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Sample records for icu follow-up services

  1. What patients think about ICU follow-up services: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Prinjha, Suman; Field, Kate; Rowan, Kathy

    2009-01-01

    Introduction UK policy recommendations advocate the use of intensive care unit (ICU) follow-up services to help detect and treat patients' physical and emotional problems after hospital discharge and as a means of service evaluation. This study explores patients' perceptions and experiences of these services. Methods Thirty-four former ICU patients were recruited throughout the UK, using maximum variation sampling to achieve as broad a range of experiences of the ICU as possible. Participants were interviewed at home by a qualitative researcher unconnected to their hospital care. Interviews were recorded and transcribed for analysis. We report a qualitative thematic analysis of patients' experiences of ICU follow up. Results Former patients said they valued ICU follow-up services, which had made an important contribution to their physical, emotional and psychological recovery in terms of continuity of care, receiving information, gaining expert reassurance and giving feedback to ICU staff. Continuity of care included having tests and being monitored, referrals to other specialists and ICU follow-up appointments soon after hospital discharge. Information about physical, emotional and psychological recovery was particularly important to patients, as was information that helped them make sense of their ICU experience. Those without access to ICU follow-up care often felt abandoned or disappointed because they had no opportunity to be monitored, referred or get more information. Conclusions Former patients value having ICU follow-up services but many found that their healthcare needs were unmet because hospitals were unable to provide the aftercare they required. Most participants were aware of the financial constraints on the health system. Although they valued ICU follow-up care, they did not want it to continue indefinitely, with many of them declining appointment invitations when they themselves felt they no longer needed them. PMID:19338653

  2. What patients think about ICU follow-up services: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Prinjha, Suman; Field, Kate; Rowan, Kathy

    2009-01-01

    UK policy recommendations advocate the use of intensive care unit (ICU) follow-up services to help detect and treat patients' physical and emotional problems after hospital discharge and as a means of service evaluation. This study explores patients' perceptions and experiences of these services. Thirty-four former ICU patients were recruited throughout the UK, using maximum variation sampling to achieve as broad a range of experiences of the ICU as possible. Participants were interviewed at home by a qualitative researcher unconnected to their hospital care. Interviews were recorded and transcribed for analysis. We report a qualitative thematic analysis of patients' experiences of ICU follow up. Former patients said they valued ICU follow-up services, which had made an important contribution to their physical, emotional and psychological recovery in terms of continuity of care, receiving information, gaining expert reassurance and giving feedback to ICU staff. Continuity of care included having tests and being monitored, referrals to other specialists and ICU follow-up appointments soon after hospital discharge. Information about physical, emotional and psychological recovery was particularly important to patients, as was information that helped them make sense of their ICU experience. Those without access to ICU follow-up care often felt abandoned or disappointed because they had no opportunity to be monitored, referred or get more information. Former patients value having ICU follow-up services but many found that their healthcare needs were unmet because hospitals were unable to provide the aftercare they required. Most participants were aware of the financial constraints on the health system. Although they valued ICU follow-up care, they did not want it to continue indefinitely, with many of them declining appointment invitations when they themselves felt they no longer needed them.

  3. Integrative review of nurse-led follow-up after discharge from the ICU.

    PubMed

    Jónasdóttir, Rannveig J; Klinke, Marianne E; Jónsdóttir, Helga

    2016-01-01

    To analyse and synthesise the structure, content, types of outcome variables and advantages of nurse-led follow-up of adult patients after discharge from intensive care units. Follow-up service after discharge from the intensive care unit has been suggested as a way of supporting recovery of patients. Nevertheless, varieties exist in the understanding and content of nurse-led follow-up. An integrative review of nurse-led follow-up inspired by the framework of Whittemore and Knafl. An integrative method merged with the recommendations of the PRISMA statement was used to structure the review and findings. Online databases PubMed, CINAHL, ScienceDirect and Scopus were searched from the years 2003-2014. The retrieved articles were independently assessed by two reviewers. Critical appraisal was conducted using check lists from Johanna Briggs Institute. Emerging patterns were validated by all the authors throughout the entire process of analysis. Seventeen papers were included. Three patterns of nurse-led follow-up were identified: (1) Ward visits--in the immediate time after discharge from intensive care unit, (2) Ward visits and appointment(s) to an intensive care unit follow-up clinic and (3) follow-up visit to an intensive care unit and phone call(s) after discharge. Content of short-term nurse-led follow-up (1) ranged from clinical assessment to supporting patients in articulating their subjective health concerns. Long-term nurse-led follow-up (2, 3) included appointments, phone call(s) or information on where advice could be sought. Types of outcome variables were primarily descriptive. There were strong implications for patients' satisfaction with nurse-led follow-up up to six months after discharge. Nurse-led follow-up might promote patients' health and enable use of adequate resources. The findings of this review could be used to design, and test, future interventions and their implementation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Mortality and functional status at one-year of follow-up in elderly patients with prolonged ICU stay.

    PubMed

    Pintado, M C; Villa, P; Luján, J; Trascasa, M; Molina, R; González-García, N; de Pablo, R

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate mortality and functional status at one year of follow-up in patients>75 years of age who survive Intensive Care Unit (ICU) admission of over 14 days. A prospective observational study was carried out. A Spanish medical-surgical ICU. Patients over 75 years of age admitted to the ICU. ICU admission: demographic data, baseline functional status (Barthel index), baseline mental status (Red Cross scale of mental incapacity), severity of illness (APACHE II and SOFA), stay and mortality. One-year follow-up: hospital stay and mortality, functional and mental status, and one-year follow-up mortality. A total of 176 patients were included, of which 22 had a stay of over 14 days. Patients with prolonged stay did not show more ICU mortality than those with a shorter stay in the ICU (40.9% vs 25.3% respectively, P=.12), although their hospital (63.6% vs 33.8%, P<.01) and one-year follow-up mortality were higher (68.2% vs 41.2%, P=.02). Among the survivors, one-year mortality proved similar (87.5% vs 90.6%, P=.57). These patients presented significantly greater impairment of functional status at hospital discharge than the patients with a shorter ICU stay, and this difference persisted after three months. The levels of independence at one-year follow-up were never similar to baseline. No such findings were observed in relation to mental status. Patients over 75 years of age with a ICU stay of more than 14 days have high hospital and one-year follow-up mortality. Patients who survive to hospital admission did not show greater mortality, though their functional dependency was greater. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluating an outreach service for paediatric burns follow up.

    PubMed

    Cubitt, Jonathan J; Chesney, Amy; Brown, Liz; Nguyen, Dai Q

    2015-09-01

    Complications following paediatric burns are well documented and care needs to be taken to ensure the appropriate follow up of these patients. Historically this has meant follow up into adulthood however this is often not necessary. The centralisation of burns services in the UK means that patients and their parents may have to travel significant distances to receive this follow up care. To optimise our burns service we have introduced a burns outreach service to enable the patients to be treated closer to home. The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of the introduction of the burns outreach service and within this environment define the optimum length of time needed to follow up these patients. A retrospective analysis was carried out of 100 consecutive paediatric burns patients who underwent surgical management of their burn. During the follow up period there were 43 complications in 32 patients (32%). These included adverse scarring (either hypertrophic or keloid), delayed healing (taking >1 month to heal) and contractures (utilising either splinting or surgical correction). Fifty-nine percent of these complications occurred within 6 months of injury and all occurred within 18 months. Size of burn was directly correlated to the risk of developing a complication. The outreach service reduced the distance the patient needs to travel for follow up by more than 50%. There was also a significant financial benefit for the service as the follow up clinics were on average 50% cheaper with burns outreach than burns physician. Burns outreach is a feasible service that not only benefits the patients but also is cheaper for the burns service. The optimum length of follow up for paediatric burns in 18 months, after which if there have not been any complications they can be discharged. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  6. Reasons for ICU demand and long-term follow-up of a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease cohort.

    PubMed

    Takir, Huriye Berk; Karakurt, Zuhal; Salturk, Cuneyt; Kargin, Feyza; Balci, Merih; Yalcinsoy, Murat; Ozmen, Ipek; Yazicioglu, Ozlem Mocin; Gungor, Gokay; Burunsuzoğlu, Bünyamin; Adiguzel, Nalan

    2014-12-01

    Acute respiratory failure (ARF) can necessitate mechanical ventilation and intensive care unit (ICU) admission in patients with COPD. We evaluated the reasons COPD patients are admitted to the ICU and assessed long-term outcomes in a retrospective cohort study in a respiratory level-III ICU of a teaching government hospital between November 2007 and April 2012. All COPD patients admitted to ICU for the first time were enrolled and followed for 12 months. Patient characteristics, body mass index (BMI), long-term oxygen therapy (LTOT), non-invasive ventilation (LT-NIV) at home, COPD co-morbidities, reasons for ICU admission, ICU data, length of stay, prescription of new LTOT and LT-NIV, and ICU mortality were recorded. Patient survival after ICU discharge was evaluated by Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. A total of 962 (710 male) patients were included. The mean age was 70 (SD 10). The major reasons for ICU admission were COPD exacerbation (66.7%) and pneumonia (19.7%). ICU and hospital mortality were 11.4%, 12.5% respectively, and 842 patients were followed-up. The new LT-NIV prescription rate was 15.8%. The 6-month 1, 2, 3, and 5-year mortality rates were 24.5%, 33.7%, 46.9%, 58.9% and 72.5%, respectively. Long-term survival was negatively affected by arrhythmia (p < 0.013) and pneumonia (p < 0.025). LT-NIV use (p < 0.016) with LTOT (p < 0.038) increase survival. Pulmonary infection can be a major reason for ICU admission and determining outcome after ICU discharge. Unlike arrhythmia and pneumonia, LT-NIV can improve long-term survival in eligible COPD patients.

  7. ICU service in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kuo-Chen; Lu, Chin-Li; Chung, Yueh-Chih; Huang, Mei-Chen; Shen, Hsiu-Nien; Chen, Hsing-Min; Zhang, Haibo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to understand the current status of intensive care unit (ICU) in order to optimize the resources achieving the best possible care. The study analyzed the status of ICU settings based on the Taiwan National Health Insurance database between March 2004 and February 2009. A total of 1,028,364 ICU patients were identified. The age was 65 ± 18 years, and 61% of the patients were male. The total ICU bed occupancy rate was 83.8% which went up to 87.3% during winter. The ICU bed occupancy was 94.4% in major medical centers. The ICU stay was 6.5 ± 0.5 days, and the overall ICU mortality rate was 20.2%. The hospital stay was 16.4 ± 16.8 days, and the average cost of total hospital stay was approximately US$5,186 per patient. The rate of ICU bed occupancy was dependent on seasonal changes, and it reached near full capacity in major medical centers in Taiwan. The ICU beds were distributed based on the categories of hospitals in order to achieve a reasonable cost efficiency. ICU faces many challenges to maintain and improve quality care because of the increasing cost of state-of-the-art technologies and dealing with aging population.

  8. Ultrasonography for Screening and Follow-Up of Diaphragmatic Dysfunction in the ICU: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Mariani, Lucie Fenet; Bedel, Jêrome; Gros, Antoine; Lerolle, Nicolas; Milojevic, Kolia; Laurent, Virgine; Hilly, Julia; Troché, Gilles; Bedos, Jean Pierre; Planquette, Benjamin

    2016-06-01

    Reversibility and impact of diaphragmatic dysfunction (DD) are unknown. The principal aim was to describe diaphragmatic function as assessed by ultrasonography during weaning trials. The present study is a 6-month single-center prospective study. All patients under mechanical ventilation for more than 7 days and eligible for a spontaneous breathing trial (SBT) were enrolled prospectively. Two blinded ultrasonographers evaluated each hemidiaphragm during SBT. Prevalence of DD among weaning failure and death and interobserver reproducibility have been evaluated. The 34 included patients had a mean Simplified Acute Physiology Score version II of 55.7 ± 14 and a median intensive care unit (ICU) stay length of 17 days (13-30). Diaphragmatic dysfunction was found in 13 (38%) patients, on both sides in 8. Bilateral DD resolved before ICU discharge in 5 of the 7 reevaluated patients. No weaning failures were recorded. The ICU mortality was higher in patients with DD (37% vs 5%, P = .048). Mean interobserver agreement rate was 91%. Reproducibility was better with M-mode. The ICU-acquired DD usually improves before ICU discharge but might constitute a marker for greater disease severity. The present preliminary results require confirmation in a larger prospective multicenter study. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Suicide Prevention and Follow-Up Services: A Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbari, Behrooz; Malakouti, Seyed Kazem; Nojomi, Marzieh; Alavi, Kaveh; Khaleghparast, Shiva

    2016-01-01

    Previous suicide attempt is the most important predictor of death by suicide. Thus preventive interventions after attempting to suicide is essential to prevent reattempts. This paper attempts to determine whether phone preventive interventions or other vehicles (postal cards, email and case management) are effective in reattempt prevention and health promotion after discharge by providing an overview of studies on suicide reattempts. The research investigated in this review conducted from 1995 to 2014. A total of 26 cases related to the aim of this research were derived from 36 English articles with the aforementioned keywords Research shows that providing comprehensive aids, social support, and follow-up after discharge can significantly prevent suicide reattempts. Several studies showed that follow-up support (phone calls, crisis cards, mails, postal cards.) after discharge can significantly decrease the risk of suicide. More randomized controlled trials (RCT) are required to determine what factors of follow-up are more effective than other methods. PMID:26652085

  10. 25 CFR 26.28 - What follow-up services are available after I become employed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What follow-up services are available after I become... JOB PLACEMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAM Job Placement Services § 26.28 What follow-up services are available after I become employed? As determined by the service provider, the following type of services may...

  11. 25 CFR 26.28 - What follow-up services are available after I become employed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What follow-up services are available after I become... JOB PLACEMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAM Job Placement Services § 26.28 What follow-up services are available after I become employed? As determined by the service provider, the following type of services may...

  12. 25 CFR 26.36 - What follow-up service is available after I complete training?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... JOB PLACEMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAM Training Services § 26.36 What follow-up service is available after I complete training? Job Placement assistance may follow training. ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What follow-up service is available after I complete...

  13. 25 CFR 26.36 - What follow-up service is available after I complete training?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... JOB PLACEMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAM Training Services § 26.36 What follow-up service is available after I complete training? Job Placement assistance may follow training. ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What follow-up service is available after I complete...

  14. A nurse-led paediatric head injury follow-up service.

    PubMed

    Falk, Ann-Charlotte

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to describe a nurse-led follow-up service, duration of children's late head injury symptoms and parent/child informational needs. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in children. In Sweden; 7200 children and adolescents are hospitalized every year because of head trauma, and 90% of all head traumas are considered a mild head injury. Although the head injury may be mild, 5-15% of children report sequelae (headache, dizziness, fatigue or memory problems), and the need for a follow-up service has been proposed several times. An empirical descriptive study of a nurse-led follow-up service to improve the quality of care among children with mild-to-moderate head injuries. The data were collected in the period 2003-2005 at a Swedish University Hospital. In total, 149 children (mean age: 9.3 years) received the follow-up service. In 92% of cases, one follow-up visit was performed. Eight per cent needed several visits to ensure symptom resolution. Ninety-one per cent of all children described late symptoms [headache (75%) and tiredness (74%)] at the follow-up visits. The mean symptom duration was 5 weeks. However, 18% of the children reported long-lasting symptoms for 8 weeks, and 16 children (10%) reported long-lasting symptoms beyond 3 months postinjury. An early follow-up service with the aim of meeting the family's needs and reducing any negative impact after a childhood head injury could minimize long-lasting complications for both parents and children. © 2012 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences © 2012 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  15. Improving Library Services to Satellite Campuses: A Follow-Up Study at the University of Lethbridge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eva, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    In an effort to provide better service to the University of Lethbridge satellite campus locations, a survey was done of instructors on the northern campuses regarding their knowledge and use of the University of Lethbridge Library services available to them. This was a follow-up to a survey conducted in 2011, at which time it was found that many…

  16. Follow-Up Study of Children Referred to Developmental Evaluation Services for Children (DESC).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Judith A.; Hebbeler, Kathleen M.

    Developmental Evaluation Services for Children (DESC) provides in-depth medical and educational diagnostic services for children in Montgomery County, Maryland, who are under 6 years of age and who are suspected of having handicapping conditions in two or more areas of development. This follow-up study was designed to determine the progress of…

  17. Improving Library Services to Satellite Campuses: A Follow-Up Study at the University of Lethbridge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eva, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    In an effort to provide better service to the University of Lethbridge satellite campus locations, a survey was done of instructors on the northern campuses regarding their knowledge and use of the University of Lethbridge Library services available to them. This was a follow-up to a survey conducted in 2011, at which time it was found that many…

  18. Evaluation of clinical pharmacists' follow-up service in an oncology pain clinic.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Nikki; Chambers, Carole; Ralph, Christopher; England, Dean; Cusano, Frances

    2013-06-01

    Patients who present with pain in an oncology setting are often complex and require a multidisciplinary approach for symptom control. The Pain and Symptom Control Clinic at Tom Baker Cancer Center includes two pharmacists who participate in weekly multidisciplinary clinics and provide a follow-up service to patients. This study will assess the impact of the pharmacists' follow-up service with respect to activities performed as well as patient and health care professional satisfaction. The activities performed will also be compared to defined objectives for pharmacy practice in a hospital setting. Activities performed by the pharmacists over a 10-week period were recorded and tabulated. Online surveys were completed by health care professionals and telephone surveys were completed by patients 1 month post clinic visit. Over 6 weeks, 44 patients assessed in clinic required follow-up from a pharmacist. There was an average of 2.3 interactions per patient and an average time of 85 min was spent on each patient outside of clinic. The three activities that occurred most frequently included: (1) interacting with other health care professionals, (2) making alterations to patients' medication regimens, and (3) organizing refills. All health care professionals surveyed felt that the pharmacists' follow-up service was a valuable component of the Pain and Symptom Control Clinic and nearly all patients surveyed reported a positive experience with the service received. The inclusion of pharmacists in the Pain and Symptom Control Clinic is favored by patients and health care professionals and provides increased efficiency to the clinic.

  19. [Quality control of capillary blood measurements in clinical services: follow up by the biologist].

    PubMed

    Desjobert, H; Durand, G; Chérubin, N; Le Moël, G

    2001-04-01

    In Bichat-Claude Bernard Hospital, the study of capillary glucose analyzers in the aim of uniformizing the selection of glucose meters, has shown the relevance of a standardized handling in order to obtain clinically interpretable results. It has been necessary to implement a quality follow up by the biologist. In the first stage, the biochemistry laboratory, with the clinical service supervisor and the supplier, has assured the training of the medical staff habilitated to use the meters and to carry out a quality control. In the second stage, the biologist implemented a monthly control on a total blood control sample, the stability of which has been checked after the necessary addition of glucose. Dosing of that sample, which is used as an external control, is carried out in parallel by the QID Precision glucose analyzer (Abbott) and by the portable Hemocue B Glucose (Vermed), which is selected as a comparison standard. This allows a monthly control of the accuracy of the meter. The condition of the equipment, as well as the weekly control follow up, validated by the nurse, is registered on a sheet prepared by the biologist. In partnership with Vermed, we have developed a processing software of the data stored in the Hemocue, allowing the automatic issue of a report summarizing the equipment condition and the data of weekly and monthly controls follow up. This report, signed by the biologist, is sent to every Service Manager and Supervising Nurse. On the basis of our one year experience, this practice has generated an efficient collaboration between the clinical services and the biochemistry laboratory, allowing to keep the quality of the capillary glucose measurements performed in inpatients.

  20. Cost analysis for the implementation of a medication review with follow-up service in Spain.

    PubMed

    Noain, Aranzazu; Garcia-Cardenas, Victoria; Gastelurrutia, Miguel Angel; Malet-Larrea, Amaia; Martinez-Martinez, Fernando; Sabater-Hernandez, Daniel; Benrimoj, Shalom I

    2017-08-01

    Background Medication review with follow-up (MRF) is a professional pharmacy service proven to be cost-effective. Its broader implementation is limited, mainly due to the lack of evidence-based implementation programs that include economic and financial analysis. Objective To analyse the costs and estimate the price of providing and implementing MRF. Setting Community pharmacy in Spain. Method Elderly patients using poly-pharmacy received a community pharmacist-led MRF for 6 months. The cost analysis was based on the time-driven activity based costing model and included the provider costs, initial investment costs and maintenance expenses. The service price was estimated using the labour costs, costs associated with service provision, potential number of patients receiving the service and mark-up. Main outcome measures Costs and potential price of MRF. Results A mean time of 404.4 (SD 232.2) was spent on service provision and was extrapolated to annual costs. Service provider cost per patient ranged from €196 (SD 90.5) to €310 (SD 164.4). The mean initial investment per pharmacy was €4594 and the mean annual maintenance costs €3,068. Largest items contributing to cost were initial staff training, continuing education and renting of the patient counselling area. The potential service price ranged from €237 to €628 per patient a year. Conclusion Time spent by the service provider accounted for 75-95% of the final cost, followed by initial investment costs and maintenance costs. Remuneration for professional pharmacy services provision must cover service costs and appropriate profit, allowing for their long-term sustainability.

  1. An evaluation and 20-year follow-up of a community forensic intellectual disability service.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, William R; Steptoe, Lesley; Wallace, Lisa; Haut, Fabian; Brewster, Eleanor

    2013-04-01

    Since the middle of the 20th century, there have been several heterogeneous studies of recidivism by offenders with intellectual disabilities (ID) who have been in specialist mental health services after an index offence. Although some were long term, as befits a chronically needy group, laws and services have changed in that time. It may no longer be appropriate to rely on findings from the 1960s and 1970s. To compare mental health presentations and recidivism between male sex offenders, men convicted of other offences and female offenders from a 1986-2008 cohort of offenders referred to specialist forensic ID services in Scotland. A 20-year follow-up of an assessment and treatment service for 309 offenders with ID (156 sex offenders, 126 non sexual male offenders and 27 women) was conducted. Sex offenders were more likely to be referred from the courts and had lower anger levels. Women were more likely to be diagnosed with mental illness. There was a split between groups with sex offenders committing few nonsexual offences and the other groups showing few sexual offences. During the study period, 16% of sexual offenders, 43% of male nonsexual offenders and 23% of women committed at least one further offence. Following assessment and treatment there was a 90-95% reduction in offending incidents. Although recidivism rates are disappointing, harm reduction data suggests that assessment and treatment for offenders with ID can be highly successful in terms of public safety. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. The effectiveness of dementia care mapping in intellectual disability residential services: a follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Jaycock, Sue; Persaud, Michelle; Johnson, Robert

    2006-12-01

    This article is presented as a follow-up to exploratory work published in this journal in 2001. It describes a study that aimed to assess the effectiveness of dementia care mapping in supporting practice improvement in intellectual disability residential services. An average of 9 hours of observational data was collected using dementia care mapping in relation to 14 adults with severe or profound intellectual disabilities. Sixteen interviews were also undertaken with staff over a 4 month period.The findings provided a detailed picture of the activities and interactions between the participants involved in the study and raised some issues about 'organizational culture' when developing person-centred approaches. They have helped strengthen the case that care mapping has the potential to be a useful addition to the existing repertoire of tools to support effective practice improvement and person-centred planning.

  3. Impact of involuntary out-patient commitment on reducing hospital services: 2-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Castells-Aulet, Laura; Hernández-Viadel, Miguel; Jiménez-Martos, Jesús; Cañete-Nicolás, Carlos; Bellido-Rodríguez, Carmen; Calabuig-Crespo, Roman; Asensio-Pascual, Pedro; Lera-Calatayud, Guillem

    2015-08-01

    Aims and method To evaluate whether involuntary out-patient commitment (OPC) in patients with severe mental disorder reduces their use of hospital services. This is a retrospective case-control study comparing a group of patients on OPC (n = 75) and a control group (n = 75) which was composed of patients whose sociodemographic variables and clinical characteristics were similar to those of the OPC group. Each control case is paired with an OPC case, so the control case must have an involuntary admission in the month that the index OPC case admission occurred. Emergency room visits, admissions and average length of hospital stay over a 2-year follow-up after the initiation of OPC were compared. Results No statistically significant evidence was found in the use of mental healthcare services between the two groups. Different reasons for admission found between the groups limit similarity when comparing the two. Clinical implications The findings cast doubt over the effectiveness of this legal measure to reduce emergency visits, the number of admissions and the length of stay in the hospital.

  4. Young and midlife stroke survivors' experiences with the health services and long-term follow-up needs.

    PubMed

    Martinsen, Randi; Kirkevold, Marit; Sveen, Unni

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this qualitative study was to explore young and midlife stroke survivors' experiences with the health services and to identify long-term follow-up needs. Sixteen participants from two cohorts were interviewed in-depth. The interviews were analyzed applying a hermeneutic-phenomenological analysis. The participants struggled to gain access to follow-up health services. They felt that whether they were systematically followed up was more coincidental than planned. Young and midlife stroke survivors thus appear vulnerable to falling outside the follow-up system. Those participants who received some follow-up care perceived it as untailored to their specific needs. To be considered supportive, the follow-up programs must be in line with their long-term needs, take into account their particular challenges as young and midlife stroke survivors, and be planned in close collaboration with the individual patient. To secure systematic and follow-up health services tailored to the individual, knowledgeable and committed healthcare professionals should play a prominent role within the community health services.

  5. Telephone follow-up and self-performed urine pregnancy testing after early medical abortion: a service evaluation.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Sharon T; Glasier, Anna; Dewart, Helen; Johnstone, Anne; Burnside, Audrey

    2012-07-01

    Telephone follow-up with a self-performed low-sensitivity urine pregnancy (LSUP) test was introduced at the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, Scotland, as an alternative to routine ultrasonography for confirming successful abortion at 2 weeks following early medical abortion (<9 weeks' gestation). Women who screened 'positive' at telephone follow-up on the basis of ongoing pregnancy symptoms, scant bleeding or LSUP test result subsequently attended the clinic for a confirmatory ultrasound. A service evaluation was conducted of the first 8 months of telephone follow-up consisting of a review of the numbers choosing this method of follow-up, the proportion successfully contacted and the efficacy for detecting ongoing pregnancies. In the last 3 months of the study, women were surveyed about their satisfaction with this method of follow-up. Opting for telephone follow-up were 476 out of 619 women (77%). Four women (1%) attended the clinic before telephone follow-up because of pain or bleeding. A total of 410 (87%) of the remaining 472 women were successfully contacted by telephone. Sixty women (15%) screened 'positive', three of whom had ongoing pregnancies, and one woman falsely screened 'negative'. The sensitivity of the telephone follow-up was 75% [95% confidence interval (CI) 30.1-95.4], and specificity was 86% (95% CI 82.2-89). The negative predictive value was 99.7% (95% CI 98.4-99.9), and positive predictive value was 5% (95% CI 1.7-13.7). All women surveyed (n=75) would recommend telephone follow-up to a friend. A telephone follow-up and an LSUP test at 2 weeks are effective for detecting ongoing pregnancy, have good follow-up rates and are popular choices for women. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. White House Conference on Library and Information Services Follow-Up Inquiry. State/Territory Agency Responses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Commission on Libraries and Information Science, Washington, DC.

    State and territory agency responses to a 1980 follow-up inquiry of the 1979 White House Conference on Library and Information Services (WHCLIST) are presented. Individual questionnaires were completed by 24 states and 2 trust territories. Questionnaires provide information on increased state aid to libraries, new library legislation,…

  7. White House Conference on Library and Information Services Follow-Up Inquiry. State/Territory Agency Responses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Commission on Libraries and Information Science, Washington, DC.

    State and territory agency responses to a 1980 follow-up inquiry of the 1979 White House Conference on Library and Information Services (WHCLIST) are presented. Individual questionnaires were completed by 24 states and 2 trust territories. Questionnaires provide information on increased state aid to libraries, new library legislation,…

  8. A community service for high-risk mentally disordered sex offenders: a follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Craissati, Jackie; Blundell, Rachel

    2013-04-01

    There is sparse literature on mentally disordered sex offenders, and little is published on treatment participation and outcomes for this group. This article aims to describe the characteristics of a cohort of high-risk mentally disordered-largely personality disordered-sex offenders at risk in the community in southeast London. Drawing on various measures of personality dysfunction-including key developmental variables, a self-report personality disorder questionnaire Millon Clinical Multi-axial Inventory-III (MCMI-III) and psychopathy as measured by the Psychopathy Checklist: Screening Version (PCL:SV)-the researchers describe the characteristics of a cohort of mentally disordered sex offenders referred to the Challenge project. Follow-up data for those placed in treatment are reported and include consideration of treatment completion and reconviction: the relationship between personality dysfunction and a dynamic measure of risk are also explored. Of the 137 participants, 53% were placed in the community treatment project. Seventy five percent completed treatment, and were followed up for an average of 40 months. Eleven percent were sexually reconvicted, 3% violently reconvicted. Community failure was best predicted by a combination of static risk and personality-related variables.

  9. The Impact of Arbitration Intervention Services on Psychosocial Functioning: A Follow-Up Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dembo, Richard; Wareham, Jennifer; Poythress, Norman G.; Cook, Brittany; Schmeidler, James

    2006-01-01

    We report the impact of case management services on drug use and self-reported delinquency for youths involved in a clinical trial of the Juvenile Arbitration program. The project evaluated an innovative intervention service providing 16 weeks of intensive case management services to youths and their families. The present study examines interview…

  10. The Impact of Arbitration Intervention Services on Youth Recidivism: One-Year Follow-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dembo, Richard; Wareham, Jennifer; Poythress, Norman G.; Cook, Brittany; Schmeidler, James

    2006-01-01

    We report the impact of case management services and youth psychopathic features on twelve-month recidivism rates for youths involved in a Center for Substance Abuse Treatment funded clinical trial conducted in a juvenile diversion program. The project is evaluating an innovative intervention service providing 16 weeks of intensive case management…

  11. Reducing pharmacy wait time to promote customer service: a follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Slowiak, Julie M; Huitema, Bradley E

    2015-01-01

    The present study had 3 objectives: (1) to evaluate the effects of 2 different interventions (feedback regarding customer satisfaction with wait time and combined feedback and goal setting) on wait time in a hospital outpatient pharmacy; (2) to assess the extent to which the previously applied interventions maintained their effects; and (3) to evaluate the differences between the effects of the original study and those of the present follow-up study. Participants were 10 employees (4 pharmacists and 6 technicians) of an outpatient pharmacy. Wait times and customer satisfaction ratings were collected for "waiting customers." An ABCB within-subjects design was used to assess the effects of the interventions on both wait time and customer satisfaction, where A was the baseline (no feedback and no goal setting); B was the customer satisfaction feedback; and C was the customer satisfaction feedback, the wait time feedback, and the goal setting for wait time reduction. Wait time decreased after baseline when the combined intervention was introduced, and wait time increased with the reintroduction of satisfaction feedback (alone). The results of the replication study confirm the pattern of the results of the original study and demonstrate high sensitivity of levels of customer satisfaction with wait time. The most impressive result of the replication is the nearly 2-year maintenance of lower wait time between the end of the original study and the beginning (baseline) of the replication.

  12. 20 CFR 664.450 - What are follow-up services for youth?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) The leadership development and supportive service activities listed in §§ 664.420 and 664.440; (2... education; (4) Work-related peer support groups; (5) Adult mentoring; and (6) Tracking the progress of youth...

  13. Improving the Blood Pressure Control With the ProActive Attitude of Hypertensive Patients Seeking Follow-up Services

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shangfeng; Bishwajit, Ghose; Ji, Lu; Feng, Da; Fang, Haiqing; Fu, Hang; Shao, Tian; Shao, Piaopiao; Liu, Chunyan; Feng, Zhanchun; Luba, Tegene R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Proactive attitude of hypertensive patients seeking follow-up services (FUS) lies at the core of self-efficacy. However, few evidence have shown the activeness of seeking FUS in the context of blood pressure control among hypertensive patients. Improvements in follow-up visits may not just by services itself cause better control of blood pressure among hypertensive patients, rather due to the patient's pro-active attitude of the patient in seeking FUS. A cross-sectional study was carried out in selected rural regions of China to explore the association between blood pressure control and sociodemographic and economic variables and activeness of hypertensive patients in seeking FUS. The primary clinical outcome for this study was blood pressure control (systolic blood pressure <140 mmHg or diastolic blood pressure <90 mmHg) Out of the total 2321 participants with hypertension aged 35 years or older participated in this survey. Number of proactive FUS seekers were 3.17 times greater than those of passive seekers (odds ratio [OR] = 3.17, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.56–3.93, P < 0.001). In all subgroups, hypertensive patients who were seeking FUS actively were more likely to control blood pressure better than those seeking FUS passively. Proactive attitude of seeking follow-up services can improve blood pressure control among hypertensive patients. PMID:27057859

  14. 20 CFR 664.450 - What are follow-up services for youth?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) The leadership development and supportive service activities listed in §§ 664.420 and 664.440; (2... problems that arise; (3) Assistance in securing better paying jobs, career development and further education; (4) Work-related peer support groups; (5) Adult mentoring; and (6) Tracking the progress of...

  15. Placement and Follow-Up in the Vocational Rehabilitation Process. Ninth Institute on Rehabilitation Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky State Dept. of Education, Frankfort. Bureau of Rehabilitation Services.

    The report was prepared to increase awareness of the importance and nature of the placement process, to review current practices in placement and followup, and to provide guidelines to assist rehabilitation counselors in improving the delivery of placement and followup services. (NTIS)

  16. Placement and Follow-Up in the Vocational Rehabilitation Process. Ninth Institute on Rehabilitation Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky State Dept. of Education, Frankfort. Bureau of Rehabilitation Services.

    The report was prepared to increase awareness of the importance and nature of the placement process, to review current practices in placement and followup, and to provide guidelines to assist rehabilitation counselors in improving the delivery of placement and followup services. (NTIS)

  17. Student Placement and Follow-Up Services in the Junior College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, Mary

    A placement service may make higher education possible for certain students by providing on- or off-campus jobs for them while they attend college. It also helps graduates and former students find jobs related to their study areas, keeps the institution in touch with employers so that the adequacy of course content can be evaluated, and interprets…

  18. Role of the Personnel Manager in Manpower Follow-Up Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wortman, Max S., Jr.; Forst, Leland I.

    1974-01-01

    Effects of followup services (number of clients still employed at placements and employee retention rate) on 234 disadvantaged manpower program participants were studied in an eastern metropolitan Concentrated Employment Program. An organizational team approach (fellow employee, supervisor, and personnel manager) is proposed as a supportive…

  19. [Follow-up discussion on restructuring the medical-service system].

    PubMed

    Kato, Seiya; Kamada, Arisu

    2012-12-01

    The Japan Tuberculosis Society organized symposia on restructuring the medical-service system at the 84th and 86th annual meetings. These symposia clarified the following issues and concerns. It is becoming difficult to maintain tuberculosis beds in wards in many areas, since beds required for tuberculosis are declining due to the decreasing incidence of tuberculosis and shortened hospitalization periods. The extremely poor profitability of medical practices has caused closure of tuberculosis wards. A highly urbanized area may have a shortage of tuberculosis beds, while some rural areas have the problem of poor access to hospitalization. Aging of tuberculosis patients causes an increase in the number of patients with serious complications that are sometimes difficult to treat within a prefectural jurisdiction. Infection control for multi-drug resistant tuberculosis needs to be solid. To address these issues and challenges, it will be necessary to restructure the medical-service system for tuberculosis. The Prevention Guideline addressed in May 2011 by the Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare mentions that the medical-service system should seek to ensure enough tuberculosis beds and to realize patient-centered medical service. The future directions should be 1) ensuring a core hospital for tuberculosis treatment at the prefectural level, 2) ensuring a principal hospital for treating tuberculosis patients with serious complications in an area, 3) ensuring the treatment environment is suitable to individual patient conditions, 4) formulating a regional coordination mechanism with a core hospital at the center in each area, and 5) achieving complete infection control. This symposium was organized based on discussions in the previous symposia to present points necessary to realize the future medical-service system described in the Prevention Guideline. When constructing a new hospital or renovating a ward, attention must be paid to infection control and amenities for

  20. Parental mental health after the accidental death of a son during military service: 23-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Pål; Heir, Trond; Herlofsen, Pål H; Langsrud, Øyvind; Weisæth, Lars

    2012-01-01

    We prospectively studied parental mental health after suddenly losing a son in a military training accident. Parents (N = 32) were interviewed at 1, 2 and 23 years after the death of their son. The General Health Questionnaire and Expanded Texas Inventory of Grief were self-reported at 1, 2, 5, and 23 years; the Inventory of Complicated Grief was self-reported at 23 years. We observed a high prevalence of psychiatric disorders at 1- and 2-year follow-ups (57% and 45%, respectively), particularly major depression (43% and 31%, respectively). Only one mental disorder was diagnosed at the 23-year follow-up. Grief and psychological distress were highest at 1- and 2-year follow-ups. Spouses exhibited a high concordance of psychological distress. Mothers reported more intense grief reactions than did fathers. The loss of a son during military service may have a substantial impact on parental mental health particularly during the first 2 years after death. Spouses' grief can be interrelated and may contribute to their psychological distress.

  1. Treatment, Services and Follow-up for Victims of Family Violence in Health Clinics in Maputo, Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Jethá, Eunice Abdul Remane; Lynch, Catherine A; Houry, Debra; Rodrigues, Maria Alexandra; Keyes, Christine E.; Chilundo, Baltazar; Wright, David W.; Sasser, Scott M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Family violence (FV) is a global health problem that not only impacts the victim, but the family unit, local community and society at large. Objective: To quantitatively and qualitatively evaluate the treatment and follow up provided to victims of violence amongst immediate and extended family units who presented to three health centers in Mozambique for care following violence. Methods: We conducted a verbally-administered survey to self-disclosed victims of FV who presented to one of three health units, each at a different level of service, in Mozambique for treatment of their injuries. Data were entered into SPSS (SPSS, version 13.0) and analyzed for frequencies. Qualitative short answer data were transcribed during the interview, coded and analyzed prior to translation by the principal investigator. Results: One thousand two hundred and six assault victims presented for care during the eight-week study period, of which 216 disclosed the relationship of the assailant, including 92 who were victims of FV. Almost all patients (90%) waited less than one hour to be seen, with most patients (67%) waiting less than 30 minutes. Most patients did not require laboratory or radiographic diagnostics at the primary (70%) and secondary (93%) health facilities, while 44% of patients received a radiograph at the tertiary care center. Among all three hospitals, only 10% were transferred to a higher level of care, 14% were not given any form of follow up or referral information, while 13% required a specialist evaluation. No victims were referred for psychological follow-up or support. Qualitative data revealed that some patients did not disclose violence as the etiology, because they believed the physician was unable to address or treat the violence-related issues and/or had limited time to discuss. Conclusion: Healthcare services for treating the physical injuries of victims of FV were timely and rarely required advanced levels of medical care, but there were no

  2. The Impact of Implementation of an ICU Consult Service on Hospital-Wide Outcomes and ICU-Specific Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Al-Rajhi, Amjad; Mardini, Louay; Jayaraman, Dev

    2016-08-01

    Rapid response teams (RRTs) were developed to promote assessment of and early intervention for clinically deteriorating hospitalized patients. Although the ideal composition of RRTs is not known, their implementation does require significant resources. To test the effectiveness of a dedicated daytime/weekday intensive care unit (ICU) consult service without formal training of ward teams. Pre- and postintervention study with weekends/nights during implementation period acting as a concurrent control. An adult tertiary care university center in Montreal without an RRT. A daytime/weekday ICU consult service with a dedicated intensivist. Total hospital mortality rate did not differ between the control and the implementation period (6.65% vs 6.60%; P = .84). The hospital code blue rates also did not differ (1.21/1000 vs 1.14/1000 patient days; P = .58). In contrast, 30-day mortality of patients admitted to the ICU following an ICU consult decreased (39% vs 24% P = .01). Multivariate analysis confirmed this effect on 30-day mortality (odds ratio for implementation period: 0.53 [95% confidence interval: 0.33-0.85] P = .009). The 14-day ICU readmission rate was reduced with the intervention (5.1% vs 4.1%; P < .001). The effect on 30-day mortality and ICU readmissions were only present during daytime/weekdays. Implementation of an ICU consult service without any formal afferent limb training was associated with decreased mortality and 14-day readmission rates of patients admitted to the ICU. In contrast, hospital-wide mortality and code blue rates were unaffected. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Longevity of posterior resin composite restorations in permanent teeth in Public Dental Health Service: a prospective 8 years follow up.

    PubMed

    Pallesen, Ulla; van Dijken, Jan W V; Halken, Jette; Hallonsten, Anna-Lena; Höigaard, Ruth

    2013-04-01

    To investigate in a prospective follow up the longevity of posterior resin composites (RC) placed in permanent teeth of children and adolescents attending Public Dental Health Service. All posterior RC placed, in the PDHS clinics in the cities of Copenhagen and Frederiksberg in Denmark between November 1998 and December 2002, in permanent teeth of children and adolescents up to 18 years, were evaluated in an up to 8 years follow up. The endpoint of each restoration was defined, when repair or replacement was performed. Survival analyses were performed between subgroups with Kaplan-Meier analysis. The individual contribution of different cofactors to predict the outcome was performed with Cox regression analysis. Totally 2881 children with a mean age of 13.7 years (5-18) received 4355 RC restorations placed by 115 dentists. Eighty percent were placed in molars and 49% were Class I. Two percent of restorations with base material and 1% of the restorations without base material showed postoperative sensitivity (n.s.). Replacements were made in 406 and repairs in 125 restorations. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a cumulative survival at 8 years of 84.3%, resulting in an annual failure rate of 2%. Lower patient age, more than one restoration per patient, placement of a base material and placement of RC: in molars, in cavities with high number of surfaces, in lower jaw teeth, showed all significant higher failure rates. Five variables had significant importance for the end point, replacement/repair of the resin composite restorations: age of patient, age of operator, jaw, tooth type and cavity size. Posterior RC restorations placed in children and adolescents in Public Dental Health clinics showed an acceptable durability with annual failure rates comparable with those of randomized controlled RC studies in adults. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Assessing Nonresponse Bias at Follow-up in a Large Prospective Cohort of Relatively Young and Mobile Military Service Members

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-21

    creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use , distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is...follow-up survey. Logistic regression models were used to calculate inverse probability weights using propensity scores. Results: Characteristics...and were presumed alive at the time of follow-up; of these, 54,960 (71.6%) completed the first follow-up survey. Logistic regression models were used

  5. Glaucoma public service announcements: factors associated with follow-up of participants with risk factors for glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Hoffelt, Zakary; Fallon, Shawn; Wong, Brad A.; Lucas, Betty; Coleman, Anne L.; Mills, Richard P.; Wilson, Richard; Mansberger, Steven L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To determine the prevalence of follow-up and factors associated with completing an eye exam after a glaucoma public service announcement. Design Cross-sectional observational study Participants Individuals who participated in the Glaucoma EyeCare Program by calling a toll-free telephone number and receiving referral by meeting inclusion criteria. Methods The Glaucoma EyeCare Program uses public service announcements to encourage those at increased risk for glaucoma to obtain an eye exam. The program requires interested persons to dial a toll-free telephone number to collect demographic, medical, and socioeconomic information, and refers those at higher risk of glaucoma to an ophthalmologist for a free eye exam. The ophthalmologist completes an outcome form, which indicates whether the participant obtained an eye exam, and the results of this eye exam. We determined the factors associated with obtaining an eye exam. Main Outcome Measures Sociodemographic characteristics associated with obtaining an eye exam after referral through the Glaucoma EyeCare Program Results Ophthalmologists returned outcome forms for 24% (1514/6343) of participants. Of those with outcome forms, 671 (44.3%) had an eye exam, 756 (49.9%) did not make an appointment, and 87 (5.7%) made an appointment but did not complete the exam. A multivariate logistic regression model showed younger age, female gender, lack of health insurance, medical history of diabetes, and shorter distance to be associated with obtaining an eye exam. Conclusion Public service announcements encourage participants to have an eye exam. Multiple factors alter the success of obtaining an eye exam. Future studies are needed regarding the best method of decreasing the risk of undiagnosed glaucoma. PMID:21439644

  6. Health promotion and information provision during long-term follow-up for childhood cancer survivors: A service evaluation.

    PubMed

    Mayes, Jonathan; Brown, Morven C; Davies, Nicola; Skinner, Roderick

    2016-09-01

    Health promotion is an important component of long-term follow-up (LTFU) care for childhood cancer survivors (CCS). However, little information exists about how survivors perceive their own health promotion needs. As part of a service evaluation, 51 CCS who had previously attended the LTFU clinic took part in a single semistructured interview to seek their views on information they had received regarding late adverse effects (LAEs) of treatment, the purpose of LTFU, and the provision of health promotion information. Although most (93%) CCS were satisfied with the information received about LAEs, 37% desired further details. Over half (59%) believed that the purpose of LTFU was to screen for LAEs, whereas 31% felt that it was to check for relapse. No survivor reported health promotion to be an aim of LTFU; only 14% of CCS expected to receive healthy lifestyle advice, and fewer than 10% wanted dietary and physical activity advice. Most (88%) CCS felt that their hospital-based health care professional was best placed to give healthy lifestyle advice, but there was no consensus about the optimum timing for health promotion. CCS varied in their knowledge, needs, and wishes regarding LTFU care. The results of this evaluation strongly indicate that the profile of health promotion needs to be raised within our service and identifies issues that may be pertinent to similar services. Further research is needed to understand the views of CCS regarding health promotion and lifestyle behaviors, with the aim of tailoring and improving the delivery of effective health education to CCS.

  7. Assessing nonresponse bias at follow-up in a large prospective cohort of relatively young and mobile military service members

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Nonresponse bias in a longitudinal study could affect the magnitude and direction of measures of association. We identified sociodemographic, behavioral, military, and health-related predictors of response to the first follow-up questionnaire in a large military cohort and assessed the extent to which nonresponse biased measures of association. Methods Data are from the baseline and first follow-up survey of the Millennium Cohort Study. Seventy-six thousand, seven hundred and seventy-five eligible individuals completed the baseline survey and were presumed alive at the time of follow-up; of these, 54,960 (71.6%) completed the first follow-up survey. Logistic regression models were used to calculate inverse probability weights using propensity scores. Results Characteristics associated with a greater probability of response included female gender, older age, higher education level, officer rank, active-duty status, and a self-reported history of military exposures. Ever smokers, those with a history of chronic alcohol consumption or a major depressive disorder, and those separated from the military at follow-up had a lower probability of response. Nonresponse to the follow-up questionnaire did not result in appreciable bias; bias was greatest in subgroups with small numbers. Conclusions These findings suggest that prospective analyses from this cohort are not substantially biased by non-response at the first follow-up assessment. PMID:20964861

  8. Assessing nonresponse bias at follow-up in a large prospective cohort of relatively young and mobile military service members.

    PubMed

    Littman, Alyson J; Boyko, Edward J; Jacobson, Isabel G; Horton, Jaime; Gackstetter, Gary D; Smith, Besa; Hooper, Tomoko; Wells, Timothy S; Amoroso, Paul J; Smith, Tyler C

    2010-10-21

    Nonresponse bias in a longitudinal study could affect the magnitude and direction of measures of association. We identified sociodemographic, behavioral, military, and health-related predictors of response to the first follow-up questionnaire in a large military cohort and assessed the extent to which nonresponse biased measures of association. Data are from the baseline and first follow-up survey of the Millennium Cohort Study. Seventy-six thousand, seven hundred and seventy-five eligible individuals completed the baseline survey and were presumed alive at the time of follow-up; of these, 54,960 (71.6%) completed the first follow-up survey. Logistic regression models were used to calculate inverse probability weights using propensity scores. Characteristics associated with a greater probability of response included female gender, older age, higher education level, officer rank, active-duty status, and a self-reported history of military exposures. Ever smokers, those with a history of chronic alcohol consumption or a major depressive disorder, and those separated from the military at follow-up had a lower probability of response. Nonresponse to the follow-up questionnaire did not result in appreciable bias; bias was greatest in subgroups with small numbers. These findings suggest that prospective analyses from this cohort are not substantially biased by non-response at the first follow-up assessment.

  9. Earlier intervention for acute kidney injury: evaluation of an outreach service and a long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Mark E; Sitch, Alice; Baharani, Jyoti; Dowswell, George

    2015-02-01

    There have been few studies of earlier systematic intervention to reduce the impact of acute kidney injury (AKI). In 2009, we piloted an AKI outreach service with a before and after study, and we report on the study and its longer-term follow-up. AKI patients were identified using a laboratory delta check for creatinine of 75%. In the 4-week before phase patients received standard care. In a consecutive 7-week after phase an outreach team of nephrology doctors and nurses reviewed all alerts twice daily, 5 days a week. The primary clinical team caring for the patient was called to be given advice on AKI care. There were 157 and 251 patients in the before and after groups, respectively, who were comparable in their characteristics. The mean age was 70 years in both groups and ∼ 80% of each group were admitted to the hospital. In the after group, the Outreach telephone call was successful in 88%, at a median of 14 h. Substantial numbers of recommendations were made, largely related to fluid balance, investigations and medication use. Survival showed an immediate non-significant improvement in the after group, but converged at about 4 years. Outreach shows potential to improve outcomes in AKI. In order to achieve this it seems likely that at least a five-day per week service will be needed to assist good renal and general medical care for this vulnerable group. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  10. The impact of a medication review with follow-up service on hospital admissions in aged polypharmacy patients.

    PubMed

    Malet-Larrea, Amaia; Goyenechea, Estíbaliz; García-Cárdenas, Victoria; Calvo, Begoña; Arteche, Jose M; Aranegui, Pedro; Zubeldia, Jose J; Gastelurrutia, Miguel A; Martínez-Martínez, Fernando; Benrimoj, Shalom I

    2016-09-01

    The aims were to assess the impact of a medication review with follow-up (MRF) service provided in community pharmacy to aged polypharmacy patients on the number of medication-related hospital admissions and to estimate the effect on hospital costs. This was a sub-analysis of a cluster randomized controlled trials carried out in 178 community pharmacies in Spain. Pharmacies in the intervention group (IG) provided a comprehensive medication review during 6 months. Pharmacists in the comparison group (CG) delivered usual care. For the purposes of this sub-analysis, an expert panel of three internal medicine specialists screened the hospitalizations occurring during the main study, in order to identify medication-related hospitalizations. Inter-rater reliability was measured using Fleiss's kappa. Hospital costs were calculated using diagnosis related groups. One thousand four hundred and three patients were included in the main study and they had 83 hospitalizations. Forty-two hospitalizations (50.6%) were medicine-related, with a substantial level of agreement among the experts (kappa = 0.65, 95% CI 0.52, 0.78, P < 0.01). The number of medication-related hospitalizations was significantly lower in patients receiving MRF (IG 11, GC 31, P = 0.042). The probability of being hospitalized was 3.7 times higher in the CG (odds ratio 3.7, 95% CI 1.2, 11.3, P = 0.021). Costs for a medicine-related hospitalization were €6672. Medication-related hospitalization costs were lower for patients receiving MRF [IG: €94 (SD 917); CG: €301 (SD 2102); 95% CI 35.9, 378.0, P = 0.018]. MRF provided by community pharmacists might be an effective strategy to balance the assurance of the benefit from medications and the avoidance of medication-related hospitalizations in aged patients using polypharmacy. © 2016 The British Pharmacological Society.

  11. Local School Teams at the Toronto Board: A Five-Year Follow-Up Study. Research Services No. 216.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Ester; Brown, Robert S.

    This follow-up study examined the goals, roles, and functions of the Toronto Board of Education's local school teams (LSTs), which are designed to support teachers in providing appropriate interventions for students in need of assistance in regular and special education settings. The 1990 and 1995 study used similar questionnaires and…

  12. Consumer satisfaction with the Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service and its association with treatment outcome: a 3-4-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Solberg, Cathrine; Larsson, Bo; Jozefiak, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Consumer satisfaction studies with the Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAMHS) have mainly assessed evaluations in a short-term follow-up perspective. Adolescent reports with CAMHS have not been included nationally. The purposes of this study were to explore adolescent and parental satisfaction with the CAMHS in a 3-4-year follow-up perspective, and to examine the relationships between reported consumer satisfaction and clinical parameters such as reason for adolescent referral, emotional/behavioral symptoms and treatment outcome. Of 190 adolescent-parent pairs in a sample of CAMHS outpatients, 120 completed a Consumer Satisfaction Questionnaire. Parents assessed adolescent emotional/behavior problems both at baseline and at follow-up by completing the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). Correlations were examined between adolescent and parental evaluations. The relationships between service satisfaction and symptom load at baseline and follow-up and treatment outcome at follow-up were explored. Overall, adolescents and parents were satisfied with the services received from the CAMHS. The correlations between adolescent and parent consumer satisfaction ratings were low to moderate. Consumer satisfaction was significantly and negatively correlated with symptom load on the CBCL Total Problems scores at baseline, but not at follow-up. There was no difference in satisfaction levels between those who improved after treatment and those who did not. Given the differences in informant ratings of consumer satisfaction, it is important to include both adolescent and parental perceptions in evaluations of CAMHS services and treatment outcomes. Consumer satisfaction should serve as a supplement to established standardized outcome measures.

  13. Addressing barriers to emergency anaphylaxis care: from emergency medical services to emergency department to outpatient follow-up.

    PubMed

    Fineman, Stanley M; Bowman, Steven H; Campbell, Ronna L; Dowling, Paul; O'Rourke, Dianne; Russell, W Scott; Sublett, J Wesley; Wallace, Dana

    2015-10-01

    Anaphylaxis is a systemic life-threatening allergic reaction that presents unique challenges for emergency care practitioners. Allergists and emergency physicians have a history of collaborating to promote an evidence-based, multidisciplinary approach to improve the emergency management and follow-up of patients with or at risk of anaphylaxis. To review recent scientific literature about anaphylaxis, discuss barriers to care, and recommend strategies to support improvement in emergency anaphylaxis care. An expert panel of allergists and emergency physicians was convened by the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology in November 2014 to discuss current knowledge about anaphylaxis, identify opportunities for emergency practitioners and allergists to partner to address barriers to care, and recommend strategies to improve medical management of anaphylaxis along the continuum of care: from emergency medical systems and emergency department practitioners for acute management through appropriate outpatient follow-up with allergists to confirm diagnosis, identify triggers, and plan long-term care. The panel identified key barriers to anaphylaxis care, including difficulties in making an accurate diagnosis, low rates of epinephrine administration during acute management, and inadequate follow-up. Strategies to overcome these barriers were discussed and recommendations made for future allergist/emergency physician collaborations, and key messages to be communicated to emergency practitioners were proposed. The panel recommended that allergists and emergency physicians continue to work in partnership, that allergists be proactive in outreach to emergency care practitioners, and that easy-to-access educational programs and materials be developed for use by emergency medical systems and emergency department practitioners in the training environment and in practice. Copyright © 2015 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  14. Pathways through Services for Offenders with Intellectual Disability: A One- and Two-Year Follow-Up Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, William R.; Holland, Tony; Wheeler, Jessica R.; Carson, Derek; O'Brien, Gregory; Taylor, John L.; Steptoe, Lesley; Middleton, Claire; Price, Karen; Johnston, Susan; Young, Steven J.

    2010-01-01

    The pathways through services for offenders with intellectual disability were reviewed. Participants were 197 offenders with intellectual disability accepted into three types of community and three types of secure forensic intellectual disability services. They were first compared with 280 participants referred but not accepted into services and…

  15. Pathways through Services for Offenders with Intellectual Disability: A One- and Two-Year Follow-Up Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, William R.; Holland, Tony; Wheeler, Jessica R.; Carson, Derek; O'Brien, Gregory; Taylor, John L.; Steptoe, Lesley; Middleton, Claire; Price, Karen; Johnston, Susan; Young, Steven J.

    2010-01-01

    The pathways through services for offenders with intellectual disability were reviewed. Participants were 197 offenders with intellectual disability accepted into three types of community and three types of secure forensic intellectual disability services. They were first compared with 280 participants referred but not accepted into services and…

  16. Mental Health Service Use among 18-Year-Old Adolescent Boys: A Prospective 10-Year Follow-Up Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sourander, Andre; Multimaki, Petteri; Santalahti, Paivi; Parkkola, Kai; Haavisto, Antti; Helenius, Hans; Nikolakaros, Georgios; Piha, Jorma; Tamminen, Tuula; Moilanen, Irma; Kumpulainen, Kirsti; Aronen, Eeva T.; Linna, Sirkka-Liisa; Puura, Kaija; Almqvist, Fredrik

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study prevalence and factors associated with mental health service use among 18-year-old adolescent boys. Method: Predictors at age 8 and factors at age 18 associated with mental health service use during the preceding 12 months were studied in a general population sample of 2,316 Finnish boys born in 1981 attending military call-up…

  17. Mental Health Service Use among 18-Year-Old Adolescent Boys: A Prospective 10-Year Follow-Up Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sourander, Andre; Multimaki, Petteri; Santalahti, Paivi; Parkkola, Kai; Haavisto, Antti; Helenius, Hans; Nikolakaros, Georgios; Piha, Jorma; Tamminen, Tuula; Moilanen, Irma; Kumpulainen, Kirsti; Aronen, Eeva T.; Linna, Sirkka-Liisa; Puura, Kaija; Almqvist, Fredrik

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study prevalence and factors associated with mental health service use among 18-year-old adolescent boys. Method: Predictors at age 8 and factors at age 18 associated with mental health service use during the preceding 12 months were studied in a general population sample of 2,316 Finnish boys born in 1981 attending military call-up…

  18. A 12-month follow-up study of people with dementia referred to general hospital liaison psychiatry services.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Bart; Lall, Ranjit; Gage, Heather; Holland, Caroline; Katz, Jeanne; Mitchell, Kate

    2013-11-01

    new services for patients with dementia in general hospitals are being widely developed. Little is known of outcomes after hospital for such patients. to establish outcomes for patients with dementia referred to general hospital psychiatric services. prospective cohort study. two UK general hospitals. referrals with dementia to liaison psychiatric services. eligible referrals (n = 112), and their carers, were assessed during admission, and at 6 and 12 months, using battery of health measurements. mortality at 6 months was 31% and at 12 months 40%. At baseline, 13% lived in a care home, rising to 84% by 6 months. Quality of life scores remained stable over 12 months, while carer stress fell significantly. Baseline clinical and demographic variables did not predict quality of life or carer stress at 6 and 12 months. dementia liaison services in general hospitals currently focus on poor outcome cases.

  19. A Telemedicine system based on Internet and short message service as a new approach in the follow-up of patients with gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Ferre, Natalia; Galindo, Mercedes; Fernández, M Dolores; Velasco, Victoria; de la Cruz, M José; Martín, Patricia; del Valle, Laura; Calle-Pascual, Alfonso L

    2010-02-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of a Telemedicine system based on Internet and short message service in the follow-up of patients with gestational diabetes. Compared to control group, Telemedicine group reduced 62% the number of unscheduled face-to-face visits, and 82.7% in the subgroup of insulin-treated patients, improving patient satisfaction, and achieving similar pregnancy and new born outcomes.

  20. Reducing follow-ups: an opportunity to increase the capacity of genitourinary medicine services across the UK.

    PubMed

    Ahmed-Jushuf, I; Griffiths, V

    2007-05-01

    Significant increases in genitourinary (GU) medicine clinic workloads throughout the UK have resulted in an unmet demand for appointments, and increased waiting times. In order to meet the government target of a 48-hour maximum waiting time for all patients, many clinics are modernising current practices to increase capacity and improve access to services. The 'Six Sigma' study group of 12 GU medicine clinics which was formed in 2003 to investigate means of enhancing capacity of GU medicine services, has demonstrated that there is a significant amount of unreleased capacity within UK clinics. In this article, the Six Sigma group present potential actions which other GU medicine clinics in the UK may be able to apply and thereby release additional capacity. Example case studies from the Six Sigma study are also presented, illustrating the applicability of this model throughout the UK. The findings of the Six Sigma project offer GU medicine clinics across the UK the opportunity to increase capacity, without adversely affecting quality of care.

  1. Burnout as a predictor of self‐reported sickness absence among human service workers: prospective findings from three year follow up of the PUMA study

    PubMed Central

    Borritz, M; Rugulies, R; Christensen, K B; Villadsen, E; Kristensen, T S

    2006-01-01

    Aim To investigate whether burnout predicts sickness absence days and sickness absence spells in human service workers. Method A total of 824 participants from an ongoing prospective study in different human service sector organisations were eligible for the three year follow up analysis. Burnout was measured with the work related burnout scale of the Copenhagen Burnout Inventory. Sickness absence was measured with self‐reported number of days and spells during the last 12 months before the baseline and the follow up survey. A Poisson regression model with a scale parameter was used to account for over dispersion. A linear regression model was used for analysing changes in burnout and absence between baseline and follow up. Results Burnout was prospectively associated with both sickness absence days and sickness absence spells per year. Differences in sickness absence days varied from a mean of 5.4 days per year in the lowest quartile of the work related burnout scale to a mean of 13.6 in the highest quartile. An increase of one standard deviation on the work related burnout scale predicted an increase of 21% in sickness absence days per year (rate ratio 1.21, 95% CI 1.11 to 1.32) after adjusting for gender, age, organisation, socioeconomic status, lifestyle factors, family status, having children under 7 years of age, and prevalence of diseases. Regarding sickness absence spells, an increase of one standard deviation on the work related burnout scale predicted an increase of 9% per year (rate ratio 1.09, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.17). Changes in burnout level from baseline to follow up were positively associated with changes in sickness absence days (estimate 1.94 days/year, SE 0.63) and sickness absence spell (estimate 0.34 spells/year, SE 0.08). Conclusion The findings indicate that burnout predicts sickness absence. Reducing burnout is likely to reduce sickness absence. PMID:16421387

  2. A qualitative follow-up study of diabetes patients' appraisal of an integrated diabetes service in primary care.

    PubMed

    Burridge, Letitia H; Foster, Michele M; Donald, Maria; Zhang, Jianzhen; Russell, Anthony W; Jackson, Claire L

    2016-10-26

    As the prevalence of type 2 diabetes continues to escalate, health system reform is seeking better patient outcomes through new models of care that aim to provide the most appropriate care when needed. Patients' experiences of service innovations can shed light on the successes and challenges of implementing change. This paper explores patients' views of a new model of integrated care for patients with type 2 diabetes. A mixed-methods, randomised control trial evaluated a beacon clinic model of care for complex type 2 diabetes led by specialist general practitioners (GPs) in primary care settings in Brisbane, Australia. In this qualitative sub-study conducted between May 2014 and January 2015, 25 consenting participants were re-interviewed after 12 months using semi-structured questions, to explore their experiences of the new model of care. Interview transcripts were analysed thematically. In the first theme, Organised for patient-centred care, patients appraised the structural elements of the clinic. For most, it was an enabling experience which included convenience, flexibility and prompt communication back to the referring GPs. The preferences of a minority were partly realised, as they tried to understand the clinical purpose in comparison with traditional care. The second theme, Positioned as partners in care, revealed the pivotal role of patient-clinician relationships in patients' engagement with advice and self-care. Most found clinicians' collaborative approach engaging and motivating. A small minority with contextual concerns were disappointed with the focus on diabetes and struggled to engage fully with the model. Most participants valued this model of care, which reflects a capacity to manage the variable and complex needs of most patients referred for care. However, multi-level strategies are also needed to enhance patients' engagement with care and the sustainability of integrated diabetes care.

  3. The REAnimation Low Immune Status Markers (REALISM) project: a protocol for broad characterisation and follow-up of injury-induced immunosuppression in intensive care unit (ICU) critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Rol, Mary-Luz; Venet, Fabienne; Rimmele, Thomas; Moucadel, Virginie; Cortez, Pierre; Quemeneur, Laurence; Gardiner, David; Griffiths, Andrew; Pachot, Alexandre; Textoris, Julien; Monneret, Guillaume

    2017-06-21

    The host response to septic shock is dynamic and complex. A sepsis-induced immunosuppression phase has recently been acknowledged and linked to bad outcomes and increased healthcare costs. Moreover, a marked suppression of the immune response has also been partially described in patients hospitalized in intensive care unit (ICU) for severe trauma or burns. It has been hypothesized that immune monitoring could enable identification of patients who might most benefit from novel, adjunctive immune-stimulating therapies. However, there is currently neither a clear definition for such injury-induced immunosuppression nor a stratification biomarker compatible with clinical constraints. We set up a prospective, longitudinal single-centre clinical study to determine the incidence, severity and persistency of innate and adaptive immune alterations in ICU patients. We optimized a workflow to describe and follow the immunoinflammatory status of 550 patients (septic shock, severe trauma/burn and major surgery) during the first 2 months after their initial injury. On each time point, two immune functional tests will be performed to determine whole-blood TNF-α production in response to ex vivo lipopolysaccharide stimulation and the T lymphocyte proliferation in response to phytohaemagglutinin. In addition, a complete immunophenotyping using flow cytometry including monocyte HLA-DR expression and lymphocyte subsets will be obtained. New markers (ie, levels of expression of host mRNA and viral reactivation) will be also evaluated. Reference intervals will be determined from a cohort of 150 age-matched healthy volunteers. This clinical study will provide, for the first time, data describing the immune status of severe ICU patients over time. Ethical approval has been obtained from the institutional review board (no 69HCL15_0379) and the French National Security agency for drugs and health-related products. Results will be disseminated through presentations at scientific meetings

  4. Association of adherence support and outreach services with total attrition, loss to follow-up, and death among ART patients in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Matthew R; El-Sadr, Wafaa M; Geng, Elvin; Nash, Denis

    2012-01-01

    Loss to follow-up (LTF) after antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation is common in HIV clinics. We examined the effect of availability of adherence support and active patient outreach services on patient attrition following ART initiation. This ecologic study examined clinic attrition rates (total attrition, LTF, and death) among 232,389 patients initiating ART at 349 clinics during 2004-2008 in 10 sub-Saharan African countries, and cohort attrition (proportion retained at 6 and 12 months after ART initiation) among a subset of patients with follow-up information (n=83,389). Log-linear regression compared mean rates of attrition, LTF, and death between clinics with and without adherence support and outreach services. Cumulative attrition, LTF, and death rates were 14.2, 9.2, and 4.9 per 100 person-years on ART, respectively. In multivariate analyses, clinic availability of >2 adherence support services was marginally associated with lower attrition rates (RR(adj)=0.59, 95%CI: 0.35-1.0). Clinics with availability of counseling services (RR(adj)=0.62, 95%CI: 0.42-0.92), educational materials (RR(adj)=0.73, 95%CI: 0.63-0.85), reminder tools (RR(adj)=0.79, 95%CI: 0.64-0.97), and food rations (RR(adj)=0.72, 95%CI: 0.58-0.90) had significantly lower attrition, with similar results observed for LTF. Outreach services were not significantly associated with attrition. In cohort analyses, attrition was significantly lower at clinics offering >2 adherence support services (RR(adj,6m)=0.84, 95%CI: 0.73-0.96), dedicated pharmacy services (RR(adj,6m)=0.78, 95%CI: 0.69-0.90), and active patient outreach (RR(adj,6m)=0.85, 95%CI: 0.73-0.99). Availability of food rations was marginally associated with increased retention at 6 (RR(adj,6m) =0.82, 95%CI: 0.64-1.05) but not 12 months (RR(adj,12m) =0.98, 95%CI: 0.78-1.21). Availability of adherence support services, active patient outreach and food rations at HIV care clinics may improve retention following ART initiation.

  5. Health Problems during Compulsory Military Service Predict Disability Retirement: A Register-Based Study on Secular Trends during 40 Years of Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Frilander, Heikki; Lallukka, Tea; Viikari-Juntura, Eira; Heliövaara, Markku; Solovieva, Svetlana

    2016-01-01

    Disability retirement causes a significant burden on the society and affects the well-being of individuals. Early health problems as determinants of disability retirement have received little attention. The objective was to study, whether interrupting compulsory military service is an early indicator of disability retirement among Finnish men and whether seeking medical advice during military service increases the risk of all-cause disability retirement and disability retirement due to mental disorders and musculoskeletal diseases. We also looked at secular trends in these associations. We examined a nationally representative sample of 2069 men, who had entered military service during 1967–1996. We linked military service health records with cause-specific register data on disability retirement from 1968 to 2008. Secular trends were explored in three service time strata. We used the Cox regression model to estimate proportional hazard ratios and their 95% confidence intervals. During the follow-up time altogether 140 (6.8%) men retired due to disability, mental disorders being the most common cause. The men who interrupted service had a remarkably higher cumulative incidence of disability retirement (18.9%). The associations between seeking medical advice during military service and all-cause disability retirement were similar across the three service time cohorts (overall hazard ratio 1.40 per one standard deviation of the number of visits; 95% confidence interval 1.26–1.56). Visits due to mental problems predicted disability retirement due to mental disorders in the men who served between 1987 and 1996 and a tendency for a similar cause-specific association was seen for musculoskeletal diseases in the men who served in 1967–1976. In conclusion, health problems—in particular mental problems—during late adolescence are strong determinants of disability retirement. Call-up examinations and military service provide access to the entire age cohort of men

  6. Alcohol Consumption and Inpatient Health Service Utilization in a Cohort of Patients With Alcohol Dependence After 20 Years of Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Miquel, Laia; Gual, Antoni; Vela, Emili; Lligoña, Anna; Bustins, Montserrat; Colom, Joan; Rehm, Jürgen

    2017-03-09

    To examine the association between drinking levels and inpatient health service utilization in people with a lifetime diagnosis of alcohol dependence. A longitudinal prospective study was conducted in a cohort of patients with alcohol dependence who had undergone treatment in 1987. Current results refer to the association between drinking patterns at 20-year follow-up and subsequent inpatient health service utilization. At 20 years after baseline, 530 of 850 patients were alive with administrative data available. Follow-up interview was conducted on 378 patients. There were 88 refusals and 64 could not be traced. Three categories of alcohol consumption were established (abstainers, moderate drinkers and heavy drinkers) depending on the pattern of alcohol use during the last year prior to the evaluation. Health service utilization was based on official statistics, including admissions to general, rehabilitation and psychiatric hospitals. The time period analysed was 5 years after the assessment of drinking patterns. Admission rates were lowest for abstainers compared to people with moderate and heavy drinking. With respect to hospital days, heavy drinking was associated with significantly higher adjusted rates than both abstainers and moderate drinkers. Alcohol-related diagnoses in hospital admissions were more frequent for both moderate and heavy drinkers. Abstinence and moderate alcohol consumption were both associated with lower hospitalization in people with a lifetime diagnosis of alcohol dependence. Thus, not only abstinence-oriented treatment strategies but also those to reduce alcohol intake would reduce inpatient hospitalizations. Abstention and reduced drinking in lifetime alcohol-dependent patients were associated with lower health care utilization compared to heavy drinking. Alcohol treatment strategies for alcohol-dependent patients have a positive impact on the reduction in health care utilization. An increase in treatment rate for alcohol use

  7. Prospective evaluation of a complex public health intervention: lessons from an initial and follow-up cross-sectional survey of the tuberculosis strain typing service in England.

