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Sample records for icu follow-up services

  1. Food Service Follow-up Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, David C.

    Bakersfield City College reports on a followup study done to evaluate their Food Service Management Program. The program offers courses in three areas: certification and skill updating for those already employed in school cafeteria work, an A.A. degree program, and avocational courses for extended day students. Identical questionnaires were sent…

  2. Evaluating an outreach service for paediatric burns follow up.

    PubMed

    Cubitt, Jonathan J; Chesney, Amy; Brown, Liz; Nguyen, Dai Q

    2015-09-01

    Complications following paediatric burns are well documented and care needs to be taken to ensure the appropriate follow up of these patients. Historically this has meant follow up into adulthood however this is often not necessary. The centralisation of burns services in the UK means that patients and their parents may have to travel significant distances to receive this follow up care. To optimise our burns service we have introduced a burns outreach service to enable the patients to be treated closer to home. The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of the introduction of the burns outreach service and within this environment define the optimum length of time needed to follow up these patients. A retrospective analysis was carried out of 100 consecutive paediatric burns patients who underwent surgical management of their burn. During the follow up period there were 43 complications in 32 patients (32%). These included adverse scarring (either hypertrophic or keloid), delayed healing (taking >1 month to heal) and contractures (utilising either splinting or surgical correction). Fifty-nine percent of these complications occurred within 6 months of injury and all occurred within 18 months. Size of burn was directly correlated to the risk of developing a complication. The outreach service reduced the distance the patient needs to travel for follow up by more than 50%. There was also a significant financial benefit for the service as the follow up clinics were on average 50% cheaper with burns outreach than burns physician. Burns outreach is a feasible service that not only benefits the patients but also is cheaper for the burns service. The optimum length of follow up for paediatric burns in 18 months, after which if there have not been any complications they can be discharged. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  3. Review of retention strategies in longitudinal studies and application to follow-up of ICU survivors.

    PubMed

    Tansey, Catherine M; Matté, Andrea L; Needham, Dale; Herridge, Margaret S

    2007-12-01

    To review the literature on retention strategies in follow-up studies and their relevance to critical care and to comment on the Toronto experience with the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) follow-up studies. Literature review and two cohort studies in a tertiary care hospital in Toronto, Canada. ARDS and SARS patients. Review articles from the social sciences and medicine are summarized and our own experience with two longitudinal studies is drawn upon to elucidate strategies that can be successfully used to attenuate participant drop-out from longitudinal studies. Three key areas for retention of subjects are identified from the literature: (a) respect for patients: respect for their ideas and their time commitment to the research project; (b) tracking: collect information on many patient contacts at the initiation of the study and outline tracking procedures for subjects lost to follow-up; and (c) study personnel: interpersonal skills must be reinforced, flexible working hours mandated, and support offered. Our 5-year ARDS and 1-year SARS study retention rates were 86% and 91%, respectively, using these methods. Strategies to reduce patient attrition are time consuming but necessary to preserve internal and external validity. When the follow-up system is working effectively, researchers can acquire the necessary data to advance knowledge in their field and patients are satisfied that they have an important role to play in the research project.

  4. 25 CFR 26.36 - What follow-up service is available after I complete training?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... training? 26.36 Section 26.36 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES JOB PLACEMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAM Training Services § 26.36 What follow-up service is available after I complete training? Job Placement assistance may follow training. ...

  5. Parental satisfaction with follow-up services for children with major anatomical congenital anomalies.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, M; Poley, M J; Gischler, S J; Mazer, P; Ijsselstijn, H; Tibboel, D; Latour, J M

    2010-01-01

    Since 1999 a multidisciplinary follow-up programme for parents and children with major anatomical congenital anomalies is in place in our hospital, run by a dedicated team. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the services of this team from a parental perspective. Parents completed a questionnaire including open and closed questions about satisfaction with the various professional disciplines involved in the follow-up, statements on usefulness of the follow-up services and suggestions for improvement. Four hundred and sixty-nine surveys were sent out, of which 71% were returned. Non-responding parents included significantly more parents of non-Dutch origin (P= 0.038) and parents who never responded to invitations for follow-up examinations (P < 0.001). Parental satisfaction differed for the various disciplines. Eighty per cent of the parents were (very) satisfied with the social worker, compared with 92% with nurses. More than half of the parents agreed that the follow-up services give peace of mind. Almost a quarter of parents, however, considered the follow-up services as redundant. The children of these parents had significantly shorter intensive care unit stay (P= 0.02), were older at the time of the questionnaire (P= 0.04), of higher socio-economic status (P= 0.001) and less likely to be of non-Dutch origin (P= 0.008). Sixty-one per cent of the parents had contacted the 24-h helpline. Ninety per cent of the parents were satisfied with the intensive care unit, almost 80% with the general ward. Overall, parents were satisfied with the services of the follow-up team. Some parents, however, saw room for improvement related to better communication, recognizability of the team and better planning and organization.

  6. Improving Library Services to Satellite Campuses: A Follow-Up Study at the University of Lethbridge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eva, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    In an effort to provide better service to the University of Lethbridge satellite campus locations, a survey was done of instructors on the northern campuses regarding their knowledge and use of the University of Lethbridge Library services available to them. This was a follow-up to a survey conducted in 2011, at which time it was found that many…

  7. Follow Up Study of Female Radio and TV Servicing Apprentices. Part 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Society for Research on Women, Auckland (New Zealand).

    Female program completers and dropouts from a one-year course in radio and television servicing at Auckland Technical Institute (New Zealand) were followed up. Respondents included nine completers from the 1977 course, eight completers from the 1978 course, and three dropouts. Background information showed that 10 completers started the course…

  8. Cost analysis for the implementation of a medication review with follow-up service in Spain.

    PubMed

    Noain, Aranzazu; Garcia-Cardenas, Victoria; Gastelurrutia, Miguel Angel; Malet-Larrea, Amaia; Martinez-Martinez, Fernando; Sabater-Hernandez, Daniel; Benrimoj, Shalom I

    2017-08-01

    Background Medication review with follow-up (MRF) is a professional pharmacy service proven to be cost-effective. Its broader implementation is limited, mainly due to the lack of evidence-based implementation programs that include economic and financial analysis. Objective To analyse the costs and estimate the price of providing and implementing MRF. Setting Community pharmacy in Spain. Method Elderly patients using poly-pharmacy received a community pharmacist-led MRF for 6 months. The cost analysis was based on the time-driven activity based costing model and included the provider costs, initial investment costs and maintenance expenses. The service price was estimated using the labour costs, costs associated with service provision, potential number of patients receiving the service and mark-up. Main outcome measures Costs and potential price of MRF. Results A mean time of 404.4 (SD 232.2) was spent on service provision and was extrapolated to annual costs. Service provider cost per patient ranged from €196 (SD 90.5) to €310 (SD 164.4). The mean initial investment per pharmacy was €4594 and the mean annual maintenance costs €3,068. Largest items contributing to cost were initial staff training, continuing education and renting of the patient counselling area. The potential service price ranged from €237 to €628 per patient a year. Conclusion Time spent by the service provider accounted for 75-95% of the final cost, followed by initial investment costs and maintenance costs. Remuneration for professional pharmacy services provision must cover service costs and appropriate profit, allowing for their long-term sustainability.

  9. Reducing Behavioral Health Inpatient Readmissions for People With Substance Use Disorders: Do Follow-Up Services Matter?

    PubMed

    Reif, Sharon; Acevedo, Andrea; Garnick, Deborah W; Fullerton, Catherine A

    2017-08-01

    Individuals with substance use disorders are at high risk of hospital readmission. This study examined whether follow-up services received within 14 days of discharge from an inpatient hospital stay or residential detoxification reduced 90-day readmissions among Medicaid enrollees whose index admission included a substance use disorder diagnosis. Claims data were analyzed for Medicaid enrollees ages 18-64 with a substance use disorder diagnosis coded in any position for an inpatient hospital stay or residential detoxification in 2008 (N=30,439). Follow-up behavioral health services included residential, intensive outpatient, outpatient, and medication-assisted treatment (MAT). Analyses included data from ten states or fewer, based on a minimum number of index admissions and the availability of follow-up services or MAT. Survival analyses with time-varying independent variables were used to test the association of receipt of follow-up services and MAT with behavioral health readmissions. Two-thirds (67.7%) of these enrollees received no follow-up services within 14 days. Twenty-nine percent were admitted with a primary behavioral health diagnosis within 90 days of discharge. Survival analyses showed that MAT and residential treatment were associated with reduced risk of 90-day behavioral health admission. Receipt of outpatient treatment was associated with increased readmission risk, and, in only one model, receipt of intensive outpatient services was also associated with increased risk. Provision of MAT or residential treatment for substance use disorders after an inpatient or detoxification stay may help prevent readmissions. Medicaid programs should be encouraged to reduce barriers to MAT and residential treatment in order to prevent behavioral health admissions.

  10. White House Conference on Library and Information Services Follow-Up Inquiry. State/Territory Agency Responses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Commission on Libraries and Information Science, Washington, DC.

    State and territory agency responses to a 1980 follow-up inquiry of the 1979 White House Conference on Library and Information Services (WHCLIST) are presented. Individual questionnaires were completed by 24 states and 2 trust territories. Questionnaires provide information on increased state aid to libraries, new library legislation,…

  11. The Impact of Arbitration Intervention Services on Psychosocial Functioning: A Follow-Up Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dembo, Richard; Wareham, Jennifer; Poythress, Norman G.; Cook, Brittany; Schmeidler, James

    2006-01-01

    We report the impact of case management services on drug use and self-reported delinquency for youths involved in a clinical trial of the Juvenile Arbitration program. The project evaluated an innovative intervention service providing 16 weeks of intensive case management services to youths and their families. The present study examines interview…

  12. Health assessments for Indigenous Australians at Orange Aboriginal Medical Service: health problems identified and subsequent follow up.

    PubMed

    Dutton, Tegan; Stevens, Wendy; Newman, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to document the types, management and follow up of health issues identified by all Aboriginal Health Assessments (AHA) performed at Orange Aboriginal Medical Service from 1 January 2011 to 31 December 2012. This was done with a retrospective audit of clinical records. In total, 1169 AHAs were performed: 41% child, 53% adult and 6% older person AHAs. Newly identified health issues were documented in 85% (984). Being overweight (41%; 476) and smoking (26%; 301) were the common risk factors identified. As a result of the AHA, most children who were not up-to-date with their vaccinations received catch-up immunisations; 11% (36) of adult women (n=314) received a Pap smear, although Pap smear status was unknown or not up-to-date for 61% (192); 27% (311) of cases were prescribed new medication; and 1239 referrals were made but only 40% were attended. At 6 months following the AHA, 26% (240) of cases with newly identified health issues were completely managed and followed up, whereas 25% (226) received no follow up. The AHAs are useful for identifying new health issues; however, follow up of the identified health issues should be improved. If AHAs are to improve health outcomes, appropriate management and follow up of the identified health issues are essential.

  13. Reducing pharmacy wait time to promote customer service: a follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Slowiak, Julie M; Huitema, Bradley E

    2015-01-01

    The present study had 3 objectives: (1) to evaluate the effects of 2 different interventions (feedback regarding customer satisfaction with wait time and combined feedback and goal setting) on wait time in a hospital outpatient pharmacy; (2) to assess the extent to which the previously applied interventions maintained their effects; and (3) to evaluate the differences between the effects of the original study and those of the present follow-up study. Participants were 10 employees (4 pharmacists and 6 technicians) of an outpatient pharmacy. Wait times and customer satisfaction ratings were collected for "waiting customers." An ABCB within-subjects design was used to assess the effects of the interventions on both wait time and customer satisfaction, where A was the baseline (no feedback and no goal setting); B was the customer satisfaction feedback; and C was the customer satisfaction feedback, the wait time feedback, and the goal setting for wait time reduction. Wait time decreased after baseline when the combined intervention was introduced, and wait time increased with the reintroduction of satisfaction feedback (alone). The results of the replication study confirm the pattern of the results of the original study and demonstrate high sensitivity of levels of customer satisfaction with wait time. The most impressive result of the replication is the nearly 2-year maintenance of lower wait time between the end of the original study and the beginning (baseline) of the replication.

  14. A prospective examination of service use by abused and neglected children followed up into adulthood.

    PubMed

    Yanos, Philip T; Czaja, Sally J; Widom, Cathy Spatz

    2010-08-01

    This study sought to determine whether abused and neglected children are more likely than those without childhood maltreatment to use health and social services as adults and whether psychiatric status mediates or moderates the relationship. A prospective cohort design was used. Individuals with documented cases of physical and sexual abuse and neglect (ages 0-10) and nonvictimized children matched on age, sex, and race-ethnicity were interviewed in adulthood (mean age 41 years). Past-year service use (general medical, mental health, substance abuse, and social) was assessed during 2003-2004 interviews (maltreated group, N=458; control group, N=349). Psychiatric status (posttraumatic stress disorder [PTSD], drug abuse, and major depressive disorder) was assessed during 1989-1995 (mean age 29) by structured interview. Individuals with histories of childhood abuse and neglect were significantly more likely than their control group counterparts to use mental health services (odds ratio [OR]=1.60, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.04-2.45) and social services (OR=2.95, CI=2.19-3.97) in adulthood. Psychiatric status in young adulthood (PTSD and major depressive disorder) partially mediated the relationship between childhood maltreatment and use of mental health services, whereas major depression and drug abuse moderated the relationship between maltreatment and use of any services and general medical services. In adulthood, individuals with documented histories of childhood abuse and neglect are more likely than persons without such histories to use some types of services, and psychiatric status mediates and moderates these relationships. Findings have implications for the provision of services to persons with childhood abuse and neglect.

  15. The impact of nurse short message services and telephone follow-ups on diabetic adherence: which one is more effective?

    PubMed

    Zolfaghari, Mitra; Mousavifar, Seyedeh A; Pedram, Shadan; Haghani, Hamid

    2012-07-01

    To compare the effectiveness of two methods of follow-up: short message service and telephone follow-up on type 2 diabetes adherence for three months. Using telemedicine approaches may preserve appropriate blood glucose levels and may improve adherence to diabetes control recommendations in diabetic patients. A quasi-experimental, two-group, pretest and post-test design was used in this study to evaluate the effectiveness of nurse's follow-up via cellular phones and telephones. The sample consisted of 77 patients with type 2 diabetes that randomly were assigned to two groups: telephone follow-up (n = 39) and short message service (n = 38). Telephone interventions were applied by a researcher for three months; twice a week for the first month and every week for the second and third month. For three successive months, the short message service group that received messages about adherence to therapeutic regimen was examined. The data gathering instrument included data sheets - to record glycosylated haemoglobin - and the questionnaire related to adherence therapeutic regimen. Data gathering was carried out at the beginning of the study and after three and six months. The data were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistic methods with SPSS version 11.5. Results showed that both interventions had significant mean changes in glycosylated haemoglobin. For the telephone group (p < 0.001), a mean change of -0.93 and for the short message service group (p < 0.001), a mean change of -1.01. There was no significant difference in diet adherence (p = 0.000), physical exercise (p = 0.000) and medication taking (p = 0.000) adherence in either groups. Intervention using short message services of cellular phones and nurse-led-telephone follow-up improved HbA1c levels and adherence to diabetes therapeutic regimen for three months in type 2 diabetic patients. Both of follow-up intervention uses in this study can decrease HbA1c levels and escalate adherence to diabetes

  16. Results of a quantitative survey to explore both perceptions of the purposes of follow-up and preferences for methods of follow-up delivery among service users, primary care practitioners and specialist clinicians after cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Frew, G; Smith, A; Zutshi, B; Young, N; Aggarwal, A; Jones, P; Kockelbergh, R; Richards, M; Maher, E J

    2010-12-01

    To ascertain perceptions of reasons for follow-up after cancer treatment among service users (patients and carers), primary care practitioners and specialist clinicians (doctors and specialist nurses) and to identify levels of preference for different models of follow-up and the effect of an individual's experience on preferred models. A national survey designed to meet the needs of each key respondent group was carried out after a structured literature review, an extensive consultation process and a pilot scheme. Respondents were asked to assess their degree of preference for 10 pre-selected indications for follow-up. Eight models of follow-up were also identified and respondents were asked to state their experience and preference for each type. The questionnaire was distributed nationally via the 34 cancer networks in England and was available both online and in hard copy (postal). The uptake for the electronic format was in the main by primary care practitioners and specialist clinicians. Service users preferred the paper (postal) format. The survey was also publicised through the primary care and patient partnership forums at a Cancer Network Development event. In total, 2928 responses were received, comprising service users (21% of the sample), primary care practitioners (32%) and specialist clinicians (47%). Eighty-six per cent of responses were received from the 10 strategic health authorities in England, with the remaining 14% from Scotland, Wales and The Isle of Man. The responses from Scotland, Wales and the Isle of Man generally occurred where they interfaced with English cancer networks or had been engaged through word of mouth by colleagues. Among all respondents the main aims of cancer follow-up were considered to be: (1) to monitor for early complications after treatment; (2) to detect recurrences early; (3) to detect late effects of treatment. The most commonly experienced method of follow-up among all respondent groups was outpatient review with a

  17. 20 CFR 664.450 - What are follow-up services for youth?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... problems that arise; (3) Assistance in securing better paying jobs, career development and further...) The leadership development and supportive service activities listed in §§ 664.420 and 664.440; (2... less intensive for youth who have only participated in summer youth employment opportunities. (WIA sec...

  18. Rehabilitation Engineering Service Evaluation: A Follow-Up Survey of Device Effectiveness and Patient Acceptance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caudrey, David J.; Seeger, Barry R.

    1983-01-01

    A study was undertaken to determine the extent to which a rehabilitation engineering service met the needs and expectations of 100 patients (or parents of child patients). The patients were interviewed an average of 16 weeks after a new piece of equipment was supplied. (Author)

  19. Evaluation Services from Needs Assessment to Follow-up: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadbooks, Wendy J.

    This paper describes the nature and scope of evaluation services provided within the training division of Arthur Andersen & Company, and highlights some of the evaluation results. The cycle of assessment began with a needs assessment study at the curriculum level. Curriculum planning was undertaken for first-year trainees in the Tax Division.…

  20. Marketing and Distribution: A Team Plan for In-Service Follow-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Ralph E.

    1976-01-01

    Distributive education (DE) teacher education universities in Indiana completed a consortium testing an exemplary plan to use in followup service activities with first- and second-year distributive education teachers. How the plan was developed and ways in which it was successful are discussed. (HD)

  1. Community-based infant hearing screening in a developing country: parental uptake of follow-up services.

    PubMed

    Olusanya, Bolajoko O; Akinyemi, Oladele O

    2009-02-23

    Universal newborn hearing screening is now considered an essential public health care for the early detection of disabling life-long childhood hearing impairment globally. However, like any health interventions in early childhood, parental support and participation is essential for achieving satisfactory uptake of services. This study set out to determine maternal/infant socio-demographic factors associated with follow-up compliance in community-based infant hearing screening programmes in a developing country. After health educational/counselling sessions, infants attending routine childhood immunisation clinics at four primary care centres were enrolled into a two-stage infant hearing screening programme consisting of a first-stage screening with transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions and second-stage screening with automated auditory brainstem response. Infants referred after the second-stage screening were scheduled for diagnostic evaluation within three months. Maternal and infant factors associated with completion of the hearing screening protocol were determined with multivariable logistic regression analysis. No mother declined participation during the study period. A total of 285 out of 2,003 eligible infants were referred after the first-stage screening out of which 148 (51.9%) did not return for the second-stage, while 32 (39.0%) of the 82 infants scheduled for diagnostic evaluation defaulted. Mothers who delivered outside hospitals were significantly more likely to return for follow-up screening than those who delivered in hospitals (Odds ratio: 1.62; 95% confidence intervals: 0.98 - 2.70; p = 0.062). No other factors correlated with follow-up compliance for screening and diagnostic services. Place of delivery was the only factor that correlated albeit marginally with infant hearing screening compliance in this population. The likely influence of issues such as the number of return visits for follow-up services, ineffective tracking system and the

  2. Workplace health promotion and utilization of health services: follow-up data findings.

    PubMed

    Deitz, Diane; Cook, Royer; Hersch, Rebekah

    2005-01-01

    This article reports findings from a workplace substance abuse prevention program designed to investigate best practices. The study sought to assess the effects of the worksite wellness program and employee assistance program (EAP) on healthcare utilization and costs, identify predictors of outpatient costs and visits, and assess the effect of the intervention on health attitudes, behaviors, and behavioral health-related costs and visits. Results indicated that visits to the EAP increased as did overall healthcare visits, that utilization of healthcare services and costs were higher in the population receiving substance abuse prevention intervention, and that employees in the substance abuse prevention intervention reported lower heavy drinking and binge drinking. Data suggest that substance abuse prevention may result in higher healthcare costs and utilization in the short term, but a reduction in health risk behaviors such as heavy drinking may result in lower healthcare costs and utilization in the long term.

  3. First episode of psychosis - an audit of service engagement and management at 1-2 year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Milner, E C; Rowlands, P; Gardner, B; Ashby, F

    2001-01-01

    The study aimed to develop and implement local audit standards for management and service engagement in the follow-up of patients suffering from a 'first episode of psychosis'. Audit standards, developed following a literature review and consultation with colleagues, were incorporated into a questionnaire for distribution to the community keyworkers of a 'first episode of psychosis' cohort at 1-2 years of follow-up. Most satisfied standards for engagement (91%) and maintenance medication (91%). Forty-two to sixty-three per cent had received psychological, family and educational interventions but these often lacked theoretical basis and detailed content. Admission, deliberate self-harm and forensic contacts were infrequent. Less than half had any structured daytime activity. Priorities identified for improving services for this group include adequate staff training in psychosocial interventions and more active planning and resourcing of day care and other constructive daytime activities. Simple locally-developed audit standards such as those described for a 'first episode of psychosis' population can offer a useful way of assessing service delivery and highlighting areas for development.

  4. Community-based infant hearing screening in a developing country: parental uptake of follow-up services

    PubMed Central

    Olusanya, Bolajoko O; Akinyemi, Oladele O

    2009-01-01

    Background Universal newborn hearing screening is now considered an essential public health care for the early detection of disabling life-long childhood hearing impairment globally. However, like any health interventions in early childhood, parental support and participation is essential for achieving satisfactory uptake of services. This study set out to determine maternal/infant socio-demographic factors associated with follow-up compliance in community-based infant hearing screening programmes in a developing country. Methods After health educational/counselling sessions, infants attending routine childhood immunisation clinics at four primary care centres were enrolled into a two-stage infant hearing screening programme consisting of a first-stage screening with transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions and second-stage screening with automated auditory brainstem response. Infants referred after the second-stage screening were scheduled for diagnostic evaluation within three months. Maternal and infant factors associated with completion of the hearing screening protocol were determined with multivariable logistic regression analysis. Results No mother declined participation during the study period. A total of 285 out of 2,003 eligible infants were referred after the first-stage screening out of which 148 (51.9%) did not return for the second-stage, while 32 (39.0%) of the 82 infants scheduled for diagnostic evaluation defaulted. Mothers who delivered outside hospitals were significantly more likely to return for follow-up screening than those who delivered in hospitals (Odds ratio: 1.62; 95% confidence intervals: 0.98 – 2.70; p = 0.062). No other factors correlated with follow-up compliance for screening and diagnostic services. Conclusion Place of delivery was the only factor that correlated albeit marginally with infant hearing screening compliance in this population. The likely influence of issues such as the number of return visits for follow-up services

  5. Treatment, Services and Follow-up for Victims of Family Violence in Health Clinics in Maputo, Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Jethá, Eunice Abdul Remane; Lynch, Catherine A; Houry, Debra; Rodrigues, Maria Alexandra; Keyes, Christine E.; Chilundo, Baltazar; Wright, David W.; Sasser, Scott M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Family violence (FV) is a global health problem that not only impacts the victim, but the family unit, local community and society at large. Objective: To quantitatively and qualitatively evaluate the treatment and follow up provided to victims of violence amongst immediate and extended family units who presented to three health centers in Mozambique for care following violence. Methods: We conducted a verbally-administered survey to self-disclosed victims of FV who presented to one of three health units, each at a different level of service, in Mozambique for treatment of their injuries. Data were entered into SPSS (SPSS, version 13.0) and analyzed for frequencies. Qualitative short answer data were transcribed during the interview, coded and analyzed prior to translation by the principal investigator. Results: One thousand two hundred and six assault victims presented for care during the eight-week study period, of which 216 disclosed the relationship of the assailant, including 92 who were victims of FV. Almost all patients (90%) waited less than one hour to be seen, with most patients (67%) waiting less than 30 minutes. Most patients did not require laboratory or radiographic diagnostics at the primary (70%) and secondary (93%) health facilities, while 44% of patients received a radiograph at the tertiary care center. Among all three hospitals, only 10% were transferred to a higher level of care, 14% were not given any form of follow up or referral information, while 13% required a specialist evaluation. No victims were referred for psychological follow-up or support. Qualitative data revealed that some patients did not disclose violence as the etiology, because they believed the physician was unable to address or treat the violence-related issues and/or had limited time to discuss. Conclusion: Healthcare services for treating the physical injuries of victims of FV were timely and rarely required advanced levels of medical care, but there were no

  6. Willingness to use follow-up eye care services after vision screening in rural areas surrounding Chennai, India.

    PubMed

    Su, Zhuo; Wang, Bing Q; Staple-Clark, Jennifer B; Buys, Yvonne M; Forster, Susan H

    2014-08-01

    To assess the willingness to utilise follow-up eye care services among participants of community vision screenings in rural villages surrounding Chennai. Vision screening participants aged ≥40 years were selected by systematic sampling and were invited to respond to a pretested verbal survey with close-ended questions before undergoing screening. Two hundred and ninety-two people responded. Among the respondents, 50.3% reported experiencing an eye problem, and 53% of these individuals had never had an eye examination. Acceptance rate for eye surgery, medications, and eyeglasses among the respondents was 59.2%, 52.7% and 90.8%, respectively. These acceptances were not associated with sex, age, or employment; medication acceptance was inversely associated with literacy. Surgery acceptance and medication acceptance were associated with area of residence. Presence of another chronic disease was a predictor for surgery acceptance among respondents experiencing eye problems. Maintaining consistent quality of services delivered is crucial for increasing uptake of existing eye care services. Educational interventions may increase eye care service usage by targeting all demographic subgroups of rural populations equally. Additional interventions should be offered to patients without previous exposure to the healthcare system. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  7. Cost analysis and cost-benefit analysis of a medication review with follow-up service in aged polypharmacy patients.

    PubMed

    Malet-Larrea, Amaia; Goyenechea, Estíbaliz; Gastelurrutia, Miguel A; Calvo, Begoña; García-Cárdenas, Victoria; Cabases, Juan M; Noain, Aránzazu; Martínez-Martínez, Fernando; Sabater-Hernández, Daniel; Benrimoj, Shalom I

    2017-12-01

    Drug related problems have a significant clinical and economic burden on patients and the healthcare system. Medication review with follow-up (MRF) is a professional pharmacy service aimed at improving patient's health outcomes through an optimization of the medication. To ascertain the economic impact of the MRF service provided in community pharmacies to aged polypharmacy patients comparing MRF with usual care, by undertaking a cost analysis and a cost-benefit analysis. The economic evaluation was based on a cluster randomized controlled trial. Patients in the intervention group (IG) received the MRF service and the comparison group (CG) received usual care. The analysis was conducted from the national health system (NHS) perspective over 6 months. Direct medical costs were included and expressed in euros at 2014 prices. Health benefits were estimated by assigning a monetary value to the quality-adjusted life years. One-way deterministic sensitivity analysis was undertaken in order to analyse the uncertainty. The analysis included 1403 patients (IG: n = 688 vs CG: n = 715). The cost analysis showed that the MRF saved 97 € per patient in 6 months. Extrapolating data to 1 year and assuming a fee for service of 22 € per patient-month, the estimated savings were 273 € per patient-year. The cost-benefit ratio revealed that for every 1 € invested in MRF, a benefit of 3.3 € to 6.2 € was obtained. The MRF provided health benefits to patients and substantial cost savings to the NHS. Investment in this service would represent an efficient use of healthcare resources.

  8. Health promotion and information provision during long-term follow-up for childhood cancer survivors: A service evaluation.

    PubMed

    Mayes, Jonathan; Brown, Morven C; Davies, Nicola; Skinner, Roderick

    2016-09-01

    Health promotion is an important component of long-term follow-up (LTFU) care for childhood cancer survivors (CCS). However, little information exists about how survivors perceive their own health promotion needs. As part of a service evaluation, 51 CCS who had previously attended the LTFU clinic took part in a single semistructured interview to seek their views on information they had received regarding late adverse effects (LAEs) of treatment, the purpose of LTFU, and the provision of health promotion information. Although most (93%) CCS were satisfied with the information received about LAEs, 37% desired further details. Over half (59%) believed that the purpose of LTFU was to screen for LAEs, whereas 31% felt that it was to check for relapse. No survivor reported health promotion to be an aim of LTFU; only 14% of CCS expected to receive healthy lifestyle advice, and fewer than 10% wanted dietary and physical activity advice. Most (88%) CCS felt that their hospital-based health care professional was best placed to give healthy lifestyle advice, but there was no consensus about the optimum timing for health promotion. CCS varied in their knowledge, needs, and wishes regarding LTFU care. The results of this evaluation strongly indicate that the profile of health promotion needs to be raised within our service and identifies issues that may be pertinent to similar services. Further research is needed to understand the views of CCS regarding health promotion and lifestyle behaviors, with the aim of tailoring and improving the delivery of effective health education to CCS.

  9. Follow-up after arthroplasty of the hip and knee : are we over-servicing or under-caring?

    PubMed

    Lovelock, T M; Broughton, N S

    2018-01-01

    The number of arthroplasties of the hip and knee is predicted to increase rapidly during the next 20 years. Accompanying this is the dilemma of how to follow-up these patients appropriately. Current guidelines recommend long-term follow-up to identify patients with aseptic loosening, which can occur more than a decade postoperatively. The current guidelines and practices of orthopaedic surgeons vary widely. Existing models take up much clinical time and are expensive. Pilot studies using 'virtual' clinics and advanced-practice physiotherapists have shown promise in decreasing the time and costs for orthopaedic surgeons and patients. This review discusses current practices and future trends in the follow-up of patients who have an arthroplasty. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2018;100-B:6-10. ©2018 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  10. Issues and Guidelines in Designing Follow-up Systems for Special Education Service Programs. Project Report Number 89-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruininks, Robert H.; And Others

    This paper examines issues in designing post-school follow-up studies in special education. The examination focuses on survey research techniques, which are widely used in the investigation of post-school adjustment of former students with handicaps. In special education, survey research studies are used commonly to address many important…

  11. Considerations in the Design of Follow-Up and Follow-Along Systems for Improving Transition Programs and Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, David R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines the qualities and limitations of information utilization in special education program planning and improvement; discusses the results of a federally funded transition follow-along and follow-up research and demonstration project in Minnesota; and describes methods for organizing, managing, and reporting follow-along and…

  12. Addressing barriers to emergency anaphylaxis care: from emergency medical services to emergency department to outpatient follow-up.

    PubMed

    Fineman, Stanley M; Bowman, Steven H; Campbell, Ronna L; Dowling, Paul; O'Rourke, Dianne; Russell, W Scott; Sublett, J Wesley; Wallace, Dana

    2015-10-01

    Anaphylaxis is a systemic life-threatening allergic reaction that presents unique challenges for emergency care practitioners. Allergists and emergency physicians have a history of collaborating to promote an evidence-based, multidisciplinary approach to improve the emergency management and follow-up of patients with or at risk of anaphylaxis. To review recent scientific literature about anaphylaxis, discuss barriers to care, and recommend strategies to support improvement in emergency anaphylaxis care. An expert panel of allergists and emergency physicians was convened by the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology in November 2014 to discuss current knowledge about anaphylaxis, identify opportunities for emergency practitioners and allergists to partner to address barriers to care, and recommend strategies to improve medical management of anaphylaxis along the continuum of care: from emergency medical systems and emergency department practitioners for acute management through appropriate outpatient follow-up with allergists to confirm diagnosis, identify triggers, and plan long-term care. The panel identified key barriers to anaphylaxis care, including difficulties in making an accurate diagnosis, low rates of epinephrine administration during acute management, and inadequate follow-up. Strategies to overcome these barriers were discussed and recommendations made for future allergist/emergency physician collaborations, and key messages to be communicated to emergency practitioners were proposed. The panel recommended that allergists and emergency physicians continue to work in partnership, that allergists be proactive in outreach to emergency care practitioners, and that easy-to-access educational programs and materials be developed for use by emergency medical systems and emergency department practitioners in the training environment and in practice. Copyright © 2015 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  13. [The situation and associated factors of satisfaction with follow-up management of HIV/AIDS cases conducted by Community Health Service Center in Hongkou district of Shanghai].

    PubMed

    Pan, R; Zhang, J; Chen, K; Liao, C Q; Tang, X; Yao, W; Liao, X; He, N

    2017-05-06

    Objective: To analyze satisfaction with follow-up management of HIV/AIDS cases conducted by Community Health Service Center (CHS) and related factors in Hongkou district, Shanghai. Methods: Out of 302 HIV/AIDS cases followed up by CHS in Hongkou district from 2012 to 2016, 263 HIV/AIDS cases were recruited to participate in a cross-sectional study assessed by self-designed questionnaire-based interview during October 1, 2016 and October 20, 2016, with efficiency of 87.1%. Information of basic characteristics including sociodemographic, routes of infection, CD4(+)T cell counts, diagnose of AIDS and status of receiving ART were collected, as well as satisfaction with follow-up management conducted by CHS including service professionalism, service attitude, service environment, referral service, privacy protection, health education, psychological support, and care and assistance. Factors related to satisfaction were analyzed using multiple binary logistic regression. Results: Among 263 HIV/AIDS cases, the average age was 42.0±13.5, 93.2% (245 cases) were male and the proportion of overall satisfaction was 72.2% (190 cases). Out of 8 items of satisfaction, service attitude and health education got the highest score with a total number of 235 (89.4%) answering "very satisfied" or "satisfied" , while care and assistance got the lowest score with a total number of 69 (26.2%) answering "dissatisfied" or "very dissatisfied" . Compared to HIV/AIDS local residents and followed up by CHS <12 months, those who were non-local residents and followed up by CHS ≥12 months were more likely to be satisfied, the OR (95% CI ) were 2.66 (1.30-5.44) and 2.52 (1.01-6.29), respectively. Compared to HIV/AIDS ≤30 years old and receiving ART, those who were 31-50 years or >50 years old and not receiving ART were less likely to be satisfied, the OR (95% CI ) were 0.36 (0.15-0.89), 0.32 (0.10-0.97) and 0.11 (0.01-0.90), respectively. Conclusion: Satisfaction with follow-up management

  14. Consumer satisfaction with the Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service and its association with treatment outcome: a 3-4-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Solberg, Cathrine; Larsson, Bo; Jozefiak, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Consumer satisfaction studies with the Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAMHS) have mainly assessed evaluations in a short-term follow-up perspective. Adolescent reports with CAMHS have not been included nationally. The purposes of this study were to explore adolescent and parental satisfaction with the CAMHS in a 3-4-year follow-up perspective, and to examine the relationships between reported consumer satisfaction and clinical parameters such as reason for adolescent referral, emotional/behavioral symptoms and treatment outcome. Of 190 adolescent-parent pairs in a sample of CAMHS outpatients, 120 completed a Consumer Satisfaction Questionnaire. Parents assessed adolescent emotional/behavior problems both at baseline and at follow-up by completing the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). Correlations were examined between adolescent and parental evaluations. The relationships between service satisfaction and symptom load at baseline and follow-up and treatment outcome at follow-up were explored. Overall, adolescents and parents were satisfied with the services received from the CAMHS. The correlations between adolescent and parent consumer satisfaction ratings were low to moderate. Consumer satisfaction was significantly and negatively correlated with symptom load on the CBCL Total Problems scores at baseline, but not at follow-up. There was no difference in satisfaction levels between those who improved after treatment and those who did not. Given the differences in informant ratings of consumer satisfaction, it is important to include both adolescent and parental perceptions in evaluations of CAMHS services and treatment outcomes. Consumer satisfaction should serve as a supplement to established standardized outcome measures.

  15. [Situation and reasons for missed follow-up services among newly reported HIV/AIDS cases transmitted by homosexual behavior in China, 2008-2015].

    PubMed

    Xu, J; Han, J; Tang, H L; Li, J; Zang, C P; Mao, Y R

    2018-04-10

    Objective: To determine the prevalence and relative factors on those who missed the follow-up service among newly reported HIV/AIDS cases that were infected by homosexual behavior. Methods: Data were extracted from both HIV/AIDS case-reporting and follow-up cards on HIV/AIDS in the Comprehensive Response Information Management System, between December 2008 and December 2015. Data was analyzed, using the generalized estimating equations (GEE) to explore the relative factors of influence. Results: Among the newly reported HIV infection among MSM, the proportion of those who missed the follow-up services was 5.06% (6 037/119 358), and decreased dramatically, from 37.57% (1 261/3 356) to 0.84% (267/31 935) (trend χ (2)=103.43, P <0.01). In MSM population, the younger than 20-year olds ( OR =1.30, 95% CI : 1.11-1.52), 20-year olds ( OR =1.52, 95% CI : 1.36-1.69), 30-year olds ( OR =1.22, 95% CI : 1.12-1.34), 40-year olds ( OR =1.10, 95% CI : 1.01-1.20) were receiving less follow-up services than those 50-year olds. Those who had received either junior ( OR =1.52, 95% CI : 1.37-1.69) or senior high school education ( OR =1.35, 95% CI : 1.23-1.49) were receiving less follow-up service than those who were more educated. MSM with the following characteristics as unspecified occupation ( OR =2.06, 95% CI : 1.49-2.87),unemployed ( OR =1.54, 95% CI : 1.30-1.83), working in commercial service ( OR =1.31, 95% CI : 1.15-1.49) or being student ( OR =1.34, 95% CI : 1.18-1.52) were more difficult to be traced or followed than the cadres. Cases being identified on site ( OR =2.99, 95% CI : 2.26-3.95) or under special investigation ( OR =1.43, 95% CI : 1.29-1.59) had received less follow-up service than those being identified through voluntary counsel testing service. Floating population ( OR =1.46, 95% CI : 1.28-1.66) were getting less follow-up service than local residents. Conclusions: The prevalence of those who had missed the follow-up services in the newly discovered MSM HIV

  16. Completing the circle: follow-up screening of STD patients in three clinics of the United States Indian Health Service.

    PubMed

    Reilley, B; Redd, J T; Giberson, S; Sunde, S; Cullen, T

    2011-01-01

    We reviewed charts of newly diagnosed STD patients in three health facilities to determine the proportion who received follow-up STD screening. In a 12-month period, the three facilities had 140 STD cases. STD screening was not indicated for 50 (36%) patients. Among the 90 remaining STD patients, 29 (32%) were screened and 61 (68%) not screened. Among non-screened patients, 36% (22/61) were tested, but outside the time parameters allowed by the audit. The remaining 64% (39/61) received no screening at all, and represented clinical missed opportunities; in this group, nearly all (95%) had chlamydia but were not screened for HIV or syphilis. Linking chlamydia patients with a screen for HIV and syphilis using a clinical reminder in the facilities' electronic health record (EHR) or other tool, would eliminate 95% of the missed opportunities in this sample.

  17. Pathways through Services for Offenders with Intellectual Disability: A One- and Two-Year Follow-Up Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, William R.; Holland, Tony; Wheeler, Jessica R.; Carson, Derek; O'Brien, Gregory; Taylor, John L.; Steptoe, Lesley; Middleton, Claire; Price, Karen; Johnston, Susan; Young, Steven J.

    2010-01-01

    The pathways through services for offenders with intellectual disability were reviewed. Participants were 197 offenders with intellectual disability accepted into three types of community and three types of secure forensic intellectual disability services. They were first compared with 280 participants referred but not accepted into services and…

  18. A mobile phone-based, community health worker program for referral, follow-up, and service outreach in rural Zambia: outcomes and overview.

    PubMed

    Schuttner, Linnaea; Sindano, Ntazana; Theis, Mathew; Zue, Cory; Joseph, Jessica; Chilengi, Roma; Chi, Benjamin H; Stringer, Jeffrey S A; Chintu, Namwinga

    2014-08-01

    Mobile health (m-health) utilizes widespread access to mobile phone technologies to expand health services. Community health workers (CHWs) provide first-level contact with health facilities; combining CHW efforts with m-health may be an avenue for improving primary care services. As part of a primary care improvement project, a pilot CHW program was developed using a mobile phone-based application for outreach, referral, and follow-up between the clinic and community in rural Zambia. The program was implemented at six primary care sites. Computers were installed at clinics for data entry, and data were transmitted to central servers. In the field, using a mobile phone to send data and receive follow-up requests, CHWs conducted household health surveillance visits, referred individuals to clinic, and followed up clinic patients. From January to April 2011, 24 CHWs surveyed 6,197 households with 33,304 inhabitants. Of 15,539 clinic visits, 1,173 (8%) had a follow-up visit indicated and transmitted via a mobile phone to designated CHWs. CHWs performed one or more follow-ups on 74% (n=871) of active requests and obtained outcomes on 63% (n=741). From all community visits combined, CHWs referred 840 individuals to a clinic. CHWs completed all planned aspects of surveillance and outreach, demonstrating feasibility. Components of this pilot project may aid clinical care in rural settings and have potential for epidemiologic and health system applications. Thus, m-health has the potential to improve service outreach, guide activities, and facilitate data collection in Zambia.

  19. Capitation of public mental health services in Colorado: a five-year follow-up of system-level effects.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Joan R; Wang, Huihui; Kang, Soo Hyang; Wallace, Neal T; Hyun, Jenny K; Hu, Teh-wei

    2011-02-01

    Capitated Medicaid mental health programs have reduced costs over the short term by lowering the utilization of high-cost inpatient services. This study examined the five-year effects of capitated financing in community mental health centers (CMHCs) by comparing not-for-profit with for-profit programs. Data were from the Medicaid billing system in Colorado for the precapitation year (1994) and a shadow billing system for the postcapitation years (1995-1999). In a panel design, a random-effect approach estimated the impact of two financing systems on service utilization and cost while adjusting for all the covariates. Consistent with predictions, in both the for-profit and the not-for-profit CMHCs, relative to the precapitation year, there were significant reductions in each postcapitation year in high-cost treatments (inpatient treatment) for all but one comparison (not-for-profit CMHCs in 1999). Also consistent with predictions, the for-profit programs realized significant reductions in cost per user for both outpatient services and total services. In the not-for-profit programs, there were no significant changes in cost per user for total services; a significant reduction in cost per user for outpatient services was found only in the first two years, 1995 and 1996). The evidence suggests that different strategies were used by the not-for-profit and for-profit programs to control expenditures and utilization and that the for-profit programs were more successful in reducing cost per user.

  20. Determinants of Mortality and Loss to Follow-Up among Adults Enrolled in HIV Care Services in Rwanda

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunhui; Lahuerta, Maria; Nuwagaba-Biribonwoha, Harriet; Tayebwa, Edwin; Ingabire, Eugenie; Ingabire, Pacifique; Sahabo, Ruben; Twyman, Peter; Abrams, Elaine J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Antiretroviral therapy (ART) improves morbidity and mortality in patients with HIV, however high rates of loss to follow-up (LTF) and mortality have been documented in HIV care and treatment programs. Methods We analyzed routinely-collected data on HIV-infected patients ≥15 years enrolled at 41 healthcare facilities in Rwanda from 2005 to 2010. LTF was defined as not attending clinic in the last 12 months for pre-ART patients and 6 months for ART patients. For the pre-ART period, sub-distribution hazards models were constructed to estimate LTF and death to account for competing risks. Kaplan-Meier (KM) and Cox proportional hazards models were used for patients on ART. Results 31,033 ART-naïve adults were included, 64% were female and 75% were WHO stage I or II at enrollment. 17,569 (56%) patients initiated ART. Pre-ART competing risk estimates of LTF at 2 years was 11.2% (95%CI, 10.9–11.6%) and 2.9% for death (95%CI 2.7–3.1%). Among pre-ART patients, male gender was associated with higher LTF (adjusted sub-hazard ratio (aSHR) 1.3, 95%CI 1.1–1.5) and death (aSHR 1.7, 95%CI 1.4–2.1). Low CD4 count (CD4<100 vs. ≥350 aSHR 0.2, 95%CI 0.1–0.3) and higher WHO stage (WHO stage IV vs. stage I aSHR 0.4, 95%CI 0.2–0.6) were protective against pre-ART LTF. KM estimates for LTF and death in ART patients at 2 years were 4.4% (95%CI 4.4–4.5%) and 6.3% (95%CI 6.2–6.4%). In patients on ART, male gender was associated with LTF (adjusted hazard ratio (AHR) 1.4, 95%CI 1.2–1.7) and death (AHR1.3, 95%CI 1.2–1.5). Mortality was higher for ART patients ≥40 years and in those with lower CD4 count at ART initiation. Conclusions Low rates of LTF and death were founds among pre-ART and ART patients in Rwanda but greater efforts are needed to retain patients in care prior to ART initiation, particularly among those who are healthy at enrollment. PMID:24454931

  1. Follow-Up Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... second should occur after 1 year on the gluten-free diet. After that, a celiac should receive follow-up ... test result is straightforward—a celiac on the gluten-free diet should have a negative test. The numerical value ...

  2. The REAnimation Low Immune Status Markers (REALISM) project: a protocol for broad characterisation and follow-up of injury-induced immunosuppression in intensive care unit (ICU) critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Rol, Mary-Luz; Venet, Fabienne; Rimmele, Thomas; Moucadel, Virginie; Cortez, Pierre; Quemeneur, Laurence; Gardiner, David; Griffiths, Andrew; Pachot, Alexandre; Textoris, Julien; Monneret, Guillaume

    2017-06-21

    The host response to septic shock is dynamic and complex. A sepsis-induced immunosuppression phase has recently been acknowledged and linked to bad outcomes and increased healthcare costs. Moreover, a marked suppression of the immune response has also been partially described in patients hospitalized in intensive care unit (ICU) for severe trauma or burns. It has been hypothesized that immune monitoring could enable identification of patients who might most benefit from novel, adjunctive immune-stimulating therapies. However, there is currently neither a clear definition for such injury-induced immunosuppression nor a stratification biomarker compatible with clinical constraints. We set up a prospective, longitudinal single-centre clinical study to determine the incidence, severity and persistency of innate and adaptive immune alterations in ICU patients. We optimized a workflow to describe and follow the immunoinflammatory status of 550 patients (septic shock, severe trauma/burn and major surgery) during the first 2 months after their initial injury. On each time point, two immune functional tests will be performed to determine whole-blood TNF-α production in response to ex vivo lipopolysaccharide stimulation and the T lymphocyte proliferation in response to phytohaemagglutinin. In addition, a complete immunophenotyping using flow cytometry including monocyte HLA-DR expression and lymphocyte subsets will be obtained. New markers (ie, levels of expression of host mRNA and viral reactivation) will be also evaluated. Reference intervals will be determined from a cohort of 150 age-matched healthy volunteers. This clinical study will provide, for the first time, data describing the immune status of severe ICU patients over time. Ethical approval has been obtained from the institutional review board (no 69HCL15_0379) and the French National Security agency for drugs and health-related products. Results will be disseminated through presentations at scientific meetings

  3. Costs of services for homeless people with mental illness in 5 Canadian cities: a large prospective follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Latimer, Eric A.; Rabouin, Daniel; Cao, Zhirong; Ly, Angela; Powell, Guido; Aubry, Tim; Distasio, Jino; Hwang, Stephen W.; Somers, Julian M.; Stergiopoulos, Vicky; Veldhuizen, Scott; Moodie, Erica E.M.; Lesage, Alain; Goering, Paula N.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Limited evidence on the costs of homelessness in Canada is available. We estimated the average annual costs, in total and by cost category, that homeless people with mental illness engender from the perspective of society. We also identified individual characteristics associated with higher costs. Methods: As part of the At Home/Chez Soi trial of Housing First for homeless people with mental illness, 990 participants were assigned to the usual-treatment (control) group in 5 Canadian cities (Vancouver, Winnipeg, Toronto, Montréal and Moncton) between October 2009 and June 2011. They were followed for up to 2 years. Questionnaires ascertained service use and income, and city-specific unit costs were estimated. We adjusted costs for site differences in sample characteristics. We used generalized linear models to identify individual-level characteristics associated with higher costs. Results: Usable data were available for 937 participants (94.6%). Average annual costs (excluding medications) per person in Vancouver, Winnipeg, Toronto, Montréal and Moncton were $53 144 (95% confidence interval [CI] $46 297-$60 095), $45 565 (95% CI $41 039-$50 412), $58 972 (95% CI $52 237-$66 085), $56 406 (95% CI $50 654-$62 456) and $29 610 (95% CI $24 995-$34 480), respectively. Net costs ranged from $15 530 to $341 535. Distributions of costs across categories varied significantly across cities. Lower functioning and a history of psychiatric hospital stays were the most important predictors of higher costs. Interpretation: Homeless people with mental illness generate very high costs for society. Programs are needed to reorient this spending toward more effectively preventing homelessness and toward meeting the health, housing and social service needs of homeless people. PMID:28724726

  4. A qualitative follow-up study of diabetes patients' appraisal of an integrated diabetes service in primary care.

    PubMed

    Burridge, Letitia H; Foster, Michele M; Donald, Maria; Zhang, Jianzhen; Russell, Anthony W; Jackson, Claire L

    2017-05-01

    As the prevalence of type 2 diabetes continues to escalate, health system reform is seeking better patient outcomes through new models of care that aim to provide the most appropriate care when needed. Patients' experiences of service innovations can shed light on the successes and challenges of implementing change. This paper explores patients' views of a new model of integrated care for patients with type 2 diabetes. A mixed-methods, randomised control trial evaluated a beacon clinic model of care for complex type 2 diabetes led by specialist general practitioners (GPs) in primary care settings in Brisbane, Australia. In this qualitative sub-study conducted between May 2014 and January 2015, 25 consenting participants were re-interviewed after 12 months using semi-structured questions, to explore their experiences of the new model of care. Interview transcripts were analysed thematically. In the first theme, Organised for patient-centred care, patients appraised the structural elements of the clinic. For most, it was an enabling experience which included convenience, flexibility and prompt communication back to the referring GPs. The preferences of a minority were partly realised, as they tried to understand the clinical purpose in comparison with traditional care. The second theme, Positioned as partners in care, revealed the pivotal role of patient-clinician relationships in patients' engagement with advice and self-care. Most found clinicians' collaborative approach engaging and motivating. A small minority with contextual concerns were disappointed with the focus on diabetes and struggled to engage fully with the model. Most participants valued this model of care, which reflects a capacity to manage the variable and complex needs of most patients referred for care. However, multi-level strategies are also needed to enhance patients' engagement with care and the sustainability of integrated diabetes care. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Burnout as a predictor of self-reported sickness absence among human service workers: prospective findings from three year follow up of the PUMA study.

    PubMed

    Borritz, M; Rugulies, R; Christensen, K B; Villadsen, E; Kristensen, T S

    2006-02-01

    To investigate whether burnout predicts sickness absence days and sickness absence spells in human service workers. A total of 824 participants from an ongoing prospective study in different human service sector organisations were eligible for the three year follow up analysis. Burnout was measured with the work related burnout scale of the Copenhagen Burnout Inventory. Sickness absence was measured with self-reported number of days and spells during the last 12 months before the baseline and the follow up survey. A Poisson regression model with a scale parameter was used to account for over dispersion. A linear regression model was used for analysing changes in burnout and absence between baseline and follow up. Burnout was prospectively associated with both sickness absence days and sickness absence spells per year. Differences in sickness absence days varied from a mean of 5.4 days per year in the lowest quartile of the work related burnout scale to a mean of 13.6 in the highest quartile. An increase of one standard deviation on the work related burnout scale predicted an increase of 21% in sickness absence days per year (rate ratio 1.21, 95% CI 1.11 to 1.32) after adjusting for gender, age, organisation, socioeconomic status, lifestyle factors, family status, having children under 7 years of age, and prevalence of diseases. Regarding sickness absence spells, an increase of one standard deviation on the work related burnout scale predicted an increase of 9% per year (rate ratio 1.09, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.17). Changes in burnout level from baseline to follow up were positively associated with changes in sickness absence days (estimate 1.94 days/year, SE 0.63) and sickness absence spell (estimate 0.34 spells/year, SE 0.08). The findings indicate that burnout predicts sickness absence. Reducing burnout is likely to reduce sickness absence.

  6. Parent-reported symptoms, impairment, helpfulness of treatment, and unmet service needs in a follow-up of outpatient children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Sollie, Henrik; Larsson, Bo

    2016-11-01

    Limited information exists regarding the associations between impairment, symptoms, helpfulness of treatments, and service needs after initial treatment of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The aims of this study were to examine persistence rates and associations between parent-reported symptoms, impairment, helpfulness of treatments, and service needs in a retrospective follow-up study of children with ADHD. Parents of 214 children with a mean age of 12.6 years (SD = 2.1) who were diagnosed with ADHD at five child and adolescent mental health clinics (CAMHS) completed questionnaires 1-10 years (mean = 3.7 years, SD = 2.2) after baseline assessment. The response rate was 43.4%. A community comparison group (n = 110) was recruited from the same area. Approximately two-thirds (60.3%) of the sample fulfilled the DSM-IV symptom criteria of ADHD at follow-up, 84.3% were functionally impaired, and most children (84.7%) were on medication. Inattentive and emotional symptoms were the strongest predictors of impairment across impairment areas. Perceived helpfulness of different treatments varied from 71.8-88.7%, and no significant difference was found between the ADHD sub-groups regarding reported helpfulness. 'Adjustment of the school situation' was the most frequent service need, and approximately half of the parents reported needs for care co-ordination. Children fulfilling the symptom criteria of the ADHD Combined sub-group were most impaired and had most service needs. At follow-up, children were highly symptomatic and impaired, despite a high rate of persistent medication treatment. The findings underline the need for more tailored treatment and co-ordinated care over time.

  7. Increased ICU resource needs for an academic emergency general surgery service*.

    PubMed

    Lissauer, Matthew E; Galvagno, Samuel M; Rock, Peter; Narayan, Mayur; Shah, Paulesh; Spencer, Heather; Hong, Caron; Diaz, Jose J

    2014-04-01

    ICU needs of nontrauma emergency general surgery patients are poorly described. This study was designed to compare ICU utilization of emergency general surgery patients admitted to an acute care emergency surgery service with other general surgery patients. Our hypothesis is that tertiary care emergency general surgery patients utilize more ICU resources than other general surgical patients. Retrospective database review. Academic, tertiary care, nontrauma surgical ICU. All patients admitted to the surgical ICU over age 18 between March 2004 and June 2012. None. Six thousand ninety-eight patients were evaluated: 1,053 acute care emergency surgery, 1,964 general surgery, 1,491 transplant surgery, 995 facial surgery/otolaryngology, and 595 neurosurgery. Acute care emergency surgery patients had statistically significantly longer ICU lengths of stay than other groups: acute care emergency surgery (13.5 ± 17.4 d) versus general surgery (8.7 ± 12.9), transplant (7.8 ± 11.6), oral-maxillofacial surgery (5.5 ± 4.2), and neurosurgery (4.47 ± 9.8) (all p< 0.01). Ventilator usage, defined by percentage of total ICU days patients required mechanical ventilation, was significantly higher for acute care emergency surgery patients: acute care emergency surgery 73.4% versus general surgery 64.9%, transplant 63.3%, oral-maxillofacial surgery 58.4%, and neurosurgery 53.1% (all p < 0.01). Continuous renal replacement therapy usage, defined as percent of patients requiring this service, was significantly higher in acute care emergency surgery patients: acute care emergency surgery 10.8% versus general surgery 4.3%, transplant 6.6%, oral-maxillofacial surgery 0%, and neurosurgery 0.5% (all p < 0.01). Acute care emergency surgery patients were more likely interhospital transfers for tertiary care services than general surgery or transplant (24.5% vs 15.5% and 8.3% respectively, p < 0.001 for each) and more likely required emergent surgery (13.7% vs 6.7% and 3.5%, all p < 0

  8. Antenatal care service quality increases the odds of utilizing institutional delivery in Bahir Dar city administration, North Western Ethiopia: A prospective follow up study.

    PubMed

    Ejigu Tafere, Tadese; Afework, Mesganaw Fanthahun; Yalew, Alemayehu Worku

    2018-01-01

    In Ethiopia, more than 62% of pregnant women attend antenatal care at least once, yet only about one in four women give birth at health facility. This gap has fueled the need to investigate on the quality of ANC services at public health facilities and its link with the use of institutional delivery. To assess the linkage between ANC quality and the use of institutional delivery among pregnant women attending ANC at public health facilities of BDR City Administration. A facility based prospective follow up study was conducted. and nine hundred seventy pregnant women with gestational age ≤ 16 weeks who came for their first ANC visit were enrolled.Women were followed from their first ANC visit until delivery. Longitudinal data was collected during consultation with ANC providers using structured observation checklist. ANC service was considered as acceptable quality if women received ≥75th percentile of the essential ANC services. Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE) was carried out to control cluster effect among women who received ANC in the same facility. Among 823 pregnant women who completed follow up, only about one third (27.6%) received acceptable quality of ANC services. In one health facility syphilis test was not done at all for the last two years. The odds of giving birth at health institution among pregnant women who received acceptable ANC quality service was about 3.38 times higher than among pregnant women who received unacceptable ANC quality service (AOR = 3.38, 95% CI: 1.67, 6.83). In this study the quality of ANC service provision in public health facilities was compromised/low. Provision of quality ANC service had a great role in promoting institutional delivery. Therefore the local authorities at each level of health sector or the nongovernmental organizations working to improve maternal health need to provide training on focused antenatal care protocol for ANC providers.

  9. Antenatal care service quality increases the odds of utilizing institutional delivery in Bahir Dar city administration, North Western Ethiopia: A prospective follow up study

    PubMed Central

    Afework, Mesganaw Fanthahun; Yalew, Alemayehu Worku

    2018-01-01

    Background In Ethiopia, more than 62% of pregnant women attend antenatal care at least once, yet only about one in four women give birth at health facility. This gap has fueled the need to investigate on the quality of ANC services at public health facilities and its link with the use of institutional delivery. Objective To assess the linkage between ANC quality and the use of institutional delivery among pregnant women attending ANC at public health facilities of BDR City Administration Methods A facility based prospective follow up study was conducted. and nine hundred seventy pregnant women with gestational age ≤ 16 weeks who came for their first ANC visit were enrolled.Women were followed from their first ANC visit until delivery. Longitudinal data was collected during consultation with ANC providers using structured observation checklist. ANC service was considered as acceptable quality if women received ≥75th percentile of the essential ANC services. Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE) was carried out to control cluster effect among women who received ANC in the same facility. Results Among 823 pregnant women who completed follow up, only about one third (27.6%) received acceptable quality of ANC services. In one health facility syphilis test was not done at all for the last two years. The odds of giving birth at health institution among pregnant women who received acceptable ANC quality service was about 3.38 times higher than among pregnant women who received unacceptable ANC quality service (AOR = 3.38, 95% CI: 1.67, 6.83). Conclusion and recommendation In this study the quality of ANC service provision in public health facilities was compromised/low. Provision of quality ANC service had a great role in promoting institutional delivery. Therefore the local authorities at each level of health sector or the nongovernmental organizations working to improve maternal health need to provide training on focused antenatal care protocol for ANC providers

  10. Dynamic composition of medical support services in the ICU: Platform and algorithm design details.

    PubMed

    Hristoskova, Anna; Moeyersoon, Dieter; Van Hoecke, Sofie; Verstichel, Stijn; Decruyenaere, Johan; De Turck, Filip

    2010-12-01

    The Intensive Care Unit (ICU) is an extremely data-intensive environment where each patient needs to be monitored 24/7. Bedside monitors continuously register vital patient values (such as serum creatinine, systolic blood pressure) which are recorded frequently in the hospital database (e.g. every 2 min in the ICU of the Ghent University Hospital), laboratories generate hundreds of results of blood and urine samples, and nurses measure blood pressure and temperature up to 4 times an hour. The processing of such large amount of data requires an automated system to support the physicians' daily work. The Intensive Care Service Platform (ICSP) offers the needed support through the development of medical support services for processing and monitoring patients' data. With an increased deployment of these medical support services, reusing existing services as building blocks to create new services offers flexibility to the developer and accelerates the design process. This paper presents a new addition to the ICSP, the Dynamic Composer for Web services. Based on a semantic description of the medical support services, this Composer enables a service to be executed by creating a composition of medical services that provide the needed calculations. The composition is achieved using various algorithms satisfying certain quality of service (QoS) constraints and requirements. In addition to the automatic composition the paper also proposes a recovery mechanism in case of unavailable services. When executing the composition of medical services, unavailable services are dynamically replaced by equivalent services or a new composition achieving the same result. The presented platform and QoS algorithms are put through extensive performance and scalability tests for typical ICU scenarios, in which basic medical services are composed to a complex patient monitoring service. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Health Problems during Compulsory Military Service Predict Disability Retirement: A Register-Based Study on Secular Trends during 40 Years of Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Frilander, Heikki; Lallukka, Tea; Viikari-Juntura, Eira; Heliövaara, Markku; Solovieva, Svetlana

    2016-01-01

    Disability retirement causes a significant burden on the society and affects the well-being of individuals. Early health problems as determinants of disability retirement have received little attention. The objective was to study, whether interrupting compulsory military service is an early indicator of disability retirement among Finnish men and whether seeking medical advice during military service increases the risk of all-cause disability retirement and disability retirement due to mental disorders and musculoskeletal diseases. We also looked at secular trends in these associations. We examined a nationally representative sample of 2069 men, who had entered military service during 1967-1996. We linked military service health records with cause-specific register data on disability retirement from 1968 to 2008. Secular trends were explored in three service time strata. We used the Cox regression model to estimate proportional hazard ratios and their 95% confidence intervals. During the follow-up time altogether 140 (6.8%) men retired due to disability, mental disorders being the most common cause. The men who interrupted service had a remarkably higher cumulative incidence of disability retirement (18.9%). The associations between seeking medical advice during military service and all-cause disability retirement were similar across the three service time cohorts (overall hazard ratio 1.40 per one standard deviation of the number of visits; 95% confidence interval 1.26-1.56). Visits due to mental problems predicted disability retirement due to mental disorders in the men who served between 1987 and 1996 and a tendency for a similar cause-specific association was seen for musculoskeletal diseases in the men who served in 1967-1976. In conclusion, health problems-in particular mental problems-during late adolescence are strong determinants of disability retirement. Call-up examinations and military service provide access to the entire age cohort of men, where

  12. Health Problems during Compulsory Military Service Predict Disability Retirement: A Register-Based Study on Secular Trends during 40 Years of Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Frilander, Heikki; Lallukka, Tea; Viikari-Juntura, Eira; Heliövaara, Markku; Solovieva, Svetlana

    2016-01-01

    Disability retirement causes a significant burden on the society and affects the well-being of individuals. Early health problems as determinants of disability retirement have received little attention. The objective was to study, whether interrupting compulsory military service is an early indicator of disability retirement among Finnish men and whether seeking medical advice during military service increases the risk of all-cause disability retirement and disability retirement due to mental disorders and musculoskeletal diseases. We also looked at secular trends in these associations. We examined a nationally representative sample of 2069 men, who had entered military service during 1967–1996. We linked military service health records with cause-specific register data on disability retirement from 1968 to 2008. Secular trends were explored in three service time strata. We used the Cox regression model to estimate proportional hazard ratios and their 95% confidence intervals. During the follow-up time altogether 140 (6.8%) men retired due to disability, mental disorders being the most common cause. The men who interrupted service had a remarkably higher cumulative incidence of disability retirement (18.9%). The associations between seeking medical advice during military service and all-cause disability retirement were similar across the three service time cohorts (overall hazard ratio 1.40 per one standard deviation of the number of visits; 95% confidence interval 1.26–1.56). Visits due to mental problems predicted disability retirement due to mental disorders in the men who served between 1987 and 1996 and a tendency for a similar cause-specific association was seen for musculoskeletal diseases in the men who served in 1967–1976. In conclusion, health problems—in particular mental problems—during late adolescence are strong determinants of disability retirement. Call-up examinations and military service provide access to the entire age cohort of men

  13. Prospective evaluation of a complex public health intervention: lessons from an initial and follow-up cross-sectional survey of the tuberculosis strain typing service in England.

    PubMed

    Mears, Jessica; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Crisp, Debbie; Maguire, Helen; Innes, John A; Lilley, Mike; Lord, Joanne; Cohen, Ted; Borgdorff, Martien W; Vynnycky, Emilia; McHugh, Timothy D; Sonnenberg, Pam

    2014-10-02

    The national tuberculosis strain typing service (TB-STS) was introduced in England in 2010. The TB-STS involves MIRU-VNTR typing of isolates from all TB patients for the prospective identification, reporting and investigation of TB strain typing clusters. As part of a mixed-method evaluation, we report on a repeated cross-sectional survey to illustrate the challenges surrounding the evaluation of a complex national public health intervention. An online initial and follow-up questionnaire survey assessed the knowledge, attitudes and practices of public health staff, physicians and nurses working in TB control in November 2010 and March 2012. It included questions on the implementation, experience and uptake of the TB-STS. Participants that responded to both surveys were included in the analysis. 248 participants responded to the initial survey and 137 of these responded to the follow-up survey (56% retention). Knowledge: A significant increase in knowledge was observed, including a rise in the proportion of respondents who had received training (28.6% to 67.9%, p = 0.003), and the self-rated knowledge of how to use strain typing had improved ('no knowledge' decreased from 43.2% to 27.4%). Attitudes: The majority of respondents found strain typing useful; the proportion that reported strain typing to be useful was similar across the two surveys (95.7% to 94.7%, p = 0.67). Practices: There were significant increases between the initial and follow-up surveys in the number of respondents who reported using strain typing (57.0% to 80.5%, p < 0.001) and the proportion of time health protection staff spent on investigating TB (2.74% to 7.08%, p = 0.04). Evaluation of a complex public health intervention is challenging. In this example, the immediate national roll-out of the TB-STS meant that a controlled survey design was not possible. This study informs the future development of the TB-STS by identifying the need for training to reach wider professional groups, and argues

  14. [Priorization of facilitators for the implementation of medication review with follow-up service in Spanish community pharmacies through exploratory factor analysis].

    PubMed

    Gil, Modesta Inmaculada; Benrimoj, Shalom Isaac; Martínez-Martínez, Fernando; Cardero, Manuel; Gastelurrutia, Miguel Ángel

    2013-01-01

    to prioritize previously identified in Spain facilitators for the implementation of new Pharmaceutical Services that allow designing strategies for the implementation of Medication Review with follow-up (MRFup) service. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA). A draft of a questionnaire was performed based on a previous literature review and following the RAND/UCLA methodology. An expert panel worked with it and generated a definitive questionnaire which, after piloting, was used with a representative sample of pharmacists, owners or staff members, who were working in community pharmacy, using computer-assisted telephone interviewing (CATI) methodology. To understand underlying constructs in the questionnaire an EFA was performed. Different approaches were tested such as principal components factor analysis and principal axis factoring method. The best interpretability was achieved using the Factorization of Principal axis method with Direct Oblimin rotation, which explained the 40.0% of total variance. This produced four factors defined as: «Incentives», «External campaigns», «Expert in MRFup» and «Professionalism of the pharmacist». It can be stated that for implementation and sustainability of MRFup Service it is necessary being paid; also it must be explained to health professional and society in general. Practice of MRFup service demands pharmacists receiving a more clinical education and assuming more responsibilities as health professionals. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  15. Pregnant women's preference and factors associated with institutional delivery service utilization in Debra Markos Town, North West Ethiopia: a community based follow up study.

    PubMed

    Bayu, Hinsermu; Adefris, Mulatu; Amano, Abdella; Abuhay, Mulunesh

    2015-02-05

    Majority of deaths from obstetric complications are preventable. But every pregnant woman face risks which may not always be detected through the risk assessment approach during antenatal care (ANC). Therefore, the presence of a skilled birth attendant in every delivery is the most critical intervention in reducing maternal mortality and morbidity. In Ethiopia the proportion of births attended by skilled personnel, is very low, even for women who have access to the services. A community-based follow up study was conducted from January 17, 2012 to July 30, 2012, among 2(nd) and 3(rd) trimester's pregnant women in Debre-Markos town, east Gojam Zone, Amhara Region, North West Ethiopia. Simple random sampling technique was used to get a total sample size of 422 participants. A total of 393 pregnant women were included in the study. The study revealed that 292(74.3%) of the pregnant women planned to deliver in a health institution. Of these 292 pregnant women 234 (80.14%) actually delivered in a health facility. Age range from 15-19 year (AOR = 4.83, 95% CI = 1.562-12.641), college and above education of the pregnant women (AOR = 12.508, 95% CI = 1.082-14.557), ANC visit during the current pregnancy (AOR = 1.975, 95% CI = 1.021-3.392),perceived susceptibility and severity of pregnancy and delivery complication (AOR = 3.208, 95% CI = 1.262-8.155) and intention (preference) of pregnant women for place of delivery (AOR = 7.032, 95% CI = 3.045-10.234) are predictors of institutional delivery service utilization. Preference for institutional delivery is low in the study area. Sociodemographic factors, perception about delivery complication, ANC follow up and their intentions for institutional delivery are among important predictors of institutional delivery.

  16. [Breastfeeding and the anthropometric profile of children with sickle cell anemia receiving follow-up in a newborn screening reference service].

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Zeni Drubi; Boa-Sorte, Ney; Leite, Maria Efigênia de Queiroz; Kiya, Márcia Miyuki; Amorim, Tatiana; Fonseca, Silvana Fahel da

    2015-01-01

    To study breastfeeding history (BF) and the anthropometric status of children with Sickle Cell Disease (SCD). A cross-sectional study of 357 children with SS and SC hemoglobinopathies aged between 2 and 6 years old receiving regular follow-up at a Newborn Screening Reference Service (NSRS) between November 2007 and January 2009. The outcome was anthropometric status and the exposures were: BF pattern, type of hemoglobinopathy and child's age and sex. The average (SD) age was 3.7 (1.1) years, 52.9% were boys and 53.5% had SS hemoglobinopathy. The prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding (EBR) up to six months of age was 31.5%, the median EBR times (p25-p75) was 90.0 (24.0-180.0) days and the median weaning ages (p25-p75) was 360.0 (90.0-20.0) days respectively. Normal W/H children experienced EBR for an average duration almost four times longer than malnourished children (p=0.01), and were weaned later (p<0.05). Height deficit was found in 5.0% of children, while all the children with severe short stature had SS hemoglobinopathy and were over 4 years of age. EBR time and weaning age were greater than found in the literature, which is a possible effect of the multidisciplinary follow-up. Duration of EBR and later weaning were associated with improved anthropometric indicators. Copyright © 2014 Associação de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. [Network for Oncological Advisory Service (NOF) - a Pilot Project for (Long-Term) Follow-Up Care of Pediatric Cancer Patients].

