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Sample records for idaho fish screening

  1. Idaho Fish Screening Improvements Final Status Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Leitzinger, Eric J.

    2008-11-12

    This project funds two Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) fish habitat biologists to develop, secure funding for, and implement on-the-ground fish habitat improvement projects in the lower Clearwater River drainage and the upper Salmon River drainage. This report summarizes project activity during the first year of funding. The Clearwater Region fish habitat biologist began work on January 28, 2008 and the Salmon Region habitat biologist began on February 11, 2008.

  2. Augmented Fish Health Monitoring in Idaho, 1992 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, A.Douglas

    1993-12-01

    This report documents the progress of Idaho Department of Fish and Game`s fish health monitoring during the past five years and will serve as a completion report for the Augmented Fish Health Monitoring Project. Anadromous fish at twelve IDFG facilities were monitored for various pathogens and organosomatic analyses were performed to anadromous fish prior to their release. A fish disease database has been developed and data is presently being entered. Alternate funding has been secured to continue fish health monitoring.

  3. Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-57) - Idaho Fish Screening Improvement (Champion, Iron, Fourth of July, Goat Creeks)

    SciTech Connect

    Yarde, Richard

    2001-07-12

    BPA proposes to fund a project that will enhance in-stream habitat within the Upper Salmon River watershed through a program of irrigation system improvements. The proposed improvements include consolidation and improvement of diversions, installation of headgates to control diversion flow, installation of pipes to reduce conveyance loss of water, and installation of fish screens or infiltration pipes to exclude fish from irrigation canals. These conservation measures will enhance riparian habitat by contributing to instream flows in the project area, which includes Champion, Iron, Fourth of July and Goat Creeks.

  4. Field Review of Fish Habitat Improvement Projects in Central Idaho.

    SciTech Connect

    Beschta, Robert L.; Griffith, Jack; Wesche, Thomas A.

    1993-05-01

    The goal of this field review was to provide information to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) regarding previous and ongoing fish habitat improvement projects in central Idaho. On July 14, 1992, the review team met at the Sawtooth National Recreation Area office near Ketchum, Idaho, for a slide presentation illustrating several habitat projects during their construction phases. Following the slide presentation, the review team inspected fish habitat projects that have been implemented in the last several years in the Stanley Basin and adjacent valleys. At each site the habitat project was described to the field team and a brief period for project inspection followed. The review team visited approximately a dozen sites on the Challis, Sawtooth, and Boise National Forests over a period of approximately two and a half days. There are two objectives of this review namely to summarize observations for specific field sites and to provide overview commentary regarding the BPA habitat improvement program in central Idaho.

  5. Evaluation of Planning for Fish and Wildlife, Dworshak Reservoir Project, Idaho.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-01

    Walls Walla District, U. S. Army Corps of Engineers, Walla Walls, Washington. February 12, 1973. 43. Greenley , Joseph C. 1973. Letter from Director...Washington. March 9, 1973. 44. Greenley , Joseph C. 1973. Letter from Director Idaho Department of Fish and Game to District Manager, Bureau of Land...Sport Fisheries and Wildlife for General Accounting Office. August, 1973. 47. Greenley , Joseph C. 1973. Letter from Director, Idaho Department of Fish and

  6. Augmented Fish Health Monitoring in Idaho, 1989-1990 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Hauck, A. K.

    1990-10-01

    The Idaho augmented fish health monitoring contract DE-A179-87BP65903 was awarded in June 1987 and fully implemented in January 1988. The third annual report of activities serviced under this contract is presented. The prevailing fish health problems in 1989 include persistent infections caused by infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV), by Myxobolus (Myxosoma) cerebralis, Renibacterium salmoninarum and drug resistant Aeromonas salmonicida at select hatcheries on Idaho's upper Columbia River tributaries. Administrative focus during the year was to fill vacant positions and still maintain the monitoring effort at levels agreed on under contract. Complete diagnostic and inspection services were provided to eleven Idaho anadromous facilities. The present report describes work done to meet contract agreements and summarizes the fish health findings of anadromous stocks reared at and returning to Idaho's facilities during 1989.

  7. State of Idaho Augmented Anadromous Fish Health Monitoring, 1988 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Foott, J. Scott; Hauch, A. Kent

    1989-05-01

    This report documents the progress in the assigned tasks which have occurred during the second year of the Augmented Anadromous Fish Health Monitoring Project. Fish at seven Idaho Department of Fish and Game facilities were monitored for various pathogens and organosomatic analyses were performed on smolts prior to their release in the Spring of 1989. A disease database has been developed and facility impediments to fish health have been identified.

  8. Augmented Fish Health Monitoring in Idaho, 1990-1991 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, A. Douglas

    1992-08-01

    The Idaho augmented fish health monitoring contract DE-A179-87BP65903 was awarded in June 1987 and fully implemented in January 1988. The fourth annual report of activities serviced under this contract is presented. The prevailing fish health problems in 1990 include persistent infections caused by Mvxobolus cerebralis and Flexibacter osvchronhilus. Subclinical infections of Renibacterium salmoninarum have been confirmed in pools of chinook kidney tissues using Enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA), but to date, mortality and clinical signs were not apparent in juvenile anadromous fish. Clinical signs were observed in returning brood chinook at all chinook facilities. Furunculosis (Aeromonas salmonicida) was isolated in conjunction with mortality at Niagara Springs in the spring of 1991. The anadromous fish pathologist position was accepted by Doug Munson in July 1991. Complete diagnostic and inspection services were provided to eleven Idaho anadromous facilities. This report describes work done to meet contract agreements and summarizes the fish health findings of anadromous stocks reared at and returning to Idaho's facilities during 1990-1991.

  9. Mercury concentrations in water, and mercury and selenium concentrations in fish from Brownlee Reservoir and selected sites in Boise and Snake Rivers, Idaho and Oregon, 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacCoy, Dorene E.

    2014-01-01

    advise of allowable fish consumption from specific water bodies. The geometric mean Hg concentration of 10 fish of a single species collected from a single water body (lake or stream) in Idaho is compared to the action level to determine if a fish consumption advisory should be issued. The U.S. Geological Survey collected and analyzed individual fillets of mountain whitefish (Prosopium williamsoni), smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu), and channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) for Hg. The median Hg concentration of 0.32 mg/kg exceeded the Idaho water-quality criterion at the site in Brownlee Reservoir. Average Hg concentrations from Brownlee Reservoir (0.32 mg/kg) and the Boise River at mouth (0.33 mg/kg) exceeded the Hg RPTE threshold (>0.24 mg/kg). IFCAP action levels also were exceeded at the sites on Brownlee Reservoir and at the mouth of the Boise River. Median Hg concentrations in fish at the remaining four river sites were less than 0.20 mg/kg with average concentrations ranging from 0.14 to 0.21 mg/kg Hg. Selenium (Se) analysis also was conducted on one composite fish tissue sample per site to screen for general concentrations and to provide information for future risk assessments. Concentrations of Se ranged from 0.07 to 0.49 mg/kg wet weight; average concentrations were highest in smallmouth bass (0.40 mg/kg) and lowest in mountain whitefish (0.12 mg/kg).

  10. Evaluation and Monitoring of Idaho Habitat Enhancement and Anadromous Fish Natural Production : Annual Report 1986.

    SciTech Connect

    Petrosky, Charles E.; Holubetz, Terry B.

    1987-11-01

    The Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) has been conducting an evaluation of existing and proposed habitat improvement projects for anadromous fish in the Clearwater River and Salmon River drainages over the last 3 years. Projects included in the evaluation are funded by or proposed for funding by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the Northwest Power Planning Act as off-site mitigation for downstream hydropower development on the Snake and Columbia rivers. This evaluation project is also funded under the same authority. A mitigation record is being developed to use increased smolt production (i.e., yield) at full-seeding as the best measure of benefit from a habitat enhancement project. Determination of full benefit from a project depends on completion or maturation of the project and presence of adequate numbers of fish to document actual increases in fish production. The depressed nature of upriver anadromous stocks have precluded measuring full benefits of any habitat enhancement project in Idaho. Partial benefit will be credited to the mitigation record in the interim period of run restoration.

  11. Fish communities and related environmental conditions of the lower Boise River, southwestern Idaho, 1974-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacCoy, Dorene E.

    2006-01-01

    Within the last century, the lower Boise River has been transformed from a meandering, braided, gravel-bed river that supported large runs of salmon to a channelized, regulated, urban river that provides flood control and irrigation water to more than 1,200 square miles of land. An understanding of the current status of the river's fish communities and related environmental conditions is important to support the ongoing management of the Boise River. Therefore, fish community data from the U.S. Geological Survey and the Idaho Department of Fish and Game collected since 1974 were analyzed to describe the status of fish communities in the lower Boise River. Each set of data was collected to address different study objectives, but is combined here to provide an overall distribution of fish in the lower Boise River over the last 30 years. Twenty-two species of fish in 7 families have been identified in the lower Boise River-3 salmonidae, trout and whitefish; 2 cottidae, sculpins; 3 catostomidae, suckers; 7 cyprinidae, minnows; 4 centrarchidae, sunfish; 2 ictaluridae, catfish; and 1 cobitidae, loach. Analysis of fish community data using an Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) for Northwest rivers shows a decrease in the biotic integrity in a downstream direction, with the lowest IBI near the mouth of the Boise River. The number of tolerant and introduced fish were greater in the lower reaches of the river. Changes in land use, habitat, and water quality, as well as regulated streamflow have affected the lower Boise River fish community. IBI scores were negatively correlated with maximum instantaneous water temperature, specific conductance, and suspended sediment; as well as the basin land-use metrics, area of developed land, impervious surface area, and the number of major diversions upstream of a site. Fish communities in the upstream reaches were dominated by piscivorous fish, whereas the downstream reaches were dominated by tolerant, omnivorous fish. The percentage of

  12. Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project; Idaho Department of Fish and Game 2007 Final Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Cousins, Katherine

    2009-04-03

    The Idaho Department of Fish and Game maintained a total of about 2,743 acres of wildlife mitigation habitat in 2007, and protected another 921 acres. The total wildlife habitat mitigation debt has been reduced by approximately two percent (598.22 HU) through the Department's mitigation activities in 2007. Implementation of the vegetative monitoring and evaluation program continued across protected lands. For the next funding cycle, the IDFG is considering a package of restoration projects and habitat improvements, conservation easements, and land acquisitions in the project area.

  13. Yakima Fish Passage : Phase II : Fish Screen Construction.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bureau of Reclamation. Pacific Northwest Region.

    2003-03-01

    Accomplishments in 2001--2002 were spotty and limited due primarily to right-of-way problems at several sites and unanticipated changes in scope at some sites. Changes in BPA funding procedures have also impacted our ability to accomplish previously scheduled work. The following is a brief summary of work accomplished and scheduled at the remaining Phase II sites. (1) Selah-Moxee Fish Screen--Construction at this site was started in October 2001 and was completed in March 2002. We have settled the contractor claims and have closed out the construction contract. The O&M Agreement with the irrigation district was also completed in 2002. Work remains to complete the Designer's Operating Criteria. (2) Scott Fish Screen--Considerable effort was spent in 2001 and 2002 to try to resolve right-of-way issues at this site. However, these problems proved to be insurmountable, and this site has been dropped from the Phase n Program. The only thing remaining on Scott (as far as the Phase n program is concerned) is to prepare a brief wrap-up report to send to all interested parties to summarize what has been done and to explain the status of the diversion from a fish passage standpoint. (3) Packwood Fish Screen--Designs and specifications for the civil works were completed for this screen in 2002. The screen, screen cleaner, and other metal work have already been fabricated by WDFW Screen Shop. Award of a construction contract was scheduled for September 2002. The BP A lands staff has experienced significant delays in obtaining an easement from the state of Washington for a piece of the John Wayne Trail right-of-way currently occupied by the existing screen. As a result, the construction contract has been rescheduled for award in the fall of 2003. We are ready to proceed with construction if BP A can obtain the necessary easements by May 2003. (4) Fogarty Fish Screen--We opened bids on this site in August, 2002. There was only one responsive bidder and the bid was nearly double

  14. John Day Fish Passage and Screening; 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Steve

    2002-03-26

    The accomplishments of the John Day, Umatilla, and Walla Walla Fish Passage and Screening Programs include the following: Operation and maintenance of 364 existing fish screening devices (see Table 4), replacement of 18 outdated fish screening devices that totaled 31 rotary drums (some were multiple drum systems), 4 new screens at unscreened diversions, 26 pump intake fish screens, fabrication of components for 16 additional fish screens for the Rogue basin, construction of two fish passage structures, and participation in other activities. After the replacement or construction of 22 fish screening devices during 2001, we now have 108 screening devices that meet NMFS criteria. Funding for these projects was attained from BPA, NMFS and OWEB. The John Day Fish Passage and Screening Program focused construction efforts into new and replacement fish screening devices for these various programs throughout the state of Oregon. The program also continued to develop and implement innovative designs to meet the diverse and expanding needs for the state of Oregon. Projects completed during this report period meet the current National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) criteria. Fish species targeted for protection include ESA Listed Mid-Columbia steelhead, Columbia basin bull trout, anadromous and resident salmonids, and numerous non-game fish species. Priority project locations have been identified as the upper reaches of the Middle Fork, North Fork, South Fork and the Mainstem of the John Day River and their tributaries. These upper reaches contain critical salmon and steelhead spawning and rearing habitat.

  15. Assessment of fish assemblages and minimum sampling effort required to determine botic integrity of large rivers in southern Idaho, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maret, Terry R.; Ott, D.S.

    2004-01-01

    width was determined to be sufficient for collecting an adequate number of fish to estimate species richness and evaluate biotic integrity. At most sites, about 250 fish were needed to effectively represent 95 percent of the species present. Fifty-three percent of the sites assessed, using an IBI developed specifically for large Idaho rivers, received scores of less than 50, indicating poor biotic integrity.

  16. Effectiveness of common fish screen materials to protect lamprey ammocoetes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rose, Brien P.; Mesa, Matthew G.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the effects of irrigation diversions on populations of Pacific lampreyLampetra tridentata in the Columbia River basin is needed for their recovery. We tested the effectiveness of five common fish screen materials for excluding lamprey ammocoetes: interlock (IL), vertical bar (VB), perforated plate (PP), and 12-gauge and 14-gauge wire cloth (WC12) and (WC14). When fish (28–153 mm) were exposed for 60 min to screen panels perpendicular to an approach velocity of 12 cm/s in a recirculating flume, the percentage of ammocoetes entrained (i.e., passed through the screen) was 26% for the IL, 18% for the PP, 33% for the VB, 62% for the WC14, and 65% for the WC12 screens. For all screens, most fish were entrained within the first 15–20 min. Fish length significantly influenced entrainment, with the PP, VB, and IL screens preventing fish greater than 50–65 mm from entrainment and the WC14 and WC12 screens preventing entrainment of fish greater than 90–110 mm. Fish of all sizes repeatedly became impinged (i.e., contacting the screen for more than 1 s) on the screens, with the frequency of impingement events increasing during the first 5 min and becoming relatively stable thereafter. Impingement ranges were highest on the IL screen (36–62%), lowest on the WC14 and WC12 screens (13–31%), and intermediate on the PP and VB screens (23–54%). However, the WC14 and WC12 screens had fewer and larger fish remaining as time elapsed because so many were entrained. For all screen types, injuries were rare and minor, and no fish died after overnight posttest holding. Our results indicate that wire cloth screens should be replaced, where practical, with perforated plate, vertical bar, or interlocking bar screens to reduce lamprey entrainment at water diversions.

  17. Selenium-mercury relationships in Idaho lake fish versus Northeastern USA lake fish

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methyl-mercury (MeHg) exposure to wildlife and humans occurs primarily through the foodweb, notably fish consumption. Selenium moderates the toxicity of MeHg in all animal models that utilize selenoenzymatic protein synthesis, as do humans. A Se:Hg molar ratio of <1:1 appears to...

  18. Yakima River Basin Phase II Fish Screen Evaluations, 2001.

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, J.A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Chamness, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    In the summer and fall of 2001 the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year study for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. Data were collected to determine if velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met current National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage and whether bypass outfall conditions allowed fish to safely return to the river. Based on our studies in 2001, we concluded that: in general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set forth by the NMFS; most facilities efficiently protected juvenile fish from entrainment, impingement, or migration delay; automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were well greased and operative; and removal of sediment build-up and accumulated leafy and woody debris are areas that continue to improve. Continued periodic screen evaluations will increase the effectiveness of screen operation and maintenance practices by confirming the effectiveness (or ineffectiveness) of screen operating procedures at individual sites. Where procedures are being followed and problems still occur, evaluation results can be used to suggest means to better protect fish at screening facilities. There has been a progressive improvement in the maintenance and effectiveness of fish screen facilities in the Yakima River Basin during the last several years, in part, as a result of regular screen evaluations and the rapid feedback of information necessary to improve operations and design of these important fish protection devices. Continued periodic screen evaluations will increase the effectiveness of screen operation and maintenance practices by confirming the effectiveness (or ineffectiveness) of screen operating procedures at individual sites. Where procedures are being

  19. Historical and current perspectives on fish assemblages of the Snake River, Idaho and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maret, T.R.; Mebane, C.A.

    2005-01-01

    The Snake River is the tenth longest river in the United States, extending 1,667 km from its origin in Yellowstone National Park in western Wyoming to its union with the Columbia River at Pasco, Washington. Historically, the main-stem Snake River upstream from the Hells Canyon Complex supported at least 26 native fish species, including anadromous stocks of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead O. mykiss, Pacific lamprey Lampetra tridentata, and white sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus. Of these anadromous species, only the white sturgeon remains in the Snake River between the Hells Canyon Complex and Shoshone Falls. Today, much of the Snake River has been transformed into a river with numerous impoundments and flow diversions, increased pollutant loads, and elevated water temperatures. Current (1993-2002) fish assemblage collections from 15 sites along the Snake River and Henrys Fork contained 35 fish species, including 16 alien species. Many of these alien species such as catfish (Ictaluridae), carp (Cyprinidae), and sunfish (Centrarchidae) are adapted for warmwater impounded habitats. Currently, the Snake River supports 19 native species. An index of biotic integrity (IBI), developed to evaluate large rivers in the Northwest, was used to evaluate recent (1993-2002) fish collections from the Snake River and Henrys Fork in southern Idaho and western Wyoming. Index of biotic integrity site scores and component metrics revealed a decline in biotic integrity from upstream to downstream in both the Snake River and Henrys Fork. Two distinct groups of sites were evident that correspond to a range of IBI scores-an upper Snake River and Henrys Fork group with relatively high biotic integrity (mean IBI scores of 46-84) and a lower Snake River group with low biotic integrity (mean IBI scores of 10-29). Sites located in the lower Snake River exhibited fish assemblages that reflect poor-quality habitat where coldwater and sensitive species are rare or absent, and

  20. Comparing Fish Screen Performance to Physical Design Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Vucelick, Jessica A.; Abernethy, Cary S.; Neitzel, Duane A.

    2004-07-01

    Fish screens associated with irrigation diversion structures in streams where salmonids are present can perform a vital function by protecting rearing and migrating fishes. Irrigation diversions in the western United States were developed in the late 1800?s and early 1900?s with little regard to how they might affect fish populations. Fish screens were installed on some diversions beginning in the 1930's but were often ineffective. Beginning in the 1980's a ''modern-era'' fish screening program was initiated in the Yakima River basin in Washington State. A systematic phased approach was employed, with federal funding, to replace antiquated screens and to install screens where there had not previously been any. Also during this time, the federal and state agencies responsible for protecting the fish resources developed criteria to guide the design of these facilities. These criteria, developed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Agency Fisheries (formerly the National Marine Fisheries Service) and adopted by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, dictate the limits of physical metrics such as approach velocity for fish screens facilities. To determine whether the investment in fish screen facilities were paying dividends in terms of the fish protection they were designed and built to achieve, the in-situ evaluation of these facilities was required. Scientists at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) developed methods for evaluating these new fish screen facilities as they came ''on-line'' to document whether the facilities were designed, constructed, operated and maintained to be within the fish passage criteria. Because the fish protection criteria were developed to guide facility engineering and design, researchers had to interpret the criteria in terms of how they would be applied to data from the field to determine whether a specific facility was operated within criteria. PNNL uses a combination of water velocity measurements, visual

  1. Geologic map of the Fish Creek Reservoir 7.5' quadrangle, Blaine County, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skipp, Betty; Brandt, Theodore R.

    2012-01-01

    The Fish Creek Reservoir quadrangle in south-central Idaho lies on the north-central margin of the Cenozoic Snake River Plain at the southern end of the Pioneer Mountains. Rocks exposed in the quadrangle range in age from Paleozoic through Cenozoic. Mesozoic rocks are absent. Though Triassic and Jurassic sedimentary rocks may have been deposited in this area, they have been removed by erosion following uplift and thrusting of the Late Cretaceous to early Tertiary Sevier orogeny. The Late Devonian to Early Mississippian Antler orogeny preceded the Sevier. Ordovician through Devonian rocks of western-derived shale and sandstone facies and eastern carbonate shelf facies are unconformably overlain respectively by Pennsylvanian-Permian Wood River and Mississippian Copper Basin Formations. These two sequences are exposed in structural windows juxtaposed by the Sevier-age Pioneer thrust fault. Interpretive cross-sections accompany the map. Volcanic rocks of the Eocene Challis Volcanic Group, Miocene Idavada Volcanics, and Pleistocene Snake River Group cover parts of the area that remains tectonically active.

  2. Yakima River Basin Phase II Fish Screen Evaluations, 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, Jessica A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Chamness, Mickie A.

    2003-03-01

    In 2002, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met National Marine Fisheries Service criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage and whether bypass outfall conditions allowed fish to safely return to the river. In addition, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2002, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by the National Marine Fisheries Service. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to increase safe juvenile fish passage. (4) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well greased and operative. (5) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris should be improved at some sites.

  3. John Day Fish Passage and Screening; 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Hartlerode, Ray; Dabashinsky, Annette; Allen, Steve

    2003-01-28

    This project is necessary to insure that replacement of fish screening devices and fishways meet current NMFS design criteria for the protection of all salmonid life stages. The mission of the fish passage program in Northeast Oregon is to protect and enhance fish populations by assisting private landowners, public landowners, irrigation districts and others by maintaining fish screening devices and fishways. These facilities reduce or eliminate fish loss associated with irrigation withdrawals, and as a result insure fish populations are maintained for enjoyment by present and future generations. Assistance is provided through state and federal programs. This can range from basic technical advice to detailed construction, fabrication and maintenance of screening and passage facilities. John Day screens personnel identified 50 sites for fish screen replacement, and one fish passage project. These sites are located in critical spawning, rearing and migration areas for spring chinook, summer steelhead and bull trout. All projects were designed and implemented to meet current NMFS criteria. It is necessary to have a large number of sites identified due to changes in weather, landowner cooperation and access issues that come up as we try and implement our goal of 21 completed projects.

  4. Yakima River Basin Phase II Fish Screen Evaluations, 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Vucelick, Jessica A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Chamness, Mickie A.

    2004-05-01

    In 2003, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. PNNL collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met the Nation Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries, formerly the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage. In addition, PNNL conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2003, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to improve juvenile fish passage conditions. (4) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well greased and operative. (5) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris could be improved at some sites.

  5. PROTOTYPE EICHER FISH SCREEN AND EVALUATION FACILITY, INSTALLED IN 1990 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PROTOTYPE EICHER FISH SCREEN AND EVALUATION FACILITY, INSTALLED IN 1990 ON #1 PENSTOCK. PROJECT SPONSORED BY THE ELECTRICAL POWER RESEARCH INSTITUTE TO TRANSFER FISH DOWNSTREAM PAST THE TURBINES. PHOTO BY JET LOWE, HAER, 1995. - Elwha River Hydroelectric System, Elwha Hydroelectric Dam & Plant, Port Angeles, Clallam County, WA

  6. 15. CYLINDRICAL FISH SCALER Remnants of the wire screen remain, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. CYLINDRICAL FISH SCALER Remnants of the wire screen remain, through which the fish tumbled as the cylinder revolved. Note geared ring around cylinder, and the small drive shaft by which it was driven. - Hovden Cannery, 886 Cannery Row, Monterey, Monterey County, CA

  7. Assessment of Present Anadromous Fish Production Facilities in the Columbia River Basin, Idaho Department of Fish and Game Hatcheries, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Delarm, Michael R.; Smith, Robert Z.

    1990-07-01

    The goal of this report is to document current production practices for hatcheries which rear anadromous fish in the Columbia River Basin and to identify those facilities where production can be increased. A total of 85 hatchery and satellite facilities operated by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Game, US Fish and Wildlife Service, Washington Department of Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fisheries were evaluated. The years 1985 to 1987 were used in this evaluation. During those years, releases averaged 143,306,596 smolts weighing 7,693,589 pounds. A total of 48 hatchery or satellite facilities were identified as having expansion capability. They were estimated to have the potential for increasing production by an 84,448,000 smolts weighting 4,853,306 pounds. 2 refs., 25 figs.

  8. Monitoring plan for mercury in fish tissue and water from the Boise River, Snake River, and Brownlee Reservoir, Idaho and Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mebane, Christopher A.; MacCoy, Dorene E.

    2013-09-10

    The methylmercury criterion adopted as a water-quality standard in the State of Idaho is a concentration in fish tissue rather than a concentration in water. A plan for monitoring mercury in fish tissue and water was developed to evaluate whether fish in the Boise River, Idaho, upstream and downstream of wastewater-treatment plant discharges, meet the methylmercury water-quality criterion. Monitoring also will be conducted at sites on the Snake River, upstream and downstream of the confluence with the Boise River, and in Brownlee Reservoir, which lies along the border between Idaho and Oregon. Descriptions of standard procedures for collecting and processing samples and quality assurance steps are included. This monitoring plan is intended to provide a framework for cooperative methylmercury sampling in the lower Boise River basin.

  9. Walla Walla River Basin Fish Screens Evaluations, 2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Chamness, Mickie; Abernethy, Scott; Tunnicliffe, Cherylyn

    2007-01-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated Gardena Farms, Little Walla Walla, and Garden City/Lowden II Phase II fish screen facilities and provided underwater videography beneath a leaking rubber dam in the Walla Walla River basin in 2006. Evaluations of the fish screen facilities took place in early May 2006, when juvenile salmonids are generally outmigrating. At the Gardena Farms site, extended high river levels caused accumulations of debris and sediment in the forebay. This debris covered parts of the bottom drum seals, which could lead to early deterioration of the seals and drum screen. Approach velocities were excessive at the upstream corners of most of the drums, leading to 14% of the total approach velocities exceeding 0.4 feet per second (ft/s). Consequently, the approach velocities did not meet National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) design criteria guidelines for juvenile fish screens. The Little Walla Walla site was found to be in good condition, with all approach, sweep, and bypass velocities within NMFS criteria. Sediment buildup was minor and did not affect the effectiveness of the screens. At Garden City/Lowden II, 94% of approach velocities met NMFS criteria of 0.4 ft/s at any time. Sweep velocities increased toward the fish ladder. The air-burst mechanism appears to keep large debris off the screens, although it does not prevent algae and periphyton from growing on the screen face, especially near the bottom of the screens. In August 2006, the Gardena Farm Irrigation District personnel requested that we look for a leak beneath the inflatable rubber dam at the Garden City/Lowden II site that was preventing water movement through the fish ladder. Using our underwater video equipment, we were able to find a gap in the sheet piling beneath the dam. Erosion of the riverbed was occurring around this gap, allowing water and cobbles to move beneath the dam. The construction engineers and irrigation district staff were able to use the video

  10. 46. View of downstream face of fish screens at Dingle ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. View of downstream face of fish screens at Dingle Basin, looking southeast from north side of basin. Photo by Brian C. Morris, Puget Power, 1989. - Puget Sound Power & Light Company, White River Hydroelectric Project, 600 North River Avenue, Dieringer, Pierce County, WA

  11. 45. View of upstream face of fish screens at Dingle ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. View of upstream face of fish screens at Dingle Basin, looking northwest from south side of basin. Photo by Brian C. Morris, Puget Power, 1989. - Puget Sound Power & Light Company, White River Hydroelectric Project, 600 North River Avenue, Dieringer, Pierce County, WA

  12. 43. View of log boom (upstream) protecting fish screens at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. View of log boom (upstream) protecting fish screens at Dingle Basin, looking southwest from north side of basin. Photo by Brian C. Morris, PUget Power, 1989. - Puget Sound Power & Light Company, White River Hydroelectric Project, 600 North River Avenue, Dieringer, Pierce County, WA

  13. 44. View of log boom (downstream) protecting fish screens at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. View of log boom (downstream) protecting fish screens at Dingle Basin, looking northeast from south side of basin. Photo by Brian C. Morris, Puget Power, 1989. - Puget Sound Power & Light Company, White River Hydroelectric Project, 600 North River Avenue, Dieringer, Pierce County, WA

  14. Miniaturized FISH for screening of onco-hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Zanardi, Andrea; Bandiera, Dario; Bertolini, Francesco; Corsini, Chiara Antonia; Gregato, Giuliana; Milani, Paolo; Barborini, Emanuele; Carbone, Roberta

    2010-07-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) represents a major step in the analysis of chromosomal aberrations in cancer. It allows the precise detection of specific rearrangements, both for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. Here we present a miniaturized FISH method performed on fresh and fixed hematological samples. This procedure has been developed together with a microfluidic device that integrates cluster-assembled nanostructured TiO2 (ns-TiO2) as a nanomaterial promoting hematopoietic cell immobilization in conditions of shear stress. As a result of miniaturization, FISH can be performed with at least a 10-fold reduction in probe usage and minimal cell requirements, creating the possibility of using FISH in genetic screening applications. We developed the protocol on tumor cells and bone marrow (BM) from a normal donor using commercially sex-specific and onco-hematology probes. The procedure was then validated using either BM or peripheral blood (PB) from six patients with hematological diseases, each associated with different genetic lesions. Miniaturized FISH demonstrated comparable performance to standard FISH, indicating that it is suitable for genetic screenings, in research, and in clinical settings for the diagnosis of samples from onco-hematological malignancies.

  15. Fish assemblages and environmental variables associated with hard-rock mining in the Coeur d'Alene River basin, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maret, Terry R.; MacCoy, Dorene E.

    2002-01-01

    As part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water Quality Assessment Program, fish assemblages, environmental variables, and associated mine densities were evaluated at 18 test and reference sites during the summer of 2000 in the Coeur d'Alene and St. Regis river basins in Idaho and Montana. Multimetric and multivariate analyses were used to examine patterns in fish assemblages and the associated environmental variables representing a gradient of mining intensity. The concentrations of cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) in water and streambed sediment found at test sites in watersheds where production mine densities were at least 0.2 mines/km2 (in a 500-m stream buffer) were significantly higher than the concentrations found at reference sites. Many of these metal concentrations exceeded Ambient Water Quality Criteria (AWQC) and the Canadian Probable Effect Level guidelines for streambed sediment. Regression analysis identified significant relationships between the production mine densities and the sum of Cd, Pb, and Zn concentrations in water and streambed sediment (r2 = 0.69 and 0.66, respectively; P < 0.01). Zinc was identified as the primary metal contaminant in both water and streambed sediment. Eighteen fish species in the families Salmonidae, Cottidae, Cyprinidae, Catostomidae, Centrarchidae, and Ictaluridae were collected. Principal components analysis of 11 fish metrics identified two distinct groups of sites corresponding to the reference and test sites, predominantly on the basis of the inverse relationship between percent cottids and percent salmonids (r = -0.64; P < 0.05). Streams located downstream from the areas of intensive hard-rock mining in the Coeur d'Alene River basin contained fewer native fish and lower abundances as a result of metal enrichment, not physical habitat degradation. Typically, salmonids were the predominant species at test sites where Zn concentrations exceeded the acute AWQC. Cottids were absent at these sites, which

  16. John Day Fish Passage and Screening; 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Steve

    2004-02-01

    The primary goal of the Oregon Screens Project was to implement 20 replacement screens projects in the John Day sub-basin and any projects identified in the Umatilla and Walla Walla sub-basins. A secondary goal is to complete a passage project, if one is identified, in any of the above sub-basins. Mid-Columbia ESU listed steelhead and USF&W listed bull trout inhabit these sub-basins and are present at most locations, along with a variety of resident fish species. We also provide assistance to our Enterprise Screen Shop, in the Grande Ronde/Imnaha sub-basins, if needed. All projects were designed and implemented under current National Marine Fisheries Service screening and passage criteria.

  17. John Day Fish Passage and Screening; 2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Steve

    2005-02-01

    The primary goal of the Oregon Screens Project was to implement 20 replacement screens projects in the John Day sub-basin and any projects identified in the Umatilla and Walla Walla sub-basins. A secondary goal is to complete a passage project, if one is identified, in any of the above sub-basins. Mid-Columbia ESU listed steelhead and USF&W listed bull trout inhabit these sub-basins and are present at most locations, along with a variety of resident fish species. We also provide assistance to our Enterprise Screen Shop, in the Grande Ronde/Imnaha subbasins, if needed. All projects were designed and implemented under current National Marine Fisheries Service screening and passage criteria.

  18. Mercury bioaccumulation in fishes from subalpine lakes of the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest, northeastern Oregon and western Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Herring, Garth; Johnson, Branden L.; Graw, Rick

    2013-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a globally distributed pollutant that poses considerable risks to human and wildlife health. Over the past 150 years since the advent of the industrial revolution, approximately 80 percent of global emissions have come from anthropogenic sources, largely fossil fuel combustion. As a result, atmospheric deposition of Hg has increased by up to 4-fold above pre-industrial times. Because of their isolation, remote high-elevation lakes represent unique environments for evaluating the bioaccumulation of atmospherically deposited Hg through freshwater food webs, as well as for evaluating the relative importance of Hg loading versus landscape influences on Hg bioaccumulation. The increase in Hg deposition to these systems over the past century, coupled with their limited exposure to direct anthropogenic disturbance make them useful indicators for estimating how changes in Hg emissions may propagate to changes in Hg bioaccumulation and ecological risk. In this study, we evaluated Hg concentrations in fishes of high-elevation, sub-alpine lakes in the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest in northeastern Oregon and western Idaho. Our goals were to (1) assess the magnitude of Hg contamination in small-catchment lakes to evaluate the risk of atmospheric Hg to human and wildlife health, (2) quantify the spatial variability in fish Hg concentrations, and (3) determine the ecological, limnological, and landscape factors that are best correlated with fish total mercury (THg) concentrations in these systems. Across the 28 study lakes, mean THg concentrations of resident salmonid fishes varied as much as 18-fold among lakes. Importantly, our top statistical model explained 87 percent of the variability in fish THg concentrations among lakes with four key landscape and limnological variables— catchment conifer density (basal area of conifers within a lake’s catchment), lake surface area, aqueous dissolved sulfate, and dissolved organic carbon. The basal area of conifers

  19. Mercury and Selenium Concentrations in Biofilm, Macroinvertebrates, and Fish Collected in the Yankee Fork of the Salmon River, Idaho, USA, and Their Potential Effects on Fish Health

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rhea, Darren T.; Farag, Aida M.; Harper, David D.; McConnell, Elizabeth; Brumbaugh, William G.

    2013-01-01

    The Yankee Fork is a large tributary of the Salmon River located in central Idaho, USA, with an extensive history of placer and dredge-mining activities. Concentrations of selenium (Se) and mercury (Hg) in various aquatic trophic levels were measured in the Yankee Fork during 2001 and 2002. Various measurements of fish health were also performed. Sites included four on the mainstem of the Yankee Fork and two off-channel sites in partially reclaimed dredge pools used as rearing habitat for cultured salmonid eggs and fry. Hg concentrations in whole mountain whitefish and shorthead sculpin ranged from 0.28 to 0.56 μg/g dry weight (dw), concentrations that are generally less than those reported to have significant impacts on fish. Biofilm and invertebrates ranged from 0.05 to 0.43 μg Hg/g dw. Se concentrations measured in biota samples from the Yankee Fork were greater than many representative samples collected in the Snake and Columbia watersheds and often exceeded literature-based toxic thresholds. Biofilm and invertebrates ranged from 0.58 to 4.66 μg Se/g dw. Whole fish ranged from 3.92 to 7.10 μg Se/g dw, and gonads ranged from 6.91 to 31.84 μg Se/g dw. Whole-body Se concentrations exceeded reported toxicological thresholds at three of four sites and concentrations in liver samples were mostly greater than concentrations shown to have negative impacts on fish health. Histological examinations performed during this study noted liver abnormalities, especially in shorthead sculpin, a bottom-dwelling species.

  20. Patterns of fish assemblage structure and habitat use among main- and side-channel environments in the lower Kootenai River, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watkins, Carson J.; Stevens, Bryan S.; Quist, Michael; Shepard, Bradley B.; Ireland, Susan C.

    2015-01-01

    The lower Kootenai River, Idaho, was sampled during the summers of 2012 and 2013 to evaluate its fish assemblage structure at seven sites within main- and side-channel habitats where large-scale habitat rehabilitation was undertaken. Understanding the current patterns of fish assemblage structure and their relationships with habitat is important for evaluating the effects of past and future rehabilitation projects on the river. Species-specific habitat associations were modeled, and the variables that best explained the occurrence and relative abundance of fish were identified in order to guide future habitat rehabilitation so that it benefits native species. The results indicated that the side-channel habitats supported higher species richness than the main-channel habitats and that nonnative fishes were closely associated with newly rehabilitated habitats. This research provides valuable insight on the current fish assemblages in the Kootenai River and the assemblage-level responses that may occur as a result of future rehabilitation activities.

  1. State of Idaho Augmented Anadromous Fish Health Monitoring, 1987 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Foott, J. Scott; Hauck, A. Kent

    1988-05-01

    The anadromous fish health monitoring program began in full operation in January 1988 after the hiring of the lead pathologist. This short operating period limits the amount of information available at the time of this writing. Pre-release sampling of smolts revealed the presence of several sub-clinical pathogens. Organosomatic analysis results demonstrated no major abnormalities in the examined stocks. The results of the 1988 steelhead broodstock sampling are still pending.

  2. Explaining fish guidance characteristics of mesh and bar screens: The relative pressure signature hypothesis

    SciTech Connect

    Nestler, J.M.; Davidson, R.

    1995-12-31

    Hydropower dams on the Columbia River block migration of anadromous fishes. Extensive bypass facilities have been installed to guide migrating fishes around the dams. The first component of such systems encountered by out-migrating smolts is submerged bypass screens of one of two major design alternatives. Screens are constructed of either relatively fine woven mesh (traveling screens) or closely spaced bars (bar screens). Using underwater videoimaging, we quantified the relative fish impingement characteristics of each screen design at McNary Dam and The Dalles Dam. Each design was operated under a variety of deployment alternatives and turbine discharges. Video images of the screen surface were obtained from 5-6 cameras distributed on the screen centerline from the screen top (nearest the deck or intake) to the screen bottom. Over 4000 smolt-screen interactions were imaged, processed, and analyzed. A selection of hydraulic and behavioral variables was collected from each recorded image. Screen type had a significant effect on fish impingement and near-screen flow fields. These findings, in conjunction with the known influence of background noise levels on ability of fish to detect specific underwater signals, suggest that guidance effectiveness of a specific screen design may be partially determined by characteristics of the pressure field that the screen generates relative to background turbulence patterns - the Relative Pressure Signature Hypothesis.

  3. A Fisheries Evaluation of the Richland and Wapato Canal Fish Screening Facilities, Spring 1987 : Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Neitzel, Duane A.; Abernethy, C.Scott; Lusty, E.William; Wampler, Sally J.

    1988-02-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of new fish screening facilities at the Richland and Wapato canals in south-central Washington State. The screen integrity tests at the Richland Screens indicated that 100% of fall chinook salmon fry (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) released in front of the screens were prevented from entering the canal behind the screens. Our estimate is based on a 61% catch efficiency for control fish planted behind the screens. At the Wapato Canal, we estimated that between 3% and 4% of the test fish were either impinged on the screen surface and passed over the screens or passed through faulty screen seals. Our estimate is based over the screens or passed through faulty screen seals. Our estimate is based on a greater than 90% capture of control fish released in front of the screens. At the Wapato Screens, we estimated that 0.8% of steelhead smolts (Salmo gairdneri) and 1.4% of spring chinook salmon smolts released during low canal flow tests wee descaled. During full canal flow tests, 1.6% of the steelhead and 3.1% of the spring chinook salmon released were descaled. The fish return pipe at the Wapato Canal was tested: the estimate of descaled test fish wa not different from the estimate of descaled control fish. The time required for fish to exit from the Wapato Screen forebay varied with species and with canal flow. During low canal flows, 43.2% of steelhead and 61.6% of spring chinook salmon smolts released at the trash racks were captured in the fish return within 96 hr. 11 refs., 11 figs., 10 tabs.

  4. Washington Phase II Fish Diversion Screen Evaluations in the Yakima River Basin, 1998.

    SciTech Connect

    Blanton, S.L.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Neitzel, D.A.

    1999-12-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 19 Phase II screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year study for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. The sites were examined to determine if they were being effectively operated and maintained to provide fish a safe, efficient return to the Yakima River.

  5. Dioxin screening in fish product by pattern recognition of biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Bassompierre, Marc; Tomasi, Giorgio; Munck, Lars; Bro, Rasmus; Engelsen, Søren Balling

    2007-04-01

    Two alternative, cost- and time-effective dioxin screening methods relying on two categories of potential lipid biomarkers were investigated. A dioxin range varying from 1.1 to 47.1 pg PCDD/F TEQ-WHO/g lipid using 64 fish meal samples was used for model calibration. The methods were based on multivariate models using either (1) fatty acid composition monitored by GC-FID or (2) fluorescence landscape signals analysed using the PARAFAC model and in both cases predicting dioxin content as pgPCDD/F TEQ-WHO/g lipid. In both cases, Partial Least Squares (PLS) regression was performed for predicting the dioxin content of a sample. The GC-FID data analyses was based on automatic peak alignment and integration, enabling extraction of the area of 140 peaks from the gas chromatograms, as opposed to the 31 fatty acids usually considered for fish oil characterisation. In addition to classic PLS employing the whole dataset for calibration, a two-step local PLS modeling approach was performed based upon an initial selection of k number of calibration samples providing the best match to the prediction sample using a so-called k Nearest Neighbors (kNN) approach, then followed by PLS calibration on these kNN selected samples for dioxin prediction. Fluorescence spectroscopy offers a promising non-invasive and ultra-rapid technique, with less than two minutes analysis time. However, fluorescence spectroscopy using the pattern recognition "kNN-PLS" yielded a correlation of 0.76 (r2) and a high root mean square error of prediction of 11.4 pg PCDD/F TEQ-WHO/g lipid. The predictions were improved when the PLS calibration was performed on all the sample with a root mean square error of prediction of 7.0 pg PCDD/F TEQ-WHO/g lipid. Unfortunately, these results failed to demonstrate the potential of fluorophore monitoring as a screening method. In contrast, the overall best screening performance was obtained with the fatty acid profile, when the kNN-PLS combination employed for pattern

  6. Organochlorine compounds and trace elements in fish tissue and bed sediments in the lower Snake River basin, Idaho and Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Gregory M.; Maret, Terry R.

    1998-01-01

    Fish-tissue and bed-sediment samples were collected to determine the occurrence and distribution of organochlorine compounds and trace elements in the lower Snake River Basin. Whole-body composite samples of suckers and carp from seven sites were analyzed for organochlorine compounds; liver samples were analyzed for trace elements. Fillets from selected sportfish were analyzed for organochlorine compounds and trace elements. Bed-sediment samples from three sites were analyzed for organochlorine compounds and trace elements. Twelve different organochlorine compounds were detected in 14 fish-tissue samples. All fish-tissue samples contained DDT or its metabolites. Concentrations of total DDT ranged from 11 micrograms per kilogram wet weight in fillets of yellow perch from C.J. Strike Reservoir to 3,633 micrograms per kilogram wet weight in a whole-body sample of carp from Brownlee Reservoir at Burnt River. Total DDT concentrations in whole-body samples of sucker and carp from the Snake River at C.J. Strike Reservoir, Snake River at Swan Falls, Snake River at Nyssa, and Brownlee Reservoir at Burnt River exceeded criteria established for the protection of fish-eating wildlife. Total PCB concentrations in a whole-body sample of carp from Brownlee Reservoir at Burnt River also exceeded fish-eating wildlife criteria. Concentrations of organochlorine compounds in whole-body samples, in general, were larger than concentrations in sportfish fillets. However, concentrations of dieldrin and total DDT in fillets of channel catfish from the Snake River at Nyssa and Brownlee Reservoir at Burnt River, and concentrations of total DDT in fillets of smallmouth bass and white crappie from Brownlee Reservoir at Burnt River exceeded a cancer risk screening value of 10-6 established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Concentrations of organochlorine compounds in bed sediment were smaller than concentrations in fish tissue. Concentrations of p,p'DDE, the only compound detected

  7. Field-based evaluations of horizontal flat-plate fish screens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rose, B.P.; Mesa, M.G.; Barbin-Zydlewski, G.

    2008-01-01

    Diversions from streams are often screened to prevent the loss of or injury to fish. Hydraulic criteria meant to protect fish that encounter screens have been developed, but primarily for screens that are vertical to the water flow rather than horizontal. For this reason, we measured selected hydraulic variables and released wild rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss over two types of horizontal flat-plate fish screens in the field. Our goal was to assess the efficacy of these screens under a variety of conditions in the field and provide information that could be used to develop criteria for safe fish passage. We evaluated three different invertedweir screens over a range of stream (0.24-1.77 m3/s) and diversion flows (0.10-0.31 m3/s). Approach velocities (AVs) ranged from 3 to 8 cm/s and sweeping velocities (SVs) from 69 to 143 cm/s. We also evaluated a simple backwatered screen over stream flows of 0.23-0.79 m3/s and diversion flows of 0.08-0.32 m3/s. The mean SVs for this screen ranged from 15 to 66 cm/s and the mean AVs from 1 to 5 cm/s. The survival rates of fish held for 24 h after passage over these screens exceeded 98%. Overall, the number of fish-screen contacts was low and the injuries related to passage were infrequent and consisted primarily of minor fin injuries. Our results indicate that screens of this type have great potential as safe and effective fish screens for small diversions. Care must be taken, however, to avoid operating conditions that produce shallow or no water over the screen surface, situations of high AVs and low SVs at backwatered screens, and situations producing a localized high AV with spiraling flow. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2008.

  8. The relationship between land use and organochlorine compounds in streambed sediment and fish in the Central Columbia Plateau, Washington and Idaho, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Munn, M.D.; Gruber, S.J.

    1997-09-01

    The authors analyzed streambed sediment and fish in the Central Columbia Plateau in eastern Washington and Idaho for organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls ({Sigma}PCB). The objective was to assess the effects of land use on the occurrence and distribution of these compounds; land uses in the study area included forest, dryland and irrigated farming, and urban. The authors detected 16 organochlorine compounds in streambed sediment and fish tissue; fish usually had more compounds and a greater frequency of detection. The most frequently detected compound was {Sigma}DDT (sum of six isomers), which was found in 52% of bed sediment samples and 94% of whole fish composite samples. The other commonly detected compounds were dimethyl tetrachloroterephthalate (DCPA), dieldrin, hexachlorobenzene, and {Sigma}chlordane. Forest was the only land use with no detections of organochlorine compounds in either fish or bed sediment. Hexachlorobenzene was the only organochlorine pesticide detected at concentrations that differed significantly among land uses: concentrations were higher in the dryland farming areas than in the irrigated farming or urban areas. In agricultural areas irrigated by surface water, {Sigma}DDT concentrations in both streambed sediment and fish tissue were related to the percentage of land irrigated by water delivered via furrows (gravity irrigation), although {Sigma}DDT was not detectable in bed sediments until gravity irrigation exceeded 30%. Because of the relation between gravity irrigation and soil erosion, the study supports the importance of controlling soil erosion in order to reduce the overall loading of organochlorine compounds to surface waters.

  9. Biological Evaluations of an Off-Stream Channel, Horizontal Flat-Plate Fish Screen-The Farmers Screen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mesa, Matthew G.; Rose, Brien P.; Copeland, Elizabeth S.

    2010-01-01

    Screens are commonly installed at water diversion sites to reduce entrainment of fish. Recently, the Farmers Irrigation District in Hood River, Oregon, developed a new flat-plate screen design that offers passive operation and may result in reduced operation and installation costs to irrigators. To evaluate the performance (its biological effect on fish) of this type of screen, two size classes of juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kistuch) were released over a small version of this screen in the field-the Herman Creek screen. The performance of the screen was evaluated over a range of inflow [0.02 to 0.42 m3/s (cubic meters per second)] and diversion flows (0.02 to 0.34 m3/s) at different weir wall heights. The mean approach velocities for the screen ranged from 0 to 5 cm/s (centimeters per second) and mean sweeping velocities ranged from 36 to 178 cm/s. Water depths over the screen surface ranged from 1 to 25 centimeters and were directly related to weir wall height and inflow. Passage of juvenile coho salmon over the screen under a variety of hydraulic conditions did not severely injure them or cause delayed mortality. For all fish, the mean percentage of body surface area that was injured after passage over the screen ranged from about 0.4 to 3.0%. This occurred even though many fish contacted the screen surface during passage. No fish were observed becoming impinged on the screen surface (greater than 1 second contact with the screen). When operated within its design criteria (diversion flows of about 0.28 m3/s), the screen provided safe and effective downstream passage of juvenile salmonids under a variety of hydraulic conditions. However, we do not recommend operating the screen at inflows less than 0.14 m3/s (5 ft3/s) because water depth can get quite shallow and the screen can completely dewater, particularly at very low flows.

  10. Introducing a [open quote]modular[close quote] approach to fish screen installation

    SciTech Connect

    Taft, E.P.; Winchell, F.C.; Cook, T.C.; Sullivan, C.W.

    1992-12-01

    A new fish screen design-the modular inclined screen-promises to offer a versatile and cost-effective solution for fish protection in many situation. In an effort to provide the hydroelectric industry with more cost-effective alternatives to existing fish screen designs, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) recently has undertaken several research projects. One focus of EPRI's research has been on the development and testing of high-velocity fish screens. This program has led to the development of a new screening concept, which shows promise for providing effective protection for a wide range of fish species at hydro plants, steam generating facilities, and irrigation diversions. The concept, known as the Modular Inclined Screen (MIS), currently is being evaluated in laboratory studies prior to field application. The screen is of [open quotes]modular[close quotes] design so as to provide the flexibility necessary for application at a broad range of water intakes. The module is suitable for installation in penstocks, canals, and head pond intakes. The MIS module consists of an entrance with a trashrack, dewatering stoplog slots, an inclined wedgewire screen set at a shallow angle of 10 to 20 degrees to the flow, and a bypass for diverting fish to a transport pipe. The screen is mounted on a pivot shaft so that it can be cleaned via rotation and backflushing. The module is completely enclosed, and is designed to operate at water velocities ranging from 2 to 10 feet per second depending on the fish species and life stages to be protected. Laboratory studies are under way to evaluate the design configuration that yields the best hydraulic conditions for safe fish passage, and the biological effectiveness of this design in diverting selected fish species to the bypass.

  11. Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-158) - Idaho Model Watershed Habitat Projects - Twelvemile Creek Pipeline

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Shannon C.

    2004-07-15

    The Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to fund a fish passage enhancement project on Twelvemile Creek in Lemhi County, Idaho with the Lemhi Soil and Water Conservation District. The goal of this project is to enhance fish passage in Twelvemile Creek by eliminating barriers and increasing flows. The project goals will be accomplished by eliminating two diversions and two pumps from Twelvemile Creek by consolidating the flow into one diversion, eliminating ditch loss with pipe, and switching one irrigator from flood to sprinkler irrigation. This project will also attach the irrigators to a fish screen that will be installed by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game.

  12. Washington Phase II Fish Diversion Screen Evaluations in the Yakima River Basin, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, J.; McMichael, G.; Chamness, M.

    2003-01-01

    In 2002, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met National Marine Fisheries Service criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage and whether bypass outfall conditions allowed fish to safely return to the river. In addition, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2002, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by the National Marine Fisheries Service. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to increase safe juvenile fish passage. (4) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well greased and operative. (5) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris should be improved at some sites.

  13. A Fisheries Evaluation of the Sunnyside Canal Fish Screening Facility, Spring 1985 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Neitttel, D.A.; Abernethy, C.S.; Lusty, E.W.; Prohammer, L.A.

    1986-01-01

    The Sunnyside Canal Fish Screening Facility (Sunnyside Screens) is part of a joint project by the Bonneville Power Administration and the Bureau of Reclamation to construct fish passage and protective facilities at existing irrigation diversions in the Yakima River Basin. This report summarizes the evaluation of the work conducted at the Sunnyside Screens. About 4000 chinook salmon, Oncorhyncus tshawytscha, and 2000 steelhead, Salmo gairdneri, smolts were released in front of or within the Sunnyside Canal Fish Screening Facility. We caught 3625 chinook salmon and less than 2% were descaled or dead. We captured 507 of the steelhead and none were descaled or dead. The Sunnyside Screens are in the Sunnyside Canal, about 360 m downstream of the Sunnyside Dam on the Yakima River (river kilometer 167). The screening facility diverts fish that have entered the canal back into the Yakima River. Descaling and mortality data were gathered by releasing branded fish into the canal, upstream of the facility, and capturing them before they returned to the river. Captured fish were anesthetized and examined for descaling that occurred during passage through the screening facility.

