Science.gov

Sample records for icea genotypes status

  1. Helicobacter pylori isolated from Iranian drinking water: vacA, cagA, iceA, oipA and babA2 genotype status and antimicrobial resistance properties.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar, Reza; Khamesipour, Faham; Jonaidi-Jafari, Nematollah; Rahimi, Ebrahim

    2016-05-01

    Despite the clinical importance of Helicobacter pylori in human gastric disorders, its exact route of transmission is still uncertain. Based on the contentious hypothesis and findings of previous investigations, water may play an important role in the transmission of H. pylori to humans. This study was carried out to investigate the vacA, cagA, oipA, iceA and babA2 genotype status and antimicrobial resistance properties of H. pylori strains isolated from the drinking water samples of four major provinces in Iran. A total of 400 drinking water samples were cultured and tested. H. pylori-positive strains were analyzed for the presence of various genotypes and antimicrobial resistance. Twelve of 400 (3%) water samples were positive for H. pylori. Samples from Isfahan province had the highest, while those from Shiraz had the lowest prevalence of H. pylori. The seasonal distribution was also determined, with the highest prevalence of bacteria in the summer season (7.36%). H. pylori strains harbored the highest levels of resistance against ampicillin (100%), erythromycin (75%), clarithromycin (75%), and trimethoprim (58.3%). The most commonly detected genotypes were vacAs1a (83.3%), vacAm1a (66.6%), vacAs2 (50%) and cagA (50%). The presence of similar genotypes in the H. pylori strains of drinking water and those of human clinical samples suggest that contaminated water maybe the sources of bacteria. Spiramycin and furazolidone are suggested for the treatment of cases of H. pylori infection.

  2. Helicobacter pylori isolated from Iranian drinking water: vacA, cagA, iceA, oipA and babA2 genotype status and antimicrobial resistance properties.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar, Reza; Khamesipour, Faham; Jonaidi-Jafari, Nematollah; Rahimi, Ebrahim

    2016-05-01

    Despite the clinical importance of Helicobacter pylori in human gastric disorders, its exact route of transmission is still uncertain. Based on the contentious hypothesis and findings of previous investigations, water may play an important role in the transmission of H. pylori to humans. This study was carried out to investigate the vacA, cagA, oipA, iceA and babA2 genotype status and antimicrobial resistance properties of H. pylori strains isolated from the drinking water samples of four major provinces in Iran. A total of 400 drinking water samples were cultured and tested. H. pylori-positive strains were analyzed for the presence of various genotypes and antimicrobial resistance. Twelve of 400 (3%) water samples were positive for H. pylori. Samples from Isfahan province had the highest, while those from Shiraz had the lowest prevalence of H. pylori. The seasonal distribution was also determined, with the highest prevalence of bacteria in the summer season (7.36%). H. pylori strains harbored the highest levels of resistance against ampicillin (100%), erythromycin (75%), clarithromycin (75%), and trimethoprim (58.3%). The most commonly detected genotypes were vacAs1a (83.3%), vacAm1a (66.6%), vacAs2 (50%) and cagA (50%). The presence of similar genotypes in the H. pylori strains of drinking water and those of human clinical samples suggest that contaminated water maybe the sources of bacteria. Spiramycin and furazolidone are suggested for the treatment of cases of H. pylori infection. PMID:27419049

  3. Relationship between the iceA gene of Helicobacter pylori and clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaojun; Deng, Zhaomin; Zhang, Qiang; Li, Wanyi; Wang, Baoning; Li, Mingyuan

    2016-01-01

    Background The complex pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and the features of the host influence the diverse clinical outcomes. A mass of studies about virulence genes have accelerated the exploration of pathogenesis of H. pylori infection. Induced by contact with epithelium gene A (iceA) is one of the biggest concerned virulence genes. In this study, we explored the relationship between iceA and the magnitude of the risk for clinical outcomes and the prevalence of iceA-positive H. pylori in People’s Republic of China and other countries. Methods We searched the electronic databases of PubMed, Embase, CNKI, VIP, and Wanfang by literature search strategy. The studies conforming to the inclusion criteria were assessed. With these data, we systematically analyzed the relationship between the iceA gene of H. pylori and clinical outcomes. Results Nineteen articles with 22 studies, a total of 2,657 cases, were involved in the study. The iceA1 gene was significantly associated with peptic ulcer disease (odds ratio =1.28, 95% confidence interval =1.03–1.60; P=0.03), especially in People’s Republic of China (odds ratio =1.40, 95% confidence interval =1.07–1.83; P=0.01). Moreover, the prevalence of iceA1 was significantly higher than iceA2 in People’s Republic of China (P<0.0001). The prevalence of both iceA1 and iceA2 was significantly different (P<0.0001) in People’s Republic of China and in other countries. Conclusion The system analysis showed that infection with the iceA1-positive H. pylori significantly increased the overall risk for peptic ulcer disease, especially in People’s Republic of China. The iceA2 gene status and clinical outcome of H. pylori infection have no significant correlation. H. pylori iceA1 genotype is the major epidemic strain in People’s Republic of China. PMID:27462162

  4. cagA, vacA and iceA virulence genes of Helicobacter pylori isolates of children in Finland.

    PubMed

    Karhukorpi, J; Yan, Y; Kolho, K L; Rautelin, H; Lahti, M; Sirviö, A; Riipinen, K; Lindahl, H; Verkasalo, M; Fagerholm, R; Karttunen, R

    2000-10-01

    cagA, vacA s and m genotypes and iceA alleles were analyzed from Helicobacter pylori strains isolated from 17 Finnish children and 32 children of non-Finnish origin living in Finland. Twelve children in the latter group were eastern European and 15 were of African origin. Only three children of non-Finnish origin were born in Finland. The vacA sla subtype was more prevalent in the isolates from Finnish children than African children (76% vs. 7%, P<0.001); vacA s1b frequencies were 5% and 67%, respectively (P<0.001). The iceA1 allele was significantly more prevalent in African than Finnish isolates (93% vs. 35%, P< 0.01). Considerable variation was noted in the frequency of vacA s1 subtypes and iceA alleles in children originating from different geographic regions, but the geographic variation of s1 subtypes resembled that described in other reports.

  5. Helicobacter pylori: correlation of the virulence marker iceA allele with clinical outcome in a high prevalence area.

    PubMed

    Yakoob, J; Abbas, Z; Khan, R; Salim, S A; Abrar, A; Awan, S; Ahmad, Z

    2015-01-01

    The association of Helicobacter pylori virulence marker 'induced by contact with epithelium A' (iceA) allele types was determined in H. pylori-related diseases and virulence markers. Gastric biopsies were obtained at EGD from patients for culture, histopathology and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for iceA types, cagA and vacA alleles. Two hundred and eighty-four H. pylori isolates were examined. iceA type 1 was positive in 177 (62%) and iceA type 2 in 158 (56%). In iceA type 2, gastric ulcer was present in 34 (21%) (P < 0.001) and carcinoma in 28 (25%) (P = 0.002), compared to nine (8%) and 2 (2%) in iceA type 2-negative cases. For iceA type 2, 139 (88%) were associated with chronic active gastritis compared to 95 (75%) (P = 0.006) in iceA type 2-negative. H. pylori cagA was positive in 101 (64%) iceA type 2 strains compared to 57 (45%) in negative strains (P = 0.002). H. pylori iceA type 2 was dominant and associated with cagA, chronic active inflammation, gastric ulcer and carcinoma. PMID:26126322

  6. APOE genotype influences functional status among elderly without dementia

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, S.M.; Jacobs, D.M.; Stern, Y.

    1995-12-18

    The presence of apolipoprotein-{epsilon}4 (APOE-{epsilon}4) significantly increases the risk of Alzheimer`s disease (AD). The association between APOE-{epsilon}4 status and functional abilities was explored further in a multicultural sample of community-dwelling, nondemented elders. The sample was limited to cognitively-intact, community-dwelling elders, who were free of stroke or other neurologic disability. In 218 elders who met research criteria, the presence of APOE-{epsilon}4 was associated with poorer functional status, apart from the effects of neuropsychological performance, gender, age, and education (OR = 2.5, 95% CI: 1.3, 4.9). In 158 subjects without an APOE-{epsilon}4 allele, 50% reported no functional limitation; in the 60 subjects with an {epsilon}4 allele, only 28% reported no functional limitation (P < .01). The relationship was not explained by the distribution of co-morbidities. The association between poorer function and the presence of an APOE-{epsilon}4 allele was evident in each ethnic group. In path analyses, the presence of an APOE-{epsilon}4 allele was associated with decreased functional ability in non-demented elders not simply through an association with poorer cognitive status, but also independently. These results suggest that the APOE-{epsilon}4 genotype is associated with functional deficit in people with normal neuropsychological profiles. 29 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  7. Impact of Genotype on EPA and DHA Status and Responsiveness to Increased Intakes.

    PubMed

    Minihane, Anne Marie

    2016-03-01

    At a population level, cardioprotective and cognitive actions of the fish oil (FO) derived long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC n-3 PUFAs) eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) have been extensively demonstrated. In addition to dietary intake, which is limited for many individuals, EPA and DHA status is dependent on the efficiency of their biosynthesis from α-linolenic acid. Gender and common gene variants have been identified as influencing the rate-limiting desaturase and elongase enzymes. Response to a particular intake or status is also highly heterogeneous and likely influenced by genetic variants which impact on EPA and DHA metabolism and tissue partitioning, transcription factor activity, or physiological end-point regulation. Here, available literature relating genotype to tissue LC n-3 PUFA status and response to FO intervention is considered. It is concluded that the available evidence is relatively limited, with much of the variability unexplained, though APOE and FADS genotypes are emerging as being important. Although genotype × LC n-3 PUFA interactions have been described for a number of phenotypes, few have been confirmed in independent studies. A more comprehensive understanding of the genetic, physiological and behavioural modulators of EPA and DHA status and response to intervention is needed to allow refinement of current dietary LC n-3 PUFA recommendations and stratification of advice to "vulnerable" and responsive subgroups. PMID:26950146

  8. Impact of Genotype on EPA and DHA Status and Responsiveness to Increased Intakes

    PubMed Central

    Minihane, Anne Marie

    2016-01-01

    At a population level, cardioprotective and cognitive actions of the fish oil (FO) derived long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC n-3 PUFAs) eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) have been extensively demonstrated. In addition to dietary intake, which is limited for many individuals, EPA and DHA status is dependent on the efficiency of their biosynthesis from α-linolenic acid. Gender and common gene variants have been identified as influencing the rate-limiting desaturase and elongase enzymes. Response to a particular intake or status is also highly heterogeneous and likely influenced by genetic variants which impact on EPA and DHA metabolism and tissue partitioning, transcription factor activity, or physiological end-point regulation. Here, available literature relating genotype to tissue LC n-3 PUFA status and response to FO intervention is considered. It is concluded that the available evidence is relatively limited, with much of the variability unexplained, though APOE and FADS genotypes are emerging as being important. Although genotype × LC n-3 PUFA interactions have been described for a number of phenotypes, few have been confirmed in independent studies. A more comprehensive understanding of the genetic, physiological and behavioural modulators of EPA and DHA status and response to intervention is needed to allow refinement of current dietary LC n-3 PUFA recommendations and stratification of advice to “vulnerable” and responsive subgroups. PMID:26950146

  9. Helicobacter pylori genotyping in gastric adenocarcinoma and MALT lymphoma by multiplex PCR analyses of paraffin wax embedded tissues

    PubMed Central

    Koehler, C I; Mues, M B; Dienes, H P; Kriegsmann, J; Schirmacher, P; Odenthal, M

    2003-01-01

    Background: Gastric infection with Helicobacter pylori is the major cause of chronic active gastritis and is associated with the pathogenesis of peptic ulcer and gastric carcinoma. Gastric mucosal damage involves both host and H pylori dependent factors, such as the presence of the cag pathogenicity island and allelic variations of the vacA and iceA genes. Aims: To evaluate the association of these virulence factors with the development of gastric malignancies, a retrospective study was performed on archived tissue routinely obtained for diagnostic histopathology. Methods: DNA was extracted from formalin fixed, paraffin wax embedded gastric tissue sections of 93 patients with chronic active gastritis (n = 39), adenocarcinoma (n = 28), or mucosa associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma (n = 24). The extracted DNA was used to perform a polymerase chain reaction based, simultaneous analysis of the following: (1) cagA status, (2) allelic variation of the iceA genes (iceA1, iceA2), allelic variation of the signal peptide (s1a, s1b, s2) and the midregion (m1, m1a, m2) of the vacA gene. Results: The iceA1 gene showed a 3.6 fold and the vacA s1a variant a 4.2 fold higher prevalence in gastric adenocarcinoma than in gastritis. The combined presence of both the vacA s1a and iceA1 genes had a 5.6 fold higher frequency in adenocarcinoma. The vacA m2 allele was the predominant subtype in MALT lymphoma and the combination of the vacA m2 subtypes with the vacA s1 and the iceA1 variants occurred in MALT lymphoma nearly five times more often than in chronic active gastritis. Conclusions: Certain H pylori subtype combinations possess a differentiating and predictive value for the development of gastric adenocarcinoma and MALT lymphoma. PMID:12560462

  10. Hepatitis B virus in Pakistan: a systematic review of prevalence, risk factors, awareness status and genotypes.

    PubMed

    Ali, Muhammad; Idrees, Muhammad; Ali, Liaqat; Hussain, Abrar; Ur Rehman, Irshad; Saleem, Sana; Afzal, Samia; Butt, Sadia

    2011-01-01

    In Pakistan, there are estimated 7-9 million carriers of hepatitis B virus (HBV) with a carrier rate of 3-5%. This article reviews the available literature about the prevalence, risk factors, awareness status and genotypes of the HBV in Pakistan by using key words; HBV prevalence, risk factors, awareness status and genotypes in Pakistani population in PubMed, PakMediNet, Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) and Google Scholar. One hundred and six different studies published from 1998 to 2010 were included in this study. Weighted mean and standard deviation were determined for each population group. The percentage of hepatitis B virus infection in general population was 4.3318% ± 1.644%, healthy blood donors (3.93% ± 1.58%), military recruits (4.276% ± 1.646%), healthcare persons (3.25% ± 1.202%), pregnant women (5.872% ± 4.984), prisoners (5.75% ± 0.212%), surgical patients (7.397% ± 2.012%), patients with cirrhosis (28.87% ± 11.90%), patients with HCC (22% ± 2.645%), patients with hepatitis (15.896% ± 14.824%), patients with liver diseases (27.54% ± 6.385%), multiple transfused patients (6.223% ± 2.121%), opthalmic patients (3.89% ± 1.004%) and users of injectable drugs (14.95% ± 10.536%). Genotype D (63.71%) is the most prevalent genotype in Pakistani population. Mass vaccination and awareness programs should be initiated on urgent basis especially in populations with HBV infection rates of more than 5%. PMID:21375760

  11. Arsenate exposure affects amino acids, mineral nutrient status and antioxidants in rice (Oryza sativa L.) genotypes.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, S; Tripathi, R D; Tripathi, P; Kumar, A; Dave, R; Mishra, S; Singh, R; Sharma, D; Rai, U N; Chakrabarty, D; Trivedi, P K; Adhikari, B; Bag, M K; Dhankher, O P; Tuli, R

    2010-12-15

    Simulated pot experiments were conducted on four rice (Oryza sativa L.) genotypes (Triguna, IR-36, PNR-519, and IET-4786) to examine the effects of As(V) on amino acids and mineral nutrient status in grain along with antioxidant response to arsenic exposure. Rice genotypes responded differentially to As(V) exposure in terms of amino acids and antioxidant profiles. Total amino acid content in grains of all rice genotypes was positively correlated with arsenic accumulation. While, most of the essential amino acids increased in all cultivars except IR-36, glutamic acid and glycine increased in IET-4786 and PNR-519. The level of nonprotein thiols (NPTs) and the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD; EC 1.15.1.1), glutathione reductase (GR; EC 1.6.4.2) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX; EC 1.11.1.11) increased in all rice cultivars except IET-4786. A significant genotypic variation was also observed in specific arsenic uptake (SAU; mg kg(-1)dw), which was in the order of Triguna (134) > IR-36 (71) > PNR-519 (53) > IET-4786 (29). Further, application of As(V) at lower doses (4 and 8 mg L(-1) As) enhanced the accumulation of selenium (Se) and other nutrients (Fe, P, Zn, and S), however, higher dose (12 mg L(-1) As) limits the nutrient uptake in rice. In conclusion, low As accumulating genotype, IET-4786, which also had significantly induced level of essential amino acids, seems suitable for cultivation in moderately As contaminated soil and would be safe for human consumption. PMID:21077666

  12. The longitudinal and interactive effects of HIV status, stimulant use, and host genotype upon neurocognitive functioning.

    PubMed

    Levine, Andrew J; Reynolds, Sandra; Cox, Christopher; Miller, Eric N; Sinsheimer, Janet S; Becker, James T; Martin, Eileen; Sacktor, Ned

    2014-06-01

    Both human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection and illicit stimulant use can adversely impact neurocognitive functioning, and these effects can be additive. However, significant variability exists such that as-of-yet unidentified exogenous and endogenous factors affect one's risk for neurocognitive impairment. Literature on both HIV and stimulant use indicates that host genetic variants in immunologic and dopamine-related genes are one such factor. In this study, the individual and interactive effects of HIV status, stimulant use, and genotype upon neurocognitive functioning were examined longitudinally over a 10-year period. Nine hundred fifty-two Caucasian HIV+ and HIV- cases from the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study were included. All cases had at least two comprehensive neurocognitive evaluations between 1985 and 1995. Pre-highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) data were examined in order to avoid the confounding effect of variable drug regimens. Linear mixed models were used, with neurocognitive domain scores as the outcome variables. No four-way interactions were found, indicating that HIV and stimulant use do not interact over time to affect neurocognitive functioning as a function of genotype. Multiple three-way interactions were found that involved genotype and HIV status. All immunologically related genes found to interact with HIV status affected neurocognitive functioning in the expected direction; however, only C-C chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2) and CCL3 affected HIV+ individuals specifically. Dopamine-related genetic variants generally affected HIV-negative individuals only. Neurocognitive functioning among HIV+ individuals who also used stimulants was not significantly different from those who did not use stimulants. The findings support the role of immunologically related genetic differences in CCL2 and CCL3 in neurocognitive functioning among HIV+ individuals; however, their impact is minor. Being consistent with findings from another cohort

  13. Folate intake and the MTHFR C677T genotype influence choline status in young Mexican American women☆

    PubMed Central

    Abratte, Christian M.; Wang, Wei; Li, Rui; Moriarty, David J.; Caudill, Marie A.

    2009-01-01

    Numerous studies have reported a relationship between folate status, the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) 677C→T variant and disease risk. Although folate and choline metabolism are inter-related, only limited data are available on the relationship between choline and folate status in humans. This study sought to examine the influences of folate intake and the MTHFR 677C→T variant on choline status. Mexican-American women (n =43; 14 CC, 12 CT and 17 TT) consumed 135 μg/day as dietary folate equivalents (DFE) for 7 weeks followed by randomization to 400 or 800 μg DFE/day for 7 weeks. Throughout the study, total choline intake remained unchanged at ∼350 mg/day. Plasma concentrations of betaine, choline, glycerophosphocholine, phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin were measured via LC-MS/MS for Weeks 0, 7 and 14. Phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin declined ( P=.001, P=.009, respectively) in response to folate restriction and increased ( P=.08, P=.029, respectively) in response to folate treatment. The increase in phosphatidylcholine occurred in response to 800 ( P=.03) not 400 ( P=.85) μg DFE/day (week×folate interaction, P=.017). The response of phosphatidylcholine to folate intake appeared to be influenced by MTHFR C677T genotype. The decline in phosphatidylcholine during folate restriction occurred primarily in women with the CC or CT genotype and not in the TT genotype (week×genotype interaction, P=.089). Moreover, when examined independent of folate status, phosphatidylcholine was higher ( P <.05) in the TT genotype relative to the CT genotype. These data suggest that folate intake and the MTHFR C677T genotype influence choline status in humans. PMID:17588738

  14. Interactions between C-reactive protein genotypes with markers of nutritional status in relation to inflammation.

    PubMed

    Nienaber-Rousseau, Cornelie; Swanepoel, Bianca; Dolman, Robin C; Pieters, Marlien; Conradie, Karin R; Towers, G Wayne

    2014-11-11

    Inflammation, as indicated by C-reactive protein concentrations (CRP), is a risk factor for chronic diseases. Both genetic and environmental factors affect susceptibility to inflammation. As dietary interventions can influence inflammatory status, we hypothesized that dietary effects could be influenced by interactions with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CRP gene. We determined 12 CRP SNPs, as well as various nutrition status markers in 2010 black South Africans and analyzed their effect on CRP. Interactions were observed for several genotypes with obesity in determining CRP. Lipid intake modulated the pro-inflammatory effects of some SNPs, i.e., an increase in both saturated fatty acid and monounsaturated fatty acid intake in those homozygous for the polymorphic allele at rs2808630 was associated with a larger increase in CRP. Those harboring the minor alleles at rs3093058 and rs3093062 presented with significantly higher CRP in the presence of increased triglyceride or cholesterol intake. When harboring the minor allele of these SNPs, a high omega-6 to -3 ratio was, however, found to be anti-inflammatory. Carbohydrate intake also modulated CRP SNPs, as HbA1C and fasting glucose levels interacted with some SNPs to influence the CRP. This investigation highlights the impact that nutritional status can have on reducing the inherent genetic susceptibility to a heightened systemic inflammatory state.

  15. Interactions between C-Reactive Protein Genotypes with Markers of Nutritional Status in Relation to Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Nienaber-Rousseau, Cornelie; Swanepoel, Bianca; Dolman, Robin C.; Pieters, Marlien; Conradie, Karin R.; Towers, G. Wayne

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation, as indicated by C-reactive protein concentrations (CRP), is a risk factor for chronic diseases. Both genetic and environmental factors affect susceptibility to inflammation. As dietary interventions can influence inflammatory status, we hypothesized that dietary effects could be influenced by interactions with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CRP gene. We determined 12 CRP SNPs, as well as various nutrition status markers in 2010 black South Africans and analyzed their effect on CRP. Interactions were observed for several genotypes with obesity in determining CRP. Lipid intake modulated the pro-inflammatory effects of some SNPs, i.e., an increase in both saturated fatty acid and monounsaturated fatty acid intake in those homozygous for the polymorphic allele at rs2808630 was associated with a larger increase in CRP. Those harboring the minor alleles at rs3093058 and rs3093062 presented with significantly higher CRP in the presence of increased triglyceride or cholesterol intake. When harboring the minor allele of these SNPs, a high omega-6 to -3 ratio was, however, found to be anti-inflammatory. Carbohydrate intake also modulated CRP SNPs, as HbA1C and fasting glucose levels interacted with some SNPs to influence the CRP. This investigation highlights the impact that nutritional status can have on reducing the inherent genetic susceptibility to a heightened systemic inflammatory state. PMID:25393688

  16. Interactions between C-reactive protein genotypes with markers of nutritional status in relation to inflammation.

    PubMed

    Nienaber-Rousseau, Cornelie; Swanepoel, Bianca; Dolman, Robin C; Pieters, Marlien; Conradie, Karin R; Towers, G Wayne

    2014-11-01

    Inflammation, as indicated by C-reactive protein concentrations (CRP), is a risk factor for chronic diseases. Both genetic and environmental factors affect susceptibility to inflammation. As dietary interventions can influence inflammatory status, we hypothesized that dietary effects could be influenced by interactions with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CRP gene. We determined 12 CRP SNPs, as well as various nutrition status markers in 2010 black South Africans and analyzed their effect on CRP. Interactions were observed for several genotypes with obesity in determining CRP. Lipid intake modulated the pro-inflammatory effects of some SNPs, i.e., an increase in both saturated fatty acid and monounsaturated fatty acid intake in those homozygous for the polymorphic allele at rs2808630 was associated with a larger increase in CRP. Those harboring the minor alleles at rs3093058 and rs3093062 presented with significantly higher CRP in the presence of increased triglyceride or cholesterol intake. When harboring the minor allele of these SNPs, a high omega-6 to -3 ratio was, however, found to be anti-inflammatory. Carbohydrate intake also modulated CRP SNPs, as HbA1C and fasting glucose levels interacted with some SNPs to influence the CRP. This investigation highlights the impact that nutritional status can have on reducing the inherent genetic susceptibility to a heightened systemic inflammatory state. PMID:25393688

  17. Riboflavin status, MTHFR genotype and blood pressure: current evidence and implications for personalised nutrition.

    PubMed

    McAuley, E; McNulty, H; Hughes, C; Strain, J J; Ward, M

    2016-08-01

    Clinical deficiency of the B-vitamin riboflavin (vitamin B2) is largely confined to developing countries; however accumulating evidence indicates that suboptimal riboflavin status is a widespread problem across the developed world. Few international data are available on riboflavin status as measured by the functional biomarker, erythrocyte glutathione reductase activation coefficient, considered to be the gold standard index. One important role of riboflavin in the form of flavin dinucleotide is as a co-factor for the folate-metabolising enzyme methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR). Homozygosity for the common C677T polymorphism in MTHFR, affecting over 10 % of the UK and Irish populations and up to 32 % of other populations worldwide, has been associated with an increased risk of CVD, and more recently with hypertension. This review will explore available studies reporting riboflavin status worldwide, the interaction of riboflavin with the MTHFR C677T polymorphism and the potential role of riboflavin in personalised nutrition. Evidence is accumulating for a novel role of riboflavin as an important modulator of blood pressure (BP) specifically in individuals with the MTHFR 677TT genotype, with results from a number of recent randomised controlled trials demonstrating that riboflavin supplementation can significantly reduce systolic BP by 5-13 mmHg in these genetically at risk adults. Studies are however required to investigate the BP-lowering effect of riboflavin in different populations and in response to doses higher than 1·6 mg/d. Furthermore, work focusing on the translation of this research to health professionals and patients is also required.

  18. Riboflavin status, MTHFR genotype and blood pressure: current evidence and implications for personalised nutrition.

    PubMed

    McAuley, E; McNulty, H; Hughes, C; Strain, J J; Ward, M

    2016-08-01

    Clinical deficiency of the B-vitamin riboflavin (vitamin B2) is largely confined to developing countries; however accumulating evidence indicates that suboptimal riboflavin status is a widespread problem across the developed world. Few international data are available on riboflavin status as measured by the functional biomarker, erythrocyte glutathione reductase activation coefficient, considered to be the gold standard index. One important role of riboflavin in the form of flavin dinucleotide is as a co-factor for the folate-metabolising enzyme methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR). Homozygosity for the common C677T polymorphism in MTHFR, affecting over 10 % of the UK and Irish populations and up to 32 % of other populations worldwide, has been associated with an increased risk of CVD, and more recently with hypertension. This review will explore available studies reporting riboflavin status worldwide, the interaction of riboflavin with the MTHFR C677T polymorphism and the potential role of riboflavin in personalised nutrition. Evidence is accumulating for a novel role of riboflavin as an important modulator of blood pressure (BP) specifically in individuals with the MTHFR 677TT genotype, with results from a number of recent randomised controlled trials demonstrating that riboflavin supplementation can significantly reduce systolic BP by 5-13 mmHg in these genetically at risk adults. Studies are however required to investigate the BP-lowering effect of riboflavin in different populations and in response to doses higher than 1·6 mg/d. Furthermore, work focusing on the translation of this research to health professionals and patients is also required. PMID:27170501

  19. Primate genotyping via high resolution melt analysis: rapid and reliable identification of color vision status in wild lemurs.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Rachel L; Spriggs, Amanda N; MacFie, Tammie S; Baden, Andrea L; Irwin, Mitchell T; Wright, Patricia C; Louis, Edward E; Lawler, Richard R; Mundy, Nicholas I; Bradley, Brenda J

    2016-10-01

    Analyses of genetic polymorphisms can aid our understanding of intra- and interspecific variation in primate sociality, ecology, and behavior. Studies of primate opsin genes are prime examples of this, as single nucleotide variants (SNVs) in the X-linked opsin gene underlie variation in color vision. For primate species with polymorphic trichromacy, genotyping opsin SNVs can generally indicate whether individual primates are red-green color-blind (denoted homozygous M or homozygous L) or have full trichromatic color vision (heterozygous ML). Given the potential influence of color vision on behavior and fitness, characterizing the color vision status of study subjects is becoming commonplace for many primate field projects. Such studies traditionally involve a multi-step sequencing-based method that can be costly and time-consuming. Here we present a new reliable, rapid, and relatively inexpensive method for characterizing color vision in primate populations using high resolution melt analysis (HRMA). Using lemurs as a case study, we characterized variation at exons 3 and/or 5 of the X-linked opsin gene for 87 individuals representing nine species. We scored opsin genotypes and color vision status using both traditional sequencing-based methods as well as our novel melting-curve based HRMA protocol. For each species, the melting curves of varying genotypes (homozygous M, homozygous L, heterozygous ML) differed in melting temperature and/or shape. Melting curves for each sample were consistent across replicates, and genotype-specific melting curves were consistent across DNA sources (blood vs. feces). We show that opsin genotypes can be quickly and reliably scored using HRMA once lab-specific reference curves have been developed based on known genotypes. Although the protocol presented here focuses on genotyping lemur opsin loci, we also consider the larger potential for applying this approach to various types of genetic studies of primate populations. PMID:27271303

  20. Primate genotyping via high resolution melt analysis: rapid and reliable identification of color vision status in wild lemurs.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Rachel L; Spriggs, Amanda N; MacFie, Tammie S; Baden, Andrea L; Irwin, Mitchell T; Wright, Patricia C; Louis, Edward E; Lawler, Richard R; Mundy, Nicholas I; Bradley, Brenda J

    2016-10-01

    Analyses of genetic polymorphisms can aid our understanding of intra- and interspecific variation in primate sociality, ecology, and behavior. Studies of primate opsin genes are prime examples of this, as single nucleotide variants (SNVs) in the X-linked opsin gene underlie variation in color vision. For primate species with polymorphic trichromacy, genotyping opsin SNVs can generally indicate whether individual primates are red-green color-blind (denoted homozygous M or homozygous L) or have full trichromatic color vision (heterozygous ML). Given the potential influence of color vision on behavior and fitness, characterizing the color vision status of study subjects is becoming commonplace for many primate field projects. Such studies traditionally involve a multi-step sequencing-based method that can be costly and time-consuming. Here we present a new reliable, rapid, and relatively inexpensive method for characterizing color vision in primate populations using high resolution melt analysis (HRMA). Using lemurs as a case study, we characterized variation at exons 3 and/or 5 of the X-linked opsin gene for 87 individuals representing nine species. We scored opsin genotypes and color vision status using both traditional sequencing-based methods as well as our novel melting-curve based HRMA protocol. For each species, the melting curves of varying genotypes (homozygous M, homozygous L, heterozygous ML) differed in melting temperature and/or shape. Melting curves for each sample were consistent across replicates, and genotype-specific melting curves were consistent across DNA sources (blood vs. feces). We show that opsin genotypes can be quickly and reliably scored using HRMA once lab-specific reference curves have been developed based on known genotypes. Although the protocol presented here focuses on genotyping lemur opsin loci, we also consider the larger potential for applying this approach to various types of genetic studies of primate populations.

  1. vacA Genotype Status of Helicobacter pylori Isolated from Foods with Animal Origin.

    PubMed

    Saeidi, Elnaz; Sheikhshahrokh, Amirhossein

    2016-01-01

    According to controversial theories and results of studies, foods with animal origins play an important role in the transmission of H. pylori to human. The aim of this study was to determine the distribution of vacA genotypes of H. pylori, isolated from milk and meat samples of cow, sheep, goat, camel, and buffalo. Eight hundred and twenty raw milk and meat samples were collected from various parts of Iran. Samples were cultured and those found positive for H. pylori were analyzed for the presence of various genotypes of vacA gene. Out of 420 milk and 400 meat samples, 92 (21.90%) and 105 (26.25%) were positive for H. pylori, respectively. The most commonly detected genotypes in the vacA gene were s1a (86.80%), m1a (79.18%), s1b (69.54%), and m1b (63.45%) and detected combined genotypes were mostly m1as1a (68.52%), m1as1b (60.40%), m1bs1b (55.83%), and m1bs1a (53.29%). High presence of bacteria in the milk and meat samples of sheep represents that sheep may be the natural host of H. pylori. High presence of H. pylori strains in milk and meat samples similar to vacA genotypes in human being suggests that milk and meat samples could be the sources of bacteria for human. PMID:27088092

  2. Estrogen Receptor Genotypes, Menopausal Status, and the Lipid Effects of Tamoxifen

    PubMed Central

    Ntukidem, NI; Nguyen, AT; Stearns, V; Rehman, M; Schott, A; Skaar, T; Jin, Y; Blanche, P; Li, L; Lemler, S; Hayden, J; Krauss, RM; Desta, Z; Flockhart, DA

    2009-01-01

    Tamoxifen induces important changes in serum lipid profiles in some women; however, little information is available to predict which women will experience improved lipid profiles during tamoxifen therapy. As part of a multicenter prospective observational trial in 176 breast cancer patients, we tested the hypothesis that tamoxifen-induced lipid changes were associated with genetic variants in candidate target genes (CYP2D6, ESR1, and ESR2). Tamoxifen lowered low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (P<0.0001) by 23.5mg/dl (13.5–33.5mg/dl) and increased triglycerides (P=0.006). In postmenopausal women, the ESR1-XbaI and ESR2-02 genotypes were associated with tamoxifen-induced changes in total cholesterol (P=0.03; GG vs GA/AA) and triglycerides (P=0.01; gene–dose effect), respectively. In premenopausal women, the ESR1-XbaI genotypes were associated with tamoxifen-induced changes in triglycerides (P=0.002; gene–dose effect) and high-density lipoprotein (P=0.004; gene–dose effect). Our results suggest that estrogen receptor genotyping may be useful in predicting which women would benefit more from tamoxifen. PMID:17713466

  3. Foreign-Born Status and Geographic Patterns of Tuberculosis Genotypes in Tarrant County, Texas

    PubMed Central

    Oppong, Joseph R.; Denton, Curtis J.; Moonan, Patrick K.; Weis, Stephen E.

    2015-01-01

    Regardless of destination, immigrants arrive with health profiles typical of people in their previous surroundings. Thus, immigrants change the epidemiological profile of destination communities, and immigrant neighborhoods may represent islands of infectious disease. Genotyping has emerged as a useful surveillance tool to track the spread of disease at the molecular level. Yet the spatial distribution of infectious disease at the molecular level associated with migration and immigrant neighborhoods has received little attention. Using molecular genotyping to characterize M. tuberculosis isolated from tuberculosis cases, this article analyzes spatial variations of unique molecular M. tuberculosis strains by zip code in Tarrant County, Texas. The results suggest that immigrant neighborhoods have higher rates of unique isolates of tuberculosis (suggestive of remote transmission) compared to neighborhoods occupied by the native-born. Neighborhoods dominated by the native-born have higher rates of clustered isolates (suggestive of recent transmission). Therefore, in addition to being culturally distinct, immigrant neighborhoods may also be pathogenically distinct from surrounding neighborhoods. PMID:26504253

  4. Assignment of polled status using single nucleotide polymorphism genotypes and predicted gene content

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is growing interest in cattle that are naturally polled, but the polled allele has a very low frequency. The best way to increase its frequency is by index selection, which requires known polled status for all animals. Laboratory tests for polled are used as data, and US and Canadian bulls wit...

  5. Genotype, B-vitamin status, and androgens affect spaceflight-induced ophthalmic changes.

    PubMed

    Zwart, Sara R; Gregory, Jesse F; Zeisel, Steven H; Gibson, Charles R; Mader, Thomas H; Kinchen, Jason M; Ueland, Per M; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Heer, Martina A; Smith, Scott M

    2016-01-01

    Ophthalmic changes have occurred in a subset of astronauts on International Space Station missions. Visual deterioration is considered the greatest human health risk of spaceflight. Affected astronauts exhibit higher concentrations of 1-carbon metabolites (e.g., homocysteine) before flight. We hypothesized that genetic variations in 1-carbon metabolism genes contribute to susceptibility to ophthalmic changes in astronauts. We investigated 5 polymorphisms in the methionine synthase reductase (MTRR), methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT), and cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) genes and their association with ophthalmic changes after flight in 49 astronauts. The number of G alleles of MTRR 66 and C alleles of SHMT1 1420 both contributed to the odds of visual disturbances. Preflight dehydroepiandrosterone was positively associated with cotton wool spots, and serum testosterone response during flight was associated with refractive change. Block regression showed that B-vitamin status and genetics were significant predictors of many of the ophthalmic outcomes that we observed. In one example, genetics trended toward improving (P = 0.10) and B-vitamin status significantly improved (P < 0.001) the predictive model for refractive change after flight. We document an association between MTRR 66 and SHMT1 1420 polymorphisms and spaceflight-induced vision changes. This line of research could lead to therapeutic options for both space travelers and terrestrial patients. PMID:26316272

  6. Study of Helicobacter pylori genotype status in cows, sheep, goats and human beings

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori is one of the most controversial bacteria in the world causing diverse gastrointestinal diseases. The transmission way of this bacterium still remains unknown. The possibility of zoonotic transmission of H. pylori has been suggested, but is not proven in nonprimate reservoirs. In the current survey, we investigate the presence of H. pylori in cow, sheep and goat stomach, determine the bacterium virulence factors and finally compare the human H. pylori virulence factors and animals in order to examine whether H. pylori might be transmitted from these animals to human beings. Methods This cross- sectional study was performed on 800 gastric biopsy specimens of cows, sheep, goats and human beings. The PCR assays was performed to detection of H. pylori, vacA and cagA genes. The PCR products of Ruminant’s samples with positive H. pylori were subjected to DNA sequencing analysis. Statistical tests were applied for data analysis. Results Overall 6 (3%) cows, 32 (16%) sheep and 164 (82%) human beings specimens were confirmed to be H. pylori positive; however we were not able to detect this bacterium in all 200 goat samples. The vacA s1a/m1a was the predominant H. pylori genotype in all three kinds of studied population. There was 3.4–8.4% variability and 92.9-98.5% homology between sheep and human samples. Conclusions Considering the high sequence homology among DNA of H. pylori isolated from sheep and human, our data suggest that sheep may act as a reservoir for H. pylori and in the some extent share the ancestral host for the bacteria with human. PMID:24708464

  7. Additional food folate derived exclusively from natural sources improves folate status in young women with the MTHFR 677 CC or TT genotype.

    PubMed

    Hung, Jean; Yang, Tai Li; Urrutia, Tania F; Li, Rui; Perry, Cydne A; Hata, Hiroko; Cogger, Edward A; Moriarty, David J; Caudill, Marie A

    2006-11-01

    The effectiveness of additional food folate in improving folate status in humans is uncertain particularly in people with the common genetic variant (677 C-->T) in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene. To examine the effect of a doubling of food folate consumption on folate status response variables, women (n=32; 18-46 years) with the MTHFR 677 CC or TT genotype consumed either 400 (n=15; 7 CC and 8 TT) or 800 (n=17; 8 CC and 9 TT) microg/day of dietary folate equivalents (DFE) derived exclusively from naturally occurring food folate for 12 weeks. A repeated measures two-factor ANOVA was used to examine the effect of the dietary treatment, the MTHFR C677T genotype and their interactions on serum folate, RBC folate and plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) during the last 3 weeks of the study. Consumption of 800 microg DFE/day resulted in serum folate concentrations that were 67% (P=.005) higher than consumption of 400 microg DFE/day (18.6+/-2.9 vs. 31.0+/-2.7 nmol/L, respectively) and RBC folate concentrations that were 33% (P=.001) higher (1172+/-75 vs. 1559+/-70 nmol/L, respectively). Serum folate (P=.065) and RBC folate (P=.022) concentrations were lower and plasma tHcy was higher (P=.039) in women with the MTHFR 677 TT genotype relative to the CC genotype. However, no genotype by dietary treatment interaction was detected. These data suggest that a doubling of food folate intake will lead to marked improvements in folate status in women with the MTHFR 677 CC or TT genotype.

  8. ACTN3 Genotype, Athletic Status, and Life Course Physical Capability: Meta-Analysis of the Published Literature and Findings from Nine Studies

    PubMed Central

    Alfred, Tamuno; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Cooper, Rachel; Hardy, Rebecca; Cooper, Cyrus; Deary, Ian J; Gunnell, David; Harris, Sarah E; Kumari, Meena; Martin, Richard M; Moran, Colin N; Pitsiladis, Yannis P; Ring, Susan M; Sayer, Avan Aihie; Smith, George Davey; Starr, John M; Kuh, Diana; Day, Ian NM

    2011-01-01

    The ACTN3 R577X (rs1815739) genotype has been associated with athletic status and muscle phenotypes, although not consistently. Our objective was to conduct a meta-analysis of the published literature on athletic status and investigate its associations with physical capability in several new population-based studies. Relevant data were extracted from studies in the literature, comparing genotype frequencies between controls and sprint/power and endurance athletes. For life course physical capability, data were used from two studies of adolescents and seven studies in the Healthy Ageing across the Life Course (HALCyon) collaborative research program, involving individuals aged between 53 and 90+ years. We found evidence from the published literature to support the hypothesis that in Europeans the RR genotype is more common among sprint/power athletes compared with their controls. There is currently no evidence that the X allele is advantageous to endurance athleticism. We found no association between R577X and grip strength (P = 0.09, n = 7,672 in males; P = 0.90, n = 7,839 in females), standing balance, timed get up and go, or chair rises in our studies of physical capability. The ACTN3 R577X genotype is associated with sprint/power athletic status in Europeans, but does not appear to be associated with objective measures of physical capability in the general population. Hum Mutat 32:1–11, 2011. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:21542061

  9. Anal Human Papillomavirus Genotype Distribution in HIV-Infected Men Who Have Sex with Men by Geographical Origin, Age, and Cytological Status in a Spanish Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Montserrat; González, Cristina; del Romero, Jorge; Viciana, Pompeyo; Ocampo, Antonio; Rodríguez-Fortúnez, Patricia; Masiá, Mar; Blanco, José Ramón; Portilla, Joaquín; Rodríguez, Carmen; Hernández-Novoa, Beatriz; del Amo, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of human papillomavirus (HPV) type distribution in populations at risk for anal cancer is needed. Here, we describe the anal HPV genotype distribution in a large Spanish cohort (Cohort of the Spanish HIV Research Network HPV [CoRIS-HPV]) of HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) according to geographical origin, age, and cytological status. A cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from 1,439 HIV-infected MSM (2007 to 2012) was performed. Anal HPV genotyping was performed using the Linear Array HPV genotyping test. Descriptive analyses of subject characteristics, prevalences, and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were performed. The global prevalences of HPV, high-risk HPV (HR-HPV), and low-risk HPV (LR-HPV) types were 95.8%, 83.0%, and 72.7%, respectively. Among the HR-HPV types, HPV16 was the most common, followed by HPV59, -39, -51, -18, and -52. The prevalence of multiple HR-HPV infections was 58.5%. There were no differences in the crude analyses between Spanish and Latin-American MSM for most HPV types, and a peak in prevalence for most HPV types was seen in patients in their late thirties. Globally and by specific HPV groups, men with abnormal anal cytologies had a higher prevalence of infection than those with normal cytologies. This study has the largest number of HIV-positive MSM with HPV genotype data analyzed according to cytological status as far as we know. The information gained from this study can help with the design of anal cancer prevention strategies in HIV-positive patients. PMID:23966501

  10. Anal human papillomavirus genotype distribution in HIV-infected men who have sex with men by geographical origin, age, and cytological status in a Spanish cohort.

    PubMed

    Torres, Montserrat; González, Cristina; del Romero, Jorge; Viciana, Pompeyo; Ocampo, Antonio; Rodríguez-Fortúnez, Patricia; Masiá, Mar; Blanco, José Ramón; Portilla, Joaquín; Rodríguez, Carmen; Hernández-Novoa, Beatriz; del Amo, Julia; Ortiz, Marta

    2013-11-01

    Knowledge of human papillomavirus (HPV) type distribution in populations at risk for anal cancer is needed. Here, we describe the anal HPV genotype distribution in a large Spanish cohort (Cohort of the Spanish HIV Research Network HPV [CoRIS-HPV]) of HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) according to geographical origin, age, and cytological status. A cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from 1,439 HIV-infected MSM (2007 to 2012) was performed. Anal HPV genotyping was performed using the Linear Array HPV genotyping test. Descriptive analyses of subject characteristics, prevalences, and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were performed. The global prevalences of HPV, high-risk HPV (HR-HPV), and low-risk HPV (LR-HPV) types were 95.8%, 83.0%, and 72.7%, respectively. Among the HR-HPV types, HPV16 was the most common, followed by HPV59, -39, -51, -18, and -52. The prevalence of multiple HR-HPV infections was 58.5%. There were no differences in the crude analyses between Spanish and Latin-American MSM for most HPV types, and a peak in prevalence for most HPV types was seen in patients in their late thirties. Globally and by specific HPV groups, men with abnormal anal cytologies had a higher prevalence of infection than those with normal cytologies. This study has the largest number of HIV-positive MSM with HPV genotype data analyzed according to cytological status as far as we know. The information gained from this study can help with the design of anal cancer prevention strategies in HIV-positive patients.

  11. Vitamin D Status and VDR Genotype in NF1 Patients: A Case-Control Study from Southern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Souza Mario Bueno, Larissa; Rosset, Clévia; Aguiar, Ernestina; Pereira, Fernando de Souza; Izetti Ribeiro, Patrícia; Scalco, Rosana; Matzenbacher Bittar, Camila; Brinckmann Oliveira Netto, Cristina; Gischkow Rucatti, Guilherme; Chies, José Artur; Camey, Suzi Alves; Ashton-Prolla, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) patients are more likely to have vitamin D deficiency when compared to the general population. This study aimed to determine the levels of 25-OH-vitamin D [25(OH)D] in individuals with NF1 and disease-unaffected controls and analyze FokI and BsmI VDR gene polymorphisms in a case and in a control group. Vitamin D levels were compared between a group of 45 NF1 patients from Southern Brazil and 45 healthy controls matched by sex, skin type, and age. Genotypic and allelic frequencies of VDR gene polymorphisms were obtained from the same NF1 patients and 150 healthy controls. 25(OH)D deficiency or insufficiency was not more frequent in NF1 patients than in controls (p = 0.074). We also did not observe an association between FokI and BsmI VDR gene polymorphisms and vitamin D levels in NF1 patients, suggesting that their deficient or insufficient biochemical phenotypes are not associated with these genetic variants. The differences between the groups in genotypic and allelic frequencies for FokI and BsmI VDR gene polymorphisms were small and did not reach statistical significance. These polymorphisms are in partial linkage disequilibrium and the haplotype frequencies also did not differ in a significant way between the two groups (p = 0.613). PMID:26161090

  12. Human papillomavirus genotypes distribution by cervical cytologic status among women attending the General Hospital of Loandjili, Pointe-Noire, Southwest Congo (Brazzaville).

    PubMed

    Boumba, Luc Magloire Anicet; Qmichou, Zineb; Mouallif, Mustapha; Attaleb, Mohammed; El Mzibri, Mohammed; Hilali, Lahoucine; Donatien, Moukassa; Ennaji, Moulay Mustapha

    2015-10-01

    HPV infection is associated with cervical cancer, one of the major public health problems in developing countries. In the Republic of Congo, despite of the high age-standardized incidence rate estimated at 25.2 per 100,000 women, molecular epidemiology data on HPV infections are very limited. We investigated HPV genotypes distribution in cervical smears among patients attending the General Hospital of Loandjili, Southwest Congo. A cross-sectional hospital-based study was conducted on 321 women. Liquid-based cytology samples were collected for cytological diagnosis and HPV detection. Nested-PCR was performed using MY09/MY11 and GP5+/GP6+ primers with genotyping by direct sequencing. Type-specific PCR for HPV-6, -11, -16, -18, -31 and -33 was also used to assess multiple infections. Out of 321 women examined, 189 (58.8%) had normal cytology, 16 (5.0%) had ASCUS and 116 (36.1%) had cytological abnormalities. HPV-DNA was detected in 22 (11.6%), 6 (37.5%), and 104 (89.6%) normal cytology, ASCUS and cytological abnormalities respectively. HPV16 was the most prevalent genotype regardless of cytological status followed by HPV70 in women without lesions and HPV33 among those with lesions. HR-HPV prevalence varied significantly according to the cervical cytology (P = 0.000). Among women without lesions, two peaks of HPV infections were observed in age group less than 30 years (60.0%) and in age group 50-59 years (7.1%). Age, age of first sex, multiple sexual partners and pregnancies were the risk factors for HPV infection in women without lesions. Our findings could be used as evidence data base for future epidemiological monitoring in this region.

  13. Capsaicin consumption, Helicobacter pylori CagA status and IL1B-31C>T genotypes: a host and environment interaction in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    López-Carrillo, Lizbeth; Camargo, M Constanza; Schneider, Barbara G; Sicinschi, Liviu A; Hernández-Ramírez, Raúl U; Correa, Pelayo; Cebrian, Mariano E

    2012-06-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) has been associated with a complex combination of genetic and environmental factors. In contrast to most countries, available information on GC mortality trends showed a gradual increase in Mexico. Our aim was to explore potential interactions among dietary (chili pepper consumption), infectious (Helicobacter pylori) and genetic factors (IL1B-31 genotypes) on GC risk. The study was performed in three areas of Mexico, with different GC mortality rates. We included 158 GC patients and 317 clinical controls. Consumption of capsaicin (Cap), the pungent active substance of chili peppers, was estimated by food frequency questionnaire. H. pylori CagA status was assessed by ELISA, and IL1B-31 genotypes were determined by TaqMan assays and Pyrosequencing in DNA samples. Multivariate unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate potential interactions. Moderate to high Cap consumption synergistically increased GC risk in genetically susceptible individuals (IL1B-31C allele carriers) infected with the more virulent H. pylori (CagA+) strains. The combined presence of these factors might explain the absence of a decreasing trend for GC in Mexico. However, further research on gene-environment interactions is required to fully understand the factors determining GC patterns in susceptible populations, with the aim of recommending preventive measures for high risk individuals. PMID:22414649

  14. The Study of HFE Genotypes and Its Expression Effect on Iron Status of Iranian Haemochromatosis, Iron Deficiency Anemia Patients, Iron-Taker and Non Iron-Taker Controls.

    PubMed

    Beiranvand, Elham; Abediankenari, Saeid; Rostamian, Mosayeb; Beiranvand, Behnoush; Naazeri, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    The role of HFE gene mutations or its expression in regulation of iron metabolism of hereditary haemochromatosis (HH) patients is remained controversial. Therefore here the correlation between two common HFE genotype (p.C282Y, p.H63D) and HFE gene expression with iron status in HH, iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and healthy Iranian participants was studied. For this purpose genotype determination was done by polymerase chain reaction--restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Real-Time PCR was applied for evaluation of HFE gene expression. Biochemical parameters and iron consumption were also assessed. Homozygote p.H63D mutation was seen in all HH patients and p.C282Y was not observed in any member of the population. A significant correlation was observed between serum ferritin (SF) level and gender or age of HH patients. p.H63D homozygote was seen to be able to significantly increase SF and transferrin saturation (TS) level without affecting on liver function. Our results also showed that iron consumption affects on TS level increasing. HFE gene expression level of IDA patients was significantly higher than other groups. Also the HFE gene expression was negatively correlated with TS. Finally, the main result of our study showed that loss of HFE function in HH is not derived from its gene expression inhibition and much higher HFE gene expression might lead to IDA. However we propose repeating of the study for more approval of our finding.

  15. Genotype and fetal size affect maternal-fetal amino acid status and fetal endocrinology in Large White × Landrace and Meishan pigs.

    PubMed

    Ashworth, Cheryl J; Nwagwu, Margaret O; McArdle, Harry J

    2013-01-01

    This study compared maternal plasma amino acid concentrations, placental protein secretion in vitro and fetal body composition and plasma amino acid and hormone concentrations in feto-placental units from the smallest and a normally-sized fetus carried by Large White × Landrace or Meishan gilts on Day 100 of pregnancy. Compared with Large White × Landrace, Meishan placental tissue secreted more protein and Meishan fetuses contained relatively more fat and protein, but less moisture. Fetal plasma concentrations of insulin, triiodothryonine, thyroxine and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II were higher in Meishan than Large White × Landrace fetuses. In both breeds, fetal cortisol concentrations were inversely related to fetal size, whereas concentrations of IGF-I were higher in average-sized fetuses. Concentrations of 10 amino acids were higher in Large White × Landrace than Meishan gilts, while glutamine concentrations were higher in Meishan gilts. Concentrations of alanine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid and threonine were higher in Meishan than Large White × Landrace fetuses. Average-sized fetuses had higher concentrations of asparagine, leucine, lysine, phenylalanine, threonine, tyrosine and valine than the smallest fetus. This study revealed novel genotype and fetal size differences in porcine maternal-fetal amino acid status and fetal hormone and metabolite concentrations.

  16. Bovine mastitis: the diagnostic properties of a PCR-based assay to monitor the Staphylococcus aureus genotype B status of a herd, using bulk tank milk.

    PubMed

    Syring, C; Boss, R; Reist, M; Bodmer, M; Hummerjohann, J; Gehrig, P; Graber, H U

    2012-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus genotype B (GTB) is a contagious mastitis pathogen in cattle, occurring in up to 87% of individuals. Because treatment is generally insufficient, culling is often required, leading to large economic loss in the Swiss dairy industry. As the detection of this pathogen in bulk tank milk (BTM) would greatly facilitate its control, a novel real-time quantitative PCR-based assay for BTM has previously been developed and is now being evaluated for its diagnostic properties at the herd level. Herds were initially classified as to their Staph. aureus GTB status by a reference method. Using BTM and herd pools of single-quarter and 4-quarter milk, the herds were then grouped by the novel assay, and the resulting classifications were compared. A total of 54 dairy herds were evaluated. Using the reference method, 21 herds were found to be GTB positive, whereas 33 were found to be negative. Considering the novel assay using both herd pools, all herds were grouped correctly, resulting in maximal diagnostic sensitivities (100%) and specificities (100%). For BTM samples, diagnostic sensitivities and specificities were 90 and 100%, respectively. Two herds were false negative in BTM, because cows with clinical signs of mastitis were not milked into the tank. Besides its excellent diagnostic properties, the assay is characterized by its low detection level, high efficiency, and its suitability for automation. Using the novel knowledge and assay, eradication of Staph. aureus GTB from a dairy herd may be considered as a realistic goal.

  17. Genetic and epigenetic transgenerational implications related to omega-3 fatty acids. Part I: maternal FADS2 genotype and DNA methylation correlate with polyunsaturated fatty acid status in toddlers: an exploratory analysis.

    PubMed

    Lupu, Daniel S; Cheatham, Carol L; Corbin, Karen D; Niculescu, Mihai D

    2015-11-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism in toddlers is regulated by a complex network of interacting factors. The contribution of maternal genetic and epigenetic makeup to this milieu is not well understood. In a cohort of mothers and toddlers 16 months of age (n = 65 mother-child pairs), we investigated the association between maternal genetic and epigenetic fatty acid desaturase 2 (FADS2) profiles and toddlers' n-6 and n-3 fatty acid metabolism. FADS2 rs174575 variation and DNA methylation status were interrogated in mothers and toddlers, as well as food intake and plasma fatty acid concentrations in toddlers. A multivariate fit model indicated that maternal rs174575 genotype, combined with DNA methylation, can predict α-linolenic acid plasma concentration in all toddlers and arachidonic acid concentrations in boys. Arachidonic acid intake was predictive for its plasma concentration in girls, whereas intake of 3 major n-3 species (eicosapentaenoic, docosapentaenoic, and docosahexaenoic acids) were predictive for their plasma concentrations in boys. FADS2 genotype and DNA methylation in toddlers were not related to plasma concentrations or food intakes, except for CpG8 methylation. Maternal FADS2 methylation was a predictor for the boys' α-linolenic acid intakes. This exploratory study suggests that maternal FADS2 genetic and epigenetic status could be related to toddlers' polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism.

  18. Compressed Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Erlich, Yaniv; Gordon, Assaf; Brand, Michael; Hannon, Gregory J.; Mitra, Partha P.

    2011-01-01

    Over the past three decades we have steadily increased our knowledge on the genetic basis of many severe disorders. Nevertheless, there are still great challenges in applying this knowledge routinely in the clinic, mainly due to the relatively tedious and expensive process of genotyping. Since the genetic variations that underlie the disorders are relatively rare in the population, they can be thought of as a sparse signal. Using methods and ideas from compressed sensing and group testing, we have developed a cost-effective genotyping protocol to detect carriers for severe genetic disorders. In particular, we have adapted our scheme to a recently developed class of high throughput DNA sequencing technologies. The mathematical framework presented here has some important distinctions from the ’traditional’ compressed sensing and group testing frameworks in order to address biological and technical constraints of our setting. PMID:21451737

  19. Helicobacter pylori in Vegetables and Salads: Genotyping and Antimicrobial Resistance Properties

    PubMed Central

    Yahaghi, Emad; Khamesipour, Faham; Mashayekhi, Fatemeh; Safarpoor Dehkordi, Farhad; Sakhaei, Mohammad Hossein; Masoudimanesh, Mojtaba; Khameneie, Maryam Khayyat

    2014-01-01

    From a clinical and epidemiological perspective, it is important to know which genotypes and antibiotic resistance patterns are present in H. pylori strains isolated from salads and vegetables. Therefore, the present investigation was carried out to find this purpose. Three hundred eighty washed and unwashed vegetable samples and fifty commercial and traditional salad samples were collected from Isfahan, Iran. Samples were cultured and those found positive for H. pylori were analyzed using PCR. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using disk diffusion method. Seven out of 50 (14%) salad and 52 out of 380 (13.68%) vegetable samples harbored H. pylori. In addition, leek, lettuce, and cabbage were the most commonly contaminated samples (30%). The most prevalent virulence genes were oipA (86.44%) and cagA (57.625). VacA s1a (37.28%) and iceA1 (47.45%) were the most prevalent genotypes. Forty different genotypic combinations were recognized. S1a/cagA+/iceA1/oipA+ (33.89%), s1a/cagA+/iceA2/oipA (30.50%), and m1a/cagA+/iceA1/oipA+ (28.81%) were the most prevalent combined genotypes. Bacterial strains had the highest levels of resistance against metronidazole (77.96%), amoxicillin (67.79%), and ampicillin (61.01%). High similarity in the genotyping pattern of H. pylori among vegetable and salad samples and human specimens suggests that vegetable and salads may be the sources of the bacteria. PMID:25184146

  20. Venom alkaloid and cuticular hydrocarbon profiles are associated with social organization, queen fertility status, and queen genotype in the fire ant Solenopsis invicta.

    PubMed

    Eliyahu, Dorit; Ross, Kenneth G; Haight, Kevin L; Keller, Laurent; Liebig, Jürgen

    2011-11-01

    Queens in social insect colonies advertise their presence in the colony to: a) attract workers' attention and care; b) gain acceptance by workers as replacement or supplemental reproductives; c) prevent reproductive development in nestmates. We analyzed the chemical content of whole body surface extracts of adult queens of different developmental and reproductive stages, and of adult workers from monogyne (single colony queen) and polygyne (multiple colony queens) forms of the fire ant Solenopsis invicta. We found that the composition of the most abundant components, venom alkaloids, differed between queens and workers, as well as between reproductive and non-reproductive queens. Additionally, workers of the two forms could be distinguished by alkaloid composition. Finally, sexually mature, non-reproductive queens from polygyne colonies differed in their proportions of cis-piperidine alkaloids, depending on their Gp-9 genotype, although the difference disappeared once they became functional reproductives. Among the unsaturated cuticular hydrocarbons characteristic of queens, there were differences in amounts of alkenes/alkadienes between non-reproductive polygyne queens of different Gp-9 genotypes, between non-reproductive and reproductive queens, and between polygyne and monogyne reproductive queens, with the amounts increasing at a relatively higher rate through reproductive ontogeny in queens bearing the Gp-9 b allele. Given that the genotype-specific piperidine differences reflect differences in rates of reproductive maturation between queens, we speculate that these abundant and unique compounds have been co-opted to serve in fertility signaling, while the cuticular hydrocarbons now play a complementary role in regulation of social organization by signaling queen Gp-9 genotype. PMID:22095515

  1. SSR genotyping.

    PubMed

    Mason, Annaliese S

    2015-01-01

    SSR genotyping involves the use of simple sequence repeats (SSRs) as DNA markers. SSRs, also called microsatellites, are a type of repetitive DNA sequence ubiquitous in most plant genomes. SSRs contain repeats of a motif sequence 1-6 bp in length. Due to this structure SSRs frequently undergo mutations, mainly due to DNA polymerase errors, which involve the addition or subtraction of a repeat unit. Hence, SSR sequences are highly polymorphic and may be readily used for detection of allelic variation within populations. SSRs are present within both genic and nongenic regions and are occasionally transcribed, and hence may be identified in expressed sequence tags (ESTs) as well as more commonly in nongenic DNA sequences. SSR genotyping involves the design of DNA-based primers to amplify SSR sequences from extracted genomic DNA, followed by amplification of the SSR repeat region using polymerase chain reaction, and subsequent visualization of the resulting DNA products, usually using gel electrophoresis. These procedures are described in this chapter. SSRs have been one of the most favored molecular markers for plant genotyping in the last 20 years due to their high levels of polymorphism, wide distribution across most plant genomes, and ease of use and will continue to be a useful tool in many species for years to come.

  2. Treponema pallidum pallidum Genotypes and Macrolide Resistance Status in Syphilitic Lesions among Patients at 2 Sexually Transmitted Infection Clinics in Lima, Peru.

    PubMed

    Flores, Juan Antonio; Vargas, Silver Keith; Leon, Segundo Ramos; Perez, Danny Giancarlo; Ramos, Lourdes Beatriz; Chow, Jeremy; Konda, Kelika Anne; Calvo, Gino Mauricio; Salvatierra, Hector J; Klaussner, Jeffrey D; Caceres, Carlos Fernando

    2016-07-01

    We report the circulating genotypes and the frequency of macrolide-resistance patterns among Treponema pallidum pallidum DNA isolated from syphilitic lesions from patients who attended 2 sexual health clinics in Lima, Peru. We implemented and used a molecular typing scheme to describe local T. pallidum pallidum strains. Among 14 specimens, subtype 14d/f was the most prevalent strain in 7 fully typed T. pallidum DNA specimens obtained from men who have sex with men and transgender women presenting with chancre-like lesions. No macrolide-resistance mutations were found in T. pallidum DNA from 10 lesions. PMID:27322050

  3. Treponema pallidum pallidum Genotypes and Macrolide Resistance Status in Syphilitic Lesions among Patients at 2 Sexually Transmitted Infection Clinics in Lima, Peru.

    PubMed

    Flores, Juan Antonio; Vargas, Silver Keith; Leon, Segundo Ramos; Perez, Danny Giancarlo; Ramos, Lourdes Beatriz; Chow, Jeremy; Konda, Kelika Anne; Calvo, Gino Mauricio; Salvatierra, Hector J; Klaussner, Jeffrey D; Caceres, Carlos Fernando

    2016-07-01

    We report the circulating genotypes and the frequency of macrolide-resistance patterns among Treponema pallidum pallidum DNA isolated from syphilitic lesions from patients who attended 2 sexual health clinics in Lima, Peru. We implemented and used a molecular typing scheme to describe local T. pallidum pallidum strains. Among 14 specimens, subtype 14d/f was the most prevalent strain in 7 fully typed T. pallidum DNA specimens obtained from men who have sex with men and transgender women presenting with chancre-like lesions. No macrolide-resistance mutations were found in T. pallidum DNA from 10 lesions.

  4. Virulence of Escherichia coli Clinical Isolates in a Murine Sepsis Model in Relation to Sequence Type ST131 Status, Fluoroquinolone Resistance, and Virulence Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Stephen B.; Zhanel, George; Kuskowski, Michael A.; Denamur, Erick

    2012-01-01

    Escherichia coli sequence type ST131 (O25b:H4) has emerged over the past decade as a globally disseminated, multidrug-resistant pathogen. Unlike traditional antimicrobial-resistant E. coli, ST131 derives from virulence-associated phylogenetic group B2 and exhibits extraintestinal virulence factors. This, plus preliminary evidence of virulence in experimental animals, has suggested that ST131's epidemic emergence may be due to high virulence potential, compared with other E. coli types. To test this hypothesis, we compared a large number of matched ST131 and non-ST131 E. coli clinical isolates, both fluoroquinolone resistant and susceptible, plus isolates from classic extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) sequence types (STs) and case report ST131 household transmission isolates, for virulence in a mouse subcutaneous sepsis model. Overall, in mice, the study isolates produced a wide range of lethality and clinical illness. However, neither ST131 status nor fluoroquinolone phenotype correlated with this diversity of illness severity, which occurred within each of the 6 study groups. In contrast, multiple known or suspected ExPEC virulence genes, including pap (P fimbriae), vat (vacuolating toxin), kpsM II (group 2 capsule), ibeA (invasion of brain endothelium), and clbB/N (colibactin synthesis), plus molecularly defined ExPEC status, were significantly associated with virulence. These findings point away from ST131 isolates as having higher virulence potential compared with other E. coli types in causing invasive extraintestinal infections and suggest instead that ST131's epidemiological success may reflect enhanced fitness for upstream steps in pathogenesis or in colonization and transmission. Additionally, the extensive within-ST virulence diversity suggests an opportunity to compare closely related strains to identify the responsible genetic determinants. PMID:22311928

  5. Survival of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in bovine monocyte-derived macrophages is not affected by host infection status but depends on the infecting bacterial genotype.

    PubMed

    Gollnick, Nicole S; Mitchell, Rebecca M; Baumgart, Martin; Janagama, Harish K; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Schukken, Ynte H

    2007-12-15

    In this study we investigated the ability of different Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) strains to survive in bovine monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) of cows naturally infected with M. paratuberculosis and control cows. We tested the hypotheses that infection status of cows affects macrophage killing ability and that survival of M. paratuberculosis in macrophages is dependent on the strain. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were obtained from Johne's disease-positive (n=3) and age and stage of lactation matched Johne's disease-negative (n=3) multiparious cows. Following differentiation, MDMs were challenged in vitro with four M. paratuberculosis strains of different host specificity (cattle and sheep). Two hours and 2, 4, and 7 days after infection, ingestion, and intracellular survival of M. paratuberculosis strains were determined by fluorescence microscopy. There was no effect of the origin of MDMs (Johne's disease-positive or control animals) on phagocytosis, survival of bacteria, or macrophage survival. In contrast, important strain differences were observed. These findings suggest that some M. paratuberculosis strains interfere more successfully than others with the ability of macrophages to kill intracellular pathogens which may make it important to include strain typing when designing control programs.

  6. Characterization of hepatitis B virus genotypes in chronically infected patients.

    PubMed

    Basaras, M; Arrese, E; Blanco, S; Sota, M; de las Heras, B; Cisterna, R

    2007-12-01

    Genomic mutations occurring during reverse transcription of hepatitis B virus (HBV) could explain its genetic diversity and account for 8 genetically distinct genotypes that are geographically distributed quite differently. The main objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of hepatitis B virus genotypes in patients with chronic hepatitis B and to see if there was a relationship between genotypes and risk factors for transmission based on HBeAg status. A total of 14 serum samples were analyzed using INNO-LIPA HBV genotyping assay. Genotype D was the most prevalent (64.3%) followed by genotype A (28.6%). There was one case of co-infection (D/E genotypes) that was confirmed by PCR sequencing. All patients except one were HBeAg-negative and anti-HBe-positive. The risk factors for HBV transmission were unknown in half of the cases; in the other half, sexual, transfusion, maternal or interfamilial transmission were observed. The results show that genotype D is the most prevalent genotype in our hospital, followed by genotype A. On the other hand, no relationship was found between HBeAg status and genotype.

  7. A pilot study of Helicobacter pylori genotypes and cytokine gene polymorphisms in reflux oesophagitis and peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Akdogan, R A; Ozgur, O; Gucuyeter, S; Kaklikkaya, N; Cobanoglu, U; Aydin, F

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori causes various diseases such as chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric cancer. While majority of the people infected with H. pylori is asymptomatic, 15-20 % of them develop such diseases. The main factors, which determine the development of H. pylori related diseases might be bacterial virulence, host genetic and environmental factors.The aim of this study was to reveal the factors that play a role in the disease development in patients with reflux esophagitis and peptic ulcer, infected with Helicobacter pylori. Environmental factors such as medical agents, smoking and body mass index were evaluated. The factors specific to bacteria such as vacA, CagA, babA and iceA virulence genotypes and the host factors such as IL-1, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, interferon-γ, TNF-α, ve TGF-β1 gene polymorphisms were compared between the two groups.H. pylori infected twenty five patients with reflux esophagitis and peptic ulcer were enrolled in the study. There was no statistical difference between the two groups regarding environmental factors. IL-2 -330T +166T (p=0.037) and IL10 -1082A; -819C (p=0.049) gene polymorphisms were significantly more common in the group of patients with peptic ulcer compared to the group with reflux esophagitis. In both groups of patients, either with reflux esophagitis or peptic ulcer, multiple H. pylori virulence genotypes (cagA, vacA, babA) (mean values 74 %, 78 %, 54 % respectively) were observed.In this study, we revealed that cytokine gene polymorphisms may play a role in the development peptic ulcer while H. pylori virulence genotypes seem to be crucial for the development of associated diseases (Tab. 4, Ref. 51).

  8. Global Distribution and Prevalence of Hepatitis C Virus Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Messina, Jane P; Humphreys, Isla; Flaxman, Abraham; Brown, Anthony; Cooke, Graham S; Pybus, Oliver G; Barnes, Eleanor

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) exhibits high genetic diversity, characterized by regional variations in genotype prevalence. This poses a challenge to the improved development of vaccines and pan-genotypic treatments, which require the consideration of global trends in HCV genotype prevalence. Here we provide the first comprehensive survey of these trends. To approximate national HCV genotype prevalence, studies published between 1989 and 2013 reporting HCV genotypes are reviewed and combined with overall HCV prevalence estimates from the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) project. We also generate regional and global genotype prevalence estimates, inferring data for countries lacking genotype information. We include 1,217 studies in our analysis, representing 117 countries and 90% of the global population. We calculate that HCV genotype 1 is the most prevalent worldwide, comprising 83.4 million cases (46.2% of all HCV cases), approximately one-third of which are in East Asia. Genotype 3 is the next most prevalent globally (54.3 million, 30.1%); genotypes 2, 4, and 6 are responsible for a total 22.8% of all cases; genotype 5 comprises the remaining <1%. While genotypes 1 and 3 dominate in most countries irrespective of economic status, the largest proportions of genotypes 4 and 5 are in lower-income countries. Conclusion: Although genotype 1 is most common worldwide, nongenotype 1 HCV cases—which are less well served by advances in vaccine and drug development—still comprise over half of all HCV cases. Relative genotype proportions are needed to inform healthcare models, which must be geographically tailored to specific countries or regions in order to improve access to new treatments. Genotype surveillance data are needed from many countries to improve estimates of unmet need. (Hepatology 2015;61:77–87) PMID:25069599

  9. Evaluation of HPV Genotyping Assays for Archival Clinical Samples.

    PubMed

    Lillsunde Larsson, Gabriella; Carlsson, Jessica; Karlsson, Mats G; Helenius, Gisela

    2015-05-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) testing and genotyping of FFPE tissue samples is important in epidemiological investigations. Here, we compare four different HPV genotyping methods for use in FFPE clinical samples. Comparative testing was performed on 99 samples with a clinical suspicion of HPV. Specimens were analyzed with Anyplex II HPV28 detecting 28 genotypes using real-time PCR and melting curve analysis, CLART HPV2 detecting 35 genotypes using PCR and microarray detection, and MGP5+/6+ consensus primer system together with pyrosequencing. Results were compared to a real-time PCR reference protocol detecting 14 genotypes. In total, 68% of the samples were positive for an HPV genotype using the reference protocol and MGP5+/6+ primer system. Anyplex II HPV28 analysis and CLART HPV2 had 82% and 72% positive samples, respectively. All four methods showed good agreement when comparing the 14 genotypes included in the reference protocol. When evaluating all genotypes, the Anyplex II HPV28 assay and the CLART assay changed the status of the sample (individually or together) from negative with respect to the reference protocol to positive for either a Group 1 (n = 4) or Group 2 (n = 6) genotype. We conclude from this study that for an extended genotyping approach with a high sensitivity for FFPE specimens, both the Anyplex II HPV28 and CLART HPV2 assays are suitable alternatives despite minor intra-assay differences.

  10. HIV Genotypic Resistance Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? HIV Antiretroviral Drug Resistance Testing, Genotypic Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Anti-retroviral Drug Resistance Testing; ARV Resistance Testing Formal name: ...

  11. APOE Genotyping, Cardiovascular Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Risk Assessment ; HDL Cholesterol ; LDL Cholesterol ; Lipid Profile ; Triglycerides Were you looking instead for APOE genotyping ordered ... the skin called xanthomas, a high level of triglycerides in the blood, and atherosclerosis that develops at ...

  12. Axiom turkey genotyping array

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Axiom®Turkey Genotyping Array interrogates 643,845 probesets on the array, covering 643,845 SNPs. The array development was led by Dr. Julie Long of the USDA-ARS Beltsville Agricultural Research Center under a public-private partnership with Hendrix Genetics, Aviagen, and Affymetrix. The Turk...

  13. Egyptian genotyping of Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    El-Shazly, Atef M; Mowafy, Nawras; Soliman, Mohamed; El-Bendary, Mahmoud; Morsy, Ayman T A; Ramadan, Nashwa I I; Arafa, Wafaa A S

    2004-04-01

    Out of 105 patients infected with Giardia, 38 patients have Genotype I (36.19%), 13 have Genotype II (12.38%), 10 have Genotype III (9.52%), 16 have mixed Genotype infection (15.24%) and 28 with undetermined Giardia infection by PCR (26.67%). None of the control group gave positive results for Giardia in stool by PCR. So, the sensitivity of the test for detection and identification of Giardia Genotypes from the original stool samples was 73.33% and specificity was 100%. Out of 61 cases in the symptomatic group, the prevalence of Giardia Genotype I was 32.79%, Genotype II was 16.39%, Genotype III was 9.84%, mixed Genotype infection was 16.39% and undetermined Genotype was 24.59% as compared to 40.91%, 6.82%, 9.09%, 13.64% & 29.55% in the asymptomatic group respectively. There is statistically insignificant difference between both groups as regarding the prevalence of the different Giardia Genotypes. (P < or = 0.05). The use of PCR as a routine work for diagnosis of giardiasis is not accepted at least in the developing and under-developing countries due to its high cost, the high quality of technical staff and advanced laboratory equipments required for PCR performance. Its application is usually limited to research activities, the detection of water sources contamination and for the detection of a potential source of Giardia infection in epidemics.

