breaking Off of Large <span class="hlt">Ice</span> Masses From Hanging Glaciers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pralong, A.; Funk, M.</p> <p></p> <p>In order to reduce <span class="hlt">damage</span> to settlements or other installations (roads, railway, etc) and avoid loss of life, a forecast of the final failure time of <span class="hlt">ice</span> masses is required. At present, the most promising approach for such a prediction is based on the regularity by which certain large <span class="hlt">ice</span> masses accelerate prior to the instant of collapse. The lim- itation of this forecast lies in short-term irregularities and in the difficulties to obtain sufficiently accurate data. A better physical understanding of the breaking off process is required, in order to improve the forecasting method. Previous analyze has shown that a stepwise crack extension coupling with a viscous flow leads to the observed acceleration function. We propose another approach by considering a local <span class="hlt">damage</span> evolution law (gener- alized Kachanow's law) coupled with Glen's flow law to simulate the spatial evolu- tion of <span class="hlt">damage</span> in polycristalline <span class="hlt">ice</span>, using a finite element computational model. The present study focuses on the transition from a diffuse to a localised <span class="hlt">damage</span> reparti- tion occurring during the <span class="hlt">damage</span> evolution. The influence of inhomogeneous initial conditions (inhomogeneity of the mechanical properties of <span class="hlt">ice</span>, <span class="hlt">damage</span> inhomogene- ity) and inhomogeneous boundary conditions on the <span class="hlt">damage</span> repartition are especially investigated.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6414077','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6414077"><span>Alaska marine <span class="hlt">ice</span> atlas</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>LaBelle, J.C.; Wise, J.L.; Voelker, R.P.; Schulze, R.H.; Wohl, G.M.</p> <p>1982-01-01</p> <p>A comprehensive Atlas of Alaska marine <span class="hlt">ice</span> is presented. It includes information on pack and landfast sea <span class="hlt">ice</span> and calving tidewater glacier <span class="hlt">ice</span>. It also gives information on <span class="hlt">ice</span> and related environmental conditions collected over several years time and indicates the normal and extreme conditions that might be expected in Alaska coastal waters. Much of the information on <span class="hlt">ice</span> conditions in Alaska coastal waters has emanated from research activities in outer continental shelf regions under assessment for oil and gas exploration and development potential. (DMC)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA157041','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA157041"><span><span class="hlt">Ice</span> Observation Handbook, 1984</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>which is navigable by surface vessels. Flaw polynya : A polynya between drift <span class="hlt">ice</span> and fast <span class="hlt">ice</span>. Floating <span class="hlt">ice</span>: Any form of <span class="hlt">ice</span> found floating in water...10 to 6/10 with many leads and polynyas , and the floes are generally not in contact with one another. Open water: A large area of freely navigable...the surface; its appearance may rapidly cover wide areas of water. 9l 2-9 7-7 Polynya : Any non-linear shaped opening enclosed in <span class="hlt">ice</span>. Polynyas may</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005AGUFMSA21A0270H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005AGUFMSA21A0270H"><span>Global ionospheric disturbances during super magnetic <span class="hlt">storms</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Huang, C.; Foster, J.; Rideout, W.; Zhang, Y.; Paxton, L.</p> <p>2005-12-01</p> <p>Magnetic <span class="hlt">storms</span> represent the largest disturbances in the magnetosphere and ionosphere. We will present the ionospheric observations by the Millstone Hill incoherent scatter radar, global GPS network, and TIMED GUVI instrument during two super <span class="hlt">storms</span>. The sudden commencement (SSC) of the 15 July 2000 <span class="hlt">storm</span> occurred at 19 UT, and the minimum Dst reached -301 nT. The dayside midlatitude ionospheric F region electron density showed a sudden decrease at Millstone Hill and Eglin in response to the SSC. The elevation scan measurements of the Millstone HIll radar show that the sudden decrease in the ionospheric electron density was related to an electron density trough which had an equatorward boundary at Eglin (magnetic latitude 41 degree) at 16 MLT. The formation of the trough may be related to equatorward incursion of the disturbance SAPS electric field. The dayside TEC decreased significantly at the equatorial and upper midlatitudes, and an enhanced TEC band occurred between the depleted regions. The SSC of the 29 October 2003 <span class="hlt">storm</span> occurred at 07 UT, the <span class="hlt">storm</span> was further enhanced at 18 UT, and the minimum Dst reached -363 nT. The Millstone Hill radar also detected a sudden decrease of the dayside F region electron density immediately after the <span class="hlt">storm</span> enhancement. The simultaneous TIMED GUVI measurements show a significant decrease in the O/N2 ratio over the Atlantic sector from the auroral zone to anomaly latitudes, and large TEC depletions occurred coincidentally with the O/N2 decrease. In this second case, both the enhanced electric field and decrease of O/N2 ratio contributed to the depletion of the dayside midlatitude F-region electron density and TEC. The multiple measurements during the two <span class="hlt">storms</span> reveal the distinct properties and mechanisms of the global ionospheric disturbances.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AnGeo..26.2645G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AnGeo..26.2645G"><span>Derivation of a planetary ionospheric <span class="hlt">storm</span> index</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gulyaeva, T. L.; Stanislawska, I.</p> <p>2008-09-01</p> <p>The planetary ionospheric <span class="hlt">storm</span> index, Wp, is deduced from the numerical global ionospheric GPS-IONEX maps of the vertical total electron content, TEC, for more than half a solar cycle, 1999-2008. The TEC values are extracted from the 600 grid points of the map at latitudes 60° N to 60° S with a step of 5° and longitudes 0° to 345° E with a step of 15° providing the data for 00:00 to 23:00 h of local time. The local effects of the solar radiant energy are filtered out by normalizing of the TEC in terms of the solar zenith angle χ at a particular time and the local noon value χ0. The degree of perturbation, DTEC, is computed as log of TEC relative to quiet reference median for 27 days prior to the day of observation. The W-index map is generated by segmentation of DTEC with the relevant thresholds specified earlier for foF2 so that 1 or -1 stands for the quiet state, 2 or -2 for the moderate disturbance, 3 or -3 for the moderate ionospheric <span class="hlt">storm</span>, and 4 or -4 for intense ionospheric <span class="hlt">storm</span> at each grid point of the map. The planetary ionospheric <span class="hlt">storm</span> Wp index is obtained from the W-index map as a latitudinal average of the distance between maximum positive and minimum negative W-index weighted by the latitude/longitude extent of the extreme values on the map. The threshold Wp exceeding 4.0 index units and the peak value Wpmax≥6.0 specify the duration and the power of the planetary ionosphere-plasmasphere <span class="hlt">storm</span>. It is shown that the occurrence of the Wp <span class="hlt">storms</span> is growing with the phase of the solar cycle being twice as much as the number of the magnetospheric <span class="hlt">storms</span> with Dst≤-100 nT and Ap≥100 nT.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JGRA..121..764C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JGRA..121..764C"><span>Ionospheric data assimilation and forecasting during <span class="hlt">storms</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chartier, Alex T.; Matsuo, Tomoko; Anderson, Jeffrey L.; Collins, Nancy; Hoar, Timothy J.; Lu, Gang; Mitchell, Cathryn N.; Coster, Anthea J.; Paxton, Larry J.; Bust, Gary S.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Ionospheric <span class="hlt">storms</span> can have important effects on radio communications and navigation systems. <span class="hlt">Storm</span> time ionospheric predictions have the potential to form part of effective mitigation strategies to these problems. Ionospheric <span class="hlt">storms</span> are caused by strong forcing from the solar wind. Electron density enhancements are driven by penetration electric fields, as well as by thermosphere-ionosphere behavior including Traveling Atmospheric Disturbances and Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances and changes to the neutral composition. This study assesses the effect on 1 h predictions of specifying initial ionospheric and thermospheric conditions using total electron content (TEC) observations under a fixed set of solar and high-latitude drivers. Prediction performance is assessed against TEC observations, incoherent scatter radar, and in situ electron density observations. Corotated TEC data provide a benchmark of forecast accuracy. The primary case study is the <span class="hlt">storm</span> of 10 September 2005, while the anomalous <span class="hlt">storm</span> of 21 January 2005 provides a secondary comparison. The study uses an ensemble Kalman filter constructed with the Data Assimilation Research Testbed and the Thermosphere Ionosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model. Maps of preprocessed, verticalized GPS TEC are assimilated, while high-latitude specifications from the Assimilative Mapping of Ionospheric Electrodynamics and solar flux observations from the Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Experiment are used to drive the model. The filter adjusts ionospheric and thermospheric parameters, making use of time-evolving covariance estimates. The approach is effective in correcting model biases but does not capture all the behavior of the <span class="hlt">storms</span>. In particular, a ridge-like enhancement over the continental USA is not predicted, indicating the importance of predicting <span class="hlt">storm</span> time electric field behavior to the problem of ionospheric forecasting.