    PubMed

    Kremeike, K; Mohr, A; Kampschulte, R; Bergmann, J; Beil, S; Neuhaus, U; Dierks, M-L; Driftmann, C; Duhr, A; Groeneveld, S; Kaspar, M; Kowollik, G; Miest, H-H; Schene, I; Reinhardt, D

    2016-11-01

    Background: In Germany some 2 000 children and adolescent are diagnosed with cancer every year. Curing rates are increasing and therewith also the number of survivors is growing. Survivors frequently suffer from long-term effects of the disease and its treatment, but long-term follow-up care shows deficits. Method: The Network for oncological advisory service (NOF) started in 11/2013, researching and building up a network of available support in Lower Saxony. A telephone hotline was installed in 01/2014 in order to advice survivors on their problems. At the same time, an interview study on survivors needs was conducted throughout Germany. Results: In the first 2 years, the NOF gave advice to 79 patients. Whilst enquiries of medical or psychological nature were transferred to the cooperation partner, requests on psychosocial and social legal issues are being deled by the NOF due to lack of appropriate partners. The evaluation of 25 interviews shows key issues in long-term after-care: (1) transition from acute therapy to everyday life, (2) problems due to pediatric cancer and therapy, (3) patients perception of own disposition, (4) social reactions towards survivors, (5) structure of long-term follow-up care, (6) information flow. Conclusion: Many survivors suffer from long-term effects of cancer and treatment. The lack of available contact person and being in limbo between cured and simultaneously affected by the cancer treatment and chronic diseases is perceived as being problematic. This translates to various requirements on a patient-oriented long-term care, mainly in the psychosocial field. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Follow-up study of female delinquent adolescents in a detention centre: effectiveness of psychiatric intervention as a mental health service.

    PubMed

    Ariga, Michio; Uehara, Toru; Takeuchi, Kazuo; Ishige, Yoko; Nakano, Reiko; Mikuni, Masahiko

    2010-01-01

    of previous studies suggest that many female offenders have co-morbid psychiatric disorders, which require mental health services. However, few longitudinal studies examined subjects during incarceration or detention. This study compares depressive symptoms, abnormal eating behaviour and impulsivity before release from a detention centre and after incarceration, thereby indicating the effectiveness of psychiatric intervention in a Japanese detention centre. Of 64 young women, 36 were followed up. Self-report measures were used to assess depression, eating behaviour and impulsivity after incarceration and one month before release. s: Of the 36 participants, nine were diagnosed using the MINI-kids as needing mental health services. Those who received psychiatric intervention were diagnosed as having major depression and/or post-traumatic stress disorder. Significant main effects of intervention and effects of time were shown in the DSD. The EAT-26 score demonstrated the significance of the effects of time and interaction. In the BIS-11 scores, neither intervention nor time showed significant effects. Results of this study showed that the time course and psychiatric intervention contributed to recovery of depression and therapeutic intervention. The time course might reduce eating problems. Psychiatric intervention might be necessary for female juvenile detainees, which presents an important issue for future studies.

  19. Homeless people's access to primary care physiotherapy services: an exploratory, mixed-method investigation using a follow-up qualitative extension to core quantitative research.

    PubMed

    Dawes, Jo; Deaton, Stuart; Greenwood, Nan

    2017-06-30

    The purpose of this study was to appraise referrals of homeless patients to physiotherapy services and explore perceptions of barriers to access. This exploratory mixed-method study used a follow-up qualitative extension to core quantitative research design. Over 9 months, quantitative data were gathered from the healthcare records of homeless patients referred to physiotherapy by a general practitioner (GP) practice, including the number of referrals and demographic data of all homeless patients referred. Corresponding physiotherapy records of those people referred to physiotherapy were searched for the outcome of their care. Qualitative semi-structured telephone interviews, based on the quantitative findings, were carried out with staff involved with patient care from the referring GP practice and were used to expand insight into the quantitative findings. Two primary care sites provided data for this study: a GP practice dedicated exclusively to homeless people and the physiotherapy department receiving their referrals. Quantitative data from the healthcare records of 34 homeless patient referrals to physiotherapy were collected and analysed. In addition, five staff involved in patient care were interviewed. 34 referrals of homeless people were made to physiotherapy in a 9-month period. It was possible to match 25 of these to records from the physiotherapy department. Nine (36%) patients did not attend their first appointment; seven (28%) attended an initial appointment, but did not attend a subsequent appointment and were discharged from the service; five (20%) completed treatment and four patients (16%) had ongoing treatment. Semi-structured interviews revealed potential barriers preventing homeless people from accessing physiotherapy services, the complex factors being faced by those making referrals and possible ways to improve physiotherapy access. Homeless people with musculoskeletal problems may fail to access physiotherapy treatment, but opportunities

  20. Intervention effects on diurnal cortisol rhythms of Child Protective Services-referred infants in early childhood: preschool follow-up results of a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Kristin; Hostinar, Camelia E; Dozier, Mary

    2015-02-01

    A number of interventions for at-risk children have shown benefits for children's hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity immediately after treatment. It is critical to examine whether such changes are maintained over time, given that physiological regulation is implicated in later mental and physical health outcomes. To examine whether differences in diurnal cortisol production between children receiving the active parenting intervention and children in the control group persisted at a preschool follow-up (approximately 3 years following intervention). Between-subject comparison of cortisol patterns among 2 groups of children (experimental and control groups) involved with Child Protective Services following allegations of neglect. The participants included 115 children (43.5% female) between 46.5 and 69.6 months of age (mean [SD], 50.73 [4.98] months) who had been previously randomly assigned to either the Attachment and Biobehavioral Catch-up (ABC) intervention (n = 54) or the control intervention (n = 61). The experimental ABC intervention focused on 3 aims: increasing parental nurturance to child distress, increasing synchronous interactions, and decreasing frightening parental behavior. The control intervention provided educational information about child development to parents. Both interventions were manualized and involved 10 sessions implemented by a trained parent coach in the families' homes or other places of residence. Salivary cortisol samples collected at waking and bedtime for children on 3 separate days. Analyses revealed significant differences in cortisol production at the preschool follow-up, such that children in the ABC intervention group showed more typical patterns of cortisol production than children in the control intervention group. Specifically, children in the ABC group exhibited higher mean (SD) log-transformed morning levels than children in the control group (-0.87 [0.45] vs -1.05 [0.43] μg/dL, respectively [to convert

  1. Mental health service use by patients with dysthymic disorder: treatment use and dropout in a 7 1/2-year naturalistic follow-up study.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Brian R; Klein, Daniel N

    2005-01-01

    Little is known about long-term treatment use among patients with dysthymia. This paper describes patterns of treatment use by 85 outpatients with dysthymic disorder and a comparison group of 36 outpatients with nonchronic (episodic) major depression in a naturalistic follow-up. Patients with dysthymia had higher rates of treatment use across 7 1/2 years compared with patients with episodic major depression. Baseline variables that predicted which patients with dysthymia dropped out of treatment before recovering from dysthymic disorder included age, ethnicity, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Revised Third Edition Axis II pathology as obtained from informant reports, higher self-reported autonomy, and receiving psychotherapy alone as compared to receiving a combination of psychotherapy and medication. Dysthymic disorder places a significant burden on the mental health services system, yet many outpatients with dysthymia may be receiving inadequate treatment. Younger patients, ethnic minority patients, and patients with personality disorders may be at increased risk of dropping out from treatment for depression. Combination treatments may increase treatment retention.

  2. Long-Term Effectiveness of Two Educational Methods on Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice Toward Palliative Care Consultation Services Among Nursing Staff: A Longitudinal Follow-Up Study.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hsueh-Hsing; Wu, Li-Fen; Hung, Yu-Chun; Chu, Chi-Ming; Wang, Kwua-Yun

    2018-05-01

    This experimental study investigated long-term effectiveness of two educational methods on knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) about palliative care consultation services (PCCS) among nurses, recruited from a medical center located in Northern Taiwan in 2015, using a stratified cluster sampling method, with 88 participants in multimedia (experimental) and 92 in traditional paper education (control) group. Data were collected using KAP-PCCS questionnaire before education, immediately after, and 3rd and 6th month after education. Results showed that both K-PCCSI and P-PCCSI significantly increased immediately after, and at the 3rd month after education for the experimental group; the K-PCCSI remained significantly higher for the experimental group at the 6th month. The highest increase in scores for both K-PCCSI and P-PCCSI was observed at the 3rd month. There was no significant change in A-PCCS in both groups after follow-up periods, when compared before education. Therefore, using multimedia every 3 months to continue strengthening their knowledge may increase the referrals of terminal patients to PCCS.

  3. Objectively Assessed Physical Activity and Subsequent Health Service Use of UK Adults Aged 70 and Over: A Four to Five Year Follow Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Simmonds, Bethany; Fox, Kenneth; Davis, Mark; Ku, Po-Wen; Gray, Selena; Hillsdon, Melvyn; Sharp, Debbie; Stathi, Afroditi; Thompson, Janice; Coulson, Joanna; Trayers, Tanya

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine the associations between volume and intensity of older peoples' physical activity, with their subsequent health service usage over the following four to five years. Study Design A prospective cohort design using baseline participant characteristics, objectively assessed physical activity and lower limb function provided by Project OPAL (Older People and Active Living). OPAL-PLUS provided data on numbers of primary care consultations, prescriptions, unplanned hospital admissions, and secondary care referrals, extracted from medical records for up to five years following the baseline OPAL data collection. Participants and Data Collection OPAL participants were a diverse sample of 240 older adults with a mean age of 78 years. They were recruited from 12 General Practitioner surgeries from low, middle, and high areas of deprivation in a city in the West of England. Primary care consultations, secondary care referrals, unplanned hospital admissions, number of prescriptions and new disease diagnoses were assessed for 213 (104 females) of the original 240 OPAL participants who had either consented to participate in OPAL-PLUS or already died during the follow-up period. Results In regression modelling, adjusted for socio-economic variables, existing disease, weight status, minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) per day predicted subsequent numbers of prescriptions. Steps taken per day and MVPA also predicted unplanned hospital admissions, although the strength of the effect was reduced when further adjustment was made for lower limb function. Conclusions Community-based programs are needed which are successful in engaging older adults in their late 70s and 80s in more walking, MVPA and activity that helps them avoid loss of physical function. There is a potential for cost savings to health services through reduced reliance on prescriptions and fewer unplanned hospital admissions. PMID:24866573

  4. Objectively assessed physical activity and subsequent health service use of UK adults aged 70 and over: a four to five year follow up study.

    PubMed

    Simmonds, Bethany; Fox, Kenneth; Davis, Mark; Ku, Po-Wen; Gray, Selena; Hillsdon, Melvyn; Sharp, Debbie; Stathi, Afroditi; Thompson, Janice; Coulson, Joanna; Trayers, Tanya

    2014-01-01

    To examine the associations between volume and intensity of older peoples' physical activity, with their subsequent health service usage over the following four to five years. A prospective cohort design using baseline participant characteristics, objectively assessed physical activity and lower limb function provided by Project OPAL (Older People and Active Living). OPAL-PLUS provided data on numbers of primary care consultations, prescriptions, unplanned hospital admissions, and secondary care referrals, extracted from medical records for up to five years following the baseline OPAL data collection. OPAL participants were a diverse sample of 240 older adults with a mean age of 78 years. They were recruited from 12 General Practitioner surgeries from low, middle, and high areas of deprivation in a city in the West of England. Primary care consultations, secondary care referrals, unplanned hospital admissions, number of prescriptions and new disease diagnoses were assessed for 213 (104 females) of the original 240 OPAL participants who had either consented to participate in OPAL-PLUS or already died during the follow-up period. In regression modelling, adjusted for socio-economic variables, existing disease, weight status, minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) per day predicted subsequent numbers of prescriptions. Steps taken per day and MVPA also predicted unplanned hospital admissions, although the strength of the effect was reduced when further adjustment was made for lower limb function. Community-based programs are needed which are successful in engaging older adults in their late 70s and 80s in more walking, MVPA and activity that helps them avoid loss of physical function. There is a potential for cost savings to health services through reduced reliance on prescriptions and fewer unplanned hospital admissions.

  5. Strategy for NEO follow-up observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichy, Milos; Honkova, Michaela; Ticha, Jana; Kocer, Michal

    2015-03-01

    The Near-Earth Objects (NEOs) belong to the most important small bodies in the solar system, having the capability of close approaches to the Earth and even possibility to collide with the Earth. In fact, it is impossible to calculate reliable orbit of an object from a single night observations. Therefore it is necessary to extend astrometry dataset by early follow-up astrometry. Follow-up observations of the newly discovered NEO candidate should be done over an arc of several hours after the discovery and should be repeated over several following nights. The basic service used for planning of the follow-up observations is the NEO Confirmation Page (NEOCP) maintained by the Minor Planet Center of the IAU. This service provides on-line tool for calculating geocentric and topocentic ephemerides and sky-plane uncertainty maps of these objects at the specific date and time. Uncertainty map is one of the most important information used for planning of follow-up observation strategy for given time, indicating also the estimated distance of the newly discovered object and including possibility of the impact. Moreover, observatories dealing with NEO follow-up regularly have prepared their special tools and systems for follow-up work. The system and strategy for the NEO follow-up observation used at the Klet Observatory are described here. Methods and techniques used at the Klet NEO follow-up CCD astrometric programme, using 1.06-m and 0.57-m telescopes, are also discussed.

  6. Are weekend inpatient rehabilitation services value for money? An economic evaluation alongside a randomized controlled trial with a 30 day follow up.

    PubMed

    Brusco, Natasha Kareem; Watts, Jennifer J; Shields, Nora; Taylor, Nicholas F

    2014-05-29

    Providing additional Saturday rehabilitation can improve functional independence and health related quality of life at discharge and it may reduce patient length of stay, yet the economic implications are not known. The aim of this study was to determine from a health service perspective if the provision of rehabilitation to inpatients on a Saturday in addition to Monday to Friday was cost effective compared to Monday to Friday rehabilitation alone. Cost utility and cost effectiveness analyses were undertaken alongside a multi-center, single-blind randomized controlled trial with a 30-day follow up after discharge. Participants were adults admitted for inpatient rehabilitation in two publicly funded metropolitan rehabilitation facilities. The control group received usual care rehabilitation services from Monday to Friday and the intervention group received usual care plus an additional rehabilitation service on Saturday. Incremental cost utility ratio was reported as cost per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained and an incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER) was reported as cost for a minimal clinically important difference (MCID) in functional independence. 996 patients (mean age 74 (standard deviation 13) years) were randomly assigned to the intervention (n = 496) or the control group (n = 500). Mean difference in cost of AUD$1,673 (95% confidence interval (CI) -271 to 3,618) was a saving in favor of the intervention group. The incremental cost utility ratio found a saving of AUD$41,825 (95% CI -2,817 to 74,620) per QALY gained for the intervention group. The ICER found a saving of AUD$16,003 (95% CI -3,074 to 87,361) in achieving a MCID in functional independence for the intervention group. If the willingness to pay per QALY gained or for a MCID in functional independence was zero dollars the probability of the intervention being cost effective was 96% and 95%, respectively. A sensitivity analysis removing Saturday penalty rates did not significantly

  7. Providing accessible medical abortion services in a Victorian rural community: A description and audit of service delivery and contraception follow up.

    PubMed

    Tomnay, Jane E; Coelli, Lauren; Davidson, Ange; Hulme-Chambers, Alana; Orr, Catherine; Hocking, Jane S

    2018-06-01

    To describe how a nurse led, MToP service is run in primary care in regional Victoria and investigate the characteristics and contraceptive choices of the women who have attended. Descriptive study of the development and implementation of a rural MToP service and a retrospective chart audit of patients attending between January 2015 and September 2016. Characteristics and clinical outcomes for women attending an MToP service in a primary care setting in rural Victoria. Contraceptive usage pre and post attending a rural service for MToP. There were 229 presentations, representing 223 women, of which 172 women (75.1%; 95%CI: 69.0%, 80.6%) had a successful MToP and for two further women, MToP failed, requiring a surgical termination (0.9%; 95%CI: 0.1%, 3.1%). At the time of presentation, the mean age of women was 25 years, the median length of gestation was 49 days and 171 (75%) had not had a previous termination. Data about contraceptive use was available for 195 women, 143 (73.3%) reported no contraception, 2 reported emergency contraceptive pill (1.0%), 10 used condoms (2.1%) and 39 (20.0%) reported hormonal contraception. Among the 156 women using no contraception, condoms or emergency contraception at the time of pregnancy, 113 (72.4%) initiated a reliable form of contraception post presentation to the MToP service. Provision of accessible, affordable MToP through an integrated primary health service is one strategy to address access inequity in regional areas. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Critical Care Follow-up Clinics: A Scoping Review of Interventions and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Oles, Sylwia K.; Mundell, James; London, Susan; Khan, Babar

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this scoping review was to identify evidence describing benefits of interventions provided in ICU-survivor follow-up clinics. Background Advances in intensive care unit (ICU) treatments have increased the number of survivors who require specialized care for ICU-related sequelae. ICU survivor follow-up clinics exist yet little is known about the nature and impact of interventions provided in such clinics. A scoping review of publications about in-person post-ICU follow-up care was undertaken. Method Ten databases were searched yielding one-hundred eleven relevant unique publication titles and abstracts. Sample heterogeneity supported using a scoping review method. After excluding non-related publications, 33 reports were fully reviewed. Twenty international publications were included that described ICU follow-up clinic interventions and/or outcomes. Results Authors discussed very diverse interventions in 15 publications, and 9 reported some level of intervention effectiveness. Evidence was strongest that supported the use of prospective diaries as an intervention to prevent or improve psychological symptoms whereas evidence to support implementation of other interventions was weak. Conclusions Although ICU follow-up clinics exist, evidence for interventions and effectiveness of treatments in these clinics remains under-explored. Implications ICU survivor follow-up clinics provide a venue for further interdisciplinary intervention research that could lead to better health outcomes for ICU survivors. PMID:27309787

  9. Reducing Readmissions among Heart Failure Patients Discharged to Home Health Care: Effectiveness of Early and Intensive Nursing Services and Early Physician Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Murtaugh, Christopher M; Deb, Partha; Zhu, Carolyn; Peng, Timothy R; Barrón, Yolanda; Shah, Shivani; Moore, Stanley M; Bowles, Kathryn H; Kalman, Jill; Feldman, Penny H; Siu, Albert L

    2017-08-01

    To compare the effectiveness of two "treatments"-early, intensive home health nursing and physician follow-up within a week-versus less intense and later postacute care in reducing readmissions among heart failure (HF) patients discharged to home health care. National Medicare administrative, claims, and patient assessment data. Patients with a full week of potential exposure to the treatments were followed for 30 days to determine exposure status, 30-day all-cause hospital readmission, other health care use, and mortality. An extension of instrumental variables methods for nonlinear statistical models corrects for nonrandom selection of patients into treatment categories. Our instruments are the index hospital's rate of early aftercare for non-HF patients and hospital discharge day of the week. All hospitalizations for a HF principal diagnosis with discharge to home health care between July 2009 and June 2010 were identified from source files. Neither treatment by itself has a statistically significant effect on hospital readmission. In combination, however, they reduce the probability of readmission by roughly 8 percentage points (p < .001; confidence interval = -12.3, -4.1). Results are robust to changes in implementation of the nonlinear IV estimator, sample, outcome measure, and length of follow-up. Our results call for closer coordination between home health and medical providers in the clinical management of HF patients immediately after hospital discharge. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  10. From screening to postpartum follow-up – the determinants and barriers for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) services, a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) – a transitory form of diabetes first recognised during pregnancy complicates between < 1% and 28% of all pregnancies. GDM has important short and long-term health consequences for both the mother and her offspring. To prevent adverse pregnancy outcomes and to prevent or delay future onset of type 2 diabetes in mother and offspring, timely detection, optimum treatment, and preventive postpartum care and follow-up is necessary. However the area remains grossly under-prioritised. Methods To investigate determinants and barriers to GDM care from initial screening and diagnosis to prenatal treatment and postpartum follow-up, a PubMed database search to identify quantitative and qualitative studies on the subject was done in September 2012. Fifty-eight relevant studies were reviewed. Results Adherence to prevailing GDM screening guidelines and compliance to screening tests seems sub-optimal at best and arbitrary at worst, with no clear or consistent correlation to health care provider, health system or client characteristics. Studies indicate that most women express commitment and motivation for behaviour change to protect the health of their unborn baby, but compliance to recommended treatment and advice is fraught with challenges, and precious little is known about health system or societal factors that hinder compliance and what can be done to improve it. A number of barriers related to health care provider/system and client characteristics have been identified by qualitative studies. Immediately following a GDM pregnancy many women, when properly informed, desire and intend to maintain healthy lifestyles to prevent future diabetes, but find the effort challenging. Adherence to recommended postpartum screening and continued lifestyle modifications seems even lower. Here too, health care provider, health system and client related determinants and barriers were identified. Studies reveal that sense of self

  11. What sort of follow-up services would Australian breast cancer survivors prefer if we could no longer offer long-term specialist-based care? A discrete choice experiment

    PubMed Central

    Bessen, T; Chen, G; Street, J; Eliott, J; Karnon, J; Keefe, D; Ratcliffe, J

    2014-01-01

    Background: Early diagnosis and improved treatment outcomes have increased breast cancer survival rates that, in turn, have led to increased numbers of women undergoing follow-up after completion of primary treatment. The current workload growth is unsustainable for breast cancer specialists who also provide care for women newly diagnosed or with a recurrence. Appropriate and acceptable follow-up care is important; yet, currently we know little about patient preferences. The aim of this study was to explore the preferences of Australian breast cancer survivors for alternative modes of delivery of follow-up services. Methods: A self-administered questionnaire (online or paper) was developed. The questionnaire contained a discrete choice experiment (DCE) designed to explore patient preferences with respect to provider, location, frequency and method of delivery of routine follow-up care in years 3, 4 and 5 after diagnosis, as well as the perceived value of ‘drop-in' clinics providing additional support. Participants were recruited throughout Australia over a 6-month period from May to October 2012. Preference scores and choice probabilities were used to rank the top 10 most preferred follow-up scenarios for respondents. Results: A total of 836 women participated in the study, of whom 722 (86.4%) completed the DCE. In the absence of specialist follow-up, the 10 most valued surveillance scenarios all included a Breast Physician as the provider of follow-up care. The most preferred scenario is a face-to-face local breast cancer follow-up clinic held every 6 months and led by a Breast Physician, where additional clinics focused on the side effects of treatment are also provided. Conclusion: Beyond the first 2 years from diagnosis, in the absence of a specialist led follow-up, women prefer to have their routine breast cancer follow-up by a Breast Physician (or a Breast Cancer Nurse) in a dedicated local breast cancer clinic, rather than with their local General

  12. An Assessment of Service-Learning in 34 US Schools of Pharmacy Follow Up on the 2001 Professional Affairs Committee Report

    PubMed Central

    Schlesselman, Lauren; Borrego, Matthew; Mehta, Bella; Drobitch, Robert K.; Smith, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To determine if the service-learning components used at a convenience sample of schools and colleges of pharmacy meet the intent of the 2001 AACP Professional Affairs Committee (PAC) report. Methods. An online questionnaire was used to survey faculty members or staff involved with service-learning education at their school of pharmacy. Questions addressed aspects of service-learning including types of activities used, duration of student involvement with community partners, and association of learning objectives with service-learning activities. Results. The majority (85.3%) of respondents reported their institution used service-learning. Activities reported as part of service-learning ranged from working at health fairs to involvement with pharmacy school recruitment. More than half (64.3%) of service-learning activities involved long-term interactions with one community partner, and 74.1% of respondents indicated there was always an opportunity for student reflection on the service-learning activity. Conclusion. There is increasing though inconsistent application of PAC guidelines regarding service-learning. PMID:26688584

  13. Critical Care Follow-up Clinics: A Scoping Review of Interventions and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lasiter, Sue; Oles, Sylwia K; Mundell, James; London, Susan; Khan, Babar

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this scoping review is to identify evidence describing benefits of interventions provided in intensive care unit (ICU) survivor follow-up clinics. Advances in ICU treatments have increased the number of survivors who require specialized care for ICU-related sequelae. Intensive care unit survivor follow-up clinics exist, yet little is known about the nature and impact of interventions provided in such clinics. A scoping review of publications about in-person post-ICU follow-up care was undertaken. Ten databases were searched yielding 111 relevant unique publication titles and abstracts. Sample heterogeneity supported using a scoping review method. After excluding nonrelated publications, 33 reports were fully reviewed. Twenty international publications were included that described ICU follow-up clinic interventions and/or outcomes. Authors discussed very diverse interventions in 15 publications, and 9 reported some level of intervention effectiveness. Evidence was strongest that supported the use of prospective diaries as an intervention to prevent or improve psychological symptoms, whereas evidence to support implementation of other interventions was weak. Although ICU follow-up clinics exist, evidence for interventions and effectiveness of treatments in these clinics remains underexplored. Intensive care unit survivor follow-up clinics provide a venue for further interdisciplinary intervention research that could lead to better health outcomes for ICU survivors.

  14. Human service work, gender and antidepressant use: a nationwide register-based 19-year follow-up of 752 683 women and men.

    PubMed

    Buscariolli, André; Kouvonen, Anne; Kokkinen, Lauri; Halonen, Jaana I; Koskinen, Aki; Väänänen, Ari

    2018-06-01

    To examine antidepressant use among male and female human service professionals. A random sample of individuals between 25 years and 54 years of age (n=752 683; 49.2% women; mean age 39.5 years). Information about each individual's filled antidepressant prescriptions from 1995 to 2014 was provided by the Social Insurance Institution. First, antidepressant use in five broad human service categories was compared with that in all other occupations grouped together, separately for men and women. Then, each of the 15 human service professions were compared with all other occupations from the same skill/education level (excluding other human services professions). Cox models were applied and the results are presented as HRs for antidepressant use with 95% CIs. The hazard of antidepressant use was higher among men working in human service versus all other occupations with the same skill/occupational level (1.22, 95% CI 1.18 to 1.27), but this was not the case for women (0.99, 95% CI 0.98 to 1.01). The risks differed between professions: male health and social care professionals (including medical doctors, nurses, practical nurses and home care assistants), social workers, childcare workers, teachers and psychologists had a higher risk of antidepressant use than men in non-human service occupations, whereas customer clerks had a lower risk. Male human service professionals had a higher risk of antidepressant use than men working in non-human service occupations. Gendered sociocultural norms and values related to specific occupations as well as occupational selection may be the cause of the elevated risk. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  15. Does staff-patient agreement on needs for care predict a better mental health outcome? A 4-year follow-up in a community service.

    PubMed

    Lasalvia, A; Bonetto, C; Tansella, M; Stefani, B; Ruggeri, M

    2008-01-01

    Patients treated in primary care settings report better mental outcomes when they agree with practitioners about the nature of their core presenting problems. However, no study has examined the impact of staff-patient agreement on treatment outcomes in specialist mental health services. We investigated whether a better staff-patient agreement on needs for care predicts more favourable outcome in patients receiving community-based psychiatric care. A 3-month prevalence cohort of 188 patients with the full spectrum of psychiatric conditions was assessed at baseline and at 4 years using the Camberwell Assessment of Need (CAN), both staff (CAN-S) and patient versions (CAN-P), and a set of standardized outcome measures. Baseline staff-patient agreement on needs was included among predictors of outcome. Both clinician-rated (psychopathology, social disability, global functioning) and patient-rated (subjective quality of life and satisfaction with services) outcomes were considered. Controlling for the effect of sociodemographics, service utilization and changes in clinical status, better staff-patient agreement makes a significant additional contribution in predicting treatment outcomes not only on patient-rated but also on clinician-rated measures. Mental health care should be provided on the basis of a negotiation process involving both professionals and service users to ensure effective interventions; every effort should be made by services to implement strategies aiming to increase consensus between staff and patients.

  16. Association of Structured Virtual Visits for Hypertension Follow-Up in Primary Care with Blood Pressure Control and Use of Clinical Services.

    PubMed

    Levine, David Michael; Dixon, Ronald F; Linder, Jeffrey A

    2018-04-23

    Optimal management of hypertension requires frequent monitoring and follow-up. Novel, pragmatic interventions have the potential to engage patients, maintain blood pressure control, and enhance access to busy primary care practices. "Virtual visits" are structured asynchronous online interactions between a patient and a clinician to extend medical care beyond the initial office visit. To compare blood pressure control and healthcare utilization between patients who received virtual visits compared to usual hypertension care. Propensity score-matched, retrospective cohort study with adjustment by difference-in-differences. Primary care patients with hypertension. Patient participation in at least one virtual visit for hypertension. Usual care patients did not use a virtual visit but were seen in-person for hypertension. Adjusted difference in mean systolic blood pressure, primary care office visits, specialist office visits, emergency department visits, and inpatient admissions in the 180 days before and 180 days after the in-person visit. Of the 1051 virtual visit patients and 24,848 usual care patients, we propensity score-matched 893 patients from each group. Both groups were approximately 61 years old, 44% female, 85% White, had about five chronic conditions, and about 20% had a mean pre-visit systolic blood pressure of 140-160 mmHg. Compared to usual care, virtual visit patients had an adjusted 0.8 (95% CI, 0.3 to 1.2) fewer primary care office visits. There was no significant adjusted difference in systolic blood pressure control (0.6 mmHg [95% CI, - 2.0 to 3.1]), specialist visits (0.0 more visits [95% CI, - 0.3 to 0.3]), emergency department visits (0.0 more visits [95% CI, 0.0 to 0.01]), or inpatient admissions (0.0 more admissions [95% CI, 0.0 to 0.1]). Among patients with reasonably well-controlled hypertension, virtual visit participation was associated with equivalent blood pressure control and reduced in-office primary care utilization.

  17. An 8 Year Follow-Up of a Specialist Supported Employment Service for High-Ability Adults with Autism or Asperger Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howlin, Patricia; Alcock, Jennifer; Burkin, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    Few supported employment programmes have been specifically designed for people with autism, especially those who are more able. This study examines the outcome of a supported employment service (NAS Prospects) for adults with autism or Asperger syndrome (IQ 60+) over an 8 year period. Approximately 68 percent of clients found employment. Of the…

  18. Follow-Up of Non-Teaching Graduates; Graduates of 1969, 1970 Responses concerning Majors, Minors, Financial Aid, Employment Status, Placement Services, Guidance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Univ., Stevens Point.

    The purpose of this study was to determine what 1969 and 1970 nonteaching graduates of the Wisconsin State University at Stevens Point were doing, the adequacy of the University's services in helping the graduates get through school and helping them find suitable employment. Questionnaires were sent to 447 1969 graduates of whom 307 returned…

  19. The effect of a neurocritical care service without a dedicated neuro-ICU on quality of care in intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Burns, Joseph D; Green, Deborah M; Lau, Helena; Winter, Michael; Koyfman, Feliks; DeFusco, Christina M; Holsapple, James W; Kase, Carlos S

    2013-06-01

    Introduction of neurocritical care services to dedicated neuro-ICUs is associated with improved quality of care. The impact of a neurocritical care service without a dedicated neuro-ICU has not been studied. We retrospectively identified all patients admitted to our institution with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in two 12-month periods: immediately before the arrival of the first neurointensivist ("before") and after the neurocritical care service was established ("after"). There was no nursing team, ICU housestaff/physician extender team, or physical unit dedicated to the care of patients with critical neurologic illness during either period. Using an uncontrolled before-after design, we compared clinical outcomes and performance on quality metrics between groups. We included 74 patients with primary supratentorial ICH. Mortality, length of stay (LOS), proportion of patients with modified Rankin Score 0-3, and destination on discharge did not differ between groups when adjusted for confounders. Time to first two consecutive systolic blood pressure (SBP) measurements <180 mmHg was shorter in the "after" cohort (mean 4.5 vs. 3.2 h, p = 0.001). Area under the curve measurement for change in SBP from baseline over the first 24 h after ED arrival demonstrated greater, sustained SBP reduction in the "after" cohort (mean -187.9 vs. -720.9, p = 0.04). A higher proportion of patients were fed without passing a dysphagia screen in the "before" group (45 vs. 0%, p < 0.001). Introduction of a neurocritical service without a neuro-ICU at our institution was associated with a trend toward longer ICU LOS and improvement in some key metrics of quality of care for patients with ICH.

  20. Functional outcome and service engagement in major depressive disorder with psychotic features: comparisons with schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder and bipolar disorder in a 6-year follow-up of the Cavan-Monaghan First Episode Psychosis Study (CAMFEPS).

    PubMed

    Kingston, Tara; Scully, Paul J; Browne, David J; Baldwin, Patrizia A; Kinsella, Anthony; O'Callaghan, Eadbhard; Russell, Vincent; Waddington, John L

    2018-03-25

    While long-term outcome following a first psychotic episode is well studied in schizophrenia (SZ), schizoaffective disorder (SA), and bipolar disorder (BD), major depressive disorder with psychotic features (MDDP) has received less investigation. This study compares MDDP with SZ, SA, and BD at 6-year follow-up. At 6 years after a first psychotic episode, follow-up data on psychopathology, functioning, quality of life, and service engagement were obtained for 27 cases of MDDP in comparison to 60 SZ, 27 SA, and 35 BD. Positive psychotic symptoms were less prominent in MDDP and BD than in SZ and SA. Negative symptoms, impaired functioning, and reduction in objectively determined quality of life were less prominent in MDDP and BD, intermediate in SA and most prominent in SZ. However, subjectively determined quality of life was indistinguishable across diagnoses. Service engagement was highest for MDDP, intermediate for SA and BD, and lowest for SZ. At 6-year follow-up, these diagnoses are characterized by quantitative rather than qualitative differences in psychopathology, functionality, quality of life, and service engagement, with considerable overlap between them. These findings suggest that MDDP should join SZ, SA, and BD in a milieu of psychosis that transcends arbitrary boundaries. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. A Pragmatic Randomised, Controlled Trial of Intensive Care follow up programmes in improving Longer-term outcomes from critical illness. The PRACTICAL study

    PubMed Central

    Cuthbertson, Brian H; Rattray, Janice; Johnston, Marie; Wildsmith, J Anthony; Wilson, Edward; Hernendez, Rodolfo; Ramsey, Craig; Hull, Alastair M; Norrie, John; Campbell, Marion

    2007-01-01

    Background A number of intensive care (ICU) patients experience significant problems with physical, psychological, and social functioning for some time after discharge from ICU. These problems have implications not just for patients, but impose a continuing financial burden for the National Health Service. To support recovery, a number of hospitals across the UK have developed Intensive Care follow-up clinics. However, there is a lack of evidence base to support these, and this study aims to test the hypothesis that intensive care follow up programmes are effective and cost-effective at improving physical and psychological quality of life in the year after intensive care discharge. Methods/Design This is a multi-centre, pragmatic, randomised controlled trial. Patients (n = 270) will be recruited prior to hospital discharge from three intensive care units in the UK, and randomised to one of two groups. The control group will receive standard in-hospital follow-up and the intervention group will participate in an ICU follow-up programme with clinic appointments 2–3 and 9 months after ICU discharge. The primary outcome measure is Health-related Quality of Life (HRQoL) 12 months after ICU discharge as measured by the Short Form-36. Secondary measures include: HRQoL at six months; Quality-adjusted life years using EQ-5D; posttraumatic psychopathology as measured by Davidson Trauma Scale; and anxiety and depression using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale at both six and twelve months after ICU discharge. Contacts with health services in the twelve months after ICU discharge will be measured as part of the economic analysis. Discussion The provision of intensive care follow-up clinics within the UK has developed in an ad hoc manner, is inconsistent in both the number of hospitals offering such a service or in the type of service offered. This study provides the opportunity to evaluate such services both in terms of patient benefit and cost-effectiveness. The

  2. The impact of primary healthcare reform on equity of utilization of services in the province of Quebec: a 2003-2010 follow-up.

    PubMed

    Ouimet, Marie-Jo; Pineault, Raynald; Prud'homme, Alexandre; Provost, Sylvie; Fournier, Michel; Levesque, Jean-Frédéric

    2015-11-30

    In 2003, the Quebec government made important changes in its primary healthcare (PHC) system. This reform included the creation of new models of PHC, Family Medicine Groups (e.g. multidisciplinary health teams with extended opening hours and enrolment of patients) and Network Clinics (clinics providing access to investigation and specialist services). Considering that equity is one of the guiding principles of the Quebec health system, our objectives are to assess the impact of the PHC reform on equity by examining the association between socio-economic status (SES) and utilization of healthcare services between 2003 and 2010; and to determine how the organizational model of PHC facilities impacts utilization of services according to SES. We held population surveys in 2005 (n = 9206) and 2010 (n = 9180) in the two most populated regions of Quebec province, relating to utilization and experience of care during the preceding two years, as well as organizational surveys of all PHC facilities. We performed multiple logistical regression analyses comparing levels of SES for different utilization variables, controlling for morbidity and perceived health; we repeated the analyses, this time including type of PHC facility (older vs newer models). Compared with the lowest SES, highest SES is associated with less emergency room visits (OR 0.80) and higher likelihood of at least one visit to a PHC facility (OR 2.17), but lower likelihood of frequent visits to PHC (OR 0.69), and higher affiliation to a family doctor (OR 2.04). Differences remained stable between the 2005 and 2010 samples except for likelihood of visit to PHC source which deteriorated for the lowest SES. Greater improvement in affiliation to family doctor was seen for the lowest SES in older models of PHC organizations, but a deterioration was seen for that same group in newer models. Differences favoring the rich in affiliation to family doctor and likelihood of visit to PHC facility likely represent

  3. An 8 year follow-up of a specialist supported employment service for high-ability adults with autism or Asperger syndrome.

    PubMed

    Howlin, Patricia; Alcock, Jennifer; Burkin, Catherine

    2005-12-01

    Few supported employment programmes have been specifically designed for people with autism, especially those who are more able. This study examines the outcome of a supported employment service (NAS Prospects) for adults with autism or Asperger syndrome (IQ 60+) over an 8 year period. Approximately 68 percent of clients found employment. Of the 192 jobs, the majority were permanent contracts and most involved administrative, technical or computing work. Assessment of current clients indicates that IQ, language skills and educational attainments are high. However, work has also been found for those of lower abilities. Individuals supported by Prospects show a rise in salaries, contribute more tax and claim fewer benefits. Satisfaction with the scheme is high among clients, employers and support workers. Although the programme continues to incur a financial deficit, this has decreased. Moreover, there are many non-financial benefits, which are difficult to quantify. The importance of specialist employment support of this kind is discussed.

  4. Public telesurveillance service for frail elderly living at home, outcomes and cost evolution: a quasi experimental design with two follow-ups.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Claude; Reinharz, Daniel; Deaudelin, Isabelle; Garceau, Mathieu; Talbot, Lise R

    2006-07-07

    Telesurveillance is a technologically based modality that allows the surveillance of patients in the natural setting, mainly home. It is based on communication technologies to relay information between a patient and a central call center where services are coordinated. Different types of telesurveillance systems have been implemented, some being staffed with non-health professionals and others with health professional, mainly nurses. Up to now, only telesurveillance services staffed with non-health professionals have been shown to be effective and efficient. The objective of this study was to document outcomes and cost evolution of a nurse-staffed telesurveillance system for frail elderly living at home. A quasi experimental design over a nine-month period was done. Patients (n = 38) and caregivers (n = 38) were selected by health professionals from two local community health centers. To be eligible, elders had to be over 65, live at home with a permanent physical, slight cognitive or motor disability or both and have a close relative (the caregiver) willing to participate to the study. These disabilities had to hinder the accomplishment of daily life activities deemed essential to continue living at home safely. Three data sources were used: patient files, telesurveillance center's quarterly reports and personal questionnaires (Modified Mini-Mental State, Functional Autonomy Measurement System, Life Event Checklist, SF-12, Life-H, Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with Assistive Technology, Caregiver Burden). The telesurveillance technology permitted, among various functionalities, bi-directional communication (speaker-receiver) between the patient and the response center. A total of 957 calls for 38 registered clients over a 6-month period was recorded. Only 48 (5.0%) of the calls were health-related. No change was reported in the elders' quality of life and daily activity abilities. Satisfaction was very high. Caregivers' psychological burden decreased

  5. Streamlining a blood center and hospital transfusion service supply chain with an informatics vendor-managed inventory solution: development, implementation, and 3-month follow-up.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Hamilton C; Garcia, Adam; Scott, Robert; Lancaster, David; Geary, Dianne; Nguyen, Anh-Thu; Shankar, Raina; Buchanan, Leslie; Pham, Tho D

    2018-05-16

    The ordering process at Stanford Health Care involved twice-daily shipments predicated upon current stock levels from the blood center to the hospital transfusion service. Manual census determination is time consuming and error prone. We aimed to enhance inventory management by developing an informatics platform to streamline the ordering process and reallocate staff productivity. The general inventory accounts for more than 50 product categories based on characteristics including component, blood type, irradiation status, and cytomegalovirus serology status. Over a 5-month calibration period, inventory levels were determined algorithmically and electronically. An in-house software program was created to determine inventory levels, optimize the electronic ordering process, and reduce labor time. A 3-month pilot period was implemented using this program. This system showed noninferiority while saving labor time. The average weekly transfused:stocked ratios for cryoprecipitate, plasma, and red blood cells, respectively, were 1.03, 1.21, and 1.48 before the pilot period, compared with 0.88, 1.17, and 1.40 during (p = 0.28). There were 27 (before) and 31 (during) average STAT units ordered per week (p = 0.86). The number of monthly wasted products due to expiration was 226 (before) and 196 (during) units, respectively (p = 0.28). An estimated 7 hours per week of technologist time was reallocated to other tasks. An in-house electronic ordering system can enhance information fidelity, reallocate and optimize valuable staff productivity, and further standardize ordering. This system showed noninferiority to the labor-intensive manual system while freeing up over 360 hours of staff time per year. © 2018 AABB.

  6. [Callers' perception of the service at the cardiovascular hotline of the German Hypertension Society: results of follow-up telephone interviews].

    PubMed

    Leiblein, J; Dominiak, P

    2010-12-01

    To provide a source of valid information to hypertensive patients, their families as well as the public a cardiovascular hotline (HKT) has been established by the German Hypertension Society in April 1992. Until the end of the year 2007 approx. 55.000 phone calls have been answered. The aim of this study was to assess the callers' support needs and the perception of the information received. Callers who had previously provided their contact data were called back later. From a total of 803 eligible persons 311 volunteered for a phone interview made up of ten questions concerning (1) the accessibility of the phone service, (2) the atmosphere of the conversation and (3) the adequacy of time for the phone conversation, (4) the suitability of the answers received, (5) life style changes initiated by the original phone call, (6) discussion with the attending physician about the phone conversation, (7) information about preventive measures against consequential damages of high blood pressure, (8) instructions about the prescribed medication as well as side effects, (9) improvement of the blood pressure after the call and (10) willingness to recommend to others a call at the cardiovascular hotline. The gender distribution of the participants in the interview revealed a sex ratio of 47 % females vs. 53 % males compared to 51 % females vs. 49 % males among all callers at the hotline in 2007. Members of both populations were quite evenly distributed over the federal states of Germany. Taken together, these findings suggest that the interview data are representative of the opinions of callers' at the cardiovascular hotline. The analysis of the results of the survey provide ample evidence that the cardiovascular hotline is well accepted by the callers and hence effective in conveying information about hypertension. This is particularly important in view of the ever increasing demand of such information by members of the rapidly ageing population in Germany. © Georg Thieme

  7. Placement and Follow-up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shippen, Samuel Joseph, Ed.; Wasil, Raymond A., Ed.

    This document contains a compilation of original manuscripts written by competent authorities in the field of job placement services for students. Viewing placement as both a product and an integral part of a developmental process, these papers are divided into the following six topical areas: (1) information, (2) exploration, (3) counseling, (4)…

  8. Effects of mobile phone WeChat services improve adherence to corticosteroid nasal spray treatment for chronic rhinosinusitis after functional endoscopic sinus surgery: a 3-month follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shaoyan; Liang, Zibin; Zhang, Rongkai; Liao, Wei; Chen, Yuan; Fan, Yunping; Li, Huabin

    2017-03-01

    The objective of the study is to investigate the impact of receiving daily WeChat services on one's cell phone on adherence to corticosteroid nasal spray treatment in chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) patients after functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS). This study was a two-arm, randomized, follow-up investigation. Patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with/without nasal polyps following bilateral FESS were randomised to receive, or to not receive, daily WeChat service on their cell phone to take corticosteroid nasal spray treatment. A prescription of budesonide aqueous nasal spray 128 µg bid was given to all the subjects. Then they returned to the clinic after 30, 60, 90 days. The primary study outcome was adherence to nasal spray treatment, whereas secondary outcomes were change in endoscopic findings and SinoNasal Outcome Test-20 (SNOT-20). On the whole, there was a significant inter-group difference in the change of adherence rate (F = 90.88, p = 0.000). The WeChat group had much higher adherence rate than the control group during the follow-up. In terms of postoperative endoscopic scores and SNOT-20, except granulation score, no significant differences were observed between the two randomization groups. WeChat services are already after a short period of observation associated with improved adherence to corticosteroid nasal spray treatment in CRS patients after FESS.

  9. Role of a service corridor in ICU noise control, staff stress, and staff satisfaction: environmental research of an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhe; Downs, Betsy; Farell, Ashley; Cook, Kimberly; Hourihan, Peter; McCreery, Shimby

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the role of a dedicated service corridor in intensive care unit (ICU) noise control and staff stress and satisfaction. Shared corridors immediately adjacent to patient rooms are generally noisy due to a variety of activities, including service deliveries and pickups. The strategy of providing a dedicated service corridor is thought to reduce noise for patient care, but the extent to which it actually contributes to noise reduction in the patient care environment and in turn improves staff performance has not been previously documented. A before-and-after comparison was conducted in an adult cardiac ICU. The ICU was relocated from a traditional hospital environment to a new addition with a dedicated service corridor. A total of 118 nursing staff participated in the surveys regarding pre-move and post-move environmental comfort, stress, and satisfaction in the previous and new units. Acoustical measures of noise within the new ICU and a control environment of the previous unit were collected during four work days, along with on-site observations of corridor traffic. Independent and paired sample t-tests of survey data showed that the perceived noise level was lower and staff reported less stress and more satisfaction in the new ICU (p < 0.01). Analyses of acoustical data confirmed that the new ICU was significantly quieter (p < 0.02). Observations revealed how the service corridor impacted patient care services and traffic. The addition of a dedicated service corridor works in the new unit for improving noise control and staff stress and satisfaction. Critical care/intensive care, noise, satisfaction, staff, work environment.

  10. Comparing office and telephone follow-up after medical abortion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Melissa J; Rounds, Kacie M; Creinin, Mitchell D; Cansino, Catherine; Hou, Melody Y

    2016-08-01

    Compare proportion lost to follow-up, successful abortion, and staff effort in women who choose office or telephone-based follow-up evaluation for medical abortion at a teaching institution. We performed a chart review of all medical abortions provided in the first three years of service provision. Women receiving mifepristone and misoprostol could choose office follow-up with an ultrasound evaluation one to two weeks after mifepristone or telephone follow-up with a scheduled telephone interview at one week post abortion and a second telephone call at four weeks to review the results of a home urine pregnancy test. Of the 176 medical abortion patients, 105 (59.7%) chose office follow-up and 71 (40.3%) chose telephone follow-up. Office evaluation patients had higher rates of completing all required follow-up compared to telephone follow-up patients (94.3% vs 84.5%, respectively, p=.04), but proportion lost to follow-up was similar in both groups (4.8% vs 5.6%, respectively, p=1.0). Medical abortion efficacy was 94.0% and 92.5% in women who chose office and telephone follow-up, respectively. We detected two (1.2%) ongoing pregnancies, both in the office group. Staff rescheduled 15.0% of appointments in the office group. For the telephone follow-up cohort, staff made more than one phone call to 43.9% and 69.4% of women at one week and four weeks, respectively. Proportion lost to follow-up is low in women who have the option of office or telephone follow-up after medical abortion. Women who choose telephone-based evaluation compared to office follow-up may require more staff effort for rescheduling of contact, but overall outcomes are similar. Although women who choose telephone evaluation may require more rescheduling of contact as compared to office follow-up, having alternative follow-up options may decrease the proportion of women who are lost to follow-up. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Tele-ICU "myth busters".

    PubMed

    Venditti, Angelo; Ronk, Chanda; Kopenhaver, Tracey; Fetterman, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Tele-intensive care unit (ICU) technology has been proven to bridge the gap between available resources and quality care for many health care systems across the country. Tele-ICUs allow the standardization of care and provide a second set of eyes traditionally not available in the ICU. A growing body of literature supports the use of tele-ICUs based on improved outcomes and reduction in errors. To date, the literature has not effectively outlined the limitations of this technology related to response to changes in patient care, interventions, and interaction with the care team. This information can potentially have a profound impact on service expectations. Some misconceptions about tele-ICU technology include the following: tele-ICU is "watching" 24 hours a day, 7 days a week; tele-ICU is a telemetry unit; tele-ICU is a stand-alone crisis intervention tool; tele-ICU decreases staffing at the bedside; tele-ICU clinical roles are clearly defined and understood; and tele-ICUs are not cost-effective to operate. This article outlines the purpose of tele-ICU technology, reviews outcomes, and "busts" myths about tele-ICU technology.

  12. Supervised team management, with or without structured psychotherapy, in heavy users of a mental health service with borderline personality disorder: a two-year follow-up preliminary randomized study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Individuals affected by severe Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) are often heavy users of Mental Health Services (MHS). Short-term treatments currently used in BPD therapy are useful to target disruptive behaviors but they are less effective in reducing heavy MHS use. Therefore, alternative short-term treatments, less complex than long-term psychodynamic psychotherapies but specifically oriented to BPD core problems, need to be developed to reduce MHS overuse. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of adding Sequential Brief Adlerian Psychodynamic Psychotherapy (SB-APP) to Supervised Team Management (STM) in BPD treatment compared to STM alone in a naturalistic group of heavy MHS users with BPD. Effectiveness was evaluated 6 times along a two-year follow-up. Methods Thirty-five outpatients who met inclusion criteria were randomly assigned to two treatment groups (STM = 17; SB-APP = 18) and then compared. Clinical Global Impression (CGI) and CGI-modified (CGI-M) for BPD, Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF), State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory (STAXI), and Symptom Checklist-90 Revised (SCL-90-R) were administered at T1, T3, T6, T12, T18 and T24. At T12 the Working Alliance Inventory-Short Form (WAI-S) was also completed. At the one-year follow-up, SB-APP group did not receive any additional individual psychological support. MHS team was specifically trained in BPD treatment and had regular supervisions. Results All patients improved on CGI, GAF, and STAXI scores after 6 and 12 months, independently of treatment received. SB-APP group showed better outcome on impulsivity, suicide attempts, chronic feelings of emptiness, and disturbed relationships. We found a good stabilization at the one year follow-up, even after the interruption of brief psychotherapy in the SB-APP group. Conclusions Although STM for BPD applied to heavy MHS users was effective in reducing symptoms and improving their global functioning, adding a time-limited and focused

  13. Supervised team management, with or without structured psychotherapy, in heavy users of a mental health service with borderline personality disorder: a two-year follow-up preliminary randomized study.

    PubMed

    Amianto, Federico; Ferrero, Andrea; Pierò, Andrea; Cairo, Elisabetta; Rocca, Giuseppe; Simonelli, Barbara; Fassina, Simona; Abbate-Daga, Giovanni; Fassino, Secondo

    2011-11-21

    Individuals affected by severe Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) are often heavy users of Mental Health Services (MHS). Short-term treatments currently used in BPD therapy are useful to target disruptive behaviors but they are less effective in reducing heavy MHS use. Therefore, alternative short-term treatments, less complex than long-term psychodynamic psychotherapies but specifically oriented to BPD core problems, need to be developed to reduce MHS overuse. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of adding Sequential Brief Adlerian Psychodynamic Psychotherapy (SB-APP) to Supervised Team Management (STM) in BPD treatment compared to STM alone in a naturalistic group of heavy MHS users with BPD. Effectiveness was evaluated 6 times along a two-year follow-up. Thirty-five outpatients who met inclusion criteria were randomly assigned to two treatment groups (STM = 17; SB-APP = 18) and then compared. Clinical Global Impression (CGI) and CGI-modified (CGI-M) for BPD, Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF), State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory (STAXI), and Symptom Checklist-90 Revised (SCL-90-R) were administered at T1, T3, T6, T12, T18 and T24. At T12 the Working Alliance Inventory-Short Form (WAI-S) was also completed. At the one-year follow-up, SB-APP group did not receive any additional individual psychological support. MHS team was specifically trained in BPD treatment and had regular supervisions. All patients improved on CGI, GAF, and STAXI scores after 6 and 12 months, independently of treatment received. SB-APP group showed better outcome on impulsivity, suicide attempts, chronic feelings of emptiness, and disturbed relationships. We found a good stabilization at the one year follow-up, even after the interruption of brief psychotherapy in the SB-APP group. Although STM for BPD applied to heavy MHS users was effective in reducing symptoms and improving their global functioning, adding a time-limited and focused psychotherapy was found to achieve a

  14. Follow-up Cost Study. TEX-SIS FOLLOW-UP SC5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baugh, Ronald C.

    This report presents data on the costs of follow-up studies, based on 29 separate follow-up studies conducted by eight public community/junior colleges in Texas. The purpose of this study, conducted by Navarro College as a subcontractor of Project FOLLOW-UP, was to provide data and information regarding the cost of follow-up studies that would be…

  15. Design and evaluation of a service oriented architecture for paperless ICU tarification.

    PubMed

    Steurbaut, Kristof; Colpaert, Kirsten; Van Hoecke, Sofie; Steurbaut, Sabrina; Danneels, Chris; Decruyenaere, Johan; De Turck, Filip

    2012-06-01

    The computerization of Intensive Care Units provides an overwhelming amount of electronic data for both medical and financial analysis. However, the current tarification, which is the process to tick and count patients' procedures, is still a repetitive, time-consuming process on paper. Nurses and secretaries keep track manually of the patients' medical procedures. This paper describes the design methodology and implementation of automated tarification services. In this study we investigate if the tarification can be modeled in service oriented architecture as a composition of interacting services. Services are responsible for data collection, automatic assignment of records to physicians and application of rules. Performance is evaluated in terms of execution time, cost evaluation and return on investment based on tracking of real procedures. The services provide high flexibility in terms of maintenance, integration and rules support. It is shown that services offer a more accurate, less time-consuming and cost-effective tarification.

  16. Robotic Follow-Up for Human Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fong, Terrence; Bualat, Maria; Deans, Matthew C.; Adams, Byron; Allan, Mark; Altobelli, Martha; Bouyssounouse, Xavier; Cohen, Tamar; Flueckiger, Lorenzo; Garber, Joshua; hide

    2010-01-01

    We are studying how "robotic follow-up" can improve future planetary exploration. Robotic follow-up, which we define as augmenting human field work with subsequent robot activity, is a field exploration technique designed to increase human productivity and science return. To better understand the benefits, requirements, limitations and risks associated with this technique, we are conducting analog field tests with human and robot teams at the Haughton Crater impact structure on Devon Island, Canada. In this paper, we discuss the motivation for robotic follow-up, describe the scientific context and system design for our work, and present results and lessons learned from field testing.

  17. Follow up of injected polyurethane slab jacking.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2003-08-01

    GLENN JACKSON BRIDGE FOLLOW-UP REPORT The elevation monitoring in the report entitled Injected Polyurethane Slab Jacking (Soltesz 2000) is continued in this current report. The elevations of the concrete slabs are being monitored to see if polyuretha...

  18. E3 Sample Follow-up Email

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Sample follow-up email to assist in identifying and nominating those suppliers who you think could benefit most from joining the Green Suppliers Network; your role is to facilitate supplier selection and engagement.

  19. The design and implementation of a study to investigate the effectiveness of community vs hospital eye service follow-up for patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration with quiescent disease

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, J; Scott, L J; Rogers, C A; Muldrew, A; O'Reilly, D; Wordsworth, S; Mills, N; Hogg, R; Violato, M; Harding, S P; Peto, T; Townsend, D; Chakravarthy, U; Reeves, B C

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Standard treatment for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) is intravitreal injections of anti-VEGF drugs. Following multiple injections, nAMD lesions often become quiescent but there is a high risk of reactivation, and regular review by hospital ophthalmologists is the norm. The present trial examines the feasibility of community optometrists making lesion reactivation decisions. Methods The Effectiveness of Community vs Hospital Eye Service (ECHoES) trial is a virtual trial; lesion reactivation decisions were made about vignettes that comprised clinical data, colour fundus photographs, and optical coherence tomograms displayed on a web-based platform. Participants were either hospital ophthalmologists or community optometrists. All participants were provided with webinar training on the disease, its management, and assessment of the retinal imaging outputs. In a balanced design, 96 participants each assessed 42 vignettes; a total of 288 vignettes were assessed seven times by each professional group. The primary outcome is a participant's judgement of lesion reactivation compared with a reference standard. Secondary outcomes are the frequency of sight threatening errors; judgements about specific lesion components; participant-rated confidence in their decisions about the primary outcome; cost effectiveness of follow-up by optometrists rather than ophthalmologists. Discussion This trial addresses an important question for the NHS, namely whether, with appropriate training, community optometrists can make retreatment decisions for patients with nAMD to the same standard as hospital ophthalmologists. The trial employed a novel approach as participation was entirely through a web-based application; the trial required very few resources compared with those that would have been needed for a conventional randomised controlled clinical trial. PMID:26449197

  20. The design and implementation of a study to investigate the effectiveness of community vs hospital eye service follow-up for patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration with quiescent disease.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J; Scott, L J; Rogers, C A; Muldrew, A; O'Reilly, D; Wordsworth, S; Mills, N; Hogg, R; Violato, M; Harding, S P; Peto, T; Townsend, D; Chakravarthy, U; Reeves, B C

    2016-01-01

    IntroductionStandard treatment for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) is intravitreal injections of anti-VEGF drugs. Following multiple injections, nAMD lesions often become quiescent but there is a high risk of reactivation, and regular review by hospital ophthalmologists is the norm. The present trial examines the feasibility of community optometrists making lesion reactivation decisions.MethodsThe Effectiveness of Community vs Hospital Eye Service (ECHoES) trial is a virtual trial; lesion reactivation decisions were made about vignettes that comprised clinical data, colour fundus photographs, and optical coherence tomograms displayed on a web-based platform. Participants were either hospital ophthalmologists or community optometrists. All participants were provided with webinar training on the disease, its management, and assessment of the retinal imaging outputs. In a balanced design, 96 participants each assessed 42 vignettes; a total of 288 vignettes were assessed seven times by each professional group.The primary outcome is a participant's judgement of lesion reactivation compared with a reference standard. Secondary outcomes are the frequency of sight threatening errors; judgements about specific lesion components; participant-rated confidence in their decisions about the primary outcome; cost effectiveness of follow-up by optometrists rather than ophthalmologists.DiscussionThis trial addresses an important question for the NHS, namely whether, with appropriate training, community optometrists can make retreatment decisions for patients with nAMD to the same standard as hospital ophthalmologists. The trial employed a novel approach as participation was entirely through a web-based application; the trial required very few resources compared with those that would have been needed for a conventional randomised controlled clinical trial.

  1. Graduate Follow-up. TEX-SIS FOLLOW-UP SC6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Rayford T.

    This report details the research activities conducted by San Antonio College (SAC) as a subcontractor of Project FOLLOW-UP, in the design, development, and implementation of a graduate follow-up system. Numerous information gathering techniques, including personal interviews and follow-up questionnaires, were attempted. Four different groups of…

  2. TEX-SIS FOLLOW-UP: Student Follow-up Management Information System. Procedures Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarrant County Junior Coll. District, Ft. Worth, TX.

    Project FOLLOW-UP was conducted to develop, test, and validate a statewide management information system for follow-up of Texas public junior and community college students. The results of this project was a student information system (TEX-SIS) consisting of seven subsystems: (1) Student's Educational Intent, (2) Nonreturning Student Follow-up,…

  3. TEX-SIS FOLLOW-UP: Student Follow-up Management Information System. Data Processing Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarrant County Junior Coll. District, Ft. Worth, TX.

    Project FOLLOW-UP was conducted to develop, test, and validate a statewide management information system for follow-up of Texas public junior and community college students. The result of this project was a student information system (TEX-SIS) consisting of seven subsystems: (1) Student's Educational Intent, (2) Nonreturning Student Follow-up, (3)…

  4. Cost-effectiveness of community versus hospital eye service follow-up for patients with quiescent treated age-related macular degeneration alongside the ECHoES randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Violato, M; Dakin, H; Chakravarthy, U; Reeves, B C; Peto, T; Hogg, R E; Harding, S P; Scott, L J; Taylor, J; Cappel-Porter, H; Mills, N; O'Reilly, D; Rogers, C A; Wordsworth, S

    2016-10-24

    To assess the cost-effectiveness of optometrist-led follow-up monitoring reviews for patients with quiescent neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) in community settings (including high street opticians) compared with ophthalmologist-led reviews in hospitals. A model-based cost-effectiveness analysis with a 4-week time horizon, based on a 'virtual' non-inferiority randomised trial designed to emulate a parallel group design. A virtual internet-based clinical assessment, conducted at community optometry practices, and hospital ophthalmology clinics. Ophthalmologists with experience in the age-related macular degeneration service; fully qualified optometrists not participating in nAMD shared care schemes. The participating optometrists and ophthalmologists classified lesions from vignettes and were asked to judge whether any retreatment was required. Vignettes comprised clinical information, colour fundus photographs and optical coherence tomography images. Participants' classifications were validated against experts' classifications (reference standard). Resource use and cost information were attributed to these retreatment decisions. Correct classification of whether further treatment is needed, compared with a reference standard. The mean cost per assessment, including the subsequent care pathway, was £411 for optometrists and £397 for ophthalmologists: a cost difference of £13 (95% CI -£18 to £45). Optometrists were non-inferior to ophthalmologists with respect to the overall percentage of lesions correctly assessed (difference -1.0%; 95% CI -4.5% to 2.5%). In the base case analysis, the slightly larger number of incorrect retreatment decisions by optometrists led to marginally and non-significantly higher costs. Sensitivity analyses that reflected different practices across eye hospitals indicate that shared care pathways between optometrists and ophthalmologists can be identified which may reduce demands on scant hospital resources, although

  5. Cost-effectiveness of community versus hospital eye service follow-up for patients with quiescent treated age-related macular degeneration alongside the ECHoES randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Violato, M; Dakin, H; Chakravarthy, U; Reeves, B C; Peto, T; Hogg, R E; Harding, S P; Scott, L J; Taylor, J; Cappel-Porter, H; Mills, N; O'Reilly, D; Rogers, C A; Wordsworth, S

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the cost-effectiveness of optometrist-led follow-up monitoring reviews for patients with quiescent neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) in community settings (including high street opticians) compared with ophthalmologist-led reviews in hospitals. Design A model-based cost-effectiveness analysis with a 4-week time horizon, based on a ‘virtual’ non-inferiority randomised trial designed to emulate a parallel group design. Setting A virtual internet-based clinical assessment, conducted at community optometry practices, and hospital ophthalmology clinics. Participants Ophthalmologists with experience in the age-related macular degeneration service; fully qualified optometrists not participating in nAMD shared care schemes. Interventions The participating optometrists and ophthalmologists classified lesions from vignettes and were asked to judge whether any retreatment was required. Vignettes comprised clinical information, colour fundus photographs and optical coherence tomography images. Participants' classifications were validated against experts' classifications (reference standard). Resource use and cost information were attributed to these retreatment decisions. Main outcome measures Correct classification of whether further treatment is needed, compared with a reference standard. Results The mean cost per assessment, including the subsequent care pathway, was £411 for optometrists and £397 for ophthalmologists: a cost difference of £13 (95% CI −£18 to £45). Optometrists were non-inferior to ophthalmologists with respect to the overall percentage of lesions correctly assessed (difference −1.0%; 95% CI −4.5% to 2.5%). Conclusions In the base case analysis, the slightly larger number of incorrect retreatment decisions by optometrists led to marginally and non-significantly higher costs. Sensitivity analyses that reflected different practices across eye hospitals indicate that shared care pathways between

  6. Handbook of Exemplary Practices in Placement and Follow-Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehallis, Mantha Vlahos

    This handbook for teachers, counselors, and administrators presents exemplary practices in the use of job placement and follow-up services based on results of a survey of Florida school districts and community colleges. A description of survey methodology and the survey questionnaire, as well as a statewide profile of Florida exemplary practices…

  7. Follow-Up Research on Agoraphobics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambless, Dianne L.

    In vivo exposure is the most commonly used and generally the most effective behavioral treatment for agoraphobia. Follow-up studies are difficult to interpret because additional treatment does not necessarily indicate relapse and non-treatment does not necessarily indicate non-relapse. Relapse rates are difficult to estimate because of lack of…

  8. Follow-up Study of 1988 Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leddick, Linda; Stavros, Denny

    This follow-up study of 1988 graduates of Detroit (Michigan) public high schools examines the status of graduates one year following graduation. Information was gathered from a survey and correlated with demographic and achievement information from student records. Findings must be interpreted in light of a 24 percent response rate to the survey,…

  9. The LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, Tim; Greenstreet, Sarah; Gomez, Edward; Christensen, Eric J.; Larson, Stephen M.

    2016-10-01

    The LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network is using the telescopes of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGT) and a web-based target selection, scheduling and data reduction system to confirm NEO candidates and characterize radar-targeted known NEOs. Starting in July 2014, the LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network has observed over 3,500 targets and reported more than 16,000 astrometric and photometric measurements to the Minor Planet Center (MPC).The LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network's main aims are to perform confirming follow-up of the large number of NEO candidates and to perform characterization measurements of radar targets to obtain light curves and rotation rates. The NEO candidates come from the NEO surveys such as Catalina, PanSTARRS, ATLAS, NEOWISE and others. In particular, we are targeting objects in the Southern Hemisphere, where the LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network is the largest resource for NEO observations.LCOGT has completed the first phase of the deployment with the installation and commissioning of the nine 1-meter telescopes at McDonald Observatory (Texas), Cerro Tololo (Chile), SAAO (South Africa) and Siding Spring Observatory (Australia). The telescope network has been fully operational since 2014 May, and observations are being executed remotely and robotically. Future expansion to a site at Ali Observatory, Tibet is planned for 2017-2018.We have developed web-based software called NEOexchange which automatically downloads and aggregates NEO candidates from the Minor Planet Center's NEO Confirmation Page, the Arecibo and Goldstone radar target lists and the NASA ARM list. NEOexchange allows the planning and scheduling of observations on the LCOGT Telescope Network and the tracking of the resulting blocks and generated data. We have recently extended the NEOexchange software to include automated data reduction to re-compute the astrometric solution, determine the photometric zeropoint and find moving objects and present these results to the user via

  10. Prospective impact of panic disorder and panic-anxiety on asthma control, health service use, and quality of life in adult patients with asthma over a 4-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Favreau, Helene; Bacon, Simon L; Labrecque, Manon; Lavoie, Kim L

    2014-02-01

    Background Panic disorder (PD) is a common anxiety disorder among asthmatic patients with overlapping symptoms (e.g., hyperventilation). However, the longitudinal impact of PD on asthma control remains poorly understood. This study assessed the impact of PD and panic-anxiety on asthma control over a 4.3-year follow-up in 643 adult asthmatic patients. Methods Consecutive patients presenting to a tertiary asthma clinic underwent a sociodemographic, medical history, and psychiatric (Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders) interview and completed questionnaires including the Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI) to assess panic-anxiety. At follow-up, patients completed the Asthma Control (ACQ) and Asthma Quality of Life (AQLQ) questionnaires and reported emergency department visits and hospitalizations during the follow-up. Results Baseline frequency of PD was 10% (n = 65). In fully adjusted models, analyses revealed that PD and ASI scores predicted worse follow-up ACQ total scores (β = 0.292, p = .037; β = 0.012, p = .003) but not AQLQ total scores. ASI scores also predicted greater nocturnal and waking symptoms, activity limitations, and bronchodilator use on the ACQ (β = 0.012-0.018, p < .05) as well as lower symptom (β = -0.012, p = .006) and emotional distress (β = -0.014, p = .002) subscale scores on the AQLQ. Neither PD nor ASI scores were associated with hospitalizations, although ASI scores (but not PD) were associated with an increased risk of emergency department visits (relative risk = 1.023, 95% confidence interval = 1.001-1.044). Conclusions PD and anxiety sensitivity are prospectively associated with poorer asthma control and may be important targets for treatment.

  11. TEX-SIS FOLLOW-UP: Student Follow-up Management Information System. Activities Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarrant County Junior Coll. District, Ft. Worth, TX.

    Project FOLLOW-UP was conducted to develop, test, and validate a statewide management information system for follow-up of Texas public junior and community college students. This activities manual provides an overview of the resultant student information system (TEX-SIS) and its characteristics. Seven subsystems comprise SIS, each with its own…

  12. Disk Detective Follow-Up Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchner, Marc

    As new data on exoplanets and young stellar associations arrive, we will want to know: which of these planetary systems and young stars have circumstellar disks? The vast allsky database of 747 million infrared sources from NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mission can supply answers. WISE is a discovery tool intended to find targets for JWST, sensitive enough to detect circumstellar disks as far away as 3000 light years. The vast WISE archive already serves us as a roadmap to guide exoplanet searches, provide information on disk properties as new planets are discovered, and teach us about the many hotly debated connections between disks and exoplanets. However, because of the challenges of utilizing the WISE data, this resource remains underutilized as a tool for disk and planet hunters. Attempts to use WISE to find disks around Kepler planet hosts were nearly scuttled by confusion noise. Moreover, since most of the stars with WISE infrared excesses were too red for Hipparcos photometry, most of the disks sensed by WISE remain obscure, orbiting stars unlisted in the usual star databases. To remedy the confusion noise problem, we have begun a massive project to scour the WISE data archive for new circumstellar disks. The Disk Detective project (Kuchner et al. 2016) engages layperson volunteers to examine images from WISE, NASA's Two Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) and optical surveys to search for new circumstellar disk candidates via the citizen science website DiskDetective.org. Fueled by the efforts of > 28,000 citizen scientists, Disk Detective is the largest survey for debris disks with WISE. It has already uncovered 4000 disk candidates worthy of follow-up. However, most host stars of the new Disk Detective disk candidates have no known spectral type or distance, especially those with red colors: K and M stars and Young Stellar Objects. Others require further observations to check for false positives. The Disk Detective project is supported by

  13. The LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, Tim; Gomez, Edward; Greenstreet, Sarah

    2015-08-01

    Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGT) has deployed a homogeneous telescope network of nine 1-meter telescopes to four locations in the northern and southern hemispheres, with a planned network of twelve 1-meter telescopes at 6 locations. This network is very versatile and is designed to respond rapidly to target of opportunity events and also to perform long term monitoring of slowly changing astronomical phenomena. The global coverage of the network and the apertures of telescope available make LCOGT ideal for follow-up and characterization of Solar System objects (e.g. asteroids, Kuiper Belt Objects, comets, Near-Earth Objects (NEOs)) and ultimately for the discovery of new objects.LCOGT has completed the first phase of the deployment with the installation and commissioning of the nine 1-meter telescopes at McDonald Observatory (Texas), Cerro Tololo (Chile), SAAO (South Africa) and Siding Spring Observatory (Australia). The telescope network has been fully operational since 2014 May, and observations are being executed remotely and robotically. Future expansion to sites in the Canary Islands and Tibet is planned for 2016.I am using the LCOGT network to confirm newly detected NEO candidates produced by the major sky surveys such as Catalina Sky Survey (CSS) and PanSTARRS (PS1) and several hundred targets are now being followed-up per year. An increasing amount of time is being spent to obtain follow-up astrometry and photometry for radar-targeted objects and those on the Near-Earth Object Human Space Flight Accessible Targets Study (NHATS) or Asteroid Retrieval Mission (ARM) lists in order to improve the orbits, determine the light curves and rotation periods and improve the characterization. This will be extended to obtain more light curves of other NEOs which could be targets. Recent results have included the first period determinations for several of the Goldstone-targeted NEOs. We are in the process of building a NEO Portal which will allow

  14. NASA Audit Follow-up Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This NASA Audit Follow-up Handbook is issued pursuant to the requirements of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A-50, Audit Follow-up, dated September 29, 1982. It sets forth policy, uniform performance standards, and procedural guidance to NASA personnel for use when considering reports issued by the Office of Inspector General (OIG), other executive branch audit organizations, the Defense Contract Audit Agency (DCAA), and the General Accounting Office (GAO). It is intended to: specify principal roles; strengthen the procedures for management decisions (resolution) on audit findings and corrective action on audit report recommendations; emphasize the importance of monitoring agreed upon corrective actions to assure actual accomplishment; and foster the use of audit reports as effective tools of management. A flow chart depicting the NASA audit and management decision process is in Appendix A. This handbook is a controlled handbook issued in loose-leaf form and will be revised by page changes. Additional copies for internal use may be obtained through normal distribution channels.

