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Sample records for identifies cellular cofactors

  1. A Functional Genomic Screen Identifies Cellular Cofactors of Hepatitis C Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Andrew W.; Benita, Yair; Peng, Lee F.; Kim, Sun-Suk; Sakamoto, Naoya; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Chung, Raymond T.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Hepatitis C virus (HCV) chronically infects 3% of the world’s population, and complications from HCV are the leading indication for liver transplantation. Given the need for better anti-HCV therapies, one strategy is to identify and target cellular cofactors of the virus lifecycle. Using a genome-wide siRNA library, we identified 96 human genes that support HCV replication, with a significant number of them being involved in vesicle organization and biogenesis. Phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase PI4KA and multiple subunits of the COPI vesicle coat complex were among the genes identified. Consistent with this, pharmacologic inhibitors of COPI and PI4KA blocked HCV replication. Targeting hepcidin, a peptide critical for iron homeostasis, also affected HCV replication, which may explain the known dysregulation of iron homeostasis in HCV infection. The host cofactors for HCV replication identified in this study should serve as a useful resource in delineating new targets for anti-HCV therapies. PMID:19286138

  2. Cofactor modification analysis: a computational framework to identify cofactor specificity engineering targets for strain improvement.

    PubMed

    Lakshmanan, Meiyappan; Chung, Bevan Kai-Sheng; Liu, Chengcheng; Kim, Seon-Won; Lee, Dong-Yup

    2013-12-01

    Cofactors, such as NAD(H) and NADP(H), play important roles in energy transfer within the cells by providing the necessary redox carriers for a myriad of metabolic reactions, both anabolic and catabolic. Thus, it is crucial to establish the overall cellular redox balance for achieving the desired cellular physiology. Of several methods to manipulate the intracellular cofactor regeneration rates, altering the cofactor specificity of a particular enzyme is a promising one. However, the identification of relevant enzyme targets for such cofactor specificity engineering (CSE) is often very difficult and labor intensive. Therefore, it is necessary to develop more systematic approaches to find the cofactor engineering targets for strain improvement. Presented herein is a novel mathematical framework, cofactor modification analysis (CMA), developed based on the well-established constraints-based flux analysis, for the systematic identification of suitable CSE targets while exploring the global metabolic effects. The CMA algorithm was applied to E. coli using its genome-scale metabolic model, iJO1366, thereby identifying the growth-coupled cofactor engineering targets for overproducing four of its native products: acetate, formate, ethanol, and lactate, and three non-native products: 1-butanol, 1,4-butanediol, and 1,3-propanediol. Notably, among several target candidates for cofactor engineering, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPD) is the most promising enzyme; its cofactor modification enhanced both the desired product and biomass yields significantly. Finally, given the identified target, we further discussed potential mutational strategies for modifying cofactor specificity of GAPD in E. coli as suggested by in silico protein docking experiments.

  3. Cellular cofactors of lentiviral integrase: from target validation to drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Taltynov, Oliver; Desimmie, Belete A; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Christ, Frauke; Debyser, Zeger

    2012-01-01

    To accomplish their life cycle, lentiviruses make use of host proteins, the so-called cellular cofactors. Interactions between host cell and viral proteins during early stages of lentiviral infection provide attractive new antiviral targets. The insertion of lentiviral cDNA in a host cell chromosome is a step of no return in the replication cycle, after which the host cell becomes a permanent carrier of the viral genome and a producer of lentiviral progeny. Integration is carried out by integrase (IN), an enzyme playing also an important role during nuclear import. Plenty of cellular cofactors of HIV-1 IN have been proposed. To date, the lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75) is the best studied cofactor of HIV-1 IN. Moreover, small molecules that block the LEDGF/p75-IN interaction have recently been developed for the treatment of HIV infection. The nuclear import factor transportin-SR2 (TRN-SR2) has been proposed as another interactor of HIV IN-mediating nuclear import of the virus. Using both proteins as examples, we will describe approaches to be taken to identify and validate novel cofactors as new antiviral targets. Finally, we will highlight recent advances in the design and the development of small-molecule inhibitors binding to the LEDGF/p75-binding pocket in IN (LEDGINs).

  4. Identification of small peptides inhibiting the integrase-LEDGF/p75 interaction through targeting the cellular co-factor.

    PubMed

    Cavalluzzo, Claudia; Christ, Frauke; Voet, Arnout; Sharma, Ajendra; Singh, Brajendra Kumar; Zhang, Kam Y J; Lescrinier, Eveline; De Maeyer, Marc; Debyser, Zeger; Van der Eycken, Erik

    2013-10-01

    The integration of the viral DNA into the host genome is one of the essential steps in the HIV replication cycle. This process is mediated by the viral enzyme integrase (IN) and lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75). LEDGF/p75 has been identified as a crucial cellular co-factor of integration that acts by tethering IN to the cellular chromatin. Recently, circular peptides were identified that bind to the C-terminal domain of IN and disrupt the interaction with LEDGF/p75. Starting from the circular peptides, we identified a short peptidic sequence able to inhibit the LEDGF/p75-IN interaction at low μM concentration through its binding to the IN binding site of LEDGF/p75. This discovery can lead to the synthesis of peptidomimetics with high anti-HIV activity targeting the cellular co-factor LEDGF/p75 and not the viral protein IN.

  5. Remaining challenges in cellular flavin cofactor homeostasis and flavoprotein biogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giancaspero, Teresa Anna; Colella, Matilde; Brizio, Carmen; Difonzo, Graziana; Fiorino, Giuseppina Maria; Leone, Piero; Brandsch, Roderich; Bonomi, Francesco; Iametti, Stefania; Barile, Maria

    2015-04-01

    The primary role of the water-soluble vitamin B2 (riboflavin) in cell biology is connected with its conversion into FMN and FAD, the cofactors of a large number of dehydrogenases, oxidases and reductases involved in energetic metabolism, epigenetics, protein folding, as well as in a number of diverse regulatory processes. The problem of localisation of flavin cofactor synthesis events and in particular of the FAD synthase (EC 2.7.7.2) in HepG2 cells is addressed here by confocal microscopy in the frame of its relationships with kinetics of FAD synthesis and delivery to client apo-flavoproteins. FAD synthesis catalysed by recombinant isoform 2 of FADS occurs via an ordered bi-bi mechanism in which ATP binds prior to FMN, and pyrophosphate is released before FAD. Spectrophotometric continuous assays of the reconstitution rate of apo-D-aminoacid oxidase with its cofactor, allowed us to propose that besides its FAD synthesising activity, hFADS is able to operate as a FAD "chaperone". The physical interaction between FAD forming enzyme and its clients was further confirmed by dot blot and immunoprecipitation experiments carried out testing as a client either a nuclear or a mitochondrial enzyme that is lysine specific demethylase 1 (LSD1, EC 1.-.-.-) and dimethylglycine dehydrogenase (Me2GlyDH, EC 1.5.8.4), respectively which carry out similar reactions of oxidative demethylation, assisted by tetrahydrofolate used to form 5,10-methylene-tetrahydrofolate. A direct transfer of the cofactor from hFADS2 to apo-dimethyl glycine dehydrogenase was also demonstrated. Thus, FAD synthesis and delivery to these enzymes are crucial processes for bioenergetics and nutri-epigenetics of liver cells.

  6. Remaining challenges in cellular flavin cofactor homeostasis and flavoprotein biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Giancaspero, Teresa A; Colella, Matilde; Brizio, Carmen; Difonzo, Graziana; Fiorino, Giuseppina M; Leone, Piero; Brandsch, Roderich; Bonomi, Francesco; Iametti, Stefania; Barile, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The primary role of the water-soluble vitamin B2 (riboflavin) in cell biology is connected with its conversion into FMN and FAD, the cofactors of a large number of dehydrogenases, oxidases and reductases involved in a broad spectrum of biological activities, among which energetic metabolism and chromatin remodeling. Subcellular localisation of FAD synthase (EC 2.7.7.2, FADS), the second enzyme in the FAD forming pathway, is addressed here in HepG2 cells by confocal microscopy, in the frame of its relationships with kinetics of FAD synthesis and delivery to client apo-flavoproteins. FAD synthesis catalyzed by recombinant isoform 2 of FADS occurs via an ordered bi-bi mechanism in which ATP binds prior to FMN, and pyrophosphate is released before FAD. Spectrophotometric continuous assays of the reconstitution rate of apo-D-aminoacid oxidase with its cofactor, allowed us to propose that besides its FAD synthesizing activity, hFADS is able to operate as a FAD "chaperone." The physical interaction between FAD forming enzyme and its clients was further confirmed by dot blot and immunoprecipitation experiments carried out testing as a client either a nuclear lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) or a mitochondrial dimethylglycine dehydrogenase (Me2GlyDH, EC 1.5.8.4). Both enzymes carry out similar reactions of oxidative demethylation, in which tetrahydrofolate is converted into 5,10-methylene-tetrahydrofolate. A direct transfer of the cofactor from hFADS2 to apo-dimethyl glycine dehydrogenase was also demonstrated. Thus, FAD synthesis and delivery to these enzymes are crucial processes for bioenergetics and nutri-epigenetics of liver cells. PMID:25954742

  7. Remaining challenges in cellular flavin cofactor homeostasis and flavoprotein biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Giancaspero, Teresa A.; Colella, Matilde; Brizio, Carmen; Difonzo, Graziana; Fiorino, Giuseppina M.; Leone, Piero; Brandsch, Roderich; Bonomi, Francesco; Iametti, Stefania; Barile, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The primary role of the water-soluble vitamin B2 (riboflavin) in cell biology is connected with its conversion into FMN and FAD, the cofactors of a large number of dehydrogenases, oxidases and reductases involved in a broad spectrum of biological activities, among which energetic metabolism and chromatin remodeling. Subcellular localisation of FAD synthase (EC 2.7.7.2, FADS), the second enzyme in the FAD forming pathway, is addressed here in HepG2 cells by confocal microscopy, in the frame of its relationships with kinetics of FAD synthesis and delivery to client apo-flavoproteins. FAD synthesis catalyzed by recombinant isoform 2 of FADS occurs via an ordered bi-bi mechanism in which ATP binds prior to FMN, and pyrophosphate is released before FAD. Spectrophotometric continuous assays of the reconstitution rate of apo-D-aminoacid oxidase with its cofactor, allowed us to propose that besides its FAD synthesizing activity, hFADS is able to operate as a FAD “chaperone.” The physical interaction between FAD forming enzyme and its clients was further confirmed by dot blot and immunoprecipitation experiments carried out testing as a client either a nuclear lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) or a mitochondrial dimethylglycine dehydrogenase (Me2GlyDH, EC 1.5.8.4). Both enzymes carry out similar reactions of oxidative demethylation, in which tetrahydrofolate is converted into 5,10-methylene-tetrahydrofolate. A direct transfer of the cofactor from hFADS2 to apo-dimethyl glycine dehydrogenase was also demonstrated. Thus, FAD synthesis and delivery to these enzymes are crucial processes for bioenergetics and nutri-epigenetics of liver cells. PMID:25954742

  8. Molybdate uptake by Agrobacterium tumefaciens correlates with the cellular molybdenum cofactor status.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Marie-Christine; Ali, Koral; Sonnenschein, Marleen; Robrahn, Laura; Strauss, Daria; Narberhaus, Franz; Masepohl, Bernd

    2016-09-01

    Many enzymes require the molybdenum cofactor, Moco. Under Mo-limiting conditions, the high-affinity ABC transporter ModABC permits molybdate uptake and Moco biosynthesis in bacteria. Under Mo-replete conditions, Escherichia coli represses modABC transcription by the one-component regulator, ModE, consisting of a DNA-binding and a molybdate-sensing domain. Instead of a full-length ModE protein, many bacteria have a shorter ModE protein, ModE(S) , consisting of a DNA-binding domain only. Here, we asked how such proteins sense the intracellular molybdenum status. We show that the Agrobacterium tumefaciens ModE(S) protein Atu2564 is essential for modABC repression. ModE(S) binds two Mo-boxes in the modA promoter as shown by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Northern analysis revealed cotranscription of modE(S) with the upstream gene, atu2565, which was dispensable for ModE(S) activity. To identify genes controlling ModE(S) function, we performed transposon mutagenesis. Tn5 insertions resulting in derepressed modA transcription mapped to the atu2565-modE(S) operon and several Moco biosynthesis genes. We conclude that A. tumefaciens ModE(S) activity responds to Moco availability rather than to molybdate concentration directly, as is the case for E. coli ModE. Similar results in Sinorhizobium meliloti suggest that Moco dependence is a common feature of ModE(S) regulators.

  9. Molybdate uptake by Agrobacterium tumefaciens correlates with the cellular molybdenum cofactor status.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Marie-Christine; Ali, Koral; Sonnenschein, Marleen; Robrahn, Laura; Strauss, Daria; Narberhaus, Franz; Masepohl, Bernd

    2016-09-01

    Many enzymes require the molybdenum cofactor, Moco. Under Mo-limiting conditions, the high-affinity ABC transporter ModABC permits molybdate uptake and Moco biosynthesis in bacteria. Under Mo-replete conditions, Escherichia coli represses modABC transcription by the one-component regulator, ModE, consisting of a DNA-binding and a molybdate-sensing domain. Instead of a full-length ModE protein, many bacteria have a shorter ModE protein, ModE(S) , consisting of a DNA-binding domain only. Here, we asked how such proteins sense the intracellular molybdenum status. We show that the Agrobacterium tumefaciens ModE(S) protein Atu2564 is essential for modABC repression. ModE(S) binds two Mo-boxes in the modA promoter as shown by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Northern analysis revealed cotranscription of modE(S) with the upstream gene, atu2565, which was dispensable for ModE(S) activity. To identify genes controlling ModE(S) function, we performed transposon mutagenesis. Tn5 insertions resulting in derepressed modA transcription mapped to the atu2565-modE(S) operon and several Moco biosynthesis genes. We conclude that A. tumefaciens ModE(S) activity responds to Moco availability rather than to molybdate concentration directly, as is the case for E. coli ModE. Similar results in Sinorhizobium meliloti suggest that Moco dependence is a common feature of ModE(S) regulators. PMID:27196733

  10. Global analysis of induced transcription factors and cofactors identifies Tfdp2 as an essential coregulator during terminal erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cynthia; Lodish, Harvey F

    2014-06-01

    Key transcriptional regulators of terminal erythropoiesis, such as GATA-binding factor 1 (GATA1) and T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia protein 1 (TAL1), have been well characterized, but transcription factors and cofactors and their expression modulations have not yet been explored on a global scale. Here, we use global gene expression analysis to identify 28 transcription factors and 19 transcriptional cofactors induced during terminal erythroid differentiation whose promoters are enriched for binding by GATA1 and TAL1. Utilizing protein-protein interaction databases to identify cofactors for each transcription factor, we pinpoint several co-induced pairs, of which E2f2 and its cofactor transcription factor Dp-2 (Tfdp2) were the most highly induced. TFDP2 is a critical cofactor required for proper cell cycle control and gene expression. GATA1 and TAL1 are bound to the regulatory regions of Tfdp2 and upregulate its expression and knockdown of Tfdp2 results in significantly reduced rates of proliferation as well as reduced upregulation of many erythroid-important genes. Loss of Tfdp2 also globally inhibits the normal downregulation of many E2F2 target genes, including those that regulate the cell cycle, causing cells to accumulate in S phase and resulting in increased erythrocyte size. Our findings highlight the importance of TFDP2 in coupling the erythroid cell cycle with terminal differentiation and validate this study as a resource for future work on elucidating the role of diverse transcription factors and coregulators in erythropoiesis.

  11. Global analysis of induced transcription factors and cofactors identifies Tfdp2 as an essential coregulator during terminal erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cynthia; Lodish, Harvey F.

    2014-01-01

    Key transcriptional regulators of terminal erythropoiesis, such as GATA1 and TAL1, have been well characterized, but transcription factors and cofactors and their expression modulations have not yet been explored on a global scale. Here we use global gene expression analysis to identify 28 transcription factors and 19 transcriptional cofactors induced during terminal erythroid differentiation and whose promoters are enriched for binding by GATA1 and TAL1. Utilizing protein-protein interaction databases to identify cofactors for each transcription factor, we pinpoint several co-induced pairs, of which E2f2 and its cofactor Tfdp2 were the most highly induced. TFDP2 is a critical cofactor required for proper cell cycle control and gene expression. GATA1 and TAL1 are bound to the regulatory regions of Tfdp2 and upregulate its expression, and knockdown of Tfdp2 results in significantly reduced rates of proliferation, as well as reduced upregulation of many erythroid-important genes. Loss of Tfdp2 also globally inhibits the normal downregulation of many E2F2 target genes, including those that regulate the cell cycle, causing cells to accumulate in S phase and resulting in increased erythrocyte size. Our findings highlight the importance of TFDP2 in coupling the erythroid cell cycle with terminal differentiation and validate this study as a resource for future work on elucidating the role of diverse transcription factors and coregulators in erythropoiesis. PMID:24607859

  12. Quantitative Lipid Droplet Proteome Analysis Identifies Annexin A3 as a Cofactor for HCV Particle Production.

    PubMed

    Rösch, Kathrin; Kwiatkowski, Marcel; Hofmann, Sarah; Schöbel, Anja; Grüttner, Cordula; Wurlitzer, Marcus; Schlüter, Hartmut; Herker, Eva

    2016-09-20

    Lipid droplets are vital to hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection as the putative sites of virion assembly, but morphogenesis and egress of virions remain ill defined. We performed quantitative lipid droplet proteome analysis of HCV-infected cells to identify co-factors of that process. Our results demonstrate that HCV disconnects lipid droplets from their metabolic function. Annexin A3 (ANXA3), a protein enriched in lipid droplet fractions, strongly impacted HCV replication and was characterized further: ANXA3 is recruited to lipid-rich fractions in HCV-infected cells by the viral core and NS5A proteins. ANXA3 knockdown does not affect HCV RNA replication but severely impairs virion production with lower specific infectivity and higher density of secreted virions. ANXA3 is essential for the interaction of viral envelope E2 with apolipoprotein E (ApoE) and for trafficking, but not lipidation, of ApoE in HCV-infected cells. Thus, we identified ANXA3 as a regulator of HCV maturation and egress. PMID:27653686

  13. An integrated systems biology approach identifies positive cofactor 4 as a factor that increases reprogramming efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Junghyun; Hwang, Sohyun; Kim, Hyung Joon; Hong, Soomin; Lee, Jeoung Eun; Lee, Sung-Geum; Baek, Ahmi; Han, Heonjong; Lee, Jin Il; Lee, Insuk; Lee, Dong Ryul

    2016-01-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) can spontaneously dedifferentiate into embryonic stem cell (ESC)-like cells, which are designated as multipotent SSCs (mSSCs), without ectopic expression of reprogramming factors. Interestingly, SSCs express key pluripotency genes such as Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and Myc. Therefore, molecular dissection of mSSC reprogramming may provide clues about novel endogenous reprogramming or pluripotency regulatory factors. Our comparative transcriptome analysis of mSSCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) suggests that they have similar pluripotency states but are reprogrammed via different transcriptional pathways. We identified 53 genes as putative pluripotency regulatory factors using an integrated systems biology approach. We demonstrated a selected candidate, Positive cofactor 4 (Pc4), can enhance the efficiency of somatic cell reprogramming by promoting and maintaining transcriptional activity of the key reprograming factors. These results suggest that Pc4 has an important role in inducing spontaneous somatic cell reprogramming via up-regulation of key pluripotency genes. PMID:26740582

  14. Translational regulation of HIV-1 replication by HIV-1 Rev cellular cofactors Sam68, eIF5A, hRIP, and DDX3.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinfeng; Henao-Mejia, Jorge; Liu, Hao; Zhao, Yingren; He, Johnny J

    2011-06-01

    Nuclear export and translation of HIV-1 RNA are two important posttranscriptional events for HIV-1 gene expression and replication. HIV-1 Rev functions to export unspliced and incompletely spliced HIV-1 RNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm; it requires interaction with several cellular cofactors such as Sam68, eIF5A, hRIP, and DDX3. Meanwhile, some studies have also implicated Rev and some of its cofactors such as Sam68 in HIV-1 RNA translation. Thus, in this study, we aimed to characterize the potential function of all these four Rev cofactors in HIV-1 RNA translation. Ectopic expression, siRNA knockdown, and trans-complementation assays confirmed that all these cofactors were very important for HIV-1 gene expression and production through Rev and, accordingly, Rev-dependent reporter gene expression. Importantly, these studies revealed for the first time that each of these cofactors also regulated Rev-independent reporter gene expression. To directly determine the roles of these cofactors in HIV-1 RNA translation, we designed and synthesized a full-length capped HIV-1 RNA in vitro, transfected it into cells to bypass the RNA nuclear export step, and determined HIV-1 Gag expression from the cytoplasmic RNA in the cells that had ectopically expressed or siRNA knocked down cofactors. Gag expression was found to closely correlate with the expression levels of all these cofactors. Furthermore, we took advantage of a HIV-1 internal ribosomal entry site (IRES)-based bicistronic reporter gene assay and determined the effects of these cofactors on cap-independent IRES-mediated HIV-1 translation. The results showed that DDX3, eIF5A, and hRIP enhanced HIV-1 IRES-mediated translation, whereas Sam68 did not. Taken together, these results show that HIV-1 Rev cofactors Sam68, eIF5A, hRIP, and DDX3 also function in the translation of HIV-1 RNA and suggest that the regulatory mechanisms of HIV-1 RNA translation are likely different among these cofactors.

  15. PRIC295, a Nuclear Receptor Coactivator, Identified from PPARα-Interacting Cofactor Complex

    PubMed Central

    Pyper, Sean R.; Viswakarma, Navin; Jia, Yuzhi; Zhu, Yi-Jun; Fondell, Joseph D.; Reddy, Janardan K.

    2010-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) plays a key role in lipid metabolism and energy combustion. Chronic activation of PPARα in rodents leads to the development of hepatocellular carcinomas. The ability of PPARα to induce expression of its target genes depends on Mediator, an evolutionarily conserved complex of cofactors and, in particular, the subunit 1 (Med1) of this complex. Here, we report the identification and characterization of PPARα-interacting cofactor (PRIC)-295 (PRIC295), a novel coactivator protein, and show that it interacts with the Med1 and Med24 subunits of the Mediator complex. PRIC295 contains 10 LXXLL signature motifs that facilitate nuclear receptor binding and interacts with PPARα and five other members of the nuclear receptor superfamily in a ligand-dependent manner. PRIC295 enhances the transactivation function of PPARα, PPARγ, and ERα. These data demonstrate that PRIC295 interacts with nuclear receptors such as PPARα and functions as a transcription coactivator under in vitro conditions and may play an important role in mediating the effects in vivo as a member of the PRIC complex with Med1 and Med24. PMID:20885938

  16. Interactome Analysis of the Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus RNA Polymerase Complex Identifies Protein Chaperones as Important Cofactors That Promote L-Protein Stability and RNA Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Munday, Diane C.; Wu, Weining; Smith, Nikki; Fix, Jenna; Noton, Sarah Louise; Galloux, Marie; Touzelet, Olivier; Armstrong, Stuart D.; Dawson, Jenna M.; Aljabr, Waleed; Easton, Andrew J.; Rameix-Welti, Marie-Anne; de Oliveira, Andressa Peres; Simabuco, Fernando M.; Ventura, Armando M.; Hughes, David J.; Barr, John N.; Fearns, Rachel; Digard, Paul

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) core viral RNA polymerase comprises the large polymerase protein (L) and its cofactor, the phosphoprotein (P), which associate with the viral ribonucleoprotein complex to replicate the genome and, together with the M2-1 protein, transcribe viral mRNAs. While cellular proteins have long been proposed to be involved in the synthesis of HRSV RNA by associating with the polymerase complex, their characterization has been hindered by the difficulty of purifying the viral polymerase from mammalian cell culture. In this study, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-tagged L- and P-protein expression was coupled with high-affinity anti-GFP antibody-based immunoprecipitation and quantitative proteomics to identify cellular proteins that interacted with either the L- or the P-proteins when expressed as part of a biologically active viral RNP. Several core groups of cellular proteins were identified that interacted with each viral protein including, in both cases, protein chaperones. Ablation of chaperone activity by using small-molecule inhibitors confirmed previously reported studies which suggested that this class of proteins acted as positive viral factors. Inhibition of HSP90 chaperone function in the current study showed that HSP90 is critical for L-protein function and stability, whether in the presence or absence of the P-protein. Inhibition studies suggested that HSP70 also disrupts virus biology and might help the polymerase remodel the nucleocapsid to allow RNA synthesis to occur efficiently. This indicated a proviral role for protein chaperones in HRSV replication and demonstrates that the function of cellular proteins can be targeted as potential therapeutics to disrupt virus replication. IMPORTANCE Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) represents a major health care and economic burden, being the main cause of severe respiratory infections in infants worldwide. No vaccine or effective therapy is

  17. Molecular and cellular effects of vitamin B12 in brain, myocardium and liver through its role as co-factor of methionine synthase.

    PubMed

    Guéant, Jean-Louis; Caillerez-Fofou, Maatem; Battaglia-Hsu, Shyuefang; Alberto, Jean-Marc; Freund, Jean-Noel; Dulluc, Isabelle; Adjalla, Charles; Maury, Florence; Merle, Carole; Nicolas, Jean-Pierre; Namour, Fares; Daval, Jean-Luc

    2013-05-01

    Vitamin B12 (cobalamin, cbl) is a cofactor of methionine synthase (MTR) in the synthesis of methionine, the precursor of the universal methyl donor S-Adenosylmethionine (SAM), which is involved in epigenomic regulatory mechanisms. We have established a neuronal cell model with stable expression of a transcobalamin-oleosin chimer and subsequent decreased cellular availability of vitamin B12, which produces reduced proliferation, increased apoptosis and accelerated differentiation through PP2A, NGF and TACE pathways. Anti-transcobalamin antibody or impaired transcobalamin receptor expression produce also impaired proliferation in other cells. Consistently, the transcription, protein expression and activity of MTR are increased in proliferating cells of skin and intestinal epitheliums, in rat intestine crypts and in proliferating CaCo2 cells, while MTR activity correlates with DNA methylation in rat intestine villi. Exposure to nitrous oxide in animal models identified impairment of MTR reaction as the most important metabolic cause of neurological manifestations of B12 deficiency. Early vitamin B12 and folate deprivation during gestation and lactation of a 'dam-progeny' rat model developed in our laboratory is associated with long-lasting disabilities of behavior and memory capacities, with persisting hallmarks related to increased apoptosis, impaired neurogenesis and altered plasticity. We found also an epigenomic deregulation of energy metabolism and fatty acids beta-oxidation in myocardium and liver, through imbalanced methylation/acetylation of PGC-1alpha and decreased expression of SIRT1. These nutrigenomic effects display similarities with the molecular mechanisms of fetal programming. Beside deficiency, B12 loading increases the expression of MTR through internal ribosome entry sites (IRES) and down-regulates MDR-1 gene expression. In conclusion, vitamin B12 influences cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis in brain. Vitamin B12 and folate combined

  18. An Integrative Proteomic Approach Identifies Novel Cellular SMYD2 Substrates.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Hazem; Duan, Shili; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Barsyte-Lovejoy, Dalia; Schapira, Matthieu

    2016-06-01

    Protein methylation is a post-translational modification with important roles in transcriptional regulation and other biological processes, but the enzyme-substrate relationship between the 68 known human protein methyltransferases and the thousands of reported methylation sites is poorly understood. Here, we propose a bioinformatic approach that integrates structural, biochemical, cellular, and proteomic data to identify novel cellular substrates of the lysine methyltransferase SMYD2. Of the 14 novel putative SMYD2 substrates identified by our approach, six were confirmed in cells by immunoprecipitation: MAPT, CCAR2, EEF2, NCOA3, STUB1, and UTP14A. Treatment with the selective SMYD2 inhibitor BAY-598 abrogated the methylation signal, indicating that methylation of these novel substrates was dependent on the catalytic activity of the enzyme. We believe that our integrative approach can be applied to other protein lysine methyltransferases, and help understand how lysine methylation participates in wider signaling processes. PMID:27163177

  19. About the role and underlying mechanisms of cofactors in anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Wölbing, F; Fischer, J; Köberle, M; Kaesler, S; Biedermann, T

    2013-09-01

    Anaphylaxis is the systemic and most severe presentation of type I allergy. A number of conditions were identified that modulate the onset of anaphylaxis such as co- or augmentation factors, which significantly lower the allergen dose necessary for triggering anaphylaxis. Next to physical exercise or alcohol consumption, co-administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) or concomitant infectious diseases are well-documented cofactors of anaphylaxis. Registries for anaphylaxis document a role for cofactors in about 30% of anaphylactic reactions. Some disease entities such as 'wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis' (WDEIA) are explicitly characterized by elicitation of anaphylaxis only in the presence of at least one such cofactor. Using WDEIA as a model disease, studies demonstrated that exercise increases skin prick test reactivity to and bioavailability of the allergen. Additional data indicate that alcohol consumption and NSAID administration display similar effects. Modulation of the cellular activation threshold is another mechanism underlying cofactor-induced anaphylaxis, most likely also functional when infectious diseases orchestrate elicitation of anaphylaxis. Cofactors are increasingly accepted to play a fundamental role in eliciting anaphylaxis. Consequently, to improve patient management modalities, a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms is warranted. This review aims to update clinicians and clinical scientists on recent developments.

  20. Factor VIII C1 domain spikes 2092-2093 and 2158-2159 comprise regions that modulate cofactor function and cellular uptake.

    PubMed

    Bloem, Esther; van den Biggelaar, Maartje; Wroblewska, Aleksandra; Voorberg, Jan; Faber, Johan H; Kjalke, Marianne; Stennicke, Henning R; Mertens, Koen; Meijer, Alexander B

    2013-10-11

    The C1 domain of factor VIII (FVIII) has been implicated in binding to multiple constituents, including phospholipids, von Willebrand factor, and low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP). We have previously described a human monoclonal antibody called KM33 that blocks these interactions as well as cellular uptake by LRP-expressing cells. To unambiguously identify the apparent "hot spot" on FVIII to which this antibody binds, we have employed hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry. The results showed that KM33 protects FVIII regions 2091-2104 and 2157-2162 from hydrogen-deuterium exchange. These comprise the two C1 domain spikes 2092-2093 and 2158-2159. Spike 2092-2093 has been demonstrated recently to contribute to assembly with lipid membranes with low phosphatidylserine (PS) content. Therefore, spike 2158-2159 might serve a similar role. This was assessed by replacement of Arg-2159 for Asn, which introduces a motif for N-linked glycosylation. Binding studies revealed that the purified, glycosylated R2159N variant had lost its interaction with antibody KM33 but retained substantial binding to von Willebrand factor and LRP. Cellular uptake of the R2159N variant was reduced both by LRP-expressing U87-MG cells and by human monocyte-derived dendritic cells. FVIII activity was virtually normal on membranes containing 15% PS but reduced at low PS content. These findings suggest that the C1 domain spikes 2092-2093 and 2158-2159 together modulate FVIII membrane assembly by a subtle, PS-dependent mechanism. These findings contribute evidence in favor of an increasingly important role of the C1 domain in FVIII biology. PMID:24009077

  1. Factor VIII C1 Domain Spikes 2092–2093 and 2158–2159 Comprise Regions That Modulate Cofactor Function and Cellular Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Bloem, Esther; van den Biggelaar, Maartje; Wroblewska, Aleksandra; Voorberg, Jan; Faber, Johan H.; Kjalke, Marianne; Stennicke, Henning R.; Mertens, Koen; Meijer, Alexander B.

    2013-01-01

    The C1 domain of factor VIII (FVIII) has been implicated in binding to multiple constituents, including phospholipids, von Willebrand factor, and low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP). We have previously described a human monoclonal antibody called KM33 that blocks these interactions as well as cellular uptake by LRP-expressing cells. To unambiguously identify the apparent “hot spot” on FVIII to which this antibody binds, we have employed hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry. The results showed that KM33 protects FVIII regions 2091–2104 and 2157–2162 from hydrogen-deuterium exchange. These comprise the two C1 domain spikes 2092–2093 and 2158–2159. Spike 2092–2093 has been demonstrated recently to contribute to assembly with lipid membranes with low phosphatidylserine (PS) content. Therefore, spike 2158–2159 might serve a similar role. This was assessed by replacement of Arg-2159 for Asn, which introduces a motif for N-linked glycosylation. Binding studies revealed that the purified, glycosylated R2159N variant had lost its interaction with antibody KM33 but retained substantial binding to von Willebrand factor and LRP. Cellular uptake of the R2159N variant was reduced both by LRP-expressing U87-MG cells and by human monocyte-derived dendritic cells. FVIII activity was virtually normal on membranes containing 15% PS but reduced at low PS content. These findings suggest that the C1 domain spikes 2092–2093 and 2158–2159 together modulate FVIII membrane assembly by a subtle, PS-dependent mechanism. These findings contribute evidence in favor of an increasingly important role of the C1 domain in FVIII biology. PMID:24009077

  2. Control of ubiquitin conjugation by cdc48 and its cofactors.

    PubMed

    Buchberger, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Cdc48 (alias p97, VCP) is an important motor and regulator for the turnover of ubiquitylated proteins, both in proteasomal degradation and in nonproteolytic pathways. The diverse cellular tasks of Cdc48 are controlled by a large number of cofactors. Substrate-recruiting cofactors mediate the specific recognition of ubiquitylated target proteins, whereas substrate-processing cofactors often exhibit ubiquitin ligase or deubiquitylating activities that enable them to modulate the ubiquitylation state of substrates. This chapter introduces the major groups of Cdc48 cofactors and discusses the versatile options of substrate-processing cofactors to control the fate of Cdc48 substrates.

  3. Protein cofactor competition regulates the action of a multifunctional RNA helicase in different pathways.

    PubMed

    Heininger, Annika U; Hackert, Philipp; Andreou, Alexandra Z; Boon, Kum-Loong; Memet, Indira; Prior, Mira; Clancy, Anne; Schmidt, Bernhard; Urlaub, Henning; Schleiff, Enrico; Sloan, Katherine E; Deckers, Markus; Lührmann, Reinhard; Enderlein, Jörg; Klostermeier, Dagmar; Rehling, Peter; Bohnsack, Markus T

    2016-01-01

    A rapidly increasing number of RNA helicases are implicated in several distinct cellular processes, however, the modes of regulation of multifunctional RNA helicases and their recruitment to different target complexes have remained unknown. Here, we show that the distribution of the multifunctional DEAH-box RNA helicase Prp43 between its diverse cellular functions can be regulated by the interplay of its G-patch protein cofactors. We identify the orphan G-patch protein Cmg1 (YLR271W) as a novel cofactor of Prp43 and show that it stimulates the RNA binding and ATPase activity of the helicase. Interestingly, Cmg1 localizes to the cytoplasm and to the intermembrane space of mitochondria and its overexpression promotes apoptosis. Furthermore, our data reveal that different G-patch protein cofactors compete for interaction with Prp43. Changes in the expression levels of Prp43-interacting G-patch proteins modulate the cellular localization of Prp43 and G-patch protein overexpression causes accumulation of the helicase in the cytoplasm or nucleoplasm. Overexpression of several G-patch proteins also leads to defects in ribosome biogenesis that are consistent with withdrawal of the helicase from this pathway. Together, these findings suggest that the availability of cofactors and the sequestering of the helicase are means to regulate the activity of multifunctional RNA helicases and their distribution between different cellular processes. PMID:26821976

  4. Interaction of poliovirus polypeptide 3CDpro with the 5' and 3' termini of the poliovirus genome. Identification of viral and cellular cofactors needed for efficient binding.

    PubMed

    Harris, K S; Xiang, W; Alexander, L; Lane, W S; Paul, A V; Wimmer, E

    1994-10-28

    Poliovirus proteinase 3CDpro by itself is not an RNA-binding protein. Two cellular proteins have been purified from HeLa cells (p50 and p36) which interact with purified 3CDpro but only p36-3CDpro bind to the 5'-terminal 110 nucleotides of polioviral RNA genome, an RNA segment whose secondary structure resembles a cloverleaf. The identity of these factors was determined by microsequencing tryptic digests of the purified proteins. Host protein p50 is the eukaryotic elongation factor EF-1 alpha, and p36 an N-terminal fragment thereof. p36, referred to as host factor, did not appear to interact with purified 3Cpro or 3Dpol. Significantly, the formation of a 3CDpro-cloverleaf complex was also observed in the presence of purified poliovirus polypeptide 3AB, the precursor of VPg. 3AB by itself does not stably bind to the cloverleaf. Competition experiments have demonstrated that the RNA-protein interactions are specific for the full-length cloverleaf. UV cross-linking studies were employed to examine the protein components of the cloverleaf ribonucleoproteins. RNA footprinting was used to determine the site on the cloverleaf where the viral and cellular factors bind. Finally, we have discovered that 3AB-3CDpro also interacts with the 3'-terminal sequence of poliovirus RNA. In contrast to the 5'-terminal cloverleaf, the 3'-terminal RNA can bind 3AB in the absence of other proteins. A model for initiation of poliovirus RNA synthesis is presented. PMID:7929441

  5. Bacterial cytological profiling rapidly identifies the cellular pathways targeted by antibacterial molecules

    PubMed Central

    Nonejuie, Poochit; Burkart, Michael; Pogliano, Kit; Pogliano, Joe

    2013-01-01

    Identifying the mechanism of action for antibacterial compounds is essential for understanding how bacteria interact with one another and with other cell types and for antibiotic discovery efforts, but determining a compound's mechanism of action remains a serious challenge that limits both basic research and antibacterial discovery programs. Here, we show that bacterial cytological profiling (BCP) is a rapid and powerful approach for identifying the cellular pathway affected by antibacterial molecules. BCP can distinguish between inhibitors that affect different cellular pathways as well as different targets within the same pathway. We use BCP to demonstrate that spirohexenolide A, a spirotetronate that is active against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, rapidly collapses the proton motive force. BCP offers a simple, one-step assay that can be broadly applied, solving the longstanding problem of how to rapidly determine the cellular target of thousands of compounds. PMID:24046367

  6. Co-factor activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, C.W.; Mangel, W.F.

    1996-08-06

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying the peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described. 29 figs.

  7. Co-factor activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1996-08-06

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  8. Cellular adhesome screen identifies critical modulators of focal adhesion dynamics, cellular traction forces and cell migration behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Fokkelman, Michiel; Balcıoğlu, Hayri E.; Klip, Janna E.; Yan, Kuan; Verbeek, Fons J.; Danen, Erik H. J.; van de Water, Bob

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells migrate from the primary tumour into surrounding tissue in order to form metastasis. Cell migration is a highly complex process, which requires continuous remodelling and re-organization of the cytoskeleton and cell-matrix adhesions. Here, we aimed to identify genes controlling aspects of tumour cell migration, including the dynamic organization of cell-matrix adhesions and cellular traction forces. In a siRNA screen targeting most cell adhesion-related genes we identified 200+ genes that regulate size and/or dynamics of cell-matrix adhesions in MCF7 breast cancer cells. In a subsequent secondary screen, the 64 most effective genes were evaluated for growth factor-induced cell migration and validated by tertiary RNAi pool deconvolution experiments. Four validated hits showed significantly enlarged adhesions accompanied by reduced cell migration upon siRNA-mediated knockdown. Furthermore, loss of PPP1R12B, HIPK3 or RAC2 caused cells to exert higher traction forces, as determined by traction force microscopy with elastomeric micropillar post arrays, and led to considerably reduced force turnover. Altogether, we identified genes that co-regulate cell-matrix adhesion dynamics and traction force turnover, thereby modulating overall motility behaviour. PMID:27531518

  9. Cellular adhesome screen identifies critical modulators of focal adhesion dynamics, cellular traction forces and cell migration behaviour.

    PubMed

    Fokkelman, Michiel; Balcıoğlu, Hayri E; Klip, Janna E; Yan, Kuan; Verbeek, Fons J; Danen, Erik H J; van de Water, Bob

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells migrate from the primary tumour into surrounding tissue in order to form metastasis. Cell migration is a highly complex process, which requires continuous remodelling and re-organization of the cytoskeleton and cell-matrix adhesions. Here, we aimed to identify genes controlling aspects of tumour cell migration, including the dynamic organization of cell-matrix adhesions and cellular traction forces. In a siRNA screen targeting most cell adhesion-related genes we identified 200+ genes that regulate size and/or dynamics of cell-matrix adhesions in MCF7 breast cancer cells. In a subsequent secondary screen, the 64 most effective genes were evaluated for growth factor-induced cell migration and validated by tertiary RNAi pool deconvolution experiments. Four validated hits showed significantly enlarged adhesions accompanied by reduced cell migration upon siRNA-mediated knockdown. Furthermore, loss of PPP1R12B, HIPK3 or RAC2 caused cells to exert higher traction forces, as determined by traction force microscopy with elastomeric micropillar post arrays, and led to considerably reduced force turnover. Altogether, we identified genes that co-regulate cell-matrix adhesion dynamics and traction force turnover, thereby modulating overall motility behaviour. PMID:27531518

  10. The molybdenum cofactor.

    PubMed

    Mendel, Ralf R

    2013-05-10

    The transition element molybdenum needs to be complexed by a special cofactor to gain catalytic activity. Molybdenum is bound to a unique pterin, thus forming the molybdenum cofactor (Moco), which, in different variants, is the active compound at the catalytic site of all molybdenum-containing enzymes in nature, except bacterial molybdenum nitrogenase. The biosynthesis of Moco involves the complex interaction of six proteins and is a process of four steps, which also require iron, ATP, and copper. After its synthesis, Moco is distributed, involving Moco-binding proteins. A deficiency in the biosynthesis of Moco has lethal consequences for the respective organisms.

  11. A chemoproteomic method for identifying cellular targets of covalent kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying-Chu; Zhang, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinases are attractive drug targets for numerous human diseases including cancers, diabetes and neurodegeneration. A number of kinase inhibitors that covalently target a cysteine residue in their target kinases have recently entered use in the cancer clinic. Despite the advantages of covalent kinases inhibitors, their inherent reactivity can lead to non-specific binding to other cellular proteins and cause off- target effects in cells. It is thus essential to determine the identity of these off targets in order to fully account for the phenotype and to improve the selectivity and efficacy of covalent inhibitors. Herein we present a detailed protocol for a chemoproteomic method to enrich and identify cellular targets of covalent kinase inhibitors. PMID:27551330

  12. Molybdenum cofactor deficiency.

    PubMed

    Atwal, Paldeep S; Scaglia, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Molybdenum cofactor deficiency (MoCD) is a severe autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism first described in 1978. It is characterized by a neonatal presentation of intractable seizures, feeding difficulties, severe developmental delay, microcephaly with brain atrophy and coarse facial features. MoCD results in deficiency of the molybdenum cofactor dependent enzymes sulfite oxidase, xanthine dehydrogenase, aldehyde oxidase and mitochondrial amidoxime reducing component. The resultant accumulation of sulfite, taurine, S-sulfocysteine and thiosulfate contributes to the severe neurological impairment. Recently, initial evidence has demonstrated early treatment with cyclic PMP can turn MoCD type A from a previously neonatal lethal condition with only palliative options, to near normal neurological outcomes in affected patients. We review MoCD and focus on describing the currently published evidence of this exciting new therapeutic option for MoCD type A caused by pathogenic variants in MOCD1.

  13. The structures and physicochemical properties of organic cofactors in biocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Julia D; Holliday, Gemma L; Rahman, Syed A; Thornton, Janet M

    2010-11-12

    Many crucial biochemical reactions in the cell require not only enzymes for catalysis but also organic cofactors or metal ions. Here, we analyse the physicochemical properties, chemical structures and functions of organic cofactors. Based on a thorough analysis of the literature complemented by our quantitative characterisation and classification, we found that most of these molecules are constructed from nucleotide and amino-acid-type building blocks, as well as some recurring cofactor-specific chemical scaffolds. We show that, as expected, organic cofactors are on average significantly more polar and slightly larger than other metabolites in the cell, yet they cover the full spectrum of physicochemical properties found in the metabolome. Furthermore, we have identified intrinsic groupings among the cofactors, based on their molecular properties, structures and functions, that represent a new way of considering cofactors. Although some classes of cofactors, as defined by their physicochemical properties, exhibit clear structural communalities, cofactors with similar structures can have diverse functional and physicochemical profiles. Finally, we show that the molecular functions of the cofactors not only may duplicate reactions performed by inorganic metal cofactors and amino acids, the cell's other catalytic tools, but also provide novel chemistries for catalysis.

  14. A cellular screen identifies ponatinib and pazopanib as inhibitors of necroptosis.

    PubMed

    Fauster, A; Rebsamen, M; Huber, K V M; Bigenzahn, J W; Stukalov, A; Lardeau, C-H; Scorzoni, S; Bruckner, M; Gridling, M; Parapatics, K; Colinge, J; Bennett, K L; Kubicek, S; Krautwald, S; Linkermann, A; Superti-Furga, G

    2015-01-01

    Necroptosis is a form of regulated necrotic cell death mediated by receptor-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase 1 (RIPK1) and RIPK3. Necroptotic cell death contributes to the pathophysiology of several disorders involving tissue damage, including myocardial infarction, stroke and ischemia-reperfusion injury. However, no inhibitors of necroptosis are currently in clinical use. Here we performed a phenotypic screen for small-molecule inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)-induced necroptosis in Fas-associated protein with death domain (FADD)-deficient Jurkat cells using a representative panel of Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs. We identified two anti-cancer agents, ponatinib and pazopanib, as submicromolar inhibitors of necroptosis. Both compounds inhibited necroptotic cell death induced by various cell death receptor ligands in human cells, while not protecting from apoptosis. Ponatinib and pazopanib abrogated phosphorylation of mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL) upon TNF-α-induced necroptosis, indicating that both agents target a component upstream of MLKL. An unbiased chemical proteomic approach determined the cellular target spectrum of ponatinib, revealing key members of the necroptosis signaling pathway. We validated RIPK1, RIPK3 and transforming growth factor-β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) as novel, direct targets of ponatinib by using competitive binding, cellular thermal shift and recombinant kinase assays. Ponatinib inhibited both RIPK1 and RIPK3, while pazopanib preferentially targeted RIPK1. The identification of the FDA-approved drugs ponatinib and pazopanib as cellular inhibitors of necroptosis highlights them as potentially interesting for the treatment of pathologies caused or aggravated by necroptotic cell death. PMID:25996294

  15. A cellular screen identifies ponatinib and pazopanib as inhibitors of necroptosis

    PubMed Central

    Fauster, A; Rebsamen, M; Huber, K V M; Bigenzahn, J W; Stukalov, A; Lardeau, C-H; Scorzoni, S; Bruckner, M; Gridling, M; Parapatics, K; Colinge, J; Bennett, K L; Kubicek, S; Krautwald, S; Linkermann, A; Superti-Furga, G

    2015-01-01

    Necroptosis is a form of regulated necrotic cell death mediated by receptor-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase 1 (RIPK1) and RIPK3. Necroptotic cell death contributes to the pathophysiology of several disorders involving tissue damage, including myocardial infarction, stroke and ischemia-reperfusion injury. However, no inhibitors of necroptosis are currently in clinical use. Here we performed a phenotypic screen for small-molecule inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)-induced necroptosis in Fas-associated protein with death domain (FADD)-deficient Jurkat cells using a representative panel of Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs. We identified two anti-cancer agents, ponatinib and pazopanib, as submicromolar inhibitors of necroptosis. Both compounds inhibited necroptotic cell death induced by various cell death receptor ligands in human cells, while not protecting from apoptosis. Ponatinib and pazopanib abrogated phosphorylation of mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL) upon TNF-α-induced necroptosis, indicating that both agents target a component upstream of MLKL. An unbiased chemical proteomic approach determined the cellular target spectrum of ponatinib, revealing key members of the necroptosis signaling pathway. We validated RIPK1, RIPK3 and transforming growth factor-β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) as novel, direct targets of ponatinib by using competitive binding, cellular thermal shift and recombinant kinase assays. Ponatinib inhibited both RIPK1 and RIPK3, while pazopanib preferentially targeted RIPK1. The identification of the FDA-approved drugs ponatinib and pazopanib as cellular inhibitors of necroptosis highlights them as potentially interesting for the treatment of pathologies caused or aggravated by necroptotic cell death. PMID:25996294

  16. Identifying the cellular mechanisms of symbiont-induced epithelial morphogenesis in the squid-Vibrio association.

    PubMed

    Koropatnick, Tanya; Goodson, Michael S; Heath-Heckman, Elizabeth A C; McFall-Ngai, Margaret

    2014-02-01

    The symbiotic association between the Hawaiian bobtail squid Euprymna scolopes and the luminous marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri provides a unique opportunity to study epithelial morphogenesis. Shortly after hatching, the squid host harvests bacteria from the seawater using currents created by two elaborate fields of ciliated epithelia on the surface of the juvenile light organ. After light organ colonization, the symbiont population signals the gradual loss of the ciliated epithelia through apoptosis of the cells, which culminates in the complete regression of these tissues. Whereas aspects of this process have been studied at the morphological, biochemical, and molecular levels, no in-depth analysis of the cellular events has been reported. Here we describe the cellular structure of the epithelial field and present evidence that the symbiosis-induced regression occurs in two steps. Using confocal microscopic analyses, we observed an initial epithelial remodeling, which serves to disable the function of the harvesting apparatus, followed by a protracted regression involving actin rearrangements and epithelial cell extrusion. We identified a metal-dependent gelatinolytic activity in the symbiont-induced morphogenic epithelial fields, suggesting the involvement of Zn-dependent matrix metalloproteinase(s) (MMP) in light organ morphogenesis. These data show that the bacterial symbionts not only induce apoptosis of the field, but also change the form, function, and biochemistry of the cells as part of the morphogenic program.

  17. The use of cellular diagnostics for identifying sub-lethal stress in reef corals.

    PubMed

    Downs, Craig A; Ostrander, Gary K; Rougee, Luc; Rongo, Teina; Knutson, Sean; Williams, David E; Mendiola, Wendy; Holbrook, Jackalyn; Richmond, Robert H

    2012-04-01

    Coral reefs throughout the world are exhibiting documented declines in coral cover and species diversity, which have been linked to anthropogenic stressors including land-based sources of pollution. Reductions in coastal water and substratum quality are affecting coral survivorship, reproduction and recruitment, and hence, the persistence of coral reefs. One major obstacle in effectively addressing these declines is the lack of tools that can identify cause-and-effect relationships between stressors and specific coral reef losses, while a second problem is the inability to measure the efficacy of mitigation efforts in a timely fashion. We examined corals from six coral reefs on Guam, Mariana Islands, which were being affected by different environmental stressors (e.g. PAH's, pesticides, PCB's and sedimentation). Cellular diagnostic analysis differentiated the cellular-physiological condition of these corals. Examination of protein expression provided insight into their homeostatic responses to chemical and physical stressors in exposed corals prior to outright mortality, providing improved opportunities for developing locally-based management responses. This approach adds critically needed tools for addressing the effects of multiple stressors on corals and will allow researchers to move beyond present assessment and monitoring techniques that simply document the loss of coral abundance and diversity.

  18. Toward detecting and identifying macromolecules in a cellular context: Template matching applied to electron tomograms

    PubMed Central

    Böhm, Jochen; Frangakis, Achilleas S.; Hegerl, Reiner; Nickell, Stephan; Typke, Dieter; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2000-01-01

    Electron tomography is the only technique available that allows us to visualize the three-dimensional structure of unfixed and unstained cells currently with a resolution of 6–8 nm, but with the prospect to reach 2–4 nm. This raises the possibility of detecting and identifying specific macromolecular complexes within their cellular context by virtue of their structural signature. Templates derived from the high-resolution structure of the molecule under scrutiny are used to search the reconstructed volume. Here we outline and test a computationally feasible two-step procedure: In a first step, mean-curvature motion is used for segmentation, yielding subvolumes that contain with a high probability macromolecules in the expected size range. Subsequently, the particles contained in the subvolumes are identified by cross-correlation, using a set of three-dimensional templates. With simulated and real tomographic data we demonstrate that such an approach is feasible and we explore the detection limits. Even structurally similar particles, such as the thermosome, GroEL, and the 20S proteasome can be identified with high fidelity. This opens up exciting prospects for mapping the territorial distribution of macromolecules and for analyzing molecular interactions in situ. PMID:11087814

  19. Insect cell-derived cofactors become fully functional after proteinase K and heat treatment for high-fidelity amplification of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored recombinant scrapie and BSE prion proteins.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Morikazu; Kato, Nobuko; Okada, Hiroyuki; Yoshioka, Miyako; Iwamaru, Yoshifumi; Shimizu, Yoshihisa; Mohri, Shirou; Yokoyama, Takashi; Murayama, Yuichi

    2013-01-01

    The central event in prion infection is the conformational conversion of host-encoded cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) into the pathogenic isoform (PrP(Sc)). Diverse mammalian species possess the cofactors required for in vitro replication of PrP(Sc) by protein-misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA), but lower organisms, such as bacteria, yeasts, and insects, reportedly lack the essential cofactors. Various cellular components, such as RNA, lipids, and other identified cofactor molecules, are commonly distributed in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, but the reasons for the absence of cofactor activity in lower organisms remain to be elucidated. Previously, we reported that brain-derived factors were necessary for the in vitro replication of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored baculovirus-derived recombinant PrP (Bac-PrP). Here, we demonstrate that following protease digestion and heat treatment, insect cell lysates had the functional cofactor activity required for Bac-PrP replication by PMCA. Mammalian PrP(Sc) seeds and Bac-PrP(Sc) generated by PMCA using Bac-PrP and insect cell-derived cofactors showed similar pathogenicity and produced very similar lesions in the brains of inoculated mice. These results suggested that the essential cofactors required for the high-fidelity replication of mammalian PrP(Sc) were present in the insect cells but that the cofactor activity was masked or inhibited in the native state. We suggest that not only RNA, but also DNA, are the key components of PMCA, although other cellular factors were necessary for the expression of the cofactor activity of nucleic acids. PMCA using only insect cell-derived substances (iPMCA) was highly useful for the ultrasensitive detection of PrP(Sc) of some prion strains.

  20. A high-content cellular senescence screen identifies candidate tumor suppressors, including EPHA3.

    PubMed

    Lahtela, Jenni; Corson, Laura B; Hemmes, Annabrita; Brauer, Matthew J; Koopal, Sonja; Lee, James; Hunsaker, Thomas L; Jackson, Peter K; Verschuren, Emmy W

    2013-02-15

    Activation of a cellular senescence program is a common response to prolonged oncogene activation or tumor suppressor loss, providing a physiological mechanism for tumor suppression in premalignant cells. The link between senescence and tumor suppression supports the hypothesis that a loss-of-function screen measuring bona fide senescence marker activation should identify candidate tumor suppressors. Using a high-content siRNA screening assay for cell morphology and proliferation measures, we identify 12 senescence-regulating kinases and determine their senescence marker signatures, including elevation of senescence-associated β-galactosidase, DNA damage and p53 or p16 (INK4a) expression. Consistent with our hypothesis, SNP array CGH data supports loss of gene copy number of five senescence-suppressing genes across multiple tumor samples. One such candidate is the EPHA3 receptor tyrosine kinase, a gene commonly mutated in human cancer. We demonstrate that selected intracellular EPHA3 tumor-associated point mutations decrease receptor expression level and/or receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) activity. Our study therefore describes a new strategy to mine for novel candidate tumor suppressors and provides compelling evidence that EPHA3 mutations may promote tumorigenesis only when key senescence-inducing pathways have been inactivated. PMID:23324396

  1. Cofactor squelching: Artifact or fact?

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Søren Fisker; Larsen, Bjørk Ditlev; Loft, Anne; Mandrup, Susanne

    2016-07-01

    Cofactor squelching is the term used to describe competition between transcription factors (TFs) for a limited amount of cofactors in a cell with the functional consequence that TFs in a given cell interfere with the activity of each other. Since cofactor squelching was proposed based primarily on reporter assays some 30 years ago, it has remained controversial, and the idea that it could be a physiologically relevant mechanism for transcriptional repression has not received much support. However, recent genome-wide studies have demonstrated that signal-dependent TFs are very often absent from the enhancers that are acutely repressed by those signals, which is consistent with an indirect mechanism of repression such as squelching. Here we review these recent studies in the light of the classical studies of cofactor squelching, and we discuss how TF cooperativity in so-called hotspots and super-enhancers may sensitize these to cofactor squelching.

  2. Biosynthesis of flavin cofactors in man: implications in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Barile, Maria; Giancaspero, Teresa Anna; Brizio, Carmen; Panebianco, Concetta; Indiveri, Cesare; Galluccio, Michele; Vergani, Lodovica; Eberini, Ivano; Gianazza, Elisabetta

    2013-01-01

    The primary role of the water-soluble vitamin B2, i.e. riboflavin, in cell biology is connected with its conversion into FMN and FAD, the cofactors of a large number of dehydrogenases, reductases and oxidases involved in energetic metabolism, redox homeostasis and protein folding as well as in diverse regulatory events. Deficiency of riboflavin in men and experimental animal models has been linked to several diseases, including neuromuscular and neurological disorders and cancer. Riboflavin at pharmacological doses has been shown to play unexpected and incompletely understood regulatory roles. Besides a summary on riboflavin uptake and a survey on riboflavin-related diseases, the main focus of this review is on discovery and characterization of FAD synthase (EC 2.7.7.2) and other components of the cellular networks that ensure flavin cofactor homeostasis.Special attention is devoted to the problem of sub-cellular compartmentalization of cofactor synthesis in eukaryotes, made possible by the existence of different FAD synthase isoforms and specific molecular components involved in flavin trafficking across sub-cellular membranes.Another point addressed in this review is the mechanism of cofactor delivery to nascent apo-proteins, especially those localized into mitochondria, where they integrate FAD in a process that involves additional mitochondrial protein(s) still to be identified. Further efforts are necessary to elucidate the role of riboflavin/FAD network in human pathologies and to exploit the structural differences between human and microbial/fungal FAD synthase as the rational basis for developing novel antibiotic/antimycotic drugs. PMID:23116402

  3. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Immune Cell Receptors, Coreceptors, and Cofactors: Implications for Prevention and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Woodham, Andrew W; Skeate, Joseph G; Sanna, Adriana M; Taylor, Julia R; Da Silva, Diane M; Cannon, Paula M; Kast, W Martin

    2016-07-01

    In the last three decades, extensive research on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has highlighted its capability to exploit a variety of strategies to enter and infect immune cells. Although CD4(+) T cells are well known as the major HIV target, with infection occurring through the canonical combination of the cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4) receptor and either the C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) or C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) coreceptors, HIV has also been found to enter other important immune cell types such as macrophages, dendritic cells, Langerhans cells, B cells, and granulocytes. Interestingly, the expression of distinct cellular cofactors partially regulates the rate in which HIV infects each distinct cell type. Furthermore, HIV can benefit from the acquisition of new proteins incorporated into its envelope during budding events. While several publications have investigated details of how HIV manipulates particular cell types or subtypes, an up-to-date comprehensive review on HIV tropism for different immune cells is lacking. Therefore, this review is meant to focus on the different receptors, coreceptors, and cofactors that HIV exploits to enter particular immune cells. Additionally, prophylactic approaches that have targeted particular molecules associated with HIV entry and infection of different immune cells will be discussed. Unveiling the underlying cellular receptors and cofactors that lead to HIV preference for specific immune cell populations is crucial in identifying novel preventative/therapeutic targets for comprehensive strategies to eliminate viral infection.

  4. The general definition of the p97/valosin-containing protein (VCP)-interacting motif (VIM) delineates a new family of p97 cofactors.

    PubMed

    Stapf, Christopher; Cartwright, Edward; Bycroft, Mark; Hofmann, Kay; Buchberger, Alexander

    2011-11-01

    Cellular functions of the essential, ubiquitin-selective AAA ATPase p97/valosin-containing protein (VCP) are controlled by regulatory cofactors determining substrate specificity and fate. Most cofactors bind p97 through a ubiquitin regulatory X (UBX) or UBX-like domain or linear sequence motifs, including the hitherto ill defined p97/VCP-interacting motif (VIM). Here, we present the new, minimal consensus sequence RX(5)AAX(2)R as a general definition of the VIM that unites a novel family of known and putative p97 cofactors, among them UBXD1 and ZNF744/ANKZF1. We demonstrate that this minimal VIM consensus sequence is necessary and sufficient for p97 binding. Using NMR chemical shift mapping, we identified several residues of the p97 N-terminal domain (N domain) that are critical for VIM binding. Importantly, we show that cellular stress resistance conferred by the yeast VIM-containing cofactor Vms1 depends on the physical interaction between its VIM and the critical N domain residues of the yeast p97 homolog, Cdc48. Thus, the VIM-N domain interaction characterized in this study is required for the physiological function of Vms1 and most likely other members of the newly defined VIM family of cofactors.

  5. Eukaryotic elongation factor 1 complex subunits are critical HIV-1 reverse transcription cofactors.

    PubMed

    Warren, Kylie; Wei, Ting; Li, Dongsheng; Qin, Fangyun; Warrilow, David; Lin, Min-Hsuan; Sivakumaran, Haran; Apolloni, Ann; Abbott, Catherine M; Jones, Alun; Anderson, Jenny L; Harrich, David

    2012-06-12

    Cellular proteins have been implicated as important for HIV-1 reverse transcription, but whether any are reverse transcription complex (RTC) cofactors or affect reverse transcription indirectly is unclear. Here we used protein fractionation combined with an endogenous reverse transcription assay to identify cellular proteins that stimulated late steps of reverse transcription in vitro. We identified 25 cellular proteins in an active protein fraction, and here we show that the eEF1A and eEF1G subunits of eukaryotic elongation factor 1 (eEF1) are important components of the HIV-1 RTC. eEF1A and eEF1G were identified in fractionated human T-cell lysates as reverse transcription cofactors, as their removal ablated the ability of active protein fractions to stimulate late reverse transcription in vitro. We observed that the p51 subunit of reverse transcriptase and integrase, two subunits of the RTC, coimmunoprecipitated with eEF1A and eEF1G. Moreover eEF1A and eEF1G associated with purified RTCs and colocalized with reverse transcriptase following infection of cells. Reverse transcription in cells was sharply down-regulated when eEF1A or eEF1G levels were reduced by siRNA treatment as a result of reduced levels of RTCs in treated cells. The combined evidence indicates that these eEF1 subunits are critical RTC stability cofactors required for efficient completion of reverse transcription. The identification of eEF1 subunits as unique RTC components provides a basis for further investigations of reverse transcription and trafficking of the RTC to the nucleus.

  6. Quantitative phase-digital holographic microscopy: a new imaging modality to identify original cellular biomarkers of diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquet, P.; Rothenfusser, K.; Rappaz, B.; Depeursinge, C.; Jourdain, P.; Magistretti, P. J.

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative phase microscopy (QPM) has recently emerged as a powerful label-free technique in the field of living cell imaging allowing to non-invasively measure with a nanometric axial sensitivity cell structure and dynamics. Since the phase retardation of a light wave when transmitted through the observed cells, namely the quantitative phase signal (QPS), is sensitive to both cellular thickness and intracellular refractive index related to the cellular content, its accurate analysis allows to derive various cell parameters and monitor specific cell processes, which are very likely to identify new cell biomarkers. Specifically, quantitative phase-digital holographic microscopy (QP-DHM), thanks to its numerical flexibility facilitating parallelization and automation processes, represents an appealing imaging modality to both identify original cellular biomarkers of diseases as well to explore the underlying pathophysiological processes.

  7. Hindered rotation of a cofactor methyl group as a probe for protein-cofactor interaction.

    PubMed

    Brosi, Richard; Illarionov, Boris; Mathes, Tilo; Fischer, Markus; Joshi, Monika; Bacher, Adelbert; Hegemann, Peter; Bittl, Robert; Weber, Stefan; Schleicher, Erik

    2010-07-01

    Exploring protein-cofactor interactions on a molecular level is one of the major challenges in modern biophysics. Based on structural data alone it is rarely possible to identify how subtle interactions between a protein and its cofactor modulate the protein's reactivity. In the case of enzymatic processes in which paramagnetic molecules play a certain role, EPR and related methods such as ENDOR are suitable techniques to unravel such important details. In this contribution, we describe how cryogenic-temperature ENDOR spectroscopy can be applied to various LOV domains, the blue-light sensing domains of phototropin photoreceptors, to gain information on the direct vicinity of the flavin mononucleotide (FMN) cofactor by analyzing the temperature dependence of methyl-group rotation attached to C(8) of the FMN's isoalloxazine ring. More specifically, mutational studies of three amino acids surrounding the methyl group led to the identification of Asn425 as an important amino acid that critically influences the dark-state recovery of Avena sativa LOV2 domains. Consequently, it is possible to probe protein-cofactor interactions on a sub-angstrom level by following the temperature dependencies of hyperfine couplings.

  8. Intracellular trafficking of the pyridoxal cofactor. Implications for health and metabolic disease.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, James W

    2016-02-15

    The importance of the vitamin B6-derived pyridoxal cofactor for human health has been established through more than 70 years of intensive biochemical research, revealing its fundamental roles in metabolism. B6 deficiency, resulting from nutritional limitation or impaired uptake from dietary sources, is associated with epilepsy, neuromuscular disease and neurodegeneration. Hereditary disorders of B6 processing are also known, and genetic defects in pathways involved in transport of B6 into the cell and its transformation to the pyridoxal-5'-phosphate enzyme cofactor can contribute to cardiovascular disease by interfering with homocysteine metabolism and the biosynthesis of vasomodulatory polyamines. Compared to the processes involved in cellular uptake and processing of the B6 vitamers, trafficking of the PLP cofactor across intracellular membranes is very poorly understood, even though the availability of PLP within subcellular compartments (particularly the mitochondrion) may have important health implications. The aim of this review is to concisely summarize the state of current knowledge of intracellular trafficking of PLP and to identify key directions for future research.

  9. Chemical Genomics Identifies the PERK-Mediated Unfolded Protein Stress Response as a Cellular Target for Influenza Virus Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Landeras-Bueno, Sara; Fernández, Yolanda; Falcón, Ana; Oliveros, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza A viruses generate annual epidemics and occasional pandemics of respiratory disease with important consequences for human health and the economy. Therefore, a large effort has been devoted to the development of new anti-influenza virus drugs directed to viral targets, as well as to the identification of cellular targets amenable to anti-influenza virus therapy. Here we have addressed the identification of such potential cellular targets by screening collections of drugs approved for human use. We reasoned that screening with a green fluorescent protein-based recombinant replicon system would identify cellular targets involved in virus transcription/replication and/or gene expression and hence address an early stage of virus infection. By using such a strategy, we identified Montelukast (MK) as an inhibitor of virus multiplication. MK inhibited virus gene expression but did not alter viral RNA synthesis in vitro or viral RNA accumulation in vivo. The low selectivity index of MK prevented its use as an antiviral, but it was sufficient to identify a new cellular pathway suitable for anti-influenza virus intervention. By deep sequencing of RNA isolated from mock- and virus-infected human cells, treated with MK or left untreated, we showed that it stimulates the PERK-mediated unfolded protein stress response. The phosphorylation of PERK was partly inhibited in virus-infected cells but stimulated in MK-treated cells. Accordingly, pharmacological inhibition of PERK phosphorylation led to increased viral gene expression, while inhibition of PERK phosphatase reduced viral protein synthesis. These results suggest the PERK-mediated unfolded protein response as a potential cellular target to modulate influenza virus infection. PMID:27094326

  10. Sparse feature selection methods identify unexpected global cellular response to strontium-containing materials.

    PubMed

    Autefage, Hélène; Gentleman, Eileen; Littmann, Elena; Hedegaard, Martin A B; Von Erlach, Thomas; O'Donnell, Matthew; Burden, Frank R; Winkler, David A; Stevens, Molly M

    2015-04-01

    Despite the increasing sophistication of biomaterials design and functional characterization studies, little is known regarding cells' global response to biomaterials. Here, we combined nontargeted holistic biological and physical science techniques to evaluate how simple strontium ion incorporation within the well-described biomaterial 45S5 bioactive glass (BG) influences the global response of human mesenchymal stem cells. Our objective analyses of whole gene-expression profiles, confirmed by standard molecular biology techniques, revealed that strontium-substituted BG up-regulated the isoprenoid pathway, suggesting an influence on both sterol metabolite synthesis and protein prenylation processes. This up-regulation was accompanied by increases in cellular and membrane cholesterol and lipid raft contents as determined by Raman spectroscopy mapping and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy analyses and by an increase in cellular content of phosphorylated myosin II light chain. Our unexpected findings of this strong metabolic pathway regulation as a response to biomaterial composition highlight the benefits of discovery-driven nonreductionist approaches to gain a deeper understanding of global cell-material interactions and suggest alternative research routes for evaluating biomaterials to improve their design.

  11. High content analysis at single cell level identifies different cellular responses dependent on nanomaterial concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manshian, Bella B.; Munck, Sebastian; Agostinis, Patrizia; Himmelreich, Uwe; Soenen, Stefaan J.

    2015-09-01

    A mechanistic understanding of nanomaterial (NM) interaction with biological environments is pivotal for the safe transition from basic science to applied nanomedicine. NM exposure results in varying levels of internalized NM in different neighboring cells, due to variances in cell size, cell cycle phase and NM agglomeration. Using high-content analysis, we investigated the cytotoxic effects of fluorescent quantum dots on cultured cells, where all effects were correlated with the concentration of NMs at the single cell level. Upon binning the single cell data into different categories related to NM concentration, this study demonstrates, for the first time, that quantum dots activate both cytoprotective and cytotoxic mechanisms, resulting in a zero net result on the overall cell population, yet with significant effects in cells with higher cellular NM levels. Our results suggest that future NM cytotoxicity studies should correlate NM toxicity with cellular NM numbers on the single cell level, as conflicting mechanisms in particular cell subpopulations are commonly overlooked using classical toxicological methods.

  12. Identifying the Cellular Targets of Drug Action in the Central Nervous System Following Corticosteroid Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Corticosteroid (CS) therapy is used widely in the treatment of a range of pathologies, but can delay production of myelin, the insulating sheath around central nervous system nerve fibers. The cellular targets of CS action are not fully understood, that is, “direct” action on cells involved in myelin genesis [oligodendrocytes and their progenitors the oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs)] versus “indirect” action on other neural cells. We evaluated the effects of the widely used CS dexamethasone (DEX) on purified OPCs and oligodendrocytes, employing complementary histological and transcriptional analyses. Histological assessments showed no DEX effects on OPC proliferation or oligodendrocyte genesis/maturation (key processes underpinning myelin genesis). Immunostaining and RT-PCR analyses show that both cell types express glucocorticoid receptor (GR; the target for DEX action), ruling out receptor expression as a causal factor in the lack of DEX-responsiveness. GRs function as ligand-activated transcription factors, so we simultaneously analyzed DEX-induced transcriptional responses using microarray analyses; these substantiated the histological findings, with limited gene expression changes in DEX-treated OPCs and oligodendrocytes. With identical treatment, microglial cells showed profound and global changes post-DEX addition; an unexpected finding was the identification of the transcription factor Olig1, a master regulator of myelination, as a DEX responsive gene in microglia. Our data indicate that CS-induced myelination delays are unlikely to be due to direct drug action on OPCs or oligodendrocytes, and may occur secondary to alterations in other neural cells, such as the immune component. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first comparative molecular and cellular analysis of CS effects in glial cells, to investigate the targets of this major class of anti-inflammatory drugs as a basis for myelination deficits. PMID:24147833

  13. Protein acetylation in metabolism - metabolites and cofactors.

    PubMed

    Menzies, Keir J; Zhang, Hongbo; Katsyuba, Elena; Auwerx, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Reversible acetylation was initially described as an epigenetic mechanism regulating DNA accessibility. Since then, this process has emerged as a controller of histone and nonhistone acetylation that integrates key physiological processes such as metabolism, circadian rhythm and cell cycle, along with gene regulation in various organisms. The widespread and reversible nature of acetylation also revitalized interest in the mechanisms that regulate lysine acetyltransferases (KATs) and deacetylases (KDACs) in health and disease. Changes in protein or histone acetylation are especially relevant for many common diseases including obesity, diabetes mellitus, neurodegenerative diseases and cancer, as well as for some rare diseases such as mitochondrial diseases and lipodystrophies. In this Review, we examine the role of reversible acetylation in metabolic control and how changes in levels of metabolites or cofactors, including nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, nicotinamide, coenzyme A, acetyl coenzyme A, zinc and butyrate and/or β-hydroxybutyrate, directly alter KAT or KDAC activity to link energy status to adaptive cellular and organismal homeostasis.

  14. Systems Biology-Based Investigation of Cellular Antiviral Drug Targets Identified by Gene-Trap Insertional Mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Feixiong; Murray, James L; Zhao, Junfei; Sheng, Jinsong; Zhao, Zhongming; Rubin, Donald H

    2016-09-01

    Viruses require host cellular factors for successful replication. A comprehensive systems-level investigation of the virus-host interactome is critical for understanding the roles of host factors with the end goal of discovering new druggable antiviral targets. Gene-trap insertional mutagenesis is a high-throughput forward genetics approach to randomly disrupt (trap) host genes and discover host genes that are essential for viral replication, but not for host cell survival. In this study, we used libraries of randomly mutagenized cells to discover cellular genes that are essential for the replication of 10 distinct cytotoxic mammalian viruses, 1 gram-negative bacterium, and 5 toxins. We herein reported 712 candidate cellular genes, characterizing distinct topological network and evolutionary signatures, and occupying central hubs in the human interactome. Cell cycle phase-specific network analysis showed that host cell cycle programs played critical roles during viral replication (e.g. MYC and TAF4 regulating G0/1 phase). Moreover, the viral perturbation of host cellular networks reflected disease etiology in that host genes (e.g. CTCF, RHOA, and CDKN1B) identified were frequently essential and significantly associated with Mendelian and orphan diseases, or somatic mutations in cancer. Computational drug repositioning framework via incorporating drug-gene signatures from the Connectivity Map into the virus-host interactome identified 110 putative druggable antiviral targets and prioritized several existing drugs (e.g. ajmaline) that may be potential for antiviral indication (e.g. anti-Ebola). In summary, this work provides a powerful methodology with a tight integration of gene-trap insertional mutagenesis testing and systems biology to identify new antiviral targets and drugs for the development of broadly acting and targeted clinical antiviral therapeutics.

  15. Systems Biology-Based Investigation of Cellular Antiviral Drug Targets Identified by Gene-Trap Insertional Mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Feixiong; Murray, James L; Zhao, Junfei; Sheng, Jinsong; Zhao, Zhongming; Rubin, Donald H

    2016-09-01

    Viruses require host cellular factors for successful replication. A comprehensive systems-level investigation of the virus-host interactome is critical for understanding the roles of host factors with the end goal of discovering new druggable antiviral targets. Gene-trap insertional mutagenesis is a high-throughput forward genetics approach to randomly disrupt (trap) host genes and discover host genes that are essential for viral replication, but not for host cell survival. In this study, we used libraries of randomly mutagenized cells to discover cellular genes that are essential for the replication of 10 distinct cytotoxic mammalian viruses, 1 gram-negative bacterium, and 5 toxins. We herein reported 712 candidate cellular genes, characterizing distinct topological network and evolutionary signatures, and occupying central hubs in the human interactome. Cell cycle phase-specific network analysis showed that host cell cycle programs played critical roles during viral replication (e.g. MYC and TAF4 regulating G0/1 phase). Moreover, the viral perturbation of host cellular networks reflected disease etiology in that host genes (e.g. CTCF, RHOA, and CDKN1B) identified were frequently essential and significantly associated with Mendelian and orphan diseases, or somatic mutations in cancer. Computational drug repositioning framework via incorporating drug-gene signatures from the Connectivity Map into the virus-host interactome identified 110 putative druggable antiviral targets and prioritized several existing drugs (e.g. ajmaline) that may be potential for antiviral indication (e.g. anti-Ebola). In summary, this work provides a powerful methodology with a tight integration of gene-trap insertional mutagenesis testing and systems biology to identify new antiviral targets and drugs for the development of broadly acting and targeted clinical antiviral therapeutics. PMID:27632082

  16. Systems Biology-Based Investigation of Cellular Antiviral Drug Targets Identified by Gene-Trap Insertional Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Junfei; Sheng, Jinsong; Rubin, Donald H.

    2016-01-01

    Viruses require host cellular factors for successful replication. A comprehensive systems-level investigation of the virus-host interactome is critical for understanding the roles of host factors with the end goal of discovering new druggable antiviral targets. Gene-trap insertional mutagenesis is a high-throughput forward genetics approach to randomly disrupt (trap) host genes and discover host genes that are essential for viral replication, but not for host cell survival. In this study, we used libraries of randomly mutagenized cells to discover cellular genes that are essential for the replication of 10 distinct cytotoxic mammalian viruses, 1 gram-negative bacterium, and 5 toxins. We herein reported 712 candidate cellular genes, characterizing distinct topological network and evolutionary signatures, and occupying central hubs in the human interactome. Cell cycle phase-specific network analysis showed that host cell cycle programs played critical roles during viral replication (e.g. MYC and TAF4 regulating G0/1 phase). Moreover, the viral perturbation of host cellular networks reflected disease etiology in that host genes (e.g. CTCF, RHOA, and CDKN1B) identified were frequently essential and significantly associated with Mendelian and orphan diseases, or somatic mutations in cancer. Computational drug repositioning framework via incorporating drug-gene signatures from the Connectivity Map into the virus-host interactome identified 110 putative druggable antiviral targets and prioritized several existing drugs (e.g. ajmaline) that may be potential for antiviral indication (e.g. anti-Ebola). In summary, this work provides a powerful methodology with a tight integration of gene-trap insertional mutagenesis testing and systems biology to identify new antiviral targets and drugs for the development of broadly acting and targeted clinical antiviral therapeutics. PMID:27632082

  17. Genetics Home Reference: molybdenum cofactor deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... molybdenum, is essential to the function of several enzymes. These enzymes help break down (metabolize) different substances in the ... molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis. Without the cofactor, the metabolic enzymes that rely on it cannot function. The resulting ...

  18. Impact of Resolution on Simulation of Closed Mesoscale Cellular Convection Identified by Dynamically Guided Watershed Segmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Martini, Matus N.; Gustafson, William I.; Yang, Qing; Xiao, Heng

    2014-11-18

    Organized mesoscale cellular convection (MCC) is a common feature of marine stratocumulus that forms in response to a balance between mesoscale dynamics and smaller scale processes such as cloud radiative cooling and microphysics. We use the Weather Research and Forecasting model with chemistry (WRF-Chem) and fully coupled cloud-aerosol interactions to simulate marine low clouds during the VOCALS-REx campaign over the southeast Pacific. A suite of experiments with 3- and 9-km grid spacing indicates resolution-dependent behavior. The simulations with finer grid spacing have smaller liquid water paths and cloud fractions, while cloud tops are higher. The observed diurnal cycle is reasonably well simulated. To isolate organized MCC characteristics we develop a new automated method, which uses a variation of the watershed segmentation technique that combines the detection of cloud boundaries with a test for coincident vertical velocity characteristics. This ensures that the detected cloud fields are dynamically consistent for closed MCC, the most common MCC type over the VOCALS-REx region. We demonstrate that the 3-km simulation is able to reproduce the scaling between horizontal cell size and boundary layer height seen in satellite observations. However, the 9-km simulation is unable to resolve smaller circulations corresponding to shallower boundary layers, instead producing invariant MCC horizontal scale for all simulated boundary layers depths. The results imply that climate models with grid spacing of roughly 3 km or smaller may be needed to properly simulate the MCC structure in the marine stratocumulus regions.

  19. Protein-protein interaction networks identify targets which rescue the MPP+ cellular model of Parkinson’s disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keane, Harriet; Ryan, Brent J.; Jackson, Brendan; Whitmore, Alan; Wade-Martins, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are complex multifactorial disorders characterised by the interplay of many dysregulated physiological processes. As an exemplar, Parkinson’s disease (PD) involves multiple perturbed cellular functions, including mitochondrial dysfunction and autophagic dysregulation in preferentially-sensitive dopamine neurons, a selective pathophysiology recapitulated in vitro using the neurotoxin MPP+. Here we explore a network science approach for the selection of therapeutic protein targets in the cellular MPP+ model. We hypothesised that analysis of protein-protein interaction networks modelling MPP+ toxicity could identify proteins critical for mediating MPP+ toxicity. Analysis of protein-protein interaction networks constructed to model the interplay of mitochondrial dysfunction and autophagic dysregulation (key aspects of MPP+ toxicity) enabled us to identify four proteins predicted to be key for MPP+ toxicity (P62, GABARAP, GBRL1 and GBRL2). Combined, but not individual, knockdown of these proteins increased cellular susceptibility to MPP+ toxicity. Conversely, combined, but not individual, over-expression of the network targets provided rescue of MPP+ toxicity associated with the formation of autophagosome-like structures. We also found that modulation of two distinct proteins in the protein-protein interaction network was necessary and sufficient to mitigate neurotoxicity. Together, these findings validate our network science approach to multi-target identification in complex neurological diseases.