    PubMed

    Mears, Jessica; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Crisp, Debbie; Maguire, Helen; Innes, John A; Lilley, Mike; Lord, Joanne; Cohen, Ted; Borgdorff, Martien W; Vynnycky, Emilia; McHugh, Timothy D; Sonnenberg, Pam

    2014-10-02

    The national tuberculosis strain typing service (TB-STS) was introduced in England in 2010. The TB-STS involves MIRU-VNTR typing of isolates from all TB patients for the prospective identification, reporting and investigation of TB strain typing clusters. As part of a mixed-method evaluation, we report on a repeated cross-sectional survey to illustrate the challenges surrounding the evaluation of a complex national public health intervention. An online initial and follow-up questionnaire survey assessed the knowledge, attitudes and practices of public health staff, physicians and nurses working in TB control in November 2010 and March 2012. It included questions on the implementation, experience and uptake of the TB-STS. Participants that responded to both surveys were included in the analysis. 248 participants responded to the initial survey and 137 of these responded to the follow-up survey (56% retention). Knowledge: A significant increase in knowledge was observed, including a rise in the proportion of respondents who had received training (28.6% to 67.9%, p = 0.003), and the self-rated knowledge of how to use strain typing had improved ('no knowledge' decreased from 43.2% to 27.4%). Attitudes: The majority of respondents found strain typing useful; the proportion that reported strain typing to be useful was similar across the two surveys (95.7% to 94.7%, p = 0.67). Practices: There were significant increases between the initial and follow-up surveys in the number of respondents who reported using strain typing (57.0% to 80.5%, p < 0.001) and the proportion of time health protection staff spent on investigating TB (2.74% to 7.08%, p = 0.04). Evaluation of a complex public health intervention is challenging. In this example, the immediate national roll-out of the TB-STS meant that a controlled survey design was not possible. This study informs the future development of the TB-STS by identifying the need for training to reach wider professional groups, and argues

  8. Increased ICU resource needs for an academic emergency general surgery service*.

    PubMed

    Lissauer, Matthew E; Galvagno, Samuel M; Rock, Peter; Narayan, Mayur; Shah, Paulesh; Spencer, Heather; Hong, Caron; Diaz, Jose J

    2014-04-01

    ICU needs of nontrauma emergency general surgery patients are poorly described. This study was designed to compare ICU utilization of emergency general surgery patients admitted to an acute care emergency surgery service with other general surgery patients. Our hypothesis is that tertiary care emergency general surgery patients utilize more ICU resources than other general surgical patients. Retrospective database review. Academic, tertiary care, nontrauma surgical ICU. All patients admitted to the surgical ICU over age 18 between March 2004 and June 2012. None. Six thousand ninety-eight patients were evaluated: 1,053 acute care emergency surgery, 1,964 general surgery, 1,491 transplant surgery, 995 facial surgery/otolaryngology, and 595 neurosurgery. Acute care emergency surgery patients had statistically significantly longer ICU lengths of stay than other groups: acute care emergency surgery (13.5 ± 17.4 d) versus general surgery (8.7 ± 12.9), transplant (7.8 ± 11.6), oral-maxillofacial surgery (5.5 ± 4.2), and neurosurgery (4.47 ± 9.8) (all p< 0.01). Ventilator usage, defined by percentage of total ICU days patients required mechanical ventilation, was significantly higher for acute care emergency surgery patients: acute care emergency surgery 73.4% versus general surgery 64.9%, transplant 63.3%, oral-maxillofacial surgery 58.4%, and neurosurgery 53.1% (all p < 0.01). Continuous renal replacement therapy usage, defined as percent of patients requiring this service, was significantly higher in acute care emergency surgery patients: acute care emergency surgery 10.8% versus general surgery 4.3%, transplant 6.6%, oral-maxillofacial surgery 0%, and neurosurgery 0.5% (all p < 0.01). Acute care emergency surgery patients were more likely interhospital transfers for tertiary care services than general surgery or transplant (24.5% vs 15.5% and 8.3% respectively, p < 0.001 for each) and more likely required emergent surgery (13.7% vs 6.7% and 3.5%, all p < 0

  9. [Priorization of facilitators for the implementation of medication review with follow-up service in Spanish community pharmacies through exploratory factor analysis].

    PubMed

    Gil, Modesta Inmaculada; Benrimoj, Shalom Isaac; Martínez-Martínez, Fernando; Cardero, Manuel; Gastelurrutia, Miguel Ángel

    2013-01-01

    to prioritize previously identified in Spain facilitators for the implementation of new Pharmaceutical Services that allow designing strategies for the implementation of Medication Review with follow-up (MRFup) service. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA). A draft of a questionnaire was performed based on a previous literature review and following the RAND/UCLA methodology. An expert panel worked with it and generated a definitive questionnaire which, after piloting, was used with a representative sample of pharmacists, owners or staff members, who were working in community pharmacy, using computer-assisted telephone interviewing (CATI) methodology. To understand underlying constructs in the questionnaire an EFA was performed. Different approaches were tested such as principal components factor analysis and principal axis factoring method. The best interpretability was achieved using the Factorization of Principal axis method with Direct Oblimin rotation, which explained the 40.0% of total variance. This produced four factors defined as: «Incentives», «External campaigns», «Expert in MRFup» and «Professionalism of the pharmacist». It can be stated that for implementation and sustainability of MRFup Service it is necessary being paid; also it must be explained to health professional and society in general. Practice of MRFup service demands pharmacists receiving a more clinical education and assuming more responsibilities as health professionals. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  10. [Breastfeeding and the anthropometric profile of children with sickle cell anemia receiving follow-up in a newborn screening reference service].

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Zeni Drubi; Boa-Sorte, Ney; Leite, Maria Efigênia de Queiroz; Kiya, Márcia Miyuki; Amorim, Tatiana; Fonseca, Silvana Fahel da

    2015-01-01

    To study breastfeeding history (BF) and the anthropometric status of children with Sickle Cell Disease (SCD). A cross-sectional study of 357 children with SS and SC hemoglobinopathies aged between 2 and 6 years old receiving regular follow-up at a Newborn Screening Reference Service (NSRS) between November 2007 and January 2009. The outcome was anthropometric status and the exposures were: BF pattern, type of hemoglobinopathy and child's age and sex. The average (SD) age was 3.7 (1.1) years, 52.9% were boys and 53.5% had SS hemoglobinopathy. The prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding (EBR) up to six months of age was 31.5%, the median EBR times (p25-p75) was 90.0 (24.0-180.0) days and the median weaning ages (p25-p75) was 360.0 (90.0-20.0) days respectively. Normal W/H children experienced EBR for an average duration almost four times longer than malnourished children (p=0.01), and were weaned later (p<0.05). Height deficit was found in 5.0% of children, while all the children with severe short stature had SS hemoglobinopathy and were over 4 years of age. EBR time and weaning age were greater than found in the literature, which is a possible effect of the multidisciplinary follow-up. Duration of EBR and later weaning were associated with improved anthropometric indicators. Copyright © 2014 Associação de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  11. Psychological support for families of ICU patients: longitudinal documentation of the service.

    PubMed

    Demetriadou, E; Kokkinou, M; Metaxas, G; Kyriakides, E; Kyprianou, T

    2016-09-09

    This study is the first systematic effort to investigate psychological services provided to relatives of ICU patients at Nicosia General Hospital. Documentation of psychological sessions provided to relatives of ICU patients for the years 2011-2014 was analyzed. To investigate possible differences in the total number of sessions for the referenced years, the records were analyzed using patients' demographics, the outcome of hospitalization and the total number of sessions with relatives. A questionnaire was sent to the ICU staff aiming to identify their perception towards the need for psychological support. A total number of 863 psychological sessions were conducted with 640 relatives of 345 patients hospitalized in the ICU. Results indicate that more sessions are recorded when the outcome of younger patients' condition worsens, whereas the number of sessions decreases for older patients' families. When comparing the personnel's beliefs, regarding the importance of providing psychological services to different age groups, significant difference was found suggesting that the older the patient the less sessions they believe are required indicating a possible ageism bias.

  12. Eight-year incidence of psychiatric disorders and service use from adolescence to early adulthood: longitudinal follow-up of the Mexican Adolescent Mental Health Survey.

    PubMed

    Benjet, Corina; Borges, Guilherme; Méndez, Enrique; Albor, Yesica; Casanova, Leticia; Orozco, Ricardo; Curiel, Teresa; Fleiz, Clara; Medina-Mora, María Elena

    2016-02-01

    Half of mental disorders have their first onset before adulthood when the presence of a disorder may be particularly disruptive to developmental milestones. Retrospective prevalence estimates have been shown to underestimate the burden of mental illness and scarce data are available on the incidence of disorders throughout the adolescent period, especially in developing countries. Thus, the objective was to determine the incidence of mental disorders in an 8-year period from adolescence to young adulthood, onset of service use and their predictors in a Mexican cohort. 1071 respondents from a representative two-wave panel sample participated in the Mexican Adolescent Mental Health Survey in 2005 and in the follow-up survey in 2013. Disorders were evaluated with the World Mental Health Composite International Diagnostic Interview. 37.9% experienced the onset of a psychiatric disorder and 28.4% sought services for the first time. Substance use disorders had the greatest incidence, followed by mood and behavior disorders, anxiety disorders and lastly eating disorders. Sex, age, school dropout, childhood adversities and prior mental disorders predicted the onset of new disorders. Being female, having more educated parents and most classes of disorder predicted first time service use. These findings contribute to a paradigm shift in conceptions of mental disorder similar to how we think of common physical afflictions as near universal experiences across the life course, but less frequent at any given moment. Adolescents are particularly vulnerable. Therefore, public health policy should focus on early universal promotion of positive mental health and structural determinants of mental health.

  13. Homeless people's access to primary care physiotherapy services: an exploratory, mixed-method investigation using a follow-up qualitative extension to core quantitative research.

    PubMed

    Dawes, Jo; Deaton, Stuart; Greenwood, Nan

    2017-06-30

    The purpose of this study was to appraise referrals of homeless patients to physiotherapy services and explore perceptions of barriers to access. This exploratory mixed-method study used a follow-up qualitative extension to core quantitative research design. Over 9 months, quantitative data were gathered from the healthcare records of homeless patients referred to physiotherapy by a general practitioner (GP) practice, including the number of referrals and demographic data of all homeless patients referred. Corresponding physiotherapy records of those people referred to physiotherapy were searched for the outcome of their care. Qualitative semi-structured telephone interviews, based on the quantitative findings, were carried out with staff involved with patient care from the referring GP practice and were used to expand insight into the quantitative findings. Two primary care sites provided data for this study: a GP practice dedicated exclusively to homeless people and the physiotherapy department receiving their referrals. Quantitative data from the healthcare records of 34 homeless patient referrals to physiotherapy were collected and analysed. In addition, five staff involved in patient care were interviewed. 34 referrals of homeless people were made to physiotherapy in a 9-month period. It was possible to match 25 of these to records from the physiotherapy department. Nine (36%) patients did not attend their first appointment; seven (28%) attended an initial appointment, but did not attend a subsequent appointment and were discharged from the service; five (20%) completed treatment and four patients (16%) had ongoing treatment. Semi-structured interviews revealed potential barriers preventing homeless people from accessing physiotherapy services, the complex factors being faced by those making referrals and possible ways to improve physiotherapy access. Homeless people with musculoskeletal problems may fail to access physiotherapy treatment, but opportunities

  14. What Contributes to the Regularity of Patients with Hypertension or Diabetes Seeking Health Services? A Pilot Follow-Up, Observational Study in Two Sites in Hubei Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Da; Serrano, Ray; Ye, Ting; Tang, Shangfeng; Duan, Lei; Xu, Yuan; Yang, Jian; Liang, Yuan; Chen, Shanquan; Feng, Zhanchun; Zhang, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Regular maintenance of non-communicable chronic diseases can constrain disease progression in diabetic and hypertensive patients. To identify the individual and social factors that are associated with positive health-seeking behaviors and regular maintenance of chronic diseases, we have conducted a follow up study in 2015 on diabetic and hypertensive patients in Hubei Province. We used binary logistic regression models to determine specific factors associated with diabetic and hypertensive patients that sought healthcare services for their conditions in accordance with current Chinese Centers for Disease Prevention and Control (CDC) guidelines. Our findings show that 42.16% of 510 people living with chronic conditions (PLCDs) sought health services in line with existing guidelines. Findings also show a higher probability (8.418 times) for PLCDs seeking healthcare services at higher-tiered hospitals (secondary and tertiary hospitals) than for PLCDs seeking care at primary hospitals (odds ratio (OR) = 8.418, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 4.82, 14.27, p < 0.001). These analyses underscore the importance of having patient advocates who can provide support, where necessary, and encourage positive health-seeking behavior. The study also shows a negative impact on regular maintenance for PLCDs in households with high financial constraints. In contrast, the study shows positive impacts for increased household income, age, and residency in rural locations. In sum, this study underscores the importance of primary hospitals as key points of care and critical players in care coordination for PLCDs. The study provides more evidence for Chinese policymakers seeking to contain costs and improve population health. The findings also underscore the need for community-based interventions, specifically interventions that link local primary hospitals, friends/family members, and PLCDs. PMID:28009850

  15. Intervention effects on diurnal cortisol rhythms of Child Protective Services-referred infants in early childhood: preschool follow-up results of a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Kristin; Hostinar, Camelia E; Dozier, Mary

    2015-02-01

    A number of interventions for at-risk children have shown benefits for children's hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity immediately after treatment. It is critical to examine whether such changes are maintained over time, given that physiological regulation is implicated in later mental and physical health outcomes. To examine whether differences in diurnal cortisol production between children receiving the active parenting intervention and children in the control group persisted at a preschool follow-up (approximately 3 years following intervention). Between-subject comparison of cortisol patterns among 2 groups of children (experimental and control groups) involved with Child Protective Services following allegations of neglect. The participants included 115 children (43.5% female) between 46.5 and 69.6 months of age (mean [SD], 50.73 [4.98] months) who had been previously randomly assigned to either the Attachment and Biobehavioral Catch-up (ABC) intervention (n = 54) or the control intervention (n = 61). The experimental ABC intervention focused on 3 aims: increasing parental nurturance to child distress, increasing synchronous interactions, and decreasing frightening parental behavior. The control intervention provided educational information about child development to parents. Both interventions were manualized and involved 10 sessions implemented by a trained parent coach in the families' homes or other places of residence. Salivary cortisol samples collected at waking and bedtime for children on 3 separate days. Analyses revealed significant differences in cortisol production at the preschool follow-up, such that children in the ABC intervention group showed more typical patterns of cortisol production than children in the control intervention group. Specifically, children in the ABC group exhibited higher mean (SD) log-transformed morning levels than children in the control group (-0.87 [0.45] vs -1.05 [0.43] μg/dL, respectively [to convert

  16. Breastfeeding and the anthropometric profile of children with sickle cell anemia receiving follow-up in a newborn screening reference service

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Zeni Drubi; Boa-Sorte, Ney; Leite, Maria Efigênia de Queiroz; Kiya, Márcia Miyuki; Amorim, Tatiana; da Fonseca, Silvana Fahel

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the breastfeeding history (BF) and the anthropometric status of children with Sickle Cell Disease (SCD). METHODS: A cross-sectional study of 357 children with SCD aged between 2 and 6 years, regularly followed at a Newborn Screening Reference Service (NSRS) between November 2007 and January 2009. The outcome was anthropometric status and the exposures were: BF pattern, type of hemoglobinopathy and child's age and gender. RESULTS: The mean (SD) age was 3.7 (1.1) years, 52.9% were boys and 53.5% had SCA (hemoglobin SS). The prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding (EBR) up to six months of age was 31.5%, the median EBR times (p25-p75) was 90.0 (24.0-180.0) days and the median weaning ages (p25-p75) was 360.0 (90.0-720.0) days respectively. Normal W/H children experienced EBR for a mean duration almost four times longer than malnourished children (p=0.01), and were weaned later (p<0.05). Height deficit was found in 5.0% of children, while all the children with severe short stature had had SCA (hemoglobin SS) and were older than 4 years of age. CONCLUSIONS: EBF time and weaning age were greater than that found in the literature, which is a possible effect of the multidisciplinary follow-up. Duration of EBF and later weaning were associated with improved anthropometric indicators. PMID:25662563

  17. Objectively Assessed Physical Activity and Subsequent Health Service Use of UK Adults Aged 70 and Over: A Four to Five Year Follow Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Simmonds, Bethany; Fox, Kenneth; Davis, Mark; Ku, Po-Wen; Gray, Selena; Hillsdon, Melvyn; Sharp, Debbie; Stathi, Afroditi; Thompson, Janice; Coulson, Joanna; Trayers, Tanya

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine the associations between volume and intensity of older peoples' physical activity, with their subsequent health service usage over the following four to five years. Study Design A prospective cohort design using baseline participant characteristics, objectively assessed physical activity and lower limb function provided by Project OPAL (Older People and Active Living). OPAL-PLUS provided data on numbers of primary care consultations, prescriptions, unplanned hospital admissions, and secondary care referrals, extracted from medical records for up to five years following the baseline OPAL data collection. Participants and Data Collection OPAL participants were a diverse sample of 240 older adults with a mean age of 78 years. They were recruited from 12 General Practitioner surgeries from low, middle, and high areas of deprivation in a city in the West of England. Primary care consultations, secondary care referrals, unplanned hospital admissions, number of prescriptions and new disease diagnoses were assessed for 213 (104 females) of the original 240 OPAL participants who had either consented to participate in OPAL-PLUS or already died during the follow-up period. Results In regression modelling, adjusted for socio-economic variables, existing disease, weight status, minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) per day predicted subsequent numbers of prescriptions. Steps taken per day and MVPA also predicted unplanned hospital admissions, although the strength of the effect was reduced when further adjustment was made for lower limb function. Conclusions Community-based programs are needed which are successful in engaging older adults in their late 70s and 80s in more walking, MVPA and activity that helps them avoid loss of physical function. There is a potential for cost savings to health services through reduced reliance on prescriptions and fewer unplanned hospital admissions. PMID:24866573

  18. Impact of Birth HIV-PCR Testing on the Uptake at Follow-Up Early Infant Diagnosis Services in Cape Town, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Dunning, Lorna; Kroon, Max; Fourie, Lezanne; Ciaranello, Andrea; Myer, Landon

    2017-07-27

    PCR testing at birth ('birth-testing') is suggested by new World Health Organization guidelines for rapid diagnosis of infants infected with HIV in utero. However, there are few data on the implementation of this approach in sub-Saharan Africa and whether birth-testing affects uptake of subsequent routine early infant diagnosis (EID) testing at 6-10 weeks of age is unknown. We reviewed 575 consecutive infants undergoing targeted high-risk birth-testing in Cape Town, South Africa, and matched those testing HIV-negative at birth (n=551) to HIV-exposed infants who did not receive birth-testing (n=551). Maternal and infant clinical and demographic data, including EID testing uptake, were abstracted from routine records. Overall 3.8% of all birth-tests conducted were positive, while later EID testing positivity rates were 0.5% for those infants testing HIV-negative at birth and 0.4% for those without birth-testing. Infants who underwent birth-testing were less likely to present for later EID compared with those without a birth-test (73% vs 85%; p<0.001). This difference persisted after adjusting for maternal and infant characteristics (adjusted odds ratio,0.60 95% confidence interval, 0.41-0.86) and across demographic and clinical subgroups. Infants undergoing birth-testing also presented for later EID at a significantly older age (mean age 60 vs 50 days, p<0.001). While the yield of targeted high-risk birth testing in this setting appears high, neonates testing HIV-negative at birth may be less likely to present for subsequent EID testing. For birth-testing implementation to contribute to overall EID program goals, structured interventions are required to support follow-up EID services after negative birth-test results.

  19. Knowledge and Awareness of MTCT and PMTCT Post-Natal Follow-up Services Among HIV Infected Mothers in the Mankweng Region, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Ramoshaba, Refilwe; Sithole, Sello Levy

    2017-01-01

    The pandemic of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is the most severe health challenge affecting children across the world. It is estimated that more than 90% of all HIV infections in children result from Mother-to-Child Transmission (MTCT). Poor knowledge and awareness of MTCT and Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission (PMTCT) among HIV positive mothers and their babies is a major setback to the success of the PMTCT programmes. A qualitative approach and a cross-sectional design were applied in this study. The sample size of the study was 26 participants. Purposive sampling was used to select HIV infected mothers enrolled for PMTCT follow-up services and health care providers responsible for the implementation of the PMTCT programmes. In-depth interviews were conducted with fifteen HIV infected mothers at two health facilities. Two Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) were conducted with eleven health workers at the two health facilities. Focus groups comprised of six participants from Mankweng Clinic and five participants from Mankweng Gateway Clinic. The findings from the study reveal that the majority of the respondents were aware of MTCT, but lacked knowledge and understanding about how a mother can transmit HIV to her child during pregnancy, labour and breastfeeding. The majority of the participants did not understand the risk of MTCT after birth and failed to mention breastfeeding as a mode of transmission. However, most of the participants were aware that MTCT can be prevented. The respondents were aware of the importance of treatment adherence as a prevention measure to avoid MTCT. Based on these findings, a number of recommendations were made. The first is that educational and awareness programmes need to be developed or strengthened on health risks. Mass campaign media should provide information on the importance of PMTCT activities through the use of community radio stations, Television, newsletters, bill boards etc. People need to know more about PMTCT

  20. Evaluation of a telemedicine-based service for the follow-up and monitoring of patients treated with oral anticoagulant therapy.

    PubMed

    Salvador, Carlos H; Ruiz-Sanchez, Antonio; González de Mingo, Miguel A; Carmona Rodríguez, Montserrat; Carrasco, Mario Pascual; Sagredo, Pilar G; Fragua, Juan A; Caballero-Martinez, Fernando; García-López, Fernando; Márquez-Montes, Joaqu N; Monteagudo, José L

    2008-11-01

    The authors have designed and developed a telemedicine-based service for the follow-up and monitoring of patients on oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT) that consists of two phases; the first involving self-testing and the second involving guided self-management. To evaluate the first phase of the protocol, a project was conducted with 108 patients, with a mean age of 72.7 years and a mean treatment time at the start of the study of 55.2 months, divided into two groups: telemedicine and control (conventional procedure). The degree of anticoagulation control was similar in the two groups: individual in-range international normalized ratios (59.2% vs 61.1%; p = 0.55) and individual time within target range (65.7% vs 66.4%; p = 0.85) showed no significant differences. The incidence of adverse events--death (5.5% vs 5.5%; p = 1.0), major hemorrhagic complications (0% vs 1.8%; p = 1.0), minor hemorrhagic complications (7.4% vs 3.7%; p = 0.67), and thromboembolism (1.8% vs 3.7%; p = 1.0)--was also similar, with no significant differences. Acceptability of the change, measured in terms of quality of life (SF-12 and Sawicki questionnaires) and anxiety (state-trait anxiety inventory questionnaire) at the beginning and end of the study period was higher in the telemedicine group, with statistically significant improvements in mental component summary (3.6 vs -6.2; p = 0.02), dissatisfaction (-0.8 vs 0.2; p = 0.001), stress (-0.3 vs 0.05; p = 0.03), limitations (-0.2 vs 0.3; p = 0.005), social problems (-0.1 vs 0.3; p = 0.03), and state anxiety (-2.5 vs 2.3; p = 0.04). Parameters related to costs, such as the mean number per patient of office visits due to OAT (1.7 vs 13.8; p < 0.001) and other office visits (10.1 vs 11.5; p = 0.028), were also more favorable in the telemedicine group, as were additional parameters that enabled an exhaustive evaluation of the service. The positive results obtained indicate that the second phase of the trial can be initiated.

  1. Reducing Readmissions among Heart Failure Patients Discharged to Home Health Care: Effectiveness of Early and Intensive Nursing Services and Early Physician Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Murtaugh, Christopher M; Deb, Partha; Zhu, Carolyn; Peng, Timothy R; Barrón, Yolanda; Shah, Shivani; Moore, Stanley M; Bowles, Kathryn H; Kalman, Jill; Feldman, Penny H; Siu, Albert L

    2017-08-01

    To compare the effectiveness of two "treatments"-early, intensive home health nursing and physician follow-up within a week-versus less intense and later postacute care in reducing readmissions among heart failure (HF) patients discharged to home health care. National Medicare administrative, claims, and patient assessment data. Patients with a full week of potential exposure to the treatments were followed for 30 days to determine exposure status, 30-day all-cause hospital readmission, other health care use, and mortality. An extension of instrumental variables methods for nonlinear statistical models corrects for nonrandom selection of patients into treatment categories. Our instruments are the index hospital's rate of early aftercare for non-HF patients and hospital discharge day of the week. All hospitalizations for a HF principal diagnosis with discharge to home health care between July 2009 and June 2010 were identified from source files. Neither treatment by itself has a statistically significant effect on hospital readmission. In combination, however, they reduce the probability of readmission by roughly 8 percentage points (p < .001; confidence interval = -12.3, -4.1). Results are robust to changes in implementation of the nonlinear IV estimator, sample, outcome measure, and length of follow-up. Our results call for closer coordination between home health and medical providers in the clinical management of HF patients immediately after hospital discharge. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  2. What sort of follow-up services would Australian breast cancer survivors prefer if we could no longer offer long-term specialist-based care? A discrete choice experiment

    PubMed Central

    Bessen, T; Chen, G; Street, J; Eliott, J; Karnon, J; Keefe, D; Ratcliffe, J

    2014-01-01

    Background: Early diagnosis and improved treatment outcomes have increased breast cancer survival rates that, in turn, have led to increased numbers of women undergoing follow-up after completion of primary treatment. The current workload growth is unsustainable for breast cancer specialists who also provide care for women newly diagnosed or with a recurrence. Appropriate and acceptable follow-up care is important; yet, currently we know little about patient preferences. The aim of this study was to explore the preferences of Australian breast cancer survivors for alternative modes of delivery of follow-up services. Methods: A self-administered questionnaire (online or paper) was developed. The questionnaire contained a discrete choice experiment (DCE) designed to explore patient preferences with respect to provider, location, frequency and method of delivery of routine follow-up care in years 3, 4 and 5 after diagnosis, as well as the perceived value of ‘drop-in' clinics providing additional support. Participants were recruited throughout Australia over a 6-month period from May to October 2012. Preference scores and choice probabilities were used to rank the top 10 most preferred follow-up scenarios for respondents. Results: A total of 836 women participated in the study, of whom 722 (86.4%) completed the DCE. In the absence of specialist follow-up, the 10 most valued surveillance scenarios all included a Breast Physician as the provider of follow-up care. The most preferred scenario is a face-to-face local breast cancer follow-up clinic held every 6 months and led by a Breast Physician, where additional clinics focused on the side effects of treatment are also provided. Conclusion: Beyond the first 2 years from diagnosis, in the absence of a specialist led follow-up, women prefer to have their routine breast cancer follow-up by a Breast Physician (or a Breast Cancer Nurse) in a dedicated local breast cancer clinic, rather than with their local General

  3. From screening to postpartum follow-up – the determinants and barriers for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) services, a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) – a transitory form of diabetes first recognised during pregnancy complicates between < 1% and 28% of all pregnancies. GDM has important short and long-term health consequences for both the mother and her offspring. To prevent adverse pregnancy outcomes and to prevent or delay future onset of type 2 diabetes in mother and offspring, timely detection, optimum treatment, and preventive postpartum care and follow-up is necessary. However the area remains grossly under-prioritised. Methods To investigate determinants and barriers to GDM care from initial screening and diagnosis to prenatal treatment and postpartum follow-up, a PubMed database search to identify quantitative and qualitative studies on the subject was done in September 2012. Fifty-eight relevant studies were reviewed. Results Adherence to prevailing GDM screening guidelines and compliance to screening tests seems sub-optimal at best and arbitrary at worst, with no clear or consistent correlation to health care provider, health system or client characteristics. Studies indicate that most women express commitment and motivation for behaviour change to protect the health of their unborn baby, but compliance to recommended treatment and advice is fraught with challenges, and precious little is known about health system or societal factors that hinder compliance and what can be done to improve it. A number of barriers related to health care provider/system and client characteristics have been identified by qualitative studies. Immediately following a GDM pregnancy many women, when properly informed, desire and intend to maintain healthy lifestyles to prevent future diabetes, but find the effort challenging. Adherence to recommended postpartum screening and continued lifestyle modifications seems even lower. Here too, health care provider, health system and client related determinants and barriers were identified. Studies reveal that sense of self

  4. An Assessment of Service-Learning in 34 US Schools of Pharmacy Follow Up on the 2001 Professional Affairs Committee Report

    PubMed Central

    Schlesselman, Lauren; Borrego, Matthew; Mehta, Bella; Drobitch, Robert K.; Smith, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To determine if the service-learning components used at a convenience sample of schools and colleges of pharmacy meet the intent of the 2001 AACP Professional Affairs Committee (PAC) report. Methods. An online questionnaire was used to survey faculty members or staff involved with service-learning education at their school of pharmacy. Questions addressed aspects of service-learning including types of activities used, duration of student involvement with community partners, and association of learning objectives with service-learning activities. Results. The majority (85.3%) of respondents reported their institution used service-learning. Activities reported as part of service-learning ranged from working at health fairs to involvement with pharmacy school recruitment. More than half (64.3%) of service-learning activities involved long-term interactions with one community partner, and 74.1% of respondents indicated there was always an opportunity for student reflection on the service-learning activity. Conclusion. There is increasing though inconsistent application of PAC guidelines regarding service-learning. PMID:26688584

  5. An Assessment of Service-Learning in 34 US Schools of Pharmacy Follow Up on the 2001 Professional Affairs Committee Report.

    PubMed

    Schlesselman, Lauren; Borrego, Matthew; Bloom, Timothy J; Mehta, Bella; Drobitch, Robert K; Smith, Thomas

    2015-10-25

    Objective. To determine if the service-learning components used at a convenience sample of schools and colleges of pharmacy meet the intent of the 2001 AACP Professional Affairs Committee (PAC) report. Methods. An online questionnaire was used to survey faculty members or staff involved with service-learning education at their school of pharmacy. Questions addressed aspects of service-learning including types of activities used, duration of student involvement with community partners, and association of learning objectives with service-learning activities. Results. The majority (85.3%) of respondents reported their institution used service-learning. Activities reported as part of service-learning ranged from working at health fairs to involvement with pharmacy school recruitment. More than half (64.3%) of service-learning activities involved long-term interactions with one community partner, and 74.1% of respondents indicated there was always an opportunity for student reflection on the service-learning activity. Conclusion. There is increasing though inconsistent application of PAC guidelines regarding service-learning.

  6. Building Capacity for Mental Health: A Two and a Half Year Follow-Up of the Auseinet Reorientation of Services Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hanlon, Anne; Ratnaike, Deepika; Parham, Jennie; Kosky, Robert; Martin, Graham

    From mid 1998 to mid 1999, The Australian Network for Promotion, Prevention and Early Intervention for Mental Health (Auseinet) provided funding and intensive support for eight agencies that provide services to young people to reorient an aspect of their service to an early intervention approach. The agencies developed a range of tailored,…

  7. Hyper Cold Systems follow up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berges, Jean Claude; Beltrando, Gerard; Cacault, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    The follow up of intense precipitation system is a key information for climate studies. Whereas some rainfall measurement series cover more than one century they cannot retrieve these phenomena in their spatial and temporal continuity. The geostationary satellite data offer a good trade-off between the length of data series and the retrieval accuracy. However a difficulty arise from ambiguous interpretation of the lone infrared signal in nephanalysis. Hence the tropopause temperature is used as a proxy to characterize extreme precipitation event. That does not mean that the more intense rain-rate will be always collocated with the coldest temperature but that most of these intense events is produced by systems whose a part is colder than tropopause. Computations have been carried out on 38 months of MSG and Meteosat/IODC. System follow up is achieved by a simple 3D connexity algorithm, the time being considered as the third dimension. This algorithm produce three dimension clusters from where the main system parameters can be easily extracted. Thus the systems can be classified trajectory characteristic (duration, speed ans size variation). A drawback of this simple threshold method relies is some over-segmentation. In most of case the bias is minor as unconnected clusters are small and short-lived. However an aggregating algorithm have been developed to retrieve the most complex system trajectories. To assess the efficiency of this method three regional studies are displayed: the North African Maghreb, the West African Sahel and the Indian Ocean. On Maghreb, the location of system initialization shows a dramatic difference between the eastern and western parts. Whereas in Tunisia a significant part of these systems are generated on sea and most have no clear relation with relief, the Morocco is mainly characterized with land initiated system with a strong orographic effect on system triggering. Another difference relies on the low level wind shear impact which

  8. The impact of primary healthcare reform on equity of utilization of services in the province of Quebec: a 2003-2010 follow-up.

    PubMed

    Ouimet, Marie-Jo; Pineault, Raynald; Prud'homme, Alexandre; Provost, Sylvie; Fournier, Michel; Levesque, Jean-Frédéric

    2015-11-30

    In 2003, the Quebec government made important changes in its primary healthcare (PHC) system. This reform included the creation of new models of PHC, Family Medicine Groups (e.g. multidisciplinary health teams with extended opening hours and enrolment of patients) and Network Clinics (clinics providing access to investigation and specialist services). Considering that equity is one of the guiding principles of the Quebec health system, our objectives are to assess the impact of the PHC reform on equity by examining the association between socio-economic status (SES) and utilization of healthcare services between 2003 and 2010; and to determine how the organizational model of PHC facilities impacts utilization of services according to SES. We held population surveys in 2005 (n = 9206) and 2010 (n = 9180) in the two most populated regions of Quebec province, relating to utilization and experience of care during the preceding two years, as well as organizational surveys of all PHC facilities. We performed multiple logistical regression analyses comparing levels of SES for different utilization variables, controlling for morbidity and perceived health; we repeated the analyses, this time including type of PHC facility (older vs newer models). Compared with the lowest SES, highest SES is associated with less emergency room visits (OR 0.80) and higher likelihood of at least one visit to a PHC facility (OR 2.17), but lower likelihood of frequent visits to PHC (OR 0.69), and higher affiliation to a family doctor (OR 2.04). Differences remained stable between the 2005 and 2010 samples except for likelihood of visit to PHC source which deteriorated for the lowest SES. Greater improvement in affiliation to family doctor was seen for the lowest SES in older models of PHC organizations, but a deterioration was seen for that same group in newer models. Differences favoring the rich in affiliation to family doctor and likelihood of visit to PHC facility likely represent

  9. Follow-up of deaths among U.S. Postal Service workers potentially exposed to Bacillus anthracis--District of Columbia, 2001-2002.

    PubMed

    2003-10-03

    In October 2001, two letters contaminated with Bacillus anthracis spores were processed by mechanical and manual methods at the U.S. Postal Service (USPS) Brentwood Mail Processing and Distribution Center in the District of Columbia. Four postal workers at the Brentwood facility became ill with what was diagnosed eventually as inhalational anthrax; two died. The facility was closed on October 21, and postexposure prophylaxis was recommended for approximately 2,500 workers and business visitors. Subsequent reports of deaths of facility workers prompted concern about whether mortality was unusually high among workers, perhaps related to the anthrax attacks. To evaluate the rates and causes of death among workers at the Brentwood facility during October 12, 2001-October 11, 2002, CDC, in collaboration with state and local health departments, analyzed death certificate data. In addition, these data were compared with aggregate mortality data from the five USPS facilities contaminated with B. anthracis during the fall 2001 anthrax attacks. This report summarizes the results of that analysis, which indicate that rates and causes of death among Brentwood workers during the 12 months after the anthrax attacks of 2001 were not different from rates and causes of deaths that occurred during the preceding 5 years.

  10. [Callers' perception of the service at the cardiovascular hotline of the German Hypertension Society: results of follow-up telephone interviews].

    PubMed

    Leiblein, J; Dominiak, P

    2010-12-01

    To provide a source of valid information to hypertensive patients, their families as well as the public a cardiovascular hotline (HKT) has been established by the German Hypertension Society in April 1992. Until the end of the year 2007 approx. 55.000 phone calls have been answered. The aim of this study was to assess the callers' support needs and the perception of the information received. Callers who had previously provided their contact data were called back later. From a total of 803 eligible persons 311 volunteered for a phone interview made up of ten questions concerning (1) the accessibility of the phone service, (2) the atmosphere of the conversation and (3) the adequacy of time for the phone conversation, (4) the suitability of the answers received, (5) life style changes initiated by the original phone call, (6) discussion with the attending physician about the phone conversation, (7) information about preventive measures against consequential damages of high blood pressure, (8) instructions about the prescribed medication as well as side effects, (9) improvement of the blood pressure after the call and (10) willingness to recommend to others a call at the cardiovascular hotline. The gender distribution of the participants in the interview revealed a sex ratio of 47 % females vs. 53 % males compared to 51 % females vs. 49 % males among all callers at the hotline in 2007. Members of both populations were quite evenly distributed over the federal states of Germany. Taken together, these findings suggest that the interview data are representative of the opinions of callers' at the cardiovascular hotline. The analysis of the results of the survey provide ample evidence that the cardiovascular hotline is well accepted by the callers and hence effective in conveying information about hypertension. This is particularly important in view of the ever increasing demand of such information by members of the rapidly ageing population in Germany. © Georg Thieme

  11. A comparative study of two various models of organising diabetes follow-up in public primary health care - the model influences the use of services, their quality and costs.

    PubMed

    Honkasalo, Mikko T; Linna, Miika; Sane, Timo; Honkasalo, Atte; Elonheimo, Outi

    2014-01-20

    In Finland diabetologists have long been concerned about the level of diabetes care as the incidence of type 1 diabetes and complicated type 2 diabetes is exceeding the capacity of specialist clinics. We compared the outcome of diabetes care in two middle-sized Finnish municipalities with different models of diabetes care organisation in public primary health care. In Kouvola the primary health care of all diabetic patients is based on general practitioners, whereas in Nurmijärvi the follow-up of type 1 and most complicated type 2 diabetic patients is assigned to a general practitioner specialised in diabetes care. Our study population consisted of all adult diabetic patients living in the municipalities under review.We compared the use and costs of public diabetes care, glycemic control, blood pressure, LDL-cholesterol level, the application of the national guidelines and patient satisfaction. The main outcome measures were the costs and use of health care services due to diabetes and its complications. In Nurmijärvi, where diabetes care was centralised, more type 1 diabetic patients were followed up in primary health care than in Kouvola, where general practitioners need more specialist consultations. The centralisation resulted in cost savings in the diabetes care of type 1 diabetic patients. Although the quality of care was similar, type 1 diabetic patients were more satisfied with their follow-up in the centralised system. In the care of type 2 diabetic patients the centralised system required fewer specialist consultations, but the quality and costs were similar in both models. The follow-up of most diabetic patients - including type 1 diabetes - can be organised in primary health care with the same quality as in secondary care units. The centralised primary care of type 1 diabetes is less costly and requires fewer specialist consultations.

  12. Effects of mobile phone WeChat services improve adherence to corticosteroid nasal spray treatment for chronic rhinosinusitis after functional endoscopic sinus surgery: a 3-month follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shaoyan; Liang, Zibin; Zhang, Rongkai; Liao, Wei; Chen, Yuan; Fan, Yunping; Li, Huabin

    2017-03-01

    The objective of the study is to investigate the impact of receiving daily WeChat services on one's cell phone on adherence to corticosteroid nasal spray treatment in chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) patients after functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS). This study was a two-arm, randomized, follow-up investigation. Patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with/without nasal polyps following bilateral FESS were randomised to receive, or to not receive, daily WeChat service on their cell phone to take corticosteroid nasal spray treatment. A prescription of budesonide aqueous nasal spray 128 µg bid was given to all the subjects. Then they returned to the clinic after 30, 60, 90 days. The primary study outcome was adherence to nasal spray treatment, whereas secondary outcomes were change in endoscopic findings and SinoNasal Outcome Test-20 (SNOT-20). On the whole, there was a significant inter-group difference in the change of adherence rate (F = 90.88, p = 0.000). The WeChat group had much higher adherence rate than the control group during the follow-up. In terms of postoperative endoscopic scores and SNOT-20, except granulation score, no significant differences were observed between the two randomization groups. WeChat services are already after a short period of observation associated with improved adherence to corticosteroid nasal spray treatment in CRS patients after FESS.

  13. The effect of a neurocritical care service without a dedicated neuro-ICU on quality of care in intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Burns, Joseph D; Green, Deborah M; Lau, Helena; Winter, Michael; Koyfman, Feliks; DeFusco, Christina M; Holsapple, James W; Kase, Carlos S

    2013-06-01

    Introduction of neurocritical care services to dedicated neuro-ICUs is associated with improved quality of care. The impact of a neurocritical care service without a dedicated neuro-ICU has not been studied. We retrospectively identified all patients admitted to our institution with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in two 12-month periods: immediately before the arrival of the first neurointensivist ("before") and after the neurocritical care service was established ("after"). There was no nursing team, ICU housestaff/physician extender team, or physical unit dedicated to the care of patients with critical neurologic illness during either period. Using an uncontrolled before-after design, we compared clinical outcomes and performance on quality metrics between groups. We included 74 patients with primary supratentorial ICH. Mortality, length of stay (LOS), proportion of patients with modified Rankin Score 0-3, and destination on discharge did not differ between groups when adjusted for confounders. Time to first two consecutive systolic blood pressure (SBP) measurements <180 mmHg was shorter in the "after" cohort (mean 4.5 vs. 3.2 h, p = 0.001). Area under the curve measurement for change in SBP from baseline over the first 24 h after ED arrival demonstrated greater, sustained SBP reduction in the "after" cohort (mean -187.9 vs. -720.9, p = 0.04). A higher proportion of patients were fed without passing a dysphagia screen in the "before" group (45 vs. 0%, p < 0.001). Introduction of a neurocritical service without a neuro-ICU at our institution was associated with a trend toward longer ICU LOS and improvement in some key metrics of quality of care for patients with ICH.

  14. Placement and Follow-up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shippen, Samuel Joseph, Ed.; Wasil, Raymond A., Ed.

    This document contains a compilation of original manuscripts written by competent authorities in the field of job placement services for students. Viewing placement as both a product and an integral part of a developmental process, these papers are divided into the following six topical areas: (1) information, (2) exploration, (3) counseling, (4)…

  15. Placement and Follow-up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shippen, Samuel Joseph, Ed.; Wasil, Raymond A., Ed.

    This document contains a compilation of original manuscripts written by competent authorities in the field of job placement services for students. Viewing placement as both a product and an integral part of a developmental process, these papers are divided into the following six topical areas: (1) information, (2) exploration, (3) counseling, (4)…

  16. Prospect Follow Up Pays Dividends in Enrollment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wassom, Julie

    1993-01-01

    Describes a follow-up program for enrolling day care center prospects. Follow-up within the center utilizes contact management software and a prospect profile system to record information about potential customers. External follow-up includes a telephone call to confirm an appointment to the center or to provide additional information to the…

  17. Prospect Follow Up Pays Dividends in Enrollment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wassom, Julie

    1993-01-01

    Describes a follow-up program for enrolling day care center prospects. Follow-up within the center utilizes contact management software and a prospect profile system to record information about potential customers. External follow-up includes a telephone call to confirm an appointment to the center or to provide additional information to the…

  18. Comparing office and telephone follow-up after medical abortion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Melissa J; Rounds, Kacie M; Creinin, Mitchell D; Cansino, Catherine; Hou, Melody Y

    2016-08-01

    Compare proportion lost to follow-up, successful abortion, and staff effort in women who choose office or telephone-based follow-up evaluation for medical abortion at a teaching institution. We performed a chart review of all medical abortions provided in the first three years of service provision. Women receiving mifepristone and misoprostol could choose office follow-up with an ultrasound evaluation one to two weeks after mifepristone or telephone follow-up with a scheduled telephone interview at one week post abortion and a second telephone call at four weeks to review the results of a home urine pregnancy test. Of the 176 medical abortion patients, 105 (59.7%) chose office follow-up and 71 (40.3%) chose telephone follow-up. Office evaluation patients had higher rates of completing all required follow-up compared to telephone follow-up patients (94.3% vs 84.5%, respectively, p=.04), but proportion lost to follow-up was similar in both groups (4.8% vs 5.6%, respectively, p=1.0). Medical abortion efficacy was 94.0% and 92.5% in women who chose office and telephone follow-up, respectively. We detected two (1.2%) ongoing pregnancies, both in the office group. Staff rescheduled 15.0% of appointments in the office group. For the telephone follow-up cohort, staff made more than one phone call to 43.9% and 69.4% of women at one week and four weeks, respectively. Proportion lost to follow-up is low in women who have the option of office or telephone follow-up after medical abortion. Women who choose telephone-based evaluation compared to office follow-up may require more staff effort for rescheduling of contact, but overall outcomes are similar. Although women who choose telephone evaluation may require more rescheduling of contact as compared to office follow-up, having alternative follow-up options may decrease the proportion of women who are lost to follow-up. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Health service use in adults 20–64 years with traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury or pelvic fracture. A cohort study with 9-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Laursen, Bjarne; Helweg-Larsen, Karin

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the health service use over 9 years after the injury year for patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI), spinal cord injury (SCI) and pelvic fracture (PF), and compare with non-injured. Design A register-based cohort design with a 9-year follow-up period. Setting The Danish population. Participants The study included 434, 100 and 278 hospital-treated incident patients with TBI, SCI and PF, respectively, among 20-year-olds to 64-year-olds identified using the National Patient Register. Controls for each patient group were drawn from the population register, matched by age, sex and health service use during 1995. All were followed during 1996–2005 by linkage to national health registers. The observations were excluded when the patients left Denmark or died. Outcome measures The use of hospital treatments, contacts with general practitioners and the use of physiotherapy. Results Compared to the controls, more patients with TBI and SCI were hospital admitted all 9 years after the injury year, on average 0.36 and 0.50 times annually, respectively. For patients with PF hospital admissions returned to baseline year 2 after the injury year. For patients with SCI the use of general practitioner services remained at an increased level year 9 after the injury year, while it returned to baseline level year 4 after the injury year for patients with TBI and year 2 for patients with PF. For patients with SCI physiotherapy use remained increased over 9 years after the injury year, while it returned to baseline the fifth year for patients with TBI and the third year after for patients with PF. Conclusions TBI and SCI increase the use of health services over 9 years after the injury year, while most health service use after PF returned to baseline 2 years after the injury year. PMID:23103605

  20. Supervised team management, with or without structured psychotherapy, in heavy users of a mental health service with borderline personality disorder: a two-year follow-up preliminary randomized study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Individuals affected by severe Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) are often heavy users of Mental Health Services (MHS). Short-term treatments currently used in BPD therapy are useful to target disruptive behaviors but they are less effective in reducing heavy MHS use. Therefore, alternative short-term treatments, less complex than long-term psychodynamic psychotherapies but specifically oriented to BPD core problems, need to be developed to reduce MHS overuse. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of adding Sequential Brief Adlerian Psychodynamic Psychotherapy (SB-APP) to Supervised Team Management (STM) in BPD treatment compared to STM alone in a naturalistic group of heavy MHS users with BPD. Effectiveness was evaluated 6 times along a two-year follow-up. Methods Thirty-five outpatients who met inclusion criteria were randomly assigned to two treatment groups (STM = 17; SB-APP = 18) and then compared. Clinical Global Impression (CGI) and CGI-modified (CGI-M) for BPD, Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF), State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory (STAXI), and Symptom Checklist-90 Revised (SCL-90-R) were administered at T1, T3, T6, T12, T18 and T24. At T12 the Working Alliance Inventory-Short Form (WAI-S) was also completed. At the one-year follow-up, SB-APP group did not receive any additional individual psychological support. MHS team was specifically trained in BPD treatment and had regular supervisions. Results All patients improved on CGI, GAF, and STAXI scores after 6 and 12 months, independently of treatment received. SB-APP group showed better outcome on impulsivity, suicide attempts, chronic feelings of emptiness, and disturbed relationships. We found a good stabilization at the one year follow-up, even after the interruption of brief psychotherapy in the SB-APP group. Conclusions Although STM for BPD applied to heavy MHS users was effective in reducing symptoms and improving their global functioning, adding a time-limited and focused

  1. Experience from multidisciplinary follow-up on critically ill patients treated in an intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Fonsmark, Lise; Rosendahl-Nielsen, Mette

    2015-05-01

    International literature describes that former intensive care unit (ICU) patients suffer considerable physical and neuropsychological complications. Systematic data on Danish ICU survivors are scarce as standardised follow-up after intensive care has yet to be described. This article describes and evaluates the knowledge gained from outpatient follow-up at a tertiary intensive care unit at Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, during a three-year period. A total of 101 adult former ICU patients attended the outpatient clinic over a three-year period. Patients included were medical and surgical patients with a length of stay exceeding four days. Patients attended the clinic after discharge from hospital and for a minimum of two months from their discharge from the ICU. The patients were assessed for physical, neuropsychological and psychological problems and, if necessary, further treatment or rehabilitation was initiated. Reduced physical ability was seen in 82%. A total of 89% suffered a substantial weight loss. 83.2% had signs indicating acute brain dysfunction during the ICU stay, and approximately half of the patients still had cognitive problems. A total of 66 interventions were initiated. Our data confirmed that a large proportion of ICU survivors suffer considerable long-term physical and neuropsychological sequelae. Intensive care follow-up may contribute to address these specific problems and to initiate the needed interventions. Research is needed to determine whether specialised rehabilitation is required. not relevant. not relevant.

  2. The Effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and acceptability of Community versus Hospital Eye Service follow-up for patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration with quiescent disease (ECHoES): a virtual randomised balanced incomplete block trial.

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Barnaby C; Scott, Lauren J; Taylor, Jodi; Hogg, Ruth; Rogers, Chris A; Wordsworth, Sarah; Townsend, Daisy; Muldrew, Alyson; Peto, Tunde; Violato, Mara; Dakin, Helen; Cappel-Porter, Heike; Mills, Nicola; O'Reilly, Dermot; Harding, Simon P; Chakravarthy, Usha

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) usually attend regular reviews, even when the disease is quiescent. Reviews are burdensome to health services, patients and carers. OBJECTIVES To compare the proportion of correct lesion classifications made by community-based optometrists and ophthalmologists from vignettes of patients; to estimate the cost-effectiveness of community follow-up by optometrists compared with follow-up by ophthalmologists in the Hospital Eye Service (HES); to ascertain views of patients, their representatives, optometrists, ophthalmologists and clinical commissioners on the proposed shared care model. DESIGN Community-based optometrists and ophthalmologists in the HES classified lesions from vignettes comprising clinical information, colour fundus photographs and optical coherence tomography images. Participants' classifications were validated against experts' classifications (reference standard). SETTING Internet-based application. PARTICIPANTS Ophthalmologists had to have ≥ 3 years post-registration experience in ophthalmology, have passed part 1 of the Royal College of Ophthalmologists, Diploma in Ophthalmology or equivalent examination, and have experience in the age-related macular degeneration service. Optometrists had to be fully qualified, be registered with the General Optical Council for ≥ 3 years and not be participating in nAMD shared care. INTERVENTIONS The trial sought to emulate a conventional trial in comparing optometrists' and ophthalmologists' decision-making, but vignettes, not patients, were assessed; therefore, there were no interventions. Participants received training prior to assessing vignettes. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Primary outcome - correct classification of the activity status of a lesion based on a vignette, compared with a reference standard. Secondary outcomes - frequencies of potentially sight-threatening errors, participants' judgements about specific lesion

  3. The Effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and acceptability of Community versus Hospital Eye Service follow-up for patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration with quiescent disease (ECHoES): a virtual randomised balanced incomplete block trial.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Barnaby C; Scott, Lauren J; Taylor, Jodi; Hogg, Ruth; Rogers, Chris A; Wordsworth, Sarah; Townsend, Daisy; Muldrew, Alyson; Peto, Tunde; Violato, Mara; Dakin, Helen; Cappel-Porter, Heike; Mills, Nicola; O'Reilly, Dermot; Harding, Simon P; Chakravarthy, Usha

    2016-10-01

    Patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) usually attend regular reviews, even when the disease is quiescent. Reviews are burdensome to health services, patients and carers. To compare the proportion of correct lesion classifications made by community-based optometrists and ophthalmologists from vignettes of patients; to estimate the cost-effectiveness of community follow-up by optometrists compared with follow-up by ophthalmologists in the Hospital Eye Service (HES); to ascertain views of patients, their representatives, optometrists, ophthalmologists and clinical commissioners on the proposed shared care model. Community-based optometrists and ophthalmologists in the HES classified lesions from vignettes comprising clinical information, colour fundus photographs and optical coherence tomography images. Participants' classifications were validated against experts' classifications (reference standard). Internet-based application. Ophthalmologists had to have ≥ 3 years post-registration experience in ophthalmology, have passed part 1 of the Royal College of Ophthalmologists, Diploma in Ophthalmology or equivalent examination, and have experience in the age-related macular degeneration service. Optometrists had to be fully qualified, be registered with the General Optical Council for ≥ 3 years and not be participating in nAMD shared care. The trial sought to emulate a conventional trial in comparing optometrists' and ophthalmologists' decision-making, but vignettes, not patients, were assessed; therefore, there were no interventions. Participants received training prior to assessing vignettes. Primary outcome - correct classification of the activity status of a lesion based on a vignette, compared with a reference standard. Secondary outcomes - frequencies of potentially sight-threatening errors, participants' judgements about specific lesion components, participant-rated confidence in their decisions and cost-effectiveness of follow-up

  4. Follow-up Cost Study. TEX-SIS FOLLOW-UP SC5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baugh, Ronald C.

    This report presents data on the costs of follow-up studies, based on 29 separate follow-up studies conducted by eight public community/junior colleges in Texas. The purpose of this study, conducted by Navarro College as a subcontractor of Project FOLLOW-UP, was to provide data and information regarding the cost of follow-up studies that would be…

  5. Francoise, a Fifteen-Year Follow Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rondal, J. A.; Elbouz, M.; Ylieff, M.; Docquier, L.

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports on a 15-year follow-up of the linguistic and cognitive profile of a woman with standard trisomy 21 (Down syndrome). The follow-up found recent rapid deterioration in receptive and productive language skills. However, basic phonological and morphosyntactic skills are preserved. Her changing profile mirrors that found in aging…

  6. Towards sustainability assessment follow-up

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison-Saunders, Angus; Pope, Jenny; Bond, Alan; Retief, Francois

    2014-02-15

    This paper conceptualises what sustainability assessment follow-up might entail for three models of sustainability assessment: EIA-driven integrated assessment, objectives-led integrated assessment and the contribution to sustainability model. The first two are characterised by proponent monitoring and evaluation of individual impacts and indicators while the latter takes a holistic view based around focused sustainability criteria relevant to the context. The implications of three sustainability challenges on follow-up are also examined: contested time horizons and value changes, trade-offs, and interdisciplinarity. We conclude that in order to meet these challenges some form of adaptive follow-up is necessary and that the contribution to sustainability approach is the best approach. -- Highlights: • We explore sustainability follow-up for three different sustainability models. • Long-time frames require adaptive follow-up and are a key follow-up challenge. • Other key challenges include interdisciplinarity, and trade-offs. • Sustainability follow-up should be a direction of travel and not an outcome. • Only the follow-up for contribution to sustainability model addresses sustainability challenges sufficiently.

  7. Francoise, a Fifteen-Year Follow Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rondal, J. A.; Elbouz, M.; Ylieff, M.; Docquier, L.

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports on a 15-year follow-up of the linguistic and cognitive profile of a woman with standard trisomy 21 (Down syndrome). The follow-up found recent rapid deterioration in receptive and productive language skills. However, basic phonological and morphosyntactic skills are preserved. Her changing profile mirrors that found in aging…

  8. The dangers of "follow-up" feeds.

    PubMed

    Greiner, T

    1991-09-01

    Artificial feeds constituted with contaminated water and unclean bottles are the leading cause of diarrhea in infants. Companies market artificial feeds globally as infant formula (a substitute for breast milk) and follow-up formula (a complement to breast milk). Breast milk is best for all 0-12 month old infants. Breast-fed infants do not need any formula even follow-up formula. Indeed 6-month old infants require solid healthful foods and breast milk. Like infant formulas, follow-up formula made with contaminated water or bottles can cause the infant to become ill with an infection, and offering follow-up formulas to infants impedes weaning and is costly. Follow-up formulas do not complement breast milk, but instead tend to replace it. The 1986 WHO World Health Assembly has even declared that, in some countries, provision of follow-up formula is not necessary. WHO fears mothers could use follow-up formula instead of infant formula because it has a higher protein and mineral content thus increasing the risk of dehydration during diarrhea. Follow-up formula can result in an unbalanced diet. Since the International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes does not address formulas marketed as a complement to breast milk, formula companies market follow-up formulas in both developed and developing countries. Most mothers do not know the risks of using follow-up formulas, however. Governments have several alternatives to stop the marketing of these formulas. They can design and implement a code that defines breast-milk substitutes as any formula perceived and used as a breast milk option even if promoted as a breast-milk complement. They can also amend an existing code. WHO offers technical assistance to any member government who wishes to design, implement, and monitor such a code.

  9. Robotic Follow-Up for Human Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fong, Terrence; Bualat, Maria; Deans, Matthew C.; Adams, Byron; Allan, Mark; Altobelli, Martha; Bouyssounouse, Xavier; Cohen, Tamar; Flueckiger, Lorenzo; Garber, Joshua; Palmer, Elizabeth; Heggy, Essam; Jurgens, Frank; Kennedy, Tim; Kobayashi, Linda; Lee, Pascal; Lee, Susan Y.; Lees, David; Lundy, Mike; Park, Eric; Pedersen, Liam; Smith, Trey; To, Vinh; Utz, Hans; Wheeler, Dawn

    2010-01-01

    We are studying how "robotic follow-up" can improve future planetary exploration. Robotic follow-up, which we define as augmenting human field work with subsequent robot activity, is a field exploration technique designed to increase human productivity and science return. To better understand the benefits, requirements, limitations and risks associated with this technique, we are conducting analog field tests with human and robot teams at the Haughton Crater impact structure on Devon Island, Canada. In this paper, we discuss the motivation for robotic follow-up, describe the scientific context and system design for our work, and present results and lessons learned from field testing.

  10. Postnatal gestational diabetes mellitus follow-up: Australian women's experiences.

    PubMed

    Kilgour, Catherine; Bogossian, Fiona Elizabeth; Callaway, Leonie; Gallois, Cindy

    2015-12-01

    Postnatal follow-up screening is recommended for all women diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). However follow-up rates are poor and highly variable in Australia and internationally. The reasons that mothers are not completing recommended postnatal screening after GDM diagnosis are not well understood or studied. The quality of communication may be an important influence on the completion of postnatal GDM follow-up. To explore and assess women's communication experiences of postnatal GDM follow-up. Theoretical, purposeful sampling was used to identify women diagnosed with GDM. Convergent interviews explored participants' communication experiences with GDM and postnatal follow-up. Transcripts were provided to and updated by participants. Data was analysed with Leximancer(®) (V4, 2011) automated content analysis software. This research was conducted at a major tertiary referral hospital in Queensland, Australia, between December 2012 and July 2013. Women participating in maternity shared care and diagnosed with GDM were interviewed (n=13). Five themes, all concerned with obtaining information, were identified: diagnosis of GDM; seeking GDM information; accessing specialist services; need for postnatal GDM follow-up; and completing GDM follow-up. Results were interpreted using Communication Accommodation Theory (CAT) to explore whether and how the information needs of women were accommodated. Women's interpretations of communication events influenced their knowledge, perceptions and motivation to complete recommended postnatal follow-up. Accommodation of the communication and information needs of women with GDM may be an effective strategy for clinicians to encourage completion of recommended postnatal GDM follow-up. Copyright © 2015 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The design and implementation of a study to investigate the effectiveness of community vs hospital eye service follow-up for patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration with quiescent disease.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J; Scott, L J; Rogers, C A; Muldrew, A; O'Reilly, D; Wordsworth, S; Mills, N; Hogg, R; Violato, M; Harding, S P; Peto, T; Townsend, D; Chakravarthy, U; Reeves, B C

    2016-01-01

    IntroductionStandard treatment for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) is intravitreal injections of anti-VEGF drugs. Following multiple injections, nAMD lesions often become quiescent but there is a high risk of reactivation, and regular review by hospital ophthalmologists is the norm. The present trial examines the feasibility of community optometrists making lesion reactivation decisions.MethodsThe Effectiveness of Community vs Hospital Eye Service (ECHoES) trial is a virtual trial; lesion reactivation decisions were made about vignettes that comprised clinical data, colour fundus photographs, and optical coherence tomograms displayed on a web-based platform. Participants were either hospital ophthalmologists or community optometrists. All participants were provided with webinar training on the disease, its management, and assessment of the retinal imaging outputs. In a balanced design, 96 participants each assessed 42 vignettes; a total of 288 vignettes were assessed seven times by each professional group.The primary outcome is a participant's judgement of lesion reactivation compared with a reference standard. Secondary outcomes are the frequency of sight threatening errors; judgements about specific lesion components; participant-rated confidence in their decisions about the primary outcome; cost effectiveness of follow-up by optometrists rather than ophthalmologists.DiscussionThis trial addresses an important question for the NHS, namely whether, with appropriate training, community optometrists can make retreatment decisions for patients with nAMD to the same standard as hospital ophthalmologists. The trial employed a novel approach as participation was entirely through a web-based application; the trial required very few resources compared with those that would have been needed for a conventional randomised controlled clinical trial.

  12. The design and implementation of a study to investigate the effectiveness of community vs hospital eye service follow-up for patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration with quiescent disease

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, J; Scott, L J; Rogers, C A; Muldrew, A; O'Reilly, D; Wordsworth, S; Mills, N; Hogg, R; Violato, M; Harding, S P; Peto, T; Townsend, D; Chakravarthy, U; Reeves, B C

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Standard treatment for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) is intravitreal injections of anti-VEGF drugs. Following multiple injections, nAMD lesions often become quiescent but there is a high risk of reactivation, and regular review by hospital ophthalmologists is the norm. The present trial examines the feasibility of community optometrists making lesion reactivation decisions. Methods The Effectiveness of Community vs Hospital Eye Service (ECHoES) trial is a virtual trial; lesion reactivation decisions were made about vignettes that comprised clinical data, colour fundus photographs, and optical coherence tomograms displayed on a web-based platform. Participants were either hospital ophthalmologists or community optometrists. All participants were provided with webinar training on the disease, its management, and assessment of the retinal imaging outputs. In a balanced design, 96 participants each assessed 42 vignettes; a total of 288 vignettes were assessed seven times by each professional group. The primary outcome is a participant's judgement of lesion reactivation compared with a reference standard. Secondary outcomes are the frequency of sight threatening errors; judgements about specific lesion components; participant-rated confidence in their decisions about the primary outcome; cost effectiveness of follow-up by optometrists rather than ophthalmologists. Discussion This trial addresses an important question for the NHS, namely whether, with appropriate training, community optometrists can make retreatment decisions for patients with nAMD to the same standard as hospital ophthalmologists. The trial employed a novel approach as participation was entirely through a web-based application; the trial required very few resources compared with those that would have been needed for a conventional randomised controlled clinical trial. PMID:26449197

  13. Heart Valve Surgery Recovery and Follow Up

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Heart Valve Surgery Recovery and Follow Up Updated:Sep 14,2016 ... Surgery Milestones • Personal Stories Video: Preparing For Your Surgery Find helpful tips from others who have successfully ...

  14. E3 Sample Follow-up Email

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Sample follow-up email to assist in identifying and nominating those suppliers who you think could benefit most from joining the Green Suppliers Network; your role is to facilitate supplier selection and engagement.

  15. TEX-SIS FOLLOW-UP: Student Follow-up Management Information System. Data Processing Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarrant County Junior Coll. District, Ft. Worth, TX.

    Project FOLLOW-UP was conducted to develop, test, and validate a statewide management information system for follow-up of Texas public junior and community college students. The result of this project was a student information system (TEX-SIS) consisting of seven subsystems: (1) Student's Educational Intent, (2) Nonreturning Student Follow-up, (3)…

  16. TEX-SIS FOLLOW-UP: Student Follow-up Management Information System. Data Processing Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarrant County Junior Coll. District, Ft. Worth, TX.

    Project FOLLOW-UP was conducted to develop, test, and validate a statewide management information system for follow-up of Texas public junior and community college students. The result of this project was a student information system (TEX-SIS) consisting of seven subsystems: (1) Student's Educational Intent, (2) Nonreturning Student Follow-up, (3)…

  17. Innovative designs for the smart ICU: Part 2: The ICU.

    PubMed

    Halpern, Neil A

    2014-03-01

    Successfully designing a new ICU requires clarity of vision and purpose and the recognition that the patient room is the core of the ICU experience for patients, staff, and visitors. The ICU can be conceptualized into three components: the patient room, central areas, and universal support services. Each patient room should be designed for single patient use and be similarly configured and equipped. The design of the room should focus upon functionality, ease of use, healing, safety, infection control, communications, and connectivity. All aspects of the room, including its infrastructure; zones for work, care, and visiting; environment, medical devices, and approaches to privacy; logistics; and waste management, are important elements in the design process. Since most medical devices used at the ICU bedside are really sophisticated computers, the ICU needs to be capable of supporting the full scope of medical informatics. The patient rooms, the central ICU areas (central stations, corridors, supply rooms, pharmacy, laboratory, staff lounge, visitor waiting room, on-call suite, conference rooms, and offices), and the universal support services (infection prevention, finishings and flooring, staff communications, signage and wayfinding, security, and fire and safety) work best when fully interwoven. This coordination helps establish efficient and safe patient throughput and care and fosters physical and social cohesiveness within the ICU. A balanced approach to centralized and decentralized monitoring and logistics also offers great flexibility. Synchronization of the universal support services in the ICU with the hospital's existing systems maintains unity of purpose and continuity across the enterprise and avoids unnecessary duplication of efforts.

  18. Cost-effectiveness of community versus hospital eye service follow-up for patients with quiescent treated age-related macular degeneration alongside the ECHoES randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Violato, M; Dakin, H; Chakravarthy, U; Reeves, B C; Peto, T; Hogg, R E; Harding, S P; Scott, L J; Taylor, J; Cappel-Porter, H; Mills, N; O'Reilly, D; Rogers, C A; Wordsworth, S

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the cost-effectiveness of optometrist-led follow-up monitoring reviews for patients with quiescent neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) in community settings (including high street opticians) compared with ophthalmologist-led reviews in hospitals. Design A model-based cost-effectiveness analysis with a 4-week time horizon, based on a ‘virtual’ non-inferiority randomised trial designed to emulate a parallel group design. Setting A virtual internet-based clinical assessment, conducted at community optometry practices, and hospital ophthalmology clinics. Participants Ophthalmologists with experience in the age-related macular degeneration service; fully qualified optometrists not participating in nAMD shared care schemes. Interventions The participating optometrists and ophthalmologists classified lesions from vignettes and were asked to judge whether any retreatment was required. Vignettes comprised clinical information, colour fundus photographs and optical coherence tomography images. Participants' classifications were validated against experts' classifications (reference standard). Resource use and cost information were attributed to these retreatment decisions. Main outcome measures Correct classification of whether further treatment is needed, compared with a reference standard. Results The mean cost per assessment, including the subsequent care pathway, was £411 for optometrists and £397 for ophthalmologists: a cost difference of £13 (95% CI −£18 to £45). Optometrists were non-inferior to ophthalmologists with respect to the overall percentage of lesions correctly assessed (difference −1.0%; 95% CI −4.5% to 2.5%). Conclusions In the base case analysis, the slightly larger number of incorrect retreatment decisions by optometrists led to marginally and non-significantly higher costs. Sensitivity analyses that reflected different practices across eye hospitals indicate that shared care pathways between

  19. [Lyme borreliosis: follow up criteria after antibiotherapy?].

    PubMed

    Christmann, D

    2007-01-01

    The post therapeutic follow-up of Lyme borreliosis is managed according to clinical and serological data. The evolution of antibody rates is such that it doesn't constitute the best element to rely on for follow-up. Indeed, after a sometimes transitory increase of this rate during or after antibiotherapy, the decrease is very slow, sometimes several months, and often incomplete. The follow-up should thus be made according to clinical symptoms and their resolution. Resolution of some but not all symptoms must lead to discussing two options. The first is that of administrating a complementary antibiotherapy with a different mode of action than the first antibiotic used. The second is that this may be due to recontamination, especially in highly endemic zones, given that antibodies present have no protecting effect. In this case, a new antibiotherapy must of course be initiated.