  15. Follow-up of differentiated thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pagano, L; Klain, M; Pulcrano, M; Angellotti, G; Pasano, F; Salvatore, M; Lombardi, G; Biondi, B

    2004-12-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy. More than 90% of primary thyroid cancers are differentiated papillary or follicular types. The treatment of differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) consists of total thyroidectomy and radioactive iodine ablation therapy, followed by L-thyroxine therapy. The extent of initial surgery, the indication for radioiodine ablation therapy and the degree of TSH-suppression are all issues that are still being debated cancers are in relation to the risk of recurrence. Total thyroidectomy reduces the risk of recurrence and facilitates (131)I ablation of thyroid remnants. The aim of radioiodine ablation is to destroy any normal or neoplastic residuals of thyroid tissue. These procedures also improve the sensitivity of thyroglobulin (Tg) as a marker of disease, and increase the sensitivity of (131)I total body scan (TBS) for the detection of persistent or recurrent disease. The aim of TSH-suppressive therapy is to restore euthyroidism and to decrease serum TSH levels, in order to reduce the growth and progression of thyroid cancer. After initial treatment, the objectives of the follow-up of DTC is to maintain adequate thyroxine therapy and to detect persistent or recurrent disease through the combined use of neck ultrasound (US) and serum Tg and (131)I TBS after TSH stimulation. The follow-up protocol should be adapted to the risk of recurrence. Recent advances in the follow-up of DTC are related to the use of recombinant human TSH (rhTSH) in order to stimulate Tg production and the ultrasensitive methods for Tg measurement. Undetectable serum Tg during TSH suppressive therapy with L-T4 does not exclude persistent disease, therefore serum Tg should be measured after TSH stimulation. The results of rhTSH administration and L-thyroxine therapy withdrawal are equivalent in detecting recurrent thyroid cancer, but the use of rhTSH helps to avoid the onset of hypothyroid symptoms and the negative effects of acute hypothyroidism on

  16. [The Outpatient Health Care Package for the very premature infant: application of the program to follow-up services for the Neonatal Intensive Care, Pediatrics Department, Università "La Sapienza" I Facoltà, Roma (June 2008-March 2010)].

    PubMed

    Colarizi, P; De Luca, T; Ruggeri, A; Cerasaro, C

    2010-06-01

    Fifty-nine children were enrolled in the Outpatient Health Care Package (OHCP) from 01/06/2008 to 31/03/2010. All children, except two, attended entirely the follow-up appointments; a satisfactory result, considering also that 30% of family were living outside the urban area and more than a third of the families was originated in a foreign country. At 3 months corrected age(CA) Haemoglobin mean values of 47 infants, all in iron treatment, were: 12.26 (10.1-14-1) g/dL; 25% had values between 10.1 and 12 g/dL. Mean values for Calcium were 10.75 (9.50-15.26) mg/dL Mean values for ALP were 393 (179-1075) UI/L, values >1000 UI/L were found in two infants who suspended Vitamin D treatment. At 3 months CA 50 infants performed ABR, 12 of these showing abnormalities. To date 9 infants repeated ABR at 6-9 months CA, 4 of these showed again abnormal results. Overall were found 4 ABR abnormalities among 47 children (8.5%). Outcome of 23 children at 12 months CA: no moderate or severe neurologic abnormalities were found, 4 children (17.4%) presented mild abnormalities, 2 were referred for rehabilitation. No QSM <80% was found (mean QSM 93.7%) in 10 children evaluated. One child presented growth retardation <5 degrees; 2 underwent laser treatment for ROP with normal vision, 7 (30.4%)had sistolic BP > or = 95 degrees; 6 (26%) were rehospitalized. This experience was positive: OHCP promoted a better compliance and standardization of follow-up. It would be desirable to prolong OHCP until school-age, including renal and cardiac functions monitoring.

  17. Systematic co-operation between employer, occupational health service and social insurance office: a 6-year follow-up of vocational rehabilitation for people on sick-leave, including economic benefits.

    PubMed

    Kärrholm, Jenny; Ekholm, Karolina; Ekholm, Jan; Bergroth, Alf; Ekholm, Kristina Schüldt

    2008-08-01

    To evaluate the effects of systematic co-operation among municipal employees on the number of sick-leave days per month and the type of benefit granted by the Social Insurance Office. A further aim was to evaluate the economic consequences for society. A 6-year follow-up study with a matched-pairs design. Days on sick-leave were calculated for each subject one year before the intervention started and yearly for the following 6-year period. Statistical mixed-model analysis was used. The economic benefit of the intervention was estimated as the increased production stemming from fewer days on sick-leave. Sixty-four employees on long-term sick-leave were individually matched with controls from another Social Insurance Office in a county with a socioeconomic structure similar to that of the study group. The study group had 5.7 fewer days on sick-leave per month and person over the 6-year period (p=0.003). The estimated average economic benefit of the intervention was euro36,600 per person over the 6-year period. In conclusion, those who received systematic co-operation in vocational rehabilitation had fewer days on sick-leave than their "treatment-as-usual" peers. This effect persisted over 6 years, generating substantial net economic gains for society.

  18. Is follow-up capacity the current NHS bottleneck?

    PubMed

    Allder, Steven; Walley, Paul; Silvester, Kate

    2011-02-01

    Capacity and demand theory suggests that the presence of a queue is not necessarily an indication of a shortage of capacity in a system. It is much more likely that either there is a demand and capacity variation that creates queues or there is a delay designed into the system. A shortage of capacity is only really indicated where a backlog is not stable and continues to grow. In this article, data are taken from one NHS trust that provides evidence for a continually growing backlog for follow-up outpatient services. It is believed that these data are representative of most locations within the NHS in England and therefore suggest an immediate shortage in effective follow-up capacity. To avoid compromise to patient care, the problem will have to be addressed before the situation becomes unmanageable. The paper highlights options to reduce or deflect demand or to increase effective capacity.

  19. Therapeutic abortion follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Margolis, A J; Davison, L A; Hanson, K H; Loos, S A; Mikkelsen, C M

    1971-05-15

    To determine the long-range psychological effects of therapeutic abortion, 50 women (aged from 13-44 years), who were granted abortions between 1967 and 1968 Because of possible impairment of mental and/or physical health, were analyzed by use of demographic questionnaires, psychological tests, and interviews. Testing revealed that 44 women had psychiatric problems at time of abortion. 43 patients were followed for 3-6 months. The follow-up interviews revealed that 29 patients reacted positively after abortion, 10 reported no significant change and 4 reacted negatively. 37 would definitely repeat the abortion. Women under 21 years of age felt substantially more ambivalent and guilty than older patients. A study of 36 paired pre- and post-abortion profiles showed that 15 initially abnormal tests had become normal. There was a significant increase in contraceptive use among the patients after the abortion, but 4 again became pregnant and 8 were apparently without consistent contraception. It is concluded that the abortions were therapeutic, but physicians are encouraged to be aware of psychological problems in abortion cases. Strong psychological and contraceptive counselling should be exercised.

  20. A Case Study on Improving Intensive Care Unit (ICU) Services Reliability: By Using Process Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (PFMEA)

    PubMed Central

    Yousefinezhadi, Taraneh; Jannesar Nobari, Farnaz Attar; Goodari, Faranak Behzadi; Arab, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: In any complex human system, human error is inevitable and shows that can’t be eliminated by blaming wrong doers. So with the aim of improving Intensive Care Units (ICU) reliability in hospitals, this research tries to identify and analyze ICU’s process failure modes at the point of systematic approach to errors. Methods: In this descriptive research, data was gathered qualitatively by observations, document reviews, and Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) with the process owners in two selected ICUs in Tehran in 2014. But, data analysis was quantitative, based on failures’ Risk Priority Number (RPN) at the base of Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) method used. Besides, some causes of failures were analyzed by qualitative Eindhoven Classification Model (ECM). Results: Through FMEA methodology, 378 potential failure modes from 180 ICU activities in hospital A and 184 potential failures from 99 ICU activities in hospital B were identified and evaluated. Then with 90% reliability (RPN≥100), totally 18 failures in hospital A and 42 ones in hospital B were identified as non-acceptable risks and then their causes were analyzed by ECM. Conclusions: Applying of modified PFMEA for improving two selected ICUs’ processes reliability in two different kinds of hospitals shows that this method empowers staff to identify, evaluate, prioritize and analyze all potential failure modes and also make them eager to identify their causes, recommend corrective actions and even participate in improving process without feeling blamed by top management. Moreover, by combining FMEA and ECM, team members can easily identify failure causes at the point of health care perspectives. PMID:27157162

  1. A follow-up meeting post death is appreciated by family members of deceased patients.

    PubMed

    Kock, M; Berntsson, C; Bengtsson, A

    2014-08-01

    A practice with a follow-up meeting post death (FUMPD) with physician and staff for family members of patients who died in the intensive care unit (ICU) was started as a quality project to improve the support of families in post-ICU bereavement. A quality improvement control was conducted after 4 years. The quality improvement control was made retrospectively as an anonymous non-coded questionnaire. Part A related to the FUMPD. Part B inquired if we could contact the family member again for a research project to evaluate family support post-ICU bereavement. The questionnaires were sent to 84 family members of 56 deceased patients. Part A: 46 out of 84 family members answered and had attended a FUMPD. Ninety-one percent of the family members thought that we should continue to offer FUMPD. Seventy-eight percent were satisfied with their meeting. Eighty percent felt that they understood the cause of death. The majority wanted the meeting to take place within 6 weeks of death. Ninety-one percent rated the physician as important to be present at the meeting. The social worker was rated more important to attend the meeting than the assistant nurse. Ninety-one percent wanted to discuss the cause of death.Part B: 54 out of 84 family members answered. Twenty out of 54 did not want us to contact them again. A routine with a Follow-Up Meeting Post Death with the ICU team for the families of the patients who die in the ICU is appreciated. The presence of the physician is important. © 2014 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. OT discovered by MASTER during Fermi Trigger Num 430645968 follow up observations follow up observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiurina, N.; Balanutsa, P.; Denisenko, D.; Lipunov, V.; Gorbovskoy, E.; Kornilov, V.; Chazov, V.; Kuznetsov, A.; Vladimirov, V.; Yecheistov, V.; Shumkov, V.; Ivanov, K.; Yazev, S.; Budnev, N.; Konstantinov, E.; Chuvalaev, O.; Poleshchuk, V.; Gress, O.; Parkhomenko, A.; Tlatov, A.; Dormidontov, D.; Senik, V.; Yurkov, V.; Sergienko, Y.; Varda, D.; Sinyakov, E.; Gabovich, A.; Krushinsky, V.; Zalozhnih, I.; Popov, A.; Bourdanov, A.; Podvorotny, P.; Shurpakov, S.; Levato, H.; Saffe, C.; Mallamaci, C.; Lopez, C.; Podest, F.

    2014-08-01

    MASTER-Tunka auto-detection system during follow-up Fermi Trigger 430645968 observations (GCN 16745) discovered OT source at: MASTER-Tunka auto-detection system discovered MASTER OT J230448.20+324534.1 at (RA, Dec) = 23h 04m 48.20s +32d 45m 34.1s on 2014-08-25.62245 UT.

  3. [Endoscopic follow-up of translaryngeal Fantoni tracheostomy].

    PubMed

    Succo, G; Crosetti, E; Mattalia, P; Voltolina, M; Bramardi, F; Di Lisi, D; Riva, F; Sartoris, A

    2002-08-01

    Dilatational tracheotomy techniques are widely used in the long-term management of the respiratory tract in patients in intensive care units (ICU). The translaryngeal tracheotomy technique (TLT) was first described by Fantoni in 1993 and rapidly asserted itself, especially in Europe. This technique basically differs from the other percutaneous techniques in that it involves a progressive, retrograde, dilatation of the trachea in a single session conducted from inside the trachea, working outward, simultaneously exerting a counter-pressure on the pre-tracheal soft tissues with the fingers. The present study involves an endoscopy follow-up of 130 patients who had undergone TLT at the Intensive Care Unit of our Hospital between November 2000 and May 2001. The pre-operative oro-tracheal intubation time varied from 1 to 42 days. All patients filled out a brief questionnaire containing validated questions on their general health and quality of life with particular attention focused on respiratory conditions. Then, after receiving informed consent, the patients underwent laryngo-tracheoscopy with local anesthetic using a flexible tracheobronchoscope. All tests were recorded and viewed later by two operators in order to identify and divide the patients according to the level of execution of the tracheotomy and the presence of sequelae. The results obtained have shown that, like other percutaneous tracheotomy techniques, TLT provides some benefits including the fact that procedure can be performed at the bedside in a short time, with few post-operative complications, simpler nursing and fewer sequelae in time. Analysis of data concerning time of tracheostomy execution, tracheal level of stomia and nursing times has revealed three factors that determine severe sequelae: delay in tracheostomy execution, high level of execution with cricoid involvement and onset of problems during first tracheal cannula change.

  4. Long-term follow-up after voluntary human immunodeficiency virus/sexually transmitted infection counseling, point-of-service testing, and referral to substance abuse treatment from the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Edward; Heeren, Timothy; Winter, Michael; Ashong, Desiree; Bliss, Caleb; Madico, Guillermo; Ayalew, Beza; Bernstein, Judith

    2012-04-01

    Public health initiatives have lowered human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission risk associated with injection drug use in the United States, making sexual risk behaviors a greater source of transmission. Strategies are therefore needed to reduce these risk behaviors among all emergency department (ED) patients who use drugs, regardless of route of administration. Although recent articles have focused on the opportunity for early HIV detection and treatment through an array of ED screening and testing strategies, the effect of voluntary HIV testing and brief counseling (VT/C) on the sexual behaviors of out-of-treatment drug users over time has not yet been reported. From November 2004 to May 2008, the study screened 46,208 urban ED patients aged 18 to 54 years; 2,148 (4.6%) reported cocaine or heroin use within 30 days, 1,538 met eligibility criteria (Drug Abuse Severity Test [DAST] scores ≥3 and were either English- or Spanish-speaking), and 1,030 were enrolled. These data were obtained in the course of a randomized, controlled trial (Project SAFE) of a brief motivational intervention focused on reducing risky sexual behaviors. Although the intervention itself did not demonstrate any differential effect on the number or percentage of unprotected sexual acts, both control and intervention group participants received baseline VT/C and referral for drug treatment as part of the study protocol. This study is a report of a secondary analysis of cohort data to describe changes in sexual behaviors over time among drug users after the VT/C and referral. The mean (±SD) age of enrollees was 35.8 (±8.4) years; 67% were male, 39% were non-Hispanic black or African American, 41% were white non-Hispanic, and 19% were Hispanic. Half injected drugs, and 53% met criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). At baseline testing, 8.8% were HIV-positive on enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Follow-ups were conducted at 6 and 12 months, with an attrition rate of 22

  5. Follow-up chest radiographic findings in patients with MERS-CoV after recovery

    PubMed Central

    Das, Karuna M; Lee, Edward Y; Singh, Rajvir; Enani, Mushira A; Al Dossari, Khalid; Van Gorkom, Klaus; Larsson, Sven G; Langer, Ruth D

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the follow-up chest radiographic findings in patients with Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) who were discharged from the hospital following improved clinical symptoms. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six consecutive patients (9 men, 27 women; age range 21–73 years, mean ± SD 42.5 ± 14.5 years) with confirmed MERS-CoV underwent follow-up chest radiographs after recovery from MERS-CoV. The 36 chest radiographs were obtained at 32 to 230 days with a median follow-up of 43 days. The reviewers systemically evaluated the follow-up chest radiographs from 36 patients for lung parenchymal, airway, pleural, hilar and mediastinal abnormalities. Lung parenchyma and airways were assessed for consolidation, ground-glass opacity (GGO), nodular opacity and reticular opacity (i.e., fibrosis). Follow-up chest radiographs were also evaluated for pleural thickening, pleural effusion, pneumothorax and lymphadenopathy. Patients were categorized into two groups: group 1 (no evidence of lung fibrosis) and group 2 (chest radiographic evidence of lung fibrosis) for comparative analysis. Patient demographics, length of ventilations days, number of intensive care unit (ICU) admission days, chest radiographic score, chest radiographic deterioration pattern (Types 1-4) and peak lactate dehydrogenase level were compared between the two groups using the student t-test, Mann-Whitney U test and Fisher's exact test. Results: Follow-up chest radiographs were normal in 23 out of 36 (64%) patients. Among the patients with abnormal chest radiographs (13/36, 36%), the following were found: lung fibrosis in 12 (33%) patients GGO in 2 (5.5%) patients, and pleural thickening in 2 (5.5%) patients. Patients with lung fibrosis had significantly greater number of ICU admission days (19 ± 8.7 days; P value = 0.001), older age (50.6 ± 12.6 years; P value = 0.02), higher chest radiographic scores [10 (0-15.3); P value = 0.04] and higher peak lactate dehydrogenase

  6. Effectiveness of palliative home-care services in reducing hospital admissions and determinants of hospitalization for terminally ill patients followed up by a palliative home-care team: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Riolfi, Mirko; Buja, Alessandra; Zanardo, Chiara; Marangon, Chiara Francesca; Manno, Pietro; Baldo, Vincenzo

    2014-05-01

    It has been demonstrated that most patients in the terminal stages of cancer would benefit from palliative home-care services. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of appropriate palliative home-care services in reducing hospital admissions, and to identify factors predicting the likelihood of patients treated at home being hospitalized. Retrospective cohort study. We enrolled all 402 patients listed by the Local Health Authority No. 5, Veneto Region (North-East Italy), as dying of cancer in 2011. Of the cohort considered, 39.9% patients had been taken into care by a palliative home-care team. Irrespective of age, gender, and type of tumor, patients taken into care by the palliative home-care team were more likely to die at home, less likely to be hospitalized, and spent fewer days in hospital in the last 2 months of their life. Among the patients taken into care by the palliative home-care team, those with hematological cancers and hepatocellular carcinoma were more likely to be hospitalized, and certain symptoms (such as dyspnea and delirium) were predictive of hospitalization. Our study confirms the effectiveness of palliative home care in enabling patients to spend the final period of their lives at home. The services of a palliative home-care team reduced the consumption of hospital resources. This study also provided evidence of some types of cancer (e.g. hematological cancers and hepatocellular carcinoma) being more likely to require hospitalization, suggesting the need to reconsider the pathways of care for these diseases.

  7. Biological age as a health index for mortality and major age-related disease incidence in Koreans: National Health Insurance Service – Health screening 11-year follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Young Gon; Suh, Eunkyung; Lee, Jae-woo; Kim, Dong Wook; Cho, Kyung Hee; Bae, Chul-Young

    2018-01-01

    Purpose A comprehensive health index is needed to measure an individual’s overall health and aging status and predict the risk of death and age-related disease incidence, and evaluate the effect of a health management program. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the validity of estimated biological age (BA) in relation to all-cause mortality and age-related disease incidence based on National Sample Cohort database. Patients and methods This study was based on National Sample Cohort database of the National Health Insurance Service – Eligibility database and the National Health Insurance Service – Medical and Health Examination database of the year 2002 through 2013. BA model was developed based on the National Health Insurance Service – National Sample Cohort (NHIS – NSC) database and Cox proportional hazard analysis was done for mortality and major age-related disease incidence. Results For every 1 year increase of the calculated BA and chronological age difference, the hazard ratio for mortality significantly increased by 1.6% (1.5% in men and 2.0% in women) and also for hypertension, diabetes mellitus, heart disease, stroke, and cancer incidence by 2.5%, 4.2%, 1.3%, 1.6%, and 0.4%, respectively (p<0.001). Conclusion Estimated BA by the developed BA model based on NHIS – NSC database is expected to be used not only as an index for assessing health and aging status and predicting mortality and major age-related disease incidence, but can also be applied to various health care fields. PMID:29593385

  8. Family members' satisfaction with care and decision-making in intensive care units and post-stay follow-up needs-a cross-sectional survey study.

    PubMed

    Frivold, Gro; Slettebø, Åshild; Heyland, Daren K; Dale, Bjørg

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore family members' satisfaction with care and decision-making during the intensive care units stay and their follow-up needs after the patient's discharge or death. A cross-sectional survey study was conducted. Family members of patients recently treated in an ICU were participating. The questionnaire contented of background variables, the instrument Family Satisfaction in ICU (FS-ICU 24) and questions about follow-up needs. Descriptive and non-parametric statistics and a multiple linear regression were used in the analysis. A total of 123 (47%) relatives returned the questionnaire. Satisfaction with care was higher scored than satisfaction with decision-making. Follow- up needs after the ICU stay was reported by 19 (17%) of the participants. Gender and length of the ICU stay were shown as factors identified to predict follow-up needs.

  9. Telephone Follow-Up following Office Anorectal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fallaize, Rebecca C; Tinline-Purvis, Christine; Dixon, Anthony R; Pullyblank, Anne-Marie

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Patients with minor anorectal conditions are frequently reviewed at an 8-week out-patient appointment (OPA). This study was designed to assess whether telephone follow-up could reduce OPA numbers whilst maintaining patient satisfaction. PATIENTS AND METHODS Over an 11-month period, 46 patients (23 male) underwent banding of haemorrhoids and 14 were prescribed medical treatment for fissure-in-ano (3 male). All were telephoned at 6 weeks and were offered an 8-week OPA if they had continuing problems. Patients were telephoned at a later date by a member of the hospital's patient panel to assess satisfaction. RESULTS Overall, 88% were contacted at 6 weeks, 60% at the first attempt; 40% required two or more attempts. Of those who underwent banding, 68% were asymptomatic, 17% requested an OPA for re-banding and 15% requested an OPA for a different problem. Of fissure patients, 25% were cured; the remainder were prescribed either second-line medical treatment (8%), anorectal physiology (42%) or surgery (25%). All avoided an OPA. Of a potential 60 OPAs, 47 were saved by telephone follow-up. None of 7 non-contactable patients accepted a written offer of an OPA. Overall, 89% of patients were contacted by the patient panel; of these patients, 93% reported a high level of satisfaction. CONCLUSIONS Telephone follow-up can reduce the number of OPAs following out-patient treatment of minor anorectal conditions whilst maintaining a high level of patient satisfaction. However, it requires considerable consultant time. This process could be developed into either a nurse-led service with booked telephone appointments or a patient-led service to a dedicated hotline. PMID:18598594

  10. Telephone follow-up following office anorectal surgery.

    PubMed

    Fallaize, Rebecca C; Tinline-Purvis, Christine; Dixon, Anthony R; Pullyblank, Anne-Marie

    2008-09-01

    Patients with minor anorectal conditions are frequently reviewed at an 8-week out-patient appointment (OPA). This study was designed to assess whether telephone follow-up could reduce OPA numbers whilst maintaining patient satisfaction. Over an 11-month period, 46 patients (23 male) underwent banding of haemorrhoids and 14 were prescribed medical treatment for fissure-in-ano (3 male). All were telephoned at 6 weeks and were offered an 8-week OPA if they had continuing problems. Patients were telephoned at a later date by a member of the hospital's patient panel to assess satisfaction. Overall, 88% were contacted at 6 weeks, 60% at the first attempt; 40% required two or more attempts. Of those who underwent banding, 68% were asymptomatic, 17% requested an OPA for re-banding and 15% requested an OPA for a different problem. Of fissure patients, 25% were cured; the remainder were prescribed either second-line medical treatment (8%), anorectal physiology (42%) or surgery (25%). All avoided an OPA. Of a potential 60 OPAs, 47 were saved by telephone follow-up. None of 7 non-contactable patients accepted a written offer of an OPA. Overall, 89% of patients were contacted by the patient panel; of these patients, 93% reported a high level of satisfaction. Telephone follow-up can reduce the number of OPAs following out-patient treatment of minor anorectal conditions whilst maintaining a high level of patient satisfaction. However, it requires considerable consultant time. This process could be developed into either a nurse-led service with booked telephone appointments or a patient-led service to a dedicated hotline.

  11. 46 CFR 4.06-50 - Specimen analysis and follow-up procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... to develop all relevant information and to produce a complete analysis report. (b) Reports shall be... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Specimen analysis and follow-up procedures. 4.06-50... Involving Vessels in Commercial Service § 4.06-50 Specimen analysis and follow-up procedures. (a) Each...

  12. 46 CFR 4.06-50 - Specimen analysis and follow-up procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... to develop all relevant information and to produce a complete analysis report. (b) Reports shall be... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Specimen analysis and follow-up procedures. 4.06-50... Involving Vessels in Commercial Service § 4.06-50 Specimen analysis and follow-up procedures. (a) Each...

  13. The Increased Effectiveness of HIV Preventive Intervention among Men Who Have Sex with Men and of Follow-Up Care for People Living with HIV after ‘Task-Shifting’ to Community-Based Organizations: A ‘Cash on Service Delivery’ Model in China

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Hongjing; Zhang, Min; Zhao, Jinkou; Huan, Xiping; Ding, Jianping; Wu, Susu; Wang, Chenchen; Xu, Yuanyuan; Liu, Li; Xu, Fei; Yang, Haitao

    2014-01-01

    Background A large number of men who have sex with men (MSM) and people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHA) are underserved despite increased service availability from government facilities while many community based organizations (CBOs) are not involved. We aimed to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of the task shifting from government facilities to CBOs in China. Methods HIV preventive intervention for MSM and follow-up care for PLHA were shifted from government facilities to CBOs. Based on ‘cash on service delivery’ model, 10 USD per MSM tested for HIV with results notified, 82 USD per newly HIV cases diagnosed, and 50 USD per PLHA received a defined package of follow-up care services, were paid to the CBOs. Cash payments were made biannually based on the verified results in the national web-based HIV/AIDS information system. Findings After task shifting, CBOs gradually assumed preventive intervention for MSM and follow-up care for PLHA from 2008 to 2012. HIV testing coverage among MSM increased from 4.1% in 2008 to 22.7% in 2012. The baseline median CD4 counts of newly diagnosed HIV positive MSM increased from 309 to 397 cells/µL. HIV tests among MSM by CBOs accounted for less than 1% of the total HIV tests in Nanjing but the share of HIV cases detected by CBOs was 12.4% in 2008 and 43.6% in 2012. Unit cost per HIV case detected by CBOs was 47 times lower than that by government facilities. The coverage of CD4 tests and antiretroviral therapy increased from 71.1% and 78.6% in 2008 to 86.0% and 90.1% in 2012, respectively. Conclusion It is feasible to shift essential HIV services from government facilities to CBOs, and to verify independently service results to adopt ‘cash on service delivery’ model. Services provided by CBOs are cost-effective, as compared with that by government facilities. PMID:25050797

  14. Follow-up of early stage melanoma: specialist clinician perspectives on the functions of follow-up and implications for extending follow-up intervals.

    PubMed

    Rychetnik, Lucie; McCaffery, Kirsten; Morton, Rachael L; Thompson, John F; Menzies, Scott W; Irwig, Les

    2013-04-01

    There is limited evidence on the relative effectiveness of different follow-up schedules for patients with AJCC stage I or II melanoma, but less frequent follow-up than is currently recommended has been proposed. To describe melanoma clinicians' perspectives on the functions of follow-up, factors that influence follow-up intervals, and important considerations for extending intervals. Qualitative interviews with 16 clinicians (surgical oncologists, dermatologists, melanoma unit physicians) who conduct follow-up at two of Australia's largest specialist centers. Follow-up is conducted for early detection of recurrences or new primary melanomas, to manage patient anxiety, support patient self-care, and as part of shared care. Recommended intervals are based on guidelines but account for each patient's clinical risk profile, level of anxiety, patient education requirements, capacity to engage in skin self-examination, and how the clinician prefers to manage any suspicious lesions. To revise guidelines and implement change it is important to understand the rationale underpinning existing practice. Extended follow-up intervals for early stage melanoma are more likely to be adopted after the first year when patients are less anxious and sufficiently prepared to conduct self-examination. Clinicians may retain existing schedules for highly anxious patients or those unable to examine themselves. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Loss to specialist follow-up in congenital heart disease; out of sight, out of mind

    PubMed Central

    Wray, Jo; Frigiola, Alessandra; Bull, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the scale and clinical importance of loss to follow-up of past patients with serious congenital heart disease, using a common malformation as an example. To better understand the antecedents of loss to specialist follow-up and patients’ attitudes to returning. Design Cohort study using NHS number functionality. Content and thematic analysis of telephone interviews of subset contacted after loss to follow-up. Patients, intervention and setting Longitudinal follow-up of complete consecutive list of all 1085 UK patients with repair of tetralogy of Fallot from single institution 1964–2009. Main outcome measures Survival, freedom from late pulmonary valve replacement, loss to specialist follow-up, shortfall in late surgical revisions related to loss to follow-up. Patients’ narrative about loss to follow-up. Results 216 (24%) of patients known to be currently alive appear not to be registered with specialist clinics; some are seen in general cardiology clinics. Their median age is 32 years and median duration of loss to follow-up is 22 years; most had been lost before Adult Congenital services had been consolidated in their present form. 48% of the late deaths to date have occurred in patients not under specialist follow-up. None of those lost to specialist follow-up has had secondary pulmonary valve replacement while 188 patients under specialist care have. Patients lost to specialist follow-up who were contacted by telephone had no knowledge of its availability. Conclusions Loss to specialist follow-up, typically originating many years ago, impacts patient management. PMID:23257171

  16. Improved Newborn Hearing Screening Follow-up Results in More Infants Identified

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Suhana; Gaffney, Marcus; Eichwald, John

    2015-01-01

    Longitudinal research suggests that efforts at the national, state, and local levels are leading to improved follow-up and data reporting. Data now support the assumption that the number of deaf or hard-of-hearing infants identified through newborn hearing screening increases with a reduction in the number of infants lost to follow-up. Documenting the receipt of services has made a noticeable impact on reducing lost to follow-up rates and early identification of infants with hearing loss; however, continued improvement and monitoring of services are still needed. PMID:23803975

  17. Improved newborn hearing screening follow-up results in more infants identified.

    PubMed

    Alam, Suhana; Gaffney, Marcus; Eichwald, John

    2014-01-01

    Longitudinal research suggests that efforts at the national, state, and local levels are leading to improved follow-up and data reporting. Data now support the assumption that the number of deaf or hard-of-hearing infants identified through newborn hearing screening increases with a reduction in the number of infants lost to follow-up. Documenting the receipt of services has made a noticeable impact on reducing lost to follow-up rates and early identification of infants with hearing loss; however, continued improvement and monitoring of services are still needed.

  18. Evacuation of the ICU

    PubMed Central

    Niven, Alexander S.; Beninati, William; Fang, Ray; Einav, Sharon; Rubinson, Lewis; Kissoon, Niranjan; Devereaux, Asha V.; Christian, Michael D.; Grissom, Colin K.; Christian, Michael D.; Devereaux, Asha V.; Dichter, Jeffrey R.; Kissoon, Niranjan; Rubinson, Lewis; Amundson, Dennis; Anderson, Michael R.; Balk, Robert; Barfield, Wanda D.; Bartz, Martha; Benditt, Josh; Beninati, William; Berkowitz, Kenneth A.; Daugherty Biddison, Lee; Braner, Dana; Branson, Richard D; Burkle, Frederick M.; Cairns, Bruce A.; Carr, Brendan G.; Courtney, Brooke; DeDecker, Lisa D.; De Jong, Marla J.; Dominguez-Cherit, Guillermo; Dries, David; Einav, Sharon; Erstad, Brian L.; Etienne, Mill; Fagbuyi, Daniel B.; Fang, Ray; Feldman, Henry; Garzon, Hernando; Geiling, James; Gomersall, Charles D.; Grissom, Colin K.; Hanfling, Dan; Hick, John L.; Hodge, James G.; Hupert, Nathaniel; Ingbar, David; Kanter, Robert K.; King, Mary A.; Kuhnley, Robert N.; Lawler, James; Leung, Sharon; Levy, Deborah A.; Lim, Matthew L.; Livinski, Alicia; Luyckx, Valerie; Marcozzi, David; Medina, Justine; Miramontes, David A.; Mutter, Ryan; Niven, Alexander S.; Penn, Matthew S.; Pepe, Paul E.; Powell, Tia; Prezant, David; Reed, Mary Jane; Rich, Preston; Rodriquez, Dario; Roxland, Beth E.; Sarani, Babak; Shah, Umair A.; Skippen, Peter; Sprung, Charles L.; Subbarao, Italo; Talmor, Daniel; Toner, Eric S.; Tosh, Pritish K.; Upperman, Jeffrey S.; Uyeki, Timothy M.; Weireter, Leonard J.; West, T. Eoin; Wilgis, John; Ornelas, Joe; McBride, Deborah; Reid, David; Baez, Amado; Baldisseri, Marie; Blumenstock, James S.; Cooper, Art; Ellender, Tim; Helminiak, Clare; Jimenez, Edgar; Krug, Steve; Lamana, Joe; Masur, Henry; Mathivha, L. Rudo; Osterholm, Michael T.; Reynolds, H. Neal; Sandrock, Christian; Sprecher, Armand; Tillyard, Andrew; White, Douglas; Wise, Robert; Yeskey, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite the high risk for patient harm during unanticipated ICU evacuations, critical care providers receive little to no training on how to perform safe and effective ICU evacuations. We reviewed the pertinent published literature and offer suggestions for the critical care provider regarding ICU evacuation. The suggestions in this article are important for all who are involved in pandemics or disasters with multiple critically ill or injured patients, including front-line clinicians, hospital administrators, and public health or government officials. METHODS: The Evacuation and Mobilization topic panel used the American College of Chest Physicians (CHEST) Guidelines Oversight Committee’s methodology to develop seven key questions for which specific literature searches were conducted to identify studies upon which evidence-based recommendations could be made. No studies of sufficient quality were identified. Therefore, the panel developed expert opinion-based suggestions using a modified Delphi process. RESULTS: Based on current best evidence, we provide 13 suggestions outlining a systematic approach to prepare for and execute an effective ICU evacuation during a disaster. Interhospital and intrahospital collaboration and functional ICU communication are critical for success. Pre-event planning and preparation are required for a no-notice evacuation. A Critical Care Team Leader must be designated within the Hospital Incident Command System. A three-stage ICU Evacuation Timeline, including (1) no immediate threat, (2) evacuation threat, and (3) evacuation implementation, should be used. Detailed suggestions on ICU evacuation, including regional planning, evacuation drills, patient transport preparation and equipment, patient prioritization and distribution for evacuation, patient information and tracking, and federal and international evacuation assistance systems, are also provided. CONCLUSIONS: Successful ICU evacuation during a disaster requires

  19. Current status of neonatal follow-up in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Synnes, Anne R; Lefebvre, Francine; Cake, Heather A

    2006-01-01

    Follow-up programs in Canada collect audit and outcome research data, and provide clinical and preventive health care to extremely premature survivors and other new survivors of neonatal intensive care. Results of a 2001 to 2002 survey of Canadian follow-up programs showed a tremendous variation in the patient populations seen, the timing of visits and the evaluations performed. A description of the new Quebec consortium of follow-up programs is provided and possible future directions are discussed. PMID:19030287

  20. 29 CFR 99.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Audit findings follow-up. 99.315 Section 99.315 Labor Office... § 99.315 Audit findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective... include the reference numbers the auditor assigns to audit findings under § 99.510(c). Since the summary...

  1. Innovative Designs for the Smart ICU.

    PubMed

    Halpern, Neil A

    2014-03-01

    Successfully designing a new ICU requires clarity of vision and purpose and the recognition that the patient room is the core of the ICU experience for patients, staff, and visitors. The ICU can be conceptualized into three components: the patient room, central areas, and universal support services. Each patient room should be designed for single patient use and be similarly configured and equipped. The design of the room should focus upon functionality, ease of use, healing, safety, infection control, communications, and connectivity. All aspects of the room, including its infrastructure; zones for work, care, and visiting; environment, medical devices, and approaches to privacy; logistics; and waste management, are important elements in the design process. Since most medical devices used at the ICU bedside are really sophisticated computers, the ICU needs to be capable of supporting the full scope of medical informatics. The patient rooms, the central ICU areas (central stations, corridors, supply rooms, pharmacy, laboratory, staff lounge, visitor waiting room, on-call suite, conference rooms, and offices), and the universal support services (infection prevention, finishings and flooring, staff communications, signage and wayfinding, security, and fire and safety) work best when fully interwoven. This coordination helps establish efficient and safe patient throughput and care and fosters physical and social cohesiveness within the ICU. A balanced approach to centralized and decentralized monitoring and logistics also offers great flexibility. Synchronization of the universal support services in the ICU with the hospital's existing systems maintains unity of purpose and continuity across the enterprise and avoids unnecessary duplication of efforts. Copyright © 2014 The American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Current state of high-risk infant follow-up care in the United States: results of a national survey of academic follow-up programs.

    PubMed

    Kuppala, V S; Tabangin, M; Haberman, B; Steichen, J; Yolton, K

    2012-04-01

    High-risk infant follow-up programs have the potential to act as multipurpose clinics by providing continuity of clinical care, education of health care trainees and facilitating outcome data research. Currently there are no nationally representative data on high-risk infant follow-up practices in the United States. The objective of this study is to collect information about the composition of high-risk infant follow-up programs associated with academic centers in the United States, with respect to their structure, function, funding resources and developmental assessment practices, and to identify the barriers to establishment of such programs. Staff neonatologists, follow-up program directors and division directors of 170 Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU) associated with pediatric residency programs were invited to participate in an anonymous online survey from October 2009 to January 2010. The overall response rate was 84%. Ninety three percent of the respondents have a follow-up program associated with their NICU. Birth weight, gestational age and critical illness in the NICU were the major criteria for follow-up care. Management of nutrition and neurodevelopmental assessments was the most common service provided. Over 70% have health care trainees in the clinic. About 75% of the respondents have the neurodevelopmental outcome data available. Most of the respondents reported multiple funding sources. Lack of personnel and funding were the most common causes for not having a follow-up program. High-risk infant follow-up programs associated with academic centers in the United States are functioning as multidisciplinary programs providing clinical care, trainee education and facilitating outcomes research.

  3. Follow-up methods for retrospective cohort studies in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Fawcett, Jackie; Garrett, Nick; Bates, Michael N

    2002-01-01

    To define a general methodology for maximising the success of follow-up processes for retrospective cohort studies in New Zealand, and to illustrate an approach to developing country-specific follow-up methodologies. We recently conducted a cohort study of mortality and cancer incidence in New Zealand professional fire fighters. A number of methods were used to trace vital status, including matching with records of the New Zealand Health Information Service (NZHIS), pension records of Work and Income New Zealand (WINZ), and electronic electoral rolls. Non-electronic methods included use of paper electoral rolls and the records of the Registrar of Births Deaths and Marriages. 95% of the theoretical person-years of follow-up of the cohort were traced using these methods. In terms of numbers of cohort members traced to end of follow-up, the most useful tracing methods were fire fighter employment records, the NZHIS, WINZ, and the electronic electoral rolls. The follow-up process used for the cohort study was highly successful. On the basis of this experience, we propose a generic, but flexible, model for follow-up of retrospective cohort studies in New Zealand. Similar models could be constructed for other countries. Successful follow-up of cohort studies is possible in New Zealand using established methods. This should encourage the use of cohort studies for the investigation of epidemiological issues. Similar models for follow-up processes could be constructed for other countries.

  4. Large Regional Differences in Serological Follow-Up of Q Fever Patients in The Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Morroy, Gabriëlla; Wielders, Cornelia C. H.; Kruisbergen, Mandy J. B.; van der Hoek, Wim; Marcelis, Jan H.; Wegdam-Blans, Marjolijn C. A.; Wijkmans, Clementine J.; Schneeberger, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    Background During the Dutch Q fever epidemic more than 4,000 Q fever cases were notified. This provided logistical challenges for the organisation of serological follow-up, which is considered mandatory for early detection of chronic infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the proportion of acute Q fever patients that received serological follow-up, and to identify regional differences in follow-up rates and contributing factors, such as knowledge of medical practitioners. Methods Serological datasets of Q fever patients diagnosed between 2007 and 2009 (N = 3,198) were obtained from three Laboratories of Medical Microbiology (LMM) in the province of Noord-Brabant. One LMM offered an active follow-up service by approaching patients; the other two only tested on physician's request. The medical microbiologist in charge of each LMM was interviewed. In December 2011, 240 general practices and 112 medical specialists received questionnaires on their knowledge and practices regarding the serological follow-up of Q fever patients. Results Ninety-five percent (2,226/2,346) of the Q fever patients diagnosed at the LMM with a follow-up service received at least one serological follow-up within 15 months of diagnosis. For those diagnosed at a LMM without this service, this was 25% (218/852) (OR 54, 95% CI 43–67). Although 80% (162/203) of all medical practitioners with Q fever patients reported informing patients of the importance of serological follow-up, 33% (67/203) never requested it. Conclusions Regional differences in follow-up are substantial and range from 25% to 95%. In areas with a low follow-up rate the proportion of missed chronic Q fever is potentially higher than in areas with a high follow-up rate. Medical practitioners lack knowledge regarding the need, timing and implementation of serological follow-up, which contributes to patients receiving incorrect or no follow-up. Therefore, this information should be incorporated in national guidelines

  5. 38 CFR 41.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Audit findings follow-up. 41.315 Section 41.315 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Auditees § 41.315 Audit findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is...

  6. Leisure of Opiate Addicts at Posttreatment Follow-Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, D. Dwayne; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Comparisons of self-reported leisure showed an overall shift toward more positive, socially accepted leisure activities at follow-up. More free time was spent with family and friends who did not use drugs. Positive leisure at follow-up was related to favorable outcomes on drug use, criminality, and productive activities. (Author)

  7. ICU Director Data

    PubMed Central

    Ogbu, Ogbonna C.; Coopersmith, Craig M.

    2015-01-01

    Improving value within critical care remains a priority because it represents a significant portion of health-care spending, faces high rates of adverse events, and inconsistently delivers evidence-based practices. ICU directors are increasingly required to understand all aspects of the value provided by their units to inform local improvement efforts and relate effectively to external parties. A clear understanding of the overall process of measuring quality and value as well as the strengths, limitations, and potential application of individual metrics is critical to supporting this charge. In this review, we provide a conceptual framework for understanding value metrics, describe an approach to developing a value measurement program, and summarize common metrics to characterize ICU value. We first summarize how ICU value can be represented as a function of outcomes and costs. We expand this equation and relate it to both the classic structure-process-outcome framework for quality assessment and the Institute of Medicine’s six aims of health care. We then describe how ICU leaders can develop their own value measurement process by identifying target areas, selecting appropriate measures, acquiring the necessary data, analyzing the data, and disseminating the findings. Within this measurement process, we summarize common metrics that can be used to characterize ICU value. As health care, in general, and critical care, in particular, changes and data become more available, it is increasingly important for ICU leaders to understand how to effectively acquire, evaluate, and apply data to improve the value of care provided to patients. PMID:25846533

  8. Redesigning the ICU nursing discharge process: a quality improvement study.

    PubMed

    Chaboyer, Wendy; Lin, Frances; Foster, Michelle; Retallick, Lorraine; Panuwatwanich, Kriengsak; Richards, Brent

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate the impact of a redesigned intensive care unit (ICU) nursing discharge process on ICU discharge delay, hospital mortality, and ICU readmission within 72 hours. A quality improvement study using a time series design and statistical process control analysis was conducted in one Australian general ICU. The primary outcome measure was hours of discharge delay per patient discharged alive per month, measured for 15 months prior to, and for 12 months after the redesigned process was implemented. The redesign process included appointing a change agent to facilitate process improvement, developing a patient handover sheet, requesting ward staff to nominate an estimated transfer time, and designing a daily ICU discharge alert sheet that included an expected date of discharge. A total of 1,787 ICU discharges were included in this study, 1,001 in the 15 months before and 786 in the 12 months after the implementation of the new discharge processes. There was no difference in in-hospital mortality after discharge from ICU or ICU readmission within 72 hours during the study period. However, process improvement was demonstrated by a reduction in the average patient discharge delay time of 3.2 hours (from 4.6 hour baseline to 1.0 hours post-intervention). Involving both ward and ICU staff in the redesign process may have contributed to a shared situational awareness of the problems, which led to more timely and effective ICU discharge processes. The use of a change agent, whose ongoing role involved follow-up of patients discharged from ICU, may have helped to embed the new process into practice. ©2011 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  9. Follow-up after curative treatment for colorectal cancer: longitudinal evaluation of patient initiated follow-up in the first 12 months.

    PubMed

    Batehup, L; Porter, K; Gage, H; Williams, P; Simmonds, P; Lowson, E; Dodson, L; Davies, N J; Wagland, R; Winter, J D; Richardson, A; Turner, A; Corner, J L

    2017-07-01

    To compare patient-triggered follow-up (PTFU) for curatively treated colorectal cancer against traditional outpatient follow-up (OPFU). Questionnaires were mailed at four time points over one-year post-treatment to two prospectively-recruited cohorts: A, patients entering follow-up and receiving OPFU pre-implementation of PTFU; B, patients entering follow-up (FU) and receiving either OPFU (B1) or PTFU (B2) post-implementation of PTFU. Bi-variate tests were used to compare patient characteristics and outcomes eight months after entering follow-up (generic and cancer-specific quality of life (QoL), satisfaction). Regression analysis explored associations between follow-up model and outcomes. Resource implications and costs of models were compared. Patients in Cohort B1 were significantly more likely to have received chemotherapy (p < 0.001), radiotherapy (p < 0.05), and reported poorer QoL (p = 0.001). Having a longstanding co-morbid condition was the most important determinant of QoL (p < 0.001); model of care was not significant. Patients were satisfied with their follow-up care regardless of model. Health service costs were higher in PTFU over the first year CONCLUSIONS: PTFU is acceptable to patients with colorectal cancer and can be considered to be a realistic alternative to OPFU for clinically suitable patients. The initial costs are higher due to provision of a self-management (SM) programme and remote surveillance. Further research is needed to establish long-term outcomes and costs.

  10. Two-Year Follow-up of the Competitive Employment Status of Graduates with Developmental Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoisch, Sharon A.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This follow-up study of 54 graduates of a California high school career and vocational services program for students with developmental disabilities or learning disabilities found that only 39 percent were in competitive employment and that jobs were predominantly in the food, building, fabrication, and packaging service occupations. Most…

  11. Do Frequent Follow-Up Tests Help Colorectal Cancer Survivors?

    Cancer.gov

    Two studies of colorectal cancer survivors examined whether more frequent follow-up testing for recurrence improved how long people lived. Read this Cancer Currents blog post to learn whether testing frequency affects survival.

  12. Creating the Action Model for High Risk Infant Follow Up Program in Iran.

    PubMed

    Heidarzadeh, Mohammad; Jodiery, Behzad; Mirnia, Kayvan; Akrami, Forouzan; Hosseini, Mohammad Bagher; Heidarabadi, Seifollah; HabibeLahi, Abbas

    2013-11-01

    Intervention in early childhood development as one of the social determinants of health, is important for reducing social gap and inequity. In spite of increasingly developing intensive neonatal care wards and decreasing neonatal mortality rate, there is no follow up program in Iran. This study was carreid out to design high risk infants follow up care program with the practical aim of creating an model action for whole country, in 2012. This qualitative study has been done by the Neonatal Department of the Deputy of Public Health in cooperation with Pediatrics Health Research Center of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran. After study of international documents, consensus agreement about adapted program for Iran has been accomplished by focus group discussion and attended Delphi agreement technique. After compiling primary draft included evidence based guidelines and executive plan, 14 sessions including expert panels were hold to finalize the program. After finalizing the program, high risk infants follow up care service package has been designed in 3 chapters: Evidence based clinical guidelines; eighteen main clinical guidelines and thirteen subsidiaries clinical guidelines, executive plan; 6 general, 6 following up and 5 backup processes. Education program including general and especial courses for care givers and follow up team, and family education processes. We designed and finalized high risk infants follow up care service package. It seems to open a way to extend it to whole country.

  13. Creating the Action Model for High Risk Infant Follow Up Program in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Heidarzadeh, Mohammad; Jodiery, Behzad; Mirnia, Kayvan; Akrami, Forouzan; Hosseini, Mohammad Bagher; Heidarabadi, Seifollah; HabibeLahi, Abbas

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Intervention in early childhood development as one of the social determinants of health, is important for reducing social gap and inequity. In spite of increasingly developing intensive neonatal care wards and decreasing neonatal mortality rate, there is no follow up program in Iran. This study was carreid out to design high risk infants follow up care program with the practical aim of creating an model action for whole country, in 2012. Methods This qualitative study has been done by the Neonatal Department of the Deputy of Public Health in cooperation with Pediatrics Health Research Center of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran. After study of international documents, consensus agreement about adapted program for Iran has been accomplished by focus group discussion and attended Delphi agreement technique. After compiling primary draft included evidence based guidelines and executive plan, 14 sessions including expert panels were hold to finalize the program. Results After finalizing the program, high risk infants follow up care service package has been designed in 3 chapters: Evidence based clinical guidelines; eighteen main clinical guidelines and thirteen subsidiaries clinical guidelines, executive plan; 6 general, 6 following up and 5 backup processes. Education program including general and especial courses for care givers and follow up team, and family education processes. Conclusion We designed and finalized high risk infants follow up care service package. It seems to open a way to extend it to whole country. PMID:26171344

  14. Plans for Follow-Up Observations of Kepler Planet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautier, Thomas N., III

    2009-05-01

    Ground based follow-up observations of transiting planet candidates identified by Kepler are pursued to identify false positives and to search for non-transiting planets in the systems of true transiting planets. I will describe the observational protocols developed by the Kepler team and the web based infrastructure we are using to support the observations. The current state of the Kepler follow-up observations will be reported.

  15. Factors Associated With Follow-Up Attendance Among Rape Victims Seen in Acute Medical Care.

    PubMed

    Darnell, Doyanne; Peterson, Roselyn; Berliner, Lucy; Stewart, Terri; Russo, Joan; Whiteside, Lauren; Zatzick, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Rape is associated with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and related comorbidities. Most victims do not obtain treatment for these conditions. Acute care medical settings are well positioned to link patients to services; however, difficulty engaging victims and low attendance at provided follow-up appointments is well documented. Identifying factors associated with follow-up can inform engagement and linkage strategies. Administrative, patient self-report, and provider observational data from Harborview Medical Center were combined for the analysis. Using logistic regression, we examined factors associated with follow-up health service utilization after seeking services for rape in the emergency department. Of the 521 diverse female (n = 476) and male (n = 45) rape victims, 28% attended the recommended medical/counseling follow-up appointment. In the final (adjusted) logistic regression model, having a developmental or other disability (OR = 0.40, 95% CI = 0.21-0.77), having a current mental illness (OR = 0.25, 95% CI = 0.13-0.49), and being assaulted in public (OR = 0.50, 95% CI = 0.28-0.87) were uniquely associated with reduced odds of attending the follow-up. Having a prior mental health condition (OR = 3.02, 95% CI = 1.86-4.91), a completed Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner's (SANE) examination (OR = 2.97, 95% CI = 1.84-4.81), and social support available to help cope with the assault (OR = 3.54, 95% CI = 1.76-7.11) were associated with an increased odds of attending the follow-up. Findings point to relevant characteristics ascertained at the acute care medical visit for rape that may be used to identify victims less likely to obtain posttraumatic medical and mental health services. Efforts to improve service linkage for these patients is warranted and may require alternative service delivery models that engage rape survivors and support posttraumatic recovery.

  16. Internet of things and bariatric surgery follow-up: Comparative study of standard and IoT follow-up.

    PubMed

    Vilallonga, Ramon; Lecube, Albert; Fort, José Manuel; Boleko, Maria Angeles; Hidalgo, Marta; Armengol, Manel

    2013-09-01

    Follow-up of obese patient is difficult. There is no literature related to patient follow-up that incorporates the concept of Internet of Things (IoT), use of WiFi, Internet, or portable devices for this purpose. This prospective observational study commenced in June 2011. Patients were prospectively offered to participate in the IoT study group, in which they received a WiFi scale (Withing®, Paris) that provides instant WiFi data to the patient and surgeon. Other patients were admitted to the standard follow-up group at the outpatient clinic. A total of 33 patients were included in our study (ten in the IoT group). Twelve patients did not have WiFi at home, ten lacked of computer knowledge, and seven preferred standard for follow-up. All patients underwent different surgical procedures. There were no complications. Excess weight loss (EWL) was similar in both groups. More than 90% of patients were satisfied. In the IoT group, patients considered it valuable in saving time, and considered seeing their evolution graphics extremely motivating. IoT technology can monitor medical parameters remotely and collect data. A WiFi scale can facilitate preoperative and follow-up. Standard follow-up in a classical outpatient clinic setting with the surgeon was preferred globally.

  17. Estimating ICU bed capacity using discrete event simulation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhecheng; Hen, Bee Hoon; Teow, Kiok Liang

    2012-01-01

    The intensive care unit (ICU) in a hospital caters for critically ill patients. The number of the ICU beds has a direct impact on many aspects of hospital performance. Lack of the ICU beds may cause ambulance diversion and surgery cancellation, while an excess of ICU beds may cause a waste of resources. This paper aims to develop a discrete event simulation (DES) model to help the healthcare service providers determine the proper ICU bed capacity which strikes the balance between service level and cost effectiveness. The DES model is developed to reflect the complex patient flow of the ICU system. Actual operational data, including emergency arrivals, elective arrivals and length of stay, are directly fed into the DES model to capture the variations in the system. The DES model is validated by open box test and black box test. The validated model is used to test two what-if scenarios which the healthcare service providers are interested in: the proper number of the ICU beds in service to meet the target rejection rate and the extra ICU beds in service needed to meet the demand growth. A 12-month period of actual operational data was collected from an ICU department with 13 ICU beds in service. Comparison between the simulation results and the actual situation shows that the DES model accurately captures the variations in the system, and the DES model is flexible to simulate various what-if scenarios. DES helps the healthcare service providers describe the current situation, and simulate the what-if scenarios for future planning.

  18. Early primary care follow-up after ED and hospital discharge - does it affect readmissions?

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sanjai; Seirup, Joanna; Carmel, Amanda

    2017-04-01

    After hospitalization, timely discharge follow-up has been linked to reduced readmissions in the heart failure population, but data from general inpatients has been mixed. The objective of this study was to determine if there was an association between completed follow-up appointments within 14 days of hospital discharge and 30-day readmission amongst primary care patients at an urban academic medical center. Index discharges included both inpatient and emergency room settings. A secondary objective was to identify patient factors associated with completed follow-up appointments within 14 days. We conducted a retrospective review of primary care patients at an urban academic medical center who were discharged from either the emergency department (ED) or inpatient services at the Weill Cornell Medical Center/New York Presbyterian Hospital from 1 January 2014-31 December 2014. Cox proportional hazard models were used to identify the relationship between follow-up in primary care within 14 days and readmission within 30 days. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association of patient factors with 14-day follow-up. Among 9,662 inpatient and ED discharges, multivariable analysis (adjusting for age, gender, race/ethnicity, insurance, number of diagnoses on problem list, length of stay, and discharge service) showed that follow-up with primary care within 14 days was not associated with a lower hazard of readmission within 30 days (HR = 0.78; 95% CI 0.56-1.09). A higher number of diagnoses on the problem list was associated with greater odds of follow-up for both inpatient and emergency department discharges (inpatient: HR = 1.03, 95% CI 1.02-1.04; ED: HR = 1.02, 95% CI 1.00-1.04). For inpatient discharges, each additional day in length of stay was associated with 3% lower odds of follow-up (HR = 0.97, 95% CI 0.96-0.99). Early follow-up within 14 days after discharge from general inpatient services was associated with a trend toward lower hazard of

  19. Individualized follow up programme and early discharge in term neonates.

    PubMed

    De Carolis, Maria Pia; Cocca, Carmen; Valente, Elisabetta; Lacerenza, Serafina; Rubortone, Serena Antonia; Zuppa, Antonio Alberto; Romagnoli, Costantino

    2014-07-15

    Early discharge of mother/neonate dyad has become a common practice, and its effects are measured by readmission rates. We evaluated the safety of early discharge followed by an individualized Follow-up programme and the efficacy in promoting breastfeeding initiation and duration. During a nine-month period early discharge followed by an early targeted Follow-up was carried out in term neonates in the absence of weight loss <10% or hyperbilirubinaemia at risk of treatment. Follow-up visits were performed at different timepoints with a specific flow-chart according to both bilirubin levels and weight loss at discharge. During the study period early discharge was performed in 419 neonates and Follow-up was carried out in 408 neonates (97.4%). No neonates required readmission for hyperbilirubinaemia and dehydration during the first 28 days of life. Breastfeeding rate was 90.6%, 75.2%, 41.5% at 30, 90 and 180 days of life, respectively. A six-month phone interview was performed for 383 neonates (93.8%) and satisfaction of parents about early discharge was high in 345 cases (90.1%). Early discharge in association with an individualized Follow-up programme resulted safe for the neonate and effective for breastfeeding initation and duration.

  20. Volunteer melanoma screenings. Follow-up, compliance, and outcome.

    PubMed

    de Rooij, M J; Rampen, F H; Schouten, L J; Neumann, H A

    1997-03-01

    Follow-up information on free melanoma screening clinics is not readily available. We studied the follow-up, compliance, and outcome of positive screenees after a screening campaign for melanoma in the Netherlands. Of the 4146 participants, 486 (11.7%) had a suspicious premalignant or malignant lesion warranting referral to his or her general physician indicating the proposed line of management. Participants with borderline lesions were not referred. Referral of borderline cases should have resulted in a considerable increase of the number of positive screenees (18.1%). All positive screenees but two gave permission for follow-up. Only 18 screenees (3.7%) were lost during follow-up. Moreover, one screenee with a presumed basal cell carcinoma and six screenees suspicious of having a premalignant lesion decided not to seek medical attention despite several reminders. The positive predictive value for melanoma was 17.2%, and for nonmelanoma skin cancers was 42.9%. A selective referral policy may reduce the generated costs of melanoma screenings substantially. Adequate follow-up of positive screenees is mandatory in order to determine the ultimate yield and usefulness of such campaigns.

  1. Effect of Health Literacy on Research Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Leak, Cardella; Goggins, Kathryn; Schildcrout, Jonathan S.; Theobald, Cecelia; Donato, Katharine M.; Bell, Susan P.; Schnelle, John; Kripalani, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has not examined the effect of health literacy on research subjects' completion of scheduled research follow-up. This article evaluates patient factors associated with incomplete research follow-up at three time points after enrollment in a large, hospital-based prospective cohort study. Predictor variables included health literacy, age, race, gender, education, employment status, difficulty paying bills, hospital diagnosis, length of stay, self-reported global health status, depression, perceived health competence, medication adherence and healthcare system distrust. In a sample of 2042 patients, multivariable models demonstrated that lower health literacy and younger age were significantly associated with a lower likelihood of completing research follow-up interviews at 2-3 days, 30 days and 90 days after hospital discharge. Additionally, patients who had less education, were currently employed, and had moderate financial stress were less likely to complete 90-day follow-up. This study is the first to demonstrate that lower health literacy is a significant predictor of incomplete research follow-up. PMID:26513035

  2. Nonimaging aspects of follow-up in breast cancer reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Wood, W C

    1991-09-01

    Follow-up of patients with breast cancer is directed to the early detection of recurrent or metastatic disease and the detection of new primary breast cancer. The survival benefit of early detection is limited to some patients with local failure or new primary tumors. That imaging is not used in follow-up of patients who have had breast cancer reconstruction is related to possible interference with this putative benefit by the reconstructive procedure. Such follow-up is accomplished by the patient's own surveillance, clinical examination, and laboratory testing supplemented by imaging studies. Clinical follow-up trials of women who have undergone breast reconstructive surgery show no evidence that locally recurrent breast carcinoma is masked when compared with follow-up of women who did not undergo reconstructive procedures. Reshaping of the contralateral breast to match the reconstructed breast introduces the possibility of interference with palpation as well as mammographic distortion in some women. This is an uncommon practical problem except when complicated by fat necrosis.

  3. Predicting general practice attendance for follow-up cancer care.

    PubMed

    Ngune, Irene; Jiwa, Moyez; McManus, Alexandra; Parsons, Richard; Hodder, Rupert

    2015-03-01

    To examine the role of the theory of planned behavior (TPB) in influencing patients' intention to attend follow-up visits with a general practitioner (GP). A questionnaire based on the TPB was used to assess colorectal cancer (CRC) patients' intention to attend follow-up visits with a GP. TPB factors accounted for 43.3% of the variance of intention for follow-up visits. Attitude alone explained 23.3% of the variance. Attitude and presence of other comorbidities significantly affected intention to visit a GP (attitude: R(2)=0.23, F [1, 65]=4.35, p < .01; comorbidity: R(2)=0.13, F [1, 65]=3.02, p < .05). Patients who believe their GP has the skills and knowledge to detect a recurrence and patients with other comorbidities have greater intention to visit their GP following treatment.

  4. Structured nursing follow-up: does it help in diabetes care?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In 1995 Clalit Health Services introduced a structured follow-up schedule, by primary care nurses, of diabetic patients. This was supplementary care, given in addition to the family physician’s follow-up care. This article aims to describe the performance of diabetes follow-up and diabetes control in patients with additional structured nursing follow-up care, compared to those patients followed only by their family physician. Methods We randomly selected 2,024 type 2 diabetic subjects aged 40–76 years. For each calendar year, from 2005–2007, patients who were “under physician follow-up only” were compared to those who received additional structured nursing follow-up care. Main outcomes Complete diabetes follow-up parameters including: HbA1c, LDL cholesterol, microalbumin, blood pressure measurements and fundus examination. Results The average age of study participants was 60.7 years, 52% were females and 38% were from low socioeconomic status (SES). In 2005, 39.5% of the diabetic patients received structured nursing follow-up, and the comparable figures for 2006 and 2007 were 42.1% 49.6%, respectively. The intervention subjects tended to be older, from lower SES, suffered from more chronic diseases and visited their family physician more frequently than the control patients. Patients in the study group were more likely to perform a complete diabetes follow-up plan: 52.8% vs. 21.5% (2005; p < 0.001) 55.5% vs. 30.3% (2006; p < 0.001), 52.3% vs. 35.7% (2007; p < 0.001). LDL cholesterol levels were lower in the study group only in 2005: 103.7 vs. 110.0 p < 0.001. Conclusion Subjects with supplementary structured nursing follow-up care were more likely to perform complete diabetes follow-up protocol. Our results reinforce the importance of teamwork in diabetic care. Further study is required to identify strategies for channeling the use of the limited resources to the patients who stand to benefit the most. PMID:25180073

  5. Measures of follow-up in early hearing detection and intervention programs: a need for standardization.

    PubMed

    Mason, Craig A; Gaffney, Marcus; Green, Denise R; Grosse, Scott D

    2008-06-01

    To demonstrate the need for standardized data definitions and reporting for early hearing detection and intervention (EHDI) programs collecting information on newborn hearing screening and follow-up, and types of information best collected in a standardized manner. A hypothetical birth cohort was used to show the potential effects of nonstandardized definitions and data classifications on rates of hearing screening, audiologic follow-up, and hearing loss. The true screening rate in this cohort was 92.4%. The calculated rate was between 90.0% and 96.5%, depending on the measure used. Among children documented as screened and referred for follow-up, 61.0% received this testing. Only 49.0% were documented to have been tested. Despite a true prevalence of 3.7 per 1,000 births, only 1.5 per 1,000 children were documented with a hearing loss. Ensuring that children receive recommended follow-up is challenging. Without complete reporting by audiologists to EHDI programs, accurate calculation of performance measures is impossible. Lack of documentation can lead to the overstatement of "loss to follow-up." Also, standardization of measures is essential for programs to evaluate how many children receive recommended services and assess progress toward national goals. A new survey has been implemented to collect more detailed and standardized information about recommended services.

  6. Personality Disorders in People with Learning Disabilities: Follow-Up of a Community Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lidher, J.; Martin, D. M.; Jayaprakash, M. S.; Roy, A.

    2005-01-01

    Background: A sample of community-based service users with intellectual disability (ID) was re-examined after 5 years to determine the impact of a diagnosis of personality disorder (PD). Methods: Seventy-five of the original 101 participants were followed up. Of these, 21 people had a PD identified during the original study. Results: Compared with…

  7. Lack of Follow-Up Exams after Failed School Vision Screenings: An Investigation of Contributing Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimel, Linda S.

    2006-01-01

    Programs to facilitate professional eye exams after failed school vision screenings often are based on the assumption that funding and access to services are major obstacles to care. Despite such programs, many children do not receive professional exams. The purpose of this study was to identify additional barriers to follow-up eye care. School…

  8. A Randomized Effectiveness Trial of Brief Parent Training: Six-Month Follow-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kjøbli, John; Bjørnebekk, Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine the follow-up effectiveness of brief parent training (BPT) for children with emerging or existing conduct problems. Method: With the use of a randomized controlled trial and parent and teacher reports, this study examined the effectiveness of BPT compared to regular services 6 months after the end of the intervention.…

  9. Follow-up Medical Care After Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... long-term effects, and to study health-related quality of life and behaviors in long-term survivors. Healthcare Delivery ... perceptions, knowledge, and practices of primary care and oncology specialist physicians about follow-up care of adult cancer survivors after treatment. ... for Childhood Cancer Survivors ...

  10. Follow-Up of the Fall 1990 FTIC Cohort.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Windham, Patricia

    Drawing from data provided by the Florida Education and Training Placement Information Program (FETPIP), this series of reports provides follow-up information on FTIC students entering Tallahassee Community College (TCC) in fall 1990. The four reports compare students based on race, entry level test pass rates, full-/part-time status, and grade…

  11. Extended Follow-Up | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    NCI supports the continued follow-up of participants in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial (PLCO) to strengthen the PLCO as a valuable resource for molecular epidemiologic research as well as provide long-term data on the trial’s primary endpoints. |

  12. Loss to Follow-Up: Issues and Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Jeff; Munoz, Karen F.; Bradham, Tamala S.; Nelson, Lauri

    2011-01-01

    State coordinators of early hearing detection and intervention (EHDI) programs completed a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats, or SWOT, analysis that examined 12 areas within state EHDI programs. Related to how EHDI programs address loss to follow-up, 47 coordinators responded with 277 items, and themes were identified in each…

  13. Spontaneous pregnancy loss: evaluation, management, and follow-up counseling.

    PubMed

    Scroggins, K M; Smucker, W D; Krishen, A E

    2000-03-01

    Spontaneous pregnancy loss is a common problem requiring a logical and systematic approach to evaluation and management. This article outlines a practical method for primary care physicians to use throughout the diagnosis, management, and follow-up periods. It integrates collaborative decision making and attention to the emotional and informational needs of the patient experiencing spontaneous pregnancy loss.

  14. Nurse-Initiated Telephone Follow Up after Ureteroscopic Stone Surgery.

    PubMed

    Tackitt, Helen M; Eaton, Samuel H; Lentz, Aaron C

    2016-01-01

    This article presents findings of a quality improvement (QI) project using the DMAIC (define, measure, analyze, improve, and control) model designed to decrease the rate of emergency department (ED) visits and nurse advice line calls after ureteroscopic stone surgery. Results indicated that nurse-initiated follow- up phone calls can decrease ED visits.

  15. Language-Impaired Preschoolers: A Follow-Up into Adolescence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stothard, Susan E.; Snowling, Margaret J.; Bishop, D. V. M.; Chipchase, Barry B.; Kaplan, Carole A.

    1998-01-01

    A follow-up study of 71 adolescents with preschool histories of speech-language impairments found children whose language problems had been resolved by ages 5 to 6 did not differ from controls on tests of vocabulary and language-comprehension skills, however, they performed significantly less well on tests of phonological processing and literacy…

  16. Brevard District Plan for Placement and Follow-Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Olive W.

    The Brevard District Plan for placement and follow-up is intended for all secondary students, including dropouts, disadvantaged, adult students, and graduates. The areas of placement may be in gainful employment, educational institutions, or a combination of both. The plan specifies procedures for implementing placement and stipulates the type of…

  17. Follow-Up Activities for the HISD Kindergarten Screening Instrument.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Pat; Cater, Margot

    The Kindergarten Screening Instrument consists of five sub-scales and attempts to screen for possible difficulty in the areas of distant vision, hearing, eye-hand coordination, language learning, and gross motor performance. In response to many requests for follow-up activities after screening, this manual was prepared by Volunteers in Public…

  18. Factors Associated with Adherence to Follow-up Colposcopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fish, Laura J.; Moorman, Patricia G.; Wordlaw-Stintson, Lashawn; Vidal, Adriana; Smith, Jennifer S.; Hoyo, Cathrine

    2013-01-01

    Background: Understanding the gaps in knowledge about human papilloma virus (HPV) infection, transmission, and health consequences and factors associated with the knowledge gap is an essential first step for the development of interventions to improve adherence to follow-up among women with abnormal Pap smears. Purpose: To examine the relationship…

  19. Refractive surgery for accommodative esotropia: 5-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Magli, Adriano; Forte, Raimondo; Gallo, Flavio; Carelli, Roberta

    2014-02-01

    To assess the long-term effectiveness and safety of refractive surgery with LASIK or photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) for treating accommodative esotropia in adults. All patients with accommodative esotropia treated with LASIK or PRK until December 2007 and with a minimum follow-up of 5 years were retrospectively included. LASIK was performed on 44 eyes of 22 patients (12 women, 10 men; mean age: 22.7 ± 2.9 years). Mean postoperative follow-up was 62.1 ± 3.2 months. PRK was performed on 16 eyes of 8 patients (4 women, 4 men; mean age: 23.7 ± 1.7 years). Mean postoperative follow-up was 61.3 ± 2.8 months. At the 5-year follow-up, the mean cycloplegic refraction was more hyperopic in the PRK group (0.3 ± 0.8 vs 0.06 ± 0.3 diopters, P = .01). Correction of esotropia to esophoria or orthotropia was present in 21 patients (95.4%) treated with LASIK and in all patients treated with PRK. Both LASIK and PRK were effective in the long-term reduction of accommodative esotropia. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Trident Technical College 1998 Graduate Follow-Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trident Technical Coll., Charleston, SC.