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004BAMS...85..177K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004BAMS...85..177K"><span>A Snowfall Impact Scale Derived from Northeast <span class="hlt">Storm</span> Snowfall Distributions.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kocin, Paul J.; Uccellini, Louis W.</p> <p>2004-02-01</p> <p>A Northeast snowfall impact scale (NESIS) is presented to convey a measure of the impact of heavy snowfall in the Northeast urban corridor, a region that extends from southern Virginia to New England. The scale is derived from a synoptic climatology of 30 major snowstorms in the Northeast urban corridor and applied to the snowfall distribution of 70 snowstorms east of the Rocky Mountains. NESIS is similar in concept to other meteorological scales that are designed to simplify complex phenomena into an easily understood range of values. The Fujita scale for tornadoes and the Saffir Simpson scale for hurricanes measure the potential for destruction to property and loss of life by wind-related <span class="hlt">damage</span> (and <span class="hlt">storm</span> surge for Saffir Simpson) through use of a categorical ranking (0 or 1 5).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFMNH21A1589F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFMNH21A1589F"><span>Comparison of Probabilistic Coastal Inundation Maps Based on Historical <span class="hlt">Storms</span> and Statistically Modeled <span class="hlt">Storm</span> Ensemble</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Feng, X.; Sheng, Y.; Condon, A. J.; Paramygin, V. A.; Hall, T.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>A cost effective method, JPM-OS (Joint Probability Method with Optimal Sampling), for determining <span class="hlt">storm</span> response and inundation return frequencies was developed and applied to quantify the hazard of hurricane <span class="hlt">storm</span> surges and inundation along the Southwest FL,US coast (Condon and Sheng 2012). The JPM-OS uses piecewise multivariate regression splines coupled with dimension adaptive sparse grids to enable the generation of a base flood elevation (BFE) map. <span class="hlt">Storms</span> are characterized by their landfall characteristics (pressure deficit, radius to maximum winds, forward speed, heading, and landfall location) and a sparse grid algorithm determines the optimal set of <span class="hlt">storm</span> parameter combinations so that the inundation from any other <span class="hlt">storm</span> parameter combination can be determined. The end result is a sample of a few hundred (197 for SW FL) optimal <span class="hlt">storms</span> which are simulated using a dynamically coupled <span class="hlt">storm</span> surge / wave modeling system CH3D-SSMS (Sheng et al. 2010). The limited historical climatology (1940 - 2009) is explored to develop probabilistic characterizations of the five <span class="hlt">storm</span> parameters. The probability distributions are discretized and the inundation response of all parameter combinations is determined by the interpolation in five-dimensional space of the optimal <span class="hlt">storms</span>. The surge response and the associated joint probability of the parameter combination is used to determine the flood elevation with a 1% annual probability of occurrence. The limited historical data constrains the accuracy of the PDFs of the hurricane characteristics, which in turn affect the accuracy of the BFE maps calculated. To offset the deficiency of limited historical dataset, this study presents a different method for producing coastal inundation maps. Instead of using the historical <span class="hlt">storm</span> data, here we adopt 33,731 tracks that can represent the <span class="hlt">storm</span> climatology in North Atlantic basin and SW Florida coasts. This large quantity of hurricane tracks is generated from a new statistical model</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017EaFut...5..107D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017EaFut...5..107D"><span>Arctic <span class="hlt">ice</span> management</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Desch, Steven J.; Smith, Nathan; Groppi, Christopher; Vargas, Perry; Jackson, Rebecca; Kalyaan, Anusha; Nguyen, Peter; Probst, Luke; Rubin, Mark E.; Singleton, Heather; Spacek, Alexander; Truitt, Amanda; Zaw, Pye Pye; Hartnett, Hilairy E.</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>As the Earth's climate has changed, Arctic sea <span class="hlt">ice</span> extent has decreased drastically. It is likely that the late-summer Arctic will be <span class="hlt">ice</span>-free as soon as the 2030s. This loss of sea <span class="hlt">ice</span> represents one of the most severe positive feedbacks in the climate system, as sunlight that would otherwise be reflected by sea <span class="hlt">ice</span> is absorbed by open ocean. It is unlikely that CO2 levels and mean temperatures can be decreased in time to prevent this loss, so restoring sea <span class="hlt">ice</span> artificially is an imperative. Here we investigate a means for enhancing Arctic sea <span class="hlt">ice</span> production by using wind power during the Arctic winter to pump water to the surface, where it will freeze more rapidly. We show that where appropriate devices are employed, it is possible to increase <span class="hlt">ice</span> thickness above natural levels, by about 1 m over the course of the winter. We examine the effects this has in the Arctic climate, concluding that deployment over 10% of the Arctic, especially where <span class="hlt">ice</span> survival is marginal, could more than reverse current trends of <span class="hlt">ice</span> loss in the Arctic, using existing industrial capacity. We propose that winter <span class="hlt">ice</span> thickening by wind-powered pumps be considered and assessed as part of a multipronged strategy for restoring sea <span class="hlt">ice</span> and arresting the strongest feedbacks in the climate system.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23135061','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23135061"><span>Tropical <span class="hlt">storm</span> off Myanmar coast sweeps reefs in Ritchie's Archipelago, Andaman.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Krishnan, P; Grinson-George; Vikas, N; Titus-Immanuel, Titus; Goutham-Bharathi, M P; Anand, A; Kumar, K Vinod; Kumar, S Senthil</p> <p>2013-06-01</p> <p>The reefs in some islands of Andaman and Nicobar suffered severe <span class="hlt">damage</span> following a tropical <span class="hlt">storm</span> in the Bay of Bengal off Myanmar coast during 13-17 March 2011. Surveys were conducted at eight sites in Andaman, of which five were located in the Ritchie's Archipelago where maximum wind speeds of 11 m s(-1) was observed; and three around Port Blair which lay on the leeward side of the <span class="hlt">storm</span> and had not experienced wind speeds of more than 9 m s(-1). Corals in the shallow inshore reefs were broken and dislodged by the thrust of the waves. Significant <span class="hlt">damage</span> in the deeper regions and offshore reefs were caused by the settlement of debris and sand brought down from the shallower regions. The fragile branching corals (Acropora sp.) were reduced to rubbles and the larger boulder corals (Porites sp.) were toppled over or scarred by falling debris. The reefs on the windward side and directly in the path of the <span class="hlt">storm</span> winds were the worst affected. The investigation exposes the vulnerability of the reefs in Andaman to the oceanographic features which generally remain unnoticed unless the <span class="hlt">damage</span> is caused to the coastal habitats.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3081589','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3081589"><span><span class="hlt">ICE</span> SLURRY APPLICATIONS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Kauffeld, M.; WANG, M. J.; Goldstein, V.; Kasza, K. E.