Science.gov

Sample records for identification field test

  1. Radiation Isotope Identification Device (RIIDs) Field Test and Evaluation Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Hodge, Raymond Keegan

    2007-08-01

    Handheld, backpack, and mobile sensors are elements of the Global Nuclear Detection System for the interdiction and control of illicit radiological and nuclear materials. They are used by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and other government agencies and organizations in various roles for border protection, law enforcement, and nonproliferation monitoring. In order to systematically document the operational performance of the common commercial off-the-shelf portable radiation detection systems, the DHS Domestic Nuclear Detection Office conducted a test and evaluation campaign conducted at the Nevada Test Site from January 18 to February 27, 2006. Named 'Anole', it was the first test of its kind in terms of technical design and test complexities. The Anole test results offer users information for selecting appropriate mission-specific portable radiation detection systems. The campaign also offered manufacturers the opportunity to submit their equipment for independent operationally relevant testing to subsequently improve their detector performance. This paper will present the design, execution, and methodologies of the DHS Anole portable radiation detection system test campaign.

  2. Development of a cows' milk identification test (COMIT) for field use.

    PubMed

    García, T; Martín, R; Rodríguez, E; Hernández, P E; Sanz, B

    1989-11-01

    A cows' milk identification test (COMIT) has been successfully developed for the detection of defined amounts of cows' milk (3-100%) in ewes' milk. The assay uses polyclonal antibodies raised in goats against bovine whey proteins. The test, an agar-gel immunodiffusion technique, uses agar plates with a printed template for correct placement of the test components (antisera discs, positive and negative milk reference discs and sample discs). The presence of cows' milk in the sample was recorded as positive when the precipitin lines appearing between the sample disc and the antisera disc fuse completely with those from the positive cows' milk reference disc. This test is reliable, practical and easy to perform in the field and in dairy factories. Furthermore, the nature and stability of the components of the test make it suitable for commercial development into kits which should be highly practical in any kind of inspection programme concerned with milk species identification.

  3. Development of an overnight rapid bovine identification test (ORBIT) for field use.

    PubMed

    Mageau, R P; Cutrufelli, M E; Schwab, B; Johnston, R W

    1984-01-01

    An Overnight Rapid Bovine Identification Test (ORBIT) has been developed as a serological screen test for species verification of raw, whole tissue, bovine meat products. The test, an agar-gel immunodiffusion technique, uses stabilized reagent paper discs and prepared agar plates that have a printed template for correct placement of test components. This test is reliable, practical, economical, and easily performed in the field, such as at a meat import inspection station. The only nonbovine species found to react in the test are the bovine-related species of American bison (buffalo) and water buffalo (from Australia); however, these rare-occurring species do not present a problem for the intended application of the test. Stability of all test components, when stored in a refrigerator, is excellent for at least 1 year. The nature and stability of the test make it suitable for commercial development into test kits which should be highly practical and economical for wide availability and application of this procedure to meat inspection programs concerned with species verification.

  4. Isolation, identification and field tests of the sex pheromone of the carambola fruit borer, Eucosma notanthes.

    PubMed

    Hung, C C; Hwang, J S; Hung, M D; Yen, Y P; Hou, R F

    2001-09-01

    Two components, (Z)-8-dodecenyl acetate (Z8-12:Ac) and (Z)-8-dodecenol (Z8-12:OH), were isolated from sex pheromone glands of the carambola fruit borer, Eucosma notanthes, and were identified by GC, and GC-MS, chemical derivatization, and comparison of retention times. The ratio of the alcohol to acetate in the sex pheromone extracts was 2.7. However, synthetic mixtures (1 mg) in ratios ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 were more effective than other blends in trapping male moths in field tests.

  5. Weed Identification Field Training Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murdock, Edward C.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Reviews efforts undertaken in weed identification field training sessions for agriprofessionals in South Carolina. Data over a four year period (1980-1983) revealed that participants showed significant improvement in their ability to identify weeds. Reaffirms the value of the field demonstration technique. (ML)

  6. Color identification testing device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brawner, E. L.; Martin, R.; Pate, W.

    1970-01-01

    Testing device, which determines ability of a technician to identify color-coded electric wires, is superior to standard color blindness tests. It tests speed of wire selection, detects partial color blindness, allows rapid testing, and may be administered by a color blind person.

  7. Field theory of pattern identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agu, Masahiro

    1988-06-01

    Based on the psychological experimental fact that images in mental space are transformed into other images for pattern identification, a field theory of pattern identification of geometrical patterns is developed with the use of gauge field theory in Euclidean space. Here, the ``image'' or state function ψ[χ] of the brain reacting to a geometrical pattern χ is made to correspond to the electron's wave function in Minkowski space. The pattern identification of the pattern χ with the modified pattern χ+Δχ is assumed to be such that their images ψ[χ] and ψ[χ+Δχ] in the brain are transformable with each other through suitable transformation groups such as parallel transformation, dilatation, or rotation. The transformation group is called the ``image potential'' which corresponds to the vector potential of the gauge field. An ``image field'' derived from the image potential is found to be induced in the brain when the two images ψ[χ] and ψ[χ+Δχ] are not transformable through suitable transformation groups or gauge transformations. It is also shown that, when the image field exists, the final state of the image ψ[χ] is expected to be different, depending on the paths of modifications of the pattern χ leading to a final pattern. The above fact is interpreted as a version of the Aharonov and Bohm effect of the electron's wave function [A. Aharonov and D. Bohm, Phys. Rev. 115, 485 (1959)]. An excitation equation of the image field is also derived by postulating that patterns are identified maximally for the purpose of minimizing the number of memorized standard patterns.

  8. Field Identification in Nonunitary Diagonal Cosets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, Pierre; Sénéchal, David; Walton, Mark

    We study the nonunitary diagonal cosets constructed from admissible representations of Kač-Moody algebras at fractional level, with an emphasis on the question of field identification. Generic classes of field identifications are obtained from the analysis of the modular S matrix. These include the usual class related to outer automorphisms, as well as some intrinsically nonunitary field identifications. They allow for a simple choice of coset field representatives where all field components of the coset are associated with integrable weights.

  9. LSA field test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, P.

    1979-01-01

    Degradation tests indicate that electrical degradation is not a slow monotonically increasing phenomenon as originally thought but occurs abruptly as the result of some traumatic event. This finding has led to a change in the test philosophy. A discussion of this change is presented along with a summary of degradation and failure data from all the sites and results from a variety of special tests. New instrumentation for in-field measurements are described. Field testing activity was expanded by the addition of twelve remote sites located as far away as Alaska and the Canal Zone. Descriptions of the new sites are included.

  10. Field test experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, R. W.

    1983-01-01

    As a part of the Flat-Plate Solar Array Project (FSA), a field-test program was developed to obtain solar photovoltaic (PV) module performance and endurance data. These data are used to identify the specific characteristics of module designs under various environmental conditions. The information obtained from field testing is useful to all participants in the National Photovoltaics Program, from the research planner to the life-cycle cost analyst.

  11. Integrating field methodology and web-based data collection to assess the reliability of the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT).

    PubMed

    Celio, Mark A; Vetter-O'Hagen, Courtney S; Lisman, Stephen A; Johansen, Gerard E; Spear, Linda P

    2011-12-01

    Field methodologies offer a unique opportunity to collect ecologically valid data on alcohol use and its associated problems within natural drinking environments. However, limitations in follow-up data collection methods have left unanswered questions regarding the psychometric properties of field-based measures. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the reliability of self-report data collected in a naturally occurring environment - as indexed by the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) - compared to self-report data obtained through an innovative web-based follow-up procedure. Individuals recruited outside of bars (N=170; mean age=21; range 18-32) provided a BAC sample and completed a self-administered survey packet that included the AUDIT. BAC feedback was provided anonymously through a dedicated web page. Upon sign in, follow-up participants (n=89; 52%) were again asked to complete the AUDIT before receiving their BAC feedback. Reliability analyses demonstrated that AUDIT scores - both continuous and dichotomized at the standard cut-point - were stable across field- and web-based administrations. These results suggest that self-report data obtained from acutely intoxicated individuals in naturally occurring environments are reliable when compared to web-based data obtained after a brief follow-up interval. Furthermore, the results demonstrate the feasibility, utility, and potential of integrating field methods and web-based data collection procedures.

  12. RESOLVE 2010 Field Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Captain, J.; Quinn, J.; Moss, T.; Weis, K.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the field tests conducted in 2010 of the Regolith Environment Science & Oxygen & Lunar Volatile Extraction (RESOLVE). The Resolve program consist of several mechanism: (1) Excavation and Bulk Regolith Characterization (EBRC) which is designed to act as a drill and crusher, (2) Regolith Volatiles Characterization (RVC) which is a reactor and does gas analysis,(3) Lunar Water Resources Demonstration (LWRD) which is a fluid system, water and hydrogen capture device and (4) the Rover. The scientific goal of this test is to demonstrate evolution of low levels of hydrogen and water as a function of temperature. The Engineering goals of this test are to demonstrate:(1) Integration onto new rover (2) Miniaturization of electronics rack (3) Operation from battery packs (elimination of generator) (4) Remote command/control and (5) Operation while roving. Views of the 2008 and the 2010 mechanisms, a overhead view of the mission path, a view of the terrain, the two drill sites, and a graphic of the Master Events Controller Graphical User Interface (MEC GUI) are shown. There are descriptions of the Gas chromatography (GC), the operational procedure, water and hydrogen doping of tephra. There is also a review of some of the results, and future direction for research and tests.

  13. Laboratory and Field Testing of Commercially Available Detectors for the Identification of Chemicals of Interest in the Nuclear Fuel Cycle for the Detection of Undeclared Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Carla Miller; Mary Adamic; Stacey Barker; Barry Siskind; Joe Brady; Warren Stern; Heidi Smartt; Mike McDaniel; Mike Stern; Rollin Lakis

    2014-07-01

    then identified commercial off the shelf (COTS) chemical detectors that may detect the chemicals of interest. Three chemical detectors were selected and tested both in laboratory settings and in field operations settings at Idaho National Laboratory. The instruments selected are: Thermo Scientific TruDefender FT (FTIR), Thermo Scientific FirstDefender RM (Raman), and Bruker Tracer III SD (XRF). Functional specifications, operability, and chemical detectability, selectivity, and limits of detection were determined. Results from the laboratory and field tests will be presented. This work is supported by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative, Office of Nonproliferation and International Security, National Nuclear Security Administration.

  14. Soil Identification using Field Electrical Resistivity Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazreek, Z. A. M.; Rosli, S.; Chitral, W. D.; Fauziah, A.; Azhar, A. T. S.; Aziman, M.; Ismail, B.

    2015-06-01

    Geotechnical site investigation with particular reference to soil identification was important in civil engineering works since it reports the soil condition in order to relate the design and construction of the proposed works. In the past, electrical resistivity method (ERM) has widely being used in soil characterization but experienced several black boxes which related to its results and interpretations. Hence, this study performed a field electrical resistivity method (ERM) using ABEM SAS (4000) at two different types of soils (Gravelly SAND and Silty SAND) in order to discover the behavior of electrical resistivity values (ERV) with type of soils studied. Soil basic physical properties was determine thru density (p), moisture content (w) and particle size distribution (d) in order to verify the ERV obtained from each type of soil investigated. It was found that the ERV of Gravelly SAND (278 Ωm & 285 Ωm) was slightly higher than SiltySAND (223 Ωm & 199 Ωm) due to the uncertainties nature of soils. This finding has showed that the results obtained from ERM need to be interpreted based on strong supported findings such as using direct test from soil laboratory data. Furthermore, this study was able to prove that the ERM can be established as an alternative tool in soil identification provided it was being verified thru other relevance information such as using geotechnical properties.

  15. Autonomous star field identification for robotic solar system exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholl, Marija S.

    A six-feature all-sky star field identification algorithm has been developed. The minimum identifiable star pattern element consists of an oriented star triplet defined by three stars, their celestial coordinates and visual magnitudes. This algorithm has been integrated with a CCD-based imaging camera. The autonomous intelligent camera identifies in real time any star field without a priori knowledge. Observatory tests on star fields with this intelligent camera are described.

  16. FSA field test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, P.; Weaver, R. W.; Lee, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    The 12 continental remote sites were decommissioned. Testing was consolidated into a five-site network consisting of the four Southern California sites and a new Florida site. 16 kW of new state-of-the-art modules were deployed at the five sites. Testing of the old modules continued at the Goldstone site but as a low-priority item. Array testing of modules is considered. Additional new testing capabilities were added. A battery-powered array data logger is discussed. A final set of failure and degradation data was obtained from the modules.

  17. Stimulus Picture Identification in Articulation Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, Patricia A.; Whitehead, Robert L.

    1977-01-01

    Compared with 20 normal speaking and 20 articulation defective Ss (7 and 8 years old) was the percent of correct initial identification of stimulus pictures on the Goldman-Fristoe Test of Articulation with the percent correct identification on the Arizona Articulation Proficiency Scale. (Author/IM)

  18. Causal Indicator Models: Identification, Estimation, and Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bollen, Kenneth A.; Davis, Walter R.

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the identification, estimation, and testing of structural equation models that have causal indicators. We first provide 2 rules of identification that are particularly helpful in models with causal indicators--the 2C emitted paths rule and the exogenous X rule. We demonstrate how these rules can help us distinguish identified from…

  19. Field Test Kit for Gun Residue Detection

    SciTech Connect

    WALKER, PAMELA K.; RODACY, PHILIP J.

    2002-01-01

    One of the major needs of the law enforcement field is a product that quickly, accurately, and inexpensively identifies whether a person has recently fired a gun--even if the suspect has attempted to wash the traces of gunpowder off. The Field Test Kit for Gunshot Residue Identification based on Sandia National Laboratories technology works with a wide variety of handguns and other weaponry using gunpowder. There are several organic chemicals in small arms propellants such as nitrocellulose, nitroglycerine, dinitrotoluene, and nitrites left behind after the firing of a gun that result from the incomplete combustion of the gunpowder. Sandia has developed a colorimetric shooter identification kit for in situ detection of gunshot residue (GSR) from a suspect. The test kit is the first of its kind and is small, inexpensive, and easily transported by individual law enforcement personnel requiring minimal training for effective use. It will provide immediate information identifying gunshot residue.

  20. LSA field test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, P.

    1980-01-01

    After almost four years of endurance testing of photovoltaic modules, no fundamental life-limiting mechanisms were identified that could prevent the twenty-year life goal from being met. The endure data show a continual decline in the failure rate with each new large-scale procurement. Cracked cells and broken interconnects continue to be the principal causes of failure. Although the modules are more adversely affected physically by hot, humid environments than by cool or dry environments there are insufficient data to correlate failure with environment. There is little connection between the outward physical condition of a module and changes in its electrical performance.

  1. Production Hydraulic Packer Field Test

    SciTech Connect

    Schneller, Tricia; Salas, Jose

    2000-06-30

    In October 1999, the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center and Halliburton Energy Services cooperated on a field test of Halliburton's new Production Hydraulic Packer technology on Well 46-TPX-10 at Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 near Casper, WY. Performance of the packer was evaluated in set and unset operations. The packer's ability to seal the annulus between the casing and tubing was hydraulically tested and the results were recorded.

  2. The North Carolina Field Test

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, T.R.; Ternes, M.P.

    1990-08-01

    The North Carolina Field Test will test the effectiveness of two weatherization approaches: the current North Carolina Low-Income Weatherization Assistance Program and the North Carolina Field Test Audit. The Field Test Audit will differ from North Carolina's current weatherization program in that it will incorporate new weatherization measures and techniques, a procedure for basing measure selection of the characteristics of the individual house and the cost-effectiveness of the measure, and also emphasize cooling energy savings. The field test will determine the differences of the two weatherization approaches from the viewpoints of energy savings, cost effectiveness, and implementation ease. This Experimental Plan details the steps in performing the field test. The field test will be a group effort by several participating organizations. Pre- and post-weatherization data will be collected over a two-year period (November 1989 through August 1991). The 120 houses included in the test will be divided into a control group and two treatment groups (one for each weatherization procedure) of 40 houses each. Weekly energy use data will be collected for each house representing whole-house electric, space heating and cooling, and water heating energy uses. Corresponding outdoor weather and house indoor temperature data will also be collected. The energy savings of each house will be determined using linear-regression based models. To account for variations between the pre- and post-weatherization periods, house energy savings will be normalized for differences in outdoor weather conditions and indoor temperatures. Differences between the average energy savings of treatment groups will be identified using an analysis of variance approach. Differences between energy savings will be quantified using multiple comparison techniques. 9 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. CLASSIFICATION TOOLS FOR EFFICIENT IDENTIFICATION OF MULTIPLE SOURCES OF IMPAIRMENT: A FIELD TEST OF GEOGRAPHICALLY-DEPENDENT VS. THRESHOLD-BASED GEOGRAPHICALLY-INDEPENDENT CLASSIFICATION SCHEMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current monitoring strategies for iotic ecosystems have focused on identification of either specific impaired stream reaches or regional incidence of impaired stream reaches, with little or no ancillary data collected to facilitate diagnosis of impairment, or extrapolation of res...

  4. Report of Field Test Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Regional Instructional Materials Center for Handicapped Children and Youth.

    Reported by the Great Lakes Region Special Education Instructional Materials Center are field test evaluation of 18 auditory instructional materials for use with handicapped children who learn best through the auditory modality. Among materials evaluated are a taped program on use of the abacus and a cassette audiotape on bird habits and sounds.…

  5. STIS Sparse Field CTE test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudfrooij, Paul

    1997-07-01

    CTE measurements are made using the "sparse field test", along both the serial and parallel axes. This program needs special commanding to provide {a} off-center MSM positionings of some slits, and {b} the ability to read out with any amplifier {A, B, C, or D}. All exposures are internals.

  6. Descent Advisor Preliminary Field Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Steven M.; Vivona, Robert A.; Sanford, Beverly

    1995-01-01

    A field test of the Descent Advisor (DA) automation tool was conducted at the Denver Air Route Traffic Control Center in September 1994. DA is being developed to assist Center controllers in the efficient management and control of arrival traffic. DA generates advisories, based on trajectory predictions, to achieve accurate meter-fix arrival times in a fuel efficient manner while assisting the controller with the prediction and resolution of potential conflicts. The test objectives were: (1) to evaluate the accuracy of DA trajectory predictions for conventional and flight-management system equipped jet transports, (2) to identify significant sources of trajectory prediction error, and (3) to investigate procedural and training issues (both air and ground) associated with DA operations. Various commercial aircraft (97 flights total) and a Boeing 737-100 research aircraft participated in the test. Preliminary results from the primary test set of 24 commercial flights indicate a mean DA arrival time prediction error of 2.4 seconds late with a standard deviation of 13.1 seconds. This paper describes the field test and presents preliminary results for the commercial flights.

  7. Descent advisor preliminary field test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Steven M.; Vivona, Robert A.; Sanford, Beverly

    1995-01-01

    A field test of the Descent Advisor (DA) automation tool was conducted at the Denver Air Route Traffic Control Center in September 1994. DA is being developed to assist Center controllers in the efficient management and control of arrival traffic. DA generates advisories, based on trajectory predictions, to achieve accurate meter-fix arrival times in a fuel efficient manner while assisting the controller with the prediction and resolution of potential conflicts. The test objectives were to evaluate the accuracy of DA trajectory predictions for conventional- and flight-management-system-equipped jet transports, to identify significant sources of trajectory prediction error, and to investigate procedural and training issues (both air and ground) associated with DA operations. Various commercial aircraft (97 flights total) and a Boeing 737-100 research aircraft participated in the test. Preliminary results from the primary test set of 24 commercial flights indicate a mean DA arrival time prediction error of 2.4 sec late with a standard deviation of 13.1 sec. This paper describes the field test and presents preliminary results for the commercial flights.

  8. PINS Testing and Modification for Explosive Identification

    SciTech Connect

    E.H. Seabury; A.J. Caffrey

    2011-09-01

    The INL's Portable Isotopic Neutron Spectroscopy System (PINS)1 non-intrusively identifies the chemical fill of munitions and sealed containers. PINS is used routinely by the U.S. Army, the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, and foreign military units to determine the contents of munitions and other containers suspected to contain explosives, smoke-generating chemicals, and chemical warfare agents such as mustard and nerve gas. The objects assayed with PINS range from softball-sized M139 chemical bomblets to 200 gallon DOT 500X ton containers. INL had previously examined2 the feasibility of using a similar system for the identification of explosives, and based on this proof-of-principle test, the development of a dedicated system for the identification of explosives in an improvised nuclear device appears entirely feasible. INL has been tasked by NNSA NA-42 Render Safe Research and Development with the development of such a system.

  9. Cryopumping field joint can testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Wesley; Fesmire, James; Meneghelli, Barry

    2012-06-01

    For long installations, vacuum jacketed piping often comes in 40 foot sections that are butt welded together in the field. A short can is then welded over the bare pipe connection to allow for insulation to be protected from the environment. Traditionally, the field joint is insulated with multilayer insulation and a vacuum is pulled on the can to minimize heat leak through the bare section and prevent frost from forming on the pipe section. The vacuum jacketed lines for the Ares I mobile launch platform were to be a combined 2000 feet long, with 60+ pipe sections and field joint cans. Historically, Kennedy Space Center has drilled a hole in the long sections to create a common vacuum with the field joint can to minimize maintenance on the vacuum jacketed piping. However, this effort looked at ways to use a passive system that didn't require a vacuum, but may cryopump to create its own vacuum. Various forms of aerogel, multilayer insulations, and combinations thereof were tested to determine the best method of insulating the field joint while minimizing maintenance and thermal losses.

  10. Cryopumping Field Joint Can Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wesley L.; Fesmire, James E.; Meneghelli, Barry E.

    2011-01-01

    For long installations, vacuum jacketed piping often comes in 40 foot sections that are butt welded together in the field. A short can is then welded over the bare pipe connection to allow for insulation to be protected from the environment. Traditionally, the field joint is insulated with multilayer insulation and a vacuum is pulled on the can to minimize heat leak through the bare section and prevent frost from forming on the pipe section. The vacuum jacketed lines for the Ares I mobile launch platform were to be a combined 2000 feet long, with 60+ pipe sections and field joint cans. Historically, Kennedy Space Center has drilled a hole in the long sections to create a common vacuum with the field joint can to minimize maintenance on the vacuum jacketed piping. However, this effort looked at ways to use a passive system that didn't require a vacuum, but may cryopump to create its own vacuum. Various forms of aerogel, multilayer insulations, and combinations thereof were tested to determine the best method of insulating the field joint while minimizing maintenance and thermal losses.

  11. Identification of corn fields using multidate radar data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanmugan, K. S.; Ulaby, F. T.; Narayanan, V.; Dobson, C.

    1983-01-01

    Airborne C- and L-band radar data acquired over a test site in western kansas were analyzed to determine corn-field identification accuracies obtainable using single-channel, multichannel, and multidate radar data. An automated pattern-recognition procedure was used to classify 144 fields into three categories: corn, pasture land, and bare soil (including wheat stubble and fallow). Corn fields were identified with accuracies ranging from 85 percent for single channel, single-date data to 100 percent for single-channel, multidate data. The effects of radar parameters such as frequency, polarization, and look angle as well as the effects of soil moisture on the classification accuracy are also presented.

  12. Pescara benchmark: overview of modelling, testing and identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellino, A.; Brancaleoni, F.; Bregant, L.; Carminelli, A.; Catania, G.; Di Evangelista, A.; Gabriele, S.; Garibaldi, L.; Marchesiello, S.; Sorrentino, S.; Spina, D.; Valente, C.; Zuccarino, L.

    2011-07-01

    The `Pescara benchmark' is part of the national research project `BriViDi' (BRIdge VIbrations and DIagnosis) supported by the Italian Ministero dell'Universitá e Ricerca. The project is aimed at developing an integrated methodology for the structural health evaluation of railway r/c, p/c bridges. The methodology should provide for applicability in operating conditions, easy data acquisition through common industrial instrumentation, robustness and reliability against structural and environmental uncertainties. The Pescara benchmark consisted in lab tests to get a consistent and large experimental data base and subsequent data processing. Special tests were devised to simulate the train transit effects in actual field conditions. Prestressed concrete beams of current industrial production both sound and damaged at various severity corrosion levels were tested. The results were collected either in a deterministic setting and in a form suitable to deal with experimental uncertainties. Damage identification was split in two approaches: with or without a reference model. In the first case f.e. models were used in conjunction with non conventional updating techniques. In the second case, specialized output-only identification techniques capable to deal with time-variant and possibly non linear systems were developed. The lab tests allowed validating the above approaches and the performances of classical modal based damage indicators.

  13. 7 CFR 29.428 - Identification of sample for testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Identification of sample for testing. 29.428 Section... CONTAINER REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Regulations Miscellaneous § 29.428 Identification of sample for testing. Samples of imported tobacco shall be identified by the inspector on a form approved by...

  14. Biometric identification devices -- Laboratory testing vs. real life

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrens, J.S.

    1997-05-01

    For over fifteen years Sandia National Laboratories has been involved in laboratory testing of biometric identification devices. The key concept of biometric identification devices is the ability for the system to identify some unique aspect of the individual rather than some object a person may be carrying or some password they are required to know. Tests were conducted to verify manufacturer`s performance claims, to determine strengths/weaknesses of devices, and to determine devices that meet the US Department of energy`s needs. However, during recent field installation, significantly different performance was observed than was predicted by laboratory tests. Although most people using the device believed it operated adequately, the performance observed was over an order of magnitude worse than predicted. The search for reasons behind this gap between the predicted and the actual performance has revealed many possible contributing factors. As engineers, the most valuable lesson to be learned from this experience is the value of scientists and engineers with (1) common sense, (2) knowledge of human behavior, (3) the ability to observe the real world, and (4) the capability to realize the significant differences between controlled experiments and actual installations.

  15. Introduction to Analog Field Testing

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA tests systems and operational concepts in analog environments, which include locations underwater, in the arctic, on terrestrial impact craters, in the desert, and on the International Space S...

  16. Analyzing Educational Testing Service Graduate Major Field Test Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Barry; Arbogast, Gordon

    2012-01-01

    The Educational Testing Service (ETS) created the Graduate Major Field Test in Business (GMFT-B) for MBA students. This test is administered to all MBA classes at Jacksonville University for the purpose of measuring student academic achievement and growth, as well as to assess educational outcomes. The test is given in the capstone course,…

  17. Minicourse 18: Main Field Test Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skailand, Dawn

    This report describes the main field test of Minicourse 18: Teaching Reading as Decoding. The purposes of the main field test were: (1) to evaluate the effects of the course on the participating teachers, (2) to evaluate four reteach treatments on teacher skill acquisition, (3) to compare scores for central city and suburban teachers, and (4) to…

  18. Field Testing: A Model and Its Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Marjorie T.

    Described is a Social Learning Curriculum (SLC) field test model that focuses on aspects of personnel utilization, communication systems, and the quality of human communication and that highlights the role of the supervisor in the education of the mentally retarded. The four field test model phases discussed are 1) the planning phase (including…

  19. Test fields cannot destroy extremal black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natário, José; Queimada, Leonel; Vicente, Rodrigo

    2016-09-01

    We prove that (possibly charged) test fields satisfying the null energy condition at the event horizon cannot overspin/overcharge extremal Kerr–Newman or Kerr–Newman–anti de Sitter black holes, that is, the weak cosmic censorship conjecture cannot be violated in the test field approximation. The argument relies on black hole thermodynamics (without assuming cosmic censorship), and does not depend on the precise nature of the fields. We also discuss generalizations of this result to other extremal black holes.

  20. Test fields cannot destroy extremal black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natário, José; Queimada, Leonel; Vicente, Rodrigo

    2016-09-01

    We prove that (possibly charged) test fields satisfying the null energy condition at the event horizon cannot overspin/overcharge extremal Kerr-Newman or Kerr-Newman-anti de Sitter black holes, that is, the weak cosmic censorship conjecture cannot be violated in the test field approximation. The argument relies on black hole thermodynamics (without assuming cosmic censorship), and does not depend on the precise nature of the fields. We also discuss generalizations of this result to other extremal black holes.

  1. Simplified panel of assimilation tests for identification of Acinetobacter species.

    PubMed

    Kenchappa, Prashanth; Sreenivasmurthy, Badrinath

    2003-10-01

    A total of 66 Acinetobacter isolates obtained from JIPMER hospital wards were subjected to phenotypic identification schemes involving 25-test and a simplified 13-test panel of carbon utilization or assimilation tests. Reference strains belonging to different DNA groups (n=24) were also tested. Identification was done using numerical approach based on a matrix constructed of phenotypic data published elsewhere and the strains were assigned to different DNA groups according to classification of Tjernberg & Ursing. Sixty-six strains tested represented 10 DNA groups in matrix of large test panel; at a probability level of 0.95. Much simplified scheme of 13 assimilation test panel failed to differentiate some isolates with in A. calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex (Acb-complex) unlike extended panel. In all, from the large panel 95% of isolates were identified correctly among all the isolates and it did not identify 5% of isolates. From the small panel, a total of 89% of isolates were identified correctly and it could not identify 11% of isolates. Reduced number of assimilation tests to 13 from the large panel bought reduction in identification percentage rate by only 6%. It is impossible for many bacterial diagnostic labs worldwide to perform large panel of carbon utilization tests in routine practice. Simplified panel of assimilation tests suggested here seems to be the best alternative method for identification of Acinetobacter species. PMID:15025386

  2. Testing Large Structures in the Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, George; Carne, Thomas G.

    2009-01-01

    Field testing large structures creates unique challenges such as limited choices for boundary conditions and the fact that natural excitation sources cannot be removed. Several critical developments in field testing of large structures are reviewed, including: step relaxation testing which has been developed into a useful technique to apply large forces to operational systems by careful windowing; the capability of large structures testing with free support conditions which has been expanded by implementing modeling of the support structure; natural excitation which has been developed as a viable approach to field testing; and the hybrid approach which has been developed to allow forces to be estimated in operating structures. These developments have increased the ability to extract information from large structures and are highlighted in this presentation.

  3. Microfermentation Test For Identification Of Yeast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, D. L.; Mishra, S. K.; Molina, Thomas C.

    1995-01-01

    Microfermentation test developed as supplementary method for use in identifying yeasts, especially in clinical and environmental studies. In comparison with traditional fermentation tests, simpler and easier, and requiries less equipment, material, and laboratory space. Results obtained in days instead of weeks.

  4. SRS environmental technology development field test platform

    SciTech Connect

    Riha, B.D.; Rossabi, J.; Eddy-Dilek, C.A.

    1995-09-01

    A critical and difficult step in the development and implementation of new technologies for environmental monitoring and characterization is successfully transferring these technologies to industry and government users for routine assessment and compliance activities. The Environmental Sciences Section of the DOE Savannah River Technology Center provides a forum for developers, potential users, and regulatory organizations to evaluate new technologies in comparison with baseline technologies in a well characterized field test bed. The principal objective of this project is to conduct comprehensive, objective field tests of monitoring and characterization technologies that are not currently used in EPA standard methods and evaluate their performance during actual operating conditions against baseline methods. This paper provides an overview of the field test site and a description of some of the technologies demonstrated at the site including their field applications.

  5. Witnessing orifice meter calibration and field testing

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, D.

    1995-12-01

    It would seem with the advent of electronic measurement and electronic custody transfer of natural gas and other petroleum products that witnessing orifice meter calibration and field testing would become an obsolete practice in the petroleum industry. This however, is not the case. Due to low volume measurement, remote locations, dollar cost of electronic measurement, and arrangements between companies regarding electronic custody, transfer, witnessing orifice meter calibration and field testing will continue to be an integral part of the petroleum industry`s future. Even as technology moves forward and electronic measurement becomes common within the petroleum industry, electronic hardware used in measurement will, like the orifice recorder, only be a secondary measuring device. The meter tube and orifice plate will continue to be the primary measuring device. Due to these circumstances witnessing orifice meter calibration and field testing will also continue to be important even though some emphasis will be shifted to witnessing field testing of electronic equipment. The information in this paper is not meant to be an absolute, but, to be used as a guide in witnessing and field testing orifice meters. There are many variables in testing that. due to the length of this paper, will not be discussed.

  6. Trip Report-Produced-Water Field Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Enid J.

    2012-05-25

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) conducted field testing of a produced-water pretreatment apparatus with assistance from faculty at the Texas A&M University (TAMU) protein separation sciences laboratory located on the TAMU main campus. The following report details all of the logistics surrounding the testing. The purpose of the test was to use a new, commercially-available filter media housing containing modified zeolite (surfactant-modified zeolite or SMZ) porous medium for use in pretreatment of oil and gas produced water (PW) and frac-flowback waters. The SMZ was tested previously in October, 2010 in a lab-constructed configuration ('old multicolumn system'), and performed well for removal of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) from PW. However, a less-expensive, modular configuration is needed for field use. A modular system will allow the field operator to add or subtract SMZ filters as needed to accommodate site specific conditions, and to swap out used filters easily in a multi-unit system. This test demonstrated the use of a commercial filter housing with a simple flow modification and packed with SMZ for removing BTEX from a PW source in College Station, Texas. The system will be tested in June 2012 at a field site in Pennsylvania for treating frac-flowback waters. The goals of this test are: (1) to determine sorption efficiency of BTEX in the new configuration; and (2) to observe the range of flow rates, backpressures, and total volume treated at a given flow rate.

  7. Combustion Safety Simplified Test Protocol Field Study

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, L.; Cautley, D.; Bohac, D.; Francisco, P.; Shen, L.; Gloss, S.

    2015-11-01

    Combustions safety is an important step in the process of upgrading homes for energy efficiency. There are several approaches used by field practitioners, but researchers have indicated that the test procedures in use are complex to implement and provide too many false positives. Field failures often mean that the house is not upgraded until after remediation or not at all, if not include in the program. In this report the PARR and NorthernSTAR DOE Building America Teams provide a simplified test procedure that is easier to implement and should produce fewer false positives. A survey of state weatherization agencies on combustion safety issues, details of a field data collection instrumentation package, summary of data collected over seven months, data analysis and results are included. The project team collected field data on 11 houses in 2015.

  8. Sultan - forced flow, high field test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, I.; Vecsey, G.; Weymuth, P.; Zellweger, J.

    1981-09-01

    Three European laboratories: CNEN (Frascati, I) ECN (Petten, NL) and SIN (Villigen, CH) decided to coordinate their development efforts and to install a common high field forced flow test facility at Villigen Switzerland. The test facility SULTAN (Supraleiter Testanlage) is presently under construction. As a first step, an 8T/1m bore solenoid with cryogenic periphery will be ready in 1981. The cryogenic system, data acquisition system and power supplies which are contributed by SIN are described. Experimental feasibilities, including cooling, and instrumentation are reviewed. Progress of components and facility construction is described. Planned extension of the background field up to 12T by insert coils is outlined. 5 refs.

  9. Numerical simulations of capillary barrier field tests

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, C.E.; Stormont, J.C.

    1997-12-31

    Numerical simulations of two capillary barrier systems tested in the field were conducted to determine if an unsaturated flow model could accurately represent the observed results. The field data was collected from two 7-m long, 1.2-m thick capillary barriers built on a 10% grade that were being tested to investigate their ability to laterally divert water downslope. One system had a homogeneous fine layer, while the fine soil of the second barrier was layered to increase its ability to laterally divert infiltrating moisture. The barriers were subjected first to constant infiltration while minimizing evaporative losses and then were exposed to ambient conditions. The continuous infiltration period of the field tests for the two barrier systems was modelled to determine the ability of an existing code to accurately represent capillary barrier behavior embodied in these two designs. Differences between the field test and the model data were found, but in general the simulations appeared to adequately reproduce the response of the test systems. Accounting for moisture retention hysteresis in the layered system will potentially lead to more accurate modelling results and is likely to be important when developing reasonable predictions of capillary barrier behavior.

  10. Cold chain: solar refrigerator field tested.

    PubMed

    1983-04-01

    The Health Ministries of Colombia and Peru, in collaboration with the Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI)/Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), have begun field testing a solar-powered vaccine refrigerator. The aim of the fields trials is to determine whether solar refrigerators can maintain the temperatures required for vaccine storage (+4-8 degrees Celsius) and produce ice at a rate of 2 kg/24 hours under different environmental conditions. these refrigerators would be particularly useful in areas that lack a consistent supply of good quality fuel or where the electrical supply is intermittent or nonexistent. Full appraisal of this technology will require 2 years of field testing; Colombia and Peru expect to complete testing in 1985. To date, 5 models have passed CDC-developed specifications, all of which are manufactured in the US. PAHO/WHO recommends that health ministries should consider the following guidelines in considering the purchase of a particular system: the initial purchase should be for a limited quantity (about 5) of refrigerators to permit field testing; solar panels should meet specific criteria; consideration should be given only to those models that have passed qualification tests; each unit should be fully equipped with monitoring devices and spare parts; and a trained refrigerator technician should be available to repair the equipment.

  11. STIS Sparse Field CTE test {Cycle 9}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudfrooij, Paul

    2000-07-01

    CTE measurements are made using the "sparse field test", along both the serial and parallel axes. This program needs special commanding to provide {a} off-center MSM positionings of some slits, and {b} the ability to read out with any amplifier {A, B, C, or D}. All exposures are internals.

  12. STIS Sparse Field CTE test {Cycle 8}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudfrooij, Paul

    1999-07-01

    CTE measurements are made using the "sparse field test", along both the serial and parallel axes. This program needs special commanding to provide {a} off-center MSM positionings of some slits, and {b} the ability to read out with any amplifier {A, B, C, or D}. All exposures are internals.

  13. Use of Brief Intelligence Tests in the Identification of Giftedness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierson, Eric E.; Kilmer, Lydia M.; Rothlisberg, Barbara A.; McIntosh, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Schools often administer brief intelligence tests as the first step in the identification of students who are cognitively gifted. However, brief measures are often used without consideration of underlying constructs or the psychometric properties of the measures and without regard to the links between screening decisions and educational…

  14. Comparative Field Tests of Pressurised Rover Prototypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, G. A.; Wood, N. B.; Clarke, J. D.; Piechochinski, S.; Bamsey, M.; Laing, J. H.

    The conceptual designs, interior layouts and operational performances of three pressurised rover prototypes - Aonia, ARES and Everest - were field tested during a recent simulation at the Mars Desert Research Station in Utah. A human factors experiment, in which the same crew of three executed the same simulated science mission in each of the three vehicles, yielded comparative data on the capacity of each vehicle to safely and comfortably carry explorers away from the main base, enter and exit the vehicle in spacesuits, perform science tasks in the field, and manage geological and biological samples. As well as offering recommendations for design improvements for specific vehicles, the results suggest that a conventional Sports Utility Vehicle (SUV) would not be suitable for analog field work; that a pressurised docking tunnel to the main habitat is essential; that better provisions for spacesuit storage are required; and that a crew consisting of one driver/navigator and two field science crew specialists may be optimal. From a field operations viewpoint, a recurring conflict between rover and habitat crews at the time of return to the habitat was observed. An analysis of these incidents leads to proposed refinements of operational protocols, specific crew training for rover returns and again points to the need for a pressurised docking tunnel. Sound field testing, circulating of results, and building the lessons learned into new vehicles is advocated as a way of producing ever higher fidelity rover analogues.

  15. The "Sniffin' Kids" test--a 14-item odor identification test for children.

    PubMed

    Schriever, Valentin A; Mori, Eri; Petters, Wenke; Boerner, Carolin; Smitka, Martin; Hummel, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Tools for measuring olfactory function in adults have been well established. Although studies have shown that olfactory impairment in children may occur as a consequence of a number of diseases or head trauma, until today no consensus on how to evaluate the sense of smell in children exists in Europe. Aim of the study was to develop a modified "Sniffin' Sticks" odor identification test, the "Sniffin' Kids" test for the use in children. In this study 537 children between 6-17 years of age were included. Fourteen odors, which were identified at a high rate by children, were selected from the "Sniffin' Sticks" 16-item odor identification test. Normative date for the 14-item "Sniffin' Kids" odor identification test was obtained. The test was validated by including a group of congenital anosmic children. Results show that the "Sniffin' Kids" test is able to discriminate between normosmia and anosmia with a cutoff value of >7 points on the odor identification test. In addition the test-retest reliability was investigated in a group of 31 healthy children and shown to be ρ = 0.44. With the 14-item odor identification "Sniffin' Kids" test we present a valid and reliable test for measuring olfactory function in children between ages 6-17 years.

  16. Goldstone field test activities: Target search

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarter, J.

    1986-01-01

    In March of this year prototype SETI equipment was installed at DSS13, the 26 meter research and development antenna at NASA's Goldstone complex of satellite tracking dishes. The SETI equipment will remain at this site at least through the end of the summer so that the hardware and software developed for signal detection and recognition can be fully tested in a dynamic observatory environment. The field tests are expected to help understand which strategies for observing and which signal recognition algorithms perform best in the presence of strong man-made interfering signals (RFI) and natural astronomical sources.

  17. Ice slurry cooling development and field testing

    SciTech Connect

    Kasza, K.E.; Hietala, J.; Wendland, R.D.; Collins, F.

    1992-07-01

    A new advanced cooling technology collaborative program is underway involving Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Northern States Power (NSP) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The program will conduct field tests of an ice slurry distributed load network cooling concept at a Northern States Power utility service center to further develop and prove the technology and to facilitate technology transfer to the private sector. The program will further develop at Argonne National Laboratory through laboratory research key components of hardware needed in the field testing and develop an engineering data base needed to support the implementation of the technology. This program will sharply focus and culminate research and development funded by both the US Department of Energy and the Electric Power Research Institute on advanced cooling and load management technology over the last several years.

  18. Ice slurry cooling development and field testing

    SciTech Connect

    Kasza, K.E. ); Hietala, J. ); Wendland, R.D. ); Collins, F. )

    1992-01-01

    A new advanced cooling technology collaborative program is underway involving Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Northern States Power (NSP) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The program will conduct field tests of an ice slurry distributed load network cooling concept at a Northern States Power utility service center to further develop and prove the technology and to facilitate technology transfer to the private sector. The program will further develop at Argonne National Laboratory through laboratory research key components of hardware needed in the field testing and develop an engineering data base needed to support the implementation of the technology. This program will sharply focus and culminate research and development funded by both the US Department of Energy and the Electric Power Research Institute on advanced cooling and load management technology over the last several years.

  19. Combustion Safety Simplified Test Protocol Field Study

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, L; Cautley, D.; Bohac, D.; Francisco, P.; Shen, L.; Gloss, S.

    2015-11-05

    "9Combustions safety is an important step in the process of upgrading homes for energy efficiency. There are several approaches used by field practitioners, but researchers have indicated that the test procedures in use are complex to implement and provide too many false positives. Field failures often mean that the house is not upgraded until after remediation or not at all, if not include in the program. In this report the PARR and NorthernSTAR DOE Building America Teams provide a simplified test procedure that is easier to implement and should produce fewer false positives. A survey of state weatherization agencies on combustion safety issues, details of a field data collection instrumentation package, summary of data collected over seven months, data analysis and results are included. The project provides several key results. State weatherization agencies do not generally track combustion safety failures, the data from those that do suggest that there is little actual evidence that combustion safety failures due to spillage from non-dryer exhaust are common and that only a very small number of homes are subject to the failures. The project team collected field data on 11 houses in 2015. Of these homes, two houses that demonstrated prolonged and excessive spillage were also the only two with venting systems out of compliance with the National Fuel Gas Code. The remaining homes experienced spillage that only occasionally extended beyond the first minute of operation. Combustion zone depressurization, outdoor temperature, and operation of individual fans all provide statistically significant predictors of spillage.

  20. Field testing plan for unsaturated zone monitoring and field studies

    SciTech Connect

    Young, M.H.; Wierenga, P.J.; Warrick, A.W.

    1996-10-01

    The University of Arizona, in cooperation with the Bureau of Economic Geology at The University of Texas at Austin, and Stephens and Associates in Albuquerque, New Mexico has developed a field testing plan for evaluating subsurface monitoring systems. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has requested development of these testing plans for low-level radioactive waste disposal sites (LLW) and for monitoring at decommissioned facilities designated under the {open_quotes}Site Decommissioning Management Plan{close_quotes} (SDMP). The tests are conducted on a 50 m by 50 m plot on the University of Arizona`s Maricopa Agricultural Center. Within the 50 m by 50 m plot one finds: (1) an instrumented buried trench, (2) monitoring islands similar to those proposed for the Ward Valley, California LLW Facility, (3) deep borehole monitoring sites, (4) gaseous transport monitoring, and (5) locations for testing non-invasive geophysical measurement techniques. The various subplot areas are instrumented with commercially available instruments such as neutron probes, time domain reflectometry probes, tensiometers, psychrometers, heat dissipation sensors, thermocouples, solution samplers, and cross-hole geophysics electrodes. Measurement depths vary from ground surface to 15 m. The data from the controlled flow and transport experiments, conducted over the plot, will be used to develop an integrated approach to long-term monitoring of the vadose zone at waste disposal sites. The data will also be used to test field-scale flow and transport models. This report describes in detail the design of the experiment and the methodology proposed for evaluating the data.

  1. A new method of field MRTD test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhibin; Song, Yan; Liu, Xianhong; Xiao, Wenjian

    2014-09-01

    MRTD is an important indicator to measure the imaging performance of infrared camera. In the traditional laboratory test, blackbody is used as simulated heat source which is not only expensive and bulky but also difficult to meet field testing requirements of online automatic infrared camera MRTD. To solve this problem, this paper introduces a new detection device for MRTD, which uses LED as a simulation heat source and branded plated zinc sulfide glass carved four-bar target as a simulation target. By using high temperature adaptability cassegrain collimation system, the target is simulated to be distance-infinite so that it can be observed by the human eyes to complete the subjective test, or collected to complete objective measurement by image processing. This method will use LED to replace blackbody. The color temperature of LED is calibrated by thermal imager, thereby, the relation curve between the LED temperature controlling current and the blackbody simulation temperature difference is established, accurately achieved the temperature control of the infrared target. Experimental results show that the accuracy of the device in field testing of thermal imager MRTD can be limited within 0.1K, which greatly reduces the cost to meet the project requirements with a wide application value.

  2. Bistatic radar sea state monitoring field test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruck, G. T.; Kirchbaum, G. K.; Everly, J. O.

    1975-01-01

    Recent advances in understanding the physical phenomena controlling the interaction of electromagnetic energy with the ocean surface have revealed the possiblity of remote measurement of the two-dimensional surface wave height spectrum of the ocean using bistatic radar techniques. The basic feasibility of such a technique operating at frequencies in the HF region (3 to 30 MHz) was examined during previous studies and hardware for an experimental verification experiment was specified. The activities have resulted in a determination of the required hardware and system parameters for both satellite and aircraft systems, the development, assembly, and testing of hardware for an experimental aircraft system, the development and initial testing of data processing procedures, and the conduct of an initial flight test experiment. Activities were devoted to completing the assembly and testing of the experimental hardware, completing the experiment planning, conducting a field test experiment, and the processing and analysis of the experimental data. Even though directional spectrum maps of the test area cannot be generated from the measured data, the hardware concept employed appears viable, and solutions to the problems encountered have been identified.

  3. Preliminary Results of Field Emission Cathode Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, James S.; Kovaleski, Scott D.

    2001-01-01

    Preliminary screening tests of field emission cathodes such as chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond, textured pyrolytic graphite, and textured copper were conducted at background pressures typical of electric thruster test facilities to assess cathode performance and stability. Very low power electric thrusters which provide tens to hundreds micronewtons of thrust may need field emission neutralizers that have a capability of tens to hundreds of microamperes. From current voltage characteristics, it was found that the CVD diamond and textured metals cathodes clearly satisfied the Fowler-Nordheim emission relation. The CVD diamond and a textured copper cathode had average current densities of 270 and 380 mA/sq cm, respectively, at the beginning-of-life. After a few hours of operation the cathode emission currents degraded by 40 to 75% at background pressures in the 10(exp -5) Pa to 10(exp -4) Pa range. The textured pyrolytic graphite had a modest current density at beginning-of-life of 84 mA/sq cm, but this cathode was the most stable of all. Extended testing of the most promising cathodes is warranted to determine if current degradation is a burn-in effect or whether it is a long-term degradation process. Preliminary experiments with ferroelectric emission cathodes, which are ceramics with spontaneous electric polarization, were conducted. Peak current densities of 30 to 120 mA/sq cm were obtained for pulse durations of about 500 ns in the 10(exp -4) Pa pressure range.

  4. Development of a simple method for the rapid identification of organisms causing anthrax by coagglutination test.

    PubMed

    Sumithra, T G; Chaturvedi, V K; Gupta, P K; Siju, S J; Susan, C; Bincy, J; Laxmi, U; Sunita, S C; Rai, A K

    2014-11-01

    A protective antigen (PA) based coagglutination test was optimized in the present study for the specific and sensitive identification of bacteria causing anthrax in a cost effective and less risky manner. The test showed 100% specificity and sensitivity up to 9 × 10(3) formalinized vegetative cells or 11 ng of PA. The optimized test also detected anthrax toxin directly from the serum as well as blood of anthrax infected animals indicating the potential application for direct diagnosis of anthrax under field conditions.

  5. In Situ Field Testing of Processes

    SciTech Connect

    J. Wang

    2001-12-14

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). This revision updates data and analyses presented in the initial issue of this AMR. This AMR was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' and ''Technical Work Plan for UZ Flow, Transport, and Coupled Processes Process Model Report. These activities were performed to investigate in situ flow and transport processes. The evaluations provide the necessary framework to: (1) refine and confirm the conceptual model of matrix and fracture processes in the unsaturated zone (UZ) and (2) analyze the impact of excavation (including use of construction water and effect of ventilation) on the UZ flow and transport processes. This AMR is intended to support revisions to ''Conceptual and Numerical Models for UZ Flow and Transport'' and ''Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Process Model Report''. In general, the results discussed in this AMR are from studies conducted using a combination or a subset of the following three approaches: (1) air-injection tests, (2) liquid-release tests, and (3) moisture monitoring using in-drift sensors or in-borehole sensors, to evaluate the impact of excavation, ventilation, and construction-water usage on the surrounding rocks. The liquid-release tests and air-injection tests provide an evaluation of in situ fracture flow and the competing processes of matrix imbibition. Only the findings from testing and data not covered in the ''Seepage Calibration Model and Seepage Testing Data'' are analyzed in detail in the AMR.

  6. Issues related to field testing in tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.M.

    1982-12-31

    This paper has brought out the unique properties of tuffs and related them to needs associated with their use as a host rock for a high level nuclear waste repository. Major issues of temperature, pore water, joints, and depositional patterns have been identified and related responses and impacts outlined in Table 1. Planned experiments have been outlined and their relationships to the rock mechanics issues summarized in Table 2. The conclusions from this paper are: (1) tuff is a complex rock and basic phenomenological understanding is incomplete; and (2) available field test facilities will be used for a series of experiments designed to improve phenomenological understanding and support repository design efforts.

  7. A model for field toxicity tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kaiser, Mark S.; Finger, Susan E.

    1996-01-01

    Toxicity tests conducted under field conditions present an interesting challenge for statistical modelling. In contrast to laboratory tests, the concentrations of potential toxicants are not held constant over the test. In addition, the number and identity of toxicants that belong in a model as explanatory factors are not known and must be determined through a model selection process. We present one model to deal with these needs. This model takes the record of mortalities to form a multinomial distribution in which parameters are modelled as products of conditional daily survival probabilities. These conditional probabilities are in turn modelled as logistic functions of the explanatory factors. The model incorporates lagged values of the explanatory factors to deal with changes in the pattern of mortalities over time. The issue of model selection and assessment is approached through the use of generalized information criteria and power divergence goodness-of-fit tests. These model selection criteria are applied in a cross-validation scheme designed to assess the ability of a model to both fit data used in estimation and predict data deleted from the estimation data set. The example presented demonstrates the need for inclusion of lagged values of the explanatory factors and suggests that penalized likelihood criteria may not provide adequate protection against overparameterized models in model selection.

  8. 3X-100 blade field test.

    SciTech Connect

    Zayas, Jose R.; Johnson, Wesley D.

    2008-03-01

    In support of a Work-For-Other (WFO) agreement between the Wind Energy Technology Department at Sandia National Laboratories and 3TEX, one of the three Micon 65/13M wind turbines at the USDA Agriculture Research Service (ARS) center in Bushland, Texas, has been used to test a set of 9 meter wind turbine blades, manufactured by TPI composites using the 3TEX carbon material for the spar cap. Data collected from the test has been analyzed to evaluate both the aerodynamic performance and the structural response from the blades. The blades aerodynamic and structural performance, the meteorological inflow and the wind turbine structural response has been monitored with an array of 57 instruments: 15 to characterize the blades, 13 to characterize inflow, and 15 to characterize the time-varying state of the turbine. For the test, data was sampled at a rate of 40 Hz using the ATLAS II (Accurate GPS Time-Linked Data Acquisition System) data acquisition system. The system features a time-synchronized continuous data stream and telemetered data from the turbine rotor. This paper documents the instruments and infrastructure that have been developed to monitor these blades, turbines and inflow, as well as both modeling and field testing results.

  9. IN SITU FIELD TESTING OF PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect

    J.S.Y. YANG

    2004-11-08

    The purpose of this scientific analysis report is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts and surface-based boreholes through unsaturated zone (UZ) tuff rock units. In situ testing, monitoring, and associated laboratory studies are conducted to directly assess and evaluate the waste emplacement environment and the natural barriers to radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain. This scientific analysis report supports and provides data to UZ flow and transport model reports, which in turn contribute to the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) of Yucca Mountain, an important document for the license application (LA). The objectives of ambient field-testing activities are described in Section 1.1. This report is the third revision (REV 03), which supercedes REV 02. The scientific analysis of data for inputs to model calibration and validation as documented in REV 02 were developed in accordance with the Technical Work Plan (TWP) ''Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167969]). This revision was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Section 1.2.4) for better integrated, consistent, transparent, traceable, and more complete documentation in this scientific analysis report and associated UZ flow and transport model reports. No additional testing or analyses were performed as part of this revision. The list of relevant acceptance criteria is provided by ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654]), Table 3-1. Additional deviations from the TWP regarding the features, events, and processes (FEPs) list are discussed in Section 1.3. Documentation in this report includes descriptions of how, and under what conditions, the tests were conducted. The descriptions and

  10. Adaptive identification and interpretation of pressure transient tests of horizontal wells: challenges and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, V. L.; Van Hoang, Dong

    2016-09-01

    The paper deals with a topical issue of defining oil reservoir properties during transient tests of horizontal wells equipped with information-measuring systems and reducing well downtime. The aim is to consider challenges and perspectives of developing models and algorithms for adaptive identification and interpretation of transient tests in horizontal wells with pressure buildup curve analysis. The models and algorithms should allow analyzing flow behavior, defining oil reservoir properties and determining well test completion time, as well as reducing well downtime. The present paper is based on the previous theoretical and practical findings in the spheres of transient well testing, systems analysis, system identification, function optimization and linear algebra. Field data and results of transient well tests with pressure buildup curve analysis have also been considered. The suggested models and algorithms for adaptive interpretation of transient tests conducted in horizontal wells with resulting pressure buildup curve make it possible to analyze flow behavior, as well as define the reservoir properties and determine well test completion time. The algorithms for adaptive interpretation are based on the integrated system of radial flow PBC models with time- dependent variables, account of additional a priori information and estimates of radial flow permeability. Optimization problems are solved with the case study of PBC interpretation for five horizontal wells of the Verkhnechonsk field.

  11. FIELD TEST OF THE FLAME QUALITY INDICATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Rudin, Andrew M; Butcher, Thomas; Troost, Henry

    2003-02-04

    The flame quality indicator concept was developed at BNL specifically to monitor the brightness of the flame in a small oil burner and to provide a ''call for service'' notification when the brightness has changed from its setpoint, either high or low. In prior development work BNL has explored the response of this system to operational upsets such as excess air changes, fouled atomizer nozzles, poor fuel quality, etc. Insight Technologies, Inc. and Honeywell, Inc. have licensed this technology from the U.S. Department of Energy and have been cooperating to develop product offerings which meet industry needs with an optimal combination of function and price. Honeywell has recently completed the development of the Flame Quality Monitor (FQM or Honeywell QS7100F). This is a small module which connects via a serial cable to the burners primary operating control. Primary advantages of this approach are simplicity, cost, and ease of installation. Call-for-service conditions are output in the form of front panel indicator lights and contact closure which can trigger a range of external communication options. Under this project a field test was conducted of the FQM in cooperation with service organizations in Virginia, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, and Connecticut. At total of 83 field sites were included. At each site the FQM was installed in parallel with another embodiment of this concept--the Insight AFQI. The AFQI incorporates a modem and provides the ability to provide detailed information on the trends in the flame quality over the course of the two year test period. The test site population was comprised of 79.5% boilers, 13.7% warm air furnaces, and 6.8% water heaters. Nearly all were of residential size--with firing rates ranging from 0.6 gallons of oil per hour to 1.25. During the course of the test program the monitoring equipment successfully identified problems including: plugged fuel lines, fouled nozzles, collapsed combustion chambers, and poor fuel

  12. Cooperative field test program for wind systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bollmeier, W.S. II; Dodge, D.M.

    1992-03-01

    The objectives of the Federal Wind Energy Program, managed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), are (1) to assist industry and utilities in achieving a multi-regional US market penetration of wind systems, and (2) to establish the United States as the world leader in the development of advanced wind turbine technology. In 1984, the program conducted a series of planning workshops with representatives from the wind energy industry to obtain input on the Five-Year Research Plan then being prepared by DOE. One specific suggestion that came out of these meetings was that the federal program should conduct cooperative research tests with industry to enhance the technology transfer process. It was also felt that the active involvement of industry in DOE-funded research would improve the state of the art of wind turbine technology. DOE established the Cooperative Field Test Program (CFTP) in response to that suggestion. This program was one of the first in DOE to feature joint industry-government research test teams working toward common objectives.

  13. APPLYING TOXICITY IDENTIFICATION PROCEDURES TO FIELD COLLECTED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identification of specific causes of sediment toxicity can allow for much more focused risk assessment and management decision making. We have been developing toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) methods for contaminated sediments and focusing on three toxicant groups (ammoni...

  14. RESULTS OF APPLYING TOXICITY IDENTIFICATION PROCEDURES TO FIELD COLLECTED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identification of specific causes of sediment toxicity can allow for much more focused risk assessment and management decision making. We have been developing toxicity identification evaluation TIE) methods for contaminated sediments and are focusing on three toxicant groups (amm...