  14. Susceptibility of biallelic haplotype and genotype frequencies to genotyping error.

    PubMed

    Moskvina, Valentina; Schmidt, Karl Michael

    2006-12-01

    With the availability of fast genotyping methods and genomic databases, the search for statistical association of single nucleotide polymorphisms with a complex trait has become an important methodology in medical genetics. However, even fairly rare errors occurring during the genotyping process can lead to spurious association results and decrease in statistical power. We develop a systematic approach to study how genotyping errors change the genotype distribution in a sample. The general M-marker case is reduced to that of a single-marker locus by recognizing the underlying tensor-product structure of the error matrix. Both method and general conclusions apply to the general error model; we give detailed results for allele-based errors of size depending both on the marker locus and the allele present. Multiple errors are treated in terms of the associated diffusion process on the space of genotype distributions. We find that certain genotype and haplotype distributions remain unchanged under genotyping errors, and that genotyping errors generally render the distribution more similar to the stable one. In case-control association studies, this will lead to loss of statistical power for nondifferential genotyping errors and increase in type I error for differential genotyping errors. Moreover, we show that allele-based genotyping errors do not disturb Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in the genotype distribution. In this setting we also identify maximally affected distributions. As they correspond to situations with rare alleles and marker loci in high linkage disequilibrium, careful checking for genotyping errors is advisable when significant association based on such alleles/haplotypes is observed in association studies.

  15. Genotyping Sleep Disorders Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shadan, Farhad F.; Dawson, Arthur; Cronin, John W.; Jamil, Shazia M.; Grizas, Alexandra P.; Koziol, James A.; Kline, Lawrence E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective The genetic susceptibility factors underlying sleep disorders might help us predict prognoses and responses to treatment. Several candidate polymorphisms for sleep disorders have been proposed, but there has as yet inadequate replication or validation that the candidates may be useful in the clinical setting. Methods To assess the validity of several candidate associations, we obtained saliva deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) samples and clinical information from 360 consenting research participants who were undergoing clinical polysomnograms. Ten single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped. These were thought to be related to depression, circadian sleep disorders, sleep apnea, restless legs syndrome (RLS), excessive sleepiness, or to slow waves in sleep. Results With multivariate generalized linear models, the association of TEF rs738499 with depressive symptoms was confirmed. Equivocal statistical evidence of association of rs1801260 (the C3111T SNP in the CLOCK gene) with morningness/eveningness and an association of Apolipoprotein E (APOE) rs429358 with the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) were obtained, but these associations were not strong enough to be of clinical value by themselves. Predicted association of SNPs with sleep apnea, RLS, and slow wave sleep were not confirmed. Conclusion The SNPs tested would not, by themselves, be of use for clinical genotyping in a sleep clinic. PMID:20396431

  16. HBV Genotypic Variability in Cuba

    PubMed Central

    Loureiro, Carmen L.; Aguilar, Julio C.; Aguiar, Jorge; Muzio, Verena; Pentón, Eduardo; Garcia, Daymir; Guillen, Gerardo; Pujol, Flor H.

    2015-01-01

    The genetic diversity of HBV in human population is often a reflection of its genetic admixture. The aim of this study was to explore the genotypic diversity of HBV in Cuba. The S genomic region of Cuban HBV isolates was sequenced and for selected isolates the complete genome or precore-core sequence was analyzed. The most frequent genotype was A (167/250, 67%), mainly A2 (149, 60%) but also A1 and one A4. A total of 77 isolates were classified as genotype D (31%), with co-circulation of several subgenotypes (56 D4, 2 D1, 5 D2, 7 D3/6 and 7 D7). Three isolates belonged to genotype E, two to H and one to B3. Complete genome sequence analysis of selected isolates confirmed the phylogenetic analysis performed with the S region. Mutations or polymorphisms in precore region were more common among genotype D compared to genotype A isolates. The HBV genotypic distribution in this Caribbean island correlates with the Y lineage genetic background of the population, where a European and African origin prevails. HBV genotypes E, B3 and H isolates might represent more recent introductions. PMID:25742179

  17. HBV genotypic variability in Cuba.

    PubMed

    Loureiro, Carmen L; Aguilar, Julio C; Aguiar, Jorge; Muzio, Verena; Pentón, Eduardo; Garcia, Daymir; Guillen, Gerardo; Pujol, Flor H

    2015-01-01

    The genetic diversity of HBV in human population is often a reflection of its genetic admixture. The aim of this study was to explore the genotypic diversity of HBV in Cuba. The S genomic region of Cuban HBV isolates was sequenced and for selected isolates the complete genome or precore-core sequence was analyzed. The most frequent genotype was A (167/250, 67%), mainly A2 (149, 60%) but also A1 and one A4. A total of 77 isolates were classified as genotype D (31%), with co-circulation of several subgenotypes (56 D4, 2 D1, 5 D2, 7 D3/6 and 7 D7). Three isolates belonged to genotype E, two to H and one to B3. Complete genome sequence analysis of selected isolates confirmed the phylogenetic analysis performed with the S region. Mutations or polymorphisms in precore region were more common among genotype D compared to genotype A isolates. The HBV genotypic distribution in this Caribbean island correlates with the Y lineage genetic background of the population, where a European and African origin prevails. HBV genotypes E, B3 and H isolates might represent more recent introductions.

  18. AN EVALUATION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM GENOTYPING

    EPA Science Inventory

    We evaluated the specificity and sensitivity of 11 previously described species differentiation and genotyping PCR protocols for detection of Cryptosporidium parasites. Genomic DNA from three species of Crytosporidium parasites (genotype 1 and genotype 2 of C. parvum, C. muris, a...

  19. Genotype Specification Language.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Erin H; Sagawa, Shiori; Weis, James W; Schubert, Max G; Bissell, Michael; Hawthorne, Brian; Reeves, Christopher D; Dean, Jed; Platt, Darren

    2016-06-17

    We describe here the Genotype Specification Language (GSL), a language that facilitates the rapid design of large and complex DNA constructs used to engineer genomes. The GSL compiler implements a high-level language based on traditional genetic notation, as well as a set of low-level DNA manipulation primitives. The language allows facile incorporation of parts from a library of cloned DNA constructs and from the "natural" library of parts in fully sequenced and annotated genomes. GSL was designed to engage genetic engineers in their native language while providing a framework for higher level abstract tooling. To this end we define four language levels, Level 0 (literal DNA sequence) through Level 3, with increasing abstraction of part selection and construction paths. GSL targets an intermediate language based on DNA slices that translates efficiently into a wide range of final output formats, such as FASTA and GenBank, and includes formats that specify instructions and materials such as oligonucleotide primers to allow the physical construction of the GSL designs by individual strain engineers or an automated DNA assembly core facility. PMID:26886161

  20. Genotype Specification Language.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Erin H; Sagawa, Shiori; Weis, James W; Schubert, Max G; Bissell, Michael; Hawthorne, Brian; Reeves, Christopher D; Dean, Jed; Platt, Darren

    2016-06-17

    We describe here the Genotype Specification Language (GSL), a language that facilitates the rapid design of large and complex DNA constructs used to engineer genomes. The GSL compiler implements a high-level language based on traditional genetic notation, as well as a set of low-level DNA manipulation primitives. The language allows facile incorporation of parts from a library of cloned DNA constructs and from the "natural" library of parts in fully sequenced and annotated genomes. GSL was designed to engage genetic engineers in their native language while providing a framework for higher level abstract tooling. To this end we define four language levels, Level 0 (literal DNA sequence) through Level 3, with increasing abstraction of part selection and construction paths. GSL targets an intermediate language based on DNA slices that translates efficiently into a wide range of final output formats, such as FASTA and GenBank, and includes formats that specify instructions and materials such as oligonucleotide primers to allow the physical construction of the GSL designs by individual strain engineers or an automated DNA assembly core facility.

  1. Representativeness of Tuberculosis Genotyping Surveillance in the United States, 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Shak, Emma B; France, Anne Marie; Cowan, Lauren; Starks, Angela M; Grant, Juliana

    2015-01-01

    Genotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates contributes to tuberculosis (TB) control through detection of possible outbreaks. However, 20% of U.S. cases do not have an isolate for testing, and 10% of cases with isolates do not have a genotype reported. TB outbreaks in populations with incomplete genotyping data might be missed by genotyping-based outbreak detection. Therefore, we assessed the representativeness of TB genotyping data by comparing characteristics of cases reported during January 1, 2009-December 31, 2010, that had a genotype result with those cases that did not. Of 22,476 cases, 14,922 (66%) had a genotype result. Cases without genotype results were more likely to be patients <19 years of age, with unknown HIV status, of female sex, U.S.-born, and with no recent history of homelessness or substance abuse. Although cases with a genotype result are largely representative of all reported U.S. TB cases, outbreak detection methods that rely solely on genotyping data may underestimate TB transmission among certain groups. PMID:26556930

  2. [Genotyping of Giardia intestinalis isolates in the Thrace Region, Turkey].

    PubMed

    Çiçek, Cemal; Şakru, Nermin

    2015-10-01

    Giardia intestinalis is a common protozoon that infects humans and may cause water and food-borne outbreaks. It is regarded as a major public health problem worldwide and in Turkey as well. Molecular techniques are widely used to determine the epidemiology, genetic populations and taxonomy of G.intestinalis. It has two genotypes including genotype A and genotype B in humans. The purpose of the present study is to implement the molecular analysis and genotyping of the isolates of G.intestinalis obtained from human stool samples. A total of 39 isolates obtained from the stool samples of persons (30 male, 9 female; age range: 1-74 years, median age: 20) who have admitted to Trakya University Medical Research and Practice Health Center and Edirne State Hospital between September 2011- April 2013 were included in the study. The average number of cysts were identified both with native and lugol methods among all microscopically detected samples by screening at least 50 field with x400 magnification. The samples were then analyzed through loop-mediated isothermal amplification method (LAMP) for the presence of elongation factor-1 alpha (EF-1α) gene, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method for the presence of beta-giardin (bg) gene regions. In addition, sequence analysis of bg gene was performed. Of 39 samples, 32 (82%) and 19 (48.7%) were found to be positive for G.intestinalis EF-1α and bg genes by LAMP and PCR methods, respectively. Genotyping was implemented in 17 out of 19 samples yielding nine genotype A and eight genotype B strains. The sub-genotypes of these strains were identified as A2 (n= 6), A3 (n= 3), B2 (n= 6), B3 (n= 1) and B4 (n= 1). In eight isolates that could be typed among 21 symptomatic patients, genotype B (n= 5) and in nine isolates that could be typed among 18 asymptomatic patients, genotype A (n= 6) were more frequently observed. There was no significant association between symptomatic or asymptomatic status and genotypic patterns of the cases

  3. [Genotyping of Giardia intestinalis isolates in the Thrace Region, Turkey].

    PubMed

    Çiçek, Cemal; Şakru, Nermin

    2015-10-01

    Giardia intestinalis is a common protozoon that infects humans and may cause water and food-borne outbreaks. It is regarded as a major public health problem worldwide and in Turkey as well. Molecular techniques are widely used to determine the epidemiology, genetic populations and taxonomy of G.intestinalis. It has two genotypes including genotype A and genotype B in humans. The purpose of the present study is to implement the molecular analysis and genotyping of the isolates of G.intestinalis obtained from human stool samples. A total of 39 isolates obtained from the stool samples of persons (30 male, 9 female; age range: 1-74 years, median age: 20) who have admitted to Trakya University Medical Research and Practice Health Center and Edirne State Hospital between September 2011- April 2013 were included in the study. The average number of cysts were identified both with native and lugol methods among all microscopically detected samples by screening at least 50 field with x400 magnification. The samples were then analyzed through loop-mediated isothermal amplification method (LAMP) for the presence of elongation factor-1 alpha (EF-1α) gene, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method for the presence of beta-giardin (bg) gene regions. In addition, sequence analysis of bg gene was performed. Of 39 samples, 32 (82%) and 19 (48.7%) were found to be positive for G.intestinalis EF-1α and bg genes by LAMP and PCR methods, respectively. Genotyping was implemented in 17 out of 19 samples yielding nine genotype A and eight genotype B strains. The sub-genotypes of these strains were identified as A2 (n= 6), A3 (n= 3), B2 (n= 6), B3 (n= 1) and B4 (n= 1). In eight isolates that could be typed among 21 symptomatic patients, genotype B (n= 5) and in nine isolates that could be typed among 18 asymptomatic patients, genotype A (n= 6) were more frequently observed. There was no significant association between symptomatic or asymptomatic status and genotypic patterns of the cases

  4. Plant genotype, microbial recruitment and nutritional security.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jai S; Singh, Akanksha; Singh, Harikesh B; Sarma, Birinchi K

    2015-01-01

    Agricultural food products with high nutritional value should always be preferred over food products with low nutritional value. Efforts are being made to increase nutritional value of food by incorporating dietary supplements to the food products. The same is more desirous if the nutritional value of food is increased under natural environmental conditions especially in agricultural farms. Fragmented researches have demonstrated possibilities in achieving the same. The rhizosphere is vital in this regard for not only health and nutritional status of plants but also for the microorganisms colonizing the rhizosphere. Remarkably robust composition of plant microbiome with respect to other soil environments clearly suggests the role of a plant host in discriminating its colonizers (Zancarini et al., 2012). A large number of biotic and abiotic factors are believed to manipulate the microbial communities in the rhizosphere. However, plant genotype has proven to be the key in giving the final shape of the rhizosphere microbiome (Berendsen et al., 2012; Marques et al., 2014).

  5. Identification of novel Cryptosporidium genotypes in kangaroos from Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rongchang; Fenwick, Stanley; Potter, Abbey; Ng, Josephine; Ryan, Una

    2011-06-30

    A total of 763 faecal samples were collected from western grey kangaroos (Macropus fuliginosus) in Western Australia and screened for the presence of Cryptosporidium by PCR at the 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) locus. Samples that were positive at the 18S locus were also amplified at the actin locus. The overall prevalence was 9.3% (71/763). At the 18S rRNA locus, sequences were obtained for 28 of the 71 positives. Sequence analysis identified four species; Cryptosporidium fayeri in seven isolates, Cryptosporidium marcopodum in four isolates, Cryptosporidium xiaoi in six isolates and a novel genotype (kangaroo genotype I) in eleven isolates. Analysis at the actin locus confirmed the genetic distinctness of the novel genotype. The results of the present study indicate that in addition to C. fayeri and C. marcopodum, kangaroos may be capable of being infected with a wider range of Cryptosporidium species and genotypes including livestock species such as C. xiaoi. The novel genotype identified in the kangaroos most likely represents a cryptic species that requires further analyses to confirm its species status.

  6. Current Status of Genotyping and Discovery Work at USMARC

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Illumina BovineSNP50 DNA chip has substantially changed the genetic and genomic research program at USMARC. It has enhanced our commitment to produce genetic tools that can be exported to beef cattle producers to further their selection goals in hard-to-measure traits such as feed efficiency, co...

  7. Hepatitis B virus genotypes and genome characteristics in China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong-Mei; Wang, Jian-Qiong; Wang, Rui; Zhao, Qian; Li, Li; Zhang, Jin-Ping; Shen, Tao

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the hepatitis B virus (HBV) characters in China, as well as the correlation between several HBV mutation and hepatitis symptoms. METHODS: A total of 1148 HBV genome sequences from patients throughout China were collected via the National Center For Biotechnology Information database (information including: genotype, territory and clinical status). HBV genotypes were classified by a direct reference from the Genbank sequence annotation, phylogenetic tree and online software analysis (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/projects/genotyping/formpage.cgi). The phylogenetic tree was constructed based on the neighbor-joining method by MEGA5.0 software. HBV sequences were grouped based on phylogenetic tree and the distance between the groups was calculated by using the computer between group mean distance methods. Seven hundred and twelve HBV sequences with clear annotation of clinical symptoms were selected to analyses the correlation of mutation and clinical symptoms. Characteristics of sequences were analyzed by using DNAStar and BioEdit software packages. The codon usage bias and RNA secondary structures analysis were performed by RNAdraw software. Recombination analysis was performed by using Simplot software. RESULTS: In China, HBV genotype C was the predominant in Northeastern, genotype B was predominant in Central Southern areas, genotype B and C were both dominant in Southwestern areas, and the recombinant genotype C/D was predominant in Northwestern areas. C2 and B2 were identified as the two major sub-genotypes, FJ386674 might be a putative sub-genotype as B10. The basal core promoter double mutation and pre-C mutation showed various significant differences between hepatitis symptoms. In addition to ATG, many other HBV initiation codons also exist. HBV has codon usage bias; the termination codon of X, C and P open reading frames (ORF) were TAA, TAG, and TGA, respectively. The major stop codons of S-ORF were TAA (96.45%) and TGA (83.60%) in B2 and C2

  8. Genotype imputation via matrix completion.

    PubMed

    Chi, Eric C; Zhou, Hua; Chen, Gary K; Del Vecchyo, Diego Ortega; Lange, Kenneth

    2013-03-01

    Most current genotype imputation methods are model-based and computationally intensive, taking days to impute one chromosome pair on 1000 people. We describe an efficient genotype imputation method based on matrix completion. Our matrix completion method is implemented in MATLAB and tested on real data from HapMap 3, simulated pedigree data, and simulated low-coverage sequencing data derived from the 1000 Genomes Project. Compared with leading imputation programs, the matrix completion algorithm embodied in our program MENDEL-IMPUTE achieves comparable imputation accuracy while reducing run times significantly. Implementation in a lower-level language such as Fortran or C is apt to further improve computational efficiency. PMID:23233546

  9. Analysis of Helicobacter pylori Genotypes in Afghani and Iranian Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Dabrii, Hossein; Bolfion, Mehdi; Mirsalehian, Akbar; Rezadehbashi, Maryam; Jafari, Fereshteh; Shokrzadeh, Leila; Sahebekhtiari, Navid; Zojaji, Homayon; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Mirsattari, Darioush; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2011-01-01

    The geographical variation in Helicobacter pylori genotypes is an observed phenomenon. Cytotoxin associated genes A (cagA) and E (cagE), and vacuolating cytotoxin (vacA) genotypes of H. pylori are associated with peptic ulcer disease (PUD). This study compared the distribution of these genotypes in Iranian and Afghani isolates and their association with clinical outcomes. H. pylori infected patients, as proven by positive culture, were recruited prospectively. A total of 70 patients, 55 Iranian (26 men and 29 women, mean age 48±18 years) and 15 Afghani immigrants (13 men and 2 women, mean age 34.8±11 years) living in Tehran, Iran were enrolled in this study. DNA was extracted from isolated H. pylori and polymerase chain reaction was carried out to determine the cagA and cagE status and vacA alleles. The number of gastric cancer, peptic ulcer and gastritis cases was 11, 23 and 36, respectively. The cagA positive isolates were more common in Iranian (67%) than Afghani isolates (60%). cagE was positive in 53% of Afghani compared to 51% of Iranian isolates. The most common vacA s-region genotype was s1; 80% in Afghani and 67% in Iranian. The s1m1 was a frequently observed genotype in Afghani strains (53%) while s1m2 (47%) was more common in strains isolated from Iranian patients. There is a difference in the H. pylori strains between Iranian and Afghani groups, for instance Iranian isolates were similar to European isolates while Afghani isolates were similar to isolates from India. However, there was no significant association between cagA, cagE and vacA genotypes and clinical outcomes in Iranian and Afghani patients. PMID:20568532

  10. Cloning to reproduce desired genotypes.

    PubMed

    Westhusin, M E; Long, C R; Shin, T; Hill, J R; Looney, C R; Pryor, J H; Piedrahita, J A

    2001-01-01

    Cloned sheep, cattle, goats, pigs and mice have now been produced using somatic cells for nuclear transplantation. Animal cloning is still very inefficient with on average less than 10% of the cloned embryos transferred resulting in a live offspring. However successful cloning of a variety of different species and by a number of different laboratory groups has generated tremendous interest in reproducing desired genotypes. Some of these specific genotypes represent animal cell lines that have been genetically modified. In other cases there is a significant demand for cloning animals characterized by their inherent genetic value, for example prize livestock, household pets and rare or endangered species. A number of different variables may influence the ability to reproduce a specific genotype by cloning. These include species, source of recipient ova, cell type of nuclei donor, treatment of donor cells prior to nuclear transfer, and the techniques employed for nuclear transfer. At present, there is no solid evidence that suggests cloning will be limited to only a few specific animals, and in fact, most data collected to date suggests cloning will be applicable to a wide variety of different animals. The ability to reproduce any desired genotype by cloning will ultimately depend on the amount of time and resources invested in research.

  11. Belief propagation in genotype-phenotype networks.

    PubMed

    Moharil, Janhavi; May, Paul; Gaile, Daniel P; Blair, Rachael Hageman

    2016-03-01

    Graphical models have proven to be a valuable tool for connecting genotypes and phenotypes. Structural learning of phenotype-genotype networks has received considerable attention in the post-genome era. In recent years, a dozen different methods have emerged for network inference, which leverage natural variation that arises in certain genetic populations. The structure of the network itself can be used to form hypotheses based on the inferred direct and indirect network relationships, but represents a premature endpoint to the graphical analyses. In this work, we extend this endpoint. We examine the unexplored problem of perturbing a given network structure, and quantifying the system-wide effects on the network in a node-wise manner. The perturbation is achieved through the setting of values of phenotype node(s), which may reflect an inhibition or activation, and propagating this information through the entire network. We leverage belief propagation methods in Conditional Gaussian Bayesian Networks (CG-BNs), in order to absorb and propagate phenotypic evidence through the network. We show that the modeling assumptions adopted for genotype-phenotype networks represent an important sub-class of CG-BNs, which possess properties that ensure exact inference in the propagation scheme. The system-wide effects of the perturbation are quantified in a node-wise manner through the comparison of perturbed and unperturbed marginal distributions using a symmetric Kullback-Leibler divergence. Applications to kidney and skin cancer expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) data from different mus musculus populations are presented. System-wide effects in the network were predicted and visualized across a spectrum of evidence. Sub-pathways and regions of the network responded in concert, suggesting co-regulation and coordination throughout the network in response to phenotypic changes. We demonstrate how these predicted system-wide effects can be examined in connection with

  12. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing genotype, northern Malawi.

    PubMed

    Glynn, Judith R; Crampin, Amelia C; Traore, Hamidou; Yates, Malcolm D; Mwaungulu, Frank D; Ngwira, Bagrey M; Chaguluka, Steven D; Mwafulirwa, Donex T; Floyd, Sian; Murphy, Caroline; Drobniewski, Francis A; Fine, Paul E M

    2005-01-01

    In a 7-year population-based study in Malawi, we showed that Beijing genotype tuberculosis (TB) increased as a proportion of TB cases. All the Beijing genotype strains were fully drug sensitive. Contact histories, TB type, and case-fatality rates were similar for Beijing and non-Beijing genotype TB.

  13. Selection of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) genotypes using a genotype plus genotype x environment interaction biplot.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, A M; Teodoro, P E; Gonçalves, M C; Santos, A; Torres, F E

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the genotype plus genotype x environment interaction (GGE) biplot methodology has been used to investigate genotype x environment interactions in several crop species, but has not been applied to the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) crop in Brazil. The aim of this study was to identify common bean genotypes that exhibit high grain yield and stability in the State of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. We conducted 12 trials from 2000 to 2006 in the municipalities of Aquidauana and Dourados, and evaluated 13 genotypes in a randomized block design with three replications. Grain yield data were subjected to individual and joint analyses of variance. After analyzing the GE interaction, the adaptability and phenotypic stability of the common bean genotypes were analyzed using GGE biplot methodology. The genotypes EMGOPA-201, Xamego, and Aporé are recommended for growing in Mato Grosso do Sul, because they exhibited high grain yield and phenotypic stability. PMID:27525915

  14. Evaluating the impact of genotype errors on rare variant tests of association.

    PubMed

    Cook, Kaitlyn; Benitez, Alejandra; Fu, Casey; Tintle, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    The new class of rare variant tests has usually been evaluated assuming perfect genotype information. In reality, rare variant genotypes may be incorrect, and so rare variant tests should be robust to imperfect data. Errors and uncertainty in SNP genotyping are already known to dramatically impact statistical power for single marker tests on common variants and, in some cases, inflate the type I error rate. Recent results show that uncertainty in genotype calls derived from sequencing reads are dependent on several factors, including read depth, calling algorithm, number of alleles present in the sample, and the frequency at which an allele segregates in the population. We have recently proposed a general framework for the evaluation and investigation of rare variant tests of association, classifying most rare variant tests into one of two broad categories (length or joint tests). We use this framework to relate factors affecting genotype uncertainty to the power and type I error rate of rare variant tests. We find that non-differential genotype errors (an error process that occurs independent of phenotype) decrease power, with larger decreases for extremely rare variants, and for the common homozygote to heterozygote error. Differential genotype errors (an error process that is associated with phenotype status), lead to inflated type I error rates which are more likely to occur at sites with more common homozygote to heterozygote errors than vice versa. Finally, our work suggests that certain rare variant tests and study designs may be more robust to the inclusion of genotype errors. Further work is needed to directly integrate genotype calling algorithm decisions, study costs and test statistic choices to provide comprehensive design and analysis advice which appropriately accounts for the impact of genotype errors.

  15. Estimating genotypes with independently sampled descent graphs.

    PubMed

    Henshall, J M; Tier, B; Kerr, R J

    2001-12-01

    A method for estimating genotypic and identity-by-descent probabilities in complex pedigrees is described. The method consists of an algorithm for drawing independent genotype samples which are consistent with the pedigree and observed genotype. The probability distribution function for samples obtained using the algorithm can be evaluated up to a normalizing constant, and combined with the likelihood to produce a weight for each sample. Importance sampling is then used to estimate genotypic and identity-by-descent probabilities. On small but complex pedigrees, the genotypic probability estimates are demonstrated to be empirically unbiased. On large complex pedigrees, while the algorithm for obtaining genotype samples is feasible, importance sampling may require an infeasible number of samples to estimate genotypic probabilities with accuracy.

  16. Plant genotype, microbial recruitment and nutritional security

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Jai S.; Singh, Akanksha; Singh, Harikesh B.; Sarma, Birinchi K.

    2015-01-01

    Agricultural food products with high nutritional value should always be preferred over food products with low nutritional value. Efforts are being made to increase nutritional value of food by incorporating dietary supplements to the food products. The same is more desirous if the nutritional value of food is increased under natural environmental conditions especially in agricultural farms. Fragmented researches have demonstrated possibilities in achieving the same. The rhizosphere is vital in this regard for not only health and nutritional status of plants but also for the microorganisms colonizing the rhizosphere. Remarkably robust composition of plant microbiome with respect to other soil environments clearly suggests the role of a plant host in discriminating its colonizers (Zancarini et al., 2012). A large number of biotic and abiotic factors are believed to manipulate the microbial communities in the rhizosphere. However, plant genotype has proven to be the key in giving the final shape of the rhizosphere microbiome (Berendsen et al., 2012; Marques et al., 2014). PMID:26300905

  17. Plant genotype, microbial recruitment and nutritional security.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jai S; Singh, Akanksha; Singh, Harikesh B; Sarma, Birinchi K

    2015-01-01

    Agricultural food products with high nutritional value should always be preferred over food products with low nutritional value. Efforts are being made to increase nutritional value of food by incorporating dietary supplements to the food products. The same is more desirous if the nutritional value of food is increased under natural environmental conditions especially in agricultural farms. Fragmented researches have demonstrated possibilities in achieving the same. The rhizosphere is vital in this regard for not only health and nutritional status of plants but also for the microorganisms colonizing the rhizosphere. Remarkably robust composition of plant microbiome with respect to other soil environments clearly suggests the role of a plant host in discriminating its colonizers (Zancarini et al., 2012). A large number of biotic and abiotic factors are believed to manipulate the microbial communities in the rhizosphere. However, plant genotype has proven to be the key in giving the final shape of the rhizosphere microbiome (Berendsen et al., 2012; Marques et al., 2014). PMID:26300905

  18. Serotonin Transporter Genotype (5HTTLPR) Moderates the Longitudinal Impact of Atypical Attachment on Externalizing Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Humphreys, Kathryn L.; Zeanah, Charles H.; Nelson, Charles A.; Fox, Nathan A.; Drury, Stacy S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To test whether genotype of the serotonin transporter-linked polymorphic region (5HTTLPR) and atypical attachment interact to predict externalizing psychopathology prospectively in a sample of children with a history of early institutional care. Methods Caregiver report of externalizing behavior at 54 months was examined in 105 children initially reared in institutional care and enrolled in the Bucharest Early Intervention Project, a randomized controlled trial of high quality foster care. 5HTTLPR genotype, attachment status at 42 months of age (typical [secure, avoidant, or ambivalent] or atypical [disorganized-controlling, insecure-other]), as well as their interaction, were examined as predictors of externalizing behavior at age 54 months. Results 5HTTLPR genotype and atypical attachment at age 42 months interacted to predict externalizing behavior at age 54 months. Specifically, children with the s/s genotype with an atypical attachment had the highest externalizing scores. However, s/s children with a typical attachment demonstrated the lowest externalizing scores, even after controlling for intervention group status. There was no association between attachment status and externalizing behavior among children carrying at least one copy of the l allele. Discussion These findings indicate that genetic variation in the serotonergic system moderates the association between atypical attachment status and externalizing in young children. Our findings suggest that children, as a result of genetic variability in the serotonergic system, demonstrate differential sensitivity to the attachment relationship. PMID:25933228

  19. HIV Infection Affects Streptococcus mutans Levels, but Not Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, G.; Saxena, D.; Chen, Z.; Norman, R.G.; Phelan, J.A.; Laverty, M.; Fisch, G.S.; Corby, P.M.; Abrams, W.; Malamud, D.; Li, Y.

    2012-01-01

    We report a clinical study that examines whether HIV infection affects Streptococcus mutans colonization in the oral cavity. Whole stimulated saliva samples were collected from 46 HIV-seropositive individuals and 69 HIV-seronegative control individuals. The level of S. mutans colonization was determined by conventional culture methods. The genotype of S. mutans was compared between 10 HIV-positive individuals before and after highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and 10 non-HIV-infected control individuals. The results were analyzed against viral load, CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell counts, salivary flow rate, and caries status. We observed that S. mutans levels were higher in HIV-infected individuals than in the non-HIV-infected control individuals (p = 0.013). No significant differences in S. mutans genotypes were found between the two groups over the six-month study period, even after HAART. There was a bivariate linear relationship between S. mutans levels and CD8+ counts (r = 0.412; p = 0.007), but not between S. mutans levels and either CD4+ counts or viral load. Furthermore, compared with non-HIV-infected control individuals, HIV-infected individuals experienced lower salivary secretion (p = 0.009) and a positive trend toward more decayed tooth surfaces (p = 0.027). These findings suggest that HIV infection can have a significant effect on the level of S. mutans, but not genotypes. PMID:22821240

  20. ACTN3 GENOTYPE IS ASSOCIATED WITH TESTOSTERONE LEVELS OF ATHLETES

    PubMed Central

    Donnikov, A.E.; Trofimov, D.Y.

    2014-01-01

    α-Actinin-3 (ACTN3) has been proposed to regulate skeletal muscle differentiation and hypertrophy through its interaction with the signalling protein calcineurin. Since the inhibition of calcineurin potentiates the production of testosterone, we hypothesized that α-actinin-3 deficiency (predicted from the ACTN3 XX genotype) may influence serum levels of testosterone of athletes. Objective: To investigate the association of ACTN3 gene R577X polymorphism with resting testosterone levels in athletes. Methods: A total of 209 elite Russian athletes from different sports (119 males, 90 females) were genotyped for ACTN3 gene R577X polymorphism by real-time PCR. Resting testosterone was examined in serum of athletes using enzyme immunoassay. Results: The mean testosterone levels were significantly higher in both males and females with the ACTN3 R allele than in XX homozygotes (males: RR: 24.9 (5.7), RX: 21.8 (5.5), XX: 18.6 (4.9) ng · mL-1, P = 0.0071; females: RR: 1.43 (0.6), RX: 1.21 (0.71), XX: 0.79 (0.66) ng · mL-1, P = 0.0167). Conclusions: We found that the ACTN3 R allele was associated with high levels of testosterone in athletes, and this may explain, in part, the association between the ACTN3 RR genotype, skeletal muscle hypertrophy and power athlete status. PMID:24899773

  1. UGT genotyping in belinostat dosing.

    PubMed

    Goey, Andrew K L; Figg, William D

    2016-03-01

    Certain genetic polymorphisms of UDP glucuronosyltransferase 1 family, polypeptide A1 (UGT1A1) can reduce gene expression (*28, *60, *93) or activity (*6), thereby altering the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and the risk of toxicities of UGT1A1 substrates, of which irinotecan is a widely-described example. This review presents an overview of the clinical effects of UGT1A1 polymorphisms on the pharmacology of UGT1A1 substrates, with a special focus on the novel histone deacetylase inhibitor belinostat. Belinostat, approved for the treatment of peripheral T-cell lymphoma, is primarily glucuronidated by UGT1A1. Recent preclinical and clinical data showed that UGT1A1*28 was associated with reduced glucuronidation in human liver microsomes, while in a retrospective analysis of a Phase I trial with patients receiving belinostat UGT1A1*60 was predominantly associated with increased belinostat plasma concentrations. Furthermore, both UGT1A1*28 and *60 variants were associated with increased incidence of thrombocytopenia and neutropenia. Using population pharmacokinetic analysis a 33% dose reduction has been proposed for patients carrying UGT1A1 variant alleles. Clinical effects of this genotype-based dosing recommendation is currently prospectively being investigated. Overall, the data suggest that UGT1A1 genotyping is useful for improving belinostat therapy. PMID:26773202

  2. Rotavirus genotypes in Belarus, 2008-2012.

    PubMed

    Semeiko, Galina V; Yermalovich, Marina A; Poliakova, Nadezhda; Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Kerin, Tara K; Wasley, Annemarie; Videbaek, Dovile; Gentsch, Jon R; Bowen, Michael D; Samoilovich, Elena O

    2014-12-01

    This study describes group A rotavirus (RVA) genotype prevalence in Belarus from 2008 to 2012. In 2008, data from 3 sites in Belarus (Brest, Mogilev, Minsk) indicated that G4P[8] was the predominant genotype. Data from Minsk (2008-2012) showed that G4P[8] was the predominant RVA genotype in all years except in 2011 when G3P[8] was most frequently detected. Other RVA genotypes common in Europe (G1P[8], G2P[4]) were detected each year of the study. This study reveals the dominance of genotype G4P[8] in Belarus and helps to establish the baseline genotype prevalence prior to RVA vaccine introduction in the country.

  3. Detection of Rotavirus Genotypes in Korea 5 Years after the Introduction of Rotavirus Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ju-Young; Kim, Min-Sung; Jung, Tae Woong; Kim, Seong Joon; Kang, Jin-Han; Han, Seung Beom; Kim, Sang Yong; Rhim, Jung Woo; Kim, Hwang-Min; Park, Jae Hong; Jo, Dae Sun; Ma, Sang Hyuk; Jeong, Hye-Sook; Cheon, Doo-Sung; Kim, Jong-Hyun

    2015-10-01

    Rotavirus (RV) is one of the most important viral etiologic agents of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in children. Although effective RV vaccines (RVVs) are now used worldwide, novel genotypes and outbreaks resulting from rare genotype combinations have emerged. This study documented RV genotypes in a Korean population of children with AGE 5 yr after the introduction of RVV and assessed potential genotype differences based on vaccination status or vaccine type. Children less than 5-yr-old diagnosed with AGE between October 2012 and September 2013 admitted to 9 medical institutions from 8 provinces in Korea were prospectively enrolled. Stool samples were tested for RV by enzyme immunoassay and genotyped by multiplex reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. In 346 patients, 114 (32.9%) were RV-positive. Among them, 87 (76.3%) patients were infected with RV alone. Eighty-six of 114 RV-positive stool samples were successfully genotyped, and their combinations of genotypes were G1P[8] (36, 41.9%), G2P[4] (12, 14.0%), and G3P[8] (6, 7.0%). RV was detected in 27.8% of patients in the vaccinated group and 39.8% in the unvaccinated group (P=0.035). Vaccination history was available for 67 of 86 cases with successfully genotyped RV-positive stool samples; RotaTeq (20, 29.9%), Rotarix (7, 10.4%), unvaccinated (40, 59.7%). The incidence of RV AGE is lower in the RV-vaccinated group compared to the unvaccinated group with no evidence of substitution with unusual genotype combinations.

  4. Different Risk Indictors of Diabetic Nephropathy in Transforming Growth Factor-beta1 T869C CC/CT Genotype and TT Genotype

    PubMed Central

    MOU, Xin; LIU, Yinghui; ZHOU, Diyi; HU, Yongbin; MA, Guoling; SHOU, Chengmin; CHEN, Jiawei; ZHOU, Danyang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Transforming growth factor-beta 1(TGF-β1) T869C (rs1800470, the same below) gene polymorphism is notably relative with the development of Diabetic Nephropathy (DN), and CC/CT genotype diabetic have higher frequency of than TT genotype diabetic. To find out individual risk factors in the two genotypes especially in susceptible genotype could provide more efficient and targeted prevention. Methods: This was a prospective cohort study. A total of 251 type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients [53.4% male, 56(52–67) years] were enrolled in this cohort study. Multiple concerned factors were collected and the relationship of these risk factors and development of DN were evaluated by Cox regression analysis. Hazard ratios of development of DN were calculated by Kaplan-Meier curves and the Cox proportional hazards model for CC/CT genotype versus TT genotype patients. Results: TGF-β1 T869C gene polymorphism was an independent predictor of DN in T2DM patients (HR, 2.08; 95%CI, 1.18–3.66; P=0.012). Hyperlipemia (HR, 1.91; 95%CI, 1.19–3.08; P=0.007), age (HR, 0.95; 95%CI, 0.93–0.98; P=0.001) and smoking status (HR, 2.36; 95%CI, 1.07–5.21; P=0.033) were risk indictors of the development of DN in CC/CT genotype patients. HbA1c (HR, 2.8; 95%CI, 1.07–7.30; P=0.036), hypertension (HR, 7.46; 95%CI, 1.38–40.29; P=0.02), and hyperlipemia (HR, 12.33; 95%CI, 1.05–145.39; P=0.046) were risk indictors for the development of DN in TT genotype patients. Conclusion: TGF-β1 T869C gene polymorphism was an independent predictor of DN for T2DM patients and CC/CT genotype had higher susceptibility to DN. CC/CT genotype and TT genotype patients had different risk indictors of DN. PMID:27648419

  5. Different Risk Indictors of Diabetic Nephropathy in Transforming Growth Factor-beta1 T869C CC/CT Genotype and TT Genotype

    PubMed Central

    MOU, Xin; LIU, Yinghui; ZHOU, Diyi; HU, Yongbin; MA, Guoling; SHOU, Chengmin; CHEN, Jiawei; ZHOU, Danyang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Transforming growth factor-beta 1(TGF-β1) T869C (rs1800470, the same below) gene polymorphism is notably relative with the development of Diabetic Nephropathy (DN), and CC/CT genotype diabetic have higher frequency of than TT genotype diabetic. To find out individual risk factors in the two genotypes especially in susceptible genotype could provide more efficient and targeted prevention. Methods: This was a prospective cohort study. A total of 251 type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients [53.4% male, 56(52–67) years] were enrolled in this cohort study. Multiple concerned factors were collected and the relationship of these risk factors and development of DN were evaluated by Cox regression analysis. Hazard ratios of development of DN were calculated by Kaplan-Meier curves and the Cox proportional hazards model for CC/CT genotype versus TT genotype patients. Results: TGF-β1 T869C gene polymorphism was an independent predictor of DN in T2DM patients (HR, 2.08; 95%CI, 1.18–3.66; P=0.012). Hyperlipemia (HR, 1.91; 95%CI, 1.19–3.08; P=0.007), age (HR, 0.95; 95%CI, 0.93–0.98; P=0.001) and smoking status (HR, 2.36; 95%CI, 1.07–5.21; P=0.033) were risk indictors of the development of DN in CC/CT genotype patients. HbA1c (HR, 2.8; 95%CI, 1.07–7.30; P=0.036), hypertension (HR, 7.46; 95%CI, 1.38–40.29; P=0.02), and hyperlipemia (HR, 12.33; 95%CI, 1.05–145.39; P=0.046) were risk indictors for the development of DN in TT genotype patients. Conclusion: TGF-β1 T869C gene polymorphism was an independent predictor of DN for T2DM patients and CC/CT genotype had higher susceptibility to DN. CC/CT genotype and TT genotype patients had different risk indictors of DN.

  6. Additional novel Cryptosporidium genotypes in ornamental fishes.

    PubMed

    Morine, M; Yang, R; Ng, J; Kueh, S; Lymbery, A J; Ryan, U M

    2012-12-21

    Current knowledge on the prevalence and genotypes of Cryptosporidium in fishes is still limited. This study investigated the prevalence of Cryptosporidium species in 171 ornamental fishes, belonging to 33 species, collected from 8 commercial aquariums around Perth, Western Australia. All samples were screened by nested PCR targeting the 18S rRNA locus. A total of 6 positives were identified by PCR at the 18S locus from 4 different species of fishes (red eye tetra, Moenkhausia sanctaefilomenae; gold gourami, Trichogaster trichopterus; neon tetra, Paracheirodon innesi; goldfish, Carassius auratus auratus), giving an overall prevalence of 3.5% (6/171). Four different genotypes were identified, only one of which has been previously reported in fish; piscine genotype 4 in a neon tetra isolate, a rat genotype III-like isolate in a goldfish, a novel genotype in three isolates from red eye (piscine genotype 7) which exhibited a 3.5% genetic distance from piscine genotype 1 and a piscine genotype 6-like from a gold gourami (1% genetic distance). Further biological and genetic characterisation is required to determine the relationship of these genotypes to established species and strains of Cryptosporidium. PMID:22819587

  7. Hepatitis C virus genotypes in Myanmar

    PubMed Central

    Win, Nan Nwe; Kanda, Tatsuo; Nakamoto, Shingo; Yokosuka, Osamu; Shirasawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Myanmar is adjacent to India, Bangladesh, Thailand, Laos and China. In Myanmar, the prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is 2%, and HCV infection accounts for 25% of hepatocellular carcinoma. In this study, we reviewed the prevalence of HCV genotypes in Myanmar. HCV genotypes 1, 3 and 6 were observed in volunteer blood donors in and around the Myanmar city of Yangon. Although there are several reports of HCV genotype 6 and its variants in Myanmar, the distribution of the HCV genotypes has not been well documented in areas other than Yangon. Previous studies showed that treatment with peginterferon and a weight-based dose of ribavirin for 24 or 48 wk could lead to an 80%-100% sustained virological response (SVR) rates in Myanmar. Current interferon-free treatments could lead to higher SVR rates (90%-95%) in patients infected with almost all HCV genotypes other than HCV genotype 3. In an era of heavy reliance on direct-acting antivirals against HCV, there is an increasing need to measure HCV genotypes, and this need will also increase specifically in Myanmar. Current available information of HCV genotypes were mostly from Yangon and other countries than Myanmar. The prevalence of HCV genotypes in Myanmar should be determined. PMID:27468202

  8. Using DNA pools for genotyping trios.

    PubMed

    Beckman, Kenneth B; Abel, Kenneth J; Braun, Andreas; Halperin, Eran

    2006-01-01

    The genotyping of mother-father-child trios is a very useful tool in disease association studies, as trios eliminate population stratification effects and increase the accuracy of haplotype inference. Unfortunately, the use of trios for association studies may reduce power, since it requires the genotyping of three individuals where only four independent haplotypes are involved. We describe here a method for genotyping a trio using two DNA pools, thus reducing the cost of genotyping trios to that of genotyping two individuals. Furthermore, we present extensions to the method that exploit the linkage disequilibrium structure to compensate for missing data and genotyping errors. We evaluated our method on trios from CEPH pedigree 66 of the Coriell Institute. We demonstrate that the error rates in the genotype calls of the proposed protocol are comparable to those of standard genotyping techniques, although the cost is reduced considerably. The approach described is generic and it can be applied to any genotyping platform that achieves a reasonable precision of allele frequency estimates from pools of two individuals. Using this approach, future trio-based association studies may be able to increase the sample size by 50% for the same cost and thereby increase the power to detect associations.

  9. Genotypic analysis of primary and metastatic cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Rao, U N M; Jones, M W; Finkelstein, S D

    2003-01-01

    Microdissection genotyping was performed on 16 cases of melanoma, including two cutaneous and one lymph node metastases. Three benign nevi were used as controls. Where possible, tumor was microdissected at several sites. Genotyping involved assessment of loss of heterozygosity [LOH]), which was accomplished using a panel of nine polymorphic tetranucleotide microsatellites. Polymerase chain reaction was performed on the normal tissue sample to establish microsatellite heterozygous status. Informative markers were then tested on microdissected lesional tissue and scored for the presence and extent of allelic imbalance (AI). Microsatellite informativeness varied from 33% to 66%. Benign nevi were without AI. All invasive melanomas manifested acquired allelic loss, which involved 75% or 100% of the markers shown to be informative for each subject. Eleven of 13 (84%) primary melanomas demonstrated intratumoral heterogeneity of AI consistent with development of tumor subclones with differing genotypic profiles within thin as well as thick melanomas. Although a consistent pattern did not emerge among the markers, LOH of 9p21 (D9S254) occurred in 60% (9/15) of the cases followed by 40% of cases displaying LOH of 1p34, p53, 10q (MXI1), and 10q23 (D10S520) and 25% with 5q21 (D5S 592) abnormalities. A third of the cases including the metastatic foci demonstrated two different patterns of AI affecting alternative alleles of the same genomic marker within different parts of the melanoma. Two melanomas in situ did not display LOH of any markers in the informative cases although the in situ component in the invasive tumors had allelic losses that were in part similar to the invasive areas. The results of this study support the expanded use of microdissection genotyping and explore other markers to define the unique mutational profile for malignant melanoma that may complement other histologic characteristics of melanoma. PMID:12550756

  10. SNP genotyping by heteroduplex analysis.

    PubMed

    Paniego, Norma; Fusari, Corina; Lia, Verónica; Puebla, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Heteroduplex-based genotyping methods have proven to be technologically effective and economically efficient for low- to medium-range throughput single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) determination. In this chapter we describe two protocols that were successfully applied for SNP detection and haplotype analysis of candidate genes in association studies. The protocols involve (1) enzymatic mismatch cleavage with endonuclease CEL1 from celery, associated with fragment separation using capillary electrophoresis (CEL1 cleavage), and (2) differential retention of the homo/heteroduplex DNA molecules under partial denaturing conditions on ion pair reversed-phase liquid chromatography (dHPLC). Both methods are complementary since dHPLC is more versatile than CEL1 cleavage for identifying multiple SNP per target region, and the latter is easily optimized for sequences with fewer SNPs or small insertion/deletion polymorphisms. Besides, CEL1 cleavage is a powerful method to localize the position of the mutation when fragment resolution is done using capillary electrophoresis.

  11. minimac2: faster genotype imputation

    PubMed Central

    Fuchsberger, Christian; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Hinds, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Genotype imputation is a key step in the analysis of genome-wide association studies. Upcoming very large reference panels, such as those from The 1000 Genomes Project and the Haplotype Consortium, will improve imputation quality of rare and less common variants, but will also increase the computational burden. Here, we demonstrate how the application of software engineering techniques can help to keep imputation broadly accessible. Overall, these improvements speed up imputation by an order of magnitude compared with our previous implementation. Availability and implementation: minimac2, including source code, documentation, and examples is available at http://genome.sph.umich.edu/wiki/Minimac2 Contact: cfuchsb@umich.edu, goncalo@umich.edu PMID:25338720

  12. Association between susceptible genotypes to periodontitis and clinical outcomes of periodontal regenerative therapy: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Koidou, Vasiliki-Petros

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this review is to systematically investigate the effect of a susceptible genotype to periodontitis with the clinical outcomes of periodontal regeneration. Material and Methods Based on a focused question, an electronic search identified 155 unique citations. Three journals (Journal of Periodontology, Journal of Clinical Periodontology and Journal of Periodontal Research), references of relevant studies and review articles were hand-searched. Two independent reviewers implementing eligibility inclusion criteria selected the studies. Results Of the 155, four studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. All studies were published between 2000 and 2004 and the samples’ size was 40 to 86 patients. Polymorphisms of Interleukin-1 (IL-1) gene were included in all. Three out of four studies failed to identify an association between susceptible genotypes to periodontitis and clinical outcomes of periodontal regeneration, while one found an association. The heterogeneity and small number of studies included prevented the conduct of a meta-analysis. No studies were identified evaluating the effect of other genotypes and as a result only IL-1 genotype studies were included. Conclusions Within the limits of the present review, no direct conclusion for the effect of a susceptible IL-1 genotype status to the clinical outcome after periodontal regeneration could be drawn. The need of more qualitative studies to explore a possible association emerges. Key words:Periodontitis, genotype, periodontal therapy, regeneration, susceptibility, systematic review. PMID:26946210

  13. Chikungunya Outbreaks Caused by African Genotype, India

    PubMed Central

    Yergolkar, Prasanna N.; Tandale, Babasaheb V.; Arankalle, Vidya A.; Sathe, Padmakar S.; Gandhe, Swati S.; Gokhle, Mangesh D.; Jacob, George P.; Hundekar, Supriya L.

    2006-01-01

    Chikungunya fever is reported in India after 32 years. Immunoglobulin M antibodies and virus isolation confirmed the cause. Phylogenic analysis based on partial sequences of NS4 and E1 genes showed that all earlier isolates (1963–1973) were Asian genotype, whereas the current and Yawat (2000) isolates were African genotype. PMID:17176577

  14. Disentangling pooled triad genotypes for association studies.

    PubMed

    Shi, Min; Umbach, David M; Weinberg, Clarice R

    2014-09-01

    Association studies that genotype affected offspring and their parents (triads) offer robustness to genetic population structure while enabling assessments of maternal effects, parent-of-origin effects, and gene-by-environment interaction. We propose case-parents designs that use pooled DNA specimens to make economical use of limited available specimens. One can markedly reduce the number of genotyping assays required by randomly partitioning the case-parent triads into pooling sets of h triads each and creating three pools from every pooling set, one pool each for mothers, fathers, and offspring. Maximum-likelihood estimation of relative risk parameters proceeds via log-linear modeling using the expectation-maximization algorithm. The approach can assess offspring and maternal genetic effects and accommodate genotyping errors and missing genotypes. We compare the power of our proposed analysis for testing offspring and maternal genetic effects to that based on a difference approach and that of the gold standard based on individual genotypes, under a range of allele frequencies, missing parent proportions, and genotyping error rates. Power calculations show that the pooling strategies cause only modest reductions in power if genotyping errors are low, while reducing genotyping costs and conserving limited specimens.

  15. Estimating Genotype- and Environment-Specific Heritabilities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The advantages of computing genotype- and environment-specific heritabilities are discussed. A statistical approach is used in which logvariances of both genotype by environment interaction and error are modeled as random variables. Resulting estimators of variances are weighted averages of a pool...

  16. Using genotypic information to reduce disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this presentation is to provide a cursory overview of how genotypic data may be utilized by veterinarians in the future. Genotypic information is accumulating at a rapid pace. This information may reveal deleterious genes, quantitative trait loci, and genetic predisposition for a ...

  17. Filling in missing genotypes using haplotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Unknown genotypes can be made known (imputed) from observed genotypes at the same or nearby loci of relatives using pedigree haplotyping, or from matching allele patterns (regardless of pedigree) using population haplotyping. Fortran program findhap.f90 was designed to combine population and pedigre...

  18. New cryptosporidium genotypes in HIV-infected persons.

    PubMed Central

    Pieniazek, N. J.; Bornay-Llinares, F. J.; Slemenda, S. B.; da Silva, A. J.; Moura, I. N.; Arrowood, M. J.; Ditrich, O.; Addiss, D. G.

    1999-01-01

    Using DNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis, we identified four distinct Cryptosporidium genotypes in HIV-infected patients: genotype 1 (human), genotype 2 (bovine) Cryptosporidium parvum, a genotype identical to C. felis, and one identical to a Cryptosporidium sp. isolate from a dog. This is the first identification of human infection with the latter two genotypes. PMID:10341184

  19. Toward fully automated genotyping: Genotyping microsatellite markers by deconvolution

    SciTech Connect

    Perlin, M.W.; Lancia, G.; See-Kiong, Ng

    1995-11-01

    Dense genetic linkage maps have been constructed for the human and mouse genomes, with average densities of 2.9 cM and 0.35 cM, respectively. These genetic maps are crucial for mapping both Mendelian and complex traits and are useful in clinical genetic diagnosis. Current maps are largely comprised of abundant, easily assayed, and highly polymorphic PCR-based microsatellite markers, primarily dinucleotide (CA){sub n} repeats. One key limitation of these length polymorphisms is the PCR stutter (or slippage) artifact that introduces additional stutter bands. With two (or more) closely spaced alleles, the stutter bands overlap, and it is difficult to accurately determine the correct alleles; this stutter phenomenon has all but precluded full automation, since a human must visually inspect the allele data. We describe here novel deconvolution methods for accurate genotyping that mathematically remove PCR stutter artifact from microsatellite markers. These methods overcome the manual interpretation bottleneck and thereby enable full automation of genetic map construction and use. New functionalities, including the pooling of DNAs and the pooling of markers, are described that may greatly reduce the associated experimentation requirements. 32 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Human papillomavirus genotypes and their association with cervical neoplasia in a cohort of Western Australian women.

    PubMed

    Brestovac, Brian; Harnett, Gerry B; Smith, David W; Shellam, Geoffrey R; Frost, Felicity A

    2005-05-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is known to be the cause of almost all cervical cancers. The genotypes have been classified into high and low risk types according to their oncogenic potential. However, data for many of the genotypes are limited and some (HPV-26, 53, and 66) have no agreed status. A study was undertaken to determine the HPV genotype distribution in women of Western Australia and the association with cervical neoplasia. Liquid based cervical samples from a cohort of 282 Western Australian women were tested for HPV DNA by PCR followed by DNA sequencing to determine HPV genotypes. HPV-53 and HPV-16 were the most common genotypes found in this population. In addition 86 archived liquid based cervical samples from women with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grades 1-3 (CIN 1-3) were tested for HPV DNA. Also 32 archived paraffin biopsy samples from women with squamous cell carcinoma were also tested. HPV-16 was the most common genotype found in these samples. Of the cohort of Western Australian women tested, 27% were found to contain HPV and approximately half of these contained known high-risk HPV genotypes, but only 30% of these were types 16 or 18. The data from this study indicate that HPV-53 is not oncogenic based on an R value and odds ratio (OR) of zero. The data also suggest that HPV-73 may be oncogenic, while HPV-66 is unlikely to be. Two high-risk HPV genotypes that are associated with the Asian region (HPV-52 and HPV-58) were found in Western Australian women suggesting a possible epidemiological link between women in these countries.

  1. Folate Intake at RDA Levels Is Inadequate for Mexican American Men with the Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase 677TT Genotype123

    PubMed Central

    Solis, Claudia; Veenema, Kristin; Ivanov, Alexandre A.; Tran, Sally; Li, Rui; Wang, Wei; Moriarty, David J.; Maletz, Charles V.; Caudill, Marie A.

    2009-01-01

    Since the establishment of the 1998 folate recommended dietary allowance (RDA), the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) 677C→T variant has emerged as a strong modifier of folate status. This controlled feeding study investigated the adequacy of the RDA, 400 μg/d as dietary folate equivalents (DFE), for Mexican American men with the MTHFR 677CC or TT genotype. Because of the interdependency between folate and choline, the influence of choline intake on folate status was also assessed. Mexican American men (n = 60; 18–55 y) with the MTHFR 677CC (n = 31) or TT (n = 29) genotype consumed 438 μg DFE/d and total choline intakes of 300, 550 (choline adequate intake), 1100, or 2200 mg/d for 12 wk. Folate status response was assessed via serum folate (SF), RBC folate, plasma total homocysteine (tHcy), and urinary folate. SF decreased (P < 0.001) 66% to 7.9 ± 0.7 nmol/L (means ± SEM) in men with the 677TT genotype and 62% to 11.3 ± 0.9 nmol/L in the 677CC genotype. Plasma tHcy increased (P < 0.0001) 170% to 31 ± 3 μmol/L in men with the 677TT genotype and 18% to 11.6 ± 0.3 μmol/L in the 677CC genotype. At the end of the study, 34% (677TT) and 16% (677CC) had SF concentrations <6.8 nmol/L and 79% (677TT) and 7% (677CC) had tHcy concentrations >14 μmol/L. Choline intake did not influence the response of the measured variables. These data showed that the folate RDA is not adequate for men of Mexican descent, particularly for those with the MTHFR 677TT genotype, and demonstrated a lack of influence of choline intake on the folate status variables measured in this study. PMID:18156406

  2. Flavonoid profile of green asparagus genotypes.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Alventosa, J M; Jaramillo, S; Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, G; Cermeño, P; Espejo, J A; Jiménez-Araujo, A; Guillén-Bejarano, R; Fernández-Bolaños, J; Rodríguez-Arcos, R

    2008-08-27

    The determination of flavonoid profiles from different genotypes of triguero asparagus and their comparison to those from green asparagus commercial hybrids was the main goal of this study. The samples consisted of 32 commercial hybrids and 65 genotypes from the Huetor-Tajar population variety (triguero). The analysis of individual flavonoids by HPLC-DAD-MS has allowed the determination of eight naturally occurring flavonol derivatives in several genotypes of triguero asparagus. Those compounds included mono-, di-, and triglycosides of three flavonols, that is, quercetin, isorhamnetin, and kaempferol. The detailed analysis of the flavonoid profiles revealed significant differences among the distinct genotypes. These have been classified in three distinct groups as the result of a k-means clustering analysis, two of them containing both commercial hybrids and triguero asparagus and another cluster constituted by 21 genotypes of triguero asparagus, which contain several key flavonol derivatives able to differentiate them. Hence, the triglycosides tentatively identified as quercetin-3-rhamnosyl-rutinoside, isorhamnetin-3-rhamnosyl-rutinoside, and isorhamnetin-3-O-glucoside have been detected only in the genotypes grouped in the above-mentioned cluster. On the other hand, the compound tentatively identified as isorhamnetin-3-glucosyl-rutinoside was present in most genotypes of triguero asparagus, whereas it has not been detected in any of the commercial hybrids.

  3. Hepatitis C virus genotypes in Tirana, Albania.

    PubMed

    Haldeda, Migena; Baume, Julien; Tamalet, Catherine; Bizhga, Melpomeni; Colson, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a worldwide concern. Knowledge of the HCV genotype is clinically important because it predicts the rate of response to therapy and guides the treatment duration. Moreover, it allows molecular epidemiology to be performed. To our knowledge, the prevalence of HCV genotypes has been assessed only once in Albania, using a line probe genotyping assay. We determined HCV genotypes by population sequencing of HCV-infected patients in Tirana, Albania. HCV genotype and sequence analyses were performed for serum samples collected from January 2011 through May 2012 from 61 HCV-seropositive patients using population sequencing of the NS3 protease gene and alternatively the NS5b gene and the 5' untranslated region (UTR). HCV RNA was retrieved from the blood samples of 50 patients. The HCV NS3 protease gene was sequenced for 28 patients and NS5b and/or 5'UTR fragments were sequenced for an additional 22 patients. The predominant genotype was 1b in 25 patients (50%), followed by genotypes 2c, 4a, 3a, and 1a in 18%, 14%, 8%, and 6% of cases, respectively. Best matches for these HCV RNAs in GenBank were obtained in different countries worldwide. One NS3 protease naturally harbored an amino acid conferring minor drug resistance to newly available HCV protease inhibitors. In conclusion, HCV-1b was predominant in the present Albanian population, as in southeastern Europe.

  4. ACTN3 genotype in professional soccer players.

    PubMed

    Santiago, C; González-Freire, M; Serratosa, L; Morate, F J; Meyer, T; Gómez-Gallego, F; Lucia, A

    2008-01-01

    The authors studied the frequency distribution of alpha-actinin-3 (ACTN3) R577X genotypes in 60 top-level professional soccer players. The results were compared with those of 52 elite endurance athletes and 123 sedentary controls. The per cent distribution of RR and RX genotypes in soccer players (48.3% and 36.7%) was significantly higher and lower, respectively, than controls (28.5% and 53.7%) and endurance athletes (26.5% and 52%) (p = 0.041). Although there are notable exceptions, elite soccer players tend to have the sprint/power ACTN3 genotype.

  5. Clinical significance of human papillomavirus genotyping.

    PubMed

    Choi, Youn Jin; Park, Jong Sup

    2016-03-01

    Cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer in women worldwide, and the human papillomavirus (HPV) is the main causative agent for its development. HPV is a heterogeneous virus, and a persistent infection with a high-risk HPV contributes to the development of cancer. In recent decades, great advances have been made in understanding the molecular biology of HPV, and HPV's significance in cervical cancer prevention and management has received increased attention. In this review, we discuss the role of HPV genotyping in cervical cancer by addressing: clinically important issues in HPV virology; the current application of HPV genotyping in clinical medicine; and potential future uses for HPV genotyping.

  6. Molecular Taxonomic Evidence for Two Distinct Genotypes of Mycobacterium yongonense via Genome-Based Phylogenetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byoung-Jun; Kim, Bo-Ram; Lee, So-Young; Kim, Ga-Na; Kook, Yoon-Hoh; Kim, Bum-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we introduced a distinct Mycobacterium intracellulare INT-5 genotype, distantly related to other genotypes of M. intracellulare (INT-1 to -4). The aim of this study is to determine the exact taxonomic status of the M. intracellulare INT-5 genotype via genome-based phylogenetic analysis. To this end, genome sequences of the two INT-5 strains, MOTT-H4Y and MOTT-36Y were compared with M. intracellulare ATCC 13950T and Mycobacterium yongonense DSM 45126T. Our phylogenetic analysis based on complete genome sequences, multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) of 35 target genes, and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis indicated that the two INT-5 strains were more closely related to M. yongonense DSM 45126T than the M. intracellulare strains. These results suggest their taxonomic transfer from M. intracellulare into M. yongonense. Finally, we selected 5 target genes (argH, dnaA, deaD, hsp65, and recF) and used SNPs for the identification of M. yongonese strains from other M. avium complex (MAC) strains. The application of the SNP analysis to 14 MAC clinical isolates enabled the selective identification of 4 M. yongonense clinical isolates from the other MACs. In conclusion, our genome-based phylogenetic analysis showed that the taxonomic status of two INT-5 strains, MOTT-H4Y and MOTT-36Y should be revised into M. yongonense. Our results also suggest that M. yongonense could be divided into 2 distinct genotypes (the Type I genotype with the M. parascrofulaceum rpoB gene and the Type II genotype with the M. intracellulare rpoB gene) depending on the presence of the lateral gene transfer of rpoB from M. parascrofulaceum. PMID:27031100

  7. Can Clustering in Genotype Space Reveal "Niches"?

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, Rafael; Ostling, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Community ecology lacks the success enjoyed by population genetics to quantify the relative roles played by deterministic and stochastic processes. It has been proposed that clustered patterns of abundance in genotype space provide evidence of selection in microbial communities, since no such clustering would arise in the absence of selection. We critique this test for its unrealistic null hypothesis. We show mathematically and with simulations that point mutations alone lead to clustering in genotype space by causing correlations between abundances of similar genotypes. We also show potential deviations from the mutation-only pattern caused by immigration from a source pool. Clustered patterns in genotype space may still be revealing of selection if analyzed quantitatively but only if neutral and selective regimes can be distinguished once mutation and immigration are included in the null model.

  8. Rapid genotyping of swine influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Mak, Polly W Y; Wong, Chloe K S; Li, Olive T W; Chan, Kwok Hung; Cheung, Chung Lam; Ma, Edward S; Webby, Richard J; Guan, Yi; Malik Peiris, Joseph S; Poon, Leo L M

    2011-04-01

    The emergence of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus highlighted the need for enhanced surveillance of swine influenza viruses. We used real-time reverse-transcription PCR-based genotyping and found that this rapid and simple genotyping method may identify reassortants derived from viruses of Eurasian avian-like, triple reassortant-like, and pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus lineages.

  9. Rapid Genotyping of Swine Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Polly W.Y.; Wong, Chloe K.S.; Li, Olive T.W.; Chan, Kwok Hung; Cheung, Chung Lam; Ma, Edward S.; Webby, Richard J.; Guan, Yi; Peiris, Joseph S. Malik

    2011-01-01

    The emergence of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus highlighted the need for enhanced surveillance of swine influenza viruses. We used real-time reverse–transcription PCR–based genotyping and found that this rapid and simple genotyping method may identify reassortants derived from viruses of Eurasian avian-like, triple reassortant-like, and pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus lineages. PMID:21470462

  10. XYY genotype and crime: 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Freyne, A; O'Connor, A

    1992-07-01

    The presence of 47, XYY genotype has stimulated much debate as to whether these men are more likely to indulge in criminal and violent behaviour than 46, XY males. Two cases of XYY men who had committed murder are described, and the current literature regarding criminality and psychopathology in XYY males is reviewed. It is important that Forensic Psychiatrists with XYY patients are aware of these issues as the link between XYY genotype and criminality may be raised in court.

  11. Genotype List String: a grammar for describing HLA and KIR genotyping results in a text string.

    PubMed

    Milius, R P; Mack, S J; Hollenbach, J A; Pollack, J; Heuer, M L; Gragert, L; Spellman, S; Guethlein, L A; Trachtenberg, E A; Cooley, S; Bochtler, W; Mueller, C R; Robinson, J; Marsh, S G E; Maiers, M

    2013-08-01

    Knowledge of an individual's human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotype is essential for modern medical genetics, and is crucial for hematopoietic stem cell and solid-organ transplantation. However, the high levels of polymorphism known for the HLA genes make it difficult to generate an HLA genotype that unambiguously identifies the alleles that are present at a given HLA locus in an individual. For the last 20 years, the histocompatibility and immunogenetics community has recorded this HLA genotyping ambiguity using allele codes developed by the National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP). While these allele codes may have been effective for recording an HLA genotyping result when initially developed, their use today results in increased ambiguity in an HLA genotype, and they are no longer suitable in the era of rapid allele discovery and ultra-high allele polymorphism. Here, we present a text string format capable of fully representing HLA genotyping results. This Genotype List (GL) String format is an extension of a proposed standard for reporting killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) genotype data that can be applied to any genetic data that use a standard nomenclature for identifying variants. The GL String format uses a hierarchical set of operators to describe the relationships between alleles, lists of possible alleles, phased alleles, genotypes, lists of possible genotypes, and multilocus unphased genotypes, without losing typing information or increasing typing ambiguity. When used in concert with appropriate tools to create, exchange, and parse these strings, we anticipate that GL Strings will replace NMDP allele codes for reporting HLA genotypes.

  12. Efficient genotype elimination via adaptive allele consolidation.

    PubMed

    De Francesco, Nicoletta; Lettieri, Giuseppe; Martini, Luca

    2012-01-01

    We propose the technique of Adaptive Allele Consolidation, that greatly improves the performance of the Lange-Goradia algorithm for genotype elimination in pedigrees, while still producing equivalent output. Genotype elimination consists in removing from a pedigree those genotypes that are impossible according to the Mendelian law of inheritance. This is used to find errors in genetic data and is useful as a preprocessing step in other analyses (such as linkage analysis or haplotype imputation). The problem of genotype elimination is intrinsically combinatorial, and Allele Consolidation is an existing technique where several alleles are replaced by a single “lumped” allele in order to reduce the number of combinations of genotypes that have to be considered, possibly at the expense of precision. In existing Allele Consolidation techniques, alleles are lumped once and for all before performing genotype elimination. The idea of Adaptive Allele Consolidation is to dynamically change the set of alleles that are lumped together during the execution of the Lange-Goradia algorithm, so that both high performance and precision are achieved. We have implemented the technique in a tool called Celer and evaluated it on a large set of scenarios, with good results.

  13. Monitoring coyote population dynamics by genotyping faeces.

    PubMed

    Prugh, L R; Ritland, C E; Arthur, S M; Krebs, C J

    2005-04-01

    Reliable population estimates are necessary for effective conservation and management, and faecal genotyping has been used successfully to estimate the population size of several elusive mammalian species. Information such as changes in population size over time and survival rates, however, are often more useful for conservation biology than single population estimates. We evaluated the use of faecal genotyping as a tool for monitoring long-term population dynamics, using coyotes (Canis latrans) in the Alaska Range as a case study. We obtained 544 genotypes from 56 coyotes over 3 years (2000-2002). Tissue samples from all 15 radio-collared coyotes in our study area had > or = 1 matching faecal genotypes. We used flexible maximum-likelihood models to study coyote population dynamics, and we tested model performance against radio telemetry data. The staple prey of coyotes, snowshoe hares (Lepus americanus), dramatically declined during this study, and the coyote population declined nearly two-fold with a 1(1/2)-year time lag. Survival rates declined the year after hares crashed but recovered the following year. We conclude that long-term monitoring of elusive species using faecal genotyping is feasible and can provide data that are useful for wildlife conservation and management. We highlight some drawbacks of standard open-population models, such as low precision and the requirement of discrete sampling intervals, and we suggest that the development of open models designed for continuously collected data would enhance the utility of faecal genotyping as a monitoring tool.

  14. Genotype by environment interaction in adolescents' cognitive aptitude.

    PubMed

    Harden, K Paige; Turkheimer, Eric; Loehlin, John C

    2007-03-01

    In a replication of Turkheimer, Haley, Waldron, D'Onofrio, Gottesman II (2003, Socioeconomic status modifies heritability of IQ in young children. Psychological Science, 14:623-628), we investigate genotype-environment (G x E) interaction in the cognitive aptitude of 839 twin pairs who completed the National Merit Scholastic Qualifying Test in 1962. Shared environmental influences were stronger for adolescents from poorer homes, while genetic influences were stronger for adolescents from more affluent homes. No significant differences were found between parental income and parental education interaction effects. Results suggest that environmental differences between middle- to upper-class families influence the expression of genetic potential for intelligence, as has previously been suggested by Bronfenbrenner and Ceci's (1994, Nature-nurture reconceptualized in developmental perspective: a bioecological model Psychological Review, 101:568-586) bioecological model.

  15. Complexity of the alpha-globin genotypes identified with thalassemia screening in Sardinia.

    PubMed

    Origa, Raffaella; Paglietti, Maria E; Sollaino, Maria C; Desogus, Maria F; Barella, Susanna; Loi, Daniela; Galanello, Renzo

    2014-01-01

    α-Thalassemia commonly results from deletions or point mutations in one or both α-globin genes located on chromosome 16p13.3 giving rise to complex and variable genotypes and phenotypes. Rarely, unusual non-deletion defects or atypical deletions down-regulate the expression of the α-globin gene. In the last decade of the program for β-thalassemia carrier screening and genetic counseling in Sardinia, the association of new techniques of molecular biology such as gene sequencing and Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) to conventional methods has allowed to better define several thalassemic genotypes and the complex variability of the α-cluster with its flanking regions, with a high frequency of different genotypes and compound heterozygosity for two α mutations even in the same family. The exact molecular definition of the genotypes resulting from the interactions among the large number of α-thalassemia determinants and with β-thalassemia, is important for a correct correlation of genotype-phenotype and to prevent underdiagnosis of carrier status which could hamper the effectiveness of a screening program particularly in those regions where a high frequency of hemoglobinopathies is present. PMID:23896219

  16. Helicobacter pylori vacA Genotypes in Chronic Gastritis and Gastric Carcinoma Patients from Macau, China

    PubMed Central

    Pinto-Ribeiro, Ines; Ferreira, Rui M.; Batalha, Sellma; Hlaing, Thazin; Wong, Sio In; Carneiro, Fatima; Figueiredo, Ceu

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the major triggering factor for gastric carcinoma, but only a small proportion of infected patients develop this disease. Differences in virulence observed among H. pylori strains, namely in the vacuolating cytotoxin vacA gene, may contribute to this discrepancy. Infection with vacA s1, i1 and m1 strains increases the risk for progression of gastric premalignant lesions and for gastric carcinoma. However, in East Asian countries most of the H. pylori strains are vacA s1, regardless of the patients’ clinical status, and the significance of the vacA i1 and m1 genotypes for gastric carcinoma in this geographic area remains to be fully elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate this relationship in 290 patients from Macau, China. Using very sensitive and accurate genotyping methods, we detected infection with vacA i1 and with vacA m1 strains in, respectively, 85.2% and 52.6% of the patients that were infected with single genotypes. The prevalence of cagA-positive strains was 87.5%. No significant associations were observed between vacA genotypes or cagA and gastric carcinoma. It is worth noting that 37.5% of the infected patients had coexistence of H. pylori strains with different vacA genotypes. Additional studies directed to other H. pylori virulence factors should be performed to identify high risk patients in East Asia. PMID:27164143

  17. Gas film retention and underwater photosynthesis during field submergence of four contrasting rice genotypes.

    PubMed

    Winkel, Anders; Pedersen, Ole; Ella, Evangelina; Ismail, Abdelbagi M; Colmer, Timothy D

    2014-07-01

    Floods can completely submerge some rice (Oryza sativa L.) fields. Leaves of rice have gas films that aid O2 and CO2 exchange under water. The present study explored the relationship between gas film persistence and underwater net photosynthesis (PN) as influenced by genotype and submergence duration. Four contrasting genotypes (FR13A, IR42, Swarna, and Swarna-Sub1) were submerged for 13 days in the field and leaf gas films, chlorophyll, and the capacity for underwater PN at near ambient and high CO2 were assessed with time of submergence. At high CO2 during the PN assay, all genotypes initially showed high rates of underwater PN, and this rate was not affected by time of submergence in FR13A. This superior photosynthetic performance of FR13A was not evident in Swarna-Sub1 (carrying the SUB1 QTL) and the declines in underwater PN in both Swarna-Sub1 and Swarna were equal to that in IR42. At near ambient CO2 concentration, underwater PN declined in all four genotypes and this corresponded with loss of leaf gas films with time of submergence. FR13A retained leaf gas films moderately longer than the other genotypes, but gas film retention was not linked to SUB1. Diverse rice germplasm should be screened for gas film persistence during submergence, as this trait could potentially increase carbohydrate status and internal aeration owing to increased underwater PN, which contributes to submergence tolerance in rice.