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>The role of secondary refrigerants is expected to grow as the focus on the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions increases. The effectiveness of secondary refrigerants can be improved when phase changing media are introduced in place of single phase media. Operating at temperatures below the freezing point of water, <span class="hlt">ice</span> slurry facilitates several efficiency improvements such as reductions in pumping energy consumption as well as lowering the required temperature difference in heat exchangers due to the beneficial thermo-physical properties of <span class="hlt">ice</span> slurry. Research has shown that <span class="hlt">ice</span> slurry can be engineered to have ideal <span class="hlt">ice</span> particle characteristics so that it can be easily stored in tanks without agglomeration and then be extractable for pumping at very high <span class="hlt">ice</span> fraction without plugging. In addition <span class="hlt">ice</span> slurry can be used in many direct contact food and medical protective cooling applications. This paper provides an overview of the latest developments in <span class="hlt">ice</span> slurry technology. PMID:21528014</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4851101','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4851101"><span>Healthcare4Video<span class="hlt">Storm</span>: Making Smart Decisions Based on <span class="hlt">Storm</span> Metrics</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Zhang, Weishan; Duan, Pengcheng; Chen, Xiufeng; Lu, Qinghua</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Storm</span>-based stream processing is widely used for real-time large-scale distributed processing. Knowing the run-time status and ensuring performance is critical to providing expected dependability for some applications, e.g., continuous video processing for security surveillance. The existing scheduling strategies’ granularity is too coarse to have good performance, and mainly considers network resources without computing resources while scheduling. In this paper, we propose Healthcare4<span class="hlt">Storm</span>, a framework that finds <span class="hlt">Storm</span> insights based on <span class="hlt">Storm</span> metrics to gain knowledge from the health status of an application, finally ending up with smart scheduling decisions. It takes into account both network and computing resources and conducts scheduling at a fine-grained level using tuples instead of topologies. The comprehensive evaluation shows that the proposed framework has good performance and can improve the dependability of the <span class="hlt">Storm</span>-based applications. PMID:27120606</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27120606','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27120606"><span>Healthcare4Video<span class="hlt">Storm</span>: Making Smart Decisions Based on <span class="hlt">Storm</span> Metrics.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zhang, Weishan; Duan, Pengcheng; Chen, Xiufeng; Lu, Qinghua</p> <p>2016-04-23</p> <p><span class="hlt">Storm</span>-based stream processing is widely used for real-time large-scale distributed processing. Knowing the run-time status and ensuring performance is critical to providing expected dependability for some applications, e.g., continuous video processing for security surveillance. The existing scheduling strategies' granularity is too coarse to have good performance, and mainly considers network resources without computing resources while scheduling. In this paper, we propose Healthcare4<span class="hlt">Storm</span>, a framework that finds <span class="hlt">Storm</span> insights based on <span class="hlt">Storm</span> metrics to gain knowledge from the health status of an application, finally ending up with smart scheduling decisions. It takes into account both network and computing resources and conducts scheduling at a fine-grained level using tuples instead of topologies. The comprehensive evaluation shows that the proposed framework has good performance and can improve the dependability of the <span class="hlt">Storm</span>-based applications.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4410365','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4410365"><span>VULNERABILITY TO HURRICANE <span class="hlt">DAMAGE</span> ON THE U.S. GULF COAST SINCE 1950</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>LOGAN, JOHN R.; XU, ZENGWANG</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>We study hurricane risk on the U.S. Gulf Coast during 1950–2005, estimating the wind <span class="hlt">damage</span> and <span class="hlt">storm</span> surge from every hurricane in this extended period. Wind <span class="hlt">damage</span> is estimated from the known path and wind speeds of individual <span class="hlt">storms</span> and calibrated to fit actual <span class="hlt">damage</span> reports for a sample of Gulf Coast <span class="hlt">storms</span>. <span class="hlt">Storm</span> surge is estimated using the SLOSH model developed by NOAA. These models provide the first comprehensive overview of the hurricane <span class="hlt">storm</span> hazard as it has been experienced over a fifty-six-year period. We link the estimated <span class="hlt">damage</span> with information on the population and specific socio-demographic components of the population (by age, race, and poverty status). Results show that white, young adult, and nonpoor populations have shifted over time away from zones with higher risk of wind <span class="hlt">damage</span>, while more vulnerable population groups–the elderly, African Americans, and poor—have moved in the opposite direction. All groups have moved away from areas with high risk of <span class="hlt">storm</span> surge since 1970. But in this case, perhaps because living near the water is still perceived as an amenity, those at highest risk are whites, elderly, and nonpoor households. Here exposure represents a trade-off between the risk and the amenity. PMID:25926706</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.C21D0685B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.C21D0685B"><span>Influence of the sea-<span class="hlt">ice</span> edge on the Arctic nearshore environment</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Barnhart, K. R.; Overeem, I.; Anderson, R. S.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>Coasts form the dynamic interface of the terrestrial and oceanic systems. In the Arctic, and in much of the world, the coast is a zone of relatively high population, infrastructure, biodiversity, and ecosystem services. A significant difference between Arctic and temperate coasts is the presence of sea <span class="hlt">ice</span>. Sea <span class="hlt">ice</span> influences Arctic coasts in two main ways: (1) the length of the sea <span class="hlt">ice</span>-free season controls the length of time over which nearshore water can interact with the land, and (2) the sea <span class="hlt">ice</span> edge controls the fetch over which <span class="hlt">storm</span> winds can blow over open water, resulting in changes in nearshore water level and wave field. The resulting nearshore hydrodynamic environment impacts all aspects of the coastal system. Here, we use satellite records of sea <span class="hlt">ice</span> along with a simple model for wind-driven <span class="hlt">storm</span> surge and waves to document how changes in the length and character of the sea <span class="hlt">ice</span>-free season have impacted the nearshore hydrodynamic environment. For our sea <span class="hlt">ice</span> analysis we primarily use the Bootstrap Sea <span class="hlt">Ice</span> Concentrations from Nimbus-7 SMMR and DMSP SSM/I-SSMIS. We make whole-Arctic maps of sea <span class="hlt">ice</span> change in the coastal zone. In addition to evaluating changes in length of the sea <span class="hlt">ice</span>-free season at the coast, we look at changes segmented by azimuth. This allows us to consider changes in the sea <span class="hlt">ice</span> in the context of the wind field. For our <span class="hlt">storm</span> surge and wave field analysis we focus on the Beaufort Sea region. This region has experienced some of the greatest changes in both sea <span class="hlt">ice</span> cover and coastal erosion rates in the Arctic and is anticipated to experience significant change in the future. In addition, the NOAA ESRL GMD has observed the wind field at Barrow since extends to 1977. In our past work on the rapid and accelerating coastal erosion, we have shown that one may model <span class="hlt">storm</span> surge with a 2D numerical bathystrophic model, and that waves are well represented by the Shore Protection Manual methods for shallow-water fetch-limited waves. We use</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016DSRII.131...28T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016DSRII.131...28T"><span>Formation processes of sea <span class="hlt">ice</span> floe size distribution in the interior pack and its relationship to the marginal <span class="hlt">ice</span> zone off East Antarctica</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Toyota, Takenobu; Kohout, Alison; Fraser, Alexander D.</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>To understand the behavior of the Seasonal <span class="hlt">Ice</span> Zone (SIZ), which is composed of sea-<span class="hlt">ice</span> floes of various sizes, knowledge of the floe size distribution (FSD) is important. In particular, FSD in the Marginal <span class="hlt">Ice</span> Zone (MIZ), controlled by wave-<span class="hlt">ice</span> interaction, plays an important role in determining the retreating rates of sea-<span class="hlt">ice</span> extent on a global scale because the cumulative perimeter of floes enhances melting. To improve the understanding of wave-<span class="hlt">ice</span> interaction and subsequent effects on FSD in the MIZ, FSD measurements were conducted off East Antarctica during the second Sea <span class="hlt">Ice</span> Physics and Ecosystems eXperiment (SIPEX-2) in late winter 2012. Since logistical reasons limited helicopter operations to two interior <span class="hlt">ice</span> regions, FSD in the interior <span class="hlt">ice</span> region was determined using a combination of heli-photos and MODIS satellite visible images. The possible effect of wave-<span class="hlt">ice</span> interaction in the MIZ was examined by comparison with past results obtained in the same MIZ, with our analysis showing: (1) FSD in the interior <span class="hlt">ice</span> region is basically scale invariant for both small- (<100 m) and large- (>1 km) scale regimes; (2) although fractal dimensions are quite different between these two regimes, they are both rather close to that in the MIZ; and (3) for floes <100 m in diameter, a regime shift which appeared at 20-40 m in the MIZ is absent. These results indicate that one role of wave-<span class="hlt">ice</span> interaction is to modulate the FSD that already exists in the interior <span class="hlt">ice</span> region, rather than directly determine it. The possibilities of floe-floe collisions and <span class="hlt">storm</span>-induced lead formation are considered as possible formation processes of FSD in the interior pack.