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Sample records for identified hlxb9 mutation

  1. A homeobox gene, HLXB9, is the major locus for dominantly inherited sacral agenesis.

    PubMed

    Ross, A J; Ruiz-Perez, V; Wang, Y; Hagan, D M; Scherer, S; Lynch, S A; Lindsay, S; Custard, E; Belloni, E; Wilson, D I; Wadey, R; Goodman, F; Orstavik, K H; Monclair, T; Robson, S; Reardon, W; Burn, J; Scambler, P; Strachan, T

    1998-12-01

    Partial absence of the sacrum is a rare congenital defect which also occurs as an autosomal dominant trait; association with anterior meningocoele, presacral teratoma and anorectal abnormalities constitutes the Currarino triad (MIM 176450). Malformation at the caudal end of the developing notochord at approximately Carnegie stage 7 (16 post-ovulatory days), which results in aberrant secondary neurulation, can explain the observed pattern of anomalies. We previously reported linkage to 7q36 markers in two dominantly inherited sacral agenesis families. We now present data refining the initial subchromosomal localization in several additional hereditary sacral agenesis (HSA) families. We excluded several candidate genes before identifying patient-specific mutations in a homeobox gene, HLXB9, which was previously reported to map to 1q41-q42.1 and to be expressed in lymphoid and pancreatic tissues.

  2. HLXB9 Gene Expression, and Nuclear Location during In Vitro Neuronal Differentiation in the SK-N-BE Neuroblastoma Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Leotta, Claudia Giovanna; Federico, Concetta; Brundo, Maria Violetta; Tosi, Sabrina; Saccone, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    Different parts of the genome occupy specific compartments of the cell nucleus based on the gene content and the transcriptional activity. An example of this is the altered nuclear positioning of the HLXB9 gene in leukaemia cells observed in association with its over-expression. This phenomenon was attributed to the presence of a chromosomal translocation with breakpoint proximal to the HLXB9 gene. Before becoming an interesting gene in cancer biology, HLXB9 was studied as a developmental gene. This homeobox gene is also known as MNX1 (motor neuron and pancreas homeobox 1) and it is relevant for both motor neuronal and pancreatic beta cells development. A spectrum of mutations in this gene are causative of sacral agenesis and more broadly, of what is known as the Currarino Syndrome, a constitutional autosomal dominant disorder. Experimental work on animal models has shown that HLXB9 has an essential role in motor neuronal differentiation. Here we present data to show that, upon treatment with retinoic acid, the HLXB9 gene becomes over-expressed during the early stages of neuronal differentiation and that this corresponds to a reposition of the gene in the nucleus. More precisely, we used the SK-N-BE human neuroblastoma cell line as an in vitro model and we demonstrated a transient transcription of HLXB9 at the 4th and 5th days of differentiation that corresponded to the presence, predominantly in the cell nuclei, of the encoded protein HB9. The nuclear positioning of the HLXB9 gene was monitored at different stages: a peripheral location was noted in the proliferating cells whereas a more internal position was noted during differentiation, that is while HLXB9 was transcriptionally active. Our findings suggest that HLXB9 can be considered a marker of early neuronal differentiation, possibly involving chromatin remodeling pathways. PMID:25136833

  3. HLXB9 gene expression, and nuclear location during in vitro neuronal differentiation in the SK-N-BE neuroblastoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Leotta, Claudia Giovanna; Federico, Concetta; Brundo, Maria Violetta; Tosi, Sabrina; Saccone, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    Different parts of the genome occupy specific compartments of the cell nucleus based on the gene content and the transcriptional activity. An example of this is the altered nuclear positioning of the HLXB9 gene in leukaemia cells observed in association with its over-expression. This phenomenon was attributed to the presence of a chromosomal translocation with breakpoint proximal to the HLXB9 gene. Before becoming an interesting gene in cancer biology, HLXB9 was studied as a developmental gene. This homeobox gene is also known as MNX1 (motor neuron and pancreas homeobox 1) and it is relevant for both motor neuronal and pancreatic beta cells development. A spectrum of mutations in this gene are causative of sacral agenesis and more broadly, of what is known as the Currarino Syndrome, a constitutional autosomal dominant disorder. Experimental work on animal models has shown that HLXB9 has an essential role in motor neuronal differentiation. Here we present data to show that, upon treatment with retinoic acid, the HLXB9 gene becomes over-expressed during the early stages of neuronal differentiation and that this corresponds to a reposition of the gene in the nucleus. More precisely, we used the SK-N-BE human neuroblastoma cell line as an in vitro model and we demonstrated a transient transcription of HLXB9 at the 4th and 5th days of differentiation that corresponded to the presence, predominantly in the cell nuclei, of the encoded protein HB9. The nuclear positioning of the HLXB9 gene was monitored at different stages: a peripheral location was noted in the proliferating cells whereas a more internal position was noted during differentiation, that is while HLXB9 was transcriptionally active. Our findings suggest that HLXB9 can be considered a marker of early neuronal differentiation, possibly involving chromatin remodeling pathways.

  4. Identification of microRNAs regulating Hlxb9 gene expression during the induction of insulin-producing cells.

    PubMed

    Mu, Changzheng; Wang, Tao; Wang, Xiaomei; Tian, He; Liu, Yong

    2016-05-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (bMSCs) with the capacity of self- renewal and multilineage differentiation are promising sources for cell replacement therapy in diabetes. Here, we developed an effective method with activin A, conophylline, and nicotinamide to induce mouse bMSCs to differentiate into insulin-producing cells (IPCs). The homeobox gene Hlxb9 (encoding HB9) is prominently expressed in adult human pancreas, which can also play a key role during the induction of IPCs. To find the microRNAs (miRNAs) regulating Hlxb9 gene expression, we respectively used miRanda and TargetScan to predict and got the intersection, miR-200a and miR-141, further identified by the Dual-Luciferase assay. The results illustrated miR-200a and miR-141 could inhibit the expression of Hlxb9 by binding to its mRNA 3'UTR. Furthermore, the expression of miR-200a and miR-141 was almost reciprocal to that of Hlxb9. Overexpression of miR-200a and miR-141 downregulated the expression of pancreatic progenitor cell markers Hlxb9 and Pdx1. Therefore, miR-200a and miR-141 may directly or indirectly regulate the expression of pancreatic islet transcription factors to control the differentiation of IPCs.

  5. Pro-oncogenic Roles of HLXB9 Protein in Insulinoma Cells through Interaction with Nono Protein and Down-regulation of the c-Met Inhibitor Cblb (Casitas B-lineage Lymphoma b).

    PubMed

    Desai, Shruti S; Kharade, Sampada S; Parekh, Vaishali I; Iyer, Sucharitha; Agarwal, Sunita K

    2015-10-16

    Pancreatic islet β-cells that lack the MEN1-encoded protein menin develop into tumors. Such tumors express the phosphorylated isoform of the β-cell differentiation transcription factor HLXB9. It is not known how phospho-HLXB9 acts as an oncogenic factor in insulin-secreting β-cell tumors (insulinomas). In this study we investigated the binding partners and target genes of phospho-HLXB9 in mouse insulinoma MIN6 β-cells. Co-immunoprecipitation coupled with mass spectrometry showed a significant association of phospho-HLXB9 with the survival factor p54nrb/Nono (54-kDa nuclear RNA-binding protein, non-POU-domain-containing octamer). Endogenous phospho-HLXB9 co-localized with endogenous Nono in the nucleus. Overexpression of HLXB9 decreased the level of overexpressed Nono but not endogenous Nono. Anti-phospho-HLXB9 chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing (ChIP-Seq) identified the c-Met inhibitor, Cblb, as a direct phospho-HLXB9 target gene. Phospho-HLXB9 occupied the promoter of Cblb and reduced the expression of Cblb mRNA. Cblb overexpression or HLXB9 knockdown decreased c-Met protein and reduced cell migration. Also, increased phospho-HLXB9 coincided with reduced Cblb and increased c-Met in insulinomas of two mouse models of menin loss. These data provide mechanistic insights into the role of phospho-HLXB9 as a pro-oncogenic factor by interacting with a survival factor and by promoting the oncogenic c-Met pathway. These mechanisms have therapeutic implications for reducing β-cell proliferation in insulinomas by inhibiting phospho-HLXB9 or its interaction with Nono and modulating the expression of its direct (Cblb) or indirect (c-Met) targets. Our data also implicate the use of pro-oncogenic activities of phospho-HLXB9 in β-cell expansion strategies to alleviate β-cell loss in diabetes.

  6. VACTERL/caudal regression/Currarino syndrome-like malformations in mice with mutation in the proprotein convertase Pcsk5

    PubMed Central

    Szumska, Dorota; Pieles, Guido; Essalmani, Rachid; Bilski, Michal; Mesnard, Daniel; Kaur, Kulvinder; Franklyn, Angela; El Omari, Kamel; Jefferis, Joanna; Bentham, Jamie; Taylor, Jennifer M.; Schneider, Jurgen E.; Arnold, Sebastian J.; Johnson, Paul; Tymowska-Lalanne, Zuzanna; Stammers, Dave; Clarke, Kieran; Neubauer, Stefan; Morris, Andrew; Brown, Steve D.; Shaw-Smith, Charles; Cama, Armando; Capra, Valeria; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Constam, Daniel; Seidah, Nabil G.; Prat, Annik; Bhattacharya, Shoumo

    2008-01-01

    We have identified an ethylnitrosourea (ENU)-induced recessive mouse mutation (Vcc) with a pleiotropic phenotype that includes cardiac, tracheoesophageal, anorectal, anteroposterior patterning defects, exomphalos, hindlimb hypoplasia, a presacral mass, renal and palatal agenesis, and pulmonary hypoplasia. It results from a C470R mutation in the proprotein convertase PCSK5 (PC5/6). Compound mutants (Pcsk5Vcc/null) completely recapitulate the Pcsk5Vcc/Vcc phenotype, as does an epiblast-specific conditional deletion of Pcsk5. The C470R mutation ablates a disulfide bond in the P domain, and blocks export from the endoplasmic reticulum and proprotein convertase activity. We show that GDF11 is cleaved and activated by PCSK5A, but not by PCSK5A-C470R, and that Gdf11-deficient embryos, in addition to having anteroposterior patterning defects and renal and palatal agenesis, also have a presacral mass, anorectal malformation, and exomphalos. Pcsk5 mutation results in abnormal expression of several paralogous Hox genes (Hoxa, Hoxc, and Hoxd), and of Mnx1 (Hlxb9). These include known Gdf11 targets, and are necessary for caudal embryo development. We identified nonsynonymous mutations in PCSK5 in patients with VACTERL (vertebral, anorectal, cardiac, tracheoesophageal, renal, limb malformation OMIM 192350) and caudal regression syndrome, the phenotypic features of which resemble the mouse mutation. We propose that Pcsk5, at least in part via GDF11, coordinately regulates caudal Hox paralogs, to control anteroposterior patterning, nephrogenesis, skeletal, and anorectal development. PMID:18519639

  7. STK11 Mutation Identified in Thyroid Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuanzeng; LiVolsi, Virginia A; Brose, Marcia S; Montone, Kathleen T; Morrissette, Jennifer J D; Baloch, Zubair W

    2016-03-01

    Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) is an autosomal-dominant disorder, in which germline mutation of serine threonine-protein kinase 11 (STK11) is identified in up to 90 % of the patients who meet clinical criteria for PJS. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) slides of the tumor were reviewed to confirm areas with at least 25 % of tumor cellularity. Then, the designated area was extracted for genomic DNA. Targeted next-generation sequencing analysis was performed using a 47-gene panel. Case 1 is a 71-year-old man with high grade follicular thyroid carcinoma with clear cell and oncocytic features. The carcinoma showed a missense mutation in TP53 (p.R342G, c.1024C > G) and a 16-nucleotide intronic deletion started next to the 3' of exon 6 (involving the canonical +1 and +2 bases of the splice donor site) in STK11 (p.?, c.862 + 1_862 + 16delGTGGGAGCCTCATCCC). Case 2 is a 76-year-old woman with tall cell variant papillary thyroid carcinoma. The carcinoma demonstrated a missense mutation in BRAF (p.V600E, c.1799T > A) and a missense mutation in STK11 (p.F354L, c.1062C > G). In summary, we present two elderly patients with thyroid carcinoma harboring STK11 mutation without clinical manifestation of PJS. The findings suggest that STK11 may play a role in thyroid carcinoma development.

  8. Utilizing protein structure to identify non-random somatic mutations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Human cancer is caused by the accumulation of somatic mutations in tumor suppressors and oncogenes within the genome. In the case of oncogenes, recent theory suggests that there are only a few key “driver” mutations responsible for tumorigenesis. As there have been significant pharmacological successes in developing drugs that treat cancers that carry these driver mutations, several methods that rely on mutational clustering have been developed to identify them. However, these methods consider proteins as a single strand without taking their spatial structures into account. We propose an extension to current methodology that incorporates protein tertiary structure in order to increase our power when identifying mutation clustering. Results We have developed iPAC (identification of Protein Amino acid Clustering), an algorithm that identifies non-random somatic mutations in proteins while taking into account the three dimensional protein structure. By using the tertiary information, we are able to detect both novel clusters in proteins that are known to exhibit mutation clustering as well as identify clusters in proteins without evidence of clustering based on existing methods. For example, by combining the data in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer, our algorithm identifies new mutational clusters in well known cancer proteins such as KRAS and PI3KC α. Further, by utilizing the tertiary structure, our algorithm also identifies clusters in EGFR, EIF2AK2, and other proteins that are not identified by current methodology. The R package is available at: http://www.bioconductor.org/packages/2.12/bioc/html/iPAC.html. Conclusion Our algorithm extends the current methodology to identify oncogenic activating driver mutations by utilizing tertiary protein structure when identifying nonrandom somatic residue mutation clusters. PMID:23758891

  9. Epigenomic annotation of noncoding mutations identifies mutated pathways in primary liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lowdon, Rebecca F.

    2017-01-01

    Evidence that noncoding mutation can result in cancer driver events is mounting. However, it is more difficult to assign molecular biological consequences to noncoding mutations than to coding mutations, and a typical cancer genome contains many more noncoding mutations than protein-coding mutations. Accordingly, parsing functional noncoding mutation signal from noise remains an important challenge. Here we use an empirical approach to identify putatively functional noncoding somatic single nucleotide variants (SNVs) from liver cancer genomes. Annotation of candidate variants by publicly available epigenome datasets finds that 40.5% of SNVs fall in regulatory elements. When assigned to specific regulatory elements, we find that the distribution of regulatory element mutation mirrors that of nonsynonymous coding mutation, where few regulatory elements are recurrently mutated in a patient population but many are singly mutated. We find potential gain-of-binding site events among candidate SNVs, suggesting a mechanism of action for these variants. When aggregating noncoding somatic mutation in promoters, we find that genes in the ERBB signaling and MAPK signaling pathways are significantly enriched for promoter mutations. Altogether, our results suggest that functional somatic SNVs in cancer are sporadic, but occasionally occur in regulatory elements and may affect phenotype by creating binding sites for transcriptional regulators. Accordingly, we propose that noncoding mutation should be formally accounted for when determining gene- and pathway-mutation burden in cancer. PMID:28333948

  10. Exome Sequencing Identifies Potentially Druggable Mutations in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Yock Ping; Tan, Lu Ping; Chai, San Jiun; Abdul Aziz, Norazlin; Choo, Siew Woh; Lim, Paul Vey Hong; Pathmanathan, Rajadurai; Mohd Kornain, Noor Kaslina; Lum, Chee Lun; Pua, Kin Choo; Yap, Yoke Yeow; Tan, Tee Yong; Teo, Soo Hwang; Khoo, Alan Soo-Beng; Patel, Vyomesh

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we first performed whole exome sequencing of DNA from 10 untreated and clinically annotated fresh frozen nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) biopsies and matched bloods to identify somatically mutated genes that may be amenable to targeted therapeutic strategies. We identified a total of 323 mutations which were either non-synonymous (n = 238) or synonymous (n = 85). Furthermore, our analysis revealed genes in key cancer pathways (DNA repair, cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, immune response, lipid signaling) were mutated, of which those in the lipid-signaling pathway were the most enriched. We next extended our analysis on a prioritized sub-set of 37 mutated genes plus top 5 mutated cancer genes listed in COSMIC using a custom designed HaloPlex target enrichment panel with an additional 88 NPC samples. Our analysis identified 160 additional non-synonymous mutations in 37/42 genes in 66/88 samples. Of these, 99/160 mutations within potentially druggable pathways were further selected for validation. Sanger sequencing revealed that 77/99 variants were true positives, giving an accuracy of 78%. Taken together, our study indicated that ~72% (n = 71/98) of NPC samples harbored mutations in one of the four cancer pathways (EGFR-PI3K-Akt-mTOR, NOTCH, NF-κB, DNA repair) which may be potentially useful as predictive biomarkers of response to matched targeted therapies. PMID:28256603

  11. Exome sequencing identifies recurrent somatic RAC1 mutations in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Krauthammer, Michael; Kong, Yong; Ha, Byung Hak; Evans, Perry; Bacchiocchi, Antonella; McCusker, James P; Cheng, Elaine; Davis, Matthew J; Goh, Gerald; Choi, Murim; Ariyan, Stephan; Narayan, Deepak; Dutton-Regester, Ken; Capatana, Ana; Holman, Edna C; Bosenberg, Marcus; Sznol, Mario; Kluger, Harriet M; Brash, Douglas E; Stern, David F; Materin, Miguel A; Lo, Roger S; Mane, Shrikant; Ma, Shuangge; Kidd, Kenneth K; Hayward, Nicholas K; Lifton, Richard P; Schlessinger, Joseph; Boggon, Titus J; Halaban, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    We characterized the mutational landscape of melanoma, the form of skin cancer with the highest mortality rate, by sequencing the exomes of 147 melanomas. Sun-exposed melanomas had markedly more ultraviolet (UV)-like C>T somatic mutations compared to sun-shielded acral, mucosal and uveal melanomas. Among the newly identified cancer genes was PPP6C, encoding a serine/threonine phosphatase, which harbored mutations that clustered in the active site in 12% of sun-exposed melanomas, exclusively in tumors with mutations in BRAF or NRAS. Notably, we identified a recurrent UV-signature, an activating mutation in RAC1 in 9.2% of sun-exposed melanomas. This activating mutation, the third most frequent in our cohort of sun-exposed melanoma after those of BRAF and NRAS, changes Pro29 to serine (RAC1P29S) in the highly conserved switch I domain. Crystal structures, and biochemical and functional studies of RAC1P29S showed that the alteration releases the conformational restraint conferred by the conserved proline, causes an increased binding of the protein to downstream effectors, and promotes melanocyte proliferation and migration. These findings raise the possibility that pharmacological inhibition of downstream effectors of RAC1 signaling could be of therapeutic benefit. PMID:22842228

  12. New mutations identified in the ocular albinism type 1 gene.

    PubMed

    Roma, Cristin; Ferrante, Paola; Guardiola, Ombretta; Ballabio, Andrea; Zollo, Massimo

    2007-11-01

    As the most common form of ocular albinism, ocular albinism type I (OA1) is an X-linked disorder that has an estimated prevalence of about 1:50,000. We searched for mutations through the human genome sequence draft by direct sequencing on eighteen patients with OA1, both within the coding region and in a thousand base pairs upstream of its start site. Here, we have identified eight new mutations located in the coding region of the gene. Two independent mutations, both located in the most carboxyterminal protein regions, were further characterized by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy, thus showing an impairment in their subcellular distribution into the lysosomal compartment of Cos-7A cells. The mutations found can result in protein misfolding, thus underlining the importance of the structure-function relationships of the protein as a major pathogenic mechanism in ocular albinism. Seven individuals out of eighteen (38.9%) with a clinical diagnosis of ocular albinism showed mutations, thus underlining the discrepancies between the clinical phenotype features and their genotype correlations. We postulate that mutations that have not yet been identified are potentially located in non-coding conserved regions or regulatory sequences of the OA1 gene.

  13. Exome sequencing identifies recurrent somatic RAC1 mutations in melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Krauthammer, Michael; Kong, Yong; Ha, Byung Hak; Evans, Perry; Bacchiocchi, Antonella; McCusker, James P.; Cheng, Elaine; Davis, Matthew J.; Goh, Gerald; Choi, Murim; Ariyan, Stephan; Narayan, Deepak; Dutton-Regester, Ken; Capatana, Ana; Holman, Edna C.; Bosenberg, Marcus; Sznol, Mario; Kluger, Harriet M.; Brash, Douglas E.; Stern, David F.; Materin, Miguel A.; Lo, Roger S.; Mane, Shrikant; Ma, Shuangge; Kidd, Kenneth K.; Hayward, Nicholas K.; Lifton, Richard P.; Schlessinger, Joseph; Boggon, Titus J.; Halaban, Ruth

    2012-10-11

    We characterized the mutational landscape of melanoma, the form of skin cancer with the highest mortality rate, by sequencing the exomes of 147 melanomas. Sun-exposed melanomas had markedly more ultraviolet (UV)-like C>T somatic mutations compared to sun-shielded acral, mucosal and uveal melanomas. Among the newly identified cancer genes was PPP6C, encoding a serine/threonine phosphatase, which harbored mutations that clustered in the active site in 12% of sun-exposed melanomas, exclusively in tumors with mutations in BRAF or NRAS. Notably, we identified a recurrent UV-signature, an activating mutation in RAC1 in 9.2% of sun-exposed melanomas. This activating mutation, the third most frequent in our cohort of sun-exposed melanoma after those of BRAF and NRAS, changes Pro29 to serine (RAC1{sup P29S}) in the highly conserved switch I domain. Crystal structures, and biochemical and functional studies of RAC1{sup P29S} showed that the alteration releases the conformational restraint conferred by the conserved proline, causes an increased binding of the protein to downstream effectors, and promotes melanocyte proliferation and migration. These findings raise the possibility that pharmacological inhibition of downstream effectors of RAC1 signaling could be of therapeutic benefit.

  14. Mutations altering synaptic connectivity between identified neurons in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Thomas, J B; Wyman, R J

    1984-02-01

    By studying the effects of mutations on a simple circuit of identified neurons in Drosophila, we have found genes whose proper functioning is necessary to produce normal synaptic connections between the neurons. These neurons comprise the giant fiber (GF) system; the GFs are command neurons activated by a light-off stimulus and evoke a stereotyped pattern of activity in the thoracic muscles producing an escape jump. Each GF monosynaptically drives a motor neuron innervating the tergotrochanteral muscle (jump muscle, TTM). Each GF also disynaptically drives the motor neurons innervating the dorsal longitudinal flight muscle (DLM) via the peripherally synapsing interneuron (PSI) (King, D. G., and R. J. Wyman (1980) J. Neurocytol. 9: 753-770; M. A. Tanouye and R. J. Wyman (1980) J. Neurophysiol. 44: 405-421). A search was made for mutations affecting these identified synapses. Fifty thousand mutagenized flies were screened for nonjumping behavior to the light-off stimulus. Fifty-seven nonjumping mutant lines were established from individuals selected in the screen. Members of the lines were then tested for abnormal GF motor output to the TTM and DLM. From these lines, four X-linked mutations (representing three complementation groups) were isolated which affect the circuit. The mutations differentially disrupt specific synapses within the GF system. One mutation, bendless, disrupts synaptic transmission between the GF and the TTM motor neuron. Another, gfA, disrupts the synaptic connections of the PSI, and a third mutation, passover, disrupts transmission in both pathways.

  15. Multigene mutational profiling of cholangiocarcinomas identifies actionable molecular subgroups

    PubMed Central

    Mafficini, Andrea; Wood, Laura D.; Corbo, Vincenzo; Melisi, Davide; Malleo, Giuseppe; Vicentini, Caterina; Malpeli, Giorgio; Antonello, Davide; Sperandio, Nicola; Capelli, Paola; Tomezzoli, Anna; Iacono, Calogero; Lawlor, Rita T.; Bassi, Claudio; Hruban, Ralph H.; Guglielmi, Alfredo; Tortora, Giampaolo; de Braud, Filippo; Scarpa, Aldo

    2014-01-01

    One-hundred-fifty-three biliary cancers, including 70 intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas (ICC), 57 extrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas (ECC) and 26 gallbladder carcinomas (GBC) were assessed for mutations in 56 genes using multigene next-generation sequencing. Expression of EGFR and mTOR pathway genes was investigated by immunohistochemistry. At least one mutated gene was observed in 118/153 (77%) cancers. The genes most frequently involved were KRAS (28%), TP53 (18%), ARID1A (12%), IDH1/2 (9%), PBRM1 (9%), BAP1 (7%), and PIK3CA (7%). IDH1/2 (p=0.0005) and BAP1 (p=0.0097) mutations were characteristic of ICC, while KRAS (p=0.0019) and TP53 (p=0.0019) were more frequent in ECC and GBC. Multivariate analysis identified tumour stage and TP53 mutations as independent predictors of survival. Alterations in chromatin remodeling genes (ARID1A, BAP1, PBRM1, SMARCB1) were seen in 31% of cases. Potentially actionable mutations were seen in 104/153 (68%) cancers: i) KRAS/NRAS/BRAF mutations were found in 34% of cancers; ii) mTOR pathway activation was documented by immunohistochemistry in 51% of cases and by mutations in mTOR pathway genes in 19% of cancers; iii) TGF-ß/Smad signaling was altered in 10.5% cancers; iv) mutations in tyrosine kinase receptors were found in 9% cases. Our study identified molecular subgroups of cholangiocarcinomas that can be explored for specific drug targeting in clinical trials. PMID:24867389

  16. Rare variant mutations identified in pediatric patients with dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Rampersaud, Evadnie; Siegfried, Jill D; Norton, Nadine; Li, Duanxiang; Martin, Eden; Hershberger, Ray E

    2010-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in infants and children can be partially explained by genetic cause but the catalogue of known genes is limited. We reviewed our database of 41 cases diagnosed with DCM before 18 years of age who underwent detailed clinical and genetic evaluation, and summarize here the evidence for mutations causing DCM in these cases from 15 genes (PSEN1, PSEN2, CSRP3, LBD3, MYH7, SCN5A, TCAP, TNNT2, LMNA, MYBPC3, MYH6, TNNC1, TNNI3, TPM1, and RBM20). Thirty-five of the 41 pediatric cases had relatives with adult-onset DCM. More males (66%) were found among children diagnosed after 1 year of age with DCM. Nineteen mutations in 9 genes were identified among 15 out of 41 patients; 3 patients (diagnosed at ages 2 weeks, 9 and 13 years) had multiple mutations. Of the 19 mutations identified in 12 families, mutations in TPM1 (32%) and TNNT2 (21%) were the most commonly found. Of the 6 patients diagnosed before 1 year of age, 3 had mutations in TPM1 (including a set of identical twins), 1 in TNNT2, 1 in MYH7, and 1 with multiple mutations (MYH7 and TNNC1). Most DCM was accompanied by advanced heart failure and need for cardiac transplantation. We conclude that in some cases pediatric DCM has a genetic basis, which is complicated by allelic and locus heterogeneity as seen in adult-onset DCM. We suggest that future prospective comprehensive family-based genetic studies of pediatric DCM are indicated to further define mutation frequencies in known genes and to discover novel genetic cause. PMID:21483645

  17. Exome capture sequencing identifies a novel mutation in BBS4

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Chen, Xianfeng; Dudinsky, Lynn; Patenia, Claire; Chen, Yiyun; Li, Yumei; Wei, Yue; Abboud, Emad B.; Al-Rajhi, Ali A.; Lewis, Richard Alan; Lupski, James R.; Mardon, Graeme; Gibbs, Richard A.; Perkins, Brian D.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is one of the most severe eye dystrophies characterized by severe vision loss at an early stage and accounts for approximately 5% of all retinal dystrophies. The purpose of this study was to identify a novel LCA disease allele or gene and to develop an approach combining genetic mapping with whole exome sequencing. Methods Three patients from King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital (KKESH205) underwent whole genome single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping, and a single candidate region was identified. Taking advantage of next-generation high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies, whole exome capture sequencing was performed on patient KKESH205#7. Sanger direct sequencing was used during the validation step. The zebrafish model was used to examine the function of the mutant allele. Results A novel missense mutation in Bardet-Biedl syndrome 4 protein (BBS4) was identified in a consanguineous family from Saudi Arabia. This missense mutation in the fifth exon (c.253G>C;p.E85Q) of BBS4 is likely a disease-causing mutation as it segregates with the disease. The mutation is not found in the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) database, the 1000 Genomes Project, or matching normal controls. Functional analysis of this mutation in zebrafish indicates that the G253C allele is pathogenic. Coinjection of the G253C allele cannot rescue the mislocalization of rhodopsin in the retina when BBS4 is knocked down by morpholino injection. Immunofluorescence analysis in cell culture shows that this missense mutation in BBS4 does not cause obvious defects in protein expression or pericentriolar localization. Conclusions This mutation likely mainly reduces or abolishes BBS4 function in the retina. Further studies of this allele will provide important insights concerning the pleiotropic nature of BBS4 function. PMID:22219648

  18. Using Exome Data to Identify Malignant Hyperthermia Susceptibility Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Gonsalves, Stephen G.; Ng, David; Johnston, Jennifer J.; Teer, Jamie K.; Stenson, Peter D.; Cooper, David N.; Mullikin, James C.; Biesecker, Leslie G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Malignant hyperthermia susceptibility (MHS) is a life-threatening, inherited disorder of muscle calcium metabolism, triggered by anesthetics and depolarizing muscle relaxants. An unselected cohort was screened for MHS mutations using exome sequencing. Our aim was to pilot a strategy for the RYR1 and CACNA1S genes. Methods Exome sequencing was performed on 870 volunteers not ascertained for MHS. Variants in RYR1 and CACNA1S were annotated using an algorithm that filtered results based on mutation type, frequency, and information in mutation databases. Variants were scored on a six-point pathogenicity scale. Medical histories and pedigrees were reviewed for malignant hyperthermia and related disorders. Results We identified 70 RYR1 and 53 CACNA1S variants among 870 exomes. Sixty-three RYR1 and 41 CACNA1S variants passed the quality and frequency metrics but we excluded synonymous variants. In RYR1, we identified 65 missense mutations, one nonsense, two that affected splicing, and one non frameshift indel. In CACNA1S, 48 missense, one frameshift deletion, one splicing and one non frameshift indel were identified. RYR1 variants predicted to be pathogenic for MHS were found in three participants without medical or family histories of MHS. Numerous variants, previously described as pathogenic in mutation databases, were reclassified by us to be of unknown pathogenicity. Conclusions Exome sequencing can identify asymptomatic patients at risk for MHS, although the interpretation of exome variants can be challenging. The use of exome sequencing in unselected cohorts is an important tool to understand the prevalence and penetrance of MHS, a critical challenge for the field. PMID:24195946

  19. Identifying mutations in Tunisian families with retinal dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Habibi, Imen; Chebil, Ahmed; Falfoul, Yosra; Allaman-Pillet, Nathalie; Kort, Fedra; Schorderet, Daniel F.; El Matri, Leila

    2016-01-01

    Retinal dystrophies (RD) are a rare genetic disorder with high genetic heterogeneity. This study aimed at identifying disease-causing variants in fifteen consanguineous Tunisian families. Full ophthalmic examination was performed. Index patients were subjected to IROme analysis or whole exome sequencing followed by homozygosity mapping. All detected variations were confirmed by direct Sanger sequencing. Mutation analysis in our patients revealed two compound heterozygous mutations p.(R91W);(V172D) in RPE65, and five novel homozygous mutations: p.R765C in CNGB1, p.H337R in PDE6B, splice site variant c.1129-2A > G and c.678_681delGAAG in FAM161A and c.1133 + 3_1133 + 6delAAGT in CERKL. The latter mutation impacts pre-mRNA splicing of CERKL. The other changes detected were six previously reported mutations in CNGB3 (p.R203*), ABCA4 (p.W782*), NR2E3 (p.R311Q), RPE65 (p.H182Y), PROM1 (c.1354dupT) and EYS (c.5928-2A > G). Segregation analysis in each family showed that all affected individuals were homozygotes and unaffected individuals were either heterozygote carriers or homozygous wild type allele. These results confirm the involvement of a large number of genes in RD in the Tunisian population. PMID:27874104

  20. Novel CHM mutations identified in Chinese families with Choroideremia

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xue-Bi; Huang, Xiu-Feng; Tong, Yi; Lu, Qin-Kang; Jin, Zi-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Choroideremia is a bilateral and progressive X-linked inherited disease characterized by widespread chorioretinal atrophy with relative sparing of the macular region. It is caused by mutations in the ubiquitously expressed CHM gene, which lead to the absence of the Rab escort protein 1 (REP-1), resulting in prenylation deficiency. Typical fundus appearances for choroideremia were found in 3 probands from three unrelated Chinese families in our study. We firstly used the targeted exome sequencing (TES) technology to detect mutations in CHM gene. Based on an established filtering strategy of data analyses, along with confirmation by co-segregation, a previously reported mutation (c.1584_1587del TGTT, p.V529Hfs*7) was identified in one family, while two novel mutations (c.227_232delinsTGTCATTTCA, p.Q76Lfs*7; c.710dupA, p.Y237_S238delinsX) were identified in the other two families. These findings not only expands the currently limited spectrum of Chinese disease-causing variants in CHM gene, but also increases our understanding of the phenotypic and genotypic correlations of choroideremia, and may potentially lead to improved genetic counseling and specific treatment for families with choroideremia as well. PMID:27739455

  1. Mutation profiling of adenoid cystic carcinomas from multiple anatomical sites identifies mutations in the RAS pathway, but no KIT mutations

    PubMed Central

    Wetterskog, Daniel; Wilkerson, Paul M; Rodrigues, Daniel N; Lambros, Maryou B; Fritchie, Karen; Andersson, Mattias K; Natrajan, Rachael; Gauthier, Arnaud; Di Palma, Silvana; Shousha, Sami; Gatalica, Zoran; Töpfer, Chantal; Vukovic, Vesna; A’Hern, Roger; Weigelt, Britta; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Stenman, Göran; Rubin, Brian P; Reis-Filho, Jorge S

    2016-01-01

    Aims The majority of adenoid cystic carcinomas (AdCCs), regardless of anatomical site, harbour the MYB–NFIB fusion gene. The aim of this study was to characterize the repertoire of somatic genetic events affecting known cancer genes in AdCCs. Methods and results DNA was extracted from 13 microdissected breast AdCCs, and subjected to a mutation survey using the Sequenom OncoCarta Panel v1.0. Genes found to be mutated in any of the breast AdCCs and genes related to the same canonical molecular pathways, as well as KIT, a proto-oncogene whose protein product is expressed in AdCCs, were sequenced in an additional 68 AdCCs from various anatomical sites by Sanger sequencing. Using the Sequenom MassARRAY platform and Sanger sequencing, mutations in BRAF and HRAS were identified in three and one cases, respectively (breast, and head and neck). KIT, which has previously been reported to be mutated in AdCCs, was also investigated, but no mutations were identified. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that mutations in genes pertaining to the canonical RAS pathway are found in a minority of AdCCs, and that activating KIT mutations are either absent or remarkably rare in these cancers, and unlikely to constitute a driver and therapeutic target for patients with AdCC. PMID:23398044

  2. Multiscale mutation clustering algorithm identifies pan-cancer mutational clusters associated with pathway-level changes in gene expression.

    PubMed

    Poole, William; Leinonen, Kalle; Shmulevich, Ilya; Knijnenburg, Theo A; Bernard, Brady

    2017-02-01

    Cancer researchers have long recognized that somatic mutations are not uniformly distributed within genes. However, most approaches for identifying cancer mutations focus on either the entire-gene or single amino-acid level. We have bridged these two methodologies with a multiscale mutation clustering algorithm that identifies variable length mutation clusters in cancer genes. We ran our algorithm on 539 genes using the combined mutation data in 23 cancer types from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and identified 1295 mutation clusters. The resulting mutation clusters cover a wide range of scales and often overlap with many kinds of protein features including structured domains, phosphorylation sites, and known single nucleotide variants. We statistically associated these multiscale clusters with gene expression and drug response data to illuminate the functional and clinical consequences of mutations in our clusters. Interestingly, we find multiple clusters within individual genes that have differential functional associations: these include PTEN, FUBP1, and CDH1. This methodology has potential implications in identifying protein regions for drug targets, understanding the biological underpinnings of cancer, and personalizing cancer treatments. Toward this end, we have made the mutation clusters and the clustering algorithm available to the public. Clusters and pathway associations can be interactively browsed at m2c.systemsbiology.net. The multiscale mutation clustering algorithm is available at https://github.com/IlyaLab/M2C.

  3. Multiscale mutation clustering algorithm identifies pan-cancer mutational clusters associated with pathway-level changes in gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Poole, William; Leinonen, Kalle; Shmulevich, Ilya

    2017-01-01

    Cancer researchers have long recognized that somatic mutations are not uniformly distributed within genes. However, most approaches for identifying cancer mutations focus on either the entire-gene or single amino-acid level. We have bridged these two methodologies with a multiscale mutation clustering algorithm that identifies variable length mutation clusters in cancer genes. We ran our algorithm on 539 genes using the combined mutation data in 23 cancer types from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and identified 1295 mutation clusters. The resulting mutation clusters cover a wide range of scales and often overlap with many kinds of protein features including structured domains, phosphorylation sites, and known single nucleotide variants. We statistically associated these multiscale clusters with gene expression and drug response data to illuminate the functional and clinical consequences of mutations in our clusters. Interestingly, we find multiple clusters within individual genes that have differential functional associations: these include PTEN, FUBP1, and CDH1. This methodology has potential implications in identifying protein regions for drug targets, understanding the biological underpinnings of cancer, and personalizing cancer treatments. Toward this end, we have made the mutation clusters and the clustering algorithm available to the public. Clusters and pathway associations can be interactively browsed at m2c.systemsbiology.net. The multiscale mutation clustering algorithm is available at https://github.com/IlyaLab/M2C. PMID:28170390

  4. Key Clinical Features to Identify Girls with "CDKL5" Mutations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Nectoux, Juliette; Rosas-Vargas, Haydee; Milh, Mathieu; Boddaert, Nathalie; Girard, Benoit; Cances, Claude; Ville, Dorothee; Afenjar, Alexandra; Rio, Marlene; Heron, Delphine; Morel, Marie Ange N'Guyen; Arzimanoglou, Alexis; Philippe, Christophe; Jonveaux, Philippe; Chelly, Jamel; Bienvenu, Thierry

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the human X-linked cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 ("CDKL5") gene have been shown to cause infantile spasms as well as Rett syndrome (RTT)-like phenotype. To date, less than 25 different mutations have been reported. So far, there are still little data on the key clinical diagnosis criteria and on the natural history of…

  5. EGFR mutation specific immunohistochemistry is a useful adjunct which helps to identify false negative mutation testing in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Houang, Michelle; Sioson, Loretta; Clarkson, Adele; Watson, Nicole; Farzin, Mahtab; Toon, Christopher W; Raut, Aditi; O'Toole, Sandra A; Cooper, Wendy A; Pavlakis, Nick; Mead, Scott; Chou, Angela; Gill, Anthony J

    2014-10-01

    Mutations in EGFR guide treatment in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The most common mutations, exon 19 (delE746-A750) and exon 21 (L858R), can be identified by mutation specific immunohistochemistry (IHC). We present our prospective experience of universal reflex IHC and molecular testing in non-squamous NSCLC in the routine clinical setting.A total of 411 specimens from 332 patients were encountered over two years. Of these, 326 (98%) patients underwent EGFR IHC, 15 (5%) were positive for exon 19 deletions and 27 (8%) for exon 21 (L858R); 244 (73%) patients underwent molecular testing. Seventy-six mutations in 64 patients (19% of all patients encountered; 26% with sufficient material for testing) were identified. These comprised nine exon 18 (G719X) mutations, three also with exon 20 mutations; 24 exon 19 deletions, six also with exon 20 mutations; 23 exon 21 (L858R), three also with exon 20 mutations; and 8 exon 20 alone.All 15 exon 19 IHC positive patients were proven mutated (100% specificity, 63% sensitivity). Twenty-two of 27 exon 21 IHC positive cases were proven mutated while three patients had insufficient material for molecular testing (92% specificity, 96% sensitivity). The overall specificity and sensitivity of IHC for any EGFR mutation was 95% and 58%. Five patients initially thought to be wild type for EGFR but IHC positive underwent repeat molecular testing because of the discrepancy which confirmed the IHC result in three cases (60%).We conclude IHC is very specific but not sensitive. Whilst IHC cannot replace molecular testing, it is a useful adjunct which requires minimal tissue and identifies false negative molecular results which occurred in 5% of our patients with eventually confirmed EGFR mutations.

  6. Identifying driver mutations in sequenced cancer genomes: computational approaches to enable precision medicine

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput DNA sequencing is revolutionizing the study of cancer and enabling the measurement of the somatic mutations that drive cancer development. However, the resulting sequencing datasets are large and complex, obscuring the clinically important mutations in a background of errors, noise, and random mutations. Here, we review computational approaches to identify somatic mutations in cancer genome sequences and to distinguish the driver mutations that are responsible for cancer from random, passenger mutations. First, we describe approaches to detect somatic mutations from high-throughput DNA sequencing data, particularly for tumor samples that comprise heterogeneous populations of cells. Next, we review computational approaches that aim to predict driver mutations according to their frequency of occurrence in a cohort of samples, or according to their predicted functional impact on protein sequence or structure. Finally, we review techniques to identify recurrent combinations of somatic mutations, including approaches that examine mutations in known pathways or protein-interaction networks, as well as de novo approaches that identify combinations of mutations according to statistical patterns of mutual exclusivity. These techniques, coupled with advances in high-throughput DNA sequencing, are enabling precision medicine approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. PMID:24479672

  7. A spatial simulation approach to account for protein structure when identifying non-random somatic mutations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Current research suggests that a small set of “driver” mutations are responsible for tumorigenesis while a larger body of “passenger” mutations occur in the tumor but do not progress the disease. Due to recent pharmacological successes in treating cancers caused by driver mutations, a variety of methodologies that attempt to identify such mutations have been developed. Based on the hypothesis that driver mutations tend to cluster in key regions of the protein, the development of cluster identification algorithms has become critical. Results We have developed a novel methodology, SpacePAC (Spatial Protein Amino acid Clustering), that identifies mutational clustering by considering the protein tertiary structure directly in 3D space. By combining the mutational data in the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC) and the spatial information in the Protein Data Bank (PDB), SpacePAC is able to identify novel mutation clusters in many proteins such as FGFR3 and CHRM2. In addition, SpacePAC is better able to localize the most significant mutational hotspots as demonstrated in the cases of BRAF and ALK. The R package is available on Bioconductor at: http://www.bioconductor.org/packages/release/bioc/html/SpacePAC.html. Conclusion SpacePAC adds a valuable tool to the identification of mutational clusters while considering protein tertiary structure. PMID:24990767

  8. Identifying and calling insertions, deletions, and single-base mutations efficiently from sequence data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Whole genome sequencing studies can directly identify causative mutations for subsequent use in genomic evaluations, but sequence variant identification is a lengthy and sometimes inaccurate process. The speed and accuracy of identifying small insertions and deletions of sequence, collectively terme...

  9. Targeted next-generation sequencing identified novel mutations in triple-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Cheng; Lin, Huan-Chau; Chiang, Yi-Hao; Chen, Caleb Gon-Shen; Huang, Ling; Wang, Wei-Ting; Cheng, Chun-Chia; Lin, Johnson; Chang, Yi-Fang; Chang, Ming-Chih; Hsieh, Ruey-Kuen; Chen, Shu-Jen; Lim, Ken-Hong; Kuo, Yuan-Yeh

    2017-05-01

    Mutations in JAK2, MPL and CALR genes have been identified in the majority of myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) patients, and patients negative for these three mutations are the so-called triple-negative (TN) MPN. In this study, we examined the mutational profiles of 16 triple-negative MPN patients including 7 essential thrombocythemia (ET), 1 primary myelofibrosis and 8 polycythemia vera (PV). Targeted next-generation sequencing was performed using the ACTOnco Comprehensive Cancer Panel (Ion AmpliSeq Comprehensive Cancer Panel, Life Technologies) to target all coding exons of 409 cancer-related genes. Overall, 30 nonsynonymous somatic mutations were detected in 12 (75%) patients with a range of 1-5 mutations per sample. Notably, one ET patient was found to have JAK2V617F and KITP551L mutations at very low allele frequency. One MPLP70L and 1 MPLM602T mutations were identified each in 1 ET and 1 PV, respectively. Other recurrent mutations were also identified including KMT2C, KMT2D, IRS2, SYNE1, PDE4DIP, SETD2, ATM, TNFAIP3 and CCND2. In addition, germline mutations were also found in some cancer-related genes. Copy number changes were rare in this cohort of TN MPNs. In conclusion, both somatic and germline mutations can be detected in TN MPN patients.

  10. Whole-Exome Sequencing Identifies Novel Somatic Mutations in Chinese Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Cai, Qiuyin; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Gao, Yu-Tang; Li, Chun; Zheng, Wei; Long, Jirong

    2016-01-01

    Most breast cancer genomes harbor complex mutational landscapes. Somatic alterations have been predominantly discovered in breast cancer patients of European ancestry; however, little is known about somatic aberration in patients of other ethnic groups including Asians. In the present study, whole-exome sequencing (WES) was conducted in DNA extracted from tumor and matched adjacent normal tissue samples from eleven early onset breast cancer patients who were included in the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study. We discovered 159 somatic missense and ten nonsense mutations distributed among 167 genes. The most frequent 50 somatic mutations identified by WES were selected for validation using Sequenom MassARRAY system in the eleven breast cancer patients and an additional 433 tumor and 921 normal tissue/blood samples from the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study. Among these 50 mutations selected for validation, 32 were technically validated. Within the validated mutations, somatic mutations in the TRPM6, HYDIN, ENTHD1, and NDUFB10 genes were found in two or more tumor samples in the replication stage. Mutations in the ADRA1B, CBFB, KIAA2022, and RBM25 genes were observed once in the replication stage. To summarize, this study identified some novel somatic mutations for breast cancer. Future studies will need to be conducted to determine the function of these mutations/genes in the breast carcinogenesis. PMID:26870154

  11. Whole-exome sequencing identifies recurrent AKT1 mutations in sclerosing hemangioma of lung

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Min Sung; Lee, Sung-Hak; Park, Hyun-Chun; Choi, Hyun Joo; Maeng, Leeso; Min, Ki Ouk; Kim, Jeana; Park, Tae In; Shin, Ok Ran; Kim, Tae-Jung; Xu, Haidong; Lee, Kyo Young; Kim, Tae-Min; Song, Sang Yong; Lee, Charles; Chung, Yeun-Jun; Lee, Sug Hyung

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary sclerosing hemangioma (PSH) is a benign tumor with two cell populations (epithelial and stromal cells), for which genomic profiles remain unknown. We conducted exome sequencing of 44 PSHs and identified recurrent somatic mutations of AKT1 (43.2%) and β-catenin (4.5%). We used a second subset of 24 PSHs to confirm the high frequency of AKT1 mutations (overall 31/68, 45.6%; p.E17K, 33.8%) and recurrent β-catenin mutations (overall 3 of 68, 4.4%). Of the PSHs without AKT1 mutations, two exhibited AKT1 copy gain. AKT1 mutations existed in both epithelial and stromal cells. In two separate PSHs from one patient, we observed two different AKT1 mutations, indicating they were not disseminated but independent arising tumors. Because the AKT1 mutations were not found to co-occur with β-catenin mutations (or any other known driver alterations) in any of the PSHs studied, we speculate that this may be the single-most common driver alteration to develop PSHs. Our study revealed genomic differences between PSHs and lung adenocarcinomas, including a high rate of AKT1 mutation in PSHs. These genomic features of PSH identified in the present study provide clues to understanding the biology of PSH and for differential genomic diagnosis of lung tumors. PMID:27601661

  12. Whole-genome sequencing identifies recurrent mutations in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Puente, Xose S.; Pinyol, Magda; Quesada, Víctor; Conde, Laura; Ordóñez, Gonzalo R.; Villamor, Neus; Escaramis, Georgia; Jares, Pedro; Beà, Sílvia; González-Díaz, Marcos; Bassaganyas, Laia; Baumann, Tycho; Juan, Manel; López-Guerra, Mónica; Colomer, Dolors; Tubío, José M. C.; López, Cristina; Navarro, Alba; Tornador, Cristian; Aymerich, Marta; Rozman, María; Hernández, Jesús M.; Puente, Diana A.; Freije, José M. P.; Velasco, Gloria; Gutiérrez-Fernández, Ana; Costa, Dolors; Carrió, Anna; Guijarro, Sara; Enjuanes, Anna; Hernández, Lluís; Yagüe, Jordi; Nicolás, Pilar; Romeo-Casabona, Carlos M.; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Castillo, Ester; Dohm, Juliane C.; de Sanjosé, Silvia; Piris, Miguel A.; de Alava, Enrique; Miguel, Jesús San; Royo, Romina; Gelpí, Josep L.; Torrents, David; Orozco, Modesto; Pisano, David G.; Valencia, Alfonso; Guigó, Roderic; Bayés, Mónica; Heath, Simon; Gut, Marta; Klatt, Peter; Marshall, John; Raine, Keiran; Stebbings, Lucy A.; Futreal, P. Andrew; Stratton, Michael R.; Campbell, Peter J.; Gut, Ivo; López-Guillermo, Armando; Estivill, Xavier; Montserrat, Emili; López-Otín, Carlos; Campo, Elías

    2012-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL), the most frequent leukaemia in adults in Western countries, is a heterogeneous disease with variable clinical presentation and evolution1,2. Two major molecular subtypes can be distinguished, characterized respectively by a high or low number of somatic hypermutations in the variable region of immunoglobulin genes3,4. The molecular changes leading to the pathogenesis of the disease are still poorly understood. Here we performed whole-genome sequencing of four cases of CLL and identified 46 somatic mutations that potentially affect gene function. Further analysis of these mutations in 363 patients with CLL identified four genes that are recurrently mutated: notch 1 (NOTCH1), exportin 1 (XPO1), myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MYD88) and kelch-like 6 (KLHL6). Mutations in MYD88 and KLHL6 are predominant in cases of CLL with mutated immunoglobulin genes, whereas NOTCH1 and XPO1 mutations are mainly detected in patients with unmutated immunoglobulins. The patterns of somatic mutation, supported by functional and clinical analyses, strongly indicate that the recurrent NOTCH1, MYD88 and XPO1 mutations are oncogenic changes that contribute to the clinical evolution of the disease. To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive analysis of CLL combining whole-genome sequencing with clinical characteristics and clinical outcomes. It highlights the usefulness of this approach for the identification of clinically relevant mutations in cancer. PMID:21642962

  13. Whole-genome sequencing identifies recurrent mutations in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Puente, Xose S; Pinyol, Magda; Quesada, Víctor; Conde, Laura; Ordóñez, Gonzalo R; Villamor, Neus; Escaramis, Georgia; Jares, Pedro; Beà, Sílvia; González-Díaz, Marcos; Bassaganyas, Laia; Baumann, Tycho; Juan, Manel; López-Guerra, Mónica; Colomer, Dolors; Tubío, José M C; López, Cristina; Navarro, Alba; Tornador, Cristian; Aymerich, Marta; Rozman, María; Hernández, Jesús M; Puente, Diana A; Freije, José M P; Velasco, Gloria; Gutiérrez-Fernández, Ana; Costa, Dolors; Carrió, Anna; Guijarro, Sara; Enjuanes, Anna; Hernández, Lluís; Yagüe, Jordi; Nicolás, Pilar; Romeo-Casabona, Carlos M; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Castillo, Ester; Dohm, Juliane C; de Sanjosé, Silvia; Piris, Miguel A; de Alava, Enrique; San Miguel, Jesús; Royo, Romina; Gelpí, Josep L; Torrents, David; Orozco, Modesto; Pisano, David G; Valencia, Alfonso; Guigó, Roderic; Bayés, Mónica; Heath, Simon; Gut, Marta; Klatt, Peter; Marshall, John; Raine, Keiran; Stebbings, Lucy A; Futreal, P Andrew; Stratton, Michael R; Campbell, Peter J; Gut, Ivo; López-Guillermo, Armando; Estivill, Xavier; Montserrat, Emili; López-Otín, Carlos; Campo, Elías

    2011-06-05

    Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL), the most frequent leukaemia in adults in Western countries, is a heterogeneous disease with variable clinical presentation and evolution. Two major molecular subtypes can be distinguished, characterized respectively by a high or low number of somatic hypermutations in the variable region of immunoglobulin genes. The molecular changes leading to the pathogenesis of the disease are still poorly understood. Here we performed whole-genome sequencing of four cases of CLL and identified 46 somatic mutations that potentially affect gene function. Further analysis of these mutations in 363 patients with CLL identified four genes that are recurrently mutated: notch 1 (NOTCH1), exportin 1 (XPO1), myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MYD88) and kelch-like 6 (KLHL6). Mutations in MYD88 and KLHL6 are predominant in cases of CLL with mutated immunoglobulin genes, whereas NOTCH1 and XPO1 mutations are mainly detected in patients with unmutated immunoglobulins. The patterns of somatic mutation, supported by functional and clinical analyses, strongly indicate that the recurrent NOTCH1, MYD88 and XPO1 mutations are oncogenic changes that contribute to the clinical evolution of the disease. To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive analysis of CLL combining whole-genome sequencing with clinical characteristics and clinical outcomes. It highlights the usefulness of this approach for the identification of clinically relevant mutations in cancer.

  14. Molecular testing of 163 patients with Morquio A (Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA) identifies 39 novel GALNS mutations.

    PubMed

    Morrone, A; Tylee, K L; Al-Sayed, M; Brusius-Facchin, A C; Caciotti, A; Church, H J; Coll, M J; Davidson, K; Fietz, M J; Gort, L; Hegde, M; Kubaski, F; Lacerda, L; Laranjeira, F; Leistner-Segal, S; Mooney, S; Pajares, S; Pollard, L; Ribeiro, I; Wang, R Y; Miller, N

    2014-06-01

    Morquio A (Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA; MPS IVA) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder caused by partial or total deficiency of the enzyme galactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS; also known as N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase) encoded by the GALNS gene. Patients who inherit two mutated GALNS gene alleles have a decreased ability to degrade the glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) keratan sulfate and chondroitin 6-sulfate, thereby causing GAG accumulation within lysosomes and consequently pleiotropic disease. GALNS mutations occur throughout the gene and many mutations are identified only in single patients or families, causing difficulties both in mutation detection and interpretation. In this study, molecular analysis of 163 patients with Morquio A identified 99 unique mutations in the GALNS gene believed to negatively impact GALNS protein function, of which 39 are previously unpublished, together with 26 single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Recommendations for the molecular testing of patients, clear reporting of sequence findings, and interpretation of sequencing data are provided.

  15. Whole-exome sequencing identified mutational profiles of high-grade colon adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Min; Rhee, Je-Keun; Park, Hyeon-Chun; Sung, Min Kim; Kim, Sung Soo; Hyeok, Chang An; Lee Hyung, Sug; Chung, Yeun-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Although gene-to-gene analyses identified genetic alterations such as APC, KRAS and TP53 mutations in colon adenomas, it is largely unknown whether there are any others in them. Mutational profiling of high-grade colon adenoma (HGCA) that just precedes colon carcinoma might identify not only novel adenoma-specific genes but also critical genes for its progression to carcinoma. For this, we performed whole-exome sequencing (WES) of 12 HGCAs and identified 11 non-hypermutated and one hypermutated (POLE-mutated) cases. We identified 22 genes including APC, KRAS, TP53, GNAS, NRAS, SMAD4, ARID2, and PIK3CA with non-silent mutations in the cancer Census Genes. Bi-allelic and mono-allelic APC alterations were found in nine and one HGCAs, respectively, while the other two harbored wild-type APC. Five HGCAs harbored either mono-allelic (four HGCAs) or bi-allelic (one HGCA) SMAD4 mutation or 18q loss that had been known as early carcinoma-specific changes. We identified MTOR, ACVR1B, GNAQ, ATM, CNOT1, EP300, ARID2, RET and MAP2K4 mutations for the first time in colon adenomas. Our WES data is largely matched with the earlier ‘adenoma-carcinoma model’ (APC, KRAS, NRAS and GNAS mutations), but there are newly identified SMAD4, MTOR, ACVR1B, GNAQ, ATM, CNOT1, EP300, ARID2, RET and MAP2K4 mutations in this study. Our findings provide resource for understanding colon premalignant lesions and for identifying genomic clues for differential diagnosis and therapy options for colon adenomas and carcinomas. PMID:28179590

  16. Novel PTPRQ mutations identified in three congenital hearing loss patients with various types of hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Sakuma, Naoko; Moteki, Hideaki; Azaiez, Hela; Booth, Kevin T; Takahashi, Masahiro; Arai, Yasuhiro; Shearer, A Eliot; Sloan, Christina M; Nishio, Shin-ya; Kolbe, Diana L; Iwasaki, Satoshi; Oridate, Nobuhiko; Smith, Richard J H; Usami, Shin-ichi

    2015-01-01

    Objective We present three patients with congenital sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) caused by the novel PTPRQ mutations, including clinical manifestations and phenotypic features. Methods Two hundred and twenty (220) Japanese subjects with sensorineural hearing loss from unrelated and non-consanguineous families were enrolled in the study. Targeted genomic enrichment with massively parallel sequencing of all known non-syndromic hearing loss genes was performed to identify the genetic cause of hearing loss. Results Four novel causative PTPRQ mutations were identified in three cases. Case 1 had progressive profound SNHL with homozygous nonsense mutation. Case 2 had non-progressive profound SNHL with compound heterozygous mutation (nonsense and missense mutation). Case 3 had non-progressive moderate SNHL with compound heterozygous mutation (missense and splice site mutation). Caloric test and vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) test showed vestibular dysfunction in Case 1. Conclusion Hearing loss levels and progression among the present cases were varied, and there seem to be no obvious correlation between genotypes and the phenotypic features of their hearing loss. The PTPRQ mutation appeared to be responsible for the vestibular dysfunction. PMID:25788564

  17. Whole Exome Sequencing Identifies de Novo Mutations in GATA6 Associated with Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lan; Bennett, James T.; Wynn, Julia; Carvill, Gemma L.; Cheung, Yee Him; Shen, Yufeng; Mychaliska, George B.; Azarow, Kenneth S.; Crombleholme, Timothy M.; Chung, Dai H.; Potoka, Douglas; Warner, Brad W.; Bucher, Brian; Lim, Foong-Yen; Pietsch, John; Stolar, Charles; Aspelund, Gudrun; Arkovitz, Marc S.; Mefford, Heather; Chung, Wendy K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a common birth defect affecting 1 in 3,000 births. It is characterized by herniation of abdominal viscera through an incompletely formed diaphragm. Although chromosomal anomalies and mutations in several genes have been implicated, the cause for most patients is unknown. Methods We used whole exome sequencing in two families with CDH and congenital heart disease, and identified mutations in GATA6 in both. Results In the first family, we identified a de novo missense mutation (c.1366C>T, p.R456C) in a sporadic CDH patient with tetralogy of Fallot. In the second, a nonsense mutation (c.712G>T, p.G238*) was identified in two siblings with CDH and a large ventricular septal defect. The G238* mutation was inherited from their mother, who was clinically affected with congenital absence of the pericardium, patent ductus arteriosus, and intestinal malrotation. Deep sequencing of blood and saliva derived DNA from the mother suggested somatic mosaicism as an explanation for her milder phenotype, with only approximately 15% mutant alleles. To determine the frequency of GATA6 mutations in CDH, we sequenced the gene in 378 patients with CDH. We identified one additional de novo mutation (c.1071delG, p.V358Cfs34*). Conclusions Mutations in GATA6 have been previously associated with pancreatic agenesis and congenital heart disease. We conclude that, in addition to the heart and the pancreas, GATA6 is involved in development of two additional organs, the diaphragm and the pericardium. In addition we have shown that de novo mutations can contribute to the development of CDH, a common birth defect. PMID:24385578

  18. Triangulation of the human, chimpanzee, and Neanderthal genome sequences identifies potentially compensated mutations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guojie; Pei, Zhang; Krawczak, Michael; Ball, Edward V; Mort, Matthew; Kehrer-Sawatzki, Hildegard; Cooper, David N

    2010-12-01

    Triangulation of the human, chimpanzee, and Neanderthal genome sequences with respect to 44,348 disease-causing or disease-associated missense mutations and 1,712 putative regulatory mutations listed in the Human Gene Mutation Database was employed to identify genetic variants that are apparently pathogenic in humans but which may represent a "compensated" wild-type state in at least one of the other two species. Of 122 such "potentially compensated mutations" (PCMs) identified, 88 were deemed "ancestral" on the basis that the reported wild-type Neanderthal nucleotide was identical to that of the chimpanzee. Another 33 PCMs were deemed to be "derived" in that the Neanderthal wild-type nucleotide matched the human but not the chimpanzee wild-type. For the remaining PCM, all three wild-type states were found to differ. Whereas a derived PCM would require compensation only in the chimpanzee, ancestral PCMs are useful as a means to identify sites of possible adaptive differences between modern humans on the one hand, and Neanderthals and chimpanzees on the other. Ancestral PCMs considered to be disease-causing in humans were identified in two Neanderthal genes (DUOX2, MAMLD1). Because the underlying mutations are known to give rise to recessive conditions in human, it is possible that they may also have been of pathological significance in Neanderthals. Hum Mutat 31:1-8, 2010. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Targeted sequencing approach to identify genetic mutations in Nasu-Hakola disease

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, Jun-ichi; Yanaizu, Motoaki; Tosaki, Youhei; Sakai, Kenji; Kino, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Summary Nasu-Hakola disease (NHD) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by sclerosing leukoencephalopathy and multifocal bone cysts, caused by a loss-of-function mutation of either TYROBP (DAP12) or TREM2. TREM2 and DAP12 constitute a receptor/adaptor signaling complex expressed exclusively on osteoclasts, dendritic cells, macrophages, and microglia. Premortem molecular diagnosis of NHD requires genetic analysis of both TYROBP and TREM2, in which 20 distinct NHD-causing mutations have been reported. Due to genetic heterogeneity, it is often difficult to identify the exact mutation responsible for NHD. Recently, the revolution of the next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology has greatly advanced the field of genome research. A targeted sequencing approach allows us to investigate a selected set of disease-causing genes and mutations in a number of samples within several days. By targeted sequencing using the TruSight One Sequencing Panel, we resequenced genetic mutations of seven NHD cases with known molecular diagnosis and two control subjects. We identified homozygous variants of TYROBP or TREM2 in all NHD cases, composed of a frameshift mutation of c.141delG in exon 3 of TYROBP in four cases, a missense mutation of c.2T>C in exon 1 of TYROBP in two cases, or a splicing mutation of c.482+2T>C in intron 3 of TREM2 in one case. The results of targeted resequencing corresponded to those of Sanger sequencing. In contrast, causative variants were not detected in control subjects. These results indicate that targeted sequencing is a useful approach to precisely identify genetic mutations responsible for NHD in a comprehensive manner. PMID:27904822

  20. Whole-genome sequencing identifies a recurrent functional synonymous mutation in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Gartner, Jared J; Parker, Stephen C J; Prickett, Todd D; Dutton-Regester, Ken; Stitzel, Michael L; Lin, Jimmy C; Davis, Sean; Simhadri, Vijaya L; Jha, Sujata; Katagiri, Nobuko; Gotea, Valer; Teer, Jamie K; Wei, Xiaomu; Morken, Mario A; Bhanot, Umesh K; Chen, Guo; Elnitski, Laura L; Davies, Michael A; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E; Carter, Hannah; Karchin, Rachel; Robinson, William; Robinson, Steven; Rosenberg, Steven A; Collins, Francis S; Parmigiani, Giovanni; Komar, Anton A; Kimchi-Sarfaty, Chava; Hayward, Nicholas K; Margulies, Elliott H; Samuels, Yardena

    2013-08-13

    Synonymous mutations, which do not alter the protein sequence, have been shown to affect protein function [Sauna ZE, Kimchi-Sarfaty C (2011) Nat Rev Genet 12(10):683-691]. However, synonymous mutations are rarely investigated in the cancer genomics field. We used whole-genome and -exome sequencing to identify somatic mutations in 29 melanoma samples. Validation of one synonymous somatic mutation in BCL2L12 in 285 samples identified 12 cases that harbored the recurrent F17F mutation. This mutation led to increased BCL2L12 mRNA and protein levels because of differential targeting of WT and mutant BCL2L12 by hsa-miR-671-5p. Protein made from mutant BCL2L12 transcript bound p53, inhibited UV-induced apoptosis more efficiently than WT BCL2L12, and reduced endogenous p53 target gene transcription. This report shows selection of a recurrent somatic synonymous mutation in cancer. Our data indicate that silent alterations have a role to play in human cancer, emphasizing the importance of their investigation in future cancer genome studies.

  1. Mutations in phosphodiesterase 6 identified in familial cases of retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, Inayat; Kabir, Firoz; Gottsch, Clare Brooks S; Naeem, Muhammad Asif; Guru, Aditya A; Ayyagari, Radha; Khan, Shaheen N; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Akram, Javed; Riazuddin, S Amer

    2016-01-01

    To delineate the genetic determinants associated with retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a hereditary retinal disorder, we recruited four large families manifesting cardinal symptoms of RP. We localized these families to regions on the human genome harboring the α and β subunits of phosphodiesterase 6 and identified mutations that were absent in control chromosomes. Our data suggest that mutations in PDE6A and PDE6B are responsible for the retinal phenotype in these families. PMID:27917291

  2. Two novel mutations of ornithine transcarbamylase gene identified from three Chinese neonates with ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Dong, Lei; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Mei

    2015-01-01

    We aim to analyze the blood metabolic profiling and the gene mutation of ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) in three neonates with ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTCD). Three neonates with OTCD were included in this study. The profiling of amino acids and acylcarnitine was determined using MS-MS assay. The OTC exons were amplified using PCR amplification. DNA sequencing was performed, based on which mutation analysis of OTC genes was carried out. For the clinical symptoms, all the three neonates showed poor reaction and feeding. In addition, convulsion and neonatal infection were noticed. A remarkable decrease of citrulline concentration was revealed by MS-MS assay. In case 1, a 548A > G substitution was identified in exon 6, which resulted in replacement of cysteine by tyrosine in codon 183. In case 2, a 1016T > G substitution was identified in exon 10, leading to replacement of valine by glycine in codon 339. In case 3, a 995G > C mutation was noted in exon 9, resulting in missense mutation of tryptophane to serine in codon332. Three types of OTC gene mutations were identified in Chinese neonates with OTC deficiency, among which two novel mutations, including 1016T > G and 995G > C, are presented uniquely in our study.

  3. Whole-exome sequencing identifies novel homozygous mutation in NPAS2 in family with nonobstructive azoospermia

    PubMed Central

    Ramasamy, Ranjith; Bakircioğlu, M. Emre; Cengiz, Cenk; Karaca, Ender; Scovell, Jason; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Akdemir, Zeynep C.; Bainbridge, Matthew; Yu, Yao; Huff, Chad; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lupski, James R.; Lamb, Dolores J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the genetic cause of nonobstructive azoospermia (NOA) in a consanguineous Turkish family through homozygosity mapping followed by targeted exon/whole-exome sequencing to identify genetic variations. Design Whole-exome sequencing Setting Research laboratory Patient(s) We sequenced the exomes of two siblings in a consanguineous family with NOA. Intervention(s) All variants passing filter criteria were validated with Sanger sequencing to confirm familial segregation and absence in the control population. Main Outcome Measure Discovery of a mutation that could potentially cause NOA Results A novel non-synonymous mutation in neuronal PAS 2 domain (NPAS2) was identified in a consanguineous family from Turkey. This mutation in exon 14 (chr2: 101592000 C>G) of NPAS2 is likely a disease-causing mutation as it is predicted to be damaging, is a novel variant, and segregates with the disease. Family segregation of the variants showed the presence of homozygous mutation in the three brothers with NOA and heterozygous mutation in mother, one brother and one sister who were both fertile. The mutation is not found in the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) database, the 1000 Genomes Project, Baylor College of Medicine cohort of 500 Turkish patients (not a population specific polymorphism) or matching 50 fertile controls. Conclusions Using WES, we identified a novel homozygous mutation in NPAS2 as a likely disease-causing variant in a Turkish family diagnosed with NOA. Our data reinforce the clinical role of WES in the molecular diagnosis of highly heterogeneous genetic diseases which conventional genetic approaches have previously failed to conclude a molecular diagnosis. PMID:25956372

  4. Whole exome sequencing identifies a recurrent RQCD1 P131L mutation in cutaneous melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Stephen Q.; Behren, Andreas; Mar, Victoria J.; Woods, Katherine; Li, Jason; Martin, Claire; Sheppard, Karen E.; Wolfe, Rory; Kelly, John; Cebon, Jonathan; Dobrovic, Alexander; McArthur, Grant A.

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma is often caused by mutations due to exposure to ultraviolet radiation. This study reports a recurrent somatic C > T change causing a P131L mutation in the RQCD1 (Required for Cell Differentiation1 Homolog) gene identified through whole exome sequencing of 20 metastatic melanomas. Screening in 715 additional primary melanomas revealed a prevalence of ~4%. This represents the first reported recurrent mutation in a member of the CCR4-NOT complex in cancer. Compared to tumors without the mutation, the P131L mutant positive tumors were associated with increased thickness (p = 0.02), head and neck (p = 0.009) and upper limb (p = 0.03) location, lentigo maligna melanoma subtype (p = 0.02) and BRAF V600K (p = 0.04) but not V600E or NRAS codon 61 mutations. There was no association with nodal disease (p = 0.3). Mutually exclusive mutations of other members of the CCR4-NOT complex were found in ~20% of the TCGA melanoma dataset suggesting the complex may play an important role in melanoma biology. Mutant RQCD1 was predicted to bind strongly to HLA-A0201 and HLA-Cw3 MHC1 complexes. From thirteen patients with mutant RQCD1, an anti-tumor CD8+ T cell response was observed from a single patient's peripheral blood mononuclear cell population stimulated with mutated peptide compared to wildtype indicating a neoantigen may be formed. PMID:25544760

  5. A distinctive oral phenotype points to FAM20A mutations not identified by Sanger sequencing.

    PubMed

    Poulter, James A; Smith, Claire E L; Murrillo, Gina; Silva, Sandra; Feather, Sally; Howell, Marianella; Crinnion, Laura; Bonthron, David T; Carr, Ian M; Watson, Christopher M; Inglehearn, Chris F; Mighell, Alan J

    2015-11-01

    Biallelic FAM20A mutations cause two conditions where Amelogenesis Imperfecta (AI) is the presenting feature: Amelogenesis Imperfecta and Gingival Fibromatosis Syndrome; and Enamel Renal Syndrome. A distinctive oral phenotype is shared in both conditions. On Sanger sequencing of FAM20A in cases with that phenotype, we identified two probands with single, likely pathogenic heterozygous mutations. Given the recessive inheritance pattern seen in all previous FAM20A mutation-positive families and the potential for renal disease, further screening was carried out to look for a second pathogenic allele. Reverse transcriptase-PCR on cDNA was used to determine transcript levels. CNVseq was used to screen for genomic insertions and deletions. In one family, FAM20A cDNA screening revealed only a single mutated FAM20A allele with the wild-type allele not transcribed. In the second family, CNV detection by whole genome sequencing (CNVseq) revealed a heterozygous 54.7 kb duplication encompassing exons 1 to 4 of FAM20A. This study confirms the link between biallelic FAM20A mutations and the characteristic oral phenotype. It highlights for the first time examples of FAM20A mutations missed by the most commonly used mutation screening techniques. This information informed renal assessment and ongoing clinical care.

  6. A systematic screening to identify de novo mutations causing sporadic early-onset Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Kun-Rodrigues, Celia; Ganos, Christos; Guerreiro, Rita; Schneider, Susanne A.; Schulte, Claudia; Lesage, Suzanne; Darwent, Lee; Holmans, Peter; Singleton, Andrew; Bhatia, Kailash; Bras, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Despite the many advances in our understanding of the genetic basis of Mendelian forms of Parkinson's disease (PD), a large number of early-onset cases still remain to be explained. Many of these cases, present with a form of disease that is identical to that underlined by genetic causes, but do not have mutations in any of the currently known disease-causing genes. Here, we hypothesized that de novo mutations may account for a proportion of these early-onset, sporadic cases. We performed exome sequencing in full parent–child trios where the proband presents with typical PD to unequivocally identify de novo mutations. This approach allows us to test all genes in the genome in an unbiased manner. We have identified and confirmed 20 coding de novo mutations in 21 trios. We have used publicly available population genetic data to compare variant frequencies and our independent in-house dataset of exome sequencing in PD (with over 1200 cases) to identify additional variants in the same genes. Of the genes identified to carry de novo mutations, PTEN, VAPB and ASNA1 are supported by various sources of data to be involved in PD. We show that these genes are reported to be within a protein–protein interaction network with PD genes and that they contain additional rare, case-specific, mutations in our independent cohort of PD cases. Our results support the involvement of these three genes in PD and suggest that testing for de novo mutations in sporadic disease may aid in the identification of novel disease-causing genes. PMID:26362251

  7. Exome Sequencing Identifies INPPL1 Mutations as a Cause of Opsismodysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Céline; Faqeih, Eissa Ali; Bartholdi, Deborah; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Borochowitz, Zvi; Cavalcanti, Denise P.; Frigo, Amandine; Nitschke, Patrick; Roume, Joelle; Santos, Heloísa G.; Shalev, Stavit A.; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Delezoide, Anne-Lise; Le Merrer, Martine; Munnich, Arnold; Cormier-Daire, Valérie

    2013-01-01

    Opsismodysplasia (OPS) is a severe autosomal-recessive chondrodysplasia characterized by pre- and postnatal micromelia with extremely short hands and feet. The main radiological features are severe platyspondyly, squared metacarpals, delayed skeletal ossification, and metaphyseal cupping. In order to identify mutations causing OPS, a total of 16 cases (7 terminated pregnancies and 9 postnatal cases) from 10 unrelated families were included in this study. We performed exome sequencing in three cases from three unrelated families and only one gene was found to harbor mutations in all three cases: inositol polyphosphate phosphatase-like 1 (INPPL1). Screening INPPL1 in the remaining cases identified a total of 12 distinct INPPL1 mutations in the 10 families, present at the homozygote state in 7 consanguinous families and at the compound heterozygote state in the 3 remaining families. Most mutations (6/12) resulted in premature stop codons, 2/12 were splice site, and 4/12 were missense mutations located in the catalytic domain, 5-phosphatase. INPPL1 belongs to the inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate 5-phosphatase family, a family of signal-modulating enzymes that govern a plethora of cellular functions by regulating the levels of specific phosphoinositides. Our finding of INPPL1 mutations in OPS, a severe spondylodysplastic dysplasia with major growth plate disorganization, supports a key and specific role of this enzyme in endochondral ossification. PMID:23273569

  8. A genetic pedigree analysis to identify gene mutations involved in femoral head necrosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Pan, Hehai; Zhu, Zhen-An

    2014-10-01

    The present study presents results from a linkage and mutation screening analysis aiming to identify the causative gene of femoral head necrosis, also known as osteonecrosis of femoral head (ONFH), in a Chinese pedigree. We collected clinical data on the osteonecrosis pedigree, and extracted blood and genomic DNA from the family members. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct sequencing allowed to identify a mutation in the COL2A1 gene of the proband; the clinical manifestations of the proband meet the criteria for osteonecrosis. The exons of COL2A1 were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and mutation screening was conducted by direct sequencing in all the family members. The locus was also sequenced in 50 unrelated healthy controls. The c.3665G>A heterozygous mutation was detected in patients of the pedigree, but not in healthy individuals. We conclude that a mutation in the COL2A1 gene is the causative agent of ONFH in this family. Therefore, this mutation may be associated with osteonecrosis in Chinese populations.

  9. Whole-exome sequencing to identify somatic mutations in peritoneal metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yu; Li, Tingting; Huang, Haipeng; Lin, Tian; Hu, Yanfeng; Qi, Xiaolong; Yu, Jiang; Li, Guoxin

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal metastasis occurs in more than half of patients with unresectable or recurrent gastric cancer and is associated with the worst prognosis. The associated genomic events and pathogenesis remain ambiguous. The aim of the present study was to characterize the mutation spectrum of gastric cancer with peritoneal metastasis and provide a basis for the identification of new biomarkers and treatment targets. Matched pairs of normal gastric mucosa and peritoneal tissue and matched pairs of primary tumor and peritoneal metastasis were collected from one patient for whole-exome sequencing (WES); Sanger sequencing was employed to confirm the somatic mutations. G>A and C>T mutations were the two most frequent transversions among the somatic mutations. We confirmed 48somatic mutations in the primary site and 49 in the peritoneal site. Additionally, 25 non-synonymous somatic variations (single-nucleotide variants, SNVs) and 2 somatic insertions/deletions (INDELs) were confirmed in the primary tumor, and 30 SNVs and 5 INDELs were verified in the peritoneal metastasis. Approximately 59% of the somatic mutations were shared between the primary and metastatic site. Five genes (TP53, BAI1, THSD1, ARID2, and KIAA2022) verified in our study were also mutated at a frequency greater than 5%in the COSMIC database. We also identified 9genes (ERBB4, ZNF721, NT5E, PDE10A, CA1, NUMB, NBN, ZFYVE16, and NCAM1) that were only mutated in metastasis and are expected to become treatment targets. In conclusion, we observed that the majority of the somatic mutations in the primary site persisted in metastasis, whereas several single-nucleotide polymorphisms occurred de novo at the second site. PMID:27270314

  10. Mutations in the Kinase Domain of the HER2/ERBB2 Gene Identified in a Wide Variety of Human Cancers.

    PubMed

    Wen, Wenhsiang; Chen, Wangjuh Sting; Xiao, Nick; Bender, Ryan; Ghazalpour, Anatole; Tan, Zheng; Swensen, Jeffrey; Millis, Sherri Z; Basu, Gargi; Gatalica, Zoran; Press, Michael F

    2015-09-01

    The HER2 (official name ERBB2) gene encodes a membrane receptor in the epidermal growth factor receptor family amplified and overexpressed in adenocarcinoma. Activating mutations also occur in several cancers. We report mutation analyses of the HER2 kinase domain in 7497 histologically diverse cancers. Forty-five genes, including the kinase domain of HER2 with HER2 IHC and dual in situ hybridization, were analyzed in tumors from 7497 patients with cancer, including 850 breast, 770 colorectal, 910 non-small cell lung, 823 uterine or cervical, 1372 ovarian, and 297 pancreatic cancers, as well as 323 melanomas and 2152 other solid tumors. Sixty-nine HER2 kinase domain mutations were identified in tumors from 68 patients (approximately 1% of all cases, ranging from absent in sarcomas to 4% in urothelial cancers), which included previously published activating mutations and 13 novel mutations. Fourteen cases with coexisting HER2 mutation and amplification and/or overexpression were identified. Fifty-two of 68 patients had additional mutations in other analyzed genes, whereas 16 patients (23%) had HER2 mutations identified as the sole driver mutation. HER2 mutations coexisted with HER2 gene amplification and overexpression and with mutations in other functionally important genes. HER2 mutations were identified as the only driver mutation in a significant proportion of solid cancers. Evaluation of anti-HER2 therapies in nonamplified, HER2-mutated cancers is warranted.