  15. Identification of Algerian Field-Caught Phlebotomine Sand Fly Vectors by MALDI-TOF MS

    PubMed Central

    Lafri, Ismail; Almeras, Lionel; Bitam, Idir; Caputo, Aurelia; Yssouf, Amina; Forestier, Claire-Lise; Izri, Arezki; Raoult, Didier; Parola, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Background Phlebotomine sand flies are known to transmit Leishmania parasites, bacteria and viruses that affect humans and animals in many countries worldwide. Precise sand fly identification is essential to prevent phlebotomine-borne diseases. Over the past two decades, progress in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has emerged as an accurate tool for arthropod identification. The objective of the present study was to investigate the usefulness of MALDI-TOF MS as a tool for identifying field-caught phlebotomine. Methodology/Principal Findings Sand flies were captured in four sites in north Algeria. A subset was morphologically and genetically identified. Six species were found in these areas and a total of 28 stored frozen specimens were used for the creation of the reference spectrum database. The relevance of this original method for sand fly identification was validated by two successive blind tests including the morphological identification of 80 new specimens which were stored at -80°C, and 292 unknown specimens, including engorged specimens, which were preserved under different conditions. Intra-species reproducibility and inter-species specificity of the protein profiles were obtained, allowing us to distinguish specimens at the gender level. Querying of the sand fly database using the MS spectra from the blind test groups revealed concordant results between morphological and MALDI-TOF MS identification. However, MS identification results were less efficient for specimens which were engorged or stored in alcohol. Identification of 362 phlebotomine sand flies, captured at four Algerian sites, by MALDI-TOF MS, revealed that the subgenus Larroussius was predominant at all the study sites, except for in M’sila where P. (Phlebotomus) papatasi was the only sand fly species detected. Conclusion The present study highlights the application of MALDI-TOF MS for monitoring sand fly fauna captured in the field

  16. Identification of suicidal ideations with the help of projective tests: a review.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Devvarta; Nizamie, S Haque; Abhishek, Priyadarshee; Prasanna, Lavanya Tumkur

    2014-12-01

    Identification of the presence of suicidal ideations in an individual is crucial for the timely intervention. However, these ideations may remain unidentified as an individual with serious intentions of self-harm may not express them explicitly. Various projective tests can provide crucial clues to clinicians about the presence of suicidal ideations in an individual's mind. The present review is intended to update clinicians working in the field of suicide prevention about salient findings on these tests which can serve as a ready reckoner for them. We also highlight the status of research in this domain. PMID:25153298

  17. Identification of Pedestrian Bridge Dynamic Response trough Field Measurements and Numerical Modelling: Case Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manolis, George D.; Athanatopoulou-Kyriakou, Asimina; Dragos, Kosmas D.; Arabatzis, Argyris; Lavdas, Alexandros; Karakostas, Christos Z.

    2014-06-01

    In this work, we develop a technique for performing system identification in typical pedestrian bridges, using routine equipment at a minimal configuration, and for cases where actual structural data are either sparse or absent. To this end, two pedestrian bridges were examined, modelled and finally instrumented so as to record their dynamic response under operational conditions. More specifically, the bridges were numerically modelled using the finite element method (FEM) according to what was deduced to be their current operating status, while rational assumptions were made with respect to uncertain structural properties. Next, results from field testing using a portable accelerometer unit were processed to produce response spectra that were used as input to a structural identification software program, which in turn yielded the excited natural frequencies and mode shapes of the bridges. The low level of discrepancy is given between analytical and experimental results, the latter are used for a final calibration of the numerical models.

  18. 40 CFR 1065.935 - Emission test sequence for field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Emission test sequence for field... Systems § 1065.935 Emission test sequence for field testing. (a) Time the start of field testing as.... Start the field test within 20 min of engine shutdown. (3) If the standard-setting part requires...

  19. 40 CFR 1065.935 - Emission test sequence for field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Emission test sequence for field... Systems § 1065.935 Emission test sequence for field testing. (a) Time the start of field testing as.... Start the field test within 20 min of engine shutdown. (3) If the standard-setting part requires...

  20. 40 CFR 1065.935 - Emission test sequence for field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emission test sequence for field... Systems § 1065.935 Emission test sequence for field testing. (a) Time the start of field testing as.... Start the field test within 20 min of engine shutdown. (3) If the standard-setting part requires...

  1. 40 CFR 1065.935 - Emission test sequence for field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Emission test sequence for field... Systems § 1065.935 Emission test sequence for field testing. (a) Time the start of field testing as.... Start the field test within 20 min of engine shutdown. (3) If the standard-setting part requires...

  2. Vadose Zone Transport Field Study: Detailed Test Plan for Simulated Leak Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, Anderson L.; Gee, Glendon W.

    2000-06-23

    This report describes controlled transport experiments at well-instrumented field tests to be conducted during FY 2000 in support of DOE?s Vadose Zone Transport Field Study (VZTFS). The VZTFS supports the Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project Science and Technology Initiative. The field tests will improve understanding of field-scale transport and lead to the development or identification of efficient and cost-effective characterization methods. These methods will capture the extent of contaminant plumes using existing steel-cased boreholes. Specific objectives are to 1) identify mechanisms controlling transport processes in soils typical of the hydrogeologic conditions of Hanford?s waste disposal sites; 2) reduce uncertainty in conceptual models; 3) develop a detailed and accurate data base of hydraulic and transport parameters for validation of three-dimensional numerical models; and 4) identify and evaluate advanced, cost-effective characterization methods with the potential to assess changing conditions in the vadose zone, particularly as surrogates of currently undetectable high-risk contaminants. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) manages the VZTFS for DOE.

  3. 40 CFR 1065.925 - PEMS preparation for field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false PEMS preparation for field testing. 1065.925 Section 1065.925 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Field Testing and Portable Emission Measurement Systems § 1065.925 PEMS preparation for field testing....

  4. Field testing method for photovaltaic modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Gerber N.

    For remote areas, where solar photovoltaic modules are the only source of power, it is essential to perform preventive maintenance to insure that the PV system works properly; unfortunately, prices for PV testers range from 1,700 to 8,000. To address this issue, a portable inexpensive tester and analysis methodology have been developed. Assembling a simple tester, which costs $530 and weighs about 5 pounds, and using the Four-Parameters PV Model, we characterized the current-voltage (I-V) curve at environmental testing conditions; and then employing radiation, temperature, and age degradation sensitivity equations, we extrapolated the I-V curve to standard testing conditions. After applying the methodology to three kinds of silicon modules (mono-crystalline, multi-crystalline, and thin-film), we obtained maximum power points up to 97% of the manufacturer's specifications. Therefore, based on these results, it is reasonably accurate and affordable to verify the performance of solar modules in the field.

  5. Hazard identification and risk assessment procedure for genetically modified plants in the field--GMHAZID.

    PubMed

    Koivisto, Raija A; Törmäkangas, Kirsi M; Kauppinen, Veli S

    2002-01-01

    The safe application of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) requires a risk assessment prior to their proposed use. Based on methods from the chemical industry, we developed a hazard identification procedure for the risk assessment of field tests with genetically modified plants. This risk assessment method, GMHAZID, is carried out in the form of guided brainstorm sessions. GMHAZID was tested with a case study for which a risk assessment had previously been made, and the results of the assessments were compared. The results showed that some new hazards potentially leading to uncontrolled spreading, in addition to those from the previous assessment, were identified using GMHAZID. GMHAZID also recognised some hazards leading to failures in the field experiments. We suggest that GMHAZID provides systematics, reliability, and transparency to the risk assessment procedure.

  6. Research Based on Optical Non-Destructive Testing of Pigment Identification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jigang; Hao, Shengcai; Zhou, Wenhua; Qi, Xiaokun; Shi, Jilong

    2016-04-01

    Optical Non-Destructive Testing (ONDT) can be applied as penetrating elemental and structure analysis technology in the Pigments identification field. Three-dimensional video microscopy, Raman microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy are employed to measure the materials based on a Qing Dynasty meticulous painting. The results revealed that the dark yellow area within the decorative patterns was presented due to the interaction of Emerald green and hematite, and the bright yellow edge area was delineated by Cu-Zn-Pb composition. The interesting thing is that an artificial synthetic ultramarine blue was checked in the painting. According to the first synthesized time of ultramarine blue and Paris green, the time limit of the painting completion can be identified. The principle of Pigment subtractive colorant and nitikaset method were employed to interpreting the results. Optical testing combined with the area of cultural relic identification can be a potential method to build an expert identification system successfully. This work also help lay the optical method groundwork for further cultural relic identification, sterilization, and preservation. PMID:27451669

  7. Research Based on Optical Non-Destructive Testing of Pigment Identification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jigang; Hao, Shengcai; Zhou, Wenhua; Qi, Xiaokun; Shi, Jilong

    2016-04-01

    Optical Non-Destructive Testing (ONDT) can be applied as penetrating elemental and structure analysis technology in the Pigments identification field. Three-dimensional video microscopy, Raman microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy are employed to measure the materials based on a Qing Dynasty meticulous painting. The results revealed that the dark yellow area within the decorative patterns was presented due to the interaction of Emerald green and hematite, and the bright yellow edge area was delineated by Cu-Zn-Pb composition. The interesting thing is that an artificial synthetic ultramarine blue was checked in the painting. According to the first synthesized time of ultramarine blue and Paris green, the time limit of the painting completion can be identified. The principle of Pigment subtractive colorant and nitikaset method were employed to interpreting the results. Optical testing combined with the area of cultural relic identification can be a potential method to build an expert identification system successfully. This work also help lay the optical method groundwork for further cultural relic identification, sterilization, and preservation.

  8. A valid field test protocol of linear speed and agility in rugby union.

    PubMed

    Green, Brian S; Blake, Catherine; Caulfield, Brian M

    2011-05-01

    Field testing is a key component to measure player performance in all sports, which provides coaches and strength and conditioning staff information to evaluate player performance and measure desired training effects. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the reliability and construct validity of a rugby union field test protocol based on analysis of the components of the game. Participants were placed in an Academy (n = 17) or Club (n = 11) group determined by current playing level. Trials of 10- and 30-m linear speed (LS), change of direction speed, and reactive agility speed were measured to evaluate the field test protocol's utility in distinguishing players of different playing abilities. Reliability analysis of each field test demonstrated stable values allowing this field test protocol to be used to compare between groups. Furthermore, the Academy players performed significantly (p < 0.05) faster compared to Club players in all LS and agility components. These results suggest that this field test protocol is appropriate to identify rugby union players of varying playing abilities allowing coaches and strength and fitness staff to measure a player's capability to execute critical aspects of the game and may have application in performance evaluation and talent identification. The results from this study suggest that this test battery is an appropriate measure in identifying the varying playing abilities of rugby union players. This enables coaches and fitness staff to assess a player's capability in executing critical aspects of the game and also may have application in performance evaluation and talent identification.

  9. Field Testing of Environmentally Friendly Drilling System

    SciTech Connect

    David Burnett

    2009-05-31

    The Environmentally Friendly Drilling (EFD) program addresses new low-impact technology that reduces the footprint of drilling activities, integrates light weight drilling rigs with reduced emission engine packages, addresses on-site waste management, optimizes the systems to fit the needs of a specific development sites and provides stewardship of the environment. In addition, the program includes industry, the public, environmental organizations, and elected officials in a collaboration that addresses concerns on development of unconventional natural gas resources in environmentally sensitive areas. The EFD program provides the fundamentals to result in greater access, reasonable regulatory controls, lower development cost and reduction of the environmental footprint associated with operations for unconventional natural gas. Industry Sponsors have supported the program with significant financial and technical support. This final report compendium is organized into segments corresponding directly with the DOE approved scope of work for the term 2005-2009 (10 Sections). Each specific project is defined by (a) its goals, (b) its deliverable, and (c) its future direction. A web site has been established that contains all of these detailed engineering reports produced with their efforts. The goals of the project are to (1) identify critical enabling technologies for a prototype low-impact drilling system, (2) test the prototype systems in field laboratories, and (3) demonstrate the advanced technology to show how these practices would benefit the environment.

  10. Identification of anomalous motion of thunderstorms using daily rainfall fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Moral, Anna; Llasat, Maria Carmen; Rigo, Tomeu

    2016-04-01

    Adverse weather phenomena in Catalonia (NE of the Iberian Peninsula) is commonly associated to heavy rains, large hail, strong winds, and/or tornados, all of them caused by thunderstorms. In most of the cases with adverse weather, thunderstorms vary sharply their trajectories in a concrete moment, changing completely the motion directions that have previously followed. Furthermore, it is possible that a breaking into several cells may be produced, or, in the opposite, it can be observed a joining of different thunderstorms into a bigger system. In order to identify the main features of the developing process of thunderstorms and the anomalous motions that these may follow in some cases, this contribution presents a classification of the events using daily rainfall fields, with the purpose of distinguishing quickly anomalous motion of thunderstorms. The methodology implemented allows classifying the daily rainfall fields in three categories by applying some thresholds related with the daily precipitation accumulated values and their extension: days with "no rain", days with "potentially convective" rain and days with "non-potentially convective" rain. Finally, for those "potentially convective" daily rainfall charts, it also allows a geometrical identification and classification of all the convective structures into "ellipse" and "non-ellipse", obtaining then the structures with "normal" or "anomalous" motion pattern, respectively. The work is focused on the period 2008-2015, and presents some characteristics of the rainfall behaviour in terms of the seasonal distribution of convective rainfall or the geographic variability. It shows that convective structures are mainly found during late spring and summer, even though they can be recorded in any time of the year. Consequently, the maximum number of convective structures with anomalous motion is recorded between July and November. Furthermore, the contribution shows the role of the orography of Catalonia in the

  11. Development of HT-BP nueral network system for the identification of well test interpretation model

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, W.; Hanyang, U.; Yoo, I.

    1995-12-31

    The neural network technique that is a field of artificial intelligence (AI) has proved to be a good model classifier in all areas of engineering and especially, it has gained a considerable acceptance in well test interpretation model (WTIM) identification of petroleum engineering. Conventionally, identification of the WTIM has been approached by graphical analysis method that requires an experienced expert. Recently, neural network technique equipped with back propagation (BP) learning algorithm was presented and it differs from the AI technique such as symbolic approach that must be accompanied with the data preparation procedures such as smoothing, segmenting, and symbolic transformation. In this paper, we developed BP neural network with Hough transform (HT) technique to overcome data selection problem and to use single neural network rather sequential nets. The Hough transform method was proved to be a powerful tool for the shape detection in image processing and computer vision technologies. Along these lines, a number of exercises were conducted with the actual well test data in two steps. First, the newly developed AI model, namely, ANNIS (Artificial intelligence Neural Network Identification System) was utilized to identify WTIM. Secondly, we obtained reservoir characteristics with the well test model equipped with modified Levenberg-Marquart method. The results show that ANNIS was proved to be quite reliable model for the data having noisy, missing, and extraneous points. They also demonstrate that reservoir parameters were successfully estimated.

  12. Field testing of asphalt-emulsion radon-barrier system

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, J.N.; Freeman, H.D.; Baker, E.G.; Elmore, M.R.; Nelson, D.A.; Voss, C.F.; Koehmstedt, P.L.

    1981-09-01

    Three years of laboratory and field testing have demonstrated that asphalt emulsion seals are effective radon diffusion barriers. Both laboratory and field tests in 1979, 1980 and 1981 have shown that an asphalt emulsion seal can reduce radon fluxes by greater than 99.9%. The effective diffusion coefficient for the various asphalt emulsion admix seals averages about 10/sup -6/ cm/sup 2//s. The 1981 joint field test is a culmination of all the technology developed to date for asphalt emulsion radon barrier systems. Preliminary results of this field test and the results of the 1980 field test are presented. 18 figures, 6 tables.

  13. An Approach to Near Field Data Selection in Radio Frequency Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkworth, Robert D.

    Personal identification is needed in many civil activities, and the common identification cards, such as a driver's license, have become the standard document de facto. Radio frequency identification has complicated this matter. Unlike their printed predecessors, contemporary RFID cards lack a practical way for users to control access to their individual fields of data. This leaves them more available to unauthorized parties, and more prone to abuse. Here, then was undertaken a means to test a novel RFID card technology that allows overlays to be used for reliable, reversible data access settings. Similar to other proposed switching mechanisms, it offers advantages that may greatly improve outcomes. RFID use is increasing in identity documents such as drivers' licenses and passports, and with it concern over the theft of personal information, which can enable unauthorized tracking or fraud. Effort put into designing a strong foundation technology now may allow for widespread development on them later. In this dissertation, such a technology was designed and constructed, to drive the central thesis that selective detuning could serve as a feasible, reliable mechanism. The concept had been illustrated effective in limiting access to all fields simultaneously before, and was here effective in limiting access to specific fields selectively. A novel card was produced in familiar dimensions, with an intuitive interface by which users may conceal the visible print of the card to conceal the wireless emissions it allows. A discussion was included of similar technologies, involving capacitive switching, that could further improve the outcomes if such a product were put to large-scale commercial fabrication. The card prototype was put to a battery of laboratory tests to measure the degree of independence between data fields and the reliability of the switching mechanism when used under realistically variable coverage, demonstrating statistically consistent performance in

  14. Field Accuracy Test of Rpas Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, P.; Coakley, R.

    2013-08-01

    Baseline Surveys Ltd is a company which specialises in the supply of accurate geospatial data, such as cadastral, topographic and engineering survey data to commercial and government bodies. Baseline Surveys Ltd invested in aerial drone photogrammetric technology and had a requirement to establish the spatial accuracy of the geographic data derived from our unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) photogrammetry before marketing our new aerial mapping service. Having supplied the construction industry with survey data for over 20 years, we felt that is was crucial for our clients to clearly understand the accuracy of our photogrammetry so they can safely make informed spatial decisions, within the known accuracy limitations of our data. This information would also inform us on how and where UAV photogrammetry can be utilised. What we wanted to find out was the actual accuracy that can be reliably achieved using a UAV to collect data under field conditions throughout a 2 Ha site. We flew a UAV over the test area in a "lawnmower track" pattern with an 80% front and 80% side overlap; we placed 45 ground markers as check points and surveyed them in using network Real Time Kinematic Global Positioning System (RTK GPS). We specifically designed the ground markers to meet our accuracy needs. We established 10 separate ground markers as control points and inputted these into our photo modelling software, Agisoft PhotoScan. The remaining GPS coordinated check point data were added later in ArcMap to the completed orthomosaic and digital elevation model so we could accurately compare the UAV photogrammetry XYZ data with the RTK GPS XYZ data at highly reliable common points. The accuracy we achieved throughout the 45 check points was 95% reliably within 41 mm horizontally and 68 mm vertically and with an 11.7 mm ground sample distance taken from a flight altitude above ground level of 90 m.The area covered by one image was 70.2 m × 46.4 m, which equals 0.325 Ha. This finding has shown

  15. Crime laboratory proficiency testing results, 1978-1991, I: Identification and classification of physical evidence.

    PubMed

    Peterson, J L; Markham, P N

    1995-11-01

    The proficiency testing of crime laboratories began in the mid-1970s and presently assumes an important role in quality assurance programs within most forensic laboratories. This article reviews the origins and early results of this testing program and also examines the progress of proficiency testing in allied scientific fields. Beginning in 1978, a fee-based crime laboratory proficiency testing program was launched and has grown to its present level involving almost 400 laboratories worldwide. This is the first of two articles that review the objectives, limitations and results of this testing from 1978 through 1991. Part I reviews the success of laboratories in the identification and classification of common evidence types: controlled substances, flammables, explosives, fibers, bloodstains, and hairs. Laboratories enjoy a high degree of success in identifying drugs and classifying (typing) bloodstains. They are moderately successful in identifying flammables, explosives, and fibers. Animal hair identification and human hair body location results are troublesome. The second paper will review the proficiency of crime laboratories in determining if two or more evidentiary samples shared a common origin.

  16. Integrated approach to gas accumulation identification in Field M

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyshevskaya, K.; Rukavishnikov, V.; Belozerov, B.; Podnebesnikh, A.

    2015-02-01

    The given paper describes how the integration of different methods, such as core data, well logs, production logging, seismic data and well test analysis, was used to solve the problem of determining gas accumulation boundaries in sediment complex PK1-3 of Field M. This paper is devoted to the block with wells 2, 36, 49, 85, 127, 148 of the field, since it is characterized by high uncertainty, sc. recently drilled wells 1V, 2V and 120 have produced oil, although according to the present-day geological concept they were considered to be gas saturated in the intervals investigated with production logging. Besides, well 127 that was presumably oil saturated has produced gas. By accounting mismatching production data and the geological concept, the authors have supposed that PK1-3 gas accumulation is characterized by a more complex structure than it was supposed by the predecessors and it is represented by reservoir compartmentalization and high heterogeneity. Therefore, the main goal of the work was to revise the distribution of gas saturated reservoir within the PK1-3 sediment complex. To achieve this goal, the authors have set the following tasks: to revise the geological correlation and gas oil contact; to carry out fault interpretation by means of seismic and well test data; to determine areal facies distribution on the basis of integrated core, perform a log motifs and seismic facies analysis. Thus, the estimation of the gas saturated reservoir portion was implemented in two stages: defining the boundary of gas accumulation in depth on the basis of well logs, production data and fault interpretation; reservoir distribution determination on the basis of the seismic facies analysis within the derived gas accumulation boundary.

  17. Magnetic Field Apparatus (MFA) Hardware Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Ken; Boody, April; Reed, Dave; Wang, Chung; Stuckey, Bob; Cox, Dave

    1999-01-01

    The objectives of this study are threefold: (1) Provide insight into water delivery in microgravity and determine optimal germination paper wetting for subsequent seed germination in microgravity; (2) Observe the behavior of water exposed to a strong localized magnetic field in microgravity; and (3) Simulate the flow of fixative (using water) through the hardware. The Magnetic Field Apparatus (MFA) is a new piece of hardware slated to fly on the Space Shuttle in early 2001. MFA is designed to expose plant tissue to magnets in a microgravity environment, deliver water to the plant tissue, record photographic images of plant tissue, and deliver fixative to the plant tissue.

  18. Identification of an abnormal beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test.

    PubMed

    Frome, Edward L; Newman, Lee S; Cragle, Donna L; Colyer, Shirley P; Wambach, Paul F

    2003-02-01

    The potential hazards from exposure to beryllium or beryllium compounds in the workplace were first reported in the 1930s. The tritiated thymidine beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test (BeLPT) is an in vitro blood test that is widely used to screen beryllium exposed workers in the nuclear industry for sensitivity to beryllium. The clinical significance of the BeLPT was described and a standard protocol was developed in the late 1980s. Cell proliferation is measured by the incorporation of tritiated thymidine into dividing cells on two culture dates and using three concentrations of beryllium sulfate. Results are expressed as a 'stimulation index' (SI) which is the ratio of the amount of tritiated thymidine (measured by beta counts) in the simulated cells divided by the counts for the unstimulated cells on the same culture day. Several statistical methods for use in the routine analysis of the BeLPT were proposed in the early 1990s. The least absolute values (LAV) method was recommended for routine analysis of the BeLPT. This report further evaluates the LAV method using new data, and proposes a new method for identification of an abnormal or borderline test. This new statistical-biological positive (SBP) method reflects the clinical judgment that: (i) at least two SIs show a 'positive' response to beryllium; and (ii) that the maximum of the six SIs must exceed a cut-point that is determined from a reference data set of normal individuals whose blood has been tested by the same method in the same serum. The new data is from the Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge (Y-12) and consists of 1080 workers and 33 non-exposed control BeLPTs (all tested in the same serum). Graphical results are presented to explain the statistical method, and the new SBP method is applied to the Y-12 group. The true positive rate and specificity of the new method were estimated to be 86% and 97%, respectively. An electronic notebook that is accessible via the Internet was used in

  19. Discrepancies between Aedes aegypti identification in the field and in the laboratory after collection with a sticky trap

    PubMed Central

    Maciel-de-Freitas, Rafael; Lima, Arthur Weiss da Silva; Araújo, Simone Costa; Lima, José Bento Pereira; Galardo, Allan Kardec Ribeiro; Honório, Nildimar Alves; Braga, Ima Aparecida; Coelho, Giovanini Evelim; Codeço, Claudia Torres; Valle, Denise

    2014-01-01

    Currently, sticky traps are regularly employed to assist in the surveillance of Aedes aegypti infestation. We tested two alternative procedures for specimen identification performed by local health agents: directly in the field, as recommended by certain manufacturers, or after transportation to the laboratory. A total of 384 sticky traps (MosquiTRAP) were monitored monthly during one year in four geographically representative Brazilian municipalities. When the same samples were inspected in the field and in the laboratory, large differences were noted in the total number of mosquitoes recorded and in the number of specimens identified as Ae. aegypti by both procedures. Although field identification has the potential to speed vector surveillance, these results point to uncertainties in the evaluated protocol. PMID:25317711

  20. Development of toxicant identification procedures for whole sediment toxicity tests

    SciTech Connect

    Mount, D.R.; Henke, C.E.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Besser, J.M.; Ankley, G.T.; Norberg-King, T.J.; West, C.W.

    1995-12-31

    To effectively assess and manage contaminated sediments, identifying the specific contaminants responsible for sediment toxicity is highly desirable. Though effective toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) methods are well established for water column toxicity, new TIE methodologies are needed that address the special characteristics of whole sediment toxicity tests. Much of the effort to date has focused on the assessment of ammonia toxicity. Whereas pH manipulation is a key tool used to characterize ammonia toxicity in water column TIE, control of pH in interstitial water is much more challenging. Direct addition of hard acid has shown undesirable side effects (e.g., liberation and oxidation of iron), while CO{sub 2}-enrichment is limited in penetration of fine-grained sediments. Biological buffers (MES and POPSO) incorporated into the sediment are effective at altering interstitial pH without causing direct toxicity to Chironomus tentans, Lumbriculus variegatus, and to a lesser extent Hyalella azteca, but the range of pH control achieved has been small ({+-} 0.5 units). Introduction of aquatic plants reduces ammonia concentrations in the water column, but may not provide sufficient control of interstitial water. To date, the most promising results have been achieved using zeolite; adding zeolite to sediment produces moderate reductions in interstitial ammonia concentrations and is non-toxic to the organisms referenced above. Attempts to induce microbial removal of ammonia have been unsuccessful thus far. This presentation will review these and other sediment TIE methods currently under development in laboratories.

  1. Negative symptoms of schizophrenia correlate with impairment on the University of Pennsylvania smell identification test.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, Koko; Tajinda, Katsunori; Colantuoni, Carlo; Morita, Masahiko; Winicki, Jessica; Le, Cindy; Lin, Sandra; Schretlen, David; Sawa, Akira; Cascella, Nicola G

    2010-01-01

    Deficits in odor identification have been most frequently described in schizophrenia (SZ). A relationship between dysfunction in odor identification and negative symptoms of SZ has also been reported. Furthermore, deficit SZ (a subtype of the illness with primary, enduring negative symptoms) has been found to be associated with a particularly poor performance on odor identification tests indicating that deficits in smell identification could be differentially expressed in some subtypes of SZ. We describe correlations of performance on smell identification with positive and negative symptoms of SZ. Patients with SZ (n=15) and normal controls (n=19) were tested by the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT). Psychopathology was assessed with the Scales for the Assessment of Positive and Negative Symptoms (SAPS and SANS). SZ patients performed more poorly on the UPSIT test than did normal controls. Consistent with previous findings, we observed a correlation of SANS with UPSIT performance. In particular, specific subdomains of SANS, such as blunted affect, apathy and anhedonia, were associated with odor identification deficits. Furthermore, UPSIT score predicts these subdomains of negative symptoms. No correlation was observed between positive symptom and odor identification deficits. Our study further reinforces a relation between olfactory identification deficit and negative symptoms in SZ and suggests that smell identification could be a candidate endophenotype relevant to negative symptoms of SZ.

  2. Field Lysimeter Test Facility: Second year (FY 1989) test results

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, M.D.; Gee, G.W.; Kanyid, M.J.; Rockhold, M.L.

    1990-04-01

    The Record of Decision associated with the Hanford Defense Waste Environmental Impact Statement (53 FR 12449-53) commits to an evaluation of the use of protective barriers placed over near-surface wastes. The barrier must protect against wind and water erosion and limit plant and animal intrusion and infiltration of water. Successful conclusion of this program will yield the necessary protective barrier design for near-surface waste isolation. This report presents results from the second year of tests at the FLTF. The primary objective of testing protective barriers at the FLTF was to measure the water budgets within the various barriers and assess the effectiveness of their designs in limiting water intrusion into the zone beneath each barrier. Information obtained from these measurements is intended for use in refining barrier designs. Four elements of water budget were measured during the year: precipitation, evaporation, storage, and drainage. Run-off, which is a fifth element of a complete water budget, was made negligible by a lip on the lysimeters that protrudes 5 cm above the soil surface to prevent run-off. A secondary objective of testing protective barriers at the FLTF was to refine procedures and equipment to support data collection for verification of the computer model needed for long-term projections of barrier performance. 6 refs.

  3. Hydro-Balanced Stuffing Box field test

    SciTech Connect

    Giangiacomo, L.A.

    1999-05-28

    The Hydro-Balanced Stuffing Box is a seal assembly for polished rod pumping installations commonly used in oil and gas pumping well installations to contain produced well fluids. The improved stuffing box was developed and patented by Harold H. Palmour of The Palmour Group of Livingston, TX. The stuffing box is designed to reduce the incidence of seal leakage and to utilize an environmentally safe fluid, so that if there is any leakage, environmental damage is reduced or eliminated. The unit was tested on two wells at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center. During the test period, the performance of the stuffing box was measured by monitoring the pressure on the tubing and the inner chamber with a Barton Two-pen recorder. The amount of safe fluid consumed, fluid leakage at the top of the stuffing box, pressure supplied from the nitrogen bottle, ambient temperature, and polish rod temperature was recorded. The stuffing box is capable of providing a better seal between well fluids an d the environment than conventional stuffing boxes. It allows the polished rod to operate cooler and with lubrication, extending the life of the packing elements, and reducing the amount of attention required to prevent leakage.

  4. Reliability and validity of a talent identification test battery for seated and standing Paralympic throws.

    PubMed

    Spathis, Jemima Grace; Connick, Mark James; Beckman, Emma Maree; Newcombe, Peter Anthony; Tweedy, Sean Michael

    2015-01-01

    Paralympic throwing events for athletes with physical impairments comprise seated and standing javelin, shot put, discus and seated club throwing. Identification of talented throwers would enable prediction of future success and promote participation; however, a valid and reliable talent identification battery for Paralympic throwing has not been reported. This study evaluates the reliability and validity of a talent identification battery for Paralympic throws. Participants were non-disabled so that impairment would not confound analyses, and results would provide an indication of normative performance. Twenty-eight non-disabled participants (13 M; 15 F) aged 23.6 years (±5.44) performed five kinematically distinct criterion throws (three seated, two standing) and nine talent identification tests (three anthropometric, six motor); 23 were tested a second time to evaluate test-retest reliability. Talent identification test-retest reliability was evaluated using Intra-class Correlation Coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman plots (Limits of Agreement). Spearman's correlation assessed strength of association between criterion throws and talent identification tests. Reliability was generally acceptable (mean ICC = 0.89), but two seated talent identification tests require more extensive familiarisation. Correlation strength (mean rs = 0.76) indicated that the talent identification tests can be used to validly identify individuals with competitively advantageous attributes for each of the five kinematically distinct throwing activities. Results facilitate further research in this understudied area.

  5. FSA field test report, 1980 - 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maxwell, H. G.; Grimmett, C. A.; Repar, J.; Frickland, P. O.; Amy, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    Photovoltaic modules made of new and developing materials were tested in a continuing study of weatherability, compatibility, and corrosion protection. Over a two-year period, 365 two-cell submodules have been exposed for various intervals at three outdoor sites in Southern California or subjected to laboratory acceptance tests. Results to date show little loss of maximum power output, except in two types of modules. In the first of these, failure is due to cell fracture from the stresses that arise as water is regained from the surrounding air by a hardboard substrate, which shrank as it dried during its encapsulation in plastic film at 150 C in vacuo. In the second, the glass superstrate is sensitive to cracking, which also damages the cells electrostatically bonded to it; inadequate bonding of interconnects to the cells is also a problem in these modules. In a third type of module, a polyurethane pottant has begun to yellow, though as yet without significant effect on maximum power output.

  6. Vadose zone transport field study: Detailed test plan for simulated leak tests

    SciTech Connect

    AL Ward; GW Gee

    2000-06-23

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project Science and Technology initiative was created in FY 1999 to reduce the uncertainty associated with vadose zone transport processes beneath waste sites at DOE's Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. This information is needed not only to evaluate the risks from transport, but also to support the adoption of measures for minimizing impacts to the groundwater and surrounding environment. The principal uncertainties in vadose zone transport are the current distribution of source contaminants and the natural heterogeneity of the soil in which the contaminants reside. Oversimplified conceptual models resulting from these uncertainties and limited use of hydrologic characterization and monitoring technologies have hampered the understanding contaminant migration through Hanford's vadose zone. Essential prerequisites for reducing vadose transport uncertainly include the development of accurate conceptual models and the development or adoption of monitoring techniques capable of delineating the current distributions of source contaminants and characterizing natural site heterogeneity. The Vadose Zone Transport Field Study (VZTFS) was conceived as part of the initiative to address the major uncertainties confronting vadose zone fate and transport predictions at the Hanford Site and to overcome the limitations of previous characterization attempts. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is managing the VZTFS for DOE. The VZTFS will conduct field investigations that will improve the understanding of field-scale transport and lead to the development or identification of efficient and cost-effective characterization methods. Ideally, these methods will capture the extent of contaminant plumes using existing infrastructure (i.e., more than 1,300 steel-cased boreholes). The objectives of the VZTFS are to conduct controlled transport experiments at well-instrumented field sites at Hanford to

  7. Test of QED at critical field strength

    SciTech Connect

    Bula, C.

    1997-01-01

    In a new experiment at the Final Focus Test Beam at SLAC, a low-emittance 46.6 GeV electron beam is brought into collisions with terawatt pulses of 1054 nm or 527 nm wavelength from a Nd:glass laser. Peak laser intensities of 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} have been achieved corresponding to a value of 0.6 for the parameter {eta} = e{epsilon}/m{omega}{sub 0}c. In this case, an electron that crosses the center of the laser pulse has near-unit interaction probability. Results are presented for multiphoton Compton scattering in which an electron interacts with up to four laser photons, in agreement with theoretical calculations.

  8. Brahms Mobile Agents: Architecture and Field Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancey, William J.; Sierhuis, Maarten; Kaskiris, Charis; vanHoof, Ron

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a model-based, distributed architecture that integrates diverse components in a system designed for lunar and planetary surface operations: an astronaut's space suit, cameras, rover/All-Terrain Vehicle (ATV), robotic assistant, other personnel in a local habitat, and a remote mission support team (with time delay). Software processes, called agents, implemented in the Brahms language, run on multiple, mobile platforms. These mobile agents interpret and transform available data to help people and robotic systems coordinate their actions to make operations more safe and efficient. The Brahms-based mobile agent architecture (MAA) uses a novel combination of agent types so the software agents may understand and facilitate communications between people and between system components. A state-of-the-art spoken dialogue interface is integrated with Brahms models, supporting a speech-driven field observation record and rover command system (e.g., return here later and bring this back to the habitat ). This combination of agents, rover, and model-based spoken dialogue interface constitutes a personal assistant. An important aspect of the methodology involves first simulating the entire system in Brahms, then configuring the agents into a run-time system.

  9. Flight Test Identification and Simulation of a UH-60A Helicopter and Slung Load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cicolani, Luigi S.; Sahai, Ranjana; Tucker, George E.; McCoy, Allen H.; Tyson, Peter H.; Tischler, Mark B.; Rosen, Aviv

    2001-01-01

    Helicopter slung-load operations are common in both military and civil contexts. Helicopters and loads are often qualified for these operations by means of flight tests, which can be expensive and time consuming. There is significant potential to reduce such costs both through revisions in flight-test methods and by using validated simulation models. To these ends, flight tests were conducted at Moffett Field to demonstrate the identification of key dynamic parameters during flight tests (aircraft stability margins and handling-qualities parameters, and load pendulum stability), and to accumulate a data base for simulation development and validation. The test aircraft was a UH-60A Black Hawk, and the primary test load was an instrumented 8- by 6- by 6-ft cargo container. Tests were focused on the lateral and longitudinal axes, which are the axes most affected by the load pendulum modes in the frequency range of interest for handling qualities; tests were conducted at airspeeds from hover to 80 knots. Using telemetered data, the dynamic parameters were evaluated in near real time after each test airspeed and before clearing the aircraft to the next test point. These computations were completed in under 1 min. A simulation model was implemented by integrating an advanced model of the UH-60A aerodynamics, dynamic equations for the two-body slung-load system, and load static aerodynamics obtained from wind-tunnel measurements. Comparisons with flight data for the helicopter alone and with a slung load showed good overall agreement for all parameters and test points; however, unmodeled secondary dynamic losses around 2 Hz were found in the helicopter model and they resulted in conservative stability margin estimates.

  10. Identification of in-field defect development in digital image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudas, Jozsef; Wu, Linda M.; Jung, Cory; Chapman, Glenn H.; Koren, Zahava; Koren, Israel

    2007-02-01

    Although solid-state image sensors are known to develop defects in the field, little information is available about the nature, quantity or development rate of these defects. We report on and algorithm and calibration tests, which confirmed the existence of significant quantities of in-field defects in 4 out of 5 high-end digital cameras. Standard hot pixels were identified in all 4 cameras. Stuck hot pixels, which have not been described previously, were identified in 2 cameras. Previously, hot-pixels were thought to have no impact at short exposure durations, but the large offset of stuck hot pixels will degrade almost any image and cannot be ignored. Fully-stuck and abnormal sensitivity defects were not found. Spatial investigation found no clustering. We tracked hot pixel growth over the lifetime of one camera, using only normal photographs. We show that defects develop continually over the lifetime of the sensor, starting within several months of first use, and do not heal over time. Our success in tracing the history of each defect confirms the feasibility of using automatic defect identification to analyze defect response and growth characteristics in a multitude of cameras already in the field, without performing additional experiments or requiring physical access to the cameras.

  11. A comparative overview of modal testing and system identification for control of structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, J.-N.; Pappa, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    A comparative overview is presented of the disciplines of modal testing used in structural engineering and system identification used in control theory. A list of representative references from both areas is given, and the basic methods are described briefly. Recent progress on the interaction of modal testing and control disciplines is discussed. It is concluded that combined efforts of researchers in both disciplines are required for unification of modal testing and system identification methods for control of flexible structures.

  12. Test ion transport in a collisional, field-reversed configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, T.; McWilliams, R.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Bolte, N.; Garate, E. P.; Morehouse, M.; Slepchenkov, M.; Wessel, F.

    2014-08-01

    Diffusion of test-ions in a flux-coil generated, collisional, field-reversed configuration is measured via time-resolved tomographic reconstruction of Ar+ optical emission in the predominantly nitrogen plasma. Azimuthal test ion diffusion across magnetic field lines is found to be classical during the stable period of the discharge. Test ion radial confinement is enhanced by a radial electric field, reducing the observed outward radial transport rate below predictions based solely on classical cross-field diffusion rates. Test ion diffusion is ˜500 m2 s-1 during the stable period of the discharge. The electric field inferred from plasma potential measurements and from equilibrium calculations is consistent with the observed reduction in argon transport.

  13. Designing an Online In-House Major Field Learning Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilda, Agacer; Christofi, Andreas; Moliver, Donald

    2014-01-01

    Our paper provides some critical attributes of an online homegrown assessment test, which we labelled Major Field Learning Test (MFLT). These attributes are also valid for departmental tests, directly connected to coursework which makes up the MFLT. The paper provides helpful recommendations for online assessment of learning as well as retention…

  14. Field tests of transgenic barley lines in North Dakota

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Testing transgenic barley lines for FHB in the greenhouse does not necessarily give the same results as field tests. The objective of this project was to test 18 transgenic lines in replicated trials in an inoculated FHB nursery. Several programs have developed barley lines expressing anti-fungal a...

  15. Probe Station and Near-Field Scanner for Testing Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, Afroz; Lee, Richard Q.; Darby, William G.; Barr, Philip J.; Miranda, Felix A.; Lambert, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    A facility that includes a probe station and a scanning open-ended waveguide probe for measuring near electromagnetic fields has been added to Glenn Research Center's suite of antenna-testing facilities, at a small fraction of the cost of the other facilities. This facility is designed specifically for nondestructive characterization of the radiation patterns of miniaturized microwave antennas fabricated on semiconductor and dielectric wafer substrates, including active antennas that are difficult to test in traditional antenna-testing ranges because of fragility, smallness, or severity of DC-bias or test-fixture requirements. By virtue of the simple fact that a greater fraction of radiated power can be captured in a near-field measurement than in a conventional far-field measurement, this near-field facility is convenient for testing miniaturized antennas with low gains.

  16. Flight test planning and parameter extraction for rotorcraft system identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. C.; Demiroz, M. Y.; Talbot, P. D.

    1986-01-01

    The present study is concerned with the mathematical modelling of aircraft dynamics on the basis of an investigation conducted with the aid of the Rotor System Research Aircraft (RSRA). The particular characteristics of RSRA make it possible to investigate aircraft properties which cannot be readily studied elsewhere, for example in the wind tunnel. The considered experiment had mainly the objective to develop an improved understanding of the physics of rotor flapping dynamics and rotor loads in maneuvers. The employed approach is based on a utilization of parameter identification methodology (PID) with application to helicopters. A better understanding of the contribution of the main rotor to the overall aircraft forces and moments is also to be obtained. Attention is given to the mathematical model of a rotorcraft system, an integrated identification method, flight data processing, and the identification of RSRA mathematical models.

  17. Validation studies of an immunochromatographic 1-step test for the forensic identification of human blood.

    PubMed

    Hochmeister, M N; Budowle, B; Sparkes, R; Rudin, O; Gehrig, C; Thali, M; Schmidt, L; Cordier, A; Dirnhofer, R

    1999-05-01

    An immunochromatographic 1-step test for the detection of fecal occult blood was evaluated for applicability for the forensic identification of human blood in stained material. The following experiments were conducted: 1) determination of the sensitivity and specificity of the assay; 2) evaluation of different extraction media for bloodstains (sterile water, Tris buffer pH 7.5 provided in the test kit, 5% ammonia); 3) analysis of biological samples subjected to a variety of environmental insults; and 4) evaluation of casework samples. This immunochromatographic 1-step occult blood test is specific for human (primate) hemoglobin and is at least an order of magnitude more sensitive than previous methods for detecting human hemoglobin in bloodstains. The antigen is insensitive to a variety of environmental insults, except for exposure to certain detergents and household bleaches and prolonged exposure to certain preparations of luminol. The entire assay can be conducted in field testing conditions within minutes. When in the laboratory the supernatant from a DNA extraction is used for the assay, there is essentially no consumption of DNA for determining the presence of human hemoglobin in a forensic sample. The data demonstrate that this test is robust and suitable for forensic analyses.

  18. Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Tests; Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, A.L.; Beatty, J.; Buscheck, T.A.; Carlson, R.; Daily, W.; LaTorre, V.R.; Lee, K.; Lin, Wunan; Mao, Nai-hsien; Nitao, J.J.; Towse, D.; Ueng, Tzou-Shin; Watwood, D.; Wilder, D.

    1989-07-26

    This paper presents selected preliminary results obtained during the first 54 days of the Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Tests (PEBSFT) that are being performed in G-Tunnel within the Nevada Test Site. The test described is a precursor to the Engineered Barrier Systems Field Tests (EBSFT). The EBSFT will consist of in situ tests of the geohydrologic and geochemical environment in the near field (within a few meters) of heaters emplaced in welded tuff to simulate the thermal effects of waste packages. The PEBSFTs are being conducted to evaluate the applicability of measurement techniques, numerical models, and procedures for future investigations that will be conducted in the Exploratory Shaft Facilities of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). The paper discusses the evolution of hydrothermal behavior during the prototype test, including rock temperatures, changes in rock moisture content, air permeability of fractures, gas pressures, and rock mass gas-phase humidity. 10 refs., 12 figs.

  19. Star Identification Without Attitude Knowledge: Testing with X-Ray Timing Experiment Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ketchum, Eleanor

    1997-01-01

    As the budget for the scientific exploration of space shrinks, the need for more autonomous spacecraft increases. For a spacecraft with a star tracker, the ability to determinate attitude from a lost in space state autonomously requires the capability to identify the stars in the field of view of the tracker. Although there have been efforts to produce autonomous star trackers which perform this function internally, many programs cannot afford these sensors. The author previously presented a method for identifying stars without a priori attitude knowledge specifically targeted for onboard computers as it minimizes the necessary computer storage. The method has previously been tested with simulated data. This paper provides results of star identification without a priori attitude knowledge using flight data from two 8 by 8 degree charge coupled device star trackers onboard the X-Ray Timing Experiment.

  20. Field-based physiological testing of wheelchair athletes.

    PubMed

    Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L; Leicht, Christof A

    2013-02-01

    The volume of literature on field-based physiological testing of wheelchair sports, such as basketball, rugby and tennis, is considerably smaller when compared with that available for individuals and team athletes in able-bodied (AB) sports. In analogy to the AB literature, it is recognized that performance in wheelchair sports not only relies on fitness, but also sport-specific skills, experience and technical proficiency. However, in contrast to AB sports, two major components contribute towards 'wheeled sports' performance, which are the athlete and the wheelchair. It is the interaction of these two that enable wheelchair propulsion and the sporting movements required within a given sport. Like any other athlete, participants of wheelchair sports are looking for efficient ways to train and/or analyse their technique and fitness to improve their performance. Consequently, laboratory and/or field-based physiological monitoring tools used at regular intervals at key time points throughout the year must be considered to help with training evaluation. The present review examines methods available in the literature to assess wheelchair sports fitness in a field-based environment, with special attention on outcome variables, validity and reliability issues, and non-physiological influences on performance. It also lays out the context of field-based testing by providing details about the Paralympic court sports and the impacts of a disability on sporting performance. Due to the limited availability of specialized equipment for testing wheelchair-dependent participants in the laboratory, the adoption of field-based testing has become the preferred option by team coaches of wheelchair athletes. An obvious advantage of field-based testing is that large groups of athletes can be tested in less time. Furthermore, athletes are tested in their natural environment (using their normal sports wheelchair set-up and floor surface), potentially making the results of such testing

  1. Field-based physiological testing of wheelchair athletes.

    PubMed

    Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L; Leicht, Christof A

    2013-02-01

    The volume of literature on field-based physiological testing of wheelchair sports, such as basketball, rugby and tennis, is considerably smaller when compared with that available for individuals and team athletes in able-bodied (AB) sports. In analogy to the AB literature, it is recognized that performance in wheelchair sports not only relies on fitness, but also sport-specific skills, experience and technical proficiency. However, in contrast to AB sports, two major components contribute towards 'wheeled sports' performance, which are the athlete and the wheelchair. It is the interaction of these two that enable wheelchair propulsion and the sporting movements required within a given sport. Like any other athlete, participants of wheelchair sports are looking for efficient ways to train and/or analyse their technique and fitness to improve their performance. Consequently, laboratory and/or field-based physiological monitoring tools used at regular intervals at key time points throughout the year must be considered to help with training evaluation. The present review examines methods available in the literature to assess wheelchair sports fitness in a field-based environment, with special attention on outcome variables, validity and reliability issues, and non-physiological influences on performance. It also lays out the context of field-based testing by providing details about the Paralympic court sports and the impacts of a disability on sporting performance. Due to the limited availability of specialized equipment for testing wheelchair-dependent participants in the laboratory, the adoption of field-based testing has become the preferred option by team coaches of wheelchair athletes. An obvious advantage of field-based testing is that large groups of athletes can be tested in less time. Furthermore, athletes are tested in their natural environment (using their normal sports wheelchair set-up and floor surface), potentially making the results of such testing

  2. Photovoltaic-Powered Vaccine Refrigerator: Freezer Systems Field Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratajczak, A. F.

    1985-01-01

    A project to develop and field test photovoltaic-powered refrigerator/freezers suitable for vaccine storage was undertaken. Three refrigerator/freezers were qualified; one by Solar Power Corp. and two by Solvolt. Follow-on contracts were awarded for 19 field test systems and for 10 field test systems. A total of 29 systems were installed in 24 countries between October 1981 and October 1984. The project, systems descriptions, installation experiences, performance data for the 22 systems for which field test data was reported, an operational reliability summary, and recommendations relative to system designs and future use of such systems are explained. Performance data indicate that the systems are highly reliable and are capable of maintaining proper vaccine storage temperatures in a wide range of climatological and user environments.

  3. Photovoltaic-powered vaccine refrigerator: Freezer systems field test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratajczak, A. F.

    1985-08-01

    A project to develop and field test photovoltaic-powered refrigerator/freezers suitable for vaccine storage was undertaken. Three refrigerator/freezers were qualified; one by Solar Power Corp. and two by Solvolt. Follow-on contracts were awarded for 19 field test systems and for 10 field test systems. A total of 29 systems were installed in 24 countries between October 1981 and October 1984. The project, systems descriptions, installation experiences, performance data for the 22 systems for which field test data was reported, an operational reliability summary, and recommendations relative to system designs and future use of such systems are explained. Performance data indicate that the systems are highly reliable and are capable of maintaining proper vaccine storage temperatures in a wide range of climatological and user environments.

  4. STIS Sparse Field CTE test-internal {Cycle 12}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudfrooij, Paul

    2003-07-01

    CTE measurements are made using the "internal sparse field test", along the parallel axis. The "POS=" optional parameter, introduced during cycle 11, is used to provide off-center MSM positionings of some slits. All exposures are internals.

  5. STIS Sparse Field CTE test-internal {Cycle 11}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudfrooij, Paul

    2002-07-01

    CTE measurements are made using the "internal sparse field test", along the parallel axis. The new "POS=" optional parameter is used to provide off-center MSM positionings of some slits. All exposures are internals.

  6. Field Testing Research at the NWTC (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2015-02-01

    The National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Laboratory (NREL) has extensive field testing capabilities that have been used in collaboration with the wind industry to accelerate wind technology development and deployment for more than 30 years.

  7. Identification and Validation of a Brief Test Anxiety Screening Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von der Embse, Nathaniel P.; Kilgus, Stephen P.; Segool, Natasha; Putwain, Dave

    2013-01-01

    The implementation of test-based accountability policies around the world has increased the pressure placed on students to perform well on state achievement tests. Educational researchers have begun taking a closer look at the reciprocal effects of test anxiety and high-stakes testing. However, existing test anxiety assessments lack efficiency and…

  8. The Center-TRACON Automation System: Simulation and field testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denery, Dallas G.; Erzberger, Heinz

    1995-01-01

    A new concept for air traffic management in the terminal area, implemented as the Center-TRACON Automation System, has been under development at NASA Ames in a cooperative program with the FAA since 1991. The development has been strongly influenced by concurrent simulation and field site evaluations. The role of simulation and field activities in the development process will be discussed. Results of recent simulation and field tests will be presented.

  9. Identification of wind fields for wave modeling near Qatar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Sashikant; Balan Sobhana, Sandeepan; Panchang, Vijay

    2016-04-01

    Due to the development of coastal and offshore infrastructure in and around the Arabian Gulf, a large semi-enclosed sea, knowledge of met-ocean factors like prevailing wind systems, wind generated waves, and currents etc. are of great importance. Primarily it is important to identify the wind fields that are used as forcing functions for wave and circulation models for hindcasting and forecasting purposes. The present study investigates the effects of using two sources of wind-fields on the modeling of wind-waves in the Arabian Gulf, in particular near the coastal regions of Qatar. Two wind sources are considered here, those obtained from ECMWF and those generated by us using the WRF model. The wave model SWAN was first forced with the 6 hourly ERA Interim daily winds (from ECMWF) having spatial resolution of 0.125°. For the second option, wind fields were generated by us using the mesoscale wind model (WRF) with a high spatial resolution (0.1°) at every 30 minute intervals. The simulations were carried out for a period of two months (7th October-7th December, 2015) during which measurements were available from two moored buoys (deployed and operated by the Qatar Meteorological Department), one in the north of Qatar ("Qatar North", in water depth of 58.7 m) and other in the south ("Shiraouh Island", in water depth of 16.64 m). This period included a high-sea event on 11-12th of October, recorded by the two buoys where the significant wave heights (Hs) reached as high as 2.9 m (i.e. max wave height H ~ 5.22 m) and 1.9 (max wave height H ~ 3.4 m) respectively. Model results were compared with the data for this period. The scatter index (SI) of the Hs simulated using the WRF wind fields and the observed Hs was found to be about 30% and 32% for the two buoys (total period). The observed Hs were generally reproduced but there was consistent underestimation. (Maximum 27% for the high-sea event). For the Hs obtained with ERA interim wind fields, the underestimation was

  10. A novel fluorescence in situ hybridization test for rapid pathogen identification in positive blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Makristathis, A; Riss, S; Hirschl, A M

    2014-10-01

    A novel molecular beacon-based fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) test allowing for the identification of a wide range of bacterial pathogens directly in positive blood cultures (BCs) was evaluated with positive BCs of 152 patients. Depending on the Gram stain, either a Gram-negative or a Gram-positive panel was used. The time to result was 30 min, and the hands-on time was only 10 min. Seven per cent of the cultured microorganisms were not included in the FISH panels; the identification rate of those included was 95.2%. Overall, the FISH test enabled accurate pathogen identification in 88.2% of all cases analysed.

  11. Rapid and field-deployable biological and chemical Raman-based identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botonjic-Sehic, Edita; Paxon, Tracy L.; Boudries, Hacene

    2011-06-01

    Pathogen detection using Raman spectroscopy is achieved through the use of a sandwich immunoassay. Antibody-modified magnetic beads are used to capture and concentrate target analytes in solution and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) tags are conjugated with antibodies and act as labels to enable specific detection of biological pathogens. The rapid detection of biological pathogens is critical to first responders, thus assays to detect E.Coli and Anthrax have been developed and will be reported. The problems associated with pathogen detection resulting from the spectral complexity and variability of microorganisms are overcome through the use of SERS tags, which provide an intense, easily recognizable, and spectrally consistent Raman signal. The developed E. coli assay has been tested with 5 strains of E. coli and shows a low limit of detection, on the order of 10 and 100 c.f.u. per assay. Additionally, the SERS assay utilizes magnetic beads to collect the labeled pathogens into the focal point of the detection laser beam, making the assay robust to commonly encountered white powder interferants such as flour, baking powder, and corn starch. The reagents were also found to be stable at room temperature over extended periods of time with testing conducted over a one year period. Finally, through a specialized software algorithm, the assays are interfaced to the Raman instrument, StreetLab Mobile, for rapid-field-deployable biological identification.

  12. Results of field tests of a transportable calorimeter assay system

    SciTech Connect

    Rakel, D.A.; Lemming, J.F.; Rodenburg, W.W.; Duff, M.F.; Jarvis, J.Y.

    1981-01-01

    A transportable calorimetric assay system, developed for use by US Department of Energy inspectors, is described. The results of field tests at three DOE sites are presented. The samples measured in these tests represent a variety of forms (ash, oxide, metal buttons), isotopic composition, and total plutonium content.

  13. Differential Gender Performance on the Major Field Test-Business

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bielinska-Kwapisz, Agnieszka; Brown, F. William

    2013-01-01

    The Major Field Test in Business (MFT-B), a standardized assessment test of business knowledge among undergraduate business seniors, is widely used to measure student achievement. Many previous studies analyzing scores on the MFT-B report gender differences on the exam even after controlling for student's aptitude, general intellectual…

  14. Documenting and Explaining Major Field Test Results among Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Contreras, Salvador; Badua, Frank; Chen, Jiun Shiu; Adrian, Mitchell

    2011-01-01

    The authors investigated the results of the Educational Testing Service Major Field Test (ETS-MFT) administered to business majors at a U.S. state university. Longitudinal trends and cross-sectional differences are documented, including significant performance differences among students of different majors. Findings suggest that a cohort affect…

  15. Identification of nematic superconductivity from the upper critical field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venderbos, Jörn W. F.; Kozii, Vladyslav; Fu, Liang

    2016-09-01

    Recent nuclear magnetic resonance and specific heat measurements have provided concurring evidence of spontaneously broken rotational symmetry in the superconducting state of the doped topological insulator CuxBi2Se3 . This suggests that the pairing symmetry corresponds to a two-dimensional representation of the D3 d crystal point group, and that CuxBi2Se3 is a nematic superconductor. In this paper, we present a comprehensive study of the upper critical field Hc 2 of nematic superconductors within Ginzburg-Landau (GL) theory. Contrary to typical GL theories which have an emergent U(1) rotational symmetry obscuring the discrete symmetry of the crystal, the theory of two-component superconductors in trigonal D3 d crystals reflects the true crystal rotation symmetry. This has direct implications for the upper critical field. First, Hc 2 of trigonal superconductors with D3 d symmetry exhibits a sixfold anisotropy in the basal plane. Second, when the degeneracy of the two components is lifted by, e.g., uniaxial strain, Hc 2 exhibits a twofold anisotropy with characteristic angle and temperature dependence. Our thorough study shows that measurement of the upper critical field is a direct method of detecting nematic superconductivity, which is directly applicable to recently-discovered trigonal superconductors CuxBi2Se3 , SrxBi2Se3 , NbxBi2Se3 , and TlxBi2Te3 .

  16. Magnetic field exposure in a nondestructive testing operation.

    PubMed

    Lippert, Julia F; Lacey, Steven E; Kennedy, Kathleen J; Esmen, Nurtan A; Buchanich, Jeanine M; Marsh, Gary M

    2007-01-01

    Nondestructive testing is any technique used to inspect the integrity of a manufactured item without diminishing its future usefulness. Magnetic particle inspection is one type of nondestructive testing that uses electromagnetism in the inspection procedure, thus potentially exposing the operator to magnetic fields. During magnetic particle inspection, investigators took peak magnetic field measurements of 8 turbine engine shafts at a turbine engine overhaul and repair center. They recorded 95 peak magnetic field measurements, ranging from < 0.1 to 29.27 mT. The exposure values measured were among the highest reported in the occupational setting. Further work is needed to characterize magnetic field exposures in magnetic particle inspection operations--in particular, by differentiating magnetic field magnitude by current frequency--and to understand exposure as it relates to different types of magnetic particle inspection devices.

  17. Automated particulate sampler field test model operations guide

    SciTech Connect

    Bowyer, S.M.; Miley, H.S.

    1996-10-01

    The Automated Particulate Sampler Field Test Model Operations Guide is a collection of documents which provides a complete picture of the Automated Particulate Sampler (APS) and the Field Test in which it was evaluated. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Automated Particulate Sampler was developed for the purpose of radionuclide particulate monitoring for use under the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). Its design was directed by anticipated requirements of small size, low power consumption, low noise level, fully automatic operation, and most predominantly the sensitivity requirements of the Conference on Disarmament Working Paper 224 (CDWP224). This guide is intended to serve as both a reference document for the APS and to provide detailed instructions on how to operate the sampler. This document provides a complete description of the APS Field Test Model and all the activity related to its evaluation and progression.

