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Sample records for icosahedral virus capsid

  1. Dynamic and Kinetic Assembly Studies of an Icosahedral Virus Capsid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kelly

    2011-03-01

    Hepatitis B virus has an icosahedrally symmetrical core particle (capsid), composed of either 90 or 120 copies of a dimeric protein building block. We are using time-resolved, solution small-angle X-ray scattering and single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to probe the core particle assembly reaction at the ensemble and individual assembly levels. Our experiments to date reveal the assembly process to be highly cooperative with minimal population of stable intermediate species. Solution conditions, particularly salt concentration, appears to influence the partitioning of assembly products into the two sizes of shells. Funding from NIH R00-GM080352 and University of Washington.

  2. Atomistic modeling of the low-frequency mechanical modes and Raman spectra of icosahedral virus capsids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykeman, Eric C.; Sankey, Otto F.

    2010-02-01

    We describe a technique for calculating the low-frequency mechanical modes and frequencies of a large symmetric biological molecule where the eigenvectors of the Hessian matrix are determined with full atomic detail. The method, which follows order N methods used in electronic structure theory, determines the subset of lowest-frequency modes while using group theory to reduce the complexity of the problem. We apply the method to three icosahedral viruses of various T numbers and sizes; the human viruses polio and hepatitis B, and the cowpea chlorotic mottle virus, a plant virus. From the normal-mode eigenvectors, we use a bond polarizability model to predict a low-frequency Raman scattering profile for the viruses. The full atomic detail in the displacement patterns combined with an empirical potential-energy model allows a comparison of the fully atomic normal modes with elastic network models and normal-mode analysis with only dihedral degrees of freedom. We find that coarse-graining normal-mode analysis (particularly the elastic network model) can predict the displacement patterns for the first few (˜10) low-frequency modes that are global and cooperative.

  3. Allosteric Control of Icosahedral Capsid Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Lazaro, Guillermo R.

    2017-01-01

    During the lifecycle of a virus, viral proteins and other components self-assemble to form an ordered protein shell called a capsid. This assembly process is subject to multiple competing constraints, including the need to form a thermostable shell while avoiding kinetic traps. It has been proposed that viral assembly satisfies these constraints through allosteric regulation, including the interconversion of capsid proteins among conformations with different propensities for assembly. In this article we use computational and theoretical modeling to explore how such allostery affects the assembly of icosahedral shells. We simulate assembly under a wide range of protein concentrations, protein binding affinities, and two different mechanisms of allosteric control. We find that, above a threshold strength of allosteric control, assembly becomes robust over a broad range of subunit binding affinities and concentrations, allowing the formation of highly thermostable capsids. Our results suggest that allostery can significantly shift the range of protein binding affinities that lead to successful assembly, and thus should be accounted for in models that are used to estimate interaction parameters from experimental data. PMID:27117092

  4. Imaging and Quantitation of a Succession of Transient Intermediates Reveal the Reversible Self-Assembly Pathway of a Simple Icosahedral Virus Capsid.

    PubMed

    Medrano, María; Fuertes, Miguel Ángel; Valbuena, Alejandro; Carrillo, Pablo J P; Rodríguez-Huete, Alicia; Mateu, Mauricio G

    2016-11-30

    Understanding the fundamental principles underlying supramolecular self-assembly may facilitate many developments, from novel antivirals to self-organized nanodevices. Icosahedral virus particles constitute paradigms to study self-assembly using a combination of theory and experiment. Unfortunately, assembly pathways of the structurally simplest virus capsids, those more accessible to detailed theoretical studies, have been difficult to study experimentally. We have enabled the in vitro self-assembly under close to physiological conditions of one of the simplest virus particles known, the minute virus of mice (MVM) capsid, and experimentally analyzed its pathways of assembly and disassembly. A combination of electron microscopy and high-resolution atomic force microscopy was used to structurally characterize and quantify a succession of transient assembly and disassembly intermediates. The results provided an experiment-based model for the reversible self-assembly pathway of a most simple (T = 1) icosahedral protein shell. During assembly, trimeric capsid building blocks are sequentially added to the growing capsid, with pentamers of building blocks and incomplete capsids missing one building block as conspicuous intermediates. This study provided experimental verification of many features of self-assembly of a simple T = 1 capsid predicted by molecular dynamics simulations. It also demonstrated atomic force microscopy imaging and automated analysis, in combination with electron microscopy, as a powerful single-particle approach to characterize at high resolution and quantify transient intermediates during supramolecular self-assembly/disassembly reactions. Finally, the efficient in vitro self-assembly achieved for the oncotropic, cell nucleus-targeted MVM capsid may facilitate its development as a drug-encapsidating nanoparticle for anticancer targeted drug delivery.

  5. HCIV-1 and Other Tailless Icosahedral Internal Membrane-Containing Viruses of the Family Sphaerolipoviridae.

    PubMed

    Demina, Tatiana A; Pietilä, Maija K; Svirskaitė, Julija; Ravantti, Janne J; Atanasova, Nina S; Bamford, Dennis H; Oksanen, Hanna M

    2017-02-18

    Members of the virus family Sphaerolipoviridae include both archaeal viruses and bacteriophages that possess a tailless icosahedral capsid with an internal membrane. The genera Alpha- and Betasphaerolipovirus comprise viruses that infect halophilic euryarchaea, whereas viruses of thermophilic Thermus bacteria belong to the genus Gammasphaerolipovirus . Both sequence-based and structural clustering of the major capsid proteins and ATPases of sphaerolipoviruses yield three distinct clades corresponding to these three genera. Conserved virion architectural principles observed in sphaerolipoviruses suggest that these viruses belong to the PRD1-adenovirus structural lineage. Here we focus on archaeal alphasphaerolipoviruses and their related putative proviruses. The highest sequence similarities among alphasphaerolipoviruses are observed in the core structural elements of their virions: the two major capsid proteins, the major membrane protein, and a putative packaging ATPase. A recently described tailless icosahedral haloarchaeal virus, Haloarcula californiae icosahedral virus 1 (HCIV-1), has a double-stranded DNA genome and an internal membrane lining the capsid. HCIV-1 shares significant similarities with the other tailless icosahedral internal membrane-containing haloarchaeal viruses of the family Sphaerolipoviridae . The proposal to include a new virus species, Haloarcula virus HCIV1 , into the genus Alphasphaerolipovirus was submitted to the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV) in 2016.

  6. Breaking Symmetry in Viral Icosahedral Capsids as Seen through the Lenses of X-ray Crystallography and Cryo-Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Parent, Kristin N.; Schrad, Jason R.; Cingolani, Gino

    2018-01-01

    The majority of viruses on Earth form capsids built by multiple copies of one or more types of a coat protein arranged with 532 symmetry, generating an icosahedral shell. This highly repetitive structure is ideal to closely pack identical protein subunits and to enclose the nucleic acid genomes. However, the icosahedral capsid is not merely a passive cage but undergoes dynamic events to promote packaging, maturation and the transfer of the viral genome into the host. These essential processes are often mediated by proteinaceous complexes that interrupt the shell’s icosahedral symmetry, providing a gateway through the capsid. In this review, we take an inventory of molecular structures observed either internally, or at the 5-fold vertices of icosahedral DNA viruses that infect bacteria, archea and eukaryotes. Taking advantage of the recent revolution in cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and building upon a wealth of crystallographic structures of individual components, we review the design principles of non-icosahedral structural components that interrupt icosahedral symmetry and discuss how these macromolecules play vital roles in genome packaging, ejection and host receptor-binding. PMID:29414851

  7. Deciphering the kinetic mechanism of spontaneous self-assembly of icosahedral capsids.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hung D; Reddy, Vijay S; Brooks, Charles L

    2007-02-01

    Self-assembly of viral proteins into icosahedral capsids is an interesting yet poorly understood phenomenon of which elucidation may aid the exploration of beneficial applications of capsids in materials science and medicine. Using molecular dynamics simulations of coarse-grained models for capsid proteins, we show that the competition between the formation of full capsids and nonidealized structures is strongly dependent upon the protein concentration and temperature, occurring kinetically as a cascade of elementary reactions in which free monomers are added to the growing oligomers on a downhill free-energy landscape. However, the insertion of the final subunits is the rate-limiting, energetically unfavorable step in viral capsid assembly. A phase diagram has been constructed to show the regions where capsids or nonidealized structures are stable at each concentration and temperature. We anticipate that our findings will provide guidance in identifying suitable conditions required for in vitro viral capsid assembly experiments.

  8. Archaeal Haloarcula californiae Icosahedral Virus 1 Highlights Conserved Elements in Icosahedral Membrane-Containing DNA Viruses from Extreme Environments.

    PubMed

    Demina, Tatiana A; Pietilä, Maija K; Svirskaitė, Julija; Ravantti, Janne J; Atanasova, Nina S; Bamford, Dennis H; Oksanen, Hanna M

    2016-07-19

    Despite their high genomic diversity, all known viruses are structurally constrained to a limited number of virion morphotypes. One morphotype of viruses infecting bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes is the tailless icosahedral morphotype with an internal membrane. Although it is considered an abundant morphotype in extreme environments, only seven such archaeal viruses are known. Here, we introduce Haloarcula californiae icosahedral virus 1 (HCIV-1), a halophilic euryarchaeal virus originating from salt crystals. HCIV-1 also retains its infectivity under low-salinity conditions, showing that it is able to adapt to environmental changes. The release of progeny virions resulting from cell lysis was evidenced by reduced cellular oxygen consumption, leakage of intracellular ATP, and binding of an indicator ion to ruptured cell membranes. The virion contains at least 12 different protein species, lipids selectively acquired from the host cell membrane, and a 31,314-bp-long linear double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). The overall genome organization and sequence show high similarity to the genomes of archaeal viruses in the Sphaerolipoviridae family. Phylogenetic analysis based on the major conserved components needed for virion assembly-the major capsid proteins and the packaging ATPase-placed HCIV-1 along with the alphasphaerolipoviruses in a distinct, well-supported clade. On the basis of its virion morphology and sequence similarities, most notably, those of its core virion components, we propose that HCIV-1 is a member of the PRD1-adenovirus structure-based lineage together with other sphaerolipoviruses. This addition to the lineage reinforces the notion of the ancient evolutionary links observed between the viruses and further highlights the limits of the choices found in nature for formation of a virion. Under conditions of extreme salinity, the majority of the organisms present are archaea, which encounter substantial selective pressure, being constantly attacked by

  9. Structure of the Triatoma virus capsid.

    PubMed

    Squires, Gaëlle; Pous, Joan; Agirre, Jon; Rozas-Dennis, Gabriela S; Costabel, Marcelo D; Marti, Gerardo A; Navaza, Jorge; Bressanelli, Stéphane; Guérin, Diego M A; Rey, Felix A

    2013-06-01

    The members of the Dicistroviridae family are non-enveloped positive-sense single-stranded RNA (+ssRNA) viruses pathogenic to beneficial arthropods as well as insect pests of medical importance. Triatoma virus (TrV), a member of this family, infects several species of triatomine insects (popularly named kissing bugs), which are vectors for human trypanosomiasis, more commonly known as Chagas disease. The potential use of dicistroviruses as biological control agents has drawn considerable attention in the past decade, and several viruses of this family have been identified, with their targets covering honey bees, aphids and field crickets, among others. Here, the crystal structure of the TrV capsid at 2.5 Å resolution is reported, showing that as expected it is very similar to that of Cricket paralysis virus (CrPV). Nevertheless, a number of distinguishing structural features support the introduction of a new genus (Triatovirus; type species TrV) under the Dicistroviridae family. The most striking differences are the absence of icosahedrally ordered VP4 within the infectious particle and the presence of prominent projections that surround the fivefold axis. Furthermore, the structure identifies a second putative autoproteolytic DDF motif in protein VP3, in addition to the conserved one in VP1 which is believed to be responsible for VP0 cleavage during capsid maturation. The potential meaning of these new findings is discussed.

  10. Assembly of the Herpes Simplex Virus Capsid: Preformed Triplexes Bind to the Nascent Capsid

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Juliet V.; Newcomb, William W.; Thomsen, Darrell R.; Homa, Fred L.; Brown, Jay C.

    1998-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) capsid is a T=16 icosahedral shell that forms in the nuclei of infected cells. Capsid assembly also occurs in vitro in reaction mixtures created from insect cell extracts containing recombinant baculovirus-expressed HSV-1 capsid proteins. During capsid formation, the major capsid protein, VP5, and the scaffolding protein, pre-VP22a, condense to form structures that are extended into procapsids by addition of the triplex proteins, VP19C and VP23. We investigated whether triplex proteins bind to the major capsid-scaffold protein complexes as separate polypeptides or as preformed triplexes. Assembly products from reactions lacking one triplex protein were immunoprecipitated and examined for the presence of the other. The results showed that neither triplex protein bound unless both were present, suggesting that interaction between VP19C and VP23 is required before either protein can participate in the assembly process. Sucrose density gradient analysis was employed to determine the sedimentation coefficients of VP19C, VP23, and VP19C-VP23 complexes. The results showed that the two proteins formed a complex with a sedimentation coefficient of 7.2S, a value that is consistent with formation of a VP19C-VP232 heterotrimer. Furthermore, VP23 was observed to have a sedimentation coefficient of 4.9S, suggesting that this protein exists as a dimer in solution. Deletion analysis of VP19C revealed two domains that may be required for attachment of the triplex to major capsid-scaffold protein complexes; none of the deletions disrupted interaction of VP19C with VP23. We propose that preformed triplexes (VP19C-VP232 heterotrimers) interact with major capsid-scaffold protein complexes during assembly of the HSV-1 capsid. PMID:9557680

  11. Curating viscoelastic properties of icosahedral viruses, virus-based nanomaterials, and protein cages.

    PubMed

    Kant, Ravi; Rayaprolu, Vamseedhar; McDonald, Kaitlyn; Bothner, Brian

    2018-06-01

    The beauty, symmetry, and functionality of icosahedral virus capsids has attracted the attention of biologists, physicists, and mathematicians ever since they were first observed. Viruses and protein cages assemble into functional architectures in a range of sizes, shapes, and symmetries. To fulfill their biological roles, these structures must self-assemble, resist stress, and are often dynamic. The increasing use of icosahedral capsids and cages in materials science has driven the need to quantify them in terms of structural properties such as rigidity, stiffness, and viscoelasticity. In this study, we employed Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation technology (QCM-D) to characterize and compare the mechanical rigidity of different protein cages and viruses. We attempted to unveil the relationships between rigidity, radius, shell thickness, and triangulation number. We show that the rigidity and triangulation numbers are inversely related to each other and the comparison of rigidity and radius also follows the same trend. Our results suggest that subunit orientation, protein-protein interactions, and protein-nucleic acid interactions are important for the resistance to deformation of these complexes, however, the relationships are complex and need to be explored further. The QCM-D based viscoelastic measurements presented here help us elucidate these relationships and show the future prospect of this technique in the field of physical virology and nano-biotechnology.

  12. Structure of the Triatoma virus capsid

    SciTech Connect

    Squires, Gaëlle; Pous, Joan; Agirre, Jon

    The crystallographic structure of TrV shows specific morphological and functional features that clearly distinguish it from the type species of the Cripavirus genus, CrPV. The members of the Dicistroviridae family are non-enveloped positive-sense single-stranded RNA (+ssRNA) viruses pathogenic to beneficial arthropods as well as insect pests of medical importance. Triatoma virus (TrV), a member of this family, infects several species of triatomine insects (popularly named kissing bugs), which are vectors for human trypanosomiasis, more commonly known as Chagas disease. The potential use of dicistroviruses as biological control agents has drawn considerable attention in the past decade, and several viruses ofmore » this family have been identified, with their targets covering honey bees, aphids and field crickets, among others. Here, the crystal structure of the TrV capsid at 2.5 Å resolution is reported, showing that as expected it is very similar to that of Cricket paralysis virus (CrPV). Nevertheless, a number of distinguishing structural features support the introduction of a new genus (Triatovirus; type species TrV) under the Dicistroviridae family. The most striking differences are the absence of icosahedrally ordered VP4 within the infectious particle and the presence of prominent projections that surround the fivefold axis. Furthermore, the structure identifies a second putative autoproteolytic DDF motif in protein VP3, in addition to the conserved one in VP1 which is believed to be responsible for VP0 cleavage during capsid maturation. The potential meaning of these new findings is discussed.« less

  13. Integrated Nanosystems Templated by Self-assembled Virus Capsids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephanopoulos, Nicholas

    This dissertation presents the synthesis and modeling of multicomponent nanosystems templated by self-assembled virus capsids. The design principles, synthesis, analysis, and future directions for these capsid-based materials are presented. Chapter 1 gives an overview of the literature on the application of virus capsids in constructing nanomaterials. The uses of capsids in three main areas are considered: (1) as templates for inorganic materials or nanoparticles; (2) as vehicles for biological applications like medical imaging and treatment; and (3) as scaffolds for catalytic materials. In light of this introduction, an overview of the material in this dissertation is described. Chapters 2-4 all describe integrated nanosystems templated by bacteriophage MS2, a spherical icosahedral virus capsid. MS2 possesses an interior and exterior surface that can be modified orthogonally using bioconjugation chemistry to create multivalent, multicomponent constructs with precise localization of components attached to the capsid proteins. Chapter 2 describes the use of MS2 to synthesize a photocatalytic construct by modifying the internal surface with sensitizing chromophores and the external surface with a photocatalytic porphyrin. The chromophores absorbed energy that the porphyrin could not, and transferred it to the porphyrin via FRET through the protein shell. The porphyrin was then able to utilize the energy to carry out photocatalysis at new wavelengths. In Chapter 3, porphyrins were installed on the interior surface of MS2 and DNA aptamers specific for Jurkat leukemia T cells on the exterior surface. The dual-modified capsids were able to bind to Jurkat cells, and upon illumination the porphyrins generated singlet oxygen to kill them selectively over non-targeted cells. Chapter 4 explores integrating MS2 with DNA origami in order to arrange the capsids at larger length scales. Capsids modified with fluorescent dyes inside and single-stranded DNA outside were able to

  14. The icosahedral RNA virus as a grotto: organizing the genome into stalagmites and stalactites.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Stephen C; Zeng, Yingying; Heitsch, Christine E

    2013-03-01

    There are two important problems in the assembly of small, icosahedral RNA viruses. First, how does the capsid protein select the viral RNA for packaging, when there are so many other candidate RNA molecules available? Second, what is the mechanism of assembly? With regard to the first question, there are a number of cases where a particular RNA sequence or structure--often one or more stem-loops--either promotes assembly or is required for assembly, but there are others where specific packaging signals are apparently not required. With regard to the assembly pathway, in those cases where stem-loops are involved, the first step is generally believed to be binding of the capsid proteins to these "fingers" of the RNA secondary structure. In the mature virus, the core of the RNA would then occupy the center of the viral particle, and the stem-loops would reach outward, towards the capsid, like stalagmites reaching up from the floor of a grotto towards the ceiling. Those viruses whose assembly does not depend on protein binding to stem-loops could have a different structure, with the core of the RNA lying just under the capsid, and the fingers reaching down into the interior of the virus, like stalactites. We review the literature on these alternative structures, focusing on RNA selectivity and the assembly mechanism, and we propose experiments aimed at determining, in a given virus, which of the two structures actually occurs.

  15. Structural rigidity in the capsid assembly of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hespenheide, B. M.; Jacobs, D. J.; Thorpe, M. F.

    2004-11-01

    The cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) has a protein cage, or capsid, which encloses its genetic material. The structure of the capsid consists of 180 copies of a single protein that self-assemble inside a cell to form a complete capsid with icosahedral symmetry. The icosahedral surface can be naturally divided into pentagonal and hexagonal faces, and the formation of either of these faces has been proposed to be the first step in the capsid assembly process. We have used the software FIRST to analyse the rigidity of pentameric and hexameric substructures of the complete capsid to explore the viability of certain capsid assembly pathways. FIRST uses the 3D pebble game to determine structural rigidity, and a brief description of this algorithm, as applied to body-bar networks, is given here. We find that the pentameric substructure, which corresponds to a pentagonal face on the icosahedral surface, provides the best structural properties for nucleating the capsid assembly process, consistent with experimental observations.

  16. Analytical and computational modeling of early penetration of non-enveloped icosahedral viruses into cells.

    PubMed

    Katzengold, Rona; Zaharov, Evgeniya; Gefen, Amit

    2016-07-27

    As obligate intracellular parasites, all viruses penetrate target cells to initiate replication and infection. This study introduces two approaches for evaluating the contact loads applied to a cell during early penetration of non-enveloped icosahedral viruses. The first approach is analytical modeling which is based on Hertz's theory for the contact of two elastic bodies; here we model the virus capsid as a triangle and the cell as an order-of-magnitude larger sphere. The second approach is finite element modeling, where we simulate three types of viruses: adeno-, papilloma- and polio- viruses, each interacting with a cell section. We find that the peak contact pressures and forces generated at the initial virus-cell contact depend on the virus geometry - that is both size and shape. With respect to shape, we show that the icosahedral virus shape induces greater peak pressures compared to a spherical virus shape. With respect to size, it is shown that the larger the virus is the greater are the contact loads in the attacked cell. Utilization of our modeling can be substantially useful not only for basic science studies, but also in other, more applied fields, such as in the field of gene therapy, or in `phage' virus studies.

  17. Highly specific salt bridges govern bacteriophage P22 icosahedral capsid assembly: identification of the site in coat protein responsible for interaction with scaffolding protein.

    PubMed

    Cortines, Juliana R; Motwani, Tina; Vyas, Aashay A; Teschke, Carolyn M

    2014-05-01

    Icosahedral virus assembly requires a series of concerted and highly specific protein-protein interactions to produce a proper capsid. In bacteriophage P22, only coat protein (gp5) and scaffolding protein (gp8) are needed to assemble a procapsid-like particle, both in vivo and in vitro. In scaffolding protein's coat binding domain, residue R293 is required for procapsid assembly, while residue K296 is important but not essential. Here, we investigate the interaction of scaffolding protein with acidic residues in the N-arm of coat protein, since this interaction has been shown to be electrostatic. Through site-directed mutagenesis of genes 5 and 8, we show that changing coat protein N-arm residue 14 from aspartic acid to alanine causes a lethal phenotype. Coat protein residue D14 is shown by cross-linking to interact with scaffolding protein residue R293 and, thus, is intimately involved in proper procapsid assembly. To a lesser extent, coat protein N-arm residue E18 is also implicated in the interaction with scaffolding protein and is involved in capsid size determination, since a cysteine mutation at this site generated petite capsids. The final acidic residue in the N-arm that was tested, E15, is shown to only weakly interact with scaffolding protein's coat binding domain. This work supports growing evidence that surface charge density may be the driving force of virus capsid protein interactions. Bacteriophage P22 infects Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and is a model for icosahedral viral capsid assembly. In this system, coat protein interacts with an internal scaffolding protein, triggering the assembly of an intermediate called a procapsid. Previously, we determined that there is a single amino acid in scaffolding protein required for P22 procapsid assembly, although others modulate affinity. Here, we identify partners in coat protein. We show experimentally that relatively weak interactions between coat and scaffolding proteins are capable of driving

  18. Assembly/disassembly of a complex icosahedral virus to incorporate heterologous nucleic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascual, Elena; Mata, Carlos P.; Carrascosa, José L.; Castón, José R.

    2017-12-01

    Hollow protein containers are widespread in nature, and include virus capsids as well as eukaryotic and bacterial complexes. Protein cages are studied extensively for applications in nanotechnology, nanomedicine and materials science. Their inner and outer surfaces can be modified chemically or genetically, and the internal cavity can be used to template, store and/or arrange molecular cargos. Virus capsids and virus-like particles (VLP, noninfectious particles) provide versatile platforms for nanoscale bioengineering. Study of capsid protein self-assembly into monodispersed particles, and of VLP structure and biophysics is necessary not only to understand natural processes, but also to infer how these platforms can be redesigned to furnish novel functional VLP. Here we address the assembly dynamics of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV), a complex icosahedral virus. IBDV has a ~70 nm-diameter T  =  13 capsid with VP2 trimers as the only structural subunits. During capsid assembly, VP2 is synthesized as a precursor (pVP2) whose C terminus is cleaved. The pVP2 C terminus has an amphipathic helix that controls VP2 polymorphism. In the absence of the VP3 scaffolding protein, necessary for control of assembly, 466/456-residue pVP2 intermediates bearing this helix assemble into VLP only when expressed with an N-terminal His6 tag (the HT-VP2-466 protein). HT-VP2-466 capsids are optimal for genetic insertion of proteins (cargo space ~78 000 nm3). We established an in vitro assembly/disassembly system of HT-VP2-466-based VLP for heterologous nucleic acid packaging and/or encapsulation of drugs and other molecules. HT-VP2-466 (empty) capsids were disassembled and reassembled by dialysis against low-salt/basic pH and high-salt/acid pH buffers, respectively, thus illustrating the reversibility in vitro of IBDV capsid assembly. HT-VP2-466 VLP also packed heterologous DNA by non-specific confinement during assembly. These and previous results establish the bases

  19. C Terminus of Infectious Bursal Disease Virus Major Capsid Protein VP2 Is Involved in Definition of the T Number for Capsid Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Castón, José R.; Martínez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge L.; Maraver, Antonio; Lombardo, Eleuterio; Rodríguez, José F.; Casal, J. Ignacio; Carrascosa, José L.

    2001-01-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV), a member of the Birnaviridae family, is a double-stranded RNA virus. The IBDV capsid is formed by two major structural proteins, VP2 and VP3, which assemble to form a T=13 markedly nonspherical capsid. During viral infection, VP2 is initially synthesized as a precursor, called VPX, whose C end is proteolytically processed to the mature form during capsid assembly. We have computed three-dimensional maps of IBDV capsid and virus-like particles built up by VP2 alone by using electron cryomicroscopy and image-processing techniques. The IBDV single-shelled capsid is characterized by the presence of 260 protruding trimers on the outer surface. Five classes of trimers can be distinguished according to their different local environments. When VP2 is expressed alone in insect cells, dodecahedral particles form spontaneously; these may be assembled into larger, fragile icosahedral capsids built up by 12 dodecahedral capsids. Each dodecahedral capsid is an empty T=1 shell composed of 20 trimeric clusters of VP2. Structural comparison between IBDV capsids and capsids consisting of VP2 alone allowed the determination of the major capsid protein locations and the interactions between them. Whereas VP2 forms the outer protruding trimers, VP3 is found as trimers on the inner surface and may be responsible for stabilizing functions. Since elimination of the C-terminal region of VPX is correlated with the assembly of T=1 capsids, this domain might be involved (either alone or in cooperation with VP3) in the induction of different conformations of VP2 during capsid morphogenesis. PMID:11602723

  20. Studies of inactivation mechanism of non-enveloped icosahedral virus by a visible ultrashort pulsed laser

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    electron microscope (TEM) images of viral particles before and after USP laser irradiation, the locations of weak structural links on the capsid of MNV-1 were revealed. This important information will greatly aid our understanding of the structure of non-enveloped, icosahedral viruses. We envision that this non-invasive, efficient viral eradication method will find applications in the disinfection of pharmaceuticals, biologicals and blood products in the near future. PMID:24495489

  1. Theory of morphological transformation of viral capsid shell during the maturation process in the HK97 bacteriophage and similar viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konevtsova, O. V.; Lorman, V. L.; Rochal, S. B.

    2016-05-01

    We consider the symmetry and physical origin of collective displacement modes playing a crucial role in the morphological transformation during the maturation of the HK97 bacteriophage and similar viruses. It is shown that the experimentally observed hexamer deformation and pentamer twist in the HK97 procapsid correspond to the simplest irreducible shear strain mode of a spherical shell. We also show that the icosahedral faceting of the bacteriophage capsid shell is driven by the simplest irreducible radial displacement field. The shear field has the rotational icosahedral symmetry group I while the radial field has the full icosahedral symmetry Ih. This difference makes their actions independent. The radial field sign discriminates between the icosahedral and the dodecahedral shapes of the faceted capsid shell, thus making the approach relevant not only for the HK97-like viruses but also for the parvovirus family. In the frame of the Landau-Ginzburg formalism we propose a simple phenomenological model valid for the first reversible step of the HK97 maturation process. The calculated phase diagram illustrates the discontinuous character of the virus shape transformation. The characteristics of the virus shell faceting and expansion obtained in the in vitro and in vivo experiments are related to the decrease in the capsid shell thickness and to the increase of the internal capsid pressure.

  2. Virus templated plasmonic nanoclusters with icosahedral symmetry via directed assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratna, Banahalli; Fontana, Jake; Dressick, Walter; Phelps, Jamie; Johnson, John; Sampson, Travian; Rendell, Ronald; Soto, Carissa

    2015-03-01

    Controlling the spatial and orientational order of plasmonic nanoparticles may lead to structures with novel electromagnetic properties and applications such as sub-wavelength imaging and ultra-sensitive chemical sensors. Here we report the directed assembly of three-dimensional, icosahedral plasmonic nanoclusters with resonances at visible wavelengths. We show using transmission electron microcopy and in situ dynamic light scattering the nanoclusters consist of twelve gold nanospheres attached to thiol groups at predefined locations on the surface of a genetically engineered cowpea mosaic virus with icosahedral symmetry. We measured the bulk absorbance from aqueous suspensions of nanoclusters and reproduced the major features of the spectrum using finite-element simulations. Furthermore, because the viruses are easily produced in gram quantities the directed assembly approach is capable of high-throughput, providing a strategy to realize large quantities for applications. NRL summer intern under the HBCU/MI Summer Research Program.

  3. Screening for the Location of RNA using the Chloride Ion Distribution in Simulations of Virus Capsids.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Daniel S D; van der Spoel, David

    2012-07-10

    The complete structure of the genomic material inside a virus capsid remains elusive, although a limited amount of symmetric nucleic acid can be resolved in the crystal structure of 17 icosahedral viruses. The negatively charged sugar-phosphate backbone of RNA and DNA as well as the large positive charge of the interior surface of the virus capsids suggest that electrostatic complementarity is an important factor in the packaging of the genomes in these viruses. To test how much packing information is encoded by the electrostatic and steric envelope of the capsid interior, we performed extensive all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of virus capsids with explicit water molecules and solvent ions. The model systems were two small plant viruses in which significant amounts of RNA has been observed by X-ray crystallography: satellite tobacco mosaic virus (STMV, 62% RNA visible) and satellite tobacco necrosis virus (STNV, 34% RNA visible). Simulations of half-capsids of these viruses with no RNA present revealed that the binding sites of RNA correlated well with regions populated by chloride ions, suggesting that it is possible to screen for the binding sites of nucleic acids by determining the equilibrium distribution of negative ions. By including the crystallographically resolved RNA in addition to ions, we predicted the localization of the unresolved RNA in the viruses. Both viruses showed a hot-spot for RNA binding at the 5-fold symmetry axis. The MD simulations were compared to predictions of the chloride density based on nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation (PBE) calculations with mobile ions. Although the predictions are superficially similar, the PBE calculations overestimate the ion concentration close to the capsid surface and underestimate it far away, mainly because protein dynamics is not taken into account. Density maps from chloride screening can be used to aid in building atomic models of packaged virus genomes. Knowledge of the principles of

  4. Structural Studies of Adeno-Associated Virus Serotype 8 Capsid Transitions Associated with Endosomal Trafficking

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Hyun-Joo; Gurda, Brittney L.; McKenna, Robert

    2012-09-17

    The single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) parvoviruses enter host cells through receptor-mediated endocytosis, and infection depends on processing in the early to late endosome as well as in the lysosome prior to nuclear entry for replication. However, the mechanisms of capsid endosomal processing, including the effects of low pH, are poorly understood. To gain insight into the structural transitions required for this essential step in infection, the crystal structures of empty and green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene-packaged adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (AAV8) have been determined at pH values of 6.0, 5.5, and 4.0 and then at pH 7.5 after incubation at pHmore » 4.0, mimicking the conditions encountered during endocytic trafficking. While the capsid viral protein (VP) topologies of all the structures were similar, significant amino acid side chain conformational rearrangements were observed on (i) the interior surface of the capsid under the icosahedral 3-fold axis near ordered nucleic acid density that was lost concomitant with the conformational change as pH was reduced and (ii) the exterior capsid surface close to the icosahedral 2-fold depression. The 3-fold change is consistent with DNA release from an ordering interaction on the inside surface of the capsid at low pH values and suggests transitions that likely trigger the capsid for genome uncoating. The surface change results in disruption of VP-VP interface interactions and a decrease in buried surface area between VP monomers. This disruption points to capsid destabilization which may (i) release VP1 amino acids for its phospholipase A2 function for endosomal escape and nuclear localization signals for nuclear targeting and (ii) trigger genome uncoating.« less

  5. Three-dimensional structure and function of the Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus capsid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinzheng; Xiang, Ye; Dunigan, David D; Klose, Thomas; Chipman, Paul R; Van Etten, James L; Rossmann, Michael G

    2011-09-06

    A cryoelectron microscopy 8.5 Å resolution map of the 1,900 Å diameter, icosahedral, internally enveloped Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus was used to interpret structures of the virus at initial stages of cell infection. A fivefold averaged map demonstrated that two minor capsid proteins involved in stabilizing the capsid are missing in the vicinity of the unique vertex. Reconstruction of the virus in the presence of host chlorella cell walls established that the spike at the unique vertex initiates binding to the cell wall, which results in the enveloped nucleocapsid moving closer to the cell. This process is concurrent with the release of the internal viral membrane that was linked to the capsid by many copies of a viral membrane protein in the mature infectous virus. Simultaneously, part of the trisymmetrons around the unique vertex disassemble, probably in part because two minor capsid proteins are absent, causing Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus and the cellular contents to merge, possibly as a result of enzyme(s) within the spike assembly. This may be one of only a few recordings of successive stages of a virus while infecting a eukaryotic host in pseudoatomic detail in three dimensions.

  6. Three-dimensional structure and function of the Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus capsid

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinzheng; Xiang, Ye; Dunigan, David D.; Klose, Thomas; Chipman, Paul R.; Van Etten, James L.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    A cryoelectron microscopy 8.5 Å resolution map of the 1,900 Å diameter, icosahedral, internally enveloped Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus was used to interpret structures of the virus at initial stages of cell infection. A fivefold averaged map demonstrated that two minor capsid proteins involved in stabilizing the capsid are missing in the vicinity of the unique vertex. Reconstruction of the virus in the presence of host chlorella cell walls established that the spike at the unique vertex initiates binding to the cell wall, which results in the enveloped nucleocapsid moving closer to the cell. This process is concurrent with the release of the internal viral membrane that was linked to the capsid by many copies of a viral membrane protein in the mature infectous virus. Simultaneously, part of the trisymmetrons around the unique vertex disassemble, probably in part because two minor capsid proteins are absent, causing Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus and the cellular contents to merge, possibly as a result of enzyme(s) within the spike assembly. This may be one of only a few recordings of successive stages of a virus while infecting a eukaryotic host in pseudoatomic detail in three dimensions. PMID:21873222

  7. Shape transformation of viral capsids and HIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Toan

    2005-03-01

    We present a continuum description of the shape transformation of viral capsids. The cone-like HIV virus is shown to be an thermodynamic stable shape, intermediate between icosahedral and sphero-cylinder capsid shapes. A generalized Caspar-Klug classification is introduced to describe spherical, conical and cylinderical shapes of virus.

  8. Determination of prestress and elastic properties of virus capsids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Ankush

    2018-03-01

    Virus capsids are protein shells that protect the virus genome, and determination of their mechanical properties has been a topic of interest because of their potential use in nanotechnology and therapeutics. It has been demonstrated that stresses exist in virus capsids, even in their equilibrium state, due to their construction. These stresses, termed "prestresses" in this study, closely affect the capsid's mechanical behavior. Three methods—shape-based metric, atomic force microscope indentation, and molecular dynamics—have been proposed to determine the capsid elastic properties without fully accounting for prestresses. In this paper, we theoretically analyze the three methods used for mechanical characterization of virus capsids and numerically investigate how prestresses affect the capsid's mechanical properties. We consolidate all the results and propose that by using these techniques collectively, it is possible to accurately determine both the mechanical properties and prestresses in capsids.

  9. Structure-based engineering of an icosahedral virus for nanomedicine and nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, N F; Lin, T; Lomonossoff, G P; Johnson, J E

    2009-01-01

    A quintessential tenet of nanotechnology is the self-assembly of nanometer-sized components into devices. Biological macromolecular systems such as viral particles were found to be suitable building blocks for nanotechnology for several reasons: viral capsids are extremely robust and can be produced in large quantities with ease, the particles self-assemble into monodisperse particles with a high degree of symmetry and polyvalency, they have the propensity to form arrays, and they offer programmability through genetic and chemical engineering. Here, we review the recent advances in engineering the icosahedral plant virus Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) for applications in nano-medicine and -technology. In the first part, we will discuss how the combined knowledge of the structure of CPMV at atomic resolution and the use of chimeric virus technology led to the generation of CPMV particles with short antigenic peptides for potential use as vaccine candidates. The second part focuses on the chemical addressability of CPMV. Strategies to chemically attach functional molecules at designed positions on the exterior surface of the viral particle are described. Biochemical conjugation methods led to the fabrication of electronically conducting CPMV particles and networks. In addition, functional proteins for targeted delivery to mammalian cells were successfully attached to CPMV. In the third part, we focus on the utilization of CPMV as a building block for the generation of 2D and 3D arrays. Overall, the potential applications of viral nanobuilding blocks are manifold and range from nanoelectronics to biomedical applications.

  10. Mechanostability of Proteins and Virus Capsids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Marek

    2013-03-01

    Molecular dynamics of proteins within coarse grained models have become a useful tool in studies of large scale systems. The talk will discuss two applications of such modeling. The first is a theoretical survey of proteins' resistance to constant speed stretching as performed for a set of 17134 simple and 318 multidomain proteins. The survey has uncovered new potent force clamps. They involve formation of cysteine slipknots or dragging of a cystine plug through the cystine ring and lead to characteristic forces that are significantly larger than the common shear-based clamp such as observed in titin. The second application involves studies of nanoindentation processes in virus capsids and elucidates their molecular aspects by showing deviations in behavior compared to the continuum shell model. Across the 35 capsids studied, both the collapse force and the elastic stiffness are observed to vary by a factor of 20. The changes in mechanical properties do not correlate simply with virus size or symmetry. There is a strong connection to the mean coordination number < z > , defined as the mean number of interactions to neighboring amino acids. The Young's modulus for thin shell capsids rises roughly quadratically with < z > - 6, where 6 is the minimum coordination for elastic stability in three dimensions. Supported by European Regional Development Fund, through Innovative Economy grant Nanobiom (POIG.01.01.02-00-008/08)

  11. Modeling virus capsids and their protein binding -- the search for weak regions within the HIV capsid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankey, Otto; Benson, Daryn

    2010-10-01

    Viruses remain a threat to the health of humans worldwide with 33 million infected with AIDS. Viruses are ubiquitous infecting animals, plants, and bacteria. Each virus infects in its own unique manner making the problem seem intractable. However, some general physical steps apply to many viruses and the application of basic physical modeling can potentially have great impact. The aim of this theoretical study is to investigate the stability of the HIV viral capsid (protein shell). The structural shell can be compromised by physical probes such as pulsed laser light. But what are the weakest regions of the capsid so that we can begin to understand vulnerabilities of these deadly materials? The atomic structure of HIV capsids is not precisely known and we begin by describing our work to model the capsid structure. Next we describe a course grained model to investigate protein interactions within the capsid.

  12. Stabilising the Herpes Simplex Virus capsid by DNA packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuite, Gijs; Radtke, Kerstin; Sodeik, Beate; Roos, Wouter

    2009-03-01

    Three different types of Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1) nuclear capsids can be distinguished, A, B and C capsids. These capsids types are, respectively, empty, contain scaffold proteins, or hold DNA. We investigate the physical properties of these three capsids by combining biochemical and nanoindentation techniques. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) experiments show that A and C capsids are mechanically indistinguishable whereas B capsids already break at much lower forces. By extracting the pentamers with 2.0 M GuHCl or 6.0 M Urea we demonstrate an increased flexibility of all three capsid types. Remarkably, the breaking force of the B capsids without pentamers does not change, while the modified A and C capsids show a large drop in their breaking force to approximately the value of the B capsids. This result indicates that upon DNA packaging a structural change at or near the pentamers occurs which mechanically reinforces the capsids structure. The reported binding of proteins UL17/UL25 to the pentamers of the A and C capsids seems the most likely candidate for such capsids strengthening. Finally, the data supports the view that initiation of DNA packaging triggers the maturation of HSV-1 capsids.

  13. Internal Proteins of the Procapsid and Mature Capsids of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Mapped by Bubblegram Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Weimin; Newcomb, William W.; Cheng, Naiqian; Aksyuk, Anastasia; Winkler, Dennis C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) capsid is a huge assembly, ∼1,250 Å in diameter, and is composed of thousands of protein subunits with a combined mass of ∼200 MDa, housing a 100-MDa genome. First, a procapsid is formed through coassembly of the surface shell with an inner scaffolding shell; then the procapsid matures via a major structural transformation, triggered by limited proteolysis of the scaffolding proteins. Three mature capsids are found in the nuclei of infected cells. A capsids are empty, B capsids retain a shrunken scaffolding shell, and C capsids—which develop into infectious virions—are filled with DNA and ostensibly have expelled the scaffolding shell. The possible presence of other internal proteins in C capsids has been moot as, in cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), they would be camouflaged by the surrounding DNA. We have used bubblegram imaging to map internal proteins in all four capsids, aided by the discovery that the scaffolding protein is exceptionally prone to radiation-induced bubbling. We confirmed that this protein forms thick-walled inner shells in the procapsid and the B capsid. C capsids generate two classes of bubbles: one occupies positions beneath the vertices of the icosahedral surface shell, and the other is distributed throughout its interior. A likely candidate is the viral protease. A subpopulation of C capsids bubbles particularly profusely and may represent particles in which expulsion of scaffold and DNA packaging are incomplete. Based on the procapsid structure, we propose that the axial channels of hexameric capsomers afford the pathway via which the scaffolding protein is expelled. IMPORTANCE In addition to DNA, capsids of tailed bacteriophages and their distant relatives, herpesviruses, contain internal proteins. These proteins are often essential for infectivity but are difficult to locate within the virion. A novel adaptation of cryo-EM based on detecting gas bubbles generated by radiation

  14. Development of a genetic system for the archaeal virus Sulfolobus turreted icosahedral virus (STIV).

    PubMed

    Wirth, Jennifer Fulton; Snyder, Jamie C; Hochstein, Rebecca A; Ortmann, Alice C; Willits, Deborah A; Douglas, Trevor; Young, Mark J

    2011-06-20

    Our understanding of archaeal viruses has been limited by the lack of genetic systems for examining viral function. We describe the construction of an infectious clone for the archaeal virus Sulfolobus turreted icosahedral virus (STIV). STIV was isolated from a high temperature (82°C) acidic (pH 2.2) hot spring in Yellowstone National Park and replicates in the archaeal model organism Sulfolobus solfataricus (Rice et al., 2004). While STIV is one of most studied archaeal viruses, little is known about its replication cycle. The development of an STIV infectious clone allows for directed gene disruptions and detailed genetic analysis of the virus. The utility of the STIV infectious clone was demonstrated by gene disruption of STIV open reading frame (ORF) B116 which resulted in crippled virus replication, while disruption of ORFs A197, C381 and B345 was lethal for virus replication. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. African Swine Fever Virus Undergoes Outer Envelope Disruption, Capsid Disassembly and Inner Envelope Fusion before Core Release from Multivesicular Endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Hernáez, Bruno; Guerra, Milagros; Salas, María L.

    2016-01-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) is a nucleocytoplasmic large DNA virus (NCLDV) that causes a highly lethal disease in domestic pigs. As other NCLDVs, the extracellular form of ASFV possesses a multilayered structure consisting of a genome-containing nucleoid successively wrapped by a thick protein core shell, an inner lipid membrane, an icosahedral protein capsid and an outer lipid envelope. This structural complexity suggests an intricate mechanism of internalization in order to deliver the virus genome into the cytoplasm. By using flow cytometry in combination with pharmacological entry inhibitors, as well as fluorescence and electron microscopy approaches, we have dissected the entry and uncoating pathway used by ASFV to infect the macrophage, its natural host cell. We found that purified extracellular ASFV is internalized by both constitutive macropinocytosis and clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Once inside the cell, ASFV particles move from early endosomes or macropinosomes to late, multivesicular endosomes where they become uncoated. Virus uncoating requires acidic pH and involves the disruption of the outer membrane as well as of the protein capsid. As a consequence, the inner viral membrane becomes exposed and fuses with the limiting endosomal membrane to release the viral core into the cytosol. Interestingly, virus fusion is dependent on virus protein pE248R, a transmembrane polypeptide of the inner envelope that shares sequence similarity with some members of the poxviral entry/fusion complex. Collective evidence supports an entry model for ASFV that might also explain the uncoating of other multienveloped icosahedral NCLDVs. PMID:27110717

  16. Studies of Inactivation Mechanism of non-enveloped icosahedral viruses by a visible ultrashort pulsed laser

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The inactivation mechanism of ultrashort pulsed laser irradiation at a wavelength of 425 nm has been studied using two different-sized, non-enveloped icosahedral viruses, murine norovirus-1 (MNV-1) and human papillomavirus-16 (HPV-16) pseudovirions. Our experimental results are consistent with a mo...

  17. Mechanisms of Size Control and Polymorphism in Viral Capsid Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Elrad, Oren M.; Hagan, Michael F.

    2009-01-01

    We simulate the assembly dynamics of icosahedral capsids from subunits that interconvert between different conformations (or quasi-equivalent states). The simulations identify mechanisms by which subunits form empty capsids with only one morphology, but adaptively assemble into different icosahedral morphologies around nanoparticle cargoes with varying sizes, as seen in recent experiments with brome mosaic virus (BMV) capsid proteins. Adaptive cargo encapsidation requires moderate cargo-subunit interaction strengths; stronger interactions frustrate assembly by stabilizing intermediates with incommensurate curvature. We compare simulation results to experiments with cowpea chlorotic mottle virus empty capsids and BMV capsids assembled on functionalized nanoparticles, and suggest new cargo encapsidation experiments. Finally, we find that both empty and templated capsids maintain the precise spatial ordering of subunit conformations seen in the crystal structure even if interactions that preserve this arrangement are favored by as little as the thermal energy, consistent with experimental observations that different subunit conformations are highly similar. PMID:18950240

  18. Stochastic dynamics of virus capsid formation: direct versus hierarchical self-assembly

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In order to replicate within their cellular host, many viruses have developed self-assembly strategies for their capsids which are sufficiently robust as to be reconstituted in vitro. Mathematical models for virus self-assembly usually assume that the bonds leading to cluster formation have constant reactivity over the time course of assembly (direct assembly). In some cases, however, binding sites between the capsomers have been reported to be activated during the self-assembly process (hierarchical assembly). Results In order to study possible advantages of such hierarchical schemes for icosahedral virus capsid assembly, we use Brownian dynamics simulations of a patchy particle model that allows us to switch binding sites on and off during assembly. For T1 viruses, we implement a hierarchical assembly scheme where inter-capsomer bonds become active only if a complete pentamer has been assembled. We find direct assembly to be favorable for reversible bonds allowing for repeated structural reorganizations, while hierarchical assembly is favorable for strong bonds with small dissociation rate, as this situation is less prone to kinetic trapping. However, at the same time it is more vulnerable to monomer starvation during the final phase. Increasing the number of initial monomers does have only a weak effect on these general features. The differences between the two assembly schemes become more pronounced for more complex virus geometries, as shown here for T3 viruses, which assemble through homogeneous pentamers and heterogeneous hexamers in the hierarchical scheme. In order to complement the simulations for this more complicated case, we introduce a master equation approach that agrees well with the simulation results. Conclusions Our analysis shows for which molecular parameters hierarchical assembly schemes can outperform direct ones and suggests that viruses with high bond stability might prefer hierarchical assembly schemes. These insights increase

  19. Generation of West Nile virus infectious clones containing amino acid insertions between capsid and capsid anchor.

    PubMed

    Vandergaast, Rianna; Hoover, Lisa I; Zheng, Kang; Fredericksen, Brenda L

    2014-04-09

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a positive-sense RNA arbovirus responsible for recent outbreaks of severe neurological disease within the US and Europe. Large-scale analyses of antiviral compounds that inhibit virus replication have been limited due to the lack of an adequate WN reporter virus. Previous attempts to insert a reporter into the 3' untranslated region of WNV generated unstable viruses, suggesting that this region does not accommodate additional nucleotides. Here, we engineered two WNV infectious clones containing insertions at the Capsid (C)/Capsid Anchor (CA) junction of the viral polyprotein. Recombinant viruses containing a TAT(1-67) or Gaussia Luciferase (GLuc) gene at this location were successfully recovered. However, rapid loss of most, if not all, of the reporter sequence occurred for both viruses, indicating that the reporter viruses were not stable. While the GLuc viruses predominantly reverted back to wild-type WNV length, the TAT viruses retained up to 75 additional nucleotides of the reporter sequence. These additional nucleotides were stable over at least five passages and did not significantly alter WNV fitness. Thus, the C/CA junction of WNV can tolerate additional nucleotides, though insertions are subject to certain constraints.

  20. Generation of West Nile Virus Infectious Clones Containing Amino Acid Insertions Between Capsid and Capsid Anchor

    PubMed Central

    Vandergaast, Rianna; Hoover, Lisa I.; Zheng, Kang; Fredericksen, Brenda L.

    2014-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a positive-sense RNA arbovirus responsible for recent outbreaks of severe neurological disease within the US and Europe. Large-scale analyses of antiviral compounds that inhibit virus replication have been limited due to the lack of an adequate WN reporter virus. Previous attempts to insert a reporter into the 3’ untranslated region of WNV generated unstable viruses, suggesting that this region does not accommodate additional nucleotides. Here, we engineered two WNV infectious clones containing insertions at the Capsid (C)/Capsid Anchor (CA) junction of the viral polyprotein. Recombinant viruses containing a TAT(1-67) or Gaussia Luciferase (GLuc) gene at this location were successfully recovered. However, rapid loss of most, if not all, of the reporter sequence occurred for both viruses, indicating that the reporter viruses were not stable. While the GLuc viruses predominantly reverted back to wild-type WNV length, the TAT viruses retained up to 75 additional nucleotides of the reporter sequence. These additional nucleotides were stable over at least five passages and did not significantly alter WNV fitness. Thus, the C/CA junction of WNV can tolerate additional nucleotides, though insertions are subject to certain constraints. PMID:24721788

  1. Different architectures in the assembly of infectious bursal disease virus capsid proteins expressed in insect cells.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Torrecuadrada, J L; Castón, J R; Castro, M; Carrascosa, J L; Rodriguez, J F; Casal, J I

    2000-12-20

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) capsid is formed by the processing of a large polyprotein and subsequent assembly of VPX/VP2 and VP3. To learn more about the processing of the polyprotein and factors affecting the correct assembly of the viral capsid in vitro, different constructs were made using two baculovirus transfer vectors, pFastBac and pAcYM1. Surprisingly, the expression of the capsid proteins gave rise to different types of particles in each system, as observed by electron microscopy and immunofluorescence. FastBac expression led to the production of only rigid tubular structures, similar to those described as type I in viral infection. Western blot analysis revealed that these rigid tubules are formed exclusively by VPX. These tubules revealed a hexagonal arrangement of units that are trimer clustered, similar to those observed in IBDV virions. In contrast, pAcYM1 expression led to the assembly of virus-like particles (VLPs), flexible tubules, and intermediate assembly products formed by icosahedral caps elongated in tubes, suggesting an aberrant morphogenesis. Processing of VPX to VP2 seems to be a crucial requirement for the proper morphogenesis and assembly of IBDV particles. After immunoelectron microscopy, VPX/VP2 was detected on the surface of tubules and VLPs. We also demonstrated that VP3 is found only on the inner surfaces of VLPs and caps of the tubular structures. In summary, assembly of VLPs requires the internal scaffolding of VP3, which seems to induce the closing of the tubular architecture into VLPs and, thereafter, the subsequent processing of VPX to VP2. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  2. Preparation and Characterization of Monomodal Grapevine Virus A Capsid Protein.

    PubMed

    Santana, Vinícius S; Mariutti, Ricardo B; Eberle, Raphael J; Ullah, Anwar; Caruso, Icaro P; Arni, Raghuvir K

    2015-01-01

    Grapevine virus A (GVA), a flexible filament of approximately 800 nm in length is composed of capsid subunits that spontaneously assembles around a positive sense genomic RNA. In addition to encapsidation, plant viruses capsid proteins (CPs) participate in other processes throughout infection and GVA CP is involved in cell-to-cell translocation of the virus. A protocol was developed to obtain low-molecular weight GVA-CP that is not prone to aggregation and spontaneous assembly and this was characterized by circular dichroism and dynamic light scattering. These results indicate the suitably of GVA-CP for X-ray crystallographic and NMR studies that should lead to the elucidation of the first three-dimensional structure of a flexible filamentous virus from the Betaflexiviridae family.

  3. Periodic table of virus capsids: implications for natural selection and design.

    PubMed

    Mannige, Ranjan V; Brooks, Charles L

    2010-03-04

    For survival, most natural viruses depend upon the existence of spherical capsids: protective shells of various sizes composed of protein subunits. So far, general evolutionary pressures shaping capsid design have remained elusive, even though an understanding of such properties may help in rationally impeding the virus life cycle and designing efficient nano-assemblies. This report uncovers an unprecedented and species-independent evolutionary pressure on virus capsids, based on the the notion that the simplest capsid designs (or those capsids with the lowest "hexamer complexity", C(h)) are the fittest, which was shown to be true for all available virus capsids. The theories result in a physically meaningful periodic table of virus capsids that uncovers strong and overarching evolutionary pressures, while also offering geometric explanations to other capsid properties (rigidity, pleomorphy, auxiliary requirements, etc.) that were previously considered to be unrelatable properties of the individual virus. Apart from describing a universal rule for virus capsid evolution, our work (especially the periodic table) provides a language with which highly diverse virus capsids, unified only by geometry, may be described and related to each other. Finally, the available virus structure databases and other published data reiterate the predicted geometry-derived rules, reinforcing the role of geometry in the natural selection and design of virus capsids.

  4. Isolation and Characterization of Metallosphaera turreted icosahedral virus (MTIV), a founding member of a new family of archaeal viruses.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Cassia; Reddy, Vijay; Asturias, Francisco; Khoshouei, Maryam; Johnson, John E; Manrique, Pilar; Munson-McGee, Jacob; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Lawrence, C Martin; Young, Mark J

    2017-08-02

    Our understanding of archaeal virus diversity and structure is just beginning to emerge. Here we describe a new archaeal virus, tentatively named Metallosphaera turreted icosahedral virus (MTIV), that was isolated from an acidic hot spring in Yellowstone National Park, USA. Two strains of the virus were identified and found to replicate in an archaeal host species closely related to Metallosphaera yellowstonensis Each strain encodes for a 9.8-9.9 kb, linear dsDNA genome with large inverted terminal repeats. Each genome encodes for 21 ORFs. Between the strains the ORFs display high homology, but they are quite distinct from other known viral genes. The 70-nm diameter virion is built upon on a T=28 icosahedral lattice. Both single particle cryo-electron microscopy and cryo-tomography reconstructions reveal an unusual structure that has 42 turret-like projections: 12 from each of the 5-fold axes and 30 hexameric units positioned on icosahedral 2-fold axes. Both the virion structural properties and genome content support MTIV as the founding member of a new family of archaeal viruses. Importance: Many archaeal viruses are quite different than viruses infecting bacteria and eukaryotes. Initial characterization of MTIV reveals a virus distinct from other known bacterial, eukaryotic, and archaeal viruses; this finding suggests that viruses infecting Archaea are still an understudied group of viruses. As the first known virus infecting the Metallosphaera , MTIV provides a new system for exploring archaeal virology by examining host-virus interactions and the unique features of MTIV structure-function relationships. These studies will likely expand our understanding of virus ecology and evolution. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  5. A novel Sulfolobus virus with an exceptional capsid architecture.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haina; Guo, Zhenqian; Feng, Hongli; Chen, Yufei; Chen, Xiuqiang; Li, Zhimeng; Hernández-Ascencio, Walter; Dai, Xin; Zhang, Zhenfeng; Zheng, Xiaowei; Mora-López, Marielos; Fu, Yu; Zhang, Chuanlun; Zhu, Ping; Huang, Li

    2017-12-06

    A novel archaeal virus, denoted Sulfolobus ellipsoid virus 1 (SEV1), was isolated from an acidic hot spring in Costa Rica. The morphologically unique virion of SEV1 contains a protein capsid with 16 regularly spaced striations and an 11-nm-thick envelope. The capsid exhibits an unusual architecture in which the viral DNA, probably in the form of a nucleoprotein filament, wraps around the longitudinal axis of the virion in a plane to form a multilayered disk-like structure with a central hole, and 16 of these structures are stacked to generate a spool-like capsid. SEV1 harbors a linear double-stranded DNA genome of ∼23 kb, which encodes 38 predicted open reading frames (ORFs). Among the few ORFs with a putative function is a gene encoding a protein-primed DNA polymerase. Six-fold symmetrical virus-associated pyramids (VAPs) appear on the surface of the SEV1-infected cells, which are ruptured to allow the formation of a hexagonal opening and subsequent release of the progeny virus particles. Notably, the SEV1 virions acquire the lipid membrane in the cytoplasm of the host cell. The lipid composition of the viral envelope correlates with that of the cell membrane. These results suggest the use of a unique mechanism by SEV1 in membrane biogenesis. IMPORTANCE Investigation of archaeal viruses has greatly expanded our knowledge of the virosphere and its role in the evolution of life. Here we show that Sulfolobus ellipsoid virus 1 (SEV1), an archaeal virus isolated from a hot spring in Costa Rica, exhibits a novel viral shape and an unusual capsid architecture. The SEV1 DNA wraps multiple times in a plane around the longitudinal axis of the virion to form a disk-like structure, and 16 of these structures are stacked to generate a spool-like capsid. The virus acquires its envelope intracellularly and exits the host cell by creating a hexagonal hole on the host cell surface. These results shed significant light on the diversity of viral morphogenesis. Copyright © 2017

  6. Functional requirements of the yellow fever virus capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Patkar, Chinmay G; Jones, Christopher T; Chang, Yu-hsuan; Warrier, Ranjit; Kuhn, Richard J

    2007-06-01

    Although it is known that the flavivirus capsid protein is essential for genome packaging and formation of infectious particles, the minimal requirements of the dimeric capsid protein for virus assembly/disassembly have not been characterized. By use of a trans-packaging system that involved packaging a yellow fever virus (YFV) replicon into pseudo-infectious particles by supplying the YFV structural proteins using a Sindbis virus helper construct, the functional elements within the YFV capsid protein (YFC) were characterized. Various N- and C-terminal truncations, internal deletions, and point mutations of YFC were analyzed for their ability to package the YFV replicon. Consistent with previous reports on the tick-borne encephalitis virus capsid protein, YFC demonstrates remarkable functional flexibility. Nearly 40 residues of YFC could be removed from the N terminus while the ability to package replicon RNA was retained. Additionally, YFC containing a deletion of approximately 27 residues of the C terminus, including a complete deletion of C-terminal helix 4, was functional. Internal deletions encompassing the internal hydrophobic sequence in YFC were, in general, tolerated to a lesser extent. Site-directed mutagenesis of helix 4 residues predicted to be involved in intermonomeric interactions were also analyzed, and although single mutations did not affect packaging, a YFC with the double mutation of leucine 81 and valine 88 was nonfunctional. The effects of mutations in YFC on the viability of YFV infection were also analyzed, and these results were similar to those obtained using the replicon packaging system, thus underscoring the flexibility of YFC with respect to the requirements for its functioning.

  7. All-atom molecular dynamics of the HBV capsid reveals insights into biological function and cryo-EM resolution limits

    PubMed Central

    Perilla, Juan R; Schlicksup, Christopher John; Venkatakrishnan, Balasubramanian; Zlotnick, Adam; Schulten, Klaus

    2018-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus capsid represents a promising therapeutic target. Experiments suggest the capsid must be flexible to function; however, capsid structure and dynamics have not been thoroughly characterized in the absence of icosahedral symmetry constraints. Here, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations are leveraged to investigate the capsid without symmetry bias, enabling study of capsid flexibility and its implications for biological function and cryo-EM resolution limits. Simulation results confirm flexibility and reveal a propensity for asymmetric distortion. The capsid’s influence on ionic species suggests a mechanism for modulating the display of cellular signals and implicates the capsid’s triangular pores as the location of signal exposure. A theoretical image reconstruction performed using simulated conformations indicates how capsid flexibility may limit the resolution of cryo-EM. Overall, the present work provides functional insight beyond what is accessible to experimental methods and raises important considerations regarding asymmetry in structural studies of icosahedral virus capsids. PMID:29708495

  8. Nanoindentation of virus capsids in a molecular model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Marek; Robbins, Mark O.

    2010-01-01

    A molecular-level model is used to study the mechanical response of empty cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) and cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) capsids. The model is based on the native structure of the proteins that constitute the capsids and is described in terms of the Cα atoms. Nanoindentation by a large tip is modeled as compression between parallel plates. Plots of the compressive force versus plate separation for CCMV are qualitatively consistent with continuum models and experiments, showing an elastic region followed by an irreversible drop in force. The mechanical response of CPMV has not been studied, but the molecular model predicts an order of magnitude higher stiffness and a much shorter elastic region than for CCMV. These large changes result from small structural changes that increase the number of bonds by only 30% and would be difficult to capture in continuum models. Direct comparison of local deformations in continuum and molecular models of CCMV shows that the molecular model undergoes a gradual symmetry breaking rotation and accommodates more strain near the walls than the continuum model. The irreversible drop in force at small separations is associated with rupturing nearly all of the bonds between capsid proteins in the molecular model, while a buckling transition is observed in continuum models.

  9. Thirty-thousand-year-old distant relative of giant icosahedral DNA viruses with a pandoravirus morphology

    PubMed Central

    Legendre, Matthieu; Bartoli, Julia; Shmakova, Lyubov; Jeudy, Sandra; Labadie, Karine; Adrait, Annie; Lescot, Magali; Poirot, Olivier; Bertaux, Lionel; Bruley, Christophe; Couté, Yohann; Rivkina, Elizaveta; Abergel, Chantal; Claverie, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    The largest known DNA viruses infect Acanthamoeba and belong to two markedly different families. The Megaviridae exhibit pseudo-icosahedral virions up to 0.7 μm in diameter and adenine–thymine (AT)-rich genomes of up to 1.25 Mb encoding a thousand proteins. Like their Mimivirus prototype discovered 10 y ago, they entirely replicate within cytoplasmic virion factories. In contrast, the recently discovered Pandoraviruses exhibit larger amphora-shaped virions 1 μm in length and guanine–cytosine-rich genomes up to 2.8 Mb long encoding up to 2,500 proteins. Their replication involves the host nucleus. Whereas the Megaviridae share some general features with the previously described icosahedral large DNA viruses, the Pandoraviruses appear unrelated to them. Here we report the discovery of a third type of giant virus combining an even larger pandoravirus-like particle 1.5 μm in length with a surprisingly smaller 600 kb AT-rich genome, a gene content more similar to Iridoviruses and Marseillevirus, and a fully cytoplasmic replication reminiscent of the Megaviridae. This suggests that pandoravirus-like particles may be associated with a variety of virus families more diverse than previously envisioned. This giant virus, named Pithovirus sibericum, was isolated from a >30,000-y-old radiocarbon-dated sample when we initiated a survey of the virome of Siberian permafrost. The revival of such an ancestral amoeba-infecting virus used as a safe indicator of the possible presence of pathogenic DNA viruses, suggests that the thawing of permafrost either from global warming or industrial exploitation of circumpolar regions might not be exempt from future threats to human or animal health. PMID:24591590

  10. Thirty-thousand-year-old distant relative of giant icosahedral DNA viruses with a pandoravirus morphology.

    PubMed

    Legendre, Matthieu; Bartoli, Julia; Shmakova, Lyubov; Jeudy, Sandra; Labadie, Karine; Adrait, Annie; Lescot, Magali; Poirot, Olivier; Bertaux, Lionel; Bruley, Christophe; Couté, Yohann; Rivkina, Elizaveta; Abergel, Chantal; Claverie, Jean-Michel

    2014-03-18

    The largest known DNA viruses infect Acanthamoeba and belong to two markedly different families. The Megaviridae exhibit pseudo-icosahedral virions up to 0.7 μm in diameter and adenine-thymine (AT)-rich genomes of up to 1.25 Mb encoding a thousand proteins. Like their Mimivirus prototype discovered 10 y ago, they entirely replicate within cytoplasmic virion factories. In contrast, the recently discovered Pandoraviruses exhibit larger amphora-shaped virions 1 μm in length and guanine-cytosine-rich genomes up to 2.8 Mb long encoding up to 2,500 proteins. Their replication involves the host nucleus. Whereas the Megaviridae share some general features with the previously described icosahedral large DNA viruses, the Pandoraviruses appear unrelated to them. Here we report the discovery of a third type of giant virus combining an even larger pandoravirus-like particle 1.5 μm in length with a surprisingly smaller 600 kb AT-rich genome, a gene content more similar to Iridoviruses and Marseillevirus, and a fully cytoplasmic replication reminiscent of the Megaviridae. This suggests that pandoravirus-like particles may be associated with a variety of virus families more diverse than previously envisioned. This giant virus, named Pithovirus sibericum, was isolated from a >30,000-y-old radiocarbon-dated sample when we initiated a survey of the virome of Siberian permafrost. The revival of such an ancestral amoeba-infecting virus used as a safe indicator of the possible presence of pathogenic DNA viruses, suggests that the thawing of permafrost either from global warming or industrial exploitation of circumpolar regions might not be exempt from future threats to human or animal health.

  11. A Multiscale Model for Virus Capsid Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Changjun; Saxena, Rishu; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2010-01-01

    Viruses are infectious agents that can cause epidemics and pandemics. The understanding of virus formation, evolution, stability, and interaction with host cells is of great importance to the scientific community and public health. Typically, a virus complex in association with its aquatic environment poses a fabulous challenge to theoretical description and prediction. In this work, we propose a differential geometry-based multiscale paradigm to model complex biomolecule systems. In our approach, the differential geometry theory of surfaces and geometric measure theory are employed as a natural means to couple the macroscopic continuum domain of the fluid mechanical description of the aquatic environment from the microscopic discrete domain of the atomistic description of the biomolecule. A multiscale action functional is constructed as a unified framework to derive the governing equations for the dynamics of different scales. We show that the classical Navier-Stokes equation for the fluid dynamics and Newton's equation for the molecular dynamics can be derived from the least action principle. These equations are coupled through the continuum-discrete interface whose dynamics is governed by potential driven geometric flows. PMID:20224756

  12. Proteomic Analysis of Sulfolobus solfataricus During Sulfolobus Turreted Icosahedral Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Maaty, Walid S.; Selvig, Kyla; Ryder, Stephanie; Tarlykov, Pavel; Hilmer, Jonathan K.; Heinemann, Joshua; Steffens, Joseph; Snyder, Jamie C.; Ortmann, Alice C.; Movahed, Navid; Spicka, Kevin; Chetia, Lakshindra; Grieco, Paul A.; Dratz, Edward A.; Douglas, Trevor; Young, Mark J.; Bothner, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Where there is life, there are viruses. The impact of viruses on evolution, global nutrient cycling, and disease has driven research on their cellular and molecular biology. Knowledge exists for a wide range of viruses, however, a major exception are viruses with archaeal hosts. Archaeal virus-host systems are of great interest because they have similarities to both eukaryotic and bacterial systems and often live in extreme environments. Here we report the first proteomics-based experiments on archaeal host response to viral infection. Sulfolobus Turreted Icosahedral Virus (STIV) infection of Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 was studied using 1D and 2D differential gel electrophoresis (DIGE) to measure abundance and redox changes. Cysteine reactivity was measured using novel fluorescent zwitterionic chemical probes that, together with abundance changes, suggest that virus and host are both vying for control of redox status in the cells. Proteins from nearly 50% of the predicted viral open reading frames were found along with a new STIV protein with a homolog in STIV2. This study provides insight to features of viral replication novel to the archaea, makes strong connections to well described mechanisms used by eukaryotic viruses such as ESCRT-III mediated transport, and emphasizes the complementary nature of different omics approaches. PMID:22217245

  13. Portal protein functions akin to a DNA-sensor that couples genome-packaging to icosahedral capsid maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Lokareddy, Ravi K.; Sankhala, Rajeshwer S.; Roy, Ankoor

    Tailed bacteriophages and herpesviruses assemble infectious particles via an empty precursor capsid (or ‘procapsid’) built by multiple copies of coat and scaffolding protein and by one dodecameric portal protein. Genome packaging triggers rearrangement of the coat protein and release of scaffolding protein, resulting in dramatic procapsid lattice expansion. Here, we provide structural evidence that the portal protein of the bacteriophage P22 exists in two distinct dodecameric conformations: an asymmetric assembly in the procapsid (PC-portal) that is competent for high affinity binding to the large terminase packaging protein, and a symmetric ring in the mature virion (MV-portal) that has negligible affinitymore » for the packaging motor. Modelling studies indicate the structure of PC-portal is incompatible with DNA coaxially spooled around the portal vertex, suggesting that newly packaged DNA triggers the switch from PC- to MV-conformation. Thus, we propose the signal for termination of ‘Headful Packaging’ is a DNA-dependent symmetrization of portal protein.« less

  14. Adding the Third Dimension to Virus Life Cycles: Three-Dimensional Reconstruction of Icosahedral Viruses from Cryo-Electron Micrographs

    PubMed Central

    Baker, T. S.; Olson, N. H.; Fuller, S. D.

    1999-01-01

    Viruses are cellular parasites. The linkage between viral and host functions makes the study of a viral life cycle an important key to cellular functions. A deeper understanding of many aspects of viral life cycles has emerged from coordinated molecular and structural studies carried out with a wide range of viral pathogens. Structural studies of viruses by means of cryo-electron microscopy and three-dimensional image reconstruction methods have grown explosively in the last decade. Here we review the use of cryo-electron microscopy for the determination of the structures of a number of icosahedral viruses. These studies span more than 20 virus families. Representative examples illustrate the use of moderate- to low-resolution (7- to 35-Å) structural analyses to illuminate functional aspects of viral life cycles including host recognition, viral attachment, entry, genome release, viral transcription, translation, proassembly, maturation, release, and transmission, as well as mechanisms of host defense. The success of cryo-electron microscopy in combination with three-dimensional image reconstruction for icosahedral viruses provides a firm foundation for future explorations of more-complex viral pathogens, including the vast number that are nonspherical or nonsymmetrical. PMID:10585969

  15. Icosahedral plant viral nanoparticles - bioinspired synthesis of nanomaterials/nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Kannan Badri; Han, Sung Soo

    2017-10-01

    Viral nanotechnology utilizes virus nanoparticles (VNPs) and virus-like nanoparticles (VLPs) of plant viruses as highly versatile platforms for materials synthesis and molecular entrapment that can be used in the nanotechnological fields, such as in next-generation nanoelectronics, nanocatalysis, biosensing and optics, and biomedical applications, such as for targeting, therapeutic delivery, and non-invasive in vivo imaging with high specificity and selectivity. In particular, plant virus capsids provide biotemplates for the production of novel nanostructured materials with organic/inorganic moieties incorporated in a very precise and controlled manner. Interestingly, capsid proteins of spherical plant viruses can self-assemble into well-organized icosahedral three-dimensional (3D) nanoscale multivalent architectures with high monodispersity and structural symmetry. Using viral genetic and protein engineering of icosahedral viruses with a variety of sizes, the interior, exterior and the interfaces between coat protein (CP) subunits can be manipulated to fabricate materials with a wide range of desirable properties allowing for biomineralization, encapsulation, infusion, controlled self-assembly, and multivalent ligand display of nanoparticles or molecules for varied applications. In this review, we discuss the various functional nanomaterials/nanostructures developed using the VNPs and VLPs of different icosahedral plant viruses and their nano(bio)technological and nanomedical applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Drosophila Nora virus capsid proteins differ from those of other picorna-like viruses.