  11. Linkage study and exome sequencing identify a BDP1 mutation associated with hereditary hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Girotto, Giorgia; Abdulhadi, Khalid; Buniello, Annalisa; Vozzi, Diego; Licastro, Danilo; d'Eustacchio, Angela; Vuckovic, Dragana; Alkowari, Moza Khalifa; Steel, Karen P; Badii, Ramin; Gasparini, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Nonsyndromic Hereditary Hearing Loss is a common disorder accounting for at least 60% of prelingual deafness. GJB2 gene mutations, GJB6 deletion, and the A1555G mitochondrial mutation play a major role worldwide in causing deafness, but there is a high degree of genetic heterogeneity and many genes involved in deafness have not yet been identified. Therefore, there remains a need to search for new causative mutations. In this study, a combined strategy using both linkage analysis and sequencing identified a new mutation causing hearing loss. Linkage analysis identified a region of 40 Mb on chromosome 5q13 (LOD score 3.8) for which exome sequencing data revealed a mutation (c.7873 T>G leading to p.*2625Gluext*11) in the BDP1 gene (B double prime 1, subunit of RNA polymerase III transcription initiation factor IIIB) in patients from a consanguineous Qatari family of second degree, showing bilateral, post-lingual, sensorineural moderate to severe hearing impairment. The mutation disrupts the termination codon of the transcript resulting in an elongation of 11 residues of the BDP1 protein. This elongation does not contain any known motif and is not conserved across species. Immunohistochemistry studies carried out in the mouse inner ear showed Bdp1 expression within the endothelial cells in the stria vascularis, as well as in mesenchyme-derived cells surrounding the cochlear duct. The identification of the BDP1 mutation increases our knowledge of the molecular bases of Nonsyndromic Hereditary Hearing Loss and provides new opportunities for the diagnosis and treatment of this disease in the Qatari population.

  12. Exome sequencing of hepatocellular carcinomas identifies new mutational signatures and potential therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Kornelius; Imbeaud, Sandrine; Letouzé, Eric; Alexandrov, Ludmil B; Calderaro, Julien; Rebouissou, Sandra; Couchy, Gabrielle; Meiller, Clément; Shinde, Jayendra; Soysouvanh, Frederic; Calatayud, Anna-Line; Pinyol, Roser; Pelletier, Laura; Balabaud, Charles; Laurent, Alexis; Blanc, Jean-Frederic; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; Calvo, Fabien; Villanueva, Augusto; Nault, Jean-Charles; Bioulac-Sage, Paulette; Stratton, Michael R; Llovet, Josep M; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica

    2015-05-01

    Genomic analyses promise to improve tumor characterization to optimize personalized treatment for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Exome sequencing analysis of 243 liver tumors identified mutational signatures associated with specific risk factors, mainly combined alcohol and tobacco consumption and exposure to aflatoxin B1. We identified 161 putative driver genes associated with 11 recurrently altered pathways. Associations of mutations defined 3 groups of genes related to risk factors and centered on CTNNB1 (alcohol), TP53 (hepatitis B virus, HBV) and AXIN1. Analyses according to tumor stage progression identified TERT promoter mutation as an early event, whereas FGF3, FGF4, FGF19 or CCND1 amplification and TP53 and CDKN2A alterations appeared at more advanced stages in aggressive tumors. In 28% of the tumors, we identified genetic alterations potentially targetable by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs. In conclusion, we identified risk factor-specific mutational signatures and defined the extensive landscape of altered genes and pathways in HCC, which will be useful to design clinical trials for targeted therapy.

  13. Exome sequencing of hepatocellular carcinomas identifies new mutational signatures and potential therapeutic targets

    SciTech Connect

    Schulze, Kornelius; Imbeaud, Sandrine; Letouzé, Eric; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Calderaro, Julien; Rebouissou, Sandra; Couchy, Gabrielle; Meiller, Clément; Shinde, Jayendra; Soysouvanh, Frederic; Calatayud, Anna-Line; Pinyol, Roser; Pelletier, Laura; Balabaud, Charles; Laurent, Alexis; Blanc, Jean-Frederic; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; Calvo, Fabien; Villanueva, Augusto; Nault, Jean-Charles; Bioulac-Sage, Paulette; Stratton, Michael R.; Llovet, Josep M.; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica

    2015-03-30

    Our genomic analyses promise to improve tumor characterization to optimize personalized treatment for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Exome sequencing analysis of 243 liver tumors identified mutational signatures associated with specific risk factors, mainly combined alcohol and tobacco consumption and exposure to aflatoxin B1. We identified 161 putative driver genes associated with 11 recurrently altered pathways. Associations of mutations defined 3 groups of genes related to risk factors and centered on CTNNB1 (alcohol), TP53 (hepatitis B virus, HBV) and AXIN1. These analyses according to tumor stage progression identified TERT promoter mutation as an early event, whereasFGF3, FGF4, FGF19 or CCND1 amplification and TP53 and CDKN2A alterations appeared at more advanced stages in aggressive tumors. In 28% of the tumors, we identified genetic alterations potentially targetable by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)–approved drugs. Finally, we identified risk factor–specific mutational signatures and defined the extensive landscape of altered genes and pathways in HCC, which will be useful to design clinical trials for targeted therapy.

  14. Exome sequencing of hepatocellular carcinomas identifies new mutational signatures and potential therapeutic targets

    DOE PAGES

    Schulze, Kornelius; Imbeaud, Sandrine; Letouzé, Eric; ...

    2015-03-30

    Our genomic analyses promise to improve tumor characterization to optimize personalized treatment for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Exome sequencing analysis of 243 liver tumors identified mutational signatures associated with specific risk factors, mainly combined alcohol and tobacco consumption and exposure to aflatoxin B1. We identified 161 putative driver genes associated with 11 recurrently altered pathways. Associations of mutations defined 3 groups of genes related to risk factors and centered on CTNNB1 (alcohol), TP53 (hepatitis B virus, HBV) and AXIN1. These analyses according to tumor stage progression identified TERT promoter mutation as an early event, whereasFGF3, FGF4, FGF19 or CCND1more » amplification and TP53 and CDKN2A alterations appeared at more advanced stages in aggressive tumors. In 28% of the tumors, we identified genetic alterations potentially targetable by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)–approved drugs. Finally, we identified risk factor–specific mutational signatures and defined the extensive landscape of altered genes and pathways in HCC, which will be useful to design clinical trials for targeted therapy.« less

  15. Whole-exome sequencing identifies somatic ATRX mutations in pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas.

    PubMed

    Fishbein, Lauren; Khare, Sanika; Wubbenhorst, Bradley; DeSloover, Daniel; D'Andrea, Kurt; Merrill, Shana; Cho, Nam Woo; Greenberg, Roger A; Else, Tobias; Montone, Kathleen; LiVolsi, Virginia; Fraker, Douglas; Daber, Robert; Cohen, Debbie L; Nathanson, Katherine L

    2015-01-21

    Pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas (PCC/PGL) are the solid tumour type most commonly associated with an inherited susceptibility syndrome. However, very little is known about the somatic genetic changes leading to tumorigenesis or malignant transformation. Here we perform whole-exome sequencing on a discovery set of 21 PCC/PGL and identify somatic ATRX mutations in two SDHB-associated tumours. Targeted sequencing of a separate validation set of 103 PCC/PGL identifies somatic ATRX mutations in 12.6% of PCC/PGL. PCC/PGL with somatic ATRX mutations are associated with alternative lengthening of telomeres and clinically aggressive behaviour. This finding suggests that loss of ATRX, an SWI/SNF chromatin remodelling protein, is important in the development of clinically aggressive PCC/PGL.

  16. New real-time-PCR method to identify single point mutations in hepatitis C virus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qian; Belmonte, Irene; Buti, Maria; Nieto, Leonardo; Garcia-Cehic, Damir; Gregori, Josep; Perales, Celia; Ordeig, Laura; Llorens, Meritxell; Soria, Maria Eugenia; Esteban, Rafael; Esteban, Juan Ignacio; Rodriguez-Frias, Francisco; Quer, Josep

    2016-01-01

    AIM To develop a fast, low-cost diagnostic strategy to identify single point mutations in highly variable genomes such as hepatitis C virus (HCV). METHODS In patients with HCV infection, resistance-associated amino acid substitutions within the viral quasispecies prior to therapy can confer decreased susceptibility to direct-acting antiviral agents and lead to treatment failure and virological relapse. One such naturally occurring mutation is the Q80K substitution in the HCV-NS3 protease gene, which confers resistance to PI inhibitors, particularly simeprevir. Low-cost, highly sensitive techniques enabling routine detection of these single point mutations would be useful to identify patients at a risk of treatment failure. LightCycler methods, based on real-time PCR with sequence-specific probe hybridization, have been implemented in most diagnostic laboratories. However, this technique cannot identify single point mutations in highly variable genetic environments, such as the HCV genome. To circumvent this problem, we developed a new method to homogenize all nucleotides present in a region except the point mutation of interest. RESULTS Using nucleotide-specific probes Q, K, and R substitutions at position 80 were clearly identified at a sensitivity of 10% (mutations present at a frequency of at least 10% were detected). The technique was successfully applied to identify the Q80K substitution in 240 HCV G1 serum samples, with performance comparable to that of direct Sanger sequencing, the current standard procedure for this purpose. The new method was then validated in a Catalonian population of 202 HCV G1-infected individuals. Q80K was detected in 14.6% of G1a patients and 0% of G1b in our setting. CONCLUSION A fast, low-cost diagnostic strategy based on real-time PCR and fluorescence resonance energy transfer probe melting curve analysis has been successfully developed to identify single point mutations in highly variable genomes such as hepatitis C virus. This

  17. A strategy to identify de novo mutations in common disorders such as autism and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Julie, Gauthier; Hamdan, Fadi F; Rouleau, Guy A

    2011-06-15

    mutation rate. Finally, the effects of paternal age: there is a significantly increased risk of the disease with increasing paternal age, which could result from the age related increase in paternal de novo mutations. This is the case for autism and schizophrenia(3). The male-to-female ratio of mutation rate is estimated at about 4-6:1, presumably due to a higher number of germ-cell divisions with age in males. Therefore, one would predict that de novo mutations would more frequently come from males, particularly older males(4). A high rate of new mutations may in part explain why genetic studies have so far failed to identify many genes predisposing to complexes diseases genes, such as autism and schizophrenia, and why diseases have been identified for a mere 3% of genes in the human genome. Identification for de novo mutations as a cause of a disease requires a targeted molecular approach, which includes studying parents and affected subjects. The process for determining if the genetic basis of a disease may result in part from de novo mutations and the molecular approach to establish this link will be illustrated, using autism and schizophrenia as examples.

  18. Identifying functional defects in patients with immune dysregulation due to LRBA and CTLA-4 mutations.

    PubMed

    Hou, Tie Zheng; Verma, Nisha; Wanders, Jennifer; Kennedy, Alan; Soskic, Blagoje; Janman, Daniel; Halliday, Neil; Rowshanravan, Behzad; Worth, Austen; Qasim, Waseem; Baxendale, Helen; Stauss, Hans; Seneviratne, Suranjith; Neth, Olaf; Olbrich, Peter; Hambleton, Sophie; Arkwright, Peter D; Burns, Siobhan O; Walker, Lucy S K; Sansom, David M

    2017-03-16

    Heterozygous CTLA-4 deficiency has been reported as a monogenic cause of common variable immune deficiency with features of immune dysregulation. Direct mutation in CTLA-4 leads to defective regulatory T-cell (Treg) function associated with impaired ability to control levels of the CTLA-4 ligands, CD80 and CD86. However, additional mutations affecting the CTLA-4 pathway, such as those recently reported for LRBA, indirectly affect CTLA-4 expression, resulting in clinically similar disorders. Robust phenotyping approaches sensitive to defects in the CTLA-4 pathway are therefore required to inform understanding of such immune dysregulation syndromes. Here, we describe assays capable of distinguishing a variety of defects in the CTLA-4 pathway. Assessing total CTLA-4 expression levels was found to be optimal when restricting analysis to the CD45RA(-)Foxp3(+) fraction. CTLA-4 induction following stimulation, and the use of lysosomal-blocking compounds, distinguished CTLA-4 from LRBA mutations. Short-term T-cell stimulation improved the capacity for discriminating the Foxp3(+) Treg compartment, clearly revealing Treg expansions in these disorders. Finally, we developed a functionally orientated assay to measure ligand uptake by CTLA-4, which is sensitive to ligand-binding or -trafficking mutations, that would otherwise be difficult to detect and that is appropriate for testing novel mutations in CTLA-4 pathway genes. These approaches are likely to be of value in interpreting the functional significance of mutations in the CTLA-4 pathway identified by gene-sequencing approaches.

  19. The sensitivity of exome sequencing in identifying pathogenic mutations for LGMD in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Hemakumar M.; Cho, Kyung-Ah; Lek, Monkol; Estrella, Elicia; Valkanas, Elise; Jones, Michael D.; Mitsuhashi, Satomi; Darras, Basil T.; Amato, Anthony A.; Lidov, Hart G.W.; Brownstein, Catherine A.; Margulies, David M.; Yu, Timothy W.; Salih, Mustafa A.; Kunkel, Louis M.; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Kang, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    The current study characterizes a cohort of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) in the United States using whole exome sequencing. Fifty-five families affected by LGMD were recruited using an institutionally-approved protocol. Exome sequencing was performed on probands and selected parental samples. Pathogenic mutations and co-segregation patterns were confirmed by Sanger sequencing. Twenty-two families (40%) had novel and previously reported pathogenic mutations, primarily in LGMD genes, but also in genes for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy, congenital myopathy, myofibrillar myopathy, inclusion body myopathy, and Pompe disease. One family was diagnosed via clinical testing. Dominant mutations were identified in COL6A1, COL6A3, FLNC, LMNA, RYR1, SMCHD1, and VCP, recessive mutations in ANO5, CAPN3, GAA, LAMA2, SGCA, and SGCG, and X-linked mutations in DMD. A previously reported variant in DMD was confirmed to be benign. Exome sequencing is a powerful diagnostic tool for LGMD. Despite careful phenotypic screening, pathogenic mutations were found in other muscle disease genes, largely accounting for the increased sensitivity of exome sequencing. Our experience suggests that broad sequencing panels are useful for these analyses due to the phenotypic overlap of many neuromuscular conditions. The confirmation of a benign DMD variant illustrates the potential of exome sequencing to help determine pathogenicity. PMID:27708273

  20. Exome sequencing identifies MAX mutations as a cause of hereditary pheochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Comino-Méndez, Iñaki; Gracia-Aznárez, Francisco J; Schiavi, Francesca; Landa, Iñigo; Leandro-García, Luis J; Letón, Rocío; Honrado, Emiliano; Ramos-Medina, Rocío; Caronia, Daniela; Pita, Guillermo; Gómez-Graña, Alvaro; de Cubas, Aguirre A; Inglada-Pérez, Lucía; Maliszewska, Agnieszka; Taschin, Elisa; Bobisse, Sara; Pica, Giuseppe; Loli, Paola; Hernández-Lavado, Rafael; Díaz, José A; Gómez-Morales, Mercedes; González-Neira, Anna; Roncador, Giovanna; Rodríguez-Antona, Cristina; Benítez, Javier; Mannelli, Massimo; Opocher, Giuseppe; Robledo, Mercedes; Cascón, Alberto

    2011-06-19

    Hereditary pheochromocytoma (PCC) is often caused by germline mutations in one of nine susceptibility genes described to date, but there are familial cases without mutations in these known genes. We sequenced the exomes of three unrelated individuals with hereditary PCC (cases) and identified mutations in MAX, the MYC associated factor X gene. Absence of MAX protein in the tumors and loss of heterozygosity caused by uniparental disomy supported the involvement of MAX alterations in the disease. A follow-up study of a selected series of 59 cases with PCC identified five additional MAX mutations and suggested an association with malignant outcome and preferential paternal transmission of MAX mutations. The involvement of the MYC-MAX-MXD1 network in the development and progression of neural crest cell tumors is further supported by the lack of functional MAX in rat PCC (PC12) cells and by the amplification of MYCN in neuroblastoma and suggests that loss of MAX function is correlated with metastatic potential.

  1. Thirty-nine novel neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) gene mutations identified in Slovak patients.

    PubMed

    Nemethova, Martina; Bolcekova, Anna; Ilencikova, Denisa; Durovcikova, Darina; Hlinkova, Katarina; Hlavata, Anna; Kovacs, Laszlo; Kadasi, Ludevit; Zatkova, Andrea

    2013-09-01

    We performed a complex analysis of the neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) gene in Slovakia based on direct cDNA sequencing supplemented by multiple ligation dependent probe amplification (MLPA) analysis. All 108 patients had café-au-lait spots, 85% had axilary and/or inguinal freckling, 61% neurofibromas, 36% Lisch nodules of the iris and 31% optic pathway glioma, 5% suffered from typical skeletal disorders, and 51% of patients had family members with NF1. In 78 of the 86 (90.7%) index patients our analysis revealed the presence of NF1 mutations, 68 of which were small changes (87.2%), including 39 (50%) novel. Among the identified mutations the most prevalent were small deletions and insertions causing frameshift (42.3%), followed by nonsense (14.1%), missense (12.8%), and typical splicing (11.5%) mutations. Type 1 NF1 deletions and intragenic deletions/duplication were identified in five cases each (6.4%). Interestingly, in five other cases nontypical splicing variants were found, whose real effect on NF1 transcript would have remained undetected if using a DNA-based method alone, thus underlying the advantage of using the cDNA-based sequencing. We show that Slovak NF1 patients have a similar repertoire of NF1 germline mutations compared to other populations, with some prevalence of small deletions/insertions and a decreased proportion of nonsense mutations.

  2. Exome sequencing of hepatocellular carcinomas identifies new mutational signatures and potential therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrov, Ludmil B; Calderaro, Julien; Rebouissou, Sandra; Couchy, Gabrielle; Meiller, Clément; Shinde, Jayendra; Soysouvanh, Frederic; Calatayud, Anna-Line; Pinyol, Roser; Pelletier, Laura; Balabaud, Charles; Laurent, Alexis; Blanc, Jean-Frederic; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; Calvo, Fabien; Villanueva, Augusto; Nault, Jean-Charles; Bioulac-Sage, Paulette; Stratton, Michael R; Llovet, Josep M; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Genomic analyses promise to improve tumor characterization in order to optimize personalized treatment for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Exome sequencing analysis of 243 liver tumors revealed mutational signatures associated with specific risk factors, mainly combined alcohol/tobacco consumption, and aflatoxin B1. We identified 161 putative driver genes associated with 11 recurrent pathways. Associations of mutations defined 3 groups of genes related to risk factors and centered on CTNNB1 (alcohol), TP53 (HBV), and AXIN1. Analyses according to tumor stage progression revealed TERT promoter mutation as an early event whereas FGF3, FGF4, FGF19/CCND1 amplification, TP53 and CDKN2A alterations, appeared at more advanced stages in aggressive tumors. In 28% of the tumors we identified genetic alterations potentially targetable by FDA-approved drugs. In conclusion, we identified risk factor-specific mutational signatures and defined the extensive landscape of altered genes and pathways in HCC which will be useful to design clinical trials for targeted therapy. PMID:25822088

  3. CCR4 frameshift mutation identifies a distinct group of adult T cell leukaemia/lymphoma with poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Noriaki; Miyoshi, Hiroaki; Kato, Takeharu; Sakata-Yanagimoto, Mamiko; Niino, Daisuke; Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Moriuchi, Yukiyoshi; Miyahara, Masaharu; Kurita, Daisuke; Sasaki, Yuya; Shimono, Joji; Kawamoto, Keisuke; Utsunomiya, Atae; Imaizumi, Yoshitaka; Seto, Masao; Ohshima, Koichi

    2016-04-01

    Adult T cell leukaemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is an intractable T cell neoplasm caused by human T cell leukaemia virus type 1. Next-generation sequencing-based comprehensive mutation studies have revealed recurrent somatic CCR4 mutations in ATLL, although clinicopathological findings associated with CCR4 mutations remain to be delineated. In the current study, 184 cases of peripheral T cell lymphoma, including 113 cases of ATLL, were subjected to CCR4 mutation analysis. This sequence analysis identified mutations in 27% (30/113) of cases of ATLL and 9% (4/44) of cases of peripheral T cell lymphoma not otherwise specified. Identified mutations included nonsense (NS) and frameshift (FS) mutations. No significant differences in clinicopathological findings were observed between ATLL cases stratified by presence of CCR4 mutation. All ATLL cases with CCR4 mutations exhibited cell-surface CCR4 positivity. Semi-quantitative CCR4 protein analysis of immunohistochemical sections revealed higher CCR4 expression in cases with NS mutations of CCR4 than in cases with wild-type (WT) CCR4. Furthermore, among ATLL cases, FS mutation was significantly associated with a poor prognosis, compared with NS mutation and WT CCR4. These results suggest that CCR4 mutation is an important determinant of the clinical course in ATLL cases, and that NS and FS mutations of CCR4 behave differently with respect to ATLL pathophysiology.

  4. Novel Carboxypeptidase A6 (CPA6) Mutations Identified in Patients with Juvenile Myoclonic and Generalized Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Sapio, Matthew R.; Vessaz, Monique; Thomas, Pierre; Genton, Pierre; Fricker, Lloyd D.; Salzmann, Annick

    2015-01-01

    Carboxypeptidase A6 (CPA6) is a peptidase that removes C-terminal hydrophobic amino acids from peptides and proteins. The CPA6 gene is expressed in the brains of humans and animals, with high levels of expression during development. It is translated with a prodomain (as proCPA6), which is removed before secretion. The active form of CPA6 binds tightly to the extracellular matrix (ECM) where it is thought to function in the processing of peptides and proteins. Mutations in the CPA6 gene have been identified in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and febrile seizures. In the present study, we screened for CPA6 mutations in patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy and identified two novel missense mutations: Arg36His and Asn271Ser. Patients harboring these mutations also presented with generalized epilepsy. Neither of the novel mutations was found in a control population. Asn271 is highly conserved in CPA6 and other related metallocarboxypeptidases. Arg36 is present in the prodomain and is not highly conserved. To assess structural consequences of the amino acid substitutions, both mutants were modeled within the predicted structure of the enzyme. To examine the effects of these mutations on enzyme expression and activity, we expressed the mutated enzymes in human embryonic kidney 293T cells. These analyses revealed that Asn271Ser abolished enzymatic activity, while Arg36His led to a ~50% reduction in CPA6 levels in the ECM. Pulse-chase using radio-labeled amino acids was performed to follow secretion. Newly-synthesized CPA6 appeared in the ECM with peak levels between 2-8 hours. There was no major difference in time course between wild-type and mutant forms, although the amount of radiolabeled CPA6 in the ECM was lower for the mutants. Our experiments demonstrate that these mutations in CPA6 are deleterious and provide further evidence for the involvement of CPA6 mutations in the predisposition for several types of epilepsy. PMID:25875328

  5. First case of L1CAM gene mutation identified in MASA syndrome in Asia.

    PubMed

    Kanemura, Yonehiro; Takuma, Yuuichi; Kamiguchi, Hiroyuki; Yamasaki, Mami

    2005-06-01

    We report here the first case of an L1CAM gene mutation identified in mental retardation, adducted thumbs, shuffling gait, and aphasia (MASA) syndrome in Japan. The patient was a 10-year-old boy with mild mental retardation, bilateral adducted thumbs and corpus callosum hypoplasia. His family had no history of MASA syndrome. The L1CAM gene contained a nonsense mutation (R1166X) in exon 26 in the cytoplasmic domain. No mutation was found in the extracellular and transmembrane domains of L1CAM. The abnormal development of axon tracts resulting in the corpus callosum hypoplasia and adducted thumbs appears to be caused by malfunction of the cytoplasmic domain of L1CAM.

  6. Newly identified paired box 6 mutation of variant familial aniridia: Congenital iris ectropion with foveal hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woo Jin; Kim, Jong Ha; Cho, Nam Chun

    2017-01-01

    Congenital aniridia is a kind of eye disease characterized by complete or partial hypoplasia of the iris and is associated with other ocular anomalies including corneal opacity, glaucoma, and foveal hypoplasia. Heterozygous mutation of paired box 6 (PAX6) gene was identified in most cases of aniridia, with iatrogenic mutations accounting for about two-third of the cases and chromosomal rearrangements accounting for the other one-third. We report rare cases of variant aniridia, congenital iris ectropion associated with foveal hypoplasia in both a woman and her son with a mutation of PAX6 gene. To our knowledge, deletion c. 936delC in exon 8 of PAX6 gene has not been reported until now. PMID:28300742

  7. Mutations in TLR/MYD88 pathway identify a subset of young chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients with favorable outcome.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Trillos, Alejandra; Pinyol, Magda; Navarro, Alba; Aymerich, Marta; Jares, Pedro; Juan, Manel; Rozman, María; Colomer, Dolors; Delgado, Julio; Giné, Eva; González-Díaz, Marcos; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M; Colado, Enrique; Rayón, Consolación; Payer, Angel R; Terol, Maria José; Navarro, Blanca; Quesada, Victor; Puente, Xosé S; Rozman, Ciril; López-Otín, Carlos; Campo, Elías; López-Guillermo, Armando; Villamor, Neus

    2014-06-12

    Mutations in Toll-like receptor (TLR) and myeloid differentiation primary response 88 (MYD88) genes have been found in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) at low frequency. We analyzed the incidence, clinicobiological characteristics, and outcome of patients with TLR/MYD88 mutations in 587 CLL patients. Twenty-three patients (3.9%) had mutations, 19 in MYD88 (one with concurrent IRAK1 mutation), 2 TLR2 (one with concomitant TLR6 mutation), 1 IRAK1, and 1 TLR5. No mutations were found in IRAK2 and IRAK4. TLR/MYD88-mutated CLL overexpressed genes of the nuclear factor κB pathway. Patients with TLR/MYD88 mutations were significantly younger (83% age ≤50 years) than those with no mutations. TLR/MYD88 mutations were the most frequent in young patients. Patients with mutated TLR/MYD88 CLL had a higher frequency of mutated IGHV and low expression of CD38 and ZAP-70. Overall survival (OS) was better in TLR/MYD88-mutated than unmutated patients in the whole series (10-year OS, 100% vs 62%; P = .002), and in the subset of patients age ≤50 years (100% vs 70%; P = .02). In addition, relative OS of TLR/MYD88-mutated patients was similar to that in the age- and gender-matched population. In summary, TLR/MYD88 mutations identify a population of young CLL patients with favorable outcome.

  8. Potential ligand-binding residues in rat olfactory receptors identified by correlated mutation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, M. S.; Oliveira, L.; Vriend, G.; Shepherd, G. M.

    1995-01-01

    A family of G-protein-coupled receptors is believed to mediate the recognition of odor molecules. In order to identify potential ligand-binding residues, we have applied correlated mutation analysis to receptor sequences from the rat. This method identifies pairs of sequence positions where residues remain conserved or mutate in tandem, thereby suggesting structural or functional importance. The analysis supported molecular modeling studies in suggesting several residues in positions that were consistent with ligand-binding function. Two of these positions, dominated by histidine residues, may play important roles in ligand binding and could confer broad specificity to mammalian odor receptors. The presence of positive (overdominant) selection at some of the identified positions provides additional evidence for roles in ligand binding. Higher-order groups of correlated residues were also observed. Each group may interact with an individual ligand determinant, and combinations of these groups may provide a multi-dimensional mechanism for receptor diversity.

  9. Two novel SRY missense mutations reducing DNA binding identified in XY females and their mosaic fathers

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt-Ney, M.; Scherer, G.; Thiele, H.; KaltwaBer, P.; Bardoni, B.; Cisternino, M.

    1995-04-01

    Two novel mutations in the sex-determining gene SRY were identified by screening DNA from 30 sex-reversed XY females by using the SSCP assay. Both point mutations lead to an amino acid substitution in the DNA-binding high-mobility-group domain of the SRY protein. The first mutation, changing a serine at position 91 to glycine, was found in a sporadic case. The second mutation, leading to replacement of a highly conserved proline at position 125 with leucine, is shared by three members of the same family, two sisters and a half sister having the same father. The mutant SRY proteins showed reduced DNA-binding ability in a gel-shift assay. Analysis of lymphocyte DNA from the respective fathers revealed that they carry both the wild-type and the mutant version of the SRY gene. The fact that both fathers transmitted the mutant SRY copy to their offspring implies that they are mosaic for the SRY gene in testis as well as in blood, as a result of a mutation during early embryonic development. 30 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Newborn Screening Quality Assurance Program for CFTR Mutation Detection and Gene Sequencing to Identify Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Hendrix, Miyono M.; Foster, Stephanie L.; Cordovado, Suzanne K.

    2016-01-01

    All newborn screening laboratories in the United States and many worldwide screen for cystic fibrosis. Most laboratories use a second-tier genotyping assay to identify a panel of mutations in the CF transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Newborn Screening Quality Assurance Program houses a dried blood spot repository of samples containing CFTR mutations to assist newborn screening laboratories and ensure high-quality mutation detection in a high-throughput environment. Recently, CFTR mutation detection has increased in complexity with expanded genotyping panels and gene sequencing. To accommodate the growing quality assurance needs, the repository samples were characterized with several multiplex genotyping methods, Sanger sequencing, and 3 next-generation sequencing assays using a high-throughput, low-concentration DNA extraction method. The samples performed well in all of the assays, providing newborn screening laboratories with a resource for complex CFTR mutation detection and next-generation sequencing as they transition to new methods. PMID:28261631

  11. Whole exome sequencing identified novel CRB1 mutations in Chinese and Indian populations with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yin; Yang, Yeming; Huang, Lulin; Zhai, Yaru; Li, Jie; Jiang, Zhilin; Gong, Bo; Fang, Hao; Kim, Ramasamy; Yang, Zhenglin; Sundaresan, Periasamy; Zhu, Xianjun; Zhou, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a leading cause of inherited blindness characterized by progressive degeneration of the retinal photoreceptor cells. This study aims to identify genetic mutations in a Chinese family RP-2236, an Indian family RP-IC-90 and 100 sporadic Indian individuals with autosomal recessive RP (arRP). Whole exome sequencing was performed on the index patients of RP-2236, RP-IC-90 and all of the 100 sporadic Indian patients. Direct Sanger sequencing was used to validate the mutations identified. Four novel mutations and one reported mutation in the crumbs homolog 1 (CRB1) gene, which has been known to cause severe retinal dystrophies, were identified. A novel homozygous splicing mutation c.2129-1G>C was found in the three patients In family RP-2236. A homozygous point mutation p.R664C was found in RP-IC-90. A novel homozygous mutation p.G1310C was identified in patient I-44, while novel compound heterozygous mutations p.N629D and p.A593T were found in patient I-7. All mutations described above were not present in the 1000 normal controls. In conclusion, we identified four novel mutations in CRB1 in a cohort of RP patients from the Chinese and Indian populations. Our data enlarges the CRB1 mutation spectrums and may provide new target loci for RP diagnose and treatment. PMID:27670293

  12. Functional studies of a novel germline p53 splicing mutation identified in a patient with Li-Fraumeni-like syndrome.

    PubMed

    Piao, Jinhua; Sakurai, Naoto; Iwamoto, Shotaro; Nishioka, Junji; Nakatani, Kaname; Komada, Yoshihiro; Mizutani, Shuki; Takagi, Masatoshi

    2013-10-01

    Most p53 mutations identified in Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) are missense mutations; splicing mutations have rarely been reported. A novel splicing p53 mutation was identified in a patient with Li-Fraumeni-like syndrome (LFL). Usually, p53 missense mutants identified in LFS and cancer cells function as dominant negative mutations interfering with wild-type p53 function. However, the mechanism by which p53 haploinsufficiency causes carcinogenesis is not well characterized. In this study, we describe a novel splicing mutation that results in the loss-of-function of p53. These findings suggest a linkage between the loss-of-function type p53 mutation and a LFL phenotype.

  13. Pathogenic mutations in TULP1 responsible for retinitis pigmentosa identified in consanguineous familial cases

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, Inayat; Kabir, Firoz; Iqbal, Muhammad; Gottsch, Clare Brooks S.; Naeem, Muhammad Asif; Assir, Muhammad Zaman; Khan, Shaheen N.; Akram, Javed; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Ayyagari, Radha; Hejtmancik, J. Fielding

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To identify pathogenic mutations responsible for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) in consanguineous familial cases. Methods Seven large familial cases with multiple individuals diagnosed with retinitis pigmentosa were included in the study. Affected individuals in these families underwent ophthalmic examinations to document the symptoms and confirm the initial diagnosis. Blood samples were collected from all participating members, and genomic DNA was extracted. An exclusion analysis with microsatellite markers spanning the TULP1 locus on chromosome 6p was performed, and two-point logarithm of odds (LOD) scores were calculated. All coding exons along with the exon–intron boundaries of TULP1 were sequenced bidirectionally. We constructed a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) haplotype for the four familial cases harboring the K489R allele and estimated the likelihood of a founder effect. Results The ophthalmic examinations of the affected individuals in these familial cases were suggestive of RP. Exclusion analyses confirmed linkage to chromosome 6p harboring TULP1 with positive two-point LOD scores. Subsequent Sanger sequencing identified the single base pair substitution in exon14, c.1466A>G (p.K489R), in four families. Additionally, we identified a two-base deletion in exon 4, c.286_287delGA (p.E96Gfs77*); a homozygous splice site variant in intron 14, c.1495+4A>C; and a novel missense variation in exon 15, c.1561C>T (p.P521S). All mutations segregated with the disease phenotype in the respective families and were absent in ethnically matched control chromosomes. Haplotype analysis suggested (p<10−6) that affected individuals inherited the causal mutation from a common ancestor. Conclusions Pathogenic mutations in TULP1 are responsible for the RP phenotype in seven familial cases with a common ancestral mutation responsible for the disease phenotype in four of the seven families. PMID:27440997

  14. Sequencing EVC and EVC2 identifies mutations in two-thirds of Ellis-van Creveld syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Tompson, Stuart W J; Ruiz-Perez, Victor L; Blair, Helen J; Barton, Stephanie; Navarro, Victoria; Robson, Joanne L; Wright, Michael J; Goodship, Judith A

    2007-01-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC) is caused by mutations in EVC and EVC2, genes in a divergent orientation separated by only 2.6 kb. We systematically sought mutations in both genes in a panel of 65 affected individuals to assess the proportion of cases resulting from mutations in each gene. We PCR amplified and sequenced the coding exons of both genes. We investigated mutations that could affect splicing by in vitro splicing assays and cDNA analysis. We have identified EVC mutations in 20 cases (31%); in all of these we have detected the mutation on each allele. We have identified EVC2 mutations in 25 cases (38%); in 22 of these we have isolated a mutation on each allele. The majority of the mutations introduce a premature termination codon. We sequenced the region between the two genes in 10 of the 20 cases in which we had not identified a mutation in either gene, revealing only one SNP that was not a common polymorphism. As we have not identified mutations in either gene in 20 cases (31%) it is possible that there is further genetic heterogeneity.

  15. C9ORF72 repeat expansions in cases with previously identified pathogenic mutations

    PubMed Central

    van Blitterswijk, Marka; Baker, Matthew C.; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Ghidoni, Roberta; Benussi, Luisa; Finger, Elizabeth; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek R.; Kelley, Brendan J.; Murray, Melissa E.; Rutherford, Nicola J.; Brown, Patricia E.; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Mullen, Bianca; Ash, Peter E.A.; Bieniek, Kevin F.; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Karydas, Anna; Wood, Elisabeth McCarty; Coppola, Giovanni; Bigio, Eileen H.; Lippa, Carol; Strong, Michael J.; Beach, Thomas G.; Knopman, David S.; Huey, Edward D.; Mesulam, Marsel; Bird, Thomas; White, Charles L.; Kertesz, Andrew; Geschwind, Dan H.; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Binetti, Giuliano; Miller, Bruce L.; Petrucelli, Leonard; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Boylan, Kevin B.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Mackenzie, Ian R.; Boeve, Bradley F.; Dickson, Dennis W.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To identify potential genetic modifiers contributing to the phenotypic variability that is detected in patients with repeat expansions in chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9ORF72), we investigated the frequency of these expansions in a cohort of 334 subjects previously found to carry mutations in genes known to be associated with a spectrum of neurodegenerative diseases. Methods: A 2-step protocol, with a fluorescent PCR and a repeat-primed PCR, was used to determine the presence of hexanucleotide expansions in C9ORF72. For one double mutant, we performed Southern blots to assess expansion sizes, and immunohistochemistry to characterize neuropathology. Results: We detected C9ORF72 repeat expansions in 4 of 334 subjects (1.2% [or 1.8% of 217 families]). All these subjects had behavioral phenotypes and also harbored well-known pathogenic mutations in either progranulin (GRN: p.C466LfsX46, p.R493X, p.C31LfsX35) or microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT: p.P301L). Southern blotting of one double mutant with a p.C466LfsX46 GRN mutation demonstrated a long repeat expansion in brain (>3,000 repeats), and immunohistochemistry showed mixed neuropathology with characteristics of both C9ORF72 expansions and GRN mutations. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that co-occurrence of 2 evidently pathogenic mutations could contribute to the pleiotropy that is detected in patients with C9ORF72 repeat expansions. These findings suggest that patients with known mutations should not be excluded from further studies, and that genetic counselors should be aware of this phenomenon when advising patients and their family members. PMID:24027057

  16. Abnormal expression and dysfunction of novel SGLT2 mutations identified in familial renal glucosuria patients.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lei; Lv, Ji-Cheng; Zhou, Xu-jie; Zhu, Li; Hou, Ping; Zhang, Hong

    2011-03-01

    Familial renal glucosuria (FRG) is characterized by persistent glucosuria despite normal serum glucose and in the absence of overt tubular dysfunction. Mutation of sodium/glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) has been identified and was recently reported to be involved in FRG. However, the functional and pathological consequences of such mutations remain unknown. In the current study, we collected four families with FRG. Sequencing of the SGLT2 coding region, intronic segments and cDNA revealed three missense mutations (294C>A: F98L; 1388T>G: L463R; 1435C>G: R479G) and two splice mutations (IVS 1-16 C>A: Del exon3; IVS 11+1 G>C: Del exon11). The probands were either heterozygous or compound heterozygous for SGLT2 mutations, and had glucosuria quantified at 6-27 g/day. Human 293 cells were transfected with the plasmid constructs to study the expression and function of SGLT2 mutants in vitro. Confocal microscopy using green fluorescent protein (GFP) revealed that the mutation results in a loss of punctate membrane pattern typical of the wild-type SGLT2 except in the 294C>A mutant. All mutants had significantly lower transport capacity in comparison to the wild-type control (26.49-71.48%). Renal biopsy in one consenting proband revealed significantly lower SGLT2 expression in the apical side of the proximal convoluted tubule in comparison to both healthy and disease controls (minimal change disease and diabetic nephropathy). The current study provides functional clues regarding the SGLT2 molecule from genotype to phenotype in FRG families.

  17. Phenotypic population screen identifies a new mutation in bovine DGAT1 responsible for unsaturated milk fat

    PubMed Central

    Lehnert, Klaus; Ward, Hamish; Berry, Sarah D.; Ankersmit-Udy, Alex; Burrett, Alayna; Beattie, Elizabeth M.; Thomas, Natalie L.; Harris, Bevin; Ford, Christine A.; Browning, Sharon R.; Rawson, Pisana; Verkerk, Gwyneth A.; van der Does, Yvonne; Adams, Linda F.; Davis, Stephen R.; Jordan, T. William; MacGibbon, Alastair K. H.; Spelman, Richard J.; Snell, Russell G.

    2015-01-01

    Selective breeding has strongly reduced the genetic diversity in livestock species, and contemporary breeding practices exclude potentially beneficial rare genetic variation from the future gene pool. Here we test whether important traits arising by new mutations can be identified and rescued in highly selected populations. We screened milks from 2.5 million cows to identify an exceptional individual which produced milk with reduced saturated fat content, and improved unsaturated and omega-3 fatty acid concentrations. The milk traits were transmitted dominantly to her offspring, and genetic mapping and genome sequencing revealed a new mutation in a previously unknown splice enhancer of the DGAT1 gene. Homozygous carriers show features of human diarrheal disorders, and may be useful for the development of therapeutic strategies. Our study demonstrates that high-throughput phenotypic screening can uncover rich genetic diversity even in inbred populations, and introduces a novel strategy to develop novel milks with improved nutritional properties. PMID:25719731

  18. A homozygous mutation in PEX16 identified by whole-exome sequencing ending a diagnostic odyssey

    PubMed Central

    Bacino, Carlos A.; Chao, Yu-Hsin; Seto, Elaine; Lotze, Tim; Xia, Fan; Jones, Richard O.; Moser, Ann; Wangler, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    We present a patient with a unique neurological phenotype with a progressive neurodegenerative. An 18-year diagnostic odyssey for the patient ended when exome sequencing identified a homozygous PEX16 mutation suggesting an atypical peroxisomal biogenesis disorder (PBD). Interestingly, the patient's peroxisomal biochemical abnormalities were subtle, such that plasma very-long-chain fatty acids initially failed to provide a diagnosis. This case suggests that next-generation sequencing may be diagnostic in some atypical peroxisomal biogenesis disorders. PMID:26644994

  19. Progressive retinal atrophy in Schapendoes dogs: mutation of the newly identified CCDC66 gene.

    PubMed

    Dekomien, Gabriele; Vollrath, Conni; Petrasch-Parwez, Elisabeth; Boevé, Michael H; Akkad, Denis A; Gerding, Wanda M; Epplen, Jörg T

    2010-05-01

    Canine generalized progressive retinal atrophy (gPRA) is characterized by continuous degeneration of photoreceptor cells leading to night blindness and progressive vision loss. Until now, mutations in 11 genes have been described that account for gPRA in dogs, mostly following an autosomal recessive inheritance mode. Here, we describe a gPRA locus comprising the newly identified gene coiled-coil domain containing 66 (CCDC66) on canine chromosome 20, as identified via linkage analysis in the Schapendoes breed. Mutation screening of the CCDC66 gene revealed a 1-bp insertion in exon 6 leading to a stop codon as the underlying cause of disease. The insertion is present in all affected dogs in the homozygous state as well as in all obligatory mutation carriers in the heterozygous state. The CCDC66 gene is evolutionarily conserved in different vertebrate species and exhibits a complex pattern of differential RNA splicing resulting in various isoforms in the retina. Immunohistochemically, CCDC66 protein is detected mainly in the inner segments of photoreceptors in mouse, dog, and man. The affected Schapendoes retina lacks CCDC66 protein. Thus this natural canine model for gPRA yields superior potential to understand functional implications of this newly identified protein including its physiology, and it opens new perspectives for analyzing different aspects of the general pathophysiology of gPRA.

  20. A novel homozygous mutation in SUCLA2 gene identified by exome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Lamperti, Costanza; Fang, Mingyan; Invernizzi, Federica; Liu, Xuanzhu; Wang, Hairong; Zhang, Qing; Carrara, Franco; Moroni, Isabella; Zeviani, Massimo; Zhang, Jianguo; Ghezzi, Daniele

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders with multiple mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) enzyme deficiency and depletion of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are autosomal recessive conditions due to mutations in several nuclear genes necessary for proper mtDNA maintenance. In this report, we describe two Italian siblings presenting with encephalomyopathy and mtDNA depletion in muscle. By whole exome-sequencing and prioritization of candidate genes, we identified a novel homozygous missense mutation in the SUCLA2 gene in a highly conserved aminoacid residue. Although a recurrent mutation in the SUCLA2 gene is relatively frequent in the Faroe Islands, mutations in other populations are extremely rare. In contrast with what has been reported in other patients, methyl-malonic aciduria, a biomarker for this genetic defect, was absent in our proband and very mildly elevated in her affected sister. This report demonstrates that next-generation technologies, particularly exome-sequencing, are user friendly, powerful means for the identification of disease genes in genetically and clinically heterogeneous inherited conditions, such as mitochondrial disorders. PMID:23010432

  1. Five novel somatic CDKN2/p16 mutations identified in melanoma, glioma and carcinoma of the pancreas. Mutations in brief no. 170. Online.

    PubMed

    Gretarsdóttir, S; Olafsdóttir, G H; Borg, A

    1998-01-01

    Germ-line mutations in the p16/CDKN2 gene are known to predispose to melanoma. This gene belongs to a family of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors and blocks G1-S progression. The occurrence of p16/CDKN2 germline mutations in 12 Icelandic melanoma kindreds (kindreds with two or more cases of melanoma or melanoma, pancreas and/or glioma cases) was examined. No germ-line mutation was found, however five mutations not previously discribed in solid tumours were identified, Pro48Leu, Ala57Val, Gly89Asp, Leu117Met, Tyr129Stop.

  2. Hearing loss caused by a P2RX2 mutation identified in a MELAS family with a coexisting mitochondrial 3243AG mutation

    PubMed Central

    Moteki, Hideaki; Azaiez, Hela; Booth, Kevin T; Hattori, Mitsuru; Sato, Ai; Sato, Yoshihiko; Motobayashi, Mitsuo; Sloan, Christina M; Kolbe, Diana L; Shearer, A Eliot; Smith, Richard J H; Usami, Shin-ichi

    2015-01-01

    Objective We present a family with a mitochondrial DNA 3243A>G mutation resulting in MELAS, of which some members have hearing loss where a novel mutation in the P2RX2 gene was identified. Methods One hundred ninety-four (194) Japanese subjects from unrelated families were enrolled in the study. Targeted genomic enrichment and massively parallel sequencing of all known non-syndromic hearing loss genes were performed to identify the genetic causes of hearing loss. Results A novel mutation in the P2RX2 gene, that corresponded to c.601G>A (p.Asp201Tyr) was identified. Two patients carried the mutation, and had severe SNHL, while other members with MELAS (who did not carry the P2RX2 mutation) had normal hearing. Conclusion This is the first case report of a diagnosis of hearing loss caused by P2RX2 mutation in patients with MELAS. A potential explanation is that decreasing ATP production due to MELAS with mitochondrial 3243A>G mutation might suppress activation of P2X2 receptors. We also suggest that hearing loss caused by the P2RX2 mutation might be influenced by the decrease in ATP production due to MELAS, and that nuclear genetic factors may play a modifying role in mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:25788561

  3. Mosaic and Intronic Mutations in TSC1/TSC2 Explain the Majority of TSC Patients with No Mutation Identified by Conventional Testing

    PubMed Central

    Tyburczy, Magdalena E.; Dies, Kira A.; Glass, Jennifer; Camposano, Susana; Chekaluk, Yvonne; Thorner, Aaron R.; Lin, Ling; Krueger, Darcy; Franz, David N.; Thiele, Elizabeth A.; Sahin, Mustafa; Kwiatkowski, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant tumor suppressor gene syndrome due to germline mutations in either TSC1 or TSC2. 10–15% of TSC individuals have no mutation identified (NMI) after thorough conventional molecular diagnostic assessment. 53 TSC subjects who were NMI were studied using next generation sequencing to search for mutations in these genes. Blood/saliva DNA including parental samples were available from all subjects, and skin tumor biopsy DNA was available from six subjects. We identified mutations in 45 of 53 subjects (85%). Mosaicism was observed in the majority (26 of 45, 58%), and intronic mutations were also unusually common, seen in 18 of 45 subjects (40%). Seventeen (38%) mutations were seen at an allele frequency < 5%, five at an allele frequency < 1%, and two were identified in skin tumor biopsies only, and were not seen at appreciable frequency in blood or saliva DNA. These findings illuminate the extent of mosaicism in TSC, indicate the importance of full gene coverage and next generation sequencing for mutation detection, show that analysis of TSC-related tumors can increase the mutation detection rate, indicate that it is not likely that a third TSC gene exists, and enable provision of genetic counseling to the substantial population of TSC individuals who are currently NMI. PMID:26540169

  4. Novel CLCN7 mutation identified in a Han Chinese family with autosomal dominant osteopetrosis-2

    PubMed Central

    He, Dan; Rong, Pengfei; Xu, Hongbo; Yuan, Lamei; Li, Liu; Lu, Qian; Guo, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Osteopetrosis is a heritable bone condition featuring increased bone density due to defective osteoclastic bone resorption. Exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing were conducted in Han Chinese family members, some of whom had typical osteopetrosis, and a novel missense variant c.2350A>T (p.R784W) in the chloride channel 7 gene (CLCN7) was identified. This variant cosegregated with the disorder in the family but was not observed in 800 controls. The data indicate that exome sequencing is a powerful and effective molecular diagnostic tool for detecting mutations in osteopetrosis, which is a genetically and clinically heterogeneous disorder. This discovery broadens the CLCN7 gene mutation spectrum and has important implications for clinical therapeutic regimen decisions, prognosis evaluations, and antenatal diagnoses. PMID:27325559

  5. New mutations in flagellar motors identified by whole genome sequencing in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The building of a cilium or flagellum requires molecular motors and associated proteins that allow the relocation of proteins from the cell body to the distal end and the return of proteins to the cell body in a process termed intraflagellar transport (IFT). IFT trains are carried out by kinesin and back to the cell body by dynein. Methods We used whole genome sequencing to identify the causative mutations for two temperature-sensitive flagellar assembly mutants in Chlamydomonas and validated the changes using reversion analysis. We examined the effect of these mutations on the localization of IFT81, an IFT complex B protein, the cytoplasmic dynein heavy chain (DHC1b), and the dynein light intermediate chain (D1bLIC). Results The strains, fla18 and fla24, have mutations in kinesin-2 and cytoplasmic dynein, respectively. The fla18 mutation alters the same glutamic acid (E24G) mutated in the fla10-14 allele (E24K). The fla18 strain loses flagella at 32?C more rapidly than the E24K allele but less rapidly than the fla10-1 allele. The fla18 mutant loses its flagella by detachment rather than by shortening. The fla24 mutation falls in cytoplasmic dynein and changes a completely conserved amino acid (L3243P) in an alpha helix in the AAA5 domain. The fla24 mutant loses its flagella by shortening within 6 hours at 32?C. DHC1b protein is reduced by 18-fold and D1bLIC is reduced by 16-fold at 21?C compared to wild-type cells. We identified two pseudorevertants (L3243S and L3243R), which remain flagellated at 32?C. Although fla24 cells assemble full-length flagella at 21?C, IFT81 protein localization is dramatically altered. Instead of localizing at the basal body and along the flagella, IFT81 is concentrated at the proximal end of the flagella. The pseudorevertants show wild-type IFT81 localization at 21?C, but proximal end localization of IFT81 at 32?C. Conclusions The change in the AAA5 domain of the cytoplasmic dynein in fla24 may block the recycling of IFT

  6. Genome Screen to Identify Susceptibility Genes for Parkinson Disease in a Sample without parkin Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Pankratz, Nathan; Nichols, William C.; Uniacke, Sean K.; Halter, Cheryl; Rudolph, Alice; Shults, Cliff; Conneally, P. Michael; Foroud, Tatiana

    2002-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder characterized by bradykinesia, resting tremor, muscular rigidity, and postural instability, as well as by a clinically significant response to treatment with levodopa. Mutations in the α-synuclein gene have been found to result in autosomal dominant PD, and mutations in the parkin gene produce autosomal recessive juvenile-onset PD. We have studied 203 sibling pairs with PD who were evaluated by a rigorous neurological assessment based on (a) inclusion criteria consisting of clinical features highly associated with autopsy-confirmed PD and (b) exclusion criteria highly associated with other, non-PD pathological diagnoses. Families with positive LOD scores for a marker in an intron of the parkin gene were prioritized for parkin-gene testing, and mutations in the parkin gene were identified in 22 families. To reduce genetic heterogeneity, these families were not included in subsequent genome-screen analysis. Thus, a total of 160 multiplex families without evidence of a parkin mutation were used in multipoint nonparametric linkage analysis to identify PD-susceptibility genes. Two models of PD affection status were considered: model I included only those individuals with a more stringent diagnosis of verified PD (96 sibling pairs from 90 families), whereas model II included all examined individuals as affected, regardless of their final diagnostic classification (170 sibling pairs from 160 families). Under model I, the highest LOD scores were observed on chromosome X (LOD score 2.1) and on chromosome 2 (LOD score 1.9). Analyses performed with all available sibling pairs (model II) found even greater evidence of linkage to chromosome X (LOD score 2.7) and to chromosome 2 (LOD score 2.5). Evidence of linkage was also found to chromosomes 4, 5, and 13 (LOD scores >1.5). Our findings are consistent with those of other linkage studies that have reported linkage to chromosomes 5 and X. PMID:12058349

  7. Multiple gene mutations identified in patients infected with influenza A (H7N9) virus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cuicui; Wang, Mingbang; Zhu, Zhaoqin; Qu, Jieming; Xi, Xiuhong; Tang, Xinjun; Lao, Xiangda; Seeley, Eric; Li, Tao; Fan, Xiaomei; Du, Chunling; Wang, Qin; Yang, Lin; Hu, Yunwen; Bai, Chunxue; Zhang, Zhiyong; Lu, Shuihua; Song, Yuanlin; Zhou, Wenhao

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A (H7N9) virus induced high mortality since 2013. It is important to elucidate the potential genetic variations that contribute to virus infection susceptibilities. In order to identify genetic mutations that might increase host susceptibility to infection, we performed exon sequencing and validated the SNPS by Sanger sequencing on 18 H7N9 patients. Blood samples were collected from 18 confirmed H7N9 patients. The genomic DNA was captured with the Agilent SureSelect Human All Exon kit, sequenced on the Illumina Hiseq 2000, and the resulting data processed and annotated with Genome analysis Tool. SNPs were verified by independent Sanger sequencing. The DAVID database and the DAPPLE database were used to do bioinformatics analysis. Through exon sequencing and Sanger sequencing, we identified 21 genes that were highly associated with H7N9 influenza infection. Protein-protein interaction analysis showed that direct interactions among genetic products were significantly higher than expected (p = 0.004), and DAVID analysis confirmed the defense-related functions of these genes. Gene mutation profiles of survived and non-survived patients were similar, suggesting some of genes identified in this study may be associated with H7N9 influenza susceptibility. Host specific genetic determinants of disease severity identified by this approach may provide new targets for the treatment of H7N9 influenza. PMID:27156515

  8. Perturbation of the mutated EGFR interactome identifies vulnerabilities and resistance mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiannong; Bennett, Keiryn; Stukalov, Alexey; Fang, Bin; Zhang, Guolin; Yoshida, Takeshi; Okamoto, Isamu; Kim, Jae-Young; Song, Lanxi; Bai, Yun; Qian, Xiaoning; Rawal, Bhupendra; Schell, Michael; Grebien, Florian; Winter, Georg; Rix, Uwe; Eschrich, Steven; Colinge, Jacques; Koomen, John; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Haura, Eric B

    2013-01-01

    We hypothesized that elucidating the interactome of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) forms that are mutated in lung cancer, via global analysis of protein–protein interactions, phosphorylation, and systematically perturbing the ensuing network nodes, should offer a new, more systems-level perspective of the molecular etiology. Here, we describe an EGFR interactome of 263 proteins and offer a 14-protein core network critical to the viability of multiple EGFR-mutated lung cancer cells. Cells with acquired resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) had differential dependence of the core network proteins based on the underlying molecular mechanisms of resistance. Of the 14 proteins, 9 are shown to be specifically associated with survival of EGFR-mutated lung cancer cell lines. This included EGFR, GRB2, MK12, SHC1, ARAF, CD11B, ARHG5, GLU2B, and CD11A. With the use of a drug network associated with the core network proteins, we identified two compounds, midostaurin and lestaurtinib, that could overcome drug resistance through direct EGFR inhibition when combined with erlotinib. Our results, enabled by interactome mapping, suggest new targets and combination therapies that could circumvent EGFR TKI resistance. PMID:24189400

  9. Exome sequencing identifies a novel homozygous CLN8 mutation in a Turkish family with Northern epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Yavuz; Güngör, Olcay; Gormez, Zeliha; Demirci, Huseyin; Ergüner, Bekir; Güngör, Gülay; Dilber, Cengiz

    2017-03-01

    Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL), one of the most common neurodegenerative childhood-onset disorders, is characterized by autosomal-recessive inheritance, epileptic seizures, progressive psychomotor deterioration, visual impairment, and premature death. Based on the country of origin of the patients, the clinical features/courses, and the molecular genetics background of the disorder, 14 distinct NCL subtypes have been described to date. CLN8 mutation was first identified in Finnish patients, and the condition was named Northern Epilepsy (NE); however, the severe phenotype of the CLN8 gene was subsequently found outside Finland and named 'variant late-infantile' NCL. In this study, five patients and their six healthy relatives from a large Turkish consanguineous family were enrolled. The study involved detailed clinical, radiological and molecular genetic evaluations. Whole-exome sequencing and homozygosity mapping revealed a novel homozygous CLN8 mutation, c.677T>C (p.Leu226Pro). We defined NE cases in Turkey, caused by a novel mutation in CLN8. WES can be an important diagnostic method in rare cases with atypical courses.

  10. Identifying photoreceptors in blind eyes caused by RPE65 mutations: Prerequisite for human gene therapy success.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Samuel G; Aleman, Tomas S; Cideciyan, Artur V; Sumaroka, Alexander; Schwartz, Sharon B; Windsor, Elizabeth A M; Traboulsi, Elias I; Heon, Elise; Pittler, Steven J; Milam, Ann H; Maguire, Albert M; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Stone, Edwin M; Bennett, Jean

    2005-04-26

    Mutations in RPE65, a gene essential to normal operation of the visual (retinoid) cycle, cause the childhood blindness known as Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). Retinal gene therapy restores vision to blind canine and murine models of LCA. Gene therapy in blind humans with LCA from RPE65 mutations may also have potential for success but only if the retinal photoreceptor layer is intact, as in the early-disease stage-treated animals. Here, we use high-resolution in vivo microscopy to quantify photoreceptor layer thickness in the human disease to define the relationship of retinal structure to vision and determine the potential for gene therapy success. The normally cone photoreceptor-rich central retina and rod-rich regions were studied. Despite severely reduced cone vision, many RPE65-mutant retinas had near-normal central microstructure. Absent rod vision was associated with a detectable but thinned photoreceptor layer. We asked whether abnormally thinned RPE65-mutant retina with photoreceptor loss would respond to treatment. Gene therapy in Rpe65(-/-) mice at advanced-disease stages, a more faithful mimic of the humans we studied, showed success but only in animals with better-preserved photoreceptor structure. The results indicate that identifying and then targeting retinal locations with retained photoreceptors will be a prerequisite for successful gene therapy in humans with RPE65 mutations and in other retinal degenerative disorders now moving from proof-of-concept studies toward clinical trials.

  11. Exome sequencing identifies truncating mutations in PRRT2 that cause paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wan-Jin; Lin, Yu; Xiong, Zhi-Qi; Wei, Wei; Ni, Wang; Tan, Guo-He; Guo, Shun-Ling; He, Jin; Chen, Ya-Fang; Zhang, Qi-Jie; Li, Hong-Fu; Lin, Yi; Murong, Shen-Xing; Xu, Jianfeng; Wang, Ning; Wu, Zhi-Ying

    2011-11-20

    Paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia is the most common type of paroxysmal movement disorder and is often misdiagnosed clinically as epilepsy. Using whole-exome sequencing followed by Sanger sequencing, we identified three truncating mutations within PRRT2 (NM_145239.2) in eight Han Chinese families with histories of paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia: c.514_517delTCTG (p.Ser172Argfs*3) in one family, c.649dupC (p.Arg217Profs*8) in six families and c.972delA (p.Val325Serfs*12) in one family. These truncating mutations co-segregated exactly with the disease in these families and were not observed in 1,000 control subjects of matched ancestry. PRRT2 is a newly discovered gene consisting of four exons encoding the proline-rich transmembrane protein 2, which encompasses 340 amino acids and contains two predicted transmembrane domains. PRRT2 is highly expressed in the developing nervous system, and a truncating mutation alters the subcellular localization of the PRRT2 protein. The function of PRRT2 and its role in paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia should be further investigated.

  12. Mutational analysis of the major coat protein of M13 identifies residues that control protein display.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, G. A.; Wells, J. A.; Sidhu, S. S.

    2000-01-01

    We have reported variants of the M13 bacteriophage major coat protein (P8) that enable high copy display of monomeric and oligomeric proteins, such as human growth hormone and steptavidin, on the surface of phage particles (Sidhu SS, Weiss GA, Wells JA. 2000. High copy display of large proteins on phage for functional selections. J Mol Biol 296:487-495). Here, we explore how an optimized P8 variant (opti-P8) could evolve the ability to efficiently display a protein fused to its N-terminus. Reversion of individual opti-P8 residues back to the wild-type P8 residue identifies a limited set of hydrophobic residues responsible for the high copy protein display. These hydrophobic amino acids bracket a conserved hydrophobic face on the P8 alpha helix thought to be in contact with the phage coat. Mutations additively combine to promote high copy protein display, which was further enhanced by optimization of the linker between the phage coat and the fusion protein. These data are consistent with a model in which protein display-enhancing mutations allow for better packing of the fusion protein into the phage coat. The high tolerance for phage coat protein mutations observed here suggests that filamentous phage coat proteins could readily evolve new capabilities. PMID:10794407

  13. Computational pipeline to identify and characterize functional mutations in ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Magesh, R; George Priya Doss, C

    2014-12-01

    Ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) (E.C. 2.1.3.3) is one of the enzymes in the urea cycle, which involves in a sequence of reactions in the liver cells. During protein assimilation in our body surplus nitrogen is made, this open nitrogen is altered into urea and expelled out of the body by kidneys, in this cycle OTC helps in the conversion of free toxic nitrogen into urea. Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTCD: OMIM#311250) is triggered by mutation in this OTC gene. To date more than 200 mutations have been noted. Mutation in OTC gene indicates alteration in enzyme production, which upsets the ability to carry out the chemical reaction. The computational analysis was initiated to identify the deleterious nsSNPs in OTC gene in causing OTCD using five different computational tools such as SIFT, PolyPhen 2, I-Mutant 3, SNPs&Go, and PhD-SNP. Studies on the molecular basis of OTC gene and OTCD have been done partially till date. Hence, in silico categorization of functional SNPs in OTC gene can provide valuable insight in near future in the diagnosis and treatment of OTCD.

  14. A novel reverse-genetic approach (SIMF) identifies Mutator insertions in new Myb genes.

    PubMed

    Rabinowicz, P D; Grotewold, E

    2000-11-01

    We have developed a new strategy designated SIMF (Systematic Insertional Mutagenesis of Families), to identify DNA insertions in many members of a gene family simultaneously. This method requires only a short amino acid sequence conserved in all members of the family to make a degenerate oligonucleotide, and a sequence from the end of the DNA insertion. The SIMF strategy was successfully applied to the large maize R2R3 Myb family of regulatory genes, and Mutator insertions in several novel Myb genes were identified. Application of this technique to identify insertions in other large gene families could significantly decrease the effort involved in screening at the same time for insertions in all members of groups of genes that share a limited sequence identity.

  15. Whole Exome Sequencing Identifies RAI1 Mutation in a Morbidly Obese Child Diagnosed With ROHHAD Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Esteves, Kristyn M.; Towne, Meghan C.; Brownstein, Catherine A.; James, Philip M.; Crowley, Laura; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Elsea, Sarah H.; Beggs, Alan H.; Picker, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Context: The current obesity epidemic is attributed to complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors. However, a limited number of cases, especially those with early-onset severe obesity, are linked to single gene defects. Rapid-onset obesity with hypothalamic dysfunction, hypoventilation and autonomic dysregulation (ROHHAD) is one of the syndromes that presents with abrupt-onset extreme weight gain with an unknown genetic basis. Objective: To identify the underlying genetic etiology in a child with morbid early-onset obesity, hypoventilation, and autonomic and behavioral disturbances who was clinically diagnosed with ROHHAD syndrome. Design/Setting/Intervention: The index patient was evaluated at an academic medical center. Whole-exome sequencing was performed on the proband and his parents. Genetic variants were validated by Sanger sequencing. Results: We identified a novel de novo nonsense mutation, c.3265 C>T (p.R1089X), in the retinoic acid-induced 1 (RAI1) gene in the proband. Mutations in the RAI1 gene are known to cause Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS). On further evaluation, his clinical features were not typical of either SMS or ROHHAD syndrome. Conclusions: This study identifies a de novo RAI1 mutation in a child with morbid obesity and a clinical diagnosis of ROHHAD syndrome. Although extreme early-onset obesity, autonomic disturbances, and hypoventilation are present in ROHHAD, several of the clinical findings are consistent with SMS. This case highlights the challenges in the diagnosis of ROHHAD syndrome and its potential overlap with SMS. We also propose RAI1 as a candidate gene for children with morbid obesity. PMID:25781356

  16. Mutation Analysis Identifies GUCY2D as the Major Gene Responsible for Autosomal Dominant Progressive Cone Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kitiratschky, Veronique B. D.; Wilke, Robert; Renner, Agnes B.; Kellner, Ulrich; Vadalà, Maria; Birch, David G.; Wissinger, Bernd; Zrenner, Eberhart; Kohl, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Heterozygous mutations in the GUCY2D gene, which encodes the membrane-bound retinal guanylyl cyclase-1 protein (RetGC-1), have been shown to cause autosomal dominant inherited cone degeneration and cone–rod degeneration (adCD, adCRD). The present study was a comprehensive screening of the GUCY2D gene in 27 adCD and adCRD unrelated families of these rare disorders. Methods Mutation analysis was performed by direct sequencing as well as PCR and subsequent restriction length polymorphism analysis (PCR/RFLP). Haplotype analysis was performed in selected patients by using microsatellite markers. Results GUCY2D gene mutations were identified in 11 (40%) of 27 patients, and all mutations clustered to codon 838, including two known and one novel missense mutation: p.R838C, p.R838H, and p.R838G. Haplotype analysis showed that among the studied patients only two of the six analyzed p.R838C mutation carriers shared a common haplotype and that none of the p.R838H mutation carriers did. Conclusions GUCY2D is a major gene responsible for progressive autosomal dominant cone degeneration. All identified mutations localize to codon 838. Haplotype analysis indicates that in most cases these mutations arise independently. Thus, codon 838 is likely to be a mutation hotspot in the GUCY2D gene. PMID:18487367

  17. Functional genome-wide siRNA screen identifies KIAA0586 as mutated in Joubert syndrome.

    PubMed

    Roosing, Susanne; Hofree, Matan; Kim, Sehyun; Scott, Eric; Copeland, Brett; Romani, Marta; Silhavy, Jennifer L; Rosti, Rasim O; Schroth, Jana; Mazza, Tommaso; Miccinilli, Elide; Zaki, Maha S; Swoboda, Kathryn J; Milisa-Drautz, Joanne; Dobyns, William B; Mikati, Mohamed A; İncecik, Faruk; Azam, Matloob; Borgatti, Renato; Romaniello, Romina; Boustany, Rose-Mary; Clericuzio, Carol L; D'Arrigo, Stefano; Strømme, Petter; Boltshauser, Eugen; Stanzial, Franco; Mirabelli-Badenier, Marisol; Moroni, Isabella; Bertini, Enrico; Emma, Francesco; Steinlin, Maja; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Johnson, Colin A; Freilinger, Michael; Vaux, Keith K; Gabriel, Stacey B; Aza-Blanc, Pedro; Heynen-Genel, Susanne; Ideker, Trey; Dynlacht, Brian D; Lee, Ji Eun; Valente, Enza Maria; Kim, Joon; Gleeson, Joseph G

    2015-05-30

    Defective primary ciliogenesis or cilium stability forms the basis of human ciliopathies, including Joubert syndrome (JS), with defective cerebellar vermis development. We performed a high-content genome-wide small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen to identify genes regulating ciliogenesis as candidates for JS. We analyzed results with a supervised-learning approach, using SYSCILIA gold standard, Cildb3.0, a centriole siRNA screen and the GTex project, identifying 591 likely candidates. Intersection of this data with whole exome results from 145 individuals with unexplained JS identified six families with predominantly compound heterozygous mutations in KIAA0586. A c.428del base deletion in 0.1% of the general population was found in trans with a second mutation in an additional set of 9 of 163 unexplained JS patients. KIAA0586 is an orthologue of chick Talpid3, required for ciliogenesis and Sonic hedgehog signaling. Our results uncover a relatively high frequency cause for JS and contribute a list of candidates for future gene discoveries in ciliopathies.

  18. Functional genome-wide siRNA screen identifies KIAA0586 as mutated in Joubert syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Roosing, Susanne; Hofree, Matan; Kim, Sehyun; Scott, Eric; Copeland, Brett; Romani, Marta; Silhavy, Jennifer L; Rosti, Rasim O; Schroth, Jana; Mazza, Tommaso; Miccinilli, Elide; Zaki, Maha S; Swoboda, Kathryn J; Milisa-Drautz, Joanne; Dobyns, William B; Mikati, Mohamed A; İncecik, Faruk; Azam, Matloob; Borgatti, Renato; Romaniello, Romina; Boustany, Rose-Mary; Clericuzio, Carol L; D'Arrigo, Stefano; Strømme, Petter; Boltshauser, Eugen; Stanzial, Franco; Mirabelli-Badenier, Marisol; Moroni, Isabella; Bertini, Enrico; Emma, Francesco; Steinlin, Maja; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Johnson, Colin A; Freilinger, Michael; Vaux, Keith K; Gabriel, Stacey B; Aza-Blanc, Pedro; Heynen-Genel, Susanne; Ideker, Trey; Dynlacht, Brian D; Lee, Ji Eun; Valente, Enza Maria; Kim, Joon; Gleeson, Joseph G

    2015-01-01

    Defective primary ciliogenesis or cilium stability forms the basis of human ciliopathies, including Joubert syndrome (JS), with defective cerebellar vermis development. We performed a high-content genome-wide small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen to identify genes regulating ciliogenesis as candidates for JS. We analyzed results with a supervised-learning approach, using SYSCILIA gold standard, Cildb3.0, a centriole siRNA screen and the GTex project, identifying 591 likely candidates. Intersection of this data with whole exome results from 145 individuals with unexplained JS identified six families with predominantly compound heterozygous mutations in KIAA0586. A c.428del base deletion in 0.1% of the general population was found in trans with a second mutation in an additional set of 9 of 163 unexplained JS patients. KIAA0586 is an orthologue of chick Talpid3, required for ciliogenesis and Sonic hedgehog signaling. Our results uncover a relatively high frequency cause for JS and contribute a list of candidates for future gene discoveries in ciliopathies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06602.001 PMID:26026149

  19. A novel mouse model identifies cooperating mutations and therapeutic targets critical for chronic myeloid leukemia progression

    PubMed Central

    Giotopoulos, George; van der Weyden, Louise; Osaki, Hikari; Rust, Alistair G.; Gallipoli, Paolo; Meduri, Eshwar; Horton, Sarah J.; Chan, Wai-In; Foster, Donna; Prinjha, Rab K.; Pimanda, John E.; Tenen, Daniel G.; Vassiliou, George S.; Koschmieder, Steffen; Adams, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of highly selective ABL-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has revolutionized therapy for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However, TKIs are only efficacious in the chronic phase of the disease and effective therapies for TKI-refractory CML, or after progression to blast crisis (BC), are lacking. Whereas the chronic phase of CML is dependent on BCR-ABL, additional mutations are required for progression to BC. However, the identity of these mutations and the pathways they affect are poorly understood, hampering our ability to identify therapeutic targets and improve outcomes. Here, we describe a novel mouse model that allows identification of mechanisms of BC progression in an unbiased and tractable manner, using transposon-based insertional mutagenesis on the background of chronic phase CML. Our BC model is the first to faithfully recapitulate the phenotype, cellular and molecular biology of human CML progression. We report a heterogeneous and unique pattern of insertions identifying known and novel candidate genes and demonstrate that these pathways drive disease progression and provide potential targets for novel therapeutic strategies. Our model greatly informs the biology of CML progression and provides a potent resource for the development of candidate therapies to improve the dismal outcomes in this highly aggressive disease. PMID:26304963

  20. NOTCH1 mutations identify a genetic subgroup of chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients with high risk of transformation and poor outcome.

    PubMed

    Villamor, N; Conde, L; Martínez-Trillos, A; Cazorla, M; Navarro, A; Beà, S; López, C; Colomer, D; Pinyol, M; Aymerich, M; Rozman, M; Abrisqueta, P; Baumann, T; Delgado, J; Giné, E; González-Díaz, M; Hernández, J M; Colado, E; Payer, A R; Rayon, C; Navarro, B; José Terol, M; Bosch, F; Quesada, V; Puente, X S; López-Otín, C; Jares, P; Pereira, A; Campo, E; López-Guillermo, A

    2013-04-01

    NOTCH1 has been found recurrently mutated in a subset of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). To analyze biological features and clinical impact of NOTCH1 mutations in CLL, we sequenced this gene in 565 patients. NOTCH1 mutations, found in 63 patients (11%), were associated with unmutated IGHV, high expression of CD38 and ZAP-70, trisomy 12, advanced stage and elevated lactate dehydrogenase. Sequential analysis in 200 patients demonstrated acquisition of mutation in one case (0.5%) and disappearance after treatment in two. Binet A and B patients with NOTCH1-mutated had a shorter time to treatment. NOTCH1-mutated patients were more frequently refractory to therapy and showed shorter progression-free and overall survival after complete remission. Overall survival was shorter in NOTCH1-mutated patients, although not independently from IGHV. NOTCH1 mutation increased the risk of transformation to diffuse large B-cell lymphoma independently from IGHV, with this being validated in resampling tests of replicability. In summary, NOTCH1 mutational status, that was rarely acquired during the course of the disease, identify a genetic subgroup with high risk of transformation and poor outcome. This recently identified genetic subgroup of CLL patients deserves prospective studies to define their best management.

  1. Exome sequencing identifies a DNAJB6 mutation in a family with dominantly-inherited limb-girdle muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Couthouis, Julien; Raphael, Alya R; Siskind, Carly; Findlay, Andrew R; Buenrostro, Jason D; Greenleaf, William J; Vogel, Hannes; Day, John W; Flanigan, Kevin M; Gitler, Aaron D

    2014-05-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy primarily affects the muscles of the hips and shoulders (the "limb-girdle" muscles), although it is a heterogeneous disorder that can present with varying symptoms. There is currently no cure. We sought to identify the genetic basis of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 1 in an American family of Northern European descent using exome sequencing. Exome sequencing was performed on DNA samples from two affected siblings and one unaffected sibling and resulted in the identification of eleven candidate mutations that co-segregated with the disease. Notably, this list included a previously reported mutation in DNAJB6, p.Phe89Ile, which was recently identified as a cause of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 1D. Additional family members were Sanger sequenced and the mutation in DNAJB6 was only found in affected individuals. Subsequent haplotype analysis indicated that this DNAJB6 p.Phe89Ile mutation likely arose independently of the previously reported mutation. Since other published mutations are located close by in the G/F domain of DNAJB6, this suggests that the area may represent a mutational hotspot. Exome sequencing provided an unbiased and effective method for identifying the genetic etiology of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 1 in a previously genetically uncharacterized family. This work further confirms the causative role of DNAJB6 mutations in limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 1D.

  2. Genetic Analysis of the Rhodopsin Gene Identifies a Mosaic Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa Mutation in a Healthy Individual

    PubMed Central

    Beryozkin, Avigail; Levy, Gal; Blumenfeld, Anat; Meyer, Segev; Namburi, Prasanthi; Morad, Yair; Gradstein, Libe; Swaroop, Anand; Banin, Eyal; Sharon, Dror

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous hereditary retinal diseases that result in blindness due to photoreceptor degeneration. Mutations in the rhodopsin (RHO) gene are the most common cause of autosomal dominant RP (adRP) and are responsible for 16% to 35% of adRP cases in the Western population. Our purpose was to investigate the contribution of RHO to adRP in the Israeli and Palestinian populations. Methods Thirty-two adRP families participated in the study. Mutation detection was performed by whole exome sequencing (WES) and Sanger sequencing of RHO exons. Fluorescence PCR reactions of serially diluted samples were used to predict the percentage of mosaic cells in blood samples. Results Eight RHO disease-causing mutations were identified in nine families, with only one novel mutation, c.548-638dup91bp, identified in a family where WES failed to detect any causal variant. Segregation analysis revealed that the origin of the mutation is in a mosaic healthy individual carrying the mutation in approximately 13% of blood cells. Conclusions This is the first report of the mutation spectrum of a known adRP gene in the Israeli and Palestinian populations, leading to the identification of seven previously reported mutations and one novel mutation. Our study shows that RHO mutations are a major cause of adRP in this cohort and are responsible for 28% of adRP families. The novel mutation exhibits a unique phenomenon in which an unaffected individual is mosaic for an adRP-causing mutation. PMID:26962691

  3. Novel HPS6 mutations identified by whole-exome sequencing in two Japanese sisters with suspected ocular albinism.

    PubMed

    Miyamichi, Daisuke; Asahina, Miki; Nakajima, Junya; Sato, Miho; Hosono, Katsuhiro; Nomura, Takahito; Negishi, Takashi; Miyake, Noriko; Hotta, Yoshihiro; Ogata, Tsutomu; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2016-09-01

    Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by oculocutaneous albinism, platelet dysfunction and ceroid deposition. We report suspected ocular albinism in two Japanese sisters, caused by mutations in the HPS6 (Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome 6) gene. Trio-based whole-exome sequencing (WES) identified novel compound heterozygous mutations in HPS6 (c.1898delC: mother origin and c.2038C>T: father origin) in the two sisters. To date, 10 associated mutations have been detected in HPS6. Although we detected no general manifestations, including platelet dysfunction, in the sisters, even in long-term follow-up, we established a diagnosis of HPS type 6 based on the HPS6 mutations and absence of dense bodies in the platelets, indicating that WES can identify cases of HPS type 6. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of HPS6 mutations in Japanese patients.

  4. A Mismatch EndoNuclease Array-Based Methodology (MENA) for Identifying Known SNPs or Novel Point Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Comeron, Josep M.; Reed, Jordan; Christie, Matthew; Jacobs, Julia S.; Dierdorff, Jason; Eberl, Daniel F.; Manak, J. Robert

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and rapid identification or confirmation of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), point mutations and other human genomic variation facilitates understanding the genetic basis of disease. We have developed a new methodology (called MENA (Mismatch EndoNuclease Array)) pairing DNA mismatch endonuclease enzymology with tiling microarray hybridization in order to genotype both known point mutations (such as SNPs) as well as identify previously undiscovered point mutations and small indels. We show that our assay can rapidly genotype known SNPs in a human genomic DNA sample with 99% accuracy, in addition to identifying novel point mutations and small indels with a false discovery rate as low as 10%. Our technology provides a platform for a variety of applications, including: (1) genotyping known SNPs as well as confirming newly discovered SNPs from whole genome sequencing analyses; (2) identifying novel point mutations and indels in any genomic region from any organism for which genome sequence information is available; and (3) screening panels of genes associated with particular diseases and disorders in patient samples to identify causative mutations. As a proof of principle for using MENA to discover novel mutations, we report identification of a novel allele of the beethoven (btv) gene in Drosophila, which encodes a ciliary cytoplasmic dynein motor protein important for auditory mechanosensation. PMID:27600073

  5. A Mismatch EndoNuclease Array-Based Methodology (MENA) for Identifying Known SNPs or Novel Point Mutations.

    PubMed

    Comeron, Josep M; Reed, Jordan; Christie, Matthew; Jacobs, Julia S; Dierdorff, Jason; Eberl, Daniel F; Manak, J Robert

    2016-04-05

    Accurate and rapid identification or confirmation of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), point mutations and other human genomic variation facilitates understanding the genetic basis of disease. We have developed a new methodology (called MENA (Mismatch EndoNuclease Array)) pairing DNA mismatch endonuclease enzymology with tiling microarray hybridization in order to genotype both known point mutations (such as SNPs) as well as identify previously undiscovered point mutations and small indels. We show that our assay can rapidly genotype known SNPs in a human genomic DNA sample with 99% accuracy, in addition to identifying novel point mutations and small indels with a false discovery rate as low as 10%. Our technology provides a platform for a variety of applications, including: (1) genotyping known SNPs as well as confirming newly discovered SNPs from whole genome sequencing analyses; (2) identifying novel point mutations and indels in any genomic region from any organism for which genome sequence information is available; and (3) screening panels of genes associated with particular diseases and disorders in patient samples to identify causative mutations. As a proof of principle for using MENA to discover novel mutations, we report identification of a novel allele of the beethoven (btv) gene in Drosophila, which encodes a ciliary cytoplasmic dynein motor protein important for auditory mechanosensation.

  6. Identifying Highly Penetrant Disease Causal Mutations Using Next Generation Sequencing: Guide to Whole Process

    PubMed Central

    Erzurumluoglu, A. Mesut; Shihab, Hashem A.; Baird, Denis; Richardson, Tom G.; Day, Ian N. M.; Gaunt, Tom R.