  18. Frequency-domain identification of aircraft structural modes from short-duration flight tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vayssettes, J.; Mercère, G.; Vacher, P.; De Callafon, R. A.

    2014-07-01

    This article presents identification algorithms dedicated to the modal analysis of civil aircraft structures during in-flight flutter tests. This particular operational framework implies several specifications for the identification procedure. To comply with these requirements, the identification problem is formulated in the frequency domain as an output-error problem. Iterative identification methods based on structured matrix fraction descriptions are used to solve this problem and to identify a continuous-time model. These iterative methods are specifically designed to deal with experiments where short-duration tests with multiple-input excitations are used. These algorithms are first discussed and then evaluated through a simulation example illustrative of the in-flight modal analysis of a civil aircraft. Based on these evaluation results, an efficient iterative algorithm is suggested and applied to real flight-test data measured on board a military aircraft.

  19. Full-Field Strain Measurement On Titanium Welds And Local Elasto-Plastic Identification With The Virtual Fields Method

    SciTech Connect

    Tattoli, F.; Casavola, C.; Pierron, F.; Rotinat, R.; Pappalettere, C.

    2011-01-17

    One of the main problems in welding is the microstructural transformation within the area affected by the thermal history. The resulting heterogeneous microstructure within the weld nugget and the heat affected zones is often associated with changes in local material properties. The present work deals with the identification of material parameters governing the elasto--plastic behaviour of the fused and heat affected zones as well as the base material for titanium hybrid welded joints (Ti6Al4V alloy). The material parameters are identified from heterogeneous strain fields with the Virtual Fields Method. This method is based on a relevant use of the principle of virtual work and it has been shown to be useful and much less time consuming than classical finite element model updating approaches applied to similar problems. The paper will present results and discuss the problem of selection of the weld zones for the identification.

  20. Identification and Characterization of Pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica Isolates by PCR and Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Thisted Lambertz, S.; Danielsson-Tham, M.-L.

    2005-01-01

    Approximately 550 to 600 yersiniosis patients are reported annually in Sweden. Although pigs are thought to be the main reservoir of food-borne pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica, the role of pork meat as a vehicle for transmission to humans is still unclear. Pork meat collected from refrigerators and local shops frequented by yersiniosis patients (n = 48) were examined for the presence of pathogenic Yersinia spp. A combined culture and PCR method was used for detection, and a multiplex PCR was developed and evaluated as a tool for efficient identification of pathogenic food and patient isolates. The results obtained with the multiplex PCR were compared to phenotypic test results and confirmed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). In all, 118 pork products (91 raw and 27 ready-to-eat) were collected. Pathogenic Yersinia spp. were detected by PCR in 10% (9 of 91) of the raw pork samples (loin of pork, fillet of pork, pork chop, ham, and minced meat) but in none of the ready-to-eat products. Isolates of Y. enterocolitica bioserotype 4/O:3 were recovered from six of the PCR-positive raw pork samples; all harbored the virulence plasmid. All isolates were recovered from food collected in shops and, thus, none were from the patients' home. When subjected to PFGE, the six isolates displayed four different NotI profiles. The same four NotI profiles were also present among isolates recovered from the yersiniosis patients. The application of a multiplex PCR was shown to be an efficient tool for identification of pathogenic Y. enterocolitica isolates in naturally contaminated raw pork. PMID:16000776

  1. Evaluation of three commercial agglutination tests for the identification of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Pennell, D R; Rott-Petri, J A; Kurzynski, T A

    1984-10-01

    Three commercially available rapid slide agglutination tests for the identification of Staphylococcus aureus were evaluated with 354 recent clinical isolates (165 strains of S. aureus). The test results of two latex agglutination products, SeroSTAT Staph (Scott Laboratories, Inc.) and Staphylatex (American Micro Scan), and one hemagglutination product, Staphyloslide (BBL Microbiology Systems), were compared with the results of the tube coagulase test, which was read at 4 h (4-h tube coagulase test) and, if negative, again after overnight incubation at room temperature (24-h tube coagulase test). Discrepancies between agglutination and tube coagulase identifications were resolved by use of the thermonuclease, mannitol fermentation, and slide coagulase tests. All sensitivities, specificities, predictive values of a positive result, and predictive values of a negative result for the three agglutination tests were at least 98.8% and comparable with the 4-h tube coagulase test. Best results were obtained with the 24-h tube coagulase test, which yielded one false-negative and no false-positive tests. Agglutination identifications may be performed on organisms taken directly from a primary plate when sufficient growth is present. Kit agglutination procedures yield rapid and reliable identifications and are easy to perform. This study also demonstrates the usefulness of the 24-h tube coagulase test.

  2. Solution to Shape Identification of Steady-state Viscous Flow Fields to Prescribe Flow Velocity Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katamine, Eiji; Kanai, Ryoma

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a numerical solution to shape identification problem of steady-state viscous flow fields. In this study, a shape identification problem is formulated for flow velocity distribution prescribed problem, while the total dissipated energy is constrained to less than a desired value, in the viscous flow field. The square error integral between the actual flow velocity distributions and the prescribed flow velocity distributions in the prescribed sub-domains is used as the objective functional. Shape gradient of the shape identification problem is derived theoretically using the Lagrange multiplier method, adjoint variable method, and the formulae of the material derivative. Reshaping is carried out by the traction method proposed as an approach to solving shape optimization problems. The validity of proposed method is confirmed by results of 2D numerical analysis.

  3. Comprehensive visual field test & diagnosis system in support of astronaut health and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, Wolfgang; Clark, Jonathan B.; Reisman, Garrett E.; Tarbell, Mark A.

    Long duration spaceflight, permanent human presence on the Moon, and future human missions to Mars will require autonomous medical care to address both expected and unexpected risks. An integrated non-invasive visual field test & diagnosis system is presented for the identification, characterization, and automated classification of visual field defects caused by the spaceflight environment. This system will support the onboard medical provider and astronauts on space missions with an innovative, non-invasive, accurate, sensitive, and fast visual field test. It includes a database for examination data, and a software package for automated visual field analysis and diagnosis. The system will be used to detect and diagnose conditions affecting the visual field, while in space and on Earth, permitting the timely application of therapeutic countermeasures before astronaut health or performance are impaired. State-of-the-art perimetry devices are bulky, thereby precluding application in a spaceflight setting. In contrast, the visual field test & diagnosis system requires only a touchscreen-equipped computer or touchpad device, which may already be in use for other purposes (i.e., no additional payload), and custom software. The system has application in routine astronaut assessment (Clinical Status Exam), pre-, in-, and post-flight monitoring, and astronaut selection. It is deployable in operational space environments, such as aboard the International Space Station or during future missions to or permanent presence on the Moon and Mars.

  4. Comparison of an Automated System with Conventional Identification and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing

    PubMed Central

    Duggal, Shalini; Gaind, Rajni; Tandon, Neha; Deb, Manorama; Chugh, Tulsi Das

    2012-01-01

    The present study was designed to compare a fully automated identification/antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST) system BD Phoenix (BD) for its efficacy in rapid and accurate identification and AST with conventional manual methods and to determine if the errors reported in AST, such as the (very major errors) VME (false susceptibility), (major errors) ME (false resistance), and (minor errors) MiE (intermediate category interpretation) were within the range certified by FDA. Identification and antimicrobial susceptibility test results of eighty-five clinical isolates including both gram-positive and negative were compared on Phoenix considering the results obtained from conventional manual methods of identification and disc diffusion testing of antibiotics as standards for comparison. Phoenix performed favorably well. There was 100% concordance in identification for gram-negative isolates and 94.83% for gram-positive isolates. In seven cases, Phoenix proved better than conventional identification. For antibiotic results, categorical agreement was 98.02% for gram-positive and 95.7% for gram-negative isolates. VME was 0.33%, ME 0.66%, MiE 0.99% for gram-positive isolates and 1.23% VME, 1.23% ME, and 1.85% MiE for gram-negative isolates. Therefore, this automated system can be used as a tool to facilitate early identification and susceptibility pattern of aerobic bacteria in routine microbiology laboratories. PMID:23762748

  5. Role of failure-mechanism identification in accelerated testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, J. M.; Barker, D.; Dasgupta, A.; Arora, A.

    1993-01-01

    Accelerated life testing techniques provide a short-cut method to investigate the reliability of electronic devices with respect to certain dominant failure mechanisms that occur under normal operating conditions. However, accelerated tests have often been conducted without knowledge of the failure mechanisms and without ensuring that the test accelerated the same mechanism as that observed under normal operating conditions. This paper summarizes common failure mechanisms in electronic devices and packages and investigates possible failure mechanism shifting during accelerated testing.

  6. Analytical modeling of the acoustic field during a direct field acoustic test.

    SciTech Connect

    Stasiunas, Eric Carl; Rouse, Jerry W.; Mesh, Mikhail

    2010-12-01

    The acoustic field generated during a Direct Field Acoustic Test (DFAT) has been analytically modeled in two space dimensions using a properly phased distribution of propagating plane waves. Both the pure-tone and broadband acoustic field were qualitatively and quantitatively compared to a diffuse acoustic field. The modeling indicates significant non-uniformity of sound pressure level for an empty (no test article) DFAT, specifically a center peak and concentric maxima/minima rings. This spatial variation is due to the equivalent phase among all propagating plane waves at each frequency. The excitation of a simply supported slender beam immersed within the acoustic fields was also analytically modeled. Results indicate that mid-span response is dependent upon location and orientation of the beam relative to the center of the DFAT acoustic field. For a diffuse acoustic field, due to its spatial uniformity, mid-span response sensitivity to location and orientation is nonexistent.

  7. DETECTION AND IDENTIFICATION OF TOXIC AIR POLLUTANTS USING FIELD PORTABLE AND AIRBORNE REMOTE IMAGING SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Remote sensing technologies are a class of instrument and sensor systems that include laser imageries, imaging spectrometers, and visible to thermal infrared cameras. These systems have been successfully used for gas phase chemical compound identification in a variety of field e...

  8. Identification of large masses of citrus fruit and rice fields in eastern Spain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desagredo, F. L.; Salinas, F. G.

    1973-01-01

    ERTS-1 imagery has been successfully used for the identification of large areas of citrus groves and rice fields in the Valencia region of Eastern Spain. Results are encouraging and will facilitate the elaboration of a land use map with a fair degree of definition once methods prove to be fully operational.

  9. Children with Developmental Disabilities: The Effect of Sound Field Amplification on Word Identification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flexer, Carol; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Using sound field amplification which increased the intensity of the teacher's voice by 10 decibels, 9 primary-level children with developmental disabilities made fewer errors on a word identification task, were more relaxed, and responded more quickly than without amplification. (Author/JDD)

  10. OPCW Proficiency Test: A Practical Approach Also for Interlaboratory Test on Detection and Identification of Pesticides in Environmental Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Śliwakowski, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    An overview of general strategy, standard procedures, and critical points, which may be found during carrying out an OPCW Proficiency Test concerning detection and identification of scheduled compounds relevant to Chemical Weapon Convention, has been presented. The observations have been illustrated following the case of the Eight OPCW Designated Laboratories Proficiency Test, which was performed in the OPCW Laboratory in Rijswijk in November and December 2000. Various useful hints, comments, and practical observations concerning the case study have been included as well. The same methodology and procedures may be also applied for detection, identification, and environmental analyses of pesticides and biocides, especially organophosphorus compounds. PMID:24578644

  11. Unbalance Identification and Field Balancing of Dual Rotors System with Slightly Different Rotating Speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, S.; Wang, X.-X.

    1999-02-01

    The identification of unbalance is the crux of field balancing of dual rotors system with slightly different rotating speeds. On the basis of correlation theory, this paper explains a method called “Single Point Discrete Fourier Transformation (DFT)” to identify the unbalance. By theoretical analysis, the correlation integral time and its maximum possible error are determined. The field balancing experiment on WLZY-350 horizontal spiral centrifuge verifies its precision, reliability and applicability in practice.

  12. DOE Field Operations Program EV and HEV Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Francfort, James Edward; Slezak, L. A.

    2001-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s (DOE) Field Operations Program tests advanced technology vehicles (ATVs) and disseminates the testing results to provide fleet managers and other potential ATV users with accurate and unbiased information on vehicle performance. The ATVs (including electric, hybrid, and other alternative fuel vehicles) are tested using one or more methods - Baseline Performance Testing (EVAmerica and Pomona Loop), Accelerated Reliability Testing, and Fleet Testing. The Program (http://ev.inel.gov/sop) and its nine industry testing partners have tested over 30 full-size electric vehicle (EV) models and they have accumulated over 4 million miles of EV testing experience since 1994. In conjunction with several original equipment manufacturers, the Program has developed testing procedures for the new classes of hybrid, urban, and neighborhood EVs. The testing of these vehicles started during 2001. The EVS 18 presentation will include (1) EV and hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) test results, (2) operating experience with and performance trends of various EV and HEV models, and (3) experience with operating hydrogen-fueled vehicles. Data presented for EVs will include vehicle efficiency (km/kWh), average distance driven per charge, and range testing results. The HEV data will include operating considerations, fuel use rates, and range testing results.

  13. Laboratory or field tests for evaluating firefighters' work capacity?

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Ann-Sofie; Oksa, Juha; Malm, Christer

    2014-01-01

    Muscle strength is important for firefighters work capacity. Laboratory tests used for measurements of muscle strength, however, are complicated, expensive and time consuming. The aims of the present study were to investigate correlations between physical capacity within commonly occurring and physically demanding firefighting work tasks and both laboratory and field tests in full time (N = 8) and part-time (N = 10) male firefighters and civilian men (N = 8) and women (N = 12), and also to give recommendations as to which field tests might be useful for evaluating firefighters' physical work capacity. Laboratory tests of isokinetic maximal (IM) and endurance (IE) muscle power and dynamic balance, field tests including maximal and endurance muscle performance, and simulated firefighting work tasks were performed. Correlations with work capacity were analyzed with Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (rs). The highest significant (p<0.01) correlations with laboratory and field tests were for Cutting: IE trunk extension (rs = 0.72) and maximal hand grip strength (rs = 0.67), for Stairs: IE shoulder flexion (rs = -0.81) and barbell shoulder press (rs = -0.77), for Pulling: IE shoulder extension (rs = -0.82) and bench press (rs = -0.85), for Demolition: IE knee extension (rs = 0.75) and bench press (rs = 0.83), for Rescue: IE shoulder flexion (rs = -0.83) and bench press (rs = -0.82), and for the Terrain work task: IE trunk flexion (rs = -0.58) and upright barbell row (rs = -0.70). In conclusion, field tests may be used instead of laboratory tests. Maximal hand grip strength, bench press, chin ups, dips, upright barbell row, standing broad jump, and barbell shoulder press were strongly correlated (rs≥0.7) with work capacity and are therefore recommended for evaluating firefighters work capacity. PMID:24614596

  14. Feasibility results of an electromagnetic compatibility test protocol to evaluate medical devices to radio frequency identification exposure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of radio frequency identification (RFID) systems in healthcare is increasing, and concerns for electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) pose one of the biggest obstacles for widespread adoption. Numerous studies have demonstrated that RFID systems can interfere with medical devices; however, the majority of past studies relied on time-consuming and burdensome test schemes based on ad hoc test methods applied to individual RFID systems. Methods This paper presents the results of using an RFID simulator that allows for faster evaluation of RFID-medical device EMC against a library of RFID test signals at various field strengths. Results The results of these tests demonstrate the feasibility and adequacy of simulator testing and can be used to support its incorporation into applicable consensus standards. Conclusions This work can aid the medical device community in better assessing the risks associated with medical device exposure to RFID. PMID:25086451

  15. Antarctic field tests of SARSAT personal locater beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bindschadler, Robert

    1987-01-01

    Field tests of SARSAT personal locater beacons were conducted in the Antarctic to assess the viability of using these beacons to increase the safety of Antarctic field parties. Data were collected on the extent to which dry or wet snow, melting conditions, crevasse walls and snow bridges affected the ability of the SARSAT satellite to calculate an accurate position of the beacon. Average response time between beacon turn on and alert reception in McMurdo was between 4 and 5 hours for these tests. It is concluded that the SARSAT system is viable for Antarctic operations and it is recommended that it be implemented for future field operations. Because of obstruction of line-of-sight between beacon and satellite degrades the accuracy of the location calculation (particularly in wet snow), it is further recommended that field parties have sufficient numbers of beacons to insure that in an emergency, one will be able to operate from the surface.

  16. Field testing of fugitive dust control techniques at a uranium mill tailings pile - 1982 Field Test, Gas Hills, Wyoming.

    SciTech Connect

    Elmore, M.R.; Hartley, J.N.

    1983-12-01

    A field test was conducted on a uranium tailings pile to evaluate the effectiveness of 15 chemical stabilizers for control of fugitive dust from uranium mill tailings. A tailings pile at the Federal American Partners (FAP) Uranium Mill, Gas Hills, Wyoming, was used for the field test. Preliminary laboratory tests using a wing tunnel were conducted to select the more promising stabilizers for field testing. Fourteen of the chemical stabilizers were applied with a field spray system pulled behind a tractor; one--Hydro Mulch--was applied with a hydroseeder. A portable weather station and data logger were installed to record the weather conditions at the test site. After 1 year of monitoring (including three site visits), all of the stabilizers have degraded to some degree; but those applied at the manufacturers' recommended rate are still somewhat effective in reducing fugitive emissions. The following synthetic polymer emulsions appear to be the more effective stabilizers: Wallpol 40-133 from Reichold Chemicals, SP-400 from Johnson and March Corporation, and CPB-12 from Wen Don Corporation. Installed costs for the test plots ranged from $8400 to $11,300/ha; this range results from differences in stabilizer costs. Large-scale stabilization costs of the test materials are expected to range from $680 to $3600/ha based on FAP experience. Evaluation of the chemical stabilizers will continue for approximately 1 year. 2 references, 33 figures, 22 tables.

  17. Emerging methodologies for pathogen identification in positive blood culture testing.

    PubMed

    Dubourg, Grégory; Raoult, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Bloodstream infections (BSIs) represent a major cause of death in developed countries and are associated with long-term loss of functions. Blood culture remains the gold standard for BSI diagnosis, as it is easy to perform and displays a good analytical sensitivity. However, its major drawback remains the long turnaround time, which can result in inappropriate therapy, fall of survival rate, emergence of antibiotic resistance and increase of medical costs. Over the last 10 years, molecular tools have been the alternative to blood cultures, allowing early identification of pathogens involved in sepsis, as well detection of critical antibiotic resistance genes. Besides, the advent of MALDI-TOF revolutionized practice in routine microbiology significantly reduced the time to result. Reviewed here are recent improvements in early BSI diagnosis and these authors' view for the future is presented, including innovative high-throughput technologies.

  18. Identification of irradiated foodstuffs: results of a European test intercomparison.

    PubMed

    Raffi, J; Belliardo, J J; Agnel, J P; Vincent, P

    1993-01-01

    The results of an intercomparison, organized by the Community Bureau of Reference (Commission of the European Communities), on the use of Electron Spin Resonance spectroscopy for the identification of irradiated food are presented. A qualitative intercomparison was carried out using beef and trout bones, sardine scales, pistachio nut shells, dried grapes and papaya. Protocols are proposed for meat bones, fish bones (with some restrictions) and fruits such as dried grapes and papaya. The protocol for pistachio nuts and fruits such strawberries is more complicated and further research is needed prior the organization of future intercomparisons. A quantitative intercomparison on poultry bones was also organized. Laboratories were able to distinguish between chicken bones irradiated at 1 to 3 kGy or 7 to 10 kGy.

  19. Identification of Streptococcus pyogenes – Phenotypic Tests vs Molecular Assay (spy1258PCR): A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Tintu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Traditionally Group A Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS) is differentiated from other beta haemolytic streptococci (BHS) by certain presumptive tests such as bacitracin sensitivity and production of Pyrollidonyl Aryl Sulfatase (PYR). The phenotypic and genotypic confirmatory tests are Lancefield grouping for cell wall carbohydrate antigen and PCR for spy1258 gene respectively. Reliance on presumptive tests alone may lead to misidentification of isolates. Aim To compare the predictive values of routine phenotypic tests with spy1258 PCR for the identification of Streptococcus pyogenes. Materials and Methods This comparative analytical study was carried out in the Department of Microbiology, JIPMER, Puducherry, over a period of 18 months (1st November 2013 to 30th April 2015). Two hundred and six consecutive BHS isolates from various clinical samples were subjected to phenotypic tests such as bacitracin sensitivity, PYR test and Lancefield grouping. The results were compared with spy1258 PCR which was considered 95 the confirmatory test for identification. Results The sensitivity and specificity of phenotypic tests were as follows; Susceptibility to bacitracin – 95.42%, 70.96%, PYR test – 95.42%, 77.41%, Lancefield grouping- 97.71%, 80.64%. Conclusion Clinical laboratories should not depend on bacitracin sensitivity as a single presumptive test for the routine identification of GAS but should use supplemental tests such as PYR test or latex agglutination test and for best results use spy1258 PCR. PMID:27630838

  20. Identification of Streptococcus pyogenes – Phenotypic Tests vs Molecular Assay (spy1258PCR): A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Tintu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Traditionally Group A Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS) is differentiated from other beta haemolytic streptococci (BHS) by certain presumptive tests such as bacitracin sensitivity and production of Pyrollidonyl Aryl Sulfatase (PYR). The phenotypic and genotypic confirmatory tests are Lancefield grouping for cell wall carbohydrate antigen and PCR for spy1258 gene respectively. Reliance on presumptive tests alone may lead to misidentification of isolates. Aim To compare the predictive values of routine phenotypic tests with spy1258 PCR for the identification of Streptococcus pyogenes. Materials and Methods This comparative analytical study was carried out in the Department of Microbiology, JIPMER, Puducherry, over a period of 18 months (1st November 2013 to 30th April 2015). Two hundred and six consecutive BHS isolates from various clinical samples were subjected to phenotypic tests such as bacitracin sensitivity, PYR test and Lancefield grouping. The results were compared with spy1258 PCR which was considered 95 the confirmatory test for identification. Results The sensitivity and specificity of phenotypic tests were as follows; Susceptibility to bacitracin – 95.42%, 70.96%, PYR test – 95.42%, 77.41%, Lancefield grouping- 97.71%, 80.64%. Conclusion Clinical laboratories should not depend on bacitracin sensitivity as a single presumptive test for the routine identification of GAS but should use supplemental tests such as PYR test or latex agglutination test and for best results use spy1258 PCR.

  1. Applicability of slug interference tests for hydraulic characterization of unconfined aquifers. 2: Field test examples

    SciTech Connect

    Spane, F.A. Jr.; Thorne, P.D.; Swanson, L.C.

    1996-09-01

    Slug interference testing may be particularly useful for characterizing hydraulic properties of aquifer sites where disposal of contaminated ground water makes pumping tests undesirable. The design, performance, and analysis of slug interference tests for two field test examples are presented. Results were compared with standard constant-rate pumping tests. The comparison indicates that slug interference tests provide estimates comparable to those obtained from short duration pumping tests for the determination of transmissivity, storativity, and vertical anisotropy. The close agreement in hydraulic property values obtained using the two test methods suggests that slug interference testing, under favorable test conditions (for example, observation well distances {le}30 m), can provide representative aquifer characterization results. The quality and extent of test data obtained also indicate the potential use of slug interference testing for three-dimensional hydrologic characterization investigations, when conducted using multilevel monitoring facilities.

  2. Field joint protection system rain qualification test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, M.

    1989-01-01

    This report documents the procedures, performance, and results obtained from the Field Joint Protection System (FJPS) rain test. This test was performed to validate that the flight configuration FJPS prevents the accumulation of moisture in the redesigned solid rocket motor (RSRM) field joints when subjected to simulated prelaunch natural rain environments. The FJPS test article was exposed to rain simulation for approximately 50 minutes. During the test, water entered through the open upper end of the systems tunnel and was funneled down between the tunnel and case. A sealant void at the moisture seal butt splice allowed this water to flow underneath the FJPS. The most likely cause of voids was improper bondline preparation, particularly on the moisture seal surface. In total, water penetrated underneath approximately 60 percent of the FJPS circumference. Because the test article was substantially different from flight configuration (no systems tunnel closeout), results of this test will not affect current flight motors. Due to the omission of systems tunnel covers and systems tunnel floor plate closeout, the test assembly was not representative of flight hardware and resulted in a gross overtest. It is therefore recommended that the test be declared void. It is also recommended that the test be repeated with a complete closeout of the systems tunnel, sealed systems tunnel ends, and improved adhesive bondline preparation.

  3. Field test of fiber optic ocean bottom seismograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wentao; Wang, Zhaogang; Huang, Wenzhu; Li, Li; Liu, Wenyi; Luo, Yingbo; Li, Fang

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we report the field test of fiber optic ocean bottom seismograph (OOBS) which can be used in the active source seismic research. There are three fiber laser accelerometers (FLAs) and one fiber laser hydrophone (FLH), which is wavelength division multiplexed, in the OOBS. The interrogation system is put on shore and is connected with the OOBS with optical fiber cable. The field test of using an air gun is carried out under water with a depth of 30 m. The results show that the OOBS has similar performance as conventional electric OBS.

  4. Field test of microbend fiber sensor for hospital use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhihao; Lau, Doreen; Teo, Ju Teng; Ng, Soon Huat; Yang, Xiufeng; Kei, Pin Lin

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we report a field test of a microbend fiber sensor for simultaneous measurement of breathing rate, breathing pattern, Ballistocardiogram and heart rate during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Comparative experiments conducted between our sensor and commercial physiologic device on a healthy male subject showed an accuracy of +/-2bpm for simultaneous measurement of both breathing rate and heart rate. Our preliminary field test on simultaneous measurement of breathing rate and heart rate in a clinical trial conducted on 11 healthy subjects in the 3.0 Tesla MRI environment showed very good agreement compared with measurements obtained from conventional MRcompatible devices.

  5. Development of a field test for upper-body power.

    PubMed

    Shim, A L; Bailey, M L; Westings, S H

    2001-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a field test capable of measuring upper-body power through the use of a common weight-training apparatus, a Smith machine (SM), set up for bench press (BP) movement. A small, battery-operated digital timing device was designed and constructed to allow a precise calculation of power (in conjunction with measures of distance and force) for this specific movement, which involved an explosive press from the chest to a position just short of full arm extension. In pilot work, 1 repetition maximums (1RM) were determined on the SM BP for 3 male subjects, and by subsequently testing power on the same subjects at varying resistances, an average relative percentage of the 1RM-producing peak power values was found by power curve analysis for test standardization. Reliability was assessed (using 11 men) by SM power measurements taken over 3 days on the SM fitted with the timer. An intraclass R (0.998) indicated a high correlation between the 3 separate field-test trials. Finally, 8 male subjects were used to compare SM scores with a criterion measure, the Linea Isokinetic BP station (Loredan Biomedical, Inc., Sacramento CA). A Pearson product moment coefficient found a high correlation between the field test (SM) and Linea power scores (r = 0.987). A 2-tailed dependent t-test between the field and criterion scores was not significant, suggesting that no consistent error variable was present. It can be concluded that this is a valid field test of power for this movement. PMID:11710404

  6. Testing Novel CR-39 Detector Deployment System For Identification of Subsurface Fractures, Soda Springs, ID

    SciTech Connect

    McLing, Travis; Carpenter, Michael; Brandon, William; Zavala, Bernie

    2015-06-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has teamed with Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC (BEA) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to facilitate further testing of geologic-fracture-identification methodology at a field site near the Monsanto Superfund Site located in Soda Springs, Idaho. INL has the necessary testing and technological expertise to perform this work. Battelle Memorial Institute (BMI) has engaged INL to perform this work through a Work for Others (WFO) Agreement. This study continues a multi-year collaborative effort between INL and EPA to test the efficacy of using field deployed Cr-39 radon in soil portals. This research enables identification of active fractures capable of transporting contaminants at sites where fractures are suspected pathways into the subsurface. Current state of the art methods for mapping fracture networks are exceedingly expensive and notoriously inaccurate. The proposed WFO will evaluate the applicability of using cheap, readily available, passive radon detectors to identify conductive geologic structures (i.e. fractures, and fracture networks) in the subsurface that control the transport of contaminants at fracture-dominated sites. The proposed WFO utilizes proven off-the-shelf technology in the form of CR-39 radon detectors, which have been widely deployed to detect radon levels in homes and businesses. In an existing collaborative EPA/INL study outside of this workscope,. CR-39 detectors are being utilized to determine the location of active transport fractures in a fractured granitic upland adjacent to a landfill site at the Fort Devens, MA that EPA-designated as National Priorities List (NPL) site. The innovative concept of using an easily deployed port that allows the CR-39 to measure the Rn-222 in the soil or alluvium above the fractured rock, while restricting atmospheric Rn-222 and soil sourced Ra from contaminating the detector is unique to INL and EPA approach previously developed. By deploying a series of these

  7. Field tests-low input, side-wall vented boiler

    SciTech Connect

    Litzke, W.L.; Butcher, T.A.; Celebi, Y.

    1996-07-01

    The Fan Atomized Burner (FAB) was developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory as part of the Oil Heat Combustion Equipment Technology Program to provide a practical low-firing rate technology leading to new, high efficiency oil-fired appliances. The development of the burner design and results of application testing have been presented in prior oil heat conferences over the past several years. This information is also summarized in a more comprehensive BNL report. The first field trial of a prototype unit was initiated during the 1994-95 heating season. This paper presents the results of the second year of testing, during the 1995-96 heating season. The field tests enable the demonstration of the reliability and performance of the FAB under practical, typical operating conditions. Another important objective of the field test was to demonstrate that the low input is adequate to satisfy the heating and hot water demands of the household. During the first field trial it was shown that at a maximum input rate of 0.4 gph (55,000 Btu/hr) the burner was able to heat a home with over 2,000 square feet of conditioned living space and provide adequate supply of domestic hot water for a family of six. The test is located in Long Island, NY.

  8. Field test of two energetic models for yellow perch

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaeffer, J.S.; Haas, R.C.; Diana, J.S.; Breck, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    Field data from a population of yellow perch Perca flavescens in Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron, were used to evaluate the ability of two energetic models to predict consumption by yellow perch. Field estimates of daily ration for age-l-4 fish during May through October 1987 and 1988 were compared with independent predictions made by the Wisconsin energetic model and an energetic model developed by Karas and Thoresson. Predictions of daily ration using the Wisconsin model were lower than daily rations estimated from field data for all ages, primarily due to poor model-field agreement at temperatures above 22??C. This caused estimates of cumulative consumption from the Wisconsin model to be 25-50% lower than field estimates. Predictions of daily ration by the Karas-Thoresson model agreed with field estimates over a temperature range of 1026??C for age-1-3 yellow perch but not for older fish. Despite improvement, model predictions of cumulative consumption were 2-35% lower than field estimates. Although these tests of predicted and estimated rations may provide insight into which model produced more accurate results, it must be emphasized that field measures of daily ration are also estimates and may be in error, particularly at temperatures above 22??C where gastric evacuation rates were estimated. The Karas-Thoresson modification of the Wisconsin energetic model produced better fits to field ration data and is recommended for model applications.

  9. A comparative test of the developmental, role-playing, and defensive explanations of offspring identification.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, J L; Minns, D R

    1978-01-01

    Following Mussen and Distler (1959) and Bandura, Ross and Ross (1963), the developmental, defensive, and role-playing theories of identification are tested on high school seniors. Previous tests have supported the developmental and role-playing hypotheses about equally, while the defensive hypothesis lacks consistent empirical support. Questions are raised, however, about the merit of these tests. Data are presented on seniors in an Eastern suburban school and a Midwestern small town school which support the developmental (warmth) hypothesis but which are inconsistent with the defensive and role-playing hypotheses. Parental behavior is measured by the Bronfenbrenner Parent Behavior Questionnaire and identification is measured by the semantic differential.

  10. Developmental validation of a novel lateral flow strip test for rapid identification of human blood (Rapid Stain Identification--Blood).

    PubMed

    Schweers, Brett A; Old, Jennifer; Boonlayangoor, P W; Reich, Karl A

    2008-06-01

    Human blood is the body fluid most commonly encountered at crime scenes, and blood detection may aid investigators in reconstructing what occurred during a crime. In addition, blood detection can help determine which items of evidence should be processed for DNA-STR testing. Unfortunately, many common substances can cause red-brown stains that resemble blood. Furthermore, many current human blood detection methods are presumptive and prone to false positive results. Here, the developmental validation of a new blood identification test, Rapid Stain Identification--Blood (RSID--Blood), is described. RSID--Blood utilizes two anti-glycophorin A (red blood cell membrane specific protein) monoclonal antibodies in a lateral flow strip test format to detect human blood. We present evidence demonstrating that this test is accurate, reproducible, easy to use, and highly specific for human blood. Importantly, RSID--Blood does not cross-react with ferret, skunk, or primate blood and exhibits no high-dose hook effect. Also, we describe studies on the sensitivity, body fluid specificity, and species specificity of RSID--Blood. In addition, we show that the test can detect blood from a variety of forensic exhibits prior to processing for DNA-STR analysis. In conclusion, we suggest that RSID--Blood is effective and useful for the detection of human blood on forensic exhibits, and offers improved blood detection when compared to other currently used methods.

  11. U.S. field testing programs and results

    SciTech Connect

    Wicks, G.G.

    2000-06-09

    The United States has been active in four major international in-situ or field testing programs over the past two decades, involving the burial of simulated high-level waste forms and package components. These programs are designed to supplement laboratory testing studies in order to obtain the most complete and realistic picture possible of waste glass behavior under realistic repository-relevant conditions.

  12. Field test plan: Buried waste technologies, Fiscal Year 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Heard, R.E.; Hyde, R.A.; Engleman, V.S.; Evans, J.D.; Jackson, T.W.

    1995-06-01

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Technology Development, supports the applied research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation of a suite of advanced technologies that, when integrated with commercially available baseline technologies, form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. The Fiscal Year 1995 effort is to deploy and test multiple technologies from four functional areas of buried waste remediation: site characterization, waste characterization, retrieval, and treatment. This document is the basic operational planning document for the deployment and testing of the technologies that support the field testing in Fiscal Year 1995. Discussed in this document are the scope of the tests; purpose and objective of the tests; organization and responsibilities; contingency plans; sequence of activities; sampling and data collection; document control; analytical methods; data reduction, validation, and verification; quality assurance; equipment and instruments; facilities and utilities; health and safety; residuals management; and regulatory management.

  13. Reliable five-minute test strip method for identification of Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Dealler, S F; Campbell, L; Kerr, K G; McGoldrick, J; Flannigan, K A; Hawkey, P M

    1989-04-01

    A novel and rapid method (Strep Strip, Lab M) for identification of Streptococcus pyogenes was evaluated. The method combines the established test for pyroglutamyl aminopeptidase (PYR) with a rapid chromogenic test for beta-glucosidase on a paper strip. The test was evaluated with 274 clinical isolates and 237 culture collection isolates of beta-haemolytic streptococci. Streptococcus pyogenes was identified with 100% specificity. Six isolates identified as Lancefield group A and which might therefore be assumed to be Streptococcus pyogenes were shown by the test strip method not to be this species. The beta-glucosidase test on the test strip allowed differentiation between enterococci and Streptococcus pyogenes (both PYR positive) in all cases. The test strip method represents an economical and accurate method for identification of Streptococcus pyogenes in clinical material. PMID:2565813

  14. Intermittent versus Continuous Incremental Field Tests: Are Maximal Variables Interchangeable?

    PubMed

    Carminatti, Lorival J; Possamai, Carlos A P; de Moraes, Marcelo; da Silva, Juliano F; de Lucas, Ricardo D; Dittrich, Naiandra; Guglielmo, Luiz G A

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare physiological responses derived from an incremental progressive field test with a constant speed test i.e. intermittent versus continuous protocol. Two progressive maximum tests (Carminatti`s test (T-CAR) and the Vameval test (T-VAM)), characterized by increasing speed were used. T-CAR is an intermittent incremental test, performed as shuttle runs; while T-VAM is a continuous incremental test performed on an athletic track. Eighteen physically active, healthy young subjects (21.9 ± 2.0 years; 76.5 ± 8.6 kg, 1.78 ± 0.08 m, 11.2 ± 5.4% body fat), volunteered for this study. Subjects performed four different maximum test sessions conducted in the field: two incremental tests and two time to exhaustion tests (TTE) at peak test velocities (PV). No significant differences were found for PV (T-CAR = 15.6 ± 1.2; T-VAM = 15.5 ± 1.3 km·h(-1)) and maximal HR (T-CAR = 195 ± 11; T- VAM = 194 ± 14 bpm). During TTE, there were no significant differences for HR (TTET-CAR and TTET-VAM = 192 ± 12 bpm). However, there was a significant difference in TTE (p = 0.04) (TTET-CAR = 379 ± 84, TTET-VAM = 338 ± 58 s) with a low correlation (r = 0.41). The blood lactate concentration measured at the end of the TTE tests, showed no significant difference (TTET-CAR = 13.2 ± 2.4 vs. TTET-VAM = 12.9 ± 2.4 mmol·l(-1)). Based on the present findings, it is suggested that the maximal variables derived from T-CAR and T-VAM can be interchangeable in the design of training programs. Key pointsT-CAR is an intermittent shuttle run test that predicts the maximal aerobic speed with accuracy, hence, test results could be interchangeable with continuous straight-line tests.T-CAR provides valid field data for evaluating aerobic fitness.In comparison with T-VAM, T-CAR may be a more favourable way to prescribe intermittent training using a shuttle-running protocol.

  15. Acceptance test report: Field test of mixer pump for 241-AN-107 caustic addition project

    SciTech Connect

    Leshikar, G.A.

    1997-05-16

    The field acceptance test of a 75 HP mixer pump (Hazleton serial number N-20801) installed in Tank 241-AN-107 was conducted from October 1995 thru February 1996. The objectives defined in the acceptance test were successfully met, with two exceptions recorded. The acceptance test encompassed field verification of mixer pump turntable rotation set-up and operation, verification that the pump instrumentation functions within established limits, facilitation of baseline data collection from the mixer pump mounted ultrasonic instrumentation, verification of mixer pump water flush system operation and validation of a procedure for its operation, and several brief test runs (bump) of the mixer pump.

  16. Species identification by experts and non-experts: comparing images from field guides

    PubMed Central

    Austen, G. E.; Bindemann, M.; Griffiths, R. A.; Roberts, D. L.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate species identification is fundamental when recording ecological data. However, the ability to correctly identify organisms visually is rarely questioned. We investigated how experts and non-experts compared in the identification of bumblebees, a group of insects of considerable conservation concern. Experts and non-experts were asked whether two concurrent bumblebee images depicted the same or two different species. Overall accuracy was below 60% and comparable for experts and non-experts. However, experts were more consistent in their answers when the same images were repeated, and more cautious in committing to a definitive answer. Our findings demonstrate the difficulty of correctly identifying bumblebees using images from field guides. Such error rates need to be accounted for when interpreting species data, whether or not they have been collected by experts. We suggest that investigation of how experts and non-experts make observations should be incorporated into study design, and could be used to improve training in species identification. PMID:27644140

  17. Species identification by experts and non-experts: comparing images from field guides.

    PubMed

    Austen, G E; Bindemann, M; Griffiths, R A; Roberts, D L

    2016-01-01

    Accurate species identification is fundamental when recording ecological data. However, the ability to correctly identify organisms visually is rarely questioned. We investigated how experts and non-experts compared in the identification of bumblebees, a group of insects of considerable conservation concern. Experts and non-experts were asked whether two concurrent bumblebee images depicted the same or two different species. Overall accuracy was below 60% and comparable for experts and non-experts. However, experts were more consistent in their answers when the same images were repeated, and more cautious in committing to a definitive answer. Our findings demonstrate the difficulty of correctly identifying bumblebees using images from field guides. Such error rates need to be accounted for when interpreting species data, whether or not they have been collected by experts. We suggest that investigation of how experts and non-experts make observations should be incorporated into study design, and could be used to improve training in species identification. PMID:27644140

  18. Comparison of two field tests to estimate maximum aerobic speed.

    PubMed

    Berthoin, S; Gerbeaux, M; Turpin, E; Guerrin, F; Lensel-Corbeil, G; Vandendorpe, F

    1994-08-01

    The measurement of maximal aerobic speed (MAS) and the prediction of maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max) by means of field tests were carried out on 17 students studying physical education. The subjects underwent a continuous multi-stage track test (Léger and Boucher, 1980), shuttle test (Léger et al., 1984) and VO2 max measurement on a treadmill. The VO2 max values estimated using the track test (56.8 +/- 5.8 ml kg-1 min-1) were not significantly different from the values measured in the treadmill test (56.8 +/- 7.1 ml kg-1 min-1), but were higher than those estimated using the shuttle test (51.1 +/- 5.9 ml kg-1 min-1). The maximal nature of the tests was checked by measurement of heart rate and lactate concentration, taken within 2 min post-test. The means of the MAS observed in the track test (15.8 +/- 1.9 km h-1) and in the treadmill test (15.9 +/- 2.6 km h-1) were not significantly different (P > 0.10). The mean of the shuttle test MAS (13.1 +/- 1 km h-1) was significantly lower (P < 0.01) than those of the other tests. However, the MAS of the shuttle test and track test are linked. The equation for linear regression between MAS values in these two tests is MAStrack = 1.81 x MASshuttle -7.86 (r = 0.91), allowing estimation of one of these MAS values when the other is known. Thus these values may be used within diversified training.

  19. Field Testing Vocational Education Metric Modules. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oldsen, Carl F.

    A project was conducted for the following purposes: (1) to develop a workshop training package to prepare vocational education teachers to use vocational subject-specific modules; (2) to train those teachers to use the workshop package; (3) to conduct field tests of the metric modules with experimental and control groups; (4) to analyze, describe,…

  20. A Preliminary Field Test of an Employee Work Passion Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zigarmi, Drea; Nimon, Kim; Houson, Dobie; Witt, David; Diehl, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Four dimensions of a process model for the formulation of employee work passion, derived from Zigarmi, Nimon, Houson, Witt, and Diehl (2009), were tested in a field setting. A total of 447 employees completed questionnaires that assessed the internal elements of the model in a corporate work environment. Data from the measurements of work affect,…

  1. 47 CFR 73.1515 - Special field test authorizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... informal application in letter form, signed by the applicant and including the following information: (1.... (3) A brief description of the test antenna system, its estimated effective radiated field and height above ground or average terrain, and the geographic coordinates of its proposed location(s)....

  2. Evaluation Report: Early Childhood Education Program, 1969 Field Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appalachia Educational Lab., Charleston, WV.

    Reported are findings from the first year's field test of the home-oriented Appalachia Educational Laboratory (AEL) Early Childhood Education Program for 3-, 4-, and 5-year-olds. The program consists of a 30-minute daily television lesson, a weekly home visit by a paraprofessional, and group instruction once a week in a mobile classroom. The…

  3. 29. PLAN OF THE ARVFS FIELD TEST FACILITY SHOWING BUNKER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. PLAN OF THE ARVFS FIELD TEST FACILITY SHOWING BUNKER, CABLE CHASE, SHIELDING TANK AND FRAME ASSEMBLY. F.C. TORKELSON DRAWING NUMBER 842-ARVFS-701-1. INEL INDEX CODE NUMBER: 075 0701 851 151970. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Advanced Reentry Vehicle Fusing System, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  4. 30. ELEVATION OF ARVFS FIELD TEST FACILITY SHOWING VIEW OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. ELEVATION OF ARVFS FIELD TEST FACILITY SHOWING VIEW OF SOUTH SIDE OF FACILITY, INCLUDING BUNKER, CABLE CHASE, SHIELDING TANK, AND FRAME ASSEMBLY. F.C. TORKELSON DRAWING NUMBER 842-ARVFS-701-2. INEL INDEX CODE NUMBER: 075 0701 851 151971. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Advanced Reentry Vehicle Fusing System, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  5. 40 CFR 35.2262 - Funding of field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Funding of field testing. 35.2262 Section 35.2262 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works § 35.2262 Funding of...

  6. 40 CFR 35.2262 - Funding of field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Funding of field testing. 35.2262 Section 35.2262 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works § 35.2262 Funding of...

  7. 40 CFR 35.2262 - Funding of field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Funding of field testing. 35.2262 Section 35.2262 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works § 35.2262 Funding of...

  8. FIELD TEST OF AIR SPARGING COUPLED WITH SOIL VAPOR EXTRACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A controlled field study was designed and conducted to assess the performance of air sparging for remediation of petroleum fuel and solvent contamination in a shallow (3-m deep) groundwater aquifer. Sparging was performed in an insolation test cell (5 m by 3 m by 8-m deep). A soi...

  9. STIS Sparse Field CTE test-internal {Cycle 10}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudfrooij, Paul

    2001-07-01

    CTE measurements are made using the "sparse field test", along both the serial and parallel axes. This program needs special commanding to provide {a} off-center MSM positionings of some slits, and {b} the ability to read out with any amplifier {A, B, C, or D}. All exposures are internals.

  10. A Simple Soil Percolation Test Device for Field Environmentalists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, William H.; Stark, Phillip E.

    1977-01-01

    A primary responsibility of field environmental health workers is evaluation of individual sewage disposal system sites. The authors of this article developed a practical, accurate, and inexpensive measurement device for obtaining reliable percolation test results. Directions for the construction and use of the device are detailed. Drawings…

  11. READ: Field Test of an Educational Approach to Reading Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morsink, Catherine

    This investigation describes a field test of the materials entitled "Reading: An Educational Approach to Disability" (READ), which were developed to aid disabled readers in the beginning stages of learning to decode English print. The subjects were 15 Title I reading teachers working in small groups with 183 second-grade children. The questions of…

  12. Design and testing of the LITE Variable Field Stop mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillman, Robert A.

    1993-01-01

    The Variable Field Stop (VFS) is a rotary mechanism that reliably positions any of four aperture plates in the optical path of a spaceflight experiment, limiting the amount of light reaching the detectors. This paper discusses the design, operation, and testing of the VFS.

  13. Genotoxicity of nanomaterials: refining strategies and tests for hazard identification.

    PubMed

    Pfuhler, Stefan; Elespuru, Rosalie; Aardema, Marilyn J; Doak, Shareen H; Maria Donner, E; Honma, Masamitsu; Kirsch-Volders, Micheline; Landsiedel, Robert; Manjanatha, Mugimane; Singer, Tim; Kim, James H

    2013-05-01

    A workshop addressing strategies for the genotoxicity assessment of nanomaterials (NMs) was held on October 23, 2010 in Fort Worth Texas, USA. The workshop was organized by the Environmental Mutagen Society and the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI) Health and Environmental Sciences Institute. The workshop was attended by more than 80 participants from academia, regulatory agencies, and industry from North America, Europe and Japan. A plenary session featured summaries of the current status and issues related to the testing of NMs for genotoxic properties, as well as an update on international activities and regulatory approaches. This was followed by breakout sessions and a plenary session devoted to independent discussions of in vitro assays, in vivo assays, and the need for new assays or new approaches to develop a testing strategy for NMs. Each of the standard assays was critiqued as a resource for evaluation of NMs, and it became apparent that none was appropriate without special considerations or modifications. The need for nanospecific positive controls was questioned, as was the utility of bacterial assays. The latter was thought to increase the importance of including mammalian cell gene mutation assays into the test battery. For in-vivo testing, to inform the selection of appropriate tests or protocols, it was suggested to run repeated dose studies first to learn about disposition, potential accumulation, and possible tissue damage. It was acknowledged that mechanisms may be at play that a standard genotoxicity battery may not be able to capture.

  14. Functionality of veterinary identification microchips following low- (0.5 tesla) and high-field (3 tesla) magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Piesnack, Susann; Frame, Mairi E; Oechtering, Gerhard; Ludewig, Eberhard

    2013-01-01

    The ability to read patient identification microchips relies on the use of radiofrequency pulses. Since radiofrequency pulses also form an integral part of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) process, the possibility of loss of microchip function during MRI scanning is of concern. Previous clinical trials have shown microchip function to be unaffected by MR imaging using a field strength of 1 Tesla and 1.5. As veterinary MRI scanners range widely in field strength, this study was devised to determine whether exposure to lower or higher field strengths than 1 Tesla would affect the function of different types of microchip. In a phantom study, a total of 300 International Standards Organisation (ISO)-approved microchips (100 each of three different types: ISO FDX-B 1.4 × 9 mm, ISO FDX-B 2.12 × 12 mm, ISO HDX 3.8 × 23 mm) were tested in a low field (0.5) and a high field scanner (3.0 Tesla). A total of 50 microchips of each type were tested in each scanner. The phantom was composed of a fluid-filled freezer pack onto which a plastic pillow and a cardboard strip with affixed microchips were positioned. Following an MRI scan protocol simulating a head study, all of the microchips were accurately readable. Neither 0.5 nor 3 Tesla imaging affected microchip function in this study.

  15. A novel microbead-based microfluidic device for rapid bacterial identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing.

    PubMed

    He, J; Mu, X; Guo, Z; Hao, H; Zhang, C; Zhao, Z; Wang, Q

    2014-12-01

    Effective treatment of infectious diseases depends on the ability to rapidly identify the infecting bacteria and the use of sensitive antibiotics. The currently used identification assays usually take more than 72 h to perform and have a low sensitivity. Herein, we present a microbead-based microfluidic platform that is highly sensitive and rapid for bacterial detection and antibiotic sensitivity testing. The platform includes four units, one of which is used for bacterial identification and the other three are used for susceptibility testing. Our results showed that Escherichia coli O157 at a cell density range of 10(1)-10(5) CFU/μL could be detected within 30 min. Additionally, the effects of three antibiotics on E. coli O157 were evaluated within 4-8 h. Overall, this integrated microbead-based microdevice provides a sensitive, rapid, reliable, and highly effective platform for the identification of bacteria, as well as antibiotic sensitivity testing.

  16. Flight test design for CH-47 parameter identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, W. E., Jr.; Vincent, J.

    1978-01-01

    The VTOL Approach and Landing Technology (VALT) program is a significant experimental research program aimed at establishing a data base for rotorcraft operation in a terminal area environment. Work was undertaken to determine helicopter math models suitable for analyzing maneuvers along a VTOL trajectory and to apply these math models to determine the flight test procedures of greatest effectiveness in establishing helicopter dynamic characteristics in this mode of operation. As the principal result of this investigation, a flight test specification is presented for the CH-47 VALT aircraft operating along the specified VTOL trajectory of the VALT program.

  17. Comparison of two aerobic field tests in young tennis players.

    PubMed

    Fargeas-Gluck, Marie-Agnès; Léger, Luc A

    2012-11-01

    This study compares the maximal responses of a new aerobic tennis field test, the NAVTEN to a known aerobic field test, often used with young tennis players, that is, the continuous multistage 20-m shuttle run test (20-m SRT). The NAVTEN is an intermittent (1-minute/1-minute) multistage test with side-to-side displacements and ball hitting. Ten young elite tennis players aged 12.9 ± 0.3 (mean ± SD) randomly performed both tests and were continuously monitored for heart rate (HR) and oxygen uptake (V[Combining Dot Above]O2) using the Vmax ST (Sensormedics). The 20-m SRT and NAVTEN show similar HRpeak (202 ± 6.1 vs. 208 ± 9.5, respectively) and V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak (54.2 ± 5.9 vs. 54.9 ± 6.0 ml·kg·min). Pearson correlations between both tests were 0.88 and 0.92 for V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak and maximal speed, respectively. The NAVTEN yielded V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak values that are typical for active subjects of that age and are similar to the 20-m SRT supporting its use to measure aerobic fitness of young tennis players in specific and entertaining field conditions. The fact that two-thirds of the tennis players achieved a different ranking (±1 rank) with the NAVTEN and the 20-m SRT suggests that the NAVTEN may be more specific than the 20-m SRT to assess aerobic fitness of tennis players. From a practical point of view, the NAVTEN test is more specific and pedagogical for young tennis players even though both tests yield similar maximal values.

  18. Infrared sensor system (IRSS) laboratory and field test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ax, George R., Jr.; Buss, James R.

    1997-08-01

    The U.S. Navy Office of Naval Research (ONR) has developed an infrared search and track (IRST) demonstrator system named the infrared sensor system (IRSS). This technology-base sensor was successfully developed and tested both in the laboratory and at-sea. IRSS now is being transitioned to the Naval Sea Systems Command (NAUSEA) IRST Engineering and Manufacturing Development (E&MD) Program, where it will serve, with appropriate modifications, as the engineering development model (EDM) and will be fielded aboard a U.S. Navy ship. This paper summarizes the process of developing and fielding IRSS, describes test results accomplished at sea during 1996, and discusses the technical and engineering lessons associated with design, development and testing of IRSS. Results are presented covering the areas of sensor component and overall system radiometrics (e.g., sensitivity and dynamic range), channel uniformity, stabilization, and optical, electrical and information (i.e., signal processing/track) resolution.

  19. Mud Pit Identification Report, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (September 2001, Rev. No. 0)

    SciTech Connect

    NNSA /NV

    2001-09-20

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection completed the Mud Pit Strategy, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada (DOE/NV, 2001) to document a systematic process for identifying and categorizing potentially contaminated mud pits located on the NTS, and systematically evaluating them for inclusion in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). The objectives of this report are to summarize the process used to define the six mud pit categories, identify mud pits, discuss the mud pits that do not meet FFACO entry criteria, identify mud pits for proposed FFACO entry, and describe the general mud pit distribution. Underground nuclear testing conducted since 1951 at the NTS has produced mud pits that were used for the transfer and collection of drilling mud, rock cuttings, and drilling fluids. This report documents the execution of the strategy document by examining the identification process and documenting these results. For clarification purposes, this document uses the term ''entry'' to indicate inclusion of mud pits into the FFACO and ''exclusion'' to indicate those mud pits which do not meet the ''entry'' criteria defined in this report. Based on this criteria, 257 mud pits identified that have been proposed for FFACO entry were found in 14 separate areas of the NTS. Each of the 257 mud pits proposed for FFACO entry will need to be located in the field, photographed, and documented during future Industrial Sites Project, Preliminary Assessment activities. If the field review determines that a mud pit was misidentified or improperly categorized, the appropriate FFACO modification request will be submitted for review and approval.

  20. 40 CFR 136.3 - Identification of test procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... between the reporting requirements of 40 CFR parts 122 and 125 and any reporting requirements associated with the methods listed in these tables, the provisions of 40 CFR parts 122 and 125 are controlling and..., § 136.5(a) through (d) or 40 CFR 401.13, other additional or alternate test procedures may be...

  1. 40 CFR 136.3 - Identification of test procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... between the reporting requirements of 40 CFR parts 122 and 125 and any reporting requirements associated with the methods listed in these tables, the provisions of 40 CFR parts 122 and 125 are controlling and..., § 136.5(a) through (d) or 40 CFR 401.13, other additional or alternate test procedures may be...

  2. 40 CFR 136.3 - Identification of test procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... between the reporting requirements of 40 CFR parts 122 and 125 and any reporting requirements associated with the methods listed in these tables, the provisions of 40 CFR Parts 122 and 125 are controlling and..., § 136.5(a) through (d) or 40 CFR 401.13, other additional or alternate test procedures may be...

  3. Combing Visible and Infrared Spectral Tests for Dust Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Yaping; Levy, Robert; Kleidman, Richard; Remer, Lorraine; Mattoo, Shana

    2016-01-01

    The MODIS Dark Target aerosol algorithm over Ocean (DT-O) uses spectral reflectance in the visible, near-IR and SWIR wavelengths to determine aerosol optical depth (AOD) and Angstrom Exponent (AE). Even though DT-O does have "dust-like" models to choose from, dust is not identified a priori before inversion. The "dust-like" models are not true "dust models" as they are spherical and do not have enough absorption at short wavelengths, so retrieved AOD and AE for dusty regions tends to be biased. The inference of "dust" is based on postprocessing criteria for AOD and AE by users. Dust aerosol has known spectral signatures in the near-UV (Deep blue), visible, and thermal infrared (TIR) wavelength regions. Multiple dust detection algorithms have been developed over the years with varying detection capabilities. Here, we test a few of these dust detection algorithms, to determine whether they can be useful to help inform the choices made by the DT-O algorithm. We evaluate the following methods: The multichannel imager (MCI) algorithm uses spectral threshold tests in (0.47, 0.64, 0.86, 1.38, 2.26, 3.9, 11.0, 12.0 micrometer) channels and spatial uniformity test [Zhao et al., 2010]. The NOAA dust aerosol index (DAI) uses spectral contrast in the blue channels (412nm and 440nm) [Ciren and Kundragunta, 2014]. The MCI is already included as tests within the "Wisconsin" (MOD35) Cloud mask algorithm.

  4. IDENTIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF DISEASE USING PULMONARY FUNCTION TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract
    Pulmonary function testing is used routinely in human medicine to objectively define functional deficits in individuals with respiratory disease. Despite the fact that respiratory disease is a common problem in veterinary medicine, evaluation of the small animal pa...

  5. Evaluating Gifted Identification Practice: Aptitude Testing and Linguistically Diverse Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Michael S.; Kirsch, Lauri

    2011-01-01

    The authors examined individually administered IQ scores from an entire K-5 population (N = 432) of Limited English Proficient students referred for gifted program eligibility determination in a single large urban district in the southeastern United States. Of 8 IQ tests compared, only 1, the Stanford-Binet V, had scores appreciably lower than…

  6. Application of odor identification test in Parkinson's disease in China: a matched case-control study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Chen, Shuai; Kang, Wen-Yan; Li, Bo; Xu, Zhi-Min; Xiao, Qin; Liu, Jun; Wang, Ying; Wang, Gang; Chen, Sheng-Di

    2012-05-15

    As one of the most common non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD), hyposmia is of great importance in establishing the early diagnosis of PD. To date, there are still no studies on the application of the 16-item odor identification test from Sniffin' Sticks (SS-16) in Chinese patients with PD. The aim of this study was to investigate the validity of SS-16 in Chinese PD patients (n=110) compared with age and gender matched controls (n=110), and to explore the associated factors with olfactory function in PD patients. The 16 odors in the original odor identification test were retained but some alternative descriptions were developed before applications. Mean identification scores in patients were significantly lower than in controls (7.3 ± 2.8 VS. 11.6 ± 2.0 P<0.01), with 66.4% of patients had an impairment of odor identification as evaluated by 95% confidential interval of the identification score of the control group. Receiver operating characteristic curves revealed 86% sensitivity and 81% specificity in separating PD and healthy controls with a cut-off value of 9.5. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that autonomic dysfunction was a significant influential factor of odor identification scores in patients with PD. In conclusion, SS-16 provides a valid instrument for olfactory assessment in Chinese PD patients, and hyposmia may correlate with autonomic dysfunction in patients with PD. PMID:22364958

  7. Field Testing of a Portable Radiation Detector and Mapping System

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstetter, K.J.; Hayes, D.W.; Eakle, R.F.