  14. Fabricate and Install Yakima Basin Phase II Fish Screens; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, 2006 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Staff,

    2006-12-01

    The goal of this project was to restore ESA listed and resident fish stocks within the Yakima Basin by preventing mortality and/or injury to all life stages of anadromous and resident fish at irrigation diversions. This goal is being accomplished through an on-going effort by the Yakima Basin Phase II Technical Work Group (TWG), which is comprised of local, state, federal, tribal and private groups who prioritize and assign screening projects.

  15. A Fisheries Evaluation of the Westside Ditch and Town Canal Fish Screening Facilities, Spring 1990.

    SciTech Connect

    Neitzel, Duane A.; Abernethy, C. Scott; Hartenson, Gregg A.

    1990-11-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) evaluated the effectiveness of new fish screening facilities in the Westside Ditch and Town Canal, near Ellensburg, in south-central Washington State. At the Town Canal, we estimated that 0.3% of steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss smolts released during tests were significantly descaled. The time required for 50% of the fish in the two steelhead test groups to exit from the Town Screens forebay ranged from 12 h to >85 h. Integrity tests at the Town Screens indicated that none of the rainbow trout fry released in front of the rotary drum screens passed through the screens, although 8.5% of the native zero-age chinook salmon fry diverted from the river into the screening facility were lost through the screens. At the Westside Screens, 16.8% of native zero-age chinook salmon fry passed through the screens. Most of the chinook salmon lost through the screens were small, <36 mm long. The methods used in 1990 were first used at the Sunnyside Screens in 1985. These methods were used again in subsequent years in tests at the Richland, Toppenish/Satus, Wapato, and Toppenish Creek screens. The methods used from 1985 through 1989 have been reviewed by the Washington State Department of Fisheries, US Fish and Wildlife Service, National Marine Fisheries Service, Northwest Power Planning Council, and Yakima Indian Nation. 14 refs., 12 figs., 7 tabs.

  16. Washington Phase II Fish Diversion Screen Evaluations in the Yakima River Basin, 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Vucelick, J.; McMichael, G.; Chamness, M.

    2004-05-01

    In 2003, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. PNNL collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries, formerly the National Marine Fisheries Service [NMFS]) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage. In addition, PNNL conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2003, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by the NOAA Fisheries. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to improve juvenile fish passage conditions. (4) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well greased and operative. (5) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris could be improved at some sites.

  17. Evaluation of Low and High Frequency Sound for Enhancing Fish Screening Facilities to Protect Outmigrating Salmonids.

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Robert P.; Neitzel, Duane A.; Mavros, William V.

    1998-02-01

    The need to provide passage and protective screens at irrigation diversions has always been a necessary part of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1984, 1987, 1994). From 1985 through 1990, fish protection facilities in large irrigation diversions throughout the Columbia Basin, especially in the Yakima Basin, were updated. After 1990, fish protection efforts turned to installation of new facilities on unscreened diversions and to repair and upgrade of older facilities. The screening program also includes funds to monitor and evaluate the facilities. The screen evaluations indicate they are an effective means for protecting juvenile fish larger than 40 mm in length. As state and federal agencies change screening criteria to protect smaller fish (e.g., bull trout fry), the physical barrier may not always be effective. Screen mesh small enough to protect fish may be vulnerable to frequent plugging. Gap tolerances on side and bottom seals may be difficult to install and maintain. Physical barrier screens can be enhanced with behavioral barriers that cause fish to avoid a hazard. Behavioral barriers may consist of sound generator, strobe lights, bubble curtains, or electrical barriers. State of Oregon House Bill 3112 states that "Standards and criteria shall address the overall level of protection necessary at a given water diversion and shall not favor one technology or technique over another." Additionally, it goes on to say, "Screening device means a fish screen or behavior barrier." Other Northwest states, in particular Washington, have taken a comprehensive program to install barriers at all unscreened diversions by 1999. Protecting all fish at all water withdrawals will probably require both physical and behavioral barriers. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of using an underwater sound-generator as a behavioral barrier for possible use at fish diversion facilities. This study did not include engineering and economic

  18. The relationship between land use and organochlorine compounds in streambed sediment and fish in the Central Columbia Plateau, Washington and Idaho, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Munn, M.D.; Gruber, S.J.

    1997-01-01

    We analyzeds streambed sediment and fish in the Central Columbia Plateau in eastern Washington and Idaho for or ganochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls (ΣPCB). Our objective was to assess the effects of land use on the occurrence and distribution of these compounds; land uses in the study area included forest, dryland and irrigated farming, and urban. We detected 16 organochlorine compounds in streambed sediment and fish tissue; fish usually had more compounds and a greater frequency of detection. The most frequently detected compound was ΣDDT (sum of six isomers), which was found in 52% of bed sediment samples and 94% of whole fish composite samples. The other commonly detected compounds were dimethyl tetrachloroterephthalate (DCPA), dieldrin, hexachlorobenzene, and Σchlordane (sum of cis- and trans-chlordane, cis- and trans-nonachlor oxychlordane, heptachlor, and heptachlor epoxide). Forest was the only land use with no detections of organochlorine compounds in either fish or bed sediment. Hexachlorobenzene was the only organochlorine pesticide detected at concentrations that differed significantly among land uses: concentrations were higher in the dryland farming areas than in the irrigated farming or urban areas. In agricultural areas irrigated by surface water, ΣDDT concentrations in both streambed sediment and fish tissue were related to the percentage of land irrigated by water delivered via furrows (gravity irrigation), although ΣDDT was not detectable in bed sediments until gravity irrigation exceeded 30%. Because of the relation between gravity irrigation and soil erosion, our study supports the importance of controlling soil erosion in order to reduce the overall loading of organochlorine compounds to surface waters.

  19. A fisheries evaluation of the Westside Ditch and Wapato Canal fish screening facilities, Spring 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Neitzel, D.A.; Abernethy, C.S.; Lusty, E.W.

    1990-06-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration, the United States Bureau of Reclamation, and the Washington State Department of Ecology are funding the construction and evaluation of fish passage and protection facilities at irrigation and hydroelectric diversions in the Yakima River Basin, Washington State. The programs provide offsite enhancement to compensate for fish and wildlife losses caused by hydroelectric development throughout the Columbia River Basin, and they address natural propagation of salmon to help mitigate the impact of irrigation in the Yakima River Basin. The Westside Ditch and Wapato Screens are two of the juvenile screening facilities. This report evaluates the effectiveness of the screens facilities for intercepting and returning juvenile salmonids unharmed to the Yakima River from which they were diverted. We evaluated the effectiveness of new fish screening facilities in the Westside Ditch and Wapato Canal in south-central Washington State. The screen integrity tests indicated that test fish released in front of the screens could enter the canal behind the screens. The study emphasized salmonids. Test fish were steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss smolts, spring chinook salmon O. tshawytscha smolts, and rainbow trout O. mykiss fry. Evaluations were conducted during typical spring flows in the diversion. 13 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  20. A Fisheries Evaluation of the Dryden Fish Screening Facility : Annual Report 1994.

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Robert P.; Abernethy, C.Scott; Neitzel, Duane A.

    1995-04-01

    Effectivness was evaluated of the Dryden Fish Screening Facility in the Wenatchee Reclamation District Canal near Dryden in north central Washington State. In situ tests were conducted by releasing groups of hatchery reared salmonids of different ages and sizes. Spring chinook salmon smolts (110-165 mm) were not injured or descaled in passing through the canal forebay. Smolts were not delayed as they migrated in the canal. Most fish released at the canal headworks exited the screening facility in <4 h, with >99% of the test fish captured in the fish bypass in <24 h. Steelhead subyearlings 65-125 mm were not injured or descaled in traveling through the bypass flume and fish return pipe. Average time for steelhead subyearlings to travel through thebypass structure was 70 seconds. Small rainbow trout fry 23-27mm could pass through the 0.125-in. profile bar screen openings and were entrained in the irrigation canal; about 38% was lost to the canal within 48 h of release. Some fry stayed in the forebay and did not migrate during the tests. Wild chinook fry 36-42mm were also entrained. Estimated 34% of emergent wild chinook salmon fry passed through the profile bar screens and were entrained in the canal. Approach velocity at the Dryden screens was {ge}0.4 ft/s; low velocities through the first two screen panels indicated that vertical louvers installed behind each screen panel to balance flow were not totally effective.

  1. Washington Phase II Fish Diversion Screen Evaluations in the Yakima River Basin, 1999.

    SciTech Connect

    Blanton, S.L.; Neitzel, Duane A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.

    2000-04-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 20 Phase II screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year study for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. The sites were examined to determine if they were being effectively operated and maintained to provide fish a safe, efficient return to the Yakima River. Data were collected to determine if velocities in front of the screens and in the bypass met current National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) criteria to promote safe and timely fish bypass and whether bypass outfall conditions allowed fish to safely return to the river. In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set forth by the NMFS. Although velocities often fluctuated from one sampling location to the next, average sweep velocities typically exceeded approach velocities and increased toward the bypass. Mean approach velocities were below the NMFS criteria of < 0.4 feet per second (fps) at most sites (Table 1). Based on our observations in 1999, we believe that most facilities were efficiently protecting juvenile fish from entrainment, impingement, or migration delay. Most screens were properly sealed to prevent fish entrainment and injury, although potential problems were identified at several screen sites. Six sites (one fewer than the seven sites identified in 1998) had loose or damaged seals that might have allowed fish to be entrained (Table 1). Other sites still had spaces larger than 3/32 in. where small fish could possibly pass into the irrigation canal.

  2. A fisheries evaluation of the Wapato, Sunnyside, and Toppenish Creek canal fish screening facilities, spring 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Neitzel, D.A.; Abernethy, C.S.; Lusty, E.W.

    1990-03-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration, the United States Bureau of Reclamation, and the Washington State Department of Ecology are funding the construction and evaluation of fish passage and protection facilities at irrigation and hydroelectric diversions in the Yakima River Basin, Washington State. The programs provide offsite enhancement to compensate for fish and wildlife losses caused by hydroelectric development throughout the Columbia River Basin and address natural propagation of salmon to help mitigate the impact of irrigation in the Yakima River Basin. The Wapato, Sunnyside, and Toppenish Creek Screens are three of the facilities in the basin. This report evaluates the effectiveness of the screens in intercepting and returning juvenile salmonids unharmed to the river from which they were diverted. We evaluated the effectiveness of new screening facilities at the Toppenish Creek, Wapato, and Sunnyside canals in southcentral Washington State. Screen integrity tests indicated that fish released in front of the screens were prevented from entering the canal behind the screens. We conducted descaling tests at the Toppenish Creek Screens. We measured the time required for fish to move through the screen facilities. Methods used in 1988 were the same as those used at Sunnyside in 1985 and in subsequent years at Richland. Toppenish/Satus, and Wapato. 11 refs., 11 figs., 14 tabs.

  3. IDAHO WILDERNESS, IDAHO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cater, Fred W.; Weldin, R.D.

    1984-01-01

    Mineral surveys conducted in the Idaho Wilderness identified 28 areas with probable or substantiated mineral-resource potential, and 5 mines with demonstrated or inferred resources. Metals including gold, silver, copper, lead, zinc, and tungsten, have been extracted from deposits inside the wilderness. Current studies indicate additional areas of probable mineral-resource potential for gold, tungsten, mercury, rare-earth elements, and base metals related to intrusive rocks that follow structures formed by cauldron subsidence. These on-going studies also indicate that there is probable and substantiated resource potential for cobalt with copper, silver, and gold in the Precambrian rocks in the northeastern part of the wilderness in a geologic environment similar to that of the Blackbird mine that lies outside the area. The nature of the geologic terrane precludes the potential for organic fuels.

  4. Washington Phase II Fish Diversion Screen Evaluations in the Yakima River Basin, 2000.

    SciTech Connect

    Chamness, M. A.

    2001-03-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 21 Phase II screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year study for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. The sites were examined in 1997, 1998, 1999, and 2000 to determine if they were being effectively operated and maintained to provide fish a safe, efficient return to the Yakima River. Data were collected to determine if velocities in front of the screens and in the bypass met current National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) criteria to promote safe and timely fish bypass and whether bypass outfall conditions allowed fish to safely return to the river. Based on the results of our studies in 2000, we conclude that: in general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set forth by the NMFS; most facilities were efficiently protecting juvenile fish from entrainment, impingement, or migration delay; automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were well greased and inoperative; and removal of sediment build-up and accumulated leafy and woody debris are areas that continue to improve.

  5. Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Phase II Fish Screen Operation and Maintenance; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Schille, Patrick C.

    2005-05-01

    The goal of this project is to assure that the benefits of BPA's capital investment in Yakima Basin Phase II fish screen facilities are realized by performing operations that assure optimal fish protection and long facility life through a rigorous preventative maintenance program, while helping to restore ESA listed fish stocks in the Yakima River Basin.

  6. Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Phase II Fish Screen Operation and Maintenance; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, 2005-2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Schille, Patrick C.

    2006-05-01

    The goal of this project is to assure that the benefits of BPA's capital investment in Yakima Basin Phase II fish screen facilities are realized by performing operations that assure optimal fish protection and long facility life through a rigorous preventative maintenance program, while helping to restore ESA listed fish stocks in the Yakima River Basin.

  7. Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Phase II Fish Screen Operation and Maintenance; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Schille, Patrick C.

    2004-04-01

    The goal of this project is to assure that the benefits of BPA's capital investment in Yakima Basin Phase II fish screen facilities are realized by performing operations that assure optimal fish protection and long facility life through a rigorous preventative maintenance program, while helping to restore ESA listed fish stocks in the Yakima River Basin.

  8. Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Phase II Fish Screen Operation and Maintenance; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Schille, Patrick C.

    2003-03-01

    The goal of this project is to assure that the benefits of BPA's capital investment in Yakima Basin Phase II fish screen facilities are realized by performing operations that assure optimal fish protection and long facility life through a rigorous preventative maintenance program, while helping to restore ESA listed fish stocks in the Yakima River Basin.

  9. Walla Walla River Basin Fish Screen Evaluations, 2001 : Burlingame and Little Walla Walla Sites.

    SciTech Connect

    McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Chamness, M.A.

    2001-12-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 2 newly constructed fish screen sites in the Walla Walla River Basin during the spring of 2001. The fish screens facilities at the Little Walla Walla River in Milton-Freewater, Oregon and at Burlingame west of Walla Walla, Washington were examined to determine if they were being effectively operated and maintained to provide for safe fish passage. Data were collected to determine if velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met current National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage and whether bypass outfall conditions allowed fish to safely return to the river. Due to a calibration problem with the instrument used to measure water velocities during the spring evaluations, we re-evaluated the water velocities at both sites after the canals discharges were increased in the fall. Based on the results of our studies in 2001, we concluded: Burlingame site--The rotary-drum screen design appeared to be efficiently protecting juvenile fish from entrainment, impingement, and migration delay in May and June. However, sediment and debris accumulations in the screen forebay could result in screen seal wear (due to silt) and may increase mortality due to predation in the screen forebay (due to woody debris accumulations along the screen face). All approach velocities were below the NMFS criteria of 0.4 feet per second in November. Sweep velocities were appreciably higher than approach velocities, however sweep velocities did not increase toward the bypass. Bypass velocity was greater than sweep velocities. Little Walla Walla--The flat-plate screen design appeared to be efficiently protecting juvenile fish from entrainment, impingement, and migration delay in May and June. All approach velocities were below the NMFS criteria of 0.4 feet per second in November. Sweep velocities were substantially higher than approach velocities and increased toward the bypass

  10. Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project Probability/Coordination Study Resident Fish and Wildlife Impacts Phase III, 1997 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Leitzinger, Eric J.

    1998-10-01

    Phase III began in 1995 with the overall goal of quantifying changes in resident fish habitat in the Snake River Basin upstream of Brownlee Reservoir resulting from the release of salmon flow augmentation water.

  11. Rodent neurotoxicity bioassays for screening contaminated Great Lakes fish

    SciTech Connect

    Beattie, M.K.; Hoffman, R.; Gerstenberger, S.; Dellinger, J.A.

    1996-03-01

    Standard laboratory rat neurotoxicity protocols were used to study the consequences resulting from the consumption of walleye (Stizostedion vitreum), whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis), and lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) from Lake Superior (LS) and the consumption of carp (Cyprinus carpio) from Little Lake Butte des Morte (LLBM) near Oshkosh, Wisconsin, USA. Two 90-d subchronic studies are described, including a 45-d exposure to fish diets using male Sprague-Dawley hooded rats, and a 90-d exposure to fish diets using female rats of the same species. Behavioral alterations were tested using a battery of behavioral tests. In addition, pharmacologic challenges using apomorphine and D-amphetamine were administered to the rats to reveal latent neurotoxic effects. Cumulative fish consumption data were recorded daily, weight gain recorded weekly, and behavior data collected prior to exposure, and on days 7, 14, 55 {+-} 2, 85 {+-} 2. Motor activity data were collected on days 30 {+-} 2, 60 {+-} 2, and 90 {+-} 2 of the feeding protocols. Brain tissue from rodents fed these fish were subsequently analyzed for either mercury (Hg) or polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB). Mercury concentrations were increased in the brains of the walleye-fed rats, and PCB concentrations ranged from 0.5 nl/L to 10 nl/L in the brains of rats fed carp from LLBM, a Lake Michigan tributary. Adult male rats fed LLBM carp for 45 d exhibited the greatest behavior responses to the dopaminergic agonist apomorphine on the accelerating rotarod, although these differences were not significant. The 90-d exposure of LS walleye or Hg-spiked LS walleye resulted in behavior alterations on tactile startle response and second footsplay. D-Amphetamine challenge caused changes in tactile startle response, second footsplay, and accelerating rotarod performance after consuming walleye diets. Rats fed LLBM carp had altered behavioral responses to apomorphine on the accelerating rotarod.

  12. Mercury concentrations in water and mercury and selenium concentrations in fish from Brownlee Reservoir and selected sites in the Boise and Snake Rivers, Idaho and Oregon, 2013–15

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Marshall L.; MacCoy, Dorene E.

    2016-06-30

    Mercury (Hg) analyses were conducted on samples of sport fish and water collected from selected sampling sites in Brownlee Reservoir and the Boise and Snake Rivers to meet National Pollution Discharge and Elimination System (NPDES) permit requirements for the City of Boise, Idaho, between 2013 and 2015. City of Boise personnel collected water samples from six sites between October and November 2013 and 2015, with one site sampled in 2014. Total Hg concentrations in unfiltered water samples ranged from 0.48 to 8.8 nanograms per liter (ng/L), with the highest value in Brownlee Reservoir in 2013. All Hg concentrations in water samples were less than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Hg chronic aquatic life criterion of 12 ng/L.The USEPA recommended a water-quality criterion of 0.30 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) methylmercury (MeHg) expressed as a fish-tissue residue value (wet-weight MeHg in fish tissue). The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality adopted the USEPA’s fish-tissue criterion and established a reasonable potential to exceed (RPTE) threshold 20 percent lower than the criterion or greater than 0.24 mg/kg Hg based on an average concentration of 10 fish from a receiving waterbody. NPDES permitted discharge to waters with fish having Hg concentrations exceeding 0.24 mg/kg are said to have a reasonable potential to exceed the water-quality criterion and thus are subject to additional permit obligations, such as requirements for increased monitoring and the development of a Hg minimization plan. The Idaho Fish Consumption Advisory Program (IFCAP) issues fish advisories to protect general and sensitive populations of fish consumers and has developed an action level of 0.22 mg/kg Hg in fish tissue. Fish consumption advisories are water body- and species-specific and are used to advise allowable fish consumption from specific water bodies. The geometric mean Hg concentration of 10 fish of a single species collected from a single water body

  13. Washington Phase II Fish Diversion Screen Evaluations in the Yakima River Basin, 1997 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Blanton, S.; Neitzel, C.; Abernethy, C.

    1998-02-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated 19 Phase II screen sites in the Yakima River Basin at least three times each between April 30 and August 22, 1997. The sites were examined to determine if they were being effectively operated and maintained to provide fish a safe, efficient return to the river. Data were collected to determine if velocities in front of the screens and in the bypass met current NMFS criteria and promoted timely fish bypass, if fish were protected from injury due to impingement, entrainment, and predation, and whether bypass outfall conditions allowed fish to safely return to the river. A bi-directional flow meter and underwater video system were essential in completing the investigation. In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites were acceptable by NMFS standards. High approach velocities and slow bypass flow were the most common problems noted. Although velocities often fluctuated from one sampling location to the next, average sweep and approach velocities were very good. In general, fish should not be impinged or experience delays in returning to the river under normal operating conditions. Most screens were properly sealed to prevent fish entrainment and injury, although potential problems were identified at several screen sites. Three sites had gap openings from the forebay to the aftbay, allowing fish to be entrained. Other sites had spaces larger than 3/32 inch where small fish could become trapped. Some drum screens had flat spots but these were not been confirmed as underwater gaps, primarily because of siltation. On rare occasions, seals were intact, but cracked or turned under. Submergence levels at the drum screen sites exceeded 85% for one third of our evaluations. Eight of 12 drum screen sites experienced high water levels during at least one evaluation. Only one operating site's submergence was measured at less than 65% submergence. Two flat plate screen sites were completely overtopped with water

  14. Movement of Fall Chinook Salmon Fry Oncorhynchus Tshawytscha : A Comparison of Approach Angles for Fish Bypass in a Modular Rotary Drum Fish Screen.

    SciTech Connect

    Neitzel, D.A.; Blanton, S.L.; Abernethy, C. Scott; Daly, D.S.

    1996-08-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) performed tests to determine whether a significant difference in fish passage existed between a 6-ft screening facility built perpendicularly to canal flow and an identical screening facility with the screen mounted at a 45-degree angle to the approach channel. A modular drum screen built by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife was installed at PNNL`s Aquatic Ecology research laboratory in Richland, Washington. Fall chinook salmon fry were introduced into the test system, and their movements were monitored. A total of 14 tests (400 fish per test) that lasted 20 hours were completed during April and May, 1996. There was no significant difference in fish passage rate through the two approach configurations. Attraction flow to the bypass across the face of the screen was more evident for the angled approach, although this did not appear to play a significant role in attracting fish to the bypass. Approach velocities at the face of the screen did not exceed the 0.4 fps criteria for either approach configuration and posed not threat to fish. No fish passed over, around, or through the drum screen during any test.

  15. Risk assessment and screening for potentially invasive fishes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolar, C.

    2004-01-01

    Preventing the introduction of potentially invasive species is becoming more important as this worldwide problem continues to grow. The ability to predict the identity or range of potential invaders could influence regulatory decisions and help to optimally allocate resources to deal with ongoing invasions. One screening tool presented here, using species life history and environmental tolerances to identify potential invaders similar to past invaders, can be used to predict potential invading species. Another screening tool, genetic algorithms, can be used to predict the potential range of an invading species. Use and further development of tools such as these, that are quantitative and relatively transparent, would give managers and other decision makers more information for making better-informed decisions.

  16. Field-based evaluations of horizontal flat-plate fish screens, II: Testing of a unique off-stream channel device - The Farmers Screen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mesa, Matthew G.; Rose, Brien P.; Copeland, Elizabeth S.

    2012-01-01

    Screens are installed at water diversion sites to reduce entrainment of fish. Recently, the Farmers Irrigation District (Oregon) developed a unique flat-plate screen (the “Farmers Screen”) that operates passively and may offer reduced installation and operating costs. To evaluate the effectiveness of this screen on fish, we conducted two separate field experiments. First, juvenile coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch were released over a working version of this screen under a range of inflows (0.02–0.42 m3/s) and diversion flows (0.02–0.34 m3/s) at different water depths. Mean approach velocities ranged from 0 to 5 cm/s and sweeping velocities ranged from 36 to 178 cm/s. Water depths over the screen surface ranged from 1 to 25 cm and were directly related to inflow. Passage of fish over the screen under these conditions did not severely injure them or cause delayed mortality, and no fish were observed becoming impinged on the screen surface. Second, juvenile coho salmon and steelhead O. mykiss were released at the upstream end of a 34-m flume and allowed to volitionally move downstream and pass over a 3.5-m section of the Farmers Screen to determine whether fish would refuse to pass over the screen after encountering its leading edge. For coho salmon, 75–95% of the fish passed over the screen within 5 min and 82–98% passed within 20 min, depending on hydraulic conditions. For steelhead, 47–90% of the fish passed over the screen within 5 min and 79–95% passed within 20 min. Our results indicate that when operated within its design criteria, the Farmers Screen provides safe and efficient downstream passage of juvenile salmonids under a variety of hydraulic conditions.

  17. PLASMA PROTEIN PROFILING AS A HIGH THROUGHPUT TOOL FOR CHEMICAL SCREENING USING A SMALL FISH MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hudson, R. Tod, Michael J. Hemmer, Kimberly A. Salinas, Sherry S. Wilkinson, James Watts, James T. Winstead, Peggy S. Harris, Amy Kirkpatrick and Calvin C. Walker. In press. Plasma Protein Profiling as a High Throughput Tool for Chemical Screening Using a Small Fish Model (Abstra...

  18. Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-100) - Oregon Fish Screening Project, Screen Replacements 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Shannon C.

    2002-11-25

    BPA is proposing to fund a project that will provide immediate and long-term protection for anadromous and resident fish through the replacement of out-of-criteria screening devices on private irrigation diversions and dam structures. The goal of this project is to replace approximately 20 screening devices during the 2003 work period. These screening projects will take place in the mainstem, middle fork, and south fork of the John Day River and, if the need arises, in the Umatilla/Walla Walla and Grande Ronde/Imnaha subbasins. Projects are prioritized using the Priority Screening Criteria point system adopted by ODFW from the Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board. Factors considered in prioritization include: fish species status, fish numbers, diversion size, diversion flow relative to stream, fish migration, habitat quality, basin priority, and diversions screened within the stream system.

  19. Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project probability/coordination study resident fish and wildlife impacts, Phase III. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Leitzinger, E.

    1996-09-01

    Phase III began in 1995 with the overall goal of quantifying changes in resident fish habitat in the Snake River basin upstream of Brownlee Reservoir resulting from the release of salmon flow augmentation water. Existing data, in the form of weighted usable area versus flow relationships, were used to estimate habitat changes for white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)in the Snake River between C.J. Strike Dam and Brownlee pool. The increased flows resulted in increased white sturgeon habitat for most life stages. Rainbow trout adult and spawning habitat increased while juvenile and fry habitat generally decreased. Whether or not these short term increases in habitat result in long term benefits to the fish populations has yet to be determined.

  20. Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project Probability/Coordination Study Resident Fish and Wildlife Impact Phase III, 1995 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Leitzinger, Eric J.

    1996-09-01

    Phase III began in 1995 with the overall goal of quantifying changes in resident fish habitat in the Snake River basin upstream of Brownlee Reservoir resulting from the release of salmon flow augmentation water. Existing data, in the form of weighted usable area versus flow relationships, were used to estimate habitat changes for white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in the Snake River between C.J. Strike Dam and Brownlee pool. The increased flows resulted in increased white sturgeon habitat for most life stages. Rainbow trout adult and spawning habitat increased while juvenile and fry habitat generally decreased. Whether or not these short term increases in habitat result in long term benefits to the fish populations has yet to be determined.

  1. Survey of estrogenic activity in fish feed by yeast estrogen-screen assay.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takeru; Kobayashi, Makito; Moriwaki, Toshihisa; Kawai, Shin'ichiro; Watabe, Shugo

    2004-10-01

    Fishes have been used as laboratory animal for research of estrogenic endocrine disrupters by many researchers. However, much less attention was paid to the possibility that compounds with estrogenic activity are present in fish diets. In order to examine this possibility, we measured the estrogenic activity in commercial fish feed by in vitro yeast estrogen-screen (YES) assay based on the binding ability of tested compounds to estrogen receptors. Estrogenic activity was detected in all the commercial fish feed examined (0.2-6.2 ng estradiol equivalent/g fish feed), some phytoestrogens (genistein, formononetin, equol and coumestrol; relative activity to estradiol, 8.6 x 10(-6)-1.1 x 10(-4) by giving a value of 1.0 to estradiol) and some androgens (testosterone, 11-ketotestosterone and 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone; relative activity to estradiol, 3.0 x 10(-6)-1.2 x 10(-4)). Therefore, it is possible that these compounds could affect the results of in vivo estrogen assay, such as vitellogenin production in male fish, especially when fish are fed commercial feed.

  2. Yakima and Touchet River Basins Phase II Fish Screen Evaluation, 2006-2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Chamness, Mickie; Tunnicliffe, Cherylyn

    2007-03-01

    In 2006, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) researchers evaluated 27 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima and Touchet river basins. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory performs these evaluations for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to determine whether the fish screening devices meet those National Marine Fisheries (NMFS) criteria for juvenile fish screen design, that promote safe and timely passage of juvenile salmonids. The NMFS criteria against which the sites were evaluated are as follows: (1) a uniform flow distribution over the screen surface to minimize approach velocity; (2) approach velocities less than or equal to 0.4 ft/s protects the smallest salmonids from impingement; (3) sweep velocities that are greater than approach velocities to minimize delay of out-migrating juveniles and minimize sediment deposition near the screens; (4) a bypass flow greater than or equal to the maximum flow velocity vector resultant upstream of the screens to also minimize delay of out-migrating salmonids; (5) a gradual and efficient acceleration of flow from the upstream end of the site into the bypass entrance to minimize delay of out-migrating salmonids; and (6) screen submergence between 65% and 85% for drum screen sites. In addition, the silt and debris accumulation next to the screens should be kept to a minimum to prevent excessive wear on screens, seals and cleaning mechanisms. Evaluations consist of measuring velocities in front of the screens, using an underwater camera to assess the condition and environment in front of the screens, and noting the general condition and operation of the sites. Results of the evaluations in 2006 include the following: (1) Most approach velocities met the NMFS criterion of less than or equal to 0.4 ft/s. Of the sites evaluated, 31% exceeded the criterion at least once. Thirty-three percent of flat-plate screens had problems compared to 25% of drum screens. (2) Woody debris and gravel deposited during high river

  3. Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project Probability/Coordination Study Resident Fish and Wildlife Impacts Phase III, 1996 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Leitzinger, Eric J.

    1997-12-01

    Phase 3 began in 1995 with the overall goal of quantifying changes in resident fish habitat in the Snake River Basin upstream of Brownlee Reservoir resulting from the release of salmon flow augmentation water. Existing data, in the form of weighted usable area versus flow relationships, were used to estimate habitat changes for white sturgeon (Acipenser transinontanus) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in the Snake River between C.J. Strike Dam and Brownlee pool. The increased flows resulted in increased habitat for adult and juvenile white sturgeon and adult rainbow trout. But, the flows have failed to meet mean monthly flow recommendations for the past three years despite the addition of the flow augmentation releases. It is unlikely that the flow augmentation releases have had any significant long-term benefit for sturgeon and rainbow trout in the Snake River. Flow augmentation releases from the Boise and Payette rivers have in some years helped to meet or exceed minimum flow recommendations in these tributaries. The minimum flows would not have been reached without the flow augmentation releases. But, in some instances, the timing of the releases need to be adjusted in order to maximize benefits to resident fishes in the Boise and Payette rivers.

  4. A summary of 22 Years of Fish Screen Evaluation in the Yakima River Basin, Summary Report 1985-2007.

    SciTech Connect

    Chamness, Mickie A.

    2007-12-03

    Sixty fish screen facilities were constructed in the Yakima River basin between 1985 and 2006 as part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council plan to mitigate the effects of federal hydroelectric projects on fish and wildlife populations. This report summarizes evaluations of some of those and other fish screen facilities conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) from 1985 through 2006. The objective of these studies was to determine if the newly designed and constructed fish screens were effective at providing juvenile salmonids safe passage past irrigation diversions. To answer that question, PNNL conducted release-and-catch studies at eight Phase I sites in the Yakima River basin. Increasing concerns about the impacts of hatchery fish releases on the wild fish population, as well as the cost and time necessary to perform these kinds of biological studies at more than 60 planned Phase II sites, required development of techniques to evaluate the effectiveness of the sites without releasing fish. The new techniques involved collecting information on screen design, operation, and effectiveness at guiding fish safely through the fish screen facility. Performance measures including water velocities and passage conditions provide a good alternative to biological studies at significantly lower cost and time. Physical techniques were used at all 10 Phase I and 28 Phase II sites evaluated by PNNL over the following 19 years. Results of these studies indicate the Phase I and II fish screen facilities are designed and capable of providing safe passage for juvenile salmonids so long as construction, maintenance, and operations meet the criteria used in the design of each site and the National Marine Fisheries Service criteria for juvenile fish screen design.

  5. Idaho Fires

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Wildfires in Northwestern United States     ... (MISR) image of smoke plumes from devastating wildfires in the northwestern United States. This view of the Clearwater and ... at JPL August 5, 2000 - Smoke plumes from wildfires in Idaho. project:  MISR category:  ...

  6. A Fisheries Evaluation of the Wapato, Sunnyside and Toppenish Creek Canal Fish Screening Facilities, Spring 1988 : Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Neitzel, Duane A.; Abernethy, C. Scott; Lusty, E. William

    1990-03-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of new screening facilities at the Toppenish Creek, Wapato, and Sunnyside canals in southcentral Washington State. Screen integrity tests indicated that fish released in front of the screens were prevented from entering the canal behind the screens. Screen efficiency estimates are 99% ({+-}0.6%) for Toppenish Creek, 99% ({+-}0.3%) for Wapato, and 98% ({+-}0.5%) for Sunnyside. During 1987 at the Wapato Canal, we estimated screen efficiency was 97% ({+-}l%). We conducted descaling tests at the Toppenish Creek Screens. We estimated that 0.2% of steelhead Qncorhynchus mykiss smelts released during tests were descaled. None of the fish released through the fish return pipe were descaled. We measured the time required for fish to move through the screen facilities. The time required for 50% of the test fish to exit the Toppenish Creek Screen forebay was 4 to 9 h for rainbow trout fry and up to 39 h for steelhead smelts. The time for 50% of the test fish to exit the Wapato and Sunnyside screen forebays was less than 8 h. As with past studies, exit times varied with canal flow and species. After 39 h at Toppenish Creek, half the steelhead smelts were still in the forebay when canal flows were 20 cfs. At Sunnyside, half the chinook salmon fry exited the forebay in 1 h or less. Methods used in 1988 were the same as those used at Sunnyside in 1985 and in subsequent years at Richland, Toppenish/Satus, and Wapato. The methods and previous results have been reviewed by the Washington State Department of Fisheries, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Marine Fisheries Service, Northwest Power Planning Council, and Yakima Indian Nation.

  7. Concentrations of selected trace elements in fish tissue and streambed sediment in the Clark Fork-Pend Oreille and Spokane River basins, Washington, Idaho, and Montana, 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maret, Terry R.; Skinner, K.D.

    2000-01-01

    Fish tissue and bed sediment samples were collected from 16 stream sites in the Northern Rockies Intermontane Basins study area in 1998 as part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Program. Bed sediment samples were analyzed for 45 trace elements, and fish livers and sportfish fillets were analyzed for 22 elements to characterize the occurrence and distribution of these elements in relation to stream characteristics and land use activities. Nine trace elements of environmental concern—arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, selenium, and zinc—were detected in bed sediment, but not all of these elements were detected in fish tissue. Trace-element concentrations were highest in bed sediment samples collected at sites downstream from significant natural mineral deposits and (or) mining activities. Arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, and zinc in bed sediment at some sites were elevated relative to national median concentrations, and some concentrations were at levels that can adversely affect aquatic biota. Although trace-element concentrations in bed sediment exceeded various guidelines, no concentrations in sportfish fillets exceeded U.S. Environmental Protection Agency screening values for the protection of human health. Correlations between most trace-element concentrations in bed sediment and fish tissue (liver and fillet) were not significant (r0.05). Concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, selenium, and zinc in bed sediment were significantly correlated (r=0.53 to 0.88, p2=0.95 and 0.99, p<0.001) that corresponded to trace-element enrichment categories. These strong relations warrant further study using mine density as an explanatory variable to predict trace-element concentrations in bed sediment.

  8. A simple, fast and sensitive screening LC-ESI-MS/MS method for antibiotics in fish.

    PubMed

    Guidi, Letícia Rocha; Santos, Flávio Alves; Ribeiro, Ana Cláudia S R; Fernandes, Christian; Silva, Luiza H M; Gloria, Maria Beatriz A

    2017-01-15

    The objective of this study was to develop and validate a fast, sensitive and simple liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) method for the screening of six classes of antibiotics (aminoglycosides, beta-lactams, macrolides, quinolones, sulfonamides and tetracyclines) in fish. Samples were extracted with trichloroacetic acid. LC separation was achieved on a Zorbax Eclipse XDB C18 column and gradient elution using 0.1% heptafluorobutyric acid in water and acetonitrile as mobile phase. Analysis was carried out in multiple reaction monitoring mode via electrospray interface operated in the positive ionization mode, with sulfaphenazole as internal standard. The method was suitable for routine screening purposes of 40 antibiotics, according to EC Guidelines for the Validation of Screening Methods for Residues of Veterinary Medicines, taking into consideration threshold value, cut-off factor, detection capability, limit of detection, sensitivity and specificity. Real fish samples (n=193) from aquaculture were analyzed and 15% were positive for enrofloxacin (quinolone), one of them at a higher concentration than the level of interest (50µgkg(-1)), suggesting possible contamination or illegal use of that antibiotic.

  9. Walla Walla River Basin Fish Screen Evaluations; Nursery Bridge Fishway and Garden City/Lowden II Sites, 2003 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Vucelick, J.; McMichael, G.

    2003-11-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated the fish screens at the Nursery Bridge Fishway and the newly constructed Garden City/Lowden II site west of Walla Walla, Washington, in the Walla Walla River Basin during spring and summer 2003. Both fish screen facilities were examined to determine if they were being effectively operated and maintained to provide for safe fish passage. At the Nursery Bridge Fishway, the screens were evaluated specifically to determine whether the louvers that aid in controlling water flow from behind the screens could be adjusted so that the screens would meet fish protection criteria. Data were collected to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met current National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries) (formerly National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage before and after changing the louver settings. Rock weirs downstream of the dam were also evaluated to determine whether they might impede upstream migration of juvenile salmonids during low flow conditions. At the Garden City/Lowden II site, data were collected to establish a baseline for operating conditions and to determine whether any changes in the baffle settings were needed.

  10. Fish freshness detection by a computer screen photoassisted based gas sensor array.

    PubMed

    Alimelli, Adriano; Pennazza, Giorgio; Santonico, Marco; Paolesse, Roberto; Filippini, Daniel; D'Amico, Arnaldo; Lundström, Ingemar; Di Natale, Corrado

    2007-01-23

    In the last years a large number of different measurement methodologies were applied to measure the freshness of fishes. Among them the connection between freshness and headspace composition has been considered by gas chromatographic analysis and from the last two decades by a number of sensors and biosensors aimed at measuring some characteristic indicators (usually amines). More recently also the so-called artificial olfaction systems gathering together many non-specific sensors have shown a certain capability to transduce the global composition of the fish headspace capturing the differences between fresh and spoiled products. One of the main objectives related to the introduction of sensor systems with respect to the analytical methods is the claimed possibility to distribute the freshness control since sensors are expected to be "portable" and "simple". In spite of these objectives, until now sensor systems did not result in any tool that may be broadly distributed. In this paper, we present a chemical sensor array where the optical features of layers of chemicals, sensitive to volatile compounds typical of spoilage processes in fish, are interrogated by a very simple platform based on a computer screen and a web cam. An array of metalloporphyrins is here used to classify fillets of thawed fishes according to their storage days and to monitor the spoilage in filleted anchovies for a time of 8 h. Results indicate a complete identification of the storage days of thawed fillets and a determination of the storage time of anchovies held at room temperature with a root mean square error of validation of about 30 min. The optical system produces a sort of spectral fingerprint containing information about both the absorbance and the emission of the sensitive layer. The system here illustrated, based on computer peripherals, can be easily scaled to any device endowed with a programmable screen and a camera such as cellular phones offering for the first time the

  11. Idaho Commons at the University of Idaho.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Design Cost Data, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Describes the architectural design, costs, general description, and square footage data for the Idaho Commons at the University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho. A floor plan and photos are included along with a list of manufacturers and suppliers used for the project. (GR)

  12. Vertebrates of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, W.J.; Connelly, J.W.; Halford, D.K.; Reynolds, T.D.

    1984-07-01

    Abundance, habitat use, and seasonal occurrence are reported for the 5 fish, 1 amphibian, 9 reptile, 159 bird and 37 mammal species recorded on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory National Environmental Research Park in southeastern Idaho. An additional 45 species, for which site records are lacking, were listed as possibly occurring because portions of their documented range and habitat overlap the INEL. Species of special concern on the federal and state level are discussed. 41 references, 4 tables.

  13. Walla Walla River Basin Fish Screen Evaluations, 2003: Nursery Bridge Fishway and Garden City-Lowden II

    SciTech Connect

    Vucelick, Jessica A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.

    2003-11-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated the fish screens at the Nursery Bridge Fishway and at the newly constructed Garden City-Lowden II site west of Walla Walla, Washington in the Walla Walla River Basin during the spring and summer of 2003. Both fish screen facilities were examined to determine if they were being effectively operated and maintained to provide for safe fish passage. At the Nursery Bridge Fishway, the screens were evaluated specifically to determine whether the louvers that aid in controlling water flow from behind the screens could be adjusted so that the screens would meet fish protection criteria. Data were collected to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met current National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries ((NOAA Fisheries), formerly National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage before and after changing the louver settings. Rock weirs downstream of the dam were also evaluated to determine whether they might impede upstream migration of juvenile salmonids during low flow conditions. At the Garden City-Lowden II site, data were collected to establish a baseline for operating conditions and to determine whether any changes in the baffle settings were needed. Based on the results of our studies in 2003, we concluded: Nursery Bridge Site: (1) 68% of the initial velocity measurements on the west screen exceeded the NOAA Fisheries criteria of 0.4 ft/s for approach velocity; (2) A simple adjustment of the existing louvers was not sufficient to fix the problem; (3) The sediment and debris load in the river upstream of the screens exceeded the design criteria for the site, which had frequent breakdowns in the screen cleaning systems; and (4) The rock weirs downstream of the dam would not be expected to impede upstream movement of juvenile fish during low flow conditions. Garden City-Lowden II: (1) The flat inclined-plate screen design

  14. A Fisheries Evaluation of the Westside Ditch and Wapato Canal Fish Screening Facilities, Spring 1989 : Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Neitzel, Duana A.; Abernethy, C. Scott; Lusty, E. William

    1990-06-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of new fish screening facilities in the Westside Ditch and Wapato Canal in south-central Washington State. The screen integrity tests indicated that test fish released in front of the screens could enter the canal behind the screens. At Westside Ditch, between 6% and 25% of the zero-age fry passed through the rotary drum screens. The 6% estimate is based on tests with rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss fry. The 25% estimate is based on monitoring chinook salmon 0. tshawytscha fry that were diverted from the river into the irrigation ditch. At Westside Ditch, we estimated that 1.8% of steelhead 0. mykiss smolts and 0.3% of chinook salmon smolts released during tests were descaled. The time required for 50% of the test fish to exit from the Westside Ditch Screen forebay was 3 to 8 h for chinook salmon smolts and up to 28 h for steelhead smolts. Methods used in 1988 were first used at Sunnyside in 1985 and were used in subsequent years at Richland. Toppenish/Satus. Wapato. and Toppenish Creek. The methods and 1985 through 1987 results have been reviewed by the Washington State Department of Fisheries, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Marine Fisheries Service, Northwest Power Planning Council, and the Yakima Indian Nation.

  15. Velocity Measurements at Six Fish Screening Facilities in the Yakima River Basin, Washington, Summer 1988 : Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Abernethy, C. Scott; Neitzel, Duane A.; Lusty, E. William

    1989-11-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the United States Bureau of Reclamation (USSR), and the Washington State Department of Ecology (WDOE) are funding the construction and evaluation of fish passage facilities and fish protection facilities at irrigation and hydroelectric diversions in the Yakima River Basin, Washington State. The program provides offsite enhancement to compensate for fish and wildlife losses caused by hydroelectric development throughout the Columbia River Basin, and addresses natural propagation of salmon to help mitigate the impact of irrigation in the Yakima River Basin. This report evaluates the flow characteristics of the screening facilities. Studies consisted of velocity measurements taken in front of the rotary drum screens and within the fish bypass systems during peak flows. Measurements of approach velocity and sweep velocity were emphasized in these studies; however, vertical velocity was also measured. 5 refs., 18 figs., 15 tabs.

  16. A Fisheries Evaluation of the Richland and Toppenish/Satus Canal Fish Screening Facilities, Spring 1986 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Neitzel, D.A.; Abernethy, C. Scott; Lusty, E. William

    1987-05-01

    The fisheries evaluation phase of diversion screen effectiveness summarizes the results of work at the Richland and Toppenish/Satus Fish screening facilities (Richland Screens and Toppenish/Satus Screens) during 1986. More than 10,000 steelhead, Salmo gairdneri, and chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, were released at the screen diversions. At the Richland Screens, 61% of the released steelhead were recovered and 1.1% were descaled; 93% of the spring chinook salmon were recovered and less than 1% were descaled. At the Toppenish/Satus Screens, only steelhead were evaluated for descaling; 88.9% were recovered and 23.9% were descaled. Only steelhead were evaluated because the Yakima River fisheries managers did not expect any other smolts to occur in Toppenish Creek. Because of the acclimation conditions and the amount of time the fish had to be held before testing, some of the test population were descaled during holding and transportation. The 23.9% descaling for the test fish was compared to 26.4% for the controls.

  17. Washington Phase II Fish Diversion Screen Evaluations in the Yakima River Basin, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Vucelick, Jessica; McMichael, Geoffrey; Chamness, Mickie

    2006-02-01

    In 2004, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 25 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. PNNL collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries, formerly the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage. In addition, PNNL conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2004, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by NOAA Fisheries. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well-greased and operative. (4) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris could be improved at some sites. (5) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to improve passage conditions for juvenile fish. For example, Taylor has had problems meeting bypass flow and submergence operating criteria since the main river channel shifted away from the site 2 years ago, and Fruitvale consistently has had problems meeting bypass flow criteria when the water is low. (6) Continued problems at Gleed point to design flaws. This site should be considered for redesign or replacement.

  18. Washington Phase II Fish Diversion Screen Evaluations in the Yakima and Touchet River Basins, 2005-2006 Annual Reports.

    SciTech Connect

    Chamness, Mickie; Abernethy, C.; Tunnicliffe, Cherylyn

    2006-02-01

    In 2005, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) researchers evaluated 25 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima and Touchet river basins. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory performs these evaluations for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to determine whether the fish screening devices meet National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage. Evaluations consist of measuring velocities in front of the screens, using an underwater camera to look at the condition and environment in front of the screens, and noting the general condition and operation of the sites. Results of the evaluations in 2005 include the following: (1) Most approach velocities met the NMFS criterion of less than or equal to 0.4 fps. Less than 13% of all approach measurements exceeded the criterion, and these occurred at 10 of the sites. Flat-plate screens had more problems than drum screens with high approach velocities. (2) Bypass velocities generally were greater than sweep velocities, but sweep velocities often did not increase toward the bypass. The latter condition could slow migration of fish through the facility. (3) Screen and seal materials generally were in good condition. (4) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well-greased and operative. (5) Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) generally operate and maintain fish screen facilities in a way that provides safe passage for juvenile fish. (6) In some instances, irrigators responsible for specific maintenance at their sites (e.g., debris removal) are not performing their tasks in a way that provides optimum operation of the fish screen facility. New ways need to be found to encourage them to maintain their facilities properly. (7) We recommend placing datasheets providing up-to-date operating criteria and design flows in each sites logbox. The datasheet should include

  19. Idaho Fires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1 Click on image for larger version

    This full-frame ASTER image, acquired August 30, 2000, covers an area of 60 by 60 km in the Salmon River Mountains, Idaho. In this color infrared composite, vegetation is red, clouds are white, and smoke from forest fires is blue. An enlargement (Figure 1) covers an area of 12 x 15 km. A thermal infrared band is displayed in red, a short wave infrared band is displayed in green, and a visible band is displayed in blue. In this combination, fires larger than about 50 m appear yellow because they are bright in both infrared bands. Smaller fires appear green because they are too small to be seen by the 90 m thermal pixels, but large enough to be detected in the 30 m short wave infrared pixels. We are able to see through the smoke in the infrared bands, whereas in the visible bands, the smoke obscures detection of the active fires. This image is located at 44.8 degrees north latitude and 114.8 degrees west longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  20. Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Bottum, Edward; Mikkelsen, Anders

    2002-01-01

    This report covers calendar year 2001 activities for the Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation project. This project, implemented by Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Shoshone Bannock Tribes, is designed to protect, enhance and maintain wildlife habitats to mitigate for construction losses associated with Anderson Ranch, Black Canyon, Deadwood, Minidoka and Palisades hydroelectric projects. Additional project information is available in the quarterly reports.

  1. Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Bottum, Edward; Mikkelsen, Anders

    2001-03-01

    This report covers calendar year 2000 activities for the Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation project. This project, implemented by Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Shoshone Bannock Tribes wildlife mitigation staff, is designed to protect, enhance and maintain wildlife habitats to mitigate construction losses for Palisades, Anderson Ranch, Black Canyon and Minidoka hydroelectric projects. Additional project information is available in the quarterly reports.

  2. Nez Perce Tribe Welcomes Wolves Back to Idaho.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossman, Elizabeth

    2002-01-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe is working with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to reintroduce the gray wolf to central Idaho. The tribe does all the fieldwork with the wolves and shares their work with the public at the Wolf Education and Research Center, Winchester, Idaho. Despite opposition from ranchers and legislators, the wolf population is…

  3. Idaho Geothermal Commercialization Program. Idaho geothermal handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, G.D.; Esposito, L.; Montgomery, M.

    1980-03-01

    The following topics are covered: geothermal resources in Idaho, market assessment, community needs assessment, geothermal leasing procedures for private lands, Idaho state geothermal leasing procedures - state lands, federal geothermal leasing procedures - federal lands, environmental and regulatory processes, local government regulations, geothermal exploration, geothermal drilling, government funding, private funding, state and federal government assistance programs, and geothermal legislation. (MHR)

  4. Relationship of human levels of lead and cadmium to the consumption of fish caught in and around Lake Coeur d'Alene, Idaho. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, B.S.; Rondinelli, R.

    1989-09-01

    A pilot exposure study was conducted to determine whether the consumption of fish captured in Lake Coeur d'Alene (LCD), the Coeur d'Alene River, and the adjacent Chain Lakes, could substantially increase lead and cadmium levels in human blood and urine. The goals of the study were: to characterize fish and duck consumption patterns of people living around LCD; and to determine the association between fish and duck consumption and lead/cadmium levels. The lead and cadmium levels among participants living near LCD were within the expected range and are not of any known clinical importance. After adjusting for age and smoking, it was found that persons eating fish or duck were more likely to have higher than the median levels of cadmium in their urine. There were no statistically significant associations between fish or duck consumption and blood levels of lead or cadmium or urine levels of cadmium when adjusted for creatinine.

  5. Influence of Approach Velocity and Mesh Size on the Entrainment and Contact of a Lowland River Fish Assemblage at a Screened Irrigation Pump

    PubMed Central

    Boys, Craig A.; Robinson, Wayne; Baumgartner, Lee J.; Rampano, Ben; Lowry, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Fish screens can help prevent the entrainment or injury of fish at irrigation diversions, but only when designed appropriately. Design criteria cannot simply be transferred between sites or pump systems and need to be developed using an evidence-based approach with the needs of local species in mind. Laboratory testing is typically used to quantify fish responses at intake screens, but often limits the number of species that can studied and creates artificial conditions not directly applicable to screens in the wild. In this study a field-based approach was used to assess the appropriateness of different screen design attributes for the protection of a lowland river fish assemblage at an experimental irrigation pump. Direct netting of entrained fish was used along with sonar technology to quantify the probability of screen contact for a Murray-Darling Basin (Australia) fish species. Two approach velocities (0.1 and 0.5 m.sec−1) and different sizes of woven mesh (5, 10 and 20 mm) were evaluated. Smaller fish (<150 mm) in the assemblage were significantly more susceptible to entrainment and screen contact, especially at higher approach velocities. Mesh size appeared to have little impact on screen contact and entrainment, suggesting that approach velocity rather than mesh size is likely to be the primary consideration when developing screens. Until the effects of screen contacts on injury and survival of these species are better understood, it is recommended that approach velocities not exceed 0.1 m.sec−1 when the desire is to protect the largest range of species and size classes for lowland river fish assemblages in the Murray-Darling Basin. The field method tested proved to be a useful approach that could compliment laboratory studies to refine fish screen design and facilitate field validation. PMID:23818975

  6. Adverse outcome pathways during early fish development: a conceptual framework for identification of chemical screening and prioritization strategies.

    PubMed

    Volz, David C; Belanger, Scott; Embry, Michelle; Padilla, Stephanie; Sanderson, Hans; Schirmer, Kristin; Scholz, Stefan; Villeneuve, Daniel

    2011-10-01

    The fish early life-stage (FELS) test guideline (OECD 210 or OCSPP 850.1400) is the most frequently used bioassay for predicting chronic fish toxicity and supporting aquatic ecological risk assessments around the world. For each chemical, the FELS test requires a minimum of 360 fish and 1 to 3 months from test initiation to termination. Although valuable for predicting fish full life-cycle toxicity, FELS tests are labor and resource intensive and, due to an emphasis on apical endpoints, provide little to no information about chemical mode of action. Therefore, the development and implementation of alternative testing strategies for screening and prioritizing chemicals has the potential to reduce the cost and number of animals required for estimating FELS toxicity and, at the same time, provides insights into mechanisms of toxicity. Using three reference chemicals with well-established yet distinct adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) in early life stages of fish, we proposed FELS-specific AOPs as conceptual frameworks for identifying useful chemical screening and prioritization strategies. The reference chemicals selected as case studies were a cardiotoxic aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonist (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin), neurotoxic acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (chlorpyrifos), and narcotic surfactant (linear alkylbenzene sulfonate). Using qualitative descriptions for each chemical during early fish development, we developed generalized AOPs and, based on these examples, proposed a three-tiered testing strategy for screening and prioritizing chemicals for FELS testing. Linked with biologically based concentration-response models, a tiered testing strategy may help reduce the reliance on long-term and costly FELS tests required for assessing the hazard of thousands of chemicals currently in commerce.