    2015-01-01

    Recent technological advances have created challenges for geneticists and a need to adapt to a wide range of new bioinformatics tools and an expanding wealth of publicly available data (e.g., mutation databases, and software). This wide range of methods and a diversity of file formats used in sequence analysis is a significant issue, with a considerable amount of time spent before anyone can even attempt to analyse the genetic basis of human disorders. Another point to consider that is although many possess “just enough” knowledge to analyse their data, they do not make full use of the tools and databases that are available and also do not fully understand how their data was created. The primary aim of this review is to document some of the key approaches and provide an analysis schema to make the analysis process more efficient and reliable in the context of discovering highly penetrant causal mutations/genes. This review will also compare the methods used to identify highly penetrant variants when data is obtained from consanguineous individuals as opposed to nonconsanguineous; and when Mendelian disorders are analysed as opposed to common-complex disorders. PMID:26106619

  7. Exome and genome sequencing of nasopharynx cancer identifies NF-κB pathway activating mutations

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yvonne Y; Chung, Grace T. Y.; Lui, Vivian W. Y.; To, Ka-Fai; Ma, Brigette B. Y.; Chow, Chit; Woo, John K, S.; Yip, Kevin Y.; Seo, Jeongsun; Hui, Edwin P.; Mak, Michael K. F.; Rusan, Maria; Chau, Nicole G.; Or, Yvonne Y. Y.; Law, Marcus H. N.; Law, Peggy P. Y.; Liu, Zoey W. Y.; Ngan, Hoi-Lam; Hau, Pok-Man; Verhoeft, Krista R.; Poon, Peony H. Y.; Yoo, Seong-Keun; Shin, Jong-Yeon; Lee, Sau-Dan; Lun, Samantha W. M.; Jia, Lin; Chan, Anthony W. H.; Chan, Jason Y. K.; Lai, Paul B. S.; Fung, Choi-Yi; Hung, Suet-Ting; Wang, Lin; Chang, Ann Margaret V.; Chiosea, Simion I.; Hedberg, Matthew L.; Tsao, Sai-Wah; van Hasselt, Andrew C.; Chan, Anthony T. C.; Grandis, Jennifer R.; Hammerman, Peter S.; Lo, Kwok-Wai

    2017-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is an aggressive head and neck cancer characterized by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and dense lymphocyte infiltration. The scarcity of NPC genomic data hinders the understanding of NPC biology, disease progression and rational therapy design. Here we performed whole-exome sequencing (WES) on 111 micro-dissected EBV-positive NPCs, with 15 cases subjected to further whole-genome sequencing (WGS), to determine its mutational landscape. We identified enrichment for genomic aberrations of multiple negative regulators of the NF-κB pathway, including CYLD, TRAF3, NFKBIA and NLRC5, in a total of 41% of cases. Functional analysis confirmed inactivating CYLD mutations as drivers for NPC cell growth. The EBV oncoprotein latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) functions to constitutively activate NF-κB signalling, and we observed mutual exclusivity among tumours with somatic NF-κB pathway aberrations and LMP1-overexpression, suggesting that NF-κB activation is selected for by both somatic and viral events during NPC pathogenesis. PMID:28098136

  8. Haploinsufficiency networks identify targetable patterns of allelic deficiency in low mutation ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, Joe Ryan; Patel, Chandni B.; Willis, Katelyn McCabe; Haghighiabyaneh, Mina; Axelrod, Joshua; Tancioni, Isabelle; Lu, Dan; Bapat, Jaidev; Young, Shanique; Cadassou, Octavia; Bartakova, Alena; Sheth, Parthiv; Haft, Carley; Hui, Sandra; Saenz, Cheryl; Schlaepfer, David D.; Harismendy, Olivier; Stupack, Dwayne G.

    2017-01-01

    Identification of specific oncogenic gene changes has enabled the modern generation of targeted cancer therapeutics. In high-grade serous ovarian cancer (OV), the bulk of genetic changes is not somatic point mutations, but rather somatic copy-number alterations (SCNAs). The impact of SCNAs on tumour biology remains poorly understood. Here we build haploinsufficiency network analyses to identify which SCNA patterns are most disruptive in OV. Of all KEGG pathways (N=187), autophagy is the most significantly disrupted by coincident gene deletions. Compared with 20 other cancer types, OV is most severely disrupted in autophagy and in compensatory proteostasis pathways. Network analysis prioritizes MAP1LC3B (LC3) and BECN1 as most impactful. Knockdown of LC3 and BECN1 expression confers sensitivity to cells undergoing autophagic stress independent of platinum resistance status. The results support the use of pathway network tools to evaluate how the copy-number landscape of a tumour may guide therapy. PMID:28198375

  9. Haploinsufficiency networks identify targetable patterns of allelic deficiency in low mutation ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Delaney, Joe Ryan; Patel, Chandni B; Willis, Katelyn McCabe; Haghighiabyaneh, Mina; Axelrod, Joshua; Tancioni, Isabelle; Lu, Dan; Bapat, Jaidev; Young, Shanique; Cadassou, Octavia; Bartakova, Alena; Sheth, Parthiv; Haft, Carley; Hui, Sandra; Saenz, Cheryl; Schlaepfer, David D; Harismendy, Olivier; Stupack, Dwayne G

    2017-02-15

    Identification of specific oncogenic gene changes has enabled the modern generation of targeted cancer therapeutics. In high-grade serous ovarian cancer (OV), the bulk of genetic changes is not somatic point mutations, but rather somatic copy-number alterations (SCNAs). The impact of SCNAs on tumour biology remains poorly understood. Here we build haploinsufficiency network analyses to identify which SCNA patterns are most disruptive in OV. Of all KEGG pathways (N=187), autophagy is the most significantly disrupted by coincident gene deletions. Compared with 20 other cancer types, OV is most severely disrupted in autophagy and in compensatory proteostasis pathways. Network analysis prioritizes MAP1LC3B (LC3) and BECN1 as most impactful. Knockdown of LC3 and BECN1 expression confers sensitivity to cells undergoing autophagic stress independent of platinum resistance status. The results support the use of pathway network tools to evaluate how the copy-number landscape of a tumour may guide therapy.

  10. Social Health Insurance-Based Simultaneous Screening for 154 Mutations in 19 Deafness Genes Efficiently Identified Causative Mutations in Japanese Hearing Loss Patients.

    PubMed

    Mori, Kentaro; Moteki, Hideaki; Miyagawa, Maiko; Nishio, Shin-Ya; Usami, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss is one of the most common neurosensory disorders in humans. The incidence of SNHL is estimated to be 1 in 500-1000 newborns. In more than half of these patients, the hearing loss is associated with genetic causes. In Japan, genetic testing for the patients with SNHL using the Invader assay to screen for 46 mutations in 13 deafness genes was approved by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare for inclusion in social health insurance coverage in 2012. Furthermore, from August 2015, this genetic testing has been expanded to screen for 154 mutations in 19 deafness genes using targeted genomic enrichment with massively parallel DNA sequencing combined with the Invader assay and TaqMan genotyping. For this study we analyzed 717 unrelated Japanese hearing loss patients. The total allele frequency of 154 mutations in 19 deafness genes was 32.64% (468/1434) and the total numbers of cases associated with at least one mutation was 44.07% (316/717). Among these, we were able to diagnose 212 (30%) patients, indicating that the present screening could efficiently identify causative mutations in hearing loss patients. It is noteworthy that 27 patients (3.8%) had coexistent multiple mutations in different genes. Five of these 27 patients (0.7%, 5/717 overall) were diagnosed with genetic hearing loss affected by concomitant with responsible mutations in more than two different genes. For patients identified with multiple mutations in different genes, it is necessary to consider that several genes might have an impact on their phenotypes.

  11. Social Health Insurance-Based Simultaneous Screening for 154 Mutations in 19 Deafness Genes Efficiently Identified Causative Mutations in Japanese Hearing Loss Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Kentaro; Moteki, Hideaki; Miyagawa, Maiko; Nishio, Shin-ya; Usami, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss is one of the most common neurosensory disorders in humans. The incidence of SNHL is estimated to be 1 in 500–1000 newborns. In more than half of these patients, the hearing loss is associated with genetic causes. In Japan, genetic testing for the patients with SNHL using the Invader assay to screen for 46 mutations in 13 deafness genes was approved by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare for inclusion in social health insurance coverage in 2012. Furthermore, from August 2015, this genetic testing has been expanded to screen for 154 mutations in 19 deafness genes using targeted genomic enrichment with massively parallel DNA sequencing combined with the Invader assay and TaqMan genotyping. For this study we analyzed 717 unrelated Japanese hearing loss patients. The total allele frequency of 154 mutations in 19 deafness genes was 32.64% (468/1434) and the total numbers of cases associated with at least one mutation was 44.07% (316/717). Among these, we were able to diagnose 212 (30%) patients, indicating that the present screening could efficiently identify causative mutations in hearing loss patients. It is noteworthy that 27 patients (3.8%) had coexistent multiple mutations in different genes. Five of these 27 patients (0.7%, 5/717 overall) were diagnosed with genetic hearing loss affected by concomitant with responsible mutations in more than two different genes. For patients identified with multiple mutations in different genes, it is necessary to consider that several genes might have an impact on their phenotypes. PMID:27627659

  12. Mutations in GRM6 identified in consanguineous Pakistani families with congenital stationary night blindness

    PubMed Central

    Naeem, Muhammad Asif; Gottsch, Alexander D. H.; Ullah, Inayat; Khan, Shaheen N.; Husnain, Tayyab; Butt, Nadeem H.; Qazi, Zaheeruddin A.; Akram, Javed; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Ayyagari, Radha; Hejtmancik, J. Fielding

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study was undertaken to investigate the causal mutations responsible for autosomal recessive congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB) in consanguineous Pakistani families. Methods Two consanguineous families with multiple individuals manifesting symptoms of stationary night blindness were recruited. Affected individuals underwent a detailed ophthalmological examination, including fundus examination and electroretinography. Blood samples were collected and genomic DNA was extracted. Exclusion analyses were completed by genotyping closely spaced microsatellite markers, and two-point logarithm of odds (LOD) scores were calculated. All coding exons, along with the exon–intron boundaries of GRM6, were sequenced bidirectionally. Results According to the medical history available to us, affected individuals in both families had experienced night blindness from the early years of their lives. Fundus photographs of affected individuals in both the families appeared normal, with no signs of attenuated arteries or bone spicule pigmentation. The scotopic electroretinogram (ERG) response were absent in all of the affected individuals, while the photopic measurements show reduced b-waves. During exclusion analyses, both families localized to a region on chromosome 5q that harbors GRM6, a gene previously associated with autosomal recessive CSNB. Bidirectional sequencing of GRM6 identified homozygous single base pair changes, specifically c.1336C>T (p.R446X) and c.2267G>A (p.G756D) in families PKRP170 and PKRP172, respectively. Conclusions We identified a novel nonsense and a previously reported missense mutation in GRM6 that were responsible for autosomal recessive CSNB in patients of Pakistani decent. PMID:26628857

  13. Whole-exome sequencing identifies novel MPL and JAK2 mutations in triple-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Milosevic Feenstra, Jelena D.; Nivarthi, Harini; Gisslinger, Heinz; Leroy, Emilie; Rumi, Elisa; Chachoua, Ilyas; Bagienski, Klaudia; Kubesova, Blanka; Pietra, Daniela; Gisslinger, Bettina; Milanesi, Chiara; Jäger, Roland; Chen, Doris; Berg, Tiina; Schalling, Martin; Schuster, Michael; Bock, Christoph; Constantinescu, Stefan N.; Cazzola, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Essential thrombocythemia (ET) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF) are chronic diseases characterized by clonal hematopoiesis and hyperproliferation of terminally differentiated myeloid cells. The disease is driven by somatic mutations in exon 9 of CALR or exon 10 of MPL or JAK2-V617F in >90% of the cases, whereas the remaining cases are termed “triple negative.” We aimed to identify the disease-causing mutations in the triple-negative cases of ET and PMF by applying whole-exome sequencing (WES) on paired tumor and control samples from 8 patients. We found evidence of clonal hematopoiesis in 5 of 8 studied cases based on clonality analysis and presence of somatic genetic aberrations. WES identified somatic mutations in 3 of 8 cases. We did not detect any novel recurrent somatic mutations. In 3 patients with clonal hematopoiesis analyzed by WES, we identified a somatic MPL-S204P, a germline MPL-V285E mutation, and a germline JAK2-G571S variant. We performed Sanger sequencing of the entire coding region of MPL in 62, and of JAK2 in 49 additional triple-negative cases of ET or PMF. New somatic (T119I, S204F, E230G, Y591D) and 1 germline (R321W) MPL mutation were detected. All of the identified MPL mutations were gain-of-function when analyzed in functional assays. JAK2 variants were identified in 5 of 57 triple-negative cases analyzed by WES and Sanger sequencing combined. We could demonstrate that JAK2-V625F and JAK2-F556V are gain-of-function mutations. Our results suggest that triple-negative cases of ET and PMF do not represent a homogenous disease entity. Cases with polyclonal hematopoiesis might represent hereditary disorders. PMID:26423830

  14. Whole-genome sequencing in autism identifies hot spots for de novo germline mutation.

    PubMed

    Michaelson, Jacob J; Shi, Yujian; Gujral, Madhusudan; Zheng, Hancheng; Malhotra, Dheeraj; Jin, Xin; Jian, Minghan; Liu, Guangming; Greer, Douglas; Bhandari, Abhishek; Wu, Wenting; Corominas, Roser; Peoples, Aine; Koren, Amnon; Gore, Athurva; Kang, Shuli; Lin, Guan Ning; Estabillo, Jasper; Gadomski, Therese; Singh, Balvindar; Zhang, Kun; Akshoomoff, Natacha; Corsello, Christina; McCarroll, Steven; Iakoucheva, Lilia M; Li, Yingrui; Wang, Jun; Sebat, Jonathan

    2012-12-21

    De novo mutation plays an important role in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Notably, pathogenic copy number variants (CNVs) are characterized by high mutation rates. We hypothesize that hypermutability is a property of ASD genes and may also include nucleotide-substitution hot spots. We investigated global patterns of germline mutation by whole-genome sequencing of monozygotic twins concordant for ASD and their parents. Mutation rates varied widely throughout the genome (by 100-fold) and could be explained by intrinsic characteristics of DNA sequence and chromatin structure. Dense clusters of mutations within individual genomes were attributable to compound mutation or gene conversion. Hypermutability was a characteristic of genes involved in ASD and other diseases. In addition, genes impacted by mutations in this study were associated with ASD in independent exome-sequencing data sets. Our findings suggest that regional hypermutation is a significant factor shaping patterns of genetic variation and disease risk in humans.

  15. Seven New Mutations in hMSH2, an HNPCC Gene, Identified by Denaturing Gradient-Gel Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Wijnen, Juul; Vasen, Hans; Khan, P. Meera; Menko, Fred H.; van der Klift, Heleen; van Leeuwen, Claus; van den Broek, Marianne; van Leeuwen-Cornelisse, Inge; Nagengast, Fokko; Meijers-Heijboer, Anne; Lindhout, Dick; Griffioen, Gerrit; Cats, Annemieke; Kleibeuker, Jan; Varesco, Liliana; Bertario, Lucio; Bisgaard, Marie Luise; Mohr, Jan; Fodde, Riccardo

    1995-01-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is a relatively common autosomal dominant cancer-susceptibility condition. The recent isolation of the DNA mismatch repair genes (hMSH2, hMLH1, hPMS1, and hPMS2) responsible for HNPCC has allowed the search for germ-line mutations in affected individuals. In this study we used denaturing gradient-gel electrophoresis to screen for mutations in the hMSH2 gene. Analysis of all the 16 exons of hMSH2, in 34 unrelated HNPCC kindreds, has revealed seven novel pathogenic germ-line mutations resulting in stop codons either directly or through frameshifts. Additionally, nucleotide substitutions giving rise to one missense, two silent, and one useful polymorphism have been identified. The proportion of families in which hMSH2 mutations were found is 21%. Although the spectrum of mutations spread at the hMSH2 gene among HNPCC patients appears extremely heterogeneous, we were not able to establish any correlation between the site of the individual mutations and the corresponding tumor spectrum. Our results indicate that, given the genomic size and organization of the hMSH2 gene and the heterogeneity of its mutation spectrum, a rapid and efficient mutation detection procedure is necessary for routine molecular diagnosis and presymptomatic detection of the disease in a clinical setup. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:7726159

  16. Next-generation sequencing identifies high frequency of mutations in potentially clinically actionable genes in sebaceous carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tetzlaff, Michael T; Singh, Rajesh R; Seviour, Elena G; Curry, Jonathan L; Hudgens, Courtney W; Bell, Diana; Wimmer, Daniel A; Ning, Jing; Czerniak, Bogdan A; Zhang, Li; Davies, Michael A; Prieto, Victor G; Broaddus, Russell R; Ram, Prahlad; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Esmaeli, Bita

    2016-09-01

    Sebaceous carcinoma (SC) is a rare but aggressive malignancy with frequent recurrence and metastases. Surgery is the mainstay of therapy, but effective systemic therapies are lacking because the molecular alterations driving SC remain poorly understood. To identify these, we performed whole-exome next-generation sequencing of 409 cancer-associated genes on 27 SCs (18 primary/locally recurrent ocular, 5 paired metastatic ocular, and 4 primary extraocular) from 20 patients. In ocular SC, we identified 139 non-synonymous somatic mutations (median/lesion 3; range 0-23). Twenty-five of 139 mutations (18%) occurred in potentially clinically actionable genes in 6 of 16 patients. The most common mutations were mutations in TP53 (n = 9), RB1 (n = 6), PIK3CA (n = 2), PTEN (n = 2), ERBB2 (n = 2), and NF1 (n = 2). TP53 and RB1 mutations were restricted to ocular SC and correlated with aberrant TP53 and RB protein expression. Systematic pathway analyses demonstrated convergence of these mutations to activation of the PI3K signalling cascade, and PI3K pathway activation was confirmed in tumours with PTEN and/or PIK3CA mutations. Considerable inter-tumoural heterogeneity was observed between paired primary and metastatic ocular SCs. In primary extraocular SC, we identified 77 non-synonymous somatic mutations (median/lesion 22.5; range 3-29). This overall higher mutational load was attributed to a microsatellite instability phenotype in three of four patients and somatically acquired mutations in mismatch repair genes in two of four patients. Eighteen of 77 mutations (23%) were in potentially clinically actionable genes in three of four patients, including BTK, FGFR2, PDGFRB, HRAS, and NF1 mutations. Identification of potentially clinically actionable mutations in 9 of 20 SC patients (45%) underscores the importance of next-generation sequencing to expand the spectrum of genotype-matched targeted therapies. Frequent activation of PI3K signalling pathways provides a strong

  17. Identity-by-descent filtering of exome sequence data identifies PIGV mutations in hyperphosphatasia mental retardation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Krawitz, Peter M; Schweiger, Michal R; Rödelsperger, Christian; Marcelis, Carlo; Kölsch, Uwe; Meisel, Christian; Stephani, Friederike; Kinoshita, Taroh; Murakami, Yoshiko; Bauer, Sebastian; Isau, Melanie; Fischer, Axel; Dahl, Andreas; Kerick, Martin; Hecht, Jochen; Köhler, Sebastian; Jäger, Marten; Grünhagen, Johannes; de Condor, Birgit Jonske; Doelken, Sandra; Brunner, Han G; Meinecke, Peter; Passarge, Eberhard; Thompson, Miles D; Cole, David E; Horn, Denise; Roscioli, Tony; Mundlos, Stefan; Robinson, Peter N

    2010-10-01

    Hyperphosphatasia mental retardation (HPMR) syndrome is an autosomal recessive form of mental retardation with distinct facial features and elevated serum alkaline phosphatase. We performed whole-exome sequencing in three siblings of a nonconsanguineous union with HPMR and performed computational inference of regions identical by descent in all siblings to establish PIGV, encoding a member of the GPI-anchor biosynthesis pathway, as the gene mutated in HPMR. We identified homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in PIGV in three additional families.

  18. Mutations in FRMD7, a newly identified member of the FERM family, cause X-linked idiopathic congenital nystagmus.

    PubMed

    Tarpey, Patrick; Thomas, Shery; Sarvananthan, Nagini; Mallya, Uma; Lisgo, Steven; Talbot, Chris J; Roberts, Eryl O; Awan, Musarat; Surendran, Mylvaganam; McLean, Rebecca J; Reinecke, Robert D; Langmann, Andrea; Lindner, Susanne; Koch, Martina; Jain, Sunila; Woodruff, Geoffrey; Gale, Richard P; Bastawrous, Andrew; Degg, Chris; Droutsas, Konstantinos; Asproudis, Ioannis; Zubcov, Alina A; Pieh, Christina; Veal, Colin D; Machado, Rajiv D; Backhouse, Oliver C; Baumber, Laura; Constantinescu, Cris S; Brodsky, Michael C; Hunter, David G; Hertle, Richard W; Read, Randy J; Edkins, Sarah; O'Meara, Sarah; Parker, Adrian; Stevens, Claire; Teague, Jon; Wooster, Richard; Futreal, P Andrew; Trembath, Richard C; Stratton, Michael R; Raymond, F Lucy; Gottlob, Irene

    2006-11-01

    Idiopathic congenital nystagmus is characterized by involuntary, periodic, predominantly horizontal oscillations of both eyes. We identified 22 mutations in FRMD7 in 26 families with X-linked idiopathic congenital nystagmus. Screening of 42 singleton cases of idiopathic congenital nystagmus (28 male, 14 females) yielded three mutations (7%). We found restricted expression of FRMD7 in human embryonic brain and developing neural retina, suggesting a specific role in the control of eye movement and gaze stability.

  19. Eight Mutations of Three Genes (EDA, EDAR, and WNT10A) Identified in Seven Hypohidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Binghui; Xiao, Xue; Li, Sijie; Lu, Hui; Lu, Jiaxuan; Zhu, Ling; Yu, Dongsheng; Zhao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) is characterized by abnormal development of the teeth, hair, and sweat glands. Ectodysplasin A (EDA), Ectodysplasin A receptor (EDAR), and EDAR-associated death domain (EDARADD) are candidate genes for HED, but the relationship between WNT10A and HED has not yet been validated. In this study, we included patients who presented at least two of the three ectodermal dysplasia features. The four genes were analyzed in seven HED patients by PCR and Sanger sequencing. Five EDA and one EDAR heterozygous mutations were identified in families 1–6. Two WNT10A heterozygous mutations were identified in family 7 as a compound heterozygote. c.662G>A (p.Gly221Asp) in EDA and c.354T>G (p.Tyr118*) in WNT10A are novel mutations. Bioinformatics analyses results confirmed the pathogenicity of the two novel mutations. In family 7, we also identified two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that were predicted to affect the splicing of EDAR. Analysis of the patient’s total RNA revealed normal splicing of EDAR. This ascertained that the compound heterozygous WNT10A mutations are the genetic defects that led to the onset of HED. Our data revealed the genetic basis of seven HED patients and expended the mutational spectrum. Interestingly, we confirmed WNT10A as a candidate gene of HED and we propose WNT10A to be tested in EDA-negative HED patients. PMID:27657131

  20. Exome sequencing identifies frequent mutation of MLL2 in non–small cell lung carcinoma from Chinese patients

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Shanye; Yang, Jing; Lin, Bin; Deng, Wenjun; Zhang, Yuchao; Yi, Xianfu; Shi, Yufang; Tao, Yong; Cai, Jun; Wu, Chung-I; Zhao, Guoping; Hurst, Laurence D.; Zhang, Jie; Hu, Landian; Kong, Xiangyin

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer mortality worldwide, with an estimated 1.4 million deaths each year. Here we report whole-exome sequencing of nine tumor/normal tissue pairs from Chinese patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). This allows us to identify a number of significantly mutated genes in NSCLC, which were highly enriched in DNA damage repair, NF-κB pathway, JAK/STAT signaling and chromatin modification. Notably, we identify a histone-lysine methyltransferase gene, namely, MLL2, as one of the most significantly mutated genes in our screen. In a following validation study, we identify deleterious mutations of MLL2 in 12 out of 105 (11.4%) NSCLC patients. Additionally, reduced or lost expression of MLL2 was commonly observed in tumor tissues as compared with paired adjacent non-tumor tissues regardless of mutation status. Together, our study defines the landscape of somatic mutations in Chinese NSCLC and supports the role of MLL2 mutation in the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:25112956

  1. IDENTIFYING MUTATION SPECIFIC CANCER PATHWAYS USING A STRUCTURALLY RESOLVED PROTEIN INTERACTION NETWORK

    PubMed Central

    ENGIN, H. BILLUR; HOFREE, MATAN; CARTER, HANNAH

    2014-01-01

    Here we present a method for extracting candidate cancer pathways from tumor ‘omics data while explicitly accounting for diverse consequences of mutations for protein interactions. Disease-causing mutations are frequently observed at either core or interface residues mediating protein interactions. Mutations at core residues frequently destabilize protein structure while mutations at interface residues can specifically affect the binding energies of protein-protein interactions. As a result, mutations in a protein may result in distinct interaction profiles and thus have different phenotypic consequences. We describe a protein structure-guided pipeline for extracting interacting protein sets specific to a particular mutation. Of 59 cancer genes with 3D co-complexed structures in the Protein Data Bank, 43 showed evidence of mutations with different functional consequences. Literature survey reciprocated functional predictions specific to distinct mutations on APC, ATRX, BRCA1, CBL and HRAS. Our analysis suggests that accounting for mutation-specific perturbations to cancer pathways will be essential for personalized cancer therapy. PMID:25592571

  2. A Korean family with KBG syndrome identified by ANKRD11 mutation, and phenotypic comparison of ANKRD11 mutation and 16q24.3 microdeletion.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo Jeong; Cho, Eunhae; Park, Jong Bum; Im, Woo Young; Kim, Hyon J

    2015-02-01

    KBG syndrome is a rare disease characterized by intellectual disability, typical craniofacial dysmorphism, macrodontia of the upper central incisors, short stature, and skeletal anomalies. Recently, ANKRD11 was identified as a gene that is responsible for the disease. In addition, microdeletion of 16q24.3, including ANKRD11, has been reported to result in the KBG syndrome phenotype. Herein, we discuss a Korean family with KBG syndrome, as identified by ANKRD11 gene mutation. The patients included a nine-month-old boy and his 21-month-old sister who failed to thrive and have delayed development. Chromosomal microarray was performed to identify the underlying genetic cause, but the results showed no abnormalities. However, the mother of the children was found to have features similar to her children. Therefore, we strongly suspected an autosomal-dominant inherited disease and performed whole exome sequencing. A mutation of ANKRD11 gene was found in all patients, and the frameshift variant c.2395-2398delAAAG was confirmed. Clinical manifestations of the patients were consistent with KBG syndrome. We reviewed all reported cases with confirmed ANKRD11 mutation or 16q24.3 microdeletion including ANKRD11. As a result, we conclude that severe short stature, intellectual disability, and macrodontia are the main characteristics in KBG syndrome related to ANKRD11 mutation.

  3. A novel common large genomic deletion and two new missense mutations identified in the Romanian phenylketonuria population.

    PubMed

    Gemperle-Britschgi, Corinne; Iorgulescu, Daniela; Mager, Monica Alina; Anton-Paduraru, Dana; Vulturar, Romana; Thöny, Beat

    2016-01-15

    The mutation spectrum for the phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) gene was investigated in a cohort of 84 hyperphenylalaninemia (HPA) patients from Romania identified through newborn screening or neurometabolic investigations. Differential diagnosis identified 81 patients with classic PAH deficiency while 3 had tetrahydropterin-cofactor deficiency and/or remained uncertain due to insufficient specimen. PAH-genetic analysis included a combination of Sanger sequencing of exons and exon–intron boundaries, MLPA and NGS with genomic DNA, and cDNA analysis from immortalized lymphoblasts. A diagnostic efficiency of 99.4% was achieved, as for one allele (out of a total of 162 alleles) no mutation could be identified. The most prevalent mutation was p.Arg408Trp which was found in ~ 38% of all PKU alleles. Three novel mutations were identified, including the two missense mutations p.Gln226Lys and p.Tyr268Cys that were both disease causing by prediction algorithms, and the large genomic deletion EX6del7831 (c.509 + 4140_706 + 510del7831) that resulted in skipping of exon 6 based on PAH-cDNA analysis in immortalized lymphocytes. The genomic deletion was present in a heterozygous state in 12 patients, i.e. in ~ 8% of all the analyzed PKU alleles, and might have originated from a Romanian founder.

  4. Whole-exome sequencing identifies OR2W3 mutation as a cause of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiangyu; Guan, Liping; Wu, Wei; Zhang, Yao; Zheng, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Long, Jirong; Wu, Na; Wu, Long; Xiang, Ying; Xu, Bin; Shen, Miaozhong; Chen, Yanhua; Wang, Yuewen; Yin, Ye; Li, Yingrui; Xu, Haiwei; Xu, Xun; Li, Yafei

    2015-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a heterogeneous group of inherited ocular diseases, is a genetic condition that causes retinal degeneration and eventual vision loss. Though some genes have been identified to be associated with RP, still a large part of the clinical cases could not be explained. Here we reported a four-generation Chinese family with RP, during which 6 from 9 members of the second generation affected the disease. To identify the genetic defect in this family, whole-exome sequencing together with validation analysis by Sanger sequencing were performed to find possible pathogenic mutations. After a pipeline of database filtering, including public databases and in-house databases, a novel missense mutation, c. 424 C > T transition (p.R142W) in OR2W3 gene, was identified as a potentially causative mutation for autosomal dominant RP. The mutation co-segregated with the disease phenotype over four generations. This mutation was validated in another independent three-generation family. RT-PCR analysis also identified that OR2W3 gene was expressed in HESC-RPE cell line. The results will not only enhance our current understanding of the genetic basis of RP, but also provide helpful clues for designing future studies to further investigate genetic factors for familial RP. PMID:25783483

  5. Novel homozygous PANK2 mutation identified in a consanguineous Chinese pedigree with pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Fang; Li, Hong-Fu; Zhang, Yan-Bin; Wu, Ji-Min

    2016-08-01

    Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN) is a rare autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder resulting from pantothenate kinase 2 (PANK2) gene mutations. It is clinically characterized by early onset of extrapyramidal symptoms, with or without pigmentary retinopathy, optic atrophy and acanthocytosis. The specific radiographic appearance of PKAN is the eye-of-the-tiger sign. However, there are few studies regarding PKAN patients of Chinese Han ancestry. In the present study, a Chinese 20-year-old female with an 8-year history of unsteady walking and involuntary movements is described. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed eye-of-the-tiger sign. Following sequencing of PANK2, a novel homozygous c.863C>T (p.P288L) mutation was identified in the patient and heterozygous c.863C>T was identified in her consanguineous parents. The absence of this mutation in the 1000 Genomes database, The Exome Aggregation Consortium, and 200 controls demonstrated that this mutation was probably pathogenic for PKAN in this family. In addition, the PANK2 c.863C>T mutation was predicted to be deleterious by SIFT, disease causing by Mutation Taster and probably damaging by PolyPhen2.

  6. Novel homozygous PANK2 mutation identified in a consanguineous Chinese pedigree with pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan-Fang; Li, Hong-Fu; Zhang, Yan-Bin; Wu, Ji-Min

    2016-01-01

    Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN) is a rare autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder resulting from pantothenate kinase 2 (PANK2) gene mutations. It is clinically characterized by early onset of extrapyramidal symptoms, with or without pigmentary retinopathy, optic atrophy and acanthocytosis. The specific radiographic appearance of PKAN is the eye-of-the-tiger sign. However, there are few studies regarding PKAN patients of Chinese Han ancestry. In the present study, a Chinese 20-year-old female with an 8-year history of unsteady walking and involuntary movements is described. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed eye-of-the-tiger sign. Following sequencing of PANK2, a novel homozygous c.863C>T (p.P288L) mutation was identified in the patient and heterozygous c.863C>T was identified in her consanguineous parents. The absence of this mutation in the 1000 Genomes database, The Exome Aggregation Consortium, and 200 controls demonstrated that this mutation was probably pathogenic for PKAN in this family. In addition, the PANK2 c.863C>T mutation was predicted to be deleterious by SIFT, disease causing by Mutation Taster and probably damaging by PolyPhen2. PMID:27446545

  7. Targeted next generation sequencing identifies two novel mutations in SEPN1 in rigid spine muscular dystrophy 1.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yi; Liang, Shengran; Huang, Yan; Chen, Lin; Banerjee, Santasree

    2016-12-20

    Rigid spine muscular dystrophy 1 (RSMD1) is a neuromuscular disorder, manifested with poor axial muscle strength, scoliosis and neck weakness, and a variable degree of spinal rigidity with an early ventilatory insufficiency which can lead to death by respiratory failure. Mutations of SEPN1 gene are associated with autosomal recessive RSMD1. Here, we present a clinical molecular study of a Chinese proband with RSMD1. The proband is a 17 years old male, showing difficulty in feeding, delayed motor response, problem in running with frequent fall down, early onset respiratory insufficiency, general muscle weakness and rigid cervical spine. Muscle biopsy identified increased variability of fiber size with atrophic muscle cells consistent with non-specific myopathic changes. Proband's elder brother presented with same phenotype as the proband and died at the age of 15 years due to acute respiratory failure. Proband's father and mother are phenotypically normal. Targeted exome capture based next generation sequencing and Sanger sequencing identified that the proband was a compound heterozygote with two novel mutations in SEPN1 gene; a novel missense mutation (c.1384T>C; p.Sec462Arg) and a novel nonsense mutation (c.1525C>T; p.Gln509Ter), inherited from his father and mother respectively. These two mutations are co-segregated with the disease phenotypes in the proband and was absent in normal healthy controls. Our present study expands the mutational spectrum of the SEPN1 associated RSMD1.

  8. Cross-comparison of the genome sequences from human, chimpanzee, Neanderthal and a Denisovan hominin identifies novel potentially compensated mutations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guojie; Pei, Zhang; Ball, Edward V; Mort, Matthew; Kehrer-Sawatzki, Hildegard; Cooper, David N

    2011-07-01

    The recent publication of the draft genome sequences of the Neanderthal and a ∼50,000-year-old archaic hominin from Denisova Cave in southern Siberia has ushered in a new age in molecular archaeology. We previously cross-compared the human, chimpanzee and Neanderthal genome sequences with respect to a set of disease-causing/disease-associated missense and regulatory mutations (Human Gene Mutation Database) and succeeded in identifying genetic variants which, although apparently pathogenic in humans, may represent a 'compensated' wild-type state in at least one of the other two species. Here, in an attempt to identify further 'potentially compensated mutations' (PCMs) of interest, we have compared our dataset of disease-causing/disease-associated mutations with their corresponding nucleotide positions in the Denisovan hominin, Neanderthal and chimpanzee genomes. Of the 15 human putatively disease-causing mutations that were found to be compensated in chimpanzee, Denisovan or Neanderthal, only a solitary F5 variant (Val1736Met) was specific to the Denisovan. In humans, this missense mutation is associated with activated protein C resistance and an increased risk of thromboembolism and recurrent miscarriage. It is unclear at this juncture whether this variant was indeed a PCM in the Denisovan or whether it could instead have been associated with disease in this ancient hominin.

  9. CDH1 mutations in gastric cancer patients from northern Brazil identified by Next- Generation Sequencing (NGS).

    PubMed

    El-Husny, Antonette; Raiol-Moraes, Milene; Amador, Marcos; Ribeiro-Dos-Santos, André M; Montagnini, André; Barbosa, Silvanira; Silva, Artur; Assumpção, Paulo; Ishak, Geraldo; Santos, Sidney; Pinto, Pablo; Cruz, Aline; Ribeiro-Dos-Santos, Ândrea

    2016-05-13

    Gastric cancer is considered to be the fifth highest incident tumor worldwide and the third leading cause of cancer deaths. Developing regions report a higher number of sporadic cases, but there are only a few local studies related to hereditary cases of gastric cancer in Brazil to confirm this fact. CDH1 germline mutations have been described both in familial and sporadic cases, but there is only one recent molecular description of individuals from Brazil. In this study we performed Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) to assess CDH1 germline mutations in individuals who match the clinical criteria for Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer (HDGC), or who exhibit very early diagnosis of gastric cancer. Among five probands we detected CDH1 germline mutations in two cases (40%). The mutation c.1023T > G was found in a HDGC family and the mutation c.1849G > A, which is nearly exclusive to African populations, was found in an early-onset case of gastric adenocarcinoma. The mutations described highlight the existence of gastric cancer cases caused by CDH1 germline mutations in northern Brazil, although such information is frequently ignored due to the existence of a large number of environmental factors locally. Our report represent the first CDH1 mutations in HDGC described from Brazil by an NGS platform.

  10. CDH1 mutations in gastric cancer patients from northern Brazil identified by Next- Generation Sequencing (NGS)

    PubMed Central

    El-Husny, Antonette; Raiol-Moraes, Milene; Amador, Marcos; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, André M.; Montagnini, André; Barbosa, Silvanira; Silva, Artur; Assumpção, Paulo; Ishak, Geraldo; Santos, Sidney; Pinto, Pablo; Cruz, Aline; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ândrea

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Gastric cancer is considered to be the fifth highest incident tumor worldwide and the third leading cause of cancer deaths. Developing regions report a higher number of sporadic cases, but there are only a few local studies related to hereditary cases of gastric cancer in Brazil to confirm this fact. CDH1 germline mutations have been described both in familial and sporadic cases, but there is only one recent molecular description of individuals from Brazil. In this study we performed Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) to assess CDH1 germline mutations in individuals who match the clinical criteria for Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer (HDGC), or who exhibit very early diagnosis of gastric cancer. Among five probands we detected CDH1 germline mutations in two cases (40%). The mutation c.1023T > G was found in a HDGC family and the mutation c.1849G > A, which is nearly exclusive to African populations, was found in an early-onset case of gastric adenocarcinoma. The mutations described highlight the existence of gastric cancer cases caused by CDH1 germline mutations in northern Brazil, although such information is frequently ignored due to the existence of a large number of environmental factors locally. Our report represent the first CDH1 mutations in HDGC described from Brazil by an NGS platform. PMID:27192129

  11. Exome sequencing identifies highly recurrent MED12 somatic mutations in breast fibroadenoma.

    PubMed

    Lim, Weng Khong; Ong, Choon Kiat; Tan, Jing; Thike, Aye Aye; Ng, Cedric Chuan Young; Rajasegaran, Vikneswari; Myint, Swe Swe; Nagarajan, Sanjanaa; Nasir, Nur Diyana Md; McPherson, John R; Cutcutache, Ioana; Poore, Gregory; Tay, Su Ting; Ooi, Wei Siong; Tan, Veronique Kiak Mien; Hartman, Mikael; Ong, Kong Wee; Tan, Benita K T; Rozen, Steven G; Tan, Puay Hoon; Tan, Patrick; Teh, Bin Tean

    2014-08-01

    Fibroadenomas are the most common breast tumors in women under 30 (refs. 1,2). Exome sequencing of eight fibroadenomas with matching whole-blood samples revealed recurrent somatic mutations solely in MED12, which encodes a Mediator complex subunit. Targeted sequencing of an additional 90 fibroadenomas confirmed highly frequent MED12 exon 2 mutations (58/98, 59%) that are probably somatic, with 71% of mutations occurring in codon 44. Using laser capture microdissection, we show that MED12 fibroadenoma mutations are present in stromal but not epithelial mammary cells. Expression profiling of MED12-mutated and wild-type fibroadenomas revealed that MED12 mutations are associated with dysregulated estrogen signaling and extracellular matrix organization. The fibroadenoma MED12 mutation spectrum is nearly identical to that of previously reported MED12 lesions in uterine leiomyoma but not those of other tumors. Benign tumors of the breast and uterus, both of which are key target tissues of estrogen, may thus share a common genetic basis underpinned by highly frequent and specific MED12 mutations.

  12. Whole exome sequencing identifies a troponin T mutation hot spot in familial dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Nzali; Sinagra, Gianfranco; Jones, Kenneth L; Slavov, Dobromir; Gowan, Katherine; Merlo, Marco; Carniel, Elisa; Fain, Pamela R; Aragona, Pierluigi; Di Lenarda, Andrea; Mestroni, Luisa; Taylor, Matthew R G

    2013-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) commonly causes heart failure and shows extensive genetic heterogeneity that may be amenable to newly developed next-generation DNA sequencing of the exome. In this study we report the successful use of exome sequencing to identify a pathogenic variant in the TNNT2 gene using segregation analysis in a large DCM family. Exome sequencing was performed on three distant relatives from a large family with a clear DCM phenotype. Missense, nonsense, and splice variants were analyzed for segregation among the three affected family members and confirmed in other relatives by direct sequencing. A c.517T C>T, Arg173Trp TNNT2 variant segregated with all affected family members and was also detected in one additional DCM family in our registry. The inclusion of segregation analysis using distant family members markedly improved the bioinformatics filtering process by removing from consideration variants that were not shared by all affected subjects. Haplotype analysis confirmed that the variant found in both DCM families was located on two distinct haplotypes, supporting the notion of independent mutational events in each family. In conclusion, an exome sequencing strategy that includes segregation analysis using distant affected relatives within a family represents a viable diagnostic strategy in a genetically heterogeneous disease like DCM.

  13. Whole Exome Sequencing Identifies a Troponin T Mutation Hot Spot in Familial Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Nzali; Sinagra, Gianfranco; Jones, Kenneth L.; Slavov, Dobromir; Gowan, Katherine; Merlo, Marco; Carniel, Elisa; Fain, Pamela R.; Aragona, Pierluigi; Di Lenarda, Andrea; Mestroni, Luisa; Taylor, Matthew R. G.

    2013-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) commonly causes heart failure and shows extensive genetic heterogeneity that may be amenable to newly developed next-generation DNA sequencing of the exome. In this study we report the successful use of exome sequencing to identify a pathogenic variant in the TNNT2 gene using segregation analysis in a large DCM family. Exome sequencing was performed on three distant relatives from a large family with a clear DCM phenotype. Missense, nonsense, and splice variants were analyzed for segregation among the three affected family members and confirmed in other relatives by direct sequencing. A c.517T C>T, Arg173Trp TNNT2 variant segregated with all affected family members and was also detected in one additional DCM family in our registry. The inclusion of segregation analysis using distant family members markedly improved the bioinformatics filtering process by removing from consideration variants that were not shared by all affected subjects. Haplotype analysis confirmed that the variant found in both DCM families was located on two distinct haplotypes, supporting the notion of independent mutational events in each family. In conclusion, an exome sequencing strategy that includes segregation analysis using distant affected relatives within a family represents a viable diagnostic strategy in a genetically heterogeneous disease like DCM. PMID:24205113

  14. Benefits and Challenges with Applying Unique Molecular Identifiers in Next Generation Sequencing to Detect Low Frequency Mutations.

    PubMed

    Kou, Ruqin; Lam, Ham; Duan, Hairong; Ye, Li; Jongkam, Narisra; Chen, Weizhi; Zhang, Shifang; Li, Shihong

    2016-01-01

    Indexing individual template molecules with a unique identifier (UID) before PCR and deep sequencing is promising for detecting low frequency mutations, as true mutations could be distinguished from PCR errors or sequencing errors based on consensus among reads sharing same index. In an effort to develop a robust assay to detect from urine low-abundant bladder cancer cells carrying well-documented mutations, we have tested the idea first on a set of mock templates, with wild type and known mutants mixed at defined ratios. We have measured the combined error rate for PCR and Illumina sequencing at each nucleotide position of three exons, and demonstrated the power of a UID in distinguishing and correcting errors. In addition, we have demonstrated that PCR sampling bias, rather than PCR errors, challenges the UID-deep sequencing method in faithfully detecting low frequency mutation.

  15. Frameshift mutation hotspot identified in Smith-Magenis syndrome: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Truong, Hoa T; Dudding, Tracy; Blanchard, Christopher L; Elsea, Sarah H

    2010-10-08

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a complex syndrome involving intellectual disabilities, sleep disturbance, behavioural problems, and a variety of craniofacial, skeletal, and visceral anomalies. While the majority of SMS cases harbor an ~3.5 Mb common deletion on 17p11.2 that encompasses the retinoic acid induced-1 (RAI1) gene, some patients carry small intragenic deletions or point mutations in RAI1. We present data on two cases of Smith-Magenis syndrome with mutation of RAI1. Both cases are phenotypically consistent with SMS and RAI1 mutation but also have other anomalies not previously reported in SMS, including spontaneous pneumothoraces. These cases also illustrate variability in the SMS phenotype not previously shown for RAI1 mutation cases, including hearing loss, absence of self-abusive behaviours, and mild global delays. Sequencing of RAI1 revealed mutation of the same heptameric C-tract (CCCCCCC) in exon 3 in both cases (c.3103delC one case and and c.3103insC in the other), resulting in frameshift mutations. Of the seven reported frameshift mutations occurring in poly C-tracts in RAI1, four cases (~57%) occur at this heptameric C-tract. Collectively, these results indicate that this heptameric C-tract is a preferential hotspot for single nucleotide insertion/deletions (SNindels) and therefore, should be considered a primary target for analysis in patients suspected for mutations in RAI1. We expect that as more patients are sequenced for mutations in RAI1, the incidence of frameshift mutations in this hotspot will become more evident.

  16. Biopsy-free circulating tumor DNA assay identifies actionable mutations in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Villaflor, Victoria; Won, Brian; Nagy, Rebecca; Banks, Kimberly; Lanman, Richard B.; Talasaz, AmirAli; Salgia, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The potential of oncogene-driven targeted therapy is perhaps most fully realized in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), given the number of genomic targets and approved matched therapies. However, invasive tissue biopsy at the time of each disease progression may not be possible and is associated with high morbidity and cost. Use of newly available “liquid biopsies” can circumvent these issues. Results 83% of subjects had at least one genomic alteration identified in plasma. Most commonly mutated genes were TP53, KRAS and EGFR. Subjects with no detectable ctDNA were more likely to have small volume disease, lepidic growth pattern, mucinous tumors or isolated leptomeningeal disease. Methods Subjects were individuals with NSCLC undergoing analysis of cell-free circulating tumor DNA using a validated, commercially-available next-generation sequencing assay at a single institution. Demographic, clinicopathologic information and results from tissue and plasma-based genomic testing were reviewed for each subject. Conclusions This is the first clinic-based series of NSCLC patients assessing outcomes of targeted therapies using a commercially available ctDNA assay. Over 80% of patients had detectable ctDNA, concordance between paired tissue and blood for truncal oncogenic drivers was high and patients with biomarkers identified in plasma had PFS in the expected range. These data suggest that biopsy-free ctDNA analysis is a viable first choice when the diagnostic tissue biopsy is insufficient for genotyping or at the time of progression when a repeated invasive tissue biopsy is not possible/preferred. PMID:27602770

  17. Suppressors of an Arabidopsis thaliana phyB mutation identify genes that control light signaling and hypocotyl elongation.

    PubMed Central

    Reed, J W; Elumalai, R P; Chory, J

    1998-01-01

    Ambient light controls the development and physiology of plants. The Arabidopsis thaliana photoreceptor phytochrome B (PHYB) regulates developmental light responses at both seedling and adult stages. To identify genes that mediate control of development by light, we screened for suppressors of the long hypocotyl phenotype caused by a phyB mutation. Genetic analyses show that the shy (short hypocotyl) mutations we have isolated fall in several loci. Phenotypes of the mutants suggest that some of the genes identified have functions in control of light responses. Other loci specifically affect cell elongation or expansion. PMID:9539443

  18. Balancing protein stability and activity in cancer: a new approach for identifying driver mutations affecting CBL ubiquitin ligase activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Minghui; Kales, Stephen C.; Ma, Ke; Shoemaker, Benjamin A.; Crespo-Barreto, Juan; Cangelosi, Andrew L.; Lipkowitz, Stanley; Panchenko, Anna R.

    2015-01-01

    Oncogenic mutations in the monomeric Casitas B-lineage lymphoma (Cbl) gene have been found in many tumors, but their significance remains largely unknown. Several human c-Cbl (CBL) structures have recently been solved depicting the protein at different stages of its activation cycle and thus provide mechanistic insight underlying how stability-activity tradeoffs in cancer-related proteins may influence disease onset and progression. In this study, we computationally modeled the effects of missense cancer mutations on structures representing four stages of the CBL activation cycle to identify driver mutations that affect CBL stability, binding, and activity. We found that recurrent, homozygous, and leukemia-specific mutations had greater destabilizing effects on CBL states than did random non-cancer mutations. We further tested the ability of these computational models assessing the changes in CBL stability and its binding to ubiquitin conjugating enzyme E2, by performing blind CBL-mediated EGFR ubiquitination assays in cells. Experimental CBL ubiquitin ligase activity was in agreement with the predicted changes in CBL stability and, to a lesser extent, with CBL-E2 binding affinity. Two-thirds of all experimentally tested mutations affected the ubiquitin ligase activity by either destabilizing CBL or disrupting CBL-E2 binding, whereas about one-third of tested mutations were found to be neutral. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that computational methods incorporating multiple protein conformations and stability and binding affinity evaluations can successfully predict the functional consequences of cancer mutations on protein activity, and provide a proof of concept for mutations in CBL. PMID:26676746

  19. Dissecting protein function: an efficient protocol for identifying separation-of-function mutations that encode structurally stable proteins.

    PubMed

    Lubin, Johnathan W; Rao, Timsi; Mandell, Edward K; Wuttke, Deborah S; Lundblad, Victoria

    2013-03-01

    Mutations that confer the loss of a single biochemical property (separation-of-function mutations) can often uncover a previously unknown role for a protein in a particular biological process. However, most mutations are identified based on loss-of-function phenotypes, which cannot differentiate between separation-of-function alleles vs. mutations that encode unstable/unfolded proteins. An alternative approach is to use overexpression dominant-negative (ODN) phenotypes to identify mutant proteins that disrupt function in an otherwise wild-type strain when overexpressed. This is based on the assumption that such mutant proteins retain an overall structure that is comparable to that of the wild-type protein and are able to compete with the endogenous protein (Herskowitz 1987). To test this, the in vivo phenotypes of mutations in the Est3 telomerase subunit from Saccharomyces cerevisiae were compared with the in vitro secondary structure of these mutant proteins as analyzed by circular-dichroism spectroscopy, which demonstrates that ODN is a more sensitive assessment of protein stability than the commonly used method of monitoring protein levels from extracts. Reverse mutagenesis of EST3, which targeted different categories of amino acids, also showed that mutating highly conserved charged residues to the oppositely charged amino acid had an increased likelihood of generating a severely defective est3(-) mutation, which nevertheless encoded a structurally stable protein. These results suggest that charge-swap mutagenesis directed at a limited subset of highly conserved charged residues, combined with ODN screening to eliminate partially unfolded proteins, may provide a widely applicable and efficient strategy for generating separation-of-function mutations.

  20. Targeted exome capture and sequencing identifies novel PRPF31 mutations in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa in Chinese families

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liping; Yin, Xiaobei; Wu, Lemeng; Chen, Ningning; Zhang, Huirong; Li, Genlin; Ma, Zhizhong

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To identify disease-causing mutations in two Chinese families with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP). Design Prospective analysis. Patients Two Chinese adRP families underwent genetic diagnosis. A specific hereditary eye disease enrichment panel (HEDEP) based on targeted exome capture technology was used to collect the protein coding regions of targeted 371 hereditary eye disease genes; high throughput sequencing was done with the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. The identified variants were confirmed with Sanger sequencing. Setting All experiments were performed in a large laboratory specialising in genetic studies in the Department of Ophthalmology, Peking University Third Hospital. Results Two novel mutations, including one splice site mutation (Int10 c.1074-2 A>T; p.Y359SfsX29) and one insertion (c.824_825insA; p.Y275X) of PRPF31 were identified in the two families. The two mutations segregated with the disease phenotype in their respective families. Conclusions Our findings broaden the spectrum of PRPF31 mutations causing adRP and the phenotypic spectrum of the disease in Chinese patients. The HEDEP based on targeted exome capture technology is an efficient method for molecular diagnosis in adRP patients. PMID:24202059

  1. Novel somatic mutations identified by whole-exome sequencing in muscle-invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder.

    PubMed

    Pan, Huixing; Xu, Xiaojian; Wu, Deyao; Qiu, Qiaocheng; Zhou, Shoujun; He, Xuefeng; Zhou, Yunfeng; Qu, Ping; Hou, Jianquan; He, Jun; Zhou, Jian

    2016-02-01

    Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is the one of the most commonly observed types of cancer globally. The identification of novel disease-associated genes in TCC has had a significant effect on the diagnosis and treatment of bladder cancer; however, there may be a large number of novel genes that have not been identified. In the present study, the exomes of two individuals who were diagnosed with muscle-invasive TCC (MI-TCC) were sequenced to investigate potential variants. Subsequently, following algorithm and filter analysis, Sanger sequencing was used to validate the results of deep sequencing. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was employed to observe the differences in HECT, C2 and WW domain-containing E3 ubiquitin protein ligase 1 (HECW1) protein expression between tumor tissues and para-carcinoma tissues. A total of 6 nonsynonymous mutation genes were identified in MI-TCC, identified as copine VII, RNA binding motif protein, X-linked-like 3, acyl-CoA synthetase medium-chain family member 2A, HECW1, zinc finger protein 273 and trichohyalin. Furthermore, 5 cases were identified to possess a HECW1 gene mutation in 61 MI-TCC specimens, and all of these were point mutations located at exon 11 on chromosome 7. The mutation categories of HECW1 had 4 missense mutations and 1 nonsense mutation. IHC revealed that HECW1 protein was expressed at significantly increased levels in MI-TCC compared with normal bladder urothelium (P<0.001). The present study provided a novel approach for investigating genetic changes in the MI-TCC exome, and identified the novel mutant gene HECW1, which may possess a significant role in the pathogenesis of TCC.

  2. Disease-targeted sequencing of ion channel genes identifies de novo mutations in patients with non-familial Brugada syndrome.

    PubMed

    Juang, Jyh-Ming Jimmy; Lu, Tzu-Pin; Lai, Liang-Chuan; Ho, Chia-Chuan; Liu, Yen-Bin; Tsai, Chia-Ti; Lin, Lian-Yu; Yu, Chih-Chieh; Chen, Wen-Jone; Chiang, Fu-Tien; Yeh, Shih-Fan Sherri; Lai, Ling-Ping; Chuang, Eric Y; Lin, Jiunn-Lee

    2014-10-23

    Brugada syndrome (BrS) is one of the ion channelopathies associated with sudden cardiac death (SCD). The most common BrS-associated gene (SCN5A) only accounts for approximately 20-25% of BrS patients. This study aims to identify novel mutations across human ion channels in non-familial BrS patients without SCN5A variants through disease-targeted sequencing. We performed disease-targeted multi-gene sequencing across 133 human ion channel genes and 12 reported BrS-associated genes in 15 unrelated, non-familial BrS patients without SCN5A variants. Candidate variants were validated by mass spectrometry and Sanger sequencing. Five de novo mutations were identified in four genes (SCNN1A, KCNJ16, KCNB2, and KCNT1) in three BrS patients (20%). Two of the three patients presented SCD and one had syncope. Interestingly, the two patients presented with SCD had compound mutations (SCNN1A:Arg350Gln and KCNB2:Glu522Lys; SCNN1A:Arg597* and KCNJ16:Ser261Gly). Importantly, two SCNN1A mutations were identified from different families. The KCNT1:Arg1106Gln mutation was identified in a patient with syncope. Bioinformatics algorithms predicted severe functional interruptions in these four mutation loci, suggesting their pivotal roles in BrS. This study identified four novel BrS-associated genes and indicated the effectiveness of this disease-targeted sequencing across ion channel genes for non-familial BrS patients without SCN5A variants.

  3. Structural and functional analysis of APOA5 mutations identified in patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia[S

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Barberá, Elena; Julve, Josep; Nilsson, Stefan K.; Lookene, Aivar; Martín-Campos, Jesús M.; Roig, Rosa; Lechuga-Sancho, Alfonso M.; Sloan, John H.; Fuentes-Prior, Pablo; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    During the diagnosis of three unrelated patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia, three APOA5 mutations [p.(Ser232_Leu235)del, p.Leu253Pro, and p.Asp332ValfsX4] were found without evidence of concomitant LPL, APOC2, or GPIHBP1 mutations. The molecular mechanisms by which APOA5 mutations result in severe hypertriglyceridemia remain poorly understood, and the functional impairment/s induced by these specific mutations was not obvious. Therefore, we performed a thorough structural and functional analysis that included follow-up of patients and their closest relatives, measurement of apoA-V serum concentrations, and sequencing of the APOA5 gene in 200 nonhyperlipidemic controls. Further, we cloned, overexpressed, and purified both wild-type and mutant apoA-V variants and characterized their capacity to activate LPL. The interactions of recombinant wild-type and mutated apoA-V variants with liposomes of different composition, heparin, LRP1, sortilin, and SorLA/LR11 were also analyzed. Finally, to explore the possible structural consequences of these mutations, we developed a three-dimensional model of full-length, lipid-free human apoA-V. A complex, wide array of impairments was found in each of the three mutants, suggesting that the specific residues affected are critical structural determinants for apoA-V function in lipoprotein metabolism and, therefore, that these APOA5 mutations are a direct cause of hypertriglyceridemia. PMID:23307945

  4. TP53 mutation-correlated genes predict the risk of tumor relapse and identify MPS1 as a potential therapeutic kinase in TP53-mutated breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Győrffy, Balázs; Bottai, Giulia; Lehmann-Che, Jacqueline; Kéri, György; Orfi, László; Iwamoto, Takayuki; Desmedt, Christine; Bianchini, Giampaolo; Turner, Nicholas C; de Thè, Hugues; André, Fabrice; Sotiriou, Christos; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N; Di Leo, Angelo; Pusztai, Lajos; Santarpia, Libero

    2014-05-01

    Breast cancers (BC) carry a complex set of gene mutations that can influence their gene expression and clinical behavior. We aimed to identify genes driven by the TP53 mutation status and assess their clinical relevance in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive and ER-negative BC, and their potential as targets for patients with TP53 mutated tumors. Separate ROC analyses of each gene expression according to TP53 mutation status were performed. The prognostic value of genes with the highest AUC were assessed in a large dataset of untreated, and neoadjuvant chemotherapy treated patients. The mitotic checkpoint gene MPS1 was the most significant gene correlated with TP53 status, and the most significant prognostic marker in all ER-positive BC datasets. MPS1 retained its prognostic value independently from the type of treatment administered. The biological functions of MPS1 were investigated in different BC cell lines. We also assessed the effects of a potent small molecule inhibitor of MPS1, SP600125, alone and in combination with chemotherapy. Consistent with the gene expression profiling and siRNA assays, the inhibition of MPS1 by SP600125 led to a reduction in cell viability and a significant increase in cell death, selectively in TP53-mutated BC cells. Furthermore, the chemical inhibition of MPS1 sensitized BC cells to conventional chemotherapy, particularly taxanes. Our results collectively demonstrate that TP53-correlated kinase MPS1, is a potential therapeutic target in BC patients with TP53 mutated tumors, and that SP600125 warrant further development in future clinical trials.

  5. Two novel AGXT mutations identified in primary hyperoxaluria type-1 and distinct morphological and structural difference in kidney stones

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cui; Lu, Jingru; Lang, Yanhua; Liu, Ting; Wang, Xiaoling; Zhao, Xiangzhong; Shao, Leping

    2016-01-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1) is a rare genetic disease characterized by excessive oxalate accumulation in plasma and urine, resulting in various phenotypes because of allelic and clinical heterogeneity. This study aimed to detect disease-associated genetic mutations in three PH1 patients in a Chinese family. All AGXT exons and 3 common polymorphisms which might synergistically interact with mutations, including P11L, I340 M and IVSI+74 bp were analyzed by direct sequencing in all family members. It demonstrated that in each of three patients, a previously reported nonsense mutation p.R333* was in cis with a novel missense mutation p.M49L in the minor allele characterized by the polymorphism of 74-bp duplication in intron 1, while the other novel missense mutation p.N72I was in trans with both p.R333* and P.M49L in the major allele. Kidney stones from two sibling patients were also observed though stereomicroscopic examination and scanning electron microscopy. Distinct morphological and inner-structure differences in calculi were noticed, suggesting clinical heterozygosity of PH1 to a certain extent. In brief, two novel missense mutations were identified probably in association with PH1, a finding which should provide an accurate tool for prenatal diagnosis, genetic counseling and screening for potential presymptomatic individuals. PMID:27644547

  6. Urinary bladder paragangliomas: How Immunohistochemistry can assist to identify patients with SDHB germ line and somatic mutations

    PubMed Central

    Giubellino, Alessio; Lara, Karlena; Martucci, Victoria; Huynh, T; Agarwal, Piyush; Pacak, Karel; Merino, Maria J

    2015-01-01

    Urinary bladder paraganglioma (paraganglioma) is a rare tumor of chromaffin cells of the sympathetic system of the urinary bladder wall. We studied 14 cases of this entity and investigated the usefulness of SDHB protein staining by immunohistochemistry (IHC) as a diagnostic tool to identify patients with bladder paragangliomas that could be associated with SDHB gene mutations, since these patient have a more aggressive disease. Eleven tumors from these patients were stained by IHC. Six out of 11 tumors were negative for SDHB staining by IHC with no cytoplasmic staining in tumor cells when compared with normal tissues. Five out of these 6 negative cases were confirmed to be positive for germline SDHB mutations. One case showed negative staining and no germline SDHB mutation, however, further investigation of the tumor revealed a somatic SDHB gene deletion. The remaining 5 cases showed strong cytoplasmic staining but they were negative for the presence of SDHB mutation. They were found to be either sporadic tumors or part of von Hippel-Lindau syndrome. Staining for SDH-A was positive in all cases. Our study confirms that there is very good correlation between the presence of an SDHB mutation, whether germline or sporadic, and negative SDHB IHC staining in urinary bladder paragangliomas, and represents the first study to demonstrate that somatic mutations can be recognized by IHC staining. PMID:26457353

  7. Exome sequencing of serous endometrial tumors identifies recurrent somatic mutations in chromatin-remodeling and ubiquitin ligase complex genes.

    PubMed

    Le Gallo, Matthieu; O'Hara, Andrea J; Rudd, Meghan L; Urick, Mary Ellen; Hansen, Nancy F; O'Neil, Nigel J; Price, Jessica C; Zhang, Suiyuan; England, Bryant M; Godwin, Andrew K; Sgroi, Dennis C; Hieter, Philip; Mullikin, James C; Merino, Maria J; Bell, Daphne W

    2012-12-01

    Endometrial cancer is the sixth most commonly diagnosed cancer in women worldwide, causing ~74,000 deaths annually. Serous endometrial cancers are a clinically aggressive subtype with a poorly defined genetic etiology. We used whole-exome sequencing to comprehensively search for somatic mutations within ~22,000 protein-encoding genes in 13 primary serous endometrial tumors. We subsequently resequenced 18 genes, which were mutated in more than 1 tumor and/or were components of an enriched functional grouping, from 40 additional serous tumors. We identified high frequencies of somatic mutations in CHD4 (17%), EP300 (8%), ARID1A (6%), TSPYL2 (6%), FBXW7 (29%), SPOP (8%), MAP3K4 (6%) and ABCC9 (6%). Overall, 36.5% of serous tumors had a mutated chromatin-remodeling gene, and 35% had a mutated ubiquitin ligase complex gene, implicating frequent mutational disruption of these processes in the molecular pathogenesis of one of the deadliest forms of endometrial cancer.

  8. Functional mutations in 5′UTR of the BMPR2 gene identified in Chinese families with pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chenting; Liu, Chunli; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Nuofu; Hadadi, Cyrus; Huang, Junyi; Zhong, Nanshan; Lu, Wenju

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive pulmonary vasculopathy with significant morbidity and mortality. Bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2 (BMPR2) has been well recognized as the principal gene responsible for heritable and sporadic PAH. Four unrelated Chinese patients with PAH and their family members, both symptomatic and asymptomatic, were genetically evaluated by sequencing all exons and the flanking regions of BMPR2. Functionality of the aberrant mutations at the 5′ untranslated region (UTR) of BMPR2 in the families with PAH was determined by site mutation, transient transfection, and promoter-reporter assays. Four individual mutations in the BMPR2 gene were identified in the 4 families, respectively: 10-GGC repeats, 13-GGC repeats, 4-AGC repeats in 5′UTR, and a novel missense mutation in exon 7 (c.961C>T; p.Arg321X). Moreover, we demonstrated that (1) these 5′UTR mutations decreased the transcription of BMPR2 and (2) the GGC repeats and AGC repeats in BMPR2 5′UTR bore functional binding sites of EGR-1 and MYF5, respectively. This is the first report demonstrating the presence of functional BMPR2 5′UTR mutations in familial patients with PAH and further indicating that EGR-1 and MYF5 are potential targets for correcting these genetic abnormalities for PAH therapy. PMID:27162618

  9. Functional analysis of a promoter variant identified in the CFTR gene in cis of a frameshift mutation.

    PubMed

    Viart, Victoria; Des Georges, Marie; Claustres, Mireille; Taulan, Magali

    2012-02-01

    In monogenic diseases, the presence of several sequence variations in the same allele may complicate our understanding of genotype-phenotype relationships. We described new alterations identified in a cystic fibrosis (CF) patient harboring a 48C>G promoter sequence variation associated in cis of a 3532AC>GTA mutation and in trans with the F508del mutation. Functional analyses including in vitro experiments confirmed the deleterious effect of the 3532GTA frameshift mutation through the creation of a premature termination codon. The analyses also revealed that the 48G promoter variant has a negative effect on both transcription and mRNA level, thus demonstrating the importance of analyzing all mutations or sequence variations with potential impact on CF transmembrane conductance regulator processing, even when the two known disease-causing mutations have already been detected. Our results emphasize the need to perform, wherever possible, functional studies that may greatly assist the interpretation of the disease-causing potential of rare mutation-associated sequence variations.

  10. Two-round coamplification at lower denaturation temperature-PCR (COLD-PCR)-based sanger sequencing identifies a novel spectrum of low-level mutations in lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Milbury, Coren A; Li, Cheng; Makrigiorgos, G Mike

    2009-11-01

    Reliable identification of cancer-related mutations in TP53 is often problematic, as these mutations can be randomly distributed throughout numerous codons and their relative abundance in clinical samples can fall below the sensitivity limits of conventional sequencing. To ensure the highest sensitivity in mutation detection, we adapted the recently described coamplification at lower denaturation temperature-PCR (COLD-PCR) method to employ two consecutive rounds of COLD-PCR followed by Sanger sequencing. Using this highly sensitive approach we screened 48 nonmicrodissected lung adenocarcinoma samples for TP53 mutations. Twenty-four missense/frameshift TP53 mutations throughout exons 5 to 8 were identified in 23 out of 48 (48%) lung adenocarcinoma samples examined, including eight low-level mutations at an abundance of approximately 1 to 17%, most of which would have been missed using conventional methodologies. The identified alterations include two rare lung adenocarcinoma mutations, one of which is a "disruptive" mutation currently undocumented in the lung cancer mutation databases. A sample harboring a low-level mutation ( approximately 2% abundance) concurrently with a clonal mutation (80% abundance) revealed intratumoral TP53 mutation heterogeneity. The ability to identify and sequence low-level mutations in the absence of elaborate microdissection, via COLD-PCR-based Sanger sequencing, provides a platform for accurate mutation profiling in clinical specimens and the use of TP53 as a prognostic/predictive biomarker, evaluation of cancer risk, recurrence, and further understanding of cancer biology.

  11. A new point mutation in the ND1 mitochondrial gene identified in a type II diabetic patient

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinin, V.N.; Schmidt, W.; Olek, K.

    1995-08-01

    A novel mutation in a mitochondrial gene was identified in a patient with type II diabetes mellitus. G-to-A transition was localized at the nt3316 position of gene ND1 and resulted in alanine threonine replacement at position 4 of mitochondrial NAD-H-dehydrogenase. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Whole exome sequencing identifies three recessive FIG4 mutations in an apparently dominant pedigree with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Manoj P; Waddell, Leigh; Lenk, Guy M; Kaur, Simranpreet; MacArthur, Daniel G; Meisler, Miriam H; Clarke, Nigel F

    2014-08-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is genetically heterogeneous and classification based on motor nerve conduction velocity and inheritance is used to direct genetic testing. With the less common genetic forms of CMT, identifying the causative genetic mutation by Sanger sequencing of individual genes can be time-consuming and costly. Next-generation sequencing technologies show promise for clinical testing in diseases where a similar phenotype is caused by different genes. We report the unusual occurrence of CMT4J, caused by mutations in FIG4, in a apparently dominant pedigree. The affected proband and her mother exhibit different disease severities associated with different combinations of compound heterozygous FIG4 mutations, identified by whole exome sequencing. The proband was also shown to carry a de novo nonsense mutation in the dystrophin gene, which may contribute to her more severe phenotype. This study is a cautionary reminder that in families with two generations affected, explanations other than dominant inheritance are possible, such as recessive inheritance due to three mutations segregating in the family. It also emphasises the advantages of next-generation sequencing approaches that screen multiple CMT genes at once for patients in whom the common genes have been excluded.

  13. Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing Identifies a Recurrent Mutation in MCPH1 Associating with Hereditary Breast Cancer Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Mantere, Tuomo; Winqvist, Robert; Kauppila, Saila; Grip, Mervi; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Tervasmäki, Anna; Rapakko, Katrin; Pylkäs, Katri

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is strongly influenced by hereditary risk factors, a majority of which still remain unknown. Here, we performed a targeted next-generation sequencing of 796 genes implicated in DNA repair in 189 Finnish breast cancer cases with indication of hereditary disease susceptibility and focused the analysis on protein truncating mutations. A recurrent heterozygous mutation (c.904_916del, p.Arg304ValfsTer3) was identified in early DNA damage response gene, MCPH1, significantly associating with breast cancer susceptibility both in familial (5/145, 3.4%, P = 0.003, OR 8.3) and unselected cases (16/1150, 1.4%, P = 0.016, OR 3.3). A total of 21 mutation positive families were identified, of which one-third exhibited also brain tumors and/or sarcomas (P = 0.0007). Mutation carriers exhibited significant increase in genomic instability assessed by cytogenetic analysis for spontaneous chromosomal rearrangements in peripheral blood lymphocytes (P = 0.0007), suggesting an effect for MCPH1 haploinsufficiency on cancer susceptibility. Furthermore, 40% of the mutation carrier tumors exhibited loss of the wild-type allele. These findings collectively provide strong evidence for MCHP1 being a novel breast cancer susceptibility gene, which warrants further investigations in other populations. PMID:26820313

  14. Broadening of cohesinopathies: exome sequencing identifies mutations in ANKRD11 in two patients with Cornelia de Lange-overlapping phenotype.

    PubMed

    Parenti, I; Gervasini, C; Pozojevic, J; Graul-Neumann, L; Azzollini, J; Braunholz, D; Watrin, E; Wendt, K S; Cereda, A; Cittaro, D; Gillessen-Kaesbach, G; Lazarevic, D; Mariani, M; Russo, S; Werner, R; Krawitz, P; Larizza, L; Selicorni, A; Kaiser, F J

    2016-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) and KBG syndrome are two distinct developmental pathologies sharing common features such as intellectual disability, psychomotor delay, and some craniofacial and limb abnormalities. Mutations in one of the five genes NIPBL, SMC1A, SMC3, HDAC8 or RAD21, were identified in at least 70% of the patients with CdLS. Consequently, additional causative genes, either unknown or responsible of partially merging entities, possibly account for the remaining 30% of the patients. In contrast, KBG has only been associated with mutations in ANKRD11. By exome sequencing we could identify heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in ANKRD11 in two patients with the clinical diagnosis of CdLS. Both patients show features reminiscent of CdLS such as characteristic facies as well as a small head circumference which is not described for KBG syndrome. Patient A, who carries the mutation in a mosaic state, is a 4-year-old girl with features reminiscent of CdLS. Patient B, a 15-year-old boy, shows a complex phenotype which resembled CdLS during infancy, but has developed to a more KBG overlapping phenotype during childhood. These findings point out the importance of screening ANKRD11 in young CdLS patients who were found to be negative for mutations in the five known CdLS genes.

  15. Hypomorphic mutations identified in candidate Leber congenital amaurosis disease gene CLUAP1

    PubMed Central

    Soens, Zachry T.; Li, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Li; Eblimit, Aiden; Dharmat, Rachayata; Li, Yumei; Chen, Yiyun; Naqeeb, Mohammed; Fajardo, Norma; Lopez, Irma; Sun, Zhaoxia; Koenekoop, Robert K.; Chen, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is an early-onset form of retinal degeneration and six of the 22 known LCA disease genes encode photoreceptor ciliary proteins. Despite the identification of 22 LCA disease genes, the genetic basis of approximately 30% of LCA patients remains unknown. We sought to investigate the cause of disease in the remaining 30% by examining cilia-associated genes. Methods Whole-exome sequencing was performed on an LCA cohort of 212 unsolved probands previously screened for mutations in known retinal disease genes. Immunohistochemistry using mouse retinas was used to confirm protein localization and zebrafish were used to perform rescue experiments. Results A homozygous nonsynonymous mutation was found in a single proband in CLUAP1, a gene required for ciliogenesis and cilia maintenance. Cluap1 knockout zebrafish exhibit photoreceptor cell death as early as five days post fertilization and rescue experiments revealed that our proband’s mutation is significantly hypomorphic. Conclusion Consistent with the knowledge that CLUAP1 plays an important role in cilia function and that cilia are critical to photoreceptor function, our results indicate that hypomorphic mutations in CLUAP1 can result in dysfunctional photoreceptors without systemic abnormalities. This represents the first report linking mutations in CLUAP1 to human disease and establishes CLUAP1 as a candidate LCA gene. PMID:26820066

  16. Can a Place of Origin of the Main Cystic Fibrosis Mutations Be Identified?

    PubMed Central

    Mateu, Eva; Calafell, Francesc; Ramos, Maria Dolors; Casals, Teresa; Bertranpetit, Jaume

    2002-01-01

    The genetic background of the mutations that most often cause cystic fibrosis (CF) is different from that of non-CF chromosomes in populations of European origin. It is not known whether these haplotype backgrounds could be found at high frequencies in populations in which CF is, at present, not common; such populations would be candidates for the place of origin of CF mutations. An analysis of haplotypes of CF transmembrane conductance regulator, together with their variation in specific CF chromosomes, in a worldwide survey of normal chromosomes shows (1) a very low frequency or absence of the most common CF haplotypes in all populations analyzed and (2) a strong genetic variability and divergence, among various populations, of the chromosomes that carry disease-causing mutations. The depth of the gene genealogy associated with disease-causing mutations may be greater than that of the evolutionary process that gave rise to present-day human populations. The concept of “population of origin” lacks either spatial or temporal meaning for mutations that are likely to have been present in Europeans before the ethnogenesis of present populations; subsequent population processes may have erased the traces of their geographic origin. PMID:11713719

  17. Somatic Mutation Profiles of MSI and MSS Colorectal Cancer Identified by Whole Exome Next Generation Sequencing and Bioinformatics Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Roehr, Christina; Fischer, Axel; Isau, Melanie; Boerno, Stefan T.; Wunderlich, Andrea; Barmeyer, Christian; Seemann, Petra; Koenig, Jana; Lappe, Michael; Kuss, Andreas W.; Garshasbi, Masoud; Bertram, Lars; Trappe, Kathrin; Werber, Martin; Herrmann, Bernhard G.; Zatloukal, Kurt; Lehrach, Hans; Schweiger, Michal R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is with approximately 1 million cases the third most common cancer worldwide. Extensive research is ongoing to decipher the underlying genetic patterns with the hope to improve early cancer diagnosis and treatment. In this direction, the recent progress in next generation sequencing technologies has revolutionized the field of cancer genomics. However, one caveat of these studies remains the large amount of genetic variations identified and their interpretation. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we present the first work on whole exome NGS of primary colon cancers. We performed 454 whole exome pyrosequencing of tumor as well as adjacent not affected normal colonic tissue from microsatellite stable (MSS) and microsatellite instable (MSI) colon cancer patients and identified more than 50,000 small nucleotide variations for each tissue. According to predictions based on MSS and MSI pathomechanisms we identified eight times more somatic non-synonymous variations in MSI cancers than in MSS and we were able to reproduce the result in four additional CRCs. Our bioinformatics filtering approach narrowed down the rate of most significant mutations to 359 for MSI and 45 for MSS CRCs with predicted altered protein functions. In both CRCs, MSI and MSS, we found somatic mutations in the intracellular kinase domain of bone morphogenetic protein receptor 1A, BMPR1A, a gene where so far germline mutations are associated with juvenile polyposis syndrome, and show that the mutations functionally impair the protein function. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that with deep sequencing of tumor exomes one may be able to predict the microsatellite status of CRC and in addition identify potentially clinically relevant mutations. PMID:21203531

  18. Evaluation of von Willebrand factor phenotypes and genotypes in Hemophilia A patients with and without identified F8 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Boylan, Brian; Rice, Anne S.; De Staercke, Christine; Eyster, M. Elaine; Yaish, Hassan M.; Knoll, Christine M.; Bean, Christopher J.; Miller, Connie H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Hemophilia A (HA) is an X-linked bleeding disorder caused by a deficiency in factor VIII (FVIII). von Willebrand disease (VWD) is characterized by a quantitative or qualitative defect in von Willebrand Factor (VWF). Patients with VWD with severely low VWF or VWD Type 2N (VWD2N), a VWD subtype distinguished by defective VWF binding to FVIII, may have reduced FVIII levels secondary to their VWD. These patients superficially resemble patients with HA, and pose a potential for misdiagnosis. Objectives Investigate the unexplained cause of bleeding in HA patients without known FVIII mutations by assessing plasma VWF antigen (VWF:Ag), FVIII binding capacities, and VWF genotypes. Patients/Methods Thirty-seven of 1027 patients with HA studied as part of the Hemophilia Inhibitor Research Study lacked identifiable F8 mutations. These patients (cases) and 73 patients with identified F8 mutations (controls) were evaluated for VWF:Ag, patient's VWF capacity to bind FVIII (VWF:FVIIIB), and VWF sequence. Results Four cases had VWF:Ag <3 IU/dL and VWF mutations consistent with Type3 VWD. Six cases and one control were heterozygous for mutations previously reported to cause Type1 VWD (VWD1) (n=5 cases and 1 control) or predicted to be deleterious by Polyphen2 and SIFT prediction tools (n=1 case). One control had VWF:Ag <30 IU/dl, and seven patients (4 cases and 3 controls), including two cases who were heterozygous for a known VWD2N mutation, had reduced VWF:FVIIIB. Conclusions These data emphasize that some patients diagnosed with HA require VWF assessments in order to achieve a comprehensive diagnosis and an optimal treatment strategy. PMID:25780857

  19. Cadmium-induced DNA damage and mutations in Arabidopsis plantlet shoots identified by DNA fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wan; Sun, Lizong; Zhong, Ming; Zhou, Qixing; Gong, Zongqiang; Li, Peijun; Tai, Peidong; Li, Xiaojun

    2012-11-01

    Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) test is a feasible method to evaluate the toxicity of environmental pollutants on vegetal organisms. Herein, Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) plantlets following Cadmium (Cd) treatment for 26 d were screened for DNA genetic alterations by DNA fingerprinting. Four primers amplified 20-23 mutated RAPD fragments in 0.125-3.0 mg L(-1) Cd-treated Arabidopsis plantlets, respectively. Cloning and sequencing analysis of eight randomly selected mutated fragments revealed 99-100% homology with the genes of VARICOSE-Related, SLEEPY1 F-box, 40S ribosomal protein S3, phosphoglucomutase, and noncoding regions in Arabidopsis genome correspondingly. The results show the ability of RAPD analysis to detect significant genetic alterations in Cd-exposed seedlings. Although the exact functional importance of the other mutated bands is unknown, the presence of mutated loci in Cd-treated seedlings, prior to the onset of significant physiological effects, suggests that these altered loci are the early events in Cd-treated Arabidopsis seedlings and would greatly improve environmental risk assessment.