    1998-03-01

    Researchers at the Savannah River Site (SRS) have developed a man- portable radiation detector and mapping system (RADMAPS) which integrates the accumulation of radiation information with precise ground locations. RADMAPS provides field personnel with the ability to detect, locate, and characterize nuclear material at a site or facility by analyzing the gamma or neutron spectra and correlating them with position. the man-portable field unit records gamma or neutron count rate information and its location, along with date and time, using an embedded Global Positioning System (GPS). RADMAPS is an advancement in data fusion, integrating several off-the-shelf technologies with new computer software resulting in a system that is simple to deploy and provides information useful to field personnel in an easily understandable form. Decisions on subsequent actions can be made in the field to efficiently use available field resources. The technologies employed in this system include: recording GPS, radiation detection (typically scintillation detectors), pulse height analysis, analog-to-digital converters, removable solid-state (Flash or SRAM) memory cards, Geographic Information System (GIS) software and personal computers with CD-ROM supporting digital base maps. RADMAPS includes several field deployable data acquisition systems designed to simultaneously record radiation and geographic positions. This paper summarizes the capabilities of RADMAPS and some of the results of field tests performed with the system.

  8. A color test for the convenient identification of an ingested surface activating agent.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Naoko; Jamal, Mostofa; Takakura, Ayaka; Kumihashi, Mitsuru; Tobiume, Tadashi; Tsutsui, Kunihiko; Ameno, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Color tests are easy, simple and inexpensive methods for the qualitative identification of chemicals. A color test was applied to the stomach contents of a forensic autopsy case. The result of the test, using bromophenol blue reagent, indicated the ingestion of a commercial cleaning product containing a cationic surface activating agent. Our findings suggest that forensic investigators should consider the additives used in commercial chemical products, such as surface activating agents, when determining the cause of death. PMID:26419519

  9. Large Field Photogrammetry Techniques in Aircraft and Spacecraft Impact Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littell, Justin D.

    2010-01-01

    The Landing and Impact Research Facility (LandIR) at NASA Langley Research Center is a 240 ft. high A-frame structure which is used for full-scale crash testing of aircraft and rotorcraft vehicles. Because the LandIR provides a unique capability to introduce impact velocities in the forward and vertical directions, it is also serving as the facility for landing tests on full-scale and sub-scale Orion spacecraft mass simulators. Recently, a three-dimensional photogrammetry system was acquired to assist with the gathering of vehicle flight data before, throughout and after the impact. This data provides the basis for the post-test analysis and data reduction. Experimental setups for pendulum swing tests on vehicles having both forward and vertical velocities can extend to 50 x 50 x 50 foot cubes, while weather, vehicle geometry, and other constraints make each experimental setup unique to each test. This paper will discuss the specific calibration techniques for large fields of views, camera and lens selection, data processing, as well as best practice techniques learned from using the large field of view photogrammetry on a multitude of crash and landing test scenarios unique to the LandIR.

  10. A possible field test for marine cloud brightening geoengineering. A possible field test for marine cloud brightening geoengineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadian, A.; Wood, R.; Coe, H.; Latham, J.

    2011-12-01

    A possible field test for marine cloud brightening geoengineering. Abstract: The Marine Cloud Brightening (MCB) geoengineering technique (Latham et al 2008) hypothesizes that seeding marine stratocumulus clouds with copious quantities of roughly monodisperse sub-micrometre seawater particles can enhance the cloud droplet number concentration and increase cloud albedo. Here, we propose a set of field tests to critically assess the efficacy of the MCB geoengineering proposal over a limited area. The tests are de minimus with respect to their climate effects. The tests involve three phases, with increasing logistical complexity, each of which is designed to test one or more important components of the cloud brightening scheme. Each involves the introduction and monitoring of controlled aerosol perturbations from one or more ship-based seeding platforms up to a limited area of 100x100 km2. A suite of observational platforms of increasing number and complexity, including aircraft, ships and satellites, will observe the aerosol plume and in the later experiments the cloud and albedo responses to the aerosol perturbations. These responses must include the necessary cloud physical and chemical processes which determine the efficacy of the cloud brightening scheme. Since these processes are also central to the broader problem of aerosol-cloud-climate interactions, such field tests would have significant benefits for climate science in addition to providing a critical test of the MCB hypothesis. Such field experiments should be designed and conducted in an objective manner within the framework of emerging geoengineering research governance structures. Reference: Latham J. et al.. (2008) Global temperature stabilization via controlled albedo enhancement of low-level maritime clouds. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A doi:10.1098/rsta.2008.0137

  11. Laboratory or Field Tests for Evaluating Firefighters' Work Capacity?

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Ann-Sofie; Oksa, Juha; Malm, Christer

    2014-01-01

    Muscle strength is important for firefighters work capacity. Laboratory tests used for measurements of muscle strength, however, are complicated, expensive and time consuming. The aims of the present study were to investigate correlations between physical capacity within commonly occurring and physically demanding firefighting work tasks and both laboratory and field tests in full time (N = 8) and part-time (N = 10) male firefighters and civilian men (N = 8) and women (N = 12), and also to give recommendations as to which field tests might be useful for evaluating firefighters' physical work capacity. Laboratory tests of isokinetic maximal (IM) and endurance (IE) muscle power and dynamic balance, field tests including maximal and endurance muscle performance, and simulated firefighting work tasks were performed. Correlations with work capacity were analyzed with Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (rs). The highest significant (p<0.01) correlations with laboratory and field tests were for Cutting: IE trunk extension (rs = 0.72) and maximal hand grip strength (rs = 0.67), for Stairs: IE shoulder flexion (rs = −0.81) and barbell shoulder press (rs = −0.77), for Pulling: IE shoulder extension (rs = −0.82) and bench press (rs = −0.85), for Demolition: IE knee extension (rs = 0.75) and bench press (rs = 0.83), for Rescue: IE shoulder flexion (rs = −0.83) and bench press (rs = −0.82), and for the Terrain work task: IE trunk flexion (rs = −0.58) and upright barbell row (rs = −0.70). In conclusion, field tests may be used instead of laboratory tests. Maximal hand grip strength, bench press, chin ups, dips, upright barbell row, standing broad jump, and barbell shoulder press were strongly correlated (rs≥0.7) with work capacity and are therefore recommended for evaluating firefighters work capacity. PMID:24614596

  12. Field tests for evaluating the aerobic work capacity of firefighters.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Ann-Sofie; Oksa, Juha; Gavhed, Désirée; Malm, Christer

    2013-01-01

    Working as a firefighter is physically strenuous, and a high level of physical fitness increases a firefighter's ability to cope with the physical stress of their profession. Direct measurements of aerobic capacity, however, are often complicated, time consuming, and expensive. The first aim of the present study was to evaluate the correlations between direct (laboratory) and indirect (field) aerobic capacity tests with common and physically demanding firefighting tasks. The second aim was to give recommendations as to which field tests may be the most useful for evaluating firefighters' aerobic work capacity. A total of 38 subjects (26 men and 12 women) were included. Two aerobic capacity tests, six field tests, and seven firefighting tasks were performed. Lactate threshold and onset of blood lactate accumulation were found to be correlated to the performance of one work task (r(s) = -0.65 and -0.63, p<0.01, respectively). Absolute (mL · min(-1)) and relative (mL · kg(-1) · min(-1)) maximal aerobic capacity was correlated to all but one of the work tasks (r(s) = -0.79 to 0.55 and -0.74 to 0.47, p<0.01, respectively). Aerobic capacity is important for firefighters' work performance, and we have concluded that the time to row 500 m, the time to run 3000 m relative to body weight (s · kg(-1)), and the percent of maximal heart rate achieved during treadmill walking are the most valid field tests for evaluating a firefighter's aerobic work capacity. PMID:23844153

  13. Upgraded Near-Field Antenna-Testing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunath, Richard R.; Garrett, Michael J.

    1994-01-01

    Upgraded system for near-field testing of large microwave antenna built around commercial automated network analyzer (HP8510) designed for measurement and characterization of microwave circuits and components. Contains highly capable microwave receiver also suitable for far-field and radar-cross-section measurements. Receiver operates in fast-data-acquisition mode at rate of one new data point every millisecond without averaging. Also operates with greater sensitivity by use of averaging feature at time penalty of 0.2 ms per average. Time-domain option added to analyzer enables it to perform time-domain reflectometry.

  14. Multiphase pumps and flow meters -- Status of field testing

    SciTech Connect

    Skiftesvik, P.K.; Svaeren, J.A.

    1995-12-31

    With the development and qualification of multiphase pumps and multiphase flow meters, two new tools have been made available to the oil and gas industry for enhanced production from existing installations or new field developments. This paper presents an overview of the major achievements gained from various test installations carried out the last years using equipment qualified by Framo Engineering AS. The experience from the extensive Field Verification Programmes as described shows that multiphase pumps and meters can operate in various and often harsh well environments providing significant well stream pressure boost or acceptable phase accuracy measurements of oil, water and gas.

  15. Star-field identification algorithm. [for implementation on CCD-based imaging camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholl, M. S.

    1993-01-01

    A description of a new star-field identification algorithm that is suitable for implementation on CCD-based imaging cameras is presented. The minimum identifiable star pattern element consists of an oriented star triplet defined by three stars, their celestial coordinates, and their visual magnitudes. The algorithm incorporates tolerance to faulty input data, errors in the reference catalog, and instrument-induced systematic errors.

  16. ITER Test Blanket Module Error Field Simulation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffer, M. J.

    2010-11-01

    Recent experiments at DIII-D used an active-coil mock-up to investigate effects of magnetic error fields similar to those expected from two ferromagnetic Test Blanket Modules (TBMs) in one ITER equatorial port. The largest and most prevalent observed effect was plasma toroidal rotation slowing across the entire radial profile, up to 60% in H-mode when the mock-up local ripple at the plasma was ˜4 times the local ripple expected in front of ITER TBMs. Analysis showed the slowing to be consistent with non-resonant braking by the mock-up field. There was no evidence of strong electromagnetic braking by resonant harmonics. These results are consistent with the near absence of resonant helical harmonics in the TBM field. Global particle and energy confinement in H-mode decreased by <20% for the maximum mock-up ripple, but <5% at the local ripple expected in ITER. These confinement reductions may be linked with the large velocity reductions. TBM field effects were small in L-mode but increased with plasma beta. The L-H power threshold was unaffected within error bars. The mock-up field increased plasma sensitivity to mode locking by a known n=1 test field (n = toroidal harmonic number). In H-mode the increased locking sensitivity was from TBM torque slowing plasma rotation. At low beta, locked mode tolerance was fully recovered by re-optimizing the conventional DIII-D ``I-coils'' empirical compensation of n=1 errors in the presence of the TBM mock-up field. Empirical error compensation in H-mode should be addressed in future experiments. Global loss of injected neutral beam fast ions was within error bars, but 1 MeV fusion triton loss may have increased. The many DIII-D mock-up results provide important benchmarks for models needed to predict effects of TBMs in ITER.

  17. Evaluation of six agglutination tests for Staphylococcus aureus identification depending upon local prevalence of meticillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA).

    PubMed

    Weist, Klaus; Cimbal, Ann-Katrin; Lecke, Christoph; Kampf, Günter; Rüden, Henning; Vonberg, Ralf-Peter

    2006-03-01

    Most routine laboratory detection of Staphylococcus aureus isolates is based on rapid agglutination test systems. Failure of agglutination assays to identify meticillin-resistant S. aureus strains (MRSA) has been demonstrated. The aim of this study was to evaluate six commercially available agglutination tests for the detection of meticillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) and mecA-positive MRSA strains. The Dry Spot Staphytect Plus test (Oxoid), the Pastorex Staph Plus test (Bio-Rad), the Slidex Staph-Kit and Slidex Staph Plus test (bioMérieux), the Staphaurex Plus test (Remel) and the Staphylase Test (Oxoid) were used. As determined by pulsed field gel electrophoresis, 52 distinct MRSA strains from five countries, 83 MSSA strains and 150 coagulase-negative staphylococci were included. Species identification and determination of susceptibility patterns were performed using colony morphology, Gram stain, catalase testing, tube coagulase testing, DNase testing, mannitol fermentation, susceptibility testing towards oxacillin by Etest, coagulase gene PCR, fibrinogen receptor gene PCR and PCR of the mecA gene. Sensitivity of the agglutination tests ranged from 82.7 to 100.0 % for MRSA strains and 92.8 to 100.0 % for MSSA strains, respectively. Specificity of the test systems ranged from 91.3 to 99.1 %. None of the six agglutination assays produced correct reactions for all staphylococci tested. Only the Dry Spot Staphytect Plus test correctly identified all 52 MRSA strains. For the other tests kits, sensitivity of MRSA detection was lower than for MSSA isolates. Depending upon the local MRSA prevalence and the parameter of interest (sensitivity or specificity), these test systems may be useful for routine diagnostic purposes.

  18. SMART wind turbine rotor. Design and field test

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Jonathan Charles; Resor, Brian Ray; Paquette, Joshua A.; White, Jonathan Randall

    2014-01-01

    The Wind Energy Technologies department at Sandia National Laboratories has developed and field tested a wind turbine rotor with integrated trailing-edge flaps designed for active control of rotor aerodynamics. The SMART Rotor project was funded by the Wind and Water Power Technologies Office of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and was conducted to demonstrate active rotor control and evaluate simulation tools available for active control research. This report documents the design, fabrication, and testing of the SMART Rotor. This report begins with an overview of active control research at Sandia and the objectives of this project. The SMART blade, based on the DOE / SNL 9-meter CX-100 blade design, is then documented including all modifications necessary to integrate the trailing edge flaps, sensors incorporated into the system, and the fabrication processes that were utilized. Finally the test site and test campaign are described.

  19. Identification of yeasts from clinical specimens by oxidase test.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S; Arora, B S; Mathur, M D

    2000-10-01

    A total of 100 yeasts and yeast like fungi isolates from clinical specimens were negative for oxidase production on Sabouraud dextrose agar. When grown on Columbia agar, chocolate agar, tryptose agar, Mueller-Hinton agar, brain heart infusion and a medium resembling Sabouraud's dextrose agar but with starch instead of dextrose, all the isolate of Candida albicans (55), C. guilliermondii (6), C. parapsilosis (14), C. tropicalis (6), C. pseudotropicalis (6) and Crytococcus neoformans (2) were positive for oxidase producation. Torulopsis glabrata (2), Saccharomyces cervisiae (2) and two out of seven isolates of C. krusei were negative for oxidase test. PMID:11344606

  20. Evaluation of Verigene Blood Culture Test Systems for Rapid Identification of Positive Blood Cultures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Seok; Kang, Go-Eun; Kim, Han-Sung; Kim, Hyun Soo; Song, Wonkeun; Lee, Kyu Man

    2016-01-01

    The performance of molecular tests using the Verigene Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Blood Culture nucleic acid tests (BC-GP and BC-GN, resp.; Naosphere, Northbrook, IL, USA) was evaluated for the identification of microorganisms detected from blood cultures. Ninety-nine blood cultures containing Gram-positive bacteria and 150 containing Gram-negative bacteria were analyzed using the BC-GP and BC-GN assays, respectively. Blood cultures were performed using the Bactec blood culture system (BD Diagnostic Systems, Franklin Lakes, NJ, USA) and conventional identification and antibiotic-susceptibility tests were performed using a MicroScan system (Siemens, West Sacramento, CA, USA). When a single strain of bacteria was isolated from the blood culture, Verigene assays correctly identified 97.9% (94/96) of Gram-positive bacteria and 93.8% (137/146) of Gram-negative bacteria. Resistance genes mecA and vanA were correctly detected by the BC-GP assay, while the extended-spectrum β-lactamase CTX-M and the carbapenemase OXA resistance gene were detected from 30 cases cultures by the BC-GN assay. The BC-GP and BC-GN assays showed high agreement with conventional identification and susceptibility tests. These tests are useful for rapid identification of microorganisms and the detection of clinically important resistance genes from positive Bactec blood cultures.

  1. Evaluation of Verigene Blood Culture Test Systems for Rapid Identification of Positive Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Seok; Kang, Go-Eun; Kim, Han-Sung; Song, Wonkeun; Lee, Kyu Man

    2016-01-01

    The performance of molecular tests using the Verigene Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Blood Culture nucleic acid tests (BC-GP and BC-GN, resp.; Naosphere, Northbrook, IL, USA) was evaluated for the identification of microorganisms detected from blood cultures. Ninety-nine blood cultures containing Gram-positive bacteria and 150 containing Gram-negative bacteria were analyzed using the BC-GP and BC-GN assays, respectively. Blood cultures were performed using the Bactec blood culture system (BD Diagnostic Systems, Franklin Lakes, NJ, USA) and conventional identification and antibiotic-susceptibility tests were performed using a MicroScan system (Siemens, West Sacramento, CA, USA). When a single strain of bacteria was isolated from the blood culture, Verigene assays correctly identified 97.9% (94/96) of Gram-positive bacteria and 93.8% (137/146) of Gram-negative bacteria. Resistance genes mecA and vanA were correctly detected by the BC-GP assay, while the extended-spectrum β-lactamase CTX-M and the carbapenemase OXA resistance gene were detected from 30 cases cultures by the BC-GN assay. The BC-GP and BC-GN assays showed high agreement with conventional identification and susceptibility tests. These tests are useful for rapid identification of microorganisms and the detection of clinically important resistance genes from positive Bactec blood cultures. PMID:26904669

  2. Field Testing: Independent, Accredited Testing and Validation for the Wind Industry (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-11-01

    This fact sheet describes the field testing capabilities at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). NREL's specialized facilities and personnel at the NWTC provide the U.S. wind industry with scientific and engineering support that has proven critical to the development of wind energy for U.S. energy needs. The NWTC's specialized field-testing capabilities have evolved over 30 years of continuous support by the U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program and long standing industry partnerships. The NWTC provides wind industry manufacturers, developers, and operators with turbine and component testing all in one convenient location. Although industry utilizes sophisticated modeling tools to design and optimize turbine configurations, there are always limitations in modeling capabilities, and testing is a necessity to ensure performance and reliability. Designs require validation and testing is the only way to determine if there are flaws. Prototype testing is especially important in capturing manufacturing flaws that might require fleet-wide retrofits. The NWTC works with its industry partners to verify the performance and reliability of wind turbines that range in size from 400 Watts to 3 megawatts. Engineers conduct tests on components and full-scale turbines in laboratory environments and in the field. Test data produced from these tests can be used to validate turbine design codes and simulations that further advance turbine designs.

  3. A simple, low cost application of a flight test parameter identification system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, R.; Roskam, J.

    1982-01-01

    The flight test system combines state-of-the-art microprocessor technology and high accuracy instrumentation with parameter identification technology which minimize data and flight time requirements. The system was designed to avoid permanent modifications of the test airplane and allow quick installation. It is capable of longitudinal and lateral-directional stability and control derivative estimation. This paper presents details of this system, calibration and flight test procedures, and the results of the Cessna 172 flight test program. The system has proven easy to install, simple to operate, and capable of accurate estimation of stability and control parameters in the Cessna 172 flight tests.

  4. Behaviour model identification based on inverse modeling and using Optical Full Field Measurements (OFFM): application on rubber and steel

    SciTech Connect

    Velay, V.; Robert, L.; Schmidt, F.; Hmida, S.; Vallet, T.

    2007-04-07

    Biaxial properties of materials (polymer or steel) used in many industrial processes are often difficult to measure. However, these properties are useful for the numerical simulations of plastic-processing operations like blow moulding or thermoforming for polymers and superplastic forming or single point incremental forming for steels. Today, Optical Full Field Measurements (OFFM) are promising tools for experimental analysis of materials. Indeed, they are able to provide a very large amount of data (displacement or strain) spatially distributed. In this paper, a mixed numerical and experimental investigation is proposed in order to identify multi-axial constitutive behaviour models. The procedure is applied on two different materials commonly used in forming processes: polymer (rubber in this first approach) and steel. Experimental tests are performed on various rubber and steel structural specimens (notched and open-hole plate samples) in order to generate heterogeneous displacement field. Two different behaviour models are considered. On the one hand, a Money-Rivlin hyperelastic law is investigated to describe the high levels of strain induced in tensile test performed on a rubber open-hole specimen. On the other hand, Ramberg-Osgood law allows to reproduce elasto-plastic behaviour of steel on a specimen that induces heterogeneous strain fields. Each parameter identification is based on a same Finite Element Model Updated (FEMU) procedure which consists in comparing results provided by the numerical simulation (ABAQUS) with full field measurements obtained by the DISC (Digital Image Stereo-Correlation) technique (Vic-3D)

  5. Mathematical model of testing of pipeline integrity by thermal fields

    SciTech Connect

    Vaganova, Nataliia

    2014-11-18

    Thermal fields testing at the ground surface above a pipeline are considered. One method to obtain and investigate an ideal thermal field in different environments is a direct numerical simulation of heat transfer processes taking into account the most important physical factors. In the paper a mathematical model of heat propagation from an underground source is described with accounting of physical factors such as filtration of water in soil and solar radiation. Thermal processes are considered in 3D origin where the heat source is a pipeline with constant temperature and non-uniform isolated shell (with 'damages'). This problem leads to solution of heat diffusivity equation with nonlinear boundary conditions. Approaches to analysis of thermal fields are considered to detect damages.

  6. The blue field entoptic test with normal patients.

    PubMed

    Potter, J W; Norden, L C

    1983-12-01

    One hundred normal patients were evaluated with the Blue Field Entoptoscope test. Of those one hundred patients, ninety-nine were able to describe the appearance of their own leukocytes. The methodology did not permit encouraging or coaching patients to see their leukocytes. Of the ninety-nine who could perceive their own leukocytes, nineteen 19.19%) were unable to perceive an approximately equal number in each of the four quadrants of the blue field of light which is divided by a reticle. These patients who did not see an equal number of leukocytes in all four quadrants were generally older than those who saw an equal number of leukocytes. The results indicate that if the Blue Field Entoptoscope is to be used in clinical practice or research, it is useful to standardize the instrument for the population studied. In particular, the instrument should be standardized for age. PMID:6655191

  7. Incorporating Spatial Models in Visual Field Test Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, Nikki J.; McKendrick, Allison M.; Turpin, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To introduce a perimetric algorithm (Spatially Weighted Likelihoods in Zippy Estimation by Sequential Testing [ZEST] [SWeLZ]) that uses spatial information on every presentation to alter visual field (VF) estimates, to reduce test times without affecting output precision and accuracy. Methods SWeLZ is a maximum likelihood Bayesian procedure, which updates probability mass functions at VF locations using a spatial model. Spatial models were created from empirical data, computational models, nearest neighbor, random relationships, and interconnecting all locations. SWeLZ was compared to an implementation of the ZEST algorithm for perimetry using computer simulations on 163 glaucomatous and 233 normal VFs (Humphrey Field Analyzer 24-2). Output measures included number of presentations and visual sensitivity estimates. Results There was no significant difference in accuracy or precision of SWeLZ for the different spatial models relative to ZEST, either when collated across whole fields or when split by input sensitivity. Inspection of VF maps showed that SWeLZ was able to detect localized VF loss. SWeLZ was faster than ZEST for normal VFs: median number of presentations reduced by 20% to 38%. The number of presentations was equivalent for SWeLZ and ZEST when simulated on glaucomatous VFs. Conclusions SWeLZ has the potential to reduce VF test times in people with normal VFs, without detriment to output precision and accuracy in glaucomatous VFs. Translational Relevance SWeLZ is a novel perimetric algorithm. Simulations show that SWeLZ can reduce the number of test presentations for people with normal VFs. Since many patients have normal fields, this has the potential for significant time savings in clinical settings. PMID:26981329

  8. Lidar Tracking of Multiple Fluorescent Tracers: Method and Field Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhard, Wynn L.; Willis, Ron J.

    1992-01-01

    Past research and applications have demonstrated the advantages and usefulness of lidar detection of a single fluorescent tracer to track air motions. Earlier researchers performed an analytical study that showed good potential for lidar discrimination and tracking of two or three different fluorescent tracers at the same time. The present paper summarizes the multiple fluorescent tracer method, discusses its expected advantages and problems, and describes our field test of this new technique.

  9. On-site cell field test support program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staniunas, J. W.; Merten, G. P.

    1982-09-01

    Utility sites for data monitoring were reviewed and selected. Each of these sites will be instrumented and its energy requirements monitored and analyzed for one year prior to the selection of 40 Kilowatt fuel cell field test sites. Analyses in support of the selection of sites for instrumentation shows that many building sectors offered considerable market potential. These sectors include nursing home, health club, restaurant, industrial, hotel/motel and apartment.

  10. Field test results for radioactive waste drum characterization with Waste Inspection Tomography (WIT)

    SciTech Connect

    Bernardi, R.T.

    1997-11-01

    This paper summarizes the design, fabrication, factory testing, evaluation and demonstration of waste inspection tomography (WIT). WIT consists of a self-sufficient, mobile semi-trailer for Non-Destructive Evaluation and Non-Destructive Assay (NDE/NDA) characterization of nuclear waste drums using X-ray and gamma-ray tomographic techniques. The 23-month WIT Phase I initial test results include 2 MeV Digital Radiography (DR), Computed Tomography (CT), Anger camera imaging, Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT), Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy, Collimated Gamma Scanning (CGS), and Active and Passive Computed Tomography (A&PCT) using a 1.4 mCi source of {sup 166}Ho. These techniques were initially demonstrated on a 55-gallon phantom drum with three simulated waste matrices of combustibles, heterogeneous metals, and cement using check sources of gamma active isotopes. Waste matrix identification, isotopic identification, and attenuation-corrected gamma activity determination were all demonstrated nondestructively and noninvasively. Preliminary field tests results with nuclear waste drums are summarized. WIT has inspected drums with 0 to 20 grams plutonium 239. The minimum measured was 0.131 gram plutonium 239 in cement. 8 figs.

  11. Field-testing UV disinfection of drinking water

    SciTech Connect

    Gadgil, A.; Drescher, A.; Greene, D.; Miller, P.; Motau, C.; Stevens, F.

    1997-09-01

    A recently invented device, ``UV Waterworks,`` uses ultraviolet (UV) light to disinfect drinking water. Its novel features are: low cost, robust design, rapid disinfection, low electricity use, low maintenance, high flow rate and ability to work with unpressurized water sources. The device could service a community of 1,000 persons, at an annual total cost of less than 10 US cents per person. UV Waterworks has been successfully tested in the laboratory. Limited field trials of an early version of the device were conducted in India in 1994--95. Insights from these trials led to the present design. Extended field trials of UV Waterworks, initiated in South Africa in February 1997, will be coordinated by the South African Center for Essential Community Services (SACECS), with technical and organizational support from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory(LBNL) and the Natural Resources Defense Council (both US). The first of the eight planned sites of the year long trial is an AIDS hospice near Durban. Durban metro Water and LBNL lab-tested a UV Waterworks unit prior to installing it at the hospice in August, 1997. The authors describe the field test plans and preliminary results from Durban.

  12. Performance evaluation of infrared imaging system in field test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chensheng; Guo, Xiaodong; Ren, Tingting; Zhang, Zhi-jie

    2014-11-01

    Infrared imaging system has been applied widely in both military and civilian fields. Since the infrared imager has various types and different parameters, for system manufacturers and customers, there is great demand for evaluating the performance of IR imaging systems with a standard tool or platform. Since the first generation IR imager was developed, the standard method to assess the performance has been the MRTD or related improved methods which are not perfect adaptable for current linear scanning imager or 2D staring imager based on FPA detector. For this problem, this paper describes an evaluation method based on the triangular orientation discrimination metric which is considered as the effective and emerging method to evaluate the synthesis performance of EO system. To realize the evaluation in field test, an experiment instrument is developed. And considering the importance of operational environment, the field test is carried in practical atmospheric environment. The test imagers include panoramic imaging system and staring imaging systems with different optics and detectors parameters (both cooled and uncooled). After showing the instrument and experiment setup, the experiment results are shown. The target range performance is analyzed and discussed. In data analysis part, the article gives the range prediction values obtained from TOD method, MRTD method and practical experiment, and shows the analysis and results discussion. The experimental results prove the effectiveness of this evaluation tool, and it can be taken as a platform to give the uniform performance prediction reference.

  13. Early Evolution of the Toxicity Identification Evaluation Process: Contributions from the USEPA Effluent Testing Program

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of its whole effluent testing program, the USEPA developed an effects-directed analysis (EDA) approach to identifying the cause of toxicity in toxic effluents or ambient waters, an EDA process termed a “Toxicity Identification Evaluation” (TIE), which is the focus of this...

  14. Identification of the Gifted: Tests and Measurements: A Selective Bibliography. Exceptional Child Bibliography Series No. 668.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Handicapped and Gifted Children, Reston, VA.

    The annotated bibliography on tests and measurements for identification of the gifted contains approximately 75 abstracts and associated indexing information for documents published from 1959 to 1973 and selected from the computer files of the Council for Exceptional Children's Information Services and the Education Resources Information Center…

  15. Modification of potassium nitrate assimilation test for identification of clinically important yeasts.

    PubMed Central

    Pincus, D H; Salkin, I F; Hurd, N J; Levy, I L; Kemna, M A

    1988-01-01

    The modification of an auxanographic method used in yeast species identification to determine potassium nitrate (KNO3) assimilation resulted in a simple and inexpensive KNO3 assimilation test medium. The medium provided accurate and reliable results in less than 24 h. PMID:3343330

  16. Diagnostic test for prenatal identification of Down's syndrome and mental retardation and gene therapy therefor

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Desmond J.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2000-01-01

    A a diagnostic test useful for prenatal identification of Down syndrome and mental retardation. A method for gene therapy for correction and treatment of Down syndrome. DYRK gene involved in the ability to learn. A method for diagnosing Down's syndrome and mental retardation and an assay therefor. A pharmaceutical composition for treatment of Down's syndrome mental retardation.

  17. A Picture-Identification Test for Hearing-Impaired Children. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Mark; Lerman, Jay

    The Word Intelligibility by Picture Identification Test (WIPI) was developed to measure speech discrimination ability in hearing impaired children. In the first phase of development, the word stimuli were evaluated to determine whether they were within the recognition vocabulary of 15 hearing impaired children (aged 6 to 12) and whether the…

  18. Preparation of a blood culture pellet for rapid bacterial identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing.

    PubMed

    Croxatto, Antony; Prod'hom, Guy; Durussel, Christian; Greub, Gilbert

    2014-10-15

    Bloodstream infections and sepsis are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The successful outcome of patients suffering from bacteremia depends on a rapid identification of the infectious agent to guide optimal antibiotic treatment. The analysis of Gram stains from positive blood culture can be rapidly conducted and already significantly impact the antibiotic regimen. However, the accurate identification of the infectious agent is still required to establish the optimal targeted treatment. We present here a simple and fast bacterial pellet preparation from a positive blood culture that can be used as a sample for several essential downstream applications such as identification by MALDI-TOF MS, antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST) by disc diffusion assay or automated AST systems and by automated PCR-based diagnostic testing. The performance of these different identification and AST systems applied directly on the blood culture bacterial pellets is very similar to the performance normally obtained from isolated colonies grown on agar plates. Compared to conventional approaches, the rapid acquisition of a bacterial pellet significantly reduces the time to report both identification and AST. Thus, following blood culture positivity, identification by MALDI-TOF can be reported within less than 1 hr whereas results of AST by automated AST systems or disc diffusion assays within 8 to 18 hr, respectively. Similarly, the results of a rapid PCR-based assay can be communicated to the clinicians less than 2 hr following the report of a bacteremia. Together, these results demonstrate that the rapid preparation of a blood culture bacterial pellet has a significant impact on the identification and AST turnaround time and thus on the successful outcome of patients suffering from bloodstream infections.

  19. Deep Borehole Field Test Requirements and Controlled Assumptions.

    SciTech Connect

    Hardin, Ernest

    2015-07-01

    This document presents design requirements and controlled assumptions intended for use in the engineering development and testing of: 1) prototype packages for radioactive waste disposal in deep boreholes; 2) a waste package surface handling system; and 3) a subsurface system for emplacing and retrieving packages in deep boreholes. Engineering development and testing is being performed as part of the Deep Borehole Field Test (DBFT; SNL 2014a). This document presents parallel sets of requirements for a waste disposal system and for the DBFT, showing the close relationship. In addition to design, it will also inform planning for drilling, construction, and scientific characterization activities for the DBFT. The information presented here follows typical preparations for engineering design. It includes functional and operating requirements for handling and emplacement/retrieval equipment, waste package design and emplacement requirements, borehole construction requirements, sealing requirements, and performance criteria. Assumptions are included where they could impact engineering design. Design solutions are avoided in the requirements discussion. Deep Borehole Field Test Requirements and Controlled Assumptions July 21, 2015 iv ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This set of requirements and assumptions has benefited greatly from reviews by Gordon Appel, Geoff Freeze, Kris Kuhlman, Bob MacKinnon, Steve Pye, David Sassani, Dave Sevougian, and Jiann Su.

  20. Field test comparison of natural gas engine exhaust valves

    SciTech Connect

    Bicknell, W.B.; Hay, S.C.; Shade, W.N.; Statler, G.R.

    1996-12-31

    As part of a product improvement program, an extensive spark-ignited, turbocharged, natural gas engine exhaust valve test program was conducted using laboratory and field engines. Program objectives were to identify a valve and seat insert combination that increased mean time between overhauls (MTBO) while reducing the risk of premature valve cracking and failure. Following a thorough design review, a large number of valve and seat insert configurations were tested in a popular 900 RPM, 166 BHP (0.123 Mw) per cylinder industrial gas engine series. Material, head geometry, seat angle and other parameters were compared. Careful in-place measurements and post-test inspections compared various configurations and identified optimal exhaust valving for deployment in new units and upgrades of existing engines.

  1. Field assessments in conjunction with whole effluent toxicity testing

    SciTech Connect

    La Point, T.W.; Waller, W.T.

    2000-01-01

    Whole effluent toxicity (WET) tests are widely used to assess potential effects of wastewater discharges on aquatic life. This paper represents a summary of chapters in a 1996 Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry-sponsored workshop and a literature review concerning linkages between WET testing and associated field biomonitoring. Most published studies thus far focus primarily on benthic macroinvertebrates and on effluent-dominated stream systems in which effluents demonstrate little or no significant acute toxicity. Fewer studies examine WET test predictability in other aquatic ecosystems (e.g., wetlands, estuaries, large rivers) or deal with instream biota such as fish and primary producers. Published results indicate that standards for the usual WET freshwater test species, Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas, may not always protect most of the species inhabiting a receiving stream. Although WET tests are useful in predicting aquatic individual responses, they are not meant to directly measure natural population or community responses. Further, they do not address bioconcentration or bioaccumulation of hydrophobic compounds; do not assess eutrophication effects in receiving systems; and lastly, do not reflect genotoxic effects or function to test for endocrine-disrupting chemicals. Consequently, a more direct evaluation of ecosystem health, using bioassessment techniques, may be needed to properly evaluate aquatic systems affected by wastewater discharges.

  2. Direct-to-consumer genetic testing for predicting sports performance and talent identification: Consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Webborn, Nick; Williams, Alun; McNamee, Mike; Bouchard, Claude; Pitsiladis, Yannis; Ahmetov, Ildus; Ashley, Euan; Byrne, Nuala; Camporesi, Silvia; Collins, Malcolm; Dijkstra, Paul; Eynon, Nir; Fuku, Noriyuki; Garton, Fleur C; Hoppe, Nils; Holm, Søren; Kaye, Jane; Klissouras, Vassilis; Lucia, Alejandro; Maase, Kamiel; Moran, Colin; North, Kathryn N; Pigozzi, Fabio; Wang, Guan

    2015-12-01

    The general consensus among sport and exercise genetics researchers is that genetic tests have no role to play in talent identification or the individualised prescription of training to maximise performance. Despite the lack of evidence, recent years have witnessed the rise of an emerging market of direct-to-consumer marketing (DTC) tests that claim to be able to identify children's athletic talents. Targeted consumers include mainly coaches and parents. There is concern among the scientific community that the current level of knowledge is being misrepresented for commercial purposes. There remains a lack of universally accepted guidelines and legislation for DTC testing in relation to all forms of genetic testing and not just for talent identification. There is concern over the lack of clarity of information over which specific genes or variants are being tested and the almost universal lack of appropriate genetic counselling for the interpretation of the genetic data to consumers. Furthermore independent studies have identified issues relating to quality control by DTC laboratories with different results being reported from samples from the same individual. Consequently, in the current state of knowledge, no child or young athlete should be exposed to DTC genetic testing to define or alter training or for talent identification aimed at selecting gifted children or adolescents. Large scale collaborative projects, may help to develop a stronger scientific foundation on these issues in the future. PMID:26582191

  3. Critical overview of applications of genetic testing in sport talent identification.

    PubMed

    Roth, Stephen M

    2012-12-01

    Talent identification for future sport performance is of paramount interest for many groups given the challenges of finding and costs of training potential elite athletes. Because genetic factors have been implicated in many performance- related traits (strength, endurance, etc.), a natural inclination is to consider the addition of genetic testing to talent identification programs. While the importance of genetic factors to sport performance is generally not disputed, whether genetic testing can positively inform talent identification is less certain. The present paper addresses the science behind the genetic tests that are now commercially available (some under patent protection) and aimed at predicting future sport performance potential. Also discussed are the challenging ethical issues that emerge from the availability of these tests. The potential negative consequences associated with genetic testing of young athletes will very likely outweigh any positive benefit for sport performance prediction at least for the next several years. The paper ends by exploring the future possibilities for genetic testing as the science of genomics in sport matures over the coming decade(s).

  4. Direct-to-consumer genetic testing for predicting sports performance and talent identification: Consensus statement

    PubMed Central

    Webborn, Nick; Williams, Alun; McNamee, Mike; Bouchard, Claude; Pitsiladis, Yannis; Ahmetov, Ildus; Ashley, Euan; Byrne, Nuala; Camporesi, Silvia; Collins, Malcolm; Dijkstra, Paul; Eynon, Nir; Fuku, Noriyuki; Garton, Fleur C; Hoppe, Nils; Holm, Søren; Kaye, Jane; Klissouras, Vassilis; Lucia, Alejandro; Maase, Kamiel; Moran, Colin; North, Kathryn N; Pigozzi, Fabio; Wang, Guan

    2015-01-01

    The general consensus among sport and exercise genetics researchers is that genetic tests have no role to play in talent identification or the individualised prescription of training to maximise performance. Despite the lack of evidence, recent years have witnessed the rise of an emerging market of direct-to-consumer marketing (DTC) tests that claim to be able to identify children's athletic talents. Targeted consumers include mainly coaches and parents. There is concern among the scientific community that the current level of knowledge is being misrepresented for commercial purposes. There remains a lack of universally accepted guidelines and legislation for DTC testing in relation to all forms of genetic testing and not just for talent identification. There is concern over the lack of clarity of information over which specific genes or variants are being tested and the almost universal lack of appropriate genetic counselling for the interpretation of the genetic data to consumers. Furthermore independent studies have identified issues relating to quality control by DTC laboratories with different results being reported from samples from the same individual. Consequently, in the current state of knowledge, no child or young athlete should be exposed to DTC genetic testing to define or alter training or for talent identification aimed at selecting gifted children or adolescents. Large scale collaborative projects, may help to develop a stronger scientific foundation on these issues in the future. PMID:26582191

  5. Direct-to-consumer genetic testing for predicting sports performance and talent identification: Consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Webborn, Nick; Williams, Alun; McNamee, Mike; Bouchard, Claude; Pitsiladis, Yannis; Ahmetov, Ildus; Ashley, Euan; Byrne, Nuala; Camporesi, Silvia; Collins, Malcolm; Dijkstra, Paul; Eynon, Nir; Fuku, Noriyuki; Garton, Fleur C; Hoppe, Nils; Holm, Søren; Kaye, Jane; Klissouras, Vassilis; Lucia, Alejandro; Maase, Kamiel; Moran, Colin; North, Kathryn N; Pigozzi, Fabio; Wang, Guan

    2015-12-01

    The general consensus among sport and exercise genetics researchers is that genetic tests have no role to play in talent identification or the individualised prescription of training to maximise performance. Despite the lack of evidence, recent years have witnessed the rise of an emerging market of direct-to-consumer marketing (DTC) tests that claim to be able to identify children's athletic talents. Targeted consumers include mainly coaches and parents. There is concern among the scientific community that the current level of knowledge is being misrepresented for commercial purposes. There remains a lack of universally accepted guidelines and legislation for DTC testing in relation to all forms of genetic testing and not just for talent identification. There is concern over the lack of clarity of information over which specific genes or variants are being tested and the almost universal lack of appropriate genetic counselling for the interpretation of the genetic data to consumers. Furthermore independent studies have identified issues relating to quality control by DTC laboratories with different results being reported from samples from the same individual. Consequently, in the current state of knowledge, no child or young athlete should be exposed to DTC genetic testing to define or alter training or for talent identification aimed at selecting gifted children or adolescents. Large scale collaborative projects, may help to develop a stronger scientific foundation on these issues in the future.

  6. Use of smell test identification in Parkinson's disease in Mexico: a matched case-control study.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Violante, Mayela; Lees, Andrew J; Cervantes-Arriaga, Amin; Corona, Teresa; Silveira-Moriyama, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Smell tests can be useful in the differential diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD) but are affected by cultural factors. Currently there is no smell test tailored for the Mexican population but the brief smell identification test (B-SIT) was created as a cross-cultural SIT. We have created a translation of this test into Spanish adapted to the Mexican population and have applied it to 70 PD patients and 70 age- and gender-matched controls. The B-SIT differentiated PD and controls with 71.4% sensitivity and 85.7% specificity, when subjects were divided into two age groups.

  7. Interpretation of the tube coagulase test for identification of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Sperber, W H; Tatini, S R

    1975-04-01

    The tube coagulase test is a valid means of identifying Staphylococcus auerus, provided that only a firm clot that does not move when the tube is tipped is considered a positive reaction. The widely promulgated interpretation that all degrees of clotting in coagulase plasma are a positive identification of S. auerus was disproved by the use of other tests such as anaerobic glucose fermentation, thermonuclease production, and lysostaphin sensitivity. It was found that the source of supply of the coagulase plasma is a factor in the occurrence of false-positive coagulase test results. The use of a mixture of pig and rabbit plasma in the tube coagulase test is also discussed.

  8. TESTING WEAK-LENSING MAPS WITH REDSHIFT SURVEYS: A SUBARU FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, Michael J.; Geller, Margaret J.; Fabricant, Daniel G.; Utsumi, Yousuke; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Dell'Antonio, Ian P. E-mail: mgeller@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: yousuke.utsumi@nao.ac.jp E-mail: ian@het.brown.edu

    2012-05-10

    We use a dense redshift survey in the foreground of the Subaru GTO2deg{sup 2} weak-lensing field (centered at {alpha}{sub 2000} = 16{sup h}04{sup m}44{sup s}; {delta}{sub 2000} = 43 Degree-Sign 11'24'') to assess the completeness and comment on the purity of massive halo identification in the weak-lensing map. The redshift survey (published here) includes 4541 galaxies; 4405 are new redshifts measured with the Hectospec on the MMT. Among the weak-lensing peaks with a signal-to-noise greater than 4.25, 2/3 correspond to individual massive systems; this result is essentially identical to the Geller et al. test of the Deep Lens Survey (DLS) field F2. The Subaru map, based on images in substantially better seeing than the DLS, enables detection of less massive halos at fixed redshift as expected. We demonstrate that the procedure adopted by Miyazaki et al. for removing some contaminated peaks from the weak-lensing map improves agreement between the lensing map and the redshift survey in the identification of candidate massive systems.

  9. Relation of field independence and test-item format to student performance on written piagetian tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ló; Pez-Rupérez, F.; Palacios, C.; Sanchez, J.

    In this study we have investigated the relationship between the field-dependence-independence (FDI) dimension as measured by the Group Embedded Figures Test (GEFT) and subject performance on the Longeot test, a pencil-and-paper Piagetian test, through the open or closed format of its items. The sample consisted of 141 high school students. Correlation and variance analysis show that the FDI dimension and GEFT correlate significantly on only those items on the Longeot test that require formal reasoning. The effect of open- or closed-item format is found exclusively for formal items; only the open format discriminates significantly (at the 0.01 level) between the field-dependent and -independent subjects performing on this type of item. Some implications of these results for science education are discussed.

  10. Field tests of 2- and 40-tube condensers at the East Mesa Geothermal Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, R.W.; Domingo, N.

    1982-05-01

    Two water-cooled isobutane condensers, one with 2 tubes and one with 40 tubes, were subjected to field tests at the East Mesa Geothermal Test Site to assess relative heat transfer performance in both surface evaporator and direct-contact evaporator modes. The five groups of tests established that field performance was below earlier laboratory-determined levels and that direct-contact evaporator mode performance was poorer than that for the surface evaporator mode. In all test situations, fluted condenser tubes performed better than smooth condenser tubes. Cooling water quality had no significant effect on performance, but brine preflash in the direct-contact mode did promote some relative performance improvement. Important implications of these results for binary geothermal power plants are that (1) working-fluid-side impurities can significantly degrade heat transfer performance of the power plant condensers and (2) provisions for minimizing such impurities may be required.

  11. High temperature superconducting axial field magnetic coupler: realization and test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belguerras, L.; Mezani, S.; Lubin, T.; Lévêque, J.; Rezzoug, A.

    2015-09-01

    Contactless torque transmission through a large airgap is required in some industrial applications in which hermetic isolation is necessary. This torque transmission usually uses magnetic couplers, whose dimension strongly depends on the airgap flux density. The use of high temperature superconducting (HTS) coils to create a strong magnetic field may constitute a solution to reduce the size of the coupler. It is also possible to use this coupler to replace a torque tube in transmitting the torque produced by a HTS motor to its load. This paper presents the detailed construction and tests of an axial field HTS magnetic coupler. Pancake coils have been manufactured from BSCCO tape and used in one rotor of the coupler. The second rotor is mainly composed of NdFeB permanent magnets. Several tests have been carried out showing that the constructed coupler is working properly. A 3D finite element (FE) model of the studied coupler has been developed. Airgap magnetic field and torque measurements have been carried out and compared to the FE results. It has been shown that the measured and the computed quantities are in satisfactory agreement.

  12. Validity of Selected Lab and Field Tests of Physical Working Capacity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Edmund J.

    The validity of selected lab and field tests of physical working capacity was investigated. Forty-four male college students were administered a series of lab and field tests of physical working capacity. Lab tests include a test of maximum oxygen uptake, the PWC 170 test, the Harvard Step Test, the Progressive Pulse Ratio Test, Margaria Test of…

  13. [Measures to prevent patient identification errors in blood collection/physiological function testing utilizing a laboratory information system].

    PubMed

    Shimazu, Chisato; Hoshino, Satoshi; Furukawa, Taiji

    2013-08-01

    We constructed an integrated personal identification workflow chart using both bar code reading and an all in-one laboratory information system. The information system not only handles test data but also the information needed for patient guidance in the laboratory department. The reception terminals at the entrance, displays for patient guidance and patient identification tools at blood-sampling booths are all controlled by the information system. The number of patient identification errors was greatly reduced by the system. However, identification errors have not been abolished in the ultrasound department. After re-evaluation of the patient identification process in this department, we recognized that the major reason for the errors came from excessive identification workflow. Ordinarily, an ultrasound test requires patient identification 3 times, because 3 different systems are required during the entire test process, i.e. ultrasound modality system, laboratory information system and a system for producing reports. We are trying to connect the 3 different systems to develop a one-time identification workflow, but it is not a simple task and has not been completed yet. Utilization of the laboratory information system is effective, but is not yet perfect for patient identification. The most fundamental procedure for patient identification is to ask a person's name even today. Everyday checks in the ordinary workflow and everyone's participation in safety-management activity are important for the prevention of patient identification errors.

  14. [Measures to prevent patient identification errors in blood collection/physiological function testing utilizing a laboratory information system].

    PubMed

    Shimazu, Chisato; Hoshino, Satoshi; Furukawa, Taiji

    2013-08-01

    We constructed an integrated personal identification workflow chart using both bar code reading and an all in-one laboratory information system. The information system not only handles test data but also the information needed for patient guidance in the laboratory department. The reception terminals at the entrance, displays for patient guidance and patient identification tools at blood-sampling booths are all controlled by the information system. The number of patient identification errors was greatly reduced by the system. However, identification errors have not been abolished in the ultrasound department. After re-evaluation of the patient identification process in this department, we recognized that the major reason for the errors came from excessive identification workflow. Ordinarily, an ultrasound test requires patient identification 3 times, because 3 different systems are required during the entire test process, i.e. ultrasound modality system, laboratory information system and a system for producing reports. We are trying to connect the 3 different systems to develop a one-time identification workflow, but it is not a simple task and has not been completed yet. Utilization of the laboratory information system is effective, but is not yet perfect for patient identification. The most fundamental procedure for patient identification is to ask a person's name even today. Everyday checks in the ordinary workflow and everyone's participation in safety-management activity are important for the prevention of patient identification errors. PMID:24218775

  15. Field verification of the direct view optics model for human facial identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghera, Sameer; Krapels, Keith; Hixson, Jonathan; Reynolds, Joseph P.; Driggers, Ronald G.

    2009-04-01

    Previous work by the Army's Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate extended the Army's target acquisition performance models to include the task of facial identification in the visible band. In this work, additional field data for facial identification is used to validate the direct view optic (DVO) performance model. The target acquisition model for direct view optics is based on the contrast threshold function of the eye with a modification for the optics modulation transfer function (MTF) and the optics magnification. We also show that the current Targeting Task Performance (TTP) metric can approximate the measured data, without using the full accuracy provided by the two-dimensional specific object method described in previous work.

  16. Field test of a post-closure radiation monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, S.; Christy, C.E.; Heath, R.E.

    1995-12-01

    The DOE is conducting remedial actions at many sites contaminated with radioactive materials. After closure of these sites, long-term subsurface monitoring is typically required by law. This monitoring is generally labor intensive and expensive using conventional sampling and analysis techniques. The U.S. Department of Energy`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) has contracted with Babcock and Wilcox to develop a Long-Term Post-Closure Radiation Monitoring System (LPRMS) to reduce these monitoring costs. A prototype LPRMS probe was built, and B&W and FERMCO field tested this monitoring probe at the Fernald Environmental Management Project in the fall of 1994 with funding from the DOE`s Office of Technology Development (EM-50) through METC. The system was used to measure soil and water with known uranium contamination levels, both in drums and in situ at depths up to 3 meters. For comparison purposes, measurements were also performed using a more conventional survey probe with a sodium iodide scintillator directly butt-coupled to detection electronics. This paper presents a description and the results of the field tests. The results were used to characterize the lower detection limits, precision and bias of the system, which allowed the DOE to judge the monitoring system`s ability to meet its long-term post-closure radiation monitoring needs. Based on the test results, the monitoring system has been redesigned for fabrication and testing in a potential Phase III of this program. If the DOE feels that this system can meet its needs and chooses to continue into Phase III of this program, this redesigned full scale prototype system will be built and tested for a period of approximately a year. Such a system can be used at a variety of radioactively contaminated sites.

  17. Site Guidelines for a Deep Borehole Field Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassani, D.; Kuhlman, K. L.; Freeze, G. A.; MacKinnon, R. J.; Perry, F.

    2015-12-01

    The US DOE Office of Nuclear Energy Used Nuclear Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) is initiating a Deep Borehole Field Test (DBFT), without use of any radioactive waste, to evaluate the geoscience of the approach and technical capabilities for implementation. DOE has identified Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) as the Technical Lead for the UFDC DBFT Project, with the role of supporting DOE in (i) developing the overall DBFT Project Plan, (ii) management and integration of all DBFT Project activities, and (iii) providing Project technical guidance to DOE, other DOE National Laboratories, and university partners. The DBFT includes drilling one Characterization Borehole (CB-8.5" diameter), followed by an optional Field Test Borehole (FTB), to a depth of about 5,000 m (16,400 feet) into crystalline basement rock in a geologically stable continental location. The DBFT CB will be drilled and completed to facilitate downhole scientific testing and analyses. If site conditions are found to be favorable, DOE may drill the larger-diameter (17") FTB to facilitate proof-of-concept of handling, emplacement, and retrieval activities using surrogate waste containers. Guidelines for favorable DBFT site geohydrochemical and geomechanical conditions will be discussed and status of the DBFT Project will be provided. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND2015-6426A.

  18. Test plan for FY-94 digface characterization field experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Josten, N.E.; Roybal, L.G.

    1994-08-01

    The digface characterization concept has been under development at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) since fiscal year (FY) 1992 through the support of the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program. A digface characterization system conducts continuous subsurface characterization simultaneously with retrieval of hazardous and radioactive waste from buried waste sites. The system deploys multiple sensors at the retrieval operation digface and collects data that provide a basis for detecting, locating, and classifying buried materials and hazardous conditions before they are disturbed by the retrieval equipment. This test plan describes ongoing efforts to test the digface characterization concept at the INEL`s Cold Test Pit using a simplified prototype deployment apparatus and off-the-shelf sensors. FY-94 field experiments will explore problems in object detection and classification. Detection and classification of objects are fundamental to three of the four primary functions of digface characterization during overburden removal. This test plan establishes procedures for collecting and validating the digface characterization data sets. Analysis of these data will focus on testing and further developing analysis methods for object detection and classification during overburden removal.

  19. Laboratory and field testing of improved geothermal rock bits

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, R.R.; Jones, A.H.; Winzenried, R.W.; Maish, A.B.

    1980-07-01

    The development and testing of 222 mm (8-3/4 inch) unsealed, insert type, medium hard formation, high-temperature bits are described. The new bits were fabricated by substituting improved materials in critical bit components. These materials were selected on bases of their high temperature properties, machinability, and heat treatment response. Program objectives required that both machining and heat treating could be accomplished with existing rock bit production equipment. Two types of experimental bits were subjected to laboratory air drilling tests at 250/sup 0/C (482/sup 0/F) in cast iron. These tests indicated field testing could be conducted without danger to the hole, and that bearing wear would be substantially reduced. Six additional experimental bits, and eight conventional bits were then subjected to air drilling a 240/sup 0/C (464/sup 0/F) in Francisan Graywacke at The Geysers, CA. The materials selected improved roller wear by 200%, friction-pin wear by 150%, and lug wear by 150%. Geysers drilling performances compared directly to conventional bits indicate that in-gage drilling life was increased by 70%. All bits at The Geysers are subjected to reaming out-of-gage hole prior to drilling. Under these conditions the experimental bits showed a 30% increase in usable hole over the conventional bits. These tests demonstrated a potential well cost reduction of 4 to 8%. Savings of 12% are considered possible with drilling procedures optimized for the experimental bits.

  20. Flow-Field Survey in the Test Region of the SR-71 Aircraft Test Bed Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizukami, Masashi; Jones, Daniel; Weinstock, Vladimir D.

    2000-01-01

    A flat plate and faired pod have been mounted on a NASA SR-71A aircraft for use as a supersonic flight experiment test bed. A test article can be placed on the flat plate; the pod can contain supporting systems. A series of test flights has been conducted to validate this test bed configuration. Flight speeds to a maximum of Mach 3.0 have been attained. Steady-state sideslip maneuvers to a maximum of 2 deg have been conducted, and the flow field in the test region has been surveyed. Two total-pressure rakes, each with two flow-angle probes, have been placed in the expected vicinity of an experiment. Static-pressure measurements have been made on the flat plate. At subsonic and low supersonic speeds with no sideslip, the flow in the surveyed region is quite uniform. During sideslip maneuvers, localized flow distortions impinge on the test region. Aircraft sideslip does not produce a uniform sidewash over the test region. At speeds faster than Mach 1.5, variable-pressure distortions were observed in the test region. Boundary-layer thickness on the flat plate at the rake was less than 2.1 in. For future experiments, a more focused and detailed flow-field survey than this one would be desirable.

  1. Flight test validation of a frequency-based system identification method on an F-15 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schkolnik, Gerard S.; Orme, John S.; Hreha, Mark A.

    1995-01-01

    A frequency-based performance identification approach was evaluated using flight data from the NASA F-15 Highly Integrated Digital Electronic Control aircraft. The approach used frequency separation to identify the effectiveness of multiple controls simultaneously as an alternative to independent control identification methods. Fourier transformations converted measured control and response data into frequency domain representations. Performance gradients were formed using multiterm frequency matching of control and response frequency domain models. An objective function was generated using these performance gradients. This function was formally optimized to produce a coordinated control trim set. This algorithm was applied to longitudinal acceleration and evaluated using two control effectors: nozzle throat area and inlet first ramp. Three criteria were investigated to validate the approach: simultaneous gradient identification, gradient frequency dependency, and repeatability. This report describes the flight test results. These data demonstrate that the approach can accurately identify performance gradients during simultaneous control excitation independent of excitation frequency.

  2. Design and field testing of a Savonius windpump in Kenya

    SciTech Connect

    Smalera, A.; Kammen, D.M.

    1995-12-31

    One important means of improving water availability and reducing disease exposure from polluted or stagnant sources involves the design and diffusion of inexpensive and reliable water pumps. Modernized versions of the decades-old Savonius vertical axis windmill present one technology that can play an important role in this effort. To be successful, these systems must be tailored to exploit the local wind and hydrological resources, constructed and managed locally, and inexpensive to operate and maintain. We report here on our design efforts and cooperative field research with several Kenyan development organizations. Performance tests from 10-15 meter deep water pumping applications at two field sites are presented, as well as preliminary results of an analysis of the steps involved in disseminating such technology. Our research suggests that the combination of reliability and performance offered by the Savonius design make it a useful resource for community managed energy initiatives, particularly in developing nation settings.

  3. Detailed field test of yaw-based wake steering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, P.; Churchfield, M.; Scholbrock, A.; Clifton, A.; Schreck, S.; Johnson, K.; Wright, A.; Gebraad, P.; Annoni, J.; Naughton, B.; Berg, J.; Herges, T.; White, J.; Mikkelsen, T.; Sjöholm, M.; Angelou, N.