    PubMed

    Ekström, Jens-Ola; Habayeb, Mazen S; Srivastava, Vaibhav; Kieselbach, Thomas; Wingsle, Gunnar; Hultmark, Dan

    2011-09-01

    The recently discovered Nora virus from Drosophila melanogaster is a single-stranded RNA virus. Its published genomic sequence encodes a typical picorna-like cassette of replicative enzymes, but no capsid proteins similar to those in other picorna-like viruses. We have now done additional sequencing at the termini of the viral genome, extending it by 455 nucleotides at the 5' end, but no more coding sequence was found. The completeness of the final 12,333-nucleotide sequence was verified by the production of infectious virus from the cloned genome. To identify the capsid proteins, we purified Nora virus particles and analyzed their proteins by mass spectrometry. Our results show that the capsid is built from three major proteins, VP4A, B and C, encoded in the fourth open reading frame of the viral genome. The viral particles also contain traces of a protein from the third open reading frame, VP3. VP4A and B are not closely related to other picorna-like virus capsid proteins in sequence, but may form similar jelly roll folds. VP4C differs from the others and is predicted to have an essentially α-helical conformation. In a related virus, identified from EST database sequences from Nasonia parasitoid wasps, VP4C is encoded in a separate open reading frame, separated from VP4A and B by a frame-shift. This opens a possibility that VP4C is produced in non-equimolar quantities. Altogether, our results suggest that the Nora virus capsid has a different protein organization compared to the order Picornavirales. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Efficient Capsid Antigen Presentation From Adeno-Associated Virus Empty Virions In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Pei, Xiaolei; Earley, Lauriel Freya; He, Yi; Chen, Xiaojing; Hall, Nikita Elexa; Samulski, Richard Jude; Li, Chengwen

    2018-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have been successfully applied in clinical trials for hemophilic patients. Although promising, the clinical results suggest that the capsid-specific CD8+T cell response has a negative effect on therapeutic success. In an in vitro analysis using an engineered AAV virus carrying immune-dominant SIINFEKL peptide in the capsid backbone, we have previously demonstrated that capsid antigen presentation from full (genome containing) AAV capsids requires endosome escape and is proteasome dependent and that no capsid antigen presentation is induced from empty virions. In the present study, we examined capsid antigen presentation from administration of empty virions in animal models. In wild-type mice, similar to AAV full particles, capsid antigen presentation from AAV empty virion infection was dose dependent, and the kinetics studies showed that antigen presentation was detected from 2 to 40 days after AAV empty virion administration. In the transporter associated with antigen processing 1 deficient (TAP-/-) mice, capsid antigen presentation was inhibited from both AAV full and empty virions, but higher inhibition was achieved from AAV full particle administration than that from empty virions. This indicates that the pathway of capsid antigen presentation from AAV transduction is dependent on proteasome-mediated degradation of AAV capsids (mainly for full particles) and that the endosomal pathway may also play a role in antigen presentation from empty particles but not full virions. The capsid antigen presentation efficiency from AAV preparations was positively correlated with the amount of empty virions contaminated with full particles. Collectively, the results indicate that contamination of AAV empty virions induces efficient antigen presentation in vivo and the mechanism of capsid antigen presentation from empty virions involves both endosomal and proteasomal pathways. The elucidation of capsid antigen presentation from AAV empty

  18. Efficient Capsid Antigen Presentation From Adeno-Associated Virus Empty Virions In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Xiaolei; Earley, Lauriel Freya; He, Yi; Chen, Xiaojing; Hall, Nikita Elexa; Samulski, Richard Jude; Li, Chengwen

    2018-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have been successfully applied in clinical trials for hemophilic patients. Although promising, the clinical results suggest that the capsid-specific CD8+T cell response has a negative effect on therapeutic success. In an in vitro analysis using an engineered AAV virus carrying immune-dominant SIINFEKL peptide in the capsid backbone, we have previously demonstrated that capsid antigen presentation from full (genome containing) AAV capsids requires endosome escape and is proteasome dependent and that no capsid antigen presentation is induced from empty virions. In the present study, we examined capsid antigen presentation from administration of empty virions in animal models. In wild-type mice, similar to AAV full particles, capsid antigen presentation from AAV empty virion infection was dose dependent, and the kinetics studies showed that antigen presentation was detected from 2 to 40 days after AAV empty virion administration. In the transporter associated with antigen processing 1 deficient (TAP−/−) mice, capsid antigen presentation was inhibited from both AAV full and empty virions, but higher inhibition was achieved from AAV full particle administration than that from empty virions. This indicates that the pathway of capsid antigen presentation from AAV transduction is dependent on proteasome-mediated degradation of AAV capsids (mainly for full particles) and that the endosomal pathway may also play a role in antigen presentation from empty particles but not full virions. The capsid antigen presentation efficiency from AAV preparations was positively correlated with the amount of empty virions contaminated with full particles. Collectively, the results indicate that contamination of AAV empty virions induces efficient antigen presentation in vivo and the mechanism of capsid antigen presentation from empty virions involves both endosomal and proteasomal pathways. The elucidation of capsid antigen presentation from AAV

  19. All-atom molecular dynamics of virus capsids as drug targets

    DOE PAGES

    Perilla, Juan R.; Hadden, Jodi A.; Goh, Boon Chong; ...

    2016-04-29

    Virus capsids are protein shells that package the viral genome. Although their morphology and biological functions can vary markedly, capsids often play critical roles in regulating viral infection pathways. A detailed knowledge of virus capsids, including their dynamic structure, interactions with cellular factors, and the specific roles that they play in the replication cycle, is imperative for the development of antiviral therapeutics. The following Perspective introduces an emerging area of computational biology that focuses on the dynamics of virus capsids and capsid–protein assemblies, with particular emphasis on the effects of small-molecule drug binding on capsid structure, stability, and allosteric pathways.more » When performed at chemical detail, molecular dynamics simulations can reveal subtle changes in virus capsids induced by drug molecules a fraction of their size. Finally, the current challenges of performing all-atom capsid–drug simulations are discussed, along with an outlook on the applicability of virus capsid simulations to reveal novel drug targets.« less

  20. Intracellular cargo delivery by virus capsid protein-based vehicles: From nano to micro.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ding; Lin, Xiu-Ping; Zhang, Zhi-Ping; Li, Wei; Men, Dong; Zhang, Xian-En; Cui, Zong-Qiang

    2016-02-01

    Cellular delivery is an important concern for the efficiency of medicines and sensors for disease diagnoses and therapy. However, this task is quite challenging. Self-assembly virus capsid proteins might be developed as building blocks for multifunctional cellular delivery vehicles. In this work, we found that SV40 VP1 (Simian virus 40 major capsid protein) could function as a new cell-penetrating protein. The VP1 protein could carry foreign proteins into cells in a pentameric structure. A double color structure, with red QDs (Quantum dots) encapsulated by viral capsids fused with EGFP, was created for imaging cargo delivery and release from viral capsids. The viral capsids encapsulating QDs were further used for cellular delivery of micron-sized iron oxide particles (MPIOs). MPIOs were efficiently delivered into live cells and controlled by a magnetic field. Therefore, our study built virus-based cellular delivery systems for different sizes of cargos: protein molecules, nanoparticles, and micron-sized particles. Much research is being done to investigate methods for efficient and specific cellular delivery of drugs, proteins or genetic material. In this article, the authors describe their approach in using self-assembly virus capsid proteins SV40 VP1 (Simian virus 40 major capsid protein). The cell-penetrating behavior provided excellent cellular delivery and should give a new method for biomedical applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. All-atom molecular dynamics of virus capsids as drug targets

    SciTech Connect

    Perilla, Juan R.; Hadden, Jodi A.; Goh, Boon Chong

    Virus capsids are protein shells that package the viral genome. Although their morphology and biological functions can vary markedly, capsids often play critical roles in regulating viral infection pathways. A detailed knowledge of virus capsids, including their dynamic structure, interactions with cellular factors, and the specific roles that they play in the replication cycle, is imperative for the development of antiviral therapeutics. The following Perspective introduces an emerging area of computational biology that focuses on the dynamics of virus capsids and capsid–protein assemblies, with particular emphasis on the effects of small-molecule drug binding on capsid structure, stability, and allosteric pathways.more » When performed at chemical detail, molecular dynamics simulations can reveal subtle changes in virus capsids induced by drug molecules a fraction of their size. Finally, the current challenges of performing all-atom capsid–drug simulations are discussed, along with an outlook on the applicability of virus capsid simulations to reveal novel drug targets.« less

  2. The chaperone dynein LL1 mediates cytoplasmic transport of empty and mature hepatitis B virus capsids.

    PubMed

    Osseman, Quentin; Gallucci, Lara; Au, Shelly; Cazenave, Christian; Berdance, Elodie; Blondot, Marie-Lise; Cassany, Aurélia; Bégu, Dominique; Ragues, Jessica; Aknin, Cindy; Sominskaya, Irina; Dishlers, Andris; Rabe, Birgit; Anderson, Fenja; Panté, Nelly; Kann, Michael

    2018-03-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) has a DNA genome but replicates within the nucleus by reverse transcription of an RNA pregenome, which is converted to DNA in cytoplasmic capsids. Capsids in this compartment are correlated with inflammation and epitopes of the capsid protein core (Cp) are a major target for T cell-mediated immune responses. We investigated the mechanism of cytoplasmic capsid transport, which is important for infection but also for cytosolic capsid removal. We used virion-derived capsids containing mature rcDNA (matC) and empty capsids (empC). RNA-containing capsids (rnaC) were used as a control. The investigations comprised pull-down assays for identification of cellular interaction partners, immune fluorescence microscopy for their colocalization and electron microscopy after microinjection to determine their biological significance. matC and empC underwent active transport through the cytoplasm towards the nucleus, while rnaC was poorly transported. We identified the dynein light chain LL1 as a functional interaction partner linking capsids to the dynein motor complex and showed that there is no compensatory transport pathway. Using capsid and dynein LL1 mutants we characterized the required domains on the capsid and LL1. This is the first investigation on the detailed molecular mechanism of how matC pass the cytoplasm upon infection and how empC can be actively removed from the cytoplasm into the nucleus. Considering that hepatocytes with cytoplasmic capsids are better recognized by the T cells, we hypothesize that targeting capsid DynLL1-interaction will not only block HBV infection but also stimulate elimination of infected cells. In this study, we identified the molecular details of HBV translocation through the cytoplasm. Our evidence offers a new drug target which could not only inhibit infection but also stimulate immune clearance of HBV infected cells. Copyright © 2017 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B

  3. Purification of recombinant budgerigar fledgling disease virus VP1 capsid protein and its ability for in vitro capsid assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodgers, R. E.; Chang, D.; Cai, X.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    A recombinant system for the major capsid VP1 protein of budgerigar fledgling disease virus has been established. The VP1 gene was inserted into a truncated form of the pFlag-1 vector and expressed in Escherichia coli. The budgerigar fledgling disease virus VP1 protein was purified to near homogeneity by immunoaffinity chromatography. Fractions containing highly purified VP1 were pooled and found to constitute 3.3% of the original E. coli-expressed VP1 protein. Electron microscopy revealed that the VP1 protein was isolated as pentameric capsomeres. Electron microscopy also revealed that capsid-like particles were formed in vitro from purified VP1 capsomeres with the addition of Ca2+ ions and the removal of chelating and reducing agents.

  4. Electrostatic potential of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 and rhesus macaque simian immunodeficiency virus capsid proteins.

    PubMed

    Bozek, Katarzyna; Nakayama, Emi E; Kono, Ken; Shioda, Tatsuo

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) and simian immunodeficiency virus isolated from a macaque monkey (SIVmac) are assumed to have originated from simian immunodeficiency virus isolated from sooty mangabey (SIVsm). Despite their close similarity in genome structure, HIV-2 and SIVmac show different sensitivities to TRIM5α, a host restriction factor against retroviruses. The replication of HIV-2 strains is potently restricted by rhesus (Rh) monkey TRIM5α, while that of SIVmac strain 239 (SIVmac239) is not. Viral capsid protein is the determinant of this differential sensitivity to TRIM5α, as the HIV-2 mutant carrying SIVmac239 capsid protein evaded Rh TRIM5α-mediated restriction. However, the molecular determinants of this restriction mechanism are unknown. Electrostatic potential on the protein-binding site is one of the properties regulating protein-protein interactions. In this study, we investigated the electrostatic potential on the interaction surface of capsid protein of HIV-2 strain GH123 and SIVmac239. Although HIV-2 GH123 and SIVmac239 capsid proteins share more than 87% amino acid identity, we observed a large difference between the two molecules with the HIV-2 GH123 molecule having predominantly positive and SIVmac239 predominantly negative electrostatic potential on the surface of the loop between α-helices 4 and 5 (L4/5). As L4/5 is one of the major determinants of Rh TRIM5α sensitivity of these viruses, the present results suggest that the binding site of the Rh TRIM5α may show complementarity to the HIV-2 GH123 capsid surface charge distribution.

  5. Effects of Point Mutations in the Major Capsid Protein of Beet Western Yellows Virus on Capsid Formation, Virus Accumulation, and Aphid Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Brault, V.; Bergdoll, M.; Mutterer, J.; Prasad, V.; Pfeffer, S.; Erdinger, M.; Richards, K. E.; Ziegler-Graff, V.

    2003-01-01

    Point mutations were introduced into the major capsid protein (P3) of cloned infectious cDNA of the polerovirus beet western yellows virus (BWYV) by manipulation of cloned infectious cDNA. Seven mutations targeted sites on the S domain predicted to lie on the capsid surface. An eighth mutation eliminated two arginine residues in the R domain, which is thought to extend into the capsid interior. The effects of the mutations on virus capsid formation, virus accumulation in protoplasts and plants, and aphid transmission were tested. All of the mutants replicated in protoplasts. The S-domain mutant W166R failed to protect viral RNA from RNase attack, suggesting that this particular mutation interfered with stable capsid formation. The R-domain mutant R7A/R8A protected ∼90% of the viral RNA strand from RNase, suggesting that lower positive-charge density in the mutant capsid interior interfered with stable packaging of the complete strand into virions. Neither of these mutants systemically infected plants. The six remaining mutants properly packaged viral RNA and could invade Nicotiana clevelandii systemically following agroinfection. Mutant Q121E/N122D was poorly transmitted by aphids, implicating one or both targeted residues in virus-vector interactions. Successful transmission of mutant D172N was accompanied either by reversion to the wild type or by appearance of a second-site mutation, N137D. This finding indicates that D172 is also important for transmission but that the D172N transmission defect can be compensated for by a “reverse” substitution at another site. The results have been used to evaluate possible structural models for the BWYV capsid. PMID:12584348

  6. The Globoside Receptor Triggers Structural Changes in the B19 Virus Capsid That Facilitate Virus Internalization▿

    PubMed Central

    Bönsch, Claudia; Zuercher, Christoph; Lieby, Patricia; Kempf, Christoph; Ros, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Globoside (Gb4Cer), Ku80 autoantigen, and α5β1 integrin have been identified as cell receptors/coreceptors for human parvovirus B19 (B19V), but their role and mechanism of interaction with the virus are largely unknown. In UT7/Epo cells, expression of Gb4Cer and CD49e (integrin alpha-5) was high, but expression of Ku80 was insignificant. B19V colocalized with Gb4Cer and, to a lesser extent, with CD49e. However, only anti-Gb4Cer antibodies could disturb virus attachment. Only a small proportion of cell-bound viruses were internalized, while the majority became detached from the receptor. When added to uninfected cells, the receptor-detached virus showed superior cell binding capacity and infectivity. Attachment of B19V to cells triggered conformational changes in the capsid leading to the accessibility of the N terminus of VP1 (VP1u) to antibodies, which was maintained in the receptor-detached virus. VP1u became similarly accessible to antibodies following incubation of B19V particles with increasing concentrations of purified Gb4Cer. The receptor-mediated exposure of VP1u is critical for virus internalization, since capsids lacking VP1 could bind to cells but were not internalized. Moreover, an antibody against the N terminus of VP1u disturbed virus internalization, but only when present during and not after virus attachment, indicating the involvement of this region in binding events required for internalization. These results suggest that Gb4Cer is not only the primary receptor for B19V attachment but also the mediator of capsid rearrangements required for subsequent interactions leading to virus internalization. The capacity of the virus to detach and reattach again would enhance the probability of productive infections. PMID:20826697

  7. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies to budgerigar fledgling disease virus major capsid protein VP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fattaey, A.; Lenz, L.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Eleven hybridoma cell lines producing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against intact budgerigar fledgling disease (BFD) virions were produced and characterized. These antibodies were selected for their ability to react with BFD virions in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Each of these antibodies was reactive in the immunofluorescent detection of BFD virus-infected cells. These antibodies immunoprecipitated intact virions and specifically recognized the major capsid protein, VP1, of the dissociated virion. The MAbs were found to preferentially recognize native BFD virus capsid protein when compared with denatured virus protein. These MAbs were capable of detecting BFD virus protein in chicken embryonated cell-culture lysates by dot-blot analysis.

  8. Cellular phosphoinositides and the maturation of bluetongue virus, a non-enveloped capsid virus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bluetongue virus (BTV), a member of Orbivirus genus in the Reoviridae family is a double capsid virus enclosing a genome of 10 double-stranded RNA segments. A non-structural protein of BTV, NS3, which is associated with cellular membranes and interacts with outer capsid proteins, has been shown to be involved in virus morphogenesis in infected cells. In addition, studies have also shown that during the later stages of virus infection NS3 behaves similarly to HIV protein Gag, an enveloped viral protein. Since Gag protein is known to interact with membrane lipid phosphatidylinositol (4,5) bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] and one of the known binding partners of NS3, cellular protein p11 also interacts with annexin a PI(4,5)P2 interacting protein, this study was designed to understand the role of this negatively charged membrane lipid in BTV assembly and maturation. Methods Over expression of cellular enzymes that either depleted cells of PI(4,5)P2 or altered the distribution of PI(4,5)P2, were used to analyze the effect of the lipid on BTV maturation at different times post-infection. The production of mature virus particles was monitored by plaque assay. Microscopic techniques such as confocal microscopy and electron microscopy (EM) were also undertaken to study localization of virus proteins and virus particles in cells, respectively. Results Initially, confocal microscopic analysis demonstrated that PI(4,5)P2 not only co-localized with NS3, but it also co-localized with VP5, one of the outer capsid proteins of BTV. Subsequently, experiments involving depletion of cellular PI(4,5)P2 or its relocation demonstrated an inhibitory effect on normal BTV maturation and it also led to a redistribution of BTV proteins within the cell. The data was supported further by EM visualization showing that modulation of PI(4,5)P2 in cells indeed resulted in less particle production. Conclusion This study to our knowledge, is the first report demonstrating involvement of PI(4,5)P2

  9. Small-Molecule Effectors of Hepatitis B Virus Capsid Assembly Give Insight into Virus Life Cycle▿

    PubMed Central

    Bourne, Christina; Lee, Sejin; Venkataiah, Bollu; Lee, Angela; Korba, Brent; Finn, M. G.; Zlotnick, Adam

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between the physical chemistry and biology of self-assembly is poorly understood, but it will be critical to quantitatively understand infection and for the design of antivirals that target virus genesis. Here we take advantage of heteroaryldihydropyrimidines (HAPs), which affect hepatitis B virus (HBV) assembly, to gain insight and correlate in vitro assembly with HBV replication in culture. Based on a low-resolution crystal structure of a capsid-HAP complex, a closely related series of HAPs were designed and synthesized. These differentially strengthen the association between neighboring capsid proteins, alter the kinetics of assembly, and give rise to aberrant structures incompatible with a functional capsid. The chemical nature of the HAP variants correlated well with the structure of the HAP binding pocket. The thermodynamics and kinetics of in vitro assembly had strong and predictable effects on product morphology. However, only the kinetics of in vitro assembly had a strong correlation with inhibition of HBV replication in HepG2.2.15 cells; there was at best a weak correlation between assembly thermodynamics and replication. The correlation between assembly kinetics and virus suppression implies a competition between successful assembly and misassembly, small molecule induced or otherwise. This is a predictive and testable model for the mechanism of action of assembly effectors. PMID:18684823

  10. Coat as a Dagger: The Use of Capsid Proteins to Perforate Membranes during Non-Enveloped DNA Viruses Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Bilkova, Eva; Forstova, Jitka; Abrahamyan, Levon

    2014-01-01

    To get access to the replication site, small non-enveloped DNA viruses have to cross the cell membrane using a limited number of capsid proteins, which also protect the viral genome in the extracellular environment. Most of DNA viruses have to reach the nucleus to replicate. The capsid proteins involved in transmembrane penetration are exposed or released during endosomal trafficking of the virus. Subsequently, the conserved domains of capsid proteins interact with cellular membranes and ensure their efficient permeabilization. This review summarizes our current knowledge concerning the role of capsid proteins of small non-enveloped DNA viruses in intracellular membrane perturbation in the early stages of infection. PMID:25055856

  11. Varicella-zoster virus induces the formation of dynamic nuclear capsid aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Lebrun, Marielle; Thelen, Nicolas; Thiry, Marc

    2014-04-15

    The first step of herpesviruses virion assembly occurs in the nucleus. However, the exact site where nucleocapsids are assembled, where the genome and the inner tegument are acquired, remains controversial. We created a recombinant VZV expressing ORF23 (homologous to HSV-1 VP26) fused to the eGFP and dually fluorescent viruses with a tegument protein additionally fused to a red tag (ORF9, ORF21 and ORF22 corresponding to HSV-1 UL49, UL37 and UL36). We identified nuclear dense structures containing the major capsid protein, the scaffold protein and maturing protease, as well as ORF21 and ORF22. Correlative microscopy demonstrated that the structures correspond tomore » capsid aggregates and time-lapse video imaging showed that they appear prior to the accumulation of cytoplasmic capsids, presumably undergoing the secondary egress, and are highly dynamic. Our observations suggest that these structures might represent a nuclear area important for capsid assembly and/or maturation before the budding at the inner nuclear membrane. - Highlights: • We created a recombinant VZV expressing the small capsid protein fused to the eGFP. • We identified nuclear dense structures containing capsid and procapsid proteins. • Correlative microscopy showed that the structures correspond to capsid aggregates. • Procapsids and partial capsids are found within the aggregates of WT and eGFP-23 VZV. • FRAP and FLIP experiments demonstrated that they are dynamic structures.« less

  12. Human Foamy Virus Capsid Formation Requires an Interaction Domain in the N Terminus of Gag

    PubMed Central

    Tobaly-Tapiero, Joelle; Bittoun, Patricia; Giron, Marie-Lou; Neves, Manuel; Koken, Marcel; Saïb, Ali; de Thé, Hugues

    2001-01-01

    Retroviral Gag expression is sufficient for capsid assembly, which occurs through interaction between distinct Gag domains. Human foamy virus (HFV) capsids assemble within the cytoplasm, although their budding, which mainly occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum, requires the presence of homologous Env. Yet little is known about the molecular basis of HFV Gag precursor assembly. Using fusions between HFV Gag and a nuclear reporter protein, we have identified a strong interaction domain in the N terminus of HFV Gag which is predicted to contain a conserved coiled-coil motif. Deletion within this region in an HFV provirus abolishes viral production through inhibition of capsid assembly. PMID:11287585

  13. Cryo-electron Microscopy Reconstruction and Stability Studies of the Wild Type and the R432A Variant of Adeno-associated Virus Type 2 Reveal that Capsid Structural Stability Is a Major Factor in Genome Packaging

    PubMed Central

    Drouin, Lauren M.; Lins, Bridget; Janssen, Maria; Bennett, Antonette; Chipman, Paul; McKenna, Robert; Chen, Weijun; Muzyczka, Nicholas; Cardone, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The adeno-associated viruses (AAV) are promising therapeutic gene delivery vectors and better understanding of their capsid assembly and genome packaging mechanism is needed for improved vector production. Empty AAV capsids assemble in the nucleus prior to genome packaging by virally encoded Rep proteins. To elucidate the capsid determinants of this process, structural differences between wild-type (wt) AAV2 and a packaging deficient variant, AAV2-R432A, were examined using cryo-electron microscopy and three-dimensional image reconstruction both at an ∼5.0-Å resolution (medium) and also at 3.8- and 3.7-Å resolutions (high), respectively. The high resolution structures showed that removal of the arginine side chain in AAV2-R432A eliminated hydrogen bonding interactions, resulting in altered intramolecular and intermolecular interactions propagated from under the 3-fold axis toward the 5-fold channel. Consistent with these observations, differential scanning calorimetry showed an ∼10°C decrease in thermal stability for AAV2-R432A compared to wt-AAV2. In addition, the medium resolution structures revealed differences in the juxtaposition of the less ordered, N-terminal region of their capsid proteins, VP1/2/3. A structural rearrangement in AAV2-R432A repositioned the βA strand region under the icosahedral 2-fold axis rather than antiparallel to the βB strand, eliminating many intramolecular interactions. Thus, a single amino acid substitution can significantly alter the AAV capsid integrity to the extent of reducing its stability and possibly rendering it unable to tolerate the stress of genome packaging. Furthermore, the data show that the 2-, 3-, and 5-fold regions of the capsid contributed to producing the packaging defect and highlight a tight connection between the entire capsid in maintaining packaging efficiency. IMPORTANCE The mechanism of AAV genome packaging is still poorly understood, particularly with respect to the capsid determinants

  14. Cryo-electron Microscopy Reconstruction and Stability Studies of the Wild Type and the R432A Variant of Adeno-associated Virus Type 2 Reveal that Capsid Structural Stability Is a Major Factor in Genome Packaging.

    PubMed

    Drouin, Lauren M; Lins, Bridget; Janssen, Maria; Bennett, Antonette; Chipman, Paul; McKenna, Robert; Chen, Weijun; Muzyczka, Nicholas; Cardone, Giovanni; Baker, Timothy S; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis

    2016-10-01

    The adeno-associated viruses (AAV) are promising therapeutic gene delivery vectors and better understanding of their capsid assembly and genome packaging mechanism is needed for improved vector production. Empty AAV capsids assemble in the nucleus prior to genome packaging by virally encoded Rep proteins. To elucidate the capsid determinants of this process, structural differences between wild-type (wt) AAV2 and a packaging deficient variant, AAV2-R432A, were examined using cryo-electron microscopy and three-dimensional image reconstruction both at an ∼5.0-Å resolution (medium) and also at 3.8- and 3.7-Å resolutions (high), respectively. The high resolution structures showed that removal of the arginine side chain in AAV2-R432A eliminated hydrogen bonding interactions, resulting in altered intramolecular and intermolecular interactions propagated from under the 3-fold axis toward the 5-fold channel. Consistent with these observations, differential scanning calorimetry showed an ∼10°C decrease in thermal stability for AAV2-R432A compared to wt-AAV2. In addition, the medium resolution structures revealed differences in the juxtaposition of the less ordered, N-terminal region of their capsid proteins, VP1/2/3. A structural rearrangement in AAV2-R432A repositioned the βA strand region under the icosahedral 2-fold axis rather than antiparallel to the βB strand, eliminating many intramolecular interactions. Thus, a single amino acid substitution can significantly alter the AAV capsid integrity to the extent of reducing its stability and possibly rendering it unable to tolerate the stress of genome packaging. Furthermore, the data show that the 2-, 3-, and 5-fold regions of the capsid contributed to producing the packaging defect and highlight a tight connection between the entire capsid in maintaining packaging efficiency. The mechanism of AAV genome packaging is still poorly understood, particularly with respect to the capsid determinants of the required capsid

  15. Assembly-directed antivirals differentially bind quasiequivalent pockets to modify hepatitis B virus capsid tertiary and quaternary structure.

    PubMed

    Katen, Sarah P; Tan, Zhenning; Chirapu, Srinivas Reddy; Finn, M G; Zlotnick, Adam

    2013-08-06

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a major cause of liver disease. Assembly of the HBV capsid is a critical step in virus production and an attractive target for new antiviral therapies. We determined the structure of HBV capsid in complex with AT-130, a member of the phenylpropenamide family of assembly effectors. AT-130 causes tertiary and quaternary structural changes but does not disrupt capsid structure. AT-130 binds a hydrophobic pocket that also accommodates the previously characterized heteroaryldihydropyrimidine compounds but favors a unique quasiequivalent location on the capsid surface. Thus, this pocket is a promiscuous drug-binding site and a likely target for different assembly effectors with a broad range of mechanisms of activity. That AT-130 successfully decreases virus production by increasing capsid assembly rate without disrupting capsid structure delineates a paradigm in antiviral design, that disrupting reaction timing is a viable strategy for assembly effectors of HBV and other viruses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Investigating the thermal dissociation of viral capsid by lattice model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jingzhi; Chevreuil, Maelenn; Combet, Sophie; Lansac, Yves; Tresset, Guillaume

    2017-11-01

    The dissociation of icosahedral viral capsids was investigated by a homogeneous and a heterogeneous lattice model. In thermal dissociation experiments with cowpea chlorotic mottle virus and probed by small-angle neutron scattering, we observed a slight shrinkage of viral capsids, which can be related to the strengthening of the hydrophobic interaction between subunits at increasing temperature. By considering the temperature dependence of hydrophobic interaction in the homogeneous lattice model, we were able to give a better estimate of the effective charge. In the heterogeneous lattice model, two sets of lattice sites represented different capsid subunits with asymmetric interaction strengths. In that case, the dissociation of capsids was found to shift from a sharp one-step transition to a gradual two-step transition by weakening the hydrophobic interaction between AB and CC subunits. We anticipate that such lattice models will shed further light on the statistical mechanics underlying virus assembly and disassembly.

  17. Hepatitis Virus Capsid Polymorphs Respond Differently to Changes in Encapsulated Cargo Size

    PubMed Central

    He, Li; Porterfield, J. Zachary; van der Schoot, Paul; Zlotnick, Adam; Dragnea, Bogdan

    2017-01-01

    A templated assembly approach for Hepatitis B virus-like particles was employed to determine how the T = 3 and T = 4 polymorphs of the Hepatitis B virus (HBV) icosahedral cores respond to a systematic, gradual change in the encapsulated cargo size. It was found that assembly into complete virus-like particles occurs cooperatively around a variety of core diameters, albeit the degree of cooperativity varies. Among these virus-like particles, it was found that those of an outer diameter similar to T = 4 are able to accommodate the widest range of cargo sizes. PMID:24010404

  18. The Cellular Chaperone Heat Shock Protein 90 Is Required for Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Capsid Precursor Processing and Assembly of Capsid Pentamers.

    PubMed

    Newman, Joseph; Asfor, Amin S; Berryman, Stephen; Jackson, Terry; Curry, Stephen; Tuthill, Tobias J

    2018-03-01

    Productive picornavirus infection requires the hijacking of host cell pathways to aid with the different stages of virus entry, synthesis of the viral polyprotein, and viral genome replication. Many picornaviruses, including foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), assemble capsids via the multimerization of several copies of a single capsid precursor protein into a pentameric subunit which further encapsidates the RNA. Pentamer formation is preceded by co- and posttranslational modification of the capsid precursor (P1-2A) by viral and cellular enzymes and the subsequent rearrangement of P1-2A into a structure amenable to pentamer formation. We have developed a cell-free system to study FMDV pentamer assembly using recombinantly expressed FMDV capsid precursor and 3C protease. Using this assay, we have shown that two structurally different inhibitors of the cellular chaperone heat shock protein 90 (hsp90) impeded FMDV capsid precursor processing and subsequent pentamer formation. Treatment of FMDV permissive cells with the hsp90 inhibitor prior to infection reduced the endpoint titer by more than 10-fold while not affecting the activity of a subgenomic replicon, indicating that translation and replication of viral RNA were unaffected by the drug. IMPORTANCE FMDV of the Picornaviridae family is a pathogen of huge economic importance to the livestock industry due to its effect on the restriction of livestock movement and necessary control measures required following an outbreak. The study of FMDV capsid assembly, and picornavirus capsid assembly more generally, has tended to be focused upon the formation of capsids from pentameric intermediates or the immediate cotranslational modification of the capsid precursor protein. Here, we describe a system to analyze the early stages of FMDV pentameric capsid intermediate assembly and demonstrate a novel requirement for the cellular chaperone hsp90 in the formation of these pentameric intermediates. We show the added complexity

  19. Inner tegument proteins of Herpes Simplex Virus are sufficient for intracellular capsid motility in neurons but not for axonal targeting

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Oliver; Ivanova, Lyudmila; Bialy, Dagmara; Pohlmann, Anja; Binz, Anne; Hegemann, Maike; Viejo-Borbolla, Abel; Rosenhahn, Bodo; Bauerfeind, Rudolf; Sodeik, Beate

    2017-01-01

    Upon reactivation from latency and during lytic infections in neurons, alphaherpesviruses assemble cytosolic capsids, capsids associated with enveloping membranes, and transport vesicles harboring fully enveloped capsids. It is debated whether capsid envelopment of herpes simplex virus (HSV) is completed in the soma prior to axonal targeting or later, and whether the mechanisms are the same in neurons derived from embryos or from adult hosts. We used HSV mutants impaired in capsid envelopment to test whether the inner tegument proteins pUL36 or pUL37 necessary for microtubule-mediated capsid transport were sufficient for axonal capsid targeting in neurons derived from the dorsal root ganglia of adult mice. Such neurons were infected with HSV1-ΔUL20 whose capsids recruited pUL36 and pUL37, with HSV1-ΔUL37 whose capsids associate only with pUL36, or with HSV1-ΔUL36 that assembles capsids lacking both proteins. While capsids of HSV1-ΔUL20 were actively transported along microtubules in epithelial cells and in the somata of neurons, those of HSV1-ΔUL36 and -ΔUL37 could only diffuse in the cytoplasm. Employing a novel image analysis algorithm to quantify capsid targeting to axons, we show that only a few capsids of HSV1-ΔUL20 entered axons, while vesicles transporting gD utilized axonal transport efficiently and independently of pUL36, pUL37, or pUL20. Our data indicate that capsid motility in the somata of neurons mediated by pUL36 and pUL37 does not suffice for targeting capsids to axons, and suggest that capsid envelopment needs to be completed in the soma prior to targeting of herpes simplex virus to the axons, and to spreading from neurons to neighboring cells. PMID:29284065

  20. Host-regulated Hepatitis B Virus Capsid Assembly in a Mammalian Cell-free System.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kuancheng; Hu, Jianming

    2018-04-20

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) is an important global human pathogen and represents a major cause of hepatitis, liver cirrhosis and liver cancer. The HBV capsid is composed of multiple copies of a single viral protein, the capsid or core protein (HBc), plays multiple roles in the viral life cycle, and has emerged recently as a major target for developing antiviral therapies against HBV infection. Although several systems have been developed to study HBV capsid assembly, including heterologous overexpression systems like bacteria and insect cells, in vitro assembly using purified protein, and mammalian cell culture systems, the requirement for non-physiological concentrations of HBc and salts and the difficulty in manipulating host regulators of assembly presents major limitations for detailed studies on capsid assembly under physiologically relevant conditions. We have recently developed a mammalian cell-free system based on the rabbit reticulocyte lysate (RRL), in which HBc is expressed at physiological concentrations and assembles into capsids under near-physiological conditions. This system has already revealed HBc assembly requirements that are not anticipated based on previous assembly systems. Furthermore, capsid assembly in this system is regulated by endogenous host factors that can be readily manipulated. Here we present a detailed protocol for this cell-free capsid assembly system, including an illustration on how to manipulate host factors that regulate assembly.

  1. Soft materials design via self assembly of functionalized icosahedral particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthukumar, Vidyalakshmi Chockalingam

    In this work we simulate self assembly of icosahedral building blocks using a coarse grained model of the icosahedral capsid of virus 1m1c. With significant advancements in site-directed functionalization of these macromolecules [1], we propose possible application of such self-assembled materials for drug delivery. While there have been some reports on organization of viral particles in solution through functionalization, exploiting this behaviour for obtaining well-ordered stoichiometric structures has not yet been explored. Our work is in well agreement with the earlier simulation studies of icosahedral gold nanocrystals, giving chain like patterns [5] and also broadly in agreement with the wet lab works of Finn, M.G. et al., who have shown small predominantly chain-like aggregates with mannose-decorated Cowpea Mosaic Virus (CPMV) [22] and small two dimensional aggregates with oligonucleotide functionalization on the CPMV capsid [1]. To quantify the results of our Coarse Grained Molecular Dynamics Simulations I developed analysis routines in MATLAB using which we found the most preferable nearest neighbour distances (from the radial distribution function (RDF) calculations) for different lengths of the functional groups and under different implicit solvent conditions, and the most frequent coordination number for a virus particle (histogram plots further using the information from RDF). Visual inspection suggests that our results most likely span the low temperature limits explored in the works of Finn, M.G. et al., and show a good degree of agreement with the experimental results in [1] at an annealing temperature of 4°C. Our work also reveals the possibility of novel stoichiometric N-mer type aggregates which could be synthesized using these capsids with appropriate functionalization and solvent conditions.

  2. SCHEMA computational design of virus capsid chimeras: calibrating how genome packaging, protection, and transduction correlate with calculated structural disruption.

    PubMed

    Ho, Michelle L; Adler, Benjamin A; Torre, Michael L; Silberg, Jonathan J; Suh, Junghae

    2013-12-20

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) recombination can result in chimeric capsid protein subunits whose ability to assemble into an oligomeric capsid, package a genome, and transduce cells depends on the inheritance of sequence from different AAV parents. To develop quantitative design principles for guiding site-directed recombination of AAV capsids, we have examined how capsid structural perturbations predicted by the SCHEMA algorithm correlate with experimental measurements of disruption in seventeen chimeric capsid proteins. In our small chimera population, created by recombining AAV serotypes 2 and 4, we found that protection of viral genomes and cellular transduction were inversely related to calculated disruption of the capsid structure. Interestingly, however, we did not observe a correlation between genome packaging and calculated structural disruption; a majority of the chimeric capsid proteins formed at least partially assembled capsids and more than half packaged genomes, including those with the highest SCHEMA disruption. These results suggest that the sequence space accessed by recombination of divergent AAV serotypes is rich in capsid chimeras that assemble into 60-mer capsids and package viral genomes. Overall, the SCHEMA algorithm may be useful for delineating quantitative design principles to guide the creation of libraries enriched in genome-protecting virus nanoparticles that can effectively transduce cells. Such improvements to the virus design process may help advance not only gene therapy applications but also other bionanotechnologies dependent upon the development of viruses with new sequences and functions.

  3. SCHEMA computational design of virus capsid chimeras: calibrating how genome packaging, protection, and transduction correlate with calculated structural disruption

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Michelle L.; Adler, Benjamin A.; Torre, Michael L.; Silberg, Jonathan J.; Suh, Junghae

    2013-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) recombination can result in chimeric capsid protein subunits whose ability to assemble into an oligomeric capsid, package a genome, and transduce cells depends on the inheritance of sequence from different AAV parents. To develop quantitative design principles for guiding site-directed recombination of AAV capsids, we have examined how capsid structural perturbations predicted by the SCHEMA algorithm correlate with experimental measurements of disruption in seventeen chimeric capsid proteins. In our small chimera population, created by recombining AAV serotypes 2 and 4, we found that protection of viral genomes and cellular transduction were inversely related to calculated disruption of the capsid structure. Interestingly, however, we did not observe a correlation between genome packaging and calculated structural disruption; a majority of the chimeric capsid proteins formed at least partially assembled capsids and more than half packaged genomes, including those with the highest SCHEMA disruption. These results suggest that the sequence space accessed by recombination of divergent AAV serotypes is rich in capsid chimeras that assemble into 60-mer capsids and package viral genomes. Overall, the SCHEMA algorithm may be useful for delineating quantitative design principles to guide the creation of libraries enriched in genome-protecting virus nanoparticles that can effectively transduce cells. Such improvements to the virus design process may help advance not only gene therapy applications, but also other bionanotechnologies dependent upon the development of viruses with new sequences and functions. PMID:23899192

  4. Structure of a Human Astrovirus Capsid-Antibody Complex and Mechanistic Insights into Virus Neutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanoff, Walter A.; Campos, Jocelyn; Perez, Edmundo I.

    ABSTRACT Human astroviruses (HAstVs) are a leading cause of viral diarrhea in young children, the immunocompromised, and the elderly. There are no vaccines or antiviral therapies against HAstV disease. Several lines of evidence point to the presence of protective antibodies in healthy adults as a mechanism governing protection against reinfection by HAstV. However, development of anti-HAstV therapies is hampered by the gap in knowledge of protective antibody epitopes on the HAstV capsid surface. Here, we report the structure of the HAstV capsid spike domain bound to the neutralizing monoclonal antibody PL-2. The antibody uses all six complementarity-determining regions to bindmore » to a quaternary epitope on each side of the dimeric capsid spike. We provide evidence that the HAstV capsid spike is a receptor-binding domain and that the antibody neutralizes HAstV by blocking virus attachment to cells. We identify patches of conserved amino acids that overlap the antibody epitope and may comprise a receptor-binding site. Our studies provide a foundation for the development of therapies to prevent and treat HAstV diarrheal disease. IMPORTANCEHuman astroviruses (HAstVs) infect nearly every person in the world during childhood and cause diarrhea, vomiting, and fever. Despite the prevalence of this virus, little is known about how antibodies in healthy adults protect them against reinfection. Here, we determined the crystal structure of a complex of the HAstV capsid protein and a virus-neutralizing antibody. We show that the antibody binds to the outermost spike domain of the capsid, and we provide evidence that the antibody blocks virus attachment to human cells. Importantly, our findings suggest that a subunit-based vaccine focusing the immune system on the HAstV capsid spike domain could be effective in protecting children against HAstV disease.« less

  5. Protection against myxomatosis and rabbit viral hemorrhagic disease with recombinant myxoma viruses expressing rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Bertagnoli, S; Gelfi, J; Le Gall, G; Boilletot, E; Vautherot, J F; Rasschaert, D; Laurent, S; Petit, F; Boucraut-Baralon, C; Milon, A

    1996-08-01

    Two myxoma virus-rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) recombinant viruses were constructed with the SG33 strain of myxoma virus to protect rabbits against myxomatosis and rabbit viral hemorrhagic disease. These recombinant viruses expressed the RHDV capsid protein (VP60). The recombinant protein, which is 60 kDa in size, was antigenic, as revealed by its reaction in immunoprecipitation with antibodies raised against RHDV. Both recombinant viruses induced high levels of RHDV- and myxoma virus-specific antibodies in rabbits after immunization. Inoculations by the intradermal route protected animals against virulent RHDV and myxoma virus challenges.

  6. Protection against myxomatosis and rabbit viral hemorrhagic disease with recombinant myxoma viruses expressing rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus capsid protein.

    PubMed Central

    Bertagnoli, S; Gelfi, J; Le Gall, G; Boilletot, E; Vautherot, J F; Rasschaert, D; Laurent, S; Petit, F; Boucraut-Baralon, C; Milon, A

    1996-01-01

    Two myxoma virus-rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) recombinant viruses were constructed with the SG33 strain of myxoma virus to protect rabbits against myxomatosis and rabbit viral hemorrhagic disease. These recombinant viruses expressed the RHDV capsid protein (VP60). The recombinant protein, which is 60 kDa in size, was antigenic, as revealed by its reaction in immunoprecipitation with antibodies raised against RHDV. Both recombinant viruses induced high levels of RHDV- and myxoma virus-specific antibodies in rabbits after immunization. Inoculations by the intradermal route protected animals against virulent RHDV and myxoma virus challenges. PMID:8764013

  7. Sulfolobus turreted icosahedral virus c92 protein responsible for the formation of pyramid-like cellular lysis structures.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Jamie C; Brumfield, Susan K; Peng, Nan; She, Qunxin; Young, Mark J

    2011-07-01

    Host cells infected by Sulfolobus turreted icosahedral virus (STIV) have been shown to produce unusual pyramid-like structures on the cell surface. These structures represent a virus-induced lysis mechanism that is present in Archaea and appears to be distinct from the holin/endolysin system described for DNA bacteriophages. This study investigated the STIV gene products required for pyramid formation in its host Sulfolobus solfataricus. Overexpression of STIV open reading frame (ORF) c92 in S. solfataricus alone is sufficient to produce the pyramid-like lysis structures in cells. Gene disruption of c92 within STIV demonstrates that c92 is an essential protein for virus replication. Immunolocalization of c92 shows that the protein is localized to the cellular membranes forming the pyramid-like structures.

  8. Herpesvirus capsid assembly and DNA packaging

    PubMed Central

    Heming, Jason D.; Conway, James F.; Homa, Fred L.

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type I (HSV-1) is the causative agent of several pathologies ranging in severity from the common cold sore to life-threatening encephalitic infection. During productive lytic infection, over 80 viral proteins are expressed in a highly regulated manner, resulting in the replication of viral genomes and assembly of progeny virions. The virion of all herpesviruses consists of an external membrane envelope, a proteinaceous layer called the tegument, and an icosahedral capsid containing the double-stranded linear DNA genome. The capsid shell of HSV-1 is built from four structural proteins: a major capsid protein, VP5, which forms the capsomers (hexons and pentons), the triplex consisting of VP19C and VP23 found between the capsomers, and VP26 which binds to VP5 on hexons but not pentons. In addition, the dodecameric pUL6 portal complex occupies one of the 12 capsid vertices, and the capsid vertex specific component (CVSC), a heterotrimer complex of pUL17, pUL25 and pUL36 binds specifically to the triplexes adjacent to each penton. The capsid is assembled in the nucleus where the viral genome is packaged into newly assembled closed capsid shells. Cleavage and packaging of replicated, concatemeric viral DNA requires the seven viral proteins encoded by the UL6, UL15, UL17, UL25, UL28, UL32, and UL33 genes. Considerable advances have been made in understanding the structure of the herpesvirus capsid and the function of several of the DNA packaging proteins by applying biochemical, genetic, and structural techniques. This review is a summary of recent advances with respect to the structure of the HSV-1 virion capsid and what is known about the function of the seven packaging proteins and their interactions with each other and with the capsid shell. PMID:28528442

  9. Competing Hydrophobic and Screened-Coulomb Interactions in Hepatitis B Virus Capsid Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Kegel, Willem K.; Schoot, Paul van der

    2004-01-01

    Recent experiments show that, in the range from ∼15 to 45°C, an increase in the temperature promotes the spontaneous assembly into capsids of the Escherichia coli-expressed coat proteins of hepatitis B virus. Within that temperature interval, an increase in ionic strength up to five times that of standard physiological conditions also acts to promote capsid assembly. To explain both observations we propose an interaction of mean force between the protein subunits that is the sum of an attractive hydrophobic interaction, driving the self-assembly, and a repulsive electrostatic interaction, opposing the self-assembly. We find that the binding strength of the capsid subunits increases with temperature virtually independently of the ionic strength, and that, at fixed temperature, the binding strength increases with the square root of ionic strength. Both predictions are in quantitative agreement with experiment. We point out the similarities of capsid assembly in general and the micellization of surfactants. Finally we make plausible that electrostatic repulsion between the native core subunits of a large class of virus suppresses the formation in vivo of empty virus capsids, that is, without the presence of the charge-neutralizing nucleic acid. PMID:15189887

  10. Spontaneous curvature as a regulator of the size of virus capsids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šiber, Antonio; Majdandžić, Antonio

    2009-08-01

    We investigate the physical reasons underlying the high monodispersity of empty virus capsids assembled in thermodynamical equilibrium in conditions of favorable pH and ionic strength. We propose that the high fidelity of the assembly results from the effective spontaneous curvature of the viral protein assemblies and the corresponding bending rigidity that penalizes curvatures which are larger and smaller from the spontaneous one. On the example of hepatitis B virus, which has been thoroughly studied experimentally in the context of interest to us, we estimate the magnitude of bending rigidity that is needed to suppress the appearance of aberrant capsid structures (˜60kBT) . Our approach also demonstrates that the aberrant capsids that can be classified within the Caspar-Klug framework are in most circumstances likely to be smaller from the regular ones, in agreement with the experimental findings.

  11. Adeno-associated virus capsid antigen presentation is dependent on endosomal escape

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chengwen; He, Yi; Nicolson, Sarah; Hirsch, Matt; Weinberg, Marc S.; Zhang, Ping; Kafri, Tal; Samulski, R. Jude

    2013-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors are attractive for gene delivery-based therapeutics, but data from recent clinical trials have indicated that AAV capsids induce a cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response that eliminates transduced cells. In this study, we used traditional pharmacological agents and AAV mutants to elucidate the pathway of capsid cross-presentation in AAV-permissive cells. Endosomal acidification inhibitors blocked AAV2 antigen presentation by over 90%, while proteasome inhibitors completely abrogated antigen presentation. Using mutant viruses that are defective for nuclear entry, we observed a 90% decrease in capsid antigen presentation. Different antigen presentation efficiencies were achieved by selectively mutating virion nuclear localization signals. Low antigen presentation was demonstrated with basic region 1 (BR1) mutants, despite relatively high transduction efficiency, whereas there was no difference in antigen presentation between BR2 and BR3 mutants defective for transduction, as compared with wild-type AAV2. These results suggest that effective AAV2 capsid antigen presentation is dependent on AAV virion escape from the endosome/lysosome for antigen degradation by proteasomes, but is independent of nuclear uncoating. These results should facilitate the design of effective strategies to evade capsid-specific CTL-mediated elimination of AAV-transduced target cells in future clinical trials. PMID:23454772

  12. Production of foot-and-mouth disease virus capsid proteins by the TEV protease.

    PubMed

    Puckette, Michael; Smith, Justin D; Gabbert, Lindsay; Schutta, Christopher; Barrera, José; Clark, Benjamin A; Neilan, John G; Rasmussen, Max

    2018-06-10

    Protective immunity to viral pathogens often includes production of neutralizing antibodies to virus capsid proteins. Many viruses produce capsid proteins by expressing a precursor polyprotein and related protease from a single open reading frame. The foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) expresses a 3C protease (3Cpro) that cleaves a P1 polyprotein intermediate into individual capsid proteins, but the FMDV 3Cpro also degrades many host cell proteins and reduces the viability of host cells, including subunit vaccine production cells. To overcome the limitations of using the a wild-type 3Cpro in FMDV subunit vaccine expression systems, we altered the protease restriction sequences within a FMDV P1 polyprotein to enable production of FMDV capsid proteins by the Tobacco Etch Virus NIa protease (TEVpro). Separate TEVpro and modified FMDV P1 proteins were produced from a single open reading frame by an intervening FMDV 2A sequence. The modified FMDV P1 polyprotein was successfully processed by the TEVpro in both mammalian and bacterial cells. More broadly, this method of polyprotein production and processing may be adapted to other recombinant expression systems, especially plant-based expression. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Formation of newly synthesized adeno-associated virus capsids in the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Bell, Peter; Vandenberghe, Luk H; Wilson, James M

    2014-06-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) particles inside the nucleus of a HEK 293 cell are shown by electron microscopy. Cells have been triple-transfected for vector production and were analyzed for capsid formation three days later. Newly assembled particle are visible as seemingly unstructured conglomerates or crystal-like arrays.

  14. Structural Transitions and Energy Landscape for Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus Capsid Mechanics from Nanomanipulation in Vitro and in Silico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kononova, Olga; Snijder, Joost; Brasch, Melanie; Cornelissen, Jeroen; Dima, Ruxandra I.; Marx, Kenneth A.; Wuite, Gijs J. L.; Roos, Wouter H.; Barsegov, Valeri

    2013-10-01

    Physical properties of capsids of plant and animal viruses are important factors in capsid self-assembly, survival of viruses in the extracellular environment, and their cell infectivity. Virus shells can have applications as nanocontainers and delivery vehicles in biotechnology and medicine. Combined AFM experiments and computational modeling on sub-second timescales of the indentation nanomechanics of Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus (CCMV) capsid show that the capsid's physical properties are dynamic and local characteristics of the structure, which depend on the magnitude and geometry of mechanical input. Surprisingly, under large deformations the CCMV capsid transitions to the collapsed state without substantial local structural alterations. The enthalpy change in this deformation state dH = 11.5 - 12.8 MJ/mol is mostly due to large-amplitude out-of-plane excitations, which contribute to the capsid bending, and the entropy change TdS = 5.1 - 5.8 MJ/mol is mostly due to coherent in-plane rearrangements of protein chains, which result in the capsid stiffening. Dynamic coupling of these modes defines the extent of elasticity and reversibility of capsid mechanical deformation. This emerging picture illuminates how unique physico-chemical properties of protein nanoshells help define their structure and morphology, and determine their viruses' biological function.

  15. Local rules simulation of the kinetics of virus capsid self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, R; Shor, P W; Prevelige, P E; Berger, B

    1998-12-01

    A computer model is described for studying the kinetics of the self-assembly of icosahedral viral capsids. Solution of this problem is crucial to an understanding of the viral life cycle, which currently cannot be adequately addressed through laboratory techniques. The abstract simulation model employed to address this is based on the local rules theory of. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 91:7732-7736). It is shown that the principle of local rules, generalized with a model of kinetics and other extensions, can be used to simulate complicated problems in self-assembly. This approach allows for a computationally tractable molecular dynamics-like simulation of coat protein interactions while retaining many relevant features of capsid self-assembly. Three simple simulation experiments are presented to illustrate the use of this model. These show the dependence of growth and malformation rates on the energetics of binding interactions, the tolerance of errors in binding positions, and the concentration of subunits in the examples. These experiments demonstrate a tradeoff within the model between growth rate and fidelity of assembly for the three parameters. A detailed discussion of the computational model is also provided.

  16. Inhibition of interferon-inducible MxA protein expression by hepatitis B virus capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Rosmorduc, O; Sirma, H; Soussan, P; Gordien, E; Lebon, P; Horisberger, M; Bréchot, C; Kremsdorf, D

    1999-05-01

    Chronic hepatitis B treatment has been significantly improved by interferon (IFN) treatment. However, some studies have suggested that hepatitis B virus (HBV) might have a direct effect on the resistance to IFN. Defective particles, generated by spliced HBV RNA and associated with chronic hepatitis B, have been previously characterized; expression of these particles leads to cytoplasmic accumulation of the capsid protein. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of these defective genomes in IFN resistance. The global antiviral activity of IFN was studied by virus yield reduction assays, the expression of three IFN-induced antiviral proteins was analysed by Western blotting and confocal microscopy, and the regulation of MxA gene expression was studied by Northern blotting and the luciferase assay, in Huh7 cells transfected with a complete or the defective HBV genome. Results showed that the expression of the defective genome reduces the antiviral activity of IFN and that this modulation involves a selective inhibition of MxA protein induction by the HBV capsid protein. Our results also show the trans-suppressive effect of the HBV capsid on the MxA promoter, which might participate in this phenomenon. In conclusion, this study shows a direct interplay between the IFN-sensitive pathway and the capsid protein and might implicate this defective HBV genome in virus persistence.

  17. Magic-angle spinning NMR of intact bacteriophages: Insights into the capsid, DNA and their interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, Gili; Morag, Omry; Goldbourt, Amir

    2015-04-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria. They are complex macromolecular assemblies, which are composed of multiple protein subunits that protect genomic material and deliver it to specific hosts. Various biophysical techniques have been used to characterize their structure in order to unravel phage morphogenesis. Yet, most bacteriophages are non-crystalline and have very high molecular weights, in the order of tens of MegaDaltons. Therefore, complete atomic-resolution characterization on such systems that encompass both capsid and DNA is scarce. In this perspective article we demonstrate how magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR has and is used to characterize in detail bacteriophage viruses, including filamentous and icosahedral phage. We discuss the process of sample preparation, spectral assignment of both capsid and DNA and the use of chemical shifts and dipolar couplings to probe the capsid-DNA interface, describe capsid structure and dynamics and extract structural differences between viruses.

  18. Magic-angle spinning NMR of intact bacteriophages: insights into the capsid, DNA and their interface.

    PubMed

    Abramov, Gili; Morag, Omry; Goldbourt, Amir

    2015-04-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria. They are complex macromolecular assemblies, which are composed of multiple protein subunits that protect genomic material and deliver it to specific hosts. Various biophysical techniques have been used to characterize their structure in order to unravel phage morphogenesis. Yet, most bacteriophages are non-crystalline and have very high molecular weights, in the order of tens of MegaDaltons. Therefore, complete atomic-resolution characterization on such systems that encompass both capsid and DNA is scarce. In this perspective article we demonstrate how magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR has and is used to characterize in detail bacteriophage viruses, including filamentous and icosahedral phage. We discuss the process of sample preparation, spectral assignment of both capsid and DNA and the use of chemical shifts and dipolar couplings to probe the capsid-DNA interface, describe capsid structure and dynamics and extract structural differences between viruses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Virus Capsids as Targeted Nanoscale Delivery Vessels of Photoactive Compounds for Site-Specific Photodynamic Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Brian A.

    The research presented in this work details the use of a viral capsid as an addressable delivery vessel of photoactive compounds for use in photodynamic therapy. Photodynamic therapy is a treatment that involves the interaction of light with a photosensitizing molecule to create singlet oxygen, a reactive oxygen species. Overproduction of singlet oxygen in cells can cause oxidative damage leading to cytotoxicity and eventually cell death. Challenges with the current generation of FDA-approved photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy primarily stem from their lack of tissue specificity. This work describes the packaging of photoactive cationic porphyrins inside the MS2 bacteriophage capsid, followed by external modification of the capsid with cancer cell-targeting G-quadruplex DNA aptamers to generate a tumor-specific photosensitizing agent. First, a cationic porphyrin is loaded into the capsids via nucleotide-driven packaging, a process that involves charge interaction between the porphyrin and the RNA inside the capsid. Results show that over 250 porphyrin molecules associate with the RNA within each MS2 capsid. Removal of RNA from the capsid severely inhibits the packaging of the cationic porphyrins. Porphyrin-virus constructs were then shown to photogenerate singlet oxygen, and cytotoxicity in non-targeted photodynamic treatment experiments. Next, each porphyrin-loaded capsid is externally modified with approximately 60 targeting DNA aptamers by employing a heterobifunctional crosslinking agent. The targeting aptamer is known to bind the protein nucleolin, a ubiquitous protein that is overexpressed on the cell surface by many cancer cell types. MCF-7 human breast carcinoma cells and MCF-10A human mammary epithelial cells were selected as an in vitro model for breast cancer and normal tissue, respectively. Fluorescently tagged virus-aptamer constructs are shown to selectively target MCF-7 cells versus MCF-10A cells. Finally, results are shown in which porphyrin-virus

  20. Herpes simplex virus type 1 tegument proteins VP1/2 and UL37 are associated with intranuclear capsids

    SciTech Connect

    Bucks, Michelle A.; O'Regan, Kevin J.; Murphy, Michael A.

    2007-05-10

    The assembly of the tegument of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a complex process that involves a number of events at various sites within virus-infected cells. Our studies focused on determining whether tegument proteins, VP1/2 and UL37, are added to capsids located within the nucleus. Capsids were isolated from the nuclear fraction of HSV-1-infected cells and purified by rate-zonal centrifugation to separate B capsids (containing the scaffold proteins and no viral DNA) and C capsids (containing DNA and no scaffold proteins). Western blot analyses of these capsids indicated that VP1/2 associated primarily with C capsids and UL37 associatedmore » with B and C capsids. The results demonstrate that at least two of the tegument proteins of HSV-1 are associated with capsids isolated from the nuclear fraction, and these capsid-tegument protein interactions may represent initial events of the tegumentation process.« less

  1. Capsid coding sequences of foot-and-mouth disease viruses are determinants of pathogenicity in pigs.

    PubMed

    Lohse, Louise; Jackson, Terry; Bøtner, Anette; Belsham, Graham J

    2012-05-24

    The surface exposed capsid proteins, VP1, VP2 and VP3, of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) determine its antigenicity and the ability of the virus to interact with host-cell receptors. Hence, modification of these structural proteins may alter the properties of the virus.In the present study we compared the pathogenicity of different FMDVs in young pigs. In total 32 pigs, 7-weeks-old, were exposed to virus, either by direct inoculation or through contact with inoculated pigs, using cell culture adapted (O1K B64), chimeric (O1K/A-TUR and O1K/O-UKG) or field strain (O-UKG/34/2001) viruses. The O1K B64 virus and the two chimeric viruses are identical to each other except for the capsid coding region.Animals exposed to O1K B64 did not exhibit signs of disease, while pigs exposed to each of the other viruses showed typical clinical signs of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD). All pigs infected with the O1K/O-UKG chimera or the field strain (O-UKG/34/2001) developed fulminant disease. Furthermore, 3 of 4 in-contact pigs exposed to the O1K/O-UKG virus died in the acute phase of infection, likely from myocardial infection. However, in the group exposed to the O1K/A-TUR chimeric virus, only 1 pig showed symptoms of disease within the time frame of the experiment (10 days). All pigs that developed clinical disease showed a high level of viral RNA in serum and infected pigs that survived the acute phase of infection developed a serotype specific antibody response. It is concluded that the capsid coding sequences are determinants of FMDV pathogenicity in pigs.

  2. Poliovirus-associated protein kinase: Destabilization of the virus capsid and stimulation of the phosphorylation reaction by Zn sup 2+

    SciTech Connect

    Ratka, M.; Lackmann, M.; Ueckermann, C.

    1989-09-01

    The previously described poliovirus-associated protein kinase activity phosphorylates viral proteins VP0 and VP2 as well as exogenous proteins in the presence of Mg{sup 2+}. In this paper, the effect of Zn{sup 2+} on the phosphorylation reaction and the stability of the poliovirus capsid has been studied in detail and compared to that of Mg{sup 2+}. In the presence of Zn{sup 2+}, phosphorylation of capsid proteins VP2 and VP4 is significantly higher while phosphorylation of VP0 and exogenous phosphate acceptor proteins is not detected. The results indicate the activation of more than one virus-associated protein kinase by Zn{sup 2+}. The ion-dependentmore » behavior of the enzyme activities is observed independently of whether the virus was obtained from HeLa or green monkey kidney cells. The poliovirus capsid is destabilized by Zn{sup 2+}. This alteration of the poliovirus capsid structure is a prerequisite for effective phosphorylation of viral capsid proteins. The increased level of phosphorylation of viral capsid proteins results in further destabilization of the viral capsid. As a result of the conformational changes, poliovirus-associated protein kinase activities dissociate from the virus particle. The authors suggest that the destabilizing effect of phosphorylation on the viral capsid plays a role in uncoating of poliovirus.« less

  3. Analysis of phases in the structure determination of an icosahedral virus

    SciTech Connect

    Plevka, Pavel; Kaufmann, Bärbel; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2012-03-15

    The constraints imposed on structure-factor phases by noncrystallographic symmetry (NCS) allow phase improvement, phase extension to higher resolution and hence ab initio phase determination. The more numerous the NCS redundancy and the greater the volume used for solvent flattening, the greater the power for phase determination. In a case analyzed here the icosahedral NCS phasing appeared to have broken down, although later successful phase extension was possible when the envelope around the NCS region was tightened. The phases from the failed phase-determination attempt fell into four classes, all of which satisfied the NCS constraints. These four classes corresponded to themore » correct solution, opposite enantiomorph, Babinet inversion and opposite enantiomorph with Babinet inversion. These incorrect solutions can be seeded from structure factors belonging to reciprocal-space volumes that lie close to icosahedral NCS axes where the structure amplitudes tend to be large and the phases tend to be 0 or {pi}. Furthermore, the false solutions can spread more easily if there are large errors in defining the envelope designating the region in which NCS averaging is performed.« less

  4. Analysis of phases in the structure determination of an icosahedral virus.

    PubMed

    Plevka, Pavel; Kaufmann, Bärbel; Rossmann, Michael G

    2011-06-01

    The constraints imposed on structure-factor phases by noncrystallographic symmetry (NCS) allow phase improvement, phase extension to higher resolution and hence ab initio phase determination. The more numerous the NCS redundancy and the greater the volume used for solvent flattening, the greater the power for phase determination. In a case analyzed here the icosahedral NCS phasing appeared to have broken down, although later successful phase extension was possible when the envelope around the NCS region was tightened. The phases from the failed phase-determination attempt fell into four classes, all of which satisfied the NCS constraints. These four classes corresponded to the correct solution, opposite enantiomorph, Babinet inversion and opposite enantiomorph with Babinet inversion. These incorrect solutions can be seeded from structure factors belonging to reciprocal-space volumes that lie close to icosahedral NCS axes where the structure amplitudes tend to be large and the phases tend to be 0 or π. Furthermore, the false solutions can spread more easily if there are large errors in defining the envelope designating the region in which NCS averaging is performed. © 2011 International Union of Crystallography

  5. Analysis of phases in the structure determination of an icosahedral virus

    PubMed Central

    Plevka, Pavel; Kaufmann, Bärbel; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    The constraints imposed on structure-factor phases by non­crystallographic symmetry (NCS) allow phase improvement, phase extension to higher resolution and hence ab initio phase determination. The more numerous the NCS redundancy and the greater the volume used for solvent flattening, the greater the power for phase determination. In a case analyzed here the icosahedral NCS phasing appeared to have broken down, although later successful phase extension was possible when the envelope around the NCS region was tightened. The phases from the failed phase-determination attempt fell into four classes, all of which satisfied the NCS constraints. These four classes corresponded to the correct solution, opposite enantiomorph, Babinet inversion and opposite enantiomorph with Babinet inversion. These incorrect solutions can be seeded from structure factors belonging to reciprocal-space volumes that lie close to icosahedral NCS axes where the structure amplitudes tend to be large and the phases tend to be 0 or π. Furthermore, the false solutions can spread more easily if there are large errors in defining the envelope designating the region in which NCS averaging is performed. PMID:21636897

  6. Oral Vaccination with a DNA Vaccine Encoding Capsid Protein of Duck Tembusu Virus Induces Protection Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Haoyue; Jia, Renyong; Wang, Mingshu; Chen, Shun; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Zhao, Xinxin; Yang, Qiao; Wu, Ying; Liu, Yunya; Zhang, Ling; Yin, Zhongqiong; Jing, Bo

    2018-01-01

    The emergence of duck tembusu virus (DTMUV), a new member of the Flavivirus genus, has caused great economical loss in the poultry industry in China. Since the outbreak and spread of DTMUV is hard to control in a clinical setting, an efficient and low-cost oral delivery DNA vaccine SL7207 (pVAX1-C) based on the capsid protein of DTMUV was developed and evaluated in this study. The antigen capsid protein was expressed from the DNA vaccine SL7207 (pVAX1-C), both in vitro and in vivo. The humoral and cellular immune responses in vivo were observed after oral immunization with the SL7207 (pVAX1-C) DNA vaccine. High titers of the specific antibody against the capsid protein and the neutralizing antibody against the DTMUV virus were both detected after inoculation. The ducks were efficiently protected from lethal DTMUV exposure by the SL7207 (pVAX1-C) vaccine in this experiment. Taken together, we demonstrated that the capsid protein of DTMUV possesses a strong immunogenicity against the DTMUV infection. Moreover, an oral delivery of the DNA vaccine SL7207 (pVAX1-C) utilizing Salmonella SL7207 was an efficient way to protect the ducks against DTMUV infection and provides an economic and fast vaccine delivery strategy for a large scale clinical use. PMID:29642401

  7. Hepatitis B virus core protein allosteric modulators can distort and disrupt intact capsids.

    PubMed

    Schlicksup, Christopher John; Wang, Joseph Che-Yen; Francis, Samson; Venkatakrishnan, Balasubramanian; Turner, William W; VanNieuwenhze, Michael; Zlotnick, Adam

    2018-01-29

    Defining mechanisms of direct-acting antivirals facilitates drug development and our understanding of virus function. Heteroaryldihydropyrimidines (HAPs) inappropriately activate assembly of hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein (Cp), suppressing formation of virions. We examined a fluorophore-labeled HAP, HAP-TAMRA. HAP-TAMRA induced Cp assembly and also bound pre-assembled capsids. Kinetic and spectroscopic studies imply that HAP-binding sites are usually not available but are bound cooperatively. Using cryo-EM, we observed that HAP-TAMRA asymmetrically deformed capsids, creating a heterogeneous array of sharp angles, flat regions, and outright breaks. To achieve high resolution reconstruction (<4 Å), we introduced a disulfide crosslink that rescued particle symmetry. We deduced that HAP-TAMRA caused quasi-sixfold vertices to become flatter and fivefold more angular. This transition led to asymmetric faceting. That a disordered crosslink could rescue symmetry implies that capsids have tensegrity properties. Capsid distortion and disruption is a new mechanism by which molecules like the HAPs can block HBV infection. © 2017, Schlicksup et al.

  8. Hepatitis B virus core protein allosteric modulators can distort and disrupt intact capsids

    PubMed Central

    Schlicksup, Christopher John; Wang, Joseph Che-Yen; Francis, Samson; Venkatakrishnan, Balasubramanian; Turner, William W; VanNieuwenhze, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Defining mechanisms of direct-acting antivirals facilitates drug development and our understanding of virus function. Heteroaryldihydropyrimidines (HAPs) inappropriately activate assembly of hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein (Cp), suppressing formation of virions. We examined a fluorophore-labeled HAP, HAP-TAMRA. HAP-TAMRA induced Cp assembly and also bound pre-assembled capsids. Kinetic and spectroscopic studies imply that HAP-binding sites are usually not available but are bound cooperatively. Using cryo-EM, we observed that HAP-TAMRA asymmetrically deformed capsids, creating a heterogeneous array of sharp angles, flat regions, and outright breaks. To achieve high resolution reconstruction (<4 Å), we introduced a disulfide crosslink that rescued particle symmetry. We deduced that HAP-TAMRA caused quasi-sixfold vertices to become flatter and fivefold more angular. This transition led to asymmetric faceting. That a disordered crosslink could rescue symmetry implies that capsids have tensegrity properties. Capsid distortion and disruption is a new mechanism by which molecules like the HAPs can block HBV infection. PMID:29377794

  9. Controlled immobilisation of active enzymes on the cowpea mosaic virus capsid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aljabali, Alaa A. A.; Barclay, J. Elaine; Steinmetz, Nicole F.; Lomonossoff, George P.; Evans, David J.

    2012-08-01

    Immobilisation of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and glucose oxidase (GOX) via covalent attachment of modified enzyme carbohydrate to the exterior of the cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) capsid gave high retention of enzymatic activity. The number of enzymes bound per virus was determined to be about eleven for HRP and 2-3 for GOX. This illustrates that relatively large biomacromolecules can be readily coupled to the virus surface using simple conjugation strategies. Virus-biomacromolecule hybrids have great potential for uses in catalysis, diagnostic assays or biosensors.Immobilisation of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and glucose oxidase (GOX) via covalent attachment of modified enzyme carbohydrate to the exterior of the cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) capsid gave high retention of enzymatic activity. The number of enzymes bound per virus was determined to be about eleven for HRP and 2-3 for GOX. This illustrates that relatively large biomacromolecules can be readily coupled to the virus surface using simple conjugation strategies. Virus-biomacromolecule hybrids have great potential for uses in catalysis, diagnostic assays or biosensors. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Alternative conjugation strategies, agarose gel electrophoresis of CPMV and CPMV-HRP conjugates, UV-vis spectrum of HRP-ADHCPMV, agarose gel electrophoresis of GOX-ADHCPMV particles and corresponding TEM image, calibration curves for HRP-ADHCPMV and GOX-ADHCPMV, DLS data for GOX-ADHCPMV are made available. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr31485a

  10. Breaking a virus: Identifying molecular level failure modes of a viral capsid by multiscale modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamani, V.; Globisch, C.; Peter, C.; Deserno, M.

    2016-10-01

    We use coarse-grained (CG) simulations to study the deformation of empty Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus (CCMV) capsids under uniaxial compression, from the initial elastic response up to capsid breakage. Our CG model is based on the MARTINI force field and has been amended by a stabilizing elastic network, acting only within individual proteins, that was tuned to capture the fluctuation spectrum of capsid protein dimers, obtained from all atom simulations. We have previously shown that this model predicts force-compression curves that match AFM indentation experiments on empty CCMV capsids. Here we investigate details of the actual breaking events when the CCMV capsid finally fails. We present a symmetry classification of all relevant protein contacts and show that they differ significantly in terms of stability. Specifically, we show that interfaces which break readily are precisely those which are believed to form last during assembly, even though some of them might share the same contacts as other non-breaking interfaces. In particular, the interfaces that form pentamers of dimers never break, while the virtually identical interfaces within hexamers of dimers readily do. Since these units differ in the large-scale geometry and, most noticeably, the cone-angle at the center of the 5- or 6-fold vertex, we propose that the hexameric unit fails because it is pre-stressed. This not only suggests that hexamers of dimers form less frequently during the early stages of assembly; it also offers a natural explanation for the well-known β-barrel motif at the hexameric center as a post-aggregation stabilization mechanism. Finally, we identify those amino acid contacts within all key protein interfaces that are most persistent during compressive deformation of the capsid, thereby providing potential targets for mutation studies aiming to elucidate the key contacts upon which overall stability rests.

  11. Mutation of a Conserved Nuclear Export Sequence in Chikungunya Virus Capsid Protein Disrupts Host Cell Nuclear Import.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Susan C; Taylor, Adam; Herrero, Lara J; Mahalingam, Suresh; Fazakerley, John K

    2017-10-20

    Transmitted by mosquitoes; chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is responsible for frequent outbreaks of arthritic disease in humans. CHIKV is an arthritogenic alphavirus of the Togaviridae family. Capsid protein, a structural protein encoded by the CHIKV RNA genome, is able to translocate to the host cell nucleus. In encephalitic alphaviruses nuclear translocation induces host cell shut off; however, the role of capsid protein nuclear localisation in arthritogenic alphaviruses remains unclear. Using replicon systems, we investigated a nuclear export sequence (NES) in the N-terminal region of capsid protein; analogous to that found in encephalitic alphavirus capsid but uncharacterised in CHIKV. The chromosomal maintenance 1 (CRM1) export adaptor protein mediated CHIKV capsid protein export from the nucleus and a region within the N-terminal part of CHIKV capsid protein was required for active nuclear targeting. In contrast to encephalitic alphaviruses, CHIKV capsid protein did not inhibit host nuclear import; however, mutating the NES of capsid protein (∆NES) blocked host protein access to the nucleus. Interactions between capsid protein and the nucleus warrant further investigation.

  12. In silico analysis of surface structure variation of PCV2 capsid resulting from loop mutations of its capsid protein (Cap)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Aibing; Zhang, Lijie; Khayat, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Outbreaks of porcine circovirus (PCV) type 2 (PCV2)-associated diseases have caused substantial economic losses worldwide in the last 20 years. The PCV capsid protein (Cap) is the sole structural protein and main antigenic determinant of this virus. In this study, not only were phylogenetic trees reconstructed, but variations of surface structure of the PCV capsid were analysed in the course of evolution. Unique surface patterns of the icosahedral fivefold axes of the PCV2 capsid were identified and characterized, all of which were absent in PCV type 1 (PCV1). Icosahedral fivefold axes, decorated with Loops BC, HI and DE, were distinctly different between PCV2 and PCV1. Loops BC, determining the outermost surface around the fivefold axes of PCV capsids, had limited homology between Caps of PCV1 and PCV2. A conserved tyrosine phosphorylation motif in Loop HI that might be recognized by non-receptor tyrosine kinase(s) in vivo was present only in PCV2. Particularly, the concurrent presence of 60 pairs of the conserved tyrosine and a canonical PXXP motif on the PCV2 capsid surface could be a mechanism for PXXP motif binding to and activation of an SH3-domain-containing tyrosine kinase in host cells. Additionally, a conserved cysteine in Loop DE of the PCV2 Cap was substituted by an arginine in PCV1, indicating potentially distinct assembly mechanisms of the capsid in vitro between PCV1 and PCV2. Therefore, these unique patterns on the PCV2 capsid surface, absent in PCV1 isolates, might be related to cell entry, virus function and pathogenesis. PMID:27902320

  13. In silico analysis of surface structure variation of PCV2 capsid resulting from loop mutations of its capsid protein (Cap).