  20. Exome sequencing identifies a spectrum of mutation frequencies in advanced and lethal prostate cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Akash; White, Thomas A.; MacKenzie, Alexandra P.; Clegg, Nigel; Lee, Choli; Dumpit, Ruth F.; Coleman, Ilsa; Ng, Sarah B.; Salipante, Stephen J.; Rieder, Mark J.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Corey, Eva; Lange, Paul H.; Morrissey, Colm; Vessella, Robert L.; Nelson, Peter S.; Shendure, Jay

    2011-01-01

    To catalog protein-altering mutations that may drive the development of prostate cancers and their progression to metastatic disease systematically, we performed whole-exome sequencing of 23 prostate cancers derived from 16 different lethal metastatic tumors and three high-grade primary carcinomas. All tumors were propagated in mice as xenografts, designated the LuCaP series, to model phenotypic variation, such as responses to cancer-directed therapeutics. Although corresponding normal tissue was not available for most tumors, we were able to take advantage of increasingly deep catalogs of human genetic variation to remove most germline variants. On average, each tumor genome contained ∼200 novel nonsynonymous variants, of which the vast majority was specific to individual carcinomas. A subset of genes was recurrently altered across tumors derived from different individuals, including TP53, DLK2, GPC6, and SDF4. Unexpectedly, three prostate cancer genomes exhibited substantially higher mutation frequencies, with 2,000–4,000 novel coding variants per exome. A comparison of castration-resistant and castration-sensitive pairs of tumor lines derived from the same prostate cancer highlights mutations in the Wnt pathway as potentially contributing to the development of castration resistance. Collectively, our results indicate that point mutations arising in coding regions of advanced prostate cancers are common but, with notable exceptions, very few genes are mutated in a substantial fraction of tumors. We also report a previously undescribed subtype of prostate cancers exhibiting “hypermutated” genomes, with potential implications for resistance to cancer therapeutics. Our results also suggest that increasingly deep catalogs of human germline variation may challenge the necessity of sequencing matched tumor-normal pairs. PMID:21949389

  1. Exome Sequencing and Functional Analysis Identifies BANF1 Mutation as the Cause of a Hereditary Progeroid Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Puente, Xose S.; Quesada, Victor; Osorio, Fernando G.; Cabanillas, Rubén; Cadiñanos, Juan; Fraile, Julia M.; Ordóñez, Gonzalo R.; Puente, Diana A.; Gutiérrez-Fernández, Ana; Fanjul-Fernández, Miriam; Lévy, Nicolas; Freije, José M.P.; López-Otín, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Accelerated aging syndromes represent a valuable source of information about the molecular mechanisms involved in normal aging. Here, we describe a progeroid syndrome that partially phenocopies Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) but also exhibits distinctive features, including the absence of cardiovascular deficiencies characteristic of HGPS, the lack of mutations in LMNA and ZMPSTE24, and a relatively long lifespan of affected individuals. Exome sequencing and molecular analysis in two unrelated families allowed us to identify a homozygous mutation in BANF1 (c.34G>A [p.Ala12Thr]), encoding barrier-to-autointegration factor 1 (BAF), as the molecular abnormality responsible for this Mendelian disorder. Functional analysis showed that fibroblasts from both patients have a dramatic reduction in BAF protein levels, indicating that the p.Ala12Thr mutation impairs protein stability. Furthermore, progeroid fibroblasts display profound abnormalities in the nuclear lamina, including blebs and abnormal distribution of emerin, an interaction partner of BAF. These nuclear abnormalities are rescued by ectopic expression of wild-type BANF1, providing evidence for the causal role of this mutation. These data demonstrate the utility of exome sequencing for identifying the cause of rare Mendelian disorders and underscore the importance of nuclear envelope alterations in human aging. PMID:21549337

  2. Exome sequencing and functional analysis identifies BANF1 mutation as the cause of a hereditary progeroid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Puente, Xose S; Quesada, Victor; Osorio, Fernando G; Cabanillas, Rubén; Cadiñanos, Juan; Fraile, Julia M; Ordóñez, Gonzalo R; Puente, Diana A; Gutiérrez-Fernández, Ana; Fanjul-Fernández, Miriam; Lévy, Nicolas; Freije, José M P; López-Otín, Carlos

    2011-05-13

    Accelerated aging syndromes represent a valuable source of information about the molecular mechanisms involved in normal aging. Here, we describe a progeroid syndrome that partially phenocopies Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) but also exhibits distinctive features, including the absence of cardiovascular deficiencies characteristic of HGPS, the lack of mutations in LMNA and ZMPSTE24, and a relatively long lifespan of affected individuals. Exome sequencing and molecular analysis in two unrelated families allowed us to identify a homozygous mutation in BANF1 (c.34G>A [p.Ala12Thr]), encoding barrier-to-autointegration factor 1 (BAF), as the molecular abnormality responsible for this Mendelian disorder. Functional analysis showed that fibroblasts from both patients have a dramatic reduction in BAF protein levels, indicating that the p.Ala12Thr mutation impairs protein stability. Furthermore, progeroid fibroblasts display profound abnormalities in the nuclear lamina, including blebs and abnormal distribution of emerin, an interaction partner of BAF. These nuclear abnormalities are rescued by ectopic expression of wild-type BANF1, providing evidence for the causal role of this mutation. These data demonstrate the utility of exome sequencing for identifying the cause of rare Mendelian disorders and underscore the importance of nuclear envelope alterations in human aging.

  3. Whole-exome sequencing identifies ADAM10 mutations as a cause of reticulate acropigmentation of Kitamura, a clinical entity distinct from Dowling-Degos disease.

    PubMed

    Kono, Michihiro; Sugiura, Kazumitsu; Suganuma, Mutsumi; Hayashi, Masahiro; Takama, Hiromichi; Suzuki, Tamio; Matsunaga, Kayoko; Tomita, Yasushi; Akiyama, Masashi

    2013-09-01

    Reticulate acropigmentation of Kitamura (RAK) is a rare genetic disorder of cutaneous pigmentation with an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance and a high penetration rate. The characteristic skin lesions are reticulate, slightly depressed pigmented macules mainly affecting the dorsa of the hands and feet, which first appear before puberty and subsequently expand to the proximal limb and the trunk. To identify mutations that cause RAK, we performed exome sequencing of four family members in a pedigree with RAK. Fifty-three SNV/Indels were considered as candidate mutations after some condition narrowing. We confirmed the mutation status in each candidate gene of four other members in the same pedigree to find the gene that matched the mutation status and phenotype of each member. A mutation in ADAM10 encoding a zinc metalloprotease, a disintegrin and metalloprotease domain-containing protein 10 (ADAM10), was identified in the RAK family. ADAM10 is known to be involved in the ectodomain shedding of various substrates in the skin. Sanger sequencing of four additional unrelated RAK patients revealed four additional ADAM10 mutations. We identified a total of three truncating mutations, a splice site mutation and a missense mutation in ADAM10. We searched for mutations in the KRT5 gene, a causative gene for the similar pigmentation disorder Dowling-Degos disease (DDD), in all the patients and found no KRT5 mutation. These results reveal that mutations in ADAM10 are a cause of RAK and that RAK is an independent clinical entity distinct from DDD.

  4. Mutations in NMNAT1 cause Leber congenital amaurosis and identify a new disease pathway for retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Koenekoop, Robert K.; Wang, Hui; Majewski, Jacek; Wang, Xia; Lopez, Irma; Ren, Huanan; Chen, Yiyun; Li, Yumei; Fishman, Gerald A.; Genead, Mohammed; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Solanki, Naimesh; Traboulsi, Elias I.; Cheng, Jingliang; Logan, Clare V.; McKibbin, Martin; Hayward, Bruce E.; Parry, David A.; Johnson, Colin A.; Nageeb, Mohammed; Poulter, James A.; Mohamed, Moin D.; Jafri, Hussain; Rashid, Yasmin; Taylor, Graham R.; Keser, Vafa; Mardon, Graeme; Xu, Huidan; Inglehearn, Chris F.; Fu, Qing; Toomes, Carmel; Chen, Rui

    2013-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is a blinding retinal disease that presents within the first year after birth. Using exome sequencing, we identified mutations in the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) synthase gene NMNAT1 encoding nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 1 in eight families with LCA, including the family in which LCA was originally linked to the LCA9 locus. Notably, all individuals with NMNAT1 mutations also have macular colobomas, which are severe degenerative entities of the central retina (fovea) devoid of tissue and photoreceptors. Functional assays of the proteins encoded by the mutant alleles identified in our study showed that the mutations reduce the enzymatic activity of NMNAT1 in NAD biosynthesis and affect protein folding. Of note, recent characterization of the slow Wallerian degeneration (Wlds) mouse model, in which prolonged axonal survival after injury is observed, identified NMNAT1 as a neuroprotective protein when ectopically expressed. Our findings identify a new disease mechanism underlying LCA and provide the first link between endogenous NMNAT1 dysfunction and a human nervous system disorder. PMID:22842230

  5. Familial mutations in fibrinogen Aα (FGA) chain identified in renal amyloidosis increase in vitro amyloidogenicity of FGA fragment.

    PubMed

    Sivalingam, Vishwanath; Patel, Basant K

    2016-08-01

    Amyloidoses are clinical disorders where deposition of β-sheet rich, misfolded protein aggregates called amyloid occurs in vital organs like brain, kidney, liver or heart etc. Aggregation of several proteins such as immunoglobulin light chain, fibrinogen Aα chain (FGA) and lysozyme have been found to be associated with renal amyloidosis. Fibrinogen amyloidosis (AFib) is predominantly familial and is associated with the deposition of mutant FGA amyloid, primarily in kidneys. Over ten substitution and frame-shift mutations in FGA have been identified from AFib patients. Whether wild-type FGA is also involved in AFib is yet unknown. The affected tissues from AFib patients usually show ∼10 kDA peptide from C-terminal 80 amino acid residues of mutant FGA. Notably, this region also encompasses all known disease-related mutations. Whether these point mutations increase the amyloidogenicity of FGA leading to disease progression, have not been studied yet. Here, we have investigated the role of two disease-related mutations in affecting amyloidogenic propensity of an FGA(496-581) fragment. We found that at physiological pH, the wild-type FGA(496-581) fragment remains monomeric, whereas its E540V mutant forms amyloid-like fibrils as observed by AFM. Also, FGA(496-581) harbouring another familial mutation, R554L, converts in vitro into globular, β-sheet rich aggregates, showing amyloid-like properties. These findings suggest that familial mutations in FGA may have role in renal amyloidosis via enhanced amyloid formation.

  6. Functional characterization of CDK5 and CDK5R1 mutations identified in patients with non-syndromic intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Moncini, Silvia; Castronovo, Paola; Murgia, Alessandra; Russo, Silvia; Bedeschi, Maria Francesca; Lunghi, Marta; Selicorni, Angelo; Bonati, Maria Teresa; Riva, Paola; Venturin, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) and cyclin-dependent kinase 5, regulatory subunit 1 (CDK5R1), encoding CDK5 activator p35, have a fundamental role in central nervous system (CNS) development and function, and are involved in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative disorders, thus constituting strong candidate genes for the onset of intellectual disability (ID). We carried out a mutation screening of CDK5 and CDK5R1 coding regions and CDK5R1 3'-UTR on a cohort of 360 patients with non-syndromic ID (NS-ID) using denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) and direct sequencing. We found one novel silent mutation in CDK5 and one novel silent mutation in CDK5R1 coding regions, three novel intronic variations in CDK5, not causing any splicing defect, and four novel heterozygous variations in CDK5R1 3'-UTR. None of these variations was present in 450 healthy controls and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) databases. The functional study of CDK5R1 p.A108V mutation evidenced an impaired p35 cleavage by the calcium-dependent protease calpain. Moreover, luciferase constructs containing the CDK5R1 3'-UTR mutations showed altered gene expression levels. Eight known polymorphisms were also identified displaying different frequencies in NS-ID patients compared with the controls. In particular, the minor allele of CDK5R1 3'-UTR rs735555 polymorphism was associated with increased risk for NS-ID. In conclusion, our data suggest that mutations and polymorphisms in CDK5 and CDK5R1 genes may contribute to the onset of the NS-ID phenotype.

  7. AIP mutation identified in a patient with acromegaly caused by pituitary somatotroph adenoma with neuronal choristoma.

    PubMed

    Nishizawa, H; Fukuoka, H; Iguchi, G; Inoshita, N; Yamada, S; Takahashi, Y

    2013-05-01

    Pituitary adenoma with neuronal choristoma (PANCH) is a rare condition that includes ganglion cells and GH-producing tumor that is characterized by sparsely granulated somatotroph cell type. However, the pathophysiology of this condition remains to be elucidated. We report a case of 46-year-old woman with acromegaly caused by PANCH. The patient had a large and invasive macroadenoma that was resistant to preoperative therapy with somatostatin analogue (SSA) and dopamine agonist. Histological examination showed typical diffuse, chromophobe-type adenoma containing ganglion cells, and sparsely granulated somatotroph cell type, which were consistent with PANCH. Genetic analysis showed heterozygous germline missense mutation in the AIP gene that results in Y261X amino acid substitution. The clinical characteristics of acromegaly associated with AIP mutations are reportedly macroadenomas with tumor extension and invasion, lower decreases in GH and IGF-I and less tumor shrinkage with SSA treatment, and sparsely granulated somatotroph cell type, which are comparable with those observed in PANCH. Taken together, the mutation in AIP gene may explain the clinical characteristics and pathogenesis of PANCH.

  8. Exome Sequencing Identifies GNB4 Mutations as a Cause of Dominant Intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease

    PubMed Central

    Soong, Bing-Wen; Huang, Yen-Hua; Tsai, Pei-Chien; Huang, Chien-Chang; Pan, Hung-Chuan; Lu, Yi-Chun; Chien, Hsin-Ju; Liu, Tze-Tze; Chang, Ming-Hong; Lin, Kon-Ping; Tu, Pang-Hsien; Kao, Lung-Sen; Lee, Yi-Chung

    2013-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is a heterogeneous group of inherited neuropathies. Mutations in approximately 45 genes have been identified as being associated with CMT. Nevertheless, the genetic etiologies of at least 30% of CMTs have yet to be elucidated. Using a genome-wide linkage study, we previously mapped a dominant intermediate CMT to chromosomal region 3q28–q29. Subsequent exome sequencing of two affected first cousins revealed heterozygous mutation c.158G>A (p.Gly53Asp) in GNB4, encoding guanine-nucleotide-binding protein subunit beta-4 (Gβ4), to cosegregate with the CMT phenotype in the family. Further analysis of GNB4 in an additional 88 unrelated CMT individuals uncovered another de novo mutation, c.265A>G (p.Lys89Glu), in this gene in one individual. Immunohistochemistry studies revealed that Gβ4 was abundant in the axons and Schwann cells of peripheral nerves and that expression of Gβ4 was significantly reduced in the sural nerve of the two individuals carrying the c.158G>A (p.Gly53Asp) mutation. In vitro studies demonstrated that both the p.Gly53Asp and p.Lys89Glu altered proteins impaired bradykinin-induced G-protein-coupled-receptor (GPCR) signaling, which was facilitated by the wild-type Gβ4. This study identifies GNB4 mutations as a cause of CMT and highlights the importance of Gβ4-related GPCR signaling in peripheral-nerve function in humans. PMID:23434117

  9. Exome Sequencing of Cell-Free DNA from Metastatic Cancer Patients Identifies Clinically Actionable Mutations Distinct from Primary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Timothy M.; Johnson-Camacho, Katherine; Peto, Myron; Wang, Nicholas J.; Macey, Tara A.; Korkola, James E.; Koppie, Theresa M.; Corless, Christopher L.; Gray, Joe W.; Spellman, Paul T.

    2015-01-01

    The identification of the molecular drivers of cancer by sequencing is the backbone of precision medicine and the basis of personalized therapy; however, biopsies of primary tumors provide only a snapshot of the evolution of the disease and may miss potential therapeutic targets, especially in the metastatic setting. A liquid biopsy, in the form of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) sequencing, has the potential to capture the inter- and intra-tumoral heterogeneity present in metastatic disease, and, through serial blood draws, track the evolution of the tumor genome. In order to determine the clinical utility of cfDNA sequencing we performed whole-exome sequencing on cfDNA and tumor DNA from two patients with metastatic disease; only minor modifications to our sequencing and analysis pipelines were required for sequencing and mutation calling of cfDNA. The first patient had metastatic sarcoma and 47 of 48 mutations present in the primary tumor were also found in the cell-free DNA. The second patient had metastatic breast cancer and sequencing identified an ESR1 mutation in the cfDNA and metastatic site, but not in the primary tumor. This likely explains tumor progression on Anastrozole. Significant heterogeneity between the primary and metastatic tumors, with cfDNA reflecting the metastases, suggested separation from the primary lesion early in tumor evolution. This is best illustrated by an activating PIK3CA mutation (H1047R) which was clonal in the primary tumor, but completely absent from either the metastasis or cfDNA. Here we show that cfDNA sequencing supplies clinically actionable information with minimal risks compared to metastatic biopsies. This study demonstrates the utility of whole-exome sequencing of cell-free DNA from patients with metastatic disease. cfDNA sequencing identified an ESR1 mutation, potentially explaining a patient’s resistance to aromatase inhibition, and gave insight into how metastatic lesions differ from the primary tumor. PMID:26317216

  10. Exome sequencing identifies recurrent mutations of the splicing factor SF3B1 gene in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Quesada, Víctor; Conde, Laura; Villamor, Neus; Ordóñez, Gonzalo R; Jares, Pedro; Bassaganyas, Laia; Ramsay, Andrew J; Beà, Sílvia; Pinyol, Magda; Martínez-Trillos, Alejandra; López-Guerra, Mónica; Colomer, Dolors; Navarro, Alba; Baumann, Tycho; Aymerich, Marta; Rozman, María; Delgado, Julio; Giné, Eva; Hernández, Jesús M; González-Díaz, Marcos; Puente, Diana A; Velasco, Gloria; Freije, José M P; Tubío, José M C; Royo, Romina; Gelpí, Josep L; Orozco, Modesto; Pisano, David G; Zamora, Jorge; Vázquez, Miguel; Valencia, Alfonso; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Bayés, Mónica; Heath, Simon; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo; Estivill, Xavier; López-Guillermo, Armando; Puente, Xose S; Campo, Elías; López-Otín, Carlos

    2011-12-11

    Here we perform whole-exome sequencing of samples from 105 individuals with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), the most frequent leukemia in adults in Western countries. We found 1,246 somatic mutations potentially affecting gene function and identified 78 genes with predicted functional alterations in more than one tumor sample. Among these genes, SF3B1, encoding a subunit of the spliceosomal U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP), is somatically mutated in 9.7% of affected individuals. Further analysis in 279 individuals with CLL showed that SF3B1 mutations were associated with faster disease progression and poor overall survival. This work provides the first comprehensive catalog of somatic mutations in CLL with relevant clinical correlates and defines a large set of new genes that may drive the development of this common form of leukemia. The results reinforce the idea that targeting several well-known genetic pathways, including mRNA splicing, could be useful in the treatment of CLL and other malignancies.

  11. Identifying activating mutations in the EGFR gene: prognostic and therapeutic implications in non-small cell lung cancer *

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Gabriel Lima; Vattimo, Edoardo Filippo de Queiroz; de Castro, Gilberto

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Promising new therapies have recently emerged from the development of molecular targeted drugs; particularly promising are those blocking the signal transduction machinery of cancer cells. One of the most widely studied cell signaling pathways is that of EGFR, which leads to uncontrolled cell proliferation, increased cell angiogenesis, and greater cell invasiveness. Activating mutations in the EGFR gene (deletions in exon 19 and mutation L858R in exon 21), first described in 2004, have been detected in approximately 10% of all non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients in Western countries and are the most important predictors of a response to EGFR tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs). Studies of the EGFR-TKIs gefitinib, erlotinib, and afatinib, in comparison with platinum-based regimens, as first-line treatments in chemotherapy-naïve patients have shown that the EGFR-TKIs produce gains in progression-free survival and overall response rates, although only in patients whose tumors harbor activating mutations in the EGFR gene. Clinical trials have also shown EGFR-TKIs to be effective as second- and third-line therapies in advanced NSCLC. Here, we review the main aspects of EGFR pathway activation in NSCLC, underscore the importance of correctly identifying activating mutations in the EGFR gene, and discuss the main outcomes of EGFR-TKI treatment in NSCLC. PMID:26398757

  12. Massively parallel DNA sequencing successfully identifies new causative mutations in deafness genes in patients with cochlear implantation and EAS.

    PubMed

    Miyagawa, Maiko; Nishio, Shin-ya; Ikeda, Takuo; Fukushima, Kunihiro; Usami, Shin-ichi

    2013-01-01

    Genetic factors, the most common etiology in severe to profound hearing loss, are one of the key determinants of Cochlear Implantation (CI) and Electric Acoustic Stimulation (EAS) outcomes. Satisfactory auditory performance after receiving a CI/EAS in patients with certain deafness gene mutations indicates that genetic testing would be helpful in predicting CI/EAS outcomes and deciding treatment choices. However, because of the extreme genetic heterogeneity of deafness, clinical application of genetic information still entails difficulties. Target exon sequencing using massively parallel DNA sequencing is a new powerful strategy to discover rare causative genes in Mendelian disorders such as deafness. We used massive sequencing of the exons of 58 target candidate genes to analyze 8 (4 early-onset, 4 late-onset) Japanese CI/EAS patients, who did not have mutations in commonly found genes including GJB2, SLC26A4, or mitochondrial 1555A>G or 3243A>G mutations. We successfully identified four rare causative mutations in the MYO15A, TECTA, TMPRSS3, and ACTG1 genes in four patients who showed relatively good auditory performance with CI including EAS, suggesting that genetic testing may be able to predict the performance after implantation.

  13. Genome-Wide Association Studies Identify Two Novel BMP15 Mutations Responsible for an Atypical Hyperprolificacy Phenotype in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Demars, Julie; Fabre, Stéphane; Sarry, Julien; Rossetti, Raffaella; Gilbert, Hélène; Persani, Luca; Tosser-Klopp, Gwenola; Mulsant, Philippe; Nowak, Zuzanna; Drobik, Wioleta; Martyniuk, Elzbieta; Bodin, Loys

    2013-01-01

    Some sheep breeds are naturally prolific, and they are very informative for the studies of reproductive genetics and physiology. Major genes increasing litter size (LS) and ovulation rate (OR) were suspected in the French Grivette and the Polish Olkuska sheep populations, respectively. To identify genetic variants responsible for the highly prolific phenotype in these two breeds, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) followed by complementary genetic and functional analyses were performed. Highly prolific ewes (cases) and normal prolific ewes (controls) from each breed were genotyped using the Illumina OvineSNP50 Genotyping Beadchip. In both populations, an X chromosome region, close to the BMP15 gene, harbored clusters of markers with suggestive evidence of association at significance levels between 1E−05 and 1E−07. The BMP15 candidate gene was then sequenced, and two novel non-conservative mutations called FecXGr and FecXO were identified in the Grivette and Olkuska breeds, respectively. The two mutations were associated with the highly prolific phenotype (pFecXGr = 5.98E−06 and pFecXO = 2.55E−08). Homozygous ewes for the mutated allele showed a significantly increased prolificacy (FecXGr/FecXGr, LS = 2.50±0.65 versus FecX+/FecXGr, LS = 1.93±0.42, p<1E−03 and FecXO/FecXO, OR = 3.28±0.85 versus FecX+/FecXO, OR = 2.02±0.47, p<1E−03). Both mutations are located in very well conserved motifs of the protein and altered the BMP15 signaling activity in vitro using a BMP-responsive luciferase test in COV434 granulosa cells. Thus, we have identified two novel mutations in the BMP15 gene associated with increased LS and OR. Notably, homozygous FecXGr/FecXGr Grivette and homozygous FecXO/FecXO Olkuska ewes are hyperprolific in striking contrast with the sterility exhibited by all other known homozygous BMP15 mutations. Our results bring new insights into the key role played by the BMP15 protein in ovarian function and could

  14. A Mutation Identified in Neonatal Microcephaly Destabilizes Zika Virus NS1 Assembly in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Deping; Chen, Cheng; Liu, Shengnan; Zhou, Han; Yang, Kailin; Zhao, Qi; Ji, Xiaoyun; Chen, Chen; Xie, Wei; Wang, Zefang; Mi, Li-Zhi; Yang, Haitao

    2017-02-15

    An unprecedented epidemic of Zika virus (ZIKV) infection had spread to South and Central America. ZIKV infection was recently confirmed by CDC (the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) to cause neonatal microcephaly, which posed a significant public health emergency of international concern. No specific vaccines or drugs are currently available to fight ZIKV infection. ZIKV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) plays an essential role in viral replication and immune evasion. We determined the crystal structure of ZIKV NS1172-352, which forms a head-to-head, symmetric dimer with a unique 14-stranded β-ladder conserved among flaviviruses. The assembly of the β-ladder dimer is concentration dependent. Strikingly, one pathogenic mutation T233A (NCBI accession no. KU527068), found in the brain tissue of infected fetus with neonatal microcephaly, is located at the dimer interface. Thr233, a unique residue found in ZIKV but not in other flaviviruses, organizes a central hydrogen bonding network at NS1 dimer interface. Mutation of Thr233 to Ala disrupts this elaborated interaction network, and destabilizes the NS1 dimeric assembly in vitro. In addition, our structural comparison of epitopes for protective antibody 22NS1, targeting West Nile Virus NS1, could potentially be valuable in understanding its anti-virus specificities and in the development of antibodies against ZIKV.

  15. A Mutation Identified in Neonatal Microcephaly Destabilizes Zika Virus NS1 Assembly in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Deping; Chen, Cheng; Liu, Shengnan; Zhou, Han; Yang, Kailin; Zhao, Qi; Ji, Xiaoyun; Chen, Chen; Xie, Wei; Wang, Zefang; Mi, Li-Zhi; Yang, Haitao

    2017-01-01

    An unprecedented epidemic of Zika virus (ZIKV) infection had spread to South and Central America. ZIKV infection was recently confirmed by CDC (the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) to cause neonatal microcephaly, which posed a significant public health emergency of international concern. No specific vaccines or drugs are currently available to fight ZIKV infection. ZIKV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) plays an essential role in viral replication and immune evasion. We determined the crystal structure of ZIKV NS1172–352, which forms a head-to-head, symmetric dimer with a unique 14-stranded β-ladder conserved among flaviviruses. The assembly of the β-ladder dimer is concentration dependent. Strikingly, one pathogenic mutation T233A (NCBI accession no. KU527068), found in the brain tissue of infected fetus with neonatal microcephaly, is located at the dimer interface. Thr233, a unique residue found in ZIKV but not in other flaviviruses, organizes a central hydrogen bonding network at NS1 dimer interface. Mutation of Thr233 to Ala disrupts this elaborated interaction network, and destabilizes the NS1 dimeric assembly in vitro. In addition, our structural comparison of epitopes for protective antibody 22NS1, targeting West Nile Virus NS1, could potentially be valuable in understanding its anti-virus specificities and in the development of antibodies against ZIKV. PMID:28198446

  16. A Novel Forward Genetic Screen for Identifying Mutations Affecting Larval Neuronal Dendrite Development in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Paul Mark B.; Swick, Lance L.; Andersen, Ryan; Blalock, Zachary; Brenman, Jay E.

    2006-01-01

    Vertebrate and invertebrate dendrites are information-processing compartments that can be found on both central and peripheral neurons. Elucidating the molecular underpinnings of information processing in the nervous system ultimately requires an understanding of the genetic pathways that regulate dendrite formation and maintenance. Despite the importance of dendrite development, few forward genetic approaches have been used to analyze the latest stages of dendrite development, including the formation of F-actin-rich dendritic filopodia or dendritic spines. We developed a forward genetic screen utilizing transgenic Drosophila second instar larvae expressing an actin, green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein (actin∷GFP) in subsets of sensory neurons. Utilizing this fluorescent transgenic reporter, we conducted a forward genetic screen of >4000 mutagenized chromosomes bearing lethal mutations that affected multiple aspects of larval dendrite development. We isolated 13 mutations on the X and second chromosomes composing 11 complementation groups affecting dendrite outgrowth/branching, dendritic filopodia formation, or actin∷GFP localization within dendrites in vivo. In a fortuitous observation, we observed that the structure of dendritic arborization (da) neuron dendritic filopodia changes in response to a changing environment. PMID:16415365

  17. hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes from Brugada Syndrome patients without identified mutations do not exhibit clear cellular electrophysiological abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Veerman, Christiaan C.; Mengarelli, Isabella; Guan, Kaomei; Stauske, Michael; Barc, Julien; Tan, Hanno L.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Verkerk, Arie O.; Bezzina, Connie R.

    2016-01-01

    Brugada syndrome (BrS) is a rare cardiac rhythm disorder associated with sudden cardiac death. Mutations in the sodium channel gene SCN5A are found in ~20% of cases while mutations in other genes collectively account for <5%. In the remaining patients the genetic defect and the underlying pathogenic mechanism remain obscure. To provide insight into the mechanism of BrS in individuals without identified mutations, we here studied electrophysiological properties of cardiomyocytes (CMs) generated from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) from 3 BrS patients who tested negative for mutations in the known BrS-associated genes. Patch clamp studies revealed no differences in sodium current (INa) in hiPSC-CMs from the 3 BrS patients compared to 2 unrelated controls. Moreover, action potential upstroke velocity (Vmax), reflecting INa, was not different between hiPSC-CMs from the BrS patients and the controls. hiPSC-CMs harboring the BrS-associated SCN5A-1795insD mutation exhibited a reduction in both INa and Vmax, demonstrating our ability to detect reduced sodium channel function. hiPSC-CMs from one of the BrS lines demonstrated a mildly reduced action potential duration, however, the transient outward potassium current (Ito) and the L-type calcium current (ICa,L), both implicated in BrS, were not different compared to the controls. Our findings indicate that ion channel dysfunction, in particular in the cardiac sodium channel, may not be a prerequisite for BrS. PMID:27485484

  18. Six novel alleles identified in Italian hereditary fructose intolerance patients enlarge the mutation spectrum of the aldolase B gene.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Gabriella; Santamaria, Rita; Vitagliano, Luigi; Ieno, Luigi; Viola, Antonietta; Fiori, Laura; Parenti, Giancarlo; Zancan, Lucia; Zagari, Adriana; Salvatore, Francesco

    2004-12-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is a recessively inherited disorder of carbohydrate metabolism caused by impaired functioning of human liver aldolase (B isoform; ALDOB). To-date, 29 enzyme-impairing mutations have been identified in the aldolase B gene. Here we report six novel HFI single nucleotide changes identified by sequence analysis in the aldolase B gene. Three of these are missense mutations (g.6846T>C, g.10236G>T, g.10258T>C), one is a nonsense mutation (g.8187C>T) and two affect splicing sites (g.8180G>C and g.10196A>G). We have expressed in bacterial cells the recombinant proteins corresponding to the g.6846T>C (p.I74T), g.10236G>T (p.V222F), and g.10258T>C (p.L229P) natural mutants to study their effect on aldolase B function and structure. All the new variants were insoluble; molecular graphics data suggest this is due to impaired folding.

  19. Mutations in PRDM5 in Brittle Cornea Syndrome Identify a Pathway Regulating Extracellular Matrix Development and Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Burkitt Wright, Emma M.M.; Spencer, Helen L.; Daly, Sarah B.; Manson, Forbes D.C.; Zeef, Leo A.H.; Urquhart, Jill; Zoppi, Nicoletta; Bonshek, Richard; Tosounidis, Ioannis; Mohan, Meyyammai; Madden, Colm; Dodds, Annabel; Chandler, Kate E.; Banka, Siddharth; Au, Leon; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Khan, Naz; Biesecker, Leslie G.; Wilson, Meredith; Rohrbach, Marianne; Colombi, Marina; Giunta, Cecilia; Black, Graeme C.M.

    2011-01-01

    Extreme corneal fragility and thinning, which have a high risk of catastrophic spontaneous rupture, are the cardinal features of brittle cornea syndrome (BCS), an autosomal-recessive generalized connective tissue disorder. Enucleation is frequently the only management option for this condition, resulting in blindness and psychosocial distress. Even when the cornea remains grossly intact, visual function could also be impaired by a high degree of myopia and keratoconus. Deafness is another common feature and results in combined sensory deprivation. Using autozygosity mapping, we identified mutations in PRDM5 in families with BCS. We demonstrate that regulation of expression of extracellular matrix components, particularly fibrillar collagens, by PRDM5 is a key molecular mechanism that underlies corneal fragility in BCS and controls normal corneal development and maintenance. ZNF469, encoding a zinc finger protein of hitherto undefined function, has been identified as a quantitative trait locus for central corneal thickness, and mutations in this gene have been demonstrated in Tunisian Jewish and Palestinian kindreds with BCS. We show that ZNF469 and PRDM5, two genes that when mutated cause BCS, participate in the same regulatory pathway. PMID:21664999

  20. Mutations in PRDM5 in brittle cornea syndrome identify a pathway regulating extracellular matrix development and maintenance.

    PubMed

    Burkitt Wright, Emma M M; Spencer, Helen L; Daly, Sarah B; Manson, Forbes D C; Zeef, Leo A H; Urquhart, Jill; Zoppi, Nicoletta; Bonshek, Richard; Tosounidis, Ioannis; Mohan, Meyyammai; Madden, Colm; Dodds, Annabel; Chandler, Kate E; Banka, Siddharth; Au, Leon; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Khan, Naz; Biesecker, Leslie G; Wilson, Meredith; Rohrbach, Marianne; Colombi, Marina; Giunta, Cecilia; Black, Graeme C M

    2011-06-10

    Extreme corneal fragility and thinning, which have a high risk of catastrophic spontaneous rupture, are the cardinal features of brittle cornea syndrome (BCS), an autosomal-recessive generalized connective tissue disorder. Enucleation is frequently the only management option for this condition, resulting in blindness and psychosocial distress. Even when the cornea remains grossly intact, visual function could also be impaired by a high degree of myopia and keratoconus. Deafness is another common feature and results in combined sensory deprivation. Using autozygosity mapping, we identified mutations in PRDM5 in families with BCS. We demonstrate that regulation of expression of extracellular matrix components, particularly fibrillar collagens, by PRDM5 is a key molecular mechanism that underlies corneal fragility in BCS and controls normal corneal development and maintenance. ZNF469, encoding a zinc finger protein of hitherto undefined function, has been identified as a quantitative trait locus for central corneal thickness, and mutations in this gene have been demonstrated in Tunisian Jewish and Palestinian kindreds with BCS. We show that ZNF469 and PRDM5, two genes that when mutated cause BCS, participate in the same regulatory pathway.

  1. Whole-Exome sequencing identifies FAM20A mutations as a cause of amelogenesis imperfecta and gingival hyperplasia syndrome.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, James; Bitu, Carolina C; Daly, Sarah B; Urquhart, Jill E; Barron, Martin J; Bhaskar, Sanjeev S; Martelli-Júnior, Hercilio; dos Santos Neto, Pedro Eleuterio; Mansilla, Maria A; Murray, Jeffrey C; Coletta, Ricardo D; Black, Graeme C M; Dixon, Michael J

    2011-05-13

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) describes a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders of biomineralization resulting from failure of normal enamel formation. AI is found as an isolated entity or as part of a syndrome, and an autosomal-recessive syndrome associating AI and gingival hyperplasia was recently reported. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified a homozygous nonsense mutation in exon 2 of FAM20A that was not present in the Single Nucleotide Polymorphism database (dbSNP), the 1000 Genomes database, or the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH) Diversity Panel. Expression analyses indicated that Fam20a is expressed in ameloblasts and gingivae, providing biological plausibility for mutations in FAM20A underlying the pathogenesis of this syndrome.

  2. Tetra-primer amplification refractory mutation system PCR (T-ARMS-PCR) rapidly identified a critical missense mutation (P236T) of bovine ACADVL gene affecting growth traits.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sihuan; Dang, Yonglong; Zhang, Qingfeng; Qin, Qiaomei; Lei, Chuzhao; Chen, Hong; Lan, Xianyong

    2015-04-01

    Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, very long chain (ACADVL), encoding ACADVL protein, targets the inner mitochondrial membrane where it catalyzes the first step of the mitochondrial fatty acid beta-oxidation pathway and plays an important role in body metabolism and oxidation of long chain fatty acid releasing energy. Tetra-primer amplification refractory mutation system PCR (T-ARMS-PCR) is an easy-to-operate, rapid, inexpensive, and exact method for SNP genotyping. Herein, T-ARMS-PCR was carried out to detect a critical missense mutation (AC_000176:g.2885C>A; Pro236Thr) within the ACADVL gene in 644 individuals from two cattle breeds. In order to evaluate the accuracy of the T-ARMS-PCR at this locus, the genotype of the sampled individuals was also identified by PCR-RFLP. The concordance between these two methods was 98.76%. Statistical analysis showed that the bovine ACADVL gene had a significant effect on chest width (P<0.05), chest depth (P<0.05), and hip width (P<0.05) in the Qinchuan breed. The cattle with AA genotype had superior growth traits compared to cattle with AC and/or CC genotypes. The "A" allele had positive effects on growth traits. Therefore, T-ARMS-PCR can replace PCR-RFLP for rapid genotyping of this mutation, which could be used as a DNA marker for selecting individuals with superior growth traits in the Qinchuan breed. These findings contribute to breeding and genetics in beef cattle industry.

  3. Fine mapping of the 1p36 deletion syndrome identifies mutation of PRDM16 as a cause of cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Arndt, Anne-Karin; Schafer, Sebastian; Drenckhahn, Jorg-Detlef; Sabeh, M Khaled; Plovie, Eva R; Caliebe, Almuth; Klopocki, Eva; Musso, Gabriel; Werdich, Andreas A; Kalwa, Hermann; Heinig, Matthias; Padera, Robert F; Wassilew, Katharina; Bluhm, Julia; Harnack, Christine; Martitz, Janine; Barton, Paul J; Greutmann, Matthias; Berger, Felix; Hubner, Norbert; Siebert, Reiner; Kramer, Hans-Heiner; Cook, Stuart A; MacRae, Calum A; Klaassen, Sabine

    2013-07-11

    Deletion 1p36 syndrome is recognized as the most common terminal deletion syndrome. Here, we describe the loss of a gene within the deletion that is responsible for the cardiomyopathy associated with monosomy 1p36, and we confirm its role in nonsyndromic left ventricular noncompaction cardiomyopathy (LVNC) and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). With our own data and publically available data from array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), we identified a minimal deletion for the cardiomyopathy associated with 1p36del syndrome that included only the terminal 14 exons of the transcription factor PRDM16 (PR domain containing 16), a gene that had previously been shown to direct brown fat determination and differentiation. Resequencing of PRDM16 in a cohort of 75 nonsyndromic individuals with LVNC detected three mutations, including one truncation mutant, one frameshift null mutation, and a single missense mutant. In addition, in a series of cardiac biopsies from 131 individuals with DCM, we found 5 individuals with 4 previously unreported nonsynonymous variants in the coding region of PRDM16. None of the PRDM16 mutations identified were observed in more than 6,400 controls. PRDM16 has not previously been associated with cardiac disease but is localized in the nuclei of cardiomyocytes throughout murine and human development and in the adult heart. Modeling of PRDM16 haploinsufficiency and a human truncation mutant in zebrafish resulted in both contractile dysfunction and partial uncoupling of cardiomyocytes and also revealed evidence of impaired cardiomyocyte proliferative capacity. In conclusion, mutation of PRDM16 causes the cardiomyopathy in 1p36 deletion syndrome as well as a proportion of nonsyndromic LVNC and DCM.

  4. 46,XY Gonadal Dysgenesis due to a Homozygous Mutation in Desert Hedgehog (DHH) Identified by Exome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Merz, Hartmut; Birnbaum, Wiebke; Marshall, Louise; Schröder, Tatjana; Reiz, Benedikt; Kavran, Jennifer M.; Bäumer, Tobias; Capetian, Philipp; Hiort, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Background: 46,XY disorders of sex development (DSD) comprise a heterogeneous group of congenital conditions. Mutations in a variety of genes can affect gonadal development or androgen biosynthesis/action and thereby influence the development of the internal and external genital organs. Objective: The objective of the study was to identify the genetic cause in two 46,XY sisters of a consanguineous family with DSD and gonadal tumor formation. Methods: We used a next-generation sequencing approach by exome sequencing. Electrophysiological and high-resolution ultrasound examination of peripheral nerves as well as histopathological examination of the gonads were performed. Results: We identified a novel homozygous R124Q mutation in the desert hedgehog gene (DHH), which alters a conserved residue among the three mammalian Hedgehog ligands sonic hedgehog, Indian hedgehog, and desert hedgehog. No other relevant mutations in DSD-related genes were encountered. The gonads of one patient showed partial gonadal dysgenesis with loss of Leydig cells in tubular areas with seminoma in situ and a hyperplasia of Leydig cell-like cells expressing CYP17A1 in more dysgenetic parts of the gonad. In addition, both patients suffer from a polyneuropathy. High-resolution ultrasound revealed a structural change of peripheral nerve structure that fits well to a minifascicle formation of peripheral nerves. Conclusion: Mutations in DHH play a role in 46,XY gonadal dysgenesis and are associated with seminoma formation and a neuropathy with minifascicle formation. Gonadal dysgenesis in these cases may be due to impairment of Sertoli cell-Leydig cell interaction during gonadal development. PMID:25927242

  5. Erythrocyte Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency mutation identified in multiple breeds of domestic cats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Erythrocyte pyruvate kinase deficiency (PK deficiency) is an inherited hemolytic anemia that has been documented in the Abyssinian and Somali breeds as well as random bred domestic shorthair cats. The disease results from mutations in PKLR, the gene encoding the regulatory glycolytic enzyme pyruvate kinase (PK). Multiple isozymes are produced by tissue-specific differential processing of PKLR mRNA. Perturbation of PK decreases erythrocyte longevity resulting in anemia. Additional signs include: severe lethargy, weakness, weight loss, jaundice, and abdominal enlargement. In domestic cats, PK deficiency has an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance with high variability in onset and severity of clinical symptoms. Results Sequence analysis of PKLR revealed an intron 5 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at position 304 concordant with the disease phenotype in Abyssinian and Somali cats. Located 53 nucleotides upstream of the exon 6 splice site, cats with this SNP produce liver and blood processed mRNA with a 13 bp deletion at the 3’ end of exon 5. The frame-shift mutation creates a stop codon at amino acid position 248 in exon 6. The frequency of the intronic SNP in 14,179 American and European cats representing 38 breeds, 76 western random bred cats and 111 cats of unknown breed is 6.31% and 9.35% when restricted to the 15 groups carrying the concordant SNP. Conclusions PK testing is recommended for Bengals, Egyptian Maus, La Perms, Maine Coon cats, Norwegian Forest cats, Savannahs, Siberians, and Singapuras, in addition to Abyssinians and Somalis as well an any new breeds using the afore mentioned breeds in out crossing or development programs. PMID:23110753

  6. Assessment of canine BEST1 variations identifies new mutations and establishes an independent bestrophinopathy model (cmr3)

    PubMed Central

    Wickström, Kaisa; Slavik, Julianna; Lindauer, Sarah J.; Ahonen, Saija; Schelling, Claude; Lohi, Hannes; Guziewicz, Karina E.; Aguirre, Gustavo D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Mutations in bestrophin 1 (BEST1) are associated with a group of retinal disorders known as bestrophinopathies in man and canine multifocal retinopathies (cmr) in the dog. To date, the dog is the only large animal model suitable for the complex characterization and in-depth studies of Best-related disorders. In the first report of cmr, the disease was described in a group of mastiff-related breeds (cmr1) and the Coton de Tulear (cmr2). Additional breeds, e.g., the Lapponian herder (LH) and others, subsequently were recognized with similar phenotypes, but linked loci are unknown. Analysis of the BEST1 gene aimed to identify mutations in these additional populations and extend our understanding of genotype–phenotype associations. Methods Animals were subjected to routine eye exams, phenotypically characterized, and samples were collected for molecular studies. Known BEST1 mutations were assessed, and the canine BEST1 coding exons were amplified and sequenced in selected individuals that exhibited a cmr compatible phenotype but that did not carry known mutations. Resulting sequence changes were genotyped in several different breeds and evaluated in the context of the phenotype. Results Seven novel coding variants were identified in exon 10 of cBEST1. Two linked mutations were associated with cmr exclusive to the LH breed (cmr3). Two individuals of Jämthund and Norfolk terrier breeds were heterozygous for two conservative changes, but these were unlikely to have disease-causing potential. Another three substitutions were found in the Bernese mountain dog that were predicted to have a deleterious effect on protein function. Previously reported mutations were excluded from segregation in these populations, but cmr1 was confirmed in another mastiff-related breed, the Italian cane corso. Conclusions A third independent canine model for human bestrophinopathies has been established in the LH breed. While exhibiting a phenotype comparable to cmr1 and cmr2, the

  7. Constitutive activation of the shh-ptc1 pathway by a patched1 mutation identified in BCC.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Elizabeth A; Heidtman, Keely J; Donoghue, Daniel J

    2005-01-27

    Mutations in the transmembrane receptor patched1 (ptc1) are responsible for the majority of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) cases. Many of these mutations, including ptc1-Q688X, result in premature truncation of the ptc1 protein. ptc1-Q688X has been identified in patients with both BCC and nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, an inheritable disorder causing a predisposition to cancer susceptibility. Here we describe a mechanism by which ptc1-Q688X causes constitutive cellular signaling. Cells expressing ptc1-Q688X demonstrate an increase in cell cycle progression and induce cell transformation. The ptc1-Q688X mutant enhances Gli1 activity, a downstream reporter of sonic hedgehog (shh)-ptc1 signaling, independent of shh stimulation. In contrast to wild-type ptc1, ptc1-Q688X fails to associate with endogenous cyclin B1. Expression of nuclear-targeted cyclin B1 derivatives promotes Gli1-dependent transcription, which correlates temporally with cyclin B1-cdk1 kinase activity. Coexpression of wild-type ptc1 with a nuclear-targeted cyclin B1 derivative, mutated to mimic constitutive phosphorylation, dramatically decreases Gli1 activity. In addition, the coexpression of this constitutively nuclear cyclin B1 derivative with ptc1-Q688X substantially enhances foci formation. These studies therefore describe a molecular mechanism for the aberrant activity of ptc1-Q688X that includes the premature activation of the transcription factor Gli1.

  8. Glucose transport 1 deficiency presenting as infantile spasms with a mutation identified in exon 9 of SLC2A1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun Hee

    2016-01-01

    Glucose transport 1 (GLUT-1) deficiency is a rare syndrome caused by mutations in the glucose transporter 1 gene (SLC2A1) and is characterized by early-onset intractable epilepsy, delayed development, and movement disorder. De novo mutations and several hot spots in N34, G91, R126, R153, and R333 of exons 2, 3, 4, and 8 of SLC2A1 are associated with this condition. Seizures, one of the main clinical features of GLUT-1 deficiency, usually develop during infancy. Most patients experience brief and subtle myoclonic jerk and focal seizures that evolve into a mixture of different types of seizures, such as generalized tonic-clonic, absence, myoclonic, and complex partial seizures. Here, we describe the case of a patient with GLUT-1 deficiency who developed infantile spasms and showed delayed development at 6 months of age. She had intractable epilepsy despite receiving aggressive antiepileptic drug therapy, and underwent a metabolic workup. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination showed CSF-glucose-to-blood-glucose ratio of 0.38, with a normal lactate level. Bidirectional sequencing of SLC2A1 identified a missense mutation (c.1198C>T) at codon 400 (p.Arg400Cys) of exon 9. PMID:28018440

  9. Recurrent mutation of the ID3 gene in Burkitt lymphoma identified by integrated genome, exome and transcriptome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Richter, Julia; Schlesner, Matthias; Hoffmann, Steve; Kreuz, Markus; Leich, Ellen; Burkhardt, Birgit; Rosolowski, Maciej; Ammerpohl, Ole; Wagener, Rabea; Bernhart, Stephan H; Lenze, Dido; Szczepanowski, Monika; Paulsen, Maren; Lipinski, Simone; Russell, Robert B; Adam-Klages, Sabine; Apic, Gordana; Claviez, Alexander; Hasenclever, Dirk; Hovestadt, Volker; Hornig, Nadine; Korbel, Jan O; Kube, Dieter; Langenberger, David; Lawerenz, Chris; Lisfeld, Jasmin; Meyer, Katharina; Picelli, Simone; Pischimarov, Jordan; Radlwimmer, Bernhard; Rausch, Tobias; Rohde, Marius; Schilhabel, Markus; Scholtysik, René; Spang, Rainer; Trautmann, Heiko; Zenz, Thorsten; Borkhardt, Arndt; Drexler, Hans G; Möller, Peter; MacLeod, Roderick A F; Pott, Christiane; Schreiber, Stefan; Trümper, Lorenz; Loeffler, Markus; Stadler, Peter F; Lichter, Peter; Eils, Roland; Küppers, Ralf; Hummel, Michael; Klapper, Wolfram; Rosenstiel, Philip; Rosenwald, Andreas; Brors, Benedikt; Siebert, Reiner

    2012-12-01

    Burkitt lymphoma is a mature aggressive B-cell lymphoma derived from germinal center B cells. Its cytogenetic hallmark is the Burkitt translocation t(8;14)(q24;q32) and its variants, which juxtapose the MYC oncogene with one of the three immunoglobulin loci. Consequently, MYC is deregulated, resulting in massive perturbation of gene expression. Nevertheless, MYC deregulation alone seems not to be sufficient to drive Burkitt lymphomagenesis. By whole-genome, whole-exome and transcriptome sequencing of four prototypical Burkitt lymphomas with immunoglobulin gene (IG)-MYC translocation, we identified seven recurrently mutated genes. One of these genes, ID3, mapped to a region of focal homozygous loss in Burkitt lymphoma. In an extended cohort, 36 of 53 molecularly defined Burkitt lymphomas (68%) carried potentially damaging mutations of ID3. These were strongly enriched at somatic hypermutation motifs. Only 6 of 47 other B-cell lymphomas with the IG-MYC translocation (13%) carried ID3 mutations. These findings suggest that cooperation between ID3 inactivation and IG-MYC translocation is a hallmark of Burkitt lymphomagenesis.

  10. Whole Genome Sequencing Identifies Novel Compound Heterozygous Lysosomal Trafficking Regulator Gene Mutations Associated with Autosomal Recessive Chediak-Higashi Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yaqiong; Zhang, Li; Wang, Senfen; Chen, Feng; Gu, Yang; Hong, Enyu; Yu, Yongbo; Ni, Xin; Guo, Yongli; Shi, Tieliu; Xu, Zigang

    2017-01-01

    Chediak–Higashi syndrome (CHS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by varying degrees of oculocutaneous albinism, recurrent infections, and a mild bleeding tendency, with late neurologic dysfunction. This syndrome is molecularly characterized by pathognomonic mutations in the LYST (lysosomal trafficking regulator). Using whole genome sequencing (WGS) we attempted to identify novel mutations of CHS based on a family of CHS with atypical symptoms. The two patients demonstrated a phenotypic constellation including partial oculocutaneous albinism, frequency upper respiratory infection or a marginal intelligence, without bleeding tendency and severe immunodeficiency. WGS revealed two compound LYST mutations including a maternally inherited chr1:235969126G > A (rs80338652) and a novel paternally inherited chr1: 235915327A > AT, associated with autosomal recessive CHS. These two variants fall in the coding regions of LYST, resulting in premature truncation of LYST due to R1104X/N2535KfsX2 induced incomplete translation. Notably, the heterozygous carriers (i.e. parents) were unaffected. Our finding also reveals decreased plasma serotonin levels in patients with CHS compared with unaffected individuals for the first time. The present study contributes to improved understanding of the causes of this disease and provides new ideas for possible treatments. PMID:28145517

  11. A Genetic Screen for Mutations Affecting Cell Division in the Arabidopsis thaliana Embryo Identifies Seven Loci Required for Cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Gillmor, C. Stewart; Roeder, Adrienne H. K.; Sieber, Patrick; Somerville, Chris; Lukowitz, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Cytokinesis in plants involves the formation of unique cellular structures such as the phragmoplast and the cell plate, both of which are required to divide the cell after nuclear division. In order to isolate genes that are involved in de novo cell wall formation, we performed a large-scale, microscope-based screen for Arabidopsis mutants that severely impair cytokinesis in the embryo. We recovered 35 mutations that form abnormally enlarged cells with multiple, often polyploid nuclei and incomplete cell walls. These mutants represent seven genes, four of which have previously been implicated in phragmoplast or cell plate function. Mutations in two loci show strongly reduced transmission through the haploid gametophytic generation. Molecular cloning of both corresponding genes reveals that one is represented by hypomorphic alleles of the kinesin-5 gene RADIALLY SWOLLEN 7 (homologous to tobacco kinesin-related protein TKRP125), and that the other gene corresponds to the Arabidopsis FUSED ortholog TWO-IN-ONE (originally identified based on its function in pollen development). No mutations that completely abolish the formation of cross walls in diploid cells were found. Our results support the idea that cytokinesis in the diploid and haploid generations involve similar mechanisms. PMID:26745275

  12. Whole-Exome Capture and Sequencing Identifies HEATR2 Mutation as a Cause of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia

    PubMed Central

    Horani, Amjad; Druley, Todd E.; Zariwala, Maimoona A.; Patel, Anand C.; Levinson, Benjamin T.; Van Arendonk, Laura G.; Thornton, Katherine C.; Giacalone, Joe C.; Albee, Alison J.; Wilson, Kate S.; Turner, Emily H.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Shendure, Jay; Bayly, Philip V.; Leigh, Margaret W.; Knowles, Michael R.; Brody, Steven L.; Dutcher, Susan K.; Ferkol, Thomas W.

    2012-01-01

    Motile cilia are essential components of the mucociliary escalator and are central to respiratory-tract host defenses. Abnormalities in these evolutionarily conserved organelles cause primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). Despite recent strides characterizing the ciliome and sensory ciliopathies through exploration of the phenotype-genotype associations in model organisms, the genetic bases of most cases of PCD remain elusive. We identified nine related subjects with PCD from geographically dispersed Amish communities and performed exome sequencing of two affected individuals and their unaffected parents. A single autosomal-recessive nonsynonymous missense mutation was identified in HEATR2, an uncharacterized gene that belongs to a family not previously associated with ciliary assembly or function. Airway epithelial cells isolated from PCD-affected individuals had markedly reduced HEATR2 levels, absent dynein arms, and loss of ciliary beating. MicroRNA-mediated silencing of the orthologous gene in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii resulted in absent outer dynein arms, reduced flagellar beat frequency, and decreased cell velocity. These findings were recapitulated by small hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown of HEATR2 in airway epithelial cells from unaffected donors. Moreover, immunohistochemistry studies in human airway epithelial cells showed that HEATR2 was localized to the cytoplasm and not in cilia, which suggests a role in either dynein arm transport or assembly. The identification of HEATR2 contributes to the growing number of genes associated with PCD identified in both individuals and model organisms and shows that exome sequencing in family studies facilitates the discovery of novel disease-causing gene mutations. PMID:23040496

  13. Translocation domain mutations affecting cellular toxicity identify the Clostridium difficile toxin B pore.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhifen; Park, Minyoung; Tam, John; Auger, Anick; Beilhartz, Greg L; Lacy, D Borden; Melnyk, Roman A

    2014-03-11

    Disease associated with Clostridium difficile infection is caused by the actions of the homologous toxins TcdA and TcdB on colonic epithelial cells. Binding to target cells triggers toxin internalization into acidified vesicles, whereupon cryptic segments from within the 1,050-aa translocation domain unfurl and insert into the bounding membrane, creating a transmembrane passageway to the cytosol. Our current understanding of the mechanisms underlying pore formation and the subsequent translocation of the upstream cytotoxic domain to the cytosol is limited by the lack of information available regarding the identity and architecture of the transmembrane pore. Here, through systematic perturbation of conserved sites within predicted membrane-insertion elements of the translocation domain, we uncovered highly sensitive residues--clustered between amino acids 1,035 and 1,107--that when individually mutated, reduced cellular toxicity by as much as >1,000-fold. We demonstrate that defective variants are defined by impaired pore formation in planar lipid bilayers and biological membranes, resulting in an inability to intoxicate cells through either apoptotic or necrotic pathways. These findings along with the unexpected similarities uncovered between the pore-forming "hotspots" of TcdB and the well-characterized α-helical diphtheria toxin translocation domain provide insights into the structure and mechanism of formation of the translocation pore for this important class of pathogenic toxins.

  14. Identifying disease mutations in genomic medicine settings: current challenges and how to accelerate progress

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The pace of exome and genome sequencing is accelerating, with the identification of many new disease-causing mutations in research settings, and it is likely that whole exome or genome sequencing could have a major impact in the clinical arena in the relatively near future. However, the human genomics community is currently facing several challenges, including phenotyping, sample collection, sequencing strategies, bioinformatics analysis, biological validation of variant function, clinical interpretation and validity of variant data, and delivery of genomic information to various constituents. Here we review these challenges and summarize the bottlenecks for the clinical application of exome and genome sequencing, and we discuss ways for moving the field forward. In particular, we urge the need for clinical-grade sample collection, high-quality sequencing data acquisition, digitalized phenotyping, rigorous generation of variant calls, and comprehensive functional annotation of variants. Additionally, we suggest that a 'networking of science' model that encourages much more collaboration and online sharing of medical history, genomic data and biological knowledge, including among research participants and consumers/patients, will help establish causation and penetrance for disease causal variants and genes. As we enter this new era of genomic medicine, we envision that consumer-driven and consumer-oriented efforts will take center stage, thus allowing insights from the human genome project to translate directly back into individualized medicine. PMID:22830651

  15. Whole-exome sequencing identifies LRIT3 mutations as a cause of autosomal-recessive complete congenital stationary night blindness.

    PubMed

    Zeitz, Christina; Jacobson, Samuel G; Hamel, Christian P; Bujakowska, Kinga; Neuillé, Marion; Orhan, Elise; Zanlonghi, Xavier; Lancelot, Marie-Elise; Michiels, Christelle; Schwartz, Sharon B; Bocquet, Béatrice; Antonio, Aline; Audier, Claire; Letexier, Mélanie; Saraiva, Jean-Paul; Luu, Tien D; Sennlaub, Florian; Nguyen, Hoan; Poch, Olivier; Dollfus, Hélène; Lecompte, Odile; Kohl, Susanne; Sahel, José-Alain; Bhattacharya, Shomi S; Audo, Isabelle

    2013-01-10

    Congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous retinal disorder. Two forms can be distinguished clinically: complete CSNB (cCSNB) and incomplete CSNB. Individuals with cCSNB have visual impairment under low-light conditions and show a characteristic electroretinogram (ERG). The b-wave amplitude is severely reduced in the dark-adapted state of the ERG, representing abnormal function of ON bipolar cells. Furthermore, individuals with cCSNB can show other ocular features such as nystagmus, myopia, and strabismus and can have reduced visual acuity and abnormalities of the cone ERG waveform. The mode of inheritance of this form can be X-linked or autosomal recessive, and the dysfunction of four genes (NYX, GRM6, TRPM1, and GPR179) has been described so far. Whole-exome sequencing in one simplex cCSNB case lacking mutations in the known genes led to the identification of a missense mutation (c.983G>A [p.Cys328Tyr]) and a nonsense mutation (c.1318C>T [p.Arg440(∗)]) in LRIT3, encoding leucine-rich-repeat (LRR), immunoglobulin-like, and transmembrane-domain 3 (LRIT3). Subsequent Sanger sequencing of 89 individuals with CSNB identified another cCSNB case harboring a nonsense mutation (c.1151C>G [p.Ser384(∗)]) and a deletion predicted to lead to a premature stop codon (c.1538_1539del [p.Ser513Cysfs(∗)59]) in the same gene. Human LRIT3 antibody staining revealed in the outer plexiform layer of the human retina a punctate-labeling pattern resembling the dendritic tips of bipolar cells; similar patterns have been observed for other proteins implicated in cCSNB. The exact role of this LRR protein in cCSNB remains to be elucidated.

  16. Whole-Exome Sequencing Identifies LRIT3 Mutations as a Cause of Autosomal-Recessive Complete Congenital Stationary Night Blindness

    PubMed Central

    Zeitz, Christina; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Hamel, Christian P.; Bujakowska, Kinga; Neuillé, Marion; Orhan, Elise; Zanlonghi, Xavier; Lancelot, Marie-Elise; Michiels, Christelle; Schwartz, Sharon B.; Bocquet, Béatrice; Antonio, Aline; Audier, Claire; Letexier, Mélanie; Saraiva, Jean-Paul; Luu, Tien D.; Sennlaub, Florian; Nguyen, Hoan; Poch, Olivier; Dollfus, Hélène; Lecompte, Odile; Kohl, Susanne; Sahel, José-Alain; Bhattacharya, Shomi S.; Audo, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous retinal disorder. Two forms can be distinguished clinically: complete CSNB (cCSNB) and incomplete CSNB. Individuals with cCSNB have visual impairment under low-light conditions and show a characteristic electroretinogram (ERG). The b-wave amplitude is severely reduced in the dark-adapted state of the ERG, representing abnormal function of ON bipolar cells. Furthermore, individuals with cCSNB can show other ocular features such as nystagmus, myopia, and strabismus and can have reduced visual acuity and abnormalities of the cone ERG waveform. The mode of inheritance of this form can be X-linked or autosomal recessive, and the dysfunction of four genes (NYX, GRM6, TRPM1, and GPR179) has been described so far. Whole-exome sequencing in one simplex cCSNB case lacking mutations in the known genes led to the identification of a missense mutation (c.983G>A [p.Cys328Tyr]) and a nonsense mutation (c.1318C>T [p.Arg440∗]) in LRIT3, encoding leucine-rich-repeat (LRR), immunoglobulin-like, and transmembrane-domain 3 (LRIT3). Subsequent Sanger sequencing of 89 individuals with CSNB identified another cCSNB case harboring a nonsense mutation (c.1151C>G [p.Ser384∗]) and a deletion predicted to lead to a premature stop codon (c.1538_1539del [p.Ser513Cysfs∗59]) in the same gene. Human LRIT3 antibody staining revealed in the outer plexiform layer of the human retina a punctate-labeling pattern resembling the dendritic tips of bipolar cells; similar patterns have been observed for other proteins implicated in cCSNB. The exact role of this LRR protein in cCSNB remains to be elucidated. PMID:23246293

  17. SDHA loss-of-function mutations in KIT-PDGFRA wild-type gastrointestinal stromal tumors identified by massively parallel sequencing.

    PubMed

    Pantaleo, Maria A; Astolfi, Annalisa; Indio, Valentina; Moore, Richard; Thiessen, Nina; Heinrich, Michael C; Gnocchi, Chiara; Santini, Donatella; Catena, Fausto; Formica, Serena; Martelli, Pier Luigi; Casadio, Rita; Pession, Andrea; Biasco, Guido

    2011-06-22

    Approximately 10%-15% of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) in adults do not harbor any mutation in the KIT or PDGFRA genes (ie, KIT/PDGFRA wild-type GISTs). Recently, mutations in SDHB and SDHC (which encode succinate dehydrogenase subunits B and C, respectively) but not in SDHA and SDHD (which encode subunits A and D, respectively) were identified in KIT/PDGFRA wild-type GISTs. To search for novel pathogenic mutations, we sequenced the tumor transcriptome of two young adult patients who developed sporadic KIT/PDGFRA wild-type GISTs by using a massively parallel sequencing approach. The only variants identified as disease related by computational analysis were in SDHA. One patient carried the homozygous nonsense mutation p.Ser384X, the other patient was a compound heterozygote harboring a p.Arg31X nonsense mutation and a p.Arg589Trp missense mutation. The heterozygous nonsense mutations in both patients were present in germline DNA isolated from peripheral blood. Protein structure analysis indicates that all three mutations lead to functional inactivation of the protein. This is the first report, to our knowle dge, that identifies SDHA inactivation as a common oncogenic event in GISTs that lack a mutation in KIT and PDGFRA.

  18. An innovative strategy for the molecular diagnosis of Usher syndrome identifies causal biallelic mutations in 93% of European patients

    PubMed Central

    Bonnet, Crystel; Riahi, Zied; Chantot-Bastaraud, Sandra; Smagghe, Luce; Letexier, Mélanie; Marcaillou, Charles; Lefèvre, Gaëlle M; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; El-Amraoui, Aziz; Singh-Estivalet, Amrit; Mohand-Saïd, Saddek; Kohl, Susanne; Kurtenbach, Anne; Sliesoraityte, Ieva; Zobor, Ditta; Gherbi, Souad; Testa, Francesco; Simonelli, Francesca; Banfi, Sandro; Fakin, Ana; Glavač, Damjan; Jarc-Vidmar, Martina; Zupan, Andrej; Battelino, Saba; Martorell Sampol, Loreto; Claveria, Maria Antonia; Catala Mora, Jaume; Dad, Shzeena; Møller, Lisbeth B; Rodriguez Jorge, Jesus; Hawlina, Marko; Auricchio, Alberto; Sahel, José-Alain; Marlin, Sandrine; Zrenner, Eberhart; Audo, Isabelle; Petit, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Usher syndrome (USH), the most prevalent cause of hereditary deafness–blindness, is an autosomal recessive and genetically heterogeneous disorder. Three clinical subtypes (USH1–3) are distinguishable based on the severity of the sensorineural hearing impairment, the presence or absence of vestibular dysfunction, and the age of onset of the retinitis pigmentosa. A total of 10 causal genes, 6 for USH1, 3 for USH2, and 1 for USH3, and an USH2 modifier gene, have been identified. A robust molecular diagnosis is required not only to improve genetic counseling, but also to advance gene therapy in USH patients. Here, we present an improved diagnostic strategy that is both cost- and time-effective. It relies on the sequential use of three different techniques to analyze selected genomic regions: targeted exome sequencing, comparative genome hybridization, and quantitative exon amplification. We screened a large cohort of 427 patients (139 USH1, 282 USH2, and six of undefined clinical subtype) from various European medical centers for mutations in all USH genes and the modifier gene. We identified a total of 421 different sequence variants predicted to be pathogenic, about half of which had not been previously reported. Remarkably, we detected large genomic rearrangements, most of which were novel and unique, in 9% of the patients. Thus, our strategy led to the identification of biallelic and monoallelic mutations in 92.7% and 5.8% of the USH patients, respectively. With an overall 98.5% mutation characterization rate, the diagnosis efficiency was substantially improved compared with previously reported methods. PMID:27460420

  19. An innovative strategy for the molecular diagnosis of Usher syndrome identifies causal biallelic mutations in 93% of European patients.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Crystel; Riahi, Zied; Chantot-Bastaraud, Sandra; Smagghe, Luce; Letexier, Mélanie; Marcaillou, Charles; Lefèvre, Gaëlle M; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; El-Amraoui, Aziz; Singh-Estivalet, Amrit; Mohand-Saïd, Saddek; Kohl, Susanne; Kurtenbach, Anne; Sliesoraityte, Ieva; Zobor, Ditta; Gherbi, Souad; Testa, Francesco; Simonelli, Francesca; Banfi, Sandro; Fakin, Ana; Glavač, Damjan; Jarc-Vidmar, Martina; Zupan, Andrej; Battelino, Saba; Martorell Sampol, Loreto; Claveria, Maria Antonia; Catala Mora, Jaume; Dad, Shzeena; Møller, Lisbeth B; Rodriguez Jorge, Jesus; Hawlina, Marko; Auricchio, Alberto; Sahel, José-Alain; Marlin, Sandrine; Zrenner, Eberhart; Audo, Isabelle; Petit, Christine

    2016-12-01

    Usher syndrome (USH), the most prevalent cause of hereditary deafness-blindness, is an autosomal recessive and genetically heterogeneous disorder. Three clinical subtypes (USH1-3) are distinguishable based on the severity of the sensorineural hearing impairment, the presence or absence of vestibular dysfunction, and the age of onset of the retinitis pigmentosa. A total of 10 causal genes, 6 for USH1, 3 for USH2, and 1 for USH3, and an USH2 modifier gene, have been identified. A robust molecular diagnosis is required not only to improve genetic counseling, but also to advance gene therapy in USH patients. Here, we present an improved diagnostic strategy that is both cost- and time-effective. It relies on the sequential use of three different techniques to analyze selected genomic regions: targeted exome sequencing, comparative genome hybridization, and quantitative exon amplification. We screened a large cohort of 427 patients (139 USH1, 282 USH2, and six of undefined clinical subtype) from various European medical centers for mutations in all USH genes and the modifier gene. We identified a total of 421 different sequence variants predicted to be pathogenic, about half of which had not been previously reported. Remarkably, we detected large genomic rearrangements, most of which were novel and unique, in 9% of the patients. Thus, our strategy led to the identification of biallelic and monoallelic mutations in 92.7% and 5.8% of the USH patients, respectively. With an overall 98.5% mutation characterization rate, the diagnosis efficiency was substantially improved compared with previously reported methods.

  20. Integrated analysis of somatic mutations and focal copy-number changes identifies key genes and pathways in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Guichard, Cécile; Amaddeo, Giuliana; Imbeaud, Sandrine; Ladeiro, Yannick; Pelletier, Laura; Maad, Ichrafe Ben; Calderaro, Julien; Bioulac-Sage, Paulette; Letexier, Mélanie; Degos, Françoise; Clément, Bruno; Balabaud, Charles; Chevet, Eric; Laurent, Alexis; Couchy, Gabrielle; Letouzé, Eric; Calvo, Fabien; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary liver malignancy. High-resolution copy number analysis of 125 tumors of which 24 were subjected to whole-exome sequencing identified 135 homozygous deletions and 994 somatic gene mutations with predicted functional consequences. We identified new recurrent alterations in 6 genes (ARID1A, RPS6KA3, NFE2L2, IRF2, CDH8 and PROKR2) not previously described in HCC. Functional analyses demonstrated tumor suppressor properties for IRF2 whose inactivation, exclusively found in hepatitis B virus related tumors, leads to impaired TP53 function. Alternatively, inactivation of proteins involved in chromatin remodeling was frequent and predominant in alcohol related tumors. Moreover, activation of the oxidative stress metabolism and inactivation of RPS6KA3 were new pathways associated with WNT/β-catenin activation, thereby suggesting a cooperative effect in tumorigenesis. This study shows the dramatic somatic genetic diversity in HCC, it reveals interactions between oncogene and tumor suppressor gene mutations markedly related to specific risk factors. PMID:22561517

  1. An extended set of yeast-based functional assays accurately identifies human disease mutations

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Song; Yang, Fan; Tan, Guihong; Costanzo, Michael; Oughtred, Rose; Hirschman, Jodi; Theesfeld, Chandra L.; Bansal, Pritpal; Sahni, Nidhi; Yi, Song; Yu, Analyn; Tyagi, Tanya; Tie, Cathy; Hill, David E.; Vidal, Marc; Andrews, Brenda J.; Boone, Charles; Dolinski, Kara; Roth, Frederick P.

    2016-01-01

    We can now routinely identify coding variants within individual human genomes. A pressing challenge is to determine which variants disrupt the function of disease-associated genes. Both experimental and computational methods exist to predict pathogenicity of human genetic variation. However, a systematic performance comparison between them has been lacking. Therefore, we developed and exploited a panel of 26 yeast-based functional complementation assays to measure the impact of 179 variants (101 disease- and 78 non-disease-associated variants) from 22 human disease genes. Using the resulting reference standard, we show that experimental functional assays in a 1-billion-year diverged model organism can identify pathogenic alleles with significantly higher precision and specificity than current computational methods. PMID:26975778

  2. Targeted sequencing identifies associations between IL7R-JAK mutations and epigenetic modulators in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Vicente, Carmen; Schwab, Claire; Broux, Michaël; Geerdens, Ellen; Degryse, Sandrine; Demeyer, Sofie; Lahortiga, Idoya; Elliott, Alannah; Chilton, Lucy; La Starza, Roberta; Mecucci, Cristina; Vandenberghe, Peter; Goulden, Nicholas; Vora, Ajay; Moorman, Anthony V; Soulier, Jean; Harrison, Christine J; Clappier, Emmanuelle; Cools, Jan

    2015-10-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia is caused by the accumulation of multiple oncogenic lesions, including chromosomal rearrangements and mutations. To determine the frequency and co-occurrence of mutations in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, we performed targeted re-sequencing of 115 genes across 155 diagnostic samples (44 adult and 111 childhood cases). NOTCH1 and CDKN2A/B were mutated/deleted in more than half of the cases, while an additional 37 genes were mutated/deleted in 4% to 20% of cases. We found that IL7R-JAK pathway genes were mutated in 27.7% of cases, with JAK3 mutations being the most frequent event in this group. Copy number variations were also detected, including deletions of CREBBP or CTCF and duplication of MYB. FLT3 mutations were rare, but a novel extracellular mutation in FLT3 was detected and confirmed to be transforming. Furthermore, we identified complex patterns of pairwise associations, including a significant association between mutations in IL7R-JAK genes and epigenetic regulators (WT1, PRC2, PHF6). Our analyses showed that IL7R-JAK genetic lesions did not confer adverse prognosis in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases enrolled in the UK ALL2003 trial. Overall, these results identify interconnections between the T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia genome and disease biology, and suggest a potential clinical application for JAK inhibitors in a significant proportion of patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  3. Loss of function mutations in RPL27 and RPS27 identified by whole-exome sequencing in Diamond-Blackfan anaemia.

    PubMed

    Wang, RuNan; Yoshida, Kenichi; Toki, Tsutomu; Sawada, Takafumi; Uechi, Tamayo; Okuno, Yusuke; Sato-Otsubo, Aiko; Kudo, Kazuko; Kamimaki, Isamu; Kanezaki, Rika; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Terui, Kiminori; Sato, Tomohiko; Iribe, Yuji; Ohga, Shouichi; Kuramitsu, Madoka; Hamaguchi, Isao; Ohara, Akira; Hara, Junichi; Goi, Kumiko; Matsubara, Kousaku; Koike, Kenichi; Ishiguro, Akira; Okamoto, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Kenichiro; Kanno, Hitoshi; Kojima, Seiji; Miyano, Satoru; Kenmochi, Naoya; Ogawa, Seishi; Ito, Etsuro

    2015-03-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anaemia is a congenital bone marrow failure syndrome that is characterized by red blood cell aplasia. The disease has been associated with mutations or large deletions in 11 ribosomal protein genes including RPS7, RPS10, RPS17, RPS19, RPS24, RPS26, RPS29, RPL5, RPL11, RPL26 and RPL35A as well as GATA1 in more than 50% of patients. However, the molecular aetiology of many Diamond-Blackfan anaemia cases remains to be uncovered. To identify new mutations responsible for Diamond-Blackfan anaemia, we performed whole-exome sequencing analysis of 48 patients with no documented mutations/deletions involving known Diamond-Blackfan anaemia genes except for RPS7, RPL26, RPS29 and GATA1. Here, we identified a de novo splicing error mutation in RPL27 and frameshift deletion in RPS27 in sporadic patients with Diamond-Blackfan anaemia. In vitro knockdown of gene expression disturbed pre-ribosomal RNA processing. Zebrafish models of rpl27 and rps27 mutations showed impairments of erythrocyte production and tail and/or brain development. Additional novel mutations were found in eight patients, including RPL3L, RPL6, RPL7L1T, RPL8, RPL13, RPL14, RPL18A and RPL31. In conclusion, we identified novel germline mutations of two ribosomal protein genes responsible for Diamond-Blackfan anaemia, further confirming the concept that mutations in ribosomal protein genes lead to Diamond-Blackfan anaemia.

  4. Mutation in KERA Identified by Linkage Analysis and Targeted Resequencing in a Pedigree with Premature Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    van Capelleveen, Julian C.; Bot, Ilze; de Jager, Saskia C.; van Eck, Miranda; Jolley, Jennifer; Kuiper, Johan; Stephens, Jonathon; Albers, Cornelius A.; Vosmeer, C. Ruben; Kruize, Heleen; Geerke, Daan P.; van der Wal, Allard C.; van der Loos, Chris M.; Kastelein, John J. P.; Trip, Mieke D.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Genetic factors explain a proportion of the inter-individual variation in the risk for atherosclerotic events, but the genetic basis of atherosclerosis and atherothrombosis in families with Mendelian forms of premature atherosclerosis is incompletely understood. We set out to unravel the molecular pathology in a large kindred with an autosomal dominant inherited form of premature atherosclerosis. Methods and Results Parametric linkage analysis was performed in a pedigree comprising 4 generations, of which a total of 11 members suffered from premature vascular events. A parametric LOD-score of 3.31 was observed for a 4.4 Mb interval on chromosome 12. Upon sequencing, a non-synonymous variant in KERA (c.920C>G; p.Ser307Cys) was identified. The variant was absent from nearly 28,000 individuals, including 2,571 patients with premature atherosclerosis. KERA, a proteoglycan protein, was expressed in lipid-rich areas of human atherosclerotic lesions, but not in healthy arterial specimens. Moreover, KERA expression in plaques was significantly associated with plaque size in a carotid-collar Apoe−/− mice (r2 = 0.69; p<0.0001). Conclusion A rare variant in KERA was identified in a large kindred with premature atherosclerosis. The identification of KERA in atherosclerotic plaque specimen in humans and mice lends support to its potential role in atherosclerosis. PMID:24879339

  5. A novel high-throughput in vivo molecular screen for shade avoidance mutants identifies a novel phyA mutation

    PubMed Central

    Roig-Villanova, Irma; Khan, Safina; Shanahan, Hugh; Quail, Peter H.; Martinez-Garcia, Jaime F.; Devlin, Paul F.

    2011-01-01

    The shade avoidance syndrome (SAS) allows plants to anticipate and avoid shading by neighbouring plants by initiating an elongation growth response. The phytochrome photoreceptors are able to detect a reduction in the red:far red ratio in incident light, the result of selective absorption of red and blue wavelengths by proximal vegetation. A shade-responsive luciferase reporter line (PHYB::LUC) was used to carry out a high-throughput screen to identify novel SAS mutants. The dracula 1 (dra1) mutant, that showed no avoidance of shade for the PHYB::LUC response, was the result of a mutation in the PHYA gene. Like previously characterized phyA mutants, dra1 showed a long hypocotyl in far red light and an enhanced hypocotyl elongation response to shade. However, dra1 additionally showed a long hypocotyl in red light. Since phyB levels are relatively unaffected in dra1, this gain-of-function red light phenotype strongly suggests a disruption of phyB signalling. The dra1 mutation, G773E within the phyA PAS2 domain, occurs at a residue absolutely conserved among phyA sequences. The equivalent residue in phyB is absolutely conserved as a threonine. PAS domains are structurally conserved domains involved in molecular interaction. Structural modelling of the dra1 mutation within the phyA PAS2 domain shows some similarity with the structure of the phyB PAS2 domain, suggesting that the interference with phyB signalling may be the result of non-functional mimicry. Hence, it was hypothesized that this PAS2 residue forms a key distinction between the phyA and phyB phytochrome species. PMID:21398429

  6. A novel high-throughput in vivo molecular screen for shade avoidance mutants identifies a novel phyA mutation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuewen; Roig-Villanova, Irma; Khan, Safina; Shanahan, Hugh; Quail, Peter H; Martinez-Garcia, Jaime F; Devlin, Paul F

    2011-05-01

    The shade avoidance syndrome (SAS) allows plants to anticipate and avoid shading by neighbouring plants by initiating an elongation growth response. The phytochrome photoreceptors are able to detect a reduction in the red:far red ratio in incident light, the result of selective absorption of red and blue wavelengths by proximal vegetation. A shade-responsive luciferase reporter line (PHYB::LUC) was used to carry out a high-throughput screen to identify novel SAS mutants. The dracula 1 (dra1) mutant, that showed no avoidance of shade for the PHYB::LUC response, was the result of a mutation in the PHYA gene. Like previously characterized phyA mutants, dra1 showed a long hypocotyl in far red light and an enhanced hypocotyl elongation response to shade. However, dra1 additionally showed a long hypocotyl in red light. Since phyB levels are relatively unaffected in dra1, this gain-of-function red light phenotype strongly suggests a disruption of phyB signalling. The dra1 mutation, G773E within the phyA PAS2 domain, occurs at a residue absolutely conserved among phyA sequences. The equivalent residue in phyB is absolutely conserved as a threonine. PAS domains are structurally conserved domains involved in molecular interaction. Structural modelling of the dra1 mutation within the phyA PAS2 domain shows some similarity with the structure of the phyB PAS2 domain, suggesting that the interference with phyB signalling may be the result of non-functional mimicry. Hence, it was hypothesized that this PAS2 residue forms a key distinction between the phyA and phyB phytochrome species.