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes a detailed field-test campaign to investigate yaw-based wake steering. In yaw-based wake steering, an upstream turbine intentionally misaligns its yaw with respect to the inflow to deflect its wake away from a downstream turbine, with the goal of increasing total power production. In the first phase, a nacelle-mounted scanning lidar was used to verify wake deflection of a misaligned turbine and calibrate wake deflection models. In the second phase, these models were used within a yaw controller to achieve a desired wake deflection. This paper details the experimental design and setup. All data collected as part of this field experiment will be archived and made available to the public via the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmosphere to Electrons Data Archive and Portal.

  4. Dynamic behaviors of historical wrought iron truss bridges: a field testing case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Kaoshan; Wang, Ying; Hedric, Andrew; Huang, Zhenhua

    2016-04-01

    The U.S. transportation infrastructure has many wrought iron truss bridges that are more than a century old and still remain in use. Understanding the structural properties and identifying the health conditions of these historical bridges are essential to deciding the maintenance or rebuild plan of the bridges. This research involved an on-site full-scale system identification test case study on the historical Old Alton Bridge (a wrought iron truss bridge built in 1884 in Denton, Texas) using a wireless sensor network. The study results demonstrate a practical and convenient experimental system identification method for historical bridge structures. The method includes the basic steps of the in-situ experiment and in-house data analysis. Various excitation methods are studied for field testing, including ambient vibration by wind load, forced vibration by human jumping load, and forced vibration by human pulling load. Structural responses of the bridge under these different excitation approaches were analyzed and compared with numerical analysis results.

  5. Large modal survey testing using the Ibrahim time domain /ITD/ identification technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, S. R.; Pappa, R. S.

    1981-01-01

    The ability of the ITD identification algorithm in identifying a complete set of structural modal parameters using a large number of free-response time histories simultaneously in one analysis, assuming a math model with a high number of degrees-of-freedom, has been studied. Identification results using simulated free responses of a uniform rectangular plate, with 225 measurement stations, and experimental responses from a ground vibration test of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Space Shuttle payload, with 142 measurement stations, are presented. As many as 300 degrees-of-freedom were allowed in analyzing these data. In general, the use of a significantly oversized math model in the identification process was found to maintain or increase identification accuracy and to identify modes of low response level that are not identified with smaller math model sizes. The concept of a Mode Shape Correlation Constant is introduced for use when more than one identification analysis of the same structure are conducted. This constant quantifies the degree of correlation between any two sets of complex mode shapes identified using different excitation conditions, different user-selectable algorithm constants, or overlapping sets of measurements.

  6. Preliminary operational results of the industrial process heat field tests

    SciTech Connect

    Kutscher, C.; Davenport, R.

    1980-04-01

    There are currently six DOE-funded solar industrial process heat (IPH) field tests which have been operational for one year or longer. These are all low temperature first generation projects which supply heat at temperatures below 100/sup 0/C - three hot water and three hot air. During the 1979 calendar year, personnel from the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) visited all of these sites; the performance and cost results obtained for each project and the operational problems encountered at each site are discussed.

  7. Field Testing of Utility Robots for Lunar Surface Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fong, Terrence; Bualat, Maria; Deans, Matt; Allan, Mark; Bouyssounouse, Xavier; Broxton, Michael; Edwards, Laurence; Lee, Pascal; Lee, Susan Y.; Lees, David; Park, Eric; Pedersen, Liam; Smith, Trey; To, Vinh; Utz, Hans; Pacis, Estrellina; Schreckenghost, Debra

    2008-01-01

    Since 2004, NASA has been working to return to the Moon. In contrast to the Apollo missions, two key objectives of the current exploration program is to establish significant infrastructure and an outpost. Achieving these objectives will enable long-duration stays and long-distance exploration of the Moon. To do this, robotic systems will be needed to perform tasks which cannot, or should not, be performed by crew alone. In this paper, we summarize our work to develop "utility robots" for lunar surface operations, present results and lessons learned from field testing, and discuss directions for future research.

  8. Operation and design of selected industrial process heat field tests

    SciTech Connect

    Kearney, D. W.

    1981-02-01

    The DOE program of solar industrial process heat field tests has shown solar energy to be compatible with numerous industrial needs. Both the operational projects and the detailed designs of systems that are not yet operational have resulted in valuable insights into design and hardware practice. Typical of these insights are the experiences discussed for the four projects reviewed. Future solar IPH systems should benefit greatly not only from the availability of present information, but also from the wealth of operating experience from projects due to start up in 1981.

  9. Odor Identification Test in Idiopathic REM-Behavior Disorder and Parkinson's Disease in China

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jian-Jun; Liu, Feng-Tao; Zhao, Jue; Lin, Wei; Guo, Si-Si; Wang, Yi-Xuan; Wang, Ying; Luo, Su-Shan; Sun, Yi-Min; Ding, Zheng-Tong; Yu, Huan; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Background Olfactory dysfunction is common in Parkinson's disease (PD) and idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (iRBD), which is a risk factor in the development of PD. However, a few studies have conflicting results when comparing dysosmia in the patients with iRBD and PD. There is no study investigating the olfactory function in Chinese patients with iRBD. Additionally, the Sniffin’ Sticks screening 12 test (SS-12) contains several odors that are not familiar to people in different cultures. Methods Odor identification was evaluated in iRBD patients (n = 54), PD patients (n = 54) and healthy controls (n = 54). With the identification data, a brief odor identification test was established and then validated in other subjects. Results Odor identification scores in iRBD patients were significantly higher than those in PD patients (P<0.001) but lower than those in controls (P<0.001). At the cut-off value of 7.5, the Sniffin’ Sticks clearly differentiated iRBD and PD patients from the controls, and the brief test could increase the specificity in diagnosing PD. Neither the Sniffin’ Sticks nor the brief test could clearly differentiate PD and iRBD patients from each other. Conclusions Olfaction is more impaired in PD patients than in iRBD patients, possibly due to the heterogeneity of iRBD patients. The Sniffin’ Sticks could be a useful tool for differentiating iRBD patients from the healthy population, and it could be useful for screening people at high-risk of PD in China, especially when combined with polysomnography. To reduce the expense and time required for the Sniffin’ Sticks test, this study shows that a brief test is feasible. PMID:27483429

  10. Comparison of System Identification Techniques for the Hydraulic Manipulator Test Bed (HMTB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, A. Terry

    1996-01-01

    In this thesis linear, dynamic, multivariable state-space models for three joints of the ground-based Hydraulic Manipulator Test Bed (HMTB) are identified. HMTB, housed at the NASA Langley Research Center, is a ground-based version of the Dexterous Orbital Servicing System (DOSS), a representative space station manipulator. The dynamic models of the HMTB manipulator will first be estimated by applying nonparametric identification methods to determine each joint's response characteristics using various input excitations. These excitations include sum of sinusoids, pseudorandom binary sequences (PRBS), bipolar ramping pulses, and chirp input signals. Next, two different parametric system identification techniques will be applied to identify the best dynamical description of the joints. The manipulator is localized about a representative space station orbital replacement unit (ORU) task allowing the use of linear system identification methods. Comparisons, observations, and results of both parametric system identification techniques are discussed. The thesis concludes by proposing a model reference control system to aid in astronaut ground tests. This approach would allow the identified models to mimic on-orbit dynamic characteristics of the actual flight manipulator thus providing astronauts with realistic on-orbit responses to perform space station tasks in a ground-based environment.

  11. [Application of the molecular test PCR multiplex for identification of Mycobacterium bovis BCG strains].

    PubMed

    Augustynowicz-Kopeć, Ewa; Zabost, Anna; Brzezińiska, Sylwia; Wasowicz, Marcin; Zwolska, Zofia

    2005-01-01

    In our last paper (18) we described the problem of proper microbiological identification of BCG strains and how important is distinguishing vaccine strain from virulent strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. We have suggested the modern algorithm of BCG strains identification including mycolic acids profile by HPLC and 14C PZA resistance methods. These methods allowed us to made fast and accurate microbiological identification of side effects of BCG vaccine in the children. Identification of BCG by HPLC is possible within one working day compared with 3-4 weeks required for conventional methods. However both methods need very expensive instruments like HPLC and/or Bactec-460 Tb radiometric system. Presently we have evaluated molecular test based on the analyzis of the region RD1 encoding a 9.5-kb fragment. This fragment is deleted in all BCG substrains (6) and present in all human and bovine virulent strains. To evaluate this method for the rapid and specific detection of BCG, a large strain collection (32 strains) representating M. bovis BCG (vaccine strains and strains isolated from the children in case of adverse reactions after vaccination) M. bovis and M. tuberculosis from own collection was analyzed. RD1 was present in all 15 M. tuberculosis and M. bovis tested strains and deleted in 17 of 18 BCG strains. The multiplex PCR method was 100% sensitive and specific for the identification of BCG among strains of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Multiplex PCR can be used as a diagnostic test and has significant advantages over existing methods. PMID:16989158

  12. Reliability of the colistin disk test in identification of Serratia marcescens and Serratia liquefaciens.

    PubMed

    von Graevenitz, A; Zollinger-Iten, J

    1987-02-01

    Resistance to polymycin B or E (colistin) in the disk test, which is used as a means of identification, was tested in 43 strains of Serratia marcescens and 26 of Serratia liquefaciens. While all strains had MIC values greater than 32 mg/l for colistin, false susceptibility to both polymyxins was encountered in the 24 h disk test in 9% of Serratia marcescens and 12-96% of Serratia liquefaciens strains, depending on the kind of polymyxin, temperature and duration of incubation. Using colistin disks and incubation at 25 degrees C for 48 h, the percentage of false susceptible results could be minimized.

  13. Practical considerations for the field application of miniaturized portable Raman instrumentation for the identification of minerals.

    PubMed

    Vítek, Petr; Jehlička, Jan; Edwards, Howell G M

    2013-07-01

    The nondestructive identification of both inorganic and organic compounds without the need for chemical or mechanical sample preparation is an advantage of the Raman spectroscopic analytical technique when applied in situ using miniaturized equipment for the geosciences. This is critically assessed here for several real life geoscientific scenarios in which several groups of minerals were analyzed with emphasis on evaporites, carbonates, and selected types of dark minerals and weak Raman scatterers. The role of individual analytical instrumental parameters such as focal plane precision, exposure time, and ambient light conditions that can affect the acquisition and interpretation of spectroscopic data from these specimens in field conditions was also evaluated. PMID:23816130

  14. Practical considerations for the field application of miniaturized portable Raman instrumentation for the identification of minerals.

    PubMed

    Vítek, Petr; Jehlička, Jan; Edwards, Howell G M

    2013-07-01

    The nondestructive identification of both inorganic and organic compounds without the need for chemical or mechanical sample preparation is an advantage of the Raman spectroscopic analytical technique when applied in situ using miniaturized equipment for the geosciences. This is critically assessed here for several real life geoscientific scenarios in which several groups of minerals were analyzed with emphasis on evaporites, carbonates, and selected types of dark minerals and weak Raman scatterers. The role of individual analytical instrumental parameters such as focal plane precision, exposure time, and ambient light conditions that can affect the acquisition and interpretation of spectroscopic data from these specimens in field conditions was also evaluated.

  15. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Pilot-Scale Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe

    2006-03-01

    This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, ''Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive.'' The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemissions of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate that the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project will conduct pilot and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosage requirements to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. A third utility, to be named later, will provide the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in

  16. Pricetown I underground coal gasification field test: operations report

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, A.K.; Seabaugh, P.W.; Zielinski, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    An Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) field test in bituminous coal was successfully completed near Pricetown, West Virginia. The primary objective of this field test was to determine the viability of the linked vertical well (LVV) technology to recover the 900 foot deep, 6 foot thick coal seam. A methane rich product gas with an average heating value of approximately 250 Btu/SCF was produced at low air injection flow rates during the reverse combustion linkage phase. Heating value of the gas produced during the linkage enhancement phase was 221 Btu/SCF with air injection. The high methane formation has been attributed to the thermal and hydrocracking of tars and oils along with hydropyrolysis and hydrogasification of coal char. The high heating value of the gas was the combined effect of residence time, flow pattern, injection flow rate, injection pressure, and back pressure. During the gasification phase, a gas with an average heating value of 125 Btu/SCF was produced with only air injection, which resulted in an average energy production of 362 MMBtu/day.

  17. Rapid diagnostic test that uses isocitrate lyase activity for identification of Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Hillier, S L; Charnetzky, W T

    1981-04-01

    The presence of high levels of isocitrate lyase activity in Yersinia pestis grown on blood agar base medium, as compared with low levels of this enzyme in Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia enterocolitica, suggested that the differences in the levels of this enzyme could be used for the presumptive identification of Y. pestis. A modified, semiquantitative assay for isocitrate lyase activity is described which requires no expensive instrumentation, utilizes readily available chemicals and substrates, and requires only 20 min for completion. This test yielded positive results with all 108 isolates of Y. pestis tested and negative results with all strains of Y. pseudotuberculosis (68 isolates) and Y. enterocolitica (202 isolates) tested. Less than 2% of the approximately 1,300 non-Yersinia isolates from the family Enterobacteriaceae and none of the 93 isolates from the family Pseudomonadaceae yielded positive results. We conclude that this test provides for rapid identification of Y. pestis and should be useful in the initial screening of isolates from rodent and flea populations and in the presumptive identification of this organism from suspected cases of human plague.

  18. Field Testing of Nano-PCM Enhanced Building Envelope Components

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Kaushik; Childs, Phillip W; Atchley, Jerald Allen

    2013-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy s (DOE) Building Technologies Program s goal of developing high-performance, energy efficient buildings will require more cost-effective, durable, energy efficient building envelopes. Forty-eight percent of the residential end-use energy consumption is spent on space heating and air conditioning. Reducing envelope-generated heating and cooling loads through application of phase change material (PCM)-enhanced envelope components can facilitate maximizing the energy efficiency of buildings. Field-testing of prototype envelope components is an important step in estimating their energy benefits. An innovative phase change material (nano-PCM) was developed with PCM encapsulated with expanded graphite (interconnected) nanosheets, which is highly conducive for enhanced thermal storage and energy distribution, and is shape-stable for convenient incorporation into lightweight building components. During 2012, two test walls with cellulose cavity insulation and prototype PCM-enhanced interior wallboards were installed in a natural exposure test (NET) facility at Charleston, SC. The first test wall was divided into four sections, which were separated by wood studs and thin layers of foam insulation. Two sections contained nano-PCM-enhanced wallboards: one was a three-layer structure, in which nano-PCM was sandwiched between two gypsum boards, and the other one had PCM dispersed homogeneously throughout graphite nanosheets-enhanced gypsum board. The second test wall also contained two sections with interior PCM wallboards; one contained nano-PCM dispersed homogeneously in gypsum and the other was gypsum board containing a commercial microencapsulated PCM (MEPCM) for comparison. Each test wall contained a section covered with gypsum board on the interior side, which served as control or a baseline for evaluation of the PCM wallboards. The walls were instrumented with arrays of thermocouples and heat flux transducers. Further, numerical modeling of

  19. Testing for Links Between Geomagnetic Field Variability and Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetter, L.; Acton, G.; Hill, T.

    2006-12-01

    Although orbital forcing controls much of long-term climate change and increases in greenhouse gases are thought to be driving recent global warming, other factors may also play a significant role. Recent studies have hypothesized various forms of links between climate change and solar irradiance, solar activity, and cosmic ray flux. Because changes in geomagnetic field strength affect the cosmic ray flux, it is possible that changes in the geomagnetic field contribute to long- and short-term climate change. Alternatively, it has been hypothesized that geomagnetic field variability is influenced by climate change or solar activity. We test such claims through a paleomagnetic and stable isotope study of Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) sediment cores from the Blake Outer Ridge (BOR), western North Atlantic Ocean. The goal of the study is to create a continuous, high-resolution record of geomagnetic field variability with an accurate, astronomically tuned chronology. Sediment cored on the BOR in four holes at Site 1061 during ODP Leg 172 is being used for this investigation. The high sedimentation rate, averaging 22 cm/k.y. over the Brunhes, and the exceptional paleomagnetic properties of the area make Site 1061 an excellent candidate to test for links between short- term geomagnetic events and climate. The paleomagnetic record, originally constructed mainly from continuous split-core measurements, is being refined and rock magnetic analyses are being conducted on U- channel samples that span the Brunhes. We have also refined the between-hole correlation and constructed a more detailed composite stratigraphic section for Site 1061 in order to improve the continuity and relative chronology of the record and to confirm the existence of distinct geomagnetic excursions and other short-term events in multiple drill holes. Additionally, planktonic forams are being measured for δ18 O variations across, and extending to one meter beyond each observed excursion, allowing for

  20. Laboratory and field assessment of arsenic testing field kits in Bangladesh and West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Pande, S P; Deshpande, L S; Kaul, S N

    2001-04-01

    High concentrations of arsenic in ground waters in West Bengal and Bangladesh have become a major cause for concern in recent years. Given the enormity and the severity of the problem of arsenic poisoning, a task of evaluating the commercially available arsenic detection field kits for their capabilities was undertaken. In the light of the findings, generic specifications were recommended which could form the basis for indigenous manufacture of these kits in the arsenic affected countries. This article presents the results of the laboratory and field evaluation conducted in Bangladesh and West Bengal of five arsenic testing field kits. The salient features of the kits, their merits and limitations have been brought out. Based on the criteria of kit design, quality of chemicals used, colour comparator charts, detection range, time required for analysis, cost etc., a comparative ranking of the kits has been made to facilitate the choice of the kit to meet specific requirements.

  1. Structural identification of short/middle span bridges by rapid impact testing: theory and verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Q. Q.; Guo, S. L.; Xu, D. W.; Wu, Z. S.

    2015-06-01

    A structural strain flexibility identification method by processing the multiple-reference impact testing data is proposed. First, a kind of novel long-gauge fiber optic sensor is developed for structural macro-strain monitoring. Second, the multiple-reference impact testing technology is employed, during which both the impacting force and structural strain responses are measured. The impact testing technology has unique merit because it is able to extract exact structural frequency response functions (FRFs), while other test methods, for instance ambient tests, can only output the FRFs with scaled magnitudes. Most importantly, the originality of the article is that a method of identifying the structural strain flexibility characteristic from the impact test data has been proposed, which is useful for structural static strain prediction and capacity evaluation. Examples of a six meter simple supported beam and a multiple-span continuous beam bridge have successfully verified the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  2. Perceptual and cognitive neural correlates of the useful field of view test in older adults.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Jennifer L; Lister, Jennifer J; Peronto, Carol L; Edwards, Jerri D

    2015-10-22

    The Useful Field of View Test (UFOV) is often used as a behavioral assessment of age-related decline in visual perception and cognition. Poor performance may reflect slowed processing speed, difficulty dividing attention, and difficulty ignoring irrelevant information. However, the underlying neural correlates of UFOV performance have not been identified. The relationship between older adults' UFOV performance and event-related potential (ERP) components reflecting visual processing was examined. P1 amplitude increased with better UFOV performance involving object identification (subtest 1), suggesting that this task is associated with stimulus processing at an early perceptual level. Better performance in all UFOV subtests was associated with faster speed of processing, as reflected by decreases in P3b latency. Current evidence supports the hypothesis that the UFOV recruits both early perceptual and later cognitive processing involved in attentional control. The implications of these results are discussed. PMID:26236026

  3. A European perspective on alternatives to animal testing for environmental hazard identification and risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Stefan; Sela, Erika; Blaha, Ludek; Braunbeck, Thomas; Galay-Burgos, Malyka; García-Franco, Mauricio; Guinea, Joaquin; Klüver, Nils; Schirmer, Kristin; Tanneberger, Katrin; Tobor-Kapłon, Marysia; Witters, Hilda; Belanger, Scott; Benfenati, Emilio; Creton, Stuart; Cronin, Mark T D; Eggen, Rik I L; Embry, Michelle; Ekman, Drew; Gourmelon, Anne; Halder, Marlies; Hardy, Barry; Hartung, Thomas; Hubesch, Bruno; Jungmann, Dirk; Lampi, Mark A; Lee, Lucy; Léonard, Marc; Küster, Eberhard; Lillicrap, Adam; Luckenbach, Till; Murk, Albertinka J; Navas, José M; Peijnenburg, Willie; Repetto, Guillermo; Salinas, Edward; Schüürmann, Gerrit; Spielmann, Horst; Tollefsen, Knut Erik; Walter-Rohde, Susanne; Whale, Graham; Wheeler, James R; Winter, Matthew J

    2013-12-01

    Tests with vertebrates are an integral part of environmental hazard identification and risk assessment of chemicals, plant protection products, pharmaceuticals, biocides, feed additives and effluents. These tests raise ethical and economic concerns and are considered as inappropriate for assessing all of the substances and effluents that require regulatory testing. Hence, there is a strong demand for replacement, reduction and refinement strategies and methods. However, until now alternative approaches have only rarely been used in regulatory settings. This review provides an overview on current regulations of chemicals and the requirements for animal tests in environmental hazard and risk assessment. It aims to highlight the potential areas for alternative approaches in environmental hazard identification and risk assessment. Perspectives and limitations of alternative approaches to animal tests using vertebrates in environmental toxicology, i.e. mainly fish and amphibians, are discussed. Free access to existing (proprietary) animal test data, availability of validated alternative methods and a practical implementation of conceptual approaches such as the Adverse Outcome Pathways and Integrated Testing Strategies were identified as major requirements towards the successful development and implementation of alternative approaches. Although this article focusses on European regulations, its considerations and conclusions are of global relevance.

  4. A field test of threat sensitivity in a marine gastropod

    PubMed

    Rochette; Dill; Himmelman

    1997-11-01

    In the Mingan Islands, the whelk Buccinum undatum displays defensive manoeuvres to both contact and water-borne chemical cues from the predatory asteroid Leptasterias polarisIn spite of this, whelks occasionally aggregate in great numbers near L. polaris while it is ingesting a prey; they then attempt to steal food from their predator and also wait for leftovers. In this study, the response of whelks in different types of encounters with L. polaris was examined to test the hypothesis that whelks are sensitive to the magnitude of the threat their predator represents. In a field experiment, whelks consistently fled both non-feeding and feeding L. polaris (asteroids used were consuming small prey items that were unlikely to provide food for whelks). When current flow was stable, whelks fled more directly down current and more frequently displayed violent defensive behaviours, in response to non-feeding L. polariswhich presented a higher risk, than in response to feeding asteroids (lower risk; 47% versus 2%). Consequently, whelks tested with non-feeding asteroids more rapidly distanced themselves from the predators than did whelks tested with feeding asteroids. In a field survey, there were more active whelks in the vicinity of cruising (higher risk) than stationary (lower risk) L. polaris (53% versus 14%). Among those whelks that were active, defensive behaviour patterns such as shell rocking and leaping escape movements were frequently shown by whelks near cruising predators (69%), but never by whelks near stationary predators (0%). The discriminative capabilities apparent in these results are likely to be adaptive, because they enable whelks to limit the cost of escape responses while still keeping predation risk low, and also because they facilitate a close association with L. polaris from which the whelks receive feeding benefits.Copyright 1997 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour1997The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour PMID:9398362

  5. A field test of threat sensitivity in a marine gastropod

    PubMed

    Rochette; Dill; Himmelman

    1997-11-01

    In the Mingan Islands, the whelk Buccinum undatum displays defensive manoeuvres to both contact and water-borne chemical cues from the predatory asteroid Leptasterias polarisIn spite of this, whelks occasionally aggregate in great numbers near L. polaris while it is ingesting a prey; they then attempt to steal food from their predator and also wait for leftovers. In this study, the response of whelks in different types of encounters with L. polaris was examined to test the hypothesis that whelks are sensitive to the magnitude of the threat their predator represents. In a field experiment, whelks consistently fled both non-feeding and feeding L. polaris (asteroids used were consuming small prey items that were unlikely to provide food for whelks). When current flow was stable, whelks fled more directly down current and more frequently displayed violent defensive behaviours, in response to non-feeding L. polariswhich presented a higher risk, than in response to feeding asteroids (lower risk; 47% versus 2%). Consequently, whelks tested with non-feeding asteroids more rapidly distanced themselves from the predators than did whelks tested with feeding asteroids. In a field survey, there were more active whelks in the vicinity of cruising (higher risk) than stationary (lower risk) L. polaris (53% versus 14%). Among those whelks that were active, defensive behaviour patterns such as shell rocking and leaping escape movements were frequently shown by whelks near cruising predators (69%), but never by whelks near stationary predators (0%). The discriminative capabilities apparent in these results are likely to be adaptive, because they enable whelks to limit the cost of escape responses while still keeping predation risk low, and also because they facilitate a close association with L. polaris from which the whelks receive feeding benefits.Copyright 1997 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour1997The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour

  6. Use of Enzyme Tests in Characterization and Identification of Aerobic and Facultatively Anaerobic Gram-Positive Cocci

    PubMed Central

    Bascomb, Shoshana; Manafi, Mammad

    1998-01-01

    The contribution of enzyme tests to the accurate and rapid routine identification of gram-positive cocci is introduced. The current taxonomy of the genera of aerobic and facultatively anaerobic cocci based on genotypic and phenotypic characterization is reviewed. The clinical and economic importance of members of these taxa is briefly summarized. Tables summarizing test schemes and kits available for the identification of staphylococci, enterococci, and streptococci on the basis of general requirements, number of tests, number of taxa, test classes, and completion times are discussed. Enzyme tests included in each scheme are compared on the basis of their synthetic moiety. The current understanding of the activity of enzymes important for classification and identification of the major groups, methods of testing, and relevance to the ease and speed of identification are reviewed. Publications describing the use of different identification kits are listed, and overall identification successes and problems are discussed. The relationships between the results of conventional biochemical and rapid enzyme tests are described and considered. The use of synthetic substrates for the detection of glycosidases and peptidases is reviewed, and the advantages of fluorogenic synthetic moieties are discussed. The relevance of enzyme tests to accurate and meaningful rapid routine identification is discussed. PMID:9564566

  7. The Field Lysimeter Test Facility (FLTF) at the Hanford Site: Installation and initial tests

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, G.W.; Kirkham, R.R.; Downs, J.L.; Campbell, M.D.

    1989-02-01

    The objectives of this program are to test barrier design concepts and to demonstrate a barrier design that meets established performance criteria for use in isolating wastes disposed of near-surface at the Hanford Site. Specifically, the program is designed to assess how well the barriers perform in controlling biointrusion, water infiltration, and erosion, as well as evaluating interactions between environmental variables and design factors of the barriers. To assess barrier performance and design with respect to infiltration control, field lysimeters and small- and large-scale field plots are planned to test the performance of specific barrier designs under actual and modified (enhanced precipitation) climatic conditions. The Field Lysimeter Test Facility (FLTF) is located in the 600 Area of the Hanford Site just east of the 200 West Area and adjacent to the Hanford Meteorological Station. The FLTF data will be used to assess the effectiveness of selected protective barrier configurations in controlling water infiltration. The facility consists of 14 drainage lysimeters (2 m dia x 3 m deep) and four precision weighing lysimeters (1.5 m x 1.5 m x 1.7 m deep). The lysimeters are buried at grade and aligned in a parallel configuration, with nine lysimeters on each side of an underground instrument chamber. The lysimeters were filled with materials to simulate a multilayer protective barrier system. Data gathered from the FLTF will be used to compare key barrier components and to calibrate and test models for predicting long-term barrier performance.

  8. What's in a Name? The Impact of Accurate Staphylococcus pseudintermedius Identification on Appropriate Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria in the Staphylococcus intermedius group, including Staphylococcus pseudintermedius, often encode mecA-mediated methicillin resistance. Reliable detection of this phenotype for proper treatment and infection control decisions requires that these coagulase-positive staphylococci are accurately identified and specifically that they are not misidentified as S. aureus. As correct species level bacterial identification becomes more commonplace in clinical laboratories, one can expect to see changes in guidance for antimicrobial susceptibility testing and interpretation. The study by Wu et al. in this issue (M. T. Wu, C.-A. D. Burnham, L. F. Westblade, J. Dien Bard, S. D. Lawhon, M. A. Wallace, T. Stanley, E. Burd, J. Hindler, R. M. Humphries, J Clin Microbiol 54:535–542, 2016, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JCM.02864-15) highlights the impact of robust identification of S. intermedius group organisms on the selection of appropriate antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods and interpretation. PMID:26763965

  9. What's in a Name? The Impact of Accurate Staphylococcus pseudintermedius Identification on Appropriate Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing.

    PubMed

    Limbago, Brandi M

    2016-03-01

    Bacteria in the Staphylococcus intermedius group, including Staphylococcus pseudintermedius, often encode mecA-mediated methicillin resistance. Reliable detection of this phenotype for proper treatment and infection control decisions requires that these coagulase-positive staphylococci are accurately identified and specifically that they are not misidentified as S. aureus. As correct species level bacterial identification becomes more commonplace in clinical laboratories, one can expect to see changes in guidance for antimicrobial susceptibility testing and interpretation. The study by Wu et al. in this issue (M. T. Wu, C.-A. D. Burnham, L. F. Westblade, J. Dien Bard, S. D. Lawhon, M. A. Wallace, T. Stanley, E. Burd, J. Hindler, R. M. Humphries, J Clin Microbiol 54:535-542, 2016, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JCM.02864-15) highlights the impact of robust identification of S. intermedius group organisms on the selection of appropriate antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods and interpretation.

  10. Cooperative field test program for wind systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bollmeier, W.S. II; Dodge, D.M.

    1992-03-01

    The objectives of the Federal Wind Energy Program, managed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), are (1) to assist industry and utilities in achieving a multi-regional US market penetration of wind systems, and (2) to establish the United States as the world leader in the development of advanced wind turbine technology. In 1984, the program conducted a series of planning workshops with representatives from the wind energy industry to obtain input on the Five-Year Research Plan then being prepared by DOE. One specific suggestion that came out of these meetings was that the federal program should conduct cooperative research tests with industry to enhance the technology transfer process. It was also felt that the active involvement of industry in DOE-funded research would improve the state of the art of wind turbine technology. DOE established the Cooperative Field Test Program (CFTP) in response to that suggestion. This program was one of the first in DOE to feature joint industry-government research test teams working toward common objectives.

  11. Design and Field Test of a Galvanometer Deflected Streak Camera

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, C C; Goosman, D R; Wade, J T; Avara, R

    2002-11-08

    We have developed a compact fieldable optically-deflected streak camera first reported in the 20th HSPP Congress. Using a triggerable galvanometer that scans the optical signal, the imaging and streaking function is an all-optical process without incurring any photon-electron-photon conversion or photoelectronic deflection. As such, the achievable imaging quality is limited mainly only by optical design, rather than by multiple conversions of signal carrier and high voltage electron-optics effect. All core elements of the camera are packaged into a 12 inch x 24 inch footprint box, a size similar to that of a conventional electronic streak camera. At LLNL's Site-300 Test Site, we have conducted a Fabry-Perot interferometer measurement of fast object velocity using this all-optical camera side-by-side with an intensified electronic streak camera. These two cameras are configured as two independent instruments for recording synchronously each branch of the 50/50 splits from one incoming signal. Given the same signal characteristics, the test result has undisputedly demonstrated superior imaging performance for the all-optical streak camera. It produces higher signal sensitivity, wider linear dynamic range, better spatial contrast, finer temporal resolution, and larger data capacity as compared with that of the electronic counterpart. The camera had also demonstrated its structural robustness and functional consistence to be well compatible with field environment. This paper presents the camera design and the test results in both pictorial records and post-process graphic summaries.

  12. Biplot evaluation of test environments and identification of mega-environments for sugarcane cultivars in China

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evaluation of test environments and classification of regional ecological zones are the two key issues in regional testing of sugarcane cultivars. In the present study, sugarcane yield data from a three-year nationwide field trial involving 21 cultivars and 14 pilot test locations were analyzed by u...

  13. Automated reading of a microtitre plate: preliminary evaluation in antimicrobial susceptibility tests and Enterobacteriaceae identification.

    PubMed Central

    Courcol, R J; Deleersnyder, H; Roussel-Delvallez, M; Martin, G R

    1983-01-01

    An automated microELISA Reader was evaluated for its ability to read and interpret microtitre plates. A total of 309 microtitre plates were investigated by automated and visual methods. There was disagreement between the methods in one hundred and twelve (0.6%) wells. However agreements between the two methods for susceptibility tests and Enterobacteriaceae identification were respectively 98.8% and 89.3%. PMID:6338058

  14. Identification of spatially correlated excitations on a bending plate using the Virtual Fields Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Alain; Robin, Olivier

    2016-08-01

    This paper aims at identifying the autospectral density and spatial correlation functions of random excitations acting on the surface of a thin plate, from its measured vibration response. The general framework is the Virtual Fields Method (VFM), which was previously applied by the authors to the identification of deterministic excitations on plates. In the present paper, the VFM framework is extended to the case of spatially correlated excitations. It is shown that extraction of the loading power spectral density requires measuring power spectral density functions of transverse displacements and bending curvatures, which can be typically derived from contactless Laser Doppler Vibrometry measurements. The paper details the implementation of the VFM for random excitations, presents numerical simulations and experimental results for diffuse acoustic field excitation of a plate.

  15. Known-Groups and Concurrent Validity of the Mandarin Tone Identification Test (MTIT)

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shufeng; Wong, Lena L. N.; Chen, Fei; Chen, Yuan; Wang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Objective The Mandarin Tone Identification Test (MTIT) is a new test designed to assess the tone identification abilities of children with hearing impairment (HI). Evidence for reliability and sensitivity has been reported. The present study aimed to evaluate the known-groups and concurrent validity of the MTIT. Design The MTIT and Mandarin Pediatric Speech Intelligibility test (MPSI) were administered in quiet and in noise conditions. The known-groups validity was evaluated by comparing the performance of the MTIT on children with two different levels of HI. The MPSI was included to evaluate the concurrent validity of the MTIT. Study sample 81 children with HI were recruited in the present study. They were Mandarin-speaking children with profound HI (mean age = 9; 0, n = 41) and with moderate to severe HI (mean age = 8; 9, n = 40). Results Scores on the MTIT differed between the two groups with different hearing levels suggesting good known-groups validity. A strong relationship between tone and sentence perception both in quiet and in noise provided preliminary evidence for concurrent validity. Conclusions The present study confirmed that the MTIT has good known-groups validity and provided preliminary evidence for concurrent validity. The MTIT could be used to evaluate tone identification ability in children with HI with confidence. PMID:27191394

  16. trnL-F is a powerful marker for DNA identification of field vittarioid gametophytes (Pteridaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cheng Wei; Huang, Yao Moan; Kuo, Li Yaung; Nguyen, Quoc Dat; Luu, Hong Truong; Callado, John Rey; Farrar, Donald R.; Chiou, Wen Liang

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims The gametophyte phase of ferns plays an important role in habitat selection, dispersal, adaptation and evolution. However, ecological studies on fern gametophytes have been impeded due to the difficulty of species identification of free-living gametophytes. DNA barcoding provides an alternative approach to identifying fern gametophytes but is rarely applied to field studies. In this study, an example of field vittarioid gametophyte identification using DNA barcoding, which has not been done before, is given. Methods A combination of distance-based and tree-based approaches was performed to evaluate the discriminating power of three candidate barcodes (matK, rbcL and trnL-F) on 16 vittarioid sporophytes. Sequences of the trnL-F region were generated from 15 fern gametophyte populations by tissue-direct PCR and were compared against the sporophyte dataset, using BLAST. Key Results trnL-F earns highest primer universality and discriminatory ability scores, whereas PCR success rates were very low for matK and rbcL regions (10·8 % and 41·3 %, respectively). BLAST analyses showed that all the sampled field gametophytes could be successfully identified to species level. Three gametophyte populations were also discovered to be living beyond the known occurrence of their sporophyte counterparts. Conclusions This study demonstrates that DNA barcoding (i.e. reference databasing, tissue-direct PCR and molecular analysis), especially the trnL-F region, is an efficient tool to identify field gametophytes, and has considerable potential in exploring the ecology of fern gametophytes. PMID:23380240

  17. FUELS IN SOIL TEST KIT: FIELD USE OF DIESEL DOG SOIL TEST KITS

    SciTech Connect

    Susan S. Sorini; John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani, Jr.

    2002-09-30

    Western Research Institute (WRI) has developed a new commercial product ready for technology transfer, the Diesel Dog{reg_sign} Portable Soil Test Kit, for performing analysis of fuel-contaminated soils in the field. The technology consists of a method developed by WRI (U.S. Patents 5,561,065 and 5,976,883) and hardware developed by WRI that allows the method to be performed in the field (patent pending). The method is very simple and does not require the use of highly toxic reagents. The aromatic components in a soil extract are measured by absorption at 254 nm with a field-portable photometer. WRI added significant value to the technology by taking the method through the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) approval and validation processes. The method is designated as ASTM Method D 5831-96, Standard Test Method for Screening Fuels in Soils. This ASTM designation allows the method to be used for federal compliance activities. In June 2001, the Diesel Dog technology won an American Chemical Society Regional Industrial Innovations Award. To gain field experience with the new technology, Diesel Dog kits have been used for a variety of site evaluation and cleanup activities. Information gained from these activities has led to improvements in hardware configurations and additional insight into correlating Diesel Dog results with results from laboratory methods. The Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) used Diesel Dog Soil Test Kits to guide cleanups at a variety of sites throughout the state. ENSR, of Acton, Massachusetts, used a Diesel Dog Portable Soil Test Kit to evaluate sites in the Virgin Islands and Georgia. ChemTrack and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers successfully used a test kit to guide excavation at an abandoned FAA fuel-contaminated site near Fairbanks, Alaska. Barenco, Inc. is using a Diesel Dog Portable Soil Test Kit for site evaluations in Canada. A small spill of diesel fuel was cleaned up in Laramie, Wyoming using a Diesel

  18. Multiple testing for neuroimaging via hidden Markov random field.

    PubMed

    Shu, Hai; Nan, Bin; Koeppe, Robert

    2015-09-01

    Traditional voxel-level multiple testing procedures in neuroimaging, mostly p-value based, often ignore the spatial correlations among neighboring voxels and thus suffer from substantial loss of power. We extend the local-significance-index based procedure originally developed for the hidden Markov chain models, which aims to minimize the false nondiscovery rate subject to a constraint on the false discovery rate, to three-dimensional neuroimaging data using a hidden Markov random field model. A generalized expectation-maximization algorithm for maximizing the penalized likelihood is proposed for estimating the model parameters. Extensive simulations show that the proposed approach is more powerful than conventional false discovery rate procedures. We apply the method to the comparison between mild cognitive impairment, a disease status with increased risk of developing Alzheimer's or another dementia, and normal controls in the FDG-PET imaging study of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative.

  19. Field Tested Service Oriented Robotic Architecture: Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flueckiger, Lorenzo; Utz, Hanz

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the lessons learned from six years of experiments with planetary rover prototypes running the Service Oriented Robotic Architecture (SORA) developed by the Intelligent Robotics Group (IRG) at NASA Ames Research Center. SORA relies on proven software methods and technologies applied to the robotic world. Based on a Service Oriented Architecture and robust middleware, SORA extends its reach beyond the on-board robot controller and supports the full suite of software tools used during mission scenarios from ground control to remote robotic sites. SORA has been field tested in numerous scenarios of robotic lunar and planetary exploration. The results of these high fidelity experiments are illustrated through concrete examples that have shown the benefits of using SORA as well as its limitations.

  20. Multiple testing for neuroimaging via hidden Markov random field.

    PubMed

    Shu, Hai; Nan, Bin; Koeppe, Robert

    2015-09-01

    Traditional voxel-level multiple testing procedures in neuroimaging, mostly p-value based, often ignore the spatial correlations among neighboring voxels and thus suffer from substantial loss of power. We extend the local-significance-index based procedure originally developed for the hidden Markov chain models, which aims to minimize the false nondiscovery rate subject to a constraint on the false discovery rate, to three-dimensional neuroimaging data using a hidden Markov random field model. A generalized expectation-maximization algorithm for maximizing the penalized likelihood is proposed for estimating the model parameters. Extensive simulations show that the proposed approach is more powerful than conventional false discovery rate procedures. We apply the method to the comparison between mild cognitive impairment, a disease status with increased risk of developing Alzheimer's or another dementia, and normal controls in the FDG-PET imaging study of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. PMID:26012881

  1. New challenge of field testing dense WDM systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Lynn

    1998-09-01

    Dense wavelength-division multiplexing fiber-optic techniques hold great promise as tools to address many of the challenges facing communication system operators. This new technical solution can increase the capacity of existing networks without the need for expensive re-cabling and is also an open door toward all optical network design. But the many advantages they offer come at a price: optical component properties and cable characteristics must be addressed that could safely be neglected in systems using simpler transmission techniques. The new spectral dimension brought by testing capabilities must now be provided to the field, capabilities that are usable by maintenance personnel working in conditions that are very different from those in the stable, controlled laboratory environment.

  2. A field test of a simple stochastic radiative transfer model

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, N.

    1995-09-01

    The problem of determining the effect of clouds on the radiative energy balance of the globe is of well-recognized importance. One can in principle solve the problem for any given configuration of clouds using numerical techniques. This knowledge is not useful however, because of the amount of input data and computer resources required. Besides, we need only the average of the resulting solution over the grid scale of a general circulation model (GCM). Therefore, we are interested in estimating the average of the solutions of such fine-grained problems using only coarse grained data, a science or art called stochastic radiation transfer. Results of the described field test indicate that the stochastic description is a somewhat better fit to the data than is a fractional cloud cover model, but more data are needed. 1 ref., 3 figs.

  3. Non-contact rail flaw detection system: first field test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Piervincenzo; Coccia, Stefano; Lanza di Scalea, Francesco; Bartoli, Ivan; Fateh, Mahmood

    2007-04-01

    Researchers at UCSD, with the initial support of NSF and the current support of the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA), have been working on a flaw detection prototype for rails that uses non-contact ultrasonic probing and robust data processing algorithms to provide high speed and high reliability defect detection in these structures. Besides the obvious advantages of non-contact probing, the prototype uses ultrasonic guided waves able to detect and quantify transverse cracks in the rail head, notoriously the most dangerous of all rail track defects. This paper will report on the first field test which was conducted in Gettysburg, PA in March 2006 with the technical support of ENSCO, Inc. Good results were obtained for the detection of both surface-breaking and internal cracks ranging in size from 2% cross-sectional head area (H.A.) reduction to 80% H.A. reduction.

  4. Results of field testing the cement evaluation tool

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh, C.A.; Finlayson, C.G.; Van der Kolk, C.

    1984-01-01

    The Cement Evaluation Tool (CET) developed by Schlumberger employs a pulse-echo technique using eight sonic transducers to investigate the casing cement bond. The tool has been widely field tested in a clastic environment in Brunei (N.W. Borneo), across both oil and gas bearing reservoirs. Numerous comparisons of the CET with conventional CBL/VDL logs have been made. Across oil and water bearing intervals the CET is shown to compare favourably with the CBL/VDL and yields significant additional information on channeling, cement distribution, and the success of casing centralization. In addition, the accuracy of the acoustic calipers have proved sufficient to be used in assisting drilling and completion operations. The response of the tool to a microannulus has also been demonstrated by multiple runs under varying wellbore pressures.

  5. Luciferase Reporter Mycobacteriophages for Detection, Identification, and Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Banaiee, N.; Bobadilla-del-Valle, M.; Bardarov, S.; Riska, P. F.; Small, P. M.; Ponce-de-Leon, A.; Jacobs, W. R.; Hatfull, G. F.; Sifuentes-Osornio, J.

    2001-01-01

    The utility of luciferase reporter mycobacteriophages (LRPs) for detection, identification, and antibiotic susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was prospectively evaluated in a clinical microbiology laboratory in Mexico City, Mexico. Five hundred twenty-three consecutive sputum samples submitted to the laboratory during a 5-month period were included in this study. These specimens were cultivated in Middlebrook 7H9 (MADC), MGIT, and Löwenstein-Jensen (LJ) media. Of the 71 mycobacterial isolates recovered with any of the three media, 76% were detected with the LRPs, 97% were detected with the MGIT 960 method, and 90% were detected with LJ medium. When contaminated specimens were excluded from the analysis, the LRPs detected 92% (54 of 59) of the cultures. The median time to detection of bacteria was 7 days with both the LRPs and the MGIT 960 method. LRP detection of growth in the presence of p-nitro-α-acetylamino-β-hydroxypropiophenone (NAP) was used for selective identification of M. tuberculosis complex (MTC) and compared to identification with BACTEC 460. Using the LRP NAP test, 47 (94%) out of 50 isolates were correctly identified as tuberculosis complex. The accuracy and speed of LRP antibiotic susceptibility testing with rifampin, streptomycin, isoniazid, and ethambutol were compared to those of the BACTEC 460 method, and discrepant results were checked by the conventional proportion method. In total, 50 MTC isolates were tested. The overall agreement between the LRP and BACTEC 460 results was 98.5%. The median LRP-based susceptibility turnaround time was 2 days (range, 2 to 4 days) compared to 10.5 days (range, 7 to 16 days) by the BACTEC 460 method. Phage resistance was not detected in any of the 243 MTC isolates tested. Mycobacteriophage-based approaches to tuberculosis diagnostics can be implemented in clinical laboratories with sensitivity, specificity, and rapidity that compare favorably with those of the MGIT 960 and BACTEC 460

  6. Development of a specific anaerobic field test for aerobic gymnastics.

    PubMed

    Alves, Christiano Robles Rodrigues; Borelli, Marcello Tadeu Caetano; Paineli, Vitor de Salles; Azevedo, Rafael de Almeida; Borelli, Claudia Cristine Gomes; Lancha Junior, Antônio Herbert; Gualano, Bruno; Artioli, Guilherme Giannini

    2015-01-01

    The current investigation aimed to develop a valid specific field test to evaluate anaerobic physical performance in Aerobic Gymnastics athletes. We first designed the Specific Aerobic Gymnast Anaerobic Test (SAGAT), which included gymnastics-specific elements performed in maximal repeated sprint fashion, with a total duration of 80-90 s. In order to validate the SAGAT, three independent sub-studies were performed to evaluate the concurrent validity (Study I, n=8), the reliability (Study II, n=10) and the sensitivity (Study III, n=30) of the test in elite female athletes. In Study I, a positive correlation was shown between lower-body Wingate test and SAGAT performance (Mean power: p = 0.03, r = -0.69, CI: -0.94 to 0.03 and Peak power: p = 0.02, r = -0.72, CI: -0.95 to -0.04) and between upper-body Wingate test and SAGAT performance (Mean power: p = 0.03, r = -0.67, CI: -0.94 to 0.02 and Peak power: p = 0.03, r = -0.69, CI: -0.94 to 0.03). Additionally, plasma lactate was similarly increased in response to SAGAT (p = 0.002), lower-body Wingate Test (p = 0.021) and a simulated competition (p = 0.007). In Study II, no differences were found between the time to complete the SAGAT in repeated trials (p = 0.84; Cohen's d effect size = 0.09; ICC = 0.97, CI: 0.89 to 0.99; MDC95 = 0.12 s). Finally, in Study III the time to complete the SAGAT was significantly lower during the competition cycle when compared to the period before the preparatory cycle (p < 0.001), showing an improvement in SAGAT performance after a specific Aerobic Gymnastics training period. Taken together, these data have demonstrated that SAGAT is a specific, reliable and sensitive measurement of specific anaerobic performance in elite female Aerobic Gymnastics, presenting great potential to be largely applied in training settings. PMID:25876039

  7. Advanced Utility Mercury-Sorbent Field-Testing Program

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald Landreth

    2007-12-31

    This report summarizes the work conducted from September 1, 2003 through December 31, 2007 on the project entitled Advanced Utility Mercury-Sorbent Field-Testing Program. The project covers the testing at the Detroit Edison St. Clair Plant and the Duke Power Cliffside and Buck Stations. The St. Clair Plant used a blend of subbituminous and bituminous coal and controlled the particulate emissions by means of a cold-side ESP. The Duke Power Stations used bituminous coals and controlled their particulate emissions by means of hot-side ESPs. The testing at the Detroit Edison St. Clair Plant demonstrated that mercury sorbents could be used to achieve high mercury removal rates with low injection rates at facilities that burn subbituminous coal. A mercury removal rate of 94% was achieved at an injection rate of 3 lb/MMacf over the thirty day long-term test. Prior to this test, it was believed that the mercury in flue gas of this type would be the most difficult to capture. This is not the case. The testing at the two Duke Power Stations proved that carbon- based mercury sorbents can be used to control the mercury emissions from boilers with hot-side ESPs. It was known that plain PACs did not have any mercury capacity at elevated temperatures but that brominated B-PAC did. The mercury removal rate varies with the operation but it appears that mercury removal rates equal to or greater than 50% are achievable in facilities equipped with hot-side ESPs. As part of the program, both sorbent injection equipment and sorbent production equipment was acquired and operated. This equipment performed very well during this program. In addition, mercury instruments were acquired for this program. These instruments worked well in the flue gas at the St. Clair Plant but not as well in the flue gas at the Duke Power Stations. It is believed that the difference in the amount of oxidized mercury, more at Duke Power, was the difference in instrument performance. Much of the equipment was

  8. Development of a Specific Anaerobic Field Test for Aerobic Gymnastics

    PubMed Central

    Paineli, Vitor de Salles; Azevedo, Rafael de Almeida; Borelli, Claudia Cristine Gomes; Lancha Junior, Antônio Herbert; Gualano, Bruno; Artioli, Guilherme Giannini

    2015-01-01

    The current investigation aimed to develop a valid specific field test to evaluate anaerobic physical performance in Aerobic Gymnastics athletes. We first designed the Specific Aerobic Gymnast Anaerobic Test (SAGAT), which included gymnastics-specific elements performed in maximal repeated sprint fashion, with a total duration of 80-90 s. In order to validate the SAGAT, three independent sub-studies were performed to evaluate the concurrent validity (Study I, n=8), the reliability (Study II, n=10) and the sensitivity (Study III, n=30) of the test in elite female athletes. In Study I, a positive correlation was shown between lower-body Wingate test and SAGAT performance (Mean power: p = 0.03, r = -0.69, CI: -0.94 to 0.03 and Peak power: p = 0.02, r = -0.72, CI: -0.95 to -0.04) and between upper-body Wingate test and SAGAT performance (Mean power: p = 0.03, r = -0.67, CI: -0.94 to 0.02 and Peak power: p = 0.03, r = -0.69, CI: -0.94 to 0.03). Additionally, plasma lactate was similarly increased in response to SAGAT (p = 0.002), lower-body Wingate Test (p = 0.021) and a simulated competition (p = 0.007). In Study II, no differences were found between the time to complete the SAGAT in repeated trials (p = 0.84; Cohen’s d effect size = 0.09; ICC = 0.97, CI: 0.89 to 0.99; MDC95 = 0.12 s). Finally, in Study III the time to complete the SAGAT was significantly lower during the competition cycle when compared to the period before the preparatory cycle (p < 0.001), showing an improvement in SAGAT performance after a specific Aerobic Gymnastics training period. Taken together, these data have demonstrated that SAGAT is a specific, reliable and sensitive measurement of specific anaerobic performance in elite female Aerobic Gymnastics, presenting great potential to be largely applied in training settings. PMID:25876039

  9. 10 CFR 707.7 - Random drug testing requirements and identification of testing designated positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... (HRP), codified at 10 CFR part 712. HRP employees will be subject to the drug testing standards of this... Facility (FFTF); High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR); High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR); K Production Reactor...

  10. Testing neoclassical competitive market theory in the field.

    PubMed

    List, John A

    2002-11-26

    This study presents results from a pilot field experiment that tests predictions of competitive market theory. A major advantage of this particular field experimental design is that my laboratory is the marketplace: subjects are engaged in buying, selling, and trading activities whether I run an exchange experiment or am a passive observer. In this sense, I am gathering data in a natural environment while still maintaining the necessary control to execute a clean comparison between treatments. The main results of the study fall into two categories. First, the competitive model predicts reasonably well in some market treatments: the expected price and quantity levels are approximated in many market rounds. Second, the data suggest that market composition is important: buyer and seller experience levels impact not only the distribution of rents but also the overall level of rents captured. An unexpected result in this regard is that average market efficiency is lowest in markets that match experienced buyers and experienced sellers and highest when experienced buyers engage in bargaining with inexperienced sellers. Together, these results suggest that both market experience and market composition play an important role in the equilibrium discovery process.

  11. Identification of Balance Deficits in People with Parkinson Disease; is the Sensory Organization Test Enough?

    PubMed Central

    Gera, G; Freeman, DL; Blackinton, MT; Horak, FB; King, L

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Balance deficits in people with Parkinson’s disease can affect any of the multiple systems encompassing balance control. Thus, identification of the specific deficit is crucial in customizing balance rehabilitation. The sensory organization test, a test of sensory integration for balance control, is sometimes used in isolation to identify balance deficits in people with Parkinson’s disease. More recently, the Mini-Balance Evaluations Systems Test, a clinical scale that tests multiple domains of balance control, has begun to be used to assess balance in patients with Parkinson’s disease. The purpose of our study was to compare the use of Sensory Organization Test and Mini-Balance Evaluations Systems Test in identifying balance deficits in people with Parkinson’s disease. Methods 45 participants (27M, 18F; 65.2 ± 8.2 years) with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease participated in the cross-sectional study. Balance assessment was performed using the Sensory Organization Test and the Mini-Balance Evaluations Systems Test. People were classified into normal and abnormal balance based on the established cutoff scores (normal balance: Sensory Organization Test >69; Mini-Balance Evaluations Systems Test >73). Results More subjects were classified as having abnormal balance with the Mini-Balance Evaluations Systems Test (71% abnormal) than with the Sensory Organization Test (24% abnormal) in our cohort of people with Parkinson’s disease. There were no subjects with a normal Mini-Balance Evaluations Systems Test score but abnormal Sensory Organization Test score. In contrast, there were 21 subjects who had an abnormal Mini-Balance Evaluations Systems Test score but normal Sensory Organization Test scores. Discussion and Conclusions Findings from this study suggest that investigation of sensory integration deficits, alone, may not be able to identify all types of balance deficits found in patients with Parkinson’s disease. Thus, a

  12. Field-Based Video Pre-Test Counseling, Oral Testing, and Telephonic Post-Test Counseling: Implementation of an HIV Field Testing Package among High-Risk Indian Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Hannah; Yeldandi, Vijay V.; Kumar, G. Prem; Liao, Chuanhong; Lakshmi, Vemu; Gandham, Sabitha R.; Muppudi, Uma; Oruganti, Ganesh; Schneider, John A.

    2012-01-01

    In India, men who have sex with men (MSM) and truck drivers are high-risk groups that often do not access HIV testing due to stigma and high mobility. This study evaluated a field testing package (FTP) that identified HIV positive participants through video pre-test counseling, OraQuick oral fluid HIV testing, and telephonic post-test counseling…

  13. 76 FR 3075 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing Feline Leukemia Vaccine, Live...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-19

    ... Feline Leukemia Vaccine, Live Canarypox Vector AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA... testing, and then to field test, an unlicensed Feline Leukemia Vaccine, Live Canarypox Vector. The... field testing of this vaccine, examines the potential effects that field testing this veterinary...

  14. Portable narcotics detector and the results obtained in field tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumer, Tumay O.; Su, Chih-Wu; Kaplan, Christopher R.; Rigdon, Stephen W.

    1997-02-01

    A compact integrated narcotics detection instrument (CINDI) has been developed at NOVA R&D, Inc. with funding provided by the U.S. Coast Guard. CINDI is designed as a portable sensitive neutron backscatter detector which has excellent penetration for thick and high Z compartment barriers. It also has a highly sensitive detection system for backscattered neutrons and, therefore, uses a very weak californium-252 neutron source. Neutrons backscatter profusely from materials that have a large hydrogen content, such as narcotics. The rate of backscattered neutrons detected is analyzed by a microprocessor and displayed on the control panel. The operator guides the detector along a suspected area and displays in real time the backscattered neutron rate. CINDI is capable of detecting narcotics effectively behind panels made of steel, wood, fiberglass, or even lead-lined materials. This makes it useful for inspecting marine vessels, ship bulkheads, automobiles, structure walls or small sealed containers. The strong response of CINDI to hydrogen-rich materials such as narcotics makes it an effective tool for detecting concealed drugs. Its response has been field tested by NOVA, the U.S. Coast Guard and Brewt Power Systems. The results of the tests show excellent response and specificity to narcotic drugs. Several large shipments of concealed drugs have been discovered during these trials and the results are presented and discussed.

  15. Field tracer-transport tests in unsaturated fractured tuff.

    PubMed

    Hu, Q; Salve, R; Stringfellow, W T; Wang, J S

    2001-09-01

    This paper presents the results of a field investigation in the unsaturated, fractured welded tuff within the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain, NV. This investigation included a series of tests during which tracer-laced water was released into a high-permeability zone within a horizontal injection borehole. The tracer concentration was monitored in the seepage collected in an excavated slot about 1.6 m below the borehole. Results showed significant variability in the hydrologic response of fractures and the matrix. Analyses of the breakthrough curves suggest that flow and transport pathways are dynamic, rather than fixed, and related to liquid-release rates. Under high release rates, fractures acted as the predominant flow pathways, with limited fracture-matrix interaction. Under low release rates, fracture flow was comparatively less dominant, with a noticeable contribution from matrix flow. Observations of tracer concentrations rebounding in seepage water, following an interruption of flow, provided evidence of mass exchange between the fast-flowing fractures and slow- or non-flowing regions. The tests also showed the applicability of fluorinated benzoate tracers in situations where multiple tracers of similar physical properties are warranted. PMID:11530924

  16. Development of normative data for the Brazilian adaptation of the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test.

    PubMed

    Fornazieri, Marco Aurélio; dos Santos, Clayson Alan; Bezerra, Thiago Freire Pinto; Pinna, Fábio de Rezende; Voegels, Richard Louis; Doty, Richard L

    2015-02-01

    It is well established that olfactory dysfunction has significant implications for safety, nutrition, and quality of life. The more reliable standardized tests of olfactory function, such as the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT), assess odor identification ability. Unfortunately, cultural factors can influence such tests, as a number of odors are not universally recognized. In this study, a Portuguese language version of the UPSIT was administered to an age- and sex-stratified prospective sample of 1820 Brazilian subjects. Normative data were developed for a subset of 1578 subjects who reported having no difficulties smelling or tasting. Individuals with a history of head trauma or, in the case of those over the age of 64 years, Mini-Mental State Examination Scores <24, were excluded from analysis. As in other populations, the test scores were significantly influenced by age and sex. The median overall difference between the North American and Brazilian UPSIT scores was 2.2 points for men and 0.8 points for women, although subtle age-related differences were also apparent. This research represents that largest clinical study of olfaction ever performed in South America. Correction factors based upon age and sex are provided to allow for direct comparisons of Brazilian test scores to those based upon North American norms.