  7. Application of a fish DNA damage assay as a biological toxicity screening tool for metal plating wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, K.; Zong, M.; Meier, P.G.

    2000-01-01

    The utility of a fish DNA damage assay as a rapid monitoring tool was investigated. Metal plating wastewater was chosen as a sample because it contains various genotoxic metal species. Fish DNA damage assay results were compared to data generated from the conventional whole effluent toxicity (WET) test procedure. The Microtox{reg_sign} assay (Azur Environmental, Carlsbad, CA, USA) using Vibrio fischeri was also employed. Eleven samples from two metal plating companies were collected for this evaluation. For the fish DNA damage assay, 7-d-old fathead minnow larvae, Pimephales promelas, were utilized. They were exposed to a series of dilutions at 20 C for 2 h. Whole effluent toxicity tests conducted in this study included two acute toxicity tests with Daphnia magna and fathead minnows and two chronic toxicity tests with Ceriodaphnia dubia and fathead minnows. The fish DNA damage assay showed good correlations with both the acute and chronic WET test results, especially with those obtained with fathead minnows. The kappa values, an index of agreement, between the fish DNA damage assay and WET tests were shown to be acceptable. These findings imply that this novel fish DNA damage assay has use as an expedient toxicity screening procedure since it produces comparable results to those of the acute and chronic fathead minnow toxicity tests.

  8. Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS - Idaho Model Watershed Habitat Projects - L-9 Irrigation Diversion Modification

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2004-08-02

    The Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to fund a fish passage improvement project at the L-9 diversion on the Lemhi River in Lemhi County, Idaho with the Lemhi Soil and Water Conservation District. The project proposes to replace the existing rock push-up irrigation diversion dam with a single rock weir that will incorporate a geotextile membrane to create a permanent diversion. The new weir will be a v-shaped vortex weir with a six-foot wide notch for fish passage. In addition, a ramp flume will be constructed in the diversion canal between the headgate and existing fish screen to provide for water measurement. The new diversion will provide better water delivery/control and improved passage for adult and juvenile resident and anadromous fish.

  9. 75 FR 32210 - United States v. Idaho Orthopaedic Society, Timothy Doerr, Jeffrey Hessing, Idaho Sports Medicine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-07

    ... Antitrust Division United States v. Idaho Orthopaedic Society, Timothy Doerr, Jeffrey Hessing, Idaho Sports.... Idaho Orthopaedic Society, Timothy Doerr, Jeffrey Hessing, Idaho Sports Medicine Institute, John Kloss..., Plaintiffs, vs. Idaho Orthopaedic Society, Timothy Doerr, Jeffrey Hessing, Idaho Sports Medicine...

  10. Idaho GPW Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    2001-10-01

    Idaho holds enormous resources - among the largest in theUnited States - of this clean, reliable form of energy that to date have barely been tapped. According to U.S. Geological Survey estimates, Idaho ranks seventh among the 50 states in developable geothermal energy. These resources could provide up to 20% of Idaho's heat and power needs. W h y G e o t h e r m a l ?Homegrown Energy It's here, right beneath our feet! No need to import! Current Development Idaho already boasts 70 direct-use g..

  11. Walla Walla River Basin Fish Screen Evaluations; Nursery Bridge Fishway, Garden City/Lowden II, and Little Walla Walla Sites, 2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Vucelick, J.; McMichael, G.

    2004-11-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated the fish screens at the Nursery Bridge Fishway, the Garden City/Lowden II site west of Walla Walla, Washington, and the Little Walla Walla site in Milton-Freewater, Oregon, in the Walla Walla River Basin during 2004. The fish-screen facilities were examined to determine if they were being effectively operated and maintained to provide for safe fish passage. At the Nursery Bridge Fishway, the screens were evaluated specifically to determine whether the louvers that aid in controlling water flow from behind the screens could be adjusted so that the screens would meet fish-protection criteria. Data were collected to determine whether velocities in front of the screens met current National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA Fisheries) (formerly NMFS) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage before and after changing the louver settings. The Little Walla Walla screens were evaluated to determine how a build-up of algae on the screens affected water velocities.

  12. Effects of Protective Plates and Stoplogs on Water Flow Through the Gleed Fish Screen Facility, April 2007 - September 2007.

    SciTech Connect

    Chamness, Mickie

    2007-12-03

    In 2007, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was asked by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation to provide additional velocity measurements at Gleed fish screens site to support decisions on mitigating extreme flow fluctuations near the screens. The site consistently has had extreme water velocities in places and a strong back eddy at the downstream end in spring and summer. With the help of Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife staff, we measured the effects of different stoplog configurations behind the screens in May and July 2007. Protective metal plates in front of the trash racks were confirmed to be the cause of uneven and extreme water flow past the vertical traveling screens. Stoplogs were not sufficient to significantly reduce the effect of those metal plates on water velocities past and through the site. We provide a few suggestions including making it easier to raise and lower the metal plates and then adjusting them more often, constructing a new trash rack across the diversion entrance, and raising the control gate at the end of the site as long as possible in spring and during flood events.

  13. Characteristics of fish assemblages and related environmental variables for streams of the upper Snake River basin, Idaho and western Wyoming, 1993-95

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maret, Terry R.

    1997-01-01

    limited designation for the middle reach of the Snake River between Milner Dam and King Hill and provide a framework for developing indices of biotic integrity by using fish assemblages to evaluate water quality of streams in the upper Snake River Basin.

  14. Concentrations of metals associated with mining waste in sediments, biofilm, benthic macroinvertebrates, and fish from the Coeur d'Alene River Basin, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farag, A.M.; Woodward, D.F.; Goldstein, J.N.; Brumbaugh, W.; Meyer, J.S.

    1998-01-01

    Arsenic, Cd, Cu, Pb, Hg, and Zn were measured in sediments, biofilm, benthic macroinvertebrates, and fish from the Coeur d'Alene (CDA) River to characterize the pathway of metals transfer between these components. Metals enter the CDA Basin via tributaries where mining activities have occurred. In general, the ranking of food-web components from the greatest to smallest concentrations of metals was as follows: biofilm (the layer of abiotic and biotic material on rock surfaces) and sediments > invertebrates > whole fish. Elevated Pb was documented in invertebrates, and elevated Cd and Zn were documented in sediment and biofilm approximately 80 km downstream to the Spokane River. The accumulation of metals in invertebrates was dependent on functional feeding group and shredders-scrapers that feed on biofilm accumulated the largest concentrations of metals. Although the absolute concentrations of metals were the largest in biofilm and sediments, the metals have accumulated in fish approximately 50 km downstream from Kellogg, near the town of Harrison. While metals do not biomagnify between trophic levels, the metals in the CDA Basin are bioavailable and do biotransfer. Trout less than 100 mm long feed exclusively on small invertebrates, and small invertebrates accumulate greater concentrations of metals than large invertebrates. Therefore, early-lifestage fish may be exposed to a larger dose of metals than adults.

  15. Mercury in fish tissue of Idaho lakes vs. those of the Northeastern United States as it relates to the moderating effects of selenium

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary methyl-mercury (MeHg) exposure mode to wildlife and humans is through the consumption of aquatic organisms, particulary fish. Selenium has been demonstrated to moderate the toxicity of MeHg in every test animal type examined to date. A molar ratio of Se:Hg >1 appear...

  16. Trace elements and organic compounds in sediment and fish tissue from the Great Salt Lake basins, Utah, Idaho, and Wyoming, 1998-99

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waddell, Kidd M.; Giddings, Elise M.

    2004-01-01

    A study to determine the occurrence and distribution of trace elements, organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and semivolatile organic compounds in sediment and in fish tissue was conducted in the Great Salt Lake Basins study unit of the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) program during 1998-99. Streambed-sediment and fish-tissue samples were collected concurrently at 11 sites and analyzed for trace-element concentration. An additional four sites were sampled for streambed sediment only and one site for fish tissue only. Organic compounds were analyzed from streambed-sediment and fish-tissue samples at 15 sites concurrently.Bed-sediment cores from lakes, reservoirs, and Farmington Bay collected by the NAWQA program in 1998 and by other researchers in 1982 were used to examine historical trends in trace-element concentration and to determine anthropogenic sources of contaminants. Cores collected in 1982 from Mirror Lake, a high-mountain reference location, showed an enrichment of arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, tin, and zinc in the surface sediments relative to the deeper sediments, indicating that enrichment likely began after about 1900. This enrichment was attributed to atmospheric deposition during the period of metal-ore mining and smelting. A core from Echo Reservoir, in the Weber River Basin, however, showed a different pattern of trace-element concentration that was attributed to a local source. This site is located downstream from the Park City mining district, which is the most likely historical source of trace elements. Cores collected in 1998 from Farmington Bay show that the concentration of lead began to increase after 1842 and peaked during the mid-1980s and has been in decline since. Recent sediments deposited during 1996-98 indicate a 41- to 62-percent reduction since the peak in the mid-1980s.The concentration of trace elements in streambed sediment was greatest at sites that have been affected by historic mining

  17. CONNECTICUT RIVER FISH TISSUE CONTAMINANT STUDY (2000): ECOLOGICAL AND HUMAN HEALTH RISK SCREENING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study targeted commonly caught recreational fish, as well as other fish that are important in the river food chain. Smallmouth bass, white suckers and yellow perch were collected during 2000 from the mainstem of the Connecticut River and composite samples were analyzed for t...

  18. Screening for Subtelomeric Rearrangements in Thai Patients with Intellectual Disabilities Using FISH and Review of Literature on Subtelomeric FISH in 15,591 Cases with Intellectual Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Khayman, Jariya; Praphanphoj, Verayuth

    2016-01-01

    We utilized fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to screen for subtelomeric rearrangements in 82 Thai patients with unexplained intellectual disability (ID) and detected subtelomeric rearrangements in 5 patients. Here, we reported on a patient with der(20)t(X;20)(p22.3;q13.3) and a patient with der(3)t(X;3)(p22.3;p26.3). These rearrangements have never been described elsewhere. We also reported on a patient with der(10)t(7;10)(p22.3;q26.3), of which the same rearrangement had been reported in one literature. Well-recognized syndromes were detected in two separated patients, including 4p deletion syndrome and 1p36 deletion syndrome. All patients with subtelomeric rearrangements had both ID and multiple congenital anomalies (MCA) and/or dysmorphic features (DF), except the one with der(20)t(X;20), who had ID alone. By using FISH, the detection rate of subtelomeric rearrangements in patients with both ID and MCA/DF was 8.5%, compared to 2.9% of patients with only ID. Literature review found 28 studies on the detection of subtelomeric rearrangements by FISH in patients with ID. Combining data from these studies and our study, 15,591 patients were examined and 473 patients with subtelomeric rearrangements were determined. The frequency of subtelomeric rearrangements detected by FISH in patients with ID was 3%. Terminal deletions were found in 47.7%, while unbalanced derivative chromosomes were found in 47.9% of the rearrangements. PMID:27822388

  19. Fire protection review, Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company, Idaho Falls, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson, P.H.

    1990-10-01

    A fire protection survey was conducted for the Department of Energy at the Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company, INC., Idaho Falls, Idaho, on April 24--27, April 30--May 4, June 4--8, and June 11--15, 1990. The purpose of the survey was to review the facility's fire protection program and to make recommendations according to the following criteria established by the Department of Energy: (1) Recommendations which would be made as the result of an improved risk or Highly Protected Risk (HPR) fire inspection of an industrial insured facility. (2) Identification of areas which are presently not protected or are inadequately protected where provision of automatic protection would reduce a fire or explosion loss to less than $1 million. (3) Identification of areas where loss potentials exceed $50 million assuming a failure of automatic protection systems and subsequent reliance only on separation and fire walls. (4) Evaluation of adequacy of compliance with recommendations made in prior surveys. Findings and recommendations in this report reflect to some degree the relative importance of the operation and the time to restore it to useful condition in the event that a loss were to occur.

  20. Screening for Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia Virus in Marine Fish along the Norwegian Coastal Line

    PubMed Central

    Sandlund, Nina; Gjerset, Britt; Bergh, Øivind; Modahl, Ingebjørg; Olesen, Niels Jørgen; Johansen, Renate

    2014-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) infects a wide range of marine fish species. To study the occurrence of VHSV in wild marine fish populations in Norwegian coastal waters and fjord systems a total of 1927 fish from 39 different species were sampled through 5 research cruises conducted in 2009 to 2011. In total, VHSV was detected by rRT-PCR in twelve samples originating from Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus), haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus), whiting (Merlangius merlangus) and silvery pout (Gadiculus argenteus). All fish tested positive in gills while four herring and one silvery pout also tested positive in internal organs. Successful virus isolation in cell culture was only obtained from one pooled Atlantic herring sample which shows that today's PCR methodology have a much higher sensitivity than cell culture for detection of VHSV. Sequencing revealed that the positive samples belonged to VHSV genotype Ib and phylogenetic analysis shows that the isolate from Atlantic herring and silvery pout are closely related. All positive fish were sampled in the same area in the northern county of Finnmark. This is the first detection of VHSV in Atlantic herring this far north, and to our knowledge the first detection of VHSV in silvery pout. However, low prevalence of VHSV genotype Ib in Atlantic herring and other wild marine fish are well known in other parts of Europe. Earlier there have been a few reports of disease outbreaks in farmed rainbow trout with VHSV of genotype Ib, and our results show that there is a possibility of transfer of VHSV from wild to farmed fish along the Norwegian coast line. The impact of VHSV on wild fish is not well documented. PMID:25248078

  1. COMPARISON OF AN IN VIVO FISH VTG ASSAY WITH YES AND E-SCREEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study compares the efficacy of two in vitro, estrogen-sensitive bioassays to rank the "relative estrogenicity" of five natural, pharmaceutical and xenoestrogens with a newly developed in vivo bioassay. The E-SCREEN (MCF-7 tumor cells) and YES (Yeast Estrogen Screen) assays w...

  2. Evaluation of Fish Losses through Screen Gaps at Modified and Unmodified Intakes of Bonneville Dam Second Powerhouse in 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Schilt, Carl R.

    2004-06-14

    This report was prepared by the Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, Washington, BAE Systems, Inc., a subcontractor to the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC), Vicksburg, Mississippi. This study examined the effect of gatewell modifications on the proportion of fish lost through the gap between the top of submerged traveling screens (STSs) and the ceilings of intakes in one un-modified and two modified turbine units at Bonneville Dam Second Powerhouse (B2). Combined modifications reduced the proportion of flow through the gap from 44% to 16% and increased the proportion moving up the gatewell from 56% to 84%. We used a Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar (DIDSON) acoustic camera to record proportions of juvenile salmonids moving up into the gatewell and through the gap. The acoustic camera was used to record images of fish passing up into the gatewell and through the gap for 8-h on three successive nights in every intake of units 13, 15, and 17 (i.e., 9 intakes x 3 nights = 27 nights each season). Only 28.6% of the objects detected in spring and 12.9% in summer were determined to be fish. Other objects included sticks and debris. Although the true magnitude of STS gap-loss is unknown, both acoustic camera and netting estimates indicate that gatewell modifications reduce relative gap loss by about 67%.

  3. Fish mortality by impingement on the cooling-water intake screens of Britain's largest direct-cooled power station.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, M F D

    2008-04-01

    An estimated 5.66 x 10(7) fish (summed quarterly 95% confidence intervals: 3.01 x 10(7)-1.07 x 10(8)) weighing 258.4 t (143.2-467.9 t) were killed on the cooling-water intake screens of the 2400 MW Longannet Power Station (Forth estuary) in January 1999--December 2000. Abundance and number of species (40) collected were close to predictions for a power station of this size and latitude. Potential losses of equivalent adult whiting (Merlangius merlangus), cod (Gadus morhua), and plaice (Pleuronectes platessa) through deaths of juveniles were estimated at 353.1 t (208.0-603.2 t) worth approximately euro 429,266 (euro 246,592-752,765) in 1999--2000. Fish catch-per-trawl in the estuary was generally not noticeably greater during a year of low water withdrawal (coal miners' strike of 1984--1985) when compared to other years from 1982 to 2001, except for gobies (Pomatoschistus spp.). A fish-return system is being tested at Longannet to reduce mortality.

  4. Fishing for Nature's Hits: Establishment of the Zebrafish as a Model for Screening Antidiabetic Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Tabassum, Nadia; Tai, Hongmei; Jung, Da-Woon; Williams, Darren R.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus affects millions of people worldwide and significantly impacts their quality of life. Moreover, life threatening diseases, such as myocardial infarction, blindness, and renal disorders, increase the morbidity rate associated with diabetes. Various natural products from medicinal plants have shown potential as antidiabetes agents in cell-based screening systems. However, many of these potential “hits” fail in mammalian tests, due to issues such as poor pharmacokinetics and/or toxic side effects. To address this problem, the zebrafish (Danio rerio) model has been developed as a “bridge” to provide an experimentally convenient animal-based screening system to identify drug candidates that are active in vivo. In this review, we discuss the application of zebrafish to drug screening technologies for diabetes research. Specifically, the discovery of natural product-based antidiabetes compounds using zebrafish will be described. For example, it has recently been demonstrated that antidiabetic natural compounds can be identified in zebrafish using activity guided fractionation of crude plant extracts. Moreover, the development of fluorescent-tagged glucose bioprobes has allowed the screening of natural product-based modulators of glucose homeostasis in zebrafish. We hope that the discussion of these advances will illustrate the value and simplicity of establishing zebrafish-based assays for antidiabetic compounds in natural products-based laboratories. PMID:26681965

  5. Multiplex screening of persistent organic pollutants in fish using spectrally encoded microspheres

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are food contaminants of global public health concern and known to be carcinogenic and endocrine disruptors. Their monitoring is essential and an easy-to-use, rapid and affordable multi-analyte screening method with simplified sample preparation can be a valuable...

  6. Walla Walla River Basin Fish Screen Evaluations; Nursery Bridge Fishway and Garden City/Lowden II Sites, 2005-2006 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Chamness, Mickie

    2006-06-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated two fish screen facilities in the Walla Walla River basin in 2005 and early 2006. The Garden City/Lowden screen site was evaluated in April and June 2005 to determine whether the fish screens met National Marine Fisheries Service criteria to provide safe passage for juvenile salmonids. Louvers behind the screens at the Nursery Bridge Fishway were modified in fall 2005 in an attempt to minimize high approach velocities. PNNL evaluated the effects of those modifications in March 2006. Results of the Garden City/Lowden evaluations indicate the site performs well at varying river levels and canal flows. Approach velocities did not exceed 0.4 feet per second (fps) at any time. Sweep velocities increased toward the fish ladder in March but not in June. The air-burst mechanism appears to keep large debris off the screens, although it does not prevent algae and periphyton from growing on the screen face, especially near the bottom of the screens. At Nursery Bridge, results indicate all the approach velocities were below 0.4 fps under the moderate river levels and operational conditions encountered on March 7, 2006. Sweep did not consistently increase toward the fish ladder, but the site generally met the criteria for safe passage of juvenile salmonids. Modifications to the louvers seem to allow more control over the amount of water moving through the screens. We will measure approach velocities when river levels are higher to determine whether the louver modifications can help correct excessive approach velocities under a range of river levels and auxiliary water supply flows.

  7. Augmented Fish Health Monitoring, 1989 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Michak, Patty

    1990-05-01

    Since 1986 Washington Department of Fisheries (WDF) has participated in the Columbia Basin Augmented Fish Health Monitoring Project, funded by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). This interagency project was developed to provide a standardized level of fish health information from all Agencies rearing fish in the Columbia Basin. Agencies involved in the project are: WDF, Washington Department of Wildlife, Oregon Fish and Wildlife, Idaho Fish and Game, and the US Fish and Wildlife Service. WDF has actively participated in this project, and completed its third year of fish health monitoring, data collection and pathogen inspection during 1989. This report will present data collected from January 1, 1989 to December 31, 1989 and will compare sampling results from screening at spawning for viral pathogens and bacterial kidney disease (BKD), and evaluation of causes of pre-spawning loss. The juvenile analysis will include pre-release examination results, mid-term rearing exam results and evaluation of the Organosomatic Analysis completed on stocks. 2 refs., 4 figs., 15 tabs.

  8. Fishing for age-related visual system mutants: behavioral screening of retinal degeneration genes in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Li, Yuhao; Chen, Dongyan; Shao, Jinping; Li, Xinle; Xu, Chen

    2010-02-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) has recently become a mainstream model system for genetic studies of human diseases, such as neurological degenerative diseases, heart diseases, immuno-system disorders, etc. In this article, we will review some recent findings of the usefulness of zebrafish as a model vertebrate for behavioral screening of mutations in vertebrate visual system, for example, genes involved in age-related retinal degeneration.

  9. A SIMPLE AND RAPID MATRIX-ASSISTED LASER DESORPTION/IONIZATION TIME OF FLIGHT MASS SPECTROMETRY METHOD TO SCREEN FISH PLASMA SAMPLES FOR ESTROGEN-RESPONSIVE BIOMARKERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, we describe and evaluate the performance of a simple and rapid mass spectral method for screening fish plasma for estrogen-responsive biomarkers using matrix assisted laster desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) couopled with a short...

  10. Idaho's Energy Options

    SciTech Connect

    Robert M. Neilson

    2006-03-01

    This report, developed by the Idaho National Laboratory, is provided as an introduction to and an update of the status of technologies for the generation and use of energy. Its purpose is to provide information useful for identifying and evaluating Idaho’s energy options, and for developing and implementing Idaho’s energy direction and policies.

  11. Towards a full karyotype screening of interphase cells: 'FISH and chip' technology

    SciTech Connect

    Weier, Heinz-Ulli G.; Munne, Santiago; Lersch, Robert A.; Hsieh, H.-Ben; Smida, Jan; Chen, Xiao-Ning; Korenberg, Julie R.; Pedersen, Roger A.; Fung, Jingley

    2003-06-23

    Numerical chromosome aberrations are incompatible with normal human development. Our laboratories develop hybridization based screening tools that generate a maximum of cytogenetic information for each polar body or blastomere analyzed. The methods are developed considering that the abnormality might require preparation of case-specific probes and that only one or two cells will be available for diagnosis, most of which might be in the interphase stage. Further more, assay efficiencies have to be high, since there is typically not enough time to repeat an experiment or reconfirm a result prior to fertilization or embryo transfer. Structural alterations are delineated with break point-spanning probes. When screening for numerical abnormalities, we apply a Spectral Imaging-based approach to simultaneously score as many as ten different chromosome types in individual inter phase cells. Finally, DNA micro-arrays are under development to score all of the human chromosomes in a single experiment and to increase the resolution with which micro-deletions can be delineated.

  12. Movement and Injury Rates for Three Life Stages of Spring Chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus Tshawytscha : A Comparison of Submerged Orifices and an Overflow Weir for Fish Bypass in a Modular Rotary Drum Fish Screen : Annual Report 1995.

    SciTech Connect

    Abernethy, C. Scott; Neitzel, Duane A.; Mavros, William V.

    1996-03-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated the effectiveness of 6-in. and 2-in. submerged orifices, and an overflow weir for fish bypass at a rotary drum fish screening facility. A modular drum screen built by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) was installed at PNNL`s Aquatic Ecology research laboratory in Richland, Washington. Fry, subyearlings, and smolts of spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawyacha) were introduced into the test system, and their movement and injury rates were monitored. A total of 33 tests (100 fish per test) that lasted from 24 to 48 hr were completed from 1994 through 1995. Passage rate depended on both fish size and bypass configuration. For fry/fingerling spring chinook salmon, there was no difference in passage rate through the three bypass configurations (2-in. orifice, 6-in. orifice, or overflow weir). Subyearlings moved sooner when the 6-in. orifice was used, with more than 50% exiting through the fish bypass in the first 8 hr. Smolts exited quickly and preferred the 6-in. orifice, with over 90% of the smolts exiting through the bypass in less than 2 hr. Passage was slightly slower when a weir was used, with 90% of the smolts exiting in about 4 hr. When the 2-in. orifice was used in the bypass, 90% of the smolts did not exit until after 8 hr. In addition, about 7% of the smolts failed to migrate from the forebay within 24 hr, indicating that smolts were significantly delayed when the 2-in. orifice was used. Few significant injuries were detected for any of the life stages. However, light descaling occurred on about 15% of chinook salmon smolts passing through the 2-in. orifice. Although a single passage through the orifice did not appear to cause significant scale loss or other damage, passing through several screening facilities with 2-in. orifices could cause cumulative injuries.

  13. Idaho Higher Education: 1994 Fact Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho State Board of Education, Boise.

    This fact book presents information about Idaho's public four-year college, Lewis-Clark State College, and the three universities: Boise State University, Idaho State University, and the University of Idaho. The book also provides selected data on vocational education and Idaho's two community colleges: North Idaho College and the College of…

  14. 76 FR 13976 - Eastern Idaho Resource Advisory Committee; Caribou-Targhee National Forest, Idaho Falls, ID

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    ... Forest Service Eastern Idaho Resource Advisory Committee; Caribou-Targhee National Forest, Idaho Falls... Resource Advisory Committee will meet Friday, March 25, 2011 in Idaho Falls, Idaho for a business meeting... Headquarters Office, 1405 Hollipark Drive, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83401. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  15. 76 FR 13345 - Eastern Idaho Resource Advisory Committee; Caribou-Targhee National Forest, Idaho Falls, ID

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-11

    ... Forest Service Eastern Idaho Resource Advisory Committee; Caribou-Targhee National Forest, Idaho Falls... Resource Advisory Committee will meet Friday, March 25, 2011 in Idaho Falls, Idaho for a business meeting... Headquarters Office, 1405 Hollipark Drive, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83401. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  16. Idaho Explosives Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Edward L. Reber; J. Keith Jewell; Larry G. Blackwood; Andrew J. Edwards; Kenneth W. Rohde; Edward H. Seabury

    2004-10-01

    The Idaho Explosives Detection System (IEDS) was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to respond to threats imposed by delivery trucks carrying explosives into military bases. A full-scale prototype system has been built and is currently undergoing testing. The system consists of two racks, one on each side of a subject vehicle. Each rack includes a neutron generator and an array of NaI detectors. The two neutron generators are pulsed and synchronized. A laptop computer controls the entire system. The control software is easily operable by minimally trained staff. The system was developed to detect explosives in a medium size truck within a 5-minute measurement time. System performance was successfully demonstrated with explosives at the INL in June 2004 and at Andrews Air Force Base in July 2004.

  17. State summaries: Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gillerman, V.S.; Weaver, M.J.; Bennett, E.H.

    2006-01-01

    According to the United States Geological Survey (USGS), Idaho's preliminary nonfuel mineral production value jumped to $893 million in 2005. Principal minerals by value included molybdenum concentrates, phosphate rock, sand and gravel, silver and portland cement. The state ranked second in phosphate and garnet production, third in silver and pumice, fourth in molybdenum concentrate production, and 21st overall. Majority of mining increases for the year were spurred by demand for metals by China's growing economy.

  18. An assessment of Idaho's wildlife management areas for the protection of wildlife

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karl, J.W.; Scott, J.M.; Strand, Espen

    2005-01-01

    Since 1940, Idaho Department of Fish and Game has developed a network of 31 Wildlife Management Areas (WMAs) across the state. This program has been focused mostly on conservation of game species and their habitats. We assessed the contribution of Idaho's WMAs to conservation of all Idaho's wildlife and other aspects of ecological diversity. Predicted occurrences of species' breeding habitats and other data were used to evaluate the representation of wildlife habitat and other ecological conditions. We found 33 of 39 natural land cover types were mapped as occurring in WMAs. WMAs occurred in 10 of 15 of Bailey's ecoregion sections, absent only from two sections that occupy greater than 1% of Idaho. Percent area of WMAs by elevation followed a pattern similar to percent area of Idaho; however, mean elevation for WMAs was lower than for the state and other protected areas in Idaho. We predicted breeding habitat for 98.4% of Idaho's wildlife and all federal and state listed threatened, endangered, or candidate terrestrial vertebrates to occur in at least one WMA. We predicted habitat for 39 species to occur on five or fewer WMAs, and predicted no habitat on WMAs for five species. We found that a system of WMAs established mainly to protect game species potentially conserves many other aspects of Idaho's ecological diversity, may provide habitat for more than 98% of Idaho's wildlife, and complements other protected areas in the state.

  19. Libraries in Idaho: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... 381-2276 http://www.stlukesonline.org/medlib/ Idaho Falls Eastern Idaho Regional Medical Center Health Sciences Library PO Box 2077 3100 Channing Way Idaho Falls, ID 83403-2077 208-529-6077 http://www. ...

  20. Idaho Steelhead Monitoring and Evaluation Studies : Annual Progress Report 2007.

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, Timothy; Putnam, Scott

    2008-12-01

    The goal of Idaho Steelhead Monitoring and Evaluation Studies is to collect monitoring data to evaluate wild and natural steelhead populations in the Clearwater and Salmon river drainages. During 2007, intensive population data were collected in Fish Creek (Lochsa River tributary) and Rapid River (Little Salmon River tributary); extensive data were collected in other selected spawning tributaries. Weirs were operated in Fish Creek and Rapid River to estimate adult escapement and to collect samples for age determination and genetic analysis. Snorkel surveys were conducted in Fish Creek, Rapid River, and Boulder Creek (Little Salmon River tributary) to estimate parr density. Screw traps were operated in Fish Creek, Rapid River, Secesh River, and Big Creek to estimate juvenile emigrant abundance, to tag fish for survival estimation, and to collect samples for age determination and genetic analysis. The estimated wild adult steelhead escapement in Fish Creek was 81 fish and in Rapid River was 32 fish. We estimate that juvenile emigration was 24,127 fish from Fish Creek; 5,632 fish from Rapid River; and 43,674 fish from Big Creek. The Secesh trap was pulled for an extended period due to wildfires, so we did not estimate emigrant abundance for that location. In cooperation with Idaho Supplementation Studies, trap tenders PIT tagged 25,618 steelhead juveniles at 18 screw trap sites in the Clearwater and Salmon river drainages. To estimate age composition, 143 adult steelhead and 5,082 juvenile steelhead scale samples were collected. At the time of this report, 114 adult and 1,642 juvenile samples have been aged. Project personnel collected genetic samples from 122 adults and 839 juveniles. We sent 678 genetic samples to the IDFG Eagle Fish Genetics Laboratory for analysis. Water temperature was recorded at 37 locations in the Clearwater and Salmon river drainages.

  1. Idaho Supplementation Studies : 1993 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Leitzinger, Eric J.; Plaster, Kurtis; Hassemer, Peter

    1996-12-01

    Idaho Supplementation Studies (ISS) will help determine the utility of supplementation as a potential recovery tool for decimated stocks of spring and summer chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, in Idaho as part of a program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of hydroelectric power plants on the Columbia River. The objectives are to: (1) monitor and evaluate the effects of supplementation on presmolt and smolt numbers and spawning escapements of naturally produced salmon; (2) monitor and evaluate changes in natural productivity and genetic composition of target and adjacent populations following supplementation; and (3) determine which supplementation strategies provide the quickest and highest response in natural production without adverse effects on productivity. Field work began in 1991 with the collection of baseline data from treatment and some control streams. Full implementation began in 1992 with baseline data collection on treatment and control streams and releases of supplementation fish into several treatment streams. Field methods included snorkeling to estimate chinook salmon parr populations, PIT tagging summer parr to estimate parr-to-smolt survival, multiple redd counts to estimate spawning escapement and collect carcass information. Screw traps were used to trap and PIT tag outmigrating chinook salmon during the spring and fall outmigration. Weirs were used to trap and enumerate returning adult salmon in select drainages.

  2. Acanthocephalan fish parasites (Rhadinorhynchidae Lühe, 1912) as potential biomarkers: Molecular-chemical screening by pyrolysis-field ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinertz, S.; Eckhardt, K.-U.; Theisen, S.; Palm, H. W.; Leinweber, P.

    2016-07-01

    The present study represents the first molecular-chemical screening by pyrolysis-field ionization mass spectrometry applied on fish parasites. A total of 71 fishes from Balinese fish markets, 36 Auxis rochei (Risso, 1810) and 35 A. thazard (Lacepède, 1800), were studied for their acanthocephalan parasites. This is the first record of Rhadinorhynchus zhukovi in Balinese waters, Indonesia, and we describe for the first time A. rochei and A. thazard as R. zhukovi hosts. Using this method, small scale variations within the chemical compounds of acanthocephalans could be detected. Using this methodology it will be possible to generate additional, pollutant specific information from aquatic habitats in future with the potential of a new bioindicator application for parasite/host origin and/or environmental pollution.

  3. Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-103) - Install Fish Screens to Protect ESA Listed Steelhead and Bull Trout in the Walla Walla Basin – Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Shannon C.

    2003-06-11

    Proposed Action: Install Fish Screens to Protect ESA Listed Steelhead and Bull Trout in the Walla Walla Basin – Phase II Minor Diversion Screen Installations. BPA is proposing to provide cost share for a program that will protect ESA-listed salmonid species in the Walla Walla River Basin through the installation of state and federally approved fish screen on over 300 water diversions in the Walla Walla River Basin. This program will involve a wide variety of projects including the installation of screens for both pump and gravity fed surface water diversions. This project will be implemented in conjunction with the Walla Walla County Conservation District, Columbia County Conservation District, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Walla Walla Community College, Washington Department of Ecology, and local irrigators. ESA-listed steelhead and bull trout are presently at risk in the Walla Walla Basin as a result of a combination of factors that primarily involve insufficient flow, extensive habitat degradation, and mortality from surface water diversions. Unscreened or improperly screened diversions can damage fish scaling and induce stress, both of which can be lethal. They are also known to cause migration delays and increased predation; impinge fish against screen surfaces; or, in cases where screen mesh size is too large, allow juvenile fish to be drawn directly into functioning irrigation systems resulting in direct mortality. The goal of this project is to eliminate imminent mortality risks to ESA-listed fish arising from inadequate irrigation diversions in the Walla Walla Basin by upgrading screens to current state and federal juvenile fish screen standards.

  4. Idaho Habitat/Natural Production Monitoring Part I, 1994 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Hall-Griswold, Judy A.; Leitzinger, Eric J.; Petrosky, C.E. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID

    1995-11-01

    A total of 333 stream sections were sampled in 1994 to monitor in chinook salmon and steelhead trout parr populations in Idaho. Percent carry capacity and density estimates were summarized by different classes of fish: wild A-run steelhead trout, wild B-run steelhead trout, natural A-run steelhead trout, natural B-run steelhead trout, wild spring and summer chinook salmon. These data were also summarized by cells and subbasins as defined in Idaho Department of Fish and Game`s 1992-1996 Anadromous Fish Management Plan.

  5. SELKIRK ROADLESS AREA, IDAHO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Fred K.; Benham, John R.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of mineral-resource surveys the Selkirk Roadless Area, Idaho has little promise for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources. Molybdenum, lead, uranium, thorium, chromium, tungsten, zirconium, and several rare-earth elements have been detected in panned concentrates from samples of stream sediment, but no minerals containing the first five elements were found in place, nor were any conditions conducive to their concentration found. Zirconium, thorium, and the rare earths occur in sparsely disseminated accessory minerals in granitic rocks and no resource potential is identified. There is no history of mining in the roadless area and there are no oil, gas, mineral, or geothermal leases or current claims.

  6. Alternatives to in vivo tests to detect endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in fish and amphibians--screening for estrogen, androgen and thyroid hormone disruption.

    PubMed

    Scholz, S; Renner, P; Belanger, S E; Busquet, F; Davi, R; Demeneix, B A; Denny, J S; Léonard, M; McMaster, M E; Villeneuve, D L; Embry, M R

    2013-01-01

    Endocrine disruption is considered a highly relevant hazard for environmental risk assessment of chemicals, plant protection products, biocides and pharmaceuticals. Therefore, screening tests with a focus on interference with estrogen, androgen, and thyroid hormone pathways in fish and amphibians have been developed. However, they use a large number of animals and short-term alternatives to animal tests would be advantageous. Therefore, the status of alternative assays for endocrine disruption in fish and frogs was assessed by a detailed literature analysis. The aim was to (i) determine the strengths and limitations of alternative assays and (ii) present conclusions regarding chemical specificity, sensitivity, and correlation with in vivo data. Data from 1995 to present were collected related to the detection/testing of estrogen-, androgen-, and thyroid-active chemicals in the following test systems: cell lines, primary cells, fish/frog embryos, yeast and cell-free systems. The review shows that the majority of alternative assays measure effects directly mediated by receptor binding or resulting from interference with hormone synthesis. Other mechanisms were rarely analysed. A database was established and used for a quantitative and comparative analysis. For example, a high correlation was observed between cell-free ligand binding and cell-based reporter cell assays, between fish and frog estrogenic data and between fish embryo tests and in vivo reproductive effects. It was concluded that there is a need for a more systematic study of the predictive capacity of alternative tests and ways to reduce inter- and intra-assay variability.

  7. 78 FR 23522 - Idaho Roadless Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-19

    ..., Roland Point, Wonderful Peak Idaho Roadless Areas on the Idaho Panhandle National Forests to reflect... had been inappropriately shown as only located on the Idaho Panhandle National Forest instead of split between the Idaho Panhandle and Kootenai National Forests. For purposes of this request for......

  8. Revisions of the Fish Invasiveness Screening Kit (FISK) for its application in warmer climatic zones, with particular reference to peninsular Florida.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Larry L; Hill, Jeffrey E; Vilizzi, Lorenzo; Hardin, Scott; Copp, Gordon H

    2013-08-01

    The initial version (v1) of the Fish Invasiveness Scoring Kit (FISK) was adapted from the Weed Risk Assessment of Pheloung, Williams, and Halloy to assess the potential invasiveness of nonnative freshwater fishes in the United Kingdom. Published applications of FISK v1 have been primarily in temperate-zone countries (Belgium, Belarus, and Japan), so the specificity of this screening tool to that climatic zone was not noted until attempts were made to apply it in peninsular Florida. To remedy this shortcoming, the questions and guidance notes of FISK v1 were reviewed and revised to improve clarity and extend its applicability to broader climatic regions, resulting in changes to 36 of the 49 questions. In addition, upgrades were made to the software architecture of FISK to improve overall computational speed as well as graphical user interface flexibility and friendliness. We demonstrate the process of screening a fish species using FISK v2 in a realistic management scenario by assessing the Barcoo grunter Scortum barcoo (Terapontidae), a species whose management concerns are related to its potential use for aquaponics in Florida. The FISK v2 screening of Barcoo grunter placed the species into the lower range of medium risk (score = 5), suggesting it is a permissible species for use in Florida under current nonnative species regulations. Screening of the Barcoo grunter illustrates the usefulness of FISK v2 as a proactive tool serving to inform risk management decisions, but the low level of confidence associated with the assessment highlighted a dearth of critical information on this species.

  9. Solidification of floating organic drop liquid-phase microextraction cell fishing with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for screening bioactive components from Amomum villosum Lour.

    PubMed

    Xue, Xue; Yang, Depo; Wang, Dongmei; Xu, Xinjun; Zhu, Longping; Zhao, Zhimin

    2015-04-01

    In this study, a novel solidification of floating organic drop liquid-phase microextraction cell fishing with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SFOD-LPME-CF-GC-MS) method was established and used to screen, isolate and analyze bioactive components from Amomum villosum Lour. extract. Through comparision of its effect on the models of normal cell and inflammatory cells, anti-inflammatory active components of essential oil from A. villosum Lour. were readily screened, and the components obtained are in agreement with related pharmacological articles. SFOD-LPME-CF-GC-MS was used to analyze the interaction of A. villosum Lour. extracts with normal and lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophage cells. The effect of A. villosum Lour. essential oil extracts in the LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 model were also assessed in terms of cytotoxicity and nitric oxide production as an indication of bioactivity. Three potentially bioactive components were identified, demonstrating that SFOD-LPME-CF-GC-MS can be used successfully in the drug-screening process. This approach avoids the requirement for protein precipitation, but more importantly, generates a high concentration ratio, allowing analysis of trace components in traditional Chinese medicines. SFOD-LPME-CF-GC-MS is a simple, fast, effective and reliable method for the screening and analysis of bioactive components, and it can be extended to screen other bioactive components from TCMs.

  10. Effectiveness of FISK, an invasiveness screening tool for non-native freshwater fishes, to perform risk identification assessments in the Iberian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Almeida, David; Ribeiro, Filipe; Leunda, Pedro M; Vilizzi, Lorenzo; Copp, Gordon H

    2013-08-01

    Risk assessments are crucial for identifying and mitigating impacts from biological invasions. The Fish Invasiveness Scoring Kit (FISK) is a risk identification (screening) tool for freshwater fishes consisting of two subject areas: biogeography/history and biology/ecology. According to the outcomes, species can be classified under particular risk categories. The aim of this study was to apply FISK to the Iberian Peninsula, a Mediterranean climate region highly important for freshwater fish conservation due to a high level of endemism. In total, 89 fish species were assessed by three independent assessors. Results from receiver operating characteristic analysis showed that FISK can discriminate reliably between noninvasive and invasive fishes for Iberia, with a threshold of 20.25, similar to those obtained in several regions around the world. Based on mean scores, no species was categorized as "low risk," 50 species as "medium risk," 17 as "moderately high risk," 11 as "high risk," and 11 as "very high risk." The highest scoring species was goldfish Carassius auratus. Mean certainty in response was above the category "mostly certain," ranging from tinfoil barb Barbonymus schwanenfeldii with the lowest certainty to eastern mosquitofish Gambusia holbrooki with the highest level. Pair-wise comparison showed significant differences between one assessor and the other two on mean certainty, with these two assessors showing a high coincidence rate for the species categorization. Overall, the results suggest that FISK is a useful and viable tool for assessing risks posed by non-native fish in the Iberian Peninsula and contributes to a "watch list" in this region.

  11. Vitellogenin synthesis in primary cultures of fish liver cells as endpoint for in vitro screening of the (anti)estrogenic activity of chemical substances.

    PubMed

    Navas, José M; Segner, Helmut

    2006-10-25

    Concern over possible adverse effects of endocrine-disrupting compounds on fish has caused the development of appropriate testing methods. In vitro screening assays may provide initial information on endocrine activities of a test compound and thereby may direct and optimize subsequent testing. Induction of vitellogenin (VTG) is used as a biomarker of exposure of fish to estrogen-active substances. Since VTG induction can be measured not only in vivo but also in fish hepatocytes in vitro, the use of VTG induction response in isolated fish liver cells has been suggested as in vitro screen for identifying estrogenic-active substances. The main advantages of the hepatocyte VTG assay are considered its ability to detect effects of estrogenic metabolites, since hepatocytes in vitro remain metabolically competent, and its ability to detect both estrogenic and anti-estrogenic effects. In this article, we critically review the current knowledge on the VTG response of cultured fish hepatocytes to (anti)estrogenic substances. In particular, we discuss the sensitivity, specificity, and variability of the VTG hepatocyte assay. In addition, we review the available data on culture factors influencing basal and induced VTG production, the response to natural and synthetic estrogens as well as to xenoestrogens, the detection of indirect estrogens, and the sources of assay variability. The VTG induction in cultured fish hepatocytes is clearly influenced by culture conditions (medium composition, temperature, etc.) and culture system (hepatocyte monolayers, aggregates, liver slices, etc.). The currently available database on estrogen-mediated VTG induction in cultured teleost hepatocytes is too small to support conclusive statements on whether there exist systematic differences of the VTG response between in vitro culture systems, VTG analytical methods or fish species. The VTG hepatocyte assay detects sensitively natural and synthetic estrogens, whereas the response to

  12. Idaho Habitat and Natural Production Monitoring : Annual Report 1989.

    SciTech Connect

    Kiefer, Russell B.; Forster, Katharine A.

    1991-01-01

    Project 83-7 was established under the Northwest Power Planning Council's 1982 Fish and Wildlife Program to monitor natural production of anadromous fish, evaluate Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) habitat improvement projects, and develop a credit record for off-site mitigation projects in Idaho. Project 83-7 is divided into two subprojects: general and intensive monitoring. Primary objectives of the general monitoring subproject (Part 1) are to determine natural production increases due to habitat improvement projects in terms of parr production and to determine natural production status and trends in Idaho. The second objective is accomplished by combining parr density data from monitoring and evaluation of BPA habitat projects and from other Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) management and research activities. Primary objectives of the intensive monitoring subproject (Part 2) are to determine the number of returning chinook and steelhead adults necessary to achieve optimal smolt production and to develop mitigation accounting based on increases in smolt production. Two locations are being intensively studied to meet these objectives. Field work began in 1987 in the upper Salmon River and Crooked River (South Fork Clearwater River tributary). 22 refs., 10 figs., 17 tabs.

  13. Distributed Wind Energy in Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, John; Johnson, Kathryn; Haynes, Todd; Seifert, Gary

    2009-01-31

    This project is a research and development program aimed at furthering distributed wind technology. In particular, this project addresses some of the barriers to distributed wind energy utilization in Idaho.

  14. Application of FISK, an invasiveness screening tool for non-native freshwater fishes, in the Murray-Darling Basin (southeastern Australia).

    PubMed

    Vilizzi, Lorenzo; Copp, Gordon H

    2013-08-01

    The Fish Invasiveness Scoring Kit (FISK) is currently one of the most popular pre-screening tools for freshwater fishes. A recent upgrade has ensured its wider climatic relevance to countries with subtropical regions. This enhancement is of particular importance to Australia, which encompasses tropical, arid, and temperate zones, and where the introduction of non-native fish species poses a significant risk to biodiversity. In this study, 55 fish species previously evaluated in a U.K.-based calibration of FISK are reassessed for their potential invasiveness in the Murray-Darling Basin (MDB; southeastern Australia), the continent's largest catchment encompassing arid and temperate climates. Approximately half of the species were classed as "medium risk" and the other half as "high risk," and the ≥19 threshold previously identified from the calibration study was confirmed. The three highest scoring species (common carp Cyprinus carpio carpio, goldfish Carassius auratus, and eastern mosquitofish Gambusia holbrooki) were those already present and invasive in the area, whereas nearly half of the tropical and subtropical species had lower scores compared to U.K. assessments, possibly because of climate change predictions of drier conditions across the MDB. There were some discordances between FISK and two Australian-based assessment protocols, one of which is qualitative and the other represents a simplified version of FISK. Notably, the Australian origins of FISK should provide for an additional reason for further applications of the tool in other RA areas (i.e., drainage basins) of the continent, ultimately encouraging adoption as the country's reference screening tool for management and conservation purposes.

  15. Late Ordovician paleogeography of central Idaho and its tectonic implications

    SciTech Connect

    Measures, E.A. )

    1991-02-01

    The Late Ordovician (Cincinnatian, Ashgill) paleogeography of central Idaho has been weakly constrained in the past. Previously, this area was treated as a simple extension of the miogeocline-eugeocline paleogeography defined from units in the Great Basin (Nevada and Utah). Detailed analysis of the Upper Ordovician Fish Haven Dolomite enables a more refined paleogeographic interpretation to be made at this time. The Fish Haven Dolomite (260 m or 800 ft, average thickness) of central Idaho is composed of 16 different carbonate facies which can be grouped into three sequences; facies within each sequence are depositionally related. Overall, the facies and sequences indicate that a carbonate ramp formed in central Idaho outboard of the craton and a hinge zone, within a subsiding area of the miogeocline. Shallow subtidal ramp deposits were probably deposited in approximately 30 m (100 ft.), or less, of water depth. During this time interval, open ocean, anoxic bottom waters extended up into deep ;subtidal regions (60 m or 200 ft). This information indicates that the Late Ordovician carbonate ramp underwent backstepping at its outermost portion resulting n drowning of the western ramp and eventual migration of transitional facies deposits (Roberts Mountains Formation) over miogeoclinal deposits. Tectonics played an active part in the deposition of the Fish Haven Dolomite in the miogeocline of central Idaho. The ultimate cause of the tectonism is not known at this time, but could be related to changes in the rate of sea-floor spreading, active structures within the continental margin, proximity of the Ordovician Klamath Mountains island arc Terrane, or unknown processes.

  16. 59 FR- Draft Environmental Impact Statement, Idaho; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1994-02-09

    ... Owyhee County, Idaho. Under ``Action,'' change Elmore County, Idaho, to Owyhee County, Idaho. On page 65972, first column after the legal description, change Elmore County, Idaho, to Owyhee County,...

  17. Modeling the response of native steelhead to hatchery supplementation programs in an Idaho River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byrne, Alan; Bjornn, T.C.; McIntyre, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    A life history model was used to predict the response of native steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss in the Lochsa River, Idaho, to long-term supplementation with hatchery fry and smolts. The four key factors affecting the response of the native fish to a stocking program were (1) the number of native spawners, (2) the number of stocked fish, (3) the number and fitness of progeny from stocked fish, and (4) the amount of mating between hatchery and native fish. Long-term stocking of fry or smolts led to the extinction of native fish in some scenarios. The model can be used to help assess the risks and benefits of proposed stocking programs.

  18. Water information bulletin No. 30 geothermal investigations in Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, J.C.; Johnson, L.L.; Anderson, J.E.; Spencer, S.G.; Sullivan, J.F.

    1980-06-01

    There are 899 thermal water occurrences known in Idaho, including 258 springs and 641 wells having temperatures ranging from 20 to 93/sup 0/C. Fifty-one cities or towns in Idaho containing 30% of the state's population are within 5 km of known geothermal springs or wells. These include several of Idaho's major cities such as Lewiston, Caldwell, Nampa, Boise, Twin Falls, Pocatello, and Idaho Falls. Fourteen sites appear to have subsurface temperatures of 140/sup 0/C or higher according to the several chemical geothermometers applied to thermal water discharges. These include Weiser, Big Creek, White Licks, Vulcan, Roystone, Bonneville, Crane Creek, Cove Creek, Indian Creek, and Deer Creek hot springs, and Raft River, Preston, and Magic Reservoir areas. These sites could be industrial sites, but several are in remote areas away from major transportation and, therefore, would probably be best utilized for electrical power generation using the binary cycle or Magma Max process. Present uses range from space heating to power generation. Six areas are known where commercial greenhouse operations are conducted for growing cut and potted flowers and vegetables. Space heating is substantial in only two places (Boise and Ketchum) although numerous individuals scattered throughout the state make use of thermal water for space heating and private swimming facilities. There are 22 operating resorts using thermal water and two commercial warm-water fish-rearing operations.

  19. SAWTOOTH WILDERNESS, IDAHO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kiilsgaard, Thor H.; Coffman, Joseph S.

    1984-01-01

    The Sawtooth Wilderness in Idaho consists of the former Sawtooth Primitive Area and certain contiguous tracts of land. A survey of the mineral-resource potential of the entire area disclosed hydrothermally altered and mineralized rocks at several localities, some of which have been prospected to a limited extent but none of which have produced significant quantities of ore. Sediment samples from many of the streams that drain the wilderness contained anomalous quantities of metals. At some sample sites the source of the anomalous concentrations of metals may be related to known mineralized out-crops but the source at many of the sites is unknown. The significant geochemical data, the extent of altered and mineralized rocks, and the proximity to other productive mineral districts in similar geologic environs indicate that substantial parts of the wilderness have probable mineral-resource potential. A placer deposit, in the northern part of the wilderness, has substantiated potential for rare-earth elements; an area in the southern part of the wilderness has substantiated potential for precious metals; and several mines in the wilderness have demonstrated resources of base and precious metals. The geologic setting precludes the presence of fossil fuels.

  20. Contaminant Monitoring Strategy for Henrys Lake, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    John S. Irving; R. P. Breckenridge

    1992-12-01

    Henrys Lake, located in southeastern Idaho, is a large, shallow lake (6,600 acres, {approx} 17.1 feet maximum depth) located at 6,472 feet elevation in Fremont Co., Idaho at the headwaters of the Henrys Fork of the Snake River. The upper watershed is comprised of high mountains of the Targhee National Forest and the lakeshore is surrounded by extensive flats and wetlands, which are mostly privately owned. The lake has been dammed since 1922, and the upper 12 feet of the lake waters are allocated for downriver use. Henrys Lake is a naturally productive lake supporting a nationally recognized ''Blue Ribbon'' trout fishery. There is concern that increasing housing development and cattle grazing may accelerate eutrophication and result in winter and early spring fish kills. There has not been a recent thorough assessment of lake water quality. However, the Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) is currently conducting a study of water quality on Henrys Lake and tributary streams. Septic systems and lawn runoff from housing developments on the north, west, and southwest shores could potentially contribute to the nutrient enrichment of the lake. Many houses are on steep hillsides where runoff from lawns, driveways, etc. drain into wetland flats along the lake or directly into the lake. In addition, seepage from septic systems (drainfields) drain directly into the wetlands enter groundwater areas that seep into the lake. Cattle grazing along the lake margin, riparian areas, and uplands is likely accelerating erosion and nutrient enrichment. Also, cattle grazing along riparian areas likely adds to nutrient enrichment of the lake through subsurface flow and direct runoff. Stream bank and lakeshore erosion may also accelerate eutrophication by increasing the sedimentation of the lake. Approximately nine streams feed the lake (see map), but flows are often severely reduced or completely eliminated due to irrigation diversion. In addition, subsurface flows can occur as a

  1. Wide-Scope Screening Method for Multiclass Veterinary Drug Residues in Fish, Shrimp, and Eel Using Liquid Chromatography-Quadrupole High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Turnipseed, Sherri B; Storey, Joseph M; Lohne, Jack J; Andersen, Wendy C; Burger, Robert; Johnson, Aaron S; Madson, Mark R

    2017-01-13

    A screening method for veterinary drug residues in fish, shrimp, and eel using LC with a high-resolution MS instrument has been developed and validated. The method was optimized for over 70 test compounds representing a variety of veterinary drug classes. Tissues were extracted by vortex mixing with acetonitrile acidified with 2% acetic acid and 0.2% p-toluenesulfonic acid. A centrifuged portion of the extract was passed through a novel solid phase extraction cartridge designed to remove interfering matrix components from tissue extracts. The eluent was then evaporated and reconstituted for analysis. Data were collected with a quadrupole-Orbitrap high-resolution mass spectrometer using both nontargeted and targeted acquisition methods. Residues were detected on the basis of the exact mass of the precursor and a product ion along with isotope pattern and retention time matching. Semiquantitative data analysis compared MS(1) signal to a one-point extracted matrix standard at a target testing level. The test compounds were detected and identified in salmon, tilapia, catfish, shrimp, and eel extracts fortified at the target testing levels. Fish dosed with selected analytes and aquaculture samples previously found to contain residues were also analyzed. The screening method can be expanded to monitor for an additional >260 veterinary drugs on the basis of exact mass measurements and retention times.