    PubMed

    Wang, Naidong; Zhan, Yang; Wang, Aibing; Zhang, Lijie; Khayat, Reza; Yang, Yi

    2016-12-01

    Outbreaks of porcine circovirus (PCV) type 2 (PCV2)-associated diseases have caused substantial economic losses worldwide in the last 20 years. The PCV capsid protein (Cap) is the sole structural protein and main antigenic determinant of this virus. In this study, not only were phylogenetic trees reconstructed, but variations of surface structure of the PCV capsid were analysed in the course of evolution. Unique surface patterns of the icosahedral fivefold axes of the PCV2 capsid were identified and characterized, all of which were absent in PCV type 1 (PCV1). Icosahedral fivefold axes, decorated with Loops BC, HI and DE, were distinctly different between PCV2 and PCV1. Loops BC, determining the outermost surface around the fivefold axes of PCV capsids, had limited homology between Caps of PCV1 and PCV2. A conserved tyrosine phosphorylation motif in Loop HI that might be recognized by non-receptor tyrosine kinase(s) in vivo was present only in PCV2. Particularly, the concurrent presence of 60 pairs of the conserved tyrosine and a canonical PXXP motif on the PCV2 capsid surface could be a mechanism for PXXP motif binding to and activation of an SH3-domain-containing tyrosine kinase in host cells. Additionally, a conserved cysteine in Loop DE of the PCV2 Cap was substituted by an arginine in PCV1, indicating potentially distinct assembly mechanisms of the capsid in vitro between PCV1 and PCV2. Therefore, these unique patterns on the PCV2 capsid surface, absent in PCV1 isolates, might be related to cell entry, virus function and pathogenesis.

  14. Bacteriophage P23-77 Capsid Protein Structures Reveal the Archetype of an Ancient Branch from a Major Virus Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Rissanen, Ilona; Grimes, Jonathan M.; Pawlowski, Alice; Mäntynen, Sari; Harlos, Karl; Bamford, Jaana K.H.; Stuart, David I.

    2013-01-01

    Summary It has proved difficult to classify viruses unless they are closely related since their rapid evolution hinders detection of remote evolutionary relationships in their genetic sequences. However, structure varies more slowly than sequence, allowing deeper evolutionary relationships to be detected. Bacteriophage P23-77 is an example of a newly identified viral lineage, with members inhabiting extreme environments. We have solved multiple crystal structures of the major capsid proteins VP16 and VP17 of bacteriophage P23-77. They fit the 14 Å resolution cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of the entire virus exquisitely well, allowing us to propose a model for both the capsid architecture and viral assembly, quite different from previously published models. The structures of the capsid proteins and their mode of association to form the viral capsid suggest that the P23-77-like and adeno-PRD1 lineages of viruses share an extremely ancient common ancestor. PMID:23623731

  15. Effects of immunosuppression on circulating adeno-associated virus capsid-specific T cells in humans.

    PubMed

    Parzych, Elizabeth M; Li, Hua; Yin, Xiangfan; Liu, Qin; Wu, Te-Lang; Podsakoff, Gregory M; High, Katherine A; Levine, Matthew H; Ertl, Hildegund C J

    2013-04-01

    In humans adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene transfer is followed by expansion of AAV capsid-specific T cells, evidence of cell damage, and loss of transgene product expression, implicating immunological rejection of vector-transduced cells, which may be prevented by immunosuppressive drugs. We undertook this study to assess the effect of immunosuppression (IS) used for organ transplantation on immune responses to AAV capsid antigens. Recipients of liver or kidney transplants were tested before and 4 weeks after induction of IS in comparison with matched samples from healthy human adults and an additional cohort with comorbid conditions similar to those of the transplant patients. Our data show that transplant patients and comorbid control subjects have markedly higher frequencies of circulating AAV capsid-specific T cells compared with healthy adults. On average, IS resulted in a reduction of AAV-specific CD4⁺ T cells, whereas numbers of circulating CD8⁺ effector and central memory T cells tended to increase. Independent of the type of transplant or the IS regimens, the trend of AAV capsid-specific T cell responses after drug treatment varied; in some patients responses were unaffected whereas others showed decreases or even pronounced increases, casting doubt on the usefulness of prophylactic IS for AAV vector recipients.

  16. Effects of Immunosuppression on Circulating Adeno-Associated Virus Capsid-Specific T cells in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Parzych, Elizabeth M.; Li, Hua; Yin, Xiangfan; Liu, Qin; Wu, Te-Lang; Podsakoff, Gregory M.; High, Katherine A.; Levine, Matthew H.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract In humans adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene transfer is followed by expansion of AAV capsid-specific T cells, evidence of cell damage, and loss of transgene product expression, implicating immunological rejection of vector-transduced cells, which may be prevented by immunosuppressive drugs. We undertook this study to assess the effect of immunosuppression (IS) used for organ transplantation on immune responses to AAV capsid antigens. Recipients of liver or kidney transplants were tested before and 4 weeks after induction of IS in comparison with matched samples from healthy human adults and an additional cohort with comorbid conditions similar to those of the transplant patients. Our data show that transplant patients and comorbid control subjects have markedly higher frequencies of circulating AAV capsid-specific T cells compared with healthy adults. On average, IS resulted in a reduction of AAV-specific CD4+ T cells, whereas numbers of circulating CD8+ effector and central memory T cells tended to increase. Independent of the type of transplant or the IS regimens, the trend of AAV capsid-specific T cell responses after drug treatment varied; in some patients responses were unaffected whereas others showed decreases or even pronounced increases, casting doubt on the usefulness of prophylactic IS for AAV vector recipients. PMID:23461589

  17. Cryo-EM maps reveal five-fold channel structures and their modification by gatekeeper mutations in the parvovirus minute virus of mice (MVM) capsid.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Suriyasri; Organtini, Lindsey J; Grossman, Alec; Domeier, Phillip P; Cifuente, Javier O; Makhov, Alexander M; Conway, James F; D'Abramo, Anthony; Cotmore, Susan F; Tattersall, Peter; Hafenstein, Susan

    2017-10-01

    In minute virus of mice (MVM) capsids, icosahedral five-fold channels serve as portals mediating genome packaging, genome release, and the phased extrusion of viral peptides. Previous studies suggest that residues L172 and V40 are essential for channel function. The structures of MVMi wildtype, and mutant L172T and V40A virus-like particles (VLPs) were solved from cryo-EM data. Two constriction points, termed the mid-gate and inner-gate, were observed in the channels of wildtype particles, involving residues L172 and V40 respectively. While the mid-gate of V40A VLPs appeared normal, in L172T adjacent channel walls were altered, and in both mutants there was major disruption of the inner-gate, demonstrating that direct L172:V40 bonding is essential for its structural integrity. In wildtype particles, residues from the N-termini of VP2 map into claw-like densities positioned below the channel opening, which become disordered in the mutants, implicating both L172 and V40 in the organization of VP2 N-termini. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A comparative analysis of the foamy and ortho virus capsid structures reveals an ancient domain duplication.

    PubMed

    Taylor, William R; Stoye, Jonathan P; Taylor, Ian A

    2017-04-04

    The Spumaretrovirinae (foamy viruses) and the Orthoretrovirinae (e.g. HIV) share many similarities both in genome structure and the sequences of the core viral encoded proteins, such as the aspartyl protease and reverse transcriptase. Similarity in the gag region of the genome is less obvious at the sequence level but has been illuminated by the recent solution of the foamy virus capsid (CA) structure. This revealed a clear structural similarity to the orthoretrovirus capsids but with marked differences that left uncertainty in the relationship between the two domains that comprise the structure. We have applied protein structure comparison methods in order to try and resolve this ambiguous relationship. These included both the DALI method and the SAP method, with rigorous statistical tests applied to the results of both methods. For this, we employed collections of artificial fold 'decoys' (generated from the pair of native structures being compared) to provide a customised background distribution for each comparison, thus allowing significance levels to be estimated. We have shown that the relationship of the two domains conforms to a simple linear correspondence rather than a domain transposition. These similarities suggest that the origin of both viral capsids was a common ancestor with a double domain structure. In addition, we show that there is also a significant structural similarity between the amino and carboxy domains in both the foamy and ortho viruses. These results indicate that, as well as the duplication of the double domain capsid, there may have been an even more ancient gene-duplication that preceded the double domain structure. In addition, our structure comparison methodology demonstrates a general approach to problems where the components have a high intrinsic level of similarity.

  19. Non-encapsidation Activities of the Capsid Proteins of Positive-strand RNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Peng; Kao, C. Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Viral capsid proteins (CPs) are characterized by their role in forming protective shells around viral genomes. However, CPs have additional and important roles in the virus infection cycles and in the cellular response to infection. These activities involve CP binding to RNAs in both sequence-specific and nonspecific manners as well as association with other proteins. This review focuses on CPs of both plant and animal-infecting viruses with positive-strand RNA genomes. We summarize the structural features of CPs and describe their modulatory roles in viral translation, RNA-dependent RNA synthesis, and host defense responses. PMID:24074574

  20. Structural basis for the development of avian virus capsids that display influenza virus proteins and induce protective immunity.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Elena; Mata, Carlos P; Gómez-Blanco, Josué; Moreno, Noelia; Bárcena, Juan; Blanco, Esther; Rodríguez-Frandsen, Ariel; Nieto, Amelia; Carrascosa, José L; Castón, José R

    2015-03-01

    Bioengineering of viruses and virus-like particles (VLPs) is a well-established approach in the development of new and improved vaccines against viral and bacterial pathogens. We report here that the capsid of a major avian pathogen, infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV), can accommodate heterologous proteins to induce protective immunity. The structural units of the ~70-nm-diameter T=13 IBDV capsid are trimers of VP2, which is made as a precursor (pVP2). The pVP2 C-terminal domain has an amphipathic α helix that controls VP2 polymorphism. In the absence of the VP3 scaffolding protein, 466-residue pVP2 intermediates bearing this α helix assemble into genuine VLPs only when expressed with an N-terminal His6 tag (the HT-VP2-466 protein). HT-VP2-466 capsids are optimal for protein insertion, as they are large enough (cargo space, ~78,000 nm(3)) and are assembled from a single protein. We explored HT-VP2-466-based chimeric capsids initially using enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). The VLP assembly yield was efficient when we coexpressed EGFP-HT-VP2-466 and HT-VP2-466 from two recombinant baculoviruses. The native EGFP structure (~240 copies/virion) was successfully inserted in a functional form, as VLPs were fluorescent, and three-dimensional cryo-electron microscopy showed that the EGFP molecules incorporated at the inner capsid surface. Immunization of mice with purified EGFP-VLPs elicited anti-EGFP antibodies. We also inserted hemagglutinin (HA) and matrix (M2) protein epitopes derived from the mouse-adapted A/PR/8/34 influenza virus and engineered several HA- and M2-derived chimeric capsids. Mice immunized with VLPs containing the HA stalk, an M2 fragment, or both antigens developed full protection against viral challenge. Virus-like particles (VLPs) are multimeric protein cages that mimic the infectious virus capsid and are potential candidates as nonliving vaccines that induce long-lasting protection. Chimeric VLPs can display or include foreign

  1. ICTV Virus taxonomy profile: Asfarviridae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The family Asfarviridae includes the single species African swine fever virus, isolates of which have linear dsDNA genomes of 170-194 kbp. Virons have an internal core, an internal lipid membrane, an icosahedral capsid and an outer lipid envelope. Infection of domestic pigs and wild boar results i...

  2. Atomic Force Microscopy of virus capsids uncover the interplay between mechanics, structure and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pablo, Pedro J.

    The basic architecture of a virus consists of the capsid, a shell made up of repeating protein subunits, which packs, shuttles and delivers their genome at the right place and moment. Viral particles are endorsed with specific physicochemical properties which confer to their structures certain meta-stability whose modulation permits fulfilling each task of the viral cycle. These natural designed capabilities have impelled using viral capsids as protein containers of artificial cargoes (drugs, polymers, enzymes, minerals) with applications in biomedical and materials sciences. Both natural and artificial protein cages have to protect their cargo against a variety of physicochemical aggressive environments, including molecular impacts of highly crowded media, thermal and chemical stresses, and osmotic shocks. Viral cages stability under these ambiences depend not only on the ultimate structure of the external capsid, which rely on the interactions between protein subunits, but also on the nature of the cargo. During the last decade our lab has focused on the study of protein cages with Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) (figure 1). We are interested in stablishing links of their mechanical properties with their structure and function. In particular, mechanics provide information about the cargo storage strategies of both natural and virus-derived protein cages. Mechanical fatigue has revealed as a nanosurgery tool to unveil the strength of the capisd subunit bonds. We also interrogated the electrostatics of individual protein shells. Our AFM-fluorescence combination provided information about DNA diffusing out cracked-open protein cages in real time.

  3. Role of dynamic capsomere supply for viral capsid self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettcher, Marvin A.; Klein, Heinrich C. R.; Schwarz, Ulrich S.

    2015-02-01

    Many viruses rely on the self-assembly of their capsids to protect and transport their genomic material. For many viral systems, in particular for human viruses like hepatitis B, adeno or human immunodeficiency virus, that lead to persistent infections, capsomeres are continuously produced in the cytoplasm of the host cell while completed capsids exit the cell for a new round of infection. Here we use coarse-grained Brownian dynamics simulations of a generic patchy particle model to elucidate the role of the dynamic supply of capsomeres for the reversible self-assembly of empty T1 icosahedral virus capsids. We find that for high rates of capsomere influx only a narrow range of bond strengths exists for which a steady state of continuous capsid production is possible. For bond strengths smaller and larger than this optimal value, the reaction volume becomes crowded by small and large intermediates, respectively. For lower rates of capsomere influx a broader range of bond strengths exists for which a steady state of continuous capsid production is established, although now the production rate of capsids is smaller. Thus our simulations suggest that the importance of an optimal bond strength for viral capsid assembly typical for in vitro conditions can be reduced by the dynamic influx of capsomeres in a cellular environment.

  4. A virus capsid-like nanocompartment that stores iron and protects bacteria from oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Colleen A; Fontana, Juan; Nemecek, Daniel; Cheng, Naiqian; Aksyuk, Anastasia A; Heymann, J Bernard; Winkler, Dennis C; Lam, Alan S; Wall, Joseph S; Steven, Alasdair C; Hoiczyk, Egbert

    2014-09-01

    Living cells compartmentalize materials and enzymatic reactions to increase metabolic efficiency. While eukaryotes use membrane-bound organelles, bacteria and archaea rely primarily on protein-bound nanocompartments. Encapsulins constitute a class of nanocompartments widespread in bacteria and archaea whose functions have hitherto been unclear. Here, we characterize the encapsulin nanocompartment from Myxococcus xanthus, which consists of a shell protein (EncA, 32.5 kDa) and three internal proteins (EncB, 17 kDa; EncC, 13 kDa; EncD, 11 kDa). Using cryo-electron microscopy, we determined that EncA self-assembles into an icosahedral shell 32 nm in diameter (26 nm internal diameter), built from 180 subunits with the fold first observed in bacteriophage HK97 capsid. The internal proteins, of which EncB and EncC have ferritin-like domains, attach to its inner surface. Native nanocompartments have dense iron-rich cores. Functionally, they resemble ferritins, cage-like iron storage proteins, but with a massively greater capacity (~30,000 iron atoms versus ~3,000 in ferritin). Physiological data reveal that few nanocompartments are assembled during vegetative growth, but they increase fivefold upon starvation, protecting cells from oxidative stress through iron sequestration. © 2014 The Authors.

  5. Targeting of a Nuclease to Murine Leukemia Virus Capsids Inhibits Viral Multiplication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natsoulis, Georges; Seshaiah, Partha; Federspiel, Mark J.; Rein, Alan; Hughes, Stephen H.; Boeke, Jef D.

    1995-01-01

    Capsid-targeted viral inactivation is an antiviral strategy in which toxic fusion proteins are targeted to virions, where they inhibit viral multiplication by destroying viral components. These fusion proteins consist of a virion structural protein moiety and an enzymatic moiety such as a nuclease. Such fusion proteins can severely inhibit transposition of yeast retrotransposon Ty1, an element whose transposition mechanistically resembles retroviral multiplication. We demonstrate that expression of a murine retrovirus capsid-staphylococcal nuclease fusion protein inhibits multiplication of the corresponding murine leukemia virus by 30- to 100-fold. Staphylococcal nuclease is apparently inactive intracellularly and hence nontoxic to the host cell, but it is active extracellularly because of its requirement for high concentrations of Ca2+ ions. Virions assembled in and shed from cells expressing the fusion protein contain very small amounts of intact viral RNA, as would be predicted for nuclease-mediated inhibition of viral multiplication.

  6. Discovery and Mechanistic Study of Benzamide Derivatives That Modulate Hepatitis B Virus Capsid Assembly.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuo; Zhao, Qiong; Zhang, Pinghu; Kulp, John; Hu, Lydia; Hwang, Nicky; Zhang, Jiming; Block, Timothy M; Xu, Xiaodong; Du, Yanming; Chang, Jinhong; Guo, Ju-Tao

    2017-08-15

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a global public health problem. Although the currently approved medications can reliably reduce the viral load and prevent the progression of liver diseases, they fail to cure the viral infection. In an effort toward discovery of novel antiviral agents against HBV, a group of benzamide (BA) derivatives that significantly reduced the amount of cytoplasmic HBV DNA were discovered. The initial lead optimization efforts identified two BA derivatives with improved antiviral activity for further mechanistic studies. Interestingly, similar to our previously reported sulfamoylbenzamides (SBAs), the BAs promote the formation of empty capsids through specific interaction with HBV core protein but not other viral and host cellular components. Genetic evidence suggested that both SBAs and BAs inhibited HBV nucleocapsid assembly by binding to the heteroaryldihydropyrimidine (HAP) pocket between core protein dimer-dimer interfaces. However, unlike SBAs, BA compounds uniquely induced the formation of empty capsids that migrated more slowly in native agarose gel electrophoresis from A36V mutant than from the wild-type core protein. Moreover, we showed that the assembly of chimeric capsids from wild-type and drug-resistant core proteins was susceptible to multiple capsid assembly modulators. Hence, HBV core protein is a dominant antiviral target that may suppress the selection of drug-resistant viruses during core protein-targeting antiviral therapy. Our studies thus indicate that BAs are a chemically and mechanistically unique type of HBV capsid assembly modulators and warranted for further development as antiviral agents against HBV. IMPORTANCE HBV core protein plays essential roles in many steps of the viral replication cycle. In addition to packaging viral pregenomic RNA (pgRNA) and DNA polymerase complex into nucleocapsids for reverse transcriptional DNA replication to take place, the core protein dimers, existing in several

  7. Dynamic Virus-Dependent Subnuclear Localization of the Capsid Protein from a Geminivirus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liping; Tan, Huang; Wu, Mengshi; Jimenez-Gongora, Tamara; Tan, Li; Lozano-Duran, Rosa

    2017-01-01

    Viruses are intracellular parasites with a nucleic acid genome and a proteinaceous capsid. Viral capsids are formed of at least one virus-encoded capsid protein (CP), which is often multifunctional, playing additional non-structural roles during the infection cycle. In animal viruses, there are examples of differential localization of CPs associated to the progression of the infection and/or enabled by other viral proteins; these changes in the distribution of CPs may ultimately regulate the involvement of these proteins in different viral functions. In this work, we analyze the subcellular localization of a GFP- or RFP-fused CP from the plant virus Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV; Fam. Geminiviridae) in the presence or absence of the virus upon transient expression in the host plants Nicotiana benthamiana and tomato. Our findings show that, in agreement with previous reports, when the CP is expressed alone it localizes mainly in the nucleolus and weakly in the nucleoplasm. Interestingly, the presence of the virus causes the sequential re-localization of the CP outside of the nucleolus and into discrete nuclear foci and, eventually, into an uneven distribution in the nucleoplasm. Expression of the viral replication-associated protein, Rep, is sufficient to exclude the CP from the nucleolus, but the localization of the CP in the characteristic patterns induced by the virus cannot be recapitulated by co-expression with any individual viral protein. Our results demonstrate that the subcellular distribution of the CP is a dynamic process, temporally regulated throughout the progression of the infection. The regulation of the localization of the CP is determined by the presence of other viral components or changes in the cellular environment induced by the virus, and is likely to contribute to the multifunctionality of this protein. Bearing in mind these observations, we suggest that viral proteins should be studied in the context of the infection and considering

  8. Phosphorylation of the budgerigar fledgling disease virus major capsid protein VP1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haynes, J. I. 2nd; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    The structural proteins of the budgerigar fledgling disease virus, the first known nonmammalian polyomavirus, were analyzed by isoelectric focusing and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The major capsid protein VP1 was found to be composed of at least five distinct species having isoelectric points ranging from pH 6.45 to 5.85. By analogy with the murine polyomavirus, these species apparently result from different modifications of an initial translation product. Primary chicken embryo cells were infected in the presence of 32Pi to determine whether the virus structural proteins were modified by phosphorylation. SDS-PAGE of the purified virus structural proteins demonstrated that VP1 (along with both minor capsid proteins) was phosphorylated. Two-dimensional analysis of the radiolabeled virus showed phosphorylation of only the two most acidic isoelectric species of VP1, indicating that this posttranslational modification contributes to VP1 species heterogeneity. Phosphoamino acid analysis of 32P-labeled VP1 revealed that phosphoserine is the only phosphoamino acid present in the VP1 protein.

  9. Gaussian fluctuation of the diffusion exponent of virus capsid in a living cell nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itto, Yuichi

    2018-05-01

    In their work [4], Bosse et al. experimentally showed that virus capsid exhibits not only normal diffusion but also anomalous diffusion in nucleus of a living cell. There, it was found that the distribution of fluctuations of the diffusion exponent characterizing them takes the Gaussian form, which is, quite remarkably, the same form for two different types of the virus. This suggests high robustness of such fluctuations. Here, the statistical property of local fluctuations of the diffusion exponent of the virus capsid in the nucleus is studied. A maximum-entropy-principle approach (originally proposed for a different virus in a different cell) is applied for obtaining the fluctuation distribution of the exponent. Largeness of the number of blocks identified with local areas of interchromatin corrals is also examined based on the experimental data. It is shown that the Gaussian distribution of the local fluctuations can be derived, in accordance with the above form. In addition, it is quantified how the fluctuation distribution on a long time scale is different from the Gaussian distribution.

  10. Importin α1 is required for nuclear import of herpes simplex virus proteins and capsid assembly in fibroblasts and neurons

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Fenja; Rother, Franziska; Rudolph, Kathrin; Prank, Ute; Binz, Anne; Hügel, Stefanie; Hartmann, Enno; Bader, Michael; Bauerfeind, Rudolf; Sodeik, Beate

    2018-01-01

    Herpesviruses are large DNA viruses which depend on many nuclear functions, and therefore on host transport factors to ensure specific nuclear import of viral and host components. While some import cargoes bind directly to certain transport factors, most recruit importin β1 via importin α. We identified importin α1 in a small targeted siRNA screen to be important for herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) gene expression. Production of infectious virions was delayed in the absence of importin α1, but not in cells lacking importin α3 or importin α4. While nuclear targeting of the incoming capsids, of the HSV-1 transcription activator VP16, and of the viral genomes were not affected, the nuclear import of the HSV-1 proteins ICP4 and ICP0, required for efficient viral transcription, and of ICP8 and pUL42, necessary for DNA replication, were reduced. Furthermore, quantitative electron microscopy showed that fibroblasts lacking importin α1 contained overall fewer nuclear capsids, but an increased proportion of mature nuclear capsids indicating that capsid formation and capsid egress into the cytoplasm were impaired. In neurons, importin α1 was also not required for nuclear targeting of incoming capsids, but for nuclear import of ICP4 and for the formation of nuclear capsid assembly compartments. Our data suggest that importin α1 is specifically required for the nuclear localization of several important HSV1 proteins, capsid assembly, and capsid egress into the cytoplasm, and may become rate limiting in situ upon infection at low multiplicity or in terminally differentiated cells such as neurons. PMID:29304174

  11. Mechanisms of Virus Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Perlmutter, Jason D.; Hagan, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Viruses are nanoscale entities containing a nucleic acid genome encased in a protein shell called a capsid, and in some cases surrounded by a lipid bilayer membrane. This review summarizes the physics that govern the processes by which capsids assembles within their host cells and in vitro. We describe the thermodynamics and kinetics for assembly of protein subunits into icosahedral capsid shells, and how these are modified in cases where the capsid assembles around a nucleic acid or on a lipid bilayer. We present experimental and theoretical techniques that have been used to characterize capsid assembly, and we highlight aspects of virus assembly which are likely to receive significant attention in the near future. PMID:25532951

  12. Cell culture adaptation mutations in foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype A capsid proteins: implications for receptor interactions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In this study we describe the adaptive changes fixed on the capsid of several foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype A strains during propagation in cell monolayers. Viruses passaged extensively in three cell lines (BHK-21, LFBK and IB-RS-2), consistently gained several positively charged amino acids...

  13. Perspective on Adeno-Associated Virus Capsid Modification for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Nance, Michael E; Duan, Dongsheng

    2015-12-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a X-linked, progressive childhood myopathy caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene, one of the largest genes in the genome. It is characterized by skeletal and cardiac muscle degeneration and dysfunction leading to cardiac and/or respiratory failure. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is a highly promising gene therapy vector. AAV gene therapy has resulted in unprecedented clinical success for treating several inherited diseases. However, AAV gene therapy for DMD remains a significant challenge. Hurdles for AAV-mediated DMD gene therapy include the difficulty to package the full-length dystrophin coding sequence in an AAV vector, the necessity for whole-body gene delivery, the immune response to dystrophin and AAV capsid, and the species-specific barriers to translate from animal models to human patients. Capsid engineering aims at improving viral vector properties by rational design and/or forced evolution. In this review, we discuss how to use the state-of-the-art AAV capsid engineering technologies to overcome hurdles in AAV-based DMD gene therapy.

  14. ATP Depletion Blocks Herpes Simplex Virus DNA Packaging and Capsid Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, Anindya; Wilson, Duncan W.

    1999-01-01

    During herpes simplex virus (HSV) assembly, immature procapsids must expel their internal scaffold proteins, transform their outer shell to form mature polyhedrons, and become packaged with the viral double-stranded (ds) DNA genome. A large number of virally encoded proteins are required for successful completion of these events, but their molecular roles are poorly understood. By analogy with the dsDNA bacteriophage we reasoned that HSV DNA packaging might be an ATP-requiring process and tested this hypothesis by adding an ATP depletion cocktail to cells accumulating unpackaged procapsids due to the presence of a temperature-sensitive lesion in the HSV maturational protease UL26. Following return to permissive temperature, HSV capsids were found to be unable to package DNA, suggesting that this process is indeed ATP dependent. Surprisingly, however, the display of epitopes indicative of capsid maturation was also inhibited. We conclude that either formation of these epitopes directly requires ATP or capsid maturation is normally arrested by a proofreading mechanism until DNA packaging has been successfully completed. PMID:9971781

  15. Expression and immunological analysis of capsid protein precursor of swine vesicular disease virus HK/70.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hong; Wu, Jing-yan; Shang, You-jun; Ying, Shuang-hui; Zheng, Hai-xue; Liu, Xiang-tao

    2010-06-01

    VP1, a capsid protein of swine vesicular disease virus, was cloned from the SVDV HK/70 strain and inserted into retroviral vector pBABE puro, and expressed in PK15 cells by an retroviral expression system. The ability of the VP1 protein to induce an immune response was then evaluated in guinea pigs. Western blot and ELISA results indicated that the VP1 protein can be recognized by SVDV positive serum, Furthermore, anti-SVDV specific antibodies and lymphocyte proliferation were elicited and increased by VP1 protein after vaccination. These results encourage further work towards the development of a vaccine against SVDV infection.

  16. Mutation of the N-Terminal Region of Chikungunya Virus Capsid Protein: Implications for Vaccine Design.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Adam; Liu, Xiang; Zaid, Ali; Goh, Lucas Y H; Hobson-Peters, Jody; Hall, Roy A; Merits, Andres; Mahalingam, Suresh

    2017-02-21

    Mosquito-transmitted chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an arthritogenic alphavirus of the Togaviridae family responsible for frequent outbreaks of arthritic disease in humans. Capsid protein, a structural protein encoded by the CHIKV RNA genome, is able to translocate to the host cell nucleolus. In encephalitic alphaviruses, nuclear translocation induces host cell transcriptional shutoff; however, the role of capsid protein nucleolar localization in arthritogenic alphaviruses remains unclear. Using recombinant enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-tagged expression constructs and CHIKV infectious clones, we describe a nucleolar localization sequence (NoLS) in the N-terminal region of capsid protein, previously uncharacterized in CHIKV. Mutation of the NoLS by site-directed mutagenesis reduced efficiency of nuclear import of CHIKV capsid protein. In the virus, mutation of the capsid protein NoLS (CHIKV-NoLS) attenuated replication in mammalian and mosquito cells, producing a small-plaque phenotype. Attenuation of CHIKV-NoLS is likely due to disruption of the viral replication cycle downstream of viral RNA synthesis. In mice, CHIKV-NoLS infection caused no disease signs compared to wild-type CHIKV (CHIKV-WT)-infected mice; lack of disease signs correlated with significantly reduced viremia and decreased expression of proinflammatory factors. Mice immunized with CHIKV-NoLS, challenged with CHIKV-WT at 30 days postimmunization, develop no disease signs and no detectable viremia. Serum from CHIKV-NoLS-immunized mice is able to efficiently neutralize CHIKV infection in vitro Additionally, CHIKV-NoLS-immunized mice challenged with the related alphavirus Ross River virus showed reduced early and peak viremia postchallenge, indicating a cross-protective effect. The high degree of CHIKV-NoLS attenuation may improve CHIKV antiviral and rational vaccine design. IMPORTANCE CHIKV is a mosquito-borne pathogen capable of causing explosive epidemics of incapacitating joint pain

  17. The Rubella virus capsid is an anti-apoptotic protein that attenuates the pore-forming ability of Bax.

    PubMed

    Ilkow, Carolina S; Goping, Ing Swie; Hobman, Tom C

    2011-02-01

    Apoptosis is an important mechanism by which virus-infected cells are eliminated from the host. Accordingly, many viruses have evolved strategies to prevent or delay apoptosis in order to provide a window of opportunity in which virus replication, assembly and egress can take place. Interfering with apoptosis may also be important for establishment and/or maintenance of persistent infections. Whereas large DNA viruses have the luxury of encoding accessory proteins whose primary function is to undermine programmed cell death pathways, it is generally thought that most RNA viruses do not encode these types of proteins. Here we report that the multifunctional capsid protein of Rubella virus is a potent inhibitor of apoptosis. The main mechanism of action was specific for Bax as capsid bound Bax and prevented Bax-induced apoptosis but did not bind Bak nor inhibit Bak-induced apoptosis. Intriguingly, interaction with capsid protein resulted in activation of Bax in the absence of apoptotic stimuli, however, release of cytochrome c from mitochondria and concomitant activation of caspase 3 did not occur. Accordingly, we propose that binding of capsid to Bax induces the formation of hetero-oligomers that are incompetent for pore formation. Importantly, data from reverse genetic studies are consistent with a scenario in which the anti-apoptotic activity of capsid protein is important for virus replication. If so, this would be among the first demonstrations showing that blocking apoptosis is important for replication of an RNA virus. Finally, it is tempting to speculate that other slowly replicating RNA viruses employ similar mechanisms to avoid killing infected cells.

  18. West Nile Virus-Induced Neuroinflammation: Glial Infection and Capsid Protein-Mediated Neurovirulence▿

    PubMed Central

    van Marle, Guido; Antony, Joseph; Ostermann, Heather; Dunham, Christopher; Hunt, Tracey; Halliday, William; Maingat, Ferdinand; Urbanowski, Matt D.; Hobman, Tom; Peeling, James; Power, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) infection causes neurological disease at all levels of the neural axis, accompanied by neuroinflammation and neuronal loss, although the underlying mechanisms remain uncertain. Given the substantial activation of neuroinflammatory pathways observed in WNV infection, we hypothesized that WNV-mediated neuroinflammation and cell death occurred through WNV infection of both glia and neurons, which was driven in part by WNV capsid protein expression. Analysis of autopsied neural tissues from humans with WNV encephalomyelitis (WNVE) revealed WNV infection of both neurons and glia. Upregulation of proinflammatory genes, CXCL10, interleukin-1β, and indolamine-2′,3′-deoxygenase with concurrent suppression of the protective astrocyte-specific endoplasmic reticulum stress sensor gene, OASIS (for old astrocyte specifically induced substance), was evident in WNVE patients compared to non-WNVE controls. These findings were supported by increased ex vivo expression of these proinflammatory genes in glia infected by WNV-NY99. WNV infection caused endoplasmic reticulum stress gene induction and apoptosis in neurons but did not affect glial viability. WNV-infected astrocytic cells secreted cytotoxic factors, which caused neuronal apoptosis. The expression of the WNV-NY99 capsid protein in neurons and glia by a Sindbis virus-derived vector (SINrep5-WNVc) caused neuronal death and the release of neurotoxic factors by infected astrocytes, coupled with proinflammatory gene induction and suppression of OASIS. Striatal implantation of SINrep5-WNVC induced neuroinflammation in rats, together with the induction of CXCL10 and diminished OASIS expression, compared to controls. Moreover, magnetic resonance neuroimaging showed edema and tissue injury in the vicinity of the SINrep5-WNVc implantation site compared to controls, which was complemented by neurobehavioral abnormalities in the SINrep5-WNVc-implanted animals. These studies underscore the important

  19. An alphavirus temperature-sensitive capsid mutant reveals stages of nucleocapsid assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Yan, E-mail: yzheng15@students.kgi.edu; Kielian, Margaret, E-mail: margaret.kielian@einstein.yu.edu

    2015-10-15

    Alphaviruses have a nucleocapsid core composed of the RNA genome surrounded by an icosahedral lattice of capsid protein. An insertion after position 186 in the capsid protein produced a strongly temperature-sensitive growth phenotype. Even when the structural proteins were synthesized at the permissive temperature (28 °C), subsequent incubation of the cells at the non-permissive temperature (37 °C) dramatically decreased mutant capsid protein stability and particle assembly. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of cytoplasmic nucleocapsids in mutant-infected cells cultured at the permissive temperature, but these nucleocapsids were not stable to sucrose gradient separation. In contrast, nucleocapsids isolated from mutant virus particlesmore » had similar stability to that of wildtype virus. Our data support a model in which cytoplasmic nucleocapsids go through a maturation step during packaging into virus particles. The insertion site lies in the interface between capsid proteins in the assembled nucleocapsid, suggesting the region where such a stabilizing transition occurs. - Highlights: • We characterize an alphavirus capsid insertion mutation. • These capsid mutants are highly temperature sensitive for growth. • The insertion affects nucleocapsid stability. • Results suggest that the nucleocapsid is stabilized during virus budding.« less

  20. Plum pox virus capsid protein suppresses plant pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity.

    PubMed

    Nicaise, Valerie; Candresse, Thierry

    2017-08-01

    The perception of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by immune receptors launches defence mechanisms referred to as PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI). Successful pathogens must suppress PTI pathways via the action of effectors to efficiently colonize their hosts. So far, plant PTI has been reported to be active against most classes of pathogens, except viruses, although this defence layer has been hypothesized recently as an active part of antiviral immunity which needs to be suppressed by viruses for infection success. Here, we report that Arabidopsis PTI genes are regulated upon infection by viruses and contribute to plant resistance to Plum pox virus (PPV). Our experiments further show that PPV suppresses two early PTI responses, the oxidative burst and marker gene expression, during Arabidopsis infection. In planta expression of PPV capsid protein (CP) was found to strongly impair these responses in Nicotiana benthamiana and Arabidopsis, revealing its PTI suppressor activity. In summary, we provide the first clear evidence that plant viruses acquired the ability to suppress PTI mechanisms via the action of effectors, highlighting a novel strategy employed by viruses to escape plant defences. © 2016 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  1. siRNAs encapsulated in recombinant capsid protein derived from Dengue serotype 2 virus inhibits the four serotypes of the virus and proliferation of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A S Manoj; Reddy, G E C Vidyadhar; Rajmane, Yogesh; Nair, Soumya; Pai Kamath, Sangita; Sreejesh, Greeshma; Basha, Khalander; Chile, Shailaja; Ray, Kriti; Nelly, Vivant; Khadpe, Nilesh; Kasturi, Ravishankar; Ramana, Venkata

    2015-01-10

    siRNA delivery potential of the Dengue virus capsid protein in cultured cells was recently reported, but target knockdown potential in the context of specific diseases has not been explored. In this study we have evaluated the utility of the protein as an siRNA carrier for anti Dengue viral and anti cancer applications using cell culture systems. We show that target specific siRNAs delivered using the capsid protein inhibit infection by the four serotypes of Dengue virus and proliferation of two cancer cell lines. Our data confirm the potential of the capsid for anti Dengue viral and anti cancer RNAi applications. In addition, we have optimized a fermentation strategy to improve the yield of Escherichia coli expressed D2C protein since the reported yields of E. coli expressed flaviviral capsid proteins are low. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The Mammalian Cell Cycle Regulates Parvovirus Nuclear Capsid Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Riolobos, Laura; Domínguez, Carlos; Kann, Michael; Almendral, José M.

    2015-01-01

    It is unknown whether the mammalian cell cycle could impact the assembly of viruses maturing in the nucleus. We addressed this question using MVM, a reference member of the icosahedral ssDNA nuclear parvoviruses, which requires cell proliferation to infect by mechanisms partly understood. Constitutively expressed MVM capsid subunits (VPs) accumulated in the cytoplasm of mouse and human fibroblasts synchronized at G0, G1, and G1/S transition. Upon arrest release, VPs translocated to the nucleus as cells entered S phase, at efficiencies relying on cell origin and arrest method, and immediately assembled into capsids. In synchronously infected cells, the consecutive virus life cycle steps (gene expression, proteins nuclear translocation, capsid assembly, genome replication and encapsidation) proceeded tightly coupled to cell cycle progression from G0/G1 through S into G2 phase. However, a DNA synthesis stress caused by thymidine irreversibly disrupted virus life cycle, as VPs became increasingly retained in the cytoplasm hours post-stress, forming empty capsids in mouse fibroblasts, thereby impairing encapsidation of the nuclear viral DNA replicative intermediates. Synchronously infected cells subjected to density-arrest signals while traversing early S phase also blocked VPs transport, resulting in a similar misplaced cytoplasmic capsid assembly in mouse fibroblasts. In contrast, thymidine and density arrest signals deregulating virus assembly neither perturbed nuclear translocation of the NS1 protein nor viral genome replication occurring under S/G2 cycle arrest. An underlying mechanism of cell cycle control was identified in the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated VPs trimeric assembly intermediates, which accessed a non-conserved route distinct from the importin α2/β1 and transportin pathways. The exquisite cell cycle-dependence of parvovirus nuclear capsid assembly conforms a novel paradigm of time and functional coupling between cellular and virus life

  3. Kinetics of the association of dengue virus capsid protein with the granular component of nucleolus.

    PubMed

    Tiwary, Ashish Kumar; Cecilia, D

    2017-02-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) replicates in the cytoplasm but translocation of the capsid protein (C) to the nucleoli of infected cells has been shown to facilitate virus multiplication for DENV-2. This study demonstrates that the nucleolar localization of C occurs with all four serotypes of DENV. The interaction of C with the nucleolus was found to be dynamic with a mobile fraction of 66% by FRAP. That the C shuttled between the nucleus and cytoplasm was suggested by FLIP and translation inhibition experiments. Colocalization with B23 indicated that DENV C targeted the granular component (GC) of the nucleolus. Presence of DENV C in the nucleolus affected the recovery kinetics of B23 in infected and transfected cells. Sub-nucleolar localization of DENV C of all serotypes to the GC, its mobility in and out of the nucleolus and its affect on the dynamics of B23 is being shown for the first time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Identification of the gene encoding the major capsid protein of fish lymphocystis disease virus.

    PubMed

    Schnitzler, P; Darai, G

    1993-10-01

    The gene encoding the major capsid protein (MCP) of fish lymphocystis disease virus (flounder isolate; FLCDV-f) has been identified by PCR using oligonucleotide primers corresponding to different regions of the MCP of Tipula iridescent virus (TIV), iridescent virus 22 (IV22) and Chilo iridescent virus (CIV). DNA fragments of 0.4 kbp, 0.5 kbp and 0.27 kbp in size were amplified using oligonucleotide primers corresponding to amino acids (aa) 146 to 153 (primer 1) and 274 to 268 (primer 6), or aa 146 to 153 (primer 1) and 313 to 304 (primer 8), or aa 304 to 312 (primer 7) and 385 to 381 (primer 9) of the MCP of TIV, respectively. The PCR products were used as hybridization probes for screening the gene library of FLCDV-f. The MCP gene of FLCDV-f(1377 bp; 459 aa; 51.4K) was identified within the DNA sequence of the EcoRI FLCDV-f DNA fragment C (11.2 kbp; 0.611 to 0.718 map units). A high degree of aa sequence identity/similarity was detected between the MCP of FLCDV-f and TIV (50.3%/33.8%), IV22 (49.1%/34.2%). CIV (53%/29.5%) and African swine fever virus (16%/38.1%).

  5. Packaging of Polyelectrolytes in Viral Capsids: The Interplay Between Polymer Length and Capsid Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knobler, Charles

    2008-03-01

    Each particle of the Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus (CCMV) has a very small ``parts list,'' consisting of two components: a molecule of single-stranded RNA and a 190-residue protein that makes up the 28-nm diameter icosahedral capsid. When purified viral RNA and capsid protein are mixed in solution at an appropriate pH and ionic strength, infectious wild-type viruses form spontaneously. Virus-like particles (VLPs) are formed when the protein self assembles around other anionic polymers such as poly(styrene sulfonate) (PSS). Under different pH and ionic strength conditions the capsid protein can assemble by itself into empty capsids, multishell structures, tubes and sheets. To explore the effect on virion size of the competition between the preferred curvature of the protein and the size of the packaged cargo we have examined the formation of VLPs around PSS polymers with molecular weights ranging from 400 kDa to 3.4 MDa. Two distinct sizes are observed -- 22 nm for the lower molecular weights, jumping to 27 nm at 2 MDa. While under given conditions the size of PSS in solution is directly determined by its molecular weight, the self-complementarity of RNA makes its solution structure dependent on the nucleotide sequence as well. We have therefore employed Small-Angle X-ray Scattering and Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy to examine the sizes of viral and non-viral RNAs of identical lengths. A model for the assembly that includes both the self-interactions of the polyelectrolyte and the capsid proteins and the interactions between them provides insight into the experimental results.

  6. Structure of large dsDNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    Klose, Thomas; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic large dsDNA viruses (NCLDVs) encompass an ever-increasing group of large eukaryotic viruses, infecting a wide variety of organisms. The set of core genes shared by all these viruses includes a major capsid protein with a double jelly-roll fold forming an icosahedral capsid, which surrounds a double layer membrane that contains the viral genome. Furthermore, some of these viruses, such as the members of the Mimiviridae and Phycodnaviridae have a unique vertex that is used during infection to transport DNA into the host. PMID:25003382

  7. RNA packaging of MRFV virus-like particles: The interplay between RNA pools and capsid coat protein

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) can be produced through self-assembly of capsid protein (CP) into particles with discrete shapes and sizes and containing different types of RNA molecules. The general principle that governs particle assembly and RNA packaging is determined by unique interactions between ...

  8. Effect of a hepatitis B virus inhibitor, NZ-4, on capsid formation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Wang, Ya-Juan; Chen, Hai-Jun; Shi, Li-Ping; Tong, Xian-Kun; Zhang, Yang-Ming; Wang, Gui-Feng; Wang, Wen-Long; Feng, Chun-Lan; He, Pei-Lan; Xu, Yi-Bin; Lu, Meng-Ji; Tang, Wei; Nan, Fa-Jun; Zuo, Jian-Ping

    2016-01-01

    During the hepatitis B virus (HBV) life cycle, nucleocapsid assembly is essential for HBV replication. Both RNA reverse transcription and DNA replication occur within the HBV nucleocapsid. HBV nucleocapsid is consisted of core protein (HBcAg), whose carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) contains an Arg-rich domain (ARD). The ARD of HBcAg does contribute to the encapsidation of pregenomic RNA (pgRNA). Previously, we reported a small-molecule, NZ-4, which dramatically reduced the HBV DNA level in an in vitro cell setting. Here, we explore the possible mechanisms by which NZ-4 inhibits HBV function. As an HBV inhibitor, NZ-4 leads to the formation of genome-free capsids, including a new population of capsid that runs faster on agarose gels. NZ-4's activity was dependent on the presence of the ARD I, containing at least one positively charged amino acid. NZ-4 might provide a new option for further development of HBV therapeutics for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Context-Dependent Cleavage of the Capsid Protein by the West Nile Virus Protease Modulates the Efficiency of Virus Assembly.

    PubMed

    VanBlargan, Laura A; Davis, Kaitlin A; Dowd, Kimberly A; Akey, David L; Smith, Janet L; Pierson, Theodore C

    2015-08-01

    The molecular mechanisms that define the specificity of flavivirus RNA encapsulation are poorly understood. Virions composed of the structural proteins of one flavivirus and the genomic RNA of a heterologous strain can be assembled and have been developed as live attenuated vaccine candidates for several flaviviruses. In this study, we discovered that not all combinations of flavivirus components are possible. While a West Nile virus (WNV) subgenomic RNA could readily be packaged by structural proteins of the DENV2 strain 16681, production of infectious virions with DENV2 strain New Guinea C (NGC) structural proteins was not possible, despite the very high amino acid identity between these viruses. Mutagenesis studies identified a single residue (position 101) of the DENV capsid (C) protein as the determinant for heterologous virus production. C101 is located at the P1' position of the NS2B/3 protease cleavage site at the carboxy terminus of the C protein. WNV NS2B/3 cleavage of the DENV structural polyprotein was possible when a threonine (Thr101 in strain 16681) but not a serine (Ser101 in strain NGC) occupied the P1' position, a finding not predicted by in vitro protease specificity studies. Critically, both serine and threonine were tolerated at the P1' position of WNV capsid. More extensive mutagenesis revealed the importance of flanking residues within the polyprotein in defining the cleavage specificity of the WNV protease. A more detailed understanding of the context dependence of viral protease specificity may aid the development of new protease inhibitors and provide insight into associated patterns of drug resistance. West Nile virus (WNV) and dengue virus (DENV) are mosquito-borne flaviviruses that cause considerable morbidity and mortality in humans. No specific antiflavivirus therapeutics are available for treatment of infection. Proteolytic processing of the flavivirus polyprotein is an essential step in the replication cycle and is an attractive

  10. Context-Dependent Cleavage of the Capsid Protein by the West Nile Virus Protease Modulates the Efficiency of Virus Assembly

    PubMed Central

    VanBlargan, Laura A.; Davis, Kaitlin A.; Dowd, Kimberly A.; Akey, David L.; Smith, Janet L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The molecular mechanisms that define the specificity of flavivirus RNA encapsulation are poorly understood. Virions composed of the structural proteins of one flavivirus and the genomic RNA of a heterologous strain can be assembled and have been developed as live attenuated vaccine candidates for several flaviviruses. In this study, we discovered that not all combinations of flavivirus components are possible. While a West Nile virus (WNV) subgenomic RNA could readily be packaged by structural proteins of the DENV2 strain 16681, production of infectious virions with DENV2 strain New Guinea C (NGC) structural proteins was not possible, despite the very high amino acid identity between these viruses. Mutagenesis studies identified a single residue (position 101) of the DENV capsid (C) protein as the determinant for heterologous virus production. C101 is located at the P1′ position of the NS2B/3 protease cleavage site at the carboxy terminus of the C protein. WNV NS2B/3 cleavage of the DENV structural polyprotein was possible when a threonine (Thr101 in strain 16681) but not a serine (Ser101 in strain NGC) occupied the P1′ position, a finding not predicted by in vitro protease specificity studies. Critically, both serine and threonine were tolerated at the P1′ position of WNV capsid. More extensive mutagenesis revealed the importance of flanking residues within the polyprotein in defining the cleavage specificity of the WNV protease. A more detailed understanding of the context dependence of viral protease specificity may aid the development of new protease inhibitors and provide insight into associated patterns of drug resistance. IMPORTANCE West Nile virus (WNV) and dengue virus (DENV) are mosquito-borne flaviviruses that cause considerable morbidity and mortality in humans. No specific antiflavivirus therapeutics are available for treatment of infection. Proteolytic processing of the flavivirus polyprotein is an essential step in the replication

  11. Specific interaction of capsid protein and importin-{alpha}/{beta} influences West Nile virus production

    SciTech Connect

    Bhuvanakantham, Raghavan; Chong, Mun-Keat; Ng, Mah-Lee, E-mail: micngml@nus.edu.sg

    2009-11-06

    West Nile virus (WNV) capsid (C) protein has been shown to enter the nucleus of infected cells. However, the mechanism by which C protein enters the nucleus is unknown. In this study, we have unveiled for the first time that nuclear transport of WNV and Dengue virus C protein is mediated by their direct association with importin-{alpha}. This interplay is mediated by the consensus sequences of bipartite nuclear localization signal located between amino acid residues 85-101 together with amino acid residues 42 and 43 of C protein. Elucidation of biological significance of importin-{alpha}/C protein interaction demonstrated that the binding efficiencymore » of this association influenced the nuclear entry of C protein and virus production. Collectively, this study illustrated the molecular mechanism by which the C protein of arthropod-borne flavivirus enters the nucleus and showed the importance of importin-{alpha}/C protein interaction in the context of flavivirus life-cycle.« less

  12. Structure of the immature HIV-1 capsid in intact virus particles at 8.8 Å resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schur, Florian K. M.; Hagen, Wim J. H.; Rumlová, Michaela; Ruml, Tomáš; Müller, Barbara; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Briggs, John A. G.

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) assembly proceeds in two stages. First, the 55 kilodalton viral Gag polyprotein assembles into a hexameric protein lattice at the plasma membrane of the infected cell, inducing budding and release of an immature particle. Second, Gag is cleaved by the viral protease, leading to internal rearrangement of the virus into the mature, infectious form. Immature and mature HIV-1 particles are heterogeneous in size and morphology, preventing high-resolution analysis of their protein arrangement in situ by conventional structural biology methods. Here we apply cryo-electron tomography and sub-tomogram averaging methods to resolve the structure of the capsid lattice within intact immature HIV-1 particles at subnanometre resolution, allowing unambiguous positioning of all α-helices. The resulting model reveals tertiary and quaternary structural interactions that mediate HIV-1 assembly. Strikingly, these interactions differ from those predicted by the current model based on in vitro-assembled arrays of Gag-derived proteins from Mason-Pfizer monkey virus. To validate this difference, we solve the structure of the capsid lattice within intact immature Mason-Pfizer monkey virus particles. Comparison with the immature HIV-1 structure reveals that retroviral capsid proteins, while having conserved tertiary structures, adopt different quaternary arrangements during virus assembly. The approach demonstrated here should be applicable to determine structures of other proteins at subnanometre resolution within heterogeneous environments.

  13. Selective autophagy limits cauliflower mosaic virus infection by NBR1-mediated targeting of viral capsid protein and particles

    PubMed Central

    Hafrén, Anders; Macia, Jean-Luc; Love, Andrew J.; Milner, Joel J.; Drucker, Martin; Hofius, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy plays a paramount role in mammalian antiviral immunity including direct targeting of viruses and their individual components, and many viruses have evolved measures to antagonize or even exploit autophagy mechanisms for the benefit of infection. In plants, however, the functions of autophagy in host immunity and viral pathogenesis are poorly understood. In this study, we have identified both anti- and proviral roles of autophagy in the compatible interaction of cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV), a double-stranded DNA pararetrovirus, with the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We show that the autophagy cargo receptor NEIGHBOR OF BRCA1 (NBR1) targets nonassembled and virus particle-forming capsid proteins to mediate their autophagy-dependent degradation, thereby restricting the establishment of CaMV infection. Intriguingly, the CaMV-induced virus factory inclusions seem to protect against autophagic destruction by sequestering capsid proteins and coordinating particle assembly and storage. In addition, we found that virus-triggered autophagy prevents extensive senescence and tissue death of infected plants in a largely NBR1-independent manner. This survival function significantly extends the timespan of virus production, thereby increasing the chances for virus particle acquisition by aphid vectors and CaMV transmission. Together, our results provide evidence for the integration of selective autophagy into plant immunity against viruses and reveal potential viral strategies to evade and adapt autophagic processes for successful pathogenesis. PMID:28223514

  14. Intrinsically-disordered N-termini in human parechovirus 1 capsid proteins bind encapsidated RNA.

    PubMed

    Shakeel, Shabih; Evans, James D; Hazelbaker, Mark; Kao, C Cheng; Vaughan, Robert C; Butcher, Sarah J

    2018-04-11

    Human parechoviruses (HPeV) are picornaviruses with a highly-ordered RNA genome contained within icosahedrally-symmetric capsids. Ordered RNA structures have recently been shown to interact with capsid proteins VP1 and VP3 and facilitate virus assembly in HPeV1. Using an assay that combines reversible cross-linking, RNA affinity purification and peptide mass fingerprinting (RCAP), we mapped the RNA-interacting regions of the capsid proteins from the whole HPeV1 virion in solution. The intrinsically-disordered N-termini of capsid proteins VP1 and VP3, and unexpectedly, VP0, were identified to interact with RNA. Comparing these results to those obtained using recombinantly-expressed VP0 and VP1 confirmed the virion binding regions, and revealed unique RNA binding regions in the isolated VP0 not previously observed in the crystal structure of HPeV1. We used RNA fluorescence anisotropy to confirm the RNA-binding competency of each of the capsid proteins' N-termini. These findings suggests that dynamic interactions between the viral RNA and the capsid proteins modulate virus assembly, and suggest a novel role for VP0.

  15. Enhanced sensitivity in detection of antiviral antibody responses using biotinylation of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) capsids.

    PubMed

    Kenney, Mary; Waters, Ryan A; Rieder, Elizabeth; Pega, Juan; Perez-Filguera, Mariano; Golde, William T

    2017-11-01

    Analysis of the immune response to infection of livestock by foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is most often reported as the serum antibody response to the virus. While measurement of neutralizing antibody has been sensitive and specific, measurements of the quality of the antibody response are less robust. Determining the immunoglobulin (Ig) isotype of the serum antibody response provides a deeper understanding of the biology of the response and more sensitive methods for these assays will facilitate analyses of B cell mediated immunity. We tested the hypothesis that using the virus as the molecular probe could be achieved by adding tags to the surface of the FMDV capsid, and that would enhance sensitivity in assays for anti-FMDV antibody responses. The use of a FLAG-tagged virus in these assays failed to yield improvement whereas chemically biotinylating the virus capsid resulted in significant enhancement of the signal. Here we describe methods using biotinylated virus for measuring anti-viral antibody in serum and antibody secreting cells (ASCs) in blood that are sensitive and specific. Finally, we describe using the biotinylated virus in flow cytometry where such assays should greatly enhance the analysis of anti-virus antibody producing B cells, allowing the investigator to focus on only the FMDV specific B cells when analyzing the development of the B cell response to either infection or vaccination. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Hepatitis E virus capsid protein assembles in 4M urea in the presence of salts.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunyan; Pan, Huirong; Wei, Minxi; Zhang, Xiao; Wang, Nan; Gu, Ying; Du, Hailian; Zhang, Jun; Li, Shaowei; Xia, Ningshao

    2013-03-01

    The hepatitis E virus (HEV) capsid protein has been demonstrated to be able to assemble into particles in vitro. However, this process and the mechanism of protein-protein interactions during particle assembly remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the assembly mechanism of HEV structural protein subunits, the capsid protein p239 (aa368-606), using analytical ultracentrifugation. It was the first to observe that the p239 can form particles in 4M urea as a result of supplementation with salt, including ammonium sulfate [(NH₄)₂SO₄], sodium sulfate (Na₂SO₄), sodium chloride (NaCl), and ammonium chloride (NH₄Cl). Interestingly, it is the ionic strength that determines the efficiency of promoting particle assembly. The assembly rate was affected by temperature and salt concentration. When (NH₄)₂SO₄ was used, assembling intermediates of p239 with sedimentation coefficient values of approximately 5 S, which were mostly dodecamers, were identified for the first time. A highly conserved 28-aa region (aa368-395) of p239 was found to be critical for particle assembly, and the hydrophobic residues Leu³⁷², Leu³⁷⁵, and Leu³⁹⁵ of p239 was found to be critical for particle assembly, which was revealed by site-directed mutagenesis. This study provides new insights into the assembly mechanism of native HEV, and contributes a valuable basis for further investigations of protein assembly by hydrophobic interactions under denaturing conditions. Copyright © 2012 The Protein Society.

  17. Characterization of Three Novel Linear Neutralizing B-Cell Epitopes in the Capsid Protein of Swine Hepatitis E Virus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yiyang; Liu, Baoyuan; Sun, Yani; Li, Huixia; Du, Taofeng; Nan, Yuchen; Hiscox, Julian A; Zhou, En-Min; Zhao, Qin

    2018-07-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) causes liver disease in humans and is thought to be a zoonotic infection, with domestic animals, including swine and rabbits, being a reservoir. One of the proteins encoded by the virus is the capsid protein. This is likely the major immune-dominant protein and a target for vaccination. Four monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), three novel, 1E4, 2C7, and 2G9, and one previously characterized, 1B5, were evaluated for binding to the capsid protein from genotype 4 swine HEV. The results indicated that 625 DFCP 628 , 458 PSRPF 462 , and 407 EPTV 410 peptides on the capsid protein comprised minimal amino acid sequence motifs recognized by 1E4, 2C7, and 2G9, respectively. The data suggested that 2C7 and 2G9 epitopes were partially exposed on the surface of the capsid protein. Truncated genotype 4 swine HEV capsid protein (sp239, amino acids 368 to 606) can exist in multimeric forms. Preincubation of swine HEV with 2C7, 2G9, or 1B5 before addition to HepG2 cells partially blocked sp239 cell binding and inhibited swine HEV infection. The study indicated that 2C7, 2G9, and 1B5 partially blocked swine HEV infection of rabbits better than 1E4 or normal mouse IgG. The cross-reactivity of antibodies suggested that capsid epitopes recognized by 2C7 and 2G9 are common to HEV strains infecting most host species. Collectively, MAbs 2C7, 2G9, and 1B5 were shown to recognize three novel linear neutralizing B-cell epitopes of genotype 4 HEV capsid protein. These results enhance understanding of HEV capsid protein structure to guide vaccine and antiviral design. IMPORTANCE Genotype 3 and 4 HEVs are zoonotic viruses. Here, genotype 4 HEV was studied due to its prevalence in human populations and pig herds in China. To improve HEV disease diagnosis and prevention, a better understanding of the antigenic structure and neutralizing epitopes of HEV capsid protein are needed. In this study, the locations of three novel linear B-cell recognition epitopes within genotype 4

  18. Coinfection with recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing poliovirus P1 and P3 proteins results in polyprotein processing and formation of empty capsid structures.

    PubMed

    Ansardi, D C; Porter, D C; Morrow, C D

    1991-04-01

    The assembly process of poliovirus occurs via an ordered proteolytic processing of the capsid precursor protein, P1, by the virus-encoded proteinase 3CD. To further delineate this process, we have isolated a recombinant vaccinia virus which expresses, upon infection, the poliovirus P1 capsid precursor polyprotein with an authentic carboxy terminus. Coinfection of HeLa cells with the P1-expressing vaccinia virus and with a second recombinant vaccinia virus which expresses the poliovirus proteinase 3CD resulted in the correct processing of P1 to yield the three individual capsid proteins VP0, VP3, and VP1. When extracts from coinfected cells were fractionated on sucrose density gradients, the VP0, VP3, and VP1 capsid proteins were immunoprecipitated with type 1 poliovirus antisera from fractions corresponding to a sedimentation consistent for poliovirus 75S procapsids. Examination of these fractions by electron microscopy revealed structures which lacked electron-dense cores and which corresponded in size and shape to those expected for poliovirus empty capsids. We conclude that the expression of the two poliovirus proteins P1 and 3CD in coinfected cells is sufficient for the correct processing of the capsid precursor to VP0, VP3, and VP1 as well as for the assembly of poliovirus empty capsid-like structures.

  19. Crystal Structure of the Human Astrovirus Capsid Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Toh, Yukimatsu; Harper, Justin; Dryden, Kelly A.

    Human astrovirus (HAstV) is a leading cause of viral diarrhea in infants and young children worldwide. HAstV is a nonenveloped virus with a T=3 capsid and a positive-sense RNA genome. The capsid protein (CP) of HAstV is synthesized as a 90-kDa precursor (VP90) that can be divided into three linear domains: a conserved N-terminal domain, a hypervariable domain, and an acidic C-terminal domain. Maturation of HAstV requires proteolytic processing of the astrovirus CP both inside and outside the host cell, resulting in the removal of the C-terminal domain and the breakdown of the rest of the CP into three predominantmore » protein species with molecular masses of ~34, 27/29, and 25/26 kDa, respectively. We have now solved the crystal structure of VP90 71–415(amino acids [aa] 71 to 415 of VP90) of human astrovirus serotype 8 at a 2.15-Å resolution. VP90 71–415encompasses the conserved N-terminal domain of VP90 but lacks the hypervariable domain, which forms the capsid surface spikes. The structure of VP90 71–415is comprised of two domains: an S domain, which adopts the typical jelly-roll β-barrel fold, and a P1 domain, which forms a squashed β-barrel consisting of six antiparallel β-strands similar to what was observed in the hepatitis E virus (HEV) capsid structure. Fitting of the VP90 71–415structure into the cryo-electron microscopy (EM) maps of HAstV produced an atomic model for a continuous, T=3 icosahedral capsid shell. Our pseudoatomic model of the human HAstV capsid shell provides valuable insights into intermolecular interactions required for capsid assembly and trypsin-mediated proteolytic maturation needed for virus infectivity. Such information has potential applications in the development of a virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine as well as small-molecule drugs targeting astrovirus assembly/maturation. IMPORTANCEHuman astrovirus (HAstV) is a leading cause of viral diarrhea in infants and young children worldwide. As a nonenveloped virus, HAst

  20. Molecular Dynamics Simulations to Determine the Structure and Dynamics of Hepatitis B Virus Capsid Bound to a Novel Anti-viral Drug.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Go; Sato, Shunsuke; Iwadate, Mitsuo; Umeyama, Hideaki; Hayakawa, Michiyo; Murakami, Yoshiki; Yoneda, Shigetaka

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) chronically infects millions of people worldwide and is a major cause of serious liver diseases, including liver cirrhosis and liver cancer. In our previous study, in silico screening was used to isolate new anti-viral compounds predicted to bind to the HBV capsid. Four of the isolated compounds have been reported to suppress the cellular multiplication of HBV experimentally. In the present study, molecular dynamics simulations of the HBV capsid were performed under rotational symmetry boundary conditions, to clarify how the structure and dynamics of the capsid are affected at the atomic level by the binding of one of the isolated compounds, C13. Two simulations of the free HBV capsid, two further simulations of the capsid-C13 complex, and one simulation of the capsid-AT-130 complex were performed. For statistical confidence, each set of simulations was repeated by five times, changing the simulation conditions. C13 continued to bind at the predicted binding site during the simulations, supporting the hypothesis that C13 is a capsid-binding compound. The structure and dynamics of the HBV capsid were greatly influenced by the binding and release of C13, and these effects were essentially identical to those seen for AT-130, indicating that C13 likely inhibits the function of the HBV capsid.

  1. Structural determination of importin alpha in complex with beak and feather disease virus capsid nuclear localization signal

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, Edward I.; EH Graham Centre for Agricultural Innovation; Dombrovski, Andrew K.

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Circovirus capsid proteins contain large nuclear localization signals (NLS). •A method of nuclear import has not been elucidated. •Beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) capsid NLS was crystallized with importin α. •The structure showed BFDV NLS binding to the major site of importin α. •Result shows implications for mechanism of nuclear transport for all circoviruses. -- Abstract: Circoviruses represent a rapidly increasing genus of viruses that infect a variety of vertebrates. Replication requires shuttling viral molecules into the host cell nucleus, a process facilitated by capsid-associated protein (Cap). Whilst a nuclear localization signal (NLS) has been shown to mediatemore » nuclear translocation, the mode of nuclear transport remains to be elucidated. To better understand this process, beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) Cap NLS was crystallized with nuclear import receptor importin-α (Impα). Diffraction yielded structural data to 2.9 Å resolution, and the binding site on both Impα and BFDV Cap NLS were well resolved. The binding mechanism for the major site is likely conserved across circoviruses as supported by the similarity of NLSs in circovirus Caps. This finding illuminates a crucial step for infection of host cells by this viral family, and provides a platform for rational drug design against the binding interface.« less

  2. Tomato is a highly effective vehicle for expression and oral immunization with Norwalk virus capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiuren; Buehner, Norene A; Hutson, Anne M; Estes, Mary K; Mason, Hugh S

    2006-07-01

    Norwalk virus (NV) is an important agent of epidemic gastroenteritis, and an oral subunit vaccine shows potential for protection. Recombinant Norwalk virus (rNV) capsid protein expressed in plants assembles virus-like particles (VLPs) that are orally immunogenic in mice and humans. In this article we examine rNV expression in tomato and potato using a plant-optimized gene, and test the immunogenicity of dried tomato fruit and potato tuber fed to mice. The synthetic gene increased rNV expression fourfold in tomato and potato plants, which assembled VLP. Four doses of 0.4 g freeze-dried tomato fruit containing 64 microg rNV (40 microg VLPs) induced NV-specific serum IgG and mucosal IgA in > or = 80% of mice, while doses of 0.8 g elicited systemic and mucosal antibody responses in all mice. Feedings of 1 g freeze-dried potato tuber containing 120 microg rNV (90 microg VLPs) were required to produce 100% responsiveness. Oxidation of phenolic compounds upon rehydration of dried tuber caused significant VLP instability, thus decreasing immunogenicity. Air-dried tomato fruit stimulated stronger immune responses than freeze-dried fruit of the same mass, perhaps by limiting the destruction of plant cell matrix and membrane systems that occurs with freeze-drying. Thus, rNV in dried transgenic tomato fruit was a more potent immunogen than that in dried potato tubers, based on the total VLPs ingested. These findings support the use of stabilized, dried tomato fruit for oral delivery of subunit vaccines.

  3. Hepatitis A Virus Capsid Protein VP1 Has a Heterogeneous C Terminus

    PubMed Central

    Graff, Judith; Richards, Oliver C.; Swiderek, Kristine M.; Davis, Michael T.; Rusnak, Felicia; Harmon, Shirley A.; Jia, Xi-Yu; Summers, Donald F.; Ehrenfeld, Ellie

    1999-01-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) encodes a single polyprotein which is posttranslationally processed into the functional structural and nonstructural proteins. Only one protease, viral protease 3C, has been implicated in the nine protein scissions. Processing of the capsid protein precursor region generates a unique intermediate, PX (VP1-2A), which accumulates in infected cells and is assumed to serve as precursor to VP1 found in virions, although the details of this reaction have not been determined. Coexpression in transfected cells of a variety of P1 precursor proteins with viral protease 3C demonstrated efficient production of PX, as well as VP0 and VP3; however, no mature VP1 protein was detected. To identify the C-terminal amino acid residue of HAV VP1, we performed peptide sequence analysis by protease-catalyzed [18O]H2O incorporation followed by liquid chromatography ion-trap microspray tandem mass spectrometry of HAV VP1 isolated from purified virions. Two different cell culture-adapted isolates of HAV, strains HM175pE and HM175p35, were used for these analyses. VP1 preparations from both virus isolates contained heterogeneous C termini. The predominant C-terminal amino acid in both virus preparations was VP1-Ser274, which is located N terminal to a methionine residue in VP1-2A. In addition, the analysis of HM175pE recovered smaller amounts of amino acids VP1-Glu273 and VP1-Thr272. In the case of HM175p35, which contains valine at amino acid position VP1-273, VP1-Thr272 was found in addition to VP1-Ser274. The data suggest that HAV 3C is not the protease responsible for generation of the VP1 C terminus. We propose the involvement of host cell protease(s) in the production of HAV VP1. PMID:10364353

  4. Analysis of rubella virus capsid protein-mediated enhancement of replicon replication and mutant rescue.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Wen-Pin; Matthews, Jason D; Frey, Teryl K

    2006-04-01

    The rubella virus capsid protein (C) has been shown to complement a lethal deletion (termed deltaNotI) in P150 replicase protein. To investigate this phenomenon, we generated two lines of Vero cells that stably expressed either C (C-Vero cells) or C lacking the eight N-terminal residues (Cdelta8-Vero cells), a construct previously shown to be unable to complement DeltaNotI. In C-Vero cells but not Vero or Cdelta8-Vero cells, replication of a wild-type (wt) replicon expressing the green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene (RUBrep/GFP) was enhanced, and replication of a replicon with deltaNotI (RUBrep/GFP-deltaNotI) was rescued. Surprisingly, replicons with deleterious mutations in the 5' and 3' cis-acting elements were also rescued in C-Vero cells. Interestingly, the Cdelta8 construct localized to the nucleus while the C construct localized in the cytoplasm, explaining the lack of enhancement and rescue in Cdelta8-Vero cells since rubella virus replication occurs in the cytoplasm. Enhancement and rescue in C-Vero cells were at a basic step in the replication cycle, resulting in a substantial increase in the accumulation of replicon-specific RNAs. There was no difference in translation of the nonstructural proteins in C-Vero and Vero cells transfected with the wt and mutant replicons, demonstrating that enhancement and rescue were not due to an increase in the efficiency of translation of the transfected replicon transcripts. In replicon-transfected C-Vero cells, C and the P150 replicase protein associated by coimmunoprecipitation, suggesting that C might play a role in RNA replication, which could explain the enhancement and rescue phenomena. A unifying model that accounts for enhancement of wt replicon replication and rescue of diverse mutations by the rubella virus C protein is proposed.

  5. L2, the minor capsid protein of papillomavirus

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Joshua W.; Roden, Richard B.S., E-mail: roden@jhmi.edu; Department of Oncology, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21287

    2013-10-15

    The capsid protein L2 plays major roles in both papillomavirus assembly and the infectious process. While L1 forms the majority of the capsid and can self-assemble into empty virus-like particles (VLPs), L2 is a minor capsid component and lacks the capacity to form VLPs. However, L2 co-assembles with L1 into VLPs, enhancing their assembly. L2 also facilitates encapsidation of the ∼8 kbp circular and nucleosome-bound viral genome during assembly of the non-enveloped T=7d virions in the nucleus of terminally differentiated epithelial cells, although, like L1, L2 is not detectably expressed in infected basal cells. With respect to infection, L2 ismore » not required for particles to bind to and enter cells. However L2 must be cleaved by furin for endosome escape. L2 then travels with the viral genome to the nucleus, wherein it accumulates at ND-10 domains. Here, we provide an overview of the biology of L2. - Highlights: • L2 is the minor antigen of the non-enveloped T=7d icosahedral Papillomavirus capsid. • L2 is a nuclear protein that can traffic to ND-10 and facilitate genome encapsidation. • L2 is critical for infection and must be cleaved by furin. • L2 is a broadly protective vaccine antigen recognized by neutralizing antibodies.« less

  6. Understanding dengue virus capsid protein disordered N-Terminus and pep14-23-based inhibition.

    PubMed

    Faustino, André F; Guerra, Gabriela M; Huber, Roland G; Hollmann, Axel; Domingues, Marco M; Barbosa, Glauce M; Enguita, Francisco J; Bond, Peter J; Castanho, Miguel A R B; Da Poian, Andrea T; Almeida, Fabio C L; Santos, Nuno C; Martins, Ivo C

    2015-02-20

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection affects millions of people and is becoming a major global disease for which there is no specific available treatment. pep14-23 is a recently designed peptide, based on a conserved segment of DENV capsid (C) protein. It inhibits the interaction of DENV C with host intracellular lipid droplets (LDs), which is crucial for viral replication. Combining bioinformatics and biophysics, here, we analyzed pep14-23 structure and ability to bind different phospholipids, relating that information with the full-length DENV C. We show that pep14-23 acquires α-helical conformation upon binding to negatively charged phospholipid membranes, displaying an asymmetric charge distribution structural arrangement. Structure prediction for the N-terminal segment reveals four viable homodimer orientations that alternatively shield or expose the DENV C hydrophobic pocket. Taken together, these findings suggest a new biological role for the disordered N-terminal region, which may function as an autoinhibitory domain mediating DENV C interaction with its biological targets. The results fit with our current understanding of DENV C and pep14-23 structure and function, paving the way for similar approaches to understanding disordered proteins and improved peptidomimetics drug development strategies against DENV and similar Flavivirus infections.

  7. Bioprocessing of plant-derived virus-like particles of Norwalk virus capsid protein under current Good Manufacture Practice regulations

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Huafang; Chen, Qiang

    2012-01-01

    Despite the success in expressing a variety of subunit vaccine proteins in plants and the recent stride in improving vaccine accumulation levels by transient expression systems, there is still no plant-derived vaccine that has been licensed for human use. The lack of commercial success of plant-made vaccines lies in several technical and regulatory barriers that remain to be overcome. These challenges include the lack of scalable downstream processing procedures, the uncertainty of regulatory compliance of production processes, and the lack of demonstration of plant-derived products that meet the required standards of regulatory agencies in identity, purity, potency and safety. In this study, we addressed these remaining challenges and successfully demonstrate the ability of using plants to produce a pharmaceutical grade Norwalk virus (NV) vaccine under current Good Manufacture Practice (cGMP) guidelines at multiple gram scales. Our results demonstrate that an efficient and scalable extraction and purification scheme can established for processing virus-like particles (VLP) of NV capsid protein (NVCP). We successfully operated the upstream and downstream NVCP production processes under cGMP regulations. Furthermore, plant-derived NVCP VLP demonstrates the identity, purity, potency and safety that meet the preset release specifications. This material is being tested in a Phase I human clinical trial. This research provides the first report of producing a plant-derived vaccine at scale under cGMP regulations in an academic setting and an important step for plant-produced vaccines to become a commercial reality. PMID:22134876

  8. Adeno-associated Virus (AAV) Assembly-Activating Protein Is Not an Essential Requirement for Capsid Assembly of AAV Serotypes 4, 5, and 11.