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AAS...20922102D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AAS...20922102D"><span>Of <span class="hlt">Ice</span> and Microbes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Deming, Jody</p> <p>2006-12-01</p> <p>Inuit hunters of the North have long recognized <span class="hlt">ice</span> as the natural state of water from which life flows on Earth. Although unaware of the microscopic world, they chart changes in properties of <span class="hlt">ice</span> and water that derive from a succession of microbial inhabitants. Scientific hunters of the West have largely overlooked all but the warmest of <span class="hlt">ices</span> as dynamic scenes of microbial life, considering the frozen realm to archive life forms instead. Deeply frozen glacial <span class="hlt">ice</span> on Earth does appear to preserve microbes effectively, but isn't the ocean beneath the geologically dynamic <span class="hlt">ice</span> of Europa believed too salty? Aren't the subsurface <span class="hlt">ices</span> of Mars expected to be rich in all manner of mineralogical impurities? Wherever salt and other mineral impurities are sufficiently abundant in Earth <span class="hlt">ice</span>, the <span class="hlt">ice</span> contains interior liquid water that can range from nano-layer films on grain surfaces (glacial <span class="hlt">ice</span>) to a porous network of brine (Arctic winter sea <span class="hlt">ice</span> down to 20°C). Other recent studies of saline <span class="hlt">ices</span> have indicated a world of interacting life forms, with viruses infecting bacteria in brines at -12°C (the lowest temperature tested), the domains of Bacteria and Archaea undergoing succession in winter <span class="hlt">ices</span> (down to -28°C), and evidence that cellular maintenance may go forward incrementally even below the eutectic of seawater (-55°C). Microbes are also known to alter the physical properties of their icy homes by producing exopolymers that further depress the freezing point, either directly or by entraining more salt into the <span class="hlt">ice</span>. Even the most inhospitable of <span class="hlt">ices</span> to human hunters may contain interior oases for microbes, in control to some degree of their own space. In considering the habitability of icy worlds beyond Earth, we'd do well to learn more about the evolutionary prowess of microbes in adapting to conditions beyond our warm-blooded imaginations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1263497-acceleration-loss-relativistic-electrons-during-small-geomagnetic-storms','SCIGOV-DOEP'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1263497-acceleration-loss-relativistic-electrons-during-small-geomagnetic-storms"><span>Acceleration and loss of relativistic electrons during small geomagnetic <span class="hlt">storms</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/pages">DOE PAGES</a></p> <p>Anderson, B. R.; Millan, R. M.; Reeves, G. D.; ...</p> <p>2015-12-02</p> <p>We report that past studies of radiation belt relativistic electrons have favored active <span class="hlt">storm</span> time periods, while the effects of small geomagnetic <span class="hlt">storms</span> (Dst >₋50 nT) have not been statistically characterized. In this timely study, given the current weak solar cycle, we identify 342 small <span class="hlt">storms</span> from 1989 through 2000 and quantify the corresponding change in relativistic electron flux at geosynchronous orbit. Surprisingly, small <span class="hlt">storms</span> can be equally as effective as large <span class="hlt">storms</span> at enhancing and depleting fluxes. Slight differences exist, as small <span class="hlt">storms</span> are 10% less likely to result in flux enhancement and 10% more likely to result inmore » flux depletion than large <span class="hlt">storms</span>. Nevertheless, it is clear that neither acceleration nor loss mechanisms scale with <span class="hlt">storm</span> drivers as would be expected. Small geomagnetic <span class="hlt">storms</span> play a significant role in radiation belt relativistic electron dynamics and provide opportunities to gain new insights into the complex balance of acceleration and loss processes.« less</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1263497','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1263497"><span>Acceleration and loss of relativistic electrons during small geomagnetic <span class="hlt">storms</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Anderson, B. R.; Millan, R. M.; Reeves, G. D.; Friedel, R. H. W.</p> <p>2015-12-02</p> <p>We report that past studies of radiation belt relativistic electrons have favored active <span class="hlt">storm</span> time periods, while the effects of small geomagnetic <span class="hlt">storms</span> (Dst >₋50 nT) have not been statistically characterized. In this timely study, given the current weak solar cycle, we identify 342 small <span class="hlt">storms</span> from 1989 through 2000 and quantify the corresponding change in relativistic electron flux at geosynchronous orbit. Surprisingly, small <span class="hlt">storms</span> can be equally as effective as large <span class="hlt">storms</span> at enhancing and depleting fluxes. Slight differences exist, as small <span class="hlt">storms</span> are 10% less likely to result in flux enhancement and 10% more likely to result in flux depletion than large <span class="hlt">storms</span>. Nevertheless, it is clear that neither acceleration nor loss mechanisms scale with <span class="hlt">storm</span> drivers as would be expected. Small geomagnetic <span class="hlt">storms</span> play a significant role in radiation belt relativistic electron dynamics and provide opportunities to gain new insights into the complex balance of acceleration and loss processes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JGRC..121.7898K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JGRC..121.7898K"><span>Winter ocean-<span class="hlt">ice</span> interactions under thin sea <span class="hlt">ice</span> observed by IAOOS platforms during N-<span class="hlt">ICE</span>2015: Salty surface mixed layer and active basal melt</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Koenig, Zoé; Provost, Christine; Villacieros-Robineau, Nicolas; Sennéchael, Nathalie; Meyer, Amelie</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>IAOOS (<span class="hlt">Ice</span> Atmosphere Arctic Ocean Observing System) platforms, measuring physical parameters at the atmosphere-snow-<span class="hlt">ice</span>-ocean interface deployed as part of the N-<span class="hlt">ICE</span>2015 campaign, provide new insights on winter conditions North of Svalbard. The three regions crossed during the drifts, the Nansen Basin, the Sofia Deep, and the Svalbard northern continental slope featured distinct hydrographic properties and <span class="hlt">ice</span>-ocean exchanges. In the Nansen Basin, the quiescent warm layer was capped by a stepped halocline (60 and 110 m) and a deep thermocline (110 m). <span class="hlt">Ice</span> was forming and the winter mixed layer salinity was larger by ˜0.1 g/kg than previously observed. Over the Svalbard continental slope, the Atlantic Water (AW) was very shallow (20 m from the surface) and extended offshore from the 500 m isobath by a distance of about 70 km, sank along the slope (40 m from the surface) and probably shed eddies into the Sofia Deep. In the Sofia Deep, relatively warm waters of Atlantic origin extended from 90 m downward. Resulting from different pathways, these waters had a wide range of hydrographic characteristics. Sea-<span class="hlt">ice</span> melt was widespread over the Svalbard continental slope and ocean-to-<span class="hlt">ice</span> heat fluxes reached values of 400 W m-2 (mean of ˜150 W m-2 over the continental slope). Sea-<span class="hlt">ice</span> melt events were associated with near 12 h fluctuations in the mixed-layer temperature and salinity corresponding to the periodicity of tides and near-inertial waves potentially generated by winter <span class="hlt">storms</span>, large barotropic tides over steep topography, and/or geostrophic adjustments.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_24 --> <div id="page_25" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="481"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007PhDT........29K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007PhDT........29K"><span>Arctic landfast sea <span class="hlt">ice</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Konig, Christof S.