  20. Protein-protein interaction networks identify targets which rescue the MPP+ cellular model of Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Harriet; Ryan, Brent J.; Jackson, Brendan; Whitmore, Alan; Wade-Martins, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are complex multifactorial disorders characterised by the interplay of many dysregulated physiological processes. As an exemplar, Parkinson’s disease (PD) involves multiple perturbed cellular functions, including mitochondrial dysfunction and autophagic dysregulation in preferentially-sensitive dopamine neurons, a selective pathophysiology recapitulated in vitro using the neurotoxin MPP+. Here we explore a network science approach for the selection of therapeutic protein targets in the cellular MPP+ model. We hypothesised that analysis of protein-protein interaction networks modelling MPP+ toxicity could identify proteins critical for mediating MPP+ toxicity. Analysis of protein-protein interaction networks constructed to model the interplay of mitochondrial dysfunction and autophagic dysregulation (key aspects of MPP+ toxicity) enabled us to identify four proteins predicted to be key for MPP+ toxicity (P62, GABARAP, GBRL1 and GBRL2). Combined, but not individual, knockdown of these proteins increased cellular susceptibility to MPP+ toxicity. Conversely, combined, but not individual, over-expression of the network targets provided rescue of MPP+ toxicity associated with the formation of autophagosome-like structures. We also found that modulation of two distinct proteins in the protein-protein interaction network was necessary and sufficient to mitigate neurotoxicity. Together, these findings validate our network science approach to multi-target identification in complex neurological diseases. PMID:26608097

  1. Metabolic Regulation of Histone Acetyltransferases by Endogenous Acyl-CoA Cofactors

    PubMed Central

    Guasch, Laura; Nicklaus, Marc C.; Meier, Jordan L.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The finding that chromatin modifications are sensitive to changes in cellular cofactor levels potentially links altered tumor cell metabolism and gene expression. However, the specific enzymes and metabolites that connect these two processes remain obscure. Characterizing these metabolic-epigenetic axes is critical to understanding how metabolism supports signaling in cancer, and developing therapeutic strategies to disrupt this process. Here, we describe a chemical approach to define the metabolic regulation of lysine acetyltransferase (KAT) enzymes. Using a novel chemoproteomic probe, we identify a previously unreported interaction between fatty acyl-CoAs and KAT enzymes. Further analysis reveals that palmitoyl-CoA is a potent inhibitor of KAT activity and that fatty acyl-CoA precursors reduce cellular acetylation levels. These studies implicate fatty acyl-CoAs as endogenous regulators of histone acetylation, and suggest novel strategies for the investigation and metabolic modulation of epigenetic signaling. PMID:26190825

  2. Functional diversity of organic molecule enzyme cofactors.

    PubMed

    Richter, Michael

    2013-10-11

    Covering up to 2013. Cofactor-dependent enzymes which need small organic molecule cofactors to accomplish enzymatic activity are widespread. The number of newly discovered reactions within cofactor-dependent enzyme families increases continuously. A knowledge based categorization of cofactors with respect to their chemical properties shows that within enzymes they are not used for the catalysis of singular types of reactions and functionalities. Therefore, in many cases an unambiguous and narrow classification does not seem sufficient. Rather, the functional diversity of cofactors found in enzymes represents variations around specific themes with regard to a catalysed reaction and the cofactor chemistry. Furthermore, organic cofactor molecules are also used for non-enzymatic functions. Two representative cofactors are exemplarily discussed in detail, thiamin diphosphate (ThDP) as a self-sufficient cofactor and S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM), as both a catalytic and building-block-delivering cofactor. A further synopsis on selected examples of organic cofactors emphasizes the discovery and application of new enzymatic activities based on the cofactor-dependent chemistry and shows how bioinspired synthesis approaches expand catalytic and non-catalytic synthesis applications beyond natural solutions.

  3. Nuclear Morphometry Identifies a Distinct Aggressive Cellular Phenotype in Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Glazer, Evan S.; Bartels, Peter H.; Prasad, Anil R.; Yozwiak, Michael L.; Bartels, Hubert G.; Einspahr, Janine G.; Alberts, David S.; Krouse, Robert S.

    2011-01-01

    By identifying aggressive cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) in patients who are at high risk for recurrences or second primaries after resection, intensive surveillance and therapy may decrease morbidity and mortality. We investigated the role of nuclear morphometry (karyometry) in differentiating between aggressive and nonaggressive cSCC. We retrospectively analyzed cSCC lesions from 40 male patients. 22 patients had evidence of aggressive cSCC (local/regional recurrence or a second primary cSCC), and 18 patients were identified with similar ages and sites of disease as control patients with nonaggressive cSCC (no evidence of recurrence, metastasis, or second primary). We performed karyometric analysis to identify nuclear features that discriminate between aggressive and nonaggressive cSCC nuclei. We used statistically significant differences (Kruskal-Wallis test P < 0.0001) to compose a quantitative aggressive classification score (proportion of aggressive nuclei from 0% to 100%). For comparisons, we used Fisher’s exact test or Student t test. The mean age was 79 ± 7 years for aggressive cSCC and 80 ± 9 years for nonaggressive cSCC (P = 0.66). We analyzed a mean of 96 nuclei in each group. The mean classification score for aggressive cSCC was significantly higher (69% ± 6%) than for nonaggressive cSCC (28% ± 5%, P = 0.00002). Overall, the classification score accurately categorized 80% of our patients (P = 0.0004). In most patients, karyometry differentiated between aggressive and nonaggressive cSCC. We found that classification scores, which provide information on individual lesions, could be used for risk stratification. PMID:21636541

  4. Defining efficient enzyme-cofactor pairs for bioorthogonal profiling of protein methylation

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, Kabirul; Chen, Yuling; Wu, Hong; Bothwell, Ian R.; Blum, Gil J.; Zeng, Hong; Dong, Aiping; Zheng, Weihong; Min, Jinrong; Deng, Haiteng; Luo, Minkui

    2013-11-18

    Protein methyltransferase (PMT)-mediated posttranslational modification of histone and nonhistone substrates modulates stability, localization, and interacting partners of target proteins in diverse cellular contexts. These events play critical roles in normal biological processes and are frequently deregulated in human diseases. In the course of identifying substrates of individual PMTs, bioorthogonal profiling of protein methylation (BPPM) has demonstrated its merits. In this approach, specific PMTs are engineered to process S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) analogs as cofactor surrogates and label their substrates with distinct chemical modifications for target elucidation. Despite the proof-of-concept advancement of BPPM, few efforts have been made to explore its generality. With two cancer-relevant PMTs, EuHMT1 (GLP1/KMT1D) and EuHMT2 (G9a/KMT1C), as models, we defined the key structural features of engineered PMTs and matched SAM analogs that can render the orthogonal enzyme–cofactor pairs for efficient catalysis. Here we have demonstrated that the presence of sulfonium-β-sp2 carbon and flexible, medium-sized sulfonium-δ-substituents are crucial for SAM analogs as BPPM reagents. The bulky cofactors can be accommodated by tailoring the conserved Y1211/Y1154 residues and nearby hydrophobic cavities of EuHMT1/2. Profiling proteome-wide substrates with BPPM allowed identification of >500 targets of EuHMT1/2 with representative targets validated using native EuHMT1/2 and SAM. This finding indicates that EuHMT1/2 may regulate many cellular events previously unrecognized to be modulated by methylation. The present work, therefore, paves the way to a broader application of the BPPM technology to profile methylomes of diverse PMTs and elucidate their downstream functions.

  5. Engineering redox balance through cofactor systems.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiulai; Li, Shubo; Liu, Liming

    2014-06-01

    Redox balance plays an important role in the production of enzymes, pharmaceuticals, and chemicals. To meet the demands of industrial production, it is desirable that microbes maintain a maximal carbon flux towards target metabolites with no fluctuations in redox. This requires functional cofactor systems that support dynamic homeostasis between different redox states or functional stability in a given redox state. Redox balance can be achieved by improving the self-balance of a cofactor system, regulating the substrate balance of a cofactor system, and engineering the synthetic balance of a cofactor system. This review summarizes how cofactor systems can be manipulated to improve redox balance in microbes.

  6. Molybdopterin cofactor from Methanobacterium formicicum formate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    May, H D; Schauer, N L; Ferry, J G

    1986-01-01

    The molybdopterin cofactor from the formate dehydrogenase of Methanobacterium formicicum was studied. The cofactor was released by guanidine denaturation of homogeneous enzyme, which also released greater than 80% of the molybdenum present in the enzyme. The anoxically isolated cofactor was nonfluorescent, but after exposure to air it fluoresced with spectra similar to those of described molybdopterin cofactors. Aerobic release from acid-denatured formate dehydrogenase in the presence of I2 and potassium iodide produced a mixture of fluorescent products. Alkaline permanganate oxidation of the mixture yielded pterin-6-carboxylic acid as the only detectable fluorescent product. The results showed that the cofactor from formate dehydrogenase contained a pterin nucleus with a 6-alkyl side chain of unknown structure. Covalently bound phosphate was also present. The isolated cofactor was unable to complement the cofactor-deficient nitrate reductase of the Neurospora crassa nit-1 mutant. PMID:3700335

  7. Cofactory: sequence-based prediction of cofactor specificity of Rossmann folds.

    PubMed

    Geertz-Hansen, Henrik Marcus; Blom, Nikolaj; Feist, Adam M; Brunak, Søren; Petersen, Thomas Nordahl

    2014-09-01

    Obtaining optimal cofactor balance to drive production is a challenge in metabolically engineered microbial production strains. To facilitate identification of heterologous enzymes with desirable altered cofactor requirements from native content, we have developed Cofactory, a method for prediction of enzyme cofactor specificity using only primary amino acid sequence information. The algorithm identifies potential cofactor binding Rossmann folds and predicts the specificity for the cofactors FAD(H2), NAD(H), and NADP(H). The Rossmann fold sequence search is carried out using hidden Markov models whereas artificial neural networks are used for specificity prediction. Training was carried out using experimental data from protein-cofactor structure complexes. The overall performance was benchmarked against an independent evaluation set obtaining Matthews correlation coefficients of 0.94, 0.79, and 0.65 for FAD(H2), NAD(H), and NADP(H), respectively. The Cofactory method is made publicly available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/Cofactory.

  8. Chemical proteomics approaches for identifying the cellular targets of natural products.

    PubMed

    Wright, M H; Sieber, S A

    2016-05-01

    Covering: 2010 up to 2016Deconvoluting the mode of action of natural products and drugs remains one of the biggest challenges in chemistry and biology today. Chemical proteomics is a growing area of chemical biology that seeks to design small molecule probes to understand protein function. In the context of natural products, chemical proteomics can be used to identify the protein binding partners or targets of small molecules in live cells. Here, we highlight recent examples of chemical probes based on natural products and their application for target identification. The review focuses on probes that can be covalently linked to their target proteins (either via intrinsic chemical reactivity or via the introduction of photocrosslinkers), and can be applied "in situ" - in living systems rather than cell lysates. We also focus here on strategies that employ a click reaction, the copper-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction (CuAAC), to allow minimal functionalisation of natural product scaffolds with an alkyne or azide tag. We also discuss 'competitive mode' approaches that screen for natural products that compete with a well-characterised chemical probe for binding to a particular set of protein targets. Fuelled by advances in mass spectrometry instrumentation and bioinformatics, many modern strategies are now embracing quantitative proteomics to help define the true interacting partners of probes, and we highlight the opportunities this rapidly evolving technology provides in chemical proteomics. Finally, some of the limitations and challenges of chemical proteomics approaches are discussed.

  9. Sub-cellular metal imaging identifies dynamic sites of Cu accumulation in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Hong-Hermesdorf, Anne; Miethke, Marcus; Gallaher, Sean D; Kropat, Janette; Dodani, Sheel C; Chan, Jefferson; Barupala, Dulmini; Domaille, Dylan W; Shirasaki, Dyna I; Loo, Joseph A; Weber, Peter K; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Stemmler, Timothy L; Chang, Christopher J; Merchant, Sabeeha S

    2014-01-01

    We identified a Cu accumulating structure with a dynamic role in intracellular Cu homeostasis. During Zn limitation, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii hyperaccumulated Cu, dependent on the nutritional Cu sensor CRR1, but was functionally Cu-deficient. Visualization of intracellular Cu revealed major Cu accumulation sites coincident with electron-dense structures that stained positive for low pH and polyphosphate, suggesting that they are lysosome-related organelles. NanoSIMS showed colocalization of Ca and Cu, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was consistent with Cu+ accumulation in an ordered structure. Zn resupply restored Cu homeostasis concomitant with reduced abundance of these structures. Cu isotope labeling demonstrated that sequestered Cu+ became bio-available for the synthesis of plastocyanin, and transcriptome profiling indicated that mobilized Cu became visible to CRR1. Cu trafficking to intracellular accumulation sites may be a strategy for preventing protein mis-metallation during Zn deficiency and enabling efficient cuproprotein (re)-metallation upon Zn resupply. PMID:25344811

  10. Chemical proteomics approaches for identifying the cellular targets of natural products

    PubMed Central

    Sieber, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    Covering: 2010 up to 2016 Deconvoluting the mode of action of natural products and drugs remains one of the biggest challenges in chemistry and biology today. Chemical proteomics is a growing area of chemical biology that seeks to design small molecule probes to understand protein function. In the context of natural products, chemical proteomics can be used to identify the protein binding partners or targets of small molecules in live cells. Here, we highlight recent examples of chemical probes based on natural products and their application for target identification. The review focuses on probes that can be covalently linked to their target proteins (either via intrinsic chemical reactivity or via the introduction of photocrosslinkers), and can be applied “in situ” – in living systems rather than cell lysates. We also focus here on strategies that employ a click reaction, the copper-catalysed azide–alkyne cycloaddition reaction (CuAAC), to allow minimal functionalisation of natural product scaffolds with an alkyne or azide tag. We also discuss ‘competitive mode’ approaches that screen for natural products that compete with a well-characterised chemical probe for binding to a particular set of protein targets. Fuelled by advances in mass spectrometry instrumentation and bioinformatics, many modern strategies are now embracing quantitative proteomics to help define the true interacting partners of probes, and we highlight the opportunities this rapidly evolving technology provides in chemical proteomics. Finally, some of the limitations and challenges of chemical proteomics approaches are discussed. PMID:27098809

  11. Chemical Screens Identify Drugs that Enhance or Mitigate Cellular Responses to Antibody-Toxin Fusion Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Guha, Rajarshi; Simon, Nathan; Pasetto, Matteo; Keller, Jonathan; Huang, Manjie; Angelus, Evan; Pastan, Ira; Ferrer, Marc; FitzGerald, David J.; Thomas, Craig J.

    2016-01-01

    The intersection of small molecular weight drugs and antibody-based therapeutics is rarely studied in large scale. Both types of agents are currently part of the cancer armamentarium. However, very little is known about how to combine them in optimal ways. Immunotoxins are antibody-toxin gene fusion proteins engineered to target cancer cells via antibody binding to surface antigens. For fusion proteins derived from Pseudomonas exotoxin (PE), potency relies on the enzymatic domain of the toxin which catalyzes the ADP-ribosylation of EF2 causing inhibition of protein synthesis leading to cell death. Candidate immunotoxins have demonstrated clear value in clinical trials but generally have not been curative as single agents. Therefore we undertook three screens to discover effective combinations that could act synergistically. From the MIPE-3 library of compounds we identified various enhancers of immunotoxin action and at least one major class of inhibitor. Follow-up experiments confirmed the screening data and suggested that immunotoxins when administered with everolimus or nilotinib exhibit favorable combinatory activity and would be candidates for preclinical development. Mechanistic studies revealed that everolimus-immunotoxin combinations acted synergistically on elements of the protein synthetic machinery, including S61 kinase and 4E-BP1 of the mTORC1 pathway. Conversely, PARP inhibitors antagonized immunotoxins and also blocked the toxicity due to native ADP-ribosylating toxins. Thus, our goal of investigating a chemical library was justified based on the identification of several approved compounds that could be developed preclinically as ‘enhancers’ and at least one class of mitigator to be avoided. PMID:27556570

  12. Chemical Screens Identify Drugs that Enhance or Mitigate Cellular Responses to Antibody-Toxin Fusion Proteins.

    PubMed

    Antignani, Antonella; Mathews Griner, Lesley; Guha, Rajarshi; Simon, Nathan; Pasetto, Matteo; Keller, Jonathan; Huang, Manjie; Angelus, Evan; Pastan, Ira; Ferrer, Marc; FitzGerald, David J; Thomas, Craig J

    2016-01-01

    The intersection of small molecular weight drugs and antibody-based therapeutics is rarely studied in large scale. Both types of agents are currently part of the cancer armamentarium. However, very little is known about how to combine them in optimal ways. Immunotoxins are antibody-toxin gene fusion proteins engineered to target cancer cells via antibody binding to surface antigens. For fusion proteins derived from Pseudomonas exotoxin (PE), potency relies on the enzymatic domain of the toxin which catalyzes the ADP-ribosylation of EF2 causing inhibition of protein synthesis leading to cell death. Candidate immunotoxins have demonstrated clear value in clinical trials but generally have not been curative as single agents. Therefore we undertook three screens to discover effective combinations that could act synergistically. From the MIPE-3 library of compounds we identified various enhancers of immunotoxin action and at least one major class of inhibitor. Follow-up experiments confirmed the screening data and suggested that immunotoxins when administered with everolimus or nilotinib exhibit favorable combinatory activity and would be candidates for preclinical development. Mechanistic studies revealed that everolimus-immunotoxin combinations acted synergistically on elements of the protein synthetic machinery, including S61 kinase and 4E-BP1 of the mTORC1 pathway. Conversely, PARP inhibitors antagonized immunotoxins and also blocked the toxicity due to native ADP-ribosylating toxins. Thus, our goal of investigating a chemical library was justified based on the identification of several approved compounds that could be developed preclinically as 'enhancers' and at least one class of mitigator to be avoided. PMID:27556570

  13. Emerging roles for tubulin folding cofactors at the centrosome.

    PubMed

    Fanarraga, Mónica López; Carranza, Gerardo; Castaño, Raquel; Jiménez, Victoria; Villegas, Juan Carlos; Zabala, Juan Carlos

    2010-07-01

    Despite its fundamental role in centrosome biology, procentriole formation, both in the canonical and in the de novo replication pathways, remains poorly understood, and the molecular components that are involved in human cells are not well established. We found that one of the tubulin cofactors, TBCD, is localized at centrosomes and the midbody, and is required for spindle organization, cell abscission, centriole formation and ciliogenesis. Our studies have established a molecular link between the centriole and the midbody, demonstrating that this cofactor is also necessary for microtubule retraction during cell abscission. TBCD is the first centriolar protein identified that plays a role in the assembly of both "centriolar rosettes" during early ciliogenesis, and at the procentriole budding site by S/G(2), a discovery that directly implicates tubulin cofactors in the cell division, cell migration and cell signaling research fields.

  14. Cofactor engineering for advancing chemical biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yipeng; San, Ka-Yiu; Bennett, George N

    2013-12-01

    Cofactors provide redox carriers for biosynthetic reactions, catabolic reactions and act as important agents in transfer of energy for the cell. Recent advances in manipulating cofactors include culture conditions or additive alterations, genetic modification of host pathways for increased availability of desired cofactor, changes in enzyme cofactor specificity, and introduction of novel redox partners to form effective circuits for biochemical processes and biocatalysts. Genetic strategies to employ ferredoxin, NADH and NADPH most effectively in natural or novel pathways have improved yield and efficiency of large-scale processes for fuels and chemicals and have been demonstrated with a variety of microbial organisms.

  15. The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Rev-binding protein (HRB) is a co-factor for HIV-1 Nef-mediated CD4 downregulation.

    PubMed

    Landi, Alessia; Timermans, Cristina Garcia; Naessens, Evelien; Vanderstraeten, Hanne; Stove, Veronique; Verhasselt, Bruno

    2016-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-mediated CD4 downregulation is an important determinant of viral replication in vivo. Research on cellular co-factors involved in this process could lead to the identification of potential therapeutic targets. We found that CD4 surface levels were significantly higher in HIV-1-infected cells knocked-down for the HIV Rev-binding protein (HRB) compared with control cells. HRB knock-down affected CD4 downregulation induced by Nef but not by HIV-1 Vpu. Interestingly, the knock-down of the related protein HRBL (HRB-like), but not of the HRB interaction partner EPS15 (epidermal growth factor receptor pathway substrate 15), increased CD4 levels in Vpu-expressing cells significantly. Both of these proteins are known to be involved in HIV-1-mediated CD4 downregulation as co-factors of HIV-1 Nef. These results identify HRB as a previously unknown co-factor for HIV-1 Nef-mediated CD4 downregulation and highlight differences with the related protein HRBL, which affects the CD4 downregulation in a dual role as co-factor of both HIV-1 Nef and Vpu.

  16. [Hpv cofactors in cervical carcinogenesis].

    PubMed

    Pinto, Alvaro P; Tulio, Siumara; Cruz, Olívia Russo

    2002-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) plays a central rule in uterine cervix carcinogenesis. Other factors direct or indirectly influence the installation of this mechanism in cervical squamous epithelium. Investigations regarding mechanisms of interaction of these factors with viral elements are found in the literature of the last 20 years. The present review article discusses possible co-factors of HPV in the genesis of the squamous carcinoma of uterine cervix, taking into account only the factors whose association with the virus or cervical cancer has been documented by experimental studies, and not based just on clinical or epidemiological data. Among the approached parameters are immunological factors (local and humoral immune response), the association with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, genetic factors as protein p53 polymorphism, tabagism and the use of oral contraceptives. All these factors interact in variable intensity with oncoproteins and other HPV elements, increasing and facilitating the virus action in host cells, leading to the development of immortalization and carcinogenesis. PMID:12185639

  17. Protein acetylation in metabolism - metabolites and cofactors.

    PubMed

    Menzies, Keir J; Zhang, Hongbo; Katsyuba, Elena; Auwerx, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Reversible acetylation was initially described as an epigenetic mechanism regulating DNA accessibility. Since then, this process has emerged as a controller of histone and nonhistone acetylation that integrates key physiological processes such as metabolism, circadian rhythm and cell cycle, along with gene regulation in various organisms. The widespread and reversible nature of acetylation also revitalized interest in the mechanisms that regulate lysine acetyltransferases (KATs) and deacetylases (KDACs) in health and disease. Changes in protein or histone acetylation are especially relevant for many common diseases including obesity, diabetes mellitus, neurodegenerative diseases and cancer, as well as for some rare diseases such as mitochondrial diseases and lipodystrophies. In this Review, we examine the role of reversible acetylation in metabolic control and how changes in levels of metabolites or cofactors, including nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, nicotinamide, coenzyme A, acetyl coenzyme A, zinc and butyrate and/or β-hydroxybutyrate, directly alter KAT or KDAC activity to link energy status to adaptive cellular and organismal homeostasis. PMID:26503676

  18. Genome-wide siRNA screen identifies the retromer as a cellular entry factor for human papillomavirus

    PubMed Central

    Lipovsky, Alex; Popa, Andreea; Pimienta, Genaro; Wyler, Michael; Bhan, Ashima; Kuruvilla, Leena; Guie, Marie-Aude; Poffenberger, Adrian C.; Nelson, Christian D. S.; Atwood, Walter J.; DiMaio, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Despite major advances in our understanding of many aspects of human papillomavirus (HPV) biology, HPV entry is poorly understood. To identify cellular genes required for HPV entry, we conducted a genome-wide screen for siRNAs that inhibited infection of HeLa cells by HPV16 pseudovirus. Many retrograde transport factors were required for efficient infection, including multiple subunits of the retromer, which initiates retrograde transport from the endosome to the trans-Golgi network (TGN). The retromer has not been previously implicated in virus entry. Furthermore, HPV16 capsid proteins arrive in the TGN/Golgi in a retromer-dependent fashion during entry, and incoming HPV proteins form a stable complex with retromer subunits. We propose that HPV16 directly engages the retromer at the early or late endosome and traffics to the TGN/Golgi via the retrograde pathway during cell entry. These results provide important insights into HPV entry, identify numerous potential antiviral targets, and suggest that the role of the retromer in infection by other viruses should be assessed. PMID:23569269

  19. Genome-wide siRNA screen identifies the retromer as a cellular entry factor for human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Lipovsky, Alex; Popa, Andreea; Pimienta, Genaro; Wyler, Michael; Bhan, Ashima; Kuruvilla, Leena; Guie, Marie-Aude; Poffenberger, Adrian C; Nelson, Christian D S; Atwood, Walter J; DiMaio, Daniel

    2013-04-30

    Despite major advances in our understanding of many aspects of human papillomavirus (HPV) biology, HPV entry is poorly understood. To identify cellular genes required for HPV entry, we conducted a genome-wide screen for siRNAs that inhibited infection of HeLa cells by HPV16 pseudovirus. Many retrograde transport factors were required for efficient infection, including multiple subunits of the retromer, which initiates retrograde transport from the endosome to the trans-Golgi network (TGN). The retromer has not been previously implicated in virus entry. Furthermore, HPV16 capsid proteins arrive in the TGN/Golgi in a retromer-dependent fashion during entry, and incoming HPV proteins form a stable complex with retromer subunits. We propose that HPV16 directly engages the retromer at the early or late endosome and traffics to the TGN/Golgi via the retrograde pathway during cell entry. These results provide important insights into HPV entry, identify numerous potential antiviral targets, and suggest that the role of the retromer in infection by other viruses should be assessed.

  20. Characterization of molybdenum cofactor from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Amy, N K; Rajagopalan, K V

    1979-01-01

    Molybdenum cofactor activity was found in the soluble fraction of cell-free extracts of Escherichia coli grown aerobically in media supplemented with molybdate. Cofactor was detected by its ability to complement the nitrate reductase-deficient mutant of Neurospora crossa, nit-1, resulting in the vitro formation of nitrate reductase activity. Acid treatment of E. coli extracts was not required for release of cofactor activity. Cofactor was able to diffuse through a membrane of nominal 2,000-molecular-weight cutoff and was insensitive to trypsin. The cofactor was associated with a carrier molecule (approximately 40,000 daltons) during gel filtration and sucrose gradient centrifugation, but was easily removed from the carrier by dialysis. The carrier molecule protected the cofactor from inactivation by heat or oxygen. E. coli grown in molybdenum-free media, without and with tungsten, synthesized a metal-free "empty" cofactor and its tungsten analog, respectively, both of which were subsequently activated by the addition of molybdate. Empty and tungsten-containing cofactor complemented the nitrate reductase subunits in the nit-1 extract, forming inactive, but intact, 7.9S nitrate reductase. Addition of molybdate to the enzyme complemented in this manner restored nitrate reductase activity. PMID:387715

  1. An Evolved Orthogonal Enzyme/Cofactor Pair.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Evan W; McHenry, Matthew W; Cannac, Fabien; Gober, Joshua G; Snow, Christopher D; Brustad, Eric M

    2016-09-28

    We introduce a strategy that expands the functionality of hemoproteins through orthogonal enzyme/heme pairs. By exploiting the ability of a natural heme transport protein, ChuA, to promiscuously import heme derivatives, we have evolved a cytochrome P450 (P450BM3) that selectively incorporates a nonproteinogenic cofactor, iron deuteroporphyrin IX (Fe-DPIX), even in the presence of endogenous heme. Crystal structures show that selectivity gains are due to mutations that introduce steric clash with the heme vinyl groups while providing a complementary binding surface for the smaller Fe-DPIX cofactor. Furthermore, the evolved orthogonal enzyme/cofactor pair is active in non-natural carbenoid-mediated olefin cyclopropanation. This methodology for the generation of orthogonal enzyme/cofactor pairs promises to expand cofactor diversity in artificial metalloenzymes.

  2. General approach to reversing ketol-acid reductoisomerase cofactor dependence from NADPH to NADH.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann-Chen, Sabine; Flock, Tilman; Cahn, Jackson K B; Snow, Christopher D; Brustad, Eric M; McIntosh, John A; Meinhold, Peter; Zhang, Liang; Arnold, Frances H

    2013-07-01

    To date, efforts to switch the cofactor specificity of oxidoreductases from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) have been made on a case-by-case basis with varying degrees of success. Here we present a straightforward recipe for altering the cofactor specificity of a class of NADPH-dependent oxidoreductases, the ketol-acid reductoisomerases (KARIs). Combining previous results for an engineered NADH-dependent variant of Escherichia coli KARI with available KARI crystal structures and a comprehensive KARI-sequence alignment, we identified key cofactor specificity determinants and used this information to construct five KARIs with reversed cofactor preference. Additional directed evolution generated two enzymes having NADH-dependent catalytic efficiencies that are greater than the wild-type enzymes with NADPH. High-resolution structures of a wild-type/variant pair reveal the molecular basis of the cofactor switch.

  3. General approach to reversing ketol-acid reductoisomerase cofactor dependence from NADPH to NADH

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brinkmann-Chen, Sabine; Flock, Tilman; Cahn, Jackson K. B.; Snow, Christopher D.; Brustad, Eric M.; McIntosh, John A.; Meinhold, Peter; Zhang, Liang; Arnold, Frances H.

    2013-06-17

    To date, efforts to switch the cofactor specificity of oxidoreductases from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) have been made on a case-by-case basis with varying degrees of success. Here we present a straightforward recipe for altering the cofactor specificity of a class of NADPH-dependent oxidoreductases, the ketol-acid reductoisomerases (KARIs). Combining previous results for an engineered NADH-dependent variant of Escherichia coli KARI with available KARI crystal structures and a comprehensive KARI-sequence alignment, we identified key cofactor specificity determinants and used this information to construct five KARIs with reversed cofactor preference. Additional directed evolution generated two enzymesmore » having NADH-dependent catalytic efficiencies that are greater than the wild-type enzymes with NADPH. As a result, high-resolution structures of a wild-type/variant pair reveal the molecular basis of the cofactor switch.« less

  4. General approach to reversing ketol-acid reductoisomerase cofactor dependence from NADPH to NADH

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkmann-Chen, Sabine; Flock, Tilman; Cahn, Jackson K. B.; Snow, Christopher D.; Brustad, Eric M.; McIntosh, John A.; Meinhold, Peter; Zhang, Liang; Arnold, Frances H.

    2013-06-17

    To date, efforts to switch the cofactor specificity of oxidoreductases from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) have been made on a case-by-case basis with varying degrees of success. Here we present a straightforward recipe for altering the cofactor specificity of a class of NADPH-dependent oxidoreductases, the ketol-acid reductoisomerases (KARIs). Combining previous results for an engineered NADH-dependent variant of Escherichia coli KARI with available KARI crystal structures and a comprehensive KARI-sequence alignment, we identified key cofactor specificity determinants and used this information to construct five KARIs with reversed cofactor preference. Additional directed evolution generated two enzymes having NADH-dependent catalytic efficiencies that are greater than the wild-type enzymes with NADPH. As a result, high-resolution structures of a wild-type/variant pair reveal the molecular basis of the cofactor switch.

  5. EPR monitored redox titration of the cofactors of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Nar1.

    PubMed

    Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; van der Weel, Laura; Hagen, Wilfred R

    2014-11-26

    Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) monitored redox titrations are a powerful method to determine the midpoint potential of cofactors in proteins and to identify and quantify the cofactors in their detectable redox state. The technique is complementary to direct electrochemistry (voltammetry) approaches, as it does not offer information on electron transfer rates, but does establish the identity and redox state of the cofactors in the protein under study. The technique is widely applicable to any protein containing an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) detectable cofactor. A typical titration requires 2 ml protein with a cofactor concentration in the range of 1-100 µM. The protein is titrated with a chemical reductant (sodium dithionite) or oxidant (potassium ferricyanide) in order to poise the sample at a certain potential. A platinum wire and a Ag/AgCl reference electrode are connected to a voltmeter to measure the potential of the protein solution A set of 13 different redox mediators is used to equilibrate between the redox cofactors of the protein and the electrodes. Samples are drawn at different potentials and the Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectra, characteristic for the different redox cofactors in the protein, are measured. The plot of the signal intensity versus the sample potential is analyzed using the Nernst equation in order to determine the midpoint potential of the cofactor.

  6. EPR monitored redox titration of the cofactors of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Nar1.

    PubMed

    Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; van der Weel, Laura; Hagen, Wilfred R

    2014-01-01

    Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) monitored redox titrations are a powerful method to determine the midpoint potential of cofactors in proteins and to identify and quantify the cofactors in their detectable redox state. The technique is complementary to direct electrochemistry (voltammetry) approaches, as it does not offer information on electron transfer rates, but does establish the identity and redox state of the cofactors in the protein under study. The technique is widely applicable to any protein containing an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) detectable cofactor. A typical titration requires 2 ml protein with a cofactor concentration in the range of 1-100 µM. The protein is titrated with a chemical reductant (sodium dithionite) or oxidant (potassium ferricyanide) in order to poise the sample at a certain potential. A platinum wire and a Ag/AgCl reference electrode are connected to a voltmeter to measure the potential of the protein solution A set of 13 different redox mediators is used to equilibrate between the redox cofactors of the protein and the electrodes. Samples are drawn at different potentials and the Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectra, characteristic for the different redox cofactors in the protein, are measured. The plot of the signal intensity versus the sample potential is analyzed using the Nernst equation in order to determine the midpoint potential of the cofactor. PMID:25490157

  7. Thiamin pyrophosphokinase is required for thiamin cofactor activation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ajjawi, Imad; Rodriguez Milla, Miguel A; Cushman, John; Shintani, David K

    2007-09-01

    Thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) is an essential enzyme cofactor required for the viability of all organisms. Whether derived from exogenous sources or through de novo synthesis, thiamin must be pyrophosphorylated for cofactor activation. The enzyme thiamin pyrophosphokinase (TPK) catalyzes the conversion of free thiamin to TPP in plants and other eukaryotic organisms and is central to thiamin cofactor activation. While TPK activity has been observed in a number of plant species, the corresponding gene/protein has until now not been identified or characterized for its role in thiamin metabolism. Here we report the functional identification of two Arabidopsis TPK genes, AtTPK1 and AtTPK2 and the enzymatic characterization of the corresponding proteins. AtTPK1 and AtTPK2 are biochemically redundant cytosolic proteins that are similarly expressed throughout different plant tissues. The essential nature of TPKs in plant metabolism is reflected in the observation that while single gene knockouts of either AtTPK1 or AtTPK2 were viable, the double mutant possessed a seedling lethal phenotype. HPLC analysis revealed the double mutant is nearly devoid of TPP and instead accumulates the precursor of the TPK reaction, free thiamin. These results suggest that TPK activity provides the sole mechanism by which exogenous and de novo derived thiamin is converted to the enzyme cofactor TPP.

  8. Cofactoring and Dimerization of Proteinase-Activated Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Huilan; Liu, Allen P.; Smith, Thomas H.

    2013-01-01

    Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) are G protein–coupled receptors that transmit cellular responses to extracellular proteases and have important functions in vascular physiology, development, inflammation, and cancer progression. The established paradigm for PAR activation involves proteolytic cleavage of the extracellular N terminus, which reveals a new N terminus that functions as a tethered ligand by binding intramolecularly to the receptor to trigger transmembrane signaling. Most cells express more than one PAR, which can influence the mode of PAR activation and signaling. Clear examples include murine PAR3 cofactoring of PAR4 and transactivation of PAR2 by PAR1. Thrombin binds to and cleaves murine PAR3, which facilitates PAR4 cleavage and activation. This process is essential for thrombin signaling and platelet activation, since murine PAR3 cannot signal alone. Although PAR1 and PAR4 are both competent to signal, PAR1 is able to act as a cofactor for PAR4, facilitating more rapid cleavage and activation by thrombin. PAR1 can also facilitate PAR2 activation through a different mechanism. Cleavage of the PAR1 N terminus by thrombin generates a tethered ligand domain that can bind intermolecularly to PAR2 to activate signaling. Thus, PARs can regulate each other’s activity by localizing thrombin when in complex with PAR3 and PAR4 or by cleaved PAR1, providing its tethered ligand domain for PAR2 activation. The ability of PARs to cofactor or transactivate other PARs would necessitate that the two receptors be in close proximity, likely in the form of a heterodimer. Here, we discuss the cofactoring and dimerization of PARs and the functional consequences on signaling. PMID:24064459

  9. Study of the cofactor conditions: Conditions of supercompatibility between phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xian; Srivastava, Vijay; Dabade, Vivekanand; James, Richard D.

    2013-12-01

    The cofactor conditions, introduced in James and Zhang(2005), are conditions of compatibility between phases in martensitic materials. They consist of three subconditions: (i) the condition that the middle principal stretch of the transformation stretch tensor U is unity (λ2=1), (ii) the condition a·Ucof(U2-I)n=0, where the vectors a and n are certain vectors arising in the specification of the twin system, and (iii) the inequality trU2+det U2-(1/4)|a|2|n|2≥2. Together, these conditions are necessary and sufficient for the equations of the crystallographic theory of martensite to be satisfied for the given twin system but for any volume fraction f of the twins, 0≤f≤1. This contrasts sharply with the generic solutions of the crystallographic theory which have at most two such volume fractions for a given twin system of the form f* and 1-f*. In this paper we simplify the form of the cofactor conditions, we give their specific forms for various symmetries and twin types, we clarify the extent to which the satisfaction of the cofactor conditions for one twin system implies its satisfaction for other twin systems. In particular, we prove that the satisfaction of the cofactor conditions for either Type I or Type II twins implies that there are solutions of the crystallographic theory using these twins that have no elastic transition layer. We show that the latter further implies macroscopically curved, transition-layer-free austenite/martensite interfaces for Type I twins, and planar transition-layer-free interfaces for Type II twins which nevertheless permit significant flexibility (many deformations) of the martensite. We identify some real material systems nearly satisfying the cofactor conditions. Overall, the cofactor conditions are shown to dramatically increase the number of deformations possible in austenite/martensite mixtures without the presence of elastic energy needed for coexistence. In the context of earlier work that links the special case λ2

  10. Synthesis, delivery and regulation of eukaryotic heme and Fe-S cluster cofactors.

    PubMed

    Barupala, Dulmini P; Dzul, Stephen P; Riggs-Gelasco, Pamela Jo; Stemmler, Timothy L

    2016-02-15

    In humans, the bulk of iron in the body (over 75%) is directed towards heme- or Fe-S cluster cofactor synthesis, and the complex, highly regulated pathways in place to accomplish biosynthesis have evolved to safely assemble and load these cofactors into apoprotein partners. In eukaryotes, heme biosynthesis is both initiated and finalized within the mitochondria, while cellular Fe-S cluster assembly is controlled by correlated pathways both within the mitochondria and within the cytosol. Iron plays a vital role in a wide array of metabolic processes and defects in iron cofactor assembly leads to human diseases. This review describes progress towards our molecular-level understanding of cellular heme and Fe-S cluster biosynthesis, focusing on the regulation and mechanistic details that are essential for understanding human disorders related to the breakdown in these essential pathways.

  11. Resolution of the cellular proteome of the nucleocapsid protein from a highly pathogenic isolate of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus identifies PARP-1 as a cellular target whose interaction is critical for virus biology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Long; Lear, Zoe; Hughes, David J; Wu, Weining; Zhou, En-min; Whitehouse, Adrian; Chen, Hongying; Hiscox, Julian A

    2015-03-23

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a major threat to the swine industry and food security worldwide. The nucleocapsid (N) protein is a major structural protein of PRRSV. The primary function of this protein is to encapsidate the viral RNA genome, and it is also thought to participate in the modulation of host cell biology and recruitment of cellular factors to facilitate virus infection. In order to the better understand these latter roles the cellular interactome of PRRSV N protein was defined using label free quantitative proteomics. This identified several cellular factors that could interact with the N protein including poly [ADP-ribose] polymerase 1 (PARP-1), a cellular protein, which can add adenosine diphosphate ribose to a protein. Use of the PARP-1 small molecule inhibitor, 3-AB, in PRRSV infected cells demonstrated that PARP-1 was required and acted as an enhancer factor for virus biology. Serial growth of PRRSV in different concentrations of 3-AB did not yield viruses that were able to grow with wild type kinetics, suggesting that by targeting a cellular protein crucial for virus biology, resistant phenotypes did not emerge. This study provides further evidence that cellular proteins, which are critical for virus biology, can also be targeted to ablate virus growth and provide a high barrier for the emergence of drug resistance.

  12. Androgen receptor cofactors in prostate cancer: potential therapeutic targets of castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Shiota, Masaki; Yokomizo, Akira; Fujimoto, Naohiro; Naito, Seiji

    2011-09-01

    Androgens, acting through the androgen receptor (AR), are responsible for many male reproductive and nonreproductive functions. Moreover, aberrant androgen/AR signaling plays a critical role in androgen-dependent prostate cancer (PCa) as well as castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The formation of a productive AR transcriptional complex requires AR cofactors that interact functionally and structurally with the AR. Since the discovery of the first such cofactor in 1995, an ever increasing number of proteins have been identified as AR coactivators or corepressors. The expression and function of several AR cofactors have been investigated in PCa, and a clear link between AR cofactors and the development and progression of PCa has been identified. Recently, AR splice variants in CRPC were reported, which display significant constitutive activity in the absence of ligand. Then, this discovery revolutionized the concept of AR cofactors in CRPC. The current review aims to provide an overview of AR cofactor proteins in the context of PCa. In addition, we discuss the potential of AR cofactors as novel therapeutic targets for PCa, particularly for CRPC.

  13. Cyclin T1-Dependent Genes in Activated CD4+ T and Macrophage Cell Lines Appear Enriched in HIV-1 Co-Factors

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Wendong; Ramakrishnan, Rajesh; Wang, Yan; Chiang, Karen; Sung, Tzu-Ling; Rice, Andrew P.

    2008-01-01

    HIV-1 is dependent upon cellular co-factors to mediate its replication cycle in CD4+ T cells and macrophages, the two major cell types infected by the virus in vivo. One critical co-factor is Cyclin T1, a subunit of a general RNA polymerase II elongation factor known as P-TEFb. Cyclin T1 is targeted directly by the viral Tat protein to activate proviral transcription. Cyclin T1 is up-regulated when resting CD4+ T cells are activated and during macrophage differentiation or activation, conditions that are also necessary for high levels of HIV-1 replication. Because Cyclin T1 is a subunit of a transcription factor, the up-regulation of Cyclin T1 in these cells results in the induction of cellular genes, some of which might be HIV-1 co-factors. Using shRNA depletions of Cyclin T1 and transcriptional profiling, we identified 54 cellular mRNAs that appear to be Cyclin T1-dependent for their induction in activated CD4+ T Jurkat T cells and during differentiation and activation of MM6 cells, a human monocytic cell line. The promoters for these Cyclin T1-dependent genes (CTDGs) are over-represented in two transcription factor binding sites, SREBP1 and ARP1. Notably, 10 of these CTDGs have been reported to be involved in HIV-1 replication, a significant over-representation of such genes when compared to randomly generated lists of 54 genes (p value<0.00021). The results of siRNA depletion and dominant-negative protein experiments with two CTDGs identified here, CDK11 and Casein kinase 1 gamma 1, suggest that these genes are involved either directly or indirectly in HIV-1 replication. It is likely that the 54 CTDGs identified here include novel HIV-1 co-factors. The presence of CTDGs in the protein space that was available for HIV-1 to sample during its evolution and acquisition of Tat function may provide an explanation for why CTDGs are enriched in viral co-factors. PMID:18773076

  14. A Genome-Wide Screen in Yeast Identifies Specific Oxidative Stress Genes Required for the Maintenance of Sub-Cellular Redox Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Ayer, Anita; Fellermeier, Sina; Fife, Christopher; Li, Simone S.; Smits, Gertien; Meyer, Andreas J.; Dawes, Ian W.; Perrone, Gabriel G.

    2012-01-01

    Maintenance of an optimal redox environment is critical for appropriate functioning of cellular processes and cell survival. Despite the importance of maintaining redox homeostasis, it is not clear how the optimal redox potential is sensed and set, and the processes that impact redox on a cellular/organellar level are poorly understood. The genetic bases of cellular redox homeostasis were investigated using a green fluorescent protein (GFP) based redox probe, roGFP2 and a pH sensitive GFP-based probe, pHluorin. The use of roGFP2, in conjunction with pHluorin, enabled determination of pH-adjusted sub-cellular redox potential in a non-invasive and real-time manner. A genome-wide screen using both the non-essential and essential gene collections was carried out in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using cytosolic-roGFP2 to identify factors essential for maintenance of cytosolic redox state under steady-state conditions. 102 genes of diverse function were identified that are required for maintenance of cytosolic redox state. Mutations in these genes led to shifts in the half-cell glutathione redox potential by 75-10 mV. Interestingly, some specific oxidative stress-response processes were identified as over-represented in the data set. Further investigation of the role of oxidative stress-responsive systems in sub-cellular redox homeostasis was conducted using roGFP2 constructs targeted to the mitochondrial matrix and peroxisome and EGSH was measured in cells in exponential and stationary phase. Analyses allowed for the identification of key redox systems on a sub-cellular level and the identification of novel genes involved in the regulation of cellular redox homeostasis. PMID:22970195

  15. Regulation of the DNA Damage Response by p53 Cofactors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Peng; Liu, Feng; Wang, Wei

    2012-01-01

    The selective expression of p53-targeted genes is central to the p53-mediated DNA damage response. It is affected by multiple factors including posttranslational modifications and cofactors of p53. Here, we proposed an integrated model of the p53 network to characterize how the cellular response is regulated by key cofactors of p53, Hzf and ASPP. We found that the sequential induction of Hzf and ASPP is crucial to a reliable cell-fate decision between survival and death. After DNA damage, activated p53 first induces Hzf, which promotes the expression of p21 to arrest the cell cycle and facilitate DNA repair. The cell recovers to normal proliferation after the damage is repaired. If the damage is beyond repair, Hzf is effectively degraded, and activated E2F1 induces ASPP, which promotes the expression of Bax to trigger apoptosis. Furthermore, interrupting the induction of Hzf or ASPP remarkably impairs the cellular function. We also proposed two schemes for the production of the unknown E3 ubiquitin ligase for Hzf degradation: it is induced by either E2F1 or p53. In both schemes, the sufficient degradation of Hzf is required for apoptosis induction. These results are in good agreement with experimental observations or are experimentally testable. PMID:22677378

  16. A Proteomic-Based Workflow Using Purified Respiratory Syncytial Virus Particles to Identify Cellular Factors as Drug Targets.

    PubMed

    Huong, Tra Nguyen; Tan, Boon Huan; Sugrue, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    The identification of cellular factors that play a role in respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) replication is an alternative strategy in the identification of druggable cellular protein that are essential for RSV replication. In this regard experimental strategies that are able to screen relevant proteins from the vast array of proteins in the cellular milieu will facilitate the identification of potential drug targets. In this chapter we describe a procedure where RSV particles are purified from cells that are permissive for RSV infection, and the protein composition of the purified virus particles characterized using a proteomics-based strategy. This procedure revealed that actin, several actin-binding proteins, and the chaperones HSP70 and HSP90 also co-purified with the virus particles. The relevance of the HSP90 protein to virus replication was then further validated using imaging, gene silencing and by using an established small molecule HSP90 inhibitor. PMID:27464695

  17. The biosynthesis of the molybdenum cofactors.

    PubMed

    Mendel, Ralf R; Leimkühler, Silke

    2015-03-01

    The biosynthesis of the molybdenum cofactors (Moco) is an ancient, ubiquitous, and highly conserved pathway leading to the biochemical activation of molybdenum. Moco is the essential component of a group of redox enzymes, which are diverse in terms of their phylogenetic distribution and their architectures, both at the overall level and in their catalytic geometry. A wide variety of transformations are catalyzed by these enzymes at carbon, sulfur and nitrogen atoms, which include the transfer of an oxo group or two electrons to or from the substrate. More than 50 molybdoenzymes were identified to date. In all molybdoenzymes except nitrogenase, molybdenum is coordinated to a dithiolene group on the 6-alkyl side chain of a pterin called molybdopterin (MPT). The biosynthesis of Moco can be divided into three general steps, with a fourth one present only in bacteria and archaea: (1) formation of the cyclic pyranopterin monophosphate, (2) formation of MPT, (3) insertion of molybdenum into molybdopterin to form Moco, and (4) additional modification of Moco in bacteria with the attachment of a nucleotide to the phosphate group of MPT, forming the dinucleotide variant of Moco. This review will focus on the biosynthesis of Moco in bacteria, humans and plants.

  18. Structural insights into domain movement and cofactor specificity of glutamate dehydrogenase from Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Son, Hyeoncheol Francis; Kim, Il-Kwon; Kim, Kyung-Jin

    2015-04-10

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is an enzyme involved in the synthesis of amino acids by converting glutamate to α-ketoglutarate, and vice versa. To investigate the molecular mechanism of GDH, we determined a crystal structure of the Corynebacterium glutamicum-derived GDH (CgGDH) in complex with its NADP cofactor and α-ketoglutarate substrate. CgGDH functions as a hexamer, and each CgGDH monomer comprises 2 separate domains; a Rossmann fold cofactor-binding domain and a substrate-binding domain. The structural comparison between the apo- and cofactor/substrate-binding forms revealed that the CgGDH enzyme undergoes a domain movement during catalysis. In the apo-form, CgGDH exists as an open state, and upon binding of the substrate and cofactor the protein undergoes a conformation change to a closed state. Our structural study also revealed that CgGDH has cofactor specificity for NADP, but not NAD, and this was confirmed by GDH activity measurements. Residues involved in the stabilization of the NADP cofactor and the α-ketoglutarate substrate were identified, and their roles in substrate/cofactor binding were confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis experiments.

  19. Broadening the cofactor specificity of a thermostable alcohol dehydrogenase using rational protein design introduces novel kinetic transient behavior.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Elliot; Wheeldon, Ian R; Banta, Scott

    2010-12-01

    Cofactor specificity in the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily has been well studied, and several groups have reported the rational alteration of cofactor specificity in these enzymes. Although most efforts have focused on mesostable AKRs, several putative AKRs have recently been identified from hyperthermophiles. The few that have been characterized exhibit a strong preference for NAD(H) as a cofactor, in contrast to the NADP(H) preference of the mesophilic AKRs. Using the design rules elucidated from mesostable AKRs, we introduced two site-directed mutations in the cofactor binding pocket to investigate cofactor specificity in a thermostable AKR, AdhD, which is an alcohol dehydrogenase from Pyrococcus furiosus. The resulting double mutant exhibited significantly improved activity and broadened cofactor specificity as compared to the wild-type. Results of previous pre-steady-state kinetic experiments suggest that the high affinity of the mesostable AKRs for NADP(H) stems from a conformational change upon cofactor binding which is mediated by interactions between a canonical arginine and the 2'-phosphate of the cofactor. Pre-steady-state kinetics with AdhD and the new mutants show a rich conformational behavior that is independent of the canonical arginine or the 2'-phosphate. Additionally, experiments with the highly active double mutant using NADPH as a cofactor demonstrate an unprecedented transient behavior where the binding mechanism appears to be dependent on cofactor concentration. These results suggest that the structural features involved in cofactor specificity in the AKRs are conserved within the superfamily, but the dynamic interactions of the enzyme with cofactors are unexpectedly complex.

  20. Positive newborn screen for methylmalonic aciduria identifies the first mutation in TCblR/CD320, the gene for cellular uptake of transcobalamin-bound vitamin B(12).

    PubMed

    Quadros, Edward V; Lai, Shao-Chiang; Nakayama, Yasumi; Sequeira, Jeffrey M; Hannibal, Luciana; Wang, Sihe; Jacobsen, Donald W; Fedosov, Sergey; Wright, Erica; Gallagher, Renata C; Anastasio, Natascia; Watkins, David; Rosenblatt, David S

    2010-08-01

    Elevated methylmalonic acid in five asymptomatic newborns whose fibroblasts showed decreased uptake of transcobalamin-bound cobalamin (holo-TC), suggested a defect in the cellular uptake of cobalamin. Analysis of TCblR/CD320, the gene for the receptor for cellular uptake of holo-TC, identified a homozygous single codon deletion, c.262_264GAG (p.E88del), resulting in the loss of a glutamic acid residue in the low-density lipoprotein receptor type A-like domain. Inserting the codon by site-directed mutagenesis fully restored TCblR function.

  1. Crystal Structures of a Hyperthermophilic Archaeal Homoserine Dehydrogenase Suggest a Novel Cofactor Binding Mode for Oxidoreductases.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Junji; Inoue, Shota; Kim, Kwang; Yoneda, Kazunari; Kawarabayasi, Yutaka; Ohshima, Toshihisa; Sakuraba, Haruhiko

    2015-07-08

    NAD(P)-dependent dehydrogenases differ according to their coenzyme preference: some prefer NAD, others NADP, and still others exhibit dual cofactor specificity. The structure of a newly identified archaeal homoserine dehydrogenase showed this enzyme to have a strong preference for NADP. However, NADP did not act as a cofactor with this enzyme, but as a strong inhibitor of NAD-dependent homoserine oxidation. Structural analysis and site-directed mutagenesis showed that the large number of interactions between the cofactor and the enzyme are responsible for the lack of reactivity of the enzyme towards NADP. This observation suggests this enzyme exhibits a new variation on cofactor binding to a dehydrogenase: very strong NADP binding that acts as an obstacle to NAD(P)-dependent dehydrogenase catalytic activity.

  2. Cofactor mobility determines reaction outcome in the IMPDH/GMPR (β/α)8 barrel enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Patton, Gregory C.; Stenmark, Pål; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R.; Sevastik, Robin; Kursula, Petri; Flodin, Susanne; Schuler, Herwig; Swales, Colin T.; Eklund, Hans; Himo, Fahmi; Nordlund, Pär; Hedstrom, Lizbeth

    2015-01-01

    IMP dehydrogenase (IMPDH) and GMP reductase (GMPR) belong to the same structural family, share a common set of catalytic residues and bind the same ligands. The structural and mechanistic features that determine reaction outcome in the IMPDH/GMPR family have not been identified. Here, we show that the GMPR reaction utilizes the same intermediate E-XMP* as IMPDH, but this intermediate reacts with ammonia instead of water. A single crystal structure of human GMPR type 2 with IMP and NADPH fortuitously captures three different states, each of which mimic a distinct step in the catalytic cycle of GMPR. The cofactor is found in two conformations, an "in" conformation poised for hydride transfer, and an "out" conformation where the cofactor is 6 Å from IMP. Mutagenesis, substrate/cofactor analog experiments demonstrate that the “out” conformation is required for the deamination of GMP. Remarkably, the cofactor is part of the catalytic machinery activating ammonia. PMID:22037469

  3. Exogenous cofactors for the improvement of bioremoval and biotransformation of sulfamethoxazole by Alcaligenes faecalis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-Bi; Zhou, Jiao; Xu, Qiu-Man; Cheng, Jing-Sheng; Luo, Yu-Lu; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2016-09-15

    Sulfamethoxazole (SMX), an extensively prescribed or administered antibiotic pharmaceutical product, is usually detected in aquatic environments, because of its incomplete metabolism and elimination. This study investigated the effects of exogenous cofactors on the bioremoval and biotransformation of SMX by Alcaligenes faecalis. High concentration (100mg·L(-1)) of exogenous vitamin C (VC), vitamin B6 (VB6) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) enhanced SMX bioremoval, while the additions of vitamin B2 (VB2) and vitamin B12 (VB12) did not significantly alter the SMX removal efficiency. Globally, cellular growth of A. faecalis and SMX removal both initially increased and then gradually decreased, indicating that SMX bioremoval is likely dependent on the primary biomass activity of A. faecalis. The decreases in the SMX removal efficiency indicated that some metabolites of SMX might be transformed into parent compound at the last stage of incubation. Two transformation products of SMX, N-hydroxy sulfamethoxazole (HO-SMX) and N4-acetyl sulfamethoxazole (Ac-SMX), were identified by a high-performance liquid chromatograph coupled with mass spectrometer. High concentrations of VC, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide hydrogen (NADH, 7.1mg·L(-1)), and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+), 6.6mg·L(-1)), and low concentrations of reduced glutathione (GSH, 0.1 and 10mg·L(-1)) and VB2 (1mg·L(-1)) remarkably increased the formation of HO-SMX, while VB12 showed opposite effects on HO-SMX formation. In addition, low concentrations of GSH and NADH enhanced Ac-SMX formation by the addition of A. faecalis, whereas cofactors (VC, VB2, VB12, NAD(+), and GSSG) had no obvious impact on the formation of Ac-SMX compared with the controls. The levels of Ac-SMX were stable when biomass of A. faecalis gradually decreased, indicating the direct effect of biomass on the formation of Ac-SMX by A. faecalis. In sum, these results help us understand the roles played by exogenous cofactors in

  4. Exogenous cofactors for the improvement of bioremoval and biotransformation of sulfamethoxazole by Alcaligenes faecalis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-Bi; Zhou, Jiao; Xu, Qiu-Man; Cheng, Jing-Sheng; Luo, Yu-Lu; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2016-09-15

    Sulfamethoxazole (SMX), an extensively prescribed or administered antibiotic pharmaceutical product, is usually detected in aquatic environments, because of its incomplete metabolism and elimination. This study investigated the effects of exogenous cofactors on the bioremoval and biotransformation of SMX by Alcaligenes faecalis. High concentration (100mg·L(-1)) of exogenous vitamin C (VC), vitamin B6 (VB6) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) enhanced SMX bioremoval, while the additions of vitamin B2 (VB2) and vitamin B12 (VB12) did not significantly alter the SMX removal efficiency. Globally, cellular growth of A. faecalis and SMX removal both initially increased and then gradually decreased, indicating that SMX bioremoval is likely dependent on the primary biomass activity of A. faecalis. The decreases in the SMX removal efficiency indicated that some metabolites of SMX might be transformed into parent compound at the last stage of incubation. Two transformation products of SMX, N-hydroxy sulfamethoxazole (HO-SMX) and N4-acetyl sulfamethoxazole (Ac-SMX), were identified by a high-performance liquid chromatograph coupled with mass spectrometer. High concentrations of VC, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide hydrogen (NADH, 7.1mg·L(-1)), and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+), 6.6mg·L(-1)), and low concentrations of reduced glutathione (GSH, 0.1 and 10mg·L(-1)) and VB2 (1mg·L(-1)) remarkably increased the formation of HO-SMX, while VB12 showed opposite effects on HO-SMX formation. In addition, low concentrations of GSH and NADH enhanced Ac-SMX formation by the addition of A. faecalis, whereas cofactors (VC, VB2, VB12, NAD(+), and GSSG) had no obvious impact on the formation of Ac-SMX compared with the controls. The levels of Ac-SMX were stable when biomass of A. faecalis gradually decreased, indicating the direct effect of biomass on the formation of Ac-SMX by A. faecalis. In sum, these results help us understand the roles played by exogenous cofactors in

  5. Enzymatic regeneration of adenosine triphosphate cofactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    Regenerating adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from adenosine diphosphate (ADP) by enzymatic process which utilizes carbamyl phosphate as phosphoryl donor is technique used to regenerate expensive cofactors. Process allows complex enzymatic reactions to be considered as candidates for large-scale continuous processes.

  6. Molybdenum Enzymes, Cofactors, and Model Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgmayer, S. J. N; Stiefel, E. I.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses: (l) molybdoenzymes (examining their distribution and metabolic role, composition and redox strategy, cofactors, substrate reactions, and mechanistic possibilities); (2) structural information on molybdenum (Mo) centers; (3) modeling studies (Mo-co models, nitrogenase models, and the MO-S duo); and (4) the copper-molybdenum antagonism.…

  7. Altered cofactor regulation with disease-associated p97/VCP mutations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyi; Gui, Lin; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Bulfer, Stacie L; Sanghez, Valentina; Wong, Daniel E; Lee, YouJin; Lehmann, Lynn; Lee, James Siho; Shih, Pei-Yin; Lin, Henry J; Iacovino, Michelina; Weihl, Conrad C; Arkin, Michelle R; Wang, Yanzhuang; Chou, Tsui-Fen

    2015-04-01

    Dominant mutations in p97/VCP (valosin-containing protein) cause a rare multisystem degenerative disease with varied phenotypes that include inclusion body myopathy, Paget's disease of bone, frontotemporal dementia, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. p97 disease mutants have altered N-domain conformations, elevated ATPase activity, and altered cofactor association. We have now discovered a previously unidentified disease-relevant functional property of p97 by identifying how the cofactors p37 and p47 regulate p97 ATPase activity. We define p37 as, to our knowledge, the first known p97-activating cofactor, which enhances the catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) of p97 by 11-fold. Whereas both p37 and p47 decrease the Km of ATP in p97, p37 increases the kcat of p97. In contrast, regulation by p47 is biphasic, with decreased kcat at low levels but increased kcat at higher levels. By deleting a region of p47 that lacks homology to p37 (amino acids 69-92), we changed p47 from an inhibitory cofactor to an activating cofactor, similar to p37. Our data suggest that cofactors regulate p97 ATPase activity by binding to the N domain. Induced conformation changes affect ADP/ATP binding at the D1 domain, which in turn controls ATPase cycling. Most importantly, we found that the D2 domain of disease mutants failed to be activated by p37 or p47. Our results show that cofactors play a critical role in controlling p97 ATPase activity, and suggest that lack of cofactor-regulated communication may contribute to p97-associated disease pathogenesis.

  8. Altered cofactor regulation with disease-associated p97/VCP mutations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyi; Gui, Lin; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Bulfer, Stacie L; Sanghez, Valentina; Wong, Daniel E; Lee, YouJin; Lehmann, Lynn; Lee, James Siho; Shih, Pei-Yin; Lin, Henry J; Iacovino, Michelina; Weihl, Conrad C; Arkin, Michelle R; Wang, Yanzhuang; Chou, Tsui-Fen

    2015-04-01

    Dominant mutations in p97/VCP (valosin-containing protein) cause a rare multisystem degenerative disease with varied phenotypes that include inclusion body myopathy, Paget's disease of bone, frontotemporal dementia, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. p97 disease mutants have altered N-domain conformations, elevated ATPase activity, and altered cofactor association. We have now discovered a previously unidentified disease-relevant functional property of p97 by identifying how the cofactors p37 and p47 regulate p97 ATPase activity. We define p37 as, to our knowledge, the first known p97-activating cofactor, which enhances the catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) of p97 by 11-fold. Whereas both p37 and p47 decrease the Km of ATP in p97, p37 increases the kcat of p97. In contrast, regulation by p47 is biphasic, with decreased kcat at low levels but increased kcat at higher levels. By deleting a region of p47 that lacks homology to p37 (amino acids 69-92), we changed p47 from an inhibitory cofactor to an activating cofactor, similar to p37. Our data suggest that cofactors regulate p97 ATPase activity by binding to the N domain. Induced conformation changes affect ADP/ATP binding at the D1 domain, which in turn controls ATPase cycling. Most importantly, we found that the D2 domain of disease mutants failed to be activated by p37 or p47. Our results show that cofactors play a critical role in controlling p97 ATPase activity, and suggest that lack of cofactor-regulated communication may contribute to p97-associated disease pathogenesis. PMID:25775548

  9. Multibody cofactor and substrate molecular recognition in the myo-inositol monophosphatase enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Ferruz, Noelia; Tresadern, Gary; Pineda-Lucena, Antonio; De Fabritiis, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    Molecular recognition is rarely a two-body protein-ligand problem, as it often involves the dynamic interplay of multiple molecules that together control the binding process. Myo-inositol monophosphatase (IMPase), a drug target for bipolar disorder, depends on 3 Mg2+ ions as cofactor for its catalytic activity. Although the crystallographic pose of the pre-catalytic complex is well characterized, the binding process by which substrate, cofactor and protein cooperate is essentially unknown. Here, we have characterized cofactor and substrate cooperative binding by means of large-scale molecular dynamics. Our study showed the first and second Mg2+ ions identify the binding pocket with fast kinetics whereas the third ion presents a much higher energy barrier. Substrate binding can occur in cooperation with cofactor, or alone to a binary or ternary cofactor-IMPase complex, although the last scenario occurs several orders of magnitude faster. Our atomic description of the three-body mechanism offers a particularly challenging example of pathway reconstruction, and may prove particularly useful in realistic contexts where water, ions, cofactors or other entities cooperate and modulate the binding process. PMID:27440438

  10. Multibody cofactor and substrate molecular recognition in the myo-inositol monophosphatase enzyme.

    PubMed

    Ferruz, Noelia; Tresadern, Gary; Pineda-Lucena, Antonio; De Fabritiis, Gianni

    2016-07-21

    Molecular recognition is rarely a two-body protein-ligand problem, as it often involves the dynamic interplay of multiple molecules that together control the binding process. Myo-inositol monophosphatase (IMPase), a drug target for bipolar disorder, depends on 3 Mg(2+) ions as cofactor for its catalytic activity. Although the crystallographic pose of the pre-catalytic complex is well characterized, the binding process by which substrate, cofactor and protein cooperate is essentially unknown. Here, we have characterized cofactor and substrate cooperative binding by means of large-scale molecular dynamics. Our study showed the first and second Mg(2+) ions identify the binding pocket with fast kinetics whereas the third ion presents a much higher energy barrier. Substrate binding can occur in cooperation with cofactor, or alone to a binary or ternary cofactor-IMPase complex, although the last scenario occurs several orders of magnitude faster. Our atomic description of the three-body mechanism offers a particularly challenging example of pathway reconstruction, and may prove particularly useful in realistic contexts where water, ions, cofactors or other entities cooperate and modulate the binding process.

  11. Genetic characterization of the Neurospora crassa molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Probst, Corinna; Ringel, Phillip; Boysen, Verena; Wirsing, Lisette; Alexander, Mariko Matsuda; Mendel, Ralf R; Kruse, Tobias

    2014-05-01

    Molybdenum (Mo) is a trace element that is essential for important cellular processes. To gain biological activity, Mo must be complexed in the molybdenum cofactor (Moco), a pterin derivative of low molecular weight. Moco synthesis is a multi-step pathway that involves a variable number of genes in eukaryotes, which are assigned to four steps of eukaryotic Moco biosynthesis. Moco biosynthesis mutants lack any Moco-dependent enzymatic activities, including assimilation of nitrate (plants and fungi), detoxification of sulfite (humans and plants) and utilization of hypoxanthine as sole N-source (fungi). We report the first comprehensive genetic characterization of the Neurospora crassa (N. crassa) Moco biosynthesis pathway, annotating five genes which encode all pathway enzymes, and compare it with the characterized Aspergillus nidulans pathway. Biochemical characterization of the corresponding knock-out mutants confirms our annotation model, documenting the N. crassa/A. nidulans (fungal) Moco biosynthesis as unique, combining the organizational structure of both plant and human Moco biosynthesis genes.

  12. A phylogenomic census of molecular functions identifies modern thermophilic archaea as the most ancient form of cellular life.

    PubMed

    Nasir, Arshan; Kim, Kyung Mo; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    The origins of diversified life remain mysterious despite considerable efforts devoted to untangling the roots of the universal tree of life. Here we reconstructed phylogenies that described the evolution of molecular functions and the evolution of species directly from a genomic census of gene ontology (GO) definitions. We sampled 249 free-living genomes spanning organisms in the three superkingdoms of life, Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukarya, and used the abundance of GO terms as molecular characters to produce rooted phylogenetic trees. Results revealed an early thermophilic origin of Archaea that was followed by genome reduction events in microbial superkingdoms. Eukaryal genomes displayed extraordinary functional diversity and were enriched with hundreds of novel molecular activities not detected in the akaryotic microbial cells. Remarkably, the majority of these novel functions appeared quite late in evolution, synchronized with the diversification of the eukaryal superkingdom. The distribution of GO terms in superkingdoms confirms that Archaea appears to be the simplest and most ancient form of cellular life, while Eukarya is the most diverse and recent.

  13. A Phylogenomic Census of Molecular Functions Identifies Modern Thermophilic Archaea as the Most Ancient Form of Cellular Life

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Mo; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    The origins of diversified life remain mysterious despite considerable efforts devoted to untangling the roots of the universal tree of life. Here we reconstructed phylogenies that described the evolution of molecular functions and the evolution of species directly from a genomic census of gene ontology (GO) definitions. We sampled 249 free-living genomes spanning organisms in the three superkingdoms of life, Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukarya, and used the abundance of GO terms as molecular characters to produce rooted phylogenetic trees. Results revealed an early thermophilic origin of Archaea that was followed by genome reduction events in microbial superkingdoms. Eukaryal genomes displayed extraordinary functional diversity and were enriched with hundreds of novel molecular activities not detected in the akaryotic microbial cells. Remarkably, the majority of these novel functions appeared quite late in evolution, synchronized with the diversification of the eukaryal superkingdom. The distribution of GO terms in superkingdoms confirms that Archaea appears to be the simplest and most ancient form of cellular life, while Eukarya is the most diverse and recent. PMID:25249790

  14. ChIPModule: systematic discovery of transcription factors and their cofactors from ChIP-seq data.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jun; Cai, Xiaohui; Wang, Ying; Hu, Haiyan; Li, Xiaoman

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a novel approach called ChIPModule to systematically discover transcription factors and their cofactors from ChIP-seq data. Given a ChIP-seq dataset and the binding patterns of a large number of transcription factors, ChIPModule can efficiently identify groups of transcription factors, whose binding sites significantly co-occur in the ChIP-seq peak regions. By testing ChIPModule on simulated data and experimental data, we have shown that ChIPModule identifies known cofactors of transcription factors, and predicts new cofactors that are supported by literature. ChIPModule provides a useful tool for studying gene transcriptional regulation.

  15. Interactome Analysis of the Influenza A Virus Transcription/Replication Machinery Identifies Protein Phosphatase 6 as a Cellular Factor Required for Efficient Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    York, Ashley; Hutchinson, Edward C.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The negative-sense RNA genome of influenza A virus is transcribed and replicated by the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP). The viral RdRP is an important host range determinant, indicating that its function is affected by interactions with cellular factors. However, the identities and the roles of most of these factors remain unknown. Here, we employed affinity purification followed by mass spectrometry to identify cellular proteins that interact with the influenza A virus RdRP in infected human cells. We purified RdRPs using a recombinant influenza virus in which the PB2 subunit of the RdRP is fused to a Strep-tag. When this tagged subunit was purified from infected cells, copurifying proteins included the other RdRP subunits (PB1 and PA) and the viral nucleoprotein and neuraminidase, as well as 171 cellular proteins. Label-free quantitative mass spectrometry revealed that the most abundant of these host proteins were chaperones, cytoskeletal proteins, importins, proteins involved in ubiquitination, kinases and phosphatases, and mitochondrial and ribosomal proteins. Among the phosphatases, we identified three subunits of the cellular serine/threonine protein phosphatase 6 (PP6), including the catalytic subunit PPP6C and regulatory subunits PPP6R1 and PPP6R3. PP6 was found to interact directly with the PB1 and PB2 subunits of the viral RdRP, and small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of the catalytic subunit of PP6 in infected cells resulted in the reduction of viral RNA accumulation and the attenuation of virus growth. These results suggest that PP6 interacts with and positively regulates the activity of the influenza virus RdRP. IMPORTANCE Influenza A viruses are serious clinical and veterinary pathogens, causing substantial health and economic impacts. In addition to annual seasonal epidemics, occasional global pandemics occur when viral strains adapt to humans from other species. To replicate efficiently and cause disease, influenza

  16. Lanthanide ions as required cofactors for DNA catalysts.

    PubMed

    Dokukin, Victor; Silverman, Scott K

    2012-01-01

    We report that micromolar concentrations of lanthanide ions can be required cofactors for DNA-hydrolyzing deoxyribozymes. Previous work identified deoxyribozymes that simultaneously require both Zn(2+) and Mn(2+) to achieve DNA-catalyzed DNA hydrolysis (10(12) rate enhancement); a mutant of one such DNA catalyst requires only Zn(2+). Here we show that in vitro selection in the presence of 10 µM lanthanide ion (Ce(3+), Eu(3+), or Yb(3+)) along with 1 mM Zn(2+) leads to numerous DNA-hydrolyzing deoxyribozymes that strictly require the lanthanide ion as well as Zn(2+) for catalytic activity. These DNA catalysts have a range of lanthanide dependences, including some deoxyribozymes that strongly favor one particular lanthanide ion (e.g., Ce(3+) > Eu(3+) > Yb(3+)) and others that function well with more than one lanthanide ion. Intriguingly, two of the Yb(3+)-dependent deoxyribozymes function well with Yb(3+) alone (K(d,app) ~10 µM, in the absence of Zn(2+)) and have little or no activity with Eu(3+) or Ce(3+). In contrast to these selection outcomes when lanthanide ions were present, new selections with Zn(2+) or Mn(2+) alone, or Zn(2+) with Mg(2+)/Ca(2+), led primarily to deoxyribozymes that cleave DNA by deglycosylation and β-elimination rather than by hydrolysis, including several instances of depyrimidination. We conclude that lanthanide ions warrant closer attention as cofactors when identifying new nucleic acid catalysts, especially for applications in which high concentrations of polyvalent metal ion cofactors are undesirable.

  17. A survey of synthetic nicotinamide cofactors in enzymatic processes.

    PubMed

    Paul, Caroline E; Hollmann, Frank

    2016-06-01

    Synthetic nicotinamide cofactors are analogues of the natural cofactors used by oxidoreductases as redox intermediates. Their ability to be fine-tuned makes these biomimetics an attractive alternative to the natural cofactors in terms of stability, reactivity, and cost. The following mini-review focuses on the current state of the art of those biomimetics in enzymatic processes.

  18. The phylogenomic roots of modern biochemistry: origins of proteins, cofactors and protein biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo; Kim, Kyung Mo; Caetano-Anollés, Derek

    2012-02-01

    The complexity of modern biochemistry developed gradually on early Earth as new molecules and structures populated the emerging cellular systems. Here, we generate a historical account of the gradual discovery of primordial proteins, cofactors, and molecular functions using phylogenomic information in the sequence of 420 genomes. We focus on structural and functional annotations of the 54 most ancient protein domains. We show how primordial functions are linked to folded structures and how their interaction with cofactors expanded the functional repertoire. We also reveal protocell membranes played a crucial role in early protein evolution and show translation started with RNA and thioester cofactor-mediated aminoacylation. Our findings allow elaboration of an evolutionary model of early biochemistry that is firmly grounded in phylogenomic information and biochemical, biophysical, and structural knowledge. The model describes how primordial α-helical bundles stabilized membranes, how these were decorated by layered arrangements of β-sheets and α-helices, and how these arrangements became globular. Ancient forms of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (aaRS) catalytic domains and ancient non-ribosomal protein synthetase (NRPS) modules gave rise to primordial protein synthesis and the ability to generate a code for specificity in their active sites. These structures diversified producing cofactor-binding molecular switches and barrel structures. Accretion of domains and molecules gave rise to modern aaRSs, NRPS, and ribosomal ensembles, first organized around novel emerging cofactors (tRNA and carrier proteins) and then more complex cofactor structures (rRNA). The model explains how the generation of protein structures acted as scaffold for nucleic acids and resulted in crystallization of modern translation.

  19. The phylogenomic roots of modern biochemistry: origins of proteins, cofactors and protein biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo; Kim, Kyung Mo; Caetano-Anollés, Derek

    2012-02-01

    The complexity of modern biochemistry developed gradually on early Earth as new molecules and structures populated the emerging cellular systems. Here, we generate a historical account of the gradual discovery of primordial proteins, cofactors, and molecular functions using phylogenomic information in the sequence of 420 genomes. We focus on structural and functional annotations of the 54 most ancient protein domains. We show how primordial functions are linked to folded structures and how their interaction with cofactors expanded the functional repertoire. We also reveal protocell membranes played a crucial role in early protein evolution and show translation started with RNA and thioester cofactor-mediated aminoacylation. Our findings allow elaboration of an evolutionary model of early biochemistry that is firmly grounded in phylogenomic information and biochemical, biophysical, and structural knowledge. The model describes how primordial α-helical bundles stabilized membranes, how these were decorated by layered arrangements of β-sheets and α-helices, and how these arrangements became globular. Ancient forms of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (aaRS) catalytic domains and ancient non-ribosomal protein synthetase (NRPS) modules gave rise to primordial protein synthesis and the ability to generate a code for specificity in their active sites. These structures diversified producing cofactor-binding molecular switches and barrel structures. Accretion of domains and molecules gave rise to modern aaRSs, NRPS, and ribosomal ensembles, first organized around novel emerging cofactors (tRNA and carrier proteins) and then more complex cofactor structures (rRNA). The model explains how the generation of protein structures acted as scaffold for nucleic acids and resulted in crystallization of modern translation. PMID:22210458

  20. Biosynthesis and Insertion of the Molybdenum Cofactor.

    PubMed

    Magalon, Axel; Mendel, Ralf R

    2015-01-01

    The transition element molybdenum (Mo) is of primordial importance for biological systems, because it is required by enzymes catalyzing key reactions in the global carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen metabolism. To gain biological activity, Mo has to be complexed by a special cofactor. With the exception of bacterial nitrogenase, all Mo-dependent enzymes contain a unique pyranopterin-based cofactor coordinating a Mo atom at their catalytic site. Various types of reactions are catalyzed by Mo-enzymes in prokaryotes including oxygen atom transfer, sulfur or proton transfer, hydroxylation, or even nonredox reactions. Mo-enzymes are widespread in prokaryotes and many of them were likely present in the Last Universal Common Ancestor. To date, more than 50--mostly bacterial--Mo-enzymes are described in nature. In a few eubacteria and in many archaea, Mo is replaced by tungsten bound to the same unique pyranopterin. How Mo-cofactor is synthesized in bacteria is reviewed as well as the way until its insertion into apo-Mo-enzymes.

  1. HMGB1 is a cofactor in mammalian base excision repair.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Rajendra; Liu, Yuan; Deterding, Leesa J; Poltoratsky, Vladimir P; Kedar, Padmini S; Horton, Julie K; Kanno, Shin-Ichiro; Asagoshi, Kenjiro; Hou, Esther W; Khodyreva, Svetlana N; Lavrik, Olga I; Tomer, Kenneth B; Yasui, Akira; Wilson, Samuel H

    2007-09-01

    Deoxyribose phosphate (dRP) removal by DNA polymerase beta (Pol beta) is a pivotal step in base excision repair (BER). To identify BER cofactors, especially those with dRP lyase activity, we used a Pol beta null cell extract and BER intermediate as bait for sodium borohydride crosslinking. Mass spectrometry identified the high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) as specifically interacting with the BER intermediate. Purified HMGB1 was found to have weak dRP lyase activity and to stimulate AP endonuclease and FEN1 activities on BER substrates. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments revealed interactions of HMGB1 with known BER enzymes, and GFP-tagged HMGB1 was found to accumulate at sites of oxidative DNA damage in living cells. HMGB1(-/-) mouse cells were slightly more resistant to MMS than wild-type cells, probably due to the production of fewer strand-break BER intermediates. The results suggest HMGB1 is a BER cofactor capable of modulating BER capacity in cells. PMID:17803946

  2. Recent trends and novel concepts in cofactor-dependent biotransformations.

    PubMed

    Kara, Selin; Schrittwieser, Joerg H; Hollmann, Frank; Ansorge-Schumacher, Marion B

    2014-02-01

    Cofactor-dependent enzymes catalyze a broad range of synthetically useful transformations. However, the cofactor requirement also poses economic and practical challenges for the application of these biocatalysts. For three decades, considerable research effort has been devoted to the development of reliable in situ regeneration methods for the most commonly employed cofactors, particularly NADH and NADPH. Today, researchers can choose from a plethora of options, and oxidoreductases are routinely employed even on industrial scale. Nevertheless, more efficient cofactor regeneration methods are still being developed, with the aim of achieving better atom economy, simpler reaction setups, and higher productivities. Besides, cofactor dependence has been recognized as an opportunity to confer novel reactivity upon enzymes by engineering their cofactors, and to couple (redox) biotransformations in multi-enzyme cascade systems. These novel concepts will help to further establish cofactor-dependent biotransformations as an attractive option for the synthesis of biologically active compounds, chiral building blocks, and bio-based platform molecules.