    PubMed

    Earley, Lauriel F; Powers, John M; Adachi, Kei; Baumgart, Joshua T; Meyer, Nancy L; Xie, Qing; Chapman, Michael S; Nakai, Hiroyuki

    2017-02-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have made great progress in their use for gene therapy; however, fundamental aspects of AAV's capsid assembly remain poorly characterized. In this regard, the discovery of assembly-activating protein (AAP) sheds new light on this crucial part of AAV biology and vector production. Previous studies have shown that AAP is essential for assembly; however, how its mechanistic roles in assembly might differ among AAV serotypes remains uncharacterized. Here, we show that biological properties of AAPs and capsid assembly processes are surprisingly distinct among AAV serotypes 1 to 12. In the study, we investigated subcellular localizations and assembly-promoting functions of AAP1 to -12 (i.e., AAPs derived from AAV1 to -12, respectively) and examined the AAP dependence of capsid assembly processes of these 12 serotypes using combinatorial approaches that involved immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy, barcode-Seq (i. e., a high-throughput quantitative method using DNA barcodes and a next-generation sequencing technology), and quantitative dot blot assays. This study revealed that AAP1 to -12 are all localized in the nucleus with serotype-specific differential patterns of nucleolar association; AAPs and assembled capsids do not necessarily colocalize; AAPs are promiscuous in promoting capsid assembly of other serotypes, with the exception of AAP4, -5, -11, and -12; assembled AAV5, -8, and -9 capsids are excluded from the nucleolus, in contrast to the nucleolar enrichment of assembled AAV2 capsids; and, surprisingly, AAV4, -5, and -11 capsids are not dependent on AAP for assembly. These observations highlight the serotype-dependent heterogeneity of the capsid assembly process and challenge current notions about the role of AAP and the nucleolus in capsid assembly. Assembly-activating protein (AAP) is a recently discovered adeno-associated virus (AAV) protein that promotes capsid assembly and provides new opportunities

  9. Strategies to optimize capsid protein expression and single-stranded DNA formation of adeno-associated virus in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Galli, A; Della Latta, V; Bologna, C; Pucciarelli, D; Cipriani, F; Backovic, A; Cervelli, T

    2017-08-01

    Adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV) is a nonpathogenic parvovirus that is a promising tool for gene therapy. We aimed to construct plasmids for optimal expression and assembly of capsid proteins and evaluate adenovirus (Ad) protein effect on AAV single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast expression plasmids have been developed in which the transcription of AAV capsid proteins (VP1,2,3) is driven by the constitutive ADH1 promoter or galactose-inducible promoters. Optimal VP1,2,3 expression was obtained from GAL1/10 bidirectional promoter. Moreover, we demonstrated that AAP is expressed in yeast and virus-like particles (VLPs) assembled inside the cell. Finally, the expression of two Ad proteins, E4orf6 and E1b55k, had no effect on AAV ssDNA formation. This study confirms that yeast is able to form AAV VLPs; however, capsid assembly and ssDNA formation are less efficient in yeast than in human cells. Moreover, the expression of Ad proteins did not affect AAV ssDNA formation. New manufacturing strategies for AAV-based gene therapy vectors (rAAV) are needed to reduce costs and time of production. Our study explores the feasibility of yeast as alternative system for rAAV production. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  10. Maturation of the Hepatitis A Virus Capsid Protein VP1 Is Not Dependent on Processing by the 3Cpro Proteinase

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Annette; Bénichou, Danièle; Chao, Shih-Fong; Cohen, Lisette M.; Lemon, Stanley M.

    1999-01-01

    Most details of the processing of the hepatitis A virus (HAV) polyprotein are known. Unique among members of the family Picornaviridae, the primary cleavage of the HAV polyprotein is mediated by 3Cpro, the only proteinase known to be encoded by the virus, at the 2A/2B junction. All other cleavages of the polyprotein have been considered to be due to 3Cpro, although the precise location and mechanism responsible for the VP1/2A cleavage have been controversial. Here we present data that argue strongly against the involvement of the HAV 3Cpro proteinase in the maturation of VP1 from its VP1-2A precursor. Using a heterologous expression system based on recombinant vaccinia viruses directing the expression of full-length or truncated capsid protein precursors, we show that the C terminus of the mature VP1 capsid protein is located near residue 764 of the polyprotein. However, a proteolytically active HAV 3Cpro that was capable of directing both VP0/VP3 and VP3/VP1 cleavages in vaccinia virus-infected cells failed to process the VP1-2A precursor. Using site-directed mutagenesis of an infectious molecular clone of HAV, we modified potential VP1/2A cleavage sites that fit known 3Cpro recognition criteria and found that a substitution that ablates the presumed 3Cpro dipeptide recognition sequence at Glu764-Ser765 abolished neither infectivity nor normal VP1 maturation. Altered electrophoretic mobility of VP1 from a viable mutant virus with an Arg764 substitution indicated that this residue is present in VP1 and that the VP1/2A cleavage occurs downstream of this residue. These data indicate that maturation of the HAV VP1 capsid protein is not dependent on 3Cpro processing and may thus be uniquely dependent on a cellular proteinase. PMID:10400711

  11. Relevance of Assembly-Activating Protein for Adeno-associated Virus Vector Production and Capsid Protein Stability in Mammalian and Insect Cells

    PubMed Central

    Grosse, Stefanie; Penaud-Budloo, Magalie; Herrmann, Anne-Kathrin; Börner, Kathleen; Fakhiri, Julia; Laketa, Vibor; Krämer, Chiara; Wiedtke, Ellen; Gunkel, Manuel; Ménard, Lucie; Ayuso, Eduard

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The discovery that adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) encodes an eighth protein, called assembly-activating protein (AAP), transformed our understanding of wild-type AAV biology. Concurrently, it raised questions about the role of AAP during production of recombinant vectors based on natural or molecularly engineered AAV capsids. Here, we show that AAP is indeed essential for generation of functional recombinant AAV2 vectors in both mammalian and insect cell-based vector production systems. Surprisingly, we observed that AAV2 capsid proteins VP1 to -3 are unstable in the absence of AAP2, likely due to rapid proteasomal degradation. Inhibition of the proteasome led to an increase of intracellular VP1 to -3 but neither triggered assembly of functional capsids nor promoted nuclear localization of the capsid proteins. Together, this underscores the crucial and unique role of AAP in the AAV life cycle, where it rapidly chaperones capsid assembly, thus preventing degradation of free capsid proteins. An expanded analysis comprising nine alternative AAV serotypes (1, 3 to 9, and rh10) showed that vector production always depends on the presence of AAP, with the exceptions of AAV4 and AAV5, which exhibited AAP-independent, albeit low-level, particle assembly. Interestingly, AAPs from all 10 serotypes could cross-complement AAP-depleted helper plasmids during vector production, despite there being distinct intracellular AAP localization patterns. These were most pronounced for AAP4 and AAP5, congruent with their inability to rescue an AAV2/AAP2 knockout. We conclude that AAP is key for assembly of genuine capsids from at least 10 different AAV serotypes, which has implications for vectors derived from wild-type or synthetic AAV capsids. IMPORTANCE Assembly of adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) is regulated by the assembly-activating protein (AAP), whose open reading frame overlaps with that of the viral capsid proteins. As the majority of evidence was obtained using virus

  12. Localization of herpes simplex virus type 1 UL37 in the Golgi complex requires UL36 but not capsid structures.

    PubMed

    Desai, Prashant; Sexton, Gerry L; Huang, Eugene; Person, Stanley

    2008-11-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) UL37 gene encodes a 120-kDa polypeptide which resides in the tegument structure of the virion and is important for morphogenesis. The goal of this study was to use green fluorescent protein (GFP) to follow the fate of UL37 within cells during the normal course of virus replication. GFP was inserted in frame at the C terminus of UL37 to generate a fluorescent-protein-tagged UL37 polypeptide. A virus designated K37eGFP, which replicated normally on Vero cells, was isolated and was shown to express the fusion polypeptide. When cells infected with this virus were examined by confocal microscopy, the fluorescence was observed to be predominantly cytoplasmic. As the infection progressed, fluorescence began to accumulate in a juxtanuclear structure. Mannosidase II and giantin were observed to colocalize with UL37eGFP at these structures, as judged by immunofluorescence assays. Therefore, UL37 traffics to the Golgi complex during infection. A VP26mRFP marker (red fluorescent protein fused to VP26) was recombined into K37eGFP, and when cells infected with this "dual-color" virus were examined, colocalization of the red (capsid) and green (UL37) fluorescence in the Golgi structure was observed. Null mutations in VP5 (DeltaVP5), which abolished capsid assembly, and in UL36 (Delta36) were recombined into the K37eGFP virus genome. In cells infected with K37eGFP/DeltaVP5, localization of UL37eGFP to the Golgi complex was similar to that for the parental virus (K37eGFP), indicating that trafficking of UL37eGFP to the Golgi complex did not require capsid structures. Confocal analysis of cells infected with K37eGFP/Delta36 showed that, in the absence of UL36, accumulation of UL37eGFP at the Golgi complex was not evident. This indicates an interaction between these two proteins that is important for localization of UL37 in the Golgi complex and thus possibly for cytoplasmic envelopment of the capsid. This is the first demonstration of a

  13. Dynamics and asymmetry in the dimer of the norovirus major capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Tubiana, Thibault; Boulard, Yves; Bressanelli, Stéphane

    2017-01-01

    Noroviruses are the major cause of non-bacterial acute gastroenteritis in humans and livestock worldwide, despite being physically among the simplest animal viruses. The icosahedral capsid encasing the norovirus RNA genome is made of 90 dimers of a single ca 60-kDa polypeptide chain, VP1, arranged with T = 3 icosahedral symmetry. Here we study the conformational dynamics of this main building block of the norovirus capsid. We use molecular modeling and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of the VP1 dimer for two genogroups with 50% sequence identity. We focus on the two points of flexibility in VP1 known from the crystal structure of the genogroup I (GI, human) capsid and from subsequent cryo-electron microscopy work on the GII capsid (also human). First, with a homology model of the GIII (bovine) VP1 dimer subjected to simulated annealing then classical molecular dynamics simulations, we show that the N-terminal arm conformation seen in the GI crystal structure is also favored in GIII VP1 but depends on the protonation state of critical residues. Second, simulations of the GI dimer show that the VP1 spike domain will not keep the position found in the GII electron microscopy work. Our main finding is a consistent propensity of the VP1 dimer to assume prominently asymmetric conformations. In order to probe this result, we obtain new SAXS data on GI VP1 dimers. These data are not interpretable as a population of symmetric dimers, but readily modeled by a highly asymmetric dimer. We go on to discuss possible implications of spontaneously asymmetric conformations in the successive steps of norovirus capsid assembly. Our work brings new lights on the surprising conformational range encoded in the norovirus major capsid protein.

  14. Synthesis and Evaluation of N-phenyl-3-sulfamoyl-benzamide Derivatives as Capsid Assembly Modulators inhibiting Hepatitis B Virus (HBV).

    PubMed

    Vandyck, Koen; Rombouts, Geert; Stoops, Bart; Tahri, Abdellah; Vos, Ann; Verschueren, Wim; Wu, Yiming; Yang, Jingmei; Hou, Fuliang; Huang, Bing; Vergauwen, Karen; Dehertogh, Pascale; Berke, Jan-Martin; Raboisson, Pierre Jean Marie Bernard

    2018-06-15

    Small molecule induced Hepatitis B virus (HBV) capsid assembly modulation is considered an attractive approach for new antiviral therapies against HBV. Here we describe efforts towards the discovery of a HBV capsid assembly modulator in a hit-to-lead optimization, resulting in JNJ-632, a tool compound used to further profile the mode of action. Administration of JNJ-632 (54) in HBV genotype D infected chimeric mice, resulted in a 2.77 log reduction of the HBV DNA viral load.

  15. Entrapment of viral capsids in nuclear PML cages is an intrinsic antiviral host defense against varicella-zoster virus.

    PubMed

    Reichelt, Mike; Wang, Li; Sommer, Marvin; Perrino, John; Nour, Adel M; Sen, Nandini; Baiker, Armin; Zerboni, Leigh; Arvin, Ann M

    2011-02-03

    The herpesviruses, like most other DNA viruses, replicate in the host cell nucleus. Subnuclear domains known as promyelocytic leukemia protein nuclear bodies (PML-NBs), or ND10 bodies, have been implicated in restricting early herpesviral gene expression. These viruses have evolved countermeasures to disperse PML-NBs, as shown in cells infected in vitro, but information about the fate of PML-NBs and their functions in herpesvirus infected cells in vivo is limited. Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is an alphaherpesvirus with tropism for skin, lymphocytes and sensory ganglia, where it establishes latency. Here, we identify large PML-NBs that sequester newly assembled nucleocapsids (NC) in neurons and satellite cells of human dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and skin cells infected with VZV in vivo. Quantitative immuno-electron microscopy revealed that these distinctive nuclear bodies consisted of PML fibers forming spherical cages that enclosed mature and immature VZV NCs. Of six PML isoforms, only PML IV promoted the sequestration of NCs. PML IV significantly inhibited viral infection and interacted with the ORF23 capsid surface protein, which was identified as a target for PML-mediated NC sequestration. The unique PML IV C-terminal domain was required for both capsid entrapment and antiviral activity. Similar large PML-NBs, termed clastosomes, sequester aberrant polyglutamine (polyQ) proteins, such as Huntingtin (Htt), in several neurodegenerative disorders. We found that PML IV cages co-sequester HttQ72 and ORF23 protein in VZV infected cells. Our data show that PML cages contribute to the intrinsic antiviral defense by sensing and entrapping VZV nucleocapsids, thereby preventing their nuclear egress and inhibiting formation of infectious virus particles. The efficient sequestration of virion capsids in PML cages appears to be the outcome of a basic cytoprotective function of this distinctive category of PML-NBs in sensing and safely containing nuclear aggregates of aberrant

  16. Flexible Connectors between Capsomer Subunits that Regulate Capsid Assembly.

    PubMed

    Hasek, Mary L; Maurer, Joshua B; Hendrix, Roger W; Duda, Robert L

    2017-08-04

    Viruses build icosahedral capsids of specific size and shape by regulating the spatial arrangement of the hexameric and pentameric protein capsomers in the growing shell during assembly. In the T=7 capsids of Escherichia coli bacteriophage HK97 and other phages, 60 capsomers are hexons, while the rest are pentons that are correctly positioned during assembly. Assembly of the HK97 capsid to the correct size and shape has been shown to depend on specific ionic contacts between capsomers. We now describe additional ionic interactions within capsomers that also regulate assembly. Each is between the long hairpin, the "E-loop," that extends from one subunit to the adjacent subunit within the same capsomer. Glutamate E153 on the E-loop and arginine R210 on the adjacent subunit's backbone alpha-helix form salt bridges in hexamers and pentamers. Mutations that disrupt these salt bridges were lethal for virus production, because the mutant proteins assembled into tubes or sheets instead of capsids. X-ray structures show that the E153-R210 links are flexible and maintained during maturation despite radical changes in capsomer shape. The E153-R210 links appear to form early in assembly to enable capsomers to make programmed changes in their shape during assembly. The links also prevent flattening of capsomers and premature maturation. Mutant phenotypes and modeling support an assembly model in which flexible E153-R210 links mediate capsomer shape changes that control where pentons are placed to create normal-sized capsids. The E-loop may be conserved in other systems in order to play similar roles in regulating assembly. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Recombinant human adenovirus-5 expressing capsid proteins of Indian vaccine strains of foot-and-mouth disease virus elicits effective antibody response in cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recombinant adenovirus-5 vectored foot-and-mouth disease constructs (Ad5- FMD) were made for three Indian vaccine virus serotypes O,A and Asia 1. Constructs co-expressing foot-and- mouth disease virus (FMDV) capsid and viral 3C protease sequences, were evaluated for their ability to induce a neutral...

  18. Continuum Theory of Retroviral Capsids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T. T.; Bruinsma, R. F.; Gelbart, W. M.

    2006-02-01

    We present a self-assembly phase diagram for the shape of retroviral capsids, based on continuum elasticity theory. The spontaneous curvature of the capsid proteins drives a weakly first-order transition from spherical to spherocylindrical shapes. The conical capsid shape which characterizes the HIV-1 retrovirus is never stable under unconstrained energy minimization. Only under conditions of fixed volume and/or fixed spanning length can the conical shape be a minimum energy structure. Our results indicate that, unlike the capsids of small viruses, retrovirus capsids are not uniquely determined by the molecular structure of the constituent proteins but depend in an essential way on physical constraints present during assembly.

  19. Structure-Based Mutagenesis of Sulfolobus Turreted Icosahedral Virus B204 Reveals Essential Residues in the Virion-Associated DNA-Packaging ATPase.

    PubMed

    Dellas, Nikki; Snyder, Jamie C; Dills, Michael; Nicolay, Sheena J; Kerchner, Keshia M; Brumfield, Susan K; Lawrence, C Martin; Young, Mark J

    2015-12-23

    Sulfolobus turreted icosahedral virus (STIV), an archaeal virus that infects the hyperthermoacidophile Sulfolobus solfataricus, is one of the most well-studied viruses of the domain Archaea. STIV shares structural, morphological, and sequence similarities with viruses from other domains of life, all of which are thought to belong to the same viral lineage. Several of these common features include a conserved coat protein fold, an internal lipid membrane, and a DNA-packaging ATPase. B204 is the ATPase encoded by STIV and is thought to drive packaging of viral DNA during the replication process. Here, we report the crystal structure of B204 along with the biochemical analysis of B204 mutants chosen based on structural information and sequence conservation patterns observed among members of the same viral lineage and the larger FtsK/HerA superfamily to which B204 belongs. Both in vitro ATPase activity assays and transfection assays with mutant forms of B204 confirmed the essentiality of conserved and nonconserved positions. We also have identified two distinct particle morphologies during an STIV infection that differ in the presence or absence of the B204 protein. The biochemical and structural data presented here are not only informative for the STIV replication process but also can be useful in deciphering DNA-packaging mechanisms for other viruses belonging to this lineage. STIV is a virus that infects a host from the domain Archaea that replicates in high-temperature, acidic environments. While STIV has many unique features, there exist several striking similarities between this virus and others that replicate in different environments and infect a broad range of hosts from Bacteria and Eukarya. Aside from structural features shared by viruses from this lineage, there exists a significant level of sequence similarity between the ATPase genes carried by these different viruses; this gene encodes an enzyme thought to provide energy that drives DNA packaging into

  20. The C Terminus of the Herpes Simplex Virus UL25 Protein Is Required for Release of Viral Genomes from Capsids Bound to Nuclear Pores

    PubMed Central

    Huffman, Jamie B.; Daniel, Gina R.; Falck-Pedersen, Erik; Huet, Alexis

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The herpes simplex virus (HSV) capsid is released into the cytoplasm after fusion of viral and host membranes, whereupon dynein-dependent trafficking along microtubules targets it to the nuclear envelope. Binding of the capsid to the nuclear pore complex (NPC) is mediated by the capsid protein pUL25 and the capsid-tethered tegument protein pUL36. Temperature-sensitive mutants in both pUL25 and pUL36 dock at the NPC but fail to release DNA. The uncoating reaction has been difficult to study due to the rapid release of the genome once the capsid interacts with the nuclear pore. In this study, we describe the isolation and characterization of a truncation mutant of pUL25. Live-cell imaging and immunofluorescence studies demonstrated that the mutant was not impaired in penetration of the host cell or in trafficking of the capsid to the nuclear membrane. However, expression of viral proteins was absent or significantly delayed in cells infected with the pUL25 mutant virus. Transmission electron microscopy revealed capsids accumulated at nuclear pores that retained the viral genome for at least 4 h postinfection. In addition, cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM) reconstructions of virion capsids did not detect any obvious differences in the location or structural organization for the pUL25 or pUL36 proteins on the pUL25 mutant capsids. Further, in contrast to wild-type virus, the antiviral response mediated by the viral DNA-sensing cyclic guanine adenine synthase (cGAS) was severely compromised for the pUL25 mutant. These results demonstrate that the pUL25 capsid protein has a critical role in releasing viral DNA from NPC-bound capsids. IMPORTANCE Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is the causative agent of several pathologies ranging in severity from the common cold sore to life-threatening encephalitic infection. Early steps in infection include release of the capsid into the cytoplasm, docking of the capsid at a nuclear pore, and release of the viral genome into the

  1. Expression of Norwalk virus capsid protein in transgenic tobacco and potato and its oral immunogenicity in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Mason, H S; Ball, J M; Shi, J J; Jiang, X; Estes, M K; Arntzen, C J

    1996-01-01

    Alternatives to cell culture systems for production of recombinant proteins could make very safe vaccines at a lower cost. We have used genetically engineered plants for expression of candidate vaccine antigens with the goal of using the edible plant organs for economical delivery of oral vaccines. Transgenic tobacco and potato plants were created that express the capsid protein of Norwalk virus, a calicivirus that causes epidemic acute gastroenteritis in humans. The capsid protein could be extracted from tobacco leaves in the form of 38-nm Norwalk virus-like particles. Recombinant Norwalk virus-like particle (rNV) was previously recovered when the same gene was expressed in recombinant baculovirus-infected insect cells. The capsid protein expressed in tobacco leaves and potato tubers cosedimented in sucrose gradients with insect cell-derived rNV and appeared identical to insect cell-derived rNV on immunoblots of SDS/polyacrylamide gels. The plant-expressed rNV was orally immunogenic in mice. Extracts of tobacco leaf expressing rNV were given to CD1 mice by gavage, and the treated mice developed both serum IgG and secretory IgA specific for rNV. Furthermore, when potato tubers expressing rNV were fed directly to mice, they developed serum IgG specific for rNV. These results indicate the potential usefulness of plants for production and delivery of edible vaccines. This is an appropriate technology for developing countries where vaccines are urgently needed. Images IMG Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8643575

  2. Processing of the VP1/2A junction is not necessary for production of foot-and-mouth disease virus empty capsids and infectious viruses: characterization of "self-tagged" particles.

    PubMed

    Gullberg, Maria; Polacek, Charlotta; Bøtner, Anette; Belsham, Graham J

    2013-11-01

    The foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) capsid protein precursor, P1-2A, is cleaved by 3C(pro) to generate VP0, VP3, VP1, and the peptide 2A. The capsid proteins self-assemble into empty capsid particles or viruses which do not contain 2A. In a cell culture-adapted strain of FMDV (O1 Manisa [Lindholm]), three different amino acid substitutions (E83K, S134C, and K210E) were identified within the VP1 region of the P1-2A precursor compared to the field strain (wild type [wt]). Expression of the O1 Manisa P1-2A (wt or with the S134C substitution in VP1) plus 3C(pro), using a transient expression system, resulted in efficient capsid protein production and self-assembly of empty capsid particles. Removal of the 2A peptide from the capsid protein precursor had no effect on capsid protein processing or particle assembly. However, modification of E83K alone abrogated particle assembly with no apparent effect on protein processing. Interestingly, the K210E substitution, close to the VP1/2A junction, completely blocked processing by 3C(pro) at this cleavage site, but efficient assembly of "self-tagged" empty capsid particles, containing the uncleaved VP1-2A, was observed. These self-tagged particles behaved like the unmodified empty capsids in antigen enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and integrin receptor binding assays. Furthermore, mutant viruses with uncleaved VP1-2A could be rescued in cells from full-length FMDV RNA transcripts encoding the K210E substitution in VP1. Thus, cleavage of the VP1/2A junction is not essential for virus viability. The production of such engineered self-tagged empty capsid particles may facilitate their purification for use as diagnostic reagents and vaccines.

  3. Vaccination of horses with a recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara virus (MVA) expressing African horse sickness (AHS) virus major capsid protein VP2 provides complete clinical protection against challenge.

    PubMed

    Alberca, Berta; Bachanek-Bankowska, Katarzyna; Cabana, Marta; Calvo-Pinilla, Eva; Viaplana, Elisenda; Frost, Lorraine; Gubbins, Simon; Urniza, Alicia; Mertens, Peter; Castillo-Olivares, Javier

    2014-06-17

    African horse sickness virus (AHSV) is an arthropod-borne pathogen that infects all species of equidae and causes high mortality in horses. Previously, a recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) virus expressing the protein VP2 of AHSV serotype 4 was shown to induce virus neutralising antibodies in horses and protected interferon alpha receptor gene knock-out mice (IFNAR -/-) against virulent AHSV challenge. This study builds on the previous work, examining the protective efficacy of MVA-VP2 vaccination in the natural host of AHSV infection. A study group of 4 horses was vaccinated twice with a recombinant MVA virus expressing the major capsid protein (VP2) of AHSV serotype 9. Vaccinated animals and a control group of unvaccinated horses were then challenged with a virulent strain of AHSV-9. The vaccinated animals were completely protected against clinical disease and also against viraemia as measured by standard end-point dilution assays. In contrast, all control horses presented viraemia after challenge and succumbed to the infection. These results demonstrate the potential of recombinant MVA viruses expressing the outer capsid VP2 of AHSV as a protective vaccine against AHSV infection in the field. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Biochemical and biophysical characterization of cell-free synthesized Rift Valley fever virus nucleoprotein capsids enables in vitro screening to identify novel antivirals.

    PubMed

    Broce, Sean; Hensley, Lisa; Sato, Tomoharu; Lehrer-Graiwer, Joshua; Essrich, Christian; Edwards, Katie J; Pajda, Jacqueline; Davis, Christopher J; Bhadresh, Rami; Hurt, Clarence R; Freeman, Beverly; Lingappa, Vishwanath R; Kelleher, Colm A; Karpuj, Marcela V

    2016-05-14

    Viral capsid assembly involves the oligomerization of the capsid nucleoprotein (NP), which is an essential step in viral replication and may represent a potential antiviral target. An in vitro transcription-translation reaction using a wheat germ (WG) extract in combination with a sandwich ELISA assay has recently been used to identify small molecules with antiviral activity against the rabies virus. Here, we examined the application of this system to viruses with capsids with a different structure, such as the Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), the etiological agent of a severe emerging infectious disease. The biochemical and immunological characterization of the in vitro-generated RVFV NP assembly products enabled the distinction between intermediately and highly ordered capsid structures. This distinction was used to establish a screening method for the identification of potential antiviral drugs for RVFV countermeasures. These results indicated that this unique analytical system, which combines nucleoprotein oligomerization with the specific immune recognition of a highly ordered capsid structure, can be extended to various viral families and used both to study the early stages of NP assembly and to assist in the identification of potential antiviral drugs in a cost-efficient manner. Reviewed by Jeffry Skolnick and Noah Isakov. For the full reviews please go to the Reviewers' comments section.

  5. In silico and ex vivo approaches indicate immune pressure on capsid and non-capsid regions of coxsackie B viruses in the human system.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Rhiannon; Knight, Robin; Dunga, Meenakshi; Peakman, Mark

    2018-01-01

    Coxsackie B Virus (CBV) infection has been linked to the aetiology of type 1 diabetes (T1D) and vaccination has been proposed as prophylaxis for disease prevention. Serum neutralising antibodies and the presence of viral protein and RNA in tissues have been common tools to examine this potential disease relationship, whilst the role of anti-CBV cytotoxic T cell responses and their targets have not been studied. To address this knowledge gap, we augmented conventional HLA-binding predictive algorithm-based epitope discovery by cross-referencing epitopes with sites of positive natural selection within the CBV3 viral genome, identified using mixed effects models of evolution. Eight epitopes for the common MHC class I allele HLA-A*0201 occur at sites that appear to be positively selected. Furthermore, such epitopes span the viral genome, indicating that effective anti-viral responses may not be restricted to the capsid region. To assess the spectrum of IFNy responses in non-diabetic subjects and recently diagnosed type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients, we stimulated PBMC ex vivo with pools of synthetic peptides based on component-restricted sequences identified in silico. We found responders were more likely to recognize multiple rather than a single CBV peptide pool, indicating that the natural course of infection results in multiple targets for effector memory responses, rather than immunodominant epitopes or viral components. The finding that anti-CBV CD8 T cell immunity is broadly targeted has implications for vaccination strategies and studies on the pathogenesis of CBV-linked diseases.

  6. The lectin from Musa paradisiaca binds with the capsid protein of tobacco mosaic virus and prevents viral infection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Yu; Li, Huan; Zhang, Wei

    2014-05-04

    It has been demonstrated that the lectin from Musa paradisiaca (BanLec-1) could inhibit the cellular entry of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In order to evaluate its effects on tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), the banlec-1 gene was cloned and transformed into Escherichia coli and tobacco, respectively. Recombinant BanLec-1 showed metal ions dependence, and higher thermal and pH stability. Overexpression of banlec-1 in tobacco resulted in decreased leaf size, and higher resistance to TMV infection, which includes reduced TMV cellular entry, more stable chlorophyll contents, and enhanced antioxidant enzymes. BanLec-1 was found to bind directly to the TMV capsid protein in vitro , and to inhibit TMV infection in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast to limited prevention in vivo , purified rBanLec-1 exhibited more significant effects on TMV infection in vitro . Taken together, our study indicated that BanLec-1 could prevent TMV infection in tobacco, probably through the interaction between BanLec-1 and TMV capsid protein.

  7. The lectin from Musa paradisiaca binds with the capsid protein of tobacco mosaic virus and prevents viral infection

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao-Yu; Li, Huan; Zhang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that the lectin from Musa paradisiaca (BanLec-1) could inhibit the cellular entry of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In order to evaluate its effects on tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), the banlec-1 gene was cloned and transformed into Escherichia coli and tobacco, respectively. Recombinant BanLec-1 showed metal ions dependence, and higher thermal and pH stability. Overexpression of banlec-1 in tobacco resulted in decreased leaf size, and higher resistance to TMV infection, which includes reduced TMV cellular entry, more stable chlorophyll contents, and enhanced antioxidant enzymes. BanLec-1 was found to bind directly to the TMV capsid protein in vitro, and to inhibit TMV infection in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast to limited prevention in vivo, purified rBanLec-1 exhibited more significant effects on TMV infection in vitro. Taken together, our study indicated that BanLec-1 could prevent TMV infection in tobacco, probably through the interaction between BanLec-1 and TMV capsid protein. PMID:26019527

  8. An isolate of Potato Virus X capsid protein from N. benthamiana: Insights from homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Esfandiari, Neda; Sefidbakht, Yahya

    2018-05-17

    Since Potato Virus X (PVX) is easily transmitted mechanically between their hosts, its control is difficult. We have previously reported new isolate of this virus (PVX-Iran, GenBank Accession number FJ461343). However, the molecular basis of resistance breaking activity and its relation to capsid protein structure are still not well-understood. SDS-PAGE, ELISA, Western blot and RT-PCR molecular examinations were performed on the inoculated plants Nicotiana benthamiana. The pathological symptoms were related to the PVX isolate. The capsid protein (CP) structure were modeled based on homology and subjected to three independent 80 ns molecular dynamics minimization (GROMACS, OPLS force field) in the SPC water box. The RMSD, RMSF, SASA, and electrostatic properties were retrieved from the trajectories. Flexibility and hydrophilic nature of the N-terminal residues (1-34) of solvated CP could be observed in conformational changes upon minimization. The obtained structure was then docked with NbPCIP1 using ClusPro 2.0. The strong binding affinity of these two proteins (≈-16.0 Kcal mol -1 ) represents the formation of inclusion body and hence appearance of the symptoms. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Structural transitions in Cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liepold, Lars O.; Revis, Jennifer; Allen, Mark; Oltrogge, Luke; Young, Mark; Douglas, Trevor

    2005-12-01

    Viral capsids act as molecular containers for the encapsulation of genomic nucleic acid. These protein cages can also be used as constrained reaction vessels for packaging and entrapment of synthetic cargos. The icosahedral Cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) is an excellent model for understanding the encapsulation and packaging of both genomic and synthetic materials. High-resolution structural information of the CCMV capsid has been invaluable for evaluating structure-function relationships in the assembled capsid but does not allow insight into the capsid dynamics. The dynamic nature of the CCMV capsid might play an important role in the biological function of the virus. The CCMV capsid undergoes a pH and metal ion dependent reversible structural transition where 60 separate pores in the capsid open or close, exposing the interior of the protein cage to the bulk medium. In addition, the highly basic N-terminal domain of the capsid, which is disordered in the crystal structure, plays a significant role in packaging the viral cargo. Interestingly, in limited proteolysis and mass spectrometry experiments the N-terminal domain is the first part of the subunit to be cleaved, confirming its dynamic nature. Based on our fundamental understanding of the capsid dynamics in CCMV, we have utilized these aspects to direct packaging of a range of synthetic materials including drugs and inorganic nanoparticles.

  10. Parvovirus B19 empty capsids as antigen carriers for presentation of antigenic determinants of dengue 2 virus.

    PubMed

    Amexis, Georgios; Young, Neal S

    2006-09-15

    For the production of dengue-vaccine candidates, empty capsids, or virus-like particles (VLPs), of parvovirus B19 that carry dengue 2-specific epitopes were employed as antigen carriers. Two epitopes (comprising amino acids 352-368 and 386-397) of domain BIII of the envelope glycoprotein were chosen to produce recombinant B19 VLPs for immunization of BALB/c mice. Serum samples from immunized mice revealed that recombinant B19 VLPs elicited strong humoral immune responses. In summary, this B19 VLP-vaccine platform produced high (> or =2.0 x 10(5)) anti-dengue 2 titers and robust (< or =1 120) 50%-plaque-reduction neutralization test (PRNT(50)) titers, which effectively neutralized live dengue 2 virus in PRNT(50) assays.

  11. Combined approaches to flexible fitting and assessment in virus capsids undergoing conformational change☆

    PubMed Central

    Pandurangan, Arun Prasad; Shakeel, Shabih; Butcher, Sarah Jane; Topf, Maya

    2014-01-01

    Fitting of atomic components into electron cryo-microscopy (cryoEM) density maps is routinely used to understand the structure and function of macromolecular machines. Many fitting methods have been developed, but a standard protocol for successful fitting and assessment of fitted models has yet to be agreed upon among the experts in the field. Here, we created and tested a protocol that highlights important issues related to homology modelling, density map segmentation, rigid and flexible fitting, as well as the assessment of fits. As part of it, we use two different flexible fitting methods (Flex-EM and iMODfit) and demonstrate how combining the analysis of multiple fits and model assessment could result in an improved model. The protocol is applied to the case of the mature and empty capsids of Coxsackievirus A7 (CAV7) by flexibly fitting homology models into the corresponding cryoEM density maps at 8.2 and 6.1 Å resolution. As a result, and due to the improved homology models (derived from recently solved crystal structures of a close homolog – EV71 capsid – in mature and empty forms), the final models present an improvement over previously published models. In close agreement with the capsid expansion observed in the EV71 structures, the new CAV7 models reveal that the expansion is accompanied by ∼5° counterclockwise rotation of the asymmetric unit, predominantly contributed by the capsid protein VP1. The protocol could be applied not only to viral capsids but also to many other complexes characterised by a combination of atomic structure modelling and cryoEM density fitting. PMID:24333899

  12. Analysis of SAT Type Foot-And-Mouth Disease Virus Capsid Proteins and the Identification of Putative Amino Acid Residues Affecting Virus Stability

    PubMed Central

    Maree, Francois F.; Blignaut, Belinda; de Beer, Tjaart A. P.; Rieder, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) initiates infection by adhering to integrin receptors on target cells, followed by cell entry and disassembly of the virion through acidification within endosomes. Mild heating of the virions also leads to irreversible dissociation into pentamers, a characteristic linked to reduced vaccine efficacy. In this study, the structural stability of intra- and inter-serotype chimeric SAT2 and SAT3 virus particles to various conditions including low pH, mild temperatures or high ionic strength, was compared. Our results demonstrated that while both the SAT2 and SAT3 infectious capsids displayed different sensitivities in a series of low pH buffers, their stability profiles were comparable at high temperatures or high ionic strength conditions. Recombinant vSAT2 and intra-serotype chimeric viruses were used to map the amino acid differences in the capsid proteins of viruses with disparate low pH stabilities. Four His residues at the inter-pentamer interface were identified that change protonation states at pH 6.0. Of these, the H145 of VP3 appears to be involved in interactions with A141 in VP3 and K63 in VP2, and may be involved in orientating H142 of VP3 for interaction at the inter-pentamer interfaces. PMID:23717387

  13. Yellow fever virus capsid protein is a potent suppressor of RNA silencing that binds double-stranded RNA.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Glady Hazitha; Wiley, Michael R; Badawi, Atif; Adelman, Zach N; Myles, Kevin M

    2016-11-29

    Mosquito-borne flaviviruses, including yellow fever virus (YFV), Zika virus (ZIKV), and West Nile virus (WNV), profoundly affect human health. The successful transmission of these viruses to a human host depends on the pathogen's ability to overcome a potentially sterilizing immune response in the vector mosquito. Similar to other invertebrate animals and plants, the mosquito's RNA silencing pathway comprises its primary antiviral defense. Although a diverse range of plant and insect viruses has been found to encode suppressors of RNA silencing, the mechanisms by which flaviviruses antagonize antiviral small RNA pathways in disease vectors are unknown. Here we describe a viral suppressor of RNA silencing (VSR) encoded by the prototype flavivirus, YFV. We show that the YFV capsid (YFC) protein inhibits RNA silencing in the mosquito Aedes aegypti by interfering with Dicer. This VSR activity appears to be broadly conserved in the C proteins of other medically important flaviviruses, including that of ZIKV. These results suggest that a molecular "arms race" between vector and pathogen underlies the continued existence of flaviviruses in nature.

  14. Biochemical Requirements of Virus Wrapping by the Endoplasmic Reticulum: Involvement of ATP and Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Store during Envelopment of African Swine Fever Virus

    PubMed Central

    Cobbold, Christian; Brookes, Sharon M.; Wileman, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    Enwrapment by membrane cisternae has emerged recently as a mechanism of envelopment for large enveloped DNA viruses, such as herpesviruses, poxviruses, and African swine fever (ASF) virus. For both ASF virus and the poxviruses, wrapping is a multistage process initiated by the recruitment of capsid proteins onto membrane cisternae of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or associated ER-Golgi intermediate membrane compartments. Capsid assembly induces progressive bending of membrane cisternae into the characteristic shape of viral particles, and envelopment provides virions with two membranes in one step. We have used biochemical assays for ASF virus capsid recruitment, assembly, and envelopment to define the cellular processes important for the enwrapment of viruses by membrane cisternae. Capsid assembly on the ER membrane, and envelopment by ER cisternae, were inhibited when cells were depleted of ATP or depleted of calcium by incubation with A23187 and EDTA or the ER calcium ATPase inhibitor, thapsigargin. Electron microscopy analysis showed that cells depleted of calcium were unable to assemble icosahedral particles. Instead, assembly sites contained crescent-shaped and bulbous structures and, in rare cases, empty closed five-sided particles. Interestingly, recruitment of the capsid protein from the cytosol onto the ER membrane did not require ATP or an intact ER calcium store. The results show that following recruitment of the virus capsid protein onto the ER membrane, subsequent stages of capsid assembly and enwrapment are dependent on ATP and are regulated by the calcium gradients present across the ER membrane cisternae. PMID:10666244

  15. Conserved Tryptophan Motifs in the Large Tegument Protein pUL36 Are Required for Efficient Secondary Envelopment of Herpes Simplex Virus Capsids

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Lyudmila; Buch, Anna; Döhner, Katinka; Pohlmann, Anja; Binz, Anne; Prank, Ute; Sandbaumhüter, Malte

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Herpes simplex virus (HSV) replicates in the skin and mucous membranes, and initiates lytic or latent infections in sensory neurons. Assembly of progeny virions depends on the essential large tegument protein pUL36 of 3,164 amino acid residues that links the capsids to the tegument proteins pUL37 and VP16. Of the 32 tryptophans of HSV-1-pUL36, the tryptophan-acidic motifs 1766WD1767 and 1862WE1863 are conserved in all HSV-1 and HSV-2 isolates. Here, we characterized the role of these motifs in the HSV life cycle since the rare tryptophans often have unique roles in protein function due to their large hydrophobic surface. The infectivity of the mutants HSV-1(17+)Lox-pUL36-WD/AA-WE/AA and HSV-1(17+)Lox-CheVP26-pUL36-WD/AA-WE/AA, in which the capsid has been tagged with the fluorescent protein Cherry, was significantly reduced. Quantitative electron microscopy shows that there were a larger number of cytosolic capsids and fewer enveloped virions compared to their respective parental strains, indicating a severe impairment in secondary capsid envelopment. The capsids of the mutant viruses accumulated in the perinuclear region around the microtubule-organizing center and were not dispersed to the cell periphery but still acquired the inner tegument proteins pUL36 and pUL37. Furthermore, cytoplasmic capsids colocalized with tegument protein VP16 and, to some extent, with tegument protein VP22 but not with the envelope glycoprotein gD. These results indicate that the unique conserved tryptophan-acidic motifs in the central region of pUL36 are required for efficient targeting of progeny capsids to the membranes of secondary capsid envelopment and for efficient virion assembly. IMPORTANCE Herpesvirus infections give rise to severe animal and human diseases, especially in young, immunocompromised, and elderly individuals. The structural hallmark of herpesvirus virions is the tegument, which contains evolutionarily conserved proteins that are essential for several

  16. Formation of RNA Granule-Derived Capsid Assembly Intermediates Appears To Be Conserved between Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 and the Nonprimate Lentivirus Feline Immunodeficiency Virus.

    PubMed

    Reed, Jonathan C; Westergreen, Nick; Barajas, Brook C; Ressler, Dylan T B; Phuong, Daryl J; Swain, John V; Lingappa, Vishwanath R; Lingappa, Jaisri R

    2018-05-01

    During immature capsid assembly in cells, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag co-opts a host RNA granule, forming a pathway of intracellular assembly intermediates containing host components, including two cellular facilitators of assembly, ABCE1 and DDX6. A similar assembly pathway has been observed for other primate lentiviruses. Here we asked whether feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a nonprimate lentivirus, also forms RNA granule-derived capsid assembly intermediates. First, we showed that the released FIV immature capsid and a large FIV Gag-containing intracellular complex are unstable during analysis, unlike for HIV-1. We identified harvest conditions, including in situ cross-linking, that overcame this problem, revealing a series of FIV Gag-containing complexes corresponding in size to HIV-1 assembly intermediates. Previously, we showed that assembly-defective HIV-1 Gag mutants are arrested at specific assembly intermediates; here we identified four assembly-defective FIV Gag mutants, including three not previously studied, and demonstrated that they appear to be arrested at the same intermediate as the cognate HIV-1 mutants. Further evidence that these FIV Gag-containing complexes correspond to assembly intermediates came from coimmunoprecipitations demonstrating that endogenous ABCE1 and the RNA granule protein DDX6 are associated with FIV Gag, as shown previously for HIV-1 Gag, but are not associated with a ribosomal protein, at steady state. Additionally, we showed that FIV Gag associates with another RNA granule protein, DCP2. Finally, we validated the FIV Gag-ABCE1 and FIV Gag-DCP2 interactions with proximity ligation assays demonstrating colocalization in situ Together, these data support a model in which primate and nonprimate lentiviruses form intracellular capsid assembly intermediates derived from nontranslating host RNA granules. IMPORTANCE Like HIV-1 Gag, FIV Gag assembles into immature capsids; however, it is not known whether

  17. Lag periods during the self-assembly of {Mo(72)Fe(30)} macroions: connection to the virus capsid formation process.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Li, Dong; Liu, Guang; Glover, Kerney Jebrell; Liu, Tianbo

    2009-10-28

    The kinetic properties of the self-assembly of hydrophilic Keplerate-type polyoxometalate (POM) {Mo(72)Fe(30)} macroanions into single-layer, vesicle-like blackberry structures in solutions were monitored by the static and dynamic laser light scattering techniques. In the presence of additional electrolytes, an obvious lag period at the initial stage of self-assembly was observed, followed by a fast increase of the scattered intensity. The whole kinetic curve is sigmoidal with a lag phase. A two-step nucleation-growth mechanism is proposed to explain this lag phase: the {Mo(72)Fe(30)} macroanions slowly associate into oligomers (mostly dimers), which are the thermodynamically unfavorable intermediates, at the initial stage; once the oligomers reach a critical concentration, the blackberry formation process is accelerated. Analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) was used to confirm the oligomeric state in {Mo(72)Fe(30)} solution during the lag period. The length of the lag period is dependent on temperature, ionic strength, and the valent states of the additional salts, as well as the solvent content. The kinetics (including the lag period) of the blackberry formation of the {Mo(72)Fe(30)} macroanions show similarities to the self-assembly of virus capsid proteins (which are also soluble macroions) into spherical capsid shells, suggesting possible connections between the self-assembly behaviors of inorganic species and biological macromolecules.

  18. Characterization of a protein kinase activity associated with purified capsids of the granulosis virus infecting Plodia interpunctella.

    PubMed

    Wilson, M E; Consigli, R A

    1985-06-01

    A cyclic-nucleotide independent protein kinase activity has been demonstrated in highly purified preparations of the granulosis virus infecting the Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella. A divalent cation was required for activity. Manganese was the preferred cation and a pH of 8.0 resulted in optimal incorporation of 32P radiolabel into acid-precipitable protein. Although both ATP and GTP could serve as phosphate donors, ATP was utilized more efficiently by the enzyme. The kinase activity was localized to purified capsids; and the basic, internal core protein, VP12, was found to be the predominant viral acceptor. Histones and protamine sulfate could also serve as acceptors for the capsid-associated kinase activity. Using acid hydrolysis and phosphoamino acid analysis of phosphorylated nucleocapsid protein and nuclear magnetic resonance of phosphorylated VP12, it was determined that the enzyme catalyzes the transfer of phosphate to both serine and arginine residues of acceptor proteins. We believe this kinase activity may play a significant role in the viral replication cycle.

  19. Structural studies of bean pod mottle virus, capsid, and RNA in crystal and solution states by laser Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tiansheng; Thomas, G.J. Jr.; Chen, Zhongguo

    Structures of protein and RNA components of bean pod mottle virus (BPMV) have been investigated by use of laser Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectra were collected from both aqueous solutions and single crystals of BPMV capsids (top component) and virions (middle and bottom components, which package, respectively, small and large RNA molecules). Analysis of the data permits the assignment of conformation-sensitive Raman bands to viral protein and RNA constituents and observation of structural similarities and differences between solution and crystalline states of BPMV components. The Raman results show that the protein subunits of the empty capsid contain between 45% and 55%more » {beta}-strand and {beta}-turn secondary structure, in agreement with the recently determined X-ray crystal structure, and that this total {beta}-strand content undergoes a small increase with packaging of RNA. A comparison of Raman spectra of crystal and solution states of the BPMV middle component reveals only minor structural differences between the two, and these are restricted almost exclusively to Raman bands of RNA in the region of assigned phosphodiester conformation markers. Although in both the crystal and solution only C3{prime} endo/anti nucleosides are detected, the crystal exhibits a weaker 813-cm{sup {minus}1} band and strong 870-cm{sup {minus}1} band, which suggests that {approximately}8% of the nucleotides have O-P-O torsions configured differently in the crystal from that in the solution.« less

  20. Targeted Modifications in Adeno-Associated Virus Serotype 8 Capsid Improves Its Hepatic Gene Transfer Efficiency In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Dwaipayan; Gadkari, Rupali A; Sudha, Govindarajan; Gabriel, Nishanth; Kumar, Yesupatham Sathish; Selot, Ruchita; Samuel, Rekha; Rajalingam, Sumathi; Ramya, V.; Nair, Sukesh C.; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; Srivastava, Alok

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors based on serotype 8 (AAV8) have shown significant promise for liver-directed gene therapy. However, to overcome the vector dose dependent immunotoxicity seen with AAV8 vectors, it is important to develop better AAV8 vectors that provide enhanced gene expression at significantly low vector doses. Since it is known that AAV vectors during intracellular trafficking are targeted for destruction in the cytoplasm by the host–cellular kinase/ubiquitination/proteasomal machinery, we modified specific serine/threonine kinase or ubiquitination targets on the AAV8 capsid to augment its transduction efficiency. Point mutations at specific serine (S)/threonine (T)/lysine (K) residues were introduced in the AAV8 capsid at the positions equivalent to that of the effective AAV2 mutants, generated successfully earlier. Extensive structure analysis was carried out subsequently to evaluate the structural equivalence between the two serotypes. scAAV8 vectors with the wild-type (WT) and each one of the S/T→Alanine (A) or K-Arginine (R) mutant capsids were evaluated for their liver transduction efficiency in C57BL/6 mice in vivo. Two of the AAV8-S→A mutants (S279A and S671A), and a K137R mutant vector, demonstrated significantly higher enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) transcript levels (∼9- to 46-fold) in the liver compared to animals that received WT-AAV8 vectors alone. The best performing AAV8 mutant (K137R) vector also had significantly reduced ubiquitination of the viral capsid, reduced activation of markers of innate immune response, and a concomitant two-fold reduction in the levels of neutralizing antibody formation in comparison to WT-AAV8 vectors. Vector biodistribution studies revealed that the K137R mutant had a significantly higher and preferential transduction of the liver (106 vs. 7.7 vector copies/mouse diploid genome) when compared to WT-AAV8 vectors. To further study the utility of the K137R-AAV8

  1. Application of the major capsid protein as a marker of the phylogenetic diversity of Emiliania huxleyi viruses.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Janet M; Fabre, Marie-Françoise; Gobena, Daniel; Wilson, William H; Wilhelm, Steven W

    2011-05-01

    Studies of the Phycodnaviridae have traditionally relied on the DNA polymerase (pol) gene as a biomarker. However, recent investigations have suggested that the major capsid protein (MCP) gene may be a reliable phylogenetic biomarker. We used MCP gene amplicons gathered across the North Atlantic to assess the diversity of Emiliania huxleyi-infecting Phycodnaviridae. Nucleotide sequences were examined across >6000 km of open ocean, with comparisons between concentrates of the virus-size fraction of seawater and of lysates generated by exposing host strains to these same virus concentrates. Analyses revealed that many sequences were only sampled once, while several were over-represented. Analyses also revealed nucleotide sequences distinct from previous coastal isolates. Examination of lysed cultures revealed a new richness in phylogeny, as MCP sequences previously unrepresented within the existing collection of E. huxleyi viruses (EhV) were associated with viruses lysing cultures. Sequences were compared with previously described EhV MCP sequences from the North Sea and a Norwegian Fjord, as well as from the Gulf of Maine. Principal component analysis indicates that location-specific distinctions exist despite the presence of sequences common across these environments. Overall, this investigation provides new sequence data and an assessment on the use of the MCP gene. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Phylogenetic analysis of members of the Phycodnaviridae virus family, using amplified fragments of the major capsid protein gene.

    PubMed

    Larsen, J B; Larsen, A; Bratbak, G; Sandaa, R-A

    2008-05-01

    Algal viruses are considered ecologically important by affecting host population dynamics and nutrient flow in aquatic food webs. Members of the family Phycodnaviridae are also interesting due to their extraordinary genome size. Few algal viruses in the Phycodnaviridae family have been sequenced, and those that have been have few genes in common and low gene homology. It has hence been difficult to design general PCR primers that allow further studies of their ecology and diversity. In this study, we screened the nine type I core genes of the nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses for sequences suitable for designing a general set of primers. Sequence comparison between members of the Phycodnaviridae family, including three partly sequenced viruses infecting the prymnesiophyte Pyramimonas orientalis and the haptophytes Phaeocystis pouchetii and Chrysochromulina ericina (Pyramimonas orientalis virus 01B [PoV-01B], Phaeocystis pouchetii virus 01 [PpV-01], and Chrysochromulina ericina virus 01B [CeV-01B], respectively), revealed eight conserved regions in the major capsid protein (MCP). Two of these regions also showed conservation at the nucleotide level, and this allowed us to design degenerate PCR primers. The primers produced 347- to 518-bp amplicons when applied to lysates from algal viruses kept in culture and from natural viral communities. The aim of this work was to use the MCP as a proxy to infer phylogenetic relationships and genetic diversity among members of the Phycodnaviridae family and to determine the occurrence and diversity of this gene in natural viral communities. The results support the current legitimate genera in the Phycodnaviridae based on alga host species. However, while placing the mimivirus in close proximity to the type species, PBCV-1, of Phycodnaviridae along with the three new viruses assigned to the family (PoV-01B, PpV-01, and CeV-01B), the results also indicate that the coccolithoviruses and phaeoviruses are more diverged from this

  3. Relevance of Assembly-Activating Protein for Adeno-associated Virus Vector Production and Capsid Protein Stability in Mammalian and Insect Cells.

    PubMed

    Grosse, Stefanie; Penaud-Budloo, Magalie; Herrmann, Anne-Kathrin; Börner, Kathleen; Fakhiri, Julia; Laketa, Vibor; Krämer, Chiara; Wiedtke, Ellen; Gunkel, Manuel; Ménard, Lucie; Ayuso, Eduard; Grimm, Dirk

    2017-10-15

    The discovery that adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) encodes an eighth protein, called assembly-activating protein (AAP), transformed our understanding of wild-type AAV biology. Concurrently, it raised questions about the role of AAP during production of recombinant vectors based on natural or molecularly engineered AAV capsids. Here, we show that AAP is indeed essential for generation of functional recombinant AAV2 vectors in both mammalian and insect cell-based vector production systems. Surprisingly, we observed that AAV2 capsid proteins VP1 to -3 are unstable in the absence of AAP2, likely due to rapid proteasomal degradation. Inhibition of the proteasome led to an increase of intracellular VP1 to -3 but neither triggered assembly of functional capsids nor promoted nuclear localization of the capsid proteins. Together, this underscores the crucial and unique role of AAP in the AAV life cycle, where it rapidly chaperones capsid assembly, thus preventing degradation of free capsid proteins. An expanded analysis comprising nine alternative AAV serotypes (1, 3 to 9, and rh10) showed that vector production always depends on the presence of AAP, with the exceptions of AAV4 and AAV5, which exhibited AAP-independent, albeit low-level, particle assembly. Interestingly, AAPs from all 10 serotypes could cross-complement AAP-depleted helper plasmids during vector production, despite there being distinct intracellular AAP localization patterns. These were most pronounced for AAP4 and AAP5, congruent with their inability to rescue an AAV2/AAP2 knockout. We conclude that AAP is key for assembly of genuine capsids from at least 10 different AAV serotypes, which has implications for vectors derived from wild-type or synthetic AAV capsids. IMPORTANCE Assembly of adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) is regulated by the assembly-activating protein (AAP), whose open reading frame overlaps with that of the viral capsid proteins. As the majority of evidence was obtained using virus

  4. Cyclophilin A Associates with Enterovirus-71 Virus Capsid and Plays an Essential Role in Viral Infection as an Uncoating Regulator

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jiaoyan; Yan, Wenzhong; Wang, Jinglan; Su, Dan; Ni, Cheng; Li, Jian; Rao, Zihe; Liu, Lei; Lou, Zhiyong

    2014-01-01

    Viruses utilize host factors for their efficient proliferation. By evaluating the inhibitory effects of compounds in our library, we identified inhibitors of cyclophilin A (CypA), a known immunosuppressor with peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase activity, can significantly attenuate EV71 proliferation. We demonstrated that CypA played an essential role in EV71 entry and that the RNA interference-mediated reduction of endogenous CypA expression led to decreased EV71 multiplication. We further revealed that CypA directly interacted with and modified the conformation of H-I loop of the VP1 protein in EV71 capsid, and thus regulated the uncoating process of EV71 entry step in a pH-dependent manner. Our results aid in the understanding of how host factors influence EV71 life cycle and provide new potential targets for developing antiviral agents against EV71 infection. PMID:25275585

  5. Smectic viral capsids and the aneurysm instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharmavaram, S.; Rudnick, J.; Lawrence, C. M.; Bruinsma, R. F.

    2018-05-01

    The capsids of certain Archaea-infecting viruses undergo large shape changes, while maintaining their integrity against rupture by osmotic pressure. We propose that these capsids are in a smectic liquid crystalline state, with the capsid proteins assembling along spirals. We show that smectic capsids are intrinsically stabilized against the formation of localized bulges with non-zero Gauss curvature while still allowing for large-scale cooperative shape transformation that involves global changes in the Gauss curvature.

  6. Polyvalent Display of Heme on Hepatitis B Virus Capsid Protein through Coordination to Hexahistidine Tags

    PubMed Central

    Prasuhn, Duane E.; Kuzelka, Jane; Strable, Erica; Udit, Andrew K.; Cho, So-Hye; Lander, Gabriel C.; Quispe, Joel D.; Diers, James R.; Bocian, David F.; Potter, Clint; Carragher, Bridget; Finn, M.G.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY The addition of a hexahistidine tag to the N terminus of the hepatitis B capsid protein gives rise to a self-assembled particle with 80 sites of high local density of histidine side chains. Iron protoporphyrin IX has been found to bind tightly at each of these sites, making a polyvalent system of well-defined spacing between metalloporphyrin complexes. The spectroscopic and redox properties of the resulting particle are consistent with the presence of 80 site-isolated bis(histidine)-bound heme centers, comprising a polyvalent b-type cytochrome mimic. PMID:18482703

  7. Lipids of Archaeal Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Roine, Elina; Bamford, Dennis H.

    2012-01-01

    Archaeal viruses represent one of the least known territory of the viral universe and even less is known about their lipids. Based on the current knowledge, however, it seems that, as in other viruses, archaeal viral lipids are mostly incorporated into membranes that reside either as outer envelopes or membranes inside an icosahedral capsid. Mechanisms for the membrane acquisition seem to be similar to those of viruses infecting other host organisms. There are indications that also some proteins of archaeal viruses are lipid modified. Further studies on the characterization of lipids in archaeal viruses as well as on their role in virion assembly and infectivity require not only highly purified viral material but also, for example, constant evaluation of the adaptability of emerging technologies for their analysis. Biological membranes contain proteins and membranes of archaeal viruses are not an exception. Archaeal viruses as relatively simple systems can be used as excellent tools for studying the lipid protein interactions in archaeal membranes. PMID:23049284

  8. Fragment-derived inhibitors of human N-myristoyltransferase block capsid assembly and replication of the common cold virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousnier, Aurélie; Bell, Andrew S.; Swieboda, Dawid P.; Morales-Sanfrutos, Julia; Pérez-Dorado, Inmaculada; Brannigan, James A.; Newman, Joseph; Ritzefeld, Markus; Hutton, Jennie A.; Guedán, Anabel; Asfor, Amin S.; Robinson, Sean W.; Hopkins-Navratilova, Iva; Wilkinson, Anthony J.; Johnston, Sebastian L.; Leatherbarrow, Robin J.; Tuthill, Tobias J.; Solari, Roberto; Tate, Edward W.

    2018-06-01

    Rhinoviruses (RVs) are the pathogens most often responsible for the common cold, and are a frequent cause of exacerbations in asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis. Here we report the discovery of IMP-1088, a picomolar dual inhibitor of the human N-myristoyltransferases NMT1 and NMT2, and use it to demonstrate that pharmacological inhibition of host-cell N-myristoylation rapidly and completely prevents rhinoviral replication without inducing cytotoxicity. The identification of cooperative binding between weak-binding fragments led to rapid inhibitor optimization through fragment reconstruction, structure-guided fragment linking and conformational control over linker geometry. We show that inhibition of the co-translational myristoylation of a specific virus-encoded protein (VP0) by IMP-1088 potently blocks a key step in viral capsid assembly, to deliver a low nanomolar antiviral activity against multiple RV strains, poliovirus and foot and-mouth disease virus, and protection of cells against virus-induced killing, highlighting the potential of host myristoylation as a drug target in picornaviral infections.

  9. Functional and Structural Characterization of Novel Type of Linker Connecting Capsid and Nucleocapsid Protein Domains in Murine Leukemia Virus.

    PubMed

    Doležal, Michal; Hadravová, Romana; Kožíšek, Milan; Bednárová, Lucie; Langerová, Hana; Ruml, Tomáš; Rumlová, Michaela

    2016-09-23

    The assembly of immature retroviral particles is initiated in the cytoplasm by the binding of the structural polyprotein precursor Gag with viral genomic RNA. The protein interactions necessary for assembly are mediated predominantly by the capsid (CA) and nucleocapsid (NC) domains, which have conserved structures. In contrast, the structural arrangement of the CA-NC connecting region differs between retroviral species. In HIV-1 and Rous sarcoma virus, this region forms a rod-like structure that separates the CA and NC domains, whereas in Mason-Pfizer monkey virus, this region is densely packed, thus holding the CA and NC domains in close proximity. Interestingly, the sequence connecting the CA and NC domains in gammaretroviruses, such as murine leukemia virus (MLV), is unique. The sequence is called a charged assembly helix (CAH) due to a high number of positively and negatively charged residues. Although both computational and deletion analyses suggested that the MLV CAH forms a helical conformation, no structural or biochemical data supporting this hypothesis have been published. Using an in vitro assembly assay, alanine scanning mutagenesis, and biophysical techniques (circular dichroism, NMR, microcalorimetry, and electrophoretic mobility shift assay), we have characterized the structure and function of the MLV CAH. We provide experimental evidence that the MLV CAH belongs to a group of charged, E(R/K)-rich, single α-helices. This is the first single α-helix motif identified in viral proteins. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. A Physical Interaction between Viral Replicase and Capsid Protein Is Required for Genome-Packaging Specificity in an RNA Virus

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jang-Kyun; Kwon, Sun-Jung

    2012-01-01

    Genome packaging is functionally coupled to replication in RNA viruses pathogenic to humans (Poliovirus), insects (Flock house virus [FHV]), and plants (Brome mosaic virus [BMV]). However, the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. We have observed previously that in FHV and BMV, unlike ectopically expressed capsid protein (CP), packaging specificity results from RNA encapsidation by CP that has been translated from mRNA produced from replicating genomic RNA. Consequently, we hypothesize that a physical interaction with replicase increases the CP specificity for packaging viral RNAs. We tested this hypothesis by evaluating the molecular interaction between replicase protein and CP using a FHV-Nicotiana benthamiana system. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation in conjunction with fluorescent cellular protein markers and coimmunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that FHV replicase (protein A) and CP physically interact at the mitochondrial site of replication and that this interaction requires the N-proximal region from either amino acids 1 to 31 or amino acids 32 to 50 of the CP. In contrast to the mitochondrial localization of CP derived from FHV replication, ectopic expression displayed a characteristic punctate pattern on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). This pattern was altered to relocalize the CP throughout the cytoplasm when the C-proximal hydrophobic domain was deleted. Analysis of the packaging phenotypes of the CP mutants defective either in protein A-CP interactions or ER localization suggested that synchronization between protein A-CP interaction and its subcellular localization is imperative to confer packaging specificity. PMID:22438552

  11. A physical interaction between viral replicase and capsid protein is required for genome-packaging specificity in an RNA virus.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jang-Kyun; Kwon, Sun-Jung; Rao, A L N

    2012-06-01

    Genome packaging is functionally coupled to replication in RNA viruses pathogenic to humans (Poliovirus), insects (Flock house virus [FHV]), and plants (Brome mosaic virus [BMV]). However, the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. We have observed previously that in FHV and BMV, unlike ectopically expressed capsid protein (CP), packaging specificity results from RNA encapsidation by CP that has been translated from mRNA produced from replicating genomic RNA. Consequently, we hypothesize that a physical interaction with replicase increases the CP specificity for packaging viral RNAs. We tested this hypothesis by evaluating the molecular interaction between replicase protein and CP using a FHV-Nicotiana benthamiana system. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation in conjunction with fluorescent cellular protein markers and coimmunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that FHV replicase (protein A) and CP physically interact at the mitochondrial site of replication and that this interaction requires the N-proximal region from either amino acids 1 to 31 or amino acids 32 to 50 of the CP. In contrast to the mitochondrial localization of CP derived from FHV replication, ectopic expression displayed a characteristic punctate pattern on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). This pattern was altered to relocalize the CP throughout the cytoplasm when the C-proximal hydrophobic domain was deleted. Analysis of the packaging phenotypes of the CP mutants defective either in protein A-CP interactions or ER localization suggested that synchronization between protein A-CP interaction and its subcellular localization is imperative to confer packaging specificity.

  12. Localization of the herpes simplex virus type 1 major capsid protein VP5 to the cell nucleus requires the abundant scaffolding protein VP22a.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, P; Addison, C; Cross, A M; Kennard, J; Preston, V G; Rixon, F J

    1994-05-01

    The intracellular distributions of three herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) capsid proteins, VP23, VP5 and VP22a, were examined using vaccinia virus and plasmid expression systems. During infection of cells with HSV-1 wild-type virus, all three proteins were predominantly located in the nucleus, which is the site of capsid assembly. However, when expressed in the absence of any other HSV-1 proteins, although VP22a was found exclusively in the nucleus as expected, VP5 and VP23 were distributed throughout the cell. Thus nuclear localization is not an intrinsic property of these proteins but must be mediated by one or more HSV-1-induced proteins. Co-expression experiments demonstrated that VP5 was efficiently transported to the nucleus in the presence of VP22a, but the distribution of VP23 was unaffected by the presence of either or both of the other two proteins.

  13. [Inverse PCR amplification of the complete major capsid protein gene of lymphocystis disease virus isolated from Rachycentron canadum and the phylogenetic analysis of the virus].

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiao-Zhe; Shi, Cun-Bin; Li, Ning-Qiu; Pan, Hou-Jun; Chang, Ou-Qin; Wu, Shu-Qin

    2007-09-01

    The major capsid protein of lymphocystis disease virus isolated from Rachycentron canadum (LCDV-rc) was amplified and analysed. The 457bp DNA core fragment was amplified with the degenerate primers designed according to the conserved sequences of MCP gene of iridoviruses, then the flaking sequences adjacent to the core region were amplified by inverse PCR, and the complete sequence was obtained by combining all of them. The open reading frame of the gene is 1380bp in length, encoding a putative protein of 459 aa with molecular weight 51.12 kD and pI 6.87. Constructing the phylogenetic tree for comparing the MCP amino acid of iridoviruses, the results indicated that LCDV-rc is most homologous to the other Lymphocystis viruses and all of them constitute a branch. Accordingly LCDV-rc is identified as Lymphocystivirus.

  14. Novel antibody binding determinants on the capsid surface of serotype O foot-and-mouth disease virus

    PubMed Central

    Asfor, Amin S.; Upadhyaya, Sasmita; Knowles, Nick J.; King, Donald P.; Paton, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Five neutralizing antigenic sites have been described for serotype O foot-and-mouth disease viruses (FMDV) based on monoclonal antibody (mAb) escape mutant studies. However, a mutant virus selected to escape neutralization of mAb binding at all five sites was previously shown to confer complete cross-protection with the parental virus in guinea pig challenge studies, suggesting that amino acid residues outside the mAb binding sites contribute to antibody-mediated in vivo neutralization of FMDV. Comparison of the ability of bovine antisera to neutralize a panel of serotype O FMDV identified three novel putative sites at VP2-74, VP2-191 and VP3-85, where amino acid substitutions correlated with changes in sero-reactivity. The impact of these positions was tested using site-directed mutagenesis to effect substitutions at critical amino acid residues within an infectious copy of FMDV O1 Kaufbeuren (O1K). Recovered viruses containing additional mutations at VP2-74 and VP2-191 exhibited greater resistance to neutralization with both O1K guinea pig and O BFS bovine antisera than a virus that was engineered to include only mutations at the five known antigenic sites. The changes at VP2-74 and VP3-85 are adjacent to critical amino acids that define antigenic sites 2 and 4, respectively. However VP2-191 (17 Å away from VP2-72), located at the threefold axis and more distant from previously identified antigenic sites, exhibited the most profound effect. These findings extend our knowledge of the surface features of the FMDV capsid known to elicit neutralizing antibodies, and will improve our strategies for vaccine strain selection and rational vaccine design. PMID:24584474

  15. Identification of a novel cell culture adaptation site on the capsid of foot-and-mouth disease virus

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, Kyle; Fowler, Veronica L.; Barnett, Paul V.; Gold, Sarah; Wadsworth, Jemma; Knowles, Nick J.

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination remains the most effective tool for control of foot-and-mouth disease both in endemic countries and as an emergency preparedness for new outbreaks. Foot-and-mouth disease vaccines are chemically inactivated virus preparations and the production of new vaccines is critically dependent upon cell culture adaptation of field viruses, which can prove problematic. A major driver of cell culture adaptation is receptor availability. Field isolates of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) use RGD-dependent integrins as receptors, whereas cell culture adaptation often selects for variants with altered receptor preferences. Previously, two independent sites on the capsid have been identified where mutations are associated with improved cell culture growth. One is a shallow depression formed by the three major structural proteins (VP1–VP3) where mutations create a heparan sulphate (HS)-binding site (the canonical HS-binding site). The other involves residues of VP1 and is located at the fivefold symmetry axis. For some viruses, changes at this site result in HS binding; for others, the receptors are unknown. Here, we report the identification of a novel site on VP2 where mutations resulted in an expanded cell tropism of a vaccine variant of A/IRN/87 (called A − ). Furthermore, we show that introducing the same mutations into a different type A field virus (A/TUR/2/2006) resulted in the same expanded cell culture tropism as the A/IRN/87 A −  vaccine variant. These observations add to the evidence for multiple cell attachment mechanisms for FMDV and may be useful for vaccine manufacture when cell culture adaptation proves difficult. PMID:26296881

  16. Identification of a novel cell culture adaptation site on the capsid of foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, Kyle; Fowler, Veronica L; Barnett, Paul V; Gold, Sarah; Wadsworth, Jemma; Knowles, Nick J; Jackson, Terry

    2015-09-01

    Vaccination remains the most effective tool for control of foot-and-mouth disease both in endemic countries and as an emergency preparedness for new outbreaks. Foot-and-mouth disease vaccines are chemically inactivated virus preparations and the production of new vaccines is critically dependent upon cell culture adaptation of field viruses, which can prove problematic. A major driver of cell culture adaptation is receptor availability. Field isolates of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) use RGD-dependent integrins as receptors, whereas cell culture adaptation often selects for variants with altered receptor preferences. Previously, two independent sites on the capsid have been identified where mutations are associated with improved cell culture growth. One is a shallow depression formed by the three major structural proteins (VP1-VP3) where mutations create a heparan sulphate (HS)-binding site (the canonical HS-binding site). The other involves residues of VP1 and is located at the fivefold symmetry axis. For some viruses, changes at this site result in HS binding; for others, the receptors are unknown. Here, we report the identification of a novel site on VP2 where mutations resulted in an expanded cell tropism of a vaccine variant of A/IRN/87 (called A - ). Furthermore, we show that introducing the same mutations into a different type A field virus (A/TUR/2/2006) resulted in the same expanded cell culture tropism as the A/IRN/87 A -  vaccine variant. These observations add to the evidence for multiple cell attachment mechanisms for FMDV and may be useful for vaccine manufacture when cell culture adaptation proves difficult.

  17. The C Terminus of the Large Tegument Protein pUL36 Contains Multiple Capsid Binding Sites That Function Differently during Assembly and Cell Entry of Herpes Simplex Virus

    PubMed Central

    Schipke, Julia; Pohlmann, Anja; Diestel, Randi; Binz, Anne; Rudolph, Kathrin; Nagel, Claus-Henning; Bauerfeind, Rudolf

    2012-01-01

    The largest tegument protein of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1), pUL36, is a multivalent cross-linker between the viral capsids and the tegument and associated membrane proteins during assembly that upon subsequent cell entry releases the incoming capsids from the outer tegument and viral envelope. Here we show that pUL36 was recruited to cytosolic progeny capsids that later colocalized with membrane proteins of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1) and the trans-Golgi network. During cell entry, pUL36 dissociated from viral membrane proteins but remained associated with cytosolic capsids until arrival at the nucleus. HSV1 UL36 mutants lacking C-terminal portions of increasing size expressed truncated pUL36 but could not form plaques. Cytosolic capsids of mutants lacking the C-terminal 735 of the 3,164 amino acid residues accumulated in the cytosol but did not recruit pUL36 or associate with membranes. In contrast, pUL36 lacking only the 167 C-terminal residues bound to cytosolic capsids and subsequently colocalized with viral and host membrane proteins. Progeny virions fused with neighboring cells, but incoming capsids did not retain pUL36, nor could they target the nucleus or initiate HSV1 gene expression. Our data suggest that residues 2430 to 2893 of HSV1 pUL36, containing one binding site for the capsid protein pUL25, are sufficient to recruit pUL36 onto cytosolic capsids during assembly for secondary envelopment, whereas the 167 residues of the very C terminus with the second pUL25 binding site are crucial to maintain pUL36 on incoming capsids during cell entry. Capsids lacking pUL36 are targeted neither to membranes for virus assembly nor to nuclear pores for genome uncoating. PMID:22258258

  18. Distinct DNA exit and packaging portals in the virus Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus.

    PubMed

    Zauberman, Nathan; Mutsafi, Yael; Halevy, Daniel Ben; Shimoni, Eyal; Klein, Eugenia; Xiao, Chuan; Sun, Siyang; Minsky, Abraham

    2008-05-13

    Icosahedral double-stranded DNA viruses use a single portal for genome delivery and packaging. The extensive structural similarity revealed by such portals in diverse viruses, as well as their invariable positioning at a unique icosahedral vertex, led to the consensus that a particular, highly conserved vertex-portal architecture is essential for viral DNA translocations. Here we present an exception to this paradigm by demonstrating that genome delivery and packaging in the virus Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus occur through two distinct portals. By using high-resolution techniques, including electron tomography and cryo-scanning electron microscopy, we show that Mimivirus genome delivery entails a large-scale conformational change of the capsid, whereby five icosahedral faces open up. This opening, which occurs at a unique vertex of the capsid that we coined the "stargate", allows for the formation of a massive membrane conduit through which the viral DNA is released. A transient aperture centered at an icosahedral face distal to the DNA delivery site acts as a non-vertex DNA packaging portal. In conjunction with comparative genomic studies, our observations imply a viral packaging pathway akin to bacterial DNA segregation, which might be shared by diverse internal membrane-containing viruses.