  7. Transcriptional Profile Analysis of RPGRORF15 Frameshift Mutation Identifies Novel Genes Associated with Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Genini, Sem; Zangerl, Barbara; Slavik, Julianna; Acland, Gregory M.; Beltran, William A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. To identify genes and molecular mechanisms associated with photoreceptor degeneration in a canine model of XLRP caused by an RPGR exon ORF15 microdeletion. Methods. Expression profiles of mutant and normal retinas were compared by using canine retinal custom cDNA microarrays. qRT-PCR, Western blot analysis, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) were applied to selected genes, to confirm and expand the microarray results. Results. At 7 and 16 weeks, respectively, 56 and 18 transcripts were downregulated in the mutant retinas, but none were differentially expressed (DE) at both ages, suggesting the involvement of temporally distinct pathways. Downregulated genes included the known retina-relevant genes PAX6, CHML, and RDH11 at 7 weeks and CRX and SAG at 16 weeks. Genes directly or indirectly active in apoptotic processes were altered at 7 weeks (CAMK2G, NTRK2, PRKCB, RALA, RBBP6, RNF41, SMYD3, SPP1, and TUBB2C) and 16 weeks (SLC25A5 and NKAP). Furthermore, the DE genes at 7 weeks (ELOVL6, GLOD4, NDUFS4, and REEP1) and 16 weeks (SLC25A5 and TARS2) are related to mitochondrial functions. qRT-PCR of 18 genes confirmed the microarray results and showed DE of additional genes not on the array. Only GFAP was DE at 3 weeks of age. Western blot and IHC analyses also confirmed the high reliability of the transcriptomic data. Conclusions. Several DE genes were identified in mutant retinas. At 7 weeks, a combination of nonclassic anti- and proapoptosis genes appear to be involved in photoreceptor degeneration, whereas at both 7 and 16 weeks, the expression of mitochondria-related genes indicates that they may play a relevant role in the disease process. PMID:20574030

  8. Exome sequencing covers >98% of mutations identified on targeted next generation sequencing panels

    PubMed Central

    LaDuca, Holly; Farwell, Kelly D.; Vuong, Huy; Lu, Hsiao-Mei; Mu, Wenbo; Shahmirzadi, Layla; Tang, Sha; Chen, Jefferey; Bhide, Shruti; Chao, Elizabeth C.

    2017-01-01

    Background With the expanded availability of next generation sequencing (NGS)-based clinical genetic tests, clinicians seeking to test patients with Mendelian diseases must weigh the superior coverage of targeted gene panels with the greater number of genes included in whole exome sequencing (WES) when considering their first-tier testing approach. Here, we use an in silico analysis to predict the analytic sensitivity of WES using pathogenic variants identified on targeted NGS panels as a reference. Methods Corresponding nucleotide positions for 1533 different alterations classified as pathogenic or likely pathogenic identified on targeted NGS multi-gene panel tests in our laboratory were interrogated in data from 100 randomly-selected clinical WES samples to quantify the sequence coverage at each position. Pathogenic variants represented 91 genes implicated in hereditary cancer, X-linked intellectual disability, primary ciliary dyskinesia, Marfan syndrome/aortic aneurysms, cardiomyopathies and arrhythmias. Results When assessing coverage among 100 individual WES samples for each pathogenic variant (153,300 individual assessments), 99.7% (n = 152,798) would likely have been detected on WES. All pathogenic variants had at least some coverage on exome sequencing, with a total of 97.3% (n = 1491) detectable across all 100 individuals. For the remaining 42 pathogenic variants, the number of WES samples with adequate coverage ranged from 35 to 99. Factors such as location in GC-rich, repetitive, or homologous regions likely explain why some of these alterations were not detected across all samples. To validate study findings, a similar analysis was performed against coverage data from 60,706 exomes available through the Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC). Results from this validation confirmed that 98.6% (91,743,296/93,062,298) of pathogenic variants demonstrated adequate depth for detection. Conclusions Results from this in silico analysis suggest that exome

  9. Free-energy computations identify the mutations required to confer trans-sialidase activity into Trypanosoma rangeli sialidase.

    PubMed

    Pierdominici-Sottile, Gustavo; Palma, Juliana; Roitberg, Adrian E

    2014-03-01

    Trypanosoma rangeli's sialidase (TrSA) and Trypanosoma cruzi's trans-sialidase (TcTS) are members of the glycoside hydrolase family 33 (GH-33). They share 70% of sequence identity and their crystallographic Cα RMSD is 0.59 Å. Despite these similarities they catalyze different reactions. TcTS transfers sialic acid between glycoconjugates while TrSA can only cleave sialic acid from sialyl-glyconjugates. Significant effort has been invested into unraveling the differences between TrSA and TcTS, and into conferring TrSA with trans-sialidase activity through appropriate point mutations. Recently, we calculated the free-energy change for the formation of the covalent intermediate (CI) in TcTS and performed an energy decomposition analysis of that process. In this article we present a similar study for the formation of the CI in TrSA, as well as in a quintuple mutant (TrSA5mut), which has faint trans-sialidase activity. The comparison of these new results with those previously obtained for TcTS allowed identifying five extra mutations to be introduced in TrSA5mut that should create a mutant (TrSA10mut ) with high trans-sialidase activity.

  10. Whole Exome Sequencing Identifies De Novo Heterozygous CAV1 Mutations Associated with a Novel Neonatal Onset Lipodystrophy Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Abhimanyu; Kircher, Martin; del Campo, Miguel; Amato, R. Stephen; Agarwal, Anil K.

    2016-01-01

    Despite remarkable progress in identifying causal genes for many types of genetic lipodystrophies in the last decade, the molecular basis of many extremely rare lipodystrophy patients with distinctive phenotypes remains unclear. We conducted whole exome sequencing of the parents and probands from six pedigrees with neonatal onset of generalized loss of subcutaneous fat with additional distinctive phenotypic features and report de novo heterozygous null mutations, c.424C>T (p. Q142*) and c.479_480delTT (p.F160*), in CAV1 in a 7-year-old male and a 3-year-old female of European origin, respectively. Both the patients had generalized fat loss, thin mottled skin and progeroid features at birth. The male patient had cataracts requiring extraction at age 30 months and the female patient had pulmonary arterial hypertension. Dermal fibroblasts of the female patient revealed negligible CAV1 immunofluorescence staining compared to control but there were no differences in the number and morphology of caveolae upon electron microscopy examination. Based upon the similarities in the clinical features of these two patients, previous reports of CAV1 mutations in patients with lipodystrophies and pulmonary hypertension, and similar features seen in CAV1 null mice, we conclude that these variants are the most likely cause of one subtype of neonatal onset generalized lipodystrophy syndrome. PMID:25898808

  11. A Novel Homozygous p.L539F Mutation Identified in PINK1 Gene in a Moroccan Patient with Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Ben El Haj, Rafiqua; Regragui, Wafaa; Tazi-Ahnini, Rachid; Skalli, Asmae; Bouslam, Naima; Benomar, Ali; Yahyaoui, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder after Alzheimer's disease. Ten of fifteen causative genes linked to familial forms of PD have been reported to cause autosomal recessive forms. Among them, mutations in the PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) gene were shown to be responsible for a phenotype characterized by early onset, good response to levodopa, and a benign course. Using chromosomal microarray analysis and Sanger sequencing, we identified a homozygous G/C substitution in a 58-year-old Moroccan man diagnosed with recessive inherited Parkinson's disease. This G-to-C transition occurred at position 1617 leading to an amino acid change L/F at position 539 located in highly conserved motif in the C terminal sequence of PINK1. Interestingly, the c.1617G>C substitution is absent in 192 ethnically matched control chromosomes. Our findings have shown that the p.L539F is a novel mutation located in the C terminal sequence of the PINK1 protein that could be pathogenic and responsible for a clinical phenotype resembling idiopathic Parkinson's disease with rapid progression and early cognitive impairment. PMID:27413743

  12. Exome sequencing identifies frequent mutation of the SWI/SNF complex gene PBRM1 in renal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Varela, Ignacio; Tarpey, Patrick; Raine, Keiran; Huang, Dachuan; Ong, Choon Kiat; Stephens, Philip; Davies, Helen; Jones, David; Lin, Meng-Lay; Teague, Jon; Bignell, Graham; Butler, Adam; Cho, Juok; Dalgliesh, Gillian L; Galappaththige, Danushka; Greenman, Chris; Hardy, Claire; Jia, Mingming; Latimer, Calli; Lau, King Wai; Marshall, John; McLaren, Stuart; Menzies, Andrew; Mudie, Laura; Stebbings, Lucy; Largaespada, David A; Wessels, L F A; Richard, Stephane; Kahnoski, Richard J; Anema, John; Tuveson, David A; Perez-Mancera, Pedro A; Mustonen, Ville; Fischer, Andrej; Adams, David J; Rust, Alistair; Chan-on, Waraporn; Subimerb, Chutima; Dykema, Karl; Furge, Kyle; Campbell, Peter J; Teh, Bin Tean; Stratton, Michael R; Futreal, P Andrew

    2011-01-27

    The genetics of renal cancer is dominated by inactivation of the VHL tumour suppressor gene in clear cell carcinoma (ccRCC), the commonest histological subtype. A recent large-scale screen of ∼3,500 genes by PCR-based exon re-sequencing identified several new cancer genes in ccRCC including UTX (also known as KDM6A), JARID1C (also known as KDM5C) and SETD2 (ref. 2). These genes encode enzymes that demethylate (UTX, JARID1C) or methylate (SETD2) key lysine residues of histone H3. Modification of the methylation state of these lysine residues of histone H3 regulates chromatin structure and is implicated in transcriptional control. However, together these mutations are present in fewer than 15% of ccRCC, suggesting the existence of additional, currently unidentified cancer genes. Here, we have sequenced the protein coding exome in a series of primary ccRCC and report the identification of the SWI/SNF chromatin remodelling complex gene PBRM1 (ref. 4) as a second major ccRCC cancer gene, with truncating mutations in 41% (92/227) of cases. These data further elucidate the somatic genetic architecture of ccRCC and emphasize the marked contribution of aberrant chromatin biology.

  13. Whole exome sequencing in congenital pain insensitivity identifies a novel causative intronic NTRK1-mutation due to uniparental disomy.

    PubMed

    Kurth, Ingo; Baumgartner, Manuela; Schabhüttl, Maria; Tomni, Cecilia; Windhager, Reinhard; Strom, Tim M; Wieland, Thomas; Gremel, Kurt; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela

    2016-09-01

    Congenital insensitivity to pain and anhidrosis (CIPA), also known as hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type IV (HSAN IV), is characterized by recurrent episodes of unexplained high fever, loss of pain perception and temperature sensation, absent sweating, repeated traumatic and thermal injuries, and mild mental retardation. After exclusion of obviously pathogenic mutations in NTRK1, the most common cause of CIPA, whole exome sequencing (WES) was carried out in a CIPA patient with unrelated parents. No mutations in known HSAN genes were identified. However, filtering for genes carrying two rare sequence variations detected 13 homozygous single nucleotide variants (SNV), all being located on chromosome 1. Further analysis strongly suggested that this finding might be best explained by uniparental disomy of chromosome 1. Because NTRK1 is also located on chromosome 1, we re-evaluated WES data and detected a novel intronic sequence variation at position c.2188-12 C>A, homozygously because of uniparental disomy. Subsequent analysis of NTRK1 transcripts in peripheral blood cells of the patient revealed an influence of the variant on mRNA splicing. The C>A transversion generated a novel splice-site, which led to the incorporation of 10 intronic bases into the NTRK1 mRNA and consequently to a non-functional gene product. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Fine-Scale Mapping at 9p22.2 Identifies Candidate Causal Variants That Modify Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers.

    PubMed

    Vigorito, Elena; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Beesley, Jonathan; Adlard, Julian; Agnarsson, Bjarni A; Andrulis, Irene L; Arun, Banu K; Barjhoux, Laure; Belotti, Muriel; Benitez, Javier; Berger, Andreas; Bojesen, Anders; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brewer, Carole; Caldes, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A; Campbell, Ian; Chan, Salina B; Claes, Kathleen B M; Cohn, David E; Cook, Jackie; Daly, Mary B; Damiola, Francesca; Davidson, Rosemarie; Pauw, Antoine de; Delnatte, Capucine; Diez, Orland; Domchek, Susan M; Dumont, Martine; Durda, Katarzyna; Dworniczak, Bernd; Easton, Douglas F; Eccles, Diana; Edwinsdotter Ardnor, Christina; Eeles, Ros; Ejlertsen, Bent; Ellis, Steve; Evans, D Gareth; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gaddam, Pragna; Ganz, Patricia A; Garber, Judy; Garcia-Barberan, Vanesa; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Gehrig, Andrea; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Giraud, Sophie; Godwin, Andrew K; Goldgar, David E; Hake, Christopher R; Hansen, Thomas V O; Healey, Sue; Hodgson, Shirley; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Houdayer, Claude; Hulick, Peter J; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Izatt, Louise; Izquierdo, Angel; Jacobs, Lauren; Jakubowska, Anna; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M; Vijai, Joseph; Karlan, Beth Y; Kast, Karin; Investigators, KConFab; Khan, Sofia; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lester, Jenny; Lesueur, Fabienne; Liljegren, Annelie; Lubinski, Jan; Mai, Phuong L; Manoukian, Siranoush; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Meindl, Alfons; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Montagna, Marco; Nathanson, Katherine L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Niederacher, Dieter; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Ong, Kai-Ren; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue Kyung; Paulsson-Karlsson, Ylva; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Peissel, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Pfeiler, Georg; Phelan, Catherine M; Piedmonte, Marion; Poppe, Bruce; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Radice, Paolo; Rennert, Gad; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Rookus, Matti A; Ross, Eric A; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F; Slavin, Thomas P; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Steinemann, Doris; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Sutter, Christian; Szabo, Csilla I; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Teixeira, Manuel R; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary Beth; Thomassen, Mads; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Tihomirova, Laima; Tognazzo, Silvia; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Varesco, Liliana; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Vratimos, Athanassios; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; McGuffog, Lesley; Kirk, Judy; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Hamann, Ute; Lindor, Noralane; Ramus, Susan J; Greene, Mark H; Couch, Fergus J; Offit, Kenneth; Pharoah, Paul D P; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C

    2016-01-01

    Population-based genome wide association studies have identified a locus at 9p22.2 associated with ovarian cancer risk, which also modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We conducted fine-scale mapping at 9p22.2 to identify potential causal variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Genotype data were available for 15,252 (2,462 ovarian cancer cases) BRCA1 and 8,211 (631 ovarian cancer cases) BRCA2 mutation carriers. Following genotype imputation, ovarian cancer associations were assessed for 4,873 and 5,020 SNPs in BRCA1 and BRCA 2 mutation carriers respectively, within a retrospective cohort analytical framework. In BRCA1 mutation carriers one set of eight correlated candidate causal variants for ovarian cancer risk modification was identified (top SNP rs10124837, HR: 0.73, 95%CI: 0.68 to 0.79, p-value 2× 10-16). These variants were located up to 20 kb upstream of BNC2. In BRCA2 mutation carriers one region, up to 45 kb upstream of BNC2, and containing 100 correlated SNPs was identified as candidate causal (top SNP rs62543585, HR: 0.69, 95%CI: 0.59 to 0.80, p-value 1.0 × 10-6). The candidate causal in BRCA1 mutation carriers did not include the strongest associated variant at this locus in the general population. In sum, we identified a set of candidate causal variants in a region that encompasses the BNC2 transcription start site. The ovarian cancer association at 9p22.2 may be mediated by different variants in BRCA1 mutation carriers and in the general population. Thus, potentially different mechanisms may underlie ovarian cancer risk for mutation carriers and the general population.

  15. Fine-Scale Mapping at 9p22.2 Identifies Candidate Causal Variants That Modify Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Vigorito, Elena; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Beesley, Jonathan; Adlard, Julian; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Arun, Banu K.; Barjhoux, Laure; Belotti, Muriel; Benitez, Javier; Berger, Andreas; Bojesen, Anders; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brewer, Carole; Caldes, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A.; Campbell, Ian; Chan, Salina B.; Claes, Kathleen B. M.; Cohn, David E.; Cook, Jackie; Daly, Mary B.; Damiola, Francesca; Davidson, Rosemarie; de Pauw, Antoine; Delnatte, Capucine; Diez, Orland; Domchek, Susan M.; Dumont, Martine; Durda, Katarzyna; Dworniczak, Bernd; Easton, Douglas F.; Eccles, Diana; Edwinsdotter Ardnor, Christina; Eeles, Ros; Ejlertsen, Bent; Ellis, Steve; Evans, D. Gareth; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D.; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gaddam, Pragna; Ganz, Patricia A.; Garber, Judy; Garcia-Barberan, Vanesa; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Gehrig, Andrea; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Giraud, Sophie; Godwin, Andrew K.; Goldgar, David E.; Hake, Christopher R.; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Healey, Sue; Hodgson, Shirley; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Houdayer, Claude; Hulick, Peter J.; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Isaacs, Claudine; Izatt, Louise; Izquierdo, Angel; Jacobs, Lauren; Jakubowska, Anna; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M.; Vijai, Joseph; Karlan, Beth Y.; Kast, Karin; Investigators, KConFab; Khan, Sofia; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lester, Jenny; Lesueur, Fabienne; Liljegren, Annelie; Lubinski, Jan; Mai, Phuong L.; Manoukian, Siranoush; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Meindl, Alfons; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; Montagna, Marco; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Niederacher, Dieter; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Ong, Kai-ren; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue Kyung; Paulsson-Karlsson, Ylva; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Peissel, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Pfeiler, Georg; Phelan, Catherine M.; Piedmonte, Marion; Poppe, Bruce; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Radice, Paolo; Rennert, Gad; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Rookus, Matti A.; Ross, Eric A.; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F.; Slavin, Thomas P.; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Steinemann, Doris; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Sutter, Christian; Szabo, Csilla I.; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary Beth; Thomassen, Mads; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Tihomirova, Laima; Tognazzo, Silvia; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Varesco, Liliana; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Vratimos, Athanassios; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; McGuffog, Lesley; Kirk, Judy; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Hamann, Ute; Lindor, Noralane; Ramus, Susan J.; Greene, Mark H.; Couch, Fergus J.; Offit, Kenneth; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    2016-01-01

    Population-based genome wide association studies have identified a locus at 9p22.2 associated with ovarian cancer risk, which also modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We conducted fine-scale mapping at 9p22.2 to identify potential causal variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Genotype data were available for 15,252 (2,462 ovarian cancer cases) BRCA1 and 8,211 (631 ovarian cancer cases) BRCA2 mutation carriers. Following genotype imputation, ovarian cancer associations were assessed for 4,873 and 5,020 SNPs in BRCA1 and BRCA 2 mutation carriers respectively, within a retrospective cohort analytical framework. In BRCA1 mutation carriers one set of eight correlated candidate causal variants for ovarian cancer risk modification was identified (top SNP rs10124837, HR: 0.73, 95%CI: 0.68 to 0.79, p-value 2× 10−16). These variants were located up to 20 kb upstream of BNC2. In BRCA2 mutation carriers one region, up to 45 kb upstream of BNC2, and containing 100 correlated SNPs was identified as candidate causal (top SNP rs62543585, HR: 0.69, 95%CI: 0.59 to 0.80, p-value 1.0 × 10−6). The candidate causal in BRCA1 mutation carriers did not include the strongest associated variant at this locus in the general population. In sum, we identified a set of candidate causal variants in a region that encompasses the BNC2 transcription start site. The ovarian cancer association at 9p22.2 may be mediated by different variants in BRCA1 mutation carriers and in the general population. Thus, potentially different mechanisms may underlie ovarian cancer risk for mutation carriers and the general population. PMID:27463617

  16. Molecular profiling of myeloid progenitor cells in multi-mutated advanced systemic mastocytosis identifies KIT D816V as a distinct and late event.

    PubMed

    Jawhar, M; Schwaab, J; Schnittger, S; Sotlar, K; Horny, H-P; Metzgeroth, G; Müller, N; Schneider, S; Naumann, N; Walz, C; Haferlach, T; Valent, P; Hofmann, W-K; Cross, N C P; Fabarius, A; Reiter, A

    2015-05-01

    To explore the molecular profile and its prognostic implication in systemic mastocytosis (SM), we analyzed the mutation status of granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming progenitor cells (CFU-GM) in patients with KIT D816V(+) indolent SM (ISM, n=4), smoldering SM (SSM, n=2), aggressive SM (ASM, n=1), SM with associated clonal hematologic non-mast cell lineage disorder (SM-AHNMD, n=5) and ASM-AHNMD (n=7). All patients with (A)SM-AHNMD (n=12) carried 1-4 (median 3) additional mutations in 11 genes tested, most frequently TET2, SRSF2, ASXL1, CBL and EZH2. In multi-mutated (A)SM-AHNMD, KIT D816V(+) single-cell-derived CFU-GM colonies were identified in 8/12 patients (median 60%, range 0-95). Additional mutations were identified in CFU-GM colonies in all patients, and logical hierarchy analysis indicated that mutations in TET2, SRSF2 and ASXL1 preceded KIT D816V. In ISM/SSM, no additional mutations were detected and CFU-GM colonies were exclusively KIT D816V(-). These data indicate that (a) (A)SM-AHNMD is a multi-mutated neoplasm, (b) mutations in TET2, SRSF2 or ASXL1 precede KIT D816V in ASM-AHNMD,

  17. Germline MLH1 Mutations Are Frequently Identified in Lynch Syndrome Patients With Colorectal and Endometrial Carcinoma Demonstrating Isolated Loss of PMS2 Immunohistochemical Expression.

    PubMed

    Dudley, Beth; Brand, Randall E; Thull, Darcy; Bahary, Nathan; Nikiforova, Marina N; Pai, Reetesh K

    2015-08-01

    Current guidelines on germline mutation testing for patients suspected of having Lynch syndrome are not entirely clear in patients with tumors demonstrating isolated loss of PMS2 immunohistochemical expression. We analyzed the clinical and pathologic features of patients with tumors demonstrating isolated loss of PMS2 expression in an attempt to (1) determine the frequency of germline MLH1 and PMS2 mutations and (2) correlate mismatch-repair protein immunohistochemistry and tumor histology with germline mutation results. A total of 3213 consecutive colorectal carcinomas and 215 consecutive endometrial carcinomas were prospectively analyzed for DNA mismatch-repair protein expression by immunohistochemistry. In total, 32 tumors from 31 patients demonstrated isolated loss of PMS2 immunohistochemical expression, including 16 colorectal carcinomas and 16 endometrial carcinomas. Microsatellite instability (MSI) polymerase chain reaction was performed in 29 tumors from 28 patients with the following results: 28 tumors demonstrated high-level MSI, and 1 tumor demonstrated low-level MSI. Twenty of 31 (65%) patients in the study group had tumors demonstrating histopathology associated with high-level MSI. Seventeen patients underwent germline mutation analysis with the following results: 24% with MLH1 mutations, 35% with PMS2 mutations, 12% with PMS2 variants of undetermined significance, and 29% with no mutations in either MLH1 or PMS2. Three of the 4 patients with MLH1 germline mutations had a mutation that results in decreased stability and quantity of the MLH1 protein that compromises the MLH1-PMS2 protein complex, helping to explain the presence of immunogenic but functionally inactive MLH1 protein within the tumor. The high frequency of MLH1 germline mutations identified in our study has important implications for testing strategies in patients suspected of having Lynch syndrome and indicates that patients with tumors demonstrating isolated loss of PMS2 expression

  18. Driver mutations among never smoking female lung cancer tissues in China identify unique EGFR and KRAS mutation pattern associated with household coal burning.

    PubMed

    Hosgood, H Dean; Pao, William; Rothman, Nathaniel; Hu, Wei; Pan, Yumei Helen; Kuchinsky, Kyle; Jones, Kirk D; Xu, Jun; Vermeulen, Roel; Simko, Jeff; Lan, Qing

    2013-11-01

    Lung cancer in never smokers, which has been partially attributed to household solid fuel use (i.e., coal), is etiologically and clinically different from lung cancer attributed to tobacco smoking. To explore the spectrum of driver mutations among lung cancer tissues from never smokers, specifically in a population where high lung cancer rates have been attributed to indoor air pollution from domestic coal use, multiplexed assays were used to detect >40 point mutations, insertions, and deletions (EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, HER2, NRAS, PIK3CA, MEK1, AKT1, and PTEN) among the lung tumors of confirmed never smoking females from Xuanwei, China [32 adenocarcinomas (ADCs), 7 squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs), 1 adenosquamous carcinoma (ADSC)]. EGFR mutations were detected in 35% of tumors. 46% of these involved EGFR exon 18 G719X, while 14% were exon 21 L858R mutations. KRAS mutations, all of which were G12C_34G>T, were observed in 15% of tumors. EGFR and KRAS mutations were mutually exclusive, and no mutations were observed in the other tested genes. Most point mutations were transversions and were also found in tumors from patients who used coal in their homes. Our high mutation frequencies in EGFR exon 18 and KRAS and low mutation frequency in EGFR exon 21 are strikingly divergent from those in other smoking and never smoking populations from Asia. Given that our subjects live in a region where coal is typically burned indoors, our findings provide new insights into the pathogenesis of lung cancer among never smoking females exposed to indoor air pollution from coal.

  19. Massively Parallel Sequencing of a Chinese Family with DFNA9 Identified a Novel Missense Mutation in the LCCL Domain of COCH

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xiaodong; Su, Wenling; Tang, Mingliang; Guo, Luo; Zhao, Liping

    2016-01-01

    DFNA9 is a late-onset, progressive, autosomal dominantly inherited sensorineural hearing loss with vestibular dysfunction, which is caused by mutations in the COCH (coagulation factor C homology) gene. In this study, we investigated a Chinese family segregating autosomal dominant nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss. We identified a missense mutation c.T275A p.V92D in the LCCL domain of COCH cosegregating with the disease and absent in 100 normal hearing controls. This mutation leads to substitution of the hydrophobic valine to an acidic amino acid aspartic acid. Our data enriched the mutation spectrum of DFNA9 and implied the importance for mutation screening of COCH in age related hearing loss with vestibular dysfunctions. PMID:28116169

  20. Exome Sequencing Identifies SMAD3 Mutations as a Cause of Familial Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm and Dissection with Intracranial and Other Arterial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Regalado, Ellen S.; Guo, Dong-chuan; Villamizar, Carlos; Avidan, Nili; Gilchrist, Dawna; McGillivray, Barbara; Clarke, Lorne; Bernier, Francois; Santos-Cortez, Regie L.; Leal, Suzanne M.; Bertoli-Avella, Aida M.; Shendure, Jay; Rieder, Mark J.; Nickerson, Deborah A; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Thoracic aortic aneurysms leading to acute aortic dissections (TAAD) can be inherited in families in an autosomal dominant manner. As part of the spectrum of clinical heterogeneity of familial TAAD, we recently described families with multiple members that had TAAD and intracranial aneurysms or TAAD and intracranial and abdominal aortic aneurysms inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. Objective To identify the causative mutation in a large family with autosomal dominant inheritance of TAAD with intracranial and abdominal aortic aneurysms by performing exome sequencing of two distantly related individuals with TAAD and identifying shared rare variants. Methods and Results A novel frame shift mutation, p. N218fs (c.652delA), was identified in the SMAD3 gene and segregated with the vascular diseases in this family with a LOD score of 2.52. Sequencing of 181 probands with familial TAAD identified three additional SMAD3 mutations in 4 families, p.R279K (c.836G>A), p.E239K (c.715G>A), and p.A112V (c.235C>T) resulting in a combined LOD score of 5.21. These four mutations were notably absent in 2300 control exomes. SMAD3 mutations were recently described in patients with Aneurysms Osteoarthritis Syndrome and some of the features of this syndrome were identified in individuals in our cohort, but these features were notably absent in many SMAD3 mutation carriers. Conclusions SMAD3 mutations are responsible for 2% of familial TAAD. Mutations are found in families with TAAD alone, along with families with TAAD, intracranial aneurysms, aortic and bilateral iliac aneurysms segregating in an autosomal dominant manner. PMID:21778426

  1. The exome sequencing identified the mutation in YARS2 encoding the mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase as a nuclear modifier for the phenotypic manifestation of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy-associated mitochondrial DNA mutation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Pingping; Jin, Xiaofen; Peng, Yanyan; Wang, Meng; Liu, Hao; Liu, Xiaoling; Zhang, Zengjun; Ji, Yanchun; Zhang, Juanjuan; Liang, Min; Zhao, Fuxin; Sun, Yan-Hong; Zhang, Minglian; Zhou, Xiangtian; Chen, Ye; Mo, Jun Qin; Huang, Taosheng; Qu, Jia; Guan, Min-Xin

    2016-02-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is the most common mitochondrial disorder. Nuclear modifier genes are proposed to modify the phenotypic expression of LHON-associated mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations. By using an exome sequencing approach, we identified a LHON susceptibility allele (c.572G>T, p.191Gly>Val) in YARS2 gene encoding mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase, which interacts with m.11778G>A mutation to cause visual failure. We performed functional assays by using lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from members of Chinese families (asymptomatic individuals carrying m.11778G>A mutation, or both m.11778G>A and heterozygous p.191Gly>Val mutations and symptomatic subjects harboring m.11778G>A and homozygous p.191Gly>Val mutations) and controls lacking these mutations. The 191Gly>Val mutation reduced the YARS2 protein level in the mutant cells. The aminoacylated efficiency and steady-state level of tRNA(Tyr) were markedly decreased in the cell lines derived from patients both carrying homozygous YARS2 p.191Gly>Val and m.11778G>A mutations. The failure in tRNA(Tyr) metabolism impaired mitochondrial translation, especially for polypeptides with high content of tyrosine codon such as ND4, ND5, ND6 and COX2 in cells lines carrying homozygous YARS2 p.191Gly>Val and m.11778G>A mutations. The YARS2 p.191Gly>Val mutation worsened the respiratory phenotypes associated with m.11778G>A mutation, especially reducing activities of complexes I and IV. The respiratory deficiency altered the efficiency of mitochondrial ATP synthesis and increased the production of reactive oxygen species. Thus, mutated YARS2 aggravates mitochondrial dysfunctions associated with the m.11778G>A mutation, exceeding the threshold for the expression of blindness phenotype. Our findings provided new insights into the pathophysiology of LHON that were manifested by interaction between mtDNA mutation and mutated nuclear-modifier YARS2.

  2. High-Throughput Mutation Profiling of Primary and Metastatic Endometrial Cancers Identifies KRAS, FGFR2 and PIK3CA to Be Frequently Mutated

    PubMed Central

    Seidel, Danila; Kusonmano, Kanthida; Petersen, Kjell; Mjøs, Siv; Hoivik, Erling A.; Wik, Elisabeth; Halle, Mari Kyllesø; Øyan, Anne M.; Kalland, Karl-Henning; Werner, Henrica Maria Johanna; Trovik, Jone; Salvesen, Helga

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite being the most common pelvic gynecologic malignancy in industrialized countries, no targeted therapies are available for patients with metastatic endometrial carcinoma. In order to improve treatment, underlying molecular characteristics of primary and metastatic disease must be explored. Methodology/Principal Findings We utilized the mass spectrometric-based mutation detection technology OncoMap to define the types and frequency of point somatic mutations in endometrial cancer. 67 primary tumors, 15 metastases corresponding to 7 of the included primary tumors and 11 endometrial cancer cell lines were screened for point mutations in 28 known oncogenes. We found that 27 (40.3%) of 67 primary tumors harbored one or more mutations with no increase in metastatic lesions. FGFR2, KRAS and PIK3CA were consistently the most frequently mutated genes in primary tumors, metastatic lesions and cell lines. Conclusions/Significance Our results emphasize the potential for targeting FGFR2, KRAS and PIK3CA mutations in endometrial cancer for development of novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:23300780

  3. 20 ans après: a second mutation in MAOA identified by targeted high-throughput sequencing in a family with altered behavior and cognition

    PubMed Central

    Piton, Amélie; Poquet, Hélène; Redin, Claire; Masurel, Alice; Lauer, Julia; Muller, Jean; Thevenon, Julien; Herenger, Yvan; Chancenotte, Sophie; Bonnet, Marlène; Pinoit, Jean-Michel; Huet, Frédéric; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Jaeger, Anne-Sophie; Le Gras, Stéphanie; Jost, Bernard; Gérard, Bénédicte; Peoc'h, Katell; Launay, Jean-Marie; Faivre, Laurence; Mandel, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) is characterized by an extraordinary genetic heterogeneity, with >250 genes that have been implicated in monogenic forms of ID. Because this complexity precluded systematic testing for mutations and because clinical features are often non-specific, for some of these genes only few cases or families have been unambiguously documented. It is the case of the X-linked gene encoding monoamine oxidase A (MAOA), for which only one nonsense mutation has been identified in Brunner syndrome, characterized in a single family by mild non-dysmorphic ID and impulsive, violent and aggressive behaviors. We have performed targeted high-throughput sequencing of 220 genes, including MAOA, in patients with undiagnosed ID. We identified a c.797_798delinsTT (p.C266F) missense mutation in MAOA in a boy with autism spectrum disorder, attention deficit and autoaggressive behavior. Two maternal uncles carry the mutation and have severe ID, with a history of maltreatment in early childhood. This novel missense mutation decreases MAOA enzymatic activity, leading to abnormal levels of urinary monoamines. The identification of this new point mutation confirms, for the first time since 1993, the monogenic implication of the MAOA gene in ID of various degrees, autism and behavioral disturbances. The variable expressivity of the mutation observed in male patients of this family may involve gene–environment interactions, and the identification of a perturbation in monoamine metabolism should be taken into account when prescribing psychoactive drugs in such patients. PMID:24169519

  4. Screens for Extragenic Mutations That Fail to Complement Act1 Alleles Identify Genes That Are Important for Actin Function in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Welch, M. D.; Vinh, DBN.; Okamura, H. H.; Drubin, D. G.

    1993-01-01

    Null mutations in SAC6 and ABP1, genes that encode actin-binding proteins, failed to complement the temperature-sensitive phenotype caused by a mutation in the ACT1 gene. To identify novel genes whose protein products interact with actin, mutations that fail to complement act1-1 or act1-4, two temperature-sensitive alleles of ACT1, were isolated. A total of 14 extragenic noncomplementing mutations and 12 new alleles of ACT1 were identified in two independent screens. The 14 extragenic noncomplementing mutations represent alleles of at least four different genes, ANC1, ANC2, ANC3 and ANC4 (Actin NonComplementing). Mutations in the ANC1 gene were shown to cause osmosensitivity and defects in actin organization; phenotypes that are similar to those caused by act1 mutations. We conclude that the ANC1 gene product plays an important role in actin cytoskeletal function. The 12 new alleles of ACT1 will be useful for further elucidation of the functions of actin in yeast. PMID:8243992

  5. Whole exome sequencing identifies a POLRID mutation segregating in a father and two daughters with findings of Klippel-Feil and Treacher Collins syndromes.

    PubMed

    Giampietro, Philip F; Armstrong, Linlea; Stoddard, Alex; Blank, Robert D; Livingston, Janet; Raggio, Cathy L; Rasmussen, Kristen; Pickart, Michael; Lorier, Rachel; Turner, Amy; Sund, Sarah; Sobrera, Nara; Neptune, Enid; Sweetser, David; Santiago-Cornier, Alberto; Broeckel, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    We report on a father and his two daughters diagnosed with Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS) but with craniofacial differences (zygomatic and mandibular hypoplasia and cleft palate) and external ear abnormalities suggestive of Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS). The diagnosis of KFS was favored, given that the neck anomalies were the predominant manifestations, and that the diagnosis predated later recognition of the association between spinal segmentation abnormalities and TCS. Genetic heterogeneity and the rarity of large families with KFS have limited the ability to identify mutations by traditional methods. Whole exome sequencing identified a nonsynonymous mutation in POLR1D (subunit of RNA polymerase I and II): exon2:c.T332C:p.L111P. Mutations in POLR1D are present in about 5% of individuals diagnosed with TCS. We propose that this mutation is causal in this family, suggesting a pathogenetic link between KFS and TCS.

  6. Novel A219P mutation of hydroxymethylbilane synthase identified in a Chinese woman with acute intermittent porphyria and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingjie; Qu, Hua; Wang, Hang; Deng, Huacong; Liu, Ziyan

    2015-07-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is an autosomal dominant metabolic disorder caused by deficiency of the heme biosynthetic enzyme hydroxymethylbilane synthase (approved gene symbol HMBS), also known as porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD). AIP is characterised by intermittent attacks of abdominal pain, vomiting, and neurological complaints. The highly variable symptomatic presentation of AIP causes confusion with other diseases and results in a high misdiagnosis rate (68% in China) and delayed effective treatments. Based on biochemical and genetic analysis of two Chinese families, a new and a previously reported HMBS mutation were identified in patients with AIP and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH). The novel HMBS mutation is the 655G>C point mutation (A219P). In addition, the 973C>T point mutation (R325X), which had been previously reported in two Danish families, was identified.

  7. Identifying potential functional impact of mutations and polymorphisms: linking heart failure, increased risk of arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death

    PubMed Central

    Jagu, Benoît; Charpentier, Flavien; Toumaniantz, Gilles

    2013-01-01

    Researchers and clinicians have discovered several important concepts regarding the mechanisms responsible for increased risk of arrhythmias, heart failure, and sudden cardiac death. One major step in defining the molecular basis of normal and abnormal cardiac electrical behavior has been the identification of single mutations that greatly increase the risk for arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death by changing channel-gating characteristics. Indeed, mutations in several genes encoding ion channels, such as SCN5A, which encodes the major cardiac Na+ channel, have emerged as the basis for a variety of inherited cardiac arrhythmias such as long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, progressive cardiac conduction disorder, sinus node dysfunction, or sudden infant death syndrome. In addition, genes encoding ion channel accessory proteins, like anchoring or chaperone proteins, which modify the expression, the regulation of endocytosis, and the degradation of ion channel a-subunits have also been reported as susceptibility genes for arrhythmic syndromes. The regulation of ion channel protein expression also depends on a fine-tuned balance among different other mechanisms, such as gene transcription, RNA processing, post-transcriptional control of gene expression by miRNA, protein synthesis, assembly and post-translational modification and trafficking. The aim of this review is to inventory, through the description of few representative examples, the role of these different biogenic mechanisms in arrhythmogenesis, HF and SCD in order to help the researcher to identify all the processes that could lead to arrhythmias. Identification of novel targets for drug intervention should result from further understanding of these fundamental mechanisms. PMID:24065925

  8. Mutation scanning by meltMADGE: Validations using BRCA1 and LDLR, and demonstration of the potential to identify severe, moderate, silent, rare, and paucimorphic mutations in the general population

    PubMed Central

    Alharbi, Khalid K.; Aldahmesh, Mohammed A.; Spanakis, Emmanuel; Haddad, Lema; Whittall, Roslyn A.; Chen, Xiao-he; Rassoulian, Hamid; Smith, Matt J.; Sillibourne, Julie; Ball, Nicola J.; Graham, Nikki J.; Briggs, Patricia J.; Simpson, Iain A.; Phillips, David I.W.; Lawlor, Deborah A.; Ye, Shu; Humphries, Stephen E.; Cooper, Cyrus; Smith, George Davey; Ebrahim, Shah; Eccles, Diana M.; Day, Ian N.M.

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a mutation-scanning approach suitable for whole population screening for unknown mutations. The method, meltMADGE, combines thermal ramp electrophoresis with MADGE to achieve suitable cost efficiency and throughput. The sensitivity was tested in blind trials using 54 amplicons representing the BRCA1 coding region and a panel of 94 unrelated family breast cancer risk consultands previously screened in a clinical diagnostic laboratory. All 10 common polymorphisms, 15/15 previously identified disease-causing mutations, and three previously untested single base changes were identified. Assays of LDLR exons 3 and 8 were validated in 460 familial hypercholesteremics and detected 8/9 known variants. We then applied the exon 3 assay in several DNA banks representing ∼8000 subjects with known cholesterol values and applied both assays in one DNA bank (n = 3600). In exon 3 we identified one previously reported moderate mutation, P84S (n = 1), also associated with moderate hypercholesteremia in this subject; an unreported silent variant, N76N (n = 1); and known severe hypercholesteremia splice mutation 313+1G→A (n = 2). Around exon 8 we identified a paucimorphism (n = 35) at the splice site 1061–8T→C (known to be in complete linkage disequilibrium with T705I) and unreported sequence variants 1186+11G→A (n = 1) and D335N G→A (n = 1). The cholesterol value for D335N was on the 96.2 percentile and for T705I, 2/35 carriers were above the 99th percentile. Thus, variants with predicted severe, moderate, and no effect were identified at the population level. In contrast with case collections, CpG mutations predominated. MeltMADGE will enable definition of the full population spectrum of rare, paucimorphic, severe, moderate (forme fruste), and silent mutations and effects. PMID:15998910

  9. A presenilin-1 mutation identified in familial Alzheimer disease with cotton wool plaques causes a nearly complete loss of gamma-secretase activity.

    PubMed

    Heilig, Elizabeth A; Xia, Weiming; Shen, Jie; Kelleher, Raymond J

    2010-07-16

    Mutations in presenilin-1 and presenilin-2 (PS1 and PS2) are the most common cause of familial Alzheimer disease. PS1 and PS2 are the presumptive catalytic components of the multisubunit gamma-secretase complex, which proteolyzes a number of type I transmembrane proteins, including the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and Notch. APP processing by gamma-secretase produces beta-amyloid peptides (Abeta40 and Abeta42) that accumulate in the Alzheimer disease brain. Here we identify a pathogenic L435F mutation in PS1 in two affected siblings with early-onset familial Alzheimer disease characterized by deposition of cerebral cotton wool plaques. The L435F mutation resides in a conserved C-terminal PAL sequence implicated in active site conformation and catalytic activity. The impact of PS1 mutations in and around the PAL motif on gamma-secretase activity was assessed by expression of mutant PS1 in mouse embryo fibroblasts lacking endogenous PS1 and PS2. Surprisingly, the L435F mutation caused a nearly complete loss of gamma-secretase activity, including >90% reductions in the generation of Abeta40, Abeta42, and the APP and Notch intracellular domains. Two nonpathogenic PS1 mutations, P433L and L435R, caused essentially complete loss of gamma-secretase activity, whereas two previously identified pathogenic PS1 mutations, P436Q and P436S, caused partial loss of function with substantial reductions in production of Abeta40, Abeta42, and the APP and Notch intracellular domains. These results argue against overproduction of Abeta42 as an essential property of presenilin proteins bearing pathogenic mutations. Rather, our findings provide support for the hypothesis that pathogenic mutations cause a general loss of presenilin function.

  10. A Presenilin-1 Mutation Identified in Familial Alzheimer Disease with Cotton Wool Plaques Causes a Nearly Complete Loss of γ-Secretase Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Heilig, Elizabeth A.; Xia, Weiming; Shen, Jie; Kelleher, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in presenilin-1 and presenilin-2 (PS1 and PS2) are the most common cause of familial Alzheimer disease. PS1 and PS2 are the presumptive catalytic components of the multisubunit γ-secretase complex, which proteolyzes a number of type I transmembrane proteins, including the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and Notch. APP processing by γ-secretase produces β-amyloid peptides (Aβ40 and Aβ42) that accumulate in the Alzheimer disease brain. Here we identify a pathogenic L435F mutation in PS1 in two affected siblings with early-onset familial Alzheimer disease characterized by deposition of cerebral cotton wool plaques. The L435F mutation resides in a conserved C-terminal PAL sequence implicated in active site conformation and catalytic activity. The impact of PS1 mutations in and around the PAL motif on γ-secretase activity was assessed by expression of mutant PS1 in mouse embryo fibroblasts lacking endogenous PS1 and PS2. Surprisingly, the L435F mutation caused a nearly complete loss of γ-secretase activity, including >90% reductions in the generation of Aβ40, Aβ42, and the APP and Notch intracellular domains. Two nonpathogenic PS1 mutations, P433L and L435R, caused essentially complete loss of γ-secretase activity, whereas two previously identified pathogenic PS1 mutations, P436Q and P436S, caused partial loss of function with substantial reductions in production of Aβ40, Aβ42, and the APP and Notch intracellular domains. These results argue against overproduction of Aβ42 as an essential property of presenilin proteins bearing pathogenic mutations. Rather, our findings provide support for the hypothesis that pathogenic mutations cause a general loss of presenilin function. PMID:20460383

  11. Biallelic truncating SCN9A mutation identified in four families with congenital insensitivity to pain from Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Sawal, H A; Harripaul, R; Mikhailov, A; Dad, R; Ayub, M; Jawad Hassan, M; Vincent, J B

    2016-12-01

    (a) Homozygosity-mapping-by-descent of four Bhakkar congenital indifference/insensitivity to pain (CIP) families. (b) Identification of mutation Met1190* in SCN9A. (c) SCN9A/NaV1.7 2D structure (as predicted by CCTOP and SMART) and approximate position of known nonsense (*) and missense (M) mutations ( www.hgmd.cf.ac.uk), as well as the Bhakkar mutation (this study) in red.

  12. Structural study of the effects of mutations in proteins to identify the molecular basis of the loss of local structural fluidity leading to the onset of autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ananya; Ghosh, Semanti; Bagchi, Angshuman

    2017-02-26

    Protein-Protein Interactions (PPIs) are crucial in most of the biological processes and PPI dysfunctions are known to be associated with the onsets of various diseases. One of such diseases is the auto-immune disease. Auto-immune diseases are one among the less studied group of diseases with very high mortality rates. Thus, we tried to correlate the appearances of mutations with their probable biochemical basis of the molecular mechanisms leading to the onset of the disease phenotypes. We compared the effects of the Single Amino Acid Variants (SAVs) in the wild type and mutated proteins to identify any structural deformities that might lead to altered PPIs leading ultimately to disease onset. For this we used Relative Solvent Accessibility (RSA) as a spatial parameter to compare the structural perturbation in mutated and wild type proteins. We observed that the mutations were capable to increase intra-chain PPIs whereas inter-chain PPIs would remain mostly unaltered. This might lead to more intra-molecular friction causing a deleterious alteration of protein's normal function. A Lyapunov exponent analysis, using the altered RSA values due to polymorphic and disease causing mutations, revealed polymorphic mutations have a positive mean value for the Lyapunov exponent while disease causing mutations have a negative mean value. Thus, local spatial stochasticity has been lost due to disease causing mutations, indicating a loss of structural fluidity. The amino acid conversion plot also showed a clear tendency of altered surface patch residue conversion propensity than polymorphic conversions. So far, this is the first report that compares the effects of different kinds of mutations (disease and non-disease causing polymorphic mutations) in the onset of autoimmune diseases.

  13. Whole-exome sequencing in obsessive-compulsive disorder identifies rare mutations in immunological and neurodevelopmental pathways.

    PubMed

    Cappi, C; Brentani, H; Lima, L; Sanders, S J; Zai, G; Diniz, B J; Reis, V N S; Hounie, A G; Conceição do Rosário, M; Mariani, D; Requena, G L; Puga, R; Souza-Duran, F L; Shavitt, R G; Pauls, D L; Miguel, E C; Fernandez, T V

    2016-03-29

    Studies of rare genetic variation have identified molecular pathways conferring risk for developmental neuropsychiatric disorders. To date, no published whole-exome sequencing studies have been reported in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). We sequenced all the genome coding regions in 20 sporadic OCD cases and their unaffected parents to identify rare de novo (DN) single-nucleotide variants (SNVs). The primary aim of this pilot study was to determine whether DN variation contributes to OCD risk. To this aim, we evaluated whether there is an elevated rate of DN mutations in OCD, which would justify this approach toward gene discovery in larger studies of the disorder. Furthermore, to explore functional molecular correlations among genes with nonsynonymous DN SNVs in OCD probands, a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was generated based on databases of direct molecular interactions. We applied Degree-Aware Disease Gene Prioritization (DADA) to rank the PPI network genes based on their relatedness to a set of OCD candidate genes from two OCD genome-wide association studies (Stewart et al., 2013; Mattheisen et al., 2014). In addition, we performed a pathway analysis with genes from the PPI network. The rate of DN SNVs in OCD was 2.51 × 10(-8) per base per generation, significantly higher than a previous estimated rate in unaffected subjects using the same sequencing platform and analytic pipeline. Several genes harboring DN SNVs in OCD were highly interconnected in the PPI network and ranked high in the DADA analysis. Nearly all the DN SNVs in this study are in genes expressed in the human brain, and a pathway analysis revealed enrichment in immunological and central nervous system functioning and development. The results of this pilot study indicate that further investigation of DN variation in larger OCD cohorts is warranted to identify specific risk genes and to confirm our preliminary finding with regard to PPI network enrichment for particular

  14. Whole-exome sequencing in obsessive-compulsive disorder identifies rare mutations in immunological and neurodevelopmental pathways

    PubMed Central

    Cappi, C; Brentani, H; Lima, L; Sanders, S J; Zai, G; Diniz, B J; Reis, V N S; Hounie, A G; Conceição do Rosário, M; Mariani, D; Requena, G L; Puga, R; Souza-Duran, F L; Shavitt, R G; Pauls, D L; Miguel, E C; Fernandez, T V

    2016-01-01

    Studies of rare genetic variation have identified molecular pathways conferring risk for developmental neuropsychiatric disorders. To date, no published whole-exome sequencing studies have been reported in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). We sequenced all the genome coding regions in 20 sporadic OCD cases and their unaffected parents to identify rare de novo (DN) single-nucleotide variants (SNVs). The primary aim of this pilot study was to determine whether DN variation contributes to OCD risk. To this aim, we evaluated whether there is an elevated rate of DN mutations in OCD, which would justify this approach toward gene discovery in larger studies of the disorder. Furthermore, to explore functional molecular correlations among genes with nonsynonymous DN SNVs in OCD probands, a protein–protein interaction (PPI) network was generated based on databases of direct molecular interactions. We applied Degree-Aware Disease Gene Prioritization (DADA) to rank the PPI network genes based on their relatedness to a set of OCD candidate genes from two OCD genome-wide association studies (Stewart et al., 2013; Mattheisen et al., 2014). In addition, we performed a pathway analysis with genes from the PPI network. The rate of DN SNVs in OCD was 2.51 × 10−8 per base per generation, significantly higher than a previous estimated rate in unaffected subjects using the same sequencing platform and analytic pipeline. Several genes harboring DN SNVs in OCD were highly interconnected in the PPI network and ranked high in the DADA analysis. Nearly all the DN SNVs in this study are in genes expressed in the human brain, and a pathway analysis revealed enrichment in immunological and central nervous system functioning and development. The results of this pilot study indicate that further investigation of DN variation in larger OCD cohorts is warranted to identify specific risk genes and to confirm our preliminary finding with regard to PPI network enrichment for particular

  15. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor-Interacting Protein (AIP) N-Terminus Gene Mutations Identified in Pituitary Adenoma Patients Alter Protein Stability and Function.

    PubMed

    Formosa, Robert; Vassallo, Josanne

    2017-03-02

    Mutations spanning the entire aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) gene have been found in isolated familial cases of pituitary adenomas (PA). Missense mutations located in the N-terminus of the gene have been identified in several patients. However, the functional significance of these mutations remains a matter of controversy. In most studies, the N-terminus of AIP has been shown to regulate protein stability and subcellular localization of the AIP-AHR-HSP90 complex but not to be involved in protein-protein interactions. Other studies found that the N-terminal domain interacts directly with other proteins. The aim of this study was to analyze whether specific N-terminus AIP mutations identified in PA patients would be functionally different from wild-type (WT) AIP. In vitro analyses were used to assess the role of known N-terminus variants, a locally identified mutant, R9Q, and three other commonly genotyped N-terminus mutations R16H, V49M and K103R are found in PA patients. Given the functional effect of WT AIP on cAMP signalling alterations caused by N-terminus mutants on this pathway were also analyzed in GH3 cells. Results indicate that N-terminus mutations lead to de-regulation of the effect of WT AIP on cAMP signalling and increased cAMP thresholds in GH3 cells resulting in increased growth hormone (GH) secretion. Cycloheximide chase analysis identified a variation in protein degradation patterns between WT and N-terminus variants. Therefore, both functional and structural studies reveal that N-terminus mutations in the AIP gene alter protein behaviour significantly and hence can truly be pathogenic in nature.

  16. Whole Genome Sequencing Identifies a Missense Mutation in HES7 Associated with Short Tails in Asian Domestic Cats

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiao; Sun, Xin; Hu, Xue-Song; Zhuang, Yan; Liu, Yue-Chen; Meng, Hao; Miao, Lin; Yu, He; Luo, Shu-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Domestic cats exhibit abundant variations in tail morphology and serve as an excellent model to study the development and evolution of vertebrate tails. Cats with shortened and kinked tails were first recorded in the Malayan archipelago by Charles Darwin in 1868 and remain quite common today in Southeast and East Asia. To elucidate the genetic basis of short tails in Asian cats, we built a pedigree of 13 cats segregating at the trait with a founder from southern China and performed linkage mapping based on whole genome sequencing data from the pedigree. The short-tailed trait was mapped to a 5.6 Mb region of Chr E1, within which the substitution c. 5T > C in the somite segmentation-related gene HES7 was identified as the causal mutation resulting in a missense change (p.V2A). Validation in 245 unrelated cats confirmed the correlation between HES7-c. 5T > C and Chinese short-tailed feral cats as well as the Japanese Bobtail breed, indicating a common genetic basis of the two. In addition, some of our sampled kinked-tailed cats could not be explained by either HES7 or the Manx-related T-box, suggesting at least three independent events in the evolution of domestic cats giving rise to short-tailed traits. PMID:27560986

  17. Whole Genome Sequencing Identifies a Missense Mutation in HES7 Associated with Short Tails in Asian Domestic Cats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao; Sun, Xin; Hu, Xue-Song; Zhuang, Yan; Liu, Yue-Chen; Meng, Hao; Miao, Lin; Yu, He; Luo, Shu-Jin

    2016-08-25

    Domestic cats exhibit abundant variations in tail morphology and serve as an excellent model to study the development and evolution of vertebrate tails. Cats with shortened and kinked tails were first recorded in the Malayan archipelago by Charles Darwin in 1868 and remain quite common today in Southeast and East Asia. To elucidate the genetic basis of short tails in Asian cats, we built a pedigree of 13 cats segregating at the trait with a founder from southern China and performed linkage mapping based on whole genome sequencing data from the pedigree. The short-tailed trait was mapped to a 5.6 Mb region of Chr E1, within which the substitution c. 5T > C in the somite segmentation-related gene HES7 was identified as the causal mutation resulting in a missense change (p.V2A). Validation in 245 unrelated cats confirmed the correlation between HES7-c. 5T > C and Chinese short-tailed feral cats as well as the Japanese Bobtail breed, indicating a common genetic basis of the two. In addition, some of our sampled kinked-tailed cats could not be explained by either HES7 or the Manx-related T-box, suggesting at least three independent events in the evolution of domestic cats giving rise to short-tailed traits.

  18. Recurrent mutation testing of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in Asian breast cancer patients identify carriers in those with presumed low risk by family history.

    PubMed

    Kang, Peter Choon Eng; Phuah, Sze Yee; Sivanandan, Kavitta; Kang, In Nee; Thirthagiri, Eswary; Liu, Jian Jun; Hassan, Norhashimah; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Thong, Meow Keong; Hui, Miao; Hartman, Mikael; Yip, Cheng Har; Mohd Taib, Nur Aishah; Teo, Soo Hwang

    2014-04-01

    Although the breast cancer predisposition genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 were discovered more than 20 years ago, there remains a gap in the availability of genetic counselling and genetic testing in Asian countries because of cost, access and inaccurate reporting of family history of cancer. In order to improve access to testing, we developed a rapid test for recurrent mutations in our Asian populations. In this study, we designed a genotyping assay with 55 BRCA1 and 44 BRCA2 mutations previously identified in Asian studies, and validated this assay in 267 individuals who had previously been tested by full sequencing. We tested the prevalence of these mutations in additional breast cancer cases. Using this genotyping approach, we analysed recurrent mutations in 533 Malaysian breast cancer cases with <10 % a priori risk, and found 1 BRCA1 (0.2 %) and 5 BRCA2 (0.9 %) carriers. Testing in a hospital-based unselected cohort of 532 Singaporean breast cancer cases revealed 6 BRCA1 (1.1 %) and 3 BRCA2 (0.6 %) carriers. Overall, 2 recurrent BRCA1 and 1 BRCA2 mutations in Malays, 3 BRCA1 and 2 BRCA2 mutations in Chinese and 1 BRCA1 mutation in Indians account for 60, 24 and 20 % of carrier families, respectively. By contrast, haplotype analyses suggest that a recurrent BRCA2 mutation (c.262_263delCT) found in 5 unrelated Malay families has at least 3 distinct haplotypes. Taken together, our data suggests that panel testing may help to identify carriers, particularly Asian BRCA2 carriers, who do not present with a priori strong family history characteristics.

  19. FOXC2 disease-mutations identified in lymphedema-distichiasis patients cause both loss and gain of protein function

    PubMed Central

    Tavian, Daniela; Missaglia, Sara; Maltese, Paolo E.; Michelini, Sandro; Fiorentino, Alessandro; Ricci, Maurizio; Serrani, Roberta; Walter, Michael A.; Bertelli, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Dominant mutations in the FOXC2 gene cause a form of lymphedema primarily of the limbs that usually develops at or after puberty. In 90-95% of patients, lymphedema is accompanied by distichiasis. FOXC2 is a member of the forkhead/winged-helix family of transcription factors and plays essential roles in different developmental pathways and physiological processes. We previously described six unrelated families with primary lymphedema-distichiasis in which patients showed different FOXC2 mutations located outside of the forkhead domain. Of those, four were missense mutations, one a frameshift mutation, and the last a stop mutation. To assess their pathogenic potential, we have now examined the subcellular localization and the transactivation activity of the mutated FOXC2 proteins. All six FOXC2 mutant proteins were able to localize into the nucleus; however, the frameshift truncated protein appeared to be sequestered into nuclear aggregates. A reduction in the ability to activate FOXC1/FOXC2 response elements was detected in 50% of mutations, while the remaining ones caused an increase of protein transactivation activity. Our data reveal that either a complete loss or a significant gain of FOXC2 function can cause a perturbation of lymphatic vessel formation leading to lymphedema. PMID:27276711

  20. Screening of a large cohort of Leber congenital amaurosis and retinitis pigmentosa patients identifies novel LCA5 mutations and new genotype-phenotype correlations

    PubMed Central

    Sui, Ruifang; van den Born, L. Ingeborgh; Berson, Eliot L.; Ocaka, Louise A.; Davidson, Alice E.; Heckenlively, John R.; Branham, Kari; Ren, Huanan; Lopez, Irma; Maria, Maleeha; Azam, Maleeha; Henkes, Arjen; Blokland, Ellen; Qamar, Raheel; Webster, Andrew R.; Andreasson, Sten; de Baere, Elfride; Bennett, Jean; Chader, Gerald J.; Berger, Wolfgang; Golovleva, Irina; Greenberg, Jacquie; den Hollander, Anneke I.; Klaver, Caroline C.W.; Klevering, B. Jeroen; Lorenz, Birgit; Preising, Markus N.; Ramsear, Raj; Roberts, Lisa; Roepman, Ronald; Rohrschneider, Klaus; Wissinger, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence of sequence variants in LCA5 in patients with Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), early onset rod-cone dystrophy (EORD) and autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP), to delineate the ocular phenotypes, and to provide an overview of all published LCA5 variants in an online database._Patients underwent standard ophthalmic evaluations after providing informed consent. In selected patients, optical coherence tomography (OCT) and fundus autofluorescence imaging was possible. DNA samples from 797 unrelated patients with LCA and 211 with the various types of RP were screened by Sanger sequence analysis of all LCA5 exons and intron/exon junctions. Some LCA patients were pre-screened by APEX technology or selected based on homozygosity mapping. In silico analyses were performed to assess the pathogenicity of the variants. Segregation analysis was performed where possible. Published and novel LCA5 variants were collected, amended for their correct nomenclature, and listed in a Leiden Open Variation Database (LOVD). Sequence analysis identified 18 new probands with 19 different LCA5 variants. Seventeen of the 19 LCA5 variants were novel. Except for two missense variants and one splice site variant, all variants were protein-truncating mutations. Most patients expressed a severe phenotype, typical of LCA. However, some LCA subjects had better vision and intact inner segment/outer segment (IS/OS) junctions on OCT imaging. In two families with LCA5 variants, the phenotype was more compatible with EORD with affected individuals displaying preserved islands of RPE. One of these milder families harbored a homozygous splice site mutation, a second family was found to have a combination of a stop mutation and a missense mutation. This is the largest LCA5 study to date. We sequenced 1008 patients (797 with LCA, 211 with arRP) and identified 18 probands with LCA5 mutations. Mutations in LCA5 are a rare cause of childhood retinal dystrophy accounting for

  1. Novel DDR2 mutation identified by whole exome sequencing in a Moroccan patient with spondylo-meta-epiphyseal dysplasia, short limb-abnormal calcification type.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Maria; Kayserili, Hülya; Elalaoui, Siham Chafai; Nishimura, Gen; Iida, Aritoshi; Lyahyai, Jaber; Miyake, Noriko; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Sefiani, Abdelaziz; Ikegawa, Shiro

    2016-02-01

    Spondylo-meta-epiphyseal dysplasia (SMED), short limb-abnormal calcification type (SMED, SL-AC), is a very rare autosomal recessive disorder with various skeletal changes characterized by premature calcification leading to severe disproportionate short stature. Twenty-two patients have been reported until now, but only five mutations (four missense and one splice-site) in the conserved sequence encoding the tyrosine kinase domain of the DDR2 gene has been identified. We report here a novel DDR2 missense mutation, c.370C > T (p.Arg124Trp) in a Moroccan girl with SMED, SL-AC, identified by whole exome sequencing. Our study has expanded the mutational spectrum of this rare disease and it has shown that exome sequencing is a powerful and cost-effective tool for the diagnosis of clinically heterogeneous disorders such as SMED.

  2. Functional analysis of recently identified mutations in eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2Bɛ (eIF2Bɛ) identified in Chinese patients with vanishing white matter disease.

    PubMed

    Leng, Xuerong; Wu, Ye; Wang, Xuemin; Pan, Yanxia; Wang, Jingmin; Li, Jiao; Du, Li; Dai, Lifang; Wu, Xiru; Proud, Christopher G; Jiang, Yuwu

    2011-04-01

    Vanishing white matter disease (VWM) is the first human hereditary disease known to be caused by defects in initiation of protein synthesis. Gene defects in each of the five subunits of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2B (eIF2B α-ɛ) are responsible for the disease, although the mechanism of the pathogenesis is not well understood. In our previous study, four novel eIF2Bɛ mutations were found in Chinese patients: p.Asp62Val, p.Cys335Ser, p.Asn376Asp and p.Ser610-Asp613del. Functional analysis was performed on these mutations and the recently reported p.Arg269X. Our data showed that all resulted in a decrease in the guanine nucleotide exchange (GEF) activity of the eIF2B complex. p.Arg269X and p.Ser610-Asp613del mutants displayed the lowest activity, followed by p.Cys335Ser, p.Asn376Asp and p.Asp62Val. p.Arg269X and p.Ser610-Asp613del could not produce stable eIF2Bɛ, leading to almost complete loss-of-function. No evidence was obtained for the three missense mutations in changes in eIF2Bɛ protein level or eIF2BɛSer(540) phosphorylation, and disruption of holocomplex assembly, or binding to eIF2. All patients in our study had the classical phenotype. p.Asp62Val and p.Asn376Asp mutations caused only mildly decreased GEF activity, were probably responsible for relatively mild phenotype in cases of classical VWM.

  3. Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba Syndrome in a Patient with a PTEN Mutation Identified by Chromosomal Microarray Analysis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun Hwa; Tchah, Hann

    2017-01-01

    Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome (BRRS) is one of the phosphatase and tensin homolog hamartoma tumor syndrome with a PTEN gene mutation. It is a rare dominant autosomal disorder characterized by cutaneous lipomas, macrocephaly, intestinal polyps, and developmental delay. Diagnosing this syndrome is important, because it may represent the pediatric phenotype of Cowden syndrome, in which there is an increased risk for malignant tumors in children. Until now, the prevalence of BRRS is unknown. Several dozen cases have been reported in the medical literature, but no case has been reported in Korea. Here we report a case of a 19-year-old girl who was diagnosed with BRRS because of macrocephaly, intellectual disability, and intestinal polyps. Her mother had similar findings and a PTEN mutation. Neither patient had mutations detected by conventional mutation-detection techniques, but a PTEN gene deletion was demonstrated by chromosomal microarray analysis.

  4. Whole-exome re-sequencing in a family quartet identifies POP1 mutations as the cause of a novel skeletal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Glazov, Evgeny A; Zankl, Andreas; Donskoi, Marina; Kenna, Tony J; Thomas, Gethin P; Clark, Graeme R; Duncan, Emma L; Brown, Matthew A

    2011-03-01

    Recent advances in DNA sequencing have enabled mapping of genes for monogenic traits in families with small pedigrees and even in unrelated cases. We report the identification of disease-causing mutations in a rare, severe, skeletal dysplasia, studying a family of two healthy unrelated parents and two affected children using whole-exome sequencing. The two affected daughters have clinical and radiographic features suggestive of anauxetic dysplasia (OMIM 607095), a rare form of dwarfism caused by mutations of RMRP. However, mutations of RMRP were excluded in this family by direct sequencing. Our studies identified two novel compound heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in POP1, which encodes a core component of the RNase mitochondrial RNA processing (RNase MRP) complex that directly interacts with the RMRP RNA domains that are affected in anauxetic dysplasia. We demonstrate that these mutations impair the integrity and activity of this complex and that they impair cell proliferation, providing likely molecular and cellular mechanisms by which POP1 mutations cause this severe skeletal dysplasia.

  5. A Scalable Method for Molecular Network Reconstruction Identifies Properties of Targets and Mutations in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Edison; Szedlak, Anthony; Kang, Yunyi; Smith, Peyton; Smith, Nicholas; McBride, Madison; Finlay, Darren; Vuori, Kristiina; Mason, James; Ball, Edward D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A key aim of systems biology is the reconstruction of molecular networks. We do not yet, however, have networks that integrate information from all datasets available for a particular clinical condition. This is in part due to the limited scalability, in terms of required computational time and power, of existing algorithms. Network reconstruction methods should also be scalable in the sense of allowing scientists from different backgrounds to efficiently integrate additional data. We present a network model of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In the current version (AML 2.1), we have used gene expression data (both microarray and RNA-seq) from 5 different studies comprising a total of 771 AML samples and a protein–protein interactions dataset. Our scalable network reconstruction method is in part based on the well-known property of gene expression correlation among interacting molecules. The difficulty of distinguishing between direct and indirect interactions is addressed by optimizing the coefficient of variation of gene expression, using a validated gold-standard dataset of direct interactions. Computational time is much reduced compared to other network reconstruction methods. A key feature is the study of the reproducibility of interactions found in independent clinical datasets. An analysis of the most significant clusters, and of the network properties (intraset efficiency, degree, betweenness centrality, and PageRank) of common AML mutations demonstrated the biological significance of the network. A statistical analysis of the response of blast cells from 11 AML patients to a library of kinase inhibitors provided an experimental validation of the network. A combination of network and experimental data identified CDK1, CDK2, CDK4, and CDK6 and other kinases as potential therapeutic targets in AML. PMID:25844667

  6. Reconstruction of thermotolerant yeast by one-point mutation identified through whole-genome analyses of adaptively-evolved strains.

    PubMed

    Satomura, Atsushi; Miura, Natsuko; Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-03-17

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is used as a host strain in bioproduction, because of its rapid growth, ease of genetic manipulation, and high reducing capacity. However, the heat produced during the fermentation processes inhibits the biological activities and growth of the yeast cells. We performed whole-genome sequencing of 19 intermediate strains previously obtained during adaptation experiments under heat stress; 49 mutations were found in the adaptation steps. Phylogenetic tree revealed at least five events in which these strains had acquired mutations in the CDC25 gene. Reconstructed CDC25 point mutants based on a parental strain had acquired thermotolerance without any growth defects. These mutations led to the downregulation of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) signaling pathway, which controls a variety of processes such as cell-cycle progression and stress tolerance. The one-point mutations in CDC25 were involved in the global transcriptional regulation through the cAMP/PKA pathway. Additionally, the mutations enabled efficient ethanol fermentation at 39 °C, suggesting that the one-point mutations in CDC25 may contribute to bioproduction.

  7. Impact of lymph node metastases identified on central neck dissection (CND) on the recurrence of papillary thyroid cancer: potential role of BRAFV600E mutation in defining CND.

    PubMed

    Alzahrani, Ali S; Xing, Mingzhao

    2013-02-01

    The impact of metastasized cervical lymph nodes (CLN) identified on central neck dissection (CND) on the recurrence/persistence of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) and the extent of CND needed to reduce recurrence/persistence have not been firmly established. To assess the impact of CLN metastasis and BRAF mutation on the recurrence/persistence of PTC and the potential of BRAF mutation in assisting CND. Analyses of 379 consecutive patients with PTC who underwent thyroidectomy with (n=243) or without CND (n=136) at a tertiary-care academic hospital during the period 2001-2010 for their clinicopathological outcomes and BRAF mutation status. Increasingly aggressive tumor characteristics were found as the extent of CND was advanced following conventional risk criteria from non-CND to limited CND to formal CND. Disease recurrence/persistence rate also sharply rose from 4.7% to 15.7% and 40.5% in these CND settings respectively (P<0.0001). CLN metastasis rate rose from 18.0 to 77.3% from limited CND to formal CND (P<0.0001). An increasing rate of BRAF mutation was also found from less to more extensive CND. A strong association of CLN metastasis and BRAF mutation with disease recurrence/persistence was revealed on Kaplan-Meier analysis and BRAF mutation strongly predicted CLN metastasis. CLN metastases found on CND are closely associated with disease recurrence/persistence of PTC, which are both strongly predicted by BRAF mutation. Current selection of PTC patients for CND is appropriate but higher extent of the procedure, once selected, is needed to reduce disease recurrence, which may be defined by combination use of preoperative BRAF mutation testing and conventional risk factors of PTC.

  8. Whole exome and targeted deep sequencing identify genome-wide allelic loss and frequent SETDB1 mutations in malignant pleural mesotheliomas

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sharon; Mendez, Pedro; Kim, James Wansoo; Woodard, Gavitt; Yoon, Jun-Hee; Jen, Kuang-Yu; Fang, Li Tai; Jones, Kirk; Jablons, David M.; Kim, Il-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), a rare malignancy with a poor prognosis, is mainly caused by exposure to asbestos or other organic fibers, but the underlying genetic mechanism is not fully understood. Genetic alterations and causes for multiple primary cancer development including MPM are unknown. We used whole exome sequencing to identify somatic mutations in a patient with MPM and two additional primary cancers who had no evidence of venous, arterial, lymphovascular, or perineural invasion indicating dissemination of a primary lung cancer to the pleura. We found that the MPM had R282W, a key TP53 mutation, and genome-wide allelic loss or loss of heterozygosity, a distinct genomic alteration not previously described in MPM. We identified frequent inactivating SETDB1 mutations in this patient and in 68 additional MPM patients (mutation frequency: 10%, 7/69) by targeted deep sequencing. Our observations suggest the possibility of a new genetic mechanism in the development of either MPM or multiple primary cancers. The frequent SETDB1 inactivating mutations suggest there could be new diagnostic or therapeutic options for MPM. PMID:26824986

  9. Whole-exome sequencing identifies multiple loss-of-function mutations of NF-κB pathway regulators in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hong; Dai, Wei; Cheung, Arthur Kwok Leung; Ko, Josephine Mun Yee; Kan, Rebecca; Wong, Bonnie Wing Yan; Leong, Merrin Man Long; Deng, Mingdan; Kwok, Tommy Chin Tung; Chan, Jimmy Yu-Wai; Kwong, Dora Lai-Wan; Lee, Anne Wing-Mui; Ng, Wai Tong; Ngan, Roger Kai Cheong; Yau, Chun Chung; Tung, Stewart; Lee, Victor Ho-fun; Lam, Ka-On; Kwan, Chung Kong; Li, Wing Sum; Yau, Stephen; Chan, Kwok-Wah; Lung, Maria Li

    2016-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is an epithelial malignancy with a unique geographical distribution. The genomic abnormalities leading to NPC pathogenesis remain unclear. In total, 135 NPC tumors were examined to characterize the mutational landscape using whole-exome sequencing and targeted resequencing. An APOBEC cytidine deaminase mutagenesis signature was revealed in the somatic mutations. Noticeably, multiple loss-of-function mutations were identified in several NF-κB signaling negative regulators NFKBIA, CYLD, and TNFAIP3. Functional studies confirmed that inhibition of NFKBIA had a significant impact on NF-κB activity and NPC cell growth. The identified loss-of-function mutations in NFKBIA leading to protein truncation contributed to the altered NF-κB activity, which is critical for NPC tumorigenesis. In addition, somatic mutations were found in several cancer-relevant pathways, including cell cycle-phase transition, cell death, EBV infection, and viral carcinogenesis. These data provide an enhanced road map for understanding the molecular basis underlying NPC. PMID:27647909

  10. Wide mutation spectrum and frequent variant Ala27Thr of FBN1 identified in a large cohort of Chinese patients with sporadic TAAD

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jun; Cai, Lun; Jia, Lixin; Li, Xiaoyan; Xi, Xin; Zheng, Shuai; Liu, Xuxia; Piao, Chunmei; Liu, Tingting; Sun, Zhongsheng; Cai, Tao; Du, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Genetic etiology in majority of patients with sporadic thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissections (STAAD) remains unknown. Recent GWAS study suggested common variant(s) in FBN1 is associated with STAAD. The present study aims to test this hypothesis and to identify mutation spectrum by targeted exome sequencing of the FBN1 gene in 146 unrelated patients with STAAD. Totally, 15.75% of FBN1 variants in STAAD were identified, including 5 disruptive and 18 missense mutations. Most of the variants were novel. Genotype-phenotype correlation analysis suggested that the maximum aortic diameter in the disruptive mutation group was significantly larger than that in the non-Cys missense mutation group. Interestingly, the variant Ala27Thr at −1 position, which is predicted to change the cleavage site of the signal peptidase of fibrillin-1, was detected in two unrelated patients. Furthermore, genotyping analysis of this variant detected 10 heterozygous Ala27Thr from additional 666 unrelated patients (1.50%), versus 7 from 1500 controls (0.47%), indicating a significant association of this variant with STAAD. Collectively, the identification of the variant Ala27Thr may represent a relatively common genetic predisposition and a novel pathogenetic mechanism for STAAD. Also, expansion of the mutation spectrum in FBN1 will be helpful in genetic counselling for Chinese patients with STAAD. PMID:26272055

  11. Novel mutations in CRB1 gene identified in a chinese pedigree with retinitis pigmentosa by targeted capture and next generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Lo, David; Weng, Jingning; Liu, xiaohong; Yang, Juhua; He, Fen; Wang, Yun; Liu, Xuyang

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE To detect the disease-causing gene in a Chinese pedigree with autosomal-recessive retinitis pigmentosa (ARRP). METHODS All subjects in this family underwent a complete ophthalmic examination. Targeted-capture next generation sequencing (NGS) was performed on the proband to detect variants. All variants were verified in the remaining family members by PCR amplification and Sanger sequencing. RESULTS All the affected subjects in this pedigree were diagnosed with retinitis pigmentosa (RP). The compound heterozygous c.138delA (p.Asp47IlefsX24) and c.1841G>T (p.Gly614Val) mutations in the Crumbs homolog 1 (CRB1) gene were identified in all the affected patients but not in the unaffected individuals in this family. These mutations were inherited from their parents, respectively. CONCLUSION The novel compound heterozygous mutations in CRB1 were identified in a Chinese pedigree with ARRP using targeted-capture next generation sequencing. After evaluating the significant heredity and impaired protein function, the compound heterozygous c.138delA (p.Asp47IlefsX24) and c.1841G>T (p.Gly614Val) mutations are the causal genes of early onset ARRP in this pedigree. To the best of our knowledge, there is no previous report regarding the compound mutations. PMID:27806333

  12. A Mutational Analysis Identifies Three Functional Regions of the Spindle Pole Component Spc110p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Sundberg, Holly A.; Davis, Trisha N.

    1997-01-01

    The central coiled coil of the essential spindle pole component Spc110p spans the distance between the central and inner plaques of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae spindle pole body (SPB). The carboxy terminus of Spc110p, which binds calmodulin, resides at the central plaque, and the amino terminus resides at the inner plaque from which nuclear microtubules originate. To dissect the functions of Spc110p, we created temperature-sensitive mutations in the amino and carboxy termini. Analysis of the temperature-sensitive spc110 mutations and intragenic complementation analysis of the spc110 alleles defined three functional regions of Spc110p. Region I is located at the amino terminus. Region II is located at the carboxy-terminal end of the coiled coil, and region III is the previously defined calmodulin-binding site. Overexpression of SPC98 suppresses the temperature sensitivity conferred by mutations in region I but not the phenotypes conferred by mutations in the other two regions, suggesting that the amino terminus of Spc110p is involved in an interaction with the γ-tubulin complex composed of Spc97p, Spc98p, and Tub4p. Mutations in region II lead to loss of SPB integrity during mitosis, suggesting that this region is required for the stable attachment of Spc110p to the central plaque. Our results strongly argue that Spc110p links the γ-tubulin complex to the central plaque of the SPB. PMID:9398677

  13. Complete direct sequencing of the entire AR gene in 45 unrelated patients with androgen insensitivity syndrome: Mutations identified in 32 patients (18 novel mutations), no mutation detected in 13 other patients (29%)

    SciTech Connect

    Mebarki, F.; Forest, M.G.; Josso, N.

    1994-09-01

    The androgen insensivity syndrome (AIS) is a recessive X-linked disorder resulting from a deficient function of the androgen receptor (AR). The human AR gene has 3 functional domains: N-terminal encoded by exon 1, DNA-binding domain encoded by exons 2 and 3, and androgen-binding domain encoded by exons 4 to 8. In order to characterize the molecular defects of the AR gene in AIS, the entire coding regions and the intronic bording sequences of the AR gene were amplified by PCR before automatic direct sequencing in 45 patients. Twenty seven different point mutations were found in 32 unrelated AIS patients: 18 with a complete form (CAIS), 14 with a partial form (PAIS); 18 of these mutations are novel mutations, not published to date. Only 3 mutations were repeatedly found: R804H in 3 families; M780I in 3 families and R774C in 2 families. For 26 patients out of the 32 found to have a mutation, maternal DNA was collected and sequenced: 6 de novo mutations were detected (i.e. 23% of the cases). Finally, no mutation was detected in 13 patients (29%): 7 with CAIS and 6 familial severe PAIS. The latter all presented with perineal hypospadias, micropenis, 4 out of 6 being raised as girl. Diagnosis of AIS in these 13 families in whom no mutation was detected is supported by the following criteria: clinical data, familial history (2 or 3 index cases in the same family), familial segregation of the polymorphic CAG repeat of the AR gene. Mutations in intronic regions or the promoter of the AR gene could not explain all cases of AIS without mutations in the AR coding regions, because AR binding (performed in 9 out of 13) was normal in 6, suggesting the synthesis of an AR protein. This situation led us to speculate that another X-linked factor associated with the AR could be implicated in some cases of AIS.