  18. Genotypic characterization of initial acquisition of Streptococcus mutans in American Indian children

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, David J.; Villhauer, Alissa L.; Warren, John J.; Marshall, Teresa A.; Dawson, Deborah V.; Blanchette, Derek R.; Phipps, Kathy R.; Starr, Delores E.; Drake, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Severe-early childhood caries (S-ECC) is one of the most common infectious diseases in children and is prevalent in lower socio-economic populations. American Indian children suffer from the highest levels of S-ECC in the United States. Members of the mutans streptococci, Streptococcus mutans, in particular, are key etiologic agents in the development of caries. Children typically acquire S. mutans from their mothers and early acquisition is often associated with higher levels of tooth decay. Methods We have conducted a 5-year birth cohort study with a Northern Plains Tribe to determine the temporality and fidelity of S. mutans transmission from mother to child in addition to the genotypic diversity of S. mutans in this community. Plaque samples were collected from 239 mother/child dyads at regular intervals from birth to 36 months and S. mutans were isolated and genotyped by arbitrarily primed-polymerase chain reaction (AP-PCR). Results Here we present preliminary findings from a subset of the cohort. The focus for this paper is on initial acquisition events in the children. We identified 17 unique genotypes in 711 S. mutans isolates in our subset of 40 children, 40 mothers and 14 primary caregivers. Twelve of these genotypes were identified in more than one individual. S. mutans colonization occurred by 16 months in 57.5% of the children and early colonization was associated with higher decayed, missing and filled surface (DMFS) scores (p=0.0007). Children colonized by S. mutans shared a common genotype with their mothers 47.8% of the time. While multiple genotypes were common in adults, only 10% of children harbored multiple genotypes. Conclusion These children acquire S. mutans at an earlier age than the originally described ‘window of infectivity’ and often, but not exclusively, from their mothers. Early acquisition is associated with both the caries status of the children and the mothers. PMID:25840611

  19. Genotypes and viral load of hepatitis C virus among persons attending a voluntary counseling and testing center in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Abreha, Tesfay; Woldeamanuel, Yimtubezinash; Pietsch, Corinna; Maier, Melanie; Asrat, Daniel; Abebe, Almaz; Hailegiorgis, Bereket; Aseffa, Abraham; Liebert, Uwe Gerd

    2011-05-01

    The prevalence of different genotypes of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in Ethiopia is not known. HCV genotypes influence the response to therapy with alpha-interferon alone or in combination with ribavirin. A cross sectional study was conducted on attendees of voluntary counseling and testing center. Serum samples from 1,954 (734 HIV positive and 1,220 HIV negative) individuals were screened for HCV antibody. Active HCV infection was confirmed by quantitative PCR in 18 of the 71 samples with anti-HCV antibodies. The HCV viral load ranged from 39,650 to 9,878,341 IU/ml (median 1,589,631 IU/ml) with no significant difference [χ(2)(17) = 18.00, P = 0.389] between persons positive or negative for HIV. The viral load of HCV was, however, higher in older study subjects (r = 0.80, P = 0.000). HCV genotypes were determined using the VERSANT HCV Genotype Assay (LiPA) and sequence analysis of the NS5b region of the HCV genome. Diverse HCV genotypes were found including genotypes 1, 2, 4, and 5. There was no difference in the distribution regarding the HIV status. As in other parts of the world, genotyping of HCV must be considered whenever HCV is incriminated as a cause of hepatitis. PMID:21351106

  20. Inferring haplotypes from genotypes on a pedigree with mutations, genotyping errors and missing alleles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Bung; Jiang, Tao

    2011-04-01

    Inferring the haplotypes of the members of a pedigree from their genotypes has been extensively studied. However, most studies do not consider genotyping errors and de novo mutations. In this paper, we study how to infer haplotypes from genotype data that may contain genotyping errors, de novo mutations, and missing alleles. We assume that there are no recombinants in the genotype data, which is usually true for tightly linked markers. We introduce a combinatorial optimization problem, called haplotype configuration with mutations and errors (HCME), which calls for haplotype configurations consistent with the given genotypes that incur no recombinants and require the minimum number of mutations and errors. HCME is NP-hard. To solve the problem, we propose a heuristic algorithm, the core of which is an integer linear program (ILP) using the system of linear equations over Galois field GF(2). Our algorithm can detect and locate genotyping errors that cannot be detected by simply checking the Mendelian law of inheritance. The algorithm also offers error correction in genotypes/haplotypes rather than just detecting inconsistencies and deleting the involved loci. Our experimental results show that the algorithm can infer haplotypes with a very high accuracy and recover 65%-94% of genotyping errors depending on the pedigree topology. PMID:21523936

  1. Serotonin transporter genotype and mild traumatic brain injury independently influence resilience and perception of limitations in veterans.

    PubMed

    Graham, David P; Helmer, Drew A; Harding, Mark J; Kosten, Thomas R; Petersen, Nancy J; Nielsen, David A

    2013-06-01

    Evidence indicates that individuals with the 5-HTTLPR variant short/short genotype have increased sensitivity to both positive and negative perceptions of perceived social support. The aim of this study was to evaluate this association among Veterans in the context of mild traumatic brain injury (TBI). As part of a larger TBI center, we performed a cross-sectional study of 67 OEF/OIF/OND Veterans (41 with TBI and 26 controls without TBI) who completed the questionnaires and consented to genetic testing. The primary measures included the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CDRISC) and the Perceived Limitations in community participation subscale of the Community Reintegration of Service Members Instrument (CRIS-PL). Both 5-HTTLPR genotype and TBI status were independently associated with the CRIS-PL (p = .009 for genotype, p = .001 for TBI) and the CDRISC (p = .015 for genotype, p = .003 for TBI) scores. This study suggests that both the 5-HTTLPR genotype and TBI status independently, in an almost equal but opposite direction, influence resilience and perceived limitations to social participation. Further, resilience appears more sensitive to perceived limitations in Veterans carrying an S'S' genotype than in L' carriers, but only in the context of having sustained a TBI. While having a TBI appeared to increase a Veteran's sensitivity to social stress, the Veteran's who were L' allele carriers with a TBI fared the worst, with lower resilience and more perceived limitations for community participation compared to L' carrier Veterans without a TBI or Veterans with the S'S' genotype regardless of TBI status.

  2. Effects of Smoking and Genotype on the PSR Index of Periodontal Disease in Adults Aged 18–49

    PubMed Central

    Polk, Deborah E.; Wang, Xiaojing; Feingold, Eleanor; Shaffer, John R.; Weeks, Daniel E.; Weyant, Robert J.; Crout, Richard J.; McNeil, Daniel W.; Marazita, Mary L.

    2012-01-01

    Studies have found both genetic and environmental influences on chronic periodontitis. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships among previously identified genetic variants, smoking status, and two periodontal disease-related phenotypes (PSR1 and PSR2) in 625 Caucasian adults (aged 18–49 years). The PSR Index was used to classify participants as affected or unaffected under the PSR1 and PSR2 phenotype definitions. Using logistic regression, we found that the form of the relationship varied by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP): For rs10457525 and rs12630931, the effects of smoking and genotype on risk were additive; whereas for rs10457526 and rs733048, smoking was not independently associated with affected status once genotype was taken into consideration. In contrast, smoking moderated the relationships of rs3870371 and rs733048 with affected status such that former and never smokers with select genotypes were at increased genetic risk. Thus, for several groups, knowledge of genotype may refine the risk prediction over that which can be determined by knowledge of smoking status alone. Future studies should replicate these findings. These findings provide the foundation for the exploration of novel pathways by which periodontitis may occur. PMID:23066400

  3. Compliance status

    SciTech Connect

    Black, D.G.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the activities conducted to ensure that the Hanford Site is in compliance with federal environmental protection statutes and related Washington State and local environmental protection regulations and the status of Hanford`s compliance with these requirements. Environmental permits required under the environmental protection regulations are discussed under the applicable statute.

  4. HLA genotyping in pediatric celiac disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Stanković, Biljana; Radlović, Nedeljko; Leković, Zoran; Ristić, Dragana; Radlović, Vladimir; Nikčević, Gordana; Kotur, Nikola; Vučićević, Ksenija; Kostić, Tatjana; Pavlović, Sonja; Zukić, Branka

    2014-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory disease in the small intestine triggered by gluten uptake that occurs in genetically susceptible individuals. HLA-DQ2 protein encoded by HLA-DQA1*05 and DQB1*02 alleles is found in 90-95% of CD patients. All of the remaining patients carry HLA-DQ8 protein encoded by HLA-DQA1*03 and DQB1*03:02 alleles. Specific HLA-DQ genotypes define different risk for CD incidence. Presence of susceptible HLA-DQ genotypes does not predict certain disease development, but their absence makes CD very unlikely, close to 100%. Here we presented for the first time the distribution of HLA-DQ genotypes in the group of pediatric celiac patients from the University Children’s Hospital, Belgrade, Serbia and estimated risk for CD development that these genotypes confer. Seventy three celiac disease patients and 62 healthy individuals underwent genotyping for DQA1, DQB1 alleles and DRB1 allele. 94.5% of patients carried alleles that encode DQ2 protein variant and 2.7% carried alleles that encode DQ8 protein variant. Two patients carried single DQB1*02 allele. No patients were negative for all the alleles predisposing to CD. The highest HLA-DQ genotype risk for CD development was found in group of patients homozygous for DQ2.5 haplotype, followed by the group of heterozygous carriers of DQ2.5 haplotype in combination with DQB1*02 allele within the other haplotype. The lowest risk was observed in carriers of a single copy of DQB1*02 or DQA1*05 allele or other non-predisposing alleles. HLA genotyping, more informative than serological testing commonly used, proved to be a useful diagnostic tool for excluding CD development. PMID:25172978

  5. Imputation of ungenotyped parental genotypes in dairy and beef cattle from progeny genotypes.

    PubMed

    Berry, D P; McParland, S; Kearney, J F; Sargolzaei, M; Mullen, M P

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the accuracy of imputing the genotype of parents using information on the genotype of their progeny and a family-based and population-based imputation algorithm. Two separate data sets were used, one containing both dairy and beef animals (n=3122) with high-density genotypes (735 151 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)) and the other containing just dairy animals (n=5489) with medium-density genotypes (51 602 SNPs). Imputation accuracy of three different genotype density panels were evaluated representing low (i.e. 6501 SNPs), medium and high density. The full genotypes of sires with genotyped half-sib progeny were masked and subsequently imputed. Genotyped half-sib progeny group sizes were altered from 4 up to 12 and the impact on imputation accuracy was quantified. Up to 157 and 258 sires were used to test the accuracy of imputation in the dairy plus beef data set and the dairy-only data set, respectively. The efficiency and accuracy of imputation was quantified as the proportion of genotypes that could not be imputed, and as both the genotype concordance rate and allele concordance rate. The median proportion of genotypes per animal that could not be imputed in the imputation process decreased as the number of genotyped half-sib progeny increased; values for the medium-density panel ranged from a median of 0.015 with a half-sib progeny group size of 4 to a median of 0.0014 to 0.0015 with a half-sib progeny group size of 8. The accuracy of imputation across different paternal half-sib progeny group sizes was similar in both data sets. Concordance rates increased considerably as the number of genotyped half-sib progeny increased from four (mean animal allele concordance rate of 0.94 in both data sets for the medium-density genotype panel) to five (mean animal allele concordance rate of 0.96 in both data sets for the medium-density genotype panel) after which it was relatively stable up to a half-sib progeny group size

  6. Temperature-dependent genotype-by-genotype interaction between a pathogenic fungus and its hyperparasitic virus.

    PubMed

    Bryner, Sarah Franziska; Rigling, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The outcome of host-parasite interactions may depend not only on the genotypes of the species involved but also on environmental factors. We used the fungus Cryphonectria parasitica, the causal agent of chestnut blight, and its hyperparasitic virus, Cryphonectria hypovirus-1 (CHV1), to test for genotype-by-genotype-by-environment interactions in a host-parasite system. In C. parasitica, infection with CHV1 induces a hypovirulent phenotype with reduced virulence toward the chestnut tree (Castanea spp.) and thus controls chestnut blight in many European regions. In contrast, uninfected virulent C. parasitica have nearly eradicated the American chestnut in North America. We applied a full factorial design and assessed the fungal growth and sporulation of four C. parasitica strains, uninfected and infected with each of the four known CHV1 subtypes, at 12°, 18°, 24°, and 30°C. We found a significant (P ≤ .00001) genotype-by-genotype-by-environment interaction, demonstrating the potential for a selection mosaic. As a consequence, different host and parasite genotypes would be selected under different climatic conditions, affecting the coevolutionary dynamics of the host-parasite interaction and the course of chestnut blight epidemics. Genotype-by-genotype-by-environment interactions are essential to take into account when designing biological control strategies.

  7. Precise genotyping and recombination detection of Enterovirus.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chieh-Hua; Wang, Yu-Bin; Chen, Shu-Hwa; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Lin, Chung-Yen

    2015-01-01

    Enteroviruses (EV) with different genotypes cause diverse infectious diseases in humans and mammals. A correct EV typing result is crucial for effective medical treatment and disease control; however, the emergence of novel viral strains has impaired the performance of available diagnostic tools. Here, we present a web-based tool, named EVIDENCE (EnteroVirus In DEep conception, http://symbiont.iis.sinica.edu.tw/evidence), for EV genotyping and recombination detection. We introduce the idea of using mixed-ranking scores to evaluate the fitness of prototypes based on relatedness and on the genome regions of interest. Using phylogenetic methods, the most possible genotype is determined based on the closest neighbor among the selected references. To detect possible recombination events, EVIDENCE calculates the sequence distance and phylogenetic relationship among sequences of all sliding windows scanning over the whole genome. Detected recombination events are plotted in an interactive figure for viewing of fine details. In addition, all EV sequences available in GenBank were collected and revised using the latest classification and nomenclature of EV in EVIDENCE. These sequences are built into the database and are retrieved in an indexed catalog, or can be searched for by keywords or by sequence similarity. EVIDENCE is the first web-based tool containing pipelines for genotyping and recombination detection, with updated, built-in, and complete reference sequences to improve sensitivity and specificity. The use of EVIDENCE can accelerate genotype identification, aiding clinical diagnosis and enhancing our understanding of EV evolution.

  8. Precise genotyping and recombination detection of Enterovirus

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Enteroviruses (EV) with different genotypes cause diverse infectious diseases in humans and mammals. A correct EV typing result is crucial for effective medical treatment and disease control; however, the emergence of novel viral strains has impaired the performance of available diagnostic tools. Here, we present a web-based tool, named EVIDENCE (EnteroVirus In DEep conception, http://symbiont.iis.sinica.edu.tw/evidence), for EV genotyping and recombination detection. We introduce the idea of using mixed-ranking scores to evaluate the fitness of prototypes based on relatedness and on the genome regions of interest. Using phylogenetic methods, the most possible genotype is determined based on the closest neighbor among the selected references. To detect possible recombination events, EVIDENCE calculates the sequence distance and phylogenetic relationship among sequences of all sliding windows scanning over the whole genome. Detected recombination events are plotted in an interactive figure for viewing of fine details. In addition, all EV sequences available in GenBank were collected and revised using the latest classification and nomenclature of EV in EVIDENCE. These sequences are built into the database and are retrieved in an indexed catalog, or can be searched for by keywords or by sequence similarity. EVIDENCE is the first web-based tool containing pipelines for genotyping and recombination detection, with updated, built-in, and complete reference sequences to improve sensitivity and specificity. The use of EVIDENCE can accelerate genotype identification, aiding clinical diagnosis and enhancing our understanding of EV evolution. PMID:26678286

  9. Precise genotyping and recombination detection of Enterovirus.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chieh-Hua; Wang, Yu-Bin; Chen, Shu-Hwa; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Lin, Chung-Yen

    2015-01-01

    Enteroviruses (EV) with different genotypes cause diverse infectious diseases in humans and mammals. A correct EV typing result is crucial for effective medical treatment and disease control; however, the emergence of novel viral strains has impaired the performance of available diagnostic tools. Here, we present a web-based tool, named EVIDENCE (EnteroVirus In DEep conception, http://symbiont.iis.sinica.edu.tw/evidence), for EV genotyping and recombination detection. We introduce the idea of using mixed-ranking scores to evaluate the fitness of prototypes based on relatedness and on the genome regions of interest. Using phylogenetic methods, the most possible genotype is determined based on the closest neighbor among the selected references. To detect possible recombination events, EVIDENCE calculates the sequence distance and phylogenetic relationship among sequences of all sliding windows scanning over the whole genome. Detected recombination events are plotted in an interactive figure for viewing of fine details. In addition, all EV sequences available in GenBank were collected and revised using the latest classification and nomenclature of EV in EVIDENCE. These sequences are built into the database and are retrieved in an indexed catalog, or can be searched for by keywords or by sequence similarity. EVIDENCE is the first web-based tool containing pipelines for genotyping and recombination detection, with updated, built-in, and complete reference sequences to improve sensitivity and specificity. The use of EVIDENCE can accelerate genotype identification, aiding clinical diagnosis and enhancing our understanding of EV evolution. PMID:26678286

  10. Status Epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Manno, Edward M.

    2011-01-01

    Status epilepticus is a neurological emergency that is commonly encountered by the neurohospitalist. Successful treatment depends upon the recognition of prolonged seizure activity and the acute mobilization of available resources. Pharmacologic treatment regimens have been shown to decrease the time needed for successful control of seizures and have provided for the rapid administration of anticonvulsant medications. Treatment strategies have evolved so that clinicians can administer effective doses of medication by whatever routes of administration are immediately available. Traditional algorithms for the treatment of status epilepticus have used a stepwise approach to the administration of first-, second-, and third-order medications. More recent options have included aggressive anesthetic doses of medications while second-line medications are being titrated. PMID:23983834

  11. Interleukin-28b CC genotype predicts early treatment response and CT/TT genotypes predicts non-response in patients infected with HCV genotype 3.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Abhishak Chander; Trehanpati, Nirupma; Sukriti, Sukriti; Hissar, Syed; Midha, Vandana; Sood, Ajit; Sarin, Shiv K

    2014-04-01

    Response to antiviral therapy for hepatitis C virus (HCV) depends upon the genotype and host immune response. IL28b gene mutations have been shown to modulate host antiviral immune response against genotype 1. However, the predictive value of IL28b polymorphism in genotype 3 HCV patients is largely unknown. The association of IL28b polymorphism with virological response was studied in 356 patients with genotype 3 chronic HCV undergoing treatment with peg-interferon and ribavirin and was compared with matched controls. IL28b genotyping followed by DNA sequencing was performed to identify the CC, CT, or TT genotypes. Two log reduction of HCV RNA at Day 7 (Quick Viral Response, QVR) and HCV RNA negativity at Day 28 (Rapid Viral Response, RVR) were analyzed with CC and non-CC genotypes in addition to other predictors of response. The associations of alleles with the response patterns were predicted. Sustained viral response was seen in 250 (70.2%) patients and the IL28b genotype CC/CT/TT distribution was 61.1%; 30.5%; and 8.4%, respectively. The non-CC genotypes were significantly higher in non-responders when compared to responders (67.6% vs. 38.9%, P < 0.001). Interestingly, the rapid viral response in responders was observed in 72.7% with the CC genotype and in 27.2% with the non-CC genotype (P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed CC genotype as an independent factor predicting the sustained viral response in patients infected with HCV genotype 3. In conclusion, the IL28b CT/TT genotype strongly correlates with treatment non-response in patients infected with HCV genotype 3 and CC genotype of IL28b is associated with higher quick viral response.

  12. Saponin profile of green asparagus genotypes.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Castilla, Sara; Jaramillo-Carmona, Sara; Fuentes-Alventosa, Jose María; Jiménez-Araujo, Ana; Rodríguez-Arcos, Rocío; Cermeño-Sacristán, Pedro; Espejo-Calvo, Juan Antonio; Guillén-Bejarano, Rafael

    2013-11-20

    The main goal of this study was to determine the saponin profiles of different "triguero" asparagus genotypes and to compare them to green asparagus commercial hybrids. The samples consisted of 31 commercial hybrids and 58 genotypes from the Huétor-Tájar (HT) population variety ("triguero"). The saponin analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry allowed for the determination of 12 saponins derived from a furostan-type steroidal genin, 4 of which had never been described in the edible part of asparagus. The saponin profile of "triguero" asparagus was a combination of these new saponins and protodioscin. Although protodioscin was the major saponin found in commercial hybrids, some of these 12 saponins were detected as major components in some of the commercial hybrids. The total contents of saponins described in some of these HT genotypes reach values as high as 10-100 times higher than those found in commercial hybrids.

  13. Efavirenz and Metabolites in Cerebrospinal Fluid: Relationship with CYP2B6 c.516G→T Genotype and Perturbed Blood-Brain Barrier Due to Tuberculous Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Chau, Tran Thi Hong; Fisher, Martin; Nelson, Mark; Winston, Alan; Else, Laura; Carr, Daniel F.; Taylor, Steven; Ustianowski, Andrew; Back, David; Pirmohamed, Munir; Solomon, Tom; Farrar, Jeremy; Törok, M. Estée; Khoo, Saye

    2016-01-01

    Efavirenz (EFZ) has been associated with neuropsychiatric side effects. Recently, the 8-hydroxy-EFZ (8OH-EFZ) metabolite has been shown to be a potent neurotoxin in vitro, inducing neuronal damage at concentrations of 3.3 ng/ml. EFZ induced similar neuronal damage at concentrations of 31.6 ng/ml. We investigated the effect of genotype and blood-brain barrier integrity on EFZ metabolite concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). We measured CSF drug concentrations in subjects from two separate study populations: 47 subjects with tuberculous meningitis (TBM) coinfection in Vietnam receiving 800 mg EFZ with standard antituberculous treatment and 25 subjects from the PARTITION study in the United Kingdom without central nervous system infection receiving 600 mg EFZ. EFZ and metabolite concentrations in CSF and plasma were measured and compared with estimates of effectiveness and neurotoxicity from available published in vitro and in vivo data. The effect of the CYP2B6 c.516G→T genotype (GG genotype, fast EFV metabolizer status; GT genotype, intermediate EFV metabolizer status; TT genotype, slow EFV metabolizer status) was examined. The mean CSF concentrations of EFZ and 8OH-EFZ in the TBM group were 60.3 and 39.3 ng/ml, respectively, and those in the no-TBM group were 15.0 and 5.9 ng/ml, respectively. Plasma EFZ and 8OH-EFZ concentrations were similar between the two groups. CSF EFZ concentrations were above the in vitro toxic concentration in 76% of samples (GG genotype, 61%; GT genotype, 90%; TT genotype, 100%) in the TBM group and 13% of samples (GG genotype, 0%; GT genotype, 18%; TT genotype, 50%) in the no-TBM group. CSF 8OH-EFZ concentrations were above the in vitro toxic concentration in 98% of the TBM group and 87% of the no-TBM group; levels were independent of genotype but correlated with the CSF/plasma albumin ratio. Potentially neurotoxic concentrations of 8OH-EFZ are frequently observed in CSF independently of the CYP2B6 genotype, particularly in those

  14. Metastatic colorectal cancer KRAS genotyping in routine practice: results and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Lamy, Aude; Blanchard, France; Le Pessot, Florence; Sesboüé, Richard; Di Fiore, Frédéric; Bossut, Jessie; Fiant, Elodie; Frébourg, Thierry; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe

    2011-08-01

    KRAS genotyping is mandatory before anti-epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibody therapy in metastatic colorectal cancer, which is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States and in Europe. Thus, large-scale KRAS mutation screening is needed for efficient patient management and in the future metastatic colorectal cancer genotyping might also include the detection of the BRAF V600E mutation, which is a very strong negative prognostic factor in colorectal cancer. We report our experience of routine KRAS/BRAF mutation screening practice performed on 1130 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor samples from 992 colorectal cancer patients. DNA was extracted from macrodissected tumor areas highlighted by a pathologist, KRAS codons 12/13 and BRAF V600E mutations were assessed in a single SNaPshot® multiplex assay and each mutation was confirmed by an independent analysis. KRAS and BRAF mutations were, respectively, present in 41.8 and 6.5% of the tumor samples. If KRAS and BRAF mutations were mutually exclusive, four samples presented two concomitant KRAS mutations. Genotyping of paired primary tumors and metastases from 44 patients indicated that 5 patients (11.4%) presented discordant KRAS mutational status. KRAS genotype heterogeneity was also observed within primary tumor sites in seven cases. Non-reproducible KRAS artefactual mutations were detected in 53 samples (4.7%). We found that the prominent mechanism leading to these artefactual mutations was the fragmentation of DNA occurring during tissue processing. Routine KRAS genotyping performed on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues requires, therefore, the development of quality control scheme for molecular pathology, especially because of DNA damages induced by formalin fixation. The tumor heterogeneity observed in some patients indicates that it should be more appropriate to perform KRAS genotyping on metastases if sample is available.

  15. A Combinatorial Partitioning Method to Identify Multilocus Genotypic Partitions That Predict Quantitative Trait Variation

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, M.R.; Kardia, S.L.R.; Ferrell, R.E.; Sing, C.F.

    2001-01-01

    Recent advances in genome research have accelerated the process of locating candidate genes and the variable sites within them and have simplified the task of genotype measurement. The development of statistical and computational strategies to utilize information on hundreds — soon thousands — of variable loci to investigate the relationships between genome variation and phenotypic variation has not kept pace, particularly for quantitative traits that do not follow simple Mendelian patterns of inheritance. We present here the combinatorial partitioning method (CPM) that examines multiple genes, each containing multiple variable loci, to identify partitions of multilocus genotypes that predict interindividual variation in quantitative trait levels. We illustrate this method with an application to plasma triglyceride levels collected on 188 males, ages 20–60 yr, ascertained without regard to health status, from Rochester, Minnesota. Genotype information included measurements at 18 diallelic loci in six coronary heart disease–candidate susceptibility gene regions: APOA1-C3-A4, APOB, APOE, LDLR, LPL, and PON1. To illustrate the CPM, we evaluated all possible partitions of two-locus genotypes into two to nine partitions (∼106 evaluations). We found that many combinations of loci are involved in sets of genotypic partitions that predict triglyceride variability and that the most predictive sets show nonadditivity. These results suggest that traditional methods of building multilocus models that rely on statistically significant marginal, single-locus effects, may fail to identify combinations of loci that best predict trait variability. The CPM offers a strategy for exploring the high-dimensional genotype state space so as to predict the quantitative trait variation in the population at large that does not require the conditioning of the analysis on a prespecified genetic model. PMID:11230170

  16. RHIC Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peggs, Steve

    1997-05-01

    The design and construction status of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, RHIC, is discussed. Those novel performance features of a heavy ion collider that are distinct from hadron colliders in general are noted. These features are derived from the experimental requirements of operation with a variety of ion species over a wide energy range, including collisions between protons and ions, and between ions of unequal energies. The project is in the fifth year of a seven year construction cycle. A brief review of the recent Sextant Test is given, together with progress to date on machine construction.

  17. Tevatron status

    SciTech Connect

    Dugan, G.

    1989-03-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron is both the world's highest energy accelerator system and first large-scale superconducting synchrotron. Since Tevatron commissioning in July 1983, the accelerator has operated in 1984, 1985 and 1987 with extracted beams of 800 GeV for three runs of fixed target physics, and in 1987, and 1988, with proton-antiproton colliding beams at 900 /times/ 900 GeV. This paper will focus on the collider operation of the Tevatron: its present status and the outlook for its longer-term future evolution. 18 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Hepatitis C Genotype Influences Post-Liver Transplant Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Campos-Varela, Isabel; Lai, Jennifer C.; Verna, Elizabeth C.; O'Leary, Jacqueline G.; Stravitz, R. Todd; Forman, Lisa M.; Trotter, James F.; Brown, Robert S.; Terrault, Norah A.

    2015-01-01

    Background In non-transplant patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV), HCV genotype has been linked with a differential response to antiviral therapy, risk of steatosis and fibrosis, as well as all-cause mortality, but the role of HCV genotypes in post-transplant disease progression is less clear. Methods Using the multicenter CRUSH-C cohort, genotype-specific rates of advanced fibrosis, HCV-specific graft loss and, response of antiviral therapy were examined. Results Among 745 recipients [605 (81%) genotype 1, 53 (7%) genotype 2, and 87 (12%) genotype 3] followed for a median of 3.1 years (range 2.0-8.0) the unadjusted cumulative rate of advanced fibrosis at 3 years was 31%, 19% and 19% for genotypes 1, 2 and 3 (p=0.008). After multivariable adjustment, genotype remained a significant predictor, with genotype 2 having a 66% lower risk (p=0.02) and genotype 3 having a 41% lower risk (p=0.07) of advanced fibrosis compared to genotype 1 patients. The cumulative 5-year rates of HCV-specific graft survival were 84%, 90% and 94% for genotypes 1, 2 and 3, p=0.10. A total of 37% received antiviral therapy, with higher rates of sustained virologic response in patients with genotype 2 (HR=5.10; p=0.003) and genotype 3 (HR=3.27; p=0.006) compared to patients with genotype 1. Conclusion Risk of advanced fibrosis and response to therapy are strongly influenced by genotype. LT recipients with HCV genotype 1 have the highest risk of advanced fibrosis and lowest SVR rate. These findings highlight the need for genotype-specific management strategies. PMID:25211520

  19. Circulation of HRSV in Belgium: from multiple genotype circulation to prolonged circulation of predominant genotypes.

    PubMed

    Houspie, Lieselot; Lemey, Philippe; Keyaerts, Els; Reijmen, Eva; Vergote, Valentijn; Vankeerberghen, Anne; Vaeyens, Freya; De Beenhouwer, Hans; Van Ranst, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Molecular surveillance of HRSV in Belgium for 15 consecutive seasons (1996-2011) revealed a shift from a regular 3-yearly cyclic pattern, into a yearly alternating periodicity where HRSV-B is replaced by HRSV-A. Phylogenetic analysis for HRSV-A demonstrated the stable circulation of GA2 and GA5, with GA2 being dominant over GA5 during 5 consecutive seasons (2006-2011). We also identified 2 new genotype specific amino acid mutations of the GA2 genotype (A122 and Q156) and 7 new GA5 genotype specific amino acid mutations (F102, I108, T111, I125, D161, S191 and L217). Several amino acid positions, all located in the second hypervariable region of HRSV-A were found to be under positive selection. Phylogenetic analysis of HRSV-B showed the circulation of GB12 and GB13, where GB13 represented 100% of the isolated strains in 4 out of 5 consecutive seasons (2007-2011). Amino acids under positive selection were all located in the aminoterminal hypervariable region of HRSV-B, except one amino acid located in the conserved region. The genotype distribution within the HRSV-B subgroup has evolved from a co-circulation of multiple genotypes to the circulation of a single predominant genotype. The Belgian GB13 strains circulating since 2006, all clustered under the BAIV branch and contained several branch specific amino acid substitutions. The demographic history of genotypes GA2, GA5 and GB13 demonstrated a decrease in the total GA2 and GA5 population size, coinciding with the global expansion of the GB13 population. The emergence of the GB13 genotype resulted in a newly established balance between the predominant genotypes. PMID:23577109

  20. Polyembryony in non-apomictic citrus genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Aleza, Pablo; Juárez, José; Ollitrault, Patrick; Navarro, Luis

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims Adventitious embryony from nucellar cells is the mechanism leading to apomixis in Citrus sp. However, singular cases of polyembryony have been reported in non-apomictic genotypes as a consequence of 2x × 4x hybridizations and in vitro culture of isolated nucelli. The origin of the plants arising from the aforementioned processes remains unclear. Methods The genetic structure (ploidy and allelic constitution with microsatellite markers) of plants obtained from polyembryonic seeds arising from 2x × 4x sexual hybridizations and those regenerated from nucellus culture in vitro was systematically analysed in different non-apomictic citrus genotypes. Histological studies were also conducted to try to identify the initiation process underlying polyembryony. Key Results All plants obtained from the same undeveloped seed in 2x × 4x hybridizations resulted from cleavage of the original zygotic embryo. Also, the plants obtained from in vitro nucellus culture were recovered by somatic embryogenesis from cells that shared the same genotype as the zygotic embryos of the same seed. Conclusions It appears that in non-apomictic citrus genotypes, proembryos or embryogenic cells are formed by cleavage of the zygotic embryos and that the development of these adventitious embryos, normally hampered, can take place in vivo or in vitro as a result of two different mechanisms that prevent the dominance of the initial zygotic embryo. PMID:20675656

  1. The Relativity of Genotypes and Phenotypes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willie, Charles Vert

    1995-01-01

    Asserts that Herrnstein and Murray's "The Bell Curve" (1994) is an attempt to influence and control public discourse about public policy and inequality. It examines four of the book's flaws in classification, analyses, research, and its failure to recognize intelligence as having both genotypic and phenotypic manifestations. (GR)

  2. Infectivity of the cervine genotype of Cryptosporidium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cryptosporidiosis is a diarrheal disease of humans and animals caused by parasites in the genus Cryptosporidium, a genus comprising 19 valid species and 40 genotypes. Most human infections are caused by C. hominis and C. parvum. To a lesser extent infections with C. meleagridis, C. felis, C. canis, ...

  3. ApoE (Apolipoprotein E) Genotyping

    MedlinePlus

    ... There are no clear-cut tests to diagnose Alzheimer disease during life. Health practitioners can, however, make a reasonably accurate clinical diagnosis of AD by ruling out other potential causes of dementia and checking for a genetic predisposition to AD with APOE genotyping as supplemental ...

  4. Camelina: Adaptation and performance of genotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Camelina (Camelina sativa L. Crantz) has shown potential as an alternative and biofuel crop in cereal-based cropping systems. Our study investigated the adaption, performance, and yield stability among camelina genotypes across diverse US Pacific Northwest (PNW) environments. Seven named camelina ge...

  5. Dietary beta-carotene and lutein metabolism is modulated by the APOE genotype.

    PubMed

    Huebbe, Patricia; Lange, Jennifer; Lietz, Georg; Rimbach, Gerald

    2016-07-01

    The human apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype has been suggested to interact with nutrient metabolism particularly with lipid soluble vitamins. Plasma carotenoid levels are determined by numerous dietary and genetic factors with high inter-individual variation; however, the APOE genotype has not been systematically examined so far. Our aim was to investigate the effect of the APOE genotype on dietary carotenoid metabolism with special regard to transcriptional regulation of carotenoid absorption, cleavage and adipocyte fat storage. We supplemented targeted replacement mice expressing human APOE3 and APOE4 isoforms with dietary beta-carotene (BC) and lutein (LUT) for 8 weeks. Plasma BC and adipose tissue BC and LUT levels were in trend lower in APOE4 than APOE3 mice, while hepatic expression of the beta-carotene oxygenases BCO1 and BCO2 was significantly higher. In contrast to the liver, mRNA levels of proteins involved in carotenoid absorption and cleavage in the small intestinal mucosa as well as of adipogenic markers in the adipose tissue were not different between APOE3 and APOE4 mice. Our data suggest that the hepatic carotenoid cleavage activity is higher in APOE4 mice partially reducing the circulation and extra-hepatic accumulation of intact carotenoids as compared to APOE3. Therefore we suggest considering the APOE genotype as modulator of carotenoid status in the future. © 2016 BioFactors, 42(4):388-396, 2016. PMID:27040933

  6. Host Genotype and Coinfection Modify the Relationship of within and between Host Transmission.

    PubMed

    Susi, Hanna; Vale, Pedro F; Laine, Anna-Liisa

    2015-08-01

    Variation in individual-level disease transmission is well documented, but the underlying causes of this variation are challenging to disentangle in natural epidemics. In general, within-host replication is critical in determining the extent to which infected hosts shed transmission propagules, but which factors cause variation in this relationship are poorly understood. Here, using a plant host, Plantago lanceolata, and the powdery mildew fungus Podosphaera plantaginis, we quantify how the distinct stages of within-host spread (autoinfection), spore release, and successful transmission to new hosts (alloinfection) are influenced by host genotype, pathogen genotype, and the coinfection status of the host. We find that within-host spread alone fails to predict transmission rates, as this relationship is modified by genetic variation in hosts and pathogens. Their contributions change throughout the course of the epidemic. Host genotype and coinfection had particularly pronounced effects on the dynamics of spore release from infected hosts. Confidently predicting disease spread from local levels of individual transmission, therefore, requires a more nuanced understanding of genotype-specific infection outcomes. This knowledge is key to better understanding the drivers of epidemiological dynamics and the resulting evolutionary trajectories of infectious disease. PMID:26655153

  7. Valid Monte Carlo permutation tests for genetic case-control studies with missing genotypes.

    PubMed

    Kinnamon, Daniel D; Martin, Eden R

    2014-05-01

    Monte Carlo permutation tests can be formally constructed by choosing a set of permutations of individual indices and a real-valued test statistic measuring the association between genotypes and affection status. In this paper, we develop a rigorous theoretical framework for verifying the validity of these tests when there are missing genotypes. We begin by specifying a nonparametric probability model for the observed genotype data in a genetic case-control study with unrelated subjects. Under this model and some minimal assumptions about the test statistic, we establish that the resulting Monte Carlo permutation test is exact level α if (1) the chosen set of permutations of individual indices is a group under composition and (2) the distribution of the observed genotype score matrix under the null hypothesis does not change if the assignment of individuals to rows is shuffled according to an arbitrary permutation in this set. We apply these conditions to show that frequently used Monte Carlo permutation tests based on the set of all permutations of individual indices are guaranteed to be exact level α only for missing data processes satisfying a rather restrictive additional assumption. However, if the missing data process depends on covariates that are all identified and recorded, we also show that Monte Carlo permutation tests based on the set of permutations within strata of individuals with identical covariate values are exact level α. Our theoretical results are verified and supplemented by simulations for a variety of missing data processes and test statistics.

  8. Host Genotype and Coinfection Modify the Relationship of within and between Host Transmission.

    PubMed

    Susi, Hanna; Vale, Pedro F; Laine, Anna-Liisa

    2015-08-01

    Variation in individual-level disease transmission is well documented, but the underlying causes of this variation are challenging to disentangle in natural epidemics. In general, within-host replication is critical in determining the extent to which infected hosts shed transmission propagules, but which factors cause variation in this relationship are poorly understood. Here, using a plant host, Plantago lanceolata, and the powdery mildew fungus Podosphaera plantaginis, we quantify how the distinct stages of within-host spread (autoinfection), spore release, and successful transmission to new hosts (alloinfection) are influenced by host genotype, pathogen genotype, and the coinfection status of the host. We find that within-host spread alone fails to predict transmission rates, as this relationship is modified by genetic variation in hosts and pathogens. Their contributions change throughout the course of the epidemic. Host genotype and coinfection had particularly pronounced effects on the dynamics of spore release from infected hosts. Confidently predicting disease spread from local levels of individual transmission, therefore, requires a more nuanced understanding of genotype-specific infection outcomes. This knowledge is key to better understanding the drivers of epidemiological dynamics and the resulting evolutionary trajectories of infectious disease.

  9. N-Acetyltransferase 2 genotype, exfoliated urothelial cells and benzidine exposure.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qing-wen; Lin, Guo-fang; Chen, Ji-gang; Guo, Wei-Chao; Qin, Yi-qiu; Golka, Klaus; Shen, Jian-hua

    2012-01-01

    Most studies report an association of the slow N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) status with elevated bladder cancer risk. In this study, NAT2 genotypes and the decades-long records of Papanicolaou's grading of exfoliated urothelial cells in a former benzidine-exposed cohort of the Shanghai dyestuff industry (29 bladder cancer patients; 307 non-cancer cohort members, some of them presenting different grades of pre-malignant alterations of exfoliated urothelial cells) were investigated. The cohort members had been enrolled in regular medical surveillance since mid-1980s. No overall increase of slow NAT2 genotypes in the former benzidine-exposed bladder cancer patients was found, compared with non-diseased members of the same cohort. A lower presentation of the homozygous wild genotype NAT2 4/4 was observed in bladder cancer patients, compared with non-diseased members with averaged Papanicolaou's grading (APG)3 II (OR=0.31, 95 percent CI 0.10-0.96, p=0.034) or with APG less than II (OR=0.36,95 percent CI 0.12-1.10, p=0.063). Nevertheless, neither a protective influence of rapid NAT2 genotypes on bladder cancer risk nor on pre-malignant cytological alterations could be confirmed by the present data.

  10. Multivariate Analysis of Genotype-Phenotype Association.

    PubMed

    Mitteroecker, Philipp; Cheverud, James M; Pavlicev, Mihaela

    2016-04-01

    With the advent of modern imaging and measurement technology, complex phenotypes are increasingly represented by large numbers of measurements, which may not bear biological meaning one by one. For such multivariate phenotypes, studying the pairwise associations between all measurements and all alleles is highly inefficient and prevents insight into the genetic pattern underlying the observed phenotypes. We present a new method for identifying patterns of allelic variation (genetic latent variables) that are maximally associated-in terms of effect size-with patterns of phenotypic variation (phenotypic latent variables). This multivariate genotype-phenotype mapping (MGP) separates phenotypic features under strong genetic control from less genetically determined features and thus permits an analysis of the multivariate structure of genotype-phenotype association, including its dimensionality and the clustering of genetic and phenotypic variables within this association. Different variants of MGP maximize different measures of genotype-phenotype association: genetic effect, genetic variance, or heritability. In an application to a mouse sample, scored for 353 SNPs and 11 phenotypic traits, the first dimension of genetic and phenotypic latent variables accounted for >70% of genetic variation present in all 11 measurements; 43% of variation in this phenotypic pattern was explained by the corresponding genetic latent variable. The first three dimensions together sufficed to account for almost 90% of genetic variation in the measurements and for all the interpretable genotype-phenotype association. Each dimension can be tested as a whole against the hypothesis of no association, thereby reducing the number of statistical tests from 7766 to 3-the maximal number of meaningful independent tests. Important alleles can be selected based on their effect size (additive or nonadditive effect on the phenotypic latent variable). This low dimensionality of the genotype-phenotype map

  11. In Vitro Conservation of Sweet Potato Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Arrigoni-Blank, Maria de Fátima; Tavares, Fernanda Ferreira; dos Santos, Maria Clézia; Menezes, Thays Saynara Alves; de Santana, Aléa Dayane Dantas

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a protocol for the in vitro conservation of sweet potato genotypes using the slow growth technique. The first experiment was conducted in a 4 × 5 × 2 factorial scheme, testing four genotypes (IPB-007, IPB-052, IPB-072, and IPB-137), five concentrations of abscisic acid (ABA) (0.0, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, and 8.0 mg·L−1), and two temperatures (18 and 25°C). The second experiment was conducted in a 4 × 3 × 3 factorial scheme at 18°C, testing four genotypes (IPB-007, IPB-052, IPB-072, and IPB-137), three variations of MS salts (50, 75, and 100%), and three concentrations of sucrose (10, 20, and 30 g·L−1). Every three months, we evaluated the survival (%), shoot height, and shoot viability. In vitro conservation of the sweet potato genotypes IPB-052 and IPB-007 was obtained over three and six months, respectively, using MS medium plus 2.0 mg·L−1 of ABA at either 18 or 25°C. Genotypes IPB-072 and IPB-137 can be kept for three and six months, respectively, in MS medium without ABA at 18°C. It is possible to store IPB-052 and IPB-072 for six months and IPB-007 and IPB-137 for nine months using 30 g·L−1 of sucrose and 50% MS salts. PMID:24563627

  12. [UGT1A1 Genotyping for Proper Use of Irinotecan].

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Ayumu; Ando, Yuichi

    2015-07-01

    Irinotecan is a camptothecin analog used worldwide for a broad range of solid tumors, including colorectal and lung cancers. It can cause severe adverse drug reactions, such as neutropenia or diarrhea. Irinotecan is metabolized to form active SN-38, which is further conjugated and detoxified by the UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A1 enzyme. Recent pharmacogenetic studies on irinotecan have revealed the impact of UGT1A1 polymorphisms on severe adverse effects. A variant in the promoter of the UGT1A1 gene, the UGT1A1 *28 allele, has been extensively studied, and pharmacogenetic relationships between the variant and severe toxicities of irinotecan have been reported. The US FDA and pharmaceutical companies revised the irinotecan label in 2005, and it now includes homozygosity for the UGT1A1*28 genotype as one of the risk factors for severe neutropenia. A variant in exon 1 of the UGT1A1 gene, the UGT1A1*6 allele, mainly found in East Asians, is also an important risk factor associated with severe neutropenia. The concurrence of UGT1A1*28 and UGT1A1*6, even when heterozygous, markedly alters the disposition of irinotecan, potentially increasing toxicity, which is now written on the label of irinotecan in Japan. For patients showing homozygosity for UGT1A1*28, *6, or compound heterozygosity for UGT1A1*6 and *28, dose reduction of irinotecan is strongly recommended. Genotyping tests for UGT1A1 *6 and *28 have been approved in Japan and are currently used in oncology practice. Moreover, a recent Phase 2 trial for FOLFIRINOX in Japan excluded patients who showed homozygosity for UGT1A1*28, *6, or compound heterozygosity for UGT1A1*6 and *28. At present, irinotecan chemotherapy based on a patient's UGT1A1 genetic status is scientifically reasonable. PMID:26591441

  13. RHIC status

    SciTech Connect

    Peggs, S.

    1997-08-01

    The design and construction status of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, RHIC, which is in the seventh year of a nine year construction cycle, is discussed. Those novel performance features of a heavy ion collider that are distinct from hadron colliders in general are noted. These features are derived from the experimental requirements of operation with a variety of ion species over a wide energy range, including collisions between protons and ions, and between ions of unequal energies. Section 1 gives a brief introduction to the major parameters and overall layout of RHIC. A review of the superconducting magnet program is given in Section 2. Activities during the recent Sextant Test are briefly reviewed in Section 3. Finally, Section 4 presents the plans for RHIC commissioning in 1999.

  14. Hepatitis C genotype 4: The past, present, and future

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Ghaffar, Tawhida Y; Sira, Mostafa M; El Naghi, Suzan

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype (GT) 4 represents 12%-15% (15-18 million) of total global HCV infection. It is prevalent in Northern and Equatorial Africa and the Middle East, and is also present in some countries in Europe. GT-4 (and subtype 4a in particular) dominates the HCV epidemic in Egypt. In underdeveloped countries, risk factors associated with HCV infection may be due to unsafe medical practices or other factors such as familial transmission, mother’s HCV status, or illiteracy. HCV prevention and control programs should include health education, increased community awareness towards the disease, controlling infection distribution in health-care centers, proper sterilization of medical and dental instruments, and ensuring safe supply of blood and blood-products. Response rates to a 48-wk combined pegylated-interferon (PEG-IFN) and ribavirin (RBV) treatment range from 40%-69%, and HCV-GT-4 has been considered better than GT-1 but worse than GT-2 and GT-3 in treatment with PEG-IFN/RBV. However, with the introduction of the HCV-GT-1 effective protease inhibitors boceprevir and telaprevir in 2011, HCV-GT-4 became the “most difficult (GT) to treat”. Recently, the direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) with pan- genotypic activities simeprevir, sofosbuvir, and daclatasvir have been recommended in triple regimens with PEG-IFN/RBV for the treatment of HCV-GT-4. An IFN-free regimen will be available for treatment of all genotypes of HCV in the near future. To date, several DAAs have been developed and are currently being evaluated in various combinations in clinical trials. As new regimens and new agents are being approved by the Food and Drug Administration, we can expect the guidelines for HCV treatment to be changed. The availability of shorter, simpler, and more tolerable treatment regimens can reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with HCV infection. With such a large number of therapeutic agents available, we can end up with a range of choices that we

  15. Fetal Vegf Genotype is More Important for Abortion Risk than Mother Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Yalcintepe, Sinem Atik; Silan, Fatma; Hacivelioglu, Servet Ozden; Uludag, Ahmet; Cosar, Emine; Ozdemir, Ozturk

    2014-01-01

    VEGF gene has been reported to be related with many diseases and recurrent pregnancy loss in various studies. Concerning the role of VEGF polymorphisms in pregnancy losses, generally mothers genotypes have been analyzed. To evaluate the association between VEGF A +405G/C (rs2010963), −460T/C (rs833061), +936C/T (rs3025039) and - 2578A/C (rs699947) polymorphisms and spontaneous abortion, we studied the genotypes of spontaneously aborted fetuses, their mothers and healthy controls. 23 spontaneously aborted fetal materials, 22 mothers who had these abortions and 86 healthy controls were included in this study. rs2010963, rs833061, rs3025039 and rs699947 polymorphisms were analyzed by Real Time PCR technique after genomic DNA isolation from all subjects. The frequencies of VEGF A rs2010963 GG genotype and rs2010963 G allele were higher in fetuses compared both with mothers and healthy controls. VEGF A rs3025039 TT genotype and rs3025039 T allele frequencies were higher in fetuses comparing with mothers. VEGF A rs833061 CT and TT genotypes frequencies were higher in fetuses comparing with mothers. We ascertained that VEGF A rs2010963, rs833061 and rs3025039 are the risk factors for spontaneous abortion in fetal genotypes comparing with their mothers and healthy controls. PMID:25035858

  16. Staphylococcus aureus genotype B and other genotypes isolated from cow milk in European countries.

    PubMed

    Cosandey, A; Boss, R; Luini, M; Artursson, K; Bardiau, M; Breitenwieser, F; Hehenberger, E; Lam, Th; Mansfeld, M; Michel, A; Mösslacher, G; Naskova, J; Nelson, S; Podpečan, O; Raemy, A; Ryan, E; Salat, O; Zangerl, P; Steiner, A; Graber, H U

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is globally one of the most important pathogens causing contagious mastitis in cattle. Previous studies, however, have demonstrated in Swiss cows that Staph. aureus isolated from bovine intramammary infection is genetically heterogeneous, with Staph. aureus genotype B (GTB) and GTC being the most prominent genotypes. In addition, Staph. aureus GTB was found to be contagious, whereas Staph. aureus GTC and all the remaining genotypes were involved in individual cow disease. The aim of this study was to subtype strains of Staph. aureus isolated from bovine mastitic milk and bulk tank milk to obtain a unified view of the presence of bovine staphylococcal subtypes in 12 European countries. A total of 456 strains of Staph. aureus were subjected to different typing methods: ribosomal spacer PCR, detection of enterotoxin genes, and detection of gene polymorphisms (lukE, coa). Major genotypes with their variants were combined into genotypic clusters (CL). This study revealed 5 major CL representing 76% of all strains and comprised CLB, CLC, CLF, CLI, and CLR. The clusters were characterized by the same genetic properties as the Swiss isolates, demonstrating high clonality of bovine Staph. aureus. Interestingly, CLB was situated in central Europe whereas the other CL were widely disseminated. The remaining 24% of the strains comprised 41 genotypes and variants, some of which (GTAM, GTBG) were restricted to certain countries; many others, however, were observed only once.

  17. HCV genotyping from NGS short reads and its application in genotype detection from HCV mixed infected plasma.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Ping; Stevens, Richard; Wei, Bo; Lahser, Fred; Howe, Anita Y M; Klappenbach, Joel A; Marton, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    Genotyping of hepatitis C virus (HCV) plays an important role in the treatment of HCV. As new genotype-specific treatment options become available, it has become increasingly important to have accurate HCV genotype and subtype information to ensure that the most appropriate treatment regimen is selected. Most current genotyping methods are unable to detect mixed genotypes from two or more HCV infections. Next generation sequencing (NGS) allows for rapid and low cost mass sequencing of viral genomes and provides an opportunity to probe the viral population from a single host. In this paper, the possibility of using short NGS reads for direct HCV genotyping without genome assembly was evaluated. We surveyed the publicly-available genetic content of three HCV drug target regions (NS3, NS5A, NS5B) in terms of whether these genes contained genotype-specific regions that could predict genotype. Six genotypes and 38 subtypes were included in this study. An automated phylogenetic analysis based HCV genotyping method was implemented and used to assess different HCV target gene regions. Candidate regions of 250-bp each were found for all three genes that have enough genetic information to predict HCV genotypes/subtypes. Validation using public datasets shows 100% genotyping accuracy. To test whether these 250-bp regions were sufficient to identify mixed genotypes, we developed a random primer-based method to sequence HCV plasma samples containing mixtures of two HCV genotypes in different ratios. We were able to determine the genotypes without ambiguity and to quantify the ratio of the abundances of the mixed genotypes in the samples. These data provide a proof-of-concept that this random primed, NGS-based short-read genotyping approach does not need prior information about the viral population and is capable of detecting mixed viral infection.

  18. Low frequency of PrP genotype 225SF among free-ranging mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) with chronic wasting disease.

    PubMed

    Jewell, Jean E; Conner, Mary M; Wolfe, Lisa L; Miller, Michael W; Williams, Elizabeth S

    2005-08-01

    The prion protein (PrP) gene was characterized in 1482 free-ranging mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) from Wyoming and Colorado. Using DNA sequences from 363 deer, dimorphisms at codons 20 (aspartate/glycine) and 225 [serine (S)/phenylalanine (F)] were found; silent changes occurred at codons 131 (tyrosine) and 247 (isoleucine). The remaining samples were surveyed for codon 225 genotype and all were characterized for chronic wasting disease (CWD) infection status. A total of 112 deer with the genotype 225SF or FF were found, of which one was CWD-positive; 1370 were 225SS, with 289 positive for CWD. Among CWD-negative deer, the frequency of 225SF/FF genotypes was 9.3 % but among CWD-positive deer it was only 0.3 %. For all samples combined, CWD status was not independent of codon 225 genotype (P<0.0001). The odds that a deer of the 225SS genotype was CWD-infected were 30 times greater (95 % confidence intervals=4-213) than for a 225SF deer. The proportion of 225SF animals in sampled subpopulations varied from 0 to 18 %; the CWD prevalence varied from 0 to 25 %. However, no relationship was observed between genotype frequency and CWD prevalence in different areas. The PrP sequences of experimentally infected mule deer were analysed from pre-existing projects and 10 animals were found with 225SF genotypes, all of which were positive for CWD. Data available from some of these animals suggest that the 225SF genotype could be associated with longer incubation periods in CWD infection compared with the 225SS genotype.

  19. Distribution of Hepatitis C Virus Genotypes in Bahrain

    PubMed Central

    Janahi, Essam M.; Al-Mannai, Mariam; Singh, Hemlata; Jahromi, Mohamed M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Approximately 170 million people are infected with Hepatitis C virus (HCV) worldwide, making it one of the world’s major infectious diseases. There are no published population based studies about the prevalence of HCV genotypes in Bahrain. Objectives: Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence and distribution of HCV genotypes and subtypes among a large sample of patients with chronic HCV infection in Bahrain. Patients and Methods: Serum samples were collected from 202 HCV positive patients; of them 128 had a viral load (> 500 IU/mL) suitable for the type-specific genotyping assay. Gender-wise and age-wise differences in the distribution of HCV genotypes were determined by Chi Square and Fisher’s Exact tests. Results: The predominant genotype among Bahraini patients was type 1 (36.71%), followed by genotypes 3 and 4 (15.6% each) and the lowest frequency was found for genotype 2 (3.9%). Among genotype 1, subtype 1b had the highest frequency (21.09%), followed by subtype 1a (14.06%). Among genotype 3, subtype 3a had the highest frequency (11.72%), while among genotype 4, most of subtypes were undetermined. The frequency of all different HCV genotypes was higher in male patients compared to female patients. Genotype 1 was most common in the age group of 51 - 60 years (38.3%), genotype 2 in 21 - 30 years (60%) and genotype 3 in 51 - 60 years (30%), while genotype 4 was most frequent among the age group > 61 (40%). Conclusions: The most common HCV genotype in Bahrain was subtype 1b followed by 1a and 3a. Further studies involving sources of transmission in Bahrain are required to enhance control measures for HCV infection. PMID:26977163

  20. Apolipoprotein E4 genotype does not increase risk of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders.

    PubMed

    Morgan, E E; Woods, S P; Letendre, S L; Franklin, D R; Bloss, C; Goate, A; Heaton, R K; Collier, A C; Marra, C M; Gelman, B B; McArthur, J C; Morgello, S; Simpson, D M; McCutchan, J A; Ellis, R J; Abramson, I; Gamst, A; Fennema-Notestine, C; Smith, D M; Grant, I; Vaida, F; Clifford, D B

    2013-04-01

    This is a cross-sectional, observational study to evaluate the hypothesis that HIV-seropositive (HIV+) apolipoprotein E4 (APOE4) carriers are at increased risk for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) compared to APOE4 noncarriers with HIV in the CNS HIV Antiretroviral Therapy Effects Research (CHARTER) Group sample. APOE genotype was determined in 466 CHARTER participants with varying disease stages and histories of antiretroviral treatment who did not have severe psychiatric or medical comorbid conditions that preclude diagnosis of HAND. HAND diagnoses were based on results of comprehensive neurobehavioral evaluation and use of current neuroAIDS diagnostic criteria. HAND status consists of two levels: neuropsychologically normal status (i.e., no HAND) and any HAND diagnosis (i.e., asymptomatic neurocognitive impairment, minor neurocognitive disorder, HIV-associated dementia). Logistic regression analyses revealed no association between APOE4 carrier status and HAND, and there were no interactions between APOE4 carrier status and ethnicity, age, substance use disorders, duration of infection, or nadir CD4. Results did not differ when analysis was restricted to symptomatic HAND, and no APOE4 gene dose-dependent relationship to HAND emerged. APOE4 status was not associated with concurrent HAND in this large, well-characterized sample. This does not preclude emergence of an association between APOE4 status and HAND as this population ages. Prospective, longitudinal studies are needed to examine APOE4 as a risk factor for neurocognitive decline, incident HAND at older ages, and potential associations with cerebrospinal fluid amyloid.

  1. Atlas: a java-based tool for managing genotypes.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Enciso, E; García-Bernal, P G; Pérez-Enciso, M

    2005-01-01

    With the exponential increase in genotyping capability, it is fundamental to check data consistency and improve genotype management. Atlas is a Java-based application for managing genotypes that also provides a series of tools useful in traceability, parentage testing, and identification, as well as pedigree and marker visualization. PMID:16135705

  2. Plant genotypic diversity increases population size of a herbivorous insect

    PubMed Central

    Utsumi, Shunsuke; Ando, Yoshino; Craig, Timothy P.; Ohgushi, Takayuki

    2011-01-01

    It is critical to incorporate the process of population dynamics into community genetics studies to identify the mechanisms of the linkage between host plant genetics and associated communities. We studied the effects of plant genotypic diversity of tall goldenrod Solidago altissima on the population dynamics of the aphid Uroleucon nigrotuberculatum. We found genotypic variation in plant resistance to the aphid in our experiments. To determine the impact of plant genotypic diversity on aphid population dynamics, we compared aphid densities under conditions of three treatments: single-genotype plots, mixed-genotype plots and mixed-genotype-with-cages plots. In the latter treatment plants were individually caged to prevent natural enemy attack and aphid movement among plants. The synergistic effects of genotypes on population size were demonstrated by the greater aphid population size in the mixed-genotype treatment than expected from additive effects alone. Two non-exclusive hypotheses are proposed to explain this pattern. First, there is a source–sink relationship among plant genotypes: aphids move from plant genotypes where their reproduction is high to genotypes where their reproduction is low. Second, natural enemy mortality is reduced in mixed plots in a matrix of diverse plant genotypes. PMID:21378084

  3. 21 CFR 862.3360 - Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3360 Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. (a) Identification. A drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system is a device intended for use in testing deoxyribonucleic acid...

  4. 21 CFR 862.3360 - Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3360 Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. (a) Identification. A drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system is a device intended for use in testing deoxyribonucleic acid...

  5. 21 CFR 862.3360 - Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3360 Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. (a) Identification. A drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system is a device intended for use in testing deoxyribonucleic acid...

  6. 21 CFR 862.3360 - Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3360 Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. (a) Identification. A drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system is a device intended for use in testing deoxyribonucleic acid...

  7. 21 CFR 862.3360 - Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3360 Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. (a) Identification. A drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system is a device intended for use in testing deoxyribonucleic acid...

  8. Atlas: a java-based tool for managing genotypes.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Enciso, E; García-Bernal, P G; Pérez-Enciso, M

    2005-01-01

    With the exponential increase in genotyping capability, it is fundamental to check data consistency and improve genotype management. Atlas is a Java-based application for managing genotypes that also provides a series of tools useful in traceability, parentage testing, and identification, as well as pedigree and marker visualization.

  9. An agent based model of genotype editing

    SciTech Connect

    Rocha, L. M.; Huang, C. F.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents our investigation on an agent-based model of Genotype Editing. This model is based on several characteristics that are gleaned from the RNA editing system as observed in several organisms. The incorporation of editing mechanisms in an evolutionary agent-based model provides a means for evolving agents with heterogenous post-transcriptional processes. The study of this agent-based genotype-editing model has shed some light into the evolutionary implications of RNA editing as well as established an advantageous evolutionary computation algorithm for machine learning. We expect that our proposed model may both facilitate determining the evolutionary role of RNA editing in biology, and advance the current state of research in agent-based optimization.

  10. Pathogenicity island cag, vacA and IS605 genotypes in Mexican strains of Helicobacter pylori associated with peptic ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori is associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, and gastric cancer. Two major virulence factors of H. pylori have been described: the pathogenicity island cag (cag PAI) and the vacuolating cytotoxin gene (vacA). Virtually all strains have a copy of vacA, but its genotype varies. The cag PAI is a region of 32 genes in which the insertion of IS605 elements in its middle region has been associated with partial or total deletions of it that have generated strains with varying virulence. Accordingly, the aim of this work was to determine the cag PAI integrity, vacA genotype and IS605 status in groups of isolates from Mexican patients with non-peptic ulcers (NPU), non-bleeding peptic ulcers (NBPU), and bleeding peptic ulcers (BPU). Methods The cag PAI integrity was performed by detection of eleven targeted genes along this locus using dot blot hybridization and PCR assays. The vacA allelic, cag PAI genotype 1 and IS605 status were determined by PCR analysis. Results Groups of 16-17 isolates (n = 50) from two patients with NPU, NBPU, and BPU, respectively, were studied. 90% (45/50) of the isolates harbored a complete cag PAI. Three BPU isolates lacked the cag PAI, and two of the NBPU had an incomplete cag PAI: the first isolate was negative for three of its genes, including deletion of the cagA gene, whereas the second did not have the cagM gene. Most of the strains (76%) had the vacA s1b/m1 genotype; meanwhile the IS605 was not present within the cag PAI of any strain but was detected elsewhere in the genome of 8% (4/50). Conclusion The patients had highly virulent strains since the most of them possessed a complete cag PAI and had a vacA s1b/m1 genotype. All the isolates presented the cag PAI without any IS605 insertion (genotype 1). Combined vacA genotypes showed that 1 NPU, 2 NBPU, and 1 BPU patients (66.6%) had a mixed infection; coexistence of H. pylori strains with different cag PAI status was observed in 1 NBPU and 2 BPU (50

  11. Genotyping of Coxiella burnetii from domestic ruminants and human in Hungary: indication of various genotypes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Information about the genotypic characteristic of Coxiella burnetii from Hungary is lacking. The aim of this study is to describe the genetic diversity of C. burnetii in Hungary and compare genotypes with those found elsewhere. A total of 12 samples: (cattle, n = 6, sheep, n = 5 and human, n = 1) collected from across Hungary were studied by a 10-loci multispacer sequence typing (MST) and 6-loci multiple-locus variable-number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA). Phylogenetic relationships among MST genotypes show how these Hungarian samples are related to others collected around the world. Results Three MST genotypes were identified: sequence type (ST) 20 has also been identified in ruminants from other European countries and the USA, ST28 was previously identified in Kazakhstan, and the proposed ST37 is novel. All MST genotypes yielded different MLVA genotypes and three different MLVA genotypes were identified within ST20 samples alone. Two novel MLVA types 0-9-5-5-6-2 (AG) and 0-8-4-5-6-2 (AF) (Ms23-Ms24-Ms27-Ms28-Ms33-Ms34) were defined in the ovine materials correlated with ST28 and ST37. Samples from different parts of the phylogenetic tree were associated with different hosts, suggesting host-specific adaptations. Conclusions Even with the limited number of samples analysed, this study revealed high genetic diversity among C. burnetii in Hungary. Understanding the background genetic diversity will be essential in identifying and controlling outbreaks. PMID:24885415

  12. Genotype Imputation with Millions of Reference Samples.

    PubMed

    Browning, Brian L; Browning, Sharon R

    2016-01-01

    We present a genotype imputation method that scales to millions of reference samples. The imputation method, based on the Li and Stephens model and implemented in Beagle v.4.1, is parallelized and memory efficient, making it well suited to multi-core computer processors. It achieves fast, accurate, and memory-efficient genotype imputation by restricting the probability model to markers that are genotyped in the target samples and by performing linear interpolation to impute ungenotyped variants. We compare Beagle v.4.1 with Impute2 and Minimac3 by using 1000 Genomes Project data, UK10K Project data, and simulated data. All three methods have similar accuracy but different memory requirements and different computation times. When imputing 10 Mb of sequence data from 50,000 reference samples, Beagle's throughput was more than 100× greater than Impute2's throughput on our computer servers. When imputing 10 Mb of sequence data from 200,000 reference samples in VCF format, Minimac3 consumed 26× more memory per computational thread and 15× more CPU time than Beagle. We demonstrate that Beagle v.4.1 scales to much larger reference panels by performing imputation from a simulated reference panel having 5 million samples and a mean marker density of one marker per four base pairs. PMID:26748515

  13. SNP marker detection and genotyping in tilapia.

    PubMed

    Van Bers, N E M; Crooijmans, R P M A; Groenen, M A M; Dibbits, B W; Komen, J

    2012-09-01

    We have generated a unique resource consisting of nearly 175 000 short contig sequences and 3569 SNP markers from the widely cultured GIFT (Genetically Improved Farmed Tilapia) strain of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). In total, 384 SNPs were selected to monitor the wider applicability of the SNPs by genotyping tilapia individuals from different strains and different geographical locations. In all strains and species tested (O. niloticus, O. aureus and O. mossambicus), the genotyping assay was working for a similar number of SNPs (288-305 SNPs). The actual number of polymorphic SNPs was, as expected, highest for individuals from the GIFT population (255 SNPs). In the individuals from an Egyptian strain and in individuals caught in the wild in the basin of the river Volta, 197 and 163 SNPs were polymorphic, respectively. A pairwise calculation of Nei's genetic distance allowed the discrimination of the individual strains and species based on the genotypes determined with the SNP set. We expect that this set will be widely applicable for use in tilapia aquaculture, e.g. for pedigree reconstruction. In addition, this set is currently used for assaying the genetic diversity of native Nile tilapia in areas where tilapia is, or will be, introduced in aquaculture projects. This allows the tracing of escapees from aquaculture and the monitoring of effects of introgression and hybridization. PMID:22524158

  14. SNP marker detection and genotyping in tilapia.

    PubMed

    Van Bers, N E M; Crooijmans, R P M A; Groenen, M A M; Dibbits, B W; Komen, J

    2012-09-01

    We have generated a unique resource consisting of nearly 175 000 short contig sequences and 3569 SNP markers from the widely cultured GIFT (Genetically Improved Farmed Tilapia) strain of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). In total, 384 SNPs were selected to monitor the wider applicability of the SNPs by genotyping tilapia individuals from different strains and different geographical locations. In all strains and species tested (O. niloticus, O. aureus and O. mossambicus), the genotyping assay was working for a similar number of SNPs (288-305 SNPs). The actual number of polymorphic SNPs was, as expected, highest for individuals from the GIFT population (255 SNPs). In the individuals from an Egyptian strain and in individuals caught in the wild in the basin of the river Volta, 197 and 163 SNPs were polymorphic, respectively. A pairwise calculation of Nei's genetic distance allowed the discrimination of the individual strains and species based on the genotypes determined with the SNP set. We expect that this set will be widely applicable for use in tilapia aquaculture, e.g. for pedigree reconstruction. In addition, this set is currently used for assaying the genetic diversity of native Nile tilapia in areas where tilapia is, or will be, introduced in aquaculture projects. This allows the tracing of escapees from aquaculture and the monitoring of effects of introgression and hybridization.

  15. CCR5 genotype and resistance to vertical transmission of HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Philpott, S; Burger, H; Charbonneau, T; Grimson, R; Vermund, S H; Visosky, A; Nachman, S; Kovacs, A; Tropper, P; Frey, H; Weiser, B

    1999-07-01

    A human gene has been identified that affects susceptibility to HIV-1 infection. The gene codes for CCR5, the coreceptor for macrophage-tropic strains of HIV-1. Individuals who are homozygous for a deleted, mutant form of the gene, delta32, display a high degree of natural resistance to sexual and parenteral transmission of HIV-1. To investigate whether delta32 plays a role in vertical transmission, we determined the CCR5 genotype of 552 children born to infected mothers in the United States and correlated the genotypes with HIV-1 infection status. Of these children, 13% were white, 30% Latino, and 56% African American, reflecting the ethnic makeup of infected women in the United States. The delta32 gene frequency varied among these groups, ranging from 0.08 in whites to 0.02 in both Latinos and African Americans. Approximately 27% of the children in each ethnic group were infected. Four children were identified as delta32 homozygotes, two uninfected whites (3.77%) and two uninfected Latinos (1.68%). None of the infected children displayed the delta32 homozygous genotype. Among Latinos and whites, the number of uninfected children who carried the homozygous delta32 mutation was significantly greater than that predicted by the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (p < .001 for Latinos, p = .044 for whites). This association was noted in Latino and white children whose mothers were either treated or untreated with zidovudine. These data document the occurrence of the homozygous delta32 genotype among children of HIV-1-infected mothers and suggest that this mutant genotype may confer protection from mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1. They also suggest that sexual, parenteral, and vertical transmission all involve processes that use CCR5 as a coreceptor for primary HIV-1 infection. Therefore, blocking the CCR5 receptor may provide an additional strategy to prevent HIV-1 vertical transmission.

  16. Entire genome sequence analysis of genotype IX Newcastle disease viruses reveals their early-genotype phylogenetic position and recent-genotype genome size

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Six nucleotide (nt) insertion in the 5'-noncoding region (NCR) of the nucleoprotein (NP) gene of Newcaslte disease virus (NDV) is considered to be a genetic marker for recent genotypes of NDV, which emerged after 1960. However, F48-like NDVs from China, identified a 6-nt insert in the NP gene, have been previously classified into genotype III or genotype IX. Results In order to clarify their phylogenetic position and explore the origin of NDVs with the 6-nt insert and its significance in NDV evolution, we determined the entire genome sequences of five F48-like viruses isolated in China between 1946 and 2002 by RT-PCR amplification of overlapping fragments of full-length genome and rapid amplification of cDNA ends. All the five NDV isolates shared the same genome size of 15,192-nt with the recent genotype V-VIII viruses whereas they had the highest homology with early genotype III and IV isolates. Conclusions The unique characteristic of the genome size and phylogenetic position of F48-like viruses warrants placing them in a separate geno-group, genotype IX. Results in this study also suggest that genotype IX viruses most likely originate from a genotype III virus by insertion of a 6-nt motif in the 5'-NCR of the NP gene which had occurred as early as in 1940 s, and might be the common origin of genotype V-VIII viruses. PMID:21396134

  17. PCR-based approach to distinguish group A human rotavirus genotype 1 vs. genotype 2 genes.

    PubMed

    McKell, Allison O; Nichols, Joshua C; McDonald, Sarah M

    2013-12-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVs) are eleven-segmented, double-stranded RNA viruses and important causes of severe diarrhea in children. A full-genome classification system is readily used to describe the genetic makeup of individual RV strains. In this system, each viral gene is assigned a specific genotype based upon its nucleotide sequence and established percent identity cut-off values. However, a faster and more cost-effective approach to determine RV gene genotypes is to utilize specific oligonucleotide primer sets in RT-PCR/PCR. Such primer sets and PCR-based genotyping methods have already been developed for the VP7-, VP6-, VP4- and NSP4-coding gene segments. In this study, primers were developed for the remaining seven RV gene segments, which encode proteins VP1, VP2, VP3, NSP1, NSP2, NSP3, and NSP5/6. Specifically, primers were designed to distinguish the two most common human RV genotypes (1 vs. 2) for these genes and were validated on several cell culture-adapted human and animal RV strains, as well as on human RVs from clinical fecal specimens. As such, primer sets now exist for all eleven genes of common human RVs, allowing for the identification of reassortant strains with mixed constellations of both genotype 1 and 2 genes using a rapid and economical RT-PCR/PCR method. PMID:24012969

  18. Cryptosporidium Genotypes in Wildlife from a New York Watershed▿

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yaoyu; Alderisio, Kerri A.; Yang, Wenli; Blancero, Lisa A.; Kuhne, William G.; Nadareski, Christopher A.; Reid, Michael; Xiao, Lihua

    2007-01-01

    To identify the animal sources for Cryptosporidium contamination, we genotyped Cryptosporidium spp. in wildlife from the watershed of the New York City drinking water supply, using a small-subunit rRNA gene-based PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and DNA sequencing. A total of 541 specimens from 38 species of wildlife were analyzed. One hundred and eleven (20.5%) of the wildlife specimens were PCR positive. Altogether, 21 Cryptosporidium genotypes were found in wildlife samples, 11 of which were previously found in storm runoff in the watershed, and six of these 11 were from storm water genotypes of unknown animal origin. Four new genotypes were found, and the animal hosts for four storm water genotypes were expanded. With the exception of the cervine genotype, most genotypes were found in a limited number of animal species and have no major public health significance. PMID:17720824

  19. Genotyping by Genome Reducing and Sequencing for Outbred Animals

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yumei; Chen, Zhenliang; Liao, Rongrong; Xie, Xiaoxian; Wang, Zhen; He, Pengfei; Tu, Yingying; Zhang, Xiangzhe; Yang, Changsuo; Yang, Hongjie; Yu, Fuqing; Zheng, Youmin; Zhang, Zhiwu; Wang, Qishan; Pan, Yuchun

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) approaches are widely used in genome-wide genetic marker discovery and genotyping. However, current NGS approaches are not easy to apply to general outbred populations (human and some major farm animals) for SNP identification because of the high level of heterogeneity and phase ambiguity in the haplotype. Here, we reported a new method for SNP genotyping, called genotyping by genome reducing and sequencing (GGRS) to genotype outbred species. Through an improved procedure for library preparation and a marker discovery and genotyping pipeline, the GGRS approach can genotype outbred species cost-effectively and high-reproducibly. We also evaluated the efficiency and accuracy of our approach for high-density SNP discovery and genotyping in a large genome pig species (2.8 Gb), for which more than 70,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) can be identified for an expenditure of only $80 (USD)/sample. PMID:23874423

  20. Cryptosporidium genotypes in wildlife from a new york watershed.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yaoyu; Alderisio, Kerri A; Yang, Wenli; Blancero, Lisa A; Kuhne, William G; Nadareski, Christopher A; Reid, Michael; Xiao, Lihua

    2007-10-01

    To identify the animal sources for Cryptosporidium contamination, we genotyped Cryptosporidium spp. in wildlife from the watershed of the New York City drinking water supply, using a small-subunit rRNA gene-based PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and DNA sequencing. A total of 541 specimens from 38 species of wildlife were analyzed. One hundred and eleven (20.5%) of the wildlife specimens were PCR positive. Altogether, 21 Cryptosporidium genotypes were found in wildlife samples, 11 of which were previously found in storm runoff in the watershed, and six of these 11 were from storm water genotypes of unknown animal origin. Four new genotypes were found, and the animal hosts for four storm water genotypes were expanded. With the exception of the cervine genotype, most genotypes were found in a limited number of animal species and have no major public health significance.

  1. Genotypic variation in tomatoes affecting processing and antioxidant attributes.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Mohammed Wasim; Ayala-Zavala, J F; Dhua, R S

    2015-01-01

    Tomatoes are widely consumed either raw or after processing and can provide a significant proportion of the total antioxidants in the diet associated with beneficial health properties. Over the last two or three decades an increasing interest for processing and antioxidant attributes in tomatoes has arisen. The screening of processing attributes of tomatoes is subject of a large number of articles; however, special interest has been addressed to the biochemical composition. The postharvest and industrial processing of tomato in tomato-based products includes several steps. Processing and antioxidant characteristics of the raw fruit are important considering the processing steps and final product. To respond to consumer and industrial complaints, breeders should know the range of genetic variability available in tomato resources, including local genotypes, for improving the mentioned attributes. Characterization and conservation of traditional and modern varieties is a major goal for their preservation and utilization. The bioactive contents have an impact on the processed destines so their stability must be contemplated while selecting the tomato fruits for processing. The endeavor of this review was to examine comprehensively the variation in processing and antioxidant attributes among tomatoes. Role of tomato peel in terms of bioactive contents and information on high pigment (hp) tomato mutants are also touched to some extent. Probably, patterns of variation identified/discussed in this paper would give impetus for planning breeding strategies to develop and improve the new processing cultivars with good antioxidant status.