  19. Distinct DNA Exit and Packaging Portals in the Virus Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus

    PubMed Central

    Zauberman, Nathan; Mutsafi, Yael; Halevy, Daniel Ben; Shimoni, Eyal; Klein, Eugenia; Xiao, Chuan; Sun, Siyang; Minsky, Abraham

    2008-01-01

    Icosahedral double-stranded DNA viruses use a single portal for genome delivery and packaging. The extensive structural similarity revealed by such portals in diverse viruses, as well as their invariable positioning at a unique icosahedral vertex, led to the consensus that a particular, highly conserved vertex-portal architecture is essential for viral DNA translocations. Here we present an exception to this paradigm by demonstrating that genome delivery and packaging in the virus Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus occur through two distinct portals. By using high-resolution techniques, including electron tomography and cryo-scanning electron microscopy, we show that Mimivirus genome delivery entails a large-scale conformational change of the capsid, whereby five icosahedral faces open up. This opening, which occurs at a unique vertex of the capsid that we coined the “stargate”, allows for the formation of a massive membrane conduit through which the viral DNA is released. A transient aperture centered at an icosahedral face distal to the DNA delivery site acts as a non-vertex DNA packaging portal. In conjunction with comparative genomic studies, our observations imply a viral packaging pathway akin to bacterial DNA segregation, which might be shared by diverse internal membrane–containing viruses. PMID:18479185

  20. Human Bocavirus Type-1 Capsid Facilitates the Transduction of Ferret Airways by Adeno-Associated Virus Genomes.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ziying; Feng, Zehua; Sun, Xingshen; Zhang, Yulong; Zou, Wei; Wang, Zekun; Jensen-Cody, Chandler; Liang, Bo; Park, Soo-Yeun; Qiu, Jianming; Engelhardt, John F

    2017-08-01

    Human bocavirus type-1 (HBoV1) has a high tropism for the apical membrane of human airway epithelia. The packaging of a recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (rAAV2) genome into HBoV1 capsid produces a chimeric vector (rAAV2/HBoV1) that also efficiently transduces human airway epithelia. As such, this vector is attractive for use in gene therapies to treat lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis. However, preclinical development of rAAV2/HBoV1 vectors has been hindered by the fact that humans are the only known host for HBoV1 infection. This study reports that rAAV2/HBoV1 vector is capable of efficiently transducing the lungs of both newborn (3- to 7-day-old) and juvenile (29-day-old) ferrets, predominantly in the distal airways. Analyses of in vivo, ex vivo, and in vitro models of the ferret proximal airway demonstrate that infection of this particular region is less effective than it is in humans. Studies of vector binding and endocytosis in polarized ferret proximal airway epithelial cultures revealed that a lack of effective vector endocytosis is the main cause of inefficient transduction in vitro. While transgene expression declined proportionally with growth of the ferrets following infection at 7 days of age, reinfection of ferrets with rAAV2/HBoV1 at 29 days gave rise to approximately 5-fold higher levels of transduction than observed in naive infected 29-day-old animals. The findings presented here lay the foundation for clinical development of HBoV1 capsid-based vectors for lung gene therapy in cystic fibrosis using ferret models.

  1. Packaging and structural phenotype of brome mosaic virus capsid protein with altered N-terminal {beta}-hexamer structure

    SciTech Connect

    Wispelaere, Melissanne de; Chaturvedi, Sonali; Wilkens, Stephan

    2011-10-10

    The first 45 amino acid region of brome mosaic virus (BMV) capsid protein (CP) contains RNA binding and structural domains that are implicated in the assembly of infectious virions. One such important structural domain encompassing amino acids {sup 28}QPVIV{sup 32}, highly conserved between BMV and cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV), exhibits a {beta}-hexamer structure. In this study we report that alteration of the {beta}-hexamer structure by mutating {sup 28}QPVIV{sup 32} to {sup 28}AAAAA{sup 32} had no effect either on symptom phenotype, local and systemic movement in Chenopodium quinoa and RNA profile of in vivo assembled virions. However, sensitivity to RNasemore » and assembly phenotypes distinguished virions assembled with CP subunits having {beta}-hexamer from those of wild type. A comparison of 3-D models obtained by cryo electron microscopy revealed overall similar structural features for wild type and mutant virions, with small but significant differences near the 3-fold axes of symmetry.« less

  2. Evolution to pathogenicity of the parvovirus minute virus of mice in immunodeficient mice involves genetic heterogeneity at the capsid domain that determines tropism.

    PubMed

    López-Bueno, Alberto; Segovia, José C; Bueren, Juan A; O'Sullivan, M Gerard; Wang, Feng; Tattersall, Peter; Almendral, José M

    2008-02-01

    Very little is known about the role that evolutionary dynamics plays in diseases caused by mammalian DNA viruses. To address this issue in a natural host model, we compared the pathogenesis and genetics of the attenuated fibrotropic and the virulent lymphohematotropic strains of the parvovirus minute virus of mice (MVM), and of two invasive fibrotropic MVM (MVMp) variants carrying the I362S or K368R change in the VP2 major capsid protein, in the infection of severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. By 14 to 18 weeks after oronasal inoculation, the I362S and K368R viruses caused lethal leukopenia characterized by tissue damage and inclusion bodies in hemopoietic organs, a pattern of disease found by 7 weeks postinfection with the lymphohematotropic MVM (MVMi) strain. The MVMp populations emerging in leukopenic mice showed consensus sequence changes in the MVMi genotype at residues G321E and A551V of VP2 in the I362S virus infections or A551V and V575A changes in the K368R virus infections, as well as a high level of genetic heterogeneity within a capsid domain at the twofold depression where these residues lay. Amino acids forming this capsid domain are important MVM tropism determinants, as exemplified by the switch in MVMi host range toward mouse fibroblasts conferred by coordinated changes of some of these residues and by the essential character of glutamate at residue 321 for maintaining MVMi tropism toward primary hemopoietic precursors. The few viruses within the spectrum of mutants from mice that maintained the respective parental 321G and 575V residues were infectious in a plaque assay, whereas the viruses with the main consensus sequences exhibited low levels of fitness in culture. Consistent with this finding, a recombinant MVMp virus carrying the consensus sequence mutations arising in the K368R virus background in mice failed to initiate infection in cell lines of different tissue origins, even though it caused rapid-course lethal leukopenia in SCID

  3. Critical Role of the HTLV-1 Capsid N-Terminal Domain for Gag-Gag Interactions and Virus Particle Assembly.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jessica L; Mendonça, Luiza; Marusinec, Rachel; Zuczek, Jennifer; Angert, Isaac; Blower, Ruth J; Mueller, Joachim D; Perilla, Juan R; Zhang, Wei; Mansky, Louis M

    2018-04-25

    The retroviral Gag protein is the main structural protein responsible for virus particle assembly and release. Like human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag, human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) has a structurally conserved capsid (CA) domain, including a β-hairpin turn and a centralized coiled-coil-like structure of six α helices in the CA amino-terminal domain (NTD) as well as four α-helices in the CA carboxy-terminal domain (CTD). CA drives Gag oligomerization, which is critical for both immature Gag lattice formation and particle production. The HIV-1 CA CTD has previously been shown to be a primary determinant for CA-CA interactions, and while both the HTLV-1 CA NTD and CTD have been implicated in Gag-Gag interactions, our recent observations have implicated the HTLV-1 CA NTD as encoding key determinants that dictate particle morphology. Here, we have conducted alanine-scanning mutagenesis in the HTLV-1 CA NTD nucleotide-encoding sequences spanning the loop regions and amino acids at the beginning and ends of α-helices due to their structural dissimilarity from the HIV-1 CA NTD structure. We analyzed both Gag subcellular distribution and efficiency of particle production for these mutants. We discovered several important residues (i.e., M17, Q47/F48, and Y61). Modeling implicated that these residues reside at the dimer interface (i.e., M17 and Y61) or at the trimer interface (i.e., Q47/F48). Taken together, these observations highlight the critical role of the HTLV-1 CA NTD in Gag-Gag interactions and particle assembly, which is, to the best of our knowledge, in contrast to HIV-1 and other retroviruses. Importance Retrovirus particle assembly and release from infected cells is driven by the Gag structural protein. Gag-Gag interactions, which form an oligomeric lattice structure at a particle budding site, are essential to the biogenesis of an infectious virus particle. The capsid (CA) domain of Gag is generally thought to possess the key

  4. Structural insights into the stabilization of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 capsid protein by the cyclophilin-binding domain and implications on the virus cycle.

    PubMed

    Cortines, Juliana R; Lima, Luís Mauricio T R; Mohana-Borges, Ronaldo; Millen, Thiago de A; Gaspar, Luciane Pinto; Lanman, Jason K; Prevelige, Peter E; Silva, Jerson L

    2015-05-01

    During infection, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) interacts with the cellular host factor cyclophilin A (CypA) through residues 85-93 of the N-terminal domain of HIV-1's capsid protein (CA). The role of the CA:CypA interaction is still unclear. Previous studies showed that a CypA-binding loop mutant, Δ87-97, has increased ability to assemble in vitro. We used this mutant to infer whether the CypA-binding region has an overall effect on CA stability, as measured by pressure and chemical perturbation. We built a SAXS-based envelope model for the dimer of both WT and Δ87-97. A new conformational arrangement of the dimers is described, showing the structural plasticity that CA can adopt. In protein folding studies, the deletion of the loop drastically reduces CA stability, as assayed by high hydrostatic pressure and urea. We hypothesize that the deletion promotes a rearrangement of helix 4, which may enhance the heterotypic interaction between the N- and C-terminal domains of CA dimers. In addition, we propose that the cyclophilin-binding loop may modulate capsid assembly during infection, either in the cytoplasm or near the nucleus by binding to the nuclear protein Nup385. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Self-assembly of virus-like particles of canine parvovirus capsid protein expressed from Escherichia coli and application as virus-like particle vaccine.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin; Guo, Hui-Chen; Wei, Yan-Quan; Dong, Hu; Han, Shi-Chong; Ao, Da; Sun, De-Hui; Wang, Hai-Ming; Cao, Sui-Zhong; Sun, Shi-Qi

    2014-04-01

    Canine parvovirus disease is an acute infectious disease caused by canine parvovirus (CPV). Current commercial vaccines are mainly attenuated and inactivated; as such, problems concerning safety may occur. To resolve this problem, researchers developed virus-like particles (VLPs) as biological nanoparticles resembling natural virions and showing high bio-safety. This property allows the use of VLPs for vaccine development and mechanism studies of viral infections. Tissue-specific drug delivery also employs VLPs as biological nanomaterials. Therefore, VLPs derived from CPV have a great potential in medicine and diagnostics. In this study, small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) fusion motif was utilized to express a whole, naturalVP2 protein of CPV in Escherichia coli. After the cleavage of the fusion motif, the CPV VP2 protein has self-assembled into VLPs. The VLPs had a size and shape that resembled the authentic virus capsid. However, the self-assembly efficiency of VLPs can be affected by different pH levels and ionic strengths. The mice vaccinated subcutaneously with CPV VLPs and CPV-specific immune responses were compared with those immunized with the natural virus. This result showed that VLPs can effectively induce anti-CPV specific antibody and lymphocyte proliferation as a whole virus. This result further suggested that the antigen epitope of CPV was correctly present on VLPs, thereby showing the potential application of a VLP-based CPV vaccine.

  6. Transient gene expression in serum-free suspension-growing mammalian cells for the production of foot-and-mouth disease virus empty capsids.

    PubMed

    Mignaqui, Ana Clara; Ruiz, Vanesa; Perret, Sylvie; St-Laurent, Gilles; Singh Chahal, Parminder; Transfiguracion, Julia; Sammarruco, Ayelén; Gnazzo, Victoria; Durocher, Yves; Wigdorovitz, Andrés

    2013-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious disease of cloven-hoofed animals. It produces severe economic losses in the livestock industry. Currently available vaccines are based on inactivated FMD virus (FMDV). The use of empty capsids as a subunit vaccine has been reported to be a promising candidate because it avoids the use of virus in the vaccine production and conserves the conformational epitopes of the virus. In this report, we explored transient gene expression (TGE) in serum-free suspension-growing mammalian cells for the production of FMDV recombinant empty capsids as a subunit vaccine. The recombinant proteins produced, assembled into empty capsids and induced protective immune response against viral challenge in mice. Furthermore, they were recognized by anti-FMDV bovine sera. By using this technology, we were able to achieve expression levels that are compatible with the development of a vaccine. Thus, TGE of mammalian cells is an easy to perform, scalable and cost-effective technology for the production of a recombinant subunit vaccine against FMDV.

  7. Virulent variants emerging in mice infected with the apathogenic prototype strain of the parvovirus minute virus of mice exhibit a capsid with low avidity for a primary receptor.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Mari-Paz; López-Bueno, Alberto; Almendral, José M

    2005-09-01

    The mechanisms involved in the emergence of virulent mammalian viruses were investigated in the adult immunodeficient SCID mouse infected by the attenuated prototype strain of the parvovirus Minute Virus of Mice (MVMp). Cloned MVMp intravenously inoculated in mice consistently evolved during weeks of subclinical infection to variants showing altered plaque phenotypes. All the isolated large-plaque variants spread systemically from the oronasal cavity and replicated in major organs (brain, kidney, liver), in sharp contrast to the absolute inability of the MVMp and small-plaque variants to productively invade SCID organs by this natural route of infection. The virulent variants retained the MVMp capacity to infect mouse fibroblasts, consistent with the lack of genetic changes across the 220-to-335 amino acid sequence of VP2, a capsid domain containing main determinants of MVM tropism. However, the capsid of the virulent variants shared a lower affinity than the wild type for a primary receptor used in the cytotoxic infection. The capsid gene of a virulent variant engineered in the MVMp background endowed the recombinant virus with a large-plaque phenotype, lower affinity for the receptor, and productive invasiveness by the oronasal route in SCID mice, eventually leading to 100% mortality. In the analysis of virulence in mice, both MVMp and the recombinant virus similarly gained the bloodstream 1 to 2 days postoronasal inoculation and remained infectious when adsorbed to blood cells in vitro. However, the wild-type MVMp was cleared from circulation a few days afterwards, in contrast to the viremia of the recombinant virus, which was sustained for life. Significantly, attachment to an abundant receptor of primary mouse kidney epithelial cells by both viruses could be quantitatively competed by wild-type MVMp capsids, indicating that virulence is not due to an extended receptor usage in target tissues. We conclude that the selection of capsid-receptor interactions of

  8. Virulent Variants Emerging in Mice Infected with the Apathogenic Prototype Strain of the Parvovirus Minute Virus of Mice Exhibit a Capsid with Low Avidity for a Primary Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, Mari-Paz; López-Bueno, Alberto; Almendral, José M.

    2005-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in the emergence of virulent mammalian viruses were investigated in the adult immunodeficient SCID mouse infected by the attenuated prototype strain of the parvovirus Minute Virus of Mice (MVMp). Cloned MVMp intravenously inoculated in mice consistently evolved during weeks of subclinical infection to variants showing altered plaque phenotypes. All the isolated large-plaque variants spread systemically from the oronasal cavity and replicated in major organs (brain, kidney, liver), in sharp contrast to the absolute inability of the MVMp and small-plaque variants to productively invade SCID organs by this natural route of infection. The virulent variants retained the MVMp capacity to infect mouse fibroblasts, consistent with the lack of genetic changes across the 220-to-335 amino acid sequence of VP2, a capsid domain containing main determinants of MVM tropism. However, the capsid of the virulent variants shared a lower affinity than the wild type for a primary receptor used in the cytotoxic infection. The capsid gene of a virulent variant engineered in the MVMp background endowed the recombinant virus with a large-plaque phenotype, lower affinity for the receptor, and productive invasiveness by the oronasal route in SCID mice, eventually leading to 100% mortality. In the analysis of virulence in mice, both MVMp and the recombinant virus similarly gained the bloodstream 1 to 2 days postoronasal inoculation and remained infectious when adsorbed to blood cells in vitro. However, the wild-type MVMp was cleared from circulation a few days afterwards, in contrast to the viremia of the recombinant virus, which was sustained for life. Significantly, attachment to an abundant receptor of primary mouse kidney epithelial cells by both viruses could be quantitatively competed by wild-type MVMp capsids, indicating that virulence is not due to an extended receptor usage in target tissues. We conclude that the selection of capsid-receptor interactions of

  9. Inclusion of an Arg-Gly-Asp receptor-recognition motif into the capsid protein of rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus enables culture of the virus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jie; Miao, Qiuhong; Tan, Yonggui; Guo, Huimin; Liu, Teng; Wang, Binbin; Chen, Zongyan; Li, Chuanfeng; Liu, Guangqing

    2017-05-26

    The fact that rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV), an important member of the Caliciviridae family, cannot be propagated in vitro has greatly impeded the progress of investigations into the mechanisms of pathogenesis, translation, and replication of this and related viruses. In this study, we have successfully bypassed this obstacle by constructing a mutant RHDV (mRHDV) by using a reverse genetics technique. By changing two amino acids (S305R,N307D), we produced a specific receptor-recognition motif (Arg-Gly-Asp; called RGD) on the surface of the RHDV capsid protein. mRHDV was recognized by the intrinsic membrane receptor (integrin) of the RK-13 cells, which then gained entry and proliferated as well as imparted apparent cytopathic effects. After 20 passages, the titers of RHDV reached 1 × 10 4.3 50% tissue culture infectious dose (TCID 50 )/ml at 72 h. Furthermore, mRHDV-infected rabbits showed typical rabbit plague symptoms and died within 48-72 h. After immunization with inactivated mRHDV, the rabbits survived wild-type RHDV infection, indicating that mRHDV could be a candidate virus strain for producing a vaccine against RHDV infection. In summary, this study offers a novel strategy for overcoming the challenges of proliferating RHDV in vitro Because virus uptake via specific membrane receptors, several of which specifically bind to the RGD peptide motif, is a common feature of host cells, we believe that this the strategy could also be applied to other RNA viruses that currently lack suitable cell lines for propagation such as hepatitis E virus and norovirus. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Identification of binding domains in the herpes simplex virus type 1 small capsid protein pUL35 (VP26).

    PubMed

    Apcarian, Arin; Cunningham, Anthony L; Diefenbach, Russell J

    2010-11-01

    In this study, fragments of the small capsid protein pUL35 (VP26) from herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) were generated to identify binding domains for a number of known ligands. Analysis of the binding of dynein light chain subunits, DYNLT1 and DYNLT3, as well the HSV-1 structural proteins pUL19 (VP5) and pUL37 was then undertaken using the LexA yeast two-hybrid assay. The N-terminal half of pUL35, in particular residues 30-43, was identified as a common region for the binding of DYNLT1 and DYNLT3. Additional distinct regions in the C terminus of pUL35 also contribute to the binding of DYNLT1 and DYNLT3. In contrast, only the C-terminal half of pUL35 was found to mediate the binding of pUL19 and pUL37 through distinct regions. The relevance of this information to the role of pUL35 in viral transport and assembly is discussed.

  11. Immunogenicity of Newcastle disease virus vectors expressing Norwalk virus capsid protein in the presence or absence of VP2 protein.

    PubMed

    Kim, Shin-Hee; Chen, Shun; Jiang, Xi; Green, Kim Y; Samal, Siba K

    2015-10-01

    Noroviruses are the most common cause of acute gastroenteritis in humans. Development of an effective vaccine is required for reducing their outbreaks. In order to develop a GI norovirus vaccine, Newcastle disease virus vectors, rLaSota and modified rBC, were used to express VP1 protein of Norwalk virus. Co-expression of VP1 and VP2 proteins by Newcastle disease virus vectors resulted in enhanced expression of Norwalk virus VP1 protein and self-assembly of VP1 protein into virus-like particles. Furthermore, the Norwalk virus-specific IgG response induced in mice by Newcastle disease virus vectors was similar to that induced by baculovirus-expressed virus-like particles in mice. However, the modified rBC vector in the presence of VP2 protein induced significantly higher levels of cellular and mucosal immune responses than those induced by baculovirus-expressed VLPs. These results indicate that Newcastle disease virus has great potential for developing a live Norwalk virus vaccine by inducing humoral, cellular and mucosal immune responses in humans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Immunogenicity of Newcastle Disease Virus Vectors Expressing Norwalk Virus Capsid Protein in the Presence or Absence of VP2 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Shin-Hee; Chen, Shun; Jiang, Xi; Green, Kim Y.; Samal, Siba K.

    2015-01-01

    Noroviruses are the most common cause of acute gastroenteritis in humans. Development of an effective vaccine is required for reducing their outbreaks. In order to develop a GI norovirus vaccine, Newcastle disease virus vectors, rLaSota and modified rBC, were used to express VP1 protein of Norwalk virus. Co-expression of VP1 and VP2 proteins by Newcastle disease virus vectors resulted in enhanced expression of Norwalk virus VP1 protein and self-assembly of VP1 protein into virus-like particles. Furthermore, the Norwalk virus-specific IgG response induced in mice by Newcastle disease virus vectors was similar to that induced by baculovirs-expressed virus-like particles in mice. However, the modified rBC vector in the presence of VP2 protein induced significantly higher levels of cellular and mucosal immune responses than those induced by baculovirus-expressed VLPs. These results indicate that Newcastle disease virus has great potential for developing a live Norwalk virus vaccine by inducing humoral, cellular and mucosal immune responses in humans. PMID:26099695

  13. Recombinant expression of Garlic virus C (GARV-C) capsid protein in insect cells and its potential for the production of specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Alves-Júnior, Miguel; Menezes Marraccini, Fernanda; Melo Filho, Péricles de Albuquerque; Nepomuceno Dusi, André; Pio-Ribeiro, Gilvan; Morais Ribeiro, Bergmann

    2008-01-01

    Garlic cultivars in Brazil are infected by a complex of viruses and for some virus species, such as the allexivirus, purification of the virions is sometimes cumbersume. To overcome this problem, recombinant expression of viral proteins in heterologous systems is an alternative method for producing antibodies. The capsid gene from Garlic virus C (GarV-C), an Allexivirus, was inserted into the genome of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) generating the recombinant virus vSynGarV-C. The recombinant protein expression was confirmed by SDS-PAGE and western-blot of extracts from recombinant virus infected insect cells, where a protein band of approximately 32KDa was observed only in extracts from recombinant infected cells. This protein corresponded to the predicted size of the capsid protein of the GarV-C. A rabbit polyclonal antibody was raised against this protein, shown to be specific for the GarV-C protein in western-blot and dot-Elisa, however with a low titer.

  14. The great billion-year war between ribosome- and capsid-encoding organisms (cells and viruses) as the major source of evolutionary novelties.

    PubMed

    Forterre, Patrick; Prangishvili, David

    2009-10-01

    Our conceptions on the origin, nature, and role of viruses have been shaken recently by several independent lines of research. There are many reasons to believe now that viruses are more ancient than modern cells and have always been more abundant and diverse than their cellular targets. Viruses can be defined as capsid-encoding organisms that transform their "host" cell into a viral factory. If capsid-encoding organisms (viruses) and ribosome-encoding organisms (cells) are the major types of living entities on our planet, it seems logical to conclude that their conflict has been a major engine of biological evolution (in the framework of natural selection). In particular, many novelties first selected in the viral world might have been transferred to cells as a consequence of the continuous flow of viral genes into cellular genomes. We discuss recent observations and hypotheses suggesting that viruses have played a major role at different stages of biological evolution, such as the RNA to DNA transition, the origin of the eukaryotic nucleus, or, alternatively, the origin of unique features in multicellular macrobes.

  15. Cyclophilin A Levels Dictate Infection Efficiency of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Capsid Escape Mutants A92E and G94D ▿

    PubMed Central

    Ylinen, Laura M. J.; Schaller, Torsten; Price, Amanda; Fletcher, Adam J.; Noursadeghi, Mahdad; James, Leo C.; Towers, Greg J.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclophilin A (CypA) is an important human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) cofactor in human cells. HIV-1 A92E and G94D capsid escape mutants arise during CypA inhibition and in certain cell lines are dependent on CypA inhibition. Here we show that dependence on CypA inhibition is due to high CypA levels. Restricted HIV-1 is stable, and remarkably, restriction is augmented by arresting cell division. Nuclear entry is not inhibited. We propose that high CypA levels and capsid mutations combine to disturb uncoating, leading to poor infectivity, particularly in arrested cells. Our data suggest a role for CypA in uncoating the core of HIV-1 to facilitate integration. PMID:19073742

  16. Virus World as an Evolutionary Network of Viruses and Capsidless Selfish Elements

    PubMed Central

    Dolja, Valerian V.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Viruses were defined as one of the two principal types of organisms in the biosphere, namely, as capsid-encoding organisms in contrast to ribosome-encoding organisms, i.e., all cellular life forms. Structurally similar, apparently homologous capsids are present in a huge variety of icosahedral viruses that infect bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes. These findings prompted the concept of the capsid as the virus “self” that defines the identity of deep, ancient viral lineages. However, several other widespread viral “hallmark genes” encode key components of the viral replication apparatus (such as polymerases and helicases) and combine with different capsid proteins, given the inherently modular character of viral evolution. Furthermore, diverse, widespread, capsidless selfish genetic elements, such as plasmids and various types of transposons, share hallmark genes with viruses. Viruses appear to have evolved from capsidless selfish elements, and vice versa, on multiple occasions during evolution. At the earliest, precellular stage of life's evolution, capsidless genetic parasites most likely emerged first and subsequently gave rise to different classes of viruses. In this review, we develop the concept of a greater virus world which forms an evolutionary network that is held together by shared conserved genes and includes both bona fide capsid-encoding viruses and different classes of capsidless replicons. Theoretical studies indicate that selfish replicons (genetic parasites) inevitably emerge in any sufficiently complex evolving ensemble of replicators. Therefore, the key signature of the greater virus world is not the presence of a capsid but rather genetic, informational parasitism itself, i.e., various degrees of reliance on the information processing systems of the host. PMID:24847023

  17. Virus world as an evolutionary network of viruses and capsidless selfish elements.

    PubMed

    Koonin, Eugene V; Dolja, Valerian V

    2014-06-01

    Viruses were defined as one of the two principal types of organisms in the biosphere, namely, as capsid-encoding organisms in contrast to ribosome-encoding organisms, i.e., all cellular life forms. Structurally similar, apparently homologous capsids are present in a huge variety of icosahedral viruses that infect bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes. These findings prompted the concept of the capsid as the virus "self" that defines the identity of deep, ancient viral lineages. However, several other widespread viral "hallmark genes" encode key components of the viral replication apparatus (such as polymerases and helicases) and combine with different capsid proteins, given the inherently modular character of viral evolution. Furthermore, diverse, widespread, capsidless selfish genetic elements, such as plasmids and various types of transposons, share hallmark genes with viruses. Viruses appear to have evolved from capsidless selfish elements, and vice versa, on multiple occasions during evolution. At the earliest, precellular stage of life's evolution, capsidless genetic parasites most likely emerged first and subsequently gave rise to different classes of viruses. In this review, we develop the concept of a greater virus world which forms an evolutionary network that is held together by shared conserved genes and includes both bona fide capsid-encoding viruses and different classes of capsidless replicons. Theoretical studies indicate that selfish replicons (genetic parasites) inevitably emerge in any sufficiently complex evolving ensemble of replicators. Therefore, the key signature of the greater virus world is not the presence of a capsid but rather genetic, informational parasitism itself, i.e., various degrees of reliance on the information processing systems of the host. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Empty Turnip yellow mosaic virus capsids as delivery vehicles to mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Doyeong; Lee, Younghee; Dreher, Theo W; Cho, Tae-Ju

    2018-05-03

    Turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV) was able to enter animal cells when the spherical plant virus was conjugated with Tat, a cell penetrating peptide (CPP). Tat was chemically attached to the surface lysine residues of TYMV using hydrazone chemistry. Baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells were incubated with either unmodified or Tat-conjugated TYMV and examined by flow cytometry and confocal microscopic analyses. Tat conjugation was shown to be more efficient than Lipofectamine in allowing TYMV to enter the mammalian cells. Tat-assisted-transfection was also associated with less loss of cell viability than lipofection. Among the CPPs tested (Tat, R8, Pep-1 and Pen), it was observed that R8 and Pen were also effective while Pep-1 was not. We also examined if the internal space of TYMV can be used to load fluorescein dye as a model cargo. When TYMV is treated by freezing and thawing, the virus is known to convert into a structure with a 6-8 nm hole and release viral RNA. When the resultant pot-like particles were reacted with fluorescein-5-maleimide using interior sulfhydryl groups as conjugation sites, about 145 fluorescein molecules were added per particle. The fluorescein-loaded TYMV particles were conjugated with Tat and introduced into BHK cells, again with higher transfection efficiency compared to lipofection. Our studies demonstrate the potential of modified TYMV as an efficient system for therapeutic cargo delivery to mammalian cells. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Determining the Epitope Dominance on the Capsid of a Serotype SAT2 Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus by Mutational Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Opperman, Pamela A.; Rotherham, Lia S.; Esterhuysen, Jan; Charleston, Bryan; Juleff, Nicholas; Capozzo, Alejandra V.; Theron, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Monoclonal-antibody (MAb)-resistant mutants were used to map antigenic sites on foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), which resulted in the identification of neutralizing epitopes in the flexible βG-βH loop in VP1. For FMDV SAT2 viruses, studies have shown that at least two antigenic sites exist. By use of an infectious SAT2 cDNA clone, 10 structurally exposed and highly variable loops were identified as putative antigenic sites on the VP1, VP2, and VP3 capsid proteins of SAT2/Zimbabwe (ZIM)/7/83 (topotype II) and replaced with the corresponding regions of SAT2/Kruger National Park (KNP)/19/89 (topotype I). Virus neutralization assays using convalescent-phase antisera raised against the parental virus, SAT2/ZIM/7/83, indicated that the mutant virus containing the TQQS-to-ETPV mutation in the N-terminal part of the βG-βH loop of VP1 showed not only a significant increase in the neutralization titer but also an increase in the index of avidity to the convalescent-phase antisera. Furthermore, antigenic profiling of the epitope-replaced and parental viruses with nonneutralizing SAT2-specific MAbs led to the identification of two nonneutralizing antigenic regions. Both regions were mapped to incorporate residues 71 to 72 of VP2 as the major contact point. The binding footprint of one of the antigenic regions encompasses residues 71 to 72 and 133 to 134 of VP2 and residues 48 to 50 of VP1, and the second antigenic region encompasses residues 71 to 72 and 133 to 134 of VP2 and residues 84 to 86 and 109 to 11 of VP1. This is the first time that antigenic regions encompassing residues 71 to 72 of VP2 have been identified on the capsid of a SAT2 FMDV. IMPORTANCE Monoclonal-antibody-resistant mutants have traditionally been used to map antigenic sites on foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). However, for SAT2-type viruses, which are responsible for most of the FMD outbreaks in Africa and are the most varied of all seven serotypes, only two antigenic sites have been

  20. Intergenotypic chimeric hepatitis E viruses (HEVs) with the genotype 4 human HEV capsid gene in the backbone of genotype 3 swine HEV are infectious in pigs.

    PubMed

    Feagins, Alicia R; Córdoba, Laura; Sanford, Brent J; Dryman, Barbara A; Huang, Yao-Wei; LeRoith, Tanya; Emerson, Suzanne U; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2011-03-01

    Genotypes 1 and 2 hepatitis E virus (HEV) infect only humans whereas genotypes 3 and 4 HEV infect both humans and pigs. To evaluate the mechanism of cross-species HEV infection between humans and swine, in this study we constructed five intergenotypic chimeric viruses and tested for their infectivity in vitro and in pigs. We demonstrated that chimeric viruses containing the ORF2 capsid gene either alone or in combination with its adjacent 5' junction region (JR) and 3' noncoding region (NCR) from a genotype 4 human HEV in the backbone of a genotype 3 swine HEV are replication-competent in Huh7 cells and infectious in HepG2/C3A cells and in pigs, and thus supporting the hypothesis that genotypes 3 and 4 human HEV are of swine origin. However, chimeric viruses containing the JR+ORF2+3' NCR of genotypes 3 or 4 HEV in the backbone of genotype 1 human HEV failed to infect pigs, suggesting that other genomic regions such as 5' NCR and ORF1 may also be involved in HEV cross-species infection. The results from this study provide the first experimental evidence of the exchangeability of the capsid gene between genotype 3 swine HEV and genotype 4 human HEV, and have important implications for understanding the mechanism of HEV cross-species infection. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Interactions of Prototype Foamy Virus Capsids with Host Cell Polo-Like Kinases Are Important for Efficient Viral DNA Integration

    PubMed Central

    Zurnic, Irena; Hütter, Sylvia; Rzeha, Ute; Stanke, Nicole; Reh, Juliane; Müllers, Erik; Hamann, Martin V.; Kern, Tobias; Gerresheim, Gesche K.; Serrao, Erik; Lesbats, Paul; Engelman, Alan N.; Cherepanov, Peter; Lindemann, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Unlike for other retroviruses, only a few host cell factors that aid the replication of foamy viruses (FVs) via interaction with viral structural components are known. Using a yeast-two-hybrid (Y2H) screen with prototype FV (PFV) Gag protein as bait we identified human polo-like kinase 2 (hPLK2), a member of cell cycle regulatory kinases, as a new interactor of PFV capsids. Further Y2H studies confirmed interaction of PFV Gag with several PLKs of both human and rat origin. A consensus Ser-Thr/Ser-Pro (S-T/S-P) motif in Gag, which is conserved among primate FVs and phosphorylated in PFV virions, was essential for recognition by PLKs. In the case of rat PLK2, functional kinase and polo-box domains were required for interaction with PFV Gag. Fluorescently-tagged PFV Gag, through its chromatin tethering function, selectively relocalized ectopically expressed eGFP-tagged PLK proteins to mitotic chromosomes in a Gag STP motif-dependent manner, confirming a specific and dominant nature of the Gag-PLK interaction in mammalian cells. The functional relevance of the Gag-PLK interaction was examined in the context of replication-competent FVs and single-round PFV vectors. Although STP motif mutated viruses displayed wild type (wt) particle release, RNA packaging and intra-particle reverse transcription, their replication capacity was decreased 3-fold in single-cycle infections, and up to 20-fold in spreading infections over an extended time period. Strikingly similar defects were observed when cells infected with single-round wt Gag PFV vectors were treated with a pan PLK inhibitor. Analysis of entry kinetics of the mutant viruses indicated a post-fusion defect resulting in delayed and reduced integration, which was accompanied with an enhanced preference to integrate into heterochromatin. We conclude that interaction between PFV Gag and cellular PLK proteins is important for early replication steps of PFV within host cells. PMID:27579920

  2. A nuclear fraction of turnip crinkle virus capsid protein is important for elicitation of the host resistance response.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sung-Hwan; Qu, Feng; Morris, T Jack

    2015-12-02

    The N-terminal 25 amino acids (AAs) of turnip crinkle virus (TCV) capsid protein (CP) are recognized by the resistance protein HRT to trigger a hypersensitive response (HR) and systemic resistance to TCV infection. This same region of TCV CP also contains a motif that interacts with the transcription factor TIP, as well as a nuclear localization signal (NLS). However, it is not yet known whether nuclear localization of TCV CP is needed for the induction of HRT-mediated HR and resistance. Here we present new evidence suggesting a tight correlation between nuclear inclusions formed by CP and the manifestation of HR. We show that a fraction of TCV CP localized to cell nuclei to form discrete inclusion-like structures, and a mutated CP (R6A) known to abolish HR failed to form nuclear inclusions. Notably, TIP-CP interaction augments the inclusion-forming activity of CP by tethering inclusions to the nuclear membrane. This TIP-mediated augmentation is also critical for HR resistance, as another CP mutant (R8A) known to elicit a less restrictive HR, though still self-associated into nuclear inclusions, failed to direct inclusions to the nuclear membrane due to its inability to interact with TIP. Finally, exclusion of CP from cell nuclei abolished induction of HR. Together, these results uncovered a strong correlation between nuclear localization and nuclear inclusion formation by TCV CP and induction of HR, and suggest that CP nuclear inclusions could be the key trigger of the HRT-dependent, yet TIP-reinforced, resistance to TCV. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Self-assembly of virus-like particles of porcine circovirus type 2 capsid protein expressed from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2) is a serious problem to the swine industry and can lead to significant negative impacts on profitability of pork production. Syndrome associated with PCV2 is known as porcine circovirus closely associated with post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS). The capsid (Cap) protein of PCV2 is a major candidate antigen for development of recombinant vaccine and serological diagnostic method. The recombinant Cap protein has the ability to self-assemble into virus-like particles (VLPs) in vitro, it is particularly opportunity to develop the PV2 VLPs vaccine in Escherichia coli,(E.coli ), because where the cost of the vaccine must be weighed against the value of the vaccinated pig, when it was to extend use the VLPs vaccine of PCV2. Results In this report, a highly soluble Cap-tag protein expressed in E.coli was constructed with a p-SMK expression vector with a fusion tag of small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMO). The recombinant Cap was purified using Ni2+ affinity resins, whereas the tag was used to remove the SUMO protease. Simultaneously, the whole native Cap protein was able to self-assemble into VLPs in vitro when viewed under an electron microscope. The Cap-like particles had a size and shape that resembled the authentic Cap. The result could also be applied in the large-scale production of VLPs of PCV2 and could be used as a diagnostic antigen or a potential VLP vaccine against PCV2 infection in pigs. Conclusion we have, for the first time, utilized the SUMO fusion motif to successfully express the entire authentic Cap protein of PCV2 in E. coli. After the cleavage of the fusion motif, the nCap protein has the ability to self-assemble into VLPs, which can be used as as a potential vaccine to protect pigs from PCV2-infection. PMID:20646322

  4. Detection of serum antibodies to hepatitis E virus in domestic pigs in Italy using a recombinant swine HEV capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Ponterio, Eleonora; Di Bartolo, Ilaria; Orrù, Ginevra; Liciardi, Manuel; Ostanello, Fabio; Ruggeri, Franco Maria

    2014-06-16

    The hepatitis E virus (HEV) has been detected in both humans and animals, particularly pigs, worldwide. Several evidences, including human infection following consumption of raw contaminated meat, suggest a zoonotic transmission of HEV. In Italy, large circulation of genotype 3 HEV has been reported in swine, and recent studies have confirmed the involvement of this genotype in autochthonous human cases. In this study 111 sera collected from healthy pigs in two Italian regions were tested for anti-HEV IgG antibodies. For specific HEV antibody detection in swine, we developed ELISA and Western blotting methods, using a truncated capsid (ORF2) protein lacking the first 111 amino acids of a swine HEV genotype 3 strain. The ORF2-based ELISA revealed anti-HEV antibodies in 104 out of 111 pigs compared with 102 detected with a commercial ELISA kit. A lower number of sera reacted with the recombinant ORF2 protein in a Western blotting format (81/111). Using a Latent class analysis (LCA), the estimated sensitivities for ELISA-ORF2 and ELISA-kit tests were 0.961 and 0.936, respectively, whereas specificities were 0.599 and 0.475. The estimated sensitivity of Western blotting was 0.775, and the specificity was 0.944. The overall results confirm the high prevalence of HEV seropositive healthy pigs in Italy. Through comparisons with a commercial ELISA test, the swine genotype 3 HEV antigen produced in this study was proven suitable to detect anti-HEV antibodies in pig sera by both ELISA and Western Blotting.

  5. More powerful virus inhibitors from structure-based analysis of HEV71 capsid-binding molecules

    PubMed Central

    Spyrou, John A. B.; Kelly, James; Ren, Jingshan; Grimes, Jonathan; Puerstinger, Gerhard; Stonehouse, Nicola; Walter, Thomas S.; Hu, Zhongyu; Wang, Junzhi; Li, Xuemei; Peng, Wei; Rowlands, David; Fry, Elizabeth E.; Rao, Zihe; Stuart, David I.

    2014-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (HEV71) epidemics amongst children and infants result mainly in mild symptoms, however, especially in the Asia-Pacific region, infection can be fatal. At present no therapies are available. We have used structural analysis of the complete virus to guide the design of HEV71 inhibitors. Analysis of complexes with four 3-(-4-pyridyl)-2-imidazolidinone derivatives with varying anti-HEV71 activities, pinpointed key structure-activity correlates. We then identified additional potentially beneficial substitutions, developed methods to reliably triage compounds by quantum mechanics-enhanced ligand docking, and synthesized two candidates. Structural analysis and in vitro assays confirmed the predicted binding modes and their ability to block viral infection. One ligand (IC50 = 25 pM) is an order of magnitude more potent than the best previously reported inhibitor, and is also more soluble. Our approach may be useful in the design of effective drugs for enterovirus infections. PMID:24509833

  6. Uncoupling cis-Acting RNA Elements from Coding Sequences Revealed a Requirement of the N-Terminal Region of Dengue Virus Capsid Protein in Virus Particle Formation

    PubMed Central

    Samsa, Marcelo M.; Mondotte, Juan A.; Caramelo, Julio J.

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the mechanism of flavivirus genome encapsidation. Here, functional elements of the dengue virus (DENV) capsid (C) protein were investigated. Study of the N-terminal region of DENV C has been limited by the presence of overlapping cis-acting RNA elements within the protein-coding region. To dissociate these two functions, we used a recombinant DENV RNA with a duplication of essential RNA structures outside the C coding sequence. By the use of this system, the highly conserved amino acids FNML, which are encoded in the RNA cyclization sequence 5′CS, were found to be dispensable for C function. In contrast, deletion of the N-terminal 18 amino acids of C impaired DENV particle formation. Two clusters of basic residues (R5-K6-K7-R9 and K17-R18-R20-R22) were identified as important. A systematic mutational analysis indicated that a high density of positive charges, rather than particular residues at specific positions, was necessary. Furthermore, a differential requirement of N-terminal sequences of C for viral particle assembly was observed in mosquito and human cells. While no viral particles were observed in human cells with a virus lacking the first 18 residues of C, DENV propagation was detected in mosquito cells, although to a level about 50-fold less than that observed for a wild-type (WT) virus. We conclude that basic residues at the N terminus of C are necessary for efficient particle formation in mosquito cells but that they are crucial for propagation in human cells. This is the first report demonstrating that the N terminus of C plays a role in DENV particle formation. In addition, our results suggest that this function of C is differentially modulated in different host cells. PMID:22072762

  7. Human papillomavirus type 18 chimeras containing the L2/L1 capsid genes from evolutionarily diverse papillomavirus types generate infectious virus

    PubMed Central

    Bowser, Brian S.; Chen, Horng-Shen; Conway, Michael J.; Christensen, Neil D.; Meyers, Craig

    2011-01-01

    Papillomaviruses (PVs) comprise a large family of viruses infecting nearly all vertebrate species, with more than 100 human PVs identified. Our previous studies showed that a mutant chimera HPV18/16 genome, consisting of the upper regulatory region and early ORFs of HPV18 and the late ORFs of HPV16, was capable of producing infectious virus in organotypic raft cultures. We were interested in determining whether the ability of this chimeric genome to produce infectious virus was the result of HPV18 and HPV16 being similarly oncogenic, anogenital types and whether more disparate PV types could also interact functionally. To test this we created a series of HPV18 chimeric genomes where the ORFs for the HPV18 capsid genes were replaced with the capsid genes of HPV45, HPV39, HPV33, HPV31, HPV11, HPV6b, HPV1a, CRPV, and BPV1. All chimeras were able to produce infectious chimeric viral particles, although with lower infectivity than wild-type HPV18. Steps in the viral life cycle and characteristics of the viral particles were examined to identify potential causes for the decrease in infectivity. PMID:21762735

  8. In vitro and in silico studies reveal capsid-mutant Porcine circovirus 2b with novel cytopathogenic and structural characteristics.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Taís Fukuta; Magro, Angelo José; de Castro, Alessandra M M G; Pedraza-Ordoñez, Francisco J; Tsunemi, Miriam Harumi; Perahia, David; Araujo, João Pessoa

    2018-06-02

    Porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2) is an icosahedral, non-enveloped, and single-stranded circular DNA virus that belongs to the family Circoviridae, genus Circovirus, and is responsible for a complex of different diseases defined as porcine circovirus diseases (PCVDs). These diseases - including postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS), enteric disease, respiratory disease, porcine dermatitis and nephropathy syndrome (PDNS), and reproductive failure - are responsible for large economic losses in the pig industry. After serial passages in swine testicle (ST) cells of a wild-type virus isolated from an animal with PMWS, we identified three PCV2b viruses with capsid protein (known as Cap protein) cumulative mutations, including two novel mutants. The mutant viruses were introduced into new ST cell cultures for reisolation and showed, in comparison to the wild-type PCV2b, remarkable viral replication efficiency (> 10 11 DNA copies/ml) and cell death via necrosis, which were clearly related to the accretion of capsid protein mutations. The analysis of a Cap protein/capsid model showed that the mutated residues were located in solvent-accessible positions on the external PCV2b surface. Additionally, the mutated residues were found in linear epitopes and participated in pockets on the capsid surface, indicating that these residues could also be involved in antibody recognition. Taking into account the likely natural emergence of PCV2b variants, it is possible to consider that the results of this work increase knowledge of Circovirus biology and could help to prevent future serious cases of vaccine failure that could lead to heavy losses to the swine industry. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Structure of a Reptilian Adenovirus Reveals a Phage Tailspike Fold Stabilizing a Vertebrate Virus Capsid.

    PubMed

    Menéndez-Conejero, Rosa; Nguyen, Thanh H; Singh, Abhimanyu K; Condezo, Gabriela N; Marschang, Rachel E; van Raaij, Mark J; San Martín, Carmen

    2017-10-03

    Although non-human adenoviruses (AdVs) might offer solutions to problems posed by human AdVs as therapeutic vectors, little is known about their basic biology. In particular, there are no structural studies on the complete virion of any AdV with a non-mammalian host. We combine mass spectrometry, cryo-electron microscopy, and protein crystallography to characterize the composition and structure of a snake AdV (SnAdV-1, Atadenovirus genus). SnAdV-1 particles contain the genus-specific proteins LH3, p32k, and LH2, a previously unrecognized structural component. Remarkably, the cementing protein LH3 has a trimeric β helix fold typical of bacteriophage host attachment proteins. The organization of minor coat proteins differs from that in human AdVs, correlating with higher thermostability in SnAdV-1. These findings add a new piece to the intriguing puzzle of virus evolution, hint at the use of cell entry pathways different from those in human AdVs, and will help development of new, thermostable SnAdV-1-based vectors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Expressing Transgenes That Exceed the Packaging Capacity of Adeno-Associated Virus Capsids

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, Kyle; Riyad, Jalish Mahmud; Weber, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors (rAAV) are being explored as gene delivery vehicles for the treatment of various inherited and acquired disorders. rAAVs are attractive vectors for several reasons: wild-type AAVs are nonpathogenic, and rAAVs can trigger long-term transgene expression even in the absence of genome integration—at least in postmitotic tissues. Moreover, rAAVs have a low immunogenic profile, and the various AAV serotypes and variants display broad but distinct tropisms. One limitation of rAAVs is that their genome-packaging capacity is only ∼5 kb. For most applications this is not of major concern because the median human protein size is 375 amino acids. Excluding the ITRs, for a protein of typical length, this allows the incorporation of ∼3.5 kb of DNA for the promoter, polyadenylation sequence, and other regulatory elements into a single AAV vector. Nonetheless, for certain diseases the packaging limit of AAV does not allow the delivery of a full-length therapeutic protein by a single AAV vector. Hence, approaches to overcome this limitation have become an important area of research for AAV gene therapy. Among the most promising approaches to overcome the limitation imposed by the packaging capacity of AAV is the use of dual-vector approaches, whereby a transgene is split across two separate AAV vectors. Coinfection of a cell with these two rAAVs will then—through a variety of mechanisms—result in the transcription of an assembled mRNA that could not be encoded by a single AAV vector because of the DNA packaging limits of AAV. The main purpose of this review is to assess the current literature with respect to dual-AAV-vector design, to highlight the effectiveness of the different methodologies and to briefly discuss future areas of research to improve the efficiency of dual-AAV-vector transduction. PMID:26757051

  11. Molecular Architecture of the Retroviral Capsid.

    PubMed

    Perilla, Juan R; Gronenborn, Angela M

    2016-05-01

    Retroviral capsid cores are proteinaceous containers that self-assemble to encase the viral genome and a handful of proteins that promote infection. Their function is to protect and aid in the delivery of viral genes to the nucleus of the host, and, in many cases, infection pathways are influenced by capsid-cellular interactions. From a mathematical perspective, capsid cores are polyhedral cages and, as such, follow well-defined geometric rules. However, marked morphological differences in shapes exist, depending on virus type. Given the specific roles of capsid in the viral life cycle, the availability of detailed molecular structures, particularly at assembly interfaces, opens novel avenues for targeted drug development against these pathogens. Here, we summarize recent advances in the structure and understanding of retroviral capsid, with particular emphasis on assemblies and the capsid cores. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Visualization of the herpes simplex virus portal in situ by cryo-electron tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Cardone, Giovanni; Winkler, Dennis C.; Trus, Benes L.

    2007-05-10

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), the prototypical herpesvirus, has an icosahedral nucleocapsid surrounded by a proteinaceous tegument and a lipoprotein envelope. As in tailed bacteriophages, the icosahedral symmetry of the capsid is broken at one of the 12 vertices, which is occupied by a dodecameric ring of portal protein, UL6, instead of a pentamer of the capsid protein, UL19. The portal ring serves as a conduit for DNA entering and exiting the capsid. From a cryo-EM reconstruction of capsids immuno-gold-labeled with anti-UL6 antibodies, we confirmed that UL6 resides at a vertex. To visualize the portal in the context ofmore » the assembled capsid, we used cryo-electron tomography to determine the three-dimensional structures of individual A-capsids (empty, mature capsids). The similarity in size and overall shape of the portal and a UL19 pentamer - both are cylinders of {approx} 800 kDa - combined with residual noise in the tomograms, prevented us from identifying the portal vertices directly; however, this was accomplished by a computational classification procedure. Averaging the portal-containing subtomograms produced a structure that tallies with the isolated portal, as previously reconstructed by cryo-EM. The portal is mounted on the outer surface of the capsid floor layer, with its narrow end pointing outwards. This disposition differs from that of known phage portals in that the bulk of its mass lies outside, not inside, the floor. This distinction may be indicative of divergence at the level of portal-related functions other than its role as a DNA channel.« less

  13. Ultrastructural morphogenesis of a virus associated with lymphocystis-like lesions in parore Girella tricuspidata (Kyphosidae: Perciformes).

    PubMed

    Hine, P M; Wakefield, St J; Mackereth, G; Morrison, R

    2016-09-26

    The morphogenesis of large icosahedral viruses associated with lymphocystis-like lesions in the skin of parore Girella tricuspidata is described. The electron-lucent perinuclear viromatrix comprised putative DNA with open capsids at the periphery, very large arrays of smooth endoplasmic reticulum (sER), much of it with a reticulated appearance (rsER) or occurring as rows of vesicles. Lysosomes, degenerating mitochondria and virions in various stages of assembly, and paracrystalline arrays were also present. Long electron-dense inclusions (EDIs) with 15 nm repeating units split terminally and curled to form tubular structures internalising the 15 nm repeating structures. These tubular structures appeared to form the virion capsids. Large parallel arrays of sER sometimes alternated with aligned arrays of crinkled cisternae along which passed a uniformly wide (20 nm) thread-like structure. Strings of small vesicles near open capsids may also have been involved in formation of an inner lipid layer. Granules with a fine fibrillar appearance also occurred in the viromatrix, and from the presence of a halo around mature virions it appeared that the fibrils may form a layer around the capsid. The general features of virogenesis of large icosahedral dsDNA viruses, the large amount of ER, particularly rsER and the EDIs, are features of nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses, rather than features of 1 genus or family.

  14. Clinicopathological Implications of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) L1 Capsid Protein Immunoreactivity in HPV16-Positive Cervical Cytology

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung-Jong; Lee, Ah-Won; Kang, Chang-Suk; Park, Jong-Sup; Park, Dong-Choon; Ki, Eun-Young; Lee, Keun-Ho; Yoon, Joo-Hee; Hur, Soo-Young; Kim, Tae-Jung

    2014-01-01

    Background: The objective of this study was to investigate the expression of human papilloma virus (HPV) L1 capsid protein in abnormal cervical cytology with HPV16 infection and analyze its association with cervical histopathology in Korean women. Material and Methods: We performed immunocytochemistry for HPV L1 in 475 abnormal cervical cytology samples from patients with HPV16 infections using the Cytoactiv® HPV L1 screening set. We investigated the expression of HPV L1 in cervical cytology samples and compared it with the results of histopathological examination of surgical specimens. Results: Of a total of 475 cases, 188 (39.6%) were immunocytochemically positive and 287 (60.4%) negative for HPV L1. The immunocytochemical expression rates of HPV L1 in atypical squamous cells of unknown significance (ASCUS), low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL), high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL), and cancer were 21.8%, 59.7%, 19.1%, and 0.0%, respectively. LSIL exhibited the highest rate of HPV L1 positivity. Of a total of 475 cases, the multiple-type HPV infection rate, including HPV16, in HPV L1-negative cytology samples was 27.5%, which was significantly higher than that in HPV L1-positive cytology samples (p = 0.037). The absence of HPV L1 expression in ASCUS and LSIL was significantly associated with high-grade (≥cervical intraepithelial neoplasia [CIN] 2) than low-grade (≤CIN1) histopathology diagnoses (p < 0.05), but was not significantly different between HPV16 single and multiple-type HPV infections (p > 0.05). On the other hand, among 188 HPV L1-positive cases, 30.6% of multiple-type HPV infections showed high-grade histopathology diagnoses (≥CIN3), significantly higher than the percentage of HPV16 single infections (8.6%) (p = 0.0004) Conclusions: Our study demonstrates that the expression of HPV L1 is low in advanced dysplasia. Furthermore, the absence of HPV L1 in HPV16-positive low-grade cytology (i.e., ASCUS and LSIL) is

  15. Structural, Mechanistic, and Antigenic Characterization of the Human Astrovirus Capsid

    PubMed Central

    York, Royce L.; Yousefi, Payam A.; Bogdanoff, Walter; Haile, Sara; Tripathi, Sarvind

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human astroviruses (HAstVs) are nonenveloped, positive-sense, single-stranded RNA viruses that are a leading cause of viral gastroenteritis. HAstV particles display T=3 icosahedral symmetry formed by 180 copies of the capsid protein (CP), which undergoes proteolytic maturation to generate infectious HAstV particles. Little is known about the molecular features that govern HAstV particle assembly, maturation, infectivity, and immunogenicity. Here we report the crystal structures of the two main structural domains of the HAstV CP: the core domain at 2.60-Å resolution and the spike domain at 0.95-Å resolution. Fitting of these structures into the previously determined 25-Å-resolution electron cryomicroscopy density maps of HAstV allowed us to characterize the molecular features on the surfaces of immature and mature T=3 HAstV particles. The highly electropositive inner surface of HAstV supports a model in which interaction of the HAstV CP core with viral RNA is a driving force in T=3 HAstV particle formation. Additionally, mapping of conserved residues onto the HAstV CP core and spike domains in the context of the immature and mature HAstV particles revealed dramatic changes to the exposure of conserved residues during virus maturation. Indeed, we show that antibodies raised against mature HAstV have reactivity to both the HAstV CP core and spike domains, revealing for the first time that the CP core domain is antigenic. Together, these data provide new molecular insights into HAstV that have practical applications for the development of vaccines and antiviral therapies. IMPORTANCE Astroviruses are a leading cause of viral diarrhea in young children, immunocompromised individuals, and the elderly. Despite the prevalence of astroviruses, little is known at the molecular level about how the astrovirus particle assembles and is converted into an infectious, mature virus. In this paper, we describe the high-resolution structures of the two main astrovirus

  16. Influence of minor displacements in loops of the porcine parvovirus VP2 capsid on virus-like particles assembly and the induction of antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Pan, Qunxing; He, Kongwang; Wang, Yongshan; Wang, Xiaoli; Ouyang, Wei

    2013-06-01

    An antigen-delivery system based on hybrid virus-like particles (VLPs) formed by the self-assembly of the capsid VP2 protein of porcine parvovirus (PPV) and expressing foreign peptides offers an alternative method for vaccination. In this study, the three-dimensional structure of the PPV capsid protein and surface loops deletion mutants were analyzed to define essential domains in PPV VP2 for the assembly of VLPs. Electron microscopic analysis and SDS-PAGE analysis confirmed the presence of abundant VLPs in a loop2 deletion mutant of expected size and appropriate morphology. Loop4 and loop2-loop4 deletion mutants, however, resulted in a lower number of particles and the morphology of the particles was not well preserved. Furthermore, the green fluorescent protein (gfp) gene was used as a model. GFP was observed at the same level in displacements mutants. However, GFP displacement mutants in loop2 construct allowed better adaptation for the fusion GFP to be further displayed on the surface of the capsid-like structure. Immunogenicity study showed that there is no obvious difference in mice inoculated with rAd-VP2(Δloop2), rAd-VP2(Δloop4), rAd-VP2(Δloop2-Δloop4), and PPV inactivated vaccine. The results suggested the possibility of inserting simultaneously B and T cell epitopes in the surface loop2 and the N-terminus. The combination of different types of epitopes (B, CD4+, and CD8+) in different positions of the PPV particles opens the way to the development of highly efficient vaccines, able to stimulate at the same time the different branches of the immune system.

  17. A novel tetravalent formulation combining the four aggregated domain III-capsid proteins from dengue viruses induces a functional immune response in mice and monkeys.

    PubMed

    Suzarte, Edith; Gil, Lázaro; Valdés, Iris; Marcos, Ernesto; Lazo, Laura; Izquierdo, Alienys; García, Angélica; López, Lázaro; Álvarez, Maylin; Pérez, Yusleydis; Castro, Jorge; Romero, Yaremis; Guzmán, María G; Guillén, Gerardo; Hermida, Lisset

    2015-08-01

    Our group developed a subunit vaccine candidate against dengue virus based on two different viral regions: the domain III of the envelope protein and the capsid protein. The novel chimeric protein from dengue-2 virus [domain III-capsid (DIIIC-2)], when presented as aggregated incorporating oligodeoxynucleotides, induced anti-viral and neutralizing antibodies, a cellular immune response and conferred significant protection to mice and monkeys. The remaining constructs were already obtained and properly characterized. Based on this evidence, this work was aimed at assessing the immune response in mice of the chimeric proteins DIIIC of each serotype, as monovalent and tetravalent formulations. Here, we demonstrated the immunogenicity of each protein in terms of humoral and cell-mediated immunity, without antigen competition on the mixture forming the formulation tetra DIIIC. Accordingly, significant protection was afforded as measured by the limited viral load in the mouse encephalitis model. The assessment of the tetravalent formulation in non-human primates was also conducted. In this animal model, it was demonstrated that the formulation induced neutralizing antibodies and memory cell-mediated immune response with IFN-γ-secreting and cytotoxic capacity, regardless the route of immunization used. Taken together, we can assert that the tetravalent formulation of DIIIC proteins constitutes a promising vaccine candidate against dengue virus, and propose it for further efficacy experiments in monkeys or in the dengue human infection model, as it has been recently proposed. © The Japanese Society for Immunology. 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Swelling and Softening of the Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus in Response to pH Shifts

    PubMed Central

    Wilts, Bodo D.; Schaap, Iwan A.T.; Schmidt, Christoph F.

    2015-01-01

    Cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) forms highly elastic icosahedral protein capsids that undergo a characteristic swelling transition when the pH is raised from 5 to 7. Here, we performed nano-indentation experiments using an atomic force microscope to track capsid swelling and measure the shells’ Young’s modulus at the same time. When we chelated Ca2+ ions and raised the pH, we observed a gradual swelling of the RNA-filled capsids accompanied by a softening of the shell. Control experiments with empty wild-type virus and a salt-stable mutant revealed that the softening was not strictly coupled to the swelling of the protein shells. Our data suggest that a pH increase and Ca2+ chelation lead primarily to a loosening of contacts within the protein shell, resulting in a softening of the capsid. This appears to render the shell metastable and make swelling possible when repulsive forces among the capsid proteins become large enough, which is known to be followed by capsid disassembly at even higher pH. Thus, softening and swelling are likely to play a role during inoculation. PMID:25992732

  19. Structures of Adenovirus Incomplete Particles Clarify Capsid Architecture and Show Maturation Changes of Packaging Protein L1 52/55k

    PubMed Central

    Condezo, Gabriela N.; Marabini, Roberto; Ayora, Silvia; Carazo, José M.; Alba, Raúl; Chillón, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adenovirus is one of the most complex icosahedral, nonenveloped viruses. Even after its structure was solved at near-atomic resolution by both cryo-electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography, the location of minor coat proteins is still a subject of debate. The elaborated capsid architecture is the product of a correspondingly complex assembly process, about which many aspects remain unknown. Genome encapsidation involves the concerted action of five virus proteins, and proteolytic processing by the virus protease is needed to prime the virion for sequential uncoating. Protein L1 52/55k is required for packaging, and multiple cleavages by the maturation protease facilitate its release from the nascent virion. Light-density particles are routinely produced in adenovirus infections and are thought to represent assembly intermediates. Here, we present the molecular and structural characterization of two different types of human adenovirus light particles produced by a mutant with delayed packaging. We show that these particles lack core polypeptide V but do not lack the density corresponding to this protein in the X-ray structure, thereby adding support to the adenovirus cryo-electron microscopy model. The two types of light particles present different degrees of proteolytic processing. Their structures provide the first glimpse of the organization of L1 52/55k protein inside the capsid shell and of how this organization changes upon partial maturation. Immature, full-length L1 52/55k is poised beneath the vertices to engage the virus genome. Upon proteolytic processing, L1 52/55k disengages from the capsid shell, facilitating genome release during uncoating. IMPORTANCE Adenoviruses have been extensively characterized as experimental systems in molecular biology, as human pathogens, and as therapeutic vectors. However, a clear picture of many aspects of their basic biology is still lacking. Two of these aspects are the location of minor coat proteins in

  20. Preliminary crystallographic analysis of the major capsid protein P2 of the lipid-containing bacteriophage PM2

    SciTech Connect

    Abrescia, Nicola G. A.; Kivelä, Hanna M.; Grimes, Jonathan M.

    2005-08-01

    The viral capsid protein P2 of bacteriophage PM2 has been crystallized. Preliminary X-ray analysis demonstrates the position and orientation of the two trimers in the asymmetric unit. PM2 (Corticoviridae) is a dsDNA bacteriophage which contains a lipid membrane beneath its icosahedral capsid. In this respect it resembles bacteriophage PRD1 (Tectiviridae), although it is not known whether the similarity extends to the detailed molecular architecture of the virus, for instance the fold of the major coat protein P2. Structural analysis of PM2 has been initiated and virus-derived P2 has been crystallized by sitting-nanodrop vapour diffusion. Crystals of P2 have been obtainedmore » in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with two trimers in the asymmetric unit and unit-cell parameters a = 171.1, b = 78.7, c = 130.1 Å. The crystals diffract to 4 Å resolution at the ESRF BM14 beamline (Grenoble, France) and the orientation of the non-crystallographic threefold axes, the spatial relationship between the two trimers and the packing of the trimers within the unit cell have been determined. The trimers form tightly packed layers consistent with the crystal morphology, possibly recapitulating aspects of the arrangement of subunits in the virus.« less

  1. Extreme Mutation Tolerance: Nearly Half of the Archaeal Fusellovirus Sulfolobus Spindle-Shaped Virus 1 Genes Are Not Required for Virus Function, Including the Minor Capsid Protein Gene vp3

    PubMed Central

    Iverson, Eric A.; Goodman, David A.; Gorchels, Madeline E.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Viruses infecting the Archaea harbor a tremendous amount of genetic diversity. This is especially true for the spindle-shaped viruses of the family Fuselloviridae, where >90% of the viral genes do not have detectable homologs in public databases. This significantly limits our ability to elucidate the role of viral proteins in the infection cycle. To address this, we have developed genetic techniques to study the well-characterized fusellovirus Sulfolobus spindle-shaped virus 1 (SSV1), which infects Sulfolobus solfataricus in volcanic hot springs at 80°C and pH 3. Here, we present a new comparative genome analysis and a thorough genetic analysis of SSV1 using both specific and random mutagenesis and thereby generate mutations in all open reading frames. We demonstrate that almost half of the SSV1 genes are not essential for infectivity, and the requirement for a particular gene correlates well with its degree of conservation within the Fuselloviridae. The major capsid gene vp1 is essential for SSV1 infectivity. However, the universally conserved minor capsid gene vp3 could be deleted without a loss in infectivity and results in virions with abnormal morphology. IMPORTANCE Most of the putative genes in the spindle-shaped archaeal hyperthermophile fuselloviruses have no sequences that are clearly similar to characterized genes. In order to determine which of these SSV genes are important for function, we disrupted all of the putative genes in the prototypical fusellovirus, SSV1. Surprisingly, about half of the genes could be disrupted without destroying virus function. Even deletions of one of the known structural protein genes that is present in all known fuselloviruses, vp3, allows the production of infectious viruses. However, viruses lacking vp3 have abnormal shapes, indicating that the vp3 gene is important for virus structure. Identification of essential genes will allow focused research on minimal SSV genomes and further understanding of the structure

  2. Self-assembly of hexahistidine-tagged tobacco etch virus capsid protein into microfilaments that induce IgG2-specific response against a soluble porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus chimeric protein.

    PubMed

    Manuel-Cabrera, Carlos Alberto; Vallejo-Cardona, Alba Adriana; Padilla-Camberos, Eduardo; Hernández-Gutiérrez, Rodolfo; Herrera-Rodríguez, Sara Elisa; Gutiérrez-Ortega, Abel

    2016-11-29

    Assembly of recombinant capsid proteins into virus-like particles (VLPs) still represents an interesting challenge in virus-based nanotechnologies. The structure of VLPs has gained importance for the development and design of new adjuvants and antigen carriers. The potential of Tobacco etch virus capsid protein (TEV CP) as adjuvant has not been evaluated to date. Two constructs for TEV CP expression in Escherichia coli were generated: a wild-type version (TEV-CP) and a C-terminal hexahistidine (His)-tagged version (His-TEV-CP). Although both versions were expressed in the soluble fraction of E. coli lysates, only His-TEV-CP self-assembled into micrometric flexuous filamentous VLPs. In addition, the His-tag enabled high yields and facilitated purification of TEV VLPs. These TEV VLPs elicited broader IgG2-specific antibody response against a novel porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) protein when compared to the potent IgG1 response induced by the protein alone. His-TEV CP was purified by immobilized metal affinity chromatography and assembled into VLPs, some of them reaching 2-μm length. TEV VLPs administered along with PRRSV chimeric protein changed the IgG2/IgG1 ratio against the chimeric protein, suggesting that TEV CP can modulate the immune response against a soluble antigen.

  3. Capsid expansion mechanism of bacteriophage T7 revealed by multistate atomic models derived from cryo-EM reconstructions

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Fei; Liu, Zheng; Fang, Ping-An; Zhang, Qinfen; Wright, Elena T.; Wu, Weimin; Zhang, Ci; Vago, Frank; Ren, Yue; Jakana, Joanita; Chiu, Wah; Serwer, Philip; Jiang, Wen

    2014-01-01

    Many dsDNA viruses first assemble a DNA-free procapsid, using a scaffolding protein-dependent process. The procapsid, then, undergoes dramatic conformational maturation while packaging DNA. For bacteriophage T7 we report the following four single-particle cryo-EM 3D reconstructions and the derived atomic models: procapsid (4.6-Å resolution), an early-stage DNA packaging intermediate (3.5 Å), a later-stage packaging intermediate (6.6 Å), and the final infectious phage (3.6 Å). In the procapsid, the N terminus of the major capsid protein, gp10, has a six-turn helix at the inner surface of the shell, where each skewed hexamer of gp10 interacts with two scaffolding proteins. With the exit of scaffolding proteins during maturation the gp10 N-terminal helix unfolds and swings through the capsid shell to the outer surface. The refolded N-terminal region has a hairpin that forms a novel noncovalent, joint-like, intercapsomeric interaction with a pocket formed during shell expansion. These large conformational changes also result in a new noncovalent, intracapsomeric topological linking. Both interactions further stabilize the capsids by interlocking all pentameric and hexameric capsomeres in both DNA packaging intermediate and phage. Although the final phage shell has nearly identical structure to the shell of the DNA-free intermediate, surprisingly we found that the icosahedral faces of the phage are slightly (∼4 Å) contracted relative to the faces of the intermediate, despite the internal pressure from the densely packaged DNA genome. These structures provide a basis for understanding the capsid maturation process during DNA packaging that is essential for large numbers of dsDNA viruses. PMID:25313071

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of red clover necrotic mosaic virus

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Stanton L.; Guenther, Richard H.; Sit, Tim L.

    2010-11-12

    Red clover necrotic mosaic virus (RCNMV) is a species that belongs to the Tombusviridae family of plant viruses with a T = 3 icosahedral capsid. RCNMV virions were purified and were crystallized for X-ray analysis using the hanging-drop vapor-diffusion method. Self-rotation functions and systematic absences identified the space group as I23, with two virions in the unit cell. The crystals diffracted to better than 4 {angstrom} resolution but were very radiation-sensitive, causing rapid decay of the high-resolution reflections. The data were processed to 6 {angstrom} in the analysis presented here.

  5. African Swine Fever Virus Gets Undressed: New Insights on the Entry Pathway.

    PubMed

    Andrés, Germán

    2017-02-15

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) is a large, multienveloped DNA virus composed of a genome-containing core successively wrapped by an inner lipid envelope, an icosahedral protein capsid, and an outer lipid envelope. In keeping with this structural complexity, recent studies have revealed an intricate entry program. This Gem highlights how ASFV uses two alternative pathways, macropinocytosis and clathrin-mediated endocytosis, to enter into the host macrophage and how the endocytosed particles undergo a stepwise, low pH-driven disassembly leading to inner envelope fusion and core delivery in the cytoplasm. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  6. Herpes Simplex Virus Membrane Proteins gE/gI and US9 Act Cooperatively To Promote Transport of Capsids and Glycoproteins from Neuron Cell Bodies into Initial Axon Segments

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Paul W.; Howard, Tiffani L.

    2013-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) and other alphaherpesviruses must move from sites of latency in ganglia to peripheral epithelial cells. How HSV navigates in neuronal axons is not well understood. Two HSV membrane proteins, gE/gI and US9, are key to understanding the processes by which viral glycoproteins, unenveloped capsids, and enveloped virions are transported toward axon tips. Whether gE/gI and US9 function to promote the loading of viral proteins onto microtubule motors in neuron cell bodies or to tether viral proteins onto microtubule motors within axons is not clear. One impediment to understanding how HSV gE/gI and US9 function in axonal transport relates to observations that gE−, gI−, or US9− mutants are not absolutely blocked in axonal transport. Mutants are significantly reduced in numbers of capsids and glycoproteins in distal axons, but there are less extensive effects in proximal axons. We constructed HSV recombinants lacking both gE and US9 that transported no detectable capsids and glycoproteins to distal axons and failed to spread from axon tips to adjacent cells. Live-cell imaging of a gE−/US9− double mutant that expressed fluorescent capsids and gB demonstrated >90% diminished capsids and gB in medial axons and no evidence for decreased rates of transport, stalling, or increased retrograde transport. Instead, capsids, gB, and enveloped virions failed to enter proximal axons. We concluded that gE/gI and US9 function in neuron cell bodies, in a cooperative fashion, to promote the loading of HSV capsids and vesicles containing glycoproteins and enveloped virions onto microtubule motors or their transport into proximal axons. PMID:23077321

  7. Evolution of foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype A capsid coding (P1) region on a timescale of three decades in an endemic context.

    PubMed

    Das, Biswajit; Mohapatra, Jajati K; Pande, Veena; Subramaniam, Saravanan; Sanyal, Aniket

    2016-07-01

    Three decades-long (1977-2013) evolutionary trend of the capsid coding (P1) region of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) serotype A isolated in India was analysed. The exclusive presence of genotype 18 since 2001 and the dominance of the VP3(59)-deletion group of genotype 18 was evident in the recent years. Clade 18c was found to be currently the only active one among the three clades (18a, 18b and 18c) identified in the deletion group. The rate of evolution of the Indian isolates at the capsid region was found to be 4.96×10(-3)substitutions/site/year. The timescale analysis predicted the most recent common ancestor to have existed during 1962 for Indian FMDV serotype A and around 1998 for the deletion group. The evolutionary pattern of serotype A in India appears to be homogeneous as no spatial or temporal structure was observed. Bayesian skyline plots indicate a sharp decline in the effective number of infections after 2008, which might be a result of mass vaccination or inherent loss of virus fitness. Analyses of variability at 38 known antigenically critical positions in a countrywide longitudinal data set suggested that the substitutions neither followed any specific trend nor remained fixed for a long period since frequent reversions and convergence was noticed. A maximum of 6 different amino acid residues was seen in the gene pool at any antigenically critical site over the decades, suggesting a limited combination of residues being responsible for the observed antigenic variation. Evidence of positive selection at some of the antigenically critical residues and the structurally proximal positions suggest a possible role of pre-existing immunity in the host population in driving evolution. The VP1 C-terminus neither revealed variability nor positive selection, suggesting the possibility that this stretch does not contribute to the antigenic variation and adaptation under immune selection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Amino Acids in the Capsid Protein of Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus That Are Crucial for Systemic Infection, Particle Formation, and Insect Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Noris, E.; Vaira, A. M.; Caciagli, P.; Masenga, V.; Gronenborn, B.; Accotto, G. P.