  3. iEzy-drug: a web server for identifying the interaction between enzymes and drugs in cellular networking.

    PubMed

    Min, Jian-Liang; Xiao, Xuan; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2013-01-01

    With the features of extremely high selectivity and efficiency in catalyzing almost all the chemical reactions in cells, enzymes play vitally important roles for the life of an organism and hence have become frequent targets for drug design. An essential step in developing drugs by targeting enzymes is to identify drug-enzyme interactions in cells. It is both time-consuming and costly to do this purely by means of experimental techniques alone. Although some computational methods were developed in this regard based on the knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of enzyme, unfortunately their usage is quite limited because three-dimensional structures of many enzymes are still unknown. Here, we reported a sequence-based predictor, called "iEzy-Drug," in which each drug compound was formulated by a molecular fingerprint with 258 feature components, each enzyme by the Chou's pseudo amino acid composition generated via incorporating sequential evolution information and physicochemical features derived from its sequence, and the prediction engine was operated by the fuzzy K-nearest neighbor algorithm. The overall success rate achieved by iEzy-Drug via rigorous cross-validations was about 91%. Moreover, to maximize the convenience for the majority of experimental scientists, a user-friendly web server was established, by which users can easily obtain their desired results.

  4. DEAH-RHA helicase•Znf cofactor systems in kinetoplastid RNA editing and evolutionarily distant RNA processes

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Reyes, Jorge; Mooers, Blaine H.M.; Abu-Adas, Zakaria; Kumar, Vikas; Gulati, Shelly

    2016-01-01

    Multi-zinc finger proteins are an emerging class of cofactors in DEAH-RHA RNA helicases across highly divergent eukaryotic lineages. DEAH-RHA helicase•zinc finger cofactor partnerships predate the split of kinetoplastid protozoa, which include several human pathogens, from other eukaryotic lineages 100–400 Ma. Despite a long evolutionary history, the prototypical DEAH-RHA domains remain highly conserved. This short review focuses on a recently identified DEAH-RHA helicase•zinc finger cofactor system in kinetoplastid RNA editing, and its potential functional parallels with analogous systems in embryogenesis control in nematodes and antivirus protection in humans. PMID:27540585

  5. hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes from Brugada Syndrome patients without identified mutations do not exhibit clear cellular electrophysiological abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Veerman, Christiaan C.; Mengarelli, Isabella; Guan, Kaomei; Stauske, Michael; Barc, Julien; Tan, Hanno L.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Verkerk, Arie O.; Bezzina, Connie R.

    2016-01-01

    Brugada syndrome (BrS) is a rare cardiac rhythm disorder associated with sudden cardiac death. Mutations in the sodium channel gene SCN5A are found in ~20% of cases while mutations in other genes collectively account for <5%. In the remaining patients the genetic defect and the underlying pathogenic mechanism remain obscure. To provide insight into the mechanism of BrS in individuals without identified mutations, we here studied electrophysiological properties of cardiomyocytes (CMs) generated from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) from 3 BrS patients who tested negative for mutations in the known BrS-associated genes. Patch clamp studies revealed no differences in sodium current (INa) in hiPSC-CMs from the 3 BrS patients compared to 2 unrelated controls. Moreover, action potential upstroke velocity (Vmax), reflecting INa, was not different between hiPSC-CMs from the BrS patients and the controls. hiPSC-CMs harboring the BrS-associated SCN5A-1795insD mutation exhibited a reduction in both INa and Vmax, demonstrating our ability to detect reduced sodium channel function. hiPSC-CMs from one of the BrS lines demonstrated a mildly reduced action potential duration, however, the transient outward potassium current (Ito) and the L-type calcium current (ICa,L), both implicated in BrS, were not different compared to the controls. Our findings indicate that ion channel dysfunction, in particular in the cardiac sodium channel, may not be a prerequisite for BrS. PMID:27485484

  6. hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes from Brugada Syndrome patients without identified mutations do not exhibit clear cellular electrophysiological abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Veerman, Christiaan C.; Mengarelli, Isabella; Guan, Kaomei; Stauske, Michael; Barc, Julien; Tan, Hanno L.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Verkerk, Arie O.; Bezzina, Connie R.

    2016-01-01

    Brugada syndrome (BrS) is a rare cardiac rhythm disorder associated with sudden cardiac death. Mutations in the sodium channel gene SCN5A are found in ~20% of cases while mutations in other genes collectively account for <5%. In the remaining patients the genetic defect and the underlying pathogenic mechanism remain obscure. To provide insight into the mechanism of BrS in individuals without identified mutations, we here studied electrophysiological properties of cardiomyocytes (CMs) generated from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) from 3 BrS patients who tested negative for mutations in the known BrS-associated genes. Patch clamp studies revealed no differences in sodium current (INa) in hiPSC-CMs from the 3 BrS patients compared to 2 unrelated controls. Moreover, action potential upstroke velocity (Vmax), reflecting INa, was not different between hiPSC-CMs from the BrS patients and the controls. hiPSC-CMs harboring the BrS-associated SCN5A-1795insD mutation exhibited a reduction in both INa and Vmax, demonstrating our ability to detect reduced sodium channel function. hiPSC-CMs from one of the BrS lines demonstrated a mildly reduced action potential duration, however, the transient outward potassium current (Ito) and the L-type calcium current (ICa,L), both implicated in BrS, were not different compared to the controls. Our findings indicate that ion channel dysfunction, in particular in the cardiac sodium channel, may not be a prerequisite for BrS. PMID:27485484

  7. Characterization of cofactor-dependent and cofactor-independent phosphoglycerate mutases from Archaea.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, Ulrike; Schönheit, Peter

    2007-09-01

    Phosphoglycerate mutases (PGM) catalyze the reversible conversion of 3-phosphoglycerate and 2-phosphoglycerate as part of glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. Two structural and mechanistically unrelated types of PGMs are known, a cofactor (2,3-bisphosphoglycerate)-dependent (dPGM) and a cofactor-independent enzyme (iPGM). Here, we report the characterization of the first archaeal cofactor-dependent PGM from Thermoplasma acidophilum, which is encoded by ORF TA1347. This ORF was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli and the recombinant protein was characterized as functional dPGM. The enzyme constitutes a 46 kDa homodimeric protein. Enzyme activity required 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate as cofactor and was inhibited by vanadate, a specific inhibitor of dPGMs in bacteria and eukarya; inhibition could be partially relieved by EDTA. Histidine 23 of the archaeal dPGM of T. acidophilum, which corresponds to active site histidine in dPGMs from bacteria and eukarya, was exchanged for alanine by site directed mutagenesis. The H23A mutant was catalytically inactive supporting the essential role of H23 in catalysis of the archaeal dPGM. Further, an archaeal cofactor-independent PGM encoded by ORF AF1751 from the hyperthermophilic sulfate reducer Archaeoglobus fulgidus was characterized after expression in E. coli. The monomeric 46 kDa protein showed cofactor-independent PGM activity and was stimulated by Mn(2+) and exhibited high thermostability up to 70 degrees C. A comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of both types of archaeal phosphoglycerate mutases is also presented.

  8. Lanthanide cofactors accelerate DNA-catalyzed synthesis of branched RNA.

    PubMed

    Javadi-Zarnaghi, Fatemeh; Höbartner, Claudia

    2013-08-28

    Most deoxyribozymes (DNA catalysts) require metal ions as cofactors for catalytic activity, with Mg(2+), Mn(2+), and Zn(2+) being the most represented activators. Trivalent transition-metal ions have been less frequently considered. Rare earth ions offer attractive properties for studying metal ion binding by biochemical and spectroscopic methods. Here we report the effect of lanthanide cofactors, in particular terbium (Tb(3+)), for DNA-catalyzed synthesis of 2',5'-branched RNA. We found up to 10(4)-fold increased ligation rates for the 9F7 deoxribozyme using 100 μM Tb(3+) and 7 mM Mg(2+), compared to performing the reaction with 7 mM Mg(2+) alone. Combinatorial mutation interference analysis (CoMA) was used to identify nucleotides in the catalytic region of 9F7 that are essential for ligation activity with different metal ion combinations. A minimized version of the DNA enzyme sustained high levels of Tb(3+)-assisted activity. Sensitized luminescence of Tb(3+) bound to DNA in combination with DMS probing and DNase I footprinting results supported the CoMA data. The accelerating effect of Tb(3+) was confirmed for related RNA-ligating deoxyribozymes, pointing toward favorable activation of internal 2'-OH nucleophiles. The results of this study offer fundamental insights into nucleotide requirements for DNA-catalyzed RNA ligation and will be beneficial for practical applications that utilize 2',5'-branched RNA.

  9. Regulation of estrogen-dependent transcription by the LIM cofactors CLIM and RLIM in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, Steven A; Güngör, Cenap; Prenzel, Tanja; Riethdorf, Sabine; Riethdorf, Lutz; Taniguchi-Ishigaki, Naoko; Rau, Thomas; Tursun, Baris; Furlow, J David; Sauter, Guido; Scheffner, Martin; Pantel, Klaus; Gannon, Frank; Bach, Ingolf

    2009-01-01

    Mammary oncogenesis is profoundly influenced by signaling pathways controlled by estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha). Although it is known that ERalpha exerts its oncogenic effect by stimulating the proliferation of many human breast cancers through the activation of target genes, our knowledge of the underlying transcriptional mechanisms remains limited. Our published work has shown that the in vivo activity of LIM homeodomain transcription factors (LIM-HD) is critically regulated by cofactors of LIM-HD proteins (CLIM) and the ubiquitin ligase RING finger LIM domain-interacting protein (RLIM). Here, we identify CLIM and RLIM as novel ERalpha cofactors that colocalize and interact with ERalpha in primary human breast tumors. We show that both cofactors associate with estrogen-responsive promoters and regulate the expression of endogenous ERalpha target genes in breast cancer cells. Surprisingly, our results indicate opposing functions of LIM cofactors for ERalpha and LIM-HDs: whereas CLIM enhances transcriptional activity of LIM-HDs, it inhibits transcriptional activation mediated by ERalpha on most target genes in vivo. In turn, the ubiquitin ligase RLIM inhibits transcriptional activity of LIM-HDs but enhances transcriptional activation of endogenous ERalpha target genes. Results from a human breast cancer tissue microarray of 1,335 patients revealed a highly significant correlation of elevated CLIM levels to ER/progesterone receptor positivity and poor differentiation of tumors. Combined, these results indicate that LIM cofactors CLIM and RLIM regulate the biological activity of ERalpha during the development of human breast cancer.

  10. Characterization of transcriptional regulatory domains of ankyrin repeat cofactor-1

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Aihua; Li, Chia-Wei; Chen, J. Don . E-mail: chenjd@umdnj.edu

    2007-07-13

    The ankyrin repeats cofactor-1 (ANCO-1) was recently identified as a p160 coactivator-interacting protein that may inhibit transcriptional activity of nuclear receptors. Here, we have characterized the transcriptional regulatory domains of ANCO-1. Two intrinsic repression domains (RD) were identified: an N-terminal RD1 at residues 318-611 and a C-terminal RD2 at 2369-2663. ANCO-1 also contains an activation domain (AD) capable of stimulating transcription in both mammalian and yeast cells. The minimal AD was delimited to a 70-amino acid region at residues 2076-2145. Overall, full-length ANCO-1 exhibited transcriptional repressor activity, suggesting that RD domains may suppress the AD activity. We further demonstrated that ANCO-1 silencing by siRNA enhanced progesterone receptor-mediated transcription. Together, these results indicate that the transcriptional potential of ANCO-1 may be modulated by a combination of repression and activation signals.

  11. The role of FeS clusters for molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis and molybdoenzymes in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Kenichi; Leimkühler, Silke

    2015-06-01

    The biosynthesis of the molybdenum cofactor (Moco) has been intensively studied, in addition to its insertion into molybdoenzymes. In particular, a link between the assembly of molybdoenzymes and the biosynthesis of FeS clusters has been identified in the recent years: 1) the synthesis of the first intermediate in Moco biosynthesis requires an FeS-cluster containing protein, 2) the sulfurtransferase for the dithiolene group in Moco is also involved in the synthesis of FeS clusters, thiamin and thiolated tRNAs, 3) the addition of a sulfido-ligand to the molybdenum atom in the active site additionally involves a sulfurtransferase, and 4) most molybdoenzymes in bacteria require FeS clusters as redox active cofactors. In this review we will focus on the biosynthesis of the molybdenum cofactor in bacteria, its modification and insertion into molybdoenzymes, with an emphasis to its link to FeS cluster biosynthesis and sulfur transfer.

  12. Genes for the dimerization cofactor of hepatocyte nuclear factor-1[alpha] (DCOH) are on human and murine chromsomes 10

    SciTech Connect

    Milatovich, A.; Mendel, D.B.; Crabtree, G.R.; Francke, U. )

    1993-04-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor-1[alpha] (HNF-1[alpha]; gene symbol, TCF1) forms dimers with itself as well as with HNF-1[beta] and regulates the expression of several liver-specific genes. Recently, a dimerization cofactor of hepatocyte nuclear factor-1[alpha], called DCOH, has been identified. Here, the authors report the chromosomal localization of the genes for this cofactor to chromosomes 10 in both humans and mice by Southern blot analyses of somatic cell hybrids. 25 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  13. Photosensitivity syndrome brings to light a new transcription-coupled DNA repair cofactor.

    PubMed

    Cleaver, James E

    2012-05-01

    Three teams have applied whole-exome and proteome methods to identify a new cofactor of human RNA polymerase II that is required for the recovery of transcription on damaged templates. The identification of this new factor raises questions about the causal relationships between molecular mechanisms of transcription regulation and excision repair and developmental and neurological disease and nonmalignant skin photosensitivity. PMID:22538718

  14. Role of cofactors in metalloprotein folding.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Corey J; Apiyo, David; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2004-01-01

    Metals are commonly found as natural constituents of proteins. Since many such metals can interact specifically with their corresponding unfolded proteins in vitro , cofactor-binding prior to polypeptide folding may be a biological path to active metalloproteins. By interacting with the unfolded polypeptide, the metal may create local structure that initiates and directs the polypeptide-folding process. Here, we review recent literature that addresses the involvement of metals in protein-folding reactions in vitro . To date, the best characterized systems are simple one such as blue-copper proteins, heme-binding proteins, iron-sulfur-cluster proteins and synthetic metallopeptides. Taken together, the available data demonstrates that metals can play diverse roles: it is clear that many cofactors bind before polypeptide folding and influence the reaction; yet, some do not bind until a well-structured active site is formed. The significance of characterizing the effects of metals on protein conformational changes is underscored by the many human diseases that are directly linked to anomalous protein-metal interactions.

  15. Caenorhabditis elegans UBX cofactors for CDC-48/p97 control spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sasagawa, Yohei; Yamanaka, Kunitoshi; Saito-Sasagawa, Yuko; Ogura, Teru

    2010-12-01

    UBX (ubiquitin regulatory X) domain-containing proteins act as cofactors for CDC-48/p97. CDC-48/p97 is essential for various cellular processes including retro-translocation in endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation, homotypic membrane fusion, nuclear envelope assembly, degradation of ubiquitylated proteins, and cell cycle progression. CDC-48/p97-dependent processes are determined by differential binding of cofactors including UBX proteins, but the cellular functions of UBX proteins have not yet been elucidated, especially in multicellular organisms. Therefore, we investigated the functions of UBX family members using Caenorhabditis elegans, which expresses six UBX proteins, UBXN-1 to UBXN-6. All six UBXN proteins directly interacted with CDC-48.1 and CDC-48.2, and simultaneous knockdown of the expression of three genes, ubxn-1, ubxn-2 and ubxn-3, induced embryonic lethal and sterile phenotypes, but knockdown of either one or two did not. The sterile worms had a feminized germ-line phenotype, producing oocytes but no sperm. UBXN-1, UBXN-2 and UBXN-3 colocalized with CDC-48 in spermatocytes but not mature sperm. TRA-1A, which is a key factor in the sex determination pathway and inhibits spermatogenesis, accumulated in worms in which UBXN-1, UBXN-2 and UBXN-3 had been simultaneously knocked down. Taken together, these results suggest that UBXN-1, UBXN-2 and UBXN-3 are redundant cofactors for CDC-48/p97 and control spermatogenesis via the degradation of TRA-1A.

  16. Combination of Biological Screening in a Cellular Model of Viral Latency and Virtual Screening Identifies Novel Compounds That Reactivate HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Gallastegui, Edurne; Marshall, Brett; Vidal, David; Sanchez-Duffhues, Gonzalo; Collado, Juan A.; Alvarez-Fernández, Carmen; Luque, Neus; Terme, Jean-Michel; Gatell, Josep M.; Sánchez-Palomino, Sonsoles; Muñoz, Eduardo; Mestres, Jordi; Verdin, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Although highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has converted HIV into a chronic disease, a reservoir of HIV latently infected resting T cells prevents the eradication of the virus from patients. To achieve eradication, HAART must be combined with drugs that reactivate the dormant viruses. We examined this problem in an established model of HIV postintegration latency by screening a library of small molecules. Initially, we identified eight molecules that reactivated latent HIV. Using them as templates, additional hits were identified by means of similarity-based virtual screening. One of those hits, 8-methoxy-6-methylquinolin-4-ol (MMQO), proved to be useful to reactivate HIV-1 in different cellular models, especially in combination with other known reactivating agents, without causing T-cell activation and with lower toxicity than that of the initial hits. Interestingly, we have established that MMQO produces Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) activation and enhances the T-cell receptor (TCR)/CD3 stimulation of HIV-1 reactivation from latency but inhibits CD3-induced interleukin-2 (IL-2) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) gene transcription. Moreover, MMQO prevents TCR-induced cell cycle progression and proliferation in primary T cells. The present study documents that the combination of biological screening in a cellular model of viral latency with virtual screening is useful for the identification of novel agents able to reactivate HIV-1. Moreover, we set the bases for a hypothetical therapy to reactivate latent HIV by combining MMQO with physiological or pharmacological TCR/CD3 stimulation. PMID:22258251

  17. Texture and cofactor zeros of the neutrino mass matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Jiajun; Marfatia, D.; Whisnant, K.

    2014-09-01

    We study Majorana neutrino mass matrices that have two texture zeros, or two cofactor zeros, or one texture zero and one cofactor zero. The two texture/cofactor zero conditions give four constraints, which in conjunction with the five measured oscillation parameters completely determine the nine independent real parameters of the neutrino mass matrix. We also study the implications that future measurements of neutrinoless double beta decay and the Dirac CP phase will have on these cases.

  18. Optimal cofactor swapping can increase the theoretical yield for chemical production in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    King, Zachary A; Feist, Adam M

    2014-07-01

    Maintaining cofactor balance is a critical function in microorganisms, but often the native cofactor balance does not match the needs of an engineered metabolic flux state. Here, an optimization procedure is utilized to identify optimal cofactor-specificity "swaps" for oxidoreductase enzymes utilizing NAD(H) or NADP(H) in the genome-scale metabolic models of Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The theoretical yields of all native carbon-containing molecules are considered, as well as theoretical yields of twelve heterologous production pathways in E. coli. Swapping the cofactor specificity of central metabolic enzymes (especially GAPD and ALCD2x) is shown to increase NADPH production and increase theoretical yields for native products in E. coli and yeast--including L-aspartate, L-lysine, L-isoleucine, L-proline, L-serine, and putrescine--and non-native products in E. coli-including 1,3-propanediol, 3-hydroxybutyrate, 3-hydroxypropanoate, 3-hydroxyvalerate, and styrene.

  19. Structural and biochemical characterization of an atypical short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase reveals an unusual cofactor preference.

    PubMed

    Buysschaert, Géraldine; Verstraete, Kenneth; Savvides, Savvas N; Vergauwen, Bjorn

    2013-03-01

    Short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) encompass a large and functionally diverse family of enzymes with representative members in all kingdoms of life. Despite the wealth of reactions catalyzed by SDRs, they operate through a well-conserved and efficient reaction mechanism centered in a conserved catalytic tetrad (Asn-Ser-Tyr-Lys) and the employment of an appropriate cofactor. In recent years, SDRs that lack the signature catalytic tetrad have been identified, thus adding a perplexing twist to SDR functionality. In the present study, we report the crystal structure of SDRvv, an atypical SDR from Vibrio vulnificus devoid of the catalytic tetrad, thereby defining the structural signature of this apparent SDR family outlier. Further structural analysis of SDRvv in complex with its putative cofactor NADPH, site-directed mutagenesis and binding studies via isothermal titration calorimetry, and further biochemical characterization have allowed us to dissect the cofactor preferences of SDRvv. The retained capacity to bind the NADPH cofactor, the conceivable existence of a proton relay and the conservation of the coordination distances between the key residues in the cofactor binding pocket define a first set of rules towards catalytic activity for SDRvv. The findings of the present study set the stage for deriving the identity of the natural substrate of SDRvv and add a new twist to the structure-function landscape for Rossmann-fold-dependent cofactor discrimination.

  20. An array of Escherichia coli clones over-expressing essential proteins: A new strategy of identifying cellular targets of potent antibacterial compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, H. Howard . E-mail: hxu3@calstatela.edu; Real, Lilian; Bailey, Melissa Wu

    2006-11-03

    With the advancement of high throughput screening, it has become easier and faster to discover hit compounds that inhibit proliferation of bacterial cells. However, development in technologies used to identify cellular targets of potent antibacterial inhibitors has lagged behind. Here, we describe a novel strategy of target identification for antibacterial inhibitors using an array of Escherichia coli clones each over-expressing one essential protein. In a proof-of-concept study, eight essential genes were cloned into pLex5BA vector under the control of an inducible promoter. Over-expression of target proteins was confirmed. For two clones, one over-expressing FabI and the other over-expressing MurA enzymes, the host cells became 17- and 139-fold more resistant to the specific inhibitors triclosan and phosphomycin, respectively, while the susceptibility of other clones towards these inhibitors remained unchanged after induction of gene expression. Target identification via target protein over-expression was demonstrated using both mixed clone and individual clone assay formats.

  1. Engineering the assembly of heme cofactors in man-made proteins.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Lee A; Kodali, Goutham; Moser, Christopher C; Dutton, P Leslie

    2014-02-26

    Timely ligation of one or more chemical cofactors at preselected locations in proteins is a critical preamble for catalysis in many natural enzymes, including the oxidoreductases and allied transport and signaling proteins. Likewise, ligation strategies must be directly addressed when designing oxidoreductase and molecular transport functions in man-made, first-principle protein constructs intended to operate in vitro or in vivo. As one of the most common catalytic cofactors in biology, we have chosen heme B, along with its chemical analogues, to determine the kinetics and barriers to cofactor incorporation and bishistidine ligation in a range of 4-α-helix proteins. We compare five elementary synthetic designs (maquettes) and the natural cytochrome b562 that differ in oligomeric forms, apo- and holo-tertiary structural stability; qualities that we show can either assist or hinder assembly. The cofactor itself also imposes an assembly barrier if amphiphilicity ranges toward too hydrophobic or hydrophilic. With progressive removal of identified barriers, we achieve maquette assembly rates as fast as native cytochrome b562, paving the way to in vivo assembly of man-made hemoprotein maquettes and integration of artificial proteins into enzymatic pathways.

  2. Interactions between the estrogen receptor, its cofactors and microRNAs in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    McCafferty, Marc P J; McNeill, Roisin E; Miller, Nicola; Kerin, Michael J

    2009-08-01

    The activity of selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) is not fully explained by an estrogen receptor (ER) switch model that simply turns estrogen activity on or off. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved in estrogen signaling and the development of drug resistance could help stratify patients into more coherent treatment groups and identify novel therapeutic candidates. This review describes how interactions between two novel factors known to influence estrogenic activity: nuclear receptor cofactors--protein partners which modulate estrogen action, and microRNAs--a class of recently discovered regulatory elements, may impact hormone-sensitive breast cancer. The role of nuclear receptor cofactors in estrogen signaling and the associations between ER cofactors and breast cancer are described. We outline the activity of microRNAs (miRNAs) and their associations with breast cancer and detail recent evidence of interactions between the ER and its cofactors and miRNA and provide an overview of the emerging field of miRNA-based therapeutics. We propose that previously unrecognised interactions between these two species of regulatory molecules may underlie at least some of the heterogeneity of breast cancer in terms of its clinical course and response to treatment. The exploitation of such associations will have important implications for drug development.

  3. A NADH-accepting imine reductase variant: Immobilization and cofactor regeneration by oxidative deamination.

    PubMed

    Gand, Martin; Thöle, Christian; Müller, Hubertus; Brundiek, Henrike; Bashiri, Ghader; Höhne, Matthias

    2016-07-20

    Engineering cofactor specificity of enzymes is a promising approach that can expand the application of enzymes for biocatalytic production of industrially relevant chemicals. Until now, only NADPH-dependent imine reductases (IREDs) are known. This limits their applications to reactions employing whole cells as a cost-efficient cofactor regeneration system. For applications of IREDs as cell-free catalysts, (i) we created an IRED variant showing an improved activity for NADH. With rational design we were able to identify four residues in the (R)-selective IRED from Streptomyces GF3587 (IR-Sgf3587), which coordinate the 2'-phosphate moiety of the NADPH cofactor. From a set of 15 variants, the highest NADH activity was caused by the single amino acid exchange K40A resulting in a 3-fold increased acceptance of NADH. (ii) We showed its applicability using an immobilisate obtained either from purified enzyme or from lysate using the EziG(™) carriers. Applying the variant and NADH, we reached 88% conversion in a preparative scale biotransformation when employing 4% (w/v) 2-methylpyrroline. (iii) We demonstrated a one-enzyme cofactor regeneration approach using the achiral amine N-methyl-3-aminopentanone as a hydrogen donor co-substrate.

  4. RNA polymerase II cofactor PC2 facilitates activation of transcription by GAL4-AH in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Kretzschmar, M; Stelzer, G; Roeder, R G; Meisterernst, M

    1994-01-01

    We have isolated from a crude Hela cell cofactor fraction (USA) a novel positive cofactor that cooperates with the general transcription machinery to effect efficient stimulation of transcription by GAL4-AH, a derivative of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae regulatory factor GAL4. PC2 was shown to be a 500-kDa protein complex and to be functionally and biochemically distinct from native TFIID and previously identified cofactors. In the presence of native TFIID and other general factors, PC2 was necessary and sufficient for activation by GAL4-AH. Cofactor function was specific for transcriptional activation domains of GAL4-AH. The repressor histone H1 further potentiated but was not required for activation of transcription by GAL4-AH. On the basis of the observation that PC2 exerts entirely positive effects on transcription, we propose a model in which PC2 increases the activity of the preinitiation complex in the presence of an activator, thereby establishing a specific pathway during activation of RNA polymerase II. Images PMID:8196633

  5. A NADH-accepting imine reductase variant: Immobilization and cofactor regeneration by oxidative deamination.

    PubMed

    Gand, Martin; Thöle, Christian; Müller, Hubertus; Brundiek, Henrike; Bashiri, Ghader; Höhne, Matthias

    2016-07-20

    Engineering cofactor specificity of enzymes is a promising approach that can expand the application of enzymes for biocatalytic production of industrially relevant chemicals. Until now, only NADPH-dependent imine reductases (IREDs) are known. This limits their applications to reactions employing whole cells as a cost-efficient cofactor regeneration system. For applications of IREDs as cell-free catalysts, (i) we created an IRED variant showing an improved activity for NADH. With rational design we were able to identify four residues in the (R)-selective IRED from Streptomyces GF3587 (IR-Sgf3587), which coordinate the 2'-phosphate moiety of the NADPH cofactor. From a set of 15 variants, the highest NADH activity was caused by the single amino acid exchange K40A resulting in a 3-fold increased acceptance of NADH. (ii) We showed its applicability using an immobilisate obtained either from purified enzyme or from lysate using the EziG(™) carriers. Applying the variant and NADH, we reached 88% conversion in a preparative scale biotransformation when employing 4% (w/v) 2-methylpyrroline. (iii) We demonstrated a one-enzyme cofactor regeneration approach using the achiral amine N-methyl-3-aminopentanone as a hydrogen donor co-substrate. PMID:27164259

  6. The Essential Cofactor TRRAP Recruits the Histone Acetyltransferase hGCN5 to c-Myc

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Steven B.; Wood, Marcelo A.; Cole, Michael D.

    2000-01-01

    The c-Myc protein functions as a transcription factor to facilitate oncogenic transformation; however, the biochemical and genetic pathways leading to transformation remain undefined. We demonstrate here that the recently described c-Myc cofactor TRRAP recruits histone acetylase activity, which is catalyzed by the human GCN5 protein. Since c-Myc function is inhibited by recruitment of histone deacetylase activity through Mad family proteins, these opposing biochemical activities are likely to be responsible for the antagonistic biological effects of c-Myc and Mad on target genes and ultimately on cellular transformation. PMID:10611234

  7. Neutrino mass matrices with two vanishing elements/cofactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dev, S.; Singh, Lal; Raj, Desh

    2015-08-01

    We study the phenomenological implications of the recent neutrino data for class B of two texture zeros and two vanishing cofactors for Majorana neutrinos in the flavor basis. We find that the classes () of two texture zeros and the classes () of two vanishing cofactors have similar predictions for neutrino oscillation parameters for the same mass hierarchy. Similar predictions for the classes () of two texture zeros and classes () of two vanishing cofactors are expected. However, a preference for a shift in the quadrant of the Dirac-type CP-violating phase () in contrast to the earlier analysis has been predicted for a relatively large value of the reactor neutrino mixing angle () for class B of two texture zeros and two vanishing cofactors for an inverted mass spectrum. No such shift in the quadrant of has been found for the normal mass spectrum.

  8. Enzyme cofactors: Double-edged sword for catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Ivaylo

    2013-01-01

    The metal cofactors responsible for the activity of CDK2 -- a representative member of the kinase superfamily of enzymes -- have now been shown to also have inhibitory effects during the catalytic cycle.

  9. Electronic structural flexibility of heterobimetallic Mn/Fe cofactors: R2lox and R2c proteins.

    PubMed

    Shafaat, Hannah S; Griese, Julia J; Pantazis, Dimitrios A; Roos, Katarina; Andersson, Charlotta S; Popović-Bijelić, Ana; Gräslund, Astrid; Siegbahn, Per E M; Neese, Frank; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Högbom, Martin; Cox, Nicholas

    2014-09-24

    The electronic structure of the Mn/Fe cofactor identified in a new class of oxidases (R2lox) described by Andersson and Högbom [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2009, 106, 5633] is reported. The R2lox protein is homologous to the small subunit of class Ic ribonucleotide reductase (R2c) but has a completely different in vivo function. Using multifrequency EPR and related pulse techniques, it is shown that the cofactor of R2lox represents an antiferromagnetically coupled Mn(III)/Fe(III) dimer linked by a μ-hydroxo/bis-μ-carboxylato bridging network. The Mn(III) ion is coordinated by a single water ligand. The R2lox cofactor is photoactive, converting into a second form (R2loxPhoto) upon visible illumination at cryogenic temperatures (77 K) that completely decays upon warming. This second, unstable form of the cofactor more closely resembles the Mn(III)/Fe(III) cofactor seen in R2c. It is shown that the two forms of the R2lox cofactor differ primarily in terms of the local site geometry and electronic state of the Mn(III) ion, as best evidenced by a reorientation of its unique (55)Mn hyperfine axis. Analysis of the metal hyperfine tensors in combination with density functional theory (DFT) calculations suggests that this change is triggered by deprotonation of the μ-hydroxo bridge. These results have important consequences for the mixed-metal R2c cofactor and the divergent chemistry R2lox and R2c perform. PMID:25153930

  10. Mössbauer investigation of the cofactor iron of putidamonooxin.

    PubMed

    Bill, E; Bernhardt, F H; Trautwein, A X; Winkler, H

    1985-02-15

    Mononuclear non-heme cofactor iron of putidamonooxin has been investigated in the binary oxidized 'enzyme X substrate' complex and in the ternary 'enzyme X substrate X NO' complex via Mössbauer spectroscopy. The experimental spectra were analyzed on the basis of the spin-Hamiltonian formalism. The resulting fine and hyperfine structure parameters are compared with literature values of similar compounds. From this comparison we conclude that in the binary complex (reduced and oxidized) the mononuclear non-heme cofactor iron has a coordination number higher than four. Additionally, the cofactor iron shows remarkable spectral similarities with iron in protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase, though the catalytic properties of the iron sites in the two proteins are different. The data obtained form the ternary 'enzyme X substrate X NO' complex indicate that the cofactor iron (a) is in the ferric intermediate spin state (S = 3/2) and (b) is pentacoordinated, which means that upon NO binding to the reduced cofactor iron at least one ligand has to be released. Comparing our data with literature values suggests that the cofactor iron in the binary as well as in the ternary NO complex is not directly bound to a sulfur atom, though biochemical arguments seem to indicate the opposite.

  11. Transcriptional co-factor Transducin beta-like (TBL) 1 acts as a checkpoint in pancreatic cancer malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Stoy, Christian; Sundaram, Aishwarya; Rios Garcia, Marcos; Wang, Xiaoyue; Seibert, Oksana; Zota, Annika; Wendler, Susann; Männle, David; Hinz, Ulf; Sticht, Carsten; Muciek, Maria; Gretz, Norbert; Rose, Adam J; Greiner, Vera; Hofmann, Thomas G; Bauer, Andrea; Hoheisel, Jörg; Berriel Diaz, Mauricio; Gaida, Matthias M; Werner, Jens; Schafmeier, Tobias; Strobel, Oliver; Herzig, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer fatalities in Western societies, characterized by high metastatic potential and resistance to chemotherapy. Critical molecular mechanisms of these phenotypical features still remain unknown, thus hampering the development of effective prognostic and therapeutic measures in PDAC. Here, we show that transcriptional co-factor Transducin beta-like (TBL) 1 was over-expressed in both human and murine PDAC. Inactivation of TBL1 in human and mouse pancreatic cancer cells reduced cellular proliferation and invasiveness, correlating with diminished glucose uptake, glycolytic flux, and oncogenic PI3 kinase signaling which in turn could rescue TBL1 deficiency-dependent phenotypes. TBL1 deficiency both prevented and reversed pancreatic tumor growth, mediated transcriptional PI3 kinase inhibition, and increased chemosensitivity of PDAC cells in vivo. As TBL1 mRNA levels were also found to correlate with PI3 kinase levels and overall survival in a cohort of human PDAC patients, TBL1 was identified as a checkpoint in the malignant behavior of pancreatic cancer and its expression may serve as a novel molecular target in the treatment of human PDAC. PMID:26070712

  12. Role of HOXA9 in leukemia: dysregulation, cofactors and essential targets.

    PubMed

    Collins, C T; Hess, J L

    2016-03-01

    HOXA9 is a homeodomain-containing transcription factor that has an important role in hematopoietic stem cell expansion and is commonly deregulated in acute leukemias. A variety of upstream genetic alterations in acute myeloid leukemia lead to overexpression of HOXA9, which is a strong predictor of poor prognosis. In many cases, HOXA9 has been shown to be necessary for maintaining leukemic transformation; however, the molecular mechanisms through which it promotes leukemogenesis remain elusive. Recent work has established that HOXA9 regulates downstream gene expression through binding at promoter distal enhancers along with a subset of cell-specific cofactor and collaborator proteins. Increasing efforts are being made to identify both the critical cofactors and target genes required for maintaining transformation in HOXA9-overexpressing leukemias. With continued advances in understanding HOXA9-mediated transformation, there is a wealth of opportunity for developing novel therapeutics that would be applicable for greater than 50% of AML with overexpression of HOXA9.

  13. Evidence for PQQ as cofactor in 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (dopa) decarboxylase of pig kidney.

    PubMed

    Groen, B W; van der Meer, R A; Duine, J A

    1988-09-12

    Pig kidney 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (dopa) decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.28) was purified to homogeneity. Treatment of the enzyme with phenylhydrazine (PH) according to a procedure developed for analysis of quinoproteins gave products which were identified as the hydrazone of pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) and the C(5)-hydrazone of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ). This method failed, however, in quantifying the amounts of cofactor. Direct hydrolysis of the enzyme by refluxing with hexanol and concentrated HCl led to detachment of PQQ from the protein in a quantity of 1 PQQ per enzyme molecule. In view of the reactivity of PQQ towards amines and amino acids, we postulate that it participates as a covalently bound cofactor in the catalytic cycle of the enzyme, in interplay with PLP. Since several other enzymes have been reported to show the atypical behaviour of dopa decarboxylase, it seems that the PLP-containing group of enzymes can be subdivided into pyridoxoproteins and pyridoxo-quinoproteins.

  14. Catalysis-dependent selenium incorporation and migration in the nitrogenase active site iron-molybdenum cofactor

    PubMed Central

    Spatzal, Thomas; Perez, Kathryn A; Howard, James B; Rees, Douglas C

    2015-01-01

    Dinitrogen reduction in the biological nitrogen cycle is catalyzed by nitrogenase, a two-component metalloenzyme. Understanding of the transformation of the inert resting state of the active site FeMo-cofactor into an activated state capable of reducing dinitrogen remains elusive. Here we report the catalysis dependent, site-selective incorporation of selenium into the FeMo-cofactor from selenocyanate as a newly identified substrate and inhibitor. The 1.60 Å resolution structure reveals selenium occupying the S2B site of FeMo-cofactor in the Azotobacter vinelandii MoFe-protein, a position that was recently identified as the CO-binding site. The Se2B-labeled enzyme retains substrate reduction activity and marks the starting point for a crystallographic pulse-chase experiment of the active site during turnover. Through a series of crystal structures obtained at resolutions of 1.32–1.66 Å, including the CO-inhibited form of Av1-Se2B, the exchangeability of all three belt-sulfur sites is demonstrated, providing direct insights into unforeseen rearrangements of the metal center during catalysis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11620.001 PMID:26673079

  15. Catalysis-dependent selenium incorporation and migration in the nitrogenase active site iron-molybdenum cofactor.

    PubMed

    Spatzal, Thomas; Perez, Kathryn A; Howard, James B; Rees, Douglas C

    2015-12-16

    Dinitrogen reduction in the biological nitrogen cycle is catalyzed by nitrogenase, a two-component metalloenzyme. Understanding of the transformation of the inert resting state of the active site FeMo-cofactor into an activated state capable of reducing dinitrogen remains elusive. Here we report the catalysis dependent, site-selective incorporation of selenium into the FeMo-cofactor from selenocyanate as a newly identified substrate and inhibitor. The 1.60 Å resolution structure reveals selenium occupying the S2B site of FeMo-cofactor in the Azotobacter vinelandii MoFe-protein, a position that was recently identified as the CO-binding site. The Se2B-labeled enzyme retains substrate reduction activity and marks the starting point for a crystallographic pulse-chase experiment of the active site during turnover. Through a series of crystal structures obtained at resolutions of 1.32-1.66 Å, including the CO-inhibited form of Av1-Se2B, the exchangeability of all three belt-sulfur sites is demonstrated, providing direct insights into unforeseen rearrangements of the metal center during catalysis.

  16. Co-factors for smoking and evolutionary psychobiology.

    PubMed

    Pomerleau, C S

    1997-04-01

    Smoking is becoming increasingly concentrated in people with co-factors such as depression, attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder, anxiety disorders, and bulimia/bingeing. These behavioral or cognitive patterns may be adaptive or neutral in the conditions under which we evolved but maladaptive in environments requiring alertness for extended periods, where a fully mobilized fight-or-flight response is inappropriate, and where food availability makes lack of an "appestat" a liability. Such conditions are amenable to management by nicotine because of its ability to produce small but reliable adjustments in relevant cognitive and behavioral functions. Moreover, symptomatology may be unmasked or exacerbated by nicotine abstinence, persisting beyond the usual time-course for nicotine withdrawal, which may explain the particular attraction of smoking and the difficulty these individuals experience in quitting without necessarily requiring that they be more nicotine-dependent. The implications are: (1) a better understanding of the evolutionary psychobiology of smoking may promote development of tailored interventions for smokers with co-factors; (2) nicotine may have therapeutic applications for non-smokers with co-factors; (3) because smoking has a fairly high heritability index, and because of evidence of assortative mating, special prevention efforts targeting children of smokers with co-factors, as well as early identification of the co-factor itself, may be needed.

  17. Genetic variants and evolutionary analyses of heparin cofactor II.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Abhishek; Bhandari, Anita; Sarde, Sandeep J; Goswami, Chandan

    2014-09-01

    Heparin cofactor II (HCII) belongs to serpin superfamily and it acts as a thrombin inhibitor in the coagulation cascade, in a glycosaminoglycan-dependent pathway using the release of a sequestered hirudin-like N-terminal tail for interaction with thrombin. This serpin belongs to multiple member group V2 of vertebrate serpin classification. However, there is no comprehensive study illustrating the exact phylogenetic history of HCII, to date. Herein, we explored phylogenetic traits of HCII genes. Structures of HCII gene from selected ray-finned fishes and lamprey varied in exon I and II with insertions of novel introns of which one in core domain for ray-finned fishes in exon II at the position 241c. We found HCII remain nested in the largest intron of phosphatidylinositol (PI) 4-kinase (PIK4CA) gene (genetic variants of this gene cause schizophrenia) at the origin of vertebrates, dated about 500MY old. We found that sequence features such as two acidic repeats (AR1-II), GAG-binding helix-D, three serpin motifs and inhibitory reactive center loop (RCL) of HCII protein are highly conserved in 55 vertebrates analyzed. We identified 985 HCII variants by analysis of 1092 human genomes with top three variation classes belongs to SNPs (84.3%), insertion (7.1%) and deletion (5.0%). We identified 37 deleterious mutations in the human HCII protein and we have described these mutations in relation to HCII sequence-structure-function relationships. These understandings may have clinical and medical importance as well.

  18. The Mtm1p carrier and pyridoxal 5′-phosphate cofactor trafficking in yeast mitochondria *

    PubMed Central

    Whittaker, Mei M.; Penmatsa, Aravind; Whittaker, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Biochemical communication between the cytoplasmic and mitochondrial subsystems of the cell depends on solute carriers in the mitochondrial inner membrane that transport metabolites between the two compartments. We have expressed and purified a yeast mitochondrial carrier protein (Mtm1p, YGR257cp), originally identified as a manganese ion carrier, for biochemical characterization aimed at resolving its function. High affinity, stoichiometric pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP) cofactor binding was characterized by fluorescence titration and calorimetry, and the biochemical effects of mtm1 gene deletion on yeast mitochondria were investigated. The PLP status of the mitochondrial proteome (the mitochondrial ‘PLP-ome’) was probed by immunoblot analysis of mitochondria isolated from wild type (MTM1+) and knockout (MTM1−) yeast, revealing depletion of mitochondrial PLP in the latter. A direct activity assay of the enzyme catalyzing the first committed step of heme biosynthesis, the PLP-dependent mitochondrial enzyme 5-aminolevulinate synthase, extends these results, providing a specific example of PLP cofactor limitation. Together, these experiments support a role for Mtm1p in mitochondrial PLP trafficking and highlight the link between PLP cofactor transport and iron metabolism, a remarkable illustration of metabolic integration. PMID:25637770

  19. Developmental expression patterns of candidate co-factors for vertebrate Six family transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Neilson, Karen M.; Pignoni, Francesca; Yan, Bo; Moody, Sally A.

    2010-01-01

    Six family transcription factors play important roles in craniofacial development. Their transcriptional activity can be modified by co-factor proteins. Two Six genes and one co-factor gene (Eya1) are involved in the human Branchio-otic (BO) and Branchio-otic-renal (BOR) syndromes. However, mutations in Six and Eya genes only account for about half of these patients. To discover potential new causative genes, we searched the Xenopus genome for orthologues of Drosophila co-factor proteins that interact with the fly Six-related factor, SO. We identified 33 Xenopus genes with high sequence identity to 20 of the 25 fly SO-interacting proteins. We provide the developmental expression patterns of the Xenopus orthologues for 11 of the fly genes, and demonstrate that all are expressed in developing craniofacial tissues with at least partial overlap with Six1/Six2. We speculate that these genes may function as Six-interacting partners with important roles in vertebrate craniofacial development and perhaps congenital syndromes. PMID:21089078

  20. The role of FeS clusters for molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis and molybdoenzymes in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Kenichi; Leimkühler, Silke

    2016-01-01

    Molybdenum is the only second row transition metal essential for biological systems, which is biologically available as molybdate ion. In eukarya, bacteria and archaea, molybdenum is bound to either to a tricyclic pyranopterin, thereby forming the molybdenum cofactor (Moco), or in some bacteria to the FeS cluster based iron-molybdenum cofactor (FeMoco), which forms the active site of nitrogenase. To date more than 50 Moco-containing enzymes have been purified and biochemically or structurally characterized. The physiological role of molybdenum in these enzymes is fundamental to organisms, since the reactions include the catalysis of key steps in carbon, nitrogen and sulfur metabolism. The catalyzed reactions are in most cases oxo-transfer reactions or the hydroxylation of carbon centers. The biosynthesis of Moco has been intensively studied, in addition to its insertion into molybdoenzymes. In particular, a link between the biosynthesis and maturation of molybdoenzymes and the biosynthesis and distribution of FeS clusters has been identified in the last years: 1) The synthesis of the first intermediate in Moco biosynthesis requires an FeS-cluster containing protein, 2) The sulfurtransferase for the dithiolene group in Moco is common also for the synthesis of FeS clusters, thiamin and thiolated tRNAs, 3) the modification of the active site with a sulfur atom additionally involves a sulfurtransferase, 4) most molybdoenzymes in bacteria require FeS clusters as additional redox active cofactors. In this review we will focus on the biosynthesis of the molybdenum cofactor in bacteria, its modification and insertion into molybdoenzymes, with an emphasis to its link to FeS cluster biosynthesis and sulfur transfer. PMID:25268953

  1. Escherichia coli class Ib ribonucleotide reductase contains a dimanganese(III)-tyrosyl radical cofactor in vivo†

    PubMed Central

    Cotruvo, Joseph A.; Stubbe, JoAnne

    2011-01-01

    Escherichia coli class Ib ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) converts nucleoside 5′-diphosphates to deoxynucleoside 5′-diphosphates in iron-limited and oxidative stress conditions. We have recently demonstrated in vitro that this RNR is active with both diferric-tyrosyl radical (FeIII2-Y•) and dimanganese(III)-Y• (MnIII2-Y•) cofactors in the β2 subunit, NrdF [Cotruvo J.A., Jr. and Stubbe J., Biochemistry (2010) 49, 1297–1309]. Here we demonstrate, by purification of this protein from its endogenous levels in an E. coli strain deficient in its five known iron uptake pathways and grown under iron-limited conditions, that the MnIII2-Y• cofactor is assembled in vivo. This is the first definitive determination of the active cofactor of a class Ib RNR purified from its native organism without overexpression. From 88 g of cell paste, 150 μg of NrdF was isolated with ~95% purity, with 0.2 Y•/β2, 0.9 Mn/β2, and a specific activity of 720 nmol/min/mg. In these conditions, the class Ib RNR is the primary active RNR in the cell. Our results strongly suggest that E. coli NrdF is an obligate manganese protein in vivo and that the MnIII2-Y• cofactor assembly pathway we have identified in vitro involving the flavodoxin-like protein NrdI, present inside the cell at catalytic levels, is operative in vivo. PMID:21250660

  2. Mutagenesis of Key Residues in the Binding Center of l-Aspartate-b-Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase from Escherichia coli Enhances Utilization of the Cofactor NAD(H).

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoshu; Chen, Jun; Wang, Qingzhuo; Duan, Chunlan; Li, Yan; Wang, Renxiao; Yang, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    L-Aspartate-β-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (ASADH) is a key enzyme in the aspartate pathway. In bacteria, ASADH is highly specific for the cofactor NADP(+) rather than NAD(+). Limited information on cofactor utilization is available, and neither the wild-type protein nor the available mutants could utilize NAD(+) efficiently. In this study, we identified several residues crucial for cofactor utilization by Escherichia coli ASADH (ecASADH) by mutating residues within the cofactor binding center. Among the investigated mutants, ecASADH-Q350N and ecASADH-Q350N/H171A, which exhibited markedly improved NAD(+) utilization, were further investigated by various biochemical approaches and molecular modeling. Relative to the wild type, the two mutants showed approximately 44-fold and 66-fold increases, respectively, in the constant kcat /Km of NAD(+). As desired, they could also utilize NADH efficiently to synthesize l-homoserine in cascade reactions in vitro.

  3. Cofactor Engineering for Enhancing the Flux of Metabolic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, M. Kalim; Jones, Patrik R.

    2014-01-01

    The manufacture of a diverse array of chemicals is now possible with biologically engineered strains, an approach that is greatly facilitated by the emergence of synthetic biology. This is principally achieved through pathway engineering in which enzyme activities are coordinated within a genetically amenable host to generate the product of interest. A great deal of attention is typically given to the quantitative levels of the enzymes with little regard to their overall qualitative states. This highly constrained approach fails to consider other factors that may be necessary for enzyme functionality. In particular, enzymes with physically bound cofactors, otherwise known as holoenzymes, require careful evaluation. Herein, we discuss the importance of cofactors for biocatalytic processes and show with empirical examples why the synthesis and integration of cofactors for the formation of holoenzymes warrant a great deal of attention within the context of pathway engineering. PMID:25221776

  4. A complex iron-calcium cofactor catalyzing phosphotransfer chemistry.

    PubMed

    Yong, Shee Chien; Roversi, Pietro; Lillington, James; Rodriguez, Fernanda; Krehenbrink, Martin; Zeldin, Oliver B; Garman, Elspeth F; Lea, Susan M; Berks, Ben C

    2014-09-01

    Alkaline phosphatases play a crucial role in phosphate acquisition by microorganisms. To expand our understanding of catalysis by this class of enzymes, we have determined the structure of the widely occurring microbial alkaline phosphatase PhoX. The enzyme contains a complex active-site cofactor comprising two antiferromagnetically coupled ferric iron ions (Fe(3+)), three calcium ions (Ca(2+)), and an oxo group bridging three of the metal ions. Notably, the main part of the cofactor resembles synthetic oxide-centered triangular metal complexes. Structures of PhoX-ligand complexes reveal how the active-site metal ions bind substrate and implicate the cofactor oxo group in the catalytic mechanism. The presence of iron in PhoX raises the possibility that iron bioavailability limits microbial phosphate acquisition.

  5. Structural basis for double cofactor specificity in a new formate dehydrogenase from the acidobacterium Granulicella mallensis MP5ACTX8.

    PubMed

    Fogal, Stefano; Beneventi, Elisa; Cendron, Laura; Bergantino, Elisabetta

    2015-11-01

    Formate dehydrogenases (FDHs) are considered particularly useful enzymes in biocatalysis when the regeneration of the cofactor NAD(P)H is required, that is, in chiral synthesis with dehydrogenases. Their utilization is however limited to the recycling of NAD(+), since all (apart one) of the FDHs characterized so far are strictly specific for this cofactor, and this is a major drawback for their otherwise wide applicability. Despite the many attempts performed to modify cofactor specificity by protein engineering different NAD(+)-dependent FDHs, in the general practice, glucose or phosphite dehydrogenases are chosen for the recycling of NADP(+). We report on the functional and structural characterization of a new FDH, GraFDH, identified by mining the genome of the extremophile prokaryote Granulicella mallensis MP5ACTX8. The new enzyme displays a valuable stability in the presence of many organic cosolvents as well as double cofactor specificity, with NADP(+) preferred over NAD(+) at acidic pH values, at which it also shows the highest stability. The quite low affinities for both cofactors as well as for the substrate formate indicate, however, that the native enzyme requires optimization to be applied as biocatalytic tool. We also determined the crystal structure of GraFDH both as apoprotein and as holoprotein, either in complex with NAD(+) or NADP(+). Noticeably, the latter represents the first structure of an FDH enzyme in complex with NADP(+). This fine picture of the structural determinants involved in cofactor selectivity will possibly boost protein engineering of the new enzyme or other homolog FDHs in view of their biocatalytic exploitation for NADP(+) recycling.

  6. Structural basis for double cofactor specificity in a new formate dehydrogenase from the acidobacterium Granulicella mallensis MP5ACTX8.

    PubMed

    Fogal, Stefano; Beneventi, Elisa; Cendron, Laura; Bergantino, Elisabetta

    2015-11-01

    Formate dehydrogenases (FDHs) are considered particularly useful enzymes in biocatalysis when the regeneration of the cofactor NAD(P)H is required, that is, in chiral synthesis with dehydrogenases. Their utilization is however limited to the recycling of NAD(+), since all (apart one) of the FDHs characterized so far are strictly specific for this cofactor, and this is a major drawback for their otherwise wide applicability. Despite the many attempts performed to modify cofactor specificity by protein engineering different NAD(+)-dependent FDHs, in the general practice, glucose or phosphite dehydrogenases are chosen for the recycling of NADP(+). We report on the functional and structural characterization of a new FDH, GraFDH, identified by mining the genome of the extremophile prokaryote Granulicella mallensis MP5ACTX8. The new enzyme displays a valuable stability in the presence of many organic cosolvents as well as double cofactor specificity, with NADP(+) preferred over NAD(+) at acidic pH values, at which it also shows the highest stability. The quite low affinities for both cofactors as well as for the substrate formate indicate, however, that the native enzyme requires optimization to be applied as biocatalytic tool. We also determined the crystal structure of GraFDH both as apoprotein and as holoprotein, either in complex with NAD(+) or NADP(+). Noticeably, the latter represents the first structure of an FDH enzyme in complex with NADP(+). This fine picture of the structural determinants involved in cofactor selectivity will possibly boost protein engineering of the new enzyme or other homolog FDHs in view of their biocatalytic exploitation for NADP(+) recycling. PMID:26104866

  7. Differential expression of chicken dimerization cofactor of hepatocyte nuclear factor-1 (DcoH) and its novel counterpart, DcoHalpha.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, H; You, S; Foster, L K; Farris, J; Choi, Y J; Foster, D N

    2001-01-01

    We have used differential display PCR to study altered gene expression in immortalized chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEFs) that have been established in our laboratory. This technique resulted in the cloning of a novel counterpart of the previously cloned chicken dimerization cofactor of hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-1 (cDcoH), which was identified as cDcoHalpha. The steady-state mRNA levels of cDcoHalpha were up-regulated in all immortal CEFs tested compared with primary CEF cells. cDcoH and cDcoHalpha showed opposite patterns of mRNA expression due to differential regulation of transcription rates, but not mRNA half-lives, in primary and immortal CEFs. Expression of cDcoHalpha increased in the late G1 and early S phases of the cell cycle, while cDcoH mRNA increased in the late S and G2/M phases. In contrast with consistent expression of both genes in primary quiescent cells, cDcoH mRNA, but not cDcoHalpha mRNA, was dramatically decreased in primary senescent cells. The highest levels of cDcoHalpha mRNA were found in the kidney, liver, heart and ovarian follicles, while the major tissues expressing cDcoH were hypothalamus, kidney and liver. cDcoH and cDcoHalpha probes did not cross-hybridize to human hepatocyte mRNA. When transfected into human HepG2 cells, both cDcoH and cDcoHalpha showed similar functional activity as measured by increased expression of a reporter gene, as well as alpha-fetoprotein and albumin genes that both contain HNF-1 binding elements in their promoters. Our results suggest that the novel chicken DcoHalpha might function as a transcriptional cofactor for HNF-1 in specific cellular-environmental states. PMID:11237869

  8. Iron as a Cofactor That Limits the Promotion of Cyanobacteria in Lakes Across a Tropic Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorichetti, R. J.; Creed, I. F.; Trick, C. G.

    2014-12-01

    The frequency and intensity of cyanobacterial blooms (cyanoblooms) is increasing globally. While cyanoblooms in eutrophic (nutrient-rich) freshwater lakes are expected to persist and worsen with climate change projections, many of the "new" cyanobloom reports pertain to oligotrophic (nutrient-poor) freshwater lakes with no prior history of cyanobloom occurrence. Under the pressures of a changing climate, there exists a critical research need to revisit existing conceptual models and identify cyanobloom regulating factors currently unaccounted for. Iron (Fe) is required in nearly all pathways of cyanobacterial macronutrient use, though its precise role in regulating cyanobacterial biomass across the lake trophic gradient is not fully understood. The hypotheses tested were: (1) cyanobacteria will predominate in lakes when bioavailable Fe concentration is low, and (2) cyanobacteria overcome this Fe limitation in all lakes using the siderophore-based Fe acquisition strategy to scavenge Fe providing a competitive advantage over other phytoplankton. These hypotheses were tested using natural lakes across an oligo-meso-eutrophic gradient across Canada. In all lakes sampled, the relative cyanobacterial biomass was highest at low predicted Fe bioavailability (< 1.0 × 10-19 mol L-1). Within this range of low bioavailable Fe, iron-binding organic ligands were measured. Concentrations of ligands with reactive hydroxamate moieties were positively correlated to cyanobacterial biomass in both the oligotrophic (r2 = 0.77, p < 0.001) and eutrophic (r2 = 0.81, p < 0.001) lakes suggesting a possible low-Fe mediated cellular origin, siderophores. Fe-binding ligands with catecholate-type binding sites were detected in all lakes, although lack of a relationship with cyanobacterial biomass and a significant relationship with dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in oligotrophic (r2 = 0.65, p < 0.001) and eutrophic (r2 = 0.65, p < 0.001) lakes may indicate an allochthonous source that is not

  9. Genome-Wide Analysis of the Binding of the Hox Protein Ultrabithorax and the Hox Cofactor Homothorax in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Choo, Siew Woh; White, Robert; Russell, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Hox genes encode a family of transcription factors that are key developmental regulators with a highly conserved role in specifying segmental diversity along the metazoan body axis. Although they have been shown to regulate a wide variety of downstream processes, direct transcriptional targets have been difficult to identify and this has been a major obstacle to our understanding of Hox gene function. We report the identification of genome-wide binding sites for the Hox protein Ultrabithorax (Ubx) using a YFP-tagged Drosophila protein-trap line together with chromatin immunoprecipitation and microarray analysis. We identify 1,147 genes bound by Ubx at high confidence in chromatin from the haltere imaginal disc, a prominent site of Ubx function where it specifies haltere versus wing development. The functional relevance of these genes is supported by their overlap with genes differentially expressed between wing and haltere imaginal discs. The Ubx-bound gene set is highly enriched in genes involved in developmental processes and contains both high-level regulators as well as genes involved in more basic cellular functions. Several signalling pathways are highly enriched in the Ubx target gene set and our analysis supports the view that Hox genes regulate many levels of developmental pathways and have targets distributed throughout the gene network. We also performed genome-wide analysis of the binding sites for the Hox cofactor Homothorax (Hth), revealing a striking similarity with the Ubx binding profile. We suggest that these binding profiles may be strongly influenced by chromatin accessibility and provide evidence of a link between Ubx/Hth binding and chromatin state at genes regulated by Polycomb silencing. Overall, we define a set of direct Ubx targets in the haltere imaginal disc and suggest that chromatin accessibility has important implications for Hox target selection and for transcription factor binding in general. PMID:21483667

  10. Binding cofactors with triplex-based DNA motifs.

    PubMed

    Kröner, Christoph; Göckel, Anja; Liu, Wenjing; Richert, Clemens

    2013-11-18

    Cofactors are pivotal compounds for the cell and many biotechnological processes. It is therefore interesting to ask how well cofactors can be bound by oligonucleotides designed not to convert but to store and release these biomolecules. Here we show that triplex-based DNA binding motifs can be used to bind nucleotides and cofactors, including NADH, FAD, SAM, acetyl CoA, and tetrahydrofolate (THF). Dissociation constants between 0.1 μM for SAM and 35 μM for THF were measured. A two-nucleotide gap still binds NADH. The selectivity for one ligand over the others can be changed by changing the sequence of the binding pocket. For example, a mismatch placed in one of the two triplets adjacent to the base-pairing site changes the selectivity, favoring the binding of FAD over that of ATP. Further, changing one of the two thymines of an A-binding motif to cytosine gives significant affinity for G, whereas changing the other does not. Immobilization of DNA motifs gives beads that store NADH. Exploratory experiments show that the beads release the cofactor upon warming to body temperature.

  11. Structural Basis for Cofactor-Independent Dioxygenation in Vancomycin Biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Widboom,P.; Fielding, E.; Liu, Y.; Bruner, S.

    2007-01-01

    Enzyme-catalyzed oxidations are some of the most common transformations in primary and secondary metabolism. The vancomycin biosynthetic enzyme DpgC belongs to a small class of oxygenation enzymes that are not dependent on an accessory cofactor or metal ion1. The detailed mechanism of cofactor-independent oxygenases has not been established. Here we report the first structure of an enzyme of this oxygenase class in complex with a bound substrate mimic. The use of a designed, synthetic substrate analogue allows unique insights into the chemistry of oxygen activation. The structure confirms the absence of cofactors, and electron density consistent with molecular oxygen is present adjacent to the site of oxidation on the substrate. Molecular oxygen is bound in a small hydrophobic pocket and the substrate provides the reducing power to activate oxygen for downstream chemical steps. Our results resolve the unique and complex chemistry of DpgC, a key enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway of an important class of antibiotics. Furthermore, mechanistic parallels exist between DpgC and cofactor-dependent flavoenzymes, providing information regarding the general mechanism of enzymatic oxygen activation.

  12. Recognition of enzymes lacking bound cofactor by protein quality control

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Limón, Adrián; Alriquet, Marion; Lang, Wei-Han; Calloni, Giulia; Wittig, Ilka; Vabulas, R. Martin

    2016-01-01

    Protein biogenesis is tightly linked to protein quality control (PQC). The role of PQC machinery in recognizing faulty polypeptides is becoming increasingly understood. Molecular chaperones and cytosolic and vacuolar degradation systems collaborate to detect, repair, or hydrolyze mutant, damaged, and mislocalized proteins. On the other hand, the contribution of PQC to cofactor binding-related enzyme maturation remains largely unexplored, although the loading of a cofactor represents an all-or-nothing transition in regard to the enzymatic function and thus must be surveyed carefully. Combining proteomics and biochemical analysis, we demonstrate here that cells are able to detect functionally immature wild-type enzymes. We show that PQC-dedicated ubiquitin ligase C-terminal Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP) recognizes and marks for degradation not only a mutant protein but also its wild-type variant as long as the latter remains cofactor free. A distinct structural feature, the protruding C-terminal tail, which appears in both the mutant and wild-type polypeptides, contributes to recognition by CHIP. Our data suggest that relative insufficiency of apoprotein degradation caused by cofactor shortage can increase amyloidogenesis and aggravate protein aggregation disorders. PMID:27733512

  13. Cofactor Trapping, a New Method To Produce Flavin Mononucleotide ▿

    PubMed Central

    Krauss, Ulrich; Svensson, Vera; Wirtz, Astrid; Knieps-Grünhagen, Esther; Jaeger, Karl-Erich

    2011-01-01

    We have purified flavin mononucleotide (FMN) from a flavoprotein-overexpressing Escherichia coli strain by cofactor trapping. This approach uses an overexpressed flavoprotein to trap FMN, which is thus removed from the cascade regulating FMN production in E. coli. This, in turn, allows the isolation of highly pure FMN. PMID:21131527

  14. Dendrite arborization requires the dynein cofactor NudE.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Ashley L; Yang, Sihui Z; Abellaneda, Allison M; Wildonger, Jill

    2015-06-01

    The microtubule-based molecular motor dynein is essential for proper neuronal morphogenesis. Dynein activity is regulated by cofactors, and the role(s) of these cofactors in shaping neuronal structure are still being elucidated. Using Drosophila melanogaster, we reveal that the loss of the dynein cofactor NudE results in abnormal dendrite arborization. Our data show that NudE associates with Golgi outposts, which mediate dendrite branching, suggesting that NudE normally influences dendrite patterning by regulating Golgi outpost transport. Neurons lacking NudE also have increased microtubule dynamics, reflecting a change in microtubule stability that is likely to also contribute to abnormal dendrite growth and branching. These defects in dendritogenesis are rescued by elevating levels of Lis1, another dynein cofactor that interacts with NudE as part of a tripartite complex. Our data further show that the NudE C-terminus is dispensable for dendrite morphogenesis and is likely to modulate NudE activity. We propose that a key function of NudE is to enhance an interaction between Lis1 and dynein that is crucial for motor activity and dendrite architecture.

  15. Covalent immobilization of a flavoprotein monooxygenase via its flavin cofactor.

    PubMed

    Krzek, Marzena; van Beek, Hugo L; Permentier, Hjalmar P; Bischoff, Rainer; Fraaije, Marco W

    2016-01-01

    A generic approach for flavoenzyme immobilization was developed in which the flavin cofactor is used for anchoring enzymes onto the carrier. It exploits the tight binding of flavin cofactors to their target apo proteins. The method was tested for phenylacetone monooxygenase (PAMO) which is a well-studied and industrially interesting biocatalyst. Also a fusion protein was tested: PAMO fused to phosphite dehydrogenase (PTDH-PAMO). The employed flavin cofactor derivative, N6-(6-carboxyhexyl)-FAD succinimidylester (FAD*), was covalently anchored to agarose beads and served for apo enzyme immobilization by their reconstitution into holo enzymes. The thus immobilized enzymes retained their activity and remained active after several rounds of catalysis. For both tested enzymes, the generated agarose beads contained 3 U per g of dry resin. Notably, FAD-immobilized PAMO was found to be more thermostable (40% activity after 1 h at 60 °C) when compared to PAMO in solution (no activity detected after 1 h at 60 °C). The FAD-decorated agarose material could be easily recycled allowing multiple rounds of immobilization. This method allows an efficient and selective immobilization of flavoproteins via the FAD flavin cofactor onto a recyclable carrier.

  16. The dual role of fission yeast Tbc1/cofactor C orchestrates microtubule homeostasis in tubulin folding and acts as a GAP for GTPase Alp41/Arl2.

    PubMed

    Mori, Risa; Toda, Takashi

    2013-06-01

    Supplying the appropriate amount of correctly folded α/β-tubulin heterodimers is critical for microtubule dynamics. Formation of assembly-competent heterodimers is remarkably elaborate at the molecular level, in which the α- and β-tubulins are separately processed in a chaperone-dependent manner. This sequential step is performed by the tubulin-folding cofactor pathway, comprising a specific set of regulatory proteins: cofactors A-E. We identified the fission yeast cofactor: the orthologue of cofactor C, Tbc1. In addition to its roles in tubulin folding, Tbc1 acts as a GAP in regulating Alp41/Arl2, a highly conserved small GTPase. Of interest, the expression of GDP- or GTP-bound Alp41 showed the identical microtubule loss phenotype, suggesting that continuous cycling between these forms is important for its functions. In addition, we found that Alp41 interacts with Alp1(D), the orthologue of cofactor D, specifically when in the GDP-bound form. Intriguingly, Alp1(D) colocalizes with microtubules when in excess, eventually leading to depolymerization, which is sequestered by co-overproducing GDP-bound Alp41. We present a model of the final stages of the tubulin cofactor pathway that includes a dual role for both Tbc1 and Alp1(D) in opposing regulation of the microtubule.

  17. Effect of organic matter on nitrogenase metal cofactors homeostasis in Azotobacter vinelandii under diazotrophic conditions.

    PubMed

    Noumsi, Christelle Jouogo; Pourhassan, Nina; Darnajoux, Romain; Deicke, Michael; Wichard, Thomas; Burrus, Vincent; Bellenger, Jean-Philippe

    2016-02-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation can be catalysed by three isozymes of nitrogenase: molybdenum (Mo)-nitrogenase, vanadium (V)-nitrogenase and iron-only (Fe)-nitrogenase. The activity of these isozymes strongly depends on their metal cofactors, molybdenum, vanadium and iron, and their bioavailability in ecosystems. Here, we show how metal bioavailability can be affected by the presence of tannic acid (organic matter), and the subsequent consequences on diazotrophic growth of the soil bacterium Azotobacter vinelandii. In the presence of tannic acids, A. vinelandii produces a higher amount of metallophores, which coincides with an active, regulated and concomitant acquisition of molybdenum and vanadium under cellular conditions that are usually considered not molybdenum limiting. The associated nitrogenase genes exhibit decreased nifD expression and increased vnfD expression. Thus, in limiting bioavailable metal conditions, A. vinelandii takes advantage of its nitrogenase diversity to ensure optimal diazotrophic growth.

  18. Nitric oxide synthase in cat brain: cofactors--enzyme-substrate interaction.

    PubMed

    Côté, J F; Roberge, A G

    1996-01-01

    Nitric oxide, derived from L-arginine by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase, is an activator of the soluble guanylate cyclase and a cellular messenger. This work demonstrates that, in cat brain, the neuronal constitutive nitric oxide synthase activity is a) NADPH/calcium dependent, b) independent upon exogenous calmodulin in crude brain supernatant, c) significantly enhanced by exogenous FAD and tetrahydrobiopterin (Vmax: 118 instead of 59.4 pmol of citrulline formed .mg of prot.-1 min-1, d) inhibited by calcium chelators and calmodulin antagonist, and e) present in several neuroanatomical structures. Moreover, the Km value for L-arginine was of 11 microM instead of 41 microM in the presence of FAD and tetrahydrobiopterin in the incubation mixture, thus demonstrating that these cofactors are able to stabilize the enzyme-substrate interactions.

  19. Cofactor Strap regulates oxidative phosphorylation and mitochondrial p53 activity through ATP synthase

    PubMed Central

    Maniam, S; Coutts, A S; Stratford, M R; McGouran, J; Kessler, B; La Thangue, N B

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic reprogramming is a hallmark of cancer cells. Strap (stress-responsive activator of p300) is a novel TPR motif OB-fold protein that contributes to p53 transcriptional activation. We show here that, in addition to its established transcriptional role, Strap is localised at mitochondria where one of its key interaction partners is ATP synthase. Significantly, the interaction between Strap and ATP synthase downregulates mitochondrial ATP production. Under glucose-limiting conditions, cancer cells are sensitised by mitochondrial Strap to apoptosis, which is rescued by supplementing cells with an extracellular source of ATP. Furthermore, Strap augments the apoptotic effects of mitochondrial p53. These findings define Strap as a dual regulator of cellular reprogramming: first as a nuclear transcription cofactor and second in the direct regulation of mitochondrial respiration. PMID:25168243

  20. Review of quantitative phase-digital holographic microscopy: promising novel imaging technique to resolve neuronal network activity and identify cellular biomarkers of psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Marquet, Pierre; Depeursinge, Christian; Magistretti, Pierre J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Quantitative phase microscopy (QPM) has recently emerged as a new powerful quantitative imaging technique well suited to noninvasively explore a transparent specimen with a nanometric axial sensitivity. In this review, we expose the recent developments of quantitative phase-digital holographic microscopy (QP-DHM). Quantitative phase-digital holographic microscopy (QP-DHM) represents an important and efficient quantitative phase method to explore cell structure and dynamics. In a second part, the most relevant QPM applications in the field of cell biology are summarized. A particular emphasis is placed on the original biological information, which can be derived from the quantitative phase signal. In a third part, recent applications obtained, with QP-DHM in the field of cellular neuroscience, namely the possibility to optically resolve neuronal network activity and spine dynamics, are presented. Furthermore, potential applications of QPM related to psychiatry through the identification of new and original cell biomarkers that, when combined with a range of other biomarkers, could significantly contribute to the determination of high risk developmental trajectories for psychiatric disorders, are discussed. PMID:26157976

  1. An Ancient Fingerprint Indicates the Common Ancestry of Rossmann-Fold Enzymes Utilizing Different Ribose-Based Cofactors.

    PubMed

    Laurino, Paola; Tóth-Petróczy, Ágnes; Meana-Pañeda, Rubén; Lin, Wei; Truhlar, Donald G; Tawfik, Dan S

    2016-03-01

    Nucleoside-based cofactors are presumed to have preceded proteins. The Rossmann fold is one of the most ancient and functionally diverse protein folds, and most Rossmann enzymes utilize nucleoside-based cofactors. We analyzed an omnipresent Rossmann ribose-binding interaction: a carboxylate side chain at the tip of the second β-strand (β2-Asp/Glu). We identified a canonical motif, defined by the β2-topology and unique geometry. The latter relates to the interaction being bidentate (both ribose hydroxyls interacting with the carboxylate oxygens), to the angle between the carboxylate and the ribose, and to the ribose's ring configuration. We found that this canonical motif exhibits hallmarks of divergence rather than convergence. It is uniquely found in Rossmann enzymes that use different cofactors, primarily SAM (S-adenosyl methionine), NAD (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide), and FAD (flavin adenine dinucleotide). Ribose-carboxylate bidentate interactions in other folds are not only rare but also have a different topology and geometry. We further show that the canonical geometry is not dictated by a physical constraint--geometries found in noncanonical interactions have similar calculated bond energies. Overall, these data indicate the divergence of several major Rossmann-fold enzyme classes, with different cofactors and catalytic chemistries, from a common pre-LUCA (last universal common ancestor) ancestor that possessed the β2-Asp/Glu motif.

  2. An Ancient Fingerprint Indicates the Common Ancestry of Rossmann-Fold Enzymes Utilizing Different Ribose-Based Cofactors

    PubMed Central

    Laurino, Paola; Tóth-Petróczy, Ágnes; Meana-Pañeda, Rubén; Lin, Wei; Truhlar, Donald G.; Tawfik, Dan S.

    2016-01-01

    Nucleoside-based cofactors are presumed to have preceded proteins. The Rossmann fold is one of the most ancient and functionally diverse protein folds, and most Rossmann enzymes utilize nucleoside-based cofactors. We analyzed an omnipresent Rossmann ribose-binding interaction: a carboxylate side chain at the tip of the second β-strand (β2-Asp/Glu). We identified a canonical motif, defined by the β2-topology and unique geometry. The latter relates to the interaction being bidentate (both ribose hydroxyls interacting with the carboxylate oxygens), to the angle between the carboxylate and the ribose, and to the ribose’s ring configuration. We found that this canonical motif exhibits hallmarks of divergence rather than convergence. It is uniquely found in Rossmann enzymes that use different cofactors, primarily SAM (S-adenosyl methionine), NAD (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide), and FAD (flavin adenine dinucleotide). Ribose-carboxylate bidentate interactions in other folds are not only rare but also have a different topology and geometry. We further show that the canonical geometry is not dictated by a physical constraint—geometries found in noncanonical interactions have similar calculated bond energies. Overall, these data indicate the divergence of several major Rossmann-fold enzyme classes, with different cofactors and catalytic chemistries, from a common pre-LUCA (last universal common ancestor) ancestor that possessed the β2-Asp/Glu motif. PMID:26938925

  3. The structural and functional basis of the p97/valosin-containing protein (VCP)-interacting motif (VIM): mutually exclusive binding of cofactors to the N-terminal domain of p97.

    PubMed

    Hänzelmann, Petra; Schindelin, Hermann

    2011-11-01

    The AAA (ATPase associated with various cellular activities) ATPase p97, also referred to as valosin-containing protein (VCP), mediates essential cellular processes, including ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation, and has been linked to several human proteinopathies. p97 interacts with multiple cofactors via its N-terminal (p97N) domain, a subset of which contain the VCP-interacting motif (VIM). We have determined the crystal structure of the p97N domain in complex with the VIM of the ubiquitin E3 ligase gp78 at 1.8 Å resolution. The α-helical VIM peptide binds into a groove located in between the two subdomains of the p97N domain. Interaction studies of several VIM proteins reveal that these cofactors display dramatically different affinities, ranging from high affinity interactions characterized by dissociation constants of ∼20 nm for gp78 and ANKZF1 to only weak binding in our assays. The contribution of individual p97 residues to VIM binding was analyzed, revealing that identical substitutions do not affect all cofactors in the same way. Taken together, the biochemical and structural studies define the framework for recognition of VIM-containing cofactors by p97. Of particular interest to the regulation of p97 by its cofactors, our structure reveals that the bound α-helical peptides of VIM-containing cofactors overlap with the binding site for cofactors containing the ubiquitin regulatory X (UBX) domain present in the UBX protein family or the ubiquitin-like domain of NPL4 as further corroborated by biochemical data. These results extend the concept that competitive binding is a crucial determinant in p97-cofactor interactions.

  4. Modeling the Potential Spread of the Recently Identified Non-Native Panther Grouper (Chromileptes altivelis) in the Atlantic Using a Cellular Automaton Approach

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Matthew W.; Purkis, Sam J.

    2013-01-01

    The Indo-pacific panther grouper (Chromileptes altiveli) is a predatory fish species and popular imported aquarium fish in the United States which has been recently documented residing in western Atlantic waters. To date, the most successful marine invasive species in the Atlantic is the lionfish (Pterois volitans/miles), which, as for the panther grouper, is assumed to have been introduced to the wild through aquarium releases. However, unlike lionfish, the panther grouper is not yet thought to have an established breeding population in the Atlantic. Using a proven modeling technique developed to track the lionfish invasion, presented is the first known estimation of the potential spread of panther grouper in the Atlantic. The employed cellular automaton-based computer model examines the life history of the subject species including fecundity, mortality, and reproductive potential and combines this with habitat preferences and physical oceanic parameters to forecast the distribution and periodicity of spread of this potential new invasive species. Simulations were examined for origination points within one degree of capture locations of panther grouper from the United States Geological Survey Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Database to eliminate introduction location bias, and two detailed case studies were scrutinized. The model indicates three primary locations where settlement is likely given the inputs and limits of the model; Jupiter Florida/Vero Beach, the Cape Hatteras Tropical Limit/Myrtle Beach South Carolina, and Florida Keys/Ten Thousand Islands locations. Of these locations, Jupiter Florida/Vero Beach has the highest settlement rate in the model and is indicated as the area in which the panther grouper is most likely to become established. This insight is valuable if attempts are to be made to halt this potential marine invasive species. PMID:24009726

  5. BAF53 Forms Distinct Nuclear Complexes and Functions as a Critical c-Myc-Interacting Nuclear Cofactor for Oncogenic Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeonghyeon; Wood, Marcelo A.; Cole, Michael D.

    2002-01-01

    The c-Myc oncoprotein functions as a transcription factor that can transform normal cells into tumor cells, as well as playing a direct role in normal cell proliferation. The c-Myc protein transactivates cellular promoters by recruiting nuclear cofactors to chromosomal sites through an N-terminal transactivation domain. We have previously reported the identification and functional characterization of four different c-Myc cofactors: TRRAP, hGCN5, TIP49, and TIP48. Here we present the identification and characterization of the actin-related protein BAF53 as a c-Myc-interacting nuclear cofactor that forms distinct nuclear complexes. In addition to the human SWI/SNF-related BAF complex, BAF53 forms a complex with TIP49 and TIP48 and a separate biochemically distinct complex containing TRRAP and a histone acetyltransferase which does not contain TIP60. Using deletion mutants of BAF53, we show that BAF53 is critical for c-Myc oncogenic activity. Our results indicate that BAF53 plays a functional role in c-Myc-interacting nuclear complexes. PMID:11839798

  6. Cellular Aspects of Prion Replication In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Grassmann, Andrea; Wolf, Hanna; Hofmann, Julia; Graham, James; Vorberg, Ina

    2013-01-01

    Prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are fatal neurodegenerative disorders in mammals that are caused by unconventional agents predominantly composed of aggregated misfolded prion protein (PrP). Prions self-propagate by recruitment of host-encoded PrP into highly ordered β-sheet rich aggregates. Prion strains differ in their clinical, pathological and biochemical characteristics and are likely to be the consequence of distinct abnormal prion protein conformers that stably replicate their alternate states in the host cell. Understanding prion cell biology is fundamental for identifying potential drug targets for disease intervention. The development of permissive cell culture models has greatly enhanced our knowledge on entry, propagation and dissemination of TSE agents. However, despite extensive research, the precise mechanism of prion infection and potential strain effects remain enigmatic. This review summarizes our current knowledge of the cell biology and propagation of prions derived from cell culture experiments. We discuss recent findings on the trafficking of cellular and pathologic PrP, the potential sites of abnormal prion protein synthesis and potential co-factors involved in prion entry and propagation. PMID:23340381

  7. Molecular modeling, dynamics, and an insight into the structural inhibition of cofactor independent phosphoglycerate mutase isoform 1 from Wuchereria bancrofti using cheminformatics and mutational studies.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Om Prakash; Vadlamudi, Yellamandayya; Liao, Qinghua; Strodel, Birgit; Suresh Kumar, Muthuvel

    2013-01-01

    Phosphoglycerate mutase catalyzes the interconversion between 2-phosphoglycerate and 3-phosphoglycerate in the glycolytic and gluconeogenic pathways. They exist in two unrelated forms, that is either cofactor (2,3-diphosphoglycerate) dependent or cofactor-independent. These two enzymes have no similarity in amino acid sequence, tertiary structure, and in catalytic mechanism. Wuchereria bancrofti (WB) contains the cofactor-independent form, whereas other organisms can possess the dependent form or both. Since, independent phosphoglycerate mutase (iPGM) is an essential gene for the survival of nematodes, and it has no sequence or structural similarity to the cofactor-dependent phosphoglycerate mutase found in mammals, it represents an attractive drug target for the filarial nematodes. In this current study, a putative cofactor-iPGM gene was identified in the protein sequence of the WB. In the absence of crystal structure, a three-dimensional structure was determined using the homology modeling approximation, and the most stable protein conformation was identified through the molecular dynamics simulation studies, using GROMACS 4.5. Further, the functional or characteristic residues were identified through the sequence analysis, potential inhibitors were short-listed and validated, and potential inhibitors were ranked using the cheminformatics and molecular dynamics simulations studies, Prime MM-GBSA approach, respectively.