  2. Prevalence of Hepatitis C Virus Genotypes in Mashhad, Northeast Iran

    PubMed Central

    Vossughinia, H; Goshayeshi, LA; Bayegi, H Rafatpanah; Sima, H; Kazemi, A; Erfani, S; Abedini, S; Goshayeshi, LE; Ghaffarzadegan, K; Nomani, H; Jamehdar, S Amel

    2012-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis C is a disease with significant global impact. The distribution of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes in Mashhad (the Northeast and the biggest city after the capital of Iran) is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of HCV genotypes among HCV seropositive patients, and to study the relationship between types, virologic and demographic features of patients in Mashhad. Methods: Three hundred and eighty-two clinical specimens obtained from HCV-infected patients referred to Ghaem Hospital in Mashhad during a period of 2009 to 2010 were selected. HCV genotype was determined by Nested PCR amplification of HCV core gene using genotype specific primers. Results: Totally, 299 patients were male (79.9%). The most common HCV genotype was genotype 3a, with 150 (40%) of subjects. Genotype 1a was the other frequent genotype, with 147(39.2%) subjects. Frequency of genotypes for 1b, 5 and 2 was 41(10.9%), 13(3.4%) and 9(2.4%), respectively. Mix genotype including 1a+1b in 4 (1.04%), 1a+3a in 3 (0.8%) was found in 7 patients. Four percent out of these samples had an undetermined genotype. Among the hemophilia patient, there were 13(48.1%) genotypes as 1a, 3(11.1%) 1b and 10(37%) 3a, respectively. Conclusion: The dominant HCV genotype among patients living in Mashhad was 3a. This study gives added evidence of the predominant HCV genotypes in Iran. PMID:23193507

  3. Emergence of Cryptosporidium hominis Monkey Genotype II and Novel Subtype Family Ik in the Squirrel Monkey (Saimiri sciureus) in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ziyao; Zhong, Zhijun; Shen, Liuhong; Cao, Suizhong; Yu, Xingming; Hu, Yanchuan; Chen, Weigang; Peng, Gangneng

    2015-01-01

    A single Cryptosporidium isolate from a squirrel monkey with no clinical symptoms was obtained from a zoo in Ya’an city, China, and was genotyped by PCR amplification and DNA sequencing of the small-subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA), 70-kDa heat shock protein (HSP70), Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein, and actin genes. This multilocus genetic characterization determined that the isolate was Cryptosporidium hominis, but carried 2, 10, and 6 nucleotide differences in the SSU rRNA, HSP70, and actin loci, respectively, which is comparable to the variations at these loci between C. hominis and the previously reported monkey genotype (2, 3, and 3 nucleotide differences). Phylogenetic studies, based on neighbor-joining and maximum likelihood methods, showed that the isolate identified in the current study had a distinctly discordant taxonomic status, distinct from known C. hominis and also from the monkey genotype, with respect to the three loci. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms of the SSU rRNA gene obtained from this study were similar to those of known C. hominis but clearly differentiated from the monkey genotype. Further subtyping was performed by sequence analysis of the gene encoding the 60-kDa glycoprotein (gp60). Maximum homology of only 88.3% to C. hominis subtype IdA10G4 was observed for the current isolate, and phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that this particular isolate belonged to a novel C. hominis subtype family, IkA7G4. This study is the first to report C. hominis infection in the squirrel monkey and, based on the observed genetic characteristics, confirms a new C. hominis genotype, monkey genotype II. Thus, these results provide novel insights into genotypic variation in C. hominis. PMID:26509708

  4. Emergence of Cryptosporidium hominis Monkey Genotype II and Novel Subtype Family Ik in the Squirrel Monkey (Saimiri sciureus) in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuehan; Xie, Na; Li, Wei; Zhou, Ziyao; Zhong, Zhijun; Shen, Liuhong; Cao, Suizhong; Yu, Xingming; Hu, Yanchuan; Chen, Weigang; Peng, Gangneng

    2015-01-01

    A single Cryptosporidium isolate from a squirrel monkey with no clinical symptoms was obtained from a zoo in Ya'an city, China, and was genotyped by PCR amplification and DNA sequencing of the small-subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA), 70-kDa heat shock protein (HSP70), Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein, and actin genes. This multilocus genetic characterization determined that the isolate was Cryptosporidium hominis, but carried 2, 10, and 6 nucleotide differences in the SSU rRNA, HSP70, and actin loci, respectively, which is comparable to the variations at these loci between C. hominis and the previously reported monkey genotype (2, 3, and 3 nucleotide differences). Phylogenetic studies, based on neighbor-joining and maximum likelihood methods, showed that the isolate identified in the current study had a distinctly discordant taxonomic status, distinct from known C. hominis and also from the monkey genotype, with respect to the three loci. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms of the SSU rRNA gene obtained from this study were similar to those of known C. hominis but clearly differentiated from the monkey genotype. Further subtyping was performed by sequence analysis of the gene encoding the 60-kDa glycoprotein (gp60). Maximum homology of only 88.3% to C. hominis subtype IdA10G4 was observed for the current isolate, and phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that this particular isolate belonged to a novel C. hominis subtype family, IkA7G4. This study is the first to report C. hominis infection in the squirrel monkey and, based on the observed genetic characteristics, confirms a new C. hominis genotype, monkey genotype II. Thus, these results provide novel insights into genotypic variation in C. hominis.

  5. Concentrations, viability, and distribution of Cryptosporidium genotypes in lagoons of swine facilities in the Southern Piedmont and in coastal plain watersheds of Georgia.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Michael B; Liotta, Janice L; Lucio-Forster, Araceli; Bowman, Dwight D

    2010-09-01

    Waste lagoons of swine operations are a source of Cryptosporidium oocysts. Few studies, however, have reported on oocyst concentrations in swine waste lagoons; none have reported on oocyst viability status, nor has there been a systematic assessment of species/genotype distributions across different types of swine facilities. Ten swine waste lagoons associated with farrowing, nursery, finishing, and gestation operations were each sampled once a month for a year. Oocysts were extracted from triplicate 900-ml effluent samples, enumerated by microscopy, and assessed for viability by dye exclusion/vital stain assay. DNA was extracted from processed samples, and 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) genes were amplified by PCR and sequenced for species and genotype identification. Oocysts were observed at each sampling time at each lagoon. Annual mean concentrations of total oocysts and viable oocysts ranged between 24 and 51 and between 0.6 and 12 oocysts ml(-1) effluent, respectively. The species and genotype distributions were dominated (95 to 100%) by Cryptosporidium suis and Cryptosporidium pig genotype II, the latter of which was found at eight of the lagoons. The lagoon at the gestation facility was dominated by Cryptosporidium muris (90%), and one farrowing facility showed a mix of pig genotypes, Cryptosporidium muris, and various genotypes of C. parvum. The zoonotic C. parvum bovine genotype was observed five times out of 407 18S rDNA sequences analyzed. Our results indicate that pigs can have mixed Cryptosporidium infections, but infection with C. suis is likely to be dominant. PMID:20639363

  6. Concentrations, Viability, and Distribution of Cryptosporidium Genotypes in Lagoons of Swine Facilities in the Southern Piedmont and in Coastal Plain Watersheds of Georgia ▿

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Michael B.; Liotta, Janice L.; Lucio-Forster, Araceli; Bowman, Dwight D.

    2010-01-01

    Waste lagoons of swine operations are a source of Cryptosporidium oocysts. Few studies, however, have reported on oocyst concentrations in swine waste lagoons; none have reported on oocyst viability status, nor has there been a systematic assessment of species/genotype distributions across different types of swine facilities. Ten swine waste lagoons associated with farrowing, nursery, finishing, and gestation operations were each sampled once a month for a year. Oocysts were extracted from triplicate 900-ml effluent samples, enumerated by microscopy, and assessed for viability by dye exclusion/vital stain assay. DNA was extracted from processed samples, and 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) genes were amplified by PCR and sequenced for species and genotype identification. Oocysts were observed at each sampling time at each lagoon. Annual mean concentrations of total oocysts and viable oocysts ranged between 24 and 51 and between 0.6 and 12 oocysts ml−1 effluent, respectively. The species and genotype distributions were dominated (95 to 100%) by Cryptosporidium suis and Cryptosporidium pig genotype II, the latter of which was found at eight of the lagoons. The lagoon at the gestation facility was dominated by Cryptosporidium muris (90%), and one farrowing facility showed a mix of pig genotypes, Cryptosporidium muris, and various genotypes of C. parvum. The zoonotic C. parvum bovine genotype was observed five times out of 407 18S rDNA sequences analyzed. Our results indicate that pigs can have mixed Cryptosporidium infections, but infection with C. suis is likely to be dominant. PMID:20639363

  7. Concentrations, viability, and distribution of Cryptosporidium genotypes in lagoons of swine facilities in the Southern Piedmont and in coastal plain watersheds of Georgia.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Michael B; Liotta, Janice L; Lucio-Forster, Araceli; Bowman, Dwight D

    2010-09-01

    Waste lagoons of swine operations are a source of Cryptosporidium oocysts. Few studies, however, have reported on oocyst concentrations in swine waste lagoons; none have reported on oocyst viability status, nor has there been a systematic assessment of species/genotype distributions across different types of swine facilities. Ten swine waste lagoons associated with farrowing, nursery, finishing, and gestation operations were each sampled once a month for a year. Oocysts were extracted from triplicate 900-ml effluent samples, enumerated by microscopy, and assessed for viability by dye exclusion/vital stain assay. DNA was extracted from processed samples, and 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) genes were amplified by PCR and sequenced for species and genotype identification. Oocysts were observed at each sampling time at each lagoon. Annual mean concentrations of total oocysts and viable oocysts ranged between 24 and 51 and between 0.6 and 12 oocysts ml(-1) effluent, respectively. The species and genotype distributions were dominated (95 to 100%) by Cryptosporidium suis and Cryptosporidium pig genotype II, the latter of which was found at eight of the lagoons. The lagoon at the gestation facility was dominated by Cryptosporidium muris (90%), and one farrowing facility showed a mix of pig genotypes, Cryptosporidium muris, and various genotypes of C. parvum. The zoonotic C. parvum bovine genotype was observed five times out of 407 18S rDNA sequences analyzed. Our results indicate that pigs can have mixed Cryptosporidium infections, but infection with C. suis is likely to be dominant.

  8. Genotype-Phenotype Correlations in Multiple Sclerosis: "HLA" Genes Influence Disease Severity Inferred by [superscript 1]HMR Spectroscopy and MRI Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okuda, D. T.; Srinivasan, R.; Oksenberg, J. R.; Goodin, D. S.; Baranzini, S. E.; Beheshtian, A.; Waubant, E.; Zamvil, S. S.; Leppert, D.; Qualley, P.; Lincoln, R.; Gomez, R.; Caillier, S.; George, M.; Wang, J.; Nelson, S. J.; Cree, B. A. C.; Hauser, S. L.; Pelletier, D.

    2009-01-01

    Genetic susceptibility to multiple sclerosis (MS) is associated with the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) "DRB1*1501" allele. Here we show a clear association between DRB1*1501 carrier status and four domains of disease severity in an investigation of genotype-phenotype associations in 505 robust, clinically well characterized MS patients evaluated…

  9. Genotyping of Coxiella burnetii from domestic ruminants in northern Spain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Information on the genotypic diversity of Coxiella burnetii isolates from infected domestic ruminants in Spain is limited. The aim of this study was to identify the C. burnetii genotypes infecting livestock in Northern Spain and compare them to other European genotypes. A commercial real-time PCR targeting the IS1111a insertion element was used to detect the presence of C. burnetii DNA in domestic ruminants from Spain. Genotypes were determined by a 6-loci Multiple Locus Variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) panel and Multispacer Sequence Typing (MST). Results A total of 45 samples from 4 goat herds (placentas, N = 4), 12 dairy cattle herds (vaginal mucus, individual milk, bulk tank milk, aerosols, N = 20) and 5 sheep flocks (placenta, vaginal swabs, faeces, air samples, dust, N = 21) were included in the study. Samples from goats and sheep were obtained from herds which had suffered abortions suspected to be caused by C. burnetii, whereas cattle samples were obtained from animals with reproductive problems compatible with C. burnetii infection, or consisted of bulk tank milk (BTM) samples from a Q fever surveillance programme. C. burnetii genotypes identified in ruminants from Spain were compared to those detected in other countries. Three MLVA genotypes were found in 4 goat farms, 7 MLVA genotypes were identified in 12 cattle herds and 4 MLVA genotypes were identified in 5 sheep flocks. Clustering of the MLVA genotypes using the minimum spanning tree method showed a high degree of genetic similarity between most MLVA genotypes. Overall 11 different MLVA genotypes were obtained corresponding to 4 different MST genotypes: MST genotype 13, identified in goat, sheep and cattle from Spain; MST genotype 18, only identified in goats; and, MST genotypes 8 and 20, identified in small ruminants and cattle, respectively. All these genotypes had been previously identified in animal and human clinical samples from several European countries, but

  10. ACTN3 genotype in professional endurance cyclists.

    PubMed

    Lucia, A; Gómez-Gallego, F; Santiago, C; Bandrés, F; Earnest, C; Rabadán, M; Alonso, J M; Hoyos, J; Córdova, A; Villa, G; Foster, C

    2006-11-01

    The Z-disk protein alpha-actinin-3 is only expressed in type II muscle fibres, which are responsible for generating forceful contractions at high velocity. Despite the evolutionary conservation of alpha-actinin-3, approximately one in every five Caucasians of European ancestry is totally deficient in this protein, due to homozygosity for a R577X polymorphism in the ACTN3 gene. This, together with the results of recent research on elite athletes, suggests that the "null" XX polymorphism might confer some advantage to endurance performance events. To test this hypothesis, we studied the frequency distribution of R577X genotypes in a group of 50 top-level male professional cyclists (26.9 +/- 0.4 yrs [mean +/- SEM]; VO2max: 73.5 +/- 0.8 ml x kg (-1) x min (-1)). Their results were compared with those of a group of 52 Olympic-class male endurance runners (26.8 +/- 0.6 yrs; VO2max: 73.3 +/- 0.8 ml x kg (-1) x min (-1)) and 123 healthy, sedentary male controls. All subjects were Caucasian, and of European ancestry. No significant differences (p > 0.05) were found between groups: RR: 28.5 %; RX: 53.6 % and XX: 17.9 % in controls; RR: 28.0 %; RX: 46.0 % and XX: 26.0 % in cyclists; and RR: 25.0 %; RX: 57.7 %; XX: 17.3 % in runners). No differences were found in indices of endurance performance (VO2peak or ventilatory thresholds) between athlete carriers of each R577X genotype. In summary, although the alpha-actinin-3 deficient XX genotype may be detrimental for sprint performance in humans, the R577X polymorphism of the ACTN3 gene does not appear to confer an advantage on the ability of male athletes to sustain extreme endurance performance.

  11. Multispacer Sequence Typing for Mycobacterium tuberculosis Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Djelouadji, Zoheira; Arnold, Catherine; Gharbia, Saheer; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2008-01-01

    Background Genotyping methods developed to survey the transmission dynamics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis currently rely on the interpretation of restriction and amplification profiles. Multispacer sequence typing (MST) genotyping is based on the sequencing of several intergenic regions selected after complete genome sequence analysis. It has been applied to various pathogens, but not to M. tuberculosis. Methods and Findings In M. tuberculosis, the MST approach yielded eight variable intergenic spacers which included four previously described variable number tandem repeat loci, one single nucleotide polymorphism locus and three newly evaluated spacers. Spacer sequence stability was evaluated by serial subculture. The eight spacers were sequenced in a collection of 101 M. tuberculosis strains from five phylogeographical lineages, and yielded 29 genetic events including 13 tandem repeat number variations (44.82%), 11 single nucleotide mutations (37.93%) and 5 deletions (17.24%). These 29 genetic events yielded 32 spacer alleles or spacer-types (ST) with an index of discrimination of 0.95. The distribution of M. tuberculosis isolates into ST profiles correlated with their assignment into phylogeographical lineages. Blind comparison of a further 93 M. tuberculosis strains by MST and restriction fragment length polymorphism-IS6110 fingerprinting and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units typing, yielded an index of discrimination of 0.961 and 0.992, respectively. MST yielded 41 different profiles delineating 16 related groups and proved to be more discriminatory than IS6110-based typing for isolates containing <8 IS6110 copies (P<0.0003). MST was successfully applied to 7/10 clinical specimens exhibiting a Cts ≤ 42 cycles in internal transcribed spacer-real time PCR. Conclusions These results support MST as an alternative, sequencing-based method for genotyping low IS6110 copy-number M. tuberculosis strains. The M. tuberculosis MST database is freely available

  12. SBE primer : multiplexing minisequencing-based genotyping

    SciTech Connect

    Kaderali, L.; Deshpande, A.; Uribe-Romeo, F. J.; Schliep, A.; Torney, D. C.

    2002-01-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis is a powerful tool for mapping and diagnosing disease-related alleles. Most of the known genetic diseases are caused by point mutations, and a growing number of SNPs will be routinely analyzed to diagnose genetic disorders. Mutation analysis by polymerase mediated single-base primer extension (minisequencing) can be massively parallelized using for example DNA microchips or flow cytometry with microspheres as solid support. By adding a unique oligonucleotide tag to the 5-inch end of the minisequencing primer and attaching the complementary anti-tag to the array or bead surface, the assay can be 'demultiplexed'. However, such high-throughput scoring of SNPs requires a high level of primer multiplexing in order to analyze multiple loci in one assay, thus enabling inexpensive and fast polymorphism scoring. Primers can be chosen from either the plus or the minus strand, and primers used in the same experiment must not bind to one another. To genotype a given number of polymorphic sites, the question is which primer to use for each SNP, and which primers to group into the same experiment. Furthermore, a crosshybridization-free tag/anti-tag code is required in order to sort the extended primers to the corresponding microspheres or chip spots. These problems pose challenging algorithmic questions. We present a computer program lo automate the design process for the assay. Oligonucleotide primers for the reaction are automatically selected by the software, a unique DNA tag/anti-tag system is generated, and the pairing of primers and DNA-Tags is automatically done in a way to avoid any crossreactivity. We report first results on a 45-plex genotyping assay, indicating that minisequencing can be adapted to be a powerful tool for high-throughput, massively parallel genotyping.

  13. Prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes in Balochistan.

    PubMed

    Afridi, Sarwat; Naeem, Muhammad; Hussain, Abid; Kakar, Naseebullah; Babar, Masroor Ellahi; Ahmad, Jamil

    2009-07-01

    A molecular study was conducted to investigate the prevalence of Hepatitis C virus genotypes in HCV infected population of Balochistan. Forty HCV seropositive samples belonging to seven different locations of Balochistan were collected from different health care centres. Qualitative analysis of these samples using PCR resulted in 28 positive samples. The PCR positive samples were subjected to genotyping using the method described by Ohno et al (J Clin Microbiol 35:201-202, 1997) with minor modifications. Genotyping of 28 samples revealed three different genotypes including 3a, 3b and 1a. The most prevalent genotype was 3a with rate of 50% followed by genotype 3b and 1a, respectively. Nine samples remained untyped, suggesting the need of further investigation of genotypes in this region. It has been proposed that sequencing of these samples may be helpful to unreveal these genotypes and further epidemiology of HCV genotypes. Further more, extensive and large scale studies are needed to understand the epidemiology of HCV genotypes, as no such study has been carried in this province.

  14. Geographic distribution of hepatitis C virus genotypes in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Campiotto, S; Pinho, J R R; Carrilho, F J; Da Silva, L C; Souto, F J D; Spinelli, V; Pereira, L M M B; Coelho, H S M; Silva, A O; Fonseca, J C; Rosa, H; Lacet, C M C; Bernardini, A P

    2005-01-01

    Brazil is a country of continental dimension with a population of different ethnic backgrounds. Thus, a wide variation in the frequencies of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes is expected to occur. To address this point, 1,688 sequential samples from chronic HCV patients were analyzed. HCV-RNA was amplified by the RT-PCR from blood samples collected from 1995 to 2000 at different laboratories located in different cities from all Brazilian States. Samples were collected in tubes containing a gel separator, centrifuged in the site of collection and sent by express mail in a refrigerated container to Laboratório Bioquímico Jardim Paulista, São Paulo, SP, Brazil. HCV-RNA was extracted from serum and submitted to RT and nested PCR using standard procedures. Nested PCR products were submitted to cycle sequencing reactions without prior purification. Sequences were analyzed for genotype determination and the following frequencies were found: 64.9% (1,095) for genotype 1, 4.6% (78) for genotype 2, 30.2% (510) for genotype 3, 0.2% (3) for genotype 4, and 0.1% (2) for genotype 5. The frequencies of HCV genotypes were statistically different among Brazilian regions (P = 0.00017). In all regions, genotype 1 was the most frequent (51.7 to 74.1%), reaching the highest value in the North; genotype 2 was more prevalent in the Center-West region (11.4%), especially in Mato Grosso State (25.8%), while genotype 3 was more common in the South (43.2%). Genotypes 4 and 5 were rarely found and only in the Southeast, in São Paulo State. The present data indicate the need for careful epidemiological surveys throughout Brazil since knowing the frequency and distribution of the genotypes would provide key information for understanding the spread of HCV. PMID:15665987

  15. Identification of linkage phase by parental genotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Aksenovich, T.I.

    1995-08-01

    The possibility of using the phenotypic characteristics of parents for identifying the linkage phase in offspring is analyzed. It is demonstrated that parents with similar phenotypes (or marker genotypes) carry no information about the gene linkage phase in diheterozygous offspring. The probability of a certain linkage phase remains the same in all informative crossings. It depends on the model of inheritance of the analyzed alternative trait and is similar for di- and polyallelic markers. The frequencies of informative crossings and the probability of the linkage phase for different models of inheritance of the analyzed and marker traits are estimated. 17 refs., 2 tabs.

  16. Health implications of iron overload: the role of diet and genotype.

    PubMed

    Heath, Anne-Louise M; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J

    2003-02-01

    The relationship between high dietary iron intake, mutations of the HFE gene, and iron status, and their effects on human health are reviewed. Prolonged high dietary intakes of iron are unlikely to result in iron overload in the general population. Homozygotes for the C282Y mutation of the HFE gene have elevated body iron levels. Heterozygotes have normal iron stores but some may be at increased risk for cardiovascular disease. There is no convincing evidence that elevated iron status increases the risk of coronary heart disease or type 2 diabetes, but high iron intakes may increase the risk of colorectal cancer. The dietary levels of iron associated with health risks in different HFE genotypes must be determined.

  17. Effect of reference population size and available ancestor genotypes on imputation of Mexican Holstein genotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of reference population size and the availability of information from genotyped ancestors on the accuracy of imputation of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were investigated for Mexican Holstein cattle. Three scenarios for reference population size were examined: (1) a local popula...

  18. Genetic relationships among turnip (Brassica rapa var. rapa) genotypes.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, E; Yildirim, N; Ercisli, S; Agar, G; Karlidag, H

    2010-01-01

    Turnip (Brassica rapa var. rapa) is one of the main vegetables consumed by people living in Eastern Anatolia in Turkey. In this region, farmers obtain their own seeds for production, which results in considerable morphological variability. We examined the genetic variation and relationships among 11 turnip genotypes sampled from diverse environments of the Erzurum region located in Eastern Anatolia in Turkey. Thirty-two Operon RAPD primers were screened; among them, 20 gave reproducible and clear DNA fragments after amplification. The average polymorphism ratio was 90.4%. The genetic distance between turnip genotypes were found to range from 0.302 to 0.733, indicating high genetic variability. Eleven genotypes were divided into three main clusters in a dendrogram; ETS2 and ETS8 genotypes were the most distant. We conclude that RAPD analysis would be useful for genotyping turnip genotypes.

  19. Identification of Misdiagnosed Fronto-Temporal Dementia Using APOE Genotype and Phenotype-Genotype Correlation Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Isabel; Mauleón, Ana; Rosense-Roca, Maiteé; Alegret, Montserrat; Vinyes, Georgina; Espinosa, Anna; Sotolongo-Grau, Oscar; Becker, James T.; Valero, Sergi; Tárraga, Lluís; López, Oscar L.; Ruiz, Agustín; Boada, Mercè

    2014-01-01

    Objective Postmortem and genetic studies of clinically diagnosed Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) patients suggest that a number of clinically diagnosed FTD patients are actually “frontal variants” of Alzheimer’s disease (fvAD). The purpose of this study was to evaluate this hypothesis by combining neuropathological data, genetic association studies of APOE, phenotype-APOE genotype correlations and discriminant analysis techniques. Methods Neuropathological information on 24 FTD cases, genetic association studies of APOE (168 FTD, 3083 controls and 2528 AD), phenotype-genotype correlations and discriminant techniques (LDA, logistic regression and decision trees) were combined to identify fvAD patients within a clinical FTD series. Results Four of 24 FTLD patients (16.6%) met criteria for definite AD. By comparing allele and genotype frequencies of APOE in controls, FTD and AD groups and by applying the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium law (HWE), we inferred a consistent (17.2%) degree of AD contamination in clinical FTD. A penetrance analysis for APOE ε4 genotype in the FTD series identified 14 features for discrimination analysis. These features were compared between clinical AD (n=332) and clinical FTD series (n=168) and classifiers were constructed usinglinear discriminant analysis logistic regression or decision tree techniques. The classifier had 92.8% sensitivity to FTD and 93.4% sensitivity to AD relative to neuropathology (global AUC=0.939, p<<0.001). We identified 30 potential fvAD cases (17.85%) in the clinical FTD sample. Conclusion The APOE locus association in clinical FTD might be entirely explained by the existence of “hidden” fvAD cases within an FTD sample. The degree of fvAD contamination can be inferred from APOE genotypes. PMID:24359501

  20. Genotypic richness predicts phenotypic variation in an endangered clonal plant.

    PubMed

    Evans, Suzanna M; Sinclair, Elizabeth A; Poore, Alistair G B; Bain, Keryn F; Vergés, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Declines in genetic diversity within a species can affect the stability and functioning of populations. The conservation of genetic diversity is thus a priority, especially for threatened or endangered species. The importance of genetic variation, however, is dependent on the degree to which it translates into phenotypic variation for traits that affect individual performance and ecological processes. This is especially important for predominantly clonal species, as no single clone is likely to maximise all aspects of performance. Here we show that intraspecific genotypic diversity as measured using microsatellites is a strong predictor of phenotypic variation in morphological traits and shoot productivity of the threatened, predominantly clonal seagrass Posidonia australis, on the east coast of Australia. Biomass and surface area variation was most strongly predicted by genotypic richness, while variation in leaf chemistry (phenolics and nitrogen) was unrelated to genotypic richness. Genotypic richness did not predict tissue loss to herbivores or epiphyte load, however we did find that increased herbivore damage was positively correlated with allelic richness. Although there was no clear relationship between higher primary productivity and genotypic richness, variation in shoot productivity within a meadow was significantly greater in more genotypically diverse meadows. The proportion of phenotypic variation explained by environmental conditions varied among different genotypes, and there was generally no variation in phenotypic traits among genotypes present in the same meadows. Our results show that genotypic richness as measured through the use of presumably neutral DNA markers does covary with phenotypic variation in functionally relevant traits such as leaf morphology and shoot productivity. The remarkably long lifespan of individual Posidonia plants suggests that plasticity within genotypes has played an important role in the longevity of the species

  1. Genotypic richness predicts phenotypic variation in an endangered clonal plant

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Elizabeth A.; Poore, Alistair G.B.; Bain, Keryn F.; Vergés, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Declines in genetic diversity within a species can affect the stability and functioning of populations. The conservation of genetic diversity is thus a priority, especially for threatened or endangered species. The importance of genetic variation, however, is dependent on the degree to which it translates into phenotypic variation for traits that affect individual performance and ecological processes. This is especially important for predominantly clonal species, as no single clone is likely to maximise all aspects of performance. Here we show that intraspecific genotypic diversity as measured using microsatellites is a strong predictor of phenotypic variation in morphological traits and shoot productivity of the threatened, predominantly clonal seagrass Posidonia australis, on the east coast of Australia. Biomass and surface area variation was most strongly predicted by genotypic richness, while variation in leaf chemistry (phenolics and nitrogen) was unrelated to genotypic richness. Genotypic richness did not predict tissue loss to herbivores or epiphyte load, however we did find that increased herbivore damage was positively correlated with allelic richness. Although there was no clear relationship between higher primary productivity and genotypic richness, variation in shoot productivity within a meadow was significantly greater in more genotypically diverse meadows. The proportion of phenotypic variation explained by environmental conditions varied among different genotypes, and there was generally no variation in phenotypic traits among genotypes present in the same meadows. Our results show that genotypic richness as measured through the use of presumably neutral DNA markers does covary with phenotypic variation in functionally relevant traits such as leaf morphology and shoot productivity. The remarkably long lifespan of individual Posidonia plants suggests that plasticity within genotypes has played an important role in the longevity of the species

  2. Distribution pattern of HCV genotypes & its association with viral load

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarti, Anita; Dogra, Gaurav; Verma, Vikas; Srivastava, Amit Parkash

    2011-01-01

    Background & objectives: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has emerged as a leading cause of chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma worldwide. Genotyping and assessment of the viral load in HCV patients is important for designing the therapeutic strategies. Thus the present study was designed to determine the distribution pattern of HCV genotypes in chronic hepatitis patients and their association with the viral load and biochemical profiles. Methods: Seventy one HCV RNA positive patients were included in the study. HCV genotyping was carried out by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) followed by the direct sequencing of the core region. Viral load estimation was carried out by Taqman real time PCR system. Results: Sixty three per cent (45/71) of cases were infected with genotype 3 followed by genotype 1 in 30.98 per cent (22/71) and genotype 2 in 5.63 per cent (4/71) of cases. Genotype 1 was associated with a significantly (P<0.001) higher viral load as compared to genotypes 3 and 2. There was no significant difference seen in the biochemical profile between the three groups of genotypes except in the levels of SGOT. The commonest mode of transmission was parenteral which accounted for 68 per cent of all the infected cases. Interpretation & conclusions: The present study revealed that HCV genotype 3 and 1 accounted for approximately 95 per cent of the HCV infection in Delhi and surrounding areas. Also two atypical subtypes like 3i and 3f were identified. Genotype 1 was associated with more severity of liver disease as compared to genotypes 3 and 2 as assessed by viral load. PMID:21441689

  3. Efficient genotype compression and analysis of large genetic variation datasets

    PubMed Central

    Layer, Ryan M.; Kindlon, Neil; Karczewski, Konrad J.; Quinlan, Aaron R.

    2015-01-01

    Genotype Query Tools (GQT) is a new indexing strategy that expedites analyses of genome variation datasets in VCF format based on sample genotypes, phenotypes and relationships. GQT’s compressed genotype index minimizes decompression for analysis, and performance relative to existing methods improves with cohort size. We show substantial (up to 443 fold) performance gains over existing methods and demonstrate GQT’s utility for exploring massive datasets involving thousands to millions of genomes. PMID:26550772

  4. Molecular genotyping of HCV infection in seropositive blood donor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarin, Siti Noraziah Abu; Ibrahim, Nazlina

    2013-11-01

    This study is to investigate the prevalence of hepatitis C virus infection in seropositive blood donor. RNA was extracted from 32 positive samples in National Blood Centre and Melaka Hospital. The core and NS5B sequences were obtained from 23 samples. Genotype 3a is most prevalent in this study followed by genotype 1a. Evidence of mixed-genotypes (3a and 1b) infections was found in 5 subjects.

  5. G Allele of the IGF2 ApaI Polymorphism Is Associated With Judo Status.

    PubMed

    Itaka, Toshio; Agemizu, Kenichiro; Aruga, Seiji; Machida, Shuichi

    2016-07-01

    Itaka, T, Agemizu, K, Aruga, S, and Machida, S. G allele of the IGF2 ApaI polymorphism is associated with judo status. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 2043-2048, 2016-Previous studies have reported that the insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) ApaI polymorphism is associated with body mass index, fat mass, and grip strength. Competitive judo requires high levels of strength and power. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between the IGF2 ApaI and ACTN3 R577X polymorphisms and judo status. The subjects were 156 male judo athletes from a top-level university in Japan. They were divided into 3 groups based on their competitive history: international-level athletes, national-level athletes, and others. Genomic DNA was extracted from the saliva of each athlete, and the maximal isometric strength of the trunk muscles and handgrip strength were measured. Genotyping by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism was used to detect IGF2 (rs680) and α-actinin-3 (ACTN3) (rs1815739) gene polymorphisms. The genotype frequencies of the 2 gene polymorphisms were compared among the 3 groups of judo athletes and controls. International-level judo athletes showed a higher frequency of the GG + GA genotype of the IGF2 gene than that of the national-level athletes and others. There was an inverse linear correlation between the frequency of the IGF2 AA genotype and level of judo performance (p = 0.041). Back muscle strength relative to height and weight was higher in subjects with the GG + GA genotype than in those with the AA genotype. Conversely, the ACTN3 R577X polymorphism was not associated with judo status. Additionally, no differences were found in back muscle or handgrip strength among the ACTN3 genotypes. In conclusion, the results indicate that the IGF2 gene polymorphism may be associated with judo status. PMID:26677828

  6. Genomic Variants Revealed by Invariably Missing Genotypes in Nelore Cattle

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Joaquim Manoel; Giachetto, Poliana Fernanda; da Silva, Luiz Otávio Campos; Cintra, Leandro Carrijo; Paiva, Samuel Rezende; Caetano, Alexandre Rodrigues; Yamagishi, Michel Eduardo Beleza

    2015-01-01

    High density genotyping panels have been used in a wide range of applications. From population genetics to genome-wide association studies, this technology still offers the lowest cost and the most consistent solution for generating SNP data. However, in spite of the application, part of the generated data is always discarded from final datasets based on quality control criteria used to remove unreliable markers. Some discarded data consists of markers that failed to generate genotypes, labeled as missing genotypes. A subset of missing genotypes that occur in the whole population under study may be caused by technical issues but can also be explained by the presence of genomic variations that are in the vicinity of the assayed SNP and that prevent genotyping probes from annealing. The latter case may contain relevant information because these missing genotypes might be used to identify population-specific genomic variants. In order to assess which case is more prevalent, we used Illumina HD Bovine chip genotypes from 1,709 Nelore (Bos indicus) samples. We found 3,200 missing genotypes among the whole population. NGS re-sequencing data from 8 sires were used to verify the presence of genomic variations within their flanking regions in 81.56% of these missing genotypes. Furthermore, we discovered 3,300 novel SNPs/Indels, 31% of which are located in genes that may affect traits of importance for the genetic improvement of cattle production. PMID:26305794

  7. Trichothecene genotypes of Fusarium graminearum from wheat in Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Pan, Dinorah; Calero, Natalia; Mionetto, Ana; Bettucci, Lina

    2013-03-01

    Gibberella zeae (Schwein.) Petch (anamorph F. graminearum Schwabe) is the primary causal agent of FHB of wheat in Uruguay. In the last decade, F. graminearum has produced destructive epidemics on wheat in Uruguay, causing yield losses and price discounts due to reduced seed quality. Strains of F. graminearum clade usually express one of three strain-specific profiles of trichothecene metabolites: nivalenol and its acetylated derivatives (NIV chemotype), deoxynivalenol and 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol (3-AcDON chemotype), or deoxynivalenol and 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol (15-AcDON chemotype). A multiplex PCR assay of Tri3, Tri5, and Tri7 was used to determine the trichothecene genotype of 111 strains of F. graminearum collected during 2003 and 2009 growing seasons from fields located in the major wheat production area of Uruguay. The result showed that all except one of the isolates were of DON genotype, with the remainder of NIV genotype in years 2003 and 2009. All strains with the DON genotype were also of the 15-AcDON genotype in 2003 and nearly all (45/50) in 2009. No DON/3-AcDON genotypes were found in either growing season. No potential shifts in the populations were found in the trichothecene genotypes between 2003 and the 2009 epidemic FHB harvest seasons. This study provides the first data on trichothecene genotypes of F. graminearum strains isolated from wheat in Uruguay and add to the current regional knowledge of trichothecene genotypes.

  8. Genomic Variants Revealed by Invariably Missing Genotypes in Nelore Cattle.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Joaquim Manoel; Giachetto, Poliana Fernanda; da Silva, Luiz Otávio Campos; Cintra, Leandro Carrijo; Paiva, Samuel Rezende; Caetano, Alexandre Rodrigues; Yamagishi, Michel Eduardo Beleza

    2015-01-01

    High density genotyping panels have been used in a wide range of applications. From population genetics to genome-wide association studies, this technology still offers the lowest cost and the most consistent solution for generating SNP data. However, in spite of the application, part of the generated data is always discarded from final datasets based on quality control criteria used to remove unreliable markers. Some discarded data consists of markers that failed to generate genotypes, labeled as missing genotypes. A subset of missing genotypes that occur in the whole population under study may be caused by technical issues but can also be explained by the presence of genomic variations that are in the vicinity of the assayed SNP and that prevent genotyping probes from annealing. The latter case may contain relevant information because these missing genotypes might be used to identify population-specific genomic variants. In order to assess which case is more prevalent, we used Illumina HD Bovine chip genotypes from 1,709 Nelore (Bos indicus) samples. We found 3,200 missing genotypes among the whole population. NGS re-sequencing data from 8 sires were used to verify the presence of genomic variations within their flanking regions in 81.56% of these missing genotypes. Furthermore, we discovered 3,300 novel SNPs/Indels, 31% of which are located in genes that may affect traits of importance for the genetic improvement of cattle production. PMID:26305794

  9. Current Status of Acanthamoeba in Iran: A Narrative Review Article

    PubMed Central

    NIYYATI, Maryam; REZAEIAN, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Free-living amoebae belonging to the genus Acanthamoeba have an environmental distribution. Amoebic keratitis due to these protozoan parasites continue to rise in Iran and worldwide. In Iran, there are various researches regarding both morphological and molecular identification of Acanthamoeba spp. in environmental and clinical samples. However, there is no thorough review about Acanthamoeba genotypes and their distribution in environmental sources such as water, dust and biofilm in Iran. Besides, according to increasing cases of Amoebic keratitis in the region awareness regarding the pathogenic potential of these sight-threatening amoebae is of utmost importance. Methods: We conducted a thorough review based on the database sources such as MEDLINE, PubMed and Google scholar. No restrictions were placed on study date, study design or language of publication. We searched all valuable and relevant information considering the occurrence of the Acanthamoeba in both environmental and clinical samples. Results: According to our thorough review Acanthamoeba belonging to T4 genotype is the most prevalent type strain in environmental and clinical samples in several regions in Iran and worldwide, however, there are reports regarding Acanthamoeba belonging to other genotypes such as T2, T3, T5, T6 and T11 and the mentioned point could leads us to more researches with the goal of presenting the real genotype dominance of Acanthamoeba and related disease in the country. Conclusion: Overall, the present review will focus on present status of genotypes of Acanthamoeba in Iran during recent years. PMID:26246812

  10. Welcome to the neighbourhood: interspecific genotype by genotype interactions in Solidago influence above- and belowground biomass and associated communities.

    PubMed

    Genung, Mark A; Bailey, Joseph K; Schweitzer, Jennifer A

    2012-01-01

    Intra- and interspecific plant-plant interactions are fundamental to patterns of community assembly and to the mixture effects observed in biodiversity studies. Although much research has been conducted at the species level, very little is understood about how genetic variation within and among interacting species may drive these processes. Using clones of both Solidago altissima and Solidago gigantea, we found that genotypic variation in a plant's neighbours affected both above- and belowground plant traits, and that genotype by genotype interactions between neighbouring plants impacted associated pollinator communities. The traits for which focal plant genotypic variation explained the most variation varied by plant species, whereas neighbour genotypic variation explained the most variation in coarse root biomass. Our results provide new insight into genotypic and species diversity effects in plant-neighbour interactions, the extended consequences of diversity effects, and the potential for evolution in response to competitive or to facilitative plant-neighbour interactions. PMID:22070740

  11. Interferon Lambda 4 Genotype Is Not Associated with Recurrence of Oral or Genital Herpes

    PubMed Central

    Lang Kuhs, Krystle A.; Kuniholm, Mark H.; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Chen, Sabrina; Desai, Seema; Edlin, Brian R.; Peters, Marion G.; Plankey, Michael; Sharp, Gerald B.; Strickler, Howard D.; Villacres, Maria C.; Quinn, Thomas C.; Gange, Stephen J.; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Greenblatt, Ruth M.; O’Brien, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    IFNL4-ΔG/TT (rs368234815) genotype is associated with hepatitis C virus clearance and may play a role in other infections. IFN-λ4 protein is generated only in individuals who carry the IFNL4-ΔG allele. The IFNL4 rs12979860-T allele, which is in strong linkage disequilibrium with IFNL4-ΔG, was recently reported to be associated with more frequent and severe oral herpes episodes. We investigated the association of IFNL4-ΔG/TT with herpes simplex virus (HSV)-related outcomes among 2,192 African American and European American participants in the Women’s Interagency HIV Study (WIHS). WIHS is a prospective cohort study of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected and at-risk women that began in 1994. This report includes follow-up through 2013. Available data included: HSV–1 and HSV–2 antibodies at study entry; bi-annually ascertained episodes of (self-reported) oral herpes, (self-reported) genital sores and (clinician-observed) genital ulcers; HSV–2 DNA in cervicovaginal lavage (CVL) specimens. IFNL4-ΔG/TT genotyping was determined by TaqMan. We compared women with IFNL4-ΔG/ΔG or IFNL4-TT/ΔG genotypes (i.e., IFNL4-ΔG carriers) to those with the IFNL4-TT/TT genotype, adjusting for age, race and HIV status. For outcomes with repeated measurements, the adjusted odds ratio (aOR), 95% confidence interval [CI] and p-value were determined using a generalized estimating equations approach. Median participant age at enrollment was 36 years; 81% were African American, 74% were HIV-infected. Among 1,431 participants tested for antibodies, 72.8% were positive for HSV–1 and 79.0% were positive for HSV–2. We observed no association between IFNL4-ΔG/TT genotype and any outcome: HSV–1 or HSV–2 antibody prevalence (p>0.1, all comparisons); oral herpes (aOR, 1.2; p = 0.35); genital sores (aOR, 1.0; p = 0.71); genital ulcers (aOR, 1.1; p = 0.53); detectable HSV–2 DNA in CVL (N = 322; aOR, 0.71; p = 0.49); HSV–2 DNA level (p = 0.68). In this large

  12. Differential response of kabuli and desi chickpea genotypes toward inoculation with PGPR in different soils

    PubMed Central

    Imran, Asma; Mirza, Muhammad S.; Shah, Tariq M.; Malik, Kauser A.; Hafeez, Fauzia Y.

    2015-01-01

    Pakistan is among top three chickpea producing countries but the crop is usually grown on marginal lands without irrigation and fertilizer application which significantly hampers its yield. Soil fertility and inoculation with beneficial rhizobacteria play a key role in nodulation and yield of legumes. Four kabuli and six desi chickpea genotypes were, therefore, evaluated for inoculation response with IAA-producing Ochrobactrum ciceri Ca-34T and nitrogen fixing Mesorhizobium ciceri TAL-1148 in single and co-inoculation in two soils. The soil type 1 was previously unplanted marginal soil having low organic matter, P and N contents compared to soil type 2 which was a fertile routinely legume-cultivated soil. The effect of soil fertility status was pronounced and fertile soil on average, produced 31% more nodules, 62% more biomass and 111% grain yield than marginal soil. Inoculation either with O. ciceri alone or its co-inoculation with M. ciceri produced on average higher nodules (42%), biomass (31%), grains yield (64%) and harvest index (72%) in both chickpea genotypes over non-inoculated controls in both soils. Soil 1 showed maximum relative effectiveness of Ca-34T inoculation for kabuli genotypes while soil 2 showed for desi genotypes except B8/02. Desi genotype B8/02 in soil type 1 and Pb-2008 in soil type 2 showed significant yield increase as compared to respective un-inoculated controls. Across bacterial inoculation treatments, grain yield was positively correlated to growth and yield contributing parameters (r = 0.294* to 0.838*** for desi and r = 0.388* to 0.857** for kabuli). PCA and CAT-PCA analyses clearly showed a site-specific response of genotype x bacterial inoculation. Furthermore, the inoculated bacterial strains were able to persist in the rhizosphere showing colonization on root and within nodules. Present study shows that plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) inoculation should be integrated with national chickpea breading program in

  13. Interferon Lambda 4 Genotype Is Not Associated with Recurrence of Oral or Genital Herpes.

    PubMed

    Lang Kuhs, Krystle A; Kuniholm, Mark H; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Chen, Sabrina; Desai, Seema; Edlin, Brian R; Peters, Marion G; Plankey, Michael; Sharp, Gerald B; Strickler, Howard D; Villacres, Maria C; Quinn, Thomas C; Gange, Stephen J; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Greenblatt, Ruth M; O'Brien, Thomas R

    2015-01-01

    IFNL4-ΔG/TT (rs368234815) genotype is associated with hepatitis C virus clearance and may play a role in other infections. IFN-λ4 protein is generated only in individuals who carry the IFNL4-ΔG allele. The IFNL4 rs12979860-T allele, which is in strong linkage disequilibrium with IFNL4-ΔG, was recently reported to be associated with more frequent and severe oral herpes episodes. We investigated the association of IFNL4-ΔG/TT with herpes simplex virus (HSV)-related outcomes among 2,192 African American and European American participants in the Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS). WIHS is a prospective cohort study of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected and at-risk women that began in 1994. This report includes follow-up through 2013. Available data included: HSV-1 and HSV-2 antibodies at study entry; bi-annually ascertained episodes of (self-reported) oral herpes, (self-reported) genital sores and (clinician-observed) genital ulcers; HSV-2 DNA in cervicovaginal lavage (CVL) specimens. IFNL4-ΔG/TT genotyping was determined by TaqMan. We compared women with IFNL4-ΔG/ΔG or IFNL4-TT/ΔG genotypes (i.e., IFNL4-ΔG carriers) to those with the IFNL4-TT/TT genotype, adjusting for age, race and HIV status. For outcomes with repeated measurements, the adjusted odds ratio (aOR), 95% confidence interval [CI] and p-value were determined using a generalized estimating equations approach. Median participant age at enrollment was 36 years; 81% were African American, 74% were HIV-infected. Among 1,431 participants tested for antibodies, 72.8% were positive for HSV-1 and 79.0% were positive for HSV-2. We observed no association between IFNL4-ΔG/TT genotype and any outcome: HSV-1 or HSV-2 antibody prevalence (p>0.1, all comparisons); oral herpes (aOR, 1.2; p = 0.35); genital sores (aOR, 1.0; p = 0.71); genital ulcers (aOR, 1.1; p = 0.53); detectable HSV-2 DNA in CVL (N = 322; aOR, 0.71; p = 0.49); HSV-2 DNA level (p = 0.68). In this large prospective study, IFNL4-

  14. CNTFR Genotype and Sprint/power Performance: Case-control Association and Functional Studies.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto-Mikami, E; Fujita, Y; Murakami, H; Ito, M; Miyachi, M; Kawahara, T; Fuku, N

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether rs41274853 in the 3'-untranslated region of the ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor gene (CNTFR) is associated with elite sprint/power athletic status and assess its functional significance. A total of 211 Japanese sprint/power track and field athletes (62 international, 72 national, and 77 regional athletes) and 814 Japanese controls were genotyped at rs41274853. Luciferase reporter assay was conducted to investigate whether this C-to-T polymorphism affects binding of microRNA miR-675-5p to this region. The TT genotype was significantly more frequent among international sprint/power athletes (19.4%) than in the controls after Bonferroni correction (7.9%, P=0.036, OR=2.81 [95% CI: 1.43-5.55]). Furthermore, in non-athletic young/middle-aged men (n=132), TT genotype carriers exhibited significantly greater leg extension power (26.6±5.4 vs. 24.0±5.4 W/kg BW, P=0.019) and vertical jump performance (50.1±6.9 vs. 47.9±7.5 cm, P=0.047) than the CC+CT genotype carriers. Reporter assays revealed that the miR-675-5p binds to this polymorphic region within the CNTFR mRNA, irrespective of the rs41274853 allele present. Although the functional significance of the rs41274853 polymorphism remains unclear, the CNTFR is one of the candidate genes contributing to sprint/power performance. PMID:26837930

  15. CNTFR Genotype and Sprint/power Performance: Case-control Association and Functional Studies.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto-Mikami, E; Fujita, Y; Murakami, H; Ito, M; Miyachi, M; Kawahara, T; Fuku, N

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether rs41274853 in the 3'-untranslated region of the ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor gene (CNTFR) is associated with elite sprint/power athletic status and assess its functional significance. A total of 211 Japanese sprint/power track and field athletes (62 international, 72 national, and 77 regional athletes) and 814 Japanese controls were genotyped at rs41274853. Luciferase reporter assay was conducted to investigate whether this C-to-T polymorphism affects binding of microRNA miR-675-5p to this region. The TT genotype was significantly more frequent among international sprint/power athletes (19.4%) than in the controls after Bonferroni correction (7.9%, P=0.036, OR=2.81 [95% CI: 1.43-5.55]). Furthermore, in non-athletic young/middle-aged men (n=132), TT genotype carriers exhibited significantly greater leg extension power (26.6±5.4 vs. 24.0±5.4 W/kg BW, P=0.019) and vertical jump performance (50.1±6.9 vs. 47.9±7.5 cm, P=0.047) than the CC+CT genotype carriers. Reporter assays revealed that the miR-675-5p binds to this polymorphic region within the CNTFR mRNA, irrespective of the rs41274853 allele present. Although the functional significance of the rs41274853 polymorphism remains unclear, the CNTFR is one of the candidate genes contributing to sprint/power performance.

  16. Phenotype-genotype analysis of CYP2C19 in Colombian mestizo individuals

    PubMed Central

    Isaza, Carlos; Henao, Julieta; Martínez, José H Isaza; Arias, Juan C Sepúlveda; Beltrán, Leonardo

    2007-01-01

    Background Omeprazole is metabolized by the hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2C19 enzyme to 5-hydroxyomeprazole. CYP2C19 exhibits genetic polymorphisms responsible for the presence of poor metabolizers (PMs), intermediate metabolizers (IMs) and extensive metabolizers (EMs). The defective mutations of the enzyme and their frequencies change between different ethnic groups; however, the polymorphism of the CYP2C19 gene has not been studied in Colombian mestizos. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotype and phenotype status of CYP2C19 in Colombian mestizos, in order to contribute to the use of appropriate strategies of drug therapy for this population. Methods 189 subjects were genotyped using the multiplex SNaPshot technique and a subgroup of 44 individuals received 20 mg of omeprazole followed by blood collection at 3 hours to determine the omeprazole hydroxylation index by HPLC. Results 83.6%, 15.3% and 1.1% of the subjects were genotyped as EMs, IMs and PMs, respectively. The frequencies of the CYP2C29*1 and CYP2C19*2 alleles were 91.3% and 8.7% respectively whereas the *3, *4, *5, *6 and *8 alleles were not found. No discrepancies were found between the genotype and phenotype of CYP2C19. Conclusion The frequency of poor metabolizers (1.1%) in the Colombian mestizos included in this study is similar to that in Bolivian mestizos (1%) but lower than in Mexican-Americans (3.2%), West Mexicans (6%), Caucasians (5%) and African Americans (5.4%). The results of this study will be useful for drug dosage recommendations in Colombian mestizos. PMID:17623107

  17. Dysregulation Of Innate Immunity In HCV Genotype 1 IL28B Unfavorable Genotype Patients: Impaired Viral Kinetics And Therapeutic Response

    PubMed Central

    Naggie, Susanna; Osinusi, Anu; Katsounas, Antonios; Lempicki, Richard; Herrmann, Eva; Thompson, Alexander J; Clark, Paul J; Patel, Keyur; Muir, Andrew J; McHutchison, John G; Schlaak, Joerg F; Trippler, Martin; Shivakumar, Bhavana; Masur, Henry; Polis, Michael A.; Kottilil, Shyam

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that a single nucleotide polymorphism upstream of the interleukin (IL)-28B gene plays a major role in predicting therapeutic response in HCV-infected patients treated with pegylated interferon-alpha (IFN)/ribavirin. We sought to investigate the mechanism of the IL28B polymorphism, specifically as it relates to early HCV viral kinetics (VK), IFN pharmacokinetics (PK), IFN pharmacodynamics (PD), and gene expression profiles. Two prospective cohorts (HIV/HCV co-infected and HCV mono-infected) completing treatment with IFN/ribavirin were enrolled. Patients (N=88; 44 HIV/HCV and 44 HCV) were genotyped at the polymorphic site rs12979860. In the HIV/HCV cohort frequent serum sampling was completed for HCV RNA and IFN-levels. DNA microarray of PBMCs and individual expression of interferon stimulated genes (ISGs) were quantified on IFN-therapy. The IL28B favorable (CC) genotype was associated with improved therapeutic response compared to unfavorable (CT/TT) genotypes. Patients with favorable genotype had greater first and second phase VK (P=0.004 and P=0.036, respectively), IFN maximum anti-viral efficiency (P=0.007) and infected cell death loss (P=0.009) compared to unfavorable genotypes. Functional annotation analysis of DNA microarray data was consistent with depressed innate immune function, particularly of NK cells, from patients with unfavorable genotypes (P<0.004). Induction of innate immunity genes was also lower in unfavorable genotype. ISG expression at baseline and induction with IFN was independent of IL28B genotype. Conclusions Carriers of the IL28B favorable genotype were more likely to have superior innate immune response to IFN-therapy compared to unfavorable genotypes, this suggests the unfavorable genotype has aberrant baseline induction of innate immune response pathways resulting in impaired virologic response. IL28B genotype is associated with more rapid viral kinetics and improved treatment response outcomes independent of

  18. Molecular Genetics External Quality Assessment Pilot Scheme for Irinotecan-Related UGT1A1 Genotyping in China.

    PubMed

    Yi, Lang; Lin, Guigao; Zhang, Kuo; Wang, Lunan; Zhang, Rui; Xie, Jiehong; Li, Jinming

    2016-01-01

    Irinotecan is widely used in the treatment of solid tumors, especially in colorectal cancer and lung cancer. Molecular testing for UGT1A1 genotyping is increasingly required in China for optimum irinotecan administration. In order to determine the performance of laboratories with regard to the whole testing process for UGT1A1 to ensure the consistency and accuracy of the test results, the National Center for Clinical Laboratories conducted an external quality assessment program for UGT1A1*28 genotyping in 2015. The panel, which comprised of four known mutational samples and six wild-type samples, was distributed to 45 laboratories that test for the presence of UGT1A1*28 polymorphisms. Participating laboratories were allowed to perform polymorphism analysis by using their routine methods. The accuracy of the genotyping and reporting of results was analyzed. Other information from the individual laboratories, including the number of samples tested each month, accreditation/certification status, and test methodology, was reviewed. Forty-four of the 45 participants reported the correct results for all samples. There was only one genotyping error, with a corresponding analytical sensitivity of 99.44% (179/180 challenges; 95% confidence interval: 96.94-99.99%) and an analytical specificity of 100% (270/270 challenges; 95% confidence interval: 98.64-100%). Both commercial kits and laboratory development tests were commonly used by the laboratories, and pyrosequencing was the main methodology used (n = 26, 57.8%). The style of the written reports showed large variation, and many reports showed a shortage of information. In summary, the first UGT1A1 genotyping external quality assessment result demonstrated that UGT1A1 genotype analysis of good quality was performed in the majority of pharmacogenetic testing centers that were investigated. However, greater education on the reporting of UGT1A1 genetic testing results is needed. PMID:26820647

  19. Molecular Genetics External Quality Assessment Pilot Scheme for Irinotecan-Related UGT1A1 Genotyping in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kuo; Wang, Lunan; Zhang, Rui; Xie, Jiehong; Li, Jinming

    2016-01-01

    Irinotecan is widely used in the treatment of solid tumors, especially in colorectal cancer and lung cancer. Molecular testing for UGT1A1 genotyping is increasingly required in China for optimum irinotecan administration. In order to determine the performance of laboratories with regard to the whole testing process for UGT1A1 to ensure the consistency and accuracy of the test results, the National Center for Clinical Laboratories conducted an external quality assessment program for UGT1A1*28 genotyping in 2015. The panel, which comprised of four known mutational samples and six wild-type samples, was distributed to 45 laboratories that test for the presence of UGT1A1*28 polymorphisms. Participating laboratories were allowed to perform polymorphism analysis by using their routine methods. The accuracy of the genotyping and reporting of results was analyzed. Other information from the individual laboratories, including the number of samples tested each month, accreditation/certification status, and test methodology, was reviewed. Forty-four of the 45 participants reported the correct results for all samples. There was only one genotyping error, with a corresponding analytical sensitivity of 99.44% (179/180 challenges; 95% confidence interval: 96.94−99.99%) and an analytical specificity of 100% (270/270 challenges; 95% confidence interval: 98.64−100%). Both commercial kits and laboratory development tests were commonly used by the laboratories, and pyrosequencing was the main methodology used (n = 26, 57.8%). The style of the written reports showed large variation, and many reports showed a shortage of information. In summary, the first UGT1A1 genotyping external quality assessment result demonstrated that UGT1A1 genotype analysis of good quality was performed in the majority of pharmacogenetic testing centers that were investigated. However, greater education on the reporting of UGT1A1 genetic testing results is needed. PMID:26820647

  20. Diversity of Human Clock Genotypes and Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Luoying; Ptáček, Louis J.; Fu, Ying-Hui

    2014-01-01

    The molecular clock consists of a number of genes that form transcriptional and post-transcriptional feedback loops, which function together to generate circadian oscillations that give rise to circadian rhythms of our behavioral and physiological processes. Genetic variations in these clock genes have been shown to be associated with phenotypic effects in a repertoire of biological processes, such as diurnal preference, sleep, metabolism, mood regulation, addiction, and fertility. Consistently, rodent models carrying mutations in clock genes also demonstrate similar phenotypes. Taken together, these studies suggest that human clock-gene variants contribute to the phenotypic differences observed in various behavioral and physiological processes, although to validate this requires further characterization of the molecular consequences of these polymorphisms. Investigating the diversity of human genotypes and the phenotypic effects of these genetic variations shall advance our understanding of the function of the circadian clock and how we can employ the clock to improve our overall health. PMID:23899594

  1. A microsampling method for genotyping coral symbionts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, D. W.; Fitt, W. K.; Schmidt, G. W.

    2008-06-01

    Genotypic characterization of Symbiodinium symbionts in hard corals has routinely involved coring, or the removal of branches or a piece of the coral colony. These methods can potentially underestimate the complexity of the Symbiodinium community structure and may produce lesions. This study demonstrates that microscale sampling of individual coral polyps provided sufficient DNA for identifying zooxanthellae clades by RFLP analyses, and subclades through the use of PCR amplification of the ITS-2 region of rDNA and denaturing-gradient gel electrophoresis. Using this technique it was possible to detect distinct ITS-2 types of Symbiodinium from two or three adjacent coral polyps. These methods can be used to intensely sample coral-symbiont population/communities while causing minimal damage. The effectiveness and fine scale capabilities of these methods were demonstrated by sampling and identifying phylotypes of Symbiodinium clades A, B, and C that co-reside within a single Montastraea faveolata colony.

  2. DNA fingerprints from hypervariable mitochondrial genotypes.

    PubMed

    Avise, J C; Bowen, B W; Lamb, T

    1989-05-01

    Conventional surveys of restriction-fragment polymorphisms in mitochondrial DNA of menhaden fish (Brevoortia tyrannus/patronus complex) and chuckwalla lizards (Sauromalus obesus) revealed exceptionally high levels of genetic variation, attributable to differences in mtDNA size as well as in restriction sites. The observed probabilities that any two randomly drawn individuals differed detectably in mtDNA genotype were 0.998 and 0.983 in the two species, respectively. Thus, the variable gel profiles provided unique mtDNA "fingerprints" for most conspecific animals assayed. mtDNA fingerprints differ from nuclear DNA fingerprints in several empirical respects and should find special application in the genetic assessment of maternity. PMID:2576092

  3. IL-10 and TNFα Genotypes in SLE

    PubMed Central

    López, Patricia; Gutiérrez, Carmen; Suárez, Ana

    2010-01-01

    The production of two regulators of the inflammatory response, interleukin 10 (IL-10) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), has been found to be deeply deregulated in SLE patients, suggesting that these cytokines may be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Genetic polymorphisms at the promoter regions of IL-10 and TNFα genes have been associated with different constitutive and induced cytokine production. Given that individual steady-state levels of these molecules may deviate an initial immune response towards different forms of lymphocyte activation, functional genetic variants in their promoters could influence the development of SLE. The present review summarizes the information previously reported about the involvement of IL-10 and TNFα genetic variants on SLE appearance, clinical phenotype, and outcome. We show that, in spite of the heterogeneity of the populations studied, the existing knowledge points towards a relevant role of IL-10 and TNFα genotypes in SLE. PMID:20625422

  4. Genotypic probabilities for pairs of inbred relatives.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenlei; Weir, B S

    2005-07-29

    Expressions for the joint genotypic probabilities of two related individuals are used in many population and quantitative genetic analyses. These expressions, resting on a set of 15 probabilities of patterns of identity by descent among the four alleles at a locus carried by the relatives, are generally well known. There has been recent interest in special cases where the two individuals are both related and inbred, although there have been differences among published results. Here, we return to the original 15-probability treatment and show appropriate reductions for relatives when they are drawn from a population that itself is inbred or when the relatives have parents who are related. These results have application in affected-relative tests for linkage, and in methods for interpreting forensic genetic profiles.

  5. Targeted stock identification using multilocus genotype 'familyprinting'

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Letcher, B.H.; King, T.L.

    1999-01-01

    We present an approach to stock identification of small, targeted populations that uses multilocus microsatellite genotypes of individual mating adults to uniquely identify first- and second-generation offspring in a mixture. We call the approach 'familyprinting'; unlike DNA fingerprinting where tissue samples of individuals are matched, offspring from various families are assigned to pairs of parents or sets of four grandparents with known genotypes. The basic unit of identification is the family, but families can be nested within a variety of stock units ranging from naturally reproducing groups of fish in a small tributary or pond from which mating adults can be sampled to large or small collections of families produced in hatcheries and stocked in specific locations. We show that, with as few as seven alleles per locus using four loci without error, first-generation offspring can be uniquely assigned to the correct family. For second-generation applications in a hatchery more alleles per locus (10) and loci (10) are required for correct assignment of all offspring to the correct set of grandparents. Using microsatellite DNA variation from an Atlantic salmon (Salmo solar) restoration river (Connecticut River, USA), we also show that this population contains sufficient genetic diversity in sea-run returns for 100% correct first, generation assignment and 97% correct second-generation assignment using 14 loci. We are currently using first- and second-generation familyprinting in this population with the ultimate goal of identifying stocking tributary. In addition to within-river familyprinting, there also appears to be sufficient genetic diversity within and between Atlantic salmon populations for identification of 'familyprinted' fish in a mixture of multiple populations. We also suggest that second-generation familyprinting with multiple populations may also provide a tool for examining stock structure. Familyprinting with microsatellite DNA markers is a viable

  6. Automated genotyping of dinucleotide repeat markers

    SciTech Connect

    Perlin, M.W.; Hoffman, E.P. |

    1994-09-01

    The dinucleotide repeats (i.e., microsatellites) such as CA-repeats are a highly polymorphic, highly abundant class of PCR-amplifiable markers that have greatly streamlined genetic mapping experimentation. It is expected that over 30,000 such markers (including tri- and tetranucleotide repeats) will be characterized for routine use in the next few years. Since only size determination, and not sequencing, is required to determine alleles, in principle, dinucleotide repeat genotyping is easily performed on electrophoretic gels, and can be automated using DNA sequencers. Unfortunately, PCR stuttering with these markers generates not one band for each allele, but a pattern of bands. Since closely spaced alleles must be disambiguated by human scoring, this poses a key obstacle to full automation. We have developed methods that overcome this obstacle. Our model is that the observed data is generated by arithmetic superposition (i.e., convolution) of multiple allele patterns. By quantitatively measuring the size of each component band, and exploiting the unique stutter pattern associated with each marker, closely spaced alleles can be deconvolved; this unambiguously reconstructs the {open_quotes}true{close_quotes} allele bands, with stutter artifact removed. We used this approach in a system for automated diagnosis of (X-linked) Duchenne muscular dystrophy; four multiplexed CA-repeats within the dystrophin gene were assayed on a DNA sequencer. Our method accurately detected small variations in gel migration that shifted the allele size estimate. In 167 nonmutated alleles, 89% (149/167) showed no size variation, 9% (15/167) showed 1 bp variation, and 2% (3/167) showed 2 bp variation. We are currently developing a library of dinucleotide repeat patterns; together with our deconvolution methods, this library will enable fully automated genotyping of dinucleotide repeats from sizing data.

  7. The Blood Group A Genotype Determines the Level of Expression of the Blood Group A on Platelets But Not the Anti-B Isotiter

    PubMed Central

    Lehner, Barbara; Eichelberger, Beate; Jungbauer, Christof; Panzer, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The extent of expression of the blood group A on platelets is controversial. Further, the relation between platelets' blood group A expression and the titers of isoagglutinins has not been thoroughly investigated, so far. Methods We evaluated the relation between the genotype with platelets' blood group A and H expression estimated by flow cytometry and the titers of isoagglutinins. Results The A expression varied between genotypes and within genotypes. However, the expression in A1 was stronger than in all other genotypes (p < 0.0001). An overlap of expression levels was apparent between homozygous A1A1 and heterozygous A1 individuals. Still, The A1A1 genotype is associated with a particularly high antigen expression (p = 0.009). Platelets' A expression in A2 versus blood group O donors was also significant (p = 0.007), but there was again an overlap of expression. The secretor status had only little influence on the expression (p = 0.18). Also, isoagglutinin titers were not associated with genotypes. Conclusion: To distinguish between A1 and A2 donors may reduce incompatible platelet transfusions and therefore be favorable on platelet transfusion increment. Clinical data are needed to support this notion. PMID:26733767

  8. Improved ancestry estimation for both genotyping and sequencing data using projection procrustes analysis and genotype imputation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chaolong; Zhan, Xiaowei; Liang, Liming; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Lin, Xihong

    2015-06-01

    Accurate estimation of individual ancestry is important in genetic association studies, especially when a large number of samples are collected from multiple sources. However, existing approaches developed for genome-wide SNP data do not work well with modest amounts of genetic data, such as in targeted sequencing or exome chip genotyping experiments. We propose a statistical framework to estimate individual ancestry in a principal component ancestry map generated by a reference set of individuals. This framework extends and improves upon our previous method for estimating ancestry using low-coverage sequence reads (LASER 1.0) to analyze either genotyping or sequencing data. In particular, we introduce a projection Procrustes analysis approach that uses high-dimensional principal components to estimate ancestry in a low-dimensional reference space. Using extensive simulations and empirical data examples, we show that our new method (LASER 2.0), combined with genotype imputation on the reference individuals, can substantially outperform LASER 1.0 in estimating fine-scale genetic ancestry. Specifically, LASER 2.0 can accurately estimate fine-scale ancestry within Europe using either exome chip genotypes or targeted sequencing data with off-target coverage as low as 0.05×. Under the framework of LASER 2.0, we can estimate individual ancestry in a shared reference space for samples assayed at different loci or by different techniques. Therefore, our ancestry estimation method will accelerate discovery in disease association studies not only by helping model ancestry within individual studies but also by facilitating combined analysis of genetic data from multiple sources. PMID:26027497

  9. Genotyping-by-sequencing for plant breeding and genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rapid advances in post-Sanger sequencing technology have brought the $1000 human genome within reach while providing the raw sequencing output for researchers to revolutionize the way populations are genotyped. To capitalize on these advancements, genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) has been developed as...

  10. Spectral reflectance models for characterizing winter wheat genotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Optimum wheat yield can be achieved by developing and growing the best genotype in the most suited environment. However, exhaustive field measurements are required to characterize plants in breeder plots for screening genotypes with desirable traits. Remote sensing tools have been shown to provide r...

  11. Systems properties of the Haemophilus influenzae Rd metabolic genotype.

    PubMed

    Edwards, J S; Palsson, B O

    1999-06-18

    Haemophilus influenzae Rd was the first free-living organism for which the complete genomic sequence was established. The annotated sequence and known biochemical information was used to define the H. influenzae Rd metabolic genotype. This genotype contains 488 metabolic reactions operating on 343 metabolites. The stoichiometric matrix was used to determine the systems characteristics of the metabolic genotype and to assess the metabolic capabilities of H. influenzae. The need to balance cofactor and biosynthetic precursor production during growth on mixed substrates led to the definition of six different optimal metabolic phenotypes arising from the same metabolic genotype, each with different constraining features. The effects of variations in the metabolic genotype were also studied, and it was shown that the H. influenzae Rd metabolic genotype contains redundant functions under defined conditions. We thus show that the synthesis of in silico metabolic genotypes from annotated genome sequences is possible and that systems analysis methods are available that can be used to analyze and interpret phenotypic behavior of such genotypes. PMID:10364169

  12. The genotypic view of social interactions in microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Mitri, Sara; Foster, Kevin Richard

    2013-01-01

    Dense and diverse microbial communities are found in many environments. Disentangling the social interactions between strains and species is central to understanding microbes and how they respond to perturbations. However, the study of social evolution in microbes tends to focus on single species. Here, we broaden this perspective and review evolutionary and ecological theory relevant to microbial interactions across all phylogenetic scales. Despite increased complexity, we reduce the theory to a simple null model that we call the genotypic view. This states that cooperation will occur when cells are surrounded by identical genotypes at the loci that drive interactions, with genetic identity coming from recent clonal growth or horizontal gene transfer (HGT). In contrast, because cooperation is only expected to evolve between different genotypes under restrictive ecological conditions, different genotypes will typically compete. Competition between two genotypes includes mutual harm but, importantly, also many interactions that are beneficial to one of the two genotypes, such as predation. The literature offers support for the genotypic view with relatively few examples of cooperation between genotypes. However, the study of microbial interactions is still at an early stage. We outline the logic and methods that help to better evaluate our perspective and move us toward rationally engineering microbial communities to our own advantage.

  13. Clonal propagation of walnut rootstock genotypes for genetic improvement 2011

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This year we produced more than 9700 liner-sized plantlets of 83 genotypes for use in greenhouse and field pest and disease resistance screening, growth in nurseries, and development of orchard trials. These included 6200 plants of 33 new Juglans microcarpa x ‘Serr’ paradox genotypes and 230 plants ...

  14. Regional selection of hybrid Nacional cacao genotypes in Coastal Ecuador

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent international demand for “nacional” flavour cacao has increased the need for local cacao producers in Ecuador to use high-yielding “nacional” hybrid genotypes. The relative potential of cacao genotypes over various environments needs to be assessed prior to final selection of potential candid...

  15. Paternity testing and delivering trait-predictive genotypic data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the RosBREED project, the Genotyping Team (Team Leader: Nahla Bassil) leads the effort to obtain DNA data needed to enable marker-assisted breeding for critical fruit quality traits. These data are obtained from reference genotypes of apple, peach, cherry and strawberry carefully chosen to repres...

  16. Preference of Gossypium genotypes to Bemisia argentifolii (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several Gossypium species and genotypes were evaluated by in field and greehouse tests in the Lower Rio Grande Valley, Texas, for preference to the whitefly. Genotypes with G.hirsutum, G. barabadense, G. herbaceum, and G. arboreum were examined, including commercial and obsolete cultivars,(cultivar...

  17. Characteristics of Streptococcus mutans genotypes and dental caries in children.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Kyounga; Moser, Stephen A; Wiener, Howard W; Whiddon, Jennifer; Momeni, Stephanie S; Ruby, John D; Cutter, Gary R; Childers, Noel K

    2013-06-01

    This longitudinal cohort study evaluated the diversity, commonality, and stability of Streptococcus mutans genotypes associated with dental caries history. Sixty-seven 5- and 6-yr-old children, considered as being at high caries risk, had plaque collected from baseline through 36 months for S. mutans isolation and genotyping using repetitive extragenic palindromic-PCR (4,392 total isolates). Decayed, missing, or filled surfaces (dmfs (primary teeth)/DMFS (secondary teeth)) for each child were recorded at baseline. At baseline, 18 distinct genotypes were found among 911 S. mutans isolates from 67 children (diversity), and 13 genotypes were shared by at least two children (commonality). The number of genotypes per individual was positively associated with the proportion of decayed surfaces (p-ds) at baseline. Twenty-four of the 39 children who were available at follow-up visits maintained a predominant genotype for the follow-up periods (stability) and this was negatively associated with the p-ds. The observed diversity, commonality, and stability of S. mutans genotypes represent a pattern of dental caries epidemiology in this high-caries-risk community, which suggests that fewer decayed surfaces are significantly associated with lower diversity and higher stability of S. mutans genotypes. PMID:23659236

  18. Resequencing Microarray Technology for Genotyping Human Papillomavirus in Cervical Smears

    PubMed Central

    Berthet, Nicolas; Falguières, Michael; Filippone, Claudia; Bertolus, Chloé; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Brisse, Sylvain; Gessain, Antoine; Heard, Isabelle; Favre, Michel

    2014-01-01

    There are more than 40 human papillomaviruses (HPVs) belonging to the alpha genus that cause sexually transmitted infections; these infections are among the most frequent and can lead to condylomas and anogenital intra-epithelial neoplasia. At least 18 of these viruses are causative agents of anogenital carcinomas. We evaluated the performance of a resequencing microarray for the detection and genotyping of alpha HPV of clinical significance using cloned HPV DNA. To reduce the number of HPV genotypes tiled on microarray, we used reconstructed ancestral sequences (RASs) as they are more closely related to the various genotypes than the current genotypes are among themselves. The performance of this approach was tested by genotyping with a set of 40 cervical smears already genotyped using the commercial PapilloCheck kit. The results of the two tests were concordant for 70% (28/40) of the samples and compatible for 30% (12/40). Our findings indicate that RASs were able to detect and identify one or several HPV in clinical samples. Associating RASs with homonym sequences improved the genotyping of HPV present in cases of multiple infection. In conclusion, we demonstrate the diagnostic potential of resequencing technology for genotyping of HPV, and illustrate its value both for epidemiological studies and for monitoring the distribution of HPV in the post-vaccination era. PMID:25383888

  19. Protein profiles and immunoreactivities of Acanthamoeba morphological groups and genotypes.

    PubMed

    Pumidonming, Wilawan; Koehsler, Martina; Leitsch, David; Walochnik, Julia

    2014-11-01

    Acanthamoeba is a free-living protozoan found in a wide variety of habitats. A classification of Acanthamoeba into currently eighteen genotypes (T1-T18) has been established, however, data on differences between genotypes on the protein level are scarce. The aim of this study was to compare protein and immunoreactivity profiles of Acanthamoeba genotypes. Thirteen strains, both clinical and non-clinical, from genotypes T4, T5, T6, T7, T9, T11 and T12, representing three morphological groups, were investigated for their protein profiles and IgG, IgM and IgA immunoreactivities. It was shown that protein and immunoreactivity profiles of Acanthamoeba genotypes T4, T5, T6, T7, T9, T11 and T12 are clearly distinct from each other, but the banding patterns correlate to the morphological groups. Normal human sera revealed anti-Acanthamoeba antibodies against isolates of all investigated genotypes, interestingly, however only very weak IgM and virtually no IgA immunoreactivity with T7 and T9, both representing morphological group I. The strongest IgG, IgM and IgA immunoreactivities were observed for genotypes T4, T5 and T6. Differences of both, protein and immunological patterns, between cytopathic and non-cytopathic strains, particularly within genotype T4, were not at the level of banding patterns, but rather in expression levels.

