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Sample records for identifies chromosomal regions

  1. Multi-generational genome wide association studies identify chromosomal regions associated with ascites phenotype.

    PubMed

    Tarrant, K J; Dey, S; Kinney, R; Anthony, N B; Rhoads, D D

    2017-02-21

    Ascites is a multi-faceted disease commonly observed in fast growing broilers, which is initiated when the body is insufficiently oxygenated. A series of events follow, including an increase in pulmonary artery pressure, right ventricle hypertrophy, and accumulation of fluid in the abdominal cavity and pericardium. Advances in management practices along with improved selection programs have decreased ascites incidence in modern broilers. However, ascites syndrome remains an economically important disease throughout the world, causing estimated losses of $100 million per year. In this study, a 60 K Illumina SNP BeadChip was used to perform a series of genome wide association studies (GWAS) on the 16th and 18th generation of our relaxed (REL) line descended from a commercial elite broiler line beginning in 1995. Regions significantly associated with ascites incidence were identified on chromosome 2 around 70 megabase pairs (Mbp) and on chromosome Z around 60 Mbp. Five candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) were evaluated as indicators for these 2 regions in order to identify association with ascites and right ventricle to total ventricle weight (RVTV) ratios. Chromosome 2 SNP showed an association with RVTV ratios in males phenotyped as ascites resistant and ascites susceptible (P = 0.02 and P = 0.03, respectively). The chromosome Z region also indicates an association with resistant female RVTV values (P = 0.02). Regions of significance identified on chromosomes 2 and Z described in this study will be used as proposed candidate regions for further investigation into the genetics of ascites. This information will lead to a better understanding of the underlying genetics and gene networks contributing to ascites, and thus advances in ascites reduction through commercial breeding schemes.

  2. Genome-wide association analysis to identify chromosomal regions determining components of earliness in wheat.

    PubMed

    Le Gouis, J; Bordes, J; Ravel, C; Heumez, E; Faure, S; Praud, S; Galic, N; Remoué, C; Balfourier, F; Allard, V; Rousset, M

    2012-02-01

    The modification of flowering date is considered an important way to escape the current or future climatic constraints that affect wheat crops. A better understanding of its genetic bases would enable a more efficient and rapid modification through breeding. The objective of this study was to identify chromosomal regions associated with earliness in wheat. A 227-wheat core collection chosen to be highly contrasted for earliness was characterized for heading date. Experiments were conducted in controlled conditions and in the field for 3 years to break down earliness in the component traits: photoperiod sensitivity, vernalization requirement and narrow-sense earliness. Whole-genome association mapping was carried out using 760 molecular markers and taking into account the five ancestral group structure. We identified 62 markers individually associated to earliness components corresponding to 33 chromosomal regions. In addition, we identified 15 other significant markers and seven more regions by testing marker pair interactions. Co-localizations were observed with the Ppd-1, Vrn-1 and Rht-1 candidate genes. Using an independent set of lines to validate the model built for heading date, we were able to explain 34% of the variation using the structure and the significant markers. Results were compared with already published data using bi-parental populations giving an insight into the genetic architecture of flowering time in wheat.

  3. Genome-wide association study identified a narrow chromosome 1 region associated with chicken growth traits.

    PubMed

    Xie, Liang; Luo, Chenglong; Zhang, Chengguang; Zhang, Rong; Tang, Jun; Nie, Qinghua; Ma, Li; Hu, Xiaoxiang; Li, Ning; Da, Yang; Zhang, Xiquan

    2012-01-01

    Chicken growth traits are important economic traits in broilers. A large number of studies are available on finding genetic factors affecting chicken growth. However, most of these studies identified chromosome regions containing putative quantitative trait loci and finding causal mutations is still a challenge. In this genome-wide association study (GWAS), we identified a narrow 1.5 Mb region (173.5-175 Mb) of chicken (Gallus gallus) chromosome (GGA) 1 to be strongly associated with chicken growth using 47,678 SNPs and 489 F2 chickens. The growth traits included aggregate body weight (BW) at 0-90 d of age measured weekly, biweekly average daily gains (ADG) derived from weekly body weight, and breast muscle weight (BMW), leg muscle weight (LMW) and wing weight (WW) at 90 d of age. Five SNPs in the 1.5 Mb KPNA3-FOXO1A region at GGA1 had the highest significant effects for all growth traits in this study, including a SNP at 8.9 Kb upstream of FOXO1A for BW at 22-48 d and 70 d, a SNP at 1.9 Kb downstream of FOXO1A for WW, a SNP at 20.9 Kb downstream of ENSGALG00000022732 for ADG at 29-42 d, a SNP in INTS6 for BW at 90 d, and a SNP in KPNA3 for BMW and LMW. The 1.5 Mb KPNA3-FOXO1A region contained two microRNA genes that could bind to messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) of IGF1, FOXO1A and KPNA3. It was further indicated that the 1.5 Mb GGA1 region had the strongest effects on chicken growth during 22-42 d.

  4. Haplotype Kernel Association Test as a Powerful Method to Identify Chromosomal Regions Harboring Uncommon Causal Variants

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wan-Yu; Yi, Nengjun; Lou, Xiang-Yang; Zhi, Degui; Zhang, Kui; Gao, Guimin; Tiwari, Hemant K.; Liu, Nianjun

    2014-01-01

    For most complex diseases, the fraction of heritability that can be explained by the variants discovered from genome-wide association studies is minor. Although the so-called ‘rare variants’ (minor allele frequency [MAF] < 1%) have attracted increasing attention, they are unlikely to account for much of the ‘missing heritability’ because very few people may carry these rare variants. The genetic variants that are likely to fill in the ‘missing heritability’ include uncommon causal variants (MAF < 5%), which are generally untyped in association studies using tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) or commercial SNP arrays. Developing powerful statistical methods can help to identify chromosomal regions harboring uncommon causal variants, while bypassing the genome-wide or exome-wide next-generation sequencing. In this work, we propose a haplotype kernel association test (HKAT) that is equivalent to testing the variance component of random effects for distinct haplotypes. With an appropriate weighting scheme given to haplotypes, we can further enhance the ability of HKAT to detect uncommon causal variants. With scenarios simulated according to the population genetics theory, HKAT is shown to be a powerful method for detecting chromosomal regions harboring uncommon causal variants. PMID:23740760

  5. Targeted sequencing in chromosome 17q linkage region identifies familial glioma candidates in the Gliogene Consortium.

    PubMed

    Jalali, Ali; Amirian, E Susan; Bainbridge, Matthew N; Armstrong, Georgina N; Liu, Yanhong; Tsavachidis, Spyros; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Plon, Sharon E; Lau, Ching C; Claus, Elizabeth B; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S; Il'yasova, Dora; Schildkraut, Joellen; Ali-Osman, Francis; Sadetzki, Siegal; Johansen, Christoffer; Houlston, Richard S; Jenkins, Robert B; Lachance, Daniel; Olson, Sara H; Bernstein, Jonine L; Merrell, Ryan T; Wrensch, Margaret R; Davis, Faith G; Lai, Rose; Shete, Sanjay; Aldape, Kenneth; Amos, Christopher I; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Melin, Beatrice S; Bondy, Melissa L

    2015-02-05

    Glioma is a rare, but highly fatal, cancer that accounts for the majority of malignant primary brain tumors. Inherited predisposition to glioma has been consistently observed within non-syndromic families. Our previous studies, which involved non-parametric and parametric linkage analyses, both yielded significant linkage peaks on chromosome 17q. Here, we use data from next generation and Sanger sequencing to identify familial glioma candidate genes and variants on chromosome 17q for further investigation. We applied a filtering schema to narrow the original list of 4830 annotated variants down to 21 very rare (<0.1% frequency), non-synonymous variants. Our findings implicate the MYO19 and KIF18B genes and rare variants in SPAG9 and RUNDC1 as candidates worthy of further investigation. Burden testing and functional studies are planned.

  6. Chromosomal microarray testing identifies a 4p terminal region associated with seizures in Wolf–Hirschhorn syndrome

    PubMed Central

    South, Sarah T; Lortz, Amanda; Hensel, Charles H; Sdano, Mallory R; Vanzo, Rena J; Martin, Megan M; Peiffer, Andreas; Lambert, Christophe G; Calhoun, Amy; Carey, John C; Battaglia, Agatino

    2016-01-01

    Background Wolf–Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) is a contiguous gene deletion syndrome involving variable size deletions of the 4p16.3 region. Seizures are frequently, but not always, associated with WHS. We hypothesised that the size and location of the deleted region may correlate with seizure presentation. Methods Using chromosomal microarray analysis, we finely mapped the breakpoints of copy number variants (CNVs) in 48 individuals with WHS. Seizure phenotype data were collected through parent-reported answers to a comprehensive questionnaire and supplemented with available medical records. Results We observed a significant correlation between the presence of an interstitial 4p deletion and lack of a seizure phenotype (Fisher's exact test p=3.59e-6). In our cohort, there were five individuals with interstitial deletions with a distal breakpoint at least 751 kbp proximal to the 4p terminus. Four of these individuals have never had an observable seizure, and the fifth individual had a single febrile seizure at the age of 1.5 years. All other individuals in our cohort whose deletions encompass the terminal 751 kbp region report having seizures typical of WHS. Additional examples from the literature corroborate these observations and further refine the candidate seizure susceptibility region to a region 197 kbp in size, starting 368 kbp from the terminus of chromosome 4. Conclusions We identify a small terminal region of chromosome 4p that represents a seizure susceptibility region. Deletion of this region in the context of WHS is sufficient for seizure occurrence. PMID:26747863

  7. Copy-number variations in Y-chromosomal azoospermia factor regions identified by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification.

    PubMed

    Saito, Kazuki; Miyado, Mami; Kobori, Yoshitomo; Tanaka, Yoko; Ishikawa, Hiromichi; Yoshida, Atsumi; Katsumi, Momori; Saito, Hidekazu; Kubota, Toshiro; Okada, Hiroshi; Ogata, Tsutomu; Fukami, Maki

    2015-03-01

    Although copy-number variations (CNVs) in Y-chromosomal azoospermia factor (AZF) regions have been associated with the risk of spermatogenic failure (SF), the precise frequency, genomic basis and clinical consequences of these CNVs remain unclear. Here we performed multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) analysis of 56 Japanese SF patients and 65 control individuals. We compared the results of MLPA with those of conventional sequence-tagged site PCR analyses. Eleven simple and complex CNVs, including three hitherto unreported variations, were identified by MLPA. Seven of the 11 CNVs were undetectable by conventional analyses. CNVs were widely distributed in AZF regions and shared by ~60% of the patients and ~40% of the controls. Most breakpoints resided within locus-specific repeats. The majority of CNVs, including the most common gr/gr deletion, were identified in the patient and control groups at similar frequencies, whereas simple duplications were observed exclusively in the patient group. The results imply that AZF-linked CNVs are more frequent and heterogeneous than previously reported. Non-allelic homologous recombination likely underlies these CNVs. Our data confirm the functional neutrality of the gr/gr deletion in the Japanese population. We also found a possible association between AZF-linked simple duplications and SF, which needs to be evaluated in future studies.

  8. Three tumor-suppressor regions on chromosome 11p identified by high-resolution deletion mapping in human non-small-cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bepler, G.; Garcia-Blanco, A. )

    1994-06-07

    Non-small-cell lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death for men and women in the industrialized nations. Identification of regions for genes involved in its pathogenesis has been difficult. Data presented here show three distinct regions identified on chromosome 11p. Two regions on 11p13 distal to the Wilms tumor gene WT1 and on 11p15.5 between the markers HBB and D11S860 are described. The third region on the telomere of 11p15.5 has been previously described and is further delineated in this communication. By high-resolution mapping the size of each of these regions was estimated to be 2-3 megabases. The frequency of somatic loss of genetic information in these regions (57%, 71%, and 45%, respectively) was comparable to that seen in heritable tumors such as Wilms tumor (55%) and retinoblastoma (70%) and suggests their involvement in pathogenesis of non-small-cell lung cancer. Gene dosage analyses revealed duplication of the remaining allele in the majority of cases in the 11p13 and the proximal 11p15.5 region but rarely in the distal 11p15.5 region. In tumors with loss of heterozygosity in all three regions any combination of duplication or simple deletion was observed, suggesting that loss of heterozygosity occurs independently and perhaps at different points in time. These results provide a basis for studies directed at cloning potential tumor-suppressor genes in these regions and for assessing their biological and clinical significance in non-small-cell lung cancer.

  9. The database of chromosome imbalance regions and genes resided in lung cancer from Asian and Caucasian identified by array-comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed

    Lo, Fang-Yi; Chang, Jer-Wei; Chang, I-Shou; Chen, Yann-Jang; Hsu, Han-Shui; Huang, Shiu-Feng Kathy; Tsai, Fang-Yu; Jiang, Shih Sheng; Kanteti, Rajani; Nandi, Suvobroto; Salgia, Ravi; Wang, Yi-Ching

    2012-06-12

    Cancer-related genes show racial differences. Therefore, identification and characterization of DNA copy number alteration regions in different racial groups helps to dissect the mechanism of tumorigenesis. Array-comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) was analyzed for DNA copy number profile in 40 Asian and 20 Caucasian lung cancer patients. Three methods including MetaCore analysis for disease and pathway correlations, concordance analysis between array-CGH database and the expression array database, and literature search for copy number variation genes were performed to select novel lung cancer candidate genes. Four candidate oncogenes were validated for DNA copy number and mRNA and protein expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH), reverse transcriptase-qPCR (RT-qPCR), and immunohistochemistry (IHC) in more patients. We identified 20 chromosomal imbalance regions harboring 459 genes for Caucasian and 17 regions containing 476 genes for Asian lung cancer patients. Seven common chromosomal imbalance regions harboring 117 genes, included gain on 3p13-14, 6p22.1, 9q21.13, 13q14.1, and 17p13.3; and loss on 3p22.2-22.3 and 13q13.3 were found both in Asian and Caucasian patients. Gene validation for four genes including ARHGAP19 (10q24.1) functioning in Rho activity control, FRAT2 (10q24.1) involved in Wnt signaling, PAFAH1B1 (17p13.3) functioning in motility control, and ZNF322A (6p22.1) involved in MAPK signaling was performed using qPCR and RT-qPCR. Mean gene dosage and mRNA expression level of the four candidate genes in tumor tissues were significantly higher than the corresponding normal tissues (P<0.001~P=0.06). In addition, CISH analysis of patients indicated that copy number amplification indeed occurred for ARHGAP19 and ZNF322A genes in lung cancer patients. IHC analysis of paraffin blocks from Asian Caucasian patients demonstrated that the frequency of PAFAH1B1 protein overexpression was 68

  10. A high density SNP genotyping approach within the 19q13 chromosome region identifies an association of a CNOT3 polymorphism with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Peña, Roberto; Aransay, Ana M; Suárez-Álvarez, Beatriz; Bruges-Armas, Jacome; Rodríguez-Ezpeleta, Naiara; Regueiro, María; Pimentel-Santos, Fernando M; Mulero, Juan; Sánchez, Alejandra; Collantes, Eduardo; Queiro, Rubén; Ballina, Javier; Alves, Helena; López-Larrea, Carlos

    2012-05-01

    To identify genomic variants in the 19q13 chromosome region associated with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-B27-positive populations. High-throughput genotyping of 1536 haplotype-tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was performed in 249 patients with AS and 302 healthy controls. Some of the identified associations were validated by genotyping four SNPs in two additional cohorts consisting of 412 cases/301 controls and 144 cases/203 controls. All individuals selected (both cases and controls) were HLA-B27-positive. Two markers in two different genes (CNOT3 and LAIR2) showed significant association (p<10(-3)) with AS. In addition, sliding windows analysis showed association of groups of adjacent SNPs in regions located around CNOT3 (Chr19: 59347459-59356564, p=2.43 × 10(-4) to 6.54 × 10(-4)). The associations were validated by genotyping four SNPs from regions located near LAIR2 and CNOT3 genes (rs1055234, rs8111398, rs2287828 and rs4591276) in two additional cohorts. The CNOT3 polymorphism (rs1055234) remained associated with AS (combined p=9.73 × 10(-6)). One SNP, located downstream of KIR3DL1, was detected which, tested in combination with HLA-Bw4I80, was associated with AS. A novel significant association was detected between SNP rs1055234 and AS susceptibility.

  11. Linkage and association analyses identify a candidate region for apoB level on chromosome 4q32.3 in FCHL families.

    PubMed

    Wijsman, Ellen M; Rothstein, Joseph H; Igo, Robert P; Brunzell, John D; Motulsky, Arno G; Jarvik, Gail P

    2010-06-01

    Familial combined hyperlipidemia (FCHL) is a complex trait leading to cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Elevated levels and size of apolipoprotein B (apoB) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) are associated with FCHL, which is genetically heterogeneous and is likely caused by rare variants. We carried out a linkage-based genome scan of four large FCHL pedigrees for apoB level that is independent of LDL: apoB level that is adjusted for LDL level and size. Follow-up included SNP genotyping in the region with the strongest evidence of linkage. Several regions with the evidence of linkage in individual pedigrees support the rare variant model. Evidence of linkage was strongest on chromosome 4q, with multipoint analysis in one pedigree giving LOD = 3.1 with a parametric model, and a log Bayes Factor = 1.5 from a Bayesian oligogenic approach. Of the 293 SNPs spanning the implicated region on 4q, rs6829588 completely explained the evidence of linkage. This SNP accounted for 39% of the apoB phenotypic variance, with heterozygotes for this SNP having a trait value that was approximately 30% higher than that of the high-frequency homozygote, thus identifying and considerably refining a strong candidate region. These results illustrate the advantage of using large pedigrees in the search for rare variants: reduced genetic heterogeneity within single pedigrees coupled with the large number of individuals segregating otherwise-rare single variants leads to high power to implicate such variants.

  12. Detection Of Amplified Or Deleted Chromosomal Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Stokke, Trond , Pinkel, Daniel , Gray, Joe W.

    1997-05-27

    The present invention relates to in situ hybridization methods for the identification of new chromosomal abnormalities associated with various diseases. In particular, it provides probes which are specific to a region of amplification in chromosome 20.

  13. Detection of amplified or deleted chromosomal regions

    SciTech Connect

    Stokke, Trond; Pinkel, Daniel; Gray, Joe W.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention relates to in situ hybridization methods for the identification of new chromosomal abnormalities associated with various diseases. In particular, it provides probes which are specific to a region of amplification in chromosome 20.

  14. Detection of amplified or deleted chromosomal regions

    DOEpatents

    Stokke, T.; Pinkel, D.; Gray, J.W.

    1995-12-05

    The present invention relates to in situ hybridization methods for the identification of new chromosomal abnormalities associated with various diseases. In particular, it provides probes which are specific to a region of amplification in chromosome 20. 3 figs.

  15. Extension, single-locus conversion and physical mapping of sex chromosome sequences identify the Z microchromosome and pseudo-autosomal region in a dragon lizard, Pogona vitticeps.

    PubMed

    Quinn, A E; Ezaz, T; Sarre, S D; Graves, Ja Marshall; Georges, A

    2010-04-01

    Distribution of temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD) and genotypic sex determination (GSD) across the phylogeny of dragon lizards implies multiple independent origins of at least one, and probably both, modes of sex determination. Female Pogona vitticeps are the heterogametic sex, but ZZ individuals reverse to a female phenotype at high incubation temperatures. We used reiterated genome walking to extend Z and W chromosome-linked amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers, and fluorescence in situ hybridization for physical mapping. One extended fragment hybridized to both W and Z microchromosomes, identifying the Z microchromosome for the first time, and a second hybridized to the centromere of all microchromosomes. W-linked sequences were converted to a single-locus PCR sexing assay. P. vitticeps sex chromosome sequences also shared homology with several other Australian dragons. Further physical mapping and isolation of sex-specific bacterial artificial chromosome clones will provide insight into the evolution of sex determination and sex chromosomes in GSD and TSD dragon lizards.

  16. A high-density SNP linkage scan with 142 combined subtype ADHD sib pairs identifies linkage regions on chromosomes 9 and 16.

    PubMed

    Asherson, P; Zhou, K; Anney, R J L; Franke, B; Buitelaar, J; Ebstein, R; Gill, M; Altink, M; Arnold, R; Boer, F; Brookes, K; Buschgens, C; Butler, L; Cambell, D; Chen, W; Christiansen, H; Feldman, L; Fleischman, K; Fliers, E; Howe-Forbes, R; Goldfarb, A; Heise, A; Gabriëls, I; Johansson, L; Lubetzki, I; Marco, R; Medad, S; Minderaa, R; Mulas, F; Müller, U; Mulligan, A; Neale, B; Rijsdijk, F; Rabin, K; Rommelse, N; Sethna, V; Sorohan, J; Uebel, H; Psychogiou, L; Weeks, A; Barrett, R; Xu, X; Banaschewski, T; Sonuga-Barke, E; Eisenberg, J; Manor, I; Miranda, A; Oades, R D; Roeyers, H; Rothenberger, A; Sergeant, J; Steinhausen, H-C; Taylor, E; Thompson, M; Faraone, S V

    2008-05-01

    As part of the International Multi-centre ADHD Genetics project we completed an affected sibling pair study of 142 narrowly defined Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition combined type attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) proband-sibling pairs. No linkage was observed on the most established ADHD-linked genomic regions of 5p and 17p. We found suggestive linkage signals on chromosomes 9 and 16, respectively, with the highest multipoint nonparametric linkage signal on chromosome 16q23 at 99 cM (log of the odds, LOD=3.1) overlapping data published from the previous UCLA (University of California, Los Angeles) (LOD>1, approximately 95 cM) and Dutch (LOD>1, approximately 100 cM) studies. The second highest peak in this study was on chromosome 9q22 at 90 cM (LOD=2.13); both the previous UCLA and German studies also found some evidence of linkage at almost the same location (UCLA LOD=1.45 at 93 cM; German LOD=0.68 at 100 cM). The overlap of these two main peaks with previous findings suggests that loci linked to ADHD may lie within these regions. Meta-analysis or reanalysis of the raw data of all the available ADHD linkage scan data may help to clarify whether these represent true linked loci.

  17. The Hypermethylated Regions in Avian Chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Michael; Steinlein, Claus

    2017-01-01

    Chromosomal locations and amounts of 5-methylcytosine-rich chromosome regions were detected in the karyotypes of 13 bird species by indirect immunofluorescence using a monoclonal anti-5-methylcytosine antibody. These species belong to 7 orders and 10 families of modern (Neognathae) and primitive (Palaeognathae) birds and are characterized by macro- and microchromosomes as well as ZW sex chromosomes. In all 13 species, the hypermethylated chromosome segments are confined to constitutive heterochromatin. The chromosomal locations of hypermethylated DNA regions in the karyotypes are constant and species-specific. There is no general rule with regard to the distribution of these hypermethylated chromosome regions in the genomes of birds. In most instances, hypermethylated segments are located in the centromeric regions of chromosomes, but in the sex chromosomes, these can also be found in telomeric and interstitial postitions. In most of the species studied, the centromeric heterochromatin in many, if not all, of the microchromosomes is hypermethylated. However, in one species, the only detectable hypermethylated heterochromatic regions are located in one pair of macroautosomes and in the Z sex chromosome, but none of the microchromosomes contains visible quantities of 5-methylcytosine. The analysis of 5-methylcytosine-rich chromosome regions can be very helpful for the comparative cytogenetics of closely related species or subspecies. It also reflects the dynamic evolutionary process operating in the highly repetitive DNA of eukaryotic chromosomes. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Genomic matrix attachment region and chromosome conformation capture quantitative real time PCR assays identify novel putative regulatory elements at the imprinted Dlk1/Gtl2 locus.

    PubMed

    Braem, Caroline; Recolin, Bénédicte; Rancourt, Rebecca C; Angiolini, Christopher; Barthès, Pauline; Branchu, Priscillia; Court, Franck; Cathala, Guy; Ferguson-Smith, Anne C; Forné, Thierry

    2008-07-04

    We previously showed that genomic imprinting regulates matrix attachment region activities at the mouse Igf2 (insulin-like growth factor 2) locus and that these activities are functionally linked to neighboring differentially methylated regions (DMRs). Here, we investigate the similarly structured Dlk1/Gtl2 imprinted domain and show that in the mouse liver, the G/C-rich intergenic germ line-derived DMR, a sequence involved in domain-wide imprinting, is highly retained within the nuclear matrix fraction exclusively on the methylated paternal copy, reflecting its differential function on that chromosome. Therefore, not only "classical" A/T-rich matrix attachment region (MAR) sequences but also other important regulatory DNA elements (such as DMRs) can be recovered from genomic MAR assays following a high salt treatment. Interestingly, the recovery of one A/T-rich sequence (MAR4) from the "nuclear matrix" fraction is strongly correlated with gene expression. We show that this element possesses an intrinsic activity that favors transcription, and using chromosome conformation capture quantitative real time PCR assays, we demonstrate that the MAR4 interacts with the intergenic germ line-derived DMR specifically on the paternal allele but not with the Dlk1/Gtl2 promoters. Altogether, our findings shed a new light on gene regulation at this locus.

  19. Allelic expression imbalance screening of genes in chromosome 1q21-24 region to identify functional variants for Type 2 diabetes susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Ashis K; Sharma, Neeraj K; Elbein, Steven C; Das, Swapan K

    2013-07-02

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D)-associated SNPs are more likely to be expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs). The allelic expression imbalance (AEI) analysis is the measure of relative expression between two allelic transcripts and is the most sensitive measurement to detect cis-regulatory effects. We performed AEI screening to detect cis-regulators for genes expressed in transformed lymphocytes of 190 Caucasian (CA) and African American (AA) subjects to identify functional variants for T2D susceptibility in the chromosome 1q21-24 region of linkage. Among transcribed SNPs studied in 115 genes, significant AEI (P < 0.001) occurred in 28 and 30 genes in CA and AA subjects, respectively. Analysis of the effect of selected AEI-SNPs (≥10% mean AEI) on total gene expression further established the cis-eQTLs in thioesterase superfamily member-4 (THEM4) (rs13320, P = 0.027), and IGSF8 (rs1131891, P = 0.02). Examination of published genome-wide association data identified significant associations (P < 0.01) of three AEI-SNPs with T2D in the DIAGRAM-v3 dataset. Six AEI single nucleotide polymorphisms, including rs13320 (P = 1.35E-04) in THEM4, were associated with glucose homeostasis traits in the MAGIC dataset. Evaluation of AEI-SNPs for association with glucose homeostasis traits in 611 nondiabetic subjects showed lower AIRG (P = 0.005) in those with TT/TC genotype for rs13320. THEM4 expression in adipose was higher (P = 0.005) in subjects carrying the T allele; in vitro analysis with luciferase construct confirmed the higher expression of the T allele. Resequencing of THEM4 exons in 192 CA subjects revealed four coding nonsynonymous variants, but did not explain transmission of T2D in 718 subjects from 67 Caucasian pedigrees. Our study indicates the role of a cis-regulatory SNP in THEM4 that may influence T2D predisposition by modulating glucose homeostasis.

  20. Allelic expression imbalance screening of genes in chromosome 1q21–24 region to identify functional variants for Type 2 diabetes susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Ashis K.; Sharma, Neeraj K.; Elbein, Steven C.

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D)-associated SNPs are more likely to be expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs). The allelic expression imbalance (AEI) analysis is the measure of relative expression between two allelic transcripts and is the most sensitive measurement to detect cis-regulatory effects. We performed AEI screening to detect cis-regulators for genes expressed in transformed lymphocytes of 190 Caucasian (CA) and African American (AA) subjects to identify functional variants for T2D susceptibility in the chromosome 1q21–24 region of linkage. Among transcribed SNPs studied in 115 genes, significant AEI (P < 0.001) occurred in 28 and 30 genes in CA and AA subjects, respectively. Analysis of the effect of selected AEI-SNPs (≥10% mean AEI) on total gene expression further established the cis-eQTLs in thioesterase superfamily member-4 (THEM4) (rs13320, P = 0.027), and IGSF8 (rs1131891, P = 0.02). Examination of published genome-wide association data identified significant associations (P < 0.01) of three AEI-SNPs with T2D in the DIAGRAM-v3 dataset. Six AEI single nucleotide polymorphisms, including rs13320 (P = 1.35E-04) in THEM4, were associated with glucose homeostasis traits in the MAGIC dataset. Evaluation of AEI-SNPs for association with glucose homeostasis traits in 611 nondiabetic subjects showed lower AIRG (P = 0.005) in those with TT/TC genotype for rs13320. THEM4 expression in adipose was higher (P = 0.005) in subjects carrying the T allele; in vitro analysis with luciferase construct confirmed the higher expression of the T allele. Resequencing of THEM4 exons in 192 CA subjects revealed four coding nonsynonymous variants, but did not explain transmission of T2D in 718 subjects from 67 Caucasian pedigrees. Our study indicates the role of a cis-regulatory SNP in THEM4 that may influence T2D predisposition by modulating glucose homeostasis. PMID:23673729

  1. A scan statistic for identifying chromosomal patterns of SNP association.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yan V; Levin, Albert M; Boerwinkle, Eric; Robertson, Henry; Kardia, Sharon L R

    2006-11-01

    We have developed a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) association scan statistic that takes into account the complex distribution of the human genome variation in the identification of chromosomal regions with significant SNP associations. This scan statistic has wide applicability for genetic analysis, whether to identify important chromosomal regions associated with common diseases based on whole-genome SNP association studies or to identify disease susceptibility genes based on dense SNP positional candidate studies. To illustrate this method, we analyzed patterns of SNP associations on chromosome 19 in a large cohort study. Among 2,944 SNPs, we found seven regions that contained clusters of significantly associated SNPs. The average width of these regions was 35 kb with a range of 10-72 kb. We compared the scan statistic results to Fisher's product method using a sliding window approach, and detected 22 regions with significant clusters of SNP associations. The average width of these regions was 131 kb with a range of 10.1-615 kb. Given that the distances between SNPs are not taken into consideration in the sliding window approach, it is likely that a large fraction of these regions represents false positives. However, all seven regions detected by the scan statistic were also detected by the sliding window approach. The linkage disequilibrium (LD) patterns within the seven regions were highly variable indicating that the clusters of SNP associations were not due to LD alone. The scan statistic developed here can be used to make gene-based or region-based SNP inferences about disease association.

  2. [Identification of chromosomal aberration in esophageal cancer cells by mixed BAC DNA probes of chromosome arms and regions].

    PubMed

    Jiajie, Hao; Chunli, Wang; Wenyue, Gu; Xiaoyu, Cheng; Yu, Zhang; Xin, Xu; Yan, Cai; Mingrong, Wang

    2014-06-01

    Chromosomal aberration is an important genetic feature of malignant tumor cells. This study aimed to clarify whether BAC DNA could be used to identify chromosome region and arm alterations. For each chromosome region, five to ten 1 Mb BAC DNA clones were selected to construct mixed BAC DNA clones for the particular region. All of the mixed clones from regions which could cover the whole chromosome arm were then mixed to construct mixed BAC DNA clones for the arms. Mixed BAC DNA probes of arms and regions were labeled by degenerate oligonucleotide primed PCR (DOP-PCR) and Nick translation techniques, respectively. The specificities of these probes were validated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on the metaphase chromosomes of normal human peripheral blood lymphocytes. FISH with arm-specific mixed BAC DNA probes showed that chromosomal rearrangements and involved chromosome arms were confirmed in several esophageal cancer cells. By using region-specific mixed probes, the breakpoint on 1q from the derivative chromosome t(1q;7q) was identified in 1q32-q41 in esophageal KYSE140 cells. In conclusion, we established an effective labeling method for 1 Mb BAC DNA mixed clone probes, and chromosome arm and region rearrangements could be identified in several esophageal cancer cells by using these probes. Our study provides a more precise method for identification of chromosomal aberration by M-FISH, and the established method may also be applied to the karyotype analysis of hematological malignancies and prenatal diagnosis.

  3. Novel regions of chromosomal amplification at 6p21, 5p13, and 12q14 in gastric cancer identified by array comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed

    Gorringe, Kylie L; Boussioutas, Alex; Bowtell, David D L

    2005-03-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) frequently displays changes in DNA copy number, but few studies have precisely correlated specific genetic alterations with changes in gene expression. We undertook both array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and expression analyses of 20 primary GCs using a cDNA microarray with more than 9,300 genes. Diverse clinical and histopathologic tumor subtypes, including signet-ring tumors and tumors at the gastroesophageal junction, were analyzed. All tumors showed changes in gene copy number, with the majority showing multiple changes. Regions of gain and loss were generally consistent with previous cytogenetic reports; however, the use of aCGH greatly increased the resolution of measured genomic change. By comparing gene expression and high-resolution measurement of gene copy number directly, we were able to identify several regions of high-level gain associated with substantially increased gene expression that have not been defined previously in GC. Novel candidate oncogenes included dual-specificity tyrosine-(Y)-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 2 (DYRK2) and protein tyrosine kinase 7 (PTK7).

  4. Rapid generation of region-specific probes by chromosome microdissection: Application to the identification of chromosomal rearrangements

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, J.M.; Guan, X.Y.; Zang, J.; Meltzer, P.S. )

    1993-01-01

    The authors present results using a novel strategy for chromosome microdissection and direct in vitro amplification of specific chromosomal regions, to identify cryptic chromosome alterations, and to rapidly generate region-specific genomic probes. First, banded chromosomes are microdissected and directly PCR amplified by a procedure which eliminates microchemistry (Meltzer, et al., Nature Genetics, 1:24, 1992). The resulting PCR product can be used for several applications including direct labeling for fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) to normal metaphase chromosomes. A second application of this procedure is the extremely rapid generation of chromosome region-specific probes. This approach has been successfully used to determine the derivation of chromosome segments unidentifiable by standard chromosome banding analysis. In selected instances these probes have also been used on interphase nuclei and provides the potential for assessing chromosome abnormalities in a variety of cell lineages. The microdissection probes (which can be generated in <24 hours) have also been utilized in direct library screening and provide the possibility of acquiring a significant number of region-specific probes for any chromosome band. This procedure extends the limits of conventional cytogenetic analysis by providing an extremely rapid source of numerous band-specific probes, and by enabling the direct analysis of essentially any unknown chromosome region.

  5. A Syntenic Region Conserved from Fish to Mammalian X Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Guijun; Yi, Meisheng; Kobayashi, Tohru; Hong, Yunhan; Nagahama, Yoshitaka

    2014-01-01

    Sex chromosomes bearing the sex-determining gene initiate development along the male or female pathway, no matter which sex is determined by XY male or ZW female heterogamety. Sex chromosomes originate from ancient autosomes but evolved rapidly after the acquisition of sex-determining factors which are highly divergent between species. In the heterogametic male system (XY system), the X chromosome is relatively evolutionary silent and maintains most of its ancestral genes, in contrast to its Y counterpart that has evolved rapidly and degenerated. Sex in a teleost fish, the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), is determined genetically via an XY system, in which an unpaired region is present in the largest chromosome pair. We defined the differences in DNA contents present in this chromosome with a two-color comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) approach in XY males. We further identified a syntenic segment within this region that is well conserved in several teleosts. Through comparative genome analysis, this syntenic segment was also shown to be present in mammalian X chromosomes, suggesting a common ancestral origin of vertebrate sex chromosomes. PMID:25506037

  6. Chromosomal localization of mouse bullous pemphigoid antigens, BPAG1 and BPAG2: Identification of a new region of homology between mouse and human chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, N.G.; Gilbert, D.J.; Jenkins, N.A. ); Li, K.; Sawamura, D.; Chu, Monli; Uitto, J. ); Giudice, G.J. )

    1993-01-01

    Two bullous pemphigoid antigens, BPAG1 and BPAG2, have been recently cloned and mapped to human chromosomes 6p12-p11 and 10q24.3, respectively. In this study, we localized the corresponding mouse genes by interspecific backcross analysis. Bpag-1 mapped to the proximal region of mouse chromosome 1, identifying a new region of homology between human chromosome 6 and mouse chromosome 1. Bpag-2 mapped to the distal end of mouse chromosome 19 in a region of homology to human chromosome 10q. These assignments confirm and extend the relationships between the human and the mouse chromosomes. 13 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Imputation and subset-based association analysis across different cancer types identifies multiple independent risk loci in the TERT-CLPTM1L region on chromosome 5p15.33.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaoming; Zhu, Bin; Zhang, Mingfeng; Parikh, Hemang; Jia, Jinping; Chung, Charles C; Sampson, Joshua N; Hoskins, Jason W; Hutchinson, Amy; Burdette, Laurie; Ibrahim, Abdisamad; Hautman, Christopher; Raj, Preethi S; Abnet, Christian C; Adjei, Andrew A; Ahlbom, Anders; Albanes, Demetrius; Allen, Naomi E; Ambrosone, Christine B; Aldrich, Melinda; Amiano, Pilar; Amos, Christopher; Andersson, Ulrika; Andriole, Gerald; Andrulis, Irene L; Arici, Cecilia; Arslan, Alan A; Austin, Melissa A; Baris, Dalsu; Barkauskas, Donald A; Bassig, Bryan A; Beane Freeman, Laura E; Berg, Christine D; Berndt, Sonja I; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Biritwum, Richard B; Black, Amanda; Blot, William; Boeing, Heiner; Boffetta, Paolo; Bolton, Kelly; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Bracci, Paige M; Brennan, Paul; Brinton, Louise A; Brotzman, Michelle; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Buring, Julie E; Butler, Mary Ann; Cai, Qiuyin; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Canzian, Federico; Cao, Guangwen; Caporaso, Neil E; Carrato, Alfredo; Carreon, Tania; Carta, Angela; Chang, Gee-Chen; Chang, I-Shou; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Che, Xu; Chen, Chien-Jen; Chen, Chih-Yi; Chen, Chung-Hsing; Chen, Constance; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Chen, Yuh-Min; Chokkalingam, Anand P; Chu, Lisa W; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Colditz, Graham A; Colt, Joanne S; Conti, David; Cook, Michael B; Cortessis, Victoria K; Crawford, E David; Cussenot, Olivier; Davis, Faith G; De Vivo, Immaculata; Deng, Xiang; Ding, Ti; Dinney, Colin P; Di Stefano, Anna Luisa; Diver, W Ryan; Duell, Eric J; Elena, Joanne W; Fan, Jin-Hu; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Feychting, Maria; Figueroa, Jonine D; Flanagan, Adrienne M; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Freedman, Neal D; Fridley, Brooke L; Fuchs, Charles S; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Gallinger, Steven; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gapstur, Susan M; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Garcia-Closas, Reina; Gastier-Foster, Julie M; Gaziano, J Michael; Gerhard, Daniela S; Giffen, Carol A; Giles, Graham G; Gillanders, Elizabeth M; Giovannucci, Edward L; Goggins, Michael; Gokgoz, Nalan; Goldstein, Alisa M; Gonzalez, Carlos; Gorlick, Richard; Greene, Mark H; Gross, Myron; Grossman, H Barton; Grubb, Robert; Gu, Jian; Guan, Peng; Haiman, Christopher A; Hallmans, Goran; Hankinson, Susan E; Harris, Curtis C; Hartge, Patricia; Hattinger, Claudia; Hayes, Richard B; He, Qincheng; Helman, Lee; Henderson, Brian E; Henriksson, Roger; Hoffman-Bolton, Judith; Hohensee, Chancellor; Holly, Elizabeth A; Hong, Yun-Chul; Hoover, Robert N; Hosgood, H Dean; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Hsing, Ann W; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Hu, Nan; Hu, Wei; Hu, Zhibin; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Hunter, David J; Inskip, Peter D; Ito, Hidemi; Jacobs, Eric J; Jacobs, Kevin B; Jenab, Mazda; Ji, Bu-Tian; Johansen, Christoffer; Johansson, Mattias; Johnson, Alison; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kamat, Ashish M; Kamineni, Aruna; Karagas, Margaret; Khanna, Chand; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Christopher; Kim, In-Sam; Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Young-Chul; Kim, Young Tae; Kang, Chang Hyun; Jung, Yoo Jin; Kitahara, Cari M; Klein, Alison P; Klein, Robert; Kogevinas, Manolis; Koh, Woon-Puay; Kohno, Takashi; Kolonel, Laurence N; Kooperberg, Charles; Kratz, Christian P; Krogh, Vittorio; Kunitoh, Hideo; Kurtz, Robert C; Kurucu, Nilgun; Lan, Qing; Lathrop, Mark; Lau, Ching C; Lecanda, Fernando; Lee, Kyoung-Mu; Lee, Maxwell P; Le Marchand, Loic; Lerner, Seth P; Li, Donghui; Liao, Linda M; Lim, Wei-Yen; Lin, Dongxin; Lin, Jie; Lindstrom, Sara; Linet, Martha S; Lissowska, Jolanta; Liu, Jianjun; Ljungberg, Börje; Lloreta, Josep; Lu, Daru; Ma, Jing; Malats, Nuria; Mannisto, Satu; Marina, Neyssa; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGlynn, Katherine A; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; McNeill, Lorna H; McWilliams, Robert R; Melin, Beatrice S; Meltzer, Paul S; Mensah, James E; Miao, Xiaoping; Michaud, Dominique S; Mondul, Alison M; Moore, Lee E; Muir, Kenneth; Niwa, Shelley; Olson, Sara H; Orr, Nick; Panico, Salvatore; Park, Jae Yong; Patel, Alpa V; Patino-Garcia, Ana; Pavanello, Sofia; Peeters, Petra H M; Peplonska, Beata; Peters, Ulrike; Petersen, Gloria M; Picci, Piero; Pike, Malcolm C; Porru, Stefano; Prescott, Jennifer; Pu, Xia; Purdue, Mark P; Qiao, You-Lin; Rajaraman, Preetha; Riboli, Elio; Risch, Harvey A; Rodabough, Rebecca J; Rothman, Nathaniel; Ruder, Avima M; Ryu, Jeong-Seon; Sanson, Marc; Schned, Alan; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Schwartz, Ann G; Schwartz, Kendra L; Schwenn, Molly; Scotlandi, Katia; Seow, Adeline; Serra, Consol; Serra, Massimo; Sesso, Howard D; Severi, Gianluca; Shen, Hongbing; Shen, Min; Shete, Sanjay; Shiraishi, Kouya; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Siddiq, Afshan; Sierrasesumaga, Luis; Sierri, Sabina; Loon Sihoe, Alan Dart; Silverman, Debra T; Simon, Matthias; Southey, Melissa C; Spector, Logan; Spitz, Margaret; Stampfer, Meir; Stattin, Par; Stern, Mariana C; Stevens, Victoria L; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z; Stram, Daniel O; Strom, Sara S; Su, Wu-Chou; Sund, Malin; Sung, Sook Whan; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tan, Wen; Tanaka, Hideo; Tang, Wei; Tang, Ze-Zhang; Tardon, Adonina; Tay, Evelyn; Taylor, Philip R; Tettey, Yao; Thomas, David M; Tirabosco, Roberto; Tjonneland, Anne; Tobias, Geoffrey S; Toro, Jorge R; Travis, Ruth C; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Troisi, Rebecca; Truelove, Ann; Tsai, Ying-Huang; Tucker, Margaret A; Tumino, Rosario; Van Den Berg, David; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K; Vermeulen, Roel; Vineis, Paolo; Visvanathan, Kala; Vogel, Ulla; Wang, Chaoyu; Wang, Chengfeng; Wang, Junwen; Wang, Sophia S; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Wheeler, William; White, Emily; Wiencke, John K; Wolk, Alicja; Wolpin, Brian M; Wong, Maria Pik; Wrensch, Margaret; Wu, Chen; Wu, Tangchun; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Yi-Long; Wunder, Jay S; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Xu, Jun; Yang, Hannah P; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Yatabe, Yasushi; Ye, Yuanqing; Yeboah, Edward D; Yin, Zhihua; Ying, Chen; Yu, Chong-Jen; Yu, Kai; Yuan, Jian-Min; Zanetti, Krista A; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zheng, Wei; Zhou, Baosen; Mirabello, Lisa; Savage, Sharon A; Kraft, Peter; Chanock, Stephen J; Yeager, Meredith; Landi, Maria Terese; Shi, Jianxin; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Amundadottir, Laufey T

    2014-12-15

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have mapped risk alleles for at least 10 distinct cancers to a small region of 63 000 bp on chromosome 5p15.33. This region harbors the TERT and CLPTM1L genes; the former encodes the catalytic subunit of telomerase reverse transcriptase and the latter may play a role in apoptosis. To investigate further the genetic architecture of common susceptibility alleles in this region, we conducted an agnostic subset-based meta-analysis (association analysis based on subsets) across six distinct cancers in 34 248 cases and 45 036 controls. Based on sequential conditional analysis, we identified as many as six independent risk loci marked by common single-nucleotide polymorphisms: five in the TERT gene (Region 1: rs7726159, P = 2.10 × 10(-39); Region 3: rs2853677, P = 3.30 × 10(-36) and PConditional = 2.36 × 10(-8); Region 4: rs2736098, P = 3.87 × 10(-12) and PConditional = 5.19 × 10(-6), Region 5: rs13172201, P = 0.041 and PConditional = 2.04 × 10(-6); and Region 6: rs10069690, P = 7.49 × 10(-15) and PConditional = 5.35 × 10(-7)) and one in the neighboring CLPTM1L gene (Region 2: rs451360; P = 1.90 × 10(-18) and PConditional = 7.06 × 10(-16)). Between three and five cancers mapped to each independent locus with both risk-enhancing and protective effects. Allele-specific effects on DNA methylation were seen for a subset of risk loci, indicating that methylation and subsequent effects on gene expression may contribute to the biology of risk variants on 5p15.33. Our results provide strong support for extensive pleiotropy across this region of 5p15.33, to an extent not previously observed in other cancer susceptibility loci.