  2. 77 FR 41168 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Take of Anadromous Fish

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-12

    ... Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of the potential effects of two direct take permits for hatchery operations in... Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), Idaho Department of Fish and Game, and the Bureau...

  3. Idaho Habitat/Natural Production Monitoring Part I, 1995 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Hall-Griswold, J.A.; Petrosky, C.E.

    1996-12-01

    The Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) has been monitoring trends in juvenile spring and summer chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, and steelhead trout, O. mykiss, populations in the Salmon, Clearwater, and lower Snake River drainages for the past 12 years. This work is the result of a program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of hydroelectric power plants on the Columbia River. Project 91-73, Idaho Natural Production Monitoring, consists of two subprojects: General Monitoring and Intensive Monitoring. This report updates and summarizes data through 1995 for the General Parr Monitoring (GPM) database to document status and trends of classes of wild and natural chinook salmon and steelhead trout populations. A total of 281 stream sections were sampled in 1995 to monitor trends in spring and summer chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and steelhead trout O. mykiss parr populations in Idaho. Percent carrying capacity and density estimates were summarized for 1985--1995 by different classes of fish: wild A-run steelhead trout, wild B-run steelhead trout, natural A-run steelhead trout, natural B-run steelhead trout, wild spring and summer chinook salmon, and natural spring and summer chinook salmon. The 1995 data were also summarized by subbasins as defined in Idaho Department of Fish and Game`s 1992--1996 Anadromous Fish Management Plan.

  4. 78 FR 76317 - Llano Seco Riparian Sanctuary Unit Restoration and Pumping Plant/Fish Screen Facility Protection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-17

    ... that is south of the revetment has eroded approximately 600 feet. The erosion on refuge property is...-screening efficiency of the new PCGID-PID pumping plant is now endangered by the bank erosion on the...

  5. Evaluation of automated direct sample introduction with comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry for the screening analysis of dioxins in fish oil.

    PubMed

    Hoh, Eunha; Lehotay, Steven J; Mastovska, Katerina; Huwe, Janice K

    2008-08-01

    An automated direct sample introduction technique coupled to comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry (DSI-GC x GC/TOF-MS) was applied for the development of a relatively fast and easy analytical screening method for 17 polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) and 4 non-ortho polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in fish oil. Comparison of instrumental performance between DSI-GC x GC/TOF-MS and the traditional gas chromatographic high resolution mass spectrometric (GC-HRMS) method showed good agreement of results for standard solutions analyzed in blind fashion. Relatively high tolerance of the DSI technique for lipids in the final extracts enabled a streamlined sample preparation procedure that only required gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and solid-phase extraction (SPE) cleanup with graphitized carbon black. The sample size for the method was 2g of cod liver oil, which achieved limits of quantitation (LOQs) of 0.019-7.8 pg/g toxic equivalent quotients for the individual PCDD/Fs. Lower detection limits can be achieved by using larger sample size and scaling up the sample preparation procedure, but this adds to the labor, time, solvent consumption, and expense of the approach. However, the streamlined method yielded 0.94 pg/g and 2.3 pg/g LOQs for 2,3,7,8-tetrachloro dibenzofuran (TCDF) and 3,3',4,4',5-pentachloro biphenyl (CB126), which were sufficiently low for regulatory monitoring of 2g samples. Therefore, instead of congener specific analysis, this streamlined analytical screening method for TCDF and CB126 has the potential to monitor fish oil contaminated with dioxin and dioxin-like PCBs at or above current food safety limits. Acceptable recoveries for nearly all analytes at three different spiking levels in fish oil samples were achieved with good repeatability.

  6. A screening-level assessment of lead, cadmium, and zinc in fish and crayfish from northeastern Oklahoma, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmitt, C.J.; Brumbaugh, W.G.; Linder, G.L.; Hinck, J.E.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate potential human and ecological risks associated with metals in fish and crayfish from mining in the Tri-States Mining District (TSMD). Crayfish (Orconectes spp.) and fish of six frequently consumed species (common carp, Cyprinus carpio; channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus; flathead catfish, Pylodictis olivaris; largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides; spotted bass, M. punctulatus; and white crappie, Pomoxis annularis) were collected in 2001-2002 from the Oklahoma waters of the Spring River (SR) and Neosho River (NR), which drain the TSMD. Samples from a mining-contaminated site in eastern Missouri and from reference sites were also analyzed. Individual fish were prepared for human consumption in the manner used locally by Native Americans (headed, eviscerated, and scaled) and analyzed for lead, cadmium, and zinc. Whole crayfish were analyzed as composite samples of 5-60 animals. Metals concentrations were typically higher in samples from sites most heavily affected by mining and lowest in reference samples. Within the TSMD, most metals concentrations were higher at sites on the SR than on the NR and were typically highest in common carp and crayfish than in other taxa. Higher concentrations and greater risk were associated with fish and crayfish from heavily contaminated SR tributaries than the SR or NR mainstems. Based on the results of this and previous studies, the human consumption of carp and crayfish could be restricted based on current criteria for lead, cadmium, and zinc, and the consumption of channel catfish could be restricted due to lead. Metals concentrations were uniformly low in Micropterus spp. and crappie and would not warrant restriction, however. Some risk to carnivorous avian wildlife from lead and zinc in TSMD fish and invertebrates was also indicated, as was risk to the fish themselves. Overall, the wildlife assessment is consistent with previously reported biological effects attributed to metals

  7. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry screening methods for select UV filters, synthetic musks, alkylphenols, an antimicrobial agent, and an insect repellent in fish.

    PubMed

    Mottaleb, Mohammad A; Usenko, Sascha; O'Donnell, John G; Ramirez, Alejandro J; Brooks, Bryan W; Chambliss, C Kevin

    2009-01-30

    Two screening methods have been developed for simultaneous determination of ten extensively used personal care products (PCPs) and two alkylphenol surfactants in fish. The methods consisted of extraction, clean-up, derivatization and analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with selected ion monitoring (GC-SIM-MS) or gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) techniques. Among solvents tested to assess recovery of target compounds from 1-g tissue homogenates, acetone was selected as optimal for extracting compounds with dissimilar physicochemical properties from fish tissue. Initial experiments confirmed that GC-SIM-MS could be applied for analysis of lean fillet tissue (<1% lipid) without gel-permeation chromatography (GPC), and this approach was applied to assess the presence of target analytes in fish fillets collected from a regional effluent-dominated stream in Texas, USA. Benzophenone, galaxolide, tonalide, and triclosan were detected in 11 of 11 environmental samples at concentrations ranging from; 37 to 90, 234 to 970, 26 to 97, and 17 to 31 ng/g, respectively. However, performance of this analytical approach declined appreciably with increasing lipid content of analyzed tissues. Successful analysis of samples with increased lipid content was enabled by adding GPC to the sample preparation protocol and monitoring analytes with tandem mass spectrometry. Both analytical approaches were validated using fortified fillet tissue collected from locations expected to be minimally impacted by anthropogenic influences. Average analyte recoveries ranged from 87% to 114% with RSDs <11% and from 54% to 107% with RSDs <20% for fish tissue containing <1% and 4.9% lipid, respectively. Statistically derived method detection limits (MDLs) for GC-SIM-MS and GC-MS/MS methodologies ranged from 2.4 to 16 ng/g, and 5.1 to 397 ng/g, respectively.

  8. Analysis of Idaho fire service education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Walter O.

    1999-01-01

    Becoming a career fire fighter in the state of Idaho requires specialized knowledge and training. Fire science education at Idaho colleges and universities is available only to people who are affiliated with a fire department. Law enforcement curriculum, on the other hand, is available to any interested persons. A student in law enforcement can attend the Police Officers Standards and Training (POST) academy or participate in classes in one of Idaho's institutions for higher education. There are no fire academies in Idaho. Applicants wanting to become professional fire fighters in Idaho are required to compete with applicants from other states; many of whom have had prior fire education and training. Resident Idaho fire fighter applicants are at a disadvantage when applying for Idaho fire fighting positions. Because of this apparent need, I surveyed the Idaho fire chiefs, using a research instrument I developed in a graduate field research class. I wrote the research instrument to determine the educational needs of the Idaho fire service. The College of Southern Idaho (CSI) and the Idaho Fire Chiefs Association (IFCA) were the recipients of this survey. This report, Analysis of Idaho Fire Service Education, describes that research process from beginning to end.

  9. Idaho`s 1990 fuelwood harvest. Forest Service resource bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    McLain, W.H.

    1996-02-01

    Highlights the 1990 harvest of fuelwood in Idaho by commercial fuelwood harvesters and those cutting for home consumption. Presents harvest volumes by species, county, and owner. Lists a directory of commercial fuelwood harvesters and describes the methods of data collection and compilation.

  10. Idaho Supplementation Studies : 1994 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Nemeth, Doug; Plaster, Kurtis; Apperson, Kimberly A.

    1996-11-01

    This work was the result of a program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of hydroelectric power plants on the Columbia River. Adult and jack chinook salmon escapement were indexed by redd counts and weir returns. Escapement in 1994 was low and in some cases approached the lowest on record. Although stream flow conditions and parr abundance were conducive to precise parr population estimates, some streams continued to exhibit wide confidence intervals. Different methods used to calculate the estimates yielded inconsistent results with regard to increasing or decreasing the population estimate and improving the precision of the estimates. No single method appeared definitively better for all streams. Emigrant traps captured 78,138 chinook salmon fry, parr, and smolts in 1994. Application of a weekly trap efficiency adjusted for stream flow produced emigration estimates that were up to 30% larger than when a seasonal trap efficiency was used. Detection rates for smolts tagged in some streams were similar to detection rates for parr tagged during the fall of the previous year. This was unexpected because overwinter mortality usually results in a lower detection rate for fall-tagged fish. Low escapement in 1994 severely hampered Idaho Supplementation Studies (ISS) broodstock development. The inability to develop local broodstocks for supplementation is the most important factor threatening the implementation of the ISS.

  11. Idaho Habitat Evaluation for Offsite Mitigation Record : Annual Report FY 1984.

    SciTech Connect

    Petrosky, Charles Edward; Holubetz, Terry

    1985-06-01

    An evaluation of existing and proposed habitat improvement projects for anadromous fish in the Clearwater River and Salmon River drainages was conducted. The Clearwater River and Salmon River drainages account for virtually all of Idaho's wild and natural production of summer steelhead and spring and summer chinook salmon, as well as a remnant run of sockeye salmon. Habitat enhancement projects are intended to either increase the amount of habitat, or increase the carrying capacity of existing (usually, degraded) habitat, or both. Migration barriers, such as waterfalls, culverts, and water diversions, can be modified to make available habitat that is not being used, or is underutilized, by anadromous fish. The objectives of this evaluation are: (1) document physical changes in habitat; (2) measure changes in steelhead and chinook production attributable to habitat enhancement projects; (3) measure changes in standing crops of resident fish species due to enhancement; and (4) determine project effectiveness, including relative costs and benefits, to establish the record of credit for mitigation and to guide future management actions. It was not possible to define the level of enhancement for any BPA project in 1984. Evaluations for all projects except three were in the pre-treatment phase during 1984. Because full benefits cannot be defined at current low seeding levels, projects must be monitored until full-seeding is approached. We obtained post-treatment information for three projects in 1984: Lolo Creek instream structures; upper Lochsa River instream structures; and screening of the irrigation diversion on Pole Creek. Of the three, only the Lolo Creek project exhibited any apparent benefits; these apparent benefits were not conclusively determined in 1984. The Lolo Creek project requires a follow-up evaluation in 1985. The Pole Creek project requires better passage for adult chinook at the irrigation diversion. 36 refs., 71 figs., 50 tabs. (ACR)

  12. Idaho Driver Education Administrative Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho State Dept. of Education, Boise.

    This guide provides information for school administrators and directors of commercial driver training schools about conducting driver education courses in Idaho. The first part of the guide, which applies to both public schools and commercial schools, covers the following areas: administration, sample letters and forms, instructional time…

  13. Multi-residue screening of veterinary drugs in egg, fish and meat using high-resolution liquid chromatography accurate mass time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Peters, R J B; Bolck, Y J C; Rutgers, P; Stolker, A A M; Nielen, M W F

    2009-11-13

    The last 2 years multi-compound methods are gaining ground as screening methods. In this study a high-resolution liquid chromatography combined with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HRLC-ToF-MS) is tested for the screening of about 100 veterinary drugs in three matrices, meat, fish and egg. While the results are satisfactory for 70-90% of the veterinary drugs, a more efficient sample preparation or extract purification is required for quantitative analysis of all analytes in more difficult matrices like egg. The average mass measurement error of the ToF-MS for the veterinary drugs spiked at concentrations ranging from 4 to 400 microg/kg, is 3.0 ppm (median 2.5 ppm) with little difference between the three matrices, but slightly decreases with increasing concentration. The SigmaFit value, a new feature for isotope pattern matching, also decreases with increasing concentration and, in addition, shows an increase with increasing matrix complexity. While the average SigmaFit value is 0.04, the median is 0.01 indicating some high individual deviations. As with the mass measurement error, the highest deviations are found in those regions of the chromatogram where most compounds elute from the column, be it analytes or matrix compounds. The median repeatability of the method ranges from 8% to 15%, decreasing with increasing concentration, while the median reproducibility ranges from 15% to 20% with little difference between matrices and concentrations. The median accuracy is in between 70% and 100% with a few compounds showing higher values due to matrix interference. The squared regression coefficient is >0.99 for 92% of the compounds showing a good overall linearity for most compounds. The detection capability, CCbeta, is within 2 times the associated validation level for >90% of the compounds studied. By changing a few conditions in the analyses protocol and analysing a number of blank samples, it was determined that the method is robust as well as specific. Finally

  14. Geothermal resources of southern Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mabey, Don R.

    1983-01-01

    The geothermal resource of southern Idaho as assessed by the U.S. Geological Survey in 1978 is large. Most of the known hydrothermal systems in southern Idaho have calculated reservoir temperatures of less than 150?C. Water from many of these systems is valuable for direct heat applications, but is lower than the temperature of interest for commercial generation of electricity at the present time. Most of the known and inferred geothermal resources of southern Idaho underlie the Snake River Plain. However, major uncertainties exist concerning the geology and temperatures beneath the plain. By far the largest hydrothermal system in Idaho is in the Bruneau-Grand View area of the western Snake River Plain with a calculated reservoir temperature of 107?C and an energy of 4.5? 10 20 joules. No evidence of higher temperature water associated with this system has been found. Although the geology of the eastern Snake River Plain suggests that a large thermal anomaly may underlie this area of the plain, direct evidence of high temperatures has not been found. Large volumes of water at temperatures between 90? and 150?C probably exist along the margins of the Snake River Plain and in local areas north and south of the plain. Areas that appear particularly promising for the occurrence of large high-temperature hydrothermal systems are: the area north of the Snake River Plain and west of the Idaho batholith, the Island Park area, segments of the margins of the eastern Snake River Plain, and the Blackfoot lava field.

  15. Liquid chromatography with high resolution mass spectrometry for identification of organic contaminants in fish fillet: screening and quantification assessment using two scan modes for data acquisition.

    PubMed

    Munaretto, Juliana S; May, Marília M; Saibt, Nathália; Zanella, Renato

    2016-07-22

    This study proposed a strategy to identify and quantify 182 organic contaminants from different chemical classes, as for instance pesticides, veterinary drug and personal care products, in fish fillet using liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-QToF/MS). For this purpose, two different scan methods (full scan and all ions MS/MS) were evaluated to assess the best option for screening analysis in spiked fish fillet samples. In general, full scan acquisition was found to be more reliable (84%) in the automatic identification and quantification when compared to all ions MS/MS with 72% of the compounds detected. Additionally, a qualitative automatic search showed a mass accuracy error below 5ppm for 77% of the compounds in full scan mode compared to only 52% in all ions MS/MS scan. However, all ions MS/MS provides fragmentation information of the target compounds. Undoubtedly, structural information of a wide number of compounds can be obtained using high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS), but it is necessary thoroughly assess it, in order to choose the best scan mode.

  16. Screening fungicides for use in fish culture: Evaluation of the agar plug transfer, cellophane transfer, and agar dilution methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bailey, Tom A.

    1983-01-01

    The reliability, reproducibility, and usefulness of three screening methods -- the cellophane transfer, the agar plug transfer, and the agar dilution -- to screen aquatic fungicides were evaluated. Achlya flagellata and Saprolegnia hypogyna were exposed to 1, 10, and 100 mg/L of malachite green to test each method. The cellophane transfer and agar plug transfer techniques had similar reliability and reproducibility in rating fungicidal activity, and were both superior to the agar dilution technique. The agar plug transfer and agar dilution techniques adequately projected in vivo activity of malachite green, but the cellophane transfer technique overestimated its activity. Overall, the agar plug transfer technique most accurately rated the activity of malachite green and was the easiest test to perform. It therefore appears to be the method of choice for testing aquatic fungicides.

  17. Rapid screening of tetrodotoxin in urine and plasma of patients with puffer fish poisoning by HPLC with creatinine correction.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chung-Him; Yu, Chun-Fai; Tam, Sidney; Yu, Peter Hoi-Fu

    2010-01-01

    A rapid and simple detection method for tetrodotoxin (TTX) in urine and plasma of patients with puffer fish poisoning was developed using commercially pre-packed solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridges (C18 and weak cation exchange columns) and subsequent analyses by HPLC with UV detection. The detection limit of the standard TTX, TTX-spiked urine and plasma samples were all 10 ng/ml and the average TTX recovery in urine and plasma samples after SPE were 90.3 +/- 4.0 and 87.1 +/- 2.9%, respectively. It was noticed that the creatinine-adjusted urinary TTX levels obtained within the first 24 h of presentation apparently correlated much better with the severity of poisoning than the urinary TTX concentration without adjusting for variations in concomitant creatinine excretion.

  18. Steelhead Supplementation in Idaho Rivers : 2001 Project Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, Alan

    2002-03-01

    In 2001, Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) continued an assessment of the Sawtooth Hatchery steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss stock to reestablish natural populations in Beaver and Frenchman creeks in the upper Salmon River. Crews stocked both streams with 20 pair of hatchery adults, and I estimated the potential smolt production from the 2000 adult outplants. n the Red River drainage, IDFG stocked Dworshak hatchery stock fingerlings and smolts from 1993 to 1999 to assess which life stage produces more progeny when the adults return to spawn. In 2001, IDFG operated the Red River weir to trap adults that returned from these stockings, but none were caught from either group. Wild steelhead populations in the Lochsa and Selway river drainages were assessed and the chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha escapement was enumerated in Fish Creek. I estimated that 75 wild adult steelhead and 122 adult chinook salmon returned to Fish Creek in 2001. I estimated that slightly more than 30,000 juvenile steelhead migrated out of Fish Creek. This is the largest number of steelhead to migrate out of Fish Creek in a single year since I began estimating the yearly migration in 1994. Juvenile steelhead densities in Lochsa and Selway tributaries were somewhat higher in 2001 than those observed in 2000. Crews from IDFG collected over 4,800 fin samples from wild steelhead in 74 streams of the Clearwater, Snake, and Salmon river drainages and from five hatchery stocks during the summer of 2000 for a DNA analysis to assess Idaho's steelhead stock structure. The DNA analysis was subcontracted to Dr. Jennifer Nielsen, Alaska Biological Science Center, Anchorage. Her lab developed protocols to use for the analysis in 2001 and is continuing to analyze the samples. Dr. Nielsen plans to have the complete set of wild and hatchery stocks analyzed in 2002.

  19. Salmon Supplementation Studies in Idaho Rivers; Idaho Supplementation Studies, 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Beasley, Chris; Tabor, R.A.; Kinzer, Ryan

    2003-04-01

    This report summarizes brood year 1999 juvenile production and emigration data and adult return information for 2000 for streams studied by the Nez Perce Tribe for the cooperative Idaho Salmon Supplementation Studies in Idaho Rivers (ISS) project. In order to provide inclusive juvenile data for brood year 1999, we include data on parr, presmolt, smolt and yearling captures. Therefore, our reporting period includes juvenile data collected from April 2000 through June 2001 for parr, presmolts, and smolts and through June 2002 for brood year 1999 yearling emigrants. Data presented in this report include; fish outplant data for treatment streams, snorkel and screw trap estimates of juvenile fish abundance, juvenile emigration profiles, juvenile survival estimates to Lower Granite Dam (LGJ), redd counts, and carcass data. There were no brood year 1999 treatments in Legendary Bear or Fishing Creek. As in previous years, snorkeling methods provided highly variable population estimates. Alternatively, rotary screw traps operated in Lake Creek and the Secesh River provided more precise estimates of juvenile abundance by life history type. Juvenile fish emigration in Lake Creek and the Secesh River peaked during July and August. Juveniles produced in this watershed emigrated primarily at age zero, and apparently reared in downstream habitats before detection as age one or older fish at the Snake and Columbia River dams. Over the course of the ISS study, PIT tag data suggest that smolts typically exhibit the highest relative survival to Lower Granite Dam (LGJ) compared to presmolts and parr, although we observed the opposite trend for brood year 1999 juvenile emigrants from the Secesh River. SURPH2 survival estimates for brood year 1999 Lake Creek parr, presmolt, and smolt PIT tag groups to (LGJ) were 27%, 39%, and 49% respectively, and 14%, 12%, and 5% for the Secesh River. In 2000, we counted 41 redds in Legendary Bear Creek, 4 in Fishing Creek, 5 in Slate Creek, 153 in the

  20. Idaho Senior Center Activities, Activity Participation Level, and Managers' Perceptions of Activity Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Girvan, James T.; Harris, Frances

    A survey completed by managers of 77 senior centers in Idaho revealed that meals, blood pressure screening, and games and trips were the most successful activities offered. Alzheimer's support groups, library books for loan, and exercise classes were the least successful. Possible reasons for the success or failure of these activities were…

  1. Direct solid sample analysis with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry—a fast and reliable screening procedure for the determination of inorganic arsenic in fish and seafood.

    PubMed

    Zmozinski, Ariane V; Llorente-Mirandes, Toni; Damin, Isabel C F; López-Sánchez, José F; Vale, Maria Goreti R; Welz, Bernhard; Silva, Márcia M

    2015-03-01

    Direct solid sample analysis with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (SS-GF AAS) was investigated initially with the intention of developing a method for the determination of total As in fish and other seafood. A mixture of 0.1% Pd+0.06% Mg+0.06% Triton X-100 was used as the chemical modifier, added in solution over the solid samples, making possible the use of pyrolysis and atomization temperatures of 1200 °C and 2400 °C, respectively. The sample mass had to be limited to 0.25 mg, as the integrated absorbance did not increase further with increasing sample mass. Nevertheless, the recovery of As from several certified reference materials was of the order of 50% lower than the certified value. Strong molecular absorption due to the phosphorus monoxide molecule (PO) was observed with high-resolution continuum source AAS (HR CS AAS), which, however, did not cause any spectral interference. A microwave-assisted digestion with HNO3/H2O2 was also investigated to solve the problem; however, the results obtained for several certified reference materials were statistically not different from those found with direct SS-GF AAS. Accurate values were obtained using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to analyze the digested samples, which suggested that organic As compounds are responsible for the low recoveries. HPLC-ICP-MS was used to determine the arsenobetaine (AB) concentration. Accurate results that were not different from the certified values were obtained when the AB concentration was added to the As concentration found by SS-GF AAS for most certified reference materials (CRM) and samples, suggesting that SS-GF AAS could be used as a fast screening procedure for inorganic As determination in fish and seafood.

  2. Planning Study for North Idaho College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Raymond J.

    This three-part, long-range planning study was undertaken to assist North Idaho College (NIC) to more effectively meet the educational needs and interests of youth and adults residing in the five county Panhandle Area of Northern Idaho. Part I discusses NIC and its community; presents the results of a study of the educational plans and attitudes…

  3. 40 CFR 81.410 - Idaho.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Idaho. 81.410 Section 81.410 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF... Visibility Is an Important Value § 81.410 Idaho. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing Federal...

  4. Minerals yearbook, 1990: Idaho. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Minarik, R.J.; Gillerman, V.S.

    1992-09-01

    The 1990 Annual Report is on the Mineral Industry of Idaho. Idaho ranked 26th nationally for total mineral production value compared with 28th in 1989. The State was first in the Nation in antimony and garnet production; second in silver and vandaium production; and third in output of lead, molybdenum, and marketable phosphate rock.

  5. Idaho Higher Education 1995 Fact Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho State Board of Education, Boise.

    This book reports on finances, students, faculty/staff, and intercollegiate athletics at Idaho's institutions of higher education. Most information concerns the state's public four-year colleges and its three universities with selected data on institutions providing vocational education and Idaho's two community colleges. Most of the data come…

  6. Weed hosts Globodera pallida from Idaho

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potato cyst nematode, Globodera pallida (PCN), a restricted pest in the USA, was first reported in Bingham and Bonneville counties of Idaho in 2006. The US government and Idaho State Department of Agriculture hope to eradicate it from infested fields. Eradicating PCN will require depriving the n...

  7. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Idaho, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper profiles the student subgroup achievement and gap trends in Idaho for 2010. Idaho showed improvement in reading and math in grade 8 at the basic, proficient, and advanced levels for Latino and white students, low income students, and boys and girls. The state has also made progress in narrowing achievement gaps between Latino and white…

  8. Idaho Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Overview

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    Idaho National Laboratory has been instrumental in establishing the Idaho Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics initiative -- i-STEM, which brings together industry, educators, government and other partners to provide K-12 teachers with support, materials and opportunities to improve STEM instruction and increase student interest in technical careers. You can learn more about INL's education programs at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  9. Idaho Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Overview

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Idaho National Laboratory has been instrumental in establishing the Idaho Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics initiative -- i-STEM, which brings together industry, educators, government and other partners to provide K-12 teachers with support, materials and opportunities to improve STEM instruction and increase student interest in technical careers. You can learn more about INL's education programs at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  10. Self-reporting bias in Chinook salmon sport fisheries in Idaho: implications for roving creel surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCormick, Joshua L.; Quist, Michael C.; Schill, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Self-reporting bias in sport fisheries of Chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in Idaho was quantified by comparing observed and angler-reported data. A total of 164 observed anglers fished for 541 h and caught 74 Chinook Salmon. Fifty-eight fish were harvested and 16 were released. Anglers reported fishing for 604 h, an overestimate of 63 h. Anglers reported catching 66 fish; four less harvested and four less released fish were reported than observed. A Monte Carlo simulation revealed that when angler-reported data were used, total catch was underestimated by 14–15 fish (19–20%) using the ratio-of-means estimator to calculate mean catch rate. Negative bias was reduced to six fish (8%) when the means-of-ratio estimator was used. Multiple linear regression models to predict reporting bias in time fished had poor predictive value. However, actual time fished and a categorical covariate indicating whether the angler fished continuously during their fishing trip were two variables that were present in all of the top a priori models evaluated. Underreporting of catch and overreporting of time fished by anglers present challenges when managing Chinook Salmon sport fisheries. However, confidence intervals were near target levels and using more liberal definitions of angling when estimating effort in creel surveys may decrease sensitivity to bias in angler-reported data.

  11. Fires in Idaho and Montana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    2000 continues to be the worst fire season in the United States in decades. By August 8, 2000, fires in Montana and Idaho had burned more than 250,000 acres. Resources were stretched so thin that Army and Marine soldiers were recruited to help fight the fires. President Clinton visited Payette National Forest to lend moral support to the firefighters. Dense smoke from Idaho and western Montana is visible stretching all the way to North and South Dakota in this image from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS). The image was taken on August 7, 2000. Although the primary mission of SeaWiFS is to measure the biology of the ocean, it also provides stunning color imagery of the Earth's surface. For more information about fires in the U.S., visit the National Interagency Fire Center. To learn more about using satellites to monitor fires, visit Global Fire Monitoring and New Technology for Monitoring Fires from Space in the Earth Observatory. Provided by the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  12. 75 FR 8645 - South Central Idaho Resource Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-25

    ..., USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The South Central Idaho RAC will meet in Twin Falls, Idaho... meeting will be held at The Red Lion Canyon Springs Hotel, 1357 Blue Lakes Blvd. North, Twin Falls, Idaho... Road East, Twin Falls, Idaho 83301. Comments may also be sent via e-mail to jathomas@fs.fed.us , or...

  13. Idaho Library Laws, 1999-2000. Full Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho State Library, Boise.

    This new edition of the Idaho Library Laws contains changes through the 1998 legislative session and includes Idaho Code sections that legally affect city, school-community or district libraries, or the Idaho State Library. These sections include the basic library laws in Idaho Code Title 33, Chapters 25, 26, and 27, additional sections of the law…

  14. Protection of Wild Adult Steelhead in Idaho by Adipose Fin Removal: 1984-1985 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Duke, Rodney C.

    1986-03-01

    All Idaho hatchery-reared steelhead released in the spring of 1985 received an adipose fin clip to differentiate between natural or wild and hatchery, fish, thus allowing for protection of wild fish in the sport harvest. Between 25 September and 14 December 1984, 6,360,542 steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri) were marked by excising the adipose fin. A total of 10,336 man hours were required to complete the operation. Clip quality and healing, mortality, and adipose fin composition were determined. Quality checks indicated less than 1% of the fish had more than 25% of the fin remaining. Combined mortality at all three hatcheries was 0.3% of the total fish marked. Observed and in vivo test showed complete healing of the excision within 3-4 weeks (observed) and 22 days (in vivo). Bibliographies were compiled for fin regeneration, marked fish survival, hooking mortality, and related catch-and-release studies.

  15. Retrofitting the Streetlights in Boise, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Clay; Oliver, LeAnn; Bieter, David; Johnson, Michael; Oldemeyer, Neal

    2011-01-01

    Boise, Idaho is using an energy efficiency grant to retrofit hundreds of streetlights throughout the downtown area with energy-efficient LED bulbs, which will save money and improve safety and local quality of life.

  16. Retrofitting the Streetlights in Boise, Idaho

    ScienceCinema

    Young, Clay; Oliver, LeAnn; Bieter, David; Johnson, Michael; Oldemeyer, Neal

    2016-07-12

    Boise, Idaho is using an energy efficiency grant to retrofit hundreds of streetlights throughout the downtown area with energy-efficient LED bulbs, which will save money and improve safety and local quality of life.

  17. Mineral resource appraisal of the Salmon National Forest, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Rick; Close, Terry; McHugh, Ed

    1998-01-01

    The Salmon National Forest administers 1,776,994 net acres of mountainous terrain located in east-central Idaho. Most of the Forest is in Lemhi County; only a small portion falls within Idaho and Valley Counties. Approximately 426,114 acres of the Frank Church-River of No Return Wilderness extends into the western part of the Forest and mineral entry is severely restricted. Because of its location within the Salmon River drainage, the Forest also is subject to numerous issues surrounding restoration of anadromous fish runs. Mineral production from the Salmon National Forest began during 1866 when placer gold was discovered in Leesburg Basin. Hardrock mining quickly spread throughout the Forest and many deposits containing a wide range of commodities were discovered and developed. Although early records are sketchy, production is estimated to include 940,000 ounces gold, 654,000 ounces silver, 61.9 million pounds copper, 8.9 million pounds lead, 13.9 million pounds cobalt, 208,000 pounds zinc, and 37,000 tons fluorite mill feed. Mineral resources are large, diverse, and occur in many deposit types including exhalative, stockwork, disseminated, vein, replacement, sedimentary, skarn, breccia pipe, porphyry, and placer. The largest cobalt resource in the United States occurs in the Blackbird Mining District. Other resources include gold, silver, copper, lead, molybdenum, phosphate, manganese, iron, fluorite, uranium, thorium, rare earth oxides, and barite.

  18. Fish kill from underwater explosions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuart, David J.

    1962-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has used 23 different shotpoints during two seasons of field work in our seismic study of crustal structure in western United States. Without exception, it has been found that under-water shotpoints result in a more efficient conversion of explosive energy into seismic energy than do drilled-hole shotpoints. This experience, together with elimination of drilling costs, has led to the use of underwater shotpoints wherever possible. Three of the 23 shotpoints were in the Pacific Ocean, and for these we have no detailed information on the fish kill. Another six shotpoints were located in inland bodies of water. These are: * Soda Lake near Fallon, Nevada * Mono Lake near Lee Vining, California * Lake Mead near Boulder City, Nevada * Shasta Lake near Redding, California * C.J. Strike Reservoir near Bruneau, Idaho * Lucky Peak Reservoir near Boise, Idaho The 22 high-explosive charges, weighing a total of 95,100 pounds, that were fired in lakes containing fish life resulted in the known death of 2,413 game fish with a total weight of 759 pounds. The average mortality was 110 game fish or 34.5 pounds of game fish killed per average shot of 4,325 pounds of high-explosives.

  19. USE OF WHOLE BODY CHEMICAL RESIDUE ANALYSIS AND LASER SCREENING CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY TO DESCRIBE DISTRIBUTION OF PBTS IN FISH EARLY LIFE STAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fish early life stages (ELS) are more sensitive than juveniles or adults to many persistent bioaccumulative toxicants (PBTs). To better understand the mechanisms by which these chemicals produce toxicity during fish ELS, dose-response relationships need to be determined in relat...

  20. 13. Detail view of drum screen short shaft gears, journal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Detail view of drum screen short shaft gears, journal bearing, rotation drive chain, upper sprocket gear, and drum screen edge in background, facing southeast (downstream) from drum screen cover. - Congdon Canal, Fish Screen, Naches River, Yakima, Yakima County, WA

  1. Profile of Rural Idaho: A Look at Economic and Social Trends Affecting Rural Idaho.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho State Dept. of Commerce, Boise.

    This document examines population trends and economic and social indicators in rural Idaho. The first few sections discuss the definition of "rural," rural challenges and strengths, and outside economic and political forces impacting Idaho's rural areas. Subsequent sections present data on population trends, migration patterns, race and…

  2. 1. FIRST SECTION OF PIPELINE BETWEEN CONFLUENCE POOL AND FISH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. FIRST SECTION OF PIPELINE BETWEEN CONFLUENCE POOL AND FISH SCREEN. NOTE RETAINING WALL BESIDE PIPE. VIEW TO NORTH-NORTHEAST. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Pipeline to Fish Screen, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  3. Idaho Habitat Evaluation for Off-Site Mitigation Record : Annual Report 1988.

    SciTech Connect

    Idaho. Dept. of Fish and Game.

    1990-03-01

    The Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) has been monitoring and evaluating existing and proposed habitat improvement projects for steelhead and chinook in the Clearwater and Salmon subbasins since 1984. Projects included in the monitoring are funded by, or proposed for funding by, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the Northwest Power Planning Act as off-site mitigation for downstream hydropower development on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. This monitoring project is also funded under the same authority. A mitigation record is being developed to use actual and potential increases in smolt production as the best measures of benefit from a habitat improvement project. This project is divided into two subprojects: general and intensive monitoring. Primary objectives of the general monitoring subproject are to determine natural production increases due to habitat improvement projects in terms of parr production and to determine natural production status and trends in Idaho. The second objective is accomplished by combining parr density from monitoring and evaluation of BPA habitat projects and from other IDFG management and research activities. The primary objective of the intensive monitoring subproject is to determine the relationships between spawning escapement, parr production, and smolt production in two Idaho streams; the upper Salmon River and Crooked River. Results of the intensive monitoring will be used to estimate mitigation benefits in terms of smolt production and to interpret natural production monitoring in Idaho. 30 refs., 19 figs., 34 tabs.

  4. Idaho Habitat Evaluation for Off-Site Mitigation Record : Annual Report 1985.

    SciTech Connect

    Petrosky, Charles E.; Holubetz, Terry B.

    1986-04-01

    Evaluation approaches to document a record of credit for mitigation were developed in 1984-1985 for most of the habitat projects. Restoration of upriver anadromous fish runs through increased passage survival at main stem Columbia and Snake River dams is essential to the establishment of an off-site mitigation record, as well as to the success of the entire Fish and Wildlife program. The mitigation record is being developed to use increased smolt production (i.e., yield) at full-seeding as the basic measure of benefit from a habitat project. The IDFG evaluation approach consists of three basic, integrated levels: general monitoring, standing crop evaluations, and intensive studies. Annual general monitoring of anadromous fish densities in a small number of sections for each project will be used to follow population trends and define full-seeding levels. For most projects, smolt production will be estimated indirectly from standing crop estimates by factoring appropriate survival rates from parr to smolt stages. Intensive studies in a few key production streams will be initiated to determine these appropriate survival rates and provide other basic biological information that is needed for evaluation of the Fish and Wildlife program. A common physical habitat and fish population data base is being developed for every BPA habitat project in Idaho to be integrated at each level of evaluation. Compatibility of data is also needed between Idaho and other agencies and tribes in the Columbia River basin. No final determination of mitigation credit for any Idaho habitat enhancement project has been attainable to date.

  5. DOJ News Release: Boise Couple Sentenced for Defrauding Idaho DEQ

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Jorge Garcia and Karen Damberg Garcia were sentenced today for conspiring to defraud the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality of federal grant funds that were to be used to install diesel emission reduction equipment on Idaho school buses.

  6. 75 FR 64691 - North Central Idaho Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-20

    ...: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The North Central Idaho RAC will meet in Potlatch, Idaho. The committee is.... (PST). ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Potlatch Public Library, 1010 Onaway Road,...

  7. Idaho Habitat/Natural Production Monitoring, Pt. I: General Monitoring Subproject : Annual Progress Report 1990.

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, Bruce A.; Scully, Richard J.; Petrosky, Charles Edward

    1992-01-01

    The Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) has been monitoring and evaluating proposed and existing habitat improvement projects for rainbow-steelhead trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, hereafter called steelhead, and chinook salmon O. tshawytscha, hereafter called chinook, in the Clearwater and Salmon River drainages for the past seven years. Projects included in the evaluation are funded by, or proposed for funding by, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the Northwest Power Planning Act as off-site mitigation for downstream hydropower development on the Snake and Columbia rivers. This evaluation project is also funded under the same authority (Fish and Wildlife Program, Northwest Power Planning Council). A mitigation record is being developed using increased carrying capacity and/or survival as the best measure of benefit from a habitat enhancement project. Determination of full benefit from a project depends on completion or maturation of the project and presence of adequate numbers of fish to document actual increases in fish production. The depressed status of upriver anadromous stocks has precluded measuring full benefits of any habitat project in Idaho. Partial benefit is credited to the mitigation record in the interim period of run restoration.

  8. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Julie Braun Williams

    2013-02-01

    As a federal agency, the U.S. Department of Energy has been directed by Congress, the U.S. president, and the American public to provide leadership in the preservation of prehistoric, historic, and other cultural resources on the lands it administers. This mandate to preserve cultural resources in a spirit of stewardship for the future is outlined in various federal preservation laws, regulations, and guidelines such as the National Historic Preservation Act, the Archaeological Resources Protection Act, and the National Environmental Policy Act. The purpose of this Cultural Resource Management Plan is to describe how the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office will meet these responsibilities at Idaho National Laboratory in southeastern Idaho. The Idaho National Laboratory is home to a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least 13,500 years of human occupation in the southeastern Idaho area. These resources are nonrenewable, bear valuable physical and intangible legacies, and yield important information about the past, present, and perhaps the future. There are special challenges associated with balancing the preservation of these sites with the management and ongoing operation of an active scientific laboratory. The Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office is committed to a cultural resource management program that accepts these challenges in a manner reflecting both the spirit and intent of the legislative mandates. This document is designed for multiple uses and is intended to be flexible and responsive to future changes in law or mission. Document flexibility and responsiveness will be assured through regular reviews and as-needed updates. Document content includes summaries of Laboratory cultural resource philosophy and overall Department of Energy policy; brief contextual overviews of Laboratory missions, environment, and cultural history; and an overview of cultural resource management practices. A series of appendices

  9. Evaluate Status of Pacific Lamprey in the Clearwater River and Salmon River Drainages, Idaho, 2009 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Cochnauer, Tim; Claire, Christopher

    2009-05-07

    Pacific lamprey Lampetra tridentata have received little attention in fishery science until recently, even though abundance has declined significantly along with other anadromous fish species in Idaho. Pacific lamprey in Idaho have to navigate over eight lower Snake River and Columbia River hydroelectric facilities for migration downstream as juveniles to the Pacific Ocean and again as adults migrating upstream to their freshwater spawning grounds in Idaho. The number of adult Pacific lamprey annually entering the Snake River basin at Ice Harbor Dam has declined from an average of over 18,000 during 1962-1969 to fewer than 600 during 1998-2006. Based on potential accessible streams and adult escapement over Lower Granite Dam on the lower Snake River, we estimate that no more than 200 Pacific lamprey adult spawners annually utilize the Clearwater River drainage in Idaho for spawning. We utilized electrofishing in 2000-2006 to capture, enumerate, and obtain biological information regarding rearing Pacific lamprey ammocoetes and macropthalmia to determine the distribution and status of the species in the Clearwater River drainage, Idaho. Present distribution in the Clearwater River drainage is limited to the lower sections of the Lochsa and Selway rivers, the Middle Fork Clearwater River, the mainstem Clearwater River, the South Fork Clearwater River, and the lower 7.5 km of the Red River. In 2006, younger age classes were absent from the Red River.

  10. 76 FR 80388 - IDAHO: Filing of Plats of Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-23

    ... of survey of the lands described below in the BLM Idaho State Office, Boise, Idaho, effective 9 a.m.... Dated: October 28, 2011. Stanley G. French, Chief Cadastral Surveyor for Idaho. [FR Doc. 2011-32897 Filed 12-22-11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310-GG-P...

  11. 76 FR 508 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Idaho

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-05

    ...EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the Idaho State Implementation Plan (SIP) that were submitted to EPA by the State of Idaho on April 16, 2007. This SIP submittal includes new and revised rules which provide the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (IDEQ) the regulatory authority to address regional haze and to implement Best Available Retrofit Technology (BART) requirements. The......

  12. SELWAY-BITTERROOT WILDERNESS, IDAHO AND MONTANA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Toth, Margo I.; Zilka, Nicholas T.

    1984-01-01

    Mineral-resource studies of the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness in Idaho County, Idaho, and Missoula and Ravalli Counties, Montana, were carried out. Four areas with probable and one small area of substantiated mineral-resource potential were recognized. The areas of the Running Creek, Painted Rocks, and Whistling Pig plutons of Tertiary age have probable resource potential for molybdenum, although detailed geochemical sampling and surface investigations failed to recognize mineralized systems at the surface. Randomly distributed breccia zones along a fault in the vicinity of the Cliff mine have a substantiated potential for small silver-copper-lead resources.

  13. Idaho Habitat Evaluation for Off-Site Mitigation Record : Annual Report 1987.

    SciTech Connect

    Petrosky, Charles E.; Holubetz, Terry B.

    1988-04-01

    The Idaho Department of Fish and Game has been monitoring and evaluating existing and proposed habitat improvement projects for steelhead (Salmo gairdneri) and chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Clearwater and Salmon River drainages over the last four years. Projects included in the evaluation are funded by, or proposed for funding by, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the Northwest Power Planning Act as off-site mitigation for downstream hydropower development on the Snake and Columbia rivers. A mitigation record is being developed to use increased smolt production at full seeding as the best measure of benefit from a habitat enhancement project. Determination of full benefit from a project depends on presence of adequate numbers of fish to document actual increases in fish production. The depressed nature of upriver anadromous stocks have precluded attainment of full benefit of any habitat project in Idaho. Partial benefit will be credited to the mitigation record in the interim period of run restoration. According to the BPA Work Plan, project implementors have the primary responsibility for measuring physical habitat and estimating habitat change. To date, Idaho habitat projects have been implemented primarily by the US Forest Service (USFS). The Shoshone-Bannock Tribes (SBT) have sponsored three projects (Bear Valley Mine, Yankee Fork, and the proposed East Fork Salmon River projects). IDFG implemented two barrier-removal projects (Johnson Creek and Boulder Creek) that the USFS was unable to sponsor at that time. The role of IDFG in physical habitat monitoring is primarily to link habitat quality and habitat change to changes in actual, or potential, fish production. Individual papers were processed separately for the data base.

  14. One Fish Two Fish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Michele

    1998-01-01

    This activity explains fisheries resource management to seven-year olds. First-grade students learn concepts such as offspring viability, life expectancy, and distribution of species, which help to determine when, where, and how people fish and the importance of fishing responsibly. Lists materials, procedures, and extensions. (SJR)

  15. Application of endocrine disruptor screening program fish short-term reproduction assay: Reproduction and endocrine function in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) exposed to Bermuda pond sediment.

    PubMed

    Fort, Douglas J; Mathis, Michael; Fort, Chelsea E; Fort, Hayley M; Bacon, Jamie P

    2015-06-01

    A modified tier 1 Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP) 21-d fish short-term reproduction assay (FSTRA) was used to evaluate the effects of sediment exposure from freshwater and brackish ponds in Bermuda on reproductive fecundity and endocrine function in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus). Reproductively active male and female fish were exposed to control sediment and sediment from 2 freshwater ponds (fathead minnow) and 2 marine ponds (killifish) contaminated with polyaromatic hydrocarbons and metals via flow-through exposure for 21 d. Reproductive fecundity was monitored daily. At termination, the status of the reproductive endocrine system was assessed by the gonadosomatic index, gonadal histology, plasma steroids (estrogen [E2], testosterone [T], and 11-ketotestosterone [11-KT]), steroidogenic enzymes (aromatase and combined 3β/17β -hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase [3β/17β-HSD]), and plasma vitellogenin (VTG). Decreased reproductive fecundity, lower male body weight, and altered endocrinological measures of reproductive status were observed in both species. Higher plasma T levels in female minnows and 11-KT levels in both male and female minnows and female killifish exposed to freshwater and brackish sediments, respectively. Decreased female E2 and VTG levels and gonadal cytochrome P19 (aromatase) activity were also found in sediment exposed females from both species. No effect on female 3β/17β-HSD activity was found in either species. The FSTRA provided a robust model capable of modification to evaluate reproductive effects of sediment exposure in fish.

  16. Screening of ecotoxicological, qualitative and reproductive variables in male European sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax (L.) reared in three different fish farms: Facility location and typology.

    PubMed

    Cangialosi, Maria Vittoria; Corsi, Ilaria; Bonacci, Stefano; Sensini, Cristiana; Cicero, Nicola; Focardi, Silvano; Mazzola, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of both facility location and typology of fish farm on some ecotoxicological, qualitative and reproductive variables in European sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax L. Several variables were investigated: gonado-somatic index (GSI), liver-somatic index (LSI); 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD), benzo(a)pyrene monooxygenase and acetylcholinesterase activities; glutathione (GSH), testosterone, 17β-estradiol, total lipid, phospholipid (PL) and triglyceride contents. In addition, the histological sections of gonads were examined. Results suggest that LSI, EROD activity, GSI, GSH, PL, hormone levels and gonad morphology were influenced by different facility locations and typologies of fish farm.

  17. Chemical composition of selected core samples, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Knobel, L.L.; Cecil, L.D.; Wood, T.R.

    1995-11-01

    This report presents chemical compositions determined from 84 subsamples and 5 quality-assurance split subsamples of basalt core from the eastern Snake River Plain. The 84 subsamples were collected at selected depths from 5 coreholes located on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho. This report was jointly prepared by Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company and the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office. Ten major elements and as many as 32 trace elements were determined for each subsample either by wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, or by both methods. Descriptive statistics for each element were calculated and tabulated by analytical method for each corehole.

  18. Idaho Supplementation Studies : Five Year Report : 1992-1996.

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, Jody P.

    1999-08-01

    In 1991, the Idaho Supplementation Studies (ISS) project was implemented to address critical uncertainties associated with hatchery supplementation of chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha populations in Idaho. The project was designed to address questions identified in the Supplementation Technical Work Group (STWG) Five-Year-Workplan (STWG 1988). Two goals of the project were identified: (1) assess the use of hatchery chinook salmon to increase natural populations in the Salmon and Clearwater river drainages, and (2) evaluate the genetic and ecological impacts of hatchery chinook salmon on naturally reproducing chinook salmon populations. Four objectives to achieve these goals were developed: (1) monitor and evaluate the effects of supplementation on presmolt and smolt numbers and spawning escapements of naturally produced fish; (2) monitor and evaluate changes in natural productivity and genetic composition of target and adjacent populations following supplementation; (3) determine which supplementation strategies (broodstock and release stage) provide the quickest and highest response in natural production without adverse effects on productivity; and (4) develop supplementation recommendations. This document reports on the first five years of the long-term portion of the ISS project. Small-scale studies addressing specific hypotheses of the mechanisms of supplementation effects (e.g., competition, dispersal, and behavior) have been completed. Baseline genetic data have also been collected. Because supplementation broodstock development was to occur during the first five years, little evaluation of supplementation is currently possible. Most supplementation adults did not start to return to study streams until 1997. The objectives of this report are to: (1) present baseline data on production and productivity indicators such as adult escapement, redd counts, parr densities, juvenile emigrant estimates, and juvenile survival to Lower Granite Dam (lower Snake

  19. Rural Idaho Family Physicians' Scope of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Ed; Schmitz, David; Epperly, Ted; Nukui, Ayaka; Miller, Carissa Moffat

    2010-01-01

    Context: Scope of practice is an important factor in both training and recruiting rural family physicians. Purpose: To assess rural Idaho family physicians' scope of practice and to examine variations in scope of practice across variables such as gender, age and employment status. Methods: A survey instrument was developed based on a literature…

  20. 76 FR 17341 - Idaho Roadless Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-29

    ... administrative corrections affecting Big Creek Fringe, French Creek, Placer Creek, Secesh, and Smith Creek Idaho... regulatory classifications involving two Forest Plan Special Areas (Big Creek and French Creek) and a mapping... lands in the Big Creek Fringe, Placer Creek, Secesh and French Creek Roadless Areas. In addition...

  1. A Survey of Idaho's Private Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catt, Andrew D.

    2014-01-01

    In this memo, we synthesize information collected recently in two private school surveys, one conducted by the U.S. Department of Education and another by the Friedman Foundation and the Idaho Federation of Independent Schools (IDFIS). After a brief description of the data sources, we present the key survey findings in two sections.

  2. 40 CFR 81.410 - Idaho.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Wild 216,383 92-400 USDA-FS Selway-Bitterroot Wild 2 988,770 88-577 USDA-FS Yellowstone NP 3 31,488 (4... acres are in Idaho and 251,930 acres are in Montana. 3 Yellowstone National Park, 2,219,737...

  3. 40 CFR 81.410 - Idaho.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Wild 216,383 92-400 USDA-FS Selway-Bitterroot Wild 2 988,770 88-577 USDA-FS Yellowstone NP 3 31,488 (4... acres are in Idaho and 251,930 acres are in Montana. 3 Yellowstone National Park, 2,219,737...

  4. 40 CFR 81.410 - Idaho.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Wild 216,383 92-400 USDA-FS Selway-Bitterroot Wild 2 988,770 88-577 USDA-FS Yellowstone NP 3 31,488 (4... acres are in Idaho and 251,930 acres are in Montana. 3 Yellowstone National Park, 2,219,737...

  5. 40 CFR 81.410 - Idaho.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Wild 216,383 92-400 USDA-FS Selway-Bitterroot Wild 2 988,770 88-577 USDA-FS Yellowstone NP 3 31,488 (4... acres are in Idaho and 251,930 acres are in Montana. 3 Yellowstone National Park, 2,219,737...

  6. Idaho Public Library Statistics, FY 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolles, Charles

    This document is a compilation of input and output measures and other statistics in reference to Idaho's public libraries, covering the period October 1, 1994 to September 30, 1995. This report includes data gathered by the State Library with the "Public and District Library Annual Statistical Report Form" which reflects all monies…

  7. Groundwater use on southern Idaho dairies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dairy production has expanded in irrigated areas of the western and southwestern US, potentially competing for limited water supplies. Groundwater withdrawal was measured for two years on six dairy farms with 660 to 6400 milk cows in southern Idaho. Groundwater withdrawal was calculated on an equiva...