  20. The Kepler Follow-Up Observation Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautier, Thomas N., III; Dunham, E. W.; Gilliland, R.; Jenkins, J.; Batalha, N.; Borucki, W. J.; Cochran, W. D.; Howell, S.; Koch, D.; Latham, D.; Marcy, G.; Kepler Team

    2010-01-01

    The Kepler Mission to find Earth-size exoplanets was launched on March 6, 2009, began science observations on May 11, 2009 and is now in full operation. Many planet candidates have been identified and ground based follow-up observations are weeding out false positive planet detections and beginning to confirm true planets. False positive identification techniques planned during the pre-flight phase of Kepler are proving to work well. The fraction of false positive planet detections due to binary stars sent for ground based follow-up appears small.

  1. XMM-XXL Follow-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Stephen

    2011-09-01

    XMM-XXL survey will cover 20 square degrees in two selected areas. Chandra follow-up observations of selected clusters identified with XMM will help to separate AGN emission from the cluster emission to improve estimates of cluster properties, especially the temperature and mass.

  2. Follow-Up Research on Agoraphobics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambless, Dianne L.

    In vivo exposure is the most commonly used and generally the most effective behavioral treatment for agoraphobia. Follow-up studies are difficult to interpret because additional treatment does not necessarily indicate relapse and non-treatment does not necessarily indicate non-relapse. Relapse rates are difficult to estimate because of lack of…

  3. WCTC Graduate Follow-Up Report, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waukesha County Technical Coll., Pewaukee, WI.

    This paper reports on a survey of 2001-02 graduates of Waukesha County Technical College (WCTC), Wisconsin. The report indicates 1,257 students were awarded Associate's Degrees, technical diplomas, and apprenticeship certificates by WCTC in 2001-02. Of those graduates, 702 (56%) responded to the Graduate Follow-up Survey. Also, 84% of all…

  4. Facilitating Follow-Up in ELT INSET

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Alan

    2006-01-01

    There is evidence that ELT INSET does not always result in the desired level of "follow-up," i.e. impact on teachers' classroom practices. Nevertheless, little research appears to have been carried out concerning how the design of INSET systems affects such outcomes. This paper therefore attempts to throw light on some of the factors…

  5. Walk-Off Follow-Up, Spring 1982 Students. TEX-SIS Follow-Up, Volume 5, #1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yavapai County Community Coll. District, Prescott, AZ.

    A follow-up study was undertaken at Yavapai College to determine why students stopped attending class and if possible to help them return to class. Instructors identified student "walk-outs" and notified Special Services staff who attempted to contact the students. In spring 1982, 129 walk-outs were contacted to determine why they had stopped…

  6. Prospective impact of panic disorder and panic-anxiety on asthma control, health service use, and quality of life in adult patients with asthma over a 4-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Favreau, Helene; Bacon, Simon L; Labrecque, Manon; Lavoie, Kim L

    2014-02-01

    Background Panic disorder (PD) is a common anxiety disorder among asthmatic patients with overlapping symptoms (e.g., hyperventilation). However, the longitudinal impact of PD on asthma control remains poorly understood. This study assessed the impact of PD and panic-anxiety on asthma control over a 4.3-year follow-up in 643 adult asthmatic patients. Methods Consecutive patients presenting to a tertiary asthma clinic underwent a sociodemographic, medical history, and psychiatric (Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders) interview and completed questionnaires including the Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI) to assess panic-anxiety. At follow-up, patients completed the Asthma Control (ACQ) and Asthma Quality of Life (AQLQ) questionnaires and reported emergency department visits and hospitalizations during the follow-up. Results Baseline frequency of PD was 10% (n = 65). In fully adjusted models, analyses revealed that PD and ASI scores predicted worse follow-up ACQ total scores (β = 0.292, p = .037; β = 0.012, p = .003) but not AQLQ total scores. ASI scores also predicted greater nocturnal and waking symptoms, activity limitations, and bronchodilator use on the ACQ (β = 0.012-0.018, p < .05) as well as lower symptom (β = -0.012, p = .006) and emotional distress (β = -0.014, p = .002) subscale scores on the AQLQ. Neither PD nor ASI scores were associated with hospitalizations, although ASI scores (but not PD) were associated with an increased risk of emergency department visits (relative risk = 1.023, 95% confidence interval = 1.001-1.044). Conclusions PD and anxiety sensitivity are prospectively associated with poorer asthma control and may be important targets for treatment.

  7. The LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, Tim; Greenstreet, Sarah; Gomez, Edward; Christensen, Eric J.; Larson, Stephen M.

    2016-10-01

    The LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network is using the telescopes of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGT) and a web-based target selection, scheduling and data reduction system to confirm NEO candidates and characterize radar-targeted known NEOs. Starting in July 2014, the LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network has observed over 3,500 targets and reported more than 16,000 astrometric and photometric measurements to the Minor Planet Center (MPC).The LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network's main aims are to perform confirming follow-up of the large number of NEO candidates and to perform characterization measurements of radar targets to obtain light curves and rotation rates. The NEO candidates come from the NEO surveys such as Catalina, PanSTARRS, ATLAS, NEOWISE and others. In particular, we are targeting objects in the Southern Hemisphere, where the LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network is the largest resource for NEO observations.LCOGT has completed the first phase of the deployment with the installation and commissioning of the nine 1-meter telescopes at McDonald Observatory (Texas), Cerro Tololo (Chile), SAAO (South Africa) and Siding Spring Observatory (Australia). The telescope network has been fully operational since 2014 May, and observations are being executed remotely and robotically. Future expansion to a site at Ali Observatory, Tibet is planned for 2017-2018.We have developed web-based software called NEOexchange which automatically downloads and aggregates NEO candidates from the Minor Planet Center's NEO Confirmation Page, the Arecibo and Goldstone radar target lists and the NASA ARM list. NEOexchange allows the planning and scheduling of observations on the LCOGT Telescope Network and the tracking of the resulting blocks and generated data. We have recently extended the NEOexchange software to include automated data reduction to re-compute the astrometric solution, determine the photometric zeropoint and find moving objects and present these results to the user via

  8. The Kepler Follow-up Observation Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautier, Thomas N., III; Borucki, W. J.; Caldwell, D. A.; Koch, D. G.

    2007-07-01

    The Kepler mission will use a space based, 95 cm Schmidt telescope to survey >100,000 late type dwarf stars for transiting Earth-sized planets over a period of 4 years. Up to 2000 such planets might be detected along with a hundred or more transiting giant planets. About 1000 false positive planet detections, due mainly to eclipsing binary stars, are also expected. A ground based follow-up program is planned to observe all of the planet candidates found by Kepler to weed out these false positives and produce a final catalog with a reliability greater than 95%. In addition, follow-up observations will, where possible, measure the mass of confirmed planets and look for any non-transiting giant planets. The Kepler Project is Funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration as a Discovery Mission.

  9. [Nutritional follow-up after gastric bypass].

    PubMed

    Gasteyger, C; Giusti, V

    2006-03-29

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass has become one of the main bariatric procedures. This surgical operation shows excellent results in weight evolution and quality of life and allows a decrease of mortality. However, it leads, relatively often, to nutritional deficiencies which need an effective post-operative follow-up. This follow-up includes not only medical and dietetic encounters but also regular blood analyses made every 3 months during the first post-operative year, every 6 months the second year, then each year. The most frequent deficiencies are those in vitamin B12, iron and folic acid. The secondary hyperparathyroidism characterized by an increase of PTH associated to a low vitamin D and a normal calcium, is quite frequent.

  10. The LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, Tim A.; Greenstreet, S.; Gomez, E.; Christensen, E.; Larson, S.

    2016-01-01

    Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGT) has deployed a homogeneous telescope network of nine 1-meter telescopes to four locations in the northern and southern hemispheres, with a planned network size of twelve 1-meter telescopes at 6 locations. This network is very versatile and is designed to respond rapidly to target of opportunity events and also to perform long term monitoring of slowly changing astronomical phenomena. The global coverage of the network and the apertures of telescope available make LCOGT ideal for follow-up and characterization of Solar System objects (e.g. asteroids, Kuiper Belt Objects, comets, Near-Earth Objects (NEOs)) and additionally for the discovery of new objects. We are using the LCOGT network to confirm newly detected NEO candidates produced by the major sky surveys such as Catalina Sky Survey (CSS) and PanSTARRS (PS1&2) and several hundred targets are now being followed per year. An increasing amount of time is being spent to obtain follow-up astrometry and photometry for radar-targeted objects and those on the Near-Earth Object Human Space Flight Accessible Targets Study (NHATS) or Asteroid Retrieval Mission (ARM) lists in order to improve the orbits, determine the light curves and rotation periods and improve the characterization. This will be extended to obtain more light curves of other NEOs which could be targets. Recent results have included the first period determinations for several of the Goldstone-targeted NEOs. We are in the process of building a NEO follow-up portal which will allow professionals, amateurs and Citizen Scientists to plan, schedule and analyze NEO imaging and spectroscopy observations and data using the LCOGT Network and to act as a co-ordination hub for the NEO follow-up efforts.

  11. Prompt GRB optical follow-up experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H-S; Williams, G; Ables, E; Band, D; Barthelmy, S; Bionta, R; Cline, T; Gehrels, N; Hartmann, D; Hurley, K; Kippen, M; Nemiroff, R; Pereira, W; Porrata, R

    2000-11-13

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are brief, randomly located, releases of gamma-ray energy from unknown celestial sources that occur almost daily. The study of GRBs has undergone a revolution in the past three years due to an international effort of follow-up observations of coordinates provided by Beppo/SAX and IPN GRB. These follow-up observations have shown that GRBs are at cosmological distances and interact with surrounding material as described by the fireball model. However, prompt optical counterparts have only been seen in one case and are therefore very rare or much dimmer than the sensitivity of the current instruments. Unlike later time afterglows, prompt optical measurements would provide information on the GRB progenitor. LOTIS is the very first automated and dedicated telescope system that actively utilizes the GRB Coordinates Network (GCN) and it attempts to measure simultaneous optical light curve associated with GRBs. After 3 years of running, LOTIS has responded to 75 GRB triggers. The lack of any optical signal in any of the LOTIS images places numerical limits on the surrounding matter density, and other physical parameters in the environment of the GRB progenitor. This paper presents LOTIS results and describes other prompt GRB follow-up experiments including the Super-LOTIS at Kitt Peak in Arizona.

  12. [Follow-up of encopresis in children].

    PubMed

    Steinmüller, A; Steinhausen, H C

    1990-03-01

    The course of encopresis in 41 children who had been presented at a child and adolescent university clinic was examined by means of a follow-up interview which took place on an average of 3;6 years after the initial visit. The symptoms in this sample diminished considerably: 76% of the children were free of symptoms at the time of the follow-up interview, whereby most of these children had experienced a spontaneous remission. Eighty-one percent of the children were evaluated as having improved in regards to their whole development while in about one third of all the children new problems arose. Remission occurred within the first two years of the initial consultation in 81% of the sample. An examination of the prognostic factors yielded the following relationships: the total remission of symptoms was considerably greater if the frequency of encopresis had been low, if the subjects were male, and if there had not been any therapeutic intervention. However, treatment was usually reserved for relatively serious cases. Favorable outcome tended to be marked by the following factors: normal psychosocial conditions, higher intelligence, the absence of constipation, a concurrently presenting enuresis, and a low degree of behavioral disorders as evaluated by a parental questionnaire. A comparison of the behavioral disorders at the time of the initial consultation and at follow-up revealed a significant reduction of emotional disturbances and hyperactivity. This favorable development was not evident for conduct disorders.

  13. Disk Detective Follow-Up Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchner, Marc

    As new data on exoplanets and young stellar associations arrive, we will want to know: which of these planetary systems and young stars have circumstellar disks? The vast allsky database of 747 million infrared sources from NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mission can supply answers. WISE is a discovery tool intended to find targets for JWST, sensitive enough to detect circumstellar disks as far away as 3000 light years. The vast WISE archive already serves us as a roadmap to guide exoplanet searches, provide information on disk properties as new planets are discovered, and teach us about the many hotly debated connections between disks and exoplanets. However, because of the challenges of utilizing the WISE data, this resource remains underutilized as a tool for disk and planet hunters. Attempts to use WISE to find disks around Kepler planet hosts were nearly scuttled by confusion noise. Moreover, since most of the stars with WISE infrared excesses were too red for Hipparcos photometry, most of the disks sensed by WISE remain obscure, orbiting stars unlisted in the usual star databases. To remedy the confusion noise problem, we have begun a massive project to scour the WISE data archive for new circumstellar disks. The Disk Detective project (Kuchner et al. 2016) engages layperson volunteers to examine images from WISE, NASA's Two Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) and optical surveys to search for new circumstellar disk candidates via the citizen science website DiskDetective.org. Fueled by the efforts of > 28,000 citizen scientists, Disk Detective is the largest survey for debris disks with WISE. It has already uncovered 4000 disk candidates worthy of follow-up. However, most host stars of the new Disk Detective disk candidates have no known spectral type or distance, especially those with red colors: K and M stars and Young Stellar Objects. Others require further observations to check for false positives. The Disk Detective project is supported by

  14. The LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, Tim; Gomez, Edward; Greenstreet, Sarah

    2015-08-01

    Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGT) has deployed a homogeneous telescope network of nine 1-meter telescopes to four locations in the northern and southern hemispheres, with a planned network of twelve 1-meter telescopes at 6 locations. This network is very versatile and is designed to respond rapidly to target of opportunity events and also to perform long term monitoring of slowly changing astronomical phenomena. The global coverage of the network and the apertures of telescope available make LCOGT ideal for follow-up and characterization of Solar System objects (e.g. asteroids, Kuiper Belt Objects, comets, Near-Earth Objects (NEOs)) and ultimately for the discovery of new objects.LCOGT has completed the first phase of the deployment with the installation and commissioning of the nine 1-meter telescopes at McDonald Observatory (Texas), Cerro Tololo (Chile), SAAO (South Africa) and Siding Spring Observatory (Australia). The telescope network has been fully operational since 2014 May, and observations are being executed remotely and robotically. Future expansion to sites in the Canary Islands and Tibet is planned for 2016.I am using the LCOGT network to confirm newly detected NEO candidates produced by the major sky surveys such as Catalina Sky Survey (CSS) and PanSTARRS (PS1) and several hundred targets are now being followed-up per year. An increasing amount of time is being spent to obtain follow-up astrometry and photometry for radar-targeted objects and those on the Near-Earth Object Human Space Flight Accessible Targets Study (NHATS) or Asteroid Retrieval Mission (ARM) lists in order to improve the orbits, determine the light curves and rotation periods and improve the characterization. This will be extended to obtain more light curves of other NEOs which could be targets. Recent results have included the first period determinations for several of the Goldstone-targeted NEOs. We are in the process of building a NEO Portal which will allow

  15. The Kepler Follow-up Observation Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautier, T. N.; Borucki, W. J.; Caldwell, D. A.; Koch, D. G.

    2007-07-01

    The Kepler mission will use a space based, 95-cm Schmidt telescope to survey 100,000 late type dwarf stars for transiting Earth-sized planets over a period of 4 years. Up to ˜ 2000 such planets might be detected along with a hundred or more transiting giant planets. About 1,000 false positive planet detections, due mainly to eclipsing binary stars, will also be found. A ground based follow-up program is planned to observe all of the planet candidates found by Kepler to weed out these false positives and produce a final catalog with a reliability greater than 95%.

  16. Spectroscopic Follow Up of Kepler Planet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latham, David W.; Cochran, W. D.; Marcy, G. W.; Buchhave, L.; Endl, M.; Isaacson, H.; Gautier, T. N.; Borucki, W. J.; Koch, D.; Kepler Team

    2010-01-01

    Spectroscopic follow-up observations play a crucial role in the confirmation and characterization of transiting planet candidates identified by Kepler. The most challenging part of this work is the determination of radial velocities with a precision approaching 1 m/s in order to derive masses from spectroscopic orbits. The most precious resource for this work is HIRES on Keck I, to be joined by HARPS-North on the William Herschel Telescope when that new spectrometer comes on line in two years. Because a large fraction of the planet candidates are in fact stellar systems involving eclipsing stars and not planets, our strategy is to start with reconnaissance spectroscopy using smaller telescopes, to sort out and reject as many of the false positives as possible before going to Keck. During the first Kepler observing season in 2009, more than 100 nights of telescope time were allocated for this work, using high-resolution spectrometers on the Lick 3.0-m Shane Telescope, the McDonald 2.7-m Reflector, the 2.5-m Nordic Optical Telescope, and the 1.5-m Tillinghast Reflector at the Whipple observatory. In this paper we will summarize the scope and organization of the spectroscopic follow-up observations, showing examples of the types of false positives found and ending with a presentation of the characteristics of a confirmed planet.

  17. NASA Audit Follow-up Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This NASA Audit Follow-up Handbook is issued pursuant to the requirements of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A-50, Audit Follow-up, dated September 29, 1982. It sets forth policy, uniform performance standards, and procedural guidance to NASA personnel for use when considering reports issued by the Office of Inspector General (OIG), other executive branch audit organizations, the Defense Contract Audit Agency (DCAA), and the General Accounting Office (GAO). It is intended to: specify principal roles; strengthen the procedures for management decisions (resolution) on audit findings and corrective action on audit report recommendations; emphasize the importance of monitoring agreed upon corrective actions to assure actual accomplishment; and foster the use of audit reports as effective tools of management. A flow chart depicting the NASA audit and management decision process is in Appendix A. This handbook is a controlled handbook issued in loose-leaf form and will be revised by page changes. Additional copies for internal use may be obtained through normal distribution channels.

  18. NASA Audit Follow-up Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This NASA Audit Follow-up Handbook is issued pursuant to the requirements of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A-50, Audit Follow-up, dated September 29, 1982. It sets forth policy, uniform performance standards, and procedural guidance to NASA personnel for use when considering reports issued by the Office of Inspector General (OIG), other executive branch audit organizations, the Defense Contract Audit Agency (DCAA), and the General Accounting Office (GAO). It is intended to: specify principal roles; strengthen the procedures for management decisions (resolution) on audit findings and corrective action on audit report recommendations; emphasize the importance of monitoring agreed upon corrective actions to assure actual accomplishment; and foster the use of audit reports as effective tools of management. A flow chart depicting the NASA audit and management decision process is in Appendix A. This handbook is a controlled handbook issued in loose-leaf form and will be revised by page changes. Additional copies for internal use may be obtained through normal distribution channels.

  19. Neonatal follow-up programs and follow-up studies: Historical and current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Sauve, Reg; Lee, Shoo K

    2006-01-01

    The present report reviews some highlights in the history of neonatal intensive care and neonatal follow-up programs, particularly developments and reports that were based on experiences in Canada. Early outcomes reported from ‘preemie baby units’ were distressing, but attention has consistently been paid to preterm infant outcomes, even from the early days of neonatal intensive care units. Most current follow-up programs have goals related to ‘audit’ functions, education and clinical roles, but existing literature related to these functions is limited. Several reports have provided guidance in terms of neonatal follow-up research issues, and these strengthen the place of follow-up studies in outcomes research. PMID:19030284

  20. Follow-up Observations of WASP-36

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutra, Taylor; Boley, Aaron; Hughes, Anna; Hickson, Paul

    2017-06-01

    This ongoing work aims to provide follow-up observations of known transiting extrasolar planets using the 35-cm robotic telescope at The University of British Columbia's Southern Observatory (USO), located at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) in Chile. The observations are part of a long-term effort to search for changes in transit signatures, such as transit timing variations (TTVs) and transit duration variations (TDVs), which could indicate, for example, the presence of additional planets. To help characterize the USO for transit searches, we acquired I-band observations of WASP-36 spanning from 17 January 2017 to 27 February 2017. Three complete transits and one partial transit are included in the data. We present the analysis of these new observations and discuss potential future targets.

  1. GNAT Student Follow-Up Pilot Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Noll S.; Jaggi, N.; Milne, C.

    2006-12-01

    The Global Network of Astronomical Telescopes (GNAT) has discovered some 25,000 new variable star candidates along an equatorial strip of the sky with a non-moving (drift scan) telescope. With three closely spaced observations of any given star being made on the order of 100 nights spread over three years, GNAT could not determine the types of variability and periods of the short period, aliased light curve stars in their MG-1 Variable Star Catalog. Such determinations typically require, for each star, hundreds of closely spaced observations over a number of nights with a modest-aperture tracking telescope equipped for CCD photometry. Many college and amateur observatories are capable of making such observation. At Cuesta College we have initiated a GNAT follow-up pilot program to determine how students at small observatories could efficiently make such determinations in a single-semester research course. We used a 10” Meade LX-200 telescope equipped with a SBIG ST-8XE camera to observe nine GNAT candidates, looking for short-term variability. We found two of the nine to be very short-term variables. We obtained 1397 one-minute integrations on the GNAT star GM1-15036 (GSC 13:95) over seven nights. We determined its period to be about 0.16 days. Its sinusoidal waveform has a peak-to-peak amplitude of 0.2 magnitudes. This star is most likely an RR Lyrae pulsating variable. The second short-term variable star is now being repeatedly observed and, in parallel, we are examining a second batch of nine candidates for short-term variability. At the end of the fall 2006 semester, we will summarize what have learned about one-semester GNAT student follow-up observations. We are pleased to acknowledge the assistance of Eric Craine from GNAT, Russell Genet from Cuesta College and Orion Observatory, and Thomas Smith from Dark Ridge Observatory.

  2. [Allogeneic parathyroid: 2-year follow-up].

    PubMed

    Hermosillo-Sandoval, José Manuel; Leonher-Ruezga, Karla Lisseth; Jiménez-Gómez, José Alfredo; Fuentes-Orozco, Clotilde; González-Ojeda, Alejandro; Ramírez-González, Luis Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Hypoparathyroidism is one of the most frequent complications of neck surgery. The treatment is currently medical; however this involves several complications secondary to high doses of calcium and vitamin D, thus making parathyroid allotransplantation a good management option. Patients with hypoparathyroidism were selected in the April-December period of 2011 in the general surgical clinic. They were between 16 and 65 years, and ingested high doses of calcium. The donors were patients with primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism, and the transplants were performed in relation to blood group and human leucocyte antigen. Five parathyroid allografts were performed. All the patients had iatrogenic hypoparathyroidism, all women with a mean age of 49.8 years. The graft was implanted under local anaesthesia in the non-dominant forearm. Four of the patients are so far considered functional due to the increase in paratohormone, and demonstrating its function by scintigraphy with sestamibi. One of the patients showed no increase in paratohormone or imaging studies that demonstrate its functionality. After a two year follow up the graft remains functional but with with oral calcium intake at a lower dose than before transplantation. None of the patients had immunosuppression side effects. In this study, allogeneic unrelated living parathyroid transplant with an immunosuppressive regimen of six months has proven to be a safe alternative treatment to improve quality of life by decreasing the excessive calcium intake and improving physical activity with adequate graft survival at 24 months follow up. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  3. The Safe Dates program: 1-year follow-up results.

    PubMed Central

    Foshee, V A; Bauman, K E; Greene, W F; Koch, G G; Linder, G F; MacDougall, J E

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: An earlier report described desirable 1-month follow-up effects of the Safe Dates program on psychological, physical, and sexual dating violence. Mediators of the program-behavior relationship also were identified. The present report describes the 1-year follow-up effects of the Safe Dates program. METHODS: Fourteen schools were in the randomized experiment. Data were gathered by questionnaires in schools before program activities and 1 year after the program ended. RESULTS: The short-term behavioral effects had disappeared at 1 year, but effects on mediating variables such as dating violence norms, conflict management skills, and awareness of community services for dating violence were maintained. CONCLUSIONS: The findings are considered in the context of why program effects might have decayed and the possible role of boosters for effect maintenance. PMID:11029999

  4. Short- and long-term follow-up of intensive care unit patients after sedation with isoflurane and midazolam--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sackey, Peter V; Martling, Claes-Roland; Carlswärd, Christine; Sundin, Orjan; Radell, Peter J

    2008-03-01

    To compare memories from the intensive care unit (ICU) and short- and long-term psychological morbidity in patients after sedation with intravenous midazolam or inhaled isoflurane. Prospective long-term follow-up after randomized controlled trial. General ICU at Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, Stockholm. Forty patients in need of sedation during ventilator treatment. Patients were randomized to receive isoflurane or midazolam for goal-directed sedation until extubation or for a maximum of 96 hrs. For short-term follow-up, doctors', nurses', and physiotherapists' notes from the 4 days following exposure to the study drugs were reviewed for words indicating adequate or pathologic cognitive and psychological recovery. For long-term follow-up, all 6-month survivors received questionnaires including the ICU Memory Tool (ICU-MT), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Impact of Event Scale (IES), and Well-Being Index. Additionally, several screening questions for previous posttraumatic stress symptoms were included. In the short term follow-up, no significant differences were found between groups. In the long-term follow-up, a trend toward fewer hallucinations/delusions after isoflurane sedation than after midazolam (two of ten isoflurane patients vs. five of seven midazolam patients) was found (p = .06). None of the five solely isoflurane-sedated patients reported hallucinations/delusions from the ICU. There was no difference in groups in long-term psychological morbidity as measured with HADS and IES. Memories of negative feelings in the ICU (ICU-MT) were associated with high HADS and IES scores (Fisher's exact test, p = .02 and p = .01, respectively). Sedation of ICU patients with isoflurane may result in fewer delusional memories or hallucinations from the ICU compared with more commonly used intravenous sedation. Memories of negative feelings from the ICU were associated with symptoms of depression or anxiety or symptoms indicating posttraumatic stress

  5. Follow-up of Unmarried Adolescent Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clapp, Douglas F.; Raab, Rebecca Staude

    1978-01-01

    As more adolescent unmarried mothers decide to keep their babies, social service agencies need to reevaluate their programs to meet changing needs. This study examines the living situations, educational and employment status, and interpersonal relationships of 30 adolescent unmarried mothers to determine the services they themselves thought they…

  6. Follow-Up of 1977 Occupational Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baratta, Mary Kathryne

    As part of a series of annual studies, this survey determined the characteristics and opinions of Moraine Valley Community College (MVCC) occupational graduates for 1976-77. Graduates of business (51 of 81 contacted), health service (72 of 151), public service (60 of 99), and technology (28 of 35) programs responded to a questionnaire that…

  7. Percutaneous vertebroplasty: the follow-up.

    PubMed

    Barbero, S; Casorzo, I; Durando, M; Mattone, G; Tappero, C; Venturi, C; Gandini, G

    2008-02-01

    This article reports on our experience treating vertebral fractures with percutaneous vertebroplasty. A clinical and imaging follow-up designed to identify the early (especially pulmonary embolism of bone cement) and late complications of the technique is proposed. On the basis of the current guidelines, 101 patients were selected: 64 osteoporotic and 37 neoplastic. A total of 173 vertebrae were treated. Procedures were performed with both computed tomography and fluoroscopic guidance. Residual pain was evaluated with a visual analogue scale score immediately after vertebroplasty and 1, 15, 30, 90, 180 and 270 days later. Spine and chest radiographs were obtained 24 h after vertebroplasty; spine radiography was repeated 30 days later. Therapeutic success was obtained in 88% of osteoporotic patients and in 84% of neoplastic patients. Pulmonary cement emboli were identified in four patients, all of whom were asymptomatic. Percutaneous vertebroplasty is a safe and effective technique for the treatment of osteoporotic and neoplastic vertebral fractures. Clinical and imaging followup allows effective patient monitoring and early detection of possible complications.

  8. A study protocol for facility assessment and follow-up evaluations of the barriers to access, availability, utilization and readiness of contraception, abortion and postabortion services in Zika affected areas.

    PubMed

    Ali, Moazzam; Folz, Rachel; Miller, Kelsey; Johnson, Brooke Ronald; Kiarie, James

    2017-02-02

    The Zika virus epidemic in Latin America has elicited official recommendations for women to delay or avoid pregnancy in affected countries, which has increased demand for family planning services. It is likely, however, that health facilities in areas where the population is most vulnerable to the disease lack the capacity to respond to the increased demand for family planning services. Our objectives are to perform facilities assessment and understand client perceptions in areas affected by Zika virus, and to track changes in these parameters over time. We will collaborate with local health authorities to map facilities that have the capacity to provide services in contraception and safe abortion, including induced abortion to the full extent of the law and post-abortion care for treatment of complications from unsafe abortion and post-abortion contraception. We then will carry out a survey of facilities to assess the availability of services and their readiness to provide contraception and safe abortion care. All facilities will be assessed for baseline readiness and availability of services, and a random subsample of surveyed facilities will be reassessed in second and third rounds of surveys. Focus group interviews with clients will be conducted as part of the facilities surveys in order to gain an understanding of the community's knowledge, needs and perceived barriers to healthcare in the context of the Zika virus epidemic. The findings of this study will aid the response to Zika virus ranging from the identification of healthcare facilities that can be potentially strengthened, to the formulation of interventions to reduce barriers and improve readiness of facilities to provide contraception and safe abortion services. Lessons learned from this study will help to build and strengthen health systems that are more prepared to consistently providing reproductive healthcare services in the context of health emergencies.

  9. Follow-up after treatment for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sisler, Jeffrey; Chaput, Genevieve; Sussman, Jonathan; Ozokwelu, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Objective To offer FPs a summary of evidence-based recommendations to guide their follow-up survivorship care of women treated for breast cancer. Quality of evidence A literature search was conducted in MEDLINE from 2000 to 2016 using the search words breast cancer, survivorship, follow-up care, aftercare, guidelines, and survivorship care plans, with a focus on review of recent guidelines published by national cancer organizations. Evidence ranges from level I to level III. Main message Survivorship care involves 4 main tasks: surveillance and screening, management of long-term effects, health promotion, and care coordination. Surveillance for recurrence involves only annual mammography, and screening for other cancers should be done according to population guidelines. Management of the long-term effects of cancer and its treatment addresses common issues of pain, fatigue, lymphedema, distress, and medication side effects, as well as longer-term concerns for cardiac and bone health. Health promotion emphasizes the benefits of active lifestyle change in cancer survivors, with an emphasis on physical activity. Survivorship care is enhanced by the involvement of various health professionals and services, and FPs play an important role in care coordination. Conclusion Family physicians are increasingly the main providers of follow-up care after breast cancer treatment. Breast cancer should be viewed as a chronic medical condition even in women who remain disease free, and patients benefit from the approach afforded other chronic conditions in primary care. PMID:27737976

  10. Course Withdrawal Follow-Up. TEX-SIS Follow-Up, Volume 3, #1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yavapai County Community Coll. District, Prescott, AZ.

    In spring 1982, a survey was conducted at Yavapai College to determine reasons for student course withdrawal. A TEX-SIS follow-up questionnaire was mailed to all 525 students who had dropped one or two courses, asking them to indicate their reasons for dropping the course(s) and if they felt discussion with a counselor would have been beneficial,…

  11. The increased effectiveness of HIV preventive intervention among men who have sex with men and of follow-up care for people living with HIV after 'task-shifting' to community-based organizations: a 'cash on service delivery' model in China.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hongjing; Zhang, Min; Zhao, Jinkou; Huan, Xiping; Ding, Jianping; Wu, Susu; Wang, Chenchen; Xu, Yuanyuan; Liu, Li; Xu, Fei; Yang, Haitao

    2014-01-01

    A large number of men who have sex with men (MSM) and people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHA) are underserved despite increased service availability from government facilities while many community based organizations (CBOs) are not involved. We aimed to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of the task shifting from government facilities to CBOs in China. HIV preventive intervention for MSM and follow-up care for PLHA were shifted from government facilities to CBOs. Based on 'cash on service delivery' model, 10 USD per MSM tested for HIV with results notified, 82 USD per newly HIV cases diagnosed, and 50 USD per PLHA received a defined package of follow-up care services, were paid to the CBOs. Cash payments were made biannually based on the verified results in the national web-based HIV/AIDS information system. After task shifting, CBOs gradually assumed preventive intervention for MSM and follow-up care for PLHA from 2008 to 2012. HIV testing coverage among MSM increased from 4.1% in 2008 to 22.7% in 2012. The baseline median CD4 counts of newly diagnosed HIV positive MSM increased from 309 to 397 cells/µL. HIV tests among MSM by CBOs accounted for less than 1% of the total HIV tests in Nanjing but the share of HIV cases detected by CBOs was 12.4% in 2008 and 43.6% in 2012. Unit cost per HIV case detected by CBOs was 47 times lower than that by government facilities. The coverage of CD4 tests and antiretroviral therapy increased from 71.1% and 78.6% in 2008 to 86.0% and 90.1% in 2012, respectively. It is feasible to shift essential HIV services from government facilities to CBOs, and to verify independently service results to adopt 'cash on service delivery' model. Services provided by CBOs are cost-effective, as compared with that by government facilities.

  12. Managing ICU throughput and understanding ICU census.

    PubMed

    Howell, Michael D

    2011-12-01

    Traditionally, hospitals have coped with chronically high ICU census by building more ICU beds, but this strategy is unlikely to be tenable under future financial models. Therefore, ICUs need additional tools to manage census, inflow, and throughput. Higher ICU census, without compensatory surges in nursing capacity, is associated with several adverse effects on patients and providers, but its relationship to mortality is uncertain. Providers also discharge patients more aggressively during times of high census. Little's Law (L = λ W), a cornerstone of queuing theory, provides an eminently practical basis for managing ICU census and throughput. One target for improving throughput is minimizing process steps that are without value to the patient, e.g., waiting for a bed at ICU discharge. Larger gains in ICU throughput can be found in ICU quality improvement. For example, spontaneous breathing trials, daily wake-ups, and early physical/occupational therapy programmes are all likely to improve throughput by reducing ICU length of stay. The magnitude of these interventions' effects on ICU census can be startling. ICUs should actively manage throughput and census. Operations management tools such as Little's Law can provide practical guidance about the relationship between census, throughput, and patient demand. Standard ICU quality improvement techniques can meaningfully affect both ICU census and throughput.

  13. Effectiveness of Community versus Hospital Eye Service follow-up for patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration with quiescent disease (ECHoES): a virtual non-inferiority trial

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Barnaby C; Scott, Lauren J; Taylor, Jodi; Harding, Simon P; Peto, Tunde; Muldrew, Alyson; Hogg, Ruth E; Wordsworth, Sarah; Mills, Nicola; O'Reilly, Dermot; Rogers, Chris A; Chakravarthy, Usha

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To compare the ability of ophthalmologists versus optometrists to correctly classify retinal lesions due to neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD). Design Randomised balanced incomplete block trial. Optometrists in the community and ophthalmologists in the Hospital Eye Service classified lesions from vignettes comprising clinical information, colour fundus photographs and optical coherence tomographic images. Participants' classifications were validated against experts' classifications (reference standard). Setting Internet-based application. Participants Ophthalmologists with experience in the age-related macular degeneration service; fully qualified optometrists not participating in nAMD shared care. Interventions The trial emulated a conventional trial comparing optometrists' and ophthalmologists' decision-making, but vignettes, not patients, were assessed. Therefore, there were no interventions and the trial was virtual. Participants received training before assessing vignettes. Main outcome measures Primary outcome—correct classification of the activity status of a lesion based on a vignette, compared with a reference standard. Secondary outcomes—potentially sight-threatening errors, judgements about specific lesion components and participants' confidence in their decisions. Results In total, 155 participants registered for the trial; 96 (48 in each group) completed all assessments and formed the analysis population. Optometrists and ophthalmologists achieved 1702/2016 (84.4%) and 1722/2016 (85.4%) correct classifications, respectively (OR 0.91, 95% CI 0.66 to 1.25; p=0.543). Optometrists' decision-making was non-inferior to ophthalmologists' with respect to the prespecified limit of 10% absolute difference (0.298 on the odds scale). Optometrists and ophthalmologists made similar numbers of sight-threatening errors (57/994 (5.7%) vs 62/994 (6.2%), OR 0.93, 95% CI 0.55 to 1.57; p=0.789). Ophthalmologists assessed lesion components as

  14. A Case Study on Improving Intensive Care Unit (ICU) Services Reliability: By Using Process Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (PFMEA)

    PubMed Central

    Yousefinezhadi, Taraneh; Jannesar Nobari, Farnaz Attar; Goodari, Faranak Behzadi; Arab, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: In any complex human system, human error is inevitable and shows that can’t be eliminated by blaming wrong doers. So with the aim of improving Intensive Care Units (ICU) reliability in hospitals, this research tries to identify and analyze ICU’s process failure modes at the point of systematic approach to errors. Methods: In this descriptive research, data was gathered qualitatively by observations, document reviews, and Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) with the process owners in two selected ICUs in Tehran in 2014. But, data analysis was quantitative, based on failures’ Risk Priority Number (RPN) at the base of Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) method used. Besides, some causes of failures were analyzed by qualitative Eindhoven Classification Model (ECM). Results: Through FMEA methodology, 378 potential failure modes from 180 ICU activities in hospital A and 184 potential failures from 99 ICU activities in hospital B were identified and evaluated. Then with 90% reliability (RPN≥100), totally 18 failures in hospital A and 42 ones in hospital B were identified as non-acceptable risks and then their causes were analyzed by ECM. Conclusions: Applying of modified PFMEA for improving two selected ICUs’ processes reliability in two different kinds of hospitals shows that this method empowers staff to identify, evaluate, prioritize and analyze all potential failure modes and also make them eager to identify their causes, recommend corrective actions and even participate in improving process without feeling blamed by top management. Moreover, by combining FMEA and ECM, team members can easily identify failure causes at the point of health care perspectives. PMID:27157162

  15. A retrospective case comparison study of the relationship between an Integrated Care Pathway for people diagnosed with schizophrenia in acute mental health care and service users' length of stay, readmission rates and follow-up within 7 days of discharge.

    PubMed

    Attfield, J; Brown, S; Carter, T; Callaghan, P

    2017-08-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: There is some evidence reporting the value of diagnostic-driven Integrated Care Pathways (ICPs) in reducing service users' length of inpatient stay, readmission rates and follow-up within seven days of discharge, but this evidence is untested in studies comparing care using ICP with other forms of care planning. WHAT THIS STUDY ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: This study present findings from research comparing care in a Trust that uses an ICP with a Trust using another form of care planning to direct the care of people diagnosed with schizophrenia. We were interested particularly in whether using an ICP was linked to length of inpatient stay, readmission rates and follow-up care within seven days of discharge. The results compare ICP driven care with another form of care. This study adds to the international evidence by being among the first to compare empirically, outcomes in a mental health Trust using an ICP with a Trust not using an ICP to direct care. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: Mental health nurses are central to the delivery of the psychosocial aspects of ICPs in particular and judging by the link between psychosocial interventions and quality of mental health care, it is possible that nurse-led psychosocial interventions contributed to the reduced length of stay. Background Integrated Care Pathways (ICPs) are used to deliver mental health services, yet evidence relating to outcomes is mixed. Aim To compare service users' length of stay, readmission rates and follow-up within 7 days of discharge in a mental health Trust using an ICP to direct the care of people diagnosed with schizophrenia with a Trust using a nonICP method of care planning in England. A cohort study with a random sample of 400 service users with outcomes analysed retrospectively. Results The ICP Trust had a 13.5 day shorter average length of stay, this difference was statistically significant. No statistically significant differences were observed

  16. Innovative Designs for the Smart ICU.

    PubMed

    Halpern, Neil A

    2014-03-01

    Successfully designing a new ICU requires clarity of vision and purpose and the recognition that the patient room is the core of the ICU experience for patients, staff, and visitors. The ICU can be conceptualized into three components: the patient room, central areas, and universal support services. Each patient room should be designed for single patient use and be similarly configured and equipped. The design of the room should focus upon functionality, ease of use, healing, safety, infection control, communications, and connectivity. All aspects of the room, including its infrastructure; zones for work, care, and visiting; environment, medical devices, and approaches to privacy; logistics; and waste management, are important elements in the design process. Since most medical devices used at the ICU bedside are really sophisticated computers, the ICU needs to be capable of supporting the full scope of medical informatics. The patient rooms, the central ICU areas (central stations, corridors, supply rooms, pharmacy, laboratory, staff lounge, visitor waiting room, on-call suite, conference rooms, and offices), and the universal support services (infection prevention, finishings and flooring, staff communications, signage and wayfinding, security, and fire and safety) work best when fully interwoven. This coordination helps establish efficient and safe patient throughput and care and fosters physical and social cohesiveness within the ICU. A balanced approach to centralized and decentralized monitoring and logistics also offers great flexibility. Synchronization of the universal support services in the ICU with the hospital's existing systems maintains unity of purpose and continuity across the enterprise and avoids unnecessary duplication of efforts.

  17. 46 CFR 4.06-50 - Specimen analysis and follow-up procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Involving Vessels in Commercial Service § 4.06-50 Specimen analysis and follow-up procedures. (a) Each... required by 49 CFR part 40, subpart G, and submit his or her findings to the marine employer. Blood test...

  18. 46 CFR 4.06-50 - Specimen analysis and follow-up procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Involving Vessels in Commercial Service § 4.06-50 Specimen analysis and follow-up procedures. (a) Each... required by 49 CFR part 40, subpart G, and submit his or her findings to the marine employer. Blood test...

  19. The Increased Effectiveness of HIV Preventive Intervention among Men Who Have Sex with Men and of Follow-Up Care for People Living with HIV after ‘Task-Shifting’ to Community-Based Organizations: A ‘Cash on Service Delivery’ Model in China

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Hongjing; Zhang, Min; Zhao, Jinkou; Huan, Xiping; Ding, Jianping; Wu, Susu; Wang, Chenchen; Xu, Yuanyuan; Liu, Li; Xu, Fei; Yang, Haitao

    2014-01-01

    Background A large number of men who have sex with men (MSM) and people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHA) are underserved despite increased service availability from government facilities while many community based organizations (CBOs) are not involved. We aimed to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of the task shifting from government facilities to CBOs in China. Methods HIV preventive intervention for MSM and follow-up care for PLHA were shifted from government facilities to CBOs. Based on ‘cash on service delivery’ model, 10 USD per MSM tested for HIV with results notified, 82 USD per newly HIV cases diagnosed, and 50 USD per PLHA received a defined package of follow-up care services, were paid to the CBOs. Cash payments were made biannually based on the verified results in the national web-based HIV/AIDS information system. Findings After task shifting, CBOs gradually assumed preventive intervention for MSM and follow-up care for PLHA from 2008 to 2012. HIV testing coverage among MSM increased from 4.1% in 2008 to 22.7% in 2012. The baseline median CD4 counts of newly diagnosed HIV positive MSM increased from 309 to 397 cells/µL. HIV tests among MSM by CBOs accounted for less than 1% of the total HIV tests in Nanjing but the share of HIV cases detected by CBOs was 12.4% in 2008 and 43.6% in 2012. Unit cost per HIV case detected by CBOs was 47 times lower than that by government facilities. The coverage of CD4 tests and antiretroviral therapy increased from 71.1% and 78.6% in 2008 to 86.0% and 90.1% in 2012, respectively. Conclusion It is feasible to shift essential HIV services from government facilities to CBOs, and to verify independently service results to adopt ‘cash on service delivery’ model. Services provided by CBOs are cost-effective, as compared with that by government facilities. PMID:25050797

  20. Employer Follow-up Data Summary--1976-77. Tex-SIS FOLLOW-UP; Postsecondary Student Follow-up Management Information System. Monograph 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin. Dept. of Occupational Education and Technology.

    The Tex-SIS Follow-up system Employer Follow-up Survey involved four Texas community colleges, providing a statewide composite of employer data on the competency of occupational/technical graduates. The mailing list for prospective survey participants was derived from occupational/technical graduates' responses to a survey conducted in 1975-76. A…

  1. Employer Follow-up Data Summary--1976-77. Tex-SIS FOLLOW-UP; Postsecondary Student Follow-up Management Information System. Monograph 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin. Dept. of Occupational Education and Technology.

    The Tex-SIS Follow-up system Employer Follow-up Survey involved four Texas community colleges, providing a statewide composite of employer data on the competency of occupational/technical graduates. The mailing list for prospective survey participants was derived from occupational/technical graduates' responses to a survey conducted in 1975-76. A…

  2. 29 CFR 99.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Audit findings follow-up. 99.315 Section 99.315 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Auditees § 99.315 Audit findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective...

  3. 7 CFR 3052.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Auditees § 3052.315 Audit findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Audit findings follow-up. 3052.315 Section 3052.315...

  4. 33 CFR 179.15 - Follow-up report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... discovered as of the date of the follow-up report; (3) The number of units in which corrective action has been completed as of the date of the follow-up report; (4) The number of first purchasers not notified... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Follow-up report. 179.15...

  5. The process and outcomes of a nurse-led colorectal cancer follow-up clinic.

    PubMed

    McFarlane, K; Dixon, L; Wakeman, C J; Robertson, G M; Eglinton, T W; Frizelle, F A

    2012-05-01

    Evidence suggests that follow-up after colorectal cancer improves survival. Colorectal cancer is so common that patient follow-up can overwhelm a service, affecting the ability to see new referrals and reassess patients seen previously who have new symptoms. In order to cope with this demand a nurse-led follow-up service was started in 2004. We aimed to review the results of a nurse-led colorectal cancer follow-up clinic. Between 1 December 2004 and 31 January 2011, patients who underwent resection for colorectal cancer were followed up by a nurse specialist according to a protocol determined by the colorectal surgeons in the unit. All patient details were recorded prospectively in a purpose designed database. Nine hundred and fifty patients were followed up over 7 years. Some 368 patients were discharged from the follow-up programme, 474 patients remain actively involved in the programme and 108 patients died. Of the patients discharged from the follow-up scheme 269 (73%) were discharged to their general practitioner free of disease after 5 years. Of the 108 who patients died, 98 were as a result of colorectal cancer. Twenty patients (2.1%) were identified with local (peri-anastomotic) disease recurrence and 93 patients (9.8%) were found to have developed distant metastatic disease. Of these, 65 patients (6.8%) were referred for palliative care and 28 (2.9%) had surgery for focal metastatic disease of whom 18 were still alive at the time of this analysis. This paper shows that a nurse-led clinic for colorectal cancer follow-up can achieve satisfactory results with detection rates of recurrent or metastatic disease comparable to consultant follow-up. A nurse-led clinic provides the benefits of follow-up without overwhelming the consultant colorectal surgical clinic practice. © 2011 The Authors. Colorectal Disease © 2011 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  6. Home/community monitoring using telephonic follow-up.

    PubMed

    Martin, Elisabeth Moy; French, Louis; Janos, Alicia

    2010-01-01

    Service members who have had a traumatic brain injury (TBI) in a war theatre [Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF)] may have associated injuries far different and/or more complex (i.e., polytrauma) than injuries obtained outside the theatre of operation. This article expands on what has been learned from monitoring patients injured during peacetime to the newly injured war veterans being monitored in the home setting via routine telephonic follow-up. As Tanielian et al. state TBI, post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and major depression may occur during and following deployment/s which then pose a significant health risk to these veterans. This is particularly important as veterans of these two conflicts may incur these "invisible wounds of war". Thus, safe and effective monitoring of these veterans by nurses/case managers in the home/community setting becomes important in the recovery process.

  7. Six year follow up of forty five pregnant opiate addicts.

    PubMed

    Keenan, E; Dorman, A; O'Connor, J

    1993-07-01

    Forty five pregnant addicts had attended the National Drug Treatment Centre between 1984-1986. At that time they received intensive counselling, low dose Methadone maintenance and both ante natal and post natal care. Our aim was to follow these women six years later focusing on their drug use and outcome of their children. The women were followed up by chart review, individual interviews and liaison with the social and probation services. Results indicate that a high proportion of the women abused chaotically (50%). There is a worrying high incidence of HIV positive patients (53.4%) and a mortality figure of 15.5% (7). However only 13 women (28.6%) have had further children and 22 women (49%) are currently using some form of contraception. Only 23 women (51.1%) have had further contact with probation services. Five children (11.3%) are under formal care order and 4 children have become HIV positive in their own right. In conclusion, while these women have benefitted in certain areas e.g. family planning, contact with probation services, in other areas they have remained chaotic e.g. continued drug abuse or HIV risk taking behaviour. Thus the authors believe that future programmes should concentrate more directly on detoxification and rehabilitation after pregnancy. We also believe that because of the chaotic nature of these women some review of an "at risk" register for the children should be carried out.

  8. Post-surgical tympanostomy tube follow up with audiology: experience at the Freeman Hospital.

    PubMed

    Davies-Husband, C R; Harker, C; Davison, T; Yates, P D

    2012-02-01

    Tympanostomy tube (grommet) insertion is a common procedure, with little guidance in the current literature regarding post-operative surveillance. Our institution implemented a protocol to follow up post-surgical grommet patients via audiology at six weeks. A retrospective audit of all patients less than 16 years old who had undergone grommet insertion during a three-month period. A total of 149 patients had grommets inserted. Exclusion criteria left a cohort of 123 individuals; 82 (67 per cent) were followed up by audiology. Of these, 13 (11 per cent) did not attend follow up, and were discharged; 53 (43 per cent) were discharged from audiology with normal thresholds; and 16 (13 per cent) were referred back to a consultant. Therefore, the overall reduction in patients followed up by an otolaryngologist was 54 per cent. We recommend a six-week follow up with audiology following grommet insertion, allowing for referral back to ENT services in the event of related complications.

  9. Use of health-care services, work absenteeism, leisure-time physical activity, musculoskeletal symptoms and physical performance after vocationally oriented medical rehabilitation-description of the courses and a one-and-a-half-year follow-up study with farmers, loggers, police officers and hairdressers.

    PubMed

    Arokoski, J P A; Juntunen, M; Luikku, J

    2002-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of vocationally oriented medical rehabilitation (VOMR) carried out in institutions with regard to the use of health-care services, work absenteeism, leisure-time physical activity, musculoskeletal symptoms and physical performance during 112 years of follow-up. The prospective cohort study consisted of 265 patients from four different occupational groups (loggers, hairdressers, police officers and female farmers) who took part in VOMR courses in three inhouse phases, financed by the Finnish Social Insurance Institution, and who had chronic musculoskeletal symptoms in their back and neck. The subjective physical and mental strain of work, subjective neck-shoulder and low-back pain, use of health-care services and leisure-time physical activity were assessed with a questionnaires. The muscle strength of the upper and lower extremities and trunk was determined and maximal VO2 was measured using the direct maximal bicycle ergometer test. The subjective physical and mental strain of work, subjective neck-shoulder and low-back pain and physical performance showed positive significant development and improvement. The changes in the use of health-care services and work absenteeism were minor or insignificant. The general finding was that the results from the second phase of the VOMR courses did not differ from those of the third phase. VOMR courses had a beneficial effect on physical performance and subjective pain caused by neck and back musculoskeletal diseases of farmers, loggers, police officers and hairdressers within 112 years of follow-up, but VOMR courses did not decreased the use of health-care services.

  10. Large Regional Differences in Serological Follow-Up of Q Fever Patients in The Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Morroy, Gabriëlla; Wielders, Cornelia C. H.; Kruisbergen, Mandy J. B.; van der Hoek, Wim; Marcelis, Jan H.; Wegdam-Blans, Marjolijn C. A.; Wijkmans, Clementine J.; Schneeberger, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    Background During the Dutch Q fever epidemic more than 4,000 Q fever cases were notified. This provided logistical challenges for the organisation of serological follow-up, which is considered mandatory for early detection of chronic infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the proportion of acute Q fever patients that received serological follow-up, and to identify regional differences in follow-up rates and contributing factors, such as knowledge of medical practitioners. Methods Serological datasets of Q fever patients diagnosed between 2007 and 2009 (N = 3,198) were obtained from three Laboratories of Medical Microbiology (LMM) in the province of Noord-Brabant. One LMM offered an active follow-up service by approaching patients; the other two only tested on physician's request. The medical microbiologist in charge of each LMM was interviewed. In December 2011, 240 general practices and 112 medical specialists received questionnaires on their knowledge and practices regarding the serological follow-up of Q fever patients. Results Ninety-five percent (2,226/2,346) of the Q fever patients diagnosed at the LMM with a follow-up service received at least one serological follow-up within 15 months of diagnosis. For those diagnosed at a LMM without this service, this was 25% (218/852) (OR 54, 95% CI 43–67). Although 80% (162/203) of all medical practitioners with Q fever patients reported informing patients of the importance of serological follow-up, 33% (67/203) never requested it. Conclusions Regional differences in follow-up are substantial and range from 25% to 95%. In areas with a low follow-up rate the proportion of missed chronic Q fever is potentially higher than in areas with a high follow-up rate. Medical practitioners lack knowledge regarding the need, timing and implementation of serological follow-up, which contributes to patients receiving incorrect or no follow-up. Therefore, this information should be incorporated in national guidelines

  11. Rural-Urban Differences in the Effect of Follow-Up Care on Postdischarge Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Toth, Matthew; Holmes, Mark; Van Houtven, Courtney; Toles, Mark; Weinberger, Morris; Silberman, Pam

    2017-08-01

    To assess rural-urban differences in quality of postdischarge care among Medicare beneficiaries, controlling for selection bias of postdischarge services. The Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS), Cost and Use Files from 2000 to 2010, the Area Resource File, Provider of Services File, and the Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care. Retrospective analysis of 30- and 60-day hospital readmission, emergency department (ED) use, and mortality using two-stage residual inclusion; receipt of 14-day follow-up care was the main independent variable. We defined index admission from the MCBS as any admission without a previous admission within 60 days. Noninstrumental variables estimation was the preferred estimation strategy. Fourteen-day follow-up care reduced the risk of readmission, ED use, and mortality. There were no rural- urban differences in the effect of 14-day follow-up care on readmission and mortality. Rural beneficiaries experienced a greater effect of 14-day follow-up care on reducing 30-day ED use compared to urban beneficiaries. Follow-up care reduces 30- and 60-day readmission, ED use, and mortality. Rural and urban Medicare beneficiaries experience similar beneficial effects of follow-up care on the outcomes. Policies that improve follow-up care in rural settings may be beneficial. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  12. Assault history and follow-up contact of women survivors of recent sexual assault.

    PubMed

    Boykins, Anita D; Mynatt, Sarah

    2007-08-01

    The purpose of this comparative descriptive study is to describe and examine differences in assault characteristics and the issues surrounding follow-up contact of women survivors of a recent sexual assault. This study identified assault characteristics: half of the assaults were by strangers; approximately one-third of the assaults occurred in the victim's home; 29% of the victims were abducted; weapons and physical force were used in over half of the cases; 63% were vaginal assaults; and 86% involved penile penetration. Three months after the assault and the initial examination, only 23% (n = 18) of the study participants could be contacted by telephone for follow-up. The study's findings provide not only data regarding the characteristics of sexual assault, but also the difficulties in contacting adult female survivors for follow-up services. Recommendations outline the importance of thorough, individualized examinations and the need for improved, timely, follow-up services for sexual assault victims.

  13. 49 CFR 219.211 - Analysis and follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Analysis and follow-up. 219.211 Section 219.211... Analysis and follow-up. (a) The laboratory designated in appendix B to this part undertakes prompt analysis... notification of the results of the toxicological analysis, any provision of collective bargaining...

  14. 49 CFR 219.211 - Analysis and follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Analysis and follow-up. 219.211 Section 219.211... Analysis and follow-up. (a) The laboratory designated in appendix B to this part undertakes prompt analysis... notification of the results of the toxicological analysis, any provision of collective bargaining...

  15. First Grade Follow-Up of Kidi-Prep.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stank, Peggy L.

    A 1971-72 study compared the effects of a Kindergarten Diagnostic Prereading Program with the effects of traditional kindergarten on children's predicted reading levels. A follow-up study of the first grade reading achievement of the children from both kindergarten programs was recently completed. The purpose of the follow-up study was to answer…

  16. 33 CFR 179.15 - Follow-up report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Follow-up report. 179.15 Section 179.15 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY DEFECT NOTIFICATION § 179.15 Follow-up report. (a) Each manufacturer who makes an...

  17. Graduate Follow-Up Studies: How Useful Are They?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smedley, Rande H.; Olson, George H.

    Follow-up surveys may fall prey to several sources of bias and error, among them lack of control over independent variables, lack of item validity and reliability, sampling biases, and observation bias. Two follow-up studies have been dissected to expose inherent limitations: the Texas Education Product Study (TEPS) and Project TALENT. The…

  18. 45 CFR Appendix C to Part 1356 - Calculating Sample Size for NYTD Follow-Up Populations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Populations C Appendix C to Part 1356 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON CHILDREN... Follow-Up Populations 1. Using Finite Population Correction The Finite Population Correction (FPC)...

  19. Determinants of adequate follow-up of an abnormal Papanicolaou result among Jamaican women in Portland, Jamaica

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Su Jin; Saroha, Ekta; Knight, Jeremy; Roofe, Michele; Jolly, Pauline E.

    2010-01-01

    Background Among Jamaican women, cervical cancer is the second leading cause of cancer mortality but factors that facilitate follow-up of women receiving abnormal Pap smear results are not known. We examined whether socio-demographic factors, factors reported by the women, and assistance received for follow-up facilitate adequate follow-up of abnormal Pap smears. Methods One hundred-and-twenty-one women who had abnormal Pap results during June 1998–September 2005 in Portland, Jamaica were interviewed to identify determinants of adequate follow-up. Chi-square, t-test and multivariable logistic regression analysis were used to identify determinants. Results Only half of the women in this sample sought adequate follow-up. These women had a lower number of surviving children, higher monthly income, and perceived the cost of services to be inexpensive. Advice about the timing of the follow-up activity and the next step to take by the healthcare workers were significant determinants of adequate follow-up. Women who received advice on the timing of follow-up were almost six times (adjusted OR: 5.99, 95% CI: 1.17, 30.66, p<0.05) more likely to seek adequate follow-up after adjusting for other factors. Conclusions Perceived low cost of services as well as assistance provided by healthcare workers regarding follow-up action helps to facilitate adequate follow-up of abnormal Pap smear results. PMID:20688592

  20. [Work-related asthma--diagnostics and follow-up].

    PubMed

    Aasen, Tor Olav Brøvig; Kongerud, Johny

    2014-10-28

    Approximately 10-15% of all cases of asthma occurring in adults can be ascribed to exposure at work. Work-related asthma (WRA) includes cases that represent an exacerbation of pre-existing asthma as well as occupational asthma where exposure at work is the cause of the disease. Somewhat more than 350 different sources of exposure are known to be causes of allergic WRA. The purpose of this article is to present an updated review of diagnostics and follow-up of WRA. In addition to our own searches in PubMed and comprehensive clinical experience with this patient group, the article is based on a number of literature reviews undertaken internationally. Early diagnosis requires attention to occupational asthma and rapid initiation of diagnostics, in which primary doctors play a key role. Further examination requires resources that are available only in departments with special competence in this field. Awareness of the condition and an early and correct diagnosis that leads to cessation of exposure have been shown to improve the patients' prognosis. All doctors who have responsibility for asthma patients need to be aware of this condition and provide adequate diagnostics, so that interventions to halt the exposure can be undertaken. Cooperation between GPs, employers, enterprise health services and specialists are required to achieve this.

  1. [Predictors of participation in medical rehabilitation follow-up in working patients with chronic back pain].

    PubMed

    Sibold, M; Mittag, O; Kulick, B; Müller, E; Opitz, U; Jäckel, W H

    2011-12-01

    closer to the home, by flexible follow-up offerings, alternative follow-up services (e. g. in certified physiotherapy centres and sport clubs) as well as by integrating companies in follow-up planning and implementation. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Creating the Action Model for High Risk Infant Follow Up Program in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Heidarzadeh, Mohammad; Jodiery, Behzad; Mirnia, Kayvan; Akrami, Forouzan; Hosseini, Mohammad Bagher; Heidarabadi, Seifollah; HabibeLahi, Abbas

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Intervention in early childhood development as one of the social determinants of health, is important for reducing social gap and inequity. In spite of increasingly developing intensive neonatal care wards and decreasing neonatal mortality rate, there is no follow up program in Iran. This study was carreid out to design high risk infants follow up care program with the practical aim of creating an model action for whole country, in 2012. Methods This qualitative study has been done by the Neonatal Department of the Deputy of Public Health in cooperation with Pediatrics Health Research Center of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran. After study of international documents, consensus agreement about adapted program for Iran has been accomplished by focus group discussion and attended Delphi agreement technique. After compiling primary draft included evidence based guidelines and executive plan, 14 sessions including expert panels were hold to finalize the program. Results After finalizing the program, high risk infants follow up care service package has been designed in 3 chapters: Evidence based clinical guidelines; eighteen main clinical guidelines and thirteen subsidiaries clinical guidelines, executive plan; 6 general, 6 following up and 5 backup processes. Education program including general and especial courses for care givers and follow up team, and family education processes. Conclusion We designed and finalized high risk infants follow up care service package. It seems to open a way to extend it to whole country. PMID:26171344

  3. What factors influence follow-up in orthopedic trauma surgery?

    PubMed

    Whiting, Paul S; Greenberg, Sarah E; Thakore, Rachel V; Alamanda, Vignesh K; Ehrenfeld, Jesse M; Obremskey, William T; Jahangir, Alex; Sethi, Manish K

    2015-03-01

    Among surgical patients, follow-up visits are essential for monitoring post-operative recovery and determining ongoing treatment plans. Non-adherence to clinic follow-up appointments has been associated with poorer outcomes in many different patient populations. We sought to identify factors associated with non-attendance at follow-up appointments for orthopedic trauma patients. A retrospective chart review at a level I trauma center identified 2,165 patients who underwent orthopedic trauma surgery from 2008 to 2009. Demographic data including age, sex, race, tobacco use, American Society of Anesthesiologist (ASA) score, insurance status, distance from the hospital, and follow-up time were collected. Injury characteristics including fracture type, anatomic location of the operation, length of hospital stay, living situation and employment status were recorded. Attendance at the first scheduled follow-up visit was recorded. Multivariable log-binomial regression analyses were used with statistical significance maintained at p < 0.05. Of the 2,165 patients included in the analysis, 1,449 (66.9 %) attended their first scheduled post-operative clinic visit. 33.1 % (717) were not compliant with keeping their first clinic appointment after surgery. Patients who used tobacco, lived more than 100 miles from the clinic site, did not have private insurance, had an ASA score >2, or had a fracture of the hip or pelvis were significantly less likely to follow-up. Age, sex, and race were not significantly associated with failure to follow-up. Follow-up appointments are essential for preventing complications among orthopedic trauma patients. By identifying patients at risk of failure to follow-up, orthopedic surgeons can appropriately design and implement long-term treatment plans specifically targeted for high-risk patients.

  4. The transitioning from trials to extended follow-up studies

    PubMed Central

    Drye, Lea T.; Casper, Anne S.; Sternberg, Alice L.; Holbrook, Janet T.; Jenkins, Gabrielle; Meinert, Curtis L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Investigators may elect to extend follow-up of participants enrolled in a randomized clinical trial after the trial comes to its planned end. The additional follow-up may be initiated to learn about longer term effects of treatments including adverse events, costs related to treatment, or for reasons unrelated to treatment such as to observe the natural course of the disease using the established cohort from the trial. Purpose We examine transitioning from trials to extended follow-up studies when the goal of additional follow-up is to observe longer term treatment effects. Methods We conducted a literature search in selected journals from 2000–2012 to identify trials that extended follow-up for the purpose of studying longer term treatment effects and extracted information on the operational and logistical issues in the transition. We also draw experience from three trials coordinated by the Johns Hopkins Coordinating Centers that made transitions to extended followup: the Alzheimer’s Disease Anti-inflammatory Prevention Trial (ADAPT); Multicenter Uveitis Steroid Treatment (MUST) trial; and Childhood Asthma Management Program (CAMP). Results Transitions are not uncommon in multicenter clinical trials, even in trials that continued to the planned end of the trial. Transitioning usually necessitates new participant consents. If study infrastructure is not maintained during the transition, participants will be lost and re-establishing the staff and facilities will be costly. Merging data from the trial and follow-up study can be complicated by changes in data collection measures and schedules. Limitations Our discussion and recommendations are limited to issues that we have experienced in transitions from trials to follow-up studies. Discussion We discuss issues such as maintaining funding, IRB and consent requirements, contacting participants, and combining data from the trial and follow-up phases. We conclude with a list of recommendations to

  5. Postpartum follow-up rates before and after the postpartum follow-up initiative at Queen Emma Clinic.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Pai-Jong Stacy; Nakashima, Laurie; Yamamoto, Jan; Ngo, Lynn; Kaneshiro, Bliss

    2011-03-01

    To study postpartum follow-up rates, as well as counseling opportunities, among Queen Emma Clinic patients before and after the implementation of the Queen Emma Clinic Postpartum Follow-up Initiative. This was a retrospective chart review of 221 women who received prenatal care at the Queen Emma Clinic and gave birth between April 2006 and April 2008. In April 2007 the postpartum initiative was started. The primary outcome was the number of postpartum follow-up visits. Secondary outcomes included breastfeeding, contraceptive use, depression screening and referral, follow-up screening for patien ts with gestational diabetes and subsequent pregnancy. Postpartum follow-up rates were significantly higher after the Postpartum Follow-up Initiative (86.1% compared with 71.7%, P =.012). When comparing timing of follow-up, the first postpartum visit occurred approximately one week sooner in the post intervention group (2.96 weeks compared with 3.73 weeks, P=0.38) with no difference in timing of the second postpartum visit (6.62 weeks compared with 6.42 weeks, P=.72). In the post intervention group there were more patients breastfeeding at the first postpartum visit (28.7% compared with 16%, P=.015), as well as the second postpartum visit (28.7% compared with 12.3%, P=0.01). There were also more women using contraception in the post intervention group (84.3% compared with 71.7%, P=.009). There was no difference in depression screening or referral, follow-up screening for gestational diabetes, or timing of subsequent pregnancies. The Postpartum Follow-Up Initiative improved postpartum follow-up rates, as well as breastfeeding, and contraceptive use. Hawaii Medical Journal Copyright 2011.

  6. Postpartum Follow-up Rates Before and After the Postpartum Follow-up Initiative at Queen Emma Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Laurie; Yamamoto, Jan; Ngo, Lynn; Kaneshiro, Bliss

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study postpartum follow-up rates, as well as counseling opportunities, among Queen Emma Clinic patients before and after the implementation of the Queen Emma Clinic Postpartum Follow-up Initiative. Methods This was a retrospective chart review of 221 women who received prenatal care at the Queen Emma Clinic and gave birth between April 2006 and April 2008. In April 2007 the postpartum initiative was started. The primary outcome was the number of postpartum follow-up visits. Secondary outcomes included breastfeeding, contraceptive use, depression screening and referral, follow-up screening for patients with gestational diabetes and subsequent pregnancy. Results Postpartum follow-up rates were signifificantly higher after the Postpartum Follow-up Initiative (86.1% compared with 71.7%, P=.012). When comparing timing of follow-up, the first postpartum visit occurred approximately one week sooner in the post intervention group (2.96 weeks compared with 3.73 weeks, P= 0.38) with no difference in timing of the second postpartum visit (6.62 weeks compared with 6.42 weeks, P=.72). In the post intervention group there were more patients breastfeeding at the first postpartum visit (28.7% compared with 16%, P=.015), as well as the second postpartum visit (28.7% compared with 12.3%, P= 0.01). There were also more women using contraception in the post intervention group (84.3% compared with 71.7%, P=.009). There was no difference in depression screening or referral, follow-up screening for gestational diabetes, or timing of subsequent pregnancies. Conclusion The Postpartum Follow-Up Initiative improved postpartum follow-up rates, as well as breastfeeding, and contraceptive use. PMID:21365543

  7. Factors Associated With Follow-Up Attendance Among Rape Victims Seen in Acute Medical Care.

    PubMed

    Darnell, Doyanne; Peterson, Roselyn; Berliner, Lucy; Stewart, Terri; Russo, Joan; Whiteside, Lauren; Zatzick, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Rape is associated with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and related comorbidities. Most victims do not obtain treatment for these conditions. Acute care medical settings are well positioned to link patients to services; however, difficulty engaging victims and low attendance at provided follow-up appointments is well documented. Identifying factors associated with follow-up can inform engagement and linkage strategies. Administrative, patient self-report, and provider observational data from Harborview Medical Center were combined for the analysis. Using logistic regression, we examined factors associated with follow-up health service utilization after seeking services for rape in the emergency department. Of the 521 diverse female (n = 476) and male (n = 45) rape victims, 28% attended the recommended medical/counseling follow-up appointment. In the final (adjusted) logistic regression model, having a developmental or other disability (OR = 0.40, 95% CI = 0.21-0.77), having a current mental illness (OR = 0.25, 95% CI = 0.13-0.49), and being assaulted in public (OR = 0.50, 95% CI = 0.28-0.87) were uniquely associated with reduced odds of attending the follow-up. Having a prior mental health condition (OR = 3.02, 95% CI = 1.86-4.91), a completed Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner's (SANE) examination (OR = 2.97, 95% CI = 1.84-4.81), and social support available to help cope with the assault (OR = 3.54, 95% CI = 1.76-7.11) were associated with an increased odds of attending the follow-up. Findings point to relevant characteristics ascertained at the acute care medical visit for rape that may be used to identify victims less likely to obtain posttraumatic medical and mental health services. Efforts to improve service linkage for these patients is warranted and may require alternative service delivery models that engage rape survivors and support posttraumatic recovery.