    Presents the results of South Carolina's Trident Technical College's (TTC's) 1998 graduate follow-up survey report of 915 TTC graduates. Graduates were surveyed and results were obtained for the following items: graduate goals, employment, placement rates, graduates in related fields, when job were obtained, job finding methods, job locations, job…

  1. Trident Technical College 1999 Graduate Follow-Up Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trident Technical Coll., Charleston, SC.

    Presents the results of South Carolina's Trident Technical College's (TTC's) 1999 graduate follow-up survey report. Graduates were surveyed and results were obtained for the following items: graduate goals, employment, placement rates, graduates in related fields, when job obtained, job finding methods, job locations, job satisfaction, job…

  2. A Follow-Up Study of Former Student Health Advocates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Streng, Nancy J.

    2007-01-01

    Student health advocates (SHAs) are high school students who, under the supervision of the school nurse, provide health education and health promotion activities to other students via a peer education model. This 3-year follow-up study explored how the SHA experience influences career choice and attitudes of the participants. It also examined what…

  3. Morning Star Cycle Two: Follow-up Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sloan, L. V.

    Semi-structured telephone interviews were used to gather follow-up data on students who completed the 1977-1979 Morning Star cycle two program, a community-based Native teacher education program at the Blue Quills Native Education Centre leading to a Bachelor of Education degree from the University of Alberta. Of the 24 students who completed…

  4. Follow-up and Feedback Processes in the EHEA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    del Canto, Pablo; Gallego, Isabel; López, José Manuel; Medina, Esunly; Mochón, Francisco; Mora, Javier; Reyes, Angélica; Rodríguez, Eva; Salami, Esther; Santamaría, Eduard; Valero, Miguel

    2011-01-01

    In the present paper, we describe the work being carried out by a group of professors so as to implement the follow-up and feedback processes of the activities students do throughout the first academic years in their Engineering studies. Not to mention, this project is within the EHEA (European Higher Education Area) framework. Our results show…

  5. Follow-Up Report: 2005 Placements of 2004 NDUS Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Debra; Dunn, Eddie; Hillman, Mike; Morth, Tom; Schepp, Julie; Padilla, Gina

    2007-01-01

    Some of the questions most frequently asked of the North Dakota University System relate to the status of graduates and program completers of state educational institutions. Follow-up Information on North Dakota Education and Training (FINDET) is a consortium of several state agencies formed to provide answers to those questions. This report,…

  6. Analytical framework and tool kit for SEA follow-up

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, Mans; Wiklund, Hans; Finnveden, Goeran

    2009-04-15

    Most Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) research and applications have so far neglected the ex post stages of the process, also called SEA follow-up. Tool kits and methodological frameworks for engaging effectively with SEA follow-up have been conspicuously missing. In particular, little has so far been learned from the much more mature evaluation literature although many aspects are similar. This paper provides an analytical framework and tool kit for SEA follow-up. It is based on insights and tools developed within programme evaluation and environmental systems analysis. It is also grounded in empirical studies into real planning and programming practices at themore » regional level, but should have relevance for SEA processes at all levels. The purpose of the framework is to promote a learning-oriented and integrated use of SEA follow-up in strategic decision making. It helps to identify appropriate tools and their use in the process, and to systematise the use of available data and knowledge across the planning organization and process. It distinguishes three stages in follow-up: scoping, analysis and learning, identifies the key functions and demonstrates the informational linkages to the strategic decision-making process. The associated tool kit includes specific analytical and deliberative tools. Many of these are applicable also ex ante, but are then used in a predictive mode rather than on the basis of real data. The analytical element of the framework is organized on the basis of programme theory and 'DPSIR' tools. The paper discusses three issues in the application of the framework: understanding the integration of organizations and knowledge; understanding planners' questions and analytical requirements; and understanding interests, incentives and reluctance to evaluate.« less

  7. Early deep sedation is associated with decreased in-hospital and two-year follow-up survival.

    PubMed

    Balzer, Felix; Weiß, Björn; Kumpf, Oliver; Treskatsch, Sascha; Spies, Claudia; Wernecke, Klaus-Dieter; Krannich, Alexander; Kastrup, Marc

    2015-04-28

    There is increasing evidence that deep sedation is detrimental to critically ill patients. The aim of this study was to examine effects of deep sedation during the early period after ICU admission on short- and long-term survival. In this observational, matched-pair analysis, patients receiving mechanical ventilation that were admitted to ICUs of a tertiary university hospital in six consecutive years were grouped as either lightly or deeply sedated within the first 48 hours after ICU admission. The Richmond Agitation-Sedation Score (RASS) was used to assess sedation depth (light sedation: -2 to 0; deep: -3 or below). Multivariate Cox regression was conducted to investigate the impact of early deep sedation within the first 48 hours of admission on in-hospital and two-year follow-up survival. In total, 1,884 patients met inclusion criteria out of which 27.2% (n = 513) were deeply sedated. Deeply sedated patients had longer ventilation times, increased length of stay and higher rates of mortality. Early deep sedation was associated with a hazard ratio of 1.661 (95% CI: 1.074 to 2.567; P = 0.022) for in-hospital survival and 1.866 (95% CI: 1.351 to 2.576; P < 0.001) for two-year follow-up survival. Early deep sedation during the first 48 hours of intensive care treatment was associated with decreased in-hospital and two-year follow-up survival. Since early deep sedation is a modifiable risk factor, this data shows an urgent need for prospective clinical trials focusing on light sedation in the early phase of ICU treatment.

  8. The role of follow-up ultrasound and clinical parameters after abdominal MDCT in patients with multiple trauma.

    PubMed

    Geyer, Lucas L; Körner, M; Linsenmaier, U; Wirth, S; Reiser, M F; Meindl, T

    2014-05-01

    Beside its value during the initial trauma work-up (focused assessment with sonography for trauma), ultrasound (US) is recommended for early follow-up examinations of the abdomen in multiple injured patients. However, multidetector CT (MDCT) has proven to reliably diagnose traumatic lesions of abdominal organs, to depict their extent, and to assess their clinical relevance. To evaluate the diagnostic impact of follow-up US studies after MDCT of the abdomen and to identify possible clinical parameters indicating the need of a follow-up US. During a 30-month period, patients with suspected multiple trauma were allocated. Patients with admission to the ICU, an initial abdominal MDCT scan, and an US follow-up examination after 6 and 24 h were included. Two patient cohorts were defined: patients with normal abdominal MDCT (group 1), patients with trauma-related pathologic abdominal MDCT (group 2). In all patients, parameters indicating alteration of vital functions or hemorrhage within the first 24 h were obtained by reviewing the medical charts. Forty-four of 193 patients were included: 24 were categorized in group 1 (mean age, 41.1 years; range, 21-90 years), 20 in group 2 (mean age, 36.6 years; range, 16-71 years). In group 1, US did not provide new information compared to emergency MDCT. In group 2, there were no contradictory 6- and 24-h follow-up US findings. In patients with positive MDCT findings and alterations of clinical parameters, US did not detect progression of a previously diagnosed pathology or any late manifestation of such a lesion. In none of the patients with negative abdominal MDCT and pathological clinical parameters US indicated an abdominal injury. Routine US follow-up does not yield additional information after abdominal trauma. In patients with MDCT-proven organ lesions, follow-up MDCT should be considered if indicated by abnormal clinical and/or laboratory findings.

  9. KLENOT Project - Near Earth Objects Follow-up Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichy, Milos; Ticha, Jana; Kocer, Michal; Tichy, Milos

    2015-08-01

    Near Earth Object (NEO) research is important not only as a great challenge for science but also as an important challenge for planetary defense. Therefore NEO discoveries, astrometric follow-up, orbit computations as well as physical studies are of high interest both to science community and humankind.The KLENOT Project of the Klet Observatory, South Bohemia, Czech Republic pursued the confirmation, early follow-up, long-arc follow-up and recovery of NEOs since 2002. Tens of thousands astrometric measurements helped to make inventory of NEOs as well as to understand the NEO distribution. It ranked among the world most prolific professional NEO follow-up programmes during its first phase from 2002 to 2008.The fundamental improvement of the 1.06-m KLENOT Telescope was started in autumn 2008. The new computer controlled paralactic mount was built to substantially increase telescope-time efficiency, the number of observations, their accuracy and limiting magnitude. The testing observations of the KLENOT Telescope Next Generation were started in October 2011. The new more efficient CCD camera FLI ProLine 230 was installed in summer 2013.The original Klet Software Package has been continually upgraded over the past two decades of operation.Both the system and strategy for the NEO follow-up observation used in the framework of the KLENOT Project are described here, including methods for selecting useful and important targets for NEO follow-up astrometry.The modernized KLENOT System was put into full operation in September 2013. More than 8000 of minor planet and comet astrometric positions including NEA measurements were published from September 2013 to February 2015.The 1.06-m KLENOT telescope is still the largest telescope in continental Europe used exclusively for observations of asteroids and comets. Full observing time is dedicated to the KLENOT team. Considering our results and long-time experience obtained at the Klet Observatory, we have the large potential to

  10. Representative Sampling: Follow-up of Spring 1972 and Spring 1973 Students. TEX-SIS FOLLOW-UP SC3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Larry; And Others

    This report presents the findings of a research study, conducted by the College of the Mainland (COM) as a subcontractor for Project FOLLOW-UP, designed to test the accuracy of random sampling and to measure non-response bias in mail surveys. In 1975, a computer-generated random sample of 500 students was drawn from a population of 1,256 students…

  11. What Happens Next? Follow-Up From the Children's Toddler School Program.

    PubMed

    Akshoomoff, Natacha; Stahmer, Aubyn C; Corsello, Christina; Mahrer, Nicole E

    2010-10-01

    This study was a follow-up of a group of 29 children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders at age 2 who attended an inclusive toddler program until age 3. Children ranged in age from 4 to 12 years at the time of the parent survey and follow-up testing. The majority of children were placed in a special education (noninclusive) preschool class, but among the children who were in elementary school at the time of follow-up, 63% were in general education classroom placement. Diagnoses of autism spectrum disorders remained stable, socialization skills remained a weakness, and child-related parental stress remained high despite average cognitive and language skills in the majority of children. Social skill development and support remained a service need.

  12. Lack of follow-up exams after failed school vision screenings: an investigation of contributing factors.

    PubMed

    Kimel, Linda S

    2006-06-01

    Programs to facilitate professional eye exams after failed school vision screenings often are based on the assumption that funding and access to services are major obstacles to care. Despite such programs, many children do not receive professional exams. The purpose of this study was to identify additional barriers to follow-up eye care. School nurses in an urban, midwestern public school district identified elementary school students who had not received follow-up eye exams after failed school vision screenings. Parents of these students were interviewed during the summer to determine financial, logistical, social/family, and perceptual barriers to care. Family issues, parental perceptions of vision problems, and difficulty planning ahead were found to be significant factors. Strategies to increase follow-up compliance and recommendations for overcoming barriers to care were also identified.

  13. Follow-up of Antihypertensive Therapy Improves Blood Pressure Control: Results of HYT (HYperTension survey) Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Fici, F; Seravalle, G; Koylan, N; Nalbantgil, I; Cagla, N; Korkut, Y; Quarti-Trevano, F; Makel, W; Grassi, G

    2017-09-01

    Although improved during the past few years, blood pressure control remains sub optimal. The impact of follow-up assessment on blood pressure control was evaluated in a group of patients of the HYT (HYperTension survey), treated with a combination of different dihydropyridine calcium-channel blockers (CCBs regimen) and inhibitors of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) and with uncontrolled blood pressure. This was obtained assessing (a) the rate of blood pressure control at 3 and 6 months of follow-up in the whole group of patients, (b) the rate of blood pressure control and the average blood pressure values in subjects treated with different DHP-CCBs regimen. From the 4993 patients with uncontrolled blood pressure, (BP ≥ 140/90 or ≥140/85 in patients with diabetes), 3729 (mean age 61.2 ± 11.5 years), maintained CCBs regimen combined wih RAAS blockers and were evaluated at 3 and 6 months follow-up. At each visit BP (semiautomatic device, Omron-M6, 3 measurements), heart rate, adverse events and treatment persistence were collected. At 1st and 2nd follow-up the rate of controlled BP was 63.5 and 72.8% respectively (p < 0.05 vs 35.3% at baseline), whereas in diabetes was 32.5 and 37.9% respectively (p < 0.05 vs 20% at baseline). No differences in heart rate were observed. No differences in control rate were observed between the different CCBs regimen. The incidence of drugs related adverse events was 3.6%. These findings provide evidence that: (a) the follow-up of hypertensive patients under therapy increase the rate of blood pressure control; (b) there is no significant difference in the antihypertensive effect between different CCBs regimen; (c) lipophilic CCBs induce less ankle edema.

  14. Multiwavelength Follow-up of a Rare Icecube Neutrino Multiplet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kocevski, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    IceCube detected three neutrino-induced track events arriving within less than 100s from a similar direction. Expected chance occurrence rate of 1 every 14 years, so not exceptionally rare, but interesting. If astrophysical in nature, the source would have to be relatively nearby or be an exceptional bright neutrino emitter. Follow-up observations by Swift-BAT, Swift-XRT, Master, ASAS-SN, LCOG, Veritas, FACT, and HAWC. The IceCube collaboration wanted to produce a paper summarizing the non-detections and outlining the follow-up network they have assembled. We were asked by Anna Franckowiak to contribute Fermi analysis to their write-up of this event.

  15. [Follow-up of newborns with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Biarge, M; Blanco, D; García-Alix, A; Salas, S

    2014-07-01

    Hypothermia treatment for newborn infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy reduces the number of neonates who die or have permanent neurological deficits. Although this therapy is now standard of care, neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy still has a significant impact on the child's neurodevelopment and quality of life. Infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy should be enrolled in multidisciplinary follow-up programs in order to detect impairments, to initiate early intervention, and to provide counselling and support for families. This article describes the main neurodevelopmental outcomes after term neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. We offer recommendations for follow-up based on the infant's clinical condition and other prognostic indicators, mainly neonatal neuroimaging. Other aspects, such as palliative care and medico-legal issues, are also briefly discussed. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Hyperfunctioning thyroid cancer: a five-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Monalisa Ferreira; Casulari, Luiz Augusto

    2010-02-01

    Differentiated thyroid cancer rarely occurs in association with hyperfunctioning nodules. We describe a case of a 47-year-old woman who developed symptoms of hyperthyroidism associated with a palpable thyroid nodule. Thyroid scintigraphy showed an autonomous nodule, and fine-needle aspiration biopsy was suggestive of papillary carcinoma. Laboratorial findings were consistent with the diagnosis of hyperthyroidism. The patient underwent thyroidectomy and a papillary carcinoma of 3.0 x 3.0 x 2.0 cm, follicular variant, was described by histological examination. The surrounding thyroid tissue was normal. Postoperatively, the patient received 100 mCi of (131)I, and whole body scans detected only residual uptake. No evidence of metastasis was detected during five years of follow-up. Hot thyroid nodules rarely harbor malignancies, and this case illustrated that, when a carcinoma occurs the prognosis seems to be very good with no evidence of metastatic dissemination during a long-term follow-up.

  17. Improving Lunar Exploration with Robotic Follow-up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fong, T.; Bualat, M.; Deans, M.; Heggy E.; Helper, M.; Hodges, K.; Lee, P.

    2011-01-01

    We are investigating how augmenting human field work with subsequent robot activity can improve lunar exploration. Robotic "follow-up" might involve: completing geology observations; making tedious or long-duration measurements of a target site or feature; curating samples in-situ; and performing unskilled, labor-intensive work. To study this technique, we have begun conducting a series of lunar analog field tests at Haughton Crater (Canada). Motivation: In most field geology studies on Earth, explorers often find themselves left with a set of observations they would have liked to make, or samples they would have liked to take, if only they had been able to stay longer in the field. For planetary field geology, we can imagine mobile robots - perhaps teleoperated vehicles previously used for manned exploration or dedicated planetary rovers - being deployed to perform such follow-up activities [1].

  18. From themes to hypotheses: following up with quantitative methods.

    PubMed

    Morgan, David L

    2015-06-01

    One important category of mixed-methods research designs consists of quantitative studies that follow up on qualitative research. In this case, the themes that serve as the results from the qualitative methods generate hypotheses for testing through the quantitative methods. That process requires operationalization to translate the concepts from the qualitative themes into quantitative variables. This article illustrates these procedures with examples that range from simple operationalization to the evaluation of complex models. It concludes with an argument for not only following up qualitative work with quantitative studies but also the reverse, and doing so by going beyond integrating methods within single projects to include broader mutual attention from qualitative and quantitative researchers who work in the same field. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. [Normocalcemic primary hyperparathyroidism: recommendations for management and follow-up].

    PubMed

    Martínez Díaz-Guerra, Guillermo; Jódar Gimeno, Esteban; Reyes García, Rebeca; Gómez Sáez, José Manuel; Muñoz-Torres, Manuel

    2013-10-01

    To provide practical recommendations for evaluation and follow-up of patients with normocalcemic primary hyperparathyroidism. Members of the Bone Metabolism Working Group of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology. A systematic search was made in MEDLINE (PubMed), using the terms normocalcemic primary hyperparathyroidism and primary hyperparathyroidism, for articles in English published before 22 November 2012. Literature was reviewed by 2 members of the Bone Metabolism Working Group of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology, and after development of recommendations, the manuscript was reviewed by all other members of the Group, and their suggestions were incorporated. The document provides practical recommendations for evaluation and follow-up of patients with normocalcemic primary hyperparathyroidism. There is however little evidence available about different aspects of this disease, mainly progression rate and clinical impact. More data are therefore needed before definite recommendations may be made. Copyright © 2012 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. The University of Hawaii NEO Follow-Up Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fohring, Dora; Tholen, David J.; Claytor, Zach; Ramanjooloo, Yudish; Hung, Denise; Aspin, Colin

    2017-10-01

    At the University of Hawaii, we carry out NEO follow-up observations for orbital refinement. We regularly observe eight nights a month using the University of Hawaii 88-inch (UH88) telescope and utilise Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope queue time for recovery of targets with large ephemeris uncertainties. Our focus is follow-up of Virtual Impactors and faint asteroids with magnitudes V>21. The combination of excellent atmospheric conditions on Mauna Kea and long integration times allow us to observe asteroids as faint as V=25. Recent extensive improvements to our workhorse UH88 telescope have included renovations to the telescope exterior, software upgrades, and the commissioning of the new monolithic STA-1600 10K CCD. Recent observational highlights include astrometry of 2017 JB2 during its diurnal retrograde loop and photometric observations 2016 HO3 which was measured to have a synodic period of 27.90 minutes.

  1. Occupational scleroderma. A 17-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, O; Warita, S; Tamura, A; Miyachi, Y

    1995-11-01

    Two patients with a scleroderma-like disorder induced by epoxy resins were reported from the Department of Dermatology, Gunma University School of Medicine, Japan in 1980. Here, we describe the clinical and laboratory characteristics of these patients after 17 years' follow-up from 1976 to 1993. Their systemic manifestations and indurated sclerotic skin changes disappeared within 5 years. No internal organ involvement has developed during the period of follow-up. On routine laboratory tests, no abnormalities have been found in the peripheral blood or in the blood chemistry or serology. Histological examination revealed atrophy of the dermis and restoration of the normal pattern of fine collagen bundles, when compared with the previous skin biopsy specimens. This scleroderma-like disorder induced by epoxy resins is considered to be different from systemic sclerosis: it has an acute onset and a fairly good prognosis, and does not show involvement of the internal organs.

  2. [Laparoscopic management of ureteroileal stenosis: Long term follow up.

    PubMed

    Emiliani, Esteban; Gavrilov, Pavel; Mayordomo, Olga; Salvador, Josep; Palou, Joan; Rosales, Antonio; Villavicencio, Humberto

    2017-05-01

    To describe the laparoscopic approach for uretero-ileal anastomosis strictures and to analyse our long term series. A retrospective review was performed evaluating our series of patients with benign ureteroileal anastomosis strictures treated laparoscopically from 2011 to 2017. Demographics and perioperative data were obtained and analyzed. Complications were described with the Clavien-Dindo classification. The surgical technique was described and a literature review was performed. Eleven procedures were performed in ten patients. Mean blood loss was 180 ml. All the operations were performed laparoscopically without conversion. Mean hospital stay was 10 days (4-23). Early complications were Clavien-Dindo I y II: Two cases of limited anastomosis leakage, one lymphorrea, one paralitic ileum and one accidental descent of the ureteral catheter. Mean follow-up was 56 months (12-179) No late complications have been described. Based on our series with 5 year follow up, the laparoscopic approach for uretero-ileal anastomosis strictures is feasible and safe.

  3. A Follow-up Study: The Registered Nurses Program, 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kondwros, Jerry M.

    Twenty-seven (77.1%) of the thirty-five 1977 graduates of the South Georgia Colleges' Division of Nursing responded to a follow-up survey, producing the following information: (1) 17 were employed full-time, two were employed part-time, and eight were unemployed; (2) 88.9% agreed they were prepared adequately for the state board examination; (3)…

  4. Ute Unit: Study Guide and Follow Up Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Conejos School District, Capulin, CO.

    The study guide and follow-up activities were designed primarily to give students a feeling of Ute life in the San Luis Valley in Colorado. The unit begins with six Southern Ute stories about the wolf and coyote, the race between the skunk and the coyote, the frog and the eagle, why the frog croaks, the bear (Que Ye Qat), and the two Indian…

  5. The Doctorate in Education. Volume IV, Follow-UP Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludlow, H. Glenn; And Others

    A study was conducted (follow-up to SP 004 600) of the 1,186 recipients of the Ed.D. and Ph.D. degrees in education in the United States in 1958. Questionnaire data was collected to investigate 5-year career development and job satisfaction plus ability and achievement (as measured by high school graduating class rank, intelligence test scores,…

  6. Bobath or motor relearning programme? A follow-up one and four years post stroke.

    PubMed

    Langhammer, Birgitta; Stanghelle, Johan K

    2003-11-01

    The purpose of this follow-up one and four years post stroke was to find out whether the initial physiotherapy approach had had any long-term effects on mortality, motor function, postural control, activities of daily living, life quality, follow-up from community services and living conditions. A randomized controlled trial of first time ever stroke patients. Group 1 (n = 33) and group 2 (n = 28) had initial physiotherapy according to the Motor Relearning Programme and Bobath, respectively. The Motor Assessment Scale (MAS), the Sødring Motor Evaluation Scale (SMES), the Barthel ADL Index, the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) and Berg Balance Scale were used. The following parameters were also registered: incidence of new strokes, other diseases, use of assistive devices, the patient's accommodation and use of services from the community. The mortality rates were similar in the two groups. In both groups the motor function, postural control and ADL had decreased rapidly, leaving many of the patients dependent and with a high risk of falling. Life quality had increased compared to the acute stage, but was still low in comparison with healthy persons. Patients in both groups lived at home, but were dependent on help from relatives and community services. Physiotherapy as follow-up service was seldom used. The initial physiotherapy approach did not seem to have a major influence on the patients' ability to cope in the long-term. This follow-up at one and four years post stroke showed no major influence of two different initial physiotherapy regimens on long-term function. The study confirmed a rapid deterioration of ADL and motor function and an increased dependence on relatives. The study reveals a gap between the intense treatment in the acute phase and little or no follow-up of physiotherapy treatment or other rehabilitation activities later.

  7. A follow-up study of attempted railway suicides.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, I; Arthur, A J; Farmer, R D

    1994-02-01

    This paper reports the subsequent mortality of 94 persons who attempted suicide by jumping in front of London Underground trains between 1977 and 1979. The follow-up period was 10 yr. Despite the apparent seriousness of the method, completion of suicide was not found to be higher than in previous studies of attempted suicide by other methods. By the end of the follow-up period 18 persons had died, nine of natural causes. Coroners' inquests were held for the unnatural deaths. Seven verdicts of suicide and two of accidental death were recorded. Of the nine unnatural deaths four were from multiple injuries, three from drowning, one from asphyxia and one from acute narcotic poisoning. All four multiple injury deaths were women, three of these were from repeated incidents involving London Underground trains. The time interval between the index attempt and eventual death for the suicide/accident group ranged from 1 day to 43 months. For ethical reasons it was not possible to follow-up attempted suicides who were presumed to have remained alive.

  8. Follow-up of permanent hearing impairment in childhood.

    PubMed

    Della Volpe, A; De Lucia, A; Pastore, V; Bracci Laudiero, L; Buonissimo, I; Ricci, G

    2016-02-01

    Programmes for early childhood childhood hearing impairment identification allows to quickly start the appropriate hearing aid fitting and rehabilitation process; nevertheless, a large number of patients do not join the treatment program. The goal of this article is to present the results of a strategic review of the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats connected with the audiologic/prosthetic/language follow-up process of children with bilateral permanent hearing impairment. Involving small children, the follow-up includes the involvement of specialised professionals of a multidisciplinary team and a complex and prolonged multi-faced management. Within the framework of the Italian Ministry of Health project CCM 2013 "Preventing Communication Disorders: a Regional Program for Early Identification, Intervention and Care of Hearing Impaired Children", the purpose of this analysis was to propose recommendations that can harmonise criteria for outcome evaluation and provide guidance on the most appropriate assessment methods to be used in the follow-up course of children with permanent hearing impairment. © Copyright by Società Italiana di Otorinolaringologia e Chirurgia Cervico-Facciale.

  9. Follow-Up Photometry of Kelt Transiting Planet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Denise C.; Joner, Michael D.; Hintz, Eric G.; Martin, Trevor; Spencer, Alex; Kelt Follow-Up Network (FUN) Team

    2017-10-01

    We have three telescopes at BYU that we use to follow-up possible transiting planet canidates for the KELT team. These telescopes were used to collect data on Kelt-16b and Kelt-9b, which is the hottest known exoplanet. More recently we used the newest of these telescopes, a robotic 8-inch telescope on the roof of our building, to confirm the most recent Kelt planet that will be published soon. This research has been ideal for the teaching and training of undergraduate students in the art of photometric observing and data reduction. In this presentation I will highlight how we are using our membership in the Kelt team to further the educational objective of our undergraduate astronomy program, while contributing meaningful science to the ever growing field of exoplanet discovery. I will also highlight a few of the more interesting Kelt planets and the minimum telescope requirements for detecting these planets. I will then discuss the sensitivities required to follow-up future TESS candidates, which may be of interest to others interested in joining the TESS follow-up teams.

  10. [Guidelines for the follow up of patients with bronchopulmonary dysplasia].

    PubMed

    Pérez Tarazona, S; Rueda Esteban, S; Alfonso Diego, J; Barrio Gómez de Agüero, M I; Callejón Callejón, A; Cortell Aznar, I; de la Serna Blázquez, O; Domingo Miró, X; García García, M L; García Hernández, G; Luna Paredes, C; Mesa Medina, O; Moreno Galdó, A; Moreno Requena, L; Pérez Pérez, G; Salcedo Posadas, A; Sánchez Solís de Querol, M; Torrent Vernetta, A; Valdesoiro Navarrete, L; Vilella Sabaté, M

    2016-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is the most common complication of preterm birth, and remains a major problem in pediatric pulmonology units. The decision of discharging from the Neonatal Unit should be based on a thorough assessment of the condition of the patient and compliance with certain requirements, including respiratory and nutritional stability, and caregiver education on disease management. For proper control of the disease, a schedule of visits and complementary tests should be established prior to discharge, and guidelines for prevention of exacerbations and appropriate treatment should be applied. In this paper, the Working Group in Perinatal Respiratory Diseases of the Spanish Society of Pediatric Pulmonology proposes a protocol to serve as a reference for the follow up of patients with BPD among different centers and health care settings. Key factors to consider when planning discharge from the Neonatal Unit and during follow up are reviewed. Recommendations on treatment and prevention of complications are then discussed. The final section of this guide aims to provide a specific schedule for follow-up and diagnostic interventions to be performed in patients with BPD. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Neonatal follow-up program: Where do we stand?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Neonatal follow-up program (NFP) is becoming the corner stone of standard, high quality care provided to newborns at risk of future neuorodevelopmental delay. Most of the recognized neonatal intensive care units in the developed countries are adopting NFP as part of their mandatory care for the best long term outcome of high risk infants, especially very low birth weight (VLBW) infants. Unfortunately, in the developing and in underdeveloped countries, such early detection and intervention programs are rarely existing, mainly because of the lack of awareness of and exposure to such programs in spite of the increasing numbers of surviving sick newborns due to advancement in neonatal care in these countries. This is a review article to explore the Neonatal follow-up programs looking at historical development, benefts and aims, and standard requirements for successful program development that can be adopted in our countries. In conclusion, proper Neonatal follow-up programs are needed to improve neonatal outcome. Therefore all professionals working in the feld of neonatal care in developing countries should cooperate to create such programs for early detection and hence early intervention for any adverse long term outcome in high-risk newborn infants PMID:27493326

  12. Complications and Follow-up after Unprotected Carotid Artery Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Hauth, Elke A.M.; Drescher, Robert; Jansen, Christian

    2006-08-15

    Purpose. This prospective study was undertaken to determine the success rate, complications, and outcome of carotid artery stenting (CAS) without the use of cerebral protection devices. Methods. During 12 months, 94 high-grade stenoses of the carotid artery in 91 consecutive patients were treated. Sixty-six (70%) of the stenoses were symptomatic and 28 (30%) were asymptomatic. Results. In all 94 carotid stenoses CAS was successfully performed. During the procedure and within the 30 days afterwards, there were 2 deaths and 3 major strokes in the 66 symptomatic patients, resulting in a combined death and stroke rate of 5 of 66 (7%).more » Only one of these complications, a major stroke, occurred during the procedure. In the 6-month follow-up, one additional major stroke occurred in a originally symptomatic patient resulting in a combined death and stroke rate of 6 of 66 (10%) for symptomatic patients at 6 months. No major complications occurred in asymptomatic patients during the procedure or in the 6-month follow-up period. At 6 months angiographic follow-up the restenosis rate with a degree of >50% was 3 of 49 (6%) and the rate with a degree of {>=}70% was 1 of 49 (2%). Conclusions. Cerebral embolization during CAS is not the only cause of the stroke and death rate associated with the procedure. The use of cerebral protection devices during the procedure may therefore not prevent all major complications following CAS.« less

  13. Appraising the value of independent EIA follow-up verifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Wessels, Jan-Albert, E-mail: janalbert.wessels@nwu.ac.za; Retief, Francois, E-mail: francois.retief@nwu.ac.za; Morrison-Saunders, Angus, E-mail: A.Morrison-Saunders@murdoch.edu.au

    Independent Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) follow-up verifiers such as monitoring agencies, checkers, supervisors and control officers are active on various construction sites across the world. There are, however, differing views on the value that these verifiers add and very limited learning in EIA has been drawn from independent verifiers. This paper aims to appraise how and to what extent independent EIA follow-up verifiers add value in major construction projects in the developing country context of South Africa. A framework for appraising the role of independent verifiers was established and four South African case studies were examined through a mixture ofmore » site visits, project document analysis, and interviews. Appraisal results were documented in the performance areas of: planning, doing, checking, acting, public participating and integration with other programs. The results indicate that independent verifiers add most value to major construction projects when involved with screening EIA requirements of new projects, allocation of financial and human resources, checking legal compliance, influencing implementation, reporting conformance results, community and stakeholder engagement, integration with self-responsibility programs such as environmental management systems (EMS), and controlling records. It was apparent that verifiers could be more creatively utilized in pre-construction preparation, providing feedback of knowledge into assessment of new projects, giving input to the planning and design phase of projects, and performance evaluation. The study confirms the benefits of proponent and regulator follow-up, specifically in having independent verifiers that disclose information, facilitate discussion among stakeholders, are adaptable and proactive, aid in the integration of EIA with other programs, and instill trust in EIA enforcement by conformance evaluation. Overall, the study provides insight on how to harness the learning

  14. ICU Telemedicine Program Financial Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lilly, Craig M; Motzkus, Christine; Rincon, Teresa; Cody, Shawn E; Landry, Karen; Irwin, Richard S

    2017-02-01

    ICU telemedicine improves access to high-quality critical care, has substantial costs, and can change financial outcomes. Detailed information about financial outcomes and their trends over time following ICU telemedicine implementation and after the addition of logistic center function has not been published to our knowledge. Primary data were collected for consecutive adult patients of a single academic medical center. We compared clinical and financial outcomes across three groups that differed regarding telemedicine support: a group without ICU telemedicine support (pre-ICU intervention group), a group with ICU telemedicine support (ICU telemedicine group), and an ICU telemedicine group with added logistic center functions and support for quality-care standardization (logistic center group). The primary outcome was annual direct contribution margin defined as aggregated annual case revenue minus annual case direct costs (including operating costs of ICU telemedicine and its related programs). All monetary values were adjusted to 2015 US dollars using Producer Price Index for Health-Care Facilities. Annual case volume increased from 4,752 (pre-ICU telemedicine) to 5,735 (ICU telemedicine) and 6,581 (logistic center). The annual direct contribution margin improved from $7,921,584 (pre-ICU telemedicine) to $37,668,512 (ICU telemedicine) to $60,586,397 (logistic center) due to increased case volume, higher case revenue relative to direct costs, and shorter length of stay. The ability of properly modified ICU telemedicine programs to increase case volume and access to high-quality critical care with improved annual direct contribution margins suggests that there is a financial argument to encourage the wider adoption of ICU telemedicine. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Preoperative characteristics and compliance with follow-up after trabeculectomy surgery in rural southern China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ke; Jin, Ling; Li, Li; Zeng, Siming; Dan, Aihua; Chen, Tingting; Wang, Xiuqin; Li, Guirong; Congdon, Nathan

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate preoperative characteristics and follow-up in rural China after trabeculectomy, the primary treatment for glaucoma there. Patients undergoing trabeculectomy at 14 rural hospitals in Guangdong and Guangxi Provinces and their doctors completed questionnaires concerning clinical and sociodemographic information, transportation, and knowledge and attitudes about glaucoma. Follow-up after surgery was assessed as cumulative score (1 week: 10 points, 2 weeks: 7 points, 1 month: 5 points). Among 212 eligible patients, mean preoperative presenting acuity in the operative eye was 6/120, with 61.3% (n=130) blind (≤6/60). Follow-up rates were 60.8% (129/212), 75.9% (161/212) and 26.9% (57/212) at 1 week, 2 weeks and 1 month, respectively. Patient predictors of poor follow-up included elementary education or less (OR=0.37, 95% CI 0.20 to 0.70, p=0.002), believing follow-up was not important (OR=0.62, 95% CI 0.41 to 0.94, p=0.02), lack of an accompanying person (OR=0.14, 95% CI 0.07 to 0.29, p<0.001), family annual income follow-up. Follow-up after 2 weeks was inadequate to provide optimal clinical care, and surgery is being applied too late to avoid blindness in the majority of patients. Earlier surgery, support for return visits and better explanations of the importance of follow-up are needed. Directing all patients to return for possible scleral flap suture removal may be a valid strategy to improve follow-up. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  16. Information, support, and follow-up offered to women who experienced severe maternal morbidity.

    PubMed

    Furniss, Mary; Conroy, Molly; Filoche, Sara; MacDonald, E Jane; Geller, Stacie E; Lawton, Beverley

    2018-06-01

    To determine what information, support, and follow-up were offered to women who had experienced severe maternal morbidity (SMM). The present retrospective case review included patients who experienced SMM (admission to intensive care during pregnancy or up to 42 days postpartum) who had previously been reviewed for potential preventability as part of a nationwide New Zealand study performed between January 1 and December 31, 2014. Data were audited to ascertain documented evidence of an event debrief or explanation; referral to social support and/or mental health services; a detailed discharge letter; and a follow-up appointment with a specialist. Of 257 patients who experienced SMM, 23 (8.9%) were offered all four components of care, 99 (38.5%) an event debrief, 102 (39.7%) a referral to social support and/or mental health services, 148 (57.6%) a detailed discharge letter, and 131 (51.0%) a follow-up appointment. Many women who had experienced SMM did not receive explanatory information about their illness, an offer of psychosocial support, or a follow-up appointment prior to discharge from hospital. It is incumbent on clinicians and the maternity care system to improve these aspects of care for all women experiencing a potentially life-changing SMM event to minimize the risk and burden of long-term mental illness. © 2018 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  17. Can JWST Follow Up on Gravitational-Wave Detections?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-02-01

    Bitten by the gravitational-wave bug? While we await Thursdays press conference, heres some food for thought: if LIGO were able to detect gravitational waves from compact-object mergers, how could we follow up on the detections? A new study investigates whether the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be able to observe electromagnetic signatures of some compact-object mergers.Hunting for MergersStudying compact-object mergers (mergers of black holes and neutron stars) can help us understand a wealth of subjects, like high-energy physics, how matter behaves at nuclear densities, how stars evolve, and how heavy elements in the universe were created.The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) is searching for the signature ripples in spacetime identifying these mergers, but gravitational waves are squirrelly: LIGO will only be able to localize wave sources to tens of square degrees. If we want to find out more about any mergers LIGO discovers in gravitational waves, well need a follow-up search for electromagnetic counterparts with other observatories.The Kilonova KeyOne possible electromagnetic counterpart is kilonovae, explosions that can be produced during a merger of a binary neutron star or a neutron starblack hole system. If the neutron star is disrupted during the merger, some of the hot mass is flung outward and shines brightly by radioactive decay.Kilonovae are especially promising as electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational waves for three reasons:They emit isotropically, so the number of observable mergers isnt limited by relativistic beaming.They shine for a week, giving follow-up observatories time to search for them.The source location can beeasily recovered.The only problem? We dont currently have any sensitive survey instruments in the near-infrared band (where kilonova emission peaks) that can provide coverage over tens of square degrees. Luckily, we will soon have just the thing: JWST, launching in 2018!JWSTs

  18. Sleep During Menopausal Transition: A 6-Year Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Lampio, Laura; Polo-Kantola, Päivi; Himanen, Sari-Leena; Kurki, Samu; Huupponen, Eero; Engblom, Janne; Heinonen, Olli J; Polo, Olli; Saaresranta, Tarja

    2017-07-01

    Menopausal transition is associated with increased dissatisfaction with sleep, but the effects on sleep architecture are conflicting. This prospective 6-year follow-up study was designed to evaluate the changes in sleep stages and sleep continuity that occur in women during menopausal transition. Sixty women (mean age 46.0 years, SD 0.9) participated. All women were premenopausal at baseline, and at the 6-year follow-up, women were in different stages of menopausal transition. Polysomnography was used to study sleep architecture at baseline and follow-up. The effects of aging and menopause (assessed as change in serum follicle-stimulating hormone [S-FSH]) on sleep architecture were evaluated using linear regression models. After controlling for body mass index, vasomotor, and depressive symptoms, aging of 6 years resulted in shorter total sleep time (B -37.4, 95% confidence interval [CI] -71.5 to (-3.3)), lower sleep efficiency (B -6.5, 95%CI -12.7 to (-0.2)), as well as in increased transitions from slow-wave sleep (SWS) to wakefulness (B 1.0, 95%CI 0.1 to 1.9), wake after sleep onset (B 37.7, 95%CI 12.5 to 63.0), awakenings per hour (B 1.8, 95%CI 0.8 to 2.8), and arousal index (B 2.3, 95%CI 0.1 to 4.4). Higher S-FSH concentration in menopausal transition was associated with increased SWS (B 0.09, 95%CI 0.01 to 0.16) after controlling for confounding factors. A significant deterioration in sleep continuity occurs when women age from 46 to 52 years, but change from premenopausal to menopausal state restores some SWS. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Mortality in acromegaly: a 20-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Ritvonen, Elina; Löyttyniemi, Eliisa; Jaatinen, Pia; Ebeling, Tapani; Moilanen, Leena; Nuutila, Pirjo; Kauppinen-Mäkelin, Ritva; Schalin-Jäntti, Camilla

    2016-06-01

    It is unclear whether mortality still is increased in acromegaly and whether there are gender-related differences. We dynamically assessed outcome during long-term follow-up in our nationwide cohort. We studied standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) relative to the general population and causes of death in acromegaly (n=333) compared with age- and gender-matched controls (n=4995). During 20 (0-33) years follow-up, 113 (34%) patients (n=333, 52% women) and 1334 (27%) controls (n=4995) died (P=0.004). SMR (1.9, 95% CI: 1.53-2.34, P<0.001) and all-cause mortality (OR 1.6, 95% CI: 1.2-2.2, P<0.001) were increased in acromegaly. Overall distribution of causes of death (P<0.001) differed between patients and controls but not cardiovascular (34% vs 33%) or cancer deaths (27% vs 27%). In acromegaly, but not in controls, causes of deaths shifted from 44% cardiovascular and 28% cancer deaths during the first decade, to 23% cardiovascular and 35% cancer deaths during the next two decades. In acromegaly, cancer deaths were mostly attributed to pancreatic adenocarcinoma (n=5), breast (n=4), lung (n=3) and colon (n=3) carcinoma. In acromegaly, men were younger than women at diagnosis (median 44.5 vs 50 years, P<0.001) and death (67 vs 76 years, P=0.0015). Compared with controls, women (36% vs 25%, P<0.01), but not men (31% vs 28%, P=0.44), had increased mortality. In acromegaly, men are younger at diagnosis and death than women. Compared with controls, mortality is increased during 20 years of follow-up, especially in women. Causes of deaths shift from predominantly cardiovascular to cancer deaths. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  20. Automated detection of follow-up appointments using text mining of discharge records.

    PubMed

    Ruud, Kari L; Johnson, Matthew G; Liesinger, Juliette T; Grafft, Carrie A; Naessens, James M

    2010-06-01

    To determine whether text mining can accurately detect specific follow-up appointment criteria in free-text hospital discharge records. Cross-sectional study. Mayo Clinic Rochester hospitals. Inpatients discharged from general medicine services in 2006 (n = 6481). Textual hospital dismissal summaries were manually reviewed to determine whether the records contained specific follow-up appointment arrangement elements: date, time and either physician or location for an appointment. The data set was evaluated for the same criteria using SAS Text Miner software. The two assessments were compared to determine the accuracy of text mining for detecting records containing follow-up appointment arrangements. Agreement of text-mined appointment findings with gold standard (manual abstraction) including sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV). About 55.2% (3576) of discharge records contained all criteria for follow-up appointment arrangements according to the manual review, 3.2% (113) of which were missed through text mining. Text mining incorrectly identified 3.7% (107) follow-up appointments that were not considered valid through manual review. Therefore, the text mining analysis concurred with the manual review in 96.6% of the appointment findings. Overall sensitivity and specificity were 96.8 and 96.3%, respectively; and PPV and NPV were 97.0 and 96.1%, respectively. of individual appointment criteria resulted in accuracy rates of 93.5% for date, 97.4% for time, 97.5% for physician and 82.9% for location. Text mining of unstructured hospital dismissal summaries can accurately detect documentation of follow-up appointment arrangement elements, thus saving considerable resources for performance assessment and quality-related research.

  1. Klenot Project - Near Earth Objects Follow-Up Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichý, Miloš; Tichá, Jana; Kočer, Michal

    2016-01-01

    NEO research is a great challenge just now - for science, for exploration and for planetary defence. Therefore NEO discoveries, astrometric follow-up, orbit computations as well as physical studies are of high interest both to science community and humankind. The KLENOT Project of the Klet Observatory, South Bohemia, Czech Republic pursued the confirmation, early follow-up, long-arc follow-up and recovery of Near Earth Objects since 2002. Tens of thousands astrometric measurements helped to make inventory of NEOs as well as to understand the NEO population. It ranked among the world most prolific professional NEO follow-up programmes during its first phase from 2002 to 2008. The fundamental improvement of the 1.06-m KLENOT Telescope was started in autumn 2008. The new computer controlled paralactic mount was built to substantially increase telescope-time efficiency, the number of observations, their accuracy and limiting magnitude. The testing observations of the KLENOT Telescope Next Generation (NG) were started in October 2011. The new more efficient CCD camera FLI ProLine 230 was installed in summer 2013. The original Klet Software Package has been continually upgraded over the past two decades of operation. Along with huge hardware changes we have decided for essential changes in software and the whole KLENOT work-flow. Using the current higher computing power available, enhancing and updating our databases and astrometry program, the core of our software package, will prove highly beneficial. Moreover, the UCAC4 as the more precise astrometric star catalog was implemented. The modernized KLENOT System was put into full operation in September 2013. This step opens new possibilities for the KLENOT Project, the long-term European Contribution to Monitoring and Cataloging Near Earth Objects. KLENOT Project Goals are confirmatory observations of newly discovered fainter NEO candidates, early follow-up of newly discovered NEOs, long-arc follow-up astrometry of NEOs

  2. Shillapoo Wildlife Area 2007 Follow-up HEP Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, Paul R.

    In April and May 2007 the Regional HEP Team (RHT) conducted a follow-up HEP analysis on the Egger (612 acres) and Herzog (210 acres) parcels located at the north end of the Shillapoo Wildlife Area. The Egger and Herzog parcels have been managed with Bonneville Power Administration funds since acquired in 1998 and 2001 respectively. Slightly more than 936 habitat units (936.47) or 1.14 HUs per acre was generated as an outcome of the 2007 follow-up HEP surveys. Results included 1.65 black-capped chickadee HUs, 280.57 great blue heron HUs, 581.45 Canada goose HUs, 40 mallard HUs, and 32.80 mink HUs.more » Introduction A follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) (USFWS 1980) analysis was conducted by the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's (CBFWA) Regional HEP Team (RHT) during April and May 2007 to document changes in habitat quality and to determine the number of habitat units (HUs) to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing operation and maintenance (O&M) funds since WDFW acquired the parcels. The 2007 follow-up HEP evaluation was limited to Shillapoo Wildlife Area (SWA) parcels purchased with Bonneville Power Administration funds. D. Budd (pers. comm.) reported WDFW purchased the 612 acre Egger Farms parcel on November 2, 1998 for $1,737,0001 and the 210 acre Herzog acquisition on June 21, 2001 for $500,000 with Memorandum of Agreement funds (BPA and WDFW 1996) as partial fulfillment of BPA's wildlife mitigation obligation for construction of Bonneville and John Day Dams (Rasmussen and Wright 1989). Anticipating the eventual acquisition of the Egger and Herzog properties, WDFW conducted HEP surveys on these lands in 1994 to determine the potential number of habitat units to be credited to BPA. As a result, HEP surveys and habitat unit calculations were completed as much as seven years prior to acquiring the sites. The term 'Shillapoo Wildlife Area' will be used to describe only the Herzog and Egger parcels in this document. Details

  3. [Clinical and sperm follow-up after subinguinal varicocelectomy].

    PubMed

    Vicari, E; Arancio, A; Costanzo, C; Ingrassia, G; Cannizzaro, M A

    2000-06-01

    In order to evaluate the sperm output and the adverse-side-effects after subinguinal varicoceloctomy, a follow-up study of 16 months was performed on 196 selected patients (aged from 22 to 43 years) affected by left varicocele (VR). In the pre-treatment, both Doppler ultrasonography and didymo-epididymal ultrasonography allowed to distinguish two homogeneous patient groups: group A (no. = 136), including patients affected by VR alone and, group B (n. = 60), including patients with VR combined to coincidental didymo-epididymal morphological abnormalities, DEMA). These DEMA lesions (testis size < 12 ml, epididymides abnormalities: increased head- > or = 12 mm- and/or tail- > or = 6 mm-diameter, multiple microcysts, large idrocele) were omolaterally to VR in 30/60 (50%), eterolaterally in 19/60 (31.7%) or bilaterally in 11/60 (18.3%). During sperm follow-up, group A patients showed both a significant temporal change (p < 0.01 ANOVA) of all sperm parameters studied (sperm density, total sperm count, motility and morphology) from month 8 onward and sperm values significantly higher than found in group B patients. On the contrary, the sperm parameters of group B patients did not change significantly during the follow-up observations. As far as the varicocelectomy-mediated clinical symptoms, some patients complained early and transiently (on 1-2-4 weeks following varicocelectomy) the following symptoms: didymal pain (1.5%), didymo-epididymal pain (4.1%) and parasthesiaes on the anterior-medial side of the left thigh (4.1%) or scrotal (3.1%); only four patients (2%) complained permanent paresthesiaes on the anterior-medial side of the left thigh. Furthermore, the clinical follow-up also revealed a low rate of complications: persistent VR (3.6%), hydrocele (1.5%), intrascrotal venous ecstasies (6.1%), epididymitis (0.5%). Some morpho-structural abnormalities at US scans were transient (1-2 weeks): scrotal oedema (6.1%), orchitis (2%), orchi-epididymitis (1%). Subinguinal

  4. [Follow-up interventions after suicide attempt. What tools, what effects and how to assess them?

    PubMed

    Castaigne, E; Hardy, P; Mouaffak, F

    2017-02-01

    After attempting suicide, 60 to 70% of patients are discharged from emergency departments and referred to outpatient treatment which entails psychosocial strategies, pharmacological strategies or a combination. The main objective of outpatient care consists in preventing recurrent suicidal behavior. Yet suicide attempters have been found to be very difficult to engage in treatment. Between 11% and 50% of attempters refuse outpatient treatment or drop out of outpatient therapy very quickly. In order to address this extremely serious issue, for the past 20 years monitoring or follow up interventions has been presented as a promising approach. Follow-up intervention is defined as a service that aims at both increased access to and engagement in care as well as to prevent suicide and related behaviors. This approach consists in "stay in contact" or "connectedness" protocols using phone calls or tele-assistance, sending letters, email or mobile phone messages and medical visits or nursing at home. From one study to another these tools have been used separately, associated to one another or reinforced by motivational interviewing or brief psychotherapy. To our knowledge, since 1993 16 controlled and randomized controlled studies assessed the effectiveness of diverse follow-up. Four studies assessing telephone follow up reported a significant decrease in suicide reattempt while one study evaluating a sending letters strategy reported positive results. Among five studies assessing engagement in healthcare, only two (one using phone follow up and the other sending letters reported significantly positive results. The refusal rate of monitoring strategies has not exceeded 11% attesting to the high applicability of these methods. Despite several positive results, we cannot draw firm conclusions on replicability of these results. This is largely due to methodological issues: lack of standardization of interventions, lack of consensus on definition of the main measured variables

  5. The LCOGT near-Earth-object follow-up network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, T.

    2014-07-01

    Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope (LCOGT) network is a planned homogeneous network that will eventually consist of over 35 telescopes at 6 locations in the northern and southern hemispheres [1]. This network is versatile and designed to respond rapidly to target of opportunity events and also to do long term monitoring of slowly changing astronomical phenomena. The global coverage of the network and the apertures of telescope available make the LCOGT network ideal for follow-up and characterization of a wide range of solar-system objects (e.g. asteroids, Kuiper-belt objects, comets) and in particular near-Earth objects (NEOs). There are 3 classes to the telescope resources: 2-meter aperture, 1-meter aperture and 0.4-meter aperture. We have been operating our two 2-meter telescopes since 2005 and began a specific program of NEO follow-up for the Pan-STARRS survey in October 2010. The combination of all-sky access, large aperture, rapid response, robotic operation and good site conditions allows us to provide time-critical follow-up astrometry and photometry on newly discovered objects and faint objects as they recede from the Earth, allowing the orbital arc to be extended and preventing loss of objects. These telescope resources have greatly increased as LCOGT has completed the first phase of the deployment, designated as ''Version 1.0'', with the installation, commissioning and ongoing operation of nine 1-meter telescopes. These are distributed among four sites with one 1-meter at McDonald Observatory (Texas), three telescopes at Cerro Tololo (Chile), three telescopes at SAAO (South Africa) and the final two telescope at Siding Spring Observatory (Australia). In addition to the 1-meter network, the scheduling and control system for the two 2-meter telescopes have been upgraded and unified with that of the 1-meter network to provide a coherent robotic telescopic network. The telescope network is now operating and observations are being executed remotely and

  6. Long-term follow up of gallbladder polyps.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong Youp; Hong, Sung Pil; Kim, Yoon Jae; Kim, Hong Jeoung; Kim, Hee Man; Cho, Jae Hee; Park, Seung Woo; Song, Si Young; Chung, Jae Bock; Bang, Seungmin

    2009-02-01

    The management of gallbladder polyps (GBP) is directly linked to the early diagnosis of gallbladder cancer (GBC). This study aimed to evaluate the malignant risk of GBP. In total, 1558 patients diagnosed with GBP were followed. Neoplastic polyps were defined as GBC and its premalignant lesions. The risk for malignancy was estimated with the cumulative detection rate of neoplastic polyps. Thirty-three cases (2.1%) were diagnosed with neoplastic polyps. The cumulative detection rates of neoplastic polyps were 1.7% at 1 year, 2.8% at 5 years, and 4% at 8 years after diagnosis. The size of GBP and the presence of gallstones were risk factors for neoplastic polyps. Polyps > or = 10 mm had a 24.2 times greater risk of malignancy than polyps < 10 mm. However, 15 of 33 neoplastic polyps (45.5%) were < 10 mm at the time of diagnosis of GBP. During follow up in 36 (3.5%) of 1027 cases, an increase in size was detected; of these, nine (25%) had neoplastic polyps. Even small polyps have a risk of malignancy, and careful long-term follow up of GBP will help detect and treat early GBC.

  7. Sonographic follow-up of ethanolamine oleate sclerotherapy for hydrocele.

    PubMed

    Mattila, S I; Tammela, T L; Mäkäräinen, H P; Hellström, P A

    1993-06-01

    Sclerotherapy has gained increasing popularity during the last few years as a treatment for hydrocele. Little is known of the natural course of intrascrotal changes, however, nor of their timetable after therapy. In the present trial scrotal ultrasonography was performed before the sclerotherapy and during the follow-up examination in the case of 70 symptomatic consecutive outpatients ranging in age from 19 to 85 years (mean, 58 years) with 71 hydroceles treated by ethanolamine oleate sclerotherapy. Posttreatment sonographic findings typically included heterogeneously echogenic extratesticular masses, cystic areas with peritesticular hyperechoic lines, and a thickened scrotal wall. All the lesions showed improvement. Sonography proved to be useful for differentiating hydroceles from spermatoceles and for evaluating the need for a renewed treatment during follow-up. Ethanolamine oleate was effective as a sclerosant, as 86% of cases were cured or significantly improved. Complications were mild and uncommon, and no intratesticular or epididymal changes were observed. Ethanolamine oleate sclerotherapy can be recommended as a treatment of choice for hydrocele.

  8. [Follow-up of children conceived by assisted reproductive technologies].

    PubMed

    Bouillon, C; Fauque, P

    2013-05-01

    Since the birth of the first baby conceived by in vitro fertilization (IVF) 30 years ago (Louise Brown in 1978), there has been a rapid and constant increase in the number of couples using assisted reproductive technologies (ART). Around four million of children have been born from couples experiencing fertility problems, through the use of ART, comprising roughly 2-3 % of all births in Europe and U.S. That highlights that these modes of fertilization are now well assumed by our societies. However, several questions on health of these children remain to be elucidated. As evoked in this review, even if methodological limitations exist, numerous studies have reported increased risks of birth defects, like prematurity, foetal hypotrophy, neonatal complications, congenital malformations and epigenetic diseases among ART-conceived children as compared to naturally conceived children. Nowadays, it is difficult to determine if these increased risks found in ART infants are a consequence of the ART procedures or are inherent to the infertility problems per se. However, absolute risks remain moderate and reassuring as well as the data on follow-up into infancy and early childhood. Nevertheless, because the effects may occur at the adulthood, there is a need for long-term follow-up of children born after ART. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Long-term follow-up of atomic bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Ritsu; Grant, Eric J; Ozasa, Kotaro

    2012-06-01

    The Life Span Study (LSS) is a follow-up study of atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors to investigate the radiation effects on human health and has collected data for over 60 years. The LSS cohort consists of 93,741 A-bomb survivors and another 26,580 age and sex-matched subjects who were not in either city at the time of the bombing. Radiation doses have been computed based on individual location and shielding status at the time of the bombings. Age at death and cause of death are gathered through the Japanese national family registry system and cancer incidence data have been collected through the Hiroshima and Nagasaki cancer registries. Noncancer disease incidence and health information are collected through biannual medical examinations among a subset of the LSS. Radiation significantly increases the risks of death (22% at 1 Gy), cancer incidence (47% at 1 Gy), death due to leukemia (310% at 1 Gy), as well as the incidence of several noncancer diseases (e.g. thyroid nodules, chronic liver disease and cirrhosis, uterine myoma, and hypertension). Significant effects on maturity (e.g. growth reduction and early menopause) were also observed. Long-term follow-up studies of the A-bomb survivors have provided reliable information on health risks for the survivors and form the basis for radiation protection standards for workers and the public. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Follow-up observations of SN 2010dn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botticella, Maria Teresa; Kotak, Rubina; Meikle, Peter; Smartt, Stephen; Pastorello, Andrea; Benetti, Stefano

    2010-06-01

    A new intriguing transient, SN 2010dn in NGC 3184, was discovered ten days ago. The spectroscopic and photometric evolution make this transient similar to SN 2008S, the 2006 optical transient in M85 and the 2008 optical transient in NGC 300, members of a new class of transient events given the similar pre-explosion?and post-explosion properties. The nature of these transient is still debated?and our experience with SN 2008S proved that?Spitzer data are?invaluable to shed light on it providing a critical information in the understanding?the geometry of the circumstellar environment of these transients both for the dust enshrouded progenitor stars and after?their explosion. We would like to obtain a rapid follow-up of SN 2010dn with Spitzer to check if also this transient is producing an IR echo from substantial circumstellar material around the progenitor star. The modeling of the light echo will allow us to constrain the mass and?physical scale?of the circumstellar dust around this transient and as consequence to probe the mass loss history of the progenitor star. The proposed observations will be coordinated with an extensive optical follow up and?will be of interest to the broad scientific community. To obtain prompt observations after the discovery?is crucial.

  11. Evaluating telephone follow-up of a mail survey of community pharmacies.

    PubMed

    Westrick, Salisa C; Mount, Jeanine K

    2007-06-01

    Mail and telephone are commonly used modes of survey with pharmacists. Research conducted using general population surveys consistently describes mail surveys as being less expensive but yielding lower response rates than telephone surveys. However, findings obtained from the general population may not be generalizable to pharmacist surveys. This study evaluates the effectiveness of telephone follow-up of mail survey nonrespondents by comparing the 2 survey modes on response rates, cooperation rates, cost per sample unit, and cost per usable response and evaluating potential nonresponse bias in the context of immunization activities. A census mail survey of 1,143 Washington State community pharmacies and a follow-up telephone survey of 262 randomly selected mail survey nonrespondents were compared. Both surveys included the same 15 yes/no-type questions to ask respondents about their pharmacy's involvement in immunization activities. The mail survey yielded a response rate 1 of 26.7% and a cooperation rate 1 of 26.7%, compared with 83.6% and 87.8%, respectively, for the follow-up telephone survey. With respect to cost per sample unit, the mail survey was the least expensive option ($1.20). However, when comparing cost per usable response, the mail survey was the most expensive ($4.37), and the follow-up telephone survey without an advance notification was the least expensive ($1.99). Furthermore, results suggest the presence of nonresponse bias: compared with pharmacies participating in the follow-up telephone survey, pharmacies participating in the mail survey were more likely to be involved in in-house immunization services but less likely to be involved in outsourced services. The telephone survey achieved higher outcome rates with reduced cost per usable response. A telephone survey is a viable mode that holds promise in pharmacy practice research. Maximizing response rates and assessing potential nonresponse bias should be a standard practice among pharmacy

  12. The US Department of Defense Millennium Cohort Study: career span and beyond longitudinal follow-up.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tyler C

    2009-10-01

    To describe current and future career-span health research in the US Department of Defense Millennium Cohort Study. Collaborating with all military service branches and the Department of Veterans Affairs, the Millennium Cohort Study launched in 2001, before September 11 and the start of deployments in Afghanistan and Iraq, to conduct coordinated strategic research to determine any effects of military occupational and deployment-related exposures, on long-term health. More than 150,000 consenting members represent demographic, occupational, military, and health characteristics of the US military. More than 70% of the first two panels have submitted follow-up questionnaires and >50% have deployed since 2001. Prospective cohort data have identified subgroups of military populations at higher risk or more resilient to decrements in mental and physical health. Continued career span and beyond follow-up will answer long-term health questions related to military service.

  13. Employment Outcomes of Chemical Dependency Treatment and Additional Vocational Services Publicly Funded by Washington State. A Four-and-a-Half Year Follow-up Study of Indigent Persons served by Washington State's Alcoholism and Drug Addiction Treatment and Support Act (ADATSA). Key Findings. Briefing Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Marsha; Longhi, Dario; Luchansky, Bill

    In 1987, the state of Washington created a program--the Alcohol and Drug Addiction Treatment and Support Act (ADATSA)--to treat adults addicted to alcohol or other drugs. This paper sows the results of a four-and-a-half year follow-up study of clients receiving treatment and reviews the effectiveness of ADATSA. Whereas the immediate goal of the…

  14. Routine Angiographic Follow-Up versus Clinical Follow-Up after Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong Hoon; Her, Ae-Young; Choi, Byoung Geol; Shim, Minsuk; Choi, Se Yeon; Byun, Jae Kyeong; Li, Hu; Kim, Woohyeun; Kang, Jun Hyuk; Choi, Jah Yeon; Park, Eun Jin; Park, Sung Hun; Lee, Sunki; Na, Jin Oh; Choi, Cheol Ung; Lim, Hong Euy; Kim, Eung Ju; Park, Chang Gyu; Seo, Hong Seog; Oh, Dong Joo

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Differences in the utility of routine angiographic follow-up (RAF) and clinical follow-up (CF) after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) are not well understood. The present study aimed to compare the 3-year clinical outcomes of RAF and CF in AMI patients who underwent PCI with drug-eluting stents (DES). Materials and Methods A total of 774 consecutive AMI patients who underwent PCI with DES were enrolled. RAF was performed at 6 to 9 months after index PCI (n=425). The remaining patients were medically managed and clinically followed (n=349); symptom-driven events were captured. To adjust for any potential confounders, a propensity score matched analysis was performed using a logistic regression model, and two propensity-matched groups (248 pairs, n=496, C-statistic=0.739) were generated. Cumulative clinical outcomes up to 3 years were compared between RAF and CF groups. Results During the 3-year follow-up period, the cumulative incidences of revascularization [target lesion revascularization: hazard ratio (HR), 2.40; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.18–4.85; p=0.015, target vessel revascularization (TVR): HR, 3.33; 95% CI, 1.69–6.58; p=0.001, non-TVR: HR, 5.64; 95% CI, 1.90–16.6; p=0.002] and major adverse cardiac events (MACE; HR, 3.32; 95% CI, 1.92–5.73; p<0.001) were significantly higher in the RAF group than the CF group. However, the 3-year incidences of death and myocardial infarction were not different between the two groups. Conclusion RAF following index PCI with DES in AMI patients was associated with increased incidences of revascularization and MACE. Therefore, CF seems warranted for asymptomatic patients after PCI for AMI. PMID:28540983

  15. Long-term follow-up of DDD pacing mode.

    PubMed

    Ulman, Mateusz; Dębski, Maciej; Ząbek, Andrzej; Haberka, Kazimierz; Lelakowski, Jacek; Małecka, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the long-term survival of DDD pacing and identify the main reasons for its loss. The study group consisted of 496 patients in whom a DDD pacing system was implanted between October 1984 and March 2002 and who were followed up until July 2010. The follow-up period was 152.1 ± 35.5 months. The patients' mean age at the time of implantation was 59.5 ± 12.5 years, and 53.5% were male; 58% had sick sinus syndrome (SSS), 26% had atrioventricular block (AVB), 15% had both of these indications simultaneously, and 1% had other indications. The incidence of lead malfunction, progression to chronic atrial fibrillation (AF), and the rate of infective complications was analysed. During the follow-up, 369 patients remained in DDD mode stimulation. DDD mode survival rate at one, five, ten and 15 years was, respectively, 96%, 86%, 77% and 72%. The most common reason for reprogramming out of DDD mode was the development of permanent AF in 65 (13.1%) patients. The occurrence of chronic AF was associated with a prior history of paroxysmal AF (p = 0.0001), SSS (p = 0.0215), and older age at time of implantation (p = 0.0068) compared to patients who remained in sinus rhythm. Lead malfunction caused loss of DDD mode pacing in 56 (11.3%) patients. Atrial leads were damaged in 37 patients, ventricular in 12 patients, and both leads in seven patients. The subclavian vein puncture was correlated with the mechanical damage of the atrial lead (p = 0.02935) compared to cephalic vein access. At the moment of complication, the patients with a dysfunctional lead were significantly younger than those who progressed to chronic AF(p = 0.0019). Infective complications which caused temporary loss of DDD pacing were observed in six patients: five had pocket infection and one had lead-dependent infective endocarditis. 1. Effective DDD pacing from the originally implanted system was noted in a high percentage (72%) of patients in long-term observation (15 years

  16. Vaginismus Treatment: Clinical Trials Follow Up 241 Patients.

    PubMed

    Pacik, Peter T; Geletta, Simon

    2017-06-01

    Vaginismus is mostly unknown among clinicians and women. Vaginismus causes women to have fear, anxiety, and pain with penetration attempts. To present a large cohort of patients based on prior published studies approved by an institutional review board and the Food and Drug Administration using a comprehensive multimodal vaginismus treatment program to treat the physical and psychologic manifestations of women with vaginismus and to record successes, failures, and untoward effects of this treatment approach. Assessment of vaginismus included a comprehensive pretreatment questionnaire, the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI), and consultation. All patients signed a detailed informed consent. Treatment consisted of a multimodal approach including intravaginal injections of onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox) and bupivacaine, progressive dilation under conscious sedation, indwelling dilator, follow-up and support with office visits, phone calls, e-mails, dilation logs, and FSFI reports. Logs noting dilation progression, pain and anxiety scores, time to achieve intercourse, setbacks, and untoward effects. Post-treatment FSFI scores were compared with preprocedure scores. One hundred seventy-one patients (71%) reported having pain-free intercourse at a mean of 5.1 weeks (median = 2.5). Six patients (2.5%) were unable to achieve intercourse within a 1-year period after treatment and 64 patients (26.6%) were lost to follow-up. The change in the overall FSFI score measured at baseline, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year was statistically significant at the 0.05 level. Three patients developed mild temporary stress incontinence, two patients developed a short period of temporary blurred vision, and one patient developed temporary excessive vaginal dryness. All adverse events resolved by approximately 4 months. One patient required retreatment followed by successful coitus. A multimodal program that treated the physical and psychologic aspects of vaginismus enabled women to achieve

  17. Adolescent Suicide Risk Screening: The Effect of Communication about Type of Follow-Up on Adolescents’ Screening Responses

    PubMed Central

    King, Cheryl A.; Hill, Ryan M.; Wynne, Henry A.; Cunningham, Rebecca M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective This experimental study examined the effect of communication about type of screening follow-up (in-person follow-up versus no in-person follow-up) on adolescents’ responses to a self-report suicide risk screen. Method Participants were 245 adolescents (131 girls, 114 boys; ages 13 to 17; 80% White, 21.6% Black; 9.8% American Indian; 2.9% Asian), seeking medical emergency services. They were randomized to a screening follow-up condition. Screening measures assessed primary risk factors for suicidal behavior, including suicidal thoughts, depressive symptoms, alcohol use, and aggressive/delinquent behavior. Results There was no main effect of follow-up condition on adolescents’ screening scores; however, significant interactions between follow-up condition and public assistance status were evident. Adolescents whose families received public assistance were less likely to report aggressive-delinquent behavior if assigned to In-Person Follow-Up. Adolescents whose families did not receive public assistance reported significantly higher levels of suicidal ideation if assigned to In-Person Follow-Up. Conclusions Findings suggest that response biases impact some adolescents’ responses to suicide risk screenings. Because national policy strongly recommends suicide risk screening in emergency settings, and because screening scores are used to make critical decisions regarding risk management and treatment recommendations, findings indicate the importance of improving the reliability and validity of suicide risk screening for adolescents. PMID:22540534

  18. Adolescent suicide risk screening: the effect of communication about type of follow-up on adolescents' screening responses.

    PubMed

    King, Cheryl A; Hill, Ryan M; Wynne, Henry A; Cunningham, Rebecca M

    2012-01-01

    This experimental study examined the effect of communication about type of screening follow-up (in-person follow-up vs. no in-person follow-up) on adolescents' responses to a self-report suicide risk screen. Participants were 245 adolescents (131 girls, 114 boys; ages 13-17; 80% White, 21.6% Black, 9.8% American Indian, 2.9% Asian) seeking medical emergency services. They were randomized to a screening follow-up condition. Screening measures assessed primary risk factors for suicidal behavior, including suicidal thoughts, depressive symptoms, alcohol use, and aggressive/delinquent behavior. There was no main effect of follow-up condition on adolescents' screening scores; however, significant interactions between follow-up condition and public assistance status were evident. Adolescents whose families received public assistance were less likely to report aggressive-delinquent behavior if assigned to in-person follow-up. Adolescents whose families did not receive public assistance reported significantly higher levels of suicidal ideation if assigned to in-person follow-up. Findings suggest that response biases impact some adolescents' responses to suicide risk screenings. Because national policy strongly recommends suicide risk screening in emergency settings, and because screening scores are used to make critical decisions regarding risk management and treatment recommendations, findings indicate the importance of improving the reliability and validity of suicide risk screening for adolescents.

  19. [Neuromuscular disease: respiratory clinical assessment and follow-up].

    PubMed

    Martínez Carrasco, C; Villa Asensi, J R; Luna Paredes, M C; Osona Rodríguez de Torres, F B; Peña Zarza, J A; Larramona Carrera, H; Costa Colomer, J

    2014-10-01

    Patients with neuromuscular disease are an important group at risk of frequently suffering acute or chronic respiratory failure, which is their main cause of death. They require follow-up by a pediatric respiratory medicine specialist from birth or diagnosis in order to confirm the diagnosis and treat any respiratory complications within a multidisciplinary context. The ventilatory support and the cough assistance have improved the quality of life and long-term survival for many of these patients. In this paper, the authors review the pathophysiology, respiratory function evaluation, sleep disorders, and the most frequent respiratory complications in neuromuscular diseases. The various treatments used, from a respiratory medicine point of view, will be analyzed in a next paper. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. A New GRB follow-up Software at TUG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dindar, M.; Parmaksizoglu, M.; Helhel, S.; Esenoglu, H.; Kirbiyik, H.

    2016-12-01

    A gamma-ray burst (GRB) optical photometric follow-up system at TUBITAK (Scientic and Technological Research Council of Turkey) National Observatory (TUG) has been planned. It uses the 0.6 m Telescope (T60) and can automatically respond to GRB Coordinates Network (GCN) alerts. The telescopes slew relatively fast, being able to point to a new target field within 30 s upon a request. Whenever available, the 1 m T100 and 2.5 m RTT150 telescopes will be used in the future. As an example in 2015, the GRB software system (will be server side) at T60-telescope responded to GRB alert and started the observation as early as 129 s after the GRB trigger autonomously.