  8. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Lowrey, Diana Lee

    2009-02-01

    As a federal agency, the U.S. Department of Energy has been directed by Congress, the U.S. president, and the American public to provide leadership in the preservation of prehistoric, historic, and other cultural resources on the lands it administers. This mandate to preserve cultural resources in a spirit of stewardship for the future is outlined in various federal preservation laws, regulations, and guidelines such as the National Historic Preservation Act, the Archaeological Resources Protection Act, and the National Environmental Policy Act. The purpose of this Cultural Resource Management Plan is to describe how the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office will meet these responsibilities at the Idaho National Laboratory. This Laboratory, which is located in southeastern Idaho, is home to a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least 13,500 years of human occupation in the southeastern Idaho area. These resources are nonrenewable; bear valuable physical and intangible legacies; and yield important information about the past, present, and perhaps the future. There are special challenges associated with balancing the preservation of these sites with the management and ongoing operation of an active scientific laboratory. The Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office is committed to a cultural resource management program that accepts these challenges in a manner reflecting both the spirit and intent of the legislative mandates. This document is designed for multiple uses and is intended to be flexible and responsive to future changes in law or mission. Document flexibility and responsiveness will be assured through annual reviews and as-needed updates. Document content includes summaries of Laboratory cultural resource philosophy and overall Department of Energy policy; brief contextual overviews of Laboratory missions, environment, and cultural history; and an overview of cultural resource management practices. A series of

  9. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Lowrey, Diana Lee

    2011-02-01

    As a federal agency, the U.S. Department of Energy has been directed by Congress, the U.S. president, and the American public to provide leadership in the preservation of prehistoric, historic, and other cultural resources on the lands it administers. This mandate to preserve cultural resources in a spirit of stewardship for the future is outlined in various federal preservation laws, regulations, and guidelines such as the National Historic Preservation Act, the Archaeological Resources Protection Act, and the National Environmental Policy Act. The purpose of this Cultural Resource Management Plan is to describe how the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office will meet these responsibilities at the Idaho National Laboratory. This Laboratory, which is located in southeastern Idaho, is home to a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least 13,500 years of human occupation in the southeastern Idaho area. These resources are nonrenewable; bear valuable physical and intangible legacies; and yield important information about the past, present, and perhaps the future. There are special challenges associated with balancing the preservation of these sites with the management and ongoing operation of an active scientific laboratory. The Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office is committed to a cultural resource management program that accepts these challenges in a manner reflecting both the spirit and intent of the legislative mandates. This document is designed for multiple uses and is intended to be flexible and responsive to future changes in law or mission. Document flexibility and responsiveness will be assured through annual reviews and as-needed updates. Document content includes summaries of Laboratory cultural resource philosophy and overall Department of Energy policy; brief contextual overviews of Laboratory missions, environment, and cultural history; and an overview of cultural resource management practices. A series of

  10. Completion summary for borehole USGS 136 near the Advanced Test Reactor Complex, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Twining, Brian V.; Bartholomay, Roy C.; Hodges, Mary K.V.

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, cored and completed borehole USGS 136 for stratigraphic framework analyses and long-term groundwater monitoring of the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer at the Idaho National Laboratory. The borehole was initially cored to a depth of 1,048 feet (ft) below land surface (BLS) to collect core, open-borehole water samples, and geophysical data. After these data were collected, borehole USGS 136 was cemented and backfilled between 560 and 1,048 ft BLS. The final construction of borehole USGS 136 required that the borehole be reamed to allow for installation of 6-inch (in.) diameter carbon-steel casing and 5-in. diameter stainless-steel screen; the screened monitoring interval was completed between 500 and 551 ft BLS. A dedicated pump and water-level access line were placed to allow for aquifer testing, for collecting periodic water samples, and for measuring water levels. Geophysical and borehole video logs were collected after coring and after the completion of the monitor well. Geophysical logs were examined in conjunction with the borehole core to describe borehole lithology and to identify primary flow paths for groundwater, which occur in intervals of fractured and vesicular basalt. A single-well aquifer test was used to define hydraulic characteristics for borehole USGS 136 in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer. Specific-capacity, transmissivity, and hydraulic conductivity from the aquifer test were at least 975 gallons per minute per foot, 1.4 × 105 feet squared per day (ft2/d), and 254 feet per day, respectively. The amount of measureable drawdown during the aquifer test was about 0.02 ft. The transmissivity for borehole USGS 136 was in the range of values determined from previous aquifer tests conducted in other wells near the Advanced Test Reactor Complex: 9.5 × 103 to 1.9 × 105 ft2/d. Water samples were analyzed for cations, anions, metals, nutrients, total organic

  11. Completion Summary for Well NRF-16 near the Naval Reactors Facility, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Twining, Brian V.; Fisher, Jason C.; Bartholomay, Roy C.

    2010-01-01

    In 2009, the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy's Naval Reactors Laboratory Field Office, Idaho Branch Office cored and completed well NRF-16 for monitoring the eastern Snake River Plain (SRP) aquifer. The borehole was initially cored to a depth of 425 feet below land surface and water samples and geophysical data were collected and analyzed to determine if well NRF-16 would meet criteria requested by Naval Reactors Facility (NRF) for a new upgradient well. Final construction continued after initial water samples and geophysical data indicated that NRF-16 would produce chemical concentrations representative of upgradient aquifer water not influenced by NRF facility disposal, and that the well was capable of producing sustainable discharge for ongoing monitoring. The borehole was reamed and constructed as a Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act monitoring well complete with screen and dedicated pump. Geophysical and borehole video logs were collected after coring and final completion of the monitoring well. Geophysical logs were examined in conjunction with the borehole core to identify primary flow paths for groundwater, which are believed to occur in the intervals of fractured and vesicular basalt and to describe borehole lithology in detail. Geophysical data also were examined to look for evidence of perched water and the extent of the annular seal after cement grouting the casing in place. Borehole videos were collected to confirm that no perched water was present and to examine the borehole before and after setting the screen in well NRF-16. Two consecutive single-well aquifer tests to define hydraulic characteristics for well NRF-16 were conducted in the eastern SRP aquifer. Transmissivity and hydraulic conductivity averaged from the aquifer tests were 4.8 x 103 ft2/d and 9.9 ft/d, respectively. The transmissivity for well NRF-16 was within the range of values determined from past aquifer

  12. Transverse Beam Emittance Measurements of a 16 MeV Linac at the Idaho Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    S. Setiniyaz, T.A. Forest, K. Chouffani, Y. Kim, A. Freyberger

    2012-07-01

    A beam emittance measurement of the 16 MeV S-band High Repetition Rate Linac (HRRL) was performed at Idaho State University's Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC). The HRRL linac structure was upgraded beyond the capabilities of a typical medical linac so it can achieve a repetition rate of 1 kHz. Measurements of the HRRL transverse beam emittance are underway that will be used to optimize the production of positrons using HRRL's intense electron beam on a tungsten converter. In this paper, we describe a beam imaging system using on an OTR screen and a digital CCD camera, a MATLAB tool to extract beamsize and emittance, detailed measurement procedures, and the measured transverse emittances for an arbitrary beam energy of 15 MeV.

  13. Steelhead Supplementation in Idaho Rivers, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, Alan

    2001-01-01

    In 2000, we continued our assessment of the Sawtooth Hatchery steelhead stock to reestablish natural populations in Beaver and Frenchman creeks in the upper Salmon River. We stocked both streams with 15 pair of hatchery adults and estimated the potential smolt production from the 1999 outplant. I estimated that about nine smolts per female could be produced in both streams from the 1999 outplant. The smolt-to-adult return would need to exceed 20% to return two adults at this level of production. In the Red River drainage, we stocked Dworshak hatchery stock fingerlings and smolts, from 1993 to 1999, to assess which life-stage produces more progeny when the adults return to spawn. In 2000, we operated the Red River weir to trap adults that returned from these stockings, but none were caught from either group. We continued to monitor wild steelhead populations in the Lochsa and Selway river drainages. We estimated that 26 wild adult steelhead returned to Fish Creek. This is the lowest adult escapement we have documented (when the weir was intact all spring) since we began monitoring Fish Creek in 1992. I estimated that nearly 25,000 juvenile steelhead migrated out of Fish Creek this year. Juvenile steelhead densities in Lochsa and Selway tributaries were similar to those observed in 1999. In 2000, we obtained funding for a DNA analysis to assess Idaho's steelhead stock structure. We collected fin samples from wild steelhead in 70 streams of the Clearwater, Snake, and Salmon River drainages and from our five hatchery stocks. The DNA analysis was subcontracted to Dr. Jennifer Nielsen, Alaska Biological Science Center, Anchorage, and will be completed in 2001.

  14. Deep Fish.

    PubMed

    Ishaq, Omer; Sadanandan, Sajith Kecheril; Wählby, Carolina

    2017-01-01

    Zebrafish ( Danio rerio) is an important vertebrate model organism in biomedical research, especially suitable for morphological screening due to its transparent body during early development. Deep learning has emerged as a dominant paradigm for data analysis and found a number of applications in computer vision and image analysis. Here we demonstrate the potential of a deep learning approach for accurate high-throughput classification of whole-body zebrafish deformations in multifish microwell plates. Deep learning uses the raw image data as an input, without the need of expert knowledge for feature design or optimization of the segmentation parameters. We trained the deep learning classifier on as few as 84 images (before data augmentation) and achieved a classification accuracy of 92.8% on an unseen test data set that is comparable to the previous state of the art (95%) based on user-specified segmentation and deformation metrics. Ablation studies by digitally removing whole fish or parts of the fish from the images revealed that the classifier learned discriminative features from the image foreground, and we observed that the deformations of the head region, rather than the visually apparent bent tail, were more important for good classification performance.

  15. Lu-Hf garnet geochronology of the Salmon River Suture Zone, West-Central Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilford, D. E.; Vervoort, J. D.; Lewis, R.; Tikoff, B.

    2011-12-01

    The Salmon River Suture Zone (SRSZ) in west-central Idaho records the accretion of island arc terranes to North America. It is modified by the Western Idaho Shear Zone (WISZ), a high strain zone within the SRSZ, which defines the present-day boundary between old continental North America and the accreted oceanic assemblages. Timing of the onset of deformation on the WISZ is not well established, primarily due to a poorly constrained metamorphic history. Existing garnet geochronologic studies of units within the SRSZ, using the Sm-Nd isotope system, have provided a framework towards a progressive accretion of arc-derived rocks to North America [1,2]. In this study, we report on the application of the Lu-Hf isotope system to provide ages of garnet growth within the suture zone. This system has the advantage of being insensitive to light rare earth element (LREE)-rich inclusions in garnet, which can complicate Sm-Nd geochronology. Samples were taken from several locations from both along and perpendicular to the suture zone. We report results on two of these samples, within and east of the WISZ. First, a garnet bearing leucocratic layer in a gneissic meta-sedimentary screen near Cascade, Idaho, yields a garnet age of 98 ± 2.0 Ma (2SD). The screen occurs completely within the orthogneisses of the WISZ, and displays similar fabrics and kinematics. Second, a biotite quartzo-feldspathic garnet gneiss from Elk City, Idaho, yields an age 100 ± 2.9 Ma (2SD). This location is ~35 km east of the WISZ, on a sub-parallel deformation zone that was active at the same time. Both samples were single-stage garnet fractions consisting of inclusion-free to inclusion-bearing fragments and whole rock pairs. These ages provide two important implications for the Mesozoic evolution of the western edge of North America. First, transpressional deformation in the WISZ occurred simultaneously with deformation on parallel structures in central Idaho, indicating that a wide zone of deformation

  16. Idaho Habitat and Natural Production Monitoring Part I, 1993 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, Bruce A.; Petrosky, Charles E.

    1994-02-01

    The Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) has been monitoring and evaluating proposed and existing habitat improvement projects for rainbow-steelhead trout Oncorhynchus mykiss and chinook salmon O. tshawytscha in the Clearwater River and Salmon River drainages on a large scale for the past 8 years. Projects included in the evaluation are funded by, or proposed for funding by, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the Northwest Power Planning Act as off-site mitigation for downstream hydropower development on the Snake and Columbia rivers. A mitigation record is being developed using increased carrying capacity and/or survival as the best measures of benefit from a habitat enhancement project. Determination of full benefit from a project depends on completion or maturation of the project and presence of adequate numbers of fish to document actual increases in fish production. The depressed status of upriver anadromous stocks has precluded measuring full benefits of any habitat project in Idaho. Partial benefit is credited to the mitigation record in the interim period of run restoration.

  17. Fish Allergy

    MedlinePlus

    ... can react to touching fish or breathing in vapors from cooking fish. A fish allergy can cause ... hives red spots swelling a drop in blood pressure , causing lightheadedness or loss of consciousness Your child ...

  18. Fish Hearing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaxter, J. H. S.

    1980-01-01

    Provides related information about hearing in fish, including the sensory stimulus of sound in the underwater environment, mechanoreceptors in fish, pressure perception and the swimbladder, specializations in sound conduction peculiar to certain fish families. Includes numerous figures. (CS)

  19. Screening of key antioxidant compounds of longan (Dimocarpus longan Lour.) seed extract by combining online fishing/knockout, activity evaluation, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry, and high-performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry methods.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinyu; Ge, Zhen-Zhen; Zhu, Wei; Xu, Ze; Li, Chun-Mei

    2014-10-08

    To figure out the key phenolic compounds accounting for the antioxidant effects of longan (Dimocarpus longan Lour.) seed extract, online fishing/knockout method, activity evaluation assays, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS), and high-performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS) analysis were used jointly for the first time. p-Coumaric acid-glycoside, (S)-flavogallonic acid, ellagic acid derivative, and methyl-ellagic acid glucopyranoside were first identified in longan seeds. In addition, our study revealed that ellagic acid as well as its derivative and p-coumaric acid-glycoside had important contribution to the potent antioxidant activity of longan seed extract, while gallic acid, corilagin, (S)-flavogallonic acid, methyl-ellagic acid glucopyranoside, and ethyl gallate showed very little contribution to the total antioxidant activity of longan seed extract. The combining use of the online fishing/knockout method, activity evaluation assays, FT-ICR-MS, and HPLC-ESI-MS analysis is a useful and simple strategy for screening of key bioactive compounds from complex extracts.

  20. Quality of ground water in Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yee, Johnson J.; Souza, William R.

    1987-01-01

    The major aquifers in Idaho are categorized under two rock types, sedimentary and volcanic, and are grouped into six hydrologic basins. Areas with adequate, minimally adequate, or deficient data available for groundwater-quality evaluations are described. Wide variations in chemical concentrations in the water occur within individual aquifers, as well as among the aquifers. The existing data base is not sufficient to describe fully the ground-water quality throughout the State; however, it does indicate that the water is generally suitable for most uses. In some aquifers, concentrations of fluoride, cadmium, and iron in the water exceed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's drinking-water standards. Dissolved solids, chloride, and sulfate may cause problems in some local areas. Water-quality data are sparse in many areas, and only general statements can be made regarding the areal distribution of chemical constituents. Few data are available to describe temporal variations of water quality in the aquifers. Primary concerns related to special problem areas in Idaho include (1) protection of water quality in the Rathdrum Prairie aquifer, (2) potential degradation of water quality in the Boise-Nampa area, (3) effects of widespread use of drain wells overlying the eastern Snake River Plain basalt aquifer, and (4) disposal of low-level radioactive wastes at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Shortcomings in the ground-water-quality data base are categorized as (1) multiaquifer sample inadequacy, (2) constituent coverage limitations, (3) baseline-data deficiencies, and (4) data-base nonuniformity.

  1. Mercury cycling in the Hells Canyon Complex of the Snake River, Idaho and Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Gregory M.; Naymik, Jesse; Krabbenhoft, David P.; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Aiken, George R.; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark C.; Harris, Reed C.; Myers, Ralph

    2016-07-11

    The Hells Canyon Complex (HCC) is a hydroelectric project built and operated by the Idaho Power Company (IPC) that consists of three dams on the Snake River along the Oregon and Idaho border (fig. 1). The dams have resulted in the creation of Brownlee, Oxbow, and Hells Canyon Reservoirs, which have a combined storage capacity of more than 1.5 million acre-feet and span about 90 miles of the Snake River. The Snake River upstream of and through the HCC historically has been impaired by water-quality issues related to excessive contributions of nutrients, algae, sediment, and other pollutants. In addition, historical data collected since the 1960s from the Snake River and tributaries near the HCC have documented high concentrations of mercury in fish tissue and sediment (Harris and Beals, 2013). Data collected from more recent investigations within the HCC continue to indicate elevated concentrations of mercury and methylmercury in the water column, bottom sediments, and biota (Clark and Maret, 1998; Essig, 2010; Fosness and others, 2013). As a result, Brownlee and Hells Canyon Reservoirs are listed as impaired for mercury by the State of Idaho, and the Snake River from the Oregon and Idaho border through the HCC downstream to the Oregon and Washington border is listed as impaired for mercury by the State of Oregon.

  2. University of Idaho tests engines with biodiesel from waste oil

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, C.; Fleischman, G.

    1995-12-31

    This article reports on preliminary work at the University of Idaho that investigates the possibilities of capitalizing on Idaho`s large volumes of waste oil and potatoes-generated ethanol to produce biodiesel fuel. This fuel would be hydrogenated soy ethyl ester, MySEE for short, made through a reaction between waste oil and ethanol made from potato waste. Address for full report is given.

  3. Audit of construction management at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    The Secretary of Energy`s streamlining initiatives, coupled with established policy, require the Idaho Operations Office (Idaho) to ensure that its construction projects are necessary and justified. Accordingly, the objectives of this audit were to determine if Idaho was validating project plans; identifying and evaluating construction project alternatives; and reassessing the need for planned construction in accordance with the Laboratory`s decreasing mission needs.

  4. Instream flow characterization of upper Salmon River Basin streams, Central Idaho, 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maret, Terry R.; Hortness, Jon E.; Ott, Douglas S.

    2004-01-01

    Anadromous fish populations in the Columbia River Basin have plummeted in the last 100 years. This severe decline led to Federal listing of chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) stocks as endangered or threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in the 1990s. Historically, the upper Salmon River Basin (upstream from the confluence with the Pahsimeroi River) in Idaho provided migration corridors and significant habitat for these ESA-listed species, in addition to the federally listed bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus). Human development has modified the original streamflow conditions in many streams in the upper Salmon River Basin. Summer streamflow modifications, as a result of irrigation practices, have directly affected the quantity and quality of fish habitat and also have affected migration and (or) access to suitable spawning and rearing habitat for these fish. As a result of these ESA listings and Action 149 of the Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion of 2000, the Bureau of Reclamation was tasked to conduct streamflow characterization studies in the upper Salmon River Basin to clearly define habitat requirements for effective species management and habitat restoration. These studies include the collection of habitat and streamflow information for the Physical Habitat Simulation (PHABSIM) model, a widely applied method to determine relations between habitat and discharge requirements for various fish species and life stages. Model results can be used by resource managers to guide habitat restoration efforts in the evaluation of potential fish habitat and passage improvements by increasing streamflow. Instream flow characterization studies were completed on Pole, Fourth of July, Elk, and Valley Creeks during 2003. Continuous streamflow data were collected upstream from all diversions on each stream. In addition, natural summer streamflows were estimated for each study site using regression

  5. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of the Residential Provisions of the 2015 IECC for Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Mendon, Vrushali V.; Zhao, Mingjie; Taylor, Zachary T.; Poehlman, Eric A.

    2016-02-15

    The 2015 IECC provides cost-effective savings for residential buildings in Idaho. Moving to the 2015 IECC from the 2015 Idaho State Code base code is cost-effective for residential buildings in all climate zones in Idaho.

  6. Cultural Resource Investigations for the Remote Handled Low Level Waste Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Brenda R. Pace; Hollie Gilbert; Julie Braun Williams; Clayton Marler; Dino Lowrey; Cameron Brizzee

    2010-06-01

    The U. S. Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office is considering options for construction of a facility for disposal of Idaho National Laboratory (INL) generated remote-handled low-level waste. Initial screening has resulted in the identification of two recommended alternative locations for this new facility: one near the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Complex and one near the Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Disposal Facility (ICDF). In April and May of 2010, the INL Cultural Resource Management Office conducted archival searches, intensive archaeological field surveys, and initial coordination with the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes to identify cultural resources that may be adversely affected by new construction within either one of these candidate locations. This investigation showed that construction within the location near the ATR Complex may impact one historic homestead and several historic canals and ditches that are potentially eligible for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places. No resources judged to be of National Register significance were identified in the candidate location near the ICDF. Generalized tribal concerns regarding protection of natural resources were also documented in both locations. This report outlines recommendations for protective measures to help ensure that the impacts of construction on the identified resources are not adverse.

  7. Confirmatory radiological survey of the BORAX-V turbine building Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, G.H.; Coleman, R.L.; Jensen, M.K.; Pierce, G.A.; Egidi, P.V.; Mather, S.K.

    1993-07-01

    An independent assessment of the remediation of the BORAX-V (Boiling Water Reactor Experiment) turbine building at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Idaho Falls, Idaho, was accomplished by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Pollutant Assessments Group (ORNL/PAG). The purpose of the assessment was to confirm the site`s compliance with applicable Department of Energy guidelines. The assessment included reviews of both the decontamination and decommissioning Plan and data provided from the pre- and post-remedial action surveys and an independent verification survey of the facility. The independent verification survey included determination of background exposure rates and soil concentrations, beta-gamma and gamma radiation scans, smears for detection of removable contamination, and direct measurements for alpha and beta-gamma radiation activity on the basement and mezzanine floors and the building`s interior and exterior walls. Soil samples were taken, and beta-gamma and gamma radiation exposure rates were measured on areas adjacent to the building. Results of measurements on building surfaces at this facility were within established contamination guidelines except for elevated beta-gamma radiation levels located on three isolated areas of the basement floor. Following remediation of these areas, ORNL/PAG reviewed the remedial action contractor`s report and agreed that remediation was effective in removing the source of the elevated direct radiation. Results of all independent soil analyses for {sup 60}Co were below the detection limit. The highest {sup 137}Cs analysis result was 4.6 pCi/g; this value is below the INEL site-specific guideline of 10 pCi/g.

  8. Electrofishing effort required to estimate biotic condition in Southern Idaho Rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maret, T.R.; Ott, D.S.; Herlihy, A.T.

    2007-01-01

    An important issue surrounding biomonitoring in large rivers is the minimum sampling effort required to collect an adequate number of fish for accurate and precise determinations of biotic condition. During the summer of 2002, we sampled 15 randomly selected large-river sites in southern Idaho to evaluate the effects of sampling effort on an index of biotic integrity (IBI). Boat electrofishing was used to collect sample populations of fish in river reaches representing 40 and 100 times the mean channel width (MCW; wetted channel) at base flow. Minimum sampling effort was assessed by comparing the relation between reach length sampled and change in IBI score. Thirty-two species of fish in the families Catostomidae, Centrarchidae, Cottidae, Cyprinidae, Ictaluridae, Percidae, and Salmonidae were collected. Of these, 12 alien species were collected at 80% (12 of 15) of the sample sites; alien species represented about 38% of all species (N = 32) collected during the study. A total of 60% (9 of 15) of the sample sites had poor IBI scores. A minimum reach length of about 36 times MCW was determined to be sufficient for collecting an adequate number of fish for estimating biotic condition based on an IBI score. For most sites, this equates to collecting 275 fish at a site. Results may be applicable to other semiarid, fifth-order through seventh-order rivers sampled during summer low-flow conditions. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2007.

  9. Reproduction, mortality, and heavy metal concentrations in great blue herons from three colonies in Washington and Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blus, L.J.; Henny, C.J.; Anderson, A.; Fitzner, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    We collected eggs in nests, hatchlings and eggs with advanced embryos on the ground, and prefledgling young of Great Blue Herons (Ardea herodias) at three nesting colonies in Washington and Idaho. Intact fish were also collected on the ground at the Idaho colony. The Ft. Lewis colony near Puget Sound in Washington and the Lake Chatcolet colony in northern Idaho were located near areas extensively polluted with heavy metals from minning or smelting activities. The Hanford Reservation colony near Richland, Washington was located some distance from point sources of heavy metal pollution. Heavy metals in heron samples were generally low and were all below concentrations known to induce mortality or adversely affect reproductive success. The elevated copper in one of three prefledglings from Ft. Lewis paralleled that found in an occasional nestling of several species of birds in other studies; the significance of this relationship is unclear. Breeding herons apparently fed near their colonies in areas removed from the sites of heaviest contamination, but birds in the Lake Chatcolet colony were preying on fish containing as much as 6 mu-g/g lead.

  10. 75 FR 12230 - Idaho Power Company, Idaho; Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact Statement for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-15

    ... Impact Statement for the Swan Falls Project March 5, 2010. In accordance with the National Environmental... has reviewed Idaho Power Company's application for license for the Swan Falls Project (FERC Project No... the Swan Falls Project. The draft EIS documents the views of governmental agencies, non-...

  11. 75 FR 53964 - Idaho Power Company, Idaho; Notice of Availability of Final Environmental Impact Statement for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-02

    ... Impact Statement for the Swan Falls Project August 26, 2010. In accordance with the National... Office of Energy Projects has reviewed Idaho Power Company's application for license for the Swan Falls... alternatives for relicensing the Swan Falls Project. The final EIS documents the views of governmental...

  12. Salmon Supplementation Studies in Idaho Rivers (Idaho Supplementation Studies) : Experimental Design, 1991 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Bowles, Edward C.; Leitzinger, Eric J.

    1991-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to help determine the utility of supplementation as a potential recovery tool for decimated stocks of spring and summer chinook salmon in Idaho. The goals are to assess the use of hatchery chinook to restore or augment natural populations, and to evaluate the effects of supplementation on the survival and fitness of existing natural populations.

  13. Newborn Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Activities Importance of Newborn Screening Newborn Screening and Molecular Biology Branch Pulse Oximetry Screening for CCHDs Sickle Cell Disease Laboratory SCID Quality Assurance Training and Resources ...

  14. Adult Chinook Salmon Abundance Monitoring in the Secesh River and Lake Creek, Idaho, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Faurot, Dave; Kucera, Paul A.

    2001-05-01

    Underwater time-lapse video technology has been used to monitor adult spring and summer chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) escapement into the Secesh River and Lake Creek, Idaho, since 1998. Underwater time-lapse videography is a passive methodology that does not trap or handle this Endangered Species Act listed species. Secesh River chinook salmon represent a wild spawning aggregate that has not been directly supplemented with hatchery fish. The Secesh River is also a control population under the Idaho Salmon Supplementation study. This project has demonstrated the successful application of underwater video adult salmon abundance monitoring technology in Lake Creek in 1998 and 1999. Emphasis of the project in 2000 was to determine if the temporary fish counting station could be installed early enough to successfully estimate adult spring and summer chinook salmon abundance in the Secesh River (a larger stream). Snow pack in the drainage was 93% of the average during the winter of 1999/2000, providing an opportunity to test the temporary count station structure. The temporary fish counting station was not the appropriate technology to determine adult salmon spawner abundance in the Secesh River. Due to its temporary nature it could not be installed early enough, due to high stream discharge, to capture the first upstream migrating salmon. A more permanent structure used with underwater video, or other technology needs to be utilized for accurate salmon escapement monitoring in the Secesh River. A minimum of 813 adult chinook salmon spawners migrated upstream past the Secesh River fish counting station to spawning areas in the Secesh River drainage. Of these fish, more than 324 migrated upstream into Lake Creek. The first upstream migrating adult chinook salmon passed the Secesh River and Lake Creek sites prior to operation of the fish counting stations on June 22. This was 17 and 19 days earlier than the first fish arrival at Lake Creek in 1998 and 1999

  15. Chinook Salmon Adult Abundance Monitoring in Lake Creek, Idaho, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Faurot, Dave; Kucera, Paul

    2003-11-01

    Underwater time- lapse video technology has been used to monitor adult spring and summer chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) escapement into the Secesh River and Lake Creek, Idaho, since 1998. Underwater time-lapse videography is a passive methodology that does not trap or handle this Endangered Species Act listed species. Secesh River chinook salmon represent a wild spawning aggregate that has not been directly supplemented with hatchery fish. The Secesh River is also a control stream under the Idaho Salmon Supplementation study. This project has successfully demonstrated the application of underwater video monitoring to accurately quantify chinook salmon abundance in Lake Creek in 1998, 1999, 2001 and 2002. The adult salmon spawner escapement into Lake Creek in 2002 was 410 fish. Jack salmon comprised 7.1 percent of the run. Estimated hatchery composition was 6.1 percent of the spawning run. The first fish passage on Lake Creek was recorded on June 26, 15 days after installation of the fish counting station. Peak net upstream movement of 41 adults occurred on July 8. Peak of total movement activity was August 18. The last fish passed through the Lake Creek fish counting station on September 2. Snow pack in the drainage was 91% of the average during the winter of 2001/2002. Video determined salmon spawner abundance was compared to redd count expansion method point estimates in Lake Creek in 2002. Expanded index area redd count and extensive area redd count point estimates in 2002, estimated from one percent fewer to 56 percent greater number of spawners than underwater video determined spawner abundance. Redd count expansion methods varied from two percent fewer to 55 percent greater in 2001, 11 to 46 percent fewer in 1999 and 104 to 214 percent greater in 1998. Redd count expansion values had unknown variation associated with the point estimates. Fish per redd numbers determined by video abundance and multiple pass redd counts of the larger extensive survey

  16. Adult Chinook Salmon Abundance Monitoring in Lake Creek, Idaho, Annual Report 2001.

    SciTech Connect

    Faurot, Dave

    2002-12-01

    Underwater time-lapse video technology has been used to monitor adult spring and summer chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) escapement into the Secesh River and Lake Creek, Idaho, since 1998. Underwater time- lapse videography is a passive methodology that does not trap or handle this Endangered Species Act listed species. Secesh River chinook salmon represent a wild spawning aggregate that has not been directly supplemented with hatchery fish. The Secesh River is also a control stream under the Idaho Salmon Supplementation study. This project has successfully demonstrated the application of underwater video monitoring to accurately quantify chinook salmon abundance in Lake Creek in 1998, 1999 and 2001. The adult salmon spawner escapement estimate into Lake Creek in 2001 was 697 fish, the largest escapement since the project began. Jack salmon comprised 10% of the spring migration. Snow pack in the drainage was 38% of the average during the winter of 2000/2001. The first fish passage on Lake Creek was recorded on June 9, 19 days after installation of the fish counting station and two weeks earlier than previously reported. Peak net upstream movement of 52 adults occurred on June 22. Peak of total movement activity was July 3. The last fish passed through the Lake Creek fish counting station on September 6. Redd count expansion methods were compared to underwater video determined salmon spawner abundance in Lake Creek in 2001. Expanded index area redd count point estimates and intensive area redd counts in 2001, estimated from 1.3 percent fewer to 56 percent greater number of spawners than underwater video determined spawner abundance. Redd count expansion values had unknown variation associated with the point estimates. Fish per redd numbers in Lake Creek have varied widely. In 2001 there were 2.07 fish per redd. In 1999, there were 3.58 fish per redd, and in 1998, with no jacks returning to spawn, there were 1.02 fish per redd. Migrating salmon in Lake Creek

  17. Shoshone Spirituality Archaeological Interpretation in Southeast Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, P. A.; Marler, Clayton Fay

    2001-03-01

    Tribal people in southeast Idaho sincerely desire that archaeologists include Shoshone concepts of spirituality when investigating archaeological materials and sites. However, most archaeologists and resource managers have little understanding about these concepts and this creates difficulties. We examine two important aspects of the Shoshone soul, Mugua’ and Nabushi’aipe, and discuss how understanding these attributes aid in explaining why certain archaeological remains are considered sacred. A greater understanding of Shoshone spirituality will begin to bridge the needs of both tribal people and archaeologists.

  18. THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY BERYLLIUM TECHNOLOGY UPDATE

    SciTech Connect

    Glen R. Longhurst

    2007-12-01

    A Beryllium Technology Update meeting was held at the Idaho National Laboratory on July 18, 2007. Participants came from the U.S., Japan, and Russia. There were two main objectives of this meeting. One was a discussion of current technologies for beryllium in fission reactors, particularly the Advanced Test Reactor and the Japan Materials Test Reactor, and prospects for material availability in the coming years. The second objective of the meeting was a discussion of a project of the International Science and Technology Center regarding treatment of irradiated beryllium for disposal. This paper highlights discussions held during that meeting and major conclusions reached

  19. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory site development plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This plan briefly describes the 20-year outlook for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Missions, workloads, worker populations, facilities, land, and other resources necessary to fulfill the 20-year site development vision for the INEL are addressed. In addition, the plan examines factors that could enhance or deter new or expanded missions at the INEL. And finally, the plan discusses specific site development issues facing the INEL, possible solutions, resources required to resolve these issues, and the anticipated impacts if these issues remain unresolved.

  20. Planned Parenthood of Idaho v. Wasden.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    Court Decision: 376 Federal Reporter, 3d Series 908; 2004 July 16 (date of decision). The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit reversed a lower court decision and held that Idaho's parental consent to abortion law was unconstitutional because it did not include a constitutionally valid medical emergency provision. Idaho's parental consent law contained an exception which allowed a minor to obtain an abortion without parental consent or a court order if the minor had a sudden, unexpected, and abnormal medical condition which required an immediate abortion to save her life or prevent serious risk of permanent, substantial injury. The court first rejected the state's argument that "sudden and unexpected" referred to the moment of diagnosis because the words referred to a physical condition (not a diagnosis), the word "diagnosis" did not appear in the statute, and every diagnosis could be considered sudden and unexpected. The court also noted that even a normal pregnancy could trigger a need for an immediate abortion in some or most women. Moreover, the court found that the onset of the underlying condition of many medical problems is often different from the time of diagnosis. The court declined to disregard the words "sudden," "unexpected," and "abnormal" because the words were pivotal to the meaning of the statute and held that the plain meaning of the medical emergency restriction was unconstitutionally narrow and interfered with a woman's right to undergo an abortion if her health was threatened by continuing her pregnancy. Moreover, the court held that the state's reading of the statute was neither "fairly possible" nor "readily apparent." The court also held that the emergency medical provision was unconstitutional because the time period in which a decision could be rendered for a judicial bypass was open-ended, the deadline for filing a notice of appeal was unspecified, and the timeframe for the Idaho appellate process was indeterminate. Accordingly

  1. Panther Creek, Idaho, Habitat Rehabilitation, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, Dudley W.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of the project was to achieve full chinook salmon and steelhead trout production in the Panther Creek, Idaho, basin. Plans were developed to eliminate the sources of toxic effluent entering Panther Creek. Operation of a cobalt-copper mine since the 1930's has resulted in acid, metal-bearing drainage entering the watershed from underground workings and tailings piles. The report discusses plans for eliminating and/or treating the effluent to rehabilitate the water quality of Panther Creek and allow the reestablishment of salmon and trout spawning runs. (ACR)

  2. A targeted/non-targeted screening method for perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids and sulfonates in whole fish using quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry and MS(e).

    PubMed

    Crimmins, Bernard S; Xia, Xiaoyan; Hopke, Philip K; Holsen, Thomas M

    2014-02-01

    A new method for measuring perfluoroalkyl contaminants (PFCs) in biological matrices has been developed. An ultra-high pressure liquid chromatograph equipped with a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer (UPLC-QToF) was optimized using a continuous precursor/product ion monitoring mode. Unlike traditional targeted studies that isolate precursor/product ion pairs, the current method alternates between two ionization energy channels to continuously capture standard electrospray ionization (low energy) and collision induced dissociation (high energy) spectra. The result is the indiscriminant acquisition of paired low and high energy spectra for all constituents eluting from the chromatographic system. This technique was evaluated for the routine analysis of perfluoroalkyl species. Using this technique, linear perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (C4 to C14) and perfluoroalkyl sulfonates (C4, C6, C8 and C10) exhibited a linear range spanning over three orders of magnitude and were detectable at levels less than 1 pg on column with a root mean squared signal to noise ratio of 5 to 20. Lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) and National Institutes of Standards and Technology Standard Reference Material 1946 were used to evaluate matrix effects and the accuracy of this method when applied to a whole fish extract. The current method was also evaluated as a diagnostic tool to identify unknown PFCs using experimental fragmentation patterns, mass defect filtering and Kendrick plots.

  3. 76 FR 14898 - South Central Idaho Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ...: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The South Central Idaho Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Sun Valley... meeting will be held March 30, 2011, 9:30 a.m. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Sun Valley City Hall Council Chambers, 810 Elkhorn Road, Sun Valley, Idaho 83353. Written comments should be sent...

  4. 76 FR 23333 - Idaho: Filing of Plats of Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-26

    ... Bureau of Land Management Idaho: Filing of Plats of Survey AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Filing of Plats of Surveys. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has officially filed the plats of survey of the lands described below in the BLM Idaho State Office, Boise,...

  5. 77 FR 77089 - Idaho: Filing of Plats of Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-31

    ... Bureau of Land Management Idaho: Filing of Plats of Survey AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Filing of Plats of Surveys. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has officially filed the plats of survey of the lands described below in the BLM Idaho State Office, Boise,...

  6. 76 FR 4934 - Idaho: Filing of Plats of Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-27

    ... Bureau of Land Management Idaho: Filing of Plats of Survey AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of filing of plats of surveys. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has officially filed the plats of survey of the lands described below in the BLM Idaho State Office, Boise,...

  7. 77 FR 3791 - Idaho: Filing of Plats of Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-25

    ... Bureau of Land Management Idaho: Filing of Plats of Survey AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of filing of plats of surveys. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has officially filed the plats of survey of the lands described below in the BLM Idaho State Office, Boise,...

  8. 78 FR 64530 - Idaho: Filing of Plats of Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-29

    ... Bureau of Land Management Idaho: Filing of Plats of Survey AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of filing of plats of surveys. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has officially filed the plats of survey of the lands described below in the BLM Idaho State Office, Boise,...

  9. 78 FR 21968 - Idaho: Filing of Plats of Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-12

    ... Bureau of Land Management Idaho: Filing of Plats of Survey AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Filing of Plats of Surveys. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has officially filed the plats of survey of the lands described below in the BLM Idaho State Office, Boise,...

  10. 75 FR 66788 - Idaho: Filing of Plats of Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-29

    ... Bureau of Land Management Idaho: Filing of Plats of Survey AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Filing of Plats of Surveys. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has officially filed the plat of survey of the lands described below in the BLM Idaho State Office, Boise,...

  11. 77 FR 42759 - IDAHO: Filing of Plats of Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-20

    ... Bureau of Land Management IDAHO: Filing of Plats of Survey AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of filing of plats of surveys. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has officially filed the plats of survey of the lands described below in the BLM Idaho State Office, Boise,...

  12. 76 FR 50492 - Idaho: Filing of Plats of Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-15

    ... Bureau of Land Management Idaho: Filing of Plats of Survey AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of filing of plats of surveys. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has officially accepted the plat of survey of the lands described below in the BLM Idaho State Office, Boise,...

  13. 76 FR 66322 - Idaho: Filing of Plats of Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-26

    ... Bureau of Land Management Idaho: Filing of Plats of Survey AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Filing of Plats of Surveys. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has officially filed the plats of survey of the lands described below in the BLM Idaho State Office, Boise,...

  14. 77 FR 54557 - Eastern Idaho Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-05

    ... Doc No: 2012-21807] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Eastern Idaho Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Easern Idaho Resource Advisory... Advisory Committee Act. The purpose of the committee is to improve collaborative relationships and...

  15. 36 CFR 294.22 - Idaho Roadless Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) General Forest, Rangeland, and Grassland. (c) Maps. The Chief shall maintain and make available to the public a map of each Idaho Roadless Area, including records regarding any corrections or modifications of such maps pursuant to § 294.27. (d) Activities in Idaho Roadless Areas shall be consistent with...

  16. 30 CFR 912.700 - Idaho Federal program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... those of the permanent program regulations which have been approved by the Office of Management and...) Idaho Code Sections 18-4301 and 18-7019 providing for punishment for interference with water sources... dam, reservoir or mine tailing impoundment structure. (8) Idaho Code Section 42-1718 (Supp.)...

  17. 30 CFR 912.700 - Idaho Federal program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... those of the permanent program regulations which have been approved by the Office of Management and...) Idaho Code Sections 18-4301 and 18-7019 providing for punishment for interference with water sources... dam, reservoir or mine tailing impoundment structure. (8) Idaho Code Section 42-1718 (Supp.)...

  18. An Analysis of the Charter School Facility Landscape in Idaho

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Alliance for Public Charter Schools, 2012

    2012-01-01

    In spring of 2012, the Idaho Charter School Network, the Colorado League of Charter Schools, and the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools worked to collect evidence that would accurately portray both the adequacy of charter school facilities and the average spending for facilities out of charter schools' operating budgets in Idaho.…

  19. Secondary cleanup of Idaho Chemical Processing Plant solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Mailen, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    Solvent from the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) (operated by Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company, Inc.) has been tested to determine the ability of activated alumina to remove secondary degradation products - those degradation products which are not removed by scrubbing with sodium carbonate.

  20. 75 FR 57813 - Proposed Supplementary Rules on Public Land, Idaho

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-22

    ... Bureau of Land Management Proposed Supplementary Rules on Public Land, Idaho AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Proposed supplementary rules. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM... public lands in Idaho. The BLM is also proposing to prohibit the possession of an open alcoholic...

  1. Growing Up in Idaho: The Needs of Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsell, Neal, Ed.

    The purpose of this pamphlet was to make the Idaho public aware of the needs and status of young children in their state. The information comes primarily from the findings of three major research surveys conducted by the Idaho Office of Child Development. The first survey was designed to identify existing services and resources for children, youth…

  2. 1. NORTH IDAHO PHOSPHATE COMPANY PLANTS. VIEW IS TO THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. NORTH IDAHO PHOSPHATE COMPANY PLANTS. VIEW IS TO THE NORTHEAST, WITH THE SHIPPING AND STORAGE WAREHOUSE, AMMONIUM PHOSPHATE FERTILIZER PLANT, AND PHOSPHORIC ACID PLANT APPEARING IN SUCCESSION DOWN GOVERNMENT GULCH. - North Idaho Phosphate Company, Silver King Community, Kellogg, Shoshone County, ID

  3. Purgeable organic compounds at or near the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho, 2015

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maimer, Neil V.; Bartholomay, Roy C.

    2016-05-25

    During 2015, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, collected groundwater samples from 31 wells at or near the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the Idaho National Laboratory for purgeable organic compounds (POCs). The samples were collected and analyzed for the purpose of evaluating whether purge water from wells located inside an areal polygon established downgradient of the INTEC must be treated as a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act listed waste.POC concentrations in water samples from 29 of 31 wells completed in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer were greater than their detection limit, determined from detection and quantitation calculation software, for at least one to four POCs. Of the 29 wells with concentrations greater than their detection limits, only 20 had concentrations greater than the laboratory reporting limit as calculated with detection and quantitation calculation software. None of the concentrations exceeded any maximum contaminant levels established for public drinking water supplies. Most commonly detected compounds were 1,1,1-trichoroethane, 1,1-dichloroethene, and trichloroethene.

  4. Spawning Success of Hatchery Spring Chinook Salmon Outplanted as Adults in the Clearwater River Basin, Idaho, 2001.

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, Steven P.; Ackerman, Nichlaus; Witty, Kenneth L.

    2002-04-16

    The study described in this report evaluated spawning distribution, overlap with naturally-arriving spawners, and pre-spawning mortality of spring chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, outplanted as adults in the Clearwater River Subbasin in 2001. Returns of spring chinook salmon to Snake River Basin hatcheries and acclimation facilities in 2001 exceeded needs for hatchery production goals in Idaho. Consequently, management agencies including the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) and Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) agreed to outplant chinook salmon adults as an adaptive management strategy for using hatchery adults. Adult outplants were made in streams or stream sections that have been typically underseeded with spawners. This strategy anticipated that outplanted hatchery chinook salmon would spawn successfully near the areas where they were planted, and would increase natural production. Outplanting of adult spring chinook salmon from hatcheries is likely to be proposed in years when run sizes are similar to those of the 2001 run. Careful monitoring of results from this year's outplanting can be used to guide decisions and methods for future adult outplanting. Numbers of spring chinook salmon outplanted was based on hatchery run size, hatchery needs, and available spawning habitat. Hatcheries involved in outplanting in the Clearwater Basin included Dworshak National Fish Hatchery, Kooskia National Fish Hatchery, Clearwater Anadromous Fish Hatchery, and Rapid River Fish Hatchery. The NPT, IDFG, FWS, and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) agreed upon outplant locations and a range of numbers of spring chinook salmon to be outplanted (Table 1). Outplanting occurred mainly in the Selway River Subbasin, but additional outplants were made in tributaries to the South Fork Clearwater River and the Lochsa River (Table 1). Actual outplanting activities were carried out primarily by the NPT with supplemental outplanting done

  5. Application of a yeast estrogen screen in non-biomarker species Varicorhinus barbatulus fish with two estrogen receptor subtypes to assess xenoestrogens.

    PubMed

    Fu, Keng-Yen; Chen, Chung-Yuan; Chang, Whei-Meih

    2007-06-01

    Xenoestrogens can interfere with normal estrogen signaling by competitively binding to the estrogen receptor (ER) and activating transcription of target genes. In this study, we cloned the estrogen receptor alpha (vbERalpha) and beta 2 (vbERbeta2) genes from liver of the indigenous Taiwanese cyprinid fish Varicorhinus barbatulus and tested the direct impact of several xenoestrogens on these ERs. Transcriptional activity of xenoestrogens was measured by the enzymatic activity of estrogen responsive element (ERE)-containing beta-galactosidase in a yeast reporter system. The xenoestrogens tested were phenol derivatives, DDT-related substances, phthalic acid esters, and polychlorinated biphenyls, with 17beta-estradiol (E2) as a subjective standard. The phenol derivatives [4-nonylphenol (4-NP), 4-t-octylphenol (4-t-OP) and bisphenol A (BPA)] exhibited significant dose-dependent responses in both ligand potency and ligand efficiency. Consistent with yeast assays using human or rainbow trout ERs, we observed a general subtype preference in that vbERalpha displayed higher relative potencies and efficiencies than vbERbeta2, although our assays induced a stronger response for xenoestrogens than did human or trout ERs. Whereas 4-NP and 4-t-OP have similar EC50 values relative to E2 for both ER subtypes, the strong estrogenic response of BPA markedly differentiates vbERalpha from vbERbeta2, suggesting possible species-specific BPA sensitivity. We report that the ameliorative yeast tool is readily applicable for indigenous wildlife studies of the bio-toxic influence of xenoestrogens with wildlife-specific estrogen receptors.

  6. Screening complex effluents for estrogenic activity with the T47D-KBluc cell bioassay: assay optimization and comparison with in vivo responses in fish.

    PubMed

    Wehmas, Leah C; Cavallin, Jenna E; Durhan, Elizabeth J; Kahl, Michael D; Martinovic, Dalma; Mayasich, Joe; Tuominen, Tim; Villeneuve, Daniel L; Ankley, Gerald T

    2011-02-01

    Wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents can contain estrogenic chemicals, which potentially disrupt fish reproduction and development. The current study focused on the use of an estrogen-responsive in vitro cell bioassay (T47D-KBluc), to quantify total estrogenicity of WWTP effluents. We tested a novel sample preparation method for the T47D-KBluc assay, using powdered media prepared with direct effluent. Results of the T47D-KBluc assay were compared with the induction of estrogen receptor-regulated gene transcription in male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed to the same effluents. Effluent samples for the paired studies were collected over the course of three months. According to the T47D-KBluc assay, the effluent estrogenicity ranged from 1.13 to 2.00 ng 17β-estradiol (E2) equivalents/L. Corresponding in vivo studies exposing male fathead minnows to 0, 10, 50, and 100% effluent dilutions demonstrated that exposure to 100% effluent significantly increased hepatic vitellogenin (VTG) and estrogen receptor α subunit transcripts relative to controls. The induction was also significant in males exposed to 250 ng E2/L or 100 ng E2/L. The in vitro and in vivo results support the conclusion that the effluent contains significant estrogenic activity, but there was a discrepancy between in vitro- and in vivo-based E2 equivalent estimates. Our results suggest that the direct effluent preparation method for the T47D-KBluc assay is a reasonable approach to estimate the estrogenicity of wastewater effluent.

  7. Analytical method for fast screening and confirmation of multi-class veterinary drug residues in fish and shrimp by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junghyun; Suh, Joon Hyuk; Cho, Hyun-Deok; Kang, Wonjae; Choi, Yong Seok; Han, Sang Beom

    2016-01-01

    A multi-class, multi-residue analytical method based on LC-MS/MS detection was developed for the screening and confirmation of 28 veterinary drug and metabolite residues in flatfish, shrimp and eel. The chosen veterinary drugs are prohibited or unauthorised compounds in Korea, which were categorised into various chemical classes including nitroimidazoles, benzimidazoles, sulfones, quinolones, macrolides, phenothiazines, pyrethroids and others. To achieve fast and simultaneous extraction of various analytes, a simple and generic liquid extraction procedure using EDTA-ammonium acetate buffer and acetonitrile, without further clean-up steps, was applied to sample preparation. The final extracts were analysed by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). The method was validated for each compound in each matrix at three different concentrations (5, 10 and 20 ng g(-1)) in accordance with Codex guidelines (CAC/GL 71-2009). For most compounds, the recoveries were in the range of 60-110%, and precision, expressed as the relative standard deviation (RSD), was in the range of 5-15%. The detection capabilities (CCβs) were below or equal to 5 ng g(-1), which indicates that the developed method is sufficient to detect illegal fishery products containing the target compounds above the residue limit (10 ng g(-1)) of the new regulatory system (Positive List System - PLS).

  8. Antarctic Fishes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eastman, Joseph T.; DeVries, Arthur L.

    1986-01-01

    Explains the adaptations to Antarctic waters that Notothenioidei, a group of advanced bony fishes, have exhibited. Discusses the fishes' mechanisms of production of antifreeze properties and their capacities for neutral buoyancy in water. (ML)

  9. Fish Dishes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derby, Marie

    2003-01-01

    Describes an art project that was inspired by Greek pottery, specifically dishes shaped as fish. Explains that fourth-grade students drew a fish shape that was later used to create their clay version of the fish. Discusses how the students examined the pottery to make decisions about color and design. (CMK)

  10. Water-quality and biological conditions in the Lower Boise River, Ada and Canyon Counties, Idaho, 1994-2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacCoy, Dorene E.

    2004-01-01

    Parma were higher than those in undeveloped basins sampled nationwide by the USGS. Total phosphorus concentrations at Glenwood, Middleton, and Parma also exceeded those in undeveloped basins. Macroinvertebrate and fish communities were used to evaluate the long-term integration of water-quality contaminants and loss of habitat in the lower Boise. Biological integrity of the macroinvertebrate population was assessed with the attributes (metrics) of Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera (EPT) richness and metrics used in the Idaho River Macroinvertebrate Index (RMI): taxa richness; EPT richness; percent dominant taxon; percent Elmidae (riffle beetles); and percent predators. Average EPT was about 10, and RMI scores were frequently below 16, which indicated intermediate or poor water quality. The number of EPT taxa and RMI scores for the lower Boise were half those for least-impacted streams in Idaho. The fine sediment bioassessment index (FSBI) was used to evaluate macroinvertebrate sediment tolerance. The FSBI scores were lower than those for a site upstream in the Boise River Basin near Twin Springs, a site not impacted by urbanization and agriculture, which indicated that the lower Boise macroinvertebrate population may be impacted by fine sediment. Macroinvertebrate functional feeding groups and percent tolerant species, mainly at Middleton and Parma, were typical of those in areas of degraded water quality and habitat. The biological integrity of the fish population was evaluated using the Idaho River Fish Index (RFI), which consists of the 10 metrics: number of coldwater native species, percent sculpin, percent coldwater species, percent sensitive native individuals, percent tolerant individuals, number of nonindigenous species, number of coldwater fish captured per minute of electrofishing, percent of fish with deformities (eroded fins, lesions, or tumors), number of trout age classes, and percent carp. RFI scores for lower Boise sites indicated a d

  11. 78 FR 37538 - Idaho Irrigation District; New Sweden Irrigation District; Notice of Preliminary Permit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-21

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Idaho Irrigation District; New Sweden Irrigation District; Notice of... Competing Applications On April 19, 2013, the Idaho and New Sweden Irrigation Districts, filed a joint... Street, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83404; phone: (208) 522-2356. Mr. Louis Thiel, Chairman, New Sweden...

  12. New Nutrition Standards for Idaho School Meals. Nourishing News. Volume 4, Issue 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho State Department of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Idaho Child Nutrition Programs (CNP) released the New Nutrition Standards for Idaho School Meals in January 2009 with the recommendation that all School Food Authorities fully implement the New Nutrition Standards for Idaho School Meals into their programs starting August 2009. Along with the release of the New Nutrition Standards for Idaho School…

  13. Impacts and pathways of mine contaminants to bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in an Idaho watershed.

    PubMed

    Kiser, Tim; Hansen, James; Kennedy, Brian

    2010-08-01

    Metals contamination from mining activities is a persistent problem affecting aquatic ecosystems throughout mining districts in the western USA. The Gold Creek drainage in northern Idaho has a history of mining within its headwaters and contains elevated sediment concentrations of As, Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn. To determine system-wide impacts of increased metals, we measured concentrations of metals in water, sediment, and benthic macroinvertebrate tissues and related them to whole-body fish tissues and histopathological alterations in native salmonids. Water concentrations were higher than those in reference areas, but were below water quality criteria for protection of aquatic biota for most of the study area. Sediment and benthic macroinvertebrate tissue concentrations for all metals were significantly higher at all sites compared with the reference site. Fish tissues were significantly higher for all metals below mine sites compared with the reference site, but only Cd and Pb were higher in fish tissues in the furthest downstream reach in the Gold Creek Delta. Metals concentrations in benthic macroinvertebrate tissues and fish tissues were strongly correlated, suggesting a transfer of metals through a dietary pathway. The concentrations within sediments and biota were similar to those reported in other studies in which adverse effects to salmonids occurred. We observed histopathological changes in livers of bull trout, including inflammation, necrosis, and pleomorphism. Our study is consistent with other work in which sediment-driven exposure can transfer up the food chain and may cause adverse impacts to higher organisms.