  8. Short-Term Follow-Up of Narcotic Addicts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swartz, June; Jabara, Raymond

    1974-01-01

    A follow-up questionnaire was mailed to 144 narcotic addict veterans approximately six months after termination from treatment at a multimodality drug program. It was found that 75 percent continued to use drugs, and 38 percent became readdicted. (Author)

  9. Short-Term Follow-Up of Narcotic Addicts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swartz, June; Jabara, Raymond

    1974-01-01

    A follow-up questionnaire was mailed to 144 narcotic addict veterans approximately six months after termination from treatment at a multimodality drug program. It was found that 75 percent continued to use drugs, and 38 percent became readdicted. (Author)

  10. Radiological follow-up of pediatric pneumonia: principle and practice.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Dhia; Vartzelis, George; McQueen, Paula; Perkin, Michael R

    2007-03-01

    A study was undertaken to evaluate the trends in radiological follow up of childhood pneumonia among consultant pediatricians throughout the United Kingdom. A questionnaire was sent to 120 consultant pediatricians. Among the 88 respondents, 18% would carry out a repeat chest radiograph on follow-up of all their patients admitted with pneumonia, whereas 78% would perform the investigation selectively. Among the criteria for selection, persistence of symptoms and collapse or effusion were cited, although a considerable number would repeat a chest radiograph in children with lobar pneumonia. The mean timing of a repeat chest radiograph was 5.5 weeks after presentation (range 2-12 weeks). Only 23% of the respondents worked in units with written guidelines for the follow-up of children with pneumonia. Written guidelines, specifying the categories of children who would benefit from follow-up chest radiographs, should be present and implemented in all pediatric departments.

  11. Outpatient follow-up for critical limb ischemia.

    PubMed

    Watch, Libby

    2014-09-01

    Outpatient follow-Up for critical limb ischemia offers the clinician the opportunity to monitor the patient for risk factor modification and wound healing. Routine surveillance following intervention will improve long-term patency.

  12. Women with abnormal screening mammography lost to follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Chia-Sheng; Chen, Guan-Ru; Hung, Shou-Hung; Liu, Yi-Lien; Huang, Kuo-Chin; Cheng, Shao-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Breast cancer has the highest incidence among all cancers for women in Taiwan. The current screening policy in Taiwan suggested a biennial mammography for all women 40 to 69 years of age. A recommendation for additional testing is recommended for women with a BI-RADS result of 0 or 4; a request made via postal mail. Approximately 20% of high-risk patients do not receive additional follow-up. Therefore, we aimed to explore the causes of these patients being lost to follow-up, despite an abnormal mammogram. Two questionnaires were designed separately according to the conceptual framework of the Health Belief Model. Study participants, women who received a screening mammography at the National Taiwan University Hospital in 2011 with a BI-RAD of 0 or 4, were interviewed via telephone. The dependent variable was receipt of follow-up or not. The analyses were performed by using χ2 tests and logistic regression models. In total, 528 women were enrolled in the study: 51.2% in BI-RADS 0 group and 56.6% in BI-RADS 4, respectively. In the BI-RADS 0 group, those patients who received a follow-up examination cited the most likely causes to be physician suggestion, health implications, and concerns regarding breast cancer. Patients who did not receive a follow-up examination cited a lack of time and a perception of good personal health as primary reasons. In the BI-RADS 4 group, those patients who received a follow-up examination cited the physician's recommendation and a recognition of the importance of follow-up examinations. Patients who did not receive a follow-up examination cited having received follow-up at another hospital and a desire for a second opinion. In the BI-RADS 0 group, multivariate analysis showed that patients with higher scores in the “perceived benefits” domain were statistically more likely to receive a follow-up examination. There was no significant difference in perceived threats, perceived barriers, action cues, or self-efficacy between

  13. Pediatric Celiac Disease: Follow-Up in the Spotlight.

    PubMed

    Valitutti, Francesco; Trovato, Chiara Maria; Montuori, Monica; Cucchiara, Salvatore

    2017-03-01

    The follow-up of celiac disease (CD) is challenging due to the scarcity of published data and the lack of standardized evidence-based protocols. The worldwide frequency and methods of CD follow-up appear to be heavily influenced by expert opinions of the individual physicians who assess children with CD. The aim of this review was to summarize the available studies on CD follow-up in children. We conducted a literature search with the use of PubMed, Medline, and Embase (from 1900 to 15 December 2016) for terms relevant to this review, including CD, follow-up, dietary adherence or dietary compliance, nutrition, comorbidities, complications, and quality of life. The aims of follow-up are as follows: to ensure strict adherence to a gluten-free diet, to ensure nutritional adequacy, to improve quality of life, and to prevent disease complications. For the correct evaluation of children with CD at follow-up, a clinical and biochemical evaluation is necessary on a regular basis. It is advisable to assess compliance, nutrition, comorbidities, or possible complications once a year at the referral center. Laboratory tests might be useful for a thorough evaluation of any patient with CD to rule out a micronutrient deficiency (full blood count, ferritin, folic acid, vitamin B-6, and vitamin B-12) and possible cardiovascular risk factors (glucose, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides). Biochemical evaluation is essential when there are clinical problems and should be customized on the basis of the specific clinical suspicion. Associated autoimmune thyroiditis should also be screened for yearly by measuring thyroid-stimulating hormone and thyroid autoantibody concentrations, regardless of symptoms, because hypothyroidism is often subtle and methods for early treatment are available and desirable. Although evidence-based recommendations for follow-up of pediatric patients with CD have not yet been established, we advise a yearly follow-up visit as the safest approach.

  14. Clinical Impact of Structured Follow-up After Pancreatic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Tjaden, Christine; Michalski, Christoph W; Strobel, Oliver; Giese, Nathalia; Hennche, Anne-Kathrin; Büchler, Markus W; Hackert, Thilo

    2016-07-01

    Structured follow-up after surgery for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains controversial and is currently not recommended due to a supposed lack of therapeutic consequences. Furthermore, it is not clear whether noncancer patients after pancreas resection need to be seen in the clinic on a regular basis. The present study analyzed how follow-up after pancreatic surgery affected postoperative treatment and long-term outcomes. Data of all postoperative visits in a specialized outpatient clinic for pancreatic diseases were analyzed for a 1-year period with regard to symptoms, diagnostic procedures, and therapeutic consequences. Six hundred eighteen patients underwent 940 postoperative follow-ups. Nearly half of them needed a change of medication due to altered pancreatic function. In 74 (40%) of 184 resected PDAC patients, recurrence (local or systemic) was detected during follow-up, although only 19 of these had shown associated symptoms (26%). In all patients with recurrence, a cancer-directed treatment was induced. Eleven (69%) of 16 patients with isolated local recurrence were referred for reresection. Follow-up examinations are a substantial part of the clinical management after pancreas resections. Follow-up is particularly important for PDAC because recurrence is often asymptomatic, but its detection allows for therapeutic interventions and potentially improved prognosis. This should be implemented in future guidelines.

  15. Guidelines for the follow-up of patients undergoing bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    O'Kane, Mary; Parretti, Helen M; Hughes, Carly A; Sharma, Manisha; Woodcock, Sean; Puplampu, Tamara; Blakemore, Alexandra I; Clare, Kenneth; MacMillan, Iris; Joyce, Jacqueline; Sethi, Su; Barth, Julian H

    2016-06-01

    Bariatric surgery can facilitate weight loss and improvement in medical comorbidities. It has a profound impact on nutrition, and patients need access to follow-up and aftercare. NICE CG189 Obesity emphasized the importance of a minimum of 2 years follow-up in the bariatric surgical service and recommended that following discharge from the surgical service, there should be annual monitoring as part of a shared care model of chronic disease management. NHS England Obesity Clinical Reference Group commissioned a multi-professional subgroup, which included patient representatives, to develop bariatric surgery follow-up guidelines. Terms of reference and scope were agreed upon. The group members took responsibility for different sections of the guidelines depending on their areas of expertise and experience. The quality of the evidence was rated and strength graded. Four different shared care models were proposed, taking into account the variation in access to bariatric surgical services and specialist teams across the country. The common features include annual review, ability for a GP to refer back to specialist centre, submission of follow-up data to the national data base to NBSR. Clinical commissioning groups need to ensure that a shared care model is implemented as patient safety and long-term follow-up are important. © 2016 World Obesity.

  16. Comparing cancer detection rates of patients undergoing short term follow-up vs routine follow-up after benign breast biopsies, is follow-up needed?

    PubMed

    Plecha, Donna M; Garlick, Courtney; Dubchuck, Christina; Thompson, Cheryl; Constantinou, Niki

    To compare cancer rates after benign breast biopsies between patients with short term imaging follow-up (STFU) and those with routine follow-up (RFU). Retrospective review of benign stereotactic, US or DCE-MRI breast biopsies. Of 580 lesions, 192 (33%) had STFU, and 388 (67%) had RFU. For US and mammographic detected lesions, there is no difference in cancer rates between the STFU (1 cancer, n=148) and the RFU group (0 cancer, n=365) (p=0.29). There were 2 cancers in the STFU group versus 0 in the RFU DCE-MRI group (p=0.54). Our results support RFU after benign ultrasound and stereotactic breast biopsies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Factors Associated with Follow-Up Attendance among Rape Victims Seen in Acute Medical Care

    PubMed Central

    Darnell, Doyanne; Peterson, Roselyn; Berliner, Lucy; Stewart, Terri; Russo, Joan; Whiteside, Lauren; Zatzick, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Objective Rape is associated with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and related comorbidities. Most victims do not obtain treatment for these conditions. Acute care medical settings are well-positioned to link patients to services; however, difficulty engaging victims and low attendance at provided follow-up appointments is well documented. Identifying factors associated with follow-up can inform engagement and linkage strategies. Method Administrative, patient self-report, and provider observational data from Harborview Medical Center were combined for the analysis. Using logistic regression, we examined factors associated with follow-up health service utilization after seeking services for rape in the emergency department. Results Of the 521 diverse female (n=476) and male (n=45) rape victims, 28% attended the recommended medical/counseling follow-up appointment. In the final (adjusted) logistic regression model, having a developmental or other disability (OR=0.40, 95% CI=0.21-0.77), having a current mental illness (OR=0.25, 95% CI=0.13-0.49), and being assaulted in public (OR=0.50, 95% CI=0.28-0.87) were uniquely associated with reduced odds of attending the follow-up. Having a prior mental health condition (OR= 3.02 95% CI=1.86-4.91), a completed SANE examination (OR=2.97, 95% CI=1.84-4.81), and social support available to help cope with the assault (OR=3.54, 95% CI=1.76-7.11) were associated with an increased odds of attending the follow-up. Conclusions Findings point to relevant characteristics ascertained at the acute care medical visit for rape that may be used to identify victims less likely to obtain posttraumatic medical and mental health services. Efforts to improve service linkage among these patients is warranted and may require alternative models to engage these patients to support posttraumatic recovery. PMID:26168030

  18. Does routine follow up after head injury help? A randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed Central

    Wade, D T; Crawford, S; Wenden, F J; King, N S; Moss, N E

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the Medical Disability Society's 1988 recommendation that "every patient attending hospital after a head injury should be registered and offered an outpatient follow up appointment" by determining whether offering a routine follow up service to patients presenting to hospital with a head injury of any severity affects outcome six months later. DESIGN: A randomised controlled trial design with masked assessment of outcome. SETTING: A mixed rural and urban health district with a population of about 560000. PATIENTS: 1156 consecutive patients resident in Oxfordshire aged between 16 and 65 years presenting over 13 months to accident and emergency departments or admitted to hospital and diagnosed as having a head injury of any severity, including those with other injuries. INTERVENTIONS: Patients were registered and randomised to one of two groups. Both groups continued to receive the standard service offered by the hospitals. The early follow up group were approached at 7-10 days after injury and offered additional information, advice, support, and further intervention as needed. All randomised patients were approached for follow up assessment six months after injury by independent clinicians blind to their group. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Validated questionnaires were used to elicit ratings of post-concussion symptoms (the Rivermead postconcussion symptoms questionnaire), and changes in work, relationships, leisure, social, and domestic activities (the Rivermead head injury follow up questionnaire). RESULTS: The two groups were comparable at randomisation. Data was obtained at six months on 226 of 577 "control" patients and 252 of 579 "trial" patients (59% were lost to follow up). There were no significant differences overall between the trial and control groups at follow up, but subgroup analysis of the patients with moderate or severe head injuries (posttraumatic amnesia > or = one hour, or admitted to hospital), showed that those in the early

  19. A multidisciplinary follow-up clinic after patients' discharge from ITU.

    PubMed

    Crocker, Cheryl

    Follow-up clinics following discharge from intensive care are not a new phenomenon - Whiston Hospital in Liverpool has been running a clinic since 1990. Its pioneering work has set a precedent and has inspired Nottingham City Hospital to set up its own clinic. The Department of Health (2000) recommended that all NHS trusts 'review the provision of follow-up services and ensure there is appropriate provision for those patients who will benefit'. Nottingham City Hospital set up a multidisciplinary follow-up clinic without funding, with great success, over a year ago. This service has been extremely valuable to patients and their carers and has helped staff understand the needs of patients once they have left intensive care. This article will describe the clinic's work and case studies are utilized in order to illustrate key points.

  20. Follow-up care in cancer: adjusting for referral targets and extending choice.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Kate; Lydon, Anne; Amir, Ziv

    2013-03-01

    Over recent years, several initiatives have impacted on the referral of patients to secondary care, most notably targets for urgent referral in suspected cancer and the patient choice agenda. At the same time, improved long-term survival in cancer has increased numbers attending follow-up, doubts about the effectiveness of specialist follow-up have emerged, and alternative models of follow-up have been tested. The aim of the study was to explore patient and carer perspectives on the flexibility and responsiveness of cancer services. This article focuses on findings relating to referral, subsequent outpatient appointments and cessation of outpatient follow-up. Issues were explored in a qualitative study using face-to-face interviews with a purposive sample of 54 people affected by cancer. Data were analysed concurrently with data collection, using qualitative analysis software. The study gave rise to a number of salient themes. Links were identified between three of these: choice and responsiveness during referral; the flexibility and responsiveness of outpatient appointment systems; and negotiating cessation of follow-up. It appeared that policy on urgent referrals might be adversely affecting practice relating to appointment systems and the continuance of follow-up. Hospital-based cancer follow-up is being given decreasing priority because of doubts about effectiveness and a target-driven focus on referral. This is impacting on patients, who may value outpatient follow-up as a 'safety net' but have difficulties in obtaining appointments, and may be discharged without negotiation or adequate support. For these reasons, new forms of flexible/responsive aftercare are urgently needed. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Redesigning the ICU nursing discharge process: a quality improvement study.

    PubMed

    Chaboyer, Wendy; Lin, Frances; Foster, Michelle; Retallick, Lorraine; Panuwatwanich, Kriengsak; Richards, Brent

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate the impact of a redesigned intensive care unit (ICU) nursing discharge process on ICU discharge delay, hospital mortality, and ICU readmission within 72 hours. A quality improvement study using a time series design and statistical process control analysis was conducted in one Australian general ICU. The primary outcome measure was hours of discharge delay per patient discharged alive per month, measured for 15 months prior to, and for 12 months after the redesigned process was implemented. The redesign process included appointing a change agent to facilitate process improvement, developing a patient handover sheet, requesting ward staff to nominate an estimated transfer time, and designing a daily ICU discharge alert sheet that included an expected date of discharge. A total of 1,787 ICU discharges were included in this study, 1,001 in the 15 months before and 786 in the 12 months after the implementation of the new discharge processes. There was no difference in in-hospital mortality after discharge from ICU or ICU readmission within 72 hours during the study period. However, process improvement was demonstrated by a reduction in the average patient discharge delay time of 3.2 hours (from 4.6 hour baseline to 1.0 hours post-intervention). Involving both ward and ICU staff in the redesign process may have contributed to a shared situational awareness of the problems, which led to more timely and effective ICU discharge processes. The use of a change agent, whose ongoing role involved follow-up of patients discharged from ICU, may have helped to embed the new process into practice. ©2011 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  2. Internet of things and bariatric surgery follow-up: Comparative study of standard and IoT follow-up.

    PubMed

    Vilallonga, Ramon; Lecube, Albert; Fort, José Manuel; Boleko, Maria Angeles; Hidalgo, Marta; Armengol, Manel

    2013-09-01

    Follow-up of obese patient is difficult. There is no literature related to patient follow-up that incorporates the concept of Internet of Things (IoT), use of WiFi, Internet, or portable devices for this purpose. This prospective observational study commenced in June 2011. Patients were prospectively offered to participate in the IoT study group, in which they received a WiFi scale (Withing®, Paris) that provides instant WiFi data to the patient and surgeon. Other patients were admitted to the standard follow-up group at the outpatient clinic. A total of 33 patients were included in our study (ten in the IoT group). Twelve patients did not have WiFi at home, ten lacked of computer knowledge, and seven preferred standard for follow-up. All patients underwent different surgical procedures. There were no complications. Excess weight loss (EWL) was similar in both groups. More than 90% of patients were satisfied. In the IoT group, patients considered it valuable in saving time, and considered seeing their evolution graphics extremely motivating. IoT technology can monitor medical parameters remotely and collect data. A WiFi scale can facilitate preoperative and follow-up. Standard follow-up in a classical outpatient clinic setting with the surgeon was preferred globally.

  3. Evacuation of the ICU

    PubMed Central

    Niven, Alexander S.; Beninati, William; Fang, Ray; Einav, Sharon; Rubinson, Lewis; Kissoon, Niranjan; Devereaux, Asha V.; Christian, Michael D.; Grissom, Colin K.; Christian, Michael D.; Devereaux, Asha V.; Dichter, Jeffrey R.; Kissoon, Niranjan; Rubinson, Lewis; Amundson, Dennis; Anderson, Michael R.; Balk, Robert; Barfield, Wanda D.; Bartz, Martha; Benditt, Josh; Beninati, William; Berkowitz, Kenneth A.; Daugherty Biddison, Lee; Braner, Dana; Branson, Richard D; Burkle, Frederick M.; Cairns, Bruce A.; Carr, Brendan G.; Courtney, Brooke; DeDecker, Lisa D.; De Jong, Marla J.; Dominguez-Cherit, Guillermo; Dries, David; Einav, Sharon; Erstad, Brian L.; Etienne, Mill; Fagbuyi, Daniel B.; Fang, Ray; Feldman, Henry; Garzon, Hernando; Geiling, James; Gomersall, Charles D.; Grissom, Colin K.; Hanfling, Dan; Hick, John L.; Hodge, James G.; Hupert, Nathaniel; Ingbar, David; Kanter, Robert K.; King, Mary A.; Kuhnley, Robert N.; Lawler, James; Leung, Sharon; Levy, Deborah A.; Lim, Matthew L.; Livinski, Alicia; Luyckx, Valerie; Marcozzi, David; Medina, Justine; Miramontes, David A.; Mutter, Ryan; Niven, Alexander S.; Penn, Matthew S.; Pepe, Paul E.; Powell, Tia; Prezant, David; Reed, Mary Jane; Rich, Preston; Rodriquez, Dario; Roxland, Beth E.; Sarani, Babak; Shah, Umair A.; Skippen, Peter; Sprung, Charles L.; Subbarao, Italo; Talmor, Daniel; Toner, Eric S.; Tosh, Pritish K.; Upperman, Jeffrey S.; Uyeki, Timothy M.; Weireter, Leonard J.; West, T. Eoin; Wilgis, John; Ornelas, Joe; McBride, Deborah; Reid, David; Baez, Amado; Baldisseri, Marie; Blumenstock, James S.; Cooper, Art; Ellender, Tim; Helminiak, Clare; Jimenez, Edgar; Krug, Steve; Lamana, Joe; Masur, Henry; Mathivha, L. Rudo; Osterholm, Michael T.; Reynolds, H. Neal; Sandrock, Christian; Sprecher, Armand; Tillyard, Andrew; White, Douglas; Wise, Robert; Yeskey, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite the high risk for patient harm during unanticipated ICU evacuations, critical care providers receive little to no training on how to perform safe and effective ICU evacuations. We reviewed the pertinent published literature and offer suggestions for the critical care provider regarding ICU evacuation. The suggestions in this article are important for all who are involved in pandemics or disasters with multiple critically ill or injured patients, including front-line clinicians, hospital administrators, and public health or government officials. METHODS: The Evacuation and Mobilization topic panel used the American College of Chest Physicians (CHEST) Guidelines Oversight Committee’s methodology to develop seven key questions for which specific literature searches were conducted to identify studies upon which evidence-based recommendations could be made. No studies of sufficient quality were identified. Therefore, the panel developed expert opinion-based suggestions using a modified Delphi process. RESULTS: Based on current best evidence, we provide 13 suggestions outlining a systematic approach to prepare for and execute an effective ICU evacuation during a disaster. Interhospital and intrahospital collaboration and functional ICU communication are critical for success. Pre-event planning and preparation are required for a no-notice evacuation. A Critical Care Team Leader must be designated within the Hospital Incident Command System. A three-stage ICU Evacuation Timeline, including (1) no immediate threat, (2) evacuation threat, and (3) evacuation implementation, should be used. Detailed suggestions on ICU evacuation, including regional planning, evacuation drills, patient transport preparation and equipment, patient prioritization and distribution for evacuation, patient information and tracking, and federal and international evacuation assistance systems, are also provided. CONCLUSIONS: Successful ICU evacuation during a disaster requires

  4. Predictors of follow-up for overweight youth and parents.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Keeley J; Collier, David N; Walton, Nicole L; Lazorick, Suzanne; Lamson, Angela L

    2015-03-01

    Attrition is a significant problem for health care providers working with youth and parents involved in childhood obesity treatment. Barriers for families in childhood obesity treatment have been explored, but less is known about factors that may be associated with follow-up attendance. The purpose of this study is to explore youth and parent variables, pediatrician's evaluations of youth and parents' likelihood to change (LTC), and their association with attendance at follow-up. One hundred ninety-three youth and parent dyads were included in the sample; slightly more than half of the sample did not return for a follow up visit. Descriptive statistics, paired and independent t tests, and correlations were used to determine associations between youth and parent demographic factors, attendance at follow-up, and pediatricians' evaluation of likelihood to change. Evaluations of LTC and demographic factors did not significantly associate with follow-up appointment attendance. Single parents were more likely to be rated by pediatricians as likely to make changes. Implications for future research and clinical practice are discussed.

  5. Effect of Health Literacy on Research Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Leak, Cardella; Goggins, Kathryn; Schildcrout, Jonathan S; Theobald, Cecelia; Donato, Katharine M; Bell, Susan P; Schnelle, John; Kripalani, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has not examined the effect of health literacy on research subjects' completion of scheduled research follow-up. This article evaluates patient factors associated with incomplete research follow-up at three time points after enrollment in a large, hospital-based prospective cohort study. Predictor variables included health literacy, age, race, gender, education, employment status, difficulty paying bills, hospital diagnosis, length of stay, self-reported global health status, depression, perceived health competence, medication adherence, and health care system distrust. In a sample of 2,042 patients, multivariable models demonstrated that lower health literacy and younger age were significantly associated with a lower likelihood of completing research follow-up interviews at 2-3 days, 30 days, and 90 days after hospital discharge. In addition, patients who had less education, were currently employed, and had moderate financial stress were less likely to complete 90-day follow-up. This study is the first to demonstrate that lower health literacy is a significant predictor of incomplete research follow-up.

  6. Individualized follow up programme and early discharge in term neonates.

    PubMed

    De Carolis, Maria Pia; Cocca, Carmen; Valente, Elisabetta; Lacerenza, Serafina; Rubortone, Serena Antonia; Zuppa, Antonio Alberto; Romagnoli, Costantino

    2014-07-15

    Early discharge of mother/neonate dyad has become a common practice, and its effects are measured by readmission rates. We evaluated the safety of early discharge followed by an individualized Follow-up programme and the efficacy in promoting breastfeeding initiation and duration. During a nine-month period early discharge followed by an early targeted Follow-up was carried out in term neonates in the absence of weight loss <10% or hyperbilirubinaemia at risk of treatment. Follow-up visits were performed at different timepoints with a specific flow-chart according to both bilirubin levels and weight loss at discharge. During the study period early discharge was performed in 419 neonates and Follow-up was carried out in 408 neonates (97.4%). No neonates required readmission for hyperbilirubinaemia and dehydration during the first 28 days of life. Breastfeeding rate was 90.6%, 75.2%, 41.5% at 30, 90 and 180 days of life, respectively. A six-month phone interview was performed for 383 neonates (93.8%) and satisfaction of parents about early discharge was high in 345 cases (90.1%). Early discharge in association with an individualized Follow-up programme resulted safe for the neonate and effective for breastfeeding initation and duration.

  7. [Telemedicine in pacemaker therapy and follow-up].

    PubMed

    Schuchert, A

    2009-12-01

    Present-day remote systems for cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) provide, in contrast to previous solutions, a broad range of data about the patient and the implanted device ("remote control"). Telemedicine includes remote monitoring as well as remote follow-up: Remote monitoring is the continual interrogation of the device to detect patient- or device-related adverse events earlier than with standard follow-up visits. Remote follow-up aims to replace scheduled and unscheduled face-to-face follow-up visits due to the interrogation of the automatic pacemaker functions. Currently available remote systems, such as Home Monitoring, CareLink, Merlin.net, and Latitude, have in common that they interrogate the device, send these data to a server, and provide the data to the physician on a secured web site. Automatic wireless interrogation of the device is the preferred solution; however, the devices must have been equipped with a micro-antenna, which is usually restricted to more recent pacemaker models. Knowledge about remote control in pacemaker patients is limited, because most remote applications were evaluated in ICD and CRT patients. While the most frequently reported clinical event in pacemaker patients is atrial fibrillation, the impact in routine clinical follow-up still has to be evaluated in detail. Device-related adverse events are rare. Large, long-term, randomized trials are comparing remote and conventional approaches with the aim of demonstrating the benefits of telemedicine in this patient group.

  8. Long term follow up of untreated primary hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, C R; Burns, J; Mowat, E

    1984-01-01

    Fourteen patients with primary hyperparathyroidism and whose initial serum calcium concentrations were 2.75 mmol/l (11.0 mg/100 ml) or more were followed up for five to 23 years without operative treatment. One had osteitis fibrosa when seen and died with a fibrosarcoma 22 years later. The remaining 13 patients, who were followed up for a mean of 10 years, came to little obvious harm from not being operated on. Their serum calcium concentrations did not rise and there was no evidence of progressive renal impairment. In four patients who presented originally with renal calculi there were three further episodes of renal colic in 54 patient years of follow up. Conservative management of primary hyperparathyroidism is not an unreasonable option, and patients who do not have symptoms need not necessarily be pressed to accept surgery. PMID:6437508

  9. Breast cancer follow-up in the adjuvant setting.

    PubMed

    Khatcheressian, James; Swainey, Craig

    2008-01-01

    Breast cancer may recur through 15 years and beyond after diagnosis; thus, breast cancer patients require long-term follow-up after adjuvant treatment to detect recurrent disease. History taking, physical examination, and regular mammography are still the foundation of appropriate breast cancer follow-up in the adjuvant setting. Clearly, breast MRI has a role in certain high-risk patients, but in moderate-risk patients, the decision to use MRI must be based on the complexity of the clinical scenario. Other routine imaging studies (CT, positron emission tomography, and bone scans) and laboratory testing--including tumor marker assessments--in asymptomatic patients have not demonstrated an improvement in survival, quality of life, toxicity, or cost-effectiveness. Survivorship issues are also an inherent part of breast cancer follow-up; physicians should make every effort to address supportive care issues unique to breast cancer survivors including hot flashes, bone health, neuropathy, and risk-reduction strategies.

  10. Outpatient Follow-up and Secondary Prevention for Melanoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gamble, Ryan G.; Jensen, Daniel; Suarez, Andrea L.; Hanson, Anne H.; McLaughlin, Lauren; Duke, Jodi; Dellavalle, Robert P.

    2010-01-01

    Health care providers and their patients jointly participate in melanoma prevention, surveillance, diagnosis, and treatment. This paper reviews screening and follow-up strategies for patients who have been diagnosed with melanoma, based on current available evidence, and focuses on methods to assess disease recurrence and second primary occurrence. Secondary prevention, including the roles of behavioral modification and chemoprevention are also reviewed. The role of follow-up dermatologist consultation, with focused physical examinations complemented by dermatoscopy, reflectance confocal microscopy, and/or full-body mapping is discussed. Furthermore, we address the inclusion of routine imaging and laboratory assessment as components of follow-up and monitoring of advanced stage melanoma. The role of physicians in addressing the psychosocial stresses associated with a diagnosis of melanoma is reviewed. PMID:24281112

  11. Posttreatment Follow-Up of Brucellosis by PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Morata, Pilar; Queipo-Ortuño, María Isabel; Reguera, José María; García-Ordoñez, Miguel Angel; Pichardo, Cristina; Colmenero, Juan de Dios

    1999-01-01

    In order to evaluate the usefulness of a peripheral blood PCR assay in the posttreatment follow-up of brucellosis, a cohort of 30 patients was studied by means of blood cultures, rose Bengal, seroagglutination, Coombs' antibrucella tests, and PCR assay at the time of diagnosis, at the end of treatment, and 2, 4, and 6 months later. Of the 29 patients whose PCR assays were initially positive, 28 (96.5%) were negative at the conclusion of the treatment. PCR was positive for the two patients who had relapses and negative for another four who had suspected but unconfirmed relapses. PCR was negative for 98.3% of the follow-up samples from those patients who had a favorable evolution. In conclusion, PCR appears to be a very useful technique, not only for the initial diagnosis of the disease, but also for posttreatment follow-up and the early detection of relapses. PMID:10565954

  12. A Qualitative Follow-Up Study of a Training Program in Curriculum-Based Vocational Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safarik, Lynn

    A qualitative follow-up study was conducted to determine the impacts of a program to train teachers in the use of curriculum-based vocational assessment (CBVA) for students with handicaps. The study examined the extent to which CBVA training content was used in the organization and delivery of assessment services to students with handicaps at the…

  13. Follow-Up Survey of the Graduates of 1980-81.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, June

    A follow-up study of 1980-81 graduates of Minneapolis Community College (MCC) was conducted to ascertain information on students' employment and educational activities since graduation; their attitudes towards the education received at MCC; and their use of various college services and activities. In spring 1982, questionnaires were sent to the…

  14. Follow-Up Study of Dietetic Technician Graduates 1980-1982. Volume 12, No. 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gebert, Henriette D.; Lucas, John A.

    A follow-up study was conducted at William Rainey Harper College (WRHC) to evaluate and obtain externally required information about the dietetic technician program. Surveys were mailed to all 47 of the students who graduated from the program between 1980 and 1982 to obtain information on their employment status, job title, length of service,…

  15. Personality Disorders in People with Learning Disabilities: Follow-Up of a Community Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lidher, J.; Martin, D. M.; Jayaprakash, M. S.; Roy, A.

    2005-01-01

    Background: A sample of community-based service users with intellectual disability (ID) was re-examined after 5 years to determine the impact of a diagnosis of personality disorder (PD). Methods: Seventy-five of the original 101 participants were followed up. Of these, 21 people had a PD identified during the original study. Results: Compared with…

  16. A Follow-Up Study of the Oregon Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lahti, Janet; And Others

    In 1973 the Children's Services Division (Oregon State) initiated a project to reduce the backlog of children in indeterminate status by developing more Permanent alternative placements. This follow-up study evaluates the placements of foster children who returned to their parents, were adopted, or remained in foster care. A literature review…

  17. Lack of Follow-Up Exams after Failed School Vision Screenings: An Investigation of Contributing Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimel, Linda S.

    2006-01-01

    Programs to facilitate professional eye exams after failed school vision screenings often are based on the assumption that funding and access to services are major obstacles to care. Despite such programs, many children do not receive professional exams. The purpose of this study was to identify additional barriers to follow-up eye care. School…

  18. Self-assessment of drinking on the Internet--3-, 6- and 12-month follow-ups.

    PubMed

    Koski-Jännes, Anja; Cunningham, John; Tolonen, Kari

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work was to report on the results of a pilot study of a web-based self-assessment service (DHT) for Finnish drinkers (www.paihdelinkki.fi/testaa/juomatapatesti). During the 7-month recruitment period in 2004 altogether 22,536 anonymous self-assessments were recorded in the database of this service. The study sample was recruited from the 1598 service users who also participated to a survey evaluating the DHT. Those who consented by providing required baseline data and their e-mail address (n = 343) were sent a message asking them to fill in the follow-up questions 3, 6 and 12 months later. Their self-reported use of alcohol and drinking-related problems served as the main outcome variables in this single-group follow-up study. At 3, 6 and 12 months, 78%, 69% and 61% of the study participants, respectively, responded to the follow-up. The intention-to-treat (ITT) results revealed significant reductions (P < 0.001) in all the outcome measures. The reductions occurred during the first 3 months, after which the changes were non-significant. The results are in line with previous studies with mostly shorter follow-up periods suggesting that Internet-based self-assessment services can be useful tools in reducing excessive drinking. A randomized controlled trial would, however, increase our certainty about the causes of the observed changes.

  19. A Follow-up Study of Returning Students--A Concentration on Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plotsky, Frances; Ohm, Susan

    The office of Services for Returning Students (SRS) at the University of Texas (U.T.) at Austin conducted a follow-up study of men and women students who had visited the office from February 1969 to the end of 1971. The study ascertained the average interval between periods of formal education, the fulfillment of educational goals, and the use of…

  20. A Randomized Effectiveness Trial of Brief Parent Training: Six-Month Follow-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kjøbli, John; Bjørnebekk, Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine the follow-up effectiveness of brief parent training (BPT) for children with emerging or existing conduct problems. Method: With the use of a randomized controlled trial and parent and teacher reports, this study examined the effectiveness of BPT compared to regular services 6 months after the end of the intervention.…

  1. Efficacy and utility of phone call follow-up after pediatric general surgery versus traditional clinic follow-up.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Kevin; Hogan, Virginia; Jager, Alesha; von Allmen, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Typical follow-up for surgical procedures consists of an interim history and brief focused physical examination. These appointments occupy clinic resources, require a time investment by the family, and rarely identify problems. Previous studies have demonstrated the safety of a postoperative phone call. Compare a traditional in-person clinic postoperative visit with postoperative phone call follow-up regarding patient satisfaction, rate of successful follow-up, and clinic resource utilization in a large academic practice. A retrospective review of charts of patients who underwent select surgical procedures, along with a review of the clinic schedule for the same time period. Efficacy, patient/family satisfaction, and impact on the clinic. Families were contacted by telephone two weeks after select surgical procedures to assess for complications and questions. Cohorts of patients six months before and six months after implementation were assessed for main outcome measures. Before implementation, 55.5% of patients (427/769) who had one of the select surgical procedures were seen in the clinic postoperatively, and 62.6% (435/695) had a successful postoperative phone call follow-up. There were also 1090 overall scheduled postoperative appointments. Six months after implementation, overall postoperative appointments decreased 35.5% to 703. Overall, postoperative-scheduled visits decreased by 6% compared with new visits and other general follow-up visits, which each increased by 3%. A satisfaction survey revealed that 93% of patients (n = 231) were highly satisfied with the process. A hospital cost analysis suggested an 89% cost savings ($101.75 per patient for clinic visit vs $12.50 per patient for phone call follow-up). Postoperative phone call follow-up is an effective tool that improves patient and physician efficiency and satisfaction.

  2. Patients' expectations and preferences regarding cancer follow-up care.

    PubMed

    Brandenbarg, D; Berendsen, A J; de Bock, G H

    2017-07-05

    Most survivors of cancer enter a follow-up routine after their treatment, the aim of which is to detect recurrence, provide psychological support, monitor treatment-related side-effects, and to evaluate care. Due to rising numbers of people with cancer and better survival of these patients, current follow-up routines are under pressure. We reviewed the literature on patients' expectations and preferences regarding this care. We systematically searched the databases of Pubmed, CINAHL, and PsychInfo. Studies were screened and data extraction was double performed by three authors. Data were collected from quantitative and qualitative studies and described thematically. After screening, 12 full-text articles were included, comprising 849 patients aged from 28 to 90 years. Patients expect follow-up visits to detect recurrence of cancer. They want to undergo extensive testing to get reassurance. Furthermore, patients expect relevant information to be provided and to get advice about different aspects of their illness. Psychosocial support is also expected. Patients express a desire for consistency of care as well as continuity of care, and prefer long and intensive follow-up. After cancer, patients appear to lose confidence in their bodies and fear cancer recurrence after the end of treatment, which may lead to intensive screening wishes. This is not desirable, since care for cancer is already under pressure due to rising numbers of survivors. We have to ensure that follow-up routines are sustainable and effective. Patients should receive good information about the need for follow-up tests. Doctors should be trained to give this information. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Acromegalic patients lost to follow-up: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kasuki, Leandro; Marques, Nelma Verônica; Nuez, Maria José Braga La; Leal, Vera Lucia Gomes; Chinen, Renata N; Gadelha, Mônica R

    2013-06-01

    Approximately 50 % of all acromegalic patients will require lifelong medical treatment to normalize mortality rates and reduce morbidity. Thus, adherence to therapy is essential to achieve treatment goals. To date, no study has evaluated the frequency and reasons for loss to follow-up in the acromegalic population. The current study aimed at evaluating the frequency of acromegalic patient loss to follow-up in three reference centers and the reasons responsible for their low compliance with treatment. All of the files for the acromegalic patients in the three centers were reviewed. Those patients, who had not followed up with the hospital for more than a year, were contacted via phone and/or mail and invited to participate. Patients who agreed to participate were interviewed, and blood samples were collected. A total of 239 files were reviewed; from these 42 patients (17.6 %) were identified who were lost to follow-up. It was possible to contact 27 of these patients, 10 of whom did not attend the appointments for more than one time and 17 of whom agreed to participate in the study. Fifteen of these 17 patients had active disease (88.2 %), and all of the patients restarted treatment in the original centers. The main reason for loss to follow-up was an absence of symptoms. High-quality follow-up is important in acromegaly to successfully achieve the aims of the treatment. An active search for patients may allow the resumption of treatment in a significant proportion of these cases, contributing to reduced morbidity and mortality in this patient population.

  4. MFP-REA Follow-Up 2002-2005

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    70 328 09 61 MFP- REA follow-up 2002-2005 info-DenV@tno.nl Date March 2007 Author(s) Prof Dr D.G. Simons C.A.M. van Moll. MSc Classification report...TNO 20070817259 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENTA Approved for Public Release Distribution Unlimited 3/26 MFP- REA follow-up 2002-2005 Het geluid van brekende...Kan hiermee de bodemsoort bepaald worden? onderdeel van Rapid Environmental onderzocht. De combinatie van Assessment, REA . bodemaverliesmodel en

  5. Long-term follow-up of ophthalmic Graves' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Agapitos, P J; Hart, I R

    1987-01-01

    Sixteen patients with ophthalmic Graves' disease (clinically euthyroid with ophthalmopathy or exophthalmos) were followed up for 4.3 to 14.3 (mean 9.1) years to determine whether thyroid dysfunction developed and whether their ophthalmopathy progressed, regressed or remained stable. Five patients (31%) manifested hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism, all before the end of the fifth year of follow-up. The ophthalmopathy was mild, and none of the patients required specific treatment. The thyroid function of patients with ophthalmic Graves' disease should be periodically monitored for at least 5 years. PMID:3815199

  6. MAGIC electromagnetic follow-up of gravitational wave alerts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lotto, Barbara; Ansoldi, Stefano; Antonelli, Angelo; Berti, Alessio; Carosi, Alessandro; Longo, Francesco; Stamerra, Antonio

    The year 2015 witnessed the first direct observations of a transient gravitational-wave (GW) signal from binary black hole mergers by the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (aLIGO) Collaboration with the Virgo Collaboration. The MAGIC two 17m diameter Cherenkov telescopes system joined since 2014 the vast collaboration of electromagnetic facilities for follow-up of gravitational wave alerts. During the 2015 LIGO-Virgo science run we set up the procedure for GW alerts follow-up and took data following the last GW alert. MAGIC results on the data analysis and prospects for the forthcoming run are presented.

  7. Feasibility of telephone follow-up after medical abortion.

    PubMed

    Perriera, Lisa K; Reeves, Matthew F; Chen, Beatrice A; Hohmann, Heather L; Hayes, Jennifer; Creinin, Mitchell D

    2010-02-01

    This study was conducted to assess the feasibility of using telephone calls combined with high-sensitivity urine pregnancy testing as a primary method of follow-up after medical abortion. We enrolled 139 women up to 63 days of gestation to receive mifepristone 200 mg orally and misoprostol 800 mcg vaginally or buccally, per their choice. Participants were contacted by phone one week after mifepristone administration and interviewed using standardized questions. If the subject or clinician thought the pregnancy was not expelled, the subject returned for an ultrasound examination. Otherwise, subjects performed high-sensitivity home urine pregnancy testing 30 days after the mifepristone and were called within 3 days of the test. Those with positive pregnancy tests returned for an ultrasound examination. Those with negative tests required no further follow-up. Six of the 139 (4.3%, 95% CI 1.6-9.1%) subjects presented prior to Phone Call 1 for an in-person visit. All 133 (100%, 95% CI 97.8-100%) subjects eligible for their first telephone follow-up were contacted. Eight of the 133 (6.1%, 95% CI 2.6-11.5%) women were asked to return for evaluation and all did so (100%, 95% CI 63.1-100%). Eight of the 133 women eligible for the 30 day phone call presented for an interim visit prior to the call. After 30 days, 116 of the 117 (99.1%, 95% CI 97.5-100%) eligible subjects were contacted. One subject was not reached for the day 30 phone call. Twenty-seven of the 116 (23.3%, 95% CI 15.6-31.0%) subjects had a positive pregnancy test and required follow-up. Two of these subjects (7.4%, 95% CI 1.0-24.2%) did not return for in-person follow-up. Two of the 116 (1.7%, 95% CI 0.2-6.1%) subjects had inconclusive pregnancy tests and were asked to return for follow-up. One of these subjects (50%, 95% CI 1.2-98.7%) did not return. Complete follow-up was achieved in 135 of the 139 subjects (97.1%, 95% CI 94.3-99.9%). None of the 26 women evaluated for a positive or inconclusive pregnancy

  8. Group anxiety management: effectiveness, perceived helpfulness and follow-up.

    PubMed

    Cadbury, S; Childs-Clark, A; Sandhu, S

    1990-05-01

    An evaluation was conducted on out-patient cognitive-behavioural anxiety management groups. Twenty-nine clients assessed before and after the group and at three-month follow-up showed significant improvement on self-report measures. A further follow-up on 21 clients, conducted by an independent assessor at an average of 11 months, showed greater improvement with time. Clients also rated how helpful they had found non-specific therapeutic factors, and specific anxiety management techniques. 'Universality' was the most helpful non-specific factor, and 'the explanation of anxiety' was the most helpful technique.

  9. ICU Director Data

    PubMed Central

    Ogbu, Ogbonna C.; Coopersmith, Craig M.

    2015-01-01

    Improving value within critical care remains a priority because it represents a significant portion of health-care spending, faces high rates of adverse events, and inconsistently delivers evidence-based practices. ICU directors are increasingly required to understand all aspects of the value provided by their units to inform local improvement efforts and relate effectively to external parties. A clear understanding of the overall process of measuring quality and value as well as the strengths, limitations, and potential application of individual metrics is critical to supporting this charge. In this review, we provide a conceptual framework for understanding value metrics, describe an approach to developing a value measurement program, and summarize common metrics to characterize ICU value. We first summarize how ICU value can be represented as a function of outcomes and costs. We expand this equation and relate it to both the classic structure-process-outcome framework for quality assessment and the Institute of Medicine’s six aims of health care. We then describe how ICU leaders can develop their own value measurement process by identifying target areas, selecting appropriate measures, acquiring the necessary data, analyzing the data, and disseminating the findings. Within this measurement process, we summarize common metrics that can be used to characterize ICU value. As health care, in general, and critical care, in particular, changes and data become more available, it is increasingly important for ICU leaders to understand how to effectively acquire, evaluate, and apply data to improve the value of care provided to patients. PMID:25846533

  10. Follow-Up Study of 1994 Dental Hygiene Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Marianne; Lucas, John A.

    In an effort to evaluate the effectiveness of its dental hygiene program, William Rainey Harper College (WRHC), in Illinois, conducted a follow-up study of program graduates from 1994. Surveys were mailed to all 30 1994 dental hygiene associate degree graduates, receiving responses from 77% (n=23). Study findings included the following: (1) all…

  11. Loss to Follow-Up: Issues and Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Jeff; Munoz, Karen F.; Bradham, Tamala S.; Nelson, Lauri

    2011-01-01

    State coordinators of early hearing detection and intervention (EHDI) programs completed a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats, or SWOT, analysis that examined 12 areas within state EHDI programs. Related to how EHDI programs address loss to follow-up, 47 coordinators responded with 277 items, and themes were identified in each…

  12. Trident Technical College 1998 Graduate Follow-Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trident Technical Coll., Charleston, SC.

    Presents the results of South Carolina's Trident Technical College's (TTC's) 1998 graduate follow-up survey report of 915 TTC graduates. Graduates were surveyed and results were obtained for the following items: graduate goals, employment, placement rates, graduates in related fields, when job were obtained, job finding methods, job locations, job…

  13. Trident Technical College 1999 Graduate Follow-Up Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trident Technical Coll., Charleston, SC.

    Presents the results of South Carolina's Trident Technical College's (TTC's) 1999 graduate follow-up survey report. Graduates were surveyed and results were obtained for the following items: graduate goals, employment, placement rates, graduates in related fields, when job obtained, job finding methods, job locations, job satisfaction, job…

  14. 1988-89 Graduate Follow-Up Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Board of Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education, Madison.

    In 1989, a graduate follow-up survey was conducted to gather data regarding student perceptions and activities following graduation from the Wisconsin Vocational, Technical and Adult Education System (VTAE). Primary objectives of the survey were to identify current activities of VTAE graduates, determine whether the activities were related to the…

  15. 1987-88 Graduate Follow-Up Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davison, Glen A.

    The Wisconsin Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education (VTAE) System annually conducts a student follow-up survey to gather data on the activities and perceptions of graduates of Designed to provide information for career awareness and program planning efforts, the survey investigates the current activities of VTAE graduates and the relationship…

  16. Follow-Up Report: 2005 Placements of 2004 NDUS Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Debra; Dunn, Eddie; Hillman, Mike; Morth, Tom; Schepp, Julie; Padilla, Gina

    2007-01-01

    Some of the questions most frequently asked of the North Dakota University System relate to the status of graduates and program completers of state educational institutions. Follow-up Information on North Dakota Education and Training (FINDET) is a consortium of several state agencies formed to provide answers to those questions. This report,…

  17. Job Training Partnership Act 8% Follow-up Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Charlene M.; And Others

    From September through November 1986, the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction (DPI) conducted a follow-up survey of Job Training Partnership Act (JTPA) 8% program participants in the 1985-86 school year. The DPI is responsible for administering half of the JTPA 8% Education Coordination and Grants for economically disadvantaged youth, ages…

  18. Natural history of childhood asthma. 20-year follow-up.

    PubMed Central

    Blair, H

    1977-01-01

    Of 417 asthmatic children seen in hospital from 1941 to 1947, only 208 (50%) were still attending the hospital and were available for long-term follow-up, whereas a 91% follow-up was achieved from a personal follow-up of 267 asthmatic children seen in an East London group practice from 1948 to 1952 and followed for more than 20 years to December 1972. 125 patients (52%) were almost or completely symptom free; 51 (21%) had never had any symptom-free period for longer than 6 months; a further 63 (27%) had a remission of symptoms for 3 years before relapsing. 7 patients died, 3 due to their asthma. The final prognosis was influenced by the severity of the asthma at onset, by breast feeding, by the presence of associated atopic disease, and by a positive family history of atopic disease in first-degree relatives. It was uninfluenced by the age of onset of the asthma, by the sex of the patients, or by skin testing results. Short-term follow-up of such patients will fail to include those patients whose asthma remits and subsequently relapses. PMID:921306

  19. A Follow-Up Study of the Deaf.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reich, P. A.; Reich, C. M.

    Followed up through interviews and questionnaires were 278 former students, average age 28 years, of two residential schools and one day school for the deaf in Ontario. Data was collected on the degree of hearing loss, use of a hearing aid, educational and occupational history, social integration, methods of communication, and attitudes toward…

  20. Sexually Abstinent Adolescents: An 18-Month Follow-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blinn-Pike, Lynn; Berger, Thomas J.; Hewett, John; Oleson, Jacob

    2004-01-01

    This study was a longitudinal follow-up of 697 early adolescents from 20 schools in Missouri, investigating students who, in 1997, indicated on a survey of sexual attitudes and behaviors that they had not had sexual intercourse. They completed the Reasons for Abstinence Scale (RAS) by identifying those items that were reasons why they had not had…

  1. Follow-Up Activities for the HISD Kindergarten Screening Instrument.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Pat; Cater, Margot

    The Kindergarten Screening Instrument consists of five sub-scales and attempts to screen for possible difficulty in the areas of distant vision, hearing, eye-hand coordination, language learning, and gross motor performance. In response to many requests for follow-up activities after screening, this manual was prepared by Volunteers in Public…

  2. A Follow-up Study of Secretarial Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gell, Robert L.; Bleil, David F.

    To determine how effectively the Secretarial Studies Department's program was meeting the needs of its students, a follow-up study was conducted of former Montgomery Community College Secretarial Studies students. The survey sought to determine, in particular, if the students had secured employment that was related to their course work at the…

  3. Loss to Follow-Up: Issues and Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Jeff; Munoz, Karen F.; Bradham, Tamala S.; Nelson, Lauri

    2011-01-01

    State coordinators of early hearing detection and intervention (EHDI) programs completed a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats, or SWOT, analysis that examined 12 areas within state EHDI programs. Related to how EHDI programs address loss to follow-up, 47 coordinators responded with 277 items, and themes were identified in each…

  4. Follow-up Studies at Regional State Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohut, Sylvester, Jr.

    At regional state universities, teacher education is usually a university-wide endeavor. The majority of American public school teachers are prepared at regional state universities. This paper describes a successful, low-cost follow-up study model at a regional state university, Kutztown University (Pennsylvania) Since 1952, the university has…

  5. Extended Follow-Up | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    NCI supports the continued follow-up of participants in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial (PLCO) to strengthen the PLCO as a valuable resource for molecular epidemiologic research as well as provide long-term data on the trial’s primary endpoints. |

  6. Factors Associated with Adherence to Follow-up Colposcopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fish, Laura J.; Moorman, Patricia G.; Wordlaw-Stintson, Lashawn; Vidal, Adriana; Smith, Jennifer S.; Hoyo, Cathrine

    2013-01-01

    Background: Understanding the gaps in knowledge about human papilloma virus (HPV) infection, transmission, and health consequences and factors associated with the knowledge gap is an essential first step for the development of interventions to improve adherence to follow-up among women with abnormal Pap smears. Purpose: To examine the relationship…

  7. 10 CFR 1022.17 - Follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Floodplain and Wetland Reviews § 1022.17 Follow-up. For those DOE actions taken in a floodplain or wetland, DOE shall verify that the implementation of the selected alternative,...

  8. 10 CFR 1022.17 - Follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Floodplain and Wetland Reviews § 1022.17 Follow-up. For those DOE actions taken in a floodplain or wetland, DOE shall verify that the implementation of the selected alternative,...

  9. 10 CFR 1022.17 - Follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Floodplain and Wetland Reviews § 1022.17 Follow-up. For those DOE actions taken in a floodplain or wetland, DOE shall verify that the implementation of the selected alternative,...

  10. 10 CFR 1022.17 - Follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Floodplain and Wetland Reviews § 1022.17 Follow-up. For those DOE actions taken in a floodplain or wetland, DOE shall verify that the implementation of the selected alternative,...

  11. 10 CFR 1022.17 - Follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Floodplain and Wetland Reviews § 1022.17 Follow-up. For those DOE actions taken in a floodplain or wetland, DOE shall verify that the implementation of the selected alternative,...

  12. Graduate Follow-Up Report, 1994-95.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Board of Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education, Madison.

    Each year, a follow-up study is conducted to gather data on the activities and perceptions of students approximately 6 months after their graduation from Wisconsin's Technical Colleges (WTC). Specifically, the survey seeks to identify the current activities of the WTC graduates, determine the extent to which current activities are related to the…

  13. Three Year Follow-Up of 1974 Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baratta, Mary Kathryne

    To evaluate the long-term benefits of attendance at Moraine Valley Community College (MVCC), a three-year follow-up study was conducted of the 620 1974 graduates (324 transfer and 296 occupational students). Each graduate was sent a questionnaire collecting information on involvement with MVCC after graduation, present educational status,…

  14. Factors Associated with Adherence to Follow-up Colposcopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fish, Laura J.; Moorman, Patricia G.; Wordlaw-Stintson, Lashawn; Vidal, Adriana; Smith, Jennifer S.; Hoyo, Cathrine

    2013-01-01

    Background: Understanding the gaps in knowledge about human papilloma virus (HPV) infection, transmission, and health consequences and factors associated with the knowledge gap is an essential first step for the development of interventions to improve adherence to follow-up among women with abnormal Pap smears. Purpose: To examine the relationship…

  15. Elevation Follow up Letter - signed January 19, 2001

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Elevation Follow up Letter in response to the U.S. EPA's request to review a Clean Water Act (CWA) Section 404 decision to issue a permit to Diablo Grande Limited Partnership for the Diablo Grande Resort Development, Phase 1 in Stanislaus County, CA.

  16. Follow-Up of the Fall 1990 FTIC Cohort.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Windham, Patricia

    Drawing from data provided by the Florida Education and Training Placement Information Program (FETPIP), this series of reports provides follow-up information on FTIC students entering Tallahassee Community College (TCC) in fall 1990. The four reports compare students based on race, entry level test pass rates, full-/part-time status, and grade…

  17. Gamma Ray Burst Follow-Ups with Bootes-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guziy, Sergey; Castro-Tirado, Guziy, Alberto J.; Jelinek, Martin; Gorosabel, Javier; Kubanek, Petr; Cunniffe, Ronan; Lara-Gil, Oscar; Tello, Juan C.; Jeong, Soomin; Oates, Samantha R.; Xu, Youdong; Perez-Ramirez, Dolores; Cui, Chenzou; Fan, Yufeng; Wan, Chuanjun; Bai, Jinming; Kheyfets, I.

    The Burst Observer and Optical Transient Exploring System (BOOTES), is a global robotic observatory network, which started in 1998 with Spanish leadership devoted to study optical emissions from gamma ray bursts (GRBs) that occur in the Universe. We present shot history and current status of BOOTES-4 telescope. Some details of 38 GRBs followed-up with BOOTES-4 are discussed.

  18. Cleft lip and palate surgery: 30 years follow-up.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Cesar A

    2012-07-01

    Ten cleft lip and palate patients with complete unilateral (five patients) and bilateral (five patients) clefts were treated by a multidisciplinary team integrated by psychologists, surgeons, orthodontists, prosthodontists, pediatric dentists, and speech pathologists, to obtain ideal soft tissue and hard tissue continuity, facial symmetry, functional and esthetic dentitions, excellent nasal architecture, subtle, and hidden lip scars. No hypernasality and adequate social adaptation were found in the 30 years follow-up (20-30 years follow-up with an average of 25.5 years). The patients were treated in a pro-active fashion avoiding complications and related problems, executing the ideal surgical, dental, and speech therapy plan, based on a close follow-up over the entire period. Those patients treated at the right time required less surgeries and less salvaging maneuvers and presented complete dentitions with less dental prosthesis or dental implants and stable occlusions, than those who missed the ideal dental and surgical treatment opportunities. The focus of this article is the need of a close long-term follow-up to ensure an ideal patient's quality of life.

  19. Cleft lip and palate surgery: 30 years follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Cesar A.

    2012-01-01

    Ten cleft lip and palate patients with complete unilateral (five patients) and bilateral (five patients) clefts were treated by a multidisciplinary team integrated by psychologists, surgeons, orthodontists, prosthodontists, pediatric dentists, and speech pathologists, to obtain ideal soft tissue and hard tissue continuity, facial symmetry, functional and esthetic dentitions, excellent nasal architecture, subtle, and hidden lip scars. No hypernasality and adequate social adaptation were found in the 30 years follow-up (20-30 years follow-up with an average of 25.5 years). The patients were treated in a pro-active fashion avoiding complications and related problems, executing the ideal surgical, dental, and speech therapy plan, based on a close follow-up over the entire period. Those patients treated at the right time required less surgeries and less salvaging maneuvers and presented complete dentitions with less dental prosthesis or dental implants and stable occlusions, than those who missed the ideal dental and surgical treatment opportunities. The focus of this article is the need of a close long-term follow-up to ensure an ideal patient's quality of life. PMID:23483117

  20. Follow-up photometry of iPTF16geu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.-H.

    2016-10-01

    We report follow-up photometry of the strongly lensed SNIa iPTF16geu (ATel #9603, #9626). We observed iPTF16geu on 2016/10/17 with the 2.5-m Isaac Newton Telescope (INT) + WFC at La Palma, under ~0.9" seeing condition.

  1. Matching Methods for Selection of Participants for Follow-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Elizabeth A.; Lalongo, Nicholas S.

    2010-01-01

    This work examines ways to make the best use of limited resources when selecting individuals to follow up in a longitudinal study estimating causal effects. In the setting under consideration, covariate information is available for all individuals but outcomes have not yet been collected and may be expensive to gather, and thus only a subset of…

  2. Matching Methods for Selection of Participants for Follow-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Elizabeth A.; Lalongo, Nicholas S.

    2010-01-01

    This work examines ways to make the best use of limited resources when selecting individuals to follow up in a longitudinal study estimating causal effects. In the setting under consideration, covariate information is available for all individuals but outcomes have not yet been collected and may be expensive to gather, and thus only a subset of…

  3. Factors impacting follow-up care after placement of temporary inferior vena cava filters.

    PubMed

    Gyang, Elsie; Zayed, Mohamed; Harris, E John; Lee, Jason T; Dalman, Ronald L; Mell, Matthew W

    2013-08-01

    Rates of inferior vena cava (IVC) filter retrieval have remained suboptimal, in part because of poor follow-up. The goal of our study was to determine demographic and clinical factors predictive of IVC filter follow-up care in a university hospital setting. We reviewed 250 consecutive patients who received an IVC filter placement with the intention of subsequent retrieval between March 2009 and October 2010. Patient demographics, clinical factors, and physician specialty were evaluated. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify variables predicting follow-up care. In our cohort, 60.7% of patients received follow-up care; of those, 93% had IVC filter retrieval. Major indications for IVC filter placement were prophylaxis for high risk surgery (53%) and venous thromboembolic event with contraindication and/or failure of anticoagulation (39%). Follow-up care was less likely for patients discharged to acute rehabilitation or skilled nursing facilities (P < .0001), those with central nervous system pathology (eg, cerebral hemorrhage or spinal fracture; P < .0001), and for those who did not receive an IVC filter placement by a vascular surgeon (P < .0001). In a multivariate analysis, discharge home (odds ratio [OR], 4.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.99-8.2; P < .0001), central nervous system pathology (OR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.22-0.95; P = .04), and IVC filter placement by the vascular surgery service (OR, 4.7; 95% CI, 2.3-9.6; P < .0001) remained independent predictors of follow-up care. Trauma status and distance of residence did not significantly impact likelihood of patient follow-up. Service-dependent practice paradigms play a critical role in patient follow-up and IVC filter retrieval rates. Nevertheless, specific patient populations are more prone to having poorer rates of follow-up. Such trends should be factored into institutional quality control goals and patient-centered care. Copyright © 2013 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by

  4. Outpatient follow-up after traumatic injury: Challenges and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Luke; Shaheen, Aisha; Crandall, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Background: It has been shown that rates of ambulatory follow-up after traumatic injury are not optimal, but the association with insurance status has not been studied. Aims: To describe trauma patient characteristics associated with completed follow-up after hospitalization and to compare relative rates of healthcare utilization across payor types. Setting and Design: Single institution retrospective cohort study. Materials and Methods: We compared patient demographics and healthcare utilization behavior after discharge among trauma patients between April 1, 2005 and April 1, 2010. Our primary outcome of interest was outpatient provider contact within 2 months of discharge. Statistical Analysis: Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine the association between characteristics including insurance status and subsequent ambulatory and acute care. Results: We reviewed the records of 2906 sequential trauma patients. Patients with Medicaid and those without insurance were significantly less likely to complete scheduled outpatient follow-up within 2 months, compared to those with private insurance (Medicaid, OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.51-0.88; uninsured, OR 0.29, 95% CI 0.23-0.36). Uninsured and Medicaid patients were twice as likely as privately insured patients to visit the Emergency Department (ED) for any reason after discharge (uninsured patients (Medicaid, OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.50-4.53; uninsured, OR 2.10, 94% CI 1.31-3.36). Conclusion: We found marked differences between patients in scheduled outpatient follow-up and ED utilization after injury associated with insurance status; however, Medicaid seemed to obviate some of this disparity. Medicaid expansion may improve outpatient follow-up and affect patient outcome disparities after injury. PMID:25400385

  5. Alternatives to ultrasound for follow-up after medication abortion: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Daniel; Grindlay, Kate

    2011-06-01

    Requiring a follow-up visit with ultrasound evaluation to confirm completion after medication abortion can be a barrier to providing the service. The PubMed (including MEDLINE), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and POPLINE databases were systematically searched in October and November 2009 for studies related to alternative follow-up modalities after first-trimester medication abortion to diagnose ongoing pregnancy or retained gestational sac. We calculated the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value compared with ultrasound or clinician's exam. We also calculated the proportion of cases in each study with a positive screening test. Our search identified eight articles. The most promising modalities included serum human chorionic gonadotropin measurements, standardized assessment of women's symptoms combined with low-sensitivity urine pregnancy testing and telephone consultation. These follow-up modalities had sensitivities ≥90%, negative predictive values ≥99% and proportions of "screen-positives" ≤33%. Alternatives to routine in-person follow-up visits after medication abortion are accurate at diagnosing ongoing pregnancy. Additional research is needed to demonstrate the accuracy, acceptability and feasibility of alternative follow-up modalities in practice, particularly of home-based urine testing combined with self-assessment and/or clinician-assisted assessment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Feasibility of a Team Approach to Complex Congenital Heart Defect Neurodevelopmental Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Chorna, Olena; Baldwin, H. Scott; Neumaier, Jamie; Gogliotti, Shirley; Powers, Deborah; Mouvery, Amanda; Bichell, David; Maitre, Nathalie L.

    2017-01-01

    Infants with complex congenital heart disease are at high risk for poor neurodevelopmental outcomes. However, implementation of dedicated congenital heart disease follow-up programs presents important infrastructure, personnel, and resource challenges. We present the development, implementation, and retrospective review of 1- and 2-year outcomes of a Complex Congenital Heart Defect Neurodevelopmental Follow-Up program. This program was a synergistic approach between the Pediatric Cardiology, Cardiothoracic Surgery, Pediatric Intensive Care, and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Follow-Up teams to provide a feasible and responsible utilization of existing infrastructure and personnel, to develop and implement a program dedicated to children with congenital heart disease. Trained developmental testers administered the Ages and Stages Questionnaire-3 over the phone to the parents of all referred children at least once between 6 and 12 months’ corrected age. At 18 months’ corrected age, all children were scheduled in the Neonatal Intensive-Care Unit Follow-Up Clinic for a visit with standardized neurological exams, Bayley III, multidisciplinary therapy evaluations and continued follow-up. Of the 132 patients identified in the Cardiothoracic Surgery database and at discharge from the hospital, a total number of 106 infants were reviewed. A genetic syndrome was identified in 23.4% of the population. Neuroimaging abnormalities were identified in 21.7% of the cohort with 12.8% having visibly severe insults. As a result, 23 (26.7%) received first-time referrals for early intervention services, 16 (13.8%) received referrals for new services in addition to their existing ones. We concluded that utilization of existing resources in collaboration with established programs can ensure targeted neurodevelopmental follow-up for all children with complex congenital heart disease. PMID:27220370

  7. Follow-up after acute poisoning by substances of abuse: a prospective observational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Vallersnes, Odd Martin; Jacobsen, Dag; Ekeberg, Øivind; Brekke, Mette

    2016-01-01

    Objective To chart follow-up of patients after acute poisoning by substances of abuse, register whether patients referred to specialist health services attended, and whether patients contacted a general practitioner (GP) after the poisoning episode. Design Observational cohort study. Setting A primary care emergency outpatient clinic in Oslo, Norway. Subjects Patients ≥12 years treated for acute poisoning by substances of abuse were included consecutively from October 2011 to September 2012. Main outcome measures Follow-up initiated at discharge, proportion of cases in which referred patients attended within three months, and proportion of cases in which the patient consulted a GP the first month following discharge. Results There were 2343 episodes of acute poisoning by substances of abuse. In 391 (17%) cases the patient was hospitalised, including 49 (2%) in psychiatric wards. In 235 (10%) cases the patient was referred to specialist health services, in 91 (4%) advised to see their GP, in 82 (3%) to contact social services, in 74 (3%) allotted place in a homeless shelter, and in 93 (4%) other follow-up was initiated. In 1096 (47%) cases, the patient was discharged without follow-up, and in a further 324 (14%), the patient self-discharged. When referred to specialist health services, in 200/235 (85%) cases the patient attended within three months. Among all discharges, in 527/1952 (27%) cases the patient consulted a GP within one month. When advised to see their GP, in 45/91 (49%) cases the patient did. Conclusion Attendance was high for follow-up initiated after acute poisoning by substances of abuse. Key Points Despite poor long-term prognosis, patients treated for acute poisoning by substances of abuse are frequently not referred to follow-up.Nearly all patients referred to specialist health services attended, indicating the acute poisoning as an opportune moment for intervention.Advising patients to contact their GP was significantly associated with

  8. Bobath or motor relearning programme? A follow-up one and four years post stroke.

    PubMed

    Langhammer, Birgitta; Stanghelle, Johan K

    2003-11-01

    The purpose of this follow-up one and four years post stroke was to find out whether the initial physiotherapy approach had had any long-term effects on mortality, motor function, postural control, activities of daily living, life quality, follow-up from community services and living conditions. A randomized controlled trial of first time ever stroke patients. Group 1 (n = 33) and group 2 (n = 28) had initial physiotherapy according to the Motor Relearning Programme and Bobath, respectively. The Motor Assessment Scale (MAS), the Sødring Motor Evaluation Scale (SMES), the Barthel ADL Index, the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) and Berg Balance Scale were used. The following parameters were also registered: incidence of new strokes, other diseases, use of assistive devices, the patient's accommodation and use of services from the community. The mortality rates were similar in the two groups. In both groups the motor function, postural control and ADL had decreased rapidly, leaving many of the patients dependent and with a high risk of falling. Life quality had increased compared to the acute stage, but was still low in comparison with healthy persons. Patients in both groups lived at home, but were dependent on help from relatives and community services. Physiotherapy as follow-up service was seldom used. The initial physiotherapy approach did not seem to have a major influence on the patients' ability to cope in the long-term. This follow-up at one and four years post stroke showed no major influence of two different initial physiotherapy regimens on long-term function. The study confirmed a rapid deterioration of ADL and motor function and an increased dependence on relatives. The study reveals a gap between the intense treatment in the acute phase and little or no follow-up of physiotherapy treatment or other rehabilitation activities later.

  9. KLENOT Project - Near Earth Objects Follow-up Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichy, Milos; Ticha, Jana; Kocer, Michal; Tichy, Milos

    2015-08-01

    Near Earth Object (NEO) research is important not only as a great challenge for science but also as an important challenge for planetary defense. Therefore NEO discoveries, astrometric follow-up, orbit computations as well as physical studies are of high interest both to science community and humankind.The KLENOT Project of the Klet Observatory, South Bohemia, Czech Republic pursued the confirmation, early follow-up, long-arc follow-up and recovery of NEOs since 2002. Tens of thousands astrometric measurements helped to make inventory of NEOs as well as to understand the NEO distribution. It ranked among the world most prolific professional NEO follow-up programmes during its first phase from 2002 to 2008.The fundamental improvement of the 1.06-m KLENOT Telescope was started in autumn 2008. The new computer controlled paralactic mount was built to substantially increase telescope-time efficiency, the number of observations, their accuracy and limiting magnitude. The testing observations of the KLENOT Telescope Next Generation were started in October 2011. The new more efficient CCD camera FLI ProLine 230 was installed in summer 2013.The original Klet Software Package has been continually upgraded over the past two decades of operation.Both the system and strategy for the NEO follow-up observation used in the framework of the KLENOT Project are described here, including methods for selecting useful and important targets for NEO follow-up astrometry.The modernized KLENOT System was put into full operation in September 2013. More than 8000 of minor planet and comet astrometric positions including NEA measurements were published from September 2013 to February 2015.The 1.06-m KLENOT telescope is still the largest telescope in continental Europe used exclusively for observations of asteroids and comets. Full observing time is dedicated to the KLENOT team. Considering our results and long-time experience obtained at the Klet Observatory, we have the large potential to

  10. Follow-up of Antihypertensive Therapy Improves Blood Pressure Control: Results of HYT (HYperTension survey) Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Fici, F; Seravalle, G; Koylan, N; Nalbantgil, I; Cagla, N; Korkut, Y; Quarti-Trevano, F; Makel, W; Grassi, G

    2017-05-11

    Although improved during the past few years, blood pressure control remains sub optimal. The impact of follow-up assessment on blood pressure control was evaluated in a group of patients of the HYT (HYperTension survey), treated with a combination of different dihydropyridine calcium-channel blockers (CCBs regimen) and inhibitors of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) and with uncontrolled blood pressure. This was obtained assessing (a) the rate of blood pressure control at 3 and 6 months of follow-up in the whole group of patients, (b) the rate of blood pressure control and the average blood pressure values in subjects treated with different DHP-CCBs regimen. From the 4993 patients with uncontrolled blood pressure, (BP ≥ 140/90 or ≥140/85 in patients with diabetes), 3729 (mean age 61.2 ± 11.5 years), maintained CCBs regimen combined wih RAAS blockers and were evaluated at 3 and 6 months follow-up. At each visit BP (semiautomatic device, Omron-M6, 3 measurements), heart rate, adverse events and treatment persistence were collected. At 1st and 2nd follow-up the rate of controlled BP was 63.5 and 72.8% respectively (p < 0.05 vs 35.3% at baseline), whereas in diabetes was 32.5 and 37.9% respectively (p < 0.05 vs 20% at baseline). No differences in heart rate were observed. No differences in control rate were observed between the different CCBs regimen. The incidence of drugs related adverse events was 3.6%. These findings provide evidence that: (a) the follow-up of hypertensive patients under therapy increase the rate of blood pressure control; (b) there is no significant difference in the antihypertensive effect between different CCBs regimen; (c) lipophilic CCBs induce less ankle edema.