  1. Hydrotherapy after total knee arthroplasty. A follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Giaquinto, S; Ciotola, E; Dall'Armi, V; Margutti, F

    2010-01-01

    The study evaluated the subjective functional outcome following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in participants who underwent hydrotherapy (HT) six months after discharge from a rehabilitation unit. A total of 70 subjects, 12 of which were lost at follow-up, were randomly assigned to either a conventional gym treatment (N=30) or HT (N=28). A prospective design was performed. Participants were interviewed with Western-Ontario McMasters Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) at admission, at discharge and six months later. Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon tests were applied for statistical analysis. Both groups improved. The WOMAC subscales, namely pain, stiffness and function, were all positively affected. Statistical analysis indicates that scores on all subscales were significantly lower for the HT group. The benefits gained by the time of discharge were still found after six months. HT is recommended after TKA in a geriatric population. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A follow-up of 72 cases referred for abortion.

    PubMed

    Gillis, A

    1975-01-01

    Whilst the medical indications for therapeutic abortion and the legal limitations set vary enormously from one country to another there is in general an undoubted trend towards giving the pregnant woman herself a greater say in the decision. During the first year of the operation of the Abortion Act, 1967, in England some 72 pregnant women were referred to the author and his colleagues for a recommendation on abortion. A psychiatric examination and follow-up over a period of one year was made both in those cases where abortion was performed as well as in those cases who were refused therapeutic abortion. In this communication a comparison is made between the reactions and outcome in the two groups. A provisional conclusion is reached that no significant psychiatric disturbance could be attributed to the performance of the operation or on the other hand to refusal of the woman's request.

  3. Trajectories of Nutritional Risk: The Manitoba Follow-Up Study.

    PubMed

    Lengyel, C O; Jiang, D; Tate, R B

    2017-01-01

    To identify patterns of nutritional risk among older men over a four-year period and to project their survival rates over the next two and a half years. A prospective longitudinal study. Canada. Three hundred and thirty-six male survivors of the Manitoba Follow-up Study (MFUS) cohort with an average age of 90 years in 2011. Four years of nutritional risk SCREEN II scores (five waves) from the male survivors of the MFUS cohort. The semi-parametric group-based trajectory approach and survival analysis were used to investigate the trajectories of nutritional risk. Of the participants, 30% lived alone. Five distinct developmental trajectory groups for nutritional risk score were identified. Significant statistical differences were found among the five trajectory groups for SF-36 mental health (p=.02), SF-36 physical health (p=<.001), perception of aging successfully (p=.04) and living alone (p=<.001). Among the five groups, the most pairwise differences were found in appetite, intake of meat and alternatives, and vegetables and fruit, weight change, skipping meals and eating with others. Men in the poorest nutritional risk trajectory group were two times more likely to die within a 2 1/2 year period compared to men in the best nutritional risk trajectory group (hazard rate = 2.33, p=.07). Distinct nutritional risk trajectories were found for older men over a four year period. Poor nutritional risk trajectories are associated with higher risk of mortality for very old men over a short period of time. Timely nutritional assessments by health professionals are needed to identify older men at nutritional risk. Subsequent nutrition education and follow-up may be important in preventing further decline.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging in follow-up assessment of sciatica.

    PubMed

    el Barzouhi, Abdelilah; Vleggeert-Lankamp, Carmen L A M; Lycklama à Nijeholt, Geert J; Van der Kallen, Bas F; van den Hout, Wilbert B; Jacobs, Wilco C H; Koes, Bart W; Peul, Wilco C

    2013-03-14

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is frequently performed during follow-up in patients with known lumbar-disk herniation and persistent symptoms of sciatica. The association between findings on MRI and clinical outcome is controversial. We studied 283 patients in a randomized trial comparing surgery and prolonged conservative care for sciatica and lumbar-disk herniation. Patients underwent MRI at baseline and after 1 year. We used a 4-point scale to assess disk herniation on MRI, ranging from 1 for "definitely present" to 4 for "definitely absent." A favorable clinical outcome was defined as complete or nearly complete disappearance of symptoms at 1 year. We compared proportions of patients with a favorable outcome among those with a definite absence of disk herniation and those with a definite, probable, or possible presence of disk herniation at 1 year. The area under the receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) curve was used to assess the prognostic accuracy of the 4-point scores regarding a favorable or unfavorable outcome, with 1 indicating perfect discriminatory value and 0.5 or less indicating no discriminatory value. At 1 year, 84% of the patients reported having a favorable outcome. Disk herniation was visible in 35% with a favorable outcome and in 33% with an unfavorable outcome (P=0.70). A favorable outcome was reported in 85% of patients with disk herniation and 83% without disk herniation (P=0.70). MRI assessment of disk herniation did not distinguish between patients with a favorable outcome and those with an unfavorable outcome (area under ROC curve, 0.48). MRI performed at 1-year follow-up in patients who had been treated for sciatica and lumbar-disk herniation did not distinguish between those with a favorable outcome and those with an unfavorable outcome. (Funded by the Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development and the Hoelen Foundation; Controlled Clinical Trials number, ISRCTN26872154.).

  5. The LCOGT Near Earth Object (NEO) Follow-up Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, Tim; Gomez, Edward; Christensen, Eric; Larson, Steve

    2014-11-01

    Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope (LCOGT) network is a planned homogeneous network of over 35 telescopes at 6 locations in the northern and southern hemispheres. This network is versatile and designed to respond rapidly to target of opportunity events and also to do long term monitoring of slowly changing astronomical phenomena. The global coverage of the network and the apertures of telescope available make LCOGT ideal for follow-up and characterization of Solar System objects (e.g. asteroids, Kuiper Belt Objects, comets, Near-Earth Objects (NEOs)) and ultimately for the discovery of new objects.LCOGT has completed the first phase of the deployment with the installation and commissioning of nine 1-meter telescopes at McDonald Observatory (Texas), Cerro Tololo (Chile), SAAO (South Africa) and Siding Spring Observatory (Australia). The telescope network is now operating and observations are being executed remotely and robotically.I am using the LCOGT network to confirm newly detected NEO candidates produced by the major sky surveys such as Catalina Sky Survey (CSS), NEOWISE and PanSTARRS (PS1). Over 600 NEO candidates have been targeted so far this year with 250+ objects reported to the MPC, including 70 confirmed NEOs. An increasing amount of time is being spent to obtain follow-up astrometry and photometry for radar-targeted objects in order to improve the orbits and determine the rotation periods. This will be extended to obtain more light curves of other NEOs which could be Near-Earth Object Human Space Flight Accessible Targets Study (NHATS) or Asteroid Retrieval Mission (ARM) targets. Recent results have included the first period determination for the Apollo 2002 NV16 and our first NEO spectrum from the FLOYDS spectrographs on the LCOGT 2m telescopes obtained for 2012 DA14 during the February 2013 closepass.

  6. Submillimeter Follow-up of WISE-selected Hyperluminous Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jingwen; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Sayers, Jack; Benford, Dominic; Bridge, Carrie; Blain, Andrew; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Stern, Daniel; Petty, Sara; Assef, Roberto; Bussmann, Shane; Comerford, Julia M.; Cutri, Roc; Evans, Neal J., II; Griffith, Roger; Jarrett, Thomas; Lake, Sean; Lonsdale, Carol; Rho, Jeonghee; Stanford, S. Adam; Weiner, Benjamin; Wright, Edward L.; Yan, Lin

    2012-09-01

    We have used the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) to follow-up a sample of Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) selected, hyperluminous galaxies, the so-called W1W2-dropout galaxies. This is a rare (~1000 all-sky) population of galaxies at high redshift (peaks at z = 2-3), which are faint or undetected by WISE at 3.4 and 4.6 μm, yet are clearly detected at 12 and 22 μm. The optical spectra of most of these galaxies show significant active galactic nucleus activity. We observed 14 high-redshift (z > 1.7) W1W2-dropout galaxies with SHARC-II at 350-850 μm, with nine detections, and observed 18 with Bolocam at 1.1 mm, with five detections. Warm Spitzer follow-up of 25 targets at 3.6 and 4.5 μm, as well as optical spectra of 12 targets, are also presented in the paper. Combining WISE data with observations from warm Spitzer and CSO, we constructed their mid-IR to millimeter spectral energy distributions (SEDs). These SEDs have a consistent shape, showing significantly higher mid-IR to submillimeter ratios than other galaxy templates, suggesting a hotter dust temperature. We estimate their dust temperatures to be 60-120 K using a single-temperature model. Their infrared luminosities are well over 1013 L ⊙. These SEDs are not well fitted with existing galaxy templates, suggesting they are a new population with very high luminosity and hot dust. They are likely among the most luminous galaxies in the universe. We argue that they are extreme cases of luminous, hot dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs), possibly representing a short evolutionary phase during galaxy merging and evolution. A better understanding of their long-wavelength properties needs ALMA as well as Herschel data.

  7. SUBMILLIMETER FOLLOW-UP OF WISE-SELECTED HYPERLUMINOUS GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Jingwen; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Stern, Daniel

    2012-09-01

    We have used the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) to follow-up a sample of Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) selected, hyperluminous galaxies, the so-called W1W2-dropout galaxies. This is a rare ({approx}1000 all-sky) population of galaxies at high redshift (peaks at z = 2-3), which are faint or undetected by WISE at 3.4 and 4.6 {mu}m, yet are clearly detected at 12 and 22 {mu}m. The optical spectra of most of these galaxies show significant active galactic nucleus activity. We observed 14 high-redshift (z > 1.7) W1W2-dropout galaxies with SHARC-II at 350-850 {mu}m, with nine detections, and observed 18 with Bolocam atmore » 1.1 mm, with five detections. Warm Spitzer follow-up of 25 targets at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m, as well as optical spectra of 12 targets, are also presented in the paper. Combining WISE data with observations from warm Spitzer and CSO, we constructed their mid-IR to millimeter spectral energy distributions (SEDs). These SEDs have a consistent shape, showing significantly higher mid-IR to submillimeter ratios than other galaxy templates, suggesting a hotter dust temperature. We estimate their dust temperatures to be 60-120 K using a single-temperature model. Their infrared luminosities are well over 10{sup 13} L{sub Sun }. These SEDs are not well fitted with existing galaxy templates, suggesting they are a new population with very high luminosity and hot dust. They are likely among the most luminous galaxies in the universe. We argue that they are extreme cases of luminous, hot dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs), possibly representing a short evolutionary phase during galaxy merging and evolution. A better understanding of their long-wavelength properties needs ALMA as well as Herschel data.« less

  8. Long-term follow-up of stentless prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Sansone, Fabrizio; Dato, Guglielmo Mario Actis; Zingarelli, Edoardo; Ferrero, Emanuele; Prot, Sara; Ceresa, Fabrizio; Patanè, Francesco; Casabona, Riccardo

    2014-05-01

    Stentless prostheses have an interesting hemodynamic performance when compared to stented prostheses and are recommended in cases of small aortic annulus. From January 1996 to January 2004, 138 patients suffering from aortic disease, underwent aortic valve replacement. • Group A: 93 patients underwent stentless aortic valve implantation [stentless Biocor (Biocor Industria e Pesguisa Ltda, Belo Horizonte, Brazil) and stentless Sorin (Sorin Group, Saluggia, Italy)]. • Group B: 45 patients underwent stented aortic valve implantation (stented Biocor). Patients were assessed by clinical evaluation and echocardiography after a mean follow up of 124.5 ± 58.2 months. There was a significant difference in terms of time of extracorporeal circulation and aortic cross clamp. The actuarial survival at 4, 8, 12, and 15 years is 77%, 50%, 21%, and 18%, respectively. Freedom from reoperation at 4, 8, 12, and 14 years was 92%, 83%, 73%, and 63%, respectively. Freedom from all events, death, and reoperation at 4, 8, 12, and 14 years was 70%, 39%, 13%, and 8%, respectively. There is no statistical difference among the two groups in terms of actuarial survival, freedom from reoperation, and freedom from re-hospitalization for prosthesis-related causes. There was a significantly higher incidence of pacemaker implantation in Group A and the causes are not known. The rate of freedom from reoperation is high in both groups for the patients who remained alive. There was no statistical difference about prosthesis dysfunction between the two groups. The higher incidence of death in Group A cannot be explained by causes related to the prosthesis because there is no difference in terms of causes of death. Rates of reoperation did not differ between the two groups. The results obtained with stentless prostheses are encouraging even in long-term follow-up. Copyright © 2013 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. QL-10NEURO-ONCOLOGY TELEMEDICINE FOLLOW-UP VISITS

    PubMed Central

    Green, Richard; Woyshner, Emily

    2014-01-01

    We report our 18 month experience with the use of a videoconferencing system to perform neuro-oncology follow-up visits. The Neuro-oncology Program at the Kaiser Permanente-Los Angeles Medical center serves the majority of Kaiser HMO patients in the Southern California region. We installed a videoconferencing system (Cisco TelePresence EX90, Cisco Systems, San Jose, CA) in our office in Los Angeles and in a medical office building in Anaheim, CA at a distance of 35 miles. Established neuro-oncology patients from Orange County chose between in-person and remote visits. Patients were seated in an examination room and the neuro-oncology provider alerted by text page. A focused history and physical examination was performed, followed by desktop sharing of clinical and laboratory data using an electronic medical record (Epic Systems Corporation, Verona, WI) and of neuroimages (Phillips iSite PACS, Andover, MA). Patients were asked, but not required, to complete an anonymous online 16 question satisfaction survey after each visit. Visits were performed by either a neuro-oncologist (179) or a Physician's Assistant (12). Of the 191 visits, 174 included evaluation of neuroimaging and 77 included evaluation of response to ongoing chemotherapy. During 12 visits chemotherapy was initiated, and during 15 visits the chemotherapy regimen was changed based on imaging findings. One-hundred and eleven surveys (58% of visits) were completed. Patients reported a high level of satisfaction with the visits (average 9.6, on a 1-10 scale). The average estimated travel time saved was 118 minutes per visit. Four surveys reported technical problems and 1 indicated a preference for an in-person visit. No adverse events could be attributed to use of the telemedicine system. These data suggest that neuro-oncology follow-up visits can be practiced safely and effectively using a telemedicine system, with high levels of patient satisfaction.

  10. Submillimeter Follow-Up of WISE-Selected Hyperluminous Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jingwen; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Sayers, Jack; Benford, Dominic; Bridge, Carrie; Blain, Andrew; Eisenhardt, Peter R.; Stern, Daniel; Petty, Sara; Assef, Roberto; hide

    2012-01-01

    We have used the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) to follow-up a sample of Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) selected, hyperluminous galaxies, the so-called W1W2-dropout galaxies. This is a rare (approx.1000 all-sky) population of galaxies at high redshift (peaks at z = 2-3), which are faint or undetected by WISE at 3.4 and 4.6 microns, yet are clearly detected at 12 and 22 microns. The optical spectra of most of these galaxies show significant active galactic nucleus activity. We observed 14 high-redshift (z > 1.7) W1W2-dropout galaxies with SHARC-II at 350-850 microns, with nine detections, and observed 18 with Bolocam at 1.1 mm, with five detections. Warm Spitzer follow-up of 25 targets at 3.6 and 4.5 microns, as well as optical spectra of 12 targets, are also presented in the paper. Combining WISE data with observations from warm Spitzer and CSO, we constructed their mid-IR to millimeter spectral energy distributions (SEDs). These SEDs have a consistent shape, showing significantly higher mid-IR to submillimeter ratios than other galaxy templates, suggesting a hotter dust temperature.We estimate their dust temperatures to be 60 C120 K using a single-temperature model. Their infrared luminosities are well over 10(exp 13) Stellar Luminosity. These SEDs are not well fitted with existing galaxy templates, suggesting they are a new population with very high luminosity and hot dust. They are likely among the most luminous galaxies in the universe.We argue that they are extreme cases of luminous, hot dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs), possibly representing a short evolutionary phase during galaxy merging and evolution. A better understanding of their long-wavelength properties needs ALMA as well as Herschel data.

  11. Submillimeter Follow-up of Wise-Selected Hyperluminous Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jingwen; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Sayers, Jack; Benford, Dominic; Bridge, Carrie; Blain, Andrew; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Stern, Daniel; Petty, Sara; Assef, Roberto; hide

    2013-01-01

    We have used the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) to follow-up a sample of Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) selected, hyperluminous galaxies, the so-called W1W2-dropout galaxies. This is a rare (approximately 1000 all-sky) population of galaxies at high redshift (peaks at zeta = 2-3), which are faint or undetected by WISE at 3.4 and 4.6 micrometers, yet are clearly detected at 12 and 22 micrometers. The optical spectra of most of these galaxies show significant active galactic nucleus activity. We observed 14 high-redshift (zeta greater than 1.7) W1W2-dropout galaxies with SHARC-II at 350-850 micrometers, with nine detections, and observed 18 with Bolocam at 1.1 mm, with five detections. Warm Spitzer follow-up of 25 targets at 3.6 and 4.5 micrometers, as well as optical spectra of 12 targets, are also presented in the paper. Combining WISE data with observations from warm Spitzer and CSO, we constructed their mid-IR to millimeter spectral energy distributions (SEDs). These SEDs have a consistent shape, showing significantly higher mid-IR to submillimeter ratios than other galaxy templates, suggesting a hotter dust temperature.We estimate their dust temperatures to be 60-120 K using a single-temperature model. Their infrared luminosities are well over 10(exp 13) solar luminosity. These SEDs are not well fitted with existing galaxy templates, suggesting they are a new population with very high luminosity and hot dust. They are likely among the most luminous galaxies in the universe.We argue that they are extreme cases of luminous, hot dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs), possibly representing a short evolutionary phase during galaxy merging and evolution. A better understanding of their long-wavelength properties needs ALMA as well as Herschel data.

  12. GWASeq: targeted re-sequencing follow up to GWAS.

    PubMed

    Salomon, Matthew P; Li, Wai Lok Sibon; Edlund, Christopher K; Morrison, John; Fortini, Barbara K; Win, Aung Ko; Conti, David V; Thomas, Duncan C; Duggan, David; Buchanan, Daniel D; Jenkins, Mark A; Hopper, John L; Gallinger, Steven; Le Marchand, Loïc; Newcomb, Polly A; Casey, Graham; Marjoram, Paul

    2016-03-03

    For the last decade the conceptual framework of the Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) has dominated the investigation of human disease and other complex traits. While GWAS have been successful in identifying a large number of variants associated with various phenotypes, the overall amount of heritability explained by these variants remains small. This raises the question of how best to follow up on a GWAS, localize causal variants accounting for GWAS hits, and as a consequence explain more of the so-called "missing" heritability. Advances in high throughput sequencing technologies now allow for the efficient and cost-effective collection of vast amounts of fine-scale genomic data to complement GWAS. We investigate these issues using a colon cancer dataset. After QC, our data consisted of 1993 cases, 899 controls. Using marginal tests of associations, we identify 10 variants distributed among six targeted regions that are significantly associated with colorectal cancer, with eight of the variants being novel to this study. Additionally, we perform so-called 'SNP-set' tests of association and identify two sets of variants that implicate both common and rare variants in the etiology of colorectal cancer. Here we present a large-scale targeted re-sequencing resource focusing on genomic regions implicated in colorectal cancer susceptibility previously identified in several GWAS, which aims to 1) provide fine-scale targeted sequencing data for fine-mapping and 2) provide data resources to address methodological questions regarding the design of sequencing-based follow-up studies to GWAS. Additionally, we show that this strategy successfully identifies novel variants associated with colorectal cancer susceptibility and can implicate both common and rare variants.

  13. Patient experiences of in-hospital preparations for follow-up care at home.

    PubMed

    Keller, Gretchen; Merchant, Alefia; Common, Carol; Laizner, Andrea M

    2017-06-01

    To examine patient experiences of hospital-based discharge preparation for referral for follow-up home care services. To identify aspects of discharge preparation that will assist patients with their transition from hospital-based care to home-based follow-up care. To improve patients' transitions from hospital-based care to community-based home care, hospitals incorporate home care referral processes into discharge planning. This includes patient preparation for follow-up home care services. While there is evidence to support that such preparation needs to be more patient-centred to be effective, there is little knowledge of patient experiences of preparation that would guide improvements. Qualitative descriptive study. The study was carried out at a supra-regional hospital in Eastern Canada. Findings are based on thematic content analysis of 13 semi-structured interviews of patients requiring home care after hospitalisation on a medical or surgical unit. Most interviews were held within one week of discharge. Patient experiences were associated with patient attitudes and levels of engagement in preparation. Attitudes and levels of engagement were seen as related to one another. Those who 'didn't really think about it', had low engagement, while those with the attitude 'guide me', looked for partnership. Those who had an attitude of 'this is what I want', had a very high level of engagement. Previous experience with home care services influenced patients' level of trust in the health care system, and ultimately shaped their attitudes towards and levels of engagement in preparation. Patient preparation for follow-up home care can be improved by assessing their knowledge of and previous experiences with home care. Patients recognised as using a proactive approach may be highly vulnerable. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Acute Physiologic Stress and Subsequent Anxiety Among Family Members of ICU Patients.

    PubMed

    Beesley, Sarah J; Hopkins, Ramona O; Holt-Lunstad, Julianne; Wilson, Emily L; Butler, Jorie; Kuttler, Kathryn G; Orme, James; Brown, Samuel M; Hirshberg, Eliotte L

    2018-02-01

    The ICU is a complex and stressful environment and is associated with significant psychologic morbidity for patients and their families. We sought to determine whether salivary cortisol, a physiologic measure of acute stress, was associated with subsequent psychologic distress among family members of ICU patients. This is a prospective, observational study of family members of adult ICU patients. Adult medical and surgical ICU in a tertiary care center. Family members of ICU patients. Participants provided five salivary cortisol samples over 24 hours at the time of the patient ICU admission. The primary measure of cortisol was the area under the curve from ground; the secondary measure was the cortisol awakening response. Outcomes were obtained during a 3-month follow-up telephone call. The primary outcome was anxiety, measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Anxiety. Secondary outcomes included depression and posttraumatic stress disorder. Among 100 participants, 92 completed follow-up. Twenty-nine participants (32%) reported symptoms of anxiety at 3 months, 15 participants (16%) reported depression symptoms, and 14 participants (15%) reported posttraumatic stress symptoms. In our primary analysis, cortisol level as measured by area under the curve from ground was not significantly associated with anxiety (odds ratio, 0.94; p = 0.70). In our secondary analysis, however, cortisol awakening response was significantly associated with anxiety (odds ratio, 1.08; p = 0.02). Roughly one third of family members experience anxiety after an ICU admission for their loved one, and many family members also experience depression and posttraumatic stress. Cortisol awakening response is associated with anxiety in family members of ICU patients 3 months following the ICU admission. Physiologic measurements of stress among ICU family members may help identify individuals at particular risk of adverse psychologic outcomes.

  15. What were the outcomes of home follow-up visits after postpartum hospital discharge?

    PubMed

    Jirojwong, Sansnee; Rossi, Dolene; Walker, Sandra; Ritchie, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    To assess health outcomes of home follow-up visits after postpartum discharge and assess relationships between the number of home visits and selected outcomes among women who gave birth at two Queensland, Australia, regional hospitals. A cross sectional study. Services provided during the home visits were responsive to a woman's need rather than having a structured protocol of services. The four measured health outcomes were: 1) postpartum depression; 2) confidence to undertake maternal roles; 3) breastfeeding; and, 4) satisfaction with postpartum care. Of 210 women who were invited to participate in the study, 143 (68.1%) provided information. Women who received a higher number of home visits had significantly lower confidence to undertake maternal roles than those who received fewer home visits. There was a positive correlation between the number of home follow-up visits and postpartum depression among women who gave birth at one hospital (Hospital B), but not at the other (Hospital A). No relationship was found between the home postpartum visits and the other outcomes. These results could be explained in that home follow-up visits were offered to all women at Hospital A while Hospital B only provided home visits to women who had a health risk due to their social, physical and psychological characteristics. The lack of protocol home visits and the characteristics of women receiving the visits were probably the major factors which influenced these limited beneficial outcomes.

  16. Suicide history and mortality: a follow-up of a national cohort in the United States.

    PubMed

    Al-Sayegh, Hasan; Lowry, Joseph; Polur, Ram N; Hines, Robert B; Liu, Fengqi; Zhang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the cause-specific deaths among young suicide attempters from the general population, and the time window for intervention to reduce the elevated rate of death was unclear. We analyzed a nationally representative sample of young adults (17-39 years old) who participated in the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III, 1988-1994) and were followed up with vital status through December 31, 2006. The history of attempted suicide was associated with an increased rate for all-cause death (HR = 1.52 [95% CI = 0.92-2.52]) with borderline statistical significance. Previous suicide attempters experienced a 3-fold (HR = 2.68[=1.01-7.09]) increased rate for cardiovascular diseases (CVD), and a 7-fold (HR = 7.10 [95% CI = 1.37-36.9]) increased rate of death due to completed suicide compared with non-attempters. The survival curves of the attempters declined rapidly for the first 3 years of follow-up, and the distance between curves remained consistent starting from the third year to the end of the follow-up. Prevention services should be tailored not only for suicide, but also for cardiovascular diseases among populations with suicidal tendency, and the service should be intensified within first 3 years after suicidal behaviors occur.

  17. Progression of Myopic Maculopathy during 18-Year Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuxin; Yokoi, Tae; Nagaoka, Natsuko; Shinohara, Kosei; Onishi, Yuka; Ishida, Tomoka; Yoshida, Takeshi; Xu, Xian; Jonas, Jost B; Ohno-Matsui, Kyoko

    2018-06-01

    To examine the progression pattern of myopic maculopathy. Retrospective, observational case series. Highly myopic patients who had been followed up for 10 years or more. Using fundus photographs, myopic features were differentiated according to Meta-analysis of Pathologic Myopia (META-PM) Study Group recommendations. Progression pattern of maculopathy. The study included 810 eyes of 432 patients (mean age, 42.3±16.8 years; mean axial length, 28.8±1.9 mm; mean follow-up, 18.7±7.1 years). The progression rate of myopic maculopathy was 47.0 per 1000 eye-years. Within the pathologic myopia (PM) group (n = 521 eyes), progression of myopic maculopathy was associated with female gender (odds ratio [OR], 2.21; P = 0.001), older age (OR, 1.03; P = 0.002), longer axial length (OR, 1.20; P = 0.007), greater axial elongation (OR, 1.45; P = 0.005), and development of parapapillary atrophy (PPA; OR, 3.14; P < 0.001). Diffuse atrophy, found in 217 eyes without choroidal neovascularization (CNV) or lacquer cracks (LCs) at baseline, progressed in 111 (51%) eyes, leading to macular diffuse atrophy (n = 64; 64/111 or 58%), patchy atrophy (n = 59; 53%), myopic CNV (n = 18; 16%), LCs (n = 9; 5%), and patchy-related macular atrophy (n = 3; 3%). Patchy atrophy, detected in 63 eyes without CNV or LCs at baseline, showed progression in 60 eyes (95%), leading to enlargement of original patchy atrophy (n = 59; 59/60 or 98%), new patchy atrophy (n = 29; 48%), CNV-related macular atrophy (n = 13; 22%), and patchy-related macular atrophy (n = 5; 8%). Of 66 eyes with LCs, 43 eyes (65%) showed progression with development of new patchy atrophy (n = 38; 38/43 or 88%) and new LCs (n = 7; 16%). Reduction in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was associated mainly (all P < 0.001) with the development of CNV or CNV-related macular atrophy and enlargement of macular atrophy. The most frequent progression patterns were an extension of peripapillary diffuse atrophy to macular diffuse

  18. Saudi Arabian ICU safety culture and nurses' attitudes.

    PubMed

    Alayed, Abdulrahman S; Lööf, Helena; Johansson, Unn-Britt

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine nurses' attitudes towards safety culture in six Saudi Arabian intensive care units (ICUs). The study is descriptive with a cross-sectional design. The Safety Attitude Questionnaire (SAQ)-ICU version was distributed and 216 completed questionnaires were returned. The findings provide a basis for further research on Saudi Arabian ICU safety culture. This study showed that the SAQ-ICU can be used to measure safety climate to identify areas for improvement according to nurse attitudes and perceptions. Findings indicate that ICU safety culture is an important issue that hospital managers should prioritise. The SAQ-ICU questionnaire, used to measure safety climate in Saudi Arabian ICUs, identifies service strengths and improvement areas according to attitudes and perceptions. To the knowledge, this is the first study to use SAQ to examine nurses' safety culture attitudes in Saudi Arabian ICUs. The present findings provide a baseline and further details about Saudi Arabian ICU safety. Study participants represented nine nationalities, indicating the nursing workforce's diversity, which is expected to continue in the future. Such a nursing cultural heterogeneity calls for further studies to examine and evaluate attitudes and values to improve ICU safety culture.

  19. Videoconferencing for a veteran's pain management follow-up clinic.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Janette; Chapman, Judith; Clark, David J

    2007-03-01

    The under treatment of pain has been well documented. Contributing to this is the limited availability of pain management specialists in many geographic areas. The use of technology to provide care to underserved areas is gaining momentum. We chose to study whether stable patients and staff in chronic pain clinic were satified with the use of a videoconferencing format in care delivery. Our goals were to determine whether patients and staff could successfully operate the extant videoconferencing equipment, was the equipment dependably functional, was the use of a videoconferencing format an acceptable method of healthcare delivery for both patients and staff, whether patients and staff were satisfied with the process, and whether this was a cost-effective mode of care delivery. Thirty-six patients were enrolled over 29 months. Questionnaires were administered to staff and patients. Routine pain clinic patient assessment tools were administered. Results showed the use of videoconferencing for this group of patients is useable and satisfactory for both patients and staff, that the patients save time and money, and that for a system where videoconferencing equipment is already in use, it is also cost effective. Staff were able to identify new patient problems. Some patients would prefer to be seen in person but find that the savings in time and money override this preference. Hearing impaired patients have difficulty using this medium. Dependable equipment and phone connections are needed. A videoconferencing clinic format is a clinically acceptable and cost effective method for follow-up of stable patients with chronic pain.

  20. Melorheostosis: case report with 20-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Pavone, Vito; Evola, Roberto Francesco; Di Giorgio, Angelo; Ruggieri, Martino; Ardito, Salvatore

    2008-05-01

    The authors report on a typical case of melorheostosis observed in an 18-year-old man, localized in the II digit of the right hand causing tumefaction and irregular pain. At 20-year follow-up, the patient showed a radiographical slight worsening of the lesion. Radiographic examination showed a mild increase in cortical and endosteal hyperostosis with bone shape alteration in the II digit of the right hand, slight cortical and endosteal hyperostosis at the level of right shoulder girdle involving the humerus. The other part of the skeleton was not affected. Clinical examination revealed swelling and tumefaction of the forefinger of the right hand and reduced articular motion both in proximal and distal interphalangeal joint and metacarpal phalangeal joint. The reminder of the clinical examination was normal. Melorheostosis is an uncommon mesenchymal disorder characterized by a chondral hyperostosis of the long bones associated to a sclerosis of the spongious bone. The etiology of this affection is unknown: the most accredited hypothesis is a developmental anomaly with a sequential sclerotomes distribution. Both genders may be affected, with the long tubular bones of the lower limbs more involved. This anomaly is often asymptomatic but maybe accompanied by pain with a smooth symptom progression and periodic exacerbations. Therapy is mainly symptomatic and comprises anti-inflammatory drugs or surgical approach for removal of soft tissue that may preclude daily activities. This case report demonstrates that melorheostosis is a relatively benign disorder with mildly progressive course.

  1. Long-term follow-up in Bietti crystalline dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    MANSOUR, A.M.; UWAYDAT, S.H.; CHAN, C.-C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To present a long-term follow-up of Bietti crystalline dystrophy. Methods Two brothers are presented including the clinical findings, fluorescein angiography, electrophysiology (electroretinography [ERG], electrooculography [EOG], adaptometry), optical coherence tomography (OCT), and transmission electron microscopy of bulbar conjunctiva and peripheral blood lymphocytes. The clinical findings were documented over a period of 25 years in one brother and 5 years in the other. Results The most striking features were deposits in the retina that were formed de novo with old ones replaced by choroidal atrophy in advanced stage of the disease. The light rise (EOG), rod- and cone-driven responses (ERG), and visual fields were affected progressively during the course. These changes of the retinal pigment epithelium and choriocapillaris were observed in the second decade and worsened gradually. OCT demonstrated preferential crystal accumulation in the inner retina. Cytoplasmic lipid crystalline inclusions were found in lymphocytes and conjunctival fibroblasts by transmission electron microscopy. Conclusions Bietti crystalline retinopathy is a progressive retinal disease characterized by retinal crystals gradually replaced by atrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium and gradual constriction of visual fields. PMID:17671952

  2. [Postoperative Follow-Up of Glaucoma Drainage Devices].

    PubMed

    Dietlein, T S; Neugebauer, A; Fricke, J; Lappas, A; Rosentreter, A

    2016-05-01

    There is an increasing trend towards using glaucoma drainage implants. The postoperative management of such devices depends on their technical characteristics and specific complications. The Baerveldt glaucoma implant with its larger surface area has been shown to lower mean intraocular pressure more effectively than the Ahmed-FP7 implant. As a non-valve implant, however, it has been associated with a higher rate of severe complications, particularly ocular hypotension. Moreover, glaucoma implants may induce diplopia if they interfere with extraocular muscles. Topical treatment with antibiotics and steroids is necessary in cases of intraocular inflammation. In refractory cases, the tube may even have to be removed. Surgical reposition of the tube may be indicated when it is severely dislocated. Increased intraocular pressure is primarily treated by pressure-lowering medications during postoperative follow-up. If topical glaucoma medication is insufficient to control increases in intraocular pressure due to encapsulation, a second implant may be considered or the capsule surrounding the implant may be excised to reduce outflow resistance or additional cyclodestructive procedures can be performed. Chronic hypotension may be treated with tube ligation or occlusion. Severe corneal oedema may require lamellar keratoplasty. Conjunctival erosions with tube exposure or tube retractions also require surgical correction. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Operative correction and follow-up of craniofacial duplication.

    PubMed

    Kotrikova, Bibiana; Hassfeld, Stefan; Steiner, Hans H; Hähnel, Stefan; Krempien, Robert; Mühling, Joachim

    2007-03-01

    Anterior craniofacial duplication (diprosopus) is an extremely rare form of conjoined twins. The children share a single trunk with normal extremities and varying degrees of facial malformation. Duplication of specific structures, such as the nose (diprosopus dirrhinus), eyes (diprosopus tetraophthalmus), and ears, is possible. The authors present a case of partial facial duplication (diprosopus dirrhinus) in a male infant. The clinical and radiographic findings and the surgical correction and follow-up are described. In a single surgical session, the authors were able to achieve not only a functionally but also an aesthetically acceptable result. In the postoperative course, the child showed nearly normal growth and satisfactory psychosocial and motor development. However, 40 months postoperatively, we noticed a tendency of the orbitae to diverge (i.e., toward hypertelorism). The surgical management of complex craniofacial malformations such as diprosopus needs a precise morphologic analysis of the patient's deformity followed by a clear treatment plan. A staged reconstructive approach is carried out to coincide with facial growth patterns and brain and eye function. If the interorbital distance in our patient increases progressively, a second operation for reduction of the interorbital distance may be necessary.

  4. Follow-up client satisfaction in a supported education program.

    PubMed

    Mowbray, C T; Bybee, D; Collins, M E

    2001-01-01

    Satisfaction data have recently returned to popularity, as an outcome measure in managed behavioral healthcare systems. However, there are few examples of management uses of such data. We collected data 12 months after participants had completed a supported education program, concerning their retrospective satisfaction and the barriers, needs, and personal difficulties currently experienced in their attempts to pursue post-secondary education or training. Data on follow-up supportive contacts were also obtained. Results supported participants' continuing satisfaction, and identified particular information items which were endorsed as most helpful. However, the data indicated that personal difficulties presented obstacles to many and that a majority of participants had current needs for financial aid, tutoring, job placements, support groups, and transportation. Following completion of the supported education program, many participants had continuing contacts in support of their educational plans. The amount of contact was generally low, however. In the future, supported education programs need to build in mechanisms to ensure students receive ongoing support for education, since this support was found to positively and significantly affect individuals' enrolling in college or training.

  5. Diagnosis, Treatment, and Follow-Up of Borderline Ovarian Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zikan, Michal; Dundr, Pavel; Cibula, David

    2012-01-01

    Borderline ovarian tumors represent a heterogeneous group of noninvasive tumors of uncertain malignant potential with characteristic histology. They occur in younger women, are present at an early stage, and have a favorable prognosis, but symptomatic recurrence and death may be found as long as 20 years after therapy in some patients. The molecular changes in borderline ovarian tumors indicate linkage of this disease to type I ovarian tumors (low-grade ovarian carcinomas). The pathological stage of disease and subclassification of extraovarian disease into invasive and noninvasive implants, together with the presence of postoperative macroscopic residual disease, appear to be the major predictor of recurrence and survival. However, it should be emphasized that the most important negative prognostic factor for recurrence is just the use of conservative surgery, but without any impact on patient survival because most recurrent diseases are of the borderline type—easily curable and with an excellent prognosis. Borderline tumors are difficult masses to correctly preoperatively diagnose using imaging methods because their macroscopic features may overlap with invasive and benign ovarian tumors. Over the past several decades, surgical therapy has shifted from a radical approach to more conservative treatment; however, oncologic safety must always be balanced. Follow-up is essential using routine ultrasound imaging, with special attention paid to the remaining ovary in conservatively treated patients. Current literature on this topic leads to a number of controversies that will be discussed thoroughly in this article, with the aim to provide recommendations for the clinical management of these patients. PMID:23024155

  6. SDSS-III MARVELS Planet Candidate RV Follow-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Jian; Thomas, Neil; Ma, Bo; Li, Rui; SIthajan, Sirinrat

    2014-02-01

    Planetary systems, discovered by the radial velocity (RV) surveys, reveal strong correlations between the planet frequency and stellar properties, such as metallicity and mass, and a greater diversity in planets than found in the solar system. However, due to the sample sizes of extant surveys (~100 to a few hundreds of stars) and their heterogeneity, many key questions remained to be addressed: Do metal poor stars obey the same trends for planet occurrence as metal rich stars? What is the distribution of giant planets around intermediate- mass stars and binaries? Is the ``planet desert'' within 0.6 AU in the planet orbital distribution of intermediate-mass stars real? The MARVELS survey has produced the largest homogeneous RV measurements of 3300 V=7.6-12 FGK stars. The latest data pipeline effort at UF has been able to remove long term systematic errors suffered in the earlier data pipeline. 18 high confident giant planet candidates have been identified among newly processed data. We propose to follow up these giant planet candidates with the KPNO EXPERT instrument to confirm the detection and also characterize their orbits. The confirmed planets will be used to measure occurrence rates, distributions and multiplicity of giants planets around F,G,K stars with a broad range of mass (~0.6-2.5 M_⊙) and metallicity ([Fe/H]~-1.5-0.5). The well defined MARVELS survey cadence allows robust determinations of completeness limits for rigorously testing giant planet formation theories and constraining models.

  7. Bilateral sacrospinous fixation without hysterectomy: 18-month follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Şentürk, Mehmet Baki; Güraslan, Hakan; Çakmak, Yusuf; Ekin, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of bilateral sacrospinous fixation (SSF), which was performed with surgical mesh interposition and bilateral vaginal repair. Material and Methods Twenty-two patients underwent SSF between 2010 and 2012, and the results were evaluated retrospectively. The results at preoperative and postoperative 6th, 12th, and 18th months of the pelvic organ prolapse quantification system (POP-Q) and the Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire-12 (PISQ-12) were compared using Friedman and Wilcoxon Signed Ranks tests. Values of p<0.05 and <0.01 were considered statistically significant. Results According to the POP-Q, significant healing was observed on all vaginal vault points (p=0.001), and no prolapse was observed until the 18-month follow-up stage. There were also prominent patients who felt satisfactory with respect to their sexual life according to PISQ-12 (p=0.001). Conclusion This technique appears to provide an adequate clinical resolution, and it may be the primary surgical option for women with pelvic organ prolapse. PMID:26097393

  8. French consensus. Idiopathic hypersomnia: Investigations and follow-up.

    PubMed

    Leu-Semenescu, S; Quera-Salva, M-A; Dauvilliers, Y

    Idiopathic hypersomnia is a rare, central hypersomnia, recently identified and to date of unknown physiopathology. It is characterised by a more or less permanent, excessive daytime sleepiness, associated with long and unrefreshing naps. Night-time sleep is of good quality, excessive in quantity, associated with sleep inertia in the subtype previously described as "with long sleep time". Diagnosis of idiopathic hypersomnia is complex due to the absence of a quantifiable biomarker, the heterogeneous symptoms, which overlap with the clinical picture of type 2 narcolepsy, and its variable evolution over time. Detailed evaluation enables other frequent causes of somnolence, such as depression or sleep deprivation, to be eliminated. Polysomnography and multiple sleep latency tests (MSLT) are essential to rule out other sleep pathologies and to objectify excessive daytime sleepiness. Sometimes the MSLT do not show excessive sleepiness, hence a continued sleep recording of at least 24hours is necessary to show prolonged sleep (>11h/24h). In this article, we propose recommendations for the work-up to be carried out during diagnosis and follow-up for patients suffering from idiopathic hypersomnia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. WFIRST Microlensing Exoplanet Characterization with HST Follow up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Aparna; David Bennett, Jay Anderson, J.P. Beaulieu.

    2018-01-01

    More than 50 planets are discovered with the different ground based telescopes available for microlensing. But the analysis of ground based data fails to provide a complete solution. To fulfill that gap, space based telescopes, like Hubble space telescope and Spitzer are used. My research work focuses on extracting the planet mass, host star mass, their separation and their distance in physical units from HST Follow-up observations. I will present the challenges faced in developing this method.This is the primary method to be used for NASA's top priority project (according to 2010 decadal survey) Wide Field InfraRed Survey Telescope (WFIRST) Exoplanet microlensing space observatory, to be launched in 2025. The unique ability of microlensing is that with WFIRST it can detect sub-earth- mass planets beyond the reach of Kepler at separation 1 AU to infinity. This will provide us the necessary statistics to study the formation and evolution of planetary systems. This will also provide us with necessary initial conditions to model the formation of planets and the habitable zones around M dwarf stars.

  10. Follow-up of obstructive sleep apnea in children.

    PubMed

    Barros, Emília Leite de; Pradella-Hallinan, Marcia; Moreira, Gustavo Antonio; Stefanini, Daniele de Oliveira Soares; Tufik, Sergio; Fujita, Reginaldo Raimundo

    2014-01-01

    the evolution of snoring and OSAS in children is not well established since few studies of patients without surgical treatment have been published. to evaluate the evolution of sleep disordered breathing in children who had not been submitted to upper airway surgery. twenty-six children with snoring who had not undergone upper airway surgery were evaluated prospectively. Patients were evaluated by full physical examination and nocturnal polysomnography, after which they were divided into 2 groups: apnea (16 children) and snoring (10 children). After 6 months following the initial evaluation, patients were submitted to a new nocturnal polysomnography, and all data were compared to those of the first examination. the groups did not show any differences regarding age, weight, height and airway physical examination. After 6 months of follow-up, the apnea index did not change, but the respiratory disturbance index increased in the snoring group and the number of hypopneas decreased in the group apnea. there was an increase in the percentage of N1 sleep stage and the respiratory disturbance index in the patients with primary snore. The AHI did not show significant alteration in both groups, but the number of hypopneas decreased in patients with SAOS. Copyright © 2014 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  11. Chandra follow up analysis on HESS J1841-055

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilbert, Sven

    2012-07-01

    State of the art Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkow Telescopes (IACTs) like the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS) and the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S) made surveys of the sky in order to discover new sources. The first and most famous is the H.E.S.S survey of the inner Galactic plane. So far more than 50 Galactic TeV Gamma-ray sources have been detected, a large number of which remain unidentified. HESS J1841-055 is one of the largest and most complex among these unidentified sources with an extension of approximately 1°. Follow up observations of the HESS J1841-055 region with Chandra, which is due to its high resolution good suited for searching for X-Ray counterparts and add-on analysis have revealed several X-ray sources spatially coincident with the multiple TeV emission peaks. The search for counterparts brought out the fact that not a single source itself but a bunch of sources of different nature, could be indeed the creators of this complex diffuse emission region; among them the SNR Kes 73, the pulsar within Kes 73, 1E 1841-45 and also the High Mass X-Ray Binary AX 184100.4-0536 and others.

  12. Asbestos and cancer: a cohort followed up to death.

    PubMed Central

    Enterline, P E; Hartley, J; Henderson, V

    1987-01-01

    The mortality experience of 1074 white men who retired from a United States asbestos company during the period 1941-67 and who were exposed to asbestos working as production and maintenance employees for the company is reported to the end of 1980 when 88% of this cohort was known to be dead. As noted in earlier reports the mortality for respiratory and gastrointestinal cancer was raised. A more detailed examination of causes of death shows that the excess in gastrointestinal cancer was largely due to a statistically significant excess in stomach cancer. A statistically significant excess was also noted for kidney cancer, cancer of the eye, and non-malignant respiratory disease. Eight deaths from malignant mesothelioma were observed, two of which were peritoneal. Asbestos exposures for these mesothelioma cases were low relative to other members of the cohort. Continuing follow up of this cohort shows a dose response relation for respiratory cancer that has become increasingly linear. Standardised mortality ratios peaked 10 to 15 years after retirement and were relatively constant at around 250 in each five year interval starting in 1950. This excess might have been detected as early as 1960 but certainly by 1965. The mortality experience of this cohort reflects the ultimate effects of asbestos since nearly all of the cohort has now died. PMID:3606968

  13. Follow up study of workers manufacturing chrysotile asbestos cement products.

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, M J; Winter, P D; Pannett, B; Powell, C A

    1986-01-01

    A cohort study has been carried out of 2167 subjects employed between 1941 and 1983 at an asbestos cement factory in England. The production process incorporated the use of chrysotile asbestos fibre only, except for a small amount of amosite during four months in 1976. Measured airborne fibre concentrations available since 1970 from personal samplers showed mean levels below 1 fibre/ml, although higher levels had probably occurred previously in certain areas of the factory. No excess of lung cancer was observed in the mortality follow up by comparison with either national or local death rates, and analyses of subgroups of the workforce by job, exposure level, duration of employment, duration since entry, or calendar years of employment gave no real suggestion of an asbestos related excess for this cause of death. There was one death from pleural mesothelioma and one with asbestosis mentioned as an associated cause on the death certificate, but neither is thought to be linked to asbestos exposure at this factory. Other suggested asbestos related cancers, such as laryngeal and gastrointestinal, did not show raised risks. Although the durations of exposure were short in this study, the findings are consistent with two other studies of workers exposed to low concentrations of chrysotile fibre in the manufacture of asbestos cement products which reported no excess mortality. PMID:3024695

  14. Spectroscopic follow-up of the Hercules-Aquila Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simion, Iulia T.; Belokurov, Vasily; Koposov, Sergey E.; Sheffield, Allyson; Johnston, Kathryn V.

    2018-05-01

    We designed a follow-up program to find the spectroscopic properties of the Hercules-Aquila Cloud (HAC) and test scenarios for its formation. We measured the radial velocities (RVs) of 45 RR Lyrae in the southern portion of the HAC using the facilities at the MDM observatory, producing the first large sample of velocities in the HAC. We found a double-peaked distribution in RVs, skewed slightly to negative velocities. We compared both the morphology of HAC projected on to the plane of the sky and the distribution of velocities in this structure outlined by RR Lyrae and other tracer populations at different distances to N-body simulations. We found that the behaviour is characteristic of an old, well-mixed accretion event with small apo-galactic radius. We cannot yet rule out other formation mechanisms for the HAC. However, if our interpretation is correct, HAC represents just a small portion of a much larger debris structure spread throughout the inner Galaxy whose distinct kinematic structure should be apparent in RV studies along many lines of sight.

  15. Conservative Management of Odontoid Peg Fractures, long term follow up.

    PubMed

    Osman, Aheed; Alageli, Nabil A; Short, D J; Masri, W S El

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to look at the long-term effects of conservative management of odontoid peg fractures. We reviewed 48 consecutive patients with type II (32) and 16 type III, odontoid peg fractures. The clinical & radiological outcomes were assessed over an average period of follow up of 8 years. Union rate was determined and we discussed several factors that may affect it. Patients were treated conservatively with an average period of bed rest of 4 weeks followed by bracing for an average of 9 weeks. Bony union was established in 25 of 32 (78%) type II fractures. Of 7 cases of no bony union 4 were stable probably with fibrous union. 3 remained unstable. In 13 of 16(83%) type III fractures bony union was established. 2 of the 3 with no bony union were considered stable. Osseous non-union was higher in patients with displacement of >5 mm, but there is no correlation between union and age, gender or angulation of the fracture in both types.

  16. Fired ceramic inlays: a 6-year follow up.

    PubMed

    van Dijken, J W; Höglund-Aberg, C; Olofsson, A L

    1998-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate feldspathic ceramic inlays luted with dual-cured resin composite or glass polyalkenoate (ionomer) cement (GIC) during a 6-year follow-up. One-hundred and eighteen Class II fired feldspathic ceramic inlays were placed in 50 patients. In each patient half of the inlays were luted with a dual-cured resin composite and the other half with a conventional glass ionomer cement. The inlays were evaluated clinically, according to modified USPHS criteria, at baseline, after 6 months and then annually over a 6-year period. Of the 115 inlays evaluated at 6 years, 12% in the resin composite group and 26% in the GIC group were assessed as having failed. The main reason for failure in both groups was partial fracture or total loss of the inlays. Secondary caries was found to be associated with three inlays in one high caries risk patient. One inlay was replaced because of postoperative sensitivity. A relatively high and increasing failure rate was observed over the 6-year period of the study. The failure rate was more pronounced in the GIC group.

  17. Engaging patients via mobile phone technology to assist follow-up after hospitalization in Quito, Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Maslowsky, Julie; Valsangkar, Bina; Chung, Jennifer; Rasanathan, Jennifer; Cruz, Freddy Trujillo; Ochoa, Marco; Chiriboga, Monica; Astudillo, Fernando; Heisler, Michele; Merajver, Sofia

    2012-05-01

    Disease management following hospital discharge is difficult in most low-resourced areas, posing a major obstacle to health equity. Although mobile phones are a ubiquitous and promising technology to facilitate healthcare access, few studies have tested the acceptability and feasibility of patients themselves using the devices for assisting linkages to healthcare services. We hypothesized that patients would use mobile phones to help manage postdischarge problems, if given a communication protocol. We developed a mobile phone-based program and investigated its acceptability and feasibility as a method of delivering posthospitalization care. A consecutive cohort of adult patients in a public hospital in Quito, Ecuador was enrolled over a 1-month period. A hospital-based nurse relayed patients' discharge instructions to a community-based nurse. Patients corresponded with this nurse via text messaging and phone calls according to a protocol to initiate and participate in follow-up. Eighty-nine percent of eligible patients participated. Ninety-seven percent of participants completed at least one contact with the nurse; 81% initiated contact themselves. Nurses completed 262 contacts with 32 patients, clarifying discharge instructions, providing preventive education, and facilitating clinic appointments. By this method, 87% of patients were successfully linked to follow-up appointments. High levels of patient participation and successful delivery of follow-up services indicate the mobile phone program's acceptability and feasibility for facilitating posthospitalization follow-up. Patients actively used mobile phones to interact with nurses, enabling the provision of posthospitalization medical advice and facilitate community-based care via mobile phone.

  18. Caring for the dying patient in the ICU--the past, the present and the future.

    PubMed

    Fridh, Isabell

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the state of the science concerning issues in end-of-life (EOL) care which have an impact on intensive care nurses possibilities to provide nursing care for dying patients and their families. The perspective of families is also illuminated and finally ethical challenges in the present and for the future are discussed. The literature review revealed that the problem areas nurses report concerning EOL care have been the same over three decades. Most problems are related to inter-disciplinary collaboration and communication with the medical profession about the transition from cure to comfort care. Nurses need enhanced communication skills in their role as the patient's advocate. Education in EOL care and a supportive environment are prerequisites for providing EOL care. Losing a loved one in the ICU is a stressful experience for close relatives and nursing care has a profound impact on families' memories of the EOL care given to their loved ones. It is therefore important that ICU nurses are aware of families' needs when a loved one is dying and that follow-up services are appreciated by bereaved family members. Ethical challenges are related to changed sedation practices, organ donation, globalisation and cultural sensitivity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement: 15-Year Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Palanca, Ariel; Mann, Roger A; Mann, Jeffrey A; Haskell, Andrew

    2018-02-01

    Over the past decade, total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) has become a mainstay in the treatment of end-stage ankle arthritis. Currently in its fourth generation, the Scandanavian Total Ankle Replacement (STAR) is the only 3-piece mobile bearing ankle prosthesis available in the United States. Our current study reports implant survivorship at 15 years and patient outcomes for a subset of these survivors available for study. Eighty-four TAAs were performed between 1998 and 2000. Metal component survivorship at 15 years was calculated with a Kaplan-Meier curve. Twenty-four (29%) of 84 patients were available for participation with a minimum 15-year follow-up. Any radiographic changes were documented. All additional procedures and complications were recorded. Clinical findings, self-reported performance and pain evaluations, and AOFAS ankle/hindfoot scores were noted. Metal implant survival was 73% at 15 years. Of the 24 patients available for clinical evaluation, 18 of 24 patients (70.7%) had no change in prosthetic alignment from the immediate postoperative radiograph. Only 1 subtalar fusion was required for symptomatic adjacent joint arthritis. Three patients sustained a broken polyethylene component. AOFAS scores improved from an average of 39.6 points preoperatively, to an average of 71.6. More than half (52.4%) of patients with retained implants required an additional surgical procedure; 3 required 2 additional procedures. The average time to subsequent procedure was 10.2 years. Our small cohort demonstrated STAR ankles with retention at 9 years were highly likely to survive to 15 years, and patients continued to have significant improvement in pain relief and minimal decrease in function. At 15 years from TAA, metal survivorship was 73%. As with all ankle replacements, supplementary procedures were common. Level IV, case series.

  20. Latex allergy: a follow up study of 1040 healthcare workers

    PubMed Central

    Filon, F Larese; Radman, G

    2006-01-01

    Background Natural rubber latex allergy can cause skin and respiratory symptoms The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and incidence of latex related symptoms and sensitisation among a large group of healthcare workers in Trieste hospitals, followed for three years before and after the introduction of powder‐free gloves with low latex release. Methods In the years 1997–99 the authors evaluated 1040 healthcare workers exposed to latex allergen for latex related symptoms and sensitisation by means of a questionnaire, a medical examination, skin prick tests, and IgE specific antibody assay. The second evaluation was carried out in the years 2000–02, subsequent to the changeover to a powder‐free environment. Results Glove related symptoms were seen in 21.8% of the nurses (227), mostly consisting of mild dermatitis: 38 (3.6%) complaining of contact urticaria and 24 (2.3%) of asthma and/or rhinitis. These symptoms were significantly related to skin prick tests positive to latex (OR = 9.70; 95% CI 5.5 to 17) and to personal atopy (OR = 2.29; 95% CI 1.6 to 3.2). Follow up was completed in 960 subjects (92.3%): 19 new subjects (2.4%) complained of itching erythema when using gloves, but none was prick positive to latex. Symptoms significantly improved and in most cases disappeared (p<0.0001). Conclusions Simple measures such as the avoidance of unnecessary glove use, the use of non‐powdered latex gloves by all workers, and use of non‐latex gloves by sensitised subjects can stop the progression of latex symptoms and can avoid new cases of sensitisation. PMID:16421390

  1. Tracking the follow-up of work in progress papers.

    PubMed

    Mubin, Omar; Arsalan, Mudassar; Al Mahmud, Abdullah

    2018-01-01

    Academic conferences offer numerous submission tracks to support the inclusion of a variety of researchers and topics. Work in progress papers are one such submission type where authors present preliminary results in a poster session. They have recently gained popularity in the area of Human Computer Interaction (HCI) as a relatively easier pathway to attending the conference due to their higher acceptance rate as compared to the main tracks. However, it is not clear if these work in progress papers are further extended or transitioned into more complete and thorough full papers or are simply one-off pieces of research. In order to answer this we explore self-citation patterns of four work in progress editions in two popular HCI conferences (CHI2010, CHI2011, HRI2010 and HRI2011). Our results show that almost 50% of the work in progress papers do not have any self-citations and approximately only half of the self-citations can be considered as true extensions of the original work in progress paper. Specific conferences dominate as the preferred venue where extensions of these work in progress papers are published. Furthermore, the rate of self-citations peaks in the immediate year after publication and gradually tails off. By tracing author publication records, we also delve into possible reasons of work in progress papers not being cited in follow up publications. In conclusion, we speculate on the main trends observed and what they may mean looking ahead for the work in progress track of premier HCI conferences.

  2. Clinical features and follow-up of congenital syphilis.

    PubMed

    Lago, Eleonor G; Vaccari, Alessandra; Fiori, Renato M

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate clinical features and outcomes of children treated for congenital syphilis (CS). Infants born alive in the public sector of São Lucas Hospital, Porto Alegre, Brazil, 1997 to 2004, whose mothers had syphilis and neonates with CS born in other facilities and admitted during this period were included. Follow-up was performed from birth up to 5 years. Among 24,920 live births, 379 (1.5%) met the criteria for CS. A further 19 infants born in other hospitals were included, for a total of 398 with CS. We compared infants with CS with 120 infants whose mothers received adequate treatment of syphilis before delivery (total sample, 518 infants). Congenital syphilis was associated with delivery before 34 weeks, low birth weight, and small for gestational age. During the study period, 37 stillbirths with CS were detected. Result from the serum venereal disease research laboratory test was negative at birth in 17.5% of the neonates with CS, and in 4 infants, it became positive after the second day. Thirty percent of the infants with CS were reevaluated between 8 and 60 months, and most had a good outcome when managed according to standard guidelines. Sixteen infants (13.3%) had sequelae. Of these, 8 were symptomatic in the neonatal period, and 13 (81%) of 16 had laboratory/x-ray findings. All asymptomatic and 78% of symptomatic infants had nonreactive fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption test after 12 months of age. Congenital syphilis remains an impacting disease that causes fetal and neonatal deaths, prematurity, low birth weight, and severe and irreversible sequelae in some children. This study confirms the value of standard guidelines for its management.

  3. Follow up on the crystal growth experiments of the LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, K. F.; Lind, M. D.

    1993-01-01

    The results of the 4 solution growth experiments on the LDEF have been published elsewhere. Both the crystals of CaCO3, which were large and well shaped, and the much smaller TTF-TCNQ crystals showed unusual morphological behavior. The follow up on these experiments was begun in 1981, when ESA initiated a 'Concept Definition Study' on a large, 150 kg, Solution Growth Facility (SGF) to be included in the payload of EURECA-1, the European Retrievable Carrier. This carrier was a continuation of the European Spacelab and at that time planned for launch in 1987. The long delay of the LDEF retrieval and of subsequent missions brought about reflections both on the concept of crystal growth in space and on the choice of crystallization materials that had been made for the LDEF. Already before the LDEF retrieval, research on TTF-TCNQ had been stopped, and a planned growth experiment with TTF-TCNQ on the SGF/EURECA had been cancelled. The target of the SGF investigation is now more fundamental in nature. None of the crystals to be grown here are, like TTF-TCNQ, in particular demand by science or industry, and the crystals only serve the purpose of model crystals. The real purpose of the investigation is to study the growth behavior. One of the experiments, the Soret Coefficient Measurement experiment is not growing crystals at all, but has it as its sole purpose to obtain accurate information on thermal diffusion, a process of importance in crystal growth from solution.

  4. Clinical follow up of uniparental disomy 16: First data

    SciTech Connect

    Dworniczak, B.; Koppers, B.; Bogdanova, N.

    1994-09-01

    Following the introduction of the concept of uniparental disomy (UPD) in 1980 by Engel this segregational anomaly is reported in an ever increasing number of patients. So far, several groups of individuals with an increased risk for UPD have been identified including abnormal carriers of familial balanced translocations or centric fusions, carriers of mosaic trisomies, and fetuses after prenatal diagnosis of confined placental mosaicism. A major pathogenetic mechanism appears to be post-meiotic chromosome loss in trisomic conceptuses. UPD was repeatedly observed in the fetus after diagnosis of mosaic or non-mosaic trisomies in the placenta which are usually considered {open_quotes}lethal{close_quotes} (i.e.more » trisomies 15 and 16). In an ongoing study to determine the incidence and clinical consequences of UPD we investigated the parental origin of chromosomes in the disomic cell line after prenatal diagnosis of mosaicism for various trisomies (e.g. 2, 7, 14, 15, and 16). At present, two maternal disomies 16 and one maternal disomy 15 were identified. Severe intrauterine growth retardation was a common symptome which, however, was also present in some but not all mosaics with a biparental origin of the chromosomes in question. While prognosis is clear in some instances (i.e. UPD 15) counseling can be extremely difficult in others, when imprinting effects and homozygosity for unknown recessive traits present in a parent have to be considered. To assess the clinical significance, detailed follow-up studies of proven cases of uniparental disomies are essential. First data of two cases with UPD 16 are presented.« less

  5. Postpartum follow-up: can psychosocial support reduce newborn readmissions?

    PubMed

    Barilla, Dora; Marshak, Helen Hopp; Anderson, S Eric; Hopp, Joyce W

    2010-01-01

    To determine whether there was a relationship between postpartum psychosocial support from healthcare providers and the rate of normal newborn readmissions (NNRs), and whether there was a cost benefit to justify an intervention. Data were abstracted for all normal newborn births from 1999 to 2006 (N = 14,786) at a community hospital in southern California at three different time periods: (1) at baseline prior to any intervention (1999-2000), (2) the 4 years during the comprehensive psychosocial support intervention (2001-2004), and (3) the 2 years during a limited psychosocial support intervention (2004-2006). A cost-benefit analysis was performed to analyze whether the financial benefits from the intervention matched or exceeded the costs for NNRs. There was a significantly lower readmission rate of 1.0% (p = < .001) during the comprehensive intervention time period compared to baseline (2.3%) or to the limited intervention time period (2.3%). Although there was no significant difference in the average cost per newborn readmitted across the three study time periods, during the comprehensive intervention time period the average costs of a NNR were significantly lower ($4,180, p = .041) for the intervention group compared to those who received no intervention ($5,338). There was a cost benefit of 513,540 dollars due to fewer readmissions during the comprehensive time period, but it did not exceed the cost of the intervention. Providing comprehensive follow-up for new mothers in the postpartum period can reduce NNRs, thus lowering the average newborn readmission costs for those who receive psychosocial support. Followup for new mothers should be an accepted norm rather than the exception in postpartum care, but NNRs should not be considered the sole outcome in such programs.

  6. Improving preterm infants' immunisation status: a follow-up audit.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Nigel W; Barfield, Charles; Hunt, Rod W; Pitcher, Helen; Buttery, Jim P

    2014-04-01

    Preterm infants are at increased risk of vaccine preventable diseases. An audit in 2007 identified suboptimal immunisation status of preterm infants. The aim of this study was to complete the 'audit loop', reviewing preterm infants' immunisation status at a single tertiary paediatric hospital. A retrospective follow-up immunisation audit was conducted at The Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, neonatal unit. The 'audit loop' included a preterm infants' reminder sticker and feedback of the original audit findings to Royal Children's Hospital health-care professionals. Immunisation status was determined using the Australian Childhood Immunisation Register record for all admitted preterm infants born <32 weeks gestation (July 2008-June 2009). Conducted in March 2011, the median age of participants (n = 57) was 2.5 years (range 1.7-3.1 years). Forty-four per cent (25/57) had a history of chronic lung disease, 86% (49/57) were <1500 g and 42% (24/57) <28 weeks gestation. The majority (96% (55/57)) were up to date with routine immunisations at 12 months of age. There was a 2.4-fold increase, compared with the original audit, for receipt of the additional recommended hepatitis B vaccine at 12 months of age, as well as influenza vaccine in infants with chronic lung disease. This study showed that a simple reminder combined with education strategies can improve vaccine delivery in special risk groups such as preterm infants. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2013 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  7. Eighteen-year follow-up of hyperopic photorefractive keratectomy.

    PubMed

    Wagh, Vijay K; Dave, Reena; O'Brart, David P S; Lim, Wei S; Patel, Parul; Tam, Connan; Lee, Jennifer; Marshall, John

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the long-term efficacy of hyperopic photorefractive keratectomy (PRK). University Hospital, London, United Kingdom. Prospective case series. Patients with a follow-up of 18 years ± 0.7 (SD) attended for examination. All had spherical corrections with a 6.5 mm optical zone and 1.5 mm blend zone. Twenty-five patients (45 eyes) were included. The mean preoperative spherical equivalent (SE) refractive error was +4.11 ± 1.8 diopters (D) (range +1.125 to +7.25 D). Between 1 year and 18 years, in eyes that had no cataract surgery (n = 34), there was a +1.14 ± 1.48 D increase in the mean SE (P < .0002). The increase between 7.5 years and 18.0 years did not reach clinical significance (P = .1). Uncorrected distance visual acuity improved at 18 years (P < .02). Corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA) was reduced (P < .001). The efficacy index was 0.47, and the safety index was 0.83. Six eyes (18%) lost 2 lines of CDVA, of which 4 eyes had preexisting cataract. Keratometry remained stable between 1 year and 18 years (P = .2). Forty percent still had traces of peripheral haze, and 4 (9%) had Salzmann-like changes. Eleven eyes (24%) had cataract surgery and 4 (9%) had laser iridotomy. There was no evidence of ectasia. Hyperopic PRK showed an increase in hyperopic SE between 1.0 year and 7.5 years but was generally stable thereafter. The efficacy was limited. Peripheral haze was evident in 40% of cases with Salzmann-like changes in some. Ocular comorbidity in relationship to cataract was common and reduced CDVA. Dr. Marshall was a consultant to Summit Technology, Inc. No author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Copyright © 2016 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Nutritional rehabilitation after ICU - does it happen: a qualitative interview and observational study.

    PubMed

    Merriweather, Judith; Smith, Pam; Walsh, Timothy

    2014-03-01

    To compare and contrast current nutritional rehabilitation practices against recommendations from National Institute for Health and Excellence guideline Rehabilitation after critical illness (NICE) (2009, http://www.nice.org.uk/cg83). Recovery from critical illness has gained increasing prominence over the last decade but there is remarkably little research relating to nutritional rehabilitation. The study is a qualitative study based on patient interviews and observations of ward practice. Seventeen patients were recruited into the study at discharge from the intensive care unit (ICU) of a large teaching hospital in central Scotland in 2011. Semi-structured interviews were conducted on transfer to the ward and weekly thereafter. Fourteen of these patients were followed up at three months post-ICU discharge, and a semi-structured interview was carried out. Observations of ward practice were carried out twice weekly for the duration of the ward stay. Current nutritional practice for post-intensive care patients did not reflect the recommendations from the NICE guideline. A number of organisational issues were identified as influencing nutritional care. These issues were categorised as ward culture, service-centred delivery of care and disjointed discharge planning. Their influence on nutritional care was compounded by the complex problems associated with critical illness. The NICE guideline provides few nutrition-specific recommendations for rehabilitation; however, current practice does not reflect the nutritional recommendations that are detailed in the rehabilitation care pathway. Nutritional care of post-ICU patients is problematic and strategies to overcome these issues need to be addressed in order to improve nutritional intake. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Relationship between TISS and ICU cost.

    PubMed

    Dickie, H; Vedio, A; Dundas, R; Treacher, D F; Leach, R M

    1998-10-01

    To determine whether the therapeutic intervention scoring system (TISS) reliably reflects the cost of the overall intensive care unit (ICU) population, subgroups of that population and individual ICU patients. Prospective analysis of individual patient costs and comparison with TISS. Adult, 12 bedded general medical and surgical ICU in a university teaching hospital. Two hundred fifty-seven consecutive patients including 52 coronary care (CCU), 99 cardiac surgery (CS) and 106 general ICU (GIC) cases admitted to the ICU during a 12-week period in 1994. A total of 916 TISS-scored patient days were analysed A variable cost (VC) that included consumables and service usage (nursing, physiotherapy, radiology and pathology staff costs) for individual patients was measured daily. Nursing costs were calculated in proportion to a daily nursing dependency score. A fixed cost (FC) was calculated for each patient to include medical, technical and clerical salary costs, capital equipment depreciation, equipment and central hospital costs. The correlation between cost and TISS was analysed using regression analysis. For the whole group (n = 257) the average daily FC was pound sterling 255 and daily VC was pound sterling 541 (SEM 10); range pound sterling 23-pound sterling 2,806. In the patient subgroups average daily cost (FC + VC) for CCU was pound sterling 476 (SEM 17.5), for CS pound sterling 766 (SEM 13.8) and for GIC pound sterling 873 (SEM 13.6). In the group as a whole, a strong correlation was demonstrated between VC and the TISS for each patient day (r = 0.87, p < 0.001) and this improved further when the total TISS score was compared with the total VC of the entire patient episode (r = 0.93, p < 0.001). This correlation was maintained in CCU, CS and GIC patient cohorts with only a small median difference between actual and predicted cost (2.2 % for GIC patients). However, in the individual patient, the range of error was up to +/- 65 % of the true variable cost. For the

  10. Health and re-employment in a two year follow up of long term unemployed.

    PubMed

    Claussen, B; Bjørndal, A; Hjort, P F

    1993-02-01

    The aim was to examine re-employment and changes in health during a two year follow up of a representative sample of long term unemployed. This was a cross sectional study and a two year follow up. Health was measured by psychometric testing, Hopkins symptom checklist, General health questionnaire, and medical examination. Health related selection to continuous unemployment and recovery by re-employment was estimated by logistic regression with covariances deduced from the labour market theories of human capital and segmented labour market. Four municipalities in Greenland, southern Norway. Participants were a random sample of 17 to 63 year old people registered as unemployed for more than 12 weeks. In the cross sectional study, the prevalence of depression, anxiety, and somatic illness was from four to 10 times higher than in a control group of employed people. In the follow up study, there was considerable health related selection to re-employment. A psychiatric diagnosis was associated with a 70% reduction in chances of obtaining a job. Normal performance on psychometric testing showed a two to three times increased chance of re-employment. Recovery of health following re-employment was less than expected from previous studies. Health related selection to long term unemployment seems to explain a substantial part of the excess mental morbidity among unemployed people. An increased proportion of the long term unemployed will be vocationally handicapped as years pass, putting a heavy burden on social services.

  11. Follow-up of serious offender patients in the community: multiple methods of tracing.

    PubMed

    Jamieson, Elizabeth; Taylor, Pamela J

    2002-01-01

    Longitudinal studies of people with mental disorder are important in understanding outcome and intervention effects but attrition rates can be high. This study aimed to evaluate use of multiple record sources to trace, over 12 years, a one-year discharge cohort of high-security hospital patients. Everyone leaving such a hospital in 1984 was traced until a census date of 31 December 1995. Data were collected from several national databases (Office for National Statistics (ONS), Home Office (HO) Offenders' Index, Police National Computer Records, the Electoral Roll) and by hand-searching responsible agency records (HO, National Health Service). Using all methods, only three of the 204 patients had no follow-up information. Home Office Mental Health Unit data were an excellent source, but only for people still under discharge restrictions (<50% after eight years). Sequential tracing of hospital placements for people never or no longer under such restrictions was laborious and also produced only group-specific yield. The best indicator of community residence was ONS information on general practitioner (GP/primary care) registration. The electoral roll was useful when other sources were exhausted. Follow-up of offenders/offender-patients has generally focused on event data, such as re-offending. People untraced by that method alone, however, are unlikely to be lost to follow-up on casting a wider records net. Using multiple records, attrition at the census was 38%, but, after certain assumptions, reduced further to 5%.