</p> <p></p> <p>Landfast <span class="hlt">ice</span> is sea <span class="hlt">ice</span> which forms and remains fixed along a coast, where it is attached either to the shore, or held between shoals or grounded icebergs. Landfast <span class="hlt">ice</span> fundamentally modifies the momentum exchange between atmosphere and ocean, as compared to pack <span class="hlt">ice</span>. It thus affects the heat and freshwater exchange between air and ocean and impacts on the location of ocean upwelling and downwelling zones. Further, the landfast <span class="hlt">ice</span> edge is essential for numerous Arctic mammals and Inupiat who depend on them for their subsistence. The current generation of sea <span class="hlt">ice</span> models is not capable of reproducing certain aspects of landfast <span class="hlt">ice</span> formation, maintenance, and disintegration even when the spatial resolution would be sufficient to resolve such features. In my work I develop a new <span class="hlt">ice</span> model that permits the existence of landfast sea <span class="hlt">ice</span> even in the presence of offshore winds, as is observed in mature. Based on viscous-plastic as well as elastic-viscous-plastic <span class="hlt">ice</span> dynamics I add tensile strength to the <span class="hlt">ice</span> rheology and re-derive the equations as well as numerical methods to solve them. Through numerical experiments on simplified domains, the effects of those changes are demonstrated. It is found that the modifications enable landfast <span class="hlt">ice</span> modeling, as desired. The elastic-viscous-plastic rheology leads to initial velocity fluctuations within the landfast <span class="hlt">ice</span> that weaken the <span class="hlt">ice</span> sheet and break it up much faster than theoretically predicted. Solving the viscous-plastic rheology using an implicit numerical method avoids those waves and comes much closer to theoretical predictions. Improvements in landfast <span class="hlt">ice</span> modeling can only verified in comparison to observed data. I have extracted landfast sea <span class="hlt">ice</span> data of several decades from several sources to create a landfast sea <span class="hlt">ice</span> climatology that can be used for that purpose. Statistical analysis of the data shows several factors that significantly influence landfast <span class="hlt">ice</span> distribution: distance from the coastline, ocean depth, as</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1997JApMe..36..302M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1997JApMe..36..302M"><span>Intense Convective <span class="hlt">Storms</span> with Little or No Lightning over Central Arizona: A Case of Inadvertent Weather Modification?.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Maddox, Robert A.; Howard, Kenneth W.; Dempsey, Charles L.</p> <p>1997-04-01</p> <p>On 20/21 August 1993, deep convective <span class="hlt">storms</span> occurred across much of Arizona, except for the southwestern quarter of the state. Several <span class="hlt">storms</span> were quite severe, producing downbursts and extensive wind <span class="hlt">damage</span> in the greater Phoenix area during the late afternoon and evening. The most severe convective <span class="hlt">storms</span> occurred from 0000 to 0230 UTC 21 August and were noteworthy in that, except for the first reported severe thunderstorm, there was almost no cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning observed during their life cycles. Other intense <span class="hlt">storms</span> on this day, particularly early <span class="hlt">storms</span> to the south of Phoenix and those occurring over mountainous terrain to the north and east of Phoenix, were prolific producers of CG lightning. Radar data for an 8-h period (2000 UTC 20 August-0400 UTC 21 August) indicated that 88 convective cells having maximum reflectivities greater than 55 dBZ and persisting longer than 25 min occurred within a 200-km range of Phoenix. Of these cells, 30 were identified as `low-lightning' <span class="hlt">storms</span>, that is, cells having three or fewer detected CG strikes during their entire radar-detected life cycle. The region within which the low-lightning <span class="hlt">storms</span> were occurring spread to the north and east during the analysis period.Examination of the reflectivity structure of the <span class="hlt">storms</span> using operational Doppler radar data from Phoenix, and of the supportive environment using upper-air sounding data taken at Luke Air Force Base just northwest of Phoenix, revealed no apparent physical reasons for the distinct difference in observed cloud-to-ground lightning character between the <span class="hlt">storms</span> in and to the west of the immediate Phoenix area versus those to the north, east, and south. However, the radar data do reveal that several extensive clouds of chaff initiated over flight-restricted military ranges to the southwest of Phoenix. The prevailing flow advected the chaff clouds to the north and east. Convective <span class="hlt">storms</span> that occurred in the area likely affected by the dispersing chaff</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9783070','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9783070"><span>[Magnetic <span class="hlt">storms</span> as a stress factor].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rapoport, S I; Boldypakova, T D; Malinovskaia, N K; Oraevskiĭ, V N; Meshcheriakova, S A; Breus, T K; Sosnovskiĭ, A M</p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>The functional characteristics variations during the magnetic <span class="hlt">storms</span> were observed in both the healthy humans and in patients with cardio-vascular diseases as well as in cosmonauts at SOYUZ spacecraft and MIR station. These characteristics revealed a nonspecific adaptive stress reaction, which should be accompanied by the variations in the stress-hormone production rate. The neurohumoral regulation of the organism functions during the geomagnetic <span class="hlt">storms</span> in a group of patients with cardio-vascular pathology and in a control group of healthy individuals were studied. The magnetic <span class="hlt">storm</span> effect characterised of both the sick and healthy examines was the violated ratio of glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids, namely increase of cortisone secretion (adrenal cortex hormone), as well as some tendency to the activation of sympathoadrenal system. Our investigations revealed also a suppressed production of melatonin (the pineal gland hormone) during the geomagnetic <span class="hlt">storm</span>. These results are not in contradictions with the functional characteristics violation by the magnetic <span class="hlt">storms</span> and correspond to the existence of adaptive stress reaction of the human organism to the geomagnetic field disturbances.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3063613','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3063613"><span>Electrical <span class="hlt">storm</span>: Incidence, Prognosis and Therapy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Proietti, Riccardo; Sagone, Antonio</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Implantable defibrillators are lifesavers and have improved mortality rates in patients at risk of sudden death, both in primary and secondary prevention. However, they are unable to modify the myocardial substrate, which remains susceptible to life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. Electrical <span class="hlt">storm</span> is a clinical entity characterized the recurrence of hemodynamically unstable ventricular tachycardia and/or ventricular fibrillation, twice or more in 24 hours, requiring electrical cardioversion or defibrillation. With the arrival of the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator, this definition was broadened, and electrical <span class="hlt">storm</span> is now defined as the occurrence of three or more distinct episodes of ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation in 24 hours, requiring the intervention of the defibrillator (anti-tachycardia pacing or shock). Clinical presentation can be very dramatic, with multiple defibrillator shocks and hemodynamic instability. Managing its acute presentation is a challenge, and mortality is high both in the acute phase and in the long term. In large clinical trials involving patients implanted with a defibrillator both for primary and secondary prevention, electrical <span class="hlt">storm</span> appears to be a harbinger of cardiac death, with notably high mortality soon after the event. In most cases, the <span class="hlt">storm</span> can be interrupted by medical therapy, though transcatheter radiofrequency ablation of ventricular arrhythmias may be an effective treatment for refractory cases. This narrative literature review outlines the main clinical characteristics of electrical <span class="hlt">storm</span> and emphasises critical points in approaching and managing this peculiar clinical entity. Finally focus is given to studies that consider transcatheter ablation therapy in cases refractory to medical treatment. PMID:21468247</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2803354','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2803354"><span>Emergency health impact of a severe <span class="hlt">storm</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Geehr, E C; Salluzzo, R; Bosco, S; Braaten, J; Wahl, T; Wallenkampf, V</p> <p>1989-11-01</p> <p>A severe, premature snow <span class="hlt">storm</span> resulted in widespread loss of power, communications, and transportation in a populous region of the Northeast. Staff in hospital emergency departments centered in the path of the <span class="hlt">storm</span> reported a large number of injuries and many unexpected health effects related to the <span class="hlt">storm</span>. A retrospective survey of the five major hospital emergency departments serving the most heavily affected urban and suburban areas was undertaken to determine the emergency health impact of the <span class="hlt">storm</span> and resulting operational problems. Expected findings included a decrease in emergency department visits the day of the <span class="hlt">storm</span>, followed by a sharp increase the day after. Clean-up activities accounted for a large number of the injuries, most of which were preventable. Unexpected findings include a large number of carbon monoxide poisonings and disposition and staffing problems created by caring for many patients who lost access to customary home health care services. Emergency department staff are encouraged to engage in public education efforts that may reduce serious illness or injury related to severe weather and its aftermath. Moreover, traditional disaster plans may need to be supplemented in anticipation of the disposition and staffing problems created by a growing population of elderly patients who will be cut off from vital home health care services by severe weather.