  11. Multiwavelength Follow-up of a Rare Icecube Neutrino Multiplet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kocevski, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    IceCube detected three neutrino-induced track events arriving within less than 100s from a similar direction. Expected chance occurrence rate of 1 every 14 years, so not exceptionally rare, but interesting. If astrophysical in nature, the source would have to be relatively nearby or be an exceptional bright neutrino emitter. Follow-up observations by Swift-BAT, Swift-XRT, Master, ASAS-SN, LCOG, Veritas, FACT, and HAWC. The IceCube collaboration wanted to produce a paper summarizing the non-detections and outlining the follow-up network they have assembled. We were asked by Anna Franckowiak to contribute Fermi analysis to their write-up of this event.

  12. [Follow-up of newborns with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Biarge, M; Blanco, D; García-Alix, A; Salas, S

    2014-07-01

    Hypothermia treatment for newborn infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy reduces the number of neonates who die or have permanent neurological deficits. Although this therapy is now standard of care, neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy still has a significant impact on the child's neurodevelopment and quality of life. Infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy should be enrolled in multidisciplinary follow-up programs in order to detect impairments, to initiate early intervention, and to provide counselling and support for families. This article describes the main neurodevelopmental outcomes after term neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. We offer recommendations for follow-up based on the infant's clinical condition and other prognostic indicators, mainly neonatal neuroimaging. Other aspects, such as palliative care and medico-legal issues, are also briefly discussed. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. From themes to hypotheses: following up with quantitative methods.

    PubMed

    Morgan, David L

    2015-06-01

    One important category of mixed-methods research designs consists of quantitative studies that follow up on qualitative research. In this case, the themes that serve as the results from the qualitative methods generate hypotheses for testing through the quantitative methods. That process requires operationalization to translate the concepts from the qualitative themes into quantitative variables. This article illustrates these procedures with examples that range from simple operationalization to the evaluation of complex models. It concludes with an argument for not only following up qualitative work with quantitative studies but also the reverse, and doing so by going beyond integrating methods within single projects to include broader mutual attention from qualitative and quantitative researchers who work in the same field.

  14. [Follow-up after radiation therapy for cervical cancer].

    PubMed

    Cao, K I; Mazeron, R; Barillot, I

    2015-10-01

    Radiation therapy plays a central role in treatment strategies of cervical cancer. Follow-up after external pelvic radiation therapy and brachytherapy is based upon French and international specific recommendations. It aims to assess early tumour response, and to detect local or metastatic recurrences which can be suitable for salvage treatment. Follow-up after radiation therapy for cervical cancer should also assess gastro-intestinal, urinary and sexual toxicities which may have an impact on quality of life. This is a major concern in the evaluation of the results of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and MRI-guided brachytherapy, which should lead to a better local control and to a better bowel tolerance.

  15. [Normocalcemic primary hyperparathyroidism: recommendations for management and follow-up].

    PubMed

    Martínez Díaz-Guerra, Guillermo; Jódar Gimeno, Esteban; Reyes García, Rebeca; Gómez Sáez, José Manuel; Muñoz-Torres, Manuel

    2013-10-01

    To provide practical recommendations for evaluation and follow-up of patients with normocalcemic primary hyperparathyroidism. Members of the Bone Metabolism Working Group of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology. A systematic search was made in MEDLINE (PubMed), using the terms normocalcemic primary hyperparathyroidism and primary hyperparathyroidism, for articles in English published before 22 November 2012. Literature was reviewed by 2 members of the Bone Metabolism Working Group of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology, and after development of recommendations, the manuscript was reviewed by all other members of the Group, and their suggestions were incorporated. The document provides practical recommendations for evaluation and follow-up of patients with normocalcemic primary hyperparathyroidism. There is however little evidence available about different aspects of this disease, mainly progression rate and clinical impact. More data are therefore needed before definite recommendations may be made. Copyright © 2012 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Medium term follow up of the Biodynamic neck sparing prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Molfetta, Luigi; Capozzi, Michele; Caldo, Davide

    2011-01-01

    Hip resurfacing (HR) and neck sparing prostheses (NSP) have been advocated for the treatment of arthritis in younger patients. Some complications following HR have been documented in the recent literature, but NSP are not yet supported by clinical follow-up studies of sufficient duration. We present an assessment of the neck sparing "Biodynamic" prosthesis. 153 patients were evaluated in a longitudinal cohort prospective study, with survival analysis, clinical score and radiographic assessment of stability and osteointegration at 41.8 months average follow up. Survival and clinical outcome were similar to most traditional prostheses in the literature. On radiographic analysis we recorded good neck preservation and osteointegration. Only two stem failures were recorded. Poor clinical outcome was related to misalignment of prostheses implanted during the 'learning curve'. The NSP system described may be a good alternative to HR for younger patients. The system is characterized by good survival and clinical and radiographic outcome combined with bone stock preservation.

  17. Long-term follow-up of congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Hollinger, Laura E; Harting, Matthew T; Lally, Kevin P

    2017-06-01

    Increased survival of patients with congenital diaphragmatic hernia has created a unique cohort of children, adolescent, and adult survivors with complex medical and surgical needs. Disease-specific morbidities offer the opportunity for multiple disciplines to unite together to provide long-term comprehensive follow-up, as well as an opportunity for research regarding late outcomes. These children can exhibit impaired pulmonary function, altered neurodevelopmental outcomes, nutritional insufficiency, musculoskeletal changes, and specialized surgical needs that benefit from regular monitoring and intervention, particularly in patients with increased disease severity. Below we aim to characterize the specific challenges that these survivors face as well as present an algorithm for a multidisciplinary long-term follow-up program. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Trismus-pseudocamptodactyly syndrome: a 20 year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Marianetti, T M; Dall'Asta, L; Torroni, A; Gasparini, G; Pelo, S

    2014-07-01

    Trismus-Pseudocamptodactyly Syndrome (TPS) is a rare autosomal syndrome characterised by the inability to open the mouth fully, pseudocamptodactyly, short stature and foot deformities. The maxillofacial feature entails hyperplasia of the coronoid processes which mechanically interfere with the zygomatic processes during mouth opening. A 22-year- old girl affected by a severe form of TPS was followed from the age of three years. Bone reossification was observed after two coronoidotomies of both hyperplasic coronoid processes. After the decision to perform a coronoidectomy, the four-year follow-up showed a favourable outcome. Meanwhile the patient developed an anterior open bite which was treated with a fourth orthognathic surgery. The follow-up underscores how the correction of malformation leads to the generation of EMG activity of the masticatory muscles after many years of passiveness.

  19. Improving Lunar Exploration with Robotic Follow-up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fong, T.; Bualat, M.; Deans, M.; Heggy E.; Helper, M.; Hodges, K.; Lee, P.

    2011-01-01

    We are investigating how augmenting human field work with subsequent robot activity can improve lunar exploration. Robotic "follow-up" might involve: completing geology observations; making tedious or long-duration measurements of a target site or feature; curating samples in-situ; and performing unskilled, labor-intensive work. To study this technique, we have begun conducting a series of lunar analog field tests at Haughton Crater (Canada). Motivation: In most field geology studies on Earth, explorers often find themselves left with a set of observations they would have liked to make, or samples they would have liked to take, if only they had been able to stay longer in the field. For planetary field geology, we can imagine mobile robots - perhaps teleoperated vehicles previously used for manned exploration or dedicated planetary rovers - being deployed to perform such follow-up activities [1].

  20. Longitudinal follow-up of occupational status in tinnitus patients.

    PubMed

    Andersson, G

    2000-01-01

    In this study, the long-term outcome of tinnitus patients was studied in terms of changes in occupational status from admission to follow-up for an average duration of 5 years. A consecutive series of 189 tinnitus patients seen between the years 1988 and 1995 were sent a postal questionnaire booklet; 146 provided usable responses (a 77% response rate). Results showed a significant change in occupational status, which was explained partly by retirement because of old age. Few were unemployed at follow-up, and relatively few were on sick leave. These data suggest that tinnitus patients may be less of a demand for the sickness benefit system in Sweden, but it may reflect also that tinnitus is not accepted as a cause for sick absenteeism.

  1. ICU-Acquired Weakness.

    PubMed

    Jolley, Sarah E; Bunnell, Aaron E; Hough, Catherine L

    2016-11-01

    Survivorship after critical illness is an increasingly important health-care concern as ICU use continues to increase while ICU mortality is decreasing. Survivors of critical illness experience marked disability and impairments in physical and cognitive function that persist for years after their initial ICU stay. Newfound impairment is associated with increased health-care costs and use, reductions in health-related quality of life, and prolonged unemployment. Weakness, critical illness neuropathy and/or myopathy, and muscle atrophy are common in patients who are critically ill, with up to 80% of patients admitted to the ICU developing some form of neuromuscular dysfunction. ICU-acquired weakness (ICUAW) is associated with longer durations of mechanical ventilation and hospitalization, along with greater functional impairment for survivors. Although there is increasing recognition of ICUAW as a clinical entity, significant knowledge gaps exist concerning identifying patients at high risk for its development and understanding its role in long-term outcomes after critical illness. This review addresses the epidemiologic and pathophysiologic aspects of ICUAW; highlights the diagnostic challenges associated with its diagnosis in patients who are critically ill; and proposes, to our knowledge, a novel strategy for identifying ICUAW. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Energy Conservation in the Food Industry : Follow-up Report.

    SciTech Connect

    United Industries Corporation.

    1986-06-01

    United Industries Corporation (UIC) conducted an energy analysis at five food processing plants (SIC 20) in the winter of 1984-1985. Tour of plants (Alpac, Carnation, Terminal flour mill, Tree Top) were revisited eighteen months later to determine what energy conservation measures (ECM's) had been or would be implemented. Additionally, the follow-up investigation evaluated the actual energy savings that accrued for the implemented ECM's and recorded the plants' views on the usefulness of the energy analysis.

  3. Paediatrician office follow-up of common minor fractures

    PubMed Central

    Koelink, Eric; Boutis, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evidence suggests that minor paediatric fractures can be followed by primary care paediatricians (PCPs). OBJECTIVES: To determine PCP opinions, knowledge and perceived barriers to managing minor paediatric fractures in the office. METHODS: An online survey was sent between June and September 2013 to all paediatricians who subscribed to the American Academy of Pediatrics PROS-Net Listerv and to those who were registered with the Scott’s Canadian Medical Directory as paediatricians who treated children in a primary care capacity. The primary outcome was the proportion of PCPs who agreed with PCP follow-up of minor paediatric fractures. Secondary outcomes included PCP’s perceived barriers to office follow-up. RESULTS: A total of 1752 surveys were sent; 1235 were eligible and 459 (37.2%) responded to the survey. Overall, 296 (69.5% [95% CI 65.2% to 74.0%]) PCPs agreed that minor paediatric fractures could be followed in a PCP office. The most frequently reported barriers were lack of materials to replace immobilization (58.1%), PCP knowledge deficits (44.8%) and a perceived parental preference for an orthopedic surgeon (38.6%). Finally, 58.8% of respondents believed that further education was necessary if PCPs assumed responsibility for follow-up of midshaft clavicle fractures, while 66.5% and 77.1% (P<0.0001) believed this was necessary for distal radius buckle and fibular fractures, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: More than two-thirds of responding PCPs in Canada and the United States agreed that minor common paediatric fractures can be followed-up by paediatricians. However, PCPs reported some barriers to this management strategy, including a desire for more education on this topic. PMID:25382996

  4. Developmental Screening and Follow-up by Nurses.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Brian A; Weaver, Amy L; Starr, Stephanie R; Ytterberg, Karen L; Rostad, Paulette V; Hall, David J; Tucker, Sharon J

    2015-01-01

    The Ages and Stages Questionnaire (ASQ) and Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers (M-CHAT) are commonly used screening tools for developmental delay and autism, respectively. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of implementing 18-month developmental and autism screening by mail, with a standardized follow-up process for abnormal screen results. Within a prospective cohort study design, parents of 892 children received by mail the 18-month ASQ and M-CHAT questionnaires between December 2008 and September 2009. A registered nurse scored the questionnaires and, if needed, administered follow-up screening or set up a referral to Early Intervention or subspecialty pediatrics. Medical record reviews determined clinical outcomes of children who required intervention after initial screening through September 2010. Additionally, demographic factors were evaluated for association with responding to the questionnaires. The ASQ and M-CHAT questionnaires were returned by 529 (59.3%) of the parents. Parents of White children (390/575 [67.8%]) and those with private insurance (457/660 [69.2%]) were significantly more likely to return screening questionnaires than parents of non-White (64/171 [37.4%]; P < .001) and government-insured children (58/169 [34.3%]; P < .001), respectively. Of the 529 children with returned surveys, 109 (20.6%) did not pass at least 1 of the initial screens and 12 (2.3%) were referred after not passing the follow-up screening process. Developmental and autism screening by mail is not a sufficient method to comprehensively screen a general pediatric population. A nurse-completed, standardized follow-up process after an initial failed developmental screen may increase the yield of appropriate Early Intervention or subspecialty referrals.

  5. A Follow-up Study: The Registered Nurses Program, 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kondwros, Jerry M.

    Twenty-seven (77.1%) of the thirty-five 1977 graduates of the South Georgia Colleges' Division of Nursing responded to a follow-up survey, producing the following information: (1) 17 were employed full-time, two were employed part-time, and eight were unemployed; (2) 88.9% agreed they were prepared adequately for the state board examination; (3)…

  6. A Follow-up Study: The Registered Nurses Program, 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kondwros, Jerry M.

    Twenty-seven (77.1%) of the thirty-five 1977 graduates of the South Georgia Colleges' Division of Nursing responded to a follow-up survey, producing the following information: (1) 17 were employed full-time, two were employed part-time, and eight were unemployed; (2) 88.9% agreed they were prepared adequately for the state board examination; (3)…

  7. Postencephalitic pure anomic aphasia: 2-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Okuda, B; Kawabata, K; Tachibana, H; Sugita, M; Tanaka, H

    2001-06-15

    We report a patient with pure anomic aphasia following encephalitis. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed bilateral temporal lesions, and subsequent focal atrophy in the left anterior inferior temporal lobe. Over the course of a 2-year follow-up, the patient's naming difficulty persisted without other dysfunction of language or memory. These observations indicate a contribution of the left anterior inferior temporal region to object naming.

  8. Optical follow-up of SN 2017eaw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Avanzo, P.; Wolter, A.; della Penna, F.; Garofolo, S.; Monteverdi, F.; Moreschi, B. E.; Prato, A.; Salimbeni, M.; Zizioli, M.; Covino, S.; Bersanelli, M.; Tomasi, M.

    2017-05-01

    We carried out optical follow-up of the Type II supernova 2017eaw in the nearby galaxy NGC 6946 (ATel #10372, #10374, #10376, #10377) with the 1.3m Ruths telescope of the INAF-Brera Astronomical Observatory sited in Merate (Lecco, Italy) equipped with an SBIG STL-1001E CCD. The observations, carried out under clear sky and seeing of 3", were taken as part of the Astronomy II classes of the Physics Department of the University of Milan.

  9. Ute Unit: Study Guide and Follow Up Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Conejos School District, Capulin, CO.

    The study guide and follow-up activities were designed primarily to give students a feeling of Ute life in the San Luis Valley in Colorado. The unit begins with six Southern Ute stories about the wolf and coyote, the race between the skunk and the coyote, the frog and the eagle, why the frog croaks, the bear (Que Ye Qat), and the two Indian…

  10. Neonatal follow-up program: Where do we stand?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Neonatal follow-up program (NFP) is becoming the corner stone of standard, high quality care provided to newborns at risk of future neuorodevelopmental delay. Most of the recognized neonatal intensive care units in the developed countries are adopting NFP as part of their mandatory care for the best long term outcome of high risk infants, especially very low birth weight (VLBW) infants. Unfortunately, in the developing and in underdeveloped countries, such early detection and intervention programs are rarely existing, mainly because of the lack of awareness of and exposure to such programs in spite of the increasing numbers of surviving sick newborns due to advancement in neonatal care in these countries. This is a review article to explore the Neonatal follow-up programs looking at historical development, benefts and aims, and standard requirements for successful program development that can be adopted in our countries. In conclusion, proper Neonatal follow-up programs are needed to improve neonatal outcome. Therefore all professionals working in the feld of neonatal care in developing countries should cooperate to create such programs for early detection and hence early intervention for any adverse long term outcome in high-risk newborn infants PMID:27493326

  11. Outpatient follow-up of patients hospitalized for acute leptospirosis

    PubMed Central

    Spichler, Anne; Athanazio, Daniel; Seguro, Antonio C.; Vinetz, Joseph M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Objective The outcome of leptospirosis after the resolution of acute disease, either spontaneously or after treatment, is not well described. The aim of this study was to assess the possible sequelae of acute leptospirosis after hospital discharge. Methods We report here a prospective study carried out in São Paulo, Brazil in which patients hospitalized for leptospirosis were followed in the outpatient setting. Results Forty-seven patients were serially assessed: 32 severe and 15 mild cases. Early and late complications were not common in either group, but subjective complaints were common in the first few weeks after hospital discharge (53% of severe cases, 40% of mild cases). Two patients had continuing complaints: one had profound general malaise and the other developed new onset panic disorder. The sample analyzed represented 26% of the patients hospitalized with leptospirosis in the city of São Paulo during the study period. The duration of follow-up was an average of approximately 20 days at the first visit, and approximately 40 days at the second visit. Forty-seven patients came for one follow-up visit and 22 of the same patients had two follow-up visits. Conclusions While two of 47 patients reported continuing symptoms after hospitalization for acute leptospirosis, no definitive, objective evidence of chronic sequelae due to this infection was proven. While preliminary, these observations point to the need for a prospective, rigorous and systematic study to definitively determine and characterize late complications and chronic disease after acute leptospirosis. PMID:21616696

  12. A follow-up study of attempted railway suicides.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, I; Arthur, A J; Farmer, R D

    1994-02-01

    This paper reports the subsequent mortality of 94 persons who attempted suicide by jumping in front of London Underground trains between 1977 and 1979. The follow-up period was 10 yr. Despite the apparent seriousness of the method, completion of suicide was not found to be higher than in previous studies of attempted suicide by other methods. By the end of the follow-up period 18 persons had died, nine of natural causes. Coroners' inquests were held for the unnatural deaths. Seven verdicts of suicide and two of accidental death were recorded. Of the nine unnatural deaths four were from multiple injuries, three from drowning, one from asphyxia and one from acute narcotic poisoning. All four multiple injury deaths were women, three of these were from repeated incidents involving London Underground trains. The time interval between the index attempt and eventual death for the suicide/accident group ranged from 1 day to 43 months. For ethical reasons it was not possible to follow-up attempted suicides who were presumed to have remained alive.

  13. Follow-up of permanent hearing impairment in childhood.

    PubMed

    Della Volpe, A; De Lucia, A; Pastore, V; Bracci Laudiero, L; Buonissimo, I; Ricci, G

    2016-02-01

    Programmes for early childhood childhood hearing impairment identification allows to quickly start the appropriate hearing aid fitting and rehabilitation process; nevertheless, a large number of patients do not join the treatment program. The goal of this article is to present the results of a strategic review of the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats connected with the audiologic/prosthetic/language follow-up process of children with bilateral permanent hearing impairment. Involving small children, the follow-up includes the involvement of specialised professionals of a multidisciplinary team and a complex and prolonged multi-faced management. Within the framework of the Italian Ministry of Health project CCM 2013 "Preventing Communication Disorders: a Regional Program for Early Identification, Intervention and Care of Hearing Impaired Children", the purpose of this analysis was to propose recommendations that can harmonise criteria for outcome evaluation and provide guidance on the most appropriate assessment methods to be used in the follow-up course of children with permanent hearing impairment. © Copyright by Società Italiana di Otorinolaringologia e Chirurgia Cervico-Facciale.

  14. Complications and Follow-up after Unprotected Carotid Artery Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Hauth, Elke A.M. Drescher, Robert; Jansen, Christian; Gissler, H. Martin; Schwarz, Michael; Forsting, Michael; Jaeger, Horst J.; Mathias, Klaus D.

    2006-08-15

    Purpose. This prospective study was undertaken to determine the success rate, complications, and outcome of carotid artery stenting (CAS) without the use of cerebral protection devices. Methods. During 12 months, 94 high-grade stenoses of the carotid artery in 91 consecutive patients were treated. Sixty-six (70%) of the stenoses were symptomatic and 28 (30%) were asymptomatic. Results. In all 94 carotid stenoses CAS was successfully performed. During the procedure and within the 30 days afterwards, there were 2 deaths and 3 major strokes in the 66 symptomatic patients, resulting in a combined death and stroke rate of 5 of 66 (7%). Only one of these complications, a major stroke, occurred during the procedure. In the 6-month follow-up, one additional major stroke occurred in a originally symptomatic patient resulting in a combined death and stroke rate of 6 of 66 (10%) for symptomatic patients at 6 months. No major complications occurred in asymptomatic patients during the procedure or in the 6-month follow-up period. At 6 months angiographic follow-up the restenosis rate with a degree of >50% was 3 of 49 (6%) and the rate with a degree of {>=}70% was 1 of 49 (2%). Conclusions. Cerebral embolization during CAS is not the only cause of the stroke and death rate associated with the procedure. The use of cerebral protection devices during the procedure may therefore not prevent all major complications following CAS.

  15. [Guidelines for the follow up of patients with bronchopulmonary dysplasia].

    PubMed

    Pérez Tarazona, S; Rueda Esteban, S; Alfonso Diego, J; Barrio Gómez de Agüero, M I; Callejón Callejón, A; Cortell Aznar, I; de la Serna Blázquez, O; Domingo Miró, X; García García, M L; García Hernández, G; Luna Paredes, C; Mesa Medina, O; Moreno Galdó, A; Moreno Requena, L; Pérez Pérez, G; Salcedo Posadas, A; Sánchez Solís de Querol, M; Torrent Vernetta, A; Valdesoiro Navarrete, L; Vilella Sabaté, M

    2016-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is the most common complication of preterm birth, and remains a major problem in pediatric pulmonology units. The decision of discharging from the Neonatal Unit should be based on a thorough assessment of the condition of the patient and compliance with certain requirements, including respiratory and nutritional stability, and caregiver education on disease management. For proper control of the disease, a schedule of visits and complementary tests should be established prior to discharge, and guidelines for prevention of exacerbations and appropriate treatment should be applied. In this paper, the Working Group in Perinatal Respiratory Diseases of the Spanish Society of Pediatric Pulmonology proposes a protocol to serve as a reference for the follow up of patients with BPD among different centers and health care settings. Key factors to consider when planning discharge from the Neonatal Unit and during follow up are reviewed. Recommendations on treatment and prevention of complications are then discussed. The final section of this guide aims to provide a specific schedule for follow-up and diagnostic interventions to be performed in patients with BPD.

  16. Pacemaker follow-up and adequacy of Medicare guidelines.

    PubMed

    Vallario, L E; Leman, R B; Gillette, P C; Kratz, J M

    1988-07-01

    The time of occurrence of cardiac pacemaker problems after implantation was identified to assess the adequacy of published federal guidelines for clinic and transtelephonic follow-up. One hundred eighty-nine pacemaker patients' charts were examined retrospectively to identify pacemaker problems: inadequate sensing, non-capture, battery failure, myoinhibition, muscle stimulation, and inadequate threshold safety margin. Twenty-nine patients (15%) were identified as having pacemaker problems. A total of 41 problems were identified, of which 28 (68%) were corrected by reprogramming. Sixty-one percent of the problems were found during a clinic visit. Problems occurred more frequently during the first year in dual-chamber devices (62%) vs single-chamber devices (35%). During years 1 to 4, when few problems are expected, 30% of all problems of single-chamber devices occurred and 39% of all problems of dual-chamber devices occurred. This is a period of time that Medicare guidelines allow for one clinic visit per year for single- and two visits per year for dual-chamber devices. These data suggest: (1) Many pacemaker problems will be missed with transtelephonic follow-up alone. (2) The majority of problems involving dual-chamber devices occurred in the first year. (3) For both dual- and single-chamber devices, an unexpected significant percentage of problems occurred in 1 to 4 years. (4) Medicare guidelines may be inadequate for follow-up during this time period.

  17. Investigating follow-up outcome change using hierarchical linear modeling.

    PubMed

    Ogrodniczuk, J S; Piper, W E; Joyce, A S

    2001-03-01

    Individual change in outcome during a one-year follow-up period for 98 patients who received either interpretive or supportive psychotherapy was examined using hierarchical linear modeling (HLM). This followed a previous study that had investigated average (treatment condition) change during follow-up using traditional methods of data analysis (repeated measures ANOVA, chi-square tests). We also investigated whether two patient personality characteristics-quality of object relations (QOR) and psychological mindedness (PM)-predicted individual change. HLM procedures yielded findings that were not detected using traditional methods of data analysis. New findings indicated that the rate of individual change in outcome during follow-up varied significantly among the patients. QOR was directly related to favorable individual change for supportive therapy patients, but not for patients who received interpretive therapy. The findings have implications for determining which patients will show long-term benefit following short-term supportive therapy and how to enhance it. The study also found significant associations between QOR and final outcome level.

  18. Percutaneous mitral balloon valvotomy: six-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Dighero, H; Zepeda, F; Sepúlveda, P; Soto, J R; Aranda, W

    2001-12-01

    Percutaneous mitral valvotomy (PMV) is an alternative to the surgical treatment of mitral stenosis. Results obtained with PMV appear to depend on the echocardiographical characteristics of the valvular apparatus. The purpose of this study was to report the immediate and late-term results with PMV. The incidence of late events (restenosis, mitral valve replacement and death), and their correlation with echocardiographic score (Wilkin's score) are also discussed. Between December 1987 and August 1999, a total of 160 PMVs were performed at our institution. Ninety-six patients with a minimum of 6 months follow-up and echocardiographic evaluation of the mitral valve (Wilkin's score) before and after the procedure were selected for this study. Follow-up was available for 99% of the patients, with a mean follow-up of 33 +/- 22 months (range, 6 months to 11 years). Hazard ratio (HR) and Cox's regression were used for statistical analyses. PMV was successfully performed in 97% of the cases; in 84%, the result was considered optimal. The incidence of complications related to the procedure was 10%; no mortality was observed due to PMV. Severe mitral regurgitation was observed in 7% of the patients, but only 3% of the total group developed ventricular dysfunction or worsened their New York Heart Association functional class. Eight-four percent of the patients were free of late events at the end of the follow-up period. A restenosis rate of 34% was observed during follow-up; this rate did not correlate with age, functional class or atrial fibrillation. Restenosis was associated with pulmonary hypertension (HR 2.85; 95% confidence interval, 0.68-11.80). Also, Wilkin's score was not useful to predict the development of restenosis or clinical events in the mid- to long-term. In our series, PMV had a high immediate success rate and a low incidence of complications due to the procedure. Incidence of late events was also low and was unrelated to the Wilkin's score; however

  19. Appraising the value of independent EIA follow-up verifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Wessels, Jan-Albert

    2015-01-15

    Independent Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) follow-up verifiers such as monitoring agencies, checkers, supervisors and control officers are active on various construction sites across the world. There are, however, differing views on the value that these verifiers add and very limited learning in EIA has been drawn from independent verifiers. This paper aims to appraise how and to what extent independent EIA follow-up verifiers add value in major construction projects in the developing country context of South Africa. A framework for appraising the role of independent verifiers was established and four South African case studies were examined through a mixture of site visits, project document analysis, and interviews. Appraisal results were documented in the performance areas of: planning, doing, checking, acting, public participating and integration with other programs. The results indicate that independent verifiers add most value to major construction projects when involved with screening EIA requirements of new projects, allocation of financial and human resources, checking legal compliance, influencing implementation, reporting conformance results, community and stakeholder engagement, integration with self-responsibility programs such as environmental management systems (EMS), and controlling records. It was apparent that verifiers could be more creatively utilized in pre-construction preparation, providing feedback of knowledge into assessment of new projects, giving input to the planning and design phase of projects, and performance evaluation. The study confirms the benefits of proponent and regulator follow-up, specifically in having independent verifiers that disclose information, facilitate discussion among stakeholders, are adaptable and proactive, aid in the integration of EIA with other programs, and instill trust in EIA enforcement by conformance evaluation. Overall, the study provides insight on how to harness the learning opportunities

  20. Automated detection of follow-up appointments using text mining of discharge records.

    PubMed

    Ruud, Kari L; Johnson, Matthew G; Liesinger, Juliette T; Grafft, Carrie A; Naessens, James M

    2010-06-01

    To determine whether text mining can accurately detect specific follow-up appointment criteria in free-text hospital discharge records. Cross-sectional study. Mayo Clinic Rochester hospitals. Inpatients discharged from general medicine services in 2006 (n = 6481). Textual hospital dismissal summaries were manually reviewed to determine whether the records contained specific follow-up appointment arrangement elements: date, time and either physician or location for an appointment. The data set was evaluated for the same criteria using SAS Text Miner software. The two assessments were compared to determine the accuracy of text mining for detecting records containing follow-up appointment arrangements. Agreement of text-mined appointment findings with gold standard (manual abstraction) including sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV). About 55.2% (3576) of discharge records contained all criteria for follow-up appointment arrangements according to the manual review, 3.2% (113) of which were missed through text mining. Text mining incorrectly identified 3.7% (107) follow-up appointments that were not considered valid through manual review. Therefore, the text mining analysis concurred with the manual review in 96.6% of the appointment findings. Overall sensitivity and specificity were 96.8 and 96.3%, respectively; and PPV and NPV were 97.0 and 96.1%, respectively. of individual appointment criteria resulted in accuracy rates of 93.5% for date, 97.4% for time, 97.5% for physician and 82.9% for location. Text mining of unstructured hospital dismissal summaries can accurately detect documentation of follow-up appointment arrangement elements, thus saving considerable resources for performance assessment and quality-related research.

  1. [Follow-up interventions after suicide attempt. What tools, what effects and how to assess them?

    PubMed

    Castaigne, E; Hardy, P; Mouaffak, F

    2017-02-01

    After attempting suicide, 60 to 70% of patients are discharged from emergency departments and referred to outpatient treatment which entails psychosocial strategies, pharmacological strategies or a combination. The main objective of outpatient care consists in preventing recurrent suicidal behavior. Yet suicide attempters have been found to be very difficult to engage in treatment. Between 11% and 50% of attempters refuse outpatient treatment or drop out of outpatient therapy very quickly. In order to address this extremely serious issue, for the past 20 years monitoring or follow up interventions has been presented as a promising approach. Follow-up intervention is defined as a service that aims at both increased access to and engagement in care as well as to prevent suicide and related behaviors. This approach consists in "stay in contact" or "connectedness" protocols using phone calls or tele-assistance, sending letters, email or mobile phone messages and medical visits or nursing at home. From one study to another these tools have been used separately, associated to one another or reinforced by motivational interviewing or brief psychotherapy. To our knowledge, since 1993 16 controlled and randomized controlled studies assessed the effectiveness of diverse follow-up. Four studies assessing telephone follow up reported a significant decrease in suicide reattempt while one study evaluating a sending letters strategy reported positive results. Among five studies assessing engagement in healthcare, only two (one using phone follow up and the other sending letters reported significantly positive results. The refusal rate of monitoring strategies has not exceeded 11% attesting to the high applicability of these methods. Despite several positive results, we cannot draw firm conclusions on replicability of these results. This is largely due to methodological issues: lack of standardization of interventions, lack of consensus on definition of the main measured variables

  2. Can JWST Follow Up on Gravitational-Wave Detections?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-02-01

    Bitten by the gravitational-wave bug? While we await Thursdays press conference, heres some food for thought: if LIGO were able to detect gravitational waves from compact-object mergers, how could we follow up on the detections? A new study investigates whether the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be able to observe electromagnetic signatures of some compact-object mergers.Hunting for MergersStudying compact-object mergers (mergers of black holes and neutron stars) can help us understand a wealth of subjects, like high-energy physics, how matter behaves at nuclear densities, how stars evolve, and how heavy elements in the universe were created.The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) is searching for the signature ripples in spacetime identifying these mergers, but gravitational waves are squirrelly: LIGO will only be able to localize wave sources to tens of square degrees. If we want to find out more about any mergers LIGO discovers in gravitational waves, well need a follow-up search for electromagnetic counterparts with other observatories.The Kilonova KeyOne possible electromagnetic counterpart is kilonovae, explosions that can be produced during a merger of a binary neutron star or a neutron starblack hole system. If the neutron star is disrupted during the merger, some of the hot mass is flung outward and shines brightly by radioactive decay.Kilonovae are especially promising as electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational waves for three reasons:They emit isotropically, so the number of observable mergers isnt limited by relativistic beaming.They shine for a week, giving follow-up observatories time to search for them.The source location can beeasily recovered.The only problem? We dont currently have any sensitive survey instruments in the near-infrared band (where kilonova emission peaks) that can provide coverage over tens of square degrees. Luckily, we will soon have just the thing: JWST, launching in 2018!JWSTs

  3. The US Department of Defense Millennium Cohort Study: career span and beyond longitudinal follow-up.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tyler C

    2009-10-01

    To describe current and future career-span health research in the US Department of Defense Millennium Cohort Study. Collaborating with all military service branches and the Department of Veterans Affairs, the Millennium Cohort Study launched in 2001, before September 11 and the start of deployments in Afghanistan and Iraq, to conduct coordinated strategic research to determine any effects of military occupational and deployment-related exposures, on long-term health. More than 150,000 consenting members represent demographic, occupational, military, and health characteristics of the US military. More than 70% of the first two panels have submitted follow-up questionnaires and >50% have deployed since 2001. Prospective cohort data have identified subgroups of military populations at higher risk or more resilient to decrements in mental and physical health. Continued career span and beyond follow-up will answer long-term health questions related to military service.

  4. [Barrett's oesophagus: endoscopic diagnosis and follow-up].

    PubMed

    Ponsot, P

    2006-01-01

    Barrett's oesophagus (BO), or replacement of the squamous mucosa by a specialized intestinal metaplasia due to gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD), predisposes to adenocarcinoma. It is estimated that 6 to 12% of patients undergoing GI endoscopy have short BO (< 3 cm), and 1% have a long BO. Macroscopic diagnosis of BO is sometimes difficult and, in case of doubt, endoscopy should be redone after a period of efficient anti-secretory treatment. Diagnosis of BO is histological and should be confirmed by biopsies. The incidence of adenocarcinoma is globally estimated at 0.5% patient by year of follow-up, and exists for both short and long BO. Due to this low incidence, screening for BO is only justified in patients at high risk for adenocarcinoma (male gender, age > 50 ans, old GORD in a young patient). Low-grade dysplasia (LGD) then high-grade dysplasia (HGD) precedes adenocarcinoma. Histological diagnosis of LGD is difficult: the main cause of confusion is inflammation so diagnosis of LGD must be confirmed after a 3-month high-dose anti-secretory treatment. Diagnosis of HGD is easier but multiple biopsies are needed to determine the focal or multifocal disposition of HGD. The benefit of follow-up of BO is debated. Aged patients should be followed only if dysplasia is present. When dysplasia is absent, an endoscopic control with biopsies is desirable within 3 to 5 years. In case of dysplasia, the latter must be confirmed by another examination of biopsies, particularly in case of suspicion of HGD and after antisecretory treatment. In case of LGD, endoscopy with biopsies should be redone 6 months later to screen for HGD, then every year if LGD is confirmed. In case of HGD, the 5-year risk of cancer is 60% so surgical or endoscopic treatment is usually proposed. If HGD follow-up is decided, it should be performed on a 3- to 6-month basis.

  5. Outpatient follow-up of patients hospitalized for acute leptospirosis.

    PubMed

    Spichler, Anne; Athanazio, Daniel; Seguro, Antonio C; Vinetz, Joseph M

    2011-07-01

    The outcome of leptospirosis after the resolution of acute disease, either spontaneously or after treatment, is not well described. The aim of this study was to assess the possible sequelae of acute leptospirosis after hospital discharge. We report here a prospective study carried out in São Paulo, Brazil in which patients hospitalized for leptospirosis were followed in the outpatient setting. Forty-seven patients were serially assessed: 32 severe and 15 mild cases. Early and late complications were not common in either group, but subjective complaints were common in the first few weeks after hospital discharge (53% of severe cases, 40% of mild cases). Two patients had continuing complaints: one had profound general malaise and the other developed new onset panic disorder. The sample analyzed represented 26% of the patients hospitalized with leptospirosis in the city of São Paulo during the study period. The duration of follow-up was an average of approximately 20 days at the first visit, and approximately 40 days at the second visit. Forty-seven patients came for one follow-up visit and 22 of the same patients had two follow-up visits. While two of 47 patients reported continuing symptoms after hospitalization for acute leptospirosis, no definitive, objective evidence of chronic sequelae due to this infection was proven. While preliminary, these observations point to the need for a prospective, rigorous and systematic study to definitively determine and characterize late complications and chronic disease after acute leptospirosis. Copyright © 2011 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Pediatric malignant salivary gland tumors: 60 year follow up.

    PubMed

    Cockerill, Cara C; Gross, Brian C; Contag, Stephanie; Rein, Sarah; Moore, Eric J; Olsen, Kerry D; Orvidas, Laura J

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the presentation, treatments and outcomes in pediatric patients with salivary gland malignancies. Retrospective chart review (1950-2012), Prospective phone interview. Patients ≤18 years old with a salivary gland malignancy treated at our institution were identified. Patients were also contacted by phone for a follow up survey. Fifty-six patients were identified. Tumor origin was 88% parotid (n = 49), 5% (n = 3) submandibular and 7% (n = 4) minor salivary glands. Time from onset of symptoms to diagnosis was over one year (mean = 14.4 years). Fifteen out of 52 patients with major gland malignancy had a locoregional recurrence and local recurrences were almost all after initial enucleation. Two of these patients died of disease (overall disease specific survival = 96%). Three out of 4 patients with minor gland malignancy had a local recurrence and two patients with high grade pathology developed metastases and died of their disease (overall survival = 50%). On long term follow up survey in 13 patients (25%), 100% reported normal facial movement and 54% described symptoms of Frey's syndrome, which is higher than other reported series in children. Recurrence was noted up to 45 years after initial treatment. The majority of malignant pediatric salivary gland tumors are low grade and have excellent survival, especially if found at an early stage. Minor salivary gland malignancies, particularly high grade, have a worse prognosis. Long term mild Frey's syndrome can be expected in approximately half of patients. We advocate a need for long term follow up and increased awareness among providers to diagnose these patients earlier. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Juvenile Hyaline Fibromatosis: A 10-year Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Baltacioglu, Esra; Guzeldemir, Esra; Sukuroglu, Erkan; Yildiz, Kadriye; Yuva, Pinar; Aydin, Güven; Karacal, Naci

    2017-01-01

    Juvenile hyaline fibromatosis (JHF) is a rare hereditary disease with an autosomal recessive transmission. JHF is characterized by papulonodular skin lesions, osteolytic bone lesions, flexural joint contractures, and gingival hyperplasia and usually diagnosed in infancy or early childhood. JHF is thought to be a disorder of collagen metabolism and characterized by homogenous amorphous eosinophilic material and fibrous tissue. We report the case of a 14-year-old male child with multiple papulonodular skin lesions, progressive flexion contractures of joints, and severe gingival hyperplasia, with a 10-year follow-up. Although the lesions were totally removed thrice during the last 10 years, they recurred rigorously.

  8. Alberta Euthanasia Survey: 3-year follow-up.

    PubMed Central

    Verhoef, M J; Kinsella, T D

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the opinions of Alberta physicians about active euthanasia had changed and to assess the determinants of potential changes in opinion. DESIGN: Follow-up survey (mailed questionnaire) of physicians included in the 1991 Alberta Euthanasia Survey. SETTING: Alberta. PARTICIPANTS: Of the 1391 physicians who participated in the 1991 survey 1291 (93%) had indicated that they were willing to take part in a follow-up survey. A follow-up questionnaire was mailed in 1994 to 1146 physicians who could be traced through the 1994 Medical Directory of the provincial college of physicians and surgeons; 25 questionnaires were returned because they could not be delivered. OUTCOME MEASURES: Physicians' opinions about (a) the morality of active euthanasia, (b) changes in the law to permit active euthanasia and (c) the practice of legalized euthanasia. RESULTS: Of the 1121 physicians sent a follow-up questionnaire 866 (77%) returned it completed. The responses of these same 866 physicians in 1991 provided a basis for comparison. Of the 866, 360 (42%) stated in the 1994 survey that it is sometimes right to practise active euthanasia; a similar proportion (384 [44%]) gave this response in 1991. However, other opinions changed significantly. In 1991, 250 of the respondents (29%) indicated that they would practise active euthanasia if it were legalized, as compared with 128 (15%) in 1994 (p < 0.01). In 1991, 429 (50%) of the respondents thought that the law should be changed to permit active euthanasia, as compared with 316 (37%) in 1994 (p < 0.01). Religious activity was the most important characteristic associated with changes in opinion. Despite the decrease in support for the practice and legalization of active euthanasia between 1991 and 1994, in both surveys at least 70% of those who responded to this question indicated that active euthanasia, if it were legalized, should be performed only by physicians and should be taught at medical sites. CONCLUSION

  9. [Ataxia telangiectasia. Diagnosis and follow-up in 4 cases].

    PubMed

    Monterrubio Ledezma, César Eduardo; Corona Rivera, Alfredo; Corona Rivera, Jorge Román; Rodríguez Casillas, Lourdes Jocelyn; Hernández Rocha, Juan; Barros Nuñez, Patricio; Bobadilla Morales, Lucina

    2013-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (AT) is a chromosomal instability syndrome with autosomal recessive inheritance, it is caused by more than 500 mutations of the ATM gene, which is involved in the cellular response to DNA damage. The diagnosis becomes difficult due to the evolution of the disease, their poor knowledge, and limited access to diagnostic tests. Chromosomal damage induced by ionizing radiation (IR) assay is still a sensitive method for early diagnosis, and it is essential for better management and genetic counseling. This paper shows diagnosis and follow-up in four cases with AT.

  10. Klenot Project - Near Earth Objects Follow-Up Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichý, Miloš; Tichá, Jana; Kočer, Michal

    2016-01-01

    NEO research is a great challenge just now - for science, for exploration and for planetary defence. Therefore NEO discoveries, astrometric follow-up, orbit computations as well as physical studies are of high interest both to science community and humankind. The KLENOT Project of the Klet Observatory, South Bohemia, Czech Republic pursued the confirmation, early follow-up, long-arc follow-up and recovery of Near Earth Objects since 2002. Tens of thousands astrometric measurements helped to make inventory of NEOs as well as to understand the NEO population. It ranked among the world most prolific professional NEO follow-up programmes during its first phase from 2002 to 2008. The fundamental improvement of the 1.06-m KLENOT Telescope was started in autumn 2008. The new computer controlled paralactic mount was built to substantially increase telescope-time efficiency, the number of observations, their accuracy and limiting magnitude. The testing observations of the KLENOT Telescope Next Generation (NG) were started in October 2011. The new more efficient CCD camera FLI ProLine 230 was installed in summer 2013. The original Klet Software Package has been continually upgraded over the past two decades of operation. Along with huge hardware changes we have decided for essential changes in software and the whole KLENOT work-flow. Using the current higher computing power available, enhancing and updating our databases and astrometry program, the core of our software package, will prove highly beneficial. Moreover, the UCAC4 as the more precise astrometric star catalog was implemented. The modernized KLENOT System was put into full operation in September 2013. This step opens new possibilities for the KLENOT Project, the long-term European Contribution to Monitoring and Cataloging Near Earth Objects. KLENOT Project Goals are confirmatory observations of newly discovered fainter NEO candidates, early follow-up of newly discovered NEOs, long-arc follow-up astrometry of NEOs

  11. MAXI J1305-704: Swift follow-up observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennea, J. A.; Altamirano, D.; Evans, P. A.; Krimm, H. A.; Romano, P.; Mangano, V.; Curran, P.; Yamaoka, K.; Negoro, H.

    2012-04-01

    We present analysis of Swift follow-up observations of MAXI J1305-704 (Sato et al., ATEL #4024), which has been proposed to be a newly discovered Galactic black-hole binary (BHB; Greiner et al., ATEL #4030). Starting 16:07UT on April 11th, 2012, Swift observed MAXI J1305-704 for 1ks as a Target of Opportunity, with the Swift/XRT in Windowed Timing (WT) mode, to avoid pile-up. This follows initial observations made by Swift in a 4-pointing Photon Counting (PC) mode tiling observation on April 10th, initial results of which have been reported by Greiner et al.

  12. [Clinical and sperm follow-up after subinguinal varicocelectomy].

    PubMed

    Vicari, E; Arancio, A; Costanzo, C; Ingrassia, G; Cannizzaro, M A

    2000-06-01

    In order to evaluate the sperm output and the adverse-side-effects after subinguinal varicoceloctomy, a follow-up study of 16 months was performed on 196 selected patients (aged from 22 to 43 years) affected by left varicocele (VR). In the pre-treatment, both Doppler ultrasonography and didymo-epididymal ultrasonography allowed to distinguish two homogeneous patient groups: group A (no. = 136), including patients affected by VR alone and, group B (n. = 60), including patients with VR combined to coincidental didymo-epididymal morphological abnormalities, DEMA). These DEMA lesions (testis size < 12 ml, epididymides abnormalities: increased head- > or = 12 mm- and/or tail- > or = 6 mm-diameter, multiple microcysts, large idrocele) were omolaterally to VR in 30/60 (50%), eterolaterally in 19/60 (31.7%) or bilaterally in 11/60 (18.3%). During sperm follow-up, group A patients showed both a significant temporal change (p < 0.01 ANOVA) of all sperm parameters studied (sperm density, total sperm count, motility and morphology) from month 8 onward and sperm values significantly higher than found in group B patients. On the contrary, the sperm parameters of group B patients did not change significantly during the follow-up observations. As far as the varicocelectomy-mediated clinical symptoms, some patients complained early and transiently (on 1-2-4 weeks following varicocelectomy) the following symptoms: didymal pain (1.5%), didymo-epididymal pain (4.1%) and parasthesiaes on the anterior-medial side of the left thigh (4.1%) or scrotal (3.1%); only four patients (2%) complained permanent paresthesiaes on the anterior-medial side of the left thigh. Furthermore, the clinical follow-up also revealed a low rate of complications: persistent VR (3.6%), hydrocele (1.5%), intrascrotal venous ecstasies (6.1%), epididymitis (0.5%). Some morpho-structural abnormalities at US scans were transient (1-2 weeks): scrotal oedema (6.1%), orchitis (2%), orchi-epididymitis (1%). Subinguinal

  13. Shillapoo Wildlife Area 2007 Follow-up HEP Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-03-01

    In April and May 2007 the Regional HEP Team (RHT) conducted a follow-up HEP analysis on the Egger (612 acres) and Herzog (210 acres) parcels located at the north end of the Shillapoo Wildlife Area. The Egger and Herzog parcels have been managed with Bonneville Power Administration funds since acquired in 1998 and 2001 respectively. Slightly more than 936 habitat units (936.47) or 1.14 HUs per acre was generated as an outcome of the 2007 follow-up HEP surveys. Results included 1.65 black-capped chickadee HUs, 280.57 great blue heron HUs, 581.45 Canada goose HUs, 40 mallard HUs, and 32.80 mink HUs. Introduction A follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) (USFWS 1980) analysis was conducted by the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's (CBFWA) Regional HEP Team (RHT) during April and May 2007 to document changes in habitat quality and to determine the number of habitat units (HUs) to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing operation and maintenance (O&M) funds since WDFW acquired the parcels. The 2007 follow-up HEP evaluation was limited to Shillapoo Wildlife Area (SWA) parcels purchased with Bonneville Power Administration funds. D. Budd (pers. comm.) reported WDFW purchased the 612 acre Egger Farms parcel on November 2, 1998 for $1,737,0001 and the 210 acre Herzog acquisition on June 21, 2001 for $500,000 with Memorandum of Agreement funds (BPA and WDFW 1996) as partial fulfillment of BPA's wildlife mitigation obligation for construction of Bonneville and John Day Dams (Rasmussen and Wright 1989). Anticipating the eventual acquisition of the Egger and Herzog properties, WDFW conducted HEP surveys on these lands in 1994 to determine the potential number of habitat units to be credited to BPA. As a result, HEP surveys and habitat unit calculations were completed as much as seven years prior to acquiring the sites. The term 'Shillapoo Wildlife Area' will be used to describe only the Herzog and Egger parcels in this document. Details and

  14. Root Resorption a 6-Year Follow-up Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Caroline; Closs, Luciane; Barletta, Fernando; Reston, Eduardo; Tovo, Maximiano F; Lambert, Paula

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the clinical course of a pediatric patient developing cervical external root resorption (CERR). An 11-year old male patient had sustained dental trauma and was diagnosed with crown fracture affecting the incisal and middle thirds of the maxillary right permanent central incisor and the maxillary right permanent lateral incisor with pulp exposure and CERR after 24 months. Diagnosis and treatment of CERR are a challenge for dental practitioners. In this case, preservation of natural dentition is shown as a successful treatment in a 6-year follow-up. PMID:25870717

  15. Follow-up of 13 children after ureterosigmoidostomy.

    PubMed Central

    Bakker, N J; van Damme, K J; de Voogt, H J

    1976-01-01

    Follow-up of 13 children who had had a ureterosigmoid anastomosis 3 1/2 to 10 years previously and whose initial urogram had been satisfactory, showed that growth was normal and that there was no serious metabolic disorder. In particular whole-body potassium did not differ significantly from normal values (as given by Langham, 1961). Asymptomatic urinary infection is the chief hazard in these cases but is difficult to diagnose and may lead to progressive dilatation of the ureters. PMID:962364

  16. Follow-up study of small-for-dates babies.

    PubMed

    Fancourt, R; Campbell, S; Harvey, D; Norman, A P

    1976-06-12

    A group of small-for-dates full-term babies whose intra-uterine growth was followed by serial ultrasonic cephalometry were examined at a mean age of 4 years. Those children whose skull growth had begun to slow in utero before 34 weeks' menstrual age were more likely to have a height and weight less than the 10th centile. When the onset of growth failure had occurred before 26 weeks there was a lower developmental quotient at follow-up using the Griffiths extended scales. Prolonged slow growth in utero therefore seems to be followed by slow growth and development after birth.

  17. [Rounded atelectasis: a follow up of 10 years by CT].

    PubMed

    Bruyère, P J; Bartsch, P; Ghaye, B

    2005-10-01

    We report the case of a 69-year-old man who presented with a rounded atelectasis (RA). During a 10-year follow-up by Computed Tomography (CT), the lobe showed a progressive shrinkage, and a moderate increase in size of the lesion led to a percutaneous biopsy which confirmed the diagnosis. RA is an unusual form of lung consolidation. The major cause of RA is asbestosis. RA is usually asymptomatic and may simulate a pulmonary neoplasm on chest Xray. The diagnosis is made by CT, demonstrating the pathognomonic "comet tail sign". No treatment is required.

  18. Adolescent suicide risk screening: the effect of communication about type of follow-up on adolescents' screening responses.

    PubMed

    King, Cheryl A; Hill, Ryan M; Wynne, Henry A; Cunningham, Rebecca M

    2012-01-01

    This experimental study examined the effect of communication about type of screening follow-up (in-person follow-up vs. no in-person follow-up) on adolescents' responses to a self-report suicide risk screen. Participants were 245 adolescents (131 girls, 114 boys; ages 13-17; 80% White, 21.6% Black, 9.8% American Indian, 2.9% Asian) seeking medical emergency services. They were randomized to a screening follow-up condition. Screening measures assessed primary risk factors for suicidal behavior, including suicidal thoughts, depressive symptoms, alcohol use, and aggressive/delinquent behavior. There was no main effect of follow-up condition on adolescents' screening scores; however, significant interactions between follow-up condition and public assistance status were evident. Adolescents whose families received public assistance were less likely to report aggressive-delinquent behavior if assigned to in-person follow-up. Adolescents whose families did not receive public assistance reported significantly higher levels of suicidal ideation if assigned to in-person follow-up. Findings suggest that response biases impact some adolescents' responses to suicide risk screenings. Because national policy strongly recommends suicide risk screening in emergency settings, and because screening scores are used to make critical decisions regarding risk management and treatment recommendations, findings indicate the importance of improving the reliability and validity of suicide risk screening for adolescents.

  19. Dr. Leary's Concord Prison Experiment: a 34-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Doblin, R

    1998-01-01

    This study is a long-term follow-up to the Concord Prison Experiment, one of the best-known studies in the psychedelic psychotherapy literature. The Concord Prison Experiment was conducted from 1961 to 1963 by a team of researchers at Harvard University under the direction of Timothy Leary. The original study involved the administration of psilocybin-assisted group psychotherapy to 32 prisoners in an effort to reduce recidivism rates. This follow-up study involved a search through the state and federal criminal justice system records of 21 of the original 32 subjects, as well as personal interviews with two of the subjects and three of the researchers: Timothy Leary, Ralph Metzner and Gunther Weil. The results of the follow-up study indicate that published claims of a treatment effect were erroneous. This follow-up study supports the emphasis in the original reports on the necessity of embedding psilocybin-assisted psychotherapy with inmates within a comprehensive treatment plan that includes post-release, nondrug group support programs. Despite substantial efforts by the experimental team to provide post-release support, these services were not made sufficiently available to the subjects in this study. Whether a new program of psilocybin-assisted group psychotherapy and post-release programs would significantly reduce recidivism rates is an empirical question that deserves to be addressed within the context of a new experiment.

  20. Follow-up of tibialis posterior transfer surgery (TPT) for drop-foot in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Yutaka; Lwin, Saw; Myint, Kyaw

    2007-09-01

    Prevention of Disability (POD) service needs to be expanded for future reducing the leprosy burden. Tibialis Posterior Transfer Surgery (TPT) is an established procedure and relatively easy to do at district level general hospitals. It can protect further damages of affected foot and consequently reduce patient's social burden as well. Totally 70 TPT surgeries were done during a joint project of JICA on leprosy control and basic health service in Myanmar for training purpose (Jan/2002-Jan/2006). A follow-up assessment was done for exploring the effectiveness of foot drop surgery, in Nov/2006 at 9-selected townships in Mid-Myanmar. 33 cases (Male 22, Female 11) were reviewed and the mean of follow up period was 29.1 months (SD=7.1, 10-48 months). Total results were; good: 25 cases (76%), fair: 4 cases (12%) and poor: 4 cases (12%). In good and fair cases, patients were satisfied with the results and TPT improved the QOL of patients. In almost all cases (32/33, 97%) after TPT, patients are free from plantar ulcer. Most serious complication of operation (4 cases, 12%) identified was inversion deformity due to loosed tension of lateral tail of grafted TP tendon sutured to Extensor Digitorum Longus. From the results of TPT surgery follow-up, it can benefit much to the patients if resources permit to make it as a routine service in more places.

  1. [Follow-up ultrasound of head and neck cancer].

    PubMed

    Künzel, J; Bozzato, A; Strieth, S

    2017-09-13

    In Germany high-resolution sonography using the color duplex mode in addition to computed tomography (CT) is a well-established and proven method in the context of restaging after primary therapy of head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC). There are no international evidence-based restaging guidelines. Decisions concerning neck dissection (ND) after primary radiochemotherapy (RCT) are often individually derived in the respective tumor conferences and are therefore subject to variance. Compared to the UK or USA, in Germany there is a high level of expertise in the use of ultrasound in combination with CT for the routine restaging of HNSCC after RCT. Using high-resolution sonography (B-mode and color duplex) morphological changes in neck lymph nodes can be clearly detected. Another important aspect in the field of sonographic follow-up is the accurate and standardized documentation of findings and control of dynamic changes during follow-up. In summary, clinical presentation and sonography enable therapeutic decisions and treatment from one source.

  2. Long-term follow-up of atomic bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Ritsu; Grant, Eric J; Ozasa, Kotaro

    2012-06-01

    The Life Span Study (LSS) is a follow-up study of atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors to investigate the radiation effects on human health and has collected data for over 60 years. The LSS cohort consists of 93,741 A-bomb survivors and another 26,580 age and sex-matched subjects who were not in either city at the time of the bombing. Radiation doses have been computed based on individual location and shielding status at the time of the bombings. Age at death and cause of death are gathered through the Japanese national family registry system and cancer incidence data have been collected through the Hiroshima and Nagasaki cancer registries. Noncancer disease incidence and health information are collected through biannual medical examinations among a subset of the LSS. Radiation significantly increases the risks of death (22% at 1 Gy), cancer incidence (47% at 1 Gy), death due to leukemia (310% at 1 Gy), as well as the incidence of several noncancer diseases (e.g. thyroid nodules, chronic liver disease and cirrhosis, uterine myoma, and hypertension). Significant effects on maturity (e.g. growth reduction and early menopause) were also observed. Long-term follow-up studies of the A-bomb survivors have provided reliable information on health risks for the survivors and form the basis for radiation protection standards for workers and the public. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The LCOGT near-Earth-object follow-up network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, T.

    2014-07-01

    Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope (LCOGT) network is a planned homogeneous network that will eventually consist of over 35 telescopes at 6 locations in the northern and southern hemispheres [1]. This network is versatile and designed to respond rapidly to target of opportunity events and also to do long term monitoring of slowly changing astronomical phenomena. The global coverage of the network and the apertures of telescope available make the LCOGT network ideal for follow-up and characterization of a wide range of solar-system objects (e.g. asteroids, Kuiper-belt objects, comets) and in particular near-Earth objects (NEOs). There are 3 classes to the telescope resources: 2-meter aperture, 1-meter aperture and 0.4-meter aperture. We have been operating our two 2-meter telescopes since 2005 and began a specific program of NEO follow-up for the Pan-STARRS survey in October 2010. The combination of all-sky access, large aperture, rapid response, robotic operation and good site conditions allows us to provide time-critical follow-up astrometry and photometry on newly discovered objects and faint objects as they recede from the Earth, allowing the orbital arc to be extended and preventing loss of objects. These telescope resources have greatly increased as LCOGT has completed the first phase of the deployment, designated as ''Version 1.0'', with the installation, commissioning and ongoing operation of nine 1-meter telescopes. These are distributed among four sites with one 1-meter at McDonald Observatory (Texas), three telescopes at Cerro Tololo (Chile), three telescopes at SAAO (South Africa) and the final two telescope at Siding Spring Observatory (Australia). In addition to the 1-meter network, the scheduling and control system for the two 2-meter telescopes have been upgraded and unified with that of the 1-meter network to provide a coherent robotic telescopic network. The telescope network is now operating and observations are being executed remotely and

  4. A 3-year follow-up of hypertension in Delhi.

    PubMed Central

    Gopinath, N.; Chadha, S. L.; Shekhawat, S.; Tandon, R.

    1994-01-01

    A follow-up study of hypertension was carried out among adults in Delhi 3 years after an initial community-based epidemiological survey of the same population. The treatment and the severity status of 1115 out of 1749 individuals with hypertension detected in the initial survey were compared with those observed in the follow-up. The proportion of treated cases with controlled blood pressure rose from 10.8% to 60.8%. Among the cohort of 3611 subjects aged 25-64 years who were normotensive in the initial survey, 132 new cases of hypertension, were detected. The annual incidence of hypertension was the same in men and women (12.2 per 1000). Diabetes and regular alcohol consumption were significant risk factors for hypertension, being present in 13 and 7 cases, respectively. Electrocardiograms (ECGs) were recorded for 871 of the 1115 cases of hypertension. Abnormal ECGs were exhibited by 307 cases (35.2%), of which 24 (2.7%) had had myocardial infarction, 133 (15.3%) had ischaemic ST-T changes, 54 (6.2%) had left ventricular hypertrophy, and 96 (11.0%) had conduction defects and arrhythmias. PMID:7955019

  5. Ablative radioiodine therapy for hyperthyroidism: long term follow up study.

    PubMed Central

    Kendall-Taylor, P; Keir, M J; Ross, W M

    1984-01-01

    A total of 225 patients were treated for hyperthyroidism with 555 MBq (15 mCi) radioiodine to ablate the thyroid and induce early hypothyroidism. The efficacy of this treatment in eradicating hyperthyroidism and problems of follow up were assessed one to six years later from case records and questionnaires. Information was received from 197 out of 219 live patients (90%) and from 160 doctors concerning 207 patients (92%). Only three patients were not traced and six had died since treatment. The modal time to hypothyroidism was three months, and 64% of patients were hypothyroid at one year; 5.6% had failed to become euthyroid within one year. Ninety five per cent of patients had been seen by the doctor and 82% had had a thyroid test done within the past two years. Most doctors preferred patients to be returned to their care once thyroxine treatment was stabilised. An ablative dose of 131I is recommended as an effective means of treatment which has clear advantages over conventional methods. Good communications and effective follow up should ensure success. PMID:6432100

  6. Gastric and Duodenal Stents: Follow-Up and Complications

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto Pabon, Isabel Teresa; Paul Diaz, Laura; Ruiz de Adana, Juan Carlos; Lopez Herrero, Julio

    2001-05-15

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of self-expanding metallic stents in treating inoperable gastric and duodenal stenoses during follow-up and to evaluate the complications encountered.Methods: A total of 31 patients suffering from gastroduodenal obstruction (29 malignant, 2 benign) were treated with a self-expanding metallic stent (Wallstent). In 24 cases insertion was by the peroral route, in seven cases via gastrostomy.Results: All the strictures were successfully negotiated under fluoroscopic guidance without having to resort to endoscopy. A total of 27 patients (87%) were able to resume a regular diet, a soft diet, or a liquid diet orally. Complications included one case of stent malpositioning, one case of leakage of ascitic fluid through the gastrostomy orifice, one case of perforation and fistula to the biliary tree, and two cases of hematemesis. In two patients (6%) additional stents were implanted to improve patency. In all patients follow-up was maintained until death. Recurrence of symptoms immediately before death occurred in seven cases (23%). Mean survival time of patients was 13.3 weeks (SE {+-} 4.6).Conclusions: The deployment of gastroduodenal stents resulted in good palliation of inoperable gastric and duodenal stenoses. Certain technical aspects, e.g., adaptation of stents to bowel morphology, is critical to proper stent function and avoidance of complications.

  7. Endometrial cancer. Prevention, detection, management, and follow up.

    PubMed Central

    Elit, L.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review risk factors for uterine cancer; to discuss strategies for detecting uterine cancer; to outline prognostic factors and treatment; and to review the role of follow up for patients who have completed primary therapy. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: MEDLINE was searched from January 1996 to June 1998 using the terms endometrial neoplasms, estrogen replacement therapy, hormone replacement therapy, tamoxifen, and screening. Only English language articles were reviewed. Study types included reviews. Bibliographies of articles found were searched for further relevant titles. Causation literature is available from well conducted cohort trials. Treatment recommendations are based in part on prognostic information and a few randomized controlled trials. MAIN MESSAGE: Risk factors, both intrinsic and extrinsic, are associated with uterine cancer. Family physicians have a role in preventing disease by ensuring that all women with uteri in situ using hormone replacement therapy (HRT) have progesterone therapy as part of the HRT regimen. Detection is crucial; abnormal uterine bleeding or undiagnosed postmenopausal bleeding warrants investigation with endometrial biopsy. The goal of surgery is to remove the uterus and ovaries and identify factors that make the disease at high risk of recurrence. Although adjuvant radiation therapy does not prolong survival, it does alter the pattern of disease recurrence. The goal of follow up after primary therapy is to identify recurrent disease while it is still curable. CONCLUSIONS: Family physicians play an important role in preventing uterine cancer, initiating early diagnosis of disease, and in the future, might be more actively involved in caring for patients following primary therapy. PMID:10790821

  8. Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy: a long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Faunø, P; Nielsen, A B

    1992-01-01

    A follow-up study was conducted to clarify the clinical and radiological long-term consequences of arthroscopic meniscus resection. One hundred thirty-six patients who had unilateral arthroscopic resection of an isolated meniscal tear attended for an interview and a physical and radiological examination. Follow-up averaged 8.5 years, with a range of 7.9-11.6 years. The reoperation rate was as high as 22.8%, but was the lowest in the bucket handle tear group (13%). Pain after exercise was less frequent among patients treated for a bucket handle tear compared to other lesions. Fifty-three percent of the patients had at least one of the Fairbanks change in the operated knee and only 22% in the control knees. The radiographic result was not influenced by the type of meniscus lesion nor were high age or intraoperatively described cartilage damage factors of significance. Malalignment less than 4 degrees of valgus and greater than 10 degrees of valgus was found to be a significant risk factor for the development of degenerative changes following meniscus resection.

  9. Results and implications of the INCAP follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Martorell, R

    1995-04-01

    This article is a critical synthesis of 12 papers included in this supplement. The set deals with the short- and long-term effects of improving nutrition in Guatemalan villages characterized by deficient diets, high rates of infection and pronounced growth retardation in the first 3 y of life. The data reviewed come from two studies carried out over two decades: the Institute of Nutrition of Central America and Panama (INCAP) longitudinal study (1966-1977) and its follow-up (1988-1989). The longitudinal study included a nutrition intervention that improved the energy and nutrient intakes of women and preschool children. Its effects included improved birthweights, reduced infant mortality rates and improved growth rates in children < 3 y of age. Growth rates from 3 to 7 y of age, similar to those of well-nourished children, were not affected by the intervention. The follow-up study was conducted when the subjects were 11-27 y old. Among the long-term effects found were greater stature and fat-free mass, particularly in females, improved work capacity in males and enhanced intellectual performance in both genders. The nutrition intervention did not, on the other hand, accelerate maturation during adolescence, as measured by skeletal age or age at menarche. It is concluded that improved nutrition in early childhood has important long-term effects in the adolescent and adult.

  10. [Long-term follow-up of osteochondritis dissecans].

    PubMed

    Gudas, Rimtautas; Kunigiskis, Giedrius; Kalesinskas, Romas Jonas

    2002-01-01

    Fifty-two patients with osteochondritis dissecans lesions were evaluated after 7-25 years after excision of a partially detached (grade III) fragment or loose (grade IV) fragment from the medial femoral condyles. Average follow-up time was 17.2 (range 7-25 years). Two homogenic groups based on special inclusion criteria were formed; 31 patient was in the first and 21--in the second group. The only difference between the groups was the age; the age average in the first group was--25.6 years (range 15-35 years), and -45.2 years (range 35-55 years) in the second group. Patients were evaluated through ICRS (International Cartilage Repair Society), modified HSS and KOOS (Knee injury and osteoarthritis Outcome score) scales, and with X-rays. Evaluation with the ICRS, modified HSS and KOOS rating scales for osteochondritis dissecans revealed in 9 cases (17%) good results, 32 cases (62%)--fair, and 11 cases (21%)--failure results. Final ICRS and modified HSS evaluation showed statistically significantly better results in the younger patient group at the 21 years (p < 0.04). At an average 17.2 year follow-up X-rays and KOOS evaluation form showed initial and second-degree (according to Ahlbäck) osteoarthritis signs in the knees. The long-term results of the natural history of osteochondritis dissecans are extremely poor. Consequently, we recommend autologous osteochondral grafting for the replacement of the osteochondritis dissecans defects in the knee joint.

  11. Serial extraction: 20 years of follow-up

    PubMed Central

    de ALMEIDA, Renato Rodrigues; de ALMEIDA, Marcio Rodrigues; OLTRAMARI-NAVARRO, Paula Vanessa Pedron; CONTI, Ana Cláudia de Castro Ferreira; NAVARRO, Ricardo de Lima; de SOUZA, Karen Regina Siqueira

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports a case treated by a serial extraction program at the mixed dentition stage followed by a corrective orthodontic treatment, with a long-term follow-up period. Twenty years after the interceptive treatment, a harmonious face was observed along with treatment stability in the anterior posterior direction, deep overbite (which has been mentioned as a disadvantage of the serial extraction program), and a small relapse of anterior tooth crowding. All these conditions have been regarded as normal occurrences for most orthodontic treatments with a long-term follow-up period. This case report demonstrated that the establishment of a serial extraction protocol determined relevant esthetic changes that afforded an improvement of the patient's self-esteem, with a positive social impact. Furthermore, the low cost of this protocol permits the use of this therapy with underprivileged populations. It is important to emphasize that an early correction of tooth crowding by this protocol does not guarantee stability, but small relapses do not invalidate its accomplishment. PMID:23032213

  12. Nonautistic motor stereotypies: clinical features and longitudinal follow-up.

    PubMed

    Harris, Kendra M; Mahone, E Mark; Singer, Harvey S

    2008-04-01

    To characterize further the clinical features and long-term outcomes among children with motor stereotypies who do not manifest mental retardation or pervasive developmental disorders, a review of clinical records and semistructured telephone interviews were undertaken. The identified clinical cohort consisted of 100 typically developing children with motor stereotypies. The mean length of follow-up was 6.8 +/- 4.6 years. At most recent follow-up, movements had continued in 94% of the sample (62% for >5 years). Only six children reported complete cessation of movements, with four (3 of 4 with head nodding) doing so >1 year after their initial diagnosis. Thus the course of motor stereotypies, especially in children with arm/hand movements, appears chronic. Nearly half the children in this cohort exhibit other comorbidities, including attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder (30%), tics (18%), and obsessive-compulsive behaviors/obsessive-compulsive disorder (10%). Twenty-five percent of children with motor stereotypies reported positive family histories of motor stereotypies, suggesting an underlying genetic abnormality. Finally, evidence is emerging that the clinical course of children who exhibit head nodding may differ from those whose motor stereotypy predominantly involves the hands and arms.