  14. Vegetation Description, Rare Plant Inventory, and Vegetation Monitoring for Craig Mountain, Idaho.

    SciTech Connect

    Mancuso, Michael; Moseley, Robert

    1994-12-01

    The Craig Mountain Wildlife Mitigation Area was purchased by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as partial mitigation for wildlife losses incurred with the inundation of Dworshak Reservoir on the North Fork Clearwater River. Upon completion of the National Environmental Protection Act (NEPA) process, it is proposed that title to mitigation lands will be given to the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG). Craig Mountain is located at the northern end of the Hells Canyon Ecosystem. It encompasses the plateau and steep canyon slopes extending from the confluence of the Snake and Salmon rivers, northward to near Waha, south of Lewiston, Idaho. The forested summit of Craig Mountain is characterized by gently rolling terrain. The highlands dramatically break into the canyons of the Snake and Salmon rivers at approximately the 4,700 foot contour. The highly dissected canyons are dominated by grassland slopes containing a mosaic of shrubfield, riparian, and woodland habitats. During the 1993 and 1994 field seasons, wildlife, habitat/vegetation, timber, and other resources were systematically inventoried at Craig Mountain to provide Fish and Game managers with information needed to draft an ecologically-based management plan. The results of the habitat/vegetation portion of the inventory are contained in this report. The responsibilities for the Craig Mountain project included: (1) vegetation data collection, and vegetation classification, to help produce a GIS-generated Craig Mountain vegetation map, (2) to determine the distribution and abundance of rare plants populations and make recommendations concerning their management, and (3) to establish a vegetation monitoring program to evaluate the effects of Fish and Game management actions, and to assess progress towards meeting habitat mitigation goals.

  15. Cowlitz Falls Fish Passage.

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The upper Cowlitz was once home to native salmon and steelhead. But the combined impacts of overharvest, farming, logging and road building hammered fish runs. And in the 1960s, a pair of hydroelectric dams blocked the migration path of ocean-returning and ocean-going fish. The lower Cowlitz still supports hatchery runs of chinook, coho and steelhead. But some 200 river miles in the upper river basin--much of it prime spawning and rearing habitat--have been virtually cut off from the ocean for over 26 years. Now the idea is to trap-and-haul salmon and steelhead both ways and bypass previously impassable obstacles in the path of anadromous fish. The plan can be summarized, for the sake of explanation, in three steps: (1) trap and haul adult fish--collect ocean-returning adult fish at the lowermost Cowlitz dam, and truck them upstream; (2) reseed--release the ripe adults above the uppermost dam, and let them spawn naturally, at the same time, supplement these runs with hatchery born fry that are reared and imprinted in ponds and net pens in the watershed; (3) trap and haul smolts--collection the new generation of young fish as they arrive at the uppermost Cowlitz dam, truck them past the three dams, and release them to continue their downstream migration to the sea. The critical part of any fish-collection system is the method of fish attraction. Scientists have to find the best combination of attraction system and screens that will guide young fish to the right spot, away from the turbine intakes. In the spring of 1994 a test was made of a prototype system of baffles and slots on the upriver face of the Cowlitz Falls Dam. The prototype worked at 90% efficiency in early tests, and it worked without the kind of expensive screening devices that have been installed on other dams. Now that the success of the attraction system has been verified, Harza engineers and consultants will design and build the appropriate collection part of the system.

  16. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Sewer System Upgrade Project. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment for a proposed Sewer System Upgrade Project at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) near Idaho Falls, Idaho. The proposed action would include activities conducted at the Central Facilities Area, Test Reactor Area, and the Containment Test Facility at the Test Area North at INEL. The proposed action would consist of replacing or remodeling the existing sewage treatment plants at the Central Facilities Area, Test Reactor Area, and Containment Test Facility. Also, a new sewage testing laboratory would be constructed at the Central Facilities Area. Finally, the proposed action would include replacing, repairing, and/or adding sewer lines in areas where needed.

  17. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Waste Management Operations Roadmap Document

    SciTech Connect

    Bullock, M.

    1992-04-01

    At the direction of the Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ), the DOE Idaho Field Office (DOE-ID) is developing roadmaps for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ER&WM) activities at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). DOE-ID has convened a select group of contractor personnel from EG&G Idaho, Inc. to assist DOE-ID personnel with the roadmapping project. This document is a report on the initial stages of the first phase of the INEL`s roadmapping efforts.

  18. Positron program at the Idaho Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, Giulio

    2009-09-02

    Positron physics is an important part of the research activities at the Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC). With positron annihilation spectroscopy, maps of nanodefects in materials have been obtained. For this purpose, positrons are generated by radioactive decay, photoactivation, or pair production. Preliminary tests of positron sources in the MeV range based on electron linacs have also been carried out at the IAC, and an expansion of this program is planned. A similar positron beam at Jefferson Lab would greatly improve our knowledge of the inner structure of the proton. In this paper, research with positrons at the IAC is reviewed. After a description of the Center's facilities, results from positron annihilation spectroscopy are discussed, together with future plans for testing a prototype positron source for CEBAF.

  19. Idaho Chemical Processing Plant failure rate database

    SciTech Connect

    Alber, T.G.; Hunt, C.R.; Fogarty, S.P.; Wilson, J.R.

    1995-08-01

    This report represents the first major upgrade to the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) Failure Rate Database. This upgrade incorporates additional site-specific and generic data while improving on the previous data reduction techniques. In addition, due to a change in mission at the ICPP, the status of certain equipment items has changed from operating to standby or off-line. A discussion of how this mission change influenced the relevance of failure data also has been included. This report contains two data sources: the ICPP Failure Rate Database and a generic failure rate database. A discussion is presented on the approaches and assumptions used to develop the data in the ICPP Failure Rate Database. The generic database is included along with a short discussion of its application. A brief discussion of future projects recommended to strengthen and lend credibility to the ICPP Failure Rate Database also is included.

  20. Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Joanne L. Knight

    2008-04-01

    This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, “Environmental Protection Program,” and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

  1. Idaho National Laboratory Site Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Joanne L. Knight

    2010-10-01

    This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, “Environmental Protection Program,” and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

  2. Idaho National Laboratory Site Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Joanne L. Knight

    2012-08-01

    This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, “Environmental Protection Program,” and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

  3. BOULDER-PIONEER WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, IDAHO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simons, Frank S.; Tuchek, Ernest T.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral-resource survey of the Boulder-Pioneer Wilderness study area in the Pioneer and Boulder Mountains of south-central Idaho, was made. The area has demonstrated resources of about 1. 7 million tons of lead-zinc-silver ore, mostly in the Phi Kappa mine, and an additional 2. 5 million tons of demonstrated resources in areas of substantiated potential for these metals and for tungsten, molybdenum, and fluorite. The survey indicates substantiated resource potential in eight areas and probable mineral-resource potential in seven. Mineral commodities of greatest intertest include tungsten, copper, lead, zinc, silver, gold, molybdenum, vanadium, and barite. There is little likelihood for the occurrence of oil, gas, coal, or geothermal resources.

  4. Idaho National Laboratory Quarterly Occurrence Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Lisbeth Ann

    2015-11-01

    This report is published quarterly by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Quality and Performance Management Organization. The Department of Energy (DOE) Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS), as prescribed in DOE Order 232.2, “Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information,” requires a quarterly analysis of events, both reportable and not reportable, for the previous 12 months. This report is the analysis of 85 reportable events (18 from the 4th Qtr FY-15 and 67 from the prior three reporting quarters), as well as 25 other issue reports (including events found to be not reportable and Significant Category A and B conditions) identified at INL during the past 12 months (8 from this quarter and 17 from the prior three quarters).

  5. Idaho National Laboratory Quarterly Performance Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Lisbeth

    2014-11-01

    This report is published quarterly by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Quality and Performance Management Organization. The Department of Energy (DOE) Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS), as prescribed in DOE Order 232.2, “Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information,” requires a quarterly analysis of events, both reportable and not reportable, for the previous 12 months. This report is the analysis of 60 reportable events (23 from the 4th Qtr FY14 and 37 from the prior three reporting quarters) as well as 58 other issue reports (including not reportable events and Significant Category A and B conditions) identified at INL from July 2013 through October 2014. Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA) operates the INL under contract DE AC07 051D14517.

  6. Idaho National Laboratory Research & Development Impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Stricker, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Technological advances that drive economic growth require both public and private investment. The U.S. Department of Energy’s national laboratories play a crucial role by conducting the type of research, testing and evaluation that is beyond the scope of regulators, academia or industry. Examples of such work from the past year can be found in these pages. Idaho National Laboratory’s engineering and applied science expertise helps deploy new technologies for nuclear energy, national security and new energy resources. Unique infrastructure, nuclear material inventory and vast expertise converge at INL, the nation’s nuclear energy laboratory. Productive partnerships with academia, industry and government agencies deliver high-impact outcomes. This edition of INL’s Impacts magazine highlights national and regional leadership efforts, growing capabilities, notable collaborations, and technology innovations. Please take a few minutes to learn more about the critical resources and transformative research at one of the nation’s premier applied science laboratories.

  7. Lithospheric structure in the Eastern Oregon and Western Idaho across the Western Idaho Shear Zone and Idaho Batholith from teleseismic receiver functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanciu, A. C.; Russo, R. M.; Mocanu, V. I.; Bremner, P. M.; Torpey, M.; Hongsresawat, S.

    2013-12-01

    We present new P-to-S receiver functions at 86 broadband seismic stations that we deployed in Eastern Oregon and Western Idaho as part of the IDOR (IDaho-ORegon) Earthscope project. We obtained a 3D lithospheric image detailing the crustal structure and architecture of the Idaho Batholith and Salmon River suture/Western Idaho Shear Zone (WISZ) at depth. The suture marks the sharp ~110-90 Ma contact between the accreted oceanic terranes (Blue Mountains province) and the North American Craton and is characterized largely by the near vertical dextral transpressional system of the WISZ, which closely follows the Sr 0.706 isopleth. The Idaho Batholith (Atlanta and Bitterroot lobes) is characterized by long-lived magmatism ranging between 108 and 50 Ma occurring during and after the deformation in the WISZ. To understand the evolution of this portion of the western North American plate boundary and the transition from Mesozoic transpressional tectonics west of the Idaho batholith to current basin-and-range-like tectonics to the east, we analyzed more than 350 teleseismic events generated at epicentral distances between 30 and 95 degrees. We constructed receiver functions using a modified version of the Ligorria and Ammon (1999) iterative deconvolution technique, and then applied the H-k stacking procedure of Zhu and Kanamori (2000) for each station to estimate Vp/Vs ratios and depths to different boundary interfaces. In addition we applied the common conversion point stacking method (CCP) of Dueker and Sheehan (1997) for bins of receiver functions. Preliminary results show an important variation of the crustal thickness beneath the IDOR area, with a thicker crust beneath the Atlanta lobe of the Idaho Batholith.

  8. Fish Rhabdoviruses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurath, G.; Winton, J.

    2008-01-01

    Many important viral pathogens of fish are members of the family Rhabdoviridae. The viruses in this large group cause significant losses in populations of wild fish as well as among fish reared in aquaculture. Fish rhabdoviruses often have a wide host and geographic range, and infect aquatic animals in both freshwater and seawater. The fish rhabdoviruses comprise a diverse collection of isolates that can be placed in one of two quite different groups: isolates that are members of the established genusNovirhabdovirus, and those that are most similar to members of the genus Vesiculovirus. Because the diseases caused by fish rhabdoviruses are important to aquaculture, diagnostic methods for their detection and identification are well established. In addition to regulations designed to reduce the spread of fish viruses, a significant body of research has addressed methods for the control or prevention of diseases caused by fish rhabdoviruses, including vaccination. The number of reported fish rhabdoviruses continues to grow as a result of the expansion of aquaculture, the increase in global trade, the development of improved diagnostic methods, and heightened surveillance activities. Fish rhabdoviruses serve as useful components of model systems to study vertebrate virus disease, epidemiology, and immunology.

  9. 40 CFR 131.33 - Idaho.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Little Slate Creek, Little Van Buren Creek, No Business Creek, North Creek, North Fork Slate Creek, North..., Fall Creek, Filly Creek, Fish Creek, Flossie Creek, Game Creek, Gap Creek, Ginger Creek, Green...

  10. 40 CFR 131.33 - Idaho.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Little Slate Creek, Little Van Buren Creek, No Business Creek, North Creek, North Fork Slate Creek, North..., Fall Creek, Filly Creek, Fish Creek, Flossie Creek, Game Creek, Gap Creek, Ginger Creek, Green...

  11. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory: Annual report, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The INEL underwent a year of transition in 1986. Success with new business initiatives, the prospects of even better things to come, and increased national recognition provided the INEL with a glimpse of its promising and exciting future. Among the highlights were: selection of the INEL as the preferred site for the Special Isotope Separation Facility (SIS); the first shipments of core debris from the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor to the INEL; dedication of three new facilities - the Fluorinel Dissolution Process, the Remote Analytical Laboratory, and the Stored Waste Experimental Pilot Plant; groundbreaking for the Fuel Processing Restoration Facility; and the first IR-100 award won by the INEL, given for an innovative machine vision system. The INEL has been assigned project management responsibility for the SDI Office-sponsored Multimegawatt Space Reactor and the Air Force-sponsored Multimegawatt Terrestrial Power Plant Project. New Department of Defense initiatives have been realized in projects involving development of prototype defense electronics systems, materials research, and hazardous waste technology. While some of our major reactor safety research programs have been completed, the INEL continues as a leader in advanced reactor technologies development. In April, successful tests were conducted for the development of the Integral Fast Reactor. Other 1986 highlights included the INEL's increased support to the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management for complying with the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. Major INEL activities included managing a cask procurement program, demonstrating fuel assembly consolidation, and testing spent fuel storage casks. In addition, the INEL supplied the Tennessee Valley Authority with management and personnel experienced in reactor technology, increased basic research programs at the Idaho Research Center, and made numerous outreach efforts to assist the economies of Idaho communities.

  12. Cottus schitsuumsh, a new species of sculpin (Scorpaeniformes: Cottidae) in the Columbia River basin, Idaho-Montana, USA.

    PubMed

    Lemoine, Michael; Young, Michael K; Mckelvey, Kevin S; Eby, Lisa; Pilgrim, Kristine L; Schwartz, Michael K

    2014-01-22

    Fishes of the genus Cottus have long been taxonomically challenging because of morphological similarities among species and their tendency to hybridize, and a number of undescribed species may remain in this genus. We used a combination of genetic and morphological methods to delineate and describe Cottus schitsuumsh, Cedar Sculpin, a new species, from the upper Columbia River basin, Idaho-Montana, USA. Although historically confused with the Shorthead Sculpin (C. confusus), the genetic distance between C. schitsuumsh and C. confusus (4.84-6.29%) suggests these species are distant relatives. Moreover, the two species can be differentiated on the basis of lateral-line pores on the caudal peduncle, head width, and interpelvic width. Cottus schitsuumsh is also distinct from all other Cottus in this region in having a single small, skin-covered, preopercular spine. Haplotypes of mtDNA cytochrome oxidase c subunit 1 of C. schitsuumsh differed from all other members of the genus at three positions, had interspecific genetic distances typical for congeneric fishes (1.61-2.74% to nearest neighbors), and were monophyletic in maximum-likelihood trees. Microsatellite analyses confirmed these taxonomic groupings for species potentially sympatric with C. schitsuumsh and that fish used in morphological comparisons were unlikely to be introgressed. Its irregular distribution, in the Spokane River basin in Idaho and portions of the Clark Fork River basin in Montana, may have resulted from human-assisted translocation.

  13. 76 FR 9540 - South Central Idaho Resource Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-18

    ..., Attn: Julie Thomas, 2647 Kimberly Road East, Twin Falls, Idaho 83301. Comments may also be sent via e... public may inspect comments received at the Sawtooth National Forest, 2647 Kimberly Road East, Twin...

  14. 75 FR 18146 - South Central Idaho Resource Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-09

    ... Kimberly Road East, Twin Falls, Idaho 83301. Comments may also be sent via e-mail to jathomas@fs.fed.us... received at The Sawtooth National Forest Supervisors Office at 2647 Kimberly Road East, Twin Falls,...

  15. Addendum to the distribution of two herptiles in Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, T.D.; Laurance, W.F.

    1985-04-30

    Due to an error in printing quality of an earlier article, the distribution maps for the night snake (Hypsiglena torquata) and the tiger salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum) in Idaho are reprinted. 2 references, 2 figures.

  16. RadNet Air Data From Idaho Falls, ID

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page presents radiation air monitoring and air filter analysis data for Idaho Falls, ID from EPA's RadNet system. RadNet is a nationwide network of monitoring stations that measure radiation in air, drinking water and precipitation.

  17. Ergonomic assessments of three Idaho National Engineering Laboratory cafeterias

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrom, L.T.; Romero, H.A.; Gilbert, B.G.; Wilhelmsen, C.A.

    1993-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is a Department of Energy facility that performs a variety of engineering and research projects. EG G Idaho is the prime contractor for the laboratory and, as such, performs the support functions in addition to technical, research, and development functions. As a part of the EG G Idaho Industrial Hygiene Initiative, ergonomic assessments were conducted at three Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Cafeterias. The purposes of the assessments were to determine whether ergonomic problems existed in the work places and, if so, to make recommendations to improve the work place and task designs. The study showed there were ergonomic problems in all three cafeterias assessed. The primary ergonomic stresses observed included wrist and shoulder stress in the dish washing task, postural stress in the dish washing and food preparation tasks, and back stress in the food handling tasks.

  18. Ergonomic assessments of three Idaho National Engineering Laboratory cafeterias

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrom, L.T.; Romero, H.A.; Gilbert, B.G.; Wilhelmsen, C.A.

    1993-05-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is a Department of Energy facility that performs a variety of engineering and research projects. EG&G Idaho is the prime contractor for the laboratory and, as such, performs the support functions in addition to technical, research, and development functions. As a part of the EG&G Idaho Industrial Hygiene Initiative, ergonomic assessments were conducted at three Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Cafeterias. The purposes of the assessments were to determine whether ergonomic problems existed in the work places and, if so, to make recommendations to improve the work place and task designs. The study showed there were ergonomic problems in all three cafeterias assessed. The primary ergonomic stresses observed included wrist and shoulder stress in the dish washing task, postural stress in the dish washing and food preparation tasks, and back stress in the food handling tasks.

  19. Idaho National Laboratory Mission Accomplishments, Fiscal Year 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Todd Randall; Wright, Virginia Latta

    2015-09-01

    A summary of mission accomplishments for the research organizations at the Idaho National Laboratory for FY 2015. Areas include Nuclear Energy, National and Homeland Security, Science and Technology Addressing Broad DOE Missions; Collaborations; and Stewardship and Operation of Research Facilities.

  20. Depth to water, 1991, in the Rathdrum Prairie, Idaho; Spokane River valley, Washington; Moscow-Lewiston-Grangeville area, Idaho; and selected intermontane valleys, east-central Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berenbrock, Charles E.; Bassick, M.D.; Rogers, T.L.; Garcia, S.P.

    1995-01-01

    This map report illustrates digitally generated depth-to-water zones for the Rathdrum Prairie in Idaho; part of the Spokane River Valley in eastern Washington; and the intermontane valleys of the upper Big Wood, Big Lost, Pahsimeroi, Little Lost, and Lemhi Rivers and Birch Creek in Idaho. Depth to water is 400 to 500 feet below land surface in the northern part of Rathdrum Prairie, 100 to 200 feet below land surface at the Idaho-Washington State line, and 0 to 250 feet below land surface in the Spokane area. Depth to water in the intermontane valleys in east-central Idaho is least (usually less than 50 feet) near streams and increases toward valley margins where mountain-front alluvial fans have formed. Depths to water shown in the Moscow-Lewiston-Grangeville area in Idaho are limited to point data at individual wells because most of the water levels measured were not representative of levels in the uppermost aquifer but of levels in deeper aquifers.

  1. Evaluate Status of Pacific Lamprey in the Clearwater River Drainage, Idaho, Annual Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Cochnauer, Tim; Claire, Christopher

    2003-10-01

    In 2002 Idaho Department of Fish and Game continued investigation into the status of Pacific lamprey populations in Idaho's Clearwater River drainage. Trapping, electrofishing, and spawning ground redd surveys were used to determine Pacific lamprey distribution, life history strategies, and habitat requirements in the South Fork Clearwater River, Lochsa River, Selway River, and Middle Fork Clearwater River subbasins. Five-hundred forty-one ammocoetes were captured electroshocking 70 sites in the South Fork Clearwater River, Lochsa River, Selway River, Middle Fork Clearwater River, Clearwater River, and their tributaries in 2002. Habitat utilization surveys in Red River support previous work indicating Pacific lamprey ammocoete densities are greater in lateral scour pool habitats compared to riffles and rapids. Presence-absence survey findings in 2002 augmented 2000 and 2001 indicating Pacific lamprey macrothalmia and ammocoetes are not numerous or widely distributed. Pacific lamprey distribution was confined to the lower reaches of Red River below rkm 8.0, the South Fork Clearwater River, Lochsa River (Ginger Creek to mouth), Selway River (Race Creek to mouth), Middle Fork Clearwater River, and the Clearwater River (downstream to Potlatch River).

  2. Evaluation and Statistical Review of Idaho Supplementation Studies :1991-2001.

    SciTech Connect

    Lutch, Jeffrey; Steinhorst, Kirk; Beasley, Chris

    2003-03-01

    The Idaho Supplementation Studies (ISS) was developed to evaluate the utility of supplementation as a recovery tool for Snake River basin chinook salmon (Supplementation Technical Workgroup 1987), and to help define the potential role of supplementation in managing Idaho's anadromous fisheries (IDFG 1990; IDFG 1992). Supplementation as defined by the Regional Assessment of Supplementation Project group is the use of artificial propagation in the attempt to maintain or increase natural production while maintaining the long-term fitness of the target population (RASP 1992). Poor survival has led to the decline and continued depression of upriver chinook salmon stocks due to mainstem passage and mortality factors associated with the lower Snake and Columbia river dams. Although immediate efforts should focus on alleviating the poor passage and flow conditions, supplementation may concurrently be a viable tool to meet the Northwest Power Planning Council's interim goal of doubling anadromous fish runs in the Columbia River Basin (NPPC 1987) and avoiding short-term loss of spawning aggregates.

  3. Idaho National Laboratory's FY11 Greenhouse Gas Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kimberly Frerichs

    2012-03-01

    A greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory is a systematic approach to account for the production and release of certain gases generated by an institution from various emission sources. The gases of interest are those that climate science has identified as related to anthropogenic global climate change. This document presents an inventory of GHGs generated during Fiscal Year (FY) 2011 by Idaho National Laboratory (INL), a Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored entity, located in southeastern Idaho.

  4. Idaho National Laboratory FY12 Greenhouse Gas Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kimberly Frerichs

    2013-03-01

    A greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory is a systematic approach to account for the production and release of certain gases generated by an institution from various emission sources. The gases of interest are those that climate science has identified as related to anthropogenic global climate change. This document presents an inventory of GHGs generated during Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 by Idaho National Laboratory (INL), a Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored entity, located in southeastern Idaho.

  5. Tiger Team assessment of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    McKenzie, Barbara J.; West, Stephanie G.; Jones, Olga G.; Kerr, Dorothy A.; Bieri, Rita A.; Sanderson, Nancy L.

    1991-08-01

    The purpose of the Safety and Health (S H) Subteam assessment was to determine the effectiveness of representative safety and health programs at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) site. Four Technical Safety Appraisal (TSA) Teams were assembled for this purpose by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Deputy Assistant Secretary for Safety and Quality Assurance, Office of Safety Appraisals (OSA). Team No. 1 reviewed EG G Idaho, Inc. (EG G Idaho) and the Department of Energy Field Office, Idaho (ID) Fire Department. Team No. 2 reviewed Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W). Team No. 3 reviewed selected contractors at the INEL; specifically, Morrison Knudsen-Ferguson of Idaho Company (MK-FIC), Protection Technology of Idaho, Inc. (PTI), Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory (RESL), and Rockwell-INEL. Team No. 4 provided an Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA)-type compliance sitewide assessment of INEL. The S H Subteam assessment was performed concurrently with assessments conducted by Environmental and Management Subteams. Performance was appraised in the following technical areas: Organization and Administration, Quality Verification, Operations, Maintenance, Training and Certification, Auxiliary Systems, Emergency Preparedness, Technical Support, Packaging and Transportation, Nuclear Criticality Safety, Security/Safety Interface, Experimental Activities, Site/Facility Safety Review, Radiological Protection, Personnel Protection, Worker Safety and Health (OSHA) Compliance, Fire Protection, Aviation Safety, Medical Services, and Firearms Safety.

  6. Tiger Team assessment of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    This report documents the Tiger Team Assessment of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) located in Idaho Falls, Idaho. INEL is a multiprogram, laboratory site of the US Department of Energy (DOE). Overall site management is provided by the DOE Field Office, Idaho; however, the DOE Field Office, Chicago has responsibility for the Argonne National Laboratory-West facilities and operations through the Argonne Area Office. In addition, the Idaho Branch Office of the Pittsburgh Naval Reactors Office has responsibility for the Naval Reactor Facility (NRF) at the INEL. The assessment included all DOE elements having ongoing program activities at the site except for the NRF. In addition, the Safety and Health Subteam did not review the Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company, Inc. facilities and operations. The Tiger Team Assessment was conducted from June 17 to August 2, 1991, under the auspices of the Office of Special Projects, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health, Headquarters, DOE. The assessment was comprehensive, encompassing environmental, safety, and health (ES H) disciplines; management; and contractor and DOE self-assessments. Compliance with applicable federal, state, and local regulations; applicable DOE Orders; best management practices; and internal INEL site requirements was assessed. In addition, an evaluation of the adequacy and effectiveness of the DOE and the site contractors management of ES H/quality assurance programs was conducted.

  7. Tiger Team assessment of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Edward S.; Keating, John J.

    1991-08-01

    The Management Subteam conducted a management assessment of Environment, Safety, and Health (ES H) programs and their implementation of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The objectives of the assessment were to: (1) evaluate the effectiveness of existing management functions and processes in terms of ensuring environmental compliance, and the health and safety of workers and the general public; and (2) identify probable root causes for ES H findings and concerns. Organizations reviewed were DOE-Headquarters: DOE Field Offices, Chicago (CH) and Idaho (ID); Argonne Area Offices, East (AAO-E) and West (AAO-W); Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory (RESL); Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); EG G Idaho, Inc. (EG G); Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company, Inc. (WINCO); Rockwell-INEL; MK-Ferguson of Idaho Company (MK-FIC); and Protection Technology of Idaho, Inc. (PTI). The scope of the assessment covered the following ES H management issues: policies and procedures; roles, responsibilities, and authorities; management commitment; communication; staff development, training, and certification; recruitment; compliance management; conduct of operations; emergency planning and preparedness; quality assurance; self assessment; oversight activities; and cost plus award fee processes.

  8. Evaluation of rotary drum screens used to protect juvenile salmonids in the Yakima River Basin, Washington, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Neitzel, D.A.; Abernethy, C.S. ); Clune, T.J. )

    1990-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the design and operation of rotary drum screens. Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and steelhead O. mykiss are the potentially affected fish. Cold-branded fish are released upstream of the screen facilities. For descaling tests, the fish are captured as they exit the facility and are examined for injuries, descaling, and post-test mortalities. For screen passage tests, nets are placed in the irrigation ditch, downstream of the screen facilities, to determine if fish can pass through or over the screens. More than 100 tests have been conducted with almost 35,000 fish. Additionally, nearly 2000 native fish have been evaluated. Usually less than 2% of the test fish are injured or dead, and the condition of test fish does not differ from the controls. Less than 2% of the fish pass through or over the screens when the screen seals are properly installed and maintained.

  9. Historical perspective of the mineral production of Idaho, with comments on the Hailey 1 degree x 2 degrees quadrangle, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bawiec, Walter J.; Dee, Lawrence L.

    2001-01-01

    Idaho has a long and diverse history of minerals exploration and production. A comprehensive look at this history, combined with documentation of the distribution and magnitude of past and present mineral production, can lead to a better understanding of the mineral endowment and potential resources. The total mineral production of Idaho (1905?1972), when examined as unit regional values and compared to the rest of the United States, shows that Idaho has produced above the median value of other States for both metals and precious materials, near the median value for nonmetals, and below the median value for construction materials and fuels. An examination of selected commodities within Idaho, by county, for a fifty-year period (1902?1951) shows the dominance of Shoshone County in total production within the State for silver, copper, lead, and zinc.

  10. Evaluation of total phosphorus mass balance in the lower Boise River and selected tributaries, southwestern Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Etheridge, Alexandra B.

    2013-01-01

    he U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with Idaho Department of Environmental Quality, developed spreadsheet mass-balance models for total phosphorus using results from three synoptic sampling periods conducted in the lower Boise River watershed during August and October 2012, and March 2013. The modeling reach spanned 46.4 river miles (RM) along the Boise River from Veteran’s Memorial Parkway in Boise, Idaho (RM 50.2), to Parma, Idaho (RM 3.8). The USGS collected water-quality samples and measured streamflow at 14 main-stem Boise River sites, two Boise River north channel sites, two sites on the Snake River upstream and downstream of its confluence with the Boise River, and 17 tributary and return-flow sites. Additional samples were collected from treated effluent at six wastewater treatment plants and two fish hatcheries. The Idaho Department of Water Resources quantified diversion flows in the modeling reach. Total phosphorus mass-balance models were useful tools for evaluating sources of phosphorus in the Boise River during each sampling period. The timing of synoptic sampling allowed the USGS to evaluate phosphorus inputs to and outputs from the Boise River during irrigation season, shortly after irrigation ended, and soon before irrigation resumed. Results from the synoptic sampling periods showed important differences in surface-water and groundwater distribution and phosphorus loading. In late August 2012, substantial streamflow gains to the Boise River occurred from Middleton (RM 31.4) downstream to Parma (RM 3.8). Mass-balance model results indicated that point and nonpoint sources (including groundwater) contributed phosphorus loads to the Boise River during irrigation season. Groundwater exchange within the Boise River in October 2012 and March 2013 was not as considerable as that measured in August 2012. However, groundwater discharge to agricultural tributaries and drains during non-irrigation season was a large source of discharge and

  11. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho and Component Development and Integration Facility, Butte, Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings of the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF), conducted September 14 through October 2, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. The team includes outside experts supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the INEL and CDIF. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations' carried on at the INEL and the CDIF, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis (S A) Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The S A Plan will be executed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. When completed, the S A results will be incorporated into the INEL/CDIF Survey findings for inclusion into the Environmental Survey Summary Report. 90 refs., 95 figs., 77 tabs.

  12. Idaho Habitat and Natural Production Monitoring Part II, 1992 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Kiefer, Russell B.; Lockhart, Jerald N.

    1993-10-01

    The Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) has been monitoring and evaluating proposed and existing habitat improvement projects for rainbow-steelhead trout Oncorhynchus mykiss and chinook salmon O. tshawytscha in the Clearwater River and Salmon River drainages for the past 7 years. Projects included in the evaluation are funded by, or proposed for funding by, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the Northwest Power Planning Act as off-site mitigation for downstream hydropower development on the Snake and Columbia rivers. The objectives of this project are: (1) to determine the mathematical relationship between spawning escapement, parr production, and smolt production; (2) estimate carrying capacity and optimal smolt production; and (3) determine habitat factors relating to substrate, riparian, and channel quality that limit natural smolt production.

  13. Texture Fish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Julie

    2007-01-01

    In an effort to provide an opportunity for her first graders to explore texture through an engaging subject, the author developed a three-part lesson that features fish in a mixed-media artwork: (1) Exploring Textured Paint; (2) Creating the Fish; and (3) Role Playing. In this lesson, students effectively explore texture through painting, drawing,…

  14. Dynamics of an introduced and unexploited Lake Whitefish population in Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hosack, Michael A.; Hansen, Michael J.; Horner, Ned J.

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate biological potential of a commercial fishery for an unexploited Lake Whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis population in Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho, we estimated population parameters related to production and yield. The length frequency based on trap-netting in autumn 2005 was normal with a mean of 448 mm TL, whereas the length frequency based on gillnetting in spring 2006 was bimodal with a mean of 390 mm TL. Sex composition was skewed toward females (0.66) during autumn trap-netting. Shape parameters β of weight–length models for females (β = 3.38) and males (β = 3.45) were similar to those of other unexploited populations. Instantaneous growth rates K for females (K = 0.144 per year) and males (K = 0.153 per year) were among the lowest for unexploited populations across the species’ range. Age at 50% maturity (females: 6.5 years; males: 6.0 years) and length at 50% maturity (females: 390 mm TL; males: 378 mm TL) were high for unexploited populations. The natural mortality rate M (0.149 per year, ages 11–36) was among the lowest observed for unexploited populations. Adult population density was lower than that of other populations based on total surface area (mean = 1.35 fish/ha; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.11–1.78 fish/ha) but was average based on lake area shallower than 70 m (4.07 fish/ha; 95% CI = 3.35–5.35 fish/ha). Population density of juveniles and adults averaged 84 fish/ha (95% CI = 52–143 fish/ha) over the entire surface area and 278 fish/ha (95% CI = 173–474 fish/ha) over depths shallower than 70 m. The difference between the low M of the unexploited population in Lake Pend Oreille (M = 0.149 per year; annual mortality rate A = 14%) and the high sustainable total mortality Z of exploited stocks in the Laurentian Great Lakes (Z = 1.204; A = 70%) suggests a large scope for sustainable fishing mortality F (1.055 per year; exploitation rate u = 61%) that is equivalent to a sustainable Lake Whitefish harvest of 55

  15. Steelhead Supplementation Studies; Steelhead Supplementation in Idaho Rivers, Annual Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, Alan

    2003-03-01

    The Steelhead Supplementation Study (SSS) has two broad objectives: (1) investigate the feasibility of supplementing depressed wild and natural steelhead populations using hatchery populations, and (2) describe the basic life history and genetic characteristics of wild and natural steelhead populations in the Salmon and Clearwater Basins. Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) personnel stocked adult steelhead from Sawtooth Fish Hatchery into Frenchman and Beaver creeks and estimated the number of age-1 parr produced from the outplants since 1993. On May 2, 2002, both Beaver and Frenchman creeks were stocked with hatchery adult steelhead. A SSS crew snorkeled the creeks in August 2002 to estimate the abundance of age-1 parr from brood year (BY) 2001. I estimated that the yield of age-1 parr per female stocked in 2001 was 7.3 and 6.7 in Beaver and Frenchman creeks, respectively. SSS crews stocked Dworshak hatchery stock fingerlings and smolts from 1993 to 1999 in the Red River drainage to assess which life stage produces more progeny when the adults return to spawn. In 2002, Clearwater Fish Hatchery personnel operated the Red River weir to trap adults that returned from these stockings. Twelve PIT-tagged adults from the smolt releases and one PIT-tagged adult from fingerling releases were detected during their migration up the mainstem Columbia and Snake rivers, but none from either group were caught at the weir. The primary focus of the study has been monitoring and collecting life history information from wild steelhead populations. An adult weir has been operated annually since 1992 in Fish Creek, a tributary of the Lochsa River. The weir was damaged by a rain-on-snow event in April 2002 and although the weir remained intact, some adults were able to swim undetected through the weir. Despite damage to the weir, trap tenders captured 167 adult steelhead, the most fish since 1993. The maximum likelihood estimate of adult steelhead escapement was 242. A screw trap

  16. Idaho National Laboratory Site Pollution Prevention Plan

    SciTech Connect

    E. D. Sellers

    2007-03-01

    It is the policy of the Department of Energy (DOE) that pollution prevention and sustainable environmental stewardship will be integrated into DOE operations as a good business practice to reduce environmental hazards, protect environmental resources, avoid pollution control costs, and improve operational efficiency and mission sustainability. In furtherance of this policy, DOE established five strategic, performance-based Pollution Prevention (P2) and Sustainable Environmental Stewardship goals and included them as an attachment to DOE O 450.1, Environmental Protection Program. These goals and accompanying strategies are to be implemented by DOE sites through the integration of Pollution Prevention into each site's Environmental Management System (EMS). This document presents a P2 and Sustainability Program and corresponding plan pursuant to DOE Order 450.1 and DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. This plan is also required by the state of Idaho, pursuant to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) partial permit. The objective of this document is to describe the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site P2 and Sustainability Program. The purpose of the program is to decrease the environmental footprint of the INL Site while providing enhanced support of its mission. The success of the program is dependent on financial and management support. The signatures on the previous page indicate INL, ICP, and AMWTP Contractor management support and dedication to the program. P2 requirements have been integrated into working procedures to ensure an effective EMS as part of an Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS). This plan focuses on programmatic functions which include environmentally preferable procurement, sustainable design, P2 and Sustainability awareness, waste generation and reduction, source reduction and recycling, energy management, and pollution prevention opportunity assessments. The INL Site P2 and Sustainability Program is administratively

  17. Winter foraging ecology of bald eagles on a regulated river in southwest Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kaltenecker, Gregory S.; Steenhof, Karen; Bechard, Marc J.; Munger, James C.

    1998-01-01

    We studied Bald Eagle foraging ecology on the South Fork Boise River,Idaho, during the winters of 1990-92. We compared habitat variables at 29 foraging sites, 94 perch sites, and 131 random sites.Habitat variables included river habitat (pool, riffle, run), distance to the nearest change in river habitat, distance to nearest available perch, number and species of surrounding perches, and average river depth and flow. Eagles foraged more at pools than expected, and closer( (15 m) to changes in river habitat than expected. Where eagles foraged at riffles, those riffles were slower than riffles where they perched or riffles that were available at random. Where eagles foraged at runs, those runs were shallower than runs at either perch or random sites. Eagles perched less at riffles and more at sites where trees were available than expected. Changes in river habitat represent habitat edges where river depth and flow change, making fish more vulnerable to eagle predation. Fish are more susceptible to predation at shallower river depths and slower flows. Slower river flows may be related to decreased surface turbulence, which also increases vulnerability of fish to aerial predation.

  18. Radionuclides in ground water at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knobel, LeRoy L.; Mann, Larry J.

    1988-01-01

    Sampling for radionuclides in groundwater was conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory during September to November 5 1987. Water samples from 80 wells that obtain water from the Snake River Plain aquifer and 1 well that obtains water from a shallow, discontinuous perched-water body at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex were collected and analyzed for tritium, strontium-90, plutonium-238, plutonium-239, -240 (undivided), americium-241, cesium-137, cobalt-60, and potassium-40--a naturally occurring radionuclide. The groundwater samples were analyzed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in Idaho. Tritium and strontium-90 concentrations ranged from below the reporting level to 80.6 +/-0.000005 and 193 +/-5x10 to the minus eight micrograms Ci/ml, respectively. Water from a disposal well at Test Area North--which has not been used to dispose of waste water since September 1972--contained 122 +/-9x10 to the minus eleven micrograms Ci/ml of plutonium-238, 500 +/-20x10 to the minus eleven of plutonium-239, -240 (undivided), 21 +/-4x10 to the minus eleven micrograms Ci/ml of americium-241, and 750 +/-20x10 to the minus eight micrograms Ci/ml cesium-137; the presence of these radionuclides was verified by resampling and reanalysis. The disposal well had 8.9 +/-0.0000009 micrograms Ci/ml of cobalt-60 on October 28, 1987, but cobalt-60 was not detected when the well was resampled on January 11, 1988. Potassium-40 concentrations were less than the reporting level in all wells. (USGS)

  19. Quarternary paleoecology of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Snake River Plain, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Bright, R.C.; Davis, O.K.

    1982-07-01

    Plant and animal fossils have been recovered from several different types of sediment at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Based on woodrat middens and pollen from cave sediments, the Holocene vegetation history has been one of sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) steppe that became increasingly similar to shadscale (Atriplex spp.) steppe, culminating ca. 7000 years ago. A radiocarbon date on snail shells from ''ancient'' Lake Terreton shows that the basin was filled as recently as 700 years ago. Fossils of aquatic organisms were found in aeolian sediments, indicating that lake and stream sediments may be an important source of the aeolian sediment at the INEL.

  20. Augmented Fish Health Monitoring, 1988 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, James W.

    1989-08-15

    Augmented Fish Health Monitoring Contract AI79-87BP35585 was implemented on July 20, 1987. Second year activities focused on full implementation of disease surveillance activities and histopathological support services to participating state agencies. Persistent and sometimes severe disease losses were caused by infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN) in summer steelhead trout in Idaho and in spring chinook salmon at hatcheries on the lower Columbia River. Diagnostic capability was enhanced by the installation, for field use, of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technology at the Dworshak Fish Health Center for the detection and assay of bacterial kidney disease and by a dot-blot'' training session for virus identification at the Lower Columbia Fish Health Center. Complete diagnostic and inspection services were provided to 13 Columbia River basin National Fish hatcheries. Case history data was fully documented in a computerized data base for storage and analysis. This report briefly describes work being done to meet contract requirements for fish disease surveillance at Service facilities in the Columbia River basin. It also summarizes the health status of fish reared at those hatcheries and provides a summary of case history data for calendar year 1988. 2 refs., 4 tabs.

  1. Sediment cores and chemistry for the Kootenai River White Sturgeon Habitat Restoration Project, Boundary County, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barton, Gary J.; Weakland, Rhonda J.; Fosness, Ryan L.; Cox, Stephen E.; Williams, Marshall L.

    2012-01-01

    The Kootenai Tribe of Idaho, in cooperation with local, State, Federal, and Canadian agency co-managers and scientists, is assessing the feasibility of a Kootenai River habitat restoration project in Boundary County, Idaho. This project is oriented toward recovery of the endangered Kootenai River white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) population, and simultaneously targets habitat-based recovery of other native river biota. Projects currently (2010) under consideration include modifying the channel and flood plain, installing in-stream structures, and creating wetlands to improve the physical and biological functions of the ecosystem. River restoration is a complex undertaking that requires a thorough understanding of the river. To assist in evaluating the feasibility of this endeavor, the U.S. Geological Survey collected and analyzed the physical and chemical nature of sediment cores collected at 24 locations in the river. Core depths ranged from 4.6 to 15.2 meters; 21 cores reached a depth of 15.2 meters. The sediment was screened for the presence of chemical constituents that could have harmful effects if released during restoration activities. The analysis shows that concentrations of harmful chemical constituents do not exceed guideline limits that were published by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in 2006.

  2. TAP Report - Southwest Idaho Juniper Working Group

    SciTech Connect

    Gresham, Garold Linn

    2015-09-01

    There is explicit need for characterization of the materials for possible commercialization as little characterization data exists. Pinyon-juniper woodlands are a major ecosystem type found in the Southwest and the Intermountain West regions of the United States including Nevada, Idaho and Oregon. These widespread ecosystems are characterized by the presence of several different species of pinyon and juniper as the dominant plant cover. Since the 1800s, pinyon-juniper woodlands have rapidly expanded their range at the expense of existing ecosystems. Additionally, existing woodlands have become denser, progressively creating potential fire hazards as seen in the Soda Fire, which burned more than 400 sq. miles. Land managers responsible for these areas often desire to reduce pinyon-juniper coverage on their lands for a variety of reasons, as stated in the Working Group objectives. However, the cost of clearing thinning pinyon-juniper stands can be prohibitive. One reason for this is the lack of utilization options for the resulting biomass that could help recover some of the cost of pinyon-juniper stand management. The goal of this TAP effort was to assess the feedstock characteristics of biomass from a juniper harvested from Owyhee County to evaluate possible fuel and conversion utilization options.

  3. Idaho Operations Office: Technology summary, June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This document has been prepared by the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) Office of Technology Development (OTD) in order to highlight research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation (RDDT&E) activities funded through the Idaho Operations Office. Technologies and processes described have the potential to enhance DOE`s cleanup and waste management efforts, as well as improve US industry`s competitiveness in global environmental markets. OTD programs are designed to make new, innovative, and more cost-effective technologies available for transfer to DOE environmental restoration and waste management end-users. Projects are demonstrated, tested, and evaluated to produce solutions to current problems. Transition of technologies into more advanced stages of development is based upon technological, regulatory, economic, and institutional criteria. New technologies are made available for use in eliminating radioactive, hazardous, and other wastes in compliance with regulatory mandates. The primary goal is to protect human health and prevent further contamination. OTD`s technology development programs address three major problem areas: (1) groundwater and soils cleanup; (2) waste retrieval and processing; and (3) pollution prevention. These problems are not unique to DOE, but are associated with other Federal agency and industry sites as well. Thus, technical solutions developed within OTD programs will benefit DOE, and should have direct applications in outside markets.

  4. Pegmatite mineralogy of the Sawtooth Batholith, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Boggs, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    The Sawtooth batholith is one of several anorogenic granite plutons in Central Idaho. These epizonal plutons, emplaced during the Challis volcanic-plutonic event, are for the most part associated with cauldera complexes of Tertiary age. Miarolitic cavities and small pegmatite dikes in the Sawtooth batholith contain a suite of uncommon minerals. The more common minerals of this suite are quartz (commonly smoky), microcline, albite, fluorite, hematite, topaz, and beryl (variety aquamarine). In addition a less common suite of Mn-rich minerals is found. These include helvite, spessartine garnet, zinnwaldite-masutomilite series micas, and a Mn-K-Li-rich member of the carpholite group. Of these rarer minerals the most interesting are the carpholite group member and the micas. The K occupies a crystallographic site which is normally vacant in carpholite group minerals and can have a maximum occupancy of 1. This mineral most likely represents a new species in the carpholite group. The zinnwaldite-masutomilite micas are rather low in Li and have Fe:Mn ratios ranging from about 2.2 to 0.5. These Li contents are typical of zinnwaldites from anorogenic granite pegmatites. However, all other reported occurrences of masutomilite have been richer in Li.

  5. Idaho National Laboratory Site Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Jenifer Nordstrom

    2014-02-01

    This plan provides a high-level summary of environmental monitoring performed by various organizations within and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and DOE Order 458.1, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, Guide DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance, and in accordance with 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants. The purpose of these orders is to 1) implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations, and 2) to establish standards and requirements for the operations of DOE and DOE contractors with respect to protection of the environment and members of the public against undue risk from radiation. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL Site, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. Detailed monitoring procedures, program plans, or other governing documents used by contractors or agencies to implement requirements are referenced in this plan. This plan covers all planned monitoring and environmental surveillance. Nonroutine activities such as special research studies and characterization of individual sites for environmental restoration are outside the scope of this plan.

  6. Migration behavior of pronghorn in southeastern Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Hoskinson, R.L.; Tester, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    Fifty-four pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) were radio-collared out of 232 captured on 3 winter ranges in southeastern Idaho. Radioed pronghorn were followed for up to 21 months each, from December 1975 through August 1977. Winter home ranges showed a difference (P < 0.005) in size among valleys the 1st winter and were different in size and location within valleys between years. Snow covered the ground 1 week earlier and lasted 3 weeks longer in 1975 to 1976 than in 1976 to 1977. Spring migration began more than 1 month earlier in 1977 than 1976, and appeared related to loss of snow cover on the winter ranges in both years. Distances that pronghorn migrated in spring 1976 were different among valleys (P < 0.05) but directions were, in general, upward to areas near the heads of the valleys. Summer home ranges of all radioed pronghorn averaged 2033 +- 322 (SE) ha. Yearlings wandered during summer and their home ranges were 2 to 5 times as large as ranges of adults. Fall migration in 1976 began after 1 October and was not prompted by snowfall. Percent moisture in vegetation is suggested as a stimulus for onset of fall migration, and snowfall is suggested as a factor influencing distance migrated and location of winter.

  7. Idaho radionuclide exposure study: Literature review

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, E.G.; Freeman, H.D.; Hartley, J.N.

    1987-10-01

    Phosphate ores contain elevated levels of natural radioactivity, some of which is released to the environment during processing or use of solid byproducts. The effect of radionuclides from Idaho phosphate processing operations on the local communities has been the subject of much research and study. The literature is reviewed in this report. Two primary radionuclide pathways to the environment have been studied in detail: (1) airborne release of volatile radionuclides, primarily /sup 210/Po, from calciner stacks at the two elemental phosphorus plants; and (2) use of byproduct slag as an aggregate for construction in Soda Springs and Pocatello. Despite the research, there is still no clear understanding of the population dose from radionuclide emissions, effluents, and solid wastes from phosphate processing plants. Two other potential radionuclide pathways to the environment have been identified: radon exhalation from phosphogypsum and ore piles and contamination of surface and ground waters. Recommendations on further study needed to develop a data base for a complete risk assssment are given in the report.

  8. Geothermal features of Snake River plain, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Blackwell, D.D.

    1987-08-01

    The Snake River plain is the track of a hot spot beneath the continental lithosphere. The track has passed through southern Idaho as the continental plate has moved over the hot spot at a rate of about 3.5 cm/yr. The present site of the hot spot is Yellowstone Park. As a consequence of the passage, a systematic sequence of geologic and tectonic events illustrates the response of the continental lithosphere to this hotspot event. The three areas that represent various time slices in the evolution are the Yellowstone Plateau, the Eastern Snake River plain downwarp, and the Western Snake River plain basin/Owhyee Plateau. In addition to the age of silicic volcanic activity, the topographic profile of the Snake River plain shows a systematic variation from the high elevations in the east to lowest elevations on the west. The change in elevation follows the form of an oceanic lithosphere cooling curve, suggesting that temperature change is the dominant effect on the elevation.

  9. Evaluate Status of Pacific Lamprey in the Clearwater River Drainage, Idaho: Annual Report 2001.

    SciTech Connect

    Cochnauer, Tim; Claire, Christopher

    2002-12-01

    Recent decline of Pacific lamprey Lampetra tridentata adult migrants to the Snake River drainage has focused attention on the species. Adult Pacific lamprey counted passing Ice Harbor Dam fishway averaged 18,158 during 1962-69 and 361 during 1993-2000. Human resource manipulations in the Snake River and Clearwater River drainages have altered ecosystem habitat in the last 120 years, likely impacting the productive potential of Pacific lamprey habitat. Timber harvest, stream impoundment, road construction, grazing, mining, and community development have dominated habitat alteration in the Clearwater River system and Snake River corridor. Hydroelectric projects in the Snake River corridor impact juvenile/larval Pacific lamprey outmigrants and returning adults. Juvenile and larval lamprey outmigrants potentially pass through turbines, turbine bypass/collection systems, and over spillway structures at the four lower Snake River hydroelectric dams. Clearwater River drainage hydroelectric facilities have impacted Pacific lamprey populations to an unknown degree. The Pacific Power and Light Dam on the Clearwater River in Lewiston, Idaho, restricted chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha passage in the 1927-1940 period, altering the migration route of outmigrating Pacific lamprey juveniles/larvae and upstream adult migrants (1927-1972). Dworshak Dam, completed in 1972, eliminated Pacific lamprey spawning and rearing in the North Fork Clearwater River drainage. Construction of the Harpster hydroelectric dam on the South Fork of the Clearwater River resulted in obstructed fish passage 1949-1963. Through Bonneville Power Administration support, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game continued investigation into the status of Pacific lamprey populations in Idaho's Clearwater River drainage in 2001. Trapping, electrofishing, and spawning ground redd surveys were used to determine Pacific lamprey distribution, life history strategies, and habitat requirements in the South Fork

  10. Evaluate Status of Pacific Lamprey in the Clearwater River Drainage, Idaho : Annual Report 2000.

    SciTech Connect

    Cochnauer, Tim; Claire, Christopher

    2000-01-01

    Recent decline of Pacific lamprey Lampetra tridentata adult migrants to the Snake River drainage has focused attention on the species. Adult returns in 1995-1999 were more than ten magnitudes less than returns in the early 1960's. Human activities in the Snake River and Clearwater River drainages have altered ecosystem habitat in the last 100 years and likely the productive potential of Pacific lamprey habitat. Logging, stream impoundment, road construction, grazing, mining, and community development have dominated habitat alteration in the Clearwater River system and Snake River corridor. Hydroelectric projects in the Snake River corridor impact juvenile Pacific lamprey outmigrants and returning adults. Juvenile lamprey outmigrants potentially pass through turbines, turbine bypass and collection systems, and spillway structures at lower Snake River hydroelectric dams. Clearwater River drainage hydroelectric facilities including the Pacific Power and Light Dam on the Clearwater River in Lewiston, Idaho, impacted Pacific lamprey populations, however, the degree of impact is unknown (1920's-early 1970's). Hydroelectric dam construction (Harpster Dam) on the South Fork of the Clearwater River resulted in obstructed salmonid passage in the mid-1900's. Habitat alterations in the Snake River basin and Clearwater River drainage have had numerous negative effects on salmon Oncorhynchus spp. and steelhead trout O. mykiss populations (wild fish), but the magnitude of impacts on lamprey productivity and survival is unknown. Thorough understanding of Pacific lamprey habitat use and life history processes is needed to facilitate management and restoration of the species. Through Bonneville Power Administration support, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game began investigation into the status of Pacific lamprey populations in Idaho's Clearwater River drainage in 2000. Trapping, electrofishing, and spawning ground redd surveys were used to determine where Pacific lamprey persist

  11. Development of a cumulative risk assessment for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory`s waste area group 2

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, D.E.