  8. iCDI-PseFpt: identify the channel-drug interaction in cellular networking with PseAAC and molecular fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xuan; Min, Jian-Liang; Wang, Pu; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2013-11-21

    Many crucial functions in life, such as heartbeat, sensory transduction and central nervous system response, are controlled by cell signalings via various ion channels. Therefore, ion channels have become an excellent drug target, and study of ion channel-drug interaction networks is an important topic for drug development. However, it is both time-consuming and costly to determine whether a drug and a protein ion channel are interacting with each other in a cellular network by means of experimental techniques. Although some computational methods were developed in this regard based on the knowledge of the 3D (three-dimensional) structure of protein, unfortunately their usage is quite limited because the 3D structures for most protein ion channels are still unknown. With the avalanche of protein sequences generated in the post-genomic age, it is highly desirable to develop the sequence-based computational method to address this problem. To take up the challenge, we developed a new predictor called iCDI-PseFpt, in which the protein ion-channel sample is formulated by the PseAAC (pseudo amino acid composition) generated with the gray model theory, the drug compound by the 2D molecular fingerprint, and the operation engine is the fuzzy K-nearest neighbor algorithm. The overall success rate achieved by iCDI-PseFpt via the jackknife cross-validation was 87.27%, which is remarkably higher than that by any of the existing predictors in this area. As a user-friendly web-server, iCDI-PseFpt is freely accessible to the public at the website http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iCDI-PseFpt/. Furthermore, for the convenience of most experimental scientists, a step-by-step guide is provided on how to use the web-server to get the desired results without the need to follow the complicated math equations presented in the paper just for its integrity. It has not escaped our notice that the current approach can also be used to study other drug-target interaction networks.

  9. Identification of 526 Conserved Metazoan Genetic Innovations Exposes a New Role for Cofactor E-like in Neuronal Microtubule Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Whiteside, Matthew D.; Cueva, Juan G.; Tu, Domena K.; Kang, S. Y. Catherine; Singh, Hansmeet; Baillie, David L.; Hutter, Harald; Goodman, Miriam B.; Brinkman, Fiona S. L.; Leroux, Michel R.

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of metazoans from their choanoflagellate-like unicellular ancestor coincided with the acquisition of novel biological functions to support a multicellular lifestyle, and eventually, the unique cellular and physiological demands of differentiated cell types such as those forming the nervous, muscle and immune systems. In an effort to understand the molecular underpinnings of such metazoan innovations, we carried out a comparative genomics analysis for genes found exclusively in, and widely conserved across, metazoans. Using this approach, we identified a set of 526 core metazoan-specific genes (the ‘metazoanome’), approximately 10% of which are largely uncharacterized, 16% of which are associated with known human disease, and 66% of which are conserved in Trichoplax adhaerens, a basal metazoan lacking neurons and other specialized cell types. Global analyses of previously-characterized core metazoan genes suggest a prevalent property, namely that they act as partially redundant modifiers of ancient eukaryotic pathways. Our data also highlights the importance of exaptation of pre-existing genetic tools during metazoan evolution. Expression studies in C. elegans revealed that many metazoan-specific genes, including tubulin folding cofactor E-like (TBCEL/coel-1), are expressed in neurons. We used C. elegans COEL-1 as a representative to experimentally validate the metazoan-specific character of our dataset. We show that coel-1 disruption results in developmental hypersensitivity to the microtubule drug paclitaxel/taxol, and that overexpression of coel-1 has broad effects during embryonic development and perturbs specialized microtubules in the touch receptor neurons (TRNs). In addition, coel-1 influences the migration, neurite outgrowth and mechanosensory function of the TRNs, and functionally interacts with components of the tubulin acetylation/deacetylation pathway. Together, our findings unveil a conserved molecular toolbox fundamental to metazoan

  10. Involvement of the Cys-Tyr cofactor on iron binding in the active site of human cysteine dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Arjune, Sita; Schwarz, Guenter; Belaidi, Abdel A

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur metabolism has gained increasing medical interest over the last years. In particular, cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) has been recognized as a potential marker in oncology due to its altered gene expression in various cancer types. Human CDO is a non-heme iron-dependent enzyme, which catalyzes the irreversible oxidation of cysteine to cysteine sulfinic acid, which is further metabolized to taurine or pyruvate and sulfate. Several studies have reported a unique post-translational modification of human CDO consisting of a cross-link between cysteine 93 and tyrosine 157 (Cys-Tyr), which increases catalytic efficiency in a substrate-dependent manner. However, the reaction mechanism by which the Cys-Tyr cofactor increases catalytic efficiency remains unclear. In this study, steady-state kinetics were determined for wild type CDO and two different variants being either impaired or saturated with the Cys-Tyr cofactor. Cofactor formation in CDO resulted in an approximately fivefold increase in k cat and tenfold increase in k cat/K m over the cofactor-free CDO variant. Furthermore, iron titration experiments revealed an 18-fold decrease in K d of iron upon cross-link formation. This finding suggests a structural role of the Cys-Tyr cofactor in coordinating the ferrous iron in the active site of CDO in accordance with the previously postulated reaction mechanism of human CDO. Finally, we identified product-based inhibition and α-ketoglutarate and glutarate as CDO inhibitors using a simplified well plate-based activity assay. This assay can be used for high-throughput identification of additional inhibitors, which may contribute to understand the functional importance of CDO in sulfur amino acid metabolism and related diseases.

  11. Computation of cofactors of /sI-A/ with applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, J. R.; Nail, J. B.; Mcdaniel, W. L., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    An alternate approach for computing the determinant and the cofactors of the (sI-A) matrices is presented along with a numerical code for implementing this method with the aid of transforming a matrix to phase variable canonical form. Danilevskii's method was routinely used in this capacity for systems up to 26th order and it appears that this technique is also applicable to much higher order systems.

  12. MYC cofactors: molecular switches controlling diverse biological outcomes.

    PubMed

    Hann, Stephen R

    2014-06-17

    The transcription factor MYC has fundamental roles in proliferation, apoptosis, tumorigenesis, and stem cell pluripotency. Over the last 30 years extensive information has been gathered on the numerous cofactors that interact with MYC and the target genes that are regulated by MYC as a means of understanding the molecular mechanisms controlling its diverse roles. Despite significant advances and perhaps because the amount of information learned about MYC is overwhelming, there has been little consensus on the molecular functions of MYC that mediate its critical biological roles. In this perspective, the major MYC cofactors that regulate the various transcriptional activities of MYC, including canonical and noncanonical transactivation and transcriptional repression, will be reviewed and a model of how these transcriptional mechanisms control MYC-mediated proliferation, apoptosis, and tumorigenesis will be presented. The basis of the model is that a variety of cofactors form dynamic MYC transcriptional complexes that can switch the molecular and biological functions of MYC to yield a diverse range of outcomes in a cell-type- and context-dependent fashion.

  13. Magnetostructural dynamics of Rieske versus ferredoxin iron-sulfur cofactors.

    PubMed

    Ali, Md Ehesan; Staemmler, Volker; Marx, Dominik

    2015-03-01

    The local chemical environment of the [2Fe-2S] cofactor hosted by ferredoxin and Rieske-type proteins is fundamentally different due to the presence of distinct ligands at the two iron centers in the case of Rieske proteins, whereas they are identical in ferredoxins. This renders Rieske [2Fe-2S] cores chemically asymmetric and results in more complex vibrational spectra as compared to ferredoxin. Likewise, one would expect other properties, for instance the dynamics of the magnetic exchange coupling constant J, to be also more complex. Applying ab initio molecular dynamics using our recently introduced spin-constrained two-determinant extended broken symmetry (CEBS) approach to Rieske and ferredoxin model complexes at 300 K, we extract the molecular fluctuations and the resulting magnetostructural cross-correlations involving the antiferromagnetic exchange interaction J(t). This analysis demonstrates that the details of the magnetostructural dynamics are indeed distinctly different for Rieske and ferredoxin cofactors, while the time averages of 〈J〉 are shown to be essentially identical. In particular, the frequency window between about 200 and 350 cm(-1), is a "fingerprint region" that allows one to distinguish chemically asymmetric from symmetric cofactors and thus Rieske proteins from ferredoxins.

  14. Constraints on texture zero and cofactor zero models for neutrino mass

    SciTech Connect

    Whisnant, K.; Liao, Jiajun; Marfatia, D.

    2014-06-24

    Imposing a texture or cofactor zero on the neutrino mass matrix reduces the number of independent parameters from nine to seven. Since five parameters have been measured, only two independent parameters would remain in such models. We find the allowed regions for single texture zero and single cofactor zero models. We also find strong similarities between single texture zero models with one mass hierarchy and single cofactor zero models with the opposite mass hierarchy. We show that this correspondence can be generalized to texture-zero and cofactor-zero models with the same homogeneous costraints on the elements and cofactors.

  15. Constraints on texture zero and cofactor zero models for neutrino mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whisnant, K.; Liao, Jiajun; Marfatia, D.

    2014-06-01

    Imposing a texture or cofactor zero on the neutrino mass matrix reduces the number of independent parameters from nine to seven. Since five parameters have been measured, only two independent parameters would remain in such models. We find the allowed regions for single texture zero and single cofactor zero models. We also find strong similarities between single texture zero models with one mass hierarchy and single cofactor zero models with the opposite mass hierarchy. We show that this correspondence can be generalized to texture-zero and cofactor-zero models with the same homogeneous costraints on the elements and cofactors.

  16. Cofactor binding triggers a molecular switch to allosterically activate human UDP-α-D-glucose 6-dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Sennett, Nicholas C; Kadirvelraj, Renuka; Wood, Zachary A

    2012-11-20

    Human UDP-α-D-glucose dehydrogenase (hUGDH) catalyzes the NAD(+)-dependent oxidation of UDP-α-D-glucose (UDG) to produce UDP-α-D-glucuronic acid. The oligomeric structure of hUGDH is dynamic and can form two distinct hexameric complexes in solution. The active form of hUGDH consists of dimers that undergo a concentration-dependent association to form a hexamer with 32 symmetry. In the presence of the allosteric feedback inhibitor UDP-α-D-xylose (UDX), hUGDH changes shape to form an inactive, horseshoe-shaped complex. Previous studies have identified the UDX-induced allosteric mechanism that changes the hexameric structure to inhibit the enzyme. Here, we investigate the role of the 32 symmetry hexamer in the catalytic cycle. We engineered a stable hUGDH dimer by introducing a charge-switch substitution (K94E) in the hexamer-building interface (hUGDH(K94E)). The k(cat) of hUGDH(K94E) is ~160-fold lower than that of the wild-type enzyme, suggesting that the hexamer is the catalytically relevant state. We also show that cofactor binding triggers the formation of the 32 symmetry hexamer, but UDG is needed for the stability of the complex. The hUGDH(K94E) crystal structure at 2.08 Å resolution identifies loop(88-110) as the cofactor-responsive allosteric switch that drives hexamer formation; loop(88-110) directly links cofactor binding to the stability of the hexamer-building interface. In the interface, loop(88-110) packs against the Thr131-loop/α6 helix, the allosteric switch that responds to the feedback inhibitor UDX. We also identify a structural element (the S-loop) that explains the indirect stabilization of the hexamer by substrate and supports a sequential, ordered binding of the substrate and cofactor. These observations support a model in which (i) UDG binds to the dimer and stabilizes the S-loop to promote cofactor binding and (ii) cofactor binding orders loop(88-110) to induce formation of the catalytically active hexamer.

  17. In Vitro Bioconversion of Pyruvate to n-Butanol with Minimized Cofactor Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Reiße, Steven; Haack, Martina; Garbe, Daniel; Sommer, Bettina; Steffler, Fabian; Carsten, Jörg; Bohnen, Frank; Sieber, Volker; Brück, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Due to enhanced energy content and reduced hygroscopicity compared with ethanol, n-butanol is flagged as the next generation biofuel and platform chemical. In addition to conventional cellular systems, n-butanol bioproduction by enzyme cascades is gaining momentum due to simplified process control. In contrast to other bio-based alcohols like ethanol and isobutanol, cell-free n-butanol biosynthesis from the central metabolic intermediate pyruvate involves cofactors [NAD(P)H, CoA] and acetyl-CoA-dependent intermediates, which complicates redox and energy balancing of the reaction system. We have devised a biochemical process for cell-free n-butanol production that only involves three enzyme activities, thereby eliminating the need for acetyl-CoA. Instead, the process utilizes only NADH as the sole redox mediator. Central to this new process is the amino acid catalyzed enamine–aldol condensation, which transforms acetaldehyde directly into crotonaldehyde. Subsequently, crotonaldehyde is reduced to n-butanol applying a 2-enoate reductase and an alcohol dehydrogenase, respectively. In essence, we achieved conversion of the platform intermediate pyruvate to n-butanol utilizing a biocatalytic cascade comprising only three enzyme activities and NADH as reducing equivalent. With reference to previously reported cell-free n-butanol reaction cascades, we have eliminated five enzyme activities and the requirement of CoA as cofactor. Our proof-of-concept demonstrates that n-butanol was synthesized at neutral pH and 50°C. This integrated reaction concept allowed GC detection of all reaction intermediates and n-butanol production of 148 mg L−1 (2 mM), which compares well with other cell-free n-butanol production processes. PMID:27800475

  18. Crystal Structures of Cyclohexanone Monooxygenase Reveal Complex Domain Movements and a Sliding Cofactor

    SciTech Connect

    Mirza, I.; Yachnin, B; Wang, S; Grosse, S; Bergeron, H; Imura, A; Iwaki, H; Hasegawa, Y; Lau, P; Berghuis, A

    2009-01-01

    Cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) is a flavoprotein that carries out the archetypical Baeyer-Villiger oxidation of a variety of cyclic ketones into lactones. Using NADPH and O{sub 2} as cosubstrates, the enzyme inserts one atom of oxygen into the substrate in a complex catalytic mechanism that involves the formation of a flavin-peroxide and Criegee intermediate. We present here the atomic structures of CHMO from an environmental Rhodococcus strain bound with FAD and NADP+ in two distinct states, to resolutions of 2.3 and 2.2 {angstrom}. The two conformations reveal domain shifts around multiple linkers and loop movements, involving conserved arginine 329 and tryptophan 492, which effect a translation of the nicotinamide resulting in a sliding cofactor. Consequently, the cofactor is ideally situated and subsequently repositioned during the catalytic cycle to first reduce the flavin and later stabilize formation of the Criegee intermediate. Concurrent movements of a loop adjacent to the active site demonstrate how this protein can effect large changes in the size and shape of the substrate binding pocket to accommodate a diverse range of substrates. Finally, the previously identified BVMO signature sequence is highlighted for its role in coordinating domain movements. Taken together, these structures provide mechanistic insights into CHMO-catalyzed Baeyer-Villiger oxidation.

  19. Design of dinuclear manganese cofactors for bacterial reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Olson, Tien L; Espiritu, Eduardo; Edwardraja, Selvakumar; Simmons, Chad R; Williams, JoAnn C; Ghirlanda, Giovanna; Allen, James P

    2016-05-01

    A compelling target for the design of electron transfer proteins with novel cofactors is to create a model for the oxygen-evolving complex, a Mn4Ca cluster, of photosystem II. A mononuclear Mn cofactor can be added to the bacterial reaction center, but the addition of multiple metal centers is constrained by the native protein architecture. Alternatively, metal centers can be incorporated into artificial proteins. Designs for the addition of dinuclear metal centers to four-helix bundles resulted in three artificial proteins with ligands for one, two, or three dinuclear metal centers able to bind Mn. The three-dimensional structure determined by X-ray crystallography of one of the Mn-proteins confirmed the design features and revealed details concerning coordination of the Mn center. Electron transfer between these artificial Mn-proteins and bacterial reaction centers was investigated using optical spectroscopy. After formation of a light-induced, charge-separated state, the experiments showed that the Mn-proteins can donate an electron to the oxidized bacteriochlorophyll dimer of modified reaction centers, with the Mn-proteins having additional metal centers being more effective at this electron transfer reaction. Modeling of the structure of the Mn-protein docked to the reaction center showed that the artificial protein likely binds on the periplasmic surface similarly to cytochrome c2, the natural secondary donor. Combining reaction centers with exogenous artificial proteins provides the opportunity to create ligands and investigate the influence of inhomogeneous protein environments on multinuclear redox-active metal centers. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson.

  20. Daily magnesium fluxes regulate cellular timekeeping and energy balance.

    PubMed

    Feeney, Kevin A; Hansen, Louise L; Putker, Marrit; Olivares-Yañez, Consuelo; Day, Jason; Eades, Lorna J; Larrondo, Luis F; Hoyle, Nathaniel P; O'Neill, John S; van Ooijen, Gerben

    2016-04-21

    Circadian clocks are fundamental to the biology of most eukaryotes, coordinating behaviour and physiology to resonate with the environmental cycle of day and night through complex networks of clock-controlled genes. A fundamental knowledge gap exists, however, between circadian gene expression cycles and the biochemical mechanisms that ultimately facilitate circadian regulation of cell biology. Here we report circadian rhythms in the intracellular concentration of magnesium ions, [Mg(2+)]i, which act as a cell-autonomous timekeeping component to determine key clock properties both in a human cell line and in a unicellular alga that diverged from each other more than 1 billion years ago. Given the essential role of Mg(2+) as a cofactor for ATP, a functional consequence of [Mg(2+)]i oscillations is dynamic regulation of cellular energy expenditure over the daily cycle. Mechanistically, we find that these rhythms provide bilateral feedback linking rhythmic metabolism to clock-controlled gene expression. The global regulation of nucleotide triphosphate turnover by intracellular Mg(2+) availability has potential to impact upon many of the cell's more than 600 MgATP-dependent enzymes and every cellular system where MgNTP hydrolysis becomes rate limiting. Indeed, we find that circadian control of translation by mTOR is regulated through [Mg(2+)]i oscillations. It will now be important to identify which additional biological processes are subject to this form of regulation in tissues of multicellular organisms such as plants and humans, in the context of health and disease.

  1. Daily magnesium fluxes regulate cellular timekeeping and energy balance.

    PubMed

    Feeney, Kevin A; Hansen, Louise L; Putker, Marrit; Olivares-Yañez, Consuelo; Day, Jason; Eades, Lorna J; Larrondo, Luis F; Hoyle, Nathaniel P; O'Neill, John S; van Ooijen, Gerben

    2016-04-21

    Circadian clocks are fundamental to the biology of most eukaryotes, coordinating behaviour and physiology to resonate with the environmental cycle of day and night through complex networks of clock-controlled genes. A fundamental knowledge gap exists, however, between circadian gene expression cycles and the biochemical mechanisms that ultimately facilitate circadian regulation of cell biology. Here we report circadian rhythms in the intracellular concentration of magnesium ions, [Mg(2+)]i, which act as a cell-autonomous timekeeping component to determine key clock properties both in a human cell line and in a unicellular alga that diverged from each other more than 1 billion years ago. Given the essential role of Mg(2+) as a cofactor for ATP, a functional consequence of [Mg(2+)]i oscillations is dynamic regulation of cellular energy expenditure over the daily cycle. Mechanistically, we find that these rhythms provide bilateral feedback linking rhythmic metabolism to clock-controlled gene expression. The global regulation of nucleotide triphosphate turnover by intracellular Mg(2+) availability has potential to impact upon many of the cell's more than 600 MgATP-dependent enzymes and every cellular system where MgNTP hydrolysis becomes rate limiting. Indeed, we find that circadian control of translation by mTOR is regulated through [Mg(2+)]i oscillations. It will now be important to identify which additional biological processes are subject to this form of regulation in tissues of multicellular organisms such as plants and humans, in the context of health and disease. PMID:27074515

  2. mTOR Regulates Cellular Iron Homeostasis through Tristetraprolin

    PubMed Central

    Bayeva, Marina; Khechaduri, Arineh; Puig, Sergi; Chang, Hsiang-Chun; Patial, Sonika; Blackshear, Perry J.; Ardehali, Hossein

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Iron is an essential cofactor with unique redox properties. Iron regulatory proteins 1 and 2 (IRP1/2) have been established as important regulators of cellular iron homeostasis, but little is known about the role of other pathways in this process. Here we report that the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) regulates iron homeostasis by modulating transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) stability and altering cellular iron flux. Mechanistic studies identify tristetraprolin (TTP), a protein involved in anti-inflammatory response, as the downstream target of mTOR that binds to and enhances degradation of TfR1 mRNA. We also show that TTP is strongly induced by iron chelation, promotes downregulation of iron-requiring genes in both mammalian and yeast cells, and modulates survival in low-iron states. Taken together, our data uncover a link between metabolic, inflammatory, and iron regulatory pathways, and point towards the existence of a yeast-like TTP-mediated iron conservation program in mammals. PMID:23102618

  3. Effect of Aptamer Binding on the Electron-Transfer Properties of Redox Cofactors.

    PubMed

    Emahi, Ismaila; Gruenke, Paige R; Baum, Dana A

    2015-12-01

    In vitro selection or SELEX has allowed for the identification of functional nucleic acids (FNAs) that can potentially mimic and replace protein enzymes. These FNAs likely interact with cofactors, just like enzymes bind cofactors in their active sites. Investigating how FNA binding affects cofactor properties is important for understanding how an active site is formed and for developing useful enzyme mimics. Oxidoreductase enzymes contain cofactors in their active sites that allow the enzymes to do redox chemistry. In certain applications, these redox cofactors act as electron-transfer shuttles that transport electrons between the enzymes' active sites and electrode surfaces. Three redox cofactors commonly found in oxidoreductases are flavin adenine dinucleotide, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)), and pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ). We are interested in investigating how DNA aptamers that bind these cofactors influence the cofactors' redox abilities and if these aptamer-cofactor complexes could serve as redox catalysts. We employed cyclic voltammetry and amperometry to study the electrochemical properties of NAD(+) and PQQ when bound to DNA aptamers. Our results suggest that the aptamers provide a stable environment for the cofactor to participate in redox reactions, although enhanced redox activity was not observed. This work provides a foundation for the development of new FNAs capable of redox activity.

  4. DNA polymorphism-diet-cofactor-development hypothesis and the gene-teratogen model for schizophrenia and other developmental disorders.

    PubMed

    Johnson, W G

    1999-08-20

    Three problems in identifying genes causing schizophrenia and other developmental disorders may be locus heterogeneity, high disease allele frequency, and unknown mode of inheritance. The DNA polymorphism-diet-cofactor-development (DDCD) hypothesis addresses the first two. The gene-teratogen model addresses the third. The DDCD hypothesis is that schizophrenia results in part from brain abnormality in utero from the aggregate effect of multiple mutations of small effect of genes related to important cofactors (e.g., folate, cobalamin, or pyridoxine) potentiated by maternal dietary deficiency of these cofactors and by pregnancy. The effect results from insufficiency of the cofactors and from resulting effects such as impaired DNA synthesis, immune deficiency, effects on niacin and serotonin metabolism, and teratogens, e.g., hyperhomocysteinemia. The hypothesis addresses all of the unusual features of schizophrenia: e.g., decreased brain gray matter, birth-month effect, geographical differences, socioeconomic predilection, association with obstetrical abnormalities, decreased incidence of rheumatoid arthritis, and association with famine and viral epidemics. In the gene-teratogen model, a teratogenic effect in utero produces a developmental disorder through a teratogenic locus and a modifying or specificity locus, as well as through environmental factors. An example is the major intrauterine effect seen in offspring of phenylketonuric mothers. Thus, the mode of inheritance of genes acting prenatally may in some cases be fundamentally different from that of genes acting postnatally. The model is interesting because it is simple and because teratogenic loci will be difficult to locate by conventional linkage mapping techniques due to misspecification of the affection status of both mother and affected children. A new study design is suggested for identifying teratogenic loci. PMID:10402496

  5. Mechanism by which metal cofactors control substrate specificity in pyrophosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Zyryanov, Anton B; Shestakov, Alexander S; Lahti, Reijo; Baykov, Alexander A

    2002-01-01

    Family I soluble pyrophosphatases (PPases) exhibit appreciable ATPase activity in the presence of a number of transition metal ions, but not the physiological cofactor Mg(2+). The results of the present study reveal a strong correlation between the catalytic efficiency of three family I PPases (from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Escherichia coli and rat liver) and one family II PPase (from Streptococcus mutans ) in ATP and tripolyphosphate (P(3)) hydrolysis in the presence of Mg(2+), Mn(2+), Zn(2+) and Co(2+) on the one hand, and the phosphate-binding affinity of the enzyme subsite P2 that interacts with the electrophilic terminal phosphate group of ATP on the other. A similar correlation was observed in S. cerevisiae PPase variants with modified P1 and P2 subsites. The effect of the above metal ion cofactors on ATP binding to S. cerevisiae PPase paralleled their effect on phosphate binding, resulting in a low affinity of Mg-PPase to ATP. We conclude that PPase mainly binds ATP and P(3) through the terminal phosphate group that is attacked by water. Moreover, this interaction is critical in creating a reactive geometry at the P2 site with these bulky substrates, which do not otherwise fit the active site perfectly. We propose further that ATP is not hydrolysed by Mg-PPase, since its interaction with the terminal phosphate is not adequately strong for proper positioning of the nucleophile-electrophile pair. PMID:12169093

  6. Insights into Hydrocarbon Formation by Nitrogenase Cofactor Homologs

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi Chung; Hu, Yilin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The L-cluster is an all-iron homolog of nitrogenase cofactors. Driven by europium(II) diethylenetriaminepentaacetate [Eu(II)-DTPA], the isolated L-cluster is capable of ATP-independent reduction of CO and CN− to C1 to C4 and C1 to C6 hydrocarbons, respectively. Compared to its cofactor homologs, the L-cluster generates considerably more CH4 from the reduction of CO and CN−, which could be explained by the presence of a “free” Fe atom that is “unmasked” by homocitrate as an additional site for methanation. Moreover, the elevated CH4 formation is accompanied by a decrease in the amount of longer hydrocarbons and/or the lengths of the hydrocarbon products, illustrating a competition between CH4 formation/release and C−C coupling/chain extension. These observations suggest the possibility of designing simpler synthetic clusters for hydrocarbon formation while establishing the L-cluster as a platform for mechanistic investigations of CO and CN− reduction without complications originating from the heterometal and homocitrate components. PMID:25873377

  7. Sulphur shuttling across a chaperone during molybdenum cofactor maturation.

    PubMed

    Arnoux, Pascal; Ruppelt, Christian; Oudouhou, Flore; Lavergne, Jérôme; Siponen, Marina I; Toci, René; Mendel, Ralf R; Bittner, Florian; Pignol, David; Magalon, Axel; Walburger, Anne

    2015-02-04

    Formate dehydrogenases (FDHs) are of interest as they are natural catalysts that sequester atmospheric CO2, generating reduced carbon compounds with possible uses as fuel. FDHs activity in Escherichia coli strictly requires the sulphurtransferase EcFdhD, which likely transfers sulphur from IscS to the molybdenum cofactor (Mo-bisPGD) of FDHs. Here we show that EcFdhD binds Mo-bisPGD in vivo and has submicromolar affinity for GDP-used as a surrogate of the molybdenum cofactor's nucleotide moieties. The crystal structure of EcFdhD in complex with GDP shows two symmetrical binding sites located on the same face of the dimer. These binding sites are connected via a tunnel-like cavity to the opposite face of the dimer where two dynamic loops, each harbouring two functionally important cysteine residues, are present. On the basis of structure-guided mutagenesis, we propose a model for the sulphuration mechanism of Mo-bisPGD where the sulphur atom shuttles across the chaperone dimer.

  8. Hox Specificity: Unique Roles for Cofactors and Collaborators

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Richard S.; Lelli, Katherine M.; Joshi, Rohit

    2010-01-01

    Hox proteins are well known for executing highly specific functions in vivo, but our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying gene regulation by these fascinating proteins has lagged behind. The premise of this review is that an understanding of gene regulation — by any transcription factor—requires the dissection of the cis-regulatory elements that they act upon. With this goal in mind, we review the concepts and ideas regarding gene regulation by Hox proteins and apply them to a curated list of directly regulated Hox cis-regulatory elements that have been validated in the literature. Our analysis of the Hox-binding sites within these elements suggests several emerging generalizations. We distinguish between Hox cofactors, proteins that bind DNA cooperatively with Hox proteins and thereby help with DNA-binding site selection, and Hox collaborators, proteins that bind in parallel to Hox-targeted cis-regulatory elements and dictate the sign and strength of gene regulation. Finally, we summarize insights that come from examining five X-ray crystal structures of Hox-cofactor-DNA complexes. Together, these analyses reveal an enormous amount of flexibility into how Hox proteins function to regulate gene expression, perhaps providing an explanation for why these factors have been central players in the evolution of morphological diversity in the animal kingdom. PMID:19651302

  9. Manual control of catalytic reactions: Reactions by an apoenzyme gel and a cofactor gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Yuichiro; Takashima, Yoshinori; Hashidzume, Akihito; Yamaguchi, Hiroyasu; Harada, Akira

    2015-11-01

    Enzymes play a vital role in catalysing almost all chemical reactions that occur in biological systems. Some enzymes must form complexes with non-protein molecules called cofactors to express catalytic activities. Although the control of catalytic reactions via apoenzyme-cofactor complexes has attracted significant attention, the reports have been limited to the microscale. Here, we report a system to express catalytic activity by adhesion of an apoenzyme gel and a cofactor gel. The apoenzyme and cofactor gels act as catalysts when they form a gel assembly, but they lose catalytic ability upon manual dissociation. We successfully construct a system with switchable catalytic activity via adhesion and separation of the apoenzyme gel with the cofactor gel. We expect that this methodology can be applied to regulate the functional activities of enzymes that bear cofactors in their active sites, such as the oxygen transport of haemoglobin or myoglobin and the electron transport of cytochromes.

  10. Heparin cofactor II is degraded by heparan sulfate and dextran sulfate.

    PubMed

    Saito, Akio

    2015-02-20

    Heparan sulfate normally binds to heparin cofactor II and modulates the coagulation pathway by inhibiting thrombin. However, when human heparin cofactor II was incubated with heparan sulfate, heparin cofactor II became degraded. Other glycosaminoglycans were tested, including hyaluronic acid, chondroitin sulfates, dermatan sulfate, and heparin, but only dextran sulfate also degraded heparin cofactor II. Pretreatment of heparan sulfate with heparinase reduced its heparin cofactor II-degrading activity. Heparan sulfate and dextran sulfate diminished the thrombin inhibitory activity of heparin cofactor II. Other serpins, including antithrombin III and pigment epithelium-derived factor, were also degraded by heparan sulfate. This is the first evidence of acidic polysaccharides exhibiting protein-degrading activity without the aid of other proteins.

  11. Mass spectrometry locates local and allosteric conformational changes that occur on cofactor binding.

    PubMed

    Beveridge, Rebecca; Migas, Lukasz G; Payne, Karl A P; Scrutton, Nigel S; Leys, David; Barran, Perdita E

    2016-07-15

    Fdc1 is a decarboxylase enzyme that requires the novel prenylated FMN cofactor for activity. Here, we use it as an exemplar system to show how native top-down and bottom-up mass spectrometry can measure the structural effect of cofactor binding by a protein. For Fdc1(Ubix), the cofactor confers structural stability to the enzyme. IM-MS shows the holo protein to exist in four closely related conformational families, the populations of which differ in the apo form; the two smaller families are more populated in the presence of the cofactor and depopulated in its absence. These findings, supported by MD simulations, indicate a more open structure for the apo form. HDX-MS reveals that while the dominant structural changes occur proximal to the cofactor-binding site, rearrangements on cofactor binding are evident throughout the protein, predominantly attributable to allosteric conformational tightening, consistent with IM-MS data.

  12. Mass spectrometry locates local and allosteric conformational changes that occur on cofactor binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beveridge, Rebecca; Migas, Lukasz G.; Payne, Karl A. P.; Scrutton, Nigel S.; Leys, David; Barran, Perdita E.

    2016-07-01

    Fdc1 is a decarboxylase enzyme that requires the novel prenylated FMN cofactor for activity. Here, we use it as an exemplar system to show how native top-down and bottom-up mass spectrometry can measure the structural effect of cofactor binding by a protein. For Fdc1Ubix, the cofactor confers structural stability to the enzyme. IM-MS shows the holo protein to exist in four closely related conformational families, the populations of which differ in the apo form; the two smaller families are more populated in the presence of the cofactor and depopulated in its absence. These findings, supported by MD simulations, indicate a more open structure for the apo form. HDX-MS reveals that while the dominant structural changes occur proximal to the cofactor-binding site, rearrangements on cofactor binding are evident throughout the protein, predominantly attributable to allosteric conformational tightening, consistent with IM-MS data.

  13. Manual control of catalytic reactions: Reactions by an apoenzyme gel and a cofactor gel.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yuichiro; Takashima, Yoshinori; Hashidzume, Akihito; Yamaguchi, Hiroyasu; Harada, Akira

    2015-11-05

    Enzymes play a vital role in catalysing almost all chemical reactions that occur in biological systems. Some enzymes must form complexes with non-protein molecules called cofactors to express catalytic activities. Although the control of catalytic reactions via apoenzyme-cofactor complexes has attracted significant attention, the reports have been limited to the microscale. Here, we report a system to express catalytic activity by adhesion of an apoenzyme gel and a cofactor gel. The apoenzyme and cofactor gels act as catalysts when they form a gel assembly, but they lose catalytic ability upon manual dissociation. We successfully construct a system with switchable catalytic activity via adhesion and separation of the apoenzyme gel with the cofactor gel. We expect that this methodology can be applied to regulate the functional activities of enzymes that bear cofactors in their active sites, such as the oxygen transport of haemoglobin or myoglobin and the electron transport of cytochromes.

  14. Mass spectrometry locates local and allosteric conformational changes that occur on cofactor binding

    PubMed Central

    Beveridge, Rebecca; Migas, Lukasz G.; Payne, Karl A. P.; Scrutton, Nigel S.; Leys, David; Barran, Perdita E.

    2016-01-01

    Fdc1 is a decarboxylase enzyme that requires the novel prenylated FMN cofactor for activity. Here, we use it as an exemplar system to show how native top-down and bottom-up mass spectrometry can measure the structural effect of cofactor binding by a protein. For Fdc1Ubix, the cofactor confers structural stability to the enzyme. IM–MS shows the holo protein to exist in four closely related conformational families, the populations of which differ in the apo form; the two smaller families are more populated in the presence of the cofactor and depopulated in its absence. These findings, supported by MD simulations, indicate a more open structure for the apo form. HDX-MS reveals that while the dominant structural changes occur proximal to the cofactor-binding site, rearrangements on cofactor binding are evident throughout the protein, predominantly attributable to allosteric conformational tightening, consistent with IM–MS data. PMID:27418477

  15. Rational proteomics I. Fingerprint identification and cofactor specificity in the short-chain oxidoreductase (SCOR) enzyme family.

    PubMed

    Duax, William L; Pletnev, Vladimir; Addlagatta, Anthony; Bruenn, Jeremy; Weeks, Charles M

    2003-12-01

    The short-chain oxidoreductase (SCOR) family of enzymes includes over 2000 members identified in sequenced genomes. Of these enzymes, approximately 200 have been characterized functionally, and the three-dimensional crystal structures of approximately 40 have been reported. Since some SCOR enzymes are involved in hypertension, diabetes, breast cancer, and polycystic kidney disease, it is important to characterize the other members of the family for which the biological functions are currently unknown. Although the SCOR family appears to have only a single fully conserved residue, it was possible, using bioinformatics methods, to determine characteristic fingerprints composed of 30-40 residues that are conserved at the 70% or greater level in SCOR subgroups. These fingerprints permit reliable prediction of several important structure-function features including NAD/NADP cofactor preference. For example, the correlation of aspartate or arginine residues with NAD or NADP binding, respectively, predicts the cofactor preference of more than 70% of the SCOR proteins with unknown function. The analysis of conserved residues surrounding the cofactor has revealed the presence of previously undetected CH em leader O hydrogen bonds in the majority of the SCOR crystal structures, predicts the presence of similar hydrogen bonds in 90% of the SCOR proteins of unknown function, and suggests that these hydrogen bonds may play a critical role in the catalytic functions of these enzymes.

  16. In silico model-driven cofactor engineering strategies for improving the overall NADP(H) turnover in microbial cell factories.

    PubMed

    Lakshmanan, Meiyappan; Yu, Kai; Koduru, Lokanand; Lee, Dong-Yup

    2015-10-01

    Optimizing the overall NADPH turnover is one of the key challenges in various value-added biochemical syntheses. In this work, we first analyzed the NADPH regeneration potentials of common cell factories, including Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Bacillus subtilis, and Pichia pastoris across multiple environmental conditions and determined E. coli and glycerol as the best microbial chassis and most suitable carbon source, respectively. In addition, we identified optimal cofactor specificity engineering (CSE) enzyme targets, whose cofactors when switched from NAD(H) to NADP(H) improve the overall NADP(H) turnover. Among several enzyme targets, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase was recognized as a global candidate since its CSE improved the NADP(H) regeneration under most of the conditions examined. Finally, by analyzing the protein structures of all CSE enzyme targets via homology modeling, we established that the replacement of conserved glutamate or aspartate with serine in the loop region could change the cofactor dependence from NAD(H) to NADP(H).

  17. Catalase in peroxidase clothing: Interdependent cooperation of two cofactors in the catalytic versatility of KatG.

    PubMed

    Njuma, Olive J; Ndontsa, Elizabeth N; Goodwin, Douglas C

    2014-02-15

    Catalase-peroxidase (KatG) is found in eubacteria, archaea, and lower eukaryotae. The enzyme from Mycobacterium tuberculosis has received the greatest attention because of its role in activation of the antitubercular pro-drug isoniazid, and the high frequency with which drug resistance stems from mutations to the katG gene. Generally, the catalase activity of KatGs is striking. It rivals that of typical catalases, enzymes with which KatGs share no structural similarity. Instead, catalatic turnover is accomplished with an active site that bears a strong resemblance to a typical peroxidase (e.g., cytochrome c peroxidase). Yet, KatG is the only member of its superfamily with such capability. It does so using two mutually dependent cofactors: a heme and an entirely unique Met-Tyr-Trp (MYW) covalent adduct. Heme is required to generate the MYW cofactor. The MYW cofactor allows KatG to leverage heme intermediates toward a unique mechanism for H2O2 oxidation. This review evaluates the range of intermediates identified and their connection to the diverse catalytic processes KatG facilitates, including mechanisms of isoniazid activation.

  18. Studying Nuclear Receptor Complexes in the Cellular Environment.

    PubMed

    Schaufele, Fred

    2016-01-01

    The ligand-regulated structure and biochemistry of nuclear receptor complexes are commonly determined by in vitro studies of isolated receptors, cofactors, and their fragments. However, in the living cell, the complexes that form are governed not just by the relative affinities of isolated cofactors for the receptor but also by the cell-specific sequestration or concentration of subsets of competing or cooperating cofactors, receptors, and other effectors into distinct subcellular domains and/or their temporary diversion into other cellular activities. Most methods developed to understand nuclear receptor function in the cellular environment involve the direct tagging of the nuclear receptor or its cofactors with fluorescent proteins (FPs) and the tracking of those FP-tagged factors by fluorescence microscopy. One of those approaches, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy, quantifies the transfer of energy from a higher energy "donor" FP to a lower energy "acceptor" FP attached to a single protein or to interacting proteins. The amount of FRET is influenced by the ligand-induced changes in the proximities and orientations of the FPs within the tagged nuclear receptor complexes, which is an indicator of the structure of the complexes, and by the kinetics of the interaction between FP-tagged factors. Here, we provide a guide for parsing information about the structure and biochemistry of nuclear receptor complexes from FRET measurements in living cells.

  19. Spontaneous Formation of RNA Strands, Peptidyl RNA, and Cofactors.

    PubMed

    Jauker, Mario; Griesser, Helmut; Richert, Clemens

    2015-11-23

    How the biochemical machinery evolved from simple precursors is an open question. Here we show that ribonucleotides and amino acids condense to peptidyl RNAs in the absence of enzymes under conditions established for genetic copying. Untemplated formation of RNA strands that can encode genetic information, formation of peptidyl chains linked to RNA, and formation of the cofactors NAD(+), FAD, and ATP all occur under the same conditions. In the peptidyl RNAs, the peptide chains are phosphoramidate-linked to a ribonucleotide. Peptidyl RNAs with long peptide chains were selected from an initial pool when a lipophilic phase simulating the interior of membranes was offered, and free peptides were released upon acidification. Our results show that key molecules of genetics, catalysis, and metabolism can emerge under the same conditions, without a mineral surface, without an enzyme, and without the need for chemical pre-activation.

  20. Parallel texture structures with cofactor zeros in lepton sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weijian

    2014-06-01

    In this paper we investigate the parallel texture structures with cofactor zeros in the charged lepton and neutrino sectors. The textures cannot be obtained from arbitrary leptonic matrices by making weak basis transformations, which therefore have physical meaning. The 15 parallel textures are grouped as 4 classes where each class has the same physical implications. It is founded that one of them is not phenomenologically viable and another is equivalent to the texture zero structures extensively explored in previous literature. Thus we focus on the other two classes of parallel texture structures and study the their phenomenological implications. The constraints on the physical variables are obtained for each class, which is essential for the model selection and can be measured by future experiments. The model realization is illustrated in a radiated lepton mass model.

  1. Parallel lepton mass matrices with texture and cofactor zeros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weijian

    2014-08-01

    In this paper we investigate the parallel texture structures containing texture zeros in the charged lepton mass matrix Ml and cofactor zeros in the neutrino mass matrix Mν. These textures are interesting since they are related to the Zn flavor symmetries. Using the weak basis permutation transformation, the 15 parallel textures are grouped as 4 classes (class I, II, III, and IV), with the matrices in each class sharing the same physical implications. Under the current experimental data, the classes I and III with inverted mass hierarchy and class II with normal mass hierarchy are phenomenologically acceptable. The correlations between some important physical variables are presented, which are essential for the model selection and can be tested by future experiments. The model realization is illustrated by means of Z4×Z2 flavor symmetry.

  2. Glucocorticoid receptor co-factors as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Simons, S. Stoney

    2010-01-01

    Summary Numerous transcriptional cofactors (e.g., coactivators, corepressors, and comodulators) are known to alter the maximal transcriptional activity (Amax) in gene induction and repression by steroid receptors in general and glucocorticoids in particular. However, recent data advance the earlier reports that these same factors also modify other parameters of glucocorticoid receptor transcriptional activity: the potency of agonists (or EC50) and the partial agonist activity of antisteroids (or PAA). In several instances, factors modulate the EC50 and/or PAA without changing Amax. Thus, studies of all three parameters reveal new factors acting at various stages of receptor action, thereby increasing the potential therapeutic targets for adjusting GR actions in pathological situations. PMID:20801081

  3. Structural Framework for Metal Incorporation during Molybdenum Cofactor Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Kasaragod, Vikram Babu; Schindelin, Hermann

    2016-05-01

    The molybdenum cofactor (Moco) is essential for the catalytic activity of all molybdenum-containing enzymes with the exception of nitrogenase. Moco biosynthesis follows an evolutionarily highly conserved pathway and genetic deficiencies in the corresponding human enzymes result in Moco deficiency, which manifests itself in severe neurological symptoms and death in childhood. In humans the final steps of Moco biosynthesis are catalyzed by gephyrin, specifically the penultimate adenylation of molybdopterin (MPT) by its N-terminal G domain (GephG) and the final metal incorporation by its C-terminal E domain (GephE). To better understand the poorly defined molecular framework of this final step, we determined high-resolution crystal structures of GephE in the apo state and in complex with ADP, AMP, and molybdate. Our data provide novel insights into the catalytic steps leading to final Moco maturation, namely deadenylation as well as molybdate binding and insertion. PMID:27112598

  4. Spontaneous Formation of RNA Strands, Peptidyl RNA, and Cofactors

    PubMed Central

    Jauker, Mario; Griesser, Helmut; Richert, Clemens

    2015-01-01

    How the biochemical machinery evolved from simple precursors is an open question. Here we show that ribonucleotides and amino acids condense to peptidyl RNAs in the absence of enzymes under conditions established for genetic copying. Untemplated formation of RNA strands that can encode genetic information, formation of peptidyl chains linked to RNA, and formation of the cofactors NAD+, FAD, and ATP all occur under the same conditions. In the peptidyl RNAs, the peptide chains are phosphoramidate-linked to a ribonucleotide. Peptidyl RNAs with long peptide chains were selected from an initial pool when a lipophilic phase simulating the interior of membranes was offered, and free peptides were released upon acidification. Our results show that key molecules of genetics, catalysis, and metabolism can emerge under the same conditions, without a mineral surface, without an enzyme, and without the need for chemical pre-activation. PMID:26435376

  5. Nuclear enrichment of folate cofactors and methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase 1 (MTHFD1) protect de novo thymidylate biosynthesis during folate deficiency.

    PubMed

    Field, Martha S; Kamynina, Elena; Agunloye, Olufunmilayo C; Liebenthal, Rebecca P; Lamarre, Simon G; Brosnan, Margaret E; Brosnan, John T; Stover, Patrick J

    2014-10-24

    Folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism is a metabolic network of interconnected pathways that is required for the de novo synthesis of three of the four DNA bases and the remethylation of homocysteine to methionine. Previous studies have indicated that the thymidylate synthesis and homocysteine remethylation pathways compete for a limiting pool of methylenetetrahydrofolate cofactors and that thymidylate biosynthesis is preserved in folate deficiency at the expense of homocysteine remethylation, but the mechanisms are unknown. Recently, it was shown that thymidylate synthesis occurs in the nucleus, whereas homocysteine remethylation occurs in the cytosol. In this study we demonstrate that methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase 1 (MTHFD1), an enzyme that generates methylenetetrahydrofolate from formate, ATP, and NADPH, functions in the nucleus to support de novo thymidylate biosynthesis. MTHFD1 translocates to the nucleus in S-phase MCF-7 and HeLa cells. During folate deficiency mouse liver MTHFD1 levels are enriched in the nucleus >2-fold at the expense of levels in the cytosol. Furthermore, nuclear folate levels are resistant to folate depletion when total cellular folate levels are reduced by >50% in mouse liver. The enrichment of folate cofactors and MTHFD1 protein in the nucleus during folate deficiency in mouse liver and human cell lines accounts for previous metabolic studies that indicated 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate is preferentially directed toward de novo thymidylate biosynthesis at the expense of homocysteine remethylation during folate deficiency.

  6. Nuclear Enrichment of Folate Cofactors and Methylenetetrahydrofolate Dehydrogenase 1 (MTHFD1) Protect de Novo Thymidylate Biosynthesis during Folate Deficiency*

    PubMed Central

    Field, Martha S.; Kamynina, Elena; Agunloye, Olufunmilayo C.; Liebenthal, Rebecca P.; Lamarre, Simon G.; Brosnan, Margaret E.; Brosnan, John T.; Stover, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism is a metabolic network of interconnected pathways that is required for the de novo synthesis of three of the four DNA bases and the remethylation of homocysteine to methionine. Previous studies have indicated that the thymidylate synthesis and homocysteine remethylation pathways compete for a limiting pool of methylenetetrahydrofolate cofactors and that thymidylate biosynthesis is preserved in folate deficiency at the expense of homocysteine remethylation, but the mechanisms are unknown. Recently, it was shown that thymidylate synthesis occurs in the nucleus, whereas homocysteine remethylation occurs in the cytosol. In this study we demonstrate that methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase 1 (MTHFD1), an enzyme that generates methylenetetrahydrofolate from formate, ATP, and NADPH, functions in the nucleus to support de novo thymidylate biosynthesis. MTHFD1 translocates to the nucleus in S-phase MCF-7 and HeLa cells. During folate deficiency mouse liver MTHFD1 levels are enriched in the nucleus >2-fold at the expense of levels in the cytosol. Furthermore, nuclear folate levels are resistant to folate depletion when total cellular folate levels are reduced by >50% in mouse liver. The enrichment of folate cofactors and MTHFD1 protein in the nucleus during folate deficiency in mouse liver and human cell lines accounts for previous metabolic studies that indicated 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate is preferentially directed toward de novo thymidylate biosynthesis at the expense of homocysteine remethylation during folate deficiency. PMID:25213861

  7. A regulatory role of NAD redox status on flavin cofactor homeostasis in S. cerevisiae mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Giancaspero, Teresa Anna; Locato, Vittoria; Barile, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) are two redox cofactors of pivotal importance for mitochondrial functionality and cellular redox balance. Despite their relevance, the mechanism by which intramitochondrial NAD(H) and FAD levels are maintained remains quite unclear in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We investigated here the ability of isolated mitochondria to degrade externally added FAD and NAD (in both its reduced and oxidized forms). A set of kinetic experiments demonstrated that mitochondrial FAD and NAD(H) destroying enzymes are different from each other and from the already characterized NUDIX hydrolases. We studied here, in some detail, FAD pyrophosphatase (EC 3.6.1.18), which is inhibited by NAD(+) and NADH according to a noncompetitive inhibition, with Ki values that differ from each other by an order of magnitude. These findings, together with the ability of mitochondrial FAD pyrophosphatase to metabolize endogenous FAD, presumably deriving from mitochondrial holoflavoproteins destined to degradation, allow for proposing a novel possible role of mitochondrial NAD redox status in regulating FAD homeostasis and/or flavoprotein degradation in S. cerevisiae. PMID:24078860

  8. A Regulatory Role of NAD Redox Status on Flavin Cofactor Homeostasis in S. cerevisiae Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Giancaspero, Teresa Anna; Barile, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) are two redox cofactors of pivotal importance for mitochondrial functionality and cellular redox balance. Despite their relevance, the mechanism by which intramitochondrial NAD(H) and FAD levels are maintained remains quite unclear in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We investigated here the ability of isolated mitochondria to degrade externally added FAD and NAD (in both its reduced and oxidized forms). A set of kinetic experiments demonstrated that mitochondrial FAD and NAD(H) destroying enzymes are different from each other and from the already characterized NUDIX hydrolases. We studied here, in some detail, FAD pyrophosphatase (EC 3.6.1.18), which is inhibited by NAD+ and NADH according to a noncompetitive inhibition, with Ki values that differ from each other by an order of magnitude. These findings, together with the ability of mitochondrial FAD pyrophosphatase to metabolize endogenous FAD, presumably deriving from mitochondrial holoflavoproteins destined to degradation, allow for proposing a novel possible role of mitochondrial NAD redox status in regulating FAD homeostasis and/or flavoprotein degradation in S. cerevisiae. PMID:24078860

  9. The non-enzymatic reduction of azo dyes by flavin and nicotinamide cofactors under varying conditions.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Jessica M; John, Gilbert H

    2013-10-01

    Azo dyes are ubiquitous in products and often become environmental pollutants due to their anthropogenic nature. Azoreductases are enzymes which are present within many bacteria and are capable of breaking down the azo dyes via reduction of the azo bond. Often, though, carcinogenic aromatic amines are formed as metabolites and are of concern to humans. Azoreductases function via an oxidation-reduction reaction and require cofactors (a nicotinamide cofactor and sometimes a flavin cofactor) to perform their function. Non-enzymatic reduction of azo dyes in the absence of an azoreductase enzyme has been suggested in previous studies, but has never been studied in detail in terms of varying cofactor combinations, different oxygen states or pHs, nor has the enzymatic reduction been compared to azoreduction in terms of dye reduction or metabolites produced, which was the aim of this study. Reduction of azo dyes by different cofactor combinations was found to occur under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions and under physiologically-relevant pHs to produce the same metabolites as an azoreductase. Our results show that, in some cases, the non-enzymatic reduction by the cofactors was found to be equal to that seen with the azoreductase, suggesting that all dye reduction in these cases is due to the cofactors themselves. This study details the importance of the use of a cofactor-only control when studying azoreductase enzymes.

  10. Substrate and Cofactor Range Differences of Two Cysteine Dioxygenases from Ralstonia eutropha H16

    PubMed Central

    Wenning, Leonie; Stöveken, Nadine; Wübbeler, Jan Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine dioxygenases (Cdos), which catalyze the sulfoxidation of cysteine to cysteine sulfinic acid (CSA), have been extensively studied in eukaryotes because of their roles in several diseases. In contrast, only a few prokaryotic enzymes of this type have been investigated. In Ralstonia eutropha H16, two Cdo homologues (CdoA and CdoB) have been identified previously. In vivo studies showed that Escherichia coli cells expressing CdoA could convert 3-mercaptopropionate (3MP) to 3-sulfinopropionate (3SP), whereas no 3SP could be detected in cells expressing CdoB. The objective of this study was to confirm these findings and to study both enzymes in detail by performing an in vitro characterization. The proteins were heterologously expressed and purified to apparent homogeneity by immobilized metal chelate affinity chromatography (IMAC). Subsequent analysis of the enzyme activities revealed striking differences with regard to their substrate ranges and their specificities for the transition metal cofactor, e.g., CdoA catalyzed the sulfoxidation of 3MP to a 3-fold-greater extent than the sulfoxidation of cysteine, whereas CdoB converted only cysteine. Moreover, the dependency of the activities of the Cdos from R. eutropha H16 on the metal cofactor in the active center could be demonstrated. The importance of CdoA for the metabolism of the sulfur compounds 3,3′-thiodipropionic acid (TDP) and 3,3′-dithiodipropionic acid (DTDP) by further converting their degradation product, 3MP, was confirmed. Since 3MP can also function as a precursor for polythioester (PTE) synthesis in R. eutropha H16, deletion of cdoA might enable increased synthesis of PTEs. PMID:26590284

  11. Kinetic Isotope Effects as a Probe of Hydrogen Transfers to and from Common Enzymatic Cofactors

    PubMed Central

    Roston, Daniel; Islam, Zahidul; Kohen, Amnon

    2013-01-01

    Enzymes use a number of common cofactors as sources of hydrogen to drive biological processes, but the physics of the hydrogen transfers to and from these cofactors is not fully understood. Researchers study the mechanistically important contributions from quantum tunneling and enzyme dynamics and connect those processes to the catalytic power of enzymes that use these cofactors. Here we describe some progress that has been made in studying these reactions, particularly through the use of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs). We first discuss the general theoretical framework necessary to interpret experimental KIEs, and then describe practical uses for KIEs in the context of two case studies. The first example is alcohol dehydrogenase, which uses a nicotinamide cofactor to catalyze a hydride transfer, and the second example is thymidylate synthase, which uses a folate cofactor to catalyze both a hydride and a proton transfer. PMID:24161942

  12. Atomistic and Coarse Grain Topologies for the Cofactors Associated with the Photosystem II Core Complex.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Djurre H; Liguori, Nicoletta; van den Berg, Tom; Arnarez, Clement; Periole, Xavier; Marrink, Siewert J

    2015-06-25

    Electron transfers within and between protein complexes are core processes of the electron transport chains occurring in thylakoid (chloroplast), mitochondrial, and bacterial membranes. These electron transfers involve a number of cofactors. Here we describe the derivation of molecular mechanics parameters for the cofactors associated with the function of the photosystem II core complex: plastoquinone, plastoquinol, heme b, chlorophyll A, pheophytin, and β-carotene. Parameters were also obtained for ubiquinol and ubiquinone, related cofactors involved in the respiratory chain. Parameters were derived at both atomistic and coarse grain (CG) resolutions, compatible with the building blocks of the GROMOS united-atom and Martini CG force fields, respectively. Structural and thermodynamic properties of the cofactors were compared to experimental values when available. The topologies were further tested in molecular dynamics simulations of the cofactors in their physiological environment, e.g., either in a lipid membrane environment or in complex with the heme binding protein bacterioferritin.

  13. Radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine chemistry in the synthesis of hydrogenase and nitrogenase metal cofactors.

    PubMed

    Byer, Amanda S; Shepard, Eric M; Peters, John W; Broderick, Joan B

    2015-02-13

    Nitrogenase, [FeFe]-hydrogenase, and [Fe]-hydrogenase enzymes perform catalysis at metal cofactors with biologically unusual non-protein ligands. The FeMo cofactor of nitrogenase has a MoFe7S9 cluster with a central carbon, whereas the H-cluster of [FeFe]-hydrogenase contains a 2Fe subcluster coordinated by cyanide and CO ligands as well as dithiomethylamine; the [Fe]-hydrogenase cofactor has CO and guanylylpyridinol ligands at a mononuclear iron site. Intriguingly, radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine enzymes are vital for the assembly of all three of these diverse cofactors. This minireview presents and discusses the current state of knowledge of the radical S-adenosylmethionine enzymes required for synthesis of these remarkable metal cofactors.

  14. Kinetic isotope effects as a probe of hydrogen transfers to and from common enzymatic cofactors.

    PubMed

    Roston, Daniel; Islam, Zahidul; Kohen, Amnon

    2014-02-15

    Enzymes use a number of common cofactors as sources of hydrogen to drive biological processes, but the physics of the hydrogen transfers to and from these cofactors is not fully understood. Researchers study the mechanistically important contributions from quantum tunneling and enzyme dynamics and connect those processes to the catalytic power of enzymes that use these cofactors. Here we describe some progress that has been made in studying these reactions, particularly through the use of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs). We first discuss the general theoretical framework necessary to interpret experimental KIEs, and then describe practical uses for KIEs in the context of two case studies. The first example is alcohol dehydrogenase, which uses a nicotinamide cofactor to catalyze a hydride transfer, and the second example is thymidylate synthase, which uses a folate cofactor to catalyze both a hydride and a proton transfer.

  15. Mutation in the 4a-carbinolamine dehydratase gene leads to mild hyperphenylalaninemia with defective cofactor metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Citron, B.A.; Kaufman, S.; Milstien, S.; Naylor, E.W. ); Greene, C.L. )

    1993-09-01

    Hyperphenylalaninemias represent a major class of inherited metabolic disorders. They are most often caused by mutations in the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene and, less frequently but with usually more serious consequences, in genes necessary for the synthesis and regeneration of the cofactor, tetrahydrobiopterin. This cofactor is absolutely required for all aromatic amino acid hydroxylations, and, recently, nitric oxide production from L-arginine has also been found to be dependent on tetrahydrobiopterin. Phenylalanine hydroxylase catalyzes a coupled reaction in which phenylalanine is converted to tyrosine and in which tetrahydrobiopterin is converted to the unstable carbinolamine, 4a-hydroxytetrahydrobiopterin. The enzyme, carbinolamine dehydratase, catalyzes the dehydration of the carbinolamine to quinonoid dihydropterin. A decreased rate of dehydration of this compound has been hypothesized to be responsible for the production of 7-biopterin found in certain mildly hyperphenylalaninemic individuals. The authors have now identified nonsense and missense mutations in the 4a-carbinolamine dehydratase gene in a hyperphenylalaninemic child who excretes large amounts of 7-biopterin. This finding is consistent with the role of the carbinolamine dehydratase in the phenylalanine hydroxylation reaction. Together with previously identified inherited disorders in phenylalanine hydroxylase and dihydropteridine reductase, there are now identified mutations in the three enzymes involved in the phenylalanine hydroxylation system. In addition, the genetics of this system may have broader implications, since the product of the dehydratase gene has previously been shown to play an additional role (as dimerization cofactor for hepatocyte nuclear factor-1[alpha]) in the regulation of transcription, through interaction with hepatocyte nuclear factor-1[alpha].

  16. Metabolic capabilities of Escherichia coli: I. synthesis of biosynthetic precursors and cofactors.

    PubMed

    Varma, A; Palsson, B O

    1993-12-21

    Metabolism of living cells converts substrates into metabolic energy, redox potential and metabolic end products that are essential to maintain cellular function. The flux distribution among the various biochemical pathways is determined by the kinetic properties of enzymes which are subject to strict regulatory control. Simulation of metabolic behavior therefore requires the complete knowledge of biochemical pathways, enzyme kinetics as well as their regulation. Unfortunately, complete kinetic and regulatory information is not available for microbial cells, thus preventing accurate dynamic simulation of their metabolic behavior. However, it is possible to define wider limits on metabolic behavior based solely on flux balances of biochemical pathways. We present here comprehensive information about the catabolic pathways of the bacterium Escherichia coli. Using this biochemical database, we formulate a stoichiometric model of the bacterial network of fueling reactions. After logical structural reduction, the network consists of 53 metabolic fluxes and 30 metabolites. The solution space of this under-determined system of equations presents the bounds of metabolic flux distribution that the bacterial cell can achieve. We use specific objective functions and linear optimization to investigate the capability of E. coli catabolism to maximally produce the 12 biosynthetic precursors and three key cofactors within this solution space. For the three cofactors, the maximum yields are calculated to be 18.67 ATP, 11.6 NADH and 11 NADPH per glucose molecule, respectively. The yields of NADH and NADPH are less than 12 owing to the energy costs of importing glucose. These constraints are made explicit by the interpretation of shadow prices. The optimal yields of the 12 biosynthetic precursors are computed. Four of the 12 precursors (3-phosphoglycerate, phosphoenolpyruvate, pyruvate and oxaloacetate) can be made by E. coli with complete carbon conversion. Conversely, none of the

  17. Flavodoxin cofactor binding induces structural changes that are required for protein-protein interactions with NADP(+) oxidoreductase and pyruvate formate-lyase activating enzyme.

    PubMed

    Crain, Adam V; Broderick, Joan B

    2013-12-01

    Flavodoxin (Fld) conformational changes, thermal stability, and cofactor binding were studied using circular dichroism (CD), isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and limited proteolysis. Thermodynamics of apo and holo-Fld folding were examined to discern the features of this important electron transfer protein and to provide data on apo-Fld. With the exception of fluorescence and UV-vis binding experiments with its cofactor flavin mononucleotide (FMN), apo-Fld is almost completely uncharacterized in Escherichia coli. Fld is more structured when the FMN cofactor is bound; the association is tight and driven by enthalpy of binding. Surface plasmon resonance binding experiments were carried out under anaerobic conditions for both apo- and holo-Fld and demonstrate the importance of structure and conformation for the interaction with binding partners. Holo-Fld is capable of associating with NADP(+)-dependent flavodoxin oxidoreductase (FNR) and pyruvate formate-lyase activating enzyme (PFL-AE) whereas there is no detectable interaction between apo-Fld and either protein. Limited proteolysis experiments were analyzed by LC-MS to identify the regions in Fld that are involved in conformation changes upon cofactor binding. Docking software was used to model the Fld/PFL-AE complex to understand the interactions between these two proteins and gain insight into electron transfer reactions from Fld to PFL-AE.

  18. Mechanism of pyranopterin ring formation in molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Hover, Bradley M; Tonthat, Nam K; Schumacher, Maria A; Yokoyama, Kenichi

    2015-05-19

    The molybdenum cofactor (Moco) is essential for all kingdoms of life, plays central roles in various biological processes, and must be biosynthesized de novo. During Moco biosynthesis, the characteristic pyranopterin ring is constructed by a complex rearrangement of guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP) into cyclic pyranopterin (cPMP) through the action of two enzymes, MoaA and MoaC (molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis protein A and C, respectively). Conventionally, MoaA was considered to catalyze the majority of this transformation, with MoaC playing little or no role in the pyranopterin formation. Recently, this view was challenged by the isolation of 3',8-cyclo-7,8-dihydro-guanosine 5'-triphosphate (3',8-cH2GTP) as the product of in vitro MoaA reactions. To elucidate the mechanism of formation of Moco pyranopterin backbone, we performed biochemical characterization of 3',8-cH2GTP and functional and X-ray crystallographic characterizations of MoaC. These studies revealed that 3',8-cH2GTP is the only product of MoaA that can be converted to cPMP by MoaC. Our structural studies captured the specific binding of 3',8-cH2GTP in the active site of MoaC. These observations provided strong evidence that the physiological function of MoaA is the conversion of GTP to 3',8-cH2GTP (GTP 3',8-cyclase), and that of MoaC is to catalyze the rearrangement of 3',8-cH2GTP into cPMP (cPMP synthase). Furthermore, our structure-guided studies suggest that MoaC catalysis involves the dynamic motions of enzyme active-site loops as a way to control the timing of interaction between the reaction intermediates and catalytically essential amino acid residues. Thus, these results reveal the previously unidentified mechanism behind Moco biosynthesis and provide mechanistic and structural insights into how enzymes catalyze complex rearrangement reactions.

  19. Sulphur shuttling across a chaperone during molybdenum cofactor maturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnoux, Pascal; Ruppelt, Christian; Oudouhou, Flore; Lavergne, Jérôme; Siponen, Marina I.; Toci, René; Mendel, Ralf R.; Bittner, Florian; Pignol, David; Magalon, Axel; Walburger, Anne

    2015-02-01

    Formate dehydrogenases (FDHs) are of interest as they are natural catalysts that sequester atmospheric CO2, generating reduced carbon compounds with possible uses as fuel. FDHs activity in Escherichia coli strictly requires the sulphurtransferase EcFdhD, which likely transfers sulphur from IscS to the molybdenum cofactor (Mo-bisPGD) of FDHs. Here we show that EcFdhD binds Mo-bisPGD in vivo and has submicromolar affinity for GDP—used as a surrogate of the molybdenum cofactor’s nucleotide moieties. The crystal structure of EcFdhD in complex with GDP shows two symmetrical binding sites located on the same face of the dimer. These binding sites are connected via a tunnel-like cavity to the opposite face of the dimer where two dynamic loops, each harbouring two functionally important cysteine residues, are present. On the basis of structure-guided mutagenesis, we propose a model for the sulphuration mechanism of Mo-bisPGD where the sulphur atom shuttles across the chaperone dimer.

  20. Effect of pancreatic biliary reflux as a cofactor in cholecystitis.

    PubMed

    Amr, Abdel Raouf; Hamdy, Hussam Mohamed; Nasr, Magid Mahmoud; Hedaya, Mohammed Saied; Hassan, Ahmed Mohamed Abdelaziz

    2012-04-01

    This study assessed the effect of pancreatico-biliary reflux (PBR) as co-factor in the process of chronic cholecystitis by measurement of the levels of active pancreatic enzyme amylase in gallbladder bile and serum of patients undergoing cholecystectomy. Pancreatic Amylase levels in bile from the gallbladder and serum were measured during surgery in 68 patients with chronic calcular cholecystitis subjected to elective open or laparoscopic cholecystectomy in the National Hepatology and Tropical Medicine Research Institution and Theodore Bilharz Research Institute. Bile amylase was detected in 64 patients (94.1%) indicating pancreatico-biliary reflux. Biliary amylase level ranged from 20-50 IU/L in 42 patients (61.76%), below 20 IU/l in 14 patients (20.59%), over 50 IU/L in 8 patients (11.76%) and undetectable in two patients. According to gallbladder bile amylase, the incidence of Occult PBR in patients operated upon for chronic calcular cholecystitis was 94.1%. The reason should be clarified by further research and wider scale study. Routinely investigating biliary amylase in every patient having cholecystitis can be a method for early detection of precancerous lesions.

  1. Solvent-Dependent Pyranopterin Cyclization in Molybdenum Cofactor Model Complexes.

    PubMed

    Williams, Benjamin R; Gisewhite, Douglas; Kalinsky, Anna; Esmail, Alisha; Burgmayer, Sharon J Nieter

    2015-09-01

    The conserved pterin dithiolene ligand that coordinates molybdenum (Mo) in the cofactor (Moco) of mononuclear Mo enzymes can exist in both a tricyclic pyranopterin dithiolene form and as a bicyclic pterin-dithiolene form as observed in protein crystal structures of several bacterial molybdoenzymes. Interconversion between the tricyclic and bicyclic forms via pyran scission and cyclization has been hypothesized to play a role in the catalytic mechanism of Moco. Therefore, understanding the interconversion between the tricyclic and bicyclic forms, a type of ring-chain tautomerism, is an important aspect of study to understand its role in catalysis. In this study, equilibrium constants (K(eq)) as well as enthalpy, entropy, and free energy values are obtained for pyran ring tautomerism exhibited by two Moco model complexes, namely, (Et4N)[Tp*Mo(O)(S2BMOPP)] (1) and (Et4N)[Tp*Mo(O)(S2PEOPP)] (2), as a solvent-dependent equilibrium process. Keq values obtained from (1)H NMR data in seven deuterated solvents show a correlation between solvent polarity and tautomer form, where solvents with higher polarity parameters favor the pyran form.

  2. Relocalization of human chromatin remodeling cofactor TIP48 in mitosis

    SciTech Connect

    Sigala, Barbara; Edwards, Mina; Puri, Teena; Tsaneva, Irina R. . E-mail: tsaneva@biochem.ucl.ac.uk

    2005-11-01

    TIP48 is a highly conserved eukaryotic AAA{sup +} protein which is an essential cofactor for several complexes involved in chromatin acetylation and remodeling, transcriptional and developmental regulation and nucleolar organization and trafficking. We show that TIP48 abundance in HeLa cells did not change during the cell cycle, nor did its distribution in various biochemical fractions. However, we observed distinct changes in the subcellular localization of TIP48 during M phase using immunofluorescence microscopy. Our studies demonstrate that in interphase cells TIP48 was found mainly in the nucleus and exhibited a distinct localization in the nuclear periphery. As the cells entered mitosis, TIP48 was excluded from the condensing chromosomes but showed association with the mitotic apparatus. During anaphase, some TIP48 was detected in the centrosome colocalizing with tubulin but the strongest staining appeared in the mitotic equator associated with the midzone central spindle. Accumulation of TIP48 in the midzone and the midbody was observed in late telophase and cytokinesis. This redeployment of TIP48 during anaphase and cytokinesis was independent of microtubule assembly. The relocation of endogenous TIP48 to the midzone/midbody under physiological conditions suggests a novel and distinct function for TIP48 in mitosis and possible involvement in the exit of mitosis.

  3. Molecular and biochemical characterization of nematode cofactor independent phosphoglycerate mutases.

    PubMed

    Raverdy, Sylvine; Zhang, Yinhua; Foster, Jeremy; Carlow, Clotilde K S

    2007-12-01

    Phosphoglycerate mutase (PGM, EC 5.4.2.1) catalyzes the isomerization of 3-phosphoglycerate and 2-phosphoglycerate in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. Two distinct types of PGM exist in nature, one that requires 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate as a cofactor (dPGM) and another that does not (iPGM). The two enzymes are structurally distinct and possess different mechanisms of action. In any particular organism, one form may exist or both. Nematodes possess the iPGM form whereas mammals have dPGM. In the present study, we have cloned and expressed iPGM from Onchocerca volvulus and described the catalytic properties of O. volvulus, Brugia malayi and Caenorhabditis elegans iPGM enzymes. Temperature and pH optima were determined for each enzyme. Like other iPGM enzymes, the activities of the nematode iPGM enzymes were dependent on the presence of divalent ions. Inactivation by EDTA could be restored most effectively by magnesium and manganese ions. Kinetic parameters and specific activities of the various recombinant enzymes were determined. The high similarity in catalytic properties among the enzymes indicates that a single enzyme inhibitor would likely be effective against all nematode enzymes. Inhibition of iPGM activity in vivo may lead to lethality as indicated by RNAi studies in C. elegans. Our results support the development of iPGM as a promising drug target in parasitic nematodes.

  4. Dynamic expression of LIM cofactors in the developing mouse neural tube.

    PubMed

    Ostendorff, Heather P; Tursun, Baris; Cornils, Kerstin; Schlüter, Anne; Drung, Alexander; Güngör, Cenap; Bach, Ingolf

    2006-03-01

    The developmental regulation of LIM homeodomain transcription factors (LIM-HD) by the LIM domain-binding cofactors CLIM/Ldb/NLI and RLIM has been demonstrated. Whereas CLIM cofactors are thought to be required for at least some of the in vivo functions of LIM-HD proteins, the ubiquitin ligase RLIM functions as a negative regulator by its ability to target CLIM cofactors for proteasomal degradation. In this report, we have investigated and compared the protein expression of both factors in the developing mouse neural tube. We co-localize both proteins in many tissues and, although widely expressed, we detect high levels of both cofactors in specific neural tube regions, e.g., in the ventral neural tube, where motor neurons reside. The mostly ubiquitous distribution of RLIM- and CLIM-encoding mRNA differs from the more specific expression of both cofactors at the protein level, indicating post-transcriptional regulation. Furthermore, we show that both cofactors not only co-localize with each other but also with Isl and Lhx3 LIM-HD proteins in developing ventral neural tube neurons. Our results demonstrate the dynamic expression of cofactors participating in the regulation of LIM-HD proteins during the development of the neural tube in mice and suggest additional post-transcriptional regulation in the nuclear LIM-HD protein network.

  5. Cofactor molecules maintain infectious conformation and restrict strain properties in purified prions.

    PubMed

    Deleault, Nathan R; Walsh, Daniel J; Piro, Justin R; Wang, Fei; Wang, Xinhe; Ma, Jiyan; Rees, Judy R; Supattapone, Surachai

    2012-07-10

    Prions containing misfolded prion protein (PrP(Sc)) can be formed with cofactor molecules using the technique of serial protein misfolding cyclic amplification. However, it remains unknown whether cofactors materially participate in maintaining prion conformation and infectious properties. Here we show that withdrawal of cofactor molecules during serial propagation of purified recombinant prions caused adaptation of PrP(Sc) structure accompanied by a reduction in specific infectivity of >10(5)-fold, to undetectable levels, despite the ability of adapted "protein-only" PrP(Sc) molecules to self-propagate in vitro. We also report that changing only the cofactor component of a minimal reaction substrate mixture during serial propagation induced major changes in the strain properties of an infectious recombinant prion. Moreover, propagation with only one functional cofactor (phosphatidylethanolamine) induced the conversion of three distinct strains into a single strain with unique infectious properties and PrP(Sc) structure. Taken together, these results indicate that cofactor molecules can regulate the defining features of mammalian prions: PrP(Sc) conformation, infectivity, and strain properties. These findings suggest that cofactor molecules likely are integral components of infectious prions.

  6. Biosynthesis of the iron-molybdenum cofactor and the molybdenum cofactor in Klebsiella pneumoniae: effect of sulfur source

    SciTech Connect

    Ugalde, R.A.; Imperial, J.; Shah, V.K.; Brill, W.J.

    1985-12-01

    NifQ/sup -/ and Mol/sup -/ mutants of Klebsiella pneumoniae show an elevated molybdenum requirement for nitrogen fixation. Substitution of cystine for sulfate as the sulfur source in the medium reduced the molybdenum requirement of these mutants to levels required by the wild type. Cystine also increased the intracellular molybdenum accumulation of NifQ/sup -/ and Mol/sup -/ mutants. Cystine did not affect the molybdenum requirement or accumulation in wild-type K. pneumoniae. Sulfate transport and metabolism in K. pneumoniae were repressed by cystine. However, the effect of cystine on the molybdenum requirement could not be explained by an interaction between sulfate and molybdate at the transport level. The data show that cystine does not have a generalized effect on molybdenum metabolism. Millimolar concentrations of molybdate inhibited nitrogenase and nitrate reductase derepression with sulfate as the sulfur source, but not with cystine. The inhibition was the result of a specific antagonism of sulfate metabolism by molybdate. This study suggests that a sulfur donor and molybdenum interact at an early step in the biosynthesis of the iron-molybdenum cofactor. This interaction might occur nonenzymatically when the levels of the reactants are high.

  7. Influence of the molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis on anaerobic respiration, biofilm formation and motility in Burkholderia thailandensis.

    PubMed

    Andreae, Clio A; Titball, Richard W; Butler, Clive S

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia thailandensis is closely related to Burkholderia pseudomallei, a bacterial pathogen and the causative agent of melioidosis. B. pseudomallei can survive and persist within a hypoxic environment for up to one year and has been shown to grow anaerobically in the presence of nitrate. Currently, little is known about the role of anaerobic respiration in pathogenesis of melioidosis. Using B. thailandensis as a model, a library of 1344 transposon mutants was created to identify genes required for anaerobic nitrate respiration. One transposon mutant (CA01) was identified with an insertion in BTH_I1704 (moeA), a gene required for the molybdopterin biosynthetic pathway. This pathway is involved in the synthesis of a molybdopterin cofactor required for a variety of molybdoenzymes, including nitrate reductase. Disruption of molybdopterin biosynthesis prevented growth under anaerobic conditions, when using nitrate as the sole terminal electron acceptor. Defects in anaerobic respiration, nitrate reduction, motility and biofilm formation were observed for CA01. Mutant complementation with pDA-17:BTH_I1704 was able to restore anaerobic growth on nitrate, nitrate reductase activity and biofilm formation, but did not restore motility. This study highlights the potential importance of molybdoenzyme-dependent anaerobic respiration in the survival and virulence of B. thailandensis.

  8. HIV-1 evades innate immune recognition through specific cofactor recruitment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasaiyaah, Jane; Tan, Choon Ping; Fletcher, Adam J.; Price, Amanda J.; Blondeau, Caroline; Hilditch, Laura; Jacques, David A.; Selwood, David L.; James, Leo C.; Noursadeghi, Mahdad; Towers, Greg J.

    2013-11-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 is able to replicate in primary human macrophages without stimulating innate immunity despite reverse transcription of genomic RNA into double-stranded DNA, an activity that might be expected to trigger innate pattern recognition receptors. We reasoned that if correctly orchestrated HIV-1 uncoating and nuclear entry is important for evasion of innate sensors then manipulation of specific interactions between HIV-1 capsid and host factors that putatively regulate these processes should trigger pattern recognition receptors and stimulate type 1 interferon (IFN) secretion. Here we show that HIV-1 capsid mutants N74D and P90A, which are impaired for interaction with cofactors cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor subunit 6 (CPSF6) and cyclophilins (Nup358 and CypA), respectively, cannot replicate in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages because they trigger innate sensors leading to nuclear translocation of NF-κB and IRF3, the production of soluble type 1 IFN and induction of an antiviral state. Depletion of CPSF6 with short hairpin RNA expression allows wild-type virus to trigger innate sensors and IFN production. In each case, suppressed replication is rescued by IFN-receptor blockade, demonstrating a role for IFN in restriction. IFN production is dependent on viral reverse transcription but not integration, indicating that a viral reverse transcription product comprises the HIV-1 pathogen-associated molecular pattern. Finally, we show that we can pharmacologically induce wild-type HIV-1 infection to stimulate IFN secretion and an antiviral state using a non-immunosuppressive cyclosporine analogue. We conclude that HIV-1 has evolved to use CPSF6 and cyclophilins to cloak its replication, allowing evasion of innate immune sensors and induction of a cell-autonomous innate immune response in primary human macrophages.