  8. CHROMOSOMAL LOCATION AND GENE PAUCITY IN THE MALE SPECIFIC REGION ON PAPAYA Y CHROMOSOME

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sex chromosomes in flowering plants evolved recently and many of them remain homomorphic, including those in papaya. We investigated the chromosomal location of papaya’s small male specific region of the hermaphrodite Y (Yh) chromosome (MSY) and its genomic features. We conducted chromosome fluoresc...

  9. Spectral karyotyping identifies recurrent complex rearrangements of chromosomes 8, 17, and 20 in osteosarcomas.

    PubMed

    Bayani, Jane; Zielenska, Maria; Pandita, Ajay; Al-Romaih, Khaldoun; Karaskova, Jana; Harrison, Karen; Bridge, Julia A; Sorensen, Poul; Thorner, Paul; Squire, Jeremy A

    2003-01-01

    Conventional cytogenetic studies have shown that osteosarcomas (OSs) are often highly aneuploid, with a large number of both structural and numerical chromosomal alterations. To investigate the complexity of OS karyotypes in detail, we applied spectral karyotyping (SKY) to a series of 14 primary OS tumors and four established OS cell lines. A total of 531 rearrangements were identified by SKY, of which 300 breakpoints could be assigned to a specific chromosome band. There was an average of 38.5 breakpoints identified by SKY per primary tumor. Chromosome 20 was involved in a disproportionately high number of structural rearrangements, with 38 different aberrations being detected. Chromosomal rearrangements between chromosomes 20 and 8 were evident in four tumors. FISH analysis using a 20q13 subtelomeric probe identified frequent involvement of 20q in complex structural rearrangements of OS cell lines. Characterization of the structural aberrations of chromosomes 8 and 17 by use of SKY demonstrated frequent duplication or partial gains of chromosome bands 8q23-24 and 17p11-13. Other chromosomes frequently involved in structural alteration were chromosomes 1 (47 rearrangements) and 6 (38 rearrangements). Centromeric rearrangements often involving chromosomes 1, 6, 13, 14, 17, and 20 were present. Four of the 14 primary OS tumors were characterized by nonclonal changes that included both structural and numerical alterations. In summary, OS tumors have a very high frequency of structural and numerical alterations, compounded by gross changes in ploidy. This intrinsic karyotype instability leads to a diversity of rearrangements and the acquisition of composite chromosomal rearrangements, with the highest frequency of alteration leading to gain of 8q23-24 and 17p11-13 and rearrangement of 20q. These findings suggest that specific sequences mapping to these chromosomal regions will likely have a role in the development and progression of OS.

  10. Defining the autism minimum candidate gene region on chromosome 7.

    PubMed

    Hutcheson, Holli B; Bradford, Y; Folstein, S E; Gardiner, M B; Santangelo, S L; Sutcliffe, J S; Haines, J L

    2003-02-01

    Previous genetic and cytogenetic studies provide evidence that points to one or more autism susceptibility genes residing on chromosome 7q (AUTS1, 115-149 cM on the Marshfield map). However, further localization using linkage analysis has proven difficult. To overcome this problem, we examined the Collaborative Linkage Study of Autism (CLSA) data-set to identify only the families potentially linked to chromosome 7. Out of 94, 47 families were identified and 17 markers were used to generate chromosomal haplotypes. We performed recombination breakpoint analysis to determine if any portion of the chromosome was predominately shared across families. The most commonly shared region spanned a 6 cM interval between D7S501 and D7S2847. Additional markers at 1 cM intervals within this region were genotyped and association and recombination breakpoint analysis was again performed. Although no significant allelic association was found, the recombination breakpoint data points to a shared region between D7S496-D7S2418 (120-123 cM) encompassing about 4.5 Mb of genomic DNA containing over 50 genes. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Regional Control of Chromosome Segregation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Lagage, Valentine

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome segregation in bacteria occurs concomitantly with DNA replication, and the duplicated regions containing the replication origin oriC are generally the first to separate and migrate to their final specific location inside the cell. In numerous bacterial species, a three-component partition machinery called the ParABS system is crucial for chromosome segregation. This is the case in the gammaproteobacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa, where impairing the ParABS system is very detrimental for growth, as it increases the generation time and leads to the formation of anucleate cells and to oriC mispositioning inside the cell. In this study, we investigate in vivo the ParABS system in P. aeruginosa. Using chromatin immuno-precipitation coupled with high throughput sequencing, we show that ParB binds to four parS site located within 15 kb of oriC in vivo, and that this binding promotes the formation of a high order nucleoprotein complex. We show that one parS site is enough to prevent anucleate cell formation, therefore for correct chromosome segregation. By displacing the parS site from its native position on the chromosome, we demonstrate that parS is the first chromosomal locus to be separated upon DNA replication, which indicates that it is the site of force exertion of the segregation process. We identify a region of approximatively 650 kb surrounding oriC in which the parS site must be positioned for chromosome segregation to proceed correctly, and we called it “competence zone” of the parS site. Mutant strains that have undergone specific genetic rearrangements allow us to propose that the distance between oriC and parS defines this “competence zone”. Implications for the control of chromosome segregation in P. aeruginosa are discussed. PMID:27820816

  12. Screening of an E. coli O157:H7 Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Library by Comparative Genomic Hybridization to Identify Genomic Regions Contributing to Growth in Bovine Gastrointestinal Mucus and Epithelial Cell Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Jianing; McAteer, Sean P.; Paxton, Edith; Mahajan, Arvind; Gally, David L.; Tree, Jai J.

    2011-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) O157:H7 can cause serious gastrointestinal and systemic disease in humans following direct or indirect exposure to ruminant feces containing the bacterium. The main colonization site of EHEC O157:H7 in cattle is the terminal rectum where the bacteria intimately attach to the epithelium and multiply in the intestinal mucus. This study aimed to identify genomic regions of EHEC O157:H7 that contribute to colonization and multiplication at this site. A bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library was generated from a derivative of the sequenced E. coli O157:H7 Sakai strain. The library contains 1152 clones averaging 150 kbp. To verify the library, clones containing a complete locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) were identified by DNA hybridization. In line with a previous report, these did not confer a type III secretion (T3S) capacity to the K-12 host strain. However, conjugation of one of the BAC clones into a strain containing a partial LEE deletion restored T3S. Three hundred eighty-four clones from the library were subjected to two different selective screens; one involved three rounds of adherence assays to bovine primary rectal epithelial cells while the other competed the clones over three rounds of growth in bovine rectal mucus. The input strain DNA was then compared with the selected strains using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) on an E. coli microarray. The adherence assay enriched for pO157 DNA indicating the importance of this plasmid for colonization of rectal epithelial cells. The mucus assay enriched for multiple regions involved in carbohydrate utilization, including hexuronate uptake, indicating that these regions provide a competitive growth advantage in bovine mucus. This BAC-CGH approach provides a positive selection screen that complements negative selection transposon-based screens. As demonstrated, this may be of particular use for identifying genes with redundant functions such as adhesion and carbon

  13. Imputation and subset-based association analysis across different cancer types identifies multiple independent risk loci in the TERT-CLPTM1L region on chromosome 5p15.33

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhaoming; Zhu, Bin; Zhang, Mingfeng; Parikh, Hemang; Jia, Jinping; Chung, Charles C.; Sampson, Joshua N.; Hoskins, Jason W.; Hutchinson, Amy; Burdette, Laurie; Ibrahim, Abdisamad; Hautman, Christopher; Raj, Preethi S.; Abnet, Christian C.; Adjei, Andrew A.; Ahlbom, Anders; Albanes, Demetrius; Allen, Naomi E.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Aldrich, Melinda; Amiano, Pilar; Amos, Christopher; Andersson, Ulrika; Andriole, Gerald; Andrulis, Irene L.; Arici, Cecilia; Arslan, Alan A.; Austin, Melissa A.; Baris, Dalsu; Barkauskas, Donald A.; Bassig, Bryan A.; Beane Freeman, Laura E.; Berg, Christine D.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Biritwum, Richard B.; Black, Amanda; Blot, William; Boeing, Heiner; Boffetta, Paolo; Bolton, Kelly; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Bracci, Paige M.; Brennan, Paul; Brinton, Louise A.; Brotzman, Michelle; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Buring, Julie E.; Butler, Mary Ann; Cai, Qiuyin; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Canzian, Federico; Cao, Guangwen; Caporaso, Neil E.; Carrato, Alfredo; Carreon, Tania; Carta, Angela; Chang, Gee-Chen; Chang, I-Shou; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Che, Xu; Chen, Chien-Jen; Chen, Chih-Yi; Chen, Chung-Hsing; Chen, Constance; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Chen, Yuh-Min; Chokkalingam, Anand P.; Chu, Lisa W.; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Colditz, Graham A.; Colt, Joanne S.; Conti, David; Cook, Michael B.; Cortessis, Victoria K.; Crawford, E. David; Cussenot, Olivier; Davis, Faith G.; De Vivo, Immaculata; Deng, Xiang; Ding, Ti; Dinney, Colin P.; Di Stefano, Anna Luisa; Diver, W. Ryan; Duell, Eric J.; Elena, Joanne W.; Fan, Jin-Hu; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Feychting, Maria; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Flanagan, Adrienne M.; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Freedman, Neal D.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Fuchs, Charles S.; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Gallinger, Steven; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gapstur, Susan M.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Garcia-Closas, Reina; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Gaziano, J. Michael; Gerhard, Daniela S.; Giffen, Carol A.; Giles, Graham G.; Gillanders, Elizabeth M.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Goggins, Michael; Gokgoz, Nalan; Goldstein, Alisa M.; Gonzalez, Carlos; Gorlick, Richard; Greene, Mark H.; Gross, Myron; Grossman, H. Barton; Grubb, Robert; Gu, Jian; Guan, Peng; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hallmans, Goran; Hankinson, Susan E.; Harris, Curtis C.; Hartge, Patricia; Hattinger, Claudia; Hayes, Richard B.; He, Qincheng; Helman, Lee; Henderson, Brian E.; Henriksson, Roger; Hoffman-Bolton, Judith; Hohensee, Chancellor; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Hong, Yun-Chul; Hoover, Robert N.; Hosgood, H. Dean; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Hsing, Ann W.; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Hu, Nan; Hu, Wei; Hu, Zhibin; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Hunter, David J.; Inskip, Peter D.; Ito, Hidemi; Jacobs, Eric J.; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Jenab, Mazda; Ji, Bu-Tian; Johansen, Christoffer; Johansson, Mattias; Johnson, Alison; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kamat, Ashish M.; Kamineni, Aruna; Karagas, Margaret; Khanna, Chand; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Christopher; Kim, In-Sam; Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Young-Chul; Kim, Young Tae; Kang, Chang Hyun; Jung, Yoo Jin; Kitahara, Cari M.; Klein, Alison P.; Klein, Robert; Kogevinas, Manolis; Koh, Woon-Puay; Kohno, Takashi; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Kooperberg, Charles; Kratz, Christian P.; Krogh, Vittorio; Kunitoh, Hideo; Kurtz, Robert C.; Kurucu, Nilgun; Lan, Qing; Lathrop, Mark; Lau, Ching C.; Lecanda, Fernando; Lee, Kyoung-Mu; Lee, Maxwell P.; Le Marchand, Loic; Lerner, Seth P.; Li, Donghui; Liao, Linda M.; Lim, Wei-Yen; Lin, Dongxin; Lin, Jie; Lindstrom, Sara; Linet, Martha S.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Liu, Jianjun; Ljungberg, Börje; Lloreta, Josep; Lu, Daru; Ma, Jing; Malats, Nuria; Mannisto, Satu; Marina, Neyssa; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGlynn, Katherine A.; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; McNeill, Lorna H.; McWilliams, Robert R.; Melin, Beatrice S.; Meltzer, Paul S.; Mensah, James E.; Miao, Xiaoping; Michaud, Dominique S.; Mondul, Alison M.; Moore, Lee E.; Muir, Kenneth; Niwa, Shelley; Olson, Sara H.; Orr, Nick; Panico, Salvatore; Park, Jae Yong; Patel, Alpa V.; Patino-Garcia, Ana; Pavanello, Sofia; Peeters, Petra H. M.; Peplonska, Beata; Peters, Ulrike; Petersen, Gloria M.; Picci, Piero; Pike, Malcolm C.; Porru, Stefano; Prescott, Jennifer; Pu, Xia; Purdue, Mark P.; Qiao, You-Lin; Rajaraman, Preetha; Riboli, Elio; Risch, Harvey A.; Rodabough, Rebecca J.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Ruder, Avima M.; Ryu, Jeong-Seon; Sanson, Marc; Schned, Alan; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Schwartz, Ann G.; Schwartz, Kendra L.; Schwenn, Molly; Scotlandi, Katia; Seow, Adeline; Serra, Consol; Serra, Massimo; Sesso, Howard D.; Severi, Gianluca; Shen, Hongbing; Shen, Min; Shete, Sanjay; Shiraishi, Kouya; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Siddiq, Afshan; Sierrasesumaga, Luis; Sierri, Sabina; Loon Sihoe, Alan Dart; Silverman, Debra T.; Simon, Matthias; Southey, Melissa C.; Spector, Logan; Spitz, Margaret; Stampfer, Meir; Stattin, Par; Stern, Mariana C.; Stevens, Victoria L.; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z.; Stram, Daniel O.; Strom, Sara S.; Su, Wu-Chou; Sund, Malin; Sung, Sook Whan; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tan, Wen; Tanaka, Hideo; Tang, Wei; Tang, Ze-Zhang; Tardon, Adonina; Tay, Evelyn; Taylor, Philip R.; Tettey, Yao; Thomas, David M.; Tirabosco, Roberto; Tjonneland, Anne; Tobias, Geoffrey S.; Toro, Jorge R.; Travis, Ruth C.; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Troisi, Rebecca; Truelove, Ann; Tsai, Ying-Huang; Tucker, Margaret A.; Tumino, Rosario; Van Den Berg, David; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K.; Vermeulen, Roel; Vineis, Paolo; Visvanathan, Kala; Vogel, Ulla; Wang, Chaoyu; Wang, Chengfeng; Wang, Junwen; Wang, Sophia S.; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Wheeler, William; White, Emily; Wiencke, John K.; Wolk, Alicja; Wolpin, Brian M.; Wong, Maria Pik; Wrensch, Margaret; Wu, Chen; Wu, Tangchun; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Yi-Long; Wunder, Jay S.; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Xu, Jun; Yang, Hannah P.; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Yatabe, Yasushi; Ye, Yuanqing; Yeboah, Edward D.; Yin, Zhihua; Ying, Chen; Yu, Chong-Jen; Yu, Kai; Yuan, Jian-Min; Zanetti, Krista A.; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zheng, Wei; Zhou, Baosen; Mirabello, Lisa; Savage, Sharon A.; Kraft, Peter; Chanock, Stephen J.; Yeager, Meredith; Landi, Maria Terese; Shi, Jianxin; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Amundadottir, Laufey T.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have mapped risk alleles for at least 10 distinct cancers to a small region of 63 000 bp on chromosome 5p15.33. This region harbors the TERT and CLPTM1L genes; the former encodes the catalytic subunit of telomerase reverse transcriptase and the latter may play a role in apoptosis. To investigate further the genetic architecture of common susceptibility alleles in this region, we conducted an agnostic subset-based meta-analysis (association analysis based on subsets) across six distinct cancers in 34 248 cases and 45 036 controls. Based on sequential conditional analysis, we identified as many as six independent risk loci marked by common single-nucleotide polymorphisms: five in the TERT gene (Region 1: rs7726159, P = 2.10 × 10−39; Region 3: rs2853677, P = 3.30 × 10−36 and PConditional = 2.36 × 10−8; Region 4: rs2736098, P = 3.87 × 10−12 and PConditional = 5.19 × 10−6, Region 5: rs13172201, P = 0.041 and PConditional = 2.04 × 10−6; and Region 6: rs10069690, P = 7.49 × 10−15 and PConditional = 5.35 × 10−7) and one in the neighboring CLPTM1L gene (Region 2: rs451360; P = 1.90 × 10−18 and PConditional = 7.06 × 10−16). Between three and five cancers mapped to each independent locus with both risk-enhancing and protective effects. Allele-specific effects on DNA methylation were seen for a subset of risk loci, indicating that methylation and subsequent effects on gene expression may contribute to the biology of risk variants on 5p15.33. Our results provide strong support for extensive pleiotropy across this region of 5p15.33, to an extent not previously observed in other cancer susceptibility loci. PMID:25027329

  14. Delineation and Analysis of Chromosomal Regions Specifying Yersinia pestis▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Derbise, Anne; Chenal-Francisque, Viviane; Huon, Christèle; Fayolle, Corinne; Demeure, Christian E.; Chane-Woon-Ming, Béatrice; Médigue, Claudine; Hinnebusch, B. Joseph; Carniel, Elisabeth

    2010-01-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, has recently diverged from the less virulent enteropathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. Its emergence has been characterized by massive genetic loss and inactivation and limited gene acquisition. The acquired genes include two plasmids, a filamentous phage, and a few chromosomal loci. The aim of this study was to characterize the chromosomal regions acquired by Y. pestis. Following in silico comparative analysis and PCR screening of 98 strains of Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. pestis, we found that eight chromosomal loci (six regions [R1pe to R6pe] and two coding sequences [CDS1pe and CDS2pe]) specified Y. pestis. Signatures of integration by site specific or homologous recombination were identified for most of them. These acquisitions and the loss of ancestral DNA sequences were concentrated in a chromosomal region opposite to the origin of replication. The specific regions were acquired very early during Y. pestis evolution and were retained during its microevolution, suggesting that they might bring some selective advantages. Only one region (R3pe), predicted to carry a lambdoid prophage, is most likely no longer functional because of mutations. With the exception of R1pe and R2pe, which have the potential to encode a restriction/modification and a sugar transport system, respectively, no functions could be predicted for the other Y. pestis-specific loci. To determine the role of the eight chromosomal loci in the physiology and pathogenicity of the plague bacillus, each of them was individually deleted from the bacterial chromosome. None of the deletants exhibited defects during growth in vitro. Using the Xenopsylla cheopis flea model, all deletants retained the capacity to produce a stable and persistent infection and to block fleas. Similarly, none of the deletants caused any acute flea toxicity. In the mouse model of infection, all deletants were fully virulent upon subcutaneous or aerosol infections. Therefore

  15. Delineation and analysis of chromosomal regions specifying Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Derbise, Anne; Chenal-Francisque, Viviane; Huon, Christèle; Fayolle, Corinne; Demeure, Christian E; Chane-Woon-Ming, Béatrice; Médigue, Claudine; Hinnebusch, B Joseph; Carniel, Elisabeth

    2010-09-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, has recently diverged from the less virulent enteropathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. Its emergence has been characterized by massive genetic loss and inactivation and limited gene acquisition. The acquired genes include two plasmids, a filamentous phage, and a few chromosomal loci. The aim of this study was to characterize the chromosomal regions acquired by Y. pestis. Following in silico comparative analysis and PCR screening of 98 strains of Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. pestis, we found that eight chromosomal loci (six regions [R1pe to R6pe] and two coding sequences [CDS1pe and CDS2pe]) specified Y. pestis. Signatures of integration by site specific or homologous recombination were identified for most of them. These acquisitions and the loss of ancestral DNA sequences were concentrated in a chromosomal region opposite to the origin of replication. The specific regions were acquired very early during Y. pestis evolution and were retained during its microevolution, suggesting that they might bring some selective advantages. Only one region (R3pe), predicted to carry a lambdoid prophage, is most likely no longer functional because of mutations. With the exception of R1pe and R2pe, which have the potential to encode a restriction/modification and a sugar transport system, respectively, no functions could be predicted for the other Y. pestis-specific loci. To determine the role of the eight chromosomal loci in the physiology and pathogenicity of the plague bacillus, each of them was individually deleted from the bacterial chromosome. None of the deletants exhibited defects during growth in vitro. Using the Xenopsylla cheopis flea model, all deletants retained the capacity to produce a stable and persistent infection and to block fleas. Similarly, none of the deletants caused any acute flea toxicity. In the mouse model of infection, all deletants were fully virulent upon subcutaneous or aerosol infections. Therefore

  16. New Oligonucleotide Probes for ND-FISH Analysis to Identify Barley Chromosomes and to Investigate Polymorphisms of Wheat Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shuyao; Qiu, Ling; Xiao, Zhiqiang; Fu, Shulan; Tang, Zongxiang

    2016-01-01

    Oligonucleotide probes that can be used for non-denaturing fluorescence in situ hybridization (ND-FISH) analysis are convenient tools for identifying chromosomes of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and its relatives. New oligonucleotide probes, Oligo-HvT01, Oligo-pTa71-1, Oligo-s120.1, Oligo-s120.2, Oligo-s120.3, Oligo-275.1, Oligo-275.2, Oligo-k566 and Oligo-713, were designed based on the repetitive sequences HVT01, pTa71, pTa-s120, pTa-275, pTa-k566 and pTa-713. All these probes can be used for ND-FISH analysis and some of them can be used to detect polymorphisms of wheat chromosomes. Probes Oligo-HvT01, Oligo-pTa71-1, Oligo-s120.3, Oligo-275.1, Oligo-k566 and Oligo-713 can, respectively, replace the roles of their original sequences to identify chromosomes of some barley (Hordeum vulgare ssp. vulgare) and the common wheat variety Chinese Spring. Oligo-s120.1, Oligo-s120.2 and Oligo-275.2 produced different hybridization patterns from the ones generated by their original sequences. In addition, Oligo-s120.1, Oligo-s120.2 and Oligo-s120.3, which were derived from pTa-s120, revealed different signal patterns. Likewise, Oligo-275.1 and Oligo-275.2, which were derived from pTa-275, also displayed different hybridization patterns. These results imply that differently arranged or altered structural statuses of tandem repeats might exist on different chromosome regions. These new oligonucleotide probes provide extra convenience for identifying some wheat and barley chromosomes, and they can display polymorphisms of wheat chromosomes. PMID:27929398

  17. Constitutive heterochromatin polymorphisms in human chromosomes identified by whole comparative genomic hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Dávila-Rodríguez, M.I.; Cortés Gutiérrez, E.I.; Cerda Flores, R.M.; Pita, M.; Fernández, J.L.; López-Fernández, C.; Gosálvez, J.

    2011-01-01

    Whole comparative genomic hybridization (W-CGH) is a new technique that reveals cryptic differences in highly repetitive DNA sequences, when different genomes are compared using metaphase or interphase chromosomes. W-CGH provides a quick approach to identify differential expansion of these DNA sequences at the single-chromosome level in the whole genome. In this study, we have determined the frequency of constitutive chromatin polymorphisms in the centromeric regions of human chromosomes using a whole-genome in situ cross-hybridization method to compare the whole genome of five different unrelated individuals. Results showed that the pericentromeric constitutive heterochromatin of chromosome 6 exhibited a high incidence of polymorphisms in repetitive DNA families located in pericentromeric regions. The constitutive heterochromatin of chromosomes 5 and 9 was also identified as highly polymorphic. Although further studies are necessary to corroborate and assess the overall incidence of these polymorphisms in human populations, the use of W-CGH could be pertinent and of clinical relevance to assess rapidly, from a chromosomal viewpoint, genome similarities and differences in closely related genomes such as those of relatives, or in more specific situations such as bone marrow transplantation where chimerism is produced in the recipient. PMID:22073375

  18. Cytogenetic Analysis of Chromosome Region 73ad of Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Belote, J. M.; Hoffmann, F. M.; McKeown, M.; Chorsky, R. L.; Baker, B. S.

    1990-01-01

    The 73AD salivary chromosome region of Drosophila melanogaster was subjected to mutational analysis in order to (1) generate a collection of chromosome breakpoints that would allow a correlation between the genetic, cytological and molecular maps of the region and (2) define the number and gross organization of complementation groups within this interval. Eighteen complementation groups were defined and mapped to the 73A2-73B7 region, which is comprised of 17 polytene bands. These complementation groups include the previously known scarlet (st), transformer (tra) and Dominant temperature-sensitive lethal-5 (DTS-5) genes, as well as 13 new recessive lethal complementation groups and one male and female sterile locus. One of the newly identified lethal complementation groups corresponds to the molecularly identified abl locus, and another gene is defined by mutant alleles that exhibit an interaction with with the abl mutants. We also recovered several mutations in the 73C1-D1.2 interval, representing two lethal complementation groups, one new visible mutant, plucked (plk), and a previously known visible, dark body (db). There is no evidence of a complex of sex determination genes in the region near tra. PMID:2118870

  19. Male Mouse Recombination Maps for Each Autosome Identified by Chromosome Painting

    PubMed Central

    Froenicke, Lutz; Anderson, Lorinda K.; Wienberg, Johannes; Ashley, Terry

    2002-01-01

    Linkage maps constructed from genetic analysis of gene order and crossover frequency provide few clues to the basis of genomewide distribution of meiotic recombination, such as chromosome structure, that influences meiotic recombination. To bridge this gap, we have generated the first cytological recombination map that identifies individual autosomes in the male mouse. We prepared meiotic chromosome (synaptonemal complex [SC]) spreads from 110 mouse spermatocytes, identified each autosome by multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization of chromosome-specific DNA libraries, and mapped >2,000 sites of recombination along individual autosomes, using immunolocalization of MLH1, a mismatch repair protein that marks crossover sites. We show that SC length is strongly correlated with crossover frequency and distribution. Although the length of most SCs corresponds to that predicted from their mitotic chromosome length rank, several SCs are longer or shorter than expected, with corresponding increases and decreases in MLH1 frequency. Although all bivalents share certain general recombination features, such as few crossovers near the centromeres and a high rate of distal recombination, individual bivalents have unique patterns of crossover distribution along their length. In addition to SC length, other, as-yet-unidentified, factors influence crossover distribution leading to hot regions on individual chromosomes, with recombination frequencies as much as six times higher than average, as well as cold spots with no recombination. By reprobing the SC spreads with genetically mapped BACs, we demonstrate a robust strategy for integrating genetic linkage and physical contig maps with mitotic and meiotic chromosome structure. PMID:12432495

  20. Genetic mapping of the pericentric region of human chromosome 10

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, M.K.

    1994-12-31

    A genetic linkage map of the pericentric region of human chromosome 10 has been generated to better define the region containing the gene causing the multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN-2A) disease, earlier limited to a 15.1 cM interval. 6 new markers have been added to this interval, where the markers are separated by an average of 2.65 cM. These new markers were used to evaluate three large MEN-3A families and did not reveal any recombinants that could better define the MEN-2A containing region. These families were used, however, to determine risks for individuals who were potential gene carriers. Six individuals were determined to be gene carriers and one individual, who had a thyroidectomy based on clinical testing results, was determined not to be a gene carrier. These results suggest that conventional clinical criteria need to be altered to include results from genetic testing. Since the map was generated, the RET proto-oncogene has been identified as the MEN-2A disease gene. The markers have been used to analyze familial and sporadic medullary thryoid carcinomas (MTCs). This analysis has determined one tumor (NL5) has retained heterozygosity for a limited region encompassing the RET region but has lost heterozygosity at all flanking loci on chromosome 10 tested, losing the allele which segregated with MEN-2A, suggesting a chromosomal rearrangement involving the RET locus. An analysis of sporadic and familial allelic instability with several dinucleotide repeat markers from chromosome 10 as well as other chromosomes. Similar results have been observed in colorectal cancer involving mutation in a mismatch repair enzyme (hMSH2). It is difficult to envision a direct role for the RET proto-oncogene in genetic instability, as seen in the colorectal tumors. Consequently, the genetic instability seen in the MEN-2A tumors, perhaps caused by mutations in the hMSH2 gene, may be the result of secondary effects developing independently from RET in MEN-2A tumors.

  1. Regional association analysis delineates a sequenced chromosome region influencing antinutritive seed meal compounds in oilseed rape.

    PubMed

    Snowdon, R J; Wittkop, B; Rezaidad, A; Hasan, M; Lipsa, F; Stein, A; Friedt, W

    2010-11-01

    This study describes the use of regional association analyses to delineate a sequenced region of a Brassica napus chromosome with a significant effect on antinutritive seed meal compounds in oilseed rape. A major quantitative trait locus (QTL) influencing seed colour, fibre content, and phenolic compounds was mapped to the same position on B. napus chromosome A9 in biparental mapping populations from two different yellow-seeded × black-seeded B. napus crosses. Sequences of markers spanning the QTL region identified synteny to a sequence contig from the corresponding chromosome A9 in Brassica rapa. Remapping of sequence-derived markers originating from the B. rapa sequence contig confirmed their position within the QTL. One of these markers also mapped to a seed colour and fibre QTL on the same chromosome in a black-seeded × black-seeded B. napus cross. Consequently, regional association analysis was performed in a genetically diverse panel of dark-seeded, winter-type oilseed rape accessions. For this we used closely spaced simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers spanning the sequence contig covering the QTL region. Correction for population structure was performed using a set of genome-wide SSR markers. The identification of QTL-derived markers with significant associations to seed colour, fibre content, and phenolic compounds in the association panel enabled the identification of positional and functional candidate genes for B. napus seed meal quality within a small segment of the B. rapa genome sequence.

  2. Genetic and Molecular Mapping of Chromosome Region 85a in Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Jones, W. K.; Rawls-Jr., J. M.

    1988-01-01

    Chromosome region 85A contains at least 12 genetic complementation groups, including the genes dhod, pink and hunchback. In order to better understand the organization of this chromosomal segment and to permit molecular studies of these genes, we have carried out a genetic analysis coupled with a chromosome walk to isolate the DNA containing these genes. Complementation tests with chromosomal deficiencies permitted unambiguous ordering of most of the complementation groups identified within the 85A region. Recombinant bacteriophage clones were isolated that collectively span over 120 kb of 85A DNA and these were used to produce a molecular map of the region. The breakpoint sites of a number of 85A chromosome rearrangements were localized on the molecular map, thereby delimiting regions of the DNA that contain the various genetic complementation groups. PMID:2852138

  3. [Utility of chromosome banding with ALU I enzyme for identifying methylated areas in breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Rojas-Atencio, Alicia; Yamarte, Leonard; Urdaneta, Karelis; Soto-Alvarez, Marisol; Alvarez Nava, Francisco; Cañizalez, Jenny; Quintero, Maribel; Atencio, Raquel; González, Richard

    2012-12-01

    Cancer is a group of disorders characterized by uncontrolled cell growth which is produced by two successive events: increased cell proliferation (tumor or neoplasia) and the invasive capacity of these cells (metastasis). DNA methylation is an epigenetic process which has been involved as an important pathogenic factor of cancer. DNA methylation participates in the regulation of gene expression, directly, by preventing the union of transcription factors, and indirectly, by promoting the "closed" structure of the chromatine. The objectives of this study were to identify hypermethyled chromosomal regions through the use of restriction Alu I endonuclease, and to relate cytogenetically these regions with tumor suppressive gene loci. Sixty peripheral blood samples of females with breast cancer were analyzed. Cell cultures were performed and cytogenetic spreads, previously digested with Alu I enzyme, were stained with Giemsa. Chromosomal centromeric and not centromeric regions were stained in 37% of cases. About 96% of stained hypermethyled chromosomal regions (1q, 2q, 6q) were linked with methylated genes associated with breast cancer. In addition, centromeric regions in chromosomes 3, 4, 8, 13, 14, 15 and 17, usually unstained, were found positive to digestion with Alu I enzime and Giemsa staining. We suggest the importance of this technique for the global visualization of the genome which can find methylated genes related to breast cancer, and thus lead to a specific therapy, and therefore a better therapeutic response.

  4. Perfect Conserved Linkage Across the Entire Mouse Chromosome 10 Region Homologous to Human Chromosome 21

    PubMed Central

    Wiltshire, Tim; Pletcher, Mathew; Cole, Susan E.; Villanueva, Melissa; Birren, Bruce; Lehoczky, Jessica; Dewar, Ken; Reeves, Roger H.

    1999-01-01

    The distal end of human Chromosome (HSA) 21 from PDXK to the telomere shows perfect conserved linkage with mouse Chromosome (MMU) 10. This region is bounded on the proximal side by a segment of homology to HSA22q11.2, and on the distal side by a region of homology with HSA19p13.1. A high-resolution PAC-based physical map is described that spans 2.8 Mb, including the entire 2.1 Mb from Pdxk to Prmt2 corresponding to HSA21. Thirty-four expressed sequences are mapped, three of which were not mapped previously in any species and nine more that are mapped in mouse for the first time. These genes confirm and extend the conserved linkage between MMU10 and HSA21. The ordered PACs and dense STS map provide a clone resource for biological experiments, for rapid and accurate mapping, and for genomic sequencing. The new genes identified here may be involved in Down syndrome (DS) or in several genetic diseases that map to this conserved region of HSA21. PMID:10613844

  5. Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Fa-Ten.

    1991-01-01

    We have made important progress since the beginning of the current grant year. We have further developed the microdissection and PCR- assisted microcloning techniques using the linker-adaptor method. We have critically evaluated the microdissection libraries constructed by this microtechnology and proved that they are of high quality. We further demonstrated that these microdissection clones are useful in identifying corresponding YAC clones for a thousand-fold expansion of the genomic coverage and for contig construction. We are also improving the technique of cloning the dissected fragments in test tube by the TDT method. We are applying both of these PCR cloning technique to human chromosomes 2 and 5 to construct region-specific libraries for physical mapping purposes of LLNL and LANL. Finally, we are exploring efficient procedures to use unique sequence microclones to isolate cDNA clones from defined chromosomal regions as valuable resources for identifying expressed gene sequences in the human genome. We believe that we are making important progress under the auspices of this DOE human genome program grant and we will continue to make significant contributions in the coming year. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Regional mapping of loci from human chromosome 2q to sheep chromosome 2q

    SciTech Connect

    Ansari, H.A.; Pearce, P.D.; Maher, D.W.; Malcolm, A.A.; Wood, N.J.; Phua, S.H.; Broad, T.E. )

    1994-03-01

    The human chromosome 2q loci, fibronectin 1 (FN1), the [alpha]1 chain of type III collagen (COL3A1), and the [delta] subunit of the muscle acetylcholine receptor (CHRND) have been regionally assigned to sheep chromosome 2q by in situ hybridization. COL3A1 is pericentromeric (2q12-q21), while FN1 and CHRND are in the subterminal region at 2q41-q44 and 2q42-qter, respectively. The mapping of FN1 assigns the sheep synthenic group U11, which contains FN1, villin 1 (VIL1), isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1), and [gamma] subunit of the muscle acetylcholine receptor (CHRNG), to sheep chromosome 2q. Inhibin-[alpha] (INHA) is also assigned to sheep chromosome 2q as FN1 and INHA compose sheep linkage group 3. These seven loci are members of a conserved chromosomal segment in human, mouse, and sheep. 23 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Applying deep learning technology to automatically identify metaphase chromosomes using scanning microscopic images: an initial investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yuchen; Lu, Xianglan; Yan, Shiju; Tan, Maxine; Cheng, Samuel; Li, Shibo; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin

    2016-03-01

    Automated high throughput scanning microscopy is a fast developing screening technology used in cytogenetic laboratories for the diagnosis of leukemia or other genetic diseases. However, one of the major challenges of using this new technology is how to efficiently detect the analyzable metaphase chromosomes during the scanning process. The purpose of this investigation is to develop a computer aided detection (CAD) scheme based on deep learning technology, which can identify the metaphase chromosomes with high accuracy. The CAD scheme includes an eight layer neural network. The first six layers compose of an automatic feature extraction module, which has an architecture of three convolution-max-pooling layer pairs. The 1st, 2nd and 3rd pair contains 30, 20, 20 feature maps, respectively. The seventh and eighth layers compose of a multiple layer perception (MLP) based classifier, which is used to identify the analyzable metaphase chromosomes. The performance of new CAD scheme was assessed by receiver operation characteristic (ROC) method. A number of 150 regions of interest (ROIs) were selected to test the performance of our new CAD scheme. Each ROI contains either interphase cell or metaphase chromosomes. The results indicate that new scheme is able to achieve an area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.886+/-0.043. This investigation demonstrates that applying a deep learning technique may enable to significantly improve the accuracy of the metaphase chromosome detection using a scanning microscopic imaging technology in the future.

  8. A Fast Implementation of a Scan Statistic for Identifying Chromosomal Patterns of Genome Wide Association Studies.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yan V; Jacobsen, Douglas M; Turner, Stephen T; Boerwinkle, Eric; Kardia, Sharon L R

    2009-03-15

    In order to take into account the complex genomic distribution of SNP variations when identifying chromosomal regions with significant SNP effects, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) association scan statistic was developed. To address the computational needs of genome wide association (GWA) studies, a fast Java application, which combines single-locus SNP tests and a scan statistic for identifying chromosomal regions with significant clusters of significant SNP effects, was developed and implemented. To illustrate this application, SNP associations were analyzed in a pharmacogenomic study of the blood pressure lowering effect of thiazide-diuretics (N=195) using the Affymetrix Human Mapping 100K Set. 55,335 tagSNPs (pair-wise linkage disequilibrium R(2)<0.5) were selected to reduce the frequency correlation between SNPs. A typical workstation can complete the whole genome scan including 10,000 permutation tests within 3 hours. The most significant regions locate on chromosome 3, 6, 13 and 16, two of which contain candidate genes that may be involved in the underlying drug response mechanism. The computational performance of ChromoScan-GWA and its scalability were tested with up to 1,000,000 SNPs and up to 4,000 subjects. Using 10,000 permutations, the computation time grew linearly in these datasets. This scan statistic application provides a robust statistical and computational foundation for identifying genomic regions associated with disease and provides a method to compare GWA results even across different platforms.

  9. Hypermethylated Chromosome Regions in Nine Fish Species with Heteromorphic Sex Chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Michael; Steinlein, Claus; Yano, Cassia F; Cioffi, Marcelo B

    2015-01-01

    Sites and amounts of 5-methylcytosine (5-MeC)-rich chromosome regions were detected in the karyotypes of 9 Brazilian species of Characiformes fishes by indirect immunofluorescence using a monoclonal anti-5-MeC antibody. These species, belonging to the genera Leporinus, Triportheus and Hoplias, are characterized by highly differentiated and heteromorphic ZW and XY sex chromosomes. In all species, the hypermethylated regions are confined to constitutive heterochromatin. The number and chromosome locations of hypermethylated heterochromatic regions in the karyotypes are constant and species-specific. Generally, heterochromatic regions that are darkly stained by the C-banding technique are distinctly hypermethylated, but several of the brightly fluorescing hypermethylated regions merely exhibit moderate or faint C-banding. The ZW and XY sex chromosomes of all 9 analyzed species also show species-specific heterochromatin hypermethylation patterns. The analysis of 5-MeC-rich chromosome regions contributes valuable data for comparative cytogenetics of closely related species and highlights the dynamic process of differentiation operating in the repetitive DNA fraction of sex chromosomes. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Identification of wheat chromosomal regions containing expressed resistance genes.

    PubMed Central

    Dilbirligi, Muharrem; Erayman, Mustafa; Sandhu, Devinder; Sidhu, Deepak; Gill, Kulvinder S

    2004-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to isolate and physically localize expressed resistance (R) genes on wheat chromosomes. Irrespective of the host or pest type, most of the 46 cloned R genes from 12 plant species share a strong sequence similarity, especially for protein domains and motifs. By utilizing this structural similarity to perform modified RNA fingerprinting and data mining, we identified 184 putative expressed R genes of wheat. These include 87 NB/LRR types, 16 receptor-like kinases, and 13 Pto-like kinases. The remaining were seven Hm1 and two Hs1(pro-1) homologs, 17 pathogenicity related, and 42 unique NB/kinases. About 76% of the expressed R-gene candidates were rare transcripts, including 42 novel sequences. Physical mapping of 121 candidate R-gene sequences using 339 deletion lines localized 310 loci to 26 chromosomal regions encompassing approximately 16% of the wheat genome. Five major R-gene clusters that spanned only approximately 3% of the wheat genome but contained approximately 47% of the candidate R genes were observed. Comparative mapping localized 91% (82 of 90) of the phenotypically characterized R genes to 18 regions where 118 of the R-gene sequences mapped. PMID:15020436

  11. A Large Pseudoautosomal Region on the Sex Chromosomes of the Frog Silurana tropicalis

    PubMed Central

    Bewick, Adam J.; Chain, Frédéric J.J.; Zimmerman, Lyle B.; Sesay, Abdul; Gilchrist, Michael J.; Owens, Nick D.L.; Seifertova, Eva; Krylov, Vladimir; Macha, Jaroslav; Tlapakova, Tereza; Kubickova, Svatava; Cernohorska, Halina; Zarsky, Vojtech; Evans, Ben J.

    2013-01-01

    Sex chromosome divergence has been documented across phylogenetically diverse species, with amphibians typically having cytologically nondiverged (“homomorphic”) sex chromosomes. With an aim of further characterizing sex chromosome divergence of an amphibian, we used “RAD-tags” and Sanger sequencing to examine sex specificity and heterozygosity in the Western clawed frog Silurana tropicalis (also known as Xenopus tropicalis). Our findings based on approximately 20 million genotype calls and approximately 200 polymerase chain reaction-amplified regions across multiple male and female genomes failed to identify a substantially sized genomic region with genotypic hallmarks of sex chromosome divergence, including in regions known to be tightly linked to the sex-determining region. We also found that expression and molecular evolution of genes linked to the sex-determining region did not differ substantially from genes in other parts of the genome. This suggests that the pseudoautosomal region, where recombination occurs, comprises a large portion of the sex chromosomes of S. tropicalis. These results may in part explain why African clawed frogs have such a high incidence of polyploidization, shed light on why amphibians have a high rate of sex chromosome turnover, and raise questions about why homomorphic sex chromosomes are so prevalent in amphibians. PMID:23666865

  12. The X chromosome of monotremes shares a highly conserved region with the eutherian and marsupial X chromosomes despite the absence of X chromosome inactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, J.M.; Spencer, J.A.; Graves, J.A.M. ); Riggs, A.D. )

    1990-09-01

    Eight genes, located on the long arm of the human X chromosome and present on the marsupial X chromosome, were mapped by in situ hybridization to the chromosomes of the platypus Ornithorhynchus anatinus, one of the three species of monotreme mammals. All were located on the X chromosome. The authors conclude that the long arm of the human X chromosome represents a highly conserved region that formed part of the X chromosome in a mammalian ancestor at least 150 million years ago. Since three of these genes are located on the long arm of the platypus X chromosome, which is G-band homologous to the Y chromosome and apparently exempt from X chromosome inactivation, the conservation of this region has evidently not depended on isolation by X-Y chromosome differentiation and X chromosome inactivation.

  13. Y chromosome specific nucleic acid probe and method for identifying the Y chromosome in SITU

    DOEpatents

    Gray, J.W.; Weier, H.U.

    1999-03-30

    A method for producing a Y chromosome specific probe selected from highly repeating sequences on that chromosome is described. There is little or no nonspecific binding to autosomal and X chromosomes, and a very large signal is provided. Inventive primers allowing the use of PCR for both sample amplification and probe production are described, as is their use in producing large DNA chromosome painting sequences. 9 figs.

  14. Y chromosome specific nucleic acid probe and method for identifying the Y chromosome in SITU

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich

    1999-01-01

    A method for producing a Y chromosome specific probe selected from highly repeating sequences on that chromosome is described. There is little or no nonspecific binding to autosomal and X chromosomes, and a very large signal is provided. Inventive primers allowing the use of PCR for both sample amplification and probe production are described, as is their use in producing large DNA chromosome painting sequences.

  15. Phenotypic consequences of a mosaic marker chromosome identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) as being derived from chromosome 16

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, J.H.; Zhou, X.; Pletcher, B.A.

    1994-09-01

    De novo marker chromosomes are detected in 1 in 2500 amniotic fluid samples and are associated with a 10-15% risk for phenotypic abnormality. FISH can be utilized as a research tool to identify the origins of marker chromosomes. The phenotypic consequences of a marker chromosome derived from the short arm of chromosome 16 are described. A 26-year-old woman underwent amniocentesis at 28 weeks gestation because of a prenatally diagnosed tetralogy of Fallot. Follow-up ultrasounds also showed ventriculomegaly and cleft lip and palate. 32 of 45 cells had the karyotype 47,XY,+mar; the remaining cells were 46,XY. The de novo marker chromosome was C-band positive and non-satellited and failed to stain with distamycin A/DAPI. At birth the ultrasound findings were confirmed and dysmorphic features and cryptorchidism were noted. Although a newborn blood sample contained only normal cells, mosaicism was confirmed in 2 skin biopsies. FISH using whole-chromosome painting and alpha-satellite DNA probes showed that the marker chromosome had originated from chromosome 16. As proximal 16q is distamycin A/DAPI positive, the marker is apparently derived from proximal 16p. At 15 months of age, this child is hypotonic, globally delayed and is gavage-fed. His physical examination is significant for microbrachycephaly, a round face, sparse scalp hair, ocular hypertelorism, exotropia, a flat, wide nasal bridge and tip, mild micrognathia, and tapered fingers with lymphedema of hands and feet. Inguinal hernias have been repaired. His features are consistent with those described for patients trisomic for most or all of the short arm of chromosome 16. Marker chromosomes derived from the short arm of chromosome 16 appear to have phenotypic consequences. As the origin of more marker chromosomes are identified using FISH, their karyotype/phenotype correlations will become more apparent, which will permit more accurate genetic counseling.