  12. Electronic Follow-Up of Developing World Cleft Patients: A Digital Dream?

    PubMed

    Walker, Tom W M; Chadha, Ambika; Rodgers, William; Mills, Caroline; Ayliffe, Peter

    2017-10-01

    To identify potential access to telemedicine follow-up of children with clefts operated on a humanitarian mission. A cross-sectional study of parents of children presenting to a humanitarian cleft lip and palate mission in a Provincial Hospital in the Philippines. A purpose designed questionnaire was used to assess access to electronic and digital resources that could be used to aid follow-up. Forty-five (N = 45) parents of children having primary cleft lip and or palate surgery participated. There were no interventions. Access to the Internet was through Parent Perceived Affordability of Internet Access and Parent Owned Devices. Thirty-one (N = 31) respondents were female. There was 93% mobile phone ownership. The mean distance traveled to the clinic was 187 km. Majority (56%) were fluent in English. Thirty-one percent accessed the Internet daily. Sixteen percent reported use of e-mail. Fifty-one percent accessed the Internet on a mobile device, and short message service use was the most affordable means of communication. Due to perceived unaffordability and low levels of access to devices with cameras and the Internet, as well as issues with privacy, we cannot recommend relying on electronic follow-up of patients in the developing world.

  13. Psychopathology from adolescence into young adulthood: an 8-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Ferdinand, R F; Verhulst, F C

    1995-11-01

    This study investigated the stability of behavioral and emotional problems from adolescence into young adulthood. Subjects from the general population (N = 459), aged 13-16 years, were evaluated initially with the Child Behavior Checklist (completed by parents) and 8 years later with the Young Adult Self-Report. The scoring format and factor structure of the two assessment instruments are similar; syndromes constructed from the two instruments are based on parents', teachers', and self-report information derived from large clinical samples. Signs of maladjustment also were assessed at follow-up through interviews. Of the individuals with total problem scores in the deviant range on the Child Behavior Checklist, 27.3% had total problem scores in the deviant range on the Young Adult Self-Report at follow-up. The probability of having a total problem score in the deviant range at follow-up was raised 7.4-fold by having deviant-range scores on the Child Behavior Checklist somatic complaints and anxious/depressed syndromes (simultaneously) at the initial assessment. Referral to mental health services was predicted by deviant-range scores on the anxious/depressed syndrome, while suicide attempts were predicted by deviance on the withdrawn syndrome. Adolescent problems tended to persist into young adulthood to a moderate degree. High rates of withdrawal from social contacts, anxiety or depression, somatic complaints without known medical origin, social problems, attention problems, delinquent behavior, and aggressive behavior during adolescence were risk factors for specific types of psychopathology and maladjustment at 8-year follow-up. The presence of psychopathology in adolescence should not be regarded as normative.

  14. The Follow-up Crisis: Optimizing Science in an Opportunity Rich Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestrand, T.

    Rapid follow-up tasking for robotic telescopes has been dominated by a one-dimensional uncoordinated response strategy developed for gamma-ray burst studies. However, this second-grade soccer approach is increasing showing its limitations even when there are only a few events per night. And it will certainly fail when faced with the denial-of-service attack generated by the nightly flood of new transients generated by massive variability surveys like LSST. We discuss approaches for optimizing the scientific return from autonomous robotic telescopes in the high event range limit and explore the potential of a coordinated telescope ecosystem employing heterogeneous telescopes.

  15. How and why women choose sterilization: results from six follow-up surveys.

    PubMed

    Landry, E

    1990-01-01

    Follow-up surveys were carried out in six countries (Bangladesh, Columbia, El Salvador, Guatemala, Indonesia, and Tunisia) between 1984 and 1986 to assess client decision-making regarding sterilization. The results revealed that women made well-informed, voluntary decisions to be sterilized. They were knowledgeable about other family planning methods and made the decision to be sterilized after consulting their partners, friends, relatives, or other sterilized women. Although their decisions were voluntary, other findings revealed areas for improvement such as client information and education about the risks of the procedure. These data were used to improve program services by emphasizing the need for better information, education, and counseling programs.

  16. Virtual rapid response: the next evolution of tele-ICU.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Carrie L

    2012-01-01

    The first of its kind in the Veterans Affairs (VA) system, the Denver VA Medical Center's tele-intensive care unit (ICU) program is unique because it is entirely nurse driven. A nontraditional tele-ICU model, the program was tailored to meet the needs of rural veterans by using critical care nursing expertise in Denver, Colorado. An experienced CCRN-certified nurse manages the system 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, from Eastern Colorado Health Care System. The virtual ICU provides rapid response interventions through virtual technology. This tele-ICU technology allows for a "virtual handshake" by nursing staff at the start of the shift and a report on potential patient issues. Clinical relationships have been strengthened between all 5 VA facilities in the Rocky Mountain Region, increasing the likelihood of early consultation at the onset of clinical decline of a patient. In addition, the tele-ICU nurse is available for immediate nursing consultation and support, coordinates point-to-point virtual consultation between physicians at the rural sites and specialists in Denver, and assists in expediting critical care transfers. The primary objectives for the tele-ICU program include improving quality and access of care to critical care services in rural sites, reducing community fee basis costs and frequency of transfers, and increasing collaboration and collegiality among nursing and medical staff in all Region 19's medical centers.

  17. Pediatric interventional radiology workforce survey: 10-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Claire S; James, Charles A; Harned, Roger K; Connolly, Bairbre L; Roebuck, Derek J; Cahill, Anne M; Dubois, Josee; Morello, Frank P; Morgan, Robin K; Sidhu, Manrita K

    2017-05-01

    Pediatric interventional radiology is a distinct subspecialty differing from both pediatric diagnostic radiology and adult interventional radiology. We conducted a workforce survey in 2005 to evaluate the state of pediatric interventional radiology at that time. Since then there have been many advancements to the subspecialty, including the founding of the Society for Pediatric Interventional Radiology (SPIR). To evaluate the current state of the pediatric interventional radiology workforce and compare findings with those of the initial 2005 workforce survey. We sent a two-part survey electronically to members of SPIR, the Society for Pediatric Radiology (SPR), the Society of Chairmen of Radiology in Children's Hospitals (SCORCH) and the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR). Part 1 focused on individual practitioners (n=177), while part 2 focused on group practices and was answered by a leader from each group (n=88). We examined descriptive statistics and, when possible, compared the results to the study from 2005. A total of 177 individuals replied (a 331% increase over the first study) and 88 pediatric interventional radiology (IR) service sites responded (a 131.6% increase). Pediatric IR has become a more clinically oriented specialty, with a statistically significant increase in services with admitting privileges, clinics and performance of daily rounds. Pediatric IR remains diverse in training and practice. Many challenges still exist, including anesthesia/hospital support, and the unknown impact of the new IR residency on pediatric IR training, although the workforce shortage has been somewhat alleviated, as demonstrated by the decreased mean call from 165 days/year to 67.2 days/year. Pediatric interventional radiology practitioners and services have grown significantly since 2005, although the profile of this small subspecialty has changed and some challenges remain.

  18. Summary of follow-up results from potential tuberculosis exposures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weirich, Stephen A.

    1993-01-01

    There were two isolated episodes of LeRC workers who were diagnosed with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) during the fall of 1990. The specifics surrounding each case were very different, and it is clear that the two episodes were completely unrelated. The fact that the final diagnoses of pulmonary tuberculosis came within three weeks of each other was purely coincidental. The Occupational Medicine Service (OMS) conducted separate informational sessions and offered free PPD skin testing to all employees, both NASA and contractors, who felt that they were at risk of having been exposed to tuberculosis from either individual. The procedures and results of these are briefly discussed.

  19. Mortality among US veterans of the Persian Gulf War: 7-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Kang, H K; Bullman, T A

    2001-09-01

    To assess the long-term health consequences of the 1991 Persian Gulf War, the authors compared cause-specific mortality rates of 621,902 Gulf War veterans with those of 746,248 non-Gulf veterans, by gender, with adjustment for age, race, marital status, branch of service, and type of unit. Vital status follow-up began with the date of exit from the Persian Gulf theater (Gulf veterans) or May 1, 1991 (control veterans). Follow-up for both groups ended on the date of death or December 31, 1997, whichever came first. Cox proportional hazards models were used for the multivariate analysis. For Gulf veterans, mortality risk was also assessed relative to the likelihood of exposure to nerve gas at Khamisiyah, Iraq. Among Gulf veterans, the significant excess of deaths due to motor vehicle accidents that was observed during the earlier postwar years had decreased steadily to levels found in non-Gulf veterans. The risk of death from natural causes remained lower among Gulf veterans compared with non-Gulf veterans. This was mainly accounted for by the relatively higher number of deaths related to human immunodeficiency virus infection among non-Gulf veterans. There was no statistically significant difference in cause-specific mortality among Gulf veterans relative to potential nerve gas exposure. The risk of death for both Gulf veterans and non-Gulf veterans stayed less than half of that expected in their civilian counterparts. The authors conclude that the excess risk of mortality from motor vehicle accidents that was associated with Gulf War service has dissipated after 7 years of follow-up.

  20. Lost but not forgotten: patients lost to follow-up in a trauma database

    PubMed Central

    Murnaghan, M. Lucas; Buckley, Richard E.

    2002-01-01

    Objectives To determine the characteristics of patients lost to follow-up and to identify if they are significantly different from those who are followed up in the context of a prospective randomized controlled trial. Design A retrospective review of a prospectively acquired trauma database. Setting A level 1 university-affiliated trauma hospital. Patients Two hundred and thirty-six patients treated for displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures between April 1991 and December 1996. Of these, 198 were categorized as “attenders” and the remaining 38 were deemed “nonattenders.” Demographics, severity of injury, intervention and post-treatment status of the 2 groups were compared. Demographic information, including age, gender, occupation workload, Workers’ Compensation Board involvement and other standard trauma information were compared and the differences analyzed. Results The nonattenders were younger than the attenders, and there was a significantly increased proportion of Aboriginal Canadians in the nonattenders group. Attenders were more likely to be “skilled or semi-skilled clerical, sales, service or trades crafts” workers, and nonattenders were more likely to be “unskilled clerical, sales, service or labour” workers. Attenders were more likely to have a preoperative Bohler’s angle of < 0°, compared with a preoperative Bohler’s angle of 0° to 15° for nonattenders. Conclusions This trauma population is at higher risk of being marginalized by society and may not have the same accessibility to a study nurse or a hospital contact person. Patients lost to follow-up are a demographically and clinically different patient population from those who remain involved in a long-term prospective trauma study. PMID:12067171

  1. Travelers' health problems and behavior: prospective study with post-travel follow-up.

    PubMed

    Vilkman, Katri; Pakkanen, Sari H; Lääveri, Tinja; Siikamäki, Heli; Kantele, Anu

    2016-07-13

    after travel. As the symptoms mostly remained mild, health care services were seldom needed. Typical traveler profiles were identified, thereby providing a tool for pre-travel advice. The finding that one third reported new-onset illness during follow-up attests to the importance of advising clients on potential post-travel health problems already during pre-travel visits.

  2. Six-year follow-up with Empress veneers.

    PubMed

    Fradeani, M

    1998-06-01

    This study reports on 6 years experience with IPS Empress laminate veneers. A total of 83 anterior veneers were positioned in 21 patients from January 1991 to December 1996 in the author's private practice. Final evaluation was carried out in May and June 1997. Color match, marginal discoloration, recurrent caries, contour, and marginal integrity were evaluated using the modified U.S. Public Health Service criteria at baseline and subsequent recall appointments. On the basis of the criteria used, a large percentage of veneers were rated Alfa. Only one failure was recorded, resulting in a success rate of 98.8%. A thorough description of clinical procedures and laboratory techniques through which anterior teeth can be successfully treated with ceramic veneers is supplied. A clinical case is presented to demonstrate the satisfactory esthetic results obtained using this very conservative restorative technique.

  3. Surviving ICU: Stories of recovery.

    PubMed

    Ewens, Beverley A; Hendricks, Joyce M; Sundin, Deborah

    2018-02-28

    The aim of this study was to investigate stories of recovery through the lens of intensive care unit (ICU) survivors. Survival from ICUs is increasing, as are associated physical and psychological complications. Despite the significant impact on survivors, there is inadequate support provision in Australia and world-wide for this population. An interpretive biographical approach of intensive care survivors' experiences of recovery. Data were collected during 2014-2015 from diaries, face to face interviews, memos and field notes. Six participants diarized for 3 months commencing 2 months after hospital discharge. At 5 months, participants were interviewed about the content of their diaries and symbols and signifiers in them to create a shared meaning. Analysis of diaries and interviews were undertaken using two frameworks to identify themes throughout participants' stories and provides a unique portrait of recovery through their individual lens. Participants considered their lives had irreparably changed and yet felt unsupported by a healthcare system that had "saved" them. This view through their lens identified turmoil, which existed between their surface and inner worlds as they struggled to conform to what recovery "should be". The novel biographical methods provided a safe and creative way to reveal survivors' inner thoughts and feelings. Participants' considered creating their stories supported their recovery process and in particular enabled them to reflect on their progress. Findings from this study may lead to increased awareness among health care providers about problems survivors face and improved support services more broadly, based on frameworks appropriate for this population. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. What happens to quality in integrated homecare? A 15-year follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Paljärvi, Soili; Rissanen, Sari; Sinkkonen, Sirkka; Paljärvi, Leo

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To explore the impact of structural integration on homecare quality. Methods A case study in an organisation comprising a before–after comparison with baseline and four follow-up measurements during 1994–2009, using interviews with clients (n=66–84) and postal inquiries to relatives (n=73–78) and staff (n=68–136). Results Despite the organisational reform involving extensive mergers of health and social care organisations and cuts in staff and service provision, homecare quality remained at almost the same level throughout the 15-year follow-up. According to the clients, it even slightly improved in some homecare areas. Conclusions The results show that despite the structural integration and cuts in staff and service provision, the quality of homecare remained at a good level. Assuming that the potential confounders did have inhibiting effects, the results suggest that structural integration had a positive impact on homecare quality. To obtain firmer evidence to support this tentative conclusion, further research with a randomised comparison design is needed. PMID:21949487

  5. An advocacy intervention program for women with abusive partners: six-month follow-up.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, C M; Campbell, R; Angelique, H; Eby, K K; Davidson, W S

    1994-02-01

    Presented the 6-month follow-up findings of an experimental intervention designed to provide postshelter advocacy services to women with abusive partners. The intervention involved randomly assigning half the research participants to receive the free services of an advocate, 4 to 6 hours per week, for the first 10 weeks postshelter. One hundred forty-one battered women were interviewed about their experiences immediately upon their exit from a domestic violence shelter: 95% of the sample were interviewed 10 weeks thereafter (postintervention), and 93% were successfully tracked and interviewed 6 months later. At the 6-month follow-up, participants in both groups reported increased social support, increased quality of life, less depression, less emotional attachment to their assailants, and an increased sense of personal power. Although women in both groups reported some decrease in physical abuse over time, there were no statistically significant differences between those with and those without advocates, and abuse continued to be a problem for many women. Those who were still involved with their assailants continued to experience higher levels of abuse and had been more economically dependent upon the men prior to entering the shelter. Women who had worked with advocates continued to report being more satisfied with their overall quality of life than did the women in the control group.

  6. Experiences of ICU survivors in a low middle income country- a multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Pieris, Lalitha; Sigera, Ponsuge Chathurani; De Silva, Ambepitiyawaduge Pubudu; Munasinghe, Sithum; Rashan, Aasiyah; Athapattu, Priyantha Lakmini; Jayasinghe, Kosala Saroj Amarasiri; Samarasinghe, Kerstein; Beane, Abi; Dondorp, Arjen M; Haniffa, Rashan

    2018-03-21

    Stressful patient experiences during the intensive care unit (ICU) stay is associated with reduced satisfaction in High Income Countries (HICs) but has not been explored in Lower and Middle Income Countries (LMICs). This study describes the recalled experiences, stress and satisfaction as perceived by survivors of ICUs in a LMIC. This follow-up study was carried out in 32 state ICUs in Sri Lanka between July and December 2015.ICU survivors' experiences, stress factors encountered and level of satisfaction were collected 30 days after ICU discharge by a telephone questionnaire adapted from Granja and Wright. Of 1665 eligible ICU survivors, 23.3% died after ICU discharge, 49.1% were uncontactable and 438 (26.3%) patients were included in the study. Whilst 78.1% (n = 349) of patients remembered their admission to the hospital, only 42.3% (n = 189) could recall their admission to the ICU. The most frequently reported stressful experiences were: being bedridden (34.2%), pain (34.0%), general discomfort (31.7%), daily needle punctures (32.9%), family worries (33.6%), fear of dying and uncertainty in the future (25.8%). The majority of patients (376, 84.12%) found the atmosphere of the ICU to be friendly and calm. Overall, the patients found the level of health care received in the ICU to be "very satisfactory" (93.8%, n = 411) with none of the survivors stating they were either "dissatisfied" or "very dissatisfied". In common with HIC, survivors were very satisfied with their ICU care. In contrast to HIC settings, specific ICU experiences were frequently not recalled, but those remembered were reported as relatively stress-free. Stressful experiences, in common with HIC, were most frequently related to uncertainty about the future, dependency, family, and economic concerns.

  7. Integrating Telehealth Emergency Department Follow-up Visits into Residency Training.

    PubMed

    Papanagnou, Dimitrios; Stone, Danica; Chandra, Shruti; Watts, Phillip; Chang, Anna Marie; Hollander, Judd E

    2018-04-05

    Introduction Given the rapid expansion of telehealth (TH), there is an emerging need for trained professionals who can effectively deliver TH services. As there is no formal TH training program for residents, the Department of Emergency Medicine (DEM) at Thomas Jefferson University (TJU) developed a pilot training program for senior post-graduate-year three (PGY-3) residents that exposed them to TH practices. The objective of the study was to determine the feasibility of developing a resident-led, post-Emergency-Department (ED) visit TH follow-up program as an educational opportunity to 1) address patient satisfaction; and 2) expose senior residents to TH delivery. Methods During a one-month block in their third-year of training, EM residents were exposed to and educated on TH delivery and utility through on-the-job, just-in-time training. Residents spent four hours per week evaluating patients previously seen in the ED within the last 5-7 days in the form of TH follow-up visits. ED patients were screened to identify which patient chief complaints and presentations were appropriate for a follow-up visit, given a specific day and time for their TH encounter, facilitated by a resident, and supervised by a faculty member trained in TH. Demographic patient and visit data were collected. Residents then completed a brief survey at the end of the rotation to capture their educational experiences and recommendations for subsequent training improvement. Results Over 12 months, 197 TH follow-up visits were performed by 12 residents. One hundred twenty-six patients (64%) were female. Top chief complaints included extremity pain (11.2%); abdominal pain (8.1%); upper respiratory infections (8.1%); lacerations (7.6%), and motor vehicle accidents (7.6%). The average number of days between the ED visit and the TH follow-up call was 5.1 days (IQR 3-6). 44.7% of patients were compliant with their discharge instructions and medications. On a Likert scale low (1) to high (10

  8. Additional follow-up telephone counselling and initial smoking relapse: a longitudinal, controlled study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei; He, Yao; Jiang, Bin; Zuo, Fang; Liu, Qinghui; Zhang, Li; Zhou, Changxi

    2016-04-20

    Smoking cessation services can help smokers to quit; however, many smoking relapse cases occur over time. Initial relapse prevention should play an important role in achieving the goal of long-term smoking cessation. Several studies have focused on the effect of extended telephone support in relapse prevention, but the conclusions remain conflicting. From October 2008 to August 2013, a longitudinal, controlled study was performed in a large general hospital of Beijing. The smokers who sought treatment at our smoking cessation clinic were non-randomised and divided into 2 groups: face-to-face individual counselling group (FC group), and face-to-face individual counselling plus telephone follow-up counselling group (FCF group). No pharmacotherapy was offered. The timing of initial smoking relapse was compared between FC and FCF groups. Predictors of initial relapse were investigated during the first 180 days, using the Cox proportional hazards model. Of 547 eligible male smokers who volunteered to participate, 457 participants (117 in FC group and 340 in FCF group) achieved at least 24 h abstinence. The majority of the lapse episodes occurred during the first 2 weeks after the quit date. Smokers who did not receive the follow-up telephone counselling (FC group) tended to relapse to smoking earlier than those smokers who received the additional follow-up telephone counselling (FCF group), and the log-rank test was statistically significant (p=0.003). A Cox regression model showed that, in the FCF group, being married, and having a lower Fagerström test score, normal body mass index and doctor-diagnosed tobacco-related chronic diseases, were significantly independent protective predictors of smoking relapse. Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that additional follow-up telephone counselling might be an effective strategy in preventing relapse. Further research is still needed to confirm our findings. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group

  9. Impact of Hazardous Materials on Man and the Environment: A Summer Institute with Academic Year Follow-up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kjeldsen, Chris K.

    This report focuses on three 11-day summer institutes on "The Impact of Toxic and Hazardous Materials on Humans and the Environment" conducted for 90 secondary school science teachers over the course of three summers at Sonoma State University, California. These summer institutes were all followed up with in-service days during the…

  10. Comparing the effects of education using telephone follow-up and smartphone-based social networking follow-up on self-management behaviors among patients with hypertension.

    PubMed

    Najafi Ghezeljeh, Tahereh; Sharifian, Sanaz; Nasr Isfahani, Mehdi; Haghani, Hamid

    2018-03-05

    Little is known about the benefits of social networks in the management of patients. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of self-management (SM) education using telephone follow-up and mobile phone-based social networking on SM behaviors among patients with hypertension. This randomized clinical trial was conducted with 100 patients. They were randomly allocated to four groups: (i) control, (ii) SM training without follow-up, (iii) telephone follow-up and (iv) smartphone-based social networking follow-up. The hypertension SM behavior questionnaire was used for data collection before and six weeks after the study. Those patients who underwent SM education training (with and without follow-up) had statistically significant differences from those in the control group in terms of SM behaviors (p < .001). There was no statistically significant difference between different types of follow-up. SM education using telephone follow-up and/or smartphone-based social networking follow-up influenced SM behaviors among patients with hypertension.

  11. Storytelling in the Early Bereavement Period to Reduce Emotional Distress Among Surrogates Involved in a Decision to Limit Life Support in the ICU: A Pilot Feasibility Trial.

    PubMed

    Barnato, Amber E; Schenker, Yael; Tiver, Greer; Dew, Mary Amanda; Arnold, Robert M; Nunez, Eduardo R; Reynolds, Charles F

    2017-01-01

    Surrogate decision makers involved in decisions to limit life support for an incapacitated patient in the ICU have high rates of adverse emotional health outcomes distinct from normal processes of grief and bereavement. Narrative self-disclosure (storytelling) reduces emotional distress after other traumatic experiences. We sought to assess the feasibility, acceptability, and tolerability of storytelling among bereaved surrogates involved in a decision to limit life support in the ICU. Pilot single-blind trial. Five ICUs across three hospitals within a single health system between June 2013 and November 2014. Bereaved surrogates of ICU patients. Storytelling and control conditions involved printed bereavement materials and follow-up assessments. Storytelling involved a single 1- to 2-hour home or telephone visit by a trained interventionist who elicited the surrogate's story. The primary outcomes were feasibility (rates of enrollment, intervention receipt, 3- and 6-mo follow-up), acceptability (closed and open-ended end-of-study feedback at 6 mo), and tolerability (acute mental health services referral). Of 53 eligible surrogates, 32 (60%) consented to treatment allocation. Surrogates' mean age was 55.5 (SD, 11.8), and they were making decisions for their parent (47%), spouse (28%), sibling (13%), child (3%), or other relation (8%). We allocated 14 to control and 18 to storytelling, 17 of 18 (94%) received storytelling, 14 of 14 (100%) and 13 of 14 (94%) control subjects and 16 of 18 (89%) and 17 of 18 (94%) storytelling subjects completed their 3- and 6-month telephone assessments. At 6 months, nine of 13 control participants (69%) and 16 of 17 storytelling subjects (94%) reported feeling "better" or "much better," and none felt "much worse." One control subject (8%) and one storytelling subject (6%) said that the study was burdensome, and one control subject (8%) wished they had not participated. No subjects required acute mental health services referral. A

  12. Health and re-employment in a two year follow up of long term unemployed.

    PubMed Central

    Claussen, B; Bjørndal, A; Hjort, P F

    1993-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--The aim was to examine re-employment and changes in health during a two year follow up of a representative sample of long term unemployed. DESIGN--This was a cross sectional study and a two year follow up. Health was measured by psychometric testing, Hopkins symptom checklist, General health questionnaire, and medical examination. Health related selection to continuous unemployment and recovery by re-employment was estimated by logistic regression with covariances deduced from the labour market theories of human capital and segmented labour market. SETTING--Four municipalities in Greenland, southern Norway. SUBJECTS--Participants were a random sample of 17 to 63 year old people registered as unemployed for more than 12 weeks. MAIN RESULTS--In the cross sectional study, the prevalence of depression, anxiety, and somatic illness was from four to 10 times higher than in a control group of employed people. In the follow up study, there was considerable health related selection to re-employment. A psychiatric diagnosis was associated with a 70% reduction in chances of obtaining a job. Normal performance on psychometric testing showed a two to three times increased chance of re-employment. Recovery of health following re-employment was less than expected from previous studies. CONCLUSIONS--Health related selection to long term unemployment seems to explain a substantial part of the excess mental morbidity among unemployed people. An increased proportion of the long term unemployed will be vocationally handicapped as years pass, putting a heavy burden on social services. Images PMID:8436885

  13. Offending behaviours of child and adolescent firesetters over a 10-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Lambie, Ian; Ioane, Julia; Randell, Isabel; Seymour, Fred

    2013-12-01

    To assess the postintervention arson recidivism and other offending rates of a group of 182 firesetting children and adolescents referred to the New Zealand Fire Awareness and Intervention Program (FAIP) over a follow-up period of 10 years. To investigate predictors of offending behaviour as well as variables associated with previous involvement in firesetting behaviour and offending severity. Data collected at the time of the FAIP intervention was provided by the New Zealand Fire Service and the offence histories of the sample were accessed from the New Zealand Police database (NIA). Data were analyzed using both descriptive and inferential statistics. Although the arson recidivism rate was low (2%), rates of general offending were high, with 59% of the sample having committed an offence during the follow-up period. Fifteen percent of the sample was classified as severe offenders, 40% as moderate and 4% as minor. Of offenders, 12.6% had been imprisoned during the follow-up period. Offending was predicted by experience of abuse and a previous firesetting behaviour at the time of the FAIP intervention. Living with both parents at the time of intervention decreased the probability of an individual engaging in future offending behaviour. The presence of family stress and a diagnosis of Attention Deficit Disorder or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADD/ADHD) were associated with previous firesetting behaviour. In addition, involvement with family violence (as a perpetrator, complainant or victim) was associated with more severe offending behaviour. In light of existing research, the findings of this study indicate that many firesetters are at risk for future offending and that identification of high-risk individuals is therefore an important consideration for any organization involved with firesetters. To minimize this risk, there is a need for a collaborative, multiagency approach to firesetting behaviour involving comprehensive risk assessment and

  14. Incidence and Predictors of Microbiology Results Returning Post-Discharge and Requiring Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    El-Kareh, Robert; Roy, Christopher; Brodsky, Gregor; Perencevich, Molly; Poon, Eric G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Failure to follow up microbiology results pending at discharge can delay appropriate treatment, increasing the risk of patient harm and litigation. Limited data describe the frequency of post-discharge microbiology results requiring a treatment change. Objective To determine the incidence and predictors of post-discharge microbiology results requiring follow-up Design Cross sectional Setting Large academic hospital during 2007 Measurements We evaluated blood, urine, sputum and cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) cultures ordered for hospitalized patients. We identified cultures that returned post-discharge and determined which were clinically important and not treated by an antibiotic to which they were susceptible. We reviewed a random subset to assess the potential need for antibiotic change. Using logistic regression, we identified significant predictors of results requiring follow-up. Results Of 77,349 inpatient culture results, 8,668 (11%) returned post-discharge. Of these, 385 (4%) were clinically important and untreated at discharge. Among 94 manually-reviewed cases, 53% potentially required a change in therapy. Urine cultures were more likely to potentially require therapy change than non-urine cultures (aOR 2.8, 95% CI 1.1–7.2; p=0.03). Also, 76% of 25 results from surgical services potentially required a therapy change, compared with 59% of 29 results from general medicine, 38% of 16 results from oncology and 33% of 24 results from medical subspecialties. Overall, 2.4% of post-discharge cultures potentially necessitated an antibiotic change. Conclusion Many microbiology results return post-discharge and some necessitate a change in treatment. These results arise from many specialties, suggesting the need for a hospital-wide system to ensure effective communication of these results. PMID:21661103

  15. Feasibility of a Team Approach to Complex Congenital Heart Defect Neurodevelopmental Follow-Up: Early Experience of a Combined Cardiology/Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Follow-Up Program.

    PubMed

    Chorna, Olena; Baldwin, H Scott; Neumaier, Jamie; Gogliotti, Shirley; Powers, Deborah; Mouvery, Amanda; Bichell, David; Maitre, Nathalie L

    2016-07-01

    Infants with complex congenital heart disease are at high risk for poor neurodevelopmental outcomes. However, implementation of dedicated congenital heart disease follow-up programs presents important infrastructure, personnel, and resource challenges. We present the development, implementation, and retrospective review of 1- and 2-year outcomes of a Complex Congenital Heart Defect Neurodevelopmental Follow-Up program. This program was a synergistic approach between the Pediatric Cardiology, Cardiothoracic Surgery, Pediatric Intensive Care, and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Follow-Up teams to provide a feasible and responsible utilization of existing infrastructure and personnel, to develop and implement a program dedicated to children with congenital heart disease. Trained developmental testers administered the Ages and Stages Questionnaire-3 over the phone to the parents of all referred children at least once between 6 and 12 months' corrected age. At 18 months' corrected age, all children were scheduled in the Neonatal Intensive-Care Unit Follow-Up Clinic for a visit with standardized neurological exams, Bayley III, multidisciplinary therapy evaluations and continued follow-up. Of the 132 patients identified in the Cardiothoracic Surgery database and at discharge from the hospital, a total number of 106 infants were reviewed. A genetic syndrome was identified in 23.4% of the population. Neuroimaging abnormalities were identified in 21.7% of the cohort with 12.8% having visibly severe insults. As a result, 23 (26.7%) received first-time referrals for early intervention services, 16 (13.8%) received referrals for new services in addition to their existing ones. We concluded that utilization of existing resources in collaboration with established programs can ensure targeted neurodevelopmental follow-up for all children with complex congenital heart disease. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. The Association Between Visiting Intensivists and ICU Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Whitehouse, Tony; Hodson, James; Pemberton, Philip; Veenith, Tonny; Snelson, Catherine; Bion, Julian; Rubenfeld, Gordon D

    2017-06-01

    We hypothesized that intensivists unfamiliar with an ICU team and the context of that ICU would affect patient outcomes. We examined differences in mortality when ICU patients were admitted under intensivists routinely working in that ICU and compared with those admitted by intensivists familiar with an ICU elsewhere in the same hospital. A 5-year natural experimental crossover study involving patients admitted to four ICUs in a large U.K. teaching hospital. During a period of service reconfiguration, intensivists routinely rostered to work in one ICU worked in another of the hospital's four ICUs. "Home" intensivists were those who continued to work in their usual ICU; "visitor" intensivists were those who delivered care in an unfamiliar ICU. Patient data were obtained from electronic patient records to provide analysis on sex, age, admission Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score, date and time of admission, and admission type (elective, transfer, or unplanned). We analyzed 9,981 admissions to four separate ICUs over a 5-year period. In total, 34.5% of patients were admitted by intensivists working in nonfamiliar surroundings. Visitor intensivists admitted patients with similar age and gender distributions but with greater physiologic derangement (mean Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score, 4.1 ± 2.8 vs 3.9 ± 2.8; p < 0.001) than home intensivists. Overall ICU mortality rates were higher in visitor intensivists, albeit not significantly so (11.5% vs 10.2%; p = 0.052). However, when the ICUs were analyzed separately, visitor mortality rates were found to be significantly higher than for home intensivists in two of the four ICUs (p = 0.017, 0.006). A multivariable analysis adjusting for confounding factors and the clustering of consultants revealed that the overall mortality rate was significantly higher for visitors (odds ratio, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.02-1.37; p = 0.024). A significant interaction between the ICU and visitor status was also detected (p

  17. Five-year follow-up of an acute psychiatric admission cohort in Auckland, New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Amanda; Moyle, Stuart; Jansen, Carol; Robinson, Elizabeth; Vanderpyl, Jane

    2011-06-10

    This paper describes a follow-up of acute psychiatric hospital contact in Auckland, New Zealand for an admission cohort in the 5-years past an index admission (published in the NZMJ in 2005). A 5-year follow-up study of hospital psychiatric service utilisation by 924 patients admitted (index admission) in Auckland during 2000. Hospital admissions within New Zealand for this population were extracted from electronic records. Relevant demographic information (gender, age and ethnicity) and clinical data (primary diagnosis at index admission and admission history) were included for each person. Descriptive analysis of inpatient data and negative binomial regression models were conducted. Of 924 patients, 38.5% had no readmissions anywhere in New Zealand in the 5-years following index discharge. 41.0% were readmitted within 12 months and 61.4% were readmitted within 5 years of index discharge. Only 5.6% experienced an admission every year for the 5-years post index admission. Readmission was least likely for those with index discharge diagnosis of depression. A history of admissions prior to index admission and Maori ethnicity were characteristics associated with higher numbers of readmission. Those who were younger, or a diagnosis of schizophrenia/schizoaffective disorder or previous admissions tended to have longer total length of stay over the 5-years. More than a third of patients had no further hospital contact and the two factors associated with readmission were a history of previous admissions and Maori ethnicity. Reliable community-based data needs to be a priority to enable exploration of community service utilisation and impact of service alternatives to hospital for acute care.

  18. One-year follow-up of persons discharged from a locked intermediate care facility.

    PubMed

    Lamb, H Richard; Weinberger, Linda E

    2005-02-01

    This study examined outcomes during a one-year follow-up for persons who were discharged from a locked intermediate care facility in an urban area in California. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which persons with severe mental illness can be successfully transferred from an intermediate care facility to lower levels of care. A total of 101 persons consecutively discharged were studied by record review and by obtaining information from facility staff members, therapists, case managers, and other community caretakers. During the follow-up period 56 percent of the patients who were discharged from the intermediate care facility were not able to demonstrate even minimal functioning in the community. These persons spent 90 or more days in locked or highly structured institutions that provided 24-hour care (including jail) or had five or more acute hospitalizations. However, 44 percent spent less than 90 days in these institutions and had fewer than five acute hospitalizations. Thirty-three percent were not known to have spent any time in an institution or hospital. The high rate of recidivism shown in this cohort suggests that the current emphasis on transferring patients from more structured, intermediate inpatient services to lower levels of care is not effective for a majority of patients. Furthermore, the poor clinical outcomes found in this cohort did not seem to be offset by any reduction in overall governmental costs because of the high use of acute and intermediate hospitalization and the costs of the criminal justice system.

  19. Choriocarcinoma after hydatidiform mole. Studies related to effectiveness of follow-up practice after hydatidiform mole.

    PubMed

    Bagshawe, K D; Golding, P R; Orr, A H

    1969-09-27

    Chemotherapy, in conjunction with other methods of treatment, was used in 100 patients with invasive hydatidiform mole or choriocarcinoma following mole. When treatment was instituted within two to six months of the antecedent mole serious drug resistance was not encountered, drug toxicity was slight, the duration of treatment was comparatively short, and sustained remissions were obtained in 57 out of 60 patients. When the start of chemotherapy was delayed beyond six months drug resistance occurred in many instances, toxicity was often severe, the duration of treatment was much longer, and sustained remissions were obtained in 22 out of 40 patients.The practice of giving prophylactic chemotherapy to all patients with mole is not established as effective or safe. Differences in the social background to hydatidiform mole in different geographical areas may be such that conclusions based on evidence from one area are not necessarily applicable to another.Careful follow-up after mole remains essential, though present methods often fail to ensure recognition of choriocarcinoma while it is still curable. Standard qualitative and quantitative methods for detecting the continued excretion of chorionic gonadotrophin, though useful, are sometimes too insensitive. It is suggested that to supplement local arrangements some form of centralized or regionalized follow-up service based on notification of patients with hydatidiform mole, and making use of radioimmunoassays for chorionic gonadotrophin, could reduce deaths attributable to late diagnosis.

  20. Chronic Heart Failure Follow-up Management Based on Agent Technology.

    PubMed

    Mohammadzadeh, Niloofar; Safdari, Reza

    2015-10-01

    Monitoring heart failure patients through continues assessment of sign and symptoms by information technology tools lead to large reduction in re-hospitalization. Agent technology is one of the strongest artificial intelligence areas; therefore, it can be expected to facilitate, accelerate, and improve health services especially in home care and telemedicine. The aim of this article is to provide an agent-based model for chronic heart failure (CHF) follow-up management. This research was performed in 2013-2014 to determine appropriate scenarios and the data required to monitor and follow-up CHF patients, and then an agent-based model was designed. Agents in the proposed model perform the following tasks: medical data access, communication with other agents of the framework and intelligent data analysis, including medical data processing, reasoning, negotiation for decision-making, and learning capabilities. The proposed multi-agent system has ability to learn and thus improve itself. Implementation of this model with more and various interval times at a broader level could achieve better results. The proposed multi-agent system is no substitute for cardiologists, but it could assist them in decision-making.

  1. Social inclusion: An effort to end loss-to-treatment follow-up in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, S; Manikantan, J; Sreenivas, A; Jayasankar, S; Sunilkumar, M; Rakesh, P S; Karthickeyan, D S A; Mohandas, C R

    2015-10-01

    Pathanamthitta district is implementing Revised National Tuberculosis Control Program as a pilot district since 1993. The district programme was reporting approximately 5% of their diagnosed smear positive patients as never put on treatment (Initial lost to follow up - ILFU) and 5% of the new smear positive [NSP] Pulmonary TB patients as lost to follow up [LFU] during treatment. Attempts based on reengineering of DOTS were not largely successful in bringing down these proportions. A treatment support group [TSG] is a non-statutory body of socially responsible citizens and volunteers to provide social support to each needy TB patient safeguarding his dignity and confidentiality by ensuring access to information, free and quality services and social welfare programs, empowering the patient for making decision to complete treatment successfully. It is a complete fulfilment of social inclusion standards enumerated by Standards for TB Care in India. Pathanamthitta district started implementing this strategy since 2013. After intervention, proportion of LFU among NSPTB cases dropped markedly and no LFU were reported among the latest treatment cohorts. Proportion of ILFU keeps similar trend and none were reported among the latest diagnostic cohorts. Social support for TB care is feasible under routine program conditions. Addition of standards for social inclusion in STCI is meaningful. Its meaning is translated well by a society empowered with literacy and political sense. Copyright © 2015 Tuberculosis Association of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Chronic Heart Failure Follow-up Management Based on Agent Technology

    PubMed Central

    Safdari, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Monitoring heart failure patients through continues assessment of sign and symptoms by information technology tools lead to large reduction in re-hospitalization. Agent technology is one of the strongest artificial intelligence areas; therefore, it can be expected to facilitate, accelerate, and improve health services especially in home care and telemedicine. The aim of this article is to provide an agent-based model for chronic heart failure (CHF) follow-up management. Methods This research was performed in 2013-2014 to determine appropriate scenarios and the data required to monitor and follow-up CHF patients, and then an agent-based model was designed. Results Agents in the proposed model perform the following tasks: medical data access, communication with other agents of the framework and intelligent data analysis, including medical data processing, reasoning, negotiation for decision-making, and learning capabilities. Conclusions The proposed multi-agent system has ability to learn and thus improve itself. Implementation of this model with more and various interval times at a broader level could achieve better results. The proposed multi-agent system is no substitute for cardiologists, but it could assist them in decision-making. PMID:26618038

  3. Predictors of outpatient mental health clinic follow-up after hospitalization among Medicaid-enrolled young adults.

    PubMed

    Marino, Leslie; Wissow, Lawrence S; Davis, Maryann; Abrams, Michael T; Dixon, Lisa B; Slade, Eric P

    2016-12-01

    To assess demographic and clinical predictors of outpatient mental health clinic follow-up after inpatient psychiatric hospitalization among Medicaid-enrolled young adults. Using logistic regression and administrative claims data from the Maryland public mental health system and Maryland Medicaid for young adults ages 18-26 who were enrolled in Medicaid (N = 1127), the likelihood of outpatient mental health follow-up within 30 days after inpatient psychiatric hospitalization was estimated . Only 51% of the young adults had any outpatient mental health follow-up visits within 30 days of discharge. Being black and having a co-occurring substance use disorder diagnosis were associated with a lower probability of having a follow-up visit (OR = 0.60, P < 0.01 and OR = 0.36, P < 0.01, respectively). In addition, those who utilized any outpatient public mental health services during the 180 days prior to their index hospitalization (N = 625, 55.4%) were more likely to have a follow-up visit than those without prior outpatient use (OR = 2.45, P < 0.01). Prior Medicaid-reimbursed primary care visits were not significantly associated with follow-up. In this predominantly urban, low-income statewide sample of young adults hospitalized for serious psychiatric conditions, half did not connect with an outpatient mental healthcare provider following their discharge. Outpatient transition supports may be especially needed for young adults who were not receiving outpatient services prior to being admitted for psychiatric inpatient care, as well as for young adults with substance use disorders and African Americans. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. Value of routine timed barium esophagram follow-up in achalasia after myotomy.

    PubMed

    Kachala, Stefan S; Rice, Thomas W; Baker, Mark E; Rajeswaran, Jeevanantham; Thota, Prashanthi N; Murthy, Sudish C; Blackstone, Eugene H; Zanoni, Andrea; Raja, Siva

    2018-03-08

    The value of routine timed barium esophagram (TBE) in longitudinal follow-up of achalasia after Heller myotomy is unknown. We prospectively prescribed a yearly follow-up TBE. Purposes were to characterize esophageal emptying over time after myotomy, identify preoperative TBE measures associated with follow-up TBE, and characterize follow-up TBE over time in relationship to reintervention. From March 1995 to April 2013, 635 patients underwent Heller myotomy for achalasia; 559 had at least 1 follow-up TBE. Temporal trends of 1335 follow-up TBEs in all nonreintervention and reintervention patients were assessed. Multivariable longitudinal analysis identified preoperative TBE measures associated with follow-up TBE. On average, TBE height and width at 1 and 5 minutes decreased approximately 50% and 60%, respectively, at first postoperative follow-up, and remained stable or slightly decreased for up to 5 years. Wider TBE width at 5 minutes was associated with greater follow-up TBE height and width at 1 minute. Of 118 patients undergoing reintervention, 64 (57%) had only 1 reintervention, with follow-up TBE returning to that of nonreintervention patients. Patients whose follow-up TBE remained abnormal underwent a further reintervention, some normalizing on subsequent TBE, and some not. Follow-up TBE is valuable postmyotomy, particularly if there is substantial esophageal dilatation preoperatively. Follow-up TBE reassures patients with stable or decreasing TBE measures, permitting decreased follow-up intensity. Reintervention should not be considered a myotomy failure, because a successful, single, nonsurgical reintervention often results in long-term successful palliation. More than 1 reintervention requires intensification of TBE follow-up, facilitating treatment planning. Copyright © 2018 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Process of Transition for Congenital Heart Patients: Preventing Loss to Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Hajar; Emmanuel, Yaso; Chung, Natali

    The aim of this article is to provide an overview of our nurse-led transition clinic provided to congenital heart disease patients moving from pediatric into adult care setting. Nurse-led transition clinic was analyzed at various stages of young adult care from an early stage of 12 to 14 years to entering adult setting at 16 years or older. Overview of current transition service for young adults being transferred from pediatric into adult services highlights the integral role of clinical nurse specialist as a coordinator of care. The result of the service overview indicates that nurse-led transition service enables patients to build on their knowledge. This is achieved by providing them time and the opportunities to develop an understanding of their condition and the attitudes required to engage with the adult care setting as indicated in the psychology questionnaire from transition day. A nurse-led transition clinic enhances long-term care of patients by supporting the young adults and their family/carer through the transition and transfer of the care to promote the young adult's understanding of their condition and to prevent any lost to follow-up.

  6. Evaluation of a rape protocol: a five year follow-up with nurse managers.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Carol M; DiNitto, Diana; Nelson, Terri Spahr; Just, Mary Margaret; Campbell-Ruggaard, Julie

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the use and effectiveness of a protocol developed for emergency nurses and other medical personnel to use with survivors of sexual assault. The Ohio Department of Health (ODH) Protocol for the Treatment of Adult Sexual Assault Survivors was developed by a multi-disciplinary team in 1991-92 as a written guide to provide comprehensive, standardized, non-judgmental, and equitable treatment for survivors. In 1993, this 118-page manual was sent to all Ohio hospitals. In 1994, a follow-up video and training guide were also delivered. In 1997, Victims Rights Advocacy, a non-profit agency in Ohio, and the Center for Social Work Research at The University of Texas at Austin collaboratively conducted an evaluation of the utilization and effectiveness of this protocol at Ohio hospitals. Emergency departments at Ohio hospitals were asked to complete a mailed survey regarding their policies and procedures for treating sexual assault patients. Telephone calls were made to the hospitals that did not return a survey, and site visits were conducted at 20 hospitals in diverse areas of Ohio. Overall, respondents concurred that hospitals can benefit from using a standardized protocol, such as the ODH Protocol, for treating victims of sexual assault. Survey participants also indicated that training is needed on several topics, especially testifying in court, cultural awareness, and the needs of special populations, such as male, gay, lesbian, and bisexual survivors. In addition, findings indicate that survivors need more follow-up services, and written information about these services should be provided to them. Nurse practitioners can improve the treatment of sexual assault survivors in their communities through a variety of actions, such as gathering information about available protocols and training opportunities for personnel, and becoming familiar with resources that can help victims.

  7. Methods for successful follow-up of elusive urban populations: an ethnographic approach with homeless men.

    PubMed Central

    Conover, S.; Berkman, A.; Gheith, A.; Jahiel, R.; Stanley, D.; Geller, P. A.; Valencia, E.; Susser, E.

    1997-01-01

    Public health is paying increasing attention to elusive urban populations such as the homeless, street drug users, and illegal immigrants. Yet, valid data on the health of these populations remain scarce; longitudinal research, in particular, has been hampered by poor follow-up rates. This paper reports on the follow-up methods used in two randomized clinical trials among one such population, namely, homeless men with mental illness. Each of the two trials achieved virtually complete follow-up over 18 months. The authors describe the ethnographic approach to follow-up used in these trials and elaborate its application to four components of the follow-up: training interviewers, tracking participants, administering the research office, and conducting assessments. The ethnographic follow-up method is adaptable to other studies and other settings, and may provide a replicable model for achieving high follow-up rates in urban epidemiologic studies. PMID:9211004

  8. Palliative Care Processes Embedded in the ICU Workflow May Reserve Palliative Care Teams for Refractory Cases.

    PubMed

    Mun, Eluned; Umbarger, Lillian; Ceria-Ulep, Clementina; Nakatsuka, Craig

    2018-01-01

    Palliative Care Teams have been shown to be instrumental in the early identification of multiple aspects of advanced care planning. Despite an increased number of services to meet the rising consultation demand, it is conceivable that the numbers of palliative care consultations generated from an ICU alone could become overwhelming for an existing palliative care team. Improve end-of-life care in the ICU by incorporating basic palliative care processes into the daily routine ICU workflow, thereby reserving the palliative care team for refractory situations. A structured, palliative care, quality-improvement program was implemented and evaluated in the ICU at Kaiser Permanente Medical Center in Hawaii. This included selecting trigger criteria, a care model, forming guidelines, and developing evaluation criteria. These included the early identification of the multiple features of advanced care planning, numbers of proactive ICU and palliative care family meetings, and changes in code status and treatment upon completion of either meeting. Early identification of Goals-of-Care, advance directives, and code status by the ICU staff led to a proactive ICU family meeting with resultant increases in changes in code status and treatment. The numbers of palliative care consultations also rose, but not significantly. Palliative care processes could be incorporated into a daily ICU workflow allowing for integration of aspects of advanced care planning to be identified in a systematic and proactive manner. This reserved the palliative care team for situations when palliative care efforts performed by the ICU staff were ineffective.

  9. The future for follow-up of gynaecological cancer in Europe. Summary of available data and overview of ongoing trials.

    PubMed

    Leeson, S C; Beaver, K; Ezendam, N P M; Mačuks, R; Martin-Hirsch, P L; Miles, T; Jeppesen, M M; Jensen, P T; Zola, P

    2017-03-01

    After completing treatment, most patients follow a pre-determined schedule of regular hospital outpatient appointments, which includes clinical examinations, consultations and routine tests. After several years of surveillance, patients are transferred back to primary care. However, there is limited evidence to support the effectiveness and efficiency of this approach. This paper examines the current rationale and evidence base for hospital-based follow-up after treatment for gynaecological cancer. We investigate what alternative models of care have been formally evaluated and what research is currently in progress in Europe, in order to make tentative recommendations for a model of follow-up. The evidence base for traditional hospital based follow-up is limited. Alternative models have been reported for other cancer types but there are few evaluations of alternative approaches for gynaecological cancers. We identified five ongoing European studies; four were focused on endometrial cancer patients and one feasibility study included all gynaecological cancers. Only one study had reached the reporting stage. Alternative models included nurse-led telephone follow-up and comparisons of more intensive versus less intensive regimes. Outcomes included survival, quality of life, psychological morbidity, patient satisfaction and cost effectiveness of service. More work is needed on alternative strategies for all gynaecological cancer types. New models will be likely to include risk stratification with early discharge from secondary care for early stage disease with fast track access to specialist services for suspected cancer recurrence or other problems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Follow-up of cancer in primary care versus secondary care: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Ruth A; Neal, Richard D; Williams, Nefyn H; France, Barbara; Hendry, Maggie; Russell, Daphne; Hughes, Dyfrig A; Russell, Ian; Stuart, Nicholas SA; Weller, David; Wilkinson, Clare

    2009-01-01

    Background Cancer follow-up has traditionally been undertaken in secondary care, but there are increasing calls to deliver it in primary care. Aim To compare the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of primary versus secondary care follow-up of cancer patients, determine the effectiveness of the integration of primary care in routine hospital follow-up, and evaluate the impact of patient-initiated follow-up on primary care. Design of study Systematic review. Setting Primary and secondary care settings. Method A search was carried out of 19 electronic databases, online trial registries, conference proceedings, and bibliographies of included studies. The review included comparative studies or economic evaluations of primary versus secondary care follow-up, hospital follow-up with formal primary care involvement versus conventional hospital follow-up, and hospital follow-up versus patient-initiated or minimal follow-up if the study reported the impact on primary care. Results There was no statistically significant difference for patient wellbeing, recurrence rate, survival, recurrence-related serious clinical events, diagnostic delay, or patient satisfaction. GP-led breast cancer follow-up was cheaper than hospital follow-up. Intensified primary health care resulted in increased home-care nurse contact, and improved discharge summary led to increased GP contact. Evaluation of patient-initiated or minimal follow-up found no statistically significant impact on the number of GP consultations or cancer-related referrals. Conclusion Weak evidence suggests that breast cancer follow-up in primary care is effective. Interventions improving communication between primary and secondary care could lead to greater GP involvement. Discontinuation of formal follow-up may not increase GP workload. However, the quality of the data in general was poor, and no firm conclusions can be reached. PMID:19566990

  11. Should physicians instead of industry representatives be the main actor of cardiac implantable electronic device follow-up? (Super Follow-up)

    PubMed Central

    Üreyen, Çağın Mustafa; Baş, Cem Yunus; Yüksel, İsa Öner; Kuş, Görkem; Çağırcı, Göksel; Arslan, Şakir

    2017-01-01

    Objective: This retrospective study sought to research the adequacy of the follow-up and optimization of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) performed by industry representatives. Methods: A total of 403 consecutive patients (35% females; median age, 67 years; age range 18–97 years) with either pacemakers (n=246), implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs), (n=117) or cardiac resynchronization therapy with defibrillator (CRT-D) (n=40) applied to our hospital’s outpatient pacemaker clinic for follow-up. These patients had been followed up by industry representatives alone until September 2013 and then by a cardiologist who is dealing with cardiac electrophysiology and has a knowledge of CIED follow-up. Results: It was ascertained that 117 (47.6%) of 246 patients with pacemakers had a programming error. Forty-three (36.8%) of 117 patients were symptomatic, and after reprogramming, all symptoms diminished partially or completely during the follow-up. Moreover, 30 (25.6%) of 117 patients with ICDs had a programming error. Furthermore, 6 (15%) of 40 patients with CRT-Ds had a programming error. To conclude, when all patients with CIEDs were assessed together, it was ascertained that 153 (38%) of 403 patients had programming errors. Conclusion: The prevalence of inappropriate programming of CIEDs by industry representatives was quite higher than expected. Therefore, our study strongly demonstrates that CIED follow-up should not be allowed to be performed entirely by manufacturers’ representatives alone. PMID:28430113

  12. Adherence to the follow-up of the newborn exposed to syphilis and factors associated with loss to follow-up.

    PubMed

    Feliz, Marjorie Cristiane; de Medeiros, Adeli Regina Prizybicien; Rossoni, Andrea Maciel; Tahnus, Tony; Pereira, Adriane Miro Vianna Benke; Rodrigues, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    All newborns exposed to syphilis in pregnancy must have outpatient follow-up. The interruption of this follow-up especially threatens those children who were not treated at birth. To describe the clinical, epidemiological, and sociodemographic characteristics of pregnant women with syphilis and their newborns, and to investigate the factors associated with the discontinuation of the follow-up. This is an observational, descriptive, analytical, and retrospective study of medical records of 254 children exposed to syphilis, who were assisted at the Congenital Infectious Clinic of the university hospital of the Universidade Federal do Paraná, between 2000 and 2010. The newborns were classified by reference according to their follow-up. Data were analyzed by means of the binary logistic regression model in order to identify the factors associated to drop out. The factors associated to the interruption of the follow-up were maternal age over 30 years, mothers with 3 or more children, and the absence of cross-infections by HIV and/or viral hepatitis. Such findings demonstrate the need to identify these families and implement strategies to promote the establishment of bonds. A greater rigor to indicate the treatment of the disease at birth is recommended, as most of them do not properly follow up.

  13. Warning! fire in the ICU.

    PubMed

    Rispoli, Fabio; Iannuzzi, Michele; De Robertis, Edoardo; Piazza, Ornella; Servillo, Giuseppe; Tufano, Rosalba

    2014-06-01

    At 5:30 pm on December 17, 2010, shortly after a power failure, smoke filled the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of Federico II University Hospital in Naples, Italy, triggering the hospital emergency alarm system. Immediately, staff began emergency procedures and alerted rescue teams. All patients were transferred without harm. The smoke caused pharyngeal and conjunctival irritation in some staff members. After a brief investigation, firefighters discovered the cause of the fire was a failure of the Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS).

  14. Use of Mobile Phone Technology to Improve follow-up at a Community Mental Health Clinic: A Randomized Control Trial.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gaurav; Manjunatha, Narayana; Rao, Sabina; Shashidhara, H N; Moirangthem, Sydney; Madegowda, Rajendra K; Binukumar, B; Varghese, Mathew

    2017-01-01

    Mobile phone technology is being used worldwide to improve follow-ups in health care. Aim of the study is to evaluate whether the use of mobile technology will improve or not the follow-up of Indian patients from a community mental health center. Patients or caregivers having mobile phones and consenting for study were enrolled, and sociodemographic and clinical details of patients were taken. Participants were randomized into two groups (short message service [SMS] vs. non-SMS group). At first intervention level, a SMS was sent to SMS group (not in non-SMS group) 1 day before their appointment. At second-level intervention (voice call level), patients from both groups who missed their first appointment were given a voice call requesting them to come for follow-up, and the reasons for first missed appointments (MA) were also elicited. The effect of these two intervention levels (first SMS for SMS group and next voice calls for both groups) on follow-up was evaluated. A total of 214 patients were enrolled in the study. At first SMS intervention level of SMS group ( n = 106), 62.26% of participants reached appointment-on-time (RA), while in the non-SMS/as usual group ( n = 108), 45.37% of patients RA. The difference of these groups is statistically significant. At second-level intervention (voice call), 66 of 88 (another 15 were unable to contact) were came for follow-up consultation within 2 days of MA. Distance and diagnosis of alcohol dependence were significantly associated with MA. Social reasons were most common reasons for first MA. The use of mobile phone technology in an outpatient community psychiatric clinic improved follow-up significantly.

  15. Autoregulation in the Neuro ICU.

    PubMed

    Wang, Anson; Ortega-Gutierrez, Santiago; Petersen, Nils H

    2018-05-17

    The purpose of this review is to briefly describe the concept of cerebral autoregulation, to detail several bedside techniques for measuring and assessing autoregulation, and to outline the impact of impaired autoregulation on clinical and functional outcomes in acute brain injury. Furthermore, we will review several autoregulation studies in select forms of acute brain injuries, discuss the potential for its use in patient management in the ICU, and suggest further avenues for research. Cerebral autoregulation plays a critical role in regulating cerebral blood flow, and impaired autoregulation has been associated with worse functional and clinical outcomes in various acute brain injuries. There exists a multitude of methods to assess the autoregulatory state in patients using both invasive and non-invasive modalities. Continuous monitoring of patients in the ICU has yielded autoregulatory-derived optimal perfusion pressures that may prevent secondary injury and improve outcomes. Measuring autoregulation continuously at the bedside is now a feasible option for clinicians working in the ICU, although there exists a great need to standardize autoregulatory measurement. While the clinical benefits await prospective and randomized trials, autoregulation-derived parameters show enormous potential for creating an optimal physiological environment for the injured brain.

  16. Effects of EAP follow-up on prevention of relapse among substance abuse clients.

    PubMed

    Foote, A; Erfurt, J C

    1991-05-01

    Clients entering an employee assistance program (EAP) of a large manufacturing plant in 1985 who were assessed as having an alcohol or drug abuse problem (N = 325) were randomized into an experimental "special follow-up" group and a control "regular care" group. The regular care group received follow-up only as needed (following the usual practice of the EAP), while a follow-up counselor was hired to make routine contacts with the special follow-up group. Study intake continued through 1985, and follow-up continued through the end of 1986. Data collected on study subjects included EAP participation data, absenteeism, number of hospitalizations, health care claims paid and disability claims paid. The major study hypothesis was that EAP clients randomly allocated to special follow-up would show better results than regular care clients (i.e., would have fewer relapses, better job attendance and lower health benefit utilization during the follow-up year). The follow-up intervention was incompletely implemented due to a variety of organizational problems. Differences between the two groups on the six outcome measures were not statistically significant, although clients in the special follow-up group did show better results than clients in the regular care group on the three measures related to substance abuse. Differences on these three measures were marginally significant in regression analyses after controlling for the effects of number of follow-up visits, age, race and chronicity.

  17. The experience of emotional wellbeing for patients with physical injury: A qualitative follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Wiseman, Taneal; Foster, Kim; Curtis, Kate

    2016-09-01

    Traumatic physical injury is abrupt, painful, debilitating, costly and life-altering. The experience of emotional wellbeing following traumatic physical injury has not been well investigated, and the role of health services and how services can support the emotional recovery of injured patients has not been well understood. This has impacted on care provision and contributed to a lack of evidence-informed guidance for clinicians to support patients' emotional wellbeing. To explore the patient experience of emotional wellbeing following injury and to understand how injured patients manage their emotional wellbeing. The study comprises the follow-up qualitative phase of a mixed-methods explanatory sequential study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 14 participants admitted to hospital following physical injury. Participants were purposely selected where they had reported high levels of depression, anxiety and stress on the DASS-21 at 3 and 6-months after injury. The qualitative data were analysed using thematic analysis. Three main themes were identified: experiencing the many impacts of injury; facing the emotional journey following injury; and being supported and managing the impacts of injury. Key findings were the extreme negative emotional responses experienced many months after the injury; a strong physical link between the emotional and physical aspects of health; participant reluctance to seek emotional support; a lack of emotional support provision by the health service and a subsequent need for individual and group support in order to develop resilience in the injured person. Finally, male participants who reported extreme emotional responses after injury, including suicidality, were less likely to seek help for their symptoms. Injured patients can experience substantial negative emotional responses following injury. The lack of support provided by health services to injured patients identified highlights the importance of

  18. EpiFloripa Aging cohort study: methods, operational aspects, and follow-up strategies

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Ione Jayce Ceola; Confortin, Susana Cararo; Bernardo, Carla de Oliveira; Bolsoni, Carolina Carvalho; Antes, Danielle Ledur; Pereira, Karine Gonçalves; Ono, Lariane Mortean; Marques, Larissa Pruner; Borges, Lucélia Justino; Giehl, Maruí Weber Corseuil; Krug, Rodrigo de Rosso; Goes, Vanessa Fernanda; Boing, Alexandra Crispim; Boing, Antônio Fernando; d’Orsi, Eleonora

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To describe the sample plan, operational aspects, and strategies used in the 2009/2010 and 2013/2014 EpiFloripa Aging Study. METHODS The EpiFloripa Aging is a population-based longitudinal study with 1,705 older adults (60 years or more) living in the municipality of Florianópolis, State of Santa Catarina, Brazil, in 2009/2010 (baseline). The research was conducted with a face-to-face interviews, organized into blocks of identification, socioeconomic, mental health, health and life habits, global functionality, falls, physical activity, morbidities, use of health services, use of medications, food, oral health, and violence, evaluated in the first (2009/2010) and in the second wave (2013/2014). Additionally, in the second wave, we investigated the issue of discrimination and quality of life. RESULTS The response rate of the first wave was 89.2% (n = 1,705). The baseline sample, with predominance of women (63.9%), was similar to the 2010 Census regarding age for women and slightly different for younger men. In the second wave, 1,197 participants were interviewed (response rate of 70.3%). Follow-up losses were only observed for the variable age group (p = 0.003), and predominantly for those aged 80 years or more. Mortality data linkage and active search for participants were used as a follow-up strategies. CONCLUSIONS This study used strategies that were able to help locate the participants and maintain adherence, which ensured a good response rate during investigations. PMID:29166443

  19. EpiFloripa Aging cohort study: methods, operational aspects, and follow-up strategies.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Ione Jayce Ceola; Confortin, Susana Cararo; Bernardo, Carla de Oliveira; Bolsoni, Carolina Carvalho; Antes, Danielle Ledur; Pereira, Karine Gonçalves; Ono, Lariane Mortean; Marques, Larissa Pruner; Borges, Lucélia Justino; Giehl, Maruí Weber Corseuil; Krug, Rodrigo de Rosso; Goes, Vanessa Fernanda; Boing, Alexandra Crispim; Boing, Antônio Fernando; d'Orsi, Eleonora

    2017-01-01

    To describe the sample plan, operational aspects, and strategies used in the 2009/2010 and 2013/2014 EpiFloripa Aging Study. The EpiFloripa Aging is a population-based longitudinal study with 1,705 older adults (60 years or more) living in the municipality of Florianópolis, State of Santa Catarina, Brazil, in 2009/2010 (baseline). The research was conducted with a face-to-face interviews, organized into blocks of identification, socioeconomic, mental health, health and life habits, global functionality, falls, physical activity, morbidities, use of health services, use of medications, food, oral health, and violence, evaluated in the first (2009/2010) and in the second wave (2013/2014). Additionally, in the second wave, we investigated the issue of discrimination and quality of life. The response rate of the first wave was 89.2% (n = 1,705). The baseline sample, with predominance of women (63.9%), was similar to the 2010 Census regarding age for women and slightly different for younger men. In the second wave, 1,197 participants were interviewed (response rate of 70.3%). Follow-up losses were only observed for the variable age group (p = 0.003), and predominantly for those aged 80 years or more. Mortality data linkage and active search for participants were used as a follow-up strategies. This study used strategies that were able to help locate the participants and maintain adherence, which ensured a good response rate during investigations.

  20. Impact of pharmacist intervention in conjunction with outpatient physician follow-up visits after hospital discharge on readmission rate.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Matthew E; Buys, Lucinda; Fullas, Fekadu

    2015-06-01

    The Medicare Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program (MHRRP) which took effect on October 1st, 2012 holds providers accountable for quality of care delivered, placing a greater focus on care coordination. Innovative strategies in medication management in the acute care and outpatient primary care settings require vigilant pharmacist intervention. The objective of this study is to determine if pharmacist-provided medication reconciliation service in conjunction with hospital follow-up outpatient physician visits reduces hospital readmission rate. This was a prospective study in which physician-initiated outpatient hospital follow-up appointment scheduling was used to identify patients at time of hospital discharge. All patients ≥50 years of age were eligible for outpatient pharmacist visits. Emergency room visits were excluded. Data collected included: patient demographics, characteristics of identified drug therapy problems, accuracy of outpatient medication histories and time required by pharmacist to perform the reviews. Patient adherence to early (24-72 hours) outpatient hospital follow-up visit was also evaluated. Previous year's readmission data for high risk patients who received only physician visits were also collected for comparison with those who were jointly visited by pharmacists and physicians. A total of 98 patients were assigned to receive pharmacist intervention in conjunction with physician hospital follow-up visits. Nine of the 98 patients seen by pharmacists at hospital follow-up visits were readmitted (9.2%) to a hospital within 30 days of discharge. Out of the 236 patients seen during the same period the previous year (2011) for physician alone hospital follow-up visits 46 were readmitted (19.4%) within 30-days of hospital discharge. The difference between these groups was statistically significant (p = 0.023), with patients in the pharmacist intervention group experiencing a reduction in 30-day readmission risk. Physician alone outpatient

  1. Treatment summaries, follow-up care instructions, and patient navigation: could they be combined to improve cancer survivor's receipt of follow-up care?

    PubMed

    Jabson, Jennifer M

    2015-12-01

    Cancer survivors require follow-up care to ensure early detection of recurrence, management of late/long term effects, preventive screening for early detection of second primary malignancies, as well as other forms of preventive care. But not all survivors receive necessary follow-up care. Combining survivorship care plans and patient navigation may be a successful strategy to improve survivor's receipt of necessary follow-up care. Using data from the 2010 LIVESTRONG online survey of cancer survivors (N = 3854), this study tested associations between receipt of follow-up care instructions (FCI) and treatment summaries (TS) paired with patient navigation (PN), and survivor's receipt of cancer surveillance, preventive cancer screening, and attendance at regular medical appointments. Survivors who received FCI, TS, and patient navigation were the most likely to report attendance at all medical appointments (aOR 4.17, 95% CI 2.30, 7.57, p ≤ .001) and receipt of preventive cancer screening (aOR 3.56, 95% CI 2.28, 5.55, p ≤ .001). Likelihood of receiving follow-up care was greatest when survivors received FCI, TS, and PN. This pairing appeared to be most beneficial for survivor's attendance at medical appointments and receipt of preventive cancer screening. By improving attendance at medical appointments and prevention cancer screening, pairing SCP and PN could benefit survivors through reduced recurrence, earlier recurrence detection, and prevention of second primaries.

  2. Supplement: Localization and broadband follow-up of the gravitational-wave transient GW150914

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, B. P.

    This Supplement provides supporting material for arXiv:1602.08492 . We briefly summarize past electromagnetic (EM) follow-up efforts as well as the organization and policy of the current EM follow-up program. Here, we compare the four probability sky maps produced for the gravitational-wave transient GW150914, and provide additional details of the EM follow-up observations that were performed in the different bands.

  3. Classification tree analysis to enhance targeting for follow-up exam of colorectal cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Follow-up rate after a fecal occult blood test (FOBT) is low worldwide. In order to increase the follow-up rate, segmentation of the target population has been proposed as a promising strategy, because an intervention can then be tailored toward specific subgroups of the population rather than using one type of intervention for all groups. The aim of this study is to identify subgroups that share the same patterns of characteristics related to follow-up exams after FOBT. Methods The study sample consisted of 143 patients aged 50–69 years who were requested to undergo follow-up exams after FOBT. A classification tree analysis was performed, using the follow-up rate as a dependent variable and sociodemographic variables, psychological variables, past FOBT and follow-up exam, family history of colorectal cancer (CRC), and history of bowel disease as predictive variables. Results The follow-up rate in 143 participants was 74.1% (n = 106). A classification tree analysis identified four subgroups as follows; (1) subgroup with a high degree of fear of CRC, unemployed and with a history of bowel disease (n = 24, 100.0% follow-up rate), (2) subgroup with a high degree of fear of CRC, unemployed and with no history of bowel disease (n = 17, 82.4% follow-up rate), (3) subgroup with a high degree of fear of CRC and employed (n = 24, 66.7% follow-up rate), and (4) subgroup with a low degree of fear of CRC (n = 78, 66.7% follow-up rate). Conclusion The identification of four subgroups with a diverse range of follow-up rates for CRC screening indicates the direction to take in future development of an effective tailored intervention strategy. PMID:24112563

  4. Supplement: Localization and broadband follow-up of the gravitational-wave transient GW150914

    DOE PAGES

    Abbott, B. P.

    2016-07-20

    This Supplement provides supporting material for arXiv:1602.08492 . We briefly summarize past electromagnetic (EM) follow-up efforts as well as the organization and policy of the current EM follow-up program. Here, we compare the four probability sky maps produced for the gravitational-wave transient GW150914, and provide additional details of the EM follow-up observations that were performed in the different bands.

  5. Pharmacist care plans and documentation of follow-up before the Iowa Pharmaceutical Case Management program.

    PubMed

    Becker, CoraLynn; Bjornson, Darrel C; Kuhle, Julie W

    2004-01-01

    To document drug therapy problems and their causes and assess pharmacist follow-up of patients with identified drug therapy problems. Cross-sectional analysis. Iowa. 160 pharmacists who submitted 754 pharmaceutical care plans in an effort to qualify for participation in the Iowa Pharmaceutical Case Management program. Care plans were assessed for drug therapy problems and causes and for documentation of pharmacist follow-up (actual, none, or intent to follow up). Pharmacists documented a wide variety of drug therapy problems and causes, including adverse drug reactions (20.1% of care plans), need for additional drug therapy (18.9%), lack of patient adherence to therapy (16.3%), incorrect medication being prescribed (14.1%), and drug dose too high (10.0%). Pharmacist follow-up with patients was not optimal, with 31% of care plans providing documentation of actual follow-up. Another 42.2% of plans indicated that the pharmacist intended to contact the patient for follow-up but either did not do so or did not record the intervention. No actual follow-up or intent to follow up was recorded in 26.8% of care plans. Pharmacists practicing in independent pharmacies followed up with patients more frequently than those in other settings (36.4% of care plans, compared with 22.7%, 23.2%, and 28.4% for chain, clinic, and franchise pharmacies). Pharmacists were more likely to follow up when the identified problem involved drug safety rather than effectiveness (36.2% versus 28.3% of care plans). Documentation of pharmacist follow-up with patients was less than optimal. In addition to identifying drug therapy problems and causes, pharmacists must complete the care continuum through documentation of patient monitoring and follow-up to transform the philosophy and vision of the pharmaceutical care concept into a practice of pharmacy recognized and rewarded by patients and payers.