  9. Partial purification and characterization of contact activation cofactor.

    PubMed Central

    Schiffman, S; Lee, P

    1975-01-01

    The contact phase of intrinsic clotting involves Factor XI, Factor XII, Fletcher factor, and a fourth activity that we call contact activation cofactor (CAC). All four of these activities are reduced or absent in Dicalite-adsorbed plasma. A modified activated partial thromboplastin time assay for CAC has been defined by using a substrate of Dicalite-adsorbed plasma combined with partially purified sources of Factors XI and XII, and Fletcher factor. The following properties of CAC in plasma have been determined by using the assay: it is stable up to 60 min at 56 degrees C; gradually loses activity at 80 degrees C; is stable between pH 6 and 9; is precipitated by ammonium sulfate between 40% and 50% saturation; is slightly adsorbed by A1(OH)3; and is eluted from DEAE-cellulose after the major protein peaks. A purification procedure has been devised that separates CAC from other known clotting factors. Isolated CAC was less stable than CAC in plasma, but in the presence of dilute human serum albumin it retained full activity for 80 min at 56 degrees C. On gel filtration CAC had an apparent mol wt of 220,000 daltons. These properties are consistent with those described for Fitzgerald factor, which further supports the conclusion that CAC and Fitzgerald factor represent the same activity. Isolated CAC promoted the generation of activated Factor XI (XIa) in a mixture containing purified Factor XI, Factor XII, and kaolin. The amount of Factor XIa generated was proportional to the amount of added CAC. No time-consuming reaction between Factor XI or Factor XII and CAC could be demonstrated. PMID:1184736

  10. Cofactor Requirement of HpyAV Restriction Endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Siu-Hong; Opitz, Lars; Higgins, Lauren; O'loane, Diana; Xu, Shuang-yong

    2010-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori is the etiologic agent of common gastritis and a risk factor for gastric cancer. It is also one of the richest sources of Type II restriction-modification (R-M) systems in microorganisms. Principal Findings We have cloned, expressed and purified a new restriction endonuclease HpyAV from H. pylori strain 26695. We determined the HpyAV DNA recognition sequence and cleavage site as CCTTC 6/5. In addition, we found that HpyAV has a unique metal ion requirement: its cleavage activity is higher with transition metal ions than in Mg++. The special metal ion requirement of HpyAV can be attributed to the presence of a HNH catalytic site similar to ColE9 nuclease instead of the canonical PD-X-D/EXK catalytic site found in many other REases. Site-directed mutagenesis was carried out to verify the catalytic residues of HpyAV. Mutation of the conserved metal-binding Asn311 and His320 to alanine eliminated cleavage activity. HpyAV variant H295A displayed approximately 1% of wt activity. Conclusions/Significance Some HNH-type endonucleases have unique metal ion cofactor requirement for optimal activities. Homology modeling and site-directed mutagenesis confirmed that HpyAV is a member of the HNH nuclease family. The identification of catalytic residues in HpyAV paved the way for further engineering of the metal binding site. A survey of sequenced microbial genomes uncovered 10 putative R-M systems that show high sequence similarity to the HpyAV system, suggesting lateral transfer of a prototypic HpyAV-like R-M system among these microorganisms. PMID:20140205

  11. The effect of ribosome assembly cofactors on in vitro 30S subunit reconstitution.

    PubMed

    Bunner, Anne E; Nord, Stefan; Wikström, P Mikael; Williamson, James R

    2010-04-23

    Ribosome biogenesis is facilitated by a growing list of assembly cofactors, including helicases, GTPases, chaperones, and other proteins, but the specific functions of many of these assembly cofactors are still unclear. The effect of three assembly cofactors on 30S ribosome assembly was determined in vitro using a previously developed mass-spectrometry-based method that monitors the rRNA binding kinetics of ribosomal proteins. The essential GTPase Era caused several late-binding proteins to bind rRNA faster when included in a 30S reconstitution. RimP enabled faster binding of S9 and S19 and inhibited the binding of S12 and S13, perhaps by blocking those proteins' binding sites. RimM caused proteins S5 and S12 to bind dramatically faster. These quantitative kinetic data provide important clues about the roles of these assembly cofactors in the mechanism of 30S biogenesis.

  12. Bleaching herbicide norflurazon inhibits phytoene desaturase by competition with the cofactors.

    PubMed

    Breitenbach, J; Zhu, C; Sandmann, G

    2001-11-01

    Cofactor requirement was determined for the heterologous expressed phytoene desaturases from the cyanobacterium Synechococcus and the higher plant Gentiana lutea. The cyanobacterial enzyme is dependent on either NAD(P) or plastoquinone, whereas only quinones such as plastoquinone can function as a cofactor for the phytoene desaturase from G. lutea. Enzyme kinetic studies were carried out to determine a possible competition between the cofactors and the bleaching herbicide norflurazon. For the Synechococcus enzyme, competition between norflurazon and NADP, as well as plastoquinone, could be demonstrated. The K(m) values for these cofactors were 6.6 mM and 0.23 microM, respectively. Inhibition of the phytoene desaturase from G. lutea by norflurazon was also competitive with respect to plastoquinone. The K(m) values of both enzymes for plastoquinone were very close.

  13. Organic cofactors participated more frequently than transition metals in redox reactions of primitive proteins.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hong-Fang; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Hong-Yu

    2008-08-01

    Protein redox reactions are one of the most basic and important biochemical actions. As amino acids are weak redox mediators, most protein redox functions are undertaken by protein cofactors, which include organic ligands and transition metal ions. Since both kinds of redox cofactors were available in the pre-protein RNA world, it is challenging to explore which one was more involved in redox processes of primitive proteins? In this paper, using an examination of the redox cofactor usage of putative ancient proteins, we infer that organic ligands participated more frequently than transition metals in redox reactions of primitive proteins, at least as protein cofactors. This is further supported by the relative abundance of amino acids in the primordial world. Supplementary material for this article can be found on the BioEssays website.

  14. Cofactor metals and antioxidant enzymes in cisplatin-treated rats: effect of antioxidant intervention.

    PubMed

    Sabuncuoglu, Suna; Eken, Ayse; Aydin, Ahmet; Ozgunes, Hilal; Orhan, Hilmi

    2015-10-01

    We explored the association between the activities of antioxidant enzymes and their metallic cofactors in rats treated with cisplatin. The antioxidant effects of aminoguanidine, and a combination of vitamins E and C were investigated. Plasma platin was significantly lower than liver and kidney. Cisplatin treatment caused significant increase in plasma Se-glutathione peroxidase activity. Activities of Se-glutathione peroxidase, glutathione S-transferase, catalase and Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase have been found to be significantly decreased in liver and kidney compared to controls. Zn levels in these organs were diminished upon cisplatin treatment, while levels of Cu were unaffected. Interestingly, levels of iron, the cofactor of catalase, were found to be significantly increased in liver and kidney. Intervention with aminoguanidine or vitamins was generally prevented cisplatin-caused changes in the activity of enzymes and in the tissue levels of cofactor metals. These observations suggest that relation between activities of enzymes and levels of cofactor metals is multifactorial.

  15. Spatially programmed assembling of oxidoreductases with single-stranded DNA for cofactor-required reactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianwen David; Ma, Fei; Ma, Xingyuan; Wang, Ping

    2015-04-01

    Cofactor is especially important for biotransformation catalyzed by oxidoreductases. Many attempts in enhancing performance of the reactions by improving cofactor utilization have been reported. In this study, efficiency of cofactor-requiring biocatalysis was enhanced by improving cofactor recycling via spatially programmed assembling glycerol dehydrogenase (GlyDH, Escherichia coli MG1655) and glutamate dehydrogenase (GluDH, Bacillus subtilis str168), with the aid of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). The two enzymes were first independently expressed as molecules fused with a phage protein A* that could covalently link ssDNA with certain features. After an enzymatic cross-linking reaction taking place under mild conditions, the conjugate of fused enzyme and ssDNA was assembled into desired structures through base pairing enabled by the ssDNA. Results showed that, to some extent, the fusion with protein A* could improve the specific activity of the enzymes (GlyDH-A*/GlyDH = 116.0 %; GluDH-A*/GluDH = 105.2 %). Additionally, in the coupled reaction system with glycerol and α-ketoglutaric acid as substrates, regarding the production of glutamic acid based on HPLC analysis, the efficiency of cofactor utilization was significantly enhanced (by 23.8- to 41.9-folds), indicating the existence of a substrate-channeling mechanism for cofactor utilization in the assembled reaction system due to the proximity effects. The degree of substrate channeling was calculated as from 1.65 to 1.73. Furthermore, the efficiency of cofactor utilization was influenced in an architecture-dependent manner when complexes with different stoichiometry of GlyDH and GluDH were utilized in biotransformation. This study demonstrated a novel strategy of cofactor recycling for enhanced performance of coupled oxidoreductive reactions.

  16. Molecular simulation to investigate the cofactor specificity for pichia stipitis Xylose reductase.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xiao-Le; Cong, Shan; Weng, Xiao-Rong; Chen, Jin-Hua; Wang, Jing-Fang; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2013-11-01

    Xylose is one of the most abundant carbohydrates in nature, and widely used to produce bioethanol via fermentation in industry. Xylulose can produce two key enzymes: xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase. Owing to the disparate cofactor specificities of xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase, intracellular redox imbalance is detected during the xylose fermentation, resulting in low ethanol yields. To overcome this barrier, a common strategy is applied to artificially modify the cofactor specificity of xylose reductase. In this study, we utilized molecular simulation approaches to construct a 3D (three-dimensional) structural model for the NADP-dependent Pichia stipitis xylose reductase (PsXR). Based on the 3D model, the favourable binding modes for both cofactors NAD and NADP were obtained using the flexible docking procedure and molecular dynamics simulation. Structural analysis of the favourable binding modes showed that the cofactor binding site of PsXR was composed of 3 major components: a hydrophilic pocket, a hydrophobic pocket as well as a linker channel between the aforementioned two pockets. The hydrophilic pocket could recognize the nicotinamide moiety of the cofactors by hydrogen bonding networks, while the hydrophobic pocket functioned to position the adenine moiety of the cofactors by hydrophobic and Π-Π stacking interactions. The linker channel contained some key residues for ligand-binding; their mutation could have impact to the specificity of PsXR. Finally, it was found that any of the two single mutations, K21A and K270N, might reverse the cofactor specificity of PsXR from major NADP- to NADdependent, which was further confirmed by the additional experiments. Our findings may provide useful insights into the cofactor specificity of PsXR, stimulating new strategies for better designing xylose reductase and improving ethanol production in industry.

  17. Non-DNA-binding cofactors enhance DNA-binding specificity of a transcriptional regulatory complex.

    PubMed

    Siggers, Trevor; Duyzend, Michael H; Reddy, Jessica; Khan, Sidra; Bulyk, Martha L

    2011-12-06

    Recruitment of cofactors to specific DNA sites is integral for specificity in gene regulation. As a model system, we examined how targeting and transcriptional control of the sulfur metabolism genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is governed by recruitment of the transcriptional co-activator Met4. We developed genome-scale approaches to measure transcription factor (TF) DNA-binding affinities and cofactor recruitment to >1300 genomic binding site sequences. We report that genes responding to the TF Cbf1 and cofactor Met28 contain a novel 'recruitment motif' (RYAAT), adjacent to Cbf1 binding sites, which enhances the binding of a Met4-Met28-Cbf1 regulatory complex, and that abrogation of this motif significantly reduces gene induction under low-sulfur conditions. Furthermore, we show that correct recognition of this composite motif requires both non-DNA-binding cofactors Met4 and Met28. Finally, we demonstrate that the presence of an RYAAT motif next to a Cbf1 site, rather than Cbf1 binding affinity, specifies Cbf1-dependent sulfur metabolism genes. Our results highlight the need to examine TF/cofactor complexes, as novel specificity can result from cofactors that lack intrinsic DNA-binding specificity.

  18. Nanotube-supported bioproduction of 4-hydroxy-2-butanone via in situ cofactor regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Zhang, Hongfang; Ching, Chi-Bun; Chen, Yuan; Jiang, Rongrong

    2012-06-01

    Nicotinamide cofactor-dependent oxidoreductases have been widely employed during the bioproduction of varieties of useful compounds. Efficient cofactor regeneration is often required for these biotransformation reactions. Herein, we report the synthesis of an important pharmaceutical intermediate 4-hydroxy-2-butanone (4H2B) via an immobilized in situ cofactor regeneration system composed of NAD(+)-dependent glycerol dehydrogenase (GlyDH) and NAD(+)-regenerating NADH oxidase (nox). Both enzymes were immobilized on functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) through the specific interaction between the His-tagged enzymes and the modified SWCNTs. GlyDH demonstrated ca. 100% native enzyme activity after immobilization. The GlyDH/nox ratio, pH, and amount of nicotinamide cofactor were examined to establish the optimum reaction conditions for 4H2B production. The nanoparticle-supported cofactor regeneration system become more stable and the yield of 4H2B turned out to be almost twice (37%) that of the free enzyme system after a 12-h reaction. Thus, we believe that this non-covalent specific immobilization procedure can be applied to cofactor regeneration system for bioconversions.

  19. The glmS ribozyme cofactor is a general acid-base catalyst.

    PubMed

    Viladoms, Júlia; Fedor, Martha J

    2012-11-21

    The glmS ribozyme is the first natural self-cleaving ribozyme known to require a cofactor. The d-glucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcN6P) cofactor has been proposed to serve as a general acid, but its role in the catalytic mechanism has not been established conclusively. We surveyed GlcN6P-like molecules for their ability to support self-cleavage of the glmS ribozyme and found a strong correlation between the pH dependence of the cleavage reaction and the intrinsic acidity of the cofactors. For cofactors with low binding affinities, the contribution to rate enhancement was proportional to their intrinsic acidity. This linear free-energy relationship between cofactor efficiency and acid dissociation constants is consistent with a mechanism in which the cofactors participate directly in the reaction as general acid-base catalysts. A high value for the Brønsted coefficient (β ~ 0.7) indicates that a significant amount of proton transfer has already occurred in the transition state. The glmS ribozyme is the first self-cleaving RNA to use an exogenous acid-base catalyst.

  20. The glmS Ribozyme Cofactor is a General Acid-Base Catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Viladoms, Julia; Fedor, Martha J.

    2012-01-01

    The glmS ribozyme is the first natural self-cleaving ribozyme known to require a cofactor. The D-glucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcN6P) cofactor has been proposed to serve as a general acid, but its role in the catalytic mechanism has not been established conclusively. We surveyed GlcN6P-like molecules for their ability to support self-cleavage of the glmS ribozyme and found a strong correlation between the pH dependence of the cleavage reaction and the intrinsic acidity of the cofactors. For cofactors with low binding affinities the contribution to rate enhancement was proportional to their intrinsic acidity. This linear free-energy relationship between cofactor efficiency and acid dissociation constants is consistent with a mechanism in which the cofactors participate directly in the reaction as general acid-base catalysts. A high value for the Brønsted coefficient (β ~ 0.7) indicates that a significant amount of proton transfer has already occurred in the transition state. The glmS ribozyme is the first self-cleaving RNA to use an exogenous acid-base catalyst. PMID:23113700

  1. Serine 1179 Phosphorylation of Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Increases Superoxide Generation and Alters Cofactor Regulation.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hu; Zhuang, Yugang; Harbeck, Mark C; He, Donghong; Xie, Lishi; Chen, Weiguo

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is responsible for maintaining systemic blood pressure, vascular remodeling and angiogenesis. In addition to producing NO, eNOS can also generate superoxide (O2-.) in the absence of the cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4). Previous studies have shown that bovine eNOS serine 1179 (Serine 1177/human) phosphorylation critically modulates NO synthesis. However, the effect of serine 1179 phosphorylation on eNOS superoxide generation is unknown. Here, we used the phosphomimetic form of eNOS (S1179D) to determine the effect of S1179 phosphorylation on superoxide generating activity, and its sensitivity to regulation by BH4, Ca2+, and calmodulin (CAM). S1179D eNOS exhibited significantly increased superoxide generating activity and NADPH consumption compared to wild-type eNOS (WT eNOS). The superoxide generating activities of S1179D eNOS and WT eNOS did not differ significantly in their sensitivity to regulation by either Ca2+ or CaM. The sensitivity of the superoxide generating activity of S1179D eNOS to inhibition by BH4 was significantly reduced compared to WT eNOS. In eNOS-overexpressing 293 cells, BH4 depletion with 10mM DAHP for 48 hours followed by 50ng/ml VEGF for 30 min to phosphorylate eNOS S1179 increased ROS accumulation compared to DAHP-only treated cells. Meanwhile, MTT assay indicated that overexpression of eNOS in HEK293 cells decreased cellular viability compared to control cells at BH4 depletion condition (P<0.01). VEGF-mediated Serine 1179 phosphorylation further decreased the cellular viability in eNOS-overexpressing 293 cells (P<0.01). Our data demonstrate that eNOS serine 1179 phosphorylation, in addition to enhancing NO production, also profoundly affects superoxide generation: S1179 phosphorylation increases superoxide production while decreasing sensitivity to the inhibitory effect of BH4 on this activity. PMID:26560496

  2. Engineering redox cofactor utilization for detoxification of glycolaldehyde, a key inhibitor of bioethanol production, in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Jayakody, Lahiru N; Horie, Kenta; Hayashi, Nobuyuki; Kitagaki, Hiroshi

    2013-07-01

    Hot-compressed water treatment of lignocellulose liberates numerous inhibitors that prevent ethanol fermentation of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Glycolaldehyde is one of the strongest fermentation inhibitors and we developed a tolerant strain by overexpressing ADH1 encoding an NADH-dependent reductase; however, its recovery was partial. In this study, to overcome this technical barrier, redox cofactor preference of glycolaldehyde detoxification was investigated. Glycolaldehyde-reducing activity of the ADH1-overexpressing strain was NADH-dependent but not NADPH-dependent. Moreover, genes encoding components of the pentose phosphate pathway, which generates intracellular NADPH, was upregulated in response to high concentrations of glycolaldehyde. Mutants defective in pentose phosphate pathways were sensitive to glycolaldehyde. Genome-wide survey identified GRE2 encoding a NADPH-dependent reductase as the gene that confers tolerance to glycolaldehyde. Overexpression of GRE2 in addition to ADH1 further improved the tolerance to glycolaldehyde. NADPH-dependent glycolaldehyde conversion to ethylene glycol and NADP+ content of the strain overexpressing both ADH1 and GRE2 were increased at 5 mM glycolaldehyde. Expression of GRE2 was increased in response to glycolaldehyde. Carbon metabolism of the strain was rerouted from glycerol to ethanol. Thus, it was concluded that the overexpression of GRE2 together with ADH1 restores glycolaldehyde tolerance by augmenting the NADPH-dependent reduction pathway in addition to NADH-dependent reduction pathway. The redox cofactor control for detoxification of glycolaldehyde proposed in this study could influence strategies for improving the tolerance of other fermentation inhibitors.

  3. A novel cofactor-binding mode in bacterial IMP dehydrogenases explains inhibitor selectivity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Kim, Youngchang; Maltseva, Natalia; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Gu, Minyi; Zhang, Minjia; Mandapati, Kavitha; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R.; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; et al

    2015-01-09

    The steadily rising frequency of emerging diseases and antibiotic resistance creates an urgent need for new drugs and targets. Inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMP dehydrogenase or IMPDH) is a promising target for the development of new antimicrobial agents. IMPDH catalyzes the oxidation of IMP to XMP with the concomitant reduction of NAD+, which is the pivotal step in the biosynthesis of guanine nucleotides. Potent inhibitors of bacterial IMPDHs have been identified that bind in a structurally distinct pocket that is absent in eukaryotic IMPDHs. The physiological role of this pocket was not understood. Here, we report the structures of complexes withmore » different classes of inhibitors of Bacillus anthracis, Campylobacter jejuni, and Clostridium perfringens IMPDHs. These structures in combination with inhibition studies provide important insights into the interactions that modulate selectivity and potency. We also present two structures of the Vibrio cholerae IMPDH in complex with IMP/NAD+ and XMP/NAD+. In both structures, the cofactor assumes a dramatically different conformation than reported previously for eukaryotic IMPDHs and other dehydrogenases, with the major change observed for the position of the NAD+ adenosine moiety. More importantly, this new NAD+-binding site involves the same pocket that is utilized by the inhibitors. Thus, the bacterial IMPDH-specific NAD+-binding mode helps to rationalize the conformation adopted by several classes of prokaryotic IMPDH inhibitors. As a result, these findings offer a potential strategy for further ligand optimization.« less

  4. A Novel Cofactor-binding Mode in Bacterial IMP Dehydrogenases Explains Inhibitor Selectivity*

    PubMed Central

    Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Kim, Youngchang; Maltseva, Natalia; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Gu, Minyi; Zhang, Minjia; Mandapati, Kavitha; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R.; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    The steadily rising frequency of emerging diseases and antibiotic resistance creates an urgent need for new drugs and targets. Inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMP dehydrogenase or IMPDH) is a promising target for the development of new antimicrobial agents. IMPDH catalyzes the oxidation of IMP to XMP with the concomitant reduction of NAD+, which is the pivotal step in the biosynthesis of guanine nucleotides. Potent inhibitors of bacterial IMPDHs have been identified that bind in a structurally distinct pocket that is absent in eukaryotic IMPDHs. The physiological role of this pocket was not understood. Here, we report the structures of complexes with different classes of inhibitors of Bacillus anthracis, Campylobacter jejuni, and Clostridium perfringens IMPDHs. These structures in combination with inhibition studies provide important insights into the interactions that modulate selectivity and potency. We also present two structures of the Vibrio cholerae IMPDH in complex with IMP/NAD+ and XMP/NAD+. In both structures, the cofactor assumes a dramatically different conformation than reported previously for eukaryotic IMPDHs and other dehydrogenases, with the major change observed for the position of the NAD+ adenosine moiety. More importantly, this new NAD+-binding site involves the same pocket that is utilized by the inhibitors. Thus, the bacterial IMPDH-specific NAD+-binding mode helps to rationalize the conformation adopted by several classes of prokaryotic IMPDH inhibitors. These findings offer a potential strategy for further ligand optimization. PMID:25572472

  5. Human molybdopterin synthase gene: genomic structure and mutations in molybdenum cofactor deficiency type B.

    PubMed Central

    Reiss, J; Dorche, C; Stallmeyer, B; Mendel, R R; Cohen, N; Zabot, M T

    1999-01-01

    Biosynthesis of the molybdenum cofactor (MoCo) can be divided into (1) the formation of a precursor and (2) the latter's subsequent conversion, by molybdopterin synthase, into the organic moiety of MoCo. These two steps are reflected by the complementation groups A and B and the two formally distinguished types of MoCo deficiency that have an identical phenotype. Both types of MoCo deficiency result in a pleiotropic loss of all molybdoenzyme activities and cause severe neurological damage. MOCS1 is defective in patients with group A deficiency and has been shown to encode two enzymes for early synthesis via a bicistronic transcript with two consecutive open reading frames (ORFs). MOCS2 encodes the small and large subunits of molybdopterin synthase via a single transcript with two overlapping reading frames. This gene was mapped to 5q and comprises seven exons. The coding sequence and all splice site-junction sequences were screened for mutations, in MoCo-deficient patients in whom a previous search for MOCS1 mutations had been negative. In seven of the eight patients whom we investigated, we identified MOCS2 mutations that, by their nature, are most likely responsible for the deficiency. Three different frameshift mutations were observed, with one of them found on 7 of 14 identified alleles. Furthermore, a start-codon mutation and a missense mutation of a highly conserved amino acid residue were found. The locations of the mutations confirm the functional role of both ORFs. One of the patients with identified MOCS2 mutations had been classified as type B, in complementation studies. These findings support the hypothetical mechanism, for both forms of MoCo deficiency, that formerly had been established by cell-culture experiments. PMID:10053004

  6. LC-MS based assay to measure intracellular compound levels in Mycobacterium smegmatis: linking compound levels to cellular potency.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Jyothi; Narayan, Ashwini; Venkatraman, Janani; Chatterji, Monalisa

    2013-08-01

    Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) plays a central role in maintaining cellular pool of tetrahydrofolic acid, a cofactor necessary for DNA, RNA and protein synthesis. The clinical validation of DHFR as antibacterial target was established by the success of trimethoprim (TMP). DHFR is also an attractive target for identifying anti-tuberculosis molecules however, due to observed weak cellular potency, no DHFR inhibitors have been developed as drugs so far. TMP and its analogs have poor cellular potency on Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium smegmatis cells. We found a mutant strain of M. smegmatis, mc²155 to be sensitive to TMP whereas wild type strain was not inhibited by TMP. We utilized this system to probe if poor or lack of activity of TMP is a consequence of poor intracellular compound levels. An LC-MS based method was developed for measuring TMP and rifampicin (RIF) in M. smegmatis. Using the assay, equivalent RIF levels were observed in both strains however, TMP was detected only in mc²155 cells, hence proving a positive correlation between potency and compound levels. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time LC-MS method has been used to measure compound levels in mycobacterial cells. We propose it to be a valuable tool to understand the lack of potency or resistance mechanisms in antimycobacterial drug development.

  7. Sequence-specific labeling of nucleic acids and proteins with methyltransferases and cofactor analogues.

    PubMed

    Hanz, Gisela Maria; Jung, Britta; Giesbertz, Anna; Juhasz, Matyas; Weinhold, Elmar

    2014-11-22

    S-Adenosyl-l-methionine (AdoMet or SAM)-dependent methyltransferases (MTase) catalyze the transfer of the activated methyl group from AdoMet to specific positions in DNA, RNA, proteins and small biomolecules. This natural methylation reaction can be expanded to a wide variety of alkylation reactions using synthetic cofactor analogues. Replacement of the reactive sulfonium center of AdoMet with an aziridine ring leads to cofactors which can be coupled with DNA by various DNA MTases. These aziridine cofactors can be equipped with reporter groups at different positions of the adenine moiety and used for Sequence-specific Methyltransferase-Induced Labeling of DNA (SMILing DNA). As a typical example we give a protocol for biotinylation of pBR322 plasmid DNA at the 5'-ATCGAT-3' sequence with the DNA MTase M.BseCI and the aziridine cofactor 6BAz in one step. Extension of the activated methyl group with unsaturated alkyl groups results in another class of AdoMet analogues which are used for methyltransferase-directed Transfer of Activated Groups (mTAG). Since the extended side chains are activated by the sulfonium center and the unsaturated bond, these cofactors are called double-activated AdoMet analogues. These analogues not only function as cofactors for DNA MTases, like the aziridine cofactors, but also for RNA, protein and small molecule MTases. They are typically used for enzymatic modification of MTase substrates with unique functional groups which are labeled with reporter groups in a second chemical step. This is exemplified in a protocol for fluorescence labeling of histone H3 protein. A small propargyl group is transferred from the cofactor analogue SeAdoYn to the protein by the histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) MTase Set7/9 followed by click labeling of the alkynylated histone H3 with TAMRA azide. MTase-mediated labeling with cofactor analogues is an enabling technology for many exciting applications including identification and functional study of MTase substrates as

  8. A new cofactor in prokaryotic enzyme: Tryptophan tryptophylquinone as the redox prosthetic group in methylamine dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    McIntire, W.S. Univ. of California, San Francisco ); Wemmer, D.E. ); Chistoserdov, A.; Lidstrom, M.E. )

    1991-05-10

    Methylamine dehydrogenase (MADH), an {alpha}{sub 2}{beta}{sub 2} enzyme from numerous methylotrophic soil bacteria, contains a novel quinonoid redox prosthetic group that is covalently bound to its small {beta} subunit through two amino acyl residues. A comparison of the amino acid sequence deduced from the gene sequence of the small subunit for the enzyme from Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 with the published amino acid sequence obtained by Edman degradation method, allowed the identification of the amino acyl constituents of the cofactor as two tryptophyl residues. This information was crucial for interpreting {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance, and mass spectral data collected for the semicarbazide- and carboxymethyl-derivatized bis(tripeptidyl)-cofactor of MADH from bacterium W3A1. The cofactor is composed of two cross-linked tryptophyl residues. Although there are many possible isomers, only one is consistent with all the data: The first tryptophyl residue in the peptide sequence exists as an indole-6,7-dione, and is attached at its 4 position to the 2 position of the second, otherwise unmodified, indole side group. Contrary to earlier reports, the cofactor of MADH is not 2,7,9-tricarboxypyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), a derivative thereof, of pro-PQQ. This appears to be the only example of two cross-linked, modified amino acyl residues having a functional role in the active site of an enzyme, in the absence of other cofactors or metal ions.

  9. Cofactor dependence and isotype distribution of anticardiolipin antibodies in viral infections

    PubMed Central

    Guglielmone, H; Vitozzi, S; Elbarcha, O; Fernandez, E

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Antibodies to cardiolipin (aCLs) are often detected in patients with autoimmune disorders or infectious diseases.
OBJECTIVE—To investigate the distribution of aCL isotypes and requirement of protein cofactor in viral infections in order to establish the importance, if any, of these antibodies in these infectious diseases.
PATIENTS AND METHODS—The isotype distribution of aCLs in the sera from 160 patients with infection caused by HIV-1 (n=40), hepatitis A virus (n=40), hepatitis B virus (n=40), or hepatitis C virus (n=40) was studied by standardised enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in the presence and absence of protein cofactor (mainly β2-glycoprotein I). Serum samples from healthy volunteers and patients with syphilis and antiphospholipid syndrome were also included and served as negative and positive control groups respectively.
RESULTS—The prevalence of one or more aCL isotypes in serum of patients with HIV-1, hepatitis A virus, hepatitis B virus, or hepatitis C virus infection was 47%, 92%, 42%, and 17% respectively (principally IgM and/or IgA). Most of these antibodies were mainly cofactor independent.
CONCLUSIONS—The presence of aCLs in viral infections is principally cofactor independent, suggesting that cofactor dependence of the aCLs should be assessed to distinguish subjects most likely to suffer from clinical symptoms observed in the presence of these antibodies.

 PMID:11302873

  10. Metabolic Impact of Redox Cofactor Perturbations on the Formation of Aroma Compounds in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Bloem, Audrey; Sanchez, Isabelle; Dequin, Sylvie; Camarasa, Carole

    2015-10-16

    Redox homeostasis is a fundamental requirement for the maintenance of metabolism, energy generation, and growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The redox cofactors NADH and NADPH are among the most highly connected metabolites in metabolic networks. Changes in their concentrations may induce widespread changes in metabolism. Redox imbalances were achieved with a dedicated biological tool overexpressing native NADH-dependent or engineered NADPH-dependent 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase, in the presence of acetoin. We report that targeted perturbation of the balance of cofactors (NAD(+)/NADH or, to a lesser extent, NADP(+)/NADPH) significantly affected the production of volatile compounds. In most cases, variations in the redox state of yeasts modified the formation of all compounds from the same biochemical pathway (isobutanol, isoamyl alcohol, and their derivatives) or chemical class (ethyl esters), irrespective of the cofactors. These coordinated responses were found to be closely linked to the impact of redox status on the availability of intermediates of central carbon metabolism. This was the case for α-keto acids and acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA), which are precursors for the synthesis of many volatile compounds. We also demonstrated that changes in the availability of NADH selectively affected the synthesis of some volatile molecules (e.g., methionol, phenylethanol, and propanoic acid), reflecting the specific cofactor requirements of the dehydrogenases involved in their formation. Our findings indicate that both the availability of precursors from central carbon metabolism and the accessibility of reduced cofactors contribute to cell redox status modulation of volatile compound formation.

  11. Identification of a novel cellular target and a co-factor for norovirus infection - B cells & commensal bacteria.

    PubMed

    Karst, Stephanie M

    2015-07-01

    Human noroviruses are a leading cause of gastroenteritis worldwide but research on these important enteric pathogens has long been restricted by their uncultivability. Extensive efforts to infect intestinal epithelial cells with murine and human noroviruses in vitro have been thus far unsuccessful while murine noroviruses efficiently and lytically infect innate immune cells including macrophages and dendritic cells. We have recently discovered that murine and human noroviruses infect B cells in vitro. The nature of B cell infection was distinct from innate immune cell infection in that mature B cells were infected noncytopathically in contrast to the lytic infection of macrophages and dendritic cells. Human norovirus infection of B cells was facilitated by commensal bacteria expressing an appropriate histo-blood group antigen. Importantly, we used the mouse model of norovirus infection to confirm that Peyer's patch B cells are infected, and that commensal bacteria stimulate infection, in vivo.

  12. Cellular multitasking: the dual role of human Cu-ATPases in cofactor delivery and intracellular copper balance.

    PubMed

    Lutsenko, Svetlana; Gupta, Arnab; Burkhead, Jason L; Zuzel, Vesna

    2008-08-01

    The human copper-transporting ATPases (Cu-ATPases) are essential for dietary copper uptake, normal development and function of the CNS, and regulation of copper homeostasis in the body. In a cell, Cu-ATPases maintain the intracellular concentration of copper by transporting copper into intracellular exocytic vesicles. In addition, these P-type ATPases mediate delivery of copper to copper-dependent enzymes in the secretory pathway and in specialized cell compartments such as secretory granules or melanosomes. The multiple functions of human Cu-ATPase necessitate complex regulation of these transporters that is mediated through the presence of regulatory domains in their structure, posttranslational modification and intracellular trafficking, as well as interactions with the copper chaperone Atox1 and other regulatory molecules. In this review, we summarize the current information on the function and regulatory mechanisms acting on human Cu-ATPases ATP7A and ATP7B. Brief comparison with the Cu-ATPase orthologs from other species is included.

  13. Gene Expression Mapping of Histone Deacetylases and Co-factors, and Correlation with Survival Time and 1H-HRMAS Metabolomic Profile in Human Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Dali-Youcef, Nassim; Froelich, Sébastien; Moussallieh, François-Marie; Chibbaro, Salvatore; Noël, Georges; Namer, Izzie J.; Heikkinen, Sami; Auwerx, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Primary brain tumors are presently classified based on imaging and histopathological techniques, which remains unsatisfaying. We profiled here by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) the transcripts of eighteen histone deacetylases (HDACs) and a subset of transcriptional co-factors in non-tumoral brain samples from 15 patients operated for epilepsia and in brain tumor samples from 50 patients diagnosed with grade II oligodendrogliomas (ODII, n = 9), grade III oligodendrogliomas (ODIII, n = 22) and glioblastomas (GL, n = 19). Co-factor transcripts were significantly different in tumors as compared to non-tumoral samples and distinguished different molecular subgroups of brain tumors, regardless of tumor grade. Among all patients studied, the expression of HDAC1 and HDAC3 was inversely correlated with survival, whereas the expression of HDAC4, HDAC5, HDAC6, HDAC11 and SIRT1 was significantly and positively correlated with survival time of patients with gliomas. 1H-HRMAS technology revealed metabolomically distinct groups according to the expression of HDAC1, HDAC4 and SIRT1, suggesting that these genes may play an important role in regulating brain tumorigenesis and cancer progression. Our study hence identified different molecular fingerprints for subgroups of histopathologically similar brain tumors that may enable the prediction of outcome based on the expression level of co-factor genes and could allow customization of treatment. PMID:25791281

  14. [On the influence of local molecular environment on the redox potential of electron transfer cofactors in bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers].

    PubMed

    Krasil'nikov, P M; Noks, P P; Rubin, A B

    2011-01-01

    The addition of cryosolvents (glycerol, dimethylsulfoxide) to a water solution containing bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers changes the redox potential of the bacteriochlorophyll dimer, but does not affect the redox potential of the quinone primary acceptor. It has been shown that the change in redox potential can be produced by changes of the electrostatic interactions between cofactors and the local molecular environment modified by additives entered into the solution. The degree of influence of a solvent on the redox potential of various cofactors is determined by degree of availability of these cofactors for molecules of solvent, which depends on the arrangement of cofactors in the structure of reaction centers.

  15. Computational study of the Fe(CN)2CO cofactor and its binding to HypC protein.

    PubMed

    Albareda, Marta; Palacios, Jose-Manuel; Imperial, Juan; Pacios, Luis F

    2013-10-31

    In the intricate maturation process of [NiFe]-hydrogenases, the Fe(CN)2CO cofactor is first assembled in a HypCD complex with iron coordinated by cysteines from both proteins and CO is added after ligation of cyanides. The small accessory protein HypC is known to play a role in delivering the cofactor needed for assembling the hydrogenase active site. However, the chemical nature of the Fe(CN)2CO moiety and the stability of the cofactor-HypC complex are open questions. In this work, we address geometries, properties, and the nature of bonding of all chemical species involved in formation and binding of the cofactor by means of quantum calculations. We also study the influence of environmental effects and binding to cysteines on vibrational frequencies of stretching modes of CO and CN used to detect the presence of Fe(CN)2CO. Carbon monoxide is found to be much more sensitive to sulfur binding and the polarity of the medium than cyanides. The stability of the HypC-cofactor complex is analyzed by means of molecular dynamics simulation of cofactor-free and cofactor-bound forms of HypC. The results show that HypC is stable enough to carry the cofactor, but since its binding cysteine is located at the N-terminal unstructured tail, it presents large motions in solution, which suggests the need for a guiding interaction to achieve delivery of the cofactor.

  16. Anthocyanin copigmentation and color of wine: The effect of naturally obtained hydroxycinnamic acids as cofactors.

    PubMed

    Bimpilas, Andreas; Panagopoulou, Marilena; Tsimogiannis, Dimitrios; Oreopoulou, Vassiliki

    2016-04-15

    Copigmentation of anthocyanins accounts for over 30% of fresh red wine color, while during storage, the color of polymeric pigments formed between anthocyanins and proanthocyanidins predominates. Rosmarinic acid and natural extracts rich in hydroxycinnamic acids, obtained from aromatic plants (Origanum vulgare and Satureja thymbra), were examined as cofactors to fresh Merlot wine and the effect on anthocyanin copigmentation and wine color was studied during storage for 6months. An increase of the copigmented anthocyanins that enhanced color intensity by 15-50% was observed, confirming the ability of complex hydroxycinnamates to form copigments. The samples with added cofactors retained higher percentages of copigmented anthocyanins and higher color intensity, compared to the control wine, up to 3 months. However, the change in the equilibrium between monomeric and copigmented anthocyanins that was induced by added cofactors, did not affect the rate of polymerization reactions during storage.

  17. Catalytic reduction of CN-, CO, and CO2 by nitrogenase cofactors in lanthanide-driven reactions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chi Chung; Hu, Yilin; Ribbe, Markus W

    2015-01-19

    Nitrogenase cofactors can be extracted into an organic solvent to catalyze the reduction of cyanide (CN(-)), carbon monoxide (CO), and carbon dioxide (CO2) without using adenosine triphosphate (ATP), when samarium(II) iodide (SmI2) and 2,6-lutidinium triflate (Lut-H) are employed as a reductant and a proton source, respectively. Driven by SmI2, the cofactors catalytically reduce CN(-) or CO to C1-C4 hydrocarbons, and CO2 to CO and C1-C3 hydrocarbons. The C-C coupling from CO2 indicates a unique Fischer-Tropsch-like reaction with an atypical carbonaceous substrate, whereas the catalytic turnover of CN(-), CO, and CO2 by isolated cofactors suggests the possibility to develop nitrogenase-based electrocatalysts for the production of hydrocarbons from these carbon-containing compounds.

  18. One diagonal texture or cofactor zero of the neutrino mass matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Jiajun; Marfatia, D.; Whisnant, K.

    2013-08-01

    In view of the recent measurement of nonzero θ13, we carry out a systematic study of a simple class of neutrino models that has one diagonal texture or cofactor zero in the mass matrix. There are seven free parameters in the model, and five of them are already measured by neutrino oscillation experiments; some cases for the normal or inverted hierarchy are excluded, and for the rest we obtain the preferred values for the lightest neutrino mass and Dirac CP phase. We find that there are strong similarities between one diagonal texture zero models with one mass hierarchy and one diagonal cofactor zero models with the opposite mass hierarchy. We also make predictions for neutrinoless double beta decay for these models. For the one cofactor zero models, we present a simple realization based on a new U(1) gauge symmetry.

  19. Chemomimetic biocatalysis: exploiting the synthetic potential of cofactor-dependent enzymes to create new catalysts.

    PubMed

    Prier, Christopher K; Arnold, Frances H

    2015-11-11

    Despite the astonishing breadth of enzymes in nature, no enzymes are known for many of the valuable catalytic transformations discovered by chemists. Recent work in enzyme design and evolution, however, gives us good reason to think that this will change. We describe a chemomimetic biocatalysis approach that draws from small-molecule catalysis and synthetic chemistry, enzymology, and molecular evolution to discover or create enzymes with non-natural reactivities. We illustrate how cofactor-dependent enzymes can be exploited to promote reactions first established with related chemical catalysts. The cofactors can be biological, or they can be non-biological to further expand catalytic possibilities. The ability of enzymes to amplify and precisely control the reactivity of their cofactors together with the ability to optimize non-natural reactivity by directed evolution promises to yield exceptional catalysts for challenging transformations that have no biological counterparts.

  20. The Fe-V Cofactor of Vanadium Nitrogenase Contains an Interstitial Carbon Atom.

    PubMed

    Rees, Julian A; Bjornsson, Ragnar; Schlesier, Julia; Sippel, Daniel; Einsle, Oliver; DeBeer, Serena

    2015-11-01

    The first direct evidence is provided for the presence of an interstitial carbide in the Fe-V cofactor of Azotobacter vinelandii vanadium nitrogenase. As for our identification of the central carbide in the Fe-Mo cofactor, we employed Fe Kβ valence-to-core X-ray emission spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations, and herein report the highly similar spectra of both variants of the cofactor-containing protein. The identification of an analogous carbide, and thus an atomically homologous active site in vanadium nitrogenase, highlights the importance and influence of both the interstitial carbide and the identity of the heteroatom on the electronic structure and catalytic activity of the enzyme.

  1. Anthocyanin copigmentation and color of wine: The effect of naturally obtained hydroxycinnamic acids as cofactors.

    PubMed

    Bimpilas, Andreas; Panagopoulou, Marilena; Tsimogiannis, Dimitrios; Oreopoulou, Vassiliki

    2016-04-15

    Copigmentation of anthocyanins accounts for over 30% of fresh red wine color, while during storage, the color of polymeric pigments formed between anthocyanins and proanthocyanidins predominates. Rosmarinic acid and natural extracts rich in hydroxycinnamic acids, obtained from aromatic plants (Origanum vulgare and Satureja thymbra), were examined as cofactors to fresh Merlot wine and the effect on anthocyanin copigmentation and wine color was studied during storage for 6months. An increase of the copigmented anthocyanins that enhanced color intensity by 15-50% was observed, confirming the ability of complex hydroxycinnamates to form copigments. The samples with added cofactors retained higher percentages of copigmented anthocyanins and higher color intensity, compared to the control wine, up to 3 months. However, the change in the equilibrium between monomeric and copigmented anthocyanins that was induced by added cofactors, did not affect the rate of polymerization reactions during storage. PMID:26616922

  2. The Fe–V Cofactor of Vanadium Nitrogenase Contains an Interstitial Carbon Atom

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Julian A; Bjornsson, Ragnar; Schlesier, Julia; Sippel, Daniel; Einsle, Oliver; DeBeer, Serena

    2015-01-01

    The first direct evidence is provided for the presence of an interstitial carbide in the Fe–V cofactor of Azotobacter vinelandii vanadium nitrogenase. As for our identification of the central carbide in the Fe–Mo cofactor, we employed Fe Kβ valence-to-core X-ray emission spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations, and herein report the highly similar spectra of both variants of the cofactor-containing protein. The identification of an analogous carbide, and thus an atomically homologous active site in vanadium nitrogenase, highlights the importance and influence of both the interstitial carbide and the identity of the heteroatom on the electronic structure and catalytic activity of the enzyme. PMID:26376620

  3. Impact of cofactor-binding loop mutations on thermotolerance and activity of E. coli transketolase.

    PubMed

    Morris, P; Rios-Solis, L; García-Arrazola, R; Lye, G J; Dalby, P A

    2016-07-01

    Improvement of thermostability in engineered enzymes can allow biocatalysis on substrates with poor aqueous solubility. Denaturation of the cofactor-binding loops of Escherichia coli transketolase (TK) was previously linked to the loss of enzyme activity under conditions of high pH or urea. Incubation at temperatures just below the thermal melting transition, above which the protein aggregates, was also found to anneal the enzyme to give an increased specific activity. The potential role of cofactor-binding loop instability in this process remained unclear. In this work, the two cofactor-binding loops (residues 185-192 and 382-392) were progressively mutated towards the equivalent sequence from the thermostable Thermus thermophilus TK and variants assessed for their impact on both thermostability and activity. Cofactor-binding loop 2 variants had detrimental effects on specific activity at elevated temperatures, whereas the H192P mutation in cofactor-binding loop 1 resulted in a two-fold improved stability to inactivation at elevated temperatures, and increased the critical onset temperature for aggregation. The specific activity of H192P was 3-fold and 19-fold higher than that for wild-type at 60°C and 65°C respectively, and also remained 2.7-4 fold higher after re-cooling from pre-incubations at either 55°C or 60°C for 1h. Interestingly, H192P was also 2-times more active than wild-type TK at 25°C. Optimal activity was achieved at 60°C for H192P compared to 55°C for wild type. These results show that cofactor-binding loop 1, plays a pivotal role in partial denaturation and aggregation at elevated temperatures. Furthermore, a single rigidifying mutation within this loop can significantly improve the enzyme specific activity, as well as the stability to thermal denaturation and aggregation, to give an increased temperature optimum for activity.

  4. Structural Basis for Oxygen Activation at a Heterodinuclear Manganese/Iron Cofactor.

    PubMed

    Griese, Julia J; Kositzki, Ramona; Schrapers, Peer; Branca, Rui M M; Nordström, Anders; Lehtiö, Janne; Haumann, Michael; Högbom, Martin

    2015-10-16

    Two recently discovered groups of prokaryotic di-metal carboxylate proteins harbor a heterodinuclear Mn/Fe cofactor. These are the class Ic ribonucleotide reductase R2 proteins and a group of oxidases that are found predominantly in pathogens and extremophiles, called R2-like ligand-binding oxidases (R2lox). We have recently shown that the Mn/Fe cofactor of R2lox self-assembles from Mn(II) and Fe(II) in vitro and catalyzes formation of a tyrosine-valine ether cross-link in the protein scaffold (Griese, J. J., Roos, K., Cox, N., Shafaat, H. S., Branca, R. M., Lehtiö, J., Gräslund, A., Lubitz, W., Siegbahn, P. E., and Högbom, M. (2013) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 110, 17189-17194). Here, we present a detailed structural analysis of R2lox in the nonactivated, reduced, and oxidized resting Mn/Fe- and Fe/Fe-bound states, as well as the nonactivated Mn/Mn-bound state. X-ray crystallography and x-ray absorption spectroscopy demonstrate that the active site ligand configuration of R2lox is essentially the same regardless of cofactor composition. Both the Mn/Fe and the diiron cofactor activate oxygen and catalyze formation of the ether cross-link, whereas the dimanganese cluster does not. The structures delineate likely routes for gated oxygen and substrate access to the active site that are controlled by the redox state of the cofactor. These results suggest that oxygen activation proceeds via similar mechanisms at the Mn/Fe and Fe/Fe center and that R2lox proteins might utilize either cofactor in vivo based on metal availability.

  5. Identification of a bis-molybdopterin intermediate in molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Reschke, Stefan; Sigfridsson, Kajsa G V; Kaufmann, Paul; Leidel, Nils; Horn, Sebastian; Gast, Klaus; Schulzke, Carola; Haumann, Michael; Leimkühler, Silke

    2013-10-11

    The molybdenum cofactor is an important cofactor, and its biosynthesis is essential for many organisms, including humans. Its basic form comprises a single molybdopterin (MPT) unit, which binds a molybdenum ion bearing three oxygen ligands via a dithiolene function, thus forming Mo-MPT. In bacteria, this form is modified to form the bis-MPT guanine dinucleotide cofactor with two MPT units coordinated at one molybdenum atom, which additionally contains GMPs bound to the terminal phosphate group of the MPTs (bis-MGD). The MobA protein catalyzes the nucleotide addition to MPT, but the mechanism of the biosynthesis of the bis-MGD cofactor has remained enigmatic. We have established an in vitro system for studying bis-MGD assembly using purified compounds. Quantification of the MPT/molybdenum and molybdenum/phosphorus ratios, time-dependent assays for MPT and MGD detection, and determination of the numbers and lengths of Mo-S and Mo-O bonds by X-ray absorption spectroscopy enabled identification of a novel bis-Mo-MPT intermediate on MobA prior to nucleotide attachment. The addition of Mg-GTP to MobA loaded with bis-Mo-MPT resulted in formation and release of the final bis-MGD product. This cofactor was fully functional and reconstituted the catalytic activity of apo-TMAO reductase (TorA). We propose a reaction sequence for bis-MGD formation, which involves 1) the formation of bis-Mo-MPT, 2) the addition of two GMP units to form bis-MGD on MobA, and 3) the release and transfer of the mature cofactor to the target protein TorA, in a reaction that is supported by the specific chaperone TorD, resulting in an active molybdoenzyme.

  6. Structural Basis for Oxygen Activation at a Heterodinuclear Manganese/Iron Cofactor*

    PubMed Central

    Griese, Julia J.; Kositzki, Ramona; Schrapers, Peer; Branca, Rui M. M.; Nordström, Anders; Lehtiö, Janne; Haumann, Michael; Högbom, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Two recently discovered groups of prokaryotic di-metal carboxylate proteins harbor a heterodinuclear Mn/Fe cofactor. These are the class Ic ribonucleotide reductase R2 proteins and a group of oxidases that are found predominantly in pathogens and extremophiles, called R2-like ligand-binding oxidases (R2lox). We have recently shown that the Mn/Fe cofactor of R2lox self-assembles from MnII and FeII in vitro and catalyzes formation of a tyrosine-valine ether cross-link in the protein scaffold (Griese, J. J., Roos, K., Cox, N., Shafaat, H. S., Branca, R. M., Lehtiö, J., Gräslund, A., Lubitz, W., Siegbahn, P. E., and Högbom, M. (2013) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 110, 17189–17194). Here, we present a detailed structural analysis of R2lox in the nonactivated, reduced, and oxidized resting Mn/Fe- and Fe/Fe-bound states, as well as the nonactivated Mn/Mn-bound state. X-ray crystallography and x-ray absorption spectroscopy demonstrate that the active site ligand configuration of R2lox is essentially the same regardless of cofactor composition. Both the Mn/Fe and the diiron cofactor activate oxygen and catalyze formation of the ether cross-link, whereas the dimanganese cluster does not. The structures delineate likely routes for gated oxygen and substrate access to the active site that are controlled by the redox state of the cofactor. These results suggest that oxygen activation proceeds via similar mechanisms at the Mn/Fe and Fe/Fe center and that R2lox proteins might utilize either cofactor in vivo based on metal availability. PMID:26324712

  7. Identifying Natural Substrates for Dipeptidyl Peptidases 8 and 9 Using Terminal Amine Isotopic Labeling of Substrates (TAILS) Reveals in Vivo Roles in Cellular Homeostasis and Energy Metabolism*♦

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Claire H.; Indarto, Dono; Doucet, Alain; Pogson, Lisa D.; Pitman, Melissa R.; McNicholas, Kym; Menz, R. Ian; Overall, Christopher M.; Abbott, Catherine A.

    2013-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidases (DP) 8 and 9 are homologous, cytoplasmic N-terminal post-proline-cleaving enzymes that are anti-targets for the development of DP4 (DPPIV/CD26) inhibitors for treating type II diabetes. To date, DP8 and DP9 have been implicated in immune responses and cancer biology, but their pathophysiological functions and substrate repertoire remain unknown. This study utilizes terminal amine isotopic labeling of substrates (TAILS), an N-terminal positional proteomic approach, for the discovery of in vivo DP8 and DP9 substrates. In vivo roles for DP8 and DP9 in cellular metabolism and homeostasis were revealed via the identification of more than 29 candidate natural substrates and pathways affected by DP8/DP9 overexpression. Cleavage of 14 substrates was investigated in vitro; 9/14 substrates for both DP8 and DP9 were confirmed by MALDI-TOF MS, including two of high confidence, calreticulin and adenylate kinase 2. Adenylate kinase 2 plays key roles in cellular energy and nucleotide homeostasis. These results demonstrate remarkable in vivo substrate overlap between DP8/DP9, suggesting compensatory roles for these enzymes. This work provides the first global investigation into DP8 and DP9 substrates, providing a number of leads for future investigations into the biological roles and significance of DP8 and DP9 in human health and disease. PMID:23519473

  8. Structure of the reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides R-26: the cofactors

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.P.; Feher, G.; Yeates, T.O.; Komiya, H.; Rees, D.C.

    1987-08-01

    The three-dimensional structure of the cofactors of the reaction center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides R-26 has been determined by x-ray diffraction and refined at a resolution of 2.8 A with an R value of 26%. The main features of the structure are similar to the ones determined for Rhodopseudomonas viridis. The cofactors are arranged along two branches, which are approximately related to each other by a 2-fold symmetry axis. The structure is well suited to produce light-induced charge separation across the membrane. Most of the structural features predicted from physical and biochemical measurements are confirmed by the x-ray structure.

  9. Redirecting metabolic flux in Saccharomyces cerevisiae through regulation of cofactors in UMP production.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Liu, Qingguo; Chen, Xiaochun; Wu, Jinglan; Guo, Ting; Zhu, Chenjie; Ying, Hanjie

    2015-04-01

    Although it is generally known that cofactors play a major role in the production of different fermentation products, their role has not been thoroughly and systematically studied. To understand the impact of cofactors on physiological functions, a systematic approach was applied, which involved redox state analysis, energy charge analysis, and metabolite analysis. Using uridine 5'-monophosphate metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model, we demonstrated that regulation of intracellular the ratio of NADPH to NADP(+) not only redistributed the carbon flux between the glycolytic and pentose phosphate pathways, but also regulated the redox state of NAD(H), resulting in a significant change of ATP, and a significantly altered spectrum of metabolic products.

  10. Evidence for pyrroloquinolinequinone as the carbonyl cofactor in lysyl oxidase by absorption and resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Williamson, P R; Moog, R S; Dooley, D M; Kagan, H M

    1986-12-15

    The present study investigated the possibility that pyrroloquinolinequinone (PQQ), an aromatic carbonyl recently indicated to be the carbonyl cofactor in bovine plasma amine oxidase, may also be present at the active site of lysyl oxidase. The absorption and resonance Raman spectra of the phenylhydrazones of bovine plasma amine oxidase, of peptides derived from the active site of bovine aorta lysyl oxidase, and of PQQ were very similar, indicating that the carbonyl cofactor of lysyl oxidase is PQQ or a compound which closely resembles PQQ.

  11. Cellular: Toward personal communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heffernan, Stuart

    1991-09-01

    The cellular industry is one of the fastest growing segment of the telecommunications industry. With an estimated penetration rate of 20 percent in the near future, cellular is becoming an ubiquitous telecommunications service in the U.S. In this paper we will examine the major advancements in the cellular industry: customer equipment, cellular networks, engineering tools, customer support, and nationwide seamless service.

  12. A novel cofactor-binding mode in bacterial IMP dehydrogenases explains inhibitor selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Kim, Youngchang; Maltseva, Natalia; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Gu, Minyi; Zhang, Minjia; Mandapati, Kavitha; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R.; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2015-01-09

    The steadily rising frequency of emerging diseases and antibiotic resistance creates an urgent need for new drugs and targets. Inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMP dehydrogenase or IMPDH) is a promising target for the development of new antimicrobial agents. IMPDH catalyzes the oxidation of IMP to XMP with the concomitant reduction of NAD+, which is the pivotal step in the biosynthesis of guanine nucleotides. Potent inhibitors of bacterial IMPDHs have been identified that bind in a structurally distinct pocket that is absent in eukaryotic IMPDHs. The physiological role of this pocket was not understood. Here, we report the structures of complexes with different classes of inhibitors of Bacillus anthracis, Campylobacter jejuni, and Clostridium perfringens IMPDHs. These structures in combination with inhibition studies provide important insights into the interactions that modulate selectivity and potency. We also present two structures of the Vibrio cholerae IMPDH in complex with IMP/NAD+ and XMP/NAD+. In both structures, the cofactor assumes a dramatically different conformation than reported previously for eukaryotic IMPDHs and other dehydrogenases, with the major change observed for the position of the NAD+ adenosine moiety. More importantly, this new NAD+-binding site involves the same pocket that is utilized by the inhibitors. Thus, the bacterial IMPDH-specific NAD+-binding mode helps to rationalize the conformation adopted by several classes of prokaryotic IMPDH inhibitors. As a result, these findings offer a potential strategy for further ligand optimization.

  13. Dual Posttranscriptional Regulation via a Cofactor-Responsive mRNA Leader

    PubMed Central

    Patterson-Fortin, Laura M.; Vakulskas, Christopher A.; Yakhnin, Helen; Babitzke, Paul; Romeo, Tony

    2013-01-01

    Riboswitches are cis-acting mRNA elements that regulate gene expression in response to ligand binding. Recently, a class of riboswitches was proposed to respond to the molybdenum cofactor (Moco), which serves as a redox center for metabolic enzymes. The 5′ leader of the Escherichia coli moaABCDE transcript exemplifies this candidate riboswitch class. This mRNA encodes enzymes for Moco biosynthesis, and moaA expression is feedback inhibited by Moco. Previous RNA-seq analyses showed that moaA mRNA copurified with the RNA binding protein CsrA (carbon storage regulator), suggesting that CsrA binds to this RNA in vivo. Among its global regulatory roles, CsrA represses stationary phase metabolism and activates central carbon metabolism. Here, we used gel mobility shift analysis to determine that CsrA binds specifically and with high affinity to the moaA 5′ mRNA leader. Northern blotting and studies with a series of chromosomal lacZ reporter fusions showed that CsrA posttranscriptionally activates moaA expression without altering moaA mRNA levels, indicative of translation control. Deletion analyses, nucleotide replacement studies and footprinting with CsrA-FeBABE identified two sites for CsrA binding. Toeprinting assays suggested that CsrA binding causes changes in moaA RNA structure. We propose that the moaA mRNA leader forms an aptamer, which serves as a target of posttranscriptional regulation by at least two different factors, Moco and the protein CsrA. While we are not aware of similar dual posttranscriptional regulatory mechanisms, additional examples are likely to emerge. PMID:23274138

  14. Different dynamic movements of wild-type and pathogenic VCPs and their cofactors to damaged mitochondria in a Parkin-mediated mitochondrial quality control system.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yoko; Fukushi, Junpei; Hori, Seiji; Matsuda, Noriyuki; Okatsu, Kei; Kakiyama, Yukie; Kawawaki, Junko; Kakizuka, Akira; Tanaka, Keiji

    2013-12-01

    VCP/p97 is a hexameric ring-shaped AAA(+) ATPase that participates in various ubiquitin-associated cellular functions. Mis-sense mutations in VCP gene are associated with the pathogenesis of two inherited diseases: inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget's disease of the bone and front-temporal dementia (IBMPFD) and familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). These pathogenic VCPs have higher affinities for several cofactors, including Npl4, Ufd1 and p47. In Parkin-dependent mitochondrial quality control systems, VCP migrates to damaged mitochondria (e.g., those treated with uncouplers) to aid in the degradation of mitochondrial outer membrane proteins and to eliminate mitochondria. We showed that endogenous Npl4 and p47 also migrate to mitochondria after uncoupler treatment, and Npl4, Ufd1 or p47 silencing causes defective mitochondria clearance after uncoupler treatment. Moreover, pathogenic VCPs show impaired migration to mitochondria, and the exogenous pathogenic VCP expression partially inhibits Npl4 and p47 localization to mitochondria. These results suggest that the increased affinities of pathogenic VCPs for these cofactors cause the impaired movement of pathogenic VCPs. In adult flies, exogenous expression of wild-type VCP, but not pathogenic VCPs, reduces the number of abnormal mitochondria in muscles. Failure of pathogenic VCPs to function on damaged mitochondria may be related to the pathogenesis of IBMPFD and ALS.

  15. The Arabidopsis PILZ group genes encode tubulin-folding cofactor orthologs required for cell division but not cell growth.

    PubMed

    Steinborn, Katharina; Maulbetsch, Christoph; Priester, Bianca; Trautmann, Susanne; Pacher, Tobias; Geiges, Bernd; Küttner, Frank; Lepiniec, Loic; Stierhof, York-Dieter; Schwarz, Heinz; Jürgens, Gerd; Mayer, Ulrike

    2002-04-15

    Plant microtubules are organized into specific cell cycle-dependent arrays that have been implicated in diverse cellular processes, including cell division and organized cell expansion. Mutations in four Arabidopsis genes collectively called the PILZ group result in lethal embryos that consist of one or a few grossly enlarged cells. The mutant embryos lack microtubules but not actin filaments. Whereas the cytokinesis-specific syntaxin KNOLLE is not localized properly, trafficking of the putative auxin efflux carrier PIN1 to the plasma membrane is normal. The four PILZ group genes were isolated by map-based cloning and are shown to encode orthologs of mammalian tubulin-folding cofactors (TFCs) C, D, and E, and associated small G-protein Arl2 that mediate the formation of alpha/beta-tubulin heterodimers in vitro. The TFC C ortholog, PORCINO, was detected in cytosolic protein complexes and did not colocalize with microtubules. Another gene with a related, although weaker, embryo-lethal phenotype, KIESEL, was shown to encode a TFC A ortholog. Our genetic ablation of microtubules shows their requirement in cell division and vesicle trafficking during cytokinesis, whereas cell growth is mediated by microtubule-independent vesicle trafficking to the plasma membrane during interphase.

  16. The Arabidopsis PILZ group genes encode tubulin-folding cofactor orthologs required for cell division but not cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Steinborn, Katharina; Maulbetsch, Christoph; Priester, Bianca; Trautmann, Susanne; Pacher, Tobias; Geiges, Bernd; Küttner, Frank; Lepiniec, Loic; Stierhof, York-Dieter; Schwarz, Heinz; Jürgens, Gerd; Mayer, Ulrike

    2002-01-01

    Plant microtubules are organized into specific cell cycle-dependent arrays that have been implicated in diverse cellular processes, including cell division and organized cell expansion. Mutations in four Arabidopsis genes collectively called the PILZ group result in lethal embryos that consist of one or a few grossly enlarged cells. The mutant embryos lack microtubules but not actin filaments. Whereas the cytokinesis-specific syntaxin KNOLLE is not localized properly, trafficking of the putative auxin efflux carrier PIN1 to the plasma membrane is normal. The four PILZ group genes were isolated by map-based cloning and are shown to encode orthologs of mammalian tubulin-folding cofactors (TFCs) C, D, and E, and associated small G-protein Arl2 that mediate the formation of α/β-tubulin heterodimers in vitro. The TFC C ortholog, PORCINO, was detected in cytosolic protein complexes and did not colocalize with microtubules. Another gene with a related, although weaker, embryo-lethal phenotype, KIESEL, was shown to encode a TFC A ortholog. Our genetic ablation of microtubules shows their requirement in cell division and vesicle trafficking during cytokinesis, whereas cell growth is mediated by microtubule-independent vesicle trafficking to the plasma membrane during interphase. PMID:11959844

  17. Inhibitors – cellular aspects and novel approaches for tolerance

    PubMed Central

    SCOTT, D. W.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The immune response against therapeutic clotting factors VIII and IX (FVIII and FIX) is a major adverse event that can effectively thwart their effectiveness in correcting bleeding disorders. Thus, a significant number of haemophilia patients form antibodies, called inhibitors, which neutralize the procoagulant functions of therapeutic cofactors FVIII (haemophilia A) or FIX (haemophilia B). Understanding the cellular and molecular aspects of inhibitor formation is critical to designing tolerogenic therapies for clinical use. This review will focus on the basis of the immune response to FVIII, in particular, and will discuss emerging efforts to not only reduce immunogenicity but also to prevent and/or reverse inhibitor formation. PMID:24762281

  18. Mono and dual cofactor dependence of human cystathionine β-synthase enzyme variants in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Dimster-Denk, Dago; Tripp, Katherine W; Marini, Nicholas J; Marqusee, Susan; Rine, Jasper

    2013-10-03

    Any two individuals differ from each other by an average of 3 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Some polymorphisms have a functional impact on cofactor-using enzymes and therefore represent points of possible therapeutic intervention through elevated-cofactor remediation. Because most known disease-causing mutations affect protein stability, we evaluated how the in vivo impact caused by single amino acid substitutions in a prototypical enzyme of this type compared with physical characteristics of the variant enzymes in vitro. We focused on cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) because of its clinical relevance in homocysteine metabolism and because some variants of the enzyme are clinically responsive to increased levels of its B6 cofactor. Single amino-acid substitutions throughout the CBS protein caused reduced function in vivo, and a subset of these altered sensitivity to limiting B6-cofactor. Some of these B6-sensitive substitutions also had altered sensitivity to limiting heme, another CBS cofactor. Limiting heme resulted in reduced incorporation of heme into these variants, and subsequently increased protease sensitivity of the enzyme in vitro. We hypothesize that these alleles caused a modest, yet significant, destabilization of the native state of the protein, and that the functional impact of the amino acid substitutions caused by these alleles can be influenced by cofactor(s) even when the affected amino acid is distant from the cofactor binding site.

  19. Mono and Dual Cofactor Dependence of Human Cystathionine β-Synthase Enzyme Variants In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Dimster-Denk, Dago; Tripp, Katherine W.; Marini, Nicholas J.; Marqusee, Susan; Rine, Jasper

    2013-01-01

    Any two individuals differ from each other by an average of 3 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Some polymorphisms have a functional impact on cofactor-using enzymes and therefore represent points of possible therapeutic intervention through elevated-cofactor remediation. Because most known disease-causing mutations affect protein stability, we evaluated how the in vivo impact caused by single amino acid substitutions in a prototypical enzyme of this type compared with physical characteristics of the variant enzymes in vitro. We focused on cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) because of its clinical relevance in homocysteine metabolism and because some variants of the enzyme are clinically responsive to increased levels of its B6 cofactor. Single amino-acid substitutions throughout the CBS protein caused reduced function in vivo, and a subset of these altered sensitivity to limiting B6-cofactor. Some of these B6-sensitive substitutions also had altered sensitivity to limiting heme, another CBS cofactor. Limiting heme resulted in reduced incorporation of heme into these variants, and subsequently increased protease sensitivity of the enzyme in vitro. We hypothesize that these alleles caused a modest, yet significant, destabilization of the native state of the protein, and that the functional impact of the amino acid substitutions caused by these alleles can be influenced by cofactor(s) even when the affected amino acid is distant from the cofactor binding site. PMID:23934999

  20. Structural basis of the cofactor function of denatured albumin in plasminogen activation by tissue-type plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Galántai, Rita; Módos, Károly; Fidy, Judit; Kolev, Krasimir; Machovich, Raymund

    2006-03-17

    Certain denatured proteins function as cofactors in the activation of plasminogen by tissue-type plasminogen activator. The present study approached the structural requirements for the cofactor activity of a model protein (human serum albumin). Heat denaturation of 100-230 microM albumin (80 degrees C and 60-90 min) reproducibly yielded aggregates with radius in the range of 10-150 nm. The major determinant of the cofactor potency was the size of the aggregates. The increase of particle size correlated with the cofactor activity, and there was a minimal requirement for the size of the cofactor (about 10 nm radius). Similar to other proteins, the molecular aggregates with cofactor function contained a significant amount of antiparallel intermolecular beta-sheets. Plasmin pre-digestion increased the cofactor efficiency (related to C-terminal lysine exposure) and did not affect profoundly the structure of the aggregates, suggesting a long-lasting and even a self-augmenting cofactor function of the denatured protein. PMID:16438933

  1. A modular system for regeneration of NAD cofactors using graphite particles modified with hydrogenase and diaphorase moieties.

    PubMed

    Reeve, Holly A; Lauterbach, Lars; Ash, Philip A; Lenz, Oliver; Vincent, Kylie A

    2012-02-01

    Pyrolytic graphite particles modified with hydrogenase and an NAD(+)/NADH cycling enzyme provide a modular heterogeneous catalyst system for regeneration of oxidised or reduced nicotinamide cofactors using H(2) and H(+) as electron source or sink. Particles can be tuned for cofactor supply under different conditions by appropriate choice of hydrogenase. PMID:21986817

  2. New cofactor supports α,β-unsaturated acid decarboxylation via 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition.

    PubMed

    Payne, Karl A P; White, Mark D; Fisher, Karl; Khara, Basile; Bailey, Samuel S; Parker, David; Rattray, Nicholas J W; Trivedi, Drupad K; Goodacre, Royston; Beveridge, Rebecca; Barran, Perdita; Rigby, Stephen E J; Scrutton, Nigel S; Hay, Sam; Leys, David

    2015-06-25

    The bacterial ubiD and ubiX or the homologous fungal fdc1 and pad1 genes have been implicated in the non-oxidative reversible decarboxylation of aromatic substrates, and play a pivotal role in bacterial ubiquinone (also known as coenzyme Q) biosynthesis or microbial biodegradation of aromatic compounds, respectively. Despite biochemical studies on individual gene products, the composition and cofactor requirement of the enzyme responsible for in vivo decarboxylase activity remained unclear. Here we show that Fdc1 is solely responsible for the reversible decarboxylase activity, and that it requires a new type of cofactor: a prenylated flavin synthesized by the associated UbiX/Pad1. Atomic resolution crystal structures reveal that two distinct isomers of the oxidized cofactor can be observed, an isoalloxazine N5-iminium adduct and a N5 secondary ketimine species with markedly altered ring structure, both having azomethine ylide character. Substrate binding positions the dipolarophile enoic acid group directly above the azomethine ylide group. The structure of a covalent inhibitor-cofactor adduct suggests that 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition chemistry supports reversible decarboxylation in these enzymes. Although 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition is commonly used in organic chemistry, we propose that this presents the first example, to our knowledge, of an enzymatic 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction. Our model for Fdc1/UbiD catalysis offers new routes in alkene hydrocarbon production or aryl (de)carboxylation.

  3. An unexpected reactivity of the P460 cofactor in hydroxylamine oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Dietl, Andreas; Maalcke, Wouter; Barends, Thomas R M

    2015-08-01

    Hydroxylamine oxidoreductases (HAOs) contain a unique haem cofactor called P460 that consists of a profoundly ruffled c-type haem with two covalent bonds between the haem porphyrin and a conserved tyrosine. This cofactor is exceptional in that it abstracts electrons from a ligand bound to the haem iron, whereas other haems involved in redox chemistry usually inject electrons into their ligands. The effects of the tyrosine cross-links and of the haem ruffling on the chemistry of this cofactor have been investigated theoretically but are not yet clear. A new crystal structure of an HAO from Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis, a model organism for anaerobic ammonium oxidation, now shows that its P460 cofactor has yet another unexpected reactivity: when ethylene glycol was used as a cryoprotectant, the 1.8 Å resolution electron-density maps showed additional density which could be interpreted as an ethylene glycol molecule covalently bound to the C16 atom of the haem ring, opposite the covalent links to the conserved tyrosine. Possible causes for this unexpected reactivity are discussed.

  4. Pea (Pisum sativum) diamine oxidase contains pyrroloquinoline quinone as a cofactor.

    PubMed

    Glatz, Z; Kovár, J; Macholán, L; Pec, P

    1987-03-01

    Diamine oxidase was prepared from pea (Pisum sativum) seedlings by a new purification procedure involving two h.p.l.c. steps. We studied the optical and electrochemical properties of the homogeneous enzyme and also analysed the hydrolysed protein by several methods. The data presented here suggest that the carbonyl cofactor of diamine oxidase is firmly bound pyrroloquinoline quinone.

  5. Refolding of horseradish peroxidase is enhanced in presence of metal cofactors and ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Bae, Sang-Woo; Eom, Doyoung; Mai, Ngoc Lan; Koo, Yoon-Mo

    2016-03-01

    The effects of various refolding additives, including metal cofactors, organic co-solvents, and ionic liquids, on the refolding of horseradish peroxidase (HRP), a well-known hemoprotein containing four disulfide bonds and two different types of metal centers, a ferrous ion-containing heme group and two calcium atoms, which provide a stabilizing effect on protein structure and function, were investigated. Both metal cofactors (Ca(2+) and hemin) and ionic liquids have positive impact on the refolding of HRP. For instance, the HRP refolding yield remarkably increased by over 3-fold upon addition of hemin and calcium chloride to the refolding buffer as compared to that in the conventional urea-containing refolding buffer. Moreover, the addition of ionic liquids [EMIM][Cl] to the hemin and calcium cofactor-containing refolding buffer further enhanced the HRP refolding yield up to 80% as compared to 12% in conventional refolding buffer at relatively high initial protein concentration (5 mg/ml). These results indicated that refolding method utilizing metal cofactors and ionic liquids could enhance the yield and efficiency for metalloprotein.

  6. New cofactor supports α,β-unsaturated acid decarboxylation via 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Karl A.P.; White, Mark D.; Fisher, Karl; Khara, Basile; Bailey, Samuel S.; Parker, David; Rattray, Nicholas J.W.; Trivedi, Drupad K.; Goodacre, Royston; Beveridge, Rebecca; Barran, Perdita; Rigby, Stephen E.J.; Scrutton, Nigel S.; Hay, Sam; Leys, David

    2016-01-01

    The ubiD/ubiX or the homologous fdc/pad genes have been implicated in the non-oxidative reversible decarboxylation of aromatic substrates, and play a pivotal role in bacterial ubiquinone biosynthesis1–3 or microbial biodegradation of aromatic compounds4–6 respectively. Despite biochemical studies on individual gene products, the composition and co-factor requirement of the enzyme responsible for in vivo decarboxylase activity remained unclear7–9. We show Fdc is solely responsible for (de)carboxylase activity, and that it requires a new type of cofactor: a prenylated flavin synthesised by the associated UbiX/Pad10. Atomic resolution crystal structures reveal two distinct isomers of the oxidized cofactor can be observed: an isoalloxazine N5-iminium adduct and a N5 secondary ketimine species with drastically altered ring structure, both having azomethine ylide character. Substrate binding positions the dipolarophile enoic acid group directly above the azomethine ylide group. The structure of a covalent inhibitor-cofactor adduct suggests 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition chemistry supports reversible decarboxylation in these enzymes. While 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition is commonly used in organic chemistry11–12, we propose this presents the first example of an enzymatic 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction. Our model for Fdc/UbiD catalysis offers new routes in alkene hydrocarbon production or aryl (de)carboxylation. PMID:26083754

  7. Tetrahydropterin as a possible natural cofactor in the drosophila phenylalanine hydroxylation system

    SciTech Connect

    Bel, Y.; Jacobson, K.B.; Ferre, J. . Dept. of Genetics; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN; Valencia Univ. . Dept. of Genetics)

    1989-01-01

    The aim of the present work is the study of phenylalanine hydroxylase (PH) activity of Drosophila melanogaster wild type with different cofactors: the two natural occurring tetrahydropteridines (BH{sub 4} and PH{sub 4}) and the synthetic 6,7-dimethyltetrahydropterin (DMPH{sub 4}), as well as the determination of this activity at different developmental stages. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  8. A conserved acidic residue in phenylalanine hydroxylase contributes to cofactor affinity and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Ronau, Judith A; Paul, Lake N; Fuchs, Julian E; Liedl, Klaus R; Abu-Omar, Mahdi M; Das, Chittaranjan

    2014-11-01

    The catalytic domains of aromatic amino acid hydroxylases (AAAHs) contain a non-heme iron coordinated to a 2-His-1-carboxylate facial triad and two water molecules. Asp139 from Chromobacterium violaceum PAH (cPAH) resides within the second coordination sphere and contributes key hydrogen bonds with three active site waters that mediate its interaction with an oxidized form of the cofactor, 7,8-dihydro-l-biopterin, in crystal structures. To determine the catalytic role of this residue, various point mutants were prepared and characterized. Our isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) analysis of iron binding implies that polarity at position 139 is not the sole criterion for metal affinity, as binding studies with D139E suggest that the size of the amino acid side chain also appears to be important. High-resolution crystal structures of the mutants reveal that Asp139 may not be essential for holding the bridging water molecules together, because many of these waters are retained even in the Ala mutant. However, interactions via the bridging waters contribute to cofactor binding at the active site, interactions for which charge of the residue is important, as the D139N mutant shows a 5-fold decrease in its affinity for pterin as revealed by ITC (compared to a 16-fold loss of affinity in the case of the Ala mutant). The Asn and Ala mutants show a much more pronounced defect in their kcat values, with nearly 16- and 100-fold changes relative to that of the wild type, respectively, indicating a substantial role of this residue in stabilization of the transition state by aligning the cofactor in a productive orientation, most likely through direct binding with the cofactor, supported by data from molecular dynamics simulations of the complexes. Our results indicate that the intervening water structure between the cofactor and the acidic residue masks direct interaction between the two, possibly to prevent uncoupled hydroxylation of the cofactor before the arrival of

  9. Molybdenum cofactor deficiency causes translucent integument, male-biased lethality, and flaccid paralysis in the silkworm Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Tsuguru; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Banno, Yutaka

    2016-06-01

    Uric acid accumulates in the epidermis of Bombyx mori larvae and renders the larval integument opaque and white. Yamamoto translucent (oya) is a novel spontaneous mutant with a translucent larval integument and unique phenotypic characteristics, such as male-biased lethality and flaccid larval paralysis. Xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) that requires a molybdenum cofactor (MoCo) for its activity is a key enzyme for uric acid synthesis. It has been observed that injection of a bovine xanthine oxidase, which corresponds functionally to XDH and contains its own MoCo activity, changes the integuments of oya mutants from translucent to opaque and white. This finding suggests that XDH/MoCo activity might be defective in oya mutants. Our linkage analysis identified an association between the oya locus and chromosome 23. Because XDH is not linked to chromosome 23 in B. mori, MoCo appears to be defective in oya mutants. In eukaryotes, MoCo is synthesized by a conserved biosynthesis pathway governed by four loci (MOCS1, MOCS2, MOCS3, and GEPH). Through a candidate gene approach followed by sequence analysis, a 6-bp deletion was detected in an exon of the B. mori molybdenum cofactor synthesis-step 1 gene (BmMOCS1) in the oya strain. Moreover, recombination was not observed between the oya and BmMOCS1 loci. These results indicate that the BmMOCS1 locus is responsible for the oya locus. Finally, we discuss the potential cause of male-biased lethality and flaccid paralysis observed in the oya mutants.

  10. The structure and competitive substrate inhibition of dihydrofolate reductase from Enterococcus faecalis reveal restrictions to cofactor docking.

    PubMed

    Bourne, Christina R; Wakeham, Nancy; Webb, Nicole; Nammalwar, Baskar; Bunce, Richard A; Berlin, K Darrell; Barrow, William W

    2014-02-25

    We are addressing bacterial resistance to antibiotics by repurposing a well-established classic antimicrobial target, the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) enzyme. In this work, we have focused on Enterococcus faecalis, a nosocomial pathogen that frequently harbors antibiotic resistance determinants leading to complicated and difficult-to-treat infections. An inhibitor series with a hydrophobic dihydrophthalazine heterocycle was designed from the anti-folate trimethoprim. We have examined the potency of this inhibitor series based on inhibition of DHFR enzyme activity and bacterial growth, including in the presence of the exogenous product analogue folinic acid. The resulting preferences were rationalized using a cocrystal structure of the DHFR from this organism with a propyl-bearing series member (RAB-propyl). In a companion apo structure, we identify four buried waters that act as placeholders for a conserved hydrogen-bonding network to the substrate and indicate an important role in protein stability during catalytic cycling. In these structures, the nicotinamide of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate cofactor is visualized outside of its binding pocket, which is exacerbated by RAB-propyl binding. Finally, homology models of the TMP(R) sequences dfrK and dfrF were constructed. While the dfrK-encoded protein shows clear sequence changes that would be detrimental to inhibitor binding, the dfrF-encoded protein model suggests the protein would be relatively unstable. These data suggest a utility for anti-DHFR compounds for treating infections arising from E. faecalis. They also highlight a role for water in stabilizing the DHFR substrate pocket and for competitive substrate inhibitors that may gain advantages in potency by the perturbation of cofactor dynamics.