    1998-01-01

    A functional capsid protein (CP) is essential for host plant infection and insect transmission in monopartite geminiviruses. We studied two defective genomic DNAs of tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV), Sic and SicRcv. Sic, cloned from a field-infected tomato, was not infectious, whereas SicRcv, which spontaneously originated from Sic, was infectious but not whitefly transmissible. A single amino acid change in the CP was found to be responsible for restoring infectivity. When the amino acid sequences of the CPs of Sic and SicRcv were compared with that of a closely related wild-type virus (TYLCV-Sar), differences were found in the following positions: 129 (P in Sic and SicRcv, Q in Sar), 134 (Q in Sic and Sar, H in SicRcv) and 152 (E in Sic and SicRcv, D in Sar). We constructed TYLCV-Sar variants containing the eight possible amino acid combinations in those three positions and tested them for infectivity and transmissibility. QQD, QQE, QHD, and QHE had a wild-type phenotype, whereas PHD and PHE were infectious but nontransmissible. PQD and PQE mutants were not infectious; however, they replicated and accumulated CP, but not virions, in Nicotiana benthamiana leaf discs. The Q129P replacement is a nonconservative change, which may drastically alter the secondary structure of the CP and affect its ability to form the capsid. The additional Q134H change, however, appeared to compensate for the structural modification. Sequence comparisons among whitefly-transmitted geminiviruses in terms of the CP region studied showed that combinations other than QQD are present in several cases, but never with a P129. PMID:9811744

  9. An unexpected twist in viral capsid maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Gertsman, Ilya; Gan, Lu; Guttman, Miklos

    2009-04-14

    Lambda-like double-stranded (ds) DNA bacteriophage undergo massive conformational changes in their capsid shell during the packaging of their viral genomes. Capsid shells are complex organizations of hundreds of protein subunits that assemble into intricate quaternary complexes that ultimately are able to withstand over 50 atm of pressure during genome packaging. The extensive integration between subunits in capsids requires the formation of an intermediate complex, termed a procapsid, from which individual subunits can undergo the necessary refolding and structural rearrangements needed to transition to the more stable capsid. Although various mature capsids have been characterized at atomic resolution, no such procapsidmore » structure is available for a dsDNA virus or bacteriophage. Here we present a procapsid X-ray structure at 3.65 {angstrom} resolution, termed prohead II, of the lambda-like bacteriophage HK97, the mature capsid structure of which was previously solved to 3.44 {angstrom}. A comparison of the two largely different capsid forms has unveiled an unprecedented expansion mechanism that describes the transition. Crystallographic and hydrogen/deuterium exchange data presented here demonstrate that the subunit tertiary structures are significantly different between the two states, with twisting and bending motions occurring in both helical and -sheet regions. We also identified subunit interactions at each three-fold axis of the capsid that are maintained throughout maturation. The interactions sustain capsid integrity during subunit refolding and provide a fixed hinge from which subunits undergo rotational and translational motions during maturation. Previously published calorimetric data of a closely related bacteriophage, P22, showed that capsid maturation was an exothermic process that resulted in a release of 90 kJ mol{sup -1} of energy. We propose that the major tertiary changes presented in this study reveal a structural basis for an

  10. Molecular Evolution and Genetic Analysis of the Major Capsid Protein VP1 of Duck Hepatitis A Viruses: Implications for Antigenic Stability

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiuli; Sheng, Zizhang; Huang, Bing; Qi, Lihong; Li, Yufeng; Yu, Kexiang; Liu, Cunxia; Qin, Zhuoming; Wang, Dan; Song, Minxun; Li, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV), a member of the family Picornaviridae, is the major cause of outbreaks with high mortality rates in young ducklings. It has three distinctive serotypes and among them, serotypes 1 (DHAV-1) and 3 (DHAV-3) were recognized in China. To investigate evolutionary and antigenic properties of the major capsid protein VP1 of these two serotypes, a primary target of neutralizing antibodies, we determined the VP1 coding sequences of 19 DHAV-1 (spanning 2000-2012) and 11 DHAV-3 isolates (spanning 2008-2014) associated with disease outbreaks. By bioinformatics analysis of VP1 sequences of these isolates and other DHAV strains reported previously, we demonstrated that DHAV-1 viruses evolved into two genetic lineages, while DHAV-3 viruses exhibited three distinct lineages. The rate of nucleotide substitution for DHAV-1 VP1 genes was estimated to be 5.57 x 10-4 per site per year, which was about one-third times slower than that for DHAV-3 VP1 genes. The population dynamics analysis showed an upward trend for infection of DHAV-1 viruses over time with little change observed for DHAV-3 viruses. Antigenic study of representative DHAV-1 and DHAV-3 strains covering all observed major lineages revealed no detectable changes in viral neutralization properties within the serotype, despite the lack of cross-neutralization between serotypes 1 and 3 strains. Structural analysis identified VP1 mutations in DHAV-1 and DHAV-3 viruses that underpin the observed antigenic phenotypes. Results of our experiments described here shall give novel insights into evolution and antigenicity of duck picornaviruses. PMID:26173145

  11. Exploring the binding mechanism of Heteroaryldihydropyrimidines and Hepatitis B Virus capsid combined 3D-QSAR and molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Tu, Jing; Li, Jiao Jiao; Shan, Zhi Jie; Zhai, Hong Lin

    2017-01-01

    The non-nucleoside drugs have been developed to treat HBV infection owing to their increased efficacy and lesser side effects, in which heteroaryldihydropyrimidines (HAPs) have been identified as effective inhibitors of HBV capsid. In this paper, the binding mechanism of HAPs targeting on HBV capsid protein was explored through three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship, molecular dynamics and binding free energy decompositions. The obtained models of comparative molecular field analysis and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis enable the sufficient interpretation of structure-activity relationship of HAPs-HBV. The binding free energy analysis correlates with the experimental data. The computational results disclose that the non-polar contribution is the major driving force and Y132A mutation enhances the binding affinity for inhibitor 2 bound to HBV. The hydrogen bond interactions between the inhibitors and Trp102 help to stabilize the conformation of HAPs-HBV. The study provides insight into the binding mechanism of HAPs-HBV and would be useful for the rational design and modification of new lead compounds of HAP drugs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Tabulation as a high-resolution alternative to coarse-graining protein interactions: Initial application to virus capsid subunits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiriti, Justin; Zuckerman, Daniel M.

    2015-12-01

    Traditional coarse-graining based on a reduced number of interaction sites often entails a significant sacrifice of chemical accuracy. As an alternative, we present a method for simulating large systems composed of interacting macromolecules using an energy tabulation strategy previously devised for small rigid molecules or molecular fragments [S. Lettieri and D. M. Zuckerman, J. Comput. Chem. 33, 268-275 (2012); J. Spiriti and D. M. Zuckerman, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 10, 5161-5177 (2014)]. We treat proteins as rigid and construct distance and orientation-dependent tables of the interaction energy between them. Arbitrarily detailed interactions may be incorporated into the tables, but as a proof-of-principle, we tabulate a simple α-carbon Gō-like model for interactions between dimeric subunits of the hepatitis B viral capsid. This model is significantly more structurally realistic than previous models used in capsid assembly studies. We are able to increase the speed of Monte Carlo simulations by a factor of up to 6700 compared to simulations without tables, with only minimal further loss in accuracy. To obtain further enhancement of sampling, we combine tabulation with the weighted ensemble (WE) method, in which multiple parallel simulations are occasionally replicated or pruned in order to sample targeted regions of a reaction coordinate space. In the initial study reported here, WE is able to yield pathways of the final ˜25% of the assembly process.

  13. Capsid coding region diversity of re-emerging lineage C foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype Asia1 from India.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Saravanan; Mohapatra, Jajati K; Das, Biswajit; Sharma, Gaurav K; Biswal, Jitendra K; Mahajan, Sonalika; Misri, Jyoti; Dash, Bana B; Pattnaik, Bramhadev

    2015-07-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) serotype Asia1 was first reported in India in 1951, where three major genetic lineages (B, C and D) of this serotype have been described until now. In this study, the capsid protein coding region of serotype Asia1 viruses (n = 99) from India were analyzed, giving importance to the viruses circulating since 2007. All of the isolates (n = 50) recovered during 2007-2013 were found to group within the re-emerging cluster of lineage C (designated as sublineage C(R)). The evolutionary rate of sublineage C(R) was estimated to be slightly higher than that of the serotype as a whole, and the time of the most recent common ancestor for this cluster was estimated to be approximately 2001. In comparison to the older isolates of lineage C (1993-2001), the re-emerging viruses showed variation at eight amino acid positions, including substitutions at the antigenically critical residues VP279 and VP2131. However, no direct correlation was found between sequence variations and antigenic relationships. The number of codons under positive selection and the nature of the selection pressure varied widely among the structural proteins, implying a heterogeneous pattern of evolution in serotype Asia1. While episodic diversifying selection appears to play a major role in shaping the evolution of VP1 and VP3, selection pressure acting on codons of VP2 is largely pervasive. Further, episodic positive selection appears to be responsible for the early diversification of lineage C. Recombination events identified in the structural protein coding region indicates its probable role in adaptive evolution of serotype Asia1 viruses.

  14. Simulations of polymorphic icosahedral shells assembling around many cargo molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohajerani, Farzaneh; Perlmutter, Jason; Hagan, Michael

    Bacterial microcompartments (BMCs) are large icosahedral shells that sequester the enzymes and reactants responsible for particular metabolic pathways in bacteria. Although different BMCs vary in size and encapsulate different cargoes, they are constructed from similar pentameric and hexameric shell proteins. Despite recent groundbreaking experiments which visualized the formation of individual BMCs, the detailed assembly pathways and the factors which control shell size remain unclear. In this talk, we describe theoretical and computational models that describe the dynamical encapsulation of hundreds of cargo molecules by self-assembling icosahedral shells. We present phase diagrams and analysis of dynamical simulation trajectories showing how the thermodynamics, assembly pathways, and emergent structures depend on the interactions among shell proteins and cargo molecules. Our model suggests a mechanism for controlling insertion of the 12 pentamers required for a closed shell topology, and the relationship between assembly pathway and BMC size polydispersity. In addition to elucidating how native BMCs assemble,our results establish principles for reengineering BMCs or viral capsids as customizable nanoreactors that can assemble around a programmable set of enzymes and reactants. Supported by NIH R01GM108021 and Brandeis MRSEC DMR-1420382.

  15. Comparison of the structures of three circoviruses: chicken anemia virus, porcine circovirus type 2, and beak and feather disease virus.

    PubMed

    Crowther, R A; Berriman, J A; Curran, W L; Allan, G M; Todd, D

    2003-12-01

    Circoviruses are small, nonenveloped icosahedral animal viruses characterized by circular single-stranded DNA genomes. Their genomes are the smallest possessed by animal viruses. Infections with circoviruses, which can lead to economically important diseases, frequently result in virus-induced damage to lymphoid tissue and immunosuppression. Within the family Circoviridae, different genera are distinguished by differences in genomic organization. Thus, Chicken anemia virus is in the genus Gyrovirus, while porcine circoviruses and Beak and feather disease virus belong to the genus CIRCOVIRUS: Little is known about the structures of circoviruses. Accordingly, we investigated the structures of these three viruses with a view to determining whether they are related. Three-dimensional maps computed from electron micrographs showed that all three viruses have a T=1 organization with capsids formed from 60 subunits. Porcine circovirus type 2 and beak and feather disease virus show similar capsid structures with flat pentameric morphological units, whereas chicken anemia virus has stikingly different protruding pentagonal trumpet-shaped units. It thus appears that the structures of viruses in the same genus are related but that those of viruses in different genera are unrelated.

  16. Intravenous administration of the adeno-associated virus-PHP.B capsid fails to upregulate transduction efficiency in the marmoset brain.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Yasunori; Konno, Ayumu; Mochizuki, Ryuta; Shinohara, Yoichiro; Nitta, Keisuke; Okada, Yukihiro; Hirai, Hirokazu

    2018-02-05

    Intravenous administration of adeno-associated virus (AAV)-PHP.B, a capsid variant of AAV9 containing seven amino acid insertions, results in a greater permeability of the blood brain barrier (BBB) than standard AAV9 in mice, leading to highly efficient and global transduction of the central nervous system (CNS). The present study aimed to examine whether the enhanced BBB penetrance of AAV-PHP.B observed in mice also occurs in non-human primates. Thus, a young adult (age, 1.6 years) and an old adult (age, 7.2 years) marmoset received an intravenous injection of AAV-PHP.B expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) under the control of the constitutive CBh promoter (a hybrid of cytomegalovirus early enhancer and chicken β-actin promoter). Age-matched control marmosets were treated with standard AAV9-capsid vectors. The animals were sacrificed 6 weeks after the viral injection. Based on the results, only limited transduction of neurons (0-2%) and astrocytes (0.1-2.5%) was observed in both AAV-PHP.B- and AAV9-treated marmosets. One noticeable difference between AAV-PHP.B and AAV9 was the marked transduction of the peripheral dorsal root ganglia neurons. Indeed, the soma and axons in the projection from the spinal cord to the nucleus cuneatus in the medulla oblongata were strongly labeled with EGFP by AAV-PHP.B. Thus, except for the peripheral dorsal root ganglia neurons, the AAV-PHP.B transduction efficiency in the CNS of marmosets was comparable to that of AAV9 vectors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Hepatitis B Virus Capsid Assembly Modulators, but Not Nucleoside Analogs, Inhibit the Production of Extracellular Pregenomic RNA and Spliced RNA Variants

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Suping; Espiritu, Christine; Kelly, Mollie; Lau, Vincent; Zheng, Lingjie; Hartman, George D.; Flores, Osvaldo A.; Klumpp, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein serves multiple essential functions in the viral life cycle, and antiviral agents that target the core protein are being developed. Capsid assembly modulators (CAMs) are compounds that target core and misdirect capsid assembly, resulting in the suppression of HBV replication and virion production. Besides HBV DNA, circulating HBV RNA has been detected in patient serum and can be associated with the treatment response. Here we studied the effect of HBV CAMs on the production of extracellular HBV RNA using infected HepaRG cells and primary human hepatocytes. Representative compounds from the sulfonamide carboxamide and heteroaryldihydropyrimidine series of CAMs were evaluated and compared to nucleos(t)ide analogs as inhibitors of the viral polymerase. The results showed that CAMs blocked extracellular HBV RNA with efficiencies similar to those with which they blocked pregenomic RNA (pgRNA) encapsidation, HBV DNA replication, and Dane particle production. Nucleos(t)ide analogs inhibited viral replication and virion production but not encapsidation or production of extracellular HBV RNA. Profiling of HBV RNA from both culture supernatants and patient serum showed that extracellular viral RNA consisted of pgRNA and spliced pgRNA variants with an internal deletion(s) but still retained the sequences at both the 5′ and 3′ ends. Similar variants were detected in the supernatants of infected cells with and without nucleos(t)ide analog treatment. Overall, our data demonstrate that HBV CAMs represent direct antiviral agents with a profile differentiated from that of nucleos(t)ide analogs, including the inhibition of extracellular pgRNA and spliced pgRNA. PMID:28559265

  18. A Comprehensive Study of Neutralizing Antigenic Sites on the Hepatitis E Virus (HEV) Capsid by Constructing, Clustering, and Characterizing a Tool Box*

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Min; Li, Xiao-Jing; Tang, Zi-Min; Yang, Fan; Wang, Si-Ling; Cai, Wei; Zhang, Ke; Xia, Ning-Shao; Zheng, Zi-Zheng

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis E virus (HEV) ORF2 encodes a single structural capsid protein. The E2s domain (amino acids 459–606) of the capsid protein has been identified as the major immune target. All identified neutralizing epitopes are located on this domain; however, a comprehensive characterization of antigenic sites on the domain is lacking due to its high degree of conformation dependence. Here, we used the statistical software SPSS to analyze cELISA (competitive ELISA) data to classify monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), which recognized conformational epitopes on E2s domain. Using this novel analysis method, we identified various conformational mAbs that recognized the E2s domain. These mAbs were distributed into 6 independent groups, suggesting the presence of at least 6 epitopes. Twelve representative mAbs covering the six groups were selected as a tool box to further map functional antigenic sites on the E2s domain. By combining functional and location information of the 12 representative mAbs, this study provided a complete picture of potential neutralizing epitope regions and immune-dominant determinants on E2s domain. One epitope region is located on top of the E2s domain close to the monomer interface; the other is located on the monomer side of the E2s dimer around the groove zone. Besides, two non-neutralizing epitopes were also identified on E2s domain that did not stimulate neutralizing antibodies. Our results help further the understanding of protective mechanisms induced by the HEV vaccine. Furthermore, the tool box with 12 representative mAbs will be useful for studying the HEV infection process. PMID:26085097

  19. Cyclophilins facilitate dissociation of the human papillomavirus type 16 capsid protein L1 from the L2/DNA complex following virus entry.

    PubMed

    Bienkowska-Haba, Malgorzata; Williams, Carlyn; Kim, Seong Man; Garcea, Robert L; Sapp, Martin

    2012-09-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are composed of the major and minor capsid proteins, L1 and L2, that encapsidate a chromatinized, circular double-stranded DNA genome. At the outset of infection, the interaction of HPV type 16 (HPV16) (pseudo)virions with heparan sulfate proteoglycans triggers a conformational change in L2 that is facilitated by the host cell chaperone cyclophilin B (CyPB). This conformational change results in exposure of the L2 N terminus, which is required for infectious internalization. Following internalization, L2 facilitates egress of the viral genome from acidified endosomes, and the L2/DNA complex accumulates at PML nuclear bodies. We recently described a mutant virus that bypasses the requirement for cell surface CyPB but remains sensitive to cyclosporine for infection, indicating an additional role for CyP following endocytic uptake of virions. We now report that the L1 protein dissociates from the L2/DNA complex following infectious internalization. Inhibition and small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of CyPs blocked dissociation of L1 from the L2/DNA complex. In vitro, purified CyPs facilitated the dissociation of L1 pentamers from recombinant HPV11 L1/L2 complexes in a pH-dependent manner. Furthermore, CyPs released L1 capsomeres from partially disassembled HPV16 pseudovirions at slightly acidic pH. Taken together, these data suggest that CyPs mediate the dissociation of HPV L1 and L2 capsid proteins following acidification of endocytic vesicles.

  20. Cyclophilins Facilitate Dissociation of the Human Papillomavirus Type 16 Capsid Protein L1 from the L2/DNA Complex following Virus Entry

    PubMed Central

    Bienkowska-Haba, Malgorzata; Williams, Carlyn; Kim, Seong Man; Garcea, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are composed of the major and minor capsid proteins, L1 and L2, that encapsidate a chromatinized, circular double-stranded DNA genome. At the outset of infection, the interaction of HPV type 16 (HPV16) (pseudo)virions with heparan sulfate proteoglycans triggers a conformational change in L2 that is facilitated by the host cell chaperone cyclophilin B (CyPB). This conformational change results in exposure of the L2 N terminus, which is required for infectious internalization. Following internalization, L2 facilitates egress of the viral genome from acidified endosomes, and the L2/DNA complex accumulates at PML nuclear bodies. We recently described a mutant virus that bypasses the requirement for cell surface CyPB but remains sensitive to cyclosporine for infection, indicating an additional role for CyP following endocytic uptake of virions. We now report that the L1 protein dissociates from the L2/DNA complex following infectious internalization. Inhibition and small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of CyPs blocked dissociation of L1 from the L2/DNA complex. In vitro, purified CyPs facilitated the dissociation of L1 pentamers from recombinant HPV11 L1/L2 complexes in a pH-dependent manner. Furthermore, CyPs released L1 capsomeres from partially disassembled HPV16 pseudovirions at slightly acidic pH. Taken together, these data suggest that CyPs mediate the dissociation of HPV L1 and L2 capsid proteins following acidification of endocytic vesicles. PMID:22761365

  1. Synthesis of dispersive iron or iron-silver nanoparticles on engineered capsid pVIII of M13 virus with electronegative terminal peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuai; Nakano, Kazuhiko; Zhang, Shu-liang; Yu, Hui-min

    2015-10-01

    M13 is a filamentous Escherichia coli virus covered with five types of capsid proteins, in which pVIII with 2700 copies was around the cylindered surface and pIII with five copies located at one end of the phage particle. The pIII-engineered M13 phages with enhanced binding specificity toward Fe were screened after five rounds of biopanning, and the one containing ATPTVAMSLSPL peptide at pIII-terminus was selected for mediated synthesis of zero valent (ZV) Fe nanoparticles (NPs) with the wild M13 as control. Under a reducing environment, uniformly dispersed ZVFeNPs with diameter of 5-10 nm were both synthesized and the morphologies after annealing were confirmed to be face-centered cubic type. The synthesized FeNPs mediated by the two phages showed no significant difference, revealing that the pVIII capsid did dominant contribution to metal binding in comparison with the pIII. A novel pVIII-engineered M13 containing AAEEEDPAK at terminus, named as 4ED-pVIII-M13, was constructed and it carried one more negatively charged residue than the wild one (AEGDDPAK). Metal adsorption quantification showed that the binding affinity of the 4ED-pVIII-M13 toward Ag and Ni ions improved to 62 and 18 % from original 21 and 6 %, respectively. The binding affinity toward Fe remained constant ( 85 %). ZVFe-Ag bi-NPs were successfully synthesized through mediation of 4ED-pVIII-M13. Particularly, the Fe:Ag ratio in the bi-NPs was conveniently controlled through changing the molar concentration of FeCl2 and AgNO3 solution before reduction.

  2. The Crystallographic Structure of Panicum Mosaic Virus (PMV)

    PubMed Central

    Makino, Debora L.; Larson, Steven B.; McPherson, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    The structure of Panicum Mosaic Virus (PMV) was determined by X-ray diffraction analysis to 2.9 Å resolution. The crystals were of pseudo symmetry F23; the true crystallographic unit cell was of space group P21 with a=411.7 Å, b=403.9 Å and c=412.5 Å, with β=89.7°. The asymmetric unit was two entire T=3 virus particles, or 360 protein subunits. The structure was solved by conventional molecular replacement from two distant homologues, Cocksfoot Mottle Virus (CfMV) and Tobacco Necrosis Virus (TNV), of ~20% sequence identity followed by phase extension. The model was initially refined with exact icosahedral constraints and then with icosahedral restraints. The virus has Ca++ ions octahedrally coordinated by six aspartic acid residues on quasi threefold axes, which is completely different than for either CfMV or TNV. Amino terminal residues 1–53, 1–49 and 1-21 of the A, B and C subunits, respectively, and the four C-terminal residues (239-242) are not visible in electron density maps. The additional ordered residues of the C chain form a prominent “arm” that intertwines with symmetry equivalent “arms” at icosahedral threefold axes, as was seen in both CfMV and TNV. A 17 nucleotide hairpin segment of genomic RNA is icosahedrally ordered and bound at 60 equivalent sites at quasi twofold A–B subunit interfaces at the interior surface of the capsid. This segment of RNA may serve as a conformational switch for coat protein subunits, as has been proposed for similar RNA segments in other viruses. PMID:23123270

  3. Modeling Viral Capsid Assembly

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    I present a review of the theoretical and computational methodologies that have been used to model the assembly of viral capsids. I discuss the capabilities and limitations of approaches ranging from equilibrium continuum theories to molecular dynamics simulations, and I give an overview of some of the important conclusions about virus assembly that have resulted from these modeling efforts. Topics include the assembly of empty viral shells, assembly around single-stranded nucleic acids to form viral particles, and assembly around synthetic polymers or charged nanoparticles for nanotechnology or biomedical applications. I present some examples in which modeling efforts have promoted experimental breakthroughs, as well as directions in which the connection between modeling and experiment can be strengthened. PMID:25663722

  4. Recombinant human adenovirus-5 expressing capsid proteins of Indian vaccine strains of foot-and-mouth disease virus elicits effective antibody response in cattle.

    PubMed

    Sreenivasa, B P; Mohapatra, J K; Pauszek, S J; Koster, M; Dhanya, V C; Tamil Selvan, R P; Hosamani, M; Saravanan, P; Basagoudanavar, Suresh H; de Los Santos, T; Venkataramanan, R; Rodriguez, L L; Grubman, M J

    2017-05-01

    Recombinant adenovirus-5 vectored foot-and-mouth disease constructs (Ad5- FMD) were made for three Indian vaccine virus serotypes O, A and Asia 1. Constructs co-expressing foot-and- mouth disease virus (FMDV) capsid and viral 3C protease sequences, were evaluated for their ability to induce a neutralizing antibody response in indigenous cattle (Bos indicus). Purified Ad5-FMD viruses were inoculated in cattle as monovalent (5×10 9 pfu/animal) or trivalent (5×10 9 pfu/animal per serotype) vaccines. Animals vaccinated with monovalent Ad5-FMD vaccines were boosted 63days later with the same dose. After primary immunization, virus neutralization tests (VNT) showed seroconversion in 83, 67 and 33% of animals vaccinated with Ad5-FMD O, A and Asia 1, respectively. Booster immunization elicited seroconversion in all of the animals (100%) in the monovalent groups. When used in a trivalent form, the Ad5-FMD vaccine induced neutralizing antibodies in only 33, 50 and 16% of animals against serotypes O, A and Asia 1, respectively on primo-vaccination, and titers were significantly lower than when the same vectors were used in monovalent form. Neutralizing antibody titers differed by serotype for both Ad5-FMD monovalent and trivalent vaccines, with Asia 1 serotype inducing the lowest titers. Antibody response to Ad5 vector in immunized cattle was also assessed by VNT. It appeared that the vector immunity did not impact the recall responses to expressed FMDV antigens on booster immunization. In summary, the study suggested that the recombinant Ad5-FMD vaccine has a potential use in monovalent form, while its application in multivalent form is not currently encouraging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Oral vaccination through voluntary consumption of the convict grouper Epinephelus septemfasciatus with yeast producing the capsid protein of red-spotted grouper nervous necrosis virus.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seo Young; Kim, Hyoung Jin; Lan, Nguyen Thi; Han, Hyun-Ja; Lee, Deok-Chan; Hwang, Jee Youn; Kwon, Mun-Gyeong; Kang, Bo Kyu; Han, Sang Yoon; Moon, Hyoungjoon; Kang, Hyun Ah; Kim, Hong-Jin

    2017-05-01

    Nervous necrosis viruses (NNV) cause serious economic losses in marine fish cultivation. The red-spotted grouper NNV (RGNNV) is the most common species of NNV worldwide. There have been many efforts to develop prophylactic NNV vaccines, and various types of vaccine candidate have been suggested. However, most were designed as injectable vaccines, which are not suitable for large-scale vaccination and cause too much stress to the fish. Oral vaccination through voluntary feeding is an ideal way to provide protective immunity to fish. In the present study, recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae producing RGNNV capsid protein was used as oral vaccine. The recombinant yeast was prepared in freeze-dried form after disruption. Convict groupers were divided into three groups, control, and oral and parenteral vaccination groups, each consisting of 700 fishes. The control group received no treatment, the parenteral group received one intraperitoneal injection of RGNNV virus-like particles, and the oral vaccination group consumed feed containing the lysed recombinant yeast; voluntary intake was allowed four times at one-week intervals. Both vaccination groups produced serum RGNNV neutralizing antibody titers of >10 3 (log 2, 9.96), sustained for at least 95days post-immunization. In addition, in response to challenge with RGNNV both groups suffered significantly reduced mortality and had reduced brain RGNNV titers. These results indicate that recombinant yeast-based oral fish vaccines have great potential for large-scale vaccination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A comparison of PCR assays for beak and feather disease virus and high resolution melt (HRM) curve analysis of replicase associated protein and capsid genes.

    PubMed

    Das, Shubhagata; Sarker, Subir; Ghorashi, Seyed Ali; Forwood, Jade K; Raidal, Shane R

    2016-11-01

    Beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) threatens a wide range of endangered psittacine birds worldwide. In this study, we assessed a novel PCR assay and genetic screening method using high-resolution melt (HRM) curve analysis for BFDV targeting the capsid (Cap) gene (HRM-Cap) alongside conventional PCR detection as well as a PCR method that targets a much smaller fragment of the virus genome in the replicase initiator protein (Rep) gene (HRM-Rep). Limits of detection, sensitivity, specificity and discriminatory power for differentiating BFDV sequences were compared. HRM-Cap had a high positive predictive value and could readily differentiate between a reference genotype and 17 other diverse BFDV genomes with more discriminatory power (genotype confidence percentage) than HRM-Rep. Melt curve profiles generated by HRM-Cap correlated with unique DNA sequence profiles for each individual test genome. The limit of detection of HRM-Cap was lower (2×10 -5 ng/reaction or 48 viral copies) than that for both HRM-Rep and conventional BFDV PCR which had similar sensitivity (2×10 -6 ng or 13 viral copies/reaction). However, when used in a diagnostic setting with 348 clinical samples there was strong agreement between HRM-Cap and conventional PCR (kappa=0.87, P<0.01, 98% specificity) and HRM-Cap demonstrated higher specificity (99.9%) than HRM-Rep (80.3%). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Polymorphism of DNA conformation inside the bacteriophage capsid.

    PubMed

    Leforestier, Amélie

    2013-03-01

    Double-stranded DNA bacteriophage genomes are packaged into their icosahedral capsids at the highest densities known so far (about 50 % w:v). How the molecule is folded at such density and how its conformation changes upon ejection or packaging are fascinating questions still largely open. We review cryo-TEM analyses of DNA conformation inside partially filled capsids as a function of the physico-chemical environment (ions, osmotic pressure, temperature). We show that there exists a wide variety of DNA conformations. Strikingly, the different observed structures can be described by some of the different models proposed over the years for DNA organisation inside bacteriophage capsids: either spool-like structures with axial or concentric symmetries, or liquid crystalline structures characterised by a DNA homogeneous density. The relevance of these conformations for the understanding of DNA folding and unfolding upon ejection and packaging in vivo is discussed.

  8. Production, purification and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of adeno-associated virus serotype 7

    SciTech Connect

    Quesada, Odayme; Gurda, Brittney; Govindasamy, Lakshmanan

    2007-12-01

    Crystals of baculovirus-expressed adeno-associated virus serotype 7 capsids have been produced which diffract X-rays to ∼3.0 Å resolution. Crystals of baculovirus-expressed adeno-associated virus serotype 7 capsids diffract X-rays to ∼3.0 Å resolution. The crystals belong to the rhombohedral space group R3, with unit-cell parameters a = 252.4, c = 591.2 Å in the hexagonal setting. The diffraction data were processed and reduced to an overall completeness of 79.0% and an R{sub merge} of 12.0%. There are three viral capsids in the unit cell. The icosahedral threefold axis is coincident with the crystallographic threefold axis, resulting in one third of amore » capsid (20 monomers) per crystallographic asymmetric unit. The orientation of the viral capsid has been determined by rotation-function searches and is positioned at (0, 0, 0) by packing considerations.« less

  9. Enhanced sensitivity in detection of antiviral antibody responses using biotinylation of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) capsids

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Analysis of the immune response to infection of livestock by foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is most often reported as the serum antibody response to the virus. While measurement of neutralizing antibody has been sensitive and specific, measurements of the quality of the antibody response are le...

  10. Expression and Self-Assembly in Baculovirus of Porcine Enteric Calicivirus Capsids into Virus-Like Particles and Their Use in an Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Antibody Detection in Swine

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Mingzhang; Qian, Yuan; Chang, Kyeong-Ok; Saif, Linda J.

    2001-01-01

    Porcine enteric calicivirus (PEC) causes diarrhea and intestinal lesions in pigs. PEC strain Cowden grows to low to moderate titers in cell culture but only with the addition of intestinal contents from uninfected gnotobiotic pigs (W. T. Flynn and L. J. Saif, J. Clin. Microbiol. 26:206–212, 1988; A. V. Parwani, W. T. Flynn, K. L. Gadfield, and L. J. Saif, Arch. Virol. 120:115–122, 1991). Cloning and sequence analysis of the PEC Cowden full-length genome revealed that it is most closely related genetically to the human Sapporo-like viruses. In this study, the complete PEC capsid gene was subcloned into the plasmid pBlueBac4.5 and the recombinant baculoviruses were identified by plaque assay and PCR. The PEC capsid protein was expressed in insect (Sf9) cells inoculated with the recombinant baculoviruses, and the recombinant capsid proteins self- assembled into virus-like particles (VLPs) that were released into the cell supernatant and purified by CsCl gradient centrifugation. The PEC VLPs had the same molecular mass (58 kDa) as the native virus capsid and reacted with pig hyperimmune and convalescent-phase sera to PEC Cowden in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blotting. The PEC capsid VLPs were morphologically and antigenically similar to the native virus by immune electron microscopy. High titers (1:102,400 to 204,800) of PEC-specific antibodies were induced in guinea pigs inoculated with PEC VLPs, suggesting that the VLPs could be useful for future candidate PEC vaccines. A fixed-cell ELISA and VLP ELISA were developed to detect PEC serum antibodies in pigs. For the fixed-cell ELISA, Sf9 cells were infected with recombinant baculoviruses expressing PEC capsids, followed by cell fixation with formalin. For the VLP ELISA, the VLPs were used for the coating antigen. Our data indicate that both tests were rapid, specific, and reproducible and might be used for large-scale serological investigations of PEC antibodies in swine. PMID:11283075

  11. Extreme Mutation Tolerance: Nearly Half of the Archaeal Fusellovirus Sulfolobus Spindle-Shaped Virus 1 Genes Are Not Required for Virus Function, Including the Minor Capsid Protein Gene vp3.

    PubMed

    Iverson, Eric A; Goodman, David A; Gorchels, Madeline E; Stedman, Kenneth M

    2017-05-15

    Viruses infecting the Archaea harbor a tremendous amount of genetic diversity. This is especially true for the spindle-shaped viruses of the family Fuselloviridae , where >90% of the viral genes do not have detectable homologs in public databases. This significantly limits our ability to elucidate the role of viral proteins in the infection cycle. To address this, we have developed genetic techniques to study the well-characterized fusellovirus Sulfolobus spindle-shaped virus 1 (SSV1), which infects Sulfolobus solfataricus in volcanic hot springs at 80°C and pH 3. Here, we present a new comparative genome analysis and a thorough genetic analysis of SSV1 using both specific and random mutagenesis and thereby generate mutations in all open reading frames. We demonstrate that almost half of the SSV1 genes are not essential for infectivity, and the requirement for a particular gene correlates well with its degree of conservation within the Fuselloviridae The major capsid gene vp1 is essential for SSV1 infectivity. However, the universally conserved minor capsid gene vp3 could be deleted without a loss in infectivity and results in virions with abnormal morphology. IMPORTANCE Most of the putative genes in the spindle-shaped archaeal hyperthermophile fuselloviruses have no sequences that are clearly similar to characterized genes. In order to determine which of these SSV genes are important for function, we disrupted all of the putative genes in the prototypical fusellovirus, SSV1. Surprisingly, about half of the genes could be disrupted without destroying virus function. Even deletions of one of the known structural protein genes that is present in all known fuselloviruses, vp3 , allows the production of infectious viruses. However, viruses lacking vp3 have abnormal shapes, indicating that the vp3 gene is important for virus structure. Identification of essential genes will allow focused research on minimal SSV genomes and further understanding of the structure of

  12. Detection of Foot-and-mouth Disease Virus RNA and Capsid Protein in Lymphoid Tissues of Convalescent Pigs Does Not Indicate Existence of a Carrier State.

    PubMed

    Stenfeldt, C; Pacheco, J M; Smoliga, G R; Bishop, E; Pauszek, S J; Hartwig, E J; Rodriguez, L L; Arzt, J

    2016-04-01

    A systematic study was performed to investigate the potential of pigs to establish and maintain persistent foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infection. Infectious virus could not be recovered from sera, oral, nasal or oropharyngeal fluids obtained after resolution of clinical infection with any of five FMDV strains within serotypes A, O and Asia-1. Furthermore, there was no isolation of live virus from tissue samples harvested at 28-100 days post-infection from convalescent pigs recovered from clinical or subclinical FMD. Despite lack of detection of infectious FMDV, there was a high prevalence of FMDV RNA detection in lymph nodes draining lesion sites harvested at 35 days post-infection, with the most frequent detection recorded in popliteal lymph nodes (positive detection in 88% of samples obtained from non-vaccinated pigs). Likewise, at 35 dpi, FMDV capsid antigen was localized within follicles of draining lymph nodes, but without concurrent detection of FMDV non-structural protein. There was a marked decline in the detection of FMDV RNA and antigen in tissue samples by 60 dpi, and no antigen or viral RNA could be detected in samples obtained at 100 dpi. The data presented herein provide the most extensive investigation of FMDV persistence in pigs. The overall conclusion is that domestic pigs are unlikely to be competent long-term carriers of infectious FMDV; however, transient persistence of FMDV protein and RNA in lymphoid tissues is common following clinical or subclinical infection. © Published 2014. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  13. Nanoindentation studies of full and empty viral capsids and the effects of capsid protein mutations on elasticity and strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, J. P.; Ivanovska, I. L.; Gibbons, M. M.; Klug, W. S.; Knobler, C. M.; Wuite, G. J. L.; Schmidt, C. F.

    2006-04-01

    The elastic properties of capsids of the cowpea chlorotic mottle virus have been examined at pH 4.8 by nanoindentation measurements with an atomic force microscope. Studies have been carried out on WT capsids, both empty and containing the RNA genome, and on full capsids of a salt-stable mutant and empty capsids of the subE mutant. Full capsids resisted indentation more than empty capsids, but all of the capsids were highly elastic. There was an initial reversible linear regime that persisted up to indentations varying between 20% and 30% of the diameter and applied forces of 0.6-1.0 nN; it was followed by a steep drop in force that is associated with irreversible deformation. A single point mutation in the capsid protein increased the capsid stiffness. The experiments are compared with calculations by finite element analysis of the deformation of a homogeneous elastic thick shell. These calculations capture the features of the reversible indentation region and allow Young's moduli and relative strengths to be estimated for the empty capsids. atomic force microscopy | cowpea chlorotic mottle virus | finite element analysis | biomechanics

  14. Sulfolobus Spindle-Shaped Virus 1 Contains Glycosylated Capsid Proteins, a Cellular Chromatin Protein, and Host-Derived Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Quemin, Emmanuelle R. J.; Pietilä, Maija K.; Oksanen, Hanna M.; Forterre, Patrick; Rijpstra, W. Irene C.; Schouten, Stefan; Bamford, Dennis H.; Prangishvili, David

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Geothermal and hypersaline environments are rich in virus-like particles, among which spindle-shaped morphotypes dominate. Currently, viruses with spindle- or lemon-shaped virions are exclusive to Archaea and belong to two distinct viral families. The larger of the two families, the Fuselloviridae, comprises tail-less, spindle-shaped viruses, which infect hosts from phylogenetically distant archaeal lineages. Sulfolobus spindle-shaped virus 1 (SSV1) is the best known member of the family and was one of the first hyperthermophilic archaeal viruses to be isolated. SSV1 is an attractive model for understanding virus-host interactions in Archaea; however, the constituents and architecture of SSV1 particles remain only partially characterized. Here, we have conducted an extensive biochemical characterization of highly purified SSV1 virions and identified four virus-encoded structural proteins, VP1 to VP4, as well as one DNA-binding protein of cellular origin. The virion proteins VP1, VP3, and VP4 undergo posttranslational modification by glycosylation, seemingly at multiple sites. VP1 is also proteolytically processed. In addition to the viral DNA-binding protein VP2, we show that viral particles contain the Sulfolobus solfataricus chromatin protein Sso7d. Finally, we provide evidence indicating that SSV1 virions contain glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraether (GDGT) lipids, resolving a long-standing debate on the presence of lipids within SSV1 virions. A comparison of the contents of lipids isolated from the virus and its host cell suggests that GDGTs are acquired by the virus in a selective manner from the host cytoplasmic membrane, likely during progeny egress. IMPORTANCE Although spindle-shaped viruses represent one of the most prominent viral groups in Archaea, structural data on their virion constituents and architecture still are scarce. The comprehensive biochemical characterization of the hyperthermophilic virus SSV1 presented here brings novel and

  15. Structure of the Small Outer Capsid Protein, Soc: A Clamp for Stabilizing Capsids of T4-like Phages

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Li; Fokine, Andrei; O'Donnell, Erin

    2010-07-22

    Many viruses need to stabilize their capsid structure against DNA pressure and for survival in hostile environments. The 9-kDa outer capsid protein (Soc) of bacteriophage T4, which stabilizes the virus, attaches to the capsid during the final stage of maturation. There are 870 Soc molecules that act as a 'glue' between neighboring hexameric capsomers, forming a 'cage' that stabilizes the T4 capsid against extremes of pH and temperature. Here we report a 1.9 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of Soc from the bacteriophage RB69, a close relative of T4. The RB69 crystal structure and a homology model of T4 Soc weremore » fitted into the cryoelectron microscopy reconstruction of the T4 capsid. This established the region of Soc that interacts with the major capsid protein and suggested a mechanism, verified by extensive mutational and biochemical studies, for stabilization of the capsid in which the Soc trimers act as clamps between neighboring capsomers. The results demonstrate the factors involved in stabilizing not only the capsids of T4-like bacteriophages but also many other virus capsids.« less

  16. Live cell imaging of interactions between replicase and capsid protein of Brome mosaic virus using Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation: Implications for replication and genome packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chaturvedi, Sonali; Rao, A.L.N., E-mail: arao@ucr.edu

    2014-09-15

    In Brome mosaic virus, it was hypothesized that a physical interaction between viral replicase and capsid protein (CP) is obligatory to confer genome packaging specificity. Here we tested this hypothesis by employing Bimolecular Fluorescent Complementation (BiFC) as a tool for evaluating protein–protein interactions in living cells. The efficacy of BiFC was validated by a known interaction between replicase protein 1a (p1a) and protein 2a (p2a) at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) site of viral replication. Additionally, co-expression in planta of a bona fide pair of interacting protein partners of p1a and p2a had resulted in the assembly of a functional replicase.more » Subsequent BiFC assays in conjunction with mCherry labeled ER as a fluorescent cellular marker revealed that CP physically interacts with p2a, but not p1a, and this CP:p2a interaction occurs at the cytoplasmic phase of the ER. The significance of the CP:p2a interaction in BMV replication and genome packaging is discussed. - Highlights: • YFP fusion proteins of BMV p1a and p2a are biologically active. • Self-interaction was observed for p1a, p2a and CP. • CP interacts with p2a but not p1a. • Majority of reconstituted YFP resulting from bona fide fusion protein partners localized on ER.« less

  17. Identification of the major capsid protein of erythrocytic necrosis virus (ENV) and development of quantitative real-time PCR assays for quantification of ENV DNA.

    PubMed

    Purcell, Maureen K; Pearman-Gillman, Schuyler; Thompson, Rachel L; Gregg, Jacob L; Hart, Lucas M; Winton, James R; Emmenegger, Eveline J; Hershberger, Paul K

    2016-07-01

    Viral erythrocytic necrosis (VEN) is a disease of marine and anadromous fish that is caused by the erythrocytic necrosis virus (ENV), which was recently identified as a novel member of family Iridoviridae by next-generation sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis of the ENV DNA polymerase grouped ENV with other erythrocytic iridoviruses from snakes and lizards. In the present study, we identified the gene encoding the ENV major capsid protein (MCP) and developed a quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay targeting this gene. Phylogenetic analysis of the MCP gene sequence supported the conclusion that ENV does not group with any of the currently described iridovirus genera. Because there is no information regarding genetic variation of the MCP gene across the reported host and geographic range for ENV, we also developed a second qPCR assay for a more conserved ATPase-like gene region. The MCP and ATPase qPCR assays demonstrated good analytical and diagnostic sensitivity and specificity based on samples from laboratory challenges of Pacific herring Clupea pallasii The qPCR assays had similar diagnostic sensitivity and specificity as light microscopy of stained blood smears for the presence of intraerythrocytic inclusion bodies. However, the qPCR assays may detect viral DNA early in infection prior to the formation of inclusion bodies. Both qPCR assays appear suitable for viral surveillance or as a confirmatory test for ENV in Pacific herring from the Salish Sea. © 2016 The Author(s).

  18. In vivo particle polymorphism results from deletion of a N-terminal peptide molecular switch in brome mosaic virus capsid protein

    PubMed Central

    Calhoun, Shauni L; Speir, Jeffrey A; Rao, A.L.N.

    2009-01-01

    The interaction between brome mosaic virus (BMV) coat protein (CP) and viral RNA is a carefully orchestrated process resulting in the formation of homogeneous population of infectious virions with T=3 symmetry. Expression in vivo of either wild type or mutant BMV CP through homologous replication never results in the assembly of aberrant particles. In this study, we report that deletion of amino acid residues 41–47 from the N-proximal region of BMV CP resulted in the assembly of polymorphic virions in vivo. Purified virions from symptomatic leaves remain non-infectious and Northern blot analysis of virion RNA displayed packaging defects. Biochemical of variant CP by circular dichroism and MALDI-TOF, respectively, revealed that the engineered deletion affected the protein structure and capsid dynamics. Most significantly, CP subunits dissociated from polymorphic virions are incompetent for in vitro reassembly. Based on these observations, we propose a chaperon mediated mechanism for the assembly of variant CP in vivo and also hypothesize that 41KAIKAIA47 N-proximal peptide functions as a molecular switch in regulating T= 3 virion symmetry. PMID:17449079

  19. Identification of the major capsid protein of erythrocytic necrosis virus (ENV) and development of quantitative real-time PCR assays for quantification of ENV DNA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Pearman-Gillman, Schuyler; Thompson, Rachel L.; Gregg, Jacob L.; Hart, Lucas M.; Winton, James R.; Emmenegger, Eveline J.; Hershberger, Paul K.

    2016-01-01

    Viral erythrocytic necrosis (VEN) is a disease of marine and anadromous fish that is caused by the erythrocytic necrosis virus (ENV), which was recently identified as a novel member of family Iridoviridae by next-generation sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis of the ENV DNA polymerase grouped ENV with other erythrocytic iridoviruses from snakes and lizards. In the present study, we identified the gene encoding the ENV major capsid protein (MCP) and developed a quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay targeting this gene. Phylogenetic analysis of the MCP gene sequence supported the conclusion that ENV does not group with any of the currently described iridovirus genera. Because there is no information regarding genetic variation of the MCP gene across the reported host and geographic range for ENV, we also developed a second qPCR assay for a more conserved ATPase-like gene region. The MCP and ATPase qPCR assays demonstrated good analytical and diagnostic sensitivity and specificity based on samples from laboratory challenges of Pacific herring Clupea pallasii. The qPCR assays had similar diagnostic sensitivity and specificity as light microscopy of stained blood smears for the presence of intraerythrocytic inclusion bodies. However, the qPCR assays may detect viral DNA early in infection prior to the formation of inclusion bodies. Both qPCR assays appear suitable for viral surveillance or as a confirmatory test for ENV in Pacific herring from the Salish Sea.

  20. Live cell imaging of interactions between replicase and capsid protein of Brome mosaic virus using Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation: implications for replication and genome packaging.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Sonali; Rao, A L N

    2014-09-01

    In Brome mosaic virus, it was hypothesized that a physical interaction between viral replicase and capsid protein (CP) is obligatory to confer genome packaging specificity. Here we tested this hypothesis by employing Bimolecular Fluorescent Complementation (BiFC) as a tool for evaluating protein-protein interactions in living cells. The efficacy of BiFC was validated by a known interaction between replicase protein 1a (p1a) and protein 2a (p2a) at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) site of viral replication. Additionally, co-expression in planta of a bona fide pair of interacting protein partners of p1a and p2a had resulted in the assembly of a functional replicase. Subsequent BiFC assays in conjunction with mCherry labeled ER as a fluorescent cellular marker revealed that CP physically interacts with p2a, but not p1a, and this CP:p2a interaction occurs at the cytoplasmic phase of the ER. The significance of the CP:p2a interaction in BMV replication and genome packaging is discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Crystal Structure of the Full-Length Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Capsid Protein Shows an N-Terminal β-Hairpin in the Absence of N-Terminal Proline

    PubMed Central

    Folio, Christelle; Sierra, Natalia; Dujardin, Marie; Alvarez, Guzman

    2017-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a member of the Retroviridae family. It is the causative agent of an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in cats and wild felines. Its capsid protein (CA) drives the assembly of the viral particle, which is a critical step in the viral replication cycle. Here, the first atomic structure of full-length FIV CA to 1.67 Å resolution is determined. The crystallized protein exhibits an original tetrameric assembly, composed of dimers which are stabilized by an intermolecular disulfide bridge induced by the crystallogenesis conditions. The FIV CA displays a standard α-helical CA topology with two domains, separated by a linker shorter than other retroviral CAs. The β-hairpin motif at its amino terminal end, which interacts with nucleotides in HIV-1, is unusually long in FIV CA. Interestingly, this functional β-motif is formed in this construct in the absence of the conserved N-terminal proline. The FIV CA exhibits a cis Arg–Pro bond in the CypA-binding loop, which is absent in known structures of lentiviral CAs. This structure represents the first tri-dimensional structure of a functional, full-length FIV CA. PMID:29120364

  2. Homologous recombination within the capsid gene of porcine circovirus type 2 subgroup viruses via natural co-infection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Several studies had reported homologous recombination between porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2)-group 1 (Gp1) and -group 2 (Gp2) viruses. Interestingly, the recombination events described thus far mapped either within the Rep gene sequences or the sequences flanking the Rep gene region. Previously, ...

  3. Nanoindentation studies of full and empty viral capsids and the effects of capsid protein mutations on elasticity and strength

    PubMed Central

    Michel, J. P.; Ivanovska, I. L.; Gibbons, M. M.; Klug, W. S.; Knobler, C. M.; Wuite, G. J. L.; Schmidt, C. F.

    2006-01-01

    The elastic properties of capsids of the cowpea chlorotic mottle virus have been examined at pH 4.8 by nanoindentation measurements with an atomic force microscope. Studies have been carried out on WT capsids, both empty and containing the RNA genome, and on full capsids of a salt-stable mutant and empty capsids of the subE mutant. Full capsids resisted indentation more than empty capsids, but all of the capsids were highly elastic. There was an initial reversible linear regime that persisted up to indentations varying between 20% and 30% of the diameter and applied forces of 0.6–1.0 nN; it was followed by a steep drop in force that is associated with irreversible deformation. A single point mutation in the capsid protein increased the capsid stiffness. The experiments are compared with calculations by finite element analysis of the deformation of a homogeneous elastic thick shell. These calculations capture the features of the reversible indentation region and allow Young's moduli and relative strengths to be estimated for the empty capsids. PMID:16606825

  4. Atomic Force Microscopy in Imaging of Viruses and Virus-Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Yurii G.; McPherson, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can visualize almost everything pertinent to structural virology and at resolutions that approach those for electron microscopy (EM). Membranes have been identified, RNA and DNA have been visualized, and large protein assemblies have been resolved into component substructures. Capsids of icosahedral viruses and the icosahedral capsids of enveloped viruses have been seen at high resolution, in some cases sufficiently high to deduce the arrangement of proteins in the capsomeres as well as the triangulation number (T). Viruses have been recorded budding from infected cells and suffering the consequences of a variety of stresses. Mutant viruses have been examined and phenotypes described. Unusual structural features have appeared, and the unexpectedly great amount of structural nonconformity within populations of particles has been documented. Samples may be imaged in air or in fluids (including culture medium or buffer), in situ on cell surfaces, or after histological procedures. AFM is nonintrusive and nondestructive, and it can be applied to soft biological samples, particularly when the tapping mode is employed. In principle, only a single cell or virion need be imaged to learn of its structure, though normally images of as many as is practical are collected. While lateral resolution, limited by the width of the cantilever tip, is a few nanometers, height resolution is exceptional, at approximately 0.5 nm. AFM produces three-dimensional, topological images that accurately depict the surface features of the virus or cell under study. The images resemble common light photographic images and require little interpretation. The structures of viruses observed by AFM are consistent with models derived by X-ray crystallography and cryo-EM. PMID:21646429

  5. Isolation and characterization of a virus infecting the freshwater algae Chrysochromulina parva

    SciTech Connect

    Mirza, S.F.; Staniewski, M.A.; Short, C.M.

    Water samples from Lake Ontario, Canada were tested for lytic activity against the freshwater haptophyte algae Chrysochromulina parva. A filterable lytic agent was isolated and identified as a virus via transmission electron microscopy and molecular methods. The virus, CpV-BQ1, is icosahedral, ca. 145 nm in diameter, assembled within the cytoplasm, and has a genome size of ca. 485 kb. Sequences obtained through PCR-amplification of DNA polymerase (polB) genes clustered among sequences from the family Phycodnaviridae, whereas major capsid protein (MCP) sequences clustered among sequences from either the Phycodnaviridae or Mimiviridae. Based on quantitative molecular assays, C. parva's abundance in Lakemore » Ontario was relatively stable, yet CpV-BQ1's abundance was variable suggesting complex virus-host dynamics. This study demonstrates that CpV-BQ1 is a member of the proposed order Megavirales with characteristics of both phycodnaviruses and mimiviruses indicating that, in addition to its complex ecological dynamics, it also has a complex evolutionary history. - Highlights: • A virus infecting the algae C. parva was isolated from Lake Ontario. • Virus characteristics demonstrated that this novel virus is an NCLDV. • The virus's polB sequence suggests taxonomic affiliation with the Phycodnaviridae. • The virus's capsid protein sequences also suggest Mimiviridae ancestry. • Surveys of host and virus natural abundances revealed complex host–virus dynamics.« less

  6. Synthetic approaches to construct viral capsid-like spherical nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Kazunori

    2018-06-06

    This feature article describes recent progress in synthetic strategies to construct viral capsid-like spherical nanomaterials using the self-assembly of peptides and/or proteins. By mimicking the self-assembly of spherical viral capsids and clathrin, trigonal peptide conjugates bearing β-sheet-forming peptides, glutathiones, or coiled-coil-forming peptides were developed to construct viral capsid-like particles. β-Annulus peptides from tomato bushy stunt virus self-assembled into viral capsid-like nanocapsules with a size of 30-50 nm, which could encapsulate various guest molecules and be decorated with different molecules on their surface. Rationally designed fusion proteins bearing symmetric assembling units afforded precise viral capsid-like polyhedral assemblies. These synthetic approaches to construct artificial viruses could become useful guidelines to develop novel drug carriers, vaccine platforms, nanotemplates and nanoreactors.

  7. Structure of RNA polymerase complex and genome within a dsRNA virus provides insights into the mechanisms of transcription and assembly.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xurong; Zhang, Fuxian; Su, Rui; Li, Xiaowu; Chen, Wenyuan; Chen, Qingxiu; Yang, Tao; Wang, Jiawei; Liu, Hongrong; Fang, Qin; Cheng, Lingpeng

    2018-06-25

    Most double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) viruses transcribe RNA plus strands within a common innermost capsid shell. This process requires coordinated efforts by RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) together with other capsid proteins and genomic RNA. Here we report the near-atomic resolution structure of the RdRp protein VP2 in complex with its cofactor protein VP4 and genomic RNA within an aquareovirus capsid using 200-kV cryoelectron microscopy and symmetry-mismatch reconstruction. The structure of these capsid proteins enabled us to observe the elaborate nonicosahedral structure within the double-layered icosahedral capsid. Our structure shows that the RdRp complex is anchored at the inner surface of the capsid shell and interacts with genomic dsRNA and four of the five asymmetrically arranged N termini of the capsid shell proteins under the fivefold axis, implying roles for these N termini in virus assembly. The binding site of the RNA end at VP2 is different from the RNA cap binding site identified in the crystal structure of orthoreovirus RdRp λ3, although the structures of VP2 and λ3 are almost identical. A loop, which was thought to separate the RNA template and transcript, interacts with an apical domain of the capsid shell protein, suggesting a mechanism for regulating RdRp replication and transcription. A conserved nucleoside triphosphate binding site was localized in our RdRp cofactor protein VP4 structure, and interactions between the VP4 and the genomic RNA were identified.

  8. Membrane-mediated interaction between retroviral capsids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Nguyen, Toan

    2012-02-01

    A retrovirus is an RNA virus that is replicated through a unique strategy of reverse transcription. Unlike regular enveloped viruses which are assembled inside the host cells, the assembly of retroviral capsids happens right on the cell membrane. During the assembly process, the partially formed capsids deform the membrane, giving rise to an elastic energy. When two such partial capsids approach each other, this elastic energy changes. Or in other words, the two partial capsids interact with each other via the membrane. This membrane mediated interaction between partial capsids plays an important role in the kinetics of the assembly process. In this work, this membrane mediated interaction is calculated both analytically and numerically. It is worth noting that the diferential equation determining the membrane shape in general nonlinear and cannot be solved analytically,except in the linear region of small deformations. And it is exactly the nonlinear regime that is important for the assembly kinetics of retroviruses as it provides a large energy barrier. The theory developed here is applicable to more generic cases of membrane mediated interactions between two membrane-embedded proteins.

  9. Microscopic Characterization of the Brazilian Giant Samba Virus

    PubMed Central

    Schrad, Jason R.; Young, Eric J.; Abrahão, Jônatas S.; Cortines, Juliana R.; Parent, Kristin N.

    2017-01-01

    Prior to the discovery of the mimivirus in 2003, viruses were thought to be physically small and genetically simple. Mimivirus, with its ~750-nm particle size and its ~1.2-Mbp genome, shattered these notions and changed what it meant to be a virus. Since this discovery, the isolation and characterization of giant viruses has exploded. One of the more recently discovered giant viruses, Samba virus, is a Mimivirus that was isolated from the Rio Negro in the Brazilian Amazon. Initial characterization of Samba has revealed some structural information, although the preparation techniques used are prone to the generation of structural artifacts. To generate more native-like structural information for Samba, we analyzed the virus through cryo-electron microscopy, cryo-electron tomography, scanning electron microscopy, and fluorescence microscopy. These microscopy techniques demonstrated that Samba particles have a capsid diameter of ~527 nm and a fiber length of ~155 nm, making Samba the largest Mimivirus yet characterized. We also compared Samba to a fiberless mimivirus variant. Samba particles, unlike those of mimivirus, do not appear to be rigid, and quasi-icosahedral, although the two viruses share many common features, including a multi-layered capsid and an asymmetric nucleocapsid, which may be common amongst the Mimiviruses. PMID:28216551

  10. Microscopic Characterization of the Brazilian Giant Samba Virus.

    PubMed

    Schrad, Jason R; Young, Eric J; Abrahão, Jônatas S; Cortines, Juliana R; Parent, Kristin N

    2017-02-14

    Prior to the discovery of the mimivirus in 2003, viruses were thought to be physically small and genetically simple. Mimivirus, with its ~750-nm particle size and its ~1.2-Mbp genome, shattered these notions and changed what it meant to be a virus. Since this discovery, the isolation and characterization of giant viruses has exploded. One of the more recently discovered giant viruses, Samba virus, is a Mimivirus that was isolated from the Rio Negro in the Brazilian Amazon. Initial characterization of Samba has revealed some structural information, although the preparation techniques used are prone to the generation of structural artifacts. To generate more native-like structural information for Samba, we analyzed the virus through cryo-electron microscopy, cryo-electron tomography, scanning electron microscopy, and fluorescence microscopy. These microscopy techniques demonstrated that Samba particles have a capsid diameter of ~527 nm and a fiber length of ~155 nm, making Samba the largest Mimivirus yet characterized. We also compared Samba to a fiberless mimivirus variant. Samba particles, unlike those of mimivirus, do not appear to be rigid, and quasi-icosahedral, although the two viruses share many common features, including a multi-layered capsid and an asymmetric nucleocapsid, which may be common amongst the Mimiviruses .

  11. Whole-Chain Tick Saliva Proteins Presented on Hepatitis B Virus Capsid-Like Particles Induce High-Titered Antibodies with Neutralizing Potential

    PubMed Central

    Kolb, Philipp; Wallich, Reinhard; Nassal, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Ticks are vectors for various, including pathogenic, microbes. Tick saliva contains multiple anti-host defense factors that enable ticks their bloodmeals yet also facilitate microbe transmission. Lyme disease-causing borreliae profit specifically from the broadly conserved tick histamine release factor (tHRF), and from cysteine-rich glycoproteins represented by Salp15 from Ixodes scapularis and Iric-1 from Ixodes ricinus ticks which they recruit to their outer surface protein C (OspC). Hence these tick proteins are attractive targets for anti-tick vaccines that simultaneously impair borrelia transmission. Main obstacles are the tick proteins´ immunosuppressive activities, and for Salp15 orthologs, the lack of efficient recombinant expression systems. Here, we exploited the immune-enhancing properties of hepatitis B virus core protein (HBc) derived capsid-like particles (CLPs) to generate, in E. coli, nanoparticulate vaccines presenting tHRF and, as surrogates for the barely soluble wild-type proteins, cysteine-free Salp15 and Iric-1 variants. The latter CLPs were exclusively accessible in the less sterically constrained SplitCore system. Mice immunized with tHRF CLPs mounted a strong anti-tHRF antibody response. CLPs presenting cysteine-free Salp15 and Iric-1 induced antibodies to wild-type, including glycosylated, Salp15 and Iric-1. The broadly distributed epitopes included the OspC interaction sites. In vitro, the anti-Salp15 antibodies interfered with OspC binding and enhanced human complement-mediated killing of Salp15 decorated borreliae. A mixture of all three CLPs induced high titered antibodies against all three targets, suggesting the feasibility of combination vaccines. These data warrant in vivo validation of the new candidate vaccines´ protective potential against tick infestation and Borrelia transmission. PMID:26352137

  12. Inclusion bodies of recombinant Epstein-Barr virus capsid antigen p18 as potential immobilized antigens in enzyme immunoassays for detection of nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chun Shen; Goh, Siang Ling; Kariapper, Leena; Krishnan, Gopala; Lim, Yat-Yuen; Ng, Ching Ching

    2015-08-25

    Development of indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) often utilizes synthetic peptides or recombinant proteins from Escherichia coli as immobilized antigens. Because inclusion bodies (IBs) formed during recombinant protein expression in E. coli are commonly thought as misfolded aggregates, only refolded proteins from IBs are used to develop new or in-house diagnostic assays. However, the promising utilities of IBs as nanomaterials and immobilized enzymes as shown in recent studies have led us to explore the potential use of IBs of recombinant Epstein-Barr virus viral capsid antigen p18 (VCA p18) as immobilized antigens in ELISAs for serologic detection of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Thioredoxin fusion VCA p18 (VCA-Trx) and IBs of VCA p18 without fusion tags (VCA-IBs) were purified from E. coli. The diagnostic performances of IgG/VCA-IBs, IgG/VCA-Denat-IBs (using VCA-IBs coated in 8mol/l urea), IgG/VCA-Trx, and IgG/VCA-Peptide assays were compared by screening 100 NPC case-control pairs. The IgG/VCA-Denat-IBs assay showed the best area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC: 0.802; p<0.05), while the AUCs for the IgG/VCA-IBs, IgG/VCA-Trx, and IgG/VCA-Peptide assays were comparable (AUC: 0.740, 0.727, and 0.741, respectively). We improved the diagnostic performance of the ELISA significantly using IBs of recombinant VCA p18. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Degenerate RNA packaging signals in the genome of Satellite Tobacco Necrosis Virus: implications for the assembly of a T=1 capsid.

    PubMed

    Bunka, David H J; Lane, Stephen W; Lane, Claire L; Dykeman, Eric C; Ford, Robert J; Barker, Amy M; Twarock, Reidun; Phillips, Simon E V; Stockley, Peter G

    2011-10-14

    Using a recombinant, T=1 Satellite Tobacco Necrosis Virus (STNV)-like particle expressed in Escherichia coli, we have established conditions for in vitro disassembly and reassembly of the viral capsid. In vivo assembly is dependent on the presence of the coat protein (CP) N-terminal region, and in vitro assembly requires RNA. Using immobilised CP monomers under reassembly conditions with "free" CP subunits, we have prepared a range of partially assembled CP species for RNA aptamer selection. SELEX directed against the RNA-binding face of the STNV CP resulted in the isolation of several clones, one of which (B3) matches the STNV-1 genome in 16 out of 25 nucleotide positions, including across a statistically significant 10/10 stretch. This 10-base region folds into a stem-loop displaying the motif ACAA and has been shown to bind to STNV CP. Analysis of the other aptamer sequences reveals that the majority can be folded into stem-loops displaying versions of this motif. Using a sequence and secondary structure search motif to analyse the genomic sequence of STNV-1, we identified 30 stem-loops displaying the sequence motif AxxA. The implication is that there are many stem-loops in the genome carrying essential recognition features for binding STNV CP. Secondary structure predictions of the genomic RNA using Mfold showed that only 8 out of 30 of these stem-loops would be formed in the lowest-energy structure. These results are consistent with an assembly mechanism based on kinetically driven folding of the RNA. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Epstein-Barr virus glycoprotein gH/gL antibodies complement IgA-viral capsid antigen for diagnosis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Lin-Quan; Zhang, Hua; Li, Yan; Liu, Wan-Li; Zhong, Qian; Zeng, Mu-Sheng; Huang, Xiao-Ming

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether measuring antibodies against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) glycoprotein gH/gL in serum could improve diagnostic accuracy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cases, gH/gL expressed in a recombinant baculovirus system was used in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect antibodies in two independent cohorts. Binary logistic regression analyses were performed using results from a training cohort (n = 406) to establish diagnostic mathematical models, which were validated in a second independent cohort (n = 279). Levels of serum gH/gL antibodies were higher in NPC patients than in healthy controls (p < 0.001). In the training cohort, the IgA-gH/gL ELISA had a sensitivity of 83.7%, specificity of 82.3% and area under the curve (AUC) of 0.893 (95% CI, 0.862-0.924) for NPC diagnosis. Furthermore, gH/gL maintained diagnostic capacity in IgA-VCA negative NPC patients (sensitivity = 78.1%, specificity = 82.3%, AUC = 0.879 [95% CI, 0.820 - 0.937]). Combining gH/gL and viral capsid antigen (VCA) detection improved diagnostic capacity as compared to individual tests alone in both the training cohort (sensitivity = 88.5%, specificity = 97%, AUC = 0.98 [95% CI, 0.97 - 0.991]), and validation cohort (sensitivity = 91.2%, specificity = 96.5%, AUC = 0.97 [95% CI, 0.951-0.988]). These findings suggest that EBV gH/gL detection complements VCA detection in the diagnosis of NPC and aids in the identification of patients with VCA-negative NPC. PMID:27093005

  15. The 3.2 Angstrom Resolution Structure of the Polymorphic Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus Ribonucleoprotein Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speir, Jeffrey Alan

    Structural studies of the polymorphic cowpea chlorotic mottle virus have resulted in high resolution structures for two distinct icosahedral ribonucleoprotein particle conformations dependent upon whether acidic or basic pH conditions prevail. CCMV is stable below pH 6.5, however metal-free particles maintain a 10% increase in hydrodynamic volume at pH >=q 7.5. Identification of this swollen' form of CCMV, which can easily be disrupted with 1M NaCl, led to the first reassembly of an icosahedral virus in vitro from purified viral protein and RNA to form infectious particles, and its assembly has been the subject of biochemical and biophysical investigations for over twenty-five years. Under well defined conditions of pH, ionic strength and divalent metal ion concentration, CCMV capsid protein or capsid protein and RNA will reassemble to form icosahedral particles of various sizes, sheets, tubes, rosettes, and a variety of laminar structures which resemble virion structures from non-related virus families. Analysis of native particles at 3.2A resolution and swollen particles at 28A resolution has suggested that the chemical basis for the formation of polymorphic icosahedral and anisometric structures is: (i) hexamers formed of beta-barrel subunits stabilized by an unusual hexameric parallel beta structure made up of their N-termini, (ii) the location of protein-RNA interactions, (iii) divalent metal cation binding sites that regulate quasi-symmetrical subunit associations, (iv) charge repulsion across the same interfaces when lacking divalent metal ions at basic pH, which induces the formation of sixty 20A diameter portals for RNA release, and (v) a novel, C-terminal-based, subunit dimer assembly unit. The use of C- and N-terminal arms in CCMV has not been observed in other icosahedral RNA virus structures determined at near atomic resolution, however, their detailed interactions and roles in stabilizing the quaternary organization of CCMV are related to that found

  16. High prevalence of immunoglobulin A antibody against Epstein-Barr virus capsid antigen in adult patients with lupus with disease flare: case control studies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chung-Jen; Lin, Kuei-Hsiang; Lin, Shih-Chang; Tsai, Wen-Chan; Yen, Jeng-Hsien; Chang, Shun-Jen; Lu, Sheng-Nan; Liu, Hong-Wen

    2005-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a severe autoimmune disease with rare remission and recurrent flare. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection has been reported to be strongly associated with SLE in the United States, but with an inconclusive role in Asia. We investigated the role of EBV infection in patients with SLE in Taiwan, with one of the highest population densities in Asia. We conducted case-control studies to test whether EBV infection was associated with adult SLE in Taiwan. In the first study, 36 adults with SLE and 36 sex and age matched controls were enrolled for examination of serum IgG, IgM, and IgA antibody against EBV-virus capsid antigen (EBV-VCA). In the second study, another 36 adult lupus cases and 36 matched controls were enrolled to confirm the high prevalence of IgA antibody against EBV-VCA found in the first study. Further, both groups of SLE patients were combined to analyze the association between the existence of IgA antibody against EBV-VCA and disease activity (determined by SLEDAI score) and disease flare in patients with SLE. In the first study, IgA antibody against EBV-VCA was the only marker with significantly higher prevalence in adults with SLE compared to healthy adults (36.1% vs 5.6%; p < 0.005). In the second study, we confirmed that the prevalence of IgA antibody against EBV-VCA was indeed higher in adults with SLE (38.9% vs 2.8%; p < 0.001). With further analysis (pooling analysis), adult SLE patients with IgA antibody against EBV-VCA had higher disease activity compared to SLE patients without IgA antibody against EBV-VCA (SLEDAI 7.8 +/- 6.6 vs 3.3 +/- 2.1; p < 0.001). SLE patients with flare showed much higher prevalence of IgA antibody against EBV-VCA compared to those without flare (81.3% vs 25.0%; p < 0.001). This is the first evidence that IgA antibody against EBV-VCA is strongly associated with disease flare in SLE patients. It suggests that EBV reactivation may contribute toward the disease flare of SLE.

  17. Packaging of the virion host shutoff (Vhs) protein of herpes simplex virus: two forms of the Vhs polypeptide are associated with intranuclear B and C capsids, but only one is associated with enveloped virions.

    PubMed

    Read, G Sullivan; Patterson, Mary

    2007-02-01

    The virion host shutoff (Vhs) protein (UL41) is a minor component of herpes simplex virus virions which, following penetration, accelerates turnover of host and viral mRNAs. Infected cells contain 58-kDa and 59.5-kDa forms of Vhs, which differ in the extent of phosphorylation, yet only a 58-kDa polypeptide is incorporated into virions. In pulse-chase experiments, the primary Vhs translation product comigrated in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with the 58-kDa virion polypeptide, and could be chased to 59.5 kDa. While both 59.5-kDa and 58-kDa forms were found in nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions, the 59.5-kDa form was significantly enriched in the nucleus. Both forms were associated with intranuclear B and C capsids, yet only the 58-kDa polypeptide was found in enveloped cytoplasmic virions. A 58-kDa form, but not the 59.5-kDa form, was found in L particles, noninfectious particles that contain an envelope and tegument but no capsid. The data suggest that virions contain two populations of Vhs that are packaged by different pathways. In the first pathway, the primary translation product is processed to 59.5 kDa, is transported to the nucleus, binds intranuclear capsids, and is converted to 58 kDa at some stage prior to final envelopment. The second pathway does not involve the 59.5-kDa form or interactions between Vhs and capsids. Instead, the primary translation product is phosphorylated to the 58-kDa virion form and packaged through interactions with other tegument proteins in the cytoplasm or viral envelope proteins at the site of final envelopment.

  18. Highly efficient strategy for the heterologous expression and purification of soluble Cowpea chlorotic mottle virus capsid protein and in vitro pH-dependent assembly of virus-like particles.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Valle, Armando; García-Salcedo, Yardena M; Chávez-Calvillo, Gabriela; Silva-Rosales, Laura; Carrillo-Tripp, Mauricio

    2015-12-01

    Obtaining pure and soluble viral capsid proteins (CPs) has been a major challenge in the fields of science and technology in recent decades. In many cases, the CPs can self-assemble in the absence of a viral genome, resulting in non-infectious, empty virus-like particles (VLPs) which can be safely handled. The use of VLPs has found great potential in biotechnology and health purposes. In addition, VLPs are a good model system to study protein-protein interactions at the molecular level. In this work, an optimized strategy for the heterologous expression of the Cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) CP based in Escherichia coli is described. The method is efficient, inexpensive and it consistently produces higher yields and greater purity levels than those reported so far. Additionally, one of the main advantages of this method is the prevention of the formation of inclusion bodies, thus allowing to directly obtain high amounts of the CP in a soluble and functionally active state with the capacity to readily form VLPs in vitro. The CCMV CP self-assembly pH dependence was also investigated, providing guidelines to easily modulate the process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Structure-dependent efficacy of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) recombinant vaccines.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge L; Saubi, Narciís; Pagès-Manté, Albert; Castón, José R; Espuña, Enric; Casal, J Ignacio

    2003-07-04

    The immunogenicity and protective capability of several baculovirus-expressed infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV)-derived assemblies as VP2 capsids, VPX tubules and polyprotein (PP)-derived mixed structures, were tested. Four-week-old chickens were immunised subcutaneously with one dose of each particulate antigen. VP2 icosahedral capsids induced the highest neutralising response, followed by PP-derived structures and then VPX tubules. All vaccinated animals were protected when challenged with a very virulent IBDV (vvIBDV) isolate, however the degree of protection is directly correlated with the levels of neutralising antibodies. VP2 capsids elicited stronger protective immunity than tubular structures and 3 micrograms of them were sufficient to confer a total protection comparable to that induced by an inactivated vaccine. Therefore, VP2 capsids represent a suitable candidate recombinant vaccine instead of virus-like particles (VLPs) for IBDV infections. Our results also provide clear evidence that the recombinant IBDV-derived antigens are structure-dependent in order to be efficient as vaccine components.

  20. Structure-dependent efficacy of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) recombinant vaccines.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge L; Saubi, Narcis; Pagès-Manté, Albert; Castón, José R; Espuña, Enric; Casal, J Ignacio

    2003-05-16

    The immunogenicity and protective capability of several baculovirus-expressed infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV)-derived assemblies as VP2 capsids, VPX tubules and polyprotein (PP)-derived mixed structures, were tested. Four-week-old chickens were immunised subcutaneously with one dose of each particulate antigen. VP2 icosahedral capsids induced the highest neutralising response, followed by PP-derived structures and then VPX tubules. All vaccinated animals were protected when challenged with a very virulent IBDV (vvIBDV) isolate, however the degree of protection is directly correlated with the levels of neutralising antibodies. VP2 capsids elicited stronger protective immunity than tubular structures and 3& mgr;g of them were sufficient to confer a total protection comparable to that induced by an inactivated vaccine. Therefore, VP2 capsids represent a suitable candidate recombinant vaccine instead of virus-like particles (VLPs) for IBDV infections. Our results also provide clear evidence that the recombinant IBDV-derived antigens are structure-dependent in order to be efficient as vaccine components.