  14. Zebrafish Ciliopathy Screen Plus Human Mutational Analysis Identifies C21orf59 and CCDC65 Defects as Causing Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia

    PubMed Central

    Austin-Tse, Christina; Halbritter, Jan; Zariwala, Maimoona A.; Gilberti, Renée M.; Gee, Heon Yung; Hellman, Nathan; Pathak, Narendra; Liu, Yan; Panizzi, Jennifer R.; Patel-King, Ramila S.; Tritschler, Douglas; Bower, Raqual; O’Toole, Eileen; Porath, Jonathan D.; Hurd, Toby W.; Chaki, Moumita; Diaz, Katrina A.; Kohl, Stefan; Lovric, Svjetlana; Hwang, Daw-Yang; Braun, Daniela A.; Schueler, Markus; Airik, Rannar; Otto, Edgar A.; Leigh, Margaret W.; Noone, Peadar G.; Carson, Johnny L.; Davis, Stephanie D.; Pittman, Jessica E.; Ferkol, Thomas W.; Atkinson, Jeffry J.; Olivier, Kenneth N.; Sagel, Scott D.; Dell, Sharon D.; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Milla, Carlos E.; Loges, Niki T.; Omran, Heymut; Porter, Mary E.; King, Stephen M.; Knowles, Michael R.; Drummond, Iain A.; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2013-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is caused when defects of motile cilia lead to chronic airway infections, male infertility, and situs abnormalities. Multiple causative PCD mutations account for only 65% of cases, suggesting that many genes essential for cilia function remain to be discovered. By using zebrafish morpholino knockdown of PCD candidate genes as an in vivo screening platform, we identified c21orf59, ccdc65, and c15orf26 as critical for cilia motility. c21orf59 and c15orf26 knockdown in zebrafish and planaria blocked outer dynein arm assembly, and ccdc65 knockdown altered cilia beat pattern. Biochemical analysis in Chlamydomonas revealed that the C21orf59 ortholog FBB18 is a flagellar matrix protein that accumulates specifically when cilia motility is impaired. The Chlamydomonas ida6 mutant identifies CCDC65/FAP250 as an essential component of the nexin-dynein regulatory complex. Analysis of 295 individuals with PCD identified recessive truncating mutations of C21orf59 in four families and CCDC65 in two families. Similar to findings in zebrafish and planaria, mutations in C21orf59 caused loss of both outer and inner dynein arm components. Our results characterize two genes associated with PCD-causing mutations and elucidate two distinct mechanisms critical for motile cilia function: dynein arm assembly for C21orf59 and assembly of the nexin-dynein regulatory complex for CCDC65. PMID:24094744

  15. Novel germline mutations in FLCN gene identified in two Chinese patients with Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome.

    PubMed

    Li, Teng; Ning, Xianghui; He, Qun; Gong, Kan

    2017-01-09

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) syndrome, a hereditary renal cancer syndrome caused by mutations in the folliculin (FLCN) gene, is characterized by the presence of fibrofolliculomas, pulmonary cysts, spontaneous pneumothorax, and renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Few BHD syndrome cases have been reported in Asian countries, and cutaneous presentations are relatively rare in Asian patients. Asian BHD patients may be misdiagnosed due to their atypical manifestations. Here, we report two Chinese BHD patients with novel FLCN mutations (c.946-947delAG in exon 9 and c.770-772delCCT in exon 7). Both of them had RCC and spontaneous pneumothorax without fibrofolliculomas. In patients with RCC and pulmonary cysts but without cutaneous lesions, screening for mutations in the FLCN gene should be performed, especially for those with a family history of RCC or pulmonary cysts (pneumothorax).

  16. Exon capture analysis of G protein-coupled receptors identifies activating mutations in GRM3 in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Prickett, Todd D; Wei, Xiaomu; Cardenas-Navia, Isabel; Teer, Jamie K; Lin, Jimmy C; Walia, Vijay; Gartner, Jared; Jiang, Jiji; Cherukuri, Praveen F; Molinolo, Alfredo; Davies, Michael A; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E; Stemke-Hale, Katherine; Rosenberg, Steven A; Margulies, Elliott H; Samuels, Yardena

    2011-09-25

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), the largest human gene family, are important regulators of signaling pathways. However, knowledge of their genetic alterations is limited. In this study, we used exon capture and massively parallel sequencing methods to analyze the mutational status of 734 GPCRs in melanoma. This investigation revealed that one family member, GRM3, was frequently mutated and that one of its mutations clustered within one position. Biochemical analysis of GRM3 alterations revealed that mutant GRM3 selectively regulated the phosphorylation of MEK, leading to increased anchorage-independent growth and migration. Melanoma cells expressing mutant GRM3 had reduced cell growth and cellular migration after short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown of GRM3 or treatment with a selective MEK inhibitor, AZD-6244, which is currently being used in phase 2 clinical trials. Our study yields the most comprehensive map of genetic alterations in the GPCR gene family.

  17. GNAS sequencing identifies IPMN-specific mutations in a subgroup of diminutive pancreatic cysts referred to as "incipient IPMNs".

    PubMed

    Matthaei, Hanno; Wu, Jian; Dal Molin, Marco; Shi, Chanjuan; Perner, Sven; Kristiansen, Glen; Lingohr, Philipp; Kalff, Jörg C; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Vogelstein, Bert; Maitra, Anirban; Hruban, Ralph H

    2014-03-01

    Incipient intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) are poorly described subcentimeter pancreatic cysts with papillae and mucin similar to IPMNs. They are larger than pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia but do not meet the cutoff size for IPMNs (≥ 1 cm). GNAS codon 201 mutations are hallmark genetic alterations of IPMNs. Hence, we sought to determine the GNAS status of incipient IPMNs to better classify these lesions. Incipient IPMNs from 3 institutions were histologically reassessed, manually microdissected, and the genomic DNA was extracted. Using a sensitive digital ligation technique, the mutational status of KRAS at codon 12 and GNAS at codon 201 was determined. We included 21 incipient IPMNs from 7 male and 12 female patients with a median age of 63 years (range, 40 to 76 y). Most patients underwent surgery for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (N = 8) or ampullary adenocarcinoma (N = 3). The median incipient IPMN size was 4 mm (range, 2 to 7 mm), and a majority had gastric-foveolar (N = 11) or intestinal (N = 5) differentiation. The maximum dysplasia observed was intermediate, and most of the lesions had intermediate-grade dysplasia. Mutational analysis revealed KRAS codon 12 mutations in all 21 incipient IPMNs, whereas 7 lesions (33%) in 7 individual patients harbored GNAS codon 201 mutations. The presence of GNAS 201 mutations in incipient IPMNs suggests that a fraction of these cysts are in fact small IPMNs. Morphologically, incipient IPMNs do not appear to be high-risk lesions. Additional studies in a larger cohort are needed to define the relationship of incipient IPMNs to larger IPMNs and, more importantly, to determine their clinical significance.

  18. A novel homozygous splice site mutation in NALCN identified in siblings with cachexia, strabismus, severe intellectual disability, epilepsy and abnormal respiratory rhythm.

    PubMed

    Gal, Moran; Magen, Daniella; Zahran, Younan; Ravid, Sarit; Eran, Ayelet; Khayat, Morad; Gafni, Chen; Levanon, Erez Y; Mandel, Hanna

    2016-04-01

    We studied three siblings, born to consanguineous parents who presented with severe intellectual disability, cachexia, strabismus, seizures and episodes of abnormal respiratory rhythm. Whole exome sequencing led to identification of a novel homozygous splice site mutation, IVS29-1G > A in the NALCN gene, that resulted in aberrant transcript in the patients. NALCN encodes a voltage-independent cation channel, involved in regulation of neuronal excitability. Three homozygous mutations in the NALCN gene were previously identified in only eight patients with severe hypotonia, speech impairment, cognitive delay, constipation and Infantile-Neuroaxonal-dystrophy- like symptoms. Our patients broaden the clinical spectrum associated with recessive mutations in NALCN, featuring also disrupted respiratory rhythm mimicking homozygous Nalcn knockout mice.

  19. Secondary Variants in Individuals Undergoing Exome Sequencing: Screening of 572 Individuals Identifies High-Penetrance Mutations in Cancer-Susceptibility Genes

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Jennifer J.; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Facio, Flavia M.; Ng, David; Singh, Larry N.; Teer, Jamie K.; Mullikin, James C.; Biesecker, Leslie G.

    2012-01-01

    Genome- and exome-sequencing costs are continuing to fall, and many individuals are undergoing these assessments as research participants and patients. The issue of secondary (so-called incidental) findings in exome analysis is controversial, and data are needed on methods of detection and their frequency. We piloted secondary variant detection by analyzing exomes for mutations in cancer-susceptibility syndromes in subjects ascertained for atherosclerosis phenotypes. We performed exome sequencing on 572 ClinSeq participants, and in 37 genes, we interpreted variants that cause high-penetrance cancer syndromes by using an algorithm that filtered results on the basis of mutation type, quality, and frequency and that filtered mutation-database entries on the basis of defined categories of causation. We identified 454 sequence variants that differed from the human reference. Exclusions were made on the basis of sequence quality (26 variants) and high frequency in the cohort (77 variants) or dbSNP (17 variants), leaving 334 variants of potential clinical importance. These were further filtered on the basis of curation of literature reports. Seven participants, four of whom were of Ashkenazi Jewish descent and three of whom did not meet family-history-based referral criteria, had deleterious BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. One participant had a deleterious SDHC mutation, which causes paragangliomas. Exome sequencing, coupled with multidisciplinary interpretation, detected clinically important mutations in cancer-susceptibility genes; four of such mutations were in individuals without a significant family history of disease. We conclude that secondary variants of high clinical importance will be detected at an appreciable frequency in exomes, and we suggest that priority be given to the development of more efficient modes of interpretation with trials in larger patient groups. PMID:22703879

  20. Candidate gene analysis of tooth agenesis identifies novel mutations in six genes and suggests significant role for WNT and EDA signaling and allele combinations.

    PubMed

    Arte, Sirpa; Parmanen, Satu; Pirinen, Sinikka; Alaluusua, Satu; Nieminen, Pekka

    2013-01-01

    Failure to develop complete dentition, tooth agenesis, is a common developmental anomaly manifested most often as isolated but also as associated with many developmental syndromes. It typically affects third molars or one or few other permanent teeth but severe agenesis is also relatively prevalent. Here we report mutational analyses of seven candidate genes in a cohort of 127 probands with non-syndromic tooth agenesis. 82 lacked more than five permanent teeth excluding third molars, called as oligodontia. We identified 28 mutations, 17 of which were novel. Together with our previous reports, we have identified two mutations in MSX1, AXIN2 and EDARADD, five in PAX9, four in EDA and EDAR, and nine in WNT10A. They were observed in 58 probands (44%), with a mean number of missing teeth of 11.7 (range 4 to 34). Almost all of these probands had severe agenesis. Only few of the probands but several relatives with heterozygous genotypes of WNT10A or EDAR conformed to the common type of non-syndromic tooth agenesis, incisor-premolar hypodontia. Mutations in MSX1 and PAX9 affected predominantly posterior teeth, whereas both deciduous and permanent incisors were especially sensitive to mutations in EDA and EDAR. Many mutations in EDAR, EDARADD and WNT10A were present in several families. Biallelic or heterozygous genotypes of WNT10A were observed in 32 and hemizygous or heterozygous genotypes of EDA, EDAR or EDARADD in 22 probands. An EDARADD variant were in seven probands present together with variants in EDAR or WNT10A, suggesting combined phenotypic effects of alleles in distinct genes.

  1. Candidate Gene Analysis of Tooth Agenesis Identifies Novel Mutations in Six Genes and Suggests Significant Role for WNT and EDA Signaling and Allele Combinations

    PubMed Central

    Arte, Sirpa; Parmanen, Satu; Pirinen, Sinikka; Alaluusua, Satu; Nieminen, Pekka

    2013-01-01

    Failure to develop complete dentition, tooth agenesis, is a common developmental anomaly manifested most often as isolated but also as associated with many developmental syndromes. It typically affects third molars or one or few other permanent teeth but severe agenesis is also relatively prevalent. Here we report mutational analyses of seven candidate genes in a cohort of 127 probands with non-syndromic tooth agenesis. 82 lacked more than five permanent teeth excluding third molars, called as oligodontia. We identified 28 mutations, 17 of which were novel. Together with our previous reports, we have identified two mutations in MSX1, AXIN2 and EDARADD, five in PAX9, four in EDA and EDAR, and nine in WNT10A. They were observed in 58 probands (44%), with a mean number of missing teeth of 11.7 (range 4 to 34). Almost all of these probands had severe agenesis. Only few of the probands but several relatives with heterozygous genotypes of WNT10A or EDAR conformed to the common type of non-syndromic tooth agenesis, incisor-premolar hypodontia. Mutations in MSX1 and PAX9 affected predominantly posterior teeth, whereas both deciduous and permanent incisors were especially sensitive to mutations in EDA and EDAR. Many mutations in EDAR, EDARADD and WNT10A were present in several families. Biallelic or heterozygous genotypes of WNT10A were observed in 32 and hemizygous or heterozygous genotypes of EDA, EDAR or EDARADD in 22 probands. An EDARADD variant were in seven probands present together with variants in EDAR or WNT10A, suggesting combined phenotypic effects of alleles in distinct genes. PMID:23991204

  2. Whole-exome and targeted sequencing identify ROBO1 and ROBO2 mutations as progression-related drivers in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feng; Wu, Ling-Yun; Chang, Chun-Kang; He, Qi; Zhang, Zheng; Liu, Li; Shi, Wen-Hui; Guo, Juan; Zhu, Yang; Zhao, You-Shan; Gu, Shu-Cheng; Fei, Cheng-Ming; Wu, Dong; Zhou, Li-Yu; Su, Ji-Ying; Song, Lu-Xi; Xiao, Chao; Li, Xiao

    2015-11-26

    The progressive mechanism underlying myelodysplastic syndrome remains unknown. Here we identify ROBO1 and ROBO2 as novel progression-related somatic mutations using whole-exome and targeted sequencing in 6 of 16 (37.5%) paired MDS patients with disease progression. Further deep sequencing detects 20 (10.4%) patients with ROBO mutations in a cohort of 193 MDS patients. In addition, copy number loss and loss of heterogeneity (LOH) of ROBO1 and ROBO2 are frequently observed in patients with progression or carrying ROBO mutations. In in vitro experiments, overexpression of ROBO1 or ROBO2 produces anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects in leukaemia cells. However, this effect was lost in ROBO mutants and ROBO-SLIT2 signalling is impaired. Multivariate analysis shows that ROBO mutations are independent factors for predicting poor survival. These findings demonstrate a novel contribution of ROBO mutations to the pathogenesis of MDS and highlight a key role for ROBO-SLIT2 signalling in MDS disease progression.

  3. Severely incapacitating mutations in patients with extreme short stature identify RNA-processing endoribonuclease RMRP as an essential cell growth regulator.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Christian T; Horn, Denise; Zabel, Bernhard; Ekici, Arif B; Salinas, Kelly; Gebhart, Erich; Rüschendorf, Franz; Sticht, Heinrich; Spranger, Jürgen; Müller, Dietmar; Zweier, Christiane; Schmitt, Mark E; Reis, André; Rauch, Anita

    2005-11-01

    The growth of an individual is deeply influenced by the regulation of cell growth and division, both of which also contribute to a wide variety of pathological conditions, including cancer, diabetes, and inflammation. To identify a major regulator of human growth, we performed positional cloning in an autosomal recessive type of profound short stature, anauxetic dysplasia. Homozygosity mapping led to the identification of novel mutations in the RMRP gene, which was previously known to cause two milder types of short stature with susceptibility to cancer, cartilage hair hypoplasia, and metaphyseal dysplasia without hypotrichosis. We show that different RMRP gene mutations lead to decreased cell growth by impairing ribosomal assembly and by altering cyclin-dependent cell cycle regulation. Clinical heterogeneity is explained by a correlation between the level and type of functional impairment in vitro and the severity of short stature or predisposition to cancer. Whereas the cartilage hair hypoplasia founder mutation affects both pathways intermediately, anauxetic dysplasia mutations do not affect B-cyclin messenger RNA (mRNA) levels but do severely incapacitate ribosomal assembly via defective endonucleolytic cleavage. Anauxetic dysplasia mutations thus lead to poor processing of ribosomal RNA while allowing normal mRNA processing and, therefore, genetically separate the different functions of RNase MRP.

  4. The Sac1 domain of SYNJ1 identified mutated in a family with early-onset progressive parkinsonism with generalized seizures

    PubMed Central

    Krebs, Catharine E.; Karkheiran, Siamak; Powell, James C.; Cao, Mian; Makarov, Vladimir; Darvish, Hossein; Di Paolo, Gilbert; Walker, Ruth H.; Shahidi, Gholam Ali; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; De Camilli, Pietro; Yue, Zhenyu; Paisán-Ruiz, Coro

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to elucidate the genetic causes underlying early-onset parkinsonism (EOP) in a consanguineous Iranian family. To attain this, homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing were performed. As a result, a homozygous mutation (c.773G>A; p.Arg258Gln) lying within the NH2-terminal Sac1-like inositol phosphatase domain of polyphosphoinositide phosphatase synaptojanin 1 (SYNJ1), which has been implicated in the regulation of endocytic traffic at synapses, was identified as the disease-segregating mutation. This mutation impaired the phosphatase activity SYNJ1 against its Sac1 domain substrates in vitro. We concluded that the SYNJ1 mutation identified here is responsible for the EOP phenotype seen in our patients probably due to deficiencies in its phosphatase activity and consequent impairment of its synaptic functions. Our finding not only opens new avenues of investigation in the synaptic dysfunction mechanisms associated with parkinsonism, but also suggests phosphoinositide metabolism as a novel therapeutic target for parkinsonism. PMID:23804563

  5. Targeted exome sequencing identifies novel compound heterozygous mutations in P3H1 in a fetus with osteogenesis imperfecta type VIII.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanru; Mei, Libin; Lv, Weigang; Li, Haoxian; Zhang, Rui; Pan, Qian; Tan, Hu; Guo, Jing; Luo, Xiaomei; Chen, Chen; Liang, Desheng; Wu, Lingqian

    2017-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a highly clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders. It is difficult to identify severe OI in the perinatal period. Here, a Chinese woman with a suspected history of fetal OI was referred to our institution at 19weeks of gestation, due to ultrasound inspection during antenatal screening, which revealed bulbous metaphyses, short humeri, and short thick bent femora in the fetus. Using targeted exome sequencing of 248 genes known to be involved in skeletal system diseases, we identified novel compound heterozygous mutation in the P3H1 gene in the fetus with OI type VIII: c.105_120del (p.D36Rfs*16) and c.2164C>T (p.Q722*). These two mutations were inherited from the father and mother, respectively. The mRNA level of P3H1 wasn't changed suggested that mRNA with this mutation escaped from nonsense-mediated RNA decay. Besides, the level of P3H1 was absence while the CRTAP was mildly decreased. In conclusion, our findings imply this novel compound heterozygous mutation as the molecular pathogenetic in a Chinese fetus with OI type VIII, and demonstrate that targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) is an accurate, rapid, and cost-effective method in the genetic diagnosis of fetal skeletal dysplasia with genetic and clinical heterogeneity, especially for autosomal recessive skeletal disorders.

  6. Exome capture and massively parallel sequencing identifies a novel HPSE2 mutation in a Saudi Arabian child with Ochoa (urofacial) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Al Badr, Wisam; Al Bader, Suha; Otto, Edgar; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Ackley, Todd; Peng, Weiping; Xu, Jishu; Li, Jun; Owens, Kailey M; Bloom, David; Innis, Jeffrey W

    2011-10-01

    We describe a child of Middle Eastern descent by first-cousin coupling with idiopathic neurogenic bladder and high-grade vesicoureteral reflux at 1 year of age, whose characteristic facial grimace led to the diagnosis of Ochoa (urofacial) syndrome at age 5 years. We used homozygosity mapping, exome capture and paired-end sequencing to identify the disease causing mutation in the proband. We reviewed the literature with respect to the urologic manifestations of Ochoa syndrome. A large region of marker homozygosity was observed at 10q24, consistent with known autosomal recessive inheritance, family consanguinity and previous genetic mapping in other families with Ochoa syndrome. A homozygous mutation was identified in the proband in HPSE2: c.1374_1378delTGTGC, a deletion of 5 nucleotides in exon 10 that is predicted to lead to a frameshift followed by replacement of 132 C-terminal amino acids with 153 novel amino acids (p.Ala458Alafsdel132ins153). This mutation is novel relative to very recently published mutations in HPSE2 in other families. Early intervention and recognition of Ochoa syndrome with control of risk factors and close surveillance will decrease complications and renal failure.

  7. Newly identified mutations at the CSN1S1 gene in Ethiopian goats affect casein content and coagulation properties of their milk.

    PubMed

    Mestawet, T A; Girma, A; Adnøy, T; Devold, T G; Vegarud, G E

    2013-08-01

    Very high casein content and good coagulation properties previously observed in some Ethiopian goat breeds led to investigating the αs1-casein (CSN1S1) gene in these breeds. Selected regions of the CSN1S1 gene were sequenced in 115 goats from 5 breeds (2 indigenous: Arsi-Bale and Somali, 1 exotic: Boer, and 2 crossbreeds: Boer × Arsi-Bale and Boer × Somali). The DNA analysis resulted in 35 new mutations: 3 in exons, 3 in the 5' untranslated region (UTR), and 29 in the introns. The mutations in exons that resulted in an amino acid shift were then picked to evaluate their influence on individual casein content (αs1-, αs2-, β-, and κ-CN), micellar size, and coagulation properties in the milk from the 5 goat breeds. A mutation at nucleotide 10657 (exon 10) involved a transversion: CAG→CCG, resulting in an amino acid exchange Gln77→Pro77. This mutation was associated with the indigenous breeds only. Two new mutations, at nucleotide 6072 (exon 4) and 12165 (exon 12), revealed synonymous transitions: GTC→GTT in Val15 and AGA→AGG in Arg100 of the mature protein. Transitions G→A and C→T at nucleotides 1374 and 1866, respectively, occurred in the 5' UTR, whereas the third mutation involved a transversion T→G at nucleotide location 1592. The goats were grouped into homozygote new (CC), homozygote reference (AA), and heterozygote (CA) based on the nucleotide that involved the transversion. The content of αs1-CN (15.32g/kg) in milk samples of goats homozygous (CC) for this newly identified mutation, Gln77→Pro77 was significantly higher than in milks of heterozygous (CA; 9.05g/kg) and reference (AA; 7.61g/kg) genotype animals. The αs2-, β-, and κ-CN contents showed a similar pattern. Milk from goats with a homozygous new mutation had significantly lower micellar size. Milk from both homozygote and heterozygote new-mutation goats had significantly shorter coagulation rate and stronger gel than the reference genotype. Except the transversion, the

  8. Whole-exome sequencing identifies novel compound heterozygous mutations in USH2A in Spanish patients with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Méndez-Vidal, Cristina; González-del Pozo, María; Vela-Boza, Alicia; Santoyo-López, Javier; López-Domingo, Francisco J.; Vázquez-Marouschek, Carmen; Dopazo, Joaquin; Borrego, Salud

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is an inherited retinal dystrophy characterized by extreme genetic and clinical heterogeneity. Thus, the diagnosis is not always easily performed due to phenotypic and genetic overlap. Current clinical practices have focused on the systematic evaluation of a set of known genes for each phenotype, but this approach may fail in patients with inaccurate diagnosis or infrequent genetic cause. In the present study, we investigated the genetic cause of autosomal recessive RP (arRP) in a Spanish family in which the causal mutation has not yet been identified with primer extension technology and resequencing. Methods We designed a whole-exome sequencing (WES)-based approach using NimbleGen SeqCap EZ Exome V3 sample preparation kit and the SOLiD 5500×l next-generation sequencing platform. We sequenced the exomes of both unaffected parents and two affected siblings. Exome analysis resulted in the identification of 43,204 variants in the index patient. All variants passing filter criteria were validated with Sanger sequencing to confirm familial segregation and absence in the control population. In silico prediction tools were used to determine mutational impact on protein function and the structure of the identified variants. Results Novel Usher syndrome type 2A (USH2A) compound heterozygous mutations, c.4325T>C (p.F1442S) and c.15188T>G (p.L5063R), located in exons 20 and 70, respectively, were identified as probable causative mutations for RP in this family. Family segregation of the variants showed the presence of both mutations in all affected members and in two siblings who were apparently asymptomatic at the time of family ascertainment. Clinical reassessment confirmed the diagnosis of RP in these patients. Conclusions Using WES, we identified two heterozygous novel mutations in USH2A as the most likely disease-causing variants in a Spanish family diagnosed with arRP in which the cause of the disease had not yet been identified with

  9. Two novel exonic point mutations in HEXA identified in a juvenile Tay-Sachs patient: role of alternative splicing and nonsense-mediated mRNA decay.

    PubMed

    Levit, A; Nutman, D; Osher, E; Kamhi, E; Navon, R

    2010-06-01

    We have identified three mutations in the beta-hexoseaminidase A (HEXA) gene in a juvenile Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) patient, which exhibited a reduced level of HEXA mRNA. Two mutations are novel, c.814G>A (p.Gly272Arg) and c.1305C>T (p.=), located in exon 8 and in exon 11, respectively. The third mutation, c.1195A>G (p.Asn399Asp) in exon 11, has been previously characterized as a common polymorphism in African-Americans. Hex A activity measured in TSD Glial cells, transfected with HEXA cDNA constructs bearing these mutations, was unaltered from the activity level measured in normal HEXA cDNA. Analysis of RT-PCR products revealed three aberrant transcripts in the patient, one where exon 8 was absent, one where exon 11 was absent and a third lacking both exons 10 and 11. All three novel transcripts contain frameshifts resulting in premature termination codons (PTCs). Transfection of mini-gene constructs carrying the c.814G>A and c.1305C>T mutations proved that the two mutations result in exon skipping. mRNAs that harbor a PTC are detected and degraded by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathway to prevent synthesis of abnormal proteins. However, although NMD is functional in the patient's fibroblasts, aberrant transcripts are still present. We suggest that the level of correctly spliced transcripts as well as the efficiency in which NMD degrade the PTC-containing transcripts, apparently plays an important role in the phenotype severity of the unique patient and thus should be considered as a potential target for drug therapy.

  10. Altered-function p53 missense mutations identified in breast cancers can have subtle effects on transactivation.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Jennifer J; Inga, Alberto; Conway, Kathleen; Edmiston, Sharon; Carey, Lisa A; Wu, Lin; Resnick, Michael A

    2010-05-01

    Mutations of the sequence-specific master regulator p53 that alter transactivation function from promoter response elements (RE) could result in changes in the strength of gene activation or spectra of genes regulated. Such mutations in this tumor suppressor might lead to dramatic phenotypic changes and diversification of cell responses to stress. We have determined "functional fingerprints" of sporadic breast cancer-related p53 mutants, many of which are also associated with familial cancer proneness such as the Li-Fraumeni syndrome and germline BRCA1/2 mutant-associated cancers. The ability of p53, wild-type and mutants, to transactivate from 11 human target REs has been assessed at variable expression levels using a cellular, isogenomic yeast model system that allows for the rapid analysis of p53 function using a qualitative and a quantitative reporter. Among 50 missense mutants, 29 were classified as loss of function. The remaining 21 retained transactivation toward at least one RE. At high levels of galactose-induced p53 expression, 12 of 21 mutants that retain transactivation seemed similar to wild-type. When the level of galactose was reduced, transactivation defects could be revealed, suggesting that some breast cancer-related mutants can have subtle changes in transcription. These findings have been compared with clinical data from an ongoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy treatment trial for locally advanced breast tumors. The functional and nonfunctional missense mutations may distinguish tumors in terms of demographics, appearance, and relapse, implying that heterogeneity in the functionality of specific p53 mutations could affect clinical behavior and outcome.

  11. Exome sequencing identifies a novel mutation in PIK3R1 as the cause of SHORT syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background SHORT syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant condition whose name is the acronym of short stature, hyperextensibility of joints, ocular depression, Rieger anomaly and teething delay (MIM 269880). Additionally, the patients usually present a low birth weight and height, lipodystrophy, delayed bone age, hernias, low body mass index and a progeroid appearance. Case presentation In this study, we used whole-exome sequencing approaches in two patients with clinical features of SHORT syndrome. We report the finding of a novel mutation in PIK3R1 (c.1929_1933delTGGCA; p.Asp643Aspfs*8), as well as a recurrent mutation c.1945C > T (p.Arg649Trp) in this gene. Conclusions We found a novel frameshift mutation in PIK3R1 (c.1929_1933delTGGCA; p.Asp643Aspfs*8) which consists of a deletion right before the site of substrate recognition. As a consequence, the protein lacks the position that interacts with the phosphotyrosine residue of the substrate, resulting in the development of SHORT syndrome. PMID:24886349

  12. Whole-Exome Sequencing Identifies Homozygous GPR161 Mutation in a Family with Pituitary Stalk Interruption Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Karaca, Ender; Buyukkaya, Ramazan; Pehlivan, Davut; Charng, Wu-Lin; Yaykasli, Kursat O.; Bayram, Yavuz; Gambin, Tomasz; Withers, Marjorie; Atik, Mehmed M.; Arslanoglu, Ilknur; Bolu, Semih; Erdin, Serkan; Buyukkaya, Ayla; Yaykasli, Emine; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Muzny, Donna M.; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Pituitary stalk interruption syndrome (PSIS) is a rare, congenital anomaly of the pituitary gland characterized by pituitary gland insufficiency, thin or discontinuous pituitary stalk, anterior pituitary hypoplasia, and ectopic positioning of the posterior pituitary gland (neurohypophysis). The clinical presentation of patients with PSIS varies from isolated growth hormone (GH) deficiency to combined pituitary insufficiency and accompanying extrapituitary findings. Mutations in HESX1, LHX4, OTX2, SOX3, and PROKR2 have been associated with PSIS in less than 5% of cases; thus, the underlying genetic etiology for the vast majority of cases remains to be determined. Objective: We applied whole-exome sequencing (WES) to a consanguineous family with two affected siblings who have pituitary gland insufficiency and radiographic findings of hypoplastic (thin) pituitary gland, empty sella, ectopic neurohypophysis, and interrupted pitiutary stalk—characteristic clinical diagnostic findings of PSIS. Design and Participants: WES was applied to two affected and one unaffected siblings. Results: WES of two affected and one unaffected sibling revealed a unique homozygous missense mutation in GPR161, which encodes the orphan G protein–coupled receptor 161, a protein responsible for transducing extracellular signals across the plasma membrane into the cell. Conclusion: Mutations of GPR161 may be implicated as a potential novel cause of PSIS. PMID:25322266

  13. Genome-wide Analyses Identifies MEN1 and MAX Mutations and a Neuroendocrine-like Molecular Heterogeneity in Quadruple WT GIST.

    PubMed

    Pantaleo, Maria A; Urbini, Milena; Indio, Valentina; Ravegnini, Gloria; Nannini, Margherita; De Luca, Matilde; Tarantino, Giuseppe; Angelini, Sabrina; Gronchi, Alessandro; Vincenzi, Bruno; Grignani, Giovanni; Colombo, Chiara; Fumagalli, Elena; Gatto, Lidia; Saponara, Maristella; Ianni, Manuela; Paterini, Paola; Santini, Donatella; Pirini, Maria Giulia; Ceccarelli, Claudio; Altimari, Annalisa; Gruppioni, Elisa; Renne, Salvatore L; Collini, Paola; Stacchiotti, Silvia; Brandi, Giovanni; Casali, Paolo G; Pinna, Antonio D; Astolfi, Annalisa; Biasco, Guido

    2017-01-27

    Quadruple wild-type (WT) gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) is a genomic subgroup lacking KIT/PDGFRA/RAS pathways mutations, with an intact succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) complex. The aim of this work is to perform a wide comprehensive genomic study on quadruple WT GIST to improve the characterization of these patients. We selected 14 clinical cases of quadruple WT GIST, of which nine cases showed sufficient DNA quality for Whole Exome Sequencing (WES). NF1 alterations were identified directly by WES. Gene expression from Whole Transcriptome Sequencing (WTS) and miRNA profiling were performed using fresh-frozen, quadruple WT GIST tissue specimens and compared to SDH and KIT/PDGFRAmutant GIST. WES identified an average of 18 somatic mutations per sample. The most relevant somatic oncogenic mutations identified were in TP53, MEN1, MAX, FGF1R, CHD4 and CTDNN2. No somatic alterations in NF1 were identified in the analyzed cohort. A total of 247 mRNA transcripts and 66 miRs were differentially expressed specifically in quadruple WT GIST. Overexpression of specific molecular markers (COL22A1, CALCRL) and genes involved in neural and neuroendocrine lineage (ASCL1, Family B GPCRs) were detected and further supported by predicted miRNA target analysis. Quadruple WT GIST show a specific genetic signature that deviates significantly from that of KIT/PDGFRA-mutant and SDH-mutant GIST. Mutations in MEN1 and MAX genes, a neural-committed phenotype and up-regulation of the master neuroendocrine regulator ASCL1, support a genetic similarity with neuroendocrine tumors, with whom they share also the great variability in oncogenic driver genes.

  14. Whole genome sequencing identifies ANXA3 and MTHFR mutations in a large family with an unknown equinus deformity associated genetic disorder.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiqun; Kong, Zhuqing; Zhu, Miao; Lu, Wenxiang; Ni, Lei; Bai, Yunfei; Lou, Yue

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize a previously uncharacterized genetic disorder associated with equinus deformity in a large Chinese family at the genetic level. Blood samples were obtained and whole genome sequencing was performed. Differential gene variants were identified and potential impacts on protein structure were predicted. Based on the control sample, several diseases associated variants were identified and selected for further validation. One of the potential variants identified was a ANXA3 gene [chr4, c.C820T(p.R274*)] variant. Further bioinformatic analysis showed that the observed mutation could lead to a three-dimensional conformational change. Moreover, a MTHFR variant that is different from variants associated with clubfoot was also identified. Bioinformatic analysis showed that this mutation could alter the protein binding region. These findings imply that this uncharacterized genetic disorder is not clubfoot, despite sharing some similar symptoms. Furthermore, specific CNV profiles were identified in association with the diseased samples, thus further speaking to the complexity of this multigenerational disorder. This study examined a previously uncharacterized genetic disorder appearing similar to clubfoot and yet having distinct features. Following whole genome sequencing and comparative analysis, several differential gene variants were identified to enable a further distinction from clubfoot. It is hoped that these findings will provide further insight into this disorder and other similar disorders.

  15. Targeted next generation sequencing of a panel of autism-related genes identifies an EHMT1 mutation in a Kleefstra syndrome patient with autism and normal intellectual performance.

    PubMed

    Bock, István; Németh, Krisztina; Pentelényi, Klára; Balicza, Péter; Balázs, Anna; Molnár, Mária Judit; Román, Viktor; Nagy, József; Lévay, György; Kobolák, Julianna; Dinnyés, András

    2016-12-31

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder with unknown genetic and environmental causation in most of the affected individuals. On the other hand, there are a growing number of ASD-associated syndromes, where the exact genetic origin can be revealed. Here we report a method, which included the targeted next generation sequencing (NGS) and filtering of 101 ASD associated genes, followed by database search. Next, RNA sequencing was used to study the region of interest at the transcriptional level. Using this workflow, we identified a de novo mutation in the euchromatic histone-lysine N-methyltransferase 1 gene (EHMT1) of an autistic patient with dysmorphisms. Sequencing of EHMT1 transcripts showed that the premature termination codon (Trp1138Ter) created by a single nucleotide change elicited nonsense-mediated mRNA decay, which led to haploinsufficiency already at the transcriptional level. Database and literature search provided evidence that this mutation caused Kleefstra syndrome (KS), which was confirmed by the presence of the disorder-specific phenotype in the patient. We provide a proof of principle that the implemented method is capable to elucidate the genetic etiology of individuals with syndromic autism. The novel mutation detected in the EHMT1 gene is responsible for KS's symptoms. In addition, further genetic factors might be involved in the ASD pathogenesis of the patient including a missense DPP6 mutation (Arg322Cys), which segregated with the autistic phenotype within the family.

  16. A Targeted Mutation Identified through pKa Measurements Indicates a Postrecruitment Role for Fis1 in Yeast Mitochondrial Fission.

    PubMed

    Koppenol-Raab, Marijke; Harwig, Megan Cleland; Posey, Ammon E; Egner, John M; MacKenzie, Kevin R; Hill, R Blake

    2016-09-23

    The tail-anchored protein Fis1 is implicated as a passive tether in yeast mitochondrial fission. We probed the functional role of Fis1 Glu-78, whose elevated side chain pKa suggests participation in protein interactions. Fis1 binds partners Mdv1 or Dnm1 tightly, but mutation E78A weakens Fis1 interaction with Mdv1, alters mitochondrial morphology, and abolishes fission in a growth assay. In fis1Δ rescue experiments, Fis1-E78A causes a novel localization pattern in which Dnm1 uniformly coats the mitochondria. By contrast, Fis1-E78A at lower expression levels recruits Dnm1 into mitochondrial punctate structures but fails to support normal fission. Thus, Fis1 makes multiple interactions that support Dnm1 puncta formation and may be essential after this step, supporting a revised model for assembly of the mitochondrial fission machinery. The insights gained by mutating a residue with a perturbed pKa suggest that side chain pKa values inferred from routine NMR sample pH optimization could provide useful leads for functional investigations.

  17. Whole-exome sequencing, without prior linkage, identifies a mutation in LAMB3 as a cause of dominant hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Poulter, James A; El-Sayed, Walid; Shore, Roger C; Kirkham, Jennifer; Inglehearn, Chris F; Mighell, Alan J

    2014-01-01

    The conventional approach to identifying the defective gene in a family with an inherited disease is to find the disease locus through family studies. However, the rapid development and decreasing cost of next generation sequencing facilitates a more direct approach. Here, we report the identification of a frameshift mutation in LAMB3 as a cause of dominant hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta (AI). Whole-exome sequencing of three affected family members and subsequent filtering of shared variants, without prior genetic linkage, sufficed to identify the pathogenic variant. Simultaneous analysis of multiple family members confirms segregation, enhancing the power to filter the genetic variation found and leading to rapid identification of the pathogenic variant. LAMB3 encodes a subunit of Laminin-5, one of a family of basement membrane proteins with essential functions in cell growth, movement and adhesion. Homozygous LAMB3 mutations cause junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB) and enamel defects are seen in JEB cases. However, to our knowledge, this is the first report of dominant AI due to a LAMB3 mutation in the absence of JEB.

  18. Use of expression data and the CGEMS genome-wide breast cancer association study to identify genes that may modify risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Walker, Logan C; Waddell, Nic; Ten Haaf, Anette; Grimmond, Sean; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2008-11-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 confer an increased lifetime risk of developing breast or ovarian cancer, but variable penetrance suggests that cancer susceptibility is influenced in part by modifier genes. Microarray expression profiling was conducted for 69 irradiated lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from healthy controls, or from cancer-affected women with a strong family history of breast and ovarian cancer carrying pathogenic mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2, or with no BRCA1/2 mutations (BRCAX). Genes discriminating between BRCA1, BRCA2 or BRCAX and controls were stratified based on irradiation response and/or cell cycle involvement. Gene lists were aligned against genes tagged with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) determined by the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS) Breast Cancer Whole Genome Association Scan to be nominally associated with breast cancer risk. Irradiation responsive genes whose expression correlated with BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation status were more likely to be tagged by risk-associated SNPs in the CGEMS dataset (BRCA1, P = 0.0005; BRCA2, P = 0.01). In contrast, irradiation responsive genes correlating with BRCAX status were not enriched in the CGEMS dataset. Classification of expression data by involvement in cell cycle processes did not enrich for genes tagged by risk-associated SNPs, for BRCA1, BRCA2 or BRCAX groups. Using a novel combinatorial approach, we have identified a subset of irradiation responsive genes as high priority candidate BRCA1/2 modifier genes. Similar approaches may be used to identify genes and underlying genetic risk factors that interact with exogenous stimulants to cause or modify any disease, without a priori knowledge of the pathways involved.

  19. Extreme Outlier Analysis Identifies Occult Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway Mutations in Patients With Low-Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Grisham, Rachel N.; Sylvester, Brooke E.; Won, Helen; McDermott, Gregory; DeLair, Deborah; Ramirez, Ricardo; Yao, Zhan; Shen, Ronglai; Dao, Fanny; Bogomolniy, Faina; Makker, Vicky; Sala, Evis; Soumerai, Tara E.; Hyman, David M.; Socci, Nicholas D.; Viale, Agnes; Gershenson, David M.; Farley, John; Levine, Douglas A.; Rosen, Neal; Berger, Michael F.; Spriggs, David R.; Aghajanian, Carol A.; Solit, David B.; Iyer, Gopa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose No effective systemic therapy exists for patients with metastatic low-grade serous (LGS) ovarian cancers. BRAF and KRAS mutations are common in serous borderline (SB) and LGS ovarian cancers, and MEK inhibition has been shown to induce tumor regression in a minority of patients; however, no correlation has been observed between mutation status and clinical response. With the goal of identifying biomarkers of sensitivity to MEK inhibitor treatment, we performed an outlier analysis of a patient who experienced a complete, durable, and ongoing (> 5 years) response to selumetinib, a non-ATP competitive MEK inhibitor. Patients and Methods Next-generation sequencing was used to analyze this patient's tumor as well as an additional 28 SB/LGS tumors. Functional characterization of an identified novel alteration of interest was performed. Results Analysis of the extraordinary responder's tumor identified a 15-nucleotide deletion in the negative regulatory helix of the MAP2K1 gene encoding for MEK1. Functional characterization demonstrated that this mutant induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway activation, promoted anchorage-independent growth and tumor formation in mice, and retained sensitivity to selumetinib. Analysis of additional LGS/SB tumors identified mutations predicted to induce extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway activation in 82% (23 of 28), including two patients with BRAF fusions, one of whom achieved an ongoing complete response to MEK inhibitor–based combination therapy. Conclusion Alterations affecting the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway are present in the majority of patients with LGS ovarian cancer. Next-generation sequencing analysis revealed deletions and fusions that are not detected by older sequencing approaches. These findings, coupled with the observation that a subset of patients with recurrent LGS ovarian cancer experienced dramatic and durable responses to MEK inhibitor therapy, support additional

  20. Mutational analysis identifies leucine-rich repeat insertions crucial for pigeon toll-like receptor 7 recognition and signaling.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Dan; Song, Li; Jiao, Yang; Kang, Xilong; Chen, Xiang; Geng, Shizhong; Pan, Zhiming; Jiao, Xinan

    2015-11-15

    Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) is responsible for recognizing viral single-stranded RNA and antiviral imidazoquinoline compounds, leading to the activation of the innate immune response. In this study, mutated pigeon TLR7 fragments, in which the insertion at position 10 of leucine-rich repeat 10 (LRR10) or at position 15 of LRR2/11/13/14 was deleted, were amplified with an overlap-PCR method, and inserted into the expression vector pCMV. The immune functions of the TLR7 mutants were determined with an NF-κB luciferase assay of transfected cells. The deletion of the insertions absolutely abolished TLR7-NF-κB signaling. With quantitative real-time PCR and sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we observed that stimulation with R848 failed to induce the expression of interleukin 8 (IL-8) in any of the mutant-TLR7-transfected cells, consistent with their lack of NF-κB activity. However, the expression of interferon α (IFN-α) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) was significantly upregulated in the Del10IN10 and Del14IN15 groups. Remarkably, the levels of pigeon TLR7 expression were significantly increased in all the TLR7-mutated groups. Therefore, we speculate that another part of the deficient TLR7 mediates the induction of IFN-α and TNF-α by increasing the expression of TLR7 as compensation. However, the increased expression of TLR7 in the Del11IN15 group failed to induce the production of IFN-α, IL-8, or TNF-α, indicating that a false compensation occurred when the crucial LRR insertion was deleted.

  1. Association between GWAS-identified lung adenocarcinoma susceptibility loci and EGFR mutations in never-smoking Asian women, and comparison with findings from Western populations.

    PubMed

    Seow, Wei Jie; Matsuo, Keitaro; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Shiraishi, Kouya; Song, Minsun; Kim, Hee Nam; Wong, Maria Pik; Hong, Yun-Chul; Hosgood, H Dean; Wang, Zhaoming; Chang, I-Shou; Wang, Jiu-Cun; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Tucker, Margaret; Wei, Hu; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Zheng, Wei; Kim, Jin Hee; Zhou, Baosen; Caporaso, Neil E; Albanes, Demetrius; Shin, Min-Ho; Chung, Lap Ping; An, She-Juan; Wang, Ping; Zheng, Hong; Yatabe, Yasushi; Zhang, Xu-Chao; Kim, Young Tae; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Kim, Young-Chul; Bassig, Bryan A; Chang, Jiang; Ho, James Chung Man; Ji, Bu-Tian; Kubo, Michiaki; Daigo, Yataro; Ito, Hidemi; Momozawa, Yukihide; Ashikawa, Kyota; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Honda, Takayuki; Sakamoto, Hiromi; Kunitoh, Hideo; Tsuta, Koji; Watanabe, Shun-Ichi; Nokihara, Hiroshi; Miyagi, Yohei; Nakayama, Haruhiko; Matsumoto, Shingo; Tsuboi, Masahiro; Goto, Koichi; Yin, Zhihua; Shi, Jianxin; Takahashi, Atsushi; Goto, Akiteru; Minamiya, Yoshihiro; Shimizu, Kimihiro; Tanaka, Kazumi; Wu, Tangchun; Wei, Fusheng; Wong, Jason Y Y; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Su, Jian; Kim, Yeul Hong; Oh, In-Jae; Song, Fengju; Lee, Victor Ho Fun; Su, Wu-Chou; Chen, Yuh-Min; Chang, Gee-Chen; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Lin, Hsien-Chih; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Seow, Adeline; Park, Jae Yong; Kweon, Sun-Seog; Chen, Chien-Jen; Li, Haixin; Gao, Yu-Tang; Wu, Chen; Qian, Biyun; Lu, Daru; Liu, Jianjun; Jeon, Hyo-Sung; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Sung, Jae Sook; Tsai, Ying-Huang; Jung, Yoo Jin; Guo, Huan; Hu, Zhibin; Wang, Wen-Chang; Chung, Charles C; Lawrence, Charles; Burdett, Laurie; Yeager, Meredith; Jacobs, Kevin B; Hutchinson, Amy; Berndt, Sonja I; He, Xingzhou; Wu, Wei; Wang, Junwen; Li, Yuqing; Choi, Jin Eun; Park, Kyong Hwa; Sung, Sook Whan; Liu, Li; Kang, Chang Hyun; Hu, Lingmin; Chen, Chung-Hsing; Yang, Tsung-Ying; Xu, Jun; Guan, Peng; Tan, Wen; Wang, Chih-Liang; Sihoe, Alan Dart Loon; Chen, Ying; Choi, Yi Young; Hung, Jen-Yu; Kim, Jun Suk; Yoon, Ho-Il; Cai, Qiuyin; Lin, Chien-Chung; Park, In Kyu; Xu, Ping; Dong, Jing; Kim, Christopher; He, Qincheng; Perng, Reury-Perng; Chen, Chih-Yi; Vermeulen, Roel; Wu, Junjie; Lim, Wei-Yen; Chen, Kun-Chieh; Chan, John K C; Chu, Minjie; Li, Yao-Jen; Li, Jihua; Chen, Hongyan; Yu, Chong-Jen; Jin, Li; Lo, Yen-Li; Chen, Ying-Hsiang; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Liu, Jie; Yamaji, Taiki; Yang, Yang; Hicks, Belynda; Wyatt, Kathleen; Li, Shengchao A; Dai, Juncheng; Ma, Hongxia; Jin, Guangfu; Song, Bao; Wang, Zhehai; Cheng, Sensen; Li, Xuelian; Ren, Yangwu; Cui, Ping; Iwasaki, Motoki; Shimazu, Taichi; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Zhu, Junjie; Jiang, Gening; Fei, Ke; Wu, Guoping; Chien, Li-Hsin; Chen, Hui-Ling; Su, Yu-Chun; Tsai, Fang-Yu; Chen, Yi-Song; Yu, Jinming; Stevens, Victoria L; Laird-Offringa, Ite A; Marconett, Crystal N; Lin, Dongxin; Chen, Kexin; Wu, Yi-Long; Landi, Maria Teresa; Shen, Hongbing; Rothman, Nathaniel; Kohno, Takashi; Chanock, Stephen J; Lan, Qing

    2016-12-26

    To evaluate associations by EGFR mutation status for lung adenocarcinoma risk among never-smoking Asian women, we conducted a meta-analysis of 11 loci previously identified in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Genotyping in an additional 10,780 never-smoking cases and 10,938 never-smoking controls from Asia confirmed associations with eight known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Two new signals were observed at genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10(-8)), namely, rs7216064 (17q24.3, BPTF), for overall lung adenocarcinoma risk, and rs3817963 (6p21.3, BTNL2) which is specific to cases with EGFR mutations. In further sub-analyses by EGFR status, rs9387478 (ROS1/DCBLD1) and rs2179920 (HLA-DPB1) showed stronger estimated associations in EGFR-positive compared to EGFR-negative cases. Comparison of the overall associations with published results in Western populations revealed that the majority of these findings were distinct, underscoring the importance of distinct contributing factors for smoking and non-smoking lung cancer. Our results extend the catalogue of regions associated with lung adenocarcinoma in non-smoking Asian women and highlight the importance of how the germline could inform risk for specific tumour mutation patterns, which could have important translational implications.

  2. Potential RNA Binding Proteins in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Identified as Suppressors of Temperature-Sensitive Mutations in Npl3

    PubMed Central

    Henry, M.; Borland, C. Z.; Bossie, M.; Silver, P. A.

    1996-01-01

    The NPL3 gene of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a protein with similarity to heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs). Npl3p has been implicated in many nuclear-related events including RNA export, protein import, and rRNA processing. Several temperature-sensitive alleles of NPL3 have been isolated. We now report the sequence of these alleles. For one allele, npl3-1, four complementation groups of suppressors have been isolated. The cognate genes for the two recessive mutants were cloned. One of these is the previously known RNA15, which, like NPL3, also encodes a protein with similarity to the vertebrate hnRNP A/B protein family. The other suppressor corresponds to a newly defined gene we term HRP1, which also encodes a protein with similarity to the hnRNP A/B proteins of vertebrates. Mutations in HRP1 suppress all npl3 temperature-sensitive alleles but do not bypass an npl3 null allele. We show that HRP1 is essential for cell growth and that the corresponding protein is located in the nucleus. The discovery of two hnRNP homologues that can partially suppress the function of Np13p, also an RNA binding protein, will be discussed in terms of the possible roles for Npl3p in RNA metabolism. PMID:8770588

  3. Functional analysis of three splicing mutations identified in the PMM2 gene: toward a new therapy for congenital disorder of glycosylation type Ia.

    PubMed

    Vega, Ana I; Pérez-Cerdá, Celia; Desviat, Lourdes R; Matthijs, Gert; Ugarte, Magdalena; Pérez, Belén

    2009-05-01

    The congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG) are a group of diseases caused by genetic defects affecting N-glycosylation. The most prevalent form of CDG-type Ia-is caused by defects in the PMM2 gene. This work reports the study of two new nucleotide changes (c.256-1G>C and c.640-9T>G) identified in the PMM2 gene in CDG1a patients, and of a previously described deep intronic nucleotide change in intron 7 (c.640-15479C>T). Cell-based splicing assays strongly suggest that all these are disease-causing splicing mutations. The c.256-1G>C mutation was found to cause the skipping of exons 3 and 4 in fibroblast cell lines and in a minigene expression system. The c.640-9T>G mutation was found responsible for the activation of a cryptic intronic splice-site in fibroblast cell lines and in a hybrid minigene when cotransfected with certain serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins. Finally, the deep intronic change c.640-15479C>T was found to be responsible for the activation of a pseudoexon sequence in intron 7. The use of morpholino oligonucleotides allowed the production of correctly spliced mRNA that was efficiently translated into functional and immunoreactive PMM protein. The present results suggest a novel mutation-specific approach for the treatment of this genetic disease (for which no effective treatment is yet available), and open up therapeutic possibilities for several genetic disorders in which deep intronic changes are seen.

  4. An efficient approach to identify ilvA mutations reveals an amino-terminal catalytic domain in biosynthetic threonine deaminase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, K E; Eisenstein, E

    1993-01-01

    High-level expression of the regulatory enzyme threonine deaminase in Escherichia coli strains grown on minimal medium that are deficient in the activities of enzymes needed for branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis result in growth inhibition, possibly because of the accumulation of toxic levels of alpha-ketobutyrate, the product of the committed step in isoleucine biosynthesis. This condition affords a means for selecting genetic variants of threonine deaminase that are deficient in catalysis by suppression of growth inhibition. Strains harboring mutations in ilvA that decreased the catalytic activity of threonine deaminase were found to grow more rapidly than isogenic strains containing wild-type ilvA. Modification of the ilvA gene to introduce additional unique, evenly spaced restriction enzyme sites facilitated the identification of suppressor mutations by enabling small DNA fragments to be subcloned for sequencing. The 10 mutations identified in ilvA code for enzymes with significantly reduced activity relative to that of wild-type threonine deaminase. Values for their specific activities range from 40% of that displayed by wild-type enzyme to complete inactivation as evidenced by failure to complement an ilvA deletion strain to isoleucine prototrophy. Moreover, some mutant enzymes showed altered allosteric properties with respect to valine activation and isoleucine inhibition. The location of the 10 mutations in the 5' two-thirds of the ilvA gene is consistent with suggestions that threonine deaminase is organized functionally with an amino-terminal domain that is involved in catalysis and a carboxy-terminal domain that is important for regulation. Images PMID:8407838

  5. Association of the widespread A149P hereditary fructose intolerance mutation with newly identified sequence polymorphisms in the aldolase B gene

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, C.C.; Tolan, D.R. )

    1993-04-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is a potentially fatal autosomal recessive disease resulting from the catalytic deficiency of fructose 1-phosphate aldolase (aldolase B) in fructose-metabolizing tissues. The A149P mutation in exon 5 of the aldolase B gene, located on chromosome 9q2l.3-q22.2, is widespread and the most common HFI mutation, accounting for 57% of HFI chromosomes. The possible origin of this mutation was studied by linkage to polymorphisms within the aldolase B gene. DNA fragments of the aldolase B gene containing the polymorphic marker loci from HFI patients homozygous for the A149P allele were amplified by PCR. Absolute linkage to a common Pvull RFLP allele was observed in 10 A149P homozygotes. In a more informative study, highly heterozygous polymorphisms were detected by direct sequence determination of a PCR-amplified aldolase B gene fragment. Two two-allele, single-base-pair polymorphisms, themselves in absolute linkage disequilibrium, in intron 8 (C at nucleotide 84 and A at nucleotide 105, or T at 84 and G at 105) of the aldolase B gene were identified. Mendelian segregation of these polymorphisms was confirmed in three families. Allele-specific oligonucleotide (ASO) hybridizations with probes for both sequence polymorphisms showed that 47% of 32 unrelated individuals were heterozygous at these loci; the calculated PIC value was .37. Finally, ASO hybridizations of PCR-amplified DNA from 15 HFI patients homozygous for the A149P allele with probes for these sequence polymorphisms revealed absolute linkage disequilibrium between the A149P mutation and the 84T/105G allele. These results are consistent with a single origin of the A149P allele and subsequent spread by genetic drift. 32 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. DNA Methylation Identifies Loci Distinguishing Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer Without Germ-Line MLH1/MSH2 Mutation from Sporadic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chung-Hsing; Sheng Jiang, Shih; Hsieh, Ling-Ling; Tang, Reiping; Hsiung, Chao A; Tsai, Hui-Ju; Chang, I-Shou

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Roughly half of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) cases are Lynch syndrome and exhibit germ-line mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes; the other half are familial colorectal cancer (CRC) type X (FCCTX) and are MMR proficient. About 70% of Lynch syndrome tumors have germ-line MLH1 or MSH2 mutations. The clinical presentation, histopathological features, and carcinogenesis of FCCTX resemble those of sporadic MMR-proficient colorectal tumors. It is of interest to obtain biomarkers that distinguish FCCTX from sporadic microsatellite stable (MSS) CRC, to develop preventive strategies. Methods: The tumors and adjacent normal tissues of 40 patients with HNPCC were assayed using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation27 (HM27) BeadChip to assess the DNA methylation level at about 27,000 loci. The germ-line mutation status of MLH1 and MSH2 and the microsatellite instability status in these patients were obtained. Genome-wide DNA methylation measurements of three groups of patients with general CRC were downloaded from public domain databases. Probes with DNA methylation levels that differed significantly between patients with sporadic MSS CRC and FCCTX were examined, to explore their potential as biomarkers. Results: We found that MSS HNPCC tumors were overwhelmingly hypomethylated compared with those from patient groups with other types of CRC, including germ-line MLH1/MSH2-mutated HNPCC and sporadic MSS CRC. Five gene-marker panels that exhibited a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity higher than 90% in both discovery and validation cohorts were proposed to distinguish MSS HNPCC tumors from sporadic MSS CRC. Conclusions: Our results warrant further investigation and validation. The loci identified here may become useful biomarkers for distinguishing between FCCTX and sporadic MSS CRC tumors. PMID:27977020

  7. Whole-exome sequencing identifies homozygous AFG3L2 mutations in a spastic ataxia-neuropathy syndrome linked to mitochondrial m-AAA proteases.

    PubMed

    Pierson, Tyler Mark; Adams, David; Bonn, Florian; Martinelli, Paola; Cherukuri, Praveen F; Teer, Jamie K; Hansen, Nancy F; Cruz, Pedro; Mullikin For The Nisc Comparative Sequencing Program, James C; Blakesley, Robert W; Golas, Gretchen; Kwan, Justin; Sandler, Anthony; Fuentes Fajardo, Karin; Markello, Thomas; Tifft, Cynthia; Blackstone, Craig; Rugarli, Elena I; Langer, Thomas; Gahl, William A; Toro, Camilo

    2011-10-01

    We report an early onset spastic ataxia-neuropathy syndrome in two brothers of a consanguineous family characterized clinically by lower extremity spasticity, peripheral neuropathy, ptosis, oculomotor apraxia, dystonia, cerebellar atrophy, and progressive myoclonic epilepsy. Whole-exome sequencing identified a homozygous missense mutation (c.1847G>A; p.Y616C) in AFG3L2, encoding a subunit of an m-AAA protease. m-AAA proteases reside in the mitochondrial inner membrane and are responsible for removal of damaged or misfolded proteins and proteolytic activation of essential mitochondrial proteins. AFG3L2 forms either a homo-oligomeric isoenzyme or a hetero-oligomeric complex with paraplegin, a homologous protein mutated in hereditary spastic paraplegia type 7 (SPG7). Heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in AFG3L2 cause autosomal-dominant spinocerebellar ataxia type 28 (SCA28), a disorder whose phenotype is strikingly different from that of our patients. As defined in yeast complementation assays, the AFG3L2(Y616C) gene product is a hypomorphic variant that exhibited oligomerization defects in yeast as well as in patient fibroblasts. Specifically, the formation of AFG3L2(Y616C) complexes was impaired, both with itself and to a greater extent with paraplegin. This produced an early-onset clinical syndrome that combines the severe phenotypes of SPG7 and SCA28, in additional to other "mitochondrial" features such as oculomotor apraxia, extrapyramidal dysfunction, and myoclonic epilepsy. These findings expand the phenotype associated with AFG3L2 mutations and suggest that AFG3L2-related disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of spastic ataxias.

  8. An RNA-seq Protocol to Identify mRNA Expression Changes in Mouse Diaphyseal Bone: Applications in Mice with Bone Property Altering Lrp5 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ayturk, Ugur M.; Jacobsen, Christina M.; Christodoulou, Danos C.; Gorham, Joshua; Seidman, Jonathan G.; Seidman, Christine E.; Robling, Alexander G.; Warman, Matthew L.

    2013-01-01

    Loss-of-function and certain missense mutations in the Wnt co-receptor LRP5 significantly decrease or increase bone mass, respectively. These human skeletal phenotypes have been recapitulated in mice harboring Lrp5 knockout and knockin mutations. We hypothesized that measuring mRNA expression in diaphyseal bone from mice with Lrp5 wild-type (Lrp5+/+), knockout (Lrp5−/−), and high bone mass (HBM)-causing (Lrp5p.A214V/+) alleles could identify genes and pathways that regulate or are regulated by LRP5 activity. We performed RNA-seq on pairs of tibial diaphyseal bones from four 16-week-old mice with each of the aforementioned genotypes. We then evaluated different methods for controlling for contaminating non-skeletal tissue (i.e., blood, bone marrow, and skeletal muscle) in our data. These methods included pre-digestion of diaphyseal bone with collagenase and separate transcriptional profiling of blood, skeletal muscle and bone marrow. We found that collagenase digestion reduced contamination, but also altered gene expression in the remaining cells. In contrast, in silico filtering of the diaphyseal bone RNA-seq data for highly expressed blood, skeletal muscle, and bone marrow transcripts significantly increased the correlation between RNA-seq data from an animal’s right and left tibiae and from animals with the same Lrp5 genotype. We conclude that reliable and reproducible RNA-seq data can be obtained from mouse diaphyseal bone and that lack of LRP5 has a more pronounced effect on gene expression than the HBM-causing LRP5 missense mutation. We identified 84 differentially expressed protein-coding transcripts between LRP5 “sufficient” (i.e., Lrp5+/+ and Lrp5p.A214V/+) and “insufficient” (Lrp5−/−) diaphyseal bone, and far fewer differentially expressed genes between Lrp5p.A214V/+ and Lrp5+/+ diaphyseal bone. PMID:23553928

  9. Severe vascular calcification and tumoral calcinosis in a family with hyperphosphatemia: a fibroblast growth factor 23 mutation identified by exome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Anuja; Miller, Clinton J.; Nast, Cynthia C.; Adams, Mark D.; Truitt, Barbara; Tayek, John A.; Tong, Lili; Mehtani, Parag; Monteon, Francisco; Sedor, John R.; Clinkenbeard, Erica L.; White, Kenneth; Mehrotra, Rajnish; LaPage, Janine; Dickson, Patricia; Adler, Sharon G.; Iyengar, Sudha K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Tumoral calcinosis is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by ectopic calcification and hyperphosphatemia. Methods We describe a family with tumoral calcinosis requiring amputations. The predominant metabolic anomaly identified in three affected family members was hyperphosphatemia. Biochemical and phenotypic analysis of 13 kindred members, together with exome analysis of 6 members, was performed. Results We identified a novel Q67K mutation in fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), segregating with a null (deletion) allele on the other FGF23 homologue in three affected members. Affected siblings had high circulating plasma C-terminal FGF23 levels, but undetectable intact FGF23 or N-terminal FGF23, leading to loss of FGF23 function. Conclusions This suggests that in human, as in experimental models, severe prolonged hyperphosphatemia may be sufficient to produce bone differentiation proteins in vascular cells, and vascular calcification severe enough to require amputation. Genetic modifiers may contribute to the phenotypic variation within and between families. PMID:25378588

  10. Whole-genome sequencing identifies emergence of a quinolone resistance mutation in a case of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Pak, Theodore R; Altman, Deena R; Attie, Oliver; Sebra, Robert; Hamula, Camille L; Lewis, Martha; Deikus, Gintaras; Newman, Leah C; Fang, Gang; Hand, Jonathan; Patel, Gopi; Wallach, Fran; Schadt, Eric E; Huprikar, Shirish; van Bakel, Harm; Kasarskis, Andrew; Bashir, Ali

    2015-11-01

    Whole-genome sequences for Stenotrophomonas maltophilia serial isolates from a bacteremic patient before and after development of levofloxacin resistance were assembled de novo and differed by one single-nucleotide variant in smeT, a repressor for multidrug efflux operon smeDEF. Along with sequenced isolates from five contemporaneous cases, they displayed considerable diversity compared against all published complete genomes. Whole-genome sequencing and complete assembly can conclusively identify resistance mechanisms emerging in S. maltophilia strains during clinical therapy.

  11. Whole-Genome Sequencing Identifies Emergence of a Quinolone Resistance Mutation in a Case of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Altman, Deena R.; Attie, Oliver; Sebra, Robert; Hamula, Camille L.; Lewis, Martha; Deikus, Gintaras; Newman, Leah C.; Fang, Gang; Hand, Jonathan; Patel, Gopi; Wallach, Fran; Schadt, Eric E.; Huprikar, Shirish; van Bakel, Harm; Bashir, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Whole-genome sequences for Stenotrophomonas maltophilia serial isolates from a bacteremic patient before and after development of levofloxacin resistance were assembled de novo and differed by one single-nucleotide variant in smeT, a repressor for multidrug efflux operon smeDEF. Along with sequenced isolates from five contemporaneous cases, they displayed considerable diversity compared against all published complete genomes. Whole-genome sequencing and complete assembly can conclusively identify resistance mechanisms emerging in S. maltophilia strains during clinical therapy. PMID:26324280

  12. Exome Sequencing Identifies Compound Heterozygous Mutations in SCN5A Associated with Congenital Complete Heart Block in the Thai Population

    PubMed Central

    Thongnak, Chuphong; Tangviriyapaiboon, Duangkamol; Silvilairat, Suchaya; Puangpetch, Apichaya; Pasomsub, Ekawat

    2016-01-01

    Background. Congenital heart block is characterized by blockage of electrical impulses from the atrioventricular node (AV node) to the ventricles. This blockage can be caused by ion channel impairment that is the result of genetic variation. This study aimed to investigate the possible causative variants in a Thai family with complete heart block by using whole exome sequencing. Methods. Genomic DNA was collected from a family consisting of five family members in three generations in which one of three children in generation III had complete heart block. Whole exome sequencing was performed on one complete heart block affected child and one unaffected sibling. Bioinformatics was used to identify annotated and filtered variants. Candidate variants were validated and the segregation analysis of other family members was performed. Results. This study identified compound heterozygous variants, c.101G>A and c.3832G>A, in the SCN5A gene and c.28730C>T in the TTN gene. Conclusions. Compound heterozygous variants in the SCN5A gene were found in the complete heart block affected child but these two variants were found only in the this affected sibling and were not found in other unaffected family members. Hence, these variants in the SCN5A gene were the most possible disease-causing variants in this family. PMID:28018021

  13. Genome-Wide Association Study in BRCA1 Mutation Carriers Identifies Novel Loci Associated with Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xianshu; McGuffog, Lesley; Lee, Andrew; Olswold, Curtis; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Fredericksen, Zachary; Barrowdale, Daniel; Dennis, Joe; Gaudet, Mia M.; Dicks, Ed; Kosel, Matthew; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Lee, Adam; Bacot, François; Vincent, Daniel; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Peock, Susan; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Jakubowska, Anna; Investigators, kConFab; Radice, Paolo; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Domchek, Susan M.; Piedmonte, Marion; Singer, Christian F.; Friedman, Eitan; Thomassen, Mads; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Szabo, Csilla I.; Blanco, Ignacio; Greene, Mark H.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Garber, Judy; Phelan, Catherine M.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Montagna, Marco; Olah, Edith; Andrulis, Irene L.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Goldgar, David E.; Caldes, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Osorio, Ana; Terry, Mary Beth; Daly, Mary B.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Hamann, Ute; Ramus, Susan J.; Ewart Toland, Amanda; Caligo, Maria A.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Tung, Nadine; Claes, Kathleen; Beattie, Mary S.; Southey, Melissa C.; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Tischkowitz, Marc; Janavicius, Ramunas; John, Esther M.; Kwong, Ava; Diez, Orland; Balmaña, Judith; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Arun, Banu K.; Rennert, Gad; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A.; Campbell, Ian; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Gille, Johannes J. P.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Blok, Marinus J.; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.; Rookus, Matti A.; Devilee, Peter; Verhoef, Senno; van Os, Theo A. M.; Wijnen, Juul T.; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve; Fineberg, Elena; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Adlard, Julian; Eccles, Diana M.; Cook, Jackie; Brewer, Carole; Douglas, Fiona; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Side, Lucy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Houghton, Catherine; Rogers, Mark T.; Dorkins, Huw; Eason, Jacqueline; Gregory, Helen; McCann, Emma; Murray, Alex; Calender, Alain; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Delnatte, Capucine; Nogues, Catherine; Lasset, Christine; Houdayer, Claude; Leroux, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Prieur, Fabienne; Damiola, Francesca; Sobol, Hagay; Coupier, Isabelle; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Castera, Laurent; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Léoné, Mélanie; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Złowocka-Perłowska, Elżbieta; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Huzarski, Tomasz; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Viel, Alessandra; Peissel, Bernard; Bonanni, Bernardo; Melloni, Giulia; Ottini, Laura; Papi, Laura; Varesco, Liliana; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Peterlongo, Paolo; Volorio, Sara; Manoukian, Siranoush; Pensotti, Valeria; Arnold, Norbert; Engel, Christoph; Deissler, Helmut; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Gehrig, Andrea; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Meindl, Alfons; Niederacher, Dieter; Ditsch, Nina; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Engert, Stefanie; Sutter, Christian; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Weber, Bernhard H. F.; Arver, Brita; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Loman, Niklas; Rosenquist, Richard; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Blank, Stephanie V.; Cohn, David E.; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Small, Laurie; Friedlander, Michael; Bae-Jump, Victoria L.; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Rappaport, Christine; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Lindor, Noralane M.; Kaufman, Bella; Shimon Paluch, Shani; Laitman, Yael; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Moeller, Sanne Traasdahl; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Vijai, Joseph; Sarrel, Kara; Robson, Mark; Kauff, Noah; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Ejlertsen, Bent; Nielsen, Finn C.; Jønson, Lars; Andersen, Mette K.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Steele, Linda; Foretova, Lenka; Teulé, Alex; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Mai, Phuong L.; Loud, Jennifer T.; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Narod, Steven A.; Herzog, Josef; Sand, Sharon R.; Tognazzo, Silvia; Agata, Simona; Vaszko, Tibor; Weaver, Joellen; Stavropoulou, Alexandra V.; Buys, Saundra S.; Romero, Atocha; de la Hoya, Miguel; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Muranen, Taru A.; Duran, Mercedes; Chung, Wendy K.; Lasa, Adriana; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; Miron, Alexander; Benitez, Javier; Senter, Leigha; Huo, Dezheng; Chan, Salina B.; Sokolenko, Anna P.; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Tihomirova, Laima; Friebel, Tara M.; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Lu, Karen H.; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; James, Paul A.; Hall, Per; Dunning, Alison M.; Tessier, Daniel; Cunningham, Julie; Slager, Susan L.; Wang, Chen; Hart, Steven; Stevens, Kristen; Simard, Jacques; Pastinen, Tomi; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Offit, Kenneth; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    2013-01-01

    BRCA1-associated breast and ovarian cancer risks can be modified by common genetic variants. To identify further cancer risk-modifying loci, we performed a multi-stage GWAS of 11,705 BRCA1 carriers (of whom 5,920 were diagnosed with breast and 1,839 were diagnosed with ovarian cancer), with a further replication in an additional sample of 2,646 BRCA1 carriers. We identified a novel breast cancer risk modifier locus at 1q32 for BRCA1 carriers (rs2290854, P = 2.7×10−8, HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.09–1.20). In addition, we identified two novel ovarian cancer risk modifier loci: 17q21.31 (rs17631303, P = 1.4×10−8, HR = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.17–1.38) and 4q32.3 (rs4691139, P = 3.4×10−8, HR = 1.20, 95% CI: 1.17–1.38). The 4q32.3 locus was not associated with ovarian cancer risk in the general population or BRCA2 carriers, suggesting a BRCA1-specific association. The 17q21.31 locus was also associated with ovarian cancer risk in 8,211 BRCA2 carriers (P = 2×10−4). These loci may lead to an improved understanding of the etiology of breast and ovarian tumors in BRCA1 carriers. Based on the joint distribution of the known BRCA1 breast cancer risk-modifying loci, we estimated that the breast cancer lifetime risks for the 5% of BRCA1 carriers at lowest risk are 28%–50% compared to 81%–100% for the 5% at highest risk. Similarly, based on the known ovarian cancer risk-modifying loci, the 5% of BRCA1 carriers at lowest risk have an estimated lifetime risk of developing ovarian cancer of 28% or lower, whereas the 5% at highest risk will have a risk of 63% or higher. Such differences in risk may have important implications for risk prediction and clinical management for BRCA1 carriers. PMID:23544013

  14. Genome-wide association study in BRCA1 mutation carriers identifies novel loci associated with breast and ovarian cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Couch, Fergus J; Wang, Xianshu; McGuffog, Lesley; Lee, Andrew; Olswold, Curtis; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Soucy, Penny; Fredericksen, Zachary; Barrowdale, Daniel; Dennis, Joe; Gaudet, Mia M; Dicks, Ed; Kosel, Matthew; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Lee, Adam; Bacot, François; Vincent, Daniel; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Peock, Susan; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Jakubowska, Anna; Radice, Paolo; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Domchek, Susan M; Piedmonte, Marion; Singer, Christian F; Friedman, Eitan; Thomassen, Mads; Hansen, Thomas V O; Neuhausen, Susan L; Szabo, Csilla I; Blanco, Ignacio; Greene, Mark H; Karlan, Beth Y; Garber, Judy; Phelan, Catherine M; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Montagna, Marco; Olah, Edith; Andrulis, Irene L; Godwin, Andrew K; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Goldgar, David E; Caldes, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Osorio, Ana; Terry, Mary Beth; Daly, Mary B; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Hamann, Ute; Ramus, Susan J; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Caligo, Maria A; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Tung, Nadine; Claes, Kathleen; Beattie, Mary S; Southey, Melissa C; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Tischkowitz, Marc; Janavicius, Ramunas; John, Esther M; Kwong, Ava; Diez, Orland; Balmaña, Judith; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Arun, Banu K; Rennert, Gad; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A; Campbell, Ian; van der Hout, Annemarie H; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; Seynaeve, Caroline; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; Gille, Johannes J P; Ausems, Margreet G E M; Blok, Marinus J; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L; Rookus, Matti A; Devilee, Peter; Verhoef, Senno; van Os, Theo A M; Wijnen, Juul T; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve; Fineberg, Elena; Platte, Radka; Evans, D Gareth; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Rosalind A; Adlard, Julian; Eccles, Diana M; Cook, Jackie; Brewer, Carole; Douglas, Fiona; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J; Side, Lucy E; Donaldson, Alan; Houghton, Catherine; Rogers, Mark T; Dorkins, Huw; Eason, Jacqueline; Gregory, Helen; McCann, Emma; Murray, Alex; Calender, Alain; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Delnatte, Capucine; Nogues, Catherine; Lasset, Christine; Houdayer, Claude; Leroux, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Prieur, Fabienne; Damiola, Francesca; Sobol, Hagay; Coupier, Isabelle; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Castera, Laurent; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Léoné, Mélanie; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Złowocka-Perłowska, Elżbieta; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Huzarski, Tomasz; Spurdle, Amanda B; Viel, Alessandra; Peissel, Bernard; Bonanni, Bernardo; Melloni, Giulia; Ottini, Laura; Papi, Laura; Varesco, Liliana; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Peterlongo, Paolo; Volorio, Sara; Manoukian, Siranoush; Pensotti, Valeria; Arnold, Norbert; Engel, Christoph; Deissler, Helmut; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Gehrig, Andrea; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Meindl, Alfons; Niederacher, Dieter; Ditsch, Nina; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Engert, Stefanie; Sutter, Christian; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Weber, Bernhard H F; Arver, Brita; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Loman, Niklas; Rosenquist, Richard; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Nathanson, Katherine L; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Blank, Stephanie V; Cohn, David E; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Small, Laurie; Friedlander, Michael; Bae-Jump, Victoria L; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Rappaport, Christine; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Lindor, Noralane M; Kaufman, Bella; Shimon Paluch, Shani; Laitman, Yael; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Moeller, Sanne Traasdahl; Kruse, Torben A; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Vijai, Joseph; Sarrel, Kara; Robson, Mark; Kauff, Noah; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Ejlertsen, Bent; Nielsen, Finn C; Jønson, Lars; Andersen, Mette K; Ding, Yuan Chun; Steele, Linda; Foretova, Lenka; Teulé, Alex; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Mai, Phuong L; Loud, Jennifer T; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Narod, Steven A; Herzog, Josef; Sand, Sharon R; Tognazzo, Silvia; Agata, Simona; Vaszko, Tibor; Weaver, Joellen; Stavropoulou, Alexandra V; Buys, Saundra S; Romero, Atocha; de la Hoya, Miguel; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Muranen, Taru A; Duran, Mercedes; Chung, Wendy K; Lasa, Adriana; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Miron, Alexander; Benitez, Javier; Senter, Leigha; Huo, Dezheng; Chan, Salina B; Sokolenko, Anna P; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Tihomirova, Laima; Friebel, Tara M; Agnarsson, Bjarni A; Lu, Karen H; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; James, Paul A; Hall, Per; Dunning, Alison M; Tessier, Daniel; Cunningham, Julie; Slager, Susan L; Wang, Chen; Hart, Steven; Stevens, Kristen; Simard, Jacques; Pastinen, Tomi; Pankratz, Vernon S; Offit, Kenneth; Easton, Douglas F; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C

    2013-01-01

    BRCA1-associated breast and ovarian cancer risks can be modified by common genetic variants. To identify further cancer risk-modifying loci, we performed a multi-stage GWAS of 11,705 BRCA1 carriers (of whom 5,920 were diagnosed with breast and 1,839 were diagnosed with ovarian cancer), with a further replication in an additional sample of 2,646 BRCA1 carriers. We identified a novel breast cancer risk modifier locus at 1q32 for BRCA1 carriers (rs2290854, P = 2.7 × 10(-8), HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.09-1.20). In addition, we identified two novel ovarian cancer risk modifier loci: 17q21.31 (rs17631303, P = 1.4 × 10(-8), HR = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.17-1.38) and 4q32.3 (rs4691139, P = 3.4 × 10(-8), HR = 1.20, 95% CI: 1.17-1.38). The 4q32.3 locus was not associated with ovarian cancer risk in the general population or BRCA2 carriers, suggesting a BRCA1-specific association. The 17q21.31 locus was also associated with ovarian cancer risk in 8,211 BRCA2 carriers (P = 2×10(-4)). These loci may lead to an improved understanding of the etiology of breast and ovarian tumors in BRCA1 carriers. Based on the joint distribution of the known BRCA1 breast cancer risk-modifying loci, we estimated that the breast cancer lifetime risks for the 5% of BRCA1 carriers at lowest risk are 28%-50% compared to 81%-100% for the 5% at highest risk. Similarly, based on the known ovarian cancer risk-modifying loci, the 5% of BRCA1 carriers at lowest risk have an estimated lifetime risk of developing ovarian cancer of 28% or lower, whereas the 5% at highest risk will have a risk of 63% or higher. Such differences in risk may have important implications for risk prediction and clinical management for BRCA1 carriers.

  15. Intellectual disability and non-compaction cardiomyopathy with a de novo NONO mutation identified by exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Reinstein, Eyal; Tzur, Shay; Cohen, Rony; Bormans, Concetta; Behar, Doron M

    2016-11-01

    Pathogenic variants in the NONO gene have been most recently implicated in X-linked intellectual disability syndrome. This observation has been supported by studies of NONO-deficient mice showing that NONO has an important role in regulating inhibitory synaptic activity. Thus far, the phenotypic spectrum of affected patients remains limited. We applied whole exome sequencing to members of a family in which the proband was presented with a complex phenotype consisting of developmental delay, dysmorphism, and non-compaction cardiomyopathy. Exome analysis identified a novel de novo splice-site variant c.1171+1G>T in exon 11 of NONO gene that is suspected to abolish the donor splicing site. Thus, we propose that the phenotypic spectrum of NONO-related disorder is much broader than described and that pathogenic variants in NONO cause a recognizable phenotype.