  11. Structural Basis of Thermal Stability of the Tungsten Cofactor Synthesis Protein MoaB from Pyrococcus furiosus

    PubMed Central

    Havarushka, Nastassia; Fischer-Schrader, Katrin; Lamkemeyer, Tobias; Schwarz, Guenter

    2014-01-01

    Molybdenum and tungsten cofactors share a similar pterin-based scaffold, which hosts an ene-dithiolate function being essential for the coordination of either molybdenum or tungsten. The biosynthesis of both cofactors involves a multistep pathway, which ends with the activation of the metal binding pterin (MPT) by adenylylation before the respective metal is incorporated. In the hyperthermophilic organism Pyrococcus furiosus, the hexameric protein MoaB (PfuMoaB) has been shown to catalyse MPT-adenylylation. Here we determined the crystal structure of PfuMoaB at 2.5 Å resolution and identified key residues of α3-helix mediating hexamer formation. Given that PfuMoaB homologues from mesophilic organisms form trimers, we investigated the impact on PfuMoaB hexamerization on thermal stability and activity. Using structure-guided mutagenesis, we successfully disrupted the hexamer interface in PfuMoaB. The resulting PfuMoaB-H3 variant formed monomers, dimers and trimers as determined by size exclusion chromatography. Circular dichroism spectroscopy as well as chemical cross-linking coupled to mass spectrometry confirmed a wild-type-like fold of the protomers as well as inter-subunits contacts. The melting temperature of PfuMoaB-H3 was found to be reduced by more than 15°C as determined by differential scanning calorimetry, thus demonstrating hexamerization as key determinant for PfuMoaB thermal stability. Remarkably, while a loss of activity at temperatures higher than 50°C was observed in the PfuMoaB-H3 variant, at lower temperatures, we determined a significantly increased catalytic activity. The latter suggests a gain in conformational flexibility caused by the disruption of the hexamerization interface. PMID:24465852

  12. Structural basis of thermal stability of the tungsten cofactor synthesis protein MoaB from Pyrococcus furiosus.

    PubMed

    Havarushka, Nastassia; Fischer-Schrader, Katrin; Lamkemeyer, Tobias; Schwarz, Guenter

    2014-01-01

    Molybdenum and tungsten cofactors share a similar pterin-based scaffold, which hosts an ene-dithiolate function being essential for the coordination of either molybdenum or tungsten. The biosynthesis of both cofactors involves a multistep pathway, which ends with the activation of the metal binding pterin (MPT) by adenylylation before the respective metal is incorporated. In the hyperthermophilic organism Pyrococcus furiosus, the hexameric protein MoaB (PfuMoaB) has been shown to catalyse MPT-adenylylation. Here we determined the crystal structure of PfuMoaB at 2.5 Å resolution and identified key residues of α3-helix mediating hexamer formation. Given that PfuMoaB homologues from mesophilic organisms form trimers, we investigated the impact on PfuMoaB hexamerization on thermal stability and activity. Using structure-guided mutagenesis, we successfully disrupted the hexamer interface in PfuMoaB. The resulting PfuMoaB-H3 variant formed monomers, dimers and trimers as determined by size exclusion chromatography. Circular dichroism spectroscopy as well as chemical cross-linking coupled to mass spectrometry confirmed a wild-type-like fold of the protomers as well as inter-subunits contacts. The melting temperature of PfuMoaB-H3 was found to be reduced by more than 15 °C as determined by differential scanning calorimetry, thus demonstrating hexamerization as key determinant for PfuMoaB thermal stability. Remarkably, while a loss of activity at temperatures higher than 50 °C was observed in the PfuMoaB-H3 variant, at lower temperatures, we determined a significantly increased catalytic activity. The latter suggests a gain in conformational flexibility caused by the disruption of the hexamerization interface. PMID:24465852

  13. Genomewide markers as cofactors for precision mapping of quantitative trait loci.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, R

    2013-04-01

    In composite interval mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL), subsets of background markers are used to account for the effects of QTL outside the marker interval being tested. Here, I propose a QTL mapping approach (called G model) that utilizes genomewide markers as cofactors. The G model involves backward elimination on a given chromosome after correcting for genomewide marker effects, calculated under a random effects model, at all the other chromosomes. I simulated a trait controlled by 15 or 30 QTL, mapping populations of N = 96, 192, and 384 recombinant inbreds, and N M = 192 and 384 evenly spaced markers. In the C model, which utilized subsets of background markers, the number of QTL detected and the number of false positives depended on the number of cofactors used, with five cofactors being too few with N = 384 and 20-40 cofactors being too many with N = 96. A window size of 0 cM for excluding cofactors maintained the number of true QTL detected while decreasing the number of false positives. The number of true QTL detected was generally higher with the G model than with the C model, and the G model led to good control of the type I error rate in simulations where the null hypothesis of no marker-QTL linkage was true. Overall, the results indicated that the G model is useful in QTL mapping because it is less subjective and has equal, if not better, performance when compared with the traditional approach of using subsets of markers to account for background QTL.

  14. Selective androgen receptor modulator activity of a steroidal antiandrogen TSAA-291 and its cofactor recruitment profile.

    PubMed

    Hikichi, Yukiko; Yamaoka, Masuo; Kusaka, Masami; Hara, Takahito

    2015-10-15

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) specifically bind to the androgen receptor and exert agonistic or antagonistic effects on target organs. In this study, we investigated the SARM activity of TSAA-291, previously known as a steroidal antiandrogen, in mice because TSAA-291 was found to possess partial androgen receptor agonist activity in reporter assays. In addition, to clarify the mechanism underlying its tissue selectivity, we performed comprehensive cofactor recruitment analysis of androgen receptor using TSAA-291 and dihydrotestosterone (DHT), an endogenous androgen. The androgen receptor agonistic activity of TSAA-291 was more obvious in reporter assays using skeletal muscle cells than in those using prostate cells. In castrated mice, TSAA-291 increased the weight of the levator ani muscle without increasing the weight of the prostate and seminal vesicle. Comprehensive cofactor recruitment analysis via mammalian two-hybrid methods revealed that among a total of 112 cofactors, 12 cofactors including the protein inhibitor of activated STAT 1 (PIAS1) were differently recruited to androgen receptor in the presence of TSAA-291 and DHT. Prostate displayed higher PIAS1 expression than skeletal muscle. Forced expression of the PIAS1 augmented the transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor, and silencing of PIAS1 by siRNAs suppressed the secretion of prostate-specific antigen, an androgen responsive marker. Our results demonstrate that TSAA-291 has SARM activity and suggest that TSAA-291 may induce different conformational changes of the androgen receptor and recruitment profiles of cofactors such as PIAS1, compared with DHT, to exert tissue-specific activity.

  15. Mutations of an NAD(P)H-dependent flavoprotein monooxygenase that influence cofactor promiscuity and enantioselectivity.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Chantel N; Ali, Sohail T; Allen, Michael J; Grogan, Gideon

    2013-01-01

    The flavoprotein monooxygenase (FPMO) from Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (SMFMO, Uniprot: B2FLR2) catalyses the asymmetric oxidation of thioethers and is unusual amongst FPMOs in its ability to use the non-phosphorylated cofactor NADH, as well as NADPH, for the reduction of the FAD coenzyme. In order to explore the basis for cofactor promiscuity, structure-guided mutation of two residues in the cofactor binding site, Gln193 and His194, in SMFMO were performed in an attempt to imitate the cofactor binding site of the NADPH-dependent FMO from Methylophaga aminisulfidivorans sp. SK1 (mFMO), in which structurally homologous residues Arg234 and Thr235 bind the NADPH 2'-ribose phosphate. Mutation of His194 to threonine proved most significant, with a switch in specificity from NADH to NADPH [(k cat/K m NADH)/k cat/K m NADPH) from 1.5:1 to 1:3.5, mostly as a result of a reduced K m for NADPH of approximately sevenfold in the His194Thr mutant. The structure of the Gln193Arg/His194Thr mutant revealed no substantial changes in the backbone of the enzyme or orientation of side chains resulting from mutation. Mutation of Phe52, in the vicinity of FAD, and which in mFMO is an asparagine thought to be responsible for flavin hydroperoxide stabilisation, is, in SMFMO, a determinant of enantioselectivity in sulfoxidation. Mutation of Phe52 to valine resulted in a mutant that transformed para-tolyl methyl sulfide into the (S)-sulfoxide with 32% e.e., compared to 25% (R)- for the wild type. These results shed further light both on the cofactor specificity of FPMOs, and their determinants of enantioselectivity, with a view to informing engineering studies of FPMOs in the future.

  16. Metabolic Impact of Redox Cofactor Perturbations on the Formation of Aroma Compounds in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Isabelle; Dequin, Sylvie; Camarasa, Carole

    2015-01-01

    Redox homeostasis is a fundamental requirement for the maintenance of metabolism, energy generation, and growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The redox cofactors NADH and NADPH are among the most highly connected metabolites in metabolic networks. Changes in their concentrations may induce widespread changes in metabolism. Redox imbalances were achieved with a dedicated biological tool overexpressing native NADH-dependent or engineered NADPH-dependent 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase, in the presence of acetoin. We report that targeted perturbation of the balance of cofactors (NAD+/NADH or, to a lesser extent, NADP+/NADPH) significantly affected the production of volatile compounds. In most cases, variations in the redox state of yeasts modified the formation of all compounds from the same biochemical pathway (isobutanol, isoamyl alcohol, and their derivatives) or chemical class (ethyl esters), irrespective of the cofactors. These coordinated responses were found to be closely linked to the impact of redox status on the availability of intermediates of central carbon metabolism. This was the case for α-keto acids and acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA), which are precursors for the synthesis of many volatile compounds. We also demonstrated that changes in the availability of NADH selectively affected the synthesis of some volatile molecules (e.g., methionol, phenylethanol, and propanoic acid), reflecting the specific cofactor requirements of the dehydrogenases involved in their formation. Our findings indicate that both the availability of precursors from central carbon metabolism and the accessibility of reduced cofactors contribute to cell redox status modulation of volatile compound formation. PMID:26475113

  17. Systems Biology Analysis Merging Phenotype, Metabolomic and Genomic Data Identifies Non-SMC Condensin I Complex, Subunit G (NCAPG) and Cellular Maintenance Processes as Major Contributors to Genetic Variability in Bovine Feed Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Widmann, Philipp; Reverter, Antonio; Weikard, Rosemarie; Suhre, Karsten; Hammon, Harald M.; Albrecht, Elke; Kuehn, Christa

    2015-01-01

    Feed efficiency is a paramount factor for livestock economy. Previous studies had indicated a substantial heritability of several feed efficiency traits. In our study, we investigated the genetic background of residual feed intake, a commonly used parameter of feed efficiency, in a cattle resource population generated from crossing dairy and beef cattle. Starting from a whole genome association analysis, we subsequently performed combined phenotype-metabolome-genome analysis taking a systems biology approach by inferring gene networks based on partial correlation and information theory approaches. Our data about biological processes enriched with genes from the feed efficiency network suggest that genetic variation in feed efficiency is driven by genetic modulation of basic processes relevant to general cellular functions. When looking at the predicted upstream regulators from the feed efficiency network, the Tumor Protein P53 (TP53) and Transforming Growth Factor beta 1 (TGFB1) genes stood out regarding significance of overlap and number of target molecules in the data set. These results further support the hypothesis that TP53 is a major upstream regulator for genetic variation of feed efficiency. Furthermore, our data revealed a significant effect of both, the Non-SMC Condensin I Complex, Subunit G (NCAPG) I442M (rs109570900) and the Growth /differentiation factor 8 (GDF8) Q204X (rs110344317) loci, on residual feed intake and feed conversion. For both loci, the growth promoting allele at the onset of puberty was associated with a negative, but favorable effect on residual feed intake. The elevated energy demand for increased growth triggered by the NCAPG 442M allele is obviously not fully compensated for by an increased efficiency in converting feed into body tissue. As a consequence, the individuals carrying the NCAPG 442M allele had an additional demand for energy uptake that is reflected by the association of the allele with increased daily energy intake as

  18. Systems biology analysis merging phenotype, metabolomic and genomic data identifies Non-SMC Condensin I Complex, Subunit G (NCAPG) and cellular maintenance processes as major contributors to genetic variability in bovine feed efficiency.

    PubMed

    Widmann, Philipp; Reverter, Antonio; Weikard, Rosemarie; Suhre, Karsten; Hammon, Harald M; Albrecht, Elke; Kuehn, Christa

    2015-01-01

    Feed efficiency is a paramount factor for livestock economy. Previous studies had indicated a substantial heritability of several feed efficiency traits. In our study, we investigated the genetic background of residual feed intake, a commonly used parameter of feed efficiency, in a cattle resource population generated from crossing dairy and beef cattle. Starting from a whole genome association analysis, we subsequently performed combined phenotype-metabolome-genome analysis taking a systems biology approach by inferring gene networks based on partial correlation and information theory approaches. Our data about biological processes enriched with genes from the feed efficiency network suggest that genetic variation in feed efficiency is driven by genetic modulation of basic processes relevant to general cellular functions. When looking at the predicted upstream regulators from the feed efficiency network, the Tumor Protein P53 (TP53) and Transforming Growth Factor beta 1 (TGFB1) genes stood out regarding significance of overlap and number of target molecules in the data set. These results further support the hypothesis that TP53 is a major upstream regulator for genetic variation of feed efficiency. Furthermore, our data revealed a significant effect of both, the Non-SMC Condensin I Complex, Subunit G (NCAPG) I442M (rs109570900) and the Growth /differentiation factor 8 (GDF8) Q204X (rs110344317) loci, on residual feed intake and feed conversion. For both loci, the growth promoting allele at the onset of puberty was associated with a negative, but favorable effect on residual feed intake. The elevated energy demand for increased growth triggered by the NCAPG 442M allele is obviously not fully compensated for by an increased efficiency in converting feed into body tissue. As a consequence, the individuals carrying the NCAPG 442M allele had an additional demand for energy uptake that is reflected by the association of the allele with increased daily energy intake as

  19. Systems biology analysis merging phenotype, metabolomic and genomic data identifies Non-SMC Condensin I Complex, Subunit G (NCAPG) and cellular maintenance processes as major contributors to genetic variability in bovine feed efficiency.

    PubMed

    Widmann, Philipp; Reverter, Antonio; Weikard, Rosemarie; Suhre, Karsten; Hammon, Harald M; Albrecht, Elke; Kuehn, Christa

    2015-01-01

    Feed efficiency is a paramount factor for livestock economy. Previous studies had indicated a substantial heritability of several feed efficiency traits. In our study, we investigated the genetic background of residual feed intake, a commonly used parameter of feed efficiency, in a cattle resource population generated from crossing dairy and beef cattle. Starting from a whole genome association analysis, we subsequently performed combined phenotype-metabolome-genome analysis taking a systems biology approach by inferring gene networks based on partial correlation and information theory approaches. Our data about biological processes enriched with genes from the feed efficiency network suggest that genetic variation in feed efficiency is driven by genetic modulation of basic processes relevant to general cellular functions. When looking at the predicted upstream regulators from the feed efficiency network, the Tumor Protein P53 (TP53) and Transforming Growth Factor beta 1 (TGFB1) genes stood out regarding significance of overlap and number of target molecules in the data set. These results further support the hypothesis that TP53 is a major upstream regulator for genetic variation of feed efficiency. Furthermore, our data revealed a significant effect of both, the Non-SMC Condensin I Complex, Subunit G (NCAPG) I442M (rs109570900) and the Growth /differentiation factor 8 (GDF8) Q204X (rs110344317) loci, on residual feed intake and feed conversion. For both loci, the growth promoting allele at the onset of puberty was associated with a negative, but favorable effect on residual feed intake. The elevated energy demand for increased growth triggered by the NCAPG 442M allele is obviously not fully compensated for by an increased efficiency in converting feed into body tissue. As a consequence, the individuals carrying the NCAPG 442M allele had an additional demand for energy uptake that is reflected by the association of the allele with increased daily energy intake as

  20. Cellular Phone Towers

    MedlinePlus

    ... the call. How are people exposed to the energy from cellular phone towers? As people use cell ... where people can be exposed to them. The energy from a cellular phone tower antenna, like that ...

  1. Pooled RNAi screen identifies ubiquitin ligase Itch as crucial for influenza A virus release from the endosome during virus entry.

    PubMed

    Su, Wen-Chi; Chen, Yung-Chia; Tseng, Chung-Hsin; Hsu, Paul Wei-Che; Tung, Kuo-Feng; Jeng, King-Song; Lai, Michael M C

    2013-10-22

    Influenza viruses, like other viruses, rely on host factors to support their life cycle as viral proteins usually "hijack," or collaborate with, cellular proteins to execute their functions. Identification and understanding of these factors can increase the knowledge of molecular mechanisms manipulated by the viruses and facilitate development of antiviral drugs. To this end, we developed a unique genome-wide pooled shRNA screen to search for cellular factors important for influenza A virus (IAV) replication. We identified an E3 ubiquitin ligase, Itch, as an essential factor for an early step in the viral life cycle. In Itch knockdown cells, the incorporation of viral ribonucleoprotein complex into endosomes was normal, but its subsequent release from endosomes and transport to the nucleus was retarded. In addition, upon virus infection, Itch was phosphorylated and recruited to the endosomes, where virus particles were located. Furthermore, Itch interacted with viral M1 protein and ubiquitinated M1 protein. Collectively, our findings unravel a critical role of Itch in mediating IAV release from the endosome and offer insights into the mechanism for IAV uncoating during virus entry. These findings also highlight the feasibility of pooled RNAi screening for exploring the cellular cofactors of lytic viruses. PMID:24101521

  2. Hierarchical cellular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, L.J.

    1991-12-31

    In this paper a method for estimating the contributions of both the composite and the cellular microstructures to the overall material properties and the mechanical efficiency of natural cellular solids will be described. The method will be demonstrated by focusing on the Young`s modulus; similar techniques can be used for other material properties. The results suggest efficient microstructures for engineered cellular materials.

  3. Hierarchical cellular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, L.J.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper a method for estimating the contributions of both the composite and the cellular microstructures to the overall material properties and the mechanical efficiency of natural cellular solids will be described. The method will be demonstrated by focusing on the Young's modulus; similar techniques can be used for other material properties. The results suggest efficient microstructures for engineered cellular materials.

  4. Attenuation of the suppressive activity of cellular splicing factor SRSF3 by Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus ORF57 protein is required for RNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Majerciak, Vladimir; Lu, Mathew; Li, Xiaofan; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2014-11-01

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) ORF57 is a multifunctional post-transcriptional regulator essential for viral gene expression during KSHV lytic infection. ORF57 requires interactions with various cellular proteins for its function. Here, we identified serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 3 (SRSF3, formerly known as SRp20) as a cellular cofactor involved in ORF57-mediated splicing of KSHV K8β RNA. In the absence of ORF57, SRSF3 binds to a suboptimal K8β intron and inhibits K8β splicing. Knockdown of SRSF3 promotes K8β splicing, mimicking the effect of ORF57. The N-terminal half of ORF57 binds to the RNA recognition motif of SRSF3, which prevents SRSF3 from associating with the K8β intron RNA and therefore attenuates the suppressive effect of SRSF3 on K8β splicing. ORF57 also promotes splicing of heterologous non-KSHV transcripts that are negatively regulated by SRSF3, indicating that the effect of ORF57 on SRSF3 activity is independent of RNA target. SPEN proteins, previously identified as ORF57-interacting partners, suppress ORF57 splicing activity by displacing ORF57 from SRSF3-RNA complexes. In summary, we have identified modulation of SRSF3 activity as the molecular mechanism by which ORF57 promotes RNA splicing.

  5. Attenuation of the suppressive activity of cellular splicing factor SRSF3 by Kaposi sarcoma–associated herpesvirus ORF57 protein is required for RNA splicing

    PubMed Central

    Majerciak, Vladimir; Lu, Mathew; Li, Xiaofan

    2014-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma–associated herpesvirus (KSHV) ORF57 is a multifunctional post-transcriptional regulator essential for viral gene expression during KSHV lytic infection. ORF57 requires interactions with various cellular proteins for its function. Here, we identified serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 3 (SRSF3, formerly known as SRp20) as a cellular cofactor involved in ORF57-mediated splicing of KSHV K8β RNA. In the absence of ORF57, SRSF3 binds to a suboptimal K8β intron and inhibits K8β splicing. Knockdown of SRSF3 promotes K8β splicing, mimicking the effect of ORF57. The N-terminal half of ORF57 binds to the RNA recognition motif of SRSF3, which prevents SRSF3 from associating with the K8β intron RNA and therefore attenuates the suppressive effect of SRSF3 on K8β splicing. ORF57 also promotes splicing of heterologous non-KSHV transcripts that are negatively regulated by SRSF3, indicating that the effect of ORF57 on SRSF3 activity is independent of RNA target. SPEN proteins, previously identified as ORF57-interacting partners, suppress ORF57 splicing activity by displacing ORF57 from SRSF3–RNA complexes. In summary, we have identified modulation of SRSF3 activity as the molecular mechanism by which ORF57 promotes RNA splicing. PMID:25234929

  6. A novel antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity epitope in gp120 is identified by two monoclonal antibodies isolated from a long-term survivor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection.

    PubMed Central

    Alsmadi, O; Herz, R; Murphy, E; Pinter, A; Tilley, S A

    1997-01-01

    Two monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), 42F and 43F, were isolated some 14 months apart from a single long-term survivor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. These MAbs were found to be indistinguishable in terms of their isotypes, specificities, affinities, and biological activities. Both 42F and 43F directed substantial antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) against cells infected with four divergent lab-adapted strains of HIV-1, but no neutralizing activity against these strains was detectable. The ability of MAbs 42F and 43F, as well as that of MAbs against two other gp120 epitopes, to direct ADCC against uninfected CD4+ cells to which recombinant gp120SF2 had been adsorbed (i.e., "innocent bystanders") was demonstrated to be less efficient by at least an order of magnitude than their ability to direct ADCC against HIV-1-infected cells. Flow cytometry analyses showed that 42F and 43F also bind to native primary isolate Envs from clades B and E expressed on cell surfaces. By direct binding and competition assays, it was demonstrated that the 42F/43F epitope lies in a domain of gp120 outside the previously described CD4-binding site and V3 loop ADCC epitope clusters. Immunoblot analysis revealed that the 42F/43F epitope is not dependent on disulfide bonds or N-linked glycans in gp120. Epitope mapping of 42F and 43F by binding to linear peptides demonstrated specificity of these MAbs for a sequence of 10 amino acids in the C5 domain comprising residues 491 to 500 (Los Alamos National Laboratory numbering for the HXB2 strain). Thus, 42F and 43F define a new ADCC epitope in gp120. Because of the relative conservation of this epitope and the fact that it appears to have been significantly immunogenic in the individual from which these MAbs were derived, it may prove to be a useful component of HIV vaccines. Furthermore, these MAbs may be used as tools to probe the potential importance of ADCC as an antiviral activity in HIV-1 infection. PMID

  7. Targeted cofactor quantification in metabolically engineered E. coli using solid phase extraction and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhucui; Yang, Afang; Li, Yujing; Liu, Pingping; Zhang, Zhidan; Zhang, Xueli; Shui, Wenqing

    2016-03-01

    Quantification of energy and redox cofactors is of great value to synthetic biologists to infer the balance of energy metabolism in engineered microbial strains and assess each strain's potential for further improvement. Most currently used methods for intracellular cofactor measurement suffer from incomplete coverage, low reproducibility, suboptimal sensitivity or specificity. In this study, we described an SPE-HILIC/MS approach for simultaneous determination of six cofactor targets (ATP, ADP, NAD, NADH, NADP, NADPH) in Escherichia coli cells. Sufficient linearity, precision and metabolite recoveries of this new approach justified its reliability in targeted cofactor quantification. Our approach was then compared with conventional enzymatic assays to demonstrate its superior performance. We applied the SPE-HILIC/MS approach to profile shift of cofactor balances in several engineered E. coli strains with varying isobutanol production. Our cofactor analysis clearly revealed that optimal energy fitness was achieved in the highest-yield strain through combined modulation of a transhydrogenase and a NAD(+) kinase. Apart from the targeted cofactors, the SPE enrichment procedure also allowed for confident identification of 39 groups of polar metabolites mainly involved in central carbon metabolism in E. coli cells.

  8. The human membrane cofactor CD46 is a receptor for species B adenovirus serotype 3.

    PubMed

    Sirena, Dominique; Lilienfeld, Benjamin; Eisenhut, Markus; Kälin, Stefan; Boucke, Karin; Beerli, Roger R; Vogt, Lorenz; Ruedl, Christiane; Bachmann, Martin F; Greber, Urs F; Hemmi, Silvio

    2004-05-01

    Many human adenovirus (Ad) serotypes use the coxsackie B virus-Ad receptor (CAR). Recently, CD46 was suggested to be a receptor of species B Ad serotype 11 (Ad11), Ad14, Ad16, Ad21, Ad35, and Ad50. Using Sindbis virus-mediated cDNA library expression, we identify here the membrane cofactor protein CD46 as a surface receptor of species B Ad3. All four major CD46 transcripts and one minor CD46 transcript expressed in nucleated human cells were isolated. Rodent BHK cells stably expressing the BC1 form of CD46 bound radiolabeled Ad3 with a dissociation constant of 0.3 nM, identical to that of CD46-positive HeLa cells expressing twice as many Ad3 binding sites. Pull-down experiments with recombinant Ad3 fibers and a soluble form of the CD46 extracellular domain linked to the Fc portion of human immunoglobulin G (CD46ex-Fc) indicated direct interactions of the Ad3 fiber knob with CD46ex-Fc but not CARex-Fc (Fc-linked extracellular domain of CAR). Ad3 colocalized with cell surface CD46 in both rodent and human cells at the light and electron microscopy levels. Anti-CD46 antibodies and CD46ex-Fc inhibited Ad3 binding to CD46-expressing BHK cells more than 10-fold and to human cells 2-fold. In CD46-expressing BHK cells, wild-type Ad3 and a chimeric Ad consisting of the Ad5 capsid and the Ad3 fiber elicited dose-dependent cytopathic effects and transgene expression, albeit less efficiently than in human cells. Together, our results show that all of the major splice forms of CD46 are predominant and functional binding sites of Ad3 on CD46-expressing rodent and human cells but may not be the sole receptor of species B Ads on human cells. These results have implications for understanding viral pathogenesis and therapeutic gene delivery.

  9. The Human Membrane Cofactor CD46 Is a Receptor for Species B Adenovirus Serotype 3

    PubMed Central

    Sirena, Dominique; Lilienfeld, Benjamin; Eisenhut, Markus; Kälin, Stefan; Boucke, Karin; Beerli, Roger R.; Vogt, Lorenz; Ruedl, Christiane; Bachmann, Martin F.; Greber, Urs F.; Hemmi, Silvio

    2004-01-01

    Many human adenovirus (Ad) serotypes use the coxsackie B virus-Ad receptor (CAR). Recently, CD46 was suggested to be a receptor of species B Ad serotype 11 (Ad11), Ad14, Ad16, Ad21, Ad35, and Ad50. Using Sindbis virus-mediated cDNA library expression, we identify here the membrane cofactor protein CD46 as a surface receptor of species B Ad3. All four major CD46 transcripts and one minor CD46 transcript expressed in nucleated human cells were isolated. Rodent BHK cells stably expressing the BC1 form of CD46 bound radiolabeled Ad3 with a dissociation constant of 0.3 nM, identical to that of CD46-positive HeLa cells expressing twice as many Ad3 binding sites. Pull-down experiments with recombinant Ad3 fibers and a soluble form of the CD46 extracellular domain linked to the Fc portion of human immunoglobulin G (CD46ex-Fc) indicated direct interactions of the Ad3 fiber knob with CD46ex-Fc but not CARex-Fc (Fc-linked extracellular domain of CAR). Ad3 colocalized with cell surface CD46 in both rodent and human cells at the light and electron microscopy levels. Anti-CD46 antibodies and CD46ex-Fc inhibited Ad3 binding to CD46-expressing BHK cells more than 10-fold and to human cells 2-fold. In CD46-expressing BHK cells, wild-type Ad3 and a chimeric Ad consisting of the Ad5 capsid and the Ad3 fiber elicited dose-dependent cytopathic effects and transgene expression, albeit less efficiently than in human cells. Together, our results show that all of the major splice forms of CD46 are predominant and functional binding sites of Ad3 on CD46-expressing rodent and human cells but may not be the sole receptor of species B Ads on human cells. These results have implications for understanding viral pathogenesis and therapeutic gene delivery. PMID:15078926

  10. The human membrane cofactor CD46 is a receptor for species B adenovirus serotype 3.

    PubMed

    Sirena, Dominique; Lilienfeld, Benjamin; Eisenhut, Markus; Kälin, Stefan; Boucke, Karin; Beerli, Roger R; Vogt, Lorenz; Ruedl, Christiane; Bachmann, Martin F; Greber, Urs F; Hemmi, Silvio

    2004-05-01

    Many human adenovirus (Ad) serotypes use the coxsackie B virus-Ad receptor (CAR). Recently, CD46 was suggested to be a receptor of species B Ad serotype 11 (Ad11), Ad14, Ad16, Ad21, Ad35, and Ad50. Using Sindbis virus-mediated cDNA library expression, we identify here the membrane cofactor protein CD46 as a surface receptor of species B Ad3. All four major CD46 transcripts and one minor CD46 transcript expressed in nucleated human cells were isolated. Rodent BHK cells stably expressing the BC1 form of CD46 bound radiolabeled Ad3 with a dissociation constant of 0.3 nM, identical to that of CD46-positive HeLa cells expressing twice as many Ad3 binding sites. Pull-down experiments with recombinant Ad3 fibers and a soluble form of the CD46 extracellular domain linked to the Fc portion of human immunoglobulin G (CD46ex-Fc) indicated direct interactions of the Ad3 fiber knob with CD46ex-Fc but not CARex-Fc (Fc-linked extracellular domain of CAR). Ad3 colocalized with cell surface CD46 in both rodent and human cells at the light and electron microscopy levels. Anti-CD46 antibodies and CD46ex-Fc inhibited Ad3 binding to CD46-expressing BHK cells more than 10-fold and to human cells 2-fold. In CD46-expressing BHK cells, wild-type Ad3 and a chimeric Ad consisting of the Ad5 capsid and the Ad3 fiber elicited dose-dependent cytopathic effects and transgene expression, albeit less efficiently than in human cells. Together, our results show that all of the major splice forms of CD46 are predominant and functional binding sites of Ad3 on CD46-expressing rodent and human cells but may not be the sole receptor of species B Ads on human cells. These results have implications for understanding viral pathogenesis and therapeutic gene delivery. PMID:15078926

  11. Co-ordinate variations in methylmalonyl-CoA mutase and methionine synthase, and the cobalamin cofactors in human glioma cells during nitrous oxide exposure and the subsequent recovery phase.

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, B; Fiskerstrand, T; Refsum, H; Ueland, P M

    1999-01-01

    We investigated the co-ordinate variations of the two cobalamin (Cbl)-dependent enzymes, methionine synthase (MS) and methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MCM), and measured the levels of their respective cofactors, methylcobalamin (CH3Cbl) and adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl) in cultured human glioma cells during nitrous oxide exposure and during a subsequent recovery period of culture in a nitrous oxide-free atmosphere (air). In agreement with published data, MS as the primary target of nitrous oxide was inactivated rapidly (initial rate of 0.06 h(-1)), followed by reduction of CH3Cbl (to <20%). Both enzyme activity and cofactor levels recovered rapidly when the cells were subsequently cultured in air, but the recovery was completely blocked by the protein-synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide. During MS inactivation, there was a reduction of cellular AdoCbl and holo-MCM activity (measured in the absence of exogenous AdoCbl) to about 50% of pre-treatment levels. When the cells were transferred to air, both AdoCbl and holo-MCM activity recovered, albeit more slowly than the MS system. Notably, the regain of the holo-MCM and AdoCbl was enhanced rather than inhibited by cycloheximide. These findings confirm irreversible damage of MS by nitrous oxide; hence, synthesis of the enzyme is required to restore its activity. In contrast, restoration of holo-MCM activity is only dependent on repletion of the AdoCbl cofactor. We also observed a synchronous fluctuation in AdoCbl and the much larger hydroxycobalamin pool during the inactivation and recovery phase, suggesting that the loss and repletion of AdoCbl reflect changes in intracellular Cbl homoeostasis. Our data demonstrate that the nitrous oxide-induced changes in MS and CH3Cbl are associated with reversible changes in both MCM holoactivity and the AdoCbl level, suggesting co-ordinate distribution of Cbl cofactors during depletion and repletion. PMID:10377254

  12. Selective detection of NADPH among four pyridine-nucleotide cofactors by a fluorescent probe based on aggregation-induced emission.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Takao; Dawn, Arnab; Yoshihara, Daisuke; Tsuchiya, Youichi; Yamamoto, Tatsuhiro; Shinkai, Seiji

    2013-05-14

    A fluorescent sensor based on guanidinium-tethered tetraphenylethene (TPE) has been investigated toward the differentiation of pyridine nucleotide cofactors (NAD(+) , NADH, NADP(+) , and NADPH). TPE selectively recognizes NADPH possessing the higher tetra-anionic net-charge, resulting in the steep "turn-on" fluorescence increase. The comparative aggregation behaviors and fluorescence response studies of TPE on the four cofactors reveal that the critical aggregate concentration of TPE against NADPH correlates directly with the concentration threshold for the fluorescence response. These results establish that TPE can selectively differentiate NADPH over the other three cofactors by the steep aggregation-induced fluorescence response accompanied by the high signal-to-background contrast.

  13. Relationship between methanogenic cofactor content and maximum specific methanogenic activity of anaerobic granular sludges

    SciTech Connect

    Gorris, L.G.; de Kok, T.M.; Kroon, B.M.; van der Drift, C.; Vogels, G.D.

    1988-05-01

    In this study we investigated whether a relationship exists between the methanogenic activity and the content of specific methanogenic cofactors of granular sludges cultured on different combinations of volatile fatty acids in upflow anaerobic sludge blanket or fluidized-bed reactors. Significant correlations were measured in both cases between the contents of coenzyme F/sub 420/-2 or methanopterin and the maximum specific methanogenic activities on propionate, butyrate, and hydrogen, but not acetate. For both sludges the content of sarcinapterin appeared to be correlated with methanogenic activities on propionate, butyrate, and acetate, but not hydrogen. Similar correlations were measured with regard to the total content of coenzyme F/sub 420/-4 and F/sub 420/-5 sludges from fluidized-bed reactors. The results indicate that the contents of specific methanogenic cofactors measured in anaerobic granular sludges can be used to estimate the hydrogenotrophic or acetotrophic methanogenic potential of these sludges.

  14. Ca cofactor of the water-oxidation complex: Evidence for a Mn/Ca heteronuclear cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Cinco, Roehl M.; Robblee, John H.; Messinger, Johannes; Fernandez, Carmen; McFarlane, Karen L.; Pizarro, Shelly A.; Sauer, Ken; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2001-07-25

    Calcium and chloride are necessary cofactors for the proper function of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of Photosystem II (PS II). Located in the thylakoid membranes of green plants, cyanobacteria and algae, PS II and the OEC catalyze the light-driven oxidation of water into dioxygen (released into the biosphere), protons and electrons for carbon fixation. The actual chemistry of water oxidation is performed by a cluster of four manganese atoms, along with the requisite cofactors Ca{sup 2+} and Cl{sup -}. While the Mn complex has been extensively studied by X-ray absorption techniques, comparatively less is known about the Ca{sup 2+} cofactor. The fewer number of studies on the Ca{sup 2+} cofactor have sometimes relied on substituting the native cofactor with strontium or other metals, and have stirred some debate about the structure of the binding site. past efforts using Mn EXAFS on Sr-substituted PSII are suggestive of a close link between the Mn cluster and Sr, within 3.5 {angstrom}. The most recent published study using Sr EXAFS on similar samples confirms this finding of a 3.5 {angstrom} distance between Mn and Sr. This finding was base3d on a second Fourier peak (R {approx} 3 {angstrom}) in the Sr EXAFS from functional samples, but is absent from inactive, hydroxylamine-treated PS II. This Fourier peak II was found to fit best to two Mn at 3.5 {angstrom} rather than lighter atoms (carbon). Nevertheless, other experiments have given contrary results. They wanted to extend the technique by using polarized Sr EXAFS on layered Sr-substituted samples, to provide important angle information. Polarized EXAFS involves collecting spectra for different incident angles ({theta}) between the membrane normal of the layered sample and the X-ray electric field vector. Dichroism in the EXAFS can occur, depending on how the particular absorber-backscatterer (A-B) vector is aligned with the electric field. Through analysis of the dichroism, they extract the average number

  15. Structural Basis for Binding of RNA and Cofactor by a KsgA Methyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, Chao; Tropea, Joseph E.; Austin, Brian P.; Court, Donald L.; Waugh, David S.; Ji, Xinhua

    2009-03-27

    Among methyltransferases, KsgA and the reaction it catalyzes are conserved throughout evolution. However, the specifics of substrate recognition by the enzyme remain unknown. Here we report structures of Aquifex aeolicus KsgA, in its ligand-free form, in complex with RNA, and in complex with both RNA and S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH, reaction product of cofactor S-adenosylmethionine), revealing critical structural information on KsgA-RNA and KsgA-SAH interactions. Moreover, the structures show how conformational changes that occur upon RNA binding create the cofactor-binding site. There are nine conserved functional motifs (motifs IVIII and X) in KsgA. Prior to RNA binding, motifs I and VIII are flexible, each exhibiting two distinct conformations. Upon RNA binding, the two motifs become stabilized in one of these conformations, which is compatible with the binding of SAH. Motif X, which is also stabilized upon RNA binding, is directly involved in the binding of SAH.

  16. Cofactor-independent phosphoglycerate mutase is an essential gene in procyclic form Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Djikeng, Appolinaire; Raverdy, Sylvine; Foster, Jeremy; Bartholomeu, Daniella; Zhang, Yinhua; El-Sayed, Najib M; Carlow, Clotilde

    2007-03-01

    Glycolysis and gluconeogenesis are, in part, driven by the interconversion of 3- and 2-phosphoglycerate (3-PG and 2-PG) which is performed by phosphoglycerate mutases (PGAMs) which can be cofactor dependant (dPGAM) or cofactor independent (iPGAM). The African trypanosome, Trypanosoma brucei, possesses the iPGAM form which is thought to play an important role in glycolysis. Here, we report on the use of RNA interference to down-regulate the T. brucei iPGAM in procyclic form T. brucei and evaluation of the resulting phenotype. We first demonstrated biochemically that depletion of the steady state levels of iPGM mRNA correlates with a marked reduction of enzyme activity. We further show that iPGAM is required for cell growth in procyclic T. brucei.

  17. Human GLI-2 Is a Tat Activation Response Element-Independent Tat Cofactor

    PubMed Central

    Browning, Catherine M.; Smith, Michael J.; Clark, Nina M.; Lane, Brian R.; Parada, Camilo; Montano, Monty; KewalRamani, Vineet N.; Littman, Dan R.; Essex, Max; Roeder, Robert G.; Markovitz, David M.

    2001-01-01

    Zinc finger-containing GLI proteins are involved in the development of Caenorhabditis elegans, Xenopus, Drosophila, zebrafish, mice, and humans. In this study, we show that an isoform of human GLI-2 strongly synergizes with the Tat transactivating proteins of human immunodeficiency virus types 1 and 2 (HIV-1 and -2) and markedly stimulates viral replication. GLI-2 also synergizes with the previously described Tat cofactor cyclin T1 to stimulate Tat function. Surprisingly, GLI-2/Tat synergy is not dependent on either a typical GLI DNA binding site or an intact Tat activation response element but does require an intact TATA box. Thus, GLI-2/Tat synergy results from a mechanism of action which is novel both for a GLI protein and for a Tat cofactor. These findings link the GLI family of transcriptional and developmental regulatory proteins to Tat function and HIV replication. PMID:11160734

  18. Verification of a novel NADH-binding motif: combinatorial mutagenesis of three amino acids in the cofactor-binding pocket of Corynebacterium 2,5-diketo-D-gluconic acid reductase.

    PubMed

    Banta, Scott; Anderson, Stephen

    2002-12-01

    A screening method has been developed to support randomized mutagenesis of amino acids in the cofactor-binding pocket of the NADPH-dependent 2,5-diketo-D-gluconic acid (2,5-DKG) reductase. Such an approach could enable the isolation of an enzyme that can better catalyze the reduction of 2,5-DKG to 2-keto-L-gulonic acid (2-KLG) using NADH as a cofactor. 2-KLG is a valuable precursor to ascorbic acid, or vitamin C, and an enzyme with increased activity with NADH may be able to improve two potential vitamin C production processes. Previously we have identified three amino acid residues that can be mutated to improve activity with NADH as a cofactor. As a pilot study to show feasibility, a library was made with these three amino acids randomized, and 300 random colonies were screened for increased NADH activity. The activities of seven mutants with apparent improvements were verified using activity-stained native gels, and sequencing showed that the amino acids obtained were similar to some of those already discovered using rational design. The four most active mutants were purified and kinetically characterized. All of the new mutations resulted in apparent kcat values that were equal to or higher than that of the best mutant obtained through rational design. At saturating levels of cofactor, the best mutant obtained was almost twice as active with NADH as a cofactor as the wild-type enzyme is with NADPH. This screen is a valuable tool for improving 2,5-DKG reductase, and it could easily be modified for improving other aspects of this protein or similar enzymes.

  19. CD/MCD/VTVH-MCD Studies of Escherichia coli Bacterioferritin Support a Binuclear Iron Cofactor Site.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Yeonju; Schwartz, Jennifer K; Huang, Victor W; Boice, Emily; Kurtz, Donald M; Solomon, Edward I

    2015-12-01

    Ferritins and bacterioferritins (Bfrs) utilize a binuclear non-heme iron binding site to catalyze oxidation of Fe(II), leading to formation of an iron mineral core within a protein shell. Unlike ferritins, in which the diiron site binds Fe(II) as a substrate, which then autoxidizes and migrates to the mineral core, the diiron site in Bfr has a 2-His/4-carboxylate ligand set that is commonly found in diiron cofactor enzymes. Bfrs could, therefore, utilize the diiron site as a cofactor rather than for substrate iron binding. In this study, we applied circular dichroism (CD), magnetic CD (MCD), and variable-temperature, variable-field MCD (VTVH-MCD) spectroscopies to define the geometric and electronic structures of the biferrous active site in Escherichia coli Bfr. For these studies, we used an engineered M52L variant, which is known to eliminate binding of a heme cofactor but to have very minor effects on either iron oxidation or mineral core formation. We also examined an H46A/D50A/M52L Bfr variant, which additionally disrupts a previously observed mononuclear non-heme iron binding site inside the protein shell. The spectral analyses define a binuclear and an additional mononuclear ferrous site. The biferrous site shows two different five-coordinate centers. After O2 oxidation and re-reduction, only the mononuclear ferrous signal is eliminated. The retention of the biferrous but not the mononuclear ferrous site upon O2 cycling supports a mechanism in which the binuclear site acts as a cofactor for the O2 reaction, while the mononuclear site binds the substrate Fe(II) that, after its oxidation to Fe(III), migrates to the mineral core.

  20. Potential role of Arabidopsis PHP as an accessory subunit of the PAF1 transcriptional cofactor.

    PubMed

    Park, Sunchung; Ek-Ramos, Maria Julissa; Oh, Sookyung; van Nocker, Steven

    2011-08-01

    Paf1C is a transcriptional cofactor that has been implicated in various transcription-associated mechanisms spanning initiation, elongation and RNA processing, and is important for multiple aspects of development in Arabidopsis. Our recent studies suggest Arabidopsis Paf1C is crucial for proper regulation of genes within H3K27me3-enriched chromatin, and that a protein named PHP may act as an accessory subunit of Paf1C that promotes this function.

  1. Evidence for methoxatin (pyrroloquinolinequinone) as the cofactor in bovine plasma amine oxidase from resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Moog, R S; McGuirl, M A; Cote, C E; Dooley, D M

    1986-01-01

    Resonance Raman spectra of the 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine derivatives of bovine plasma amine oxidase [amine:oxygen oxidoreductase (deaminating) (copper-containing), EC 1.4.3.6] have been measured. Detailed comparisons to the spectra of the corresponding derivatives of methoxatin (pyrroloquinolinequinone), pyridoxal, and other aldehydes and diones provide further evidence that covalently bound methoxatin or a closely similar derivative is the organic cofactor in copper-containing amine oxidases. PMID:3464962

  2. DNA Repair Cofactors ATMIN and NBS1 Are Required to Suppress T Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Prochazkova, Jana; Sakaguchi, Shinya; Owusu, Michel; Mazouzi, Abdelghani; Wiedner, Marc; Velimezi, Georgia; Moder, Martin; Turchinovich, Gleb; Hladik, Anastasiya; Gurnhofer, Elisabeth; Hayday, Adrian; Behrens, Axel; Knapp, Sylvia; Kenner, Lukas; Ellmeier, Wilfried; Loizou, Joanna I

    2015-11-01

    Proper development of the immune system is an intricate process dependent on many factors, including an intact DNA damage response. The DNA double-strand break signaling kinase ATM and its cofactor NBS1 are required during T cell development and for the maintenance of genomic stability. The role of a second ATM cofactor, ATMIN (also known as ASCIZ) in T cells is much less clear, and whether ATMIN and NBS1 function in synergy in T cells is unknown. Here, we investigate the roles of ATMIN and NBS1, either alone or in combination, using murine models. We show loss of NBS1 led to a developmental block at the double-positive stage of T cell development, as well as reduced TCRα recombination, that was unexpectedly neither exacerbated nor alleviated by concomitant loss of ATMIN. In contrast, loss of both ATMIN and NBS1 enhanced DNA damage that drove spontaneous peripheral T cell hyperactivation, proliferation as well as excessive production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, leading to a highly inflammatory environment. Intriguingly, the disease causing T cells were largely proficient for both ATMIN and NBS1. In vivo this resulted in severe intestinal inflammation, colitis and premature death. Our findings reveal a novel model for an intestinal bowel disease phenotype that occurs upon combined loss of the DNA repair cofactors ATMIN and NBS1.

  3. Substrate Recognition and Catalysis by the Cofactor-Independent Dioxygenase DpgC+

    SciTech Connect

    Fielding,E.; Widboom, P.; Bruner, S.

    2007-01-01

    The enzyme DpgC belongs to a small class of oxygenases not dependent on accessory cofactors for activity. DpgC is in the biosynthetic pathway for the nonproteinogenic amino acid 3, 5-dihydroxyphenylglycine in actinomycetes bacteria responsible for the production of the vancomycin/teicoplanin family of antibiotic natural products. The X-ray structure of DpgC confirmed the absence of cofactors and defined a novel hydrophobic dioxygen binding pocket adjacent to a bound substrate analogue. In this paper, the role specific amino acids play in substrate recognition and catalysis is examined through biochemical and structural characterization of site-specific enzyme mutations and alternate substrates. The results establish the importance of three amino acids, Arg254, Glu299, and Glu189, in the chemistry of DpgC. Arg254 and Glu189 join to form a specific contact with one of the phenolic hydroxyls of the substrate, and this interaction plays a key role in both substrate recognition and catalysis. The X-ray crystal structure of Arg254Lys was determined to address the role this residue plays in the chemistry. In addition, characterization of alternate substrate analogues demonstrates the presence and position of phenol groups are necessary for both enzyme recognition and downstream oxidation chemistry. Overall, this work defines the mechanism of substrate recognition and specificity by the cofactor-independent dioxygenase DpgC.

  4. Quantum localization and protein-assisted vibrational energy flow in cofactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, David M.

    2010-08-01

    Quantum effects influence vibrational dynamics and energy flow in biomolecules, which play a central role in biomolecule function, including control of reaction kinetics. Lifetimes of many vibrational modes of proteins and their temperature dependence, as determined by quantum golden-rule-based calculations, exhibit trends consistent with experimental observation and distinct from estimates based on classical modeling. Particularly notable are quantum coherence effects that give rise to localization of vibrational states of sizable organic molecules in the gas phase. Even when such a molecule, for instance a cofactor, is embedded in a protein, remnants of quantum localization survive that influence vibrational energy flow and its dependence on temperature. We discuss these effects on the mode-damping rates of a cofactor embedded in a protein, using the green fluorescent protein chromophore as a specific example. We find that for cofactors of this size embedded in their protein and solvent environment at room temperature a golden-rule calculation often overestimates the mode-damping rate.

  5. Regulation of the human Suv3 helicase on DNA by inorganic cofactors.

    PubMed

    Venø, Susanne T; Witt, Marie B; Kulikowicz, Tomasz; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Stevnsner, Tinna

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are essential organelles and consequently proper expression and maintenance of the mitochondrial genome are indispensable for proper cell function. The mitochondrial Suv3 (SUPV3L1) helicase is known to have a central role in mitochondrial RNA metabolism and to be essential for maintenance of mitochondrial DNA stability. Here we have performed biochemical investigations to determine the potential regulation of the human Suv3 (hSuv3) helicase function by inorganic cofactors. We find that hSuv3 helicase and ATPase activity in vitro is strictly dependent on the presence of specific divalent cations. Interestingly, we show that divalent cations and nucleotide concentration have a direct effect on helicase substrate stability. Also, hSuv3 helicase is able to utilize several different nucleotide cofactors including both NTPs and dNTPs. Intriguingly, the potency of the individual nucleotide as energy source for hSuv3 unwinding differed depending on the included divalent cation and nucleotide concentration. At low concentrations, all four NTPs could support helicase activity with varying effectiveness depending on the included divalent cation. However, at higher nucleotide concentrations, only ATP was able to elicit the helicase activity of hSuv3. Consequently, we speculate that the capacity of hSuv3 DNA unwinding activity might be sensitive to the local availability of specific inorganic cofactors.

  6. Metal cofactors in the structure and activity of the fowlpox resolvase.

    PubMed

    Culyba, Matthew J; Hwang, Young; Hu, Jimmy Yan; Minkah, Nana; Ocwieja, Karen E; Bushman, Frederic D

    2010-05-28

    Poxvirus DNA replication generates linear concatemers containing many copies of the viral genome with inverted repeat sequences at the junctions between monomers. The inverted repeats refold to generate Holliday junctions, which are cleaved by the virus-encoded resolvase enzyme to form unit-length genomes. Here we report studies of the influence of metal cofactors on the activity and structure of the resolvase of fowlpox virus, which provides a tractable model for in vitro studies. Small-molecule inhibitors of related enzymes bind simultaneously to metal cofactors and nearby surface amino acid residues, so understanding enzyme-cofactor interactions is important for the design of antiviral agents. Analysis of inferred active-site residues (D7, E60, K102, D132, and D135) by mutagenesis and metal rescue experiments specified residues that contribute to binding metal ions and that multiple binding sites are probably involved. Differential electrophoretic analysis was used to map the conformation of the DNA junction when bound by resolvase. For the wild-type complex in the presence of EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) or Ca(2+), migration was consistent with the DNA arms arranged in near-tetrahedral geometry. However, the D7N active-site mutant resolvase held the arms in a more planar arrangement in EDTA, Ca(2+), or Mg(2+) conditions, implicating metal-dependent contacts at the active site in the larger architecture of the complex. These data show how divalent metals dictate the conformation of FPV resolvase-DNA complexes and subsequent DNA cleavage.

  7. Stepwise isotope editing of [FeFe]-hydrogenases exposes cofactor dynamics.

    PubMed

    Senger, Moritz; Mebs, Stefan; Duan, Jifu; Wittkamp, Florian; Apfel, Ulf-Peter; Heberle, Joachim; Haumann, Michael; Stripp, Sven Timo

    2016-07-26

    The six-iron cofactor of [FeFe]-hydrogenases (H-cluster) is the most efficient H2-forming catalyst in nature. It comprises a diiron active site with three carbon monoxide (CO) and two cyanide (CN(-)) ligands in the active oxidized state (Hox) and one additional CO ligand in the inhibited state (Hox-CO). The diatomic ligands are sensitive reporter groups for structural changes of the cofactor. Their vibrational dynamics were monitored by real-time attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Combination of (13)CO gas exposure, blue or red light irradiation, and controlled hydration of three different [FeFe]-hydrogenase proteins produced 8 Hox and 16 Hox-CO species with all possible isotopic exchange patterns. Extensive density functional theory calculations revealed the vibrational mode couplings of the carbonyl ligands and uniquely assigned each infrared spectrum to a specific labeling pattern. For Hox-CO, agreement between experimental and calculated infrared frequencies improved by up to one order of magnitude for an apical CN(-) at the distal iron ion of the cofactor as opposed to an apical CO. For Hox, two equally probable isomers with partially rotated ligands were suggested. Interconversion between these structures implies dynamic ligand reorientation at the H-cluster. Our experimental protocol for site-selective (13)CO isotope editing combined with computational species assignment opens new perspectives for characterization of functional intermediates in the catalytic cycle.

  8. Cofactor specificity motifs and the induced fit mechanism in class I ketol-acid reductoisomerases.

    PubMed

    Cahn, Jackson K B; Brinkmann-Chen, Sabine; Spatzal, Thomas; Wiig, Jared A; Buller, Andrew R; Einsle, Oliver; Hu, Yilin; Ribbe, Markus W; Arnold, Frances H

    2015-06-15

    Although most sequenced members of the industrially important ketol-acid reductoisomerase (KARI) family are class I enzymes, structural studies to date have focused primarily on the class II KARIs, which arose through domain duplication. In the present study, we present five new crystal structures of class I KARIs. These include the first structure of a KARI with a six-residue β2αB (cofactor specificity determining) loop and an NADPH phosphate-binding geometry distinct from that of the seven- and 12-residue loops. We also present the first structures of naturally occurring KARIs that utilize NADH as cofactor. These results show insertions in the specificity loops that confounded previous attempts to classify them according to loop length. Lastly, we explore the conformational changes that occur in class I KARIs upon binding of cofactor and metal ions. The class I KARI structures indicate that the active sites close upon binding NAD(P)H, similar to what is observed in the class II KARIs of rice and spinach and different from the opening of the active site observed in the class II KARI of Escherichia coli. This conformational change involves a decrease in the bending of the helix that runs between the domains and a rearrangement of the nicotinamide-binding site.

  9. A network analysis of cofactor-protein interactions for analyzing associations between human nutrition and diseases

    PubMed Central

    Scott-Boyer, Marie Pier; Lacroix, Sébastien; Scotti, Marco; Morine, Melissa J.; Kaput, Jim; Priami, Corrado

    2016-01-01

    The involvement of vitamins and other micronutrients in intermediary metabolism was elucidated in the mid 1900’s at the level of individual biochemical reactions. Biochemical pathways remain the foundational knowledgebase for understanding how micronutrient adequacy modulates health in all life stages. Current daily recommended intakes were usually established on the basis of the association of a single nutrient to a single, most sensitive adverse effect and thus neglect interdependent and pleiotropic effects of micronutrients on biological systems. Hence, the understanding of the impact of overt or sub-clinical nutrient deficiencies on biological processes remains incomplete. Developing a more complete view of the role of micronutrients and their metabolic products in protein-mediated reactions is of importance. We thus integrated and represented cofactor-protein interaction data from multiple and diverse sources into a multi-layer network representation that links cofactors, cofactor-interacting proteins, biological processes, and diseases. Network representation of this information is a key feature of the present analysis and enables the integration of data from individual biochemical reactions and protein-protein interactions into a systems view, which may guide strategies for targeted nutritional interventions aimed at improving health and preventing diseases. PMID:26777674

  10. DNA Repair Cofactors ATMIN and NBS1 Are Required to Suppress T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Prochazkova, Jana; Sakaguchi, Shinya; Owusu, Michel; Mazouzi, Abdelghani; Wiedner, Marc; Velimezi, Georgia; Moder, Martin; Turchinovich, Gleb; Hladik, Anastasiya; Gurnhofer, Elisabeth; Hayday, Adrian; Behrens, Axel; Knapp, Sylvia; Kenner, Lukas; Ellmeier, Wilfried; Loizou, Joanna I.

    2015-01-01

    Proper development of the immune system is an intricate process dependent on many factors, including an intact DNA damage response. The DNA double-strand break signaling kinase ATM and its cofactor NBS1 are required during T cell development and for the maintenance of genomic stability. The role of a second ATM cofactor, ATMIN (also known as ASCIZ) in T cells is much less clear, and whether ATMIN and NBS1 function in synergy in T cells is unknown. Here, we investigate the roles of ATMIN and NBS1, either alone or in combination, using murine models. We show loss of NBS1 led to a developmental block at the double-positive stage of T cell development, as well as reduced TCRα recombination, that was unexpectedly neither exacerbated nor alleviated by concomitant loss of ATMIN. In contrast, loss of both ATMIN and NBS1 enhanced DNA damage that drove spontaneous peripheral T cell hyperactivation, proliferation as well as excessive production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, leading to a highly inflammatory environment. Intriguingly, the disease causing T cells were largely proficient for both ATMIN and NBS1. In vivo this resulted in severe intestinal inflammation, colitis and premature death. Our findings reveal a novel model for an intestinal bowel disease phenotype that occurs upon combined loss of the DNA repair cofactors ATMIN and NBS1. PMID:26544571

  11. Mutagenesis studies toward understanding the mechanism of the cofactor function of thrombomodulin.

    PubMed

    Rezaie, Alireza R; Yang, Likui

    2005-10-01

    Thrombomodulin (TM) is as essential cofactor in protein C activation by thrombin. To investigate the cofactor effect of TM on the P3-P3' binding specificity of thrombin, we prepared a Gla-domainless protein C (GDPC) and an antithrombin (AT) mutant in which the P3-P3' residues of both molecules were replaced with the corresponding residues of the factor Xa cleavage site in prethrombin-2. TM is known to interact with GDPC, but not AT in the complex. Thrombin did not react with either mutant in the absence of a cofactor. While the thrombin-TM complex also did not react with the AT mutant, it activated the GDPC mutant with a normal k(cat), but an approximately 4-fold impaired K(m) value. Further studies revealed that the active-site directed inhibitor p-aminobenzamidine acts as a competitive inhibitor of both wild-type and GDPC mutant in reaction with the thrombin-TM complex. These results suggest that the interaction of the P3-P3' residues of GDPC with the active-site pocket of the thrombin-TM complex makes a dominant contribution to the binding specificity of the reaction. Moreover, the observation that the GDPC mutant, but not the AT mutant, functions as an effective substrate for the thrombin-TM complex suggests that GDPC interaction with the thrombin-TM complex may be associated with the alteration of the conformation of the P3-P3' residues of the substrate. PMID:15970373

  12. Stepwise isotope editing of [FeFe]-hydrogenases exposes cofactor dynamics.

    PubMed

    Senger, Moritz; Mebs, Stefan; Duan, Jifu; Wittkamp, Florian; Apfel, Ulf-Peter; Heberle, Joachim; Haumann, Michael; Stripp, Sven Timo

    2016-07-26

    The six-iron cofactor of [FeFe]-hydrogenases (H-cluster) is the most efficient H2-forming catalyst in nature. It comprises a diiron active site with three carbon monoxide (CO) and two cyanide (CN(-)) ligands in the active oxidized state (Hox) and one additional CO ligand in the inhibited state (Hox-CO). The diatomic ligands are sensitive reporter groups for structural changes of the cofactor. Their vibrational dynamics were monitored by real-time attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Combination of (13)CO gas exposure, blue or red light irradiation, and controlled hydration of three different [FeFe]-hydrogenase proteins produced 8 Hox and 16 Hox-CO species with all possible isotopic exchange patterns. Extensive density functional theory calculations revealed the vibrational mode couplings of the carbonyl ligands and uniquely assigned each infrared spectrum to a specific labeling pattern. For Hox-CO, agreement between experimental and calculated infrared frequencies improved by up to one order of magnitude for an apical CN(-) at the distal iron ion of the cofactor as opposed to an apical CO. For Hox, two equally probable isomers with partially rotated ligands were suggested. Interconversion between these structures implies dynamic ligand reorientation at the H-cluster. Our experimental protocol for site-selective (13)CO isotope editing combined with computational species assignment opens new perspectives for characterization of functional intermediates in the catalytic cycle. PMID:27432985

  13. Immobilization of Multi-biocatalysts in Alginate Beads for Cofactor Regeneration and Improved Reusability.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hui; Khera, Eshita; Lee, Jung-Kul; Wen, Fei

    2016-04-22

    We have recently developed a simple, reusable and coupled whole-cell biocatalytic system with the capability of cofactor regeneration and biocatalyst immobilization for improved production yield and sustained synthesis. Described herewith is the experimental procedure for the development of such a system consisting of two E. coli strains that express functionally complementary enzymes. Together, these two enzymes can function co-operatively to mediate the regeneration of expensive cofactors for improving the product yield of the bioreaction. In addition, the method of synthesizing an immobilized form of the coupled biocatalytic system by encapsulation of whole cells in calcium alginate beads is reported. As an example, we present the improved biosynthesis of L-xylulose from L-arabinitol by coupling E. coli cells expressing the enzymes L-arabinitol dehydrogenase or NADH oxidase. Under optimal conditions and using an initial concentration of 150 mM L-arabinitol, the maximal L-xylulose yield reached 96%, which is higher than those reported in the literature. The immobilized form of the coupled whole-cell biocatalysts demonstrated good operational stability, maintaining 65% of the yield obtained in the first cycle after 7 cycles of successive re-use, while the free cell system almost completely lost the catalytic activity. Therefore, the methods reported here provides two strategies that could help improve the industrial production of L-xylulose, as well as other value-added compounds requiring the use of cofactors in general.

  14. Photo-cycle dynamics of LOV1-His domain of phototropin from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii with roseoflavin monophosphate cofactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, A.; Penzkofer, A.; Mathes, T.; Hegemann, P.

    2010-09-01

    The wild-type phototropin protein phot from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii consists of two N-terminal LOV domains LOV1 and LOV2 with flavin mononucleotide (FMN) cofactor and a C-terminal serine-threonine kinase domain. It controls multiple steps in the sexual lifecycle of the alga. Here the LOV1-His domain of phot with modified cofactor is studied. FMN is replaced by roseoflavin monophosphate (8-dimethylamino-8-demethyl-FMN, RoFMN). The modified LOV1 domain is called RoLOV1. The photo-dynamics consequences of the cofactor change are studied. The absorption, emission, and photo-cyclic behaviour of LOV1-His and RoLOV1-His are compared. A spectroscopic characterisation of the cofactors FMN and RoFMN (roseoflavin) is given.

  15. Overview of cellular CDMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, William C. Y.

    1991-05-01

    A general description of code division multiple access (CDMA) is presented. This overview of CDMA highlights the potential of increasing capacity in future cellular communications. The author describes the mobile radio environment and its impact on narrowband and wideband propagation. The advantage of having CDMA in cellular systems is discussed, and the concept of radio capacity in cellular is introduced. The power control schemes in CDMA are analyzed in detail.

  16. Correlating two-photon excited fluorescence imaging of breast cancer cellular redox state with seahorse flux analysis of normalized cellular oxygen consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Jue; Wright, Heather J.; Chan, Nicole; Tran, Richard; Razorenova, Olga V.; Potma, Eric O.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2016-06-01

    Two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) imaging of the cellular cofactors nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and oxidized flavin adenine dinucleotide is widely used to measure cellular metabolism, both in normal and pathological cells and tissues. When dual-wavelength excitation is used, ratiometric TPEF imaging of the intrinsic cofactor fluorescence provides a metabolic index of cells-the "optical redox ratio" (ORR). With increased interest in understanding and controlling cellular metabolism in cancer, there is a need to evaluate the performance of ORR in malignant cells. We compare TPEF metabolic imaging with seahorse flux analysis of cellular oxygen consumption in two different breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231). We monitor metabolic index in living cells under both normal culture conditions and, for MCF-7, in response to cell respiration inhibitors and uncouplers. We observe a significant correlation between the TPEF-derived ORR and the flux analyzer measurements (R=0.7901, p<0.001). Our results confirm that the ORR is a valid dynamic index of cell metabolism under a range of oxygen consumption conditions relevant for cancer imaging.

  17. Rational proteomics II: electrostatic nature of cofactor preference in the short-chain oxidoreductase (SCOR) enzyme family.

    PubMed

    Pletnev, Vladimir Z; Weeks, Charles M; Duax, William L

    2004-11-01

    The dominant role of long-range electrostatic interatomic interactions in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide/nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAD/NADP) cofactor recognition has been shown for enzymes of the short-chain oxidoreductase (SCOR) family. An estimation of cofactor preference based only on the contribution of the electrostatic energy term to the total energy of enzyme-cofactor interaction has been tested for approximately 40 known three-dimensional (3D) crystal complexes and approximately 330 SCOR enzymes, with cofactor preference predicted by the presence of Asp or Arg recognition residues at specific 3D positions in the beta2alpha3 loop (Duax et al., Proteins 2003;53:931-943). The results obtained were found to be consistent with approximately 90% reliable cofactor assignments for those subsets. The procedure was then applied to approximately 170 SCOR enzymes with completely uncertain NAD/NADP dependence, due to the lack of Asp and Arg marker residues. The proposed 3D electrostatic approach for cofactor assignment ("3D_DeltaE(el)") has been implemented in an automatic screening procedure, and together with the use of marker residues proposed earlier (Duax et al., Proteins 2003;53:931-943), increases the level of reliable predictions for the putative SCORs from approximately 70% to approximately 90%. It is expected to be applicable for any NAD/NADP-dependent enzyme subset having at least 25-30% sequence identity, with at least one enzyme of known 3D crystal structure.

  18. A water-forming NADH oxidase from Lactobacillus pentosus suitable for the regeneration of synthetic biomimetic cofactors.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Claudia; Beer, Barbara; Pick, André; Roth, Teresa; Lommes, Petra; Sieber, Volker

    2015-01-01

    The cell-free biocatalytic production of fine chemicals by oxidoreductases has continuously grown over the past years. Since especially dehydrogenases depend on the stoichiometric use of nicotinamide pyridine cofactors, an integrated efficient recycling system is crucial to allow process operation under economic conditions. Lately, the variety of cofactors for biocatalysis was broadened by the utilization of totally synthetic and cheap biomimetics. Though, to date the regeneration has been limited to chemical or electrochemical methods. Here, we report an enzymatic recycling by the flavoprotein NADH-oxidase from Lactobacillus pentosus (LpNox). Since this enzyme has not been described before, we first characterized it in regard to its optimal reaction parameters. We found that the heterologously overexpressed enzyme only contained 13% FAD. In vitro loading of the enzyme with FAD, resulted in a higher specific activity towards its natural cofactor NADH as well as different nicotinamide derived biomimetics. Apart from the enzymatic recycling, which gives water as a by-product by transferring four electrons onto oxygen, unbound FAD can also catalyze the oxidation of biomimetic cofactors. Here a two electron process takes place yielding H2O2 instead. The enzymatic and chemical recycling was compared in regard to reaction kinetics for the natural and biomimetic cofactors. With LpNox and FAD, two recycling strategies for biomimetic cofactors are described with either water or hydrogen peroxide as by-product.

  19. Activated protein C cofactor function of protein S: a novel role for a γ-carboxyglutamic acid residue.

    PubMed

    Ahnström, Josefin; Andersson, Helena M; Canis, Kevin; Norstrøm, Eva; Yu, Yao; Dahlbäck, Björn; Panico, Maria; Morris, Howard R; Crawley, James T B; Lane, David A

    2011-06-16

    Protein S has an important anticoagulant function by acting as a cofactor for activated protein C (APC). We recently reported that the EGF1 domain residue Asp95 is critical for APC cofactor function. In the present study, we examined whether additional interaction sites within the Gla domain of protein S might contribute to its APC cofactor function. We examined 4 residues, composing the previously reported "Face1" (N33S/P35T/E36A/Y39V) variant, as single point substitutions. Of these protein S variants, protein S E36A was found to be almost completely inactive using calibrated automated thrombography. In factor Va inactivation assays, protein S E36A had 89% reduced cofactor activity compared with wild-type protein S and was almost completely inactive in factor VIIIa inactivation; phospholipid binding was, however, normal. Glu36 lies outside the ω-loop that mediates Ca(2+)-dependent phospholipid binding. Using mass spectrometry, it was nevertheless confirmed that Glu36 is γ-carboxylated. Our finding that Gla36 is important for APC cofactor function, but not for phospholipid binding, defines a novel function (other than Ca(2+) coordination/phospholipid binding) for a Gla residue in vitamin K-dependent proteins. It also suggests that residues within the Gla and EGF1 domains of protein S act cooperatively for its APC cofactor function.

  20. A water-forming NADH oxidase from Lactobacillus pentosus suitable for the regeneration of synthetic biomimetic cofactors.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Claudia; Beer, Barbara; Pick, André; Roth, Teresa; Lommes, Petra; Sieber, Volker

    2015-01-01

    The cell-free biocatalytic production of fine chemicals by oxidoreductases has continuously grown over the past years. Since especially dehydrogenases depend on the stoichiometric use of nicotinamide pyridine cofactors, an integrated efficient recycling system is crucial to allow process operation under economic conditions. Lately, the variety of cofactors for biocatalysis was broadened by the utilization of totally synthetic and cheap biomimetics. Though, to date the regeneration has been limited to chemical or electrochemical methods. Here, we report an enzymatic recycling by the flavoprotein NADH-oxidase from Lactobacillus pentosus (LpNox). Since this enzyme has not been described before, we first characterized it in regard to its optimal reaction parameters. We found that the heterologously overexpressed enzyme only contained 13% FAD. In vitro loading of the enzyme with FAD, resulted in a higher specific activity towards its natural cofactor NADH as well as different nicotinamide derived biomimetics. Apart from the enzymatic recycling, which gives water as a by-product by transferring four electrons onto oxygen, unbound FAD can also catalyze the oxidation of biomimetic cofactors. Here a two electron process takes place yielding H2O2 instead. The enzymatic and chemical recycling was compared in regard to reaction kinetics for the natural and biomimetic cofactors. With LpNox and FAD, two recycling strategies for biomimetic cofactors are described with either water or hydrogen peroxide as by-product. PMID:26441891

  1. Human carcinomas variably express the complement inhibitory proteins CD46 (membrane cofactor protein), CD55 (decay-accelerating factor), and CD59 (protectin).

    PubMed

    Niehans, G A; Cherwitz, D L; Staley, N A; Knapp, D J; Dalmasso, A P

    1996-07-01

    Normal human tissues express membrane-associated complement inhibitory proteins that protect these tissues from damage by autologous complement. To determine whether neoplasms also express these proteins, we examined the distribution of the complement inhibitors decay-accelerating factor (DAF), CD59 (protectin), and membrane cofactor protein in frozen samples of human breast, colon, kidney, and lung carcinomas and in adjacent non-neoplastic tissues, using immunohistochemistry. All samples were also studied for deposition of C3 fragments and activated C5b-9. Differences between normal tissues and the corresponding neoplasms were often observed, with loss or gain of expression of one or more inhibitors. Ductal carcinomas of the breast showed the most variation in phenotype; some tumors expressed only one inhibitor while others expressed different combinations of two or three inhibitors. Colon carcinomas, by contrast, stained intensely for all inhibitors. Renal cell carcinomas had weak to moderate expression of one to three inhibitors, generally DAF and CD59, whereas non-small cell carcinomas of the lung usually expressed CD59 and membrane cofactor protein with variable DAF immunoreactivity. The two small cell carcinomas of the lung showed little or no staining for any inhibitor. Activated C5b-9 deposition was seen adjacent to tumor nests in a minority of carcinomas and showed no correlation with complement inhibitor expression. C3 fragment deposition was minimal. Our results demonstrate that most carcinomas, with the exception of small cell carcinomas of the lung, do express one or more complement inhibitors at a level likely to inhibit complement-mediated cellular damage. Unexpectedly, large quantities of DAF and CD59 were often observed in tumor stroma, with only limited deposition in normal connective tissue. This suggests that carcinomas may supplement the activity of membrane-associated complement inhibitors by release of soluble forms of DAF and CD59 into the

  2. Hijacking cellular garbage cans.

    PubMed

    Welsch, Sonja; Locker, Jacomine Krijnse

    2010-06-25

    Viruses are perfect opportunists that have evolved to modify numerous cellular processes in order to complete their replication cycle in the host cell. An article by Reggiori and coworkers in this issue of Cell Host & Microbe reveals how coronaviruses can divert a cellular quality control pathway that normally functions in degradation of mis-folded proteins to replicate the viral genome. PMID:20542246

  3. Virion-associated cofactor high-mobility group DNA-binding protein-1 facilitates transposition from the herpes simplex virus/Sleeping Beauty amplicon vector platform.

    PubMed

    de Silva, Suresh; Lotta, Louis T; Burris, Clark A; Bowers, William J

    2010-11-01

    The development of the integration-competent, herpes simplex virus/Sleeping Beauty (HSV/SB) amplicon vector platform has created a means to efficiently and stably deliver therapeutic transcription units (termed "transgenons") to neurons within the mammalian brain. Furthermore, an investigation into the transposition capacity of the HSV/SB vector system revealed that the amplicon genome provides an optimal substrate for the transposition of transgenons at least 12 kb in length [de Silva, S., Mastrangelo, M.A., Lotta, L.T., Jr., Burris, C.A., Federoff, H.J., and Bowers, W.J. ( 2010 ). Gene Ther. 17, 424-431]. These results prompted an investigation into the factors that may contribute toward efficient transposition from the HSV/SB amplicon. One of the cellular cofactors known to play a key role during SB-mediated transposition is the high-mobility group DNA-binding protein-1 (HMGB1). Our present investigation into the role of HMGB1 during amplicon-based transposition revealed that transposition is not strictly dependent on the presence of cellular HMGB1, contrary to what had been previously demonstrated with plasmid-based SB transposition. We have shown for the first time that during amplicon preparation, biologically active HMGB1 derived from the packaging cell line is copackaged into amplicon vector particles. As a result, HSV/SB amplicon virions arrive prearmed with HMGB1 protein at levels sufficient for facilitating SB-mediated transposition in the transduced mammalian cell. PMID:20568967

  4. A bicarbonate cofactor modulates 1,4-dihydroxy-2-naphthoyl-coenzyme a synthase in menaquinone biosynthesis of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ming; Chen, Minjiao; Guo, Zu-Feng; Guo, Zhihong

    2010-09-24

    1,4-Dihydroxy-2-naphthoyl coenzyme A (DHNA-CoA) synthase is a typical crotonase-fold protein catalyzing an intramolecular Claisen condensation in the menaquinone biosynthetic pathway. We have characterized this enzyme from Escherichia coli and found that it is activated by bicarbonate in a concentration-dependent manner. The bicarbonate binding site has been identified in the crystal structure of a virtually identical ortholog (96.8% sequence identity) from Salmonella typhimurium through comparison with a bicarbonate-insensitive orthologue. Kinetic properties of the enzyme and its site-directed mutants of the bicarbonate binding site indicate that the exogenous bicarbonate anion is essential to the enzyme activity. With this essential catalytic role, the simple bicarbonate anion is an enzyme cofactor, which is usually a small organic molecule derived from vitamins, a metal ion, or a metal-containing polyatomic anionic complex. This finding leads to classification of the DHNA-CoA synthases into two evolutionarily conserved subfamilies: type I enzymes that are bicarbonate-dependent and contain a conserved glycine at the bicarbonate binding site; and type II enzymes that are bicarbonate-independent and contain a conserved aspartate at the position similar to the enzyme-bound bicarbonate. In addition, the unique location of the enzyme-bound bicarbonate allows it to be proposed as a catalytic base responsible for abstraction of the α-proton of the thioester substrate in the enzymatic reaction, suggesting a unified catalytic mechanism for all DHNA-CoA synthases.

  5. An Arabidopsis F-box protein acts as a transcriptional co-factor to regulate floral development.

    PubMed

    Chae, Eunyoung; Tan, Queenie K-G; Hill, Theresa A; Irish, Vivian F

    2008-04-01

    Plants flower in response to both environmental and endogenous signals. The Arabidopsis LEAFY (LFY) transcription factor is crucial in integrating these signals, and acts in part by activating the expression of multiple floral homeotic genes. LFY-dependent activation of the homeotic APETALA3 (AP3) gene requires the activity of UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO), an F-box component of an SCF ubiquitin ligase, yet how this regulation is effected has remained unclear. Here, we show that UFO physically interacts with LFY both in vitro and in vivo, and this interaction is necessary to recruit UFO to the AP3 promoter. Furthermore, a transcriptional repressor domain fused to UFO reduces endogenous LFY activity in plants, supporting the idea that UFO acts as part of a transcriptional complex at the AP3 promoter. Moreover, chemical or genetic disruption of proteasome activity compromises LFY-dependent AP3 activation, indicating that protein degradation is required to promote LFY activity. These results define an unexpected role for an F-box protein in functioning as a DNA-associated transcriptional co-factor in regulating floral homeotic gene expression. These results suggest a novel mechanism for promoting flower development via protein degradation and concomitant activation of the LFY transcription factor. This mechanism may be widely conserved, as homologs of UFO and LFY have been identified in a wide array of plant species. PMID:18287201

  6. An Arabidopsis F-box protein acts as a transcriptional co-factor to regulate floral development.

    PubMed

    Chae, Eunyoung; Tan, Queenie K-G; Hill, Theresa A; Irish, Vivian F

    2008-04-01

    Plants flower in response to both environmental and endogenous signals. The Arabidopsis LEAFY (LFY) transcription factor is crucial in integrating these signals, and acts in part by activating the expression of multiple floral homeotic genes. LFY-dependent activation of the homeotic APETALA3 (AP3) gene requires the activity of UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO), an F-box component of an SCF ubiquitin ligase, yet how this regulation is effected has remained unclear. Here, we show that UFO physically interacts with LFY both in vitro and in vivo, and this interaction is necessary to recruit UFO to the AP3 promoter. Furthermore, a transcriptional repressor domain fused to UFO reduces endogenous LFY activity in plants, supporting the idea that UFO acts as part of a transcriptional complex at the AP3 promoter. Moreover, chemical or genetic disruption of proteasome activity compromises LFY-dependent AP3 activation, indicating that protein degradation is required to promote LFY activity. These results define an unexpected role for an F-box protein in functioning as a DNA-associated transcriptional co-factor in regulating floral homeotic gene expression. These results suggest a novel mechanism for promoting flower development via protein degradation and concomitant activation of the LFY transcription factor. This mechanism may be widely conserved, as homologs of UFO and LFY have been identified in a wide array of plant species.

  7. Regulation of Carotenoid Biosynthesis by Shade Relies on Specific Subsets of Antagonistic Transcription Factors and Cofactors.

    PubMed

    Bou-Torrent, Jordi; Toledo-Ortiz, Gabriela; Ortiz-Alcaide, Miriam; Cifuentes-Esquivel, Nicolas; Halliday, Karen J; Martinez-García, Jaime F; Rodriguez-Concepcion, Manuel

    2015-11-01

    Carotenoids are photosynthetic pigments essential for the protection against excess light. During deetiolation, their production is regulated by a dynamic repression-activation module formed by PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR1 (PIF1) and LONG HYPOCOTYL5 (HY5). These transcription factors directly and oppositely control the expression of the gene encoding PHYTOENE SYNTHASE (PSY), the first and main rate-determining enzyme of the carotenoid pathway. Antagonistic modules also regulate the responses of deetiolated plants to vegetation proximity and shade (i.e. to the perception of far-red light-enriched light filtered through or reflected from neighboring plants). These responses, aimed to adapt to eventual shading from plant competitors, include a reduced accumulation of carotenoids. Here, we show that PIF1 and related photolabile PIFs (but not photostable PIF7) promote the shade-triggered decrease in carotenoid accumulation. While HY5 does not appear to be required for this process, other known PIF antagonists were found to modulate the expression of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) PSY gene and the biosynthesis of carotenoids early after exposure to shade. In particular, PHYTOCHROME-RAPIDLY REGULATED1, a transcriptional cofactor that prevents the binding of true transcription factors to their target promoters, was found to interact with PIF1 and hence directly induce PSY expression. By contrast, a change in the levels of the transcriptional cofactor LONG HYPOCOTYL IN FAR RED1, which also binds to PIF1 and other PIFs to regulate shade-related elongation responses, did not impact PSY expression or carotenoid accumulation. Our data suggest that the fine-regulation of carotenoid biosynthesis in response to shade relies on specific modules of antagonistic transcriptional factors and cofactors.

  8. Magnetic field intensified bi-enzyme system with in situ cofactor regeneration supported by magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Muqing; Su, Zhiguo; Ji, Xiaoyuan; Ma, Guanghui; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Songping

    2013-10-20

    Efficient dynamic interactions among cofactor, enzymes and substrate molecules are of primary importance for multi-step enzymatic reactions with in situ cofactor regeneration. Here we showed for the first time that the above dynamic interactions could be significantly intensified by exerting an external alternating magnetic field on magnetic nanoparticles-supported multi-enzymatic system so that the inter-particle collisions due to Brownian motion of nanoparticles could be improved. To that end, a multienzyme system including glutamate dehydrogenase (GluDH), glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) and cofactor NAD(H) were separately immobilized on silica coated Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles with an average diameter of 105 nm, and the effect of magnetic field strength and frequency on the kinetics of the coupled bi-enzyme reaction was investigated. It was found that at low magnetic field frequency (25 Hz and 100 Hz), increasing magnetic field strength from 9.8 to 161.1 Gs led to only very slight increase in reaction rate of the coupled bi-enzyme reaction expressed by glucose consumption rate. At higher magnetic field of 200 Hz and 500 Hz, reaction rate increased significantly with increase of magnetic field strength. When the magnetic field frequency was kept at 500 Hz, the reaction rate increased from 3.89 μM/min to 8.11 μM/min by increasing magnetic field strength from 1.3 to 14.2 Gs. The immobilized bi-enzyme system also showed good reusability and stability in the magnetic field (500 Hz, 14.2 Gs), that about 46% of original activity could be retained after 33 repeated uses, accounting for totally 34 days continuous operation. These results demonstrated the feasibility in intensifying molecular interactions among magnetic nanoparticle-supported multienzymes by using nano-magnetic stirrer for efficient multi-step transformations.