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19860040512&hterms=Neyman&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3DNeyman','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19860040512&hterms=Neyman&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3DNeyman"><span>Spatial modelling of total <span class="hlt">storm</span> rainfall</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Rodriguez-Iturbe, I.; Cox, D. R.; Eagleson, P. S.</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>The spatial structure of the depth of rainfall from a stationary <span class="hlt">storm</span> event is investigated by using point process techniques. Cells are assumed to be stationary and to be distributed in space either independently according to a Poisson process, or with clustering according to a Neyman-Scott scheme. Total <span class="hlt">storm</span> rainfall at the centre of each cell is a random variable and rainfall is distributed around the centre in a way specified by a spread function that may incorporate random parameters. The mean, variance and covariance structure of the precipitation depth at a point are obtained for different spread functions. For exponentially distributed centre depth and a spread function having quadratically exponential decay, the total <span class="hlt">storm</span> depth at any point in the field is shown to have a gamma distribution. The probability of zero rainfall at a point is investigated, as is the stochastic variability of model parameters from <span class="hlt">storm</span> to <span class="hlt">storm</span>. Data from the Upper Rio Guaire basin in Venezuela are used in illustration.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20090034944&hterms=DST&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3DDST','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20090034944&hterms=DST&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3DDST"><span>Modeling of the 22 July 2009 <span class="hlt">Storm</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Fok, Mei-Ching; Buzulukova, Natalia</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The magnetic <span class="hlt">storm</span> on 22 July 2009 is the greatest <span class="hlt">storm</span> observed since the summer of 2008 when TWINS began its stereo imaging of the magnetosphere, On 22 July 2009, the Dst dropped to nearly -80 nT at 07:00 and 10:00 UT. During the main phase and at the peak of the <span class="hlt">storm</span>, TWINS 1 and 2 were near apogee and moving from pre-dawn to post-dawn local time. The energetic neutral atom (ENA) Imagers on the 2 spacecraft captured the <span class="hlt">storm</span> intensification and the formation of the partial ring current. The development of this <span class="hlt">storm</span> has been simulated using the Comprehensive Ring Current Model (CRCM) to understand and interpret the observed signatures. The CRCM reproduced the double-dip in the Dst index and the simulated ENA flux intensities agree very well with the TWINS images. However, the peak of ion flux predicted by the model is always eastward of the observed maximum by TWINS. This discrepancy posts a challenge to reexamine the physical models employed in the CRCM.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..17.7776D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..17.7776D"><span><span class="hlt">Ice</span> Formation and Growth in Orographically-Enhanced Mixed-Phase Clouds</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>David, Robert; Lowenthal, Douglas; Gannet Hallar, A.; McCubbin, Ian; Avallone, Linnea; Mace, Gerald; Wang, Zhien</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>The formation and evolution of <span class="hlt">ice</span> in mixed-phase clouds continues to be an active area of research due to the complex interactions between vapor, liquid and <span class="hlt">ice</span>. Orographically-enhanced clouds are commonly mixed-phase during winter. An airborne study, the Colorado Airborne Mixed-Phase Cloud Study (CAMPS), and a ground-based field campaign, the <span class="hlt">Storm</span> Peak Lab (SPL) Cloud Property Validation Experiment (<span class="hlt">Storm</span>VEx) were conducted in the Park Range of the Colorado Rockies. The CAMPS study utilized the University of Wyoming King Air (UWKA) to provide airborne cloud microphysical and meteorological data on 29 flights totaling 98 flight hours over the Park Range from December 15, 2010 to February 28, 2011. The UWKA was equipped with instruments that measured both cloud droplet and <span class="hlt">ice</span> crystal size distributions, liquid water content, total water content (vapor, liquid, and <span class="hlt">ice</span>), and 3-dimensional wind speed and direction. The Wyoming Cloud Radar and Lidar were also deployed during the campaign. These measurements are used to characterize cloud structure upwind and above the Park Range. <span class="hlt">Storm</span>VEx measured temperature, and cloud droplet and <span class="hlt">ice</span> crystal size distributions at SPL. The observations from SPL are used to determine mountain top cloud microphysical properties at elevations lower than the UWKA was able to sample in-situ. Comparisons showed that cloud microphysics aloft and at the surface were consistent with respect to snow growth processes. Small <span class="hlt">ice</span> crystal concentrations were routinely higher at the surface and a relationship between small <span class="hlt">ice</span> crystal concentrations, large cloud droplet concentrations and temperature was observed, suggesting liquid-dependent <span class="hlt">ice</span> nucleation near cloud base. Terrain flow effects on cloud microphysics and structure are considered.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFMOS11B1196L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFMOS11B1196L"><span>Parameters Optimization for Operational <span class="hlt">Storm</span> Surge/Tide Forecast Model using a Genetic Algorithm</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lee, W.; You, S.; Ryoo, S.; Global Environment System Research Laboratory</p> <p>2010-12-01</p> <p>Typhoons generated in northwestern Pacific Ocean annually affect the Korean Peninsula and <span class="hlt">storm</span> surges generated by strong low pressure and sea winds often cause serious <span class="hlt">damage</span> to property in the coastal region. To predict <span class="hlt">storm</span> surges, a lot of researches have been conducted by using numerical models for many years. Various parameters used for calculation of physics process are used in numerical models based on laws of physics, but they are not accurate values. Because those parameters affect to the model performance, these uncertain values can sensitively operate results of the model. Therefore, optimization of these parameters used in numerical model is essential for accurate <span class="hlt">storm</span> surge predictions. A genetic algorithm (GA) is recently used to estimate optimized values of these parameters. The GA is a stochastic exploration modeling natural phenomenon named genetic heritance and competition for survival. To realize breeding of species and selection, the groups which may be harmed are kept and use genetic operators such as inheritance, mutation, selection and crossover. In this study, we have improved operational <span class="hlt">storm</span> surge/tide forecast model(<span class="hlt">STORM</span>) of NIMR/KMA (National Institute of Meteorological Research/Korea Meteorological Administration) that covers 115E - 150E, 20N - 52N based on POM (Princeton Ocean Model) with 8km horizontal resolutions using the GA. Optimized values have been estimated about main 4 parameters which are bottom drag coefficient, background horizontal diffusivity coefficient, Smagoranski’s horizontal viscosity coefficient and sea level pressure scaling coefficient within <span class="hlt">STORM</span>. These optimized parameters were estimated on typhoon MAEMI in 2003 and 9 typhoons which have affected to Korea peninsula from 2005 to 2007. The 4 estimated parameters were also used to compare one-month predictions in February and August 2008. During the 48h forecast time, the mean and median model accuracies improved by 25 and 51%, respectively.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFMNH51C1910C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFMNH51C1910C"><span>Inverse modeling of <span class="hlt">storm</span> intensity based on grain-size analysis of hurricane-induced event beds</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Castagno, K. A.; Donnelly, J. P.