  17. Results from laboratory and field testing of nitrate measuring spectrophotometers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snazelle, Teri T.

    2015-01-01

    In Phase II, the analyzers were deployed in field conditions at three diferent USGS sites. The measured nitrate concentrations were compared to discrete (reference) samples analyzed by the Direct UV method on a Shimadzu UV1800 bench top spectrophotometer, and by the National Environmental Methods Index (NEMI) method I-2548-11 at the USGS National Water Quality Laboratory. The first deployment at USGS site 0249620 on the East Pearl River in Hancock County, Mississippi, tested the ability of the TriOs ProPs (10-mm path length), Hach NITRATAX (5 mm), Satlantic SUNA (10 mm), and the S::CAN Spectro::lyser (5 mm) to accurately measure low-level (less than 2 mg-N/L) nitrate concentrations while observing the effect turbidity and colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) would have on the analyzers' measurements. The second deployment at USGS site 01389005 Passaic River below Pompton River at Two Bridges, New Jersey, tested the analyzer's accuracy in mid-level (2-8 mg-N/L) nitrate concentrations. This site provided the means to test the analyzers' performance in two distinct matrices—the Passaic and the Pompton Rivers. In this deployment, three instruments tested in Phase I (TriOS, Hach, and SUNA) were deployed with the S::CAN Spectro::lyser (35 mm) already placed by the New Jersey Water Science Center (WSC). The third deployment at USGS site 05579610 Kickapoo Creek at 2100E Road near Bloomington, Illinois, tested the ability of the analyzers to measure high nitrate concentrations (greater than 8 mg-N/L) in turbid waters. For Kickapoo Creek, the HIF provided the TriOS (10 mm) and S::CAN (5 mm) from Phase I, and a SUNA V2 (5 mm) to be deployed adjacent to the Illinois WSC-owned Hach (2 mm). A total of 40 discrete samples were collected from the three deployment sites and analyzed. The nitrate concentration of the samples ranged from 0.3–22.2 mg-N/L. The average absolute difference between the TriOS measurements and discrete samples was 0.46 mg-N/L. For the combined data

  18. Field Lysimeter Test Facility status report IV: FY 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, G.W.; Felmy, D.G.; Ritter, J.C.; Campbell, M.D.; Downs, J.L.; Fayer, M.J.; Kirkham, R.R.; Link, S.O.

    1993-10-01

    At the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, a unique facility, the Field Lysimeter Test Facility (FLTF) is used to measure drainage from and water storage in soil covers. Drainage has ranged from near zero amounts to more than 50% of the applied water, with the amount depending on vegetative cover and soil type. Drainage occurred from lysimeters with coarse soils and gravel covers, but did not occur from capillary barrier-type lysimeters (1.5 m silt loam soil over coarse sands and gravels) except under the most extreme condition tested. For capillary barriers that were irrigated and kept vegetation-free (bare surface), no drainage occurred in 5 of the past 6 years. However, this past year (1992--1993) a record snowfall of 1,425 mm occurred and water storage in the irrigated, bare-surfaced capillary barriers exceeded 500 mm resulting in drainage of more than 30 mm from these barriers. In contrast, capillary barriers, covered with native vegetation (i.e., shrubs and grasses) did not drain under any climatic condition (with or without irrigation). In FY 1994, the FLTF treatments will be increased from 11 to 17 with the addition of materials that will simulate portions of a prototype barrier planned for construction in 1994 at the Hanford Site. The 17 FLTF treatments are designed to test the expected range of surface soil, vegetation, and climatic conditions encountered at the Hanford Site and will assist in evaluating final surface barrier designs for a waste disposal facility.

  19. Field testing advanced geothermal turbodrill (AGT). Phase 1 final report

    SciTech Connect

    Maurer, W.C.; Cohen, J.H.

    1999-06-01

    Maurer Engineering developed special high-temperature geothermal turbodrills for LANL in the 1970s to overcome motor temperature limitations. These turbodrills were used to drill the directional portions of LANL`s Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Wells at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. The Hot Dry Rock concept is to drill parallel inclined wells (35-degree inclination), hydraulically fracture between these wells, and then circulate cold water down one well and through the fractures and produce hot water out of the second well. At the time LANL drilled the Fenton Hill wells, the LANL turbodrill was the only motor in the world that would drill at the high temperatures encountered in these wells. It was difficult to operate the turbodrills continuously at low speed due to the low torque output of the LANL turbodrills. The turbodrills would stall frequently and could only be restarted by lifting the bit off bottom. This allowed the bit to rotate at very high speeds, and as a result, there was excessive wear in the bearings and on the gauge of insert roller bits due to these high rotary speeds. In 1998, Maurer Engineering developed an Advanced Geothermal Turbodrill (AGT) for the National Advanced Drilling and Excavation Technology (NADET) at MIT by adding a planetary speed reducer to the LANL turbodrill to increase its torque and reduce its rotary speed. Drilling tests were conducted with the AGT using 12 1/2-inch insert roller bits in Texas Pink Granite. The drilling tests were very successful, with the AGT drilling 94 ft/hr in Texas Pink Granite compared to 45 ft/hr with the LANL turbodrill and 42 ft/hr with a rotary drill. Field tests are currently being planned in Mexico and in geothermal wells in California to demonstrate the ability of the AGT to increase drilling rates and reduce drilling costs.

  20. Studies on the methods of identification of irradiated food I. Seedling growth test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiongying, Liu; Yanhua, Kuang; Yuemei, Zheng

    1993-07-01

    A seedling growth test for the identification of gamma irradiated edible vegetable seeds was described. The identification of gamma irradiated grape and the other seeds has been investigated. The purpose of this study was to develop an easy, rapid and practical technique for the identification of irradiated edible vegetable seeds. Seven different irradiated edible vegetable seeds as: rice ( Oryza sativa), peanut ( Arachis hypogaea), maize ( Zeamays), soybean ( Glycine max), red bean ( Phaseolus angularis), mung bean ( Phaseolus aureus) and catjang cowpea ( Vigna cylindrica) were tested by using the method of seedling growth. All of the edible vegetable seeds were exposed to gamma radiation on different doses, O(CK), 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 3.0, 5.0 kGy. After treatment with above 1.0 kGy dose to the seeds, the seedling rate was less than 50% compared with the control. Although the seedling rate of rice seeds can reached 58%, the seedling growth was not normal and the seedling leaves appeared deformed. The results by this method were helpful to identify gamma treatment of the edible vegetable seeds with above 1.0 kGy dose.

  1. Interpretation of fish biomarker data for identification, classification, risk assessment and testing of endocrine disrupting chemicals.

    PubMed

    Dang, ZhiChao

    2016-01-01

    Chemical induced changes in fish biomarkers vitellogenin (VTG), secondary sex characteristics (SSC), and sex ratio indicate modes/mechanisms of action (MOAs) of EAS (estrogen, androgen and steroidogenesis) pathways. These biomarkers could be used for defining MOAs and the causal link between MOAs and adverse effects in fish for the identification of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). This paper compiled data sets of 150 chemicals for VTG, 57 chemicals for SSC and 38 chemicals for sex ratio in fathead minnow, medaka and zebrafish. It showed 1) changes in fish biomarkers can indicate the MOAs as anticipated; 2) in addition to EAS pathways, chemicals with non-EAS pathways induced changes in fish biomarkers; 3) responses of fish biomarkers did not always follow the anticipated patterns of EAS pathways. These responses may result from the interaction of chemical-induced multiple MOAs and confounding factors like fish diet, infection, culture conditions, general toxicity and stress response. The complex response of fish biomarkers to a chemical of interest requires EDC testing at multiple biological levels. Interpretation of fish biomarker data should be combined with relevant information at different biological levels, which is critical for defining chemical specific MOAs. The utility of fish biomarker data for identification, classification, PBT assessment, risk assessment, and testing of EDCs in the regulatory context was discussed. This paper emphasizes the importance of fish biomarker data in the regulatory context, a weight of evidence approach for the interpretation of fish biomarker data and the need for defining levels of evidence for the identification of EDCs.

  2. FUELS IN SOIL TEST KIT: FIELD USE OF DIESEL DOG SOIL TEST KITS

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2001-05-31

    Western Research Institute (WRI) is commercializing Diesel Dog Portable Soil Test Kits for performing analysis of fuel-contaminated soils in the field. The technology consists of a method developed by WRI (U.S. Patents 5,561,065 and 5,976,883) and hardware developed by WRI that allows the method to be performed in the field (patent pending). The method is very simple and does not require the use of highly toxic reagents. The aromatic components in a soil extract are measured by absorption at 254 nm with a field-portable photometer. WRI added significant value to the technology by taking the method through the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) approval and validation processes. The method is designated ASTM Method D-5831-96, Standard Test Method for Screening Fuels in Soils. This ASTM designation allows the method to be used for federal compliance activities. In FY 99, twenty-five preproduction kits were successfully constructed in cooperation with CF Electronics, Inc., of Laramie, Wyoming. The kit components work well and the kits are fully operational. In the calendar year 2000, kits were provided to the following entities who agreed to participate as FY 99 and FY 00 JSR (Jointly Sponsored Research) cosponsors and use the kits as opportunities arose for field site work: Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) (3 units), F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Gradient Corporation, The Johnson Company (2 units), IT Corporation (2 units), TRC Environmental Corporation, Stone Environmental, ENSR, Action Environmental, Laco Associates, Barenco, Brown and Caldwell, Dames and Moore Lebron LLP, Phillips Petroleum, GeoSyntek, and the State of New Mexico. By early 2001, ten kits had been returned to WRI following the six-month evaluation period. On return, the components of all ten kits were fully functional. The kits were upgraded with circuit modifications, new polyethylene foam inserts, and updated instruction manuals.

  3. 10 CFR 707.7 - Random drug testing requirements and identification of testing designated positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., maintenance, or operation of nuclear reactors; or (v) Personnel directly engaged in production, use, storage... (HRP), codified at 10 CFR part 712. HRP employees will be subject to the drug testing standards of this... employee, who is allowed unescorted access to the control areas of the following DOE reactors:...

  4. 10 CFR 707.7 - Random drug testing requirements and identification of testing designated positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., maintenance, or operation of nuclear reactors; or (v) Personnel directly engaged in production, use, storage... (HRP), codified at 10 CFR part 712. HRP employees will be subject to the drug testing standards of this... employee, who is allowed unescorted access to the control areas of the following DOE reactors:...

  5. 10 CFR 707.7 - Random drug testing requirements and identification of testing designated positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., maintenance, or operation of nuclear reactors; or (v) Personnel directly engaged in production, use, storage... (HRP), codified at 10 CFR part 712. HRP employees will be subject to the drug testing standards of this... employee, who is allowed unescorted access to the control areas of the following DOE reactors:...

  6. 10 CFR 707.7 - Random drug testing requirements and identification of testing designated positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., maintenance, or operation of nuclear reactors; or (v) Personnel directly engaged in production, use, storage... (HRP), codified at 10 CFR part 712. HRP employees will be subject to the drug testing standards of this... employee, who is allowed unescorted access to the control areas of the following DOE reactors:...

  7. Sensitivity of Lagrangian coherent structure identification to flow field resolution and random errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olcay, Ali B.; Pottebaum, Tait S.; Krueger, Paul S.

    2010-03-01

    The effect of spatial and temporal resolutions and random errors on identification of Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) from Eulerian velocity fields is evaluated using two canonical flows: a two-dimensional vortex pair and a vortex ring formed by transient ejection of a jet from a tube. The flow field for the vortex pair case was steady and obtained analytically while the transient vortex ring flow was simulated using computational fluid dynamics. To evaluate resolution and random error effects, the flow fields were degraded by locally smoothing the flow and sampling it on a sparser grid to reduce spatial resolution, adding Gaussian distributed random noise to provide random errors, and/or subsampling the time series of vector fields to reduce the temporal resolution (the latter applying only for the vortex ring case). The degradation methods were meant to emulate distortions and errors introduced in common flow measurement methods such as digital particle image velocimetry. Comparing the LCS corresponding to the vortex boundary (separatrix) obtained from the degraded velocity fields with the true separatrix (obtained analytically for the vortex pair case or from high resolution, noise-free velocity fields for the vortex ring case) showed that noise levels as low as 5%-10% of the vortex velocity can cause the separatrix to significantly deviate from its true location in a random fashion, but the "mean" location still remained close to the true location. Temporal and spatial resolution degradations were found to primarily affect transient portions of the flow with strong spatial gradients. Significant deviations in the location of the separatrix were observed even for spatial resolutions as high as 2% of the jet diameter for the vortex ring case.

  8. Hepatitis C virus genotype testing in paraffin wax embedded liver biopsies for specimen identification.

    PubMed

    Ikura, Y; Ohsawa, M; Hai, E; Jomura, H; Ueda, M

    2003-12-01

    Despite advances in medical technology, careful specimen identification is still a fundamental principle of laboratory testing. If pathological samples are mixed up, especially in the case of extremely small biopsy samples, large amounts of time and energy may be wasted in correctly identifying the specimens. Recently, two liver biopsy specimens were mixed up in this department, and a new pathological technology was used to resolve the issue. Liver biopsy was performed on two patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. During sample transfer or tissue processing, the biopsy specimens were mixed up. Because the ABO blood group of the two patients was identical (type AB), the specimens were subsequently identified by analysing the HCV genotypes. RNA extracted from the paraffin wax embedded liver specimens was examined by a polymerase chain reaction based HCV genotype assay. This enabled the correct identification of the specimens, and each patient received the appropriate treatment on the basis of the accurate diagnosis.

  9. Smell testing: an additional tool for identification of adult Refsum's disease

    PubMed Central

    Gibberd, F; Feher, M; Sidey, M; Wierzbicki, A

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the prevalence and degree of olfactory dysfunction in patients with ARD. Method: The olfactory function of 16 patients with ARD was assessed using the quantitative University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT). Results: All patients had complete anosmia or grossly impaired smell function with a mean UPSIT score of 14.7 (SD 4.7) (normal>34) despite having been treated with an appropriate diet for a median of 15 years (range 1–25). Conclusions: Identification of ARD patients can be facilitated by using the UPSIT in combination with the presence of retinitis pigmentosa, even if they have no neurological or bony features. Phytanic acid screening should be performed in any patient manifesting these two signs. PMID:15314127

  10. Field-Testing of an Active Laser Tracking System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markov, V.; Khiznyak, A.; Woll, D.; Liu, S.

    -mirror module for laser beam steering and detectors, all set on a single platform. In the initial ALTS design, the laser module is conceptualized in coupled-cavitiesarchitecturewith a synchronously pumped gain media, a four-wave mixing PCM. The four-wave mixing arrangement uses optical phase conjugation to compensate for spatial inhomogeneities of the atmosphere. A significant innovation in the proposed approach is in its perspective capabilities to detect and measure the critical parameters in the returned signal that should allow to directly measure spatial/angular position and velocity of the target. This report will cover the system analysis, the ALTS design, test plan and exit criteria, functional and operational tests, and test results at Edwards AFB Range field.

  11. Rapid identification of Listeria spp.: an AOAC performance test of the MIT 1000 rapid microbial identification system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methods that rapidly confirm the identification of foodborne pathogens are highly desired. The Micro Imaging Technology (MIT) 1000 Rapid Microbial Identification (RMID) System is a benchtop instrument that detects laser light scattered from individual bacterial cells in solution with an array of 35 ...

  12. Field Testing GEOICE: A Next-Generation Polar Seismometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaudoin, B. C.; Winberry, J. P.; Huerta, A. D.; Chung, P.; Parker, T.; Anderson, K. R.; Bilek, S. L.; Carpenter, P.

    2015-12-01

    We report on the development of a new NSF MRI-community supported seismic observatory designed for studies in ice-covered regions - the Geophysical Earth Observatory for Ice Covered Environs (GEOICE). This project is motivated by the need to densify and optimize the collection of high-quality seismic data relevant to key solid Earth and cryosphere science questions. The GEOICE instruments and their power and other ancillary systems are being designed to require minimal installation time and logistical load (i.e., size and weight), while maximizing ease-of-use in the field. The system is capable of advanced data handling and telemetry while being able to withstand conditions associated with icy environments, including cold/wet conditions and high-latitude solar limitations. The instrument capability will include a hybrid seismograph pool of broadband and intermediate elements for observation of both long-period signals (e.g, long-period surface waves and slow sources) and intermediate-to-short-period signals (e.g., teleseismic body waves, local seismicity, and impulsive or extended glaciogenic signals).Key features will include a design that integrates the seismometer and digitizer into a single, environmentally and mechanically robust housing; very low power requirements (~1 watt) for the intermediate-band systems; and advanced power systems that optimize battery capacity and operational limits. The envisioned ~100 element GEOICE instruments will nearly double the current polar inventory of stations and will be maintained and supported at the IRIS PASSCAL Instrument Center to ensure full and flexible peer-reviewed community use. Prototype instruments are currently deployed in Antarctica and Alaska, with a larger Antarctic deployment planned for the 2015-2016 season. The results of these field tests will help to refine instrumentation design and lead to the production of robust and capable next-generation seismic sensors.

  13. Advanced Rooftop Control (ARC) Retrofit: Field-Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas; Ngo, Hung; Underhill, Ronald M.; Taasevigen, Danny J.; Lutes, Robert G.

    2013-07-31

    The multi-year research study was initiated to find solutions to improve packaged equipment operating efficiency in the field. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Building Technologies Office (BTO) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) conducted this research, development and demonstration (RD&D) study. Packaged equipment with constant speed supply fans is designed to provide ventilation at the design rate at all times when the fan is operating as required by building code. Although there are a number of hours during the day when a building may not be fully occupied or the need for ventilation is lower than designed, the ventilation rate cannot be adjusted easily with a constant speed fan. Therefore, modulating the supply fan in conjunction with demand controlled ventilation (DCV) will not only reduce the coil energy but also reduce the fan energy. The objective of this multi-year research, development and demonstration project was to determine the magnitude of energy savings achievable by retrofitting existing packaged rooftop air conditioners with advanced control strategies not ordinarily used for packaged units. First, through detailed simulation analysis, it was shown that significant energy (between 24% and 35%) and cost savings (38%) from fan, cooling and heating energy consumption could be realized when packaged air conditioning units with gas furnaces are retrofitted with advanced control packages (combining multi-speed fan control, integrated economizer controls and DCV). The simulation analysis also showed significant savings for heat pumps (between 20% and 60%). The simulation analysis was followed by an extensive field test of a retrofittable advanced rooftop unit (RTU) controller.

  14. Identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Staphylococcus vitulinus by the BD phoenix automated microbiology system.

    PubMed

    Cirković, Ivana; Hauschild, Tomasz; Jezek, Petr; Dimitrijević, Vladimir; Vuković, Dragana; Stepanović, Srdjan

    2008-08-01

    This study evaluated the performance of the BD Phoenix system for the identification (ID) and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) of Staphylococcus vitulinus. Of the 10 S. vitulinus isolates included in the study, 2 were obtained from the Czech Collection of Microorganisms, 5 from the environment, 2 from human clinical samples, and 1 from an animal source. The results of conventional biochemical and molecular tests were used for the reference method for ID, while antimicrobial susceptibility testing performed in accordance with Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommendations and PCR for the mecA gene were the reference for AST. Three isolates were incorrectly identified by the BD Phoenix system; one of these was incorrectly identified to the genus level, and two to the species level. The results of AST by the BD Phoenix system were in agreement with those by the reference method used. While the results of susceptibility testing compared favorably, the 70% accuracy of the Phoenix system for identification of this unusual staphylococcal species was not fully satisfactory.

  15. A Review of Quality of Life after Predictive Testing for and Earlier Identification of Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Paulsen, Jane S.; Nance, Martha; Kim, Ji-In; Carlozzi, Noelle E.; Panegyres, Peter K.; Erwin, Cheryl; Goh, Anita; McCusker, Elizabeth; Williams, Janet K.

    2013-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed an explosion of evidence suggesting that many neurodegenerative diseases can be detected years, if not decades, earlier than previously thought. To date, these scientific advances have not provoked any parallel translational or clinical improvements. There is an urgency to capitalize on this momentum so earlier detection of disease can be more readily translated into improved health-related quality of life for families at risk for, or suffering with, neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we discuss health-related quality of life (HRQOL) measurement in neurodegenerative diseases and the importance of these “patient reported outcomes” for all clinical research. Next, we address HRQOL following early identification or predictive genetic testing in some neurodegenerative diseases: Huntington disease, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Dementia with Lewy bodies, frontotemporal dementia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, prion diseases, hereditary ataxias, Dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy and Wilson's disease. After a brief report of available direct-to-consumer genetic tests, we address the juxtaposition of earlier disease identification with assumed reluctance towards predictive genetic testing. Forty-one studies examining health related outcomes following predictive genetic testing for neurodegenerative disease suggested that (a) extreme or catastrophic outcomes are rare; (b) consequences commonly include transiently increased anxiety and/or depression; (c) most participants report no regret; (d) many persons report extensive benefits to receiving genetic information; and (e) stigmatization and discrimination for genetic diseases are poorly understood and policy and laws are needed. Caution is appropriate for earlier identification of neurodegenerative diseases but findings suggest further progress is safe, feasible and likely to advance clinical care. PMID:24036231

  16. A review of quality of life after predictive testing for and earlier identification of neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, Jane S; Nance, Martha; Kim, Ji-In; Carlozzi, Noelle E; Panegyres, Peter K; Erwin, Cheryl; Goh, Anita; McCusker, Elizabeth; Williams, Janet K

    2013-11-01

    The past decade has witnessed an explosion of evidence suggesting that many neurodegenerative diseases can be detected years, if not decades, earlier than previously thought. To date, these scientific advances have not provoked any parallel translational or clinical improvements. There is an urgency to capitalize on this momentum so earlier detection of disease can be more readily translated into improved health-related quality of life for families at risk for, or suffering with, neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we discuss health-related quality of life (HRQOL) measurement in neurodegenerative diseases and the importance of these "patient reported outcomes" for all clinical research. Next, we address HRQOL following early identification or predictive genetic testing in some neurodegenerative diseases: Huntington disease, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Dementia with Lewy bodies, frontotemporal dementia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, prion diseases, hereditary ataxias, Dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy and Wilson's disease. After a brief report of available direct-to-consumer genetic tests, we address the juxtaposition of earlier disease identification with assumed reluctance toward predictive genetic testing. Forty-one studies examining health-related outcomes following predictive genetic testing for neurodegenerative disease suggested that (a) extreme or catastrophic outcomes are rare; (b) consequences commonly include transiently increased anxiety and/or depression; (c) most participants report no regret; (d) many persons report extensive benefits to receiving genetic information; and (e) stigmatization and discrimination for genetic diseases are poorly understood and policy and laws are needed. Caution is appropriate for earlier identification of neurodegenerative diseases but findings suggest further progress is safe, feasible and likely to advance clinical care. PMID:24036231

  17. Evaluation of a new system, VITEK 2, for identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of enterococci.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Garrote, F; Cercenado, E; Bouza, E

    2000-06-01

    We evaluated the new automated VITEK 2 system (bioMérieux) for the identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of enterococci. The results obtained with the VITEK 2 system were compared to those obtained by reference methods: standard identification by the scheme of Facklam and Sahm [R. R. Facklam and D. F. Sahm, p. 308-314, in P. R. Murray et al., ed., Manual of Clinical Microbiology, 6th ed., 1995] and with the API 20 STREP system and, for antimicrobial susceptibility testing, broth microdilution and agar dilution methods by the procedures of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards. The presence of vanA and vanB genes was determined by PCR. A total of 150 clinical isolates were studied, corresponding to 60 Enterococcus faecalis, 55 Enterococcus faecium, 26 Enterococcus gallinarum, 5 Enterococcus avium, 2 Enterococcus durans, and 2 Enterococcus raffinosus isolates. Among those isolates, 131 (87%) were correctly identified to the species level with the VITEK 2 system. Approximately half of the misidentifications were for E. faecium with low-level resistance to vancomycin, identified as E. gallinarum or E. casseliflavus; however, a motility test solved the discrepancies and increased the agreement to 94%. Among the strains studied, 66% were vancomycin resistant (57 VanA, 16 VanB, and 26 VanC strains), 23% were ampicillin resistant (MICs, >/=16 microgram/ml), 31% were high-level gentamicin resistant, and 45% were high-level streptomycin resistant. Percentages of agreement for susceptibility and resistance to ampicillin, vancomycin, and teicoplanin and for high-level gentamicin resistance and high-level streptomycin resistance were 93, 95, 97, 97, and 96%, respectively. The accuracy of identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of enterococci with the VITEK 2 system, together with the significant reduction in handling time, will have a positive impact on the work flow of the clinical microbiology laboratory.

  18. Development of a blood-based molecular biomarker test for identification of schizophrenia before disease onset

    PubMed Central

    Chan, M K; Krebs, M-O; Cox, D; Guest, P C; Yolken, R H; Rahmoune, H; Rothermundt, M; Steiner, J; Leweke, F M; van Beveren, N J M; Niebuhr, D W; Weber, N S; Cowan, D N; Suarez-Pinilla, P; Crespo-Facorro, B; Mam-Lam-Fook, C; Bourgin, J; Wenstrup, R J; Kaldate, R R; Cooper, J D; Bahn, S

    2015-01-01

    Recent research efforts have progressively shifted towards preventative psychiatry and prognostic identification of individuals before disease onset. We describe the development of a serum biomarker test for the identification of individuals at risk of developing schizophrenia based on multiplex immunoassay profiling analysis of 957 serum samples. First, we conducted a meta-analysis of five independent cohorts of 127 first-onset drug-naive schizophrenia patients and 204 controls. Using least absolute shrinkage and selection operator regression, we identified an optimal panel of 26 biomarkers that best discriminated patients and controls. Next, we successfully validated this biomarker panel using two independent validation cohorts of 93 patients and 88 controls, which yielded an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.97 (0.95–1.00) for schizophrenia detection. Finally, we tested its predictive performance for identifying patients before onset of psychosis using two cohorts of 445 pre-onset or at-risk individuals. The predictive performance achieved by the panel was excellent for identifying USA military personnel (AUC: 0.90 (0.86–0.95)) and help-seeking prodromal individuals (AUC: 0.82 (0.71–0.93)) who developed schizophrenia up to 2 years after baseline sampling. The performance increased further using the latter cohort following the incorporation of CAARMS (Comprehensive Assessment of At-Risk Mental State) positive subscale symptom scores into the model (AUC: 0.90 (0.82–0.98)). The current findings may represent the first successful step towards a test that could address the clinical need for early intervention in psychiatry. Further developments of a combined molecular/symptom-based test will aid clinicians in the identification of vulnerable patients early in the disease process, allowing more effective therapeutic intervention before overt disease onset. PMID:26171982

  19. Quantum field theory and the antipodal identification of black-holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, N.; Whiting, B. F.

    The antipodal points (U, V, θ, ϕ) and (-U, -V, π - θ, ϕ + π) of the Schwarzchild-Kruskal manifold, usually interpreted as two different events (in two different worlds) are considered here as physically identified (to give one single world). This has fundamental consequences for the QFT formulated on this manifold. The antipodal symmetric fields have (globally) zero norm. The usual particle-antiparticle Fock space definition breaks down. There is no quantum operator (unitary, antiunitary or projection) giving antipodal symmetric states from the usual Kruskal ones. The antipodal symmetric Green functions have the same periodicity β = 8 π M in imaginary (Schwarzschild) time as the usual (non-symmetric) ones. (Identification with ``conical singularity'' would give a period 1/2β). In any case, no usual thermal interpretation is possible for T = β-1 (nor for T0 = 2/β or any other value) in the theory. In the light of these results we discuss ``old'' ideas and more recent ones on identification. Present address: Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, NC 27514, USA.

  20. Selecting visual field tests and assessing visual field deterioration in glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Nouri-Mahdavi, Kouros

    2014-12-01

    Testing the peripheral field of vision is the mainstay for detection of glaucoma deterioration. Various methods and algorithms are currently available for detection of early glaucoma or establishing disease progression. Alternative testing strategies such as frequency doubling technology perimetry or short-wavelength automated perimetry have been extensively explored over the last 2 decades. The former has been found most promising for detection of earliest evidence of functional glaucoma damage when the standard achromatic perimetry results are still within the normal range. However, standard achromatic perimetry remains the standard technique for establishing deterioration of the disease. Both trend and event analyses are used for establishing change within series of visual fields. Trend analyses provide the clinician with rates of progression, putting the speed of glaucoma progression in the context of patient longevity, whereas event analyses demonstrate a "step" change regardless of the length of time it took for this amount of change to occur. The two techniques are complementary and should be used concurrently.

  1. 40 CFR 86.1375-2007 - Equipment specifications for field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-Exceed test procedures, use the test procedures and equipment specified in 40 CFR part 1065, subpart J. ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment specifications for field... Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.1375-2007 Equipment specifications for field testing. For testing...

  2. 40 CFR 86.1375-2007 - Equipment specifications for field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-Exceed test procedures, use the test procedures and equipment specified in 40 CFR part 1065, subpart J. ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Equipment specifications for field... Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.1375-2007 Equipment specifications for field testing. For testing...

  3. Field tests of acoustic telemetry for a portable coastal observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martini, M.; Butman, B.; Ware, J.; Frye, D.

    2006-01-01

    Long-term field tests of a low-cost acoustic telemetry system were carried out at two sites in Massachusetts Bay. At each site, an acoustic Doppler current profiler mounted on a bottom tripod was fitted with an acoustic modem to transmit data to a surface buoy; electronics mounted on the buoy relayed these data to shore via radio modem. The mooring at one site (24 m water depth) was custom-designed for the telemetry application, with a custom designed small buoy, a flexible electro-mechanical buoy to mooring joint using a molded chain connection to the buoy, quick-release electro-mechanical couplings, and dual hydrophones suspended 7 m above the bottom. The surface buoy at the second site (33 m water depth) was a U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) channel buoy fitted with telemetry electronics and clamps to hold the hydrophones. The telemetry was tested in several configurations for a period of about four years. The custom-designed buoy and mooring provided nearly error-free data transmission through the acoustic link under a variety of oceanographic conditions for 261 days at the 24 m site. The electro mechanical joint, cables and couplings required minimal servicing and were very reliable, lasting 862 days deployed before needing repairs. The acoustic communication results from the USCG buoy were poor, apparently due to the hard cobble bottom, noise from the all-steel buoy, and failure of the hydrophone assembly. Access to the USCG buoy at sea required ideal weather. ??2006 IEEE.

  4. Site Characterization for a Deep Borehole Field Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhlman, K. L.; Hardin, E. L.; Freeze, G. A.; Sassani, D.; Brady, P. V.

    2015-12-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy is at the beginning of 5-year Deep Borehole Field Test (DBFT) to investigate the feasibility of constructing and characterizing two boreholes in crystalline basement rock to a depth of 5 km (16,400 ft). The concept of deep borehole disposal for radioactive waste has some advantages over mined repositories, including incremental construction and loading, the enhanced natural barriers provided by deep continental crystalline basement, and reduced site characterization. Site characterization efforts need to determine an eligible site that does not have the following disqualifying characteristics: greater than 2 km to crystalline basement, upward vertical fluid potential gradients, presence of economically exploitable natural resources, presence of high permeability connection to the shallow subsurface, and significant probability of future seismic or volcanic activity. Site characterization activities for the DBFT will include geomechanical (i.e., rock in situ stress state, and fluid pressure), geological (i.e., rock and fracture infill lithology), hydrological (i.e., quantity of fluid, fluid convection properties, and solute transport mechanisms), and geochemical (i.e., rock-water interaction and natural tracers) aspects. Both direct (i.e., sampling and in situ testing) and indirect (i.e., borehole geophysical) methods are planned for efficient and effective characterization of these site aspects and physical processes. Borehole-based characterization will be used to determine the variability of system state (i.e., stress, pressure, temperature, and chemistry) with depth, and interpretation of material and system parameters relevant to numerical site simulation. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE

  5. Isolation and identification of gold nanoparticles synthesizing fungi from Indian Kolar Gold Field mine soil.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, V Jhansi; Kannan, K P

    2016-07-01

    An indigenous fungal strain was isolated from Indian Kolar Gold Field mine soil. The isolate was heterothallic, branched septate, deeply floccose, fast-growing, dull green with white background conidial columnar mycelium from Aspergillus section Fumigati. Diverse metabolic patterns of the isolate exhibit high metal, thermal resistance which grews well from 28 ± 1 degrees C to 37 degrees C and pH concentration was significant on the growth of isolate. Phylogenetic analysis of 16srRNA β-Tubulin gene sequence established relationship among isolate and other taxa. Molecular identification and morphological features of fungal isolate were consistent with those of Neosartorya udagawae. Heterothallic N. udagawae FJ830683 strain was closely related to homothallic N. aureola EF661890. Fungal isolate extract synthesized narrow sized stable Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). PMID:27498502

  6. Incorporating conditional random fields and active learning to improve sentiment identification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kunpeng; Xie, Yusheng; Yang, Yi; Sun, Aaron; Liu, Hengchang; Choudhary, Alok

    2014-10-01

    Many machine learning, statistical, and computational linguistic methods have been developed to identify sentiment of sentences in documents, yielding promising results. However, most of state-of-the-art methods focus on individual sentences and ignore the impact of context on the meaning of a sentence. In this paper, we propose a method based on conditional random fields to incorporate sentence structure and context information in addition to syntactic information for improving sentiment identification. We also investigate how human interaction affects the accuracy of sentiment labeling using limited training data. We propose and evaluate two different active learning strategies for labeling sentiment data. Our experiments with the proposed approach demonstrate a 5%-15% improvement in accuracy on Amazon customer reviews compared to existing supervised learning and rule-based methods.

  7. Real-time PCR Tests in Dutch Exotic Mosquito Surveys; Implementation of Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus Identification Tests, and the Development of Tests for the Identification of Aedes atropalpus and Aedes japonicus japonicus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    van de Vossenberg, B T L H; Ibáñez-Justicia, A; Metz-Verschure, E; van Veen, E J; Bruil-Dieters, M L; Scholte, E J

    2015-05-01

    Since 2009, The Netherlands Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority carries out surveys focusing on, amongst others, the presence of invasive mosquito species (IMS). Special attention is given to exotic container-breeding Aedes species Aedes aegypti (L.), Aedes albopictus (Skuse), Aedes atropalpus (Coquillett), and Aedes japonicus japonicus (Theobald). This study describes the implementation of real-time PCR tests described by Hill et al. (2008) for the identification of Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus, and the development of two novel real-time PCR tests for the identification of Ae. atropalpus and Ae. j. japonicus. Initial test showed that optimization of elements of the Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus tests was needed. Method validation tests were performed to determine if the implemented and newly developed tests are fit for routine diagnostics. Performance criteria of analytical sensitivity, analytical specificity, selectivity, repeatability, and reproducibility were determined. In addition, experiments were performed to determine the influence of environmental conditions on the usability of DNA extracted from mosquito specimens trapped in BG-Sentinel traps. The real-time PCR tests were demonstrated to be sensitive, specific, repeatable, reproducible, and are less prone to false negative results compared to partial cytochrome c oxidase I gene sequencing owing to the DNA fragmentation caused by environmental influences. PMID:26334807

  8. Real-time PCR Tests in Dutch Exotic Mosquito Surveys; Implementation of Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus Identification Tests, and the Development of Tests for the Identification of Aedes atropalpus and Aedes japonicus japonicus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    van de Vossenberg, B T L H; Ibáñez-Justicia, A; Metz-Verschure, E; van Veen, E J; Bruil-Dieters, M L; Scholte, E J

    2015-05-01

    Since 2009, The Netherlands Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority carries out surveys focusing on, amongst others, the presence of invasive mosquito species (IMS). Special attention is given to exotic container-breeding Aedes species Aedes aegypti (L.), Aedes albopictus (Skuse), Aedes atropalpus (Coquillett), and Aedes japonicus japonicus (Theobald). This study describes the implementation of real-time PCR tests described by Hill et al. (2008) for the identification of Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus, and the development of two novel real-time PCR tests for the identification of Ae. atropalpus and Ae. j. japonicus. Initial test showed that optimization of elements of the Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus tests was needed. Method validation tests were performed to determine if the implemented and newly developed tests are fit for routine diagnostics. Performance criteria of analytical sensitivity, analytical specificity, selectivity, repeatability, and reproducibility were determined. In addition, experiments were performed to determine the influence of environmental conditions on the usability of DNA extracted from mosquito specimens trapped in BG-Sentinel traps. The real-time PCR tests were demonstrated to be sensitive, specific, repeatable, reproducible, and are less prone to false negative results compared to partial cytochrome c oxidase I gene sequencing owing to the DNA fragmentation caused by environmental influences.

  9. Direct Field and Reverberant Chamber Acoustic Test Comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OConnell, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Reverberant and direct acoustic test comparisons were analyzed in this viewgraph presentation. The acoustic test data set includes: 1) CloudSat antenna subjected to PF reverberant chamber acoustic test; 2) CloudSat subjected to a PF direct speaker acoustic test; and 3) DAWN flight spacecraft subjected to PF direct speaker and a workmanship reverberant chamber acoustic test.

  10. Evolving test fields in a black-hole geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Nils

    1997-01-01

    We consider the initial value problem for a massless scalar field in the Schwarzschild geometry. When constructed using a complex-frequency approach the necessary Green's function splits into three components. We discuss all of these in some detail. (1) The contribution from the singularities (the quasinormal modes of the black hole) is approximated and the mode sum is demonstrated to converge after a certain well-defined time in the evolution. A dynamic description of the mode excitation is introduced and tested. (2) It is shown how a straightforward low-frequency approximation to the integral along the branch cut in the black-hole Green's function leads to the anticipated power-law falloff at very late times. We also calculate higher order corrections to this tail and show that they provide an important complement to the leading order. (3) The high-frequency problem is also considered. We demonstrate that the combination of the obtained approximations for the quasinormal modes and the power-law tail provide a complete description of the evolution at late times. Problems that arise (in the complex-frequency picture) for early times are also discussed, as is the fact that many of the presented results generalize to, for example, Kerr black holes.

  11. Rigorously testing multialternative decision field theory against random utility models.

    PubMed

    Berkowitsch, Nicolas A J; Scheibehenne, Benjamin; Rieskamp, Jörg

    2014-06-01

    Cognitive models of decision making aim to explain the process underlying observed choices. Here, we test a sequential sampling model of decision making, multialternative decision field theory (MDFT; Roe, Busemeyer, & Townsend, 2001), on empirical grounds and compare it against 2 established random utility models of choice: the probit and the logit model. Using a within-subject experimental design, participants in 2 studies repeatedly choose among sets of options (consumer products) described on several attributes. The results of Study 1 showed that all models predicted participants' choices equally well. In Study 2, in which the choice sets were explicitly designed to distinguish the models, MDFT had an advantage in predicting the observed choices. Study 2 further revealed the occurrence of multiple context effects within single participants, indicating an interdependent evaluation of choice options and correlations between different context effects. In sum, the results indicate that sequential sampling models can provide relevant insights into the cognitive process underlying preferential choices and thus can lead to better choice predictions.

  12. The Savannah River Technology Center environmental monitoring field test platform

    SciTech Connect

    Rossabi, J.

    1993-03-05

    Nearly all industrial facilities have been responsible for introducing synthetic chemicals into the environment. The Savannah River Site is no exception. Several areas at the site have been contaminated by chlorinated volatile organic chemicals. Because of the persistence and refractory nature of these contaminants, a complete clean up of the site will take many years. A major focus of the mission of the Environmental Sciences Section of the Savannah River Technology Center is to develop better, faster, and less expensive methods for characterizing, monitoring, and remediating the subsurface. These new methods can then be applied directly at the Savannah River Site and at other contaminated areas in the United States and throughout the world. The Environmental Sciences Section has hosted field testing of many different monitoring technologies over the past two years primarily as a result of the Integrated Demonstration Program sponsored by the Department of Energy`s Office of Technology Development. This paper provides an overview of some of the technologies that have been demonstrated at the site and briefly discusses the applicability of these techniques.

  13. Geomechanical Considerations for the Deep Borehole Field Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, B. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste is under consideration as a potential alternative to shallower mined repositories. The disposal concept consists of drilling a borehole into crystalline basement rocks to a depth of 5 km, emplacement of canisters containing solid waste in the lower 2 km, and plugging and sealing the upper 3 km of the borehole. Crystalline rocks such as granites are particularly attractive for borehole emplacement because of their low permeability and porosity at depth, and high mechanical strength to resist borehole deformation. In addition, high overburden pressures contribute to sealing of some of the fractures that provide transport pathways. We present geomechanical considerations during construction (e.g., borehole breakouts, disturbed rock zone development, and creep closure), relevant to both the smaller-diameter characterization borehole (8.5") and the larger-diameter field test borehole (17"). Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  14. Field test of a post-closure radiation monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, S.E.; Christy, C.E.; Heath, R.E.

    1995-10-01

    The DOE is conducting remedial actions at many sites contaminated with radioactive materials. After closure of these sites, long-term subsurface monitoring is typically required by law. This monitoring is generally labor intensive and expensive using conventional sampling and analysis techniques. The U.S. Department of Energy`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) has contracted with Babcock and Wilcox to develop a Long-Term Post-Closure Radiation Monitoring System (LPRMS) to reduce these monitoring costs. The system designed in Phase I of this development program monitors gamma radiation using a subsurface cesium iodide scintillator coupled to above-ground detection electronics using optical waveguide. The radiation probe can be installed to depths up to 50 meters using cone penetrometer techniques, and requires no downhole electrical power. Multiplexing, data logging and analysis are performed at a central location. A prototype LPRMS probe was built, and B&W and FERMCO field tested this monitoring probe at the Fernald Environmental Management Project in the fall of 1994 with funding from the DOE`s Office of Technology Development (EM-50) through METC. The system was used measure soil and water with known uranium contamination levels, both in drums and in situ depths up to 3 meters. For comparison purposes measurements were also performed using a more conventional survey probe with a sodium iodide scintillator directly butt-coupled to detection electronics.

  15. What Predicts Changes in Useful Field of View Test Performance?

    PubMed Central

    Lunsman, Melissa; Edwards, Jerri D.; Andel, Ross; Small, Brent J.; Ball, Karlene K.; Roenker, Daniel L.

    2015-01-01

    The Useful Field of View Test (UFOV1) has been used to examine age-related changes in visual processing and cognition and as an indicator of everyday performance outcomes, particularly driving, for over 20 years. How UFOV performance changes with age and what may impact such changes have not previously been investigated longitudinally. Predictors of change in UFOV performance over a five-year period among control-group participants (n = 690) from the Advanced Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly (ACTIVE) study were examined. Random effects models were estimated with four-subtest total UFOV as the outcome and baseline age, education, gender, race, visual acuity, depressive symptoms, mental status, and self-rated health, as well as attrition, as predictors. UFOV performance generally followed a curvilinear pattern, improving and then declining over time. Only increased age was consistently related to greater declines in UFOV performance over time. UFOV and WAIS-R Digit Symbol Substitution (DSS), a standard measure of cognitive speed, had similar trajectories of change. The implications of these results are discussed. PMID:19140660

  16. Field test of a wideband downhole EM transmitter

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Alex; Lee, Ki Ha; Reginato, Lou

    1999-07-01

    A viable large bandwidth TEM transmitter can be constructed using very conventional means although in the present case the effective magnetic permeability of the solenoid core was lower than expected. Only a small number of turns can be used too maintain reasonably low inductance. This has to be compensated with the use of large currents. In this case, good ventilation must be provided to avoid overheating the electronics. In our case the most temperature sensitive element was the optic fiber transmitter which usually failed after about an hour of operation. Care must also be taken to guarantee balance between the negative and positive pulses as this improves the signal/noise ratio. Finally, we reiterate the need to review the origin and nature of the trigger pulse so that consistent properly clocked data can be acquired. In spite of the unlimited nature of the RFS tests which prevented us from acquiring data suitable for a direct demonstration of the wavefield transform, we did secure high quality wideband data that confirmed the proper performance of the prototype transmitter. We are certain that this equipment can now be used in an oil-field environment to acquire data suitable for a practical verification of the wavefield transform.

  17. Identification of Low Order Equivalent System Models From Flight Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    2000-01-01

    Identification of low order equivalent system dynamic models from flight test data was studied. Inputs were pilot control deflections, and outputs were aircraft responses, so the models characterized the total aircraft response including bare airframe and flight control system. Theoretical investigations were conducted and related to results found in the literature. Low order equivalent system modeling techniques using output error and equation error parameter estimation in the frequency domain were developed and validated on simulation data. It was found that some common difficulties encountered in identifying closed loop low order equivalent system models from flight test data could be overcome using the developed techniques. Implications for data requirements and experiment design were discussed. The developed methods were demonstrated using realistic simulation cases, then applied to closed loop flight test data from the NASA F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle.

  18. Half-embryo test for identification of irradiated citrus fruit: collaborative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Yoko; Sugita, Takiko; Yamada, Takashi; Saito, Yukio

    1996-11-01

    A collaborative study on the use of the half-embryo test for the detection of irradiated citrus fruit was undertaken. Collaborative samples of seeds removed from citrus fruit, which were irradiated with doses of 0, 0.2 and 0.5 kGy, were examined by 12 participating laboratories. The percentage of correct identifications, whether irradiated or unirradiated, was 92% of 48 samples after 4 days incubation and 98% after 7 days incubation. Only one sample, irradiated with 0.2 kGy, was incorrectly identified. This collaborative study shows that irradiated citrus fruit can be identified using the half-embryo test and that the test can be applied in practice.

  19. System identification of the Large-Angle Magnetic Suspension Test Fixture (LAMSTF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Jen-Kuang

    1994-01-01

    The Large-Angle Magnetic Suspension Test Fixture (LAMSTF), a laboratory-scale research project to demonstrate the magnetic suspension of objects over wide ranges of attitudes, has been developed. This system represents a scaled model of a planned Large-Gap Magnetic Suspension System (LGMSS). The LAMSTF consists of a small cylindrical permanent magnet suspended element which is levitated above a planar array of five electromagnets mounted in a circular configuration. The cylinder is a rigid body and can be controlled to move in five independent degrees of freedom. Six position variables are sensed indirectly by using infrared light-emitting diodes and light-receiving phototransistors. The motion of the suspended cylinder is in general nonlinear and hence only the linear, time-invariant perturbed motion about an equilibrium state is considered. One of the main challenges in this project is the control of the suspended element over a wide range of orientations. An accurate dynamic model plays an essential role in controller design. The analytical model is first derived and open-loop characteristics discussed. The system is shown to be highly unstable and requires feedback control for system identification. Projection filters are first proposed to identify the state space model from closed-loop input/output test data in the time domain. This method is then extended to identify linear systems from the frequency test data. A canonical transformation matrix is also derived to transform the identified state space model into the physical coordinate. The LAMSTF system is stabilized by using a linear quadratic regulator (LQR) feedback controller for closed-loop identification. The rate information is obtained by calculating the back difference of the sensed position signals. Only the closed-loop random input/output data are recorded. Preliminary results from numerical simulations demonstrate that the identified system model is fairly accurate from either time domain or

  20. Update from the Laboratory: Clinical Identification and Susceptibility Testing of Fungi and Trends in Antifungal Resistance.

    PubMed

    Albataineh, Mohammad T; Sutton, Deanna A; Fothergill, Annette W; Wiederhold, Nathan P

    2016-03-01

    Despite the availability of new diagnostic assays and broad-spectrum antifungal agents, invasive fungal infections remain a significant challenge to clinicians and are associated with marked morbidity and mortality. In addition, the number of etiologic agents of invasive mycoses has increased accompanied by an expansion in the immunocompromised patient populations, and the use of molecular tools for fungal identification and characterization has resulted in the discovery of several cryptic species. This article reviews various methods used to identify fungi and perform antifungal susceptibility testing in the clinical laboratory. Recent developments in antifungal resistance are also discussed. PMID:26739605

  1. Radiation Detection Field Test at the Federal Express (FedEx) Air Cargo Facility at Denver International Airport (DIA)

    SciTech Connect

    Weirup, D; Waters, A; Hall, H; Dougan, A; Trombino, D; Mattesich, G; Hull, E; Bahowick, S; Loshak, A; Gruidl, J

    2004-02-11

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) recently conducted a field-test of radiation detection and identification equipment at the air cargo facility of Federal Express (FedEx) located at Denver International Airport (DIA) over a period of two weeks. Comprehensive background measurements were performed and were analyzed, and a trial strategy for detection and identification of parcels displaying radioactivity was implemented to aid in future development of a comprehensive protection plan. The purpose of this project was threefold: {sm_bullet} Quantify background radiation environments at an air cargo facility. {sm_bullet} Quantify and identify ''nuisance'' alarms. {sm_bullet} Evaluate the performance of various isotope identifiers deployed in an operational environment (in this case, the operational environment included the biggest blizzard in over 90 years!).

  2. Group testing regression model estimation when case identification is a goal

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Boan; Bilder, Christopher R.; Tebbs, Joshua M.

    2013-01-01

    Group testing is frequently used to reduce the costs of screening a large number of individuals for infectious diseases or other binary characteristics in small prevalence situations. In many applications, the goals include both identifying individuals as positive or negative and estimating the probability of positivity. The identification aspect leads to additional tests being performed, known as “retests,” beyond those performed for initial groups of individuals. In this paper, we investigate how regression models can be fit to estimate the probability of positivity while also incorporating the extra information from these retests. We present simulation evidence showing that significant gains in efficiency occur by incorporating retesting information, and we further examine which testing protocols are the most efficient to use. Our investigations also demonstrate that some group testing protocols can actually lead to more efficient estimates than individual testing when diagnostic tests are imperfect. The proposed methods are applied retrospectively to chlamydia screening data from the Infertility Prevention Project. We demonstrate that significant cost savings could occur through the use of particular group testing protocols. PMID:23401252

  3. TCIQ: An identification by intensity and frequency of potent testing cues in science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kermis, William J.

    Everyone experiences some anxiety while taking an examination. High-test-anxious (HTA) and low-test-anxious (LTA) students are described by two characteristic differences: frequency and intensity of anxious responses and attentional direction to testing cues. The purposes of this study were threefold: (1) to report potent testing cues (i.e., 90% response agreement for both intensity and frequency) that were identified by HTA and LTA students; (2) to report differences between HTA and LTA students for frequencies and intensities of responses to testing cues; and (3) to report differences between HTA and LTA students of attentional direction to testing cues. A pool of 396 males and females who were enrolled in physical geology completed the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. A random sample consisting of 93 HTA and 40 LTA subjects completed the Test Cues Identification Questionnaire (TCIQ). The TCIQ consists of 28 disruptive items and 27 helpful items. Subjects responded with both frequency and intensity ratings for all of the 55 items in the TCIQ. Results revealed that 22 items were viewed by subjects as potent testing cues. Empirical evidence obtained did not support previous theoretical reports of differences between HTA and LTA students for either frequency and intensity of anxious responses or attentional direction to the set of disruptive and helpful testing cues. Although test anxiousness did not appear to be associated with those two characteristics differences, a discriminant analysis revealed 24 items in the TCIQ which significantly, 2 (24) = 47.59, p < 0.004, separated HTA and LTA subjects responses. Apparently, HTA and LTA students differ in their responses to specific disruptive and helpful cues but not in their responses to the set of testing cues as was previously postulated.

  4. Smart Infrared Inspection System Field Operational Test Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Siekmann, Adam; Capps, Gary J; Franzese, Oscar; Lascurain, Mary Beth

    2011-06-01

    The Smart InfraRed Inspection System (SIRIS) is a tool designed to assist inspectors in determining which vehicles passing through the SIRIS system are in need of further inspection by measuring the thermal data from the wheel components. As a vehicle enters the system, infrared cameras on the road measure temperatures of the brakes, tires, and wheel bearings on both wheel ends of commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in motion. This thermal data is then presented to enforcement personal inside of the inspection station on a user friendly interface. Vehicles that are suspected to have a violation are automatically alerted to the enforcement staff. The main goal of the SIRIS field operational test (FOT) was to collect data to evaluate the performance of the prototype system and determine the viability of such a system being used for commercial motor vehicle enforcement. From March 2010 to September 2010, ORNL facilitated the SIRIS FOT at the Greene County Inspection Station (IS) in Greeneville, Tennessee. During the course of the FOT, 413 CMVs were given a North American Standard (NAS) Level-1 inspection. Of those 413 CMVs, 384 were subjected to a SIRIS screening. A total of 36 (9.38%) of the vehicles were flagged by SIRIS as having one or more thermal issues; with brakes issues making up 33 (91.67%) of those. Of the 36 vehicles flagged as having thermal issues, 31 (86.11%) were found to have a violation and 30 (83.33%) of those vehicles were placed out-of-service (OOS). Overall the enforcement personnel who have used SIRIS for screening purposes have had positive feedback on the potential of SIRIS. With improvements in detection algorithms and stability, the system will be beneficial to the CMV enforcement community and increase overall trooper productivity by accurately identifying a higher percentage of CMVs to be placed OOS with minimal error. No future evaluation of SIRIS has been deemed necessary and specifications for a production system will soon be drafted.

  5. Detection and identification of microorganisms using a combined flow field-flow fractionation/spectroscopy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiaojuan

    This doctoral project is focused on the implementation of a novel micron and sub-micron particle characterization technology for in-situ, continuous monitoring and detecting of microorganisms in water. The particle technology is based on simultaneous characterizing the joint particle property distribution (size, shape, and chemical composition) through the combined fractionation/separation and light scattering detection and interpretation techniques. Over more than a decade, field-flow fractionation (FFF) has shown to be well-suited for the separation and/or selection of bacteria (Giddings, 1993). As the most universal fractionation technique among the FFF family, flow field-flow fractionation (FFFF) has been chosen as the separation device in this research. The multi-angle laser light scattering (MALLS) photometer and the UV-vis/liquid core optical waveguide constitute the primary on-line light scattering detection system. The angular spectra obtained by the MALLS photometer provided information on the shape of microorganism; the multi-wavelength transmission spectra of microorganisms contain quantitative information on their size, number, shape, chemical composition and internal structure, which are essential for identification and classification of microorganisms. Both experimental results and the theoretical prediction have revealed that the particle size resolution capabilities of the FFFF fractionation system coupled with the sensitivity of the laser light scattering to particle shape, and the sensitivity of the UV-vis spectra to cell size, shape, cell orientation and chemical composition offer an integrated system for the identification and classification of microorganisms. The ability to discriminate between cell species was demonstrated by the light scattering and absorption interpretation model, which is based on light scattering theory (Rayleigh-Debye-Gans approximation), spectral deconvolution techniques, and on the approximation of the frequency

  6. Understanding spike-triggered covariance using Wiener theory for receptive field identification

    PubMed Central

    Sandler, Roman A.; Marmarelis, Vasilis Z.

    2015-01-01

    Receptive field identification is a vital problem in sensory neurophysiology and vision. Much research has been done in identifying the receptive fields of nonlinear neurons whose firing rate is determined by the nonlinear interactions of a small number of linear filters. Despite more advanced methods that have been proposed, spike-triggered covariance (STC) continues to be the most widely used method in such situations due to its simplicity and intuitiveness. Although the connection between STC and Wiener/Volterra kernels has often been mentioned in the literature, this relationship has never been explicitly derived. Here we derive this relationship and show that the STC matrix is actually a modified version of the second-order Wiener kernel, which incorporates the input autocorrelation and mixes first- and second-order dynamics. It is then shown how, with little modification of the STC method, the Wiener kernels may be obtained and, from them, the principal dynamic modes, a set of compact and efficient linear filters that essentially combine the spike-triggered average and STC matrix and generalize to systems with both continuous and point-process outputs. Finally, using Wiener theory, we show how these obtained filters may be corrected when they were estimated using correlated inputs. Our correction technique is shown to be superior to those commonly used in the literature for both correlated Gaussian images and natural images. PMID:26230978

  7. Interpretation of fish biomarker data for identification, classification, risk assessment and testing of endocrine disrupting chemicals.

    PubMed

    Dang, ZhiChao

    2016-01-01

    Chemical induced changes in fish biomarkers vitellogenin (VTG), secondary sex characteristics (SSC), and sex ratio indicate modes/mechanisms of action (MOAs) of EAS (estrogen, androgen and steroidogenesis) pathways. These biomarkers could be used for defining MOAs and the causal link between MOAs and adverse effects in fish for the identification of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). This paper compiled data sets of 150 chemicals for VTG, 57 chemicals for SSC and 38 chemicals for sex ratio in fathead minnow, medaka and zebrafish. It showed 1) changes in fish biomarkers can indicate the MOAs as anticipated; 2) in addition to EAS pathways, chemicals with non-EAS pathways induced changes in fish biomarkers; 3) responses of fish biomarkers did not always follow the anticipated patterns of EAS pathways. These responses may result from the interaction of chemical-induced multiple MOAs and confounding factors like fish diet, infection, culture conditions, general toxicity and stress response. The complex response of fish biomarkers to a chemical of interest requires EDC testing at multiple biological levels. Interpretation of fish biomarker data should be combined with relevant information at different biological levels, which is critical for defining chemical specific MOAs. The utility of fish biomarker data for identification, classification, PBT assessment, risk assessment, and testing of EDCs in the regulatory context was discussed. This paper emphasizes the importance of fish biomarker data in the regulatory context, a weight of evidence approach for the interpretation of fish biomarker data and the need for defining levels of evidence for the identification of EDCs. PMID:27155823

  8. Progressive Aerodynamic Model Identification From Dynamic Water Tunnel Test of the F-16XL Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Patrick C.; Klein, Vladislav; Szyba, Nathan M.

    2004-01-01

    Development of a general aerodynamic model that is adequate for predicting the forces and moments in the nonlinear and unsteady portions of the flight envelope has not been accomplished to a satisfactory degree. Predicting aerodynamic response during arbitrary motion of an aircraft over the complete flight envelope requires further development of the mathematical model and the associated methods for ground-based testing in order to allow identification of the model. In this study, a general nonlinear unsteady aerodynamic model is presented, followed by a summary of a linear modeling methodology that includes test and identification methods, and then a progressive series of steps suggesting a roadmap to develop a general nonlinear methodology that defines modeling, testing, and identification methods. Initial steps of the general methodology were applied to static and oscillatory test data to identify rolling-moment coefficient. Static measurements uncovered complicated dependencies of the aerodynamic coefficient on angle of attack and sideslip in the stall region making it difficult to find a simple analytical expression for the measurement data. In order to assess the effect of sideslip on the damping and unsteady terms, oscillatory tests in roll were conducted at different values of an initial offset in sideslip. Candidate runs for analyses were selected where higher order harmonics were required for the model and where in-phase and out-of-phase components varied with frequency. From these results it was found that only data in the angle-of-attack range of 35 degrees to 37.5 degrees met these requirements. From the limited results it was observed that the identified models fit the data well and both the damping-in-roll and the unsteady term gain are decreasing with increasing sideslip and motion amplitude. Limited similarity between parameter values in the nonlinear model and the linear model suggest that identifiability of parameters in both terms may be a

  9. Comparison of SVM RBF-NN and DT for crop and weed identification based on spectral measurement over corn fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is important to find an appropriate pattern-recognition method for in-field plant identification based on spectral measurement in order to classify the crop and weeds accurately. In this study, the method of Support Vector Machine (SVM) was evaluated and compared with two other methods, Decision ...