  9. Crystal structure of Trypanosoma cruzi tyrosine aminotransferase: substrate specificity is influenced by cofactor binding mode.

    PubMed Central

    Blankenfeldt, W.; Nowicki, C.; Montemartini-Kalisz, M.; Kalisz, H. M.; Hecht, H. J.

    1999-01-01

    The crystal structure of tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) from the parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, which belongs to the aminotransferase subfamily Igamma, has been determined at 2.5 A resolution with the R-value R = 15.1%. T. cruzi TAT shares less than 15% sequence identity with aminotransferases of subfamily Ialpha but shows only two larger topological differences to the aspartate aminotransferases (AspATs). First, TAT contains a loop protruding from the enzyme surface in the larger cofactor-binding domain, where the AspATs have a kinked alpha-helix. Second, in the smaller substrate-binding domain, TAT has a four-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet instead of the two-stranded beta-sheet in the AspATs. The position of the aromatic ring of the pyridoxal-5'-phosphate cofactor is very similar to the AspATs but the phosphate group, in contrast, is closer to the substrate-binding site with one of its oxygen atoms pointing toward the substrate. Differences in substrate specificities of T. cruzi TAT and subfamily Ialpha aminotransferases can be attributed by modeling of substrate complexes mainly to this different position of the cofactor-phosphate group. Absence of the arginine, which in the AspATs fixes the substrate side-chain carboxylate group by a salt bridge, contributes to the inability of T. cruzi TAT to transaminate acidic amino acids. The preference of TAT for tyrosine is probably related to the ability of Asn17 in TAT to form a hydrogen bond to the tyrosine side-chain hydroxyl group. PMID:10595543

  10. Communication between Thiamin Cofactors in the Escherichia coli Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex E1 Component Active Centers

    PubMed Central

    Nemeria, Natalia S.; Arjunan, Palaniappa; Chandrasekhar, Krishnamoorthy; Mossad, Madouna; Tittmann, Kai; Furey, William; Jordan, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Kinetic, spectroscopic, and structural analysis tested the hypothesis that a chain of residues connecting the 4′-aminopyrimidine N1′ atoms of thiamin diphosphates (ThDPs) in the two active centers of the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex E1 component provides a signal transduction pathway. Substitution of the three acidic residues (Glu571, Glu235, and Glu237) and Arg606 resulted in impaired binding of the second ThDP, once the first active center was filled, suggesting a pathway for communication between the two ThDPs. 1) Steady-state kinetic and fluorescence quenching studies revealed that upon E571A, E235A, E237A, and R606A substitutions, ThDP binding in the second active center was affected. 2) Analysis of the kinetics of thiazolium C2 hydrogen/deuterium exchange of enzyme-bound ThDP suggests half-of-the-sites reactivity for the E1 component, with fast (activated site) and slow exchanging sites (dormant site). The E235A and E571A variants gave no evidence for the slow exchanging site, indicating that only one of two active sites is filled with ThDP. 3) Titration of the E235A and E237A variants with methyl acetylphosphonate monitored by circular dichroism suggested that only half of the active sites were filled with a covalent predecarboxylation intermediate analog. 4) Crystal structures of E235A and E571A in complex with ThDP revealed the structural basis for the spectroscopic and kinetic observations and showed that either substitution affects cofactor binding, despite the fact that Glu235 makes no direct contact with the cofactor. The role of the conserved Glu571 residue in both catalysis and cofactor orientation is revealed by the combined results for the first time. PMID:20106967

  11. Evidence that a Metabolic Microcompartment Contains and Recycles Private Cofactor Pools

    PubMed Central

    Huseby, Douglas L.

    2013-01-01

    Microcompartments are loose protein cages that encapsulate enzymes for particular bacterial metabolic pathways. These structures are thought to retain and perhaps concentrate pools of small, uncharged intermediates that would otherwise diffuse from the cell. In Salmonella enterica, a microcompartment encloses enzymes for ethanolamine catabolism. The cage has been thought to retain the volatile intermediate acetaldehyde but allow diffusion of the much larger cofactors NAD and coenzyme A (CoA). Genetic tests support an alternative idea that the microcompartment contains and recycles private pools of the large cofactors NAD and CoA. Two central enzymes convert ethanolamine to acetaldehyde (EutBC) and then to acetyl-CoA (EutE). Two seemingly peripheral redundant enzymes encoded by the eut operon proved to be essential for ethanolamine utilization, when subjected to sufficiently stringent tests. These are EutD (acetyl-CoA to acetyl phosphate) and EutG (acetaldehyde to ethanol). Obligatory recycling of cofactors couples the three reactions and drives acetaldehyde consumption. Loss and toxic effects of acetaldehyde are minimized by accelerating its consumption. In a eutD mutant, acetyl-CoA cannot escape the compartment but is released by mutations that disrupt the structure. The model predicts that EutBC (ethanolamine-ammonia lyase) lies outside the compartment, using external coenzyme B12 and injecting its product, acetaldehyde, into the lumen, where it is degraded by the EutE, EutD, and EutG enzymes using private pools of CoA and NAD. The compartment appears to allow free diffusion of the intermediates ethanol and acetyl-PO4 but (to our great surprise) restricts diffusion of acetaldehyde. PMID:23585538

  12. Non-racemic Antifolates Stereo-selectively Recruit Alternate Cofactors and Overcome Resistance in S. aureus

    PubMed Central

    Keshipeddy, Santosh; Reeve, Stephanie M.; Anderson, Amy C.; Wright, Dennis L.

    2016-01-01

    While antifolates such as Bactrim (trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole; TMP-SMX) continue to play an important role in treating community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA), resistance-conferring mutations, specifically F98Y of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), have arisen and compromise continued use. In an attempt to extend the lifetime of this important class, we have developed a class of propargyl-linked antifolates (PLAs) that exhibit potent inhibition of the enzyme and bacterial strains. Probing the role of the configuration at the single propargylic stereocenter in these inhibitors required us to develop a new approach to non-racemic 3-aryl-1-butyne building blocks by the pairwise use of asymmetric conjugate addition and aldehyde dehydration protocols. Using this new route, a series of non-racemic PLA inhibitors was prepared and shown to possess potent enzyme inhibition (IC50 values < 50 nM), antibacterial effects (several with MIC values < 1 µg/mL) and to form stable ternary complexes with both wild-type and resistant mutants. Unexpectedly, crystal structures of a pair of individual enantiomers in the wild-type DHFR revealed that the single change in configuration of the stereocenter drove the selection of an alternative NADPH cofactor, with the minor α-anomer appearing with R-27. Remarkably, this cofactor switching becomes much more prevalent when the F98Y mutation is present. The observation of cofactor site plasticity leads to a postulate for the structural basis of TMP resistance in DHFR and also suggests design strategies that can be used to target these resistant enzymes. PMID:26098608

  13. Neutrino mass matrices with two equalities between the elements or cofactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dev, S.; Gautam, Radha Raman; Singh, Lal

    2013-04-01

    We study the implications of the existence of two equalities between the elements or cofactors of the neutrino mass matrix. There are 65 structures of this type for each case. Phenomenological implications for unknown parameters like the effective Majorana mass of the electron neutrino and CP-violating phases are examined for the viable cases. To illustrate how such forms of the neutrino mass matrices may be realized, we also present a simple A4 model for one of the classes in each case.

  14. Neutrino mass textures with one vanishing minor and two equal cofactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weijian

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we carry out a numerical and systematic analysis of the neutrino mass textures, which contain one vanishing minor and equality between two cofactors. Among 60 logically possible textures, only eight of them are excluded for both the normal and inverted hierarchy by the current experimental data at 3 σ level. We also demonstrate that the future long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments, especially for the measurement of the θ 23 mixing angle, will play an important role in the model selection. The phenomenological implications from neutrinoless double-beta decay and the cosmology observation are also examined. A discussion of the flavor symmetry realization of the textures is also given.

  15. Substituted quinoline quinones as surrogates for the PQQ cofactor: an electrochemical and computational study.

    PubMed

    Dorfner, Walter L; Carroll, Patrick J; Schelter, Eric J

    2015-04-17

    Pyrroloquinoline quinones (PQQ) are important cofactors that shuttle redox equivalents in diverse metalloproteins. Quinoline 7,8-quinones have been synthesized and characterized as surrogates for PQQ to elucidate redox energetics within metalloenzyme active sites. The quinoline 7,8-quinones were accessed using polymer-supported iodoxybenzoic acid and the compounds evaluated using solution electrochemistry. Together with a family of quinones, the products were evaluated computationally and used to generate a predictive correlation between a computed ΔG and the experimental reduction potentials.

  16. High-valent [MnFe] and [FeFe] cofactors in ribonucleotide reductases.

    PubMed

    Leidel, Nils; Popović-Bijelić, Ana; Havelius, Kajsa G V; Chernev, Petko; Voevodskaya, Nina; Gräslund, Astrid; Haumann, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) are essential for DNA synthesis in most organisms. In class-Ic RNR from Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct), a MnFe cofactor in subunit R2 forms the site required for enzyme activity, instead of an FeFe cofactor plus a redox-active tyrosine in class-Ia RNRs, for example in mouse (Mus musculus, Mm). For R2 proteins from Ct and Mm, either grown in the presence of, or reconstituted with Mn and Fe ions, structural and electronic properties of higher valence MnFe and FeFe sites were determined by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and complementary techniques, in combination with bond-valence-sum and density functional theory calculations. At least ten different cofactor species could be tentatively distinguished. In Ct R2, two different Mn(IV)Fe(III) site configurations were assigned either L(4)Mn(IV)(μO)(2)Fe(III)L(4) (metal-metal distance of ~2.75Å, L = ligand) prevailing in metal-grown R2, or L(4)Mn(IV)(μO)(μOH)Fe(III)L(4) (~2.90Å) dominating in metal-reconstituted R2. Specific spectroscopic features were attributed to an Fe(IV)Fe(III) site (~2.55Å) with a L(4)Fe(IV)(μO)(2)Fe(III)L(3) core structure. Several Mn,Fe(III)Fe(III) (~2.9-3.1Å) and Mn,Fe(III)Fe(II) species (~3.3-3.4Å) likely showed 5-coordinated Mn(III) or Fe(III). Rapid X-ray photoreduction of iron and shorter metal-metal distances in the high-valent states suggested radiation-induced modifications in most crystal structures of R2. The actual configuration of the MnFe and FeFe cofactors seems to depend on assembly sequences, bound metal type, valence state, and previous catalytic activity involving subunit R1. In Ct R2, the protonation of a bridging oxide in the Mn(IV)(μO)(μOH)Fe(III) core may be important for preventing premature site reduction and initiation of the radical chemistry in R1. PMID:22222354

  17. Urinary AASA excretion is elevated in patients with molybdenum cofactor deficiency and isolated sulphite oxidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Mills, Philippa B; Footitt, Emma J; Ceyhan, Serkan; Waters, Paula J; Jakobs, Cornelis; Clayton, Peter T; Struys, Eduard A

    2012-11-01

    Analysis of α-aminoadipic semialdehyde is an important tool in the diagnosis of antiquitin deficiency (pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy). However continuing use of this test has revealed that elevated urinary excretion of α-aminoadipic semialdehyde is not only found in patients with pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy but is also seen in patients with molybdenum cofactor deficiency and isolated sulphite oxidase deficiency. This should be taken into account when interpreting the laboratory data. Sulphite was shown to inhibit α-aminoadipic semialdehyde dehydrogenase in vitro.

  18. Substrate, Product, and Cofactor: the Extraordinarily Flexible Relationship between the CDE Superfamily and Heme

    PubMed Central

    Celis, Arianna I.; DuBois, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    PFam Clan 0032, also known as the CDE superfamily, is a diverse group of at least 20 protein families sharing a common α, β-barrel domain. Of these, six different groups bind heme inside the barrel’s interior, using it alternately as a cofactor, substrate, or product. Focusing on these six, an integrated picture of structure, sequence, taxonomy, and mechanism is presented here, detailing how a single structural motif might be able to mediate such an array of functions with one of nature’s most important small molecules. PMID:25778630

  19. Cofactor-free detection of phosphatidylserine with cyclic peptides mimicking lactadherin.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hong; Wang, Fang; Wang, Qin; Gao, Jianmin

    2011-10-01

    Cyclic peptides (cLacs) are designed to mimic the natural phosphatidylserine (PS) binding protein lactadherin. Unlike annexin V or its small molecule mimics, the cLac peptides selectively target PS-presenting membranes with no need for metal cofactors. We further show that a fluorophore-labeled cLac effectively stains early apoptotic cells. The small size and facile conjugation with a variety of imaging tracers make the cLac design promising for imaging cell death in vitro as well as in living organisms.

  20. Conformational control of cofactors in nature - the influence of protein-induced macrocycle distortion on the biological function of tetrapyrroles.

    PubMed

    Senge, Mathias O; MacGowan, Stuart A; O'Brien, Jessica M

    2015-12-14

    Tetrapyrrole-containing proteins are one of the most fundamental classes of enzymes in nature and it remains an open question to give a chemical rationale for the multitude of biological reactions that can be catalyzed by these pigment-protein complexes. There are many fundamental processes where the same (i.e., chemically identical) porphyrin cofactor is involved in chemically quite distinct reactions. For example, heme is the active cofactor for oxygen transport and storage (hemoglobin, myoglobin) and for the incorporation of molecular oxygen in organic substrates (cytochrome P450). It is involved in the terminal oxidation (cytochrome c oxidase) and the metabolism of H2O2 (catalases and peroxidases) and catalyzes various electron transfer reactions in cytochromes. Likewise, in photosynthesis the same chlorophyll cofactor may function as a reaction center pigment (charge separation) or as an accessory pigment (exciton transfer) in light harvesting complexes (e.g., chlorophyll a). Whilst differences in the apoprotein sequences alone cannot explain the often drastic differences in physicochemical properties encountered for the same cofactor in diverse protein complexes, a critical factor for all biological functions must be the close structural interplay between bound cofactors and the respective apoprotein in addition to factors such as hydrogen bonding or electronic effects. Here, we explore how nature can use the same chemical molecule as a cofactor for chemically distinct reactions using the concept of conformational flexibility of tetrapyrroles. The multifaceted roles of tetrapyrroles are discussed in the context of the current knowledge on distorted porphyrins. Contemporary analytical methods now allow a more quantitative look at cofactors in protein complexes and the development of the field is illustrated by case studies on hemeproteins and photosynthetic complexes. Specific tetrapyrrole conformations are now used to prepare bioengineered designer proteins

  1. Aldehyde dehydrogenase enzyme ALDH3H1 from Arabidopsis thaliana: Identification of amino acid residues critical for cofactor specificity.

    PubMed

    Stiti, Naim; Podgórska, Karolina; Bartels, Dorothea

    2014-03-01

    The cofactor-binding site of the NAD(+)-dependent Arabidopsis thaliana aldehyde dehydrogenase ALDH3H1 was analyzed to understand structural features determining cofactor-specificity. Homology modeling and mutant analysis elucidated important amino acid residues. Glu149 occupies a central position in the cofactor-binding cleft, and its carboxylate group coordinates the 2'- and 3'-hydroxyl groups of the adenosyl ribose ring of NAD(+) and repels the 2'-phosphate moiety of NADP(+). If Glu149 is mutated to Gln, Asp, Asn or Thr the binding of NAD(+) is altered and rendered the enzyme capable of using NADP(+). This change is attributed to a weaker steric hindrance and elimination of the electrostatic repulsion force of the 2'-phosphate of NADP(+). Simultaneous mutations of Glu149 and Ile200, which is situated opposite of the cofactor binding cleft, improved the enzyme efficiency with NADP(+). The double mutant ALDH3H1Glu149Thr/Ile200Val showed a good catalysis with NADP(+). Subsequently a triple mutation was generated by replacing Val178 by Arg in order to create a "closed" cofactor binding site. The cofactor specificity was shifted even further in favor of NADP(+), as the mutant ALDH3H1E149T/V178R/I200V uses NADP(+) with almost 7-fold higher catalytic efficiency compared to NAD(+). Our experiments suggest that residues occupying positions equivalent to 149, 178 and 200 constitute a group of amino acids in the ALDH3H1 protein determining cofactor affinity.

  2. Conformational control of cofactors in nature - the influence of protein-induced macrocycle distortion on the biological function of tetrapyrroles.

    PubMed

    Senge, Mathias O; MacGowan, Stuart A; O'Brien, Jessica M

    2015-12-14

    Tetrapyrrole-containing proteins are one of the most fundamental classes of enzymes in nature and it remains an open question to give a chemical rationale for the multitude of biological reactions that can be catalyzed by these pigment-protein complexes. There are many fundamental processes where the same (i.e., chemically identical) porphyrin cofactor is involved in chemically quite distinct reactions. For example, heme is the active cofactor for oxygen transport and storage (hemoglobin, myoglobin) and for the incorporation of molecular oxygen in organic substrates (cytochrome P450). It is involved in the terminal oxidation (cytochrome c oxidase) and the metabolism of H2O2 (catalases and peroxidases) and catalyzes various electron transfer reactions in cytochromes. Likewise, in photosynthesis the same chlorophyll cofactor may function as a reaction center pigment (charge separation) or as an accessory pigment (exciton transfer) in light harvesting complexes (e.g., chlorophyll a). Whilst differences in the apoprotein sequences alone cannot explain the often drastic differences in physicochemical properties encountered for the same cofactor in diverse protein complexes, a critical factor for all biological functions must be the close structural interplay between bound cofactors and the respective apoprotein in addition to factors such as hydrogen bonding or electronic effects. Here, we explore how nature can use the same chemical molecule as a cofactor for chemically distinct reactions using the concept of conformational flexibility of tetrapyrroles. The multifaceted roles of tetrapyrroles are discussed in the context of the current knowledge on distorted porphyrins. Contemporary analytical methods now allow a more quantitative look at cofactors in protein complexes and the development of the field is illustrated by case studies on hemeproteins and photosynthetic complexes. Specific tetrapyrrole conformations are now used to prepare bioengineered designer proteins

  3. Cellular Reflectarray Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R.

    2010-01-01

    The cellular reflectarray antenna is intended to replace conventional parabolic reflectors that must be physically aligned with a particular satellite in geostationary orbit. These arrays are designed for specified geographical locations, defined by latitude and longitude, each called a "cell." A particular cell occupies nominally 1,500 square miles (3,885 sq. km), but this varies according to latitude and longitude. The cellular reflectarray antenna designed for a particular cell is simply positioned to align with magnetic North, and the antenna surface is level (parallel to the ground). A given cellular reflectarray antenna will not operate in any other cell.

  4. Cellular Manufacturing Internet Performance Support System

    SciTech Connect

    Bohley, M.C.; Schwartz, M.E.

    1998-03-04

    The objective of this project was to develop an Internet-based electronic performance support system (EPSS) for cellular manufacturing providing hardware/software specifications, process descriptions, estimated cost savings, manufacturing simulations, training information, and service resources for government and industry users of Cincinnati Milacron machine tools and products. AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies (ASFM and T) used expertise in the areas of Internet design and multimedia creation to develop a performance support system (PSS) for the Internet with assistance from CM's subject matter experts from engineering, manufacturing, and technical support. Reference information was both created and re-purposed from other existing formats, then made available on the Internet. On-line references on cellular manufacturing operations include: definitions of cells and cellular manufacturing; illustrations on how cellular manufacturing improves part throughput, resource utilization, part quality, and manufacturing flexibility; illustrations on how cellular manufacturing reduces labor and overhead costs; identification of critical factors driving decisions toward cellular manufacturing; a method for identifying process improvement areas using cellular manufacturing; a method for customizing the size of cells for a specific site; a simulation for making a part using cellular manufacturing technology; and a glossary of terms and concepts.

  5. [Main Cellular Redox Couples].

    PubMed

    Bilan, D S; Shokhina, A G; Lukyanov, S A; Belousov, V V

    2015-01-01

    Most of the living cells maintain the continuous flow of electrons, which provides them by energy. Many of the compounds are presented in a cell at the same time in the oxidized and reduced states, forming the active redox couples. Some of the redox couples, such as NAD+/NADH, NADP+/NADPH, oxidized/reduced glutathione (GSSG/GSH), are universal, as they participate in adjusting of many cellular reactions. Ratios of the oxidized and reduced forms of these compounds are important cellular redox parameters. Modern research approaches allow setting the new functions of the main redox couples in the complex organization of cellular processes. The following information is about the main cellular redox couples and their participation in various biological processes.

  6. Nanostructured cellular networks.

    PubMed

    Moriarty, P; Taylor, M D R; Brust, M

    2002-12-01

    Au nanocrystals spin-coated onto silicon from toluene form cellular networks. A quantitative statistical crystallography analysis shows that intercellular correlations drive the networks far from statistical equilibrium. Spin-coating from hexane does not produce cellular structure, yet a strong correlation is retained in the positions of nanocrystal aggregates. Mechanisms based on Marangoni convection alone cannot account for the variety of patterns observed, and we argue that spinodal decomposition plays an important role in foam formation.

  7. Cellular aging and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hornsby, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Aging is manifest in a variety of changes over time, including changes at the cellular level. Cellular aging acts primarily as a tumor suppressor mechanism, but also may enhance cancer development under certain circumstances. One important process of cellular aging is oncogene-induced senescence, which acts as an important anti-cancer mechanism. Cellular senescence resulting from damage caused by activated oncogenes prevents the growth or potentially neoplastic cells. Moreover, cells that have entered senescence appear to be targets for elimination by the innnate immune system. In another aspect of cellular aging, the absence of telomerase activity in normal tissues results in such cells lacking a telomere maintenance mechanism. One consequence is that in aging there is an increase in cells with shortened telomeres. In the presence of active oncogenes that cause expansion of a neoplastic clone, shortening of telomeres leading to telomere dysfunction prevents the indefinite expansion of the clone because the cells enter crisis. Crisis results from fusions and other defects caused by dysfunctional telomeres and is a terminal state of the neoplastic clone. In this way the absence of telomerase in human cells, while one cause of cellular aging, also acts as an anti-cancer mechanism. PMID:20705476

  8. Neutrino mass matrices with two vanishing cofactors and Fritzsch texture for charged lepton mass matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weijian; Guo, Shu-Yuan; Wang, Zhi-Gang

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we study the cofactor 2 zero neutrino mass matrices with the Fritzsch-type structure in charged lepton mass matrix (CLMM). In the numerical analysis, we perform a scan over the parameter space of all the 15 possible patterns to get a large sample of viable scattering points. Among the 15 possible patterns, three of them can accommodate the latest lepton mixing and neutrino mass data. We compare the predictions of the allowed patterns with their counterparts with diagonal CLMM. In this case, the severe cosmology bound on the neutrino mass set a strong constraint on the parameter space, rendering two patterns only marginally allowed. The Fritzsch-type CLMM will have impact on the viable parameter space and give rise to different phenomenological predictions. Each allowed pattern predicts the strong correlations between physical variables, which is essential for model selection and can be probed in future experiments. It is found that under the no-diagonal CLMM, the cofactor zeros structure in neutrino mass matrix is unstable as the running of renormalization group (RG) from seesaw scale to the electroweak scale. A way out of the problem is to propose the flavor symmetry under the models with a TeV seesaw scale. The inverse seesaw model and a loop-induced model are given as two examples.

  9. Effect of mitochondrial cofactors and antioxidants supplementation on cognition in the aged canine.

    PubMed

    Snigdha, Shikha; de Rivera, Christina; Milgram, Norton W; Cotman, Carl W

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of research has focused on modifiable risk factors for prevention and attenuation of cognitive decline in aging. This has led to an unprecedented interest in the relationship between diet and cognitive function. Several preclinical and epidemiologic studies suggest that dietary intervention can be used to improve cognitive function but randomized controlled trials are increasingly failing to replicate these findings. Here, we use a canine model of aging to evaluate the effects of specific components of diet supplementation which contain both antioxidants and a combination of mitochondrial cofactors (lipoic acid [LA] and acetyl-l-carnitine) on a battery of cognitive functions. Our data suggest that supplementation with mitochondrial cofactors, but not LA or antioxidant alone, selectively improve long-term recall in aged canines. Furthermore, we found evidence that LA alone could have cognitive impairing effects. These results contrast to those of a previous longitudinal study in aged canine. Our data demonstrate that one reason for this difference may be the nutritional status of animals at baseline for the 2 studies. Overall, this study suggests that social, cognitive, and physical activity together with optimal dietary intake (rather than diet alone) promotes successful brain aging.

  10. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of molybdenum-cofactor biosynthesis protein C from Thermus thermophilus

    SciTech Connect

    Kanaujia, Shankar Prasad; Ranjani, Chellamuthu Vasuki; Jeyakanthan, Jeyaraman; Baba, Seiki; Chen, Lirong; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Wang, Bi-Cheng; Nishida, Masami; Ebihara, Akio; Shinkai, Akeo; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Shiro, Yoshitsugu; Sekar, Kanagaraj; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2010-12-03

    The Gram-negative aerobic eubacterium Thermus thermophilus is an extremely important thermophilic microorganism that was originally isolated from a thermal vent environment in Japan. The molybdenum cofactor in this organism is considered to be an essential component required by enzymes that catalyze diverse key reactions in the global metabolism of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur. The molybdenum-cofactor biosynthesis protein C derived from T. thermophilus was crystallized in two different space groups. Crystals obtained using the first crystallization condition belong to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 64.81, b = 109.84, c = 115.19 {angstrom}, {beta} = 104.9{sup o}; the crystal diffracted to a resolution of 1.9 {angstrom}. The other crystal form belonged to space group R32, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 106.57, c = 59.25 {angstrom}, and diffracted to 1.75 {angstrom} resolution. Preliminary calculations reveal that the asymmetric unit contains 12 monomers and one monomer for the crystals belonging to space group P2{sub 1} and R32, respectively.

  11. FAD synthesis and degradation in the nucleus create a local flavin cofactor pool.

    PubMed

    Giancaspero, Teresa Anna; Busco, Giovanni; Panebianco, Concetta; Carmone, Claudia; Miccolis, Angelica; Liuzzi, Grazia Maria; Colella, Matilde; Barile, Maria

    2013-10-01

    FAD is a redox cofactor ensuring the activity of many flavoenzymes mainly located in mitochondria but also relevant for nuclear redox activities. The last enzyme in the metabolic pathway producing FAD is FAD synthase (EC 2.7.7.2), a protein known to be localized both in cytosol and in mitochondria. FAD degradation to riboflavin occurs via still poorly characterized enzymes, possibly belonging to the NUDIX hydrolase family. By confocal microscopy and immunoblotting experiments, we demonstrate here the existence of FAD synthase in the nucleus of different experimental rat models. HPLC experiments demonstrated that isolated rat liver nuclei contain ∼300 pmol of FAD·mg(-1) protein, which was mainly protein-bound FAD. A mean FAD synthesis rate of 18.1 pmol·min(-1)·mg(-1) protein was estimated by both HPLC and continuous coupled enzymatic spectrophotometric assays. Rat liver nuclei were also shown to be endowed with a FAD pyrophosphatase that hydrolyzes FAD with an optimum at alkaline pH and is significantly inhibited by adenylate-containing nucleotides. The coordinate activity of these FAD forming and degrading enzymes provides a potential mechanism by which a dynamic pool of flavin cofactor is created in the nucleus. These data, which significantly add to the biochemical comprehension of flavin metabolism and its subcellular compartmentation, may also provide the basis for a more detailed comprehension of the role of flavin homeostasis in biologically and clinically relevant epigenetic events. PMID:23946482

  12. FAD Synthesis and Degradation in the Nucleus Create a Local Flavin Cofactor Pool*

    PubMed Central

    Giancaspero, Teresa Anna; Busco, Giovanni; Panebianco, Concetta; Carmone, Claudia; Miccolis, Angelica; Liuzzi, Grazia Maria; Colella, Matilde; Barile, Maria

    2013-01-01

    FAD is a redox cofactor ensuring the activity of many flavoenzymes mainly located in mitochondria but also relevant for nuclear redox activities. The last enzyme in the metabolic pathway producing FAD is FAD synthase (EC 2.7.7.2), a protein known to be localized both in cytosol and in mitochondria. FAD degradation to riboflavin occurs via still poorly characterized enzymes, possibly belonging to the NUDIX hydrolase family. By confocal microscopy and immunoblotting experiments, we demonstrate here the existence of FAD synthase in the nucleus of different experimental rat models. HPLC experiments demonstrated that isolated rat liver nuclei contain ∼300 pmol of FAD·mg−1 protein, which was mainly protein-bound FAD. A mean FAD synthesis rate of 18.1 pmol·min−1·mg−1 protein was estimated by both HPLC and continuous coupled enzymatic spectrophotometric assays. Rat liver nuclei were also shown to be endowed with a FAD pyrophosphatase that hydrolyzes FAD with an optimum at alkaline pH and is significantly inhibited by adenylate-containing nucleotides. The coordinate activity of these FAD forming and degrading enzymes provides a potential mechanism by which a dynamic pool of flavin cofactor is created in the nucleus. These data, which significantly add to the biochemical comprehension of flavin metabolism and its subcellular compartmentation, may also provide the basis for a more detailed comprehension of the role of flavin homeostasis in biologically and clinically relevant epigenetic events. PMID:23946482

  13. Bienzymatic Sequential Reaction on Microgel Particles and Their Cofactor Dependent Applications.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Nidhi C; Tripathi, Bijay P; Müller, Martin; Stamm, Manfred; Ionov, Leonid

    2016-05-01

    We report, the preparation and characterization of bioconjugates, wherein enzymes pyruvate kinase (Pk) and l-lactic dehydrogenase (Ldh) were covalently bound to poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-poly(ethylenimine) (PNIPAm-PEI) microgel support using glutaraldehyde (GA) as the cross-linker. The effects of different arrangements of enzymes on the microgels were investigated for the enzymatic behavior and to obtain maximum Pk-Ldh sequential reaction. The dual enzyme bioconjugates prepared by simultaneous addition of both the enzymes immobilized on the same microgel particles (PL), and PiLi, that is, dual enzyme bioconjugate obtained by combining single-enzyme bioconjugates (immobilized pyruvate kinase (Pi) and immobilized lactate dehydrogenase (Li)), were used to study the effect of the assembly of dual enzymes systems on the microgels. The kinetic parameters (Km, kcat), reaction parameters (temperature, pH), stability (thermal and storage), and cofactor dependent applications were studied for the dual enzymes conjugates. The kinetic results indicated an improved turn over number (kcat) for PL, while the kcat and catalytic efficiency was significantly decreased in case of PiLi. For cofactor dependent application, in which the ability of ADP monitoring and ATP synthesis by the conjugates were studied, the activity of PL was found to be nearly 2-fold better than that of PiLi. These results indicated that the influence of spacing between the enzymes is an important factor in optimization of multienzyme immobilization on the support.

  14. Convenient synthesis of deazaflavin cofactor FO and its activity in F(420)-dependent NADP reductase.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Mohammad S; Le, Cuong Q; Joseph, Ebenezer; Nguyen, Toan Q; Johnson-Winters, Kayunta; Foss, Frank W

    2015-05-14

    F420 and FO are phenolic 5-deazaflavin cofactors that complement nicotinamide and flavin redox coenzymes in biochemical oxidoreductases and photocatalytic systems. Specifically, these 5-deazaflavins lack the single electron reactivity with O2 of riboflavin-derived coenzymes (FMN and FAD), and, in general, have a more negative redox potential than NAD(P)(+). For example, F420-dependent NADP(+) oxidoreductase (Fno) is critical to the conversion of CO2 to CH4 by methanogenic archaea, while FO functions as a light-harvesting agent in DNA repair. The preparation of these cofactors is an obstacle to their use in biochemical studies and biotechnology. Here, a convenient synthesis of FO was achieved by improving the redox stability of synthetic intermediates containing a polar, electron-rich aminophenol fragment. Improved yields and simplified purification techniques for FO are described. Additionally, Fno activity was restored with FO in the absence of F420. Investigating the FO-dependent NADP(+)/NADPH redox process by stopped-flow spectrophotometry, steady state kinetics were defined as having a Km of 4.00 ± 0.39 μM and a kcat of 5.27 ± 0.14 s(-1). The preparation of FO should enable future biochemical studies and novel uses of F420 mimics.

  15. Can cofactor-binding sites in proteins be flexible? Desulfovibrio desulfuricans flavodoxin binds FMN dimer.

    PubMed

    Muralidhara, B K; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2003-11-11

    Flavodoxins catalyze redox reactions using the isoalloxazine moiety of the flavin mononucleotide (FMN) cofactor stacked between two aromatic residues located in two peptide loops. At high FMN concentrations that favor stacked FMN dimers in solution, isothermal titration calorimetric studies show that these dimers bind strongly to apo-flavodoxin from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (30 degrees C, 20 mM Hepes, pH 7, K(D) = 5.8 microM). Upon increasing the temperature so the FMN dimers dissociate (as shown by (1)H NMR), only one-to-one (FMN-to-protein) binding is observed. Calorimetric titrations result in one-to-one binding also in the presence of phosphate or sulfate (30 degrees C, 13 mM anion, pH 7, K(D) = 0.4 microM). FMN remains dimeric in the presence of phosphate and sulfate, suggesting that specific binding of a divalent anion to the phosphate-binding site triggers ordering of the peptide loops so only one isoalloxazine can fit. Although the physiological relevance of FMN and other nucleotides as dimers has not been explored, our study shows that high-affinity binding to proteins of such dimers can occur in vitro. This emphasizes that the cofactor-binding site in flavodoxin is more flexible than previously expected. PMID:14596623

  16. Thermal unfolding of Apo and Holo Desulfovibrio desulfuricans flavodoxin: cofactor stabilizes folded and intermediate states.

    PubMed

    Muralidhara, B K; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2004-10-12

    We here compare thermal unfolding of the apo and holo forms of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans flavodoxin, which noncovalently binds a flavin mononucleotide (FMN) cofactor. In the case of the apo form, fluorescence and far-UV circular dichroism (CD) detected transitions are reversible but do not overlap (T(m) of 50 and 60 degrees C, respectively, pH 7). The thermal transitions for the holo form follow the same pattern but occur at higher temperatures (T(m) of 60 and 67 degrees C for fluorescence and CD transitions, respectively, pH 7). The holoprotein transitions are also reversible and exhibit no protein concentration dependence (above 10 microM), indicating that the FMN remains bound to the polypeptide throughout. Global analysis shows that the thermal reactions for both apo and holo forms proceed via an equilibrium intermediate that has approximately 90% nativelike secondary structure and significant enthalpic stabilization relative to the unfolded states. Incubation of unfolded holoflavodoxin at high temperatures results in FMN dissociation. Rebinding of FMN at these conditions is nominal, and therefore, cooling of holoprotein heated to 95 degrees C follows the refolding pathway of the apo form. However, FMN readily rebinds to the apoprotein at lower temperatures. We conclude that (1) a three-state thermal unfolding behavior appears to be conserved among long- and short-chain, as well as apo and holo forms of, flavodoxins and (2) flavodoxin's thermal stability (in both native and intermediate states) is augmented by the presence of the FMN cofactor. PMID:15461458

  17. Bienzymatic Sequential Reaction on Microgel Particles and Their Cofactor Dependent Applications.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Nidhi C; Tripathi, Bijay P; Müller, Martin; Stamm, Manfred; Ionov, Leonid

    2016-05-01

    We report, the preparation and characterization of bioconjugates, wherein enzymes pyruvate kinase (Pk) and l-lactic dehydrogenase (Ldh) were covalently bound to poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-poly(ethylenimine) (PNIPAm-PEI) microgel support using glutaraldehyde (GA) as the cross-linker. The effects of different arrangements of enzymes on the microgels were investigated for the enzymatic behavior and to obtain maximum Pk-Ldh sequential reaction. The dual enzyme bioconjugates prepared by simultaneous addition of both the enzymes immobilized on the same microgel particles (PL), and PiLi, that is, dual enzyme bioconjugate obtained by combining single-enzyme bioconjugates (immobilized pyruvate kinase (Pi) and immobilized lactate dehydrogenase (Li)), were used to study the effect of the assembly of dual enzymes systems on the microgels. The kinetic parameters (Km, kcat), reaction parameters (temperature, pH), stability (thermal and storage), and cofactor dependent applications were studied for the dual enzymes conjugates. The kinetic results indicated an improved turn over number (kcat) for PL, while the kcat and catalytic efficiency was significantly decreased in case of PiLi. For cofactor dependent application, in which the ability of ADP monitoring and ATP synthesis by the conjugates were studied, the activity of PL was found to be nearly 2-fold better than that of PiLi. These results indicated that the influence of spacing between the enzymes is an important factor in optimization of multienzyme immobilization on the support. PMID:27010819

  18. Identity of cofactor bound to mycothiol conjugate amidase (Mca) influenced by expression and purification conditions.

    PubMed

    Kocabas, Evren; Liu, Hualan; Hernick, Marcy

    2015-08-01

    Mycothiol serves as the primary reducing agent in Mycobacterium species, and is also a cofactor for the detoxification of xenobiotics. Mycothiol conjugate amidase (Mca) is a metalloamidase that catalyzes the cleavage of MS-conjugates to form a mercapturic acid, which is excreted from the mycobacterium, and 1-D-myo-inosityl-2-amino-2-deoxy-α-D-glucopyranoside. Herein we report on the metal cofactor preferences of Mca from Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Importantly, results from homology models of Mca from M. smegmatis and M. tuberculosis suggest that the metal binding site of Mca is identical to that of the closely related protein N-acetyl-1-D-myo-inosityl-2-amino-2-deoxy-α-D-glucopyranoside deacetylase (MshB). This finding is supported by results from zinc ion affinity measurements that indicate Mca and MshB have comparable K(D)(ZnII) values (~10-20 pM). Furthermore, results from pull-down experiments using Halo-Mca indicate that Mca purifies with (stoichiometric) Fe(2+) when purified under anaerobic conditions, and Zn(2+) when purified under aerobic conditions. Consequently, Mca is likely a Fe(2+)-dependent enzyme under physiological conditions; with Zn(2+)-Mca an experimental artifact that could become biologically relevant under oxidatively stressed conditions. Importantly, these findings suggest that efforts towards the design of Mca inhibitors should include targeting the Fe(2+) form of the enzyme. PMID:26044118

  19. Failure of megakaryopoiesis and arrested erythropoiesis in mice lacking the GATA-1 transcriptional cofactor FOG

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Alice P.; Fujiwara, Yuko; Hom, Dennis B.; Orkin, Stuart H.

    1998-01-01

    GATA transcription factors are required for the differentiation of diverse cell types in several species. Recent evidence suggests that their biologic activities may be modulated through interaction with multitype zinc finger proteins, such as Friend of GATA-1 (FOG) and U-shaped (Ush). In cell culture, FOG cooperates with the hematopoietic transcription factor GATA-1 to promote erythroid and megakaryocytic differentiation. We show here that mice lacking FOG die during mid-embryonic development with severe anemia. FOG−/− erythroid cells display a marked, but partial, blockage of maturation, reminiscent of GATA-1− erythroid precursors. In contrast to GATA-1 deficiency, however, megakaryocytes fail to develop in the absence of FOG. Although the FOG−/− erythroid phenotype supports the proposed role of FOG as a GATA-1 cofactor in vivo, the latter finding points to a pivotal, GATA-1-independent requirement for FOG in megakaryocyte development from the bipotential erythroid/megakaryocytic progenitor. We speculate that FOG and other FOG-like proteins serve as complex cofactors that act through both GATA-dependent and GATA-independent mechanisms. PMID:9553047

  20. A simple method to engineer a protein-derived redox cofactor for catalysis.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sooim; Choi, Moonsung; Williamson, Heather R; Davidson, Victor L

    2014-10-01

    The 6×-Histidine tag which is commonly used for purification of recombinant proteins was converted to a catalytic redox-active center by incorporation of Co(2+). Two examples of the biological activity of this engineered protein-derived cofactor are presented. After inactivation of the natural diheme cofactor of MauG, it was shown that the Co(2+)-loaded 6×His-tag could substitute for the hemes in the H2O2-driven catalysis of tryptophan tryptophylquinone biosynthesis. To further demonstrate that the Co(2+)-loaded 6×His-tag could mediate long range electron transfer, it was shown that addition of H2O2 to the Co(2+)-loaded 6×His-tagged Cu(1+) amicyanin oxidizes the copper site which is 20Å away. These results provide proof of principle for this simple method by which to introduce a catalytic redox-active site into proteins for potential applications in research and biotechnology.

  1. Identity of cofactor bound to mycothiol conjugate amidase (Mca) influenced by expression and purification conditions.

    PubMed

    Kocabas, Evren; Liu, Hualan; Hernick, Marcy

    2015-08-01

    Mycothiol serves as the primary reducing agent in Mycobacterium species, and is also a cofactor for the detoxification of xenobiotics. Mycothiol conjugate amidase (Mca) is a metalloamidase that catalyzes the cleavage of MS-conjugates to form a mercapturic acid, which is excreted from the mycobacterium, and 1-D-myo-inosityl-2-amino-2-deoxy-α-D-glucopyranoside. Herein we report on the metal cofactor preferences of Mca from Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Importantly, results from homology models of Mca from M. smegmatis and M. tuberculosis suggest that the metal binding site of Mca is identical to that of the closely related protein N-acetyl-1-D-myo-inosityl-2-amino-2-deoxy-α-D-glucopyranoside deacetylase (MshB). This finding is supported by results from zinc ion affinity measurements that indicate Mca and MshB have comparable K(D)(ZnII) values (~10-20 pM). Furthermore, results from pull-down experiments using Halo-Mca indicate that Mca purifies with (stoichiometric) Fe(2+) when purified under anaerobic conditions, and Zn(2+) when purified under aerobic conditions. Consequently, Mca is likely a Fe(2+)-dependent enzyme under physiological conditions; with Zn(2+)-Mca an experimental artifact that could become biologically relevant under oxidatively stressed conditions. Importantly, these findings suggest that efforts towards the design of Mca inhibitors should include targeting the Fe(2+) form of the enzyme.

  2. The influence of oxygen on [NiFe]-hydrogenase cofactor biosynthesis and how ligation of carbon monoxide precedes cyanation.

    PubMed

    Stripp, Sven T; Lindenstrauss, Ute; Granich, Claudia; Sawers, R Gary; Soboh, Basem

    2014-01-01

    The class of [NiFe]-hydrogenases is characterized by a bimetallic cofactor comprising low-spin nickel and iron ions, the latter of which is modified with a single carbon monoxide (CO) and two cyanide (CN-) molecules. Generation of these ligands in vivo requires a complex maturation apparatus in which the HypC-HypD complex acts as a 'construction site' for the Fe-(CN)2CO portion of the cofactor. The order of addition of the CO and CN- ligands determines the ultimate structure and catalytic efficiency of the cofactor; however much debate surrounds the succession of events. Here, we present an FT-IR spectroscopic analysis of HypC-HypD isolated from a hydrogenase-competent wild-type strain of Escherichia coli. In contrast to previously reported samples, HypC-HypD showed spectral contributions indicative of an electron-rich Fe-CO cofactor, at the same time lacking any Fe-CN- signatures. This immature iron site binds external CO and undergoes oxidative damage when in contact with O2. Binding of CO protects the site against loss of spectral features associated with O2 damage. Our findings strongly suggest that CO ligation precedes cyanation in vivo. Furthermore, the results provide a rationale for the deleterious effects of O2 on in vivo cofactor biosynthesis.

  3. Deducing the temporal order of cofactor function in ligand-regulated gene transcription: theory and experimental verification.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Edward J; Guo, Chunhua; Simons, S Stoney; Chow, Carson C

    2012-01-01

    Cofactors are intimately involved in steroid-regulated gene expression. Two critical questions are (1) the steps at which cofactors exert their biological activities and (2) the nature of that activity. Here we show that a new mathematical theory of steroid hormone action can be used to deduce the kinetic properties and reaction sequence position for the functioning of any two cofactors relative to a concentration limiting step (CLS) and to each other. The predictions of the theory, which can be applied using graphical methods similar to those of enzyme kinetics, are validated by obtaining internally consistent data for pair-wise analyses of three cofactors (TIF2, sSMRT, and NCoR) in U2OS cells. The analysis of TIF2 and sSMRT actions on GR-induction of an endogenous gene gave results identical to those with an exogenous reporter. Thus new tools to determine previously unobtainable information about the nature and position of cofactor action in any process displaying first-order Hill plot kinetics are now available.

  4. The Influence of Oxygen on [NiFe]–Hydrogenase Cofactor Biosynthesis and How Ligation of Carbon Monoxide Precedes Cyanation

    PubMed Central

    Stripp, Sven T.; Lindenstrauss, Ute; Granich, Claudia; Sawers, R. Gary; Soboh, Basem

    2014-01-01

    The class of [NiFe]–hydrogenases is characterized by a bimetallic cofactor comprising low–spin nickel and iron ions, the latter of which is modified with a single carbon monoxide (CO) and two cyanide (CN−) molecules. Generation of these ligands in vivo requires a complex maturation apparatus in which the HypC–HypD complex acts as a ‘construction site’ for the Fe–(CN)2CO portion of the cofactor. The order of addition of the CO and CN– ligands determines the ultimate structure and catalytic efficiency of the cofactor; however much debate surrounds the succession of events. Here, we present an FT–IR spectroscopic analysis of HypC–HypD isolated from a hydrogenase–competent wild–type strain of Escherichia coli. In contrast to previously reported samples, HypC–HypD showed spectral contributions indicative of an electron–rich Fe–CO cofactor, at the same time lacking any Fe–CN– signatures. This immature iron site binds external CO and undergoes oxidative damage when in contact with O2. Binding of CO protects the site against loss of spectral features associated with O2 damage. Our findings strongly suggest that CO ligation precedes cyanation in vivo. Furthermore, the results provide a rationale for the deleterious effects of O2 on in vivo cofactor biosynthesis. PMID:25211029

  5. Enzymatic synthesis of L-lactic acid from carbon dioxide and ethanol with an inherent cofactor regeneration cycle.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xiaodong; El-Zahab, Bilal; Zhao, Xueyan; Liu, Youyan; Wang, Ping

    2011-02-01

    Efficient conversion of carbon dioxide is of great interests to today's endeavors in controlling greenhouse gas emission. A multienzyme catalytic system that uses carbon dioxide and ethanol to produce L-lactate was demonstrated in this work, thereby providing a novel reaction route to convert bio-based ethanol to an important building block for synthesis biodegradable polymers. The synthetic route has a unique internal cofactor regeneration cycle, eliminating the need of additional chemical or energy for cofactor regeneration. Lactate was successfully synthesized with 41% of ethanol converted in a batch reaction, while a turnover number of 2.2 day⁻¹ was reached for cofactor regeneration in a reaction with continuous feeding of ethanol. A kinetic model developed based on reaction kinetic parameters determined separately for each reaction step predicted well the reaction rates and yields of the multienzyme reaction system.

  6. Photoactivation of the flavin cofactor in Xenopus laevis (6–4) photolyase: Observation of a transient tyrosyl radical by time-resolved electron paramagnetic resonance

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Stefan; Kay, Christopher W. M.; Mögling, Heike; Möbius, Klaus; Hitomi, Kenichi; Todo, Takeshi

    2002-01-01

    The light-induced electron transfer reaction of flavin cofactor photoactivation in Xenopus laevis (6–4) photolyase has been studied by continuous-wave and time-resolved electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. When the photoactivation is initiated from the fully oxidized form of the flavin, a neutral flavin radical is observed as a long-lived paramagnetic intermediate of two consecutive single-electron reductions under participation of redox-active amino acid residues. By time-resolved electron paramagnetic resonance, a spin-polarized transient radical-pair signal was detected that shows remarkable differences to the signals observed in the related cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photolyase enzyme. In (6–4) photolyase, a neutral tyrosine radical has been identified as the final electron donor, on the basis of the characteristic line width, hyperfine splitting pattern, and resonance magnetic field position of the tyrosine resonances of the transient radical pair. PMID:11805294

  7. Chaperonin cofactors, Cpn10 and Cpn20, of green algae and plants function as hetero-oligomeric ring complexes.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yi-Chin C; Mueller-Cajar, Oliver; Saschenbrecker, Sandra; Hartl, F Ulrich; Hayer-Hartl, Manajit

    2012-06-01

    The chloroplast chaperonin system of plants and green algae is a curiosity as both the chaperonin cage and its lid are encoded by multiple genes, in contrast to the single genes encoding the two components of the bacterial and mitochondrial systems. In the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Cr), three genes encode chaperonin cofactors, with cpn10 encoding a single ∼10-kDa domain and cpn20 and cpn23 encoding tandem cpn10 domains. Here, we characterized the functional interaction of these proteins with the Escherichia coli chaperonin, GroEL, which normally cooperates with GroES, a heptamer of ∼10-kDa subunits. The C. reinhardtii cofactor proteins alone were all unable to assist GroEL-mediated refolding of bacterial ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase but gained this ability when CrCpn20 and/or CrCpn23 was combined with CrCpn10. Native mass spectrometry indicated the formation of hetero-oligomeric species, consisting of seven ∼10-kDa domains. The cofactor "heptamers" interacted with GroEL and encapsulated substrate protein in a nucleotide-dependent manner. Different hetero-oligomer arrangements, generated by constructing cofactor concatamers, indicated a preferential heptamer configuration for the functional CrCpn10-CrCpn23 complex. Formation of heptamer Cpn10/Cpn20 hetero-oligomers was also observed with the Arabidopsis thaliana (At) cofactors, which functioned with the chloroplast chaperonin, AtCpn60α(7)β(7). It appears that hetero-oligomer formation occurs more generally for chloroplast chaperonin cofactors, perhaps adapting the chaperonin system for the folding of specific client proteins.

  8. Activation and inhibition of rubber transferases by metal cofactors and pyrophosphate substrates.

    PubMed

    Scott, Deborah J; da Costa, Bernardo M T; Espy, Stephanie C; Keasling, Jay D; Cornish, Katrina

    2003-09-01

    Metal cofactors are necessary for the activity of alkylation by prenyl transfer in enzyme-catalyzed reactions. Rubber transferase (RuT, a cis-prenyl transferase) associated with purified rubber particles from Hevea brasiliensis, Parthenium argentatum and Ficus elastica can use magnesium and manganese interchangably to achieve maximum velocity. We define the concentration of activator required for maximum velocity as [A](max). The [A](max)(Mg2+) in F. elastica (100 mM) is 10 times the [A](max)(Mg2+) for either H. brasiliensis (10 mM) or P. argentatum (8 mM). The [A](max)(Mn2+) in F. elastica (11 mM), H. brasiliensis (3.8 mM) and P. argentatum (6.8 mM) and the [A](max)(Mg2+) in H. brasiliensis (10 mM) and P. argentatum (8 mM) are similar. The differences in [A](max)(Mg2+) correlate with the actual endogenous Mg(2+) concentrations in the latex of living plants. Extremely low Mn(2+) levels in vivo indicate that Mg(2+) is the RuT cofactor in living H. brasiliensis and F. elastica trees. Kinetic analyses demonstrate that FPP-Mg(2+) and FPP-Mn(2+) are active substrates for rubber molecule initiation, although free FPP and metal cations, Mg(2+) and Mn(2+), can interact independently at the active site with the following relative dissociation constants K(d)(FPP) cofactor requirements, and are membrane-bound enzymes. PMID:12946411

  9. Two "unrelated" families of ATP-dependent enzymes share extensive structural similarities about their cofactor binding sites.

    PubMed Central

    Denessiouk, K. A.; Lehtonen, J. V.; Korpela, T.; Johnson, M. S.

    1998-01-01

    Two proteins, D-alanine:D-alanine ligase and cAMP-dependent protein kinase, share a remarkable degree of structural convergence despite having different three-dimensional folds and different enzymatic functions. Here we report that as many as 103 residues from 10 segments form two identical super-secondary structures between which the cofactor ATP is bound. The cofactor, two bound metal cations, and several water molecules form a large network of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions common to both enzymes, and these are mediated by the similar placement of equivalent amino acids within the common supersecondary structures. PMID:9605318

  10. Electron transfer between the heme bound oxygen and the tetrahydrobiopterin cofactor of nitric oxide synthase: a DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menyhárd, Dóra K.

    2004-07-01

    Nitric oxide is synthesized from L-Arg by nitric oxide synthases (NOSs). DFT calculations carried out in the present study demonstrate that there is direct coupling between the heme bound oxygen and the tetrahydrobiopterin (H 4B) cofactor in the activated state of NOS. Results indicate that radicalization of H 4B causes the coupled reduction of heme bound oxygen. In our model system H 3B rad radical formation is prompted by proton dissociation from the N5 site of the cofactor; spin density is transferred to the heme bound oxygen, which we found in an orientation preconditioned for H abstraction from the substrate.

  11. Origins of cellular geometry

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Cells are highly complex and orderly machines, with defined shapes and a startling variety of internal organizations. Complex geometry is a feature of both free-living unicellular organisms and cells inside multicellular animals. Where does the geometry of a cell come from? Many of the same questions that arise in developmental biology can also be asked of cells, but in most cases we do not know the answers. How much of cellular organization is dictated by global cell polarity cues as opposed to local interactions between cellular components? Does cellular structure persist across cell generations? What is the relationship between cell geometry and tissue organization? What ensures that intracellular structures are scaled to the overall size of the cell? Cell biology is only now beginning to come to grips with these questions. PMID:21880160

  12. Architected Cellular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaedler, Tobias A.; Carter, William B.

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing enables fabrication of materials with intricate cellular architecture, whereby progress in 3D printing techniques is increasing the possible configurations of voids and solids ad infinitum. Examples are microlattices with graded porosity and truss structures optimized for specific loading conditions. The cellular architecture determines the mechanical properties and density of these materials and can influence a wide range of other properties, e.g., acoustic, thermal, and biological properties. By combining optimized cellular architectures with high-performance metals and ceramics, several lightweight materials that exhibit strength and stiffness previously unachievable at low densities were recently demonstrated. This review introduces the field of architected materials; summarizes the most common fabrication methods, with an emphasis on additive manufacturing; and discusses recent progress in the development of architected materials. The review also discusses important applications, including lightweight structures, energy absorption, metamaterials, thermal management, and bioscaffolds.

  13. Epigenetics and Cellular Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenyi; Wang, Fengzhong; Yu, Zhongsheng; Xin, Fengjiao

    2016-01-01

    Living eukaryotic systems evolve delicate cellular mechanisms for responding to various environmental signals. Among them, epigenetic machinery (DNA methylation, histone modifications, microRNAs, etc.) is the hub in transducing external stimuli into transcriptional response. Emerging evidence reveals the concept that epigenetic signatures are essential for the proper maintenance of cellular metabolism. On the other hand, the metabolite, a main environmental input, can also influence the processing of epigenetic memory. Here, we summarize the recent research progress in the epigenetic regulation of cellular metabolism and discuss how the dysfunction of epigenetic machineries influences the development of metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity; then, we focus on discussing the notion that manipulating metabolites, the fuel of cell metabolism, can function as a strategy for interfering epigenetic machinery and its related disease progression as well. PMID:27695375

  14. Epigenetics and Cellular Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenyi; Wang, Fengzhong; Yu, Zhongsheng; Xin, Fengjiao

    2016-01-01

    Living eukaryotic systems evolve delicate cellular mechanisms for responding to various environmental signals. Among them, epigenetic machinery (DNA methylation, histone modifications, microRNAs, etc.) is the hub in transducing external stimuli into transcriptional response. Emerging evidence reveals the concept that epigenetic signatures are essential for the proper maintenance of cellular metabolism. On the other hand, the metabolite, a main environmental input, can also influence the processing of epigenetic memory. Here, we summarize the recent research progress in the epigenetic regulation of cellular metabolism and discuss how the dysfunction of epigenetic machineries influences the development of metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity; then, we focus on discussing the notion that manipulating metabolites, the fuel of cell metabolism, can function as a strategy for interfering epigenetic machinery and its related disease progression as well.

  15. The Roles of Cellular Nanomechanics in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yallapu, Murali M.; Katti, Kalpana S.; Katti, Dinesh R.; Mishra, Sanjay R.; Khan, Sheema; Jaggi, Meena; Chauhan, Subhash C.

    2014-01-01

    The biomechanical properties of cells and tissues may be instrumental in increasing our understanding of cellular behavior and cellular manifestations of diseases such as cancer. Nanomechanical properties can offer clinical translation of therapies beyond what are currently employed. Nanomechanical properties, often measured by nanoindentation methods using atomic force microscopy, may identify morphological variations, cellular binding forces, and surface adhesion behaviors that efficiently differentiate normal cells and cancer cells. The aim of this review is to examine current research involving the general use of atomic force microscopy/nanoindentation in measuring cellular nanomechanics; various factors and instrumental conditions that influence the nanomechanical properties of cells; and implementation of nanoindentation methods to distinguish cancer cells from normal cells or tissues. Applying these fundamental nanomechanical properties to current discoveries in clinical treatment may result in greater efficiency in diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of cancer, which ultimately can change the lives of patients. PMID:25137233

  16. Cofactor-independent phosphoglycerate mutase from nematodes has limited druggability, as revealed by two high-throughput screens.

    PubMed

    Crowther, Gregory J; Booker, Michael L; He, Min; Li, Ting; Raverdy, Sylvine; Novelli, Jacopo F; He, Panqing; Dale, Natalie R G; Fife, Amy M; Barker, Robert H; Kramer, Martin L; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Carlow, Clotilde K S; Wang, Ming-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Cofactor-independent phosphoglycerate mutase (iPGAM) is essential for the growth of C. elegans but is absent from humans, suggesting its potential as a drug target in parasitic nematodes such as Brugia malayi, a cause of lymphatic filariasis (LF). iPGAM's active site is small and hydrophilic, implying that it may not be druggable, but another binding site might permit allosteric inhibition. As a comprehensive assessment of iPGAM's druggability, high-throughput screening (HTS) was conducted at two different locations: ∼220,000 compounds were tested against the C. elegans iPGAM by Genzyme Corporation, and ∼160,000 compounds were screened against the B. malayi iPGAM at the National Center for Drug Screening in Shanghai. iPGAM's catalytic activity was coupled to downstream glycolytic enzymes, resulting in NADH consumption, as monitored by a decline in visible-light absorbance at 340 nm. This assay performed well in both screens (Z'-factor >0.50) and identified two novel inhibitors that may be useful as chemical probes. However, these compounds have very modest potency against the B. malayi iPGAM (IC50 >10 µM) and represent isolated singleton hits rather than members of a common scaffold. Thus, despite the other appealing properties of the nematode iPGAMs, their low druggability makes them challenging to pursue as drug targets. This study illustrates a "druggability paradox" of target-based drug discovery: proteins are generally unsuitable for resource-intensive HTS unless they are considered druggable, yet druggability is often difficult to predict in the absence of HTS data.

  17. Transfer of the molybdenum cofactor synthesized by Rhodobacter capsulatus MoeA to XdhC and MobA.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Meina; Stöcklein, Walter; Leimkühler, Silke

    2007-09-28

    The molybdenum cofactor (Moco) exists in different variants in the cell and can be directly inserted into molybdoenzymes utilizing the molybdopterin (MPT) form of Moco. In bacteria such as Rhodobacter capsulatus and Escherichia coli, MPT is further modified by attachment of a GMP nucleotide, forming MPT guanine dinucleotide (MGD). In this work, we analyzed the distribution and targeting of different forms of Moco to their respective user enzymes by proteins that bind Moco and are involved in its further modification. The R. capsulatus proteins MogA, MoeA, MobA, and XdhC were purified, and their specific interactions were analyzed. Interactions between the protein pairs MogA-MoeA, MoeA-XdhC, MoeA-MobA, and XdhC-MobA were identified by surface plasmon resonance measurements. In addition, the transfer of Moco produced by the MogA-MoeA complex to XdhC was investigated. A direct competition of MobA and XdhC for Moco binding was determined. In vitro analyses showed that XdhC bound to MobA, prevented the binding of Moco to MobA, and thereby inhibited MGD biosynthesis. The data were confirmed by in vivo studies in R. capsulatus cells showing that overproduction of XdhC resulted in a 50% decrease in the activity of bis-MGD-containing Me(2)SO reductase. We propose that, in bacteria, the distribution of Moco in the cell and targeting to the respective user enzymes are accomplished by specific proteins involved in Moco binding and modification.

  18. Cofactor-Independent Phosphoglycerate Mutase from Nematodes Has Limited Druggability, as Revealed by Two High-Throughput Screens

    PubMed Central

    Crowther, Gregory J.; Booker, Michael L.; He, Min; Li, Ting; Raverdy, Sylvine; Novelli, Jacopo F.; He, Panqing; Dale, Natalie R. G.; Fife, Amy M.; Barker, Robert H.; Kramer, Martin L.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Carlow, Clotilde K. S.; Wang, Ming-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Cofactor-independent phosphoglycerate mutase (iPGAM) is essential for the growth of C. elegans but is absent from humans, suggesting its potential as a drug target in parasitic nematodes such as Brugia malayi, a cause of lymphatic filariasis (LF). iPGAM's active site is small and hydrophilic, implying that it may not be druggable, but another binding site might permit allosteric inhibition. As a comprehensive assessment of iPGAM's druggability, high-throughput screening (HTS) was conducted at two different locations: ∼220,000 compounds were tested against the C. elegans iPGAM by Genzyme Corporation, and ∼160,000 compounds were screened against the B. malayi iPGAM at the National Center for Drug Screening in Shanghai. iPGAM's catalytic activity was coupled to downstream glycolytic enzymes, resulting in NADH consumption, as monitored by a decline in visible-light absorbance at 340 nm. This assay performed well in both screens (Z′-factor >0.50) and identified two novel inhibitors that may be useful as chemical probes. However, these compounds have very modest potency against the B. malayi iPGAM (IC50 >10 µM) and represent isolated singleton hits rather than members of a common scaffold. Thus, despite the other appealing properties of the nematode iPGAMs, their low druggability makes them challenging to pursue as drug targets. This study illustrates a “druggability paradox” of target-based drug discovery: proteins are generally unsuitable for resource-intensive HTS unless they are considered druggable, yet druggability is often difficult to predict in the absence of HTS data. PMID:24416464

  19. KDM5 Interacts with Foxo to Modulate Cellular Levels of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xingyin; Greer, Christina; Secombe, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Increased cellular levels of oxidative stress are implicated in a large number of human diseases. Here we describe the transcription co-factor KDM5 (also known as Lid) as a new critical regulator of cellular redox state. Moreover, this occurs through a novel KDM5 activity whereby it alters the ability of the transcription factor Foxo to bind to DNA. Our microarray analyses of kdm5 mutants revealed a striking enrichment for genes required to regulate cellular levels of oxidative stress. Consistent with this, loss of kdm5 results in increased sensitivity to treatment with oxidizers, elevated levels of oxidized proteins, and increased mutation load. KDM5 activates oxidative stress resistance genes by interacting with Foxo to facilitate its recruitment to KDM5-Foxo co-regulated genes. Significantly, this occurs independently of KDM5's well-characterized demethylase activity. Instead, KDM5 interacts with the lysine deacetylase HDAC4 to promote Foxo deacetylation, which affects Foxo DNA binding. PMID:25329053

  20. Esmond E. Snell--the pathfinder of B vitamins and cofactors.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Hideyuki; Tanase, Sumio; Yagi, Toshiharu

    2010-04-01

    Esmond E. Snell (1914-2003) was a giant of B-vitamin and enzyme research. His early research in bacterial nutrition had lead to the discovery of vitamins such as lipoic acid and folic acid, and an anti-vitamin avidin. He developed microbiological assay methods for riboflavin and other vitamins and amino acids, which are still used today. He also investigated the metabolism of vitamins, discovered pyridoxal and pyridoxamine as the active forms of vitamin B(6) and revealed the mechanism of transamination and other reactions catalysed by vitamin B(6) enzymes. His research in later years on pyruvoyl-dependent histidine decarboxylase unveiled the biogenesis mechanism of this first built-in cofactor. Throughout his career, he was a great mentor of many people, all of whom are inspired by his philosophy of science.

  1. Crystal Structures of Phosphite Dehydrogenase Provide Insights into Nicotinamide Cofactor Regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Yaozhong; Zhang, Houjin; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Johannes, Tyler W.; Woodyer, Ryan; Hung, John E.; Nair, Nikhil; van der Donk, Wilfred A.; Zhao, Huimin; Nair, Satish K.

    2012-08-21

    The enzyme phosphite dehydrogenase (PTDH) catalyzes the NAD{sup +}-dependent conversion of phosphite to phosphate and represents the first biological catalyst that has been shown to conduct the enzymatic oxidation of phosphorus. Despite investigation for more than a decade into both the mechanism of its unusual reaction and its utility in cofactor regeneration, there has been a lack of any structural data for PTDH. Here we present the cocrystal structure of an engineered thermostable variant of PTDH bound to NAD{sup +} (1.7 {angstrom} resolution), as well as four other cocrystal structures of thermostable PTDH and its variants with different ligands (all between 1.85 and 2.3 {angstrom} resolution). These structures provide a molecular framework for understanding prior mutational analysis and point to additional residues, located in the active site, that may contribute to the enzymatic activity of this highly unusual catalyst.

  2. RNA with iron(II) as a cofactor catalyses electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Chiaolong; Chou, I.-Chun; Okafor, C. Denise; Bowman, Jessica C.; O'Neill, Eric B.; Athavale, Shreyas S.; Petrov, Anton S.; Hud, Nicholas V.; Wartell, Roger M.; Harvey, Stephen C.; Williams, Loren Dean

    2013-06-01

    Mg2+ is essential for RNA folding and catalysis. However, for the first 1.5 billion years of life on Earth RNA inhabited an anoxic Earth with abundant and benign Fe2+. We hypothesize that Fe2+ was an RNA cofactor when iron was abundant, and was substantially replaced by Mg2+ during a period known as the ‘great oxidation’, brought on by photosynthesis. Here, we demonstrate that reversing this putative metal substitution in an anoxic environment, by removing Mg2+ and replacing it with Fe2+, expands the catalytic repertoire of RNA. Fe2+ can confer on some RNAs a previously uncharacterized ability to catalyse single-electron transfer. We propose that RNA function, in analogy with protein function, can be understood fully only in the context of association with a range of possible metals. The catalysis of electron transfer, requisite for metabolic activity, may have been attenuated in RNA by photosynthesis and the rise of O2.

  3. The Mitochondrial Fission Receptor MiD51 Requires ADP as a Cofactor

    PubMed Central

    Losón, Oliver C.; Liu, Raymond; Rome, Michael E.; Meng, Shuxia; Kaiser, Jens T.; Shan, Shu-ou; Chan, David C.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Mitochondrial fission requires recruitment of dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) to the mitochondrial surface and activation of its GTP-dependent scission function. The Drp1 receptors MiD49 and MiD51 recruit Drp1 to facilitate mitochondrial fission, but their mechanism of action is poorly understood. Using X-ray crystallography, we demonstrate that MiD51 contains a nucleotidyl transferase domain that binds ADP with high affinity. MiD51 recruits Drp1 via a surface loop that functions independently of ADP binding. However, in the absence of nucleotide binding, the recruited Drp1 cannot be activated for fission. Purified MiD51 strongly inhibits Drp1 assembly and GTP hydrolysis in the absence of ADP. Addition of ADP relieves this inhibition and promotes Drp1 assembly into spirals with enhanced GTP hydrolysis. Our results reveal ADP as an essential cofactor for MiD51 during mitochondrial fission. PMID:24508339

  4. The mitochondrial fission receptor MiD51 requires ADP as a cofactor.

    PubMed

    Losón, Oliver C; Liu, Raymond; Rome, Michael E; Meng, Shuxia; Kaiser, Jens T; Shan, Shu-ou; Chan, David C

    2014-03-01

    Mitochondrial fission requires recruitment of dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) to the mitochondrial surface and activation of its GTP-dependent scission function. The Drp1 receptors MiD49 and MiD51 recruit Drp1 to facilitate mitochondrial fission, but their mechanism of action is poorly understood. Using X-ray crystallography, we demonstrate that MiD51 contains a nucleotidyl transferase domain that binds ADP with high affinity. MiD51 recruits Drp1 via a surface loop that functions independently of ADP binding. However, in the absence of nucleotide binding, the recruited Drp1 cannot be activated for fission. Purified MiD51 strongly inhibits Drp1 assembly and GTP hydrolysis in the absence of ADP. Addition of ADP relieves this inhibition and promotes Drp1 assembly into spirals with enhanced GTP hydrolysis. Our results reveal ADP as an essential cofactor for MiD51 during mitochondrial fission.

  5. Income poverty, poverty co-factors, and the adjustment of children in elementary school.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Brian P; Brown, Eleanor D

    2006-01-01

    Since 1990, there have been great advances in how developmental researchers construct poverty. These advances are important because they may help inform social policy at many levels and help frame how American culture constructs poverty for children, both symbolically and in the opportunities children and families get to escape from poverty. Historically, developmental perspectives have embodied social address and main effects models, snapshot views of poverty effects at single points in time, and a rather narrow focus on income as the symbolic marker of the ecology of disadvantage. More recent views, in contrast, emphasize the diverse circumstances of disadvantaged families and diverse outcomes of disadvantaged children, the multiple sources of risk and the multiple determinants of poor outcomes for these children, dynamic aspects of that ecology, and change as well as continuity in outcome trajectories. The advances also consist of more powerful frames for understanding the ecology of disadvantage and the risk it poses for child outcomes. Most developmental researchers still tend to frame causal variables ultimately in terms of the dichotomy between social causation and social selection views, with a primary emphasis on the former. In part, this framing has reflected limitations of sample size and design, because the theoretical and empirical power of reciprocal selection models is clear (Kim et al., 2003). The conceptual advances that prompt such models include widespread acknowledgement of third variable problems in interpreting effects, of the clear need for multivariate approaches, and the need to pursue mechanisms and moderators of the relations between causal candidates and child outcomes. In the context of these advances, one of the core goals of our research program has been to construct robust representations of environmental adversity for disadvantaged families. Most of our research focuses on contextual co-factors at a family level (e.g., maternal

  6. Small Cofactors May Assist Protein Emergence from RNA World: Clues from RNA-Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Liang; Ji, Hong-Fang

    2011-01-01

    It is now widely accepted that at an early stage in the evolution of life an RNA world arose, in which RNAs both served as the genetic material and catalyzed diverse biochemical reactions. Then, proteins have gradually replaced RNAs because of their superior catalytic properties in catalysis over time. Therefore, it is important to investigate how primitive functional proteins emerged from RNA world, which can shed light on the evolutionary pathway of life from RNA world to the modern world. In this work, we proposed that the emergence of most primitive functional proteins are assisted by the early primitive nucleotide cofactors, while only a minority are induced directly by RNAs based on the analysis of RNA-protein complexes. Furthermore, the present findings have significant implication for exploring the composition of primitive RNA, i.e., adenine base as principal building blocks. PMID:21789260

  7. Phenylalanine ammonia lyase catalyzed synthesis of amino acids by an MIO-cofactor independent pathway.

    PubMed

    Lovelock, Sarah L; Lloyd, Richard C; Turner, Nicholas J

    2014-04-25

    Phenylalanine ammonia lyases (PALs) belong to a family of 4-methylideneimidazole-5-one (MIO) cofactor dependent enzymes which are responsible for the conversion of L-phenylalanine into trans-cinnamic acid in eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms. Under conditions of high ammonia concentration, this deamination reaction is reversible and hence there is considerable interest in the development of PALs as biocatalysts for the enantioselective synthesis of non-natural amino acids. Herein the discovery of a previously unobserved competing MIO-independent reaction pathway, which proceeds in a non-stereoselective manner and results in the generation of both L- and D-phenylalanine derivatives, is described. The mechanism of the MIO-independent pathway is explored through isotopic-labeling studies and mutagenesis of key active-site residues. The results obtained are consistent with amino acid deamination occurring by a stepwise E1 cB elimination mechanism.

  8. Identification of a cyclic nucleotide as a cryptic intermediate in molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Hover, Bradley M; Loksztejn, Anna; Ribeiro, Anthony A; Yokoyama, Kenichi

    2013-05-01

    The molybdenum cofactor (Moco) is a redox cofactor found in all kingdoms of life, and its biosynthesis is essential for survival of many organisms, including humans. The first step of Moco biosynthesis is a unique transformation of guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP) into cyclic pyranopterin monophosphate (cPMP). In bacteria, MoaA and MoaC catalyze this transformation, although the specific functions of these enzymes were not fully understood. Here, we report the first isolation and structural characterization of a product of MoaA. This molecule was isolated under anaerobic conditions from a solution of MoaA incubated with GTP, S-adenosyl-L-methionine, and sodium dithionite in the absence of MoaC. Structural characterization by chemical derivatization, MS, and NMR spectroscopy suggested the structure of this molecule to be (8S)-3',8-cyclo-7,8-dihydroguanosine 5'-triphosphate (3',8-cH2GTP). The isolated 3',8-cH2GTP was converted to cPMP by MoaC or its human homologue, MOCS1B, with high specificities (Km < 0.060 μM and 0.79 ± 0.24 μM for MoaC and MOCS1B, respectively), suggesting the physiological relevance of 3',8-cH2GTP. These observations, in combination with some mechanistic studies of MoaA, unambiguously demonstrate that MoaA catalyzes a unique radical C-C bond formation reaction and that, in contrast to previous proposals, MoaC plays a major role in the complex rearrangement to generate the pyranopterin ring.

  9. Molybdenum cofactor and isolated sulphite oxidase deficiencies: Clinical and molecular spectrum among Egyptian patients

    PubMed Central

    Zaki, Maha S.; Selim, Laila; EL-Bassyouni, Hala T.; Issa, Mahmoud Y.; Mahmoud, Iman; Ismail, Samira; Girgis, Mariane; Sadek, Abdelrahim A.; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Abdel Hamid, Mohamed S.

    2016-01-01

    Aim Molybdenum cofactor deficiency (MoCD) and Sulfite oxidase deficiency (SOD) are rare autosomal recessive conditions of sulfur-containing amino acid metabolism with overlapping clinical features and emerging therapies. The clinical phenotype is indistinguishable and they can only be differentiated biochemically. MOCS1, MOCS2, MOCS3, and GPRN genes contribute to the synthesis of molybdenum cofactor, and SUOX gene encodes sulfite oxidase. The aim of this study was to elucidate the clinical, radiological, biochemical and molecular findings in patients with SOD and MoCD. Methods Detailed clinical and radiological assessment of 9 cases referred for neonatal encephalopathy with hypotonia, microcephaly, and epilepsy led to a consideration of disorders of sulfur-containing amino acid metabolism. The diagnosis of six with MoCD and three with SOD was confirmed by biochemical tests, targeted sequencing, and whole exome sequencing where suspicion of disease was lower. Results Novel SUOX mutations were detected in 3 SOD cases and a novel MOCS2 mutation in 1 MoCD case. Most patients presented in the first 3 months of life with intractable tonic–clonic seizures, axial hypotonia, limb hypertonia, exaggerated startle response, feeding difficulties, and progressive cystic encephalomalacia on brain imaging. A single patient with MoCD had hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, hitherto unreported with these diseases. Interpretation Our results emphasize that intractable neonatal seizures, spasticity, and feeding difficulties can be important early signs for these disorders. Progressive microcephaly, intellectual disability and specific brain imaging findings in the first year were additional diagnostic aids. These clinical cues can be used to minimize delays in diagnosis, especially since promising treatments are emerging for MoCD type A. PMID:27289259

  10. Structure of the Biliverdin Cofactor in the Pfr State of Bathy and Prototypical Phytochromes*

    PubMed Central

    Salewski, Johannes; Escobar, Francisco Velazquez; Kaminski, Steve; von Stetten, David; Keidel, Anke; Rippers, Yvonne; Michael, Norbert; Scheerer, Patrick; Piwowarski, Patrick; Bartl, Franz; Frankenberg-Dinkel, Nicole; Ringsdorf, Simone; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Lamparter, Tilman; Mroginski, Maria Andrea; Hildebrandt, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Phytochromes act as photoswitches between the red- and far-red absorbing parent states of phytochromes (Pr and Pfr). Plant phytochromes display an additional thermal conversion route from the physiologically active Pfr to Pr. The same reaction pattern is found in prototypical biliverdin-binding bacteriophytochromes in contrast to the reverse thermal transformation in bathy bacteriophytochromes. However, the molecular origin of the different thermal stabilities of the Pfr states in prototypical and bathy bacteriophytochromes is not known. We analyzed the structures of the chromophore binding pockets in the Pfr states of various bathy and prototypical biliverdin-binding phytochromes using a combined spectroscopic-theoretical approach. For the Pfr state of the bathy phytochrome from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the very good agreement between calculated and experimental Raman spectra of the biliverdin cofactor is in line with important conclusions of previous crystallographic analyses, particularly the ZZEssa configuration of the chromophore and its mode of covalent attachment to the protein. The highly homogeneous chromophore conformation seems to be a unique property of the Pfr states of bathy phytochromes. This is in sharp contrast to the Pfr states of prototypical phytochromes that display conformational equilibria between two sub-states exhibiting small structural differences at the terminal methine bridges A-B and C-D. These differences may mainly root in the interactions of the cofactor with the highly conserved Asp-194 that occur via its carboxylate function in bathy phytochromes. The weaker interactions via the carbonyl function in prototypical phytochromes may lead to a higher structural flexibility of the chromophore pocket opening a reaction channel for the thermal (ZZE → ZZZ) Pfr to Pr back-conversion. PMID:23603902

  11. Structure of the biliverdin cofactor in the Pfr state of bathy and prototypical phytochromes.

    PubMed

    Salewski, Johannes; Escobar, Francisco Velazquez; Kaminski, Steve; von Stetten, David; Keidel, Anke; Rippers, Yvonne; Michael, Norbert; Scheerer, Patrick; Piwowarski, Patrick; Bartl, Franz; Frankenberg-Dinkel, Nicole; Ringsdorf, Simone; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Lamparter, Tilman; Mroginski, Maria Andrea; Hildebrandt, Peter

    2013-06-01

    Phytochromes act as photoswitches between the red- and far-red absorbing parent states of phytochromes (Pr and Pfr). Plant phytochromes display an additional thermal conversion route from the physiologically active Pfr to Pr. The same reaction pattern is found in prototypical biliverdin-binding bacteriophytochromes in contrast to the reverse thermal transformation in bathy bacteriophytochromes. However, the molecular origin of the different thermal stabilities of the Pfr states in prototypical and bathy bacteriophytochromes is not known. We analyzed the structures of the chromophore binding pockets in the Pfr states of various bathy and prototypical biliverdin-binding phytochromes using a combined spectroscopic-theoretical approach. For the Pfr state of the bathy phytochrome from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the very good agreement between calculated and experimental Raman spectra of the biliverdin cofactor is in line with important conclusions of previous crystallographic analyses, particularly the ZZEssa configuration of the chromophore and its mode of covalent attachment to the protein. The highly homogeneous chromophore conformation seems to be a unique property of the Pfr states of bathy phytochromes. This is in sharp contrast to the Pfr states of prototypical phytochromes that display conformational equilibria between two sub-states exhibiting small structural differences at the terminal methine bridges A-B and C-D. These differences may mainly root in the interactions of the cofactor with the highly conserved Asp-194 that occur via its carboxylate function in bathy phytochromes. The weaker interactions via the carbonyl function in prototypical phytochromes may lead to a higher structural flexibility of the chromophore pocket opening a reaction channel for the thermal (ZZE → ZZZ) Pfr to Pr back-conversion. PMID:23603902

  12. On reversible H2 loss upon N2 binding to FeMo-cofactor of nitrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhi-Yong; Khadka, Nimesh; Lukoyanov, Dmitriy; Hoffman, Brian M.; Dean, Dennis R.; Seefeldt, Lance C.