  13. Wartenberg's migrant sensory neuritis: a prospective follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Stork, Abraham C J; van der Meulen, Marjon F G; van der Pol, W-Ludo; Vrancken, Alexander F J E; Franssen, Hessel; Notermans, Nicolette C

    2010-08-01

    Migrant sensory neuropathy (Wartenberg's migrant sensory neuritis) is characterized by sudden numbness in the distribution of one or multiple cutaneous nerves. To study disease course and outcome, we prospectively followed 12 patients who presented to our tertiary referral neuromuscular outpatient clinic between January 2003 and January 2004. Medical history, neurological, laboratory and electrophysiological examinations were obtained from all patients. All patients were reviewed a second time in 2007, and five had a follow-up electrophysiological examination. At the first visit, 50% described an episode of stretching preceding the sensory complaints. All but three described pain in the affected area before or concomitant with sensory loss. At clinical examination a median of six skin areas were affected, and in 75% this could be confirmed by nerve conduction studies in at least one nerve. Forty-two percent had involvement of the trigeminal nerve. After a mean disease duration of 7.5 years, three patients reported a complete disappearance of sensory complaints and five that the pain had disappeared, but numbness remained. Three patients still had both painful and numb sensory deficits. One patient developed a distal symmetric sensory polyneuropathy. In conclusion, Wartenberg's sensory neuritis is a distinct, exclusively sensory, neuropathy, marked by pain preceding numbness in affected nerves. An episode of stretching preceding pain is not necessary for the diagnosis. Wartenberg's sensory neuritis often retains its spotty, exclusively sensory characteristics after long term follow-up.

  14. Tuberculosis of the knee -- a long term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Chow, S P; Yau, A

    1980-01-01

    Thirty cases of tuberculosis of the knee followed up for an average of 15 years were reviewed. The majority of patients developed the disease during childhood. All had received standard anti-tuberculous drug treatment. Fifteen were treated conservatively alone, while the other 15 had a debridement type of surgery in addition to drugs. At review, one-third had occasional mild pain, but this was only present in the conservatively treated group. Stiffness, however, was more predominant in the operated and in the late onset groups. Some mild deformity was seen in 17 out of 30 patients and was related not so much to disturbance of epiphyseal growth, but rather, to bone collapse. Interesting X-ray appearances at follow-up were found. The factors which could lead to a good outcome included young age of onset, treatment within six months of onset, and early mobilisation. If the disease is well advanced, surgical treatment will lead to a painless joint, but with greater restriction of joint movement.

  15. Improving pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Dykes, Dana; Williams, Elizabeth; Margolis, Peter; Ruschman, Jennifer; Bick, Julianne; Saeed, Shehzad; Opipari, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Standardization of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) care through participation in the ImproveCareNow (ICN) Network has improved outcomes for pediatric patients with IBD, but under the current care model, our improvements have plateaued. Current ICN model care guidelines recommend health supervision visits every six months. We identified a gap in our practice's ability to ensure either a routine six month follow-up or a rapid follow-up after a disease flare, and a significant number of patients with active disease status during a six month period lacked timely reassessment after interventions or medication changes. Telemedicine provides an alternative method of care delivery to address these gaps, but has had limited use in patients with IBD. A multi-step approach to offer alternative follow-up care options via telemedicine was developed with potential impact on remission rates and quality of life. Short term goals of the pilot were to improve telemedicine access for patients with IBD were to 1) increase the percent of patients with active disease with a follow-up completed within two months of a visit from 40% to 70%, 2) increase the percent of patients with a visit scheduled within two months of their last sick visit from 20% to 70% (interim measure), 3) increase the number of eVisits from zero visits per month to two visits per month during pilot phase, 4) increase electronic communication with patients from zero messages per month to 200 messages per month, 5) no change in complications or adverse events (defined as an unplanned visit or ED (emergency department) encounter within 30 days of an eVisit. The expected outcomes of the e-visit model were to: maintain baseline care standards and health screening capabilities, improve access to care, and provide equivalent care delivery (no increase in the number of unplanned clinical encounters). Using the IHI model for improvement (Plan-Do-Study-Act) we have seen a progressive increase in the rate of patient signups

  16. [Cannabis cessation interventions offered to young French users: predictors of follow-up].

    PubMed

    Abdoul, H; Le Faou, A-L; Bouchez, J; Touzeau, D; Lagrue, G

    2012-04-01

    Cannabis use is very problematic among young French people, because of the young age of first consumption and its health consequences. Indeed, the average age of cannabis experimentation is about 15 in France and 49.5% of 17 year-olds report having used cannabis in their lives. To prevent this problem, tobacco and cannabis cessation services are dedicated to handle patients who want to stop tobacco and/or cannabis. Moreover, in 2004, specific medical outpatient services have been implemented to address the problem of young cannabis users. Since their establishment, some studies have reported demographic and clinical characteristics of the patients attending these services, but we still lack data on their follow-up and their medical and psychological care. The aim of this study is to describe the clinical and psychiatric characteristics of young patients referred to tobacco/cannabis cessation consultations or specific young cannabis users' consultations and to evaluate their medical care and monitoring. We designed a retrospective study in seven cessation clinics in the Paris area between 2005 and 2007. Eligible patients were regular cannabis users aged under 40. An electronic medical database was completed using patients' medical records. Medical files reported demographic and clinical data. Psychiatric disorders were assessed using the HAD and the Beck scores. Nicotine dependence was evaluated by Fagerström's score. The history of addictions, and data about consumption of cannabis, tobacco, alcohol and other drugs were recorded in the medical file. The follow-up of patients was defined by having at least two visits at the medical outpatient services. Tobacco and cannabis cessations were assessed at one-month follow-up. Univariate and multivariate logistic models were used to assess factors associated with patients' follow up and monitoring. Four cessation clinics accepted to participate in our study. One hundred and eight eligible patients were listed during the

  17. The functional outcome and recovery of patients admitted to an intensive care unit following drug overdose: a follow-up study.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, B P; Murphy, D; Conrick-Martin, I; Marsh, B

    2009-09-01

    Patients who have overdosed on drugs commonly present to emergency departments, with only the most severe cases requiring intensive care unit (ICU) admission. Such patients typically survive hospitalisation. We studied their longer term functional outcomes and recovery patterns which have not been well described. All patients admitted to the 18-bed ICU of a university-affiliated teaching hospital following drug overdoses between 1 January 2004 and 31 December 2006 were identified. With ethical approval, we evaluated the functional outcome and recovery patterns of the surviving patients 31 months after presentation, by telephone or personal interview. These were recorded as Glasgow outcome score, Karnofsky performance index and present work status. During the three years studied, 43 patients were identified as being admitted to our ICU because of an overdose. The average age was 34 years, 72% were male and the mean APACHE II score was 16.7. Of these, 32 were discharged from hospital alive. Follow-up data was attained on all of them. At a median of 31 months follow-up, a further eight had died. Of the 24 surviving there were 13 unemployed, seven employed and four in custody. The median Glasgow outcome score of survivors was 4.5, their Karnofsky score 80. Admission to ICU for treatment of overdose is associated with a very high risk of death in both the short- and long-term. While excellent functional recovery is achievable, 16% of survivors were held in custody and 54% unemployed.

  18. Predictors of Symptoms of Posttraumatic Stress and Depression in Family Members After Patient Death in the ICU

    PubMed Central

    Gries, Cynthia J.; Engelberg, Ruth A.; Kross, Erin K.; Zatzick, Doug; Nielsen, Elizabeth L.; Downey, Lois

    2010-01-01

    Background: Patients’ deaths in the ICU have been associated with a high burden of psychologic symptoms in families. This study identifies characteristics associated with psychologic symptoms in family members. Methods: Families of patients dying in the ICU or within 30 h of ICU discharge in 11 hospitals previously participated in a randomized trial. In the current study, we assessed these families for symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression with follow-up surveys. Outcomes included validated measures of PTSD (PTSD Checklist) and depressive (Patient Health Questionnaire) symptoms. Predictors included family member mental-health history, involvement in decision making, and demographics. Results: Surveys were completed by 226 families. Response rate was 46% in the original randomized trial and 82% in this study. Prevalence (95% CI) of PTSD and depressive symptoms were 14.0% (9.7%-19.3%) and 18.4% (13.5%-24.1%), respectively. Family characteristics associated with increased symptoms included: female gender (PTSD, P = .020; depression, P = .005), knowing the patient for a shorter duration (PTSD, P = .003; depression, P = .040), and discordance between family members’ preferences for decision making and their actual decision-making roles (PTSD, P = .005; depression, P = .049). Depressive symptoms were also associated with lower educational level (P = .002). Families with psychologic symptoms were more likely to report that access to a counselor (PTSD, P < .001; depression, P = .003) and information about spiritual services might have been helpful while the patient was in the ICU (PTSD, P = .024; depression, P = .029). Conclusions: Families demonstrated a high prevalence of psychologic symptoms after a death in the ICU. Characteristics associated with symptoms may help target interventions to reduce these symptoms. Trial registration: clinicaltrials.gov; Identifier: NCT00685893. PMID:19762549

  19. Long-term follow-up of DDD pacing mode.

    PubMed

    Ulman, Mateusz; Dębski, Maciej; Ząbek, Andrzej; Haberka, Kazimierz; Lelakowski, Jacek; Małecka, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the long-term survival of DDD pacing and identify the main reasons for its loss. The study group consisted of 496 patients in whom a DDD pacing system was implanted between October 1984 and March 2002 and who were followed up until July 2010. The follow-up period was 152.1 ± 35.5 months. The patients' mean age at the time of implantation was 59.5 ± 12.5 years, and 53.5% were male; 58% had sick sinus syndrome (SSS), 26% had atrioventricular block (AVB), 15% had both of these indications simultaneously, and 1% had other indications. The incidence of lead malfunction, progression to chronic atrial fibrillation (AF), and the rate of infective complications was analysed. During the follow-up, 369 patients remained in DDD mode stimulation. DDD mode survival rate at one, five, ten and 15 years was, respectively, 96%, 86%, 77% and 72%. The most common reason for reprogramming out of DDD mode was the development of permanent AF in 65 (13.1%) patients. The occurrence of chronic AF was associated with a prior history of paroxysmal AF (p = 0.0001), SSS (p = 0.0215), and older age at time of implantation (p = 0.0068) compared to patients who remained in sinus rhythm. Lead malfunction caused loss of DDD mode pacing in 56 (11.3%) patients. Atrial leads were damaged in 37 patients, ventricular in 12 patients, and both leads in seven patients. The subclavian vein puncture was correlated with the mechanical damage of the atrial lead (p = 0.02935) compared to cephalic vein access. At the moment of complication, the patients with a dysfunctional lead were significantly younger than those who progressed to chronic AF(p = 0.0019). Infective complications which caused temporary loss of DDD pacing were observed in six patients: five had pocket infection and one had lead-dependent infective endocarditis. 1. Effective DDD pacing from the originally implanted system was noted in a high percentage (72%) of patients in long-term observation (15 years

  20. Follow-up of adolescent oral contraceptive users.

    PubMed

    Delmore, T; Kalagian, W F; Loewen, I R

    1991-01-01

    Clients in birth control centers (St. Catharines, Niagara Falls, and Welland) in Ontario, Canada were profiled in 1989; factors affecting compliance with the use of oral contraceptives (OCs) were investigated. Compliance was assessed for those 16 years and after 3 months of OC use. A control group and 2 study groups were randomly formed. 1 group was told about a follow up telephone call if the 3-month checkup appointment was not kept and the other not told. Compliance was determined by keeping the follow-up appointment and taking the pill as directed. Self-administered questionnaires were obtained at the 1st appointment and the 2nd study group was interviewed at the 3-month appointment time. Of the 334 intake interviews, 28.4% were adolescents 16 years old. Information on birth control came most frequently from friends (78.7%; then high school classmates, 61.4% grade school classmates, 61.4%; and family, 38.0%). 94.3% had a boyfriend, primarily a steady one. 82.4% were sexually active before the Center visit. 21.3% had had sex when 15 years old. 9.2% of those sexually active had never used birth control. 85.2% of those using contraception had used a condom at least once, and 33.9% used withdrawal. In the preceding month, birth control was used 60% of the time. 46% of mothers and 25% of fathers were considered supportive of birth control. 228 16 years participated in the compliance study. The 2 study groups and the control group were not significantly different in their compliance. The only statistically significant predictor of compliance (from the intake interview) was the previous use of the condom. Those more likely to be compliant were the 10.9% sexually active who had never used a condom. Continuing with the family doctor, not sexually active, advice to stop, side effects concerns, and remembering to take the pill were the most common reasons for noncompliance. The implication for health and sex education is that emphasis needs to the placed on the risks taken

  1. Proximal row carpectomy: minimum 20-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Wall, Lindley B; Didonna, Michael L; Kiefhaber, Thomas R; Stern, Peter J

    2013-08-01

    Proximal row carpectomy (PRC) is a motion-sparing procedure for degenerative disorders of the proximal carpal row. Reported results at a minimum 10-year follow-up consistently show maintenance of strength, motion, and satisfaction with an average conversion rate to radiocarpal arthrodesis of 12%. We hypothesized that PRC would continue to provide a high level of satisfaction and function at a minimum of 20 years. Seventeen wrists in 16 patients, including 7 laborers, underwent PRC for symptomatic degenerative disorders of the proximal carpal row at an average age of 36 years. Patients returned for radiographic and clinical evaluation, and the Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (QuickDASH) questionnaire and Patient-Related Wrist Evaluation were used for subjective assessment. Follow-up was a minimum of 20 years (average, 24 y). Eleven wrists (65%) underwent no further surgery at a minimum 20-year follow-up. The average time to failure of PRC, defined as the time from PRC to radiocarpal arthrodesis, was 11 years (range, 8 mo to 20 y). Ten of 11 patients who did not undergo radiocarpal arthrodesis continued to be satisfied, with minimal decrease in motion and grip strength compared with the uninvolved side. Average score for QuickDASH was 16 and for Patient-Related Wrist Evaluation was 26. The flexion-extension arc was 68°, and grip strength was 72% of the contralateral side. All patients returned to their original employment. There was no correlation between degenerative radiographic changes and satisfaction level. The predicted probability of failure revealed a higher risk in patients who underwent PRC at a younger age, which leveled off at age 40 years. PRC provides satisfaction at a minimum of 20 years with a survival rate of 65%. Whereas we recommend a minimum age for PRC between 35 and 40 years, young patients should not be excluded as PRC candidates; these patients should undergo appropriate preoperative counseling of their increased failure risk

  2. Lessons learned from a black and minority health fair's 15-month follow-up counseling.

    PubMed

    Seo, Dong-Chul

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the impact of community health fairs on participants' health knowledge, literacy, attitudes, or behaviors. Few health fairs have provided followup services for participants. To evaluate the short-term (baseline) and long-term (10-month follow-up) health effects of exposure to the Indiana Black and Minority Health Fair (BMHF) and to assess the impact of personalized 15-month follow-up health counseling sessions for the BMHF participants who agreed to the sessions. A prospective panel study design was utilized with a pre-post test in addition to a cross-sectional survey design. Although few behavioral changes were observed between the baseline and the precounseling 10-month follow-up, more people perceived themselves as overweight (68.1% vs 65.3%, p < .01) and fewer people watched TV/videos 4 hours or more on a usual weekday (25.6% vs 47.0%, p <.001) than 10 months before. After the 15-month follow-up health counseling sessions, the intervention group reported substantial and meaningful improvements in self-reported general health status, health status compared to 6 months earlier, percentage of overweight or obese people, choosing leaner meats over those higher in fat, snacking while watching TV or videos, and placing a high priority on exercise when planning a schedule. A follow-up component to the health fair is not only necessary but also in demand for improving health literacy and healthy outcomes for participants. Efforts should be made to transform health fair encounters from episodic experiences to long-term educational experiences that spur individuals to make the necessary changes to enhance their health.

  3. Rural Medicare Beneficiaries Have Fewer Follow-up Visits and Greater Emergency Department Use Postdischarge.

    PubMed

    Toth, Matthew; Holmes, Mark; Van Houtven, Courtney; Toles, Mark; Weinberger, Morris; Silberman, Pam

    2015-09-01

    Hospitals are focused on improving postdischarge services for older adults, such as early follow-up care after hospitalization to reduce readmissions and unnecessary emergency department (ED) use. Rural Medicare beneficiaries face many barriers to receiving quality care, but little is known about their postdischarge care and outcomes. We hypothesize that rural Medicare beneficiaries compared with urban beneficiaries, will have fewer follow-up visits, and a greater likelihood of readmission and ED use. We conducted a retrospective analysis of elderly Medicare beneficiaries discharged home using the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey, Cost and Use files, 2000-2010. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard models were used to assess the risk of rural residency on readmission, ED use, and follow-up care up to 30 days' postdischarge. Covariates include demographic, health, and hospital-level characteristics. Compared with urban beneficiaries, Medicare beneficiaries living in isolated rural settings had a lower rate of follow-up care [hazard ratio (HR)=0.81, P<0.001]. Beneficiaries in large and small rural settings had a greater risk of an ED visit compared with urban beneficiaries (HR=1.44, P<0.001; HR=1.52, P<0.01). Rural beneficiaries did not have a greater risk of readmission, though risk of readmission was higher for beneficiaries discharged from hospitals in large and small rural settings (HR=1.33, P<0.05; HR=1.42, P<0.05). This study provides evidence of lower quality postdischarge care for Medicare beneficiaries in rural settings. As readmission penalties expand, hospitals serving rural beneficiaries may be disproportionately affected. This suggests a need for policies that increase follow-up care in rural settings.

  4. Outpatient follow-up does not prevent emergency department utilization by trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Michael K; Fox, Nicole M; Porter, John M; Hazelton, Joshua P

    2017-10-01

    Although most trauma centers have a regularly scheduled trauma clinic, research demonstrates that trauma patients do not consistently attend follow-up appointments and often use the emergency department (ED) for outpatient care. A retrospective review of outpatient follow-up of adult patients admitted to the trauma service (January 2014-December 2014) at an urban level I trauma center was conducted (n = 2134). A total of 219 patients (10%) were evaluated in trauma clinic after discharge from the hospital. Twenty-one percent of patients seen in trauma clinic visited the ED within 30 d compared with 12% of those not seen in clinic (P < 0.001). A total of 104 patients were readmitted within 30 d of discharge; no difference existed in the rate of hospital readmission between patients seen in clinic and those not seen in clinic (P = 0.25). Stepwise logistic regression showed that clinic follow-up was not a significant predictor of decreased ED utilization (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.16 [95% confidence interval 0.78-1.72], P = 0.461) and also showed that while ED use was a significant predictor of readmission (adjusted OR 216 [93-500], P < 0.001), clinic visits were not (adjusted OR 0.74 [0.33-1.69], P = 0.48). Outpatient follow-up in the trauma clinic does not decrease ED utilization or hospital readmissions indicating that interventions aimed at improving access to a conventional outpatient clinic will not impact ED utilization rates. Further study is necessary to determine the best system for providing clinically appropriate and cost-effective outpatient follow-up for trauma patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Pulmonary radiofrequency ablation (Part 2): Procedure and follow-up.

    PubMed

    Plasencia Martínez, J M

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary radiofrequency ablation requires more than just interventional radiology skills. Patients must be selected carefully, and the acts that need to be done before, during, and after the procedure must be coordinated. To guarantee patient safety, radiologists need to know the variants of the technique, the precautions that must be taken, the complications that can occur, and the risks involved. Early differentiation between tumor tissue and normal changes secondary to treatment on imaging tests will make it possible to repeat the treatment without delays, and this will increase survival. This article describes how to coordinate and carry out pulmonary radiofrequency ablation, the complications of the technique, and the current evidence in follow-up. Copyright © 2014 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Endoscopic palliation for inoperable malignant dysphagia: long term follow up.

    PubMed Central

    Maunoury, V; Brunetaud, J M; Cochelard, D; Boniface, B; Cortot, A; Paris, J C

    1992-01-01

    This prospective non-randomised trial of 128 selected patients with unresectable oesophageal or gastrooesophageal junction cancers aims to evaluate the initial relief of malignant obstruction by means of bipolar electrocoagulation for both circumferential and submucosal strictures of Nd:YAG laser for the other patients. A limited dilatation was performed initially if a small calibre endoscope was unable to pass through the stricture. Prompt and significant relief of dysphagia without complications was achieved in 83% of patients. Improved patients were retreated monthly during the follow up period. Radiotherapy was recommended when possible. Symptomatic relief of obstruction lasted 4.2 months on average and 76% of patients remained palliated until death. Monthly retreatment using the most appropriate endoscopic procedure for the tumour configuration and radiotherapy after endoscopic relief of obstruction seems to give the best palliation for patients with unresectable cancers of the oesophagus or gastrooesophageal junction. PMID:1283144

  7. A New GRB follow-up Software at TUG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dindar, M.; Parmaksizoglu, M.; Helhel, S.; Esenoglu, H.; Kirbiyik, H.

    2016-12-01

    A gamma-ray burst (GRB) optical photometric follow-up system at TUBITAK (Scientic and Technological Research Council of Turkey) National Observatory (TUG) has been planned. It uses the 0.6 m Telescope (T60) and can automatically respond to GRB Coordinates Network (GCN) alerts. The telescopes slew relatively fast, being able to point to a new target field within 30 s upon a request. Whenever available, the 1 m T100 and 2.5 m RTT150 telescopes will be used in the future. As an example in 2015, the GRB software system (will be server side) at T60-telescope responded to GRB alert and started the observation as early as 129 s after the GRB trigger autonomously.

  8. Late follow-up of the Braunwald-Cutter valve.

    PubMed

    Jonas, R A; Garratt-Boyes, B G; Kerr, A R; Whitlock, R M

    1982-06-01

    A retrospective review has been made of 234 patients who received 239 Braunwald-Cutter valves (109 aortic, 130 mitral). For the aortic valve, the thromboembolic rate was very high (10.3 per 100 patient-years). This was associated with severe strut cloth wear in 94.5% of valves and with long strands of fibrin attached to the worn cloth in 58% of valves studied at reoperation or postmortem examination. The aortic poppet showed a mean decrease in volume of 4%, and poppet escape was recognized in 4 patients. The actuarial incidence of poppet escape was less than that predicted in earlier reports. There was a 4% incidence of stenosis of the valve. The hospital mortality associated with removal of the aortic Braunwald-Cutter valve and replacement with another device was 4%. Performance of the mitral Braunwald-Cutter valve appears satisfactory to date (mean follow-up, 42 months). Its electric removal is not recommended.

  9. Follow-up of children with early expressive phonology disorders.

    PubMed

    Lewis, B A; Freebairn, L A; Taylor, H G

    2000-01-01

    Fifty-two children identified at age 4 to 6 years as demonstrating a moderate to severe expressive phonology disorder were followed to the third and fourth grades. Children were classified into two groups based on the presence of an early phonology disorder in isolation (P) or the presence of a phonology disorder with other language problems (PL). At follow-up, articulation measures failed to differentiate the groups; however, the PL group performed more poorly than the P group on measures of phoneme awareness, language, reading decoding, reading comprehension, and spelling. The P group demonstrated poor spelling skills relative to their reading and language abilities, suggesting residual spelling weaknesses in these children. The PL group reported more nuclear family members with speech-language disorders and with reading disorders than the P group. Findings support previous research linking early language disorders with later reading difficulties.

  10. [Follow-up of tetralogy of Fallot after repair].

    PubMed

    Van Aerschot, Isabelle; Iserin, Laurence

    2011-01-01

    Repair of tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) exists for more than 40 years. This repair results in a pulmonary regurgitation, which is usually well tolerated for two decades or so, but eventually this is injurious for the right ventricle (RV). The RV enlargement and severe RV dysfunction increase risk for ventricular tachycardia (VT) and sudden death in the long-term. The pulmonary valve replacement (PVR) is shifting earlier to preserve RV function before patients develop symptoms. Several parameters have to be considered to facilate correct timing for PVR (surgically of by catheterization) : echocardiography, magnetic resonance imaging, electrocardiogram and cardiopulmonary exercise. All patients should have regular follow-up in a specialized grown-up congenital heart disease (GUCH) center to detect as soon as possible pathological signs of RV enlargement. Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) implantation for primary prevention and programmed ventricular stimulation in repaired TOF remain controversal.

  11. Long thoracic nerve palsy: a follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Goodman, C E; Kenrick, M M; Blum, M V

    1975-08-01

    Twelve patients who had previously been treated for palsy of the long thoracic nerve of Bell and resultant serratus anterior paralysis were examined in a follow-up study designed to determine their extent of recovery and/or residual disability. The patients' histories were reviewed, following which they were recalled for updating of the history and reexamination. It was found that those patients whose lesions were due to acute trauma had only partial or no recovery of serratus function, while those with infectious, toxic, allergic or idiopathic etiologies had partial or complete recovery. The occurrence of a prolonged interval between onset of symptoms and institution of therapy was found to adversely affect prognosis. Among those patients with no recovery of serratus anterior function, some were able to maintain relatively good active motion in the affected shoulder by substituting with the trapezius.

  12. Endobronchial valves for advanced emphysema: an endobronchial follow-up.

    PubMed

    Salcedo, Pablo S; Seijo, Luis M; Zulueta, Javier J

    2014-01-01

    Lung volume reduction surgery is a therapeutic option for selected patients with advanced emphysema. However, it is an invasive procedure benefitting only a selected group of patients with heterogeneous upper lobe predominant disease and limited exercise capacity. The most widely studied alternatives are endobronchial valves. Hundreds of patients worldwide have undergone endobronchial valve placement. Although short-term outcomes have been described, little is known about the long-term side effects following this treatment, and endoscopic follow-up is virtually nonexistent. The images, biopsies, and microbiologic evidence accrued from this patient are witnesses to the natural evolution of endobronchial valves in the airways and should offer a word of caution with regard to valve placement in patients with life expectancies exceeding those typical of severe chronic obstructive lung disease.

  13. A follow-up campaign for fast radio bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petroff, Emily; Possenti, Andrea; Johnston, Simon; Kramer, Michael; Bailes, Matthew; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah; van Straten, Willem; Keane, Evan; Champion, David; Jameson, Andrew; Ng, Cherry; Barr, Ewan; Flynn, Chris; Caleb, Manisha

    2014-04-01

    Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) are bright, millisecond-duration radio pulses hypothesized to originate at cosmological distances. To date, no counterpart sources have been associated with FRBs and their origins remain a puzzling mystery. Some have proposed FRBs come from Crab-like pulsar giant pulses or rare bursts from main sequence flare stars in our Galaxy. Both mechanisms would generate observable subsequent FRB-like events. In this proposal we directly test this hypothesis by conducting several follow-up observations on the eight FRBs from the High Time Resolution Universe Survey. This sample represents the majority of the dozen or so known FRB sources. With these observations we will set strict limits on any repetition of FRBs while using the 12 off-source beams of the multi-beam receiver as real-time FRB and transient detectors.

  14. [Patient education: the way for long-term follow up].

    PubMed

    Ruiz, J

    2008-06-04

    Therapeutic education is now perfectly integrated in caring and medicine. Its field of application is primarily in chronic diseases for the acquisition of competences in the management of treatments, in co-operation with health professionals. In ambulatory medicine, patients and health professionals are currently running up against the difficulties of the long-term follow-up with its part of uncertainty, lassitude and economic pressure. EBM and the various models of health psychology light us only partially the way. A new type of reflexive step is emerging. This way of thinking should place in its center the concept of therapeutic relation: between science and being. We summarize here our reflexive process in the course of an interdisciplinary team gathering social sciences, art and medicine.

  15. Follow up of premature babies treated with artificial surfactant (ALEC).

    PubMed Central

    Morley, C J; Morley, R

    1990-01-01

    Of 235 survivors who had taken part in a randomised trial of artificial surfactant and who were born in Cambridge, follow up information was available for 231 (98%) infants. In 12 cases information came from local doctors; all others were assessed at 9 and 18 months (n = 212) or 9 months only (n = 7). There was no difference between those who had been treated with surfactant and control babies in the incidence of neurological impairment, mental impairment, respiratory infections, allergies, or hospital admissions up to 18 months after full term. In those born before 30 weeks' gestation (where surfactant most improves survival) the number of surviving randomised children who were normal was 35 of 61 in the treated group (57%) compared with 25 of 61 in the control group (41%). Improved neonatal survival after prophylactic surfactant treatment is not associated with an increased incidence of neurodevelopmental impairment. PMID:2201266

  16. Bleeding oesophageal varices with long term follow up.

    PubMed Central

    Spence, R A; Johnston, G W; Odling-Smee, G W; Rodgers, H W

    1984-01-01

    Complete long term follow up was obtained in 27 children who had bled from oesophageal varices. Most presented with haematemesis or melaena at an average age of 5.2 years in the portal vein thrombosis group (20 children) and 9.5 years in the intrahepatic group (7 children). All had splenomegaly. Only 6 of 20 children with portal vein thrombosis had a possible precipitating factor. A total of 182 admissions for bleeding are reported, in 68 of which injection sclerotherapy was used to control bleeding. Control rate with injection sclerotherapy was 97%. Shunts performed below age 10 years were associated with a high thrombosis rate. A conservative approach to bleeding varices in children is recommended with transfusion, pitressin, and injection sclerotherapy. Oesophageal transection may have a role in the emergency management of the few children in whom bleeding is not controlled by injection sclerotherapy. PMID:6609683

  17. Hydrotherapy after total knee arthroplasty. A follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Giaquinto, S; Ciotola, E; Dall'Armi, V; Margutti, F

    2010-01-01

    The study evaluated the subjective functional outcome following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in participants who underwent hydrotherapy (HT) six months after discharge from a rehabilitation unit. A total of 70 subjects, 12 of which were lost at follow-up, were randomly assigned to either a conventional gym treatment (N=30) or HT (N=28). A prospective design was performed. Participants were interviewed with Western-Ontario McMasters Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) at admission, at discharge and six months later. Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon tests were applied for statistical analysis. Both groups improved. The WOMAC subscales, namely pain, stiffness and function, were all positively affected. Statistical analysis indicates that scores on all subscales were significantly lower for the HT group. The benefits gained by the time of discharge were still found after six months. HT is recommended after TKA in a geriatric population. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [Neuromuscular disease: respiratory clinical assessment and follow-up].

    PubMed

    Martínez Carrasco, C; Villa Asensi, J R; Luna Paredes, M C; Osona Rodríguez de Torres, F B; Peña Zarza, J A; Larramona Carrera, H; Costa Colomer, J

    2014-10-01

    Patients with neuromuscular disease are an important group at risk of frequently suffering acute or chronic respiratory failure, which is their main cause of death. They require follow-up by a pediatric respiratory medicine specialist from birth or diagnosis in order to confirm the diagnosis and treat any respiratory complications within a multidisciplinary context. The ventilatory support and the cough assistance have improved the quality of life and long-term survival for many of these patients. In this paper, the authors review the pathophysiology, respiratory function evaluation, sleep disorders, and the most frequent respiratory complications in neuromuscular diseases. The various treatments used, from a respiratory medicine point of view, will be analyzed in a next paper. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. SUBMILLIMETER FOLLOW-UP OF WISE-SELECTED HYPERLUMINOUS GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Jingwen; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Stern, Daniel; Assef, Roberto; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Cutri, Roc; Griffith, Roger; Jarrett, Thomas; Sayers, Jack; Bridge, Carrie; Benford, Dominic; Blain, Andrew; Petty, Sara; Lake, Sean; Bussmann, Shane; Comerford, Julia M.; Evans, Neal J. II; Lonsdale, Carol; Rho, Jeonghee; Stanford, S. Adam; and others

    2012-09-01

    We have used the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) to follow-up a sample of Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) selected, hyperluminous galaxies, the so-called W1W2-dropout galaxies. This is a rare ({approx}1000 all-sky) population of galaxies at high redshift (peaks at z = 2-3), which are faint or undetected by WISE at 3.4 and 4.6 {mu}m, yet are clearly detected at 12 and 22 {mu}m. The optical spectra of most of these galaxies show significant active galactic nucleus activity. We observed 14 high-redshift (z > 1.7) W1W2-dropout galaxies with SHARC-II at 350-850 {mu}m, with nine detections, and observed 18 with Bolocam at 1.1 mm, with five detections. Warm Spitzer follow-up of 25 targets at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m, as well as optical spectra of 12 targets, are also presented in the paper. Combining WISE data with observations from warm Spitzer and CSO, we constructed their mid-IR to millimeter spectral energy distributions (SEDs). These SEDs have a consistent shape, showing significantly higher mid-IR to submillimeter ratios than other galaxy templates, suggesting a hotter dust temperature. We estimate their dust temperatures to be 60-120 K using a single-temperature model. Their infrared luminosities are well over 10{sup 13} L{sub Sun }. These SEDs are not well fitted with existing galaxy templates, suggesting they are a new population with very high luminosity and hot dust. They are likely among the most luminous galaxies in the universe. We argue that they are extreme cases of luminous, hot dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs), possibly representing a short evolutionary phase during galaxy merging and evolution. A better understanding of their long-wavelength properties needs ALMA as well as Herschel data.

  20. Hallucinations in Parkinson's disease: a follow-up study.

    PubMed

    de Maindreville, Anne Doé; Fénelon, Gilles; Mahieux, Florence

    2005-02-01

    To study prevalence of hallucinations in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) during a 1-year period, and identify factors predictive of the onset of hallucinations in patients who were hallucination-free at baseline, 141 unselected outpatients with PD were evaluated prospectively for a set of demographic, clinical, and therapeutic variables and the presence of hallucinations during the previous 3 months. Patient groups were compared with nonparametric tests, and logistic regression was applied to significant data. Follow-up data were available for 127 patients. The hallucination prevalence rates (%) at the first and second evaluation were, respectively, 41.7 and 49.6 for hallucinations of all types (NS), 29.1 and 40.2 for minor hallucinations (i.e., presence or passage hallucinations, and illusions) (P = 0.02), 22.8 and 21.2 for formed visual hallucinations (NS), and 8.7 and 8.7 for auditory hallucinations (NS). Hallucinations rarely started or ceased during the study. The most labile forms were minor hallucinations, which developed in 20% of patients and ceased in 9%. During follow-up, 15% of patients started to hallucinate. Three factors, all present at the first evaluation, independently predicted the onset of hallucinations in patients previously free of hallucinations at baseline (odds ratio; 95% confidence interval): severe sleep disturbances (14.3; 2.5-80.9), ocular disorders (9.1; 1.6-52.0), and a high axial motor score (5.7; 1.2-27.4). Hallucinations have a chronic course in most parkinsonian patients. Factors predicting the onset of hallucinations point to a role of extranigral brainstem involvement and a nonspecific, facilitating role of ocular disorders. Copyright 2004 Movement Disorder Society.

  1. Trajectories of Nutritional Risk: The Manitoba Follow-Up Study.

    PubMed

    Lengyel, C O; Jiang, D; Tate, R B

    2017-01-01

    To identify patterns of nutritional risk among older men over a four-year period and to project their survival rates over the next two and a half years. A prospective longitudinal study. Canada. Three hundred and thirty-six male survivors of the Manitoba Follow-up Study (MFUS) cohort with an average age of 90 years in 2011. Four years of nutritional risk SCREEN II scores (five waves) from the male survivors of the MFUS cohort. The semi-parametric group-based trajectory approach and survival analysis were used to investigate the trajectories of nutritional risk. Of the participants, 30% lived alone. Five distinct developmental trajectory groups for nutritional risk score were identified. Significant statistical differences were found among the five trajectory groups for SF-36 mental health (p=.02), SF-36 physical health (p=<.001), perception of aging successfully (p=.04) and living alone (p=<.001). Among the five groups, the most pairwise differences were found in appetite, intake of meat and alternatives, and vegetables and fruit, weight change, skipping meals and eating with others. Men in the poorest nutritional risk trajectory group were two times more likely to die within a 2 1/2 year period compared to men in the best nutritional risk trajectory group (hazard rate = 2.33, p=.07). Distinct nutritional risk trajectories were found for older men over a four year period. Poor nutritional risk trajectories are associated with higher risk of mortality for very old men over a short period of time. Timely nutritional assessments by health professionals are needed to identify older men at nutritional risk. Subsequent nutrition education and follow-up may be important in preventing further decline.

  2. Cold urticaria: a 20-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Jain, S V; Mullins, R J

    2016-12-01

    Chronic cold urticaria results in significant morbidity, yet information on its natural history is limited. We examined the natural history of chronic cold urticaria and its impact on quality of life. We analysed the characteristics of patients diagnosed with cold urticaria at a community-based specialist allergy practice in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) between 1995 and 2015. Follow-up data were obtained using a mailed questionnaire. Possible predictive factors of disease severity and symptom duration were evaluated. A total of 99 patients were assessed with a median age of 42 (range 5-81 years); 63% were female and the median age of onset of symptoms was 22 years. Of 41 questionnaire responders (14 ± 10.9 years follow-up; median 12 years), 5- and 10-year resolution rates were 17.9% ± 6.2% and 24.5% ± 7.2%, respectively. Whereas 22% reported resolution and 23% described improvement, the remaining 55% reported stable or worsening disease. Most individuals relied on lifestyle modification to ameliorate symptoms rather than medication. Risk factors for persistent disease were intercurrent atopic disease (P = 0.025) and those with longer duration of symptoms at the time of initial assessment (P < 0.001). Secondary causes of cold urticaria were identified in only two patients, both with B-cell malignancy. In a subset of patients, cold urticaria has low rates of spontaneous resolution and results in lifestyle changes and impaired quality of life. © 2016 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  3. Long-term follow-up of elite controllers

    PubMed Central

    Stafford, Kristen A.; Rikhtegaran Tehrani, Zahra; Saadat, Saman; Ebadi, Maryam; Redfield, Robert R.; Sajadi, Mohammad M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract To estimate the effect of hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection on the development of complications and progression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease among HIV-infected elite controllers. Single-center retrospective cohort. Kaplan–Meier methods, prevalence ratios, and Cox proportional-hazards models were used. In all, 55 HIV-infected elite controllers were included in this study. Among them, 45% were HIV/HCV coinfected and 55% were HIV mono-infected. Median follow-up time for the cohort was 11 years. Twenty-five patients experienced a complication and 16 lost elite controller status during the study period. HCV coinfected patients were 4.78 times (95% confidence interval 1.50–15.28) more likely to develop complications compared with HIV mono-infected patients. There was no association between HCV coinfection status and loss of elite control (hazard ratio 0.75, 95% confidence interval 0.27–2.06). Hepatitis C virus coinfection was significantly associated with the risk of complications even after controlling for sex, injecting drug use, and older age. HCV coinfected patients had higher levels of cellular activation while also having similar levels of lipopolysaccharide and soluble CD14. HCV coinfection was not associated with loss of elite controller status. Taken together, this suggests that HCV coinfection does not directly affect HIV replication dynamics or natural history, but that it may act synergistically with HIV to produce a greater number of associated complications. Continued follow-up will be needed to determine whether HCV cure through the use of direct-acting antivirals among HIV/HCV coinfected elite controllers will make the risk for complications among these patients similar to their HIV mono-infected counterparts. PMID:28658155

  4. [Follow-up of patients with inflammatory bowel disease].

    PubMed

    García-López, Santiago

    2013-10-01

    Multiple data were presented on inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in Digestive Disease Week (DDW). Of particular interest to gastroenterologists were those on novel treatments and information on safety. Other data, such as those relating to disease "follow-up", were possibly of lesser interest. However, the information reported this year was, in my opinion, highly important, because it could lead to significant changes in clinical practice. Thus, results presented strongly suggest that patients with asymptomatic IBD, specifically Crohn's disease (CD), often develop complications during their clinical course. Moreover, this is especially true in patients with CD and biological signs of inflammation, despite being asymptomatic. In addition, it seems clear that the absence of symptoms does not imply an absence of inflammation. These observations indicate a dual practical message: patients should be followed-up and objectively evaluated. Multiple data were presented on how to objectively evaluate disease activity in IBD. The prognostic value and objectivity of endoscopy has been reaffirmed, specifically with new data on the only validated index, the UCEIS, in ulcerative colitis. Together with endoscopy, the role of less invasive techniques such as imaging tests (magnetic resonance enterography, computed tomography enterography and even echography, with and without contrast agent) and fecal markers has been reaffirmed in several conditions and these techniques have a certain predictive value. Finally, many studies were reported that confirm the therapeutic activity of levels of anti-TNF and its antibodies in certain conditions and with some limitations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  5. ACR Appropriateness Criteria: follow-up of Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ng, Andrea; Constine, Louis S; Advani, Ranjan; Das, Prajnan; Flowers, Christopher; Friedberg, Jonathan; Hodgson, David C; Schwartz, Cindy L; Wilder, Richard B; Wilson, Lynn D; Yunes, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    In the follow-up of Hodgkin's lymphoma patients, the focus in the first 5 years is to detect recurrence, while after 5 years, the focus is on limiting and detecting late effects of treatment. In the first 5 years post-treatment, routine history and physical and computed tomography (CT) imaging (more frequent in the first 2 years) are generally appropriate. However, there are limited data to support the role of positron emission tomography scanning as routine follow-up. Beyond 5 years post-treatment, annual history and physical is appropriate, although there is no longer a role for routine imaging for recurrences. Women irradiated to the chest area at a young age (<35) would benefit from annual mammogram screening given the increased breast cancer risk. Magnetic resonance imaging can be considered, although there is a lack of data supporting its role in this population. Low-dose chest CT for lung cancer screening in patients with history of mediastinal irradiation and/or alkylating chemotherapy exposures and a smoking history can be considered, although data on its utility is lacking. Cardiac screening with echocardiogram and exercise tolerance tests in patients with history of mediastinal irradiation and/or adriamycin exposure may be appropriate, although the optimal screening interval would depend on mediastinal dose, adriamycin dose, presence of other cardiac risk factors and findings at the baseline screening. Patients at risk for cardiac disease due to treatment exposure would also benefit from lipid screening every 1-3 years. Copyright 2010 American College of Radiology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The LCOGT Near Earth Object (NEO) Follow-up Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, Tim; Gomez, Edward; Christensen, Eric; Larson, Steve

    2014-11-01

    Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope (LCOGT) network is a planned homogeneous network of over 35 telescopes at 6 locations in the northern and southern hemispheres. This network is versatile and designed to respond rapidly to target of opportunity events and also to do long term monitoring of slowly changing astronomical phenomena. The global coverage of the network and the apertures of telescope available make LCOGT ideal for follow-up and characterization of Solar System objects (e.g. asteroids, Kuiper Belt Objects, comets, Near-Earth Objects (NEOs)) and ultimately for the discovery of new objects.LCOGT has completed the first phase of the deployment with the installation and commissioning of nine 1-meter telescopes at McDonald Observatory (Texas), Cerro Tololo (Chile), SAAO (South Africa) and Siding Spring Observatory (Australia). The telescope network is now operating and observations are being executed remotely and robotically.I am using the LCOGT network to confirm newly detected NEO candidates produced by the major sky surveys such as Catalina Sky Survey (CSS), NEOWISE and PanSTARRS (PS1). Over 600 NEO candidates have been targeted so far this year with 250+ objects reported to the MPC, including 70 confirmed NEOs. An increasing amount of time is being spent to obtain follow-up astrometry and photometry for radar-targeted objects in order to improve the orbits and determine the rotation periods. This will be extended to obtain more light curves of other NEOs which could be Near-Earth Object Human Space Flight Accessible Targets Study (NHATS) or Asteroid Retrieval Mission (ARM) targets. Recent results have included the first period determination for the Apollo 2002 NV16 and our first NEO spectrum from the FLOYDS spectrographs on the LCOGT 2m telescopes obtained for 2012 DA14 during the February 2013 closepass.

  7. QL-10NEURO-ONCOLOGY TELEMEDICINE FOLLOW-UP VISITS

    PubMed Central

    Green, Richard; Woyshner, Emily

    2014-01-01

    We report our 18 month experience with the use of a videoconferencing system to perform neuro-oncology follow-up visits. The Neuro-oncology Program at the Kaiser Permanente-Los Angeles Medical center serves the majority of Kaiser HMO patients in the Southern California region. We installed a videoconferencing system (Cisco TelePresence EX90, Cisco Systems, San Jose, CA) in our office in Los Angeles and in a medical office building in Anaheim, CA at a distance of 35 miles. Established neuro-oncology patients from Orange County chose between in-person and remote visits. Patients were seated in an examination room and the neuro-oncology provider alerted by text page. A focused history and physical examination was performed, followed by desktop sharing of clinical and laboratory data using an electronic medical record (Epic Systems Corporation, Verona, WI) and of neuroimages (Phillips iSite PACS, Andover, MA). Patients were asked, but not required, to complete an anonymous online 16 question satisfaction survey after each visit. Visits were performed by either a neuro-oncologist (179) or a Physician's Assistant (12). Of the 191 visits, 174 included evaluation of neuroimaging and 77 included evaluation of response to ongoing chemotherapy. During 12 visits chemotherapy was initiated, and during 15 visits the chemotherapy regimen was changed based on imaging findings. One-hundred and eleven surveys (58% of visits) were completed. Patients reported a high level of satisfaction with the visits (average 9.6, on a 1-10 scale). The average estimated travel time saved was 118 minutes per visit. Four surveys reported technical problems and 1 indicated a preference for an in-person visit. No adverse events could be attributed to use of the telemedicine system. These data suggest that neuro-oncology follow-up visits can be practiced safely and effectively using a telemedicine system, with high levels of patient satisfaction.

  8. Detailed Follow-up Study of Pediatric Orofacial Granulomatosis Patients.

    PubMed

    Haaramo, Anu; Alapulli, Heikki; Aine, Liisa; Saarnisto, Ulla; Tuokkola, Jetta; Ruuska, Tarja; Sipponen, Taina; Pitkäranta, Anne; Kolho, Kaija-Leena

    2017-10-01

    Orofacial granulomatosis (OFG) is a chronic inflammatory condition affecting the orofacial area. Its connection to Crohn disease (CD) is debated. Our aim was to describe a cohort of pediatric patients with OFG in detail, study the long-term behavior of OFG, and evaluate factors predicting CD in patients with OFG. We invited patients diagnosed with OFG at 2 university hospitals, Finland for a follow-up appointment. Patients (n = 29) were examined by a dentist and an otorhinolaryngologist using a structural schema. Orofacial findings were also recorded using digital photographing. Patients filled in questionnaires about general health and special diets. Patients' nutrition was evaluated from food records. The findings were compared between patients with OFG only and OFG with CD. Patients with CD had more findings in the orofacial area (total score for orofacial findings median 11) compared to patients with OFG only (total score median 7.5). There was no statistically significant difference in the type of lesions between these groups, except the upper lip was more often affected in patients with CD (n = 11) than in patients with OFG only (n = 0). Most of the patients had normal otorhinolaryngological findings. All patients with elevated anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibody A levels had CD (n = 6) and they presented with more orofacial findings (total score) than patients with normal levels of anti-S cerevisiae antibody A (P = 0.0311). Long-term follow-up of pediatric-onset patients with OFG shows good prognosis. Patients with OFG do not seem to have otorhinolaryngological comorbidity. Anti-S cerevisiae antibody A may serve as a factor to indicate the possible presence of underlying CD in patients with OFG, but further studies are requested.

  9. [Intracranial stenosis. Study and follow-up of 38 patients].

    PubMed

    Palomeras Soler, E; Fossas Felip, P; Cano Orgaz, A; Sanz Cartagena, P

    2004-06-01

    To describe vascular risk factors of patients harboring intracranial arterial stenosis (IAS) as well their final outcome. We reviewed clinical reports of all patients admitted to our Institution from April 1, 1999 to November 30, 2001 with the diagnosis of IAS. Diagnosis was made by means of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) or four-vessels digital subtraction angiography. Thirty-eight patients harboring 56 IAS were identified. Mean follow-up was 18 months. Two control groups were selected: one was a group of 44 patients with stroke and embolic cardiopathy (EC) and the other was a group of 67 patients with stroke and extracranial stenosis without IAS. Mean age was 69.7 years, with male preponderance (76.3 %). Seventeen cases (44.7 %) had associated extracranial carotid stenosis greater than 50 %. Multiple IAS were found in 12 patients. Diabetes mellitus was significantly more frequent in the IAS group than in both control groups. On the other hand, cigarette smoking was more common in the IAS group with respect to the EC group. IAS was symptomatic in 25 cases, whereas in 13 patients IAS was found in the work-up for cerebral ischemia in another territory. From the group of symptomatic patients, 22 (88 %) had a Rankin scale 2 or lower on discharge and, in the long term follow-up, their incidence rate of recurrent ischemic stroke was 15 per 100 patients/year. Diabetes mellitus was the most specific risk factor for IAS. IAS was multiple in 32% of patients and in extracranial stenosis from moderate to severe degree was found in 44.7% of the cases. Stroke secondary to IAS caused a low dependency level at discharge. Incidence rate of recurrent ischemic stroke was 15 % patients/ year.

  10. Submillimeter Follow-Up of WISE-Selected Hyperluminous Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jingwen; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Sayers, Jack; Benford, Dominic; Bridge, Carrie; Blain, Andrew; Eisenhardt, Peter R.; Stern, Daniel; Petty, Sara; Assef, Roberto; hide

    2012-01-01

    We have used the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) to follow-up a sample of Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) selected, hyperluminous galaxies, the so-called W1W2-dropout galaxies. This is a rare (approx.1000 all-sky) population of galaxies at high redshift (peaks at z = 2-3), which are faint or undetected by WISE at 3.4 and 4.6 microns, yet are clearly detected at 12 and 22 microns. The optical spectra of most of these galaxies show significant active galactic nucleus activity. We observed 14 high-redshift (z > 1.7) W1W2-dropout galaxies with SHARC-II at 350-850 microns, with nine detections, and observed 18 with Bolocam at 1.1 mm, with five detections. Warm Spitzer follow-up of 25 targets at 3.6 and 4.5 microns, as well as optical spectra of 12 targets, are also presented in the paper. Combining WISE data with observations from warm Spitzer and CSO, we constructed their mid-IR to millimeter spectral energy distributions (SEDs). These SEDs have a consistent shape, showing significantly higher mid-IR to submillimeter ratios than other galaxy templates, suggesting a hotter dust temperature.We estimate their dust temperatures to be 60 C120 K using a single-temperature model. Their infrared luminosities are well over 10(exp 13) Stellar Luminosity. These SEDs are not well fitted with existing galaxy templates, suggesting they are a new population with very high luminosity and hot dust. They are likely among the most luminous galaxies in the universe.We argue that they are extreme cases of luminous, hot dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs), possibly representing a short evolutionary phase during galaxy merging and evolution. A better understanding of their long-wavelength properties needs ALMA as well as Herschel data.

  11. Submillimeter Follow-up of Wise-Selected Hyperluminous Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jingwen; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Sayers, Jack; Benford, Dominic; Bridge, Carrie; Blain, Andrew; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Stern, Daniel; Petty, Sara; Assef, Roberto; hide

    2013-01-01

    We have used the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) to follow-up a sample of Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) selected, hyperluminous galaxies, the so-called W1W2-dropout galaxies. This is a rare (approximately 1000 all-sky) population of galaxies at high redshift (peaks at zeta = 2-3), which are faint or undetected by WISE at 3.4 and 4.6 micrometers, yet are clearly detected at 12 and 22 micrometers. The optical spectra of most of these galaxies show significant active galactic nucleus activity. We observed 14 high-redshift (zeta greater than 1.7) W1W2-dropout galaxies with SHARC-II at 350-850 micrometers, with nine detections, and observed 18 with Bolocam at 1.1 mm, with five detections. Warm Spitzer follow-up of 25 targets at 3.6 and 4.5 micrometers, as well as optical spectra of 12 targets, are also presented in the paper. Combining WISE data with observations from warm Spitzer and CSO, we constructed their mid-IR to millimeter spectral energy distributions (SEDs). These SEDs have a consistent shape, showing significantly higher mid-IR to submillimeter ratios than other galaxy templates, suggesting a hotter dust temperature.We estimate their dust temperatures to be 60-120 K using a single-temperature model. Their infrared luminosities are well over 10(exp 13) solar luminosity. These SEDs are not well fitted with existing galaxy templates, suggesting they are a new population with very high luminosity and hot dust. They are likely among the most luminous galaxies in the universe.We argue that they are extreme cases of luminous, hot dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs), possibly representing a short evolutionary phase during galaxy merging and evolution. A better understanding of their long-wavelength properties needs ALMA as well as Herschel data.

  12. Predictors of First Follow-Up HIV Testing for Couples’ Voluntary HIV Counseling and Testing in Ndola, Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Czaicki, Nancy L; Davitte, Jonathan; Siangonya, Bella; Kastner, Randee; Ahmed, Nurilign; Khu, Naw Htee; Kuo, Wan Hsuan; Abdallah, Joseph; Wall, Kristin M; Tichacek, Amanda; Inambao, Mubiana; Simpungwe, Kakungu; Thior, Ibou; Allen, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We describe predictors of first follow-up testing for concordant negative and discordant couples seeking joint voluntary HIV counseling and testing in Ndola, Zambia, where cohabiting couples account for an estimated two-thirds of incident HIV infections. Methods Demographic and serostatus data were collected from couples’ voluntary HIV testing and counseling (CVCT) and follow-up testing services implemented in government clinics. We calculated follow-up testing rates by serostatus and compared rates before and after the introduction of a Good Health Package (GHP). Results The follow-up testing rate from May 2011 to December 2012 was 12.2% for concordant negative (M−F−) couples and 24.5% for discordant (M+F− or M−F+) couples. Significant predictors of follow-up testing in multivariate analyses included increasing man’s (aOR=1.02 per year) and woman’s (aOR=1.02) age, the man being HIV+ (aOR=2.57), and the woman being HIV+ (aOR=1.89). The man (aOR=1.29) and the couple (aOR=1.22) having been previously tested for HIV were predictive of follow-up testing among concordant negative couples. Introduction of a GHP increased follow-up testing among discordant (aOR=2.93) and concordant negative (aOR=2.06) couples. Conclusion A low-cost GHP including prevention, screening, and treatment for common causes of morbidity and mortality resulted in increased follow-up testing rates among HIV discordant and concordant negative couples. Overall follow-up testing rates remain low and efforts to increase these rates are necessary in order to ensure linkage to combination prevention, reduce HIV transmission within couples and identify seroconversions promptly. Further investigation of low-cost sustainable incentives and other factors influencing follow-up HIV testing for couples is needed. PMID:24326600

  13. Grief response of the primary caregiver receiving bereavement follow-up care at home.

    PubMed

    Wujcik, D

    1984-01-01

    This study implies specific guidelines for intervention. It appears that bereavement follow-up may lessen the grief response at 13 months. Therefore, hospice programs should continue this valuable service. Follow-up interventions should focus on the factors which proved significant: rumination, loss of control, and death anxiety. The study also provided the beginnings of a risk assessment tool for bereaved individuals. Increased age was proved to be a risk factor related to a greater grief response. Although most of the literature indicates women are at a higher risk early in the bereavement period, this study showed that at a later time men expressed a greater degree of grief. The implications of the study include the need for ongoing education regarding the normal grief response and the physical and emotional manifestations of grief. The results of the study support emotional care for survivors as well as provision for appropriate referral resources as needed.

  14. Recovery post ICU.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christina

    2014-10-01

    Many ICU patients struggle to recovery following critical illness and may be left with physical, cognitive and psychological problems, which have a negative impact on their quality of life. Gross muscle mass loss and weakness can take some months to recover after the patients' Intensive Care Unit (ICU) discharge, in addition critical illness polyneuropathies can further complicate physical recovery. Psychological problems such as anxiety, depression and post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are common and have an negative impact on the patients' ability to engage in rehabilitation after ICU discharge. Finally cognitive deficit affecting memory can be a significant problem. The first step in helping patients to recover from such a devastating illness is to recognise those who have the greatest need and target interventions. Research now suggests that there are interventions that can accelerate physical recovery and reduce the incidence of psychological problems such as anxiety, depression and PTSD. Cognitive rehabilitation, however, is still in its infancy. This review will look at the research into patients' recovery and what can be done to improve this where needed.

  15. Fluctuations of suicidality in the aftermath of a marital separation: 6-month follow-up observations.

    PubMed

    Kõlves, Kairi; Ide, Naoko; De Leo, Diego

    2012-12-15

    There is a lack of understanding of how the changing nature of the separation process impacts on suicidality. This paper aims to identify factors contributing to fluctuations in suicidality during the process of marital/de facto separation along a 6-month follow-up. Separated persons who had contacted relationship-counselling services, help-line services, and variety of support and self-help groups were asked to participate in the first assessment. A 'Follow-Up Questionnaire' was sent 6 months later. Participants were required to be 18 years or older and separated from their married/de facto partner within the previous 18 months but not yet divorced. Overall, in the first assessment, separated females presented lower levels of suicidality than males. During the follow-up suicidality decreased. There were some gender differences in terms of predictors of changes in suicidality. Separated males who showed an increase or stability in suicidality were more affected by stressful experiences such as legal negotiations on obtaining a divorce, feelings of loss and loneliness, loss of social networks and financial difficulties than males who were not suicidal in either assessment. Separated males and females who remained suicidal were more likely to report different mental and physical illnesses. Relatively low response rates of the follow-up (60%) limited our statistical analyses as some of the groups were too small and did not enable modelling. Suicidality decreased, which seems to indicate that individuals adjusted to their new life circumstances. However, persons whose suicidality remained or increased reported more frequently stressful life events, physical and mental illnesses. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Engaging patients via mobile phone technology to assist follow-up after hospitalization in Quito, Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Maslowsky, Julie; Valsangkar, Bina; Chung, Jennifer; Rasanathan, Jennifer; Cruz, Freddy Trujillo; Ochoa, Marco; Chiriboga, Monica; Astudillo, Fernando; Heisler, Michele; Merajver, Sofia

    2012-05-01

    Disease management following hospital discharge is difficult in most low-resourced areas, posing a major obstacle to health equity. Although mobile phones are a ubiquitous and promising technology to facilitate healthcare access, few studies have tested the acceptability and feasibility of patients themselves using the devices for assisting linkages to healthcare services. We hypothesized that patients would use mobile phones to help manage postdischarge problems, if given a communication protocol. We developed a mobile phone-based program and investigated its acceptability and feasibility as a method of delivering posthospitalization care. A consecutive cohort of adult patients in a public hospital in Quito, Ecuador was enrolled over a 1-month period. A hospital-based nurse relayed patients' discharge instructions to a community-based nurse. Patients corresponded with this nurse via text messaging and phone calls according to a protocol to initiate and participate in follow-up. Eighty-nine percent of eligible patients participated. Ninety-seven percent of participants completed at least one contact with the nurse; 81% initiated contact themselves. Nurses completed 262 contacts with 32 patients, clarifying discharge instructions, providing preventive education, and facilitating clinic appointments. By this method, 87% of patients were successfully linked to follow-up appointments. High levels of patient participation and successful delivery of follow-up services indicate the mobile phone program's acceptability and feasibility for facilitating posthospitalization follow-up. Patients actively used mobile phones to interact with nurses, enabling the provision of posthospitalization medical advice and facilitate community-based care via mobile phone.

  17. "Alice in wonderland" syndrome: presenting and follow-up characteristics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Alessandra M; Liu, Jonathan G; Liu, Geraldine W; Liu, Grant T

    2014-09-01

    We investigated the distribution of symptoms and etiologies of patients with "Alice in Wonderland" syndrome (visual perception of change in one's body size) and "Alice in Wonderland"-like syndrome (extrapersonal illusions) at presentation and to determine their prognosis. Retrospective chart review and telephone interview. Charts of children diagnosed with "Alice in Wonderland" syndrome by a pediatric neuro-ophthalmologist between July 1993 and July 2013 were reviewed. Patients seen before 2012, or their parents, were contacted for follow-up information. A total of 48 patients (average age 8.1 years) diagnosed with "Alice in Wonderland" syndrome or "Alice in Wonderland"-like syndrome were identified. Common visual symptoms were micropsia (69%), teleopsia (50%), macropsia (25%), metamorphopsia (15%), and pelopsia (10%). Magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography were unrevealing in 21 of 21 and 23 of 23 cases, respectively. The etiology was infection in 33% of patients and migraine and head trauma in 6% each. No associated conditions were found in 52%. Of the 15 patients with follow-up, 20% had a few more events of "Alice in Wonderland" syndrome or "Alice in Wonderland"-like syndrome, which eventually stopped after the initial diagnosis; 40% had no more events, and 40% were still having "Alice in Wonderland" syndrome or "Alice in Wonderland"-like syndrome symptoms at the time of the interview, while four patients (27%) developed migraines and one patient (7%) seizures since the diagnosis. "Alice in Wonderland" syndrome and "Alice in Wonderland"-like syndrome typically affect young children, and the most common visual complaints are micropsia and teleopsia. The most common associated condition is infection, but half of these individuals have no obvious trigger. Magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography are not helpful. The symptoms of "Alice in Wonderland" syndrome and "Alice in Wonderland"-like syndrome usually resolve, but in more than one

  18. Why parents refuse newborn hearing screening and default on follow-up rescreening--a South African perspective.

    PubMed

    Scheepers, Lucia Jane; Swanepoel, De Wet; Roux, Talita le

    2014-04-01

    due to associated costs and mostly defaulted on follow-up due to an apparent lack of knowledge regarding initial screen outcome and recommendations made for follow-up. Including NHS as a mandated birthing service is essential if coverage is to be increased, while reducing follow-up defaults requires proactive reminders and improved communication with caregivers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Telemedicine Intervention Improves ICU Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Sadaka, Farid; Palagiri, Ashok; Trottier, Steven; Deibert, Wendy; Gudmestad, Donna; Sommer, Steven E.; Veremakis, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Telemedicine for the intensive care unit (Tele-ICU) was founded as a means of delivering the clinical expertise of intensivists located remotely to hospitals with inadequate access to intensive care specialists. This was a retrospective pre- and postintervention study of adult patients admitted to a community hospital ICU. The patients in the preintervention period (n = 630) and during the Tele-ICU period (n = 2193) were controlled for baseline characteristics, acute physiologic scores (APS), and acute physiologic and health evaluation (APACHE IV) scores. Mean APS scores were 37.1 (SD, 22.8) and 37.7 (SD, 19.4) (P = 0.56), and mean APACHE IV scores were 49.7 (SD, 24.8) and 50.4 (SD, 21.0) (P = 0.53), respectively. ICU mortality was 7.9% during the preintervention period compared with 3.8% during the Tele-ICU period (odds ratio (OR) = 0.46, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.32–0.66, P < 0.0001). ICU LOS in days was 2.7 (SD, 4.1) compared with 2.2 (SD, 3.4), respectively (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.16, 95% CI, 1.00–1.40, P = 0.01). Implementation of Tele-ICU intervention was associated with reduced ICU mortality and ICU LOS. This suggests that there are benefits of a closed Tele-ICU intervention beyond what is provided by daytime bedside physicians. PMID:23365729

  20. ICU Telemedicine Program Financial Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lilly, Craig M; Motzkus, Christine; Rincon, Teresa; Cody, Shawn E; Landry, Karen; Irwin, Richard S

    2017-02-01

    ICU telemedicine improves access to high-quality critical care, has substantial costs, and can change financial outcomes. Detailed information about financial outcomes and their trends over time following ICU telemedicine implementation and after the addition of logistic center function has not been published to our knowledge. Primary data were collected for consecutive adult patients of a single academic medical center. We compared clinical and financial outcomes across three groups that differed regarding telemedicine support: a group without ICU telemedicine support (pre-ICU intervention group), a group with ICU telemedicine support (ICU telemedicine group), and an ICU telemedicine group with added logistic center functions and support for quality-care standardization (logistic center group). The primary outcome was annual direct contribution margin defined as aggregated annual case revenue minus annual case direct costs (including operating costs of ICU telemedicine and its related programs). All monetary values were adjusted to 2015 US dollars using Producer Price Index for Health-Care Facilities. Annual case volume increased from 4,752 (pre-ICU telemedicine) to 5,735 (ICU telemedicine) and 6,581 (logistic center). The annual direct contribution margin improved from $7,921,584 (pre-ICU telemedicine) to $37,668,512 (ICU telemedicine) to $60,586,397 (logistic center) due to increased case volume, higher case revenue relative to direct costs, and shorter length of stay. The ability of properly modified ICU telemedicine programs to increase case volume and access to high-quality critical care with improved annual direct contribution margins suggests that there is a financial argument to encourage the wider adoption of ICU telemedicine. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Seven years follow-up after ankle inversion trauma.

    PubMed

    Konradsen, L; Bech, L; Ehrenbjerg, M; Nickelsen, T

    2002-06-01

    During one year all ankle inversion injuries seen at the acute ward of our institution were divided into grades of severity and classified according to the maximal area of tenderness at the time of clinical examination. Seven years later 648 of the subjects (91%) evaluated their ankle with the help of a questionnaire. Location of maximal tenderness at the time of injury was: lateral fibular ligaments 61%, lateral midfoot ligaments 24%, base of the fifth metatarsal/peroneal tendons 5% and combined lesions 8%. 39% were considered minor, 46% were moderate, and 15% severe. All cases followed a functional treatment protocol. Seven years post- injury 32% reported chronic complaints of pain, swelling or recurrent sprains. 72% of the subjects with residual disability reported that they were functionally impaired by their ankle - in most cases a question of not performing sports at a desired level. 4% experienced pain at rest and were severely disabled. 19% were bothered by repeated inversion injuries - 43% of these subjects felt that they could compensate by using an external ankle support. There was no correlation between the severity of the sprain as judged at the time of injury and the frequency of residual disability or between the area of maximal tenderness at the time of injury and the area of maximal pain at the time of follow-up.

  2. Integrated GW-EM Follow-up Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackley, Kendall; Eikenberry, Stephen; Klimenko, Sergey; LSC Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Advanced Gravitational-Wave (GW) detectors such as Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo are expected to become operational for observation runs in 2015, with an expected ultimate improvement in sensitivity over previous configurations by a factor of 10 by 2019. There are many potential electromagnetic (EM) counterparts to GWs including short and long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and kilonovae. While SGRBs and LGRBs predominantly emit in the X-ray, and the recently-observed kilonova primarily in the infrared, all three sources are expected to have detectable traces in the optical band, albeit requiring very sensitive optical telescopes. In order to aid in the optimization of GW trigger follow-up procedures, we perform an end-to-end analysis feasibility study using synthesized Advanced detector data simulating a GW detection with a theoretical EM counterpart injected into archival optical images. We use images from Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment (ROTSE) and Palomar Transient Factory (PTF), and inject candidate events following observed lightcurves of SGRBs, LGRBs, and kilonovae. The use of Zernike PSF decomposition on candidate objects offers a fast way to identify point sources, speeding up the automated identification of transient sources in the images. We present our method of transient recovery and the latest results of our feasibility study of a joint GW-EM observation.

  3. French consensus. Idiopathic hypersomnia: Investigations and follow-up.

    PubMed

    Leu-Semenescu, S; Quera-Salva, M-A; Dauvilliers, Y

    Idiopathic hypersomnia is a rare, central hypersomnia, recently identified and to date of unknown physiopathology. It is characterised by a more or less permanent, excessive daytime sleepiness, associated with long and unrefreshing naps. Night-time sleep is of good quality, excessive in quantity, associated with sleep inertia in the subtype previously described as "with long sleep time". Diagnosis of idiopathic hypersomnia is complex due to the absence of a quantifiable biomarker, the heterogeneous symptoms, which overlap with the clinical picture of type 2 narcolepsy, and its variable evolution over time. Detailed evaluation enables other frequent causes of somnolence, such as depression or sleep deprivation, to be eliminated. Polysomnography and multiple sleep latency tests (MSLT) are essential to rule out other sleep pathologies and to objectify excessive daytime sleepiness. Sometimes the MSLT do not show excessive sleepiness, hence a continued sleep recording of at least 24hours is necessary to show prolonged sleep (>11h/24h). In this article, we propose recommendations for the work-up to be carried out during diagnosis and follow-up for patients suffering from idiopathic hypersomnia.

  4. COPD and microalbuminuria: a 12-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Romundstad, Solfrid; Naustdal, Thor; Romundstad, Pål Richard; Sorger, Hanne; Langhammer, Arnulf

    2014-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), low lung function independent of diagnosis and markers of inflammation are all associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Microalbuminuria, reflecting endothelial dysfunction, could be a relevant inflammatory marker of potential systemic effects of COPD. We hypothesised that there was a positive association between microalbuminuria and mortality in individuals with COPD. We conducted a 12-year follow-up study of 3129 participants in the second survey of the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT), Norway. At baseline, albuminuria was analysed in three urine samples and spirometry was performed. Among the participants, 136 had COPD and microalbuminuria, defined as a urinary albumin/creatinine ratio between 2.5 and 30.0 mg·mmol(-1). The main outcome measures were hazard ratio of all-cause mortality according to microalbuminuria. Compared to those with COPD without microalbuminuria, the adjusted hazard ratio for all-cause mortality in those with COPD and microalbuminuria was 1.54, 95% CI 1.16-2.04. This result was similar after excluding cardiovascular disease at baseline. Classifying COPD severity by Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease, there was a positive association trend with increasing severity stages. Microalbuminuria is associated with all-cause mortality in individuals with COPD and could be a relevant tool in identification of patients with poor prognosis.

  5. Surveys, Astrometric Follow-Up, and Population Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedicke, R.; Granvik, M.; Micheli, M.; Ryan, E.; Spahr, T.; Yeomans, D. K.