  20. Monotonicity is a key feature of genotype-phenotype maps

    PubMed Central

    Gjuvsland, Arne B.; Wang, Yunpeng; Plahte, Erik; Omholt, Stig W.

    2013-01-01

    It was recently shown that monotone gene action, i.e., order-preservation between allele content and corresponding genotypic values in the mapping from genotypes to phenotypes, is a prerequisite for achieving a predictable parent-offspring relationship across the whole allele frequency spectrum. Here we test the consequential prediction that the design principles underlying gene regulatory networks are likely to generate highly monotone genotype-phenotype maps. To this end we present two measures of the monotonicity of a genotype-phenotype map, one based on allele substitution effects, and the other based on isotonic regression. We apply these measures to genotype-phenotype maps emerging from simulations of 1881 different 3-gene regulatory networks. We confirm that in general, genotype-phenotype maps are indeed highly monotonic across network types. However, regulatory motifs involving incoherent feedforward or positive feedback, as well as pleiotropy in the mapping between genotypes and gene regulatory parameters, are clearly predisposed for generating non-monotonicity. We present analytical results confirming these deep connections between molecular regulatory architecture and monotonicity properties of the genotype-phenotype map. These connections seem to be beyond reach by the classical distinction between additive and non-additive gene action. PMID:24223579

  1. Characteristics of Streptococcus mutans genotypes and dental caries in children

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Kyounga; Moser, Stephen A.; Wiener, Howard W.; Whiddon, Jennifer; Momeni, Stephanie S.; Ruby, John D.; Cutter, Gary R.; Childers, Noel K.

    2013-01-01

    This longitudinal cohort study evaluated the diversity, commonality, and stability of Streptococcus mutans genotypes associated with dental caries history. Sixty-seven 5 and 6 yr-old children, considered being at high caries risk, had plaque collected from baseline through 36 months for S. mutans isolation and genotyping with repetitive extragenic palindromic-PCR (4,392 total isolates). Decayed, missing, filled surfaces (dmfs/DMFS) for each child were recorded at baseline. At baseline, 18 distinct genotypes were found among 911 S. mutans isolates from 67 children (diversity) and 13 genotypes were shared by at least 2 children (commonality). The number of genotypes per individual was positively associated with the proportion of decayed surfaces (p-ds) at baseline. Twenty-four of the 39 children who were available at follow-up visits maintained a predominant genotype for the follow-up periods (stability) and was negatively associated with p-ds. The observed diversity, commonality, and stability of S. mutans genotypes represent a pattern of dental caries epidemiology in this high caries risk community, which suggest fewer decayed surfaces are significantly associated with lower diversity and stability of S. mutans genotypes. PMID:23659236

  2. Distribution study of Chlamydia trachomatis genotypes in symptomatic patients in Buenos Aires, Argentina: association between genotype E and neonatal conjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chlamydia trachomatis infections are the most prevalent sexually transmitted bacterial infections in the world. There is scarce data available referring to the distribution of C. trachomatis genotypes in Argentina. The aim of this study was to identify the genotypes of C. trachomatis circulating in the metropolitan area of Buenos Aires (Argentina) associated with ophthalmia neonatorum and genital infections. Findings From 2001 to 2006, 199 positive samples for C. trachomatis infection from symptomatic adult patients and neonates with ophthalmia neonatorum from two public hospitals were studied. C. trachomatis genotypes were determined by PCR-RFLP of an ompA fragment. Genotype E was the most prevalent regardless of the sample origin (46.3% 57/123 in adults and 72.4% 55/76 in neonates), followed by genotype D (19.5% 24/123) and F (14.6% 18/123) in adults, and G (9.2% 7/76) and D (7.9% 6/76) in neonates. We detected a significantly higher frequency of genotype E (p < 0.001, OR = 3.03 (1.57Genotype D was associated with genital localization (p < 0.05, OR = 2.83 (1.03genotype E in neonatal conjunctivitis, which may indicate an epidemiological association between this genotype and the newborn population. The present study also contributed to increase the knowledge on genotype distribution of Chlamydia trachomatis in symptomatic adult patients in Buenos Aires, Argentina, in which genotypes E, D and F were the predominant ones. PMID:20181127

  3. The Association of Il28b Genotype with the Histological Features of Chronic Hepatitis C Is HCV Genotype Dependent

    PubMed Central

    D’Ambrosio, Roberta; Aghemo, Alessio; De Francesco, Raffaele; Rumi, Maria Grazia; Galmozzi, Enrico; De Nicola, Stella; Cheroni, Cristina; Clark, Paul J.; Ronchi, Guido; Lampertico, Pietro; Colombo, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    The interleukin 28B (IL28B) rs12979860 polymorphism is associated with treatment outcome in hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 and 4 patients. Its association with the histological features of chronic hepatitis C and disease severity needs further clarifications. To assess the correlation between IL28B genotype, HCV genotype and liver biopsy findings in untreated patients. Materials and Methods Pre-treatment liver biopsies from 335 HCV Caucasian patients (59% males, age 50 years) enrolled in the MIST study were staged for fibrosis and inflammation according to the METAVIR and the Ishak scoring systems; steatosis was dichotomized as <5% or ≥5%. IL28B was typed by Taqman Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) genotyping assay. HCV genotype was 1 in 151 (45%), 2 in 99 (30%), 3 in 50 (15%) and 4 in 35 (10%) patients. IL28B genotype was CC in 117 (34%), CT in 166 (49%) and TT in 52 (15%). At univariate analysis, the IL28B CC genotype was associated with severe portal inflammation in HCV-1 patients (CC vs. CT/TT: 86% vs. 63%, p = 0.005), severe lobular inflammation in HCV-2 patients (CC vs. CT/TT: 44% vs. 23%, p = 0.03), and less fatty infiltration in HCV-1 patients (CC vs. CT/TT: 72% vs. 51%, p = 0.02). Despite the lack of any association between IL28B and fibrosis stage, in HCV-3 patients IL28B CC correlated with METAVIR F3–F4 (CC vs. CT/TT: 74% vs. 26%, p = 0.05). At multivariate analysis, the genotype CC remained associated with severe portal inflammation in HCV-1, only (Odds Ratio (OR): 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 3.24 (1.23–8.51)). IL28B genotype is associated with the histological features of chronic hepatitis C in a HCV genotype dependent manner, with CC genotype being independently associated with severe portal inflammation. PMID:24776764

  4. Prevalence of BPV genotypes in a German cowshed determined by a novel multiplex BPV genotyping assay.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Markus; Fiedler, Volker; Müller, Martin

    2010-12-01

    Bovine papillomaviruses (BPV) induce benign tumours of the cutaneous or mucosal epithelia in cattle, but are also involved in the development of cancer of the urinary bladder and of the upper gastrointestinal tract. Current BPV genotyping assays employ techniques developed originally for the detection of human papillomaviruses. These methods rely on consensus PCR amplification and subsequent sequencing and are cumbersome and limited in their analytic sensitivity to detect BPV, especially in multiple infections. In this study, a novel multiplex BPV genotyping assay is described to detect sensitively and specifically BPV-1 to -10 as well as BaPV-11. The assay is based on a multiplex PCR using novel broad-spectrum bovine papillomavirus (BSBP) primers followed by multiplex bovine genotyping (MBG) by Luminex xMAP technology. The detection limit of the assay was shown to be between 10 and 100 BPV genomes. In a first application, BPV was detected in 100% of wart preparations with BPV-8 being most prevalent, followed by types 6, 1 and 10. The majority of warts were positive for at least four BPV types. In conclusion, BSBP-PCR/MBG is a powerful high-throughput method suitable for the study of the natural history of BPV and could be useful to veterinarians for the monitoring of the efficacy of future BPV vaccines.

  5. Mental status testing

    MedlinePlus

    Mental status exam; Neurocognitive testing; Dementia-mental status testing ... A health care provider will ask a number of questions. The test can be ... cognitive assessment (MoCA). The following may be tested: ...

  6. HPV genotypes detected in the oropharyngeal mucosa of HIV-infected men who have sex with men in Northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, M; Mazza, F; Frati, E R; Fasolo, M M; Colzani, D; Bianchi, S; Fasoli, E; Amendola, A; Orlando, G; Tanzi, E

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the epidemiological profile of HPV oropharyngeal infections in HIV-infected men who have sex with men. A total of 135 subjects were enrolled at the L. Sacco University Hospital (Milan, Italy) to evaluate their HPV oropharyngeal infection status at baseline and at a follow-up visit at least 12 months later. HPV DNA was detected from oropharyngeal swabs using an in-house nested PCR that amplifies a segment of the L1 gene. The PCR products were then sequenced and genotyped. A greater percentage of high-risk genotypes was identified compared to low-risk genotypes (13·7% vs. 6·9%, P < 0·05), and two uncommon alpha-HPV genotypes were detected, i.e. HPV-102 and HPV-114. HPV infection prevalence was 24·4% and the cumulative incidence was 24·1%. During the follow-up period, one case of HPV infection (HPV-33) persisted, while the overall rate of infection clearance was 58·3%. HPV oropharyngeal infection was widespread in the cohort examined, and most of the infections were transient and cleared within 12 months. These results may help to clarify the role of HPV in the oropharynx and may also improve our understanding of the need to implement preventive strategies in at-risk populations.

  7. [Genotyping of ABO loci in para-Bombay type individuals].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jian-Qiang; Luo, Guang-Ping

    2004-08-01

    To study the molecular genetic basis of ABO alleles in para-Bombay type individuals, samples from five para-Bombay type individuals identified by serologic tests including absorption-elution tests, saliva neutralizing or inhibitor substances tests, were genotyped by using PCR-SSP based ABO genotyping. Exon 6 and exon 7 at the ABO locus for all 5 samples were sequenced. The results showed that the ABO genotypes of five para-Bombay samples were A102B1, A102B1, A102O1, A102B1, B1O1 respectively, the direct DNA sequencing results were in accordance with the results genotyped by PCR-SSP method, No novel nucleotide mutation was found at the exon 6 and exon 7 of ABO gene. In conclusion, the ABO genotyping assay by PCR-SSP provide a simple, rapid and accurate method for determining the ABO type of para-Bombay cases.

  8. National Tuberculosis Genotyping and Surveillance Network: Design and Methods

    PubMed Central

    Braden, Christopher R.; Schable, Barbara A.; Onorato, Ida M.

    2002-01-01

    The National Tuberculosis Genotyping and Surveillance Network was established in 1996 to perform a 5-year, prospective study of the usefulness of genotyping Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates to tuberculosis control programs. Seven sentinel sites identified all new cases of tuberculosis, collected information on patients and contacts, and obtained patient isolates. Seven genotyping laboratories performed DNA fingerprinting analysis by the international standard IS6110 method. BioImage Whole Band Analyzer software was used to analyze patterns, and distinct patterns were assigned unique designations. Isolates with six or fewer bands on IS6110 patterns were also spoligotyped. Patient data and genotyping designations were entered in a relational database and merged with selected variables from the national surveillance database. In two related databases, we compiled the results of routine contact investigations and the results of investigations of the relationships of patients who had isolates with matching genotypes. We describe the methods used in the study. PMID:12453342

  9. Association of water spectral indices with plant and soil water relations in contrasting wheat genotypes.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Mario; Reynolds, Matthew P; Klatt, Arthur R

    2010-07-01

    Spectral reflectance indices can be used to estimate the water status of plants in a rapid, non-destructive manner. Water spectral indices were measured on wheat under a range of water-deficit conditions in field-based yield trials to establish their relationship with water relations parameters as well as available volumetric soil water (AVSW) to indicate soil water extraction patterns. Three types of wheat germplasm were studied which showed a range of drought adaptation; near-isomorphic sister lines from an elite/elite cross, advanced breeding lines, and lines derived from interspecific hybridization with wild relatives (synthetic derivative lines). Five water spectral indices (one water index and four normalized water indices) based on near infrared wavelengths were determined under field conditions between the booting and grain-filling stages of crop development. Among all water spectral indices, one in particular, which was denominated as NWI-3, showed the most consistent associations with water relations parameters and demonstrated the strongest associations in all three germplasm sets. NWI-3 showed a strong linear relationship (r(2) >0.6-0.8) with leaf water potential (psi(leaf)) across a broad range of values (-2.0 to -4.0 MPa) that were determined by natural variation in the environment associated with intra- and inter-seasonal affects. Association observed between NWI-3 and canopy temperature (CT) was consistent with the idea that genotypes with a better hydration status have a larger water flux (increased stomatal conductance) during the day. NWI-3 was also related to soil water potential (psi(soil)) and AVSW, indicating that drought-adapted lines could extract more water from deeper soil profiles to maintain favourable water relations. NWI-3 was sufficiently sensitive to detect genotypic differences (indicated by phenotypic and genetic correlations) in water status at the canopy and soil levels indicating its potential application in precision

  10. Association of water spectral indices with plant and soil water relations in contrasting wheat genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Mario; Reynolds, Matthew P.; Klatt, Arthur R.

    2010-01-01

    Spectral reflectance indices can be used to estimate the water status of plants in a rapid, non-destructive manner. Water spectral indices were measured on wheat under a range of water-deficit conditions in field-based yield trials to establish their relationship with water relations parameters as well as available volumetric soil water (AVSW) to indicate soil water extraction patterns. Three types of wheat germplasm were studied which showed a range of drought adaptation; near-isomorphic sister lines from an elite/elite cross, advanced breeding lines, and lines derived from interspecific hybridization with wild relatives (synthetic derivative lines). Five water spectral indices (one water index and four normalized water indices) based on near infrared wavelengths were determined under field conditions between the booting and grain-filling stages of crop development. Among all water spectral indices, one in particular, which was denominated as NWI-3, showed the most consistent associations with water relations parameters and demonstrated the strongest associations in all three germplasm sets. NWI-3 showed a strong linear relationship (r2 >0.6–0.8) with leaf water potential (ψleaf) across a broad range of values (–2.0 to –4.0 MPa) that were determined by natural variation in the environment associated with intra- and inter-seasonal affects. Association observed between NWI-3 and canopy temperature (CT) was consistent with the idea that genotypes with a better hydration status have a larger water flux (increased stomatal conductance) during the day. NWI-3 was also related to soil water potential (ψsoil) and AVSW, indicating that drought-adapted lines could extract more water from deeper soil profiles to maintain favourable water relations. NWI-3 was sufficiently sensitive to detect genotypic differences (indicated by phenotypic and genetic correlations) in water status at the canopy and soil levels indicating its potential application in precision phenotyping

  11. Pepino mosaic virus genotype shift in North America and rapid genotype identification using loop-mediated isothermal amplification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pepino mosaic, once an emerging disease a decade ago, has become endemic on greenhouse tomatoes worldwide in recent years. Three distinct genotypes of Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV), including EU, US1 and CH2 have been recognized. Our earlier study in 2006-2007 demonstrated a predominant EU genotype ...

  12. Classification of hepatitis B virus genotypes by the PCR-Invader method with genotype-specific probes.

    PubMed

    Tadokoro, Kenichi; Kobayashi, Mariko; Yamaguchi, Toshikazu; Suzuki, Fumitaka; Miyauchi, Saeko; Egashira, Toru; Kumada, Hiromitsu

    2006-12-01

    Hepatitis B virus is a worldwide public health problem. A simple and effective test to identify viral genotypes would greatly aid efforts to understand and control the spread of this disease. A serial invasive signal amplification reaction assay (PCR-Invader assay) was developed for distinguishing the known eight genotypes (A-H) and four subgenotypes (Aa, Ae, Ba, Bj) of hepatitis B virus (HBV). The preS/S and core regions were amplified by multiplex PCR and delivered to 12 wells containing genotype-specific Invader probes. By observing the fluorescence patterns in the wells, HBV sub/genotypes can be assigned. A total of 505 serum samples containing HBV/HBsAg in Japan was examined by PCR-Invader and compared the results with those from ELISA assays with monoclonal antibodies against epitopes on gene products of the preS2 region and with a genotype-specific probe assay (GSPA) based on the preS1 region. Genotypes determined by the PCR-Invader agreed with those of the ELISA method in 98.2% of cases and with the GSPA method in 97.1% of cases. Co-infection with two distinct genotypes was correctly identified by the PCR-Invader in four serum samples, as determined by GSPA. Thus, the PCR-Invader assay is a useful tool for detecting the 10 known HBV sub/genotypes. PMID:16934340

  13. Newcastle Disease Virus in Madagascar: Identification of an Original Genotype Possibly Deriving from a Died Out Ancestor of Genotype IV

    PubMed Central

    Maminiaina, Olivier F.; Gil, Patricia; Briand, François-Xavier; Albina, Emmanuel; Keita, Djénéba; Andriamanivo, Harentsoaniaina Rasamoelina; Chevalier, Véronique; Lancelot, Renaud; Martinez, Dominique; Rakotondravao, R.; Rajaonarison, Jean-Joseph; Koko, M.; Andriantsimahavandy, Abel A.; Jestin, Véronique; Servan de Almeida, Renata

    2010-01-01

    In Madagascar, Newcastle disease (ND) has become enzootic after the first documented epizootics in 1946, with recurrent annual outbreaks causing mortality up to 40%. Four ND viruses recently isolated in Madagascar were genotypically and pathotypically characterised. By phylogenetic inference based on the F and HN genes, and also full-genome sequence analyses, the NDV Malagasy isolates form a cluster distant enough to constitute a new genotype hereby proposed as genotype XI. This new genotype is presumably deriving from an ancestor close to genotype IV introduced in the island probably more than 50 years ago. Our data show also that all the previously described neutralising epitopes are conserved between Malagasy and vaccine strains. However, the potential implication in vaccination failures of specific amino acid substitutions predominantly found on surface-exposed epitopes of F and HN proteins is discussed. PMID:21085573

  14. [Distribution of hepatitis C virus genotypes in Manisa region, Turkey].

    PubMed

    Sanlidağ, Tamer; Akçali, Sinem; Ozbakkaloğlu, Beril; Ertekin, Deniz; Akduman, Elçin

    2009-10-01

    The duration of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and the response to the standard therapy is strongly related to the HCV genotypes. In addition, the geographical distribution of HCV genotypes is important for the epidemiological studies in terms of distribution and possible risk groups. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the distribution of HCV genotypes in Manisa region (located at the Aegean part of Turkey). A total of 100 anti-HCV (microparticle EIA; Abbott Laboratories, USA) and HCV-RNA (real time RT-PCR; Applied Biosystems, USA) positive patients (53 female, 47 male; mean age: 44.4 +/- 10.4 years), who were admitted to Celal Bayar University Medical School Hospital between 2002-2005, were included to the study. Quantitative HCV-RNA levels of the patients were between 10(4)-10(8) copies/ml. Complementary DNAs obtained from HCV-RNAs isolated by Invitek RTP DNA/RNA Virus Mini Kit were used for genotyping with selected primers [primer 11 (5'-AGG TCT CTG AGA CCG TGC ACC ATG AGC AC-3') and primer 13 (5'-CTG TGA GGA ACT ACT GTC TT-3') for the first PCR; primer 12 (5'-ACT GCC TGA TAG GGT GCT TGC GAG TG-3') and primer 14 (5'-CAC GCA GAA AGC GTC TAG-3') for the second PCR]. The RT-PCR products were purified with Invisorb Spin PCRapid Kit and sequenced by BigDye Terminator v3.1 Cycle Sequencing Kit in ABI Prism 310 Genetic Analyzer. Genotype 1 was found in 92% of the patients (92%) and genotypes 2 and 4 were found in 7% of the patients, while HCV genotype could not be identified in one patient (1%). When evaluating the subtypes, genotype 1b was determined in 90 patients (90%), genotype 4a in five patients (5%), genotype 1a in two patients (2%) and genotype 2a in two patients (2%). In conclusion, 1b was found to be the most common HCV genotype in Manisa region in concordance with the previous data obtained in Turkey, followed by genotype 4a, although a rare one. The data of this study is noteworthy especially for the arrangement of treatment and

  15. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase homozygosis and low-density lipoproteins in patients with genotype 1 chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Petta, S; Bellia, C; Mazzola, A; Cabibi, D; Cammà, C; Caruso, A; Di Marco, V; Craxì, A; Ciaccio, M

    2012-07-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase status, homocysteine and lipoproteins levels have been associated with severity of disease and both rapid and sustained virological response (SVR) in patients with genotype 1 chronic hepatitis C (CHC). We aimed to assess the association of homocysteine and MTHFR status with serum cholesterol levels and their potential links to both histological findings and virological response, in patients with genotype 1 hepatitis C virus (HCV). A total of 119 consecutive patients were evaluated by biopsy and metabolic measurements. A total of 103 healthy blood donors were used as controls. Serum homocysteine and MTHFR C677T mutation were also evaluated. All patients underwent antiviral therapy with PEG-IFN alfa-2a plus ribavirin. HCV-RNA was assessed at baseline, week 4, week 12, at the end of therapy and after 6 months of follow-up. Mean serum values of homocysteine were higher in patients than in controls (15.8 ± 5.8 μg/L vs 12.5 ± 5.8 μg/L; P < 0.001), with a similar CC, CT and TT MTHFR distribution (23.6%, 48.7% and 27.7% in G1-CHC vs 34%, 48.5% and 17.5% in controls; P = 0.14). In genotype 1, HCV MTHFR TT homozygosis was independently linked to higher LDL (OR 1.016; CI 1.002-1.031; P = 0.03), but not to homocysteine. No association were found between homocysteine, MTHFR and histological features or both rapid virological response (RVR) and SVR. Low cholesterol (OR 0.988, 95%CI 0.975-0.999, P = 0.04) was independently linked to severe fibrosis, and high LDL was the only independent positive predictors of both RVR and SVR (OR 1.036; 95%CI 1.017-1.055; P < 0.001; and OR 1.016; 95%CI 1.001-1.031; P = 0.04 respectively). In patients with genotype 1 hepatitis C, showing higher homocysteine serum levels than controls, MTHFR C677T homozygosis, via modulating cholesterol levels, could interfere with liver fibrosis and response to antiviral therapy. PMID:22676358

  16. Chromosomal regions impacting pregnancy status in Braford, Brangus and Simbrah cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We aimed to validate SNP associated with reproductive success in cattle. Cattle were individually genotyped for 73 SNP which were previously identified as significantly associated with reproductive success based on a previous study utilizing DNA pooling. Pregnancy status data were recorded from 200...

  17. Heuristic status polling

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J.; Blocksome, Michael A.; Heidelberger, Philip; Kumar, Sameer; Parker, Jeffrey J.; Ratterman, Joseph D.

    2011-06-07

    Methods, compute nodes, and computer program products are provided for heuristic status polling of a component in a computing system. Embodiments include receiving, by a polling module from a requesting application, a status request requesting status of a component; determining, by the polling module, whether an activity history for the component satisfies heuristic polling criteria; polling, by the polling module, the component for status if the activity history for the component satisfies the heuristic polling criteria; and not polling, by the polling module, the component for status if the activity history for the component does not satisfy the heuristic criteria.

  18. Genotyping-in-Thousands by sequencing (GT-seq): A cost effective SNP genotyping method based on custom amplicon sequencing.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Nathan R; Harmon, Stephanie A; Narum, Shawn R

    2015-07-01

    Genotyping-in-Thousands by sequencing (GT-seq) is a method that uses next-generation sequencing of multiplexed PCR products to generate genotypes from relatively small panels (50-500) of targeted single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for thousands of individuals in a single Illumina HiSeq lane. This method uses only unlabelled oligos and PCR master mix in two thermal cycling steps for amplification of targeted SNP loci. During this process, sequencing adapters and dual barcode sequence tags are incorporated into the amplicons enabling thousands of individuals to be pooled into a single sequencing library. Post sequencing, reads from individual samples are split into individual files using their unique combination of barcode sequences. Genotyping is performed with a simple perl script which counts amplicon-specific sequences for each allele, and allele ratios are used to determine the genotypes. We demonstrate this technique by genotyping 2068 individual steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) samples with a set of 192 SNP markers in a single library sequenced in a single Illumina HiSeq lane. Genotype data were 99.9% concordant to previously collected TaqMan(™) genotypes at the same 192 loci, but call rates were slightly lower with GT-seq (96.4%) relative to Taqman (99.0%). Of the 192 SNPs, 187 were genotyped in ≥90% of the individual samples and only 3 SNPs were genotyped in <70% of samples. This study demonstrates amplicon sequencing with GT-seq greatly reduces the cost of genotyping hundreds of targeted SNPs relative to existing methods by utilizing a simple library preparation method and massive efficiency of scale.

  19. Genotyping for cytochrome P450 polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Daly, Ann K; King, Barry P; Leathart, Julian B S

    2006-01-01

    Protocols for the extraction of DNA from human blood and for genotyping for a number of common cytochrome P450 polymorphisms using either polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism or PCR-single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis are described. Rapid high-throughput techniques are also available for analyses of this type, but they require access to specialized equipment and are not considered here. General guidelines for performing amplification using PCR are described together with electrophoresis protocols for analysis of restriction digests of PCR products with agarose and polyacrylamide gels including the use of polyacrylamide-based gels for SSCP analysis. Protocols for the following specific isoforms and alleles are also provided: CYP1A1 (*2B and *4 alleles), CYP2C8 (*3 and *4 alleles), CYP2C9 (*2, *3, and *11 alleles), CYP2C19 (*2 and *3 alleles), CYP2D6 (*3, *4, *5, and *6 alleles), CYP2E1 (*5A, *5B, and *6 alleles), and CYP3A5 (*3 allele).

  20. Automated genotyping of circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Stakenborg, Tim; Liu, Chengxun; Henry, Olivier; Borgen, Elin; Laddach, Nadja; Roeser, Tina; Ritzi-Lehnert, Marion; Fermér, Christian; Hauch, Sigfried; O'Sullivan, Ciara K; Lagae, Liesbet

    2010-09-01

    Cancer remains a prominent health concern in modern societies. Continuous innovations and introduction of new technologies are essential to level or reduce current healthcare spending. A diagnostic platform to detect circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in peripheral blood may be most promising in this respect. CTCs have been proposed as a minimally invasive, prognostic and predictive marker to reflect the biological characteristics of tumors and are implemented in an increasing number of clinical studies. Still, their detection remains a challenge as they may occur at concentrations below one single cell per ml of blood. To facilitate their detection, here we describe microfluidic modules to isolate and genotype CTCs directly from clinical blood samples. In a first cell isolation and detection module, the CTCs are immunomagnetically enriched, separated and counted. In a second module and after cell lysis, the mRNA is reversely transcripted to cDNA, followed by a multiplex ligation probe amplification of 20 specific genetic markers and two control fragments. Following the multiplex ligation probe amplification reaction, the amplified fragments are electrochemically detected in a third and final module. Besides the design of the modules, their functionality is described using control samples. Further testing using clinical samples and integration of all modules in a single, fully automated smart miniaturized system will enable minimal invasive testing for frequent detection and characterization of CTCs.

  1. Genotyping of Canine parvovirus in western Mexico.

    PubMed

    Pedroza-Roldán, César; Páez-Magallan, Varinia; Charles-Niño, Claudia; Elizondo-Quiroga, Darwin; De Cervantes-Mireles, Raúl Leonel; López-Amezcua, Mario Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) is one of the most common infectious agents related to high morbidity rates in dogs. In addition, the virus is associated with severe gastroenteritis, diarrhea, and vomiting, resulting in high death rates, especially in puppies and nonvaccinated dogs. To date, there are 3 variants of the virus (CPV-2a, CPV-2b, and CPV-2c) circulating worldwide. In Mexico, reports describing the viral variants circulating in dog populations are lacking. In response to this deficiency, a total of 41 fecal samples of suspected dogs were collected from October 2013 through April 2014 in the Veterinary Hospital of the University of Guadalajara in western Mexico. From these, 24 samples resulted positive by polymerase chain reaction, and the viral variant was determined by restriction fragment length polymorphism. Five positive diagnosed samples were selected for partial sequencing of the vp2 gene and codon analysis. The results demonstrated that the current dominant viral variant in Mexico is CPV-2c. The current study describes the genotyping of CPV strains, providing valuable evidence of the dominant frequency of this virus in a dog population from western Mexico.

  2. Genotyping for cytochrome P450 polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Daly, Ann K; King, Barry P; Leathart, Julian B S

    2006-01-01

    Protocols for the extraction of DNA from human blood and for genotyping for a number of common cytochrome P450 polymorphisms using either polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism or PCR-single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis are described. Rapid high-throughput techniques are also available for analyses of this type, but they require access to specialized equipment and are not considered here. General guidelines for performing amplification using PCR are described together with electrophoresis protocols for analysis of restriction digests of PCR products with agarose and polyacrylamide gels including the use of polyacrylamide-based gels for SSCP analysis. Protocols for the following specific isoforms and alleles are also provided: CYP1A1 (*2B and *4 alleles), CYP2C8 (*3 and *4 alleles), CYP2C9 (*2, *3, and *11 alleles), CYP2C19 (*2 and *3 alleles), CYP2D6 (*3, *4, *5, and *6 alleles), CYP2E1 (*5A, *5B, and *6 alleles), and CYP3A5 (*3 allele). PMID:16719392

  3. Illumina human exome genotyping array clustering and quality control

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yan; He, Jing; Zhao, Shilin; Wu, Hui; Zhong, Xue; Sheng, Quanhu; Samuels, David C; Shyr, Yu; Long, Jirong

    2015-01-01

    With the rise of high-throughput sequencing technology, traditional genotyping arrays are gradually being replaced by sequencing technology. Against this trend, Illumina has introduced an exome genotyping array that provides an alternative approach to sequencing, especially suited to large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWASs). the exome genotyping array targets the exome plus rare single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), a feature that makes it substantially more challenging to process than previous genotyping arrays that targeted common SNPs. Researchers have struggled to generate a reliable protocol for processing exome genotyping array data. The Vanderbilt epidemiology center, in cooperation with Vanderbilt Technologies for Advanced Genomics Analysis and Research Design (VANGARD), has developed a thorough exome chip–processing protocol. The protocol was developed during the processing of several large exome genotyping array-based studies, which included over 60,000 participants combined. The protocol described herein contains detailed clustering techniques and robust quality control procedures, and it can benefit future exome genotyping array–based GWASs. PMID:25321409

  4. The gender-specific apolipoprotein E genotype influence on the distribution of plasma lipids and apolipoproteins in the population of Rochester, Minnesota. II. Regression relationships with concomitants

    SciTech Connect

    Reilly, S.L.; Sing, C.F. ); Ferrell, R.E. ); Kottke, B.A. )

    1992-12-01

    The influence of the apolipoprotein E (Apo E) polymorphism and gender on the regression relationships between each of nine plasma lipid and apolipoprotein traits (total cholesterol; ln triglycerides; high-density-lipoprotein chloesterol; apolipoproteins AI, AII, B, and CII; ln CIII; and ln E) and four concomitants (age, weight, waist-to-hip ratio, and smoking) was studied in 507 unrelated individuals representative of the adult population of Rochester, MN. Analyses are presented separately for females and males. Each lipid and apolipoprotein trait exhibited at least one Apo E genotype-specific regression relationship with the concomitants investigated in this study. In most cases the heterogeneity of regression was associated with differences between the [var epsilon]32 and [var epsilon]33 genotype. This study documents that the influence of Apo E genotype on average levels of plasma lipids and apolipoproteins varies among subdivisions of the population defined by age, body size, and smoking status. 61 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  5. Hepatitis C Genotype 4: Genotypic Diversity, Epidemiological Profile, and Clinical Relevance of Subtypes in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al Ashgar, Hamad I; Khan, Mohammed Q.; Al-Ahdal, Mohammed; Al Thawadi, Sahar; Helmy, Ahmad Salem; Al Qahtani, Ahmed; Sanai, Faisal M.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aim: Hepatitis C virus genotypes 4 (HCV-4) is the most prevalent genotype in Saudi Arabia, although it's various subtypes, mode and route of transmission remains unknown. The aim of this study was to analyze (i) the variability of the HCV-4 subtypes, the route and source of HCV transmission and (ii) the influence of HCV-4 subtypes on their therapeutic response. Patients and Methods: Sixty-four HCV-4 patients were analyzed retrospectively for the prevalence of various sub-genotypes and the possible mode of transmission, and it was correlated with their treatment response to pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN) α-2a and ribavirin therapy. Results: Positive history of blood or blood products transfusion was noted in 22 patients (34%), hemodialysis in 10 patients (15.6%), surgery in 7 patients (11%), and unknown etiology in 25 patients (39%). Prevalence of HCV-4 subtypes was 4a = 48.4% (31/64), 4d = 39% (25/64), 4n = 6.25% (4/64), and remaining combined (4m, 4l, 4r, 4o) 6.25% (4/64). No significant correlation between subtypes and the source of transmission was recognized (P = 0.62). Sustained virological response in all HCV-4 patients was 64% (41/64), while in each subtypes separately it was 4a 77.4% (24/31), 4d 52% (13/25), and combined (4n, 4m, 4l, 4r, 4o) 62.5% (5/8) (P = 0.046). Conclusion: No obvious cause for the mode of HCV transmission was noted in majority of the patients. No significant correlation was observed between HCV-4 subtypes and the source of HCV infection. 4a and 4d subtypes were the most common in Saudi Arabia, and patients infected with 4a subtype responded significantly better to combination therapy than to 4d subtype. PMID:23319035

  6. National Prociency Testing Result of CYP2D6*10 Genotyping for Adjuvant Tamoxifen Therapy in China.

    PubMed

    Lin, Guigao; Zhang, Kuo; Yi, Lang; Han, Yanxi; Xie, Jiehong; Li, Jinming

    2016-01-01

    Tamoxifen has been successfully used for treating breast cancer and preventing cancer recurrence. Cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) plays a key role in the process of metabolizing tamoxifen to its active moiety, endoxifen. Patients with variants of the CYP2D6 gene may not receive the full benefit of tamoxifen treatment. The CYP2D6*10 variant (the most common variant in Asians) was analyzed to optimize the prescription of tamoxifen in China. To ensure referring clinicians have accurate information for genotype-guided tamoxifen treatment, the Chinese National Center for Clinical Laboratories (NCCL) organized a national proficiency testing (PT) to evaluate the performance of laboratories providing CYP2D6*10 genotyping. Ten genomic DNA samples with CYP2D6 wild-type or CYP2D6*10 variants were validated by PCR-sequencing and sent to 28 participant laboratories. The genotyping results and pharmacogenomic test reports were submitted and evaluated by NCCL experts. Additional information regarding the number of samples tested, the accreditation/certification status, and detecting technology was also requested. Thirty-one data sets were received, with a corresponding analytical sensitivity of 98.2% (548/558 challenges; 95% confidence interval: 96.7-99.1%) and an analytic specificity of 96.5% (675/682; 95% confidence interval: 97.9-99.5%). Overall, 25/28 participants correctly identified CYP2D6*10 status in 10 samples; however, two laboratories made serious genotyping errors. Most of the essential information was included in the 20 submitted CYP2D6*10 test reports. The majority of Chinese laboratories are reliable for detecting the CYP2D6*10 variant; however, several issues revealed in this study underline the importance of PT schemes in continued external assessment and provision of guidelines. PMID:27603206

  7. National Prociency Testing Result of CYP2D6*10 Genotyping for Adjuvant Tamoxifen Therapy in China.

    PubMed

    Lin, Guigao; Zhang, Kuo; Yi, Lang; Han, Yanxi; Xie, Jiehong; Li, Jinming

    2016-01-01

    Tamoxifen has been successfully used for treating breast cancer and preventing cancer recurrence. Cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) plays a key role in the process of metabolizing tamoxifen to its active moiety, endoxifen. Patients with variants of the CYP2D6 gene may not receive the full benefit of tamoxifen treatment. The CYP2D6*10 variant (the most common variant in Asians) was analyzed to optimize the prescription of tamoxifen in China. To ensure referring clinicians have accurate information for genotype-guided tamoxifen treatment, the Chinese National Center for Clinical Laboratories (NCCL) organized a national proficiency testing (PT) to evaluate the performance of laboratories providing CYP2D6*10 genotyping. Ten genomic DNA samples with CYP2D6 wild-type or CYP2D6*10 variants were validated by PCR-sequencing and sent to 28 participant laboratories. The genotyping results and pharmacogenomic test reports were submitted and evaluated by NCCL experts. Additional information regarding the number of samples tested, the accreditation/certification status, and detecting technology was also requested. Thirty-one data sets were received, with a corresponding analytical sensitivity of 98.2% (548/558 challenges; 95% confidence interval: 96.7-99.1%) and an analytic specificity of 96.5% (675/682; 95% confidence interval: 97.9-99.5%). Overall, 25/28 participants correctly identified CYP2D6*10 status in 10 samples; however, two laboratories made serious genotyping errors. Most of the essential information was included in the 20 submitted CYP2D6*10 test reports. The majority of Chinese laboratories are reliable for detecting the CYP2D6*10 variant; however, several issues revealed in this study underline the importance of PT schemes in continued external assessment and provision of guidelines.

  8. National Prociency Testing Result of CYP2D6*10 Genotyping for Adjuvant Tamoxifen Therapy in China

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Guigao; Zhang, Kuo; Yi, Lang; Han, Yanxi; Xie, Jiehong; Li, Jinming

    2016-01-01

    Tamoxifen has been successfully used for treating breast cancer and preventing cancer recurrence. Cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) plays a key role in the process of metabolizing tamoxifen to its active moiety, endoxifen. Patients with variants of the CYP2D6 gene may not receive the full benefit of tamoxifen treatment. The CYP2D6*10 variant (the most common variant in Asians) was analyzed to optimize the prescription of tamoxifen in China. To ensure referring clinicians have accurate information for genotype-guided tamoxifen treatment, the Chinese National Center for Clinical Laboratories (NCCL) organized a national proficiency testing (PT) to evaluate the performance of laboratories providing CYP2D6*10 genotyping. Ten genomic DNA samples with CYP2D6 wild-type or CYP2D6*10 variants were validated by PCR-sequencing and sent to 28 participant laboratories. The genotyping results and pharmacogenomic test reports were submitted and evaluated by NCCL experts. Additional information regarding the number of samples tested, the accreditation/certification status, and detecting technology was also requested. Thirty-one data sets were received, with a corresponding analytical sensitivity of 98.2% (548/558 challenges; 95% confidence interval: 96.7–99.1%) and an analytic specificity of 96.5% (675/682; 95% confidence interval: 97.9–99.5%). Overall, 25/28 participants correctly identified CYP2D6*10 status in 10 samples; however, two laboratories made serious genotyping errors. Most of the essential information was included in the 20 submitted CYP2D6*10 test reports. The majority of Chinese laboratories are reliable for detecting the CYP2D6*10 variant; however, several issues revealed in this study underline the importance of PT schemes in continued external assessment and provision of guidelines. PMID:27603206

  9. The role of apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype in early mild cognitive impairment (E-MCI)

    PubMed Central

    Risacher, Shannon L.; Kim, Sungeun; Shen, Li; Nho, Kwangsik; Foroud, Tatiana; Green, Robert C.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Jack, Clifford R.; Aisen, Paul S.; Koeppe, Robert A.; Jagust, William J.; Shaw, Leslie M.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Weiner, Michael W.; Saykin, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Our goal was to evaluate the association of APOE with amyloid deposition, cerebrospinal fluid levels (CSF) of Aβ, tau, and p-tau, brain atrophy, cognition and cognitive complaints in E-MCI patients and cognitively healthy older adults (HC) in the ADNI-2 cohort. Methods: Two-hundred and nine E-MCI and 123 HC participants from the ADNI-2 cohort were included. We evaluated the impact of diagnostic status (E-MCI vs. HC) and APOE ε4 status (ε4 positive vs. ε4 negative) on cortical amyloid deposition (AV-45/Florbetapir SUVR PET scans), brain atrophy (structural MRI scans processed using voxel-based morphometry and Freesurfer version 5.1), CSF levels of Aβ, tau, and p-tau, and cognitive performance and complaints. Results: E-MCI participants showed significantly impaired cognition, higher levels of cognitive complaints, greater levels of tau and p-tau, and subcortical and cortical atrophy relative to HC participants (p < 0.05). Cortical amyloid deposition and CSF levels of Aβ were significantly associated with APOE ε4 status but not E-MCI diagnosis, with ε4 positive participants showing more amyloid deposition and lower levels of CSF Aβ than ε4 negative participants. Other effects of APOE ε4 status on cognition and CSF tau levels were also observed. Conclusions: APOE ε4 status is associated with amyloid accumulation and lower CSF Aβ, as well as increased CSF tau levels in early prodromal stages of AD (E-MCI) and HC. Alternatively, neurodegeneration, cognitive impairment, and increased complaints are primarily associated with a diagnosis of E-MCI. These findings underscore the importance of considering APOE genotype when evaluating biomarkers in early stages of disease. PMID:23554593

  10. Role of Helicobacter pylori cagA EPIYA motif and vacA genotypes for the development of gastrointestinal diseases in Southeast Asian countries: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Infection with cagA-positive, cagA EPIYA motif ABD type, and vacA s1, m1, and i1 genotype strains of Helicobacter pylori is associated with an exacerbated inflammatory response and increased risk of gastroduodenal diseases. However, it is unclear whether the prevalence and virulence factor genotypes found in Southeast Asia are similar to those in Western countries. Here, we examined the cagA status and prevalence of cagA EPIYA motifs and vacA genotypes among H. pylori strains found in Southeast Asia and examined their association with gastroduodenal disease. Methods To determine the cagA status, cagA EPIYA motifs, and vacA genotypes of H. pylori, we conducted meta-analyses of 13 previous reports for 1,281 H. pylori strains detected from several Southeast Asian countries. Results The respective frequencies of cagA-positive and vacA s1, m1, and i1 genotypes among examined subjects were 93% (1,056/1,133), 98% (1,010/1,033), 58% (581/1,009), and 96% (248/259), respectively. Stratification showed significant variation in the frequencies of cagA status and vacA genotypes among countries and the individual races residing within each respective country. The frequency of the vacA m-region genotype in patients infected with East Asian-type strains differed significantly between the northern and southern areas of Vietnam (p < 0.001). Infection with vacA m1 type or cagA-positive strains was associated with an increased risk of peptic ulcer disease (odds ratio: 1.46, 95%CI: 1.01-2.12, p = 0.046 and 2.83, 1.50-5.34, p = 0.001, respectively) in the examined Southeast Asian populations. Conclusions Both Western- and East Asian-type strains of H. pylori are found in Southeast Asia and are predominantly cagA-positive and vacA s1 type. In Southeast Asia, patients infected with vacA m1 type or cagA-positive strains have an increased risk of peptic ulcer disease. Thus, testing for this genotype and the presence of cagA may have clinical usefulness. PMID

  11. Differential Associations between CDH13 Genotypes, Adiponectin Levels, and Circulating Levels of Cellular Adhesive Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Ming-Sheng; Wu, Semon; Hsu, Lung-An; Chou, Hsin-Hua; Ko, Yu-Lin

    2015-01-01

    CDH13 gene variants with lower adiponectin levels are paradoxically associated with a more favorable metabolic profile. We investigated the statistical association between CDH13 locus variants and adiponectin levels by examining 12 circulating inflammation marker levels and adiposity status in 530 Han Chinese people in Taiwan. After adjustments for clinical covariates, adiponectin levels were positively associated with soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM1) levels and negatively associated with adiposity status and levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), soluble E-selectin (sE-selectin), and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM1). In addition, minor alleles of the CDH13 rs12051272 polymorphism were found to have lower adiponectin levels and higher CRP, sE-selectin, sICAM1, and sVCAM1 levels as well as higher body mass indices and waist circumferences in participants (all P < 0.05). In a subgroup analysis stratified by sex, significant associations between CDH13 genotypes and sE-selectin levels occurred only in men (P = 3.9 × 10−4 and interaction P = 0.005). CDH13 locus variants and adiponectin levels are associated with circulating levels of cellular adhesion molecules and adiposity status in a differential manner that interacts with sex. These results provide further evidence for the crucial role of adiponectin levels and CDH13 gene variants in immune-mediated and inflammatory diseases. PMID:26600672

  12. Effects on sister chromatid exchange frequency of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 genotype and smoking in vinyl chloride workers.

    PubMed

    Wong, R H; Wang, J D; Hsieh, L L; Du, C L; Cheng, T J

    1998-12-01

    Vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) is a human carcinogen. However, the exact mechanism of carcinogenesis remains unclear. VCM may be metabolized by cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1), aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) and glutathione S-transferases (GSTs). Thus workers with inherited variant metabolic enzyme activities may have an altered risk of genotoxicity. This study was designed to investigate which risk factors might affect sister chromatid exchange (SCE) frequency in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) workers. Study subjects were 44 male workers from three PVC factories. Questionnaires were administered to obtain detailed histories of cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, occupations, and medications. SCE frequency in peripheral lymphocytes was determined using a standardized method, and CYP2E1, GSTM1, GSTT1 and ALDH2 genotypes were identified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Analysis revealed that smoking status and exposure to VCM were significantly associated with increased SCE frequency. The presence of ALDH2 1-2/2-2 genotypes was also significantly associated with an elevation of SCE frequency (9. 5 vs. 8.1, p<0.01). However, CYP2E1, GSTM1 or GSTT1 genotypes were not significantly associated with SCE frequency. When various genotypes were considered together, combination of CYP2E1 c1c2/c2c2 with ALDH2 1-2/2-2 showed an additive effect on SCE frequency. Similar results were also found for the combination of smoking with CYP2E1, or smoking with ALDH2. These results suggest that VCM workers with ALDH2 1-2/2-2 genotypes, who also smoke, may have increased risk of DNA damage.

  13. Comprehensive CYP2D6 genotype and adherence affect outcome in breast cancer patients treated with tamoxifen monotherapy.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Alastair M; Johnson, Andrea; Quinlan, Philip; Hillman, Grantland; Fontecha, Marcel; Bray, Susan E; Purdie, Colin A; Jordan, Lee B; Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Latif, Ayshe; Hadfield, Kirsten D; Clarke, Robert B; Ashcroft, Linda; Evans, D Gareth; Howell, Anthony; Nikoloff, Michele; Lawrence, Jeffrey; Newman, William G

    2011-01-01

    The association between CYP2D6 genotype and outcome in breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant tamoxifen remains controversial. We assessed the influence of comprehensive versus limited CYP2D6 genotype in the context of tamoxifen adherence and co-medication in a large cohort of 618 patients. Genotyping of 33 CYP2D6 alleles used two archival cohorts from tamoxifen-treated women with invasive breast cancer (Dundee, n = 391; Manchester, n = 227). Estimates for recurrence-free survival (RFS) were calculated based on inferred CYP2D6 phenotypes using Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazard models, adjusted for nodal status and tumour size. Patients with at least one reduced function CYP2D6 allele (60%) or no functional alleles (6%) had a non-significant trend for worse RFS: hazard ratio (HR) 1.52 (CI 0.98-2.36, P = 0.06). For post-menopausal women on tamoxifen monotherapy, the HR for recurrence in patients with reduced functional alleles was 1.96 (CI 1.05-3.66, P = 0.036). However, RFS analysis limited to four common CYP2D6 allelic variants was no longer significant (P = 0.39). The effect of CYP2D6 genotype was increased by adjusting for adherence to tamoxifen therapy, but not significantly changed when adjusted for co-administration of potent inhibitors of CYP2D6. Comprehensive genotyping of CYP2D6 and adherence to tamoxifen therapy may be useful to identify breast cancer patients most likely to benefit from adjuvant tamoxifen.

  14. HPV genotypes distribution in Chlamydia trachomatis co-infection in a large cohort of women from north-east Italy.

    PubMed

    Seraceni, Silva; Campisciano, Giuseppina; Contini, Carlo; Comar, Manola

    2016-05-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) and Chlamydia trachomatis are pathogens with oncogenic potential associated with persistent infections. Epidemiological data on C. trachomatis infection status, C. trachomatis/HPV co-infection and the relationship between HPV genotypes in Italian women are only preliminary. The aim of the present study was to characterize the relationship between HPV genotypes and C. trachomatis in an extending cohort of asymptomatic immunocompetent women from an area of north-east Italy. A retrospective study was conducted using Luminex technology on cervical swabs from asymptomatic immunocompetent women, comprising 921 attending the prevention centre for the Cervical Cancer Program and 6214 who had been referred to the Sexually Transmitted Infections Center, with clinical indications of HPV and C. trachomatis infections. A quantitative real-time PCR was performed to assess chronic C. trachomatis infection by heat-shock protein 60 (Hsp60) gene expression. The overall prevalence of the investigated pathogens was 39 % (359/921) for HPV and 4 % (251/6214) for C. trachomatis. The Hsp60 gene was detected in 57 % of the women infected with C. trachomatis. HPV co-infection was present in 58 % of C. trachomatis-infected women. A high prevalence of co-infection was found in women with chronic C. trachomatis infection (68 %, P = 0.0002), especially in women ≤ 25 years (72 %) where HPV multiple infections were found in 78 % (P = 0.022). HPV genotype distribution showed that uncommon low-risk genotypes were associated with C. trachomatis. These results indicate a high frequency of co-detection of multiple HPV genotypes in chronically infected young women and suggest that the expression of the C. trachomatis Hsp60 gene may favour HPV infection. PMID:26944507

  15. Global proficiency study of human papillomavirus genotyping.

    PubMed

    Eklund, Carina; Zhou, Tiequn; Dillner, Joakim

    2010-11-01

    Internationally comparable quality assurance of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) DNA detection and typing methods is essential for evaluation of HPV vaccines and effective monitoring and implementation of HPV vaccination programs. Therefore, the World Health Organization (WHO) HPV Laboratory Network (LabNet) designed an international proficiency study. Following announcement at the WHO website, the responding laboratories performed HPV typing using one or more of their usual assays on 43 coded samples composed of titration series of purified plasmids of 16 HPV types (HPV6, -11, -16, -18, -31, -33, -35, -39, -45, -51, -52, -56, -58, -59, -66, and -68). Detection of at least 50 IU of HPV16 or HPV18 DNA and of 500 genome equivalents (GE) of the other 14 HPV types (in samples with single and multiple HPV types) was considered proficient. Fifty-four laboratories worldwide submitted a total of 84 data sets. More than 21 HPV-genotyping assays were used. Commonly used methods were Linear Array, Lineblot, InnoLiPa, Clinical Array, type-specific real-time PCR, PCR-Luminex and microarray assays. The major oncogenic HPV types (HPV16 and -18) were detected in 89.7% (70/78) and 92.2% (71/77) of the data sets, respectively. HPV types 56, 59, and 68 were the least commonly detected types (in less than 80% of the data sets). Twenty-eight data sets reported multiple false-positive results and were considered nonproficient. In conclusion, we found that international proficiency studies, traceable to international standards, allow standardized quality assurance for different HPV-typing assays and enable the comparison of data generated from different laboratories worldwide.

  16. Connecting functional and statistical definitions of genotype by genotype interactions in coevolutionary studies

    PubMed Central

    Heath, Katy D.; Nuismer, Scott L.

    2014-01-01

    Predicting how species interactions evolve requires that we understand the mechanistic basis of coevolution, and thus the functional genotype-by-genotype interactions (G × G) that drive reciprocal natural selection. Theory on host-parasite coevolution provides testable hypotheses for empiricists, but depends upon models of functional G × G that remain loosely tethered to the molecular details of any particular system. In practice, reciprocal cross-infection studies are often used to partition the variation in infection or fitness in a population that is attributable to G × G (statistical G × G). Here we use simulations to demonstrate that within-population statistical G × G likely tells us little about the existence of coevolution, its strength, or the genetic basis of functional G × G. Combined with studies of multiple populations or points in time, mapping and molecular techniques can bridge the gap between natural variation and mechanistic models of coevolution, while model-based statistics can formally confront coevolutionary models with cross-infection data. Together these approaches provide a robust framework for inferring the infection genetics underlying statistical G × G, helping unravel the genetic basis of coevolution. PMID:24782890

  17. Hepatitis E Virus Genotype 3 in Sewage and Genotype 1 in Acute Hepatitis Cases, Israel.

    PubMed

    Ram, Daniela; Manor, Yossi; Gozlan, Yael; Schwartz, Eli; Ben-Ari, Ziv; Mendelson, Ella; Mor, Orna

    2016-07-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is an emerging infectious agent in developed countries. HEV genotypes 1 (G1) and 3 (G3) have been identified in environmental and clinical samples in Europe. In Israel, the overall prevalence of anti-HEV IgG antibodies was found to be 10.6%; however, reports of HEV infection are scarce. In this study, the presence of HEV in Israel was investigated using 169 sewage samples from 32 treatment facilities and 49 samples from acute hepatitis patients, all collected between 2013 and 2015. Fourteen sewage samples, from Haifa (11/18 samples), Tel Aviv (2/29 samples), and Beer Sheva (1/17 samples), regions with good sanitary conditions and middle-high socioeconomic populations, were HEV positive. Among the patient samples, 6.1% (3/49) were HEV positive, all returning travelers from India. Genotype analysis revealed G1 HEV in patients and G3 HEV sequences in sewage. Evidence that HEV could be establishing itself in our region may justify more active surveillance to monitor its spread. PMID:27246446

  18. Hepatitis E Virus Genotype 3 in Wild Rats, United States

    PubMed Central

    Volk, Kylie; Van Den Bussche, Ronald A.

    2012-01-01

    The role of rodents in the epidemiology of zoonotic hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection has been a subject of considerable debate. Seroprevalence studies suggest widespread HEV infection in commensal Rattus spp. rats, but experimental transmission has been largely unsuccessful and recovery of zoonotic genotype 3 HEV RNA from wild Rattus spp. rats has never been confirmed. We surveyed R. rattus and R. norvegicus rats from across the United States and several international populations by using a hemi-nested reverse transcription PCR approach. We isolated HEV RNA in liver tissues from 35 of 446 rats examined. All but 1 of these isolates was relegated to the zoonotic HEV genotype 3, and the remaining sequence represented the recently discovered rat genotype from the United States and Germany. HEV-positive rats were detected in urban and remote localities. Genetic analyses suggest all HEV genotype 3 isolates obtained from wild Rattus spp. rats were closely related. PMID:22840202

  19. Special features of RAD Sequencing data: implications for genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Davey, John W; Cezard, Timothée; Fuentes-Utrilla, Pablo; Eland, Cathlene; Gharbi, Karim; Blaxter, Mark L

    2013-01-01

    Restriction site-associated DNA Sequencing (RAD-Seq) is an economical and efficient method for SNP discovery and genotyping. As with other sequencing-by-synthesis methods, RAD-Seq produces stochastic count data and requires sensitive analysis to develop or genotype markers accurately. We show that there are several sources of bias specific to RAD-Seq that are not explicitly addressed by current genotyping tools, namely restriction fragment bias, restriction site heterozygosity and PCR GC content bias. We explore the performance of existing analysis tools given these biases and discuss approaches to limiting or handling biases in RAD-Seq data. While these biases need to be taken seriously, we believe RAD loci affected by them can be excluded or processed with relative ease in most cases and that most RAD loci will be accurately genotyped by existing tools. PMID:23110438

  20. Genotypes are useful for more than genomic evaluation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New services that provide pedigree discovery, breed composition, mating programs, genomic inbreeding, fertility defects, and inheritance tracking all are possible from low cost genotyping, in addition to genomic evaluation. Genetic markers let breeders select among sibs before their phenotypes becam...

  1. Genotypic variation in fatty acid content of blackcurrant seeds.

    PubMed

    Ruiz del Castillo, M L; Dobson, G; Brennan, R; Gordon, S

    2002-01-16

    The fatty acid composition and total fatty acid content of seeds from 36 blackcurrant genotypes developed at the Scottish Crop Research Institute were examined. A rapid small-scale procedure, involving homogenization of seeds in toluene followed by sodium methoxide transesterification and gas chromatography, was used. There was considerable variation between genotypes. The gamma-linolenic acid content generally varied from 11 to 19% of the total fatty acids, but three genotypes had higher values of 22-24%, levels previously not reported for blackcurrant seed and similar to those for borage seed. Other nutritionally important fatty acids, stearidonic acid and alpha-linolenic acid, varied from 2 to 4% and 10-19%, respectively. The mean total fatty acid contents ranged from 14 to 23% of the seed, but repeatability was poor. The results are discussed. Blackcurrant seeds are mainly byproducts from juice production, and the study shows the potential for developing blackcurrant genotypes with optimal added value. PMID:11782203

  2. Superoxide Dismutase and Catalase Genotypes in Pediatric Migraine Patients.

    PubMed

    Saygi, Semra; Erol, İlknur; Alehan, Füsun; Yalçın, Yaprak Yılmaz; Kubat, Gözde; Ataç, Fatma Belgin

    2015-10-01

    This study compared superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) alleles in 97 consecutive children and adolescents with migraine to 96 healthy children and adolescents. Isolated genomic DNA was used as a template for SOD1 (35 A/C), SOD2 16 C/T, and CAT2 [(-262 C/T) and (-21 A/T)] allele genotyping. The SOD2 16 C/T genotype and C allele frequency differed significantly between controls and migraine (P = .047; P = .038). CAT -21 AA genotype and A allele frequency were significantly higher in both migraine with aura patients (P = .013; P = .004) and migraine without aura patients (P = .003; P = .001) compared to controls. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of differences in SOD and CAT genotypes between pediatric migraine patients and age-matched controls. Further studies on the functional implications of these genetic variants on neural antioxidant capacity and the use of antioxidant modulators for migraine treatment are warranted.

  3. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry-based SNP genotyping.

    PubMed

    Pusch, Wolfgang; Wurmbach, Jan-Henner; Thiele, Herbert; Kostrzewa, Markus

    2002-07-01

    In recent years a growing demand for simple and robust SNP genotyping platforms has arisen from the widespread use of SNPs in industrial and public research. The resulting knowledge about genotype/phenotype correlations is of special interest for the identification of potential new drug targets and in the field of pharmacogenomics. However, full exploitation of the available genomic information requires vast numbers of SNP analyses, as large cohorts of patients have to be screened for a large number of markers. Only very few of the current SNP genotyping techniques can cope with the resulting demands concerning sample throughput, automation, accuracy and cost-effectiveness. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry has the potential to develop into a 'Gold Standard' for high-throughput SNP genotyping - if it has not already done so. This review will focus on the latest developments of this technology.

  4. Special features of RAD Sequencing data: implications for genotyping.

    PubMed

    Davey, John W; Cezard, Timothée; Fuentes-Utrilla, Pablo; Eland, Cathlene; Gharbi, Karim; Blaxter, Mark L

    2013-06-01

    Restriction site-associated DNA Sequencing (RAD-Seq) is an economical and efficient method for SNP discovery and genotyping. As with other sequencing-by-synthesis methods, RAD-Seq produces stochastic count data and requires sensitive analysis to develop or genotype markers accurately. We show that there are several sources of bias specific to RAD-Seq that are not explicitly addressed by current genotyping tools, namely restriction fragment bias, restriction site heterozygosity and PCR GC content bias. We explore the performance of existing analysis tools given these biases and discuss approaches to limiting or handling biases in RAD-Seq data. While these biases need to be taken seriously, we believe RAD loci affected by them can be excluded or processed with relative ease in most cases and that most RAD loci will be accurately genotyped by existing tools.

  5. Norovirus Genotype Profiles Associated with Foodborne Transmission, 1999�?"2012

    PubMed Central

    Hewitt, Joanne; Barclay, Leslie; Ahmed, Sharia; Lake, Rob; Hall, Aron J.; Lopman, Ben; Kroneman, Annelies; Vennema, Harry; VinjA(c), Jan; Koopmans, Marion

    2015-01-01

    Worldwide, noroviruses are a leading cause of gastroenteritis. They can be transmitted from person to person directly or indirectly through contaminated food, water, or environments. To estimate the proportion of foodborne infections caused by noroviruses on a global scale, we used norovirus transmission and genotyping information from multiple international outbreak surveillance systems (Noronet, CaliciNet, EpiSurv) and from a systematic review of peer-reviewed literature. The proportion of outbreaks caused by food was determined by genotype and/or genogroup. Analysis resulted in the following final global profiles: foodborne transmission is attributed to 10% (range 9%%�?"11%) of all genotype GII.4 outbreaks, 27% (25%�?"30%) of outbreaks caused by all other single genotypes, and 37% (24%%�?"52%) of outbreaks caused by mixtures of GII.4 and other noroviruses. When these profiles are applied to global outbreak surveillance data, results indicate that �%^14% of all norovirus outbreaks are attributed to food. PMID:25811368

  6. Hepatitis E virus genotype 3 in wild rats, United States.

    PubMed

    Lack, Justin B; Volk, Kylie; Van Den Bussche, Ronald A

    2012-08-01

    The role of rodents in the epidemiology of zoonotic hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection has been a subject of considerable debate. Seroprevalence studies suggest widespread HEV infection in commensal Rattus spp. rats, but experimental transmission has been largely unsuccessful and recovery of zoonotic genotype 3 HEV RNA from wild Rattus spp. rats has never been confirmed. We surveyed R. rattus and R. norvegicus rats from across the United States and several international populations by using a hemi-nested reverse transcription PCR approach. We isolated HEV RNA in liver tissues from 35 of 446 rats examined. All but 1 of these isolates was relegated to the zoonotic HEV genotype 3, and the remaining sequence represented the recently discovered rat genotype from the United States and Germany. HEV-positive rats were detected in urban and remote localities. Genetic analyses suggest all HEV genotype 3 isolates obtained from wild Rattus spp. rats were closely related. PMID:22840202

  7. Genotyping of colorectal cancer for cancer precision medicine: Results from the IPH Center for Molecular Pathology.

    PubMed

    Jesinghaus, Moritz; Pfarr, Nicole; Endris, Volker; Kloor, Matthias; Volckmar, Anna-Lena; Brandt, Regine; Herpel, Esther; Muckenhuber, Alexander; Lasitschka, Felix; Schirmacher, Peter; Penzel, Roland; Weichert, Wilko; Stenzinger, Albrecht

    2016-06-01

    Cancer precision medicine has opened up new avenues for the treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC). To fully realize its potential, high-throughput sequencing platforms that allow genotyping beyond KRAS need to be implemented and require performance assessment. We comprehensively analyzed first-year data of 202 consecutive formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) CRC samples for which prospective genotyping at our institution was requested. Deep targeted genotyping was done using a semiconductor-based sequencing platform and a self-designed panel of 30 CRC-related genes. Additionally, microsatellite status (MS) was determined. Ninety-seven percent of tumor samples were suitable for sequencing and in 88% MS could be assessed. The minimal drop-out rates of 6 and 25 cases, respectively were due to too low amounts or heavy degradation of DNA. Of 557 nonsynonymous mutations, 90 (16%) have not been described in COSMIC at the time of data query. Forty-three cases (22%) had double- or triple mutations affecting a single gene. Sixty-four percent had genetic alterations influencing oncological therapy. Eight percent of patients (MSI phenotype: 6%; mutated POLE: 2%) were potentially eligible for treatment with immune checkpoint inhibitors. Of 56% of KRASwt CRC that potentially qualified for anti-EGFR treatment, 30% presented with mutations in BRAF/NRAS. Mutated PIK3CA was detected in 21%. In conclusion, we here present real-life routine diagnostics data that not only demonstrate the robustness and feasibility of deep targeted sequencing and MS-analysis of FFPE CRC samples but also contribute to the understanding of CRC genetics. Most importantly, in more than half of the patients our approach enabled the selection of the best treatment currently available. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26917275

  8. Methods to Increase the Sensitivity of High Resolution Melting Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Genotyping in Malaria.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Rachel; Hamilton, Elizabeth J; Durfee, Katelyn; Ndiaye, Daouda; Wirth, Dyann F; Hartl, Daniel L; Volkman, Sarah K

    2015-01-01

    Despite decades of eradication efforts, malaria remains a global burden. Recent renewed interest in regional elimination and global eradication has been accompanied by increased genomic information about Plasmodium parasite species responsible for malaria, including characteristics of geographical populations as well as variations associated with reduced susceptibility to anti-malarial drugs. One common genetic variation, single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), offers attractive targets for parasite genotyping. These markers are useful not only for tracking drug resistance markers but also for tracking parasite populations using markers not under drug or other selective pressures. SNP genotyping methods offer the ability to track drug resistance as well as to fingerprint individual parasites for population surveillance, particularly in response to malaria control efforts in regions nearing elimination status. While informative SNPs have been identified that are agnostic to specific genotyping technologies, high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis is particularly suited to field-based studies. Compared to standard fluorescent-probe based methods that require individual SNPs in a single labeled probe and offer at best 10% sensitivity to detect SNPs in samples that contain multiple genomes (polygenomic), HRM offers 2-5% sensitivity. Modifications to HRM, such as blocked probes and asymmetric primer concentrations as well as optimization of amplification annealing temperatures to bias PCR towards amplification of the minor allele, further increase the sensitivity of HRM. While the sensitivity improvement depends on the specific assay, we have increased detection sensitivities to less than 1% of the minor allele. In regions approaching malaria eradication, early detection of emerging or imported drug resistance is essential for prompt response. Similarly, the ability to detect polygenomic infections and differentiate imported parasite types from cryptic local reservoirs

  9. Methods to Increase the Sensitivity of High Resolution Melting Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Genotyping in Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Rachel; Hamilton, Elizabeth J.; Durfee, Katelyn; Ndiaye, Daouda; Wirth, Dyann F.; Hartl, Daniel L.; Volkman, Sarah K.

    2015-01-01

    Despite decades of eradication efforts, malaria remains a global burden. Recent renewed interest in regional elimination and global eradication has been accompanied by increased genomic information about Plasmodium parasite species responsible for malaria, including characteristics of geographical populations as well as variations associated with reduced susceptibility to anti-malarial drugs. One common genetic variation, single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), offers attractive targets for parasite genotyping. These markers are useful not only for tracking drug resistance markers but also for tracking parasite populations using markers not under drug or other selective pressures. SNP genotyping methods offer the ability to track drug resistance as well as to fingerprint individual parasites for population surveillance, particularly in response to malaria control efforts in regions nearing elimination status. While informative SNPs have been identified that are agnostic to specific genotyping technologies, high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis is particularly suited to field-based studies. Compared to standard fluorescent-probe based methods that require individual SNPs in a single labeled probe and offer at best 10% sensitivity to detect SNPs in samples that contain multiple genomes (polygenomic), HRM offers 2-5% sensitivity. Modifications to HRM, such as blocked probes and asymmetric primer concentrations as well as optimization of amplification annealing temperatures to bias PCR towards amplification of the minor allele, further increase the sensitivity of HRM. While the sensitivity improvement depends on the specific assay, we have increased detection sensitivities to less than 1% of the minor allele. In regions approaching malaria eradication, early detection of emerging or imported drug resistance is essential for prompt response. Similarly, the ability to detect polygenomic infections and differentiate imported parasite types from cryptic local reservoirs

  10. Comparative proteomics lends insight into genotype-specific pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Guarnieri, Michael T

    2013-09-01

    Comparative proteomic analyses have emerged as a powerful tool for the identification of unique biomarkers and mechanisms of pathogenesis. In this issue of Proteomics, Murugaiyan et al. utilize difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE) to examine differential protein expression between nonpathogenic and pathogenic genotypes of Prototheca zopfii, a causative agent in bovine enteritis and mastitis. Their findings provide insights into molecular mechanisms of infection and evolutionary adaptation of pathogenic genotypes, demonstrating the power of comparative proteomic analyses. PMID:23925996

  11. Tissue distribution of Epstein-Barr virus genotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, H L; Lung, M L; Chan, K H; Griffin, B E; Ng, M H

    1996-01-01

    The genome of naturally occurring Epstein-Barr virus contains either two or three copies of a 29-bp tandem repeat sequence in the first intron of the BZLF gene. These genotypes differ markedly in their distribution between blood and epithelial tissues, presumably because they have adapted to separate life cycles in these sites. The genotype prevalent in the blood also appears to be better able to transform B lymphocytes. PMID:8794387

  12. Detection of Mendelian Consistent Genotyping Errors in Pedigrees

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Charles Y. K.; Thompson, Elizabeth A.; Wijsman, Ellen M.

    2014-01-01

    Detection of genotyping errors is a necessary step to minimize false results in genetic analysis. This is especially important when the rate of genotyping errors is high, as has been reported for high-throughput sequence data. To detect genotyping errors in pedigrees, Mendelian inconsistent (MI) error checks exist, as do multi-point methods that flag Mendelian consistent (MC) errors for sparse multi-allelic markers. However, few methods exist for detecting MC genotyping errors, particularly for dense variants on large pedigrees. Here we introduce an efficient method to detect MC errors even for very dense variants (e.g. SNPs and sequencing data) on pedigrees that may be large. Our method first samples inheritance vectors (IVs) using a moderately sparse but informative set of markers using a Markov chain Monte Carlo-based sampler. Using sampled IVs, we considered two test statistics to detect MC genotyping errors: the percentage of IVs inconsistent with observed genotypes (A1) or the posterior probability of error configurations (A2). Using simulations, we show that this method, even with the simpler A1 statistic, is effective for detecting MC genotyping errors in dense variants, with sensitivity almost as high as the theoretical best sensitivity possible. We also evaluate the effectiveness of this method as a function of parameters, when including the observed pattern for genotype, density of framework markers, error rate, allele frequencies, and number of sampled inheritance vectors. Our approach provides a line of defense against false findings based on the use of dense variants in pedigrees. PMID:24718985

  13. CALIPSO Mission Status Update: Payload Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verhappen, Ron; Borchardt, Robert; MacDonnell, David; Cisewski, Mike

    2007-01-01

    The CALIPSO mission payload status update is presented. The contents include: 1) Wide Field Camera Overview; 2) WFC Temperatures; 3) WFC Voltages; 4) Imaging Infrared Radiometer (IIR) Health; 5) IIR Voltages; 6) Payload Control (PLC) Voltages; 7) PLC Temperatures; 8) Low Voltage Power Supply (LVPS) (CALOPS0025N); 9) PLC Radiation Effects; 10) SDS Status (CALOPS0020N); 11) CALIOP LIDAR; 12) Laser Energy Trends; 13) Laser Energy Zoom; 14) Laser Management Approach; 15) Green / Red Ratio; 16) Pedestal @ SHG Temperature Trends; 17) LOM Heater Duty Cycle Trends; 18) LOM Pressure Trends; 19) Boresight Trend; 20) 1064 Dark Noise Trend; 21) 532 SNR Trend; 22) Spike Trends; 23) LIDAR Highlights; 24) Backup Laser Status; and 25) Future Plans.

  14. A New High-Throughput Approach to Genotype Ancient Human Gastrointestinal Parasites.

    PubMed

    Côté, Nathalie M L; Daligault, Julien; Pruvost, Mélanie; Bennett, E Andrew; Gorgé, Olivier; Guimaraes, Silvia; Capelli, Nicolas; Le Bailly, Matthieu; Geigl, Eva-Maria; Grange, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Human gastrointestinal parasites are good indicators for hygienic conditions and health status of past and present individuals and communities. While microscopic analysis of eggs in sediments of archeological sites often allows their taxonomic identification, this method is rarely effective at the species level, and requires both the survival of intact eggs and their proper identification. Genotyping via PCR-based approaches has the potential to achieve a precise species-level taxonomic determination. However, so far it has mostly been applied to individual eggs isolated from archeological samples. To increase the throughput and taxonomic accuracy, as well as reduce costs of genotyping methods, we adapted a PCR-based approach coupled with next-generation sequencing to perform precise taxonomic identification of parasitic helminths directly from archeological sediments. Our study of twenty-five 100 to 7,200 year-old archeological samples proved this to be a powerful, reliable and efficient approach for species determination even in the absence of preserved eggs, either as a stand-alone method or as a complement to microscopic studies.

  15. Phenotypic variability in X-linked ocular albinism: Relationship to linkage genotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Schnur, R.E. |; Wick, P.A.; Bailey, C.; Rebbeck, T.; Weleber, R.G.; Wagstaff, J.; Grix, A.W.; Pagon, R.A.; Hockey, A.; Edwards, M.J.

    1994-09-01

    One hundred nineteen individuals from 11 families with X-linked ocular albinism (OA1) were studied with respect to both their clinical phenotypes and their linkage genotypes. In a four-generation Australian family, two affected males and an obligatory carrier lacked cutaneous melanin macroglobules (MMGs); ocular features were identical to those of Nettleship-Falls OA1. Four other families had more unusual phenotypic features in addition to OA1. All OA1 families were genotyped at DXS16, DXS85, DXS143, STS, and DXS452 and for a CA-repeat polymorphism at the Kallmann syndrome locus (KAL). Separate two-point linkage analyses were performed for the following: group A, six families with biopsy-proved MMGs in at least one affected male; group B, four families whose biopsy status was not known; and group C, OA-9 only (16 samples), the family without MMGs. At the set of loci closest to OA1, there is no clear evidence in our data set for locus heterogeneity between groups A and C or among the four other families with complex phenotypes. Combined multipoint analysis (LINKMAP) in the 11 families and analysis of individual recombination events confirms that the major locus for OA1 resides within the DXS85-DXS143 interval. The authors suggest that more detailed clinical evaluations of OA1 individuals and families should be performed for future correlation with specific mutations in candidate OA1 genes. 29 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Genotypic and phenotypic variation in transmission traits of a complex life cycle parasite

    PubMed Central

    Louhi, Katja-Riikka; Karvonen, Anssi; Rellstab, Christian; Jokela, Jukka

    2013-01-01

    Characterizing genetic variation in parasite transmission traits and its contribution to parasite vigor is essential for understanding the evolution of parasite life-history traits. We measured genetic variation in output, activity, survival, and infection success of clonal transmission stages (cercaria larvae) of a complex life cycle parasite (Diplostomum pseudospathaceum). We further tested if variation in host nutritional stage had an effect on these traits by keeping hosts on limited or ad libitum diet. The traits we measured were highly variable among parasite genotypes indicating significant genetic variation in these life-history traits. Traits were also phenotypically variable, for example, there was significant variation in the measured traits over time within each genotype. However, host nutritional stage had no effect on the parasite traits suggesting that a short-term reduction in host resources was not limiting the cercarial output or performance. Overall, these results suggest significant interclonal and phenotypic variation in parasite transmission traits that are not affected by host nutritional status. PMID:23919156

  17. HIV infection among U.S. Army and Air Force military personnel: sociodemographic and genotyping analysis.

    PubMed

    Singer, Darrell E; Bautista, Christian T; O'Connell, Robert J; Sanders-Buell, Eric; Agan, Brian K; Kijak, Gustavo H; Hakre, Shilpa; Sanchez, Jose L; Sateren, Warren B; McCutchan, Francine E; Michael, Nelson L; Scott, Paul T

    2010-08-01

    Since 1985, the U.S. Department of Defense has periodically screened all military personnel for HIV allowing for the monitoring of the infection in this dynamic cohort population. A nested case-control study was performed to study sociodemographics, overseas assignment, and molecular analysis of HIV. Cases were newly identified HIV infections among U.S. Army and Air Force military personnel from 2000 to 2004. Controls were frequency matched to cases by gender and date of case first positive HIV screening test. Genotyping analysis was performed using high-throughput screening assays and partial genome sequencing. HIV was significantly associated with black race [odds ratio (OR) = 6.65], single marital status (OR = 4.45), and age (OR per year = 1.07). Ninety-seven percent were subtype B and 3% were non-B subtypes (A3, CRF01_AE, A/C recombinant, G, CRF02_AG). Among cases, overseas assignment in the period at risk prior to their first HIV-positive test was associated with non-B HIV subtype infection (OR = 8.44). Black and single military personnel remain disproportionately affected by HIV infection. Most non-B HIV subtypes were associated with overseas assignment. Given the increased frequency and length of assignments, and the expanding HIV genetic diversity observed in this population, there is a need for active HIV genotyping surveillance and a need to reinforce primary HIV prevention efforts.