  16. [Late-replicating regions in salivary gland polytene chromosomes of Drosophila melanogaster].

    PubMed

    Kolesnikov, T D; Andreenkova, N G; Beliaeva, E S; Goncharov, F P; Zykova, T Iu; Boldyreva, L V; Pokholkova, g V; Zhimulev, I F

    2013-01-01

    About 240 specific regions that are replicated at the very end of the S-phase have been identified in D. melanogaster polytene chromosomes. These regions have a repressive chromatine state, low gene density, long intergenic distances and are enriched in tissue specific genes. In polytene chromosomes, about a quarter of these regions have no enough time to complete replication. As a result, underreplication zones represented by fewer DNA copy number, appear. We studied 60 chromosome regions that demonstrated the most pronounced under-replication. By comparing the location of these regions on a molecular map with syntenic blocks found earlier for Drosophila species by von Grotthuss et al., 2010, we have shown that across the genus Drosophila, these regions tend to have conserved gene order. This forces us to assume the existence of evolutionary mechanisms aimed at maintaining the integrity of these regions.

  17. Genome-wide Linkage Screen in Familial Parkinson Disease Identifies Loci on Chromosomes 3 and 18

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiaoyi; Martin, Eden R.; Liu, Yutao; Mayhew, Gregory; Vance, Jeffery M.; Scott, William K.

    2009-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a complex, multifactorial neurodegenerative disease with substantial evidence for genetic risk factors. We conducted a genome-wide linkage screen of 5824 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in 278 families of European, non-Hispanic descent to localize regions that harbor susceptibility loci for PD. By using parametric and nonparametric linkage analyses and allowing for genetic heterogeneity among families, we found two loci for PD. Significant evidence for linkage was detected on chromosome 18q11 (maximum lod score [MLOD] = 4.1) and suggestive evidence for linkage was obtained on chromosome 3q25 (MLOD = 2.5). These results were strongest in families not previously screened for linkage, and simulation studies suggest that these findings are likely due to locus heterogeneity rather than random statistical error. The finding of two loci (one highly statistically significant) suggests that additional PD susceptibility genes might be identified through targeted candidate gene studies in these regions. PMID:19327735

  18. Assignment of genes to regions of mouse chromosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Eicher, E M; Washburn, L L

    1978-01-01

    A genetic mapping procedure, called the duplication-deficiency method, is described. This method permits the genetic location of a translocation to be determined within a linkage group without the use of recombination. By utilizing the duplication-deficiency method to define the genetic breakpoints for a series of translocations involving a given chromosome and integrating this information with their cytological breakpoints, obtained by Giemsa banding, a genetic map of the chromosomes is constructed whereby groups of loci are assigned to banded regions. Duplication-deficiency mapping and Giemsa banding analysis of the T(X;7)1Ct and T(7;19)145H translocations together with information from the c25H deletion have permitted mouse chromosome 7 to be divided into six and chromosome 19 into two definable genetic regions. Images PMID:273256

  19. Evolution of the terminal regions of the Streptomyces linear chromosome.

    PubMed

    Choulet, Frédéric; Aigle, Bertrand; Gallois, Alexandre; Mangenot, Sophie; Gerbaud, Claude; Truong, Chantal; Francou, François-Xavier; Fourrier, Céline; Guérineau, Michel; Decaris, Bernard; Barbe, Valérie; Pernodet, Jean-Luc; Leblond, Pierre

    2006-12-01

    Comparative analysis of the Streptomyces chromosome sequences, between Streptomyces coelicolor, Streptomyces avermitilis, and Streptomyces ambofaciens ATCC23877 (whose partial sequence is released in this study), revealed a highly compartmentalized genetic organization of their genome. Indeed, despite the presence of specific genomic islands, the central part of the chromosome appears highly syntenic. In contrast, the chromosome of each species exhibits large species-specific terminal regions (from 753 to 1,393 kb), even when considering closely related species (S. ambofaciens and S. coelicolor). Interestingly, the size of the central conserved region between species decreases as the phylogenetic distance between them increases, whereas the specific terminal fraction reciprocally increases in size. Between highly syntenic central regions and species-specific chromosomal parts, there is a notable degeneration of synteny due to frequent insertions/deletions. This reveals a massive and constant genomic flux (from lateral gene transfer and DNA rearrangements) affecting the terminal contingency regions. We speculate that a gradient of recombination rate (i.e., insertion/deletion events) toward the extremities is the force driving the exclusion of essential genes from the terminal regions (i.e., chromosome compartmentalization) and generating a fast gene turnover for strong adaptation capabilities.

  20. Isolation, characterization, and regional mapping of microclones from a human chromosome 21 microdissection library

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, J.; Hartz, J.; Yisheng Xu; Gemmill, R.M.; Patterson, D.; Kao, Faten ); Gemmill, R.M.; Patterson, D.; Kao, Fa-Ten ); Korenberg, J.R. )

    1992-08-01

    Thirty-four unique-sequence microclones were isolated from a previously described microdissection library of human chromosome 21 and were regionally mapped using a cell hybrid mapping panel which consists of six cell hybrids and divides chromosome 21 into eight regions. The mapping results showed that the microclones were unevenly distributed along chromosome 21, with the majority of microclones located in the distal half portion of the long arm, between 21q21.3 and 21qter. The number of unique-sequence clones began to decrease significantly from 21q21.2 to centromere and extending to the short arm. This finding is consistent with those reported in other chromosome 21 libraries. Thus, it may be inferred that the proximal portion of the long arm of chromosome 21 contains higher proportions of repetitive sequences, rather than unique sequences of genes. The microclones were also characterized for insert size and were used to identify the corresponding genomic fragments generated by HindIII. In addition, the authors demonstrated that the microclones with short inserts can be efficiently used to identify YAC (yeast artificial chromosome) clones with large inserts, for increased genomic coverage for high-resolution physical mapping. They also used 200 unique-sequence microclones to screen a human liver cDNA library and identified two cDNA clones which were regionally assigned to the 21q21.3-q22.1 region. Thus, generation of unique-sequence microclones from chromosome 21 appears to be useful to isolate and regionally map many cDNA clones, among which will be candidate genes for important diseases on chromosome 21, including Down syndrome, Alzheimer disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and one form of epilepsy.

  1. The mouse and human excitatory amino acid transporter gene (EAAT1) maps to mouse chromosome 15 and a region of syntenic homology on human chromosome 5

    SciTech Connect

    Kirschner, M.A.; Arriza, J.L.; Amara, S.G.

    1994-08-01

    The gene for human excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT1) was localized to the distal region of human chromosome 5p13 by in situ hybridization of metaphase chromosome spreads. Interspecific backcross analysis identified the mouse Eaat1 locus in a region of 5p13 homology on mouse chromosome 15. Markers that are linked with EAAT1 on both human and mouse chromosomes include the receptors for leukemia inhibitory factor, interleukin-7, and prolactin. The Eaat1 locus appears not be linked to the epilepsy mutant stg locus, which is also on chromosome 15. The EAAT1 locus is located in a region of 5p deletions that have been associated with mental retardation and microcephaly. 22 refs., 2 figs.

  2. [Fluorescence in situ hybridization with DNA probes derived from individual chromosomes and chromosome regions].

    PubMed

    Bogomolov, A G; Karamysheva, T V; Rubtsov, N B

    2014-01-01

    A significant part of the eukaryotic genomes consists of repetitive DNA, which can form large clusters or distributed along euchromatic chromosome regions. Repeats located in chromosomal regions make a problem in analysis and identification of the chromosomal material with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). In most cases, the identification of chromosome regions using FISH requires detection of the signal produced with unique sequences. The feasibility, advantages and disadvantages of traditional methods of suppression of repetitive DNA hybridization, methods of repeats-free probe construction and methods of chromosome-specific DNA sequences visualization using image processing of multicolor FISH results are considered in the paper. The efficiency of different techniques for DNA probe generation, different FISH protocols, and image processing of obtained microscopic images depends on the genomic size and structure of analyzing species. This problem was discussed and different approaches were considered for the analysis of the species with very large genome, rare species and species which specimens are too small in size to obtain the amount of genomic and Cot-1 DNA required for suppression of repetitive DNA hybridization.

  3. Is mammalian chromosomal evolution driven by regions of genome fragility?

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Herrera, Aurora; Castresana, Jose; Robinson, Terence J

    2006-01-01

    Background A fundamental question in comparative genomics concerns the identification of mechanisms that underpin chromosomal change. In an attempt to shed light on the dynamics of mammalian genome evolution, we analyzed the distribution of syntenic blocks, evolutionary breakpoint regions, and evolutionary breakpoints taken from public databases available for seven eutherian species (mouse, rat, cattle, dog, pig, cat, and horse) and the chicken, and examined these for correspondence with human fragile sites and tandem repeats. Results Our results confirm previous investigations that showed the presence of chromosomal regions in the human genome that have been repeatedly used as illustrated by a high breakpoint accumulation in certain chromosomes and chromosomal bands. We show, however, that there is a striking correspondence between fragile site location, the positions of evolutionary breakpoints, and the distribution of tandem repeats throughout the human genome, which similarly reflect a non-uniform pattern of occurrence. Conclusion These observations provide further evidence that certain chromosomal regions in the human genome have been repeatedly used in the evolutionary process. As a consequence, the genome is a composite of fragile regions prone to reorganization that have been conserved in different lineages, and genomic tracts that do not exhibit the same levels of evolutionary plasticity. PMID:17156441

  4. Identification of chromosome 7 inversion breakpoints in an autistic family narrows candidate region for autism susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Cukier, Holly N; Skaar, David A; Rayner-Evans, Melissa Y; Konidari, Ioanna; Whitehead, Patrice L; Jaworski, James M; Cuccaro, Michael L; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Gilbert, John R

    2009-10-01

    Chromosomal breaks and rearrangements have been observed in conjunction with autism and autistic spectrum disorders. A chromosomal inversion has been previously reported in autistic siblings, spanning the region from approximately 7q22.1 to 7q31. This family is distinguished by having multiple individuals with autism and associated disabilities. The region containing the inversion has been strongly implicated in autism by multiple linkage studies, and has been particularly associated with language defects in autism as well as in other disorders with language components. Mapping of the inversion breakpoints by FISH has localized the inversion to the region spanning approximately 99-108.75 Mb of chromosome 7. The proximal breakpoint has the potential to disrupt either the coding sequence or regulatory regions of a number of cytochrome P450 genes while the distal region falls in a relative gene desert. Copy number variant analysis of the breakpoint regions detected no duplication or deletion that could clearly be associated with disease status. Association analysis in our autism data set using single nucleotide polymorphisms located near the breakpoints showed no significant association with proximal breakpoint markers, but has identified markers near the distal breakpoint ( approximately 108-110 Mb) with significant associations to autism. The chromosomal abnormality in this family strengthens the case for an autism susceptibility gene in the chromosome 7q22-31 region and targets a candidate region for further investigation.

  5. Molecular mapping of the Edwards syndrome phenotype to two noncontiguous regions on chromosome 18.

    PubMed Central

    Boghosian-Sell, L.; Mewar, R.; Harrison, W.; Shapiro, R. M.; Zackai, E. H.; Carey, J.; Davis-Keppen, L.; Hudgins, L.; Overhauser, J.

    1994-01-01

    In an effort to identify regions on chromosome 18 that may be critical in the appearance of the Edwards syndrome phenotype, we have analyzed six patients with partial duplication of chromosome 18. Four of the patients have duplications involving the distal half of 18q (18q21.1-qter) and are very mildly affected. The remaining two patients have most of 18q (18q12.1-qter) duplicated, are severely affected, and have been diagnosed with Edwards syndrome. We have employed FISH, using DNA probes from a chromosome 18-specific library, for the precise determination of the duplicated material in each of these patients. The clinical features and the extent of the chromosomal duplication in these patients were compared with four previously reported partial trisomy 18 patients, to identify regions of chromosome 18 that may be responsible for certain clinical features of trisomy 18. The comparative analysis confirmed that there is no single region on 18q that is sufficient to produce the trisomy 18 phenotype and identified two regions on 18q that may work in conjunction to produce the Edwards syndrome phenotype. In addition, correlative analysis indicates that duplication of 18q12.3-q22.1 may be associated with more severe mental retardation in trisomy 18 individuals. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:8079991

  6. Molecular mapping of the Edwards syndrome phenotype to two noncontiguous regions on chromosome 18

    SciTech Connect

    Boghosian-Sell, L.; Mewar, R.; Harrison, W.; Shapiro, R.M.; Zackai, E.H.; Carey, J.; Davis-Keppen, L.; Hudgins, L.; Overhauser, J.

    1994-09-01

    In an effort to identify regions on chromosome 18 that may be critical in the appearance of the Edwards syndrome phenotype, the authors have analyzed six patients with partial duplication of chromosome 18. Four of the patients have duplications involving the distal half of 18q (18q21.1-qter) and are very mildly affected. The remaining two patients have most of 18q (18q12.1-qter) duplicated, are severely affected, and have been diagnosed with Edwards syndrome. The authors have employed FISH, using DNA probes from a chromosome 18-specific library, for the precise determination of the duplicated material in each of these patients. The clinical features and the extent of the chromosomal duplication in these patients were compared with four previously reported partial trisomy 18 patients, to identify regions of chromosome 18 that may be responsible for certain clinical features of trisomy 18. The comparative analysis confirmed that there is no single region on 18q that is sufficient to produce the trisomy 18 phenotype and identified two regions on 18q that may work in conjunction to produce the Edwards syndrome phenotype. In addition, correlative analysis indicates that duplication of 18q12.3-q22.1 may be associated with more severe mental retardation in trisomy 18 individuals. 25 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Genetic testing in infantile spasms identifies a chromosome 13q deletion and retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Jones, Kevin; Minassian, Berge A

    2014-05-01

    Infantile spasms is an epileptic encephalopathy and the common final manifestation of numerous disparate insults to the developing brain during infancy. The varied etiologies may be structural, metabolic, genetic, or unknown. Etiological diagnosis is important as it may lead to specific therapy, which may affect developmental outcome. We report a case of infantile spasms of unknown etiology with dysmorphic features, in which genetic copy number variation microarray testing was included in the investigation of the cause of the disease. A large deletion of chromosome 13 was identified in the region 13q13 to 13q21.3 encompassing the retinoblastoma gene (13q14.2). Urgent ophthalmological evaluation revealed an asymptomatic retinoblastoma of the left eye, leading to early treatment. This is the first case report of infantile spasms specifically associated with a chromosome 13q deletion. Chromosomal region 13q13 to 13q21.3 may contain one or more genes whose hemizygous loss leads to infantile spasms. Copy number variation testing for cryptogenic infantile spasms led to the discovery of a mutation responsible for retinoblastoma, enabling early diagnosis and treatment of a potentially life-threatening cancer. High-sensitivity molecular diagnosis improves health care and substantially reduces expenses. This shift in diagnostic evaluation is broadly relevant to health care. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Transcriptional map of chromosome region 6q16-->q21.

    PubMed

    Karayianni, E; Magnanini, C; Orphanos, V; Negrini, M; Maniatis, G M; Spathas, D H; Barbanti-Brodano, G; Morelli, C

    1999-01-01

    We present the transcription map of chromosome region 6q16-->q21 by mapping fifteen known genes within this region. Five genes lay in the subregion containing a tumor suppressor gene, eight genes are located in the subregion harboring a senescence gene, and two genes are distal to the latter region. The precise location of the genes was obtained using a previously described translocation and deletion mouse/human hybrid panel. An even more accurate definition was possible for the genes spanning the senescence gene region, since a previously described YAC contig with its restriction map was available. From this transcription map it is possible to derive a large region of synteny with mouse chromosome 10.

  9. Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma: Identifying the Loss of the Y Chromosome on Multiphasic MDCT.

    PubMed

    Young, Jonathan R; Coy, Heidi; Douek, Michael; Lo, Pechin; Sayre, James; Pantuck, Allan J; Raman, Steven S

    2017-08-01

    The objective of our study was to investigate whether multiphasic MDCT enhancement can help identify clear cell renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) with the loss of the Y chromosome. We derived a cohort of 43 clear cell RCCs in men who underwent preoperative four-phase renal mass MDCT from October 2000 to August 2013. Each lesion was segmented in its entirety on axial images. A computer-assisted detection algorithm selected a 0.5-cm-diameter region of maximal attenuation within each lesion in each phase. A 0.5-cm-diameter ROI was manually placed on uninvolved renal cortex in each phase. The relative attenuation of each lesion was calculated as follows: [(maximal lesion attenuation - cortex attenuation) / cortex attenuation] × 100. Absolute attenuation and relative attenuation in each phase were compared using t tests. Both clear cell RCCs with the loss of the Y chromosome and clear cell RCCs without the loss of the Y chromosome exhibited peak enhancement in the corticomedullary phase. However, relative nephrographic attenuation of clear cell RCCs with the loss of Y was significantly less than that of clear cell RCCs without the loss of Y (mean, -8.9 vs 8.4 respectively; p = 0.013). A relative nephrographic attenuation threshold of -1.6 identified the loss of Y with an accuracy of 70% (30/43), sensitivity of 73% (16/22), and specificity of 67% (14/21). Multiphasic MDCT enhancement may assist in identifying the loss of the Y chromosome in clear cell RCCs; this result should be validated in a large prospective trial.

  10. Enhancement of multichannel chromosome classification using a region-based classifier and vector median filtering.

    PubMed

    Karvelis, Petros S; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I; Tsalikakis, Dimitrios G; Georgiou, Ioannis A

    2009-07-01

    Multichannel chromosome image acquisition is used for cancer diagnosis and research on genetic disorders. This type of imaging, apart from aiding the cytogeneticist in several ways, facilitates the visual detection of chromosome abnormalities. However, chromosome misclassification errors result from different factors, such as uneven hybridization, spectral overlap among fluors, and biochemical noise. In this paper, we enhance the chromosome classification accuracy by making use of a region Bayes classifier that increases the classification accuracy when compared to the already developed pixel-by-pixel classifier and by incorporating the vector median filtering approach for filtering of the image. The method is evaluated using a publicly available database that contains 183 six-channel chromosome sets of images. The overall improvement on the chromosome classification accuracy is 9.99%, compared to the pixel-by-pixel classifier without filtering. This improvement in the chromosome classification accuracy would allow subtle deoxyribonucleic acid abnormalities to be identified easily. The efficiency of the method might further improve by using features extracted from each region and a more sophisticated classifier.

  11. Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Fa-Ten.

    1992-08-01

    During the grant period progress has been made in the successful demonstration of regional mapping of microclones derived from microdissection libraries; successful demonstration of the feasibility of converting microclones with short inserts into yeast artificial chromosome clones with very large inserts for high resolution physical mapping of the dissected region; Successful demonstration of the usefulness of region-specific microclones to isolate region-specific cDNA clones as candidate genes to facilitate search for the crucial genes underlying genetic diseases assigned to the dissected region; and the successful construction of four region-specific microdissection libraries for human chromosome 2, including 2q35-q37, 2q33-q35, 2p23-p25 and 2p2l-p23. The 2q35-q37 library has been characterized in detail. The characterization of the other three libraries is in progress. These region-specific microdissection libraries and the unique sequence microclones derived from the libraries will be valuable resources for investigators engaged in high resolution physical mapping and isolation of disease-related genes residing in these chromosomal regions.

  12. Narrowing the genetic interval and yeast artificial chromosome map in the branchio-oto-renal region on chromosome 8q

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Shrawan; Kimberling, W.J.; Pinnt, J.

    1996-01-01

    Branchio-oto-renal (BOR) syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by branchial abnormality, hearing loss, and renal anomalies. Recently, the disease gene has been localized to chromosome 8q. Here, we report genetic studies that further refine the disease gene region to a smaller interval and identify several YACs from the critical region. We studied two large, clinically well-characterized BOR families with a set of 13 polymorphic markers spanning the D8S165-D8S275 interval from the chromosome 8q region. Based on multipoint analysis, the highest likelihood for the location of the BOR gene is between markers D8S543 and D8S530, a distance of about 2 cM. YACs that map in the BOR critical region have been identified and characterized by fluorescence in situ hybridization and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. A YAC contig, based on the STS content map, that covers a minimum of 4 Mb of human DNA in the critical region of BOR is assembled. This lays the groundwork for the construction of a transcriptional map of this region and the eventual identification of genes involved in BOR syndrome. 40 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Chromosome Fragile Sites in Arabidopsis Harbor Matrix Attachment Regions That May Be Associated with Ancestral Chromosome Rearrangement Events

    PubMed Central

    dela Paz, Joelle S.; Stronghill, Patti E.; Douglas, Scott J.; Saravia, Sandy; Hasenkampf, Clare A.; Riggs, C. Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the BREVIPEDICELLUS (BP) gene of Arabidopsis thaliana condition a pleiotropic phenotype featuring defects in internode elongation, the homeotic conversion of internode to node tissue, and downward pointing flowers and pedicels. We have characterized five mutant alleles of BP, generated by EMS, fast neutrons, x-rays, and aberrant T–DNA insertion events. Curiously, all of these mutagens resulted in large deletions that range from 140 kbp to over 900 kbp just south of the centromere of chromosome 4. The breakpoints of these mutants were identified by employing inverse PCR and DNA sequencing. The south breakpoints of all alleles cluster in BAC T12G13, while the north breakpoint locations are scattered. With the exception of a microhomology at the bp-5 breakpoint, there is no homology in the junction regions, suggesting that double-stranded breaks are repaired via non-homologous end joining. Southwestern blotting demonstrated the presence of nuclear matrix binding sites in the south breakpoint cluster (SBC), which is A/T rich and possesses a variety of repeat sequences. In situ hybridization on pachytene chromosome spreads complemented the molecular analyses and revealed heretofore unrecognized structural variation between the Columbia and Landsberg erecta genomes. Data mining was employed to localize other large deletions around the HY4 locus to the SBC region and to show that chromatin modifications in the region shift from a heterochromatic to euchromatic profile. Comparisons between the BP/HY4 regions of A. lyrata and A. thaliana revealed that several chromosome rearrangement events have occurred during the evolution of these two genomes. Collectively, the features of the region are strikingly similar to the features of characterized metazoan chromosome fragile sites, some of which are associated with karyotype evolution. PMID:23284301

  14. Chromosome Rearrangements That Involve the Nucleolus Organizer Region in Neurospora

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, D. D.; Raju, N. B.; Barry, E. G.; Butler, D. K.

    1995-01-01

    In ~3% of Neurospora crassa rearrangements, part of a chromosome arm becomes attached to the nucleolus organizer region (NOR) at one end of chromosome 2 (linkage group V). Investigations with one inversion and nine translocations of this type are reported here. They appear genetically to be nonreciprocal and terminal. When a rearrangement is heterozygous, about one-third of viable progeny are segmental aneuploids with the translocated segment present in two copies, one in normal position and one associated with the NOR. Duplications from many of the rearrangements are highly unstable, breaking down by loss of the NOR-attached segment to restore normal chromosome sequence. When most of the rearrangements are homozygous, attenuated strands can be seen extending through the unstained nucleolus at pachytene, joining the translocated distal segment to the remainder of chromosome 2. Although the rearrangements appear genetically to be nonreciprocal, molecular evidence shows that at least several of them are physically reciprocal, with a block of rDNA repeats translocated away from the NOR. Evidence that NOR-associated breakpoints are nonterminal is also provided by intercrosses between pairs of translocations that transfer different-length segments of the same donor-chromosome arm to the NOR. PMID:8582636

  15. [Prevalence of congenital abnormalities identified in fetuses with 13, 18 and 21 chromosomal trisomy].

    PubMed

    Emer, Caroline Soares Cristofari; Duque, Julio Alejandro Peña; Müller, Ana Lúcia Letti; Gus, Rejane; Sanseverino, Maria Teresa Vieira; da Silva, André Anjos; Magalhães, José Antonio de Azevedo

    2015-07-01

    To describe the prevalence of malformations found in fetuses with trisomy of chromosomes 13, 18 and 21 by identifying the most frequent within each condition. A retrospective cross-sectional study with the analysis of trisomy cases of chromosomes 13, 18 and 21 diagnosed through fetal karyotype obtained by amniocentesis/cordocentesis, between October 1994 and May 2014, at a Teaching Hospital in Brazil Southern Region. Malformations identified through morphological ultrasonography were described and, subsequently, confirmed in newborn examinations and/or fetal autopsy. The results were analyzed using Fisher's test and analysis of variance (ANOVA), with a 5% level of significance (p=0.05). Sixty-nine cases of trisomy were diagnosed among 840 exams; nine were excluded due to outcome outside Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre or incomplete records, remaining 60 cases (nine cases of chromosome 13 trisomy, 26 of chromosome 18, and 25 of chromosome 21). In all three groups, heart disease occurred in most cases; the ventricular septal defect was more prevalent and occurred in 66.7% of the trisomy 13 group. Gastrointestinal abnormalities were more prevalent in the trisomy 18 group, especially omphalocele (38.5%; p<0.01). Genitourinary anomalies were more significantly frequent in the trisomy 13 group (pyelectasis, 55.6% - p<0.01; ambiguous genitalia, 33.3% - p=0.01). Central nervous system defects were identified in all cases of trisomy 13. Facial cracks were significantly more prevalent among fetuses with trisomy 13 (66.7%; p<0.01). Hand and feet malformations significantly differed among the trisomy groups. Hand defects occurred in 50% of trisomy 18 cases, and in 44.4% of all trisomy 13 cases (p<0.01); congenital clubfoot was more common in the trisomy 18 group, being detected in 46.2% of fetuses (p<0.01). The abnormalities were found in 50.9, 27.3 and 21.7% of trisomy 18, 13 and 21 cases respectively. Many fetal malformations identified at ultrasound are suggestive of

  16. Fine Mapping and Evolution of a QTL Region on Cattle Chromosome 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donthu, Ravikiran

    2009-01-01

    The goal of my dissertation was to fine map the milk yield and composition quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapped to cattle chromosome 3 (BTA3) by Heyen et al. (1999) and to identify candidate genes affecting these traits. To accomplish this, the region between "BL41" and "TGLA263" was mapped to the cattle genome sequence assembly Btau 3.1 and a…

  17. Fine Mapping and Evolution of a QTL Region on Cattle Chromosome 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donthu, Ravikiran

    2009-01-01

    The goal of my dissertation was to fine map the milk yield and composition quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapped to cattle chromosome 3 (BTA3) by Heyen et al. (1999) and to identify candidate genes affecting these traits. To accomplish this, the region between "BL41" and "TGLA263" was mapped to the cattle genome sequence assembly Btau 3.1 and a…

  18. A yeast artificial chromosome contig of the critical region for cri-du-chat syndrome.

    PubMed

    Goodart, S A; Simmons, A D; Grady, D; Rojas, K; Moyzis, R K; Lovett, M; Overhauser, J

    1994-11-01

    Cri-du-chat is a chromosomal deletion syndrome characterized by partial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 5. The clinical symptoms include growth and mental retardation, microcephaly, hypertelorism, epicanthal folds, hypotonia, and a high-pitched monochromatic cry that is usually considered diagnostic for the syndrome. Recently, a correlation between clinical features and the extent of the chromosome 5 deletions has identified two regions of the short arm that appear to be critical for the abnormal development manifested in this syndrome. Loss of a small region in 5p15.2 correlates with all of the clinical features of cri-du-chat with the exception of the cat-like cry, which maps to 5p15.3. Here we report the construction of a YAC contig that spans the chromosomal region in 5p15.2 that plays a major role in the etiology of the cri-du-chat syndrome. YACs that span the 2-Mb cri-du-chat critical region have been identified and characterized. This YAC contig lays the groundwork for the construction of a transcriptional map of this region and the eventual identification of genes involved in the clinical features associated with the cri-du-chat syndrome. It also provides a new diagnostic tool for cri-du-chat in the shape of a YAC clone that may span the entire critical region.

  19. A yeast artificial chromosome contig of the critical region for cri-du-chat syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Goodart, S.A.; Rojas, K.; Overhauser, J.

    1994-11-01

    Cri-du-chat is a chromosomal deletion syndrome characterized by partial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 5. The clinical symptoms include growth and mental retardation, microcephaly, hypertelorism, epicanthal folds, hyptonia, and a high-pitched monochromatic cry that is usually considered diagnostic for the syndrome. Recently, a correlation between clinical features and the extent of the chromosome 5 deletions has identified two regions of the short arm that appear to be critical for the abnormal development manifested in this syndrome. Loss of a small region in 5p15.2 correlates with all of the clinical features of cri-du-chat with the exception of the cat-like cry, which maps to 5p15.3. Here the authors report the construction of a YAC contig that spans the chromosomal region in 5p15.2 that plays a major role in the etiology of the cri-du-chat syndrome. YACs that span the 2-Mb cri-du-chat critical region have been identified and characterized. This YAC contig lays the groundwork for the construction of a transcriptional map of this region and the eventual identification of genes involved in the clinical features associated with the cri-du-chat syndrome. It also provides a new diagnostic tool for cri-du-chat in the shape of a YAC clone that may span the entire critical region. 24 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Characterization of a rice variety with high hydraulic conductance and identification of the chromosome region responsible using chromosome segment substitution lines

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Shunsuke; Tsuru, Yukiko; Kondo, Motohiko; Yamamoto, Toshio; Arai-Sanoh, Yumiko; Ando, Tsuyu; Ookawa, Taiichiro; Yano, Masahiro; Hirasawa, Tadashi

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims The rate of photosynthesis in paddy rice often decreases at noon on sunny days because of water stress, even under submerged conditions. Maintenance of higher rates of photosynthesis during the day might improve both yield and dry matter production in paddy rice. A high-yielding indica variety, ‘Habataki’, maintains a high rate of leaf photosynthesis during the daytime because of the higher hydraulic conductance from roots to leaves than in the standard japonica variety ‘Sasanishiki’. This research was conducted to characterize the trait responsible for the higher hydraulic conductance in ‘Habataki’ and identified a chromosome region for the high hydraulic conductance. Methods Hydraulic conductance to passive water transport and to osmotic water transport was determined for plants under intense transpiration and for plants without transpiration, respectively. The varietal difference in hydraulic conductance was examined with respect to root surface area and hydraulic conductivity (hydraulic conductance per root surface area, Lp). To identify the chromosome region responsible for higher hydraulic conductance, chromosome segment substitution lines (CSSLs) derived from a cross between ‘Sasanishiki’ and ‘Habataki’ were used. Key Results The significantly higher hydraulic conductance resulted from the larger root surface area not from Lp in ‘Habataki’. A chromosome region associated with the elevated hydraulic conductance was detected between RM3916 and RM2431 on the long arm of chromosome 4. The CSSL, in which this region was substituted with the ‘Habataki’ chromosome segment in the ‘Sasanishiki’ background, had a larger root mass than ‘Sasanishiki’. Conclusions The trait for increasing plant hydraulic conductance and, therefore, maintaining the higher rate of leaf photosynthesis under the conditions of intense transpiration in ‘Habataki’ was identified, and it was estimated that there is at least one

  1. Characterization of a rice variety with high hydraulic conductance and identification of the chromosome region responsible using chromosome segment substitution lines.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Shunsuke; Tsuru, Yukiko; Kondo, Motohiko; Yamamoto, Toshio; Arai-Sanoh, Yumiko; Ando, Tsuyu; Ookawa, Taiichiro; Yano, Masahiro; Hirasawa, Tadashi

    2010-11-01

    The rate of photosynthesis in paddy rice often decreases at noon on sunny days because of water stress, even under submerged conditions. Maintenance of higher rates of photosynthesis during the day might improve both yield and dry matter production in paddy rice. A high-yielding indica variety, 'Habataki', maintains a high rate of leaf photosynthesis during the daytime because of the higher hydraulic conductance from roots to leaves than in the standard japonica variety 'Sasanishiki'. This research was conducted to characterize the trait responsible for the higher hydraulic conductance in 'Habataki' and identified a chromosome region for the high hydraulic conductance. Hydraulic conductance to passive water transport and to osmotic water transport was determined for plants under intense transpiration and for plants without transpiration, respectively. The varietal difference in hydraulic conductance was examined with respect to root surface area and hydraulic conductivity (hydraulic conductance per root surface area, L(p)). To identify the chromosome region responsible for higher hydraulic conductance, chromosome segment substitution lines (CSSLs) derived from a cross between 'Sasanishiki' and 'Habataki' were used. The significantly higher hydraulic conductance resulted from the larger root surface area not from L(p) in 'Habataki'. A chromosome region associated with the elevated hydraulic conductance was detected between RM3916 and RM2431 on the long arm of chromosome 4. The CSSL, in which this region was substituted with the 'Habataki' chromosome segment in the 'Sasanishiki' background, had a larger root mass than 'Sasanishiki'. The trait for increasing plant hydraulic conductance and, therefore, maintaining the higher rate of leaf photosynthesis under the conditions of intense transpiration in 'Habataki' was identified, and it was estimated that there is at least one chromosome region for the trait located on chromosome 4.

  2. Patterns of chromosomal deletions identified by a birth defects registry, Hawaii, 1986-2003.

    PubMed

    Forrester, Mathias B; Merz, Ruth D

    2007-06-01

    The aim of the investigation was to describe the chromosomal deletions identified by a birth defects registry with respect to the chromosomes involved, pregnancy outcome, method of diagnosis, inheritance, sex, and the diagnosis of major structural birth defects. Cases were derived from a population-based birth defects registry in Hawaii and comprised all infants and fetuses with chromosomal deletions delivered during 1986-2003. A total of 71 cases were identified through a statewide birth defects registry in Hawaii during 1986-2003. The chromosomes involved in the greatest proportion of deletions were chromosomes 22 (14.1%), 4 (11.3%), and 5 (11.3%). Live births accounted for 58 (81.7%) of the cases. Diagnosis was made by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling in 19 (26.8%) of the cases. Of the 18 cases with known inheritance, the deletion was inherited in 5 (27.8%) and de novo in 13 (72.2%). Males accounted for 28 (39.4%) and females for 43 (60.6%) of the cases. Major structural birth defects were identified in 51 (71.8%) of the cases. Chromosomal deletions do not appear to affect all chromosomes equally. Most of the chromosomal deletions that were detected occurred among live births and were de novo conditions. Infants and fetuses with chromosomal deletions are more likely to be females and to be associated with major structural birth defects.

  3. Homozygosity Mapping Identifies an Additional Locus for Wolfram Syndrome on Chromosome 4q

    PubMed Central

    El-Shanti, Hatem; Lidral, Andrew C.; Jarrah, Nadim; Druhan, Lawrence; Ajlouni, Kamel

    2000-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome, which is sometimes referred to as “DIDMOAD” (diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness), is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder for which only insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy are necessary to make the diagnosis. Researchers have mapped Wolfram syndrome to chromosome 4p16.1, and, recently, a gene encoding a putative transmembrane protein has been cloned and mutations have been identified in patients. To pursue the possibility of locus heterogeneity, 16 patients from four different families were recruited. These patients, who have the Wolfram syndrome phenotype, also have additional features that have not previously been reported. There is an absence of diabetes insipidus in all affected family members. In addition, several patients have profound upper gastrointestinal ulceration and bleeding. With the use of three microsatellite markers (D4S432, D4S3023, and D4S2366) reported to be linked to the chromosome 4p16.1 locus, we significantly excluded linkage in three of the four families. The two affected individuals in one family showed homozygosity for all three markers from the region of linkage on chromosome 4p16.1. For the other three families, genetic heterogeneity for Wolfram syndrome was verified by demonstration of linkage to chromosome 4q22-24. In conclusion, we report the unique clinical findings and linkage-analysis results of 16 patients with Wolfram syndrome and provide further evidence for the genetic heterogeneity of this disorder. We also provide data on a new locus that plays a role in the etiology of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. PMID:10739754

  4. Major factors influencing linkage disequilibrium by analysis of different chromosome regions in distinct populations: demography, chromosome recombination frequency and selection.

    PubMed

    Zavattari, P; Deidda, E; Whalen, M; Lampis, R; Mulargia, A; Loddo, M; Eaves, I; Mastio, G; Todd, J A; Cucca, F

    2000-12-12

    Linkage disequilibrium (LD) mapping of disease genes is complicated by population- and chromosome-region-specific factors. We have analysed demographic factors by contrasting intermarker LD results obtained in a large cosmopolitan population (UK), a large genetic isolate (Sardinia) and a subisolate (village of Gavoi) for two regions of the X chromosome. A dramatic increase of LD was found in the subisolate. Demographic history of populations therefore influences LD. Chromosome-region-specific effects, namely the pattern and frequency of homologous recombination, were next delineated by the analysis of chromosome 6p21, including the HLA region. Patterns of global LD in this region were very similar in the UK and Sardinian populations despite their entirely distinct demographies, and correlate well with the pattern of recombinations. Nevertheless, haplotypes extend across recombination hot spots indicative of selection of certain haplotypes. Subisolate aside, chromosome-region-specific differences in LD patterns appear to be more important than the differences in intermarker LD between distinct populations.

  5. Alu-primed polymerase chain reaction for regional assignment of 110 yeast artificial chromosome clones from the human X chromosome: Identification of clones associated with a disease locus

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, D.L.; Ballabio, A.; Victoria, M.F.; Pieretti, M.; Bies, R.D.; Gibbs, R.A.; Maley, J.A.; Chinault, A.C.; Webster, T.D.; Caskey, C.T. )

    1991-07-15

    Over 400 yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) clones were isolated from the human X chromosome, and 110 of these were assigned to regions defined by chromosome translocation and deletion breakpoints. Polymerase chain reaction using Alu primers was applied to YAC clones in order to generate probes, to identify overlapping clones, and to derive fingerprints and sequence data directly from total yeast DNA. Several clones were identified in regions of medical interest. One set of three overlapping clones was found to cross a chromsomal translocation implicated in Lowe syndrome. The regional assignment of groups of YAC clones provides initiation points for further attempts to develop large cloned contiguous sequences, as well as material for investigation of regions involved in genetic diseases.

  6. A region of mouse chromosome 16 is syntenic to the DiGeorge, velocardiofacial syndrome minimal critical region.

    PubMed

    Galili, N; Baldwin, H S; Lund, J; Reeves, R; Gong, W; Wang, Z; Roe, B A; Emanuel, B S; Nayak, S; Mickanin, C; Budarf, M L; Buck, C A

    1997-01-01

    DGS and VCFS, haploinsufficiencies characterized by multiple craniofacial and cardiac abnormalities, are associated with a microdeletion of chromosome 22q11.2. Here we document synteny between a 150-kb region on mouse chromosome 16 and the most commonly deleted portion of 22q11.2. Seven genes, all of which are transcribed in the early mouse embryo, have been identified. Of particular interest are two serine/threonine kinase genes and a novel goosecoid-like homeobox gene (Gscl). Comparative sequence analysis of a 38-kb segment reveals similarities in gene content, order, exon composition, and transcriptional direction. Therefore, if deletion of these genes results in DGS/VCFS in humans, then haploinsufficiencies involving this region of chromosome 16 should recapitulate the developmental field defects characteristic of this syndrome.

  7. Identifying regional opportunities for accelerated timber managemnet

    Treesearch

    David A. Gansner; Joseph E. Barnard; Samuel F. Gingrich; Samuel F. Gingrich

    1973-01-01

    Describes a procedure for identifying regional opportunities for accelerated timber management and demonstrates its application. Results provide a basis for rational choices among alternative management strategies and permit meaningful micro- and macro-evaluations of treatment response.

  8. Method of detecting genetic deletions identified with chromosomal abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Joe W; Pinkel, Daniel; Tkachuk, Douglas

    2013-11-26

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyzes. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acids probes are typically of a complexity greater tha 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particlularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar ut genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  9. Method of detecting genetic translocations identified with chromosomal abnormalities

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel; Tkachuk, Douglas

    2001-01-01

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  10. Fragility of the centromeric region of chromosome 1 associated with combined immunodeficiency in siblings. A recessively inherited entity?

    PubMed

    Fasth, A; Forestier, E; Holmberg, E; Holmgren, G; Nordenson, I; Söderström, T; Wahlström, J

    1990-01-01

    Instability of the centromeric region of chromosome 1, and multibranched configurations formed by the short and long arms were seen in a brother and sister with facial dysmorphism, mental retardation and recurrent infections. No chromosomal abnormalities were seen in the parents, who were first cousins. The fragility of chromosome 1 was identified in amniotic fluid cells of the sister. A combined immunodeficiency characterized by a lack of immunoglobulin production, low numbers of T cells and a lack of cells with NK cell markers was diagnosed. This is the first report of familial occurrence of this unique chromosomal aberration. The cause may be an autosomal recessive gene defect.

  11. Commonly deleted region on the long arm of chromosome 7 in differentiated adenocarcinoma of the stomach.

    PubMed

    Nishizuka, S; Tamura, G; Terashima, M; Satodate, R

    1997-01-01

    Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at several chromosomal loci is a common event in human malignancies. Frequent LOH on the long arm of chromosome 7 has been reported in various human malignancies, and investigators have identified the most common site of LOH as 7q31.1. We have identified ten chromosomal loci, including chromosome 7q, that have been shown by previous allelotype study to be sites of frequent LOH in differentiated adenocarcinoma of the stomach. In the present study, we performed a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) microsatellite analysis to define the common deleted region on 7q, using 14 polymorphic microsatellite markers in matched tumour and non-tumour DNAs from 53 patients with primary gastric carcinoma of the differentiated type. LOH at any locus on 7q occurred in 34% (18 out of 53) of the tumours. Although many tumours exhibited total or large interstitial deletions, we determined the smallest common deleted region to be at D7S480 (7q31.1). This is identical to the region identified for other human malignancies. These observations indicate that a putative tumour suppressor gene at 7q31.1 may be involved in the pathogenesis of differentiated adenocarcinoma of the stomach.

  12. Commonly deleted region on the long arm of chromosome 7 in differentiated adenocarcinoma of the stomach.

    PubMed Central

    Nishizuka, S.; Tamura, G.; Terashima, M.; Satodate, R.

    1997-01-01

    Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at several chromosomal loci is a common event in human malignancies. Frequent LOH on the long arm of chromosome 7 has been reported in various human malignancies, and investigators have identified the most common site of LOH as 7q31.1. We have identified ten chromosomal loci, including chromosome 7q, that have been shown by previous allelotype study to be sites of frequent LOH in differentiated adenocarcinoma of the stomach. In the present study, we performed a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) microsatellite analysis to define the common deleted region on 7q, using 14 polymorphic microsatellite markers in matched tumour and non-tumour DNAs from 53 patients with primary gastric carcinoma of the differentiated type. LOH at any locus on 7q occurred in 34% (18 out of 53) of the tumours. Although many tumours exhibited total or large interstitial deletions, we determined the smallest common deleted region to be at D7S480 (7q31.1). This is identical to the region identified for other human malignancies. These observations indicate that a putative tumour suppressor gene at 7q31.1 may be involved in the pathogenesis of differentiated adenocarcinoma of the stomach. Images Figure 1 PMID:9413943

  13. Genetic Analysis of the Heterochromatin of Chromosome 3 in Drosophila Melanogaster. II. Vital Loci Identified through Ems Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Marchant, G. E.; Holm, D. G.

    1988-01-01

    Chromosome 3 of Drosophila melanogaster contains the last major blocks of heterochromatin in this species to be genetically analyzed. Deficiencies of heterochromatin generated through the detachment of compound-3 chromosomes revealed the presence of vital loci in the heterochromatin of chromosome 3, but an extensive complementation analysis with various combinations of lethal and nonlethal detachment products gave no evidence of tandemly repeated vital genes in this region. These findings indicate that the heterochromatin of chromosome 3 is genetically similar to that of chromosome 2. A more thorough genetic analysis of the heterochromatic regions has been carried out using the chemical mutagen ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS). Seventy-five EMS-induced lethals allelic to loci uncovered by detachment-product deficiencies were recovered and tested for complementation. In total, 12 complementation groups were identified, ten in the heterochromatin to the left of the centromere and two to the right. All but two complementation groups in the left heterochromatic block could be identified as separate loci through deficiency mapping. The interallelic complementation observed between some EMS-induced lethals, as well as the recovery of a temperature-sensitive allele for each of the two loci, provided further evidence that single-copy, transcribed vital genes reside in the heterochromatin of chromosome 3. Cytological analysis of three detachment-product deficiencies provided evidence that at least some of the genes uncovered in this study are located in the most distal segments of the heterochromatin in both arms. This study provides a detailed genetic analysis of chromosome 3 heterochromatin and offers further information on the genetic nature and heterogeneity of Drosophila heterochromatin. PMID:17246481

  14. Simultaneous localization of cosmids and chromosome R-banding by fluorescence microscopy: Application to regional mapping of human chromosome 11

    SciTech Connect

    Cherif, D.; Derre, J.; Berger, R. ); Julier, C.; Lathrop, G.M. ); Delattre, O. )

    1990-09-01

    A technique for nonradioactive in situ hybridization on human metaphase chromosomes has been developed to localize human cosmid clones. The simple procedure using two fluorescent dyes (fluorescein and propidium iodide) allows the simultaneous identification of chromosomal R-bands and hybridization signal in a single screening of the slides. This technique has been used for rapid correlation of the genetic and physical map of chromosome 11q13-qter in the region of genes responsible for ataxia-telangiectasia and tuberous sclerosis.