  6. ICU Telemedicine Comanagement Methods and Length of Stay.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Helen A; Lilly, Craig M; Kaster, David A; Groves, Robert H; Khurana, Hargobind

    2016-08-01

    Studies have identified processes that are associated with more favorable length of stay (LOS) outcomes when an ICU telemedicine program is implemented. Despite these studies, the relation of the acceptance of ICU telemedicine management services by individual ICUs to LOS outcomes is unknown. This is a single ICU telemedicine center study that compares LOS outcomes among three groups of intensivist-staffed mixed medical-surgical ICUs that used alternative comanagement strategies. The proportion of provider orders recorded by an ICU telemedicine provider to all recorded orders was compared among ICUs that used a monitor and notify comanagement approach, a direct intervention with timely notification process, and ICUs that used a mix of these two approaches. The primary outcome was acuity-adjusted hospital LOS. ICUs that used the direct intervention with timely notification strategy had a significantly larger proportion of provider orders recorded by ICU telemedicine physicians than the mixed methods of comanagement group, which had a larger proportion than ICUs that used the monitor and notify method (P < .001). Acuity-adjusted hospital LOS was significantly lower for the direct intervention with timely notification comanagement strategy (0.68; 0.65-0.70) compared with the mixed methods group (0.70 [0.69-0.72]; P = .01), which was significantly lower than the monitor and notify group (0.83 [0.80-0.86]; P < .001). Direct intervention with timely notification strategies of ICU telemedicine comanagement were associated with shorter LOS outcomes than monitor and notify comanagement strategies. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The business case for breastfeeding: a successful regional implementation, evaluation, and follow-up.

    PubMed

    Garvin, Cheza C; Sriraman, Natasha K; Paulson, Amy; Wallace, Elise; Martin, Charley E; Marshall, Liz

    2013-08-01

    Breastfeeding benefits the health of babies and mothers, but returning to work is a significant barrier for mothers wishing to continue breastfeeding for the recommended 12 months. A resource training kit, The Business Case for Breastfeeding (BC4BF), developed by the Health Resources and Services Administration, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, was implemented in Southeastern Virginia to assist businesses in developing lactation support programs (LSPs) and eliminating breastfeeding barriers. The primary goals of the 1-year project were to educate 20 businesses about breastfeeding support in the workplace, engage 10 businesses to implement the BC4BF, and assess sustainability via documented policy and environmental changes and integration of the LSP into the business infrastructure. The Transtheoretical Model of Behavior Change was adapted to assess stage of organizational change. A Centers for Disease Control and Prevention tool for measuring community-level policy, systems, and environmental change was adapted to assess worksite policy and environmental changes. Over 20 businesses were educated about the BC4BF. Seventeen engaged in the project. Fourteen significantly increased their stage of change, development of LSPs, written policies, and physical and social environment changes (p≤0.001). A brief follow-up study revealed that all 14 employers maintained their programs 8 months after the program ended, with increased stages of change, policy enforcement, and physical environment (p≤0.05). The BC4BF provided an effective approach to assisting employers in establishing and maintaining LSPs in the workplace across several cities.

  8. Establishment of an inferior vena cava filter database and interventional radiology led follow-up - retrieval rates and patients lost to follow-up.

    PubMed

    Klinken, Sven; Humphries, Charlotte; Ferguson, John

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the rates of inferior vena cava (IVC) filter retrieval and the number of patient's lost to follow-up, before and after the establishment of an IVC filter database and interventional radiology (inserting physician) led follow-up. On the 1st of June 2012, an electronic interventional radiology database was established at our Institution. In addition, the interventional radiology team took responsibility for follow-up of IVC filters. Data were prospectively collected from the database for all patients who had an IVC filter inserted between the 1st June 2012 and the 31st May 2014. Data on patients who had an IVC filter inserted between the 1st of June 2009 to the 31st of May 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Patient demographics, insertion indications, filter types, retrieval status, documented retrieval decisions, time in situ, trackable events and complications were obtained in the pre-database (n = 136) and post-database (n = 118) cohorts. Attempted IVC filter retrieval rates were improved from 52.9% to 72.9% (P = 0.001) following the establishment of the database. The number of patients with no documented decision (lost to follow-up) regarding their IVC filter reduced from 31 of 136 (23%) to 0 of 118 patients (P = < 0.001). There was a non-significant reduction in IVC filter dwell time in the post-database group (113 as compared to 137 days, P = 0.129). Following the establishment of an IVC filter database and interventional radiology led follow-up, we demonstrate a significant improvement in the attempted retrieval rates of IVC filters and the number of patient's lost to follow-up. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  9. Motivators and barriers to uptake of post-operative voluntary medical male circumcision follow-up in Yala division, Siaya County, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Abunah, Bonface; Onkoba, Rueben; Nyagero, Josephat; Muhula, Samuel; Omondi, Edward; Guyah, Bernard; Omondi, Gregory Barnabas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Follow-up visits are recommended to all voluntary medical male circumcision clients (VMMC), however, adherence is variable. High lost-to-follow-up cases limit knowledge about clinical status of clients and adverse events. This study sought to establish Motivators and Barriers to the Uptake of VMMC post-operative follow-up services in Siaya County, Kenya. Methods 277 clients from five VMMC sites in Yala were recruited immediately post-operation to participate in a telephone interview between the 21st and 31st day post-surgery during which a semi-structured questionnaire was administered. Descriptive and inferential statistics was used to analyse quantitative information using SPSS while responses from open ended questions were grouped into themes, sieved out, coded and analyzed. Results 137(49.5%) of the 277 participants utilized the follow-up services. Health education (31.4%) and emergency reviews/adverse events (24.1%) were the main motivation for returning for follow-up while occupational and other engagements (29.7%) and presumption of healing (24.6%) were the main barriers. Type of facility attended (p=0.0173), satisfaction with the discharge process (p=0.0150) and residency in Yala (p<0.001) were statistically significant to the respondents’ return for follow-up. 85(62.0%) of the participants returned on the 7th day, 9(6.6%) returned after 7 days, and 43(31.4%) returned before 7 days. Conclusion VMMC health education should include and emphasize the benefits of follow-up care to the clients and the providers should address the barriers to accessing follow-up services. Our results will inform the programme on areas identified to improve care for VMMC clients and reduce subsequent lost-to-follow-up cases. PMID:28439331

  10. Motivators and barriers to uptake of post-operative voluntary medical male circumcision follow-up in Yala division, Siaya County, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Abunah, Bonface; Onkoba, Rueben; Nyagero, Josephat; Muhula, Samuel; Omondi, Edward; Guyah, Bernard; Omondi, Gregory Barnabas

    2016-01-01

    Follow-up visits are recommended to all voluntary medical male circumcision clients (VMMC), however, adherence is variable. High lost-to-follow-up cases limit knowledge about clinical status of clients and adverse events. This study sought to establish Motivators and Barriers to the Uptake of VMMC post-operative follow-up services in Siaya County, Kenya. 277 clients from five VMMC sites in Yala were recruited immediately post-operation to participate in a telephone interview between the 21st and 31st day post-surgery during which a semi-structured questionnaire was administered. Descriptive and inferential statistics was used to analyse quantitative information using SPSS while responses from open ended questions were grouped into themes, sieved out, coded and analyzed. 137(49.5%) of the 277 participants utilized the follow-up services. Health education (31.4%) and emergency reviews/adverse events (24.1%) were the main motivation for returning for follow-up while occupational and other engagements (29.7%) and presumption of healing (24.6%) were the main barriers. Type of facility attended (p=0.0173), satisfaction with the discharge process (p=0.0150) and residency in Yala (p<0.001) were statistically significant to the respondents' return for follow-up. 85(62.0%) of the participants returned on the 7th day, 9(6.6%) returned after 7 days, and 43(31.4%) returned before 7 days. VMMC health education should include and emphasize the benefits of follow-up care to the clients and the providers should address the barriers to accessing follow-up services. Our results will inform the programme on areas identified to improve care for VMMC clients and reduce subsequent lost-to-follow-up cases.

  11. Insurance-Based Differences in Time to Diagnostic Follow-up after Positive Screening Mammography.

    PubMed

    Durham, Danielle D; Robinson, Whitney R; Lee, Sheila S; Wheeler, Stephanie B; Reeder-Hayes, Katherine E; Bowling, J Michael; Olshan, Andrew F; Henderson, Louise M

    2016-11-01

    Insurance may lengthen or inhibit time to follow-up after positive screening mammography. We assessed the association between insurance status and time to initial diagnostic follow-up after a positive screening mammogram. Using 1995-2010 data from a North Carolina population-based registry of breast imaging and cancer outcomes, we identified women with a positive screening mammogram. We compared receipt of follow-up within 60 days of screening using logistic regression and evaluated time to follow-up initiation using Cox proportional hazards regression. Among 43,026 women included in the study, 73% were <65 years and 27% were 65+ years. Median time until initial diagnostic follow-up was similar by age group and insurance status. In the adjusted model for women <65, uninsured women experienced a longer time to initiation of diagnostic follow-up [HR, 0.47; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.25-0.89] versus women with private insurance. There were increased odds of these uninsured women not meeting the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guideline for follow-up within 60 days (OR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.31-1.94). Among women ages 65+, women with private insurance experienced a faster time to follow-up (adjusted HR, 2.09; 95% CI, 1.27-3.44) than women with Medicare and private insurance. Approximately 10% of women had no follow-up by 365 days. We found differences in time to initial diagnostic follow-up after a positive screening mammogram by insurance status and age group. Uninsured women younger than 65 years at a positive screening event had delayed follow-up. Replication of these findings and examination of their clinical significance warrant additional investigation. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(11); 1474-82. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Follow-up care of young childhood cancer survivors: attendance and parental involvement.

    PubMed

    Vetsch, Janine; Rueegg, Corina S; Mader, Luzius; Bergstraesser, Eva; Rischewski, Johannes; Kuehni, Claudia E; Michel, Gisela

    2016-07-01

    Despite recommendations, only a proportion of long-term childhood cancer survivors attend follow-up care. We aimed to (1) describe the follow-up attendance of young survivors aged 11-17 years; (2) describe the parental involvement in follow-up, and (3) investigate predictors of follow-up attendance and parental involvement. As part of the Swiss Childhood Cancer Survivor Study, a follow-up questionnaire was sent to parents of childhood cancer survivors aged 11-17 years. We assessed follow-up attendance of the child, parents' involvement in follow-up, illness perception (Brief IPQ), and sociodemographic data. Clinical data was available from the Swiss Childhood Cancer Registry. Of 309 eligible parents, 189 responded (67 %; mean time since diagnosis 11.3 years, range 6.8-17.2) and 75 % (n = 141) reported that their child still attended follow-up. Of these, 83 % (n = 117) reported ≥1 visit per year and 17 % (n = 23) reported <1 visit every year. Most survivors saw pediatric oncologists (n = 111; 79 % of 141), followed by endocrinologists (n = 24, 17 %) and general practitioners (n = 22, 16 %). Most parents (92 %) reported being involved in follow-up (n = 130). In multivariable and Cox regression analyses, longer time since diagnosis (p = 0.025) and lower perceived treatment control (assessed by IPQ4: how much parents thought follow-up can help with late effects; p = 0.009) were associated with non-attendance. Parents' overall information needs was significantly associated with parental involvement in the multivariable model (p = 0.041). Educating survivors and their parents on the importance and effectiveness of follow-up care might increase attendance in the longer term.

  13. Palliative Care Needs Assessment in the Neuro-ICU: Effect on Family.

    PubMed

    Creutzfeldt, Claire J; Hanna, Marina G; Cheever, C Sherry; Lele, Abhijit V; Spiekerman, Charles; Engelberg, Ruth A; Curtis, J Randall

    2017-10-01

    Examine the association of a daily palliative care needs checklist on outcomes for family members of patients discharged from the neurosciences intensive care unit (neuro-ICU). We conducted a prospective, longitudinal cohort study in a single, thirty-bed neuro-ICU in a regional comprehensive stroke and level 1 trauma center. One of two neuro-ICU services that admit patients to the same ICU on alternating days used a palliative care needs checklist during morning work rounds. Between March and October, 2015, surveys were mailed to family members of patients discharged from the neuro-ICU. Nearly half of surveys (n = 91, 48.1%) were returned at a median of 4.7 months. At the time of survey completion, mean Modified rankin scale score (mRS) of neuro-ICU patients was 3.1 (SD 2). Overall ratings of quality of care were relatively high (82.2 on a 0-100 scale) with 32% of family members meeting screening criteria for depressive syndrome. The primary outcome measuring family satisfaction, consisting of eight items from the Family Satisfaction in the ICU questionnaire, did not differ significantly between families of patients from either ICU service nor did family ratings of depression (PHQ-8) and post-traumatic stress (PCL-17). Among families of patients discharged from the neuro-ICU, the daily use of a palliative care needs checklist had no measurable effect on family satisfaction scores or long-term psychological outcomes. Further research is needed to identify optimal interventions to meet the palliative care needs specific to family members of patients treated in the neuro-ICU.

  14. Design and impact of bundled payment for detox and follow-up care.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Amity E; Hodgkin, Dominic; Perloff, Jennifer N; Stewart, Maureen T; Brolin, Mary; Lane, Nancy; Horgan, Constance M

    2017-11-01

    Recent payment reforms promote movement from fee-for-service to alternative payment models that shift financial risk from payers to providers, incentivizing providers to manage patients' utilization. Bundled payment, an episode-based fixed payment that includes the prices of a group of services that would typically treat an episode of care, is expanding in the United States. Bundled payment has been recommended as a way to pay for comprehensive SUD treatment and has the potential to improve treatment engagement after detox, which could reduce detox readmissions, improve health outcomes, and reduce medical care costs. However, if moving to bundled payment creates large losses for some providers, it may not be sustainable. The objective of this study was to design the first bundled payment for detox and follow-up care and to estimate its impact on provider revenues. Massachusetts Medicaid beneficiaries' behavioral health, medical, and pharmacy claims from July 2010-April 2013 were used to build and test a detox bundled payment for continuously enrolled adults (N=5521). A risk adjustment model was developed using general linear modeling to predict beneficiaries' episode costs. The projected payments to each provider from the risk adjustment analysis were compared to the observed baseline costs to determine the potential impact of a detox bundled payment reform on organizational revenues. This was modeled in two ways: first assuming no change in behavior and then assuming a supply-side cost sharing behavioral response of a 10% reduction in detox readmissions and an increase of one individual counseling and one group counseling session. The mean total 90-day detox episode cost was $3743. Nearly 70% of the total mean cost consists of the index detox, psychiatric inpatient care, and short-term residential care. Risk mitigation, including risk adjustment, substantially reduced the variation of the mean episode cost. There are opportunities for organizations to gain revenue

  15. Phoning Logistics in a Longitudinal Follow-Up of Batterers and Their Partners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gondolf, Edward W.; Deemer, Crystal

    2004-01-01

    More needs to be known about the phoning logistics of interviewing subjects for longitudinal follow-up studies in the domestic violence field. Using phoning logs from a 4-year follow-up of batterer intervention, the authors calculated the number, results, and costs of phone calls from a sub sample of 100 men and 138 women. The number of calls is…

  16. From Student Follow-Up Responses to a Statewide Supply/Demand Analysis of Educational Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Toni

    The Texas Student Follow-up Information System (Tex-SIS) for comprehensive postsecondary follow-up and the supply/demand analysis work of the Texas 1202 Commission, Office of Postsecondary Education Planning, together may provide a valuable prototype for other states and perhaps even for a national system of data collection and analysis. Tex-SIS…

  17. Career Program Completers. 1989-90 Long-Term Follow-Up Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson County Community Coll., Overland Park, KS. Office of Institutional Research.

    In summer 1994, a long-term follow-up study was conducted of 1989-90 graduates of career programs at Johnson County Community College (JCCC) in Kansas. A survey was mailed to 536 graduates, certificate holders, and students who left JCCC with marketable skills to assess their satisfaction with JCCC and their jobs. With telephone follow-up, a…

  18. Outcome of recommendations for radiographic follow-up of pneumonia on outpatient chest radiography.

    PubMed

    Little, Brent P; Gilman, Matthew D; Humphrey, Kathryn L; Alkasab, Tarik K; Gibbons, Fiona K; Shepard, Jo-Anne O; Wu, Carol C

    2014-01-01

    Follow-up chest radiographs are frequently recommended by radiologists to document the clearing of radiographically suspected pneumonia. However, the clinical utility of follow-up radiography is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to examine the incidence of important pulmonary pathology revealed during follow-up imaging of suspected pneumonia on outpatient chest radiography. Reports of 29,138 outpatient chest radiography examinations performed at an academic medical center in 2008 were searched to identify cases in which the radiologist recommended follow-up chest radiography for presumed community-acquired pneumonia (n = 618). Descriptions of index radiographic abnormalities were recorded. Reports of follow-up imaging (radiography and CT) performed during the period from January 2008 to January 2010 were reviewed to assess the outcome of the index abnormality. Clinical history, demographics, microbiology, and pathology reports were reviewed and recorded. Compliance with follow-up imaging recommendations was 76.7%. In nine of 618 cases (1.5%), a newly diagnosed malignancy corresponded to the abnormality on chest radiography initially suspected to be pneumonia. In 23 of 618 cases (3.7%), an alternative nonmalignant disease corresponded with the abnormality on chest radiography initially suspected to be pneumonia. Therefore, in 32 of 618 patients (5.2%), significant new pulmonary diagnoses were established during follow-up imaging of suspected pneumonia. Follow-up imaging of radiographically suspected pneumonia leads to a small number of new diagnoses of malignancy and important nonmalignant diseases, which may alter patient management.

  19. Men with Intellectual Disabilities Who Have Attended Sex Offender Treatment Groups: A Follow-up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heaton, Kathryn M.; Murphy, Glynis H.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There have been a number of studies of treatment for men with intellectual disabilities and sexually abusive behaviour but few follow-up studies. Our aim was to follow up men with intellectual disabilities who had attended group cognitive behavioural treatment (CBT) for sexually abusive behaviour. Method Thirty-four men (from seven…

  20. How Do Mode and Timing of Follow-up Surveys Affect Evaluation Success?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koundinya, Vikram; Klink, Jenna; Deming, Philip; Meyers, Andrew; Erb, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the analysis of evaluation methods used in a well-designed and comprehensive evaluation effort of a significant Extension program. The evaluation data collection methods were analyzed by questionnaire mode and timing of follow-up surveys. Response rates from the short- and long-term follow-ups and different questionnaire…

  1. Development and Initial Results of a Longitudinal Secondary Follow-Up Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Benjamin

    1984-01-01

    Reviews the literature and difficulties of school follow-up studies. Describes the purpose, design, and methodology of the Peel Secondary Follow-up study. Shows how results from the first round of the study raise important issues about students' expectations and how they are or are not borne out. (SB)

  2. 48 CFR 2027.305-3 - Follow-up by Government.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Follow-up by Government... GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Patent Rights Under Government Contracts 2027.305-3 Follow-up by Government. (a) The contracting officer shall, as a part of the closeout of a...

  3. 48 CFR 2027.305-3 - Follow-up by Government.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Follow-up by Government... GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Patent Rights Under Government Contracts 2027.305-3 Follow-up by Government. (a) The contracting officer shall, as a part of the closeout of a...

  4. Risk of Future Suicide Attempts in Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients at 18-Month Follow-Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinkman-Sull, David C.; Overholser, James C.; Silverman, Eden

    2000-01-01

    Investigates potential predictors of suicidal behavior in adolescent psychiatric patients (N=60) during an 18-month follow-up period. Follow-up suicidality was most strongly predicted by high intake levels of hopelessness, and an increase in or persistent problems with depression. Proposes a model in which the impact of family functioning on…

  5. Utility of Follow-Up Skeletal Surveys in Suspected Child Physical Abuse Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Stephanie; Makoroff, Kathi; Care, Marguerite; Thomas, Amy; Shapiro, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the utility of a follow-up skeletal survey in suspected child physical abuse evaluations. Methods: In this prospective study, follow-up skeletal surveys were recommended for 74 children who, after an initial skeletal survey and evaluation by the Child Abuse Team, were suspected victims of physical abuse. The number and…

  6. 48 CFR 2427.305-2 - Follow-up by contractor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Follow-up by contractor....305-2 Follow-up by contractor. (b) Contractor reports. Contractors shall complete and submit to the... Contracting Officer shall send the form to those contractors whose contract work may have required the...

  7. Socializing Intellectual Talk: A Case Study of Instructor Follow-Up Statements in Classroom Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Caroline S.

    2017-01-01

    By analyzing the audio recording and transcription of classroom discourse, this case study focused on the ways in which the instructor used follow-up statements to socialize students into intellectual talk. Four relevant categories of follow-up statements emerged: (a) revoicing, (b) contextualization, (c) parallel elaboration, and (d) assistive…

  8. Documentation for the 2008-09 Teacher Follow-up Survey. NCES 2011-304

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Shawna; Parmer, Randall; Chambers, Lisa; Tourkin, Steven; Lyter, Deanna M.

    2011-01-01

    The Teacher Follow-up Survey (TFS) is sponsored by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) on behalf of the U.S. Department of Education and is conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau. TFS is a follow-up survey of selected elementary and secondary school teachers who participated in the Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS). SASS is the…

  9. A Research on Students' Needs for Follow-Up Curriculum of College English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jin, Jie; Liu, Hengying; Zhang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Increased universities and colleges offer the undergraduates with more follow-up courses with the further reform in college English education in China. An investigation on self-evaluation, difficulty, and willingness of undergraduates in learning English further was made in order to design more appropriate and adaptable follow-up courses. This…

  10. Infantile Amnesia across the Years: A 2-Year Follow-Up of Children's Earliest Memories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Carole; Warren, Kelly L.; Short, Megan M.

    2011-01-01

    Although infantile amnesia has been investigated for many years in adults, only recently has it been investigated in children. This study was a 2-year follow-up and extension of an earlier study. Children (4-13 years old) were asked initially and 2 years later for their earliest 3 memories. At follow-up, their age at the time of these memories…

  11. Barriers to Follow-Up for Abnormal Papanicolaou Smears among Female Sex Workers in Lima, Peru.

    PubMed

    Aharon, Devora; Calderon, Martha; Solari, Vicky; Alarcon, Patricia; Zunt, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the most prevalent cancer among Peruvian women. Female sex workers (FSW) in Peru are at elevated risk for HPV infection, and receive annual Papanicolaou screening. The objective of this study was to identify barriers to follow-up for abnormal Pap smears among FSW in Peru. 97 FSW attending the Alberto Barton Health Center in Lima were surveyed regarding their STI screening history. 17 women with a history of an abnormal Pap smear were interviewed about their experiences regarding follow-up care. Of the 27 HPV-positive women, only 8 (30%) received follow-up treatment. Of the 19 women who did not receive follow-up, 7 (37%) had not been informed of their abnormal result. Qualitative interviews revealed that the major barrier to follow-up was lack of knowledge about HPV and potential health consequences of an abnormal Pap smear. HPV infection is highly prevalent in Peruvian FSW, yet only 30% of FSW with abnormal Pap smears receive follow-up care. The predominant barriers to follow-up were lack of standardization in recording and communicating results and insufficient FSW knowledge regarding health consequences of HPV infection. Standardization of record-keeping and distribution of educational pamphlets have been implemented to improve follow-up for HPV.

  12. High School and Beyond First Follow-Up (1982). Sample Design Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tourangeau, Roger; And Others

    This report documents the major technical aspects of the sample selection and implementation of the 1982 High School and Beyond First Follow Up, the first in a series of planned resurveys of the students and schools in the 1980 High School and Beyond Base Year Survey. The First Follow-Up included subsamples of nearly 30,000 sophomore cohort and…

  13. Compilation of Case Studies: Exemplary Placement and Follow-Up Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dale, Jack

    Examples of placement and follow-up conceptual models developed for a program of vocational education (kindergarten through university) are presented. Section 1 contains a historical overview of placement and follow-up activities in Florida and describes a comprehensive model. Section 2, describing a model for utilizing community resources for the…

  14. 77 FR 69896 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Follow-Up...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-21

    ... for OMB Review; Comment Request; Follow-Up Survey Information for Green Jobs and Health Care Impact... request (ICR) proposal titled, ``Follow-Up Survey Information for Green Jobs and Health Care Impact... Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Green Jobs and Health Care Grants Impact Evaluation (OMB 1205-0486), and in March, 2012...

  15. An ontology-based approach to patient follow-up assessment for continuous and personalized chronic disease management.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-Fan; Gou, Ling; Zhou, Tian-Shu; Lin, De-Nan; Zheng, Jing; Li, Ye; Li, Jing-Song

    2017-08-01

    Chronic diseases are complex and persistent clinical conditions that require close collaboration among patients and health care providers in the implementation of long-term and integrated care programs. However, current solutions focus partially on intensive interventions at hospitals rather than on continuous and personalized chronic disease management. This study aims to fill this gap by providing computerized clinical decision support during follow-up assessments of chronically ill patients at home. We proposed an ontology-based framework to integrate patient data, medical domain knowledge, and patient assessment criteria for chronic disease patient follow-up assessments. A clinical decision support system was developed to implement this framework for automatic selection and adaptation of standard assessment protocols to suit patient personal conditions. We evaluated our method in the case study of type 2 diabetic patient follow-up assessments. The proposed framework was instantiated using real data from 115,477 follow-up assessment records of 36,162 type 2 diabetic patients. Standard evaluation criteria were automatically selected and adapted to the particularities of each patient. Assessment results were generated as a general typing of patient overall condition and detailed scoring for each criterion, providing important indicators to the case manager about possible inappropriate judgments, in addition to raising patient awareness of their disease control outcomes. Using historical data as the gold standard, our system achieved a rate of accuracy of 99.93% and completeness of 95.00%. This study contributes to improving the accessibility, efficiency and quality of current patient follow-up services. It also provides a generic approach to knowledge sharing and reuse for patient-centered chronic disease management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Self-administered multi-level pregnancy tests in simplified follow-up of medical abortion in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Dabash, Rasha; Shochet, Tara; Hajri, Selma; Chelli, Héla; Hassairi, Anne-Emmanuele; Haleb, Douha; Labassi, Hayet; Sfar, Ezzedine; Temimi, Fatma; Koenig, Leah; Winikoff, Beverly

    2016-07-30

    This study was conducted to assess the efficacy and acceptability of using a multi-level pregnancy test (MLPT) combined with telephone follow-up for medical abortion in Tunisia, where the majority of providers are midwives. Four hundred and four women with gestational age ≤ 70 days' LMP seeking medical abortion at six study sites were enrolled in this open-label trial. Participants administered a baseline MLPT at the clinic prior to mifepristone administration and were asked to take a second MLPT at home and to call in its results before returning the day of their scheduled follow-up visit 10-14 days later. Almost all women with follow-up (97.1 %, n = 332/342) had successful abortions without the need for surgical intervention. The MLPT worked extremely well among women ≤63 days' LMP in ruling out ongoing pregnancy (negative predictive value (NPV) =100 % (n = 298/298)) and also detecting women with ongoing pregnancies (sensitivity = 100 %; 2/2) as needing follow-up due to non-declining hCG. Among women 64-70 days' LMP, the test also worked well in ruling out ongoing pregnancy (NPV = 96.9 % (n = 31/32) but not as well in terms of sensitivity (50 %), with only one of two ongoing pregnancies detected by MLPT as needing follow-up. Most women (95.1 %) found the MLPT to be very easy or easy to use and would consider using the MLPT again (97.4 %) if needed. Self-administered pre and post MLPT are very easy for women to use and accurate in assessing medical abortion success up to 63 days' LMP. MLPT use for medical abortion follow-up has the potential to facilitate task sharing services and eliminate the burden of routine in-person follow-up visits for the large majority of women. Additional research is warranted to explore the accuracy of the MLPT in identifying ongoing pregnancy among women with gestational ages > 63 days. This study was registered on May 13, 2010, on clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01150279 .

  17. Impact of Pharmacists’ Participation in a Pharmacotherapy Follow-Up Program

    PubMed Central

    Dualde, Elena; Santonja, Francisco J.; Faus, Maria J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the impact of a continuing pharmacy education (CPE) course on Spanish community pharmacists’ participation in a pharmacotherapy follow-up program. Design. Participation in a CPE course offered 4 times over a 4-year period via satellite teleconferencing was monitored and the data analyzed to determine the course’s impact on community pharmacists’ participation in a pharmacotherapy follow-up program. Assessment. Community pharmacists’ participation in the pharmaceutical care CPE course had a slightly positive impact on their participation in the pharmacotherapy follow-up program. In the best profiles, there was a probability of 7.3% that participants would participate in the pharmacotherapy follow-up program. Conclusions. Completion of pharmaceutical care CPE courses did not have a significant impact on pharmacists’ participation in a pharmacotherapy follow-up program. PMID:22438606

  18. [Health management system in outpatient follow-up of kidney transplantation patients].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Xie, Jinliang; Yao, Hui; Liu, Ling; Tan, Jianwen; Geng, Chunmi

    2014-07-01

    To develop a health management system for outpatient follow-up of kidney transplant patients. Access 2010 database software was used to establish the health management system for kidney transplantation patients in Windows XP operating system. Database management and post-operation follow-up of the kidney transplantation patients were realized through 6 function modules including data input, data query, data printing, questionnaire survey, data export, and follow-up management. The system worked stably and reliably, and the data input was easy and fast. The query, the counting and printing were convenient. Health management system for patients after kidney transplantation not only reduces the work pressure of the follow-up staff, but also improves the efficiency of outpatient follow-up.

  19. Increasing Follow-up Outcomes of At-Risk Alcohol Patients Using Motivational Interviewing.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Andrew J; Garbers, Rachael; Lang, Ann; Borgert, Andrew J; Fisher, Mason

    2016-01-01

    Our trauma division implemented a screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) program in 2009 and has maintained more than 92% screening rate for all inpatient admissions since inception. Brief interventions are proven to be more likely to effect and reinforce change if a follow-up contact is made with patients. This led to discussion regarding whether identified patients were more likely to follow up with our SBIRT wellness specialist using motivational interviewing or with our partners, exercise physiology, who use traditional interviewing techniques. We retrospectively reviewed more than 3,000 inpatient admissions in which screening for at-risk alcohol use were positive. Fifty-one percent of identified patients were referred for wellness specialist consultation with a follow-up rate of 52% compared with a follow-up rate of only 21% in the exercise physiology group. Motivational interviewing is more effective in encouraging at-risk alcohol users to participate in follow-up care.

  20. The Research Agenda in ICU Telemedicine

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Nicholas S.; Lilly, Craig M.; Angus, Derek C.; Jacobi, Judith; Rubenfeld, Gordon D.; Rothschild, Jeffrey M.; Sales, Anne E.; Scales, Damon C.; Mathers, James A. L.

    2011-01-01

    ICU telemedicine uses audiovisual conferencing technology to provide critical care from a remote location. Research is needed to best define the optimal use of ICU telemedicine, but efforts are hindered by methodological challenges and the lack of an organized delivery approach. We convened an interdisciplinary working group to develop a research agenda in ICU telemedicine, addressing both methodological and knowledge gaps in the field. To best inform clinical decision-making and health policy, future research should be organized around a conceptual framework that enables consistent descriptions of both the study setting and the telemedicine intervention. The framework should include standardized methods for assessing the preimplementation ICU environment and describing the telemedicine program. This framework will facilitate comparisons across studies and improve generalizability by permitting context-specific interpretation. Research based on this framework should consider the multidisciplinary nature of ICU care and describe the specific program goals. Key topic areas to be addressed include the effect of ICU telemedicine on the structure, process, and outcome of critical care delivery. Ideally, future research should attempt to address causation instead of simply associations and elucidate the mechanism of action in order to determine exactly how ICU telemedicine achieves its effects. ICU telemedicine has significant potential to improve critical care delivery, but high-quality research is needed to best inform its use. We propose an agenda to advance the science of ICU telemedicine and generate research with the greatest potential to improve patient care. PMID:21729894

  1. Economics of ICU organization and management.

    PubMed

    Wunsch, Hannah; Gershengorn, Hayley; Scales, Damon C

    2012-01-01

    The intensive care unit (ICU) is a complex system and the economic implications of altering care patterns in the ICU can be difficult to unravel. Few studies have specifically examined the economics of implementing organizational and management changes or acknowledged the many competing economic interests of patient, hospital,payer, and society. With continuously increasing healthcare costs,there is a great need for more studies focused on the optimal organization of the ICU. These studies should not focus solely on reductions in ICU length of stay but should strive to measure the true costs of care within a given healthcare system.

  2. Interventions to Improve Follow-Up of Abnormal Findings in Cancer Screening

    PubMed Central

    Bastani, Roshan; Yabroff, K. Robin; Myers, Ronald E.; Glenn, Beth

    2006-01-01

    The potential reduction in morbidity and mortality through cancer screening cannot be realized without receipt of appropriate follow-up care for abnormalities identified via screening. In this paper, the authors critically examine the existing literature on correlates of receipt of appropriate follow-up care for screen-detected abnormalities, as well as the literature on interventions designed to increase rates of receipt of follow-up care. Lessons learned describe what is known and not known about factors that are related to or predict receipt of follow-up care. Similarly, effective interventions to increase follow-up are described and gaps identified. A conceptual model is developed that categorizes the health care system in the United States as comprising four levels: policy, practice, provider, and patient. Some patient-level factors that influence follow-up receipt are identified, but the lack of data severely limit the understanding of provider, practice, and policy-level correlates. The majority of intervention studies to increase follow-up receipt have focused on patient-level factors and have targeted follow-up of abnormal Papanicolaou smears. Insufficient information is available regarding the effectiveness of provider, practice, or policy-level interventions. Standard definitions of what constitutes appropriate follow-up are lacking, which severely limit comparability of findings across studies. The validity of various methods of obtaining outcome data has not been clearly established. More research is needed on interventions targeting provider, system, and policy-level factors, particularly interventions focusing on follow-up of colorectal and breast abnormalities. Standardization of definitions and measures is needed to facilitate comparisons across studies. PMID:15316914

  3. Cost Analysis of Following Up Incomplete Low-Risk Fetal Anatomy Ultrasounds.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Karen; Shainker, Scott A; Modest, Anna M; Spiel, Melissa H; Resetkova, Nina; Shah, Neel; Hacker, Michele R

    2017-03-01

    To examine the clinical utility and cost of follow-up ultrasounds performed as a result of suboptimal views at the time of initial second-trimester ultrasound in a cohort of low-risk pregnant women. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of women at low risk for fetal structural anomalies who had second-trimester ultrasounds at 16 to less than 24 weeks of gestation from 2011 to 2013. We determined the probability of women having follow-up ultrasounds as a result of suboptimal views at the time of the initial second-trimester ultrasound, and calculated the probability of detecting an anomaly on follow-up ultrasound. These probabilities were used to estimate the national cost of our current ultrasound practice, and the cost to identify one fetal anomaly on follow-up ultrasound. During the study period, 1,752 women met inclusion criteria. Four fetuses (0.23% [95% CI 0.06-0.58]) were found to have anomalies at the initial ultrasound. Because of suboptimal views, 205 women (11.7%) returned for a follow-up ultrasound, and one (0.49% [95% CI 0.01-2.7]) anomaly was detected. Two women (0.11%) still had suboptimal views and returned for an additional follow-up ultrasound, with no anomalies detected. When the incidence of incomplete ultrasounds was applied to a similar low-risk national cohort, the annual cost of these follow-up scans was estimated at $85,457,160. In our cohort, the cost to detect an anomaly on follow-up ultrasound was approximately $55,000. The clinical yield of performing follow-up ultrasounds because of suboptimal views on low-risk second-trimester ultrasounds is low. Since so few fetal abnormalities were identified on follow-up scans, this added cost and patient burden may not be warranted. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Protracted immune disorders at one year after ICU discharge in patients with septic shock.

    PubMed

    Riché, Florence; Chousterman, Benjamin G; Valleur, Patrice; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Launay, Jean-Marie; Gayat, Etienne

    2018-02-21

    , remained in the elevated abnormal range. In this study, protracted immune disturbances were observed one year after ICU discharge. The study results suggested the presence of long-lasting immune illness disorders following a long-term septic insult, indicating the need for long-term patient follow up after ICU discharge and questioning the use of immune intervention to restore immune homeostasis after abdominal septic shock.

  5. Smartphone Application WeChat for Clinical Follow-up of Discharged Patients with Head and Neck Tumors: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Ke-Xing; Zhao, Jing; Wang, Bin; Xiong, Guan-Xia; Yang, Wei-Qiang; Liu, Qi-Hong; Zhu, Xiao-Lin; Sun, Wei; Jiang, Ai-Yun; Wen, Wei-Ping; Lei, Wen-Bin

    2016-12-05

    Nowadays, social media tools such as short message service, Twitter, video, and web-based systems are more and more used in clinical follow-up, making clinical follow-up much more time- and cost-effective than ever before. However, as the most popular social media in China, little is known about the utility of smartphone WeChat application in follow-up. In this study, we aimed to investigate the feasibility and superiority of WeChat application in clinical follow-up. A total of 108 patients diagnosed with head and neck tumor were randomized to WeChat follow-up (WFU) group or telephone follow-up (TFU) group for 6-month follow-up. The follow-ups were delivered by WeChat or telephone at 2 weeks, 1, 2, 3, and 6 months to the patients after being discharged. The study measurements were time consumption for follow-up delivery, total economic cost, lost-to-follow-up rate, and overall satisfaction for the follow-up method. Time consumption in WFU group for each patient (23.36 ± 6.16 min) was significantly shorter than that in TFU group (42.89 ± 7.15 min) (P < 0.001); total economic cost in WFU group (RMB 90 Yuan) was much lower than that in TFU group (RMB 196 Yuan). Lost-to-follow-up rate in the WFU group was 7.02% (4/57) compared with TFU group, 9.80% (5/51), while no significance was observed (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.176-2.740; P = 0.732). The overall satisfaction rate in WFU group was 94.34% (50/53) compared with 80.43% (37/46) in TFU group (95% CI: 0.057-0.067; P = 0.034). The smartphone WeChat application was found to be a viable option for follow-up in discharged patients with head and neck tumors. WFU was time-effective, cost-effective, and convenient in communication. This doctor-led follow-up model has the potential to establish a good physician-patient relationship by enhancing dynamic communications and providing individual health instructions. Chinese Clinical Trial Registry, ChiCTR-IOR-15007498; http://www.chictr.org.cn/ showproj.aspx?proj=12613.

  6. Smartphone Application WeChat for Clinical Follow-up of Discharged Patients with Head and Neck Tumors: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lyu, Ke-Xing; Zhao, Jing; Wang, Bin; Xiong, Guan-Xia; Yang, Wei-Qiang; Liu, Qi-Hong; Zhu, Xiao-Lin; Sun, Wei; Jiang, Ai-Yun; Wen, Wei-Ping; Lei, Wen-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nowadays, social media tools such as short message service, Twitter, video, and web-based systems are more and more used in clinical follow-up, making clinical follow-up much more time- and cost-effective than ever before. However, as the most popular social media in China, little is known about the utility of smartphone WeChat application in follow-up. In this study, we aimed to investigate the feasibility and superiority of WeChat application in clinical follow-up. Methods: A total of 108 patients diagnosed with head and neck tumor were randomized to WeChat follow-up (WFU) group or telephone follow-up (TFU) group for 6-month follow-up. The follow-ups were delivered by WeChat or telephone at 2 weeks, 1, 2, 3, and 6 months to the patients after being discharged. The study measurements were time consumption for follow-up delivery, total economic cost, lost-to-follow-up rate, and overall satisfaction for the follow-up method. Results: Time consumption in WFU group for each patient (23.36 ± 6.16 min) was significantly shorter than that in TFU group (42.89 ± 7.15 min) (P < 0.001); total economic cost in WFU group (RMB 90 Yuan) was much lower than that in TFU group (RMB 196 Yuan). Lost-to-follow-up rate in the WFU group was 7.02% (4/57) compared with TFU group, 9.80% (5/51), while no significance was observed (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.176–2.740; P = 0.732). The overall satisfaction rate in WFU group was 94.34% (50/53) compared with 80.43% (37/46) in TFU group (95% CI: 0.057–0.067; P = 0.034). Conclusions: The smartphone WeChat application was found to be a viable option for follow-up in discharged patients with head and neck tumors. WFU was time-effective, cost-effective, and convenient in communication. This doctor-led follow-up model has the potential to establish a good physician-patient relationship by enhancing dynamic communications and providing individual health instructions. Trial Registration: Chinese Clinical Trial Registry, Chi

  7. Communication skills in ICU and adult hospitalisation unit nursing staff.

    PubMed

    Ayuso-Murillo, D; Colomer-Sánchez, A; Herrera-Peco, I

    In this study researchers are trying to analyse the personality factors related to social skills in nurses who work in: Intensive Care Units, ICU, and Hospitalisation units. Both groups are from the Madrid Health Service (SERMAS). The present investigation has been developed as a descriptive transversal study, where personality factors in ICU nurses (n=29) and those from Hospitalisation units (n=40) were compared. The 16PF-5 questionnaire was employed to measure the personality factors associated with communication skills. The comparison of the personality factors associated to social skills, communication, in both groups, show us that nurses from ICU obtain in social receptivity: 5,6 (A+), 5,2 (C-), 6,2 (O+), 5,1 (H-), 5,3 (Q1-), and emotional control: 6,1 (B+), 5,9 (N+). Meanwhile the data doesn't adjust to the expected to emotional and social expressiveness, emotional receptivity and social control, there are not evidence. The personality factors associated to communication skills in ICU nurses are below those of hospitalisation unit nurses. The present results suggest the necessity to develop training actions, focusing on nurses from intensive care units to improve their communication social skills. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Enfermería Intensiva y Unidades Coronarias (SEEIUC). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. [Progressive lost of interest of family medicine residents with regard to home follow-up of the elderly].

    PubMed

    Aubry, François; Couturier, Yves; Dumont, Serge

    2014-06-01

    This paper deals with the lack of interest shown by family medicine residents in Quebec (Canada) in home follow-up or monitoring of the elderly. By collecting and analyzing data from sixteen family medicine residents before and after their first experience of home follow-up, and from four medical supervisors, we found that residents experience a rapid loss of interest in this practice over a very short period. We show that this lack of interest stems first from the difficulty of applying the principle of patient-centered care, wherein medical interventions must meet the needs of the elderly in their entirety. Secondly, residents complain that they have to deal with many administrative tasks. They call for implementation of professional features to better integrate services such as case management.

  9. Endoscopic follow-up of 383 patients with colorectal adenoma: an observational study in daily practice.

    PubMed

    Jonkers, Daisy; Ernst, Justi; Pladdet, Ingrid; Stockbrügger, Reinhold; Hameeteman, Wim

    2006-06-01

    Endoscopic removal of colorectal adenomas reduces the incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer (CRC), but follow-up surveillance is recommended. Compliance with the Dutch surveillance guidelines and detection of neoplasia during follow-up has been evaluated in daily practice. From 1987 to 1996, 383 consecutive patients with colorectal adenomas (56.4% male, 61.8+/-11.3 years) were included and followed until December 2000. The mean follow-up was 80.5+/-42.5 months with 2.2+/-0.9 follow-up endoscopies. A total of 32.5 and 27.3% of follow-up endoscopies were performed >25% (time between advised and actual endoscopy) too late or too early, respectively. At the end of follow-up, 33.4% of patients had left the follow-up (two-thirds died) and 60.1% were known with co-morbidity. A first, second, third, fourth and fifth follow-up endoscopy had been performed in 327, 238, 132, 64 and 35 patients, respectively. Adenomatous polyps (with high-risk polyps) were detected in 100% (42.6%) of the index endoscopies and in 25.1% (17.4%), 23.9% (10.5%), 28.0% (12.1%), 34.4% (25.0%) and 37.1% (17.1%) of the first to fifth follow-up endoscopy, respectively. CRC was diagnosed in seven patients (46.1+/-22.9 months after index endoscopy), resulting in a standardized incidence ratio of 1.4 (confidence interval 0.6-3.0, P=0.4) compared to the general population. In this daily practice, high numbers of total and high-risk adenomatous polyps were found during follow-up surveillance. The incidence of CRC was not significantly different from the general population, which might be due to the intensive follow-up and removal of polyps. These findings support the importance of follow-up surveillance. However, the high overall morbidity and mortality should be taken into account when selecting patients for an intensive follow-up programme.

  10. Indian Juvenile Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Prevention. Hearings before the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs. House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session on H.R. 1156 to Coordinate and Expand Services for the Prevention, Identification, Treatment, and Follow-Up Care of Alcohol and Drug Abuse among Indian Youth, and for Other Purposes and H.R. 2624 to Authorize Programs for the Treatment and Prevention of Drug and Alcohol Abuse among Indian Juveniles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs.

    Three hearings held in Arizona, New Mexico, and South Dakota provide individual statements and panel presentations on problems, programs, and proposals for prevention, identification, treatment, and follow-up care of alcohol and drug abuse among American Indian juveniles. The majority of witnesses are members of Indian tribes in the three…

  11. Oral Cancer Screening at Workplace in India—One-year Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Uplap, PA; Mishra, GA; Majumdar, P; Gupta, SD; Rane, PS; Sadalge, PK; Avasare, AM; Goswami, SS; Dhar, VA; Shastri, SS

    2011-01-01

    Background: Oral cancer remains the commonest form of cancer and cancer-related deaths among Indian males due to popularity of avoidable risk factors such as tobacco and alcohol use. A workplace oral cancer screening and tobacco cessation study was commenced on World No Tobacco Day 2007 at a chemical industry in rural Maharashtra. Aims: The objectives were to screen the employees for oral neoplasia and to correlate it with their tobacco consumption pattern. In addition, the objective was to provide tobacco cessation services at the workplace. Materials and Methods: This is an interventional cohort study among 104 employees of a chemical industrial unit in rural Maharashtra. Naked eye examination of the oral cavity was performed for all employees by a doctor irrespective of the tobacco habits at the beginning and at the end of 1 year. In between, the tobacco users were regularly examined during each follow-up. Statistical analysis used: Through personal interviews of the participants, data were manually recorded and were transferred to electronic data base. Data analysis was conducted in STATA™ 8.2 on intention to treat basis. Results and Conclusions: Among the 104 employees, 50 (48.08%) were current tobacco users at the beginning of the program. Oral precancers were seen exclusively among 20 (40%) tobacco users. After 1 year of workplace tobacco cessation intervention, 80% of oral precancers regressed. This shows that screening of the oral cavity at the workplace is effective when combined with tobacco cessation. PMID:21976799

  12. CMS proposes prioritizing patient preferences, linking patients to follow-up care in discharge planning process.

    PubMed

    2016-03-01

    Hospital providers voice concerns about a proposed rule by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) that would require providers to devote more resources to discharge planning. The rule would apply to inpatients as well as emergency patients requiring comprehensive discharge plans as opposed to discharge instructions. CMS states that the rule would ensure the prioritization of patient preferences and goals in the discharge planning process, and also would prevent avoidable complications and readmissions. However, hospital and emergency medicine leaders worry that community resources are not yet in place to facilitate the links and follow-up required in the proposed rule, and that the costs associated with implementation would be prohibitive. The proposed rule would apply to acute care hospitals, EDs, long-term care facilities, inpatient rehabilitation centers, and home health agencies. Regardless of the setting, though, CMS is driving home the message that patient preferences should be given more weight during the discharge planning process. Under the rule, hospitals or EDs would need to develop a patient-centered discharge plan within 24 hours of admission or registration, and complete the plan prior to discharge or transfer to another facility. Under the rule, emergency physicians would determine which patients require a comprehensive discharge plan. Both the American Hospital Association and the American College of Emergency Physicians worry that hospitals will have to take on more staff, invest in training, and make changes to their electronic medical record systems to implement the provisions in the proposed rule.

  13. Treatment of active duty military with PTSD in primary care: A follow-up report.

    PubMed

    Cigrang, Jeffrey A; Rauch, Sheila A M; Mintz, Jim; Brundige, Antoinette; Avila, Laura L; Bryan, Craig J; Goodie, Jeffrey L; Peterson, Alan L

    2015-12-01

    First-line trauma-focused therapies offered in specialty mental health clinics do not reach many veterans and active duty service members with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Primary care is an ideal environment to expand access to mental health care. Several promising clinical case series reports of brief PTSD therapies adapted for primary care have shown positive results, but the long-term effectiveness with military members is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the long-term outcome of an open trial of a brief cognitive-behavioral primary care-delivered protocol developed specifically for deployment-related PTSD in a sample of 24 active duty military (15 men, 9 women). Measures of PTSD symptom severity showed statistically and clinically significant reductions from baseline to posttreatment that were maintained at the 6-month and 1-year follow-up assessments. Similar reductions were maintained in depressive symptoms and ratings of global mental health functioning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Management of nucleus loss into the vitreous: long term follow up in 63 patients

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Aroca, Pedro; Fernández-Ballart, Juan; Méndez-Marín, Isabel; Salvat-Serra, Merce; Baget-Bernaldiz, Marc; Buil-Calvo, Jose A

    2007-01-01

    Background: The aim of present study is to determine the long-term results of patients who undergo pars plana vitrectomy after retained nucleus into the vitreous. Setting: Service of Ophthalmology, Hospital Universitari St Joan, Reus (Barcelona), Spain. Methods: Retrospective, noncomparative, consecutive case series. Medical records were reviewed of all patients who underwent pars plana vitrectomy for retained nucleus into the vitreous after complicated cataract surgery, over a 9-year period between August 1, 1997 and July 31, 2005. Result: The incidence of retained lens fragments was 0.57% (63 patients), the postoperative visual acuity was higher than 20/40 in 59.60% and fell to 48.93% by the end of the study, and was related to the presence of CME and retinal detachment. The CME appeared in 31.91% of the patients and was related to preoperative uveitis an corneal edema. In the group of patients on whom the vitrectomy was performed at the time of cataract complication, visual acuity was higher than 20/40 in 77.77%, and no one developed secondary glaucoma or uveitis. Conclusion: Being retrospective, our study was not result conclusive. Despite the initial good results of these patients after PPV surgery, follow-up should be accurate and over a long period of time in order to minimize postoperative complications such as retinal detachment, retinal breaks, secondary glaucoma and CME. PMID:19668529

  15. Screening and Follow-Up Monitoring for Substance Use in Primary Care: An Exploration of Rural-Urban Variations.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ya-Fen; Lu, Shou-En; Howe, Bill; Tieben, Hendrik; Hoeft, Theresa; Unützer, Jürgen

    2016-02-01

    Rates of substance use in rural areas are close to those of urban areas. While recent efforts have emphasized integrated care as a promising model for addressing workforce shortages in providing behavioral health services to those living in medically underserved regions, little is known on how substance use problems are addressed in rural primary care settings. To examine rural-urban variations in screening and monitoring primary care- based patients for substance use problems in a state-wide mental health integration program. This was an observational study using patient registry. The study included adult enrollees (n = 15,843) with a mental disorder from 133 participating community health clinics. We measured whether a standardized substance use instrument was used to screen patients at treatment entry and to monitor symptoms at follow-up visits. While on average 73.6 % of patients were screened for substance use, follow-up on substance use problems after initial screening was low (41.4 %); clinics in small/isolated rural settings appeared to be the lowest (13.6 %). Patients who were treated for a mental disorder or substance abuse in the past and who showed greater psychiatric complexities were more likely to receive a screening, whereas patients of small, isolated rural clinics and those traveling longer distances to the care facility were least likely to receive follow-up monitoring for their substance use problems. Despite the prevalent substance misuse among patients with mental disorders, opportunities to screen this high-risk population for substance use and provide a timely follow-up for those identified as at risk remained overlooked in both rural and urban areas. Rural residents continue to bear a disproportionate burden of substance use problems, with rural-urban disparities found to be most salient in providing the continuum of services for patients with substance use problems in primary care.

  16. The nursing role in ICU outreach: an international exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Endacott, Ruth; Chaboyer, Wendy

    2006-01-01

    It is widely acknowledged that many critically ill patients are managed outside of designated critical care units. One strategy adopted in Australia and England to assess and manage risk in these patients is the intensive care unit (ICU) outreach or liaison nurse service. This article examines how ICU outreach/liaison roles in Australia and England operate in the context of Manley's theoretical framework for advanced nursing practice. Descriptive case study design using semi-structured interviews and job descriptions as sources of evidence. Findings of interviews with six Australian ICU Liaison nurses are already published; this study replicated the Australian study with four ICU Consultant Nurses in England and mapped interview and job description data from both countries onto Manley's conceptual framework for advanced practice/consultant nurse. Four themes emerged from the English data: patient interventions, support for ward staff, liaison between ward and ICU staff and hospital-wide impact. The first three of these comprised the core service common to the roles in both countries. Manley's four subroles (expert practitioner, consultant, educator and researcher) were present across both countries. However, the interview and job description data demonstrated that there were lower expectations in Australia that the roles would lead to staff development and build capacity across the hospital system. Similarly, formal education for ward staff such as ALERT and CRiSP courses were more developed in UK. Our data demonstrate that the role undertaken in England and Australia is sufficiently comparable to use as a research intervention in international studies across the two countries. However, the macro service level differs. Job descriptions across both countries emphasized the need to influence hospital policy; however, the ICU consultant nurses in England might be considered better placed to achieve this through role title and access to the hospital executive. In both

  17. Comparison of trabeculectomy versus Ex-PRESS: 3-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Rodriguez, Johanna M; Trope, Graham E; Drori-Wagschal, Lilach; Jinapriya, Delan; Buys, Yvonne M

    2016-09-01

    To compare the outcomes of Ex-PRESS versus trabeculectomy at 3 years. Consenting patients aged 18-85 years with medically uncontrolled open-angle glaucoma scheduled for trabeculectomy were included in this study. 63 subjects were randomised to undergo Ex-PRESS (32) or trabeculectomy (31). Follow-up data included intraocular pressure (IOP), glaucoma medications, visual acuity (VA), complications and additional interventions. Complete success was defined as IOP between 5 and 18 mm Hg and 20% reduction from baseline without glaucoma medications, while qualified success was with or without glaucoma medications. Complete success at 2 and 3 years was 43% vs 42% (p=0.78) and 35% vs 38% (p=0.92) in Ex-PRESS versus trabeculectomy, respectively. Qualified success at 2 and 3 years was 59% vs 76% (p=0.20) and 52% vs 61% (p=0.43) in Ex-PRESS versus trabeculectomy, respectively. Mean IOP at 2 and 3 years was 12.5±5.1 mm Hg vs 10.3±3.7 mm Hg (p=0.07) and 13.3±4.5 mm Hg vs 11.1±4.4 mm Hg (p=0.10) for Ex-PRESS versus trabeculectomy, respectively. At 3 years, 47.6% of Ex-PRESS and 50% of trabeculectomy patients were on glaucoma medications (p=1.00). No difference in VA was found after 3 years (logarithm of minimum angle of resolution 0.43±0.4 vs 0.72±0.8 for Ex-PRESS vs trabeculectomy, p=0.11). When excluding patients who underwent reoperation VA was better in the Ex-PRESS group at 1, 2 and 3 years. There were no complications after the first year in either group. We found no difference in success rates, mean IOP or other secondary outcomes between Ex-PRESS and trabeculectomy after 3 years of follow-up. NCT01263561; post results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  18. A Comparative Study of Nurses as Case Manager and Telephone Follow-up on Clinical Outcomes of Patients with Severe Mental Illness

    PubMed Central

    Malakouti, Seyed Kazem; Nojomi, Marzieh; Mirabzadeh, Arash; Mottaghipour, Yasaman; Zahiroddin, Alireza; Kangrani, Hamed Mohammadi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Providing community-based mental health services is crucial and is an agreed plan between the Iranian Mental Health Office and the Regional Committee for the Eastern Mediterranean (affiliated with WHO). The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of home-visit clinical case-management services on the hospitalization rate and other clinical outcomes in patients with severe mental illness. Methods: A total of 182 patients were randomly allocated into three groups, namely, home-visit (n=60), telephone follow-up (n=61) and as-usual care (n=61) groups. Trained nurses as clinical case-managers provided home-visit services and the telephone follow-up tasks. Hospitalization rate as a measure of recurrence, as well as burden, knowledge, general health condition of caregivers with positive/negative symptoms, satisfaction, quality of life, and social skills of the consumers were assessed as the main and secondary outcomes, respectively. Results: Most clinical variables were improved in both intervention groups compared with the control group. During the one year follow-up, the rate of rehospitalization for the telephone follow-up and as-usual groups were respectively 1.5 and 2.5 times higher than the home-visit group. Conclusion: Trained clinical case-managers are capable of providing continuous care services to patients with severe mental illness. The telephone follow-up services could also have beneficiary outcome for the consumers, their caregivers, and the health system network. PMID:26722141

  19. A Facebook Follow-Up Strategy for Rural Drug-Using Women.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Megan F; Staton-Tindall, Michele; Smith, Kirsten E; Leukefeld, Carl; Webster, J Matthew; Oser, Carrie B

    2017-06-01

    Facebook (FB) use has grown exponentially over the past decade, including in rural areas. Despite its popularity, FB has been underutilized as a research follow-up approach to maintain contact with research participants and may have advantages in less densely populated areas and among more hard-to-reach, at-risk groups. The overall goal of this study was to examine FB as a supplemental follow-up approach to other follow-up strategies with rural drug-using women. Face-to-face interviews were conducted with randomly selected women who completed baseline interviews in 3 rural jails in 1 state. Analyses focus on participants who were released from jail and were eligible for 3-month follow-up (n = 284). Bivariate analyses were used to examine differences between FB users and nonusers, and multivariate logistic regression models examined predictors of 3-month follow-up participation and being located for follow-up using FB. About two-thirds (64.4%) of participants were regular FB users. Bivariate analyses indicated that FB users were younger, more educated, and more likely to have used alcohol in the 30 days before incarceration but less likely to have a chronic health problem. Regression analyses indicated that rural FB users had more than 5 times the odds of being located for the 3-month follow-up interview, even after controlling for other variables. There were no significant predictors of being followed up using FB. Findings suggest that FB is widely used and well accepted among rural drug-using women. Among hard-to-reach populations, including those in rural, geographically isolated regions, FB serves as a method to improve participant follow-up. © 2016 National Rural Health Association.

  20. Post-discharge follow-up visits and hospital utilization by Medicare patients, 2007-2010.

    PubMed

    DeLia, Derek; Tong, Jian; Gaboda, Dorothy; Casalino, Lawrence P

    2014-01-01

    Document trends in time to post-discharge follow-up visit for Medicare patients with an index admission for heart failure (HF), acute myocardial infarction (AMI), or community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Determine factors predicting whether the first post-discharge utilization event is a follow-up visit, treat-and-release emergency department (ED) visit, or readmission. Using Medicare claims data from 2007-2010, we plotted annual cumulative incidence functions for the time frame post-discharge to follow-up visit, accounting for competing risks with censoring at 30 days. We used multinomial probit regression to determine factors predicting the probability of first-occurring post-discharge utilization events within 30 days. For each cohort, the cumulative incidence of follow-up visits increased during the study period. For example, in 2010, 54.6% of HF patients had a follow-up visit within 10 days of discharge compared to 47.9% in 2007. Within each cohort, the largest increase in follow-up visits took place between 2008 and 2009. Follow-up visits were less likely for patients who were Black, Hispanic, and enrolled in Medicaid or Medicare Advantage, and they were more likely for patients with greater comorbidities and prior procedures as well as those with private or supplemental Medicare coverage. There were no changes in 30-day readmission rates. Although increases in follow-up visits may have been influenced by the introduction of publicly reported readmission rates in 2009, these increases did not continue in 2010 and were not associated with a change in readmissions. Patients who were Black, Hispanic, and/or enrolled in Medicaid or Medicare Advantage were less likely to have follow-up visits.

  1. Compliance with follow-up after cataract surgery in rural China.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guofu; Crooms, Rita; Chen, Qianyun; Congdon, Nathan; He, Mingguang

    2012-04-01

    To evaluate reasons for non-compliance with post-cataract surgical follow-up in rural China, and assess the impact of incentives on improving compliance. Patients having undergone cataract surgery more than 3 months previously at cataract surgery training hospitals in Guangdong were invited by telephone and advertisements to a hospital-based study examination, with compensation for travel costs (US$7). Information on prior post-surgical follow up was collected by questionnaire at the hospital or by telephone. Logistic regression was used to assess predictors of post-operative attendance with or without compensation. Among 518 eligible patients, 426 (82.2%) underwent interviews and 342 (66.0%) attended the compensated study examination. Ninety nine participants (23.2%) reported previously returning for uncompensated follow-up ≥ 3 months post-operatively, and 225 (52.8%) had returned for any prior post-operative examination. Uncompensated follow-up at ≥ 3 months was associated with higher income (P = 0.037), and recalling instruction by a doctor to follow-up (P = 0.001), while age, gender, travel cost, and post-operative satisfaction and vision were not associated. Younger (P = 0.002) patients and those reporting being instructed to follow up (P = 0.008) were more likely to return for the compensated research examination. Among all interviewed subjects, only 170 (39.9%) reported knowing they were to return to hospital. Modest compensation, advertisements and telephone contact can increase medium-term follow-up rates after cataract surgery by three-fold. Better communication of specific targets for follow-up may improve follow-up compliance.

  2. Obesity, Gynecological Factors, and Abnormal Mammography Follow-Up in Minority and Medically Underserved Women

    PubMed Central

    Wujcik, Debra; Lin, Jin-Mann S.; Grau, Ana; Wilson, Veronica; Champion, Victoria; Zheng, Wei; Egan, Kathleen M.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The relationship between obesity and screening mammography adherence has been examined previously, yet few studies have investigated obesity as a potential mediator of timely follow-up of abnormal (Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System [BIRADS-0]) mammography results in minority and medically underserved patients. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 35 women who did not return for follow-up >6 months from index abnormal mammography and 41 who returned for follow-up ≤6 months in Nashville, Tennessee. Patients with a BIRADS-0 mammography event in 2003–2004 were identified by chart review. Breast cancer risk factors were collected by telephone interview. Multivariate logistic regression was performed on selected factors with return for diagnostic follow-up. Results Obesity and gynecological history were significant predictors of abnormal mammography resolution. A significantly higher frequency of obese women delayed return for mammography resolution compared with nonobese women (64.7% vs. 35.3%). A greater number of hysterectomized women returned for diagnostic follow-up compared with their counterparts without a hysterectomy (77.8% vs. 22.2%). Obese patients were more likely to delay follow-up >6 months (adjusted OR 4.09, p = 0.02). Conversely, hysterectomized women were significantly more likely to return for timely mammography follow-up ≤6 months (adjusted OR 7.95, p = 0.007). Conclusions Study results suggest that weight status and gynecological history influence patients' decisions to participate in mammography follow-up studies. Strategies are necessary to reduce weight-related barriers to mammography follow-up in the healthcare system including provider training related to mammography screening of obese women. PMID:19558307

  3. Is Follow-Up Testing with the FilmArray Gastrointestinal Multiplex PCR Panel Necessary?

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sholhui; Hitchcock, Matthew M.; Gomez, Carlos A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The FilmArray gastrointestinal (GI) panel (BioFire Diagnostics, Salt Lake City, UT) is a simple, sample-to-answer, on-demand, multiplex, nucleic acid amplification test for syndromic diagnosis of infectious gastroenteritis. The aim of this study was to measure the yield of follow-up testing with FilmArray GI panel within 4 weeks of an initial test. Consecutive adult and pediatric patients tested at an academic institution between August 2015 and June 2016 were included in this study. Of 145 follow-up tests in 106 unique patients with an initial negative result, 134 (92.4%) tests and 98 (92.5%) patients remained negative upon follow-up testing. Excluding targets that are not reported at this institution (Clostridium difficile, enteroaggregative Escherichia coli, enteropathogenic E. coli, and enterotoxigenic E. coli), 137 (94.5%) follow-up tests and 101 (95.3%) patients remained negative. Weekly conversion rates were not significantly different across the 4-week follow-up interval. No epidemiological or clinical factors were significantly associated with a negative to positive conversion. Of 80 follow-up tests in patients with an initial positive result, 43 (53.8%) remained positive for the same target, 34 (42.5%) were negative, and 3 were positive for a different target (3.8%). Follow-up testing with FilmArray GI panel within 4 weeks of a negative result rarely changed the initial result, and the follow-up test reverted to negative less than half the time after an initial positive result. In the absence of clinical or epidemiological evidence for a new infection, follow-up testing should be limited and FilmArray GI panel should not be used as a test of cure. PMID:28122874

  4. HIS-Based Support of Follow-Up Documentation – Concept and Implementation for Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Herzberg, S.; Fritz, F.; Rahbar, K.; Stegger, L.; Schäfers, M.; Dugas, M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Follow-up data must be collected according to the protocol of each clinical study, i.e. at certain time points. Missing follow-up information is a critical problem and may impede or bias the analysis of study data and result in delays. Moreover, additional patient recruitment may be necessary due to incomplete follow-up data. Current electronic data capture (EDC) systems in clinical studies are usually separated from hospital information systems (HIS) and therefore can provide limited functionality to support clinical workflow. In two case studies, we assessed the feasibility of HIS-based support of follow-up documentation. Methods We have developed a data model and a HIS-based workflow to provide follow-up forms according to clinical study protocols. If a follow-up form was due, a database procedure created a follow-up event which was translated by a communication server into an HL7 message and transferred to the import interface of the clinical information system (CIS). This procedure generated the required follow-up form and enqueued a link to it in a work list of the relating study nurses and study physicians, respectively. Results A HIS-based follow-up system automatically generated follow-up forms as defined by a clinical study protocol. These forms were scheduled into work lists of study nurses and study physicians. This system was integrated into the clinical workflow of two clinical studies. In a study from nuclear medicine, each scenario from the test concept according to the protocol of the single photon emission computer tomography/computer tomography (SPECT/CT) study was simulated and each scenario passed the test. For a study in psychiatry, 128 follow-up forms were automatically generated within 27 weeks, on average five forms per week (maximum 12, minimum 1 form per week). Conclusion HIS-based support of follow-up documentation in clinical studies is technically feasible and can support compliance with study protocols. PMID:23616857

  5. Effectiveness of Transitional and Follow-Up Programmes to Community Integration of Young Adults with Intellectual Disabilities (YAWID) in Kiambu County, Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makanya, Margaret W.; Runo, Mary; Wawire, Violet

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how vocational education and transitional services offered in vocational institutions helped young adults with intellectual disabilities (YAWID) attain full community integration. The study objectives included investigate the effectiveness of transitional services and follow-up programs towards aiding…

  6. Interpretable Topic Features for Post-ICU Mortality Prediction.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yen-Fu; Rumshisky, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Electronic health records provide valuable resources for understanding the correlation between various diseases and mortality. The analysis of post-discharge mortality is critical for healthcare professionals to follow up potential causes of death after a patient is discharged from the hospital and give prompt treatment. Moreover, it may reduce the cost derived from readmissions and improve the quality of healthcare. Our work focused on post-discharge ICU mortality prediction. In addition to features derived from physiological measurements, we incorporated ICD-9-CM hierarchy into Bayesian topic model learning and extracted topic features from medical notes. We achieved highest AUCs of 0.835 and 0.829 for 30-day and 6-month post-discharge mortality prediction using baseline and topic proportions derived from Labeled-LDA. Moreover, our work emphasized the interpretability of topic features derived from topic model which may facilitates the understanding and investigation of the complexity between mortality and diseases.

  7. The Practice of Respect in the ICU.

    PubMed

    Brown, Samuel M; Azoulay, Elie; Benoit, Dominique; Butler, Terri Payne; Folcarelli, Patricia; Geller, Gail; Rozenblum, Ronen; Sands, Ken; Sokol-Hessner, Lauge; Talmor, Daniel; Turner, Kathleen; Howell, Michael D

    2018-06-01

    Although "respect" and "dignity" are intuitive concepts, little formal work has addressed their systematic application in the ICU setting. After convening a multidisciplinary group of relevant experts, we undertook a review of relevant literature and collaborative discussions focused on the practice of respect in the ICU. We report the output of this process, including a summary of current knowledge, a conceptual framework, and a research program for understanding and improving the practice of respect and dignity in the ICU. We separate our report into findings and proposals. Findings include the following: 1) dignity and respect are interrelated; 2) ICU patients and families are vulnerable to disrespect; 3) violations of respect and dignity appear to be common in the ICU and overlap substantially with dehumanization; 4) disrespect may be associated with both primary and secondary harms; and 5) systemic barriers complicate understanding and the reliable practice of respect in the ICU. Proposals include: 1) initiating and/or expanding a field of research on the practice of respect in the ICU; 2) treating "failures of respect" as analogous to patient safety events and using existing quality and safety mechanisms for improvement; and 3) identifying both benefits and potential unintended consequences of efforts to improve the practice of respect. Respect and dignity are important considerations in the ICU, even as substantial additional research remains to be done.

  8. Hercules Inc Hattiesburg, Mississippi Forest County NOV Response Follow-up

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Letter dated June 9, 2009 from Ashland Water Technologies to Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality about a notice of violation Hercules, Inc Hattiesburg Forest County NOV response follow-up.

  9. Notification: Follow-up on a Framework for Developing Tribal Capacity

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Project #OA-FY12-0333, March 1, 2012. We plan to follow-up on the 2008 report Framework for Developing Tribal Capacity Needed in the Indian General Assistance Program. and the Agency’s corrective actions.

  10. Breast Cancer and the Environment on Long Island Follow-up Study

    Cancer.gov

    A follow-up study on women with breast cancer who participated in the parent population-based case-control study of Long Island women to determine whether environmental and other lifestyle factors influence breast cancer survival.

  11. Early Primary Care Provider Follow-up and Readmission After High-Risk Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Brooke, Benjamin S.; Stone, David H.; Cronenwett, Jack L.; Nolan, Brian; DeMartino, Randall R.; MacKenzie, Todd A.; Goodman, David C.; Goodney, Philip P.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Follow-up with a primary care provider (PCP) in addition to the surgical team is routinely recommended to patients discharged after major surgery despite no clear evidence that it improves outcomes. OBJECTIVE To test whether PCP follow-up is associated with lower 30-day readmission rates after open thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) repair and ventral hernia repair (VHR), surgical procedures known to have a high and low risk of readmission, respectively. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS In a cohort of Medicare beneficiaries discharged to home after open TAA repair (n = 12 679) and VHR (n = 52 807) between 2003 to 2010, we compared 30-day readmission rates between patients seen and not seen by a PCP within 30 days of discharge and across tertiles of regional primary care use. We stratified our analysis by the presence of complications during the surgical (index) admission. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Thirty-day readmission rate. RESULTS Overall, 2619 patients (20.6%) undergoing open TAA repair and 4927 patients (9.3%) undergoing VHR were readmitted within 30 days after surgery. Complications occurred in 4649 patients (36.6%) undergoing open TAA repair and 4528 patients (8.6%) undergoing VHR during their surgical admission. Early follow-up with a PCP significantly reduced the risk of readmission among open TAA patients who experienced perioperative complications, from 35.0% (without follow-up) to 20.4% (with follow-up) (P < .001). However, PCP follow-up made no significant difference in patients whose hospital course was uncomplicated (19.4% with follow-up vs 21.9% without follow-up; P = .31). In comparison, early follow-up with a PCP after VHR did not reduce the risk of readmission, regardless of complications. In adjusted regional analyses, undergoing open TAA repair in regions with high compared with low primary care use was associated with an 18% lower likelihood of 30-day readmission (odds ratio, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.71–0.96; P = .02), whereas no significant

  12. Planning for Long-Term Follow-Up: Strategies Learned from Longitudinal Studies.

    PubMed

    Hill, Karl G; Woodward, Danielle; Woelfel, Tiffany; Hawkins, J David; Green, Sara

    2016-10-01

    Preventive interventions are often designed and tested with the immediate program period in mind, and little thought that the intervention sample might be followed up for years or even decades beyond the initial trial. However, depending on the type of intervention and the nature of the outcomes, long-term follow-up may well be appropriate. The advantages of long-term follow-up of preventive interventions are discussed and include the capacity to examine program effects across multiple later life outcomes, the ability to examine the etiological processes involved in the development of the outcomes of interest, and the ability to provide more concrete estimates of the relative benefits and costs of an intervention. In addition, researchers have identified potential methodological risks of long-term follow-up such as inflation of type 1 error through post hoc selection of outcomes, selection bias, and problems stemming from attrition over time. The present paper presents a set of seven recommendations for the design or evaluation of studies for potential long-term follow-up organized under four areas: Intervention Logic Model, Developmental Theory and Measurement Issues; Design for Retention; Dealing with Missing Data; and Unique Considerations for Intervention Studies. These recommendations include conceptual considerations in the design of a study, pragmatic concerns in the design and implementation of the data collection for long-term follow-up, as well as criteria to be considered for the evaluation of an existing intervention for potential for long-term follow-up. Concrete examples from existing intervention studies that have been followed up over the long term are provided.