  18. A New High-Throughput Approach to Genotype Ancient Human Gastrointestinal Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Côté, Nathalie M. L.; Daligault, Julien; Pruvost, Mélanie; Bennett, E. Andrew; Gorgé, Olivier; Guimaraes, Silvia; Capelli, Nicolas; Le Bailly, Matthieu; Geigl, Eva-Maria; Grange, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Human gastrointestinal parasites are good indicators for hygienic conditions and health status of past and present individuals and communities. While microscopic analysis of eggs in sediments of archeological sites often allows their taxonomic identification, this method is rarely effective at the species level, and requires both the survival of intact eggs and their proper identification. Genotyping via PCR-based approaches has the potential to achieve a precise species-level taxonomic determination. However, so far it has mostly been applied to individual eggs isolated from archeological samples. To increase the throughput and taxonomic accuracy, as well as reduce costs of genotyping methods, we adapted a PCR-based approach coupled with next-generation sequencing to perform precise taxonomic identification of parasitic helminths directly from archeological sediments. Our study of twenty-five 100 to 7,200 year-old archeological samples proved this to be a powerful, reliable and efficient approach for species determination even in the absence of preserved eggs, either as a stand-alone method or as a complement to microscopic studies. PMID:26752051

  19. Advanced onset of puberty after metformin therapy in swine with thrifty genotype.

    PubMed

    Astiz, S; Gonzalez-Bulnes, A; Astiz, I; Barbero, A; Perez-Solana, M L; Garcia-Real, I

    2014-09-01

    The prevention and treatment of obesity in children is based on adequate nutrition and exercise plus antihyperglycaemic drugs. Currently, the incidence of childhood obesity is aggravated in ethnicities with thrifty genotype, but there is no available information on the effects of metformin therapy. The relative effects of lifestyle and metformin on patterns of growth, fattening, metabolic status and attainment of puberty were assessed in females of an obese swine model (Iberian gilts), allocated to three experimental groups (group A, obesogenic diet and scarce exercise; group DE, adequate diet and opportunity for exercise; and group DEM, adequate diet and opportunity for exercise plus metformin). Group A evidenced high weight, corpulence and adiposity, high plasma triglycerides and impairments of glucose regulation predisposing to insulin resistance. These features were favourably modulated by adequate lifestyle (group DE), and these effects were strengthened by metformin treatment (group DEM), which induced an improvement in body development by favouring muscle deposition. However, contrary to expectations, metformin advanced the onset of puberty. Metformin treatments would have positive effects on growth patterns, adiposity and metabolic features of young females from ethnicities with thrifty genotype or developing leptin resistance, but a negative effect by advancing the attainment of puberty. This study provides a warning regarding the use of metformin, without further studies, in girls from these ethnicities.

  20. Apolipoprotein E genotype predicts 24-month bayley scales infant development score.

    PubMed

    Wright, Robert O; Hu, Howard; Silverman, Edwin K; Tsaih, Shirng W; Schwartz, Joel; Bellinger, David; Palazuelos, Eduardo; Weiss, Scott T; Hernandez-Avila, Mauricio

    2003-12-01

    Apolipoprotein E (APOE) regulates cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism, and may mediate synaptogenesis during neurodevelopment. To our knowledge, the effects of APOE4 isoforms on infant development have not been studied. This study was nested within a cohort of mother-infant pairs living in and around Mexico City. A multiple linear regression model was constructed using the 24-mo Mental Development Index (MDI) of the Bayley Scale as the primary outcome and infant APOE genotype as the primary risk factor of interest. Regression models stratified on APOE genotype were constructed to explore effect modification. Of 311 subjects, 53 (17%) carried at least one copy of the APOE4 allele. Mean (SD) MDI scores among carriers with at least one copy of APOE4 were 94.1 (14.3) and among E3/E2 carriers were 91.2 (14.0). After adjustment for covariates, APOE4 carrier status was associated with a 4.4 point (95% confidence interval: 0.1-8.7; p = 0.04) higher 24-mo MDI. In the stratified regression models, the negative effects for umbilical cord blood lead level on 24-mo MDI score was approximately 4-fold greater among APOE3/APOE2 carriers than among APOE4 carriers. These results suggest that subjects with the E4 isoform of APOE may have advantages over those with the E2 or E3 isoforms with respect to early life neuronal/brain development.

  1. Spatial analysis to support geographic targeting of genotypes to environments

    PubMed Central

    Hyman, Glenn; Hodson, Dave; Jones, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Crop improvement efforts have benefited greatly from advances in available data, computing technology, and methods for targeting genotypes to environments. These advances support the analysis of genotype by environment interactions (GEI) to understand how well a genotype adapts to environmental conditions. This paper reviews the use of spatial analysis to support crop improvement research aimed at matching genotypes to their most appropriate environmental niches. Better data sets are now available on soils, weather and climate, elevation, vegetation, crop distribution, and local conditions where genotypes are tested in experimental trial sites. The improved data are now combined with spatial analysis methods to compare environmental conditions across sites, create agro-ecological region maps, and assess environment change. Climate, elevation, and vegetation data sets are now widely available, supporting analyses that were much more difficult even 5 or 10 years ago. While detailed soil data for many parts of the world remains difficult to acquire for crop improvement studies, new advances in digital soil mapping are likely to improve our capacity. Site analysis and matching and regional targeting methods have advanced in parallel to data and technology improvements. All these developments have increased our capacity to link genotype to phenotype and point to a vast potential to improve crop adaptation efforts. PMID:23515351

  2. High-throughput variation detection and genotyping using microarrays.

    PubMed

    Cutler, D J; Zwick, M E; Carrasquillo, M M; Yohn, C T; Tobin, K P; Kashuk, C; Mathews, D J; Shah, N A; Eichler, E E; Warrington, J A; Chakravarti, A

    2001-11-01

    The genetic dissection of complex traits may ultimately require a large number of SNPs to be genotyped in multiple individuals who exhibit phenotypic variation in a trait of interest. Microarray technology can enable rapid genotyping of variation specific to study samples. To facilitate their use, we have developed an automated statistical method (ABACUS) to analyze microarray hybridization data and applied this method to Affymetrix Variation Detection Arrays (VDAs). ABACUS provides a quality score to individual genotypes, allowing investigators to focus their attention on sites that give accurate information. We have applied ABACUS to an experiment encompassing 32 autosomal and eight X-linked genomic regions, each consisting of approximately 50 kb of unique sequence spanning a 100-kb region, in 40 humans. At sufficiently high-quality scores, we are able to read approximately 80% of all sites. To assess the accuracy of SNP detection, 108 of 108 SNPs have been experimentally confirmed; an additional 371 SNPs have been confirmed electronically. To access the accuracy of diploid genotypes at segregating autosomal sites, we confirmed 1515 of 1515 homozygous calls, and 420 of 423 (99.29%) heterozygotes. In replicate experiments, consisting of independent amplification of identical samples followed by hybridization to distinct microarrays of the same design, genotyping is highly repeatable. In an autosomal replicate experiment, 813,295 of 813,295 genotypes are called identically (including 351 heterozygotes); at an X-linked locus in males (haploid), 841,236 of 841,236 sites are called identically.

  3. Genotype × age interaction in human transcriptional ageing

    PubMed Central

    Kent, Jack W.; Göring, Harald H. H.; Charlesworth, Jac C.; Drigalenko, Eugene; Diego, Vincent P.; Curran, Joanne E.; Johnson, Matthew P.; Dyer, Thomas D.; Cole, Shelley A.; Jowett, Jeremy B. M.; Mahaney, Michael C.; Comuzzie, Anthony G.; Almasy, Laura; Moses, Eric K.; Blangero, John; Williams-Blangero, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Individual differences in biological ageing (i.e., the rate of physiological response to the passage of time) may be due in part to genotype-specific variation in gene action. However, the sources of heritable variation in human age-related gene expression profiles are largely unknown. We have profiled genome-wide expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 1,240 individuals in large families and found 4,472 human autosomal transcripts, representing ~4,349 genes, significantly correlated with age. We identified 623 transcripts that show genotype by age interaction in addition to a main effect of age, defining a large set of novel candidates for characterization of the mechanisms of differential biological ageing. We applied a novel SNP genotype×age interaction test to one of these candidates, the ubiquilin-like gene UBQLNL, and found evidence of joint cis-association and genotype by age interaction as well as trans-genotype by age interaction for UBQLNL expression. Both UBQLNL expression levels at recruitment and cis genotype are associated with longitudinal cancer risk in our study cohort. PMID:22871458

  4. Omeprazole-induced acute interstitial nephritis is not related to CYP2C19 genotype or CYP2C19 phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Helsby, Nuala A; Lo, Wing-Yee; Simpson, Ian J; Voss, David M; Logan, Kaye E; Searle, Martin; Schollum, John B W; de Zoysa, Janak R

    2010-01-01

    AIM Omeprazole-induced acute interstitial nephritis (OIAIN) is a rare adverse event. It is unknown if this is an idiosyncratic immune mediated reaction or if it relates to direct drug toxicity. Individuals who are homozygous for the variant alleles of CYP2C19 are poor metabolizers of omeprazole and have a greater exposure to the drug. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of the CYP2C19 poor metabolizer genotype and phenotype in patients with OIAIN. METHODS Twenty patients were genotyped for the CYP2C19 variant alleles (*2, 681G>A and *3, 636G>A) by RFLP-PCR analysis and eighteen phenotyped for CYP2C19 metabolizer status. RESULTS The frequency of the CYP2C19*2 allelic variant was 12.5%, no *3 allelic variants were detected and no patient was a homozygous variant genotype. This was not different from the expected frequency. 33% of subjects were phenotypically CYP2C19 poor metabolizers. CONCLUSIONS There was discordance between CYP2C19 genotype and phenotype. However, up to 45% of healthy elderly subjects have a poor metabolizer phenotype. Thus neither CYP2C19 poor metabolizer genotype nor phenotype is a risk factor for OIAIN. PMID:20573087

  5. Effects of Hybrid and Non-hybrid Epichloë Endophytes and Their Associated Host Genotypes on the Response of a Native Grass to Varying Environments.

    PubMed

    Jia, Tong; Oberhofer, Martina; Shymanovich, Tatsiana; Faeth, Stanley H

    2016-07-01

    Asexual Epichloë endophytes are prevalent in cool season grasses, and many are of hybrid origin. Hybridization of asexual endophytes is thought to provide a rapid influx of genetic variation that may be adaptive to endophyte-host grass symbiota in stressful environments. For Arizona fescue (Festuca arizonica), hybrid symbiota are commonly found in resource-poor environments, whereas non-hybrid symbiota are more common in resource-rich environments. There have been very few experimental tests where infection, hybrid and non-hybrid status, and plant genotype have been controlled to tease apart their effects on host phenotype and fitness in different environments. We conducted a greenhouse experiment where hybrid (H) and non-hybrid (NH) endophytes were inoculated into plant genotypes that were originally uninfected (E-) or once infected with either the H or NH endophytes. Nine endophyte and plant genotypic group combinations were grown under low and high water and nutrient treatments. Inoculation with the resident H endophyte enhanced growth and altered allocation to roots and shoots, but these effects were greatest in resource-rich environments, contrary to expectations. We found no evidence of co-adaptation between endophyte species and their associated host genotypes. However, naturally E- plants performed better when inoculated with the hybrid endophyte, suggesting these plants were derived from H infected lineages. Our results show complex interactions between endophyte species of hybrid and non-hybrid origin with their host plant genotypes and environmental factors. PMID:26909796

  6. Sofosbuvir with peginterferon-ribavirin for 12 weeks in previously treated patients with hepatitis C genotype 2 or 3 and cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Lawitz, Eric; Poordad, Fred; Brainard, Diana M; Hyland, Robert H; An, Di; Dvory-Sobol, Hadas; Symonds, William T; McHutchison, John G; Membreno, Fernando E

    2015-01-01

    Sofosbuvir (SOF) in combination with ribavirin (RBV) for 12 or 24 weeks is the current standard of care for patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes 2 and 3, respectively. However, in clinical trials treatment-experienced patients, particularly those with cirrhosis, had suboptimal sustained virological response (SVR) rates. We assessed the efficacy and safety of sofosbuvir plus peginterferon and ribavirin (SOF+Peg-IFN+RBV) administered for 12 weeks to treatment-experienced patients with HCV genotypes 2 and 3, with and without cirrhosis. We enrolled 47 patients in this open-label, nonrandomized, uncontrolled phase 2 study. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients with SVR at 12 weeks after cessation of study treatment (SVR12). The overall rate of SVR12 was 89% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 77-97). Rates of SVR12 were higher in patients with genotype 2 than in those with genotype 3, 96% (95% CI: 78-100) and 83% (95% CI: 62-95), respectively. Rates of SVR12 were similar in patients with and without cirrhosis: for genotype 2, 93% of patients with cirrhosis and 100% of patients without cirrhosis achieved SVR12, and for genotype 3, the SVR12 rate was 83% in patients both with and without cirrhosis. One patient discontinued study treatment because of an adverse event and four patients experienced serious adverse events. The most common adverse events were influenza-like illness, fatigue, anemia, and neutropenia. Conclusion: In treatment-experienced patients with HCV genotypes 2 and 3, 12-week administration of SOF+Peg-IFN+RBV provided high SVR rates, irrespective of cirrhosis status. No safety concerns were identified. (Hepatology 2015;61:769–775) PMID:25322962

  7. Nuclear proliferation status report. Status report

    SciTech Connect

    1992-07-01

    This report contains information concerning the nuclear proliferation status of the following countries: (1) Russia, (2) Ukraine, (3) Belarus, (4) Kazakhstan, (5) Israel, (6) India, (7) Pakistan, (8) South Africa, (9) North Korea, (10) Iraq, (11) Iran, (12) Lybia, (13) Algeria, (14) Syria, (15) Brazil, (16) Argentina, and (17) Taiwan.

  8. X-33 Program Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dill, Charlie C.; Austin, Robert E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The presentation briefly presents the current status of the program. The program's objectives and near term plans are stated. A brief description of the vehicle configuration, the technologies to be demonstrated and the missions to be flown are presented. Finally, a status of the vehicle assembly, the launch control center development and the significant test programs' accomplishments are presented.

  9. Status epilepticus in adults.

    PubMed

    Betjemann, John P; Lowenstein, Daniel H

    2015-06-01

    Status epilepticus is a common neurological emergency with considerable associated health-care costs, morbidity, and mortality. The definition of status epilepticus as a prolonged seizure or a series of seizures with incomplete return to baseline is under reconsideration in an effort to establish a more practical definition to guide management. Clinical research has focused on early seizure termination in the prehospital setting. The approach of early escalation to anaesthetic agents for refractory generalised convulsive status epilepticus, rather than additional trials of second-line anti-epileptic drugs, to avoid neuronal injury and pharmaco-resistance associated with prolonged seizures is gaining momentum. Status epilepticus is also increasingly identified in the inpatient setting as the use of extended electroencephalography monitoring becomes more commonplace. Substantial further research to enable early identification of status epilepticus and efficacy of anti-epileptic drugs will be important to improve outcomes.

  10. Blood group genotyping facilitates transfusion of beta-thalassemia patients.

    PubMed

    Castilho, Lilian; Rios, Maria; Pellegrino, Jordão; T O Saad, Sara; F Costa, Fernando

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of blood group genotyping as a supplement to hemagglutination to determine the red blood cell (RBC) antigen profile of polytransfused patients with beta-thalassemia. We selected 10 alloimmunized patients who were receiving antigen-matched RBCs based on phenotype, and had clinical evidence of delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction. DNA was prepared from blood samples and RH E/e, K1/K2, FY A/FY B, and JK A/JK B alleles were determined by PCR-RFLP. RH D/non-D was determined according to the PCR product size associated with the RHD gene sequence in intron 4 and exon 10/3'UTR. RH C/c was tested by multiplex PCR. The phenotypes and genotypes of nine of the 10 samples were discrepant. Five of the discrepancies occurred in the Rh system. One sample was phenotyped as Rhcc and genotyped as RH C/C, and two samples were phenotyped as RhCc and genotyped as RH C/C. Two other samples were phenotyped as RhEe and genotyped as RH e/e. Three samples had discrepancies in the Kidd system with phenotype Jk(a+b+) and were genotyped as homozygous for JK B. One sample had a discrepancy in the Duffy system: it was phenotyped as Fy(a+b-) and homozygous for FY B. Genotyping was very important in determining the true blood groups of many polytransfused patients with beta-thalassemia, and it assisted in the identification of suspected alloantibodies and the selection of antigen-negative RBCs for transfusion.

  11. Feeding layers of different genotypes in organic feed environments.

    PubMed

    Elwinger, K; Tufvesson, M; Lagerkvist, G; Tauson, R

    2008-11-01

    1. Two experiments were carried out to evaluate the suitability of an experimental laying hen genotype (SH) in organic egg production. SH had been selected over 25 generations on a low protein diet (130 g/kg) based on home grown feedstuffs. SH hens were compared with LSL (Experiment 1) and Hyline (Experiment 2) hens. The birds were kept in 12 aviary pens with access to outdoor runs. 2. Four diets, which were different in each experiment, were used. A control diet was compared with diets based on feedstuffs supposed to be able to be grown and produced according to organic standards. The diets differed in the content of sulphur amino acids. 3. There were no significant differences in mortality caused by diets or genotypes but an incidence of cannibalism occurred in one Hyline group fed on the diet with the lowest methionine content. 4. Severe feather pecking of LSL birds occurred and was worst on the low protein diet. In Experiment 2, signs of feather pecking of birds on the low protein diet occurred at the end of the experiment, but there was no difference between the genotypes. There was no significant difference in number of eggs produced between diets. Egg weight was influenced by diets in both experiments and by genotype in Experiment 2. Number of misplaced eggs was higher in SH hens in both experiments. There were few significant diet x genotype interactions. 5. The use of the outdoor area was influenced by diets and genotype in both experiments. 6. In conclusion, diets low in methionine content influenced predominantly plumage condition and egg weight, although production of eggs by number was unaffected. The SH hen adapted well to organic conditions, as did the Hyline genotype.

  12. Can Serotonin Transporter Genotype Predict Craving in Alcoholism?

    PubMed Central

    Ait-Daoud, Nassima; Roache, John D.; Dawes, Michael A.; Liu, Lei; Wang, Xin-Qun; Javors, Martin A.; Seneviratne, Chamindi; Johnson, Bankole A.

    2009-01-01

    Background We hypothesize that functional control of the serotonergic system is regulated in part by differential expression of the serotonin (5-HT) transporter (5-HTT). Alcohol-dependent individuals with the LL/LS genotype (L-carriers), compared with those with the SS genotype, have a lower 5-HT neurotransmission, which we hypothesize would be associated with higher craving for alcohol among L-carriers. We hypothesize further that acute peripheral depletion of tryptophan (5-HT’s precursor), while further reducing 5-HT function, might decrease auto-inhibition of 5-HT neuronal firing, thereby increasing 5-HT neurotransmission transiently and lowering alcohol craving. Methods We tested these hypotheses by examining whether in 34 Hispanic alcohol-dependent individuals subjective and physiological cue craving for alcohol differed by genotype, age of problem drinking onset, and tryptophan availability. Results On subjective “urge to drink” and “crave for a drink”, we found a significant (p<0.05) main effect of genotype and cue, as well as an interaction among genotype, age of problem drinking onset, and tryptophan depletion. For the physiological measure of pulse, there was a main effect of genotype. L-carriers had higher craving than their SS counterparts, an effect that decreased under tryptophan depletion. While craving in L-carriers increased the earlier the age of problem drinking onset, the opposite effect was seen in those with the SS genotype. Conclusion These results not only provide support for the hypothesis that alcoholics who are L-carriers have greater alcohol craving and possibly greater propensity for drinking but also propose that there is an important 5-HTT gene-by-environment interaction that alters cue craving response for alcohol. PMID:19426172

  13. Influence of Acanthamoeba Genotype on Clinical Course and Outcomes for Patients with Acanthamoeba Keratitis in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Lumbreras-Fernández, Blanca; Martín-Navarro, Carmen M.; Valladares, Basilio; Lopez-Velez, Rogelio; Morcillo-Laiz, Rafael; Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Genotype T4 is by far the most frequent genotype of Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) and therefore has been considered the most virulent. This study included 14 cases of AK of genotype T4 and three cases of non-T4 genotype. We found that cases of non-T4 genotype had a worse response to medical therapy, greater need for surgical intervention, greater risk of extracorneal involvement, and remarkably poorer final visual outcome than those of T4 genotype, suggesting an association between Acanthamoeba virulence and genotype that requires additional case investigation. PMID:24430449

  14. Epstein-Barr Virus and Human Papillomavirus Infections and Genotype Distribution in Head and Neck Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Zeyi; Uehara, Takayuki; Maeda, Hiroyuki; Hasegawa, Masahiro; Matayoshi, Sen; Kiyuna, Asanori; Agena, Shinya; Pan, Xiaoli; Zhang, Chunlin; Yamashita, Yukashi; Xie, Minqiang; Suzuki, Mikio

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prevalence, genotypes, and prognostic values of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and human papillomavirus (HPV) infections in Japanese patients with different types of head and neck cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials HPV and EBV DNA, EBV genotypes and LMP-1 variants, and HPV mRNA expression were detected by PCR from fresh-frozen HNC samples. HPV genotypes were determined by direct sequencing, and EBV encoded RNA (EBER) was examined by in situ hybridization. Results Of the 209 HNC patients, 63 (30.1%) had HPV infection, and HPV-16 was the most common subtype (86.9%). HPV E6/E7 mRNA expression was found in 23 of 60 (38.3%) HPV DNA-positive cases detected. The site of highest prevalence of HPV was the oropharynx (45.9%). Among 146 (69.9%) HNCs in which EBV DNA was identified, 107 (73.3%) and 27 (18.5%) contained types A and B, respectively, and 124 (84.9%) showed the existence of del-LMP-1. However, only 13 (6.2%) HNCs were positive for EBER, 12 (92.3%) of which derived from the nasopharynx. Co-infection of HPV and EBER was found in only 1.0% of HNCs and 10.0% of NPCs. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed significantly better disease-specific and overall survival in the HPV DNA+/mRNA+ oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPC) patients than in the other OPC patients (P = 0.027 and 0.017, respectively). Multivariate analysis showed that stage T1–3 (P = 0.002) and HPV mRNA-positive status (P = 0.061) independently predicted better disease-specific survival. No significant difference in disease-specific survival was found between the EBER-positive and -negative NPC patients (P = 0.155). Conclusions Our findings indicate that co-infection with HPV and EBV is rare in HNC. Oropharyngeal SCC with active HPV infection was related to a highly favorable outcome, while EBV status was not prognostic in the NPC cohort. PMID:25405488

  15. Environmental factors and not genotype influence the plasma level of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist in normal individuals

    PubMed Central

    Cullup, H; Middleton, P G; Duggan, G; Conn, J S; Dickinson, A M

    2004-01-01

    Cytokine production may be regulated by both genotypic (single nucleotide or tandem repeat polymorphisms) and non-genotypic factors relating to the environment and inherent biology (i.e. gender). Interleukin (IL)-1 is one of the body's most highly proinflammatory cytokines and is implicated in the pathophysiology of numerous diseases, but also in the maintenance of homeostasis in a number of tissues. The cytokine IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) is the competitive inhibitor of the IL-1 agonists IL-1α and IL-1β. In vivo IL-1Ra was measured in a cohort of 200 + blood donors and the effect of the IL-1 gene polymorphisms, environmental and biological factors assessed. In this study, we observed that possession of particular alleles of 5 IL-1 gene polymorphisms (IL1A-889, IL1Α VNTR, IL1B -511, IL1B +3953 and the IL1RN VNTR) did not correlate with higher plasma IL-1Ra levels. Environmental factors such as smoking and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug ingestion were associated with higher in vivo IL-1Ra levels (P = 0·015 and 0·022, respectively), but biological factors such as gender, age and menstruation status did not have any impact upon in vivo IL-1Ra levels. Genotypic associations of IL-1 gene family polymorphisms with disease features may reflect characteristics of stressed rather than normal control circuits for cytokine production. PMID:15270852

  16. HLA genotyping in the international Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Mychaleckyj, Josyf C; Noble, Janelle A; Moonsamy, Priscilla V; Carlson, Joyce A; Varney, Michael D; Post, Jeff; Helmberg, Wolfgang; Pierce, June J; Bonella, Persia; Fear, Anna Lisa; Lavant, Eva; Louey, Anthony; Boyle, Sean; Lane, Julie A; Sali, Paul; Kim, Samuel; Rappner, Rebecca; Williams, Dustin T; Perdue, Letitia H; Reboussin, David M; Tait, Brian D; Akolkar, Beena; Hilner, Joan E; Steffes, Michael W; Erlich, Henry A

    2010-01-01

    Background Although human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DQ and DR loci appear to confer the strongest genetic risk for type 1 diabetes, more detailed information is required for other loci within the HLA region to understand causality and stratify additional risk factors. The Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium (T1DGC) study design included high-resolution genotyping of HLA-A, B, C, DRB1, DQ, and DP loci in all affected sibling pair and trio families, and cases and controls, recruited from four networks worldwide, for analysis with clinical phenotypes and immunological markers. Purpose In this article, we present the operational strategy of training, classification, reporting, and quality control of HLA genotyping in four laboratories on three continents over nearly 5 years. Methods Methods to standardize HLA genotyping at eight loci included: central training and initial certification testing; the use of uniform reagents, protocols, instrumentation, and software versions; an automated data transfer; and the use of standardized nomenclature and allele databases. We implemented a rigorous and consistent quality control process, reinforced by repeated workshops, yearly meetings, and telephone conferences. Results A total of 15,246 samples have been HLA genotyped at eight loci to four-digit resolution; an additional 6797 samples have been HLA genotyped at two loci. The genotyping repeat rate decreased significantly over time, with an estimated unresolved Mendelian inconsistency rate of 0.21%. Annual quality control exercises tested 2192 genotypes (4384 alleles) and achieved 99.82% intra-laboratory and 99.68% inter-laboratory concordances. Limitations The chosen genotyping platform was unable to distinguish many allele combinations, which would require further multiple stepwise testing to resolve. For these combinations, a standard allele assignment was agreed upon, allowing further analysis if required. Conclusions High-resolution HLA genotyping can be performed in multiple

  17. Genotype-driven recruitment: a strategy whose time has come?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Genotype-Driven Recruitment (GDR) is a research design that recruits research participants based on genotype rather than based on the presence or absence of a particular condition or clinical outcome. Analyses of the ethical issues of GDR studies, and the recommendations derived from these analyses, are based on GDR research designs that make use of genetic information already collected in previous studies. However, as genotyping becomes more affordable, it is expected that genotypic information will become a common part of the information stored in biobanks and held in health care records. Furthermore, individuals will increasingly gain knowledge of their own genotypes through Direct-to-Consumer services. One can therefore foresee that individuals will be invited to participate not only in follow-up GDR studies but also in original GDR studies because genetic information about them is available. These individuals may or may have not participated in research before and may or may not be aware that their genetic information is available for research. Discussion From a conceptual point of view, we investigate whether the current ethics-related recommendations for the conduct of GDR suffice for a broader array of circumstances under which genetic information can be available. Our analysis reveals that the existing recommendations do not suffice for a broader use of GDR. Summary Our findings refocus attention on ethical issues which are neither new nor specific to GDR but which place greater demand on coordinated solutions. These challenges and approaches for addressing them are discussed. PMID:23702358

  18. Efficient genotyping of Schistosoma mansoni miracidia following whole genome amplification.

    PubMed

    Valentim, Claudia L L; LoVerde, Philip T; Anderson, Timothy J C; Criscione, Charles D

    2009-07-01

    Small parasites and larval stages pose a problem for molecular analyses because limited amounts of DNA template are available. Isothermal methods for faithfully copying DNA have the potential to revolutionize studies of such organisms. We evaluated the fidelity of multiple displacement amplification (MDA) for amplifying DNA extracted from a single miracidium of Schistosoma mansoni. To do this we genotyped DNA extracted from 28 F1 miracidia following MDA using 56 microsatellite markers. Because these miracidia were obtained from a cross between a male and female worm of known genotypes, we were able to predict the alleles present in the progeny and quantify the genotyping error rate. We found just 8/1568 genotypes deviated from Mendelian expectations. Furthermore, because 1 of these resulted from a genuine mutation, the error rate due to MDA is 7/1568 (0.45%). We conclude that many hundreds of microsatellites or other genetic markers can be accurately genotyped from a single miracidium using this method, greatly expanding the scope of population genetic, epidemiological and evolutionary studies on this parasite. PMID:19428677

  19. Genotype constellation and evolution of group A rotaviruses infecting humans.

    PubMed

    Matthijnssens, Jelle; Van Ranst, Marc

    2012-08-01

    Numerous rotavirus group A (RVA) strains with distinct G-genotype and P-genotype combinations have been described infecting humans worldwide. However, the increasing amount of complete RVA genome data which have become available, suggest that only RVA strains with 2 discrete genotype constellations have been successful in sustaining infection of humans worldwide over longer periods of time. Those genotype constellations have been designated I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T1-E1-H1 and I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2 and are also known as Wa-like and DS-1-like, respectively. RVAs of other genotype constellations which were able to spread to a limited extent in the human population are AU-1-related RVA strains (I3-R3-C3-M3-A3/A12-N3-T3-E3-H3/H6) in combination with G3P[9] or G12P[9], and neonatal G10P[11] RVA strains in India (bovine×human Wa-like reassortants). On the basis of the analysis of complete genomes, it is suggested that the overall genetic diversity of epidemiologically widespread human RVA strains is more limited than generally assumed. This conclusion has consequences for how we look at host range restriction and the criteria according to which the effectiveness of RVA universal mass vaccination programs is assessed.

  20. Ant colony optimization as a method for strategic genotype sampling.

    PubMed

    Spangler, M L; Robbins, K R; Bertrand, J K; Macneil, M; Rekaya, R

    2009-06-01

    A simulation study was carried out to develop an alternative method of selecting animals to be genotyped. Simulated pedigrees included 5000 animals, each assigned genotypes for a bi-allelic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) based on assumed allelic frequencies of 0.7/0.3 and 0.5/0.5. In addition to simulated pedigrees, two beef cattle pedigrees, one from field data and the other from a research population, were used to test selected methods using simulated genotypes. The proposed method of ant colony optimization (ACO) was evaluated based on the number of alleles correctly assigned to ungenotyped animals (AK(P)), the probability of assigning true alleles (AK(G)) and the probability of correctly assigning genotypes (APTG). The proposed animal selection method of ant colony optimization was compared to selection using the diagonal elements of the inverse of the relationship matrix (A(-1)). Comparisons of these two methods showed that ACO yielded an increase in AK(P) ranging from 4.98% to 5.16% and an increase in APTG from 1.6% to 1.8% using simulated pedigrees. Gains in field data and research pedigrees were slightly lower. These results suggest that ACO can provide a better genotyping strategy, when compared to A(-1), with different pedigree sizes and structures. PMID:19220227

  1. A new genotype of Japanese encephalitis virus from Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Chen, W R; Rico-Hesse, R; Tesh, R B

    1992-07-01

    Primer-extension sequencing of the RNA template of polio, dengue, Rift Valley fever, and Japanese encephalitis (JE) viruses has provided new information on their geographic distribution, origin, and evolution. In a previous study of 46 diverse JE virus strains, we demonstrated the existence of three distinct JE genotypes in Asia. We now report the occurrence of a fourth genotype. In the present study, 19 JE virus isolates, representing various geographic regions of Asia and a 50-year time span, were compared with each other and with Murray Valley encephalitis, West Nile, and Kunjin viruses. Twelve of the JE strains from the Indonesian Archipelago and the Philippines had not been previously examined; the remainder were representatives of the three previously identified genotypes. Two hundred forty nucleotides from the pre-M gene region of the virus were used in these comparisons. Using 12% divergence as a cut-off point, the 19 JE strains fell into four distinct genotypic groups; maximum divergence across the comparison region was 21%. The newly recognized fourth genotype was comprised of five Indonesian isolates that were 7% divergent from the rest of the JE viruses.

  2. Human papillomavirus genotypes distribution in cervical samples from Uruguayan women.

    PubMed

    Ramas, Viviana; Mirazo, Santiago; Bonilla, Sylvia; Mendoza, Laura; Lago, Olga; Basiletti, Jorge; González, Joaquin; Picconi, Maria Alejandra; Arbiza, Juan

    2013-05-01

    Persistent infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) causes cervical preneoplasic lesions and invasive cervical cancer. This study evaluated the prevalence and distribution of HPV genotypes in cervical exfoliated cells from Uruguayan women. Five hundred sixty-eight cervical specimens were examined by PCR using MY09/11 primer set, and were genotyped by restriction enzyme digestion (RFLP). Some of the samples which remained undetermined were reanalyzed by PGMY PCR combined with reverse line blot hybridization. Overall, about 42% of samples were positive for HPV; 96% in high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion, 66% in low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion, 15% in atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance, and 19% in samples negative for intraepithelial lesion or malignancy. HPV 16 was the most commonly found genotype, followed by HPV 68 and 58. Within low risk-HPV genotypes 6, 61, and 11 were the most frequent. This is the first cross-sectional study, accounting for prevalence and genotype distribution of HPV in Uruguayan women.

  3. Status Epilepticus and Refractory Status Epilepticus Management

    PubMed Central

    Abend, Nicholas S.; Bearden, David; Helbig, Ingo; McGuire, Jennifer; Narula, Sona; Panzer, Jessica A.; Topjian, Alexis; Dlugos, Dennis J.

    2014-01-01

    Status epilepticus (SE) describes persistent or recurring seizures without a return to baseline mental status, and is a common neurologic emergency. SE can occur in the context of epilepsy or may be symptomatic of a wide range of underlying etiologies. The clinician’s aim is to rapidly institute care that simultaneously stabilizes the patient medically, identifies and manages any precipitant conditions, and terminates seizures. Seizure management involves “emergent” treatment with benzodiazepines followed by “urgent” therapy with other anti-seizure medications. If seizures persist then refractory SE is diagnosed and management options include additional anti-seizure medications or infusions of midazolam or pentobarbital. This paper reviews the management of pediatric SE and RSE. PMID:25727508

  4. Cross Reactive Cellular Immune Response to HCV Genotype 1 and 4 Antigens among Genotype 4 Exposed Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Galal, Iman F.; Zakaria, Zainab; Allam, Walaa R.; Mahmoud, Mohamed A.; Ezzat, Ahmed R.; Osman, Ahmed; Waked, Imam; Strickland, G. Thomas; Abdelwahab, Sayed F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection is a global health burden particularly in Egypt, where HCV genotype 4a (GT-4a) predominates. The prevention and control of HCV infection will remain a challenge until the development of an effective vaccine that protects against different genotypes. Several HCV GT-1-based vaccines are in different stages of clinical trials, but antigenic differences could make protection against other genotypes problematic. In this regard, data comparing the cell-mediated immune (CMI) response to different HCV genotypes are limited. We aimed to ex vivo investigate whether GT-1-based vaccine may protect against HCV GT-4 infections. This was carried out on samples collected from genotype 4 infected/exposed subjects. Methods/Principal Findings The CMI responses of 35 subjects; infected with HCV GT-4/or who had spontaneously-resolved the infection and 10 healthy control subjects; to two sets of seven HCV overlapping 15-mer peptide pools derived from both genotypes; and covering most of the viral proteins; were evaluated. This was carried out using an interferon gamma (IFNγ) enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISpot) assay. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 17 subjects (48%) responded to at least one peptide pool derived from GT-1b/GT-4a with 13 subjects responding to peptide pools from both genotypes. A strong correlation was found in the responses to both genotypes (r = 0.82, p<0.001; 95% confidence interval = 0.562–0.933). The average IFNγ total spot forming cells (SFC)/106 PBMC (±SE) from the responding subjects for GT-1b and GT-4a was 216±56 and 199±55, respectively (p = 0.833). Also, there were no significant differences between those who cleared their HCV infection or who remained HCV-RNA positive (p = 0.8). Conclusion/Significance Our data suggest that an effective GT-1b vaccine could protect from GT-4a infection. These data could help in HCV rationale vaccine design and efficacy studies and further our

  5. Equine cryptosporidial infection associated with Cryptosporidium hedgehog genotype in Algeria.

    PubMed

    Laatamna, Abd Elkarim; Wagnerová, Pavla; Sak, Bohumil; Květoňová, Dana; Aissi, Miriem; Rost, Michael; Kváč, Martin

    2013-10-18

    Faecal samples from two horse farms in Algeria keeping Arabian, Thoroughbred, and Barb horses were examined for the presence of Cryptosporidium in 2010-2011. A total of 138 faecal samples (16 from a farm keeping 50 animals and 122 from a farm with 267 horses) were screened for Cryptosporidium spp. infection using molecular tools. DNA was extracted from all samples. Nested PCR was performed to amplify fragments of the SSU rDNA and gp60 genes to determine the presence of Cryptosporidium species and genotypes. Sequence analyses of SSU and gp60 genes revealed four animals positive for the presence of subtype XIIIa A22R9 of the Cryptosporidium hedgehog genotype. The infections were not associated with diarrhoea. This study reports, for the first time, the occurrence of Cryptosporidium in Algeria and the first occurrence of the hedgehog genotype in horses. These findings support the potential role of infected horses in sylvatic-domestic transmission of Cryptosporidium.

  6. Phenotypic characteristics for discrimination between advanced genotypes of Brachiaria ruziziensis.

    PubMed

    Rezende, B A; Ribeiro, C B; Teixeira, D H L; Gonçalves, F M A; Souza Sobrinho, F

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to use multivariate methods and Pearson and partial correlations to disregard phenotypic characteristics that contribute little to differentiation between Brachiaria ruziziensis genotypes. Eighty-one genotypes of B. ruziziensis were assessed in completely randomized blocks with three replications. Ten phenotypic characteristics were assessed: plant height, leaf length, leaf width, sheath length, length of the flower stem, length of the inflorescence axis, number of racemes per inflorescence, length of the basal raceme, number of spikelets per basal raceme, and width of the rachis. The best traits for differentiation between genotypes were determined by assessing relative contribution to diversity, canonical variables, as well as Pearson and partial correlations. Four canonical variables were found to account for 57% of the overall variation, while plant height, sheath length, and number of racemes per inflorescence were considered traits that could potentially be disregarded in future assessments. PMID:27051034

  7. From genotype to apricot fruit quality: the antioxidant properties contribution.

    PubMed

    Leccese, Annamaria; Bartolini, Susanna; Viti, Raffaella

    2012-12-01

    Apricot fruit (Prunus armeniaca L.) quality strictly relates to the eating quality of fresh produce. Since consumers are more and more interested in healthy food, and apricot germplasm shows a wide choice of new selections and cultivars, apricot nutraceutical properties are under evaluation in order to select outstanding genotypes, which may link breeding and marketing. In the present study, 18 apricot genotypes of the Italian and international germplasm were evaluated over three years according to pomological, total antioxidant and total phenols attributes using principal component and hierarchical cluster analyses. The antioxidant capacity ranged from 1.24 to 11.47 μmolTE gFW⁻¹ and total phenols from 0.22 to 1.58 mgGAE gFW⁻¹. Four outstanding genotypes stood out as healthy food for fresh consumption which may also be introduced in breeding programs to produce new cultivars with improved nutraceutical values in addition to fruit qualitative attributes.

  8. Clinical utility of thiopurine S-methyltransferase genotyping.

    PubMed

    Corominas, Hèctor; Baiget, Montserrat

    2004-01-01

    Thiopurine S-methyltransferase (TPMT) is a cytosolic enzyme that plays a major role in the metabolism of thiopurine drugs such as mercaptopurine and azathioprine. The interindividual differences in response to thiopurine administration is in part due to the presence of genetic polymorphisms in the gene that regulates TPMT activity. TPMT genotype correlates well with the in vivo enzyme activity within erythrocytes. Patients with genetically determined decreased TPMT activity develop severe myelosuppression when treated with standard doses of thiopurine drugs because an excess of thioguanine nucleotides accumulates in hematopoietic tissues. TPMT genotyping provides clinicians with a reliable method for identifying TPMT-deficient patients who can benefit from low doses of thiopurine drugs in order to reduce the risk of developing adverse effects. Moreover, the administration of higher doses of the drug could improve therapeutic response in patients in whom the TPMT genotyping demonstrates the absence of mutated alleles.

  9. argyle: An R Package for Analysis of Illumina Genotyping Arrays.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Andrew P

    2015-12-18

    Genotyping microarrays are an important and widely-used tool in genetics. I present argyle, an R package for analysis of genotyping array data tailored to Illumina arrays. The goal of the argyle package is to provide simple, expressive tools for nonexpert users to perform quality checks and exploratory analyses of genotyping data. To these ends, the package consists of a suite of quality-control functions, normalization procedures, and utilities for visually and statistically summarizing such data. Format-conversion tools allow interoperability with popular software packages for analysis of genetic data including PLINK, R/qtl and DOQTL. Detailed vignettes demonstrating common use cases are included as supporting information. argyle bridges the gap between the low-level tasks of quality control and high-level tasks of genetic analysis. It is freely available at https://github.com/andrewparkermorgan/argyle and has been submitted to Bioconductor.

  10. Plasticity, memory and the adaptive landscape of the genotype

    PubMed Central

    l, C. P

    1998-01-01

    The adaptive value of epigenetic inheritance systems is investigated in a simple mathematical framework. These systems enable the environmentally induced phenotypes to be transmitted between generations. The frequencies of the different epigenetic variants are determined by the plasticity and the efficiency of transmission (called memory). Plasticity and memory are genetically determined. This paper studies the evolution of a quantitative character, its plasticity and memory, on the adaptive landscape. Due to the dual inheritance of the character, selection acts on two levels: on the phenotypes of the same genotype, and on the different genotypes. Plasticity generates the raw material, and memory increases the strength of phenotypic selection. If the character is far from the peak of the landscape, then dual inheritance of the character can be advantageous for the genotype. Near the peak it is more favourable to suppress phenotypic variation. This would lead to genetic assimilation.

  11. Equine cryptosporidial infection associated with Cryptosporidium hedgehog genotype in Algeria.

    PubMed

    Laatamna, Abd Elkarim; Wagnerová, Pavla; Sak, Bohumil; Květoňová, Dana; Aissi, Miriem; Rost, Michael; Kváč, Martin

    2013-10-18

    Faecal samples from two horse farms in Algeria keeping Arabian, Thoroughbred, and Barb horses were examined for the presence of Cryptosporidium in 2010-2011. A total of 138 faecal samples (16 from a farm keeping 50 animals and 122 from a farm with 267 horses) were screened for Cryptosporidium spp. infection using molecular tools. DNA was extracted from all samples. Nested PCR was performed to amplify fragments of the SSU rDNA and gp60 genes to determine the presence of Cryptosporidium species and genotypes. Sequence analyses of SSU and gp60 genes revealed four animals positive for the presence of subtype XIIIa A22R9 of the Cryptosporidium hedgehog genotype. The infections were not associated with diarrhoea. This study reports, for the first time, the occurrence of Cryptosporidium in Algeria and the first occurrence of the hedgehog genotype in horses. These findings support the potential role of infected horses in sylvatic-domestic transmission of Cryptosporidium. PMID:23731858

  12. Genotypic variability for protoplast regeneration in Saintpaulia ionantha (H. Wendl.).

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, T; Grunewaldt, J

    1995-08-01

    The behaviour of eleven Saintpaulia ionantha (H. Wendl.) genotypes in protoplast culture was compared. Isolation of protoplasts from young shootlets regenerated in vitro on leaf explants, yielded 0.7 to 1.8 × 10(6) protoplasts per gram fresh weight. In all cultivars and breeding lines tested, cell divisions were observed. The mean division frequencies varied between 1.0 and 5.0% after 14 days, and between 6.4 and 13.8% after 24 days of culture. In ten genotypes callussing and shoot regeneration were achieved. The difference between the genotypes in shoot regeneration rate, between 2 and 68%, was more pronounced. The comparison of four cytokinins indicated hat thidiazuron was most effective for shoot regeneration, but often resulted in poorer shoot quality than benzylaminopurine. PMID:24186626

  13. [B0 aberrant genotype of AB0 blood group system].

    PubMed

    Zachová, M; Pexa, T; Zelený, M; Mazura, I; Hirt, M

    2004-07-01

    The AB0 blood group system typing remains one of the basic laboratory tasks in a forensic practice. However, problems arise when the analysed samples are seriously degraded. The DNA analysis promised to solve this but an unexpected complication was encountered. For the AB0 blood group system typing a Polymerase Chain Reaction method was used to amplify glycosyltransferase gene, when DNA had been isolated from artificially created blood stains, followed by their subsequent artificial thermal degradation. In the B0 genotype an aberrant genotype was suprisingly found and its structure was confirmed by sequencing. This meant that a newly formed B00 (not the original BO) genotype was present. Such a finding, to our best knowledge, had not been observed yet and we were unable to find any references in the professional literature. The explanation of this result thus remains unclear. PMID:15493712

  14. Influence of endophyte genotype on swainsonine concentrations in Oxytropis sericea.

    PubMed

    Cook, Daniel; Grum, Daniel S; Gardner, Dale R; Welch, Kevin D; Pfister, James A

    2013-01-01

    Locoism is a toxic syndrome of livestock caused by the ingestion of a subset of legumes belonging to the Astragalus and Oxytropis genera known as "locoweeds". Locoweeds contain the toxic indolizidine alkaloid swainsonine, which is produced by the endophytic fungi Undifilum species. Previously we reported that swainsonine concentrations differ between populations of Oxytropis sericea. We hypothesized that the genotype of the plant, endophyte, or an interaction of the two may be responsible for the differences in swainsonine concentration between populations of O. sericea. To test this hypothesis, plants derived from seeds collected at each location were grown in a common garden, Undifilum oxytropis isolates from each location were cultured and grown in a common environment, and a plant genotype by endophyte cross inoculation was performed. Here we show that the genotype of the endophyte is responsible for the differences in swainsonine concentrations observed in the two populations of O. sericea. PMID:23149419

  15. Research participants' perspectives on genotype-driven research recruitment.

    PubMed

    Beskow, Laura M; Namey, Emily E; Cadigan, R Jean; Brazg, Tracy; Crouch, Julia; Henderson, Gail E; Michie, Marsha; Nelson, Daniel K; Tabor, Holly K; Wilfond, Benjamin S

    2011-12-01

    Genotype-driven recruitment is a potentially powerful approach for studying human genetic variation but presents ethical challenges. We conducted in-depth interviews with research participants in six studies where such recruitment occurred. Nearly all responded favorably to the acceptability of recontact for research recruitment, and genotype-driven recruitment was viewed as a positive sign of scientific advancement. Reactions to questions about the disclosure of individual genetic research results varied. Common themes included explaining the purpose of recontact, informing decisions about further participation, reciprocity, "information is valuable," and the possibility of benefit, as well as concerns about undue distress and misunderstanding. Our findings suggest contact about additional research may be least concerning if it involves a known element (e.g., trusted researchers). Also, for genotype-driven recruitment, it may be appropriate to set a lower bar for disclosure of individual results than the clinical utility threshold recommended more generally.

  16. [Preliminary study on HLA-B genotyping by oligonucleotide chips].

    PubMed

    Lan, Ke; Hu, Shou-Wang; Zhang, Fan; Wang, Hui; Guan, Wei; Ding, Yu; Sun, Ou-Jun; Wang, Sheng-Qi

    2003-04-01

    HLA genes constitute a highly polymorphic multigene system. In the present study, HLA-B oligonucleotide chips were manufactured by using a set of sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes derived from polymorphic regions in exon 2 and exon 3 of HLA-B gene spotted by microarrayer onto the aldehyde modified glass slides. In addition, the sequenced HLA-B gene clones used as standard samples were amplified from exon 2 and exon 3 by PCR. Together with the correct hybridization and wash conditions, the PCR products were bound with the array probes on the chip, and the hybridization patterns were transformed to HLA-B genotypes. The results showed that the genotypes of standard samples by the HLA-B oligonucleotide chips were completely identical with the sequenced clones. In conclusion, the oligonucleotide chip method presented here for HLA-B genotyping is a rapid, accurate, sensitive and attractive high throughput biochemical way.

  17. Folate status and neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Molloy, A M; Mills, J L; Kirke, P N; Weir, D G; Scott, J M

    1999-01-01

    Periconceptional folic acid supplementation prevents approximately 70% of neural tube defects (NTDs). While most women carrying affected fetuses do not have deficient blood folate levels, the risk of having an NTD affected child is inversely correlated with pregnancy red cell folate levels. Current research is focused on the discovery of genetic abnormalities in folate related enzymes which might explain the role of folate in NTD prevention. The first candidate gene to emerge was the C677T variant of 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase. Normal subjects who are homozygous for the mutation (TT) have red cell folate status some 20% lower than expected. It is now established that the prevalence of the TT genotype is significantly higher among spina bifida cases and their parents. Nevertheless, our studies show that the variant does not account for the reduced blood folate levels in many NTD affected mothers. We conclude that low maternal folate status may in itself be the most important risk factor for NTDs and that food fortification may be the only population strategy of benefit in the effort to eliminate NTDs. PMID:10609896

  18. PGMRA: a web server for (phenotype x genotype) many-to-many relation analysis in GWAS.

    PubMed

    Arnedo, Javier; del Val, Coral; de Erausquin, Gabriel Alejandro; Romero-Zaliz, Rocío; Svrakic, Dragan; Cloninger, Claude Robert; Zwir, Igor

    2013-07-01

    It has been proposed that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) discovered by genome-wide association studies (GWAS) account for only a small fraction of the genetic variation of complex traits in human population. The remaining unexplained variance or missing heritability is thought to be due to marginal effects of many loci with small effects and has eluded attempts to identify its sources. Combination of different studies appears to resolve in part this problem. However, neither individual GWAS nor meta-analytic combinations thereof are helpful for disclosing which genetic variants contribute to explain a particular phenotype. Here, we propose that most of the missing heritability is latent in the GWAS data, which conceals intermediate phenotypes. To uncover such latent information, we propose the PGMRA server that introduces phenomics--the full set of phenotype features of an individual--to identify SNP-set structures in a broader sense, i.e. causally cohesive genotype-phenotype relations. These relations are agnostically identified (without considering disease status of the subjects) and organized in an interpretable fashion. Then, by incorporating a posteriori the subject status within each relation, we can establish the risk surface of a disease in an unbiased mode. This approach complements-instead of replaces-current analysis methods. The server is publically available at http://phop.ugr.es/fenogeno.

  19. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 2a has a better virologic response to antiviral therapy than HCV genotype 1b

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meng; Zhang, Yi; Li, Zhiqin; Zhang, Hongyu; Zhang, Zhen; Yue, Dongli; Zhou, Rong; Li, Xiaogang; Wu, Shuhuan; Li, Jiansheng

    2015-01-01

    The standard treatment, pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN) plus ribavirin (RBV), for patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC), does not provide a sustained virologic response (SVR) in a large majority of patients. In the present study, 211 treatment-naïve patients with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1b and 2a were recruited and treated weekly with PEG-IFN plus RBV to determine the response of HCV genotype 1b and 2a patients to standard antiviral treatment. Virologic responses were assessed by TaqMan at week 4, 12, 24, 48 and 24 weeks of treatment. Patients with HCV genotype 2a had a significantly higher rapid virologic response (RVR), early virologic response, end-of-treatment response and SVR, and a lower relapse rate than patients with HCV genotype 1b. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the HCV genotype 2a patients had a HCV RNA level ≤ 5.70 log10 IU/ml, a fibrosis stage < S3, and that HLA-A02 expression and RVR were independent factors of SVR that may improve HCV clearance. PMID:26221288

  20. Genotype matching in a parasitoid-host genotypic food web: an approach for measuring effects of environmental change.

    PubMed

    Lavandero, Blas; Tylianakis, Jason M

    2013-01-01

    Food webs typically quantify interactions between species, whereas evolution operates through the success of alleles within populations of a single species. To bridge this gap, we quantify genotypic interaction networks among individuals of a single specialized parasitoid species and its obligate to cyclically parthenogenetic aphid host along a climatic gradient. As a case study for the kinds of questions genotype food webs could be used to answer, we show that genetically similar parasitoids became more likely to attack genetically similar hosts in warmer sites (i.e. there was network-wide congruence between the within-species shared allelic distance of the parasitoid and that of its host). Narrowing of host-genotype-niche breadth by parasitoids could reduce resilience of the network to changes in host genetic structure or invasion by novel host genotypes and inhibit biological control. Thus, our approach can be easily used to detect changes to sub-species-level food webs, which may have important ecological and evolutionary implications, such as promoting host-race specialization or the accelerated loss of functional diversity following extinctions of closely related genotypes.

  1. Differences between spent hens of different genotype in performance, meat yield and suitability of the meat for sausage production.

    PubMed

    Loetscher, Y; Albiker, D; Stephan, R; Kreuzer, M; Messikommer, R E

    2015-02-01

    The valorization of spent hens via the food chain has some major limitations, which include low meat yield and tough meat. The latter issue can be overcome by producing convenience foods; the first may be alleviated by employing a genotype with higher meatiness. To quantitatively compare two common layer genotypes in production performance, meat yield and sausage quality, 2200 57 weeks old Institut de Sélection Animale (ISA) Warren and Dekalb White hens each were investigated during the last 60 days of egg laying. The hens were housed in an aviary system in 2×10 compartments (10 compartments/each genotype). Measurements included feed intake, laying performance, egg weight and feed conversion ratio as measured per compartment. BW was determined twice on 10 animals per compartment. Finally, two sub-groups of five hens per compartment were slaughtered, meat yield was recorded and bratwurst-type sausages were produced (n=20 per genotype). Fat proportion, cooking loss, connective tissue properties and Kramer shear energy were measured. After 1, 4, 7 and 10 months of frozen storage, oxidative stability (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS)) and microbiological status were determined as shelf-life related criteria. ANOVA was performed considering genotype as the main effect. The ISA Warren hens were inferior in laying performance (-11%) and feed conversion ratio (+10%) compared with Dekalb White, but had the same feed intake. The ISA Warren had higher BW and carcass weight than the Dekalb White. Carcass yield was higher by 5.9%. There were 80 g (23%) more meat available for sausage production from ISA Warren compared with Dekalb White. Sausages prepared from meat of ISA Warren hens contained less fat than those from Dekalb White, but showed the same cooking loss. Although the collagen proportion of the sausages produced from ISA Warren was lower than from Dekalb White, collagen solubility was lower and shear energy was higher. During the 10 months of frozen

  2. Consensus Genotyper for Exome Sequencing (CGES): improving the quality of exome variant genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Trubetskoy, Vassily; Rodriguez, Alex; Dave, Uptal; Campbell, Nicholas; Crawford, Emily L.; Cook, Edwin H.; Sutcliffe, James S.; Foster, Ian; Madduri, Ravi; Cox, Nancy J.; Davis, Lea K.

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: The development of cost-effective next-generation sequencing methods has spurred the development of high-throughput bioinformatics tools for detection of sequence variation. With many disparate variant-calling algorithms available, investigators must ask, ‘Which method is best for my data?’ Machine learning research has shown that so-called ensemble methods that combine the output of multiple models can dramatically improve classifier performance. Here we describe a novel variant-calling approach based on an ensemble of variant-calling algorithms, which we term the Consensus Genotyper for Exome Sequencing (CGES). CGES uses a two-stage voting scheme among four algorithm implementations. While our ensemble method can accept variants generated by any variant-calling algorithm, we used GATK2.8, SAMtools, FreeBayes and Atlas-SNP2 in building CGES because of their performance, widespread adoption and diverse but complementary algorithms. Results: We apply CGES to 132 samples sequenced at the Hudson Alpha Institute for Biotechnology (HAIB, Huntsville, AL) using the Nimblegen Exome Capture and Illumina sequencing technology. Our sample set consisted of 40 complete trios, two families of four, one parent–child duo and two unrelated individuals. CGES yielded the fewest total variant calls (NCGES=139°897), the highest Ts/Tv ratio (3.02), the lowest Mendelian error rate across all genotypes (0.028%), the highest rediscovery rate from the Exome Variant Server (EVS; 89.3%) and 1000 Genomes (1KG; 84.1%) and the highest positive predictive value (PPV; 96.1%) for a random sample of previously validated de novo variants. We describe these and other quality control (QC) metrics from consensus data and explain how the CGES pipeline can be used to generate call sets of varying quality stringency, including consensus calls present across all four algorithms, calls that are consistent across any three out of four algorithms, calls that are consistent across any two out

  3. Identifying traits for genotypic adaptation using crop models.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Villegas, Julian; Watson, James; Challinor, Andrew J

    2015-06-01

    Genotypic adaptation involves the incorporation of novel traits in crop varieties so as to enhance food productivity and stability and is expected to be one of the most important adaptation strategies to future climate change. Simulation modelling can provide the basis for evaluating the biophysical potential of crop traits for genotypic adaptation. This review focuses on the use of models for assessing the potential benefits of genotypic adaptation as a response strategy to projected climate change impacts. Some key crop responses to the environment, as well as the role of models and model ensembles for assessing impacts and adaptation, are first reviewed. Next, the review describes crop-climate models can help focus the development of future-adapted crop germplasm in breeding programmes. While recently published modelling studies have demonstrated the potential of genotypic adaptation strategies and ideotype design, it is argued that, for model-based studies of genotypic adaptation to be used in crop breeding, it is critical that modelled traits are better grounded in genetic and physiological knowledge. To this aim, two main goals need to be pursued in future studies: (i) a better understanding of plant processes that limit productivity under future climate change; and (ii) a coupling between genetic and crop growth models-perhaps at the expense of the number of traits analysed. Importantly, the latter may imply additional complexity (and likely uncertainty) in crop modelling studies. Hence, appropriately constraining processes and parameters in models and a shift from simply quantifying uncertainty to actually quantifying robustness towards modelling choices are two key aspects that need to be included into future crop model-based analyses of genotypic adaptation.

  4. Human papillomavirus genotyping and integration in ovarian cancer Saudi patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with different malignancies but its role in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer is controversial. This study investigated the prevalence, genotyping and physical state of HPV in ovarian cancer Saudi patients. Methods Hundred formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) ovarian carcinoma tissues and their normal adjacent tissues (NAT) were included in the study. HPV was detected by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using degenerated HPVL1 consensus primer pairs MY09/MY11 and GP5+/GP6 + to amplify a broad spectrum of HPV genotypes in a single reaction. The HPV positive samples were further genotyped using DNA sequencing. The physical state of the virus was identified using Amplification of Papillomavirus Oncogene Transcripts (APOT) assay in the samples positive for HPV16 and/or HPV18. Results High percentage of HPV (42%) was observed in ovarian carcinoma compared to 8% in the NAT. The high-risk HPV types 16, 18 and 45 were highly associated with the advanced stages of tumor, while low-risk types 6 and 11 were present in NAT. In malignant tissues, HPV-16 was the most predominant genotype followed by HPV-18 and -45. The percentage of viral integration into the host genome was significantly high (61.1%) compared to 38.9% episomal in HPV positive tumors tissues. In HPV18 genotype the percentage of viral integration was 54.5% compared to 45.5% episomal. Conclusion The high risk HPV genotypes in ovarian cancer may indicate its role in ovarian carcinogenesis. The HPV vaccination is highly recommended to reduce this type of cancer. PMID:24252426

  5. Duarte GALT genotypes are not associated with ovarian cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Merritt, Melissa A.; Kotsopoulos, Joanne; Cramer, Daniel W.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Terry, Kathryn L.; Tworoger, Shelley S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase (GALT) variant genotypes were associated with epithelial ovarian cancer risk and to determine if this association was modified by lactose intake. Design two prospective cohort studies and a case-control study. Setting Academic institution. Patient(s) 992 cases and 1050 population-based controls from a New England case-control study and 240 cases and 900 controls from the Nurses’ Health Studies. Intervention(s) None. Main Outcome Measure(s) Genotyping of the N314D variant and the 4-bp deletion (-119delGTCA) of GALT using the Taqman 5′ nuclease assay. Duarte1 (D1) genotype individuals have a missense mutation (N314D) associated with normal GALT activity unless it occurs together with an associated 4-bp deletion leading to reduced GALT activity (Duarte2 or D2). Result(s) Logistic regression analysis identified no association between D1/D2 genotypes and ovarian cancer risk (pooled RR, 1.1 (95% CI, 0.8–1.5) for D1 and 1.0 (95% CI, 0.7–1.4) for D2). We did not observe a significant interaction between D1 and D2 genotypes in analyses stratified by level of lactose intake (Pinteraction ≥ 0.3). Conclusion(s) D1 and D2 genotypes do not appear to play a role in the association between galactose intake, possible ovarian dysfunction and the link with ovarian cancer. PMID:22749219

  6. Effect of COMT Val108/158Met genotype on risk for polydipsia in chronic patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kenji; Shinkai, Takahiro; Chen, Hsin-I; Utsunomiya, Kensuke; Nakamura, Jun

    2014-06-01

    Polydipsia is a serious condition often seen among patients with schizophrenia (SCZ). The cause of polydipsia is unknown; hence, it is hard to treat or manage. Animal studies showed that the drinking behavior is regulated by central dopaminergic neurotransmission at the hypothalamus. Meanwhile, the existence of a genetic predisposition to polydipsia in patients with SCZ has been suggested. The purpose of this study was to assess whether a functional polymorphism, Val(108/158)Met in the gene for catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), is associated with susceptibility to polydipsia using a Japanese sample of SCZ. Our sample includes 330 chronic patients with SCZ (83 polydipsic patients and 247 non-polydipsic controls). The common COMT Val(108/158)Met polymorphism was genotyped, and the differences in genotype distribution and allele frequency between cases and controls were evaluated using the χ(2) test. A significant association between the COMT Val(108/158)Met polymorphism and polydipsia was found (genotype distribution: χ(2) = 13.0, df = 2, p = 0.001; allele frequency: χ(2) = 7.50, df = 1, p = 0.006). The high-COMT activity group (Val/Val) was more frequent among patients with polydipsia compared with the low-COMT activity group (Val/Met + Met/Met) [odds ratio (OR) = 2.46]. The association survived after controlling for other possible confounding factors, including gender, age, age of onset, current antipsychotic dose, and smoking status. Our results suggest that the COMT Val(108/158)Met genotype may confer susceptibility to polydipsia in SCZ. To our knowledge, this is the first association study between the COMT gene and polydipsia in SCZ. Further studies with larger sample sizes are warranted to confirm present findings. PMID:24443099

  7. Influence of the APOE genotype on hepatic stress response: Studies in APOE targeted replacement mice and human liver cells.

    PubMed

    Dose, Janina; Nebel, Almut; Piegholdt, Stefanie; Rimbach, Gerald; Huebbe, Patricia

    2016-07-01

    Apolipoprotein E (APOE) is a multifunctional plasma protein mainly acting in lipid metabolism. Human APOE is polymorphic with three major isoforms (APOE2, APOE3 and APOE4). Up to 75% of the body's APOE is produced by the liver. There is increasing evidence from studies in brain-derived cells that APOE4 affects mitochondrial function and biogenesis as well as stress and inflammatory responses - processes, whose disturbances are considered hallmarks of the ageing process. However, although the liver is the main production site of APOE, knowledge about the impact of the APOE genotype on hepatic stress response-related processes is rather limited. Therefore, we studied biomarkers of oxidative status (glutathione levels, 3-nitrotyrosine adducts, protein carbonyl concentration), ER stress (XBP1(S), BiP, DDIT3), proteasome activity, mitochondrial function (respiratory complexes, ATP levels and mitochondrial membrane potential as well as biomarkers of mitochondrial biogenesis, fission and fusion), autophagy (LC3, LAMP2A), apoptosis (BCL2, BAX, CYCS) and DNA damage in the liver of APOE targeted replacement (TR) mice and in Huh7 hepatocytes overexpressing the APOE3 and the APOE4 isoform, respectively. APOE4 mice exhibited a lower chymotrypsin-like and a higher trypsin-like proteasome activity. Levels of protein carbonyls were moderately higher in liver tissue of APOE4 vs. APOE3 mice. Other biomarkers of oxidative stress were similar between the two genotypes. Under basal conditions, the stress-response pathways investigated appeared largely unaffected by the APOE genotype. However, upon stress induction, APOE4 expressing cells showed lower levels of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and lower mRNA levels of the ATP-generating complex V of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Overall, our findings provide evidence for a rather low influence of the APOE genotype on the hepatic stress response processes investigated in this study. PMID:27130033

  8. Knowledge and awareness of personal sickle cell genotype among parents of children with sickle cell disease in southeast Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ezenwosu, O U; Chukwu, B F; Ikefuna, A N; Hunt, A T; Keane, J; Emodi, I J; Ezeanolue, E E

    2015-10-01

    Sickle cell trait (SCT; HbAS), the heterozygous state for the sickle cell allele of the beta globin gene, is carried by as many as 100 million individuals worldwide. Nigeria has the highest prevalence of SCT, impacting an estimated 25 % of adult population. This study was designed to assess timing of awareness, knowledge of SCT status and preferred method of education among parents of children with sickle cell disease (SCD). We conducted a cross-sectional survey of parents of children with SCD from June 2013-March 2014. Participants completed a 20-item questionnaire to assess (1) awareness of personal sickle cell genotype, (2) timing of awareness of personal sickle cell genotype, and (3) knowledge of SCT. One hundred and fifty-five participants completed the survey. Seventy-eight percent were females, and 87 % (135/155) were aware of their own sickle cell genotype. Timing of awareness varied as follows: following birth of a child with sickle cell disease (45 %); during marriage (21.5 %); school admission (9.6 %); during pregnancy (9.6 %); and other times (14 %). Approximately 35.5 % of participants thought that sickle cell trait was a mild form of sickle cell disease. Radio (43.9 %), informational community meetings (27.7 %), and television (21.9 %) were identified by participants as the most effective method of increasing sickle cell trait awareness. Innovative approaches are needed to increase the proportion of individuals who are aware of their own sickle cell genotype prior to having a child with sickle cell anemia in line with the Healthy People 2020 objective. PMID:25869330

  9. Genotypic structure of a Drosophila population for adult locomotor activity

    SciTech Connect

    Grechanyi, G.V.; Korzun, V.M.

    1995-01-01

    Analysis of the variation of adult locomotor activity in four samples taken at different times from a natural population of Drosophila melanogaster showed that the total variation of this trait is relatively stable in time and has a substantial genetic component. Genotypic structure of the population for locomotor activity is characterized by the presence of large groups of genotypes with high and low values of this trait. A possible explanation for the presence of such groups in a population is cyclic density-dependent selection.

  10. Next-generation genotype imputation service and methods.

    PubMed

    Das, Sayantan; Forer, Lukas; Schönherr, Sebastian; Sidore, Carlo; Locke, Adam E; Kwong, Alan; Vrieze, Scott I; Chew, Emily Y; Levy, Shawn; McGue, Matt; Schlessinger, David; Stambolian, Dwight; Loh, Po-Ru; Iacono, William G; Swaroop, Anand; Scott, Laura J; Cucca, Francesco; Kronenberg, Florian; Boehnke, Michael; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Fuchsberger, Christian

    2016-10-01

    Genotype imputation is a key component of genetic association studies, where it increases power, facilitates meta-analysis, and aids interpretation of signals. Genotype imputation is computationally demanding and, with current tools, typically requires access to a high-performance computing cluster and to a reference panel of sequenced genomes. Here we describe improvements to imputation machinery that reduce computational requirements by more than an order of magnitude with no loss of accuracy in comparison to standard imputation tools. We also describe a new web-based service for imputation that facilitates access to new reference panels and greatly improves user experience and productivity. PMID:27571263

  11. Phylogenetic evidence for a new genotype of Acanthamoeba (Amoebozoa, Acanthamoebida).

    PubMed

    Corsaro, Daniele; Venditti, Danielle

    2010-06-01

    Acanthamoeba are widespread free-living amoebae, able to cause infection in animals, with keratitis and granulomatous encephalitis as major diseases in humans. Recent developments in the subgenus classification are based on the determination of the nucleotide sequence of the 18S rDNA. By this mean, Acanthamoeba have been clustered into 15 sequence types or genotypes, called T1 to T15. In this study, we analysed near full 18S rDNA of an Acanthamoeba recovered from an environmental sample and various unidentified Acanthamoeba sequences retrieved from GenBank. We provided phylogenetic evidence for a new genotype, which we proposed to name T16.

  12. PEPA-1* genotype affects return rate for hatchery steelhead

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reisenbichler, R.R.; Hayes, M.C.; Rubin, S.P.; Wetzel, L.A.; Baker, B.M.

    2006-01-01

    Allozymes continue to be useful as genetic markers in a variety of studies; however, their utility often hinges on the selective neutrality of the allelic variation. Our study tested for neutrality between the two most common alleles (*100 and *110) at the cytosol nonspecific dipeptidase locus (PEPA-1*) in steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss from Dworshak National Fish Hatchery in Idaho. We tested for differential growth and survival among fish with the * 100/100, *100/ 110, and *110/110 genotypes rearing in a hatchery or a natural stream. We repeated the study for two year-classes, using heterozygous (*100/110) adults to make the experimental crosses. This design avoided differences in family contribution among genotypes because each cross produced all three genotypes. We divided the progeny from each family into two groups. One group was reared in a hatchery for 1 year and then released for migration to the sea and subsequent return to the hatchery as adults. The other group was released into a natural stream and monitored for 3 years. We found no significant differences in size or survival among PEPA-1* genotypes for either the naturally reared fish or the hatchery-reared fish immediately prior to release as smolts. For females, survival to returning adult also was similar among genotypes; however, hatchery-reared males with the *110/110 genotype returned at a higher rate than did males with the *100/ 100 genotype; heterozygous males were intermediate. These results indicate that selection occurs at the PEPA-1* locus or at one or more loci tightly linked to it. The finding of nearly equal frequencies for these two alleles in the source population suggests that selection differentials among genotypes reverse or vary from year to year; otherwise, steady directional selection would drive the *100 allele to low frequencies or extinction. Locus PEPA-1* seems inappropriate for genetic marks in studies of steelhead that span the full life cycle and probably should be avoided

  13. VP4 genotyping of human rotavirus in the United States.

    PubMed Central

    Santos, N; Riepenhoff-Talty, M; Clark, H F; Offit, P; Gouvea, V

    1994-01-01

    The VP4 (P) and VP7 (G) types of 171 rotavirus isolates obtained from children with diarrhea in the United States were characterized by PCR typing assays. Strains P1G1 predominated (71%); this was followed by strains P1G3 (20%) and P2G2 and P1G4 (2% each). Mixed types were identified in five (3%) specimens. Two (1%) strains bearing the P3 genotype (P3G1 and P3G2) were found in children with severe dehydrating diarrhea, although the P3 genotype has been regarded as a possible marker for virus attenuation. Images PMID:8126181

  14. Safety system status monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, J.R.; Morgenstern, M.H.; Rideout, T.H.; Cowley, P.J.

    1984-03-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory has studied the safety aspects of monitoring the preoperational status of safety systems in nuclear power plants. The goals of the study were to assess for the NRC the effectiveness of current monitoring systems and procedures, to develop near-term guidelines for reducing human errors associated with monitoring safety system status, and to recommend a regulatory position on this issue. A review of safety system status monitoring practices indicated that current systems and procedures do not adequately aid control room operators in monitoring safety system status. This is true even of some systems and procedures installed to meet existing regulatory guidelines (Regulatory Guide 1.47). In consequence, this report suggests acceptance criteria for meeting the functional requirements of an adequate system for monitoring safety system status. Also suggested are near-term guidelines that could reduce the likelihood of human errors in specific, high-priority status monitoring tasks. It is recommended that (1) Regulatory Guide 1.47 be revised to address these acceptance criteria, and (2) the revised Regulatory Guide 1.47 be applied to all plants, including those built since the issuance of the original Regulatory Guide.

  15. Phylogeography and epidemic history of hepatitis C virus genotype 4 in Africa.

    PubMed

    Iles, James C; Raghwani, Jayna; Harrison, G L Abby; Pepin, Jacques; Djoko, Cyrille F; Tamoufe, Ubald; LeBreton, Matthew; Schneider, Bradley S; Fair, Joseph N; Tshala, Felix M; Kayembe, Patrick K; Muyembe, Jean Jacques; Edidi-Basepeo, Samuel; Wolfe, Nathan D; Simmonds, Peter; Klenerman, Paul; Pybus, Oliver G

    2014-09-01

    HCV genotype 4 is prevalent in many African countries, yet little is known about the genotype׳s epidemic history on the continent. We present a comprehensive study of the molecular epidemiology of genotype 4. To address the deficit of data from the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) we PCR amplified 60 new HCV isolates from the DRC, resulting in 33 core- and 48 NS5B-region sequences. Our data, together with genotype 4 database sequences, were analysed using Bayesian phylogenetic approaches. We find three well-supported intra-genotypic lineages and estimate that the genotype 4 common ancestor existed around 1733 (1650-1805). We show that genotype 4 originated in central Africa and that multiple lineages have been exported to north Africa since ~1850, including subtype 4a which dominates the epidemic in Egypt. We speculate on the causes of the historical intra-continental spread of genotype 4, including population movements during World War 2.

  16. Genotypes of hepatitis B virus among voluntary blood donors in northern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Jutavijittum, Prapan; Jiviriyawat, Yupa; Yousukh, Amnat; Kunachiwa, Warunee; Toriyama, Kan

    2006-08-01

    There are distinct ethnogeographic variations for the distribution of various hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes, and pathogenic and therapeutic differences are also observed. In general, genotype B infection has a relatively better prognosis than genotype C. In Thailand, genotypes C and B were reported as the major genotypes; however, there were no previous reports of HBV genotyping in the north of the country. From 1998 to 2000, 216 HBsAg-positive serum samples (164 males and 52 females, aged 16-52 years), were screened and collected from voluntary blood donors in four provinces of northern Thailand. The method of Naito et al. was employed in this study, with the multiplex-PCR approach and genotype-specific primers to identify genotypes A-F. We found that the HBV genotype C was highly predominant in northern Thailand (89.3%), when compared with the previous reports of genotype C distribution among voluntary blood donors from other areas in the country (50-65%), followed by genotype B (7.4%), mixed infection of genotype B and C (1.9%) and genotype A (0.5%). Four samples (1.9%) were unclassifiable. There was no significant difference of genotype distribution among four northern Thai provinces or each age group.