  16. Genomics and drug profiling of fatal TCF3-HLF-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia identifies recurrent mutation patterns and therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    Bornhauser, Beat; Gombert, Michael; Kratsch, Christina; Stütz, Adrian M.; Sultan, Marc; Tchinda, Joelle; Worth, Catherine L.; Amstislavskiy, Vyacheslav; Badarinarayan, Nandini; Baruchel, André; Bartram, Thies; Basso, Giuseppe; Canpolat, Cengiz; Cario, Gunnar; Cavé, Hélène; Dakaj, Dardane; Delorenzi, Mauro; Dobay, Maria Pamela; Eckert, Cornelia; Ellinghaus, Eva; Eugster, Sabrina; Frismantas, Viktoras; Ginzel, Sebastian; Haas, Oskar A.; Heidenreich, Olaf; Hemmrich-Stanisak, Georg; Hezaveh, Kebria; Höll, Jessica I.; Hornhardt, Sabine; Husemann, Peter; Kachroo, Priyadarshini; Kratz, Christian P.; te Kronnie, Geertruy; Marovca, Blerim; Niggli, Felix; McHardy, Alice C.; Moorman, Anthony V.; Panzer-Grümayer, Renate; Petersen, Britt S.; Raeder, Benjamin; Ralser, Meryem; Rosenstiel, Philip; Schäfer, Daniel; Schrappe, Martin; Schreiber, Stefan; Schütte, Moritz; Stade, Björn; Thiele, Ralf; von der Weid, Nicolas; Vora, Ajay; Zaliova, Marketa; Zhang, Langhui; Zichner, Thomas; Zimmermann, Martin; Lehrach, Hans; Borkhardt, Arndt; Bourquin, Jean-Pierre; Franke, Andre; Korbel, Jan O.; Stanulla, Martin; Yaspo, Marie-Laure

    2015-01-01

    TCF3-HLF-fusion positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is currently incurable. Employing an integrated approach, we uncovered distinct mutation, gene expression, and drug response profiles in TCF3-HLF-positive and treatment-responsive TCF3-PBX1-positive ALL. Recurrent intragenic deletions of PAX5 or VPREB1 were identified in constellation with TCF3-HLF. Moreover somatic mutations in the non-translocated allele of TCF3 and a reduction of PAX5 gene dosage in TCF3-HLF ALL suggest cooperation within a restricted genetic context. The enrichment for stem cell and myeloid features in the TCF3-HLF signature may reflect reprogramming by TCF3-HLF of a lymphoid-committed cell of origin towards a hybrid, drug-resistant hematopoietic state. Drug response profiling of matched patient-derived xenografts revealed a distinct profile for TCF3-HLF ALL with resistance to conventional chemotherapeutics, but sensitivity towards glucocorticoids, anthracyclines and agents in clinical development. Striking on-target sensitivity was achieved with the BCL2-specific inhibitor venetoclax (ABT-199). This integrated approach thus provides alternative treatment options for this deadly disease. PMID:26214592

  17. Targeted next-generation sequencing identifies novel compound heterozygous mutations of DYNC2H1 in a fetus with short rib-polydactyly syndrome, type III.

    PubMed

    Mei, Libin; Huang, Yanru; Pan, Qian; Su, Wei; Quan, Yi; Liang, Desheng; Wu, Lingqian

    2015-07-20

    A 26-year-old woman with a past history of fetal skeletal dysplasia was referred to our institution at 24weeks of gestation following a routine sonographic diagnosis of short limbs in the fetus. A fetal ultrasound showed short limbs, a narrow thorax, short ribs with marginal spurs, and polydactyly. Conventional cytogenetics analysis of cultured amniocytes demonstrated that the fetal karyotype was normal. Using targeted exome sequencing of 226 known genes implicated in inherited skeletal dysplasia, we identified compound heterozygous mutations in the DYNC2H1 gene in the fetus with short rib-polydactyly syndrome, type III (SRPS III), c.1151 C>T(p.Ala384Val) and c.4351 C>T (p.Gln1451*), which were inherited from paternally and maternally, respectively. These variants were further confirmed using Sanger sequencing and have not been previously reported. To our knowledge, this is the first report of DYNC2H1 mutations causing SRPS III, in the Chinese population. Our findings expand the number of reported cases of this rare disease, and indicate that targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) is an accurate, rapid, and cost-effective method in the genetic diagnosis of fetal skeletal dysplasia.

  18. Oral and craniofacial manifestations and two novel missense mutations of the NTRK1 gene identified in the patient with congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Li; Guo, Hao; Ye, Nan; Bai, Yudi; Liu, Xin; Yu, Ping; Xue, Yang; Ma, Shufang; Wei, Kewen; Jin, Yan; Wen, Lingying; Xuan, Kun

    2013-01-01

    Congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis (CIPA) is a rare inherited disorder of the peripheral nervous system resulting from mutations in neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor 1 gene (NTRK1), which encodes the high-affinity nerve growth factor receptor TRKA. Here, we investigated the oral and craniofacial manifestations of a Chinese patient affected by autosomal-recessive CIPA and identified compound heterozygosity in the NTRK1 gene. The affected boy has multisystemic disorder with lack of reaction to pain stimuli accompanied by self-mutilation behavior, the inability to sweat leading to defective thermoregulation, and mental retardation. Oral and craniofacial manifestations included a large number of missing teeth, nasal malformation, submucous cleft palate, severe soft tissue injuries, dental caries and malocclusion. Histopathological evaluation of the skin sample revealed severe peripheral nerve fiber loss as well as mild loss and absent innervation of sweat glands. Ultrastructural and morphometric studies of a shed tooth revealed dental abnormalities, including hypomineralization, dentin hypoplasia, cementogenesis defects and a dysplastic periodontal ligament. Genetic analysis revealed a compound heterozygosity--c.1561T>C and c.2057G>A in the NTRK1 gene. This report extends the spectrum of NTRK1 mutations observed in patients diagnosed with CIPA and provides additional insight for clinical and molecular diagnosis.

  19. [A woman with beta-propeller protein-associated neurodegeneration identified by the WDR45 mutation presenting as Rett-like syndrome in childhood].

    PubMed

    Morisada, Naoya; Tsuneishi, Syuichi; Taguchi, Kazuhiro; Yagi, Ryuzaburo; Nishiyama, Masahiro; Toyoshima, Daisaku; Nakagawa, Taku; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Takada, Satoshi; Iijima, Kazumoto

    2016-05-01

    Beta-propeller protein-associated neurodegeneration (BPAN) is one of the neurodegenerative disorders characterized by iron deposition in the brain and is the only known disease in humans to be caused by an aberration in autophagocytosis. Here, we present the case of a 42-year-old woman with BPAN identified by the WDR45 mutation. From early childhood, she was recognized as having global developmental delay, and she frequently sucked her hand, which was considered to be a stereotypical movement. She had a febrile convulsion at 6 months of age but there was no history of epilepsy. The delay in language development was more severe than the delay in motor development; she was able to dress herself, walk unaided, and follow simple instructions until adolescence. After the age of 20, her movement ability rapidly declined. By the time she was 42 years old, she was bedridden and unable to communicate. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 21 years revealed no abnormality except non-specific cerebral atrophy. However, MRI at 39 years revealed abnormalities in the globus pallidus and substantia nigra, with neurodegeneration and iron accumulation in the brain. Genetic analysis for WDR45 revealed that she had a splice site mutation (NM_007075.3: c.830 + 2 T > C) which was previously reported, and a diagnosis of BPAN was confirmed. For specific therapies to be developed for BPAN in the future, it is necessary to establish early diagnosis, including genetic analysis.

  20. Exome sequencing and CRISPR/Cas genome editing identify mutations of ZAK as a cause of limb defects in humans and mice.

    PubMed

    Spielmann, Malte; Kakar, Naseebullah; Tayebi, Naeimeh; Leettola, Catherine; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Sowada, Nadine; Lupiáñez, Darío G; Harabula, Izabela; Flöttmann, Ricarda; Horn, Denise; Chan, Wing Lee; Wittler, Lars; Yilmaz, Rüstem; Altmüller, Janine; Thiele, Holger; van Bokhoven, Hans; Schwartz, Charles E; Nürnberg, Peter; Bowie, James U; Ahmad, Jamil; Kubisch, Christian; Mundlos, Stefan; Borck, Guntram

    2016-02-01

    The CRISPR/Cas technology enables targeted genome editing and the rapid generation of transgenic animal models for the study of human genetic disorders. Here we describe an autosomal recessive human disease in two unrelated families characterized by a split-foot defect, nail abnormalities of the hands, and hearing loss, due to mutations disrupting the SAM domain of the protein kinase ZAK. ZAK is a member of the MAPKKK family with no known role in limb development. We show that Zak is expressed in the developing limbs and that a CRISPR/Cas-mediated knockout of the two Zak isoforms is embryonically lethal in mice. In contrast, a deletion of the SAM domain induces a complex hindlimb defect associated with down-regulation of Trp63, a known split-hand/split-foot malformation disease gene. Our results identify ZAK as a key player in mammalian limb patterning and demonstrate the rapid utility of CRISPR/Cas genome editing to assign causality to human mutations in the mouse in <10 wk.

  1. Exome sequencing and CRISPR/Cas genome editing identify mutations of ZAK as a cause of limb defects in humans and mice

    PubMed Central

    Spielmann, Malte; Kakar, Naseebullah; Tayebi, Naeimeh; Leettola, Catherine; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Sowada, Nadine; Lupiáñez, Darío G.; Harabula, Izabela; Flöttmann, Ricarda; Horn, Denise; Chan, Wing Lee; Wittler, Lars; Yilmaz, Rüstem; Altmüller, Janine; Thiele, Holger; van Bokhoven, Hans; Schwartz, Charles E.; Nürnberg, Peter; Bowie, James U.; Ahmad, Jamil; Kubisch, Christian; Mundlos, Stefan; Borck, Guntram

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas technology enables targeted genome editing and the rapid generation of transgenic animal models for the study of human genetic disorders. Here we describe an autosomal recessive human disease in two unrelated families characterized by a split-foot defect, nail abnormalities of the hands, and hearing loss, due to mutations disrupting the SAM domain of the protein kinase ZAK. ZAK is a member of the MAPKKK family with no known role in limb development. We show that Zak is expressed in the developing limbs and that a CRISPR/Cas-mediated knockout of the two Zak isoforms is embryonically lethal in mice. In contrast, a deletion of the SAM domain induces a complex hindlimb defect associated with down-regulation of Trp63, a known split-hand/split-foot malformation disease gene. Our results identify ZAK as a key player in mammalian limb patterning and demonstrate the rapid utility of CRISPR/Cas genome editing to assign causality to human mutations in the mouse in <10 wk. PMID:26755636

  2. Positional cloning and next-generation sequencing identified a TGM6 mutation in a large Chinese pedigree with acute myeloid leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Li-li; Huang, Yuan-mao; Wang, Min; Zhuang, Xiao-e; Luo, Dong-feng; Guo, Shi-cheng; Zhang, Zhi-shun; Huang, Qing; Lin, Sheng-long; Wang, Shao-yuan

    2015-01-01

    An inherited predisposition to acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is exceedingly rare, but the investigation of these families will aid in the delineation of the underlying mechanisms of the more common, sporadic cases. Three AML predisposition genes, RUNX1, CEBPA and GATA2, have been recognised, but the culprit genes in the majority of AML pedigrees remain obscure. We applied a combined strategy of linkage analysis and next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology in an autosomal-dominant AML Chinese family with 11 cases in four generations. A genome-wide linkage scan using a 500K SNP genotyping array was conducted to identify a previously unreported candidate region on 20p13 with a maximum multipoint heterogeneity LOD (HLOD) score of 3.56 (P=0.00005). Targeted NGS within this region and whole-exome sequencing (WES) revealed a missense mutation in TGM6 (RefSeq, NM_198994.2:c.1550T>G, p.(L517W)), which cosegregated with the phenotype in this family, and was absent in 530 healthy controls. The mutated amino acid was located in a highly conserved position, which may be deleterious and affect the activation of TGM6. Our results strongly support the candidacy of TGM6 as a novel familial AML-associated gene. PMID:24755948

  3. To the Root of the Curl: A Signature of a Recent Selective Sweep Identifies a Mutation That Defines the Cornish Rex Cat Breed

    PubMed Central

    Gandolfi, Barbara; Alhaddad, Hasan; Affolter, Verena K.; Brockman, Jeffrey; Haggstrom, Jens; Joslin, Shannon E. K.; Koehne, Amanda L.; Mullikin, James C.; Outerbridge, Catherine A.; Warren, Wesley C.; Lyons, Leslie A.

    2013-01-01

    The cat (Felis silvestris catus) shows significant variation in pelage, morphological, and behavioral phenotypes amongst its over 40 domesticated breeds. The majority of the breed specific phenotypic presentations originated through artificial selection, especially on desired novel phenotypic characteristics that arose only a few hundred years ago. Variations in coat texture and color of hair often delineate breeds amongst domestic animals. Although the genetic basis of several feline coat colors and hair lengths are characterized, less is known about the genes influencing variation in coat growth and texture, especially rexoid – curly coated types. Cornish Rex is a cat breed defined by a fixed recessive curly coat trait. Genome-wide analyses for selection (di, Tajima’s D and nucleotide diversity) were performed in the Cornish Rex breed and in 11 phenotypically diverse breeds and two random bred populations. Approximately 63K SNPs were used in the analysis that aimed to localize the locus controlling the rexoid hair texture. A region with a strong signature of recent selective sweep was identified in the Cornish Rex breed on chromosome A1, as well as a consensus block of homozygosity that spans approximately 3 Mb. Inspection of the region for candidate genes led to the identification of the lysophosphatidic acid receptor 6 (LPAR6). A 4 bp deletion in exon 5, c.250_253_delTTTG, which induces a premature stop codon in the receptor, was identified via Sanger sequencing. The mutation is fixed in Cornish Rex, absent in all straight haired cats analyzed, and is also segregating in the German Rex breed. LPAR6 encodes a G protein-coupled receptor essential for maintaining the structural integrity of the hair shaft; and has mutations resulting in a wooly hair phenotype in humans. PMID:23826204

  4. Discrimination of germline V genes at different sequencing lengths and mutational burdens: A new tool for identifying and evaluating the reliability of V gene assignment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bochao; Meng, Wenzhao; Prak, Eline T Luning; Hershberg, Uri

    2015-12-01

    Immune repertoires are collections of lymphocytes that express diverse antigen receptor gene rearrangements consisting of Variable (V), (Diversity (D) in the case of heavy chains) and Joining (J) gene segments. Clonally related cells typically share the same germline gene segments and have highly similar junctional sequences within their third complementarity determining regions. Identifying clonal relatedness of sequences is a key step in the analysis of immune repertoires. The V gene is the most important for clone identification because it has the longest sequence and the greatest number of sequence variants. However, accurate identification of a clone's germline V gene source is challenging because there is a high degree of similarity between different germline V genes. This difficulty is compounded in antibodies, which can undergo somatic hypermutation. Furthermore, high-throughput sequencing experiments often generate partial sequences and have significant error rates. To address these issues, we describe a novel method to estimate which germline V genes (or alleles) cannot be discriminated under different conditions (read lengths, sequencing errors or somatic hypermutation frequencies). Starting with any set of germline V genes, this method measures their similarity using different sequencing lengths and calculates their likelihood of unambiguous assignment under different levels of mutation. Hence, one can identify, under different experimental and biological conditions, the germline V genes (or alleles) that cannot be uniquely identified and bundle them together into groups of specific V genes with highly similar sequences.

  5. Systematic interpretation of molecular beacon PCR for identifying rpoB mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates with mixed resistant and susceptible bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Diana I.; Fisher-Hoch, Susan P.; Bordt, Andrea S.; Quitugua, Teresa N.; Robledo, Jaime; Alvarez, Nataly; Correa, Nidia; McCormick, Joseph B.; Restrepo, Blanca I.

    2010-01-01

    Detection of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), a frequent cause of treatment failure, takes two or more weeks to identify by culture. Rifampicin (RIF) resistance is a hallmark of MDR-TB, and detection of mutations in the rpoB gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis using molecular beacon probes with real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) is a novel approach that takes ≤ 2 days. However, qPCR identification of resistant isolates, particularly for isolates with mixed RIF-susceptible and RIF-resistant bacteria, is reader-dependent and limits its clinical use. The aim of this study was to develop an objective, reader independent method to define rpoB mutants using beacon qPCR. This would facilitate the transition from a research protocol to the clinical setting, where high-throughput methods with objective interpretation are required. For this, DNAs from 107 M. tuberculosis clinical isolates with known susceptibility to RIF by culture-based methods were obtained from two regions where isolates have not previously been subjected to evaluation using molecular beacon qPCR: The Texas-Mexico border and Colombia. Using coded DNA specimens, mutations within an 81 bp hot-spot region of rpoB were established by qPCR with five beacons spanning this region. Visual and mathematical approaches were used to establish whether the qPCR cycle threshold (Ct) of the experimental isolate was significantly higher (mutant) compared to a reference wild-type isolate. Visual classification of the beacon qPCR required reader training for strains with a mixture of RIF-susceptible and resistant bacteria. Only then, the visual interpretation by an experienced reader had 100% sensitivity and 94.6% specificity versus RIF-resistance by culture phenotype, and 98.1% sensitivity and 100% specificity versus mutations based on DNA sequence. The mathematical approach was 98% sensitive and 94.5% specific versus culture, and 96.2% sensitive and 100% specific versus DNA sequence. Our findings indicate the

  6. Exome sequencing identifies de novo gain of function missense mutation in KCND2 in identical twins with autism and seizures that slows potassium channel inactivation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hane; Lin, Meng-chin A; Kornblum, Harley I; Papazian, Diane M; Nelson, Stanley F

    2014-07-01

    Numerous studies and case reports show comorbidity of autism and epilepsy, suggesting some common molecular underpinnings of the two phenotypes. However, the relationship between the two, on the molecular level, remains unclear. Here, whole exome sequencing was performed on a family with identical twins affected with autism and severe, intractable seizures. A de novo variant was identified in the KCND2 gene, which encodes the Kv4.2 potassium channel. Kv4.2 is a major pore-forming subunit in somatodendritic subthreshold A-type potassium current (ISA) channels. The de novo mutation p.Val404Met is novel and occurs at a highly conserved residue within the C-terminal end of the transmembrane helix S6 region of the ion permeation pathway. Functional analysis revealed the likely pathogenicity of the variant in that the p.Val404Met mutant construct showed significantly slowed inactivation, either by itself or after equimolar coexpression with the wild-type Kv4.2 channel construct consistent with a dominant effect. Further, the effect of the mutation on closed-state inactivation was evident in the presence of auxiliary subunits that associate with Kv4 subunits to form ISA channels in vivo. Discovery of a functionally relevant novel de novo variant, coupled with physiological evidence that the mutant protein disrupts potassium current inactivation, strongly supports KCND2 as the causal gene for epilepsy in this family. Interaction of KCND2 with other genes implicated in autism and the role of KCND2 in synaptic plasticity provide suggestive evidence of an etiological role in autism.

  7. Transcriptome analysis of an apple (Malus × domestica) yellow fruit somatic mutation identifies a gene network module highly associated with anthocyanin and epigenetic regulation

    PubMed Central

    El-Sharkawy, Islam; Liang, Dong; Xu, Kenong

    2015-01-01

    Using RNA-seq, this study analysed an apple (Malus×domestica) anthocyanin-deficient yellow-skin somatic mutant ‘Blondee’ (BLO) and its red-skin parent ‘Kidd’s D-8’ (KID), the original name of ‘Gala’, to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the mutation. A total of 3299 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified between BLO and KID at four developmental stages and/or between two adjacent stages within BLO and/or KID. A weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) of the DEGs uncovered a network module of 34 genes highly correlated (r=0.95, P=9.0×10–13) with anthocyanin contents. Although 12 of the 34 genes in the WGCNA module were characterized and known of roles in anthocyanin, the remainder 22 appear to be novel. Examining the expression of ten representative genes in the module in 14 diverse apples revealed that at least eight were significantly correlated with anthocyanin variation. MdMYB10 (MDP0000259614) and MdGST (MDP0000252292) were among the most suppressed module member genes in BLO despite being undistinguishable in their corresponding sequences between BLO and KID. Methylation assay of MdMYB10 and MdGST in fruit skin revealed that two regions (MR3 and MR7) in the MdMYB10 promoter exhibited remarkable differences between BLO and KID. In particular, methylation was high and progressively increased alongside fruit development in BLO while was correspondingly low and constant in KID. The methylation levels in both MR3 and MR7 were negatively correlated with anthocyanin content as well as the expression of MdMYB10 and MdGST. Clearly, the collective repression of the 34 genes explains the loss-of-colour in BLO while the methylation in MdMYB10 promoter is likely causal for the mutation. PMID:26417021

  8. Using diverse U.S. beef cattle genomes to identify missense mutations in EPAS1, a gene associated with pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, Michael P.; Smith, Timothy P.L.; Carnahan, Jacky K.; Basnayake, Veronica; Qiu, Jiansheng; Simpson, Barry; Kalbfleisch, Theodore S.

    2016-01-01

    The availability of whole genome sequence (WGS) data has made it possible to discover protein variants in silico. However, existing bovine WGS databases do not show data in a form conducive to protein variant analysis, and tend to under represent the breadth of genetic diversity in global beef cattle. Thus, our first aim was to use 96 beef sires, sharing minimal pedigree relationships, to create a searchable and publicly viewable set of mapped genomes relevant for 19 popular breeds of U.S. cattle. Our second aim was to identify protein variants encoded by the bovine endothelial PAS domain-containing protein 1 gene ( EPAS1), a gene associated with pulmonary hypertension in Angus cattle. The identity and quality of genomic sequences were verified by comparing WGS genotypes to those derived from other methods. The average read depth, genotype scoring rate, and genotype accuracy exceeded 14, 99%, and 99%, respectively. The 96 genomes were used to discover four amino acid variants encoded by EPAS1 (E270Q, P362L, A671G, and L701F) and confirm two variants previously associated with disease (A606T and G610S). The six EPAS1 missense mutations were verified with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry assays, and their frequencies were estimated in a separate collection of 1154 U.S. cattle representing 46 breeds. A rooted phylogenetic tree of eight polypeptide sequences provided a framework for evaluating the likely order of mutations and potential impact of EPAS1 alleles on the adaptive response to chronic hypoxia in U.S. cattle. This public, whole genome resource facilitates in silico identification of protein variants in diverse types of U.S. beef cattle, and provides a means of translating WGS data into a practical biological and evolutionary context for generating and testing hypotheses. PMID:27746904

  9. Transcriptome analysis of an apple (Malus × domestica) yellow fruit somatic mutation identifies a gene network module highly associated with anthocyanin and epigenetic regulation.

    PubMed

    El-Sharkawy, Islam; Liang, Dong; Xu, Kenong

    2015-12-01

    Using RNA-seq, this study analysed an apple (Malus×domestica) anthocyanin-deficient yellow-skin somatic mutant 'Blondee' (BLO) and its red-skin parent 'Kidd's D-8' (KID), the original name of 'Gala', to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the mutation. A total of 3299 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified between BLO and KID at four developmental stages and/or between two adjacent stages within BLO and/or KID. A weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) of the DEGs uncovered a network module of 34 genes highly correlated (r=0.95, P=9.0×10(-13)) with anthocyanin contents. Although 12 of the 34 genes in the WGCNA module were characterized and known of roles in anthocyanin, the remainder 22 appear to be novel. Examining the expression of ten representative genes in the module in 14 diverse apples revealed that at least eight were significantly correlated with anthocyanin variation. MdMYB10 (MDP0000259614) and MdGST (MDP0000252292) were among the most suppressed module member genes in BLO despite being undistinguishable in their corresponding sequences between BLO and KID. Methylation assay of MdMYB10 and MdGST in fruit skin revealed that two regions (MR3 and MR7) in the MdMYB10 promoter exhibited remarkable differences between BLO and KID. In particular, methylation was high and progressively increased alongside fruit development in BLO while was correspondingly low and constant in KID. The methylation levels in both MR3 and MR7 were negatively correlated with anthocyanin content as well as the expression of MdMYB10 and MdGST. Clearly, the collective repression of the 34 genes explains the loss-of-colour in BLO while the methylation in MdMYB10 promoter is likely causal for the mutation.

  10. Fine mapping and conditional analysis identify a new mutation in the autoimmunity susceptibility gene BLK that leads to reduced half-life of the BLK protein

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Vega, Angélica M; Dozmorov, Mikhail G; Quirós, Manuel Bernal; Wu, Ying-Yu; Martínez-García, Belén; Kozyrev, Sergey V; Frostegård, Johan; Truedsson, Lennart; de Ramón, Enrique; González-Escribano, María F; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A; D'Alfonso, Sandra; Sebastiani, Gian Domenico; Witte, Torsten; Lauwerys, Bernard R; Endreffy, Emoke; Kovács, László; Vasconcelos, Carlos; da Silva, Berta Martins; Wren, Jonathan D; Martin, Javier; Castillejo-López, Casimiro; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To perform fine mapping of the autoimmunity susceptibility gene BLK and identify functional variants involved in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods Genotyping of 1163 European SLE patients and 1482 controls and imputation were performed covering the BLK gene with 158 single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Logistic regression analysis was done using PLINK and conditional analyses using GENABEL's test score. Transfections of BLK constructs on HEK293 cells containing the novel mutation or the wild type form were analysed for their effect on protein half-life using a protein stability assay, cycloheximide and western blot. CHiP-qPCR for detection of nuclear factor κ B (NFkB) binding. Results Fine mapping of BLK identified two independent genetic effects with functional consequences: one represented by two tightly linked associated haplotype blocks significantly enriched for NFκB-binding sites and numerous putative regulatory variants whose risk alleles correlated with low BLK mRNA levels. Binding of NFkBp50 and p65 to an associated 1.2 Kb haplotype segment was confirmed. A second independent genetic effect was represented by an Ala71Thr, low-frequency missense substitution with an OR=2.31 (95% CI 1.38 to 3.86). The 71Thr decreased BLK protein half-life. Conclusions These results show that rare and common regulatory variants in BLK are involved in disease susceptibility and both, albeit independently, lead to reduced levels of BLK protein. PMID:22696686

  11. IDH1 and IDH2 Gene Mutations Identify Novel Molecular Subsets Within De Novo Cytogenetically Normal Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Cancer and Leukemia Group B Study

    PubMed Central

    Marcucci, Guido; Maharry, Kati; Wu, Yue-Zhong; Radmacher, Michael D.; Mrózek, Krzysztof; Margeson, Dean; Holland, Kelsi B.; Whitman, Susan P.; Becker, Heiko; Schwind, Sebastian; Metzeler, Klaus H.; Powell, Bayard L.; Carter, Thomas H.; Kolitz, Jonathan E.; Wetzler, Meir; Carroll, Andrew J.; Baer, Maria R.; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Larson, Richard A.; Bloomfield, Clara D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To analyze the frequency and associations with prognostic markers and outcome of mutations in IDH genes encoding isocitrate dehydrogenases in adult de novo cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML). Patients and Methods Diagnostic bone marrow or blood samples from 358 patients were analyzed for IDH1 and IDH2 mutations by DNA polymerase chain reaction amplification/sequencing. FLT3, NPM1, CEBPA, WT1, and MLL mutational analyses and gene- and microRNA-expression profiling were performed centrally. Results IDH mutations were found in 33% of the patients. IDH1 mutations were detected in 49 patients (14%; 47 with R132). IDH2 mutations, previously unreported in AML, were detected in 69 patients (19%; 13 with R172 and 56 with R140). R172 IDH2 mutations were mutually exclusive with all other prognostic mutations analyzed. Younger age (< 60 years), molecular low-risk (NPM1-mutated/FLT3-internal tandem duplication–negative) IDH1-mutated patients had shorter disease-free survival than molecular low-risk IDH1/IDH2-wild-type (wt) patients (P = .046). R172 IDH2-mutated patients had lower complete remission rates than IDH1/IDH2wt patients (P = .007). Distinctive microarray gene- and microRNA-expression profiles accurately predicted R172 IDH2 mutations. The highest expressed gene and microRNAs in R172 IDH2-mutated patients compared with the IDH1/IDH2wt patients were APP (previously associated with complex karyotype AML) and miR-1 and miR-133 (involved in embryonal stem-cell differentiation), respectively. Conclusion IDH1 and IDH2 mutations are recurrent in CN-AML and have an unfavorable impact on outcome. The R172 IDH2 mutations, previously unreported in AML, characterize a novel subset of CN-AML patients lacking other prognostic mutations and associate with unique gene- and microRNA-expression profiles that may lead to the discovery of novel, therapeutically targetable leukemogenic mechanisms. PMID:20368543

  12. A Nationwide Study of Norwegian Patients with Hereditary Angioedema with C1 Inhibitor Deficiency Identified Six Novel Mutations in SERPING1

    PubMed Central

    Johnsrud, Irene; Kulseth, Mari Ann; Rødningen, Olaug Kristin; Landrø, Linn; Helsing, Per; Waage Nielsen, Erik; Heimdal, Ketil

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema with C1 inhibitor deficiency (C1-INH-HAE) is characterized by relapsing, non-pruritic swelling in skin and submucosal tissue. Symptoms can appear in early infancy when diagnosis is more difficult. In the absence of a correct diagnosis, treatment of abdominal attacks often lead to unnecessary surgery, and laryngeal edema can cause asphyxiation. A cohort study of 52 patients from 25 unrelated families in Norway was studied. Diagnosis of C1-INH-HAE was based on international consensus criteria including low functional and/or antigenic C1-INH values and antigenic C4. As SERPING1 mutations in Norwegian patients with C1-INH-HAE are largely undescribed and could help in diagnosis, we aimed to find and describe these mutations. Mutation analysis of the SERPING1 gene was performed by Sanger sequencing of all protein coding exons and exon-intron boundaries. Samples without detected mutation were further analyzed by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification to detect deletions and duplications. Novel mutations suspected to lead to splice defects were analyzed on the mRNA level. Fifty-two patients from 25 families were included. Forty-four (84,6%) suffered from C1-INH-HAE type I and eight (15,4%) suffered from C1-INH-HAE type II. Pathogenic or likely pathogenic mutations were found in 22/25 families (88%). Thirteen unique mutations were detected, including six previously undescribed. There were three missense mutations including one mutation affecting the reactive center loop at codon 466, three nonsense mutations, three small deletions/duplications, three gross deletions, and one splice mutation. PMID:26154504

  13. The semidominant Mi(b) mutation identifies a role for the HLH domain in DNA binding in addition to its role in protein dimerization.

    PubMed Central

    Steingrímsson, E; Nii, A; Fisher, D E; Ferré-D'Amaré, A R; McCormick, R J; Russell, L B; Burley, S K; Ward, J M; Jenkins, N A; Copeland, N G

    1996-01-01

    The mouse microphthalmia (mi) locus encodes a basic helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper (bHLH-Zip) transcription factor called MITF (microphthalmia transcription factor). Mutations at mi affect the development of several different cell types, including melanocytes, mast cells, osteoclasts and pigmented epithelial cells of the eye. Here we describe the phenotypic and molecular characterization of the semidominant Microphthalmia(brwnish) (Mi(b)) mutation. We show that this mutation primarily affects melanocytes and produces retinal degeneration. The mutation is a G to A transition leading to a Gly244Glu substitution in helix 2 of the HLH dimerization domain. This location is surprising since other semidominant mi mutations characterized to date have been shown to affect DNA binding or transcriptional activation domains of MITF and act as dominant negatives, while mutations that affect MITF dimerization are inherited recessively. Gel retardation assays showed that while the mutant MITF(Mi-b) protein retains its dimerization potential, it is defective in its ability to bind DNA. Computer modeling suggested that the Gly244Glu mutation might disrupt DNA binding by interfering with productive docking of the protein dimer onto DNA. The Mi(b) mutation therefore appears to dissociate a DNA recognition function of the HLH domain from its role in protein dimerization. Images PMID:8947051

  14. Somatic mosaicism for a newly identified splice-site mutation in a patient with adenosine deaminase-deficient immunodeficiency and spontaneous clinical recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschhorn, R.; Yang, D.R.; Israni, A.; Huie, M.L. ); Ownby, D.R. )

    1994-07-01

    Absent or severely reduced adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity produces inherited immunodeficiency of varying severity, with defects of both cellular and humoral immunity. The authors report somatic mosaicism as the basis for a delayed presentation and unusual course of a currently healthy young adult receiving no therapy. He was diagnosed at age 2[1/2] years because of life-threatening pneumonia, recurrent infections, failure of normal growth, and lymphopenia, but he retained significant cellular immune function. A fibroblast cell line and a B cell line, established at diagnosis, lacked ADA activity and were heteroallelic for a splice-donor-site mutation in IVS 1 (+1GT[yields]CT) and a missense mutation (Arg101Gln). All clones (17/17) isolated from the B cell mRNA carried the missense mutation, indicating that the allele with the splice-site mutation produced unstable mRNA. In striking contrast, a B cell line established at age 16 years expressed 50% of normal ADA; 50% had the missense mutation. Genomic DNA contained the missense mutation but not the splice-site mutation. All three cell lines were identical for multiple polymorphic markers and the presence of a Y chromosome. In vivo somatic mosaicism was demonstrated in genomic DNA from peripheral blood cells obtained at 16 years of age, in that less than half the DNA carried the splice-site mutation (P<.0.02, vs. original B cell line). Consistent with mosaicism, erythrocyte content of the toxic metabolite deoxyATP was only minimally elevated. Somatic mosaicism could have arisen either by somatic mutation or by reversion at the site of mutation. Selection in vivo for ADA normal hematopoietic cells may have played a role in the return to normal health, in the absence of therapy. 57 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Potential Susceptibility Mutations in C Gene for Hepatitis B-Related Hepatocellular Carcinoma Identified by a Two-Stage Study in Qidong, China

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Lishuai; Zhang, Haifeng; Liu, Jinxia; Liu, Taotao; Shen, Xizhong; Chen, Taoyang; Ni, Zhengpin; Lu, Cuihua

    2016-01-01

    A two stage study was conducted to explore new potential mutations in the full genome of hepatitis B virus (HBV) on the progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in Qidong, China. In stage 1, full genomes of HBV were compared between 30 HCC cases and 30 controls. In stage 2, an independent case–control study including 100 HCC cases and 100 controls was enrolled to verify the relationship between hot-spot mutations and HCC development. Furthermore, a longitudinal study was conducted on 11 HCC cases with serial serum samples available before HCC diagnosis. A total of 10 mutations (including pre-S2 start codon mutation and pre-S deletion in pre-S gene, G1613A, C1653T, A1762T, and G1764A mutations in X gene, A2159G, A2189Y, G2203W, and C2288R mutations in C gene) showed an increased risk of HCC. In the validation study, pre-S deletion, C1653T, A1762T/G1764A, A2159G, A2189Y, G2203W, and C2288R mutations were associated with increased HCC risk in univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis indicated that pre-S deletion, A1762T/G1764A, A2159G, and A2189Y mutations were independently related with HCC development. Moreover, a significant biological gradient of HCC risk by number of mutations in the C gene was observed. Longitudinal observation demonstrated a gradual combination of the above mutations accumulated during the progression of HCC. PMID:27727182

  16. Systematic Mutational Analysis of Histidine Kinase Genes in the Nosocomial Pathogen Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Identifies BfmAK System Control of Biofilm Development

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Liu; Wang, Fang-Fang; Ren, Bao-Zhen; Liu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Stenotrophomonas maltophilia lives in diverse ecological niches. As a result of its formidable capabilities of forming biofilm and its resistance to multiple antibiotic agents, the bacterium is also a nosocomial pathogen of serious threat to the health of patients whose immune systems are suppressed or compromised. Besides the histidine kinase RpfC, the two-component signal transduction system (TCS), which is the canonical regulatory machinery used by most bacterial pathogens, has never been experimentally investigated in S. maltophilia. Here, we annotated 62 putative histidine kinase genes in the S. maltophilia genome and successfully obtained 51 mutants by systematical insertional inactivation. Phenotypic characterization identified a series of mutants with deficiencies in bacterial growth, swimming motility, and biofilm development. A TCS, named here BfmA-BfmK (Smlt4209-Smlt4208), was genetically confirmed to regulate biofilm formation in S. maltophilia. Together with interacting partner prediction and chromatin immunoprecipitation screens, six candidate promoter regions bound by BfmA in vivo were identified. We demonstrated that, among them, BfmA acts as a transcription factor that binds directly to the promoter regions of bfmA-bfmK and Smlt0800 (acoT), a gene encoding an acyl coenzyme A thioesterase that is associated with biofilm development, and positively controls their transcription. Genome-scale mutational analyses of histidine kinase genes and functional dissection of BfmK-BfmA regulation in biofilm provide genetic information to support more in-depth studies on cellular signaling in S. maltophilia, in the context of developing novel approaches to fight this important bacterial pathogen. PMID:26873318

  17. CDH1 germ-line missense mutation identified by multigene sequencing in a family with no history of diffuse gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Lajus, Tirzah Braz Petta; Sales, Roberto Magnus Duarte

    2015-09-01

    Germ-line mutation in CDH1 gene is associated with high risk for Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer (HDGC) and Infiltrative Lobular Carcinoma (ILC). Although somatic CDH1 mutations were also detected in ILC with a frequency ranging from 10 to 56%, CDH1 alterations in more frequent infiltrative ductal carcinoma (IDC) appear to be rare, and no association with germ-line CDH1 mutation and IDC has been established. Here we report the case of a woman diagnosed with IDC at 39years of age, presenting extensive familial history of cancer at multiple sites with early-age onset and with no case of HDGC. Deep sequencing have revealed CDH1 missense mutation c.1849G>A (p.Ala617Thr) in heterozygous and four BRCA2 single nucleotide polymorphism in homozygosis. In this family, the mutation c.1849G>A in the CDH1 gene is not related to HDGC nor ILC. Therefore, here we highlight that multigene analysis is important to detect germ-line mutations and genetic variants in patients with cancers at multiple sites in the family, even if inconclusive genetic counseling can be offered, since hereafter, medical awareness will be held.

  18. Next generation sequencing of benzo(a)pyrene-induced lacZ mutants identifies a germ cell-specific mutation spectrum

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Jason M.; Beal, Marc A.; Yauk, Carole L.; Marchetti, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    De novo mutations are implicated in a variety of genetic diseases and arise primarily in the male germline. We investigated whether male germ cells have unique mechanisms for spontaneous or chemically-induced mutation relative to somatic cells using the MutaMouse model. We recovered lacZ transgenes from sperm 42 days after a 28-day exposure to benzo(a)pyrene (BaP, 100 mg/kg/day) to assess mutations arising in dividing spermatogonia. BaP caused a 3.4-fold increase in lacZ mutant frequency over controls which increased to 4.1-fold after clonal correction. We then used next generation sequencing to compare the spontaneous and BaP-induced mutation spectra in sperm and bone marrow. The spontaneous spectrum in sperm had significantly more G:C to A:T transitions and fewer mutations at A:T basepairs than bone marrow. BaP predominantly induced G:C to T:A transversions in both cell types, and both were enriched for mutations at CpG dinucleotides. However, BaP induced significantly more deletions in sperm, but more G:C to A:T transitions and G:C to C:G transversions in bone marrow. Differences in error-prone translesion DNA synthesis polymerases may underlie the observed spectrum differences between sperm and bone marrow. These findings suggest that mutations in sperm can arise via mechanisms that are unique to male germ cells. PMID:27829668

  19. Treatment with carbamazepine and gabapentin of a patient with primary erythermalgia (erythromelalgia) identified to have a mutation in the SCN9A gene, encoding a voltage-gated sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Natkunarajah, J; Atherton, D; Elmslie, F; Mansour, S; Mortimer, P

    2009-12-01

    Primary erythermalgia (erythromelalgia) is a rare autosomal dominant condition characterized by intermittent attacks of erythema, increased skin temperature and severe burning pain in the extremities, in a bilateral symmetrical distribution. Mutations in the SCN9A gene, which encodes a voltage-gated sodium channel have been shown to cause this disease. We report a family identified to have a mutation in the SCN9A gene, in which one severely affected family member has responded to the therapeutic combination of gabapentin and carbamazepine treatment.

  20. Point mutations in the Moloney murine leukemia virus enhancer identify a lymphoid-specific viral core motif and 1,3-phorbol myristate acetate-inducible element.

    PubMed Central

    Speck, N A; Renjifo, B; Hopkins, N

    1990-01-01

    The transcriptional enhancer of the Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV) is organized as a 75-base-pair repeat, and in each copy of the repeat there are multiple binding sites for nuclear factors. We have introduced point mutations into each of the known nuclear factor-binding sites in the MoMLV enhancer, in both copies of the direct repeat, and have analyzed the transcriptional activity conferred by the mutated enhancers by transient-expression assays in both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cell lines. Mutation of individual binding sites in the MoMLV enhancer has moderate effects (less than 2-fold to 20-fold) on transcription in six independent cell lines. Several mutations decreased transcription from the MoMLV enhancer ubiquitously (the leukemia virus factor b site and the glucocorticoid response element), whereas others affected transcription specifically in lymphoid cell lines (core motif) or, more significantly, in fibroblasts (nuclear factor 1 site). The transcriptional activity of the MoMLV enhancer can be induced 8- to 10-fold by 1,3-phorbol myristate acetate in Jurkat T cells. Mutations in any of three adjacent binding sites (leukemia virus factor b and c sites and the core motif) within a 28-base-pair region in the center of the direct repeat sequence of the MoMLV enhancer completely attenuate the response to 1,3-phorbol myristate acetate. Images PMID:2104942

  1. Whole-exome-sequencing identifies mutations in histone acetyltransferase gene KAT6B in individuals with the Say-Barber-Biesecker variant of Ohdo syndrome.

    PubMed

    Clayton-Smith, Jill; O'Sullivan, James; Daly, Sarah; Bhaskar, Sanjeev; Day, Ruth; Anderson, Beverley; Voss, Anne K; Thomas, Tim; Biesecker, Leslie G; Smith, Philip; Fryer, Alan; Chandler, Kate E; Kerr, Bronwyn; Tassabehji, May; Lynch, Sally-Ann; Krajewska-Walasek, Malgorzata; McKee, Shane; Smith, Janine; Sweeney, Elizabeth; Mansour, Sahar; Mohammed, Shehla; Donnai, Dian; Black, Graeme

    2011-11-11

    Say-Barber-Biesecker-Young-Simpson syndrome (SBBYSS or Ohdo syndrome) is a multiple anomaly syndrome characterized by severe intellectual disability, blepharophimosis, and a mask-like facial appearance. A number of individuals with SBBYSS also have thyroid abnormalities and cleft palate. The condition usually occurs sporadically and is therefore presumed to be due in most cases to new dominant mutations. In individuals with SBBYSS, a whole-exome sequencing approach was used to demonstrate de novo protein-truncating mutations in the highly conserved histone acetyltransferase gene KAT6B (MYST4/MORF)) in three out of four individuals sequenced. Sanger sequencing was used to confirm truncating mutations of KAT6B, clustering in the final exon of the gene in all four individuals and in a further nine persons with typical SBBYSS. Where parental samples were available, the mutations were shown to have occurred de novo. During mammalian development KAT6B is upregulated specifically in the developing central nervous system, facial structures, and limb buds. The phenotypic features seen in the Qkf mouse, a hypomorphic Kat6b mutant, include small eyes, ventrally placed ears and long first digits that mirror the human phenotype. This is a further example of how perturbation of a protein involved in chromatin modification might give rise to a multisystem developmental disorder.

  2. Targeted high-throughput sequencing identifies a TARDBP mutation as a cause of early-onset FTD without motor neuron disease.

    PubMed

    Synofzik, Matthis; Born, Christoph; Rominger, Axel; Lummel, Nina; Schöls, Ludger; Biskup, Saskia; Schüle, Cornelius; Grasshoff, Ute; Klopstock, Thomas; Adamczyk, Christopher

    2014-05-01

    Targeted high-throughput sequencing of many amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and fronto-temporal dementia (FTD) genes in parallel has the potential to reveal novel ALS- and/or FTD-phenotypes and to provide missing links on the ALS-FTD continuum. For example, although the 43-kDa transactive response DNA binding protein is the major pathologic hallmark linking ALS and FTD, mutations in the gene encoding 43-kDa transactive response DNA binding protein (TARDBP) have been appreciated only as a cause of ALS-phenotypes, but not yet of pure FTD. Thus, the genetic link is not yet well substantiated that TARDBP mutations can cause the full spectrum of the ALS-FTD continuum. High-throughput sequencing of 18 ALS and FTD genes in an index patient presenting with early-onset pure (behavioral) FTD and a positive family history for ALS revealed an established TARDBP mutation, A382T. This finding demonstrates that a TARDPB mutation can cause early-onset pure FTD without evidence for ALS even in advanced FTD disease stages. Moreover, it indicates that TARDPB screening might be considered even in young patients with "pure" neuropsychiatric disturbances and without evidence of neurodegenerative disease in the parental generation.

  3. Mutations in the bovine ABCG2 and the ovine MSTN gene added to the few quantitative trait nucleotides identified in farm animals: a mini-review.

    PubMed

    Braunschweig, M H

    2010-01-01

    The progress in molecular genetics in animal breeding is moderately effective as compared to traditional animal breeding using quantitative genetic approaches. There is an extensive disparity between the number of reported quantitative trait loci (QTLs) and their linked genetic variations in cattle, pig, and chicken. The identification of causative mutations affecting quantitative traits is still very challenging and hampered by the cloudy relationship between genotype and phenotype. There are relatively few reports in which a successful identification of a causative mutation for an animal production trait was demonstrated. The examples that have attracted considerable attention from the animal breeding community are briefly summarized and presented in a table. In this mini-review, the recent progress in mapping quantitative trait nucleotides (QTNs) are reviewed, including the ABCG2 gene mutation that underlies a QTL for fat and protein content and the ovine MSTN gene mutation that causes muscular hypertrophy in Texel sheep. It is concluded that the progress in molecular genetics might facilitate the elucidation of the genetic architecture of QTLs, so that also the high-hanging fruits can be harvested in order to contribute to efficient and sustainable animal production.

  4. Exome Sequencing Identifies a Novel LMNA Splice-Site Mutation and Multigenic Heterozygosity of Potential Modifiers in a Family with Sick Sinus Syndrome, Dilated Cardiomyopathy, and Sudden Cardiac Death.

    PubMed

    Zaragoza, Michael V; Fung, Lianna; Jensen, Ember; Oh, Frances; Cung, Katherine; McCarthy, Linda A; Tran, Christine K; Hoang, Van; Hakim, Simin A; Grosberg, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The goals are to understand the primary genetic mechanisms that cause Sick Sinus Syndrome and to identify potential modifiers that may result in intrafamilial variability within a multigenerational family. The proband is a 63-year-old male with a family history of individuals (>10) with sinus node dysfunction, ventricular arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, heart failure, and sudden death. We used exome sequencing of a single individual to identify a novel LMNA mutation and demonstrated the importance of Sanger validation and family studies when evaluating candidates. After initial single-gene studies were negative, we conducted exome sequencing for the proband which produced 9 gigabases of sequencing data. Bioinformatics analysis showed 94% of the reads mapped to the reference and identified 128,563 unique variants with 108,795 (85%) located in 16,319 genes of 19,056 target genes. We discovered multiple variants in known arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, or ion channel associated genes that may serve as potential modifiers in disease expression. To identify candidate mutations, we focused on ~2,000 variants located in 237 genes of 283 known arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, or ion channel associated genes. We filtered the candidates to 41 variants in 33 genes using zygosity, protein impact, database searches, and clinical association. Only 21 of 41 (51%) variants were validated by Sanger sequencing. We selected nine confirmed variants with minor allele frequencies <1% for family studies. The results identified LMNA c.357-2A>G, a novel heterozygous splice-site mutation as the primary mutation with rare or novel variants in HCN4, MYBPC3, PKP4, TMPO, TTN, DMPK and KCNJ10 as potential modifiers and a mechanism consistent with haploinsufficiency.

  5. Exome Sequencing Identifies a Novel LMNA Splice-Site Mutation and Multigenic Heterozygosity of Potential Modifiers in a Family with Sick Sinus Syndrome, Dilated Cardiomyopathy, and Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Zaragoza, Michael V.; Fung, Lianna; Jensen, Ember; Oh, Frances; Cung, Katherine; McCarthy, Linda A.; Tran, Christine K.; Hoang, Van; Hakim, Simin A.; Grosberg, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The goals are to understand the primary genetic mechanisms that cause Sick Sinus Syndrome and to identify potential modifiers that may result in intrafamilial variability within a multigenerational family. The proband is a 63-year-old male with a family history of individuals (>10) with sinus node dysfunction, ventricular arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, heart failure, and sudden death. We used exome sequencing of a single individual to identify a novel LMNA mutation and demonstrated the importance of Sanger validation and family studies when evaluating candidates. After initial single-gene studies were negative, we conducted exome sequencing for the proband which produced 9 gigabases of sequencing data. Bioinformatics analysis showed 94% of the reads mapped to the reference and identified 128,563 unique variants with 108,795 (85%) located in 16,319 genes of 19,056 target genes. We discovered multiple variants in known arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, or ion channel associated genes that may serve as potential modifiers in disease expression. To identify candidate mutations, we focused on ~2,000 variants located in 237 genes of 283 known arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, or ion channel associated genes. We filtered the candidates to 41 variants in 33 genes using zygosity, protein impact, database searches, and clinical association. Only 21 of 41 (51%) variants were validated by Sanger sequencing. We selected nine confirmed variants with minor allele frequencies <1% for family studies. The results identified LMNA c.357-2A>G, a novel heterozygous splice-site mutation as the primary mutation with rare or novel variants in HCN4, MYBPC3, PKP4, TMPO, TTN, DMPK and KCNJ10 as potential modifiers and a mechanism consistent with haploinsufficiency. PMID:27182706

  6. Mutations Related to Antiretroviral Resistance Identified by Ultra-Deep Sequencing in HIV-1 Infected Children under Structured Interruptions of HAART

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez-Guillen, Jose Manuel; Palacios-Saucedo, Gerardo C.; Rivera-Morales, Lydia G.; Garcia-Campos, Jorge; Ortiz-Lopez, Rocio; Noguera-Julian, Marc; Paredes, Roger; Vielma-Ramirez, Herlinda J.; Ramirez, Teresa J.; Chavez-Garcia, Marcelino; Lopez-Guillen, Paulo; Briones-Lara, Evangelina; Sanchez-Sanchez, Luz M.; Vazquez-Martinez, Carlos A.; Rodriguez-Padilla, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Although Structured Treatment Interruptions (STI) are currently not considered an alternative strategy for antiretroviral treatment, their true benefits and limitations have not been fully established. Some studies suggest the possibility of improving the quality of life of patients with this strategy; however, the information that has been obtained corresponds mostly to studies conducted in adults, with a lack of knowledge about its impact on children. Furthermore, mutations associated with antiretroviral resistance could be selected due to sub-therapeutic levels of HAART at each interruption period. Genotyping methods to determine the resistance profiles of the infecting viruses have become increasingly important for the management of patients under STI, thus low-abundance antiretroviral drug-resistant mutations (DRM’s) at levels under limit of detection of conventional genotyping (<20% of quasispecies) could increase the risk of virologic failure. In this work, we analyzed the protease and reverse transcriptase regions of the pol gene by ultra-deep sequencing in pediatric patients under STI with the aim of determining the presence of high- and low-abundance DRM’s in the viral rebounds generated by the STI. High-abundance mutations in protease and high- and low-abundance mutations in reverse transcriptase were detected but no one of these are directly associated with resistance to antiretroviral drugs. The results could suggest that the evaluated STI program is virologically safe, but strict and carefully planned studies, with greater numbers of patients and interruption/restart cycles, are still needed to evaluate the selection of DRM’s during STI. PMID:26807922

  7. University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center: High-Throughput Screening Identifying Driving Mutations in Endometrial Cancer | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Recent advances in next-generation sequencing technology have enabled the unprecedented characterization of a full spectrum of somatic alterations in cancer genomes. Given the large numbers of somatic mutations typically detected by this approach, a key challenge in the downstream analysis is to distinguish “drivers” that functionally contribute to tumorigenesis from “passengers” that occur as the consequence of genomic instability.

  8. Cross-Neutralising Nanobodies Bind to a Conserved Pocket in the Hemagglutinin Stem Region Identified Using Yeast Display and Deep Mutational Scanning

    PubMed Central

    Gaiotto, Tiziano; Hufton, Simon E.

    2016-01-01

    Cross-neutralising monoclonal antibodies against influenza hemagglutinin (HA) are of considerable interest as both therapeutics and diagnostic tools. We have recently described five different single domain antibodies (nanobodies) which share this cross-neutralising activity and suggest their small size, high stability, and cleft binding properties may present distinct advantages over equivalent conventional antibodies. We have used yeast display in combination with deep mutational scanning to give residue level resolution of positions in the antibody-HA interface which are crucial for binding. In addition, we have mapped positions within HA predicted to have minimal effect on antibody binding when mutated. Our cross-neutralising nanobodies were shown to bind to a highly conserved pocket in the HA2 domain of A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza virus overlapping with the fusion peptide suggesting their mechanism of action is through the inhibition of viral membrane fusion. We also note that the epitope overlaps with that of CR6261 and F10 which are human monoclonal antibodies in clinical development as immunotherapeutics. Although all five nanobodies mapped to the same highly conserved binding pocket we observed differences in the size of the epitope footprint which has implications in comparing the relative genetic barrier each nanobody presents to a rapidly evolving influenza virus. To further refine our epitope map, we have re-created naturally occurring mutations within this HA stem epitope and tested their effect on binding using yeast display. We have shown that a D46N mutation in the HA2 stem domain uniquely interferes with binding of R2b-E8. Further testing of this substitution in the context of full length purified HA from 1918 H1N1 pandemic (Spanish flu), 2009 H1N1 pandemic (swine flu) and highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 demonstrated binding which correlated with D46 whereas binding to seasonal H1N1 strains carrying N46 was absent. In addition, our deep sequence

  9. Identifying Mutations of the Tetratricopeptide Repeat Domain 37 (TTC37) Gene in Infants With Intractable Diarrhea and a Comparison of Asian and Non-Asian Phenotype and Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wen-I; Huang, Jing-Long; Chen, Chien-Chang; Lin, Ju-Li; Wu, Ren-Chin; Jaing, Tang-Her; Ou, Liang-Shiou

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Syndromic diarrhea/tricho-hepato-enteric syndrome (SD/THE) is a rare, autosomal recessive and severe bowel disorder mainly caused by mutations in the tetratricopeptide repeat domain 37 (TTC37) gene which act as heterotetrameric cofactors to enhance aberrant mRNAs decay. The phenotype and immune profiles of SD/THE overlap those of primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs). Neonates with intractable diarrhea underwent immunologic assessments including immunoglobulin levels, lymphocyte subsets, lymphocyte proliferation, superoxide production, and IL-10 signaling function. Candidate genes for PIDs predisposing to inflammatory bowel disease were sequencing in this study. Two neonates, born to nonconsanguineous parents, suffered from intractable diarrhea, recurrent infections, and massive hematemesis from esopharyngeal varices due to liver cirrhosis or accompanying Trichorrhexis nodosa that developed with age and thus guided the diagnosis of SD/THE compatible to TTC37 mutations (homozygous DelK1155H, Fs∗2; heterozygous Y1169Ter and InsA1143, Fs∗3). Their immunologic evaluation showed normal mitogen-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation, superoxide production, and IL-10 signaling, but low IgG levels, undetectable antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen and decreased antigen-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation. A PubMed search for bi-allelic TTC37 mutations and phenotypes were recorded in 14 Asian and 12 non-Asian cases. They had similar presentations of infantile onset refractory diarrhea, facial dysmorphism, hair anomalies, low IgG, low birth weight, and consanguinity. A higher incidence of heart anomalies (8/14 vs 2/12; P = 0.0344, Chi-square), nonsense mutations (19 in 28 alleles), and hot-spot mutations (W936Ter, 2779-2G>A, and Y1169Ter) were found in the Asian compared with the non-Asian patients. Despite immunoglobulin therapy in 20 of the patients, 4 died from liver cirrhosis and 1 died from sepsis. Patients of all ethnicities with SD/THE with the

  10. A knockin mouse model for human ATP4aR703C mutation identified in familial gastric neuroendocrine tumors recapitulates the premalignant condition of the human disease and suggests new therapeutic strategies

    PubMed Central

    Varro, Andrea; Pritchard, D. Mark; Barroso, Alicia; Oteo, Marta; Morcillo, Miguel Ángel; Vargiu, Pierfrancesco; Dodd, Steven; Garcia, Miriam; Reyes, José; Ortega, Sagrario; Benitez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT By whole exome sequencing, we recently identified a missense mutation (p.R703C) in the human ATP4a gene, which encodes the proton pump responsible for gastric acidification. This mutation causes an aggressive familial type I gastric neuroendocrine tumor in homozygous individuals. Affected individuals show an early onset of the disease, characterized by gastric hypoacidity, hypergastrinemia, iron-deficiency anemia, gastric intestinal metaplasia and, in one case, an associated gastric adenocarcinoma. Total gastrectomy was performed as the definitive treatment in all affected individuals. We now describe the generation and characterization of a knockin mouse model for the ATP4aR703C mutation to better understand the tumorigenesis process. Homozygous mice recapitulated most of the phenotypical alterations that were observed in human individuals, strongly suggesting that this mutation is the primary alteration responsible for disease development. Homozygous mice developed premalignant condition with severe hyperplasia, dysplasia and glandular metaplasia in the stomach. Interestingly, gastric acidification in homozygous mice, induced by treatment with 3% HCl acid in the drinking water, prevented (if treated from birth) or partially reverted (if treated during adulthood) the development of glandular metaplasia and dysplasia in the stomach and partially rescued the abnormal biochemical parameters. We therefore suggest that, in this model, achlorhydria contributes to tumorigenesis to a greater extent than hypergastrinemia. Furthermore, our mouse model represents a unique and novel tool for studying the pathologies associated with disturbances in gastric acid secretion. PMID:27491072

  11. Whole-genome sequencing identifies a novel ABCB7 gene mutation for X-linked congenital cerebellar ataxia in a large family of Mongolian ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Protasova, Maria S; Grigorenko, Anastasia P; Tyazhelova, Tatiana V; Andreeva, Tatiana V; Reshetov, Denis A; Gusev, Fedor E; Laptenko, Alexander E; Kuznetsova, Irina L; Goltsov, Andrey Y; Klyushnikov, Sergey A; Illarioshkin, Sergey N; Rogaev, Evgeny I

    2016-01-01

    X-linked congenital cerebellar ataxia is a heterogeneous nonprogressive neurodevelopmental disorder with onset in early childhood. We searched for a genetic cause of this condition, previously reported in a Buryat pedigree of Mongolian ancestry from southeastern Russia. Using whole-genome sequencing on Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform, we found a missense mutation in the ABCB7 (ABC-binding cassette transporter B7) gene, encoding a mitochondrial transporter, involved in heme synthesis and previously associated with sideroblastic anemia and ataxia. The mutation resulting in a substitution of a highly conserved glycine to serine in position 682 is apparently a major causative factor of the cerebellar hypoplasia/atrophy found in affected individuals of a Buryat family who had no evidence of sideroblastic anemia. Moreover, in these affected men we also found the genetic defects in two other genes closely linked to ABCB7 on chromosome X: a deletion of a genomic region harboring the second exon of copper-transporter gene (ATP7A) and a complete deletion of PGAM4 (phosphoglycerate mutase family member 4) retrogene located in the intronic region of the ATP7A gene. Despite the deletion, eliminating the first of six metal-binding domains in ATP7A, no signs for Menkes disease or occipital horn syndrome associated with ATP7A mutations were found in male carriers. The role of the PGAM4 gene has been previously implicated in human reproduction, but our data indicate that its complete loss does not disrupt male fertility. Our finding links cerebellar pathology to the genetic defect in ABCB7 and ATP7A structural variant inherited as X-linked trait, and further reveals the genetic heterogeneity of X-linked cerebellar disorders. PMID:26242992

  12. TARGET Researchers Identify Mutations in SIX1/2 and microRNA Processing Genes in Favorable Histology Wilms Tumor | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    TARGET researchers molecularly characterized favorable histology Wilms tumor (FHWT), a pediatric renal cancer. Comprehensive genome and transcript analyses revealed single-nucleotide substitution/deletion mutations in microRNA processing genes (15% of FHWT patients) and Sine Oculis Homeobox Homolog 1/2 (SIX1/2) genes (7% of FHWT patients). SIX1/2 genes play a critical role in renal development and were not previously associated with FHWT, thus presenting a novel role for SIX1/2 pathway aberrations in this disease.

  13. A New IL-2RG Gene Mutation in an X-linked SCID Identified through TREC/KREC Screening: a Case Report.

    PubMed

    Nourizadeh, Maryam; Borte, Stephan; Fazlollahi, Mohammad Reza; Hammarström, Lennart; Pourpak, Zahra

    2015-08-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) represents a rare group of primary immunodeficiency disorders (PIDs), with known or unknown genetic alterations. Here, we report a new interleukin 2 receptor, gamma chain (IL-2RG) mutation in an Iranian SCID newborn. The patient was a 6-day old boy with a family history of PID. The child was screened using a molecular-based analysis for the assessment of T cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) and kappa-deleting recombination excision circles (KRECs). Moreover, a complete immunological evaluation and gene sequencing was performed. Results showed undetectable TREC but a high level of KREC copy numbers. Flow cytometric data indicated low numbers of T and NK cells, but elevated number of B cells. A novel substitution in IL2RG: c.675 C>A, leading to p.225 Ser>Arg was found. Based on the functional analysis, the mutation is predicted to be damaging. The patient was diagnosed as a T B+ NK X-linked SCID.

  14. Screening for germline BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53 and CHEK2 mutations in families at-risk for hereditary breast cancer identified in a population-based study from Southern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Palmero, Edenir Inêz; Alemar, Bárbara; Schüler-Faccini, Lavínia; Hainaut, Pierre; Moreira-Filho, Carlos Alberto; Ewald, Ingrid Petroni; dos Santos, Patricia Koehler; Ribeiro, Patricia Lisbôa Izetti; de Oliveira, Cristina Brinkmann; Kelm, Florence Le Calvez; Tavtigian, Sean; Cossio, Silvia Liliana; Giugliani, Roberto; Caleffi, Maira; Ashton-Prolla, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In Brazil, breast cancer is a public health care problem due to its high incidence and mortality rates. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of hereditary breast cancer syndromes (HBCS) in a population-based cohort in Brazils southernmost capital, Porto Alegre. All participants answered a questionnaire about family history (FH) of breast, ovarian and colorectal cancer and those with a positive FH were invited for genetic cancer risk assessment (GCRA). If pedigree analysis was suggestive of HBCS, genetic testing of the BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53, and CHEK2 genes was offered. Of 902 women submitted to GCRA, 214 had pedigrees suggestive of HBCS. Fifty of them underwent genetic testing: 18 and 40 for BRCA1/BRCA2 and TP53 mutation screening, respectively, and 7 for CHEK2 1100delC testing. A deleterious BRCA2 mutation was identified in one of the HBOC probands and the CHEK2 1100delC mutation occurred in one of the HBCC families. No deleterious germline alterations were identified in BRCA1 or TP53. Although strict inclusion criteria and a comprehensive testing approach were used, the suspected genetic risk in these families remains unexplained. Further studies in a larger cohort are necessary to better understand the genetic component of hereditary breast cancer in Southern Brazil. PMID:27223485

  15. An overlapping phenotype of Osteogenesis imperfecta and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome due to a heterozygous mutation in COL1A1 and biallelic missense variants in TNXB identified by whole exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Mackenroth, Luisa; Fischer-Zirnsak, Björn; Egerer, Johannes; Hecht, Jochen; Kallinich, Tilmann; Stenzel, Werner; Spors, Birgit; von Moers, Arpad; Mundlos, Stefan; Kornak, Uwe; Gerhold, Kerstin; Horn, Denise

    2016-04-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) are variable genetic disorders that overlap in different ways [Cole 1993; Grahame 1999]. Here, we describe a boy presenting with severe muscular hypotonia, multiple fractures, and joint hyperflexibility, features that are compatible with mild OI and hypermobility type EDS, respectively. By whole exome sequencing, we identified both a COL1A1 mutation (c.4006-1G > A) inherited from the patient's mildly affected mother and biallelic missense variants in TNXB (p.Val1213Ile, p.Gly2592Ser). Analysis of cDNA showed that the COL1A1 splice site mutation led to intron retention causing a frameshift (p.Phe1336Valfs*72). Type 1 collagen secretion by the patient's skin fibroblasts was reduced. Immunostaining of a muscle biopsy obtained from the patient revealed a clear reduction of tenascin-X in the extracellular matrix compared to a healthy control. These findings imply that the combination of the COL1A1 mutation with the TNXB variants might cause the patient's unique phenotype.

  16. UV Signature Mutations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing complete tumor genomes and exomes has sparked the cancer field's interest in mutation signatures for identifying the tumor's carcinogen. This review and meta-analysis discusses signatures and their proper use. We first distinguish between a mutagen's canonical mutations – deviations from a random distribution of base changes to create a pattern typical of that mutagen – and the subset of signature mutations, which are unique to that mutagen and permit inference backward from mutations to mutagen. To verify UV signature mutations, we assembled literature datasets on cells exposed to UVC, UVB, UVA, or solar simulator light (SSL) and tested canonical UV mutation features as criteria for clustering datasets. A confirmed UV signature was: ≥60% of mutations are C→T at a dipyrimidine site, with ≥5% CC→TT. Other canonical features such as a bias for mutations on the non-transcribed strand or at the 3' pyrimidine had limited application. The most robust classifier combined these features with criteria for the rarity of non-UV canonical mutations. In addition, several signatures proposed for specific UV wavelengths were limited to specific genes or species; non-signature mutations induced by UV may cause melanoma BRAF mutations; and the mutagen for sunlight-related skin neoplasms may vary between continents. PMID:25354245

  17. Exome sequencing identifies 2 novel presenilin 1 mutations (p.L166V and p.S230R) in British early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Sassi, Celeste; Guerreiro, Rita; Gibbs, Raphael; Ding, Jinhui; Lupton, Michelle K; Troakes, Claire; Lunnon, Katie; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Brown, Kristelle S; Medway, Chirstopher; Lord, Jenny; Turton, James; Mann, David; Snowden, Julie; Neary, David; Harris, Jeniffer; Bras, Jose; Morgan, Kevin; Powell, John F; Singleton, Andrew; Hardy, John

    2014-10-01

    Early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD) represents 1%-2% of the Alzheimer's disease (AD) cases, and it is generally characterized by a positive family history and a rapidly progressive symptomatology. Rare coding and fully penetrant variants in amyloid precursor protein (APP), presenilin 1 (PSEN1), and presenilin 2 (PSEN2) are the only causative mutations reported for autosomal dominant AD. Thus, in this study we used exome sequencing data to rapidly screen rare coding variability in APP, PSEN1, and PSEN2, in a British cohort composed of 47 unrelated EOAD cases and 179 elderly controls, neuropathologically proven. We report 2 novel and likely pathogenic variants in PSEN1 (p.L166V and p.S230R). A comprehensive catalog of rare pathogenic variants in the AD Mendelian genes is pivotal for a premortem diagnosis of autosomal dominant EOAD and for the differential diagnosis with other early onset dementias such as frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD).

  18. In situ single cell analysis identifies heterogeneity for PIK3CA mutation and HER2 amplification in HER2+ breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Janiszewska, Michalina; Liu, Lin; Almendro, Vanessa; Kuang, Yanan; Paweletz, Cloud; Sakr, Rita A.; Weigelt, Britta; Hanker, Ariella B.; Chandarlapaty, Sarat; King, Tari A.; Reis-Filho, Jorge S.; Arteaga, Carlos L.; Park, So Yeon; Michor, Franziska; Polyak, Kornelia

    2015-01-01

    Detection of minor genetically distinct subpopulations within tumors is a key challenge in cancer genomics. Here we report STAR-FISH (Specific-To-Allele PCR – FISH), a novel method for the combined detection of single nucleotide and copy number alterations in single cells in intact archived tissues. Using this method, we assessed the clinical impact of changes in the frequency and topology of PIK3CA mutation and HER2/ERBB2 amplification within HER2+ breast cancer during neoadjuvant therapy. We found that the two genetic events are not always present within the same cell. Chemotherapy selects for PIK3CA mutant cells, a minor subpopulation in nearly all treatment-naïve samples, and modulates genetic diversity within tumors. Treatment-associated changes in spatial distribution of cellular genetic diversity correlated with poor long-term outcome following adjuvant trastuzumab therapy. Our findings support the use of in situ single-cell based methods in cancer genomics and imply that chemotherapy before HER2-targeted therapy may promote treatment resistance. PMID:26301495

  19. In situ single-cell analysis identifies heterogeneity for PIK3CA mutation and HER2 amplification in HER2-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Janiszewska, Michalina; Liu, Lin; Almendro, Vanessa; Kuang, Yanan; Paweletz, Cloud; Sakr, Rita A; Weigelt, Britta; Hanker, Ariella B; Chandarlapaty, Sarat; King, Tari A; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Arteaga, Carlos L; Park, So Yeon; Michor, Franziska; Polyak, Kornelia

    2015-10-01

    Detection of minor, genetically distinct subpopulations within tumors is a key challenge in cancer genomics. Here we report STAR-FISH (specific-to-allele PCR-FISH), a novel method for the combined detection of single-nucleotide and copy number alterations in single cells in intact archived tissues. Using this method, we assessed the clinical impact of changes in the frequency and topology of PIK3CA mutation and HER2 (ERBB2) amplification within HER2-positive breast cancer during neoadjuvant therapy. We found that these two genetic events are not always present in the same cells. Chemotherapy selects for PIK3CA-mutant cells, a minor subpopulation in nearly all treatment-naive samples, and modulates genetic diversity within tumors. Treatment-associated changes in the spatial distribution of cellular genetic diversity correlated with poor long-term outcome following adjuvant therapy with trastuzumab. Our findings support the use of in situ single cell-based methods in cancer genomics and imply that chemotherapy before HER2-targeted therapy may promote treatment resistance.

  20. Mutational analysis of the EMCV 2A protein identifies a nuclear localization signal and an eIF4E binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Groppo, Rachel; Brown, Bradley A.; Palmenberg, Ann C.

    2011-02-05

    Cardioviruses have a unique 2A protein (143 aa). During genome translation, the encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) 2A is released through a ribosome skipping event mitigated through C-terminal 2A sequences and by subsequent N-terminal reaction with viral 3C{sup pro}. Although viral replication is cytoplasmic, mature 2A accumulates in nucleoli shortly after infection. Some protein also transiently associates with cytoplasmic 40S ribosomal subunits, an activity contributing to inhibition of cellular cap-dependent translation. Cardiovirus sequences predict an eIF4E binding site (aa 126-134) and a nuclear localization signal (NLS, aa 91-102), within 2A, both of which are functional during EMCV infection. Point mutations preventing eIF4E:2A interactions gave small-plaque phenotype viruses, but still inhibited cellular cap-dependent translation. Deletions within the NLS motif relocalized 2A to the cytoplasm and abrogated the inhibition of cap-dependent translation. A fusion protein linking the 2A NLS to eGFP was sufficient to redirect the reporter to the nucleus but not into nucleoli.

  1. Mutational analysis of FANCL, FANCM and the recently identified FANCI suggests that among the 13 known Fanconi Anemia genes, only FANCD1/BRCA2 plays a major role in high-risk breast cancer predisposition.

    PubMed

    García, María J; Fernández, Victoria; Osorio, Ana; Barroso, Alicia; Fernández, Fernando; Urioste, Miguel; Benítez, Javier

    2009-11-01

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) is a rare recessive syndrome characterized by cellular hypersensitivity to DNA-cross-linking agents. To date, 13 FA complementation groups have been described and all 13 genes associated to each of these groups have been currently identified. Three of the known FA genes are also high-risk (FANCD1/BRCA2) or moderate-risk (FANCN/PALB2 and FANCJ/BRIP1) breast cancer susceptibility genes, which makes all members of the FA pathway particularly attractive breast cancer candidate genes. Most FA genes have been screened for mutations in breast cancer families negative for BRCA1/2 mutations but the role of FANCL, FANCM and the recently identified FANCI has not been evaluated to date. This fact and novel data sustaining greater functional relevance of the three genes within the FA pathway prompted us to scrutinize all coding sequences and splicing sites of FANCI, FANCL and FANCM in 95 BRCA1/2-negative index cases from Spanish high-risk breast cancer families. We identified 68 sequence variants of which 24 were coding and 44 non-coding. Six exonic and 26 non-coding variants had not been described previously. None of the coding changes caused clearly pathogenic changes and computational analysis of all non-described intronic variants did not revealed major impact in splicing. With the present study, all known FA genes have been evaluated within the context of breast cancer high-risk predisposition. Our results rule out a major role of FANCI, FANCL and FANCM in familial breast cancer susceptibility, suggesting that among the 13 known FA genes, only FANCD1/BRCA2 plays a major role in high-risk breast cancer predisposition.

  2. Human junctophilin-2 undergoes a structural rearrangement upon binding PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 and the S101R mutation identified in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy obviates this response.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Hayley J; Davenport, John Bernard; Collins, Richard F; Trafford, Andrew W; Pinali, Christian; Kitmitto, Ashraf

    2013-12-01

    JP2 (junctophilin-2) is believed to hold the transverse tubular and jSR (junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum) membranes in a precise geometry that facilitates excitation-contraction coupling in cardiomyocytes. We have expressed and purified human JP2 and shown using electron microscopy that the protein forms elongated structures ~15 nm long and 2 nm wide. Employing lipid-binding assays and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation we have determined that JP2 is selective for PS (phosphatidylserine), with a Kd value of ~0.5 μM, with the N-terminal domain mediating this interaction. JP2 also binds PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 at a different site than PS, resulting in the protein adopting a more flexible conformation; this interaction is modulated by both Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) ions. We show that the S101R mutation identified in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy leads to modification of the protein secondary structure, forming a more flexible molecule with an increased affinity for PS, but does not undergo a structural transition in response to binding PtdIns(3,4,5)P3. In conclusion, the present study provides new insights into the structural and lipid-binding properties of JP2 and how the S101R mutation may have an effect upon the stability of the dyad organization with the potential to alter JP2-protein interactions regulating Ca(2+) cycling.

  3. Immunohistochemical markers of the hypoxic response can identify malignancy in phaeochromocytomas and paragangliomas and optimize the detection of tumours with VHL germline mutations

    PubMed Central

    Pinato, D J; Ramachandran, R; Toussi, S T K; Vergine, M; Ngo, N; Sharma, R; Lloyd, T; Meeran, K; Palazzo, F; Martin, N; Khoo, B; Dina, R; Tan, T M

    2013-01-01

    Background: There are no reliable markers of malignancy in phaeochromocytomas (PCC) and paragangliomas (PGL). We investigated the relevance of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)/AKT and hypoxic pathways as novel immunohistochemical markers of malignancy. Methods: Tissue microarray blocks were constructed with a total of 100 tumours (10 metastatic) and 20 normal adrenomedullary samples. Sections were immunostained for hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (Hif-1α), vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), mTOR, carbonic anhydrase IX (CaIX) and AKT. The predictive performance of these markers was studied using univariate, multivariate and receiver operating characteristic analyses. Results: In all, 100 consecutive patients, 64% PCC, 29% familial with a median tumour size of 4.7 cm (range 1–14) were included. Univariate analyses showed Hif-1α overexpression, tumour necrosis, size >5 cm, capsular and vascular invasion to be predictors of metastasis. In multivariate analysis, Hif-1α, necrosis and vascular invasion remained as independent predictors of metastasis. Hif-1α was the most discriminatory biomarker for the presence of metastatic diffusion. Strong membranous CaIX expression was seen in von Hippel–Lindau (VHL) PCC as opposed to other subtypes. Conclusion: Lack of vascular invasion, tumour necrosis and low Hif-1α expression identify tumours with lower risk of malignancy. We propose membranous CaIX expression as a potential marker for VHL disease in patients presenting with PCC. PMID:23257898

  4. Genome destabilizing mutator alleles drive specific mutational trajectories in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Stirling, Peter C; Shen, Yaoqing; Corbett, Richard; Jones, Steven J M; Hieter, Philip

    2014-02-01

    In addition to environmental factors and intrinsic variations in base substitution rates, specific genome-destabilizing mutations can shape the mutational trajectory of genomes. How specific alleles influence the nature and position of accumulated mutations in a genomic context is largely unknown. Understanding the impact of genome-destabilizing alleles is particularly relevant to cancer genomes where biased mutational signatures are identifiable. We first created a more complete picture of cellular pathways that impact mutation rate using a primary screen to identify essential Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene mutations that cause mutator phenotypes. Drawing primarily on new alleles identified in this resource, we measure the impact of diverse mutator alleles on mutation patterns directly by whole-genome sequencing of 68 mutation-accumulation strains derived from wild-type and 11 parental mutator genotypes. The accumulated mutations differ across mutator strains, displaying base-substitution biases, allele-specific mutation hotspots, and break-associated mutation clustering. For example, in mutants of POLα and the Cdc13-Stn1-Ten1 complex, we find a distinct subtelomeric bias for mutations that we show is independent of the target sequence. Together our data suggest that specific genome-instability mutations are sufficient to drive discrete mutational signatures, some of which share properties with mutation patterns seen in tumors. Thus, in a population of cells, genome-instability mutations could influence clonal evolution by establishing discrete mutational trajectories for genomes.

  5. Modeling, Substrate Docking, and Mutational Analysis Identify Residues Essential for the Function and Specificity of a Eukaryotic Purine-Cytosine NCS1 Transporter*

    PubMed Central

    Krypotou, Emilia; Kosti, Vasiliki; Amillis, Sotiris; Myrianthopoulos, Vassilios; Mikros, Emmanuel; Diallinas, George

    2012-01-01

    The recent elucidation of crystal structures of a bacterial member of the NCS1 family, the Mhp1 benzyl-hydantoin permease from Microbacterium liquefaciens, allowed us to construct and validate a three-dimensional model of the Aspergillus nidulans purine-cytosine/H+ FcyB symporter. The model consists of 12 transmembrane α-helical, segments (TMSs) and cytoplasmic N- and C-tails. A distinct core of 10 TMSs is made of two intertwined inverted repeats (TMS1–5 and TMS6–10) that are followed by two additional TMSs. TMS1, TMS3, TMS6, and TMS8 form an open cavity that is predicted to host the substrate binding site. Based on primary sequence alignment, three-dimensional topology, and substrate docking, we identified five residues as potentially essential for substrate binding in FcyB; Ser-85 (TMS1), Trp-159, Asn-163 (TMS3), Trp-259 (TMS6), and Asn-354 (TMS8). To validate the role of these and other putatively critical residues, we performed a systematic functional analysis of relevant mutants. We show that the proposed substrate binding residues, plus Asn-350, Asn-351, and Pro-353 are irreplaceable for FcyB function. Among these residues, Ser-85, Asn-163, Asn-350, Asn-351, and Asn-354 are critical for determining the substrate binding affinity and/or the specificity of FcyB. Our results suggest that Ser-85, Asn-163, and Asn-354 directly interact with substrates, Trp-159 and Trp-259 stabilize binding through π-π stacking interactions, and Pro-353 affects the local architecture of substrate binding site, whereas Asn-350 and Asn-351 probably affect substrate binding indirectly. Our work is the first systematic approach to address structure-function-specificity relationships in a eukaryotic member of NCS1 family by combining genetic and computational approaches. PMID:22969088

  6. MECP2 mutations in males

    PubMed Central

    Villard, Laurent

    2007-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RS; MIM 312750) is a severe neurological disorder affecting exclusively females. Its prevalence is about 1 in 10 000 female births, and it is a prominent cause of profound mental handicap in women. RS is caused by mutations in the X‐linked methyl CpG‐binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene. These mutations were initially thought to be lethal in males. However, MECP2 mutations are now frequently identified in mentally retarded male patients. The frequency of disease‐causing MECP2 mutations in this population is between 1.3% and 1.7%. Surprisingly, MECP2 mutations in males are responsible for a wide spectrum of neurological disorders, ranging from mild mental retardation to severe neonatal encephalopathy. The aim of this review is to describe the nature of the MECP2 mutations identified in male patients to date and their associated phenotypes. PMID:17351020

  7. The androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    PubMed

    Patterson, M N; Hughes, I A; Gottlieb, B; Pinsky, L

    1994-09-01

    The androgen receptor gene mutations database is a comprehensive listing of mutations published in journals and meetings proceedings. The majority of mutations are point mutations identified in patients with androgen insensitivity syndrome. Information is included regarding the phenotype, the nature and location of the mutations, as well as the effects of the mutations on the androgen binding activity of the receptor. The current version of the database contains 149 entries, of which 114 are unique mutations. The database is available from EMBL (NetServ@EMBL-Heidelberg.DE) or as a Macintosh Filemaker file (mc33001@musica.mcgill.ca).