  13. Text messaging research participants as a follow-up strategy to decrease emergency department study attrition.

    PubMed

    Varner, Catherine; McLeod, Shelley; Nahiddi, Negine; Borgundvaag, Bjug

    2018-01-01

    Collecting patient-reported follow-up data for prospective studies in the emergency department (ED) is challenging in this minimal continuity setting. The objective of this study was to determine whether text messaging study participants involved in an ongoing randomized trial resulted in a lower rate of attrition as compared to conventional telephone follow-up. This was a nested cohort analysis of research participants enrolled in a randomized controlled trial assessing head injury discharge instructions. During the first 4 months of study follow-up, participants were contacted by a conventional telephone call. For the final 3 months, participants were contacted by text messaging following the first failed telephone attempt. A total of 118 patients were enrolled in the study (78 underwent conventional follow-up, and 40 received text messages). During the period of conventional follow-up, 3 participants withdrew from the study. Of the remaining 75 participants, 24 (32.0%) at 2 weeks and 32 (42.7%) at 4 weeks were unable to be contacted. Of the 40 participants receiving a reminder text message, 4 (10.0%) at 2 weeks and 10 (25.0%) at 4 weeks were unable to be contacted. Overall, text messaging study participants decreased attrition by 22% (95% CI: 5.9%, 34.7%) and 17.7% (95% CI: -0.8%, 33.3%) at 2- and 4-week follow-ups, respectively. In this ED cohort participating in a randomized trial, text message reminders of upcoming telephone follow-up interviews decreased the rate of attrition. Text messaging is a viable, low-cost communication strategy that can improve follow-up participation in prospective research studies.

  14. Recorded interactive seminars and follow-up discussions as an effective method for distance learning.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kenneth T; Hannum, Wallace M; Proffit, William R

    2011-03-01

    Previous studies have suggested that, although orthodontic residents prefer to be live and interactive in a seminar, they learn almost as much when watching a previously recorded interactive seminar and following up with live discussion. Our objective was to test the effectiveness and acceptability of using previously recorded interactive seminars and different types of live follow-up discussions. Residents at schools participating from a distance completed preseminar readings and at their convenience watched streaming video of some or all recordings of 4 interactive seminar sequences consisting of 6 seminars each. Afterward, distant residents participated in 1 of 4 types of interaction: local follow-up discussion, videoconference, teleconference, and no discussion. The effectiveness of the seminar sequences was tested by pretest and posttest scores. Acceptability was evaluated from ratings of aspects of the seminar and discussion experience. Open-ended questions allowed residents to express what they liked and to suggest changes in their experiences. In each seminar sequence, test scores of schools participating through recordings and follow-up discussions improved more than those participating live and interactive. After viewing, residents preferred local follow-up discussion, which was not statistically different from participating live and interactive both locally and from a distance. Videoconference and teleconference discussions were both more acceptable to residents than no follow-up discussion, which was found to be significantly below all methods tested. When residents are live and interactive in a seminar, there does not appear to be a significant difference between being local vs at a distance. Recorded interactive seminars with follow-up discussions are also an effective and acceptable method of distance learning. Residents preferred local follow-up discussion, but, at a distance, they preferred videoconference to both teleconference and no discussion

  15. The value of gynecologic cancer follow-up: evidence-based ignorance?

    PubMed

    Lajer, Henrik; Jensen, Mette B; Kilsmark, Jannie; Albæk, Jens; Svane, Danny; Mirza, Mansoor R; Geertsen, Poul F; Reerman, Diana; Hansen, Kåre; Milter, Maya C; Mogensen, Ole

    2010-11-01

    To explore the extent of evidence-based data and cost-utility of follow-up after primary treatment of endometrial and ovarian cancer, addressing perspectives of technology, organization, economics, and patients. Systematic literature searches according to the recommendations of the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions were conducted separately for each of the 4 perspectives. In addition, the organizational analysis included a nationwide questionnaire survey among all relevant hospital departments, and the operating costs were calculated. None of the identified studies supported a survival benefit from hospital-based follow-up after completion of primary treatment of endometrial or ovarian cancer. The methods for follow-up were of low technology (gynecologic examination with or without ultrasound examination). Other technologies had poor sensitivity and specificity in detecting recurrence. Small changes in applied technologies and organization lead to substantial changes in costs. Substantial differences especially in frequency and applied methods were found between departments. The literature review did not find evidence that follow-up affects the women's quality of life. The main purpose of follow-up after treatment of cancer is improved survival. Our review of the literature showed no evidence of a positive effect on survival in women followed up after primary treatment of endometrial or ovarian cancer. The conception of follow-up among physicians, patients, and their relatives therefore needs revision. Follow-up after treatment should have a clearly defined and evidence-based purpose. Based on the existing literature, this purpose should presently focus on other end points rather than early detection of relapse and improved survival. These end points could be quality of life, treatment toxicity, and economy.

  16. Planning for Long-Term Follow-up: Strategies Learned from Longitudinal Studies

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Karl G.; Woodward, Danielle; Woelfel, Tiffany; Hawkins, J. David; Green, Sara

    2017-01-01

    Preventive interventions are often designed and tested with the immediate program period in mind, and little thought that the intervention sample might be followed up for years, or even decades beyond the initial trial. However, depending on the type of intervention and the nature of the outcomes, long-term follow-up may well be appropriate. The advantages of long-term follow-up of preventive interventions are discussed, and include the capacity to examine program effects across multiple later life outcomes, the ability to examine the etiological processes involved in the development of the outcomes of interest and the ability to provide more concrete estimates of the relative benefits and costs of an intervention. In addition, researchers have identified potential methodological risks of long-term follow-up such as inflation of type 1 error through post-hoc selection of outcomes, selection bias and problems stemming from attrition over time. The present paper presents a set of seven recommendations for the design or evaluation of studies for potential long-term follow-up organized under four areas: Intervention Logic Model, Developmental Theory and Measurement Issues; Design for Retention; Dealing with Missing Data; and Unique Considerations for Intervention Studies. These recommendations include conceptual considerations in the design of a study, pragmatic concerns in the design and implementation of the data collection for long-term follow-up, as well as criteria to be considered for the evaluation of an existing intervention for potential for long-term follow-up. Concrete examples from existing intervention studies that have been followed up over the long-term are provided. PMID:26453453

  17. Optimizing Bariatric Surgery Multidisciplinary Follow-up: a Focus on Patient-Centered Care.

    PubMed

    Aarts, Mary-Anne; Sivapalan, Nardhana; Nikzad, Seyed-Ehsan; Serodio, Kristin; Sockalingam, Sanjeev; Conn, Lesley Gotlib

    2017-03-01

    Failure to follow-up post-bariatric surgery has been associated with higher postoperative complications, lower percentage weight loss and poorer nutrition. This study aimed to understand the patient follow-up experience in order to optimize follow-up care within a comprehensive bariatric surgery program. Qualitative telephone interviews were conducted in patients who underwent surgery through a publically funded multidisciplinary bariatric surgery program in 2011, in Ontario, Canada. Inductive thematic analysis was used. Of the 46 patients interviewed, 76.1 % were female, mean age was 50, and 10 were lost to follow-up within 1 year postsurgery. Therapeutic continuity was the most important element of follow-up care identified by patients and was most frequently established with the dietician, as this team member was highly sought and accessible. Patients who attended regularly (1) appreciated the specialized care, (2) favoured ongoing monitoring and support, (3) were committed to the program and (4) felt their family doctor had insufficient experience/knowledge to manage their follow-up care. Of the 36 people who attended the clinic regularly, 8 were not planning to return after 2 years due to (1) perceived diminishing usefulness, (2) system issues, (3) confidence that their family physician could continue their care or (4) higher priority personal/health issues. Patients lost to follow-up stated similar barriers. Patients believe the follow-up post-bariatric surgery is essential in providing the support required to maintain their diet and health. More personalized care focusing on continuity and relationships catering to individual patient needs balanced with local healthcare resources may redefine and reduce attrition rates.

  18. Compliance with recommendations for tympanostomy tube follow-up: patient characteristics.

    PubMed

    Kao, Richard; Kirse, Daniel J; Evans, Adele K

    2014-09-01

    (1) To determine the percentage of otherwise healthy patients achieving "graduation," or postoperative compliance achieving complete problem resolution and discharge from the otolaryngologist's care, after tympanostomy tube placement. (2) To analyze follow-up behaviors and patient characteristics influencing the likelihood of graduation. Retrospective cohort study. Tertiary care hospital. Analysis of details of tympanostomy tube placements performed from 2004 to 2011 by 2 pediatric otolaryngologists for children aged 0 to 18 years. Exclusion criteria were clearly defined craniofacial anomalies, cleft palates, and other ongoing postoperative care. The remaining study subjects were categorized into 3 groups. Graduation (GRAD) subjects achieved discharge from care with "follow-up pro re nata" status. LOST<2Y subjects had not attended scheduled follow-up in <2 years. LOST≥2Y subjects had no follow-up in ≥2 years. A total of 1454 pediatric subjects were included. GRADs constituted only 25.6% of the subject pool; 22.1% were LOST<2Y, and 52.3% were LOST≥2Y. Statistically significant factors in achieving graduation were total number of follow-up visits, total duration of follow-up, compliance with first postoperative visit, patient age, insurance type, and distance between home and practice. Rate of graduation, or postoperative compliance achieving complete problem resolution, of otherwise healthy tympanostomy tube patients is low despite perioperative discussions of the importance of proper follow-up. Higher graduation rates are associated with increasing number of follow-up visits and duration, younger patient age, private insurance, and proximity to the practice. Compliance with attending the first postoperative visit may be an early marker for increased likelihood of graduation. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2014.

  19. Laboratory guidelines for the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with monoclonal gammopathies.

    PubMed

    Bravo García-Morato, M; Padilla-Merlano, B; Nozal, P; Espiño, M; Juárez, C; Villar, L M; López-Trascasa, M

    2016-04-01

    We present guidelines from the Immunochemistry group of the Spanish Society for Immunology that are designed to provide a practical tool for the diagnosis and follow-up of monoclonal gammopathies. We review the clinical and analytical features of various monoclonal gammopathies, international consensus guidelines and techniques used to detect and follow-up monoclonal components. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  20. [Clinical and social characteristics of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis registered as follow-up group 2].

    PubMed

    Khudushina, T A; Maslakova, M G

    1997-01-01

    The paper analyzes the examination of 240 patients with alleviating pulmonary tuberculosis (follow-up group 2) and provides clinical and social characteristics of this group of patients who had poor social factors, such as a social behaviour, alcoholism, unemployment, etc. Ninety one patients had various concomitant visceral diseases. During treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis, most patients developed profound residual changes. This all requires more thorough follow-up while performing seasonal drug regimens and other prophylactic measures in Group 2 patients.

  1. Transarterial onyx embolization of cranial dural arteriovenous fistulas: long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Chandra, R V; Leslie-Mazwi, T M; Mehta, B P; Yoo, A J; Rabinov, J D; Pryor, J C; Hirsch, J A; Nogueira, R G

    2014-09-01

    Endovascular therapy with liquid embolic agents is a common treatment strategy for cranial dural arteriovenous fistulas. This study evaluated the long-term effectiveness of transarterial Onyx as the single embolic agent for curative embolization of noncavernous cranial dural arteriovenous fistulas. We performed a retrospective review of 40 consecutive patients with 41 cranial dural arteriovenous fistulas treated between March 2006 and June 2012 by using transarterial Onyx embolization with intent to cure. The mean age was 57 years; one-third presented with intracranial hemorrhage. Most (85%) had cortical venous drainage. Once angiographic cure was achieved, long-term treatment effectiveness was assessed with DSA and clinical follow-up. Forty-nine embolization sessions were performed; 85% of cranial dural arteriovenous fistulas were treated in a single session. The immediate angiographic cure rate was 95%. The permanent neurologic complication rate was 2% (mild facial palsy). Thirty-five of the 38 patients with initial cure underwent short-term follow-up DSA (median, 4 months). The short-term recurrence rate was only 6% (2/35). All patients with occlusion at short-term DSA undergoing long-term DSA (median, 28 months) had durable occlusion. No patient with long-term clinical follow-up (total, 117 patient-years; median, 45 months) experienced hemorrhage. Transarterial embolization with Onyx as the single embolic agent results in durable long-term cure of noncavernous cranial dural arteriovenous fistulas. Recurrence rates are low on short-term follow-up, and all patients with angiographic occlusion on short-term DSA follow-up have experienced a durable long-term cure. Thus, angiographic cure should be defined at short-term follow-up angiography instead of at the end of the final embolization session. Finally, long-term DSA follow-up may not be necessary if occlusion is demonstrated on short-term angiographic follow-up. © 2014 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  2. What Happens Next? Follow-Up from the Children's Toddler School Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akshoomoff, Natacha; Stahmer, Aubyn C.; Corsello, Christina; Mahrer, Nicole E.

    2010-01-01

    This study was a follow-up of a group of 29 children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders at age 2 who attended an inclusive toddler program until age 3. Children ranged in age from 4 to 12 years at the time of the parent survey and follow-up testing. The majority of children were placed in a special education (noninclusive) preschool class,…

  3. Annual Trends in Follow-Up Visits for Pediatric Concussion in Emergency Departments and Physicians' Offices.

    PubMed

    Fridman, Liraz; Scolnik, Michal; Macpherson, Alison; Rothman, Linda; Guttmann, Astrid; Grool, Anne M; Rodriguez Duque, Daniel; Zemek, Roger L

    2018-01-01

    To assess whether children and youth with concussion receive follow-up visits in accordance with the recommended guidelines. We conducted a retrospective, population-based study using linked health administrative data from all concussion-related visits to emergency department and physician offices by children aged 5 through 18 years (range, 5.00-18.99) in Ontario between 2003 and 2013. We analyzed the percentage of children and youth seen for follow-up. The Mann-Kendall test for trends was used to assess a monotonic increasing trend over time in concussion follow-up visits. A total of 126 654 children and youth were evaluated for an index concussion visit. The number of children and youth assessed for concussion follow-up (N = 45 155) has increased significantly over time (P < .001). In 2003, 781 of 7126 patients (11.0%; 95% CI, 10.3-11.7) with an index visit for concussion had a follow-up assessment. By 2013, 6526 of 21 681 (30.1%; 95% CI, 29.5-30.7) patients received follow-up care. The proportion of children and youth receiving follow-up after an acute concussion has significantly increased between 2003 and 2013. Nevertheless, more than two-thirds of all patients do not seek medical follow-up or clearance as recommended by current concussion guidelines, suggesting that ongoing efforts to improve and monitor compliance with recommended guidelines by patients and physicians are important. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Rationale and design of the health economics evaluation registry for remote follow-up: TARIFF.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Renato P; D'Onofrio, Antonio; Padeletti, Luigi; Sagone, Antonio; Vicentini, Alfredo; Vincenti, Antonio; Morichelli, Loredana; Cavallaro, Ciro; Ricciardi, Giuseppe; Lombardi, Leonida; Fusco, Antonio; Rovaris, Giovanni; Silvestri, Paolo; Guidotto, Tiziana; Pollastrelli, Annalisa; Santini, Massimo

    2012-11-01

    The aims of the study are to develop a cost-minimization analysis from the hospital perspective and a cost-effectiveness analysis from the third payer standpoint, based on direct estimates of costs and QOL associated with remote follow-ups, using Merlin@home and Merlin.net, compared with standard ambulatory follow-ups, in the management of ICD and CRT-D recipients. Remote monitoring systems can replace ambulatory follow-ups, sparing human and economic resources, and increasing patient safety. TARIFF is a prospective, controlled, observational study aimed at measuring the direct and indirect costs and quality of life (QOL) of all participants by a 1-year economic evaluation. A detailed set of hospitalized and ambulatory healthcare costs and losses of productivity that could be directly influenced by the different means of follow-ups will be collected. The study consists of two phases, each including 100 patients, to measure the economic resources consumed during the first phase, associated with standard ambulatory follow-ups, vs. the second phase, associated with remote follow-ups. Remote monitoring systems enable caregivers to better ensure patient safety and the healthcare to limit costs. TARIFF will allow defining the economic value of remote ICD follow-ups for Italian hospitals, third payers, and patients. The TARIFF study, based on a cost-minimization analysis, directly comparing remote follow-up with standard ambulatory visits, will validate the cost effectiveness of the Merlin.net technology, and define a proper reimbursement schedule applicable for the Italian healthcare system. NCT01075516.

  5. Electronic Detection of Delayed Test Result Follow-Up in Patients with Hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Ashley N D; Murphy, Daniel R; Al-Mutairi, Aymer; Sittig, Dean F; Wei, Li; Russo, Elise; Singh, Hardeep

    2017-07-01

    Delays in following up abnormal test results are a common problem in outpatient settings. Surveillance systems that use trigger tools to identify delayed follow-up can help reduce missed opportunities in care. To develop and test an electronic health record (EHR)-based trigger algorithm to identify instances of delayed follow-up of abnormal thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) results in patients being treated for hypothyroidism. We developed an algorithm using structured EHR data to identify patients with hypothyroidism who had delayed follow-up (>60 days) after an abnormal TSH. We then retrospectively applied the algorithm to a large EHR data warehouse within the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), on patient records from two large VA networks for the period from January 1, 2011, to December 31, 2011. Identified records were reviewed to confirm the presence of delays in follow-up. During the study period, 645,555 patients were seen in the outpatient setting within the two networks. Of 293,554 patients with at least one TSH test result, the trigger identified 1250 patients on treatment for hypothyroidism with elevated TSH. Of these patients, 271 were flagged as potentially having delayed follow-up of their test result. Chart reviews confirmed delays in 163 of the 271 flagged patients (PPV = 60.1%). An automated trigger algorithm applied to records in a large EHR data warehouse identified patients with hypothyroidism with potential delays in thyroid function test results follow-up. Future prospective application of the TSH trigger algorithm can be used by clinical teams as a surveillance and quality improvement technique to monitor and improve follow-up.

  6. Online follow-up after total hip replacement: a first case

    PubMed Central

    Dexter, Caroline; Bradley, Benjamin; Williams, Daniel H

    2013-01-01

    With the current challenging financial climate in the NHS there is an increasing drive to reduce the number of postoperative follow-up appointments. We report on a patient who has successfully used a new online platform, www.myclinicaloutcomes.co.uk, to record condition-specific and generic wellbeing scores following total hip replacement. This case highlights the potential for remote follow-up of routine postoperative patients. PMID:23396931

  7. Follow-up: who does it and how do they do it?

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, J M; Carraccio, C L

    1994-12-01

    Follow-up appointments and phone contact after discharge are important components of the emergency department (ED) encounter. We surveyed ED directors at hospitals with accredited pediatric residency programs to determine mechanisms for follow-up 1) to chart progression of illness (POI), 2) for positive laboratory or x-ray results, and 3) for specific illness such as child abuse, burns, and complex wounds. One hundred thirty-five of 207 program directors responded (65%). To follow POI, 54% of EDs use the ED itself, and 59% send patients to community physicians. Of those that use community physicians, 24% do not notify the physician to expect a follow-up visit, and 27% do not send a copy of the ED chart to a physician's office. To follow POI, 20% of EDs have no formal mechanism for telephone follow-up. Sixteen percent keep no record of phone contact. For follow-up of positive laboratory tests or x-rays, results are better; only 4 and 5%, respectively, do not keep records of phone contact. Eleven percent of EDs have no mechanism for follow-up of child abuse. Mechanisms for follow-up of children seen in the ED are variable. We have identified deficiencies in the following areas: 1) lack of communication with the physician to provide follow-up, 2) lack of documentation regarding subsequent patient contacts for POI and positive test results, and 3) lack of resources to follow victims of child abuse. These deficiencies have potential implications regarding optimal patient outcome.

  8. Nonoperative management of blunt renal trauma: Is routine early follow-up imaging necessary?

    PubMed Central

    Malcolm, John B; Derweesh, Ithaar H; Mehrazin, Reza; DiBlasio, Christopher J; Vance, David D; Joshi, Salil; Wake, Robert W; Gold, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Background There is no consensus on the role of routine follow-up imaging during nonoperative management of blunt renal trauma. We reviewed our experience with nonoperative management of blunt renal injuries in order to evaluate the utility of routine early follow-up imaging. Methods We reviewed all cases of blunt renal injury admitted for nonoperative management at our institution between 1/2002 and 1/2006. Data were compiled from chart review, and clinical outcomes were correlated with CT imaging results. Results 207 patients were identified (210 renal units). American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST) grades I, II, III, IV, and V were assigned to 35 (16%), 66 (31%), 81 (39%), 26 (13%), and 2 (1%) renal units, respectively. 177 (84%) renal units underwent routine follow-up imaging 24–48 hours after admission. In three cases of grade IV renal injury, a ureteral stent was placed after serial imaging demonstrated persistent extravasation. In no other cases did follow-up imaging independently alter clinical management. There were no urologic complications among cases for which follow-up imaging was not obtained. Conclusion Routine follow-up imaging is unnecessary for blunt renal injuries of grades I-III. Grade IV renovascular injuries can be followed clinically without routine early follow-up imaging, but urine extravasation necessitates serial imaging to guide management decisions. The volume of grade V renal injuries in this study is not sufficient to support or contest the need for routine follow-up imaging. PMID:18768088

  9. Follow-up after telephone consultations at out-of-hours primary care.

    PubMed

    Huibers, Linda; Koetsenruijter, Jan; Grol, Richard; Giesen, Paul; Wensing, Michel

    2013-01-01

    After a contact with a primary care physician (PCP) cooperative for out-of-hours care, many patients have subsequent contact with health care. Little is known about the factors associated with these follow-up contacts. The objective of this study was to examine whether patient experiences with nurse telephone consultations and the cooperative's organizational characteristics were associated with the probability of follow-up contact. We conducted a cross-sectional study of patients attending 16 Dutch PCP cooperatives (2009 to 2011) using a validated questionnaire to measure patient experiences with nurse telephone consultations and patient-reported follow-up. Participating cooperatives provided information on 12 organizational characteristics. Multilevel regression modeling was used to identify associations. A total of 7039 patients returned a questionnaire (50.4%), of which 5678 were complete. About half of patients reported a follow-up contact (47%). Regression analyses showed increasing probability of follow-up contact in patients with higher age (≥65 years; odds ratio [OR], 2.39), patients receiving a home visit (OR, 1.32), and cooperatives with a higher percentage of telephone consultations (OR, 1.02) and a decreased probability among patients with more positive experiences with a nurse via telephone contact (OR, 0.68). Although follow-up contacts can be medically required, a substantial number of contacts seem to be not required and thus are potentially avoidable (eg, by changes in work routine and communication).

  10. Effects of enterostomal nurse telephone follow-up on postoperative adjustment of discharged colostomy patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun-e; Wong, Frances Kam Yuet; You, Li-ming; Zheng, Mei-chun; Li, Qiong; Zhang, Bing-yan; Huang, Man-rong; Ye, Xin-Mei; Liang, Ming-juan; Liu, Jin-ling

    2013-01-01

    People with a new colostomy encounter many difficulties as they struggle to adjust to their ostomies. Nurse telephone follow-up is a convenient way to ensure continuity of care. There is a paucity of studies testing if nurse telephone follow-up can enhance adjustment of postdischarged colostomy patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of enterostomal nurse telephone follow-up on the adjustment levels of discharged colostomy patients. This was a randomized controlled trial. Participants (n = 103) who had undergone colostomy operations in China were recruited and randomly assigned to the study or control group. Both the study and control groups received routine discharge care, whereas the study group received 2-3 nurse telephone calls in the follow-up period. The outcome measures included Ostomy Adjustment Scale, Stoma Self-efficacy Scale, satisfaction with care, and stoma complications. Results of this study indicated that participants in the study group had significantly better ostomy adjustment, higher stoma self-efficacy, higher satisfaction with care, and less stoma complications compared with those in the control group. This study provided evidence to support that enterostomal nurse telephone follow-up can improve patient ostomy adjustment level and other related outcomes. Nurse telephone follow-up is an effective intervention to support the adjustment of stoma patients after hospital discharge.

  11. Behavior Problems and Psychiatric Diagnoses in Girls with Gender Identity Disorder: A Follow-Up Study.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Kelley D; Bradley, Susan J; Peterson-Badali, Michele; VanderLaan, Doug P; Zucker, Kenneth J

    2018-02-17

    This study evaluated the presence of clinical range behavior problems and psychiatric diagnoses in 25 girls referred for gender identity disorder (GID) in childhood (mean age: 8.88 years) at the time of follow-up in adolescence or adulthood (mean age: 23.2 years). At follow-up, three (12%) of the girls were judged to have persistent GID based on DSM-IV criteria. With regard to behavior problems at follow-up, 39.1% of the girls had a clinical range score on either the Child Behavior Checklist or Adult Behavior Checklist as rated by their mothers, and 33.3% had a clinical range score on either the Youth Self-Report or the Adult Self-Report. On either the Diagnostic Interview for Children and Adolescents or the Diagnostic Interview Schedule, the girls had, on average, 2.67 diagnoses (range: 0-10); 46% met criteria for three or more diagnoses. From the childhood assessment, five variables were significantly associated with a composite Psychopathology Index (PI) at follow-up: a lower IQ, living in a non-two-parent or reconstituted family, a composite behavior problem index, and poor peer relations. At follow-up, degree of concurrent homoeroticism and a composite index of gender dysphoria were both associated with the composite PI. Girls with GID show a psychiatric vulnerability at the time of follow-up in late adolescence or adulthood, although there was considerable variation in their general well-being.

  12. Radiology-led Follow-up System for IVC Filters: Effects on Retrieval Rates and Times

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, L.; Taylor, J.; Munneke, G.

    Purpose: Successful IVC filter retrieval rates fall with time. Serious complications have been reported following attempts to remove filters after 3-18 months. Failed retrieval may be associated with adverse clinical sequelae. This study explored whether retrieval rates are improved if interventional radiologists organize patient follow-up, rather than relying on the referring clinicians. Methods: Proactive follow-up of patients who undergo filter placement was implemented in May 2008. At the time of filter placement, a report was issued to the referring consultant notifying them of the advised timeframe for filter retrieval. Clinicians were contacted to arrange retrieval within 30 days. We comparedmore » this with our practice for the preceding year. Results: The numbers of filters inserted during the two time periods was similar, as were the numbers of retrieval attempts and the time scale at which they occurred. The rate of successful retrievals increased but not significantly. The major changes were better documentation of filter types and better clinical follow-up. After the change in practice, only one patient was lost to follow-up compared with six the preceding year. Conclusions: Although there was no significant improvement in retrieval rates, the proactive, radiology-led approach improved follow-up and documentation, ensuring that a clinical decision was made about how long the filter was required and whether retrieval should be attempted and ensuring that patients were not lost to follow-up.« less

  13. Performance of a fail-safe system to follow up abnormal mammograms in primary care.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Ellie; Phillips, Russell S; Weingart, Saul N

    2010-09-01

    Missed and delayed breast cancer diagnoses are major sources of potential harm to patients and medical malpractice liability in the United States. Follow-up of abnormal mammogram results is an essential but challenging component of safe breast care. To explore the value of an inexpensive method to follow up abnormal test results, we examined a paper-based fail-safe system. We examined a fail-safe system used to follow up abnormal mammograms at a primary care practice at an urban teaching hospital. We analyzed all abnormal mammogram reports and clinicians' responses to follow-up reminders. We characterized potential lapses identified in this system and used regression models to identify patient, provider, and test result characteristics associated with such lapses. Clinicians responded to fail-safe reminders for 92% of 948 abnormal mammograms. Clinicians reported that they were unaware of the abnormal result in 8% of cases and that there was no follow-up plan in place for 3% of cases. Clinicians with more years of experience were more likely to be aware of the abnormal result (odds of being unaware per incremental year in practice, 0.92; 95% confidence interval, 0.88-0.97) and were more likely to have a follow-up plan. A paper-based fail-safe system for abnormal mammograms is feasible in a primary care practice. However, special care is warranted to ensure full clinician adherence and address staff transitions and trainee-related issues.

  14. Effects of bioaerosol exposure on respiratory health in compost workers: a 13-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    van Kampen, V; Hoffmeyer, F; Deckert, A; Kendzia, B; Casjens, S; Neumann, H D; Buxtrup, M; Willer, E; Felten, C; Schöneich, R; Brüning, T; Raulf, M; Bünger, J

    2016-12-01

    To determine the risk of German compost workers developing chronic respiratory effects from long-term exposure to bioaerosols. Respiratory health was determined in 74 currently exposed compost workers and 37 non-exposed controls after 13 years of follow-up. In addition, 42 former compost workers (drop-outs) who left their work during the follow-up period were also examined. Respiratory symptoms and working conditions were assessed using identical questionnaires as at baseline. In addition, lung function was measured using the same spirometer as in the initial study. Sera from both surveys were tested for specific IgE and IgG antibodies to moulds and the risk of work-related symptoms was evaluated using regression approaches for prospective studies with binary data. In the follow-up period, the number of participants reporting cough significantly increased in compost workers and drop-outs compared to the controls. Working as a compost worker for at least 5 years increased the relative risk for cough (RR 1.28; 95% CI 1.2 to 1.4) and for cough with phlegm (RR 1.32; 95% CI 1.2 to 1.5). Current and former compost workers had slightly lower predicted percentage of forced expiratory volume in 1 s and predicted percentage of forced vital capacity than controls, but decrease in lung function during follow-up was not different among the 3 groups. In addition, no significant changes could be detected in antibody concentrations. Our results suggest that chronic exposure to bioaerosols in composting plants is related to a significantly higher risk for cough with phlegm, indicating chronic bronchitis. However, compost workers showed no higher incidence of deterioration of pulmonary function over the study. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  15. Patent foramen ovale closure following cryptogenic stroke or transient ischaemic attack: Long-term follow-up of 301 cases.

    PubMed

    Mirzaali, Mikaeil; Dooley, Maureen; Wynne, Dylan; Cooter, Nina; Lee, Lorraine; Haworth, Peter; Saha, Romi; Gainsborough, Nicola; Hildick-Smith, David

    2015-11-15

    Patent foramen ovale has been identified as a conduit for paradoxical embolism resulting in cryptogenic stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). We aimed to establish rates of death, recurrent stroke or TIA among patients undergoing PFO closure for stroke or TIA at our unit. A retrospective analysis of all PFO closure patients was performed between May 2004 and January 2013. Follow up was performed by mortality tracing using the Medical Research Information Service of the Office of National Statistics. With regard to stroke or TIA recurrence, written consent forms and questionnaires were mailed with follow up telephone calls. Medical notes and imaging records were consulted where adverse events were noted. 301 patients aged 48.6 ± 11.0 years, 54.4% male, with ≥1 thromboembolic neurovascular event had percutaneous PFO closure with one of eight devices, with successful implantation in 99% of cases. Follow-up duration was 40.2 ± 26.2 months (range 1.3-105.3); complete in 301 patients for mortality (100%) and 283 patients (94.0%) for neurovascular events. Two patients died during follow-up (respiratory failure n = 1; road traffic accident n = 1). Recurrent stroke (MRI or CT confirmed) was observed in five patients (0.5%; 0.55 per 100 person-years) and TIA in 9 (1.1%; 0.98 per 100 person-years). Atrial fibrillation requiring treatment was documented in 14 patients (1.7%). Percutaneous PFO closure in patients with cryptogenic stroke or TIA is a safe treatment with a low incidence of procedural complications and recurrent neurovascular events. Registry data like these may help to demonstrate the utility of PFO closure in stroke. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Mobile phone-based telemedicine system for the home follow-up of patients undergoing ambulatory surgery.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ramos, Carlos; Cerdán, María Teresa; López, Rodrigo S

    2009-01-01

    A pilot study was done to address the efficacy of a General Packet Radio Service mobile phone-based telemedicine system used to improve follow-up after ambulatory surgery. The method involves sending images of surgical wounds or other areas from the patient's home, to assess local complications and avoid unnecessary hospital visits. Ninety-six (N = 96) patients were enrolled in the study. The phone used was a Nokia 6600, which provides images in Joint Photographic Experts Group format. These images were sent via e-mail and visualized on a standard 17-inch screen of a personal computer. After the follow-up period, self-reported patient satisfaction was assessed by analyzing the replies to a 9-item questionnaire. Thirty of the 96 patients (31.3%) reported local problems including: hematoma in 20 (66.7%) patients, surgical bandage blood-stained in 7 (23.3%), exudates in 1 (3.3%), allergic skin reactions in 1 (3.3%), and bandage too tight in 1 (3.3%). In total, 225 photographs were evaluated by 3 physicians. In all cases, it was possible to identify and assess the postoperative problem with consensus among the 3 physicians. Images served to resolve patients' concerns in 20 individuals (66.7%). In 10 patients (33.3%), concerns were satisfied but it was suggested that follow-up images be sent in the following days. Only 1 patient (3.3%) was asked to visit the hospital. The telemedicine system proposed increases the efficiency of home follow-up to ambulatory surgery, avoids unnecessary hospital visits, and clearly improves patient satisfaction.

  17. Financial cost of social exclusion: follow up study of antisocial children into adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Stephen; Knapp, Martin; Henderson, Juliet; Maughan, Barbara

    2001-01-01

    Objectives To compare the cumulative costs of public services used through to adulthood by individuals with three levels of antisocial behaviour in childhood. Design Costs applied to data of 10 year old children from the inner London longitudinal study selectively followed up to adulthood. Setting Inner London borough. Participants 142 individuals divided into three groups in childhood: no problems, conduct problems, and conduct disorder. Main outcome measures Costs in 1998 prices for public services (excluding private, voluntary agency, indirect, and personal costs) used over and above basic universal provision. Results By age 28, costs for individuals with conduct disorder were 10.0 times higher than for those with no problems (95% confidence interval of bootstrap ratio 3.6 to 20.9) and 3.5 times higher than for those with conduct problems (1.7 to 6.2). Mean individual total costs were £70 019 for the conduct disorder group (bootstrap mean difference from no problem group £62 898; £22 692 to £117 896) and £24 324 (£16 707; £6594 to £28 149) for the conduct problem group, compared with £7423 for the no problem group. In all groups crime incurred the greatest cost, followed by extra educational provision, foster and residential care, and state benefits; health costs were smaller. Parental social class had a relatively small effect on antisocial behaviour, and although substantial independent contributions came from being male, having a low reading age, and attending more than two primary schools, conduct disorder still predicted the greatest cost. Conclusions Antisocial behaviour in childhood is a major predictor of how much an individual will cost society. The cost is large and falls on many agencies, yet few agencies contribute to prevention, which could be cost effective. What is already known on this topicChildren who show substantial antisocial behaviour have poor social functioning as adults and are at high risk of social exclusion

  18. Preparing for LSST with the LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenstreet, Sarah; Lister, Tim; Gomez, Edward

    2016-10-01

    The Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGT) provides an ideal platform for follow-up and characterization of Solar System objects (e.g. asteroids, Kuiper Belt Objects, comets, Near-Earth Objects (NEOs)) and ultimately for the discovery of new objects. The LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network is using the LCOGT telescope network in addition to a web-based system developed to perform prioritized target selection, scheduling, and data reduction to confirm NEO candidates and characterize radar-targeted known NEOs.In order to determine how to maximize our NEO follow-up efforts, we must first define our goals for the LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network. This means answering the following questions. Should we follow-up all objects brighter than some magnitude limit? Should we only focus on the brightest objects or push to the limits of our capabilities by observing the faintest objects we think we can see and risk not finding the objects in our data? Do we (and how do we) prioritize objects somewhere in the middle of our observable magnitude range? If we want to push to faint objects, how do we minimize the amount of data in which the signal-to-noise ratio is too low to see the object? And how do we find a balance between performing follow-up and characterization observations?To help answer these questions, we have developed a LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network simulator that allows us to test our prioritization algorithms for target selection, confirm signal-to-noise predictions, and determine ideal block lengths and exposure times for observing NEO candidates. We will present our results from the simulator and progress on our NEO follow-up efforts.In the era of LSST, developing/utilizing infrastructure, such as the LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network and our web-based platform for selecting, scheduling, and reducing NEO observations, capable of handling the large number of detections expected to be produced on a daily basis by LSST will be critical to follow-up efforts. We hope our

  19. Follow-Up of Abnormal Breast and Colorectal Cancer Screening by Race/Ethnicity.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Anne Marie; Kim, Jane J; Beaber, Elisabeth F; Zheng, Yingye; Burnett-Hartman, Andrea; Chubak, Jessica; Ghai, Nirupa R; McLerran, Dale; Breen, Nancy; Conant, Emily F; Geller, Berta M; Green, Beverly B; Klabunde, Carrie N; Inrig, Stephen; Skinner, Celette Sugg; Quinn, Virginia P; Haas, Jennifer S; Schnall, Mitchell; Rutter, Carolyn M; Barlow, William E; Corley, Douglas A; Armstrong, Katrina; Doubeni, Chyke A

    2016-10-01

    Timely follow-up of abnormal tests is critical to the effectiveness of cancer screening, but may vary by screening test, healthcare system, and sociodemographic group. Timely follow-up of abnormal mammogram and fecal occult blood testing or fecal immunochemical tests (FOBT/FIT) were compared by race/ethnicity using Population-Based Research Optimizing Screening through Personalized Regimens consortium data. Participants were women with an abnormal mammogram (aged 40-75 years) or FOBT/FIT (aged 50-75 years) in 2010-2012. Analyses were performed in 2015. Timely follow-up was defined as colonoscopy ≤3 months following positive FOBT/FIT; additional imaging or biopsy ≤3 months following Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System Category 0, 4, or 5 mammograms; or ≤9 months following Category 3 mammograms. Logistic regression was used to model receipt of timely follow-up adjusting for study site, age, year, insurance, and income. Among 166,602 mammograms, 10.7% were abnormal; among 566,781 FOBT/FITs, 4.3% were abnormal. Nearly 96% of patients with abnormal mammograms received timely follow-up versus 68% with abnormal FOBT/FIT. There was greater variability in receipt of follow-up across healthcare systems for positive FOBT/FIT than for abnormal mammograms. For mammography, black women were less likely than whites to receive timely follow-up (91.8% vs 96.0%, OR=0.71, 95% CI=0.51, 0.97). For FOBT/FIT, Hispanics were more likely than whites to receive timely follow-up than whites (70.0% vs 67.6%, OR=1.12, 95% CI=1.04, 1.21). Timely follow-up among women was more likely for abnormal mammograms than FOBT/FITs, with small variations in follow-up rates by race/ethnicity and larger variation across healthcare systems. Copyright © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. All rights reserved.

  20. Lost to follow-up for appointments in a dedicated dry eye clinic

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Kip Hoe; Yeo, Sharon; Tong, Louis

    2014-01-01

    Objective Dry eye is a prevalent condition with significant socioeconomic burden. This study evaluates the extent and reasons for loss to follow-up (LTF) in a dedicated dry eye clinic. LTF refers to patient who discontinued visits for >2 years. Method The proportion of patients LTF and the demographics in a cohort of dry eye patients (2006 to 2010) were determined. A telephone survey was prospectively conducted for patients who were LTF. Results Of 505 patients, 240 (47.5%) were LTF. Associated demographic factors for LTF were male sex, non-Chinese ethnicity, and age group <30 years old (all P<0.05). The reasons for LTF through the telephone survey (response rate 77.9%) were categorized into three broad groups, stabilized dry eye condition (47%), personal/social factors (25%) and perceived insufficiency of healthcare delivery (28%). Only two (1.1%) were considered as management failures. The younger patients (age <50 years) were more likely to become LTF (P<0.001) due to stabilized dry eye disease, compared to older patients who were more likely to be LTF due to personal/social reasons (P=0.02). Poor communication and service factors under healthcare delivery were found to be higher (P=0.002) in those who visited once before they were LTF (8.5%) compared to those who visited multiple times before they were LTF (0.1%). Conclusion LTF was relatively common in hospital-based dry eye management. Female and older patients were less likely to stop consultation. Stabilized dry eye condition, common in younger patients, was the most common reason for LTF. Elderly patients have difficulty attending clinics due to nonmedical problems, which may require a more holistic approach. PMID:25336929

  1. Treatment and follow up of children with chronic hepatitis C in Albania

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Treatment of Hepatitis C in children has a better outcome than in adults, and for this reason the treatment had different views. However, in pediatric age hepatitis C is seen to have an evolution towards chronicity. Today is a normal option to treat chronic hepatitis C as early as possible according to certain criteria. The aim of this study is to show the results of treatment with interferon and ribavirin and the follow-up of children diagnosed with chronic hepatitis C in our service. Patients and methods This is a prospective study which has included children 3 up to 15 years old (13 boys and 4 girls) diagnosed with chronic hepatitis C. All patients underwent a certain protocol, including liver biopsy prior to treatment. Treatment consisted in use for 48 weeks of INF α-2b, 3 MIU/m2 three times a week s/c and ribavirin 15 mg/kg orally divided bid. Two patients were treated with PEGINF α-2b with dose 1.5 mcg/kg once a week s/c and ribavirin 15 mg/kg. After the treatment all patients have stayed under our control for an average period of 24 weeks. Results At the end of the treatment we detected a patient with HCV-RNA positive. End Treatment Viral Response was 94%. Six months later we found three patients who showed relapse of disease. Sustained Viral Response was approximately 83% Conclusion The combination therapy of interferon with Ribavirin in treatment of children with chronic hepatitis C provides a higher SVR when treatment is initiated at the earliest stages of hepatic changes. Side effects of therapy are insignificant in comparison with results obtained PMID:22244498

  2. Information-seeking behaviour and information needs of LGBTQ health professionals: a follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Morris, Martin; Roberto, K R

    2016-09-01

    Except for one study in 2004, the literature has no data on the information-seeking behaviour of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer/questioning (LGBTQ) health professionals. After a decade of change for LGBTQ people, and the growth of electronic information sources and social networks, it is appropriate to revisit this subject. To gain an updated understanding of the information-seeking behaviour of LGBTQ health professionals and of how medical libraries can provide a culturally competent service to such users. A mixed-methods approach was adopted combining a Web-based questionnaire with email follow-up discussions. One hundred and twenty-three complete responses were received, mostly from the USA and Canada, between November 2012 and October 2013. LGBTQ health professionals remain more comfortable seeking LGBTQ health information from a medical librarian whom they know to be LGBTQ because they perceive LGBTQ librarians as more likely to have specialist knowledge, or through concern that non-LGBTQ librarians may be more likely to react in a stigmatising or discriminatory way. The study also provides evidence suggesting that online chat has marginal appeal for respondents seeking LGBTQ health information, despite its anonymity. Medical libraries seeking to demonstrate their cultural competency should provide visible evidence of this, such as through the creation of dedicated resource lists, promotion of LGBTQ literature on the library's website, and display of other symbols or statements supporting diversity. Opportunities exist for LGBTQ health professionals and medical librarians to work together to ensure that medical libraries are culturally competent and welcoming spaces for LGBTQ patrons, that library collections match their needs, and in the creation of guides to ensure maximum access to the results of LGBTQ health research. Medical libraries should also consider nominating and, if necessary, training a specialist in LGBTQ health information. Such

  3. Protocol for follow up of hip arthroplasty in the long term: effect on revision (WHISTLER study).

    PubMed

    Smith, Lindsay K; Lenguerrand, Erik; Blom, Ashley; Powell, Jane; Palmer, Shea

    2017-12-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is highly successful for reducing pain and improving function, providing health-related quality of life benefit. Demand for THA is increasing with associated increase in revision hip surgery. Hip arthroplasty surveillance (long-term follow up) can identify asymptomatically failing THA to prepare for revision surgery, reducing potential for complications or complexity of surgery. However, it is unknown whether the surveillance of THA can be shown to improve the patient outcomes or reduce costs around revision surgery. With the current need to reduce unnecessary health consultations and to show the economic advantages of any service, the purpose of this study is to consider the relative effectiveness of hip arthroplasty surveillance on revision hip arthroplasty. This is a single-centre, observational study in which consecutive patients undergoing aseptic revision of THA over 12 months in a large orthopaedic unit will be considered for participation. Primary outcome measures will be change in each of three valid patient-reported scores from pre-operatively to 12 months post-surgery. Secondary outcomes will be the costs of treatment calculated using data obtained from the participants' hospital records and a self-report questionnaire. An exploratory approach will be used to investigate the effect of surveillance on the outcomes of interest. A linear mixed method model will be used to study the change in scores between baseline and 12 months. The economic evaluation will be a cost-utility analysis, which compares the value of alternative interventions by attaching costs to the quality-adjusted life years produced by each intervention. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Patients' experiences of an open access follow up arrangement in managing inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, A; Kennedy, A; Nelson, E; Robinson, A

    2004-01-01

    Background: Improving access is a key policy issue in improving quality of care and extending patient choice and participation. People's experience of changing from fixed outpatient appointments to more flexible direct access arrangements for chronic disease has been underexplored. Objectives: To examine patients' views on using an open system of access compared with fixed outpatient appointments as part of a guided self-management intervention for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Design: Embedded qualitative study undertaken alongside a randomised controlled trial. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken to obtain an in depth understanding of patients' experience of the change in access arrangements. Participants: A purposive sample (n = 30) was drawn from the intervention group (n = 700) according to a range of responses to the trial baseline and follow up quantitative measures. Results: 28 interviews were included in the analysis. Compared with the previous system of fixed appointments, preference for the new open access system was based on enhanced personal control in contacting services and the view that it fitted better with everyday routine management and the requirement for urgent medical contact when symptoms fail to respond to medication. Preference for retaining fixed appointments was based on a sense of security from gaining access which did not require the individual to initiate the request for medical help. Conclusions: Open access may fit better with patients' self-management of their condition and everyday routines, roles and responsibilities. Ensuring that outpatient organisational arrangements and personnel are responsive to patient initiated requests for appointments is likely to impact on the acceptability of this type of access arrangement. Some people may continue to prefer the fixed appointment system which should be retained if patient choice is to be respected. PMID:15465941

  5. Health correlates of workplace bullying: a 3-wave prospective follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Bonde, Jens Peter; Gullander, Maria; Hansen, Åse Marie; Grynderup, Matias; Persson, Roger; Hogh, Annie; Willert, Morten Vejs; Kaerlev, Linda; Rugulies, Reiner; Kolstad, Henrik A

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the course of workplace bullying and health correlates among Danish employees across a four-year period. In total, 7502 public service and private sector employees participated in a 3-wave study from 2006 through 2011. Workplace bullying over the past 6-12 months and data on health characteristics were obtained by self-reports. We identified major depression using Schedules for Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry interviews and the Major Depression Inventory. We performed cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses of outcomes according to self-labelled bullying at baseline using logistic regression. Reports of bullying were persistent across four years in 22.2% (57/257) of employees who initially reported bullying. Baseline associations between self-labelled bullying and sick-listing, poor self-rated health, poor sleep, and depressive symptoms were significant with adjusted odds ratios (OR) ranging from 1.8 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.5-2.4] for poor sleep quality among those bullied "now and then" to 6.9 (95% CI 3.9-12.3) for depression among those reporting being bullied on a daily to monthly basis. In longitudinal analyses adjusting for bullying during follow-up, all health correlates except poor sleep quality persisted up to four years. Self-reported health correlates of workplace bullying including sick-listing, poor self-rated health, depressive symptoms, and a diagnosis of depression tend to persist for several years regardless of whether bullying is discontinued or not. Independent measures of bullying and outcomes are needed to learn whether these findings reflect long lasting health consequences of workplace bullying or whether self-labelled workplace bullying and health complaints are correlated because of common underlying factors.

  6. Occupational lifting and rhegmatogenous retinal detachment: a follow-up study of Swedish conscripts.

    PubMed

    Farioli, Andrea; Kriebel, David; Mattioli, Stefano; Kjellberg, Katarina; Hemmingsson, Tomas

    2017-07-01

    To investigate the association between occupational lifting and the risk of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) using data from a large population of men. We used data from a national cohort of 49 321 Swedish men conscripted for compulsory military service in 1969-1970. We collected information on surgically treated RRD from the National Patient Register and we followed up the cohort between 1991 and 2009 at ages 40-60 years. Exposure to occupational lifting was assessed by applying a job exposure matrix to occupational data from the 1990 census. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and 95% CIs were estimated through Poisson regression models adjusted by degree of myopia, income and education level. We observed 217 cases of RRD in 7 80 166 person-years. In univariate analyses we did not observe an association between occupational lifting and RRD. However, after adjustment for myopia and socioeconomic factors, we found an increased risk of RRD (IRR 2.38, 95% CI 1.15 to 4.93) for subjects in the highest category of exposure compared with those in the lowest one. The incidence rate of RRD among subjects lifting heavy loads at least twice per week, aged between 50 years and 59 years, and affected by severe myopia was as high as 7.9 cases per 1000 person-years, compared with an overall rate of 0.28. Our study supports the hypothesis that heavy occupational lifting is a risk factor for RRD. Information on myopia degree and socioeconomic status is necessary when studying the association between occupational lifting and RRD. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  7. Vaccine financing and billing in practices serving adult patients: A follow-up survey.

    PubMed

    Lindley, Megan C; Hurley, Laura P; Beaty, Brenda L; Allison, Mandy A; Crane, Lori A; Brtnikova, Michaela; Snow, Megan; Bridges, Carolyn B; Kempe, Allison

    2018-02-14

    Financial concerns are often cited by physicians as a barrier to administering routinely recommended vaccines to adults. The purpose of this study was to assess perceived payments and profit from administering recommended adult vaccines and vaccine purchasing practices among general internal medicine (GIM) and family medicine (FM) practices in the United States. We conducted an interviewer-administered survey from January-June 2014 of practices stratified by specialty (FM or GIM), affiliation (standalone or ≥ 2 practice sites), and level of financial decision-making (independent or larger system level) in FM and GIM practices that responded to a previous survey on adult vaccine financing and provided contact information for follow-up. Practice personnel identified as knowledgeable about vaccine financing and billing responded to questions about payments relative to vaccine purchase price and payment for vaccine administration, perceived profit on vaccination, claim denial, and utilization of various purchasing strategies for private vaccine stocks. Survey items on payment and perceived profit were assessed for various public and private payer types. Descriptive statistics were calculated and responses compared by physician specialty, practice affiliation, and level of financial decision-making. Of 242 practices approached, 43% (n = 104) completed the survey. Reported payment levels and perceived profit varied by payer type. Only for preferred provider organizations did a plurality of respondents report profiting on adult vaccination services. Over half of respondents reported losing money vaccinating adult Medicaid beneficiaries. One-quarter to one-third of respondents reported not knowing about Medicare Part D payment levels for vaccine purchase and vaccine administration, respectively. Few respondents reported negotiating with manufacturers or insurance plans on vaccine purchase prices or payments for vaccination. Practices vaccinating adults may

  8. A comparative survey of missed initial and follow-up appointments to psychiatric specialties in the United kingdom.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Alex J; Selmes, Thomas

    2007-06-01

    Missed appointments are common in psychiatry. Nonattendance at the initial appointment may have different prognostic significance than nonattendance at subsequent appointments. This study examined the frequency of missed appointments among 9,511 initial outpatient appointments and 7,700 follow-up appointments across ten psychiatric subspecialties in a publicly funded mental health service in the United Kingdom. The pooled missed appointment rate was 15.9%, higher than in previous studies on primary and secondary care attendance in the United Kingdom. Nonattendance was lowest on Fridays, in winter months, and in geriatric psychiatry and highest for substance abuse services and in community psychiatry. In most services, attendance improved after the initial appointment, but in psychosomatic medicine and geriatric psychiatry this pattern was reversed. There was a low rate of missed appointments in geriatric psychiatry, rehabilitation psychiatry, cognitive-behavioral therapy, and psychosocial medicine. A high nonattendance rate was found among persons with drug and alcohol difficulties and to a lesser extent in general adult psychiatry. Future studies should consider initial and follow-up appointments as distinct.

  9. Post-trial follow-up methodology in large randomized controlled trials: a systematic review protocol.

    PubMed

    Llewellyn-Bennett, Rebecca; Bowman, Louise; Bulbulia, Richard

    2016-12-15

    Clinical trials typically have a relatively short follow-up period, and may both underestimate potential benefits of treatments investigated, and fail to detect hazards, which can take much longer to emerge. Prolonged follow-up of trial participants after the end of the scheduled trial period can provide important information on both efficacy and safety outcomes. This protocol describes a systematic review to qualitatively compare methods of post-trial follow-up used in large randomized controlled trials. A systematic search of electronic databases and clinical trial registries will use a predefined search strategy. All large (more than 1000 adult participants) randomized controlled trials will be evaluated. Two reviewers will screen and extract data according to this protocol with the aim of 95% concordance of papers checked and discrepancies will be resolved by a third reviewer. Trial methods, participant retention rates and prevalence of missing data will be recorded and compared. The potential for bias will be evaluated using the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool (applied to the methods used during the in-trial period) with the aim of investigating whether the quality of the post-trial follow-up methodology might be predicted by the quality of the methods used for the original trial. Post-trial follow-up can provide valuable information about the long-term benefits and hazards of medical interventions. However, it can be logistically challenging and costly. The aim of this systematic review is to describe how trial participants have been followed-up post-trial in order to inform future post-trial follow-up designs. Not applicable for PROSPERO registration.

  10. Angiographic follow-up of infants and children undergoing percutaneous carotid artery interventions.

    PubMed

    Ligon, R Allen; Kim, Dennis W; Vincent, Robert N; Bauser-Heaton, Holly D; Ooi, Yinn K; Petit, Christopher J

    2018-01-23

    The purpose of this study was to review the outcomes following the percutaneous carotid arterial (PCA) approach in infants and children with congenital heart disease. PCA access is becoming more commonly adopted following reports demonstrating it is a safe alternative to surgical carotid cutdown and even the femoral arterial route. However, follow-up outcomes after PCA remain unreported. We reviewed all cases with PCA access and follow-up catheterizations which included carotid artery (CA) angiography between May 2012 until December 2016. We examined for evidence of CA stenosis at follow-up angiography and assessed any other CA complications associated with vascular access. There were 61 PCA catheterizations performed in 55 unique patients. Follow-up CA imaging with angiography was available in 43 patients (78%, 43/55). There was no vessel stenosis nor lumen irregularity in 28 (65%) patients. In 15 cases (35%), there was a mild degree of irregularity or narrowing by angiography (median 4.1%, range 2.3%-12.5%). Nine patients underwent repeat PCA catheterizations. Seven of these had no visible vascular stenosis on follow-up angiographic imaging, including a patient who was accessed three separate times from the CA. No statistically significant risk factors for developing mild CA stenosis were identified. PCA access for pediatric interventional catheterization appears to be safe with a very low rate of mild stenosis, and very few complications. Follow-up outcomes in our series are excellent, with a CA patency rate of 100%, even after multiple procedures. Mild CA stenosis was not associated with patient size or sheath introducer caliber. While the acute results from percutaneous CA catheterization have proven safe in recent literature, longer-term outcomes remain unreported. At our institution, the outcomes following percutaneous carotid access are associated with an excellent patency rate of 100%, even after multiple procedures on the same vessel. A low incidence of

  11. [LONG TERM FOLLOW-UP OF TRANSCATHETER SELF EXPANDABLE AORTIC VALVE IMPLANTATION].

    PubMed

    Chen, Shmuel; Zenios, Vicky; Gilon, Dan; Planer, David; Beeri, Ronen; Lotan, Chaim; Danenberg, Haim D

    2018-03-01

    Aortic stenosis is the most common significant valvular disease in the western world. These patients are treated operatively unless they are at high operative risk or inoperable. During the last decade an alternative approach has evolved - transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). This method was shown to be at least as effective and safe as the operative one. However, very little data exists on long term follow-up (5 years and above), especially regarding valve durability and patient survival. To present a long term follow-up on patients who underwent transcutaneous self-expandable aortic valve implantation in our department between the years 2008-2011. In September 2008 the first CoreValve implantation was performed in Israel at Hadassah Medical Center. All records of patients who were transplanted between 9.2008 and 10.2011 were reviewed. The function of the valve early after the procedure was compared to its function at the end of the follow-up period. A total of 38 patients (out of 71) survived at least 54 months, of them, 19 have an echocardiography examination at the end of the follow-up period. In all patients the implanted valve was found to function well at the end of the follow-up period, without significant stenosis or paravalvular leak. In fact, in approximately half of these patients, the degree of paravalvular leak decreased during the follow-up period. On long term (5 years) follow-up of patients who were implanted with the self-expandable aortic valve (CoreValve), no deterioration of the valve was observed. In fact, in approximately half of the patients, a decrease in the severity of the paravalvular leak was demonstrated.

  12. Use of imaging during symptomatic follow-up after resection of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Groot, Vincent P; Daamen, Lois A; Hagendoorn, Jeroen; Borel Rinkes, Inne H M; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; Molenaar, I Quintus

    2018-01-01

    Controversy exists whether follow-up after resection of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) should include standardized imaging for the detection of disease recurrence. The purpose of this study was to evaluate how often patients undergo imaging in a setting where routine imaging is not performed. Secondly, the pattern, timing, and treatment of recurrent PDAC were assessed. This was a post hoc analysis of a prospective database of all consecutive patients undergoing pancreatic resection of PDAC between January 2011 and January 2015. Data on imaging procedures during follow-up, recurrence location, and treatment for recurrence were extracted and analyzed. Associations between clinical characteristics and post-recurrence survival were assessed with the log-rank test and Cox univariable and multivariable proportional hazards models. A total of 85 patients were included. Seventy-four patients (87%) underwent imaging procedures during follow-up at least once, with a mean amount of 3.1 ± 1.9 imaging procedures during the entire follow-up period. Sixty-eight patients (80%) were diagnosed with recurrence, 58 (85%) of whom after the manifestation of clinical symptoms. Additional tumor-specific treatment was administered in 17 of 68 patients (25%) with recurrence. Patients with isolated local recurrence, treatment after recurrence, and a recurrence-free survival >10 mo had longer post-recurrence survival. Even though a symptomatic follow-up strategy does not include routine imaging, the majority of patients with resected PDAC underwent additional imaging procedures during their follow-up period. Further prospective studies are needed to determine the actual clinical value, psychosocial implications, and cost-effectiveness of different forms of follow-up after resection of PDAC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Assessing factors for loss to follow-up of HIV infected patients in Guinea-Bissau.

    PubMed

    Nordentoft, Pernille Bejer; Engell-Sørensen, Thomas; Jespersen, Sanne; Correia, Faustino Gomes; Medina, Candida; da Silva Té, David; Østergaard, Lars; Laursen, Alex Lund; Wejse, Christian; Hønge, Bo Langhoff

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study was to ascertain vital status of patients considered lost to follow-up at an HIV clinic in Guinea-Bissau, and describe reasons for loss to follow-up (LTFU). This study was a cross-sectional sample of a prospective cohort, carried out between May 15, 2013, and January 31, 2014. Patients lost to follow-up, who lived within the area of the Bandim Health Project, a demographic surveillance site (DSS), were eligible for inclusion. Active follow-up was attempted by telephone and tracing by a field assistant. Semi-structured interviews were done face to face or by phone by a field assistant and patients were asked why they had not shown up for the scheduled appointment. Patients were included by date of HIV testing and risk factors for LTFU were assessed using Cox proportional hazard model. Among 561 patients (69.5 % HIV-1, 18.0 % HIV-2 and 12.6 % HIV-1/2) living within the DSS, 292 patients had been lost to follow-up and were, therefore, eligible for active follow-up. Vital status was ascertained in 65.9 % of eligible patients and 42.7 % were alive, while 23.2 % had died. Information on reasons for LTFU existed for 103 patients. Major reasons were moving (29.1 %), travelling (17.5 %), and transferring to other clinics (11.7 %). A large proportion of the patients at the clinic were lost to follow-up. The main reason for this was found to be the geographic mobility of the population in Guinea-Bissau.

  14. Genealogical databases as a tool for extending follow-up in clinical reviews.

    PubMed

    Ho, Thuy-Van; Chowdhury, Naweed; Kandl, Christopher; Hoover, Cindy; Robinson, Ann; Hoover, Larry

    2016-08-01

    Long-term follow-up in clinical reviews often presents significant difficulty with conventional medical records alone. Publicly accessible genealogical databases such as Ancestry.com provide another avenue for obtaining extended follow-up and added outcome information. No previous studies have described the use of genealogical databases in the follow-up of individual patients. Ancestry.com, the largest genealogical database in the United States, houses extensive demographic data on an increasing number of Americans. In a recent retrospective review of esthesioneuroblastoma patients treated at our institution, we used this resource to ascertain the outcomes of patients otherwise lost to follow-up. Additional information such as quality of life and supplemental treatments the patient may have received at home was obtained through direct contact with living relatives. The use of Ancestry.com resulted in a 25% increase (20 months) in follow-up duration as well as incorporation of an additional 7 patients in our study (18%) who would otherwise not have had adequate hospital chart data for inclusion. Many patients within this subset had more advanced disease or were remotely located from our institution. As such, exclusion of these outliers can impact the quality of subsequent outcome analysis. Online genealogical databases provide a unique resource of public information that is acceptable to institutional review boards for patient follow-up in clinical reviews. Utilization of Ancestry.com data led to significant improvement in follow-up duration and increased the number of patients with sufficient data that could be included in our retrospective study. © 2016 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  15. The minimum follow-up required for radial head arthroplasty: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Laumonerie, P; Reina, N; Kerezoudis, P; Declaux, S; Tibbo, M E; Bonnevialle, N; Mansat, P

    2017-12-01

    The primary aim of this study was to define the standard minimum follow-up required to produce a reliable estimate of the rate of re-operation after radial head arthroplasty (RHA). The secondary objective was to define the leading reasons for re-operation. Four electronic databases, between January 2000 and March 2017 were searched. Articles reporting reasons for re-operation (Group I) and results (Group II) after RHA were included. In Group I, a meta-analysis was performed to obtain the standard minimum follow-up, the mean time to re-operation and the reason for failure. In Group II, the minimum follow-up for each study was compared with the standard minimum follow-up. A total of 40 studies were analysed: three were Group I and included 80 implants and 37 were Group II and included 1192 implants. In Group I, the mean time to re-operation was 1.37 years (0 to 11.25), the standard minimum follow-up was 3.25 years; painful loosening was the main indication for re-operation. In Group II, 33 Group II articles (89.2%) reported a minimum follow-up of < 3.25 years. The literature does not provide a reliable estimate of the rate of re-operation after RHA. The reproducibility of results would be improved by using a minimum follow-up of three years combined with a consensus of the definition of the reasons for failure after RHA. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:1561-70. ©2017 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  16. Inter-Physician Variation in Follow-Up Colonoscopies after Screening Colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Stock, Christian; Hoffmeister, Michael; Birkner, Berndt; Brenner, Hermann

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Surveillance is an integral part of the colorectal cancer (CRC) screening process. We aimed to investigate inter-physician variation in follow-up procedures after screening colonoscopy in an opportunistic CRC screening program. Methods A historical cohort study in the German statutory health insurance system was conducted. 55,301 individuals who underwent screening colonoscopy in 2006 in Bavaria, Germany, and who were not diagnosed with CRC were included. Utilization of follow-up colonoscopies performed by the same physician (328 physicians overall) within 3 years was ascertained. Mixed effects logistic regression modelling was used to assess the effect of physicians and other potential predictors (screening result, age group, and sex) on re-utilization of colonoscopy. Physicians were grouped into quintiles according to individual effects estimated in a preliminary model. Predicted probabilities of follow-up colonoscopy by screening result and physician group were calculated. Results The observed rate of follow-up colonoscopy was 6.2% (95% confidence interval: 5.9-6.4%), 18.6% (17.8-19.4%), and 37.0% (35.5-38.4%) after negative colonoscopy, low-risk adenoma and high-risk adenoma detection, respectively. All considered predictors were statistically significantly associated with follow-up colonoscopy. The predicted probabilities of follow-up colonoscopy ranged from 1.7% (1.4-2.0%) to 11.0% (10.2-11.7%), from 7.3% (6.2-8.5%) to 35.1% (32.6-37.7%), and from 17.9% (15.5-20.6%) to 56.9% (53.5-60.3%) in the 1st quintile (lowest rates of follow-up) and 5th quintile (highest rates of follow-up) of physicians after negative colonoscopy, low-risk adenoma and high-risk adenoma detection, respectively. Conclusions This study suggests substantial inter-physician variation in follow-up habits after screening colonoscopy. Interventions, including organizational changes in CRC screening should be considered to reduce this variation. PMID:23874941

  17. A national follow-up survey of UK graduates opinion of undergraduate oral surgery teaching.

    PubMed

    Macluskey, M; Shepherd, S; Carter, E; Bulsara, Y; Durham, J A; Bell, A; Dargue, A; Emanuel, C; Freeman, C; Jones, J; Khawaja, N; Leeson, R; Marley, J; Andiappan, M; Millsopp, L; Nayyer, N; Renton, T; Taylor, K; Thomson, P; Toedtling, V

    2016-08-01

    A national follow-up survey was undertaken to determine whether dental graduates from 2009 perceived that their undergraduate oral surgery education had equipped them for general dental practice 4 years after graduating. Graduates from the same 13 United Kingdom dental schools who had taken part in the original survey were invited to take part in this follow-up online survey. Their contact details were identified via the general dental council register, social media and alumni groups. In total, 161 responded (2009b) which represents 16% of the graduates of the original survey in 2009a. A similar percentage of these respondents perceived that the teaching in oral surgery had given them sufficient knowledge to undertake independent practice (83% and 79% in 2009a and 2009b, respectively). Most respondents (99% in both years) reported confidence in undertaking simple forceps exodontia. Confidence in surgical exodontia was poor in both surveys, but one area that appeared improved in the follow-up related to the sectioning of teeth (84% in 2009b compared with 49% in 2009a). Areas of weakness identified in 2009 were reported to be improved in the follow-up. This follow-up survey supports the findings of the original survey. Future longitudinal studies would allow institutions to identify possible weaknesses in their curriculum and to track the career development of their graduates and facilitate robust data collection. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Long-term follow-up of patients with Bartter syndrome type I and II.

    PubMed

    Puricelli, Elena; Bettinelli, Alberto; Borsa, Nicolò; Sironi, Francesca; Mattiello, Camilla; Tammaro, Fabiana; Tedeschi, Silvana; Bianchetti, Mario G

    2010-09-01

    Little information is available on a long-term follow-up in Bartter syndrome type I and II. Clinical presentation, treatment and long-term follow-up (5.0-21, median 11 years) were evaluated in 15 Italian patients with homozygous (n = 7) or compound heterozygous (n = 8) mutations in the SLC12A1 (n = 10) or KCNJ1 (n = 5) genes. Thirteen new mutations were identified. The 15 children were born pre-term with a normal for gestational age body weight. Medical treatment at the last follow-up control included supplementation with potassium in 13, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents in 12 and gastroprotective drugs in five patients. At last follow-up, body weight and height were within normal ranges in the patients. Glomerular filtration rate was <90 mL/min/1.73 m(2) in four patients (one of them with a pathologically increased urinary protein excretion). In three patients, abdominal ultrasound detected gallstones. The group of patients with antenatal Bartter syndrome had a lower renin ratio (P < 0.05) and a higher standard deviation score (SDS) for height (P < 0.05) than a previously studied group of patients with classical Bartter syndrome. Patients with Bartter syndrome type I and II tend to present a satisfactory prognosis after a median follow-up of more than 10 years. Gallstones might represent a new complication of antenatal Bartter syndrome.

  19. Caffeine use and dependence in adolescents: one-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Oberstar, Joel V; Bernstein, Gail A; Thuras, Paul D

    2002-01-01

    The objectives were to conduct a 1-year follow-up of daily caffeine-using adolescents to further describe caffeine dependence symptoms and to determine whether caffeine dependence is associated with other substance dependence disorders. Twenty-one of 36 (58.3%) adolescents who participated in a study of caffeine dependence returned for follow-up. The previous study was a case series of adolescents who consumed caffeine daily and met some Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (fourth edition) substance dependence criteria as applied to caffeine. At follow-up, caffeine consumption from beverages was 179.9 +/- 151.8 mg/day. Of the 21 teenagers, 23.8% (n = 5) met criteria for caffeine dependence. Four of these participants developed caffeine dependence during the follow-up period. Other substance dependence disorders were not overrepresented in the caffeine dependent group compared to the caffeine nondependent group. The most commonly reported withdrawal symptoms in dependent teenagers (at baseline and follow-up combined) were feeling drowsy/tired, fatigued, or sluggish/slowed down (83.3% each) and headache (75.0%). Caffeine dependence occurs in some adolescents who drink caffeine daily and is marked by symptoms similar to those found in adults.

  20. Perspectives on Pap Test Follow Up Care Among Rural Appalachian Women

    PubMed Central

    Schoenberg, Nancy; Baltisberger, Julie; Bardach, Shoshana; Dignan, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Approximately one to three quarters of women notified of abnormal Pap test results do not receive appropriate follow up care, dramatically elevating their risk for invasive cervical cancer (ICC). We explored barriers to/facilitators of follow up care for women in two counties in Appalachian Kentucky, where ICC incidence and mortality are significantly higher than the national average. In-depth interviews were conducted among 27 Appalachian women and seven local health department personnel. Those who had been told of an atypical Pap test result tended to have one of three reactions; (1) not alarmed and generally did not obtain follow-up care; (2) alarmed and obtained follow up care; or (3) alarmed, but did not obtain care. Each of these typologies appeared to be shaped by a differing set of three categories of influences: personal factors; procedure/provider/system factors; and ecological/community factors. Recommendations to increase appropriate follow up care included pursuing research on explanations for these typologies and developing tailored interventions specific to women in each of the response types. PMID:20981638

  1. Follow-up brain imaging of 37 children with congenital Zika syndrome: case series study

    PubMed Central

    Aragao, Maria de Fatima Vasco; van der Linden, Vanessa; Parizel, Paul; Jungmann, Patricia; Araújo, Luziany; Abath, Marília; Fernandes, Andrezza; Brainer-Lima, Alessandra; Holanda, Arthur; Mello, Roberto; Sar