  10. Forensic identification of urine using the DMAC test: a method validation study.

    PubMed

    Ong, Sandy Y; Wain, Adrian; Groombridge, Linda; Grimes, Eileen

    2012-06-01

    Forensic scientists may sometimes be asked to identify the presence of urine in cases such as harassment, rape or murder. One popular presumptive test method uses para-dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde (DMAC), favoured because it is simple, rapid and safe. This paper confirms that DMAC reacts with urea rather than creatinine, ammonia or uric acid. Sensitivity studies found that the 0.1% w/v DMAC solution currently used for urine identification detects levels of urea found in other body fluids, potentially resulting in false positives. A 0.05% w/v solution was found to be more appropriate in terms of sensitivity to urea however the test is still not specific for urine, giving positive reactions with a number of body fluids (saliva, semen, sweat and vaginal material) and other substances (foot lotion, hair removal cream and broccoli).

  11. Use of system identification techniques for improving airframe finite element models using test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanagud, Sathya V.; Zhou, Weiyu; Craig, James I.; Weston, Neil J.

    1993-01-01

    A method for using system identification techniques to improve airframe finite element models using test data was developed and demonstrated. The method uses linear sensitivity matrices to relate changes in selected physical parameters to changes in the total system matrices. The values for these physical parameters were determined using constrained optimization with singular value decomposition. The method was confirmed using both simple and complex finite element models for which pseudo-experimental data was synthesized directly from the finite element model. The method was then applied to a real airframe model which incorporated all of the complexities and details of a large finite element model and for which extensive test data was available. The method was shown to work, and the differences between the identified model and the measured results were considered satisfactory.

  12. Loop Identification and Capacity Estimation of Digital Subscriber Lines with Single Ended Line Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neus, Carine; Foubert, Wim; van Biesen, Leo

    Digital subscriber lines offer the possibility to deliver broadband services over the existing telephone network. Still, beforehand subscriber loops must be tested to see whether they can support high-speed data services, and at what bit rate. From the existing measurement techniques, Single Ended Line Testing is often preferred because all necessary measurements can be performed from the central office. Consequently the capacity cannot be measured directly, but should be calculated through the estimation of the loop make-up. This paper discusses some main difficulties of this identification. Moreover, in contrast to the traditional approach where the data are interpreted in the time domain, this paper presents a new approach by doing most of the processing in the frequency domain.

  13. Spectral modeling for the identification and quantification of algal blooms: A test of approach

    SciTech Connect

    Malthus, T.J.; Grieve, L.; Harwar, M.D.

    1997-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to develop and test a Monte Carlo modelling approach for the characterization of reflectance for different bloom-forming marine phytoplankton species. The model was tested on optical data for four species (Dunaliella salina, Pavlova pinguis, Emiliania huxleyi and Synechocystes spp.) and simulations performed over a range of chlorophyll concentrations. Discriminant analysis identified 10 key wavelengths which could be used to maximize the separation between the four species. The resulting wavelengths were combined in a neural network to show 100% accuracy in classifying species type. Further simulations were undertaken to investigate the effect of aquatic humus on reflectance characteristics and the change in wavelengths for algal discrimination. The implications for the development of algorithms for the identification of algal bloom species type by remote sensing are briefly discussed.

  14. Trace Contraband Detection Field-Test by the South Texas Specialized Crimes and Narcotics Task Force

    SciTech Connect

    Hannum, David W.; Shannon, Gary W.

    2006-04-01

    This report describes the collaboration between the South Texas Specialized Crimes and Narcotics Task Force (STSCNTF) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in a field test that provided prototype hand-held trace detection technology for use in counter-drug operations. The National Institute of Justice (NIJ)/National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center (NLECTC)/Border Research and Technology Center (BRTC) was contacted by STSCNTF for assistance in obtaining cutting-edge technology. The BRTC created a pilot project for Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the STSCNTF for the use of SNL’s Hound, a hand-held sample collection and preconcentration system that, when combined with a commercial chemical detector, can be used for the trace detection of illicit drugs and explosives. The STSCNTF operates in an area of high narcotics trafficking where methods of concealment make the detection of narcotics challenging. Sandia National Laboratories’ (SNL) Contraband Detection Department personnel provided the Hound system hardware and operational training. The Hound system combines the GE VaporTracer2, a hand-held commercial chemical detector, with an SNL-developed sample collection and preconcentration system. The South Texas Task force reported a variety of successes, including identification of a major shipment of methamphetamines, the discovery of hidden compartments in vehicles that contained illegal drugs and currency used in drug deals, and the identification of a suspect in a nightclub shooting. The main advantage of the hand-held trace detection unit is its ability to quickly identify the type of chemical (drugs or explosives) without a long lag time for laboratory analysis, which is the most common analysis method for current law enforcement procedures.

  15. Trace contraband detection field-test by the south Texas specialized crimes and narcotics task force.

    SciTech Connect

    Hannum, David W.; Shannon, Gary W.

    2006-04-01

    This report describes the collaboration between the South Texas Specialized Crimes and Narcotics Task Force (STSCNTF) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in a field test that provided prototype hand-held trace detection technology for use in counter-drug operations. The National Institute of Justice (NIJ)/National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center (NLECTC)/Border Research and Technology Center (BRTC) was contacted by STSCNTF for assistance in obtaining cutting-edge technology. The BRTC created a pilot project for Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the STSCNTF for the use of SNLs Hound, a hand-held sample collection and preconcentration system that, when combined with a commercial chemical detector, can be used for the trace detection of illicit drugs and explosives. The STSCNTF operates in an area of high narcotics trafficking where methods of concealment make the detection of narcotics challenging. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Contraband Detection Department personnel provided the Hound system hardware and operational training. The Hound system combines the GE VaporTracer2, a hand-held commercial chemical detector, with an SNL-developed sample collection and preconcentration system. The South Texas Task force reported a variety of successes, including identification of a major shipment of methamphetamines, the discovery of hidden compartments in vehicles that contained illegal drugs and currency used in drug deals, and the identification of a suspect in a nightclub shooting. The main advantage of the hand-held trace detection unit is its ability to quickly identify the type of chemical (drugs or explosives) without a long lag time for laboratory analysis, which is the most common analysis method for current law enforcement procedures.

  16. Does Field Independence Relate to Performance on Communicative Language Tests?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmani-Nodoushan, Mohammad Ali

    2006-01-01

    Recent language testing research investigates factors other than language proficiency that may be responsible for systematic variance in language test performance. One such factor is the test takers' cognitive styles. The present study was carried out with the aim of finding the probable effects of Iranian EFL learners' cognitive styles on their…

  17. BOBCAT Personal Radiation Detector Field Test and Evaluation Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Chris Hodge

    2008-03-01

    Following the success of the Anole test of portable detection system, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Domestic Nuclear Detection Office organized a test and evaluation campaign for personal radiation detectors (PRDs), also known as “Pagers.” This test, “Bobcat,” was conducted from July 17 to August 8, 2006, at the Nevada Test Site. The Bobcat test was designed to evaluate the performance of PRDs under various operational scenarios, such as pedestrian surveying, mobile surveying, cargo container screening, and pedestrian chokepoint monitoring. Under these testing scenarios, many operational characteristics of the PRDs, such as gamma and neutron sensitivities, positive detection and false alarm rates, response delay times, minimum detectable activities, and source localization errors, were analyzed. This paper will present the design, execution, and methodologies used to test this equipment for the DHS.

  18. Personal Radiation Detector Field Test and Evaluation Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Chris A. Hodge, Ding Yuan, Raymond P. Keegan, Michael A. Krstich

    2007-07-09

    Following the success of the Anole test of portable detection system, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Domestic Nuclear Detection Office organized a test and evaluation campaign for personal radiation detectors (PRDs), also known as 'Pagers'. This test, 'Bobcat', was conducted from July 17 to August 8, 2006, at the Nevada Test Site. The Bobcat test was designed to evaluate the performance of PRDs under various operational scenarios, such as pedestrian surveying, mobile surveying, cargo container screening, and pedestrian chokepoint monitoring. Under these testing scenarios, many operational characteristics of the PRDs, such as gamma and neutron sensitivities, positive detection and false alarm rates, response delay times, minimum detectable activities, and source localization errors, were analyzed. This paper will present the design, execution, and methodologies used to test this equipment for the DHS.

  19. Exercise testing in Warmblood sport horses under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Munsters, Carolien C B M; van Iwaarden, Alexandra; van Weeren, René; Sloet van Oldruitenborgh-Oosterbaan, Marianne M

    2014-10-01

    Regular exercise testing in Warmblood sport horses may, as in racing, potentially help to characterise fitness indices in different disciplines and at various competition levels and assist in understanding when a horse is 'fit to compete'. In this review an overview is given of the current state of the art of exercise testing in the Olympic disciplines of eventing, show jumping and dressage, and areas for further development are defined. In event horses, a simple four-step incremental exercise test measuring heart rate (HR), lactate concentration (LA) and velocity (V) is most often used. In dressage and riding horses, a wide variety of exercise tests have been developed, including incremental exercise tests, indoor riding tests and lunging tests. In show jumping, the use of a five-step incremental exercise test and exercise tests evaluating technical skills and fatigue of the horse has been reported. The velocity at a plasma LA of 4 mmol/L (VLA4) and HR recovery during submaximal exercise intensity have been shown to be the best parameters in event horses for predicting performance and impending injuries. In riding horses, the fitness level of horses is also an important determinant of injuries. Implementation of regular exercise testing and monitoring of training sessions may have important added value in the assessment of performance ability and potential future injuries in Warmblood sport horses. However, there is an urgent need to standardise methodologies and outcome parameters in order to make results comparable.

  20. Field Lysimeter Test Facility: Protective barrier test results (FY 1990, the third year)

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, M.D.; Gee, G.W.

    1990-11-01

    The Field Lysimeter Test Facility (FLTF) was constructed to test protective barriers for isolating low-level radioactive and hazardous wastes from the biosphere. Protective barriers are specially configured earth materials placed over near-surface wastes to prevent intrusion of water, plants, and animals. Low-level radioactive waste is stored in near-surface repositories at the Hanford Site and can be transported into the biosphere by water, plants, and animals. The purpose of the FLTF is to measure water balance within barriers as precipitation is partitioned to evaporation (including transpiration), storage, and drainage. Runoff was prevented by raised edges on the lysimeters. Water balance in protective barriers depends on the water-holding capacity of the soil, the gradient of a potential, and the conductivity of the underlying capillary barrier. Current barrier design uses soil with a high water storage capacity and a capillary barrier underlying the soil to increase its water storage capacity. This increased storage capacity is to hold water, which would normally drain, near the the surface where evaporation can cycle it back to the atmosphere. 7 refs., 23 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. TESTING GALACTIC MAGNETIC FIELD MODELS USING NEAR-INFRARED POLARIMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Pavel, Michael D.; Clemens, D. P.; Pinnick, A. F. E-mail: clemens@bu.edu

    2012-04-10

    This work combines new observations of NIR starlight linear polarimetry with previously simulated observations in order to constrain dynamo models of the Galactic magnetic field. Polarimetric observations were obtained with the Mimir instrument on the Perkins Telescope in Flagstaff, AZ, along a line of constant Galactic longitude (l = 150 Degree-Sign ) with 17 pointings of the 10' Multiplication-Sign 10' field of view between -75 Degree-Sign < b < 10 Degree-Sign , with more frequent pointings toward the Galactic midplane. A total of 10,962 stars were photometrically measured and 1116 had usable polarizations. The observed distribution of polarization position angles with Galactic latitude and the cumulative distribution function of the measured polarizations are compared to predicted values. While the predictions lack the effects of turbulence and are therefore idealized, this comparison allows significant rejection of A0-type magnetic field models. S0 and disk-even halo-odd magnetic field geometries are also rejected by the observations, but at lower significance. New predictions of spiral-type, axisymmetric magnetic fields, when combined with these new NIR observations, constrain the Galactic magnetic field spiral pitch angle to -6 Degree-Sign {+-} 2 Degree-Sign .

  2. Critical Assessment of Current Force Fields. Short Peptide Test Case.

    PubMed

    Vymětal, Jiří; Vondrášek, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    The applicability of molecular dynamics simulations for studies of protein folding or intrinsically disordered proteins critically depends on quality of energetic functions-force fields. The four popular force fields for biomolecular simulations, CHARMM22/CMAP, AMBER FF03, AMBER FF99SB, and OPLS-AA/L, were compared in prediction of conformational propensities of all common proteinogenic amino acids. The minimalistic model of terminally block amino acids (dipeptides) was chosen for assessment of side chain effects on backbone propensities. The precise metadynamics simulations revealed striking inconsistency of trends in conformational preferences as manifested by investigated force fields for both backbone and side chains. To trace this disapproval between force fields, the two related AMBER force fields were studied more closely. In the cases of FF99SB and FF03, we uncovered that the distinct tends were driven by different charge models. Additionally, the effects of recent correction for side chain torsion (FF99SB-ILDN) were examined on affected amino acids and exposed significant coupling between free energy profiles and propensities of backbone and side chain conformers. These findings have important consequences for further force field development.

  3. Pressure transient testing at Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera, J.R.; Samaniego, F.V.; Schroeder, R.C.

    1980-01-01

    Because of the inherent problems in applying pressure build-up tests to wells producing two-phase fluids, it was decided to use variable flow tests of short duration known as two-rates tests. In these tests of variation in the well flow rates can be used to intepret the transient pressure response in order to determine reservoir parameters such as permeability, well-bore damage and mean reservoir pressure in the well drainage area. Some examples will illustrate the application of this technique. 11 refs.

  4. Recent field test results using OMEGA transmissions for clock synchronization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chi, A. R.; Wardrip, S. C.

    1974-01-01

    The results are presented of clock synchronization experiments using OMEGA transmissions from North Dakota on 13.10 kHz and 12.85 kHz. The OMEGA transmissions were monitored during April 1974 from NASA tracking sites located at Madrid, Spain; Canary Island; and Winkfield, England. The sites are located at distances between 6600 kilometers (22,100 microseconds) to 7300 kilometers (24,400 microseconds) from North Dakota. The data shows that cycle identification of the received signals was accomplished. There are, however, discrepancies between the measured and calculated propagation delay values which have not been explained, but seem to increase with distance between the receiver and the transmitter. The data also indicates that three strategically located OMEGA transmitting stations may be adequate to provide worldwide coverage for clock synchronization to within plus or minus two (2) microseconds.

  5. A comparison of ABAcard(®) p30 and RSID™-Semen test kits for forensic semen identification.

    PubMed

    Boward, Emily S; Wilson, Stacey L

    2013-11-01

    The screening and confirmatory tests available to a forensic laboratory allow evidence to be examined for the presence of bodily fluids. With the majority of evidence being submitted involving sexual assaults, it is important to have confirmatory tests for the identification of semen that are straightforward, quick, and reliable. The purpose of this study was to compare two commonly used semen identification kits utilized by forensic laboratories: ABAcard(®) p30 and Rapid Stain Identification of Human Semen (RSID™-Semen). These kits were assessed with aged semen stains, fresh and frozen post-vasectomy semen, post-coital samples collected on different substrates, post-vasectomy semen mixed with blood, saliva, and urine, a series of swabs collected at increasing time intervals after sexual intercourse, and multiple non-semen samples. The test kits were compared on the basis of sensitivity, specificity, and the cost and time effectiveness of each protocol. Overall, both semen identification tests performed well in the studies. Both kits proved specificity for identifying semen, however the ABAcard(®) p30 test surpassed the RSID™-Semen test in sensitivity, cost per test, and simplified test protocol.

  6. Development of a polymerase chain reaction test for specific identification of the urinary tract pathogen Aerococcus urinae.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, M; Collins, M D

    1993-05-01

    A polymerase chain reaction test was developed for identification of the gram-positive urinary tract pathogen Aerococcus urinae. Oligonucleotide primers were based on highly specific sequences within the small-subunit rRNA gene. A confirmatory test based on hybridization of the amplified products to a highly specific internal probe was also developed.

  7. Optimizing odor identification testing as quick and accurate diagnostic tool for Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Mahlknecht, Philipp; Pechlaner, Raimund; Boesveldt, Sanne; Volc, Dieter; Pinter, Bernardette; Reiter, Eva; Müller, Christoph; Krismer, Florian; Berendse, Henk W.; van Hilten, Jacobus J.; Wuschitz, Albert; Schimetta, Wolfgang; Högl, Birgit; Djamshidian, Atbin; Nocker, Michael; Göbel, Georg; Gasperi, Arno; Kiechl, Stefan; Willeit, Johann; Poewe, Werner

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction The aim of this study was to evaluate odor identification testing as a quick, cheap, and reliable tool to identify PD. Methods Odor identification with the 16‐item Sniffin' Sticks test (SS‐16) was assessed in a total of 646 PD patients and 606 controls from three European centers (A, B, and C), as well as 75 patients with atypical parkinsonism or essential tremor and in a prospective cohort of 24 patients with idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (center A). Reduced odor sets most discriminative for PD were determined in a discovery cohort derived from a random split of PD patients and controls from center A using L1‐regularized logistic regression. Diagnostic accuracy was assessed in the rest of the patients/controls as validation cohorts. Results Olfactory performance was lower in PD patients compared with controls and non‐PD patients in all cohorts (each P < 0.001). Both the full SS‐16 and a subscore of the top eight discriminating odors (SS‐8) were associated with an excellent discrimination of PD from controls (areas under the curve ≥0.90; sensitivities ≥83.3%; specificities ≥82.0%) and from non‐PD patients (areas under the curve ≥0.91; sensitivities ≥84.1%; specificities ≥84.0%) in all cohorts. This remained unchanged when patients with >3 years of disease duration were excluded from analysis. All 8 incident PD cases among patients with idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder were predicted with the SS‐16 and the SS‐8 (sensitivity, 100%; positive predictive value, 61.5%). Conclusions Odor identification testing provides excellent diagnostic accuracy in the distinction of PD patients from controls and diagnostic mimics. A reduced set of eight odors could be used as a quick tool in the workup of patients presenting with parkinsonism and for PD risk indication. © 2016 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Parkinson and

  8. Olfactory performance during childhood. I. Development of an odorant identification test for children.

    PubMed

    Richman, R A; Post, E M; Sheehe, P R; Wright, H N

    1992-12-01

    Because there has been no suitable diagnostic instrument for evaluation of olfaction in children, we designed an odorant identification test for that purpose. We screened 40 microencapsulated odorants ("scratch 'n' sniff" cards) by randomly grouping them into 40 overlapping sets of five odorants each. Forty-one children, 4 and 5 years of age, tried to identify each test odorant, selecting their responses from among five photographs depicting the substances in the set of odorants. We used the results to select a subset of five odorants (baby powder, bubble gum, candy cane, fish, and orange). To determine how well these odorants could be identified by normal children, we tested another 134 subjects, 3 1/2 to 13 years of age. For children 3 1/2 years to 5 years 4 months of age, the mean (+/- SEM) percentage of correct responses increased from 66% +/- 8% to 92% +/- 2%. Thereafter the mean percentage of correct responses remained at a plateau of about 90%. The 10th percentile for the percentage of correct responses tended to be higher for girls than for boys throughout childhood. We concluded that this set of five odorants can be correctly identified by most normal children 5 years of age or older. The performances of three older subjects with Kallmann syndrome were all subnormal, but the overall efficacy of the test for evaluating children with olfactory deficits needs to be determined. PMID:1447653

  9. The Sex Attractant Pheromone of Male Brown Rats: Identification and Field Experiment.

    PubMed

    Takács, Stephen; Gries, Regine; Zhai, Huimin; Gries, Gerhard

    2016-05-10

    Trapping brown rats is challenging because they avoid newly placed traps in their habitat. Herein, we report the identification of the sex pheromone produced by male brown rats and its effect on trap captures of wild female brown rats. Collecting urine- and feces-soiled bedding material of laboratory-kept rats and comparing the soiled-bedding odorants of juvenile and adult males, as well as of adult males and females, we found nine compounds that were specific to, or most prevalent in, the odor profiles of sexually mature adult males. When we added a synthetic blend of six of these compounds (2-heptanone, 4-heptanone, 3-ethyl-2-heptanone, 2-octanone, 2-nonanone, 4-nonanone) to one of two paired food-baited trap boxes, these boxes attracted significantly more laboratory-strain female rats in laboratory experiments, and captured ten times more wild female rats in a field experiment than the corresponding control boxes. Our data show that the pheromone facilitates captures of wild female brown rats. PMID:27060700

  10. Identification of Staphylococcus aureus: DNase and Mannitol salt agar improve the efficiency of the tube coagulase test

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The ideal identification of Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolates requires a battery of tests and this is costly in resource limited settings. In many developing countries, the tube coagulase test is usually confirmatory for S. aureus and is routinely done using either human or sheep plasma. This study evaluated Mannitol salt agar and the deoxyribonuclease (DNase) test for improving the efficiency of the tube coagulase test in resource limited settings. The efficiency of human and sheep plasma with tube coagulase tests was also evaluated. Methods One hundred and eighty Gram positive, Catalase positive cocci occurring in pairs, short chains or clusters were subjected to growth on Mannitol salt agar, deoxyribonuclease and tube coagulase tests. Of these, isolates that were positive for at least two of the three tests (n = 60) were used to evaluate the performance of the tube coagulase test for identification of S. aureus, using PCR-amplification of the nuc gene as a gold standard. Results Human plasma was more sensitive than sheep plasma for the tube coagulase test (sensitivity of 91% vs. 81% respectively), but both plasmas had very low specificity (11% and 7% respectively). The sensitivity and specificity of the tube coagulase test (human plasma) was markedly improved when Mannitol salt agar and DNase were introduced as a tri-combination test for routine identification of Staphylococcus aureus (100% specificity and 75% sensitivity). The specificity and sensitivity of Mannitol salt agar/DNase/tube coagulase (sheep plasma) combination was 100% and 67%, respectively. Conclusion The efficiency of the tube coagulase test can be markedly improved by sequel testing of the isolates with Mannitol salt agar, DNase and Tube coagulase. There is no single phenotypic test (including tube coagulase) that can guarantee reliable results in the identification of Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:20707914

  11. Field Dependence-Independence as a Variable in Second Language Cloze Test Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stansfield, Charles; Hansen, Jacqueline

    1983-01-01

    A study of test performance and field dependent-independent (FD/I) cognitive style in 250 college students showed consistently positive correlation between FI and cloze test scores, and other measures such as final grade. It is suggested cloze tests may call forth cognitive restructuring capabilities more easily for more field independent…

  12. 76 FR 12932 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing Fowl Laryngotracheitis-Marek's...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-09

    ..., examines the potential effects that field testing this veterinary vaccine could have on the quality of the... testing this veterinary vaccine will not have a significant impact on the quality of the human environment... Assessment for Field Testing Fowl Laryngotracheitis-Marek's Disease Vaccine, Serotype 3, Live Marek's...

  13. 78 FR 29698 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing a Canine Lymphoma Vaccine, DNA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-21

    ... a Canine Lymphoma Vaccine, DNA AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION... testing, and then to field test, an unlicensed Canine Lymphoma Vaccine, DNA. The environmental assessment... Lymphoma Vaccine, DNA. Possible Field Test Locations: Arizona, Florida, Georgia, New York, North...

  14. Comparison of field and laboratory-simulated drill-off tests

    SciTech Connect

    Bourdon, J.C.; Peltier, B. ); Cooper, G.A. ); Curry, D.A. ); McCann, D. )

    1989-12-01

    In this paper, field drill-off test results are compared with data from laboratory simulations. A simple theory for analyzing drill-off tests is developed. The weight-on bit (WOB) decay with time is close to exponential, but large threshold WOB's, resulting from poor weight transmission downhole, are sometimes observed in field tests.

  15. Small-scale field tests of attract-and-kill stations for pest Tephritid fruit flies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field tests were conducted at UF-TREC, Homestead to test efficacy of wax-matrix bait stations and mass trapping for control of the Caribbean fruit fly in a 5 by 30 tree guava planting. Results of the study and the ability to document control using small-scale field tests will be discussed....

  16. Initial field testing definition of subsurface sealing and backfilling tests in unsaturated tuff; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, J.A.; Case, J.B.; Tyburski, J.R.

    1993-05-01

    This report contains an initial definition of the field tests proposed for the Yucca Mountain Project repository sealing program. The tests are intended to resolve various performance and emplacement concerns. Examples of concerns to be addressed include achieving selected hydrologic and structural requirements for seals, removing portions of the shaft liner, excavating keyways, emplacing cementitious and earthen seals, reducing the impact of fines on the hydraulic conductivity of fractures, efficient grouting of fracture zones, sealing of exploratory boreholes, and controlling the flow of water by using engineered designs. Ten discrete tests are proposed to address these and other concerns. These tests are divided into two groups: Seal component tests and performance confirmation tests. The seal component tests are thorough small-scale in situ tests, the intermediate-scale borehole seal tests, the fracture grouting tests, the surface backfill tests, and the grouted rock mass tests. The seal system tests are the seepage control tests, the backfill tests, the bulkhead test in the Calico Hills unit, the large-scale shaft seal and shaft fill tests, and the remote borehole sealing tests. The tests are proposed to be performed in six discrete areas, including welded and non-welded environments, primarily located outside the potential repository area. The final selection of sealing tests will depend on the nature of the geologic and hydrologic conditions encountered during the development of the Exploratory Studies Facility and detailed numerical analyses. Tests are likely to be performed both before and after License Application.

  17. ANOLE Portable Radiation Detection System Field Test and Evaluation Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Chris A. Hodge

    2007-07-12

    Handheld, backpack, and mobile sensors are elements of the Global Nuclear Detection System for the interdiction and control of illicit radiological and nuclear materials. They are used by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and other government agencies and organizations in various roles for border protection, law enforcement, and nonproliferation monitoring. In order to systematically document the operational performance of the common commercial off-the-shelf portable radiation detection systems, the DHS Domestic Nuclear Detection Office conducted a test and evaluation campaign conducted at the Nevada Test Site from January 18 to February 27, 2006. Named “Anole,” it was the first test of its kind in terms of technical design and test complexities. The Anole test results offer users information for selecting appropriate mission-specific portable radiation detection systems. The campaign also offered manufacturers the opportunity to submit their equipment for independent operationally relevant testing to subsequently improve their detector performance. This paper will present the design, execution, and methodologies of the DHS Anole portable radiation detection system test campaign.

  18. Testing the flexibility of the modified receptive field (MRF) theory: evidence from an unspaced orthography (Thai).

    PubMed

    Winskel, Heather; Perea, Manuel; Peart, Emma

    2014-07-01

    In the current study, we tested the generality of the modified receptive field (MRF) theory (Tydgat & Grainger, 2009) with English native speakers (Experiment 1) and Thai native speakers (Experiment 2). Thai has a distinctive alphabetic orthography with visually complex letters (ฝ ฟ or ผ พ) and nonlinear characteristics and lacks interword spaces. We used a two-alternative forced choice (2AFC) procedure to measure identification accuracy for all positions in a string of five characters, which consisted of Roman script letters, Thai letters, or symbols. For the English speakers, we found a similar pattern of results as in previous studies (i.e., a dissociation between letters and symbols). In contrast, for the Thai participants, we found that the pattern for Thai letters, Roman letters and symbols displayed a remarkably similar linear trend. Thus, while we observed qualified support for the MRF theory, in that we found an advantage for initial position, this effect also applied to symbols (i.e., our data revealed a language-specific effect). We propose that this pattern for letters and symbols in Thai has developed as a specialized adaptive mechanism for reading in this visually complex and crowded nonlinear script without interword spaces. PMID:24818534

  19. Testing the flexibility of the modified receptive field (MRF) theory: evidence from an unspaced orthography (Thai).

    PubMed

    Winskel, Heather; Perea, Manuel; Peart, Emma

    2014-07-01

    In the current study, we tested the generality of the modified receptive field (MRF) theory (Tydgat & Grainger, 2009) with English native speakers (Experiment 1) and Thai native speakers (Experiment 2). Thai has a distinctive alphabetic orthography with visually complex letters (ฝ ฟ or ผ พ) and nonlinear characteristics and lacks interword spaces. We used a two-alternative forced choice (2AFC) procedure to measure identification accuracy for all positions in a string of five characters, which consisted of Roman script letters, Thai letters, or symbols. For the English speakers, we found a similar pattern of results as in previous studies (i.e., a dissociation between letters and symbols). In contrast, for the Thai participants, we found that the pattern for Thai letters, Roman letters and symbols displayed a remarkably similar linear trend. Thus, while we observed qualified support for the MRF theory, in that we found an advantage for initial position, this effect also applied to symbols (i.e., our data revealed a language-specific effect). We propose that this pattern for letters and symbols in Thai has developed as a specialized adaptive mechanism for reading in this visually complex and crowded nonlinear script without interword spaces.

  20. Field testing the wildlink capture collar on wolves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.; Gese, E.M.

    1992-01-01

    Seventeen Wildlink capture collars were tested 61 times on 18 gray wolves (Canis lupus) during 1989-1991 in the Superior National Forest of northeastern Minnesota. Overall success rate was 89%, and most failures were attributable to premature battery expiration. When batteries were changed .ltoreq. every 2 months, 17 of 17 tests succeeded. With an upgraded version of the collar in which batteries lasted longer, 17 of 18 tests succeeded. Over the 2-year study, 6 of the 17 collars were lost. For serially recapturing individuals, the Wildlink collar proved useful and reliable if care was taken to replace batteries at proper intervals.

  1. Lessons Learnt from the Dynamic Identification / Qualification Tests on the ESC-A Upper stage Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rittweger, A.; Beuchel, W.; Eckhardt, K.

    2002-01-01

    The dynamic qualification of the new cryogenic upper stage ESC-A of the ARIANE 5 is supported by several tests in order to verify the assumptions and the modelling approach made at the beginning of the development. The upper composite of the ARIANE 5, consisting of upper stage, vehicle equipment bay, payload carrying structures, payload dummies and fairing, was modal tested to validate the mathematical model of the launcher. Additionally, transfer functions were measured for Pogo investigations. Validated mathematical launcher models are the basis to predict the launcher global responses in the low frequency domain with sufficient confidence. The predicted global axial and lateral responses for selected sections at the stage represent the flight loads for these sections. The stage contains a large amount of equipment such as propellant lines, acceleration rockets, batteries, fluid control equipment etc. The verification of the equipment responses in the integrated state was done by a sine vibration test, excited to levels representing the predicted flight loads including a qualification factor. Acoustic tests with the upper stage were performed to verify the random vibration responses in the frequency range up to 2000 Hz. To verify the shock response level induced by stage separation (pyro shock) a stage separation test was performed. All the equipment was qualified separately for its dynamic (sine, random and shock excitation) and thermal environment to proof its structural and functional integrity. The paper concentrates on the experience made with the modal identification and sine-vibration test of the stage. For the sine vibration test an electrodynamic multi-shaker table was used. It was able to produce the required input precisely up to 150 Hz as specified, not an easy task for a test set-up of 20 tons weight. The paper presents the approach how the dynamic qualification was reached successfully and highlights the experiences which were made - the comparison

  2. Computer Folding of RNA Tetraloops: Identification of Key Force Field Deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Kührová, Petra; Best, Robert B; Bottaro, Sandro; Bussi, Giovanni; Šponer, Jiří; Otyepka, Michal; Banáš, Pavel

    2016-09-13

    The computer-aided folding of biomolecules, particularly RNAs, is one of the most difficult challenges in computational structural biology. RNA tetraloops are fundamental RNA motifs playing key roles in RNA folding and RNA-RNA and RNA-protein interactions. Although state-of-the-art Molecular Dynamics (MD) force fields correctly describe the native state of these tetraloops as a stable free-energy basin on the microsecond time scale, enhanced sampling techniques reveal that the native state is not the global free energy minimum, suggesting yet unidentified significant imbalances in the force fields. Here, we tested our ability to fold the RNA tetraloops in various force fields and simulation settings. We employed three different enhanced sampling techniques, namely, temperature replica exchange MD (T-REMD), replica exchange with solute tempering (REST2), and well-tempered metadynamics (WT-MetaD). We aimed to separate problems caused by limited sampling from those due to force-field inaccuracies. We found that none of the contemporary force fields is able to correctly describe folding of the 5'-GAGA-3' tetraloop over a range of simulation conditions. We thus aimed to identify which terms of the force field are responsible for this poor description of TL folding. We showed that at least two different imbalances contribute to this behavior, namely, overstabilization of base-phosphate and/or sugar-phosphate interactions and underestimated stability of the hydrogen bonding interaction in base pairing. The first artifact stabilizes the unfolded ensemble, while the second one destabilizes the folded state. The former problem might be partially alleviated by reparametrization of the van der Waals parameters of the phosphate oxygens suggested by Case et al., while in order to overcome the latter effect we suggest local potentials to better capture hydrogen bonding interactions.

  3. Rapid field identification of subjects involved in firearm-related crimes based on electroanalysis coupled with advanced chemometric data treatment.

    PubMed

    Cetó, Xavier; O'Mahony, Aoife M; Samek, Izabela A; Windmiller, Joshua R; del Valle, Manel; Wang, Joseph

    2012-12-01

    We demonstrate a novel system for the detection and discrimination of varying levels of exposure to gunshot residue from subjects in various control scenarios. Our aim is to address the key challenge of minimizing the false positive identification of individuals suspected of discharging a firearm. The chemometric treatment of voltammetric data from different controls using Canonical Variate Analysis (CVA) provides several distinct clusters for each scenario examined. Multiple samples were taken from subjects in controlled tests such as secondary contact with gunshot residue (GSR), loading a firearm, and postdischarge of a firearm. These controls were examined at both bare carbon and gold-modified screen-printed electrodes using different sampling methods: the 'swipe' method with integrated sampling and electroanalysis and a more traditional acid-assisted q-tip swabbing method. The electroanalytical fingerprint of each sample was examined using square-wave voltammetry; the resulting data were preprocessed with Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), followed by CVA treatment. High levels of discrimination were thus achieved in each case over 3 classes of samples (reflecting different levels of involvement), achieving maximum accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity values of 100% employing the leave-one-out validation method. Further validation with the 'jack-knife' technique was performed, and the resulting values were in good agreement with the former method. Additionally, samples from subjects in daily contact with relevant metallic constituents were analyzed to assess possible false positives. This system may serve as a potential method for a portable, field-deployable system aimed at rapidly identifying a subject who has loaded or discharged a firearm to verify involvement in a crime, hence providing law enforcement personnel with an invaluable forensic tool in the field.

  4. Objectives and first results of the NASA SETI Sky Survey field tests at Goldstone, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulkis, S.; Klein, M. J.; Olsen, E. T.; Crow, R. B.; Downs, G. S.

    1985-01-01

    The objectives and preliminary results of the initial field tests of the prototype hardware and software for the NASA SETI program are reviewed with emphasis on the Sky Survey component of the NASA search strategy. In particular, attention is given to field test instrumentation, sky pixelation, sky survey field tests, baseline tests, antenna control tests, and radio frequency interference survey. The test results and observational experience will be used to finalize the design of the SETI Sky Survey processing system and to optimize the observational strategy and procedures in time to begin a full-scale Microwave Observing Program in 1990.

  5. Use of system identification techniques for improving airframe finite element models using test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanagud, Sathya V.; Zhou, Weiyu; Craig, James I.; Weston, Neil J.

    1991-01-01

    A method for using system identification techniques to improve airframe finite element models was developed and demonstrated. The method uses linear sensitivity matrices to relate changes in selected physical parameters to changes in total system matrices. The values for these physical parameters were determined using constrained optimization with singular value decomposition. The method was confirmed using both simple and complex finite element models for which pseudo-experimental data was synthesized directly from the finite element model. The method was then applied to a real airframe model which incorporated all the complexities and details of a large finite element model and for which extensive test data was available. The method was shown to work, and the differences between the identified model and the measured results were considered satisfactory.

  6. SMART Wind Turbine Rotor: Design and Field Test

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Jonathan C.; Resor, Brian R.; Paquette, Joshua A.; White, Jonathan R.

    2014-01-29

    This report documents the design, fabrication, and testing of the SMART Rotor. This work established hypothetical approaches for integrating active aerodynamic devices (AADs) into the wind turbine structure and controllers.

  7. 49 CFR 236.1035 - Field testing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... uncertified PTC system, or a product of an uncertified PTC system, or any regression testing of a certified... on-track equipment; (4) An analysis of the applicability of the requirements of subparts A through...

  8. 49 CFR 236.1035 - Field testing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... uncertified PTC system, or a product of an uncertified PTC system, or any regression testing of a certified... on-track equipment; (4) An analysis of the applicability of the requirements of subparts A through...

  9. 49 CFR 236.1035 - Field testing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... uncertified PTC system, or a product of an uncertified PTC system, or any regression testing of a certified... on-track equipment; (4) An analysis of the applicability of the requirements of subparts A through...

  10. 49 CFR 236.1035 - Field testing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... uncertified PTC system, or a product of an uncertified PTC system, or any regression testing of a certified... on-track equipment; (4) An analysis of the applicability of the requirements of subparts A through...

  11. 49 CFR 236.1035 - Field testing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... uncertified PTC system, or a product of an uncertified PTC system, or any regression testing of a certified... on-track equipment; (4) An analysis of the applicability of the requirements of subparts A through...

  12. Reverberant Acoustic Testing and Direct Field Acoustic Testing Acoustic Standing Waves and their Impact on Structural Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Doty, Benjamin; Chang, Zensheu

    2012-01-01

    The aerospace industry has been using two methods of acoustic testing to qualify flight hardware: (1) Reverberant Acoustic Test (RAT), (2) Direct Field Acoustic Test (DFAT). The acoustic field obtained by RAT is generally understood and assumed to be diffuse, expect below Schroeder cut-of frequencies. DFAT method of testing has some distinct advantages over RAT, however the acoustic field characteristics can be strongly affected by test setup such as the speaker layouts, number and location of control microphones and control schemes. In this paper the following are discussed based on DEMO tests performed at APL and JPL: (1) Acoustic wave interference patterns and acoustic standing waves, (2) The structural responses in RAT and DFAT.

  13. CATION TRANSPORT AND PARTITIONING DURING A FIELD TEST OF ELECTROOSMOSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of soil properties, such as the cation exchange capacity and mineral content, on pH, soluble ion concentrations, and electrical conductivity during electroosmosis in a silty clay soil. The soil is composed mainly of quartz ...

  14. Laboratory and field testing of commercial rotational seismometers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nigbor, R.L.; Evans, J.R.; Hutt, C.R.

    2009-01-01

    There are a small number of commercially available sensors to measure rotational motion in the frequency and amplitude ranges appropriate for earthquake motions on the ground and in structures. However, the performance of these rotational seismometers has not been rigorously and independently tested and characterized for earthquake monitoring purposes as is done for translational strong- and weak-motion seismometers. Quantities such as sensitivity, frequency response, resolution, and linearity are needed for the understanding of recorded rotational data. To address this need, we, with assistance from colleagues in the United States and Taiwan, have been developing performance test methodologies and equipment for rotational seismometers. In this article the performance testing methodologies are applied to samples of a commonly used commercial rotational seismometer, the eentec model R-1. Several examples were obtained for various test sequences in 2006, 2007, and 2008. Performance testing of these sensors consisted of measuring: (1) sensitivity and frequency response; (2) clip level; (3) self noise and resolution; and (4) cross-axis sensitivity, both rotational and translational. These sensor-specific results will assist in understanding the performance envelope of the R-1 rotational seismometer, and the test methodologies can be applied to other rotational seismometers.

  15. Lithologic identification & mapping test based on 3D inversion of magnetic and gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jiayong; Lv, Qingtian; Qi, Guang; Zhao, Jinhua; Zhang, Yongqian

    2016-04-01

    Though lithologic identification & mapping to achieve ore concentration district transparent within 5km depth is the main way to realize deep fine structures study, to explore deep mineral resources and to reveal metallogenic regularity of large-scale ore district . Owing to the wide covered area, high sampling density and mature three-dimensional inversion algorithm of gravity and magnetic data, so gravity and magnetic inversion become the most likely way to achieve three-dimensional lithologic mapping at the present stage. In this paper, we take Lu-zong(Lujiang county to Zongyang county in Anhui province ,east China) ore district as a case, we proposed lithologic mapping flow based 3D inversion of gravity magnetic and then carry out the lithologic mapping test. Lithologic identification & mapping flow is as follows: 1. Analysis relations between lithology and density and magnetic susceptibility by cross plot. 2.Extracting appropriate residual anomalies from high-precision Bourger gravity and aeromagnetic. 3.Use same mesh, do 3D magnetic and gravity inversion respectively under prior information constrained, and then invert susceptibility and density 3D model. 4. According setp1, construct logical topology operations between density 3D model and susceptibility. 5.Use the logical operations, identify lithogies cell by cell in 3D mesh, and then get 3D lithological model. According this flow, we obtained three-dimensional distribution of five main type lithologies in the Lu-Zong ore district within 5km depth. The result of lithologic mapping not only showed that the shallow characteristics and surface geological mapping are basically Coincide,more importantly ,it reveals the deeper lithologic changes.The lithlogical model make up the insufficient of surface geological mapping. The lithologic mapping test results in Lu-Zong ore concentration district showed that lithological mapping using 3D inversion of gravity and magnetic is a effective method to reveal the

  16. Comparison of three commercial rapid agglutination test kits for identification of coagulase positive staphylococci from foods and animals.

    PubMed

    Holme, I J; Rosef, O; Ewald, S

    1991-01-01

    Three rapid agglutination assays for the identification of Staphylococcus aureus Monostaph (Bionor A/S, Skien, Norway), Staphyslide-Test (BioMerieux, Lyon, France) and Staph-Rapid-Test (Roche, Basel, Switzerland), were compared. A total of 104 Gram-positive, catalase positive cocci were tested: Nineteen Staphylococcus reference strains comprising 15 spp. (4 strains were coagulase positive), and 7 Micrococcus reference strains comprising 4 spp.; 22 food isolates comprising 13 S. aureus, 8 coagulase positive Staphylococcus spp., and 1 Micrococcus sp.; 56 animal isolates comprising 11 S. aureus, 9 S. hyicus subsp. hyicus, 2 S. intermedius, 15 coagulase positive and 19 coagulase negative Staphylococcus spp. Totally 54 strains were coagulase positive. Considering agglutination of a coagulase positive strain as a correct identification, Monostaph, Staph-Rapid-Test, and Staphyslide-Test correctly identified 52 (96.3%), 47 (87.0%) and 48 (89.0%) of the coagulase positive staphylococci, respectively. Monostaph, Staph-Rapid-Test and Staphyslide-Test showed 1 (2.0%), 4 (8.0%) and 4 (8.0%) false positive reactions respectively. Monostaph, Staph-Rapid-Test and Staphyslide-Test gave 0 (0.0%), 6 (5.8%) and 7 (6.7%) non-interpretable reactions, respectively. Monostaph may be a good alternative to the tube-coagulase test for rapid and reliable identification of coagulase positive staphylococci from both food and veterinary sources. However, false negative reactions may occur with coagulase positive strains of S. hyicus subsp. hyicus and S. intermedius.

  17. Identification and prioritization of rail squat defects in the field using rail magnetisation technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaewunruen, Sakdirat

    2015-04-01

    Inevitably, rail squats and studs are continuing to be a serious problem for railway organisations around the world in the 21st century. They are typically classified as the growth of any cracks that have grown longitudinally through the subsurface and some of the cracks propagating to the bottom of rails transversely, and have branched from initial longitudinal cracks with a depression of rail surface. The horizontal crack, which results in a depression of rail surface, induces increased maintenance level, more frequent monitoring, compromised rail testing (as the crack shields the signal echoes), and possible broken rails. This paper presents field investigations using a magnetised-rail testing device developed by MRX Technologies to identify and prioritise the rail squats. Most of the in situ squats were found on the high rail of the transition (variable-radius curved track), which is associated with rolling contact fatigue (RCF). This investigation highlights the field performance of the MRX's surface crack detection technology in comparison with the traditional ultrasonic method and detailed walking inspection. Visually, it was found in the field that the size of the RCF squats varies from very small to moderate. The predicted crack data were obtained by scanning the magnitised rails. The comparison of the actual crack depths (ultrasonic) and the predicted crack depths (MRX device) shows: • A possible correlation for small RCF/ squat cracks. • Poor interpretation of larger defects and welds. The field assessment also suggests some practical issues required for further development, including the detection of rail spalling, deep transverse crack, welding, and so on.

  18. Design and Installation of a Disposal Cell Cover Field Test

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, C.H.; Waugh, W.J.; Albright, W.H.; Smith, G.M.; Bush, R.P.

    2011-02-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Legacy Management (LM) initiated a cover assessment project in September 2007 to evaluate an inexpensive approach to enhancing the hydrological performance of final covers for disposal cells. The objective is to accelerate and enhance natural processes that are transforming existing conventional covers, which rely on low-conductivity earthen barriers, into water balance covers, that store water in soil and release it as soil evaporation and plant transpiration. A low conductivity cover could be modified by deliberately blending the upper layers of the cover profile and planting native shrubs. A test facility was constructed at the Grand Junction, Colorado, Disposal Site to evaluate the proposed methodology. The test cover was constructed in two identical sections, each including a large drainage lysimeter. The test cover was constructed with the same design and using the same materials as the existing disposal cell in order to allow for a direct comparison of performance. One test section will be renovated using the proposed method; the other is a control. LM is using the lysimeters to evaluate the effectiveness of the renovation treatment by monitoring hydrologic conditions within the cover profile as well as all water entering and leaving the system. This paper describes the historical experience of final covers employing earthen barrier layers, the design and operation of the lysimeter test facility, testing conducted to characterize the as-built engineering and edaphic properties of the lysimeter soils, the calibration of instruments installed at the test facility, and monitoring data collected since the lysimeters were constructed.

  19. Field test of Ku-band transmission using small-dish (IBS) earth stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Yoshio; Nohara, Mitsuo; Takahata, Fumio

    A field test of an experimental Intelsat business services (IBS) communications system was conducted for approximately one year to evaluate the transmission quality at the Ku-band before IBS was brought into commercial use in Japan. At first, the configuration of the field test is outlined. Then, the results of the field test are demonstrated and discussed in detail, especially with respect to the bit error rate performance, which specifies the transmission quality of the digital communications.

  20. Identification of pilot-vehicle dynamics from simulation and flight test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Ronald A.

    1990-01-01

    The paper discusses an identification problem in which a basic feedback control structure, or pilot control strategy, is hypothesized. Identification algorithms are employed to determine the particular form of pilot equalization in each feedback loop. It was found that both frequency- and time-domain identification techniques provide useful information.

  1. Boundary shape identification problems in two-dimensional domains related to thermal testing of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Kojima, Fumio

    1988-01-01

    The identification of the geometrical structure of the system boundary for a two-dimensional diffusion system is reported. The domain identification problem treated here is converted into an optimization problem based on a fit-to-data criterion and theoretical convergence results for approximate identification techniques are discussed. Results of numerical experiments to demonstrate the efficacy of the theoretical ideas are reported.

  2. Field Testing of Compartmentalization Methods for Multifamily Construction

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, K.; Lstiburek, J.

    2015-03-01

    The 2012 IECC has an airtightness requirement of 3 air changes per hour at 50 Pascals test pressure for both single-family and multifamily construction in Climate Zones 3-8. Other programs (LEED, ASHRAE 189, ASHRAE 62.2) have similar or tighter compartmentalization requirements, driving the need for easier and more effective methods of compartmentalization in multifamily buildings. Builders and practitioners have found that fire-resistance rated wall assemblies are a major source of difficulty in air sealing/compartmentalization, particularly in townhouse construction. This problem is exacerbated when garages are “tucked in” to the units and living space is located over the garages. In this project, Building Science Corporation examined the taping of exterior sheathing details to improve air sealing results in townhouse and multifamily construction, when coupled with a better understanding of air leakage pathways. Current approaches are cumbersome, expensive, time consuming, and ineffective; these details were proposed as a more effective and efficient method. The effectiveness of these air sealing methods was tested with blower door testing, including “nulled” or “guarded” testing (adjacent units run at equal test pressure to null out inter-unit air leakage, or “pressure neutralization”). Pressure diagnostics were used to evaluate unit-to-unit connections and series leakage pathways (i.e., air leakage from exterior, into the fire-resistance rated wall assembly, and to the interior).

  3. Characterizing a faulted aquifer by field testing and numerical simulation.

    PubMed

    Allen, D M; Michel, F A

    1999-01-01

    Faulted aquifers constitute one of the most complex geological environments for analysis and interpretation of hydraulic test data because of the inherent ability of faults to act not only as highly transmissive zones but also as hydraulic barriers. Previous studies of the fractured carbonate aquifer at Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada, characterized the flow regime as predominantly linear, but with limited radial nature, and undertook to analyze constant discharge test data using both radial and linear flow models. When used as direct input to a numerical model, the hydraulic parameters, calculated directly from hydraulic test data, were inappropriate and resulted in a poorly calibrated model. While our interpretation of the faulted aquifer remains linear-radial in nature, parameter estimation by numerical simulation highlighted the presence of hydraulic barriers associated with the faults. These barriers are not readily apparent in the constant discharge test data and act to modify the hydraulic test curves at early to mid time, leading to incorrect estimates of the hydraulic parameters. This paper describes the conceptual model and the numerical approach, and demonstrates the importance of using transient simulations for model calibration. PMID:19125925

  4. Predictors of eyewitness identification decisions from video lineups in England: a field study.

    PubMed

    Horry, Ruth; Memon, Amina; Wright, Daniel B; Milne, Rebecca

    2012-08-01

    Eyewitness identification decisions from 1,039 real lineups in England were analysed. Identification procedures have undergone dramatic change in the United Kingdom over recent years. Video lineups are now standard procedure, in which each lineup member is seen sequentially. The whole lineup is seen twice before the witness can make a decision, and the witness can request additional viewings of the lineup. A key aim of this paper was to investigate the association between repeated viewing and eyewitness decisions. Repeated viewing was strongly associated with increased filler identification rates, suggesting that witnesses who requested additional viewings were more willing to guess. In addition, several other factors were associated with lineup outcomes, including the age difference between the suspect and the witness, the type of crime committed, and delay. Overall, the suspect identification rate was 39%, the filler identification rate was 26% and the lineup rejection rate was 35%.

  5. Field testing the prototype BNL fan-atomized oil burner

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, R.; Celebi, Y.

    1995-04-01

    BNL has developed a new oil burner design referred to as the Fan Atomized burner System. The primary objective of the field study was to evaluate and demonstrate the reliable operation of the Fan Atomized Burner. The secondary objective was to establish and validate the ability of a low firing rate burner (0.3-0.4 gph) to fully satisfy the heating and domestic hot water load demands of an average household in a climate zone with over 5,000 heating-degree-days. The field activity was also used to evaluate the practicality of side-wall venting with the Fan Atomized Burner with a low stack temperature (300F) and illustrate the potential for very high efficiency with an integrated heating system approach based on the Fan Atomized Burner.

  6. THE USE OF THE TRADITIONAL CHINESE VERSION OF THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA SMELL IDENTIFICATION TEST AND THE SMELL THRESHOLD TEST FOR HEALTHY YOUNG AND OLD ADULTS IN TAIWAN.

    PubMed

    Li, Kuan-Yi; Fu, Hsuan-Wei; Yau, Tan-Ya; Chen, Rou-Shayn; Wu, Ching-Lung

    2015-06-01

    This study investigated the use of the traditional Chinese version of the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test and the Smell Threshold Test to assess olfactory function for healthy young and old adults in Taiwan. One hundred young adults (50 men; M = 24.34 yr., SD = 2.63; 50 women; M = 24.50 yr., SD = 2.96) and 49 old adults (20 men; M = 60.85 yr., SD = 4.21; 29 women; M = 59.93 yr., SD = 3.97) with normal olfaction completed the traditional Chinese versions of the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test. Of these individuals, 40 young adults and 40 old adults also completed the Smell Threshold Test. The mean of the traditional Chinese versions of the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test scores and Smell Threshold Test thresholds were significantly different between young and old adults. The threshold value for the Smell Threshold Test was lower in both young and old adults as compared to previously established American norms. Both tests require further modifications for clinical use in Taiwan.

  7. Identification of the elastic stiffness of composites using the virtual fields method and digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lebin; Guo, Baoqiao; Xie, Huimin

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents an effective methodology for characterizing the mechanical parameters of composites using digital image correlation combined with the virtual fields method. By using a three-point bending test configuration, this method can identify all mechanical parameters of the material with merely a single test. Successful results verified that this method is especially effective for characterizing composite materials. In this study, the method is applied to measure the orthotropic elastic parameters of fiber-reinforced polymer-matrix composites before and after the hygrothermal aging process. The results indicate that the hygrothermal aging environment significantly influences the mechanical property of a composite. The components of the parameters in the direction of the fiber bundle decreased significantly. From the accuracy analysis, we found that the actual measurement accuracy is sensitive to a shift of the horizontal edges and rotation of the vertical edges.

  8. Hanle Effect Diagnostics of the Coronal Magnetic Field: A Test Using Realistic Magnetic Field Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raouafi, N.-E.; Solanki, S. K.; Wiegelmann, T.

    2009-06-01

    Our understanding of coronal phenomena, such as coronal plasma thermodynamics, faces a major handicap caused by missing coronal magnetic field measurements. Several lines in the UV wavelength range present suitable sensitivity to determine the coronal magnetic field via the Hanle effect. The latter is a largely unexplored diagnostic of coronal magnetic fields with a very high potential. Here we study the magnitude of the Hanle-effect signal to be expected outside the solar limb due to the Hanle effect in polarized radiation from the H I Lyα and β lines, which are among the brightest lines in the off-limb coronal FUV spectrum. For this purpose we use a magnetic field structure obtained by extrapolating the magnetic field starting from photospheric magnetograms. The diagnostic potential of these lines for determining the coronal magnetic field, as well as their limitations are studied. We show that these lines, in particular H I Lyβ, are useful for such measurements.

  9. Choking under the pressure of a positive stereotype: gender identification and self-consciousness moderate men's math test performance.

    PubMed

    Tagler, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Choking under pressure occurs when an individual underperforms due to situational pressure. The present study examined whether being the target of a positive social stereotype regarding math ability causes choking among men. Gender identification and self-consciousness were hypothesized to moderate the effect of math-gender stereotypes on men's math test performance. Men high in self-consciousness but low in gender identification significantly underperformed when exposed to gender-relevant test instructions. No significant effects were found under a gender-irrelevant condition. These findings are discussed in the contexts of research on stereotype threat, stereotype lift, and choking under pressure.

  10. Validation of the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test and the Drug Use Disorders Identification Test in a Swedish sample of suspected offenders with signs of mental health problems: results from the Mental Disorder, Substance Abuse and Crime study.

    PubMed

    Durbeej, Natalie; Berman, Anne H; Gumpert, Clara H; Palmstierna, Tom; Kristiansson, Marianne; Alm, Charlotte

    2010-12-01

    Substance abuse is common among offenders. One method widely used for the detection of substance abuse is screening. This study explored the concurrent validity of the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) and the Drug Use Disorders Identification Test (DUDIT) screening tools in relation to (a) substance abuse and dependency diagnoses and (b) three problem severity domains of the sixth version of the Addiction Severity Index in a sample of 181 suspected offenders with signs of mental health problems. The screening tools showed moderate to high accuracy for identification of dependency diagnoses. The AUDIT was associated with alcohol problem severity, whereas the DUDIT was associated with drug and legal problem severity. Administering the screening tools in the current population yields valid results. However, the suggested cutoff scores should be applied with caution due to the discrepancy between present and previous findings.

  11. Field Test of a DHW Distribution System: Temperature and Flow Analyses (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Barley, C. D.; Hendron, B.; Magnusson, L.

    2010-05-13

    This presentation discusses a field test of a DHW distribution system in an occupied townhome. It includes measured fixture flows and temperatures, a tested recirculation system, evaluated disaggregation of flow by measured temperatures, Aquacraft Trace Wizard analysis, and comparison.

  12. Moving from the laboratory to the field: Adding natural environmental conditions to toxicology testing

    EPA Science Inventory

    While laboratory toxicology tests are generally easy to perform, cost effective and readily interpreted, they have been criticized for being unrealistic. In contrast, field tests are considered realistic while producing results that are difficult to interpret and expensive. To ...

  13. Field Testing Stand-Alone Courseware: A Proven Practical Procedure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westgaard, Odin

    1979-01-01

    Describes procedure to measure a new course's ability to meet standards in three areas: student acceptance, student gains, and student comprehension. It has been used over three years to test the acceptability of 31 courses which contain more than 200 videotape presentations, and thousands of pages of print materials. (Author/JEG)

  14. Robert's Rules for Optimal Learning: Model Development, Field Testing, Implications!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGinty, Robert L.

    The value of accelerated learning techniques developed by the national organization for Suggestive Accelerated Learning Techniques (SALT) was tested in a study using Administrative Policy students taking the capstone course in the Eastern Washington University School of Business. Educators have linked the brain and how it functions to various…

  15. EZVI Injection Field Test Leads to Pilot-Scale Application

    EPA Science Inventory

    Testing and monitoring of emulsified zero-valent ironTM (EZVI) injections was conducted at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station’s Launch Complex 34, FL, in 2002 to 2005 to evaluate the technology’s efficacy in enhancing in situ dehalogenation of dense nonaqueous-phase liquid (DNAPL) ...

  16. 47 CFR 73.1515 - Special field test authorizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... final amplifier stage, and the AM antenna current or the FM or TV transmitter output power must be...) Purpose, duration and need for the survey. (2) Frequency, transmitter output powers and time of operation..., the power requested shall not exceed that necessary for the purposes of the test. (2) The...

  17. Field Test of an Epidemiology Curriculum for Middle School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaelin, Mark A.; Huebner, Wendy W.; Nicolich, Mark J.; Kimbrough, Maudellyn L.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the effectiveness of a middle school epidemiology curriculum called Detectives in the Classroom. The curriculum presents epidemiology as the science of public health, using health-related issues that capture the interest of young students and help prepare them to make evidence-based health-related decisions.…

  18. Field performance and identification capability of the Innsbruck PTR-TOF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graus, M.; Müller, M.; Hansel, A.