  15. NOR sites detected by Ag-dAPI staining of an unusual autosome chromosome of Bradysia hygida (Diptera:Sciaridae) colocalize with C-banded heterochromatic region.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Vanessa Pinatto; Borges, Alex Rodrigues; Fernandez, Maria Aparecida

    2002-01-01

    The study of chromosomes in insects is a good tool in mitotic process analysis, zoographic localization and evolution investigation. Among them, the Sciaridae offers a karyotype with a small number of chromosomes, where the heterochromatin and nucleolar organizer region, NOR, are easily analyzed in metaphase chromosomes obtained from cerebral ganglia squashes. In this work, the heterochromatic regions on Bradysia hygida mitotic chromosomes, revealed by C-banding, were identified as centromeric blocks on A and C chromosomes and as dark interstitial region in B and X chromosomes. By Ag-DAPI staining, active nucleolus organizer region, NOR, was revealed associated to the constitutive heterochromatin in the end of the C autosome chromosome. The C-band regions and the unusual ribosomal site localization are discussed.

  16. A boy with small supernumerary marker chromosome X identified by FISH.

    PubMed

    Koç, A; Yirmibeş Karaoğuz, M; Pala, E; Kan, D; Karaer, K; Gücüyener, K; Perçin, E F

    2007-01-01

    Marker or ring X chromosomes are frequently seen in Ullrich-Turner Syndrome with 46,X,r(X) karyotype, but only 8 children were reported with an extra marker X chromosome in at least some of their cell lines, we describe a 5 years old male patient who is mosaic (17%) for a cell line with an extra ring shaped marker X chromosome in addition to a normal 46,XY cell line. He had mild motor mental retardation, a dysmorphic face, dysplastic ears, high arched palate, cryptorchidism and brachydactyly. G-banding showed 46,XY[83]/47,XY,+r?[17] karyotype. NOR banding revealed no satellite region but its centromere was intact in C-banding. By fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technique, dual X/Y alpha-satellite probes were used to detect the origin of ring shaped marker chromosome and 17% of his cells had two X chromosome signals due to marker X; hybridization with X chromosome inactivation center (XIST) specific probe revealed the absence of the locus on the ring chromosome. In this report, clinical features of our patient are compared with previously reported cases and the cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic techniques used to detect origin of marker chromosome are discussed.

  17. Differentially methylated regions in maternal and paternal uniparental disomy for chromosome 7

    PubMed Central

    Hannula-Jouppi, Katariina; Muurinen, Mari; Lipsanen-Nyman, Marita; Reinius, Lovisa E; Ezer, Sini; Greco, Dario; Kere, Juha

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is a hallmark of genomic imprinting and differentially methylated regions (DMRs) are found near and in imprinted genes. Imprinted genes are expressed only from the maternal or paternal allele and their normal balance can be disrupted by uniparental disomy (UPD), the inheritance of both chromosomes of a chromosome pair exclusively from only either the mother or the father. Maternal UPD for chromosome 7 (matUPD7) results in Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS) with typical features and growth retardation, but no gene has been conclusively implicated in SRS. In order to identify novel DMRs and putative imprinted genes on chromosome 7, we analyzed eight matUPD7 patients, a segmental matUPD7q31-qter, a rare patUPD7 case and ten controls on the Infinium HumanMethylation450K BeadChip with 30 017 CpG methylation probes for chromosome 7. Genome-scale analysis showed highly significant clustering of DMRs only on chromosome 7, including the known imprinted loci GRB10, SGCE/PEG10, and PEG/MEST. We found ten novel DMRs on chromosome 7, two DMRs for the predicted imprinted genes HOXA4 and GLI3 and one for the disputed imprinted gene PON1. Quantitative RT-PCR on blood RNA samples comparing matUPD7, patUPD7, and controls showed differential expression for three genes with novel DMRs, HOXA4, GLI3, and SVOPL. Allele specific expression analysis confirmed maternal only expression of SVOPL and imprinting of HOXA4 was supported by monoallelic expression. These results present the first comprehensive map of parent-of-origin specific DMRs on human chromosome 7, suggesting many new imprinted sites. PMID:24247273

  18. The Drosophila suppressor of underreplication protein binds to late-replicating regions of polytene chromosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Makunin, I V; Volkova, E I; Belyaeva, E S; Nabirochkina, E N; Pirrotta, V; Zhimulev, I F

    2002-01-01

    In many late-replicating euchromatic regions of salivary gland polytene chromosomes, DNA is underrepresented. A mutation in the SuUR gene suppresses underreplication and leads to normal levels of DNA polytenization in these regions. We identified the SuUR gene and determined its structure. In the SuUR mutant stock a 6-kb insertion was found in the fourth exon of the gene. A single SuUR transcript is present at all stages of Drosophila development and is most abundant in adult females and embryos. The SuUR gene encodes a protein of 962 amino acids whose putative sequence is similar to the N-terminal part of SNF2/SWI2 proteins. Staining of salivary gland polytene chromosomes with antibodies directed against the SuUR protein shows that the protein is localized mainly in late-replicating regions and in regions of intercalary and pericentric heterochromatin. PMID:11901119

  19. Correlation approach to identify coding regions in DNA sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ossadnik, S. M.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Goldberger, A. L.; Havlin, S.; Mantegna, R. N.; Peng, C. K.; Simons, M.; Stanley, H. E.

    1994-01-01

    Recently, it was observed that noncoding regions of DNA sequences possess long-range power-law correlations, whereas coding regions typically display only short-range correlations. We develop an algorithm based on this finding that enables investigators to perform a statistical analysis on long DNA sequences to locate possible coding regions. The algorithm is particularly successful in predicting the location of lengthy coding regions. For example, for the complete genome of yeast chromosome III (315,344 nucleotides), at least 82% of the predictions correspond to putative coding regions; the algorithm correctly identified all coding regions larger than 3000 nucleotides, 92% of coding regions between 2000 and 3000 nucleotides long, and 79% of coding regions between 1000 and 2000 nucleotides. The predictive ability of this new algorithm supports the claim that there is a fundamental difference in the correlation property between coding and noncoding sequences. This algorithm, which is not species-dependent, can be implemented with other techniques for rapidly and accurately locating relatively long coding regions in genomic sequences.

  20. Correlation approach to identify coding regions in DNA sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ossadnik, S. M.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Goldberger, A. L.; Havlin, S.; Mantegna, R. N.; Peng, C. K.; Simons, M.; Stanley, H. E.

    1994-01-01

    Recently, it was observed that noncoding regions of DNA sequences possess long-range power-law correlations, whereas coding regions typically display only short-range correlations. We develop an algorithm based on this finding that enables investigators to perform a statistical analysis on long DNA sequences to locate possible coding regions. The algorithm is particularly successful in predicting the location of lengthy coding regions. For example, for the complete genome of yeast chromosome III (315,344 nucleotides), at least 82% of the predictions correspond to putative coding regions; the algorithm correctly identified all coding regions larger than 3000 nucleotides, 92% of coding regions between 2000 and 3000 nucleotides long, and 79% of coding regions between 1000 and 2000 nucleotides. The predictive ability of this new algorithm supports the claim that there is a fundamental difference in the correlation property between coding and noncoding sequences. This algorithm, which is not species-dependent, can be implemented with other techniques for rapidly and accurately locating relatively long coding regions in genomic sequences.

  1. Characterization of a microdissection library from human chromosome region 3p14

    SciTech Connect

    Bardenheuer, W.; Szymanski, S.; Lux, A.; Schuette, J. ); Luedecke, H.J.; Horsthemke, B. ); Claussen, U.; Senger, G. ); Smith, D.I.; Wang, N.D. )

    1994-01-15

    Structural alterations in human chromosome region 3p14-p23 resulting in the inactivation of one or more tumor suppressor genes are thought to play a pathogenic role in small cell lung cancer, renal cell carcinoma, and other human neoplasms. To identify putative tumor suppressor genes, 428 recombinant clones from a microdissection library specific for human chromosome region 3p14 were isolated and characterized. Ninety-six of these (22.5%) were human single-copy DNA sequences, 57 of which were unique sequence clones. Forty-four of these were mapped to the microdissected region using a cell hybrid mapping panel. Within this mapping panel, four probes detected two new chromosome breakpoints that were previously indistinguishable from the translocation breakpoint t(3;8) in 3p14.2 in hereditary renal cell carcinoma. One probe maps to the homozygously deleted region of the small cell lung cancer cell line U2020. In addition, microdissection clones have been shown to be suitable for isolation of yeast artificial chromosomes. 52 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Bird and mammal sex-chromosome orthologs map to the same autosomal region in a salamander (ambystoma).

    PubMed

    Smith, Jeramiah J; Voss, S Randal

    2007-09-01

    We tested hypotheses concerning the origin of bird and mammal sex chromosomes by mapping the location of amniote sex-chromosome loci in a salamander amphibian (Ambystoma). We found that ambystomatid orthologs of human X and chicken Z sex chromosomes map to neighboring regions of a common Ambystoma linkage group 2 (ALG2). We show statistically that the proportion of human X and chicken Z orthologs observed on ALG2 is significantly different from the proportion that would be expected by chance. We further show that conserved syntenies between ALG2 and amniote chromosomes are identified as overlapping conserved syntenies when all available chicken (N = 3120) and human (N = 14,922) RefSeq orthologs are reciprocally compared. In particular, the data suggest that chromosomal regions from chicken chromosomes (GGA) Z and 4 and from human chromosomes (HSA) 9, 4, X, 5, and 8 were linked ancestrally. A more distant outgroup comparison with the pufferfish Tetraodon nigroviridis reveals ALG2/GGAZ/HSAX syntenies among three pairs of ancestral chromosome duplicates. Overall, our results suggest that sex chromosomal regions of birds and mammals were recruited from a common ancestral chromosome, and thus our findings conflict with the currently accepted hypothesis of separate autosomal origins. We note that our results were obtained using the most immediate outgroup to the amniote clade (mammals, birds, and other reptiles) while the currently accepted hypothesis is primarily based upon conserved syntenies between in-group taxa (birds and mammals). Our study illustrates the importance of an amphibian outgroup perspective in identifying ancestral amniote gene orders and in reconstructing patterns of vertebrate sex-chromosome evolution.

  3. [Chromosomal variation in Chironomus plumosus L. (Diptera, Chironomidae) from populations of Bryansk region, Saratov region (Russia), and Gomel region (Belarus)].

    PubMed

    Belyanina, S I

    2015-02-01

    Cytogenetic analysis was performed on samples of Chironomus plumosus L. (Diptera, Chironomidae) taken from waterbodies of various types in Bryansk region (Russia) and Gomel region (Belarus). Karyotypes of specimens taken from stream pools of the Volga were used as reference samples. The populations of Bryansk and Gomel regions (except for a population of Lake Strativa in Starodubskii district, Bryansk region) exhibit broad structural variation, including somatic mosaicism for morphotypes of the salivary gland chromosome set, decondensation of telomeric sites, and the presence of small structural changes, as opposed to populations of Saratov region. As compared with Saratov and Bryansk regions, the Balbiani ring in the B-arm of chromosome I is repressed in populations of Gomel region. It is concluded that the chromosome set of Ch. plumosus in a range of waterbodies of Bryansk and Gomel regions is unstable.

  4. Foundations of identifying individual chromosomes by imaging flow cytometry with applications in radiation biodosimetry.

    PubMed

    Beaton-Green, Lindsay A; Rodrigues, Matthew A; Lachapelle, Sylvie; Wilkins, Ruth C

    2017-01-01

    Biodosimetry is an important tool for triage in the case of large-scale radiological or nuclear emergencies, but traditional microscope-based methods can be tedious and prone to scorer fatigue. While the dicentric chromosome assay (DCA) has been adapted for use in triage situations, it is still time-consuming to create and score slides. Recent adaptations of traditional biodosimetry assays to imaging flow cytometry (IFC) methods have dramatically increased throughput. Additionally, recent improvements in image analysis algorithms in the IFC software have resulted in improved specificity for spot counting of small events. In the IFC method for the dicentric chromosome analysis (FDCA), lymphocytes isolated from whole blood samples are cultured with PHA and Colcemid. After incubation, lymphocytes are treated with a hypotonic solution and chromosomes are isolated in suspension, labelled with a centromere marker and stained for DNA content with DRAQ5. Stained individual chromosomes are analyzed on the ImageStream®(X) (EMD-Millipore, Billerica, MA) and mono- and dicentric chromosome populations are identified and enumerated using advanced image processing techniques. Both the preparation of the isolated chromosome suspensions as well as the image analysis methods were fine-tuned in order to optimize the FDCA. In this paper we describe the method to identify and score centromeres in individual chromosomes by IFC and show that the FDCA method may further improve throughput for triage biodosimetry in the case of large-scale radiological or nuclear emergencies.

  5. Amplifications of chromosomal region 20q13 as a prognostic indicator breast cancer

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Collins, Colin; Pinkel, Daniel; Kallioniemi, Olli-Pekka; Tanner, Minna M.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention relates to in situ hybridization methods for the identification of new chromosomal abnormalities associated with various diseases. In particular, it provides probes which are specific to a region of amplification in chromosome 20.

  6. Amplifications of chromosomal region 20q13 as a prognostic indicator in breast cancer

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Collins, Colin; Pinkel, Daniel; Kallioniemi, Olli-Pekka; Tanner, Minna M.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates to in situ hybridization methods for the identification of new chromosomal abnormalities associated with various diseases. In particular, it provides probes which are specific to a region of amplification in chromosome 20.

  7. [Chromosomal anomalies: The experience of the Congenital Anomalies Registry of the Valencia Region].

    PubMed

    Gimeno-Martos, S; Cavero-Carbonell, C; López-Maside, A; Bosch-Sánchez, S; Martos-Jiménez, C; Zurriaga, O

    2016-04-01

    To describe the temporal trend and distribution of chromosomal congenital abnormalities (CA) in the Valencia Region, in less than one year olds, during the period 2007-2011. Live births, still births and termination of pregnancy due to foetal anomaly between 2007 and 2011 with chromosomal CA (Q90-Q99.9 codes of the 10th International Classification of Diseases -British Paediatric Association) were selected from the CA population-based Registry of Valencia Region The prevalence per 10,000 births for the chromosomal CA and for the different types of chromosomal syndromes with 95% confidence intervals was calculated. The analysis was performed by calculating prevalences and data were compared using Pearson Chi-squared test. A total of 895 cases were found, representing a prevalence of 33.5 per 10,000 births (95% CI: 31.0-35.9), highlighting five syndromes: Down's, Edward's, Patau, Turner and Klinefelter. The prevalence of chromosomal CA and Down's syndrome were stable over the period, except in 2010. Down's was the most frequent chromosomal CA (67% of the cases), and the most frequent termination of pregnancy type was for foetal anomaly (69%). Cardiac heart defects represented 70.3% of the associated congenital anomalies. Mothers of children with chromosomal CA were mainly Spanish (73.3%). The age group of mothers over 39 years had a higher prevalence (133.0 per 10,000 births). The province of Castellón had the highest prevalence, 39.1 per 10,000 births. The prevalence has remained stable over the five years, excluding the significant decline in 2010, for chromosomal CA detected and two of the major syndromes. The chromosomal CA are an important public health problem as they represent 15% of all CA identified in the Valencia Region, and agrees with the European data. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Characterization of the OmyY1 region on the rainbow trout Y chromosome

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phillips, Ruth B.; DeKoning, Jenefer J.; Brunelli, Joseph P.; Faber-Hammond, Joshua J.; Hansen, John D.; Christensen, Kris A.; Renn, Suzy C.P.; Thorgaard, Gary H.

    2013-01-01

    We characterized the male-specific region on the Y chromosome of rainbow trout, which contains both sdY (the sex-determining gene) and the male-specific genetic marker, OmyY1. Several clones containing the OmyY1 marker were screened from a BAC library from a YY clonal line and found to be part of an 800 kb BAC contig. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), these clones were localized to the end of the short arm of the Y chromosome in rainbow trout, with an additional signal on the end of the X chromosome in many cells. We sequenced a minimum tiling path of these clones using Illumina and 454 pyrosequencing. The region is rich in transposons and rDNA, but also appears to contain several single-copy protein-coding genes. Most of these genes are also found on the X chromosome; and in several cases sex-specific SNPs in these genes were identified between the male (YY) and female (XX) homozygous clonal lines. Additional genes were identified by hybridization of the BACs to the cGRASP salmonid 4x44K oligo microarray. By BLASTn evaluations using hypothetical transcripts of OmyY1-linked candidate genes as query against several EST databases, we conclude at least 12 of these candidate genes are likely functional, and expressed.

  9. Characterization of the OmyY1 Region on the Rainbow Trout Y Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Ruth B.; DeKoning, Jenefer J.; Brunelli, Joseph P.; Faber-Hammond, Joshua J.; Hansen, John D.; Christensen, Kris A.; Renn, Suzy C. P.; Thorgaard, Gary H.

    2013-01-01

    We characterized the male-specific region on the Y chromosome of rainbow trout, which contains both sdY (the sex-determining gene) and the male-specific genetic marker, OmyY1. Several clones containing the OmyY1 marker were screened from a BAC library from a YY clonal line and found to be part of an 800 kb BAC contig. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), these clones were localized to the end of the short arm of the Y chromosome in rainbow trout, with an additional signal on the end of the X chromosome in many cells. We sequenced a minimum tiling path of these clones using Illumina and 454 pyrosequencing. The region is rich in transposons and rDNA, but also appears to contain several single-copy protein-coding genes. Most of these genes are also found on the X chromosome; and in several cases sex-specific SNPs in these genes were identified between the male (YY) and female (XX) homozygous clonal lines. Additional genes were identified by hybridization of the BACs to the cGRASP salmonid 4x44K oligo microarray. By BLASTn evaluations using hypothetical transcripts of OmyY1-linked candidate genes as query against several EST databases, we conclude at least 12 of these candidate genes are likely functional, and expressed. PMID:23671840

  10. Identification and Validation of Novel Chromosomal Integration and Expression Loci in Escherichia coli Flagellar Region 1

    PubMed Central

    Juhas, Mario; Ajioka, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli is used as a chassis for a number of Synthetic Biology applications. The lack of suitable chromosomal integration and expression loci is among the main hurdles of the E. coli engineering efforts. We identified and validated chromosomal integration and expression target sites within E. coli K12 MG1655 flagellar region 1. We analyzed five open reading frames of the flagellar region 1, flgA, flgF, flgG, flgI, and flgJ, that are well-conserved among commonly-used E. coli strains, such as MG1655, W3110, DH10B and BL21-DE3. The efficiency of the integration into the E. coli chromosome and the expression of the introduced genetic circuit at the investigated loci varied significantly. The integrations did not have a negative impact on growth; however, they completely abolished motility. From the investigated E. coli K12 MG1655 flagellar region 1, flgA and flgG are the most suitable chromosomal integration and expression loci. PMID:25816013

  11. Pattern of chromosomal inversions identified by a birth defects registry, Hawaii, 1986-2002.

    PubMed

    Forrester, Mathias B; Merz, Ruth D

    2007-09-01

    The aim of the investigation was to describe chromosomal inversions identified by a birth defects registry with respect to chromosomes involved, pregnancy outcome, method of diagnosis, inheritance, sex and diagnosis of major structural birth defects. Cases were derived from a population-based birth defects registry in Hawaii and comprised all infants and fetuses with chromosomal deletions delivered during 1986-2002. A total of 68 cases were identified through a statewide birth defects registry in Hawaii during 1986-2002. The chromosomes involved in the greatest proportion of inversions were chromosomes 6 (18%) and 9 (18%). Live births accounted for 62 (91%) of the cases. Diagnosis was made by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling in 60 (88%) of the cases. Of the 43 cases with known inheritance, the inversion was inherited in 40 (93%) and de novo in three (7%). Males accounted for 31 (46%) and females for 37 (54%) of the cases. Major structural birth defects were identified in 12 (18%) of the cases. Inversions diagnosed among infants and fetuses in Hawaii do not appear to affect all chromosomes equally. Most detected inversions occurred among live births and were inherited conditions. Infants and fetuses with inversions are not frequently associated with major structural birth defects.

  12. DELETION MAPPING OF CRITICAL REGION FOR HYPOSPADIAS, PENOSCROTAL TRANSPOSITION AND IMPERFORATE ANUS ON HUMAN CHROMOSOME 13

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Nilda M.; Allgood, Jocelyn; Santos, Lane J.; Lonergan, D.; Batanian, J.R.; Henkemeyer, Mark; Bartsch, Oliver; Schultz, Roger A.; Zinn, Andrew R.; Baker, Linda A.

    2007-01-01

    Background The 13q-deletion syndrome causes human congenital birth defects due to the loss of regions of one long arm of human chromosome 13. A distal critical region for severe genitourinary and anorectal birth defects in the region of 13q32.2-34 has been suggested; we sought to narrow this critical region. Methods From patients with karyotypes revealing haploinsufficiency for distal chromosome 13q and their parents, peripheral blood was obtained and lymphocytes were immortalized for DNA isolation. Genetic and molecular cytogenetic methods were used to map deletions. Patient and parental samples were genotyped with a panel of 20 microsatellite markers spanning 13q31.3 qter and deletions identified by loss of heterozygosity. Deletions were also mapped using a panel of 35 BAC clones from the same region as probes for fluorescence in-situ hybridization on patient lymphoblastoid metaphase preparations. The data were synthesized and a deletion map defining the critical region was generated. Results Eight patients with known deletions around 13q32qter and their parents were analyzed, and categorized into three groups: three patients with anorectal and genitourinary anomalies (hypospadias, penoscrotal transposition), four male patients without anorectal and genitourinary anomalies, and one XY patient with ambiguous genitalia without anorectal anomalies. We mapped the critical region for anorectal and genitourinary anomalies to a ∼9.5-Mb interval of 13q33.3-q34 delineated by markers D13S280-D13S285; this spans ∼8% of the chromosome and contains 20 annotated genes Conclusion The critical region of chromosome 13q mediating genitourinary/anorectal anomalies has been mapped, and will be narrowed by additional patients and further mapping. Identification of the gene(s) mediating these syndromic genitourinary defects should further our knowledge of molecular mediators of non-syndromic hypospadias, penoscrotal transposition and anorectal malformations. PMID:17476316

  13. Centromere Destiny in Dicentric Chromosomes: New Insights from the Evolution of Human Chromosome 2 Ancestral Centromeric Region.

    PubMed

    Chiatante, Giorgia; Giannuzzi, Giuliana; Calabrese, Francesco Maria; Eichler, Evan E; Ventura, Mario

    2017-07-01

    Dicentric chromosomes are products of genomic rearrangements that place two centromeres on the same chromosome. Due to the presence of two primary constrictions, they are inherently unstable and overcome their instability by epigenetically inactivating and/or deleting one of the two centromeres, thus resulting in functionally monocentric chromosomes that segregate normally during cell division. Our understanding to date of dicentric chromosome formation, behavior and fate has been largely inferred from observational studies in plants and humans as well as artificially produced de novo dicentrics in yeast and in human cells. We investigate the most recent product of a chromosome fusion event fixed in the human lineage, human chromosome 2, whose stability was acquired by the suppression of one centromere, resulting in a unique difference in chromosome number between humans (46 chromosomes) and our most closely related ape relatives (48 chromosomes). Using molecular cytogenetics, sequencing, and comparative sequence data, we deeply characterize the relicts of the chromosome 2q ancestral centromere and its flanking regions, gaining insight into the ancestral organization that can be easily broadened to all acrocentric chromosome centromeres. Moreover, our analyses offered the opportunity to trace the evolutionary history of rDNA and satellite III sequences among great apes, thus suggesting a new hypothesis for the preferential inactivation of some human centromeres, including IIq. Our results suggest two possible centromere inactivation models to explain the evolutionarily stabilization of human chromosome 2 over the last 5-6 million years. Our results strongly favor centromere excision through a one-step process. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Identifying Groundwater Recharge in Arid Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, B. F.; Famiglietti, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    Recharge epodicity in arid regions provides a method to estimate annual groundwater recharge given a relationship expressed as the recharge to precipitation ratio. Traditionally, in-situ observations are required to identify aquifer recharge events, while more advanced approaches such as the water-table fluctuation method or the episodic master recession method are necessary to delineate the recharge event. Our study uses the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) observations to estimate monthly changes in groundwater storage which are attributed to the combination of groundwater abstraction and episodic recharge in the arid southwestern United States. Our results illustrate the ability of remote sensing technologies to identify episodic groundwater recharge in arid regions which can be used within sustainable groundwater management frameworks to effectively manage groundwater resources.

  15. Exclusion of primary congenital glaucoma (buphthalmos) from two candidate regions of chromosome arm 6p and chromosome 11

    SciTech Connect

    Akarsu, A.N.; Hossain, A.; Sarfarazi, M.

    1996-01-22

    Primary congenital glaucoma (gene symbol: GLC3) is characterized by an improper development of the aqueous outflow system. The reduced outflow of fluid results in an increased intraocular pressure leading to buphthalmos, optic nerve damage, and eventual visual impairment. GLC3 is a heterogeneous condition with an estimated incidence of 1:2,500 in Middle Eastern and 1:10,000 in Western countries. In many families, GLC3 is an autosomal recessive trait with presentation of an earlier age-of-onset, high intraocular pressure, enlarged cloudy cornea, buphthalmos, and a more aggressive course. The pathogenesis of GLC3 remains elusive despite extensive histologic efforts to identify a single anatomic defect. Recent advances in positional mapping and cloning of human disorders provided an opportunity to identify chromosome locations of the GLC3 phenotype. Our laboratory is currently involved in the mapping of this condition by using a combination of candidate chromosome regions associated with the GLC3 phenotype and by a general positional mapping strategy. 16 refs., 3 tabs.

  16. Chromosome

    MedlinePlus

    Chromosomes are structures found in the center (nucleus) of cells that carry long pieces of DNA. DNA ... is the building block of the human body. Chromosomes also contain proteins that help DNA exist in ...

  17. Localization of chromosome regions in potoroo nuclei ( Potorous tridactylus Marsupialia: Potoroinae).

    PubMed

    Rens, W; O'Brien, P C M; Graves, J A M; Ferguson-Smith, M A

    2003-08-01

    Chromosome paints of the rat kangaroo ( Aepyprymnus rufuscens, 2 n=32) were used to define chromosome regions in the long nosed potoroo ( Potorous tridactylus, 2 n=12 female, 13 male) karyotype and localize these regions in three-dimensionally preserved nuclei of the potoroo to test the hypothesis that marsupial chromosomes have a radial distribution. In human nuclei chromosomes are distributed in a proposed radial fashion. Gene-rich chromosomes in the human interphase nucleus are preferentially located in the central area while gene-poor chromosomes are found more at the periphery of the nucleus; this feature is conserved in primates and chicken. Chromosome ordering in nuclei of P. tridactylus is related to their size and centromere position. Its relationship with replication patterns in interphase nuclei and metaphase was studied. In addition it was observed that the nucleus was not a smooth entity but had projections occupied by specific chromosome regions.

  18. A physical map of the polytenized region (101EF-102F) of chromosome 4 in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Locke, J; Podemski, L; Aippersbach, N; Kemp, H; Hodgetts, R

    2000-01-01

    Chromosome 4, the smallest autosome ( approximately 5 Mb in length) in Drosophila melanogaster contains two major regions. The centromeric domain ( approximately 4 Mb) is heterochromatic and consists primarily of short, satellite repeats. The remaining approximately 1.2 Mb, which constitutes the banded region (101E-102F) on salivary gland polytene chromosomes and contains the identified genes, is the region mapped in this study. Chromosome walking was hindered by the abundance of moderately repeated sequences dispersed along the chromosome, so we used many entry points to recover overlapping cosmid and BAC clones. In situ hybridization of probes from the two ends of the map to polytene chromosomes confirmed that the cloned region had spanned the 101E-102F interval. Our BAC clones comprised three contigs; one gap was positioned distally in 102EF and the other was located proximally at 102B. Twenty-three genes, representing about half of our revised estimate of the total number of genes on chromosome 4, were positioned on the BAC contigs. A minimal tiling set of the clones we have mapped will facilitate both the assembly of the DNA sequence of the chromosome and a functional analysis of its genes. PMID:10880479

  19. A physical map of the polytenized region (101EF-102F) of chromosome 4 in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Locke, J; Podemski, L; Aippersbach, N; Kemp, H; Hodgetts, R

    2000-07-01

    Chromosome 4, the smallest autosome ( approximately 5 Mb in length) in Drosophila melanogaster contains two major regions. The centromeric domain ( approximately 4 Mb) is heterochromatic and consists primarily of short, satellite repeats. The remaining approximately 1.2 Mb, which constitutes the banded region (101E-102F) on salivary gland polytene chromosomes and contains the identified genes, is the region mapped in this study. Chromosome walking was hindered by the abundance of moderately repeated sequences dispersed along the chromosome, so we used many entry points to recover overlapping cosmid and BAC clones. In situ hybridization of probes from the two ends of the map to polytene chromosomes confirmed that the cloned region had spanned the 101E-102F interval. Our BAC clones comprised three contigs; one gap was positioned distally in 102EF and the other was located proximally at 102B. Twenty-three genes, representing about half of our revised estimate of the total number of genes on chromosome 4, were positioned on the BAC contigs. A minimal tiling set of the clones we have mapped will facilitate both the assembly of the DNA sequence of the chromosome and a functional analysis of its genes.

  20. Identifying molecular signatures of hypoxia adaptation from sex chromosomes: A case for Tibetan Mastiff based on analyses of X chromosome.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hong; Liu, Yan-Hu; Wang, Guo-Dong; Yang, Chun-Tao; Otecko, Newton O; Liu, Fei; Wu, Shi-Fang; Wang, Lu; Yu, Li; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2016-10-07

    Genome-wide studies on high-altitude adaptation have received increased attention as a classical case of organismal evolution under extreme environment. However, the current genetic understanding of high-altitude adaptation emanated mainly from autosomal analyses. Only a few earlier genomic studies paid attention to the allosome. In this study, we performed an intensive scan of the X chromosome of public genomic data generated from Tibetan Mastiff (TM) and five other dog populations for indications of high-altitude adaptation. We identified five genes showing signatures of selection on the X chromosome. Notable among these genes was angiomotin (AMOT), which is related to the process of angiogenesis. We sampled additional 11 dog populations (175 individuals in total) at continuous altitudes in China from 300 to 4,000 meters to validate and test the association between the haplotype frequency of AMOT gene and altitude adaptation. The results suggest that AMOT gene may be a notable candidate gene for the adaptation of TM to high-altitude hypoxic conditions. Our study shows that X chromosome deserves consideration in future studies of adaptive evolution.

  1. Identifying molecular signatures of hypoxia adaptation from sex chromosomes: A case for Tibetan Mastiff based on analyses of X chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hong; Liu, Yan-Hu; Wang, Guo-Dong; Yang, Chun-Tao; Otecko, Newton O.; Liu, Fei; Wu, Shi-Fang; Wang, Lu; Yu, Li; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide studies on high-altitude adaptation have received increased attention as a classical case of organismal evolution under extreme environment. However, the current genetic understanding of high-altitude adaptation emanated mainly from autosomal analyses. Only a few earlier genomic studies paid attention to the allosome. In this study, we performed an intensive scan of the X chromosome of public genomic data generated from Tibetan Mastiff (TM) and five other dog populations for indications of high-altitude adaptation. We identified five genes showing signatures of selection on the X chromosome. Notable among these genes was angiomotin (AMOT), which is related to the process of angiogenesis. We sampled additional 11 dog populations (175 individuals in total) at continuous altitudes in China from 300 to 4,000 meters to validate and test the association between the haplotype frequency of AMOT gene and altitude adaptation. The results suggest that AMOT gene may be a notable candidate gene for the adaptation of TM to high-altitude hypoxic conditions. Our study shows that X chromosome deserves consideration in future studies of adaptive evolution. PMID:27713520

  2. Sex chromosome system ZZ/ZW in Apareiodon hasemani Eigenmann, 1916 (Characiformes, Parodontidae) and a derived chromosomal region

    PubMed Central

    Bellafronte, Elisangela; Schemberger, Michelle Orane; Artoni, Roberto Ferreira; Filho, Orlando Moreira; Vicari, Marcelo Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    Parodontidae fish show few morphological characteristics for the identification of their representatives and chromosomal analyses have provided reliable features for determining the interrelationships in this family. In this study, the chromosomes of Apareiodon hasemani from the São Francisco River basin, Brazil, were analyzed and showed a karyotype with 2n = 54 meta/submetacentric chromosomes, and a ZZ/ZW sex chromosome system. The study revealed active NORs located on pair 11 and additional 18S rDNA sites on pairs 7 and 22. The 5S rDNA locus was found in pair 14. It showed a pericentric inversion regarding the ancestral condition. The satellite DNA pPh2004 was absent in the chromosomes of A. hasemani, a shared condition with most members of Apareiodon. The WAp probe was able to detect the amplification region of the W chromosome, corroborating the common origin of the system within Parodontidae. These chromosomal data corroborate an origin for the ZW system of Parodontidae and aid in the understanding of the differentiation of sex chromosome systems in Neotropical fishes. PMID:23271937

  3. Identification of the human chromosomal region containing the iridogoniodysgenesis anomaly locus by genomic-mismatch scanning.

    PubMed Central

    Mirzayans, F; Mears, A J; Guo, S W; Pearce, W G; Walter, M A

    1997-01-01

    Genome-mismatch scanning (GMS) is a new method of linkage analysis that rapidly isolates regions of identity between two genomes. DNA molecules from regions of identity by descent from two relatives are isolated based on their ability to form extended mismatch-free heteroduplexes. We have applied this rapid technology to identify the chromosomal region shared by two fifth-degree cousins with autosomal dominant iridogoniodysgenesis anomaly (IGDA), a rare ocular neurocristopathy. Markers on the short arm of human chromosome 6p were recovered, consistent with the results of conventional linkage analysis conducted in parallel, indicating linkage of IGDA to 6p25. Control markers tested on a second human chromosome were not recovered. A GMS error rate of approximately 11% was observed, well within an acceptable range for a rapid, first screening approach, especially since GMS results would be confirmed by family analysis with selected markers from the putative region of identity by descent. These results demonstrate not only the value of this technique in the rapid mapping of human genetic traits, but the first application of GMS to a multicellular organism. Images Figure 2 PMID:9245991

  4. Regulatory Regions of the Homeotic Gene Proboscipedia Are Sensitive to Chromosomal Pairing

    PubMed Central

    Kapoun, A. M.; Kaufman, T. C.

    1995-01-01

    We have identified regulatory regions of the homeotic gene proboscipedia that are capable of repressing a linked white minigene in a manner that is sensitive to chromosomal pairing. Normally, the eye color of transformants containing white in a P-element vector is affected by the number of copies of the transgene; homozygous flies have darker eyes than heterozygotes. However, we found that flies homozygous for select pb DNA-containing transgenes had lighter eyes than heterozygotes. Several pb DNA fragments are capable of causing this pairing sensitive (PS) negative regulation of white. Two fragments in the upstream DNA of pb, 0.58 and 0.98 kb, are PS; additionally, two PS sites are located in the second intron, including a 0.5-kb region and 49-bp sequence. This phenotype is not observed when two PS sites are located at different chromosomal insertion sites (in trans-heterozygous transgenic animals), indicating that the pb-DNA-mediated repression of white is dependent on the pairing or proximity of the PS regions. The observed phenomenon is similar to transvection in which certain alleles of a gene can complement each other, but only when homologous chromosomes are paired. Interestingly, the intronic PS regions contain positive regulatory sequences for pb, whereas the upstream PS sites contain pb negative regulatory elements. PMID:7498743

  5. The MaoP/maoS Site-Specific System Organizes the Ori Region of the E. coli Chromosome into a Macrodomain

    PubMed Central

    Valens, Michèle; Thiel, Axel

    2016-01-01

    The Ori region of bacterial genomes is segregated early in the replication cycle of bacterial chromosomes. Consequently, Ori region positioning plays a pivotal role in chromosome dynamics. The Ori region of the E. coli chromosome is organized as a macrodomain with specific properties concerning DNA mobility, segregation of loci and long distance DNA interactions. Here, by using strains with chromosome rearrangements and DNA mobility as a read-out, we have identified the MaoP/maoS system responsible for constraining DNA mobility in the Ori region and limiting long distance DNA interactions with other regions of the chromosome. MaoP belongs to a group of proteins conserved in the Enterobacteria that coevolved with Dam methylase including SeqA, MukBEF and MatP that are all involved in the control of chromosome conformation and segregation. Analysis of DNA rings excised from the chromosome demonstrated that the single maoS site is required in cis on the chromosome to exert its effect while MaoP can act both in cis and in trans. The position of markers in the Ori region was affected by inactivating maoP. However, the MaoP/maoS system was not sufficient for positioning the Ori region at the ¼–¾ regions of the cell. We also demonstrate that the replication and the resulting expansion of bulk DNA are localized centrally in the cell. Implications of these results for chromosome positioning and segregation in E. coli are discussed. PMID:27627105

  6. Comparative analysis of three-dimensional chromosomal architecture identifies a novel fetal hemoglobin regulatory element.

    PubMed

    Huang, Peng; Keller, Cheryl A; Giardine, Belinda; Grevet, Jeremy D; Davies, James O J; Hughes, Jim R; Kurita, Ryo; Nakamura, Yukio; Hardison, Ross C; Blobel, Gerd A

    2017-08-15

    Chromatin structure is tightly intertwined with transcription regulation. Here we compared the chromosomal architectures of fetal and adult human erythroblasts and found that, globally, chromatin structures and compartments A/B are highly similar at both developmental stages. At a finer scale, we detected distinct folding patterns at the developmentally controlled β-globin locus. Specifically, new fetal stage-specific contacts were uncovered between a region separating the fetal (γ) and adult (δ and β) globin genes (encompassing the HBBP1 and BGLT3 noncoding genes) and two distal chromosomal sites (HS5 and 3'HS1) that flank the locus. In contrast, in adult cells, the HBBP1-BGLT3 region contacts the embryonic ε-globin gene, physically separating the fetal globin genes from the enhancer (locus control region [LCR]). Deletion of the HBBP1 region in adult cells alters contact landscapes in ways more closely resembling those of fetal cells, including increased LCR-γ-globin contacts. These changes are accompanied by strong increases in γ-globin transcription. Notably, the effects of HBBP1 removal on chromatin architecture and gene expression closely mimic those of deleting the fetal globin repressor BCL11A, implicating BCL11A in the function of the HBBP1 region. Our results uncover a new critical regulatory region as a potential target for therapeutic genome editing for hemoglobinopathies and highlight the power of chromosome conformation analysis in discovering new cis control elements. © 2017 Huang et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  7. Regional Seismic Methods of Identifying Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, W. R.; Ford, S. R.; Pasyanos, M.; Pyle, M. L.; Hauk, T. F.

    2013-12-01

    A lesson from the 2006, 2009 and 2013 DPRK declared nuclear explosion Ms:mb observations is that our historic collection of data may not be representative of future nuclear test signatures (e.g. Selby et al., 2012). To have confidence in identifying future explosions amongst the background of other seismic signals, we need to put our empirical methods on a firmer physical footing. Here we review the two of the main identification methods: 1) P/S ratios and 2) Moment Tensor techniques, which can be applied at the regional distance (200-1600 km) to very small events, improving nuclear explosion monitoring and confidence in verifying compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). Amplitude ratios of seismic P-to-S waves at sufficiently high frequencies (~>2 Hz) can identify explosions among a background of natural earthquakes (e.g. Walter et al., 1995). However the physical basis for the generation of explosion S-waves, and therefore the predictability of this P/S technique as a function of event properties such as size, depth, geology and path, remains incompletely understood. Calculated intermediate period (10-100s) waveforms from regional 1-D models can match data and provide moment tensor results that separate explosions from earthquakes and cavity collapses (e.g. Ford et al. 2009). However it has long been observed that some nuclear tests produce large Love waves and reversed Rayleigh waves that complicate moment tensor modeling. Again the physical basis for the generation of these effects from explosions remains incompletely understood. We are re-examining regional seismic data from a variety of nuclear test sites including the DPRK and the former Nevada Test Site (now the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS)). Newer relative amplitude techniques can be employed to better quantify differences between explosions and used to understand those differences in term of depth, media and other properties. We are also making use of the Source Physics

  8. Exclusion of primary congenital glaucoma (PCG) from two candidate regions of chromosomes 1 and 6

    SciTech Connect

    Sarfarazi, M.; Akarsu, A.N.; Barsoum-Homsy, M.

    1994-09-01

    PCG is a genetically heterogeneous condition in which a significant proportion of families inherit in an autosomally recessive fashion. Although association of PCG with chromosomal abnormalities has been repeatedly reported in the literature, the chromosomal location of this condition is still unknown. Therefore, this study is designed to identify the chromosomal location of the PCG locus by positional mapping. We have identified 80 PCG families with a total of 261 potential informative meiosis. A group of 19 pedigrees with a minimum of 2 affected children in each pedigree and consanguinity in most of the parental generation were selected as our initial screening panel. This panel consists of a total of 44 affected and 93 unaffected individuals giving a total of 99 informative meiosis, including 5 phase-known. We used polymerase chain reaction (PCR), denaturing polyacrylamide gels and silver staining to genotype our families. We first screened for markers on 1q21-q31, the reported location for juvenile primary open-angle glaucoma and excluded a region of 30 cM as the likely site for the PCG locus. Association of PCG with both ring chromosome 6 and HLA-B8 has also been reported. Therefore, we genotyped our PCG panel with PCR applicable markers from 6p21. Significant negative lod scores were obtained for D6S105 (Z = -18.70) and D6S306 (Z = -5.99) at {theta}=0.001. HLA class 1 region has also contained one of the tubulin genes (TUBB) which is an obvious candidate for PCG. Study of this gene revealed a significant negative lod score with PCG (Z = -16.74, {theta}=0.001). A multipoint linkage analysis of markers in this and other regions containing the candidate genes will be presented.

  9. Minute supernumerary ring chromosome 22 associated with cat eye syndrome: further delineation of the critical region.

    PubMed

    Mears, A J; el-Shanti, H; Murray, J C; McDermid, H E; Patil, S R

    1995-09-01

    Cat eye syndrome (CES) is typically associated with a supernumerary bisatellited marker chromosome (inv dup 22pter-22q11.2) resulting in four copies of this region. We describe an individual showing the inheritance of a minute supernumerary double ring chromosome 22, which resulted in expression of all cardinal features of CES. The size of the ring was determined by DNA dosage analysis and FISH analysis for five loci mapping to 22q11.2. The probes to the loci D22S9, D22S43, and ATP6E were present in four copies, whereas D22S57 and D22S181 were present in two copies. This finding further delineates the distal boundary of the critical region of CES, with ATP6E being the most distal duplicated locus identified. The phenotypically normal father and grandfather of the patient each had a small supernumerary ring chromosome and demonstrated three copies for the loci D22S9, D22S43, and ATP6E. Although three copies of this region have been reported in other cases with CES features, it is possible that the presence of four copies leads to greater susceptibility.

  10. Minute supernumerary ring chromosome 22 associated with cat eye syndrome: Further delineation of the critical region

    SciTech Connect

    Mears, A.J.; McDermid, H.E.; El-Shanti, H.