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>As the coastal population continues to grow in size and wealth, increased hurricane frequency and intensity present a growing threat of property <span class="hlt">damage</span> and loss of life. Recent reconstructions of past intense-hurricane landfalls from sediment cores in southeastern New England identify a series of active intervals over the past 2,000 years, with the last few centuries among the most quiescent intervals. The frequency of intense-hurricane landfalls in southeastern New England is well constrained, but the intensity of these <span class="hlt">storms</span>, particularly prehistoric events, is not. This study analyzes the grain sizes of major <span class="hlt">storm</span> event beds along a transect of sediment cores in Salt Pond, Falmouth, MA. Several prehistoric events contain more coarse material than any of the deposits from the historical interval, suggesting that landfalling hurricanes in the northeastern United States may have been more intense than the historically encountered category 2 and 3 <span class="hlt">storms</span>. The intensity of major <span class="hlt">storm</span> events is estimated using grain-size analysis with a digital image processing, size, and shape analyzer. Since event deposits in Salt Pond result from a combination of coastal inundation and wave action, a large population of both historical and synthetic <span class="hlt">storms</span> is used to assess the <span class="hlt">storm</span> characteristics that could result in the wave heights inversely modeled from grain size trends. Intense-hurricane activity may be closely tied to warming in sea surface temperature. As such, the prehistoric intervals of increased frequency and intensity provide potential analogs for current and future hurricane risk in the northeastern United States.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/576768','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/576768"><span><span class="hlt">Storm</span> water modeling at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Veis, Christopher</p> <p>1996-05-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Storm</span> water modeling is important to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for compliance with regulations that govern water discharge at large industrial facilities. Modeling is also done to study trend in contaminants and <span class="hlt">storm</span> sewer infrastructure. The <span class="hlt">Storm</span> Water Management Model (SWMM) was used to simulate rainfall events at LLNL. SWMM is a comprehensive computer model for simulation of urban runoff quantity and quality in <span class="hlt">storm</span> and combined sewer systems. Due to time constraints and ongoing research, no modeling was completed at LLNL. With proper information about the <span class="hlt">storm</span> sewers, a SWMM simulation of a rainfall event on site would be beneficial to <span class="hlt">storm</span> sewer analyst.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.C42B..05M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.C42B..05M"><span><span class="hlt">Ice</span> flow of the Antarctica <span class="hlt">Ice</span> Sheet</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mouginot, J.; Scheuchl, B.; Rignot, E. J.</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Ice</span> velocity is fundamental characteristic of the dynamics of <span class="hlt">ice</span> sheets and is essential to know for calculating the mass budget of <span class="hlt">ice</span> sheet and for controlling <span class="hlt">ice</span> sheet numerical models with realistic boundary conditions. Until recently, data were mostly available on a discrete basis over small areas with variable precision. Here, we report on our results of processing <span class="hlt">ice</span> velocity from the interferometric synthetic-aperture radar data acquired by ALOS PALSAR in 2006 to 2010 by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), by ENVISAT ASAR in 2007 to 2009, by RADARSAT-2 in 2009 and 2011, by RADARSAT-1 in 1997 and 2000 and by ERS-1 & -2 in 1996 in the framework of the International Polar Year 2007-2009. The result is the most comprehensive and precise high-resolution digital map of <span class="hlt">ice</span> motion ever produced on the Antarctic continent. While important surprises are found along the coastline, it is in the interior that this map is revealing the most interesting features. The data reveal widespread, patterned, enhanced flow with tributary glaciers reaching hundreds to thousands of kilometers inland, over the entire continent. We show that the <span class="hlt">ice</span> motion along these flow features has a strong basal slip component. This has far reaching implications for the modeling of <span class="hlt">ice</span> sheet flow and evolution. In addition, our multi-year coverage of the coastal sectors reveal the beginning of an acceleration on Thwaites glacier and a wave of accelerated flow propagating inland rapidly on Pine Island Glacier between 2006 and 2010. This work was conducted at the Department of Earth System Science, University of California Irvine under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's MEaSUREs program.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFMAE11A..04M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFMAE11A..04M"><span>Simulating <span class="hlt">storm</span> electrification with bin and bulk microphysics</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mansell, E. R.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>Simulated <span class="hlt">storm</span> electrification can be highly dependent on the parameterizations of microphysical processes, particularly those involving <span class="hlt">ice</span> particles. Commonly-used bulk microphysics assume a functional form of the particle size distribution and predict one or more moments of the distribution, such as total mass, number concentration, and reflectivity. Bin schemes, on the other hand, allow the particle spectrum to evolve by predicting the number of particles in discrete size ranges (bins). Bin schemes are often promoted as benchmark solutions, but have much greater computational expense and can have other disadvantages. Only a few studies have compared results for bin and bulk schemes within the same model framework, which controls for differences in model numerics and other physics. Here, the bin microphysics scheme of Takahashi has been incorporated into the COMMAS model for comparison with the 2-3-moment bulk scheme. The resulting electrification, charge structure and lightning are compared, as well. Charge separation and transfer have been newly added to the bin scheme, along with some updates to the physics, such as improved <span class="hlt">ice</span> melting. Thus the same laboratory-based charging schemes from previous work can be used with both microphysics packages. The bulk and bin schemes generally have similar microphysical features in the simulations. Differences can result in part from differences the parameterizations of partical interactions (and particle types) as much as from the simple difference in size distributions. For example both the bin and bulk schemes are sensitive to the concentration of cloud condensation nuclei, as shown in recent work from the bulk scheme. Results will be presented for idealized 2-dimensional cases and for fully 3D simulations of a small multicell thunderstorms.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015DPS....4740005B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015DPS....4740005B"><span>The Evolution of Saturn’s <span class="hlt">Storm</span>-Perturbed Latitudinal Band Determined from Cassini/VIMS Daytime and Nighttime Spectra</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Baines, K. H.; Sromovsky, Larry A.; Fry, Patrick M.; Moimary, Thomas W.; Badman, Sarah; Brown, Robert H.; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Clark, Roger N.; Nicholson, Philip D.; Sotin, Christophe</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>Saturn’s Great <span class="hlt">Storm</span> of 2010-2011 was one of the most powerful convective events ever witnessed, as indicated, for example, by its ability to deliver spectrally-identifiable water <span class="hlt">ice</span> to the top of its convective tower ~200 km above the water vapor condensation level near 20 bar (Sromovsky, L. A., et al., Icarus 226, 402-418. 