  1. Membrane-containing virus particles exhibit the mechanics of a composite material for genome protection.

    PubMed

    Azinas, S; Bano, F; Torca, I; Bamford, D H; Schwartz, G A; Esnaola, J; Oksanen, H M; Richter, R P; Abrescia, N G

    2018-04-26

    The protection of the viral genome during extracellular transport is an absolute requirement for virus survival and replication. In addition to the almost universal proteinaceous capsids, certain viruses add a membrane layer that encloses their double-stranded (ds) DNA genome within the protein shell. Using the membrane-containing enterobacterial virus PRD1 as a prototype, and a combination of nanoindentation assays by atomic force microscopy and finite element modelling, we show that PRD1 provides a greater stability against mechanical stress than that achieved by the majority of dsDNA icosahedral viruses that lack a membrane. We propose that the combination of a stiff and brittle proteinaceous shell coupled with a soft and compliant membrane vesicle yields a tough composite nanomaterial well-suited to protect the viral DNA during extracellular transport.

  2. All-atom molecular dynamics calculation study of entire poliovirus empty capsids in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Andoh, Y.; Yoshii, N.; Yamada, A.

    2014-10-28

    Small viruses that belong, for example, to the Picornaviridae, such as poliovirus and foot-and-mouth disease virus, consist simply of capsid proteins and a single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) genome. The capsids are quite stable in solution to protect the genome from the environment. Here, based on long-time and large-scale 6.5 × 10{sup 6} all-atom molecular dynamics calculations for the Mahoney strain of poliovirus, we show microscopic properties of the viral capsids at a molecular level. First, we found equilibrium rapid exchange of water molecules across the capsid. The exchange rate is so high that all water molecules inside the capsid (about 200 000)more » can leave the capsid and be replaced by water molecules from the outside in about 25 μs. This explains the capsid's tolerance to high pressures and deactivation by exsiccation. In contrast, the capsid did not exchange ions, at least within the present simulation time of 200 ns. This implies that the capsid can function, in principle, as a semipermeable membrane. We also found that, similar to the xylem of trees, the pressure of the solution inside the capsid without the genome was negative. This is caused by coulombic interaction of the solution inside the capsid with the capsid excess charges. The negative pressure may be compensated by positive osmotic pressure by the solution-soluble ssRNA and the counter ions introduced into it.« less

  3. All-atom molecular dynamics calculation study of entire poliovirus empty capsids in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andoh, Y.; Yoshii, N.; Yamada, A.; Fujimoto, K.; Kojima, H.; Mizutani, K.; Nakagawa, A.; Nomoto, A.; Okazaki, S.

    2014-10-01

    Small viruses that belong, for example, to the Picornaviridae, such as poliovirus and foot-and-mouth disease virus, consist simply of capsid proteins and a single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) genome. The capsids are quite stable in solution to protect the genome from the environment. Here, based on long-time and large-scale 6.5 × 106 all-atom molecular dynamics calculations for the Mahoney strain of poliovirus, we show microscopic properties of the viral capsids at a molecular level. First, we found equilibrium rapid exchange of water molecules across the capsid. The exchange rate is so high that all water molecules inside the capsid (about 200 000) can leave the capsid and be replaced by water molecules from the outside in about 25 μs. This explains the capsid's tolerance to high pressures and deactivation by exsiccation. In contrast, the capsid did not exchange ions, at least within the present simulation time of 200 ns. This implies that the capsid can function, in principle, as a semipermeable membrane. We also found that, similar to the xylem of trees, the pressure of the solution inside the capsid without the genome was negative. This is caused by coulombic interaction of the solution inside the capsid with the capsid excess charges. The negative pressure may be compensated by positive osmotic pressure by the solution-soluble ssRNA and the counter ions introduced into it.

  4. Antimicrobial peptide capsids of de novo design.

    PubMed

    De Santis, Emiliana; Alkassem, Hasan; Lamarre, Baptiste; Faruqui, Nilofar; Bella, Angelo; Noble, James E; Micale, Nicola; Ray, Santanu; Burns, Jonathan R; Yon, Alexander R; Hoogenboom, Bart W; Ryadnov, Maxim G

    2017-12-22

    The spread of bacterial resistance to antibiotics poses the need for antimicrobial discovery. With traditional search paradigms being exhausted, approaches that are altogether different from antibiotics may offer promising and creative solutions. Here, we introduce a de novo peptide topology that-by emulating the virus architecture-assembles into discrete antimicrobial capsids. Using the combination of high-resolution and real-time imaging, we demonstrate that these artificial capsids assemble as 20-nm hollow shells that attack bacterial membranes and upon landing on phospholipid bilayers instantaneously (seconds) convert into rapidly expanding pores causing membrane lysis (minutes). The designed capsids show broad antimicrobial activities, thus executing one primary function-they destroy bacteria on contact.

  5. Mutations in CypA Binding Region of HIV-1 Capsid Affect Capsid Stability and Viral Replication in Primary Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Setiawan, Laurentia C; van Dort, Karel A; Rits, Maarten A N; Kootstra, Neeltje A

    2016-04-01

    Mutations in the cyclophilin A (CypA) binding region in the HIV-1 capsid affect their dependency on the known HIV-1 cofactor CypA and allow escape from the HIV-1 restriction factor Trim5α in human and simian cells. Here we study the effect of these mutations in the CypA binding region of capsid on cofactor binding, capsid destabilization, and viral replication in primary cells. We showed that the viral capsid with mutations in the CypA binding region (CypA-BR) interacted efficiently with CypA, but had an increased stability upon infection as compared to the wild-type capsid. Interestingly, the wild-type virus was able to infect monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) more efficiently as compared to the CypA-BR mutant variant. The lower infectivity of the CypA-BR mutant virus in MDM was associated with lower levels of reverse transcription products. Similar to the wild-type virus, the CypA-BR mutant variant was unable to induce a strong innate response in primary macrophages. These data demonstrate that mutations in the CypA binding site of the capsid resulted in higher capsid stability and hampered infectivity in macrophages.

  6. Beta cell device using icosahedral boride compounds

    DOEpatents

    Aselage, Terrence L.; Emin, David

    2002-01-01

    A beta cell for converting beta-particle energies into electrical energy having a semiconductor junction that incorporates an icosahedral boride compound selected from B.sub.12 As.sub.2, B.sub.12 P.sub.2, elemental boron having an .alpha.-rhombohedral structure, elemental boron having a .beta.-rhombohedral structure, and boron carbides of the chemical formula B.sub.12-x C.sub.3-x, where 0.15icosahedral boride compound self-heals, resisting degradation from radiation damage.

  7. Detection of phosphorylated forms of moloney murine leukemia virus major capsid protein p30 by immunoprecipitation and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Ikuta, K.; Luftig, R.B.

    1988-01-01

    The authors detected phosphorylation of the major Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-MuLV) capsid polypeptide, p30, by using /sup 32/P/sub i/-labeled virions. This was observed both on two-dimensional polyacrylamide gels directly or on one-dimensional gels of viral lysates that had been immunoprecipitated with monospecific goat anti-p30 serum. The phosphorylation event had been difficult to detect because pp12 the major virion phosphoprotein incorporates almost all of the /sup 32/P label added to infected cells. When immunoprecipitates from M-MuLV lysates labeled with /sup 32/P/sub i/ were compared with those labeled with (/sup 35/S)methionine, it was calculated that the degree of phosphorylation at themore » p30 domain of Pr65/sup gag/ was only 0.22 to 0.54% relative to phosphorylation at the p12 domain. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of the /sup 32/P-labeled p30 immunoprecipitates showed that there were three phosphorylated p30 forms with isoelectric points (pIs) of 5.7, 5.8, and 6.0. These forms were generally more acidic than the (/sup 35/S) methionine-labeled p30 forms, which had pIs of 6.0, 6.1, 6.3 (the major constituent with > 80% of the label), and 6.6. The predominant phosphoamino acid of the major phosphorylated p30 form (pI 5.8) was phosphoserine. Further, tryptic peptide analysis of this p30 form showed that only one peptide was predominantly phosphorylated. Based on a comparison of specific labeling of p30 tryptic peptides with (/sup 14/C)sesrine, (/sup 35/S)methionine, and /sup 32/P/sub i/, we tentatively assigned the phosphorylation site to a 2.4-kilodalton NH/sub 2/-terminal peptide containing triple tandem serines spanning the region from amino acids 4 to 24.« less

  8. A quasi-atomic model of human adenovirus type 5 capsid

    PubMed Central

    Fabry, Céline M S; Rosa-Calatrava, Manuel; Conway, James F; Zubieta, Chloé; Cusack, Stephen; Ruigrok, Rob W H; Schoehn, Guy

    2005-01-01

    Adenoviruses infect a wide range of vertebrates including humans. Their icosahedral capsids are composed of three major proteins: the trimeric hexon forms the facets and the penton, a noncovalent complex of the pentameric penton base and trimeric fibre proteins, is located at the 12 capsid vertices. Several proteins (IIIa, VI, VIII and IX) stabilise the capsid. We have obtained a 10 Å resolution map of the human adenovirus 5 by image analysis from cryo-electron micrographs (cryoEMs). This map, in combination with the X-ray structures of the penton base and hexon, was used to build a quasi-atomic model of the arrangement of the two major capsid components and to analyse the hexon–hexon and hexon–penton interactions. The secondary proteins, notably VIII, were located by comparing cryoEM maps of native and pIX deletion mutant virions. Minor proteins IX and IIIa are located on the outside of the capsid, whereas protein VIII is organised with a T=2 lattice on the inner face of the capsid. The capsid organisation is compared with the known X-ray structure of bacteriophage PRD1. PMID:15861131

  9. Turnip yellow mosaic virus as a chemoaddressable bionanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Barnhill, Hannah N; Reuther, Rachel; Ferguson, P Lee; Dreher, Theo; Wang, Qian

    2007-01-01

    Viruses and virus-like particles (VLPs) have been demonstrated to be robust scaffolds for the construction of nanomaterials. In order to develop new nanoprobes for time-resolved fluoroimmuno assays as well as to investigate the two-dimensional self-assembly of viruses and VLPs, the icosahedral turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV) was investigated as a potential building block in our study. TYMV is an icosahedral plant virus with an average diameter of 28 nm that can be isolated inexpensively in gram quantities from turnips or Chinese cabbage. There are 180 coat protein subunits per TYMV capsid. The conventional N-hydroxysuccinimide-mediated amidation reaction was employed for the chemical modification of the viral capsid. Tryptic digestion with sequential MALDI-TOF MS analysis identified that the amino groups of K32 of the flexible N-terminus made the major contribution for the reactivity of TYMV toward N-hydroxysuccinimide ester (NHS) reagents. The reactivity was also monitored with UV-vis absorbance and fluorescence, which revealed that approximately 60 lysines per particle could be addressed. We hypothesized that the flexible A chain contains the reactive lysine because the crystal structure of TYMV has shown that chain A is much more flexible compared to B and C, especially at the N-terminal region where the Lys-32 located. In addition, about 90 to 120 carboxyl groups, located in the most exposed sequence, could be modified with amines catalyzed with 1-(3-dimethylaminopropyl-3-ethylcarbodiimide) hydrochloride (EDC) and sulfo-NHS. TYMV was stable to a wide range of reaction conditions and maintained its integrity after the chemical conjugations. Therefore, it can potentially be employed as a reactive scaffold for the display of a variety of materials for applications in many areas of nanoscience.

  10. A Novel Virus Causes Scale Drop Disease in Lates calcarifer

    PubMed Central

    de Groof, Ad; Guelen, Lars; Deijs, Martin; van der Wal, Yorick; Miyata, Masato; Ng, Kah Sing; van Grinsven, Lotte; Simmelink, Bartjan; Biermann, Yvonne; Grisez, Luc; van Lent, Jan; de Ronde, Anthony; Chang, Siow Foong; Schrier, Carla; van der Hoek, Lia

    2015-01-01

    From 1992 onwards, outbreaks of a previously unknown illness have been reported in Asian seabass (Lates calcarifer) kept in maricultures in Southeast Asia. The most striking symptom of this emerging disease is the loss of scales. It was referred to as scale drop syndrome, but the etiology remained enigmatic. By using a next-generation virus discovery technique, VIDISCA-454, sequences of an unknown virus were detected in serum of diseased fish. The near complete genome sequence of the virus was determined, which shows a unique genome organization, and low levels of identity to known members of the Iridoviridae. Based on homology of a series of putatively encoded proteins, the virus is a novel member of the Megalocytivirus genus of the Iridoviridae family. The virus was isolated and propagated in cell culture, where it caused a cytopathogenic effect in infected Asian seabass kidney and brain cells. Electron microscopy revealed icosahedral virions of about 140 nm, characteristic for the Iridoviridae. In vitro cultured virus induced scale drop syndrome in Asian seabass in vivo and the virus could be reisolated from these infected fish. These findings show that the virus is the causative agent for the scale drop syndrome, as each of Koch’s postulates is fulfilled. We have named the virus Scale Drop Disease Virus. Vaccines prepared from BEI- and formalin inactivated virus, as well as from E. coli produced major capsid protein provide efficacious protection against scale drop disease. PMID:26252390

  11. Turnip Yellow Mosaic Virus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The bumpy exterior of the turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV) protein coat, or capsid, was defined in detail by Dr. Alexander McPherson of the University of California, Irvin using proteins crystallized in space for analysis on Earth. TYMV is an icosahedral virus constructed from 180 copies of the same protein arranged into 12 clusters of five proteins (pentamers), and 20 clusters of six proteins (hexamers). The final TYMV structure led to the unexpected hypothesis that the virus releases its RNA by essentially chemical-mechanical means. Most viruses have fairly flat coats, but in TYNV, the fold in each protein, called the jellyroll, is clustered at the points where the protein pentamers and hexamers join. The jellyrolls are almost standing on end, producing a bumpy surface with knobs at all of the pentamers and hexamers. At the inside surface of the pentamers is a void that is not present at the hexamers. The coating had been seen in early stuties of TYMV, but McPherson's atomic structure shows much more detail. The inside surface is strikingly, and unexpectedly, different than the outside. While the pentamers contain a central void on the inside, the hexameric units contain peptides linked to each other, forming a ring or, more accurately, rings to fill the void. Credit: Dr. Alexander McPherson, University of California, Irvine

  12. Changes in the stability and biomechanics of P22 bacteriophage capsid during maturation.

    PubMed

    Kant, Ravi; Llauró, Aida; Rayaprolu, Vamseedhar; Qazi, Shefah; de Pablo, Pedro J; Douglas, Trevor; Bothner, Brian

    2018-03-15

    The capsid of P22 bacteriophage undergoes a series of structural transitions during maturation that guide it from spherical to icosahedral morphology. The transitions include the release of scaffold proteins and capsid expansion. Although P22 maturation has been investigated for decades, a unified model that incorporates thermodynamic and biophysical analyses is not available. A general and specific model of icosahedral capsid maturation is of significant interest to theoreticians searching for fundamental principles as well as virologists and material scientists seeking to alter maturation to their advantage. To address this challenge, we have combined the results from orthogonal biophysical techniques including differential scanning fluorimetry, atomic force microscopy, circular dichroism, and hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry. By integrating these results from single particle and population measurements, an energy landscape of P22 maturation from procapsid through expanded shell to wiffle ball emerged, highlighting the role of metastable structures and the thermodynamics guiding maturation. The propagation of weak quaternary interactions across symmetric elements of the capsid is a key component for stability in P22. A surprising finding is that the progression to wiffle ball, which lacks pentamers, shows that chemical and thermal stability can be uncoupled from mechanical rigidity, elegantly demonstrating the complexity inherent in capsid protein interactions and the emergent properties that can arise from icosahedral symmetry. On a broader scale, this work demonstrates the power of applying orthogonal biophysical techniques to elucidate assembly mechanisms for supramolecular complexes and provides a framework within which other viral systems can be compared. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Essential role of the unordered VP2 n-terminal domain of the parvovirus MVM capsid in nuclear assembly and endosomal enlargement of the virion fivefold channel for cell entry

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Martinez, Cristina; Grueso, Esther; Carroll, Miles

    The unordered N-termini of parvovirus capsid proteins (Nt) are translocated through a channel at the icosahedral five-fold axis to serve for virus traffick. Heterologous peptides were genetically inserted at the Nt of MVM to study their functional tolerance to manipulations. Insertion of a 5T4-single-chain antibody at VP2-Nt (2Nt) yielded chimeric capsid subunits failing to enter the nucleus. The VEGFR2-binding peptide (V1) inserted at both 2Nt and VP1-Nt efficiently assembled in virions, but V1 disrupted VP1 and VP2 entry functions. The VP2 defect correlated with restricted externalization of V1-2Nt out of the coat. The specific infectivity of MVM and wtVP-pseudotyped mosaicmore » MVM-V1 virions, upon heating and/or partial 2Nt cleavage, demonstrated that some 2Nt domains become intracellularly translocated out of the virus shell and cleaved to initiate entry. The V1 insertion defines a VP2-driven endosomal enlargement of the channel as an essential structural rearrangement performed by the MVM virion to infect.« less

  14. Essential role of the unordered VP2 n-terminal domain of the parvovirus MVM capsid in nuclear assembly and endosomal enlargement of the virion fivefold channel for cell entry.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Martínez, Cristina; Grueso, Esther; Carroll, Miles; Rommelaere, Jean; Almendral, José M

    2012-10-10

    The unordered N-termini of parvovirus capsid proteins (Nt) are translocated through a channel at the icosahedral five-fold axis to serve for virus traffick. Heterologous peptides were genetically inserted at the Nt of MVM to study their functional tolerance to manipulations. Insertion of a 5T4-single-chain antibody at VP2-Nt (2Nt) yielded chimeric capsid subunits failing to enter the nucleus. The VEGFR2-binding peptide (V1) inserted at both 2Nt and VP1-Nt efficiently assembled in virions, but V1 disrupted VP1 and VP2 entry functions. The VP2 defect correlated with restricted externalization of V1-2Nt out of the coat. The specific infectivity of MVM and wtVP-pseudotyped mosaic MVM-V1 virions, upon heating and/or partial 2Nt cleavage, demonstrated that some 2Nt domains become intracellularly translocated out of the virus shell and cleaved to initiate entry. The V1 insertion defines a VP2-driven endosomal enlargement of the channel as an essential structural rearrangement performed by the MVM virion to infect. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Interaction of the host protein NbDnaJ with Potato virus X minus-strand stem-loop 1 RNA and capsid protein affects viral replication and movement.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sang-Yun; Cho, Won Kyong; Sohn, Seong-Han; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2012-01-06

    Plant viruses must interact with host cellular components to replicate and move from cell to cell. In the case of Potato virus X (PVX), it carries stem-loop 1 (SL1) RNA essential for viral replication and movement. Using two-dimensional electrophoresis northwestern blot analysis, we previously identified several host proteins that bind to SL1 RNA. Of those, we further characterized a DnaJ-like protein from Nicotiana benthamiana named NbDnaJ. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay confirmed that NbDnaJ binds only to SL1 minus-strand RNA, and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) indicated that NbDnaJ interacts with PVX capsid protein (CP). Using a series of deletion mutants, the C-terminal region of NbDnaJ was found to be essential for the interaction with PVX CP. The expression of NbDnaJ significantly changed upon infection with different plant viruses such as PVX, Tobacco mosaic virus, and Cucumber mosaic virus, but varied depending on the viral species. In transient experiments, both PVX replication and movement were inhibited in plants that over-expressed NbDnaJ but accelerated in plants in which NbDnaJ was silenced. In summary, we suggest that the newly identified NbDnaJ plays a role in PVX replication and movement by interacting with SL1(-) RNA and PVX CP. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Physical properties of the HIV-1 capsid from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perilla, Juan R.; Schulten, Klaus

    2017-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is highly dependent on its capsid. The capsid is a large container, made of ~1,300 proteins with altogether 4 million atoms. Although the capsid proteins are all identical, they nevertheless arrange themselves into a largely asymmetric structure made of hexamers and pentamers. The large number of degrees of freedom and lack of symmetry pose a challenge to studying the chemical details of the HIV capsid. Simulations of over 64 million atoms for over 1 μs allow us to conduct a comprehensive study of the chemical-physical properties of an empty HIV-1 capsid, including its electrostatics, vibrational and acoustic properties, and the effects of solvent (ions and water) on the capsid. The simulations reveal critical details about the capsid with implications to biological function.

  17. Physical properties of the HIV-1 capsid from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Perilla, Juan R.; Schulten, Klaus

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is highly dependent on its capsid. The capsid is a large container, made of B 1,300 proteins with altogether 4 million atoms. Though the capsid proteins are all identical, they nevertheless arrange themselves into a largely asymmetric structure made of hexamers and pentamers. The large number of degrees of freedom and lack of symmetry pose a challenge to studying the chemical details of the HIV capsid. Simulations of over 64 million atoms for over 1 μs allow us to conduct a comprehensive study of the chemical–physical properties of an empty HIV-1 capsid, includingmore » its electrostatics, vibrational and acoustic properties, and the effects of solvent (ions and water) on the capsid. Furthermore, the simulations reveal critical details about the capsid with implications to biological function.« less

  18. Physical properties of the HIV-1 capsid from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Perilla, Juan R.; Schulten, Klaus

    2017-07-19

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is highly dependent on its capsid. The capsid is a large container, made of B 1,300 proteins with altogether 4 million atoms. Though the capsid proteins are all identical, they nevertheless arrange themselves into a largely asymmetric structure made of hexamers and pentamers. The large number of degrees of freedom and lack of symmetry pose a challenge to studying the chemical details of the HIV capsid. Simulations of over 64 million atoms for over 1 μs allow us to conduct a comprehensive study of the chemical–physical properties of an empty HIV-1 capsid, includingmore » its electrostatics, vibrational and acoustic properties, and the effects of solvent (ions and water) on the capsid. Furthermore, the simulations reveal critical details about the capsid with implications to biological function.« less

  19. Discovery and Pre-Clinical Characterization of Third-Generation 4-H Heteroaryldihydropyrimidine (HAP) Analogues as Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Capsid Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zongxing; Lin, Xianfeng; Zhang, Weixing; Zhou, Mingwei; Guo, Lei; Kocer, Buelent; Wu, Guolong; Zhang, Zhisen; Liu, Haixia; Shi, Houguang; Kou, Buyu; Hu, Taishan; Hu, Yimin; Huang, Mengwei; Yan, S Frank; Xu, Zhiheng; Zhou, Zheng; Qin, Ning; Wang, Yue Fen; Ren, Shuang; Qiu, Hongxia; Zhang, Yuxia; Zhang, Yi; Wu, Xiaoyue; Sun, Kai; Zhong, Sheng; Xie, Jianxun; Ottaviani, Giorgio; Zhou, Yuan; Zhu, Lina; Tian, Xiaojun; Shi, Liping; Shen, Fang; Mao, Yi; Zhou, Xue; Gao, Lu; Young, John A T; Wu, Jim Zhen; Yang, Guang; Mayweg, Alexander V; Shen, Hong C; Tang, Guozhi; Zhu, Wei

    2017-04-27

    Described herein are the discovery and structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies of the third-generation 4-H heteroaryldihydropyrimidines (4-H HAPs) featuring the introduction of a C6 carboxyl group as novel HBV capsid inhibitors. This new series of 4-H HAPs showed improved anti-HBV activity and better drug-like properties compared to the first- and second-generation 4-H HAPs. X-ray crystallographic study of analogue 12 (HAP_R01) with Cp149 Y132A mutant hexamer clearly elucidated the role of C6 carboxyl group played for the increased binding affinity, which formed strong hydrogen bonding interactions with capsid protein and coordinated waters. The representative analogue 10 (HAP_R10) was extensively characterized in vitro (ADMET) and in vivo (mouse PK and PD) and subsequently selected for further development as oral anti-HBV infection agent.

  20. Diversity in virus assembly: biology makes things complicated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlotnick, Adam

    2008-03-01

    Icosahedral viruses have an elegance of geometry that implies a general path of assembly. However, structure alone provides insufficient information. Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus (CCMV), an important system for studying virus assembly, consists of 90 coat protein (CP) homodimers condensed around an RNA genome. The crystal structure (Speir et al, 1995) reveals that assembly causes burial of hydrophobic surface and formation of β hexamers, the intertwining of N-termini of the CPs surrounding a quasi-sixfold. This structural view leads to reasonable and erroneous predictions: (i) CCMV capsids are extremely stable, and (ii) β hexamer formation is critical to assembly. Experimentally, we have found that capsids are based on a network of extremely weak (4-5 kT) pairwise interactions and that pentamer formation is the critical step in assembly kinetics. Because of the fragility of CP-Cp interaction, we can redirect assembly to generate and dissociate tubular nanostructures. The dynamic behavior of CCMV reflects the requirements and peculiarities of an evolved biological system; it does not necessarily reflect the behavior predicted from a more static picture of the virus.

  1. Two separable functional domains of simian virus 40 large T antigen: carboxyl-terminal region of simian virus 40 large T antigen is required for efficient capsid protein synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Tornow, J; Polvino-Bodnar, M; Santangelo, G; Cole, C N

    1985-01-01

    The carboxyl-terminal portion of simian virus 40 large T antigen is essential for productive infection of CV-1 and CV-1p green monkey kidney cells. Mutant dlA2459, lacking 14 base pairs at 0.193 map units, was positive for viral DNA replication, but unable to form plaques in CV-1p cells (J. Tornow and C.N. Cole, J. Virol. 47:487-494, 1983). In this report, the defect of dlA2459 is further defined. Simian virus 40 late mRNAs were transcribed, polyadenylated, spliced, and transported in dlA2459-infected cells, but the level of capsid proteins produced in infected CV-1 green monkey kidney cells was extremely low. dlA2459 large T antigen lacks those residues known to be required for adenovirus helper function, and the block to productive infection by dlA2459 occurs at the same stage of infection as the block to productive adenovirus infection of CV-1 cells. These results suggest that the adenovirus helper function is required for productive infection by simian virus 40. Mutant dlA2459 was able to grow on the Vero and BSC-1 lines of African green monkey kidney cells. Additional mutants affecting the carboxyl-terminal portion of large T were prepared. Mutant inv2408 contains an inversion of the DNA between the BamHI and BclI sites (0.144 to 0.189 map units). This inversion causes transposition of the carboxyl-terminal 26 amino acids of large T antigen and the carboxyl-terminal 18 amino acids of VP1. This mutant was viable, even though the essential information absent from dlA2459 large T antigen has been transferred to the carboxyl terminus of VP1 of inv2408. The VP1 polypeptide carrying this carboxyl-terminal portion of large T could overcome the defect of dlA2459. This indicates that the carboxyl terminus of large T antigen is a separate and separable functional domain. Images PMID:2982029

  2. In situ structures of the genome and genome-delivery apparatus in a single-stranded RNA virus.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xinghong; Li, Zhihai; Lai, Mason; Shu, Sara; Du, Yushen; Zhou, Z Hong; Sun, Ren

    2017-01-05

    Packaging of the genome into a protein capsid and its subsequent delivery into a host cell are two fundamental processes in the life cycle of a virus. Unlike double-stranded DNA viruses, which pump their genome into a preformed capsid, single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) viruses, such as bacteriophage MS2, co-assemble their capsid with the genome; however, the structural basis of this co-assembly is poorly understood. MS2 infects Escherichia coli via the host 'sex pilus' (F-pilus); it was the first fully sequenced organism and is a model system for studies of translational gene regulation, RNA-protein interactions, and RNA virus assembly. Its positive-sense ssRNA genome of 3,569 bases is enclosed in a capsid with one maturation protein monomer and 89 coat protein dimers arranged in a T = 3 icosahedral lattice. The maturation protein is responsible for attaching the virus to an F-pilus and delivering the viral genome into the host during infection, but how the genome is organized and delivered is not known. Here we describe the MS2 structure at 3.6 Å resolution, determined by electron-counting cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) and asymmetric reconstruction. We traced approximately 80% of the backbone of the viral genome, built atomic models for 16 RNA stem-loops, and identified three conserved motifs of RNA-coat protein interactions among 15 of these stem-loops with diverse sequences. The stem-loop at the 3' end of the genome interacts extensively with the maturation protein, which, with just a six-helix bundle and a six-stranded β-sheet, forms a genome-delivery apparatus and joins 89 coat protein dimers to form a capsid. This atomic description of genome-capsid interactions in a spherical ssRNA virus provides insight into genome delivery via the host sex pilus and mechanisms underlying ssRNA-capsid co-assembly, and inspires speculation about the links between nucleoprotein complexes and the origins of viruses.

  3. Monte Carlo simulations of polyelectrolytes inside viral capsids.

    PubMed

    Angelescu, Daniel George; Bruinsma, Robijn; Linse, Per

    2006-04-01

    Structural features of polyelectrolytes as single-stranded RNA or double-stranded DNA confined inside viral capsids and the thermodynamics of the encapsidation of the polyelectrolyte into the viral capsid have been examined for various polyelectrolyte lengths by using a coarse-grained model solved by Monte Carlo simulations. The capsid was modeled as a spherical shell with embedded charges and the genome as a linear jointed chain of oppositely charged beads, and their sizes corresponded to those of a scaled-down T=3 virus. Counterions were explicitly included, but no salt was added. The encapisdated chain was found to be predominantly located at the inner capsid surface, in a disordered manner for flexible chains and in a spool-like structure for stiff chains. The distribution of the small ions was strongly dependent on the polyelectrolyte-capsid charge ratio. The encapsidation enthalpy was negative and its magnitude decreased with increasing polyelectrolyte length, whereas the encapsidation entropy displayed a maximum when the capsid and polyelectrolyte had equal absolute charge. The encapsidation process remained thermodynamically favorable for genome charges ca. 3.5 times the capsid charge. The chain stiffness had only a relatively weak effect on the thermodynamics of the encapsidation.

  4. Capsid functions of inactivated human picornaviruses and feline calicivirus.

    PubMed

    Nuanualsuwan, Suphachai; Cliver, Dean O

    2003-01-01

    The exceptional stability of enteric viruses probably resides in their capsids. The capsid functions of inactivated human picornaviruses and feline calicivirus (FCV) were determined. Viruses were inactivated by UV, hypochlorite, high temperature (72 degrees C), and physiological temperature (37 degrees C), all of which are pertinent to transmission via food and water. Poliovirus (PV) and hepatitis A virus (HAV) are transmissible via water and food, and FCV is the best available surrogate for the Norwalk-like viruses, which are leading causes of food-borne and waterborne disease in the United States. The capsids of all 37 degrees C-inactivated viruses still protected the viral RNA against RNase, even in the presence of proteinase K, which contrasted with findings with viruses inactivated at 72 degrees C. The loss of ability of the virus to attach to homologous cell receptors was universal, regardless of virus type and inactivation method, except for UV-inactivated HAV, and so virus inactivation was almost always accompanied by the loss of virus attachment. Inactivated HAV and FCV were captured by homologous antibodies. However, inactivated PV type 1 (PV-1) was not captured by homologous antibody and 37 degrees C-inactivated PV-1 was only partially captured. The epitopes on the capsids of HAV and FCV are evidently discrete from the receptor attachment sites, unlike those of PV-1. These findings indicate that the primary target of UV, hypochlorite, and 72 degrees C inactivation is the capsid and that the target of thermal inactivation (37 degrees C versus 72 degrees C) is temperature dependent.

  5. About the atomic structures of icosahedral quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiquandon, Marianne; Gratias, Denis

    2014-01-01

    This paper is a survey of the crystallographic methods that have been developed these last twenty five years to decipher the atomic structures of the icosahedral stable quasicrystals since their discovery in 1982 by D. Shechtman. After a brief recall of the notion of quasiperiodicity and the natural description of Z-modules in 3-dim as projection of regular lattices in N>3-dim spaces, we give the basic geometrical ingredients useful to describe icosahedral quasicrystals as irrational 3-dim cuts of ordinary crystals in 6-dim space. Atoms are described by atomic surfaces (ASs) that are bounded volumes in the internal (or perpendicular) 3-dim space and the intersections of which with the physical space are the actual atomic positions. The main part of the paper is devoted to finding the major properties of quasicrystalline icosahedral structures. As experimentally demonstrated, they can be described with a surprisingly few high symmetry ASs located at high symmetry special points in 6-dim space. The atomic structures are best described by aggregations and intersections of high symmetry compact interpenetrating atomic clusters. We show here that the experimentally relevant clusters are derived from one generic cluster made of two concentric triacontahedra scaled by τ and an external icosidodecahedron. Depending on which ones of the orbits of this cluster are eventually occupied by atoms, the actual atomic clusters are of type Bergman, Mackay, Tsai and others….

  6. Screening of binding proteins that interact with Chinese sacbrood virus VP3 capsid protein in Apis cerana larvae cDNA library by the yeast two-hybrid method.

    PubMed

    Fei, Dongliang; Wei, Dong; Yu, Xiaolei; Yue, Jinjin; Li, Ming; Sun, Li; Jiang, Lili; Li, Yijing; Diao, Qingyun; Ma, Mingxiao

    2018-03-15

    Chinese sacbrood virus (CSBV) causes larval death and apiary collapse of Apis cerana. VP3 is a capsid protein of CSBV but its function is poorly understood. To determine the function of VP3 and screen for novel binding proteins that interact with VP3, we conducted yeast two-hybrid screening, glutathione S-transferase pull-down, and co-immunoprecipitation assays. Galectin (GAL) is a protein involved in immune regulation and host-pathogen interactions. The yeast two-hybrid screen implicated GAL as a major VP3-binding candidate. The assays showed that the VP3 interacted with GAL. Identification of these cellular targets and clarifying their contributions to the host-pathogen interaction may be useful for the development of novel therapeutic and prevention strategies against CSBV infection. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Viral Uncoating Is Directional: Exit of the Genomic RNA in a Common Cold Virus Starts with the Poly-(A) Tail at the 3′-End

    PubMed Central

    Sedivy, Arthur; Subirats, Xavier; Kowalski, Heinrich; Köhler, Gottfried; Blaas, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    Upon infection, many RNA viruses reorganize their capsid for release of the genome into the host cell cytosol for replication. Often, this process is triggered by receptor binding and/or by the acidic environment in endosomes. In the genus Enterovirus, which includes more than 150 human rhinovirus (HRV) serotypes causing the common cold, there is persuasive evidence that the viral RNA exits single-stranded through channels formed in the protein shell. We have determined the time-dependent emergence of the RNA ends from HRV2 on incubation of virions at 56°C using hybridization with specific oligonucleotides and detection by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. We report that psoralen UV crosslinking prevents complete RNA release, allowing for identification of the sequences remaining inside the capsid. We also present the structure of uncoating intermediates in which parts of the RNA are condensed and take the form of a rod that is directed roughly towards a two-fold icosahedral axis, the presumed RNA exit point. Taken together, in contrast to schemes frequently depicted in textbooks and reviews, our findings demonstrate that exit of the RNA starts from the 3′-end. This suggests that packaging also occurs in an ordered manner resulting in the 3′-poly-(A) tail becoming located close to a position of pore formation during conversion of the virion into a subviral particle. This directional genome release may be common to many icosahedral non-enveloped single-stranded RNA viruses. PMID:23592991

  8. Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV), a versatile platform for polyvalent display of antigenic epitopes and vaccine design.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shantanu; Ochoa, Wendy; Singh, Pratik; Hsu, Catherine; Schneemann, Anette; Manchester, Marianne; Olson, Mark; Reddy, Vijay

    2009-05-25

    Viruses-like particles (VLPs) are frequently being used as platforms for polyvalent display of foreign epitopes of interest on their capsid surface to improve their presentation enhancing the antigenicity and host immune response. In the present study, we used the VLPs of Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV), an icosahedral plant virus, as a platform to display 180 copies of 16 amino acid epitopes of ricin toxin fused to the C-terminal end of a modified TBSV capsid protein (NDelta52). Expression of the chimeric recombinant protein in insect cells resulted in spontaneous assembly of VLPs displaying the ricin epitope. Cryo-electron microscopy and image reconstruction of the chimeric VLPs at 22 A resolution revealed the locations and orientation of the ricin epitope exposed on the TBSV capsid surface. Furthermore, injection of chimeric VLPs into mice generated antisera that detected the native ricin toxin. The ease of fusing of short peptides of 15-20 residues and their ability to form two kinds (T=1, T=3) of bio-nanoparticles that result in the display of 60 or 180 copies of less constrained and highly exposed antigenic epitopes makes TBSV an attractive and versatile display platform for vaccine design.

  9. Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV), a versatile platform for polyvalent display of antigenic epitopes and vaccine design

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Shantanu; Ochoa, Wendy; Singh, Pratik

    2009-05-25

    Viruses-like particles (VLPs) are frequently being used as platforms for polyvalent display of foreign epitopes of interest on their capsid surface to improve their presentation enhancing the antigenicity and host immune response. In the present study, we used the VLPs of Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV), an icosahedral plant virus, as a platform to display 180 copies of 16 amino acid epitopes of ricin toxin fused to the C-terminal end of a modified TBSV capsid protein (NDELTA52). Expression of the chimeric recombinant protein in insect cells resulted in spontaneous assembly of VLPs displaying the ricin epitope. Cryo-electron microscopy and imagemore » reconstruction of the chimeric VLPs at 22 A resolution revealed the locations and orientation of the ricin epitope exposed on the TBSV capsid surface. Furthermore, injection of chimeric VLPs into mice generated antisera that detected the native ricin toxin. The ease of fusing of short peptides of 15-20 residues and their ability to form two kinds (T = 1, T = 3) of bio-nanoparticles that result in the display of 60 or 180 copies of less constrained and highly exposed antigenic epitopes makes TBSV an attractive and versatile display platform for vaccine design.« less

  10. Parvovirus Capsid Structures Required for Infection: Mutations Controlling Receptor Recognition and Protease Cleavages

    PubMed Central

    Callaway, Heather M.; Feng, Kurtis H.; Lee, Donald W.; Pinard, Melissa; McKenna, Robert; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Hafenstein, Susan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Parvovirus capsids are small but complex molecular machines responsible for undertaking many of the steps of cell infection, genome packing, and cell-to-cell as well as host-to-host transfer. The details of parvovirus infection of cells are still not fully understood, but the processes must involve small changes in the capsid structure that allow the endocytosed virus to escape from the endosome, pass through the cell cytoplasm, and deliver the single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) genome to the nucleus, where viral replication occurs. Here, we examine capsid substitutions that eliminate canine parvovirus (CPV) infectivity and identify how those mutations changed the capsid structure or altered interactions with the infectious pathway. Amino acid substitutions on the exterior surface of the capsid (Gly299Lys/Ala300Lys) altered the binding of the capsid to transferrin receptor type 1 (TfR), particularly during virus dissociation from the receptor, but still allowed efficient entry into both feline and canine cells without successful infection. These substitutions likely control specific capsid structural changes resulting from TfR binding required for infection. A second set of changes on the interior surface of the capsid reduced viral infectivity by >100-fold and included two cysteine residues and neighboring residues. One of these substitutions, Cys270Ser, modulates a VP2 cleavage event found in ∼10% of the capsid proteins that also was shown to alter capsid stability. A neighboring substitution, Pro272Lys, significantly reduced capsid assembly, while a Cys273Ser change appeared to alter capsid transport from the nucleus. These mutants reveal additional structural details that explain cell infection processes of parvovirus capsids. IMPORTANCE Parvoviruses are commonly found in both vertebrate and invertebrate animals and cause widespread disease. They are also being developed as oncolytic therapeutics and as gene therapy vectors. Most functions involved in

  11. Parvovirus Capsid Structures Required for Infection: Mutations Controlling Receptor Recognition and Protease Cleavages.

    PubMed

    Callaway, Heather M; Feng, Kurtis H; Lee, Donald W; Allison, Andrew B; Pinard, Melissa; McKenna, Robert; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Hafenstein, Susan; Parrish, Colin R

    2017-01-15

    Parvovirus capsids are small but complex molecular machines responsible for undertaking many of the steps of cell infection, genome packing, and cell-to-cell as well as host-to-host transfer. The details of parvovirus infection of cells are still not fully understood, but the processes must involve small changes in the capsid structure that allow the endocytosed virus to escape from the endosome, pass through the cell cytoplasm, and deliver the single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) genome to the nucleus, where viral replication occurs. Here, we examine capsid substitutions that eliminate canine parvovirus (CPV) infectivity and identify how those mutations changed the capsid structure or altered interactions with the infectious pathway. Amino acid substitutions on the exterior surface of the capsid (Gly299Lys/Ala300Lys) altered the binding of the capsid to transferrin receptor type 1 (TfR), particularly during virus dissociation from the receptor, but still allowed efficient entry into both feline and canine cells without successful infection. These substitutions likely control specific capsid structural changes resulting from TfR binding required for infection. A second set of changes on the interior surface of the capsid reduced viral infectivity by >100-fold and included two cysteine residues and neighboring residues. One of these substitutions, Cys270Ser, modulates a VP2 cleavage event found in ∼10% of the capsid proteins that also was shown to alter capsid stability. A neighboring substitution, Pro272Lys, significantly reduced capsid assembly, while a Cys273Ser change appeared to alter capsid transport from the nucleus. These mutants reveal additional structural details that explain cell infection processes of parvovirus capsids. Parvoviruses are commonly found in both vertebrate and invertebrate animals and cause widespread disease. They are also being developed as oncolytic therapeutics and as gene therapy vectors. Most functions involved in infection or transduction

  12. Recovery of infectious pariacoto virus from cDNA clones and identification of susceptible cell lines.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K N; Ball, L A

    2001-12-01

    Pariacoto virus (PaV) is a nodavirus that was recently isolated in Peru from the Southern armyworm, Spodoptera eridania. Virus particles are non enveloped and about 30 nm in diameter and have T=3 icosahedral symmetry. The 3.0-A crystal structure shows that about 35% of the genomic RNA is icosahedrally ordered, with the RNA forming a dodecahedral cage of 25-nucleotide (nt) duplexes that underlie the inner surface of the capsid. The PaV genome comprises two single-stranded, positive-sense RNAs: RNA1 (3,011 nt), which encodes the 108-kDa catalytic subunit of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, and RNA2 (1,311 nt), which encodes the 43-kDa capsid protein precursor alpha. In order to apply molecular genetics to the structure and assembly of PaV, we identified susceptible cell lines and developed a reverse genetic system for this virus. Cell lines that were susceptible to infection by PaV included those from Spodoptera exigua, Helicoverpa zea and Aedes albopictus, whereas cells from Drosophila melanogaster and Spodoptera frugiperda were refractory to infection. To recover virus from molecular clones, full-length cDNAs of PaV RNAs 1 and 2 were cotranscribed by T7 RNA polymerase in baby hamster kidney cells that expressed T7 RNA polymerase. Lysates of these cells were infectious both for cultured cells from Helicoverpa zea (corn earworm) and for larvae of Galleria mellonella (greater wax moth). The combination of infectious cDNA clones, cell culture infectivity, and the ability to produce milligram amounts of virus allows the application of DNA-based genetic methods to the study of PaV structure and assembly.

  13. Recovery of Infectious Pariacoto Virus from cDNA Clones and Identification of Susceptible Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Karyn N.; Ball, L. Andrew

    2001-01-01

    Pariacoto virus (PaV) is a nodavirus that was recently isolated in Peru from the Southern armyworm, Spodoptera eridania. Virus particles are non enveloped and about 30 nm in diameter and have T=3 icosahedral symmetry. The 3.0-Å crystal structure shows that about 35% of the genomic RNA is icosahedrally ordered, with the RNA forming a dodecahedral cage of 25-nucleotide (nt) duplexes that underlie the inner surface of the capsid. The PaV genome comprises two single-stranded, positive-sense RNAs: RNA1 (3,011 nt), which encodes the 108-kDa catalytic subunit of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, and RNA2 (1,311 nt), which encodes the 43-kDa capsid protein precursor α. In order to apply molecular genetics to the structure and assembly of PaV, we identified susceptible cell lines and developed a reverse genetic system for this virus. Cell lines that were susceptible to infection by PaV included those from Spodoptera exigua, Helicoverpa zea and Aedes albopictus, whereas cells from Drosophila melanogaster and Spodoptera frugiperda were refractory to infection. To recover virus from molecular clones, full-length cDNAs of PaV RNAs 1 and 2 were cotranscribed by T7 RNA polymerase in baby hamster kidney cells that expressed T7 RNA polymerase. Lysates of these cells were infectious both for cultured cells from Helicoverpa zea (corn earworm) and for larvae of Galleria mellonella (greater wax moth). The combination of infectious cDNA clones, cell culture infectivity, and the ability to produce milligram amounts of virus allows the application of DNA-based genetic methods to the study of PaV structure and assembly. PMID:11711613

  14. Effects of two amino acid substitutions in the capsid proteins on the interaction of two cell-adapted PanAsia-1 strains of foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype O with heparan sulfate receptor.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xingwen; Bao, Huifang; Li, Pinghua; Wei, Wei; Zhang, Meng; Sun, Pu; Cao, Yimei; Lu, Zengjun; Fu, Yuanfang; Xie, Baoxia; Chen, Yingli; Li, Dong; Luo, Jianxun; Liu, Zaixin

    2014-07-24

    Some cell-adapted strains of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) can utilize heparan sulfate (HS) as a receptor to facilitate viral infection in cultured cells. A number of independent sites on the capsid that might be involved in FMDV-HS interaction have been studied. However, the previously reported residues do not adequately explain HS-dependent infection of two cell-adapted PanAsia-1 strains (O/Tibet/CHA/6/99tc and O/Fujian/CHA/9/99tc) of FMDV serotype O. To identify the molecular determinant(s) for the interaction of O/Tibet/CHA/6/99tc and O/Fujian/CHA/9/99tc with HS receptor, several chimeric viruses and site-directed mutants were generated by using an infectious cDNA of a non-HS-utilizing rescued virus (Cathay topotype) as the genomic backbone. Phenotypic properties of these viruses were determined by plaque assays and virus adsorption and penetration assays in cultured cells. Only two of the rescued viruses encoding VP0 of O/Tibet/CHA/6/99tc or VP1 of O/Fujian/CHA/9/99tc formed plaques on wild-type Chinese hamster ovary (WT-CHO; HS+) cells, but not on HS-negative pgsD-677 cells. The formation of plaques by these two chimeric viruses on WT-CHO cells could be abolished by the introduction of single amino acid mutations Gln-2080 → Leu in VP2 of O/Tibet/CHA/6/99tc and Lys-1083 → Glu in VP1 of O/Fujian/CHA/9/99tc, respectively. Nonetheless, the introduced mutation Leu-2080 → Gln in VP2 of O/Fujian/CHA/9/99tc for the construction of expectant recombinant plasmid led to non-infectious progeny virus in baby hamster kidney 21 (BHK-21) cells, and the site-directed mutant encoding Glu-1083 → Lys in VP1 of O/Tibet/CHA/6/99tc did not acquire the ability to produce plaques on WT-CHO cells. Significant differences in the inhibition of the infectivity of four HS-utilizing viruses by heparin and RGD-containing peptide were observed in BHK-21 cells. Interestingly, the chimeric virus encoding VP0 of O/Fujian/CHA/9/99tc, and the site-directed mutant

  15. Effects of two amino acid substitutions in the capsid proteins on the interaction of two cell-adapted PanAsia-1 strains of foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype O with heparan sulfate receptor

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Some cell-adapted strains of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) can utilize heparan sulfate (HS) as a receptor to facilitate viral infection in cultured cells. A number of independent sites on the capsid that might be involved in FMDV-HS interaction have been studied. However, the previously reported residues do not adequately explain HS-dependent infection of two cell-adapted PanAsia-1 strains (O/Tibet/CHA/6/99tc and O/Fujian/CHA/9/99tc) of FMDV serotype O. To identify the molecular determinant(s) for the interaction of O/Tibet/CHA/6/99tc and O/Fujian/CHA/9/99tc with HS receptor, several chimeric viruses and site-directed mutants were generated by using an infectious cDNA of a non-HS-utilizing rescued virus (Cathay topotype) as the genomic backbone. Phenotypic properties of these viruses were determined by plaque assays and virus adsorption and penetration assays in cultured cells. Results Only two of the rescued viruses encoding VP0 of O/Tibet/CHA/6/99tc or VP1 of O/Fujian/CHA/9/99tc formed plaques on wild-type Chinese hamster ovary (WT-CHO; HS+) cells, but not on HS-negative pgsD-677 cells. The formation of plaques by these two chimeric viruses on WT-CHO cells could be abolished by the introduction of single amino acid mutations Gln-2080 → Leu in VP2 of O/Tibet/CHA/6/99tc and Lys-1083 → Glu in VP1 of O/Fujian/CHA/9/99tc, respectively. Nonetheless, the introduced mutation Leu-2080 → Gln in VP2 of O/Fujian/CHA/9/99tc for the construction of expectant recombinant plasmid led to non-infectious progeny virus in baby hamster kidney 21 (BHK-21) cells, and the site-directed mutant encoding Glu-1083 → Lys in VP1 of O/Tibet/CHA/6/99tc did not acquire the ability to produce plaques on WT-CHO cells. Significant differences in the inhibition of the infectivity of four HS-utilizing viruses by heparin and RGD-containing peptide were observed in BHK-21 cells. Interestingly, the chimeric virus encoding VP0 of O/Fujian/CHA/9/99tc, and the site

  16. Satellite Tobacco Mosaic Virus (STMV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The structure of the Satellite Tobacco Mosaic Virus (STMV)--one of the smallest viruses known--has been successfully deduced using STMV crystals grown aboard the Space Shuttle in 1992 and 1994. The STMV crystals were up to 30 times the volume of any seen in the laboratory. At the same time they gave the best resolution data ever obtained on any virus crystal. STMV is a small icosahedral plant virus, consisting of a protein shell made up of 60 identical protein subunits of molecular weight 17,500. Particularly noteworthy is the fact that, in contrast to the crystal grown on Earth, the crystals grown under microgravity conditions were viusally perfect, with no striations or clumping of crystals. Furthermore, the X-ray diffraction data obtained from the space-grown crystals was of a much higher quality than the best data available at that time from ground-based crystals. This computer model shows the external coating or capsid. STMV is used because it is a simple protein to work with; studies are unrelated to tobacco. Credit: Dr. Alex McPherson, Univeristy of California at Irvin.

  17. Turnip Yellow Mosaic Virus Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The bumpy exterior of the turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV) protein coat, or capsid, was defined in detail by Dr. Alexander McPherson of the University of California, Irvin using protein crystallized in space for analysis on Earth. TYMV is an icosahedral virus constructed from 180 copies of the same protein arranged into 12 clusters of five proteins (pentamers), and 20 clusters of six proteins (hexamers). The final TYMV structure led to the enexpected hypothesis that the virus release its RNA by essentially chemical-mechanical means. Most viruses have farly flat coats, but in TYMV, the fold in each protein, called the jellyroll, is clustered at the points where the protein pentamers and hexamers join. The jellyrolls are almost standing on end, producing a bumpy surface with knobs at all of the pentamers and hexamers. At the inside surface of the pentamers is a void that is not present at the hexamers. The coating had been seen in early studies of TYMV, but McPhereson's atomic structure shows much more detail. The inside surface is strikingly, and unexpectedly, different than the outside. While the pentamers contain a central viod on the inside, the hexameric units contain peptides liked to each other, forming a ring or, more accurately, rings to fill the voild. Credit: Dr. Alexander McPherson, University of California, Irvine.

  18. Varieties of charge distributions in coat proteins of ssRNA+  viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lošdorfer Božič, Anže; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2018-01-01

    A major part of the interactions involved in the assembly and stability of icosahedral, positive-sense single-stranded RNA (ssRNA+) viruses is electrostatic in nature, as can be inferred from the strong pH- and salt-dependence of their assembly phase diagrams. Electrostatic interactions do not act only between the capsid coat proteins (CPs), but just as often provide a significant contribution to the interactions of the CPs with the genomic RNA, mediated to a large extent by positively charged, flexible N-terminal tails of the CPs. In this work, we provide two clear and complementary definitions of an N-terminal tail of a protein, and use them to extract the tail sequences of a large number of CPs of ssRNA+  viruses. We examine the pH-dependent interplay of charge on both tails and CPs alike, and show that—in contrast to the charge on the CPs—the net positive charge on the N-tails persists even to very basic pH values. In addition, we note a limit to the length of the wild-type genomes of those viruses which utilize positively charged tails, when compared to viruses without charged tails and similar capsid size. At the same time, we observe no clear connection between the charge on the N-tails and the genome lengths of the viruses included in our study.

  19. Molecular packing in virus crystals: geometry, chemistry, and biology.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, P; Johnson, J E

    1998-01-01

    An automated procedure was developed to determine the geometrical and chemical interactions of crystalline virus particles using the crystal parameters, particle position, orientation, and atomic coordinates for an icosahedral asymmetric unit. Two applications of the program are reported: (1) An analysis of a novel pseudo-rhombohedral (R32) symmetry present in the monoclinic crystal lattices of both Nodamura Virus (NOV) and Coxsackie virus B3 (CVB3). The study shows that in both cases the interactions between particles is substantially increased by minor deviations from exact R32 symmetry and that only particles with the proper ratio of dimensions along twofold and fivefold symmetry axes (such as southern bean mosaic virus) can achieve comparable buried surface area in the true R32 space group. (2) An attempt was made to correlate biological function with remarkably conserved interparticle contact regions found in different crystal forms of three members of the nodavirus family, NOV, Flock House Virus (FHV), and Black Beetle Virus (BBV). Mutational evidence implicates the quasi-threefold region on the viral surface in receptor binding in nodaviruses and this region is dominant in particle contacts in all three virus crystals. Examination of particle contacts in numerous crystal structures of viruses in the picornavirus super-family showed that portions of the capsid surface known to interact with a receptor or serve as an epitope for monoclonal antibodies frequently stabilize crystal contacts.

  20. Viral video: Live imaging of virus-host encounters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Kwangmin; Guasto, Jeffrey S.; Cubillos-Ruiz, Andres; Chisholm, Sallie W.; Sullivan, Matthew B.; Stocker, Roman

    2014-11-01

    Viruses are non-motile infectious agents that rely on Brownian motion to encounter and subsequently adsorb to their hosts. Paradoxically, the viral adsorption rate is often reported to be larger than the theoretical limit imposed by the virus-host encounter rate, highlighting a major gap in the experimental quantification of virus-host interactions. Here we present the first direct quantification of the viral adsorption rate, obtained using live imaging of individual host cells and viruses for thousands of encounter events. The host-virus pair consisted of Prochlorococcus MED4, a 800 nm small non-motile bacterium that dominates photosynthesis in the oceans, and its virus PHM-2, a myovirus that has a 80 nm icosahedral capsid and a 200 nm long rigid tail. We simultaneously imaged hosts and viruses moving by Brownian motion using two-channel epifluorescent microscopy in a microfluidic device. This detailed quantification of viral transport yielded a 20-fold smaller adsorption efficiency than previously reported, indicating the need for a major revision in infection models for marine and likely other ecosystems.

  1. Method of making an icosahedral boride structure

    DOEpatents

    Hersee, Stephen D.; Wang, Ronghua; Zubia, David; Aselage, Terrance L.; Emin, David

    2005-01-11

    A method for fabricating thin films of an icosahedral boride on a silicon carbide (SiC) substrate is provided. Preferably the icosahedral boride layer is comprised of either boron phosphide (B.sub.12 P.sub.2) or boron arsenide (B.sub.12 As.sub.2). The provided method achieves improved film crystallinity and lowered impurity concentrations. In one aspect, an epitaxially grown layer of B.sub.12 P.sub.2 with a base layer or substrate of SiC is provided. In another aspect, an epitaxially grown layer of B.sub.12 As.sub.2 with a base layer or substrate of SiC is provided. In yet another aspect, thin films of B.sub.12 P.sub.2 or B.sub.12 As.sub.2 are formed on SiC using CVD or other vapor deposition means. If CVD techniques are employed, preferably the deposition temperature is above 1050.degree. C., more preferably in the range of 1100.degree. C. to 1400.degree. C., and still more preferably approximately 1150.degree. C.

  2. Crystal structure of an antiviral ankyrin targeting the HIV-1 capsid and molecular modeling of the ankyrin-capsid complex.

    PubMed

    Praditwongwan, Warachai; Chuankhayan, Phimonphan; Saoin, Somphot; Wisitponchai, Tanchanok; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran; Nangola, Sawitree; Hong, Saw See; Minard, Philippe; Boulanger, Pierre; Chen, Chun-Jung; Tayapiwatana, Chatchai

    2014-08-01

    Ankyrins are cellular repeat proteins, which can be genetically modified to randomize amino-acid residues located at defined positions in each repeat unit, and thus create a potential binding surface adaptable to macromolecular ligands. From a phage-display library of artificial ankyrins, we have isolated Ank(GAG)1D4, a trimodular ankyrin which binds to the HIV-1 capsid protein N-terminal domain (NTD(CA)) and has an antiviral effect at the late steps of the virus life cycle. In this study, the determinants of the Ank(GAG)1D4-NTD(CA) interaction were analyzed using peptide scanning in competition ELISA, capsid mutagenesis, ankyrin crystallography and molecular modeling. We determined the Ank(GAG)1D4 structure at 2.2 Å resolution, and used the crystal structure in molecular docking with a homology model of HIV-1 capsid. Our results indicated that NTD(CA) alpha-helices H1 and H7 could mediate the formation of the capsid-Ank(GAG)1D4 binary complex, but the interaction involving H7 was predicted to be more stable than with H1. Arginine-18 (R18) in H1, and R132 and R143 in H7 were found to be the key players of the Ank(GAG)1D4-NTD(CA) interaction. This was confirmed by R-to-A mutagenesis of NTD(CA), and by sequence analysis of trimodular ankyrins negative for capsid binding. In Ank(GAG)1D4, major interactors common to H1 and H7 were found to be S45, Y56, R89, K122 and K123. Collectively, our ankyrin-capsid binding analysis implied a significant degree of flexibility within the NTD(CA) domain of the HIV-1 capsid protein, and provided some clues for the design of new antivirals targeting the capsid protein and viral assembly.

  3. Crystal structure of an antiviral ankyrin targeting the HIV-1 capsid and molecular modeling of the ankyrin-capsid complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praditwongwan, Warachai; Chuankhayan, Phimonphan; Saoin, Somphot; Wisitponchai, Tanchanok; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran; Nangola, Sawitree; Hong, Saw See; Minard, Philippe; Boulanger, Pierre; Chen, Chun-Jung; Tayapiwatana, Chatchai

    2014-08-01

    Ankyrins are cellular repeat proteins, which can be genetically modified to randomize amino-acid residues located at defined positions in each repeat unit, and thus create a potential binding surface adaptable to macromolecular ligands. From a phage-display library of artificial ankyrins, we have isolated AnkGAG1D4, a trimodular ankyrin which binds to the HIV-1 capsid protein N-terminal domain (NTDCA) and has an antiviral effect at the late steps of the virus life cycle. In this study, the determinants of the AnkGAG1D4-NTDCA interaction were analyzed using peptide scanning in competition ELISA, capsid mutagenesis, ankyrin crystallography and molecular modeling. We determined the AnkGAG1D4 structure at 2.2 Å resolution, and used the crystal structure in molecular docking with a homology model of HIV-1 capsid. Our results indicated that NTDCA alpha-helices H1 and H7 could mediate the formation of the capsid-AnkGAG1D4 binary complex, but the interaction involving H7 was predicted to be more stable than with H1. Arginine-18 (R18) in H1, and R132 and R143 in H7 were found to be the key players of the AnkGAG1D4-NTDCA interaction. This was confirmed by R-to-A mutagenesis of NTDCA, and by sequence analysis of trimodular ankyrins negative for capsid binding. In AnkGAG1D4, major interactors common to H1 and H7 were found to be S45, Y56, R89, K122 and K123. Collectively, our ankyrin-capsid binding analysis implied a significant degree of flexibility within the NTDCA domain of the HIV-1 capsid protein, and provided some clues for the design of new antivirals targeting the capsid protein and viral assembly.

  4. Viral capsid mobility: a dynamic conduit for inactivation.

    PubMed

    Broo, K; Wei, J; Marshall, D; Brown, F; Smith, T J; Johnson, J E; Schneemann, A; Siuzdak, G

    2001-02-27

    Mass spectrometry and fluorescent probes have provided direct evidence that alkylating agents permeate the protein capsid of naked viruses and chemically inactivate the nucleic acid. N-acetyl-aziridine and a fluorescent alkylating agent, dansyl sulfonate aziridine, inactivated three different viruses, flock house virus, human rhinovirus-14, and foot and mouth disease virus. Mass spectral studies as well as fluorescent probes showed that alkylation of the genome was the mechanism of inactivation. Because particle integrity was not affected by selective alkylation (as shown by electron microscopy and sucrose gradient experiments), it was reasoned that the dynamic nature of the viral capsid acts as a conduit to the interior of the particle. Potential applications include fluorescent labeling for imaging viral genomes in living cells, the sterilization of blood products, vaccine development, and viral inactivation in vivo.

  5. Evidence from electron micrographs that icosahedral quasicrystals are icosahedral twins of cubic crystals.

    PubMed

    Pauling, L

    1990-10-01

    An analysis of electron micrographs of Al5Mn quasicrystals obtained by rapidly cooling a molten alloy with composition Al17Mn and removing the Al matrix by electrosolution, revealing aggregates of 20 microcrystals at the corners of a pentagonal dodecahedron, supports the proposal that these microcrystals are cubic crystals twinned about an icosahedral seed, with each cubic microcrystal sharing a threefold axis and three symmetry planes with the seed.

  6. Many-molecule encapsulation by an icosahedral shell

    PubMed Central

    Perlmutter, Jason D; Mohajerani, Farzaneh; Hagan, Michael F

    2016-01-01

    We computationally study how an icosahedral shell assembles around hundreds of molecules. Such a process occurs during the formation of the carboxysome, a bacterial microcompartment that assembles around many copies of the enzymes ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/ oxygenase and carbonic anhydrase to facilitate carbon fixation in cyanobacteria. Our simulations identify two classes of assembly pathways leading to encapsulation of many-molecule cargoes. In one, shell assembly proceeds concomitantly with cargo condensation. In the other, the cargo first forms a dense globule; then, shell proteins assemble around and bud from the condensed cargo complex. Although the model is simplified, the simulations predict intermediates and closure mechanisms not accessible in experiments, and show how assembly can be tuned between these two pathways by modulating protein interactions. In addition to elucidating assembly pathways and critical control parameters for microcompartment assembly, our results may guide the reengineering of viruses as nanoreactors that self-assemble around their reactants. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14078.001 PMID:27166515

  7. Identification of Factors Promoting HBV Capsid Self-Assembly by Assembly-Promoting Antivirals.

    PubMed

    Rath, Soumya Lipsa; Liu, Huihui; Okazaki, Susumu; Shinoda, Wataru

    2018-02-26

    Around 270 million individuals currently live with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Heteroaryldihydropyrimidines (HAPs) are a family of antivirals that target the HBV capsid protein and induce aberrant self-assembly. The capsids formed resemble the native capsid structure but are unable to propagate the virus progeny because of a lack of RNA/DNA. Under normal conditions, self-assembly is initiated by the viral genome. The mode of action of HAPs, however, remains largely unknown. In this work, using molecular dynamics simulations, we attempted to understand the action of HAP by comparing the dynamics of capsid proteins with and without HAPs. We found that the inhibitor is more stable in higher oligomers. It retains its stability in the hexamer throughout 1 μs of simulation. Our results also show that the inhibitor might help in stabilizing the C-terminus, the HBc 149-183 arginine-rich domain of the capsid protein. The C-termini of dimers interact with each other, assisted by the HAP inhibitor. During capsid assembly, the termini are supposed to directly interact with the viral genome, thereby suggesting that the viral genome might work in a similar way to stabilize the capsid protein. Our results may help in understanding the underlying molecular mechanism of HBV capsid self-assembly, which should be crucial for exploring new drug targets and structure-based drug design.

  8. Towards the modeling of nanoindentation of virus shells: Do substrate adhesion and geometry matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousquet, Arthur; Dragnea, Bogdan; Tayachi, Manel; Temam, Roger

    2016-12-01

    Soft nanoparticles adsorbing at surfaces undergo deformation and buildup of elastic strain as a consequence of interfacial adhesion of similar magnitude with constitutive interactions. An example is the adsorption of virus particles at surfaces, a phenomenon of central importance for experiments in virus nanoindentation and for understanding of virus entry. The influence of adhesion forces and substrate corrugation on the mechanical response to indentation has not been studied. This is somewhat surprising considering that many single-stranded RNA icosahedral viruses are organized by soft intermolecular interactions while relatively strong adhesion forces are required for virus immobilization for nanoindentation. This article presents numerical simulations via finite elements discretization investigating the deformation of a thick shell in the context of slow evolution linear elasticity and in presence of adhesion interactions with the substrate. We study the influence of the adhesion forces in the deformation of the virus model under axial compression on a flat substrate by comparing the force-displacement curves for a shell having elastic constants relevant to virus capsids with and without adhesion forces derived from the Lennard-Jones potential. Finally, we study the influence of the geometry of the substrate in two-dimensions by comparing deformation of the virus model adsorbed at the cusp between two cylinders with that on a flat surface.

  9. Impact of virus surface characteristics on removal mechanisms within membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Rabia M; Holloway, Ryan W; Cath, Tzahi Y; Nelson, Kara L

    2015-11-01

    In this study we investigated the removal of viruses with similar size and shape but with different external surface capsid proteins by a bench-scale membrane bioreactor (MBR). The goal was to determine which virus removal mechanisms (retention by clean backwashed membrane, retention by cake layer, attachment to biomass, and inactivation) were most impacted by differences in the virus surface properties. Seven bench-scale MBR experiments were performed using mixed liquor wastewater sludge that was seeded with three lab-cultured bacteriophages with icosahedral capsids of ∼30 nm diameter (MS2, phiX174, and fr). The operating conditions were designed to simulate those at a reference, full-scale MBR facility. The virus removal mechanism most affected by virus type was attachment to biomass (removals of 0.2 log for MS2, 1.2 log for phiX174, and 3 log for fr). These differences in removal could not be explained by electrostatic interactions, as the three viruses had similar net negative charge when suspended in MBR permeate. Removals by the clean backwashed membrane (less than 1 log) and cake layer (∼0.6 log) were similar for the three viruses. A comparison between the clean membrane removals seen at the bench-scale using a virgin membrane (∼1 log), and the full-scale using 10-year old membranes (∼2-3 logs) suggests that irreversible fouling, accumulated on the membrane over years of operation that cannot be removed by cleaning, also contributes towards virus removal. This study enhances the current mechanistic understanding of virus removal in MBRs and will contribute to more reliable treatment for water reuse applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Mechanisms of Entry and Endosomal Pathway of African Swine Fever Virus

    PubMed Central

    G. Sánchez, Elena; Pérez-Núñez, Daniel; Revilla, Yolanda

    2017-01-01

    African Swine Fever Virus (ASFV) causes a serious swine disease that is endemic in Africa and Sardinia and presently spreading in Russia and neighboring countries, including Poland and recently, the Czech Republic. This uncontrolled dissemination is a world-wide threat, as no specific protection or vaccine is available. ASFV is a very complex icosahedral, enveloped virus about 200 nm in diameter, which infects several members of pigs. The virus enters host cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis that depends on energy, vacuolar pH and temperature. The specific receptor(s) and attachment factor(s) involved in viral entry are still unknown, although macropinocytosis and clathrin-dependent mechanisms have been proposed. After internalization, ASFV traffics through the endolysosomal system. The capsid and inner envelope are found in early endosomes or macropinosomes early after infection, colocalizing with EEA1 and Rab5, while at later times they co-localize with markers of late endosomes and lysosomes, such as Rab7 or Lamp 1. A direct relationship has been established between the maturity of the endosomal pathway and the progression of infection in the cell. Finally, ASFV uncoating first involves the loss of the outer capsid layers, and later fusion of the inner membrane with endosomes, releasing the nude core into the cytosol. PMID:29117102

  11. Overcoming preexisting humoral immunity to AAV using capsid decoys.

    PubMed

    Mingozzi, Federico; Anguela, Xavier M; Pavani, Giulia; Chen, Yifeng; Davidson, Robert J; Hui, Daniel J; Yazicioglu, Mustafa; Elkouby, Liron; Hinderer, Christian J; Faella, Armida; Howard, Carolann; Tai, Alex; Podsakoff, Gregory M; Zhou, Shangzhen; Basner-Tschakarjan, Etiena; Wright, John Fraser; High, Katherine A

    2013-07-17

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors delivered through the systemic circulation successfully transduce various target tissues in animal models. However, similar attempts in humans have been hampered by the high prevalence of neutralizing antibodies to AAV, which completely block vector transduction. We show in both mouse and nonhuman primate models that addition of empty capsid to the final vector formulation can, in a dose-dependent manner, adsorb these antibodies, even at high titers, thus overcoming their inhibitory effect. To further enhance the safety of the approach, we mutated the receptor binding site of AAV2 to generate an empty capsid mutant that can adsorb antibodies but cannot enter a target cell. Our work suggests that optimizing the ratio of full/empty capsids in the final formulation of vector, based on a patient's anti-AAV titers, will maximize the efficacy of gene transfer after systemic vector delivery.

  12. A Simple Model for Immature Retrovirus Capsid Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paquay, Stefan; van der Schoot, Paul; Dragnea, Bogdan

    In this talk I will present simulations of a simple model for capsomeres in immature virus capsids, consisting of only point particles with a tunable range of attraction constrained to a spherical surface. We find that, at sufficiently low density, a short interaction range is sufficient for the suppression of five-fold defects in the packing and causes instead larger tears and scars in the capsid. These findings agree both qualitatively and quantitatively with experiments on immature retrovirus capsids, implying that the structure of the retroviral protein lattice can, for a large part, be explained simply by the effective interaction between the capsomeres. We thank the HFSP for funding under Grant RGP0017/2012.

  13. Overcoming Preexisting Humoral Immunity to AAV Using Capsid Decoys

    PubMed Central

    Anguela, Xavier M.; Pavani, Giulia; Chen, Yifeng; Davidson, Robert J.; Hui, Daniel J.; Yazicioglu, Mustafa; Elkouby, Liron; Hinderer, Christian J.; Faella, Armida; Howard, Carolann; Tai, Alex; Podsakoff, Gregory M.; Zhou, Shangzhen; Basner-Tschakarjan, Etiena; Wright, John Fraser

    2014-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors delivered through the systemic circulation successfully transduce various target tissues in animal models. However, similar attempts in humans have been hampered by the high prevalence of neutralizing antibodies to AAV, which completely block vector transduction. We show in both mouse and nonhuman primate models that addition of empty capsid to the final vector formulation can, in a dose-dependent manner, adsorb these antibodies, even at high titers, thus overcoming their inhibitory effect. To further enhance the safety of the approach, we mutated the receptor binding site of AAV2 to generate an empty capsid mutant that can adsorb antibodies but cannot enter a target cell. Our work suggests that optimizing the ratio of full/empty capsids in the final formulation of vector, based on a patient's anti-AAV titers, will maximize the efficacy of gene transfer after systemic vector delivery. PMID:23863832

  14. Viral genome structures, charge, and sequences are optimal for capsid assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagan, Michael

    2014-03-01

    For many viruses, the spontaneous assembly of a capsid shell around the nu-cleic acid (NA) genome is an essential step in the viral life cycle. Capsid formation is a multicomponent, out-of-equilibrium assembly process for which kinetic effects and thermodynamic constraints compete to determine the outcome. Understand-ing how viral components drive highly efficient assembly under these constraints could promote biomedical efforts to block viral propagation, and would elucidate the factors controlling assembly in a wide range of systems containing proteins and polyelectrolytes. This talk will describe coarse-grained models of capsid proteins and NAs with which we investigate the dynamics and thermodynamics of virus assembly. In con-trast to recent theoretical models, we find that capsids spontaneously `overcharge' that is, the NA length which is kinetically and thermodynamically optimal possess-es a negative charge greater than the positive charge of the capsid. When applied to specific virus capsids, the calculated optimal NA lengths closely correspond to the natural viral genome lengths. These results suggest that the features included in this model (i.e. electrostatics, excluded volume, and NA tertiary structure) play key roles in determining assembly thermodynamics and consequently exert selec-tive pressure on viral evolution. I will then discuss mechanisms by which se-quence-specific interactions between NAs and capsid proteins promote selective encapsidation of the viral genome. This work was supported by NIH R01GM108021 and the Brandeis MRSEC NSF-MRSEC-0820492.

  15. Mysteries of icosahedral quasicrystals: how are the atoms arranged?

    PubMed

    Ishimasa, Tsutomu

    2016-07-01

    Higher-dimensional structure analysis of quasicrystals is now possible. Yamada et al. [IUCrJ (2016), 3, 247-258] have solved the atomic structure of icosahedral ScZn7.33 including the characteristic imperfections.