    2009-04-01

    Over the last one and a half decades Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) [1, 2] has gained recognition as fast on-line sensor for monitoring volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the atmosphere. Sample collection is very straight forward and the fact that no pre-concentration is needed is of particular advantage for compounds that are notoriously difficult to pre-concentrate and/or analyze by gas chromatographic (GC) methods. Its ionization method is very versatile, i.e. all compounds that perform exothermic proton transfer with hydronium ions - and most VOCs do so - are readily ionized, producing quasi-molecular ions VOC.H+. In the quasi-molecular ion the elemental composition of the analyte compound is conserved and allows, in combination with some background knowledge of the sample, conclusions about the identity of that compound. De Gouw and Warneke (2007) [3] summarized the applicability of PTR-MS in atmospheric chemistry but they also pointed out shortcomings in the identification capabilities. Goldstein and Galbally (2007) [4] addressed the multitude of VOCs potentially present in the atmosphere and they emphasized the gasphase-to-aerosol partitioning of organic compounds (volatile and semi-volatile) in dependence of carbon-chain length and oxygen containing functional groups. In collaboration with Ionicon and assisted by TOFWERK we developed a PTR time-of-flight (PTR-TOF) instrument that allows for the identification of the atomic composition of oxygenated hydrocarbons by exact-mass determination. A detection limit in the low pptv range was achieved at a time resolution of one minute, one-second detection limit is in the sub-ppbv range. In 2008 the Innsbruck PTR-TOF was field deployed in the icebreaker- and helicopter based Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study (ASCOS) to characterize the organic trace gas composition of the High Arctic atmosphere. During the six-week field campaign the PTR-TOF was run without problems even under harsh conditions in

  19. The ROSAT Deep Survey. 2; Optical Identification, Photometry and Spectra of X-Ray Sources in the Lockman Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, M.; Hasinger, G.; Gunn, J.; Schneider, D.; Burg, R.; Giacconi, R.; Lehmann, I.; MacKenty, J.; Truemper, J.; Zamorani, G.

    1998-01-01

    The ROSAT Deep Survey includes a complete sample of 50 X-ray sources with fluxes in the 0.5 - 2 keV band larger than 5.5 x 10(exp -15)erg/sq cm/s in the Lockman field (Hasinger et al., Paper 1). We have obtained deep broad-band CCD images of the field and spectra of many optical objects near the positions of the X-ray sources. We define systematically the process leading to the optical identifications of the X-ray sources. For this purpose, we introduce five identification (ID) classes that characterize the process in each case. Among the 50 X-ray sources, we identify 39 AGNs, 3 groups of galaxies, 1 galaxy and 3 galactic stars. Four X-ray sources remain unidentified so far; two of these objects may have an unusually large ratio of X-ray to optical flux.

  20. Simulating solute transport in a structured field soil: uncertainty in parameter identification and predictions.

    PubMed

    Larsbo, Mats; Jarvis, Nicholas

    2005-01-01

    Dual-permeability models have been developed to account for the significant effects of macropore flow on contaminant transport, but their use is hampered by difficulties in estimating the additional parameters required. Therefore, our objective was to evaluate data requirements for parameter identification for predictive modeling with the dual-permeability model MACRO. Two different approaches were compared: sequential uncertainty fitting (SUFI) and generalized likelihood uncertainty estimation (GLUE). We investigated six parameters controlling macropore flow and pesticide sorption and degradation, applying MACRO to a comprehensive field data set of bromide andbentazone [3-isopropyl-1H-2,1,3-benzothiadiazin-4(3H)-one-2,2dioxide] transport in a structured soil. The GLUE analyses of parameter conditioning for different combinations of observations showed that both resident and flux concentrations were needed to obtain highly conditioned and unbiased parameters and that observations of tracer transport generally improved the conditioning of macropore flow parameters. The GLUE "behavioral" parameter sets covered wider parameter ranges than the SUFI posterior uncertainty domains. Nevertheless, estimation uncertainty ranges defined by the 5th and 95th percentiles were similar and many simulations randomly sampled from the SUFI posterior uncertainty domains had negative model efficiencies (minimum of -3.2). This is because parameter correlations are neglected in SUFI and the posterior uncertainty domains were not always determined correctly. For the same reasons, uncertainty ranges for predictions of bentazone losses through drainflow for good agricultural practice in southern Sweden were 27% larger for SUFI compared with GLUE. Although SUFI proved to be an efficient parameter estimation tool, GLUE seems better suited as a method of uncertainty estimation for predictions.

  1. CX-100 and TX-100 blade field tests.

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, Adam (USDA-Agriculture Research Service, Bushland, TX); Jones, Perry L.; Zayas, Jose R.

    2005-12-01

    In support of the DOE Low Wind Speed Turbine (LWST) program two of the three Micon 65/13M wind turbines at the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) center in Bushland, Texas will be used to test two sets of experimental blades, the CX-100 and TX-100. The blade aerodynamic and structural characterization, meteorological inflow and wind turbine structural response will be monitored with an array of 75 instruments: 33 to characterize the blades, 15 to characterize the inflow, and 27 to characterize the time-varying state of the turbine. For both tests, data will be sampled at a rate of 30 Hz using the ATLAS II (Accurate GPS Time-Linked Data Acquisition System) data acquisition system. The system features a time-synchronized continuous data stream and telemetered data from the turbine rotor. This paper documents the instruments and infrastructure that have been developed to monitor these blades, turbines and inflow.

  2. A field diagnostic test for the improvised explosive urea nitrate.

    PubMed

    Almog, Joseph; Klein, Asne; Tamiri, Tsippy; Shloosh, Yael; Abramovich-Bar, Sara

    2005-05-01

    A sensitive, specific and simple color test for the improvised explosive urea nitrate is described. It is based on the formation of a red pigment upon the reaction between urea nitrate and p-dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde (p-DMAC) under neutral conditions. Urea itself, which is the starting material for urea nitrate, does not react with p-DMAC under the same conditions. Other potential sources of false positive response e.g., common fertilizers, medications containing the urea moiety and various amines, do not produce the red pigment with p-DMAC. Exhibits collected from 10 terrorist cases have been tested with p-DMAC. The results were in full agreement with those obtained by instrumental techniques including GC/MS, XRD and IR.

  3. Roadside tree/pole crash barrier field test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, A. H.

    1979-01-01

    A series of tests was carried out to evaluate the performance of a crash barrier designed to protect the occupants of an automobile from serious injury. The JPL barrier design is a configuration of empty aluminum beverage cans contained in a tear-resistant bag which, in turn, is encased in a collapsible container made of plywood and steel. Tests were conducted with a driven vehicle impacting the barrier. The basic requirements of NCHRP Report 153 were followed except that speeds of 30 mph rather than 60 mph were used. Accelerometer readings on the driver's helmet showed that the driver was never subjected to dangerous decelerations, and never experienced more than temporary discomfort. Also, all of the requirements of the cited report were met. An extrapolation of data indicated that the JPL barrier installed in front of a tree or telephone pole along a roadside would also have met the requirements at a speed of 40 mph.

  4. Spinning test particles in a Kerr field - I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semerák, O.

    1999-09-01

    Mathisson-Papapetrou equations are solved numerically to obtain trajectories of spinning test particles in (the meridional section of) the Kerr space-time. The supplementary conditions p_σS^μσ=0 are used to close the system of equations. The results show that in principle a spin-curvature interaction may lead to considerable deviations from geodesic motion, although in astrophysical situations of interest probably no large spin effects can be expected for values of spin consistent with a pole-dipole test-particle approximation. However, a significant cumulative effect may occur, e.g. in the inspiral of a spinning particle on to a rotating compact body, that would modify gravitational waves generated by such a system. A thorough literature review is included in the paper.

  5. Cosmological tests of an axiverse-inspired quintessence field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emami, Razieh; Grin, Daniel; Pradler, Josef; Raccanelli, Alvise; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2016-06-01

    Inspired by the string axiverse idea, it has been suggested that the recent transition from decelerated to accelerated cosmic expansion is driven by an axion-like quintessence field with a sub-Planckian decay constant. The scenario requires that the axion field be rather near the maximum of its potential but is less finely tuned than other explanations of cosmic acceleration. The model is parametrized by an axion decay constant f , the axion mass m , and an initial misalignment angle |θi| which is close to π . In order to determine the m and θi values consistent with observations, these parameters are mapped onto observables: the Hubble parameter H (z ) at an angular-diameter distance dA(z ) to redshift z =0.57 , as well as the angular sound horizon of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Measurements of the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) scale at z ≃0.57 by the BOSS survey and Planck measurements of CMB temperature anisotropies are then used to probe the {m ,f ,θi} parameter space. With current data, CMB constraints are the most powerful, allowing a fraction of only ˜0.2 of the parameter-space volume. Measurements of the BAO scale made using the SPHEREx or SKA experiments could go further, observationally distinguishing all but ˜10-2 or ˜10-5 of the parameter-space volume (allowed by simple priors) from the Λ CDM model.

  6. Pressure-interference testing of the Sumikawa geothermal field

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, S.K.; Pritchett, J.W.; Ariki, K.; Kawano, Y.

    1991-01-01

    Pressure interference tests have been used to determine the permeability structure of the Sumikawa reservoir. Interference tests between wells S-4 and KY-1 have indicated the presence of a very high permeability (140 md) north-south channel in the altered andesite layer. Pressure buildup data from well SN-7D have provided indications of a high transmissivity (kh {approx} 18 darcy-meters) reservoir located in the granodiorite layer, lack of pressure response in nearby shutin Sumikawa wells implies that the reservoir penetrated by SN-7D is isolated from the shallower reservoir in the altered andesites. The ''altered andesite'' and the ''granodiorite'' formations constitute the principal geothermal aquifers at Sumikawa. Pressure interference tests (wells KY-1 and SB-2, and wells KY-2 and SB-3) have also confirmed the presence of moderately high transmissivity ({approx} 2 darcy-meters) dacitic layers in the ''marine-volcanic complex'' formation. Because of its low vertical permeability, the ''marine volcanic complex'' formation constitutes an attractive target for the reinjection of waste geothermal fluids.

  7. Applicability of subchronic toxicity test with Hyalella azteca for toxicity identification evaluation programs

    SciTech Connect

    Putt, A.E.; Jop, K.M.

    1995-12-31

    A series of screening tests including the short-term chronic exposure of Ceriodaphnia dubia to sediment pore waters, 10-day exposures of Chironomus tentans and Hyalella azteca to bulk sediments and a bioaccumulation study with Lumbriculus variegatus were performed as part of an ecological risk assessment of Plow Shop Pond, Fort Devens, Massachusetts. Chronic endpoints such as reproduction and growth indicated sediment toxicity, however, a toxicity identification evaluation program was initiated to further define the source and extent of the toxicity. A short-term chronic exposure with C. dubia was a logical choice for the TIE, however, since amphipods are epibenthic organisms, they are a better surrogate of sediment dwelling organisms than a water column species such as C. dubia. Observations performed during H. azteca culture suggested that this species of amphipod could thrive in the water column for up to three weeks. Therefore, 7-day old H. azteca were exposed to pore water samples under static-renewal conditions for 10 days. Survival and growth (i.e., dry weight) were determined at the termination of each exposure. Laboratory control group performance consistently averaged a {>=}90% survival and {>=}43 {micro}g of dry weight per amphipod. Growth of amphipods used in each exposure generally exceeded two times the initial body weight after 10 days of exposure. Previous studies have indicated that the growth and reproductive response of H. azteca are positively correlated for a given set of exposure conditions. The results of these 10-day subchronic exposures with H. azteca provide a consistent and reliable measure of the chronic sediment toxicity with a benthic invertebrate for toxicity identification evaluation programs.

  8. Phosphatase-novobiocin-mannose-inhibition test (PNMI-test) for routine identification of the coagulase-negative staphylococcal urinary tract pathogens S. epidermidis and S. saprophyticus.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, H; Naumann, G

    1990-04-01

    A modified Kloos/Schleifer-scheme proved to be useful in identifying coagulase-negative staphylococci isolated from urine. S. epidermidis (44.2%) and S. saprophyticus (21.5%) were the most frequent species. Analysis of patients confirmed both species as urinary pathogens. Using an abbreviated scheme of 6 characteristics, S. saprophyticus was mis-classified in 19.5% of cases. A Phosphatase-Novobiocin-Mannose-Inhibition Test (PNMI-Test) together with a high NaCl concentration (10%) in combination with a coagulase test seems to be an acceptable compromise for routine identification of the three most important staphylococcal urinary tract pathogens, S. aureus, S. epidermidis, and S. saprophyticus. The technical and financial expenditure can be reduced considerably, because an extended identification has to be applied only to strains which cannot be identified by the PNMI-Test.

  9. Phosphatase-novobiocin-mannose-inhibition test (PNMI-test) for routine identification of the coagulase-negative staphylococcal urinary tract pathogens S. epidermidis and S. saprophyticus.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, H; Naumann, G

    1990-04-01

    A modified Kloos/Schleifer-scheme proved to be useful in identifying coagulase-negative staphylococci isolated from urine. S. epidermidis (44.2%) and S. saprophyticus (21.5%) were the most frequent species. Analysis of patients confirmed both species as urinary pathogens. Using an abbreviated scheme of 6 characteristics, S. saprophyticus was mis-classified in 19.5% of cases. A Phosphatase-Novobiocin-Mannose-Inhibition Test (PNMI-Test) together with a high NaCl concentration (10%) in combination with a coagulase test seems to be an acceptable compromise for routine identification of the three most important staphylococcal urinary tract pathogens, S. aureus, S. epidermidis, and S. saprophyticus. The technical and financial expenditure can be reduced considerably, because an extended identification has to be applied only to strains which cannot be identified by the PNMI-Test. PMID:2163255

  10. Experimental identification and study of hydraulic resonance test rig with Francis turbine operating at partial load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favrel, A.; Landry, C.; Müller, A.; Avellan, F.

    2012-11-01

    Resonance in hydraulic systems is characterized by pressure fluctuations of high amplitude which can lead to undesirable and dangerous effects, such as noise, vibration and structural failure. For a Francis turbine operating at partial load, the cavitating vortex rope developing at the outlet of the runner induces pressure fluctuations which can excite the hydraulic system resonance, leading to undesirable large torque and power fluctuations. At resonant operating points, the prediction of amplitude pressure fluctuations by hydro-acoustic models breaks down and gives unreliable results. A more detailed knowledge of the eigenmodes and a better understanding of phenomenon occurring at resonance could allow improving the hydro-acoustic models prediction.This paper presents an experimental identification of a resonance observed in a close-looped hydraulic system with a Francis turbine reduced scale model operating at partial load. The resonance is excited matching one of the test rig eigenfrequencies with the vortex rope precession frequency. At this point, the hydro-acoustic response of the test rig is studied more precisely and used finally to reproduce the shape of the excited eigenmode.

  11. Adhoc electromagnetic compatibility testing of non-implantable medical devices and radio frequency identification

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The use of radiofrequency identification (RFID) in healthcare is increasing and concerns for electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) pose one of the biggest obstacles for widespread adoption. Numerous studies have documented that RFID can interfere with medical devices. The majority of past studies have concentrated on implantable medical devices such as implantable pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs). This study examined EMC between RFID systems and non-implantable medical devices. Methods Medical devices were exposed to 19 different RFID readers and one RFID active tag. The RFID systems used covered 5 different frequency bands: 125–134 kHz (low frequency (LF)); 13.56 MHz (high frequency (HF)); 433 MHz; 915 MHz (ultra high frequency (UHF])) and 2.4 GHz. We tested three syringe pumps, three infusion pumps, four automatic external defibrillators (AEDs), and one ventilator. The testing procedure is modified from American National Standards Institute (ANSI) C63.18, Recommended Practice for an On-Site, Ad Hoc Test Method for Estimating Radiated Electromagnetic Immunity of Medical Devices to Specific Radio-Frequency Transmitters. Results For syringe pumps, we observed electromagnetic interference (EMI) during 13 of 60 experiments (22%) at a maximum distance of 59 cm. For infusion pumps, we observed EMI during 10 of 60 experiments (17%) at a maximum distance of 136 cm. For AEDs, we observed EMI during 18 of 75 experiments (24%) at a maximum distance of 51 cm. The majority of the EMI observed was classified as probably clinically significant or left the device inoperable. No EMI was observed for all medical devices tested during exposure to 433 MHz (two readers, one active tag) or 2.4 GHz RFID (two readers). Conclusion Testing confirms that RFID has the ability to interfere with critical medical equipment. Hospital staff should be aware of the potential for medical device EMI caused by RFID systems and should be encouraged to

  12. Exploration 3-D Seismic Field Test/Native Tribes Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, Herbert B.; Chen, K.C.; Guo, Genliang; Johnson, W.I.; Reeves,T.K.; Sharma,Bijon

    1999-04-27

    To determine current acquisition procedures and costs and to further the goals of the President's Initiative for Native Tribes, a seismic-survey project is to be conducted on Osage tribal lands. The goals of the program are to demonstrate the capabilities, costs, and effectiveness of 3-D seismic work in a small-operator setting and to determine the economics of such a survey. For these purposes, typical small-scale independent-operator practices are being followed and a shallow target chose in an area with a high concentration of independent operators. The results will be analyzed in detail to determine if there are improvements and/or innovations which can be easily introduced in field-acquisition procedures, in processing, or in data manipulation and interpretation to further reduce operating costs and to make the system still more active to the small-scale operator.

  13. Do Toxicity Identification and Evaluation Laboratory-Based Methods Reflect Causes of Field Impairment?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediment Toxicity Identification and Evaluation (TIE) methods have been developed for both interstitial waters and whole sediments. These relatively simple laboratory methods are designed to identify specific toxicants or classes of toxicants in sediments; however, the question ...

  14. Field Testing of Compartmentalization Methods for Multifamily Construction

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, K.; Lstiburek, J. W.

    2015-03-01

    The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) has an airtightness requirement of 3 air changes per hour at 50 Pascals test pressure (3 ACH50) for single-family and multifamily construction (in climate zones 3–8). The Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design certification program and ASHRAE Standard 189 have comparable compartmentalization requirements. ASHRAE Standard 62.2 will soon be responsible for all multifamily ventilation requirements (low rise and high rise); it has an exceptionally stringent compartmentalization requirement. These code and program requirements are driving the need for easier and more effective methods of compartmentalization in multifamily buildings.

  15. Land reclamation on the Nevada Test Site: A field tour

    SciTech Connect

    Winkel, V.K.; Ostler, W.K.

    1993-12-31

    An all-day tour to observe and land reclamation on the Nevada Test Site was conducted in conjunction with the 8th Wildland Shrub and Arid Land Restoration Symposium. Tour participants were introduced to the US Department of Energy reclamation programs for Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project and Treatability Studies for Soil Media (TSSM) Project. The tour consisted of several stops that covered a variety of topics and studies including revegetation by seeding, topsoil stockpile stabilization, erosion control, shrub transplanting, shrub herbivory, irrigation, mulching, water harvesting, and weather monitoring.

  16. Jet-Surface Interaction Test: Far-Field Noise Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Clifford A.

    2012-01-01

    Many configurations proposed for the next generation of aircraft rely on the wing or other aircraft surfaces to shield the engine noise from the observers on the ground. However, the ability to predict the shielding effect and any new noise sources that arise from the high-speed jet flow interacting with a hard surface is currently limited. Furthermore, quality experimental data from jets with surfaces nearby suitable for developing and validating noise prediction methods are usually tied to a particular vehicle concept and, therefore, very complicated. The Jet/Surface Interaction Test was intended to supply a high quality set of data covering a wide range of surface geometries and positions and jet flows to researchers developing aircraft noise prediction tools. During phase one, the goal was to measure the noise of a jet near a simple planar surface while varying the surface length and location in order to: (1) validate noise prediction schemes when the surface is acting only as a jet noise shield and when the jet/surface interaction is creating additional noise, and (2) determine regions of interest for more detailed tests in phase two. To meet these phase one objectives, a flat plate was mounted on a two-axis traverse in two distinct configurations: (1) as a shield between the jet and the observer (microphone array) and (2) as a reflecting surface on the opposite side of the jet from the observer.

  17. Second Field Test of the AEL Measure of School Capacity for Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copley, Lisa D.; Meehan, Merrill L.; Howley, Caitlin W.; Hughes, Georgia K.

    2005-01-01

    The major purpose of the second field test of the AEL MSCI instrument was to assess the psychometric properties of the refined version with a larger, more diverse group of respondents. The first objective of this field test was to expand the four-point Likert-type response scale to six points in order to yield more variance in responses. The…

  18. 40 CFR 35.2211 - Field testing for Innovative and Alternative Technology Report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Field testing for Innovative and Alternative Technology Report. 35.2211 Section 35.2211 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Treatment Works § 35.2211 Field testing for Innovative and Alternative Technology Report. The grantee...

  19. 40 CFR 35.2211 - Field testing for Innovative and Alternative Technology Report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Field testing for Innovative and Alternative Technology Report. 35.2211 Section 35.2211 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Treatment Works § 35.2211 Field testing for Innovative and Alternative Technology Report. The grantee...

  20. Training Probation and Parole Officers to Provide Substance Abuse Treatment: A Field Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, John A.; Herie, Marilyn; Martin, Garth; Turner, Bonnie J.

    1998-01-01

    The results of field-testing a substance-abuse treatment protocol are reported. Ten probation and parole officers were trained in Structured Relapse Prevention, and 55 clients were treated. Incentives and barriers to treatment are highlighted. The use of this type of field test as a dissemination technique is discussed. (EMK)

  1. The Major Field Test in Business: A Solution to the Problem of Assurance of Learning Assessment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Jeffrey J.; Stone, Courtenay Clifford; Zegeye, Abera

    2014-01-01

    Colleges and universities are being asked by numerous sources to provide assurance of learning assessments of their students and programs. Colleges of business have responded by using a plethora of assessment tools, including the Major Field Test in Business. In this article, the authors show that the use of the Major Field Test in Business for…

  2. 78 FR 58514 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing of a DNA Immunostimulant

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-24

    ... of a DNA Immunostimulant AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of... then to field test, an unlicensed DNA Immunostimulant recommended for reduction in morbidity and.... Product: DNA Immunostimulant. Possible Field Test Locations: Texas, Mississippi, and Georgia for...

  3. 40 CFR 1048.515 - What are the field-testing procedures?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CFR part 1065, subpart J, we describe the equipment and sampling methods for testing engines in the field. Use fuel meeting the specifications of 40 CFR part 1065, subpart H, or a fuel typical of what you... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What are the field-testing...

  4. Multibar sawless lint cleaner: fiber quality analysis after 3rd year of field testing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    After two years of field testing a prototype spiked-tooth lint cleaner, the Multibar Sawless Lint Cleaner (MBSLC), a final year of field evaluation was conducted at commercial cotton gin in West Texas located approximately 30 miles Southwest of Lubbock, Texas.The cotton lint cleaner was tested in a ...

  5. 40 CFR 35.2211 - Field testing for Innovative and Alternative Technology Report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Field testing for Innovative and Alternative Technology Report. 35.2211 Section 35.2211 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Treatment Works § 35.2211 Field testing for Innovative and Alternative Technology Report. The grantee...

  6. 40 CFR 35.2211 - Field testing for Innovative and Alternative Technology Report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Field testing for Innovative and Alternative Technology Report. 35.2211 Section 35.2211 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Treatment Works § 35.2211 Field testing for Innovative and Alternative Technology Report. The grantee...

  7. 40 CFR 35.2211 - Field testing for Innovative and Alternative Technology Report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Field testing for Innovative and Alternative Technology Report. 35.2211 Section 35.2211 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Treatment Works § 35.2211 Field testing for Innovative and Alternative Technology Report. The grantee...

  8. Biplot evaluation of test environments and identification of mega-environment for sugarcane cultivars in China

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jun; Pan, Yong-Bao; Que, Youxiong; Zhang, Hua; Grisham, Michael Paul; Xu, Liping

    2015-01-01

    Test environments and classification of regional ecological zones into mega environments are the two key components in regional testing of sugarcane cultivars. This study aims to provide the theoretical basis for test environment evaluation and ecological zone division for sugarcane cultivars. In the present study, sugarcane yield data from a three-year nationwide field trial involving 21 cultivars and 14 pilot test locations were analysed using both analysis of variance (ANOVA) and heritability adjusted-genotype main effect plus genotype-environment interaction (HA-GGE) biplot. The results showed that among the interactive factors, the GE interaction had the greatest impact, while the genotype and year interaction showed the lowest impact. Kaiyuan, Lincang and Baoshan of Yunnan, Zhangzhou and Fuzhou of Fujian, and Hechi, Liuzhou and Chongzuo of Guangxi, and Lingao of Hainan were ideal test environments with a demonstrated high efficiency in selecting new cultivars with a wide adaptability, whereas Baise of Guangxi was not. Based on HA-GGE biplot analysis, there are three ecological sugarcane production zones in China, the Southern China Inland Zone, the Southwestern Plateau Zone, and the Southern Coastal Zone. The HA-GGE biplot analysis here presents the ideal test environments and also identifies the mega-environment for sugarcane cultivars in China. PMID:26489689

  9. Biplot evaluation of test environments and identification of mega-environment for sugarcane cultivars in China.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jun; Pan, Yong-Bao; Que, Youxiong; Zhang, Hua; Grisham, Michael Paul; Xu, Liping

    2015-10-22

    Test environments and classification of regional ecological zones into mega environments are the two key components in regional testing of sugarcane cultivars. This study aims to provide the theoretical basis for test environment evaluation and ecological zone division for sugarcane cultivars. In the present study, sugarcane yield data from a three-year nationwide field trial involving 21 cultivars and 14 pilot test locations were analysed using both analysis of variance (ANOVA) and heritability adjusted-genotype main effect plus genotype-environment interaction (HA-GGE) biplot. The results showed that among the interactive factors, the GE interaction had the greatest impact, while the genotype and year interaction showed the lowest impact. Kaiyuan, Lincang and Baoshan of Yunnan, Zhangzhou and Fuzhou of Fujian, and Hechi, Liuzhou and Chongzuo of Guangxi, and Lingao of Hainan were ideal test environments with a demonstrated high efficiency in selecting new cultivars with a wide adaptability, whereas Baise of Guangxi was not. Based on HA-GGE biplot analysis, there are three ecological sugarcane production zones in China, the Southern China Inland Zone, the Southwestern Plateau Zone, and the Southern Coastal Zone. The HA-GGE biplot analysis here presents the ideal test environments and also identifies the mega-environment for sugarcane cultivars in China.

  10. An Investigation into the Use of Cognitive Ability Tests in the Identification of Gifted Students in Design and Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twissell, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    This study examines whether MidYIS and YELLIS cognitive ability tests (CATs) are appropriate methods for the identification of giftedness in Design and Technology. A key rationale for the study was whether CATs and able to identify those students with the aptitudes considered of importance to identifying giftedness in Design and Technology and…

  11. Testing a Poisson Counter Model for Visual Identification of Briefly Presented, Mutually Confusable Single Stimuli in Pure Accuracy Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyllingsbaek, Soren; Markussen, Bo; Bundesen, Claus

    2012-01-01

    The authors propose and test a simple model of the time course of visual identification of briefly presented, mutually confusable single stimuli in pure accuracy tasks. The model implies that during stimulus analysis, tentative categorizations that stimulus i belongs to category j are made at a constant Poisson rate, v(i, j). The analysis is…

  12. Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: Program Descriptionand Results

    SciTech Connect

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Xu, Peng

    2006-04-06

    California utilities have been exploring the use of critical peak prices (CPP) to help reduce needle peaks in customer end-use loads. CPP is a form of price-responsive demand response (DR). Recent experience has shown that customers have limited knowledge of how to operate their facilities in order to reduce their electricity costs under CPP (Quantum 2004). While the lack of knowledge about how to develop and implement DR control strategies is a barrier to participation in DR programs like CPP, another barrier is the lack of automation of DR systems. During 2003 and 2004, the PIER Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) conducted a series of tests of fully automated electric demand response (Auto-DR) at 18 facilities. Overall, the average of the site-specific average coincident demand reductions was 8% from a variety of building types and facilities. Many electricity customers have suggested that automation will help them institutionalize their electric demand savings and improve their overall response and DR repeatability. This report focuses on and discusses the specific results of the Automated Critical Peak Pricing (Auto-CPP, a specific type of Auto-DR) tests that took place during 2005, which build on the automated demand response (Auto-DR) research conducted through PIER and the DRRC in 2003 and 2004. The long-term goal of this project is to understand the technical opportunities of automating demand response and to remove technical and market impediments to large-scale implementation of automated demand response (Auto-DR) in buildings and industry. A second goal of this research is to understand and identify best practices for DR strategies and opportunities. The specific objectives of the Automated Critical Peak Pricing test were as follows: (1) Demonstrate how an automated notification system for critical peak pricing can be used in large commercial facilities for demand response (DR). (2) Evaluate effectiveness of such a system. (3) Determine how customers

  13. Construction and Testing of Field Panels for the CDF II Central Outer Tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madrak, Robyn

    1998-04-01

    The construction and testing of field panels for the CDF II Central Outer Tracker(COT) will be described. The field panels shape the electrostatics of cells in the COT, and consist of 12 mil stainless steel wires epoxied in a slight parabola to 0.25 mil mylar sheets coated with gold. This is a significant improvement to the CDF Run I Central Tracking Chamber, where the electrostatics of cells were shaped by planes of field wires. After construction, each field panel is tested to determine whether its length and gravitational sag are within tolerance. These characteristics determine the position of the field panel, which in turn affects the wire gain.

  14. Design, production, and testing of field effect transistors. [cryogenic MOSFETS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sclar, N.

    1982-01-01

    Cryogenic MOSFETS (CRYOFETS), specifically designed for low temperature preamplifier application with infrared extrinsic detectors were produced and comparatively tested with p-channel MOSFETs under matched conditions. The CRYOFETs exhibit lower voltage thresholds, high source-follower gains at lower bias voltage, and lower dc offset source voltage. The noise of the CRYOFET is found to be 2 to 4 times greater than the MOSFET with a correspondingly lower figure of merit (which is established for source-follower amplifiers). The device power dissipation at a gain of 0.98 is some two orders of magnitude lower than for the MOSFET. Further, CRYOFETs are free of low temperature I vs V character hysteresis and balky conduction turn-on effects and operate effectively in the 2.4 to 20 K range. These devices have promise for use on long term duration sensor missions and for on-focal-plane signal processing at low temperatures.

  15. Wind turbine blade aerodynamics: The analysis of field test data

    SciTech Connect

    Luttges, M.W.; Miller, M.S.; Robinson, M.C.; Shipley, D.E.; Young, T.S.

    1994-08-01

    Data obtained from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory site test of a wind turbine (The Combined Experiment) was analyzed specifically to capture information regarding the aerodynamic loading experienced by the machine rotor blades. The inflow conditions were shown to be extremely variable. These inflows yielded three different operational regimes about the blades. Each regime produced very different aerodynamic loading conditions. Two of these regimes could not have been readily predicted from wind tunnel data. These conditions are being subjected to further analyses to provide new guidelines for both designers and operators. The roles of unsteady aerodynamics effects are highlighted since periods of dynamic stall were shown to be associated with brief episodes of high aerodynamic forces.

  16. Spinning test particles in a Kerr field - II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyrian, K.; Semerák, O.

    2007-12-01

    The motion of small spinning free test bodies is usually treated within the `pole-dipole' approximation, which - in general relativity - leads to Mathisson-Papapetrou (MP) equations. These have to be supplemented by three side constraints in order to provide a unique solution. Several different `spin conditions' have been proposed and used in the literature, each leading to different worldlines. In a previous paper, we integrated the MP equations with the pσSμσ = 0 condition numerically in Kerr space-time and illustrated the effect of the spin-curvature interaction by comparing the trajectories obtained for various spin magnitudes. Here we also consider other spin conditions and clarify their interrelations analytically as well as numerically on particular trajectories. The notion of a `minimal worldtube' is introduced in order to judge the individual supplementary conditions and to expose the limitations of the pole-dipole approximation.

  17. Development and Testing of the Positron Identification By Coincident Annihilation Photons (PICAP) System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, D.; Connell, J. J.; Lopate, C.; Bickford, B.

    2014-12-01

    Moderate energy positrons (~few to 10 MeV) have seldom been observed in the Heliosphere, due primarily to there not having been dedicated instruments for such measurements. Their detection would have implications in the study of Solar energetic particle events and the transport and modulation of the Solar wind and Galactic cosmic rays. The Positron Identification by Coincident Annihilation Photons (PICAP) system is designed specifically to measure these moderate energy positrons by simultaneously detecting the two 511-keV γ-ray photons that result from a positron stopping in the instrument and the subsequent electron-positron annihilation. This method is also expected to effectively discriminate positrons from protons by measuring the amount of energy deposited in the detectors (dE/dx versus residual energy). PICAP offers a low-mass, low-power option for measuring positrons, electrons, and ions in space. Following Monte Carlo modeling, a PICAP laboratory prototype, adaptable to a space-flight design, was designed, built, and tested. This instrument is comprised of (Si) solid-state detectors, plastic scintillation detectors, and high-Z BGO crystal scintillator suitable for detecting the 511-keV γ rays. The prototype underwent preliminary laboratory testing and calibration using radioactive sources for the purpose of establishing functionality. It has since been exposed to beams of energetic protons (up to ~200 MeV) at Massachusetts General Hospital's Francis H. Burr Proton Beam Therapy Center and positrons and electrons (up to ~10 MeV) at Idaho State University's Idaho Accelerator Center. The goal is to validate modeling and determine the performance of the instrument concept. We will present a summary of modeling calculations and analysis of data taken at the accelerator tests. This work is 95% supported by NASA Grant NNX10AC10G.

  18. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Spanish field isolates of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, A; Carvajal, A; García-Feliz, C; Osorio, J; Rubio, P

    2009-08-01

    This study is the first conducted in Spain to evaluate antimicrobial susceptibility of field isolates of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae. One hundred and eight isolates of the bacterium, recovered from different Spanish swine farms between 2000 and 2007, were investigated. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of erythromycin, tylosin, tiamulin, valnemulin, clindamycin and lincomycin were determined using a broth microdilution technique. Most of the isolates showed poor susceptibility to erythromycin (MIC(90)>256 microg/ml), tylosin (MIC(90)>256 microg/ml), clindamycin (MIC(90)>4 microg/ml) and lincomycin (MIC(90)=128 microg/ml). Reduced susceptibility to tiamulin and valnemulin was observed with a MIC>2 microg/ml in 17.6% and 7.41% of the B. hyodysenteriae isolates, respectively. Moreover, a survival analysis permitted the detection of an increasing trend in the MIC values for almost all the antimicrobials used in the treatment of swine dysentery when comparing recent isolates (from 2006 to 2007) with those recovered in earlier years (between 2000 and 2004). PMID:19084246

  19. The Savannah River Environmental Technology Field Test Platform: Phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Rossabi, J.; Riha, B.D.; Eddy-Dilek, C.A.; Pemberton, B.E.; May, C.P.; Jarosch, T.R.; Looney, B.B.; Raymond, R.

    1995-03-14

    The principal goal in the development of new technologies for environmental monitoring and characterization is transferring them to organizations and individuals for use in site assessment and compliance monitoring. The DOE complex has devised several strategies to facilitate this transfer including joint research projects between private industries and government laboratories or universities (CRADAs) and streamlined licensing procedures. One strategy that has been under-utilized is a planned sequence gradually moving from laboratory development and field demonstration to long term evaluation and onsite use. Industrial partnership and commercial production can be initiated at any step based on the performance, market, user needs, and costs associated with the technology. This approach allows use of the technology by onsite groups for compliance monitoring tasks (e.g. Environmental Restoration and Waste Management), while following parallel research and development organizations the opportunity to evaluate the long term performance and to make modifications or improvements to the technology. This probationary period also provides regulatory organizations, potential industrial partners, and potential users with the opportunity to evaluate the technology`s performance and its utility for implementation in environmental characterization and monitoring programs.

  20. Field-testing competing runoff source and hydrochemical conceptualisations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Western, A. W.; Saffarpour, S.; Adams, R.; Costelloe, J. F.; McDonnell, J.

    2014-12-01

    There are competing conceptualisations of heterogeneity in catchment systems. It is often convenient to divide catchments into zones, for example the soil profile, groundwater aquifers (saturated zone), riparian zones, etc. We also often divide flow sources into distinct categories such as surface runoff, interflow and baseflow, implying a few distinct stores of water. In tracer hydrology we typically assume water from such zones has distinct and invariant chemistry that is used to infer the runoff source mixture through conservative mixing model techniques such as End-Member Mixing Analysis (EMMA). An alternative conceptualisation is that catchments consist of a large number of stores with varying residence times. In this case individual stores contribute a variable proportion of flow and may have a temporally varying composition due to processes such as evapo-concentration. Hence they have a variable influence on the hydrochemistry of runoff. In this presentation, examples from two field studies in southern Australia will be presented that examine the relationships between hydrologic and hydrochemical conceptualisations and the relative variation within and between different hydrologic zones. The implications for water quality behaviour will be examined and the additional behavioural complexities associated with interactions between runoff pathways for non-conservative chemical species will be discussed.

  1. Hot-water aquifer storage: A field test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parr, A. D.; Molz, F. J.; Andersen, P. F.

    1980-01-01

    The basic water injection cycle used in a large-scale field study of heat storage in a confined aquifer near Mobile, Alabama is described. Water was pumped from an upper semi-confined aquifer, passed through a boiler where it was heated to a temperature of about 55 C, and injected into a medium sand confined aquifer. The injection well has a 6-inch (15-cm) partially-penetrating steel screen. The top of the storage formation is about 40 meters below the surface and the formation thickness is about 21 meters. In the first cycle, after a storage period of 51 days, the injection well was pumped until the temperature of the recovered water dropped to 33 c. At that point 55,300 cubic meters of water had been withdrawn and 66 percent of the injected energy had been recovered. The recovery period for the second cycle continued until the water temperature was 27.5 C and 100,100 cubic meters of water was recovered. At the end of the cycle about 90 percent of the energy injected during the cycle had been recovered.

  2. Multibody dynamics modelling and system identification of a quarter-car test rig with McPherson strut suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandu, Corina; Andersen, Erik R.; Southward, Steve

    2011-02-01

    In this paper, we develop a multibody dynamics model of a quarter-car test-rig equipped with a McPherson strut suspension and we apply a system identification technique on it. Constrained equations of motion in the Lagrange multiplier form are derived and employed to characterise the dynamic behaviour of the test rig modelled once as a linear system and once as a non-linear system. The system of differential algebraic equations is integrated using a Hilber-Hughes-Taylor integrator. The responses of both models (linear and non-linear) to a given displacement input are obtained and compared with the experimental response recorded using the physical quarter-car test rig equipped with a McPherson strut suspension. The system identification is performed for control purposes. The results, as well as the performance and area of applicability of the test rig models derived, are discussed.

  3. Test plan for the field evaluation and demonstration of the Contamination Control Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Winberg, M.R.; Thompson, D.N.

    1993-06-01

    This report describes test details of a full demonstration of the Contamination Control Unit (CCU). The CCU is a mobile trailer capable of employing the use of soil fixatives, dust suppression agents, misting, and vacuum systems. These systems can perform a large number of contamination control functions to support the Office of Waste Technology Development (OTD) Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) projects, transuranic (TRU) waste retrieval operations, and emergency response for hazardous and radioactive materials incidents. The demonstration will include both performance testing at the North Holmes Laboratory Facility (NHLF) and field testing in conjunction with the Remote Excavation System Demonstration at the Cold Test Pit. The NHLF will test operational parameters using water only, and the field demonstration at the Cold Test Pit involves full scale operation of vacuum, fixant, misting, and dust suppression systems. Test objectives, detailed experimental procedures, and data quality objectives necessary to perform the field demonstration are included in this test plan.

  4. A New Facility for Testing Superconducting Solenoid Magnets with Large Fringe Fields at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Orris, D.; Carcagno, R.; Nogiec, J.; Rabehl, R.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.

    2013-09-01

    Testing superconducting solenoid with no iron flux return can be problematic for a magnet test facility due to the large magnetic fringe fields generated. These large external fields can interfere with the operation of equipment while precautions must be taken for personnel supporting the test. The magnetic forces between the solenoid under test and the external infrastructure must also be taken under consideration. A new test facility has been designed and built at Fermilab specifically for testing superconducting magnets with large external fringe fields. This paper discusses the test stand design, capabilities, and details of the instrumentation and controls with data from the first solenoid tested in this facility: the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) coupling coil.

  5. High-rate axial-field ionization chamber for particle identification of radioactive beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadas, J.; Singh, Varinderjit; Visser, G.; Alexander, A.; Hudan, S.; Huston, J.; Wiggins, B. B.; Chbihi, A.; Famiano, M.; Bischak, M. M.; deSouza, R. T.

    2016-11-01

    The design, construction and performance characteristics of a simple axial-field ionization chamber suitable for identifying ions in a radioactive beam are presented. Optimized for use with low-energy radioactive beams (< 5 MeV / A) the detector presents only three 0.5 μm/cm2 foils to the beam in addition to the detector gas. A fast charge sensitive amplifier (CSA) integrated into the detector design is also described. Coupling this fast CSA to the axial field ionization chamber produces an output pulse with a risetime of 60-70 ns and a fall time of 100 ns, making the detector capable of sustaining a relatively high rate and providing a time resolution of 6-8 ns. Tests with an α source establish the detector energy resolution as ∼ 8 % for an energy deposit of ∼3.5 MeV. The energy resolution with beams of 2.5 and 4.0 MeV/A 39K ions and the dependence of the energy resolution on beam intensity is measured. At an instantaneous rate of 3×105 ions/s the energy resolution has degraded to 14% with a pileup of 12%. The good energy resolution of this detector at rates up to 3×105 ions/s makes it an effective tool in the characterization of low-energy radioactive beams.

  6. 75 FR 54589 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing Foot-and-Mouth Disease Vaccine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-08

    ... Foot-and-Mouth Disease Vaccine, Live Adenovirus Vector AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection... purpose of field testing, and then to field test, an unlicensed foot-and-mouth disease vaccine, live... field testing of this vaccine, examines the potential effects that field testing this veterinary...

  7. Testing a Stakeholder Participation Framework for Fielding Bioremediation Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Anex, Robert P.; Focht, Will

    2004-03-17

    This research is investigating stakeholder attitudes about the use of bioremediation technologies with the objective of reducing conflict among stakeholders. The research protocol includes four closely related components. First, we are testing a framework for stakeholder participation that prescribes appropriate stakeholder involvement strategies based on stakeholders trust of the other parties involved in technology deployment decision-making. Second, we are assessing conflict among stakeholders regarding the acceptability of in situ bioremediation as a means to reduce risks posed by radionuclides and metals in the environment. Third, we are assessing the role that awareness of risk exposure plays in the willingness of stakeholders to engage in problem-solving and making risk tradeoffs. Fourth, we are assessing the potential of using the results of these first three components to forge consensus among stakeholders regarding the use and oversight of bioremediation technologies and stakeholder involvement in the decision process. This poster presents preliminary results of a Q methodological survey of stakeholders who are familiar with radionuclide and heavy metal contamination and DOE efforts to remediate that contamination at Los Alamos, Oak Ridge and Hanford reservations. The Q study allows the research team to diagnose conflict among stakeholders and discover opportunities for consensus.

  8. A comparison of results from dynamic-response field tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hock, Susan M.; Thresher, Robert W.; Wright, Alan D.

    1988-11-01

    The dynamic response of Howden's 330-kW horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT) and the Northern Power Systems 100-kW North Wind 100 HAWT has been measured. The Howden machine incorporates a 26-m-diameter, upwind, three-bladed, wood/epoxy rotor that operates at 42 rpm and is a rigid-hub design. The North Wind 100 rotor has a diameter of 17.8 m, is upwind, two-bladed, and constructed of fiberglass, and has a teetered hub. The Northern Power turbine's blades are fully pitchable, while the Howden machine uses pitchable blade tips. This paper will present the results from each of these test programs in an effort to compare the dynamic response of each turbine. The analysis will focus on rotor bending loads in terms of both time domain and frequency response. The FLAP code will be used to explore sensitivity to teeter stiffness and natural frequency placement to provide a better understanding of the differences in behavior caused by configuration alone. The results are presented in the form of normalized azimuth-averaged plots of the deterministic loads, and spectral density plots of the stochastic responses. This presentation of the results will contrast major response differences due to design configurations.

  9. Identification and testing of oviposition attractant chemical compounds for Musca domestica

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Rui; Zhang, Feng; Kone, N’Golopé; Chen, Jing-Hua; Zhu, Fen; Han, Ri-Chou; Lei, Chao-Liang; Kenis, Marc; Huang, Ling-Qiao; Wang, Chen-Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Oviposition attractants for the house fly Musca domestica have been investigated using electrophysiological tests, behavioural assays and field tests. Volatiles were collected via head space absorption method from fermented wheat bran, fresh wheat bran, rearing substrate residue and house fly maggots. A Y-tube olfactometer assay showed that the odor of fermented wheat bran was a significant attractant for female house flies. Bioactive compounds from fermented wheat bran for house fly females were identified by electrophysiology and mass spectrophotometry and confirmed with standard chemicals. Four electrophysiologically active compounds including ethyl palmitate, ethyl linoleate, methyl linoleate, and linoleic acid were found at a proportion of 10:24:6:0.2. Functional imaging in the female antennal lobes revealed an overlapped active pattern for all chemicals. Further multiple-choice behavioural bioassays showed that these chemicals, as well as a mixture that mimicked the naturally occurring combination, increased the attractiveness of non-preferred rearing substrates of cotton and maize powder. Finally, a field demonstration test revealed that, by adding this mimic blend into a rearing substrate used to attract and breed house flies in West Africa, egg numbers laid by females were increased. These chemicals could be utilized to improve house fly production systems or considered for lure traps. PMID:27667397

  10. Development of an antigen-based rapid diagnostic test for the identification of blowfly (Calliphoridae) species of forensic significance.

    PubMed

    McDonagh, Laura; Thornton, Chris; Wallman, James F; Stevens, Jamie R

    2009-06-01

    In this study we examine the limitations of currently used sequence-based approaches to blowfly (Calliphoridae) identification and evaluate the utility of an immunological approach to discriminate between blowfly species of forensic importance. By investigating antigenic similarity and dissimilarity between the first instar larval stages of four forensically important blowfly species, we have been able to identify immunoreactive proteins of potential use in the development of species-specific immuno-diagnostic tests. Here we outline our protein-based approach to species determination, and describe how it may be adapted to develop rapid diagnostic assays for the 'on-site' identification of blowfly species.

  11. Impact of Acoustic Standing Waves on Structural Responses: Reverberant Acoustic Testing (RAT) vs. Direct Field Acoustic Testing (DFAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Doty, Benjamin; Chang, Zensheu

    2012-01-01

    Loudspeakers have been used for acoustic qualification of spacecraft, reflectors, solar panels, and other acoustically responsive structures for more than a decade. Limited measurements from some of the recent speaker tests used to qualify flight hardware have indicated significant spatial variation of the acoustic field within the test volume. Also structural responses have been reported to differ when similar tests were performed using reverberant chambers. To address the impact of non-uniform acoustic field on structural responses, a series of acoustic tests were performed using a flat panel and a 3-ft cylinder exposed to the field controlled by speakers and repeated in a reverberant chamber. The speaker testing was performed using multi-input-single-output (MISO) and multi-input-multi-output (MIMO) control schemes with and without the test articles. In this paper the spatial variation of the acoustic field due to acoustic standing waves and their impacts on the structural responses in RAT and DFAT (both using MISO and MIMO controls for DFAT) are discussed in some detail.

  12. Identification of irradiated wheat by germination test, DNA comet assay and electron spin resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, Adilson C.; Freund, Maria Teresa L.; Villavicencio, Ana Lúcia C. H.; Delincée, Henry; Arthur, Valter

    2002-03-01

    In several countries, there has been an increase in the use of radiation for food processing thus improving the quality and sanitary conditions, inhibiting pathogenic microorganisms, delaying the natural aging process and so extending product lifetime. The need to develop analytical methods to detect these irradiated products is also increasing. The goal of this research was to identify wheat irradiated using different radiation doses. Seeds were irradiated with a gamma 60Co source (Gammacell 220 GC) in the Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura and the Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares. Dose rate used were 1.6 and 5.8kGy/h. Applied doses were 0.0, 0.10, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, 1.0, and 2.0kGy. After irradiation, seeds were analysed over a 6 month period. Three different detection methods were employed to determine how irradiation had modified the samples. Screening methods consisted of a germination test measuring the inhibition of shooting and rooting and analysis of DNA fragmentation. The method of electron spin resonance spectroscopy allowed a better dosimetric evaluation. These techniques make the identification of irradiated wheat with different doses possible.

  13. SplAdder: identification, quantification and testing of alternative splicing events from RNA-Seq data

    PubMed Central

    Kahles, André; Ong, Cheng Soon; Zhong, Yi; Rätsch, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Understanding the occurrence and regulation of alternative splicing (AS) is a key task towards explaining the regulatory processes that shape the complex transcriptomes of higher eukaryotes. With the advent of high-throughput sequencing of RNA (RNA-Seq), the diversity of AS transcripts could be measured at an unprecedented depth. Although the catalog of known AS events has grown ever since, novel transcripts are commonly observed when working with less well annotated organisms, in the context of disease, or within large populations. Whereas an identification of complete transcripts is technically challenging and computationally expensive, focusing on single splicing events as a proxy for transcriptome characteristics is fruitful and sufficient for a wide range of analyses. Results: We present SplAdder, an alternative splicing toolbox, that takes RNA-Seq alignments and an annotation file as input to (i) augment the annotation based on RNA-Seq evidence, (ii) identify alternative splicing events present in the augmented annotation graph, (iii) quantify and confirm these events based on the RNA-Seq data and (iv) test for significant quantitative differences between samples. Thereby, our main focus lies on performance, accuracy and usability. Availability: Source code and documentation are available for download at http://github.com/ratschlab/spladder. Example data, introductory information and a small tutorial are accessible via http://bioweb.me/spladder. Contacts: andre.kahles@ratschlab.org or gunnar.ratsch@ratschlab.org Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26873928

  14. Evaluation of a Fourier transform infrared continuous emission monitor field test at a TSCA incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Z.; Demirgian, J.C.; Reedy, G.

    1994-06-01

    A Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer was field tested as a continuous emission monitor (CEM) at the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) incinerator at K-25 in Oak Ridge, Tenn., from August 23 to September 3, 1993. This paper reports results obtained from this field test. The FTIR spectrometer and the long-path cell used for the field test were specially designed and constructed, so that optical alignment of the system can be easily performed in the field. The system was tested in the laboratory and then in the field for instrument stability and signal-to-noise ratio. Time interval required for taking a new background spectrum was determined. It appears that the system performs well both in the laboratory and in the field. The field test followed a standard operation procedure (SOP), developed for the test, based on a proposed EPA protocol for applying FTIR in emission testing. Sixteen compounds were selected as target analytes. Ethylene was used as a calibration transfer standard to ensure that spectral performance of the FTIR spectrometer in the field is consistent with that in the laboratory. Spike tests were regularly conducted with a known concentration of a mixture of six compounds and also with SF{sub 6} to check the accuracy of the monitoring system. Data sampling, processing, and reporting were automated to collect data every 10 min, and data were collected throughout the test as long as liquid nitrogen was available in the detector. The instrumentation and software performed flawlessly. Although the field test was a success, further improvement is necessary. Suggestions for revising the SOP and the proposed EPA protocol are discussed.

  15. Identification of hyperelastic properties of passive thigh muscle under compression with an inverse method from a displacement field measurement.

    PubMed

    Affagard, Jean-Sébastien; Feissel, Pierre; Bensamoun, Sabine F

    2015-11-26

    The mechanical behavior of muscle tissue is an important field of investigation with different applications in medicine, car crash and sport, for example. Currently, few in vivo imaging techniques are able to characterize the mechanical properties of muscle. Thus, this study presents an in vivo method to identify a hyperelatic behavior from a displacement field measured with ultrasound and Digital Image Correlation (DIC) techniques. This identification approach was composed of 3 inter-dependent steps. The first step was to perform a 2D MRI acquisition of the thigh in order to obtain a manual segmentation of muscles (quadriceps, ischio, gracilis and sartorius) and fat tissue, and then develop a Finite Element model. In addition, a Neo-Hookean model was chosen to characterize the hyperelastic behavior (C10, D) in order to simulate a displacement field. Secondly, an experimental compression device was developed in order to measure the in vivo displacement fields in several areas of the thigh. Finally, an inverse method was performed to identify the C10 and D parameters of each soft tissue. The identification procedure was validated with a comparison with the literature. The relevance of this study was to identify the mechanical properties of each investigated soft tissues.

  16. Field Testing of New Interference-Free Ambient Ozone Monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ollison, W. M.; Capel, J.; Crow, W.; Johnson, T.; Spicer, C. W.

    2013-05-01

    Multibillion-dollar strategies control ambient air ozone (O3) levels in the U.S. so it is essential that the O3 measurements made for developing state implementation plans, assessing population risks, and determining compliance with regulations be accurate. The predominant U.S. regulatory method employed to monitor ambient O3 is ultraviolet (254 nm) photometry and many previous studies have demonstrated positive interferences associated with this technology. We evaluate two new humidity-controlled commercial instruments - a 2B Technology Model 211 ultraviolet O3 photometer that replaces its conventional MnO2 scrubber with gas-phase NO titration and a Teledyne-API Model 265E NO-O3 chemiluminescence monitor - both designed to minimize the aromatic organic, mercury, and water vapor interferences common to O3 photometers. New units were paired with conventional photometers sampling indoor, outdoor, and in-vehicle environments where populations spend most of their time. Overall, during the fixed-site monitor comparisons in Houston, TX, the three instruments were highly correlated (r2 ≥ 0.99) with regression slopes of 1.00 ± 0.01, and O3 averaged over the study period agreed within 1 ppb; however, U.S. O3 standard compliance depends on fourth highest annual daily maximum 8-hour O3 values, so urban monitors must measure accurately during typically hot, humid, and stagnant O3-conducive day conditions. Conventional photometers reported the highest values for the four highest 8-hour daily maxima during our three month late summer test period, with 8-hour average differences between the new and conventional monitors ranging up to 4 ppb. In paired 10-minute average sampling with a Model 211 in Durham, NC, conventional photometers generally exhibited modest positive interference bias (under 5 ppb) in 176 sampled residences, shops, malls, restaurants, offices, parks, roadways, and vehicles; however, in six percent of our samples indoor differences exceeded 10 ppb and in two

  17. Objective Method for Presumptive Field-Testing of Illicit Drug Possession Using Centrifugal Microdevices and Smartphone Analysis.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Shannon T; Remcho, Thomas P; Lipes, Shelby M; Aranda, Roman; Maynard, Henry P; Shukla, Nishant; Li, Jingyi; Tontarski, Richard E; Landers, James P

    2016-09-01

    Current colorimetric presumptive identification of illicit drugs for determining illegal possession of controlled substances by law enforcement relies solely on the subjective interpretation of color change using drug- or class-specific reactions. Here, we describe the use of inexpensive polyester-toner, rotation-driven microfluidic devices with a smartphone as a potential alternative for current presumptive colorimetric field-testing of illicit drugs, allowing for an objective and user-friendly image analysis technique for detection. The centrifugal microfluidic platform accommodates simultaneous presumptive testing of material from a single input to multiple reaction chambers, enabling rapid screening. Hue and saturation image analysis parameters are used to define threshold values for the detection of cocaine and methamphetamine as proof-of-principle with 0.25 and 0.75 mg/mL limits of detection, respectively, with nonvolatile reagents stored on-board and smartphone for detection. Reported LODs are lower than those concentrations used in the field. Additionally, the developed objective detection method addresses the testing of drugs with various common cutting agents, including those known to produce false negative and positive results. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the method by successfully identifying the composition of 30 unknown samples.

  18. Objective Method for Presumptive Field-Testing of Illicit Drug Possession Using Centrifugal Microdevices and Smartphone Analysis.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Shannon T; Remcho, Thomas P; Lipes, Shelby M; Aranda, Roman; Maynard, Henry P; Shukla, Nishant; Li, Jingyi; Tontarski, Richard E; Landers, James P

    2016-09-01

    Current colorimetric presumptive identification of illicit drugs for determining illegal possession of controlled substances by law enforcement relies solely on the subjective interpretation of color change using drug- or class-specific reactions. Here, we describe the use of inexpensive polyester-toner, rotation-driven microfluidic devices with a smartphone as a potential alternative for current presumptive colorimetric field-testing of illicit drugs, allowing for an objective and user-friendly image analysis technique for detection. The centrifugal microfluidic platform accommodates simultaneous presumptive testing of material from a single input to multiple reaction chambers, enabling rapid screening. Hue and saturation image analysis parameters are used to define threshold values for the detection of cocaine and methamphetamine as proof-of-principle with 0.25 and 0.75 mg/mL limits of detection, respectively, with nonvolatile reagents stored on-board and smartphone for detection. Reported LODs are lower than those concentrations used in the field. Additionally, the developed objective detection method addresses the testing of drugs with various common cutting agents, including those known to produce false negative and positive results. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the method by successfully identifying the composition of 30 unknown samples. PMID:27525468

  19. Results from the Pronghorn field test using passive infrared spectroradiometers-CATSI and AIRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, James O.; Theriault, Jean-Marc; Bradette, Claude; Gittins, Christopher M.; Marinelli, William J.

    2002-02-01

    The Pronghorn Field Tests were held at the Nevada Test Site for a two-week period in June 2001. Two passive infrared sensors were tested for inclusion into the Joint Service Wide Area Detection Program. The Adaptive InfraRed Imaging Spectroradiometer (AIRIS) and Compact ATmospheric Sounding Interferometer (CATSI) systems were tested with good results. This field test was a joint effort between the U.S (SBCCOM) and Canada (DREV). Various chemicals were detected and quantified from a distance of 1.5 kilometers. Passive ranging of Chemical Plumes was demonstrated.

  20. Results of the Pronghorn field test using passive infrared spectroradiometers: CATSI and AIRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, James O.; Theriault, Jean-Marc; Bradette, Claude; Gittins, Christopher M.; Marinelli, William J.

    2002-08-01

    The Pronghorn Field Tests were held at the Nevada Test Site for a two-week period in June 2001. Two passive infrared sensors were tested for inclusion into the Joint Service Wide Area Detection Program. The Adaptive InfraRed Imaging Spectroradiometer (AIRIS) and Compact Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (CATSI) systems were tested with good results. This field test was a joint effort between the US (SBCCOM) and Canada (DREV). Various chemicals were detected and quantified from a distance of 1.5 kilometers. Passive ranging of Chemical Plumes was demonstrated.