    1995-11-01

    In 1989, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) was added to the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) National Priorities List of Superfund sites. A Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFA/CO) for the INEL was signed by the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID), EPA, and the State of Idaho in December 1991. The goal of this agreement is to ensure that potential or actual INEL releases of hazardous substances to the environment are thoroughly investigated in accordance with the National Contingency Plan (NCP) and that appropriate response actions are taken as necessary to protect human health and the environment. The Test Reactor Area (TRA) is included as Waste Area Group (WAG) 2 of ten INEL WAGs identified in the FFA/CO. WAG 2 consists of 13 operable units (OUs) which include pits, tanks, rubble piles, ponds, cooling towers, wells, french drains, perched water and spill areas. OU 2-13 is the Comprehensive Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) for WAG 2. The study presented here is a preliminary evaluation of the comprehensive risk for WAG-2. This investigation will be used as the basis of the WAG-2 comprehensive baseline risk assessment (BRA), and it will serve as a model for other INEL comprehensive risk assessments. The WAG-2 preliminary risk evaluation consisted of two broad phases. These phases were (1) a site and contaminant screening that was intended to support the identification of COPCs and risk assessment data gaps, and (2) an exposure pathway analysis that evaluated the comprehensive human health risks associated with WAG-2. The primary purposes of the investigation were to screen WAG-2 release sites and contaminants, and to identify risk assessment data gaps, so the investigation will be referred to as the WAG-2 Screening and Data Gap Analysis (SDGA) for the remainder of this report.

  12. Phase I Water Rental Pilot Project : Snake River Resident Fish and Wildlife Resources and Management Recommendations.

    SciTech Connect

    Riggin, Stacey H.; Hansen, H. Jerome

    1992-10-01

    The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project was implemented as a part of the Non-Treaty Storage Fish and Wildlife Agreement (NTSA) between Bonneville Power Administration and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority. The goal of the project is to improve juvenile and adult salmon and steelhead passage in the lower Snake River with the use of rented water for flow augmentation. The primary purpose of this project is to summarize existing resource information and provide recommendations to protect or enhance resident fish and wildlife resources in Idaho with actions achieving flow augmentation for anadromous fish. Potential impacts of an annual flow augmentation program on Idaho reservoirs and streams are modeled. Potential sources of water for flow augmentation and operational or institutional constraints to the use of that water are identified. This report does not advocate flow augmentation as the preferred long-term recovery action for salmon. The state of Idaho strongly believes that annual drawdown of the four lower Snake reservoirs is critical to the long-term enhancement and recovery of salmon (Andrus 1990). Existing water level management includes balancing the needs of hydropower production, irrigated agriculture, municipalities and industries with fish, wildlife and recreation. Reservoir minimum pool maintenance, water quality and instream flows are issues of public concern that will be directly affected by the timing and quantity of water rental releases for salmon flow augmentation, The potential of renting water from Idaho rental pools for salmon flow augmentation is complicated by institutional impediments, competition from other water users, and dry year shortages. Water rental will contribute to a reduction in carryover storage in a series of dry years when salmon flow augmentation is most critical. Such a reduction in carryover can have negative impacts on reservoir fisheries by eliminating shoreline spawning beds, reducing available fish habitat

  13. Instream flow characterization of upper Salmon River basin streams, central Idaho, 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maret, Terry R.; Hortness, Jon E.; Ott, Douglas S.

    2005-01-01

    Anadromous fish populations in the Columbia River Basin have plummeted in the last 100 years. This severe decline led to Federal listing of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) stocks as endangered or threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in the 1990s. Historically, the upper Salmon River Basin (upstream of the confluence with the Pahsimeroi River) in Idaho provided migration corridors and significant habitat for these ESA-listed species, in addition to the ESA-listed bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus). Human development has modified the original streamflow conditions in many streams in the upper Salmon River Basin. Summer streamflow modifications resulting from irrigation practices, have directly affected quantity and quality of fish habitat and also have affected migration and (or) access to suitable spawning and rearing habitat for these fish. As a result of these ESA listings and Action 149 of the Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion of 2000, the Bureau of Reclamation was tasked to conduct streamflow characterization studies in the upper Salmon River Basin to clearly define habitat requirements for effective species management and habitat restoration. These studies include collection of habitat and streamflow information for the Physical Habitat Simulation System model, a widely applied method to determine relations between habitat and discharge requirements for various fish species and life stages. Model results can be used by resource managers to guide habitat restoration efforts by evaluating potential fish habitat and passage improvements by increasing streamflow. In 2004, instream flow characterization studies were completed on Salmon River and Beaver, Pole, Champion, Iron, Thompson, and Squaw Creeks. Continuous streamflow data were recorded upstream of all diversions on Salmon River and Pole, Iron, Thompson, and Squaw Creeks. In addition, natural summer streamflows were

  14. Instream flow characterization of Upper Salmon River basin streams, central Idaho, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maret, Terry R.; Hortness, Jon E.; Ott, Douglas S.

    2006-01-01

    Anadromous fish populations in the Columbia River Basin have plummeted in the last 100 years. This severe decline led to Federal listing of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) stocks as endangered or threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in the 1990s. Historically, the upper Salmon River Basin (upstream of the confluence with the Pahsimeroi River) in Idaho provided migration corridors and significant habitat for these ESA-listed species, in addition to the ESA-listed bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus). Human development has modified the original streamflow conditions in many streams in the upper Salmon River Basin. Summer streamflow modifications resulting from irrigation practices, have directly affected quantity and quality of fish habitat and also have affected migration and (or) access to suitable spawning and rearing habitat for these fish. As a result of these ESA listings and Action 149 of the Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion of 2000, the Bureau of Reclamation was tasked to conduct streamflow characterization studies in the upper Salmon River Basin to clearly define habitat requirements for effective species management and habitat restoration. These studies include collection of habitat and streamflow information for the Physical Habitat Simulation System (PHABSIM) model, a widely applied method to determine relations between habitat and discharge requirements for various fish species and life stages. Model simulation results can be used by resource managers to guide habitat restoration efforts by evaluating potential fish habitat and passage improvements by increasing or decreasing streamflow. In 2005, instream flow characterization studies were completed on Big Boulder, Challis, Bear, Mill, and Morgan Creeks. Continuous streamflow data were recorded upstream of all diversions on Big Boulder. Instantaneous measurements of discharge were also made at selected sites. In

  15. One Fish, Two Fish, Redfish, You Fish!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Katherine; Timmons, Maryellen; Medders, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The recreational fishing activity presented in this article provides a hands-on, problem-based experience for students; it unites biology, math, economics, environmental policy, and population dynamics concepts. In addition, the activity allows students to shape environmental policy in a realistic setting and evaluate their peers' work. By…

  16. Fishing Forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    ROFFS stands for Roffer's Ocean Fishing Forecasting Service, Inc. Roffer combines satellite and computer technology with oceanographic information from several sources to produce frequently updated charts sometimes as often as 30 times a day showing clues to the location of marlin, sailfish, tuna, swordfish and a variety of other types. Also provides customized forecasts for racing boats and the shipping industry along with seasonal forecasts that allow the marine industry to formulate fishing strategies based on foreknowledge of the arrival and departure times of different fish. Roffs service exemplifies the potential for benefits to marine industries from satellite observations. Most notable results are reduced search time and substantial fuel savings.

  17. Strontium Distribution Coefficients of Basalt Core Samples from the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    J. J. Colello; J. J. Rosentreter; R. C. Bartholomay; M. J. Liszewski

    1998-12-01

    Strontium distribution coefficients (Kd's) were measured for 24 basalt core samples collected from selected sites at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The measurements were made to help assess the variability of strontium Kd's as part of an ongoing investigation of strontium transport properties through geologic materials at the INEEL. The investigation is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey and Idaho State University in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy. Batch experiments were used to measure Kd's of basalt core samples using an aqueous solution representative of wastewater in waste-disposal ponds at the INEEL. Calculated strontium Kd's of the 24 basalt core samples ranged from 3.6{+-}1.3 to 29.4{+-}1.6 milliliters per gram. These results indicate a narrow range of variability in the strontium sorptive capacities of basalt relative to those of the sedimentary materials at the INEEL. The narrow range of the basalt Kd's can be attributed to physical and chemical properties of the basalt, and to compositional changes in the equilibrated solutions after being mixed with the basalt. The small Kd's indicate that basalt is not a major contributor in preventing the movement of strontium-90 in solution.

  18. Hydrologic conditions at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho, emphasis; 1974-1978

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barraclough, Jack T.; Lewis, Barney D.; Jensen, Rodger G.

    1981-01-01

    Aqueous chemical and radioactive wastes have been discharged to shallow ponds and to shallow or deep wells on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) since 1952 and has affected the quality of the ground water in the underlying Snake River Plain aquifer. Ongoing studies conducted from 1974 through 1978 have shown the perpetuation of a perched ground-water zone in the basalt underlying the waste disposal ponds at the INEL 's Test Reactor Area and of several waste plumes in the regional aquifer created by deep well disposal at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). The perched zone contains tritium, chromium-51, cobalt-60, strontium-90, and several nonradioactive chemicals. Tritium has formed the largest waste plume south of the ICPP, and accounts for 95 percent of the total radioacticity disposed of through the ICPP disposal well. Waste plumes with similar configurations and flowpaths contain sodium, chloride, and nitrate. Strontium-90, iodine-129, and cesium-137 are also discharged through the well but they are sorbed from solution as they move through the aquifer or are discharged in very small quantities. Strontium-90 and iodine-129 have formed small waste plumes and cesium-137 is not detectable in ground-water samples. Radionuclide plume size and concentrations therein are controlled by aquifer flow conditions, the quantity discharged, radioactive decay, sorption, dilution by dispersion, and perhaps other chemical reactions. Chemical wastes are subject to the same processes except for radioactive decay. (USGS)

  19. Subsurface information from eight wells drilled at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, southeastern Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldstein, F.J.; Weight, W.D.

    1982-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) covers about 890 square miles of the eastern Snake River Plain, in southeastern Idaho. The eastern Snake River Plain is a structural basin which has been filled with thin basaltic lava flows, rhyolitic deposits, and interbedded sediments. These rocks form an extensive ground-water reservoir known as the Snake River Plain aquifer. Six wells were drilled and two existing wells were deepened at the INEL from 1969 through 1974. Interpretation of data from the drilling program confirms that the subsurface is dominated by basalt flows interbedded with layers of sediment, cinders, and silicic volcanic rocks. Water levels in the wells show cyclic seasonal fluctuations of maximum water levels in winter and minimum water levels in mid-summer. Water levels in three wells near the Big Lost River respond to changes in recharge to the Snake River Plain aquifer from the Big Lost River. Measured water levels in multiple piezometers in one well indicate increasing pressure heads with depth. A marked decline in water levels in the wells since 1977 is attributed to a lack of recharge to the Snake River Plain aquifer.

  20. Evidence for Bombus occidentalis (Hymenoptera: Apidae) Populations in the Olympic Peninsula, the Palouse Prairie, and Forests of Northern Idaho

    PubMed Central

    Rhoades, Paul R.; Koch, Jonathan B.; Waits, Lisette P.; Strange, James P.; Eigenbrode, Sanford D.

    2016-01-01

    Since the mid-1990s, Bombus occidentalis (Green) has declined from being one of the most common to one of the rarest bumble bee species in the Pacific Northwest of the United States. Although its conservation status is unresolved, a petition to list this species as endangered or threatened was recently submitted to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. To shed light on the conservation situation and inform the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service decision, we report on the detection and abundance of B. occidentalis following bumble bee collection between 2012 and 2014 across the Pacific Northwest. Collection occurred from the San Juan Islands and Olympic peninsula east to northern Idaho and northeastern Oregon, excluding the arid region in central Washington. B. occidentalis was observed at 23 collection sites out of a total of 234. With the exception of three sites on the Olympic peninsula, all of these were in the southeastern portion of the collection range. PMID:26856817

  1. Bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) telemetry and associated habitat data collected in a geodatabase from the upper Boise River, southwestern Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacCoy, Dorene E.; Shephard, Zachary M.; Benjamin, Joseph R.; Vidergar, Dmitri T.; Prisciandaro, Anthony F.

    2017-03-23

    Bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act, are among the more thermally sensitive of coldwater species in North America. The Boise River upstream of Arrowrock Dam in southwestern Idaho (including Arrowrock Reservoir) provides habitat for one of the southernmost populations of bull trout. The presence of the species in Arrowrock Reservoir poses implications for dam and reservoir operations. From 2011 to 2014, the Bureau of Reclamation and the U.S. Geological Survey collected fish telemetry data to improve understanding of bull trout distribution and movement in Arrowrock Reservoir and in the upper Boise River tributaries. The U.S. Geological Survey compiled the telemetry (fish location) data, along with reservoir elevation, river discharge, precipitation, and water-quality data in a geodatabase. The geodatabase includes metadata compliant with Federal Geographic Data Committee content standards. The Bureau of Reclamation plans to incorporate the data in a decision‑support tool for reservoir management.

  2. Fish Allergy

    MedlinePlus

    ... been diagnosed with a fish allergy, keep injectable epinephrine on hand in case of a severe reaction. ... mouth or throat or difficulty breathing, give the epinephrine auto-injector right away. Every second counts in ...

  3. Designer Fish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, William R., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Described is an activity in which students are asked to design a fish that would survive in a natural system. A project to computerize the activity is discussed. The development of this artificial intelligence software is detailed. (CW)

  4. Fish Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... not eat any fish because they worry about mercury in seafood. Mercury is a metal that, at high levels, can ... many types of seafood have little or no mercury at all. So your risk of mercury exposure ...

  5. Fighting fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchi, E.; Guerrini, V.; Rinaldi, S.; Schaeffer, G.

    2017-01-01

    We introduce new combinatorial structures, called fighting fish, that generalize directed convex polyominoes by allowing them to branch out of the plane into independent substructures. On the one hand the combinatorial structure of fighting fish appears to be particularly rich: we show that their generating function with respect to the perimeter and number of tails is algebraic, and we conjecture a mysterious multivariate equidistribution property with the left ternary trees introduced by Del Lungo et al On the other hand, fighting fish provide a simple and natural model of random branching surfaces which displays original features: in particular, we show that the average area of a uniform random fighting fish with perimeter 2n is of order n 5/4: to the best of our knowledge this behaviour is non-standard and suggests that we have identified a new universality class of random structures. Dedicated to Tony Guttmann on the occasion of his 70th birthday.

  6. 77 FR 38618 - Idaho Power Company; Notice of Application for Amendment of License and Soliciting Comments...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-28

    ... Program Coordinator, ] Idaho Power, PO Box 70, 1221 W Idaho Street, Boise, ID 83702, (208) 388-2964... CFR 385.210, .211, .214. In determining the appropriate action to take, the Commission will...

  7. 77 FR 38621 - Idaho Power Company; Notice of Application for Amendment of License and Soliciting Comments...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-28

    .... Applicant Contact: L. Lewis Wardle, Licensing Program Coordinator, Idaho Power, PO Box 70, 1221 W Idaho... requirements of Rules of Practice and Procedure, 18 CFR 385.210, .211, .214. In determining the...

  8. 77 FR 38620 - Idaho Power Company; Notice of Application for Amendment of License And Soliciting Comments...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-28

    ... Coordinator, Idaho Power, PO Box 70, 1221 W Idaho Street, Boise, ID 83702, (208) 388-2964, lwardle@idahopower... accordance with the requirements of Rules of Practice and Procedure, 18 CFR 385.210, .211, .214....

  9. Idaho: basic data for thermal springs and wells as recorded in GEOTHERM, Part A

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, J.D.

    1983-07-01

    All chemical data for geothermal fluids in Idaho available as of December 1981 is maintained on GEOTHERM, computerized information system. This report presents summaries and sources of records for Idaho. 7 refs. (ACR)

  10. Health Screening

    MedlinePlus

    Screenings are tests that look for diseases before you have symptoms. Screening tests can find diseases early, when they're easier ... Overweight and obesity Prostate cancer in men Which tests you need depends on your age, your sex, ...

  11. Depression Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Centers Diseases + Condition Centers Mental Health Medical Library Depression Screening (PHQ-9) - Instructions The following questions are ... this tool, there is also text-only version . Depression Screening - Manual Instructions The following questions are a ...

  12. Surface-water data for Idaho, 1971-75

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cordes, S.C.

    1980-01-01

    Surface-water data collection began in Idaho in 1889 with the establishment of three gaging stations: Snake River at Eagle Rock (now Idaho Falls), Big Wood River near Hailey, and Bear River at Preston. Following passage of the National Reclamation Act of 1902, a notable increase in investigations of water resources began throughout the Western United States. Although Idaho enacted laws in 1903 to activate stream-gaging programs, it was no until 1909 that the State entered into a formal agreement with the U.S. Geological Survey from this work. Since that time, except for a hiatus from 1914-18, the Federal-State cooperative program of water-resources investigations has continued uninterrupted to the present.

  13. The Idaho Spent Fuel Project Update-January, 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, R.; Tulberg, D.; Carter, C.

    2003-02-25

    The Department of Energy awarded a privatized contract to Foster Wheeler Environmental Corporation in May 2000 for the design, licensing, construction and operation of a spent nuclear fuel repackaging and storage facility. The Foster Wheeler Environmental Team consists of Foster Wheeler Environmental Corp. (the primary contractor), Alstec, RWE-Nukem, RIO Technical Services, Winston and Strawn, and Utility Engineering. The Idaho Spent Fuel (ISF) facility is an integral part of the DOE-EM approach to accelerating SNF disposition at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Construction of this facility is also important in helping DOE to meet the provisions of the Idaho Settlement Agreement. The ISF Facility is a substantial facility with heavy shielding walls in the repackaging and storage bays and state-of-the-art features required to meet the provisions of 10 CFR 72 requirements. The facility is designed for a 40-year life.

  14. Industrial application of geothermal energy in Southeast Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Batdorf, J.A.; McClain, D.W.; Gross, M.; Simmons, G.M.

    1980-02-01

    Those phosphate related and food processing industries in Southeastern Idaho are identified which require large energy inputs and the potential for direct application of geothermal energy is assessed. The total energy demand is given along with that fractional demand that can be satisfied by a geothermal source of known temperature. The potential for geothermal resource development is analyzed by examining the location of known thermal springs and wells, the location of state and federal geothermal exploration leases, and the location of federal and state oil and gas leasing activity in Southeast Idaho. Information is also presented regarding the location of geothermal, oil, and gas exploration wells in Southeast Idaho. The location of state and federal phosphate mining leases is also presented. This information is presented in table and map formats to show the proximity of exploration and development activities to current food and phosphate processing facilities and phosphate mining activities. (MHR)

  15. Current Reactor Physics Benchmark Activities at the Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; Margaret A. Marshall; Mackenzie L. Gorham; Joseph Christensen; James C. Turnbull; Kim Clark

    2011-11-01

    The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) [1] and the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) [2] were established to preserve integral reactor physics and criticality experiment data for present and future research. These valuable assets provide the basis for recording, developing, and validating our integral nuclear data, and experimental and computational methods. These projects are managed through the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD-NEA). Staff and students at the Department of Energy - Idaho (DOE-ID) and INL are engaged in the development of benchmarks to support ongoing research activities. These benchmarks include reactors or assemblies that support Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) research, space nuclear Fission Surface Power System (FSPS) design validation, and currently operational facilities in Southeastern Idaho.

  16. Geothermometric evaluation of geothermal resources in southeastern Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neupane, G.; Mattson, E. D.; McLing, T. L.; Palmer, C. D.; Smith, R. W.; Wood, T. R.; Podgorney, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    Southeastern Idaho exhibits numerous warm springs, warm water from shallow wells, and hot water from oil and gas test wells that indicate a potential for geothermal development in the area. We have estimated reservoir temperatures from chemical composition of thermal waters in southeastern Idaho using an inverse geochemical modeling technique (Reservoir Temperature Estimator, RTEst) that calculates the temperature at which multiple minerals are simultaneously at equilibrium while explicitly accounting for the possible loss of volatile constituents (e.g., CO2), boiling and/or water mixing. The temperature estimates in the region varied from moderately warm (59 °C) to over 175 °C. Specifically, hot springs near Preston, Idaho, resulted in the highest reservoir temperature estimates in the region.

  17. Augmented Fish Health Monitoring, 1990 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, James W.

    1990-08-15

    Augmented Fish Health Monitoring Contract AI79-87BP35585 was implemented on July 20, 1987. This report briefly describes third-year work being done to meet contract requirements for fish disease surveillance at Service facilities in the Columbia River basin and for histopathological support services provided to participating state agencies. It also summarizes the health status of fish reared at participating Service hatcheries and provides a summary of case history data for calendar year 1989. Items of note included severe disease losses to infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN) in summer steelhead trout in Idaho, the detection of IHN virus in juvenile spring chinook salmon at hatcheries on the lower Columbia River, and improved bacterial kidney disease (BKD) detection and adult assay by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technology at the Dworshak Fish Health Center. Complete diagnostic and inspection services were provided to 13 Columbia River Basin National Fish Hatcheries. Case history data was fully documented in a computerized data base for storage and analysis and is summarized herein. 2 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  18. Modeling ecohydrological impacts of land management and water use in the Silver Creek basin, Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loinaz, Maria C.; Gross, Dayna; Unnasch, Robert; Butts, Michael; Bauer-Gottwein, Peter

    2014-03-01

    A number of anthropogenic stressors, including land use change and intensive water use, have caused stream habitat deterioration in arid and semiarid climates throughout the western U.S. These often contribute to high stream temperatures, a widespread water quality problem. Stream temperature is an important indicator of stream ecosystem health and is affected by catchment-scale climate and hydrological processes, morphology, and riparian vegetation. To properly manage affected systems and achieve ecosystem sustainability, it is important to understand the relative impact of these factors. In this study, we predict relative impacts of different stressors using an integrated catchment-scale ecohydrological model that simulates hydrological processes, stream temperature, and fish growth. This type of model offers a suitable measure of ecosystem services because it provides information about the reproductive capability of fish under different conditions. We applied the model to Silver Creek, Idaho, a stream highly valued for its world-renowned trout fishery. The simulations indicated that intensive water use by agriculture and climate change are both major contributors to habitat degradation in the study area. Agricultural practices that increase water use efficiency and mitigate drainage runoff are feasible and can have positive impacts on the ecosystem. All of the mitigation strategies simulated reduced stream temperatures to varying degrees; however, not all resulted in increases in fish growth. The results indicate that temperature dynamics, rather than point statistics, determine optimal growth conditions for fish. Temperature dynamics are influenced by surface water-groundwater interactions. Combined restoration strategies that can achieve ecosystem stability under climate change should be further explored.

  19. 76 FR 10018 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-23

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory AGENCY: Department of Energy... Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Idaho National Laboratory. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... Public Participation: The EM SSAB, Idaho National Laboratory, welcomes the attendance of the public...

  20. 76 FR 66917 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-28

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory AGENCY: Department of Energy... Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Idaho National Laboratory. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... Environmental Assessment Public Participation: The EM SSAB, Idaho National Laboratory, welcomes the...

  1. 78 FR 12747 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-25

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory AGENCY: Department of Energy... Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Idaho National Laboratory. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... Participation: The EM SSAB, Idaho National Laboratory, welcomes the attendance of the public at its...

  2. 77 FR 53192 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-31

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory AGENCY: Department of Energy... Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Idaho National Laboratory. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... Closeout Process Public Participation: The EM SSAB, Idaho National Laboratory, welcomes the attendance...

  3. Better Together: Coeur d'Alene Reservation Communities and the University of Idaho

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salant, Priscilla; Laumatia, Laura

    2011-01-01

    The Coeur d'Alene Reservation spans 345,000 acres of mountains and farmland in northern Idaho. Most people on the reservation live in the communities of Worley, Plummer, Tensed, and Desmet. Roughly 50 miles south of Plummer is the University of Idaho's main campus in Moscow. The university is Idaho's land-grant institution, with a statewide…

  4. 78 FR 60273 - David E. Cereghino, Idaho County Light & Power Cooperative Association, Inc.; Notice of Transfer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-01

    ... Federal Energy Regulatory Commission David E. Cereghino, Idaho County Light & Power Cooperative... Idaho County Light & Power Cooperative Association, Inc. informed the Commission that the exemption from... transferred to Idaho County Light & Power Cooperative Association, Inc. The project is located on John...

  5. 75 FR 7440 - Notice of Idaho Panhandle Resource Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-19

    ... (Public Law 110-343) the Idaho Panhandle National Forest's Idaho Panhandle Resource Advisory Committee will meet Friday, February 19, 2010, at 9 a.m. in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho for a business meeting. The business meeting is open to the public. DATES: February 19, 2010. ADDRESSES: The meeting location is...

  6. Idaho Marketing Education Core Curriculum. Career Sustaining Level, Specialist Level, Supervisory Level, Entrepreneurial Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Linda Wise; Winn, Richard

    This document contains Idaho's marketing education (ME) core curriculum. Presented first are a list of 22 ME strategies that are aligned with the Idaho State Division of Vocational-Technical Education's strategic plan and a chart detailing the career pathways of ME in Idaho (arts and communication, business and management, health services, human…

  7. 40 CFR 272.651 - Idaho State-Administered Program: Final Authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Idaho § 272.651 Idaho..., 2008. (b) The State of Idaho has primary responsibility for enforcing its hazardous waste management... part of the hazardous waste management program under subtitle C of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6921 et seq....

  8. 77 FR 59879 - Idaho: Incorporation by Reference of Approved State Hazardous Waste Management Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 272 Idaho: Incorporation by Reference of Approved State Hazardous Waste Management... codify in the regulations entitled ``Approved State Hazardous Waste Management Programs,'' Idaho's authorized hazardous waste program. The EPA ] proposes to revise the codification of Idaho's program...

  9. 78 FR 17716 - Notice of Public Meeting, Idaho Falls District Resource Advisory Council Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-22

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Public Meeting, Idaho Falls District Resource Advisory Council... 1972 (FACA), the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Idaho Falls District Resource Advisory Council (RAC), will meet as indicated below. DATES: The Idaho Falls District RAC...

  10. 77 FR 74203 - Notice of Public Meeting, Idaho Falls District Resource Advisory Council Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-13

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Public Meeting, Idaho Falls District Resource Advisory Council... 1972 (FACA), the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Idaho Falls District Resource Advisory Council (RAC), will meet as indicated below. DATES: The RAC will next meet in Idaho...

  11. 76 FR 3651 - Notice of Public Meeting, Idaho Falls District Resource Advisory Council Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-20

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Public Meeting, Idaho Falls District Resource Advisory Council... 1972 (FACA), the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Idaho Falls District Resource Advisory Council (RAC), will meet as indicated below. DATES: The RAC will next meet in Idaho...

  12. 77 FR 49826 - Notice of Public Meeting, Idaho Falls District Resource Advisory Council Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-17

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Public Meeting, Idaho Falls District Resource Advisory Council... 1972 (FACA), the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Idaho Falls District Resource Advisory Council (RAC), will meet as indicated below. DATES: The Idaho Falls District RAC...

  13. 76 FR 28306 - Amendment of Class D and Class E Airspace; Idaho Falls, ID

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-17

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class D and Class E Airspace; Idaho Falls, ID... existing Class D and Class E airspace at Idaho Falls, ID, by changing the name of the airport to Idaho Falls Regional Airport, and adjusting the geographic coordinates of the airport. This action also...

  14. 75 FR 27360 - Notice of Public Meeting, Idaho Falls District Resource Advisory Council Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-14

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Public Meeting, Idaho Falls District Resource Advisory Council... 1972 (FACA), the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Idaho Falls District Resource Advisory Council (RAC), will meet as indicated below. DATES: The Idaho Falls District RAC...

  15. 78 FR 19522 - Notice of Public Meeting, Idaho Falls District Resource Advisory Council Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-01

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Public Meeting, Idaho Falls District Resource Advisory Council... 1972 (FACA), the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Idaho Falls District Resource Advisory Council (RAC), will meet as indicated below. DATES: The Idaho Falls District RAC...

  16. 77 FR 17093 - Notice of Public Meeting, Idaho Falls District Resource Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-23

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Public Meeting, Idaho Falls District Resource Advisory Council AGENCY... U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Idaho Falls District Resource Advisory Council (RAC), will meet as indicated below. DATES: The Idaho Falls District RAC will meet...

  17. 75 FR 49944 - Notice of Public Meeting, Idaho Falls District Resource Advisory Council Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-16

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Public Meeting, Idaho Falls District Resource Advisory Council... 1972 (FACA), the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Idaho Falls District Resource Advisory Council (RAC), will meet as indicated below. DATES: The Idaho Falls District RAC...

  18. 76 FR 76179 - Notice of Public Meeting, Idaho Falls District Resource Advisory Council Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-06

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Public Meeting, Idaho Falls District Resource Advisory Council... 1972 (FACA), the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Idaho Falls District Resource Advisory Council (RAC), will meet as indicated below. DATES: The RAC will next meet in Idaho...

  19. 78 FR 38071 - Notice of Public Meeting, Idaho Falls District Resource Advisory Council Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-25

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Public Meeting, Idaho Falls District Resource Advisory Council... 1972 (FACA), the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Idaho Falls District Resource Advisory Council (RAC), will meet as indicated below. DATES: The Idaho Falls District RAC...

  20. 76 FR 48883 - Notice of Public Meeting, Idaho Falls District Resource Advisory Council Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-09

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Public Meeting, Idaho Falls District Resource Advisory Council... 1972 (FACA), the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Idaho Falls District Resource Advisory Council (RAC), will meet as indicated below. DATES: The Idaho Falls District RAC...

  1. 76 FR 76684 - Idaho: Tentative Approval of State Underground Storage Tank Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-08

    ...-0896; FRL-9502-6] Idaho: Tentative Approval of State Underground Storage Tank Program AGENCY... approval of its Underground Storage Tank (UST) Program under Subtitle I of the Resource Conservation and...--Health; Title 39, Chapter 72, Idaho Land Remediation Act; Chapter 88, Idaho Underground Storage Tank...

  2. Idaho Supplementation Studies, 1991-1992 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Leitzinger, Eric J.; Bowles, Edward C.; Plaster, Kurtis

    1993-10-01

    Idaho Supplementation Studies (ISS) will help determine the utility of supplementation as a potential recovery tool for decimated stocks of spring and summer chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in Idaho. The objectives are to monitor and evaluate the effects of supplementation on presmolt and smolt numbers and spawning escapements of naturally produced salmon; monitor and evaluate changes in natural productivity and genetic composition of target and adjacent populations following supplementation and; determine which supplementation strategies (broodstock and release stage) provide the quickest effects on and highest response in natural production without adverse productivity.

  3. Idaho National Laboratory Emergency Readiness Assurance Plan - Fiscal Year 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, Carl J.

    2015-09-01

    Department of Energy Order 151.1C, Comprehensive Emergency Management System requires that each Department of Energy field element documents readiness assurance activities, addressing emergency response planning and preparedness. Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, as prime contractor at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), has compiled this Emergency Readiness Assurance Plan to provide this assurance to the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office. Stated emergency capabilities at the INL are sufficient to implement emergency plans. Summary tables augment descriptive paragraphs to provide easy access to data. Additionally, the plan furnishes budgeting, personnel, and planning forecasts for the next 5 years.

  4. CONTEXTUAL AERIAL VIEW OF "EXCLUSION" MTR AREA WITH IDAHO CHEMICAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONTEXTUAL AERIAL VIEW OF "EXCLUSION" MTR AREA WITH IDAHO CHEMICAL PROCESSING PLANT IN BACKGROUND AT CENTER TOP OF VIEW. CAMERA FACING EAST. EXCLUSION GATE HOUSE AT LEFT OF VIEW. BEYOND MTR BUILDING AND ITS WING, THE PROCESS WATER BUILDING AND WORKING RESERVOIR ARE LEFT-MOST. FAN HOUSE AND STACK ARE TO ITS RIGHT. PLUG STORAGE BUILDING IS RIGHT-MOST STRUCTURE. NOTE FAN LOFT ABOVE MTR BUILDING'S ONE-STORY WING. THIS WAS LATER CONVERTED FOR OFFICES. INL NEGATIVE NO. 3610. Unknown Photographer, 10/30/1951 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  5. Assessment of Present Anadromous Fish Production Facilities in the Columbia River Basin, US Fish and Wildlife Hatcheries, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Delarm, Michael R.; Smith, Robert Z.

    1990-07-01

    The goal of this report is to document current production practices for hatcheries which rear anadromous fish in the Columbia River Basin and to identify those facilities where production can be increased. A total of 85 hatchery and satellite facilities operated by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Game, US Fish and Wildlife Service, Washington Department of Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fisheries were evaluated. The years 1985 to 1987 were used in this evaluation. During those years, releases averaged 143,306,596 smolts weighing 7,693,589 pounds. A total of 48 hatchery or satellite facilities were identified as having expansion capability. They were estimated to have the potential for increasing production by an 84,448,000 smolts weighing 4,853,306 pounds. 2 refs., 25 tabs.

  6. Assessment of Present Anadromous Fish Production Facilities in the Columbia River Basin, Washington Department of Fish Hatcheries, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Delarm, Michael R.; Smith, Robert Z.

    1990-07-01

    The goal of this report is to document current production practices for hatcheries which rear anadromous fish in the Columbia River Basin and to identify those facilities where production can be increased. A total of 85 hatchery and satellite facilities operated by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Game, US Fish and Wildlife Service, Washington Department of Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fisheries were evaluated. The years 1985 to 1987 were used in this evaluation. During those years, releases averaged 143,306,596 smolts weighing 7,693,589 pounds. A total of 48 hatchery or satellite facilities were identified as having expansion capability. They were estimated to have the potential for increasing production by an 84,448,000 smolts weighing 4,853,306 pounds. 2 refs., 25 figs.

  7. Stratigraphy of the unsaturated zone at the radioactive waste management complex, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, S.R.; Lewis, B.D.

    1989-01-01

    A complex sequence of layered basalt flows, cinders, and sediment underlies the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in southeastern Idaho. Wells drilled to 700 ft penetrate a sequence of 10 basalt-flow groups and 7 major sedimentary interbeds that range in age from about 100,000 to 600,000 years old. The 10 flow groups consist of 22 separate lava flows and flow-units. Each flow group is made up of from one to five petrographically similar flows that erupted from common source areas during periods of less than 200 years. Sedimentary interbeds consist of fluvial, lacustrine, and wind-blown deposits of clay, silt, sand, and gravel that accumulated during periods of volcanic inactivity ranging from thousands to hundreds of thousands of years. Flows and sediment are unsaturated to a depth of about 600 ft. Flows and sediment below a depth of 600 ft are saturated and make up the uppermost part of the Snake River Plain aquifer. The areal extent of flow groups and interbeds was determined from well cuttings, cores, geophysical logs, potassium-argon ages, and geomagnetic properties. Stratigraphical control was provided by four sequential basalt flows near the base of the unsaturated zone that have reversed geomagnetic polarity and high emission of natural gamma radiation compared to other flows. Natural gamma logs were used as a primary correlation tool. Natural-gamma emissions, which are generally uniform in related, petrographically similar flows, increase or decrease between petrographically dissimilar flows of different age and source. (USGS)

  8. Iodine-129 in the Snake River Plain aquifer at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mann, L.J.; Chew, E.W.; Morton, J.S.; Randolph, R.B.

    1988-01-01

    From 1953 to 1983, an estimated 0.01 to 0.136 Ci (curies)/year of iodine-129 were contained in wastewater generated by the ICPP (Idaho Chemical Processing Plant) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The wastewater was directly discharged to the Snake River Plain aquifer through a deep disposal well until February 9, 1984, when the well was replaced by an unlined infiltration pond; a second pond was put into use on October 17, 1985. For 1984-86, the annual amount of iodine-129 in wastewater discharged to the ponds ranged from 0.0064 to 0.039 Ci. In August 1986, iodine-129 concentrations in water from 35 wells near the ICPP ranged from less than the reporting level to 3.6 +or-0.4 pCi/L (picocuries/L). By comparison, in April 1977 the water from 20 wells contained a maximum of 27 +or-1 pCi/L of iodine-129; in 1981, the maximum concentration in water from 32 wells was 41 +or-2 pCi/L. The average concentrations of iodine-129 in water from 18 wells that were sampled in 1977, 1981 and 1986 were 4.0, 6.7 and 1.3 pCi/L, respectively. The marked decrease in the iodine-129 concentration from 1981 to 1986 is the result of three factors: (1) The amount of iodine-129 disposed annually; (2) a change from the routine use of the disposal well to the infiltration ponds; and (3) a dilution of the iodine-129 in the aquifer by recharge from the Big Lost River. (USGS)

  9. Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) survey of the Idaho State Emergency Operating Center, Boise, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Crutcher, R.I.; Buchanan, M.E.; Jones, R.W.

    1992-02-01

    The purpose of this report is to develop an engineering design package to protect the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) National Radio System (FNARS) facilities from the effects of high- altitude electromagnetic pulses (HEMPs). This report was developed specifically for the Idaho State Emergency Operating Center (EOC) in Boise, Idaho. It is highly probable that there will be a heavy dependence upon high-frequency (hf) radio communications for long- haul communications following a nuclear attack on the continental United States, should one occur. To maintain the viability of the FEMA hf radio network during such a situation, steps must be taken to protect the FNARS facilities against the effects of HEMP that are likely to be created in a nuclear confrontation. The solution must than be to reduce HEMP-induced stresses on the system by means of tailored retrofit hardening measures using commercial protection devices when available. It is the intent of this report to define the particular hardening measures that will minimize the susceptibility of system components to HEMP effects. To the extent economically viable, protective actions have been recommended for implementation, along with necessary changes or additions, during the period of the FNARS upgrade program. This report addresses electromagnetic pulse (EMP) effects only and disregards any condition in which radiation effects may be a factor. It has been established that, except for the source region of a surface burst, EMP effects of high-altitude bursts are more severe than comparable detonations in either air or surface regions. Any system hardened to withstand the more extreme EMP environment will survive the less severe EMP conditions. The threatening environment will therefore be limited to HEMP situations.

  10. Annual report -- 1992: Environmental surveillance for EG & G Idaho Waste Management Facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelmsen, R.N.; Wright, K.C.; McBride, D.W.

    1993-08-01

    This report describes the 1992 environmental surveillance activities of the Environmental Monitoring Unit of EG&G Idaho, Inc., at EG&G Idaho-operated Waste Management facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The major facilities monitored include the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility, the Mixed Waste Storage Facility, and two surplus facilities. Included are some results of the sampling performed by the Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory and the United States Geological Survey. The primary purposes of monitoring are to evaluate environmental conditions, to provide and interpret data, to ensure compliance with applicable regulations or standards, and to ensure protection of human health and the environment. This report compares 1992 environmental surveillance data with DOE derived concentration guides, and with data from previous years.

  11. Evaluation of Machine Guarding pilot course taught in Idaho Falls, Idaho, June 23, 1992--June 25, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, T.S.

    1992-10-01

    This report summarizes trainee evaluations for the Safety Training Section course, Machine Guarding which was conducted June 23--25 at the Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company, in Idaho Falls, Idaho. This class was the fourth pilot course taught. Also, this report summarize the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course. Appendix A provides a transcript of the trainees' written comments. This class was conducted concurrently with a Supervisors Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE'' class. This allowed the lead instructor to use two experts in the classes without additional cost. The experiment was successful, both from a standpoint of cost and quality. The same format (concurrent classes) will be used at the Nevada test site in October.

  12. Escapement Monitoring of Adult Chinook Salmon in the Secesh River and Lake Creek, Idaho, 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Faurot, Dave; Kucera, Paul A.

    2001-04-01

    Underwater time-lapse video technology was used to monitor adult spring and summer chinook salmon abundance in spawning areas in Lake Creek and the Secesh River, Idaho, in 1999. This technique is a passive methodology that does not trap or handle this Endangered Species Act listed species. This was the third year of testing the remote application of this methodology in the Secesh River drainage. Secesh River chinook salmon represent a wild salmon spawning aggregate that has not been directly supplemented with hatchery fish. Adult chinook salmon spawner abundance was estimated in Lake Creek with the remote time-lapse video application. Adult spawner escapement into Lake Creek in 1999 was 67 salmon. Significant upstream and downstream spawner movement affected the ability to determine the number of fish that contributed to the spawning population. The first passage on Lake Creek was recorded on July 11, two days after installation of the fish counting station. Peak net upstream adult movement occurred at the Lake Creek site on July 20, peak of total movement activity was August 19 with the last fish observed on August 26. A minimum of 133 adult chinook salmon migrated upstream past the Secesh River fish counting station to spawning areas in the Secesh River drainage. The first upstream migrating adult chinook salmon passed the Secesh River site prior to the July 15 installation of the fish counting station. Peak net upstream adult movement at the Secesh River site occurred July 19, peak of total movement was August 15, 17 and 18 and the last fish passed on September 10. Migrating salmon in the Secesh River and Lake Creek exhibited two behaviorally distinct segments of fish movement. Mainly upstream only, movement characterized the first segment. The second segment consisted of upstream and downstream movement with very little net upstream movement. Estimated abundance was compared to single and multiple-pass redd count surveys within the drainage. There were

  13. Electrofishing effort requirements for estimating species richness in the Kootenai River, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watkins, Carson J.; Quist, Michael; Shepard, Bradley B.; Ireland, Susan C.

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted on the Kootenai River, Idaho to provide insight on sampling requirements to optimize future monitoring effort associated with the response of fish assemblages to habitat rehabilitation. Our objective was to define the electrofishing effort (m) needed to have a 95% probability of sampling 50, 75, and 100% of the observed species richness and to evaluate the relative influence of depth, velocity, and instream woody cover on sample size requirements. Sidechannel habitats required more sampling effort to achieve 75 and 100% of the total species richness than main-channel habitats. The sampling effort required to have a 95% probability of sampling 100% of the species richness was 1100 m for main-channel sites and 1400 m for side-channel sites. We hypothesized that the difference in sampling requirements between main- and side-channel habitats was largely due to differences in habitat characteristics and species richness between main- and side-channel habitats. In general, main-channel habitats had lower species richness than side-channel habitats. Habitat characteristics (i.e., depth, current velocity, and woody instream cover) were not related to sample size requirements. Our guidelines will improve sampling efficiency during monitoring effort in the Kootenai River and provide insight on sampling designs for other large western river systems where electrofishing is used to assess fish assemblages.

  14. Idaho Habitat/Natural Production Monitoring, Part II: Intensive Monitoring Subproject : Annual Progress Report 1990.

    SciTech Connect

    Kiefer, Russell B.; Forster, Katharine A.

    1992-04-01

    Project 83-7 was established under the Northeast Power Planning Council's 1982 Fish and Wildlife Program, Measure 704 (d) (1) to monitor natural production of anadromous fish, evaluate Bonneville Power Administration habitat improvement project, and develop a credit record for off-site mitigation projects in Idaho. Project 83-7 is divided into two sub-projects: general and intensive monitoring. Results of the intensive monitoring sub-project are reported here. Results from the general monitoring sub-project will be reported in a separate document. The purpose of this intensive monitoring project is to determine the number of returning chinook and steelhead adults necessary to achieve optimal smolt production, and develop mitigation accounting based on increases in smolt production. Two locations are being intensively studied to meet these objectives. Information from this research will be applied to parr monitoring streams statewide to develop escapement objectives and determine success of habitat enhancement projects. Field work began in 1987 in upper Salmon River and Crooked River (South Fork Clearwater River tributary). Methods include using weirs to trap adults, conducting ground and aerial redd counts, snorkeling to estimate parr populations, PIT-tagging juveniles to determine parr-tosmolt survival, trapping fall and spring downstream emigrants with scoop traps, and outplanting adults to determine juvenile carrying capacity. PIT tags also provide a wide range of other information such as migration timing, effects of flow and passage conditions on smolt survival, other factors affecting smolt survival, and growth.

  15. Double screening

    SciTech Connect

    Gratia, Pierre; Hu, Wayne; Joyce, Austin; Ribeiro, Raquel H.

    2016-06-15

    Attempts to modify gravity in the infrared typically require a screening mechanism to ensure consistency with local tests of gravity. These screening mechanisms fit into three broad classes; we investigate theories which are capable of exhibiting more than one type of screening. Specifically, we focus on a simple model which exhibits both Vainshtein and kinetic screening. We point out that due to the two characteristic length scales in the problem, the type of screening that dominates depends on the mass of the sourcing object, allowing for different phenomenology at different scales. We consider embedding this double screening phenomenology in a broader cosmological scenario and show that the simplest examples that exhibit double screening are radiatively stable.

  16. The Image of the University of Idaho: A Qualitative Exploration of the Perceptions of Southeastern Idaho Opinion Leaders and the Effectual Influence upon the Choices of Prospective University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, Marc T.

    2010-01-01

    This study explored perceptions about the University of Idaho among southeastern Idaho opinion leaders through qualitative inquiry. For many years the University of Idaho has struggled to recruit and retain students from the southeastern region of Idaho. From data collected from focus groups, face to face interviews, and field observations five…

  17. Dietary effects of metals-contaminated invertebrates from the Coeur d'Alene River, Idaho, on cutthroat trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farag, A.M.; Woodward, D.F.; Brumbaugh, W.; Goldstein, J.N.; MacConnell, Elizabeth; Hogstrand, Christer; Barrows, F.T.

    1999-01-01

    Benthic macroinvertebrates with elevated concentrations of metals were collected from the Coeur d'Alene (CDA) River, Idaho, pasteurized, and fed to cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarki in the laboratory from start of feeding until 90 d posthatch. Invertebrates were collected from two sites known to contain elevated concentrations of metals: near Pinehurst in the South Fork of the CDA River and at Cataldo, approximately 5 km below the confluence of the South Fork and the North Fork. Invertebrates collected from a relatively clean site in the North Fork were used as a reference diet. We performed measurements of fish health that indicate reduced fitness of fish fed the South Fork and Cataldo diets. Effects measured were reduced feeding activity, increased number of macrophage aggregates and hyperplasia of cells in the kidney, degeneration of mucosal epithelium in the pyloric caecae, and metallothionein induction. These effects would likely reduce growth and survival of fish in the wild. Vacuolization of glial cells were also observed in fish fed the Cataldo diet. Metals in the water often exacerbated the histological effects observed. Although the invertebrates collected near Cataldo had lower concentrations of arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) than the invertebrates from the South Fork, fish fed the Cataldo diet had equally high or higher concentrations of all metals except as by day 44. The Cataldo diet also caused the most deleterious effects on survival and growth. These findings are especially important for early life stage fish, whose diet consists wholly of benthic macroinvertebrates. Therefore, fish feeding on invertebrates in the CDA River below the Bunker Hill smelting complex are at risk of reduced fitness.

  18. Colon cancer screening

    MedlinePlus

    Screening for colon cancer; Colonoscopy - screening; Sigmoidoscopy - screening; Virtual colonoscopy - screening; Fecal immunochemical test; Stool DNA test; sDNA test; Colorectal cancer - screening; Rectal ...

  19. A COMPUTERIZED SURVEY QUESTIONNAIRE TO ASSIST TRIBAL REPRESENTATIVES IN GATHERING DATA ON TRIBAL FISH CONSUMPTION FOR RISK ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Context
    EPA Region 10, which comprises Alaska, Washington, Idaho, and Oregon, has 269 federally recognized Native American Tribes. It is has been documented that Tribal members consume much larger quantities of fish than the general population. ORD's Human Studies Division...

  20. Assessment of Native Salmonids Above Hells Canyon Dam, Idaho, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Kevin A.; Lamansky, Jr., James A.

    2004-03-01

    We assessed the relationships between specific stream attributes and Yellowstone cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarki bouvieri distribution and biomass at 773 stream reaches (averaging 100 m in length) throughout the Upper Snake River Basin in Idaho, in an effort to identify possible limiting factors. Because limiting factors were expected to vary across the range of cutthroat trout distribution in Idaho, separate logistic and multiple regression models were developed for each of the nine major river drainages to relate stream conditions to occurrence and biomass of cutthroat trout. Adequate stream flow to measure fish and habitat existed at 566 sites, and of those, Yellowstone cutthroat trout were present at 322 sites, while rainbow trout O. mykiss (or rainbow x cutthroat hybrids) and brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis occurred at 108 and 181 sites, respectively. In general, cutthroat trout presence at a specific site within a drainage was associated with a higher percentage of public property, higher elevation, more gravel and less fine substrate, and more upright riparian vegetation. However, there was much variation between drainages in the direction and magnitude of the relationships between stream characteristics and Yellowstone cutthroat trout occurrence and biomass, and in model strength. This was especially true for biomass models, in which we were able to develop models for only five drainages that explained more than 50% of the variation in cutthroat trout biomass. Sample size appeared to affect the strength of the biomass models, with a higher explanation of biomass variation in drainages with lower sample sizes. The occurrence of nonnative salmonids was not strongly related to cutthroat trout occurrence, but their widespread distribution and apparent ability to displace native cutthroat trout suggest they may nevertheless pose the largest threat to long-term cutthroat trout persistence in the Upper Snake River Basin.

  1. Southern idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Bottum, Edward; Mikkelsen, Anders

    2000-04-01

    This report is for the Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation project. This project, implemented by IDFG and SBT wildlife mitigation staff, is designed to protect, enhance and maintain wildlife habitats to mitigate construction losses for Palisades, Anderson Ranch, Black Canyon and Minidoka hydroelectric projects. Additional project information is available in the quarterly reports.

  2. Idaho National Laboratory Site Long-Term Stewardship Implementation Plan

    SciTech Connect

    B. E. Olaveson

    2006-07-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy has established long-term stewardship programs to protect human health and the environment at sites where residual contamination remains after site cleanup. At the Idaho National Laboratory Site, Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERLA) long-term stewardship activities performed under the aegis of regulatory agreements, the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order for the Idaho National Laboratory, and state and federal requirements are administered primarily under the direction of the Idaho Cleanup Project. It represents a subset of all on-going environmental activity at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. This plan provides a listing of applicable CERCLA long-term stewardship requirements and their planned and completed implementation goals. It proffers the Long-Term Stewardship Environmental Data Warehouse for Sitewide management of environmental data. This plan will be updated as needed over time, based on input from the U.S. Department of Energy, its cognizant subcontractors, and other local and regional stakeholders.

  3. Teenage Drinking In Idaho's Rural Communities. Research Bulletin 121.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lassey, M. L.; Carlson, J. E.

    In 1977, 8th and 12th grade students (n=889) from largely rural schools in 3 Idaho counties were surveyed as representive of both early and late stages of the teenage period to determine levels and patterns of liquor consumption. Respondents categorized themselves as nondrinkers (NDs), seldom drinkers (SDs), occasional drinkers (ODs), and frequent…

  4. Analysis of Due Process Decisions in Idaho: 2004 to 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wattam, Marni Jo

    2014-01-01

    This study used an explanatory mixed methods design to examine special education due process outcomes in Idaho for the time period of January 1, 2004 to June 30, 2012. The study was done in two phases. Phase one of the study explored what types of special education related issues are being brought before the state hearing officer(s) as due process…

  5. Idaho K-12 English Language Arts Content Guide and Framework.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meeks, Lynn Langer

    Representing a shift toward performance based education, this content guide and framework is designed to help schools in Idaho develop a K-12 English language arts curriculum and program and formulate some realistic goals for themselves and their students. An introductory section discusses performance based education, goals for English language…

  6. 77 FR 58094 - Central Idaho Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-19

    ... Forest Service Central Idaho Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of... committee is to improve collaborative relationships and to provide advice and recommendations to the Forest Service concerning projects and funding consistent with the title II of the Act. The meeting is open...

  7. 78 FR 23741 - North Central Idaho Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-22

    ... Forest Service North Central Idaho Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION...) (Pub. L. 92-463). The purpose of the RAC is to improve collaborative relationships and to provide advice and recommendations to the Forest Service concerning projects and funding consistent with Title...

  8. 77 FR 52310 - Central Idaho Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-29

    ... Forest Service Central Idaho Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of... purpose of the committee is to improve collaborative relationships and to provide advice and recommendations to the Forest Service concerning projects and funding consistent with the title II of the Act....

  9. Academic and Special Libraries in Idaho. 1996/97 Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandt, Sandy, Comp.

    This directory provides a concise list of academic and special libraries in Idaho. Libraries are listed alphabetically, and include library contact name, title, telephone, fax number, and address. The directory also contains an alphabetical listing of the library contacts, which includes the name of the library where the person works and the…

  10. 78 FR 45955 - IDAHO: Filing of Plats of Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-30

    .... ] Dated: July 10, 2013. Stanley G. French, Chief Cadastral Surveyor for Idaho. BILLING CODE 4310-GG-P ..., effective 9:00 a.m., on the dates specified. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Bureau of Land Management... resurvey of a portion of the subdivisional lines, and the subdivision of section 34, T., 2 N., R., 17...

  11. Effects of organophosphorus insecticides on sage grouse in southeastern Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blus, L.J.; Staley, C.S.; Henny, C.J.; Pendleton, G.W.; Craig, T.H.; Craig, E.H.; Halford, D.K.

    1989-01-01

    Unverified reports indicated die-offs of sage grouse have occurred since the 1970s in southeastern Idaho. Some verification that organophosphorus insecticides were involved was obtained in 1981 and 1983. A radio telemetry study indicated that dimethoate was responsible for most mortality. Methamidophos also acounted for mortality. Sage grouse populations may be adversely affected by organophosphorus insecticides.

  12. Larry Echo Hawk: A Rising Star from Idaho.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisecarver, Charmaine

    1993-01-01

    Larry Echo Hawk, Idaho attorney general and former state legislator, discusses success factors in college and law school; early experiences as an Indian lawyer; first election campaign; and his views on tribal sovereignty, state-tribal relationship, gambling, and his dual responsibility to the general public and Native American issues. (SV)

  13. National Environmental/Energy Workforce Assessment for Idaho.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Field Research Center Inc., Iowa City, IA.