  8. Characterization of host-dependent mutations of apple fruit crinkle viroid replicating in newly identified experimental hosts suggests maintenance of stem-loop structures in the left-hand half of the molecule is important for replication.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takahiro; Fujibayashi, Misato; Hataya, Tatsuji; Taneda, Akito; He, Ying-Hong; Tsushima, Taro; Duraisamy, Ganesh Selvaraj; Siglová, Kristyna; Matoušek, Jaroslav; Sano, Teruo

    2017-03-01

    Apple fruit crinkle viroid (AFCVd) is a tentative member of the genus Apscaviroid, family Pospiviroidae. AFCVd has a narrow host range and is known to infect apple, hop and persimmon as natural hosts. In this study, tomato, cucumber and wild hop have been identified as new experimental herbaceous hosts. Foliar symptoms were very mild or virtually undetectable, but fruits of infected tomato were small, cracked and distorted. These symptoms resemble those observed on some AFCVd-sensitive apple cultivars. After transfer to tomato, cucumber and wild hop, sequence changes were detected in a natural AFCVd isolate from hop, and major variants in tomato, cucumber and wild hop differed in 10, 8 or 2 nucleotides, respectively, from the predominant one in the inoculum. The major variants in tomato and cucumber were almost identical, and the one in wild hop was very similar to the one in cultivated hop. Detailed analyses of the host-dependent sequence changes that appear in a naturally occurring AFCVd isolate from hop after transfer to tomato using small RNA deep sequence data and infectivity studies with dimeric RNA transcripts followed by progeny analysis indicate that the major AFCVd variant in tomato emerged by selection of a minor variant present in the inoculum (i.e. hop) followed by one to two host-dependent de novo mutations. Comparison of the secondary structures of major variants in hop, tomato and persimmon after transfer to tomato suggested that maintenance of stem-loop structures in the left-hand half of the molecule is critical for infection.

  9. Integrated tumor and germline whole-exome sequencing identifies mutations in MAPK and PI3K pathway genes in an adolescent with rosette-forming glioneuronal tumor of the fourth ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Frank Y.; Bergstrom, Katie; Person, Richard; Bavle, Abhishek; Ballester, Leomar Y.; Scollon, Sarah; Raesz-Martinez, Robin; Jea, Andrew; Birchansky, Sherri; Wheeler, David A.; Berg, Stacey L.; Chintagumpala, Murali M.; Adesina, Adekunle M.; Eng, Christine; Roy, Angshumoy; Plon, Sharon E.; Parsons, D. Williams

    2016-01-01

    The integration of genome-scale studies such as whole-exome sequencing (WES) into the clinical care of children with cancer has the potential to provide insight into the genetic basis of an individual's cancer with implications for clinical management. This report describes the results of clinical tumor and germline WES for a patient with a rare tumor diagnosis, rosette-forming glioneuronal tumor of the fourth ventricle (RGNT). Three pathogenic gene alterations with implications for clinical care were identified: somatic activating hotspot mutations in FGFR1 (p.N546K) and PIK3CA (p.H1047R) and a germline pathogenic variant in PTPN11 (p.N308S) diagnostic for Noonan syndrome. The molecular landscape of RGNT is not well-described, but these data are consistent with prior observations regarding the importance of the interconnected MAPK and PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathways in this rare tumor. The co-occurrence of FGFR1, PIK3CA, and PTPN11 alterations provides further evidence for consideration of RGNT as a distinct molecular entity from pediatric low-grade gliomas and suggests potential therapeutic strategies for this patient in the event of tumor recurrence as novel agents targeting these pathways enter pediatric clinical trials. Although RGNT has not been definitively linked with cancer predisposition syndromes, two prior cases have been reported in patients with RASopathies (Noonan syndrome and neurofibromatosis type 1 [NF1]), providing an additional link between these tumors and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. In summary, this case provides an example of the potential for genome-scale sequencing technologies to provide insight into the biology of rare tumors and yield both tumor and germline results of potential relevance to patient care. PMID:27626068

  10. Calreticulin Mutations in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Lavi, Noa

    2014-01-01

    With the discovery of the JAK2V617F mutation in patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative (Ph−) myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) in 2005, major advances have been made in the diagnosis of MPNs, in understanding of their pathogenesis involving the JAK/STAT pathway, and finally in the development of novel therapies targeting this pathway. Nevertheless, it remains unknown which mutations exist in approximately one-third of patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL essential thrombocythemia (ET) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF). At the end of 2013, two studies identified recurrent mutations in the gene encoding calreticulin (CALR) using whole-exome sequencing. These mutations were revealed in the majority of ET and PMF patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL but not in polycythemia vera patients. Somatic 52-bp deletions (type 1 mutations) and recurrent 5-bp insertions (type 2 mutations) in exon 9 of the CALR gene (the last exon encoding the C-terminal amino acids of the protein calreticulin) were detected and found always to generate frameshift mutations. All detected mutant calreticulin proteins shared a novel amino acid sequence at the C-terminal. Mutations in CALR are acquired early in the clonal history of the disease, and they cause activation of JAK/STAT signaling. The CALR mutations are the second most frequent mutations in Ph− MPN patients after the JAK2V617F mutation, and their detection has significantly improved the diagnostic approach for ET and PMF. The characteristics of the CALR mutations as well as their diagnostic, clinical, and pathogenesis implications are discussed in this review. PMID:25386351

  11. Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA mutations in Chinese patients: 16 novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Weimin; Wang, Yun; Meng, Yan; Su, Liang; Shi, Huiping; Huang, Shangzhi

    2010-08-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA; Morquio A syndrome) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase (GALNS) and transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait. This is the first systematic mutation screen in Chinese MPS IVA patients. Mutation detections in 24 unrelated Chinese MPS IVA patients were performed by PCR and direct sequencing of exons or the mRNA of GALNS. A total of 42 mutant alleles were identified, belonging to 27 different mutations. Out of the 27 mutations, 16 were novel, including 2 splicing mutations (c.567-1G>T and c.634-1G>A), 2 nonsense mutations (p.W325X and p.Q422X) and 12 missense mutations (p.T88I, p.H142R, p.P163H, p.G168L, p.H236D, p.N289S, p.T312A, p.G316V, p.A324E, p.L366P, p.Q422K and p.F452L). p.G340D was found to be a common mutation in the Chinese MPS IVA patients, accounting for 16.7% of the total number of mutant alleles. The results show that the mutations in Chinese MPS IVA patients are also family specific but have a different mutation spectrum as compared to those of other populations.

  12. Analysis of mucolipidosis II/III GNPTAB missense mutations identifies domains of UDP-GlcNAc:lysosomal enzyme GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase involved in catalytic function and lysosomal enzyme recognition.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yi; van Meel, Eline; Flanagan-Steet, Heather; Yox, Alex; Steet, Richard; Kornfeld, Stuart

    2015-01-30

    UDP-GlcNAc:lysosomal enzyme GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase tags newly synthesized lysosomal enzymes with mannose 6-phosphate recognition markers, which are required for their targeting to the endolysosomal system. GNPTAB encodes the α and β subunits of GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase, and mutations in this gene cause the lysosomal storage disorders mucolipidosis II and III αβ. Prior investigation of missense mutations in GNPTAB uncovered amino acids in the N-terminal region and within the DMAP domain involved in Golgi retention of GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase and its ability to specifically recognize lysosomal hydrolases, respectively. Here, we undertook a comprehensive analysis of the remaining missense mutations in GNPTAB reported in mucolipidosis II and III αβ patients using cell- and zebrafish-based approaches. We show that the Stealth domain harbors the catalytic site, as some mutations in these regions greatly impaired the activity of the enzyme without affecting its Golgi localization and proteolytic processing. We also demonstrate a role for the Notch repeat 1 in lysosomal hydrolase recognition, as missense mutations in conserved cysteine residues in this domain do not affect the catalytic activity but impair mannose phosphorylation of certain lysosomal hydrolases. Rescue experiments using mRNA bearing Notch repeat 1 mutations in GNPTAB-deficient zebrafish revealed selective effects on hydrolase recognition that differ from the DMAP mutation. Finally, the mutant R587P, located in the spacer between Notch 2 and DMAP, was partially rescued by overexpression of the γ subunit, suggesting a role for this region in γ subunit binding. These studies provide new insight into the functions of the different domains of the α and β subunits.

  13. ENAM Mutations with Incomplete Penetrance

    PubMed Central

    Seymen, F.; Lee, K.-E.; Koruyucu, M.; Gencay, K.; Bayram, M.; Tuna, E.B.; Lee, Z.H.; Kim, J.-W.

    2014-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a genetic disease affecting tooth enamel formation. AI can be an isolated entity or a phenotype of syndromes. To date, more than 10 genes have been associated with various forms of AI. We have identified 2 unrelated Turkish families with hypoplastic AI and performed mutational analysis. Whole-exome sequencing identified 2 novel heterozygous nonsense mutations in the ENAM gene (c.454G>T p.Glu152* in family 1, c.358C>T p.Gln120* in family 2) in the probands. Affected individuals were heterozygous for the mutation in each family. Segregation analysis within each family revealed individuals with incomplete penetrance or extremely mild enamel phenotype, in spite of having the same mutation with the other affected individuals. We believe that these findings will broaden our understanding of the clinical phenotype of AI caused by ENAM mutations. PMID:25143514

  14. A newly identified Thr99fsX110 mutation in the PMP22 gene associated with an atypical phenotype of the hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies.

    PubMed

    Moszyńska, Izabela; Kabzińska, Dagmara; Sinkiewicz-Darol, Elena; Kochański, Andrzej

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is manifested by a spectrum of phenotypes, from the classical HNPP course associated with intermittent nerve palsies to a neuropathy resembling Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1 (CMT1) disease. The majority of HNPP cases are associated with submicroscopical deletions in the 17p11.2-p12 region containing the PMP22 gene, while PMP22 point mutations are rare, representing about 15% of HNPP cases. In this study, we present a patient manifesting with atypical HNPP phenotype associated with a new Thr99fsX110 mutation in the PMP22 gene. We conclude that all patients who fulfill the electrophysiological criteria of HNPP, even if they lack the typical HNPP phenotype, should be tested for point mutations in the PMP22 gene.

  15. Analysis of the COL1A1 and COL1A2 genes by PCR amplification and scanning by conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis identifies only COL1A1 mutations in 15 patients with osteogenesis imperfecta type I: identification of common sequences of null-allele mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Körkkö, J; Ala-Kokko, L; De Paepe, A; Nuytinck, L; Earley, J; Prockop, D J

    1998-01-01

    Although >90% of patients with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) have been estimated to have mutations in the COL1A1 and COL1A2 genes for type I procollagen, mutations have been difficult to detect in all patients with the mildest forms of the disease (i.e., type I). In this study, we first searched for mutations in type I procollagen by analyses of protein and mRNA in fibroblasts from 10 patients with mild OI; no evidence of a mutation was found in 2 of the patients by the protein analyses, and no evidence of a mutation was found in 5 of the patients by the RNA analyses. We then searched for mutations in the original 10 patients and in 5 additional patients with mild OI, by analysis of genomic DNA. To assay the genomic DNA, we established a consensus sequence for the first 12 kb of the COL1A1 gene and for 30 kb of new sequences of the 38-kb COL1A2 gene. The sequences were then used to develop primers for PCR for the 103 exons and exon boundaries of the two genes. The PCR products were first scanned for heteroduplexes by conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis, and then products containing heteroduplexes were sequenced. The results detected disease-causing mutations in 13 of the 15 patients and detected two additional probable disease-causing mutations in the remaining 2 patients. Analysis of the data developed in this study and elsewhere revealed common sequences for mutations causing null alleles. PMID:9443882

  16. Mutation analysis in Turkish phenylketonuria patients.

    PubMed Central

    Ozgüç, M; Ozalp, I; Coşkun, T; Yilmaz, E; Erdem, H; Ayter, S

    1993-01-01

    Forty-four classical PKU patients have been screened for various mutations. The newly identified IVS 10 splicing mutation was found in 32% of the mutant alleles and comprises 74.5% of the mutations that could be typed: 261arg-gln (6.8%), 158arg-gly (2.3%), 252arg-trp (1.1%), 280glu-lys (-), and 272gly-stop (-) were the other mutations that were screened. Images PMID:8445616

  17. Whole Genome Sequencing of Newly Established Pancreatic Cancer Lines Identifies Novel Somatic Mutation (c.2587G>A) in Axon Guidance Receptor Plexin A1 as Enhancer of Proliferation and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Abisoye-Ogunniyan, Abisola; Waterfall, Joshua J.; Davis, Sean; Killian, J. Keith; Pineda, Marbin; Ray, Satyajit; McCord, Matt R.; Pflicke, Holger; Burkett, Sandra Sczerba; Meltzer, Paul S.; Rudloff, Udo

    2016-01-01

    The genetic profile of human pancreatic cancers harbors considerable heterogeneity, which suggests a possible explanation for the pronounced inefficacy of single therapies in this disease. This observation has led to a belief that custom therapies based on individual tumor profiles are necessary to more effectively treat pancreatic cancer. It has recently been discovered that axon guidance genes are affected by somatic structural variants in up to 25% of human pancreatic cancers. Thus far, however, some of these mutations have only been correlated to survival probability and no function has been assigned to these observed axon guidance gene mutations in pancreatic cancer. In this study we established three novel pancreatic cancer cell lines and performed whole genome sequencing to discover novel mutations in axon guidance genes that may contribute to the cancer phenotype of these cells. We discovered, among other novel somatic variants in axon guidance pathway genes, a novel mutation in the PLXNA1 receptor (c.2587G>A) in newly established cell line SB.06 that mediates oncogenic cues of increased invasion and proliferation in SB.06 cells and increased invasion in 293T cells upon stimulation with the receptor’s natural ligand semaphorin 3A compared to wild type PLXNA1 cells. Mutant PLXNA1 signaling was associated with increased Rho-GTPase and p42/p44 MAPK signaling activity and cytoskeletal expansion, but not changes in E-cadherin, vimentin, or metalloproteinase 9 expression levels. Pharmacologic inhibition of the Rho-GTPase family member CDC42 selectively abrogated PLXNA1 c.2587G>A-mediated increased invasion. These findings provide in-vitro confirmation that somatic mutations in axon guidance genes can provide oncogenic gain-of-function signals and may contribute to pancreatic cancer progression. PMID:26962861

  18. Whole Genome Sequencing of Newly Established Pancreatic Cancer Lines Identifies Novel Somatic Mutation (c.2587G>A) in Axon Guidance Receptor Plexin A1 as Enhancer of Proliferation and Invasion.

    PubMed

    Sorber, Rebecca; Teper, Yaroslav; Abisoye-Ogunniyan, Abisola; Waterfall, Joshua J; Davis, Sean; Killian, J Keith; Pineda, Marbin; Ray, Satyajit; McCord, Matt R; Pflicke, Holger; Burkett, Sandra Sczerba; Meltzer, Paul S; Rudloff, Udo

    2016-01-01

    The genetic profile of human pancreatic cancers harbors considerable heterogeneity, which suggests a possible explanation for the pronounced inefficacy of single therapies in this disease. This observation has led to a belief that custom therapies based on individual tumor profiles are necessary to more effectively treat pancreatic cancer. It has recently been discovered that axon guidance genes are affected by somatic structural variants in up to 25% of human pancreatic cancers. Thus far, however, some of these mutations have only been correlated to survival probability and no function has been assigned to these observed axon guidance gene mutations in pancreatic cancer. In this study we established three novel pancreatic cancer cell lines and performed whole genome sequencing to discover novel mutations in axon guidance genes that may contribute to the cancer phenotype of these cells. We discovered, among other novel somatic variants in axon guidance pathway genes, a novel mutation in the PLXNA1 receptor (c.2587G>A) in newly established cell line SB.06 that mediates oncogenic cues of increased invasion and proliferation in SB.06 cells and increased invasion in 293T cells upon stimulation with the receptor's natural ligand semaphorin 3A compared to wild type PLXNA1 cells. Mutant PLXNA1 signaling was associated with increased Rho-GTPase and p42/p44 MAPK signaling activity and cytoskeletal expansion, but not changes in E-cadherin, vimentin, or metalloproteinase 9 expression levels. Pharmacologic inhibition of the Rho-GTPase family member CDC42 selectively abrogated PLXNA1 c.2587G>A-mediated increased invasion. These findings provide in-vitro confirmation that somatic mutations in axon guidance genes can provide oncogenic gain-of-function signals and may contribute to pancreatic cancer progression.

  19. Anaerobically Grown Escherichia coli Has an Enhanced Mutation Rate and Distinct Mutational Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Shewaramani, Sonal; Finn, Thomas J.; Kassen, Rees; Rainey, Paul B.

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a major cause of mutation but little is known about how growth in the absence of oxygen impacts the rate and spectrum of mutations. We employed long-term mutation accumulation experiments to directly measure the rates and spectra of spontaneous mutation events in Escherichia coli populations propagated under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. To detect mutations, whole genome sequencing was coupled with methods of analysis sufficient to identify a broad range of mutational classes, including structural variants (SVs) generated by movement of repetitive elements. The anaerobically grown populations displayed a mutation rate nearly twice that of the aerobic populations, showed distinct asymmetric mutational strand biases, and greater insertion element activity. Consistent with mutation rate and spectra observations, genes for transposition and recombination repair associated with SVs were up-regulated during anaerobic growth. Together, these results define differences in mutational spectra affecting the evolution of facultative anaerobes. PMID:28103245

  20. Loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 5q in ovarian cancer is frequently accompanied by TP53 mutation and identifies a tumour suppressor gene locus at 5q13.1-21.

    PubMed Central

    Tavassoli, M.; Steingrimsdottir, H.; Pierce, E.; Jiang, X.; Alagoz, M.; Farzaneh, F.; Campbell, I. G.

    1996-01-01

    Forty-nine ovarian tumours were examined for loss of heterozygosity (LOH) on chromosome 5 using eight microsatellite markers spanning both arms, including one at the APC locus. LOH on 5q was a frequent event, detectable in 23 of 49 (47%) tumours, whereas 5p LOH was detected in only 1 of 22 tumours (5%). Six tumours showed partial LOH on 5q, enabling the candidate region to be localised to a 22 cM region proximal to APC, flanked by D5S424 and D5S644. An association was found between 5q LOH and TP53 mutation, with 18 of 23 (78%) tumours with LOH on 5q also harbouring a TP53 mutation. LOH on 5q was observed in 6 of 18 (33%) stage I tumours, suggesting that it may be an early event in the molecular pathogenesis of certain ovarian carcinomas. Images Figure 1 PMID:8679443

  1. Mutational profiling reveals PIK3CA mutations in gallbladder carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The genetics of advanced biliary tract cancers (BTC), which encompass intra- and extra-hepatic cholangiocarcinomas as well as gallbladder carcinomas, are heterogeneous and remain to be fully defined. Methods To better characterize mutations in established known oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes we tested a mass spectrometric based platform to interrogate common cancer associated mutations across a panel of 77 formalin fixed paraffin embedded archived BTC cases. Results Mutations among three genes, KRAS, NRAS and PIK3CA were confirmed in this cohort. Activating mutations in PIK3CA were identified exclusively in GBC (4/32, 12.5%). KRAS mutations were identified in 3 (13%) intra-hepatic cholangiocarcinomas and 1 (33%) perihillar cholangiocarcinoma but were not identified in gallbladder carcinomas and extra-hepatic cholangiocarcinoma. Conclusions The presence of activating mutations in PIK3CA specifically in GBC has clinical implications in both the diagnosis of this cancer type, as well as the potential utility of targeted therapies such as PI3 kinase inhibitors. PMID:21303542

  2. Strategy of mutual compensation of green and red mutants of firefly luciferase identifies a mutation of the highly conservative residue E457 with a strong red shift of bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Koksharov, Mikhail I; Ugarova, Natalia N

    2013-11-01

    Bioluminescence spectra of firefly luciferases demonstrate highly pH-sensitive spectra changing the color from green to red light when pH is lowered from alkaline to acidic. This reflects a change of ratio of the green and red emitters in the bimodal spectra of bioluminescence. We show that the mutations strongly stabilizing green (Y35N) or red (H433Y) emission compensate each other leading to the WT color of firefly luciferase. We further used this compensating ability of Y35N to search for strong red-shifting mutations in the C-domain of firefly luciferase by random mutagenesis. The discovered mutation E457K substantially increased the contribution of the red emitter and caused a 12 nm red shift of the green emitter as well. E457 is highly conservative not only in beetle luciferases but also in a whole ANL superfamily of adenylating enzymes and forms a conservative structural hydrogen bond with V471. Our results suggest that the removal of this hydrogen bond only mildly affects luciferase properties and that most of the effect of E457K is caused by the introduction of positive charge. E457 forms a salt bridge with R534 in most ANL enzymes including pH-insensitive luciferases which is absent in pH-sensitive firefly luciferases. The mutant A534R shows that this salt bridge is not important for pH-sensitivity but considerably improves in vivo thermostability. Although E457 is located far from the oxyluciferin-binding site, the properties of the mutant E457K suggest that it affects color by influencing the AMP binding.

  3. Evaluation of TP53 Pro72Arg and MDM2 SNP285-SNP309 polymorphisms in an Italian cohort of LFS suggestive patients lacking identifiable TP53 germline mutations.

    PubMed

    Ponti, Francesca; Corsini, Serena; Gnoli, Maria; Pedrini, Elena; Mordenti, Marina; Sangiorgi, Luca

    2016-10-01

    Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is a rare genetic cancer predisposition disease, partly determined by the presence of a TP53 germline mutation; lacking thereof, in presence of a typical LFS phenotype, defines a wide group of 'LFS Suggestive' patients. Alternative LFS susceptibility genes have been investigated without promising results, thus suggesting other genetic determinants involvement in cancer predisposition. Hence, this study explores the single and combined effects of cancer risk, age of onset and cancer type of three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)-TP53 Pro72Arg, MDM2 SNP285 and SNP309-already described as modifiers on TP53 mutation carriers but not properly investigated in LFS Suggestive patients. This case-control study examines 34 Italian LFS Suggestive lacking of germline TP53 mutations and 95 tumour-free subjects. A significant prevalence of homozygous MDM2 SNP309 G in the LFS Suggestive group (p < 0.0005) confirms its contribute to cancer susceptibility, also highlighted in LFS TP53 positive families. Conversely its anticipating role on tumour onset has not been confirmed, as in our results it was associated with the SNP309 T allele. A strong combined outcome with a 'dosage' effect has also been reported for TP53 P72 and MDM2 SNP309 G allele on cancer susceptibility (p < 0.0005). Whereas the MDM2 SNP285 C allele neutralizing effect on MDM2 SNP309 G variant is not evident in our population. Although it needs further evaluations, obtained results strengthen the role of MDM2 SNP309 as a genetic factor in hereditary predisposition to cancer, so improving LFS Suggestive patients management.

  4. Mutation and the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, M.L. ); Albertini, R.J. )

    1990-01-01

    This book is covered under the following topics: Somatic Mutation: Animal Model; Somatic Mutation: Human; Heritable Mutation: Animal Model; Heritable Mutation: Approaches to Human Induction Rates; Heritable Mutation: Human Risk; Epidemiology: Population Studies on Genotoxicity; and Epidemiology: Workplace Studies of Genotoxicity.

  5. 2015 Update of the Drug Resistance Mutations in HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Wensing, Annemarie M; Calvez, Vincent; Günthard, Huldrych F; Johnson, Victoria A; Paredes, Roger; Pillay, Deenan; Shafer, Robert W; Richman, Douglas D

    2015-01-01

    The 2015 edition of the IAS-USA drug resistance mutations list updates the figures last published in July 2014. The mutations listed are those that have been identified by specific criteria for evidence and drugs described. The figures are designed to assist practitioners in identifying key mutations associated with resistance to antiretroviral drugs and, therefore, in making clinical decisions regarding antiretroviral therapy.

  6. 2017 Update of the Drug Resistance Mutations in HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Wensing, Annemarie M; Calvez, Vincent; Günthard, Huldrych F; Johnson, Victoria A; Paredes, Roger; Pillay, Deenan; Shafer, Robert W; Richman, Douglas D

    The 2017 edition of the IAS-USA drug resistance mutations list updates the figures last published in November 2015. The mutations listed are those that have been identified by specific criteria for evidence and drugs described. The figures are designed to assist practitioners in identifying key mutations associated with resistance to antiretroviral drugs and, therefore, in making clinical decisions regarding antiretroviral therapy.

  7. Trichohepatoenteric syndrome: founder mutation in asian indians.

    PubMed

    Kotecha, U H; Movva, S; Puri, R D; Verma, I C

    2012-08-01

    Trichohepatoenteric syndrome (THES) is characterized by chronic diarrhea, dysmorphic facies and hair abnormalities. Hepatic involvement varies from no abnormality to cirrhosis and hemochromatosis. Recently, mutations in the tetratricopeptide repeat domain 37 (TTC37) gene were identified to cause THES. The c.2808G>A variation was suggested as a possible founder mutation among the South Asians. We further report 2 unrelated cases of Asian-Indian ethnicity (Gujrati) with THES, wherein targeted mutation analysis revealed the same mutation in homozygous form in both cases. These findings, as well as haplotype analysis, corroborate the founder mutation hypothesis amongst Asian Indo-Pakistani ethnic groups. A restriction enzyme-based method is also described to identify this founder mutation. One of our probands had multiple hepatic hemangiomas, a feature not previously observed in this syndrome.

  8. Mutations affecting enzymatic activity in liver arginase

    SciTech Connect

    Vockley, J.G.; Tabor, D.E.; Goodman, B.K.

    1994-09-01

    The hydrolysis of arginine to ornithine and urea is catalyzed by arginase in the last step of the urea cycle. We examined a group of arginase deficient patients by PCR-SSCP analysis to characterize the molecular basis of this disorder. A heterogeneous population of nonsense mutations, microdeletions, and missense mutations has been identified in our cohort. Microdeletions which introduce premature stop codons downstream of the deletion and nonsense mutations result in no arginase activity. These mutations occur randomly along the gene. The majority of missense mutations identified appear to occur in regions of high cross-species homology. To test the effect of these missense mutations on arginase activity, site-directed mutagenesis was used to re-create the patient mutations for in vivo expression studies in a prokaryotic fusion-protein expression system. Of 4 different missense mutations identified in 6 individuals, only one was located outside of a conserved region. The three substitution mutations within the conserved regions had a significant effect on enzymatic activity (0-3.1 nmole/30min, normal is 1300-1400 nmoles/30min, as determined by in vitro arginase assay), while the fourth mutation, a T to S substitution, did not. In addition, site-directed mutagenesis was utilized to create mutations not in residues postulated to play a significant role in the enzymatic function or active site formation in manganese-binding proteins such as arginase. We have determined that the substitution of glycine for a histidine residue, located in a very highly conserved region of exon 3, and the substitution of a histidine and an aspartic acid residue within a similarly conserved region in exon 4, totally abolishes enzymatic activity. Mutations substituting glycine for an additional histidine and aspartic acid residue in exon 4 and two aspartic acid residues in exon 7 have also been created. We are currently in the process of characterizing these mutations.

  9. OXPHOS mutations and neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Koopman, Werner J H; Distelmaier, Felix; Smeitink, Jan AM; Willems, Peter HGM

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) sustains organelle function and plays a central role in cellular energy metabolism. The OXPHOS system consists of 5 multisubunit complexes (CI–CV) that are built up of 92 different structural proteins encoded by the nuclear (nDNA) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Biogenesis of a functional OXPHOS system further requires the assistance of nDNA-encoded OXPHOS assembly factors, of which 35 are currently identified. In humans, mutations in both structural and assembly genes and in genes involved in mtDNA maintenance, replication, transcription, and translation induce ‘primary' OXPHOS disorders that are associated with neurodegenerative diseases including Leigh syndrome (LS), which is probably the most classical OXPHOS disease during early childhood. Here, we present the current insights regarding function, biogenesis, regulation, and supramolecular architecture of the OXPHOS system, as well as its genetic origin. Next, we provide an inventory of OXPHOS structural and assembly genes which, when mutated, induce human neurodegenerative disorders. Finally, we discuss the consequences of mutations in OXPHOS structural and assembly genes at the single cell level and how this information has advanced our understanding of the role of OXPHOS dysfunction in neurodegeneration. PMID:23149385

  10. APC germline mutations in families with familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    De Queiroz Rossanese, Lillian Barbosa; De Lima Marson, Fernando Augusto; Ribeiro, José Dirceu; Coy, Claudio Saddy Rodrigues; Bertuzzo, Carmen Silvia

    2013-11-01

    Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) germline mutations are responsible for the occurrence of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Somatic mutations lead to malignant transformation of adenomas. In this context, considering the significance of APC germline mutations in FAP, we aimed to identify APC germline mutations. In the present study, 20 FAP patients were enrolled. The determination of APC germline mutations was performed using sequencing, and the mutations were compared with clinical markers (gender, age at diagnosis, smoking habits, TNM stage, Astler‑Coller stage, degree of differentiation of adenocarcinoma). The data were compared using the SPSS program, with the Fisher's exact test and χ2 test, considering α=0.05. According to the main results in our sample, 16 alleles with deleterious mutations (80% of the patients) were identified while 7 (35%) patients had no deleterious mutations. There was a predominance of nonsense (45% of the patients) and frameshift (20% of the patients) mutations. There was no statistical significance between the APC germline mutations identified and the clinical variables considered in our study. Only TNM stage was associated with the presence of deleterious mutations. Patients with deleterious mutations had an OR, 0.086 (IC=0.001-0.984); TNM stage I+II in comparison with III+IV, when compared with the patients with no deleterious mutations identified. In this context, as a conclusion, we demonstrated the molecular heterogeneity of APC germline mutations in FAP and the difficulty to perform molecular diagnostics in a Brazilian population, considering the admixed population analyzed.

  11. Identifying Hazards

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The federal government has established a system of labeling hazardous materials to help identify the type of material and threat posed. Summaries of information on over 300 chemicals are maintained in the Envirofacts Master Chemical Integrator.

  12. Genomic Analysis of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Characterizes Strain Diversity for Recent U.S. Salmonellosis Cases and Identifies Mutations Linked to Loss of Fitness under Nitrosative and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, Hillary S.; Matamouros, Susana; Hager, Kyle R.; Brittnacher, Mitchell J.; Rohmer, Laurence; Radey, Matthew C.; Weiss, Eli J.; Kim, Katie B.; Jacobs, Michael A.; Sims-Day, Elizabeth H.; Yue, Min; Zaidi, Mussaret B.; Schifferli, Dieter M.; Manning, Shannon D.; Walson, Judd L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is one of the most common S. enterica serovars associated with U.S. foodborne outbreaks. S. Typhimurium bacteria isolated from humans exhibit wide-ranging virulence phenotypes in inbred mice, leading to speculation that some strains are more virulent in nature. However, it is unclear whether increased virulence in humans is related to organism characteristics or initial treatment failure due to antibiotic resistance. Strain diversity and genetic factors contributing to differential human pathogenicity remain poorly understood. We reconstructed phylogeny, resolved genetic population structure, determined gene content and nucleotide variants, and conducted targeted phenotyping assays for S. Typhimurium strains collected between 1946 and 2012 from humans and animals in the United States and abroad. Strains from recent U.S. salmonellosis cases were associated with five S. Typhimurium lineages distributed within three phylogenetic clades, which are not restricted by geography, year of acquisition, or host. Notably, two U.S. strains and four Mexican strains are more closely related to strains associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals in sub-Saharan Africa than to other North American strains. Phenotyping studies linked variants specific to these strains in hmpA and katE to loss of fitness under nitrosative and oxidative stress, respectively. These results suggest that U.S. salmonellosis is caused by diverse S. Typhimurium strains circulating worldwide. One lineage has mutations in genes affecting fitness related to innate immune system strategies for fighting pathogens and may be adapting to immunocompromised humans by a reduction in virulence capability, possibly due to a lack of selection for its maintenance as a result of the worldwide HIV epidemic. PMID:26956590

  13. FKRP mutations, including a founder mutation, cause phenotype variability in Chinese patients with dystroglycanopathies.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaona; Yang, Haipo; Wei, Cuijie; Jiao, Hui; Wang, Shuo; Yang, Yanling; Han, Chunxi; Wu, Xiru; Xiong, Hui

    2016-12-01

    Mutations in the fukutin-related protein (FKRP) gene have been associated with dystroglycanopathies, which are common in Europe but rare in Asia. Our study aimed to retrospectively analyze and characterize the clinical, myopathological and genetic features of 12 Chinese patients with FKRP mutations. Three patients were diagnosed with congenital muscular dystrophy type 1C (MDC1C) and nine patients were diagnosed with limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2I (LGMD2I). Three muscle biopsy specimens had dystrophic changes and reduced glycosylated α-dystroglycan staining, and two showed reduced expression of laminin α2. Two known and 13 novel mutations were identified in our single center cohort. Interestingly, the c.545A>G mutation was found in eight of the nine LGMD2I patients as a founder mutation and this founder mutation in Chinese patients differs from the one seen in European patients. Moreover, patients homozygous for the c.545A>G mutation were clinically asymptomatic, a less severe phenotype than in compound heterozygous patients with the c.545A>G mutation. The 13 novel mutations of FKRP significantly expanded the mutation spectrum of MDC1C and LGMD2I, and the different founder mutations indicate the ethnic difference in FKRP mutations.

  14. Chlamydia trachomatis clinical isolates identified as tetracycline resistant do not exhibit resistance in vitro: whole-genome sequencing reveals a mutation in porB but no evidence for tetracycline resistance genes.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, C E; Seth-Smith, H M B; Van Der Pol, B; Harris, S R; Thomson, N R; Cutcliffe, L T; Clarke, I N

    2013-04-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common bacterial sexually transmitted infection worldwide and the leading cause of preventable blindness in developing countries. Tetracycline is commonly the drug of choice for treating C. trachomatis infections, but cases of antibiotic resistance in clinical isolates have previously been reported. Here, we used antibiotic resistance assays and whole-genome sequencing to interrogate the hypothesis that two clinical isolates (IU824 and IU888) have acquired mechanisms of antibiotic resistance. Immunofluorescence staining was used to identify C. trachomatis inclusions in cell cultures grown in the presence of tetracycline; however, only antibiotic-free control cultures yielded the strong fluorescence associated with the presence of chlamydial inclusions. Infectivity was lost upon passage of harvested cultures grown in the presence of tetracycline into antibiotic-free medium, so we conclude that these isolates were phenotypically sensitive to tetracycline. Comparisons of the genome and plasmid sequences for the two isolates with tetracycline-sensitive strains did not identify regions of low sequence identity that could accommodate horizontally acquired resistance genes, and the tetracycline binding region of the 16S rRNA gene was identical to that of the sensitive control strains. The porB gene of strain IU824, however, was found to contain a premature stop codon not previously identified, which is noteworthy but unlikely to be related to tetracycline resistance. In conclusion, we found no evidence of tetracycline resistance in the two strains investigated, and it seems most likely that the small, aberrant inclusions previously identified resulted from the high chlamydial load used in the original antibiotic resistance assays.

  15. [TP53 mutations and molecular epidemiology].

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Kazunori; Ishioka, Chikashi

    2007-05-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 protein is activated by a variety of cellular stresses through several pathways and transactivates its downstream genes, including regulators of cell cycle, apoptosis and DNA repair. The loss of p53 function by TP53 gene mutations therefore fails to activate these genes and is thought to be a critical cause of carcinogenesis and/or tumor progression. TP53 is one of the most frequently mutated genes in human cancer. TP53 mutations are found in about 50% of human cancers, although the frequency of TP53 mutations differs among tumor types. However, the degree of functional disorder of mutant p53 varies according to the type of TP53 mutation. And the effects of p53 on cancer formation and/or progression are influenced by the degree of p53 dysfunction. So it is important to analyze the effects of TP53 mutations carefully according to the oncogenicity of each mutation from the molecular epidemiological point of view. Here, together with some cautions needed for analyzing and interpreting the significance of TP53 gene mutations, we present some examples of the identified specific mutation spectrum and the correlation between the prognosis and TP53 mutation in some cancers.

  16. SOS mutator DNA polymerase IV functions in adaptive mutation and not adaptive amplification.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, G J; Lee, P L; Lombardo, M J; Hastings, P J; Rosenberg, S M

    2001-03-01

    Adaptive point mutation and amplification are induced responses to environmental stress, promoting genetic changes that can enhance survival. A specialized adaptive mutation mechanism has been documented in one Escherichia coli assay, but its enzymatic basis remained unclear. We report that the SOS-inducible, error-prone DNA polymerase (pol) IV, encoded by dinB, is required for adaptive point mutation in the E. coli lac operon. A nonpolar dinB mutation reduces adaptive mutation frequencies by 85% but does not affect adaptive amplification, growth-dependent mutation, or survival after oxidative or UV damage. We show that pol IV, together with the major replicase, pol III, can account for all adaptive point mutations at lac. The results identify a role for pol IV in inducible genetic change.

  17. Mantle cell lymphoma displays a homogenous methylation profile: a comparative analysis with chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Halldórsdóttir, Anna Margrét; Kanduri, Meena; Marincevic, Millaray; Mansouri, Larry; Isaksson, Anders; Göransson, Hanna; Axelsson, Tomas; Agarwal, Prasoon; Jernberg-Wiklund, Helena; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Sander, Birgitta; Ehrencrona, Hans; Rosenquist, Richard

    2012-04-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) are mature CD5(+) B-cell malignancies with different biological/clinical characteristics. We recently reported an association between different prognostic subgroups of CLL (i.e., IGHV mutated and unmutated) and genomic methylation pattern. However, the relationship between DNA methylation and prognostic markers, such as the proliferation gene expression signature, has not been investigated in MCL. We applied high-resolution methylation microarrays (27,578 CpG sites) to assess the global DNA methylation profiles in 20 MCL (10 each with high/low proliferation signature) and 30 CLL (15 poor-prognostic IGHV unmutated subset #1 and 15 good-prognostic IGHV mutated subset #4) samples. Notably, MCL and each CLL subset displayed distinct genomic methylation profiles. After unsupervised hierarchical clustering, 17/20 MCL cases formed a cluster separate from CLL, while CLL subsets #1 and #4 formed subclusters. Surprisingly, few differentially methylated genes (n = 6) were identified between high vs. low proliferation MCL. In contrast, distinct methylation profiles were demonstrated for MCL and CLL. Importantly, certain functional classes of genes were preferentially methylated in either disease. For instance, developmental genes, in particular homeobox transcription factor genes (e.g., HLXB9, HOXA13), were more highly methylated in MCL, whereas apoptosis-related genes were enriched among targets methylated in CLL (e.g., CYFIP2, NR4A1). Results were validated using pyrosequencing, RQ-PCR and reexpression of specific genes. In summary, the methylation profile of MCL was homogeneous and no correlation with the proliferation signature was observed. Compared to CLL, however, marked differences were discovered such as the preferential methylation of homeobox genes in MCL.

  18. Gene mutations in Cushing's disease

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Qi; Ge, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Cushing's disease (CD) is a severe (and potentially fatal) disease caused by adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting adenomas of the pituitary gland (often termed pituitary adenomas). The majority of ACTH-secreting corticotroph tumors are sporadic and CD rarely appears as a familial disorder, thus, the genetic mechanisms underlying CD are poorly understood. Studies have reported that various mutated genes are associated with CD, such as those in menin 1, aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein and the nuclear receptor subfamily 3 group C member 1. Recently it was identified that ubiquitin-specific protease 8 mutations contribute to CD, which was significant towards elucidating the genetic mechanisms of CD. The present study reviews the associated gene mutations in CD patients. PMID:27588171

  19. A Haplotype Framework for Cystic Fibrosis Mutations in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Elahi, Elahe; Khodadad, Ahmad; Kupershmidt, Ilya; Ghasemi, Fereshteh; Alinasab, Babak; Naghizadeh, Ramin; Eason, Robert G.; Amini, Mahshid; Esmaili, Mehran; Esmaeili Dooki, Mohammad R.; Sanati, Mohammad H.; Davis, Ronald W.; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Thorstenson, Yvonne R.

    2006-01-01

    This is the first comprehensive profile of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mutations and their corresponding haplotypes in the Iranian population. All of the 27 CFTR exons of 60 unrelated Iranian CF patients were sequenced to identify disease-causing mutations. Eleven core haplotypes of CFTR were identified by genotyping six high-frequency simple nucleotide polymorphisms. The carrier frequency of 2.5 in 100 (1 in 40) was estimated from the frequency of heterozygous patients and suggests that contrary to popular belief, cystic fibrosis may be a common, under-diagnosed disease in Iran. A heterogeneous mutation spectrum was observed at the CFTR locus in 60 cystic fibrosis (CF) patients from Iran. Twenty putative disease-causing mutations were identified on 64 (53%) of the 120 chromosomes. The five most common Iranian mutations together represented 37% of the expected mutated alleles. The most frequent mutation, ΔF508 (p.F508del), represented only 16% of the expected mutated alleles. The next most frequent mutations were c.1677del2 (p.515fs) at 7.5%, c.4041C>G (p.N1303K) at 5.6%, c.2183AA>G (p.684fs) at 5%, and c.3661A>T (p.K1177X) at 2.5%. Three of the five most frequent Iranian mutations are not included in a commonly used panel of CF mutations, underscoring the importance of identifying geographic-specific mutations in this population. PMID:16436643

  20. A haplotype framework for cystic fibrosis mutations in Iran.

    PubMed

    Elahi, Elahe; Khodadad, Ahmad; Kupershmidt, Ilya; Ghasemi, Fereshteh; Alinasab, Babak; Naghizadeh, Ramin; Eason, Robert G; Amini, Mahshid; Esmaili, Mehran; Esmaeili Dooki, Mohammad R; Sanati, Mohammad H; Davis, Ronald W; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Thorstenson, Yvonne R

    2006-02-01

    This is the first comprehensive profile of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mutations and their corresponding haplotypes in the Iranian population. All of the 27 CFTR exons of 60 unrelated Iranian CF patients were sequenced to identify disease-causing mutations. Eleven core haplotypes of CFTR were identified by genotyping six high-frequency simple nucleotide polymorphisms. The carrier frequency of 2.5 in 100 (1 in 40) was estimated from the frequency of heterozygous patients and suggests that contrary to popular belief, cystic fibrosis may be a common, under-diagnosed disease in Iran. A heterogeneous mutation spectrum was observed at the CFTR locus in 60 cystic fibrosis (CF) patients from Iran. Twenty putative disease-causing mutations were identified on 64 (53%) of the 120 chromosomes. The five most common Iranian mutations together represented 37% of the expected mutated alleles. The most frequent mutation, DeltaF508 (p.F508del), represented only 16% of the expected mutated alleles. The next most frequent mutations were c.1677del2 (p.515fs) at 7.5%, c.4041C>G (p.N1303K) at 5.6%, c.2183AA>G (p.684fs) at 5%, and c.3661A>T (p.K1177X) at 2.5%. Three of the five most frequent Iranian mutations are not included in a commonly used panel of CF mutations, underscoring the importance of identifying geographic-specific mutations in this population.

  1. Role of ADAMTSL4 mutations in FBN1 mutation-negative ectopia lentis patients.

    PubMed

    Aragon-Martin, Jose Antonio; Ahnood, Dana; Charteris, David G; Saggar, Anand; Nischal, Ken K; Comeglio, Paolo; Chandra, Aman; Child, Anne H; Arno, Gavin

    2010-08-01

    Ectopia lentis (EL) is genetically heterogeneous with both autosomal-dominant and -recessive forms. The dominant disorder can be caused by mutations in FBN1, at the milder end of the type-1 fibrillinopathies spectrum. Recently in a consanguineous Jordanian family, recessive EL was mapped to locus 1q21 containing the ADAMTSL4 gene and a nonsense mutation was found in exon 11 (c.1785T>G, p.Y595X). In this study, 36 consecutive probands with EL who did not fulfill the Ghent criteria for MFS were screened for mutations in FBN1 and ADAMTSL4. Causative FBN1 mutations were identified in 23/36 (64%) of probands while homozygous or compound heterozygous ADAMTSL4 mutations were identified in 6/12 (50%) of the remaining probands. Where available, familial screening of these families confirmed the mutation co-segregated with the EL phenotype. This study confirms that homozygous mutations in ADAMTSL4 are associated with autosomal-recessive EL in British families. Furthermore; the first compound heterozygous mutation is described resulting in a PTC and a missense mutation in the PLAC (protease and lacunin) domain. The identification of a causative mutation in ADAMTSL4 may allow the exclusion of Marfan syndrome in these families and guide the clinical management, of particular relevance in young children affected by EL.

  2. Understanding mutagenesis through delineation of mutational signatures in human cancer

    DOE PAGES

    Petljak, Mia; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.

    2016-05-04

    Each individual cell within a human body acquires a certain number of somatic mutations during a course of its lifetime. These mutations originate from a wide spectra of both endogenous and exogenous mutational processes that leave distinct patterns of mutations, termed mutational signatures, embedded within the genomes of all cells. In recent years, the vast amount of data produced by sequencing of cancer genomes was coupled with novel mathematical models and computational tools to generate the first comprehensive map of mutational signatures in human cancer. Up to date, >30 distinct mutational signatures have been identified, and etiologies have been proposedmore » for many of them. This paper provides a brief historical background on examination of mutational patterns in human cancer, summarizes the knowledge accumulated since introducing the concept of mutational signatures and discusses their future potential applications and perspectives within the field.« less

  3. Understanding mutagenesis through delineation of mutational signatures in human cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Petljak, Mia; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.

    2016-05-04

    Each individual cell within a human body acquires a certain number of somatic mutations during a course of its lifetime. These mutations originate from a wide spectra of both endogenous and exogenous mutational processes that leave distinct patterns of mutations, termed mutational signatures, embedded within the genomes of all cells. In recent years, the vast amount of data produced by sequencing of cancer genomes was coupled with novel mathematical models and computational tools to generate the first comprehensive map of mutational signatures in human cancer. Up to date, >30 distinct mutational signatures have been identified, and etiologies have been proposed for many of them. This paper provides a brief historical background on examination of mutational patterns in human cancer, summarizes the knowledge accumulated since introducing the concept of mutational signatures and discusses their future potential applications and perspectives within the field.

  4. Detection of mutations in the ALD gene (ABCD1) in seven Italian families: description of four novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Lira, M G; Mottes, M; Pignatti, P F; Medica, I; Uziel, G; Cappa, M; Bertini, E; Rizzuto, N; Salviati, A

    2000-09-01

    The study describes the mutations causing adrenoleukodystrophy in seven Italian families. Four missense mutations leading to amino acid substitutions, two frameshift mutations leading to a premature termination signal, and a splicing mutation were identified. Mutations 2014C>T (P543L), 2053A>G (Q556A), 673-674insCC, and 1874+1G>A are described for the first time in this report. Mutations 1638C>T (R418W), 1588G>A(R401Q), and 1801-1802delAG are already known to be link to ALD.

  5. Gene mutations in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Amin, Nisar A; Malek, Sami N

    2016-04-01

    The recent discovery of genes mutated in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) has stimulated new research into the role of these genes in CLL pathogenesis. CLL cases carry approximately 5-20 mutated genes per exome, a lower number than detected in many human tumors. Of the recurrently mutated genes in CLL, all are mutated in 10% or less of patients when assayed in unselected CLL cohorts at diagnosis. Mutations in TP53 are of major clinical relevance, are often associated with del17p and gain in frequency over time. TP53 mutated and associated del17p states substantially lower response rates, remission duration, and survival in CLL. Mutations in NOTCH1 and SF3B1 are recurrent, often associated with progressive CLL that is also IgVH unmutated and ZAP70-positive and are under investigation as targets for novel therapies and as factors influencing CLL outcome. There are an estimated 20-50 additional mutated genes with frequencies of 1%-5% in CLL; more work is needed to identify these and to study their significance. Finally, of the major biological aberration categories influencing CLL as a disease, gene mutations will need to be placed into context with regard to their ultimate role and importance. Such calibrated appreciation necessitates studies incorporating multiple CLL driver aberrations into biological and clinical analyses.

  6. Factors affecting the nature of induced mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, L.B.; Russell, W.L.; Rinchik, E.M.; Hunsicker, P.R.

    1989-01-01

    The recent considerable expansion of specific-locus-mutation data has made possible an examination of the effects of germ-cell stage on both quantity of mutation yield and nature of mutations. For chemicals mutagenic in poststem-cell stages, three patterns have been identified according to the stages in which they elicit maximum response: (1) early spermatozoa and late spermatids; (2) early spermatids; and (3) differentiating spermatogonia. The majority of chemicals tested fall into Pattern 1. Chemicals that are also mutagenic in stem-cell spermatogonia do not preferentially belong to any one of these three categories. For only one chemical (CHL) has an entire set of mutations been analyzed molecularly. However, the results of genetic and molecular analyses of genomic regions surrounding six of the specific-locus markers allow us to conclude that any mutation that causes lethality of homozygotes (in the case of d, prenatal lethality, specifically) must involve one or more loci in addition to the marked one. Such mutations have been classified as large lesions'' (LL), the remainder as other lesions'' (OL). Analysis of the data shows that, regardless of the nature of the chemical (Pattern-1, -2, or -3), (1) LLs constitute a very low proportion of the mutations induced in either stem-cell or differentiating spermatogonia, and (b) LLs constitute a high proportion of mutations induced in postmeiotic stages. Chemicals that are active in both pre- and postmeiotic stages produce LL or OL mutations depending on cell stage.

  7. Mutational analysis using oligonucleotide microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Hacia, J.; Collins, F.

    1999-01-01

    The development of inexpensive high throughput methods to identify individual DNA sequence differences is important to the future growth of medical genetics. This has become increasingly apparent as epidemiologists, pathologists, and clinical geneticists focus more attention on the molecular basis of complex multifactorial diseases. Such undertakings will rely upon genetic maps based upon newly discovered, common, single nucleotide polymorphisms. Furthermore, candidate gene approaches used in identifying disease associated genes necessitate screening large sequence blocks for changes tracking with the disease state. Even after such genes are isolated, large scale mutational analyses will often be needed for risk assessment studies to define the likely medical consequences of carrying a mutated gene.
This review concentrates on the use of oligonucleotide arrays for hybridisation based comparative sequence analysis. Technological advances within the past decade have made it possible to apply this technology to many different aspects of medical genetics. These applications range from the detection and scoring of single nucleotide polymorphisms to mutational analysis of large genes. Although we discuss published scientific reports, unpublished work from the private sector12 could also significantly affect the future of this technology.


Keywords: mutational analysis; oligonucleotide microarrays; DNA chips PMID:10528850

  8. Exposing synonymous mutations.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Ryan C; Simhadri, Vijaya L; Iandoli, Matthew; Sauna, Zuben E; Kimchi-Sarfaty, Chava

    2014-07-01

    Synonymous codon changes, which do not alter protein sequence, were previously thought to have no functional consequence. Although this concept has been overturned in recent years, there is no unique mechanism by which these changes exert biological effects. A large repertoire of both experimental and bioinformatic methods has been developed to understand the effects of synonymous variants. Results from this body of work have provided global insights into how biological systems exploit the degeneracy of the genetic code to control gene expression, protein folding efficiency, and the coordinated expression of functionally related gene families. Although it is now clear that synonymous variants are important in a variety of contexts, from human disease to the safety and efficacy of therapeutic proteins, there is no clear consensus on the approaches to identify and validate these changes. Here, we review the diverse methods to understand the effects of synonymous mutations.

  9. Integrative analysis of mutational and transcriptional profiles reveals driver mutations of metastatic breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Hyun; Zhao, Xing-Ming; Yoon, Ina; Lee, Jin Young; Kwon, Nam Hoon; Wang, Yin-Ying; Lee, Kyung-Min; Lee, Min-Joo; Kim, Jisun; Moon, Hyeong-Gon; In, Yongho; Hao, Jin-Kao; Park, Kyung-Mii; Noh, Dong-Young; Han, Wonshik; Kim, Sunghoon

    2016-01-01

    Despite the explosion in the numbers of cancer genomic studies, metastasis is still the major cause of cancer mortality. In breast cancer, approximately one-fifth of metastatic patients survive 5 years. Therefore, detecting the patients at a high risk of developing distant metastasis at first diagnosis is critical for effective treatment strategy. We hereby present a novel systems biology approach to identify driver mutations escalating the risk of metastasis based on both exome and RNA sequencing of our collected 78 normal-paired breast cancers. Unlike driver mutations occurring commonly in cancers as reported in the literature, the mutations detected here are relatively rare mutations occurring in less than half metastatic samples. By supposing that the driver mutations should affect the metastasis gene signatures, we develop a novel computational pipeline to identify the driver mutations that affect transcription factors regulating metastasis gene signatures. We identify driver mutations in ADPGK, NUP93, PCGF6, PKP2 and SLC22A5, which are verified to enhance cancer cell migration and prompt metastasis with in vitro experiments. The discovered somatic mutations may be helpful for identifying patients who are likely to develop distant metastasis. PMID:27625789

  10. Integrative analysis of mutational and transcriptional profiles reveals driver mutations of metastatic breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Hyun; Zhao, Xing-Ming; Yoon, Ina; Lee, Jin Young; Kwon, Nam Hoon; Wang, Yin-Ying; Lee, Kyung-Min; Lee, Min-Joo; Kim, Jisun; Moon, Hyeong-Gon; In, Yongho; Hao, Jin-Kao; Park, Kyung-Mii; Noh, Dong-Young; Han, Wonshik; Kim, Sunghoon

    2016-01-01

    Despite the explosion in the numbers of cancer genomic studies, metastasis is still the major cause of cancer mortality. In breast cancer, approximately one-fifth of metastatic patients survive 5 years. Therefore, detecting the patients at a high risk of developing distant metastasis at first diagnosis is critical for effective treatment strategy. We hereby present a novel systems biology approach to identify driver mutations escalating the risk of metastasis based on both exome and RNA sequencing of our collected 78 normal-paired breast cancers. Unlike driver mutations occurring commonly in cancers as reported in the literature, the mutations detected here are relatively rare mutations occurring in less than half metastatic samples. By supposing that the driver mutations should affect the metastasis gene signatures, we develop a novel computational pipeline to identify the driver mutations that affect transcription factors regulating metastasis gene signatures. We identify driver mutations in ADPGK, NUP93, PCGF6, PKP2 and SLC22A5, which are verified to enhance cancer cell migration and prompt metastasis with in vitro experiments. The discovered somatic mutations may be helpful for identifying patients who are likely to develop distant metastasis.

  11. Spectrum of small mutations in the dystrophin coding region.

    PubMed Central

    Prior, T W; Bartolo, C; Pearl, D K; Papp, A C; Snyder, P J; Sedra, M S; Burghes, A H; Mendell, J R

    1995-01-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD and BMD) are caused by defects in the dystrophin gene. About two-thirds of the affected patients have large deletions or duplications, which occur in the 5' and central portion of the gene. The nondeletion/duplication cases are most likely the result of smaller mutations that cannot be identified by current diagnostic screening strategies. We screened approximately 80% of the dystrophin coding sequence for small mutations in 158 patients without deletions or duplications and identified 29 mutations. The study indicates that many of the DMD and the majority of the BMD small mutations lie in noncoding regions of the gene. All of the mutations identified were unique to single patients, and most of the mutations resulted in protein truncation. We did not find a clustering of small mutations similar to the deletion distribution but found > 40% of the small mutations 3' of exon 55. The extent of protein truncation caused by the 3' mutations did not determine the phenotype, since even the exon 76 nonsense mutation resulted in the severe DMD phenotype. Our study confirms that the dystrophin gene is subject to a high rate of mutation in CpG sequences. As a consequence of not finding any hotspots or prevalent small mutations, we conclude that it is presently not possible to perform direct carrier and prenatal diagnostics for many families without deletions or duplications. Images Figure 2 PMID:7611292

  12. Spectrum of small mutations in the dystrophin coding region.

    PubMed

    Prior, T W; Bartolo, C; Pearl, D K; Papp, A C; Snyder, P J; Sedra, M S; Burghes, A H; Mendell, J R

    1995-07-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD and BMD) are caused by defects in the dystrophin gene. About two-thirds of the affected patients have large deletions or duplications, which occur in the 5' and central portion of the gene. The nondeletion/duplication cases are most likely the result of smaller mutations that cannot be identified by current diagnostic screening strategies. We screened approximately 80% of the dystrophin coding sequence for small mutations in 158 patients without deletions or duplications and identified 29 mutations. The study indicates that many of the DMD and the majority of the BMD small mutations lie in noncoding regions of the gene. All of the mutations identified were unique to single patients, and most of the mutations resulted in protein truncation. We did not find a clustering of small mutations similar to the deletion distribution but found > 40% of the small mutations 3' of exon 55. The extent of protein truncation caused by the 3' mutations did not determine the phenotype, since even the exon 76 nonsense mutation resulted in the severe DMD phenotype. Our study confirms that the dystrophin gene is subject to a high rate of mutation in CpG sequences. As a consequence of not finding any hotspots or prevalent small mutations, we conclude that it is presently not possible to perform direct carrier and prenatal diagnostics for many families without deletions or duplications.

  13. Exonuclease mutations in DNA polymerase epsilon reveal replication strand specific mutation patterns and human origins of replication.

    PubMed

    Shinbrot, Eve; Henninger, Erin E; Weinhold, Nils; Covington, Kyle R; Göksenin, A Yasemin; Schultz, Nikolaus; Chao, Hsu; Doddapaneni, HarshaVardhan; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Sander, Chris; Pursell, Zachary F; Wheeler, David A

    2014-11-01

    Tumors with somatic mutations in the proofreading exonuclease domain of DNA polymerase epsilon (POLE-exo*) exhibit a novel mutator phenotype, with markedly elevated TCT→TAT and TCG→TTG mutations and overall mutation frequencies often exceeding 100 mutations/Mb. Here, we identify POLE-exo* tumors in numerous cancers and classify them into two groups, A and B, according to their mutational properties. Group A mutants are found only in POLE, whereas Group B mutants are found in POLE and POLD1 and appear to be nonfunctional. In Group A, cell-free polymerase assays confirm that mutations in the exonuclease domain result in high mutation frequencies with a preference for C→A mutation. We describe the patterns of amino acid substitutions caused by POLE-exo* and compare them to other tumor types. The nucleotide preference of POLE-exo* leads to increased frequencies of recurrent nonsense mutations in key tumor suppressors such as TP53, ATM, and PIK3R1. We further demonstrate that strand-specific mutation patterns arise from some of these POLE-exo* mutants during genome duplication. This is the first direct proof of leading strand-specific replication by human POLE, which has only been demonstrated in yeast so far. Taken together, the extremely high mutation frequency and strand specificity of mutations provide a unique identifier of eukaryotic origins of replication.

  14. Mutational screening of the RB1 gene in Italian patients with retinoblastoma reveals 11 novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Sampieri, Katia; Hadjistilianou, Theodora; Mari, Francesca; Speciale, Caterina; Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; Cetta, Francesco; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Giachino, Daniela; Pasini, Barbara; Acquaviva, Antonio; Caporossi, Aldo; Frezzotti, Renato; Renieri, Alessandra; Bruttini, Mirella

    2006-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB, OMIM#180200) is the most common intraocular tumour in infancy and early childhood. Constituent mutations in the RB1 gene predispose individuals to RB development. We performed a mutational screening of the RB1 gene in Italian patients affected by RB referred to the Medical Genetics of the University of Siena. In 35 unrelated patients, we identified germline RB1 mutations in 6 out of 9 familial cases (66%) and in 7 out of 26 with no family history of RB (27%). Using the single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) technique, 11 novel mutations were detected, including 3 nonsense, 5 frameshift and 4 splice-site mutations. Only two of these mutations (1 splice site and 1 missense) were previously reported. The mutation spectrum reflects the published literature, encompassing predominately nonsense or frameshift and splicing mutations. RB1 germline mutation was detected in 37% of our cases. Gross rearrangements outside the investigated region, altered DNA methylation, or mutations in non-coding regions, may be the cause of disease in the remainder of the patients. Some cases, e.g. a case of incomplete penetrance, or variable expressivity ranging from retinoma to multiple tumours, are discussed in detail. In addition, a case of pre-conception genetic counselling resolved by rescue of banked cordonal blood of the affected deceased child is described.

  15. Oncogenic PIK3CA mutations occur in epidermal nevi and seborrheic keratoses with a characteristic mutation pattern

    PubMed Central

    Hafner, Christian; López-Knowles, Elena; Luis, Nuno M.; Toll, Agustí; Baselga, Eulàlia; Fernández-Casado, Alex; Hernández, Silvia; Ribé, Adriana; Mentzel, Thomas; Stoehr, Robert; Hofstaedter, Ferdinand; Landthaler, Michael; Vogt, Thomas; Pujol, Ramòn M.; Hartmann, Arndt; Real, Francisco X.

    2007-01-01

    Activating mutations of the p110 α subunit of PI3K (PIK3CA) oncogene have been identified in a broad spectrum of malignant tumors. However, their role in benign or preneoplastic conditions is unknown. Activating FGF receptor 3 (FGFR3) mutations are common in benign skin lesions, either as embryonic mutations in epidermal nevi (EN) or as somatic mutations in seborrheic keratoses (SK). FGFR3 mutations are also common in low-grade malignant bladder tumors, where they often occur in association with PIK3CA mutations. Therefore, we examined exons 9 and 20 of PIK3CA and FGFR3 hotspot mutations in EN (n = 33) and SK (n = 62), two proliferative skin lesions lacking malignant potential. Nine of 33 (27%) EN harbored PIK3CA mutations; all cases showed the E545G substitution, which is uncommon in cancers. In EN, R248C was the only FGFR3 mutation identified. By contrast, 10 of 62 (16%) SK revealed the typical cancer-associated PIK3CA mutations E542K, E545K, and H1047R. The same lesions displayed a wide range of FGFR3 mutations. Corresponding unaffected tissue was available for four EN and two mutant SK: all control samples displayed a WT sequence, confirming the somatic nature of the mutations found in lesional tissue. Forty of 95 (42%) lesions showed at least one mutation in either gene. PIK3CA and FGFR3 mutations displayed an independent distribution; 5/95 lesions harbored mutations in both genes. Our findings suggest that, in addition to their role in cancer, oncogenic PIK3CA mutations contribute to the pathogenesis of skin tumors lacking malignant potential. The remarkable genotype–phenotype correlation as observed in this study points to a distinct etiopathogenesis of the mutations in keratinocytes occuring either during fetal development or in adult life. PMID:17673550

  16. Reverse mutations in fragile X syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, W.T.; Nolin, S.; Houck, G.E.

    1994-09-01

    The fragile X syndrome is the most common inherited form of mental retardation. Yet new mutations have not been described and no affected child has been born to a carrier mother having less than 60 FMR-1 CGG triplet repeats. Reverse mutations also appear to be very rare. We have previously identified the daughter of a premutation mother (95 CGGs) who inherited a normal repeat size of 35 as a reverse mutation. In the process of carrier testing by PCR, we have now identified two additional females with reverse mutations. All three of these reverse mutation women were previously tested by linkage as part of known fragile X families (subsequently confirmed by direct analysis), and assigned a > 99% risk as a carrier. In the second family, the mother carries a premutation allele of 95 repeats and the daughter inherited a 43 repeat allele. Prior to direct DNA testing, she had a positive prenatal diagnosis by linkage (> 99% risk) and cytogenetics with 3/450 cells apparently positive. Subsequent retesting of the products of conception by PCR now reveals a 43 repeat allele from her carrier mother with an 82 repeat allele. Testing with close CA markers (FRAXAC1 and DXS548) confirmed that these women inherited the same chromosome and their full mutation brothers. Further analysis is pending. These examples of reverse mutations are the only ones we have identified in our study of offspring of more than 200 carriers (400+ meioses) examined to date. Therefore, we conclude the frequency of fragile X back mutations is likely to be less than 1%. Retesting of linkage positive carriers is recommended to detect reverse mutations and assure accurate genetic counseling.

  17. Interlaboratory comparison of IDH mutation detection.

    PubMed

    van den Bent, Martin J; Hartmann, C; Preusser, Matthias; Ströbel, Thomas; Dubbink, Hendrikus J; Kros, Johan M; von Deimling, Andreas; Boisselier, Blandine; Sanson, Marc; Halling, Kevin C; Diefes, Kristin L; Aldape, Kenneth; Giannini, Caterina

    2013-04-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutational testing is becoming increasingly important. For this, robust and reliable assays are needed. We tested the variation of results between six laboratories of testing for IDH mutations. Each laboratory received five unstained slides from 31 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) glioma samples, and followed its own standard IDH diagnostic routine. All laboratories used immunohistochemistry (IHC) with an antibody against the most frequent IDH1 mutation (R132H) as a first step. Three laboratories then sequenced only IHC negative cases while the others sequenced all cases. Based on the overall analysis, 13 samples from 11 tumors had an R132H mutation and one tumor showed an R132G mutation. Results of IHC for IDH1 R132H mutations in all six laboratories were completely in agreement, and identified all R132H mutations. Upon sequencing the results of two laboratories deviated from those of the others. After a review of the entire diagnostic process, on repeat (blinded) testing one laboratory was completely in agreement with the overall result. A change in technique did only partially improve the results in the other laboratory. IHC for the IDH1 R132H mutation is very reliable and consistent across laboratories. IDH sequencing procedures yielded inconsistent results in 2 out of 6 laboratories. Quality assurance is pivotal before IDH testing is made part of clinical management of patients.

  18. IFITM5 mutations and osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Hanagata, Nobutaka

    2016-03-01

    Interferon-induced transmembrane protein 5 (IFITM5) is an osteoblast-specific membrane protein that has been shown to be a positive regulatory factor for mineralization in vitro. However, Ifitm5 knockout mice do not exhibit serious bone abnormalities, and thus the function of IFITM5 in vivo remains unclear. Recently, a single point mutation (c.-14C>T) in the 5' untranslated region of IFITM5 was identified in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta type V (OI-V). Furthermore, a single point mutation (c.119C>T) in the coding region of IFITM5 was identified in OI patients with more severe symptoms than patients with OI-V. Although IFITM5 is not directly involved in the formation of bone in vivo, the reason why IFITM5 mutations cause OI remains a major mystery. In this review, the current state of knowledge of OI pathological mechanisms due to IFITM5 mutations will be reviewed.

  19. Weaver syndrome and EZH2 mutations: Clarifying the clinical phenotype.

    PubMed

    Tatton-Brown, Katrina; Murray, Anne; Hanks, Sandra; Douglas, Jenny; Armstrong, Ruth; Banka, Siddharth; Bird, Lynne M; Clericuzio, Carol L; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Cushing, Tom; Flinter, Frances; Jacquemont, Marie-Line; Joss, Shelagh; Kinning, Esther; Lynch, Sally Ann; Magee, Alex; McConnell, Vivienne; Medeira, Ana; Ozono, Keiichi; Patton, Michael; Rankin, Julia; Shears, Debbie; Simon, Marleen; Splitt, Miranda; Strenger, Volker; Stuurman, Kyra; Taylor, Clare; Titheradge, Hannah; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Temple, I Karen; Cole, Trevor; Seal, Sheila; Rahman, Nazneen

    2013-12-01

    Weaver syndrome, first described in 1974, is characterized by tall stature, a typical facial appearance, and variable intellectual disability. In 2011, mutations in the histone methyltransferase, EZH2, were shown to cause Weaver syndrome. To date, we have identified 48 individuals with EZH2 mutations. The mutations were primarily missense mutations occurring throughout the gene, with some clustering in the SET domain (12/48). Truncating mutations were uncommon (4/48) and only identified in the final exon, after the SET domain. Through analyses of clinical data and facial photographs of EZH2 mutation-positive individuals, we have shown that the facial features can be subtle and the clinical diagnosis of Weaver syndrome is thus challenging, especially in older individuals. However, tall stature is very common, reported in >90% of affected individuals. Intellectual disability is also common, present in ~80%, but is highly variable and frequently mild. Additional clinical features which may help in stratifying individuals to EZH2 mutation testing include camptodactyly, soft, doughy skin, umbilical hernia, and a low, hoarse cry. Considerable phenotypic overlap between Sotos and Weaver syndromes is also evident. The identification of an EZH2 mutation can therefore provide an objective means of confirming a subtle presentation of Weaver syndrome and/or distinguishing Weaver and Sotos syndromes. As mutation testing becomes increasingly accessible and larger numbers of EZH2 mutation-positive individuals are identified, knowledge of the clinical spectrum and prognostic implications of EZH2 mutations should improve.

  20. Sporadic medulloblastomas contain PTCH mutations.

    PubMed

    Raffel, C; Jenkins, R B; Frederick, L; Hebrink, D; Alderete, B; Fults, D W; James, C D

    1997-03-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), or Gorlin's syndrome, is an autosomal dominant disorder that predisposes to developmental defects and various forms of cancer. PTCH was recently proposed as a candidate gene for NBCCS due to its frequent mutation in basal cell carcinomas, the cancer most often associated with this syndrome. Another NBCCS-associated cancer is medulloblastoma, a common central nervous system tumor in children. Most medulloblastomas, however, occur without indication of an inherited predisposition. We have examined 24 sporadic medulloblastomas for loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at loci flanking as well as within PTCH. In cases with LOH, single-strand conformational polymorphism and sequencing analysis were performed to determine the status of the remaining PTCH allele. Microsatellite analysis indicated LOH of PTCH in 5 of 24 tumors, and in three of these cases a mutation of the remaining allele was identified. Two of the mutations were duplication insertions, and the third consisted of a single base deletion. It is interesting that all three mutations occur in exon 17 of the PTCH gene. These data suggest that inactivation of PTCH function is involved in the development of at least a subset of sporadic medulloblastomas.

  1. Isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations in gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Waitkus, Matthew S.; Diplas, Bill H.; Yan, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, extraordinary progress has been made in elucidating the underlying genetic causes of gliomas. In 2008, our understanding of glioma genetics was revolutionized when mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1/2) were identified in the vast majority of progressive gliomas and secondary glioblastomas (GBMs). IDH enzymes normally catalyze the decarboxylation of isocitrate to generate α-ketoglutarate (αKG), but recurrent mutations at Arg132 of IDH1 and Arg172 of IDH2 confer a neomorphic enzyme activity that catalyzes reduction of αKG into the putative oncometabolite D-2-hydroxyglutate (D2HG). D2HG inhibits αKG-dependent dioxygenases and is thought to create a cellular state permissive to malignant transformation by altering cellular epigenetics and blocking normal differentiation processes. Herein, we discuss the relevant literature on mechanistic studies of IDH1/2 mutations in gliomas, and we review the potential impact of IDH1/2 mutations on molecular classification and glioma therapy. PMID:26188014

  2. Tumour morphology predicts PALB2 germline mutation status

    PubMed Central

    Teo, Z L; Provenzano, E; Dite, G S; Park, D J; Apicella, C; Sawyer, S D; James, P A; Mitchell, G; Trainer, A H; Lindeman, G J; Shackleton, K; Cicciarelli, L; Buys, S S; Andrulis, I L; Mulligan, A M; Glendon, G; John, E M; Terry, M B; Daly, M; Odefrey, F A; Nguyen-Dumont, T; Giles, G G; Dowty, J G; Winship, I; Goldgar, D E; Hopper, J L; Southey, M C

    2013-01-01

    Background: Population-based studies of breast cancer have estimated that at least some PALB2 mutations are associated with high breast cancer risk. For women carrying PALB2 mutations, knowing their carrier status could be useful in directing them towards effective cancer risk management and therapeutic strategies. We sought to determine whether morphological features of breast tumours can predict PALB2 germline mutation status. Methods: Systematic pathology review was conducted on breast tumours from 28 female carriers of PALB2 mutations (non-carriers of other known high-risk mutations, recruited through various resources with varying ascertainment) and on breast tumours from a population-based sample of 828 Australian women diagnosed before the age of 60 years (which included 40 BRCA1 and 18 BRCA2 mutation carriers). Tumour morphological features of the 28 PALB2 mutation carriers were compared with those of 770 women without high-risk mutations. Results: Tumours arising in PALB2 mutation carriers were associated with minimal sclerosis (odds ratio (OR)=19.7; 95% confidence interval (CI)=6.0–64.6; P=5 × 10−7). Minimal sclerosis was also a feature that distinguished PALB2 mutation carriers from BRCA1 (P=0.05) and BRCA2 (P=0.04) mutation carriers. Conclusion: This study identified minimal sclerosis to be a predictor of germline PALB2 mutation status. Morphological review can therefore facilitate the identification of women most likely to carry mutations in PALB2. PMID:23787919

  3. 21 CFR 866.5900 - Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system. 866.5900 Section 866.5900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG...) gene mutation detection system. (a) Identification. The CFTR gene mutation detection system is a device used to simultaneously detect and identify a panel of mutations and variants in the CFTR gene. It...

  4. 21 CFR 866.5900 - Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system. 866.5900 Section 866.5900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG...) gene mutation detection system. (a) Identification. The CFTR gene mutation detection system is a device used to simultaneously detect and identify a panel of mutations and variants in the CFTR gene. It...

  5. 21 CFR 866.5900 - Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system. 866.5900 Section 866.5900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG...) gene mutation detection system. (a) Identification. The CFTR gene mutation detection system is a device used to simultaneously detect and identify a panel of mutations and variants in the CFTR gene. It...

  6. 21 CFR 866.5900 - Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system. 866.5900 Section 866.5900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG...) gene mutation detection system. (a) Identification. The CFTR gene mutation detection system is a device used to simultaneously detect and identify a panel of mutations and variants in the CFTR gene. It...

  7. 21 CFR 866.5900 - Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system. 866.5900 Section 866.5900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG...) gene mutation detection system. (a) Identification. The CFTR gene mutation detection system is a device used to simultaneously detect and identify a panel of mutations and variants in the CFTR gene. It...

  8. Novel recurrently mutated genes in African American colon cancers

    PubMed Central

    Guda, Kishore; Veigl, Martina L.; Varadan, Vinay; Nosrati, Arman; Ravi, Lakshmeswari; Lutterbaugh, James; Beard, Lydia; Willson, James K. V.; Sedwick, W. David; Wang, Zhenghe John; Molyneaux, Neil; Miron, Alexander; Adams, Mark D.; Elston, Robert C.; Markowitz, Sanford D.; Willis, Joseph E.

    2015-01-01

    We used whole-exome and targeted sequencing to characterize somatic mutations in 103 colorectal cancers (CRC) from African Americans, identifying 20 new genes as significantly mutated in CRC. Resequencing 129 Caucasian derived CRCs confirmed a 15-gene set as a preferential target for mutations in African American CRCs. Two predominant genes, ephrin type A receptor 6 (EPHA6) and folliculin (FLCN), with mutations exclusive to African American CRCs, are by genetic and biological criteria highly likely African American CRC driver genes. These previously unsuspected differences in the mutational landscapes of CRCs arising among individuals of different ethnicities have potential to impact on broader disparities in cancer behaviors. PMID:25583493

  9. BRCC3 mutations in myeloid neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Dayong; Nagata, Yasunobu; Grossmann, Vera; Radivoyevitch, Tomas; Okuno, Yusuke; Nagae, Genta; Hosono, Naoko; Schnittger, Susanne; Sanada, Masashi; Przychodzen, Bartlomiej; Kon, Ayana; Polprasert, Chantana; Shen, Wenyi; Clemente, Michael J.; Phillips, James G.; Alpermann, Tamara; Yoshida, Kenichi; Nadarajah, Niroshan; Sekeres, Mikkael A.; Oakley, Kevin; Nguyen, Nhu; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Shiozawa, Yusuke; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Koeffler, H. Phillip; Klein, Hans-Ulrich; Dugas, Martin; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Miyano, Satoru; Haferlach, Claudia; Kern, Wolfgang; Haferlach, Torsten; Du, Yang; Ogawa, Seishi; Makishima, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Next generation sequencing technologies have provided insights into the molecular heterogeneity of various myeloid neoplasms, revealing previously unknown somatic genetic events. In our cohort of 1444 cases analyzed by next generation sequencing, somatic mutations in the gene BRCA1-BRCA2-containing complex 3 (BRCC3) were identified in 28 cases (1.9%). BRCC3 is a member of the JAMM/MPN+ family of zinc metalloproteases capable of cleaving Lys-63 linked polyubiquitin chains, and is implicated in DNA repair. The mutations were located throughout its coding region. The average variant allelic frequency of BRCC3 mutations was 30.1%, and by a serial sample analysis at two different time points a BRCC3 mutation was already identified in the initial stage of a myelodysplastic syndrome. BRCC3 mutations commonly occurred in nonsense (n=12), frameshift (n=4), and splice site (n=5) configurations. Due to the marginal male dominance (odds ratio; 2.00, 0.84–4.73) of BRCC3 mutations, the majority of mutations (n=23; 82%) were hemizygous. Phenotypically, BRCC3 mutations were frequently observed in myelodysplastic syndromes and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms and associated with -Y abnormality (odds ratio; 3.70, 1.25–11.0). Clinically, BRCC3 mutations were also related to higher age (P=0.01), although prognosis was not affected. Knockdown of Brcc3 gene expression in murine bone marrow lineage negative, Sca1 positive, c-kit positive cells resulted in 2-fold more colony formation and modest differentiation defect. Thus, BRCC3 likely plays a role as tumor-associated gene in myelodysplastic syndromes and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms. PMID:26001790

  10. Effective Temperature of Mutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derényi, Imre; Szöllősi, Gergely J.

    2015-02-01

    Biological macromolecules experience two seemingly very different types of noise acting on different time scales: (i) point mutations corresponding to changes in molecular sequence and (ii) thermal fluctuations. Examining the secondary structures of a large number of microRNA precursor sequences and model lattice proteins, we show that the effects of single point mutations are statistically indistinguishable from those of an increase in temperature by a few tens of kelvins. The existence of such an effective mutational temperature establishes a quantitative connection between robustness to genetic (mutational) and environmental (thermal) perturbations.

  11. Transglutaminase 1 mutations in autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis: private and recurrent mutations in an isolated population.

    PubMed Central

    Laiho, E; Ignatius, J; Mikkola, H; Yee, V C; Teller, D C; Niemi, K M; Saarialho-Kere, U; Kere, J; Palotie, A

    1997-01-01

    Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI) is a rare, heterogenous keratinization disorder of the skin, classically divided into two clinical subtypes, lamellar ichthyosis (LI) and nonbullous congenital ichthyosiformis erythroderma (CIE). Recently, strong evidence for the involvement of the transglutaminase 1 gene (TGM1) in LI has evolved. We have studied ARCI in the isolated Finnish population, in which recessive disorders are often caused by single mutations enriched by a founder effect. Surprisingly, five different mutations of TGM1 (Arg141His, Arg142Cys, Gly217Ser, Val378Leu, and Arg395Leu) were found in Finnish ARCI patients. In addition to affected LI patients, we also identified TGM1 mutations in CIE patients. Moreover, haplotype analysis of the chromosomes carrying the most common mutation, a C-->T transition changing Arg142 to Cys, revealed that the same mutation has been introduced twice in the Finnish population. In addition to this Arg142Cys mutation, three other mutations, in