  17. Web Operational Status Boards

    2004-04-16

    Web Operational Status Boards (WebOSB)is a web-based application designed to acquire, display, and update highly dynamic status information between multiple users and jurisdictions. WebOSB is able to disseminate real-time status information—support the timely sharing of information—with constant, dynamic updates via personal computers and the Internet between emergency operations centers (EOCs), incident command centers, and to users outside the EOC who need to know the information (hospitals, shelters, schools). The WebOSB application far exceeds outdated information-sharingmore » methods used by emergency workers: whiteboards, Word and Excel documents, or even locality-specific Web sites. WebOSB’s capabilities include the following elements: - Secure access. Multiple users can access information on WebOSB from any personal computer with Internet access and a secure ID. Privileges are use to control access and distribution of status information and to identify users who are authorized to add or edit information. - Simultaneous update. WebOSB provides options for users to add, display, and update dynamic information simultaneously at all locations involved in the emergency management effort, A single status board can be updated from multiple locations enabling shelters and hospitals to post bed availability or list decontamination capability. - On-the-fly modification. Allowing the definition of an existing status board to be modified on-the-fly can be an asset during an emergency, where information requirements can change quickly. The status board designer feature allows an administrator to quickly define, modi,, add to, and implement new status boards in minutes without needing the help of Web designers and computer programmers. - Publisher/subscriber notification. As a subscriber, each user automatically receives notification of any new information relating to specific status boards. The publisher/subscriber feature automatically notified each user of any

  18. No association between ACTN3 R577X polymorphism and elite judo athletic status.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Romo, Gabriel; Yvert, Thomas; de Diego, Alfonso; Santiago, Catalina; Díaz de Durana, Alfonso L; Carratalá, Vicente; Garatachea, Nuria; Lucia, Alejandro

    2013-09-01

    The authors compared ACTN3 R577X genotype and allele frequencies in the majority of all-time-best Spanish judo male athletes (n = 108) and 343 ethnically matched nonathletic men. No between-groups differences were found in allele (P = .077) or genotype distributions (P = .178). Thus, the R577X polymorphism was not significantly associated with the status of being an elite judo athlete, at least in the Spanish population. The contribution of genetics to sports-related phenotype traits is undeniable with some genotypes, of which ACTN3 R577X is currently the leading candidate, partly distinguishing individuals predisposed to either endurance or power sports. However, few athletic events can be categorized as purely power or endurance based. Although genetic testing (ie, for ACTN3 R577X) is already being marketed to predict sports talent and potential of young children, its usefulness is still questionable, at least in competitive judo. PMID:23348074

  19. Pattern and molecular epidemiology of Hepatitis B virus genotypes circulating in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Awan, Zunaira; Idrees, Muhammad; Amin, Irum; Butt, Sadia; Afzal, Samia; Akbar, Haji; Rehman, Irshad-ur; Younas, Saima; Shahid, Muhammad; Lal, Amreek; Saleem, Sana; Rauff, Bisma

    2010-12-01

    The continuously mutating nature of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is responsible for the emergence of varying genotypes in different regions of the world affecting the disease outcome. The objective of the current study was to find out the pattern of HBV genotypes circulating in Pakistan. HBV genotypes were determined in HBV chronic patients of different age and gender from all the four different geographical regions (provinces) of Pakistan for a period of 2 years (2007-2009). Out of the total 3137 consecutive patients, 300 (175; 58.3% males and 125; 41.7% females) were randomly selected for HBV genotype A through H determination using molecular genotyping methods. Total 269 (89.6%) isolates were successfully genotyped where as 31 (10.3%) samples failed to generate a type-specific PCR band and were found untypable. Out of the successfully genotyped samples, 43 (14.3%) were with type A, 54 (18%) were with type B, 83 (27.6%) were with type C, 39 (13%) were with type D, 2 (0.6%) were with type E, 4 (1.3%) were with genotype F and total 44 (14.6%) were with mixed HBV infections. Of the mixed genotype infection cases, 16 were with genotypes A/D, 9 were B/C, six were A/D/F, five were with genotypes A/F, two were with A/B/D and B/E and one each for A/C as well as A/E genotypes. Four common genotypes of HBV found worldwide (A, B, C & D) were isolated from Pakistan along with uncommon genotypes E and F for the first time in Pakistan. Overall Genotype C is the most prevalent genotype. Genotypes B and C are predominant in Punjab & Balochistan and Khyber Pakhtoonkhwa, respectively whereas genotype A in Sindh.

  20. Laser capture microdissection as a tool to evaluate human papillomavirus genotyping and methylation as biomarkers of persistence and progression of anal lesions

    PubMed Central

    Cornall, Alyssa M; Roberts, Jennifer M; Molano, Monica; Machalek, Dorothy A; Phillips, Samuel; Hillman, Richard J; Grulich, Andrew E; Jin, Fengyi; Poynten, I Mary; Templeton, David J; Garland, Suzanne M; Tabrizi, Sepehr N

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Anal squamous cell carcinoma is preceded by persistent infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) and the cancer precursor, high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL). Detection of specific HPV genotypes and HPV-related biomarkers may be an option for primary anal screening. However, more data on the natural history of HPV-related anal lesions are required. The outcomes from this study will enhance our understanding of the clinical and biological behaviour of HPV-related anal lesions and inform the development of future HPV genotype and/or biomarker screening tests. Methods and analysis HIV-negative and HIV-positive men who have sex with men, aged 35 years and over, recruited from community-based settings in Sydney, Australia, attend 6 clinic visits over 3 years. At the first 5 visits, participants undergo a digital anorectal examination, an anal swab for HPV genotyping and anal cytology, and high-resolution anoscopy with directed biopsy of any visible abnormalities that are suggestive of any abnormality suspicious of SIL. Tissue sections from participants diagnosed with histologically confirmed HSIL at the baseline clinic visit will undergo laser capture microdissection, HPV detection and genotyping, and quantitation of CpG methylation in baseline and follow-up biopsies. Histological and cytological findings in combination with HPV genotyping data will be used to identify persistent HSIL. HSIL will be stratified as non-persistent and persistent based on their status at 12 months. The performance of HPV genotype and methylation status in predicting disease persistence at 12 months will be assessed, along with associations with HIV status and other covariates such as age. Ethics and dissemination The St Vincent's Hospital Ethics Committee granted ethics approval for the study. Written informed consent is obtained from all individuals before any study-specific procedures are performed. Findings from this study will be disseminated

  1. Prior infection of pigs with a genotype 3 swine hepatitis E virus (HEV) protects against subsequent challenges with homologous and heterologous genotypes 3 and 4 human HEV.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Brenton J; Dryman, Barbara A; Huang, Yao-Wei; Feagins, Alicia R; Leroith, Tanya; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2011-07-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is an important human pathogen. At least four recognized and two putative genotypes of mammalian HEV have been reported: genotypes 1 and 2 are restricted to humans whereas genotypes 3 and 4 are zoonotic. The current experimental vaccines are all based on a single strain of HEV, even though multiple genotypes of HEV are co-circulating in some countries and thus an individual may be exposed to more than one genotype. Genotypes 3 and 4 swine HEV is widespread in pigs and known to infect humans. Therefore, it is important to know if prior infection with a genotype 3 swine HEV will confer protective immunity against subsequent exposure to genotypes 3 and 4 human and swine HEV. In this study, specific-pathogen-free pigs were divided into 4 groups of 6 each. Pigs in the three treatment groups were each inoculated with a genotype 3 swine HEV, and 12 weeks later, challenged with the same genotype 3 swine HEV, a genotype 3 human HEV, and a genotype 4 human HEV, respectively. The control group was inoculated and challenged with PBS buffer. Weekly sera from all pigs were tested for HEV RNA and IgG anti-HEV, and weekly fecal samples were also tested for HEV RNA. The pigs inoculated with swine HEV became infected as evidenced by fecal virus shedding and viremia, and the majority of pigs also developed IgG anti-HEV prior to challenge at 12 weeks post-inoculation. After challenge, viremia was not detected and only two pigs challenged with swine HEV had 1-week fecal virus shedding, suggesting that prior infection with a genotype 3 swine HEV prevented pigs from developing viremia and fecal virus shedding after challenges with homologous and heterologous genotypes 3 and 4 HEV. The results from this study have important implications for future development of an effective HEV vaccine.

  2. Surveillance for Echinococcus canadensis genotypes in Canadian ungulates.

    PubMed

    Schurer, Janna; Shury, Todd; Leighton, Frederick; Jenkins, Emily

    2013-12-01

    The geographic and host distribution, prevalence and genotypes of Echinococcus canadensis in wild ungulates in Canada are described to better understand the significance for wildlife and public health. We observed E. canadensis in 10.5% (11/105) of wild elk (wapiti; Cervus canadensis) in Riding Mountain National Park, Manitoba, examined at necropsy, over two consecutive years (2010-2011). Molecular characterization of hydatid cyst material from these elk, as well as three other intermediate wildlife host species, was based on sequence of a 470 bp region of the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (NAD1) mitochondrial gene. In moose [Alces alces], elk, and caribou [Rangifer tarandus] from northwestern Canada, the G10 genotype was the only one present, and the G8 genotype was detected in a muskox (Ovibos moschatus) from northeastern Canada. On a search of the national wildlife health database (1992-2010), cervids with hydatid cysts were reported in all provinces and territories except the Atlantic provinces, from which wolves [Canis lupis] are historically absent. Of the 93 cervids with records of hydatid cysts, 42% were elk, 37% were moose, 14% were caribou, and 6% were white-tailed and mule deer [Odocoileus virginianus and Odocoileus hemonius]. In these animals, 83% of cysts were detected in lungs alone, 8% in both lungs and liver, 3% in liver alone, and 6% in other organs. These observations can help target surveillance programs and contribute to a better understanding of ecology, genetic diversity, and genotype pathogenicity in the Echinococcus granulosus species complex.

  3. Genotype and ancestry modulate brain's DAT availability in healthy humans

    SciTech Connect

    Shumay, E.; Shumay, E.; Chen, J.; Fowler, J.S.; Volkow, N.D.

    2011-08-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is a principal regulator of dopaminergic neurotransmission and its gene (the SLC6A3) is a strong biological candidate gene for various behavioral- and neurological disorders. Intense investigation of the link between the SLC6A3 polymorphisms and behavioral phenotypes yielded inconsistent and even contradictory results. Reliance on objective brain phenotype measures, for example, those afforded by brain imaging, might critically improve detection of DAT genotype-phenotype association. Here, we tested the relationship between the DAT brain availability and the SLC6A3 genotypes using an aggregate sample of 95 healthy participants of several imaging studies. These studies employed positron emission tomography (PET) with [{sup 11}C] cocaine wherein the DAT availability was estimated as Bmax/Kd; while the genotype values were obtained on two repeat polymorphisms - 3-UTR- and intron 8- VNTRs. The main findings are the following: (1) both polymorphisms analyzed as single genetic markers and in combination (haplotype) modulate DAT density in midbrain; (2) ethnic background and age influence the strength of these associations; and (3) age-related changes in DAT availability differ in the 3-UTR and intron8 - genotype groups.

  4. Clonal Propagation of Walnut Rootstock Genotypes for Genetic Improvement 2009

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We produced over 3000 liner-sized plantlets of 26 genotypes for use in greenhouse screens and for growing in nurseries to a size large enough for grafting and use in orchard trials. In addition, over 1400 liner plantlets of 15 lines transformed for resistance to crown gall were produced for greenhou...

  5. Distribution of Candida albicans genotypes among family members

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, S. K.; Stevens, D. A.; Mishra, S. K.; Feroze, F.; Pierson, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    Thirty-three families (71 subjects) were screened for the presence of Candida albicans in mouthwash or stool specimens; 12 families (28 subjects) were culture-positive for this yeast. An enrichment procedure provided a twofold increase in the recovery of C. albicans from mouthwash specimens. Nine of the twelve culture-positive families had two positive members each, two families had three positive members each, and one family had four positive members. Genetic profiles were obtained by three methods: pulsed-field gel electrophoresis; restriction endonuclease analysis, and random amplification of polymorphic DNA analysis. DNA fingerprinting of C. albicans isolated from one body site three consecutive times revealed that each of the 12 families carried a distinct genotype. No two families shared the same strain, and two or more members of a family commonly shared the same strain. Intrafamily genotypic identity (i.e., each member within the family harbored the same strain) was demonstrated in six families. Genotypes of isolates from husband and wife differed from one another in five families. All three methods were satisfactory in determining genotypes; however, we concluded that restriction endonuclease analysis provided adequate resolving power.

  6. LHRH and LHR genotypes and prostate cancer incidence and survival.

    PubMed

    Ingles, Sue Ann; Liu, Stephen V; Pinski, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    Despite their crucial role in initiating steroid-hormone synthesis, the hypothalamic and pituitary hormones (LH, LHRH) and their receptors have received scant attention in genetic studies of hormone-related diseases. This study included 1,170 men diagnosed with prostate cancer (PC) in Los Angeles County between 1999 and 2003. LHRH and LH receptor genotypes were examined for association with PC survival. Additionally, associations with PC incidence were examined by comparing PC cases to control men of similar age and race/ethnicity. The LHR 312 G allele was found to be associated with increased PC mortality (p=0.01). Ten years after diagnosis, 16% of men carrying two copies of the G allele (genotype GG) had died of PC, compared to 11% of those with genotype AG and 9% of those with AA. In a case-control comparison, this same allele was significantly associated with decreased PC risk: OR=0.68 (95% CI: 0.49, 0.93) for genotype GG vs. AA. These results suggest that androgens may play opposing roles in PC initiation and progression, and highlight the need to include these important but overlooked genes in future studies of PC etiology, prognosis, and treatment.

  7. Nutrient uptake of peanut genotypes under different water regimes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Drought is a serious environmental stress limiting growth and productivity in peanut and other crops. Nutrient uptake of peanut is reduced under drought conditions, which reduces yield. The objectives of this study were to investigate nutrient uptake of peanut genotypes in response to drought and ...

  8. Genotypes are useful for more than genomic evaluation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New services that provide pedigree discovery, breed composition, mating programs, genomic inbreeding, fertility defects, and inheritance tracking all are possible from low-cost genotyping in addition to genomic evaluation. Genetic markers let breeders select among sibs before their phenotypes became...

  9. Genotypic Variation for Drought Tolerance in Beta vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    OBER, E. S.; LUTERBACHER, M. C.

    2002-01-01

    Insufficient soil moisture during summer months is now the major cause of sugar beet yield losses in the UK. However, selection for increased drought tolerance has not been a breeding priority until recently. Genetic variation for drought tolerance is an essential prerequisite for the development of more stress‐tolerant varieties, but commercial sugar beet varieties seem to have similar yield responses to drought. The objective of this study was to assess the degree of genotypic variation for drought tolerance within a wide range of sugar beet germplasm and genebank accessions within Beta. Thirty sugar beet genotypes were screened under field drought conditions, and putative drought tolerant and sensitive lines (in terms of yield reduction in polythene‐covered vs. irrigated plots) were identified. Significant genotype × water treatment interactions were found for dry matter yield and relative leaf expansion rate. Genotypic differences for drought susceptibility index were also significant. Differential sensitivity of seedling shoot growth to water deficit was examined by comparing 350 genebank accessions in a simple growth chamber screen. Methods of data management were devised to highlight lines for entry into subsequent field tests. The results of the field and seedling screens indicate that there is variation for tolerance to water deficits within sugar beet and related types, and that there are lines that show greater drought tolerance than selected commercial varieties. Divergent lines showing contrasting behaviour should aid in the identification of key morpho‐physiological traits that confer drought tolerance. PMID:12102517

  10. Genotype x environment interaction, environmental heterogeneity, and the lek paradox

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Substantial additive genetic variance (VA) often exists for male signaling traits in spite of the directional selection that female choice imposes. One solution to this problem, generally termed the ‘lek paradox’, is that genotype x environment interaction (GEI) occurs and generates a ‘crossover’ of...

  11. Tamarix (Tamaricaceae) hybrids: most dominant invasive genotype in southern Africa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hybridization can potentially enhance invasiveness. Tamarix (Tamaricaceae) hybrids appear to be the dominant genotypes in their invasions. Exotic Tamarix are declared invasive in South Africa and the exotic T. chinensis and T. ramosissima are known to hybridize between themselves, and with the nativ...

  12. Genotypic response to multiple abiotic stresses: Functional relationships among nutrients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Macro- and micro-nutrients estimated in leaves, stems and seed of eleven genotypes of five physiologically diverse crop species (chickpeas, corn, safflower, soybean, and wheat, respectively producing protein, carbohydrates, oil, protein-oil, and carbohydrates-protein, as main seed storage macromolec...

  13. Approaches to genotyping individual miracidia of Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ning; Remais, Justin V; Brindley, Paul J; Qiu, Dong-Chuan; Carlton, Elizabeth J; Li, Rong-Zhi; Lei, Yang; Blair, David

    2013-12-01

    Molecular genetic tools are needed to address questions as to the source and dynamics of transmission of the human blood fluke Schistosoma japonicum in regions where human infections have reemerged, and to characterize infrapopulations in individual hosts. The life stage that interests us as a target for collecting genotypic data is the miracidium, a very small larval stage that consequently yields very little DNA for analysis. Here, we report the successful development of a multiplex format permitting genotyping of 17 microsatellite loci in four sequential multiplex reactions using a single miracidium held on a Whatman Classic FTA indicating card. This approach was successful after short storage periods, but after long storage (>4 years), considerable difficulty was encountered in multiplex genotyping, necessitating the use of whole genome amplification (WGA) methods. WGA applied to cards stored for long periods of time resulted in sufficient DNA for accurate and repeatable genotyping. Trials and tests of these methods, as well as application to some field-collected samples, are reported, along with the discussion of the potential insights to be gained from such techniques. These include recognition of sibships among miracidia from a single host, and inference of the minimum number of worm pairs that might be present in a host. PMID:24013341

  14. Human platelet antigen genotyping of platelet donors in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Merzoni, J; Fagundes, I S; Lunardi, L W; Lindenau, J D-R; Gil, B C; Jobim, M; Dias, V G; Merzoni, L; Sekine, L; Onsten, T G H; Jobim, L F

    2015-10-01

    Human platelet antigens (HPA) are immunogenic structures that result from single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) leading to single amino acid substitutions. This study sought to determine the allele and genotype frequencies of HPA-1, HPA-2, HPA-3, HPA-4, HPA-5 and HPA-15 in platelet donors from the state of Rio Grande do Sul (RS), Brazil, and compare their allele frequencies to those observed in other populations. HPA genotyping was performed by PCR-SSP method. The study sample comprised 201 platelet donors (167 Caucasians and 34 non-Caucasians). Allele 'a' was that most commonly found for HPA-1 to 5 in both groups. The HPA-15ab genotype predominated over homozygous genotypes of this system. Fisher's exact test revealed statistically significant differences for the HPA-5 system, with a greater prevalence of the HPA-5b allele in non-Caucasians. The neighbour-joining method and principal components analysis revealed genetic proximity between our Caucasian group and European populations. We conclude that the allele frequencies of HPA-1 to 5 and HPA-15 found in our Caucasian sample are similar to those reported for European populations. These findings corroborate the ethnic makeup of the population of RS. The higher frequency of the HPA-5b allele found in the non-Caucasian group of our sample suggests the possibility of allosensitization in patients who receive platelet transfusions from genetically incompatible donors.

  15. Assessing allelic dropout and genotype reliability using maximum likelihood.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Craig R; Joyce, Paul; Waits, Lisette P

    2002-01-01

    A growing number of population genetic studies utilize nuclear DNA microsatellite data from museum specimens and noninvasive sources. Genotyping errors are elevated in these low quantity DNA sources, potentially compromising the power and accuracy of the data. The most conservative method for addressing this problem is effective, but requires extensive replication of individual genotypes. In search of a more efficient method, we developed a maximum-likelihood approach that minimizes errors by estimating genotype reliability and strategically directing replication at loci most likely to harbor errors. The model assumes that false and contaminant alleles can be removed from the dataset and that the allelic dropout rate is even across loci. Simulations demonstrate that the proposed method marks a vast improvement in efficiency while maintaining accuracy. When allelic dropout rates are low (0-30%), the reduction in the number of PCR replicates is typically 40-50%. The model is robust to moderate violations of the even dropout rate assumption. For datasets that contain false and contaminant alleles, a replication strategy is proposed. Our current model addresses only allelic dropout, the most prevalent source of genotyping error. However, the developed likelihood framework can incorporate additional error-generating processes as they become more clearly understood. PMID:11805071

  16. Root response of Jerusalem artichoke genotypes to different water regimes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to determine effects of drought on selected root growth parameters and develop relationships between root parameters and tuber yield for selected Jerusalem artichoke (JA) genotypes. Three water regimes (Field capacity, 50% available water (AW) and 25% AW) and five JA...

  17. Comparing performance of modern genotype imputation methods in different ethnicities

    PubMed Central

    Roshyara, Nab Raj; Horn, Katrin; Kirsten, Holger; Ahnert, Peter; Scholz, Markus

    2016-01-01

    A variety of modern software packages are available for genotype imputation relying on advanced concepts such as pre-phasing of the target dataset or utilization of admixed reference panels. In this study, we performed a comprehensive evaluation of the accuracy of modern imputation methods on the basis of the publicly available POPRES samples. Good quality genotypes were masked and re-imputed by different imputation frameworks: namely MaCH, IMPUTE2, MaCH-Minimac, SHAPEIT-IMPUTE2 and MaCH-Admix. Results were compared to evaluate the relative merit of pre-phasing and the usage of admixed references. We showed that the pre-phasing framework SHAPEIT-IMPUTE2 can overestimate the certainty of genotype distributions resulting in the lowest percentage of correctly imputed genotypes in our case. MaCH-Minimac performed better than SHAPEIT-IMPUTE2. Pre-phasing always reduced imputation accuracy. IMPUTE2 and MaCH-Admix, both relying on admixed-reference panels, showed comparable results. MaCH showed superior results if well-matched references were available (Nei’s GST ≤ 0.010). For small to medium datasets, frameworks using genetically closest reference panel are recommended if the genetic distance between target and reference data set is small. Our results are valid for small to medium data sets. As shown on a larger data set of population based German samples, the disadvantage of pre-phasing decreases for larger sample sizes. PMID:27698363

  18. Hepatitis E Virus Genotype 3 in Humans and Swine, Bolivia

    PubMed Central

    Cavallo, Annalisa; Gonzales, José Luis; Bonelli, Sara Irene; Valda, Ybar; Pieri, Angela; Segundo, Higinio; Ibañez, Ramón; Mantella, Antonia; Bartalesi, Filippo; Tolari, Francesco; Bartoloni, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    We determined the seroprevalence of hepatitis E virus (HEV) in persons in 2 rural communities in southeastern Bolivia and the presence of HEV in human and swine fecal samples. HEV seroprevalence was 6.3%, and HEV genotype 3 strains with high sequence homology were detected. PMID:21801630

  19. Tissue fractions of cadmium in two hyperaccumulating Jerusalem artichoke genotypes.

    PubMed

    Long, Xiaohua; Ni, Ni; Liu, Zhaopu; Rengel, Zed; Jiang, Xin; Shao, Hongbo

    2014-01-01

    In order to investigate the mechanisms in two Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) genotypes that hyperaccumulate Cd, a sand-culture experiment was carried out to characterize fractionation of Cd in tissue of Cd-hyperaccumulating genotypes NY2 and NY5. The sequential extractants were: 80% v/v ethanol (FE), deionized water (FW), 1 M NaCl (FNaCl), 2% v/v acetic acid (FAcet), and 0.6 M HCl (FHCl). After 20 days of treatments, NY5 had greater plant biomass and greater Cd accumulation in tissues than NY2. In both genotypes the FNaCl fraction was the highest in roots and stems, whereas the FAcet and FHCl fractions were the highest in leaves. With an increase in Cd concentration in the culture solution, the content of every Cd fraction also increased. The FW and FNaCl ratios in roots were lower in NY5 than in NY2, while the amount of other Cd forms was higher. It implied that, in high accumulator, namely, NY5, the complex of insoluble phosphate tends to be shaped more easily which was much better for Cd accumulation. Besides, translocation from plasma to vacuole after combination with protein may be one of the main mechanisms in Cd-accumulator Jerusalem artichoke genotypes. PMID:24883399

  20. Detection of genotype recycling fraud in U.S. immigrants.

    PubMed

    Wenk, Robert E

    2011-01-01

    Relationship testing laboratories provide genetic evidence to support or refute claims of kinship between U.S. citizen petitioners and potential immigrant beneficiaries. One female beneficiary presented a male amelogenin type and alleles at 15 autosomal loci that were identical to an alleged brother's. Laboratory records showed that her alleged father had petitioned to have 15 children emigrate from Ghana. The petitioner's 15 paternity indices exceeded 10⁵, but the children shared only four short tandem repeat (STR) profiles, suggesting fraudulent reuse of genotypes in this alleged pedigree (AP). To determine the extent of this "genotype recycling," I examined the laboratory's 555 APs from Ghana and 532 control APs from Nigeria. Seventeen Ghanaian APs (3.1%) but no Nigerian APs showed genotype recycling. Of 90 tested people in the 17 APs, 56 shared identical STR profiles with others in their AP. Of these 56 people, 10 were petitioners with unexpectedly high parentage indices. Seven of 56 had amelogenin types that disagreed with their declared genders. Database searches for identical multilocus genotypes in allegedly different people would best detect this fraud.

  1. Evaluation of soybean genotypes for resistance to charcoal rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Charcoal rot caused by Macrophomina phaseolina causes more yield loss in soybean than most other diseases in the southern U.S.A. There are no commercial genotypes marketed as resistant to charcoal rot of soybean. Reactions of 27 maturity group (MG) III, 29 Early MG IV, 34 Late MG IV, and 59 MG V gen...

  2. Latent Variable Models of Genotype-Environment Covariance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershberger, Scott L.

    2003-01-01

    Results of a study involving 136 pairs of identical twins reared together, 175 pairs of fraternal twins reared together, 83 pairs of identical twins reared apart, and 182 pairs of fraternal twins reared apart suggest that genotype- environment covariance is important for the work environment and should be included as a parameter in behavior…

  3. Comparing performance of modern genotype imputation methods in different ethnicities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshyara, Nab Raj; Horn, Katrin; Kirsten, Holger; Ahnert, Peter; Scholz, Markus

    2016-10-01

    A variety of modern software packages are available for genotype imputation relying on advanced concepts such as pre-phasing of the target dataset or utilization of admixed reference panels. In this study, we performed a comprehensive evaluation of the accuracy of modern imputation methods on the basis of the publicly available POPRES samples. Good quality genotypes were masked and re-imputed by different imputation frameworks: namely MaCH, IMPUTE2, MaCH-Minimac, SHAPEIT-IMPUTE2 and MaCH-Admix. Results were compared to evaluate the relative merit of pre-phasing and the usage of admixed references. We showed that the pre-phasing framework SHAPEIT-IMPUTE2 can overestimate the certainty of genotype distributions resulting in the lowest percentage of correctly imputed genotypes in our case. MaCH-Minimac performed better than SHAPEIT-IMPUTE2. Pre-phasing always reduced imputation accuracy. IMPUTE2 and MaCH-Admix, both relying on admixed-reference panels, showed comparable results. MaCH showed superior results if well-matched references were available (Nei’s GST ≤ 0.010). For small to medium datasets, frameworks using genetically closest reference panel are recommended if the genetic distance between target and reference data set is small. Our results are valid for small to medium data sets. As shown on a larger data set of population based German samples, the disadvantage of pre-phasing decreases for larger sample sizes.

  4. Genotypic and Pathotypic Characterization of Newcastle Disease Viruses from India

    PubMed Central

    Tirumurugaan, Krishnaswamy G.; Vijayarani, Kumanan; Kumanan, Kathaperumal; Elankumaran, Subbiah

    2011-01-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is an avian paramyxovirus that causes significant economic losses to the poultry industry in most parts of the world. The susceptibility of a wide variety of avian species coupled with synanthropic bird reservoirs has contributed to the vast genomic diversity of this virus as well as diagnostic failures. Since the first panzootic in 1926, Newcastle disease (ND) became enzootic in India with recurrent outbreaks in multiple avian species. The genetic characteristics of circulating strains in India, however, are largely unknown. To understand the nature of NDV genotypes in India, we characterized two representative strains isolated 13 years apart from a chicken and a pigeon by complete genome sequence analysis and pathotyping. The viruses were characterized as velogenic by pathogenicity indices devised to distinguish these strains. The genome length was 15,186 nucleotides (nt) and consisted of six non-overlapping genes, with conserved and complementary 3′ leader and 5′ trailer regions, conserved gene starts, gene stops, and intergenic sequences similar to those in avian paramyxovirus 1 (APMV-1) strains. Matrix gene sequence analysis grouped the pigeon isolate with APMV-1 strains. Phylogeny based on the fusion (F), and hemagglutinin (HN) genes and complete genome sequence grouped these viruses into genotype IV. Genotype IV strains are considered to have “died out” after the first panzootic (1926–1960) of ND. But, our results suggest that there is persistence of genotype IV strains in India. PMID:22174801

  5. Potential antioxidant response to coffee — A matter of genotype?

    PubMed Central

    Hassmann, Ute; Haupt, Larisa M.; Smith, Robert A.; Winkler, Swantje; Bytof, Gerhard; Lantz, Ingo; Griffiths, Lyn R.; Marko, Doris

    2014-01-01

    In a human intervention study, coffee combining natural green coffee bean constituents and dark roast products was identified as a genotype-dependent inducer of the Nrf2/ARE pathway, significantly affecting Nrf2 gene expression and downstream GST1A1 and UGT1A1 gene transcription. The observed transcriptional changes correlated with the presence of specific Nrf2 genotypes suggesting their influence on both Nrf2 and subsequent ARE-dependent GST1A1 and UGT1A1 transcription. While the presence of the − 653 SNP seems to be advantageous, resulting in higher Nrf2, GST1A1 and UGT1A1 gene transcription following coffee consumption, in contrast, the presence of the − 651 SNP significantly down-regulated the response to the study coffee. Furthermore, the presence of the B/B genotype in GST1A1 along with the frequency of the [TA]6/6 and [TA]7/7 polymorphisms in UGT1A1 appeared to significantly increase sensitivity toward coffee-induced gene transcription. This data suggests that when examining the role of the Nrf2/ARE pathway in the regulation of antioxidative and chemopreventive phase II efficacy, individual genotypes should be included when considering the potency of bioactive food/food constituents and their therapeutic potential. PMID:25606436

  6. Potential antioxidant response to coffee - A matter of genotype?

    PubMed

    Hassmann, Ute; Haupt, Larisa M; Smith, Robert A; Winkler, Swantje; Bytof, Gerhard; Lantz, Ingo; Griffiths, Lyn R; Marko, Doris

    2014-12-01

    In a human intervention study, coffee combining natural green coffee bean constituents and dark roast products was identified as a genotype-dependent inducer of the Nrf2/ARE pathway, significantly affecting Nrf2 gene expression and downstream GST1A1 and UGT1A1 gene transcription. The observed transcriptional changes correlated with the presence of specific Nrf2 genotypes suggesting their influence on both Nrf2 and subsequent ARE-dependent GST1A1 and UGT1A1 transcription. While the presence of the - 653 SNP seems to be advantageous, resulting in higher Nrf2, GST1A1 and UGT1A1 gene transcription following coffee consumption, in contrast, the presence of the - 651 SNP significantly down-regulated the response to the study coffee. Furthermore, the presence of the B/B genotype in GST1A1 along with the frequency of the [TA]6/6 and [TA]7/7 polymorphisms in UGT1A1 appeared to significantly increase sensitivity toward coffee-induced gene transcription. This data suggests that when examining the role of the Nrf2/ARE pathway in the regulation of antioxidative and chemopreventive phase II efficacy, individual genotypes should be included when considering the potency of bioactive food/food constituents and their therapeutic potential. PMID:25606436

  7. Molecular genotyping and quantitation assay for rotavirus surveillance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Lurain, Kate; Sobuz, Shihab U; Begum, Sharmin; Kumburu, Happiness; Gratz, Jean; Kibiki, Gibson; Toney, Denise; Gautam, Rashi; Bowen, Michael D; Petri, William A; Haque, Rashidul; Houpt, Eric R

    2015-03-01

    Rotavirus genotyping is useful for surveillance purposes especially in areas where rotavirus vaccination has been or will be implemented. RT-PCR based molecular methods have been applied widely, but quantitative assays targeting a broad spectrum of genotypes have not been developed. Three real time RT-PCR panels were designed to identify G1, G2, G9, G12 (panel GI), G3, G4, G8, G10 (panel GII), and P[4], P[6], P[8], P[10], P[11] (panel P), respectively. An assay targeting NSP3 was included in both G panels as an internal control. The cognate assays were also formulated as one RT-PCR-Luminex panel for simultaneous detection of all the genotypes listed above plus P[9]. The assays were evaluated with various rotavirus isolates and 89 clinical samples from Virginia, Bangladesh and Tanzania, and exhibited 95% (81/85) sensitivity compared with the conventional RT-PCR-Gel-electrophoresis method, and 100% concordance with sequencing. Real time assays identified a significantly higher rate of mixed genotypes in Bangladeshi samples than the conventional gel-electrophoresis-based RT-PCR assay (32.5% versus 12.5%, P<0.05). In these mixed infections, the relative abundance of the rotavirus types could be estimated by Cq values. These typing assays detect and discriminate a broad range of G/P types circulating in different geographic regions with high sensitivity and specificity and can be used for rotavirus surveillance.

  8. Nutrient composition of strawberry genotypes cultivated in a horticulture farm.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Ashrafi; Begum, Parveen; Salma Zannat, M; Hafizur Rahman, Md; Ahsan, Monira; Islam, Sheikh Nazrul

    2016-05-15

    This article decribes the nutrient composition of four strawberry genotypes cultivated at the Sher-e-Bangla Agriculture University horticulture farm in Dhaka (Bangladesh). AOAC and standard validated methods were employed to analyse the nutrient composition. Protein, fat and ash contents were found to be vary significantly (LSD<0.05), while the variation in moisture (LSD<1.33), dietary fibre (LSD<0.15) and total sugar (LSD<0.09) were found to be insignificant among the genotypes. Vitamin C content ranged from 26.46 mg to 37.77 mg per 100g edible strawberries (LSD<0.060). Amount of carotenoids were found to be very low being in a range of 0.99-3.30 μg per 100g edible fruit. Analysis of mineral revealed that strawberry genotypes contained a wide array of minerals including Ca, Mg, Na, K, P, Mn, Zn, Cu and Fe; most of which varied significantly (LSD<0.05) among the genotypes. Strawberries could be a potential dietary supplement for vitamin C along with minerals, particularly for the children who do not like local fruits, but love to eat the colourful strawberries. PMID:26776020

  9. Genotypic characterization of amoeba isolated from Acanthamoeba keratitis in Poland.

    PubMed

    Derda, Monika; Solarczyk, Piotr; Cholewiński, Marcin; Hadaś, Edward

    2015-03-01

    Free-living amoebae belonging to the genus Acanthamoeba are the causative factor of many diseases. Among others, they cause Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK), a condition that usually occurs in contact lens wearers, though it is also observed in non-wearers. The number of diagnosed cases of AK increased more than eightfold during 8 years in the USA, and a proportional increase in frequency also occurred in Poland and Europe. Cases of AK are usually diagnosed late, and their therapy is difficult and rarely successful. AK is an uncommon diagnosis in Poland. The increased number of positive cases observed in our laboratory may reflect the growing at-risk population of contact lens wearers. Acanthamoeba as a genus of facultative human parasites is currently classified into 17 genotypes. Isolates belonging to seven genotypes were found to be associated with AK. One genotype in particular, T4, was found to be overrepresented in human disease. The main finding of our study is that in Poland, AK is almost always associated with the T4 genotype.

  10. Comprehensive genotyping of the USA national maize inbred seed bank

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The germplasm bank at the USDA-ARS North Central Regional Plant Introduction Station (NCRPIS) in Ames, Iowa, preserves maize inbred lines from breeding programs from all over the world, including some of the key lines from the breeding history of maize. We genotyped 2,815 maize inbred accessions, mo...

  11. Diagnostic multiplex PCR for toxin genotyping of Clostridium perfringens isolates.

    PubMed

    Baums, Christoph G; Schotte, Ulrich; Amtsberg, Gunter; Goethe, Ralph

    2004-05-20

    In this study we provide a protocol for genotyping Clostridium perfringens with a new multiplex PCR. This PCR enables reliable and specific detection of the toxin genes cpa, cpb, etx, iap, cpe and cpb2 from heat lysed bacterial suspensions. The efficiency of the protocol was demonstrated by typing C. perfringens reference strains and isolates from veterinary bacteriological routine diagnostic specimens.

  12. Differential soil acidity tolerance of dry bean genotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil acidity is a major yield limiting factors for bean production in the tropical regions. Using soil acidity tolerant genotypes is an important strategy in improving bean yields and reducing cost of production. A greenhouse experiment was conducted with the objective of evaluating 20 dry bean geno...

  13. Potential antioxidant response to coffee - A matter of genotype?

    PubMed

    Hassmann, Ute; Haupt, Larisa M; Smith, Robert A; Winkler, Swantje; Bytof, Gerhard; Lantz, Ingo; Griffiths, Lyn R; Marko, Doris

    2014-12-01

    In a human intervention study, coffee combining natural green coffee bean constituents and dark roast products was identified as a genotype-dependent inducer of the Nrf2/ARE pathway, significantly affecting Nrf2 gene expression and downstream GST1A1 and UGT1A1 gene transcription. The observed transcriptional changes correlated with the presence of specific Nrf2 genotypes suggesting their influence on both Nrf2 and subsequent ARE-dependent GST1A1 and UGT1A1 transcription. While the presence of the - 653 SNP seems to be advantageous, resulting in higher Nrf2, GST1A1 and UGT1A1 gene transcription following coffee consumption, in contrast, the presence of the - 651 SNP significantly down-regulated the response to the study coffee. Furthermore, the presence of the B/B genotype in GST1A1 along with the frequency of the [TA]6/6 and [TA]7/7 polymorphisms in UGT1A1 appeared to significantly increase sensitivity toward coffee-induced gene transcription. This data suggests that when examining the role of the Nrf2/ARE pathway in the regulation of antioxidative and chemopreventive phase II efficacy, individual genotypes should be included when considering the potency of bioactive food/food constituents and their therapeutic potential.

  14. Genotyping by sequencing in grape - stacks or tassel?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genotyping by sequencing (GBS) is a powerful method for assaying populations of individuals for hundreds of thousands of genetic markers. The optimal strategy employed for data collection and analysis depends on the kind of biological question being asked and the genomic resources already available...

  15. Iterative combination of national phenotype, genotype, pedigree, and foreign information

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Single step methods can combine all sources of information into accurate rankings for animals with and without genotypes. Equations that require inverting the genomic relationship matrix G work well with limited numbers of animals, but equivalent models without inversion are needed as numbers increa...

  16. Speech Characteristics Associated with Three Genotypes of Ataxia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sidtis, John J.; Ahn, Ji Sook; Gomez, Christopher; Sidtis, Diana

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Advances in neurobiology are providing new opportunities to investigate the neurological systems underlying motor speech control. This study explores the perceptual characteristics of the speech of three genotypes of spino-cerebellar ataxia (SCA) as manifest in four different speech tasks. Methods: Speech samples from 26 speakers with SCA…

  17. Accuracy of genotype imputation in Swiss cattle breeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of imputation from Illumina Bovine3k Bead Chip (3k) and Illumina BovineLD (6k) to 54k chip information in Swiss dairy cattle breeds. Genotype data comprised of 54k SNP chip data of Original Braunvieh (OB), Brown Swiss (BS), Swiss Fleckvieh (SF...

  18. A Rapid Genotyping Assay for Segregating Human Olfactory Receptor Pseudogenes

    PubMed Central

    Hinkley, Craig S.; Ismaili, Lindita

    2012-01-01

    Variation in odor perception between individuals is initiated by binding of “odorant” molecules to olfactory receptors (ORs) located in the nasal cavity. To determine the mechanism for variation in odor perception, identification of specific ligands for a large number of ORs is required. However, it has been difficult to identify specific ligands, and ligands have been identified for only 2–3% of the hundreds of mammalian ORs. One way to increase the number of identified ligands is to take advantage of >60 human OR genes that are segregating as a result of a single nucleotide polymorphism, between a functional intact allele and a nonfunctional pseudogene allele. Potential ligands for these ORs can be identified by correlating odor perception of an individual with their genotype [intact/intact (I/I) vs. pseudogene/pseudogene (P/P)] for an OR gene. For this type of study, genotypes must be determined for a large number of individuals. We have developed a PCR-based assay to distinguish between the intact and pseudogene alleles of 49 segregating human OR genes and to determine an individual's genotype for these genes. To facilitate rapid determination of genotypes for a large number of individuals, the assay uses a small number of simple steps and equipment commonly found in most molecular biology and biochemistry laboratories. Although this assay was developed to distinguish between polymorphisms in OR genes, it can easily be adapted for use in distinguishing single nucleotide polymorphisms in any gene or chromosomal locus. PMID:23002384

  19. Thermolabile MTHFR genotype and retinal vascular occlusive disease

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, M; Karabatzaki, M; Donoghue, C; Meleady, R; Mynett-Johnson, L; Mooney, D; Graham, I; Whitehead, A; Shields, D

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Raised levels of total plasma homocysteine (tHcy) are associated with an increased risk of retinal vascular occlusive disease. A thermolabile form of a pivotal enzyme in homocysteine metabolism, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), has been associated with vascular occlusive disease and raised tHcy levels. The relation between thermolabile MTHFR genotype, tHcy, and retinal vascular occlusive disease has not been determined.
METHODS—A retrospective case-control study involving hospital based controls and cases with retinal vascular occlusions in whom tHcy levels had been determined was undertaken. Genotyping for the MTHFR 677 C-T mutation that specifies the thermolabile form of the enzyme was performed by established methods in all subjects. The relation between homozygosity for thermolabile MTHFR genotype (TT), raised tHcy levels, and risk of retinal vascular occlusive disease was examined.
RESULTS—87 cases of retinal vascular occlusive disease (mean age 68.7 years) comprising 26 cases of retinal artery occlusion and 61 of retinal vein occlusion were compared with 87 controls (mean age 70.2 years). The TT genotype did not confer a significantly increased risk of retinal vascular occlusive disease. The mean tHcy level was significantly higher in the cases than in the controls (p<0.0001). Overall, and in both the cases and controls, the frequency of the TT genotype was higher in those with normal tHcy levels than in those with increased levels of tHcy. However, the TT genotype did not significantly alter the risk of increased tHcy levels in these patients.
CONCLUSIONS—The TT genotype is not associated with an increased risk of retinal vascular occlusive disease or increased tHcy levels in this group of elderly patients. In older patients, nutritional rather than genetic factors may be more important in increasing tHcy levels, a known risk factor for retinal vascular occlusive disease.

 PMID:11133719

  20. Refractory status epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sanjay P; Agarwal, Shubhi; Faulkner, M

    2014-01-01

    Refractory status epilepticus is a potentially life-threatening medical emergency. It requires early diagnosis and treatment. There is a lack of consensus upon its semantic definition of whether it is status epilepticus that continues despite treatment with benzodiazepine and one antiepileptic medication (AED), i.e., Lorazepam + phenytoin. Others regard refractory status epilepticus as failure of benzodiazepine and 2 antiepileptic medications, i.e., Lorazepam + phenytoin + phenobarb. Up to 30% patients in SE fail to respond to two antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and 15% continue to have seizure activity despite use of three drugs. Mechanisms that have made the treatment even more challenging are GABA-R that is internalized during status epilepticus and upregulation of multidrug transporter proteins. All patients of refractory status epilepticus require continuous EEG monitoring. There are three main agents used in the treatment of RSE. These include pentobarbital or thiopental, midazolam and propofol. RSE was shown to result in mortality in 35% cases, 39.13% of patients were left with severe neurological deficits, while another 13% had mild neurological deficits. PMID:24791086

  1. [Rh-D genotyping for exon 2, 5 and 7 of German and Japanese blood donors with sequence specific polymerase chain reaction].

    PubMed

    Maas, J H; Legler, T J; Lynen, R; Blaschke, V; Ohto, H; Köhler, M

    1997-01-01

    RHD genotyping from fetal cells was applied for the detection of the RHD gene in the fetus of immunized Rh-D-negative women. Additionally, RHD genotyping was applied for the characterization of Rh-D variants. Although 44 nucleotide substitutions are known to code for 35 amino acid differences between the RHCE and the RHD gene, only a few polymorphisms have been investigated yet. We investigated 7 RHD-specific nucleotides on exons 2, 5, and 7 with sequence-specific primers and 1 nucleotide with ligation-based typing. All RHD genotyping results were correlated with serological results and established genotyping methods in 116 German and 98 Japanese blood donors, because different genetic sequences coding for Rh-D polypeptides have been described in different ethnic groups. Sequence-specific amplification of D-specific sequences was concordant with the serological result in all blood donors tested. However, ligation-based typing on exon 5 gave false-negative results in 7 donors. In summary, 5 new sequence-specific PCRs have been evaluated for further characterization of Rh-D variants. Furthermore, the methods described allow nested PCR and thus may help in determination of the fetal RhD status from maternal peripheral blood during pregnancy.

  2. Genotypes and antibiotic resistance of canine Campylobacter jejuni isolates.

    PubMed

    Amar, Chantal; Kittl, Sonja; Spreng, David; Thomann, Andreas; Korczak, Bożena M; Burnens, André P; Kuhnert, Peter

    2014-01-10

    Campylobacter jejuni is the most important cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in humans. It is a commensal in many wild and domestic animals, including dogs. Whereas genotypes of human and chicken C. jejuni isolates have been described in some detail, only little information on canine C. jejuni genotypes is available. To gain more information on genotypes of canine C. jejuni and their zoonotic potential, isolates from routine diagnostics of diarrheic dogs as well as isolates of a prevalence study in non-diarrheic dogs were analyzed. Prevalence of thermophilic Campylobacter among non-diarrheic dogs was 6.3% for C. jejuni, 5.9% for Campylobacter upsaliensis and 0.7% for Campylobacter coli. The C. jejuni isolates were genotyped by multi locus sequence typing (MLST) and flaB typing. Resistance to macrolides and quinolones was genetically determined in parallel. Within the 134 genotyped C. jejuni isolates 57 different sequence types (ST) were found. Five STs were previously unrecognized. The most common STs were ST-48 (11.2%), ST-45 (10.5%) and ST-21 (6.0%). Whereas no macrolide resistance was found, 28 isolates (20.9%) were resistant to quinolones. ST-45 was significantly more prevalent in diarrheic than in non-diarrheic dogs. Within the common time frame of isolation 94% of the canine isolates had a ST that was also found in human clinical isolates. In conclusion, prevalence of C. jejuni in Swiss dogs is low but there is a large genetic overlap between dog and human isolates. Given the close contact between human and dogs, the latter should not be ignored as a potential source of human campylobacteriosis.

  3. Subtyping novel zoonotic pathogen Cryptosporidium chipmunk genotype I.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yaqiong; Cebelinski, Elizabeth; Matusevich, Christine; Alderisio, Kerri A; Lebbad, Marianne; McEvoy, John; Roellig, Dawn M; Yang, Chunfu; Feng, Yaoyu; Xiao, Lihua

    2015-05-01

    Cryptosporidium chipmunk genotype I is an emerging zoonotic pathogen in humans. The lack of subtyping tools makes it impossible to determine the role of zoonotic transmission in epidemiology. To identify potential subtyping markers, we sequenced the genome of a human chipmunk genotype I isolate. Altogether, 9,509,783 bp of assembled sequences in 853 contigs were obtained, with an N50 of 117,886 bp and >200-fold coverage. Based on the whole-genome sequence data, two genetic markers encoding the 60-kDa glycoprotein (gp60) and a mucin protein (ortholog of cgd1_470) were selected for the development of a subtyping tool. The tool was used for characterizing chipmunk genotype I in 25 human specimens from four U.S. states and Sweden, one specimen each from an eastern gray squirrel, a chipmunk, and a deer mouse, and 4 water samples from New York. At the gp60 locus, although different subtypes were seen among the animals, water, and humans, the 15 subtypes identified differed mostly in the numbers of trinucleotide repeats (TCA, TCG, or TCT) in the serine repeat region, with only two single nucleotide polymorphisms in the nonrepeat region. Some geographic differences were found in the subtype distribution of chipmunk genotype I from humans. In contrast, only two subtypes were found at the mucin locus, which differed from each other in the numbers of a 30-bp minisatellite repeat. Thus, Cryptosporidium chipmunk genotype I isolates from humans and wildlife are genetically similar, and zoonotic transmission might play a potential role in human infections. PMID:25762767

  4. Subtyping Novel Zoonotic Pathogen Cryptosporidium Chipmunk Genotype I

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yaqiong; Cebelinski, Elizabeth; Matusevich, Christine; Alderisio, Kerri A.; Lebbad, Marianne; McEvoy, John; Roellig, Dawn M.; Yang, Chunfu

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium chipmunk genotype I is an emerging zoonotic pathogen in humans. The lack of subtyping tools makes it impossible to determine the role of zoonotic transmission in epidemiology. To identify potential subtyping markers, we sequenced the genome of a human chipmunk genotype I isolate. Altogether, 9,509,783 bp of assembled sequences in 853 contigs were obtained, with an N50 of 117,886 bp and >200-fold coverage. Based on the whole-genome sequence data, two genetic markers encoding the 60-kDa glycoprotein (gp60) and a mucin protein (ortholog of cgd1_470) were selected for the development of a subtyping tool. The tool was used for characterizing chipmunk genotype I in 25 human specimens from four U.S. states and Sweden, one specimen each from an eastern gray squirrel, a chipmunk, and a deer mouse, and 4 water samples from New York. At the gp60 locus, although different subtypes were seen among the animals, water, and humans, the 15 subtypes identified differed mostly in the numbers of trinucleotide repeats (TCA, TCG, or TCT) in the serine repeat region, with only two single nucleotide polymorphisms in the nonrepeat region. Some geographic differences were found in the subtype distribution of chipmunk genotype I from humans. In contrast, only two subtypes were found at the mucin locus, which differed from each other in the numbers of a 30-bp minisatellite repeat. Thus, Cryptosporidium chipmunk genotype I isolates from humans and wildlife are genetically similar, and zoonotic transmission might play a potential role in human infections. PMID:25762767

  5. Genetic diversity of popcorn genotypes using molecular analysis.

    PubMed

    Resh, F S; Scapim, C A; Mangolin, C A; Machado, M F P S; do Amaral, A T; Ramos, H C C; Vivas, M

    2015-08-19

    In this study, we analyzed dominant molecular markers to estimate the genetic divergence of 26 popcorn genotypes and evaluate whether using various dissimilarity coefficients with these dominant markers influences the results of cluster analysis. Fifteen random amplification of polymorphic DNA primers produced 157 amplified fragments, of which 65 were monomorphic and 92 were polymorphic. To calculate the genetic distances among the 26 genotypes, the complements of the Jaccard, Dice, and Rogers and Tanimoto similarity coefficients were used. A matrix of Dij values (dissimilarity matrix) was constructed, from which the genetic distances among genotypes were represented in a more simplified manner as a dendrogram generated using the unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic average. Clusters determined by molecular analysis generally did not group material from the same parental origin together. The largest genetic distance was between varieties 17 (UNB-2) and 18 (PA-091). In the identification of genotypes with the smallest genetic distance, the 3 coefficients showed no agreement. The 3 dissimilarity coefficients showed no major differences among their grouping patterns because agreement in determining the genotypes with large, medium, and small genetic distances was high. The largest genetic distances were observed for the Rogers and Tanimoto dissimilarity coefficient (0.74), followed by the Jaccard coefficient (0.65) and the Dice coefficient (0.48). The 3 coefficients showed similar estimations for the cophenetic correlation coefficient. Correlations among the matrices generated using the 3 coefficients were positive and had high magnitudes, reflecting strong agreement among the results obtained using the 3 evaluated dissimilarity coefficients.

  6. Genetic diversity of popcorn genotypes using molecular analysis.

    PubMed

    Resh, F S; Scapim, C A; Mangolin, C A; Machado, M F P S; do Amaral, A T; Ramos, H C C; Vivas, M

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed dominant molecular markers to estimate the genetic divergence of 26 popcorn genotypes and evaluate whether using various dissimilarity coefficients with these dominant markers influences the results of cluster analysis. Fifteen random amplification of polymorphic DNA primers produced 157 amplified fragments, of which 65 were monomorphic and 92 were polymorphic. To calculate the genetic distances among the 26 genotypes, the complements of the Jaccard, Dice, and Rogers and Tanimoto similarity coefficients were used. A matrix of Dij values (dissimilarity matrix) was constructed, from which the genetic distances among genotypes were represented in a more simplified manner as a dendrogram generated using the unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic average. Clusters determined by molecular analysis generally did not group material from the same parental origin together. The largest genetic distance was between varieties 17 (UNB-2) and 18 (PA-091). In the identification of genotypes with the smallest genetic distance, the 3 coefficients showed no agreement. The 3 dissimilarity coefficients showed no major differences among their grouping patterns because agreement in determining the genotypes with large, medium, and small genetic distances was high. The largest genetic distances were observed for the Rogers and Tanimoto dissimilarity coefficient (0.74), followed by the Jaccard coefficient (0.65) and the Dice coefficient (0.48). The 3 coefficients showed similar estimations for the cophenetic correlation coefficient. Correlations among the matrices generated using the 3 coefficients were positive and had high magnitudes, reflecting strong agreement among the results obtained using the 3 evaluated dissimilarity coefficients. PMID:26345916

  7. Epigenomics and bolting tolerance in sugar beet genotypes.

    PubMed

    Hébrard, Claire; Peterson, Daniel G; Willems, Glenda; Delaunay, Alain; Jesson, Béline; Lefèbvre, Marc; Barnes, Steve; Maury, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    In sugar beet (Beta vulgaris altissima), bolting tolerance is an essential agronomic trait reflecting the bolting response of genotypes after vernalization. Genes involved in induction of sugar beet bolting have now been identified, and evidence suggests that epigenetic factors are involved in their control. Indeed, the time course and amplitude of DNA methylation variations in the shoot apical meristem have been shown to be critical in inducing sugar beet bolting, and a few functional targets of DNA methylation during vernalization have been identified. However, molecular mechanisms controlling bolting tolerance levels among genotypes are still poorly understood. Here, gene expression and DNA methylation profiles were compared in shoot apical meristems of three bolting-resistant and three bolting-sensitive genotypes after vernalization. Using Cot fractionation followed by 454 sequencing of the isolated low-copy DNA, 6231 contigs were obtained that were used along with public sugar beet DNA sequences to design custom Agilent microarrays for expression (56k) and methylation (244k) analyses. A total of 169 differentially expressed genes and 111 differentially methylated regions were identified between resistant and sensitive vernalized genotypes. Fourteen sequences were both differentially expressed and differentially methylated, with a negative correlation between their methylation and expression levels. Genes involved in cold perception, phytohormone signalling, and flowering induction were over-represented and collectively represent an integrative gene network from environmental perception to bolting induction. Altogether, the data suggest that the genotype-dependent control of DNA methylation and expression of an integrative gene network participate in bolting tolerance in sugar beet, opening up perspectives for crop improvement.

  8. Epigenomics and bolting tolerance in sugar beet genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Hébrard, Claire; Peterson, Daniel G.; Willems, Glenda; Delaunay, Alain; Jesson, Béline; Lefèbvre, Marc; Barnes, Steve; Maury, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    In sugar beet (Beta vulgaris altissima), bolting tolerance is an essential agronomic trait reflecting the bolting response of genotypes after vernalization. Genes involved in induction of sugar beet bolting have now been identified, and evidence suggests that epigenetic factors are involved in their control. Indeed, the time course and amplitude of DNA methylation variations in the shoot apical meristem have been shown to be critical in inducing sugar beet bolting, and a few functional targets of DNA methylation during vernalization have been identified. However, molecular mechanisms controlling bolting tolerance levels among genotypes are still poorly understood. Here, gene expression and DNA methylation profiles were compared in shoot apical meristems of three bolting-resistant and three bolting-sensitive genotypes after vernalization. Using Cot fractionation followed by 454 sequencing of the isolated low-copy DNA, 6231 contigs were obtained that were used along with public sugar beet DNA sequences to design custom Agilent microarrays for expression (56k) and methylation (244k) analyses. A total of 169 differentially expressed genes and 111 differentially methylated regions were identified between resistant and sensitive vernalized genotypes. Fourteen sequences were both differentially expressed and differentially methylated, with a negative correlation between their methylation and expression levels. Genes involved in cold perception, phytohormone signalling, and flowering induction were over-represented and collectively represent an integrative gene network from environmental perception to bolting induction. Altogether, the data suggest that the genotype-dependent control of DNA methylation and expression of an integrative gene network participate in bolting tolerance in sugar beet, opening up perspectives for crop improvement. PMID:26463996

  9. Molecular Assay and Genotyping of Hepatitis C Virus among Infected Egyptian and Saudi Arabian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Farag, Mohamed MS; Sofy, Ahmed R; Mousa, Adel A; Ahmed, Mohamed A; Alganzory, Mohamed R

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major health problem recognized globally. HCV is a common cause of liver fibrosis that may lead to liver cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of HCV infection and genotyping among Egyptian and Saudi Arabian chronic patients using different molecular techniques. HCV RNA viral load was assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technology. For HCV genotyping, RT-PCR hybridization fluorescence-based method and reverse hybridization line probe assay (INNO-LiPA) were used. A total of 40 anti-HCV-positive patients with chronic hepatitis C were examined for HCV RNA, genotyping, and different laboratory investigations. In the present study, HCV genotypes 4, mixed 4.1b, and 1 were detected in patients of both countries, while genotype 2 was only detected in Saudi Arabian patients. Genotyping methods for HCV showed no difference in the classification at the genotype level. With regard to HCV subtypes, INNO-LiPA assay was a reliable test in HCV genotyping for the detection of major genotypes and subtypes, while RT-PCR-based assay was a good test at the genotype level only. HCV genotype 4 was found to be the predominant genotype among Egyptian and Saudi Arabian chronic patients. In conclusion, data analysis for detecting and genotyping HCV was an important factor for understanding the epidemiology and treatment strategies of HCV among Egyptian and Saudi Arabian chronic patients. PMID:26512201

  10. Further evidence of hepatitis B virus genotype I circulation in Northeast India.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Ashrafali Mohamed; Goel, Ashish; Kannangai, Rajesh; Abraham, Priya

    2013-08-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes have known to show a geographical pattern in their distribution and have been used to trace the migration of populations from geographically distant regions. Novel recombinants between HBV genotypes A, G and C referred as genotype I has been recently reported from Eastern India. In our investigation to characterise antiviral resistance mutations, we identified a rare case of HBV genotype I infection in chronic hepatitis B subject. We encountered confounding results of this emerging genotype 'designated as genotype G' in three widely used HBV sequence database for genotype determination. The recombinant fragment of genotype G largely occupies the surface gene sequence of the newly identified genotype I and could hence lead to misclassification of genotype I. Additionally, recombination analysis of the generated sequences in Simplot and jpHMM model showed two different patterns of recombination events. In conclusion, the increasing recognition of genotype I in this population suggests that further studies may reveal uncommon genotypes from other geographically distant regions. Our observation of potential genotype I misclassification despite the use of public HBV sequence database and other recombination analysis tools highlights the need for updating and validating public sequence domains of diagnostic importance.

  11. Reliable genotyping of the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) using DNA isolated from a single faecal pellet.

    PubMed

    Wedrowicz, Faye; Karsa, Mawar; Mosse, Jennifer; Hogan, Fiona E

    2013-07-01

    The koala, an Australian icon, has been added to the threatened species list. Rationale for the listing includes proposed declines in population size, threats to populations (e.g. disease) and loss and fragmentation of habitat. There is now an urgent need to obtain accurate data to assess the status of koala populations in Australia, to ensure the long-term viability of this species. Advances in genetic techniques have enabled DNA analysis to study and inform the management of wild populations; however, sampling of individual koalas is difficult in tall, often remote, eucalypt forest. The collection of faecal pellets (scats) from the forest floor presents an opportunistic sampling strategy, where DNA can be collected without capturing or even sighting an individual. Obtaining DNA via noninvasive sampling can be used to rapidly sample a large proportion of a population; however, DNA from noninvasively collected samples is often degraded. Factors influencing DNA quality and quantity include environmental exposure, diet and methods of sample collection, storage and DNA isolation. Reduced DNA quality and quantity can introduce genotyping errors and provide inaccurate DNA profiles, reducing confidence in the ability of such data to inform management/conservation strategies. Here, we present a protocol that produces a reliable individual koala genotype from a single faecal pellet and highlight the importance of optimizing DNA isolation and analysis for the species of interest. This method could readily be adapted for genetic studies of mammals other than koalas, particularly those whose diet contains high proportions of volatile materials that are likely to induce DNA damage.

  12. Pollen-Stigma Adhesion in Kale Is Not Dependent on the Self-(In)Compatibility Genotype.

    PubMed Central

    Luu, D. T.; Heizmann, P.; Dumas, C.

    1997-01-01

    The adhesion of pollen on the stigmas of flowering plants is a critical step for the success of reproduction in angiosperms, long considered to present some specificity in terms of self-incompatibility. We carried out quantitative measurements of the pollen-stigma adhesion (expressed in Newtons) in kale (Brassica oleracea), using the flotation force of Archimedes exerted by dense sucrose solutions (50%, w/v) to release pollen grains fixed on the surface of stigmas. We demonstrate that pollen adhesion varies with the genotypes of the plants used as partners, but increases with time in all cases for about 30 to 60 min after pollination. There is no correlation with the self- or cross-status of the pollinations, nor with the self-compatible or -incompatible genotypes of the parents. Only late events of pollination, after the germination or arrest of the pollen tube, depend on compatibility type. Biochemical and physiological dissection of pollen-stigma adhesion points to major components of this interaction: among male components, the pollen coating, eliminated by delipidation (or modified by mutation in the case of the cer mutants of the related species Arabidopsis thaliana), plays a major role in adhesion; the genetic background of the pollen parent is also of some importance. On the female side, the developmental stage of the stigma and the protein constituents of the stigmatic pellicle are critical for pollen capture. The SLG and SLR1 proteins are not involved in the initial stages of pollen adhesion on the stigma but one or both may be involved in the later stages. PMID:12223868

  13. Communication about social status.

    PubMed

    Fernald, Russell D

    2014-10-01

    Dominance hierarchies are ubiquitous in social species and serve to organize social systems. Social and sexual status is communicated directly among animals via sensory systems evolved in the particular species. Such signals may be chemical, visual, auditory, postural or a combination of signals. In most species, status is initially established through physical conflict between individuals that leads to ritualized conflict or threats, reducing possibly dangerous results of fighting. Many of the status signals contain other information, as in some bird species that communicate both the size of their group and their individual rank vocally. Recent studies have shown that scent signaling among hyenas of east Africa is unique, being produced by fermentative, odor producing bacteria residing in the scent glands. PMID:24793315

  14. System status display evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, Leland G.

    1988-01-01

    The System Status Display is an electronic display system which provides the crew with an enhanced capability for monitoring and managing the aircraft systems. A flight simulation in a fixed base cockpit simulator was used to evaluate alternative design concepts for this display system. The alternative concepts included pictorial versus alphanumeric text formats, multifunction versus dedicated controls, and integration of the procedures with the system status information versus paper checklists. Twelve pilots manually flew approach patterns with the different concepts. System malfunctions occurred which required the pilots to respond to the alert by reconfiguring the system. The pictorial display, the multifunction control interfaces collocated with the system display, and the procedures integrated with the status information all had shorter event processing times and lower subjective workloads.

  15. COMMUNICATION ABOUT SOCIAL STATUS

    PubMed Central

    Fernald, Russell D.

    2014-01-01

    Dominance hierarchies are ubiquitous in social species and serve to organize social systems. Social and sexual status is communicated directly among animals via sensory systems evolved in the particular species. Such signals may be chemical, visual, auditory, postural or a combination of signals. In most species, status is initially established through physical conflict between individuals that leads to ritualized conflict or threats, reducing possibly dangerous results of fighting. Many of the status signals contain other information, as in some bird species that communicate both the size of their group and their individual rank vocally. Recent studies have shown that scent signaling among hyenas of east Africa is unique, being produced by fermentative, odor producing bacteria residing in the scent glands. PMID:24793315

  16. The effect of interleukin-1 allele 2 genotype (IL-1a(-889) and IL-1b(+3954)) on the individual's susceptibility to peri-implantitis: case-control study.

    PubMed

    Hamdy, Ahmed Abd El-Meguid Mostafa; Ebrahem, Mohamed Abd El-Moniem

    2011-06-01

    Individuals bearing the combination of interleukin (IL)-1 allele 2 at IL-1A(-889) and IL-1B(+3954) are referred to as being genotype positive and are susceptible to increased periodontal tissue destruction. The aim of this study was to assess the possible association of IL-1 allele 2 (IL-1A(-889) and IL-B(+3954)) genotypes with the severity of peri-implantitis progression and the effect of this combination on treatment outcomes. Fifty patients with International Team for Implantology implants were studied; patients ranged in age from 35-55 years, and each patient had 1 implant. According to peri-implant tissue status, patients were divided into 2 groups: group I consisted of 25 patients with peri-implantitis, and group II comprised 25 patients with healthy peri-implant tissue. Clinical parameters were assessed at baseline and after 3 and 6 months. Epithelial cells were collected from the oral mucosa by plastic spatula and were used for IL-1 genotyping by the polymerase chain reaction technique. Group I patients were subjected to a peri-implantitis treatment and maintenance program. In all, 17 patients from group I and 5 patients from group II were genotype positive, with a statistically significant difference noted between the 2 groups. Group I genotype-positive patients presented with higher scores and measurements of clinical parameters with increased suppuration from peri-implant tissues compared with group II; differences were statistically significant (P < .05). In terms of response to treatment, genotype-negative patients demonstrated better response than genotype-positive patients. The combination of IL-1 allele 2 (IL-1A(-889) and IL-1B(+3954)) in patients with inflamed periodontal or peri-implant tissues acts as a risk factor that leads to greater tissue destruction. IL-1 gene polymorphism at IL-1A(-889) and IL-1B(+3954) may affect outcomes of treatment for peri-implantitis in genotype-positive individuals. PMID:20594066

  17. The Impact in Older Women of Ovarian FMR1 Genotypes and Sub-Genotypes on Ovarian Reserve

    PubMed Central

    Gleicher, Norbert; Weghofer, Andrea; Kim, Ann; Barad, David H.

    2012-01-01

    We recently associated ovarian FMR1genotypes and sub-genotypes with distinct ovarian aging patterns. How they impact older females is, however, unknown. We, therefore, investigated 217 consecutive first in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles in women >40 assessing oocyte yields, stratified for better (anti-Müllerian hormone, AMH >1.05 ng/mL) or poorer (AMH≤1.05 ng/mL) functional reserve (FOR)). Mean age was 42.4±2.0 years, mean AMH 0.76±0.92 ng/mL and mean oocyte yield 5.3±5.4. Overall, and in women with better FOR, FMR1 did not affect oocyte yields. With poorer FOR (AMH≤1.05 ng/mL) women with het-norm/high, however, demonstrated higher oocyte yields (5.0±3.8) than those with het-norm/low sub-genotype 3.1±2.5; P = 0.03), confirmed after log conversion. Known associated with low FOR at young age, het-norm/high, thus, appears to preserve FOR into older age, and both het sub-genotypes appear to expand female reproductive lifespan into opposite directions. PMID:22438971

  18. Proteome Differences between Hepatitis B Virus Genotype-B- and Genotype-C-Induced Hepatocellular Carcinoma Revealed by iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Wei, Dahai; Zeng, Yongyi; Xing, Xiaohua; Liu, Hongzhi; Lin, Minjie; Han, Xiao; Liu, Xiaolong; Liu, Jingfeng

    2016-02-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the main cause of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in southeast Asia where HBV genotype B and genotype C are the most prevalent. Viral genotypes have been reported to significantly affect the clinical outcomes of HCC. However, the underlying molecular differences among different genotypes of HBV virus infected HCC have not been revealed. Here, we applied isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) technology integrated with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis to identify the proteome differences between the HBV genotypes B- and C-induced HCC. In brief, a total of 83 proteins in the surrounding noncancerous tissues and 136 proteins in the cancerous tissues between HBV genotype-B- and genotype-C-induced HCC were identified, respectively. This information revealed that there might be different molecular mechanisms of the tumorigenesis and development of HBV genotypes B- and C-induced HCC. Furthermore, our results indicate that the two proteins ARFIP2 and ANXA1 might be potential biomarkers for distinguishing the HBV genotypes B- and C-induced HCC. Thus, the quantitative proteomic analysis revealed molecular differences between the HBV genotypes B- and C-induced HCC, and might provide fundamental information for further deep study. PMID:26709725

  19. FRIB Cryogenic Plant Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, K.; Ganni, V.; Knudsen, P.; Casagrande, F.

    2015-12-01

    After practical changes were approved to the initial conceptual design of the cryogenic system for MSU FRIB and an agreement was made with JLab in 2012 to lead the design effort of the cryogenic plant, many activities are in place leading toward a cool-down of the linacs prior to 2018. This is mostly due to using similar equipment used at CHLII for the 12 GeV upgrade at JLab and an aggressive schedule maintained by the MSU Conventional Facilities department. Reported here is an updated status of the cryogenic plant, including the equipment procurement status, plant layout, facility equipment and project schedule.

  20. Nutritional Status Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.

    2008-01-01

    Nutritional Status Assessment (Nutrition) is the most comprehensive inflight study done by NASA to date of human physiologic changes during long-duration space flight; this includes measures of bone metabolism, oxidative damage, nutritional assessments, and hormonal changes. This study will impact both the definition of nutritional requirements and development of food systems for future space exploration missions to the Moon and Mars. This experiment will also help to understand the impact of countermeasures (exercise and pharmaceuticals) on nutritional status and nutrient requirements for astronauts.

  1. Iron status of vegetarians.

    PubMed

    Craig, W J

    1994-05-01

    An appropriately planned well-balanced vegetarian diet is compatible with an adequate iron status. Although the iron stores of vegetarians may be reduced, the incidence of iron-deficiency anemia in vegetarians is not significantly different from that in omnivores. Restrictive vegetarian diets (eg, macrobiotic) are associated with more widespread iron-deficiency anemia. Western vegetarians who consume a variety of foods have a better iron status than do those in developing countries who consume a limited diet based on unleavened, unrefined cereals. Whereas phytates, polyphenolics, and other plant constituents found in vegetarian diets inhibit nonheme-iron absorption, vitamin C, citric acid, and other organic acids facilitate nonheme-iron absorption.

  2. Prevalence and Genotyping of High Risk Human Papillomavirus in Cervical Cancer Samples from Punjab, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqa, Abida; Zainab, Maidah; Qadri, Ishtiaq; Bhatti, Muhammad Faraz; Parish, Joanna L.

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most common cause of cancer-related death in women worldwide. Infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is established as the cause of cervical carcinoma, therefore, high risk HPV detection may have prognostic significance for the women who are at increased risk of disease progression. The paucity of data on the incidence of cervical cancer in Pakistan makes it difficult to determine disease burden. Even less information is available regarding the prevalent HPV strains in cervical specimens collected from this region. Cervical cancer is a neglected disease in Pakistan in terms of screening, prevention, and vaccination. Identification and accurate genotyping of the virus burden in cancer specimens is important to inform intervention policies for future management of HPV associated disease and to potentially stratify patients dependent on HPV status. In this study, detection and genotyping of HPV types 16 and 18 from 77 cervical specimens were carried out. Consensus primers GP5+/GP6+, which detect 44 genital HPV types, and type specific primers (TS16 and TS18) were used in conjunction with newly designed type specific primers. Using a combination of these methods of detection, a total of 94.81% (95% CI ±4.95) of cervical lesions were positive for HPV. Single infections of HPV16 were detected in 24.68% (95% CI ±9.63) of total samples and HPV18 was found in 25.97% (95% CI ±9.79) samples. Interestingly, a high proportion of samples (40.26%, 95% CI ±10.95) was positive for both HPV16 and 18, indicating a higher incidence of co-infection than previously reported for similar ethnic regions. The HPV genotype of 3.90% of HPV positive samples remained undetected, although these samples were positive with the GP5+/GP6+ primer set indicating infection with an HPV type other than 16 or 18. These data indicate that the overall incidence of high risk HPV infection in cervical cancer and intraepithelial neoplasia specimens in Punjab

  3. Prevalence and genotyping of high risk human papillomavirus in cervical cancer samples from Punjab, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Siddiqa, Abida; Zainab, Maidah; Qadri, Ishtiaq; Bhatti, Muhammad Faraz; Parish, Joanna L

    2014-07-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most common cause of cancer-related death in women worldwide. Infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is established as the cause of cervical carcinoma, therefore, high risk HPV detection may have prognostic significance for the women who are at increased risk of disease progression. The paucity of data on the incidence of cervical cancer in Pakistan makes it difficult to determine disease burden. Even less information is available regarding the prevalent HPV strains in cervical specimens collected from this region. Cervical cancer is a neglected disease in Pakistan in terms of screening, prevention, and vaccination. Identification and accurate genotyping of the virus burden in cancer specimens is important to inform intervention policies for future management of HPV associated disease and to potentially stratify patients dependent on HPV status. In this study, detection and genotyping of HPV types 16 and 18 from 77 cervical specimens were carried out. Consensus primers GP5+/GP6+, which detect 44 genital HPV types, and type specific primers (TS16 and TS18) were used in conjunction with newly designed type specific primers. Using a combination of these methods of detection, a total of 94.81% (95% CI ±4.95) of cervical lesions were positive for HPV. Single infections of HPV16 were detected in 24.68% (95% CI ±9.63) of total samples and HPV18 was found in 25.97% (95% CI ±9.79) samples. Interestingly, a high proportion of samples (40.26%, 95% CI ±10.95) was positive for both HPV16 and 18, indicating a higher incidence of co-infection than previously reported for similar ethnic regions. The HPV genotype of 3.90% of HPV positive samples remained undetected, although these samples were positive with the GP5+/GP6+ primer set indicating infection with an HPV type other than 16 or 18. These data indicate that the overall incidence of high risk HPV infection in cervical cancer and intraepithelial neoplasia specimens in Punjab

  4. Effect of C282Y Genotype on Self-Reported Musculoskeletal Complications in Hereditary Hemochromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Simão, Márcio; Cancela, Leonor; Ottaviani, Sébastien; Cohen-Solal, Martine; Richette, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Objective Arthropathy that mimics osteoarthritis (OA) and osteoporosis (OP) is considered a complication of hereditary hemochromatosis (HH). We have limited data comparing OA and OP prevalence among HH patients with different hemochromatosis type 1 (HFE) genotypes. We investigated the prevalence of OA and OP in patients with HH by C282Y homozygosity and compound heterozygosity (C282Y/H63D) genotype. Methods A total of 306 patients with HH completed a questionnaire. Clinical and demographic characteristics and presence of OA, OP and related complications were compared by genotype, adjusting for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), current smoking and menopausal status. Results In total, 266 of the 306 patients (87%) were homozygous for C282Y, and 40 (13%) were compound heterozygous. The 2 groups did not differ by median age [60 (interquartile range [IQR] 53 to 68) vs. 61 (55 to 67) years, P=0.8], sex (female: 48.8% vs. 37.5%, P=0.18) or current smoking habits (12.4% vs. 10%, P=0.3). As compared with compound heterozygous patients, C282Y homozygous patients had higher median serum ferritin concentration at diagnosis [1090 (IQR 610 to 2210) vs. 603 (362 to 950) µg/L, P<0.001], higher median transferrin saturation [80% (IQR 66 to 91%) vs. 63% (55 to 72%), P<0.001]) and lower median BMI [24.8 (22.1 to 26.9) vs. 26.2 (23.5 to 30.3) kg/m2, P<0.003]. The overall prevalence of self-reported OA was significantly higher with C282Y homozygosity than compound heterozygosity (53.4% vs. 32.5%; adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 2.4 [95% confidence interval 1.2–5.0]), as was self-reported OP (25.6% vs. 7.5%; aOR 3.5 [1.1–12.1]). Conclusion Patients with C282Y homozygosity may be at increased risk of musculoskeletal complications of HH. PMID:25822977

  5. APOE polymorphism, socioeconomic status and cognitive function in mid-life--the Whitehall II longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing Hua; Brunner, Eric; Kumari, Meena; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Hawe, Emma; Talmud, Philippa; Marmot, Mickael; Humphries, Steve

    2005-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the association of the common apolipoprotein E gene (APOE) variants with cognitive function and cognitive decline in adult mid-life, and explore the possibility that APOE genotype mediates the link between socioeconomic status (SES) and cognitive function. Methods Data on cognitive function, as measured by five cognitive tests, together with APOE genotype were obtained in an occupational cohort (the Whitehall II study) of 6,004 participants aged 44–69 years (1997–1999). Cognitive change was examined in 2,717 participants who had cognitive function measured at baseline (1991–1993). Results SES based on civil service employment grade was strongly related to cognitive function. There was no association between APOE genotype and employment grade. In women, participants with APOE-ε4 had a lower memory score (p<0.05) but the result was sensitive to data from a small number of individuals. A marginal cross-sectional difference in the semantic fluency score was found (p=0.07) and there was a relative decline at follow-up (p<0.001, net change =−1.19, 95%CI = 1.90 ~ −0.49) in those with APOE-ε4 genotypes. Conclusions APOE-ε4 has little influence on cognitive decline in mid-life while SES is a strong determinant, although APOE genotype may emerge as an important factor in cognitive function in later life. PMID:16021346

  6. Microbe-ID: An open source toolbox for microbial genotyping and species identification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Development of tools to identify species, genotypes, or novel strains of invasive organisms is critical for monitoring emergence and implementing rapid response measures. Molecular markers, although critical to identifying species or genotypes, require bioinformatic tools for analysis. However, user...