    This report presents existing workforce levels, training programs and career potentials and develops staffing level projections (1976-1982) based on available information for the State of Idaho. The study concerns itself with the environmental pollution control areas of air, noise, potable water, pesticides, radiation, solid waste, wastewater, and…

  14. Energy and protein content of coyote prey in southeastern Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    MacCracken, J.G.; Hansen, R.M.

    1986-04-30

    Gross energy, digestible energy, crude protein, and digestible crude protein were estimated for two leporids and five rodents that were the primary prey of coyotes (Canis latrans) in southeastern Idaho. Digestible protein estimates differed (38%-54%) more than digestible energy (3.5-4.4 kcal), in the prey examined. 15 references, 1 table.

  15. Idaho Youth Risk Behavior Survey, 1995. Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho State Dept. of Health and Welfare, Boise. Div. of Consumer and Health Education.

    Many of the health problems experienced by youth are caused by preventable behaviors, such as alcohol abuse and unprotected sexual intercourse. The increasing cost of health care demands that youth be taught to adopt and maintain healthy behaviors. School health programs are essential to attaining this goal. The results of the 1995 Idaho Youth…

  16. Systems modeling at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, Michael A.

    1994-12-01

    This paper describes two experiences in systems modeling at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. These experiences reinforce key points that bear on the use of systems modeling in analyzing health-care issues. The first point is that mental models are a crucial part of systems. The second point is that simulation uncovers long-term consequences of existing assumptions.

  17. Profile of State College Entrance Exam Policies. Idaho

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Idaho's college entrance exam standards and polices. Some of the categories presented include: (1) College entrance exam policy; (2) Purpose; (3) Major changes in college entrance exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (4) Preparation state offers to students taking college…

  18. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Idaho

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Idaho's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  19. Traumatic Brain Injury: A Guidebook for Idaho Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Susanne

    This guide is an introduction to head injury and to educational resources in the field. An introductory section describes traumatic brain injury (TBI) as a federally recognized disability category and provides its federal and Idaho definitions. The following section introduces the unique characteristics of students with brain injuries. A section…

  20. Flood characteristics of streams in Owyhee County, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riggs, H.C.; Harenberg, W.A.

    1976-01-01

    Channel-width measurements were used to estimate annual peaks with a recurrence interval of 10 years at 79 sites in Owyhee County, Idaho, and adjacent areas. These discharges and those from 33 gaging stations are plotted on a map of the area. The map will allow the user to interpolate between sites. (Woodard-USGS)

  1. Geospatial Data Curation at the University of Idaho

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenyon, Jeremy; Godfrey, Bruce; Eckwright, Gail Z.

    2012-01-01

    The management and curation of digital geospatial data has become a central concern for many academic libraries. Geospatial data is a complex type of data critical to many different disciplines, and its use has become more expansive in the past decade. The University of Idaho Library maintains a geospatial data repository called the Interactive…

  2. Program Management Educational Needs of Idaho Business and Marketing Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitchel, Allen; Cannon, John; Duncan, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the perceived program management professional development needs of Idaho secondary business/marketing teachers (N = 233) in order to guide pre-service curriculum development and in-service training activities. Sixty-two percent (n = 146) of the 233 teachers completed a modified version of Joerger's (2002)…

  3. 75 FR 72705 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Idaho

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-26

    ... that eliminated the excessive downward transport of ozone from the top layers of the model. This... Air Act (the Act or CAA) section 110(a)(2)(D)(i) for the 1997 8-hour ozone National Ambient Air... emissions from Idaho sources do not significantly contribute to nonattainment of the 1997 8-hour ozone...

  4. Idaho Communication Arts: A Review for the Educator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Dennis

    A study examined secondary school teacher views concerning a number of related issues concerning communication certification and education. Three research questions were framed: (1) Are the current Idaho certification guidelines for Communication Arts sufficient? (2) Is instruction of communication arts at the junior and senior high school level…

  5. Amchitka Island Environmental Analysis at Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Gracy Elias; W. F. Bauer; J.G. Eisenmenger; C.C. Jensen; B.K. Schuetz; T. C. Sorensen; B.M. White; A. L. Freeman; M. E. McIlwain

    2005-08-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) provided support to Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP) in their activities which is supported by the Department of Energy (DOE) to assess the impact of past nuclear testing at Amchitka Island on the ecosystemof the island and surrounding ocean. INL participated in this project in three phases, Phase 1, Phase 2 and Phase 3.

  6. Idaho K-12 Physical Education: Content Guide and Framework.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Shannon L.; And Others

    This framework has been designed to help Idaho elementary and secondary public schools develop their physical education curricula and programs and formulate realistic goals. The document represents a change from past approaches and one early section details some examples of how this guide is different from previous guides. Among these differences…

  7. Sediment in Lake Coeur d'Alene, Idaho.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nord, Gail; Nord, John

    1998-01-01

    Describes how a mathematical model can be constructed and used to better understand human impact on natural resources. Uses the source of many current discussions in northern Idaho to present algebraic concepts and show an application of exponential functions. Contains 13 references. (ASK)

  8. Karuk Fishing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Ruth, Ed.; Goodwin, Norman

    A booklet on traditional fishing practices of the Karuk Indians of northwestern California is presented in the formal, literary English speech of Norman Goodwin, a Karuk medicine man involved in preserving ancient tribal traditions. Empirical information and personal narratives are combined in descriptions of different kinds of nets, social rules…

  9. Gone Fishing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson-Demme, Hillary; Kisiel, Jim

    2003-01-01

    Presents a hands-on activity in which students create a model of an ocean ecosystem to gain an understanding of how humans can alter biodiversity through their actions. Uses differing levels of fishing technology to explore the concepts of sustainability and overfishing. (Author/SOE)

  10. Commercial Fishing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This document is a curriculum framework for a program in commercial fishing to be taught in Florida secondary and postsecondary institutions. This outline covers the major concepts/content of the program, which is designed to prepare students for employment in occupations with titles such as net fishers, pot fishers, line fishers, shrimp boat…

  11. Influences of body size and environmental factors on autumn downstream migration of bull trout in the Boise River, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Monnot, L.; Dunham, J.B.; Hoem, T.; Koetsier, P.

    2008-01-01

    Many fishes migrate extensively through stream networks, yet patterns are commonly described only in terms of the origin and destination of migration (e.g., between natal and feeding habitats). To better understand patterns of migration in bull trout,Salvelinus confluentus we studied the influences of body size (total length [TL]) and environmental factors (stream temperature and discharge) on migrations in the Boise River basin, Idaho. During the autumns of 2001-2003, we tracked the downstream migrations of 174 radio-tagged bull trout ranging in size from 21 to 73 cm TL. The results indicated that large bull trout (>30 cm) were more likely than small fish to migrate rapidly downstream after spawning in headwater streams in early autumn. Large bull trout also had a higher probability of arriving at the current terminus of migration in the system, Arrowrock Reservoir. The rate of migration by small bull trout was more variable and individuals were less likely to move into Arrowrock Reservoir. The rate of downstream migration by all fish was slower when stream discharge was greater. Temperature was not associated with the rate of migration. These findings indicate that fish size and environmentally related changes in behavior have important influences on patterns of migration. In a broader context, these results and other recent work suggest, at least in some cases, that commonly used classifications of migratory behavior may not accurately reflect the full range of behaviors and variability among individuals (or life stages) and environmental conditions. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2008.

  12. Annual Review of BPA-Funded Anadromous Fish Projects, March 18-20, 1986, Holiday Inn Airport, Portland, Oregon.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1986-02-01

    This report contains descriptions of projects specifically related to anadromous salmonids. They include projects in the following categories: (1) fish and wildlife projects in western Montana; (2) fish health and physiology; (3) habitat enhancement and passage improvement - Oregon I; (4) passage improvement and natural propagation - Washington; (5) habitat enhancement and passage improvements - Oregon II; (6) future hydroelectric assessments; (7) habitat enhancement and passage improvement - Idaho; (8) downstream migration: flows and monitoring; (9) downstream migration: reservoir impacts; and (10) habitat evaluation and monitoring. (ACR)

  13. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Sitewide Institutional Controls Plan

    SciTech Connect

    W. L. Jolley

    2006-07-27

    On November 9, 2002, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality approved the Record of Decision Experimental Breeder Reactor-I/Boiling Water Reactor Experiment Area and Miscellaneous Sites, which requires a Sitewide Institutional Controls Plan for the then Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (now known as the Idaho National Laboratory). This document, first issued in June 2004, fulfilled that requirement. The revision is needed to provide an update as remedial actions are completed and new areas of concern are found. This Sitewide Institutional Controls Plan is based on guidance in the May 3, 1999, EPA Region 10 Final Policy on the Use of Institutional Controls at Federal Facilities; the September 29, 2000, EPA guidance Institutional Controls: A Site Manager's Guide to Identifying, Evaluating, and Selecting Institutional Controls at Superfund and RCRA Corrective Action Cleanups; and the April 9, 2003, DOE Policy 454.1, "Use of Institutional Controls." These policies establish measures that ensure short- and long-term effectiveness of institutional controls that protect human health and the environment at federal facility sites undergoing remedial action pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and/or corrective action pursuant to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The site-specific institutional controls currently in place at the Idaho National Laboratory are documented in this Sitewide Institutional Controls Plan. This plan is being updated, along with the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Comprehensive Facilities and Land Use Plan, to reflect the progress of remedial activities and changes in CERCLA sites.

  14. Assessment of the Geothermal System Near Stanley, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Trent Armstrong; John Welhan; Mike McCurry

    2012-06-01

    The City of Stanley, Idaho (population 63) is situated in the Salmon River valley of the central Idaho highlands. Due to its location and elevation (6270 feet amsl) it is one of the coldest locales in the continental U.S., on average experiencing frost 290 days of the year as well as 60 days of below zero (oF) temperatures. Because of high snowfall (76 inches on average) and the fact that it is at the terminus of its rural grid, the city also frequently endures extended power outages during the winter. To evaluate its options for reducing heating costs and possible local power generation, the city obtained a rural development grant from the USDA and commissioned a feasibility study through author Roy Mink to determine whether a comprehensive site characterization and/or test drilling program was warranted. Geoscience students and faculty at Idaho State University (ISU), together with scientists from the Idaho Geological Survey (IGS) and Idaho National Laboratory (INL) conducted three field data collection campaigns between June, 2011 and November, 2012 with the assistance of author Beckwith who arranged for food, lodging and local property access throughout the field campaigns. Some of the information collected by ISU and the IGS were compiled by author Mink and Boise State University in a series of progress reports (Makovsky et al., 2011a, b, c, d). This communication summarizes all of the data collected by ISU including data that were compiled as part of the IGS’s effort for the National Geothermal Data System’s (NGDS) data compilation project funded by the Department of Energy and coordinated by the Arizona Geological Survey.

  15. Completion summary for boreholes USGS 140 and USGS 141 near the Advanced Test Reactor Complex, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Twining, Brian V.; Bartholomay, Roy C.; Hodges, Mary K.V.

    2014-01-01

    In 2013, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, drilled and constructed boreholes USGS 140 and USGS 141 for stratigraphic framework analyses and long-term groundwater monitoring of the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer at the Idaho National Laboratory in southeast Idaho. Borehole USGS 140 initially was cored to collect continuous geologic data, and then re-drilled to complete construction as a monitor well. Borehole USGS 141 was drilled and constructed as a monitor well without coring. Boreholes USGS 140 and USGS 141 are separated by about 375 feet (ft) and have similar geologic layers and hydrologic characteristics based on geophysical and aquifer test data collected. The final construction for boreholes USGS 140 and USGS 141 required 6-inch (in.) diameter carbon-steel well casing and 5-in. diameter stainless-steel well screen; the screened monitoring interval was completed about 50 ft into the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer, between 496 and 546 ft below land surface (BLS) at both sites. Following construction and data collection, dedicated pumps and water-level access lines were placed to allow for aquifer testing, for collecting periodic water samples, and for measuring water levels. Borehole USGS 140 was cored continuously, starting from land surface to a depth of 543 ft BLS. Excluding surface sediment, recovery of basalt and sediment core at borehole USGS 140 was about 98 and 65 percent, respectively. Based on visual inspection of core and geophysical data, about 32 basalt flows and 4 sediment layers were collected from borehole USGS 140 between 34 and 543 ft BLS. Basalt texture for borehole USGS 140 generally was described as aphanitic, phaneritic, and porphyritic; rubble zones and flow mold structure also were described in recovered core material. Sediment layers, starting near 163 ft BLS, generally were composed of fine-grained sand and silt with a lesser amount of clay; however, between 223 and 228 ft BLS, silt

  16. 78 FR 68466 - BLM Director's Response to the Idaho Governor's Appeal of the BLM Idaho State Director's Governor...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-14

    ... Sage-Grouse Plan concerns, your letter did not identify inconsistencies between your Plan and any of... regulatory requirements by specifically identifying inconsistencies between the Greater Sage-Grouse Plan and... of BLM Idaho's statement that your Greater Sage-Grouse Plan was `not sufficiently final' to...

  17. Discovery of a Balkan fresh-water fauna in the Idaho formation of Snake River Valley, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dall, W.H.

    1925-01-01

    In 1866 Gabb described Melania taylori and Lithasia antiqua "from a fresh-water deposit on Snake River, Idaho Territory, on the road from Fort Boise to the Owyhee mining country. Collected by A. Taylor." He states that a small bivalve, perhaps a Sphaerium, was associated with them.

  18. [Opportunities and Obstacles: Implementing Stimulus-Funded School Improvement Grants in Maryland, Michigan, and Idaho. Idaho Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Caitlin; McMurrer, Jennifer; McIntosh, Shelby

    2012-01-01

    Two schools in Idaho received ARRA SIG (American Recovery and Reinvestment Act School Improvement Grants) funds to enable them to implement improvement efforts. This paper describes the outcomes of these two ARRA SIG recipient schools: (1) Jefferson Middle School; and (2) Lakeside Elementary School. The experiences of this non-recipient school is…

  19. Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS --Idaho Model Watershed Habitat Projects - Pahsimeroi Fence Crossing

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2004-08-11

    The Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to fund the installation of a fenced stream crossing over the Pahsimeroi River to enhance a livestock riparian enclosure. This structure would include up to four wood fence posts and two deadman anchors buried in the ground. The goal of this project is to enhance salmon and steelhead rearing and migration habitat by preventing livestock from entering the riparian area via the river. The NEPA compliance checklist for this project was completed by Carl Rudeen with the Custer Soil and Water Conservation District (August 4, 2004) and meets the standards and guidelines for the Watershed Management Program Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). The Endangered Species Act (ESA) listed species that may occur in the general vicinity of the project area are gray wolf, Canada lynx, bald eagle, Ute ladies'Tresses, Snake River chinook salmon, Snake River steelhead trout, and Columbia River Basin bull trout. It was determined that the proposed fence crossing construction project would have no effect on these species. Bald eagle, gray wolf and Canada lynx are not known to occur in the immediate project vicinity. Since the site is used primarily as livestock pasture it does not lend itself to the presence of Ute ladies'Tresses. ESA listed fish may be present in the project vicinity but will not be affected because the project does not involve instream work. Soil disturbance will be limited to the livestock pasture and to two holes that will be used to bury anchors for the suspended portion of the fence. Required river crossings will be made on foot. Requirements associated with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act were handled by the Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS), in cooperation with staff from the U.S. Forest Service (Boise National Forest), under their existing Programmatic Agreement with the Idaho State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO). A description of the Pahsimeroi

  20. A Long-Term Comparison of Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout Abundance and Size Structure in Their Historical Range in Idaho.

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Kevin A.; Schill, Daniel J.; Elle, F. Steven

    2002-05-23

    We compared estimates of population abundance and size structure for Yellowstone cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarki bouvieri obtained by electrofishing 77 stream segments across southeastern Idaho in the 1980s and again in 1999-2000 to test whether populations of Yellowstone cutthroat trout had changed. Sites sampled in the 1980s were relocated in 1999-2000 by using maps and photographs or by finding original site-boundary stakes, so that the same reach of stream was sampled during both periods. Abundance of Yellowstone cutthroat trout longer than 10 cm did not change, averaging 41 fish/100 m of stream during both the 1980s and 1999-2000. The proportion of the total catch of trout composed of Yellowstone cutthroat trout also did not change, averaging 82% in the 1980s and 78% in 1999-2000. At the 48 sites where size structure could be estimated for both periods, the proportion of Yellowstone cutthroat trout that were 10-20 cm long declined slightly (74% versus 66%), but the change was due entirely to the shift in size structure at the Teton River sites. The number of sites that contained rainbow trout O. mykiss or cutthroat trout 3 rainbow trout hybrids rose from 23 to 37, but the average proportion of the catch composed of rainbow trout and hybrids did not increase (7% in both the 1980s and 1999-2000). Although the distribution and abundance of Yellowstone cutthroat trout have been substantially reduced in Idaho over the last century, our results indicate that Yellowstone cutthroat trout abundance and size structure in Idaho have remained relatively stable at a large number of locations for the last 10-20 years. The expanding distribution of rainbow trout and hybrids in portions of the upper Snake River basin, however, calls for additional monitoring and active management actions.

  1. Salmon Supplementation Studies in Idaho Rivers; Field Activities Conducted on Clear and Pete King Creeks, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Gass, Carrie; Olson, Jim M.

    2004-11-01

    In 2001 the Idaho Fisheries Resource Office continued as a cooperator on the Salmon Supplementation Studies in Idaho Rivers (ISS) project on Pete King and Clear creeks. Data relating to supplementation treatment releases, juvenile sampling, juvenile PIT tagging, brood stock spawning and rearing, spawning ground surveys, and snorkel surveys were used to evaluate project data points and augment past data. Due to low adult spring Chinook returns to Kooskia National Fish Hatchery (KNFH) in brood year 1999 there was no smolt supplementation treatment release into Clear Creek in 2001. A 17,014 spring Chinook parr supplementation treatment (containing 1000 PIT tags) was released into Pete King Creek on July 24, 2001. On Clear Creek, there were 412 naturally produced spring Chinook parr PIT tagged and released. Using juvenile collection methods, Idaho Fisheries Resource Office staff PIT tagged and released 320 naturally produced spring Chinook pre-smolts on Clear Creek, and 16 natural pre-smolts on Pete King Creek, for minimum survival estimates to Lower Granite Dam. There were no PIT tag detections of brood year 1999 smolts from Clear or Pete King creeks. A total of 2261 adult spring Chinook were collected at KNFH. Forty-three females were used for supplementation brood stock, and 45 supplementation (ventral fin-clip), and 45 natural (unmarked) adults were released upstream of KNFH to spawn naturally. Spatial and temporal distribution of 37 adults released above the KNFH weir was determined through the use of radio telemetry. On Clear Creek, a total of 166 redds (8.2 redds/km) were observed and data was collected from 195 carcasses. Seventeen completed redds (2.1 redds/km) were found, and data was collected data from six carcasses on Pete King Creek.

  2. Impact of entrainment and impingement on fish populations in the Hudson River Estuary. Volume II. Impingement impact analyses, evaluations of alternative screening devices, and critiques of utility testimony relating to density-dependent growth, the age-composition of the striped bass spawning stock, and the LMS real-time life cycle model

    SciTech Connect

    Barnthouse, L. W.; Van Winkle, W.; Golumbek, J.; Cada, G. F.; Goodyear, C. P.; Christensen, S. W.; Cannon, J. B.; Lee, D. W.

    1982-04-01

    This volume includes a series of four exhibits relating to impacts of impingement on fish populations, together with a collection of critical evaluations of testimony prepared for the utilities by their consultants. The first exhibit is a quantitative evaluation of four sources of bias (collection efficiency, reimpingement, impingement on inoperative screens, and impingement survival) affecting estimates of the number of fish killed at Hudson River power plants. The two following exhibits contain, respectively, a detailed assessment of the impact of impingement on the Hudson River white perch population and estimates of conditional impingement mortality rates for seven Hudson River fish populations. The fourth exhibit is an evaluation of the engineering feasibility and potential biological effectiveness of several types of modified intake structures proposed as alternatives to cooling towers for reducing impingement impacts. The remainder of Volume II consists of critical evaluations of the utilities' empirical evidence for the existence of density-dependent growth in young-of-the-year striped bass and white perch, of their estimate of the age-composition of the striped bass spawning stock in the Hudson River, and of their use of the Lawler, Matusky, and Skelly (LMS) Real-Time Life Cycle Model to estimate the impact of entrainment and impingement on the Hudson River striped bass population.

  3. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1998

    SciTech Connect

    T. R. Saffle; R. G. Mitchell; R. B. Evans; D. B. Martin

    2000-07-01

    The results of the various monitoring programs for 1998 indicated that radioactivity from the DOE's Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) operations could generally not be distinguished from worldwide fallout and natural radioactivity in the region surrounding the INEEL. Although some radioactive materials were discharged during INEEL operations, concentrations in the offsite environment and doses to the surrounding population were far less than state of Idaho and federal health protection guidelines. Gross alpha and gross beta measurements, used as a screening technique for air filters, were investigated by making statistical comparisons between onsite or boundary location concentrations and the distant community group concentrations. Gross alpha activities were generally higher at distant locations than at boundary and onsite locations. Air samples were also analyzed for specific radionuclides. Some human-made radionuclides were detected at offsite locations, but most were near the minimum detectable concentration and their presence was attributable to natural sources, worldwide fallout, and statistical variations in the analytical results rather than to INEEL operations. Low concentrations of 137Cs were found in muscle tissue and liver of some game animals and sheep. These levels were mostly consistent with background concentrations measured in animals sampled onsite and offsite in recent years. Ionizing radiation measured simultaneously at the INEEL boundary and distant locations using environmental dosimeters were similar and showed only background levels. The maximum potential population dose from submersion, ingestion, inhalation, and deposition to the approximately 121,500 people residing within an 80-km (50-mi) radius from the geographical center of the INEEL was estimated to be 0.08 person-rem (8 x 10-4 person-Sv) using the MDIFF air dispersion model. This population dose is less than 0.0002 percent of the estimated 43,7 00

  4. ICPP injection well alternative project, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) portion of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has been obtaining water needed for its operations from the Snake River aquifer, which occupies the entire region underlying the site. Most of this water has been used for cooling operating equipment, while a small portion has found various process uses. After passing through the ICPP process area, these waters are then returned to the aquifer. A small portion (about 1%) of the returned stream contains measurable amounts of radioactivity derived from the miscellaneous process users. This report and the recommendations contained herein are based upon stream flows projected for 1985 as supplied by DOE for the ICPP. 26 different alternatives for handling cooling water, chemical, and low level radioactive water disposal are examined. These cases are considered from technical, environmental, safety, and economic points of view. The level of detail is sufficient to eliminate non-viable cases, and to identify those which offer improvements over present practice. The Environmental/Safety Risk Factors were evaluated on a qualitative comparison basis only. Before a recommended improvement is incorporated into the waste disposal system, a conceptual design study should be made which would evaluate all those secondary effects and environmental factors that, by the very nature of the screening process, this study has not provided. Certain synergistic combinations have been noted and are discussed. This report does note whether the operations considered are in regulatory compliance, or are likely to be capable of providing lasting improvement to the waste water system. Qualitative comparisons were made between the various alternatives to confirm their relationship with applicable standards.

  5. Stratigraphic data for wells at and near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S.R.; Ackerman, D.J.; Liszewski, M.J.; Frieburger, R.M.

    1996-05-01

    A stratigraphic data base containing 230 stratigraphic units in 333 wells was constructed for deposits that make up the unsaturated zone and the Snake River Plain aquifer at and near INEL in eastern Idaho. Stratigraphic units, which were identified and correlated using data from numerous outcrops, 26 continuous cores, and 328 natural-gamma logs available in Dec. 1993, include 121 basalt-flow groups, 102 sedimentary interbeds, 6 andesite-flow groups, and 1 rhyolite dome. By volume, basalt flows make up about 90% of the deposits underlying most of this 890 mi{sup 2} area. Basalt, sediment, andesite, and rhyolite were identified from outcrops and cores that were selectively evaluated. Stratigraphic units were correlated using these data and natural-gamma logs. Best correlations were for basalt and sediment at Test Area North, the Naval Reactors Area, the Test Reactor Area, ICPP, and the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC), where most cores and 2/3 of the logs were obtained. Correlations range from good at the RWMC to uncertain the eastern half of the study area. A computer diskette containing the data is included.

  6. Mineralogy of selected sedimentary interbeds at or near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, M.F.; Bartholomay, R.C.

    1994-08-01

    The US Geological Survey`s (USGS) Project Office at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) analyzed 66 samples from sedimentary interbed cores during a 38-month period beginning in October 1990 to determine bulk and clay mineralogy. These cores had been collected from 19 sites in the Big Lost River Basin, 2 sites in the Birch Creek Basin, and 1 site in the Mud Lake Basin, and were archived at the USGS lithologic core library at the INEL. Mineralogy data indicate that core samples from the Big Lost River Basin have larger mean and median percentages of quartz, total feldspar, and total clay minerals, but smaller mean and median percentages of calcite than the core samples from the Birch Creek Basin. Core samples from the Mud Lake Basin have abundant quartz, total feldspar, calcite, and total clay minerals. Identification of the mineralogy of the Snake River Plain is needed to aid in the study of the hydrology and geochemistry of subsurface waste disposal.

  7. Geochemistry and hydrology of thermal springs in the Idaho Batholith and adjacent areas, central Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Young, H.W.

    1985-01-01

    The occurrence of nature of thermal springs in the Idaho batholith and adjacent areas suggest a relation between structural controls and deeply circulating hot-water systems. Springs issuing from granitic rocks are associated mostly with major regional fault structures. Springs issuing from other rocks probably are related to local faulting. Individual spring flows and water temperatures are variable and range from less than 1 gallon per minute to 2,710 gallons per minute and from 20.5 degrees to 94.0 degrees Celsius. Annual spring discharge is at least 27,000 acre-feet; heat discharges convectively is estimated to be 5.0 x 107 calories per second. Thermal springs discharge relatively dilute water; dissolved solids range from 103 to 839 milligrams per liter. The chemical quality of the water suggests deep circulation of meteoric water. Estimated reservoir temperatures are generally less than 100 degrees Celsius, but temperatures for several springs exceed 150 degrees Celsius. Stable-isotope data suggest that most of the thermal water is not derived from current precipitation. Carbon-14 values indicate that thermal waters are old; apparent residence times range from 9,000 to more than 40,000 years.

  8. Geothermal investigations in Idaho: Geothermal resource analysis in Twin Falls County, Idaho:

    SciTech Connect

    Street, L.V.; DeTar, R.E.

    1987-07-01

    Increased utilization of the geothermal resource in the Twin Falls - Banbury area of southern Idaho has resulted in noticeable declines in the artesian head of the system. In order to determine the nature of the declines, a network of wells was identified for monitoring shut-in pressures and temperatures. In addition, a compilation of data and reconnaissance of the areal geology was undertaken in order to better understand the geologic framework and its relationship to the occurrence of the thermal waters in the system. The results of the monitoring indicate that while water temperatures have remained constant, the system shows a gradual overall decline in artesian pressure superimposed on fluctuations caused by seasonal use of the system. Well testing and the similarity of hydrographs resulting from well monitoring throughout the area suggest that there are no major hydrologic barriers to thermal water movement in the system and that wells are affected by increases and decreases in utilization of nearby wells. 46 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Genetic screening

    PubMed Central

    Andermann, Anne; Blancquaert, Ingeborg

    2010-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To provide a primer for primary care professionals who are increasingly called upon to discuss the growing number of genetic screening services available and to help patients make informed decisions about whether to participate in genetic screening, how to interpret results, and which interventions are most appropriate. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE As part of a larger research program, a wide literature relating to genetic screening was reviewed. PubMed and Internet searches were conducted using broad search terms. Effort was also made to identify the gray literature. MAIN MESSAGE Genetic screening is a type of public health program that is systematically offered to a specified population of asymptomatic individuals with the aim of providing those identified as high risk with prevention, early treatment, or reproductive options. Ensuring an added benefit from screening, as compared with standard clinical care, and preventing unintended harms, such as undue anxiety or stigmatization, depends on the design and implementation of screening programs, including the recruitment methods, education and counseling provided, timing of screening, predictive value of tests, interventions available, and presence of oversight mechanisms and safeguards. There is therefore growing apprehension that economic interests might lead to a market-driven approach to introducing and expanding screening before program effectiveness, acceptability, and feasibility have been demonstrated. As with any medical intervention, there is a moral imperative for genetic screening to do more good than harm, not only from the perspective of individuals and families, but also for the target population and society as a whole. CONCLUSION Primary care professionals have an important role to play in helping their patients navigate the rapidly changing terrain of genetic screening services by informing them about the benefits and risks of new genetic and genomic technologies and empowering them to

  10. Investigating drought using extreme climatic indices over Idaho, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrabi, M.; Ryu, J.

    2011-12-01

    To investigate consequences of climate variability and change, twenty-seven climatic indices of temperature and precipitation for Idaho, USA were computed, especially focusing on growing seasons (May through August). Mean temperature and average of maximum of maximum temperature, yearly minimum value of Self Calibrated Palmer Index (sc-PDSI) and Standard Precipitation Index (SPI) for 1, 3, 6 and 12 month time scales were also used to identify spatial and temporal distributions of climatic variability to be utilized in water management decisions. The analyses were conducted for 57 meteorological stations, during the period from 1962 to 2007, characterized by a long-term and high-quality dataset. Preliminary results indicate that global warming likely occurs over Idaho in the sense that declining trends in precipitation amount and frequency have been presented over most of the stations. Increasing trends in minimum of minimum temperature have been seen at the 56 stations and statistical significance of the trends were shown at the 33 stations out of them. Similarly, increasing trends in maximum of maximum temperature at the 48 stations have been found, and 25 stations out of them have significant trends. Consequently, frost and ice days dwindle as growing season length, tropical nights and summer days increase. Annual precipitation shows decreasing trends in 39 stations which 33 percent of them are significant. Generally, precipitation amount and frequency considerably dwindle in southern Idaho, while these indices increase in northern Idaho. Growing season precipitation also declines considerably, particularly in Snake River basin. Results of monthly and annual average of both SPI and sc-PDSI reveal considerable number of negative trends (approaching dry condition). SPI 12 month time scale and sc-PDSI indicate similar pattern. Furthermore, their results are consistent with drought reports published by Idaho Department of Water Resources. Minimum sc-PDSI has negative

  11. Review of the transport of selected radionuclides in the interim risk assessment for the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, Waste Area Group 7 Operable Unit 7-13/14, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rousseau, Joseph P.; Landa, Edward R.; Nimmo, John R.; Cecil, L. DeWayne; Knobel, LeRoy L.; Glynn, Pierre D.; Kwicklis, Edward M.; Curtis, Gary P.; Stollenwerk, Kenneth G.; Anderson, Steven R.; Bartholomay, Roy C.; Bossong, Clifford R.; Orr, Brennon R.

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requested that the U.S. Geological Survey conduct an independent technical review of the Interim Risk Assessment (IRA) and Contaminant Screening for the Waste Area Group 7 (WAG-7) Remedial Investigation, the draft Addendum to the Work Plan for Operable Unit 7-13/14 WAG-7 comprehensive Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study (RI/FS), and supporting documents that were prepared by Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies, Inc. The purpose of the technical review was to assess the data and geotechnical approaches that were used to estimate future risks associated with the release of the actinides americium, uranium, neptunium, and plutonium to the Snake River Plain aquifer from wastes buried in pits and trenches at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA). The SDA is located at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex in southeastern Idaho within the boundaries of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Radionuclides have been buried in pits and trenches at the SDA since 1957 and 1952, respectively. Burial of transuranic wastes was discontinued in 1982. The five specific tasks associated with this review were defined in a ?Proposed Scope of Work? prepared by the DOE, and a follow-up workshop held in June 1998. The specific tasks were (1) to review the radionuclide sampling data to determine how reliable and significant are the reported radionuclide detections and how reliable is the ongoing sampling program, (2) to assess the physical and chemical processes that logically can be invoked to explain true detections, (3) to determine if distribution coefficients that were used in the IRA are reliable and if they have been applied properly, (4) to determine if transport model predictions are technically sound, and (5) to identify issues needing resolution to determine technical adequacy of the risk assessment analysis, and what additional work is required to resolve those issues.

  12. Using a geographic information system to improve childhood lead-screening efforts.

    PubMed

    Graff, Robert

    2013-06-13

    The Idaho Division of Public Health conducted a pilot study to produce a lead-exposure-risk map to help local and state agencies better target childhood lead-screening efforts. Priority lead-screening areas, at the block group level, were created by using county tax assessor data and geographic information system software. A series of maps were produced, indicating childhood lead-screening prevalence in areas in which there was high potential for exposure to lead. These maps could enable development of more systematically targeted and cost-effective childhood lead-screening efforts.

  13. A mycosis-like granuloma of fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, E.M.; Yasutake, W.T.; Lehman, W.L.

    1955-01-01

    Mycoses of systemic distribution are rarely observed in fresh-water fish in this country. In a recent review of atypical cell growths in fishes, Nigrelli cited the only known instance of a mycetoma in a North American fresh-water fish which occurred in the head of fingerling landlocked salmon from an Idaho hatchery. The fungus associated with this granuloma was characterized by a branching septate mycelium. Rucker reported a streptomycete which was pathogenic to blueblack salmon. This organism produced internal nodules containing masses of hyphae but no inflammatory response. A pathogenic fungus has been observed frequently in marine fish, however, and in both marine and fresh-water fish in Europe. This organism was tentatively classified as a Phycomycete in or near the order Chytridiales and was assigned to the genus and species Ichthyophonus hoferi, later reclassified as Ichthyosporidium hoferi. The graduloma described in this report occurs in fresh-water trout and is apparently caused by a budding, yeast-like form with no hyphae which evokes a tremendous inflammatory reaction. Morphologically, the organism does not resemble the previously described Ichthyosporidium. The lesions were first seen accidentally in sections prepared from a diplobacillus infection of brook trout termed “kidney disease.” Subsequently, the granuloma was observed in three widely separated infections involving the diplobacillus in each instance.The histological material was received in a fixed condition; thus, no cultural data was available and the nomenclature and classification of the mycotic organism were not attempted. The present distribution of the disease, however, with its potential threat to domestic fish populations, seemed to warrant a description and discussion of the disease. Efforts are in progress to culture the organism.

  14. Bathymetry, morphology, and lakebed geologic characteristics of potential Kokanee salmon spawning habitat in Lake Pend Oreille, Bayview and Lakeview quadrangles, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barton, Gary J.; Dux, Andrew M.

    2013-01-01

    Kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) are a keystone species in Lake Pend Oreille in northern Idaho, historically supporting a high-yield recreational fishery and serving as the primary prey for the threatened native bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and the Gerrard-strain rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). After 1965, the kokanee population rapidly declined and has remained at a low level of abundance. Lake Pend Oreille is one of the deepest lakes in the United States, the largest lake in Idaho, and home to the U.S. Navy Acoustic Research Detachment Base. The U.S. Geological Survey and Idaho Department of Fish and Game are mapping the bathymetry, morphology, and the lakebed geologic units and embeddedness of potential kokanee salmon spawning habitat in Lake Pend Oreille. Relations between lake morphology, lakebed geologic units, and substrate embeddedness are characterized for the shore zone, rise zone, and open water in bays and the main stem of the lake. This detailed knowledge of physical habitat along the shoreline of Lake Pend Oreille is necessary to better evaluate and develop kokanee recovery actions.

  15. Meat-, fish-, and poultry-processing wastes. [Industrial wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Litchfield, J.H.

    1982-06-01

    A review of the literature dealing with the effectiveness of various waste processing methods for meat-, fish,-, and poultry-processing wastes is presented. Activated sludge processes, anaerobic digestion, filtration, screening, oxidation ponds, and aerobic digestion are discussed.

  16. Factors influencing nesting success of burrowing owls in southeastern Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Gleason, R.S.; Johnson, D.R.

    1985-01-31

    A burrowing owl (Athene cunicularia) population nesting on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in southeastern Idaho utilized burrows excavated by badgers (Taxidea taxus) or natural cavities in lava flows as nesting sites. The size of the population was small (N = 13-14 pairs) in relation to the number of available nesting sites, suggesting that factors other than burrow availability limited this population. Rodents and Jerusalem crickets (Stenopelmatus fuscus) represented the primary prey utilized during the nesting season. This population demonstrated both a numerical (brood size) and functional (dietary) response to a decrease in the density of three species of rodents on the INEL during a drought in 1977. 11 references, 1 figure, 2 table.

  17. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory installation roadmap document. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-30

    The roadmapping process was initiated by the US Department of Energy`s office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) to improve its Five-Year Plan and budget allocation process. Roadmap documents will provide the technical baseline for this planning process and help EM develop more effective strategies and program plans for achieving its long-term goals. This document is a composite of roadmap assumptions and issues developed for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) by US Department of Energy Idaho Field Office and subcontractor personnel. The installation roadmap discusses activities, issues, and installation commitments that affect waste management and environmental restoration activities at the INEL. The High-Level Waste, Land Disposal Restriction, and Environmental Restoration Roadmaps are also included.

  18. Prehistoric Rock Structures of the Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Brenda R Pace

    2007-04-01

    Over the past 13,500 years, human populations have lived in and productively utilized the natural resources offered by the cold desert environment of the northeastern Snake River Plain in eastern Idaho. Within an overall framework of hunting and gathering, groups relied on an intimate familiarity with the natural world and developed a variety of technologies to extract the resources that they needed to survive. Useful items were abundant and found everywhere on the landscape. Even the basaltic terrain and the rocks, themselves, were put to productive use. This paper presents a preliminary classification scheme for rock structures built on the Idaho National Laboratory landscape by prehistoric aboriginal populations, including discussions of the overall architecture of the structures, associated artifact assemblages, and topographic placement. Adopting an ecological perspective, the paper concludes with a discussion of the possible functions of these unique resources for the desert populations that once called the INL home.

  19. Geophysical Investigations of Archaeological Resources in Southern Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Brenda Ringe Pace; Gail Heath; Clark Scott; Carlan McDaniel

    2005-10-01

    At the Idaho National Laboratory and other locations across southern Idaho, geophysical tools are being used to discover, map, and evaluate archaeological sites. A variety of settings are being explored to expand the library of geophysical signatures relevant to archaeology in the region. Current targets of interest include: prehistoric archaeological features in open areas as well as lava tube caves, historical structures and activity areas, and emigrant travel paths. We draw from a comprehensive, state of the art geophysical instrumentation pool to support this work. Equipment and facilities include ground penetrating radar, electromagnetic and magnetic sensors, multiple resistivity instruments, advanced positioning instrumentation, state of the art processing and data analysis software, and laboratory facilities for controlled experiments.

  20. Paleozoic carbonate buildup (reef) inventory, central and southeastern Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacson, P.E.

    1987-08-01

    Knowledge of central and southeastern Idaho's Paleozoic rocks to date suggest that three styles of buildup (reef) complexes occur in Late Devonian, Mississippian, and Pennsylvanian-Permian time. The Late Devonian Jefferson Formation has stromatoporoid and coral (both rugosan and tabulate) organisms effecting a buildup in the Grandview Canyon vicinity; Early Mississippian Waulsortian-type mud mounds occur in the Lodgepole formation of southeastern Idaho; there are Late Mississippian Waulsortian-type mounds in the Surrett Canyon Formation of the Lost River Range; and cyclic Pennsylvanian-Permian algal and hydrozoan buildups occur in the Juniper gulch Member of the Snaky Canyon Formation in the Arco Hills and Lemhi Range. Late Devonian (Frasnian) carbonates of the Jefferson formation show buildup development on deep ramp sediments.

  1. U.S. hydropower resource assessment for Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, A.M.; Francfort, J.E.

    1998-08-01

    The US Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in the US. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory for this purpose. HES measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the US, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report describes the resource assessment results for the State of Idaho.

  2. The Idaho Section's Experiences with Hosting Irradiated Food Dinners

    SciTech Connect

    Steve Herring; John Commander; Chris Ischay; Bob Skinner; Bob Seidel

    2000-11-12

    Over the past 15 yr, the Idaho Section of the American Nuclear Society (IANS) has hosted four dinners in which irradiated foods were featured. The purpose of these dinners was to make our members, the community, and the local press aware of the benefits of irradiation technology for preserving and sterilizing food without changing the taste or texture of the food. We would like to share our experiences with the arrangements, publicity, and logistical efforts necessary to host these dinners.

  3. Tertiary epizonal plutonic rocks of the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness, Idaho County, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Motzer, W.E.

    1996-01-01

    Geologic mapping in the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness identified approximately 731 kmS of epizonal plutonic granitic rocks within the Bitterroot lobe of the Idaho batholith. From north to south, the intrusions are the Rock Lake Creek stock and the Whistling Pig, Running Creek, Bad Luck and Painted Rocks plutons. The stock and plutons consist of medium- to coarse-grained biotite and hornblende-biotite syenorgranite to monzogranite and quartz syenite capped by fine-grained biotite leucogranite. These rocks are intruded by late-synplutonic leucogranite dikes and post plutonic porphyritic rhyolite to rhyodacite and basalt dikes. The medium-grained granitic rocks are high in SiO2, K2O, Na2O, Ga, Th, U, W and Zr, but low in Al7O3, CaO, MgO, Cr, Ni, Co and V. Most of the granites are peraluminous. Rare-earth element (REE) plots (rock sample/chondrite) show enrichment in light REE over heavy REE with strong EU depletions. K-Ar biotite radiometric age determinations for medium-grained granites in all of the plutons range from approximately 51 Ma (Whistling Pig pluton) to 43.7 Ma (Painted Rocks pluton). Petrogenetic studies suggest that the plutons were rapidly emplaced to within 3.0 km of the paleosurface. The types, textures and color of the rocks result from devolatilization of the crystallizing melt and very low-grade hydrothermal alteration. The fluorine-rich melts are the fractionated with accumulate residue; they are considered to be anorogenic (A-type) granites intruded into the center of a metamorphic core complex.

  4. Purgeable organic compounds in ground water at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho; 1988 and 1989

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mann, L.J.

    1990-01-01

    Groundwater samples from 38 wells at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory were analyzed for 36 purgeable organic compounds in 1988-89. Thirty-six of the wells obtain water from the Snake River Plain aquifer and were equipped with dedicated or portable pumps. Water samples from one well that obtains water from the aquifer and one that obtains water from a perched groundwater zone were collected using a thief sampler. Analyses of water from 22 wells indicated the aquifer locally contained detectable concentrations of at least 1 of 19 purgeable organic compounds, mainly carbon tetrachloride, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and trichloroethylene. Except for five wells, the maximum concentration of a specific compound in groundwater was 6.4 microgram/L or less; concentrations of most compounds were less than 0.2 microgram/L. Water from four wells at and near the Test Area North contained from 44 to 29, 000 micrograms/L of trichloroethylene. Water from a well that obtains water from a discontinuous perched groundwater zone at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex contained 1,400 micrograms/L of carbon tetrachloride, 940 micrograms/L of chloroform, 250 micrograms/L of 1,1,1- trichloroethane, and 1,100 micrograms/L trichloroethylene. Selected purgeable organic compounds, such as total xylene and methylene chloride, were detected in some groundwater samples and some blank samples consisting of boiled deionized water. Their presence in the blank samples suggest the compounds could have been inadvertently introduced into the groundwater sampled during or subsequent to collection. (USGS)

  5. Quadruple screen test

    MedlinePlus

    Quad screen; Multiple marker screening; AFP plus; Triple screen test; AFP maternal; MSAFP; 4-marker screen; Down syndrome - quadruple; Trisomy 21 - quadruple; Turner syndrome - quadruple; Spina bifida - ...

  6. Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation at 14 of 27 Major Hydroelectric Projects in Idaho, 1983-1984 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Robert C.; Mehrhoff, L.A.

    1985-01-01

    The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act and wildlife and their habitats in the Columbia River Basin and to compliance with the Program, the wildlife mitigation status reports coordination with resource agencies and Indian Tribes. developed the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program development, operation, and maintenance of hydroelectric projects on existing agreements; and past, current, and proposed wildlife factual review and documentation of existing information on wildlife meet the requirements of Measure 1004(b)(l) of the Program. The mitigation, enhancement, and protection activities were considered. In mitigate for the losses to those resources resulting from the purpose of these wildlife mitigation status reports is to provide a resources at some of the Columbia River Basin hydroelectric projects the river and its tributaries. To accomplish this goal, the Council were written with the cooperation of project operators, and in within Idaho.

  7. Fish Immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Mashoof, Sara; Criscitiello, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    The B cell receptor and secreted antibody are at the nexus of humoral adaptive immunity. In this review, we summarize what is known of the immunoglobulin genes of jawed cartilaginous and bony fishes. We focus on what has been learned from genomic or cDNA sequence data, but where appropriate draw upon protein, immunization, affinity and structural studies. Work from major aquatic model organisms and less studied comparative species are both included to define what is the rule for an immunoglobulin isotype or taxonomic group and what exemplifies an exception. PMID:27879632

  8. Fish Tales

    SciTech Connect

    McLerran, L.

    2010-07-06

    This talk is about fishing and the friendships that have resulted in its pursuit. It is also about theoretical physics, and the relationship of imagination and fantasy to the establishment of ideas about nature. Fishermen, like theoretical physicists, are well known for their inventive imaginations. Perhaps neither are as clever as sailors, who conceived of the mermaid. If one doubts the power of this fantasy, one should remember the ghosts of the many sailors who drowned pursuing these young nymphs. An extraordinary painting by J. Waterhouse is shown as Fig. 1. The enchantment of a mermaid must reflect an extraordinary excess of imagination on the part of the sailor, perhaps together with an impractical turn of mind. A consummated relationship with a mermaid is after all, by its very nature a fantasy incapable of realization. To a theoretical physicist, she is symbolic of many ideas we develop. There are many truths known to fisherman in which one might also find parallels to the goals of scientists: (1) A fish is the only animal that keeps growing after its death; (2) Nothing makes a fish bigger than almost being caught; (3) ''...of all the liars among mankind, the fisherman is the most trustworthy.'' (William Sherwood Fox, in Silken Lines and Silver Hooks); and (4) Men and fish are alike. They both get into trouble when they open their mouths. These quotes may be interpreted as reflecting skepticism regarding the honesty of fisherman, and probably do not reflect adequate admiration for a creative imagination. Is it fair to criticize a person for believing a falsehood that he or she sincerely believes to be true? The fisherman simultaneously invents the lie, and believes in it himself. The parallel with theoretical physics is perhaps only approximate, although we physicists may invent stories that we come to believe, on some rare occasions our ideas actually correspond to a more or less true descriptions of nature. These minor philosophical differences are not

  9. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Consolidated Transportation Facility. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0822, addressing environmental impacts that could result from siting, construction, and operation of a consolidated transportation facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) near Idaho Falls, Idaho. The DOE proposes to construct and operate a new transportation facility at the Central Facilities Area (CFA) at the INEL. The proposed facility would replace outdated facilities and consolidate in one location operations that are conducted at six different locations at the CFA. The proposed facility would be used for vehicle and equipment maintenance and repair, administrative support, bus parking, and bus driver accommodation. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required and the Department is issuing this finding of no significant impact.

  10. Geothermal Reservoir Temperatures in Southeastern Idaho using Multicomponent Geothermometry

    SciTech Connect

    Neupane, Ghanashyam; Mattson, Earl D.; McLing, Travis L.; Palmer, Carl D.; Smith, Robert W.; Wood, Thomas R.; Podgorney, Robert K.

    2015-03-01

    Southeastern Idaho exhibits numerous warm springs, warm water from shallow wells, and hot water within oil and gas test wells that indicate a potential for geothermal development in the area. Although the area exhibits several thermal expressions, the measured geothermal gradients vary substantially (19 – 61 ºC/km) within this area, potentially suggesting a redistribution of heat in the overlying ground water from deeper geothermal reservoirs. We have estimated reservoir temperatures from measured water compositions using an inverse modeling technique (Reservoir Temperature Estimator, RTEst) that calculates the temperature at which multiple minerals are simultaneously at equilibrium while explicitly accounting for the possible loss of volatile constituents (e.g., CO2), boiling and/or water mixing. Compositions of a selected group of thermal waters representing southeastern Idaho hot/warm springs and wells were used for the development of temperature estimates. The temperature estimates in the the region varied from moderately warm (59 ºC) to over 175 ºC. Specifically, hot springs near Preston, Idaho resulted in the highest temperature estimates in the region.

  11. MRSA Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tests Online. AACC is a not-for-profit organization and does not endorse non-AACC products and services. Advertising ... aureus Screening Related tests: Wound Culture All content on Lab Tests Online has been ...

  12. Hypertension screening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foulke, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    An attempt was made to measure the response to an announcement of hypertension screening at the Goddard Space Center, to compare the results to those of previous statistics. Education and patient awareness of the problem were stressed.

  13. Developmental Screening

    MedlinePlus

    Learn More about Your Child’s Development: Developmental Monitoring and Screening Taking a first step, waving “bye-bye,” and pointing to something interesting are all developmental milestones, ...

  14. Get Screened

    MedlinePlus

    ... health. Depending on your age, sex, and medical history, you may need to be screened for things like: Certain types of cancer High blood pressure or high cholesterol Diabetes Osteoporosis (weak bones) ...

  15. Phase III Archaeological Test Excavations Hagerman National Fish Hatchery Site 10GG176 Gooding County, Idaho.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    of projectile points from 10GG176. Ignimbrite is a term often used interchangeably with vitrophyre, but the former is more descriptive of the...greater number of these artifacts found at the Birch Creek locality by Swanson (1972), however, were made of chalcedony, ignimbrite , and chert. None of the...granite ( ignimbrite ?). Unlike the utilized cobbles and hammer- stones, these grinding stones have been purposefully shaped into the disk and cylindrical

  16. Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation; Idaho Department of Fish and Game, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Kiefer, Russell B.; Johnson, June; Bunn, Paul

    2006-06-01

    This report covers the following 3 parts of the project: Part 1--Improve wild steelhead trout smolt-to-adult survival rate information by PIT tagging additional wild steelhead trout juveniles. Part 2--Estimating the stock-recruitment relationship for Snake River spring/summer chinook salmon and forecasting wild/natural smolt production. Part 3--Monitoring age composition of wild adult spring and summer chinook salmon returning to the Snake River basin.

  17. Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation; Idaho Department of Fish and Game, 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Kiefer, Russell B.; Anderson, Dave; Johnson, June

    2001-10-01

    This report covers efforts to monitor age composition of wild adult spring/summer chinook salmon returning to the Snake River Basin. Accurately determining the ocean age proportions of wild adult spring/summer chinook salmon is important information for monitoring the status and trends of these species. During this report period, project personnel selected the preferred structure for aging, set up a database to track all samples collected, developed procedures and ordered equipment for structure preparation and reading, and aged the adults that were sampled in 1999. Chinook salmon carcasses were sampled from representative spawning areas throughout the Snake River Basin. Ocean age proportions were determined for each 5 centimeter fork length group for wild adult spring/summer chinook salmon returning to the Snake River. These ocean age proportions were applied to the number and estimated length frequency distribution of wild chinook salmon adults passing Lower Granite Dam to estimate the number of adult returns for each ocean age group.

  18. Archaeological Test Excavations. Phase II Testing at the Hagerman National Fish Hatchery, Hagerman Valley, Idaho,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-01

    uncovered in the area by the EWU archaeologists. This consisted of a cluster of obsidian flakes found in the southeast corner of excavation unit X-21 * (ON...lS/21-22W). A few fragments of battered basalt were also found along with the obsidian flakes suggesting a possible activity area. This con...sandy soils, dark brown; to light friable dark brown soil a few obsidian flakes, old buried soils, (buried soil); 14 flakes, 1 piece bits of fractured

  19. Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation; Idaho Department of Fish and Game, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, Timothy; Johnson, June; Bunn, Paul

    2004-12-01

    This report covers the following 3 parts of the Project: Part 1--Monitoring age composition of wild adult spring and summer Chinook salmon returning to the Snake River basin in 2003 to predict smolt-to-adult return rates Part 2--Development of a stock-recruitment relationship for Snake River spring/summer Chinook salmon to forecast natural smolt production Part 3--Improve the precision of smolt-to-adult survival rate estimates for wild steelhead trout by PIT tagging additional juveniles.

  20. Biotic integrity of the Boise River upstream and downstream from two municipal wastewater treatment facilities, Boise, Idaho, 1995-96

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mullins, William H.

    1999-01-01

    Aquatic biological communities were used to assess the biotic integrity of the Boise River upstream and downstream from the Lander Street and West Boise municipal wastewater treatment facilities (WTFs) in Boise, Idaho. Samples of epilithic periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrates, and fish were collected in late February and early March 1995, in late October 1996, and in early December 1996. Epilithic periphyton biomass, expressed as chlorophyll-a and ash-free dry weight, declined substantially between 1995 and 1996. Chlorophyll-a concentrations were higher at sites downstream from WTFs in both years, but differences in concentrations between sites upstream and downstream from WTFs were not statistically significant. High withinsite variance suggests that greater sampling intensity would improve statistical comparison. Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) scores calculated for benthic macroinvertebrates were higher for the sites upstream from WTFs in 1995 and were the same for all sites in 1996. Similarly, IBI scores calculated for fish were higher for the sites upstream from WTFs in 1995, were higher for the site upstream from the Lander Street WTF in 1996, and were the same for sites upstream and downstream from the West Boise WTF in 1996. Two species of sculpin (Cottus) were abundant at the site upstream from both WTFs but were absent at all other sites downstream from WTFs in 1995 and composed only 2 percent of the total number of fish collected downstream from the Lander Street WTF in 1996.