    1995-09-01

    Cat eye syndrome (CES) is typically associated with a supernumerary bisatellited marker chromosome (inv dup 22pter-22q11.2) resulting in four copies of this region. We describe an individual showing the inheritance of a minute supernumerary double ring chromosome 22, which resulted in expression of all cardinal features of CES. The size of the ring was determined by DNA dosage analysis and FISH analysis for five loci mapping to 22q11.2. The probes to the loci D22S9, D22S43, and ATP6E were present in four copies, whereas D22S57 and D22S181 were present in two copies. This finding further delineates the distal boundary of the critical region of CES, with ATP6E being the most distal duplicated locus identified. The phenotypically normal father and grandfather of the patient each had a small supernumerary ring chromosome and demonstrated three copies for the loci D22S9, D22S43, and ATP6E. Although three copies of this region have been reported in other cases with CES features, it is possible that the presence of four copies leads to greater susceptibility. 35 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Y chromosome azoospermia factor region microdeletions and transmission characteristics in azoospermic and severe oligozoospermic patients

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiao-Wei; Wei, Zhen-Tong; Jiang, Yu-Ting; Zhang, Song-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Spermatogenesis is an essential reproductive process that is regulated by many Y chromosome specific genes. Most of these genes are located in a specific region known as the azoospermia factor region (AZF) in the long arm of the human Y chromosome. AZF microdeletions are recognized as the most frequent structural chromosomal abnormalities and are the major cause of male infertility. Assisted reproductive techniques (ART) such as intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and testicular sperm extraction (TESE) can overcome natural fertilization barriers and help a proportion of infertile couples produce children; however, these techniques increase the transmission risk of genetic defects. AZF microdeletions and their associated phenotypes in infertile males have been extensively studied, and different AZF microdeletion types have been identified by sequence-tagged site polymerase chain reaction (STS-PCR), suspension array technology (SAT) and array-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH); however, each of these approaches has limitations that need to be overcome. Even though the transmission of AZF microdeletions has been reported worldwide, arguments correlating ART and the incidence of AZF microdeletions and explaining the occurrence of de novo deletions and expansion have not been resolved. Using the newest findings in the field, this review presents a systematic update concerning progress in understanding the functions of AZF regions and their associated genes, AZF microdeletions and their phenotypes and novel approaches for screening AZF microdeletions. Moreover, the transmission characteristics of AZF microdeletions and the future direction of research in the field will be specifically discussed. PMID:26628946

  12. Characterization of chromosomal regions conserved in Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and lost by Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Pouillot, Flavie; Fayolle, Corinne; Carniel, Elisabeth

    2008-10-01

    The transformation of the enteropathogenic bacterium Yersinia pseudotuberculosis into the plague bacillus, Yersinia pestis, has been accompanied by extensive genetic loss. This study focused on chromosomal regions conserved in Y. pseudotuberculosis and lost during its transformation into Y. pestis. An extensive PCR screening of 78 strains of the two species identified five regions (R1 to R5) and four open reading frames (ORFs; orf1 to orf4) that were conserved in Y. pseudotuberculosis and absent from Y. pestis. Their conservation in Y. pseudotuberculosis suggests a positive selective pressure and a role during the life cycle of this species. Attempts to delete two ORFs (orf3 and orf4) from the chromosome of strain IP32953 were unsuccessful, indicating that they are essential for its viability. The seven remaining loci were individually deleted from the IP32953 chromosome, and the ability of each mutant to grow in vitro and to kill mice upon intragastric infection was evaluated. Four loci (orf1, R2, R4, and R5) were not required for optimal growth or virulence of Y. pseudotuberculosis. In contrast, orf2, encoding a putative pseudouridylate synthase involved in RNA stability, was necessary for the optimal growth of IP32953 at 37 degrees C in a chemically defined medium (M63S). Deletion of R1, a region predicted to encode the methionine salvage pathway, altered the mutant pathogenicity, suggesting that the availability of free methionine is severely restricted in vivo. R3, a region composed mostly of genes of unknown functions, was necessary for both optimal growth of Y. pseudotuberculosis at 37 degrees C in M63S and for virulence. Therefore, despite their loss in Y. pestis, five of the nine Y. pseudotuberculosis-specific chromosomal loci studied play a role in the survival, growth, or virulence of this species.

  13. Analysis of plant meiotic chromosomes by chromosome painting.

    PubMed

    Lysak, Martin A; Mandáková, Terezie

    2013-01-01

    Chromosome painting (CP) refers to visualization of large chromosome regions, entire chromosome arms, or entire chromosomes via fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). For CP in plants, contigs of chromosome-specific bacterial artificial chromosomes (BAC) from the target species or from a closely related species (comparative chromosome painting, CCP) are typically applied as painting probes. Extended pachytene chromosomes provide the highest resolution of CP in plants. CP enables identification and tracing of particular chromosome regions and/or entire chromosomes throughout all meiotic stages as well as corresponding chromosome territories in premeiotic interphase nuclei. Meiotic pairing and structural chromosome rearrangements (typically inversions and translocations) can be identified by CP. Here, we describe step-by-step protocols of CP and CCP in plant species including chromosome preparation, BAC DNA labeling, and multicolor FISH.

  14. Allelotyping in Wilms tumors identifies a putative third tumor suppressor gene on chromosome 11

    SciTech Connect

    Radice, P.; Benedetti, V.D.; Mondini, P.

    1995-06-10

    An analysis of loss of heterozygosity for markers on both the short and the long arm of chromosome 11 was performed in 24 sporadic Wilms tumors. Six cases (25%) showed allelic losses involving the entire chromosome. In one case (4%) the loss was restricted solely to the WT1 gene on band p13. Two cases (8%) displayed allelic losses for WT1 and for markers on band p15.5, where the putative tumor suppressor gene WT2 has been mapped, but retained heterozygosity for markers on the long arm. In three tumors (13%) the loss of heterozygosity involved markers mapped to chromosomal regions p15.5 and q23.3-qter, but did not affect WT1 and markers on q12-q13. Altogether, the proportion of cases showing allelic losses at the distal region of 11q (37%) was comparable to that of cases with LOH affecting the WT1 (37%) or the WT2 (46%) loci, thus suggesting the existence of a third chromosome 11 tumor suppressor gene involved in the pathogenesis of Wilms tumors. 51 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  15. A second gene for cerulean cataracts maps to the {beta} crystallin region on chromosome 22

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, P.; Yount, J.; Lovrien, E.

    1996-08-01

    Cogenital cataracts are one of the most common major eye abnormalities and often lead to blindness in infants. At least a third of all cases are familial. Within this group, highly penetrant, autosomal dominant forms of congenital cataracts (ADCC) are most common. ADCC is a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders, in which at least eight different loci have been identified for nine clinically distinct forms. Among these, Armitage et al. mapped a gene for cerulean blue cataracts to chromosome 17q24. Bodker et al. described a large family with cerulean blue cataracts, in which the affected daughter of affected first cousins was presumed to be homozygous for the purported gene. We report linkage in this family to the region on chromosome 22q that includes two {beta} crystallin genes (CRYBB2, CRYBB3) and one pseudogene (CRYBB2P1). The affected female in question is homozygous at all markers. 25 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  16. Genetic linkage of mild pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH) to markers in the pericentromeric region of chromosome 19

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, M.D.; Rasmussen, M.; Garber, P.; Rimoin, D.L.; Cohn, D.H. ); Weber, J.L. ); Yuen, J.; Reinker, K. )

    1993-12-01

    Pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH) is a dominantly inherited form of short-limb dwarfism characterized by dysplastic changes in the spine, epiphyses, and metaphyses and early onset osteoarthropathy. Chondrocytes from affected individuals accumulate an unusual appearing material in the rough endoplasmic reticulum, which has led to the hypothesis that a structural abnormality in a cartilage-specific protein produces the phenotype. The authors recently identified a large family with a mild form of pseudoachondroplasia. By genetic linkage to a dinucleotide repeat polymorphic marker (D19S199), they have localized the disease gene to chromosome 19 (maximum lod score of 7.09 at a recombination fraction of 0.03). Analysis of additional markers and recombinations between the linked markers and the phenotype suggests that the disease gene resides within a 6.3-cM interval in the immediate pericentromeric region of the chromosome. 39 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Crossover Interference on Nucleolus Organizing Region-Bearing Chromosomes in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Sandy Y.; Horn, Sarah R.; Radford, Sarah J.; Housworth, Elizabeth A.; Stahl, Franklin W.; Copenhaver, Gregory P.

    2005-01-01

    In most eukaryotes, crossovers are not independently distributed along the length of a chromosome. Instead, they appear to avoid close proximity to one another—a phenomenon known as crossover interference. Previously, for three of the five Arabidopsis chromosomes, we measured the strength of interference and suggested a model wherein some crossovers experience interference while others do not. Here we show, using the same model, that the fraction of interference-insensitive crossovers is significantly smaller on the remaining two chromosomes. Since these two chromosomes bear the Arabidopsis NOR domains, the possibility that these chromosomal regions influence interference is discussed. PMID:15802520

  18. Crossover interference on nucleolus organizing region-bearing chromosomes in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Lam, Sandy Y; Horn, Sarah R; Radford, Sarah J; Housworth, Elizabeth A; Stahl, Franklin W; Copenhaver, Gregory P

    2005-06-01

    In most eukaryotes, crossovers are not independently distributed along the length of a chromosome. Instead, they appear to avoid close proximity to one another--a phenomenon known as crossover interference. Previously, for three of the five Arabidopsis chromosomes, we measured the strength of interference and suggested a model wherein some crossovers experience interference while others do not. Here we show, using the same model, that the fraction of interference-insensitive crossovers is significantly smaller on the remaining two chromosomes. Since these two chromosomes bear the Arabidopsis NOR domains, the possibility that these chromosomal regions influence interference is discussed.

  19. FISH of supernumerary marker chromosomes (SMCs) identifies six diagnostically relevant intervals on chromosome 22q and a novel type of bisatellited SMC(22).

    PubMed

    Bartsch, Oliver; Rasi, Sasan; Hoffmann, Kristina; Blin, Nikolaus

    2005-05-01

    Supernumerary marker chromosomes (SMCs) are frequently found at pre- and postnatal cytogenetic diagnosis and require identification. A disproportionally large subset of SMCs is derived from the human chromosome 22 and confers tri- or tetrasomy for the cat eye chromosomal region (CECR, the proximal 2 Mb of chromosome 22q) and/or other segments of 22q. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and 15 different DNA probes, we studied nine unrelated patients with an SMC(22) that contained the CECR. Five patients showed the small (type I) cat eye syndrome (CES) chromosome and each one had the larger (type II) CES chromosome, small ring chromosome 22, der(22)t(11;22) extrachromosome, and a novel type of bisatellited SMC(22) with breakpoints outside the low-copy repeats (LCRs22). By size and morphology, the novel bisatellited SMC(22) resembled the typical (types I and II) CES chromosomes, but it might have been associated with the chromosome 22q duplication syndrome, not CES. This SMC included a marker from band 22q12.3 and conferred only one extra copy each of the 22 centromere, CECR, and common 22q11 deletion area. There has been no previous report of a bisatellited SMC(22) predicting the chromosome 22q duplication syndrome. Accounting for the cytogenetic resemblance to CES chromosomes but different makeup and prognosis, we propose naming this an atypical (type III) CES chromosome. In this study, we found six distinct intervals on 22q to be relevant for FISH diagnostics. We propose to characterize SMCs(22) using DNA probes corresponding to these intervals.

  20. [Comparative FISH analysis of C-positive regions of chromosomes of wood mice (Rodentia, Muridae, Sylvaemus)].

    PubMed

    Rubtsov, N B; Karamysheva, T V; Bogdanov, A S; Likhoshvaĭ, T V; Kartavtseva, I V

    2011-09-01

    The homology of DNA of C-positive centromeric regions of chromosomes in wood mice of the genus Sylvaemus (S. uralensis, S. fulvipectus, S. sylvaticus, S. flavicollis, and S. ponticus) was estimated for the first time. DNA probes were generated by microdissection from the centromeric regions of individual autosomes of each species, and their fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with metaphase chromosomes of representatives of all studied wood mouse species was carried out. Unlike in the chromosomal forms and races of S. uralensis, changes in the DNA composition of the chromosomal centromeric regions in the wood mouse species of the genus Sylvaemus (including closely related S. flavicollis and S. ponticus) are both quantitative and qualitative. The patterns of FISH signals after in situ hybridization of the microdissection DNA probes with chromosomes of the species involved in the study demonstrate significant differences between C-positive regions of wood mouse chromosomes in the copy number and the level of homology of repetitive sequences as well as in the localization of homologous repetitive sequences. It was shown that C-positive regions of wood mouse chromosomes can contain both homologous and distinct sets of repetitive sequences. Regions enriched with homologous repeats were detected either directly in C-positive regions of individual chromosomes or only on the short arms of acrocentrics, or at the boundary of C-positive and C-negative regions.

  1. Conservation of Regional Variation in Sex-Specific Sex Chromosome Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Alison E.; Zimmer, Fabian; Harrison, Peter W.; Mank, Judith E.

    2015-01-01

    Regional variation in sex-specific gene regulation has been observed across sex chromosomes in a range of animals and is often a function of sex chromosome age. The avian Z chromosome exhibits substantial regional variation in sex-specific regulation, where older regions show elevated levels of male-biased expression. Distinct sex-specific regulation also has been observed across the male hypermethylated (MHM) region, which has been suggested to be a region of nascent dosage compensation. Intriguingly, MHM region regulatory features have not been observed in distantly related avian species despite the hypothesis that it is situated within the oldest region of the avian Z chromosome and is therefore orthologous across most birds. This situation contrasts with the conservation of other aspects of regional variation in gene expression observed on the avian sex chromosomes but could be the result of sampling bias. We sampled taxa across the Galloanserae, an avian clade spanning 90 million years, to test whether regional variation in sex-specific gene regulation across the Z chromosome is conserved. We show that the MHM region is conserved across a large portion of the avian phylogeny, together with other sex-specific regulatory features of the avian Z chromosome. Our results from multiple lines of evidence suggest that the sex-specific expression pattern of the MHM region is not consistent with nascent dosage compensation. PMID:26245831

  2. Topological Organization of Multi-chromosomal Regions by Firre

    PubMed Central

    Hacisuleyman, Ezgi; Goff, Loyal A.; Trapnell, Cole; Williams, Adam; Henao-Mejia, Jorge; Sun, Lei; McClanahan, Patrick; Hendrickson, David G.; Sauvageau, Martin; Kelley, David R.; Morse, Michael; Engreitz, Jesse; Lander, Eric S.; Guttman, Mitch; Lodish, Harvey F.; Flavell, Richard; Raj, Arjun; Rinn, John L.

    2014-01-01

    RNA is known to be an abundant and important structural component of the nuclear matrix, including long noncoding RNAs (lncRNA). Yet the molecular identities, functional roles, and localization dynamics of lncRNAs that influence nuclear architecture remain poorly understood. Here, we describe one lncRNA, Firre, that interacts with the nuclear matrix factor hnRNPU, through a 156 bp repeating sequence and Firre localizes across a ~5 Mb domain on the X-chromosome. We further observed Firre localization across at least five distinct trans-chromosomal loci, which reside in spatial proximity to the Firre genomic locus on the X-chromosome. Both genetic deletion of the Firre locus or knockdown of hnRNPU resulted in loss of co-localization of these trans-chromosomal interacting loci. Thus, our data suggest a model in which lncRNAs such as Firre can interface with and modulate nuclear architecture across chromosomes. PMID:24463464

  3. Genetic and physical map of the von Recklinghausen neurofibromatosis (NF1) region on chromosome 17

    SciTech Connect

    Yagle, M.K.; Parruti, G.; Xu, W.; Solomon, E. ); Ponder, B.A.J. )

    1990-09-01

    The von Recklinghausen neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) locus has been previously assigned to the proximal long arm of chromosome 17, and two NF1 patients have been identified who have constitutional balanced translocations involving 17q11.2. The authors have constructed a cosmid library from a chromosome-mediated gene transfectant, KLT8, that contains approximately 10% of chromosome 17, including 17q11.2. Cosmids isolated from this library have been mapped across a panel of somatic cell hybrids, including the hybrids from the two patients, and have been localized to seven small regions of proximal 17q. They have 5 cosmids that map directly above the two NF1 translocations, and 11 cosmids that map directly below. Of these, 2 cosmids in each region are linked to the disease locus and 3 of these cosmids show no recombination. One distal cosmid, 2B/B35, detects the two NF1 translocations by pulsed-field gel analysis and has been used to produce a long-range restriction map that covers the translocations.

  4. Sex chromosome loss and the pseudoautosomal region genes in hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Stephanie; Stoner, Samuel A.; Zhang, Dong-Er

    2016-01-01

    Cytogenetic aberrations, such as chromosomal translocations, aneuploidy, and amplifications, are frequently detected in hematological malignancies. For many of the common autosomal aberrations, the mechanisms underlying their roles in cancer development have been well-characterized. On the contrary, although loss of a sex chromosome is observed in a broad range of hematological malignancies, how it cooperates in disease development is less understood. Nevertheless, it has been postulated that tumor suppressor genes reside on the sex chromosomes. Although the X and Y sex chromosomes are highly divergent, the pseudoautosomal regions are homologous between both chromosomes. Here, we review what is currently known about the pseudoautosomal region genes in the hematological system. Additionally, we discuss implications for haploinsufficiency of critical pseudoautosomal region sex chromosome genes, driven by sex chromosome loss, in promoting hematological malignancies. Because mechanistic studies on disease development rely heavily on murine models, we also discuss the challenges and caveats of existing models, and propose alternatives for examining the involvement of pseudoautosomal region genes and loss of a sex chromosome in vivo. With the widespread detection of loss of a sex chromosome in different hematological malignances, the elucidation of the role of pseudoautosomal region genes in the development and progression of these diseases would be invaluable to the field. PMID:27655702

  5. Regions of the polytene chromosomes of Drosophila virilis carrying multiple dispersed p Dv 111 DNA sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Gubenko, I.S.; Evgen'ev, M.B.

    1986-09-01

    The cloned sequences of p Dv 111 DNA hybridized in situ with more than 170 regions of Drosophila virilis salivary gland chromosomes. Comparative autoradiography of in situ hybridization and the nature of pulse /sup 3/H-thymidine and /sup 3/H-deoxycytidine incorporation into the polytene chromosomes of D. virilis at the puparium formation stage showed that the hybridization sites of p Dv 111 are distributed not only in the heterochromatic regions but also in the euchromatic regions of the chromosomes that are not late replicating. Two distinct bands of hybridization of p Dv 111 /sup 3/H-DNA were observed in the region of the heat shock puff 20CD. The regions of the distal end of chromosome 2, in which breaks appeared during radiation-induced chromosomal rearrangements, hybridized with the p Dv 111 DNA.

  6. Construction of a yeast artifical chromosome contig spanning the spinal muscular atrophy disease gene region

    SciTech Connect

    Kleyn, P.W.; Wang, C.H.; Vitale, E.; Pan, J.; Ross, B.M.; Grunn, A.; Palmer, D.A.; Warburton, D.; Brzustowicz, L.M.; Gilliam, T.G. ); Lien, L.L.; Kunkel, L.M. )

    1993-07-15

    The childhood spinal muscular atrophies (SMAs) are the most common, serious neuromuscular disorders of childhood second to Duchenne muscular dystrophy. A single locus for these disorders has been mapped by recombination events to a region of 0.7 centimorgan (range, 0.1-2.1 centimorgans) between loci D5S435 and MAP1B on chromosome 5q11.2-13.3. By using PCR amplification to screen yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) DNA pools and the PCR-vectorette method to amplify YAC ends, a YAC contig was constructed across the disease gene region. Nine walk steps identified 32 YACs, including a minimum of seven overlapping YAC clones (average size, 460 kb) that span the SMA region. The contig is characterized by a collection of 30 YAC-end sequence tag sites together with seven genetic markers. The entire YAC contig spans a minimum of 3.2 Mb; the SMA locus is confined to roughly half of this region. Microsatellite markers generated along the YAC contig segregate with the SMA locus in all families where the flanking markers (D5S435 and MAP1B) recombine. Construction of a YAC contig across the disease gene region is an essential step in isolation of the SMA-encoding gene. 26 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Construction of a yeast artificial chromosome contig spanning the spinal muscular atrophy disease gene region.

    PubMed Central

    Kleyn, P W; Wang, C H; Lien, L L; Vitale, E; Pan, J; Ross, B M; Grunn, A; Palmer, D A; Warburton, D; Brzustowicz, L M

    1993-01-01

    The childhood spinal muscular atrophies (SMAs) are the most common, serious neuromuscular disorders of childhood second to Duchenne muscular dystrophy. A single locus for these disorders has been mapped by recombination events to a region of 0.7 centimorgan (range, 0.1-2.1 centimorgans) between loci D5S435 and MAP1B on chromosome 5q11.2-13.3. By using PCR amplification to screen yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) DNA pools and the PCR-vectorette method to amplify YAC ends, a YAC contig was constructed across the disease gene region. Nine walk steps identified 32 YACs, including a minimum of seven overlapping YAC clones (average size, 460 kb) that span the SMA region. The contig is characterized by a collection of 30 YAC-end sequence tag sites together with seven genetic markers. The entire YAC contig spans a minimum of 3.2 Mb; the SMA locus is confined to roughly half of this region. Microsatellite markers generated along the YAC contig segregate with the SMA locus in all families where the flanking markers (D5S435 and MAP1B) recombine. Construction of a YAC contig across the disease gene region is an essential step in isolation of the SMA-encoding gene. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8341701

  8. Karyotypes, C-banding, and chromosomal location of active nucleolar organizing regions in Tapinoma (Hymenoptera, Formicidae).

    PubMed

    Palomeque, T; Chica, E; Cano, M A; Díaz de la Guardia, R

    1988-04-01

    The haploid and diploid karyotypes of Tapinoma erraticum (n = 8) and Tapinoma nigerrimum (n = 9) were analyzed using C-banding and observation of NOR sites. C-banding showed the existence of heterochromatin in the paracentromeric regions of all chromosomes. The analysis of NOR sites in these species proved the existence of primary activity NOR in one or two chromosomes, respectively, whereas the other chromosomes showed secondary activity NOR, expressed only in a minority of cells. In both species the NOR were located in paracentromeric regions. These results are discussed in relation to a hypothesis of chromosome differentiation of these species.

  9. Y chromosome analysis reveals a sharp genetic boundary in the Carpathian region.

    PubMed

    Stefan, M; Stefanescu, G; Gavrila, L; Terrenato, L; Jobling, M A; Malaspina, P; Novelletto, A

    2001-01-01

    Nine single nucleotide (SNP) or indel binary polymorphisms were used to determine the frequencies and phylogenetic relationships of 12 Y chromosomal haplogroups in 289 males from Romania and the Republic of Moldova. Our data indicated a low but not null rate of the homoplasic appearance of the DYZ3 (-) allelic state. All other markers confirmed the previously proposed phylogeny. Based on the affinities between populations in terms of haplogroup frequencies, this work identified the geographical region of the Carpathians as a break point in the gene geography of Eastern Central Europe, providing a finer definition of one of the possible sharp genetic changes between Western and Eastern Europe.

  10. Isolation and refined regional mapping of expressed sequences from human chromosome 21

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, F.T.; Yu, J.; Patterson, D.

    1994-10-01

    To increase candidate genes from human chromosome 21 for the analysis of Down syndrome and other genetic diseases localized on this chromosome, we have isolated and studied 9 cDNA clones encoded by chromosome 21. For isolating cDNAs, single-copy microclones from a chromosome 21 microdissection library were used in direct screening of various cDNA libraries. Seven of the cDNA clones have been regionally mapped on chromosome 21 using a comprehensive hybrid mapping panel comprising 24 cell hybrids that divide the chromosome into 33 subregions. These cDNA clones with refined mapping positions should be useful for identification and cloning of genes responsible for the specific component phenotypes of Down syndrome and other diseases on chromosome 21, including progressive myoclonus epilepsy in 21q22.3. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. PCR-based karyotyping of Anopheles gambiae inversion 2Rj identifies the BAMAKO chromosomal form.

    PubMed

    Coulibaly, Mamadou B; Pombi, Marco; Caputo, Beniamino; Nwakanma, Davis; Jawara, Musa; Konate, Lassana; Dia, Ibrahima; Fofana, Abdrahamane; Kern, Marcia; Simard, Frédéric; Conway, David J; Petrarca, Vincenzo; della Torre, Alessandra; Traoré, Sékou; Besansky, Nora J

    2007-10-01

    The malaria vector Anopheles gambiae is polymorphic for chromosomal inversions on the right arm of chromosome 2 that segregate nonrandomly between assortatively mating populations in West Africa. One such inversion, 2Rj, is associated with the BAMAKO chromosomal form endemic to southern Mali and northern Guinea Conakry near the Niger River. Although it exploits a unique ecology and both molecular and chromosomal data suggest reduced gene flow between BAMAKO and other A. gambiae populations, no molecular markers exist to identify this form. To facilitate study of the BAMAKO form, a PCR assay for molecular karyotyping of 2Rj was developed based on sequences at the breakpoint junctions. The assay was extensively validated using more than 700 field specimens whose karyotypes were determined in parallel by cytogenetic and molecular methods. As inversion 2Rj also occurs in SAVANNA populations outside the geographic range of BAMAKO, samples were tested from Senegal, Cameroon and western Guinea Conakry as well as from Mali. In southern Mali, where 2Rj polymorphism in SAVANNA populations was very low and most of the 2Rj homozygotes were found in BAMAKO karyotypes, the molecular and cytogenetic methods were almost perfectly congruent. Elsewhere agreement between the methods was much poorer, as the molecular assay frequently misclassified 2Rj heterozygotes as 2R+j standard homozygotes. Molecular karyotyping of 2Rj is robust and accurate on 2R+j standard and 2Rj inverted homozygotes. Therefore, the proposed approach overcomes the lack of a rapid tool for identifying the BAMAKO form across developmental stages and sexes, and opens new perspectives for the study of BAMAKO ecology and behaviour. On the other hand, the method should not be applied for molecular karyotyping of j-carriers within the SAVANNA chromosomal form.

  12. PCR-based karyotyping of Anopheles gambiae inversion 2Rj identifies the BAMAKO chromosomal form

    PubMed Central

    Coulibaly, Mamadou B; Pombi, Marco; Caputo, Beniamino; Nwakanma, Davis; Jawara, Musa; Konate, Lassana; Dia, Ibrahima; Fofana, Abdrahamane; Kern, Marcia; Simard, Frédéric; Conway, David J; Petrarca, Vincenzo; Torre, Alessandra della; Traoré, Sékou; Besansky, Nora J

    2007-01-01

    Background The malaria vector Anopheles gambiae is polymorphic for chromosomal inversions on the right arm of chromosome 2 that segregate nonrandomly between assortatively mating populations in West Africa. One such inversion, 2Rj, is associated with the BAMAKO chromosomal form endemic to southern Mali and northern Guinea Conakry near the Niger River. Although it exploits a unique ecology and both molecular and chromosomal data suggest reduced gene flow between BAMAKO and other A. gambiae populations, no molecular markers exist to identify this form. Methods To facilitate study of the BAMAKO form, a PCR assay for molecular karyotyping of 2Rj was developed based on sequences at the breakpoint junctions. The assay was extensively validated using more than 700 field specimens whose karyotypes were determined in parallel by cytogenetic and molecular methods. As inversion 2Rj also occurs in SAVANNA populations outside the geographic range of BAMAKO, samples were tested from Senegal, Cameroon and western Guinea Conakry as well as from Mali. Results In southern Mali, where 2Rj polymorphism in SAVANNA populations was very low and most of the 2Rj homozygotes were found in BAMAKO karyotypes, the molecular and cytogenetic methods were almost perfectly congruent. Elsewhere agreement between the methods was much poorer, as the molecular assay frequently misclassified 2Rj heterozygotes as 2R+j standard homozygotes. Conclusion Molecular karyotyping of 2Rj is robust and accurate on 2R+j standard and 2Rj inverted homozygotes. Therefore, the proposed approach overcomes the lack of a rapid tool for identifying the BAMAKO form across developmental stages and sexes, and opens new perspectives for the study of BAMAKO ecology and behaviour. On the other hand, the method should not be applied for molecular karyotyping of j-carriers within the SAVANNA chromosomal form. PMID:17908310

  13. Breakpoint regions and homologous synteny blocks in chromosomes have different evolutionary histories.

    PubMed

    Larkin, Denis M; Pape, Greg; Donthu, Ravikiran; Auvil, Loretta; Welge, Michael; Lewin, Harris A

    2009-05-01

    The persistence of large blocks of homologous synteny and a high frequency of breakpoint reuse are distinctive features of mammalian chromosomes that are not well understood in evolutionary terms. To gain a better understanding of the evolutionary forces that affect genome architecture, synteny relationships among 10 amniotes (human, chimp, macaque, rat, mouse, pig, cattle, dog, opossum, and chicken) were compared at <1 human-Mbp resolution. Homologous synteny blocks (HSBs; N = 2233) and chromosome evolutionary breakpoint regions (EBRs; N = 1064) were identified from pairwise comparisons of all genomes. Analysis of the size distribution of HSBs shared in all 10 species' chromosomes (msHSBs) identified three (>20 Mbp) that are larger than expected by chance. Gene network analysis of msHSBs >3 human-Mbp and EBRs <1 Mbp demonstrated that msHSBs are significantly enriched for genes involved in development of the central nervous and other organ systems, whereas EBRs are enriched for genes associated with adaptive functions. In addition, we found EBRs are significantly enriched for structural variations (segmental duplications, copy number variants, and indels), retrotransposed and zinc finger genes, and single nucleotide polymorphisms. These results demonstrate that chromosome breakage in evolution is nonrandom and that HSBs and EBRs are evolving in distinctly different ways. We suggest that natural selection acts on the genome to maintain combinations of genes and their regulatory elements that are essential to fundamental processes of amniote development and biological organization. Furthermore, EBRs may be used extensively to generate new genetic variation and novel combinations of genes and regulatory elements that contribute to adaptive phenotypes.

  14. Breakpoint regions and homologous synteny blocks in chromosomes have different evolutionary histories

    PubMed Central

    Larkin, Denis M.; Pape, Greg; Donthu, Ravikiran; Auvil, Loretta; Welge, Michael; Lewin, Harris A.

    2009-01-01

    The persistence of large blocks of homologous synteny and a high frequency of breakpoint reuse are distinctive features of mammalian chromosomes that are not well understood in evolutionary terms. To gain a better understanding of the evolutionary forces that affect genome architecture, synteny relationships among 10 amniotes (human, chimp, macaque, rat, mouse, pig, cattle, dog, opossum, and chicken) were compared at <1 human-Mbp resolution. Homologous synteny blocks (HSBs; N = 2233) and chromosome evolutionary breakpoint regions (EBRs; N = 1064) were identified from pairwise comparisons of all genomes. Analysis of the size distribution of HSBs shared in all 10 species' chromosomes (msHSBs) identified three (>20 Mbp) that are larger than expected by chance. Gene network analysis of msHSBs >3 human-Mbp and EBRs <1 Mbp demonstrated that msHSBs are significantly enriched for genes involved in development of the central nervous and other organ systems, whereas EBRs are enriched for genes associated with adaptive functions. In addition, we found EBRs are significantly enriched for structural variations (segmental duplications, copy number variants, and indels), retrotransposed and zinc finger genes, and single nucleotide polymorphisms. These results demonstrate that chromosome breakage in evolution is nonrandom and that HSBs and EBRs are evolving in distinctly different ways. We suggest that natural selection acts on the genome to maintain combinations of genes and their regulatory elements that are essential to fundamental processes of amniote development and biological organization. Furthermore, EBRs may be used extensively to generate new genetic variation and novel combinations of genes and regulatory elements that contribute to adaptive phenotypes. PMID:19342477

  15. Major chromosomal breakpoint intervals in breast cancer co-localize with differentially methylated regions.

    PubMed

    Tang, Man-Hung; Varadan, Vinay; Kamalakaran, Sitharthan; Zhang, Michael Q; Dimitrova, Nevenka; Hicks, James

    2012-01-01

    Solid tumors exhibit chromosomal rearrangements resulting in gain or loss of multiple chromosomal loci (copy number variation, or CNV), and translocations that occasionally result in the creation of novel chimeric genes. In the case of breast cancer, although most individual tumors each have unique CNV landscape, the breakpoints, as measured over large datasets, appear to be non-randomly distributed in the genome. Breakpoints show a significant regional concentration at genomic loci spanning perhaps several megabases. The proximal cause of these breakpoint concentrations is a subject of speculation, but is, as yet, largely unknown. To shed light on this issue, we have performed a bio-statistical analysis on our previously published data for a set of 119 breast tumors and normal controls (Wiedswang et al., 2003), where each sample has both high-resolution CNV and methylation data. The method examined the distribution of closeness of breakpoint regions with differentially methylated regions (DMR), coupled with additional genomic parameters, such as repeat elements and designated "fragile sites" in the reference genome. Through this analysis, we have identified a set of 93 regional loci called breakpoint enriched DMR (BEDMRs) characterized by altered DNA methylation in cancer compared to normal cells that are associated with frequent breakpoint concentrations within a distance of 1 Mb. BEDMR loci are further associated with local hypomethylation (66%), concentrations of the Alu SINE repeats within 3 Mb (35% of the cases), and tend to occur near a number of cancer related genes such as the protocadherins, AKT1, DUB3, GAB2. Furthermore, BEDMRs seem to deregulate members of the histone gene family and chromatin remodeling factors, e.g., JMJD1B, which might affect the chromatin structure and disrupt coordinate signaling and repair. From this analysis we propose that preference for chromosomal breakpoints is related to genome structure coupled with alterations in DNA

  16. Major Chromosomal Breakpoint Intervals in Breast Cancer Co-Localize with Differentially Methylated Regions

    PubMed Central

    Eric Tang, Man-Hung; Varadan, Vinay; Kamalakaran, Sitharthan; Zhang, Michael Q.; Dimitrova, Nevenka; Hicks, James

    2012-01-01

    Solid tumors exhibit chromosomal rearrangements resulting in gain or loss of multiple chromosomal loci (copy number variation, or CNV), and translocations that occasionally result in the creation of novel chimeric genes. In the case of breast cancer, although most individual tumors each have unique CNV landscape, the breakpoints, as measured over large datasets, appear to be non-randomly distributed in the genome. Breakpoints show a significant regional concentration at genomic loci spanning perhaps several megabases. The proximal cause of these breakpoint concentrations is a subject of speculation, but is, as yet, largely unknown. To shed light on this issue, we have performed a bio-statistical analysis on our previously published data for a set of 119 breast tumors and normal controls (Wiedswang et al., 2003), where each sample has both high-resolution CNV and methylation data. The method examined the distribution of closeness of breakpoint regions with differentially methylated regions (DMR), coupled with additional genomic parameters, such as repeat elements and designated “fragile sites” in the reference genome. Through this analysis, we have identified a set of 93 regional loci called breakpoint enriched DMR (BEDMRs) characterized by altered DNA methylation in cancer compared to normal cells that are associated with frequent breakpoint concentrations within a distance of 1 Mb. BEDMR loci are further associated with local hypomethylation (66%), concentrations of the Alu SINE repeats within 3 Mb (35% of the cases), and tend to occur near a number of cancer related genes such as the protocadherins, AKT1, DUB3, GAB2. Furthermore, BEDMRs seem to deregulate members of the histone gene family and chromatin remodeling factors, e.g., JMJD1B, which might affect the chromatin structure and disrupt coordinate signaling and repair. From this analysis we propose that preference for chromosomal breakpoints is related to genome structure coupled with alterations in

  17. Posterior probability of linkage analysis of autism dataset identifies linkage to chromosome 16

    PubMed Central

    Wassink, Thomas H.; Vieland, Veronica J.; Sheffield, Val C.; Bartlett, Christopher W.; Goedken, Rhinda; Childress, Deborah; Piven, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Objective To apply phenotypic and statistical methods designed to account for heterogeneity to linkage analyses of the autism Collaborative Linkage Study of Autism (CLSA) affected sibling pair families. Method The CLSA contains two sets of 57 families each; Set 1 has been analyzed previously, whereas this study presents the first analyses of Set 2. The two sets were analyzed independently, and were further split based on the degree of phrase speech delay in the siblings. Linkage analysis was carried out using the posterior probability of linkage (PPL), a Bayesian statistic that provides a mathematically rigorous mechanism for combining linkage evidence across multiple samples. Results Two-point PPLs from Set 1 led to the follow-up genotyping of 18 markers around linkage peaks on 1q, 13p, 13q, 16q, and 17q in both sets of families. Multipoint PPLs were then calculated for the entire CLSA sample. These analyses identified four regions with at least modest evidence in support of linkage: 1q at 173 cM, PPL = 0.12; 13p at 21 cM, PPL = 0.16; 16q at 63 cM, PPL= 0.36; Xq at 40 cM, PPL = 0.11. Conclusion We find strengthened evidence for linkage of autism to chromosomes 1q, 13p, 16q, and Xq, and diminished evidence for linkage to 7q and 13q. The verity of these findings will be tested by continuing to update our PPL analyses with data from additional autism datasets. PMID:18349700

  18. Prenatal diagnosis of a small supernumerary, XIST-negative, mosaic ring X chromosome identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization in an abnormal male fetus.

    PubMed

    Le Caignec, C; Boceno, M; Joubert, M; Winer, N; Aubron, F; Fallet-Bianco, C; Rival, J M

    2003-02-01

    Marker or ring X [r(X)] chromosomes of varying size are often found in patients with Turner syndrome. Patients with very small r(X) chromosomes that did not include the X-inactivation locus (XIST) have been described with a more severe phenotype. Small r(X) chromosomes are rare in males and there are only five previous reports of such cases. We report the identification of a small supernumerary X chromosome in an abnormal male fetus. Cytogenetic analysis from chorionic villus sampling was performed because of fetal nuchal translucency thickness and it showed mosaicism 46,XY/47,XY,+r(X)/48,XY,+r(X),+r(X). Fluorescence in situ hybridizations (FISH) showed the marker to be of X-chromosome origin and not to contain the XIST locus. Additional specific probes showed that the r(X) included a euchromatic region in proximal Xq. At 20 weeks gestation, a second ultrasound examination revealed cerebral abnormalities. After genetic counselling, the pregnancy was terminated. The fetus we describe is the first male with a mosaic XIST-negative r(X) chromosome identified at prenatal diagnosis. The phenotype we observed was probably the result of functional disomy of the genes in the r(X) chromosome, secondary to loss of the XIST locus.

  19. DNA repair and crossing over favor similar chromosome regions as discovered in radiation hybrid of Triticum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The uneven distribution of recombination across the length of chromosomes results in inaccurate estimates of genetic to physical distances. In wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) chromosome 3B, it has been estimated that 90% of the cross over occurs in distal sub-telomeric regions representing 40% of the...

  20. Transcript catalogs of human chromosome 21 and orthologous chimpanzee and mouse regions.

    PubMed

    Sturgeon, Xiaolu; Gardiner, Katheleen J

    2011-06-01

    A comprehensive representation of the gene content of the long arm of human chromosome 21 (Hsa21q) remains of interest for the study of Down syndrome, its associated phenotypic features, and mouse models. Here we compare transcript catalogs for Hsa21q, chimpanzee chromosome 21 (Ptr21q), and orthologous regions of mouse chromosomes 16, 17, and 10 for open reading frame (ORF) characteristics and conservation. The Hsa21q and mouse catalogs contain 552 and 444 gene models, respectively, of which only 162 are highly conserved. Hsa21q transcripts were used to identify orthologous exons in Ptr21q and assemble 533 putative transcripts. Transcript catalogs for all three organisms are searchable for nucleotide and amino acid sequence features of ORF length, repeat content, experimental support, gene structure, and conservation. For human and mouse comparisons, three additional summaries are provided: (1) the chromosomal distribution of novel ORF transcripts versus potential functional RNAs, (2) the distribution of species-specific transcripts within Hsa21q and mouse models of Down syndrome, and (3) the organization of sense-antisense and putative sense-antisense structures defining potential regulatory mechanisms. Catalogs, summaries, and nucleotide and amino acid sequences of all composite transcripts are available and searchable at http://gfuncpathdb.ucdenver.edu/iddrc/chr21/home.php. These data sets provide comprehensive information useful for evaluation of candidate genes and mouse models of Down syndrome and for identification of potential functional RNA genes and novel regulatory mechanisms involving Hsa21q genes. These catalogs and search tools complement and extend information available from other gene annotation projects.

  1. Partial hexasomy for the Prader-Willi-Angelman syndrome critical region due to a maternally inherited large supernumerary marker chromosome.

    PubMed

    Hoppman-Chaney, Nicole L; Dawson, D Brian; Nguyen, Lai; Sengupta, Sunanda; Reynolds, Kara; McPherson, Elizabeth; Velagaleti, Gopalrao

    2010-08-01

    Extra copies of the Prader-Willi-Angelman syndrome critical region (PWASCR) have been shown to have detrimental phenotypic effects depending on the parent of origin. Hexasomy for the PWASCR is rare; only 6 cases have been described to date. We report on a 15-year-old girl referred for developmental delay and seizures with a mosaic tricentric small marker chromosome (SMC) 15 identified by routine G-banding chromosome studies. C-banding and FISH confirmed the presence of three chromosome 15 centromeres as well as four copies of the PWASCR on the SMC in approximately 60% of interphase cells. Microsatellite genotyping documented maternal inheritance of the SMC, and methylation-sensitive multiplex ligation-dependent PCR amplification (MS-MLPA) showed that the extra copies of the PWASCR contained on the marker chromosome bear a methylation pattern similar to a normal maternal chromosome, implying maternal inheritance. These findings are consistent with the patient's phenotype as paternal inheritance of such a marker chromosome is thought to be benign. However, this patient's phenotype is the mildest described to date and may be a result of mosaicism for the SMC.

  2. The sex-specific region of sex chromosomes in animals and plants.

    PubMed

    Gschwend, Andrea R; Weingartner, Laura A; Moore, Richard C; Ming, Ray

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of the evolution of sex chromosomes has increased greatly in recent years due to a number of molecular evolutionary investigations in divergent sex chromosome systems, and these findings are reshaping theories of sex chromosome evolution. In particular, the dynamics of the sex-determining region (SDR) have been demonstrated by recent findings in ancient and incipient sex chromosomes. Radical changes in genomic structure and gene content in the male specific region of the Y chromosome between human and chimpanzee indicated rapid evolution in the past 6 million years, defying the notion that the pace of evolution in the SDR was fast at early stages but slowed down overtime. The chicken Z and the human X chromosomes appeared to have acquired testis-expressed genes and expanded in intergenic regions. Transposable elements greatly contributed to SDR expansion and aided the trafficking of genes in the SDR and its X or Z counterpart through retrotransposition. Dosage compensation is not a destined consequence of sex chromosomes as once thought. Most X-linked microRNA genes escape silencing and are expressed in testis. Collectively, these findings are challenging many of our preconceived ideas of the evolutionary trajectory and fates of sex chromosomes.

  3. Protein composition of interband regions in polytene and cell line chromosomes of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite many efforts, little is known about distribution and interactions of chromatin proteins which contribute to the specificity of chromomeric organization of interphase chromosomes. To address this issue, we used publicly available datasets from several recent Drosophila genome-wide mapping and annotation projects, in particular, those from modENCODE project, and compared molecular organization of 13 interband regions which were accurately mapped previously. Results Here we demonstrate that in interphase chromosomes of Drosophila cell lines, the interband regions are enriched for a specific set of proteins generally characteristic of the "open" chromatin (RNA polymerase II, CHRIZ (CHRO), BEAF-32, BRE1, dMI-2, GAF, NURF301, WDS and TRX). These regions also display reduced nucleosome density, histone H1 depletion and pronounced enrichment for ORC2, a pre-replication complex component. Within the 13 interband regions analyzed, most were around 3-4 kb long, particularly those where many of said protein features were present. We estimate there are about 3500 regions with similar properties in chromosomes of D. melanogaster cell lines, which fits quite well the number of cytologically observed interbands in salivary gland polytene chromosomes. Conclusions Our observations suggest strikingly similar organization of interband chromatin in polytene chromosomes and in chromosomes from cell lines thereby reflecting the existence of a universal principle of interphase chromosome organization. PMID:22093916

  4. Direct selection in the BRCA1 region of human chromosome 17q21

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne-Lawrence, S.L.; Welcsh, P.L.; Gallardo, T.D.

    1994-09-01

    Direct cDNA selection was used to obtain candidate genes within the region of human chromosome 17q21 associated with early onset familial breast and ovarian cancer (BRCA1). Four sets of pooled cosmids (10 to 25 per set) derived from this region were used in the selection of cDNAs from four complex human cDNA pools: placenta, fetal head, HeLa cells, and activated T cells. Two YACs within our contig were also used in a separate selection. A reporter gene, estradiol 17 beta-hydroxysteriod dehydrogenase (EDH17B), located on one of the cosmids in the contig of the region, was monitored to observe the efficiency of the selection. A >10,000-fold enrichment of EDH17B was seen after two rounds of selection based on the number of EDH17B clones found in the resultant selected library. Selected inserts were cloned into lambda gt10, amplified with the PCR using vector primers, and dot blotted. 200 inserts have been hybridized individually to cosmids from the contig and to the cDNA dot blots. Approximately 70% of these map back to specific cosmids or YACs in the region. These PCR products were sequenced directly and analyzed for homology against each other as well as against sequences within GenBank. At least 23 new genes have been identified and isolated from this region based on sequence and hybridization overlaps. Seventeen of these cDNAs appear to be unique, two are known genes previously mapped to the region, one has homology to a known known Drosophilia gene, one is homologous to a human non-histone chromosomal protein HMG-17, and two are new members of gene families. These cDNAs are being used for mutational analyses in affected women from families with multiple cases of breast and ovarian cancer.

  5. A gene for distal arthrogryposis Type I maps to the pericentromeric region of chromosome 9

    SciTech Connect

    Bamshad, M.; Watkins, W.S.; Zenger, R.K.; Bohnsack, J.F.; Carey, J.C.; Otterud, B.; Krakowiak, P.A.; Robertson, M.; Jorde, L.B.

    1994-12-01

    Club foot is one of the most common human congenital malformations. Distal arthrogryposis type I (DA-1) is a frequent cause of dominantly inherited club foot. Performing a genomewide search using short tandem repeat (STR) polymorphisms, we have mapped a DA-1 gene to the pericentromeric region of chromosome 9 in a large kindred. Linkage analysis has generated a positive lod score of 5.90 at {theta} = 0, with the marker GS-4. Multiple recombinants bracketing the region have been identified. Analysis of an additional family demonstrated no linkage to the same locus, indicating likely locus heterogeneity. Of the autosomal congenital contracture disorders causing positional foot deformities, this is the first to be mapped.