    Asteroid surveys are the backbone of asteroid science, and with this in mind we begin with a broad review of the impact of asteroid surveys on our field. We then provide a brief history of asteroid discoveries so as to place contemporary and future surveys in perspective. Surveys in the United States (U.S.) have discovered the vast majority of the asteroids, and this dominance has been consolidated since the publication of Asteroids III. Our descriptions of the asteroid surveys that have been operational since that time are focused on those that have contributed the vast majority of asteroid observations and discoveries. We also provide some insight into upcoming next-generation surveys that are sure to alter our understanding of the small bodies in the inner solar system and provide evidence to untangle their complicated dynamical and physical histories. The Minor Planet Center, the nerve center of the asteroid discovery effort, has improved its operations significantly in the past decade so that it can manage the increasing discovery rate, and ensure that it is well-placed to handle the data rates expected in the next decade. We also consider the difficulties associated with astrometric follow-up of newly identified objects. It seems clear that both of these efforts must operate in new modes in order to keep pace with expected discovery rates of next-generation ground- and spacebased surveys.

  6. Videoconferencing for a veteran's pain management follow-up clinic.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Janette; Chapman, Judith; Clark, David J

    2007-03-01

    The under treatment of pain has been well documented. Contributing to this is the limited availability of pain management specialists in many geographic areas. The use of technology to provide care to underserved areas is gaining momentum. We chose to study whether stable patients and staff in chronic pain clinic were satified with the use of a videoconferencing format in care delivery. Our goals were to determine whether patients and staff could successfully operate the extant videoconferencing equipment, was the equipment dependably functional, was the use of a videoconferencing format an acceptable method of healthcare delivery for both patients and staff, whether patients and staff were satisfied with the process, and whether this was a cost-effective mode of care delivery. Thirty-six patients were enrolled over 29 months. Questionnaires were administered to staff and patients. Routine pain clinic patient assessment tools were administered. Results showed the use of videoconferencing for this group of patients is useable and satisfactory for both patients and staff, that the patients save time and money, and that for a system where videoconferencing equipment is already in use, it is also cost effective. Staff were able to identify new patient problems. Some patients would prefer to be seen in person but find that the savings in time and money override this preference. Hearing impaired patients have difficulty using this medium. Dependable equipment and phone connections are needed. A videoconferencing clinic format is a clinically acceptable and cost effective method for follow-up of stable patients with chronic pain.

  7. A follow-up study on three caries activity tests.

    PubMed

    Shi, Sizhen; Deng, Qing; Hayashi, Yoshihiro; Yakushiji, Masashi; Machida, Yukio; Liang, Qin

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to study the efficacy of three CAT's (Dentocult SM, Dentocult LB and Dentobuff Strip) in revealing caries condition and predicting caries progress, and provide a reference for application by comparing the three tests. Oral condition and results of the three CAT's of 82 children aged 3 to 4 were recorded and followed up. The examination was checked again two years later. The caries incidence, dft and CSI data from the two examinations were analyzed statistically. The results were that each Dentocult SM degree showed significant variances in incidence rate, as did the dft and CSI results in the second examination. The dft and CSI of both examinations exhibited a high degree of statistical significance. The same may be said of the Dentocult LB findings for the two years. No noticeable variances in caries incidence rate, dft and CSI from the Dentobuff Strip test were observed in both years' study, nor was there any statistical significance drawn from the findings, except for those of the second exam. No gender differences were observed in the distribution by degree with the three CATs The conclusion is that Dentocult SM is the best of the three tests for the diagnosis of the presence of caries and prognosis of its progress, Dentocult LB is second best whereas the Dentobuff Strip shows no detection capability. The findings serve as an application reference.

  8. Twenty to 40 year follow up of infantile hiatal hernia.

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, B T; Carré, I J; Thomas, P S; Collins, B J

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess clinical and radiological findings of gastro-oesophageal reflux in adults who were diagnosed as having a hiatal hernia in infancy or early childhood. One hundred and eighteen patients with a minimum age of 20 who were diagnosed as having a hiatal hernia in childhood were interviewed; barium meal examination was performed in 96 of these cases. Ninety four patients had not required surgery for their hernia. The hiatal hernia persisted in 53% of these patients and 46% experienced heartburn at least monthly but in only three was this severe. Heartburn was significantly more common in patients in whom reflux was seen on barium meal. The consumption of antacids was significantly lower (20% v 46%) in patients who responded well to treatment as children. Eighteen of 24 patients who underwent surgery as children experienced heart-burn monthly but in only one patient was this severe. Two patients underwent endoscopy at their request because of symptoms during this follow up. Both had Barrett's oesophagus. In conclusion, despite the persistence of the hiatal hernia in half of the non-surgically treated patients, few complained of significant symptoms. Effective treatment in childhood was associated with a significant reduction in antacid consumption for heartburn as adults. The finding of Barrett's oesophagus in two patients high-lights a possible role for endoscopic screening in this patient group. Images p810-a PMID:7615264

  9. Bilateral sacrospinous fixation without hysterectomy: 18-month follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Şentürk, Mehmet Baki; Güraslan, Hakan; Çakmak, Yusuf; Ekin, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of bilateral sacrospinous fixation (SSF), which was performed with surgical mesh interposition and bilateral vaginal repair. Material and Methods Twenty-two patients underwent SSF between 2010 and 2012, and the results were evaluated retrospectively. The results at preoperative and postoperative 6th, 12th, and 18th months of the pelvic organ prolapse quantification system (POP-Q) and the Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire-12 (PISQ-12) were compared using Friedman and Wilcoxon Signed Ranks tests. Values of p<0.05 and <0.01 were considered statistically significant. Results According to the POP-Q, significant healing was observed on all vaginal vault points (p=0.001), and no prolapse was observed until the 18-month follow-up stage. There were also prominent patients who felt satisfactory with respect to their sexual life according to PISQ-12 (p=0.001). Conclusion This technique appears to provide an adequate clinical resolution, and it may be the primary surgical option for women with pelvic organ prolapse. PMID:26097393

  10. Follow-up skeletal survey use by child abuse pediatricians.

    PubMed

    Harper, Nancy S; Lewis, Terri; Eddleman, Sonja; Lindberg, Daniel M

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal survey is frequently used to identify occult fractures in young children with concern for physical abuse. Because skeletal survey is relatively insensitive for some abusive fractures, a follow-up skeletal survey (FUSS) may be undertaken at least 10-14 days after the initial skeletal survey to improve sensitivity for healing fractures. This was a prospectively planned secondary analysis of a prospective, observational study of 2,890 children who underwent subspecialty evaluation for suspected child physical abuse at 1 of 19 centers. Our objective was to determine variability between sites in rates of FUSS recommendation, completion and fracture identification among the 2,049 participants who had an initial SS. Among children with an initial skeletal survey, the rate of FUSS recommendation for sites ranged from 20% to 97%; the rate of FUSS completion ranged from 10% to 100%. Among sites completing at least 10 FUSS, rates of new fracture identification ranged from 8% to 28%. Among completed FUSS, new fractures were more likely to be identified in younger children, children with higher initial level of concern for abuse, and those with a fracture or cutaneous injury identified in the initial evaluation. The current variability in FUSS utilization is not explained by variability in occult fracture prevalence. Specific guidelines for FUSS utilization are needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Cardiological follow-up in patients with Fabry disease].

    PubMed

    Pieruzzi, Federico; Pieroni, Maurizio; Chimenti, Cristina; Frustaci, Andrea; Sarais, Cristiano; Cecchi, Franco

    2010-01-01

    Fabry disease is a rare tesaurismosis due to a deficit of the lysosomal enzyme activity of alpha-galactosidase, needed for the normal catabolism of globotriaosylceramides (GL3). Fabry cardiac involvement has several clinical manifestations: concentric left ventricular hypertrophy without left ventricular dilation and severe loss of left ventricular systolic function, mitral and aortic valvulopathy, disorders of the atrioventricular conduction or repolarization, and compromised diastolic function. Differentiating Fabry disease from similar conditions is often quite straightforward, e.g., cardiac amyloidosis is often associated with low electrocardiographic voltages, and systemic symptoms are usually associated with hemochromatosis and sarcoidosis. However, sometimes second-level (genetic analysis, alpha-galactosidase levels) or invasive investigations are required, which can include endomyocardial biopsy. Diagnostic imaging techniques have been described, but they lack specificity. Echocardiographic imaging with tissue Doppler analysis and/or strain rate analysis can allow diagnosis of Fabry disease even before left ventricular hypertrophy becomes apparent. This review illustrates the techniques for staging cardiac involvement and damage in Fabry disease and for the long-term follow-up of Fabry patients with or without cardiac involvement. Careful cardiac monitoring is especially important in elderly female carriers, who often develop renal disorders and/or left ventricular hypertrophy as the only manifestations of their late Fabry disease. In some clinical series, Fabry disease was diagnosed in 12% of women with adult-onset hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Cardiological problems and outcomes of enzyme replacement therapy, associated with or without other cardiological treatments, are also discussed.

  12. [Surgery for phimosis with Plastibell. A follow-up study].

    PubMed

    Jensen, M K

    1998-06-22

    Fifty-three boys were interviewed 11 years (9-14 years) after an operation for phimosis using the Plastibell technique. The interview concentrated on the cosmetic result, sexual function and late complications. Seventeen patients (31%) experienced cosmetic complications, and 11 patients (21%) claimed to have experienced psycho-social problems due to the appearance of the penis after the operation. Nonetheless an overall of 44 patients (83%) were fully satisfied/satisfied with the cosmetic result. Four patients (8%) claimed to have pain or discomfort on erection or intercourse. One patient (2%) was re-operated three years after the primary operation because of a recurrence of the symptoms. Overall 48 patients (91%) were fully satisfied or satisfied with the result after the operation. In conclusion we find the Plastibell procedure to be a safe and reliable method in treating phimosis. There are some minor technical pitfalls that have to be addressed in learning the technique, but performed in trained hands, the technique offers a very high satisfaction rate at long term follow-up.

  13. Advances in diagnosis and follow-up in kidney cancer.

    PubMed

    Rioja, Jorge; de la Rosette, Jean J M C H; Wijkstra, Hessel; Laguna, M Pilar

    2008-09-01

    To review the most recent data on preoperative diagnostic methods in kidney cancer and in follow-up and monitoring after ablation therapy. Although the role of the percutaneous biopsy in the diagnostics of renal masses has been limited, new data suggest a high accuracy of the percutaneous core biopsy in the diagnostics of malignancy and a fair to perfect interobserver and intraobserver variability. Accuracy in determining the subtype is also high but lower for Fuhrman grade determination. Data on fine needle aspiration remain controversial. Refinements in cross-sectional imaging might have a value in differentiation of low-fat content angiomyolipoma from renal cell carcinoma. Contrast cross-sectional imaging remains the reference standard in the assessment of ablation results. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound shows promising results in this field but further confirmation is needed. Although few changes are evident in the diagnostic imaging of kidney tumors, percutaneous core biopsy has gained attention and in the light of the current results might play an extended role in the preoperative workup of renal masses. New techniques should be investigated for monitoring after ablation therapies in order to reduce toxicity and costs.

  14. Follow up study of workers manufacturing chrysotile asbestos cement products.

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, M J; Winter, P D; Pannett, B; Powell, C A

    1986-01-01

    A cohort study has been carried out of 2167 subjects employed between 1941 and 1983 at an asbestos cement factory in England. The production process incorporated the use of chrysotile asbestos fibre only, except for a small amount of amosite during four months in 1976. Measured airborne fibre concentrations available since 1970 from personal samplers showed mean levels below 1 fibre/ml, although higher levels had probably occurred previously in certain areas of the factory. No excess of lung cancer was observed in the mortality follow up by comparison with either national or local death rates, and analyses of subgroups of the workforce by job, exposure level, duration of employment, duration since entry, or calendar years of employment gave no real suggestion of an asbestos related excess for this cause of death. There was one death from pleural mesothelioma and one with asbestosis mentioned as an associated cause on the death certificate, but neither is thought to be linked to asbestos exposure at this factory. Other suggested asbestos related cancers, such as laryngeal and gastrointestinal, did not show raised risks. Although the durations of exposure were short in this study, the findings are consistent with two other studies of workers exposed to low concentrations of chrysotile fibre in the manufacture of asbestos cement products which reported no excess mortality. PMID:3024695

  15. Benzene-induced chromosome aberrations: A follow-up study

    SciTech Connect

    Forni, A.

    1996-12-01

    To study the evolution of cytogenetic damage from past exposure to high concentrations of benzene and its health significance, chromosome aberrations (CA) in lymphocytes were reinvestigated after approximately 20 years in four subjects with past severe hemopathy and in seven controls studied in the late 1960s. Increased chromosome-type aberrations were still present up to 30 years after benzene toxicity, but blood counts were normal. The vital status at the end of 1993 was ascertained for 32 subjects with a history of benzene toxicity and for 31 controls studied for CA from 1965 to 1970, who differed significantly for CA rates. Of the 32 benzene-exposed subjects, 1 was lost to follow-up, 20 were still alive, and 11 had died at ages 36 to 83, between 1 and 20 years after the last CA study. Five deaths were from neoplasia (acute erythroleukemia, brain tumor, cancer of lung, paranasal cavity, esophagus). The deceased subjects had significantly higher rates of chromosome-type aberrations than those alive, and those who died of neoplasia had the highest rates of these aberrations in the last study before death or diagnosis of cancer. Out of the 31 controls, 12 had died from 4 to 23 years after the CA study. Three deaths were from neoplasia (two lung cancer, one brain tumor). Even if this is a small sample, the results suggest a higher risk of cancer for the benzene-exposed cohort, who had persistently high CA rates in lymphocytes. 10 refs., 4 tabs.

  16. Postoperative Electroencephalogram for Follow up of Pediatric Moyamoya Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Deok-Soo; Ra, Young-Shin; Choi, Choong-Gon

    2006-01-01

    It is well known that the electroencephalographic finding in patients with moyamoya disease demonstrates the characteristic "re-build up" phenomenon a few minutes after hyperventilation. To evaluate the usefulness of an electroencephalogram (EEG) in the postoperative management of children with moyamoya disease, we studied the presence or absence of improvement in the clinical, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and EEG findings, before and after surgery. Twenty-two patients, who underwent indirect revascularization surgery for moyamoya disease, were included in our study. Clinical improvement was assessed as the disappearance or decrease of a transient ischemic attack or headache. The findings on the EEG and SPECT were considered improved when the re-build up phenomenon was absent and when there was improvement in the cerebrovascular reserve as a result of the acetazolamide challenge test. The statistical correlation analysis for both clinical and EEG improvement were consistent (kappa value=0.409, p<0.05). However, the result from the clinical and SPECT improvement as well as that from EEG and SPECT improvement were not statistically significant. Our results suggest that EEG can be used as a noninvasive and simple follow-up test for moyamoya disease after indirect revascularization surgery if the hyperventilation procedure is effectively performed during EEG recording. PMID:16778396

  17. Continued Astrometric Follow-up Of Near-Earth Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spahr, Timothy; Johnson, Lindley (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    As the grant periods overlapped, some of this information below will also be present on the previous final report. During the period May 1 2004 to April 30 2005, approximately 100 NEOs fainter than V = 20 were observed on separate nights from the 1.2-m telescope at Mt. Hopkins. Additionally, a few comets were targeted, including astrometric support of the Deep Impact mission by observing comet P/Tempel 1. Kyle Smalley was again employed as an independent contractor, and he was trained in use of the telescope, performed several remote observing runs on his own, and has now begun critical software support of the observing program. Code to automatically operate the telescope, given a target list, is approximately 90% done. During the first observing run scheduled in late September or early October, this code will be tested at on the telescope. It is probable that the 1.2m telescope will be run automatically all night without any interruption from the observer for anything during this time. Additional work on selecting which NEO targets to observe is progressing, with a beta-release of a simple target selection web page. Additionally, two-night objects with the potential of being NEOs have been extracted on a routine basis during this last grant cycle. These will also be added to a web page to facilitate additional astrometric follow-up.

  18. Strategies to photometric follow-up transiting exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, L.

    2014-03-01

    It is now well ascertained that those extrasolar planets that transit in front to their parent stars deserve extensive follow-up observations because they are the only ones for which we can directly measure all their physical parameters. This information currently provides the best route to constructing the mass-radius diagram of exoplanets, which channels the theoretical formation/evolution models in the right path. However, many of the discovered transiting planets do not have high-quality light curves, so their physical properties are poorly known. In this perspective, we are leading a large program to obtain ultra-high-precision photometry of transit events, which are analyzed to accurately measure the physical properties of know planetary systems. Besides measuring and refining the physical properties of the planets and their parent stars, we also try to obtain additional information from the light curves, by identifying particular features of the systems (e.g. stellar activity) and investigating the composition of the planetary atmospheres by transmission photometry. In this conference-proceedings contribution I present several observational strategies that we adopt to achieve these goals. %

  19. Broadband Electromagnetic Follow-up of Advanced LIGO Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pound Singer, Leo

    2016-04-01

    Advanced LIGO began observing in September 2015 with over 3 times the distance reach (27 times the sensitive volume) of its previous configuration. Some gravitational-wave sources, particularly neutron star binary mergers, are expected to produce broadband electromagnetic transients which may be crucial to understanding the astrophysical context of these events. We have assembled a consortium of over 60 ground- and space-based gamma-ray, x-ray, optical, infrared, and radio facilities collaborating to search for broadband electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational-wave sources. In this talk, we describe the LIGO/Virgo EM follow-up program and the astronomical facilities that participated during this first LIGO observing run. Then, we survey the multi-wavelength observing campaigns embarked upon for specific gravitational-wave events. Finally, we discuss lessons learned and the way forward for joint GW-EM observations in an era of increasingly sensitive GW detectors.Submitted with The LIGO Scientific Collaboration and The Virgo Collaboration.

  20. Diagnosis, Treatment, and Follow-Up of Borderline Ovarian Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zikan, Michal; Dundr, Pavel; Cibula, David

    2012-01-01

    Borderline ovarian tumors represent a heterogeneous group of noninvasive tumors of uncertain malignant potential with characteristic histology. They occur in younger women, are present at an early stage, and have a favorable prognosis, but symptomatic recurrence and death may be found as long as 20 years after therapy in some patients. The molecular changes in borderline ovarian tumors indicate linkage of this disease to type I ovarian tumors (low-grade ovarian carcinomas). The pathological stage of disease and subclassification of extraovarian disease into invasive and noninvasive implants, together with the presence of postoperative macroscopic residual disease, appear to be the major predictor of recurrence and survival. However, it should be emphasized that the most important negative prognostic factor for recurrence is just the use of conservative surgery, but without any impact on patient survival because most recurrent diseases are of the borderline type—easily curable and with an excellent prognosis. Borderline tumors are difficult masses to correctly preoperatively diagnose using imaging methods because their macroscopic features may overlap with invasive and benign ovarian tumors. Over the past several decades, surgical therapy has shifted from a radical approach to more conservative treatment; however, oncologic safety must always be balanced. Follow-up is essential using routine ultrasound imaging, with special attention paid to the remaining ovary in conservatively treated patients. Current literature on this topic leads to a number of controversies that will be discussed thoroughly in this article, with the aim to provide recommendations for the clinical management of these patients. PMID:23024155

  1. Myxedema madness complicating postoperative follow-up of thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Morosán Allo, Yanina J; Rosmarin, Melanie; Urrutia, Agustina; Faingold, Maria Cristina; Musso, Carla; Brenta, Gabriela

    2015-08-01

    Although hypothyroidism is associated with an increased prevalence of psychiatric manifestations, myxedema madness is rarely observed. We report the case of a 62-year-old woman with no prior history of psychiatric disorders, who presented to the emergency department with psychomotor agitation 6 weeks after total thyroidectomy for papillary thyroid cancer. Serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) on admission was 62.9 mIU/L and free T4 was < 0.35 ng/dL, indicating severe hypothyroidism. After ruling out other possible causes, the diagnosis of myxedema madness was considered; hence, antipsychotic drug treatment and intravenous levothyroxine were prescribed. Behavioral symptoms returned to normal within 4 days of presentation, while levels of thyroid hormones attained normal values 1 week after admission. Recombinant TSH (Thyrogen®) was used successfully to prevent new episodes of mania due to thyroid hormone withdrawal in further controls for her thyroid cancer. This case illustrates that myxedema madness can occur in the setting of acute hypothyroidism, completely reverting with levothyroxine and antipsychotic treatment. Recombinant TSH may be a useful tool to prevent myxedema madness or any severe manifestation of levothyroxine withdrawal for the follow-up of thyroid cancer.

  2. Orthopedics management of acromicric dysplasia: follow up of nine patients.

    PubMed

    Klein, Céline; Le Goff, Carine; Topouchian, Vicken; Odent, Sylvie; Violas, Philippe; Glorion, Christophe; Cormier-Daire, Valérie

    2014-02-01

    Acromicric dysplasia (AD) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by short stature, short extremities, stiff joint and skeleton features including brachymetacarpia, cone-shaped epiphyses, internal notch of the femoral head, and delayed bone age. Recently, we identified fibrillin 1 (FBN1) as the disease gene of AD. The aim of our study was to further describe the long-term follow up of AD patients with an emphasis on orthopedic management. Nine patients with FBN1 mutations were included in the study ranging in age from 5.5 to 64 years. For all, detailed clinical and radiological data were available. Birth parameters were always normal and patients progressively developed short stature <-3 SD. Carpal tunnel syndrome was observed in four patients. We found discrepancy between the carpal bone age and the radius and ulna epiphysis bone ages, a variable severity of hip dysplasia with acetabular dysplasia, epiphyseal and metaphyseal femoral dysplasia resembling Legg-Perthes-Calvé disease and variable pelvic anteversion and hyperlordosis. Orthopedic surgery was required in two patients for hip dysplasia, in one for limb lengthening and in three for carpal tunnel syndrome. Our observations expand the AD phenotype and emphasize the importance of regular orthopedic survey. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Melorheostosis: case report with 20-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Pavone, Vito; Evola, Roberto Francesco; Di Giorgio, Angelo; Ruggieri, Martino; Ardito, Salvatore

    2008-05-01

    The authors report on a typical case of melorheostosis observed in an 18-year-old man, localized in the II digit of the right hand causing tumefaction and irregular pain. At 20-year follow-up, the patient showed a radiographical slight worsening of the lesion. Radiographic examination showed a mild increase in cortical and endosteal hyperostosis with bone shape alteration in the II digit of the right hand, slight cortical and endosteal hyperostosis at the level of right shoulder girdle involving the humerus. The other part of the skeleton was not affected. Clinical examination revealed swelling and tumefaction of the forefinger of the right hand and reduced articular motion both in proximal and distal interphalangeal joint and metacarpal phalangeal joint. The reminder of the clinical examination was normal. Melorheostosis is an uncommon mesenchymal disorder characterized by a chondral hyperostosis of the long bones associated to a sclerosis of the spongious bone. The etiology of this affection is unknown: the most accredited hypothesis is a developmental anomaly with a sequential sclerotomes distribution. Both genders may be affected, with the long tubular bones of the lower limbs more involved. This anomaly is often asymptomatic but maybe accompanied by pain with a smooth symptom progression and periodic exacerbations. Therapy is mainly symptomatic and comprises anti-inflammatory drugs or surgical approach for removal of soft tissue that may preclude daily activities. This case report demonstrates that melorheostosis is a relatively benign disorder with mildly progressive course.

  4. Cohort Profile: The Manitoba Follow-up Study (MFUS).

    PubMed

    Tate, Robert B; Cuddy, T Edward; Mathewson, Francis A L

    2015-10-01

    The Manitoba Follow-up Study (MFUS) is Canada's longest running study of cardiovascular disease and ageing. The MFUS cohort consists of 3983 men recruited from the Royal Canadian Air Force at the end of World War II. At entry to the study, 1 July 1948, their mean age was 31 years, with 90% between ages 20 and 39 years. All study members were free of clinical evidence of ischaemic heart disease. The protocol of MFUS was to obtain routine medical examinations from these men at regular intervals over time. The research goal of the study was to examine the role that any abnormalities detected on routine electrocardiograms from apparently healthy men might play in the prediction of subsequent diagnoses of cardiovascular disease. Over the course of 65 years, about 35% of the cohort has documented evidence of ischaemic heart disease. The research focus was expanded in 1996 to explore the roles of physical, mental and social functioning in support of healthy and successful ageing. On 1 July 2013, 429 original cohort members were alive with a mean age of 92 years. Collaborative research with others outside the in-house team is welcomed.

  5. SDSS-III MARVELS Planet Candidate RV Follow-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Jian; Thomas, Neil; Ma, Bo; Li, Rui; SIthajan, Sirinrat

    2014-02-01

    Planetary systems, discovered by the radial velocity (RV) surveys, reveal strong correlations between the planet frequency and stellar properties, such as metallicity and mass, and a greater diversity in planets than found in the solar system. However, due to the sample sizes of extant surveys (~100 to a few hundreds of stars) and their heterogeneity, many key questions remained to be addressed: Do metal poor stars obey the same trends for planet occurrence as metal rich stars? What is the distribution of giant planets around intermediate- mass stars and binaries? Is the ``planet desert'' within 0.6 AU in the planet orbital distribution of intermediate-mass stars real? The MARVELS survey has produced the largest homogeneous RV measurements of 3300 V=7.6-12 FGK stars. The latest data pipeline effort at UF has been able to remove long term systematic errors suffered in the earlier data pipeline. 18 high confident giant planet candidates have been identified among newly processed data. We propose to follow up these giant planet candidates with the KPNO EXPERT instrument to confirm the detection and also characterize their orbits. The confirmed planets will be used to measure occurrence rates, distributions and multiplicity of giants planets around F,G,K stars with a broad range of mass (~0.6-2.5 M_⊙) and metallicity ([Fe/H]~-1.5-0.5). The well defined MARVELS survey cadence allows robust determinations of completeness limits for rigorously testing giant planet formation theories and constraining models.

  6. Follow-up of MARVELS Brown Dwarf Candidates using EXPERT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Bo; Ge, Jian; Li, Rui; Sithajan, Sirinrat; Thomas, Neil; Wang, Ji; De Lee, Nathan

    2013-02-01

    The SDSS-III MARVELS survey is a comprehensive radial velocity survey of 3,300 nearby F-K stars, between 7.6 < V < 12.0 in 2008-2012. All of the survey data for 2580 FGK stars from the first two and half years have been processed with the latest data pipeline. A total of 26 new brown dwarfs (BD) candidates have been identified in the processed RV data. We expect to have 8 more BD candidates from the ~800 stars currently under processing, which will make a total of 34 BD candidates. This proposal requests KPNO 2.1m telescope time with the EXPERT instrument, to follow up all of these BD candidates to confirm the detections and characterize the orbits. The results will be used to (1) reveal the overall distribution of the new BDs in the parameter space; (2) measure the occurrence rate of BD around FGK type stars; (3) measure dryness of the brown dwarf desert around stars with different mass and metallicity; (4) constrain theoretical models regarding the formation of brown dwarfs; (5) confirm the discovery of `desert in the brown dwarf desert'; (6) identify additional companions associated with the detected systems.

  7. Multi-wavelength follow-up of ANTARES neutrino alerts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, Aurore

    2015-10-01

    Transient sources are often associated with the most violent phenomena in the Universe, where the acceleration of hadrons may occur. Such sources include gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), active galactic nuclei (AGN) or core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe), and are promising candidates for the production of high energy cosmic rays and neutrinos. The ANTARES telescope, located in the Mediterranean sea, aims at detecting these high energy neutrinos, which could reveal the presence of a cosmic ray accelerator. However, to enhance the sensitivity to transient sources, a method based on multi-wavelength follow-up of neutrino alerts has been developed within the ANTARES collaboration. This program, denoted as TAToO, triggers a network of robotic optical telescopes and the Swift-XRT with a delay of only a few seconds after a neutrino detection. The telescopes start an observation program of the corresponding region of the sky in order to detect a possible electromagnetic counterpart to the neutrino event. The work presented in this thesis covers the development and implementation of an optical image analysis pipeline, as well as the analysis of optical and X-ray data to search for fast transient sources, such as GRB afterglows, and slowly varying transient sources, such as CCSNe.

  8. Asbestos and cancer: a cohort followed up to death.

    PubMed Central

    Enterline, P E; Hartley, J; Henderson, V

    1987-01-01

    The mortality experience of 1074 white men who retired from a United States asbestos company during the period 1941-67 and who were exposed to asbestos working as production and maintenance employees for the company is reported to the end of 1980 when 88% of this cohort was known to be dead. As noted in earlier reports the mortality for respiratory and gastrointestinal cancer was raised. A more detailed examination of causes of death shows that the excess in gastrointestinal cancer was largely due to a statistically significant excess in stomach cancer. A statistically significant excess was also noted for kidney cancer, cancer of the eye, and non-malignant respiratory disease. Eight deaths from malignant mesothelioma were observed, two of which were peritoneal. Asbestos exposures for these mesothelioma cases were low relative to other members of the cohort. Continuing follow up of this cohort shows a dose response relation for respiratory cancer that has become increasingly linear. Standardised mortality ratios peaked 10 to 15 years after retirement and were relatively constant at around 250 in each five year interval starting in 1950. This excess might have been detected as early as 1960 but certainly by 1965. The mortality experience of this cohort reflects the ultimate effects of asbestos since nearly all of the cohort has now died. PMID:3606968

  9. [Attitude of primary care doctors to follow-up dyslipidemias].

    PubMed

    Alonso Cerezo, C; Simón Martín, J; Fernández Jiménez, G; Rivera Franco, J

    2004-04-15

    To know the opinion of primary care physicians about the criteria that they use in the request of the laboratories tests of hyperlipidemia and to confirm the above-mentioned opinion with the parameters edited in some guides of clinical practice published on hyperlipidemia. Transverse and descriptive study. Accomplishment of 2 questionnaires, one by internal post and another one through personal or telephonic interview. Comparison of most important guides of clinical practice. Primary care of an area of Madrid. In the survey directed to all the 199 primary care physicians, 116 valid answers were obtained. In the survey directed to all 20 coordinators of the centers of primary care, 16 valid answers were obtained. The frequency, the percentage and the confidence interval. 109 (94%) of the primary care physicians request laboratories tests in the goal to exclude secondary reasons of hyperlipidemia. The LDL-cholesterol is considered to be a suitable test for the follow-up of the hyperlipidemia by 108 (93.0%) primary care physicians. According to the opinion of the coordinators, the year of edition and/or review of the existing guide in the center changes between 1992-2000. As strategy of improvement of the clinical practice it is necessary to realize and support an updated guide of clinical practice, where the suitable tests are defined to look for the etiología of hyperlipidemia, the determinations that must be requested for the initial control of the treatment and with which periodicity they are requested.

  10. [Follow-up and counselling after pelvic inflammatory disease].

    PubMed

    Derniaux, E; Lucereau-Barbier, M; Graesslin, O

    2012-12-01

    Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) can be responsible for infertility and chronic pelvic pain. Treatment of acute PID is very important as it can reduce the risk of sequelae. However, follow-up, partner treatment and counselling are also useful to reduce the reinfection rate. Few weeks after PID, clinical evaluation as well as transvaginal and transabdominal sonography must be performed. The interest of systematic bacteriological tests is not proved. Hysterosalpingography and second-look laparoscopy should be considered only for women with infertility and severe infection. Use of condom is advisable in this population in order to prevent sexually transmitted diseases (STD) including HIV and to decrease rate of recurrence, associated to contraceptive pill, which is also a good option. In selected cases, intrauterine devices can be used in patients with history of PID if the infection is resolved and no significant risk factors for STD exist. Infertility and chronic pelvic pain are the most common sequelae in the population of young women with severe and recurrent infection. The risk of ectopic pregnancy is higher for these women and must be kept in mind. Counselling and risk-reduction interventions decreased significatively the rate of recurrence and sequelae in PID. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  11. Follow-up after treatment for breast cancer: Practical guide to survivorship care for family physicians.

    PubMed

    Sisler, Jeffrey; Chaput, Genevieve; Sussman, Jonathan; Ozokwelu, Emmanuel

    2016-10-01

    To offer FPs a summary of evidence-based recommendations to guide their follow-up survivorship care of women treated for breast cancer. A literature search was conducted in MEDLINE from 2000 to 2016 using the search words breast cancer, survivorship, follow-up care, aftercare, guidelines, and survivorship care plans, with a focus on review of recent guidelines published by national cancer organizations. Evidence ranges from level I to level III. Survivorship care involves 4 main tasks: surveillance and screening, management of long-term effects, health promotion, and care coordination. Surveillance for recurrence involves only annual mammography, and screening for other cancers should be done according to population guidelines. Management of the long-term effects of cancer and its treatment addresses common issues of pain, fatigue, lymphedema, distress, and medication side effects, as well as longer-term concerns for cardiac and bone health. Health promotion emphasizes the benefits of active lifestyle change in cancer survivors, with an emphasis on physical activity. Survivorship care is enhanced by the involvement of various health professionals and services, and FPs play an important role in care coordination. Family physicians are increasingly the main providers of follow-up care after breast cancer treatment. Breast cancer should be viewed as a chronic medical condition even in women who remain disease free, and patients benefit from the approach afforded other chronic conditions in primary care. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  12. Diagnosis and 10-year follow-up of a community-based hepatitis C cohort.

    PubMed

    Yawn, Barbara P; Wollan, Peter; Gazzuola, Liliana; Kim, W Ray

    2002-02-01

    To determine the health care follow-up and treatment associated with physician-diagnosed hepatitis C (HCV) in a community-based population. We conducted a retrospective medical record review using records from all providers in Olmsted County, Minnesota. The study incorporated all Olmsted County residents with physician-diagnosed hepatitis C from 1990 through 1999. We assessed demographic and health status information as well as health services use in subjects with physician-diagnosed HCV. Physicians diagnosed hepatitis C in 355 subjects (219 men [62%], 136 women [38%]), mean age 43 years, in the 10-year period studied. About half of diagnoses (45%, n = 159) were confirmed with polymerase chain reaction or liver biopsies. Identified risk factors included IV drug use (50%), multiple sex partners (36%), and blood transfusion (30%). Follow-up assessment with aspartate aminotransferase/amino alanine transferase (AST/ALT) tests occurred in about half (49%) of subjects, while 202 subjects (60%) were referred for gastrointestinal (GI) specialist evaluation and 49 patients (14% of all, 25% of those referred to a GI specialist) had specific treatment for hepatitis C. Although well over half of patients (60%) had possible contraindications to HCV treatment, including heavy alcohol use, few were referred for chemical dependency therapy. In this community, follow-up and treatment related to HCV were limited. Attention to prevention of disease-accelerating co- infections was only modest. Referral or documented recommendations for treatment of alcoholism or heavy chronic alcohol ingestion were minimal.

  13. ICU nurses' experiences in providing terminal care.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Laura; Young, Anne; Symes, Lene; Haile, Brenda; Walsh, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    At least 1 in 5 Americans die while using intensive care service-a number that is expected to increase as society ages. Many of these deaths involve withholding or withdrawing life-sustaining therapies. In these situations, the role of intensive care nurses shifts from providing aggressive care to end-of-life care. While hospice and palliative care nurses typically receive specialized support to cope with death and dying, intensive care nurses usually do not receive this support. Understanding the experiences of intensive care nurses in providing care at the end of life is an important first step to improving terminal care in the intensive care unit (ICU). This phenomenological research study explores the experiences of intensive care nurses who provide terminal care in the ICU. The sample consisted of 18 registered nurses delivering terminal care in an ICU that participated in individual interviews and focus groups. Colaizzi's steps for data analysis were used to identify themes within the context of nursing. Three major themes consisted of (1) barriers to optimal care, (2) internal conflict, and (3) coping. Providing terminal care creates significant personal and professional struggles among ICU nurses.

  14. Clinical follow up of uniparental disomy 16: First data

    SciTech Connect

    Dworniczak, B.; Koppers, B.; Bogdanova, N.

    1994-09-01

    Following the introduction of the concept of uniparental disomy (UPD) in 1980 by Engel this segregational anomaly is reported in an ever increasing number of patients. So far, several groups of individuals with an increased risk for UPD have been identified including abnormal carriers of familial balanced translocations or centric fusions, carriers of mosaic trisomies, and fetuses after prenatal diagnosis of confined placental mosaicism. A major pathogenetic mechanism appears to be post-meiotic chromosome loss in trisomic conceptuses. UPD was repeatedly observed in the fetus after diagnosis of mosaic or non-mosaic trisomies in the placenta which are usually considered {open_quotes}lethal{close_quotes} (i.e. trisomies 15 and 16). In an ongoing study to determine the incidence and clinical consequences of UPD we investigated the parental origin of chromosomes in the disomic cell line after prenatal diagnosis of mosaicism for various trisomies (e.g. 2, 7, 14, 15, and 16). At present, two maternal disomies 16 and one maternal disomy 15 were identified. Severe intrauterine growth retardation was a common symptome which, however, was also present in some but not all mosaics with a biparental origin of the chromosomes in question. While prognosis is clear in some instances (i.e. UPD 15) counseling can be extremely difficult in others, when imprinting effects and homozygosity for unknown recessive traits present in a parent have to be considered. To assess the clinical significance, detailed follow-up studies of proven cases of uniparental disomies are essential. First data of two cases with UPD 16 are presented.

  15. Follow up on the crystal growth experiments of the LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, K. F.; Lind, M. D.

    1993-01-01

    The results of the 4 solution growth experiments on the LDEF have been published elsewhere. Both the crystals of CaCO3, which were large and well shaped, and the much smaller TTF-TCNQ crystals showed unusual morphological behavior. The follow up on these experiments was begun in 1981, when ESA initiated a 'Concept Definition Study' on a large, 150 kg, Solution Growth Facility (SGF) to be included in the payload of EURECA-1, the European Retrievable Carrier. This carrier was a continuation of the European Spacelab and at that time planned for launch in 1987. The long delay of the LDEF retrieval and of subsequent missions brought about reflections both on the concept of crystal growth in space and on the choice of crystallization materials that had been made for the LDEF. Already before the LDEF retrieval, research on TTF-TCNQ had been stopped, and a planned growth experiment with TTF-TCNQ on the SGF/EURECA had been cancelled. The target of the SGF investigation is now more fundamental in nature. None of the crystals to be grown here are, like TTF-TCNQ, in particular demand by science or industry, and the crystals only serve the purpose of model crystals. The real purpose of the investigation is to study the growth behavior. One of the experiments, the Soret Coefficient Measurement experiment is not growing crystals at all, but has it as its sole purpose to obtain accurate information on thermal diffusion, a process of importance in crystal growth from solution.

  16. Latex allergy: a follow up study of 1040 healthcare workers

    PubMed Central

    Filon, F Larese; Radman, G

    2006-01-01

    Background Natural rubber latex allergy can cause skin and respiratory symptoms The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and incidence of latex related symptoms and sensitisation among a large group of healthcare workers in Trieste hospitals, followed for three years before and after the introduction of powder‐free gloves with low latex release. Methods In the years 1997–99 the authors evaluated 1040 healthcare workers exposed to latex allergen for latex related symptoms and sensitisation by means of a questionnaire, a medical examination, skin prick tests, and IgE specific antibody assay. The second evaluation was carried out in the years 2000–02, subsequent to the changeover to a powder‐free environment. Results Glove related symptoms were seen in 21.8% of the nurses (227), mostly consisting of mild dermatitis: 38 (3.6%) complaining of contact urticaria and 24 (2.3%) of asthma and/or rhinitis. These symptoms were significantly related to skin prick tests positive to latex (OR = 9.70; 95% CI 5.5 to 17) and to personal atopy (OR = 2.29; 95% CI 1.6 to 3.2). Follow up was completed in 960 subjects (92.3%): 19 new subjects (2.4%) complained of itching erythema when using gloves, but none was prick positive to latex. Symptoms significantly improved and in most cases disappeared (p<0.0001). Conclusions Simple measures such as the avoidance of unnecessary glove use, the use of non‐powdered latex gloves by all workers, and use of non‐latex gloves by sensitised subjects can stop the progression of latex symptoms and can avoid new cases of sensitisation. PMID:16421390

  17. Follow-up practices for high-grade extremity Osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Rothermundt, Christian; Seddon, Beatrice M; Dileo, Palma; Strauss, Sandra J; Coleman, Joanne; Briggs, Timothy W; Haile, Sarah R; Whelan, Jeremy S

    2016-05-06

    The optimal conduct of follow-up (FU) of patients with osteosarcoma is uncertain. In the absence of any formal validation of optimal timing and method of surveillance, guidance is provided by oncology societies' recommendations. FU is designed to detect either local recurrence or metastatic disease at a time when early treatment is still possible and might be effective. We performed a retrospective analysis of 101 patients with high-grade extremity osteosarcoma in a single centre. Chest x-ray (CXR) was used as routine surveillance method; however patients with initial lung metastases or previous suspicious findings had computed tomography (CT) scans. With a median FU time of 30.7 months 34 patients relapsed. Relapse-free survival after 5 years was 61% (CI 52%; 73%), late relapses occurred in only two patients between 2 and 5 years of FU. Twenty-five of the 34 relapses were detected at routine FU appointments. All 8 local recurrences were noted clinically. Twenty-two patients had metastases confined to the lungs, either detected on CXR or CT. Thirty-two percent of patients with lung metastases only were salvaged successfully. Routine FU in high-grade osteosarcoma results in clinical detection of local relapse, and detection of lung metastases by CXR at a time when metastatectomy is possible. The optimal time interval for FU appointments is not known, however we recommend more frequent surveillance visits during the two years after treatment. We hypothesize that routine CT scans are not required and propose CXR for detection of lung metastases.

  18. Improving preterm infants' immunisation status: a follow-up audit.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Nigel W; Barfield, Charles; Hunt, Rod W; Pitcher, Helen; Buttery, Jim P

    2014-04-01

    Preterm infants are at increased risk of vaccine preventable diseases. An audit in 2007 identified suboptimal immunisation status of preterm infants. The aim of this study was to complete the 'audit loop', reviewing preterm infants' immunisation status at a single tertiary paediatric hospital. A retrospective follow-up immunisation audit was conducted at The Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, neonatal unit. The 'audit loop' included a preterm infants' reminder sticker and feedback of the original audit findings to Royal Children's Hospital health-care professionals. Immunisation status was determined using the Australian Childhood Immunisation Register record for all admitted preterm infants born <32 weeks gestation (July 2008-June 2009). Conducted in March 2011, the median age of participants (n = 57) was 2.5 years (range 1.7-3.1 years). Forty-four per cent (25/57) had a history of chronic lung disease, 86% (49/57) were <1500 g and 42% (24/57) <28 weeks gestation. The majority (96% (55/57)) were up to date with routine immunisations at 12 months of age. There was a 2.4-fold increase, compared with the original audit, for receipt of the additional recommended hepatitis B vaccine at 12 months of age, as well as influenza vaccine in infants with chronic lung disease. This study showed that a simple reminder combined with education strategies can improve vaccine delivery in special risk groups such as preterm infants. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2013 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  19. Six year follow-up of cryopreserved human embryos.

    PubMed

    Lornage, J; Chorier, H; Boulieu, D; Mathieu, C; Czyba, J C

    1995-10-01

    In 1987, we became aware of the importance of remaining in contact with couples whose embryos had been cryopreserved for > 1 year. As a result, a questionnaire was designed to follow the fate of these embryos. Of 407 couples with cryopreserved embryos, 262 couples opted to use them within 1 year with the intention of fulfilling a parental plan. The remaining 145 couples were questioned by six successive questionnaires sent out between 1987 and 1992. By the end of the study, 336 of the 407 couples (82.5%) had chosen to utilize their embryos in a parental plan. In most cases, the maximum delay of response (5 years according to the Council of State) was respected. The remaining 71 couples (17.5%) either abandoned the parental plan or had not given any information by the end of the study. Initially, anonymous donation to another couple was chosen in preference to destroying the surplus embryos (32 versus 18 couples, P < 0.05). Latterly, however, these differences have balanced out (24 versus 28, not significant). Only those couples who initially opted to donate embryos to another couple changed their attitude in later years. In the long run, 62 couples decided not to pursue their parental plan; of these, 24 couples chose to make a gift to another couple, 28 couples opted for destruction, and 10 chose to make a gift to research. Nine couples (out of 71) declined to make a decision, but they had all achieved a pregnancy during an in-vitro fertilization (IVF) attempt. Three of these were lost to follow-up, i.e. 0.7% of all couples benefiting from the freezing technique.

  20. Clozapine and anemia: a 2-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jimmy; Bies, Robert; Bhaloo, Amaal; Powell, Valerie; Remington, Gary

    2015-12-01

    Clozapine's association with agranulocytosis led to the implementation of stringent and mandatory hematologic monitoring guidelines in most countries. Although other hematologic aberrations such as eosinophilia and neutropenia have been previously described, clozapine's impact on the erythroid lineage has not been studied. There is a suspicion that a higher rate of anemia is observed in patients receiving clozapine; therefore, we hypothesized that there would be a higher rate of anemia in patients receiving clozapine therapy. All individuals initiated on clozapine at our center from 2009 to 2010 were recruited. Information on age, gender, medical comorbidities, and smoking status was extracted from the medical records. Data from complete blood counts over a 2-year follow-up period were extracted, with anemia defined as a hemoglobin value below 120 g/L for women and 130 g/L for men. Time to anemia event was calculated and Cox regression was employed to identify predictors of anemia. We found a high incidence of anemia in the first 2 years following clozapine initiation; of the 94 individuals (68 men, 26 women) recruited, 23 (24.5%) developed anemia. Higher baseline hemoglobin level (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.86, P = .002) and smoking status (HR = 0.21, P = .021) were identified as significant protective factors against anemia in men but not in women (HR = 0.92, P = .184, and HR = 0.52, P = .467 for baseline hemoglobin and smoking, respectively). Although smoking appears to lower the risk of anemia, we believe this is due to smoking's up-regulation of hemoglobin levels. Further studies are warranted in light of the present findings; for example, we cannot exclude the possibility that anemia was an epiphenomenon, characterizing instead a population with severe mental illness. © Copyright 2015 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  1. Effectiveness of antismoking telephone helpline: follow up survey.

    PubMed Central

    Platt, S.; Tannahill, A.; Watson, J.; Fraser, E.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of an antismoking campaign conducted by the Health Education Board for Scotland. DESIGN: Descriptive survey of adult callers to a telephone helpline (Smokeline) for stopping smoking; panel study of a random sample of adult callers; assessment of changes in prevalence of smoking in Scotland before and after introduction of the helpline. SETTING: Telephone helpline. SUBJECTS: Callers to Smokeline over the initial one year period. Detailed information was collected on a 10% sample (n = 8547). A cohort of adult smokers who called Smokeline (total n = 848) was followed up by telephone interview three weeks, six months, and one year after the initial call. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Numbers of adult smokers calling helpline; changes in smoking behaviour, especially stopping smoking among cohort members; and changes in prevalence of smoking in the general population. RESULTS: An estimated 82782 regular adult smokers made genuine contact with Smokeline over the year, representing about 5.9% of all adult smokers in Scotland. At one year 143 of the cohort of 848 callers (23.6%; 95% confidence interval 20.2% to 27.0%) reported that they had stopped smoking and 534 (88.0%; 85.4% to 90.6%) reported having made some change. About 19500 (16700 to 22350) adult smokers, equivalent to 1.4% (1.2% to 1.6%) of the mean adult smoking population, stopped smoking with direct help from Smokeling. During the second year of the campaign (1994) smoking prevalence among 25-65 year olds in Scotland was 6% (2.0% to 10.0%) lower than it had been before the start of the campaign. CONCLUSION: The Health Education Board for Scotland's antismoking campaign reached a high number of adult smokers, was associated with a highly acceptable quit rate among adults given direct help through Smokeline, and contributed considerably to an accelerated decline in smoking prevalence in Scotland. PMID:9161308

  2. [Diagnosis and follow up of 23 children with organic acidurias].

    PubMed

    Cornejo, Verónica; Colombo, Marta; Durán, Gloria; Mabe, Paulina; Jiménez, Mónica; De la Parra, Alicia; Valiente, Alf; Raimann, Erna

    2002-03-01

    Propionic aciduria (PA) and Methymalonic aciduria (MMA) result from an inherited abnormality of the enzymes propionyl CoA carboxylase and methylmalonyl CoA mutase respectively. This produces marked increases in the amino acids methionine, threonine, valine and isoleucine (MTVI). Their clinical presentation can be neonatal or late onset forms. To report 23 children with organic acidurias. Twenty three cases of organic acidurias diagnosed since 1980 (17 PA and 6 MMA) and followed at the Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology, are reported. The average age of diagnosis was 3.9 days for the neonatal form and 8.3 months for the late onset form. The most frequent symptoms were hypotonia, lethargy and vomiting. Neonatal PA had mean ammonemias of 1089 +/- 678.3 micrograms/dl. The figure for MMA was 933 +/- 801.9 micrograms/dl. Seven children were dialyzed and 30% died. 16 children are followed and 81.2% have normal weight for age. Seven children required gastrostomy because of anorexia and failure to thrive. The nutritional treatment is based on natural and artificial proteins without MTVI, with periodical controls, amino acid and ammonia quantification. Some patients were submitted to enzyme assays and molecular studies. An early diagnosis and a very strict follow up allows a normal development of children with organic acidurias. There is a relationship between prognosis and the presentation form, the nutritional status and the emergency treatment during acute episodes. The importance of the enzymatic and molecular studies is emphasized because they facilitate treatment, accurate diagnosis and allow an adequate genetic counseling.

  3. Six month-follow up of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Keleidari, Behrouz; Mahmoudie, Mohsen; Anaraki, Amin Ghanei; Shahraki, Masoud Sayadi; Jamalouee, Samira Dvashi; Gharzi, Mahsa; Mohtashampour, Farnoosh

    2016-01-01

    Background: The rising prevalence of obesity in today populations has led obese individuals to seek medical interventions. Aside from special diets, routine exercise and in some cases, medical treatment, most of the obese patients, favoring those with morbid or super obesity can benefit from bariatric surgery to lose weight. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) is relatively new method to limit the compliance of stomach. The consequent quick satiety during each meal results in gradual weight loss in patients. We investigated the efficacy and safety of this method among a group of our patients. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in Isfahan, Iran, from January 2012 to January 2013. Thirty-five cases of obesity that had undergone LSG were enrolled and their baseline data of weight, body mass index (BMI), blood sugar, lipid profile, liver function indexes and blood pressure were collected. The patients were followed up for 6 months. The 6-month results were analyzed. Results: There was significant reduction in BMI, weight, blood sugar, blood pressure, liver enzymes and lipid profile components (P < 0.05), except for alkaline phosphatase (ALP) (P = 0.3). The average of excess weight loss percentage after 6 months was 69.2 ± 20.9%. No mortality occurred. Two of the patients had micro anastomotic leaks that were treated with nonoperative management. A case of gross leakage was treated with tube jejunostomy. Conclusion: Our study confirmed the efficacy and safety of LSG as a single surgical intervention for body weight reduction in morbidly and super obese patients. PMID:27110546

  4. Cognitive therapy v. usual treatment for borderline personality disorder: prospective 6-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Kate M; Tyrer, Peter; Norrie, John; Palmer, Stephen J; Tyrer, Helen

    2010-12-01

    Longer-term follow-up of patients with borderline personality disorder have found favourable clinical outcomes, with long-term reduction in symptoms and diagnosis. We examined the 6-year outcome of patients with borderline personality disorder who were randomised to 1 year of cognitive-behavioural therapy for personality disorders (CBT-PD) or treatment as usual (TAU) in the BOSCOT trial, in three centres across the UK (trial registration: ISRCTN86177428). In total, 106 participants met criteria for borderline personality disorder in the original trial. Patients were interviewed at follow-up by research assistants masked to the patient's original treatment group, CBT-PD or TAU, using the same measures as in the original randomised trial. Statistical analyses of data for the group as a whole are based on generalised linear models with repeated measures analysis of variance type models to examine group differences. Follow-up data were obtained for 82% of patients at 6 years. Over half the patients meeting criteria for borderline personality disorder at entry into the study no longer did so 6 years later. The gains of CBT-PD over TAU in reduction of suicidal behaviour seen after 1-year follow-up were maintained. Length of hospitalisation and cost of services were lower in the CBT-PD group compared with the TAU group. Although the use of CBT-PD did not demonstrate a statistically significant cost-effective advantage, the findings indicate the potential for continued long-term cost-offsets that accrue following the initial provision of 1 year of CBT-PD. However, the quality of life and affective disturbance remained poor.

  5. Additional follow-up telephone counselling and initial smoking relapse: a longitudinal, controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lei; He, Yao; Jiang, Bin; Zuo, Fang; Liu, Qinghui; Zhang, Li; Zhou, Changxi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Smoking cessation services can help smokers to quit; however, many smoking relapse cases occur over time. Initial relapse prevention should play an important role in achieving the goal of long-term smoking cessation. Several studies have focused on the effect of extended telephone support in relapse prevention, but the conclusions remain conflicting. Design and setting From October 2008 to August 2013, a longitudinal, controlled study was performed in a large general hospital of Beijing. Participants The smokers who sought treatment at our smoking cessation clinic were non-randomised and divided into 2 groups: face-to-face individual counselling group (FC group), and face-to-face individual counselling plus telephone follow-up counselling group (FCF group). No pharmacotherapy was offered. Outcomes The timing of initial smoking relapse was compared between FC and FCF groups. Predictors of initial relapse were investigated during the first 180 days, using the Cox proportional hazards model. Results Of 547 eligible male smokers who volunteered to participate, 457 participants (117 in FC group and 340 in FCF group) achieved at least 24 h abstinence. The majority of the lapse episodes occurred during the first 2 weeks after the quit date. Smokers who did not receive the follow-up telephone counselling (FC group) tended to relapse to smoking earlier than those smokers who received the additional follow-up telephone counselling (FCF group), and the log-rank test was statistically significant (p=0.003). A Cox regression model showed that, in the FCF group, being married, and having a lower Fagerström test score, normal body mass index and doctor-diagnosed tobacco-related chronic diseases, were significantly independent protective predictors of smoking relapse. Conclusions Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that additional follow-up telephone counselling might be an effective strategy in preventing relapse. Further research is still

  6. The Follow-up Crisis: Optimizing Science in an Opportunity Rich Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestrand, T.

    Rapid follow-up tasking for robotic telescopes has been dominated by a one-dimensional uncoordinated response strategy developed for gamma-ray burst studies. However, this second-grade soccer approach is increasing showing its limitations even when there are only a few events per night. And it will certainly fail when faced with the denial-of-service attack generated by the nightly flood of new transients generated by massive variability surveys like LSST. We discuss approaches for optimizing the scientific return from autonomous robotic telescopes in the high event range limit and explore the potential of a coordinated telescope ecosystem employing heterogeneous telescopes.

  7. Mortality patterns among workers exposed to acrylamide: 1994 follow up

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, G. M.; Lucas, L. J.; Youk, A. O.; Schall, L. C.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To update the mortality experience of a cohort of 8508 workers with potential exposure to acrylamide at three plants in the United States from 1984-94. METHODS: Analyses of standardised mortality ratios (SMR) with national and local rates and relative risk (RR) regression modelling were performed to assess site specific cancer risks by demographic and work history factors, and exposure indicators for acrylamide and muriatic acid. RESULTS: For the 1925-94 study period, excess and deficit overall mortality risks were found for cancer sites of interest: brain and other central nervous system (CNS) (SMR 0.65, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.36 to 1.09), thyroid gland (SMR 2.11, 95% CI 0.44 to 6.17), testis and other male genital organs (SMR 0.28, 95% CI 0.01 to 1.59), and cancer of the respiratory system (SMR 1.10, 95% CI 0.99 to 1.22); however, none was significant or associated with exposure to acrylamide. A previously reported excess mortality risk of cancer of the respiratory system at one plant remained increased among workers with potential exposure to muriatic acid (RR 1.50, 95% CI 0.86 to 2.59), but was only slightly increased among workers exposed or unexposed to acrylamide. In an exploratory exposure-response analysis of rectal, oesophageal, pancreatic, and kidney cancer, we found increased SMRs for some categories of exposure to acrylamide, but little evidence of an exposure-response relation. A significant 2.26-fold risk (95% CI 1.03 to 4.29) was found for pancreatic cancer among workers with cumulative exposure to acrylamide > 0.30 mg/m3.years; however, no consistent exposure-response relations were detected with the exposure measures considered when RR regression models were adjusted for time since first exposure to acrylamide. CONCLUSION: The contribution of 1115 additional deaths and nearly 60,000 person-years over the 11 year follow up period corroborate the original cohort study findings of little evidence for a causal relation between

  8. Kepler Data Validation and Follow-up Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    William, Borucki J.

    2009-01-01

    The approach that the Kepler Mission uses to remove false positive events and to validate the discoveries consists of two parts; data validation (DPI) and follow up observations program (FOP). DV consists of several methods of examining the data from the spacecraft observations. First, to rule out statistical fluctuations in the data, accept only signals that show 3 or more transits and that have a total signal-to-noise ratio that exceeds 7 sigma. Second. to identify small stellar companions to the target star, we check for secondary eclipses and determine if the transit characteristics are appropriate for a planetary companion. Third, check for background binaries that are in the target aperture. Here we measure the movement of the image centroid before, during, and after the transit. If the target is producing the signal, a dimming wi11 move the image centroid in a known direction and magnitude. If the signal comes from a nearby star, the amplitude and direction of the motion wi11 be different, This test is expected to rule out the hundreds of binary signals expected from background stars. The precision of the measurement depends on the stellar fluxes and positions but can be better than 0.01 pixel; i.e., 0.04". Those candidates that pass these tests are examined using ground-based telescopes and radial velocity spectrometers. First medium precision RV is used to rule out any remaining stellar companions. Then high spatial resolution imaging is used to check for nearby stars that are in the aperture- (The Kepler apertures depend on magnitude but are of order 36 sq are sec in area.) If no stars are present that quid generate the observed signal, then the candidate goes to a large telescope such as Keck, HET, or Wi1lilam Herschel for high precision observations to get the planet mass or an upper limit to it, if there are some stars in the aperture, then the photometric observations are employed to look for the transit by cane of the confounding stars. If none are

  9. Psychological type: a 32-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Bradway, K; Detloff, W

    1996-10-01

    This study is a follow-up to three previous studies of psychological type published in this Journal in 1964, 1976 and 1978 by Bradway, Bradway and Detloff, and Bradway and Joseph Wheelwright. Participants in all of our studies were limited to Jungian analysts and candidates. Participants of the first two studies and of the current study were from California; participants of the 1978 study included the participants from the previous study plus persons attending the 1974 International Congress in London. In 1993 we sent letters to the 232 current analysts and candidates in the San Francisco and Los Angeles C.G. Jung Institutes, as well as to the nine participants in our 1974 study who were no longer members of the Institutes but could be located, asking them to fill out a questionnaire that included self-typing, and to self-administer the Gray-Wheelwrights Jungian Type Survey (GW). The response rate was high: 196 or 81% of the 241 persons to whom we sent letters returned filled-in questionnaires and GWs; all 67 or 100% of the participants in the 1974 study who could be located returned the filled-in material. Eight of those 67 had also been in the 1961 study. The current study provides data on the changes in psychological type over time, in some instances over a period of 32 years. It added for the first time a consideration of analysts' rating of themselves as primarily clinically or symbolically orientated, and a survey of analyst opinions as to the determinants of psychological type. Summarizing the results: A smaller percentage of analysts typed themselves as intuitive thinking than in 1961; the percentages of congruence between self-typing and the Gray-Wheelwrights scores in the three dimensions (introvert/extravert, sensation/intuition, and thinking/feeling) in 1961, 1974 and 1993 are between 76% and 96%; changes in typology from 1961 to 1993 occur more frequently in the younger age group than in the older age group; 65% of the participants considered the

  10. Kepler Data Validation and Follow-up Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    William, Borucki J.

    2009-01-01

    The approach that the Kepler Mission uses to remove false positive events and to validate the discoveries consists of two parts; data validation (DPI) and follow up observations program (FOP). DV consists of several methods of examining the data from the spacecraft observations. First, to rule out statistical fluctuations in the data, accept only signals that show 3 or more transits and that have a total signal-to-noise ratio that exceeds 7 sigma. Second. to identify small stellar companions to the target star, we check for secondary eclipses and determine if the transit characteristics are appropriate for a planetary companion. Third, check for background binaries that are in the target aperture. Here we measure the movement of the image centroid before, during, and after the transit. If the target is producing the signal, a dimming wi11 move the image centroid in a known direction and magnitude. If the signal comes from a nearby star, the amplitude and direction of the motion wi11 be different, This test is expected to rule out the hundreds of binary signals expected from background stars. The precision of the measurement depends on the stellar fluxes and positions but can be better than 0.01 pixel; i.e., 0.04". Those candidates that pass these tests are examined using ground-based telescopes and radial velocity spectrometers. First medium precision RV is used to rule out any remaining stellar companions. Then high spatial resolution imaging is used to check for nearby stars that are in the aperture- (The Kepler apertures depend on magnitude but are of order 36 sq are sec in area.) If no stars are present that quid generate the observed signal, then the candidate goes to a large telescope such as Keck, HET, or Wi1lilam Herschel for high precision observations to get the planet mass or an upper limit to it, if there are some stars in the aperture, then the photometric observations are employed to look for the transit by cane of the confounding stars. If none are

  11. Vertical HIV-1 transmission: prophylaxis and paediatric follow-up.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, M; Sanchéz, A; Maneiro, P; Angelosante, W; Pérez, C; Valleé, M

    2001-04-01

    To study the effectiveness of anti-HIV therapy for vertical HIV-1 transmission based on the PACTG protocol 076, modified and adapted to Venezuela. Between March 1997 and March 2000, 74 HIV-1-infected women (15-42 years old) with 77 singleton pregnancies were evaluated. Zidovudine (ZDV) 500 mg/day (average 8 weeks) was begun after Western blot confirmatory tests, independent of CD4+ count or viral load. ZDV was administered as follows: 47 patients (61 per cent) received prenatal, perinatal and postnatal therapy; 13 (17 per cent) received prenatal and postnatal therapy; two (3 per cent) received prenatal and perinatal therapy; one patient received perinatal and postnatal therapy; seven (9 per cent) received only postnatal therapy. Seven HIV-1 infected women received no treatment. Thirty-two newborns were obtained by C-section (45.7 per cent), while 38 were delivered vaginally (54.2 per cent). Due to advanced maternal illness, seven HIV-1-infected women received ZDV+3TC, two women received ZDV+ddI and one woman received ZDV+3TC+ Ritonavir. Breastfeeding was avoided in all cases. Outcomes showed 65 term newborns and five preterm newborns; three abortions; one fetal loss and one preterm death. Two maternal/fetal deaths were secondary to complications related to AIDS at 27 and 29 weeks, respectively. Twenty-one children over 18 months old were considered uninfected. Thirty-five infants below 15 months of age were considered with the status of indeterminate HIV-1 infection (PO). Three infants fewer than 5 months of age with multiple risk factors were considered infected (P2). Two infants were asymptomatic and HIV positive at 12 months of age (P1). Eight children were lost to follow-up. Independent of maternal status and delivery type, confirmed vertical transmission of HIV-1-infected women who received ZDV is 4.25 per cent. Prenatal care with a multidisciplinary team is necessary for good obstetric and newborn outcomes. Copyright 2001 IFPA and Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  12. When Subsidized Employment Is Terminated: A Follow-Up Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randolph, Alice H.; Swann, Karen

    1980-01-01

    To ease the transition of laid-off Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA) workers, a series of workshops were held to provide information and identify needs. Although most participants were satsified with CETA services, they did not feel they received help in finding new jobs. (JAC)

  13. Outcome of ICU survivors: a comprehensive review. The role of patient-reported outcome studies.

    PubMed

    Granja, C; Amaro, A; Dias, C; Costa-Pereira, A

    2012-10-01

    Problems survivors face after intensive care unit (ICU) discharge begin while they are still in the ward, where many of their specific problems may run unrecognized, but they assume a heavy weight when they arrive at their homes and face several kind of limitations, from being unable to climb stairs because of weight loss, asthenia, dyspnea or joint stiffness to anxiety, depression or post-traumatic stress disorder. Follow-up consultations have given us a better understanding of these specific problems, and the information gained has been used to improve intensive care itself and promote a quality service for patients and relatives. The aim of this article is to provide an overview on adult ICU outcome studies and discuss how they have influenced and improved the delivery of intensive care. We will explain how we went from real patients to outcome studies and what we have learned concerning the consequences of critical illness and critical care. Development of outcome studies, what we have learned through them and our own experience will be outlined focusing mainly in four topics: mortality, physical disability, neuropsychological disability and health-related quality of life. Interventions to improve outcome on these main topics will be presented, and we will explain how we went from outcome studies to clinical interventions, focusing on the most recent proposals of intervention to improve outcome. © 2012 The Authors. Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica © 2012 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  14. Caring for the dying patient in the ICU--the past, the present and the future.

    PubMed

    Fridh, Isabell

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the state of the science concerning issues in end-of-life (EOL) care which have an impact on intensive care nurses possibilities to provide nursing care for dying patients and their families. The perspective of families is also illuminated and finally ethical challenges in the present and for the future are discussed. The literature review revealed that the problem areas nurses report concerning EOL care have been the same over three decades. Most problems are related to inter-disciplinary collaboration and communication with the medical profession about the transition from cure to comfort care. Nurses need enhanced communication skills in their role as the patient's advocate. Education in EOL care and a supportive environment are prerequisites for providing EOL care. Losing a loved one in the ICU is a stressful experience for close relatives and nursing care has a profound impact on families' memories of the EOL care given to their loved ones. It is therefore important that ICU nurses are aware of families' needs when a loved one is dying and that follow-up services are appreciated by bereaved family members. Ethical challenges are related to changed sedation practices, organ donation, globalisation and cultural sensitivity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Popularity of less frequent follow up for breast cancer in randomised study: initial findings from the hotline study.

    PubMed Central

    Gulliford, T.; Opomu, M.; Wilson, E.; Hanham, I.; Epstein, R.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the experiences of patients with breast cancer who were conventionally monitored with those in whom routine follow up was restricted to the time of mammography. DESIGN: Randomisation to conventional schedule of clinic visits or to visits only after mammography. Both cohorts received identical mammography and were invited to telephone for immediate appointments if they detected symptoms. SETTING: Combined breast clinic, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital. SUBJECTS: 211 eligible outpatients with a history of breast cancer. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Acceptability of randomisation, interim use of telephone and general practitioner, satisfaction with allocation to follow up. RESULTS: Of 211 eligible patients, 196 (93%) opted for randomisation in the study. Of these, 55 were under 50 years, 78 were diagnosed fewer than five years before, 90 had stage T2-4 tumours, and 71 had involved axillary nodes. Patients who did not participate were more likely to be under 50 years, to be two to five years after diagnosis, and to have had aggressive primary disease. Twice as many patients in both groups expressed a preference for reducing rather than increasing follow up. No increased use of local practitioner services or telephone triage was apparent in the cohort randomised to less frequent follow up by specialists. CONCLUSIONS: Reducing the frequency of routine follow up has so far proved popular among patients with breast cancer at standard risk in this cohort. A multicentre study is needed to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of routine follow up with respect to disease outcomes. PMID:9022429

  16. Nurse-led follow-up at home vs. conventional medical outpatient clinic follow-up in patients with incurable upper gastrointestinal cancer: a randomized study.