    2013-01-01

    Nitrogenase is activated for N2 reduction by the accumulation of four electrons/protons on its active site FeMo-cofactor, yielding a state, designated as E4, which contains two iron-bridging hydrides [Fe–H–Fe]. A central puzzle of nitrogenase function is an apparently obligatory formation of one H2 per N2 reduced, which would “waste” two reducing equivalents and four ATP. We recently presented a draft mechanism for nitrogenase that provides an explanation for obligatory H2 production. In this model, H2 is produced by reductive elimination of the two bridging hydrides of E4 during N2 binding. This process releases H2, yielding N2 bound to FeMo-cofactor that is doubly reduced relative to the resting redox level, and thereby is activated to promptly generate bound diazene (HN=NH). This mechanism predicts that during turnover under D2/N2, the reverse reaction of D2 with the N2-bound product of reductive elimination would generate dideutero-E4 [E4(2D)], which can relax with loss of HD to the state designated E2, with a single deuteride bridge [E2(D)]. Neither of these deuterated intermediate states could otherwise form in H2O buffer. The predicted E2(D) and E4(2D) states are here established by intercepting them with the nonphysiological substrate acetylene (C2H2) to generate deuterated ethylenes (C2H3D and C2H2D2). The demonstration that gaseous H2/D2 can reduce a substrate other than H+ with N2 as a cocatalyst confirms the essential mechanistic role for H2 formation, and hence a limiting stoichiometry for biological nitrogen fixation of eight electrons/protons, and provides direct experimental support for the reductive elimination mechanism. PMID:24062454

  13. 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase: insight into cofactor binding from experimental and theoretical studies.

    PubMed

    Brisson, Lydie; El Bakkali-Taheri, Nadia; Giorgi, Michel; Fadel, Antoine; Kaizer, József; Réglier, Marius; Tron, Thierry; Ajandouz, El Hassan; Simaan, A Jalila

    2012-08-01

    1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase (ACCO) is a nonheme Fe(II)-containing enzyme that is related to the 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase family. The binding of substrates/cofactors to tomato ACCO was investigated through kinetics, tryptophan fluorescence quenching, and modeling studies. α-Aminophosphonate analogs of the substrate (1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid, ACC), 1-aminocyclopropane-1-phosphonic acid (ACP) and (1-amino-1-methyl)ethylphosphonic acid (AMEP), were found to be competitive inhibitors versus both ACC and bicarbonate (HCO(3)(-)) ions. The measured dissociation constants for Fe(II) and ACC clearly indicate that bicarbonate ions improve both Fe(II) and ACC binding, strongly suggesting a stabilization role for this cofactor. A structural model of tomato ACCO was constructed and used for docking experiments, providing a model of possible interactions of ACC, HCO(3)(-), and ascorbate at the active site. In this model, the ACC and bicarbonate binding sites are located close together in the active pocket. HCO(3)(-) is found at hydrogen-bond distance from ACC and interacts (hydrogen bonds or electrostatic interactions) with residues K158, R244, Y162, S246, and R300 of the enzyme. The position of ascorbate is also predicted away from ACC. Individually docked at the active site, the inhibitors ACP and AMEP were found coordinating the metal ion in place of ACC with the phosphonate groups interacting with K158 and R300, thus interlocking with both ACC and bicarbonate binding sites. In conclusion, HCO(3)(-) and ACC together occupy positions similar to the position of 2-oxoglutarate in related enzymes, and through a hydrogen bond HCO(3)(-) likely plays a major role in the stabilization of the substrate in the active pocket. PMID:22711330

  14. Genetic Dominance & Cellular Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seager, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    In learning genetics, many students misunderstand and misinterpret what "dominance" means. Understanding is easier if students realize that dominance is not a mechanism, but rather a consequence of underlying cellular processes. For example, metabolic pathways are often little affected by changes in enzyme concentration. This means that…

  15. The New Cellular Immunology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claman, Henry N.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the nature of the immune response and traces many of the discoveries that have led to the present state of knowledge in immunology. The new cellular immunology is directing its efforts toward improving health by proper manipulation of the immune mechanisms of the body. (JR)

  16. Inhibition of human positive cofactor 4 radiosensitizes human esophageal squmaous cell carcinoma cells by suppressing XLF-mediated nonhomologous end joining.

    PubMed

    Qian, D; Zhang, B; Zeng, X-L; Le Blanc, J M; Guo, Y-H; Xue, C; Jiang, C; Wang, H-H; Zhao, T-S; Meng, M-B; Zhao, L-J; Hao, J-H; Wang, P; Xie, D; Lu, B; Yuan, Z-Y

    2014-10-16

    Radiotherapy has the widest application to esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) patients. Factors associated with DNA damage repair have been shown to function in cell radiosensitivity. Human positive cofactor 4 (PC4) has a role in nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) and is involved in DNA damage repair. However, the clinical significance and biological role of PC4 in cancer progression and cancer cellular responses to chemoradiotherapy (CRT) remain largely unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential roles of PC4 in the radiosensitivity of ESCC. In this study, we showed that knockdown of PC4 substantially increased ESCC cell sensitivity to ionizing radiation (IR) both in vitro and in vivo and enhanced radiation-induced apoptosis and mitotic catastrophe (MC). Importantly, we demonstrated that silencing of PC4 suppressed NHEJ by downregulating the expression of XLF in ESCC cells, whereas reconstituting the expression of XLF protein in the PC4-knockdown ESCC cells restored NHEJ activity and radioresistance. Moreover, high expression of PC4 positively correlated with ESCC resistance to CRT and was an independent predictor for short disease-specific survival of ESCC patients in both of our cohorts. These findings suggest that PC4 protects ESCC cells from IR-induced death by enhancing the NHEJ-promoting activity of XLF and could be used as a novel radiosensitivity predictor and a promising therapeutic target for ESCCs.

  17. Influence of protein interactions on oxidation/reduction midpoint potentials of cofactors in natural and de novo metalloproteins.

    PubMed

    Olson, T L; Williams, J C; Allen, J P

    2013-01-01

    As discussed throughout this special issue, oxidation and reduction reactions play critical roles in the function of many organisms. In photosynthetic organisms, the conversion of light energy drives oxidation and reduction reactions through the transfer of electrons and protons in order to create energy-rich compounds. These reactions occur in proteins such as cytochrome c, a heme-containing water-soluble protein, the bacteriochlorophyll-containing reaction center, and photosystem II where water is oxidized at the manganese cluster. A critical measure describing the ability of cofactors in proteins to participate in such reactions is the oxidation/reduction midpoint potential. In this review, the basic concepts of oxidation/reduction reactions are reviewed with a summary of the experimental approaches used to measure the midpoint potential of metal cofactors. For cofactors in proteins, the midpoint potential not only depends upon the specific chemical characteristics of cofactors but also upon interactions with the surrounding protein, such as the nature of the coordinating ligands and protein environment. These interactions can be tailored to optimize an oxidation/reduction reaction carried out by the protein. As examples, the midpoint potentials of hemes in cytochromes, bacteriochlorophylls in reaction centers, and the manganese cluster of photosystem II are discussed with an emphasis on the influence that protein interactions have on these potentials. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Metals in Bioenergetics and Biomimetics Systems.

  18. Engineering a d-lactate dehydrogenase that can super-efficiently utilize NADPH and NADH as cofactors.

    PubMed

    Meng, Hengkai; Liu, Pi; Sun, Hongbing; Cai, Zhen; Zhou, Jie; Lin, Jianping; Li, Yin

    2016-04-25

    Engineering the cofactor specificity of a natural enzyme often results in a significant decrease in its activity on original cofactor. Here we report that a NADH-dependent dehydrogenase (d-LDH) from Lactobacillus delbrueckii 11842 can be rationally engineered to efficiently use both NADH and NADPH as cofactors. Point mutations on three amino acids (D176S, I177R, F178T) predicted by computational analysis resulted in a modified enzyme designated as d-LDH*. The Kcat/Km of the purified d-LDH* on NADPH increased approximately 184-fold while the Kcat/Km on NADH also significantly increased, showing for the first time that a rationally engineered d-LDH could exhibit comparable activity on both NADPH and NADH. Further kinetic analysis revealed that the enhanced affinity with NADH or NADPH and the significant increased Kcat of d-LDH* resulted in the significant increase of d-LDH* activity on both NADPH and NADH. This study thus demonstrated that the cofactor specificity of dehydrogenase can be broadened by using targeted engineering approach, and the engineered enzyme can efficiently function in NADH-rich, or NADPH-rich, or NADH and NADPH-rich environment.

  19. Substitutions at the cofactor phosphate-binding site of a clostridial alcohol dehydrogenase lead to unexpected changes in substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Maddock, Danielle J; Patrick, Wayne M; Gerth, Monica L

    2015-08-01

    Changing the cofactor specificity of an enzyme from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide 2'-phosphate (NADPH) to the more abundant NADH is a common strategy for increasing overall enzyme efficiency in microbial metabolic engineering. The aim of this study was to switch the cofactor specificity of the primary-secondary alcohol dehydrogenase from Clostridium autoethanogenum, a bacterium with considerable promise for the bio-manufacturing of fuels and other petrochemicals, from strictly NADPH-dependent to NADH-dependent. We used insights from a homology model to build a site-saturation library focussed on residue S199, the position deemed most likely to disrupt binding of the 2'-phosphate of NADPH. Although the CaADH(S199X) library did not yield any NADH-dependent enzymes, it did reveal that substitutions at the cofactor phosphate-binding site can cause unanticipated changes in the substrate specificity of the enzyme. Using consensus-guided site-directed mutagenesis, we were able to create an enzyme that was stringently NADH-dependent, albeit with a concomitant reduction in activity. This study highlights the role that distal residues play in substrate specificity and the complexity of enzyme-cofactor interactions.

  20. Cofactor Specificity Engineering of Streptococcus mutans NADH Oxidase 2 for NAD(P)(+) Regeneration in Biocatalytic Oxidations.

    PubMed

    Petschacher, Barbara; Staunig, Nicole; Müller, Monika; Schürmann, Martin; Mink, Daniel; De Wildeman, Stefaan; Gruber, Karl; Glieder, Anton

    2014-01-01

    Soluble water-forming NAD(P)H oxidases constitute a promising NAD(P)(+) regeneration method as they only need oxygen as cosubstrate and produce water as sole byproduct. Moreover, the thermodynamic equilibrium of O2 reduction is a valuable driving force for mostly energetically unfavorable biocatalytic oxidations. Here, we present the generation of an NAD(P)H oxidase with high activity for both cofactors, NADH and NADPH. Starting from the strictly NADH specific water-forming Streptococcus mutans NADH oxidase 2 several rationally designed cofactor binding site mutants were created and kinetic values for NADH and NADPH conversion were determined. Double mutant 193R194H showed comparable high rates and low K m values for NADPH (k cat 20 s(-1), K m 6 µM) and NADH (k cat 25 s(-1), K m 9 µM) with retention of 70% of wild type activity towards NADH. Moreover, by screening of a SeSaM library S. mutans NADH oxidase 2 variants showing predominantly NADPH activity were found, giving further insight into cofactor binding site architecture. Applicability for cofactor regeneration is shown for coupling with alcohol dehydrogenase from Sphyngobium yanoikuyae for 2-heptanone production.

  1. Complex formation between the hepatitis C virus serine protease and a synthetic NS4A cofactor peptide.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, E; Urbani, A; Biasiol, G; Brunetti, M; Pessi, A; De Francesco, R; Steinkühler, C

    1997-06-24

    The NS3 protein of the hepatitis C virus contains a serine protease that, upon binding to its cofactor, NS4A, is responsible for maturational cleavages that occur in the nonstructural region of the viral polyprotein. We have studied in vitro complex formation between the NS3 protease domain expressed in Escherichia coli and a synthetic peptide spanning the minimal domain of the NS4A cofactor. Complex dissociation constants in the low micromolar range were measured using different techniques such as activity titration, fluorescence titration, and pre-equilibrium analysis of complex formation. Cofactor binding was strictly dependent on the glycerol content of buffer solutions and was not significantly influenced by substrate saturation of the enzyme. NS4A peptide binding to NS3 was accompanied by changes in the circular dichroism spectrum in the region between 270 and 290 nm, as well as by an enhancement of tryptophan fluorescence. Conversely, no changes in the far UV region of the circular dichroism spectrum were detectable. These data are indicative of induced tertiary structure changes and suggest that the secondary structure content of the uncomplexed enzyme does not differ significantly from that of the NS3-cofactor complex. Pre-equilibrium measurements of complex formation showed very low values for k(on), suggesting conformational transitions to be rate limiting for the association reaction.

  2. Engineering a d-lactate dehydrogenase that can super-efficiently utilize NADPH and NADH as cofactors

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Hengkai; Liu, Pi; Sun, Hongbing; Cai, Zhen; Zhou, Jie; Lin, Jianping; Li, Yin

    2016-01-01

    Engineering the cofactor specificity of a natural enzyme often results in a significant decrease in its activity on original cofactor. Here we report that a NADH-dependent dehydrogenase (d-LDH) from Lactobacillus delbrueckii 11842 can be rationally engineered to efficiently use both NADH and NADPH as cofactors. Point mutations on three amino acids (D176S, I177R, F178T) predicted by computational analysis resulted in a modified enzyme designated as d-LDH*. The Kcat/Km of the purified d-LDH* on NADPH increased approximately 184-fold while the Kcat/Km on NADH also significantly increased, showing for the first time that a rationally engineered d-LDH could exhibit comparable activity on both NADPH and NADH. Further kinetic analysis revealed that the enhanced affinity with NADH or NADPH and the significant increased Kcat of d-LDH* resulted in the significant increase of d-LDH* activity on both NADPH and NADH. This study thus demonstrated that the cofactor specificity of dehydrogenase can be broadened by using targeted engineering approach, and the engineered enzyme can efficiently function in NADH-rich, or NADPH-rich, or NADH and NADPH-rich environment. PMID:27109778

  3. Cytosolic Iron-Sulfur Cluster Assembly (CIA) System: Factors, Mechanism, and Relevance to Cellular Iron Regulation*

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Anil K.; Pallesen, Leif J.; Spang, Robert J.; Walden, William E.

    2010-01-01

    FeS cluster biogenesis is an essential process in virtually all forms of life. Complex protein machineries that are conserved from bacteria through higher eukaryotes facilitate assembly of the FeS cofactor in proteins. In the last several years, significant strides have been made in our understanding of FeS cluster assembly and the functional overlap of this process with cellular iron homeostasis. This minireview summarizes the present understanding of the cytosolic iron-sulfur cluster assembly (CIA) system in eukaryotes, with a focus on information gained from studies in budding yeast and mammalian systems. PMID:20522543

  4. Cytosolic iron-sulfur cluster assembly (CIA) system: factors, mechanism, and relevance to cellular iron regulation.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anil K; Pallesen, Leif J; Spang, Robert J; Walden, William E

    2010-08-27

    FeS cluster biogenesis is an essential process in virtually all forms of life. Complex protein machineries that are conserved from bacteria through higher eukaryotes facilitate assembly of the FeS cofactor in proteins. In the last several years, significant strides have been made in our understanding of FeS cluster assembly and the functional overlap of this process with cellular iron homeostasis. This minireview summarizes the present understanding of the cytosolic iron-sulfur cluster assembly (CIA) system in eukaryotes, with a focus on information gained from studies in budding yeast and mammalian systems.

  5. Determinants of Cofactor Specificity for the Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase from Escherichia coli: Simulation, Kinetics and Evolutionary Studies

    PubMed Central

    Fuentealba, Matias; Muñoz, Rodrigo; Maturana, Pablo; Krapp, Adriana; Cabrera, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Glucose 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenases (G6PDHs) from different sources show varying specificities towards NAD+ and NADP+ as cofactors. However, it is not known to what extent structural determinants of cofactor preference are conserved in the G6PDH family. In this work, molecular simulations, kinetic characterization of site-directed mutants and phylogenetic analyses were used to study the structural basis for the strong preference towards NADP+ shown by the G6PDH from Escherichia coli. Molecular Dynamics trajectories of homology models showed a highly favorable binding energy for residues K18 and R50 when interacting with the 2'-phosphate of NADP+, but the same residues formed no observable interactions in the case of NAD+. Alanine mutants of both residues were kinetically characterized and analyzed with respect to the binding energy of the transition state, according to the kcat/KM value determined for each cofactor. Whereas both residues contribute to the binding energy of NADP+, only R50 makes a contribution (about -1 kcal/mol) to NAD+ binding. In the absence of both positive charges the enzyme was unable to discriminate NADP+ from NAD+. Although kinetic data is sparse, the observed distribution of cofactor preferences within the phylogenetic tree is sufficient to rule out the possibility that the known NADP+-specific G6PDHs form a monophyletic group. While the β1-α1 loop shows no strict conservation of K18, (rather, S and T seem to be more frequent), in the case of the β2-α2 loop, different degrees of conservation are observed for R50. Noteworthy is the fact that a K18T mutant is indistinguishable from K18A in terms of cofactor preference. We conclude that the structural determinants for the strict discrimination against NAD+ in the case of the NADP+-specific enzymes have evolved independently through different means during the evolution of the G6PDH family. We further suggest that other regions in the cofactor binding pocket, besides the β1-α1 and β2-α2

  6. Determinants of Cofactor Specificity for the Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase from Escherichia coli: Simulation, Kinetics and Evolutionary Studies.

    PubMed

    Fuentealba, Matias; Muñoz, Rodrigo; Maturana, Pablo; Krapp, Adriana; Cabrera, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Glucose 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenases (G6PDHs) from different sources show varying specificities towards NAD+ and NADP+ as cofactors. However, it is not known to what extent structural determinants of cofactor preference are conserved in the G6PDH family. In this work, molecular simulations, kinetic characterization of site-directed mutants and phylogenetic analyses were used to study the structural basis for the strong preference towards NADP+ shown by the G6PDH from Escherichia coli. Molecular Dynamics trajectories of homology models showed a highly favorable binding energy for residues K18 and R50 when interacting with the 2'-phosphate of NADP+, but the same residues formed no observable interactions in the case of NAD+. Alanine mutants of both residues were kinetically characterized and analyzed with respect to the binding energy of the transition state, according to the kcat/KM value determined for each cofactor. Whereas both residues contribute to the binding energy of NADP+, only R50 makes a contribution (about -1 kcal/mol) to NAD+ binding. In the absence of both positive charges the enzyme was unable to discriminate NADP+ from NAD+. Although kinetic data is sparse, the observed distribution of cofactor preferences within the phylogenetic tree is sufficient to rule out the possibility that the known NADP+-specific G6PDHs form a monophyletic group. While the β1-α1 loop shows no strict conservation of K18, (rather, S and T seem to be more frequent), in the case of the β2-α2 loop, different degrees of conservation are observed for R50. Noteworthy is the fact that a K18T mutant is indistinguishable from K18A in terms of cofactor preference. We conclude that the structural determinants for the strict discrimination against NAD+ in the case of the NADP+-specific enzymes have evolved independently through different means during the evolution of the G6PDH family. We further suggest that other regions in the cofactor binding pocket, besides the β1-α1 and β2-α2

  7. Cofactors of LIM Domains Associate with Estrogen Receptor α to Regulate the Expression of Noncoding RNA H19 and Corneal Epithelial Progenitor Cell Function.

    PubMed

    Klein, Rachel Herndon; Stephens, Denise N; Ho, Hsiang; Chen, Jefferson K; Salmans, Michael L; Wang, Winnie; Yu, Zhengquan; Andersen, Bogi

    2016-06-17

    Cofactors of LIM domain proteins, CLIM1 and CLIM2, are widely expressed transcriptional cofactors that are recruited to gene regulatory regions by DNA-binding proteins, including LIM domain transcription factors. In the cornea, epithelium-specific expression of a dominant negative (DN) CLIM under the keratin 14 (K14) promoter causes blistering, wounding, inflammation, epithelial hyperplasia, and neovascularization followed by epithelial thinning and subsequent epidermal-like differentiation of the corneal epithelium. The defects in corneal epithelial differentiation and cell fate determination suggest that CLIM may regulate corneal progenitor cells and the transition to differentiation. Consistent with this notion, the K14-DN-Clim corneal epithelium first exhibits increased proliferation followed by fewer progenitor cells with decreased proliferative potential. In vivo ChIP-sequencing experiments with corneal epithelium show that CLIM binds to and regulates numerous genes involved in cell adhesion and proliferation, including limbally enriched genes. Intriguingly, CLIM associates primarily with non-LIM homeodomain motifs in corneal epithelial cells, including that of estrogen receptor α. Among CLIM targets is the noncoding RNA H19 whose deregulation is associated with Silver-Russell and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndromes. We demonstrate here that H19 negatively regulates corneal epithelial proliferation. In addition to cell cycle regulators, H19 affects the expression of multiple cell adhesion genes. CLIM interacts with estrogen receptor α at the H19 locus, potentially explaining the higher expression of H19 in female than male corneas. Together, our results demonstrate an important role for CLIM in regulating the proliferative potential of corneal epithelial progenitors and identify CLIM downstream target H19 as a regulator of corneal epithelial proliferation and adhesion.

  8. Mutational analysis of Kaposica reveals that bridging of MG2 and CUB domains of target protein is crucial for the cofactor activity of RCA proteins.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Avneesh Kumar; Panse, Yogesh; Ghosh, Payel; Reza, Malik Johid; Mullick, Jayati; Sahu, Arvind

    2015-10-13

    The complement system has evolved to annul pathogens, but its improper regulation is linked with diseases. Efficient regulation of the system is primarily provided by a family of proteins termed regulators of complement activation (RCA). The knowledge of precise structural determinants of RCA proteins critical for imparting the regulatory activities and the molecular events underlying the regulatory processes, nonetheless, is still limited. Here, we have dissected the structural requirements of RCA proteins that are crucial for one of their two regulatory activities, the cofactor activity (CFA), by using the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus RCA homolog Kaposica as a model protein. We have scanned the entire Kaposica molecule by sequential mutagenesis using swapping and site-directed mutagenesis, which identified residues critical for its interaction with C3b and factor I. Mapping of these residues onto the modeled structure of C3b-Kaposica-factor I complex supported the mutagenesis data. Furthermore, the model suggested that the C3b-interacting residues bridge the CUB (complement C1r-C1s, Uegf, Bmp1) and MG2 (macroglobulin-2) domains of C3b. Thus, it seems that stabilization of the CUB domain with respect to the core of the C3b molecule is central for its CFA. Identification of CFA-critical regions in Kaposica guided experiments in which the equivalent regions of membrane cofactor protein were swapped into decay-accelerating factor. This strategy allowed CFA to be introduced into decay-accelerating factor, suggesting that viral and human regulators use a common mechanism for CFA.

  9. Fabrication of cellular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prud'homme, Robert K.; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Garg, Rajeev

    1996-02-01

    Nature uses cellular materials in applications requiring strength while, simultaneously, minimizing raw materials requirements. Minimizing raw materials is efficient both in terms of the energy expended by the organism to synthesize the structure and in terms of the strength- to-weight ratio of the structure. Wood is the most obvious example of cellular bio-materials, and it is the focus of other presentations in this symposium. The lightweight bone structure of birds is another excellent example where weight is a key criterion. The anchoring foot of the common muscle [Mytilus edulis] whereby it attaches itself to objects is a further example of a biological system that uses a foam to fill space and yet conserve on raw materials. In the case of the muscle the foam is water filled and the foot structure distributes stress over a larger area so that the strength of the byssal thread from which it is suspended is matched to the strength of interfacial attachment of the foot to a substrate. In these examples the synthesis and fabrication of the cellular material is directed by intercellular, genetically coded, biochemical reactions. The resulting cell sizes are microns in scale. Cellular materials at the next larger scale are created by organisms at the next higher level of integration. For example an African tree frog lays her eggs in a gas/fluid foam sack she builds on a branch overhanging a pond. The outside of the foam sack hardens in the sun and prevents water evaporation. The foam structure minimizes the amount of fluid that needs to be incorporated into the sack and minimizes its weight. However, as far as the developing eggs are concerned, they are in an aqueous medium, i.e. the continuous fluid phase of the foam. After precisely six days the eggs hatch, and the solidified outer wall re-liquefies and dumps the emerging tadpoles into the pond below. The bee honeycomb is an example of a cellular material with exquisite periodicity at millimeter length scales. The

  10. Cofactor recycling mechanism in asymmetric biocatalytic reduction of carbonyl compounds mediated by yeast: which is the efficient electron donor?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ben-Li; Pionnier, Sébastien

    2003-08-01

    In asymmetric reduction of carbonyl compounds mediated by microorganisms, the cofactors that transfer hydride should be regenerated by using a recycling system. In most cases, this recycling system consists of carbohydrate molecules, especially glucose or sucrose. Other molecules such as ethanol and acetate have been used as electron donors too. The reduction can even be conducted without added electron donors. To improve biocatalytic synthesis, it is important to understand the cofactor recycling mechanism. In this work, the hydride-transfer mechanism in cofactor regeneration, which takes place in bioreduction mediated by yeast, was studied by means of an isotope tracing technique. The results show that, when glucose was used, the NADH involved in the glycolysis was consumed directly in the formation of ethanol and was not used in the bioreduction. Hence, the regeneration of cofactors in the reduction is not coupled with glycolysis. Nevertheless, glucose is an efficient electron donor that transfers hydride through the hexose monophosphate (HMP) pathway in which the main hydrogen source is C-1 and C-3 hydrogen of glucose. Ethanol is not a good electron donor, since, when it was used, only a small quantity of hydrogen was transferred from this molecule, and the main hydrogen source was water. Therefore, the ethanol oxidation pathway may not be efficient. In the absence of added auxiliary substrates, the yeast cells may use electron donors stored in its cellules. However, in this case we observed that the main hydrogen source for cofactor recycling was water, while only very few hydrogen atoms were from unexchangeable sites. This is similar to the case in which ethanol is used, and is in contradiction with the HMP pathway if stored glucose was the electron donor. The question that remains to be investigated is "what is the efficient electron donor recycling mechanism in the yeast cellules?" PMID:12898687

  11. Shared-intermediates in the biosynthesis of thio-cofactors: Mechanism and functions of cysteine desulfurases and sulfur acceptors.

    PubMed

    Black, Katherine A; Dos Santos, Patricia C

    2015-06-01

    Cysteine desulfurases utilize a PLP-dependent mechanism to catalyze the first step of sulfur mobilization in the biosynthesis of sulfur-containing cofactors. Sulfur activation and integration into thiocofactors involve complex mechanisms and intricate biosynthetic schemes. Cysteine desulfurases catalyze sulfur-transfer reactions from l-cysteine to sulfur acceptor molecules participating in the biosynthesis of thio-cofactors, including Fe-S clusters, thionucleosides, thiamin, biotin, and molybdenum cofactor. The proposed mechanism of cysteine desulfurases involves the PLP-dependent cleavage of the C-S bond from l-cysteine via the formation of a persulfide enzyme intermediate, which is considered the hallmark step in sulfur mobilization. The subsequent sulfur transfer reaction varies with the class of cysteine desulfurase and sulfur acceptor. IscS serves as a mecca for sulfur incorporation into a network of intertwined pathways for the biosynthesis of thio-cofactors. The involvement of a single enzyme interacting with multiple acceptors, the recruitment of shared-intermediates partaking roles in multiple pathways, and the participation of Fe-S enzymes denote the interconnectivity of pathways involving sulfur trafficking. In Bacillus subtilis, the occurrence of multiple cysteine desulfurases partnering with dedicated sulfur acceptors partially deconvolutes the routes of sulfur trafficking and assigns specific roles for these enzymes. Understanding the roles of promiscuous vs. dedicated cysteine desulfurases and their partnership with shared-intermediates in the biosynthesis of thio-cofactors will help to map sulfur transfer events across interconnected pathways and to provide insight into the hierarchy of sulfur incorporation into biomolecules. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Fe/S proteins: Analysis, structure, function, biogenesis and diseases.

  12. Probabilistic Cellular Automata

    PubMed Central

    Agapie, Alexandru; Giuclea, Marius

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Cellular automata are binary lattices used for modeling complex dynamical systems. The automaton evolves iteratively from one configuration to another, using some local transition rule based on the number of ones in the neighborhood of each cell. With respect to the number of cells allowed to change per iteration, we speak of either synchronous or asynchronous automata. If randomness is involved to some degree in the transition rule, we speak of probabilistic automata, otherwise they are called deterministic. With either type of cellular automaton we are dealing with, the main theoretical challenge stays the same: starting from an arbitrary initial configuration, predict (with highest accuracy) the end configuration. If the automaton is deterministic, the outcome simplifies to one of two configurations, all zeros or all ones. If the automaton is probabilistic, the whole process is modeled by a finite homogeneous Markov chain, and the outcome is the corresponding stationary distribution. Based on our previous results for the asynchronous case—connecting the probability of a configuration in the stationary distribution to its number of zero-one borders—the article offers both numerical and theoretical insight into the long-term behavior of synchronous cellular automata. PMID:24999557

  13. Cellular therapy in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Parida, Shreemanta K; Madansein, Rajhmun; Singh, Nalini; Padayatchi, Nesri; Master, Iqbal; Naidu, Kantharuben; Zumla, Alimuddin; Maeurer, Markus

    2015-03-01

    Cellular therapy now offer promise of potential adjunct therapeutic options for treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB). We review here the role of Mesenchymal stromal cells, (MSCs), as well as other immune effector cells in the therapy of infectious diseases with a focus on TB. MSCs represent a population of tissue-resident non-hematopoietic adult progenitor cells which home into injured tissues increase the proliferative potential of broncho-alveolar stem cells and restore lung epithelium. MSCs have been shown to be immune-modulatory and anti-inflammatory mediated via cell-cell contacts as well as soluble factors. We discuss the functional profile of MSCs and their potential use for adjunct cellular therapy of multi-drug resistant TB, with the aim of limiting tissue damage, and to convert unproductive inflammatory responses into effective anti-pathogen directed immune responses. Adjunct cellular therapy could potentially offer salvage therapy options for patients with drug-resistant TB, increase clinically relevant anti-M.tuberculosis directed immune responses and possibly shorten the duration of anti-TB therapy. PMID:25809753

  14. Cellular functions of the microprocessor.

    PubMed

    Macias, Sara; Cordiner, Ross A; Cáceres, Javier F

    2013-08-01

    The microprocessor is a complex comprising the RNase III enzyme Drosha and the double-stranded RNA-binding protein DGCR8 (DiGeorge syndrome critical region 8 gene) that catalyses the nuclear step of miRNA (microRNA) biogenesis. DGCR8 recognizes the RNA substrate, whereas Drosha functions as an endonuclease. Recent global analyses of microprocessor and Dicer proteins have suggested novel functions for these components independent of their role in miRNA biogenesis. A HITS-CLIP (high-throughput sequencing of RNA isolated by cross-linking immunoprecipitation) experiment designed to identify novel substrates of the microprocessor revealed that this complex binds and regulates a large variety of cellular RNAs. The microprocessor-mediated cleavage of several classes of RNAs not only regulates transcript levels, but also modulates alternative splicing events, independently of miRNA function. Importantly, DGCR8 can also associate with other nucleases, suggesting the existence of alternative DGCR8 complexes that may regulate the fate of a subset of cellular RNAs. The aim of the present review is to provide an overview of the diverse functional roles of the microprocessor.

  15. Increased isobutanol production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by eliminating competing pathways and resolving cofactor imbalance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Isobutanol is an important target for biorefinery research as a next-generation biofuel and a building block for commodity chemical production. Metabolically engineered microbial strains to produce isobutanol have been successfully developed by introducing the Ehrlich pathway into bacterial hosts. Isobutanol-producing baker’s yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) strains have been developed following the strategy with respect to its advantageous characteristics for cost-effective isobutanol production. However, the isobutanol yields and titers attained by the developed strains need to be further improved through engineering of S. cerevisiae metabolism. Results Two strategies including eliminating competing pathways and resolving the cofactor imbalance were applied to improve isobutanol production in S. cerevisiae. Isobutanol production levels were increased in strains lacking genes encoding members of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex such as LPD1, indicating that the pyruvate supply for isobutanol biosynthesis is competing with acetyl-CoA biosynthesis in mitochondria. Isobutanol production was increased by overexpression of enzymes responsible for transhydrogenase-like shunts such as pyruvate carboxylase, malate dehydrogenase, and malic enzyme. The integration of a single gene deletion lpd1Δ and the activation of the transhydrogenase-like shunt further increased isobutanol levels. In a batch fermentation test at the 50-mL scale from 100 g/L glucose using the two integrated strains, the isobutanol titer reached 1.62 ± 0.11 g/L and 1.61 ± 0.03 g/L at 24 h after the start of fermentation, which corresponds to the yield at 0.016 ± 0.001 g/g glucose consumed and 0.016 ± 0.0003 g/g glucose consumed, respectively. Conclusions These results demonstrate that downregulation of competing pathways and metabolic functions for resolving the cofactor imbalance are promising strategies to construct S. cerevisiae strains that effectively produce

  16. Engineering of formate dehydrogenase: synergistic effect of mutations affecting cofactor specificity and chemical stability.

    PubMed

    Hoelsch, Kathrin; Sührer, Ilka; Heusel, Moritz; Weuster-Botz, Dirk

    2013-03-01

    Formate dehydrogenases (FDHs) are frequently used for the regeneration of cofactors in biotransformations employing NAD(P)H-dependent oxidoreductases. Major drawbacks of most native FDHs are their strong preference for NAD(+) and their low operational stability in the presence of reactive organic compounds such as α-haloketones. In this study, the FDH from Mycobacterium vaccae N10 (MycFDH) was engineered in order to obtain an enzyme that is not only capable of regenerating NADPH but also stable toward the α-haloketone ethyl 4-chloroacetoacetate (ECAA). To change the cofactor specificity, amino acids in the conserved NAD(+) binding motif were mutated. Among these mutants, MycFDH A198G/D221Q had the highest catalytic efficiency (k cat/K m) with NADP(+). The additional replacement of two cysteines (C145S/C255V) not only conferred a high resistance to ECAA but also enhanced the catalytic efficiency 6-fold. The resulting quadruple mutant MycFDH C145S/A198G/D221Q/C255V had a specific activity of 4.00 ± 0.13 U mg(-1) and a K m, NADP(+) of 0.147 ± 0.020 mM at 30 °C, pH 7. The A198G replacement had a major impact on the kinetic constants of the enzyme. The corresponding triple mutant, MycFDH C145S/D221Q/C255V, showed the highest specific activity reported to date for a NADP(+)-accepting FDH (v max, 10.25 ± 1.63 U mg(-1)). However, the half-saturation constant for NADP(+) (K m, NADP(+) , 0.92 ± 0.10 mM) was about one order of magnitude higher than the one of the quadruple mutant. Depending on the reaction setup, both novel MycFDH variants could be useful for the production of the chiral synthon ethyl (S)-4-chloro-3-hydroxybutyrate [(S)-ECHB] by asymmetric reduction of ECAA with NADPH-dependent ketoreductases.

  17. Cellular mechanics and motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hénon, Sylvie; Sykes, Cécile

    2015-10-01

    The term motility defines the movement of a living organism. One widely known example is the motility of sperm cells, or the one of flagellar bacteria. The propulsive element of such organisms is a cilium(or flagellum) that beats. Although cells in our tissues do not have a flagellum in general, they are still able to move, as we will discover in this chapter. In fact, in both cases of movement, with or without a flagellum, cell motility is due to a dynamic re-arrangement of polymers inside the cell. Let us first have a closer look at the propulsion mechanism in the case of a flagellum or a cilium, which is the best known, but also the simplest, and which will help us to define the hydrodynamic general conditions of cell movement. A flagellum is sustained by cellular polymers arranged in semi-flexible bundles and flagellar beating generates cell displacement. These polymers or filaments are part of the cellular skeleton, or "cytoskeleton", which is, in this case, external to the cellular main body of the organism. In fact, bacteria move in a hydrodynamic regime in which viscosity dominates over inertia. The system is thus in a hydrodynamic regime of low Reynolds number (Box 5.1), which is nearly exclusively the case in all cell movements. Bacteria and their propulsion mode by flagella beating are our unicellular ancestors 3.5 billion years ago. Since then, we have evolved to form pluricellular organisms. However, to keep the ability of displacement, to heal our wounds for example, our cells lost their flagellum, since it was not optimal in a dense cell environment: cells are too close to each other to leave enough space for the flagella to accomplish propulsion. The cytoskeleton thus developed inside the cell body to ensure cell shape changes and movement, and also mechanical strength within a tissue. The cytoskeleton of our cells, like the polymers or filaments that sustain the flagellum, is also composed of semi-flexible filaments arranged in bundles, and also in

  18. Formin’ cellular structures

    PubMed Central

    Bogdan, Sven; Schultz, Jörg; Grosshans, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Members of the Diaphanous (Dia) protein family are key regulators of fundamental actin driven cellular processes, which are conserved from yeast to humans. Researchers have uncovered diverse physiological roles in cell morphology, cell motility, cell polarity, and cell division, which are involved in shaping cells into tissues and organs. The identification of numerous binding partners led to substantial progress in our understanding of the differential functions of Dia proteins. Genetic approaches and new microscopy techniques allow important new insights into their localization, activity, and molecular principles of regulation. PMID:24719676

  19. Purification and characterization of iron-cofactored superoxide dismutase from Enteromorpha linza

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Mingsheng; Cai, Ruanhong; Wang, Shujun; Liu, Zhaopu; Jiao, Yuliang; Fang, Yaowei; Zhang, Xiaoxin

    2013-11-01

    A superoxide dismutase was purified from Enteromorpha linza using a simple and safe procedure, which comprised phosphate buffer extraction, ammonium sulphate precipitation, ion exchange chromatography on Q-sepharose column, and gel filtration chromatography on Superdex 200 10/300GL. The E. linza superoxide dismutase ( ElSOD) was purified 103.6-fold, and a yield of 19.1% and a specific activity of 1 750 U/mg protein were obtained. The SDS-PAGE exhibited ElSOD a single band near 23 kDa and the gel filtration study showed ElSOD's molecular weight is near 46 kDa in nondenatured condition, indicating it's a homodimeric protein. El SOD is an iron-cofactored superoxide dismutase (Fe-SOD) because it was inhibited by hydrogen peroxide, insensitive to potassium cyanide. The optimal temperature for its maximal enzyme activity was 35°C, and it still had 29.8% relative activity at 0°C, then ElSOD can be classified as a cold-adapted enzyme. ElSOD was stable when temperature was below 40°C or the pH was within the range of 5-10. The first 11 N-terminal amino acids of ElSOD were ALELKAPPYEL, comparison of its N-terminal sequence with other Fe-SOD N-terminal sequences at the same position suggests it is possibly a chloroplastic Fe-SOD.

  20. Engineering of the glycerol decomposition pathway and cofactor regulation in an industrial yeast improves ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Tang, Yan; Guo, Zhongpeng; Shi, Guiyang

    2013-10-01

    Glycerol is a major by-product of industrial ethanol production and its formation consumes up to 4 % of the sugar substrate. This study modified the glycerol decomposition pathway of an industrial strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to optimize the consumption of substrate and yield of ethanol. This study is the first to couple glycerol degradation with ethanol formation, to the best of our knowledge. The recombinant strain overexpressing GCY1 and DAK1, encoding glycerol dehydrogenase and dihydroxyacetone kinase, respectively, in glycerol degradation pathway, exhibited a moderate increase in ethanol yield (2.9 %) and decrease in glycerol yield (24.9 %) compared to the wild type with the initial glucose concentration of 15 % under anaerobic conditions. However, when the mhpF gene, encoding acetylating NAD⁺-dependent acetaldehyde dehydrogenase from Escherichia coli, was co-expressed in the aforementioned recombinant strain, a further increase in ethanol yield by 5.5 % and decrease in glycerol yield by 48 % were observed for the resultant recombinant strain GDMS1 when acetic acid was added into the medium prior to inoculation compared to the wild type. The process outlined in this study which enhances glycerol consumption and cofactor regulation in an industrial yeast is a promising metabolic engineering strategy to increase ethanol production by reducing the formation of glycerol.

  1. Overexpression of Arabidopsis molybdenum cofactor sulfurase gene confers drought tolerance in maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Lu, Yao; Li, Yajun; Zhang, Jiachang; Xiao, Yitao; Yue, Yuesen; Duan, Liusheng; Zhang, Mingcai; Li, Zhaohu

    2013-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a key component of the signaling system that integrates plant adaptive responses to abiotic stress. Overexpression of Arabidopsis molybdenum cofactor sulfurase gene (LOS5) in maize markedly enhanced the expression of ZmAO and aldehyde oxidase (AO) activity, leading to ABA accumulation and increased drought tolerance. Transgenic maize (Zea mays L.) exhibited the expected reductions in stomatal aperture, which led to decreased water loss and maintenance of higher relative water content (RWC) and leaf water potential. Also, transgenic maize subjected to drought treatment exhibited lower leaf wilting, electrolyte leakage, malondialdehyde (MDA) and H(2)O(2) content, and higher activities of antioxidative enzymes and proline content compared to wild-type (WT) maize. Moreover, overexpression of LOS5 enhanced the expression of stress-regulated genes such as Rad 17, NCED1, CAT1, and ZmP5CS1 under drought stress conditions, and increased root system development and biomass yield after re-watering. The increased drought tolerance in transgenic plants was associated with ABA accumulation via activated AO and expression of stress-related gene via ABA induction, which sequentially induced a set of favorable stress-related physiological and biochemical responses.

  2. Structural Investigation of the GlmS Ribozyme Bound to Its Catalytic Cofactor

    SciTech Connect

    Cochrane,J.; Lipchock, S.; Strobel, S.

    2007-01-01

    The GlmS riboswitch is located in the 5'-untranslated region of the gene encoding glucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcN6P) synthetase. The GlmS riboswitch is a ribozyme with activity triggered by binding of the metabolite GlcN6P. Presented here is the structure of the GlmS ribozyme (2.5 {angstrom} resolution) with GlcN6P bound in the active site. The GlmS ribozyme adopts a compact double pseudoknot tertiary structure, with two closely packed helical stacks. Recognition of GlcN6P is achieved through coordination of the phosphate moiety by two hydrated magnesium ions as well as specific nucleobase contacts to the GlcN6P sugar ring. Comparison of this activator bound and the previously published apoenzyme complex supports a model in which GlcN6P does not induce a conformational change in the RNA, as is typical of other riboswitches, but instead functions as a catalytic cofactor for the reaction. This demonstrates that RNA, like protein enzymes, can employ the chemical diversity of small molecules to promote catalytic activity.

  3. Tubulin cofactor B regulates microtubule densities during microglia transition to the reactive states

    SciTech Connect

    Fanarraga, M.L.

    2009-02-01

    Microglia are highly dynamic cells of the CNS that continuously survey the welfare of the neural parenchyma and play key roles modulating neurogenesis and neuronal cell death. In response to injury or pathogen invasion parenchymal microglia transforms into a more active cell that proliferates, migrates and behaves as a macrophage. The acquisition of these extra skills implicates enormous modifications of the microtubule and actin cytoskeletons. Here we show that tubulin cofactor B (TBCB), which has been found to contribute to various aspects of microtubule dynamics in vivo, is also implicated in microglial cytoskeletal changes. We find that TBCB is upregulated in post-lesion reactive parenchymal microglia/macrophages, in interferon treated BV-2 microglial cells, and in neonate amoeboid microglia where the microtubule densities are remarkably low. Our data demonstrate that upon TBCB downregulation both, after microglia differentiation to the ramified phenotype in vivo and in vitro, or after TBCB gene silencing, microtubule densities are restored in these cells. Taken together these observations support the view that TBCB functions as a microtubule density regulator in microglia during activation, and provide an insight into the understanding of the complex mechanisms controlling microtubule reorganization during microglial transition between the amoeboid, ramified, and reactive phenotypes.

  4. The geochemical record of the ancient nitrogen cycle, nitrogen isotopes, and metal cofactors.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, Linda V; Glass, Jennifer B

    2011-01-01

    The nitrogen (N) cycle is the only global biogeochemical cycle that is driven by biological functions involving the interaction of many microorganisms. The N cycle has evolved over geological time and its interaction with the oxygen cycle has had profound effects on the evolution and timing of Earth's atmosphere oxygenation (Falkowski and Godfrey, 2008). Almost every enzyme that microorganisms use to manipulate N contains redox-sensitive metals. Bioavailability of these metals has changed through time as a function of varying redox conditions, and likely influenced the biological underpinnings of the N cycle. It is possible to construct a record through geological time using N isotopes and metal concentrations in sediments to determine when the different stages of the N cycle evolved and the role metal availability played in the development of key enzymes. The same techniques are applicable to understanding the operation and changes in the N cycle through geological time. However, N and many of the redox-sensitive metals in some of their oxidation states are mobile and the isotopic composition or distribution can be altered by subsequent processes leading to erroneous conclusions. This chapter reviews the enzymology and metal cofactors of the N cycle and describes proper utilization of methods used to reconstruct evolution of the N cycle through time.

  5. In vitro synthesis of the iron-molybdenum cofactor of nitrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Shah, V K; Imperial, J; Ugalde, R A; Ludden, P W; Brill, W J

    1986-01-01

    Molybdate- and ATP-dependent in vitro synthesis of the iron-molybdenum cofactor (FeMo-co) of nitrogenase requires the protein products of at least the nifB, nifN, and nifE genes. Extracts of FeMo-co-negative mutants of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Azotobacter vinelandii with lesions in different genes can be complemented for FeMo-co synthesis. Both K. pneumoniae and A. vinelandii dinitrogenase (component I) deficient in FeMo-co can be activated by FeMo-co synthesized in vitro. Properties of the partially purified dinitrogenase activated by FeMo-co synthesized in vitro were comparable to those of dinitrogenase from the wild-type organism; e.g., ratios of acetylene- to nitrogen-reduction activities, as well as those of acetylene reduction activities to EPR spectrum peak height at g = 3.65, were very similar. A. vinelandii mutants UW45 and CA30 have mutations in a gene functionally equivalent to nifB of K. pneumoniae. PMID:3006060

  6. Climate change as an unexpected co-factor promoting coral eating seastar (Acanthaster planci) outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Uthicke, S; Logan, M; Liddy, M; Francis, D; Hardy, N; Lamare, M

    2015-02-12

    Coral reefs face a crisis due to local and global anthropogenic stressors. A large proportion of the ~50% coral loss on the Great Barrier Reef has been attributed to outbreaks of the crown-of-thorns-seastar (COTS). A widely assumed cause of primary COTS outbreaks is increased larval survivorship due to higher food availability, linked with anthropogenic runoff . Our experiment using a range of algal food concentrations at three temperatures representing present day average and predicted future increases, demonstrated a strong influence of food concentration on development is modulated by temperature. A 2°C increase in temperature led to a 4.2-4.9 times (at Day 10) or 1.2-1.8 times (Day 17) increase in late development larvae. A model indicated that food was the main driver, but that temperature was an important modulator of development. For instance, at 5000 cells ml(-1) food, a 2°C increase may shorten developmental time by 30% and may increase the probability of survival by 240%. The main contribution of temperature is to 'push' well-fed larvae faster to settlement. We conclude that warmer sea temperature is an important co-factor promoting COTS outbreaks.

  7. Cuticle Integrity and Biogenic Amine Synthesis in Caenorhabditis elegans Require the Cofactor Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4)

    PubMed Central

    Loer, Curtis M.; Calvo, Ana C.; Watschinger, Katrin; Werner-Felmayer, Gabriele; O’Rourke, Delia; Stroud, Dave; Tong, Amy; Gotenstein, Jennifer R.; Chisholm, Andrew D.; Hodgkin, Jonathan; Werner, Ernst R.; Martinez, Aurora

    2015-01-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is the natural cofactor of several enzymes widely distributed among eukaryotes, including aromatic amino acid hydroxylases (AAAHs), nitric oxide synthases (NOSs), and alkylglycerol monooxygenase (AGMO). We show here that the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, which has three AAAH genes and one AGMO gene, contains BH4 and has genes that function in BH4 synthesis and regeneration. Knockout mutants for putative BH4 synthetic enzyme genes lack the predicted enzymatic activities, synthesize no BH4, and have indistinguishable behavioral and neurotransmitter phenotypes, including serotonin and dopamine deficiency. The BH4 regeneration enzymes are not required for steady-state levels of biogenic amines, but become rate limiting in conditions of reduced BH4 synthesis. BH4-deficient mutants also have a fragile cuticle and are generally hypersensitive to exogenous agents, a phenotype that is not due to AAAH deficiency, but rather to dysfunction in the lipid metabolic enzyme AGMO, which is expressed in the epidermis. Loss of AGMO or BH4 synthesis also specifically alters the sensitivity of C. elegans to bacterial pathogens, revealing a cuticular function for AGMO-dependent lipid metabolism in host–pathogen interactions. PMID:25808955

  8. High prevalence of co-factor independent anticardiolipin antibodies in malaria exposed individuals

    PubMed Central

    Consigny, P H; Cauquelin, B; Agnamey, P; Comby, E; Brasseur, P; Ballet, J J; Roussilhon, C

    2002-01-01

    Anticardiolipin antibodies (aCL) were investigated in 137 individuals chronically exposed to malaria and living in Africa and Asia. They belonged to several groups according to parasite (Plasmodium falciparum or vivax) and clinical manifestations (i.e. asymptomatic parasite carriers, acute uncomplicated attack or severe malaria episodes). aCL were measured in an enzyme immunoassay (ELISA) performed in the presence of either goat serum (aCLs) or gelatin (aCLg). In a group of 53 patients with autoimmune manifestations (i.e. antiphospholipid syndrome and/or lupus), detection of IgG but not IgM aCL was markedly reduced in the presence of gelatin. In malaria donors, high prevalence of serum co-factor-independent IgG and IgM were detected, and the presence of goat serum in the assay consistently decreased their detection. aCLg levels were found to be related to the clinical/endemic status of donors. IgG aCLg were found to be higher in asymptomatic P. falciparum carriers than in patients with uncomplicated acute or cerebral malaria. IgM aCLg were higher in the cerebral malaria group than in groups with uncomplicated acute malaria patients or asymptomatic individuals. Data suggest that using a serum co-factor independent, sensitive ELISA, aCL are commonly detected during malarial infections and related to malarial infection status. PMID:11882047

  9. Glucosamine and Glucosamine-6-phosphate Derivatives: Catalytic Cofactor Analogs for the glmS Ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Posakony, Jeffrey J.; Ferré-D'Amaré, Adrian R.

    2013-01-01

    Two analogues of glucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcN6P, 1) and five of glucosamine (GlcN, 2) were prepared for evaluation as catalytic cofactor of the glmS ribozyme, a bacterial gene-regulatory RNA that controls cell wall biosynthesis. Glucosamine and allosamine with 3-azido substitutions were prepared by SN2 reactions of the respective 1,2,4,6-protected sugars; final acidic hydrolysis afforded the fully deprotected compounds as their TFA salts. A 6-phospho-2-aminoglucolactam (31) was prepared from glucosamine in a 13-step synthesis, which included a late-stage POCl3-phosphorylation. A simple and widely applicable 2-step procedure with the triethylsilyl (TES) protecting group was developed to selectively expose the 6-OH group in N-protected glucosamine analogs, which provided another route to chemical phosphorylation. Mitsunobu chemistry afforded 6-cyano (35) and 6-azido (36) analogues of GlcN-(Cbz) and the selectivity for the 6-position was confirmed by NMR (COSY, HMBC, HMQC) experiments. Compound 36 was converted to the fully deprotected 6-azido-GlcN (37) and 2,6-diaminoglucose (38) analogs. A 2-hydroxylamino glucose (42) analogue was prepared via an oxaziridine (41). Enzymatic phosphorylation of 42 and chemical phosphorylation of its 6-OH precursor (43) were possible, but 42 and the 6-phospho product (44) were unstable under neutral or basic conditions. Chemical phosphorylation of the previously described 2-guanidinyl-glucose (46) afforded its 6-phospho analogue (49) after final deprotection. PMID:23578404

  10. Heparin Cofactor II in Atherosclerotic Lesions from the Pathobiological Determinants of Atherosclerosis in Youth (PDAY) Study

    PubMed Central

    Rau, Jill C.; Deans, Carolyn; Hoffman, Maureane R.; Thomas, David B.; Malcom, Gray T.; Zieske, Arthur W.; Strong, Jack P.; Koch, Gary G.; Church, Frank C.

    2009-01-01

    Heparin cofactor II (HCII) is a serine protease inhibitor (serpin) that has been shown to be a predictor of decreased atherosclerosis in the elderly and protective against atherosclerosis in mice. HCII inhibits thrombin in vitro and HCII-thrombin complexes have been detected in human plasma. Moreover, the mechanism of protection against atherosclerosis in mice was determined to be the inhibition of thrombin. Despite this evidence, the presence of HCII in human atherosclerotic tissue has not been reported. In this study, using samples of coronary arteries obtained from the Pathobiological Determinants of Atherosclerosis in Youth (PDAY) study, we explore the local relationship between HCII and (pro)thrombin in atherosclerosis. We found that HCII and (pro)thrombin are co-localized in the lipid-rich necrotic core of atheromas. A significant positive correlation between each protein and the severity of the atherosclerotic lesion was present. These results suggest that HCII is in a position to inhibit thrombin in atherosclerotic lesions where thrombin can exert a proatherogenic inflammatory response. However, these results should be tempered by the additional findings from this, and other studies, that indicate the presence of other plasma proteins (antithrombin, albumin, and α1-protease inhibitor) in the same localized region of the atheroma. PMID:19747479

  11. Climate change as an unexpected co-factor promoting coral eating seastar (Acanthaster planci) outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Uthicke, S.; Logan, M.; Liddy, M.; Francis, D.; Hardy, N.; Lamare, M.

    2015-01-01

    Coral reefs face a crisis due to local and global anthropogenic stressors. A large proportion of the ~50% coral loss on the Great Barrier Reef has been attributed to outbreaks of the crown-of-thorns-seastar (COTS). A widely assumed cause of primary COTS outbreaks is increased larval survivorship due to higher food availability, linked with anthropogenic runoff . Our experiment using a range of algal food concentrations at three temperatures representing present day average and predicted future increases, demonstrated a strong influence of food concentration on development is modulated by temperature. A 2°C increase in temperature led to a 4.2–4.9 times (at Day 10) or 1.2–1.8 times (Day 17) increase in late development larvae. A model indicated that food was the main driver, but that temperature was an important modulator of development. For instance, at 5000 cells ml−1 food, a 2°C increase may shorten developmental time by 30% and may increase the probability of survival by 240%. The main contribution of temperature is to ‘push' well-fed larvae faster to settlement. We conclude that warmer sea temperature is an important co-factor promoting COTS outbreaks. PMID:25672480

  12. Dual utilization of NADPH and NADH cofactors enhances xylitol production in engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Jo, Jung-Hyun; Oh, Sun-Young; Lee, Hyeun-Soo; Park, Yong-Cheol; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2015-12-01

    Xylitol, a natural sweetener, can be produced by hydrogenation of xylose in hemicelluloses. In microbial processes, utilization of only NADPH cofactor limited commercialization of xylitol biosynthesis. To overcome this drawback, Saccharomyces cerevisiae D452-2 was engineered to express two types of xylose reductase (XR) with either NADPH-dependence or NADH-preference. Engineered S. cerevisiae DWM expressing both the XRs exhibited higher xylitol productivity than the yeast strain expressing NADPH-dependent XR only (DWW) in both batch and glucose-limited fed-batch cultures. Furthermore, the coexpression of S. cerevisiae ZWF1 and ACS1 genes in the DWM strain increased intracellular concentrations of NADPH and NADH and improved maximum xylitol productivity by 17%, relative to that for the DWM strain. Finally, the optimized fed-batch fermentation of S. cerevisiae DWM-ZWF1-ACS1 resulted in 196.2 g/L xylitol concentration, 4.27 g/L h productivity and almost the theoretical yield. Expression of the two types of XR utilizing both NADPH and NADH is a promising strategy to meet the industrial demands for microbial xylitol production.

  13. Stress as an etiologic co-factor in recurrent aphthous ulcers and oral lichen planus.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, Priyadarshini; Aswath, Nalini

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the role of stress in the occurrence of recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) and oral lichen planus (OLP), as well as to analyze the efficacy of saliva, urine, and serum cortisol levels as markers of stress. This study included 30 subjects with RAS (Group A), 30 with OLP (Group B), and 30 controls (Group C). The serum, salivary, and urinary cortisol levels were measured using electro-chemiluminescence immunoassay. The results were analyzed using the independent t-test, and a statistically significant difference (P = 0.000) was observed between the study and control groups. Further analysis was done using ANOVA and post-hoc tests. The results of this study suggest that RAS and OLP patients had higher cortisol levels than controls, indicating that stress acts as a co-factor in the pathogenesis of RAS and OLP. Although urinary cortisol level was found to be the best indicator of stress, saliva can also be used as a reliable marker. (J Oral Sci 58, 237-240, 2016). PMID:27349545

  14. Mitochondrial cofactors in experimental Huntington's disease: behavioral, biochemical and histological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Arpit; Sandhir, Rajat

    2014-03-15

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the beneficial effect of mitochondrial cofactors; alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) and acetyl-l-carnitine (ALCAR) in 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP) induced experimental model of Huntington's disease (HD). HD was developed by administering sub-chronic doses of 3-NP, intraperitoneally, twice daily for 17 days. The animals were assessed for their behavioral performance in terms of motor (spontaneous locomotor activity, narrow beam walk test, footprint analysis and rotarod test) and cognitive (elevated plus maze and T-maze tests) functions. 3-NP treated animals showed impairment in motor coordination such as decreased stride length, increased distance between inner toes, and increased gait angle. Increased transfer latency on elevated plus maze and T-maze tasks revealed cognition deficits in 3-NP treated animals. Increased lipid peroxidation and concomitant decrease in thiol levels were also observed. 3-NP administration also induced histopathological changes in terms of enhanced striatal lesion volume, presence of pyknotic nuclei and astrogliosis. However, combined supplementation with ALA+ALCAR to 3-NP administered animals for 21 days was able to efficiently improve behavioral deficits, attenuate oxidative stress and histological changes, suggesting a putative role of these two supplements if given together in ameliorating 3-NP induced impairments and thus could be engaged in managing HD. PMID:24393741

  15. Overexpression of Arabidopsis Molybdenum Cofactor Sulfurase Gene Confers Drought Tolerance in Maize (Zea mays L.)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiachang; Xiao, Yitao; Yue, Yuesen; Duan, Liusheng; Zhang, Mingcai; Li, Zhaohu

    2013-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a key component of the signaling system that integrates plant adaptive responses to abiotic stress. Overexpression of Arabidopsis molybdenum cofactor sulfurase gene (LOS5) in maize markedly enhanced the expression of ZmAO and aldehyde oxidase (AO) activity, leading to ABA accumulation and increased drought tolerance. Transgenic maize (Zea mays L.) exhibited the expected reductions in stomatal aperture, which led to decreased water loss and maintenance of higher relative water content (RWC) and leaf water potential. Also, transgenic maize subjected to drought treatment exhibited lower leaf wilting, electrolyte leakage, malondialdehyde (MDA) and H2O2 content, and higher activities of antioxidative enzymes and proline content compared to wild-type (WT) maize. Moreover, overexpression of LOS5 enhanced the expression of stress-regulated genes such as Rad 17, NCED1, CAT1, and ZmP5CS1 under drought stress conditions, and increased root system development and biomass yield after re-watering. The increased drought tolerance in transgenic plants was associated with ABA accumulation via activated AO and expression of stress-related gene via ABA induction, which sequentially induced a set of favorable stress-related physiological and biochemical responses. PMID:23326325

  16. Coupled reactions on bioparticles: Stereoselective reduction with cofactor regeneration on PhaC inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Spieler, Valerie; Valldorf, Bernhard; Maaß, Franziska; Kleinschek, Alexander; Hüttenhain, Stefan H; Kolmar, Harald

    2016-07-01

    Chiral alcohols are important building blocks for specialty chemicals and pharmaceuticals. The production of chiral alcohols from ketones can be carried out stereo selectively with alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs). To establish a process for cost-effective enzyme immobilization on solid phase for application in ketone reduction, we used an established enzyme pair consisting of ADH from Rhodococcus erythropolis and formate dehydrogenase (FDH) from Candida boidinii for NADH cofactor regeneration and co-immobilized them on modified poly-p-hydroxybutyrate synthase (PhaC)-inclusion bodies that were recombinantly produced in Escherichia coli cells. After separate production of genetically engineered and recombinantly produced enzymes and particles, cell lysates were combined and enzymes endowed with a Kcoil were captured on the surface of the Ecoil presenting particles due to coiled-coil interaction. Enzyme-loaded particles could be easily purified by centrifugation. Total conversion of 4'-chloroacetophenone to (S)-4-chloro-α-methylbenzyl alcohol could be accomplished using enzyme-loaded particles, catalytic amounts of NAD(+) and formate as substrates for FDH. Chiral GC-MS analysis revealed that immobilized ADH retained enantioselectivity with 99 % enantiomeric excess. In conclusion, this strategy may become a cost-effective alternative to coupled reactions using purified enzymes.

  17. Engineering of cofactor regeneration enhances (2S,3S)-2,3-butanediol production from diacetyl

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Li, Lixiang; Ma, Cuiqing; Gao, Chao; Tao, Fei; Xu, Ping

    2013-01-01

    (2S,3S)-2,3-Butanediol ((2S,3S)-2,3-BD) is a potentially valuable liquid fuel and an excellent building block in asymmetric synthesis. In this study, cofactor engineering was applied to improve the efficiency of (2S,3S)-2,3-BD production and simplify the product purification. Two NADH regeneration enzymes, glucose dehydrogenase and formate dehydrogenase (FDH), were introduced into Escherichia coli with 2,3-BD dehydrogenase, respectively. Introduction of FDH resulted in higher (2S,3S)-2,3-BD concentration, productivity and yield from diacetyl, and large increase in the intracellular NADH concentration. In fed-batch bioconversion, the final titer, productivity and yield of (2S,3S)-2,3-BD on diacetyl reached 31.7 g/L, 2.3 g/(L·h) and 89.8%, the highest level of (2S,3S)-2,3-BD production thus far. Moreover, cosubstrate formate was almost totally converted to carbon dioxide and no organic acids were produced. The biocatalytic process presented should be a promising route for biotechnological production of NADH-dependent microbial metabolites. PMID:24025762

  18. Acetylation mediated by the p300/CBP-associated factor determines cellular energy metabolic pathways in cancer.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Ramkumar; Garva, Richa; Ashour, Hassan; Leung, Travis; Stratford, Ian; Krstic-Demonacos, Marija; Demonacos, Constantinos

    2013-06-01

    Normal cells produce energy either through OXPHOS in the presence of oxygen or glycolysis in its absence. Cancer cells produce energy preferably through glycolysis even in the presence of oxygen, thereby, acquiring survival and proliferative advantages. Oncogenes and tumour suppressors control these metabolic pathways by regulating the expression of their target genes involved in these processes. During hypoxia, HIF-1 favours high glycolytic flux by upregulating glycolytic enzymes. Conversely, p53 inhibits glycolysis and increases OXPHOS expression through TIGAR and SCO2 gene expression, respectively. We hypothesise that the p300/CBP-associated factor (PCAF) as a common co-factor shared between p53 and HIF-1 plays an important role in the regulation of energy production by modulating SCO2 and TIGAR gene expression mediated by these two transcription factors. The possible involvement of HIF-1 in the regulation of SCO2 and TIGAR gene expression was investigated in cells with different p53 status in normoxia- and hypoxia-mimicking conditions. Putative hypoxia response elements (HREs) were identified in the regulatory region of SCO2 and TIGAR gene promoters. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments suggested that HIF-1 was recruited to the putative HREs present in the SCO2 and TIGAR promoters in a cell type-dependent manner. Transcriptional assays endorsed the notion that PCAF may be involved in the determination of the SCO2 and TIGAR cellular levels, thereby, regulating cellular energy metabolism, a view supported by assays measuring lactic acid production and oxygen consumption in cells ectopically expressing PCAF. The present study identified HIF-1 as a potential regulator of SCO2 and TIGAR gene expression. Furthermore, evidence to suggest that PCAF is involved in the regulation of cellular energy production pathways in hypoxia-mimicking conditions is presented. This effect of PCAF is exerted by orchestrating differential recruitment of HIF-1α and p53 to the

  19. Improving the NADH-cofactor specificity of the highly active AdhZ3 and AdhZ2 from Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Pick, André; Ott, Wolfgang; Howe, Thomas; Schmid, Jochen; Sieber, Volker

    2014-11-10

    Biocatalysis is a promising tool for the sustainable production of chemicals. When cofactor depending enzymatic reactions are involved the applicability of the right cofactor is a central issue. One important example in this regard is the production of alcohols by nicotinamide cofactor (NAD(P)(+)) depending alcohol dehydrogenases. AdhZ3 from Escherichia coli, which is important for the production of alcohols from biomass, has a preference for NADPH as cofactor. We used a structure guided site-specific random approach, to change the cofactor preference towards NADH and to deduce more general rules for redesigning the cofactor specificity. Transfer of a triplet motif from NADH preferring horse liver ADH to AdhZ3 showed an insufficient switch in the preference towards NADH. A combinatorial site saturation mutagenesis altering three residues at once was applied. Library screening with two different cofactor concentrations (0.1 and 0.3mM) resulted in nine improved variants with AdhZ3-LND having the highest vmax and AdhZ3-CND having the lowest K(m). Asparagine was the most frequent amino acid found in eight of nine triplet motifs. To verify the triplet-motif, two variants of E. coli AdhZ2 DIN and LND were designed and confirmed for improved activity with NADH.

  20. Pelvic Retroperitoneal Cellular Leiomyoma: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Tantitamit, Tanitra; Hamontri, Suttha; Rangsiratanakul, Likit; Suksamarnwong, Maysita

    2015-10-01

    Leiomyomas are common benign gynecological tumors and usually arise in the uterus. The retroperitoneal cellular leiomyoma, one of the unusual manifestations, is a rare tumor. Diagnosis and treatment are challenges. We report a case of 65-year-old women presented with an asymptomatic mass beneath the right posterior vaginal mucosa. CT imaging revealed heterogeneous mass 6 cm in the pelvic cavity abutted lower segment of uterus, cervix, and vagina. The provisional diagnosis was subserosal cervical leiomyoma. She underwent exploratory laparotomy. Intra-operative, a normal size uterus was found separately from retroperitoneal pelvic mass at the level of internal os. Histological report confirmed cellular leiomyoma later Total hysterectomy, bilateral salpingoophorectomy and completely excision of tumor were achieved with good outcome. Our patient represents the rare case of retroperitoneal cellular leiomyoma, which is hardly identified from internal examination and preoperative imaging. Surgical removal is essential for pathological diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26817226

  1. Parametric study of double cellular detonation structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khasainov, B.; Virot, F.; Presles, H.-N.; Desbordes, D.

    2013-05-01

    A parametric numerical study is performed of a detonation cellular structure in a model gaseous explosive mixture whose decomposition occurs in two successive exothermic reaction steps with markedly different characteristic times. Kinetic and energetic parameters of both reactions are varied in a wide range in the case of one-dimensional steady and two-dimensional (2D) quasi-steady self-supported detonations. The range of governing parameters of both exothermic steps is defined where a "marked" double cellular structure exists. It is shown that the two-level cellular structure is completely governed by the kinetic parameters and the local overdrive ratio of the detonation front propagating inside large cells. Furthermore, since it is quite cumbersome to use detailed chemical kinetics in unsteady 2D case, the proposed work should help to identify the mixtures and the domain of their equivalence ratio where double detonation structure could be observed.

  2. Modelling mammalian cellular quiescence

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Guang

    2014-01-01

    Cellular quiescence is a reversible non-proliferating state. The reactivation of ‘sleep-like’ quiescent cells (e.g. fibroblasts, lymphocytes and stem cells) into proliferation is crucial for tissue repair and regeneration and a key to the growth, development and health of higher multicellular organisms, such as mammals. Quiescence has been a primarily phenotypic description (i.e. non-permanent cell cycle arrest) and poorly studied. However, contrary to the earlier thinking that quiescence is simply a passive and dormant state lacking proliferating activities, recent studies have revealed that cellular quiescence is actively maintained in the cell and that it corresponds to a collection of heterogeneous states. Recent modelling and experimental work have suggested that an Rb-E2F bistable switch plays a pivotal role in controlling the quiescence–proliferation balance and the heterogeneous quiescent states. Other quiescence regulatory activities may crosstalk with and impinge upon the Rb-E2F bistable switch, forming a gene network that controls the cells’ quiescent states and their dynamic transitions to proliferation in response to noisy environmental signals. Elucidating the dynamic control mechanisms underlying quiescence may lead to novel therapeutic strategies that re-establish normal quiescent states, in a variety of hyper- and hypo-proliferative diseases, including cancer and ageing. PMID:24904737

  3. Structural basis of cofactor-mediated stabilization and substrate recognition of the α-tubulin acetyltransferase αTAT1.

    PubMed

    Yuzawa, Satoru; Kamakura, Sachiko; Hayase, Junya; Sumimoto, Hideki

    2015-04-01

    The functions of microtubules are controlled in part by tubulin post-translational modification including acetylation of Lys⁴⁰ in α-tubulin. αTAT1 (α-tubulin acetyltransferase 1), an enzyme evolutionarily conserved among eukaryotes, has recently been identified as the major α-tubulin Lys⁴⁰ acetyltransferase, in which AcCoA (acetyl-CoA) serves as an acetyl group donor. The regulation and substrate recognition of this enzyme, however, have not been fully understood. In the present study, we show that AcCoA and CoA each form a stable complex with human αTAT1 to maintain the protein integrity both in vivo and in vitro. The invariant residues Arg¹³² and Ser¹⁶⁰ in αTAT1 participate in the stable interaction not only with AcCoA but also with CoA, which is supported by analysis of the present crystal structures of the αTAT1 catalytic domain in complex with CoA. Alanine substitution for Arg¹³² or Ser¹⁶⁰ leads to a drastic misfolding of the isolated αTAT1 catalytic domain in the absence of CoA and AcCoA but not in the presence of excess amounts of either cofactor. A mutant αTAT1 carrying the R132A or S160A substitution is degraded much faster than the wild-type protein when expressed in mammalian Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. Furthermore, alanine-scanning experiments using Lys⁴⁰-containing peptides reveal that α-tubulin Ser³⁸ is crucial for substrate recognition of αTAT1, whereas Asp³⁹, Ile⁴², the glycine stretch (amino acid residues 43-45) and Asp⁴⁶ are also involved. The requirement for substrate selection is totally different from that in various histone acetyltransferases, which appears to be consistent with the inability of αTAT1 to acetylate histones.

  4. mulet (mlt) encodes a tubulin-binding cofactor E-like homolog required for spermatid individualization in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Fabrizio, James J.; Aqeel, Nour; Cote, Joy; Estevez, Joshian; Jongoy, Mary; Mangal, Vanie; Tema, Winnie; Rivera, Ashley; Wnukowski, Jerrica; Bencosme, Yolisept

    2012-01-01

    Spermatogenesis in all animal species occurs within a syncytium. Only at the very end of spermatogenesis are individual sperm cells resolved from this syncytium in a process known as individualization. Individualization in Drosophila begins as a membrane-cytoskeletal complex known as the individualization complex (IC) assembles around the sperm heads and proceeds down the flagella, removing cytoplasm from between the sperm tails and shrink-wrapping each spermatid into its own plasma membrane as it travels. The mulet (mlt) mutation results in severely disrupted ICs, indicating that the mlt gene product is required for individualization. Inverse PCR followed by cycle sequencing maps all known P-insertion alleles of mlt to two overlapping genes, CG12214 (the Drosophila tubulin-binding cofactor E-like homolog) and KCNQ (a large voltage-gated potassium channel). However, since the alleles of mlt map to the 5′-UTR of CG12214 and since CG12214 is contained within an intron of KCNQ, it was hypothesized that mlt and CG12214 are allelic. Indeed, CG12214 mutant testes exhibited severely disrupted ICs and were indistinguishable from mlt mutant testes, thus further suggesting allelism. To test this hypothesis, alleles of mlt were crossed to CG12214 in order to generate trans-heterozygous males. Testes from all trans-heterozygous combinations revealed severely disrupted ICs and were also indistinguishable from mlt mutant testes, indicating that mlt and CG12214 fail to complement one another and are thus allelic. In addition, complementation testing against null alleles of KCNQ verified that the observed individualization defect is not caused by a disruption of KCNQ. Finally, since a population of spermatid-associated microtubules known to disappear prior to movement of the IC abnormally persists during individualization in CG12214 mutant testes, this work implicates TBCE-like in the removal of these microtubules prior to IC movement. Taken together, these results identify mlt

  5. Mulet (mlt) encodes a tubulin-binding cofactor E-like homolog required for spermatid individualization in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Fabrizio, James J; Aqeel, Nour; Cote, Joy; Estevez, Joshian; Jongoy, Mary; Mangal, Vanie; Tema, Winnie; Rivera, Ashley; Wnukowski, Jerrica; Bencosme, Yolisept

    2012-01-01

    Spermatogenesis in all animal species occurs within a syncytium. Only at the very end of spermatogenesis are individual sperm cells resolved from this syncytium in a process known as individualization. Individualization in Drosophila begins as a membrane-cytoskeletal complex known as the individualization complex (IC) assembles around the sperm heads and proceeds down the flagella, removing cytoplasm from between the sperm tails and shrink-wrapping each spermatid into its own plasma membrane as it travels. The mulet (mlt) mutation results in severely disrupted ICs, indicating that the mlt gene product is required for individualization. Inverse PCR followed by cycle sequencing maps all known P-insertion alleles of mlt to two overlapping genes, CG12214 (the Drosophila tubulin-binding cofactor E-like homolog) and KCNQ (a large voltage-gated potassium channel). However, since the alleles of mlt map to the 5'-UTR of CG12214 and since CG12214 is contained within an intron of KCNQ, it was hypothesized that mlt and CG12214 are allelic. Indeed, CG12214 mutant testes exhibited severely disrupted ICs and were indistinguishable from mlt mutant testes, thus further suggesting allelism. To test this hypothesis, alleles of mlt were crossed to CG12214 in order to generate trans-heterozygous males. Testes from all trans-heterozygous combinations revealed severely disrupted ICs and were also indistinguishable from mlt mutant testes, indicating that mlt and CG12214 fail to complement one another and are thus allelic. In addition, complementation testing against null alleles of KCNQ verified that the observed individualization defect is not caused by a disruption of KCNQ. Finally, since a population of spermatid-associated microtubules known to disappear prior to movement of the IC abnormally persists during individualization in CG12214 mutant testes, this work implicates TBCE-like in the removal of these microtubules prior to IC movement. Taken together, these results identify mlt as

  6. Secretory production of an FAD cofactor-containing cytosolic enzyme (sorbitol-xylitol oxidase from Streptomyces coelicolor) using the twin-arginine translocation (Tat) pathway of Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Scheele, Sandra; Oertel, Dan; Bongaerts, Johannes; Evers, Stefan; Hellmuth, Hendrik; Maurer, Karl-Heinz; Bott, Michael; Freudl, Roland

    2013-03-01

    Carbohydrate oxidases are biotechnologically interesting enzymes that require a tightly or covalently bound cofactor for activity. Using the industrial workhorse Corynebacterium glutamicum as the expression host, successful secretion of a normally cytosolic FAD cofactor-containing sorbitol-xylitol oxidase from Streptomyces coelicolor was achieved by using the twin-arginine translocation (Tat) protein export machinery for protein translocation across the cytoplasmic membrane. Our results demonstrate for the first time that, also for cofactor-containing proteins, a secretory production strategy is a feasible and promising alternative to conventional intracellular expression strategies.

  7. Secretory production of an FAD cofactor-containing cytosolic enzyme (sorbitol-xylitol oxidase from Streptomyces coelicolor) using the twin-arginine translocation (Tat) pathway of Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Scheele, Sandra; Oertel, Dan; Bongaerts, Johannes; Evers, Stefan; Hellmuth, Hendrik; Maurer, Karl-Heinz; Bott, Michael; Freudl, Roland

    2013-03-01

    Carbohydrate oxidases are biotechnologically interesting enzymes that require a tightly or covalently bound cofactor for activity. Using the industrial workhorse Corynebacterium glutamicum as the expression host, successful secretion of a normally cytosolic FAD cofactor-containing sorbitol-xylitol oxidase from Streptomyces coelicolor was achieved by using the twin-arginine translocation (Tat) protein export machinery for protein translocation across the cytoplasmic membrane. Our results demonstrate for the first time that, also for cofactor-containing proteins, a secretory production strategy is a feasible and promising alternative to conventional intracellular expression strategies. PMID:23163932

  8. Isolated iron-molybdenum cofactor of nitrogenase exists in multiple forms in its oxidized and semi-reduced states.

    PubMed

    Newton, W E; Gheller, S F; Feldman, B J; Dunham, W R; Schultz, F A

    1989-02-01

    Electrochemical and EPR spectroscopic experiments demonstrate that the isolated iron-molybdenum cofactor from the molybdenum-iron protein of nitrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii exists in multiple forms in both its oxidized and semi-reduced states. The particular forms found in either oxidation state appear to be a function of the acid/base status of the solvent, N-methylformamide. In "alkaline" N-methylformamide, a single, detectable form of iron-molybdenum cofactor is observed for both oxidized and semi-reduced states. The semi-reduced form, termed R(s-r), is the one previously recognized with an S = 3/2 EPR spectrum with apparent g values of 4.6, 3.4, 2.0. Its oxidized counterpart, termed B(ox), is characterized electrochemically by a differential pulse voltammetric reduction peak at -0.37 V versus the normal hydrogen electrode. In "acidic" solvent, two distinct, previously unrecognized redox pairs of iron-molybdenum cofactor forms exist. The two semi-reduced forms, N(s-r) and W(s-r), are characterized by EPR spectra with g = 4.5, 3.6, 2.0 and g = 4.9, 3.1, 1.9, respectively. Their oxidized counterparts, A(ox) and C(ox), have differential pulse voltammetric reduction peaks at -0.32 and -0.43 V versus the normal hydrogen electrode, respectively. Manipulations of either the isolation protocol or the sample conditions affects both the type and distribution of forms present. Each form likely corresponds to a biologically significant state of the cofactor cluster within the protein.

  9. Cellular Contraction and Polarization Drive Collective Cellular Motion.

    PubMed

    Notbohm, Jacob; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Utuje, Kazage J C; Gweon, Bomi; Jang, Hwanseok; Park, Yongdoo; Shin, Jennifer; Butler, James P; Fredberg, Jeffrey J; Marchetti, M Cristina

    2016-06-21

    Coordinated motions of close-packed multicellular systems typically generate cooperative packs, swirls, and clusters. These cooperative motions are driven by active cellular forces, but the physical nature of these forces and how they generate collective cellular motion remain poorly understood. Here, we study forces and motions in a confined epithelial monolayer and make two experimental observations: 1) the direction of local cellular motion deviates systematically from the direction of the local traction exerted by each cell upon its substrate; and 2) oscillating waves of cellular motion arise spontaneously. Based on these observations, we propose a theory that connects forces and motions using two internal state variables, one of which generates an effective cellular polarization, and the other, through contractile forces, an effective cellular inertia. In agreement with theoretical predictions, drugs that inhibit contractility reduce both the cellular effective elastic modulus and the frequency of oscillations. Together, theory and experiment provide evidence suggesting that collective cellular motion is driven by at least two internal variables that serve to sustain waves and to polarize local cellular traction in a direction that deviates systematically from local cellular velocity. PMID:27332131

  10. Studying GPCR/cAMP pharmacology from the perspective of cellular structure

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Peter T.; Schobesberger, Sophie; Gorelik, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Signal transduction via G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) relies upon the production of cAMP and other signaling cascades. A given receptor and agonist pair, produce multiple effects upon cellular physiology which can be opposite in different cell types. The production of variable cellular effects via the signaling of the same GPCR in different cell types is a result of signal organization in space and time (compartmentation). This organization is usually based upon the physical and chemical properties of the membranes in which the GPCRs reside and the repertoire of downstream effectors and co-factors that are available at that location. In this review we explore mechanisms of GPCR signal compartmentation and broadly review the state-of-the-art methodologies which can be utilized to study them. We provide a clear rationale for a “localized” approach to the study of the pharmacology and physiology of GPCRs and particularly the secondary messenger cAMP. PMID:26236239