  6. A gene for distal arthrogryposis type I maps to the pericentromeric region of chromosome 9.

    PubMed Central

    Bamshad, M.; Watkins, W. S.; Zenger, R. K.; Bohnsack, J. F.; Carey, J. C.; Otterud, B.; Krakowiak, P. A.; Robertson, M.; Jorde, L. B.

    1994-01-01

    Club foot is one of the most common human congenital malformations. Distal arthrogryposis type I (DA-1) is a frequent cause of dominantly inherited club foot. Performing a genomewide search using short tandem repeat (STR) polymorphisms, we have mapped a DA-1 gene to the pericentromeric region of chromosome 9 in a large kindred. Linkage analysis has generated a positive lod score of 5.90 at theta = 0, with the marker GS-4. Multiple recombinants bracketing the region have been identified. Analysis of an additional family demonstrated no linkage to the same locus, indicating likely locus heterogeneity. Of the autosomal congenital contracture disorders causing positional foot deformities, this is the first to be mapped. PMID:7977374

  7. [B chromosome polymorphism of blackflies (Diptera, Simuliidae) from the north-western region of Russia].

    PubMed

    Chubareva, L A; Petrova, N A

    2006-01-01

    We have studied karyofonds of natural populations and B-chromosome morphology of 8 species of blackflies from the North-Western region of Russia: Odagmia ornata Mg., Hellichiella crassa Rubz., Simulium morsitans Edw., Simulium argyreatum Mg., Shoenbaueria pusilla Fries., Cnetha fontinalis Radzv., Stegopterna duo-decimata Rubz., and Archesimulium tuberosum Lundstr. For this purpose we made slides of squashed blackflies larvae with salivary gland polytene chromosomes stained by aceto-orcein, in addition to similarly stained slides with mitotic chromosomes from gonads and ganglia. Morphology of polytene B-chromosomes of Shoenbaueria pusilla Fries., Cnetha fontinalis Radzv., Stegopterna duodecimata Rubz., and Archesimulium tuberosum Lundstr. has been first described. B-chromosome polymorphism was found in all species, but the number of B chromosomes was conserved within each differences in polytene individual. Stable and distinct interspecific differences in the morphology of polytene B-chromosomes were demonstrated, and these characters are advisable to use to distinguish the species. We have investigated for the first time karyofonds of Od. ornata populations from Arkhangelsk Region (Solovetskie Islands) and Leningrad Region (railway station Sablino), and those of S. argyreatum populations from Murmansk Region (Kandalaksha environs) and Karelia (railway station Chupa). A long term study of Od. ornata and S. argyrestum population from North-Western Russia revealed interspecific and interpopulation dynamics of the occurrence of specimens with B-chromosomes. Some populations showed an increased percentage of individuals with B-chromosomes. It is suggested that B-chromosomes may play a role in adaptation of polulations to severe environmental conditions.

  8. Regional deletion and amplification on chromosome 6 in a uveal melanoma case without abnormalities on chromosomes 1p, 3 and 8.

    PubMed

    van Gils, Walter; Kilic, Emine; Brüggenwirth, Hennie T; Vaarwater, Jolanda; Verbiest, Michael M; Beverloo, Berna; van Til-Berg, Marjan E; Paridaens, Dion; Luyten, Gregorius P; de Klein, Annelies

    2008-02-01

    Uveal melanoma (UM) is the most common primary intraocular malignancy in adults. Loss of the long arm and gain of the short arm of chromosome 6 are frequently observed chromosomal aberrations in UM, together with loss of chromosome 1p36, loss of chromosome 3 and gain of chromosome 8. This suggests the presence of one or more oncogenes on 6p and tumor suppressor genes at 6q that are involved in UM development. Both regions, however, have not been well defined yet. Furthermore in other neoplasms gain of 6p and loss of 6q are frequently occurring events. In this case report, we describe the delineation of a partial gain on chromosome 6p and a partial deletion on 6q in a UM with the objective to pinpoint smaller candidate regions on chromosome 6 involved in UM development. Conventional cytogenetics, comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) were used to delineate regions of loss and gain on chromosome 6 in this UM patient. With conventional cytogenetics a deleted region was found on chromosome 6q that was further delineated to a region ranging from 6q16.1 to 6q22 using CGH and FISH. A region of gain from 6pter to 6p21.2 was also demarcated with CGH and FISH. No other deletions or amplifications on recurrently involved chromosomes were found in this patient. This study indicates the presence of one or more tumor suppressor genes on chromosomal region 6q16.1-6q22 and the presence of one or more oncogenes on chromosomal region 6pter-6p21.2, which are likely to be important in UM and other tumors.

  9. A resistance-like gene identified by EST mapping and its association with a QTL controlling Fusarium head blight infection on wheat chromosome 3BS.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiaorong; Francki, Michael G; Ohm, Herbert W

    2006-06-01

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) is a major disease in the wheat growing regions of the world. A quantitative trait locus (QTL) on the short arm of chromosome 3B controls much of the variation for resistance. The cloning of candidate disease-resistance genes for FHB QTLs on chromosome 3B can provide further elucidation of the mechanisms that control resistance. However, rearrangements and divergence during plant genome evolution often hampers the identification of sequences with similarity to known disease-resistance genes. This study focuses on the use of wheat expressed sequence tags (ESTs) that map to the region on chromosome 3B containing the QTL for FHB resistance and low-stringency BLAST searching to identify sequences with similarity to known disease-resistance genes. One EST rich with leucine repeats and low similarity to a protein kinase domain of the barley Rpg1 gene was identified. Genetic mapping using a Ning894037 x Alondra recombinant inbred (RI) population showed that this EST mapped to the QTL on the short arm of chromosome 3B and may represent a portion of a newly diverged gene contributing to FHB resistance. The EST is a new marker suitable for marker-assisted selection and provides a starting point to begin map-based cloning for chromosome walking and investigate new diverged genes at this locus.

  10. Regional localization of the gene for thyroid peroxidase to human chromosome 2p25 and mouse chromosome 12C

    SciTech Connect

    Endo, Yuichi; Onogi, Satoshi; Fujita, Teizo

    1995-02-10

    Thyroid peroxidase (TPO) plays a central role in thyroid gland function. The enzyme catalyzes two important reactions of thyroid hormone synthesis, i.e., the iodination of tyrosine residues in thyroglobulin and phenoxy-ester formation between pairs of iodinated tyrosines to generate the thyroid hormones, thyroxine and triiodothyronine. Previously, we isolated the cDNAs encoding human and mouse TPOs and assigned the human TPO gene to the short arm of chromosome 2 by somatic cell hybrid mapping. By a similar analysis of DNA from somatic cell hybrids, the human TPO gene was mapped to 2pter-p12. The mouse TPO gene was localized to chromosome 12 using a rat TPO cDNA as a probe to hybridize with mouse-hamster somatic cell hybrids. In this study, we used fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to confirm the localization of human and mouse TPO genes to human chromosome 2 and mouse chromosome 12 and to assign them regionally to 2p25 and 12C, respectively. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  11. Physical localization of eed: A region of mouse chromosome 7 required for gastrulation

    SciTech Connect

    Holdener, B.C.; Thomas, J.W.; Schumacher, A.

    1995-06-10

    In the mouse, the embryonic ectoderm development (eed) region is defined by deletions encompassing the albino (c) locus of chromosome 7. The region is located 1-2 cM distal to the c locus and was of undetermined size. Embryos homozygous for deletions removing eed display defects in axial organization during gastrulation. Two loci, identified by chemical mutagenesis, are known to map within the eed interval. One, {ell}7Rn5, probably represents the gene required for gastrulation. The second, {ell}7Rn6, is required for survival after birth. fit1, a third locus identified by chemical mutagenesis, maps distal to the eed interval and is also required for survival after birth. A 900-kb YAC contig has been constructed, and deletion breakpoints defining the limits of the regions containing these loci have been localized. Their positions place the eed region within a maximum 150-kb interval at the proximal end of the contig, while fit1 maps to a 360-kb interval within the middle of the contig. Several clusters of rare-cutting restriction sites map within these regions and represent potential locations of candidate genes. 26 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Detailed comparative mapping of cereal chromosome regions corresponding to the Ph1 locus in wheat

    SciTech Connect

    Foote, T.; Roberts, M.; Kurata, N.

    1997-10-01

    Detailed physical mapping of markers from rich chromosome 9, and from syntenous (at the genetic level) regions of other cereal genomes, has resulted in rice yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contigs spanning parts of rice 9. This physical mapping, together with comparative genetic mapping, has demonstrated that synteny has been largely maintained between the genomes of several cereals at the level of contiged YACs. Markers located in one region of rice chromosome 9 encompassed by the YAC contigs have exhibited restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) using deletion lines for the Ph1 locus. This has allowed demarcation of the region of rice chromosome 9 syntenous with the phlb and phlc deletions in wheat chromosome 5B. A group of probes located in wheat homoeologous group 5 and barley chromosome 5H, however, have synteny with rice chromosomes other than 9. This suggests that the usefulness of comparative trait analysis and of the rice genome as a tool to facilitate gene isolation will differ from one region to the next, and implies that the rice genome is more ancestral in structure than those of the Triticeae. 38 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Localisation of a gene for mucopolysaccharidosis IIIC to the pericentromeric region of chromosome 8

    PubMed Central

    Ausseil, J; Loredo-Osti, J; Verner, A; Darmond-Zwaig, C; Maire, I; Poorthuis, B; van Diggelen, O P; Hudson, T; Fujiwara, T; Morgan, K; Pshezhetsky, A

    2004-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIC (MPS IIIC, or Sanfilippo syndrome C) is a rare lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency of acetyl-coenzyme A:α-glucosaminide-N-acetyltransferase. Patients develop progressive neuropsychiatric problems, mental retardation, hearing loss, and relatively minor visceral manifestations. The pattern of transmission is consistent with an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. The aim of this study was to find a locus for MPS IIIC using a homozygosity mapping approach. A genomewide scan was performed on DNA from 27 affected individuals and 17 of their unaffected relatives. Additional patients were recruited, and DNA was obtained from a total of 44 affected individuals and 18 unaffected family members from 31 families from 10 countries. A working candidate interval was defined by looking for excess homozygosity in patients compared with their relatives. Additional markers were genotyped in regions of interest. Linkage analysis was performed to support the informal analysis. Inspection of the genomewide scan data showed apparent excess homozygosity in patients compared with their relatives for markers on chromosome 8. Additional genotyping identified 15 consecutive markers (from D8S1051 to D8S2332) in an 8.3 cM interval for which the genotypes of affected siblings were identical in state. A maximum multipoint lod score of 10.61 was found at marker D8S519. A locus for MPS IIIC maps to an 8.3 cM (16 Mbp) interval in the pericentromeric region of chromosome 8. PMID:15591281

  14. Multistudy Fine Mapping of Chromosome 2q Identifies XRCC5 as a Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Susceptibility Gene

    PubMed Central

    Hersh, Craig P.; Pillai, Sreekumar G.; Zhu, Guohua; Lomas, David A.; Bakke, Per; Gulsvik, Amund; DeMeo, Dawn L.; Klanderman, Barbara J.; Lazarus, Ross; Litonjua, Augusto A.; Sparrow, David; Reilly, John J.; Agusti, Alvar; Calverley, Peter M. A.; Donner, Claudio F.; Levy, Robert D.; Make, Barry J.; Paré, Peter D.; Rennard, Stephen I.; Vestbo, Jørgen; Wouters, Emiel F. M.; Scholand, Mary Beth; Coon, Hilary; Hoidal, John; Silverman, Edwin K.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: Several family-based studies have identified genetic linkage for lung function and airflow obstruction to chromosome 2q. Objectives: We hypothesized that merging results of high-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) mapping in four separate populations would lead to the identification of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) susceptibility genes on chromosome 2q. Methods: Within the chromosome 2q linkage region, 2,843 SNPs were genotyped in 806 COPD cases and 779 control subjects from Norway, and 2,484 SNPs were genotyped in 309 patients with severe COPD from the National Emphysema Treatment Trial and 330 community control subjects. Significant associations from the combined results across the two case-control studies were followed up in 1,839 individuals from 603 families from the International COPD Genetics Network (ICGN) and in 949 individuals from 127 families in the Boston Early-Onset COPD Study. Measurements and Main Results: Merging the results of the two case-control analyses, 14 of the 790 overlapping SNPs had a combined P < 0.01. Two of these 14 SNPs were consistently associated with COPD in the ICGN families. The association with one SNP, located in the gene XRCC5, was replicated in the Boston Early-Onset COPD Study, with a combined P = 2.51 × 10−5 across the four studies, which remains significant when adjusted for multiple testing (P = 0.02). Genotype imputation confirmed the association with SNPs in XRCC5. Conclusions: By combining data from COPD genetic association studies conducted in four independent patient samples, we have identified XRCC5, an ATP-dependent DNA helicase, as a potential COPD susceptibility gene. PMID:20463177

  15. Multistudy fine mapping of chromosome 2q identifies XRCC5 as a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease susceptibility gene.

    PubMed

    Hersh, Craig P; Pillai, Sreekumar G; Zhu, Guohua; Lomas, David A; Bakke, Per; Gulsvik, Amund; DeMeo, Dawn L; Klanderman, Barbara J; Lazarus, Ross; Litonjua, Augusto A; Sparrow, David; Reilly, John J; Agusti, Alvar; Calverley, Peter M A; Donner, Claudio F; Levy, Robert D; Make, Barry J; Paré, Peter D; Rennard, Stephen I; Vestbo, Jørgen; Wouters, Emiel F M; Scholand, Mary Beth; Coon, Hilary; Hoidal, John; Silverman, Edwin K

    2010-09-01

    Several family-based studies have identified genetic linkage for lung function and airflow obstruction to chromosome 2q. We hypothesized that merging results of high-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) mapping in four separate populations would lead to the identification of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) susceptibility genes on chromosome 2q. Within the chromosome 2q linkage region, 2,843 SNPs were genotyped in 806 COPD cases and 779 control subjects from Norway, and 2,484 SNPs were genotyped in 309 patients with severe COPD from the National Emphysema Treatment Trial and 330 community control subjects. Significant associations from the combined results across the two case-control studies were followed up in 1,839 individuals from 603 families from the International COPD Genetics Network (ICGN) and in 949 individuals from 127 families in the Boston Early-Onset COPD Study. Merging the results of the two case-control analyses, 14 of the 790 overlapping SNPs had a combined P < 0.01. Two of these 14 SNPs were consistently associated with COPD in the ICGN families. The association with one SNP, located in the gene XRCC5, was replicated in the Boston Early-Onset COPD Study, with a combined P = 2.51 x 10(-5) across the four studies, which remains significant when adjusted for multiple testing (P = 0.02). Genotype imputation confirmed the association with SNPs in XRCC5. By combining data from COPD genetic association studies conducted in four independent patient samples, we have identified XRCC5, an ATP-dependent DNA helicase, as a potential COPD susceptibility gene.

  16. Genes associated with the genesis of leiomyoma of the uterus in a commonly deleted chromosomal region at 7q22.

    PubMed

    Saito, Emi; Okamoto, Aikou; Saito, Misato; Shinozaki, Hideo; Takakura, Satoshi; Yanaihara, Nozomu; Ochiai, Kazunori; Tanaka, Tadao

    2005-03-01

    Uterine leiomyoma occurs in about 20-30% of women over the age of 30, and is the most frequent benign tumor in gynecology. Despite its benign status, leiomyoma of the uterus has been reported to involve chromosomal abnormalities on chromosome 7. To search for genes associated with the genesis and development of this disease, we examined microsatellite alterations on chromosome 7 in 41 uterine leiomyomas, and identified a commonly-deleted region. Allelic imbalance on chromosome 7 was detected with an incidence of 7% (3/41), with the D7S501 locus being the most frequently affected (13%). The commonly deleted region was between D7S2545 and D7S2420. We examined alterations in the expression of genes located within this region by RT-PCR. Only the LAMB1 (Laminin beta1) gene showed a variable expression. Of the 21 cases, 12 showed an increase, and 5 (24%) a decrease in the expression of LAMB1 in the leiomyomatous region. These results suggested that alteration of LAMB1 expression is associated with the genesis and development of uterine leiomyoma.

  17. High-resolution G-banding and nucleolus-organizer regions of chromosomes of vole Microtus kirgisorum

    SciTech Connect

    Mazurok, N.A.; Rubtsov, N.B.; Ovechkina, Y.Y.

    1995-08-01

    The use of G-banding of chromosomes in combination with the pipette method of chromosome preparation at the early metaphase made it possible to distinguish about 520 segments in the haploid chromosome set of vole Microtus kirgisorum. The idiogram of M. kirgisorum chromosomes was obtained on the basis of detailed investigation of chromosomes at different condensation levels. Data of the localization and the number of nucleolus-organizer regions are given. 16 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Identification and characterization of genomic regions on chromosomes 4 and 8 that control the rate of photosynthesis in rice leaves.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Shunsuke; Tsuru, Yukiko; Nito, Naoko; Murata, Kazumasa; Yamamoto, Toshio; Ebitani, Takeshi; Ookawa, Taiichiro; Hirasawa, Tadashi

    2011-03-01

    DNA marker-assisted selection appears to be a promising strategy for improving rates of leaf photosynthesis in rice. The rate of leaf photosynthesis was significantly higher in a high-yielding indica variety, Habataki, than in the most popular Japanese variety, Koshihikari, at the full heading stage as a result of the higher level of leaf nitrogen at the same rate of application of nitrogen and the higher stomatal conductance even when the respective levels of leaf nitrogen were the same. The higher leaf nitrogen content of Habataki was caused by the greater accumulation of nitrogen by plants. The higher stomatal conductance of Habataki was caused by the higher hydraulic conductance. Using progeny populations and selected lines derived from a cross between Koshihikari and Habataki, it was possible to identify the genomic regions responsible for the rate of photosynthesis within a 2.1 Mb region between RM17459 and RM17552 and within a 1.2 Mb region between RM6999 and RM22529 on the long arm of chromosome 4 and on the short arm of chromosome 8, respectively. The designated region on chromosome 4 of Habataki was responsible for both the increase in the nitrogen content of leaves and hydraulic conductance in the plant by increasing the root surface area. The designated region on chromosome 8 of Habataki was responsible for the increase in hydraulic conductance by increasing the root hydraulic conductivity. The results suggest that it may be possible to improve photosynthesis in rice leaves by marker-assisted selection that focuses on these regions of chromosomes 4 and 8.

  19. Identification and characterization of genomic regions on chromosomes 4 and 8 that control the rate of photosynthesis in rice leaves

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Shunsuke; Tsuru, Yukiko; Nito, Naoko; Murata, Kazumasa; Yamamoto, Toshio; Ebitani, Takeshi; Ookawa, Taiichiro; Hirasawa, Tadashi

    2011-01-01

    DNA marker-assisted selection appears to be a promising strategy for improving rates of leaf photosynthesis in rice. The rate of leaf photosynthesis was significantly higher in a high-yielding indica variety, Habataki, than in the most popular Japanese variety, Koshihikari, at the full heading stage as a result of the higher level of leaf nitrogen at the same rate of application of nitrogen and the higher stomatal conductance even when the respective levels of leaf nitrogen were the same. The higher leaf nitrogen content of Habataki was caused by the greater accumulation of nitrogen by plants. The higher stomatal conductance of Habataki was caused by the higher hydraulic conductance. Using progeny populations and selected lines derived from a cross between Koshihikari and Habataki, it was possible to identify the genomic regions responsible for the rate of photosynthesis within a 2.1 Mb region between RM17459 and RM17552 and within a 1.2 Mb region between RM6999 and RM22529 on the long arm of chromosome 4 and on the short arm of chromosome 8, respectively. The designated region on chromosome 4 of Habataki was responsible for both the increase in the nitrogen content of leaves and hydraulic conductance in the plant by increasing the root surface area. The designated region on chromosome 8 of Habataki was responsible for the increase in hydraulic conductance by increasing the root hydraulic conductivity. The results suggest that it may be possible to improve photosynthesis in rice leaves by marker-assisted selection that focuses on these regions of chromosomes 4 and 8. PMID:21296764

  20. Comparative Mapping of the Region of Human Chromosome 7 Deleted in Williams Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    DeSilva, Udaya; Massa, Hillary; Trask, Barbara J.; Green, Eric D.

    1999-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a complex developmental disorder resulting from the deletion of a large (∼1.5–2 Mb) segment of human chromosome 7q11.23. Physical mapping studies have revealed that this deleted region, which contains a number of known genes, is flanked by several large, nearly identical blocks of DNA. The presence of such highly related DNA segments in close physical proximity to one another has hampered efforts to elucidate the precise long-range organization of this segment of chromosome 7. To gain insight about the structure and evolutionary origins of this important and complex genomic region, we have constructed a fully contiguous bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) and P1-derived artificial chromosome (PAC) contig map encompassing the corresponding region on mouse chromosome 5. In contrast to the difficulties encountered in constructing a clone-based physical map of the human WS region, the BAC/PAC-based map of the mouse WS region was straightforward to construct, with no evidence of large duplicated segments, such as those encountered in the human WS region. To confirm this difference, representative human and mouse BACs were used as probes for performing fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to metaphase and interphase chromosomes. Human BACs derived from the nonunique portion of the WS region hybridized to multiple, closely spaced regions on human chromosome 7q11.23. In contrast, corresponding mouse BACs hybridized to a single site on mouse chromosome 5. Furthermore, FISH analysis revealed the presence of duplicated segments within the WS region of various nonhuman primates (chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, and gibbon). Hybridization was also noted at the genomic locations corresponding to human chromosome 7p22 and 7q22 in human, chimpanzee, and gorilla, but not in the other animal species examined. Together, these results indicate that the WS region is associated with large, duplicated blocks of DNA on human chromosome 7q11.23 as well

  1. A unique chromosomal in-frame deletion identified among seven XP-C patients.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Steffen; Rieper, Petra; Ohlenbusch, Andreas; Seebode, Christina; Lehmann, Janin; Gratchev, Alexei; Emmert, Steffen

    2016-09-01

    The nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway, defective in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients, removes DNA photolesions in order to prevent carcinogenesis. Complementation group C (XP-C) is the most frequent group of XP patients worldwide. We analyzed seven XP-C patients clinically and molecular-genetically applying: post-UV cell survival (MTT-assay), quantitative Real-time PCR, sequencing on chromosomal as well as cDNA level, and in silico interpretation of sequencing data. All cases displayed diminished post-UV cell survival as well as reduced XPC mRNA levels. Five homozygous and two heterozygous disease causing mutations were identified. A large chromosomal deletion of ~5.8 kb identified in XP174MA leads to an unique in frame deletion of XPC exon 2 and exon 3. In silico analysis revealed the deletion of 102 amino acids in the N-terminal part of XPC while leaving the C-terminal domain intact. The novel c.361delA mutation in XP168MA leads to a frameshift in exon 3 resulting in a premature stop codon 27 codons downstream of the deleted adenine. Our analysis confirms that XP-C patients without increased sun sensitivity develop non-melanoma skin cancers earlier than sun-sensitive XP-C patients. Reduced cellular mRNA levels are characteristic for XP complementation group C and qRT-PCR represents a rapid diagnostic tool. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Sequence analysis of 21 genes located in the Kartagener syndrome linkage region on chromosome 15q.

    PubMed

    Geremek, Maciej; Schoenmaker, Frederieke; Zietkiewicz, Ewa; Pogorzelski, Andrzej; Diehl, Scott; Wijmenga, Cisca; Witt, Michal

    2008-06-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a rare genetic disorder, which shows extensive genetic heterogeneity and is mostly inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion. There are four genes with a proven pathogenetic role in PCD. DNAH5 and DNAI1 are involved in 28 and 10% of PCD cases, respectively, while two other genes, DNAH11 and TXNDC3, have been identified as causal in one PCD family each. We have previously identified a 3.5 cM (2.82 Mb) region on chromosome 15q linked to Kartagener syndrome (KS), a subtype of PCD characterized by the randomization of body organ positioning. We have now refined the KS candidate region to a 1.8 Mb segment containing 18 known genes. The coding regions of these genes and three neighboring genes were subjected to sequence analysis in seven KS probands, and we were able to identify 60 single nucleotide sequence variants, 35 of which resided in mRNA coding sequences. However, none of the variations alone could explain the occurrence of the disease in these patients.

  3. A new region of conservation is defined between human and mouse X chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Dinulos, M.B.; Disteche, C.M.; Bassi, M.T.

    1996-07-01

    Comparative mapping of the X chromosome in eutherian mammals have revealed distinct regions of conservation as well as evolutionary rearrangements between human and mouse. Recently, we and others mapped the murine homologue of CLCN4 (Chloride channel 4) to band F4 of the X chromosome in Mus spretus but to chromosome 7 in laboratory strains. We now report the mapping of the murine homologues of APXL (Apical protein Xenopus laevis-like) and OA1 (Ocular albinism type I), two genes that are located on the human X chromosome at band p22.3 and in close proximity to CLCN4. Interestingly, Oa1 and Apxl map to bands F2-F3 in both M. spretus and the laboratory strain C57BL/6J, defining a new rearrangement between human and mouse X chromosomes. 17 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Regional localization of chromosome 3-specific DNA fragments by using a hybrid cell deletion mapping panel.

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, M J; Drabkin, H A; Firnhaber, C; Miller, Y E; Scoggin, C H; Smith, D I

    1988-01-01

    A series of human chromosome 3-specific DNA fragments isolated and characterized from a lamda phage genomic library were regionally localized on human chromosome 3. This was accomplished using filter hybridization blot analysis of a human chromosome 3 hybrid cell deletion mapping panel. Twenty-three new anonymous DNA fragments were assigned to one of four physical regions of chromosome 3. Seventeen DNA fragments were mapped to the long arm of chromosome 3, including one DNA fragment that demonstrated a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). Five DNA fragments were assigned to 3p14.2----pter, including one highly polymorphic fragment sublocalized at 3p25----pter by in situ hybridization. This DNA fragment is the second reported distal 3p polymorphic probe. One DNA fragment was localized to 3p14----p14.2. In addition, three fragments previously assigned to chromosome 3 were confirmed. Polymorphic DNA probes DNF15S2 (formerly D1S1) and D3S2 were mapped to 3p14.2----pter. The previous 3p25 in situ localization of the c-raf-1 oncogene was supported by deletion panel mapping. The physical localization of these twenty-three new DNA fragments has more than doubled the number of cloned DNA fragments assigned to chromosome 3. These and future regional assignments of DNA fragment probes will facilitate construction of both a physical and genetic linkage map of chromosome 3. They may also be useful in characterizing the chromosomal and molecular aberrations involved in small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), renal cell carcinoma, other malignancies, and the 3p14.2 common fragile site. Images p[446]-a Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2902784

  5. Insights into interphase large-scale chromatin structure from analysis of engineered chromosome regions.

    PubMed

    Belmont, A S; Hu, Y; Sinclair, P B; Wu, W; Bian, Q; Kireev, I

    2010-01-01

    How chromatin folds into mitotic and interphase chromosomes has remained a difficult question for many years. We have used three generations of engineered chromosome regions as a means of visualizing specific chromosome regions in live cells and cells fixed under conditions that preserve large-scale chromatin structure. Our results confirm the existence of large-scale chromatin domains and fibers formed by the folding of 10-nm and 30-nm chromatin fibers into larger, spatially distinct domains. Transcription at levels within severalfold of the levels measured for endogenous loci occur within these large-scale chromatin structures on a condensed template linearly compacted several hundred fold to 1000-fold relative to B-form DNA. However, transcriptional induction is accompanied by a severalfold decondensation of this large-scale chromatin structure that propagates hundreds of kilobases beyond the induced gene. Examination of engineered chromosome regions in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and differentiated cells suggests a surprising degree of plasticity in this large-scale chromatin structure, allowing long-range DNA interactions within the context of large-scale chromatin fibers. Recapitulation of gene-specific differences in large-scale chromatin conformation and nuclear positioning using these engineered chromosome regions will facilitate identification of cis and trans determinants of interphase chromosome architecture.

  6. Insights into interphase large-scale chromatin structure from analysis of engineered chromosome regions

    PubMed Central

    Belmont, Andrew S.; Hu, Yan; Sinclair, Paul; Wu, Wei; Bian, Qian; Kireev, Igor

    2012-01-01

    How chromatin folds into mitotic and interphase chromosomes has remained a difficult question for many years. We have used three generations of engineered chromosome regions as a means of visualizing specific chromosome regions in live cells and cells fixed under conditions which preserve large-scale chromatin structure. Our results confirm the existence of large-scale chromatin domains and fibers formed by the folding of 10 and 30 nm chromatin fibers into larger, spatially distinct domains. Transcription at levels within several fold of the levels measured for endogenous loci occur within these large-scale chromatin structures on a condensed template linearly compacted several hundred fold to one thousand fold relative to B-form DNA. However, transcriptional induction is accompanied by a several fold decondensation of this large-scale chromatin structure that propagates hundreds of kb beyond the induced gene. Examination of engineered chromosome regions in mouse ES and differentiated cells suggests a surprising degree of plasticity in this large-scale chromatin structure, allowing long-range DNA interactions within the context of large-scale chromatin fibers. Recapitulation of gene specific differences in large-scale chromatin conformation and nuclear positioning using these engineered chromosome regions will facilitate identification of cis and trans determinants of interphase chromosome architecture. PMID:21467143

  7. Microdissection and microcloning of genomic DNA markers from human chromosomal region 11q23

    SciTech Connect

    Seki, Naohiko Kazusa DNA Research Inst., Chiba ); Yamauchi, Masatake; Saito, Toshiyuki; Katakura, Reiko; Hori, Tada-Aki ); Ohta, Tohru; Yoshiura, Koh-Ichiro; Jinno, Yoshihiro; Niikawa, Norio )

    1993-04-01

    A human genomic DNA library was constructed by using a microdissection-microcloning procedure with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques on DNA from the chromosome 11q23 region. A total of 450 recombinant pUC clones were isolated from the library. Their insert sizes ranged from 150 to 850 bp with a mean of 320 bp. Fifty clones were randomly selected and analyzed in detail. Southern blot analyses showed that 21 (42%) clones were unique DNA sequences, 20 (40%) clones were repetitive sequences, and 9 (18%) clones had no detectable hybridization. The unique sequences were used further in a secondary screening of a partially digested human genomic DNA library constructed in phage vector, and 4 clones were isolated. The chromosomal locations of these phage clones were confirmed to be in the q23 region of chromosome 11 by fluorescence in situ suppression hybridization. These pUC microclones isolated from the chromosomal region-specific genomic DNA library will be useful in the construction of physical contig maps with yeast artificial chromosome and/or cosmid clones and in the positional cloning of disease-associated genes localized to the q23 region of chromosome 11. 21 refs., 3 figs.

  8. A scan of chromosome 10 identifies a novel locus showing strong association with late-onset Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Grupe, Andrew; Li, Yonghong; Rowland, Charles; Nowotny, Petra; Hinrichs, Anthony L; Smemo, Scott; Kauwe, John S K; Maxwell, Taylor J; Cherny, Sara; Doil, Lisa; Tacey, Kristina; van Luchene, Ryan; Myers, Amanda; Wavrant-De Vrièze, Fabienne; Kaleem, Mona; Hollingworth, Paul; Jehu, Luke; Foy, Catherine; Archer, Nicola; Hamilton, Gillian; Holmans, Peter; Morris, Chris M; Catanese, Joseph; Sninsky, John; White, Thomas J; Powell, John; Hardy, John; O'Donovan, Michael; Lovestone, Simon; Jones, Lesley; Morris, John C; Thal, Leon; Owen, Michael; Williams, Julie; Goate, Alison

    2006-01-01

    Strong evidence of linkage to late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD) has been observed on chromosome 10, which implicates a wide region and at least one disease-susceptibility locus. Although significant associations with several biological candidate genes on chromosome 10 have been reported, these findings have not been consistently replicated, and they remain controversial. We performed a chromosome 10-specific association study with 1,412 gene-based single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), to identify susceptibility genes for developing LOAD. The scan included SNPs in 677 of 1,270 known or predicted genes; each gene contained one or more markers, about half (48%) of which represented putative functional mutations. In general, the initial testing was performed in a white case-control sample from the St. Louis area, with 419 LOAD cases and 377 age-matched controls. Markers that showed significant association in the exploratory analysis were followed up in several other white case-control sample sets to confirm the initial association. Of the 1,397 markers tested in the exploratory sample, 69 reached significance (P < .05). Five of these markers replicated at P < .05 in the validation sample sets. One marker, rs498055, located in a gene homologous to RPS3A (LOC439999), was significantly associated with Alzheimer disease in four of six case-control series, with an allelic P value of .0001 for a meta-analysis of all six samples. One of the case-control samples with significant association to rs498055 was derived from the linkage sample (P = .0165). These results indicate that variants in the RPS3A homologue are associated with LOAD and implicate this gene, adjacent genes, or other functional variants (e.g., noncoding RNAs) in the pathogenesis of this disorder.

  9. 3. 6-Mb genomic and YAC physical map of the Down syndrome chromosome region on chromosome 21

    SciTech Connect

    Dufresne-Zacharia, M.C.; Dahmane, N.; Theophile, D.; Orti, R.; Chettouh, Z.; Sinet, P.M.; Delabar, J.M. )

    1994-02-01

    The Down syndrome chromosome region (DCR) on chromosome 21 has been shown to contain a gene(s) important in the pathogenesis of Down syndrome. The authors constructed a long-range restriction map of the D21S55-D21S65 region covering the proximal part of the DCR. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of lymphocyte DNA digested with three rare cutting enzymes, NotI, NruI, and Mlu1, was used to establish two physical linkage groups of 5 and 7 markers, respectively, spanning 4.6 Mb on the NotI map. Mapping analysis of 40 YACs allowed the selection of 13 YACs covering 95% of the D21S55-D21S65 region and spanning 3.6 Mb. The restriction maps of these YACs and their positioning on the genomic map allowed 19 markers to be ordered, including 4 NotI linking clones, 9 polymorphic markers, the CBR gene, and the AML1 gene. The distances between markers could also be estimated. This physical map and the location of eight NotI sites between D21S55 and D21S17 should facilitate the isolation of previously unidentified genes in this region. 34 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Evaluation of single nucleotide polymorphisms in chromosomal regions impacting pregnancy status in cattle.

    PubMed

    Psaros, K M; McDaneld, T G; Kuehn, L A; Snelling, W M; Keele, J W

    2015-03-01

    Reproductive success is an important component of commercial beef cattle production, and identification of DNA markers with predictive merit for reproductive success would facilitate accurate prediction of mean daughter pregnancy rate, enabling effective selection of bulls to improve female fertility. A previous study identified SNP associated with beef cattle reproductive efficiency based on a genomewide association analysis approach using genotyping multiple-animal pools of DNA to increase the number of animals that could be genotyped with available resources. For the current study, we expand on this previous study by individually genotyping cattle from the pooling study for 89 SNP that were associated with female pregnancy rate. The aims of the study were to confirm the results of the pooling study and, more specifically, identify modes of gene action and DNA variations such as haplotypes that would not be possible with pooled genotyping. Eighty-nine SNP selected from the pooling study were evaluated using the Sequenom MassARRAY system to individually genotype animals from populations evaluated in the pooling study, including both and breeds. From this research, regions on chromosomes 5 (26.3-48.1 Mb; UMD3.1 assembly) and 9 (37,436,575 bp; UMD3.1 assembly), first identified in the previous pooling study, were shown through individual genotyping to harbor genetic variation ( < 0.05 genomewide significance) affecting reproductive efficiency in interspecific crosses ( and ) of cattle. Each of these markers exhibited additive (vs. dominant) gene action. Additionally, a haplotype block harboring an allele of origin with negative effects on reproduction was identified on chromosome 5 in interspecific composite breeds of × composites.

  11. Identification and cloning in yeast artificial chromosomes of a region of elevated loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 1p31.1 in human breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hoggard, N.; Hey, Y.; Brintnell, B.; James, L.

    1995-11-20

    We have mapped a region of high loss of heterozygosity in breast cancer to a 2-cM interval between the loci D1S430 and D1S465 on chromosome 1p31.1. This region shows allelic imbalance in around 60% of breast tumors. As part of a strategy to clone the target gene(s) within this interval, we have generated a yeast artificial chromosome contig spanning over 7 Mb. YACs from the CEPH and Zeneca (formerly ICI) libraries have been obtained by screening with PCR-based STSs from the region for both previously identified loci and newly isolated STSs. The YACs have been assembled into a contig by a combination of approaches, including analysis of their STS content, generation of new STSs from the ends of key YACs, and long-range restriction mapping. These YAC clones provide the basis for complete characterization of the region of high loss in breast cancer and for the ultimate identification of the target gene(s). 84 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Control of bacterial chromosome replication by non-coding regions outside the origin.

    PubMed

    Frimodt-Møller, Jakob; Charbon, Godefroid; Løbner-Olesen, Anders

    2017-08-01

    Chromosome replication in Eubacteria is initiated by initiator protein(s) binding to specific sites within the replication origin, oriC. Recently, initiator protein binding to chromosomal regions outside the origin has attracted renewed attention; as such binding sites contribute to control the frequency of initiations. These outside-oriC binding sites function in several different ways: by steric hindrances of replication fork assembly, by titration of initiator proteins away from the origin, by performing a chaperone-like activity for inactivation- or activation of initiator proteins or by mediating crosstalk between chromosomes. Here, we discuss initiator binding to outside-oriC sites in a broad range of different taxonomic groups, to highlight the significance of such regions for regulation of bacterial chromosome replication. For Escherichia coli, it was recently shown that the genomic positions of regulatory elements are important for bacterial fitness, which, as we discuss, could be true for several other organisms.

  13. Construction of a yeast artificial chromosome contig spanning the pseudoautosomal region and isolation of 25 new sequence-tagged sites

    SciTech Connect

    Slim, R. Laboratoire de Cytogenetique et Genetique Oncologiques, Villejuif ); Le Paslier, D.; Ougen, P.; Billault, A.; Cohen, D. ); Compain, S.; Levilliers, J.; Mintz, L.; Weissenbach, J.; Petit, C. )

    1993-06-01

    Thirty-one yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) from the human pseudoautosomal region were identified by a combination of sequence-tagged site (STS) screenings and colony hybridizations, using a subtelomeric interspersed repetitive element mapping predominantly to the pseudoautosomal region. Twenty-five new pseudoautosomal STSs were generated, of which 4 detected restriction fragment length polymorphisms. A total of 33 STSs were used to assemble the 31 YACs into a single contiguous set of overlapping DNA fragments spanning at least 2.3 megabases of the pseudoautosomal region. In addition, four pseudoautosomal genes including hydroxyindole O-methyltransferase have been positioned on this set of fragments. 48 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  14. Integrated map of the chromosome 8p12-p21 region, a region involved in human cancers and Werner syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Imbert, A.; Chaffanet, M.; Birnbaum, D.; Pebusque, M.J.

    1996-02-15

    This article discusses the genetic mapping of the specific region on human chromosome 8, 8p12-p21, and its implications to human hereditary cancers and diseases. The localization of disease genes such as NEFL and FGFR1 are given, accomplished using contigs which span the region of deletion involved in these hereditary diseases. 59 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. ChromSorter PC: A database of chromosomal regions associated with human prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Etim, Ann; Zhou, Guohui; Wen, Xinyu; Liu, Hang; Ruotti, Victor; Twigger, Simon; Jin, Weihong; Matysiak, Brian; Mathis, Jedidiah; Tonellato, Peter J; Datta, Milton W

    2004-01-01

    Background Our increasing use of genetic and genomic strategies to understand human prostate cancer means that we need access to simplified and integrated information present in the associated biomedical literature. In particular, microarray gene expression studies and associated genetic mapping studies in prostate cancer would benefit from a generalized understanding of the prior work associated with this disease. This would allow us to focus subsequent laboratory studies to genomic regions already related to prostate cancer by other scientific methods. We have developed a database of prostate cancer related chromosomal information from the existing biomedical literature. The input material was based on a broad literature search with subsequent hand annotation of information relevant to prostate cancer. Description The database was then analyzed for identifiable trends in the whole scale literature. We have used this database, named ChromSorter PC, to present graphical summaries of chromosomal regions associated with prostate cancer broken down by age, ethnicity and experimental method. In addition we have placed the database information on the human genome using the Generic Genome Browser tool that allows the visualization of the data with respect to user generated datasets. Conclusions We have used this database as an additional dataset for the filtering of genes identified through genetics and genomics studies as warranting follow-up validation studies. We would like to make this dataset publicly available for use by other groups. Using the Genome Browser allows for the graphical analysis of the associated data . Additional material from the database can be obtained by contacting the authors (mdatta@mcw.edu). PMID:15113398

  16. A genome-wide association study of COPD identifies a susceptibility locus on chromosome 19q13.

    PubMed

    Cho, Michael H; Castaldi, Peter J; Wan, Emily S; Siedlinski, Mateusz; Hersh, Craig P; Demeo, Dawn L; Himes, Blanca E; Sylvia, Jody S; Klanderman, Barbara J; Ziniti, John P; Lange, Christoph; Litonjua, Augusto A; Sparrow, David; Regan, Elizabeth A; Make, Barry J; Hokanson, John E; Murray, Tanda; Hetmanski, Jacqueline B; Pillai, Sreekumar G; Kong, Xiangyang; Anderson, Wayne H; Tal-Singer, Ruth; Lomas, David A; Coxson, Harvey O; Edwards, Lisa D; MacNee, William; Vestbo, Jørgen; Yates, Julie C; Agusti, Alvar; Calverley, Peter M A; Celli, Bartolome; Crim, Courtney; Rennard, Stephen; Wouters, Emiel; Bakke, Per; Gulsvik, Amund; Crapo, James D; Beaty, Terri H; Silverman, Edwin K

    2012-02-15

    The genetic risk factors for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are still largely unknown. To date, genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of limited size have identified several novel risk loci for COPD at CHRNA3/CHRNA5/IREB2, HHIP and FAM13A; additional loci may be identified through larger studies. We performed a GWAS using a total of 3499 cases and 1922 control subjects from four cohorts: the Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate Endpoints (ECLIPSE); the Normative Aging Study (NAS) and National Emphysema Treatment Trial (NETT); Bergen, Norway (GenKOLS); and the COPDGene study. Genotyping was performed on Illumina platforms with additional markers imputed using 1000 Genomes data; results were summarized using fixed-effect meta-analysis. We identified a new genome-wide significant locus on chromosome 19q13 (rs7937, OR = 0.74, P = 2.9 × 10(-9)). Genotyping this single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and another nearby SNP in linkage disequilibrium (rs2604894) in 2859 subjects from the family-based International COPD Genetics Network study (ICGN) demonstrated supportive evidence for association for COPD (P = 0.28 and 0.11 for rs7937 and rs2604894), pre-bronchodilator FEV(1) (P = 0.08 and 0.04) and severe (GOLD 3&4) COPD (P = 0.09 and 0.017). This region includes RAB4B, EGLN2, MIA and CYP2A6, and has previously been identified in association with cigarette smoking behavior.

  17. Investigation of a QTL region for loin eye area and fatness on pig chromosome 1.

    PubMed

    Grapes, Laura; Rothschild, Max F

    2006-06-01

    Previously, quantitative trait loci (QTL) for tenth-rib backfat (TENTHRIB) and loin eye area (LEA) were identified on pig Chromosome 1 (SSC 1) near microsatellite S0008 from a three-generation Berkshire x Yorkshire cross (BY). This work attempted to refine these QTL positions and identify genes associated with these QTL. Genotypes of BY (n = 555) were determined by PCR-RFLP or PCR tests for 13 polymorphisms identified in BY F(0) individuals for candidate genes, BAC end sequences, and genomic clones. Using least-squares regression interval mapping, the LEA QTL was estimated at S0008; the TENTHRIB QTL position was shifted approximately 1 cM downstream from S0008. Of the genes/sequences mapped in the QTL region, CL349415 was significantly associated with TENTHRIB (p = 0.02) and solute carrier family 2, member 12 (SLC2A12) was significantly associated with LEA (p = 0.02). These results suggest that the gene(s) responsible for the LEA and TENTHRIB QTL effects are tightly linked to S0008 or that the high informativeness of S0008 relative to surrounding markers is influencing the QTL position estimates. In addition, janus kinase 2 (JAK2) was mapped to a suggestive LEA QTL region and showed association with LEA (p = 0.009), fatness, color, and pH traits in BY.

  18. Tissue-Specific Differences in the Spatial Interposition of X-Chromosome and 3R Chromosome Regions in the Malaria Mosquito Anopheles messeae Fall.