    PubMed

    Uitdehaag, Madeleen J; van Putten, Paul G; van Eijck, Casper H J; Verschuur, Els M L; van der Gaast, Ate; Pek, Chulja J; van der Rijt, Carin C D; de Man, Rob A; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Laheij, Robert J F; Siersema, Peter D; Spaander, Manon C W; Kuipers, Ernst J

    2014-03-01

    Upper gastrointestinal cancer is associated with a poor prognosis. The multidimensional problems of incurable patients require close monitoring and frequent support, which cannot sufficiently be provided during conventional one to two month follow-up visits to the outpatient clinic. To compare nurse-led follow-up at home with conventional medical follow-up in the outpatient clinic for patients with incurable primary or recurrent esophageal, pancreatic, or hepatobiliary cancer. Patients were randomized to nurse-led follow-up at home or conventional medical follow-up in the outpatient clinic. Outcome parameters were quality of life (QoL), patient satisfaction, and health care consumption, measured by different questionnaires at one and a half and four months after randomization. As well, cost analyses were done for both follow-up strategies in the first four months. In total, 138 patients were randomized, of which 66 (48%) were evaluable. At baseline, both groups were similar with respect to clinical and sociodemographic characteristics and health-related QoL. Patients in the nurse-led follow-up group were significantly more satisfied with the visits, whereas QoL and health care consumption within the first four months were comparable between the two groups. Nurse-led follow-up was less expensive than conventional medical follow-up. However, the total costs for the first four months of follow-up in this study were higher in the nurse-led follow-up group because of a higher frequency of visits. The results suggest that conventional medical follow-up is interchangeable with nurse-led follow-up. A cost utility study is necessary to determine the preferred frequency and duration of the home visits. Copyright © 2014 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Quality of Follow-Up After Hospitalization for Mental Illness Among Patients From Racial-Ethnic Minority Groups

    PubMed Central

    Carson, Nicholas J.; Vesper, Andrew; Chen, Chih-nan; Cook, Benjamin Lê

    2014-01-01

    Objective Outpatient follow-up after hospitalization for mental health reasons is an important indicator of quality of health systems. Differences among racial-ethnic minority groups in the quality of service use during this period are understudied. This study assessed the quality of out-patient treatment episodes following inpatient psychiatric treatment among blacks, whites, and Latinos in the United States. Methods The Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (2004–2010) was used to identify adults with any inpatient psychiatric treatment (N=339). Logistic regression models were used to estimate predictors of any outpatient follow-up or the beginning of adequate outpatient follow-up within seven or 30 days following discharge. Predicted disparities were calculated after adjustment for clinical need variables but not for socioeconomic characteristics, consistent with the Institute of Medicine definition of health care disparities as differences that are unrelated to clinical appropriateness, need, or patient preference. Results Rates of follow-up were generally low, particularly rates of adequate treatment (<26%). Outpatient treatment prior to inpatient care was a strong predictor of all measures of follow-up. After adjustment for need and socioeconomic status, the analyses showed that blacks were less likely than whites to receive any treatment or begin adequate follow-up within 30 days of discharge. Conclusions Poor integration of follow-up treatment in the continuum of psychiatric care leaves many individuals, particularly blacks, with poor-quality treatment. Culturally appropriate interventions that link individuals in inpatient settings to outpatient follow-up are needed to reduce racial-ethnic disparities in outpatient mental health treatment following acute treatment. PMID:24686538

  18. Vietnam Amputees: Long-Term Follow-Up

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-11-01

    rehabilitative services. In addition to emphasizing stump healing and physical therapy , the administration, physicians, and staff focused attention on...had also been driven up along fascial planes by the explosion. But once the hurdle of providing initial care has been met, the medical team must look...who have similar medical problems. Most of the patients contacted in this study praised such informal "group therapy ." An amputee center provides more

  19. Five-year follow-up after clinical islet transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Edmond A; Paty, Breay W; Senior, Peter A; Bigam, David; Alfadhli, Eman; Kneteman, Norman M; Lakey, Jonathan R T; Shapiro, A M James

    2005-07-01

    Islet transplantation can restore endogenous beta-cell function to subjects with type 1 diabetes. Sixty-five patients received an islet transplant in Edmonton as of 1 November 2004. Their mean age was 42.9 +/- 1.2 years, their mean duration of diabetes was 27.1 +/- 1.3 years, and 57% were women. The main indication was problematic hypoglycemia. Forty-four patients completed the islet transplant as defined by insulin independence, and three further patients received >16,000 islet equivalents (IE)/kg but remained on insulin and are deemed complete. Those who became insulin independent received a total of 799,912 +/- 30,220 IE (11,910 +/- 469 IE/kg). Five subjects became insulin independent after one transplant. Fifty-two patients had two transplants, and 11 subjects had three transplants. In the completed patients, 5-year follow-up reveals that the majority ( approximately 80%) have C-peptide present post-islet transplant, but only a minority ( approximately 10%) maintain insulin independence. The median duration of insulin independence was 15 months (interquartile range 6.2-25.5). The HbA(1c) (A1C) level was well controlled in those off insulin (6.4% [6.1-6.7]) and in those back on insulin but C-peptide positive (6.7% [5.9-7.5]) and higher in those who lost all graft function (9.0% [6.7-9.3]) (P < 0.05). Those who resumed insulin therapy did not appear more insulin resistant compared with those off insulin and required half their pretransplant daily dose of insulin but had a lower increment of C-peptide to a standard meal challenge (0.44 +/- 0.06 vs. 0.76 +/- 0.06 nmol/l, P < 0.001). The Hypoglycemic score and lability index both improved significantly posttransplant. In the 128 procedures performed, bleeding occurred in 15 and branch portal vein thrombosis in 5 subjects. Complications of immunosuppressive therapy included mouth ulcers, diarrhea, anemia, and ovarian cysts. Of the 47 completed patients, 4 required retinal laser photocoagulation or vitrectomy and 5

  20. Five-year follow-up of children receiving comprehensive dental care under general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Savanheimo, Nora; Vehkalahti, Miira M

    2014-12-15

    Dental general anesthesia (DGA) is part of public dental care in Finland, but the intention is to return the patient to routine dental care. The aims of this study were to describe the details of treatments under DGA given to generally healthy children and to explore the outcome of their dental care during a 5-year follow-up, with special focus on preventive care. In particular, we examined the return of the patients to routine dental care, of which, to our knowledge, little is known. Our prospective 5-year follow-up of generally healthy children (aged 0-13 years) treated under DGA by the Helsinki Public Dental Service in 2004 was based on official dental and general anesthesia documents. The statistical analyses employed chi-square tests, t-tests, Pearson's correlation coefficient (r), Fisher's transformation to test r ≠ 0, and logistic regression modeling. The most common reason for DGA was uncooperation (82%), followed by dental fear (56%). Filling therapy predominated in the treatments given under anesthesia, and the mean number of treatments per patients was 9.5 (SD = 4.2). Throughout the follow-up, 54% of the patients continued to have co-operation problems and 53% expressed dental fear; 11% of the patients received repeat DGA. The mean follow-up time was 48 (median 52) months. The postoperative review visit was actualized within 1.5 (SD = 0.8) months and the first visit to the home dental clinic of the patients in 12.0 (SD = 11.8) months for the 0-5-year-olds and in 7.2 (SD = 5.9) months for the 6-13-year-olds (p < 0.001). The mean time elapsed to the first need for treatment was 18.5 (SD = 14.1) months. During the follow-up, the mean number of treatments per patient was 5.3 (SD = 4.9); almost all patients (97%) received preventive treatment at one of two visits, but the control of dental fear remained rare. To return to routine dental care after DGA, most of the generally healthy children in our study still needed special

  1. Nutritional rehabilitation after ICU - does it happen: a qualitative interview and observational study.

    PubMed

    Merriweather, Judith; Smith, Pam; Walsh, Timothy

    2014-03-01

    To compare and contrast current nutritional rehabilitation practices against recommendations from National Institute for Health and Excellence guideline Rehabilitation after critical illness (NICE) (2009, http://www.nice.org.uk/cg83). Recovery from critical illness has gained increasing prominence over the last decade but there is remarkably little research relating to nutritional rehabilitation. The study is a qualitative study based on patient interviews and observations of ward practice. Seventeen patients were recruited into the study at discharge from the intensive care unit (ICU) of a large teaching hospital in central Scotland in 2011. Semi-structured interviews were conducted on transfer to the ward and weekly thereafter. Fourteen of these patients were followed up at three months post-ICU discharge, and a semi-structured interview was carried out. Observations of ward practice were carried out twice weekly for the duration of the ward stay. Current nutritional practice for post-intensive care patients did not reflect the recommendations from the NICE guideline. A number of organisational issues were identified as influencing nutritional care. These issues were categorised as ward culture, service-centred delivery of care and disjointed discharge planning. Their influence on nutritional care was compounded by the complex problems associated with critical illness. The NICE guideline provides few nutrition-specific recommendations for rehabilitation; however, current practice does not reflect the nutritional recommendations that are detailed in the rehabilitation care pathway. Nutritional care of post-ICU patients is problematic and strategies to overcome these issues need to be addressed in order to improve nutritional intake. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Endotracheal intubation in the ICU.

    PubMed

    Lapinsky, Stephen E

    2015-06-17

    Endotracheal intubation in the ICU is a high-risk procedure, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Up to 40% of cases are associated with marked hypoxemia or hypotension. The ICU patient is physiologically very different from the usual patient who undergoes intubation in the operating room, and different intubation techniques should be considered. The common operating room practice of sedation and neuromuscular blockade to facilitate intubation may carry significant risk in the ICU patient with a marked oxygenation abnormality, particularly when performed by the non-expert. Preoxygenation is largely ineffective in these patients and oxygen desaturation occurs rapidly on induction of anesthesia, limiting the time available to secure the airway. The ICU environment is less favorable for complex airway management than the operating room, given the frequent lack of availability of additional equipment or additional expert staff. ICU intubations are frequently carried out by trainees, with a lesser degree of airway experience. Even in the presence of a non-concerning airway assessment, these patients are optimally managed as a difficult airway, utilizing an awake approach. Endotracheal intubation may be achieved by awake direct laryngoscopy in the sick ICU patient whose level of consciousness may be reduced by sepsis, hypercapnia or hypoxemia. As the patient's spontaneous respiratory efforts are not depressed by the administration of drugs, additional time is available to obtain equipment and expertise in the event of failure to secure the airway. ICU intubation complications should be tracked as part of the ICU quality improvement process.

  3. Summary of follow-up results from potential tuberculosis exposures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weirich, Stephen A.

    1993-01-01

    There were two isolated episodes of LeRC workers who were diagnosed with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) during the fall of 1990. The specifics surrounding each case were very different, and it is clear that the two episodes were completely unrelated. The fact that the final diagnoses of pulmonary tuberculosis came within three weeks of each other was purely coincidental. The Occupational Medicine Service (OMS) conducted separate informational sessions and offered free PPD skin testing to all employees, both NASA and contractors, who felt that they were at risk of having been exposed to tuberculosis from either individual. The procedures and results of these are briefly discussed.

  4. Automated Student and Adult Learner Follow-up Study. Final Report for Program Year 1994-1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas State Occupational Information Coordinating Committee, Austin.

    The chief accomplishment of the Texas Automated Follow-Up System in program year 1994-95 was a major expansion of services to secondary education. Data were collected on the results achieved by former seniors who exited high schools in 25 volunteer districts. Because the pilot districts were not necessarily representative of all school districts…

  5. Enhancing the validity of foster care follow-up studies through multiple alumni location strategies.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jason; McWilliams, Alisa; Mainieri, Tina; Pecora, Peter J; La Belle, Karin

    2006-01-01

    While family-based placement prevention services, family reunification programs, subsidized guardianship, and aggressive adoption programs are reducing the numbers of children spending long periods of time in substitute care, a significant number of America's children will come of age in foster care. Agencies and policymakers should use research and evaluation to assess the effectiveness of foster care in nurturing healthy adults and to explore ways to improve services. Outcome studies that have focused on locating and interviewing young or middle-aged adults emancipated from foster care have been hampered by modest response rates, limiting the field's ability to evaluate the efficacy of foster care programs. This article describes a set of strategies that were used to achieve higher response rates in two recent follow-up studies.

  6. Additional follow-up telephone counselling and initial smoking relapse: a longitudinal, controlled study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei; He, Yao; Jiang, Bin; Zuo, Fang; Liu, Qinghui; Zhang, Li; Zhou, Changxi

    2016-04-20

    Smoking cessation services can help smokers to quit; however, many smoking relapse cases occur over time. Initial relapse prevention should play an important role in achieving the goal of long-term smoking cessation. Several studies have focused on the effect of extended telephone support in relapse prevention, but the conclusions remain conflicting. From October 2008 to August 2013, a longitudinal, controlled study was performed in a large general hospital of Beijing. The smokers who sought treatment at our smoking cessation clinic were non-randomised and divided into 2 groups: face-to-face individual counselling group (FC group), and face-to-face individual counselling plus telephone follow-up counselling group (FCF group). No pharmacotherapy was offered. The timing of initial smoking relapse was compared between FC and FCF groups. Predictors of initial relapse were investigated during the first 180 days, using the Cox proportional hazards model. Of 547 eligible male smokers who volunteered to participate, 457 participants (117 in FC group and 340 in FCF group) achieved at least 24 h abstinence. The majority of the lapse episodes occurred during the first 2 weeks after the quit date. Smokers who did not receive the follow-up telephone counselling (FC group) tended to relapse to smoking earlier than those smokers who received the additional follow-up telephone counselling (FCF group), and the log-rank test was statistically significant (p=0.003). A Cox regression model showed that, in the FCF group, being married, and having a lower Fagerström test score, normal body mass index and doctor-diagnosed tobacco-related chronic diseases, were significantly independent protective predictors of smoking relapse. Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that additional follow-up telephone counselling might be an effective strategy in preventing relapse. Further research is still needed to confirm our findings. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group

  7. Implementing an ICU outreach team model.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Betty

    2008-01-01

    There is an increasing need for critical care expertise outside of the intensive care unit (ICU). This is particularly related to high acuity levels and limited nursing resources. Teams of critical care health care providers have been formed to meet this need. Team structure and services provided vary according to the organization's need and the resources available. In this article, the process of establishing an ICU outreach team without additional resources, in a 200-bed tertiary care hospital in central Saskatchewan is presented. The team responds to calls from within the hospital to provide critical care expertise to patients about whom the professional caregiver is concerned, or patients who have early warning signs of physiological distress. Implementation of the team has been successful in improving timely patient care, providing a resource for nurses to access for their patients, and providing an opportunity for education and support for nurses on inpatient units.

  8. Intrahospital teleradiology: ER to the ICU connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattner, Stefanie; Herron, John M.; Fuhrman, Carl R.; Towers, Jeffrey D.; Thaete, F. Leland; Gur, David

    1994-05-01

    Availability of initial radiographic images acquired in the Emergency Department (ED) for patients admitted to an Intensive Care Unit (ICU) has been a problem in our operations. It is not uncommon that images from the ED are delivered to the appropriate ICU several hours after admission, and this problem is typically magnified `off hours'. We installed a film digitizer in the ED and required technologists to digitize all chest radiographs as they came out of the film processor. These images are archived and transmitted to a workstation located near one of our busier medical ICUs. The system has been operational for eight months, and it provides reliable timely access to such images. Careful review of a large number of cases clearly demonstrated that such a system is not only feasible, but extremely effective in improving both perceptions and actual quality of radiology services in this difficult environment. Image quality was found to be acceptable for this purpose.

  9. Extended follow-up of neurological, cognitive, behavioral and academic outcomes after severe abusive head trauma.

    PubMed

    Lind, Katia; Toure, Hanna; Brugel, Dominique; Meyer, Philippe; Laurent-Vannier, Anne; Chevignard, Mathilde

    2016-01-01

    Studies about long-term outcome following abusive head trauma (AHT) are scarce. The aims of this study were to report long-term neurological, cognitive, behavioral and academic outcomes, ongoing treatments and/or rehabilitation, several years after AHT diagnosis, and factors associated with outcome. In this retrospective study, all patients admitted to a single rehabilitation unit following AHT between 1996 and 2005, with subsequent follow-up exceeding 3 years, were included. Medical files were reviewed and a medical interview was performed with parents on the phone when possible. The primary outcome measure was the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS). Forty-seven children (out of 66) met the inclusion criteria (mean age at injury 5.7 months; SD=3.2). After a median length of follow-up of 8 years (range 3.7-12), only seven children (15%) had "good outcome" (normal life - GOS I) and 19 children (40%) presented with severe neurological impairment (GOS III and IV). Children sustained epilepsy (38%), motor deficits (45%), visual deficit (45%), sleep disorders (17%), language abnormalities (49%), attention deficits (79%) and behavioral disorders (53%). Most children (83%) had ongoing rehabilitation. Only 30% followed a normal curriculum, whereas 30% required special education services. Children with better overall outcome (GOS I and II) had significantly higher educated mothers than those with worse outcomes (GOS III and IV): graduation from high school 59% and 21% respectively (p=0.006). This study highlights the high rate of severe sequelae and health care needs several years post-AHT, and emphasizes the need for extended follow-up of medical, cognitive and academic outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Telephone follow-up for case finding of domestic violence in an emergency department.

    PubMed

    Sixsmith, D M; Weissman, L; Constant, F

    1997-04-01

    To determine whether telephone follow-up of selected female patients seen in an urban ED would improve domestic violence (DV) case finding. A prospective, cross-sectional study was conducted on consecutive female patients between the ages of 16 and 65 years treated in an urban trauma center during July and August 1995. Record review identified those patients with conditions suggesting increased risk for DV: injury; substance abuse; complaints or diagnoses related to stress, anxiety, depression, or panic attack; or complaints of headache, nonspecific abdominal pain, generalized fatigue, or numbness lasting > 1 week. Attempts were made to telephone all patients who had high-risk presentations within 3 days of their emergency visits. Patients were contacted by a trained interviewer regarding the circumstances of their visits. There were 142 (9%) high-risk presentations out of 1,500 ED visits by women. Of these high-risk visits, 68 patients denied DV, 19 patients did no speak English, 16 patients gave an incorrect telephone number, 18 patients could not be reached after 3 telephone calls, and 6 patients did not give a telephone number. Of the remaining 15 patients, 5 were diagnosed at the initial visit as having experienced DV, and 10 admitted on the follow-up call that the visit had been related to DV or emotional stress at home. A structured interview, conducted via telephone in follow-up of released ED patients, identified an additional 10 victims out of 142 high-risk presentations and 1,500 total ED presentations. This approach is labor-intensive, with a relatively low yield. Nonetheless, prospective identification of selective high-risk cases by physicians, coupled with subsequent social service telephone contact, may be a complement in department case finding.

  11. Educational Goals and Student Flow: Model for Institutional Student Flow and Follow-up. TEX-SIS FOLLOW-UP SC7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hood, Duane

    This report details the development and implementation of a follow-up system, by Western Texas Community College (WTCC) as a subcontractor for Project FOLLOW-UP, relating student flow patterns to educational goals. Phase I of this project involved establishment of a data base which included elements designed to reveal an adequate picture of…

  12. Part C early intervention utilization in preterm infants: Opportunity for referral from a NICU follow-up clinic.

    PubMed

    Greene, Michelle; Patra, Kousiki

    2016-01-01

    Early Intervention (EI) services promote development for preterm infants. In the state of Illinois, Child and Family Connections (CFC) is the intake agency that determines qualification for EI services. In Illinois, all extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants are eligible for and referred to CFC at discharge from the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). This study investigated: (1) patterns of CFC and EI enrollment, and; (2) predictors of CFC enrollment, need for CFC referral, and high EI therapy use among preterm infants seen in a NICU follow-up clinic. 405 preterm infants, including 169 ELBW infants, were seen in a NICU follow-up clinic at 4-, 8- and 20-months corrected age. CFC/EI data were collected at each visit. Multiple regression analyses adjusted for the effect of medical, sociodemographic and neurodevelopmental risk factors on CFC/EI outcome. Despite the high rate of EI utilization and routine care by primary pediatricians, up to 28% of ELBW infants required a CFC referral from a NICU follow-up clinic. Medical and neurodevelopmental risk factors were associated with CFC enrollment while medical, sociodemographic and neurodevelopmental risk factors were associated with need for CFC referral. NICU follow-up clinics facilitate appropriate CFC/EI services for preterm infants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Adolescents in mental health crisis: the role of routine follow-up calls after emergency department visits.

    PubMed

    Hopper, S M; Pangestu, I; Cations, J; Stewart, C; Sharwood, L N; Babl, F E

    2011-02-01

    To improve care of adolescents in mental health crisis, the role of routine follow-up calls in discharged patients with referral plans after emergency department (ED) presentation to a children's hospital was explored. Main outcome measure was patient attendance at referral sites. In 113 mental health patients with follow-up appointments, either patient/carers or corresponding referral services could be contacted. Median age was 14 years, 77% were girls, and most presentations were after self-harm/depression (61%). Eighty-three per cent (95% CI 75% to 90%) were compliant with the discharge plan without prompting from the ED staff. Fourteen per cent (95% CI 8% to 22%) did not comply after being called by ED staff, and only 3% (95% CI 1% to 7%) were persuaded to attend their outpatient care after being prompted by ED staff. Routine follow-up calls for adolescent mental health patients after ED care are not warranted in all settings.

  14. Ongoing follow-up and support for chronic disease management in the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Diabetes Initiative.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Edwin B; Brownson, Carol A; O'Toole, Mary L; Anwuri, Victoria V

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to identify approaches to providing ongoing follow-up and support for diabetes self-management based on the experience of 14 self-management projects of the Diabetes Initiative of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. This study is a collaboration with grantees of the Diabetes Initiative of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, a program focused on diabetes self-management in primary care and community settings. Grantees and national program staff identified key functions that ongoing follow-up and support need to fill and key features of programs that do so. Key functions of ongoing follow-up and support include monitoring of status and self-management, encouragement and facilitation of regular clinical care, encouragement and motivation of self-management, and facilitating skills for coping with changes in circumstances or emergent problems. Key features of ongoing follow-up and support to fill these functions are being available on demand; being proactive in maintaining contact and preventing individuals from "falling between the cracks"; having personal, motivational, and consistent key messages; not being limited to diabetes; and being inclusive of a wide range of resources and settings. Initial characterization of key features of ongoing follow-up and support has been accomplished. This should facilitate research to clarify how it may best be provided and systematic approaches to doing so. These should lead to health service and policy initiatives supporting this critical dimension of programs to promote self-management and lifelong healthy living patterns.

  15. Exploring outcomes of a nurse practitioner-managed cardiac surgery follow-up intervention: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Sawatzky, Jo-Ann V; Christie, Sandra; Singal, Rohit K

    2013-09-01

    To describe and compare the outcomes of a nurse practitioner-managed cardiac surgery follow-up model of care with the standard model of primary care provider follow-up for coronary artery bypass graft surgery patients. Advances in healthcare have had a favourable impact on length of stay following cardiac surgery; however, the shorter length of stay has not been accompanied by enhanced support to bridge the gap between acute care and the community setting. Prospective (2009-2010) randomized study. Elective cardiac surgery patients (N = 200) were randomly assigned to the nurse practitioner follow-up intervention or to the standard model of follow-up care. The main outcomes were health-related quality of life, patient satisfaction, symptoms, and health resource use. Outcome data were elicited via telephone interviews at 2 and 6 weeks postdischarge. Baseline differences between the two groups were non-significant; however, at 2 weeks postdischarge, the intervention group reported significantly fewer symptoms and higher physical functioning status. At 2 and 6 weeks postdischarge, the intervention group was significantly more satisfied with the amount of help, as well as the quality of the services received. Differences in healthcare resource use were not statistically significant. This evidence suggests that the nurse practitioner-managed model of follow-up care effectively bridges the gap between institutional and primary care in the cardiac surgery population. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Mortality of workers exposed to ethylene oxide: extended follow up of a British cohort.

    PubMed

    Coggon, D; Harris, E C; Poole, J; Palmer, K T

    2004-04-01

    To obtain further information about the risks of cancer associated with occupational exposure to ethylene oxide Follow up was extended by 13 years for a cohort of 2876 men and women with definite or potential exposure to ethylene oxide in the chemical industry or in hospital sterilising units. Subjects were traced through National Health Service and social security records, and their mortality was compared with that expected from rates in the national population by the person-years method. Analysis was based on 565 deaths, of which 339 had occurred during the additional period of follow up. Mortality was close to or below expectation for all causes (565 deaths v 607.6 expected), all cancers (188 v 184.2), and for all specific categories of malignancy including stomach cancer (10 v 11.6), breast cancer (11 v 13.2), non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (7 v 4.8), and leukaemia (5 v 4.6). All five deaths from leukaemia occurred in the subset of subjects with greatest potential for exposure to ethylene oxide, but even in this group the excess of deaths was small (2.6 expected). The balance of evidence from this and other epidemiological investigations indicates that any risk of human cancer from ethylene oxide is low, particularly at the levels of occupational exposure that have occurred in Britain over recent decades. This may reflect the capacity of human cells to repair DNA damage caused by the chemical, which is a potent genotoxin and animal carcinogen.

  17. Contemporary options for longitudinal follow-up: lessons learned from a cohort of urban adolescents.

    PubMed

    Tobler, Amy L; Komro, Kelli A

    2011-05-01

    This study reports efforts to locate and survey participants in Project Northland Chicago (PNC), a longitudinal, group-randomized trial of an alcohol preventive intervention for racial/ethnic minority, urban, early-adolescents, 3-4 years following the end of the intervention. Data were collected annually among students from 6th-8th grade and then at age 17-18. Tracking procedures were used to maintain contact with participants and data collection consisted of three phases: (1) Internet- and mail-based surveys; (2) in-school survey administration; and (3) courier service delivery. Contact was lost with 11% of this urban cohort from the end of the PNC intervention activities through these longterm follow-up efforts, as indicated by returned locating postcards. Fifty-three percent of the cohort responded to the survey, the majority completing in Phase 1 of our data collection. Additional school-based and courier-delivery efforts increased our response rate by 11.5%. Costs per completed survey were $118 in Phase 1, $166 in Phase 2, and $440 in Phase 3. This study illustrates that it is possible to track and follow-up a high-risk cohort as they progress through adolescence, even with minimal efforts in intervening years. Lessons learned from this study may inform future efforts to track and collect longitudinal data among high-risk populations.

  18. Feasibility of epilepsy follow-up care through telemedicine: a pilot study on the patient's perspective.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Syed Nizamuddin; Mann, Carly; Sinclair, D Barry; Heino, Angela; Iskiw, Blayne; Quigley, Daphne; Ohinmaa, Arto

    2008-04-01

    Cost analysis and patient satisfaction with telemedicine in epilepsy care. This controlled study included out-of-town epilepsy patients coming to follow-up at the University of Alberta hospital epilepsy clinic. After an informed consent, patients were randomized to either conventional (n = 18) or telemedicine (n = 23) clinics. Patients or caregivers filled patient satisfaction and travel cost questionnaires in both alternatives. Cost per visit analysis included costs of traveling, lodging, and lost productivity. Average age of the population was 41 years (range 19-73; 45% women). Eighty-three percent of patients preferred their next visit through telemedicine. About 90% of patients indicated a need for companion travel (mainly by car) to conventional clinic. For the conventional group patients the value of lost productivity was CAD $201, hotel cost CAD $8.50, and the value of car mileage CAD $256.50, totaling about CAD $466.00. Patient costs for telemedicine were CAD $35.85. Telemedicine production costs are similar to the patients' savings in traveling and lost productivity. About 90% of patients in both groups were satisfied with the quality of the service. Telemedicine can play a role in follow-up care of epilepsy patients, reduce patient costs, and improve patient satisfaction. This is the first full-time epilepsy telemedicine clinic in Western Canada.

  19. Chronic Heart Failure Follow-up Management Based on Agent Technology

    PubMed Central

    Safdari, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Monitoring heart failure patients through continues assessment of sign and symptoms by information technology tools lead to large reduction in re-hospitalization. Agent technology is one of the strongest artificial intelligence areas; therefore, it can be expected to facilitate, accelerate, and improve health services especially in home care and telemedicine. The aim of this article is to provide an agent-based model for chronic heart failure (CHF) follow-up management. Methods This research was performed in 2013-2014 to determine appropriate scenarios and the data required to monitor and follow-up CHF patients, and then an agent-based model was designed. Results Agents in the proposed model perform the following tasks: medical data access, communication with other agents of the framework and intelligent data analysis, including medical data processing, reasoning, negotiation for decision-making, and learning capabilities. Conclusions The proposed multi-agent system has ability to learn and thus improve itself. Implementation of this model with more and various interval times at a broader level could achieve better results. The proposed multi-agent system is no substitute for cardiologists, but it could assist them in decision-making. PMID:26618038

  20. Chronic Heart Failure Follow-up Management Based on Agent Technology.

    PubMed

    Mohammadzadeh, Niloofar; Safdari, Reza

    2015-10-01

    Monitoring heart failure patients through continues assessment of sign and symptoms by information technology tools lead to large reduction in re-hospitalization. Agent technology is one of the strongest artificial intelligence areas; therefore, it can be expected to facilitate, accelerate, and improve health services especially in home care and telemedicine. The aim of this article is to provide an agent-based model for chronic heart failure (CHF) follow-up management. This research was performed in 2013-2014 to determine appropriate scenarios and the data required to monitor and follow-up CHF patients, and then an agent-based model was designed. Agents in the proposed model perform the following tasks: medical data access, communication with other agents of the framework and intelligent data analysis, including medical data processing, reasoning, negotiation for decision-making, and learning capabilities. The proposed multi-agent system has ability to learn and thus improve itself. Implementation of this model with more and various interval times at a broader level could achieve better results. The proposed multi-agent system is no substitute for cardiologists, but it could assist them in decision-making.

  1. Social inclusion: An effort to end loss-to-treatment follow-up in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, S; Manikantan, J; Sreenivas, A; Jayasankar, S; Sunilkumar, M; Rakesh, P S; Karthickeyan, D S A; Mohandas, C R

    2015-10-01

    Pathanamthitta district is implementing Revised National Tuberculosis Control Program as a pilot district since 1993. The district programme was reporting approximately 5% of their diagnosed smear positive patients as never put on treatment (Initial lost to follow up - ILFU) and 5% of the new smear positive [NSP] Pulmonary TB patients as lost to follow up [LFU] during treatment. Attempts based on reengineering of DOTS were not largely successful in bringing down these proportions. A treatment support group [TSG] is a non-statutory body of socially responsible citizens and volunteers to provide social support to each needy TB patient safeguarding his dignity and confidentiality by ensuring access to information, free and quality services and social welfare programs, empowering the patient for making decision to complete treatment successfully. It is a complete fulfilment of social inclusion standards enumerated by Standards for TB Care in India. Pathanamthitta district started implementing this strategy since 2013. After intervention, proportion of LFU among NSPTB cases dropped markedly and no LFU were reported among the latest treatment cohorts. Proportion of ILFU keeps similar trend and none were reported among the latest diagnostic cohorts. Social support for TB care is feasible under routine program conditions. Addition of standards for social inclusion in STCI is meaningful. Its meaning is translated well by a society empowered with literacy and political sense. Copyright © 2015 Tuberculosis Association of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The effects of navigation and types of neighborhoods on timely follow-up of abnormal mammogram among black women

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sage; Molina, Yamile; Glassgow, Anne Elizabeth; Berrios, Nerida; Guadamuz, Jenny; Calhoun, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite the availability of relatively simple and inexpensive screening tools, minority women are more often diagnosed at a late stage of breast cancer, in part due to delays in follow-up of abnormal screening result. One of the key factors for timely follow-up of abnormal mammogram may be neighborhood characteristics. Patient Navigation (PN) programs aim to diminish barriers, but its differential effects by neighborhood have not been fully examined. The current study examines the effect of types of neighborhoods on time to follow-up of abnormal mammogram, and the differential effects of PN by neighborhood characteristics. Methods We examined data from a total of 1,696 randomized patients from a randomized controlled trial, “the Patient Navigation in Medically Underserved Areas” study that explored the effect of navigation on breast health outcomes. We categorized participants’ neighborhoods into three categories and compared the effect of navigation between these neighborhood types. Results Navigated women in mixed race neighborhoods had a shorter time to follow-up compared with non-navigated women in the neighborhoods. Black women living in mixed neighborhoods had a significant longer time to follow-up of abnormal mammogram, compared with black women living in middle class black neighborhoods. Conclusion Patient navigation interventions improve timely follow-up of abnormal mammogram. Patient navigation may be particularly beneficial for minority women who reside in racially heterogeneous neighborhoods which may be less likely to have access to affordable health clinics and social services. Health policies concerning breast cancer early detection for minority women need to pay further attention to those who might potentially be excluded from health services due to the characteristics of neighborhoods. Socioeconomic conditions of neighborhood may affect individual health through multiple interlinked mechanisms. Neighborhood characteristics, such as

  3. [Safety and efficacy of classic ambulatory implantable cardioverter-defibrillator and resynchronisation systems follow-up compared to telemetric follow-up].

    PubMed

    Lelakowski, Jacek; Rydlewska, Anna; Piekarz, Justyna; Lelakowska-Pieła, Maria; Pudło, Joanna

    2016-03-01

    Telemetric follow-up (RM) after cardiac devices implantation is not only not inferior to classic follow-up, but also enables earlier clinical complications detection and stricter patient monitoring. of the study was to confirm safety and efficacy of RM in patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) or cardioverterdefibrillator with resynchronisation therapy (CRT-D), compared to traditional follow-up in outpatient clinic. Group A (CRT-D+ICD) (retrospective, patients followed-up in outpatient clinic) was consisted with 273 patients (mean age 65±11 years, 230M). Group A included 128 patients after CRT-D implantation and 145 patients with ICD. Group B (RM group) (prospective, RM Medtronic CareLink follow-up) involved 89 patients (mean age 61±14 years, 73M). 11 patients had CRT-D and 78 had ICD implanted. Only patients with Medtronic equipment were included to group B. Follow-up of patients from group A - ambulatory visit in outpatient clinic: 1-3 months after implantation, then every 6 months. Follow-up of patients from group B - daily follow-up using RM system (Medtronic CareLink). Patient's clinical status, medications, frequency/ type of arrhythmias, device interventions were assessed in both groups. To assess presence of ventricular arrhythmia, device interventions, ICD and CRT-D programming changes, pharmacotherapy changes, a number of patients were randomly chosen from group A. They were similar in age, gender, LVEF value, NYHA class, comorbidities, time of follow-up (control group) to Group B (RM group). In the RM group, compared to control group, there were significantly less programming changes (3,4 vs 28,6%, p<0,001), time to first event was shorter (ventricular arrhythmia - 39 days, p<0,001; intervention - 102 days, p<0,001), time to first necessary programming change was longer (201 days, p<0,001). RM system proved to be save, more accurate (22% visits were performed personally by the physician operating Medtronic CareLink system, 71

  4. Teacher Education Follow-up Surveys: Variables Related to Response Rate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boser, Judith A.

    This study of teacher education graduate follow-up surveys examined the relationship between response rate and number of graduates, questionnaire length, and follow-up contacts. Also, the study investigated survey practices differentiating between surveys which had high and low return rates in such areas as number of follow-up contacts,…

  5. Discharge huddle outfitted with mobile technology improves efficiency of transitioning stroke patients into follow-up care.

    PubMed

    Tielbur, Brittany R; Rice Cella, Donna E; Currie, Amanda; Roach, Jonathan D; Mattingly, Bryan; Boone, Jack; Watwood, Christina; McGauran, Ann; Kirshner, Howard S; Charles, P David

    2015-01-01

    Disjointed patient care is a well-documented problem in health care systems, often stemming from poor communication between providers, services, and follow-up care resources. A multidisciplinary discharge huddle, augmented with cellular and tablet technology, was implemented on the Neurology Stroke Service to facilitate multidisciplinary communication, improve transition of patients, and increase referrals into affiliated follow-up care. After initiating the huddle, patient length of stay decreased by 1.4 days (25%), patient flow into continuum partners increased by 10%, and the number of patients going without services after their hospital stay decreased by more than 12%. Huddle members reported that the technology was helpful, heavily utilized, and made their work more efficient. This pilot suggests that utilizing modern mobile technologies can help improve efficiency and referrals within the health care system and reduce patient length of stay.

  6. What Does Depression Mean for Korean American Elderly?: A Qualitative Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee-Kwan, Seung Hee; Han, Haera; Lee, Hochang B.; Gallo, Joseph J.; Joo, Jin Hui

    2016-01-01

    Objective Korean American Elderly (KAE) have high rates of depression but underuse mental health services. The purpose of this study was to assess the meaning of depression and help seeking among KAE residing in the United States who have clinically significant depressive symptoms. Methods As a follow up to the Memory and Aging Study of Koreans (MASK; n=1,118), a descriptive epidemiological study which showed that only one in four of KAE with clinically significant depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire-9≥10) used mental health services, we conducted a qualitative study using semi-structured interviews with participants with clinically significant depressive symptoms regarding the meaning of depression and beliefs about help seeking. Ten participants with clinically significant depressive symptoms were approached and 8 were recruited for semi-structured interviews. Results KAE did not identify themselves as depressed though experiencing clinically significant depressive symptoms. They associated depression with social discrimination, social isolation, and suicide in the extreme circumstance. They attributed depression to not achieving social and material success in America and strained relationships with their children. Participants attempted to self-manage distress without telling others in their social network. However, KAE were willing to consult with mental health professionals if the services were bilingual, affordable, and confidential. Conclusion KAE with clinically significant depressive symptoms are a vulnerable group with need and desire for linguistically and culturally relevant mental health services who are isolated due to a complex array of psychological and social factors. PMID:27757135

  7. Findings at follow-up endoscopies in subjects with suspected colorectal abnormalities: effects of baseline findings and time to follow-up.

    PubMed

    Cafferty, Fay H; Wong, Jau-Min; Yen, Amy Ming-Fang; Duffy, Stephen W; Atkin, Wendy S; Chen, Tony Hsiu-Hsi

    2007-01-01

    Guidelines for colonoscopic surveillance after the removal of colorectal polyps already exist in the United Kingdom and United States. However, there is a continuing need to build up an evidence base on the likely effect of different follow-up policies for specific current findings. This article reports on the colonoscopic surveillance of a cohort of patients in Taiwan. The risk of various outcomes at the second examination is assessed according to findings at the first examination and the interval between examinations. Data from baseline and follow-up examinations for 2,287 individuals attending the National Taiwan University Hospital were collected retrospectively. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify risk factors for the following 4 outcomes: any positive findings; multiple (> or =3) polyps; large (> or =10 mm) polyp(s); or villous adenoma(s) or cancer. The effect of the interval between examinations was assessed in all models. Older age was an independent risk factor for all outcomes. The number of baseline polyps was a significant risk factor for both positive results and multiple polyps, more severe baseline histology was a risk factor for large polyps and villous adenomas/cancer, and larger baseline polyps were a risk factor for large polyps at follow-up. Interval time was only an independent risk factor for villous adenomas/cancer, which tended to be found at shorter follow-up times. The total number of abnormalities found at follow-up was significantly related to the number of follow-up examinations but not to the total follow-up time. Results suggest that, with the possible exception of subjects with villous adenomas at baseline, most reexaminations can safely be delayed for > or =5 years. In the majority of cases staff at the hospital were correctly identifying those subjects at particularly high risk and assigning shorter follow-up intervals accordingly. Models indicate that many of the findings seen at follow-up were due to missed

  8. A follow-up study of children with phonologic disorders of unknown origin.

    PubMed

    Shriberg, L D; Kwiatkowski, J

    1988-05-01

    Recent emphasis on early intervention programming for children with speech delays of unknown origin has yielded considerable literature on alternative forms of assessment and management. Less is known about the long-term special educational needs of such children. This study reviews the exceptional educational needs histories of 36 children who had received preschool speech services at a phonology clinic. Findings indicate that a high percentage of children continued to have speech and language and other special educational needs as they neared middle school and beyond. Many children eventually required special class placements. Discussion focuses on issues in classification, prediction, and management. On the bases of both original and follow-up data in this and other studies, the term phonological disorder appears to be appropriate for approximately 75%-80% of children referred early for speech disorders of unknown origin.

  9. Early first-trimester sibutramine exposure : pregnancy outcome and neonatal follow-up.

    PubMed

    De Santis, Marco; Straface, Gianluca; Cavaliere, Anna F; Carducci, Brigida; Caruso, Alessandro

    2006-01-01

    Sibutramine is a drug that is used in the treatment of obesity. There are currently no epidemiological studies relating to sibutramine exposure in pregnancy. The objective of our study was to determine whether sibutramine exposure during pregnancy constitutes a risk factor to the mother and developing fetus. Fifty-two pregnant women who were exposed to sibutramine in the first trimester of pregnancy, when they were unaware of being pregnant, contacted our Teratology Information Service. We recorded the prospective outcomes of this case series between May 2001 and September 2004 with a complete neonatal follow-up up to 1 month after delivery. Seven cases of hypertensive complications were observed during pregnancies. No cases of congenital anomalies in neonates were observed. Although many more cases are necessary to demonstrate that sibutramine is not teratogenic in pregnancy, our experience improves the counseling of pregnancies occurring involuntarily during sibutramine therapy.

  10. Follow-up of abnormal screening mammograms among low-income ethnically diverse women: findings from a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Allen, Jennifer D; Shelton, Rachel C; Harden, Elizabeth; Goldman, Roberta E

    2008-08-01

    To understand factors that women feel facilitate or hinder their receipt of diagnostic services following an abnormal screening mammogram. This qualitative study used a purposive sampling strategy to identify low-income, ethnically diverse women aged 40 or over who had a recent abnormal mammogram. Working with a community health center, breast evaluation center, and mobile mammography van, 64 women were interviewed to identify salient themes that differentiated women who received timely follow-up from those who did not. Prominent themes among women who delayed follow-up included dissatisfaction with communication of results; perceived disrespect on the part of providers and clinic staff; logistical barriers to access of diagnostic services; anxiety and fear about a possible cancer diagnosis; and a lack of information about breast cancer screening and symptoms. Women who received timely care more often reported an appreciation of efforts by providers and clinic staff to support their prompt follow-up; availability of social support that facilitated appointment-keeping; confidence in their ability to advocate for their health; and a high priority placed on self-care. A comprehensive approach to improving timely diagnostic follow-up among underserved groups must address patient beliefs and attitudes, provider practices and communication, and practices at the health care systems level. Implications and strategies for improving patient education, patient-provider communication, and organizational practices are discussed.

  11. Methods for successful follow-up of elusive urban populations: an ethnographic approach with homeless men.

    PubMed Central

    Conover, S.; Berkman, A.; Gheith, A.; Jahiel, R.; Stanley, D.; Geller, P. A.; Valencia, E.; Susser, E.

    1997-01-01

    Public health is paying increasing attention to elusive urban populations such as the homeless, street drug users, and illegal immigrants. Yet, valid data on the health of these populations remain scarce; longitudinal research, in particular, has been hampered by poor follow-up rates. This paper reports on the follow-up methods used in two randomized clinical trials among one such population, namely, homeless men with mental illness. Each of the two trials achieved virtually complete follow-up over 18 months. The authors describe the ethnographic approach to follow-up used in these trials and elaborate its application to four components of the follow-up: training interviewers, tracking participants, administering the research office, and conducting assessments. The ethnographic follow-up method is adaptable to other studies and other settings, and may provide a replicable model for achieving high follow-up rates in urban epidemiologic studies. PMID:9211004

  12. Naturalistic follow-up of co-morbid substance use in schizophrenia: the West London first-episode study

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, I.; Joyce, E. M.; Mutsatsa, S. H.; Hutton, S. B.; Huddy, V.; Kapasi, M.; Barnes, T. R. E.

    2008-01-01

    Background The impact of co-morbid substance use in first-episode schizophrenia has not been fully explored. Method This naturalistic follow-up of a cohort of 152 people with first-episode schizophrenia examined substance use and clinical outcome in terms of symptoms and social and neuropsychological function. Results Data were collected on 85 (56%) of the patient cohort after a median period of 14 months. Over the follow-up period, the proportion of smokers rose from 60% at baseline to 64%. While 30% reported lifetime problem drinking of alcohol at baseline, only 15% had problem drinking at follow-up. Furthermore, while at baseline 63% reported lifetime cannabis use and 32% were currently using the drug, by the follow-up assessment the latter figure had fallen to 18.5%. At follow-up, persistent substance users had significantly more severe positive and depressive symptoms and greater overall severity of illness. A report of no lifetime substance use at baseline was associated with greater improvement in spatial working memory (SWM) at follow-up. Conclusions Past substance use may impede recovery of SWM performance in people with schizophrenia in the year or so following first presentation to psychiatric services. The prevalence of substance use other than tobacco tends to diminish over this period, in the absence of specific interventions. Persistent substance use in first-episode schizophrenia is associated with more severe positive and depressive symptoms but not negative symptoms, and should be a target for specific treatment intervention. PMID:17532864

  13. Discharge of elderly people from an accident and emergency department: evaluation of health visitor follow-up.

    PubMed

    Runciman, P; Currie, C T; Nicol, M; Green, L; McKay, V

    1996-10-01

    Elderly people discharged directly home from an accident and emergency department are known to be a vulnerable group. The value of health visitor follow-up in patients aged 75 years and over was assessed in a random controlled trail; 222 intervention patients were seen at home by a research health visitor shortly after discharge and screened for new dependency and support needs, appropriate community services then being offered. These patients, and 192 controls for whom no special arrangements were made, were followed up four weeks later by a research occupational therapist. New dependency, most commonly trauma-related, was found in approximately 50%, and in the majority proved transient. Advice and/or referral to a wide range of services was offered to 92% of the intervention group. Service refusal rates were high in both groups. Compared to controls, intervention patients received more services and were significantly more independent at four weeks. Health visitor assessment was seen as helpful. In order to identify elderly accident and emergency department patients at risk following discharge, study data were used to derive a short questionnaire. In follow-up visits to 48 patients the use of this questionnaire was piloted, and its validity demonstrated. A number of study limitations and areas for development of discharge planning are discussed.

  14. Ward mortality in patients discharged from the ICU with tracheostomy may depend on patient's vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Rafael; Bacelar, Nestor; Hernandez, Gonzalo; Tubau, Isabel; Baigorri, Francisco; Gili, Gisela; Artigas, Antonio

    2008-10-01

    To determine the effect of discharge from the ICU with a tracheostomy tube on ward mortality and its relation to patient vulnerability. Retrospective single-center cohort study. Database (2003-2006) review of patients undergoing mechanical ventilation (MV) > 24 h and discharged from the ICU with or without tracheostomy tube in place and followed up to hospital discharge or death. We recorded clinical characteristics, complications, major ICU procedures, subjective prognosis at ICU discharge (Sabadell score), and hospital outcome. Factors associated with ward mortality were analyzed by multiple logistic regression. From 3,065 patients admitted to the ICU, 1,502 needed MV > 24 h. Only 936 patients (62%) survived the ICU and were transferred to the ward; of these, 130 (13.9%) had a tracheostomy tube in place. Ward mortality was higher in patients with a tracheostomy tube in place than in those without (26 vs. 7%, P < 0.001). Increased ward mortality among cannulated patients was seen only in those with intermediate Sabadell score (24 vs. 9% in score 1, P = 0.02, and 38 vs. 24% in score 2, P = 0.06), but not in the "good prognosis" (2 vs. 2%, score 0) and "expected to die in hospital" (80 vs. 75%, score 3) groups. Multivariate analysis found three factors associated with ward mortality: age, tracheostomy tube in place, and Sabadell score. Lack of tracheostomy decannulation in the ICU appears to be associated with ward mortality, but only in the group with a Sabadell score of 1.

  15. Social functioning and survival: A 10-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Arve, Seija; Lavonius, Sirkku; Savikko, Niina; Lehtonen, Aapo; Isoaho, Hannu

    2009-01-01

    Although otherwise extensively researched, one aspect of social functioning in older people that has received less attention is its association with staying at home for as long as possible. This 10-year follow-up examines factors of social functioning that support older people's independent living in their own homes and that reduce the risk of mortality. The data were collected in 1991 by a postal questionnaire that was sent to all residents of Turku, Finland, born in 1920. A physical examination was also conducted. Ten years later, in 2001, the mortality rate of this population was determined. The data were examined statistically. Female gender reduced the risk of mortality. In addition, daily outdoor activities, and not needing help (from different sources) were associated with a reduced risk of mortality. No need for help and a more positive attitude towards life reduced the risk of mortality of women. There were found only non-significant trends for men. Having plans for the future also reduced the risk of mortality. The findings of this study offer useful clues for planning the services provided by home health care personnel. In planning these services it is important that home health care workers take into account the differences between women and men customers: men may need and want different things from the home health care service than women do.

  16. Psychosocial work characteristics as predictors for burnout: findings from 3-year follow up of the PUMA Study.

    PubMed

    Borritz, Marianne; Bültmann, Ute; Rugulies, Reiner; Christensen, Karl Bang; Villadsen, Ebbe; Kristensen, Tage S

    2005-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of psychosocial work characteristics on burnout. A total of 1772 participants in different human service sector organizations were eligible for the cross-sectional analyses (baseline) and 952 for the prospective analyses. We measured 14 psychosocial work characteristics and three types of burnout. Linear regression models were used for analyzing associations between psychosocial work characteristics at baseline and burnout at baseline and at 3 years of follow up. Low possibilities for development, high meaning of work, low predictability, high quality of leadership, low role clarity, and high role conflicts predicted burnout at 3 years of follow up after the psychosocial work characteristics were adjusted for each other, potential confounders, and burnout level at baseline. Psychosocial work characteristics were prospectively associated with burnout, suggesting that improving the psychosocial work environment may reduce future burnout in human service work.

  17. Patients lost to follow-up in acromegaly: results of the ACROSPECT study.

    PubMed

    Delemer, B; Chanson, Ph; Foubert, L; Borson-Chazot, F; Chabre, O; Tabarin, A; Weryha, G; Cortet-Rudelli, C; Raingeard, I; Reznik, Y; Reines, C; Bisot-Locard, S; Castinetti, F

    2014-05-01

    The complex management of acromegaly has transformed this disease into a chronic condition, with the risk of patients being lost to follow-up. The objective of this study was to estimate the proportion of acromegalic patients lost to follow-up in France and to determine the impact that abandoning follow-up has on the disease and its management. ACROSPECT was a French national, multicentre, cross-sectional, observational study. Acromegalic patients were considered lost to follow-up if no new information had been entered in their hospital records during the previous 2 years. They were traced where possible, and data were collected by means of a recall visit or questionnaire. In the study population, 21% of the 2392 acromegalic patients initially followed in 25 tertiary endocrinology centres were lost to follow-up. At their last follow-up visit, 30% were uncontrolled, 33% were receiving medical therapy and 53% had residual tumour. Of the 362 traced, 62 had died and 77% were receiving follow-up elsewhere; the leading reason for abandoning follow-up was that they had not been informed that it was necessary. Our analysis of the questionnaires suggests that they were not receiving optimal follow-up. This study underlines the need to better inform acromegalic patients of the need for long-term follow-up, the absence of which could be detrimental to patients' health, and to develop shared care for what must now be regarded as a chronic disease.

  18. Feasibility and safety of surgical wound remote follow-up by smart phone in appendectomy: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Segura-Sampedro, Juan José; Rivero-Belenchón, Inés; Pino-Díaz, Verónica; Rodríguez Sánchez, María Cristina; Pareja-Ciuró, Felipe; Padillo-Ruiz, Javier; Jimenez-Rodriguez, Rosa María

    2017-09-01

    The objective of the present study is to assess the safety and feasibility of the use of telemedicine-based services for surgical wound care and to measure patient satisfaction with telemedicine-based follow-up. 24 patients were included, they were provided with a corporate mail address. On day 7 after surgery patients sent, via email, an image of their surgical wound together with a completed questionnaire in order to obtain an early diagnosis. Two independent physicians studied this information and the histologic analysis of the specimen. On day 8, all patients underwent face-to-face office examination by a third physician and all of them completed a satisfaction questionnaire at the end of the study. The use of telemedicine-based services showed a sensitivity of 100%, a specificity of 91.6%, a positive predictive value of 75% and a negative predictive value of 100%. Degree of concordance between the two physicians, as regards the necessity of face-to-face follow-up yielded a kappa coefficient of 0.42 (standard error 0.25 and confidence interval 95% (0.92-0.08), which means a moderate agreement between the two evaluations. 94% of patients were satisfied with telemedicine-based follow-up and 93% showed their preference for this procedure over conventional methods. The telemedicine-based follow-up, has proven to be feasible and safe for the evaluation of early postoperative complications. Patients reported high levels of satisfaction with the procedure. Telemedicine-based follow-up could become standard practice with the development of a specific mobile application.

  19. Multimorbidity and long-term care dependency—a five-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Not only single, but also multiple, chronic conditions are becoming the normal situation rather than the exception in the older generation. While many studies show a correlation between multimorbidity and various health outcomes, the long-term effect on care dependency remains unclear. The objective of this study is to follow up a cohort of older adults for 5 years to estimate the impact of multimorbidity on long-term care dependency. Methods This study is based on claims data from a German health insurance company. We included 115,203 people (mean age: 71.5 years, 41.4% females). To identify chronic diseases and multimorbidity, we used a defined list of 46 chronic conditions based on ICD-10 codes. Multimorbidity was defined as three or more chronic conditions from this list. The main outcome was “time until long-term care dependency”. The follow-up started on January 1st, 2005 and lasted for 5 years until December 31st, 2009. To evaluate differences between those with multimorbidity and those without, we calculated Kaplan–Meier curves and then modeled four distinct Cox proportional hazard regressions including multimorbidity, age and sex, the single chronic conditions, and disease clusters. Results Mean follow-up was 4.5 years. People with multimorbidity had a higher risk of becoming care dependent (HR: 1.85, CI 1.78–1.92). The conditions with the highest risks for long-term care dependency are Parkinson’s disease (HR: 6.40 vs. 2.68) and dementia (HR: 5.70 vs. 2.27). Patients with the multimorbidity pattern “Neuropsychiatric disorders” have a 79% higher risk of care dependency. Conclusions The results should form the basis for future health policy decisions on the treatment of patients with multiple chronic diseases and also show the need to introduce new ways of providing long-term care to this population. A health policy focus on chronic care management as well as the development of guidelines for multimorbidity is crucial to secure

  20. Evaluation of nurse-led follow up for patients undergoing pelvic radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Faithfull, S; Corner, J; Meyer, L; Huddart, R; Dearnaley, D

    2001-01-01

    This study reports results from a randomised controlled trial of nurse-led care and was designed to determine whether nurse-led follow up improved patients morbidity and satisfaction with care in men treated with radical radiotherapy for prostate and bladder cancer. The aim was to compare outcomes in terms of toxicity, symptoms experienced, quality of life, satisfaction with care and health care costs, between those receiving nurse-led care and a group receiving standard care. The study population was of men prescribed radical radiotherapy (greater than 60 Gy). Participants completed self-assessment questionnaires for symptoms and quality of life within the first week of radiotherapy treatment, at week 3, 6 and 12 weeks from start of radiotherapy. Satisfaction with clinical care was also assessed at 12 weeks post-treatment. Observer-rated RTOG toxicity scores were recorded pre-treatment, weeks 1, 3, 6 and 12 weeks from start of radiotherapy. The results presented in this paper are on 115 of 132 (87%) of eligible men who agreed to enter the randomised trial. 6 men (4%) refused and 11 (8%) were missed for inclusion in the study. Data were analysed as a comparison at cross-sectional time points and as a general linear model using multiple regression. There was no significant difference in maximum symptom scores over the time of the trial between nurse-led follow-up care and conventional medical care. Differences were seen in scores in the initial self assessment of symptoms (week 1) that may have been as a result of early nursing intervention. Those men who had received nurse-led care were significantly more satisfied (P < 0.002) at 12 weeks and valued the continuity of the service provided. There were also significant (P < 0.001) cost benefits, with a 31% reduction in costs with nurse-led, compared to medically led care. Evidence from this study suggests that a specialist nurse is able to provide safe follow up for men undergoing radiotherapy. The intervention

  1. Design of a System for Vision Screening and Follow-up Eye Care for Children in Milwaukee Public Schools

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Kathleen; Wu, Min; Steber, Dale; Cisler, Ron A.

    2005-01-01

    Vision problems affect many school age children, while only few of children are adequately screened for vision problems. The design of an information system supporting vision screening and follow-up eye care for Milwaukee Public Schools is discussed in this paper, which includes wireless data collection and web-based data management. The implementation of the system is ongoing. The information system will provide service to approximately 5,000 students annually in 30 urban elementary schools. PMID:16779346

  2. Survival of sealants in molars affected by molar-incisor hypomineralization: 18-month follow-up.

    PubMed

    Fragelli, Camila Maria Bullio; Souza, Juliana Feltrin de; Bussaneli, Diego Girotto; Jeremias, Fabiano; Santos-Pinto, Lourdes Dos; Cordeiro, Rita de Cássia Loiola

    2017-04-27

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical survival of sealants applied in first permanent molars (FPMs) affected by molar-incisor hypomineralization (MIH), at 18 months of follow-up. Forty-one first permanent molars were selected from 21 children, 6-8 years of age. MIH was classified by one calibrated examiner (kappa = 0.80) according to EAPD criteria. The inclusion criteria were fully erupted FPMs with MIH or sound FPMs (without MIH) for which sealant treatment was indicated. The FPMs were assigned to two groups: CG (control group) and HG (MIH group). Both groups were treated with sealant (FluroShield). Clinical follow-up was performed from baseline to 18 months to assess anatomical form, marginal adaptation, retention and presence of caries, according to criteria set by the United States Public Health Service-Modified, and was conducted by a blinded examiner (kappa = 0.80). The actuarial method was used to evaluate the survival of the sealants. The survival rates for the groups were compared using Fisher's exact test (α = 5%). The cumulative survival rates were 81% at 1 month, 68.8% at 6 months, 68.8% at 12 months, and 62.6% at 18 months for CG, and 88% at 1 month, 84% at 6 months, 76% at 12 months, and 72% at 18 months for HG. No significant difference was found between the groups. The sealants in molars affected by MIH presented a survival rate similar to the sealants in the control, suggesting that sealants may be an adequate approach for preventing carious lesions in MIH-affected molars.

  3. Comparison of remote and in-clinic follow-up after methotrexate/misoprostol abortion.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Sheila; Panjwani, Dilzayn; Gupta, Melini; Meaney, Christopher; Morgan, Rebecca; Feuerstein, Erika

    2015-09-01

    This study compared adherence to follow-up and clinical outcomes between standard in-clinic and remote follow-up after methotrexate/misoprostol abortion. This nonrandomized trial recruited women requesting medical abortion at two sexual health clinics in Toronto, Canada. Women received methotrexate 50 mg/m(2) followed 3-7 days later by 800 mcg of misoprostol self-administered vaginally. For Day 15, follow-up participants could choose standard in-clinic follow-up with ultrasound and assessment or remote telephone follow-up with serum β-hCG performed at a community laboratory and symptom checklist. Standard and remote follow-up groups were compared for adherence, defined as completing follow-up within 7 days of the scheduled time, and clinical outcomes. Characteristics associated with adherence were assessed using multivariable logistic regression. Of 129 women, 86 (67%) chose remote follow-up. Nonadherence rates for remote (28%) and standard (23%) follow-up groups did not differ in univariate (p=.57) or multivariable analysis (odds ratio: 1.09, 95% confidence interval: 0.39-3.01). Rates of emergency/hospital visits were 3% and 9% for remote and standard groups, respectively (p=.22), and complete loss to follow was 6% and 14% in remote and standard groups (p=.18). Nonadherent women were more likely to be undecided about their contraception (65% vs. 28%; p=.002), and this difference persisted in the multivariable analysis. Given a choice of remote or in-clinic follow-up after methotrexate/misoprostol abortion, most women chose remote follow-up. Rates of adherence to follow-up, adverse outcomes and complete loss to follow-up were similar for women choosing remote and standard follow-up. Since standard and remote follow-up after methotrexate/misoprostol abortion are associated with similar adherence to follow-up and similar safety profiles, women should be offered their choice of follow-up method. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Follow-up of breast cancer in primary care vs specialist care: results of an economic evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Grunfeld, E; Gray, A; Mant, D; Yudkin, P; Adewuyi-Dalton, R; Coyle, D; Cole, D; Stewart, J; Fitzpatrick, R; Vessey, M

    1999-01-01

    A randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing primary-care-centred follow-up of breast cancer patients with the current standard practice of specialist-centred follow-up showed no increase in delay in diagnosing recurrence, and no increase in anxiety or deterioration in health-related quality of life. An economic evaluation of the two schemes of follow-up was conducted concurrent with the RCT. Because the RCT found no difference in the primary clinical outcomes, a cost minimization analysis was conducted. Process measures of the quality of care such as frequency and length of visits were superior in primary care. Costs to patients and to the health service were lower in primary care. There was no difference in total costs of diagnostic tests, with particular tests being performed more frequently in primary care than in specialist care. Data are provided on the average frequency and length of visits, and frequency of diagnostic testing for breast cancer patients during the follow-up period. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10098764

  5. Two-year follow-up of bibliotherapy and individual cognitive therapy for depressed older adults.

    PubMed

    Floyd, Mark; Rohen, Noelle; Shackelford, Jodie A M; Hubbard, Karen L; Parnell, Marsha B; Scogin, Forrest; Coates, Adriana

    2006-05-01

    This study examined the stability of treatment gains after receiving either cognitive bibliotherapy or individual cognitive psychotherapy for depression in older adults. A 2-year follow-up of 23 participants from Floyd, Scogin, McKendree-Smith, Floyd, and Rokke (2004) was conducted by comparing pre-and posttreatment scores with follow-up scores on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD) and the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS). Results indicated that treatment gains from baseline to the 2-year follow-up period were maintained on the HRSD and GDS, and there was not a significant decline from posttreatment to follow-up. There were no significant differences between the treatments on the GDS or HRSD at the 2-year follow-up; however, bibliotherapy participants had significantly more recurrences of depression during the follow-up period.

  6. Motivators and barriers to uptake of post-operative voluntary medical male circumcision follow-up in Yala division, Siaya County, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Abunah, Bonface; Onkoba, Rueben; Nyagero, Josephat; Muhula, Samuel; Omondi, Edward; Guyah, Bernard; Omondi, Gregory Barnabas

    2016-01-01

    Follow-up visits are recommended to all voluntary medical male circumcision clients (VMMC), however, adherence is variable. High lost-to-follow-up cases limit knowledge about clinical status of clients and adverse events. This study sought to establish Motivators and Barriers to the Uptake of VMMC post-operative follow-up services in Siaya County, Kenya. 277 clients from five VMMC sites in Yala were recruited immediately post-operation to participate in a telephone interview between the 21st and 31st day post-surgery during which a semi-structured questionnaire was administered. Descriptive and inferential statistics was used to analyse quantitative information using SPSS while responses from open ended questions were grouped into themes, sieved out, coded and analyzed. 137(49.5%) of the 277 participants utilized the follow-up services. Health education (31.4%) and emergency reviews/adverse events (24.1%) were the main motivation for returning for follow-up while occupational and other engagements (29.7%) and presumption of healing (24.6%) were the main barriers. Type of facility attended (p=0.0173), satisfaction with the discharge process (p=0.0150) and residency in Yala (p<0.001) were statistically significant to the respondents' return for follow-up. 85(62.0%) of the participants returned on the 7th day, 9(6.6%) returned after 7 days, and 43(31.4%) returned before 7 days. VMMC health education should include and emphasize the benefits of follow-up care to the clients and the providers should address the barriers to accessing follow-up services. Our results will inform the programme on areas identified to improve care for VMMC clients and reduce subsequent lost-to-follow-up cases.

  7. Treatment summaries, follow-up care instructions, and patient navigation: could they be combined to improve cancer survivor's receipt of follow-up care?

    PubMed

    Jabson, Jennifer M

    2015-12-01

    Cancer survivors require follow-up care to ensure early detection of recurrence, management of late/long term effects, preventive screening for early detection of second primary malignancies, as well as other forms of preventive care. But not all survivors receive necessary follow-up care. Combining survivorship care plans and patient navigation may be a successful strategy to improve survivor's receipt of necessary follow-up care. Using data from the 2010 LIVESTRONG online survey of cancer survivors (N = 3854), this study tested associations between receipt of follow-up care instructions (FCI) and treatment summaries (TS) paired with patient navigation (PN), and survivor's receipt of cancer surveillance, preventive cancer screening, and attendance at regular medical appointments. Survivors who received FCI, TS, and patient navigation were the most likely to report attendance at all medical appointments (aOR 4.17, 95% CI 2.30, 7.57, p ≤ .001) and receipt of preventive cancer screening (aOR 3.56, 95% CI 2.28, 5.55, p ≤ .001). Likelihood of receiving follow-up care was greatest when survivors received FCI, TS, and PN. This pairing appeared to be most beneficial for survivor's attendance at medical appointments and receipt of preventive cancer screening. By improving attendance at medical appointments and prevention cancer screening, pairing SCP and PN could benefit survivors through reduced recurrence, earlier recurrence detection, and prevention of second primaries.

  8. Supplement: Localization and broadband follow-up of the gravitational-wave transient GW150914

    DOE PAGES

    Abbott, B. P.

    2016-07-20

    This Supplement provides supporting material for arXiv:1602.08492 . We briefly summarize past electromagnetic (EM) follow-up efforts as well as the organization and policy of the current EM follow-up program. Here, we compare the four probability sky maps produced for the gravitational-wave transient GW150914, and provide additional details of the EM follow-up observations that were performed in the different bands.

  9. Evaluation of Orthopedic Trauma Surgery Follow-up and Impact of a Routine Callback Program.

    PubMed

    Casp, Aaron J; Wells, Jodi; Holzgrefe, Russell; Weiss, David; Kahler, David; Yarboro, Seth R

    2017-01-05

    A high rate of patients lost to follow-up is a common problem in orthopedic trauma surgery. This adversely affects the ability to produce accurate clinical outcomes research. The purpose of this project was to (1) evaluate the rate of loss to follow-up at an academic level I trauma center; (2) identify the patient-reported reasons for loss to follow-up; and (3) evaluate the efficacy of a routine patient callback program. All patients who underwent surgery in the orthopedic trauma division of the University of Virginia Medical Center from April 1, 2014, to September 30, 2014, and did not complete their postoperative clinic follow-up were analyzed. The characteristics of these patients were evaluated, and the primary reason for not completing the recommended follow-up was identified. All patients were then offered additional orthopedic follow-up at the time of contact. Of the 480 patients who met the inclusion criteria, 41 (8.5%) failed to complete the recommended postoperative follow-up course. The most common reason for being lost to follow-up was feeling well and not having the need to be seen (46.3%). Only 6 (14.6%) of the 41 patients requested follow-up care at the time of contact. The lost to follow-up rate in this study, 8.5%, was considerably lower than that previously reported, but patient characteristics were consistent with those of prior studies on this subject. The low lost to follow-up rate may reflect a difference in geographic location or patient population. The patient callback program had a low yield of patients requesting additional follow-up after being contacted. [Orthopedics. 201x; xx(x):xx-xx.].

  10. Supplement: Localization and broadband follow-up of the gravitational-wave transient GW150914

    DOE PAGES

    Abbott, B. P.

    2016-07-20

    This Supplement provides supporting material for arXiv:1602.08492 . We briefly summarize past electromagnetic (EM) follow-up efforts as well as the organization and policy of the current EM follow-up program. Here, we compare the four probability sky maps produced for the gravitational-wave transient GW150914, and provide additional details of the EM follow-up observations that were performed in the different bands.

  11. Follow-up and outcomes of pregnancies in French Guiana: the part of teenage pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Akoï, Koïvogui; Francoise, Julien-Pena; Aurel, Carbunar; Laure-Manuella, Imounga; Christelle, Laruade; Venise, Nebor; Sabrina, Covis

    2016-02-27

    Describe the part that teenage pregnancy plays in overall pregnancies in French Guiana. Descriptive and retrospective study of the medical records of 25,343 women who delivered in French Guiana from January 1, 2009 to December 31, 2012. The study displays and compares several indicators of follow-up visits, pregnancy-linked disorders, delivery and birth outcomes between the years and between minors and adult women. The proportion of teenage pregnancies was 6.8%; it decreased significantly from 7.2% in 2009 to 6.1% in 2012 (p=0.01). The number of antenatal visits was <7 and the visits were mainly provided by the Mother and Child Health ("Protection Maternelle et Infantile", PMI) services (38.6%). The mean (±SD) gestational age at first antenatal visit was 14.1±6.5 weeks. In comparison with adult pregnancies, teenage pregnancies were more frequently concerned with preterm labour (4.6% vs. 2%; p<0.01) but less concerned with gestational diabetes (0% vs. 2.2%; p<0.05) or pregnancy-induced hypertension (2.2% vs. 4.2%; p<0.05). Teenage pregnancies are still frequent in French Guiana, especially in the Eastern and Western communes, where first visits are often delayed by mothers who are minors and take place in PMI services, which offer less clinical, and paraclinical examinations than other settings.

  12. The business case for breastfeeding: a successful regional implementation, evaluation, and follow-up.

    PubMed

    Garvin, Cheza C; Sriraman, Natasha K; Paulson, Amy; Wallace, Elise; Martin, Charley E; Marshall, Liz

    2013-08-01

    Breastfeeding benefits the health of babies and mothers, but returning to work is a significant barrier for mothers wishing to continue breastfeeding for the recommended 12 months. A resource training kit, The Business Case for Breastfeeding (BC4BF), developed by the Health Resources and Services Administration, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, was implemented in Southeastern Virginia to assist businesses in developing lactation support programs (LSPs) and eliminating breastfeeding barriers. The primary goals of the 1-year project were to educate 20 businesses about breastfeeding support in the workplace, engage 10 businesses to implement the BC4BF, and assess sustainability via documented policy and environmental changes and integration of the LSP into the business infrastructure. The Transtheoretical Model of Behavior Change was adapted to assess stage of organizational change. A Centers for Disease Control and Prevention tool for measuring community-level policy, systems, and environmental change was adapted to assess worksite policy and environmental changes. Over 20 businesses were educated about the BC4BF. Seventeen engaged in the project. Fourteen significantly increased their stage of change, development of LSPs, written policies, and physical and social environment changes (p≤0.001). A brief follow-up study revealed that all 14 employers maintained their programs 8 months after the program ended, with increased stages of change, policy enforcement, and physical environment (p≤0.05). The BC4BF provided an effective approach to assisting employers in establishing and maintaining LSPs in the workplace across several cities.

  13. Alternative methods of follow up in breast cancer: a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, D A; Krupa, K; Cooke, T G

    2007-01-01

    Regular clinical follow up after breast cancer is a common practice. Evidence from retrospective reviews casts doubt on the efficacy of this practice and the various guidelines for follow up show little concordance. Our aim was to investigate what alternative follow-up methods (including reduced frequency of visits) have been subjected to controlled trial and to establish what evidence exists from controlled trials to advise the guidelines. The study involved systematic review of the literature using MEDLINE, Embase, CancerLit, Web of Sciences and EBM reviews as data sources. Methods included reviewing all randomised controlled trials comparing different follow-up frequencies or comparing an alternative method with clinical follow up after breast cancer. All outcome measures addressed in the trials were analysed. Two trials compared frequency of traditional follow up. Five trials assessed alternative methods. All were of inadequate power or duration to establish ideal frequency of clinic visits or safety of alternative follow-up methods. Alternative follow up had no detrimental effect on satisfaction or outcome. Few trials have been conducted, all of which are underpowered to establish safety of reducing or replacing clinic visits. Alternative methods of follow up are acceptable to patients and may be associated with other benefits. Larger trials are required. PMID:17486134

  14. Impact of an Intervention to Improve Contraceptive Use Through Follow-Up Phone Calls to Female Adolescent Clinic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Douglas; Raine, Tina; Thrush, Greg; Yuen, Cora; Sokoloff, Abby; Potter, Susan C.

    2011-01-01

    CONTEXT Adolescent females often have questions or concerns about their contraceptive methods, and they may discontinue use if these questions are not answered. Little evidence exists on whether follow-up phone calls to address young women’s concerns can help sustain contraceptive use. METHODS Between 2005 and 2007, a total of 805 females aged 14–18 attending a reproductive health clinic in San Francisco were randomly assigned to receive either regular clinic services or regula