2013), and by its ability over ~ 6 months to encircle the planet with apparently anvil-like ammonia clouds sheared away from the top of its convective tower(s). Within a half-year after the <span class="hlt">storm</span> subsided in mid-2011, these globe-encircling anvil-like clouds appeared to have largely disappeared, replaced by a 5-micron-bright band encircling the planet over nearly the same latitude region the <span class="hlt">storm</span> generated clouds had been, indicating a dramatic decrease in the opacity of aerosols sensitive to 5-micron radiation (heat) emanating from the warm depths of the planet. Here we present quantitative results on the 5-year evolution of this <span class="hlt">storm</span>-affected, 5-micron-bright region, from its initial appearance associated with a large anti-cyclone that formed in the Spring of 2011 through May 26-27, 2015, using both daytime and nighttime Cassini/VIMS spectral maps. Compared to the “normal”, unperturbed regional cloud structure upstream of the <span class="hlt">storm</span> as observed on Feb 24, 2011, we find that the initial 5-micron-bright region on May 11, 2011 had lost ~60% of its upper-cloud (100-500 mbar) opacity (i. e., nominally, 2.7 opacity post-<span class="hlt">storm</span> at 2-microns vs 7.1 pre-<span class="hlt">storm</span>) and that the pressure of an opaque, putatively NH4SH, optically-thick “sheet” cloud dropped in altitude from a pre-<span class="hlt">storm</span> level of 2.9 bar to the 3.2-bar level post-<span class="hlt">storm</span>. Subsequently over the next 4 years, the upper-cloud region recovered half of its lost opacity, reaching ~5.6 on March 21, 2014 (and nearly recovered, to ~ 7 in our tentative May 26-27, 2015 data), corresponding to an e-folding time back to pre-<span class="hlt">storm</span> opacity of 2.7 years, but the lower cloud has dropped down to the 3</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=PIA11234&hterms=Phoenix&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3DPhoenix','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=PIA11234&hterms=Phoenix&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3DPhoenix"><span>Dust <span class="hlt">Storm</span> Moving Near Phoenix Lander</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p><p/> This series of images show the movement of several dust <span class="hlt">storms</span> near NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. These images were taken by the lander's Surface Stereo Imager (SSI) on the 137th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (Oct. 13, 2008). <p/> These images were taken about 50 seconds apart, showing the formation and movement of dust <span class="hlt">storms</span> for nearly an hour. Phoenix scientists are still figuring out the exact distances these dust <span class="hlt">storms</span> occurred from the lander, but they estimate them to be about 1 to 2 kilometers (.6 or 1.2 miles) away. <p/> The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23761850','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23761850"><span>Simple buffers for 3D <span class="hlt">STORM</span> microscopy.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Olivier, Nicolas; Keller, Debora; Rajan, Vinoth Sundar; Gönczy, Pierre; Manley, Suliana</p> <p>2013-06-01</p> <p>3D <span class="hlt">STORM</span> is one of the leading methods for super-resolution imaging, with resolution down to 10 nm in the lateral direction, and 30-50 nm in the axial direction. However, there is one important requirement to perform this type of imaging: making dye molecules blink. This usually relies on the utilization of complex buffers, containing different chemicals and sensitive enzymatic systems, limiting the reproducibility of the method. We report here that the commercial mounting medium Vectashield can be used for <span class="hlt">STORM</span> of Alexa-647, and yields images comparable or superior to those obtained with more complex buffers, especially for 3D imaging. We expect that this advance will promote the versatile utilization of 3D <span class="hlt">STORM</span> by removing one of its entry barriers, as well as provide a more reproducible way to compare optical setups and data processing algorithms.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003GeoRL..30.1269D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003GeoRL..30.1269D"><span>Possible deposit of soil dust from the 1930's U.S. dust bowl identified in Greenland <span class="hlt">ice</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Donarummo, J.; Ram, M.; Stoermer, E. F.</p> <p>2003-03-01</p> <p>We have identified a dust <span class="hlt">storm</span> deposit in the GISP2 <span class="hlt">ice</span> core that most likely originated from the Great Plains region of the United States during the 1930's `Dust Bowl' era. These results indicate that the Central U.S. can be a significant source of dust to the Greenland <span class="hlt">ice</span> sheet, especially when the source area is affected by intense drought conditions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=GL-2002-001130&hterms=brewing&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dbrewing','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=GL-2002-001130&hterms=brewing&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dbrewing"><span>HUBBLE TRACKS 'PERFECT <span class="hlt">STORM</span>' ON MARS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>Two dramatically different faces of our Red Planet neighbor appear in these comparison images showing how a global dust <span class="hlt">storm</span> engulfed Mars with the onset of Martian spring in the Southern Hemisphere. When NASA's Hubble Space Telescope imaged Mars in June, the seeds of the <span class="hlt">storm</span> were caught brewing in the giant Hellas Basin (oval at 4 o'clock position on disk) and in another <span class="hlt">storm</span> at the northern polar cap. When Hubble photographed Mars in early September, the <span class="hlt">storm</span> had already been raging across the planet for nearly two months obscuring all surface features. The fine airborne dust blocks a significant amount of sunlight from reaching the Martian surface. Because the airborne dust is absorbing this sunlight, it heats the upper atmosphere. Seasonal global Mars dust <span class="hlt">storms</span> have been observed from telescopes for over a century, but this is the biggest <span class="hlt">storm</span> ever seen in the past several decades. Mars looks gibbous in the right photograph because it is 26 million miles farther from Earth than in the left photo (though the pictures have been scaled to the same angular size), and our viewing angle has changed. The left picture was taken when Mars was near its closest approach to Earth for 2001 (an event called opposition); at that point the disk of Mars was fully illuminated as seen from Earth because Mars was exactly opposite the Sun. Both images are in natural color, taken with Hubble's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2. Credit: NASA, James Bell (Cornell Univ.), Michael Wolff (Space Science Inst.), and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18.7378O','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18.7378O"><span>Impact of Arctic sea <span class="hlt">ice</span> loss on large-scale atmospheric circulation based on fully-coupled sensitivity experiments</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Oudar, Thomas; Sanchez, Emilia; Terray, Laurent; Chauvin, Fabrice</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Arctic sea <span class="hlt">ice</span> decline in the recent decades has been reported in observational studies. Modeling studies have confirmed that this downward trend in Arctic sea <span class="hlt">ice</span> is mainly caused by increasing Greenhouse Gases (GHGs) concentrations into the atmosphere. The IPCC-AR5 report concluded that Arctic sea <span class="hlt">ice</span> will continue to decrease and is projected to disappear in the middle of the 21st century, yielding to a <span class="hlt">ice</span>-free region during boreal summer season. Arctic sea <span class="hlt">ice</span> loss is expected to strongly impact the climate system. Recently, the climate community has conducted a number of studies to evaluate and understand the Arctic sea <span class="hlt">ice</span> loss implications on climate. While some studies have shown that Arctic sea <span class="hlt">ice</span> decline can significantly affect the large-scale atmospheric dynamics at high and mid-latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere, by altering the <span class="hlt">storm</span>-tracks, the jet stream (position and strength) and the planetary waves, large uncertainties remain due to a low signal-to-noise ratio and experimental protocol differences leading to a large inter-model spread. In this work, we investigate the respective roles of Arctic sea <span class="hlt">ice</span> loss and GHGs increase on the atmospheric dynamics by means of an idealized experimental set-up that uses the coupled model CNRM-CM5. The experimental set-up, based on a flux correction technique, will allow separating the contributions of Arctic sea <span class="hlt">ice</span> loss from the GHGs increasing. We will focus mainly on the atmospheric circulation response in the Northern Hemisphere and on the associated synoptic variability, represented by the <span class="hlt">storm</span>-tracks. We show that Arctic sea <span class="hlt">ice</span> loss is responsible for an equatorward shift of the northern hemisphere jet, which is opposed to the GHGs effect. Finally we show that these shifts are consistent with the <span class="hlt">storm</span>-tracks response.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA601068','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA601068"><span>Sunlight, Sea <span class="hlt">Ice</span>, and the <span class="hlt">Ice</span> Albedo Feedback in a Changing Arctic Sea <span class="hlt">Ice</span> Cover</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-09-30</p> <p>1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Sunlight, Sea <span class="hlt">Ice</span>, and the <span class="hlt">Ice</span> Albedo Feedback in a...<span class="hlt">ice</span> age, and iv) onset dates of melt and freezeup. 4. Assess the magnitude of the contribution from <span class="hlt">ice</span>- albedo feedback to the observed decrease of...COVERED 00-00-2013 to 00-00-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sunlight, Sea <span class="hlt">Ice</span>, and the <span class="hlt">Ice</span> Albedo Feedback in a Changing Arctic Sea <span class="hlt">Ice</span> Cover 5a</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_25 --> <center> <div class="footer-extlink text-muted"><small>Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. 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