  7. Biotyping and Genotyping (MLVA16) of Brucella abortus Isolated from Cattle in Brazil, 1977 to 2008

    PubMed Central

    Minharro, Sílvia; Silva Mol, Juliana P.; Dorneles, Elaine M. S.; Pauletti, Rebeca B.; Neubauer, Heinrich; Melzer, Falk; Poester, Fernando P.; Dasso, Maurício G.; Pinheiro, Elaine S.; Soares Filho, Paulo M.; Santos, Renato L.; Heinemann, Marcos B.; Lage, Andrey P.

    2013-01-01

    Brucellosis is a worldwide distributed zoonosis that causes important economic losses to animal production. In Brazil, information on the distribution of biovars and genotypes of Brucella spp. is scarce or unavailable. This study aimed (i) to biotype and genotype 137 Brazilian cattle isolates (from 1977 to 2008) of B. abortus and (ii) to analyze their distribution. B. abortus biovars 1, 2 and 3 (subgroup 3b) were confirmed and biovars 4 and 6 were first described in Brazil. Genotyping by the panel 1 revealed two groups, one clustering around genotype 40 and another around genotype 28. Panels 2A and 2B disclosed a high diversity among Brazilian B. abortus strains. Eighty-nine genotypes were found by MLVA16. MLVA16 panel 1 and 2 showed geographic clustering of some genotypes. Biotyping and MLVA16 genotyping of Brazilian B. abortus isolates were useful to better understand the epidemiology of bovine brucellosis in the region. PMID:24324670

  8. Sugarcane Genotype Performance in Three Environments (Based on Crop Cycle) at Mardan, Pakistan

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugarcane breeders often face significant genotype x environment interactions in their trials grown under multiple environments. Hence, genotypes need to be tested for their stability across different environments keeping in view the significant interactions. An experiment comprising 28 sugarcane ge...

  9. Hepatitis C virus infection: Are there still specific problems with genotype 3?

    PubMed Central

    Gondeau, Claire; Pageaux, Georges Philippe; Larrey, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is one of the most common causes of chronic liver disease and the main indication for liver transplantation worldwide. As promising specific treatments have been introduced for genotype 1, clinicians and researchers are now focusing on patients infected by non-genotype 1 HCV, particularly genotype 3. Indeed, in the golden era of direct-acting antiviral drugs, genotype 3 infections are no longer considered as easy to treat and are associated with higher risk of developing severe liver injuries, such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Moreover, HCV genotype 3 accounts for 40% of all HCV infections in Asia and is the most frequent genotype among HCV-positive injecting drug users in several countries. Here, we review recent data on HCV genotype 3 infection/treatment, including clinical aspects and the underlying genotype-specific molecular mechanisms. PMID:26576095

  10. Biological and phylogenetic characterization of a genotype VII Newcastle disease virus from Venezuela: Efficacy of vaccination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we describe the characterization a virulent genotype VII Newcastle disease virus (NDV) from Venezuela and evaluate the efficacy of heterologous genotype commercial vaccination under field and controlled rearing conditions. Biological pathotyping and molecular analysis were applied. Results sh...

  11. Genomic selection: Status in different species and challenges for breeding.

    PubMed

    Stock, K F; Reents, R

    2013-09-01

    Technical advances and development in the market for genomic tools have facilitated access to whole-genome data across species. Building-up on the acquired knowledge of the genome sequences, large-scale genotyping has been optimized for broad use, so genotype information can be routinely used to predict genetic merit. Genomic selection (GS) refers to the use of aggregates of estimated marker effects as predictors which allow improved individual differentiation at young age. Realizable benefits of GS are influenced by several factors and vary in quantity and quality between species. General characteristics and challenges of GS in implementation and routine application are described, followed by an overview over the current status of its use, prospects and challenges in important animal species. Genetic gain for a particular trait can be enhanced by shortening of the generation interval, increased selection accuracy and increased selection intensity, with species- and breed-specific relevance of the determinants. Reliable predictions based on genetic marker effects require assembly of a reference for linking of phenotype and genotype data to allow estimation and regular re-estimation. Experiences from dairy breeding have shown that international collaboration can set the course for fast and successful implementation of innovative selection tools, so genomics may significantly impact the structures of future breeding and breeding programmes. Traits of great and increasing importance, which were difficult to improve in the conventional systems, could be emphasized, if continuous availability of high-quality phenotype data can be assured. Equally elaborate strategies for genotyping and phenotyping will allow tailored approaches to balance efficient animal production, sustainability, animal health and welfare in future. PMID:23962210

  12. Genomic selection: Status in different species and challenges for breeding.

    PubMed

    Stock, K F; Reents, R

    2013-09-01

    Technical advances and development in the market for genomic tools have facilitated access to whole-genome data across species. Building-up on the acquired knowledge of the genome sequences, large-scale genotyping has been optimized for broad use, so genotype information can be routinely used to predict genetic merit. Genomic selection (GS) refers to the use of aggregates of estimated marker effects as predictors which allow improved individual differentiation at young age. Realizable benefits of GS are influenced by several factors and vary in quantity and quality between species. General characteristics and challenges of GS in implementation and routine application are described, followed by an overview over the current status of its use, prospects and challenges in important animal species. Genetic gain for a particular trait can be enhanced by shortening of the generation interval, increased selection accuracy and increased selection intensity, with species- and breed-specific relevance of the determinants. Reliable predictions based on genetic marker effects require assembly of a reference for linking of phenotype and genotype data to allow estimation and regular re-estimation. Experiences from dairy breeding have shown that international collaboration can set the course for fast and successful implementation of innovative selection tools, so genomics may significantly impact the structures of future breeding and breeding programmes. Traits of great and increasing importance, which were difficult to improve in the conventional systems, could be emphasized, if continuous availability of high-quality phenotype data can be assured. Equally elaborate strategies for genotyping and phenotyping will allow tailored approaches to balance efficient animal production, sustainability, animal health and welfare in future.

  13. Genotypic Variation and Mixtures of Lyme Borrelia in Ixodes Ticks from North America and Europe

    PubMed Central

    Crowder, Chris D.; Matthews, Heather E.; Schutzer, Steven; Rounds, Megan A.; Luft, Benjamin J.; Nolte, Oliver; Campbell, Scott R.; Phillipson, Curtis A.; Li, Feng; Sampath, Ranga; Ecker, David J.; Eshoo, Mark W.

    2010-01-01

    Background Lyme disease, caused by various species of Borrelia, is transmitted by Ixodes ticks in North America and Europe. Studies have shown the genotype of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s.) or the species of B. burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.) affects the ability of the bacteria to cause local or disseminated infection in humans. Methodology/Principal Findings We used a multilocus PCR electrospray mass spectrometry assay to determine the species and genotype Borrelia from ticks collected in New York, Connecticut, Indiana, Southern Germany, and California and characterized isolates from parts of the United States and Europe. These analyses identified 53 distinct genotypes of B. burgdorferi sensu stricto with higher resolution than ospC typing. Genotypes of other members of the B. burgdorferi sensu lato complex were also identified and genotyped including B. afzelii, B. garinii, B. lusitaniae, B. spielmanii, and B. valaisiana. While each site in North America had genotypes unique to that location, we found genotypes shared between individual regions and two genotypes found across the United States. Significant B. burgdorferi s.s. genotypic diversity was observed between North America and Europe: only 6.6% of US genotypes (3 of 45) were found in Europe and 27% of the European genotypes (3 of 11) were observed in the US. Interestingly, 39% of adult Ixodes scapularis ticks from North America were infected with more than one genotype of B. burgdorferi s.s. and 22.2% of Ixodes ricinus ticks from Germany were infected with more than one genotype of B. burgdorferi s.l. Conclusions/Significance The presence of multiple Borrelia genotypes in ticks increases the probability that a person will be infected with more than one genotype of B. burgdorferi, potentially increasing the risks of disseminated Lyme disease. Our study indicates that the genotypic diversity of Borrelia in ticks in both North America and Europe is higher then previously reported and can have

  14. Hepatitis C genotype 6: A concise review and response-guided therapy proposal

    PubMed Central

    Bunchorntavakul, Chalermrat; Chavalitdhamrong, Disaya; Tanwandee, Tawesak

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C genotype 6 is endemic in Southeast Asia [prevalence varies between 10%-60% among all hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection], as well as also sporadically reported outside the area among immigrations. The diagnosis of HCV genotype can be inaccurate with earlier methods of genotyping due to identical 5’-UTR between genotype 6 and 1b, hence the newer genotyping methods with core sequencing are preferred. Risk factors and clinical course of HCV genotype 6 do not differ considerably from other genotypes. Treatment outcome of HCV genotype 6 with a combination of pegylated interferon and ribavirin is superior to genotype 1, and nearly comparable to genotype 3, with expected sustained virological response (SVR) rates of 60%-90%. Emerging data suggests that a shorter course 24-wk treatment is equally effective as a standard 48-wk treatment, particularly for those patients who attained undetectable HCV RNA at week 4 (RVR). In addition, baseline and on-treatment predictors of response used for other HCV genotypes appear effective with genotype 6. Although some pan-genotypic direct-acting antivirals have completed phase II/III studies (sofosbuvir and simeprevir) with clinical benefit demonstrated in small number of patients with genotype 6, broad availability of these agents in Southeast Asia may not be expected in the near future. While awaiting the newer therapy, response-guided therapy seems appropriate for patients with HCV genotype 6. Patients with RVR (representing > 70% of patients) are suitable for 24-wk treatment with expected SVR rates > 80%. Patients without RVR and/or those with poor response predictors may benefit from 48 wk of therapy, and a detectable HCV RNA at week 12 (with no early virological response) serves as a stopping rule. This treatment scheme is likely to have a major economic impact on HCV therapy, particularly in Southeast Asia, wherein treatment can be truncated securely in the majority of patients with HCV genotype 6. PMID:24073301

  15. Determination of genotypes of hepatitis C virus in Venezuela by restriction fragment length polymorphism.

    PubMed Central

    Pujol, F H; Loureiro, C L; Devesa, M; Blitz, L; Parra, K; Beker, S; Liprandi, F

    1997-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus genotypes in Venezuela were analyzed by restriction fragment length polymorphism in the 5' noncoding region. The absence of BstUI digestion was found to be a useful marker for genotype 2 specimens. From 122 serum samples, 66, 20, and 2.5% were classified as genotypes 1, 2, and 3, respectively; 0.8% were classified as genotype 4; and 10% appeared to be mixed infections. PMID:9196212

  16. Mexico: Country Status Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFerren, Margaret

    A survey of the status of language usage in Mexico begins with an overview of language distribution among the population, mono- and multilingualism, changes in patterns of usage between the 1970 and 1980 censuses, and linguistic issues related to assimilation of the Indian population and the role and philosophy of the Instituto Nacional…

  17. Glueballs: a status report

    SciTech Connect

    Scharre, D.L.

    1982-01-01

    It is expected from quantum chromodynamics (QCD) that glueballs, bound states which contain gluons but no valence quarks, should exist. To date, no conclusive evidence for glueballs has been presented. After a brief review of the expected properties and experimental signatures of glueballs the status of some glueball candidate states are discussed.

  18. Status of TRISTAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagashima, Yorikiyo

    1988-02-01

    Present status of the TRISTAN accelerator1) and its three major detectors2), TOPAZ, AMY and VENUS is described. The colliding e+e- beam started operation in November 1986. During the period from Jan. 28-Feb. 19. VENUS and AMY have accumulated integrated lumunosity of 93 nb-1 and 52 nb-1 respectively. Some of their analysis results are given.

  19. Status of HRD Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    This document contains four papers presented at a symposium on the status of human resource development (HRD) research moderated by Barry Johansen at the 1996 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development. "An Exploration of the Type of Research Appearing in the AHRD Conference Proceedings" (David E. Arnold) reviews and classifies the…

  20. Angola: Country Status Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruhn, Thea C.

    A survey of the status of language usage in Angola begins with an overview of the usage and distribution of Portuguese as the official language, and the four most significant native languages and dialects spoken there: Umbundu, Kimbundu, Kikongo, and Lunda-Chokwe. The introduction of Spanish through Cuban trainers, teachers, and military advisors…

  1. Status, Numbers and Influence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melamed, David; Savage, Scott V.

    2013-01-01

    We develop a theoretical model of social influence in n-person groups. We argue that disagreement between group members introduces uncertainty into the social situation, and this uncertainty motivates people to use status characteristics to evaluate the merits of a particular opinion. Our model takes the numerical distribution of opinions and the…

  2. Chad: Country Status Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFerren, Margaret

    A survey of the status of language usage in Chad begins with an overview of the usage patterns of four languages. They include: French, designated the official language as a practical necessity; Chadian Arabic and Sara, important popularly spoken languages in their respective regions; and Toubou, a less prevalent language but one that is spoken by…

  3. Behavior, Expectations and Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, Jr, Murray; Rashotte, Lisa Slattery

    2010-01-01

    We predict effects of behavior patterns and status on performance expectations and group inequality using an integrated theory developed by Fisek, Berger and Norman (1991). We next test those predictions using new experimental techniques we developed to control behavior patterns as independent variables. In a 10-condition experiment, predictions…

  4. TRU relocation status report

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, R.M.

    1997-01-20

    To meet an internal milestone, 257 containers identified as contact- handled transuranic waste are being relocated from uncovered drum modules in the Low-Level Burial Grounds into covered facilities. The project is not yet complete. This report discusses the project and its status as of December 31, 1996.

  5. Somalia: Country Status Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFerren, Margaret

    A survey of the status of language usage in Somalia begins with an overview of the usage patterns of Somali, the official language, and three languages previously used officially: English, Italian, and Arabic. The cultural context that for many years has supported the usage of a single native language for communication and administration is also…

  6. NASA Armstrong Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Steven R.

    2014-01-01

    Armstrong (formerly Dryden) Flight Research Center continues it's legacy of exciting work in the area of dynamics and control of advanced vehicle concepts. This status presentation highlights the research and technology development that Armstrong's Control and Dynamics branch is performing in the areas of Control of Flexible Structures and Automated Cooperative Trajectories.

  7. Health Is a Status.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, George F.

    1984-01-01

    Although the terms "personal health" and "medical care" are used interchangeably, they have different meanings. Health is a personal responsibility, medicine is a drug given as a form of treatment. A new definition of health is suggested that treats health as a dynamic status. (DF)

  8. Somali. Materials Status Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Applied Linguistics, Washington, DC. Language/Area Reference Center.

    The materials status report for Somali, the official language of Somalia, is one of a series intended to provide the nonspecialist with a picture of the availability and quality of texts for teaching various languages to English speakers. The report consists of: (1) a brief narrative description of Somali, the areas where it is spoken, its major…

  9. NASA Dryden Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Timothy H.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph document reviews the status of several Dryden projects. They are: the Ikhana Project, development of the F-15 Intelligent Flight Control System, the development of a C-20A Precision Autopilot for use in Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR), the development of the X-48B Blended Wing Body aircraft, and development of Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA).

  10. Malawi: Country Status Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robson, Barbara

    A survey of the status of language usage in Malawi begins with an overview of the distribution and usage of English (the official language) and the native Bantu languages: Chichewa or Nyanja (Chinyanja), the language used by half the population; and three other Bantu languages also used there--Lomwe, Yao, and Tumbuka. The social situation favoring…

  11. VERITAS: status c.2005

    SciTech Connect

    Weekes, T. C.; Atkins, R. W.; Badran, H. M.; Blaylock, G.; Bond, I. H.; Boyle, P. J.; Bradbury, S. M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bryum, K. L.; Carter-Lewis, D. A.; Celik, O.; Chow, Y. C. K.; Cogan, P.; Cui, W.; Daniel, M. K.; Calle Perez, I. de la; Dowdall, C.; Dowkontt, P.; Duke, C.; Ergin, T.

    2006-07-11

    VERITAS (Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System), is one of a new generation of TeV gamma-ray observatories. The current status of its construction is described here. The first two telescopes and cameras have been completed and meet the design specifications; the full array of four telescopes could be operational by the end of 2006.

  12. The Status of Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banerji, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    Various factors related to the decline in social status by teachers are examined, with special consideration given to reasons for this decline in India. It is suggested that the community, government, and educational administrators must bring about changes in attitudes and relationships that affect public opinion of teachers. (LBH)

  13. Tanzania: Country Status Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robson, Barbara

    A survey of the status of language usage in Tanzania begins with an overview of the three levels of language use: (1) Swahili, the national and official language, used in public life; (2) English, used in international affairs and in technical and intellectual matters; and (3) the over 120 vernacular languages used in family and religious life,…

  14. The status of GALLEX

    SciTech Connect

    Wink, R.; The GALLEX Collaboration

    1991-12-31

    We describe the status of G A L L E X solar neutrino experiment until the end of June 1991. Since June 1990 31 desorptions with the full equipment have been done. The results of the first 27 desorptions are presented. We also describe our low level proportional counters including the counting system.

  15. The status of GALLEX

    SciTech Connect

    Wink, R. )

    1991-01-01

    We describe the status of G A L L E X solar neutrino experiment until the end of June 1991. Since June 1990 31 desorptions with the full equipment have been done. The results of the first 27 desorptions are presented. We also describe our low level proportional counters including the counting system.

  16. Status and the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Utevsky, Amanda V.; Platt, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    Social hierarchy is a fact of life for many animals. Navigating social hierarchy requires understanding one's own status relative to others and behaving accordingly, while achieving higher status may call upon cunning and strategic thinking. The neural mechanisms mediating social status have become increasingly well understood in invertebrates and model organisms like fish and mice but until recently have remained more opaque in humans and other primates. In a new study in this issue, Noonan and colleagues explore the neural correlates of social rank in macaques. Using both structural and functional brain imaging, they found neural changes associated with individual monkeys' social status, including alterations in the amygdala, hypothalamus, and brainstem—areas previously implicated in dominance-related behavior in other vertebrates. A separate but related network in the temporal and prefrontal cortex appears to mediate more cognitive aspects of strategic social behavior. These findings begin to delineate the neural circuits that enable us to navigate our own social worlds. A major remaining challenge is identifying how these networks contribute functionally to our social lives, which may open new avenues for developing innovative treatments for social disorders. PMID:25181006

  17. A biomarker based on gene expression indicates plant water status in controlled and natural environments.

    PubMed

    Marchand, Gwenaëlle; Mayjonade, Baptiste; Varès, Didier; Blanchet, Nicolas; Boniface, Marie-Claude; Maury, Pierre; Nambinina Andrianasolo, Fety; Nambinina, Fety Andrianasolo; Burger, Philippe; Debaeke, Philippe; Casadebaig, Pierre; Vincourt, Patrick; Langlade, Nicolas B

    2013-12-01

    Plant or soil water status is required in many scientific fields to understand plant responses to drought. Because the transcriptomic response to abiotic conditions, such as water deficit, reflects plant water status, genomic tools could be used to develop a new type of molecular biomarker. Using the sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) as a model species to study the transcriptomic response to water deficit both in greenhouse and field conditions, we specifically identified three genes that showed an expression pattern highly correlated to plant water status as estimated by the pre-dawn leaf water potential, fraction of transpirable soil water, soil water content or fraction of total soil water in controlled conditions. We developed a generalized linear model to estimate these classical water status indicators from the expression levels of the three selected genes under controlled conditions. This estimation was independent of the four tested genotypes and the stage (pre- or post-flowering) of the plant. We further validated this gene expression biomarker under field conditions for four genotypes in three different trials, over a large range of water status, and we were able to correct their expression values for a large diurnal sampling period.

  18. Quantitation of HBsAg predicts response to entecavir therapy in HBV genotype C patients

    PubMed Central

    Orito, Etsuro; Fujiwara, Kei; Kanie, Hiroshi; Ban, Tesshin; Yamada, Tomonori; Hayashi, Katsumi

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To analysis the factors that predict the response to entecavir therapy in chronic hepatitis patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotype C. METHODS: Fifty patients [hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg)-negative:HBeAg-positive = 26:24] with HBV genotype C, who received naïve entecavir therapy for > 2 years, were analyzed. Patients who showed HBV DNA levels ≥ 3.0 log viral copies/mL after 2 years of entecavir therapy were designated as slow-responders, while those that showed < 3.0 log copies/mL were termed rapid-responders. Quantitative hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) levels (qHBsAg) were determined by the Architect HBsAg QT immunoassay. Hepatitis B core-related antigen was detected by enzyme immunoassay. Pre-C and Core promoter mutations were determined using by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Drug-resistance mutations were detected by the PCR-Invader method. RESULTS: At year 2, HBV DNA levels in all patients in the HBeAg-negative group were < 3.0 log copies/mL. In contrast, in the HBeAg-positive group, 41.7% were slow-responders, while 58.3% were rapid-responders. No entecavir-resistant mutants were detected in the slow-responders. When the pretreatment factors were compared between the slow- and rapid-responders; the median qHBsAg in the slow-responders was 4.57 log IU/mL, compared with 3.63 log IU/mL in the rapid-responders (P < 0.01). When the pretreatment factors predictive of HBV DNA-negative status at year 2 in all 50 patients were analyzed, HBeAg-negative status, low HBV DNA levels, and low qHBsAg levels were significant (P < 0.01). Multivariate analysis revealed that the low qHBsAg level was the most significant predictive factor (P = 0.03). CONCLUSION: Quantitation of HBsAg could be a useful indicator to predict response to entecavir therapy. PMID:23112549

  19. Aphid and ladybird beetle abundance depend on the interaction of spatial effects and genotypic diversity.

    PubMed

    Genung, Mark A; Crutsinger, Gregory M; Bailey, Joseph K; Schweitzer, Jennifer A; Sanders, Nathan J

    2012-01-01

    Intraspecific variation and genotypic diversity of host-plants can affect the structure of associated arthropod communities and the dynamics of populations. Similarly, neighboring plants can also affect interactions between host-plants and their associated arthropods. However, most studies on the effects of host-plant genotypes have largely ignored the potential effects of neighboring host-plants on arthropod communities. In this study, we used a common garden experiment to ask how spatial effects of neighboring patches, along with genotype identity and genotypic diversity in tall goldenrod (Solidago altissima), affect the abundances of a common goldenrod herbivore (Uroleucon nigrotuberculatum) and their dominant predator (Harmonia axyridis, a ladybird beetle). Aphid abundance varied 80-fold among genotypes, while ladybird beetle abundance was not affected by genotype identity. Additionally, there were strong effects of neighboring plots: aphid abundance in a focal plot was positively correlated to aphid abundance in nearby plots, suggesting strong spatial patterning in the abundance of aphids. Neither aphid nor ladybird beetle abundance was affected by genotypic diversity. However, focal plot genotypic diversity mediated the strength of the neighborhood effect (i.e., strong effects for genotype polyculture focal plots and weak effects for genotype monoculture focal plots). Our results show that aphids were directly influenced by host-plant genotype identity while ladybird beetles responded mainly to prey abundance, and suggest that genotypic diversity can influence the effects of spatial processes on the plant-herbivore interactions. PMID:21805301

  20. Greater diversity of hepatitis C virus genotypes found in Hong Kong than in mainland China.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y Y; Lok, A S; Chan, D T; Widell, A

    1995-01-01

    A hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotyping PCR assay based on type-specific primers was expanded to include genotype 6a as well as genotypes 1a, 1b, 2a, and 3a. The nucleotide sequences of a 194-bp fragment in the center of the HCV core gene showed that the homologies between genotype 6a and genotypes 1a, 1b, 2a, 2b, 3a, and 5 were 81.2, 82.1, 73.8, 77.3, 81.4, and 78.9%, respectively. A high degree of homology (99.6%) was seen in the amplified core region among eight clinically unrelated genotype 6a isolates. Although the Hong Kong Chinese patients had predominantly genotype 1b (70%), it was noteworthy that genotype 6a was the second most common genotype (14%). Four other HCV genotypes--1a, 1b, 2a, and 2b--were also present. In contrast, HCV infection by mainland China was confined to genotypes 1b and 2a. Thus, we found a greater diversity of HCV genotypes in Hong Kong than in mainland China. PMID:8576348

  1. Genome-wide copy number variations using SNP genotyping in a mixed breed swine population

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Copy number variations (CNVs) are increasingly understood to affect phenotypic variation. This study uses SNP genotyping of trios of mixed breed swine to add to the catalog of known genotypic variation in an important agricultural animal. Porcine SNP60 BeadChip genotypes were collected from 1802 pi...

  2. Pathogenesis of new sub-genotypes of Newcastle disease virus strains from Israel and Pakistan

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Newcastle disease (ND) is a devastating disease of poultry worldwide caused by virulent strains of Newcastle disease virus (NDV). New genotypes and sub-genotypes of NDV frequently emerge. In the past few years, NDV strains belonging to sub-genotype VIIi and XIIIb emerged in the Middle East and Asi...

  3. Application of genotyping-by-sequencing for mapping disease resistance in grapevine breeding families

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genotyping-by-Sequencing (GBS) is a low-cost, high-throughput, method for genome-wide polymorphism discovery and genotyping adjacent to restriction sites. Since 2010, GBS has been applied for the genotyping of over 12,000 grape breeding lines, with a primary focus on identifying markers predictive ...

  4. Aphid and ladybird beetle abundance depend on the interaction of spatial effects and genotypic diversity.

    PubMed

    Genung, Mark A; Crutsinger, Gregory M; Bailey, Joseph K; Schweitzer, Jennifer A; Sanders, Nathan J

    2012-01-01

    Intraspecific variation and genotypic diversity of host-plants can affect the structure of associated arthropod communities and the dynamics of populations. Similarly, neighboring plants can also affect interactions between host-plants and their associated arthropods. However, most studies on the effects of host-plant genotypes have largely ignored the potential effects of neighboring host-plants on arthropod communities. In this study, we used a common garden experiment to ask how spatial effects of neighboring patches, along with genotype identity and genotypic diversity in tall goldenrod (Solidago altissima), affect the abundances of a common goldenrod herbivore (Uroleucon nigrotuberculatum) and their dominant predator (Harmonia axyridis, a ladybird beetle). Aphid abundance varied 80-fold among genotypes, while ladybird beetle abundance was not affected by genotype identity. Additionally, there were strong effects of neighboring plots: aphid abundance in a focal plot was positively correlated to aphid abundance in nearby plots, suggesting strong spatial patterning in the abundance of aphids. Neither aphid nor ladybird beetle abundance was affected by genotypic diversity. However, focal plot genotypic diversity mediated the strength of the neighborhood effect (i.e., strong effects for genotype polyculture focal plots and weak effects for genotype monoculture focal plots). Our results show that aphids were directly influenced by host-plant genotype identity while ladybird beetles responded mainly to prey abundance, and suggest that genotypic diversity can influence the effects of spatial processes on the plant-herbivore interactions.

  5. Identification of new sub-genotypes of virulent Newcastle disease virus with potential panzootic features.

    PubMed

    Miller, Patti J; Haddas, Ruth; Simanov, Luba; Lublin, Avishay; Rehmani, Shafqat Fatima; Wajid, Abdul; Bibi, Tasra; Khan, Taseer Ahmad; Yaqub, Tahir; Setiyaningsih, Surachmi; Afonso, Claudio L

    2015-01-01

    Virulent Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isolates from new sub-genotypes within genotype VII are rapidly spreading through Asia and the Middle East causing outbreaks of Newcastle disease (ND) characterized by significant illness and mortality in poultry, suggesting the existence of a fifth panzootic. These viruses, which belong to the new sub-genotypes VIIh and VIIi, have epizootic characteristics and do not appear to have originated directly from other genotype VII NDV isolates that are currently circulating elsewhere, but are related to the present and past Indonesian NDV viruses isolated from wild birds since the 80s. Viruses from sub-genotype VIIh were isolated in Indonesia (2009-2010), Malaysia (2011), China (2011), and Cambodia (2011-2012) and are closely related to the Indonesian NDV isolated in 2007, APMV1/Chicken/Karangasem, Indonesia (Bali-01)/2007. Since 2011 and during 2012 highly related NDV isolates from sub-genotype VIIi have been isolated from poultry production facilities and occasionally from pet birds, throughout Indonesia, Pakistan and Israel. In Pakistan, the viruses of sub-genotype VIIi have replaced NDV isolates of genotype XIII, which were commonly isolated in 2009-2011, and they have become the predominant sub-genotype causing ND outbreaks since 2012. In a similar fashion, the numbers of viruses of sub-genotype VIIi isolated in Israel increased in 2012, and isolates from this sub-genotype are now found more frequently than viruses from the previously predominant sub-genotypes VIId and VIIb, from 2009 to 2012. All NDV isolates of sub-genotype VIIi are approximately 99% identical to each other and are more closely related to Indonesian viruses isolated from 1983 through 1990 than to those of genotype VII, still circulating in the region. Similarly, in addition to the Pakistani NDV isolates of the original genotype XIII (now called sub-genotype XIIIa), there is an additional sub-genotype (XIIIb) that was initially detected in India and Iran

  6. The Effect of the APOE Genotype on Individual BrainAGE in Normal Aging, Mild Cognitive Impairment, and Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Löwe, Luise Christine; Gaser, Christian; Franke, Katja

    2016-01-01

    In our aging society, diseases in the elderly come more and more into focus. An important issue in research is Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's Disease (AD) with their causes, diagnosis, treatment, and disease prediction. We applied the Brain Age Gap Estimation (BrainAGE) method to examine the impact of the Apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype on structural brain aging, utilizing longitudinal magnetic resonance image (MRI) data of 405 subjects from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database. We tested for differences in neuroanatomical aging between carrier and non-carrier of APOE ε4 within the diagnostic groups and for longitudinal changes in individual brain aging during about three years follow-up. We further examined whether a combination of BrainAGE and APOE status could improve prediction accuracy of conversion to AD in MCI patients. The influence of the APOE status on conversion from MCI to AD was analyzed within all allelic subgroups as well as for ε4 carriers and non-carriers. The BrainAGE scores differed significantly between normal controls, stable MCI (sMCI) and progressive MCI (pMCI) as well as AD patients. Differences in BrainAGE changing rates over time were observed for APOE ε4 carrier status as well as in the pMCI and AD groups. At baseline and during follow-up, BrainAGE scores correlated significantly with neuropsychological test scores in APOE ε4 carriers and non-carriers, especially in pMCI and AD patients. Prediction of conversion was most accurate using the BrainAGE score as compared to neuropsychological test scores, even when the patient's APOE status was unknown. For assessing the individual risk of coming down with AD as well as predicting conversion from MCI to AD, the BrainAGE method proves to be a useful and accurate tool even if the information of the patient's APOE status is missing. PMID:27410431

  7. Prototheca zopfii Genotype 2-induced Nasal Dermatitis in a Cat.

    PubMed

    Huth, N; Wenkel, R F; Roschanski, N; Rösler, U; Plagge, L; Schöniger, S

    2015-05-01

    Few published cases of feline protothecosis exist; all of these were restricted to the skin and speciation of the causative organism revealed an infection with Prototheca wickerhamii in each case. This report describes Prototheca zopfii genotype 2-induced inflammation of the nasal skin and cutaneous mucosa of the right nostril in a 14-year-old neutered female domestic shorthair cat. Microscopical examination revealed marked pyogranulomatous inflammation with numerous intralesional algae. These had a round to ovoid shape, were 8-21 μm in diameter, formed endospores and displayed a positive immunoreaction for Prototheca zopfii antigen. By 18S rRNA gene amplification and sequencing the intralesional algae were confirmed as Prototheca zopfii and further characterized as Prototheca zopfii genotype 2. This case report reveals Prototheca zopfii as an additional Prototheca species associated with feline protothecosis. PMID:25814431

  8. Rationality and emotionality: serotonin transporter genotype influences reasoning bias.

    PubMed

    Stollstorff, Melanie; Bean, Stephanie E; Anderson, Lindsay M; Devaney, Joseph M; Vaidya, Chandan J

    2013-04-01

    Reasoning often occurs under emotionally charged, opinion-laden circumstances. The belief-bias effect indexes the extent to which reasoning is based upon beliefs rather than logical structure. We examined whether emotional content increases this effect, particularly for adults genetically predisposed to be more emotionally reactive. SS/SL(G) carriers of the serotonin transporter genotype (5-HTTLPR) were less accurate selectively for evaluating emotional relational reasoning problems with belief-logic conflict relative to L(A)L(A) carriers. Trait anxiety was positively associated with emotional belief-bias, and the 5-HTTLPR genotype significantly accounted for the variance in this association. Thus, deductive reasoning, a higher cognitive ability, is sensitive to differences in emotionality rooted in serotonin neurotransmitter function.

  9. Physiological sex predicts hybrid sterility regardless of genotype.

    PubMed

    Malone, John H; Michalak, P

    2008-01-01

    Reproductive isolation between biological species is characterized by Haldane's rule, which states that the heterogametic sex (XY or ZW) suffers the most dysfunctional effects of hybridization. It has been hypothesized that, in addition to X-linked recessive genes, Haldane's rule also reflects the faster evolution of genes related to male reproduction (faster-male evolution). We used sex-reversed hybrid Xenopus to test faster-male evolution by examining the fertility of sex-reversed individuals with the genotype of the inverse phenotypic sex. Hybrid males are sterile and hybrid females are fertile irrespective of their genotypic sex. Gene expression profiles match these adult phenotypes, and our results demonstrate that faster-male evolution is the most likely mechanism producing hybrid male sterility.

  10. Rationality and emotionality: serotonin transporter genotype influences reasoning bias

    PubMed Central

    Bean, Stephanie E.; Anderson, Lindsay M.; Devaney, Joseph M.; Vaidya, Chandan J.

    2013-01-01

    Reasoning often occurs under emotionally charged, opinion-laden circumstances. The belief-bias effect indexes the extent to which reasoning is based upon beliefs rather than logical structure. We examined whether emotional content increases this effect, particularly for adults genetically predisposed to be more emotionally reactive. SS/SLG carriers of the serotonin transporter genotype (5-HTTLPR) were less accurate selectively for evaluating emotional relational reasoning problems with belief-logic conflict relative to LALA carriers. Trait anxiety was positively associated with emotional belief-bias, and the 5-HTTLPR genotype significantly accounted for the variance in this association. Thus, deductive reasoning, a higher cognitive ability, is sensitive to differences in emotionality rooted in serotonin neurotransmitter function. PMID:22275169

  11. Isolation and genotypic comparison of oral streptococci from experimental bitemarks.

    PubMed

    Borgula, L M; Robinson, F G; Rahimi, M; Chew, K E K; Birchmeier, K R; Owens, S G; Kieser, J A; Tompkins, G R

    2003-12-01

    The feasibility of recovering and genotypically comparing oral bacteria from bitemarks for forensic purposes was assessed experimentally. Volunteers firmly bit their own upper arms and bitemarks were sampled at intervals to recover viable Streptococcus isolates. The recoverability of bacteria decreased over time but an average of more than one thousand viable organisms was recovered 24 hrs after biting, provided the site remained relatively undisturbed. Physical exertion, manual rubbing and application of moisturizing lotion all decreased bacterial recoverability compared to controls. Streptococci could also be recovered from bites inflicted on various fabrics. Genomic profiles (DNA "fingerprints") of bacteria recovered from bitemarks could be identified exclusively with those from the teeth of the individual responsible. These findings suggest that a bacterial genotyping approach to bitemark analysis could have forensic application in situations where the perpetrator's DNA cannot be recovered from an oral contact site.

  12. Isolation and genotypic comparison of oral streptococci from experimental bitemarks.

    PubMed

    Borgula, L M; Robinson, F G; Rahimi, M; Chew, K E K; Birchmeier, K R; Owens, S G; Kieser, J A; Tompkins, G R

    2003-12-01

    The feasibility of recovering and genotypically comparing oral bacteria from bitemarks for forensic purposes was assessed experimentally. Volunteers firmly bit their own upper arms and bitemarks were sampled at intervals to recover viable Streptococcus isolates. The recoverability of bacteria decreased over time but an average of more than one thousand viable organisms was recovered 24 hrs after biting, provided the site remained relatively undisturbed. Physical exertion, manual rubbing and application of moisturizing lotion all decreased bacterial recoverability compared to controls. Streptococci could also be recovered from bites inflicted on various fabrics. Genomic profiles (DNA "fingerprints") of bacteria recovered from bitemarks could be identified exclusively with those from the teeth of the individual responsible. These findings suggest that a bacterial genotyping approach to bitemark analysis could have forensic application in situations where the perpetrator's DNA cannot be recovered from an oral contact site. PMID:14686677

  13. Genotyping, evolution and epidemiological findings of Rickettsia species.

    PubMed

    Merhej, Vicky; Angelakis, Emmanouil; Socolovschi, Cristina; Raoult, Didier

    2014-07-01

    Rickettsiae are obligate intracellular bacteria that can cause mild to life-threatening diseases, including epidemic typhus, one of the oldest pernicious diseases of mankind. Clinical awareness of rickettsial diseases and molecular diagnosis have shown that rickettsioses should be viewed as new emerging and reemerging diseases. Rickettsia has been shown to be a large genus with a worldwide distribution, a very diverse host range, including hosts that have no relationship with vertebrate. Genomic studies have demonstrated genome reduction due to gene loss associated with increased pathogenicity and horizontal DNA acquisition according to a sympatric mode of evolution in hosts that contain several organisms. This article presents a review of genotyping techniques and examines the principle of genotype determination in terms of taxonomic strategies and detection methods. This article summarizes the epidemiological and pathological features of Rickettsia and discusses the genomic findings that help the understanding of the evolution of pathogenicity including the deleterious mutations of repair systems and the toxin-antitoxin systems.

  14. Microsatellite genotyping of individual abalone larvae: parentage assignment in aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Selvamani, M J; Degnan, S M; Degnan, B M

    2001-09-01

    In aquaculture, microsatellite DNA markers are used to genotype parental broodstock, to assess fertilization success, and to maintain pedigree information for selective breeding. In this study we genotyped individual Haliotis asinina larvae by analyzing a suit of polymorphic microsatellite loci. At least 10 loci can be analyzed from a single abalone veliger larva. We assayed 5 polymorphic loci to identify the parents of individual larvae produced in 3 separate crosses. In all cases, the parents of an individual veliger could be determined from as few as 3 loci. The microsatellite analysis revealed that, in each of our crosses, a single male fathered most of the veligers, despite efforts to normalize the amount of sperm contributed by competing males. These observations suggest that highly controlled breeding practices may be required to ensure that the genetic diversity of an abalone population produced for aquaculture is maintained at the level of diversity of the original broodstock.

  15. Genotypic and environmental variation in autumn-sown onions.

    PubMed

    Fennell, J F; Salter, P J

    1977-01-01

    Seven onion cultivars of Japanese and European origin were evaluated in autumn-sown trials, at six sites over two seasons. Within each season genotypic differences were detected for winter-kill, bolting, maturity time and yield. In general the Japanese cultivars showed consistently lower levels of bolting and winter-kill and earlier maturity relative to the European cultivars. Environmental effects were important with differences between seasons, sites and sowings recorded for most characters. It was concluded that the use of early and late August sowings would provide suitable screening environments for bolting and winter-kill respectively. There were also differences between genotypes in their linear response to environments as shown by joint regression analyses. 'Express Yellow O-X' (hybrid) showed least response to environments for bolting and winter-kill and 'Senshyu semi-globe Yellow' gave the most consistent time to maturity over environments. PMID:24317534

  16. Surveillance for Echinococcus canadensis genotypes in Canadian ungulates☆

    PubMed Central

    Schurer, Janna; Shury, Todd; Leighton, Frederick; Jenkins, Emily

    2013-01-01

    The geographic and host distribution, prevalence and genotypes of Echinococcus canadensis in wild ungulates in Canada are described to better understand the significance for wildlife and public health. We observed E. canadensis in 10.5% (11/105) of wild elk (wapiti; Cervus canadensis) in Riding Mountain National Park, Manitoba, examined at necropsy, over two consecutive years (2010–2011). Molecular characterization of hydatid cyst material from these elk, as well as three other intermediate wildlife host species, was based on sequence of a 470 bp region of the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (NAD1) mitochondrial gene. In moose [Alces alces], elk, and caribou [Rangifer tarandus] from northwestern Canada, the G10 genotype was the only one present, and the G8 genotype was detected in a muskox (Ovibos moschatus) from northeastern Canada. On a search of the national wildlife health database (1992–2010), cervids with hydatid cysts were reported in all provinces and territories except the Atlantic provinces, from which wolves [Canis lupis] are historically absent. Of the 93 cervids with records of hydatid cysts, 42% were elk, 37% were moose, 14% were caribou, and 6% were white-tailed and mule deer [Odocoileus virginianus and Odocoileus hemonius]. In these animals, 83% of cysts were detected in lungs alone, 8% in both lungs and liver, 3% in liver alone, and 6% in other organs. These observations can help target surveillance programs and contribute to a better understanding of ecology, genetic diversity, and genotype pathogenicity in the Echinococcus granulosus species complex. PMID:24533321

  17. Myeloperoxidase genotype, fruit and vegetable consumption, and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jiyoung; Gammon, Marilie D; Santella, Regina M; Gaudet, Mia M; Britton, Julie A; Teitelbaum, Susan L; Terry, Mary Beth; Neugut, Alfred I; Josephy, P David; Ambrosone, Christine B

    2004-10-15

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO), an antimicrobial enzyme in the breast, generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) endogenously. An MPO G463A polymorphism exists in the promoter region, with the variant A allele conferring lower transcription activity than the common G allele. Because oxidative stress may play a role in breast carcinogenesis, we evaluated MPO genotypes in relation to breast cancer risk among 1,011 cases and 1,067 controls from the Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project (1996-1997). We also assessed the potential modifying effects of dietary antioxidants and hormonally related risk factors on these relationships. Women over 20 years with incident breast cancer who were residents of Nassau and Suffolk Counties, NY, were identified as potential cases. Population-based controls were frequency matched by 5-year age groups. Genotyping was performed with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) technology, and suspected breast cancer risk factors and usual dietary intake were assessed during an in-person interview. Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Having at least one A allele was associated with an overall 13% reduction in breast cancer risk. When consumption of fruits and vegetables and specific dietary antioxidants were dichotomized at the median, inverse associations with either GA or AA genotypes were most pronounced among women who consumed higher amounts of total fruits and vegetables (odds ratio, 0.75; 95% confidence interval, 0.58-0.97); this association was not noted among the low-consumption group (P for interaction = 0.04). Relationships were strongest among premenopausal women. Results from this first study of MPO genotypes and breast cancer risk indicate that MPO variants, related to reduced generation of ROS, are associated with decreased breast cancer risk, and emphasize the importance of fruit and vegetable consumption in reduction of breast

  18. A Molecular Investigation of Genotype by Environment Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Dean, A. M.

    1995-01-01

    The fitnesses conferred by seven lactose operons, which had been transduced into a common genetic background from natural isolates of Escherichia coli, were determined during competition for growth rate-limiting quantities of galactosyl-glycerol, a naturally occurring galactoside. The fitnesses of these same operons have been previously determined on lactose and three artificial galactosides, lactulose, methyl-galactoside and galactosyl-arabinose. Analysis suggests that although marked genotype by environment interactions occur, changes in the fitness rankings are rare. The relative activities of the β-galactosidases and the permeases were determined on galactosyl-glycerol, lactose, lactulose and methyl-galactoside. Both enzymes display considerable kinetic variation. The β-galactosidase alleles provide no evidence for genotype by environment interactions at the level of enzyme activity. The permease alleles display genotype by environment interactions with a few causing changes in activity rankings. The contributions to fitness made by the permeases and the β-galactosidases were partitioned using metabolic control analysis. Most of the genotype by environment interaction at the level of fitness is generated by changes in the distribution of control among steps in the pathway, particularly at the permease where large control coefficients ensure that its kinetic variation has marked fitness effects. Indeed, changes in activity rankings at the permease account for the few changes in fitness rankings. In contrast, the control coefficients of the β-galactosidase are sufficiently small that its kinetic variation is in, or close to, the neutral limit. The selection coefficients are larger on the artificial galactosides because the control coefficients of the permease and β-galactosidase are larger. The flux summation theorem requires that control coefficients associated with other steps in the pathway must be reduced, implying that the selection at these steps will

  19. Practical applications of genotypic surveys for forensic STR testing.

    PubMed

    Holt, C L; Stauffer, C; Wallin, J M; Lazaruk, K D; Nguyen, T; Budowle, B; Walsh, P S

    2000-08-14

    Legitimate genotype frequency estimation for multiallelic loci relies on component allele frequencies, as population surveys represent only a fraction of possible DNA profiles. Multilocus genotypes from two ethnic human populations, African American (n=195) and U.S. Caucasian (n=200), were compiled at 13 STR loci that are used worldwide in forensic investigation (D3S1358, vWA, FGA, D16S539, TH01, TPOX, CSF1PO, D8S1179, D21S11, D18S51, D5S818, D13S317, and D7S820). Sex-specific AmpFlSTR multiplexes provided stringent PCR-based STR typing specifically optimized for multicolor fluorescence detection. Heterozygosity at each STR locus ranged from 0.57 to 0.89 and encompassed from seven (TH01) to twenty-one (D21S11) alleles. Homozygosity tests, tests based on the distinct numbers of observed homozygous and heterozygous classes, log likelihood ratio tests, and exact tests assessed that the degree of divergence from theoretical Hardy-Weinberg proportions for all 13 STRs does not have practical consequence in genotype frequency estimation. Departures from linkage equilibrium, between loci, that imposed significance to forensic calculations were not indicated by observed variance of the number of heterozygous loci or Karlin interclass correlation tests. For forensic casework, reliable multilocus profile estimates may be obtained from the product of component genotype frequencies, each calculated through application of the Hardy-Weinberg equation to population database allele frequency estimates reported here. The average probability that two randomly selected, unrelated individuals possess an identical thirteen-locus DNA profile was one in 1.8x10(15) African Americans and one in 3.8x10(14) U.S. Caucasians. PMID:10940595

  20. Diagnostic Challenges in Retinitis Pigmentosa: Genotypic Multiplicity and Phenotypic Variability

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Susie; Vaccarella, Leah; Olatunji, Sunday; Cebulla, Colleen; Christoforidis, John

    2011-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogeneous group of inherited retinal disorders. Diagnosis can be challenging as more than 40 genes are known to cause non-syndromic RP and phenotypic expression can differ significantly resulting in variations in disease severity, age of onset, rate of progression, and clinical findings. We describe the clinical manifestations of RP, the more commonly known causative gene mutations, and the genotypic-phenotypic correlation of RP. PMID:22131872

  1. Genotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: application in epidemiologic studies

    PubMed Central

    Kato-Maeda, Midori; Metcalfe, John Z.; Flores, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Genotyping is used to track specific isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a community. It has been successfully used in epidemiologic research (termed ‘molecular epidemiology’) to study the transmission dynamics of TB. In this article, we review the genetic markers used in molecular epidemiologic studies including the use of whole-genome sequencing technology. We also review the public health application of molecular epidemiologic tools. PMID:21366420

  2. Surveillance for Echinococcus canadensis genotypes in Canadian ungulates.

    PubMed

    Schurer, Janna; Shury, Todd; Leighton, Frederick; Jenkins, Emily

    2013-12-01

    The geographic and host distribution, prevalence and genotypes of Echinococcus canadensis in wild ungulates in Canada are described to better understand the significance for wildlife and public health. We observed E. canadensis in 10.5% (11/105) of wild elk (wapiti; Cervus canadensis) in Riding Mountain National Park, Manitoba, examined at necropsy, over two consecutive years (2010-2011). Molecular characterization of hydatid cyst material from these elk, as well as three other intermediate wildlife host species, was based on sequence of a 470 bp region of the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (NAD1) mitochondrial gene. In moose [Alces alces], elk, and caribou [Rangifer tarandus] from northwestern Canada, the G10 genotype was the only one present, and the G8 genotype was detected in a muskox (Ovibos moschatus) from northeastern Canada. On a search of the national wildlife health database (1992-2010), cervids with hydatid cysts were reported in all provinces and territories except the Atlantic provinces, from which wolves [Canis lupis] are historically absent. Of the 93 cervids with records of hydatid cysts, 42% were elk, 37% were moose, 14% were caribou, and 6% were white-tailed and mule deer [Odocoileus virginianus and Odocoileus hemonius]. In these animals, 83% of cysts were detected in lungs alone, 8% in both lungs and liver, 3% in liver alone, and 6% in other organs. These observations can help target surveillance programs and contribute to a better understanding of ecology, genetic diversity, and genotype pathogenicity in the Echinococcus granulosus species complex. PMID:24533321

  3. Phylogeography of Japanese Encephalitis Virus: Genotype Is Associated with Climate

    PubMed Central

    Schuh, Amy J.; Ward, Melissa J.; Leigh Brown, Andrew J.; Barrett, Alan D. T.

    2013-01-01

    The circulation of vector-borne zoonotic viruses is largely determined by the overlap in the geographical distributions of virus-competent vectors and reservoir hosts. What is less clear are the factors influencing the distribution of virus-specific lineages. Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is the most important etiologic agent of epidemic encephalitis worldwide, and is primarily maintained between vertebrate reservoir hosts (avian and swine) and culicine mosquitoes. There are five genotypes of JEV: GI-V. In recent years, GI has displaced GIII as the dominant JEV genotype and GV has re-emerged after almost 60 years of undetected virus circulation. JEV is found throughout most of Asia, extending from maritime Siberia in the north to Australia in the south, and as far as Pakistan to the west and Saipan to the east. Transmission of JEV in temperate zones is epidemic with the majority of cases occurring in summer months, while transmission in tropical zones is endemic and occurs year-round at lower rates. To test the hypothesis that viruses circulating in these two geographical zones are genetically distinct, we applied Bayesian phylogeographic, categorical data analysis and phylogeny-trait association test techniques to the largest JEV dataset compiled to date, representing the envelope (E) gene of 487 isolates collected from 12 countries over 75 years. We demonstrated that GIII and the recently emerged GI-b are temperate genotypes likely maintained year-round in northern latitudes, while GI-a and GII are tropical genotypes likely maintained primarily through mosquito-avian and mosquito-swine transmission cycles. This study represents a new paradigm directly linking viral molecular evolution and climate. PMID:24009790

  4. Phylogeography of Japanese encephalitis virus: genotype is associated with climate.

    PubMed

    Schuh, Amy J; Ward, Melissa J; Brown, Andrew J Leigh; Barrett, Alan D T

    2013-01-01

    The circulation of vector-borne zoonotic viruses is largely determined by the overlap in the geographical distributions of virus-competent vectors and reservoir hosts. What is less clear are the factors influencing the distribution of virus-specific lineages. Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is the most important etiologic agent of epidemic encephalitis worldwide, and is primarily maintained between vertebrate reservoir hosts (avian and swine) and culicine mosquitoes. There are five genotypes of JEV: GI-V. In recent years, GI has displaced GIII as the dominant JEV genotype and GV has re-emerged after almost 60 years of undetected virus circulation. JEV is found throughout most of Asia, extending from maritime Siberia in the north to Australia in the south, and as far as Pakistan to the west and Saipan to the east. Transmission of JEV in temperate zones is epidemic with the majority of cases occurring in summer months, while transmission in tropical zones is endemic and occurs year-round at lower rates. To test the hypothesis that viruses circulating in these two geographical zones are genetically distinct, we applied Bayesian phylogeographic, categorical data analysis and phylogeny-trait association test techniques to the largest JEV dataset compiled to date, representing the envelope (E) gene of 487 isolates collected from 12 countries over 75 years. We demonstrated that GIII and the recently emerged GI-b are temperate genotypes likely maintained year-round in northern latitudes, while GI-a and GII are tropical genotypes likely maintained primarily through mosquito-avian and mosquito-swine transmission cycles. This study represents a new paradigm directly linking viral molecular evolution and climate.

  5. Temporal dynamics and subpopulation analysis of Theileria orientalis genotypes in cattle.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, C; Micallef, M; Alex, S M; Collins, D; Djordjevic, S P; Bogema, D R

    2015-06-01

    In Australia, outbreaks of clinical theileriosis caused by Theileria orientalis have been largely associated with the Ikeda genotype which can occur as a sole infection, or more commonly, as a mixture of genotypes. The most prevalent genotype, Chitose, frequently co-occurs with type Ikeda, however the role of this genotype in clinical disease has not been clearly established. Furthermore, the dynamics of individual genotypes in field infection of cattle have not been examined. In this study we developed quantitative PCR (qPCR) and genotyping methods to examine the role of the Chitose genotype in clinical disease and to investigate the temporal dynamics of T. orientalis Ikeda, Chitose and Buffeli genotypes in naïve animals introduced to a T. orientalis-endemic area. Analysis of the major piroplasm surface protein (MPSP) genes of Chitose isolates revealed the presence of two distinct phylogenetic clusters, Chitose A and Chitose B. A genotyping assay aimed at determining Chitose A/B allele frequency revealed that the Chitose A phylogenetic cluster is strongly associated with clinical disease but nearly always co-occurs with the Ikeda genotype. qPCR revealed that the Chitose genotype (particularly Chitose A), undergoes temporal switching in conjunction with the Ikeda genotype and contributes substantially to the overall parasite burden. The benign Buffeli genotype can also undergo temporal switching but levels of this genotype appear to remain low relative to the Ikeda and Chitose types. Interplay between vector and host immunological factors is presumed to be critical to the population dynamics observed in this study. Genotypic switching likely contributes to the persistence of T. orientalis in the host.

  6. Geographical Distribution of Trypanosoma cruzi Genotypes in Venezuela

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, Hernán J.; Segovia, Maikell; Llewellyn, Martin S.; Morocoima, Antonio; Urdaneta-Morales, Servio; Martínez, Cinda; Martínez, Clara E.; Garcia, Carlos; Rodríguez, Marlenes; Espinosa, Raul; de Noya, Belkisyolé A.; Díaz-Bello, Zoraida; Herrera, Leidi; Fitzpatrick, Sinead; Yeo, Matthew; Miles, Michael A.; Feliciangeli, M. Dora

    2012-01-01

    Chagas disease is an endemic zoonosis native to the Americas and is caused by the kinetoplastid protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. The parasite is also highly genetically diverse, with six discrete typing units (DTUs) reported TcI – TcVI. These DTUs broadly correlate with several epidemiogical, ecological and pathological features of Chagas disease. In this manuscript we report the most comprehensive evaluation to date of the genetic diversity of T. cruzi in Venezuela. The dataset includes 778 samples collected and genotyped over the last twelve years from multiple hosts and vectors, including nine wild and domestic mammalian host species, and seven species of triatomine bug, as well as from human sources. Most isolates (732) can be assigned to the TcI clade (94.1%); 24 to the TcIV group (3.1%) and 22 to TcIII (2.8%). Importantly, among the 95 isolates genotyped from human disease cases, 79% belonged to TcI - a DTU common in the Americas, however, 21% belonged to TcIV- a little known genotype previously thought to be rare in humans. Furthermore, were able to assign multiple oral Chagas diseases cases to TcI in the area around the capital, Caracas. We discuss our findings in the context of T. cruzi DTU distributions elsewhere in the Americas, and evaluate the impact they have on the future of Chagas disease control in Venezuela. PMID:22745843

  7. Selection of Novel Cowpea Genotypes Derived through Gamma Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Horn, Lydia N; Ghebrehiwot, Habteab M; Shimelis, Hussein A

    2016-01-01

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata [L.] Walp.) yields are considerably low in Namibia due to lack of improved varieties and biotic and abiotic stresses, notably, recurrent drought. Thus, genetic improvement in cowpea aims to develop cultivars with improved grain yield and tolerance to abiotic and biotic stress factors. The objective of this study was to identify agronomically desirable cowpea genotypes after mutagenesis using gamma irradiation. Seeds of three traditional cowpea varieties widely grown in Namibia including Nakare (IT81D-985), Shindimba (IT89KD-245-1), and Bira (IT87D-453-2) were gamma irradiated with varied doses and desirable mutants were selected from M2 through M6 generations. Substantial genetic variability was detected among cowpea genotypes after mutagenesis across generations including in flowering ability, maturity, flower and seed colors and grain yields. Ten phenotypically and agronomically stable novel mutants were isolated at the M6 each from the genetic background of the above three varieties. The selected promising mutants' lines are recommended for adaptability and stability tests across representative agro-ecologies for large-scale production or breeding in Namibia or similar environments. The novel cowpea genotypes selected through the study are valuable genetic resources for genetic enhancement and breeding. PMID:27148275

  8. Genotypes of pathogenic Leptospira spp isolated from rodents in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Loffler, Sylvia Grune; Pavan, Maria Elisa; Vanasco, Bibiana; Samartino, Luis; Suarez, Olga; Auteri, Carmelo; Romero, Graciela; Brihuega, Bibiana

    2014-01-01

    Leptospirosis is the most widespread zoonosis in the world and significant efforts have been made to determine and classify pathogenic Leptospira strains. This zoonosis is maintained in nature through chronic renal infections of carrier animals, with rodents and other small mammals serving as the most important reservoirs. Additionally, domestic animals, such as livestock and dogs, are significant sources of human infection. In this study, a multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) was applied to genotype 22 pathogenic Leptospira strains isolated from urban and periurban rodent populations from different regions of Argentina. Three MLVA profiles were identified in strains belonging to the species Leptospira interrogans (serovars Icterohaemorrhagiae and Canicola); one profile was observed in serovar Icterohaemorrhagiae and two MLVA profiles were observed in isolates of serovars Canicola and Portlandvere. All strains belonging to Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Castellonis exhibited the same MLVA profile. Four different genotypes were isolated from urban populations of rodents, including both mice and rats and two different genotypes were isolated from periurban populations. PMID:24676656

  9. Optimizing drug outcomes through pharmacogenetics: A case for preemptive genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Schildcrout, Jonathan S.; Denny, Joshua C.; Bowton, Erica; Gregg, William; Pulley, Jill M.; Basford, Melissa A.; Cowan, James D.; Xu, Hua; Ramirez, Andrea H.; Crawford, Dana C.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Peterson, Josh F.; Masys, Daniel R.; Wilke, Russell A.; Roden, Dan M.

    2013-01-01

    Routine integration of genotype data into drug decision-making could improve patient safety, particularly if many relevant genetic variants can be assayed simultaneously before target drug prescribing. The frequency of pharmacogenetic prescribing opportunities and the potential adverse events (AE) mitigated are unknown. We examined the frequency with which 56 medications with known outcomes influenced by variant alleles were prescribed in a cohort of 52,942 medical home patients at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. Within a five-year window, we estimated that 64.8% (95% CI: 64.4%-65.2%) of individuals were exposed to at least one medication with an established pharmacogenetic association. Using previously published results for six medications with well-characterized, severe genetically-linked AEs, we estimated that 398 events (95% CI, 225 - 583) could have been prevented with an effective preemptive genotyping program. Our results suggest that multiplexed, preemptive genotyping may represent an efficient alternative approach to current single use (“reactive”) methods and may improve safety. PMID:22739144

  10. Seroprevalence and genotype of Chlamydia in pet parrots in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, N-Z; Zhang, X-X; Zhou, D-H; Huang, S-Y; Tian, W-P; Yang, Y-C; Zhao, Q; Zhu, X-Q

    2015-01-01

    Parrots are one of the most popular pet birds in China, and can harbour Chlamydia which has significance for human and animal health. We investigated, by indirect haemagglutination assay, the seroprevalence of Chlamydia infection in four species of parrots, namely budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus), lovebirds (Agapornis sp.), cockatiels (Nymphicus hollandicus) and Alexandrine parakeets (Psittacula eupatria) that were collected from Weifang and Beijing cities, North China and explored the association between potential risk factors and chlamydial seropositivity. We further determined the genotype of Chlamydia in 21 fresh faecal samples based on the ompA sequence by reconstruction of phylogenetic relationships. Of the 311 parrots examined, 35·37% (95% confidence interval 30·06-40·68) were seropositive, and species, gender, age, season and geographical location were identified as risk factors. Two PCR-positive samples represented Chlamydia psittaci genotype A. The occurrence of C. psittaci genotype A in the droppings of two pet parrots in China suggests potential environmental contamination with Chlamydiaceae and may raise a public health concern. PMID:24588856

  11. Genetic Diversity within Human Erythroviruses: Identification of Three Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Servant, Annabelle; Laperche, Syria; Lallemand, Francis; Marinho, Valérie; De Saint Maur, Guillemette; Meritet, Jean François; Garbarg-Chenon, Antoine

    2002-01-01

    B19 virus is a human virus belonging to the genus Erythrovirus. The genetic diversity among B19 virus isolates has been reported to be very low, with less than 2% nucleotide divergence in the whole genome sequence. We have previously reported the isolation of a human erythrovirus isolate, termed V9, whose sequence was markedly distinct (>11% nucleotide divergence) from that of B19 virus. To date, the V9 isolate remains the unique representative of a new variant in the genus Erythrovirus, and its taxonomic position is unclear. We report here the isolation of 11 V9-related viruses. A prospective study conducted in France between 1999 and 2001 indicates that V9-related viruses actually circulate at a significant frequency (11.4%) along with B19 viruses. Analysis of the nearly full-length genome sequence of one V9-related isolate (D91.1) indicates that the D91.1 sequence clusters together with but is notably distant from the V9 sequence (5.3% divergence) and is distantly related to B19 virus sequences (13.8 to 14.2% divergence). Additional phylogenetic analysis of partial sequences from the V9-related isolates combined with erythrovirus sequences available in GenBank indicates that the erythrovirus group is more diverse than thought previously and can be divided into three well-individualized genotypes, with B19 viruses corresponding to genotype 1 and V9-related viruses being distributed into genotypes 2 and 3. PMID:12186896

  12. Evolutionary escape on complex genotype-phenotype networks.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez-Marcelo, Esther; Alarcón, Tomás

    2016-04-01

    We study the problem of evolutionary escape that is the process whereby a population under sudden changes in the selective pressures acting upon it try to evade extinction by evolving from previously well-adapted phenotypes to those that are favoured by the new selective pressure. We perform a comparative analysis between results obtained by modelling genotype space as a regular hypercube (H-graphs), which is the scenario considered in previous work on the subject, to those corresponding to a complex genotype-phenotype network (B-graphs). In order to analyse the properties of the escape process on both these graphs, we apply a general theory based on multi-type branching processes to compute the evolutionary dynamics and probability of escape. We show that the distribution of distances between phenotypes in B-graphs exhibits a much larger degree of heterogeneity than in H-graphs. This property, one of the main structural differences between both types of graphs, causes heterogeneous behaviour in all results associated to the escape problem. We further show that, due to the heterogeneity characterising escape on B-graphs, escape probability can be underestimated by assuming a regular hypercube genotype network, even if we compare phenotypes at the same distance in H-graphs. Similarly, it appears that the complex structure of B-graphs slows down the rate of escape.

  13. Rapid genotype imputation from sequence without reference panels.

    PubMed

    Davies, Robert W; Flint, Jonathan; Myers, Simon; Mott, Richard

    2016-08-01

    Inexpensive genotyping methods are essential for genetic studies requiring large sample sizes. In human studies, array-based microarrays and high-density haplotype reference panels allow efficient genotype imputation for this purpose. However, these resources are typically unavailable in non-human settings. Here we describe a method (STITCH) for imputation based only on sequencing read data, without requiring additional reference panels or array data. We demonstrate its applicability even in settings of extremely low sequencing coverage, by accurately imputing 5.7 million SNPs at a mean r(2) value of 0.98 in 2,073 outbred laboratory mice (0.15× sequencing coverage). In a sample of 11,670 Han Chinese (1.7× coverage), we achieve accuracy similar to that of alternative approaches that require a reference panel, demonstrating that our approach can work for genetically diverse populations. Our method enables straightforward progression from low-coverage sequence to imputed genotypes, overcoming barriers that at present restrict the application of genome-wide association study technology outside humans. PMID:27376236

  14. Seroprevalence and genotype of Chlamydia in pet parrots in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, N-Z; Zhang, X-X; Zhou, D-H; Huang, S-Y; Tian, W-P; Yang, Y-C; Zhao, Q; Zhu, X-Q

    2015-01-01

    Parrots are one of the most popular pet birds in China, and can harbour Chlamydia which has significance for human and animal health. We investigated, by indirect haemagglutination assay, the seroprevalence of Chlamydia infection in four species of parrots, namely budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus), lovebirds (Agapornis sp.), cockatiels (Nymphicus hollandicus) and Alexandrine parakeets (Psittacula eupatria) that were collected from Weifang and Beijing cities, North China and explored the association between potential risk factors and chlamydial seropositivity. We further determined the genotype of Chlamydia in 21 fresh faecal samples based on the ompA sequence by reconstruction of phylogenetic relationships. Of the 311 parrots examined, 35·37% (95% confidence interval 30·06-40·68) were seropositive, and species, gender, age, season and geographical location were identified as risk factors. Two PCR-positive samples represented Chlamydia psittaci genotype A. The occurrence of C. psittaci genotype A in the droppings of two pet parrots in China suggests potential environmental contamination with Chlamydiaceae and may raise a public health concern.

  15. Genotype-dependent lifespan effects in peptone deprived Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Stastna, Jana J; Snoek, L Basten; Kammenga, Jan E; Harvey, Simon C

    2015-11-05

    Dietary restriction appears to act as a general non-genetic mechanism that can robustly prolong lifespan. There have however been reports in many systems of cases where restricted food intake either shortens, or does not affect, lifespan. Here we analyze lifespan and the effect of food restriction via deprived peptone levels on lifespan in wild isolates and introgression lines (ILs) of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. These analyses identify genetic variation in lifespan, in the effect of this variation in diet on lifespan and also in the likelihood of maternal, matricidal, hatching. Importantly, in the wild isolates and the ILs, we identify genotypes in which peptone deprivation mediated dietary restriction reduces lifespan. We also identify, in recombinant inbred lines, a locus that affects maternal hatching, a phenotype closely linked to dietary restriction in C. elegans. These results indicate that peptone deprivation mediated dietary restriction affects lifespan in C. elegans in a genotype-dependent manner, reducing lifespan in some genotypes. This may operate by a mechanism similar to dietary restriction.

  16. Phenotyping two tomato genotypes with different nitrogen use efficiency.

    PubMed

    Abenavoli, Maria Rosa; Longo, Caterina; Lupini, Antonio; Miller, Anthony J; Araniti, Fabrizio; Mercati, Francesco; Princi, Maria P; Sunseri, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    Nitrogen (N) supply usually limits crop production and optimizing N-use efficiency (NUE) to minimize fertilizer loss is important. NUE is a complex trait that can be dissected into crop N uptake from the soil (NUpE) and N utilization (NUtE). We compared NUE in 14 genotypes of three week old tomatoes grown in sand or hydroponic culture supplied with nitrate (NO3(-)). Culture method influenced measured NUE for some cultivars, but Regina Ostuni (RO) and UC82 were consistently identified as high and low NUE genotypes. To identify why these genotypes had contrasting NUE some traits were compared growing under 0.1 and 5 mM NO3(-) supply. UC82 showed greater root (15)NO3(-) influx at low and high supply, and stronger SlNRT2.1/NAR2.1 transporter expression under low supply when compared with RO. Conversely, RO showed a higher total root length and thickness compared to UC82. Compared with UC82, RO showed higher shoot SlNRT2.3 expression and NO3(-) storage at high supply, but similar NO3(-) reductase activity. After N-starvation, root cell electrical potentials of RO were significantly more negative than UC82, but nitrate elicited similar responses in both root types. Overall for UC82 and RO, NUtE may play a greater role than NUpE for improved NUE. PMID:27235648

  17. Selection of Novel Cowpea Genotypes Derived through Gamma Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Lydia N.; Ghebrehiwot, Habteab M.; Shimelis, Hussein A.

    2016-01-01

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata [L.] Walp.) yields are considerably low in Namibia due to lack of improved varieties and biotic and abiotic stresses, notably, recurrent drought. Thus, genetic improvement in cowpea aims to develop cultivars with improved grain yield and tolerance to abiotic and biotic stress factors. The objective of this study was to identify agronomically desirable cowpea genotypes after mutagenesis using gamma irradiation. Seeds of three traditional cowpea varieties widely grown in Namibia including Nakare (IT81D-985), Shindimba (IT89KD-245-1), and Bira (IT87D-453-2) were gamma irradiated with varied doses and desirable mutants were selected from M2 through M6 generations. Substantial genetic variability was detected among cowpea genotypes after mutagenesis across generations including in flowering ability, maturity, flower and seed colors and grain yields. Ten phenotypically and agronomically stable novel mutants were isolated at the M6 each from the genetic background of the above three varieties. The selected promising mutants’ lines are recommended for adaptability and stability tests across representative agro-ecologies for large-scale production or breeding in Namibia or similar environments. The novel cowpea genotypes selected through the study are valuable genetic resources for genetic enhancement and breeding. PMID:27148275

  18. Genotypes of pathogenic Leptospira spp isolated from rodents in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Loffler, Sylvia Grune; Pavan, Maria Elisa; Vanasco, Bibiana; Samartino, Luis; Suarez, Olga; Auteri, Carmelo; Romero, Graciela; Brihuega, Bibiana

    2014-04-01

    Leptospirosis is the most widespread zoonosis in the world and significant efforts have been made to determine and classify pathogenic Leptospira strains. This zoonosis is maintained in nature through chronic renal infections of carrier animals, with rodents and other small mammals serving as the most important reservoirs. Additionally, domestic animals, such as livestock and dogs, are significant sources of human infection. In this study, a multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) was applied to genotype 22 pathogenic Leptospira strains isolated from urban and periurban rodent populations from different regions of Argentina. Three MLVA profiles were identified in strains belonging to the species Leptospira interrogans (serovars Icterohaemorrhagiae and Canicola); one profile was observed in serovar Icterohaemorrhagiae and two MLVA profiles were observed in isolates of serovars Canicola and Portlandvere. All strains belonging to Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Castellonis exhibited the same MLVA profile. Four different genotypes were isolated from urban populations of rodents, including both mice and rats and two different genotypes were isolated from periurban populations. PMID:24676656

  19. Genotyping success of historical Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx L.) samples.

    PubMed

    Polanc, Primož; Sindičić, Magda; Jelenčič, Maja; Gomerčić, Tomislav; Kos, Ivan; Huber, Duro

    2012-03-01

    Historical samples, like tanned hides and trophy skulls, can be extremely important for genetic studies of endangered or elusive species. Selection of a sampling protocol that is likely to provide sufficient amount and quality of DNA with a minimum damage to the original specimen is often critical for a success of the study. We investigated microsatellite genotyping success of DNA isolated from three different types of Eurasian lynx historical samples. We analysed a total of 20 microsatellite loci in 106 historical samples from the endangered Dinaric lynx population, established from re-introduction of three pairs of lynx in 1973 from Slovakian Carpathians. Of the three tested sample types, turbinal bone and septum from the nasal cavity of the trophy skulls had the lowest percentage of samples successfully genotyped for all 20 microsatellite loci. Footpad samples, collected using a cork drill, exhibited better results in polymerase chain reaction amplification and genotyping than samples of footpad epidermis cut with a scalpel. We report simple and efficient sampling protocols, which could be widely applied for future studies utilizing historical samples.

  20. Estimating selfing rates from reconstructed pedigrees using multilocus genotype data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinliang; El-Kassaby, Yousry A; Ritland, Kermit

    2012-01-01

    Several methods have been developed to estimate the selfing rate of a population from a sample of individuals genotyped for several marker loci. These methods can be based on homozygosity excess (or inbreeding), identity disequilibrium, progeny array (PA) segregation or population assignment incorporating partial selfing. Progeny array-based method is generally the best because it is not subject to some assumptions made by other methods (such as lack of misgenotyping, absence of biparental inbreeding and presence of inbreeding equilibrium), and it can reveal other facets of a mixed-mating system such as patterns of shared paternity. However, in practice, it is often difficult to obtain PAs, especially for animal species. In this study, we propose a method to reconstruct the pedigree of a sample of individuals taken from a monoecious diploid population practicing mixed mating, using multilocus genotypic data. Selfing and outcrossing events are then detected when an individual derives from identical parents and from two distinct parents, respectively. Selfing rate is estimated by the proportion of selfed offspring in the reconstructed pedigree of a sample of individuals. The method enjoys many advantages of the PA method, but without the need of a priori family structure, although such information, if available, can be utilized to improve the inference. Furthermore, the new method accommodates genotyping errors, estimates allele frequencies jointly and is robust to the presence of biparental inbreeding and inbreeding disequilibrium. Both simulated and empirical data were analysed by the new and previous methods to compare their statistical properties and accuracies.