    PubMed Central

    Artemov, Gleb; Bondarenko, Semen; Sapunov, Gleb; Stegniy, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Spatial organization of a chromosome in a nucleus is very important in biology but many aspects of it are still generally unresolved. We focused on tissue-specific features of chromosome architecture in closely related malaria mosquitoes, which have essential inter-specific differences in polytene chromosome attachments in nurse cells. We showed that the region responsible for X-chromosome attachment interacts with nuclear lamina stronger in nurse cells, then in salivary glands cells in Anopheles messeae Fall. The inter-tissue differences were demonstrated more convincingly in an experiment of two distinct chromosomes interposition in the nucleus space of cells from four tissues. Microdissected DNA-probes from nurse cells X-chromosome (2BC) and 3R chromosomes (32D) attachment regions were hybridized with intact nuclei of nurse cells, salivary gland cells, follicle epithelium cells and imaginal disсs cells in 3D-FISH experiments. We showed that only salivary gland cells and follicle epithelium cells have no statistical differences in the interposition of 2BC and 32D. Generally, the X-chromosome and 3R chromosome are located closer to each other in cells of the somatic system in comparison with nurse cells on average. The imaginal disсs cell nuclei have an intermediate arrangement of chromosome interposition, similar to other somatic cells and nurse cells. In spite of species-specific chromosome attachments there are no differences in interposition of nurse cells chromosomes in An. messeae and An. atroparvus Thiel. Nurse cells have an unusual chromosome arrangement without a chromocenter, which could be due to the special mission of generative system cells in ontogenesis and evolution. PMID:25671311

  19. Tissue-specific differences in the spatial interposition of X-chromosome and 3R chromosome regions in the malaria mosquito Anopheles messeae Fall.

    PubMed

    Artemov, Gleb; Bondarenko, Semen; Sapunov, Gleb; Stegniy, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Spatial organization of a chromosome in a nucleus is very important in biology but many aspects of it are still generally unresolved. We focused on tissue-specific features of chromosome architecture in closely related malaria mosquitoes, which have essential inter-specific differences in polytene chromosome attachments in nurse cells. We showed that the region responsible for X-chromosome attachment interacts with nuclear lamina stronger in nurse cells, then in salivary glands cells in Anopheles messeae Fall. The inter-tissue differences were demonstrated more convincingly in an experiment of two distinct chromosomes interposition in the nucleus space of cells from four tissues. Microdissected DNA-probes from nurse cells X-chromosome (2BC) and 3R chromosomes (32D) attachment regions were hybridized with intact nuclei of nurse cells, salivary gland cells, follicle epithelium cells and imaginal disсs cells in 3D-FISH experiments. We showed that only salivary gland cells and follicle epithelium cells have no statistical differences in the interposition of 2BC and 32D. Generally, the X-chromosome and 3R chromosome are located closer to each other in cells of the somatic system in comparison with nurse cells on average. The imaginal disсs cell nuclei have an intermediate arrangement of chromosome interposition, similar to other somatic cells and nurse cells. In spite of species-specific chromosome attachments there are no differences in interposition of nurse cells chromosomes in An. messeae and An. atroparvus Thiel. Nurse cells have an unusual chromosome arrangement without a chromocenter, which could be due to the special mission of generative system cells in ontogenesis and evolution.

  20. Intergenomic single nucleotide polymorphisms as a tool for bacterial artificial chromosome contig building of homoeologous Brassica napus regions.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hieu Xuan; Schmidt, Renate

    2014-07-04

    Homoeologous sequences pose a particular challenge if bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) contigs shall be established for specific regions of an allopolyploid genome. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) differentiating between homoeologous genomes (intergenomic SNPs) may represent a suitable screening tool for such purposes, since they do not only identify homoeologous sequences but also differentiate between them. Sequence alignments between Brassica rapa (AA) and Brassica oleracea (CC) sequences mapping to corresponding regions on chromosomes A1 and C1, respectively were used to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms between the A and C genomes. A large fraction of these polymorphisms was also present in Brassica napus (AACC), an allopolyploid species that originated from hybridisation of A and C genome species. Intergenomic SNPs mapping throughout homoeologous chromosome segments spanning approximately one Mbp each were included in Illumina's GoldenGate® Genotyping Assay and used to screen multidimensional pools of a Brassica napus bacterial artificial chromosome library with tenfold genome coverage. Based on the results of 50 SNP assays, a BAC contig for the Brassica napus A subgenome was established that spanned the entire region of interest. The C subgenome region was represented in three BAC contigs. This proof-of-concept study shows that sequence resources of diploid progenitor genomes can be used to deduce intergenomic SNPs suitable for multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based screening of multidimensional BAC pools of a polyploid organism. Owing to their high abundance and ease of identification, intergenomic SNPs represent a versatile tool to establish BAC contigs for homoeologous regions of a polyploid genome.

  1. Identifying novel homozygous deletions by microsatellite analysis and characterization of tumor suppressor candidate 1 gene, TUSC1, on chromosome 9p in human lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Zhihong; Parker, Tracy; Wiest, Jonathan S

    2012-01-01

    Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) studies indicate that genetic alterations of chromosome 9p occur in numerous tumor types, suggesting the presence of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) on chromosome 9p critical in carcinogenesis. Our previous LOH analyses in primary lung tumors led us to propose that chromosome 9p harbors other TSGs important in lung tumorigenesis. In this study, 30 non-small-cell lung cancer and 12 small-cell lung cancer cell lines were screened with 55 markers to identify new regions of homozygous deletion (HD) on chromosome 9p. Three novel noncontiguous homozygously deleted regions were detected and ranged in size from 840 kb to 7.4 Mb. One gene identified in the deletion at D9S126, TUSC1 (tumor suppressor candidate 1), is an intronless gene. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction and Southern blot confirmed the HD of TUSC1. Northern blot analysis of TUSC1 demonstrated two transcripts of approximately 2 and 1.5 kb that are likely generated by alternative polyadenylation signals. Both transcripts are expressed in several human tissues and share an open-reading frame encoding a peptide of 209 amino acids. Analysing cell line cDNAs by reverse transcriptase (RT)–PCR demonstrated downregulation of TUSC1 in cell lines with or without HDs, suggesting that TUSC1 may play a role in lung tumorigenesis. PMID:15208665

  2. DNA methylation and heterochromatinization in the male-specific region of the primitive Y chromosome of papaya

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenli; Wang, Xiue; Yu, Qingyi; Ming, Ray; Jiang, Jiming

    2008-01-01

    Sex chromosomes evolved from autosomes. Recombination suppression in the sex-determining region and accumulation of deleterious mutations lead to degeneration of the Y chromosomes in many species with heteromorphic X/Y chromosomes. However, how the recombination suppressed domain expands from the sex-determining locus to the entire Y chromosome remains elusive. The Y chromosome of papaya (Carica papaya) diverged from the X chromosome approximately 2–3 million years ago and represents one of the most recently emerged Y chromosomes. Here, we report that the male-specific region of the Y chromosome (MSY) spans ∼13% of the papaya Y chromosome. Interestingly, the centromere of the Y chromosome is embedded in the MSY. The centromeric domain within the MSY has accumulated significantly more DNA than the corresponding X chromosomal domain, which leads to abnormal chromosome pairing. We observed four knob-like heterochromatin structures specific to the MSY. Fluorescence in situ hybridization and immunofluorescence assay revealed that the DNA sequences associated with the heterochromatic knobs are highly divergent and heavily methylated compared with the sequences in the corresponding X chromosomal domains. These results suggest that DNA methylation and heterochromatinization play an important role in the early stage of sex chromosome evolution. PMID:18593814

  3. Genomewide linkage analysis in Costa Rican families implicates chromosome 15q14 as a candidate region for OCD.

    PubMed

    Ross, Jessica; Badner, Judith; Garrido, Helena; Sheppard, Brooke; Chavira, Denise A; Grados, Marco; Woo, Jonathan M; Doo, Pamela; Umaña, Paula; Fournier, Eduardo; Murray, Sarah Shaw; Mathews, Carol A

    2011-12-01

    Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) has a complex etiology that encompasses both genetic and environmental factors. However, to date, despite the identification of several promising candidate genes and linkage regions, the genetic causes of OCD are largely unknown. The objective of this study was to conduct linkage studies of childhood-onset OCD, which is thought to have the strongest genetic etiology, in several OCD-affected families from the genetically isolated population of the Central Valley of Costa Rica (CVCR). The authors used parametric and non-parametric approaches to conduct genome-wide linkage analyses using 5,786 single nucleotide repeat polymorphisms (SNPs) in three CVCR families with multiple childhood-onset OCD-affected individuals. We identified areas of suggestive linkage (LOD score ≥ 2) on chromosomes 1p21, 15q14, 16q24, and 17p12. The strongest evidence for linkage was on chromosome 15q14 (LOD = 3.13), identified using parametric linkage analysis with a recessive model, and overlapping a region identified in a prior linkage study using a Caucasian population. Each CVCR family had a haplotype that co-segregated with OCD across a ~7 Mbp interval within this region, which contains 18 identified brain expressed genes, several of which are potentially relevant to OCD. Exonic sequencing of the strongest candidate gene in this region, the ryanodine receptor 3 (RYR3), identified several genetic variants of potential interest, although none co-segregated with OCD in all three families. These findings provide evidence that chromosome 15q14 is linked to OCD in families from the CVCR, and supports previous findings to suggest that this region may contain one or more OCD susceptibility loci.

  4. Erratum: Letter to the Editor: Exclusion of primary congenital glaucoma (buphthalmos) from two candidate regions of chromosome arm 6p and chromosome 11

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    This {open_quotes}Letter to the Editor{close_quotes} is the reprint of a corrected table from a previous paper about the exclusion of primary congenital glaucoma from two candidate regions of chromosome arm 6p and chromosome 11.

  5. Adipose and muscle tissue gene expression of two genes (NCAPG and LCORL) located in a chromosomal region associated with cattle feed intake and gain

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A region on bovine chromosome 6 has been implicated in cattle birth weight, growth, and length. Non-SMC conodensin I complex subunit G (NCAPG) and ligand dependent nuclear receptor corepressor-like protein (LCORL) are positional candidate genes within this region. Previously identified genetic mark...

  6. Adipose and muscle tissue expression of two genes (NCAPG and LCORL) located in a chromosomal region associated with cattle feed intake and gain

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A region on bovine chromosome 6 has been implicated in cattle birth weight, growth, and length. Non-SMC conodensin I complex subunit G (NCAPG) and ligand dependent nuclear receptor corepressor-like protein (LCORL) are positional candidate genes within this region. We previously identified genetic ...

  7. Cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus cytome assay and spectral karyotyping as methods for identifying chromosome damage in a lung cancer case-control population.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Stacy M; Lopez, Mirtha; El-Zein, Randa

    2013-07-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of all cancer-related deaths in the US. The need to develop more accurate cancer risk assessment tools is imperative to improve the ability to identify individuals at greatest risk of developing disease. The Cytokinesis-Blocked Micronucleus Cytome Assay (CBMNcyt) presents a sensitive and specific method of assessing DNA damage. We have previously reported that this assay is sensitive to genetic damage caused by the tobacco-specific nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), and that binucleated cells with micronuclei, nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear buds are strong predictors of lung cancer risk. The current study confirmed our previous findings and sought to identify the specific chromosomes involved in lung carcinogenesis. Spectral karyotyping was conducted on a subset of lung cancer cases [n = 116] and cancer-free controls [n = 126] with the highest CBMNcyt endpoints, on baseline and NNK-treated blood lymphocytes. After adjusting for age, gender, race/ethnicity, smoking status, and pack and smoke years, consistent significant associations between chromosome: 9, 19, 22, X, at baseline; chromosome: 3, 4, and 16 after NNK-induction; and chromosome: 1, 13, and 17 at both baseline and NNK-induction; and lung cancer risk (all P ≤ 0.05) were observed. Several of these chromosomes harbor critical genes involved in lung carcinogenesis, such as the FHIT gene, CDKN2A, PADPRP, and TP53. Our results indicate that the CBMNcyt assay when used in conjunction with other cytogenetic methodologies can increase our ability to identify specific chromosomal regions associated with DNA damage, thereby improving our understanding of the underlying mechanisms involved in individual cancer predisposition. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. A Genetic and Molecular Analysis of the 46c Chromosomal Region Surrounding the Fmrfamide Neuropeptide Gene in Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, M. A.; Roberts, M. S.; Taghert, P. H.

    1994-01-01

    We have analyzed the FMRFamide neuropeptide gene region of Drosophila melanogaster. This gene maps to the 46C region of chromosome 2R; this interval previously was not well characterized. For this genetic and molecular analysis, we have used X-ray mutagenesis, EMS mutagenesis, and the recently reported local P element transposition method. We identified four overlapping deletions, two of which have proximal breakpoints that define a 50-60-kb region surrounding the FMRFamide gene in 46C. To this small region, we mapped three lethal complementation groups; 10 additional lethal complementation groups were mapped to more distal regions of 46CD. One of these groups corresponds to even-skipped, the other 12 are previously unidentified. Using various lines of evidence we excluded the possibility that FMRFamide corresponds to any of the three lethal complementation groups mapping to its immediate 50-60-kb vicinity. The positions of two of the three lethal complementation groups were identified with P elements using a local transposition scheme. The third lethal complementation group was excluded as being FMRFamide mutants by sequence analysis and by immunocytochemistry with proFMRFamide precursor-specific antibodies. This analysis has (1) provided a genetic map of the 46CD chromosomal region and a detailed molecular map of a portion of the 46C region and (2) provided additional evidence of the utility of local transposition for targeting nearby genes. PMID:8056304

  9. Identification and genetic mapping of a homeobox gene to the 4p16.1 region of human chromosome 4.

    PubMed

    Stadler, H S; Padanilam, B J; Buetow, K; Murray, J C; Solursh, M

    1992-12-01

    A human craniofacial cDNA library was screened with a degenerate oligonucleotide probe based on the conserved third helix of homeobox genes. From this screening, we identified a homeobox gene, H6, which shared only 57-65% amino acid identity to previously reported homeodomains. H6 was physically mapped to the 4p16.1 region by using somatic cell hybrids containing specific deletions of human chromosome 4. Linkage data from a single-stranded conformational polymorphism derived from the 3' untranslated region of the H6 cDNA placed this homeobox gene more than 20 centimorgans proximal of the previously mapped HOX7 gene on chromosome 4. Identity comparisons of the H6 homeodomain with previously reported homeodomains reveal the highest identities to be with the Nk class of homeobox genes in Drosophila melanogaster.

  10. Identification and genetic mapping of a homeobox gene to the 4p16.1 region of human chromosome 4.

    PubMed Central

    Stadler, H S; Padanilam, B J; Buetow, K; Murray, J C; Solursh, M

    1992-01-01

    A human craniofacial cDNA library was screened with a degenerate oligonucleotide probe based on the conserved third helix of homeobox genes. From this screening, we identified a homeobox gene, H6, which shared only 57-65% amino acid identity to previously reported homeodomains. H6 was physically mapped to the 4p16.1 region by using somatic cell hybrids containing specific deletions of human chromosome 4. Linkage data from a single-stranded conformational polymorphism derived from the 3' untranslated region of the H6 cDNA placed this homeobox gene more than 20 centimorgans proximal of the previously mapped HOX7 gene on chromosome 4. Identity comparisons of the H6 homeodomain with previously reported homeodomains reveal the highest identities to be with the Nk class of homeobox genes in Drosophila melanogaster. Images PMID:1360670

  11. Whole-genome copy-number analysis identifies new leads for chromosomal aberrations involved in the oncogenesis and metastastic behavior of uveal melanomas.

    PubMed

    van Engen-van Grunsven, Adriana C H; Baar, Marjolein P; Pfundt, Rolph; Rijntjes, Jos; Küsters-Vandevelde, Heidi V N; Delbecq, Ann-Laure; Keunen, Jan E; Klevering, Jeroen B; Wesseling, Pieter; Blokx, Willeke A M; Groenen, Patricia J T A

    2015-06-01

    To further elucidate the genetic underpinnings of uveal melanoma (UM) and identify new markers that correlate with disease outcome, archival formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded enucleation specimens from 25 patients with UM and a mean follow-up of 14 years were analyzed for whole-genome copy-number alterations using OncoScan analysis. Copy-number alterations of chromosomes 1, 3, 6, and 8 were also analyzed in these tumors using multiplex ligation-dependent probe-amplification, and mutations in GNAQ, GNA11, and BAP1 were searched for by Sanger sequencing. Our study confirms the previously reported GNAQ and GNA11 mutation frequencies in UMs as well as the presence of monosomy 3 as a factor strongly indicating poor prognosis. Two cases with metastatic disease, but without monosomy of chromosome 3, showed loss of a small region in the distal part of chromosome 2p. Also, UMs leading to metastatic disease had more chromosomal aberrations than those without metastases. Three UMs lacking a GNAQ or a GNA11 mutation showed a gain of chromosome 8q; one of these cases showed extensive chromothripsis. Another case (with suspect lung metastasis) showed focal chromothripsis. Our whole-genome copy-number analysis shows that focal loss of chromosome 2p may be involved in the metastatic spread of UMs without monosomy 3; metastatic UMs carry more chromosomal aberrations than those without metastases; and chromothripsis may play a role in the oncogenesis of UMs, but does not necessarily indicate a poor prognosis. The clinical and particularly diagnostic utility of these findings needs to be corroborated in a larger set of patients with UM.

  12. Multiple blood pressure loci with opposing blood pressure effects on rat chromosome 1 in a homologous region linked to hypertension on human chromosome 15.

    PubMed

    Mell, Blair; Abdul-Majeed, Shakila; Kumarasamy, Sivarajan; Waghulde, Harshal; Pillai, Resmi; Nie, Ying; Joe, Bina

    2015-01-01

    Genetic dissection of blood pressure (BP) quantitative trait loci (QTLs) in rats has facilitated the fine-mapping of regions linked to the inheritance of hypertension. The goal of the current study was to further fine-map one such genomic region on rat chromosome 1 (BPQTL1b1), the homologous region of which on human chromosome 15 harbors BP QTLs, as reported by four independent studies. Of the six substrains constructed and studied, the systolic BP of two of the congenic strains were significantly lower by 36 and 27 mm Hg than that of the salt-sensitive (S) rat (P < 0.0001, P = 0.0003, respectively). The congenic segments of these two strains overlapped between 135.12 and 138.78 Mb and contained eight genes and two predicted miRNAs. None of the annotations had variants within expressed sequences. These data taken together with the previous localization resolved QTL1b1 with a 70% improvement from the original 7.39 Mb to the current 2.247 Mb interval. Furthermore, the systolic BP of one of the congenic substrains was significantly higher by 20 mm Hg (P < 0.0001) than the BP of the S rat. The limits of this newly identified QTL with a BP increasing effect (QTL1b1a) were between 134.12 and 135.76 Mb, spanning 1.64 Mb, containing two protein-coding genes, Mctp2 and Rgma, and a predicted miRNA. There were four synonymous variants within Mctp2. These data provide evidence for two independent BP QTLs with opposing BP effects within the previously identified BP QTL1b1 region. Additionally, these findings illustrate the complexity underlying the genetic mechanisms of BP regulation, wherein inherited elements beyond protein-coding sequences or known regulatory regions could be operational.

  13. Condensin I associates with structural and gene regulatory regions in vertebrate chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Hun; Zhang, Tao; Wong, Nicholas C; Davidson, Nadia; Maksimovic, Jovana; Oshlack, Alicia; Earnshaw, William C; Kalitsis, Paul; Hudson, Damien F

    2014-01-01

    The condensin complex is essential for correct packaging and segregation of chromosomes during mitosis and meiosis in all eukaryotes. To date, the genome wide location and the nature of condensin binding sites has remained elusive in vertebrates. Here we report the genome wide map of condensin I in chicken DT40 cells. Unexpectedly, we find condensin I binds predominately to promoter sequences in mitotic cells. We also find a striking enrichment at both centromeres and telomeres, highlighting the importance of the complex in chromosome segregation. Taken together, the results show condensin I is largely absent from heterochromatic regions. This map of the condensin I binding sites on the chicken genome reveals that patterns of condensin distribution on chromosomes are conserved from prokaryotes, through yeasts to vertebrates. Thus in three kingdoms of life, condensin is enriched on promoters of actively transcribed genes and at loci important for chromosome segregation. PMID:24088984

  14. Physical mapping of the NF2/meningioma region on human chromosome 22q12

    SciTech Connect

    Ruttledge, M.H.; Xie, Y.G.; Han, F.Y.; Janson, M.; Fransson, I.; Werelius, B. ); Giovannini, M.; Evans, G. ); Delattre, O.; Thomas, G. )

    1994-01-01

    Loss of genetic information from chromosome 22 has been implicated in the development of neurofibromatosis type 2, meningioma, and several other neoplasia. Molecular studies indicate that genes within chromosomal band 22q12 may be involved in tumorigenesis. The authors have mapped 29 loci into 16 groups in this region, using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, fluorescence in situ suppression hybridization, and somatic cell hybrid mapping. The region spans more than 5 Mb of genomic DNA and contains the genes for neurofibromatosis type 2 and meningioma. The order of loci presented here provides the framework for the fine mapping of this region using cosmids and yeast artificial chromosomes, and it facilitates the speedy cloning of novel genes from 22q12. 51 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Gonadoblastoma: Molecular definition of the susceptibility region on the Y chromosome and role of TSPY

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchiya, K.; Sultana, R.; Donlan, M.

    1994-09-01

    Gonadoblastomas are gonadal neoplasms that arise almost exclusively in the dysgenetic gonads of 46,XY sex-reversed females. The frequency of gonadoblastoma in patients who have dysgenetic gonads and a Y chromosome is at least 30%. In contrast 45,X Turner females who also have dysgenetic gonads do not develop this tumor. The high frequency of gonadoblastoma in sex-reversed females compared to Turner females has led to the hypothesis that there is a gene on the Y chromosome that is involved in the development of the tumor. This gene has been called the gonadoblastoma locus on the Y chromosome, or GBY. Deletion mapping of sex-reversed females with gonadoblastoma and partial Y chromosomes has previously localized the GBY gene to a region near the centromere. Using sequence-tagged sites, we have further sublocalized GBY in a patient with gonadoblastoma and a minute Y-derived marker chromosome. This region includes parts of intervals 3 and 4 of the Y chromosome. Based on the overlapping YAC contig map of the Y chromosome, this critical region is approximately 3 Mb. Using sex-reversed females with different deletions of Yp we have also localized the testis-specific protein, Y-encoded (TSPY) gene to interval 3D, which is within the gonadoblastoma critical region. TSPY consists of a repetitive gene family that is part of the DYZ5 locus. Expression of this gene has previously been shown to be limited to the testis. We have found expression of TSPY by RT-PCR in gonadoblastomas from two different individuals. In one of these patients, expression was observed in a unilateral gonadoblastoma, but not in the contralateral streak gonad. These findings suggest that TSPY may play a role in the development of gonadoblastomas.

  16. DNA repair defects associated with chromosomal translocation breaksite regions

    SciTech Connect

    Beecham, E.J.; Link, C.; Bohr, V.A.

    1994-02-01

    Using an assay that measures the removal of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers in specific DNA sequences, we have found that the Pvt-1, immunoglobulin H-C{alpha} (IgH-C{alpha}), and IgL-{kappa} loci are poorly repaired in normal B lymphoblasts from plasmacytoma-susceptible BALB/cAnPt mice. Breaksites in these genes are associated with the chromosomal translocations that are found in >95% of BALB/cAnPt plasmacytomas. In contrast to those from BALB/cAnPt mice, B lymphoblasts from plasmacytoma-resistant DBA/2N mice rapidly repair Pvt-1, IgH-C{alpha} and IgL-{kappa}. Further, (BALB/cAnPt x DBA/2N)F{sub 1} hybrids, which are resistant to plasmacytoma development, carry an efficient (DBA/2N-like) repair phenotype. Analysis of allele-specific repair in the IgH-C{alpha} locus indicates that efficient repair is controlled by dominant, transacting factors. In the F{sub 1} heterozygotes, these factors promote efficient repair of BALB/cAnPt IgH-C{alpha} gene sequences. The same sequences are poorly repaired in the BALB/cAnPt parental strain. Analysis of the strand specificity of repair indicates that both strand-selective and nonselective forms of repair determine repair efficiency at the gene level in nonimmortalized murine B lymphoblasts. 36 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. A 3 Mb YAC contig in the region of Usher Ib on chromosome 11q

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, P.M.; Overbeck, L.; Weston, M.

    1994-09-01

    Under syndrome type Ib, a recessive disorder characterized by deafness, retinitis pigmentosa, and vestibular dysfunction has been mapped to chromosome 11q13. A 3 Mb YAC contig has been constructed covering the critical region of Usher Ib and spanning over eight loci: D11S1321, D11S527, D11S533, OMP, D11S906, D11S911, D11S937, and D11S918. This contig was constructed by PCR screening using the above described DNA markers of the CEPH mega YAC library. Additional YACs were identified by data presented in the Genethon physical map. A long-range restriction map has been constructed from both YAC and genomic DNA using STS markers as probes. Cosmid libraries from a subset of YACs have been screened for the location of CpG islands. In addition, potential transcribed regions have been identified by 3{prime} exon trapping of cosmid pools and placed on the YAC physical map.

  18. Identifying X- and Y-chromosome-bearing sperm by DNA content: retrospective perspectives and prospective opinions

    SciTech Connect

    Gledhill, B.L.; Pinkel, D.; Garner, D.L.

    1982-03-05

    Theoretically, since DNA should be the most constant component, quantitatively, of normal sperm, then genotoxic agents arising from energy production and consumption, and chemical and physical mutagens, could be identified by measuring variability in the DNA content of individual sperm from exposed men or test animals. The difference between the DNA content of X and Y sperm seemed a biologically significant benchmark for the measurement technology. Several methods are available for determining the genetic activity of agents in male germ cells, but these tests are generally laborious. Sperm-based methods provide an attractive alternate since they are not invasive, and are directly applicable to the study of human exposure. Slide-based assay of DNA content suggests that human sperm with X, Y, or YY chromosome constitutions can be distinguished by their fluorescence with quinacrine. Subsequent measurement of the dry mass of human sperm heads is performed. Dry mass is proportional to DNA content. While the study showed that human sperm with none and one quinacrine-fluorescent spot are X- and Y-bearing, respectively, the dry mass measurements indicated that many of the sperm with two quinacrine-fluorescent spots are not YY-bearing. While several reports on the initial application of flow cytometry of sperm to the investigation of mammalian infertility have appeared recently, emphasis here has been on the development of an in vivo sperm-based flow cytometric bioassay for mutations, and has not centered on andrological applications. In this review, the ability to differentiate between two equally sized populations of sperm, one bearing X and the other Y chromosomes with mean DNA content differing by about 3 to 4% is described. It has direct application to the preselection of sex of offspring, and could likely have a profound impact on animal improvement. (ERB)

  19. Localization of the tight junction protein gene TJP1 to human chromosome 15q13, distal to the Prader-Willi/Angelman region, and to mouse chromosome 7

    SciTech Connect

    Mohandas, T.K.; Chen, X.N.; Korenberg, J.R.

    1995-12-10

    The gene encoding the tight junction (zonula occludens) protein, TJP1, was mapped to human chromosome 15q13 by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a cDNA probe. The Jackson Laboratory backcross DNA panel derived from the cross (C57BL/6JEi X SPRET/Ei) F1 females X SPRET/Ei males was used to map the mouse Tjp1 to chromosome 7 near position 30 on the Chromosome Committee Map, a region with conserved homology to human chromosome 15q13. FISH studies on metaphases from patients with the Prader-Willi (PWS) or the Angelman syndrome (AS) showed that TJP1 maps close but distal to the PWS/AS chromosome region. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Two loci on chromosomes 2 and X for premature coronary heart disease identified in early- and late-settlement populations of Finland.

    PubMed

    Pajukanta, P; Cargill, M; Viitanen, L; Nuotio, I; Kareinen, A; Perola, M; Terwilliger, J D; Kempas, E; Daly, M; Lilja, H; Rioux, J D; Brettin, T; Viikari, J S; Rönnemaa, T; Laakso, M; Lander, E S; Peltonen, L

    2000-12-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a complex disorder constituting a major health problem in Western societies. To assess the genetic background of CHD, we performed a genomewide linkage scan in two study samples from the genetically isolated population of Finland. An initial study sample consisted of family material from the northeastern part of Finland, settled by a small number of founders approximately 300 years ago. A second study sample originated from the southwestern region of Finland, settled approximately 2,000 years ago. Families were ascertained through probands exhibiting premature CHD, defined as >50% stenosis of at least two coronary arteries at a young age, as verified by coronary angiography. Both study samples and the pooled data set provided evidence for linkage in two chromosomal regions. A region on chromosome 2q21.1-22 yielded two-point LOD scores of 3.2, 1.9, and 3.7, in the affected sib-pair (ASP) analyses of the northeastern, southwestern, and pooled study samples. The corresponding multipoint maximum-likelihood scores (MLSs) for these three study samples were 2.4, 1.3, and 3.0. In addition, a region on chromosome Xq23-26 resulted in two-point LOD scores of 1.9, 3.5, and 2.9 and in multipoint MLSs of 3.4, 3.1, and 2.5, respectively. In conclusion, this study identifies two loci likely to contribute to premature CHD: one on chromosome 2q21.1-22 and another on chromosome Xq23-26.

  1. The spinal muscular atrophy gene region at 5q13.1 has a paralogous chromosomal region at 6p21.3.

    PubMed

    Banyer, J L; Goldwurm, S; Cullen, L; van der Griend, B; Zournazi, A; Smit, D J; Powell, L W; Jazwinska, E C

    1998-03-01

    Paralogous regions are duplicated segments of chromosomal DNA that have been acquired during the evolution of the genome. Subsequent divergent evolution of the genes within paralogous regions can lead to the formation of gene families. Here, we report the identification of a region on Chromosome (Chr) 6 at 6p21.3 that is paralogous with the Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) gene region on Chr 5 at 5q13.1. Partial characterization of this region identified nine sequences all of which are highly homologous to DNA sequences of the SMA gene region at 5q13.1. These sequences include four beta-glucuronidase sequences, two retrotransposon sequences, a novel cDNA, a Sequence Tagged Site (STS), and one that is homologous to exon 9 of the Neuronal Apoptosis Inhibitor Protein (NAIP) gene. The 6p21.3 paralogous SMA region may contain genes that are related to those in the SMA region at 5q13.1; however, a direct association of this region with SMA is unlikely given that no linkage of SMA with Chr 6 has been reported.

  2. Assignment of fifty-four cosmid clones to five regions of chromosome 10

    SciTech Connect

    Mole, S.E.; Jackson, M.S.; Ponder, B.A.J. ); Tokino, T.; Nakamura, Y. )

    1993-02-01

    The gene implicated in the development of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A, and inherited cancer syndrome transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait, has been mapped by genetic linkage to the pericentromeric region of chromosome 10. To isolate new markers for this region, we constructed cosmid libraries from two radiation hybrids, R104-2D2 and R244-3A1, derived from the hybrid cell line 762-8A, which contains only human chromosomes 10 and Y in a hamster background. 15 refs., 1 tab.

  3. Anchoring genome sequence to chromosomes of the central bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps) enables reconstruction of ancestral squamate macrochromosomes and identifies sequence content of the Z chromosome.

    PubMed

    Deakin, Janine E; Edwards, Melanie J; Patel, Hardip; O'Meally, Denis; Lian, Jinmin; Stenhouse, Rachael; Ryan, Sam; Livernois, Alexandra M; Azad, Bhumika; Holleley, Clare E; Li, Qiye; Georges, Arthur

    2016-06-10

    Squamates (lizards and snakes) are a speciose lineage of reptiles displaying considerable karyotypic diversity, particularly among lizards. Understanding the evolution of this diversity requires comparison of genome organisation between species. Although the genomes of several squamate species have now been sequenced, only the green anole lizard has any sequence anchored to chromosomes. There is only limited gene mapping data available for five other squamates. This makes it difficult to reconstruct the events that have led to extant squamate karyotypic diversity. The purpose of this study was to anchor the recently sequenced central bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps) genome to chromosomes to trace the evolution of squamate chromosomes. Assigning sequence to sex chromosomes was of particular interest for identifying candidate sex determining genes. By using two different approaches to map conserved blocks of genes, we were able to anchor approximately 42 % of the dragon genome sequence to chromosomes. We constructed detailed comparative maps between dragon, anole and chicken genomes, and where possible, made broader comparisons across Squamata using cytogenetic mapping information for five other species. We show that squamate macrochromosomes are relatively well conserved between species, supporting findings from previous molecular cytogenetic studies. Macrochromosome diversity between members of the Toxicofera clade has been generated by intrachromosomal, and a small number of interchromosomal, rearrangements. We reconstructed the ancestral squamate macrochromosomes by drawing upon comparative cytogenetic mapping data from seven squamate species and propose the events leading to the arrangements observed in representative species. In addition, we assigned over 8 Mbp of sequence containing 219 genes to the Z chromosome, providing a list of genes to begin testing as candidate sex determining genes. Anchoring of the dragon genome has provided substantial insight into

  4. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of a non-robertsonian dicentric chromosome 14;19 identified in a girl with short stature and amenorrhea.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Usha R; Pidugu, Vijaya Kumar; Dalal, Ashwin

    2012-01-01

    We report a 16-year-old girl who presented with short stature and amenorrhea. Initially the cytogenetic analysis showed the presence of a mosaic non-Robertsonian dicentric chromosome involving chromosomes 14 and 19. Subsequent molecular cytogenetic analysis by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using whole chromosome paints, centromeric probes, as well as gene specific probes confirmed the dicentric nature of the derivative chromosome and indicated that the rearrangement involved the short arms of both of these chromosomes. Furthermore, we also determined that the chromosome 19p13.3 breakpoint occurred within the terminal 1 Mb region. This is the first report of a mosaic non-Robertsonian dicentric chromosome involving chromosomes 14 and 19 with the karyotype determined as 45,XX,dic(14;19)(p11.2;p13.3)[35]/46,XX[15], and we suggest that the chromosome rearrangement could be the cause of clinical phenotype.

  5. Sororin is enriched at the central region of synapsed meiotic chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Philip W; Eyster, Craig; Chen, Jingrong; Pezza, Roberto J; Rankin, Susannah

    2017-06-01

    During meiotic prophase, cohesin complexes mediate cohesion between sister chromatids and promote pairing and synapsis of homologous chromosomes. Precisely how the activity of cohesin is controlled to promote these events is not fully understood. In metazoans, cohesion establishment between sister chromatids during mitotic divisions is accompanied by recruitment of the cohesion-stabilizing protein Sororin. During somatic cell division cycles, Sororin is recruited in response to DNA replication-dependent modification of the cohesin complex by ESCO acetyltransferases. How Sororin is recruited and acts in meiosis is less clear. Here, we have surveyed the chromosomal localization of Sororin and its relationship to the meiotic cohesins and other chromatin modifiers with the objective of determining how Sororin contributes to meiotic chromosome dynamics. We show that Sororin localizes to the cores of meiotic chromosomes in a manner that is dependent on synapsis and the synaptonemal complex protein SYCP1. In contrast, cohesin, with which Sororin interacts in mitotic cells, shows axial enrichment on meiotic chromosomes even in the absence of synapsis between homologs. Using high-resolution microscopy, we show that Sororin is localized to the central region of the synaptonemal complex. These results indicate that Sororin regulation during meiosis is distinct from its regulation in mitotic cells and may suggest that it interacts with a distinctly different partner to ensure proper chromosome dynamics in meiosis.

  6. Random search for shared chromosomal regions in four affected individuals: the assignment of a new hereditary ataxia locus

    SciTech Connect

    Nikali, K.; Suomalainen, A.; Koskinen, T.; Peltonen, L.; Terwilliger, J.; Weissenbach, J.

    1995-05-01

    Infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia (IOSCA) is an autosomal recessively inherited progressive neurological disorder of unknown etiology. This ataxia, identified so far only in the genetically isolated Finnish population, does not share gene locus with any of the previously identified hereditary ataxias, and a random mapping approach was adopted to assign the IOSCA locus. Based on the assumption of one founder mutation, a primary screening of the genome was performed using samples from just four affected individuals in two consanguineous pedigrees. The identification of a shared chromosomal region in these four patients provided the first evidence that the IOSCA gene locus is on chromosome 10q23.3-q24.1, which was confirmed by conventional linkage analysis in the complete family material. Strong linkage disequilibrium observed between IOSCA and the linked markers was utilized to define accurately the critical chromosomal region. The results showed the power of linkage disequilibrium in the locus assignment of diseases with very limited family materials. 30 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Segmental duplications and evolutionary plasticity at tumor chromosome break-prone regions

    PubMed Central

    Darai-Ramqvist, Eva; Sandlund, Agneta; Müller, Stefan; Klein, George; Imreh, Stefan; Kost-Alimova, Maria

    2008-01-01

    We have previously found that the borders of evolutionarily conserved chromosomal regions often coincide with tumor-associated deletion breakpoints within human 3p12-p22. Moreover, a detailed analysis of a frequently deleted region at 3p21.3 (CER1) showed associations between tumor breaks and gene duplications. We now report on the analysis of 54 chromosome 3 breaks by multipoint FISH (mpFISH) in 10 carcinoma-derived cell lines. The centromeric region was broken in five lines. In lines with highly complex karyotypes, breaks were clustered near known fragile sites, FRA3B, FRA3C, and FRA3D (three lines), and in two other regions: 3p12.3-p13 (∼75 Mb position) and 3q21.3-q22.1 (∼130 Mb position) (six lines). All locations are shown based on NCBI Build 36.1 human genome sequence. The last two regions participated in three of four chromosome 3 inversions during primate evolution. Regions at 75, 127, and 131 Mb positions carry a large (∼250 kb) segmental duplication (tumor break-prone segmental duplication [TBSD]). TBSD homologous sequences were found at 15 sites on different chromosomes. They were located within bands frequently involved in carcinoma-associated breaks. Thirteen of them have been involved in inversions during primate evolution; 10 were reused by breaks during mammalian evolution; 14 showed copy number polymorphism in man. TBSD sites showed an increase in satellite repeats, retrotransposed sequences, and other segmental duplications. We propose that the instability of these sites stems from specific organization of the chromosomal region, associated with location at a boundary between different CG-content isochores and with the presence of TBSDs and “instability elements,” including satellite repeats and retroviral sequences. PMID:18230801

  8. Characterization of a panel of somatic cell hybrids for regional mapping of the mouse X chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Avner, P.; Arnaud, D.; Amar, L.; Cambrou, J.; Winking, H.; Russell, L.B.

    1987-08-01

    A panel of five hybrid cell lines containing mouse X chromosomes with various deletions has been obtained by fusing splenocytes from male mice carrying one of a series of reciprocal X-autosome translocations with the azaguanine-resistant Chinese hamster cell line CH3g. These hybrids have been extensively characterized by using the allozymes hypoxanthine/guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (encoded by the Hprt locus) and ..cap alpha..-galactosidase (Ags) and a series of 11 X-chromosome-specific DNA probes whose localization had been previously established by linkage studies. Such studies have established the genetic breakpoints of the T(X;12)13R1 and T(X;2)14R1 X-autosome translocations on the X chromosome and provided additional information as to the X-chromosome genetic breakpoints of the T(X;16)16H, T(X;4)7R1, and T(X;7)6R1 translocations. The data establish clearly that both the T(X;7)5RI and T(X;12)13R1 X-chromosome breakpoints are proximal to Hprt, the breakpoint of the former being more centromeric, lying as it does in the 9-centimorgan interval between the ornithine transcarbamoylase (Otc) and DXPas7 (M2C) loci. These five hybrid cell lines provide, with the previously characterized EBS4 hybrid cell line, a nested series of seven mapping intervals distributed along the length of the mouse X chromosome. Their characterization not only allows further correlation of the genetic and cytological X-chromosome maps but also should permit the rapid identification of DNA probes specific for particular regions of the mouse X chromosome.

  9. Comparative mapping of DNA markers from the familial Alzheimer disease and Down syndrome regions of human chromosome 21 to mouse chromosomes 16 and 17

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, S.V.; Nadeau, J.H.; Tanzi, R.E.; Watkins, P.C.; Jagadesh, J.; Taylor, B.A.; Haines, J.L.; Sacchi, N.; Gusella, J.F. )

    1988-08-01

    Mouse trisomy 16 has been proposed as an animal model of Down syndrome (DS), since this chromosome contains homologues of several loci from the q22 band of human chromosome 21. The recent mapping of the defect causing familial Alzheimer disease (FAD) and the locus encoding the Alzheimer amyloid {beta} precursor protein (APP) to human chromosome 21 has prompted a more detailed examination of the extent of conservation of this linkage group between the two species. Using anonymous DNA probes and cloned genes from human chromosome 21 in a combination of recombinant inbred and interspecific mouse backcross analyses, the authors have established that the linkage group shared by mouse chromosome 16 includes not only the critical DS region of human chromosome 21 but also the APP gene and FAD-linked markers. Extending from the anonymous DNA locus D21S52 to ETS2, the linkage map of six loci spans 39% recombination in man but only 6.4% recombination in the mouse. A break in synteny occurs distal to ETS2, with the homologue of the human marker D21S56 mapping to mouse chromosome 17. Conservation of the linkage relationships of markers in the FAD region suggests that the murine homologue of the FAD locus probably maps to chromosome 16 and that detailed comparison of the corresponding region in both species could facilitate identification of the primary defect in this disorder. The break in synteny between the terminal portion of human chromosome 21 and mouse chromosome 16 indicates, however, that mouse trisomy 16 may not represent a complete model of DS.

  10. Comparative mapping of DNA markers from the familial Alzheimer disease and Down syndrome regions of human chromosome 21 to mouse chromosomes 16 and 17.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, S V; Nadeau, J H; Tanzi, R E; Watkins, P C; Jagadesh, J; Taylor, B A; Haines, J L; Sacchi, N; Gusella, J F

    1988-01-01

    Mouse trisomy 16 has been proposed as an animal model of Down syndrome (DS), since this chromosome contains homologues of several loci from the q22 band of human chromosome 21. The recent mapping of the defect causing familial Alzheimer disease (FAD) and the locus encoding the Alzheimer amyloid beta precursor protein (APP) to human chromosome 21 has prompted a more detailed examination of the extent of conservation of this linkage group between the two species. Using anonymous DNA probes and cloned genes from human chromosome 21 in a combination of recombinant inbred and interspecific mouse backcross analyses, we have established that the linkage group shared by mouse chromosome 16 includes not only the critical DS region of human chromosome 21 but also the APP gene and FAD-linked markers. Extending from the anonymous DNA locus D21S52 to ETS2, the linkage map of six loci spans 39% recombination in man but only 6.4% recombination in the mouse. A break in synteny occurs distal to ETS2, with the homologue of the human marker D21S56 mapping to mouse chromosome 17. Conservation of the linkage relationships of markers in the FAD region suggests that the murine homologue of the FAD locus probably maps to chromosome 16 and that detailed comparison of the corresponding region in both species could facilitate identification of the primary defect in this disorder. The break in synteny between the terminal portion of human chromosome 21 and mouse chromosome 16 indicates, however, that mouse trisomy 16 may not represent a complete model of DS. Images PMID:2901095

  11. Molecular Genetic Analysis of Chd3 and Polytene Chromosome Region 76B-D in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Monica T.; Conant, Alexander W.; Kennison, James A.

    2010-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster Chd3 gene encodes a member of the CHD group of SNF2/RAD54 ATPases. CHD proteins are conserved from yeast to man and many are subunits of chromatin-remodeling complexes that facilitate transcription. Drosophila CHD3 proteins are not found in protein complexes, but as monomers that remodel chromatin in vitro. CHD3 colocalize with elongating RNA polymerase II on salivary gland polytene chromosomes. Since the role of Chd3 in development was unknown, we isolated and characterized the essential genes within the 640-kb region of the third chromosome (polytene chromosome region 76B-D) that includes Chd3. We recovered mutations in 24 genes that are essential for zygotic viability. We found that transposon-insertion mutants for 46% of the essential genes are included in the Drosophila Gene Disruption Project collection. None of the essential genes that we identified are in a 200-kb region that includes Chd3. We generated a deletion of Chd3 by targeted gene replacement. This deletion had no effect on either viability or fertility. PMID:20439780

  12. Transcription map of the tuberous sclerosis complex I candidate region in human chromosome segment 9q34

    SciTech Connect

    Murrell, J.; Trofatter, J.; Rutter, M.

    1994-09-01

    A high resolution and transcription map of the tuberous sclerosis (TSCI) region on human chromosome 9 has been constructed between the polymorphic dinucleotide markers DBH and D9S114. This 600 kb region was originally thought to be 2 Mb which is much less than expected given a genetic distance of 4 cM. A minimum of three YACs from the flow-sorted human chromosome 9 library and two cosmids span this distance. Each YAC was used to identify cosmids from the flow-sorted human chromosome 9 cosmid libraries from Los Alamos National Laboratories and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories. All cosmids were then subjected to exon amplification, and the resulting exons mapped back to the cosmids and YACs. Fifty exons, 25 sequence tagged sites which include YAC ends and four simple sequence repeats were used to order the map creating a marker every 5-10 Kb. Exons were also used to obtain cDNAs. Two genes with interesting similarity to known sequences were mapped in this region. One 2.7 Kb cDNA that detected a 5.5 Kb transcript on a Northern has homology to a tumor suppressor gene. The other 2.3 Kb cDNA detected a 7 Kb transcript with Northern analysis. This previously unmapped cDNA has sequence similarity to a homeobox gene. Both transcripts are excellent candidate genes for TSCI.