  16. Ebselen, a Small-Molecule Capsid Inhibitor of HIV-1 Replication.

    PubMed

    Thenin-Houssier, Suzie; de Vera, Ian Mitchelle S; Pedro-Rosa, Laura; Brady, Angela; Richard, Audrey; Konnick, Briana; Opp, Silvana; Buffone, Cindy; Fuhrmann, Jakob; Kota, Smitha; Billack, Blase; Pietka-Ottlik, Magdalena; Tellinghuisen, Timothy; Choe, Hyeryun; Spicer, Timothy; Scampavia, Louis; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Kojetin, Douglas J; Valente, Susana T

    2016-04-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) capsid plays crucial roles in HIV-1 replication and thus represents an excellent drug target. We developed a high-throughput screening method based on a time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (HTS-TR-FRET) assay, using the C-terminal domain (CTD) of HIV-1 capsid to identify inhibitors of capsid dimerization. This assay was used to screen a library of pharmacologically active compounds, composed of 1,280in vivo-active drugs, and identified ebselen [2-phenyl-1,2-benzisoselenazol-3(2H)-one], an organoselenium compound, as an inhibitor of HIV-1 capsid CTD dimerization. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic analysis confirmed the direct interaction of ebselen with the HIV-1 capsid CTD and dimer dissociation when ebselen is in 2-fold molar excess. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry revealed that ebselen covalently binds the HIV-1 capsid CTD, likely via a selenylsulfide linkage with Cys198 and Cys218. This compound presents anti-HIV activity in single and multiple rounds of infection in permissive cell lines as well as in primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Ebselen inhibits early viral postentry events of the HIV-1 life cycle by impairing the incoming capsid uncoating process. This compound also blocks infection of other retroviruses, such as Moloney murine leukemia virus and simian immunodeficiency virus, but displays no inhibitory activity against hepatitis C and influenza viruses. This study reports the use of TR-FRET screening to successfully identify a novel capsid inhibitor, ebselen, validating HIV-1 capsid as a promising target for drug development. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Modulation of a Pore in the Capsid of JC Polyomavirus Reduces Infectivity and Prevents Exposure of the Minor Capsid Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Christian D. S.; Ströh, Luisa J.; Gee, Gretchen V.; O'Hara, Bethany A.; Stehle, Thilo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) infection of immunocompromised individuals results in the fatal demyelinating disease progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). The viral capsid of JCPyV is composed primarily of the major capsid protein virus protein 1 (VP1), and pentameric arrangement of VP1 monomers results in the formation of a pore at the 5-fold axis of symmetry. While the presence of this pore is conserved among polyomaviruses, its functional role in infection or assembly is unknown. Here, we investigate the role of the 5-fold pore in assembly and infection of JCPyV by generating a panel of mutant viruses containing amino acid substitutions of the residues lining this pore. Multicycle growth assays demonstrated that the fitness of all mutants was reduced compared to that of the wild-type virus. Bacterial expression of VP1 pentamers containing substitutions to residues lining the 5-fold pore did not affect pentamer assembly or prevent association with the VP2 minor capsid protein. The X-ray crystal structures of selected pore mutants contained subtle changes to the 5-fold pore, and no other changes to VP1 were observed. Pore mutant pseudoviruses were not deficient in assembly, packaging of the minor capsid proteins, or binding to cells or in transport to the host cell endoplasmic reticulum. Instead, these mutant viruses were unable to expose VP2 upon arrival to the endoplasmic reticulum, a step that is critical for infection. This study demonstrated that the 5-fold pore is an important structural feature of JCPyV and that minor modifications to this structure have significant impacts on infectious entry. IMPORTANCE JCPyV is an important human pathogen that causes a severe neurological disease in immunocompromised individuals. While the high-resolution X-ray structure of the major capsid protein of JCPyV has been solved, the importance of a major structural feature of the capsid, the 5-fold pore, remains poorly understood. This pore is conserved across

  18. The Role of Solution Conditions in the Bacteriophage PP7 Capsid Charge Regulation

    DOE PAGES

    Nap, Rikkert J.; Bozic, Anze Losdorfer; Szleifer, Igal; ...

    2014-10-21

    Here, we investigate and quantify the effects of pH and salt concentration on the charge regulation of the bacteriophage PP7 capsid. These effects are found to be extremely important and substantial, introducing qualitative changes in the charge state of the capsid such as a transition from net-positive to net-negative charge depending on the solution pH. The overall charge of the virus capsid arises as a consequence of a complicated balance with the chemical dissociation equilibrium of the amino acids and the electrostatic interaction between them, and the translational entropy of the mobile solution ions, i.e., counterion release. We show thatmore » to properly describe and predict the charging equilibrium of viral capsids in general, one needs to include molecular details as exemplified by the acid-base equilibrium of the detailed distribution of amino acids in the proteinaceous capsid shell.« less

  19. A novel totivirus-like virus isolated from bat guano.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinglou; Zhang, Yunzhi; Ge, Xingyi; Yuan, Junfa; Shi, Zhengli

    2012-06-01

    Previous metagenomic analysis indicated that numerous insect viruses exist in bat guano. In this study, we isolated a novel double-stranded RNA virus, a tentative member of the family Totiviridae, designated Tianjin totivirus (ToV-TJ), from bat feces. The virus is an icosahedral particle with a diameter of 40-43 nm, and it causes cytopathic effect in Sf9, Hz, and C6/36 cell lines. Full-length genomic sequence analysis showed that ToV-TJ shares high similarity with the totivirus OMRV-AK4, which was recently isolated from mosquitoes in Japan. The full-length genome of the ToV-TJ was 7611 bp and contained two predicted non-overlapping open reading frames (ORFs): ORF1, encoding the capsid protein (CP), and ORF2, encoding an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Bioassay of ToV-TJ by feeding on the larvae of Spodoptera exigua and Helicoverpa armigera (Hubner) suggests that this virus is not infectious for these two larvae in vivo. Sequences similar to that of ToV-TJ have been detected in bat feces sampled in Yunnan and Hainan Provinces, suggesting that this virus is widely distributed.

  20. A recombinant pseudorabies virus co-expressing capsid proteins precursor P1-2A of FMDV and VP2 protein of porcine parvovirus: a trivalent vaccine candidate.

    PubMed

    Hong, Qi; Qian, Ping; Li, Xiang-Min; Yu, Xiao-Lan; Chen, Huan-Chun

    2007-11-01

    Pseudorabies (PR), foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), and porcine parvovirus disease are three important infectious diseases in swine worldwide. The gene-deleted pseudorabies virus (PRV) has been used as a live-viral vector to develop multivalent genetic engineering vaccine. In this study, a recombinant PRV, which could co-express protein precursor P1-2A of FMDV and VP2 protein of PPV, was constructed using PRV TK(-)/gE(-)/LacZ(+) mutant as the vector. After homologous recombination and plaque purification, recombinant virus PRV TK(-)/gE(-)/P1-2A-VP2 was acquired and identified. Immunogenicity, safety of the recombinant PRV and its protection against PRV were confirmed in a mouse model by indirect ELISA and serum neutralization test. The results show that the recombinant PRV is a candidate vaccine strain to develop a novel trivalent vaccine against PRV, FMDV and PPV in swine.

  1. Increasing Type 1 Poliovirus Capsid Stability by Thermal Selection

    PubMed Central

    Adeyemi, Oluwapelumi O.; Nicol, Clare

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Poliomyelitis is a highly infectious disease caused by poliovirus (PV). It can result in paralysis and may be fatal. Integrated global immunization programs using live-attenuated oral (OPV) and/or inactivated (IPV) PV vaccines have systematically reduced its spread and paved the way for eradication. Immunization will continue posteradication to ensure against reintroduction of the disease, but there are biosafety concerns for both OPV and IPV. They could be addressed by the production and use of virus-free virus-like particle (VLP) vaccines that mimic the “empty” capsids (ECs) normally produced in viral infection. Although ECs are antigenically indistinguishable from mature virus particles, they are less stable and readily convert into an alternative conformation unsuitable for vaccine purposes. Stabilized ECs, expressed recombinantly as VLPs, could be ideal candidate vaccines for a polio-free world. However, although genome-free PV ECs have been expressed as VLPs in a variety of systems, their inherent antigenic instability has proved a barrier to further development. In this study, we selected thermally stable ECs of type 1 PV (PV-1). The ECs are antigenically stable at temperatures above the conversion temperature of wild-type (wt) virions. We have identified mutations on the capsid surface and in internal networks that are responsible for EC stability. With reference to the capsid structure, we speculate on the roles of these residues in capsid stability and postulate that such stabilized VLPs could be used as novel vaccines. IMPORTANCE Poliomyelitis is a highly infectious disease caused by PV and is on the verge of eradication. There are biosafety concerns about reintroduction of the disease from current vaccines that require live virus for production. Recombinantly expressed virus-like particles (VLPs) could address these inherent problems. However, the genome-free capsids (ECs) of wt PV are unstable and readily change antigenicity to a form not

  2. Nonlinear finite-element analysis of nanoindentation of viral capsids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbons, Melissa M.; Klug, William S.

    2007-03-01

    Recent atomic force microscope (AFM) nanoindentation experiments measuring mechanical response of the protein shells of viruses have provided a quantitative description of their strength and elasticity. To better understand and interpret these measurements, and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms, this paper adopts a course-grained modeling approach within the framework of three-dimensional nonlinear continuum elasticity. Homogeneous, isotropic, elastic, thick-shell models are proposed for two capsids: the spherical cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV), and the ellipsocylindrical bacteriophage ϕ29 . As analyzed by the finite-element method, these models enable parametric characterization of the effects of AFM tip geometry, capsid dimensions, and capsid constitutive descriptions. The generally nonlinear force response of capsids to indentation is shown to be insensitive to constitutive particulars, and greatly influenced by geometric and kinematic details. Nonlinear stiffening and softening of the force response is dependent on the AFM tip dimensions and shell thickness. Fits of the models capture the roughly linear behavior observed in experimental measurements and result in estimates of Young’s moduli of ≈280-360MPa for CCMV and ≈4.5GPa for ϕ29 .

  3. The Role of Capsid Maturation on Adenovirus Priming for Sequential Uncoating*

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Berná, Ana J.; Ortega-Esteban, Alvaro; Menéndez-Conejero, Rosa; Winkler, Dennis C.; Menéndez, Margarita; Steven, Alasdair C.; Flint, S. Jane; de Pablo, Pedro J.; San Martín, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    Adenovirus assembly concludes with proteolytic processing of several capsid and core proteins. Immature virions containing precursor proteins lack infectivity because they cannot properly uncoat, becoming trapped in early endosomes. Structural studies have shown that precursors increase the network of interactions maintaining virion integrity. Using different biophysical techniques to analyze capsid disruption in vitro, we show that immature virions are more stable than the mature ones under a variety of stress conditions and that maturation primes adenovirus for highly cooperative DNA release. Cryoelectron tomography reveals that under mildly acidic conditions mimicking the early endosome, mature virions release pentons and peripheral core contents. At higher stress levels, both mature and immature capsids crack open. The virus core is completely released from cracked capsids in mature virions, but it remains connected to shell fragments in the immature particle. The extra stability of immature adenovirus does not equate with greater rigidity, because in nanoindentation assays immature virions exhibit greater elasticity than the mature particles. Our results have implications for the role of proteolytic maturation in adenovirus assembly and uncoating. Precursor proteins favor assembly by establishing stable interactions with the appropriate curvature and preventing premature ejection of contents by tightly sealing the capsid vertices. Upon maturation, core organization is looser, particularly at the periphery, and interactions preserving capsid curvature are weakened. The capsid becomes brittle, and pentons are more easily released. Based on these results, we hypothesize that changes in core compaction during maturation may increase capsid internal pressure to trigger proper uncoating of adenovirus. PMID:22791715

  4. A chimeric virus created by DNA shuffling of the capsid genes of different subtypes of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) in the backbone of the non-pathogenic PCV1 induces protective immunity against the predominant PCV2b and the emerging PCV2d in pigs.

    PubMed

    Matzinger, Shannon R; Opriessnig, Tanja; Xiao, Chao-Ting; Catanzaro, Nicholas; Beach, Nathan M; Slade, David E; Nitzel, Gregory P; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2016-11-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is the primary causative agent of porcine circovirus-associated disease (PCVAD). Available commercial vaccines all target PCV2a subtype, although the circulating predominant subtype worldwide is PCV2b, and the emerging PCV2d subtype is also increasingly associated with PCVAD. Here we molecularly bred genetically-divergent strains representing PCV2a, PCV2b, PCV2c, PCV2d, and "divergent PCV2a" subtypes by DNA-shuffling of the capsid genes to produce a chimeric virus representing PCV2 global genetic diversity. When placed in the PCV2a backbone, one chimeric virus (PCV2-3cl14) induced higher neutralizing antibody titers against different PCV2 subtypes. Subsequently, a candidate vaccine (PCV1-3cl14) was produced by cloning the shuffled 3cl14 capsid into the backbone of the non-pathogenic PCV1. A vaccine efficacy study revealed that chimeric virus PCV1-3cl14 induces protective immunity against challenge with PCV2b or PCV2d in pigs. The chimeric PCV1-3cl14 virus is a strong candidate for a novel vaccine in pigs infected with variable PCV2 strains. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. In vitro binding of anthrax protective antigen on bacteriophage T4 capsid surface through Hoc-capsid interactions: A strategy for efficient display of large full-length proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shivachandra, Sathish B.; Rao, Mangala; Janosi, Laszlo

    2006-02-05

    An in vitro binding system is described to display large full-length proteins on bacteriophage T4 capsid surface at high density. The phage T4 icosahedral capsid features 155 copies of a nonessential highly antigenic outer capsid protein, Hoc, at the center of each major capsid protein hexon. Gene fusions were engineered to express the 83-kDa protective antigen (PA) from Bacillus anthracis fused to the N-terminus of Hoc and the 130-kDa PA-Hoc protein was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The purified PA-Hoc was assembled in vitro on hoc {sup -} phage particles. Binding was specific, stable, and of high affinity. Thismore » defined in vitro system allowed manipulation of the copy number of displayed PA and imposed no significant limitation on the size of the displayed antigen. In contrast to in vivo display systems, the in vitro approach allows all the capsid binding sites to be occupied by the 130-kDa PA-Hoc fusion protein. The PA-T4 particles were immunogenic in mice in the absence of an adjuvant, eliciting strong PA-specific antibodies and anthrax lethal toxin neutralizing antibodies. The in vitro display on phage T4 offers a novel platform for potential construction of customized vaccines against anthrax and other infectious diseases.« less

  6. Crystal structure of the human astrovirus capsid spike.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jinhui; Dong, Liping; Méndez, Ernesto; Tao, Yizhi

    2011-08-02

    Astroviruses are single-stranded, plus-sense RNA viruses that infect both mammals and birds, causing gastroenteritis and other extraintestinal diseases. Clinical studies have established astroviruses as the second leading cause of viral diarrhea in young children. Here we report the crystal structure of the human astrovirus dimeric surface spike determined to 1.8-Å resolution. The overall structure of each spike/projection domain has a unique three-layered β-sandwiches fold, with a core, six-stranded β-barrel structure that is also found in the hepatitis E virus capsid protrusions, suggesting a closer phylogenetic relationship between these two viruses than previously acknowledged. Based on a hepatitis E virus capsid model, we performed homology modeling and produced a complete, T = 3 astrovirus capsid model with features remarkably similar to those observed in a cryoelectron microscopy reconstruction image of a human astrovirus. Mapping conserved residues onto the astrovirus projection domain revealed a putative receptor binding site with amino acid compositions characteristic for polysaccharide recognition. Our results will have an important impact on future characterization of astrovirus structure and function, and will likely have practical applications in the development of vaccines and antivirals.

  7. Brome mosaic virus, good for an RNA virologist's basic needs.

    PubMed

    Kao, C C; Sivakumaran, K

    2000-03-01

    Abstract Taxonomic relationship: Type member of the Bromovirus genus, family Bromoviridae. A member of the alphavirus-like supergroup of positive-sense single-stranded RNA viruses. Physical properties: Virions are nonenveloped icosahedrals made up of 180 coat protein subunits (Fig. 1). The particles are 26 nm in diameter and contain 22% nucleic acid and 78% protein. The BMV genome is composed of three positive-sense, capped RNAs: RNA1 (3.2 kb), RNA2 (2.9 kb), RNA3 (2.1 kb) (Fig. 2). Viral proteins: RNA1 encodes protein 1a, containing capping and putative RNA helicase activities. RNA2 encodes protein 2a, a putative RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. RNA3 codes for two proteins: 3a, which is required for cell-to-cell movement, and the capsid protein. The capsid is translated from a subgenomic RNA, RNA4 (1.2 kb). Hosts: Monocots in the Poacea family, including Bromus inermis, Zea mays and Hordeum vulgare, in which BMV causes brown streaks. BMV can also infect the dicots Nicotiana benthamiana and several Chenopodium species. In N. benthamiana, the infection is asymptomatic while infection of Chenopodium can cause either necrotic or chlorotic lesions. Useful website:http://www4.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/ICTVdb/ICTVdB/10030001.htm.

  8. Protective immune responses in guinea pigs and swine induced by a suicidal DNA vaccine of the capsid gene of swine vesicular disease virus.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shi-Qi; Liu, Xiang-Tao; Guo, Hui-Chen; Yin, Shuang-Hui; Shang, You-Jun; Feng, Xia; Liu, Zai-Xin; Xie, Qing-Ge

    2007-03-01

    A suicidal DNA vaccine based on a Semliki Forest virus (SFV) replicon was evaluated for the development of a vaccine against swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV). The 1BCD gene of SVDV was cloned and inserted into pSCA1, an SFV DNA-based replicon vector. The resultant plasmid, pSCA/1BCD, was transfected into BHK-21 cells and the antigenicity of the expressed protein was confirmed using an indirect immunofluorescence assay. Immunogenicity was studied in guinea pigs and swine. Animals were injected intramuscularly three times with pSCA/1BCD at regular intervals. Anti-SVDV antibodies were detected by ELISA, the lymphocyte proliferation response was tested by the 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide method and neutralizing antibodies were measured by microneutralization tests. The data showed that SVDV-specific antibodies, neutralizing antibodies and lymphocyte proliferation were induced in both guinea pigs and swine. Furthermore, after three successive vaccinations with pSCA/1BCD, half of the pigs were protected against challenge with SVDV. These results should encourage further work towards the development of a DNA vaccine against SVDV.

  9. Porcine parvovirus capsid protein expressed in Escherichia coli self-assembles into virus-like particles with high immunogenicity in mice and guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Ji, Pengchao; Liu, Yunchao; Chen, Yumei; Wang, Aiping; Jiang, Dawei; Zhao, Baolei; Wang, Jvcai; Chai, Shujun; Zhou, Enmin; Zhang, Gaiping

    2017-03-01

    Porcine parvovirus (PPV) is a causative agent of reproductive failure in pregnant sows. Classical inactivated vaccine is extensively used to control PPV infection, but problems concerning safety, such as incomplete inactivation may occur. In this study, a novel subunit vaccine against PPV based on virus-like particles (VLPs) formed from the complete PPV VP2 protein expressed in a prokaryotic system with co-expressed chaperones is reported. The VLPs have a similar size, shape, and hemagglutination property to the PPV. Immunization with these VLPs stimulated the neutralization antibody and hemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody responses in mice and guinea pigs. The lymphocyte proliferation response and cytokine secretion was also induced in immunized guinea pigs comparable to those immunized with PPV inactivated vaccine. In addition, immunization with VLPs also significantly reduced the PPV content in the spleen of guinea pigs 14 days after the challenge with intact virus. These studies suggest that PPV VLPs created as described here could be a potential candidate for vaccine development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of Trichodysplasia Spinulosa-Associated Polyomavirus Capsid Protein as a New Carrier for Construction of Chimeric Virus-Like Particles Harboring Foreign Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Gedvilaite, Alma; Kucinskaite-Kodze, Indre; Lasickiene, Rita; Timinskas, Albertas; Vaitiekaite, Ausra; Ziogiene, Danguole; Zvirbliene, Aurelija

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant virus-like particles (VLPs) represent a promising tool for protein engineering. Recently, trichodysplasia spinulosa-associated polyomavirus (TSPyV) viral protein 1 (VP1) was efficiently produced in yeast expression system and shown to self-assemble to VLPs. In the current study, TSPyV VP1 protein was exploited as a carrier for construction of chimeric VLPs harboring selected B and T cell-specific epitopes and evaluated in comparison to hamster polyomavirus VP1 protein. Chimeric VLPs with inserted either hepatitis B virus preS1 epitope DPAFR or a universal T cell-specific epitope AKFVAAWTLKAAA were produced in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Target epitopes were incorporated either at the HI or BC loop of the VP1 protein. The insertion sites were selected based on molecular models of TSPyV VP1 protein. The surface exposure of the insert positions was confirmed using a collection of monoclonal antibodies raised against the intact TSPyV VP1 protein. All generated chimeric proteins were capable to self-assemble to VLPs, which induced a strong immune response in mice. The chimeric VLPs also activated dendritic cells and T cells as demonstrated by analysis of cell surface markers and cytokine production profiles in spleen cell cultures. In conclusion, TSPyV VP1 protein represents a new potential carrier for construction of chimeric VLPs harboring target epitopes. PMID:26230706

  11. Computational mechanics of viral capsids.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Melissa M; Perotti, Luigi E; Klug, William S

    2015-01-01

    Viral capsids undergo significant mechanical deformations during their assembly, maturation, and infective life-span. In order to characterize the mechanics of viral capsids, their response to applied external forces is analyzed in several experimental studies using, for instance, Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) indentation experiments. In recent years, a broader approach to study the mechanics of viral capsids has leveraged the theoretical tools proper of continuum mechanics. Even though the theory of continuum elasticity is most commonly used to study deformable bodies at larger macroscopic length scales, it has been shown that this very rich theoretical field can still offer useful insights into the mechanics of viral structures at the nanometer scale. Here we show the construction of viral capsid continuum mechanics models starting from different forms of experimental data. We will discuss the kinematics assumptions, the issue of the reference configuration, the material constitutive laws, and the numerical discretization necessary to construct a complete Finite Element capsid mechanical model. Some examples in the second part of the chapter will show the predictive capabilities of the constructed models and underline useful practical aspects related to efficiency and accuracy. We conclude each example by collecting several key findings discovered by simulating AFM indentation experiments using the constructed numerical models.

  12. Cold argon-oxygen plasma species oxidize and disintegrate capsid protein of feline calicivirus

    PubMed Central

    Mor, Sunil K.; Higgins, LeeAnn; Armien, Anibal; Youssef, Mohammed M.; Bruggeman, Peter J.; Goyal, Sagar M.

    2018-01-01

    Possible mechanisms that lead to inactivation of feline calicivirus (FCV) by cold atmospheric-pressure plasma (CAP) generated in 99% argon-1% O2 admixture were studied. We evaluated the impact of CAP exposure on the FCV viral capsid protein and RNA employing several cultural, molecular, proteomic and morphologic characteristics techniques. In the case of long exposure (2 min) to CAP, the reactive species of CAP strongly oxidized the major domains of the viral capsid protein (VP1) leading to disintegration of a majority of viral capsids. In the case of short exposure (15 s), some of the virus particles retained their capsid structure undamaged but failed to infect the host cells in vitro. In the latter virus particles, CAP exposure led to the oxidation of specific amino acids located in functional peptide residues in the P2 subdomain of the protrusion (P) domain, the dimeric interface region of VP1 dimers, and the movable hinge region linking the S and P domains. These regions of the capsid are known to play an essential role in the attachment and entry of the virus to the host cell. These observations suggest that the oxidative effect of CAP species inactivates the virus by hindering virus attachment and entry into the host cell. Furthermore, we found that the oxidative impact of plasma species led to oxidation and damage of viral RNA once it becomes unpacked due to capsid destruction. The latter effect most likely plays a secondary role in virus inactivation since the intact FCV genome is infectious even after damage to the capsid. PMID:29566061

  13. Preliminary X-ray data analysis of crystalline hibiscus chlorotic ringspot virus

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ao; Speir, Jeffrey A.; Yuan, Y. Adam; Johnson, John E.; Wong, Sek-Man

    2009-01-01

    Hibiscus chlorotic ringspot virus (HCRSV) is a positive-sense monopartite single-stranded RNA virus that belongs to the Carmovirus genus of the Tombusviridae family, which includes carnation mottle virus (CarMV). The HCRSV virion has a 30 nm diameter icosahedral capsid with T = 3 quasi-symmetry containing 180 copies of a 38 kDa coat protein (CP) and encapsidates a full-length 3.9 kb genomic RNA. Authentic virus was harvested from infected host kenaf leaves and was purified by saturated ammonium sulfate precipitation, sucrose density-gradient centrifugation and anion-exchange chromatography. Virus crystals were grown in multiple conditions; one of the crystals diffracted to 3.2 Å resolution and allowed the collection of a partial data set. The crystal belonged to space group R32, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 336.4, c = 798.5 Å. Packing considerations and rotation-function analysis determined that there were three particles per unit cell, all of which have the same orientation and fixed positions, and resulted in tenfold noncrystallography symmetry for real-space averaging. The crystals used for the structure determination of southern bean mosaic virus (SBMV) have nearly identical characteristics. Together, these findings will greatly aid the high-resolution structure determination of HCRSV. PMID:19478438

  14. Structure of a Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus assembly intermediate isolated from infected cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, Kristen; Lokesh, G.L.; Sherman, Michael

    2010-10-25

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) is a prototypical enveloped ssRNA virus of the family Togaviridae. To better understand alphavirus assembly, we analyzed newly formed nucleocapsid particles (termed pre-viral nucleocapsids) isolated from infected cells. These particles were intermediates along the virus assembly pathway, and ultimately bind membrane-associated viral glycoproteins to bud as mature infectious virus. Purified pre-viral nucleocapsids were spherical with a unimodal diameter distribution. The structure of one class of pre-viral nucleocapsids was determined with single particle reconstruction of cryo-electron microscopy images. These studies showed that pre-viral nucleocapsids assembled into an icosahedral structure with a capsid stoichiometry similar to themore » mature nucleocapsid. However, the individual capsomers were organized significantly differently within the pre-viral and mature nucleocapsids. The pre-viral nucleocapsid structure implies that nucleocapsids are highly plastic and undergo glycoprotein and/or lipid-driven rearrangements during virus self-assembly. This mechanism of self-assembly may be general for other enveloped viruses.« less

  15. Preliminary X-ray Data Analysis of Crystalline Hibiscus Chlorotic Ringspot Virus

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, A.; Speir, J; Yuan, Y

    Hibiscus chlorotic ringspot virus (HCRSV) is a positive-sense monopartite single-stranded RNA virus that belongs to the Carmovirus genus of the Tombusviridae family, which includes carnation mottle virus (CarMV). The HCRSV virion has a 30 nm diameter icosahedral capsid with T = 3 quasi-symmetry containing 180 copies of a 38 kDa coat protein (CP) and encapsidates a full-length 3.9 kb genomic RNA. Authentic virus was harvested from infected host kenaf leaves and was purified by saturated ammonium sulfate precipitation, sucrose density-gradient centrifugation and anion-exchange chromatography. Virus crystals were grown in multiple conditions; one of the crystals diffracted to 3Synchrotron .2 Amore » resolution and allowed the collection of a partial data set. The crystal belonged to space group R32, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 336.4, c = 798.5 . Packing considerations and rotation-function analysis determined that there were three particles per unit cell, all of which have the same orientation and fixed positions, and resulted in tenfold noncrystallography symmetry for real-space averaging. The crystals used for the structure determination of southern bean mosaic virus (SBMV) have nearly identical characteristics. Together, these findings will greatly aid the high-resolution structure determination of HCRSV.« less

  16. Strategies for the crystallization of viruses: using phase diagrams and gels to produce 3D crystals of Grapevine fanleaf virus.

    PubMed

    Schellenberger, Pascale; Demangeat, Gérard; Lemaire, Olivier; Ritzenthaler, Christophe; Bergdoll, Marc; Oliéric, Vincent; Sauter, Claude; Lorber, Bernard

    2011-05-01

    The small icosahedral plant RNA nepovirus Grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV) is specifically transmitted by a nematode and causes major damage to vineyards worldwide. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the recognition between the surface of its protein capsid and cellular components of its vector, host and viral proteins synthesized upon infection, the wild type GFLV strain F13 and a natural mutant (GFLV-TD) carrying a Gly₂₉₇Asp mutation were purified, characterized and crystallized. Subsequently, the geometry and volume of their crystals was optimized by establishing phase diagrams. GFLV-TD was twice as soluble as the parent virus in the crystallization solution and its crystals diffracted X-rays to a resolution of 2.7 Å. The diffraction limit of GFLV-F13 crystals was extended from 5.5 to 3 Å by growth in agarose gel. Preliminary crystallographic analyses indicate that both types of crystals are suitable for structure determination. Keys for the successful production of GFLV crystals include the rigorous quality control of virus preparations, crystal quality improvement using phase diagrams, and crystal lattice reinforcement by growth in agarose gel. These strategies are applicable to the production of well-diffracting crystals of other viruses and macromolecular assemblies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Reactive oxygen species promote heat shock protein 90-mediated HBV capsid assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yoon Sik, E-mail: yumshak@naver.com; Seo, Hyun Wook, E-mail: suruk@naver.com; Jung, Guhung, E-mail: drjung@snu.ac.kr

    2015-02-13

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and has been associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). ROS are also an important factor in HCC because the accumulated ROS leads to abnormal cell proliferation and chromosome mutation. In oxidative stress, heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and glutathione (GSH) function as part of the defense mechanism. Hsp90 prevents cellular component from oxidative stress, and GSH acts as antioxidants scavenging ROS in the cell. However, it is not known whether molecules regulated by oxidative stress are involved in HBV capsid assembly. Based on the previous study thatmore » Hsp90 facilitates HBV capsid assembly, which is an important step for the packing of viral particles, here, we show that ROS enrich Hsp90-driven HBV capsid formation. In cell-free system, HBV capsid assembly was facilitated by ROS with Hsp90, whereas it was decreased without Hsp90. In addition, GSH inhibited the function of Hsp90 to decrease HBV capsid assembly. Consistent with the result of cell-free system, ROS and buthionine sulfoximine (BS), an inhibitor of GSH synthesis, increased HBV capsid formation in HepG2.2.15 cells. Thus, our study uncovers the interplay between ROS and Hsp90 during HBV capsid assembly. - Highlights: • We examined H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and GSH modulate HBV capsid assembly. • H{sub 2}O{sub 2} facilitates HBV capsid assembly in the presence of Hsp90. • GSH inhibits function of Hsp90 in facilitating HBV capsid assembly. • H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and GSH induce conformation change of Hsp90.« less

  18. Expression and immunogenic analysis of recombinant polypeptides derived from capsid protein VP1 for developing subunit vaccine material against hepatitis A virus.

    PubMed

    Jang, Kyoung Ok; Park, Jong-Hwa; Lee, Hyun Ho; Chung, Dae Kyun; Kim, Wonyong; Chung, In Sik

    2014-08-01

    Three recombinant polypeptides, VP1-His, VP1-3N-His, and 3D2-His, were produced by Escherichia coli expression system. Recombinant VP1-His, VP1-3N-His, and 3D2-His were expressed as bands with molecular weights of 32, 38, and 30 kDa, respectively. These were purified by affinity chromatography using Ni-NTA Fast-flow resin and/or ion-exchange chromatography using DEAE-Sepharose Fast-flow resin. Intraperitoneal immunizations of recombinant polypeptides successfully elicited the productions of VP1-His, VP1-3N-His, and 3D2-His specific IgG antibodies (IgG subclass distribution of IgG1>IgG2a>IgG2b>IgG3) in sera and induced the secretions of cytokines IFN-γ and IL-6 in spleen cells. Sera from recombinant VP1-His-, VP1-3N-His-, and 3D2-His-immunized mice neutralized the propagation of HAV. The highest neutralizing activity was shown in sera from recombinant VP1-3N-His-immunized mice. These results suggest that recombinant VP1-3N-His can be a useful source for developing hepatitis A virus (HAV) subunit vaccine candidates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A Dual-Modality Herpes Simplex Virus 2 Vaccine for Preventing Genital Herpes by Using Glycoprotein C and D Subunit Antigens To Induce Potent Antibody Responses and Adenovirus Vectors Containing Capsid and Tegument Proteins as T Cell Immunogens.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Sita; Mahairas, Gregory G; Shaw, Carolyn E; Huang, Meei-Li; Koelle, David M; Posavad, Christine; Corey, Lawrence; Friedman, Harvey M

    2015-08-01

    We evaluated a genital herpes prophylactic vaccine containing herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) glycoproteins C (gC2) and D (gD2) to stimulate humoral immunity and UL19 (capsid protein VP5) and UL47 (tegument protein VP13/14) as T cell immunogens. The HSV-2 gC2 and gD2 proteins were expressed in baculovirus, while the UL19 and UL47 genes were expressed from replication-defective adenovirus vectors. Adenovirus vectors containing UL19 and UL47 stimulated human and murine CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses. Guinea pigs were either (i) mock immunized; (ii) immunized with gC2/gD2, with CpG and alum as adjuvants; (iii) immunized with the UL19/UL47 adenovirus vectors; or (iv) immunized with the combination of gC2/gD2-CpG/alum and the UL19/UL47 adenovirus vectors. Immunization with gC2/gD2 produced potent neutralizing antibodies, while UL19 and UL47 also stimulated antibody responses. After intravaginal HSV-2 challenge, the mock and UL19/UL47 adenovirus groups developed severe acute disease, while 2/8 animals in the gC2/gD2-only group and none in the combined group developed acute disease. No animals in the gC2/gD2 or combined group developed recurrent disease; however, 5/8 animals in each group had subclinical shedding of HSV-2 DNA, on 15/168 days for the gC2/gD2 group and 13/168 days for the combined group. Lumbosacral dorsal root ganglia were positive for HSV-2 DNA and latency-associated transcripts for 5/8 animals in the gC2/gD2 group and 2/8 animals in the combined group. None of the differences comparing the gC2/gD2-only group and the combined group were statistically significant. Therefore, adding the T cell immunogens UL19 and UL47 to the gC2/gD2 vaccine did not significantly reduce genital disease and vaginal HSV-2 DNA shedding compared with the excellent protection provided by gC2/gD2 in the guinea pig model. HSV-2 infection is a common cause of genital ulcer disease and a significant public health concern. Genital herpes increases the risk of transmission and

  20. A Dual-Modality Herpes Simplex Virus 2 Vaccine for Preventing Genital Herpes by Using Glycoprotein C and D Subunit Antigens To Induce Potent Antibody Responses and Adenovirus Vectors Containing Capsid and Tegument Proteins as T Cell Immunogens

    PubMed Central

    Mahairas, Gregory G.; Shaw, Carolyn E.; Huang, Meei-Li; Koelle, David M.; Posavad, Christine; Corey, Lawrence; Friedman, Harvey M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We evaluated a genital herpes prophylactic vaccine containing herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) glycoproteins C (gC2) and D (gD2) to stimulate humoral immunity and UL19 (capsid protein VP5) and UL47 (tegument protein VP13/14) as T cell immunogens. The HSV-2 gC2 and gD2 proteins were expressed in baculovirus, while the UL19 and UL47 genes were expressed from replication-defective adenovirus vectors. Adenovirus vectors containing UL19 and UL47 stimulated human and murine CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses. Guinea pigs were either (i) mock immunized; (ii) immunized with gC2/gD2, with CpG and alum as adjuvants; (iii) immunized with the UL19/UL47 adenovirus vectors; or (iv) immunized with the combination of gC2/gD2-CpG/alum and the UL19/UL47 adenovirus vectors. Immunization with gC2/gD2 produced potent neutralizing antibodies, while UL19 and UL47 also stimulated antibody responses. After intravaginal HSV-2 challenge, the mock and UL19/UL47 adenovirus groups developed severe acute disease, while 2/8 animals in the gC2/gD2-only group and none in the combined group developed acute disease. No animals in the gC2/gD2 or combined group developed recurrent disease; however, 5/8 animals in each group had subclinical shedding of HSV-2 DNA, on 15/168 days for the gC2/gD2 group and 13/168 days for the combined group. Lumbosacral dorsal root ganglia were positive for HSV-2 DNA and latency-associated transcripts for 5/8 animals in the gC2/gD2 group and 2/8 animals in the combined group. None of the differences comparing the gC2/gD2-only group and the combined group were statistically significant. Therefore, adding the T cell immunogens UL19 and UL47 to the gC2/gD2 vaccine did not significantly reduce genital disease and vaginal HSV-2 DNA shedding compared with the excellent protection provided by gC2/gD2 in the guinea pig model. IMPORTANCE HSV-2 infection is a common cause of genital ulcer disease and a significant public health concern. Genital herpes increases the risk of

  1. Synthesis of icosahedral gold nanocrystals: a thermal process strategy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Min; Chen, Shenhao; Zhao, Shiyong

    2006-03-16

    We demonstrate a one-step thermal process route to the synthesis of icosahedral gold nanocrystals. By regulating the concentrations of poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) and HAuCl4 or changing the temperature, we can readily access the shapes of icosahedral nanocrystals with good uniformity. These gold nanostructures, with unique geometrical shapes, might find use in areas that include photonics, optoelectronics, and optical sensing. We also observed that these gold nanocrystals have a strong tendency to be immobilized spontaneously on the glass substrate.

  2. DNA packaging in viral capsids with peptide arms.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qianqian; Bachmann, Michael

    2017-01-18

    Strong chain rigidity and electrostatic self-repulsion of packed double-stranded DNA in viruses require a molecular motor to pull the DNA into the capsid. However, what is the role of electrostatic interactions between different charged components in the packaging process? Though various theories and computer simulation models were developed for the understanding of viral assembly and packaging dynamics of the genome, long-range electrostatic interactions and capsid structure have typically been neglected or oversimplified. By means of molecular dynamics simulations, we explore the effects of electrostatic interactions on the packaging dynamics of DNA based on a coarse-grained DNA and capsid model by explicitly including peptide arms (PAs), linked to the inner surface of the capsid, and counterions. Our results indicate that the electrostatic interactions between PAs, DNA, and counterions have a significant influence on the packaging dynamics. We also find that the packed DNA conformations are largely affected by the structure of the PA layer, but the packaging rate is insensitive to the layer structure.

  3. Stability of Cucumber Necrosis Virus at the Quasi-6-Fold Axis Affects Zoospore Transmission.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Michael B; Kakani, Kishore; Rochon, D'Ann; Jiang, Wen; Voss, Neil R; Smith, Thomas J

    2017-10-01

    Cucumber necrosis virus (CNV) is a member of the genus Tombusvirus and has a monopartite positive-sense RNA genome. CNV is transmitted in nature via zoospores of the fungus Olpidium bornovanus As with other members of the Tombusvirus genus, the CNV capsid swells when exposed to alkaline pH and EDTA. We previously demonstrated that a P73G mutation blocks the virus from zoospore transmission while not significantly affecting replication in plants (K. Kakani, R. Reade, and D. Rochon, J Mol Biol 338:507-517, 2004, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jmb.2004.03.008). P73 lies immediately adjacent to a putative zinc binding site (M. Li et al., J Virol 87:12166-12175, 2013, https://doi.org/10.1128/JVI.01965-13) that is formed by three icosahedrally related His residues in the N termini of the C subunit at the quasi-6-fold axes. To better understand how this buried residue might affect vector transmission, we determined the cryo-electron microscopy structure of wild-type CNV in the native and swollen state and of the transmission-defective mutant, P73G, under native conditions. With the wild-type CNV, the swollen structure demonstrated the expected expansion of the capsid. However, the zinc binding region at the quasi-6-fold at the β-annulus axes remained intact. By comparison, the zinc binding region of the P73G mutant, even under native conditions, was markedly disordered, suggesting that the β-annulus had been disrupted and that this could destabilize the capsid. This was confirmed with pH and urea denaturation experiments in conjunction with electron microscopy analysis. We suggest that the P73G mutation affects the zinc binding and/or the β-annulus, making it more fragile under neutral/basic pH conditions. This, in turn, may affect zoospore transmission. IMPORTANCE Cucumber necrosis virus (CNV), a member of the genus Tombusvirus , is transmitted in nature via zoospores of the fungus Olpidium bornovanus While a number of plant viruses are transmitted via insect vectors

  4. Stability of Cucumber Necrosis Virus at the Quasi-6-Fold Axis Affects Zoospore Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Michael B.; Kakani, Kishore; Rochon, D'Ann; Jiang, Wen; Voss, Neil R.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cucumber necrosis virus (CNV) is a member of the genus Tombusvirus and has a monopartite positive-sense RNA genome. CNV is transmitted in nature via zoospores of the fungus Olpidium bornovanus. As with other members of the Tombusvirus genus, the CNV capsid swells when exposed to alkaline pH and EDTA. We previously demonstrated that a P73G mutation blocks the virus from zoospore transmission while not significantly affecting replication in plants (K. Kakani, R. Reade, and D. Rochon, J Mol Biol 338:507–517, 2004, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jmb.2004.03.008). P73 lies immediately adjacent to a putative zinc binding site (M. Li et al., J Virol 87:12166–12175, 2013, https://doi.org/10.1128/JVI.01965-13) that is formed by three icosahedrally related His residues in the N termini of the C subunit at the quasi-6-fold axes. To better understand how this buried residue might affect vector transmission, we determined the cryo-electron microscopy structure of wild-type CNV in the native and swollen state and of the transmission-defective mutant, P73G, under native conditions. With the wild-type CNV, the swollen structure demonstrated the expected expansion of the capsid. However, the zinc binding region at the quasi-6-fold at the β-annulus axes remained intact. By comparison, the zinc binding region of the P73G mutant, even under native conditions, was markedly disordered, suggesting that the β-annulus had been disrupted and that this could destabilize the capsid. This was confirmed with pH and urea denaturation experiments in conjunction with electron microscopy analysis. We suggest that the P73G mutation affects the zinc binding and/or the β-annulus, making it more fragile under neutral/basic pH conditions. This, in turn, may affect zoospore transmission. IMPORTANCE Cucumber necrosis virus (CNV), a member of the genus Tombusvirus, is transmitted in nature via zoospores of the fungus Olpidium bornovanus. While a number of plant viruses are transmitted via insect

  5. Role of electrostatic interactions in the assembly of empty spherical viral capsids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šiber, Antonio; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2007-12-01

    We examine the role of electrostatic interactions in the assembly of empty spherical viral capsids. The charges on the protein subunits that make the viral capsid mutually interact and are expected to yield electrostatic repulsion acting against the assembly of capsids. Thus, attractive protein-protein interactions of nonelectrostatic origin must act to enable the capsid formation. We investigate whether the interplay of repulsive electrostatic and attractive interactions between the protein subunits can result in the formation of spherical viral capsids of a preferred radius. For this to be the case, we find that the attractive interactions must depend on the angle between the neighboring protein subunits (i.e., on the mean curvature of the viral capsid) so that a particular angle(s) is (are) preferred energywise. Our results for the electrostatic contributions to energetics of viral capsids nicely correlate with recent experimental determinations of the energetics of protein-protein contacts in the hepatitis B virus [P. Ceres A. Zlotnick, Biochemistry 41, 11525 (2002)].

  6. Synthesis and assembly of retrovirus Gag precursors into immature capsids in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Sakalian, M; Parker, S D; Weldon, R A; Hunter, E

    1996-01-01

    The assembly of retroviral particles is mediated by the product of the gag gene; no other retroviral gene products are necessary for this process. While most retroviruses assemble their capsids at the plasma membrane, viruses of the type D class preassemble immature capsids within the cytoplasm of infected cells. This has allowed us to determine whether immature capsids of the prototypical type D retrovirus, Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (M-PMV), can assemble in a cell-free protein synthesis system. We report here that assembly of M-PMV Gag precursor proteins can occur in this in vitro system. Synthesized particles sediment in isopycnic gradients to the appropriate density and in thin-section electron micrographs have a size and appearance consistent with those of immature retrovirus capsids. The in vitro system described in this report appears to faithfully mimic the process of assembly which occurs in the host cell cytoplasm, since M-PMV gag mutants defective in in vivo assembly also fail to assemble in vitro. Likewise, the Gag precursor proteins of retroviruses that undergo type C morphogenesis, Rous sarcoma virus and human immunodeficiency virus, which do not preassemble capsids in vivo, fail to assemble particles in this system. Additionally, we demonstrate, with the use of anti-Gag antibodies, that this cell-free system can be utilized for analysis in vitro of potential inhibitors of retrovirus assembly. PMID:8648705

  7. Raman effect in icosahedral boron-rich solids

    PubMed Central

    Werheit, Helmut; Filipov, Volodymyr; Kuhlmann, Udo; Schwarz, Ulrich; Armbrüster, Marc; Leithe-Jasper, Andreas; Tanaka, Takaho; Higashi, Iwami; Lundström, Torsten; Gurin, Vladimir N; Korsukova, Maria M

    2010-01-01

    We present Raman spectra of numerous icosahedral boron-rich solids having the structure of α-rhombohedral, β-rhombohedral, α-tetragonal, β-tetragonal, YB66, orthorhombic or amorphous boron. The spectra were newly measured and, in some cases, compared with reported data and discussed. We emphasize the importance of a high signal-to-noise ratio in the Raman spectra for detecting weak effects evoked by the modification of compounds, accommodation of interstitial atoms and other structural defects. Vibrations of the icosahedra, occurring in all the spectra, are interpreted using the description of modes in α-rhombohedral boron by Beckel et al. The Raman spectrum of boron carbide is largely clarified. Relative intra- and inter-icosahedral bonding forces are estimated for the different structural groups and for vanadium-doped β-rhombohedral boron. The validity of Badger's rule is demonstrated for the force constants of inter-icosahedral B–B bonds, whereas the agreement is less satisfactory for the intra-icosahedral B–B bonds. PMID:27877328

  8. Crystallography of decahedral and icosahedral particles. II - High symmetry orientations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, C. Y.; Yacaman, M. J.; Heinemann, K.

    1979-01-01

    Based on the exact crystal structure of decahedral and icosahedral particles, high energy electron diffraction patterns and image profiles have been derived for various high symmetry orientations of the particles with respect to the incident beam. These results form a basis for the identification of small metal particle structures with advanced methods of transmission electron microscopy.

  9. The smallest capsid protein mediates binding of the essential tegument protein pp150 to stabilize DNA-containing capsids in human cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xinghong; Yu, Xuekui; Gong, Hao; Jiang, Xiaohong; Abenes, Gerrado; Liu, Hongrong; Shivakoti, Sakar; Britt, William J; Zhu, Hua; Liu, Fenyong; Zhou, Z Hong

    2013-08-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a ubiquitous herpesvirus that causes birth defects in newborns and life-threatening complications in immunocompromised individuals. Among all human herpesviruses, HCMV contains a much larger dsDNA genome within a similarly-sized capsid compared to the others, and it was proposed to require pp150, a tegument protein only found in cytomegaloviruses, to stabilize its genome-containing capsid. However, little is known about how pp150 interacts with the underlying capsid. Moreover, the smallest capsid protein (SCP), while dispensable in herpes simplex virus type 1, was shown to play essential, yet undefined, role in HCMV infection. Here, by cryo electron microscopy (cryoEM), we determine three-dimensional structures of HCMV capsid (no pp150) and virion (with pp150) at sub-nanometer resolution. Comparison of these two structures reveals that each pp150 tegument density is composed of two helix bundles connected by a long central helix. Correlation between the resolved helices and sequence-based secondary structure prediction maps the tegument density to the N-terminal half of pp150. The structures also show that SCP mediates interactions between the capsid and pp150 at the upper helix bundle of pp150. Consistent with this structural observation, ribozyme inhibition of SCP expression in HCMV-infected cells impairs the formation of DNA-containing viral particles and reduces viral yield by 10,000 fold. By cryoEM reconstruction of the resulting "SCP-deficient" viral particles, we further demonstrate that SCP is required for pp150 functionally binding to the capsid. Together, our structural and biochemical results point to a mechanism whereby SCP recruits pp150 to stabilize genome-containing capsid for the production of infectious HCMV virion.

  10. Nanobodies targeting norovirus capsid reveal functional epitopes and potential mechanisms of neutralization

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Norovirus is the leading cause of gastroenteritis worldwide. Despite recent developments in norovirus propagation in cell culture, these viruses are still challenging to grow routinely. Moreover, little is known on how norovirus infects the host cells, except that histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) are important binding factors for infection and cell entry. Antibodies that bind at the HBGA pocket and block attachment to HBGAs are believed to neutralize the virus. However, additional neutralization epitopes elsewhere on the capsid likely exist and impeding the intrinsic structural dynamics of the capsid could be equally important. In the current study, we investigated a panel of Nanobodies in order to probe functional epitopes that could trigger capsid rearrangement and/ or interfere with HBGA binding interactions. The precise binding sites of six Nanobodies (Nano-4, Nano-14, Nano-26, Nano-27, Nano-32, and Nano-42) were identified using X-ray crystallography. We showed that these Nanobodies bound on the top, side, and bottom of the norovirus protruding domain. The impact of Nanobody binding on norovirus capsid morphology was analyzed using electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. We discovered that distinct Nanobody epitopes were associated with varied changes in particle structural integrity and assembly. Interestingly, certain Nanobody-induced capsid morphological changes lead to the capsid protein degradation and viral RNA exposure. Moreover, Nanobodies employed multiple inhibition mechanisms to prevent norovirus attachment to HBGAs, which included steric obstruction (Nano-14), allosteric interference (Nano-32), and violation of normal capsid morphology (Nano-26 and Nano-85). Finally, we showed that two Nanobodies (Nano-26 and Nano-85) not only compromised capsid integrity and inhibited VLPs attachment to HBGAs, but also recognized a broad panel of norovirus genotypes with high affinities. Consequently, Nano-26 and Nano-85 have a great potential to

  11. Exploring the role of genome and structural ions in preventing viral capsid collapse during dehydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-González, Natalia; Guérin Darvas, Sofía M.; Durana, Aritz; Marti, Gerardo A.; Guérin, Diego M. A.; de Pablo, Pedro J.

    2018-03-01

    Even though viruses evolve mainly in liquid milieu, their horizontal transmission routes often include episodes of dry environment. Along their life cycle, some insect viruses, such as viruses from the Dicistroviridae family, withstand dehydrated conditions with presently unknown consequences to their structural stability. Here, we use atomic force microscopy to monitor the structural changes of viral particles of Triatoma virus (TrV) after desiccation. Our results demonstrate that TrV capsids preserve their genome inside, conserving their height after exposure to dehydrating conditions, which is in stark contrast with other viruses that expel their genome when desiccated. Moreover, empty capsids (without genome) resulted in collapsed particles after desiccation. We also explored the role of structural ions in the dehydration process of the virions (capsid containing genome) by chelating the accessible cations from the external solvent milieu. We observed that ion suppression helps to keep the virus height upon desiccation. Our results show that under drying conditions, the genome of TrV prevents the capsid from collapsing during dehydration, while the structural ions are responsible for promoting solvent exchange through the virion wall.

  12. Production of porcine parvovirus empty capsids with high immunogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Martínez, C; Dalsgaard, K; López de Turiso, J A; Cortés, E; Vela, C; Casal, J I

    1992-01-01

    The VP2 gene of porcine parvovirus was cloned in the baculovirus system and expressed in insect cells. The resulting product was present in high yield. It self-assembled into particles which were structurally and antigenically indistinguishable from regular PPV capsids. A high degree of purity of the recombinant capsids was obtained by ammonium sulphate precipitation of cell lysates. These virus-like particles were used as antigen in the immunization of two pigs. The pigs elicited an immune response which, when assayed by standard serological techniques, was identical to that of a commercial vaccine. The amount of recombinant antigen needed in a vaccine dose was only 3 micrograms in a primary dose and 1.5 micrograms in the booster.

  13. Interrogating viral capsid assembly with ion mobility-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uetrecht, Charlotte; Barbu, Ioana M.; Shoemaker, Glen K.; van Duijn, Esther; Heck, Albert J. R.

    2011-02-01

    Most proteins fulfil their function as part of large protein complexes. Surprisingly, little is known about the pathways and regulation of protein assembly. Several viral coat proteins can spontaneously assemble into capsids in vitro with morphologies identical to the native virion and thus resemble ideal model systems for studying protein complex formation. Even for these systems, the mechanism for self-assembly is still poorly understood, although it is generally thought that smaller oligomeric structures form key intermediates. This assembly nucleus and larger viral assembly intermediates are typically low abundant and difficult to monitor. Here, we characterised small oligomers of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and norovirus under equilibrium conditions using native ion mobility mass spectrometry. This data in conjunction with computational modelling enabled us to elucidate structural features of these oligomers. Instead of more globular shapes, the intermediates exhibit sheet-like structures suggesting that they are assembly competent. We propose pathways for the formation of both capsids.

  14. Impact of a nonuniform charge distribution on virus assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Siyu; Erdemci-Tandogan, Gonca; Wagner, Jef; van der Schoot, Paul; Zandi, Roya

    2017-08-01

    Many spherical viruses encapsulate their genomes in protein shells with icosahedral symmetry. This process is spontaneous and driven by electrostatic interactions between positive domains on the virus coat proteins and the negative genomes. We model the effect of the nonuniform icosahedral charge distribution from the protein shell instead using a mean-field theory. We find that this nonuniform charge distribution strongly affects the optimal genome length and that it can explain the experimentally observed phenomenon of overcharging of virus and viruslike particles.

  15. Human papilloma virus: Apprehending the link with carcinogenesis and unveiling new research avenues (Review)

    PubMed Central

    Ilie, Mihaela Adriana; Caruntu, Constantin; Zurac, Sabina; Neagu, Monica; Constantin, Carolina; Branisteanu, Daciana Elena; Voiculescu, Vlad; Mamoulakis, Charalampos; Tzanakakis, George; Spandidos, Demetrios A.

    2018-01-01

    Human papilloma viruses (HPV) are a small group of non-enveloped viruses belonging to the Papillomaviridae family with strong similarities to polyoma viruses. The viral particles consist of a genome in the form of a circular double-stranded DNA, encompassing eight open reading frames, as well as a non-enveloped icosahedral capsid. HPV infection is considered the most common sexually transmitted disease in both sexes and is strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of different types of cancer. ‘High-risk’ mucosal HPV types, predominantly types 16, 18, 31, 33 and 35, are associated with most cervical, penile, vulvar, vaginal, anal, oropharyngeal cancers and pre-cancers. Screening for HPV is necessary for the prognosis and for determining treatment strategies for cancer. Novel HPV markers, including proteomic and genomic markers, as well as anti-papillomavirus vaccines are currently available. The aim of this comprehensive review was to thoroughly present the updated information on virus development, cancer occurrence, treatment and prevention strategies, in an attempt to shed further light into the field, including novel research avenues. PMID:29393378

  16. A VP26-mNeonGreen Capsid Fusion HSV-2 Mutant Reactivates from Viral Latency in the Guinea Pig Genital Model with Normal Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Pieknik, Julianna R.; Tang, Shuang

    2018-01-01

    Fluorescent herpes simplex viruses (HSV) are invaluable tools for localizing virus in cells, permitting visualization of capsid trafficking and enhancing neuroanatomical research. Fluorescent viruses can also be used to study virus kinetics and reactivation in vivo. Such studies would be facilitated by fluorescent herpes simplex virus recombinants that exhibit wild-type kinetics of replication and reactivation and that are genetically stable. We engineered an HSV-2 strain expressing the fluorescent mNeonGreen protein as a fusion with the VP26 capsid protein. This virus has normal replication and in vivo recurrence phenotypes, providing an essential improved tool for further study of HSV-2 infection. PMID:29738431

  17. The VP7 Outer Capsid Protein of Rotavirus Induces Polyclonal B-Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Blutt, Sarah E.; Crawford, Sue E.; Warfield, Kelly L.; Lewis, Dorothy E.; Estes, Mary K.; Conner, Margaret E.

    2004-01-01

    The early response to a homologous rotavirus infection in mice includes a T-cell-independent increase in the number of activated B lymphocytes in the Peyer's patches. The mechanism of this activation has not been previously determined. Since rotavirus has a repetitively arranged triple-layered capsid and repetitively arranged antigens can induce activation of B cells, one or more of the capsid proteins could be responsible for the initial activation of B cells during infection. To address this question, we assessed the ability of rotavirus and virus-like particles to induce B-cell activation in vivo and in vitro. Using infectious rotavirus, inactivated rotavirus, noninfectious but replication-competent virus, and virus-like particles, we determined that neither infectivity nor RNA was necessary for B-cell activation but the presence of the rotavirus outer capsid protein, VP7, was sufficient for murine B-cell activation. Preincubation of the virus with neutralizing VP7 antibodies inhibited B-cell activation. Polymyxin B treatment and boiling of the virus preparation were performed, which ruled out possible lipopolysaccharide contamination as the source of activation and confirmed that the structural conformation of VP7 is important for B-cell activation. These findings indicate that the structure and conformation of the outer capsid protein, VP7, initiate intestinal B-cell activation during rotavirus infection. PMID:15194774

  18. Structural Comparison of Different Antibodies Interacting with Parvovirus Capsids

    SciTech Connect

    Hafenstein, Susan; Bowman, Valorie D.; Sun, Tao

    2009-05-13

    The structures of canine parvovirus (CPV) and feline parvovirus (FPV) complexed with antibody fragments from eight different neutralizing monoclonal antibodies were determined by cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) reconstruction to resolutions varying from 8.5 to 18 {angstrom}. The crystal structure of one of the Fab molecules and the sequence of the variable domain for each of the Fab molecules have been determined. The structures of Fab fragments not determined crystallographically were predicted by homology modeling according to the amino acid sequence. Fitting of the Fab and virus structures into the cryoEM densities identified the footprints of each antibody on the viral surface.more » As anticipated from earlier analyses, the Fab binding sites are directed to two epitopes, A and B. The A site is on an exposed part of the surface near an icosahedral threefold axis, whereas the B site is about equidistant from the surrounding five-, three-, and twofold axes. One antibody directed to the A site binds CPV but not FPV. Two of the antibodies directed to the B site neutralize the virus as Fab fragments. The differences in antibody properties have been linked to the amino acids within the antibody footprints, the position of the binding site relative to the icosahedral symmetry elements, and the orientation of the Fab structure relative to the surface of the virus. Most of the exposed surface area was antigenic, although each of the antibodies had a common area of overlap that coincided with the positions of the previously mapped escape mutations.« less

  19. Forging Unsupported Metal-Boryl Bonds with Icosahedral Carboranes.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Liban M A; Dziedzic, Rafal M; Khan, Saeed I; Spokoyny, Alexander M

    2016-06-13

    In contrast to the plethora of metal-catalyzed cross-coupling methods available for the installation of functional groups on aromatic hydrocarbons, a comparable variety of methods are currently not available for icosahedral carboranes, which are boron-rich three-dimensional aromatic analogues of aryl groups. Part of this is due to the limited understanding of the elementary steps for cross-coupling involving carboranes. Here, we report our efforts in isolating metal-boryl complexes to further our understanding of one of these elementary steps, oxidative addition. Structurally characterized examples of group 10 M-B bonds featuring icosahedral carboranes are completely unknown. Use of mercurocarboranes as a reagent to deliver M-B bonds saw divergent reactivity for platinum and palladium, with a Pt-B bond being isolated for the former, and a rare Pd-Hg bond being formed for the latter. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. In vivo encapsulation of nucleic acids using an engineered nonviral protein capsid.

    PubMed

    Lilavivat, Seth; Sardar, Debosmita; Jana, Subrata; Thomas, Geoffrey C; Woycechowsky, Kenneth J

    2012-08-15

    In Nature, protein capsids function as molecular containers for a wide variety of molecular cargoes. Such containers have great potential for applications in nanotechnology, which often require encapsulation of non-native guest molecules. Charge complementarity represents a potentially powerful strategy for engineering novel encapsulation systems. In an effort to explore the generality of this approach, we engineered a nonviral, 60-subunit capsid, lumazine synthase from Aquifex aeolicus (AaLS), to act as a container for nucleic acid. Four mutations were introduced per subunit to increase the positive charge at the inner surface of the capsid. Characterization of the mutant (AaLS-pos) revealed that the positive charges lead to the uptake of cellular RNA during production and assembly of the capsid in vivo. Surprisingly, AaLS-pos capsids were found to be enriched with RNA molecules approximately 200-350 bases in length, suggesting that this simple charge complementarity approach to RNA encapsulation leads to both high affinity and a degree of selectivity. The ability to control loading of RNA by tuning the charge at the inner surface of a protein capsid could illuminate aspects of genome recognition by viruses and pave the way for the development of improved RNA delivery systems.

  1. Crystallography of decahedral and icosahedral particles. I - Geometry of twinning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, C. Y.

    1979-01-01

    The crystal structure of the tetrahedral twins in multiply-twinned particles with decahedral and icosahedral point group symmetries has been examined and correlated with the face-centered cubic structure. Details on the crystal structure as well as the geometrical relationships among twins in each particle are presented. These crystallographic facts serve as a basis for the interpretation of small particle images obtained with advanced methods of transmission electron microscopy.

  2. Atomic clusters and atomic surfaces in icosahedral quasicrystals.

    PubMed

    Quiquandon, Marianne; Portier, Richard; Gratias, Denis

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents the basic tools commonly used to describe the atomic structures of quasicrystals with a specific focus on the icosahedral phases. After a brief recall of the main properties of quasiperiodic objects, two simple physical rules are discussed that lead one to eventually obtain a surprisingly small number of atomic structures as ideal quasiperiodic models for real quasicrystals. This is due to the fact that the atomic surfaces (ASs) used to describe all known icosahedral phases are located on high-symmetry special points in six-dimensional space. The first rule is maximizing the density using simple polyhedral ASs that leads to two possible sets of ASs according to the value of the six-dimensional lattice parameter A between 0.63 and 0.79 nm. The second rule is maximizing the number of complete orbits of high symmetry to construct as large as possible atomic clusters similar to those observed in complex intermetallic structures and approximant phases. The practical use of these two rules together is demonstrated on two typical examples of icosahedral phases, i-AlMnSi and i-CdRE (RE = Gd, Ho, Tm).

  3. Conformational Changes in the Capsid of a Calicivirus upon Interaction with Its Functional Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Ossiboff, Robert J.; Zhou, Yi; Lightfoot, Patrick J.

    2010-07-19

    Nonenveloped viral capsids are metastable structures that undergo conformational changes during virus entry that lead to interactions of the capsid or capsid fragments with the cell membrane. For members of the Caliciviridae, neither the nature of these structural changes in the capsid nor the factor(s) responsible for inducing these changes is known. Feline functional adhesion molecule A (fJAM-A) mediates the attachment and infectious viral entry of feline calicivirus (FCV). Here, we show that the infectivity of some FCV isolates is neutralized following incubation with the soluble receptor at 37 C. We used this property to select mutants resistant to preincubationmore » with the soluble receptor. We isolated and sequenced 24 soluble receptor-resistant (srr) mutants and characterized the growth properties and receptor-binding activities of eight mutants. The location of the mutations within the capsid structure of FCV was mapped using a new 3.6-{angstrom} structure of native FCV. The srr mutations mapped to the surface of the P2 domain were buried at the protruding domain dimer interface or were present in inaccessible regions of the capsid protein. Coupled with data showing that both the parental FCV and the srr mutants underwent increases in hydrophobicity upon incubation with the soluble receptor at 37 C, these findings indicate that FCV likely undergoes conformational change upon interaction with its receptor. Changes in FCV capsid conformation following its interaction with fJAM-A may be important for subsequent interactions of the capsid with cellular membranes, membrane penetration, and genome delivery.« less

  4. Structural basis of HIV-1 capsid recognition by PF74 and CPSF6

    DOE PAGES

    Bhattacharya, Akash; Alam, Steven L.; Fricke, Thomas; ...

    2014-12-17

    Upon infection of susceptible cells by HIV-1, the conical capsid formed by ~250 hexamers and 12 pentamers of the CA protein is delivered to the cytoplasm. In this study, the capsid shields the RNA genome and proteins required for reverse transcription. In addition, the surface of the capsid mediates numerous host–virus interactions, which either promote infection or enable viral restriction by innate immune responses. In the intact capsid, there is an intermolecular interface between the N-terminal domain (NTD) of one subunit and the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the adjacent subunit within the same hexameric ring. The NTD–CTD interface is criticalmore » for capsid assembly, both as an architectural element of the CA hexamer and pentamer and as a mechanistic element for generating lattice curvature. Here we report biochemical experiments showing that PF-3450074 (PF74), a drug that inhibits HIV-1 infection, as well as host proteins cleavage and polyadenylation specific factor 6 (CPSF6) and nucleoporin 153 kDa (NUP153), bind to the CA hexamer with at least 10-fold higher affinities compared with nonassembled CA or isolated CA domains. The crystal structure of PF74 in complex with the CA hexamer reveals that PF74 binds in a preformed pocket encompassing the NTD–CTD interface, suggesting that the principal inhibitory target of PF74 is the assembled capsid. Likewise, CPSF6 binds in the same pocket. Given that the NTD–CTD interface is a specific molecular signature of assembled hexamers in the capsid, binding of NUP153 at this site suggests that key features of capsid architecture remain intact upon delivery of the preintegration complex to the nucleus.« less

  5. Charge detection mass spectrometry: Instrumentation & applications to viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierson, Elizabeth E.

    For over three decades, electrospray ionization (ESI) has been used to ionize non-covalent complexes and subsequently transfer the intact ion into the gas phase for mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. ESI generates a distribution of multiple charged ions, resulting in an m/z spectrum comprised of a series of peaks, known as a charge state envelope. To obtain mass information, the number of charges for each peak must be deduced. For smaller biological analytes like peptides, the charge states are sufficiently resolved and this process is straightforward. For macromolecular complexes exceeding ~100 kDa, this process is complicated by the broadening and shifting of charge states due to incomplete desolvation, salt adduction, and inherent mass heterogeneity. As the analyte mass approaches the MDa regime, the m/z spectrum is often comprised of a broad distribution of unresolved charge states. In such cases, mass determination is precluded. Charge detection mass spectrometry (CDMS) is an emerging MS technique for determining the masses of heterogeneous, macromolecular complexes. In CDMS, the m/z and z of single ions are measured concurrently so that mass is easily calculated. With this approach, deconvolution of an m/z spectrum is unnecessary. This measurement is carried out by passing macroions through a conductive cylinder. The induced image charge on the cylindrical detector provides information about m/z and z: the m/z is related to its time-of-flight through the detector, and the z is related to the intensity of the image charge. We have applied CDMS to study the self-assembly of virus capsids. Late-stage intermediates in the assembly of hepatitis B virus, a devastating human pathogen, have been identified. This is the first time that such intermediates have been detected and represent a significant advancement towards understanding virus capsid assembly. CDMS has also been used to identify oversized, non-icosahedral polymorphs in the assembly of woodchuck hepatitis

  6. Cleavage sites within the poliovirus capsid protein precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, G.R.; Anderson, C.W.; Dorner, A.J.

    1982-01-01

    Partial amino-terminal sequence analysis was performed on radiolabeled poliovirus capsid proteins VP1, VP2, and VP3. A computer-assisted comparison of the amino acid sequences obtained with that predicted by the nucleotide sequence of the poliovirus genome allows assignment of the amino terminus of each capsid protein to a unique position within the virus polyprotein. Sequence analysis of trypsin-digested VP4, which has a blocked amino terminus, demonstrates that VP4 is encoded at or very near to the amino terminus of the polyprotein. The gene order of the capsid proteins is VP4-VP2-VP3-VP1. Cleavage of VP0 to VP4 and VP2 is shown to occurmore » between asparagine and serine, whereas the cleavages that separate VP2/VP3 and VP3/VP1 occur between glutamine and glycine residues. This finding supports the hypothesis that the cleavage of VP0, which occurs during virion morphogenesis, is distinct from the cleavages that separate functional regions of the polyprotein.« less

  7. L2, the minor capsid protein of papillomavirus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Joshua W.; Roden, Richard B.S.

    2013-01-01

    The capsid protein L2 plays major roles in both papillomavirus assembly and the infectious process. While L1 forms the majority of the capsid and can self-assemble into empty virus-like particles (VLPs), L2 is a minor capsid component and lacks the capacity to form VLPs. However, L2 co-assembles with L1 into VLPs, enhancing their assembly. L2 also facilitates encapsidation of the ~8kbp circular and nucleosome-bound viral genome during assembly of the non-enveloped T=7d virions in the nucleus of terminally differentiated epithelial cells, although, like L1, L2 is not detectably expressed in infected basal cells. With respect to infection, L2 is not required for particles to bind to and enter cells. However L2 must be cleaved by furin for endosome escape. L2 then travels with the viral genome to the nucleus, wherein it accumulates at ND-10 domains. Here, we provide an overview of the biology of L2. PMID:23689062

  8. WDR5 Facilitates Human Cytomegalovirus Replication by Promoting Capsid Nuclear Egress.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Liu, Xi-Juan; Yao, Yongxuan; Jiang, Xuan; Wang, Xian-Zhang; Yang, Hong; Sun, Jin-Yan; Miao, Yun; Wang, Wei; Huang, Zhen-Li; Wang, Yanyi; Tang, Qiyi; Rayner, Simon; Britt, William J; McVoy, Michael A; Luo, Min-Hua; Zhao, Fei

    2018-05-01

    WD repeat-containing protein 5 (WDR5) is essential for assembling the VISA-associated complex to induce a type I interferon antiviral response to Sendai virus infection. However, the roles of WDR5 in DNA virus infections are not well described. Here, we report that human cytomegalovirus exploits WDR5 to facilitate capsid nuclear egress. Overexpression of WDR5 in fibroblasts slightly enhanced the infectious virus yield. However, WDR5 knockdown dramatically reduced infectious virus titers with only a small decrease in viral genome replication or gene expression. Further investigation of late steps of viral replication found that WDR5 knockdown significantly impaired formation of the viral nuclear egress complex and induced substantially fewer infoldings of the inner nuclear membrane. In addition, fewer capsids were associated with these infoldings, and there were fewer capsids in the cytoplasm. Restoration of WDR5 partially reversed these effects. These results suggest that WDR5 knockdown impairs the nuclear egress of capsids, which in turn decreases virus titers. These findings reveal an important role for a host factor whose function(s) is usurped by a viral pathogen to promote efficient replication. Thus, WDR5 represents an interesting regulatory mechanism and a potential antiviral target. IMPORTANCE Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) has a large (∼235-kb) genome with over 170 open reading frames and exploits numerous cellular factors to facilitate its replication. HCMV infection increases protein levels of WD repeat-containing protein 5 (WDR5) during infection, overexpression of WDR5 enhances viral replication, and knockdown of WDR5 dramatically attenuates viral replication. Our results indicate that WDR5 promotes the nuclear egress of viral capsids, the depletion of WDR5 resulting in a significant decrease in production of infectious virions. This is the first report that WDR5 favors HCMV, a DNA virus, replication and highlights a novel target for antiviral therapy

  9. A molecular thermodynamic model for the stability of hepatitis B capsids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jehoon; Wu, Jianzhong

    2014-06-01

    Self-assembly of capsid proteins and genome encapsidation are two critical steps in the life cycle of most plant and animal viruses. A theoretical description of such processes from a physiochemical perspective may help better understand viral replication and morphogenesis thus provide fresh insights into the experimental studies of antiviral strategies. In this work, we propose a molecular thermodynamic model for predicting the stability of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) capsids either with or without loading nucleic materials. With the key components represented by coarse-grained thermodynamic models, the theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with experimental data for the formation free energies of empty T4 capsids over a broad range of temperature and ion concentrations. The theoretical model predicts T3/T4 dimorphism also in good agreement with the capsid formation at in vivo and in vitro conditions. In addition, we have studied the stability of the viral particles in response to physiological cellular conditions with the explicit consideration of the hydrophobic association of capsid subunits, electrostatic interactions, molecular excluded volume effects, entropy of mixing, and conformational changes of the biomolecular species. The course-grained model captures the essential features of the HBV nucleocapsid stability revealed by recent experiments.

  10. Time-resolved spectroscopy of self-assembly of CCMV protein capsids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Jelyn; Aronzon, Dina; Manoharan, V. N.

    2008-10-01

    In order to gain a deeper understanding of the process a virus undergoes to assemble; the purpose of this study to time resolve the self-assembly of a virus. Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle virus (CCMV), an icosahedral type virus, can assemble without its genetic code (RNA) depending on its chemical and physical surroundings. The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of colloidal gold particles is known to display a shift when the gold interacts with the proteins of a virus. Surface plasmon resonance is the free electron oscillation occurring at the surface of the gold particle resulting in a characteristic peak location at maximal absorbance and peak width. The shift results from the change in the refractive index of the particles as induced by the presence of the proteins. We hope to detect this shift through total internal reflection microscopy (TIRM). The accomplishments of this research are the completion of the TIR setup and the purification of the virus and its proteins.

  11. Selective Inhibitor of Nuclear Export (SINE) Compounds Alter New World Alphavirus Capsid Localization and Reduce Viral Replication in Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, Lindsay; Pinkham, Chelsea; de la Fuente, Cynthia; Brahms, Ashwini; Shafagati, Nazly; Wagstaff, Kylie M; Jans, David A; Tamir, Sharon; Kehn-Hall, Kylene

    2016-11-01

    The capsid structural protein of the New World alphavirus, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV), interacts with the host nuclear transport proteins importin α/β1 and CRM1. Novel selective inhibitor of nuclear export (SINE) compounds, KPT-185, KPT-335 (verdinexor), and KPT-350, target the host's primary nuclear export protein, CRM1, in a manner similar to the archetypical inhibitor Leptomycin B. One major limitation of Leptomycin B is its irreversible binding to CRM1; which SINE compounds alleviate because they are slowly reversible. Chemically inhibiting CRM1 with these compounds enhanced capsid localization to the nucleus compared to the inactive compound KPT-301, as indicated by immunofluorescent confocal microscopy. Differences in extracellular versus intracellular viral RNA, as well as decreased capsid in cell free supernatants, indicated the inhibitors affected viral assembly, which led to a decrease in viral titers. The decrease in viral replication was confirmed using a luciferase-tagged virus and through plaque assays. SINE compounds had no effect on VEEV TC83_Cm, which encodes a mutated form of capsid that is unable to enter the nucleus. Serially passaging VEEV in the presence of KPT-185 resulted in mutations within the nuclear localization and nuclear export signals of capsid. Finally, SINE compound treatment also reduced the viral titers of the related eastern and western equine encephalitis viruses, suggesting that CRM1 maintains a common interaction with capsid proteins across the New World alphavirus genus.

  12. Immunization with DNA Plasmids Coding for Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus Capsid and Envelope Proteins and/or Virus-Like Particles Induces Protection and Survival in Challenged Mice.

    PubMed

    Hinkula, Jorma; Devignot, Stéphanie; Åkerström, Sara; Karlberg, Helen; Wattrang, Eva; Bereczky, Sándor; Mousavi-Jazi, Mehrdad; Risinger, Christian; Lindegren, Gunnel; Vernersson, Caroline; Paweska, Janusz; van Vuren, Petrus Jansen; Blixt, Ola; Brun, Alejandro; Weber, Friedemann; Mirazimi, Ali

    2017-05-15

    Cri