  13. Detailed comparative map of human chromosome 19q and related regions of the mouse genome.

    PubMed

    Stubbs, L; Carver, E A; Shannon, M E; Kim, J; Geisler, J; Generoso, E E; Stanford, B G; Dunn, W C; Mohrenweiser, H; Zimmermann, W; Watt, S M; Ashworth, L K

    1996-08-01

    One of the larger contiguous blocks of mouse-human genomic homology includes the proximal portion of mouse chromosome 7 and the long arm of human chromosome 19. Previous studies have demonstrated the close relationship between the two regions, but have also indicated significant rearrangements in the relative orders of homologous mouse and human genes. Here we present the genetic locations of the homologs of 42 human chromosome 19q markers in the mouse, with an emphasis on genes also included in the human chromosome 19 physical map. Our results demonstrate that despite an overall inversion of sequences relative to the centromere, apparent "transpositions" of three gene-rich segments, and a local inversion of markers mapping near the 19q telomere, gene content, order, and spacing are remarkably well conserved throughout the lengths of these related mouse and human regions. Although most human 19q markers have remained genetically linked in mouse, one small human segment forms a separate region of homology between human chromosome 19q and mouse chromosome 17. Three of the four rearrangements of mouse versus human 19q sequences involve segments that are located directly adjacent to each other in 19q13.3-q13.4, suggesting either the coincident occurrence of these events or their common association with unstable DNA sequences. These data permit an unusually in-depth examination of this large region of mouse-human genomic homology and provide an important new tool to aid in the mapping of genes and associated phenotypes in both species.

  14. Linkage analysis of putative schizophrenia gene candidate regions on chromosomes 3p, 5q, 6p, 8p, 20p and 22q in a population-based sampled Finnish family set.

    PubMed

    Hovatta, I; Lichtermann, D; Juvonen, H; Suvisaari, J; Terwilliger, J D; Arajärvi, R; Kokko-Sahin, M L; Ekelund, J; Lönnqvist, J; Peltonen, L

    1998-09-01

    During the past decade numerous studies have been published describing chromosomal regions potentially linked with schizophrenia. Unfortunately, none of these studies has been able to conclusively identify any specific gene that predisposes to schizophrenia. Typically evidence for linkage is seen on large chromosomal regions, as expected, containing tens or even hundreds of genes. Furthermore, attempts to replicate the findings have rarely been successful leaving a confusion about the existence of predisposing genes for schizophrenia in a particular region of the genome. We have carried out linkage analysis in a set of 62 pedigrees rising from a genetically isolated population of Finland with markers on six chromosomal regions earlier suggested to harbor predisposing genes for schizophrenia, namely 3p, 5q, 6p, 8p, 20p, and 22q. We were not able to find significant evidence for linkage on any of these chromosomal regions. However, some support for linkage was found on all studied chromosomal regions, except 3p.

  15. Overexpression screens identify conserved dosage chromosome instability genes in yeast and human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, Supipi; Fam, Hok Khim; Wang, Yi Kan; Styles, Erin B.; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Ang, J. Sidney; Singh, Tejomayee; Larionov, Vladimir; Shah, Sohrab P.; Andrews, Brenda; Boerkoel, Cornelius F.; Hieter, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Somatic copy number amplification and gene overexpression are common features of many cancers. To determine the role of gene overexpression on chromosome instability (CIN), we performed genome-wide screens in the budding yeast for yeast genes that cause CIN when overexpressed, a phenotype we refer to as dosage CIN (dCIN), and identified 245 dCIN genes. This catalog of genes reveals human orthologs known to be recurrently overexpressed and/or amplified in tumors. We show that two genes, TDP1, a tyrosyl-DNA-phosphdiesterase, and TAF12, an RNA polymerase II TATA-box binding factor, cause CIN when overexpressed in human cells. Rhabdomyosarcoma lines with elevated human Tdp1 levels also exhibit CIN that can be partially rescued by siRNA-mediated knockdown of TDP1. Overexpression of dCIN genes represents a genetic vulnerability that could be leveraged for selective killing of cancer cells through targeting of an unlinked synthetic dosage lethal (SDL) partner. Using SDL screens in yeast, we identified a set of genes that when deleted specifically kill cells with high levels of Tdp1. One gene was the histone deacetylase RPD3, for which there are known inhibitors. Both HT1080 cells overexpressing hTDP1 and rhabdomyosarcoma cells with elevated levels of hTdp1 were more sensitive to histone deacetylase inhibitors valproic acid (VPA) and trichostatin A (TSA), recapitulating the SDL interaction in human cells and suggesting VPA and TSA as potential therapeutic agents for tumors with elevated levels of hTdp1. The catalog of dCIN genes presented here provides a candidate list to identify genes that cause CIN when overexpressed in cancer, which can then be leveraged through SDL to selectively target tumors. PMID:27551064

  16. Organization of chromosome ends in Ustilago maydis. RecQ-like helicase motifs at telomeric regions.

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Alonso, P; Guzmán, P

    1998-01-01

    In this study we have established the structure of chromosome ends in the basidiomycete fungus Ustilago maydis. We isolated and characterized several clones containing telomeric regions and found that as in other organisms, they consist of middle repeated DNA sequences. Two principal types of sequence were found: UTASa was highly conserved in nucleotide sequence and located almost exclusively at the chromosome ends, and UTASb was less conserved in nucleotide sequence than UTASa and found not just at the ends but highly interspersed throughout the genome. Sequence analysis revealed that UTASa encodes an open reading frame containing helicase motifs with the strongest homology to RecQ helicases; these are DNA helicases whose function involves the maintenance of genome stability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in humans, and the suppression of illegitimate recombination in Escherichia coli. Both UTASa and UTASb contain a common region of about 300 bp located immediately adjacent to the telomere repeats that are also found interspersed in the genome. The analysis of the chromosome ends of U. maydis provides information on the general structure of chromosome ends in eukaryotes, and the putative RecQ helicase at UTASa may reveal a novel mechanism for the maintenance of chromosome stability. PMID:9539423

  17. Y-chromosome analysis in Egypt suggests a genetic regional continuity in Northeastern Africa.

    PubMed

    Manni, Franz; Leonardi, Pascal; Barakat, Abdelhamid; Rouba, Hassan; Heyer, Evelyne; Klintschar, Michael; McElreavey, Ken; Quintana-Murci, Lluís

    2002-10-01

    The geographic location of Egypt, at the interface between North Africa, the Middle East, and southern Europe, prompted us to investigate the genetic diversity of this population and its relationship with neighboring populations. To assess the extent to which the modern Egyptian population reflects this intermediate geographic position, ten Unique Event Polymorphisms (UEPs), mapping to the nonrecombining portion of the Y chromosome, have been typed in 164 Y chromosomes from three North African populations. The analysis of these binary markers, which define 11 Y-chromosome lineages, were used to determine the haplogroup frequencies in Egyptians, Moroccan Arabs, and Moroccan Berbers and thereby define the Y-chromosome background in these regions. Pairwise comparisons with a set of 15 different populations from neighboring European, North African, and Middle Eastern populations and geographic analysis showed the absence of any significant genetic barrier in the eastern part of the Mediterranean area, suggesting that genetic variation and gene flow in this area follow the "isolation-by-distance" model. These results are in sharp contrast with the observation of a strong north-south genetic barrier in the western Mediterranean basin, defined by the Gibraltar Strait. Thus, the Y-chromosome gene pool in the modern Egyptian population reflects a mixture of European, Middle Eastern, and African characteristics, highlighting the importance of ancient and recent migration waves, followed by gene flow, in the region.

  18. Silver-Russell syndrome: a dissection of the genetic aetiology and candidate chromosomal regions

    PubMed Central

    Hitchins, M.; Stanier, P.; Preece, M.; Moore, G.

    2001-01-01

    The main features of Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS) are pre- and postnatal growth restriction and a characteristic small, triangular face. SRS is also accompanied by other dysmorphic features including fifth finger clinodactyly and skeletal asymmetry. The disorder is clinically and genetically heterogeneous, and various modes of inheritance and abnormalities involving chromosomes 7, 8, 15, 17, and 18 have been associated with SRS and SRS-like cases. However, only chromosomes 7 and 17 have been consistently implicated in patients with a strict clinical diagnosis of SRS. Two cases of balanced translocations with breakpoints in 17q23.3-q25 and two cases with a hemizygous deletion of the chorionic somatomammatropin gene (CSH1) on 17q24.1 have been associated with SRS, strongly implicating this region. Maternal uniparental disomy for chromosome 7 (mUPD(7)) occurs in up to 10% of SRS patients, with disruption of genomic imprinting underlying the disease status in these cases. Recently, two SRS patients with a maternal duplication of 7p11.2-p13, and a single proband with segmental mUPD for the region 7q31-qter, were described. These key patients define two separate candidate regions for SRS on both the p and q arms of chromosome 7. Both the 7p11.2-p13 and 7q31-qter regions are subject to genomic imprinting and the homologous regions in the mouse are associated with imprinted growth phenotypes. This review provides an overview of the genetics of SRS, and focuses on the newly defined candidate regions on chromosome 7. The analyses of imprinted candidate genes within 7p11.2-p13 and 7q31-qter, and gene candidates on distal 17q, are discussed.


Keywords: Silver-Russell syndrome; imprinting; mUPD(7); candidates PMID:11748303

  19. Genetic analysis of chromosomal rearrangements in the cyclops region of the zebrafish genome.

    PubMed Central

    Talbot, W S; Egan, E S; Gates, M A; Walker, C; Ullmann, B; Neuhauss, S C; Kimmel, C B; Postlethwait, J H

    1998-01-01

    Genetic screens in zebrafish have provided mutations in hundreds of genes with essential functions in the developing embryo. To investigate the possible uses of chromosomal rearrangements in the analysis of these mutations, we genetically characterized three gamma-ray induced alleles of cyclops (cyc), a gene required for development of midline structures. We show that cyc maps near one end of Linkage Group 12 (LG 12) and that this region is involved in a reciprocal translocation with LG 2 in one gamma-ray induced mutation, cyc(b213). The translocated segments together cover approximately 5% of the genetic map, and we show that this rearrangement is useful for mapping cloned genes that reside in the affected chromosomal regions. The other two alleles, cyc(b16) and cyc(b229), have deletions in the distal region of LG 12. Interestingly, both of these mutations suppress recombination between genetic markers in LG 12, including markers at a distance from the deletion. This observation raises the possibility that these deletions affect a site required for meiotic recombination on the LG 12 chromosome. The cyc(b16) and cyc(b229) mutations may be useful for balancing other lethal mutations located in the distal region of LG 12. These results show that chromosomal rearrangements can provide useful resources for mapping and genetic analyses in zebrafish. PMID:9475747

  20. Gene recovery microdissection (GRM) a process for producing chromosome region-specific libraries of expressed genes

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, A T; Coleman, M A; Tucker, J D

    2001-02-08

    Gene Recovery Microdissection (GRM) is a unique and cost-effective process for producing chromosome region-specific libraries of expressed genes. It accelerates the pace, reduces the cost, and extends the capabilities of functional genomic research, the means by which scientists will put to life-saving, life-enhancing use their knowledge of any plant or animal genome.

  1. A genome-wide association study of COPD identifies a susceptibility locus on chromosome 19q13

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Michael H.; Castaldi, Peter J.; Wan, Emily S.; Siedlinski, Mateusz; Hersh, Craig P.; Demeo, Dawn L.; Himes, Blanca E.; Sylvia, Jody S.; Klanderman, Barbara J.; Ziniti, John P.; Lange, Christoph; Litonjua, Augusto A.; Sparrow, David; Regan, Elizabeth A.; Make, Barry J.; Hokanson, John E.; Murray, Tanda; Hetmanski, Jacqueline B.; Pillai, Sreekumar G.; Kong, Xiangyang; Anderson, Wayne H.; Tal-Singer, Ruth; Lomas, David A.; Coxson, Harvey O.; Edwards, Lisa D.; MacNee, William; Vestbo, Jørgen; Yates, Julie C.; Agusti, Alvar; Calverley, Peter M.A.; Celli, Bartolome; Crim, Courtney; Rennard, Stephen; Wouters, Emiel; Bakke, Per; Gulsvik, Amund; Crapo, James D.; Beaty, Terri H.; Silverman, Edwin K.

    2012-01-01

    The genetic risk factors for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are still largely unknown. To date, genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of limited size have identified several novel risk loci for COPD at CHRNA3/CHRNA5/IREB2, HHIP and FAM13A; additional loci may be identified through larger studies. We performed a GWAS using a total of 3499 cases and 1922 control subjects from four cohorts: the Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate Endpoints (ECLIPSE); the Normative Aging Study (NAS) and National Emphysema Treatment Trial (NETT); Bergen, Norway (GenKOLS); and the COPDGene study. Genotyping was performed on Illumina platforms with additional markers imputed using 1000 Genomes data; results were summarized using fixed-effect meta-analysis. We identified a new genome-wide significant locus on chromosome 19q13 (rs7937, OR = 0.74, P = 2.9 × 10−9). Genotyping this single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and another nearby SNP in linkage disequilibrium (rs2604894) in 2859 subjects from the family-based International COPD Genetics Network study (ICGN) demonstrated supportive evidence for association for COPD (P = 0.28 and 0.11 for rs7937 and rs2604894), pre-bronchodilator FEV1 (P = 0.08 and 0.04) and severe (GOLD 3&4) COPD (P = 0.09 and 0.017). This region includes RAB4B, EGLN2, MIA and CYP2A6, and has previously been identified in association with cigarette smoking behavior. PMID:22080838

  2. Identifying Regions Based on Flexible User Defined Constraints.

    PubMed

    Folch, David C; Spielman, Seth E

    2014-01-01

    The identification of regions is both a computational and conceptual challenge. Even with growing computational power, regionalization algorithms must rely on heuristic approaches in order to find solutions. Therefore, the constraints and evaluation criteria that define a region must be translated into an algorithm that can efficiently and effectively navigate the solution space to find the best solution. One limitation of many existing regionalization algorithms is a requirement that the number of regions be selected a priori. The max-p algorithm, introduced in Duque et al. (2012), does not have this requirement, and thus the number of regions is an output of, not an input to, the algorithm. In this paper we extend the max-p algorithm to allow for greater flexibility in the constraints available to define a feasible region, placing the focus squarely on the multidimensional characteristics of region. We also modify technical aspects of the algorithm to provide greater flexibility in its ability to search the solution space. Using synthetic spatial and attribute data we are able to show the algorithm's broad ability to identify regions in maps of varying complexity. We also conduct a large scale computational experiment to identify parameter settings that result in the greatest solution accuracy under various scenarios. The rules of thumb identified from the experiment produce maps that correctly assign areas to their "true" region with 94% average accuracy, with nearly 50 percent of the simulations reaching 100 percent accuracy.

  3. Regions of homozygosity identified by oligonucleotide SNP arrays: evaluating the incidence and clinical utility.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia-Chi; Ross, Leslie; Mahon, Loretta W; Owen, Renius; Hemmat, Morteza; Wang, Boris T; El Naggar, Mohammed; Kopita, Kimberly A; Randolph, Linda M; Chase, John M; Matas Aguilera, Maria J; Siles, Juan López; Church, Joseph A; Hauser, Natalie; Shen, Joseph J; Jones, Marilyn C; Wierenga, Klaas J; Jiang, Zhijie; Haddadin, Mary; Boyar, Fatih Z; Anguiano, Arturo; Strom, Charles M; Sahoo, Trilochan

    2015-05-01

    Copy neutral segments with allelic homozygosity, also known as regions of homozygosity (ROHs), are frequently identified in cases interrogated by oligonucleotide single-nucleotide polymorphism (oligo-SNP) microarrays. Presence of ROHs may be because of parental relatedness, chromosomal recombination or rearrangements and provides important clues regarding ancestral homozygosity, consanguinity or uniparental disomy. In this study of 14 574 consecutive cases, 832 (6%) were found to harbor one or more ROHs over 10 Mb, of which 651 cases (78%) had multiple ROHs, likely because of identity by descent (IBD), and 181 cases (22%) with ROHs involving a single chromosome. Parental relatedness was predicted to be first degree or closer in 5%, second in 9% and third in 19%. Of the 181 cases, 19 had ROHs for a whole chromosome revealing uniparental isodisomy (isoUPD). In all, 25 cases had significant ROHs involving a single chromosome; 5 cases were molecularly confirmed to have a mixed iso- and heteroUPD15 and 1 case each with segmental UPD9pat and segmental UPD22mat; 17 cases were suspected to have a mixed iso- and heteroUPD including 2 cases with small supernumerary marker and 2 cases with mosaic trisomy. For chromosome 15, 12 (92%) of 13 molecularly studied cases had either Prader-Willi or Angelman syndrome. Autosomal recessive disorders were confirmed in seven of nine cases from eight families because of the finding of suspected gene within a ROH. This study demonstrates that ROHs are much more frequent than previously recognized and often reflect parental relatedness, ascertain autosomal recessive diseases or unravel UPD in many cases.

  4. A Narrow Segment of Maternal Uniparental Disomy of Chromosome 7q31-qter in Silver-Russell Syndrome Delimits a Candidate Gene Region

    PubMed Central

    Hannula, Katariina; Lipsanen-Nyman, Marita; Kontiokari, Tero; Kere, Juha

    2001-01-01

    Maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 7 (matUPD7), the inheritance of both chromosomes from only the mother, is observed in ∼10% of patients with Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS). It has been suggested that at least one imprinted gene that regulates growth and development resides on human chromosome 7. To date, three imprinted genes—PEG1/MEST, γ2-COP, and GRB10—have been identified on chromosome 7, but their role in the etiology of SRS remains uncertain. In a systematic screening with microsatellite markers, for matUPD7 cases among patients with SRS, we identified a patient who had a small segment of matUPD7 and biparental inheritance of the remainder of chromosome 7. Such a pattern may be explained by somatic recombination in the zygote. The matUPD7 segment at 7q31-qter extends for 35 Mb and includes the imprinted gene cluster of PEG1/MEST and γ2-COP at 7q32. GRB10 at 7p11.2-p12 is located within a region of biparental inheritance. Although partial UPD has previously been reported for chromosomes 6, 11, 14, and 15, this is the first report of a patient with SRS who has segmental matUPD7. Our findings delimit a candidate imprinted region sufficient to cause SRS. PMID:11112662

  5. Molecular genetics of the brown (b)-locus region of mouse chromosome 4. II. Complementation analyses of lethal brown deletions.

    PubMed

    Rinchik, E M

    1994-07-01

    Numerous new mutations at the brown (b) locus in mouse chromosome 4 have been recovered over the years in germ-cell mutagenesis experiments performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A large series of radiation- and chemical-induced b mutations known to be chromosomal deletions, and also known to be prenatally lethal when homozygous, were analyzed by pairwise complementation crosses as well as by pseudodominance tests involving flanking loci defined by externally visible phenotypes. These crosses were designed to determine the extent of each deletion on the genetic and phenotype map of the chromosomal region surrounding the b locus; the crosses also provided basic data that assigned deletions to complementation groups and defined four new loci associated with aberrancies in normal development. Specifically, the pseudodominance tests identified deletions that include the proximally mapping whirler (wi) and the distally mapping depilated (dep) genes, thereby bracketing these loci defined by visible developmental abnormalities with landmarks (deletion breakpoints) that are easily identified on the physical map. Furthermore, the complementation crosses, which were supplemented with additional crosses that allowed determination of the gross time of lethality of selected deletions, defined four new loci required for normal development. Homozygous deletion of one of these loci (b-associated fitness, baf) results in a runting syndrome evident during postnatal development; deletion of one locus [l(4)2Rn] causes death in the late gestation/neonatal period; and deletion of either of two loci [l(4)1Rn or l(4)3Rn] results in embryonic death, most likely in pre-, peri- or postimplantation stages. The placement of these new functionally defined loci on the evolving molecular map of the b region should be useful for continuing the analysis of the roles played in development by genes in this segment of chromosome 4.

  6. Genomic structure and paralogous regions of the inversion breakpoint occurring between human chromosome 3p12.3 and orangutan chromosome 2.

    PubMed

    Yue, Y; Grossmann, B; Tsend-Ayush, E; Grützner, F; Ferguson-Smith, M A; Yang, F; Haaf, T

    2005-01-01

    Intrachromosomal duplications play a significant role in human genome pathology and evolution. To better understand the molecular basis of evolutionary chromosome rearrangements, we performed molecular cytogenetic and sequence analyses of the breakpoint region that distinguishes human chromosome 3p12.3 and orangutan chromosome 2. FISH with region-specific BAC clones demonstrated that the breakpoint-flanking sequences are duplicated intrachromosomally on orangutan 2 and human 3q21 as well as at many pericentromeric and subtelomeric sites throughout the genomes. Breakage and rearrangement of the human 3p12.3-homologous region in the orangutan lineage were associated with a partial loss of duplicated sequences in the breakpoint region. Consistent with our FISH mapping results, computational analysis of the human chromosome 3 genomic sequence revealed three 3p12.3-paralogous sequence blocks on human chromosome 3q21 and smaller blocks on the short arm end 3p26-->p25. This is consistent with the view that sequences from an ancestral site at 3q21 were duplicated at 3p12.3 in a common ancestor of orangutan and humans. Our results show that evolutionary chromosome rearrangements are associated with microduplications and microdeletions, contributing to the DNA differences between closely related species. Copyright (c) 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. 40 CFR 255.24 - Procedure for identifying interstate regions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... regions. 255.24 Section 255.24 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES IDENTIFICATION OF REGIONS AND AGENCIES FOR SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT Procedures for Identifying...) boundaries for planning and management purposes, and consider nominating such areas where appropriate....

  8. 40 CFR 255.24 - Procedure for identifying interstate regions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... regions. 255.24 Section 255.24 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES IDENTIFICATION OF REGIONS AND AGENCIES FOR SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT Procedures for Identifying...) boundaries for planning and management purposes, and consider nominating such areas where appropriate....

  9. 40 CFR 255.24 - Procedure for identifying interstate regions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... regions. 255.24 Section 255.24 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES IDENTIFICATION OF REGIONS AND AGENCIES FOR SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT Procedures for Identifying...) boundaries for planning and management purposes, and consider nominating such areas where appropriate....

  10. 40 CFR 255.24 - Procedure for identifying interstate regions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... regions. 255.24 Section 255.24 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES IDENTIFICATION OF REGIONS AND AGENCIES FOR SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT Procedures for Identifying...) boundaries for planning and management purposes, and consider nominating such areas where appropriate....

  11. 40 CFR 255.24 - Procedure for identifying interstate regions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... regions. 255.24 Section 255.24 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES IDENTIFICATION OF REGIONS AND AGENCIES FOR SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT Procedures for Identifying...) boundaries for planning and management purposes, and consider nominating such areas where appropriate....

  12. Northwest Region: A Report Identifying and Addressing the Educational Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This report presents the deliberations of the Northwest Regional Advisory Committee (NW RAC), one of 10 RACs established under the Educational Technical Assistance Act of 2002 to assess the educational needs of the region. The Northwest RAC accepted its charge to identify educational needs and to make recommendations, working collaboratively as…

  13. Southeast Region: A Report Identifying and Addressing the Educational Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This report presents the deliberations of the Southeast Regional Advisory Committee (RAC), one of 10 RACs established by the U.S. Department of Education, identifying educational challenges across the six states in the region: Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina and South Carolina. Committee deliberations took place May 23,…

  14. 40 CFR 255.10 - Criteria for identifying regions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) Coordination should be provided with those agencies designated for water quality management planning under... IDENTIFICATION OF REGIONS AND AGENCIES FOR SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT Criteria for Identifying Regions and Agencies... recovery as appropriate. (d) Waste type should be considered since it also affects management...

  15. 40 CFR 255.10 - Criteria for identifying regions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) Coordination should be provided with those agencies designated for water quality management planning under... IDENTIFICATION OF REGIONS AND AGENCIES FOR SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT Criteria for Identifying Regions and Agencies... recovery as appropriate. (d) Waste type should be considered since it also affects management...

  16. 40 CFR 255.10 - Criteria for identifying regions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) Coordination should be provided with those agencies designated for water quality management planning under... IDENTIFICATION OF REGIONS AND AGENCIES FOR SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT Criteria for Identifying Regions and Agencies... recovery as appropriate. (d) Waste type should be considered since it also affects management...

  17. Southwest Region: A Report Identifying and Addressing the Educational Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Educational Technical Assistance Act of 2002, authorized the Southwest Regional Advisory Committee (RAC), whose members represent the states of Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas, to identify and prioritize the region's educational needs and recommend how those needs can be met. The Southwest RAC conducted three public…

  18. Genome-Wide Search Identifies 1.9 Mb from the Polar Bear Y Chromosome for Evolutionary Analyses.

    PubMed

    Bidon, Tobias; Schreck, Nancy; Hailer, Frank; Nilsson, Maria A; Janke, Axel

    2015-05-27

    The male-inherited Y chromosome is the major haploid fraction of the mammalian genome, rendering Y-linked sequences an indispensable resource for evolutionary research. However, despite recent large-scale genome sequencing approaches, only a handful of Y chromosome sequences have been characterized to date, mainly in model organisms. Using polar bear (Ursus maritimus) genomes, we compare two different in silico approaches to identify Y-linked sequences: 1) Similarity to known Y-linked genes and 2) difference in the average read depth of autosomal versus sex chromosomal scaffolds. Specifically, we mapped available genomic sequencing short reads from a male and a female polar bear against the reference genome and identify 112 Y-chromosomal scaffolds with a combined length of 1.9 Mb. We verified the in silico findings for the longer polar bear scaffolds by male-specific in vitro amplification, demonstrating the reliability of the average read depth approach. The obtained Y chromosome sequences contain protein-coding sequences, single nucleotide polymorphisms, microsatellites, and transposable elements that are useful for evolutionary studies. A high-resolution phylogeny of the polar bear patriline shows two highly divergent Y chromosome lineages, obtained from analysis of the identified Y scaffolds in 12 previously published male polar bear genomes. Moreover, we find evidence of gene conversion among ZFX and ZFY sequences in the giant panda lineage and in the ancestor of ursine and tremarctine bears. Thus, the identification of Y-linked scaffold sequences from unordered genome sequences yields valuable data to infer phylogenomic and population-genomic patterns in bears. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  19. Genome-Wide Search Identifies 1.9 Mb from the Polar Bear Y Chromosome for Evolutionary Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Bidon, Tobias; Schreck, Nancy; Hailer, Frank; Nilsson, Maria A.; Janke, Axel

    2015-01-01

    The male-inherited Y chromosome is the major haploid fraction of the mammalian genome, rendering Y-linked sequences an indispensable resource for evolutionary research. However, despite recent large-scale genome sequencing approaches, only a handful of Y chromosome sequences have been characterized to date, mainly in model organisms. Using polar bear (Ursus maritimus) genomes, we compare two different in silico approaches to identify Y-linked sequences: 1) Similarity to known Y-linked genes and 2) difference in the average read depth of autosomal versus sex chromosomal scaffolds. Specifically, we mapped available genomic sequencing short reads from a male and a female polar bear against the reference genome and identify 112 Y-chromosomal scaffolds with a combined length of 1.9 Mb. We verified the in silico findings for the longer polar bear scaffolds by male-specific in vitro amplification, demonstrating the reliability of the average read depth approach. The obtained Y chromosome sequences contain protein-coding sequences, single nucleotide polymorphisms, microsatellites, and transposable elements that are useful for evolutionary studies. A high-resolution phylogeny of the polar bear patriline shows two highly divergent Y chromosome lineages, obtained from analysis of the identified Y scaffolds in 12 previously published male polar bear genomes. Moreover, we find evidence of gene conversion among ZFX and ZFY sequences in the giant panda lineage and in the ancestor of ursine and tremarctine bears. Thus, the identification of Y-linked scaffold sequences from unordered genome sequences yields valuable data to infer phylogenomic and population-genomic patterns in bears. PMID:26019166

  20. Fine mapping analysis confirms and strengthens linkage of four chromosomal regions in familial hypospadias

    PubMed Central

    Söderhäll, Cilla; Körberg, Izabella Baranowska; Thai, Hanh T T; Cao, Jia; Chen, Yougen; Zhang, Xufeng; Shulu, Zu; van der Zanden, Loes F M; van Rooij, Iris A L M; Frisén, Louise; Roeleveld, Nel; Markljung, Ellen; Kockum, Ingrid; Nordenskjöld, Agneta

    2015-01-01

    Hypospadias is a common male genital malformation and is regarded as a complex disease affected by multiple genetic as well as environmental factors. In a previous genome-wide scan for familial hypospadias, we reported suggestive linkage in nine chromosomal regions. We have extended this analysis by including new families and additional markers using non-parametric linkage. The fine mapping analysis displayed an increased LOD score on chromosome 8q24.1 and 10p15 in altogether 82 families. On chromosome 10p15, with the highest LOD score, we further studied AKR1C2, AKR1C3 and AKR1C4 involved in steroid metabolism, as well as KLF6 expressed in preputial tissue from hypospadias patients. Mutation analysis of the AKR1C3 gene showed a new mutation, c.643G>A (p.(Ala215Thr)), in a boy with penile hypospadias. This mutation is predicted to have an impact on protein function and structure and was not found in controls. Altogether, we homed in on four chromosomal regions likely to harbor genes for hypospadias. Future studies will aim for studying regulatory sequence variants in these regions. PMID:24986825

  1. Fine mapping analysis confirms and strengthens linkage of four chromosomal regions in familial hypospadias.

    PubMed

    Söderhäll, Cilla; Körberg, Izabella Baranowska; Thai, Hanh T T; Cao, Jia; Chen, Yougen; Zhang, Xufeng; Shulu, Zu; van der Zanden, Loes F M; van Rooij, Iris A L M; Frisén, Louise; Roeleveld, Nel; Markljung, Ellen; Kockum, Ingrid; Nordenskjöld, Agneta

    2015-04-01

    Hypospadias is a common male genital malformation and is regarded as a complex disease affected by multiple genetic as well as environmental factors. In a previous genome-wide scan for familial hypospadias, we reported suggestive linkage in nine chromosomal regions. We have extended this analysis by including new families and additional markers using non-parametric linkage. The fine mapping analysis displayed an increased LOD score on chromosome 8q24.1 and 10p15 in altogether 82 families. On chromosome 10p15, with the highest LOD score, we further studied AKR1C2, AKR1C3 and AKR1C4 involved in steroid metabolism, as well as KLF6 expressed in preputial tissue from hypospadias patients. Mutation analysis of the AKR1C3 gene showed a new mutation, c.643G>A (p.(Ala215Thr)), in a boy with penile hypospadias. This mutation is predicted to have an impact on protein function and structure and was not found in controls. Altogether, we homed in on four chromosomal regions likely to harbor genes for hypospadias. Future studies will aim for studying regulatory sequence variants in these regions.

  2. Linkage disequilibrium patterns vary with chromosomal location: A case study from the von Willebrand factor region

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, W.S.; Zenger, R.; O'Brien, E.; Jorde, L.B. ); Nyman, D. ); Eriksson, A.W. ); Renlund, M.

    1994-08-01

    Linkage disequilibrium analysis has been used as a tool for analyzing marker order and locating disease genes. Under appropriate circumstances, disequilibrium patterns reflect recombination events that have occurred throughput a population's history. As a result, disequilibrium mapping may be useful in genomic regions of <1 cM where the number of informative meioses needed to detect recombinant individuals within pedigrees is exceptionally high. Its utility for refining target areas for candidate disease genes before initiating chromosomal walks and cloning experiments will be enhanced as the relationship between linkage disequilibrium and physical distance is better understood. To address this issue, the authors have characterized linkage disequilibrium in a 144-kb region of the von Willebrand factor gene on chromosome 12. Sixty CEPH and 12 von Willebrand disease families were genotypes for five PCR-based markers, which include two microsatellite repeats and three single-base-pair substitutions. Linkage disequilibrium and physical distance between polymorphisms are highly correlated (r[sub m] = -.76; P<.05) within this region. None of the five markers showed significant disequilibrium with the von Willebrand disease phenotype. The linkage disequilibrium/physical distance relationship was also analyzed as a function of chromosomal location for this and eight previously characterized regions. This analysis revealed a general trend in which linkage disequilibrium dissipates more rapidly with physical distance in telomeric regions than in centromeric regions. This trend is consistent with higher recombination rates near telomeres. 52 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Regional localization of DNA sequences on chromosome 21 using somatic cell hybrids.

    PubMed Central

    Van Keuren, M L; Watkins, P C; Drabkin, H A; Jabs, E W; Gusella, J F; Patterson, D

    1986-01-01

    We have used a panel of Chinese hamster X human somatic cell hybrids, each containing various portions of chromosome 21 as the only detectable human chromosome component, for regional mapping of cloned, chromosome 21-derived DNA sequences. Thirty unique and very low-repeat sequences were mapped to the short arm and three sections of the long arm. Three unique sequences map to the proximal part of the terminal band 21q22.3, and five to the distal part of this band. Some of these may represent parts of gene sequences that may be relevant to the pathogenesis of Down syndrome, as 21q22 is the area required to be present in triplicate for the full clinical picture. Images Fig. 1 PMID:3014865

  4. Formation of plant metabolic gene clusters within dynamic chromosomal regions

    PubMed Central

    Field, Ben; Fiston-Lavier, Anna-Sophie; Kemen, Ariane; Geisler, Katrin; Quesneville, Hadi; Osbourn, Anne E.

    2011-01-01

    In bacteria, genes with related functions often are grouped together in operons and are cotranscribed as a single polycistronic mRNA. In eukaryotes, functionally related genes generally are scattered across the genome. Notable exceptions include gene clusters for catabolic pathways in yeast, synthesis of secondary metabolites in filamentous fungi, and the major histocompatibility complex in animals. Until quite recently it was thought that gene clusters in plants were restricted to tandem duplicates (for example, arrays of leucine-rich repeat disease-resistance genes). However, operon-like clusters of coregulated nonhomologous genes are an emerging theme in plant biology, where they may be involved in the synthesis of certain defense compounds. These clusters are unlikely to have arisen by horizontal gene transfer, and the mechanisms behind their formation are poorly understood. Previously in thale cress (Arabidopsis thaliana) we identified an operon-like gene cluster that is required for the synthesis and modification of the triterpene thalianol. Here we characterize a second operon-like triterpene cluster (the marneral cluster) from A. thaliana, compare the features of these two clusters, and investigate the evolutionary events that have led to cluster formation. We conclude that common mechanisms are likely to underlie the assembly and control of operon-like gene clusters in plants. PMID:21876149

  5. Terminal regions of wheat chromosomes select their pairing partners in meiosis.

    PubMed

    Corredor, Eduardo; Lukaszewski, Adam J; Pachón, Paula; Allen, Diana C; Naranjo, Tomás

    2007-10-01

    Many plant species, including important crops like wheat, are polyploids that carry more than two sets of genetically related chromosomes capable of meiotic pairing. To safeguard a diploid-like behavior at meiosis, many polyploids evolved genetic loci that suppress incorrect pairing and recombination of homeologues. The Ph1 locus in wheat was proposed to ensure homologous pairing by controlling the specificity of centromere associations that precede chromosome pairing. Using wheat chromosomes that carry rye centromeres, we show that the centromere associations in early meiosis are not based on homology and that the Ph1 locus has no effect on such associations. Although centromeres indeed undergo a switch from nonhomologous to homologous associations in meiosis, this process is driven by the terminally initiated synapsis. The centromere has no effect on metaphase I chiasmate chromosome associations: homologs with identical or different centromeres, in the presence and absence of Ph1, pair the same. A FISH analysis of the behavior of centromeres and distal chromomeres in telocentric and bi-armed chromosomes demonstrates that it is not the centromeric, but rather the subtelomeric, regions that are involved in the correct partner recognition and selection.

  6. Type 1 diabetes and the control of dexamethazone-induced apoptosis in mice maps to the same region on chromosome 6

    SciTech Connect

    Penha-Goncalves, C.; Leijon, K.; Persson, L.

    1995-08-10

    Quantitative trait loci mapping was used to identify the chromosomal location of genes that contribute to increase the resistance to apoptosis induced in immature CD4{sup +}8{sup +} thymocytes. An F2 intercross of the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse (displaying an apoptosis-resistance phenotype) and the C57BL/6 mouse (displaying a nonresistance phenotype) was phenotypically analyzed and genotyped for 32 murine microsatellite polymorphisms. Maximum likelihood methods identified a region on the distal part of chromosome 6 that is linked to dexamethazone-induced apoptosis (lod score = 3.46) and accounts for 14% of the phenotypic variation. This chromosomal region contains the diabetes susceptibility locus Idd6, suggesting that the apoptosis-resistance phenotype constitutes a pathogenesis factor in IDDM of NOD mice. 29 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Prenatal diagnosis of chromosome 15 abnormalities in the Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome region by traditional and molecular cytogenetics

    SciTech Connect

    Toth-Fejel, S.; Magenis, R.E.; Leff, S.

    1995-02-13

    With improvements in culturing and banding techniques, amniotic fluid studies now achieve a level of resolution at which the Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) region may be questioned. Chromosome 15 heteromorphisms, detected with Q- and R-banding and used in conjunction with PWS/AS region-specific probes, can confirm a chromosome deletion and establish origin to predict the clinical outcome. We report four de novo cases of an abnormal-appearing chromosome 15 in amniotic fluid samples referred for advanced maternal age or a history of a previous chromosomally abnormal child. The chromosomes were characterized using G-, Q-, and R-banding, as well as isotopic and fluorescent in situ hybridization of DNA probes specific for the proximal chromosome 15 long arm. In two cases, one chromosome 15 homolog showed a consistent deletion of the ONCOR PWS/AS region A and B. In the other two cases, one of which involved an inversion with one breakpoint in the PWS/AS region, all of the proximal chromosome 15 long arm DNA probes used in the in situ hybridization were present on both homologs. Clinical follow-up was not available on these samples, as in all cases the parents chose to terminate the pregnancies. These cases demonstrate the ability to prenatally diagnose chromosome 15 abnormalities associated with PWS/AS. In addition, they highlight the need for a better understanding of this region for accurate prenatal diagnosis. 41 refs., 5 figs.

  8. The size and sequence organization of the centromeric region of arabidopsis thaliana chromosome 5.

    PubMed

    Kumekawa, N; Hosouchi, T; Tsuruoka, H; Kotani, H

    2000-12-31

    We have determined the size of the centromeric region of Arabidopsis thaliana chromosome 5, which corresponds to the genetically defined centromere by Copenhaver et al. (Science, 286, 2468-2474, 1999) on the basis of restriction analysis. As a large clone gap was present in the previously constructed contig map of the centromeric region, the restriction map of this region was constructed using Asc I, Not I, Apa I and Pme I and genomic DNA from a hypomethylated strain. The size of the centromeric region finally estimated by combination with the sequence data of cloned regions at both sides was 4.35 megabases (Mb). This value is over 2 Mb longer than those estimated in our previous work and also by Copenhaver et al. Combing this centromeric region with the physical map previously constructed, the entire length of chromosome 5 becomes 31 Mb. Although the internal moiety of the centromeric region has not been sequenced yet because of extremely high repetition, the result of sequence analysis from both sides toward the inside strongly suggests that the centromeric region is composed of the central 2.9-Mb domain consisting of mainly 180-bp repeats and Athila retrotransposons and flanking regions containing various types of transposons. On the basis of these observations, a structural model for the centromeric region is discussed.

  9. Molecular definition of a region of chromosome 21 that causes features of the Down syndrome phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Korenberg, Julie R.; Kawashima, Hiroko; Pulst, Stefan-M.; Ikeuchi, T.; Ogasawara, N.; Yamamoto, K.; Schonberg, Steven A.; West, Ruth; Allen, Leland; Magenis, Ellen; Ikawa, K.; Taniguchi, N.; Epstein, Charles J.

    1990-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is a major cause of mental retardation and heart disease. Although it is usually caused by the presence of an extra chromosome 21, a subset of the diagnostic features may be caused by the presence of only band 21q22. We now present evidence that significantly narrows the chromosomal region responsible for several of the phenotypic features of DS. We report a molecular and cytogenetic analysis of a three-generation family containing four individuals with clinical DS as manifested by the characteristic facial appearance, endocardial cushion defect, mental retardation, and probably dermatoglyphic changes. Autoradiograms of quantitative Southern blots of DNAs from two affected sisters, their carrier father, and a normal control were analyzed after hybridization with two to six unique DNA sequences regionally mapped on chromosome 21. These include cDNA probes for the genes for CuZn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) mapping in 21q22.1 and for the amyloid precursor protein (APP) mapping in 21q11.2-21.05, in addition to six probes for single-copy sequences: D21S46 in 21q11.2-21.05, D21S47 and SF57 in 21q22.1-22.3, and D21S39, D21S42, and D21S43 in 21q22.3. All sequences located in 21q22.3 were present in three copies in the affected individuals, whereas those located proximal to this region were present in only two copies. In the carrier father, all DNA sequences were present in only two copies. Cytogenetic analysis of affected individuals employing R and G banding of prometaphase preparations combined with in situ hybridization revealed a translocation of the region from very distal 21q22.1 to 21qter to chromosome 4q. Except for a possible phenotypic contribution from the deletion of chromosome band 4q35, these data provide a molecular definition of the minimal region of chromosome 21 which, when duplicated, generates the facial features, heart defect, a component of the mental retardation, and probably several of the dermatoglyphic changes of DS. This region

  10. Localized Mutagenesis of Any Specific Small Region of the Bacterial Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jen-Shiang; Ames, Bruce N.

    1971-01-01

    A method, which we call localized mutagenesis, is described for the isolation of temperature-sensitive and other types of mutations in any specific small region (about 1%) of the bacterial chromosome. The principle of this method is to mutate the transducing DNA rather than the bacterial DNA. One can select for the introduction of this mutated DNA into any particular region of the bacterial chromosome by transducing an auxotrophic marker in that region to prototrophy, thereby introducing new mutations in the neighborhood. We have used this method to isolate many different temperature-sensitive mutations in genes of unknown function in particular regions of the chromosome. Since the method is very simple, it can be used to saturate any region of the map with mutations in essential genes, or for various types of genetic manipulations. Although we have used hydroxylamine-mutagenized phage P22 and Salmonella typhimurium, the method should be applicable to other mutagens and bacteria and transducing phage. PMID:4943557

  11. [Variations of heterochromatic chromosomal regions and chromosome abnormalities in children with autism: identification of genetic markers in autistic spectrum disorders].

    PubMed

    Vorsanova, S G; Iurov, I Iu; Demidova, I A; Voinova-Ulas, V Iu; Kravets, V S; Solov'ev, I V; Gorbachevskaia, N L; Iurov, Iu B

    2006-01-01

    In the present study, the cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic analysis of 90 children with autism and their mothers (18 subjects) was carried out. Chromosome fragility and abnormalities were found in four cases: mos 47,XXX[98]/ 46,XX[2]; 46,XY,r(22)(p11q13); 46,XY,inv(2)(p11.2q13),16qh-; 46Y,fra(X)(q27.3)16qh-. Using C-banding and quantitative fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), the significantly increased incidence of heterochromatic region variation was shown in autism as compared to the controls (48 and 16%, respectively). Pericentric 9phqh inversion was not characteristic of the patients with autism whereas heterochromatic variations 1phqh, 9qh+ and 16qh- were more frequent in autism (p<0,05). Basing on the data obtained, a possible role of position effect in autism pathogenesis as well as a potential of heterochromatic region variation analysis for the search of biological markers of autistic spectrum disorders are discussed.

  12. An intron capture strategy used to identify and map a lysyl oxidase-like gene on chromosome 9 in the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Wydner, K.S.; Passmore, H.C.; Kim, Houngho; Csiszar, K.; Boyd, C.D.

    1997-03-01

    An intron capture strategy involving use of polymerase chain reaction was used to identify and map the mouse homologue of a human lysyl oxidase-like gene (LOXL). Oligonucleotides complementary to conserved domains within exons 4 and 5 of the human lysyl oxidase-like gene were used to amplify the corresponding segment from mouse genomic DNA. Sequencing of the resulting mouse DNA fragment of approximately 1 kb revealed that the exon sequences at the ends of the amplified fragment are highly homologous (90% nucleotide identity) to exons 4 and 5 of the human lysyl oxidase-like gene. An AluI restriction site polymorphism within intron 4 was used to map the mouse lysyl oxidase-like gene (Loxl) to mouse Chromosome 9 in a region that shares linkage conservation with human chromosome 15q24, to which the LOXL was recently mapped. 22 refs., 3 figs.

  13. High-Resolution genomic arrays identify CNVs that phenocopy the chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Busse, Tracy; Graham, John M; Feldman, Gerald; Perin, Juan; Catherwood, Anne; Knowlton, Robert; Rappaport, Eric F; Emanuel, Beverly; Driscoll, Deborah A; Saitta, Sulagna C

    2011-01-01

    The 22q11 Deletion Syndrome includes the overlapping phenotypes of DiGeorge/Velocardiofacial Syndromes, characterized by conotruncal heart defects, cleft palate, thymus, and parathyroid gland dysplasia. The majority (90%) of patients harbor detectable chr22q11.2 deletions, but a genetic etiology for the remainder of patients without a deletion can remain undefined despite major birth defects. We analyzed DNA from eight patients with normal 22q11 FISH studies by high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays and identified potentially pathogenic copy number variants (CNVs) in four of eight patients. Two patients showed large CNVs in regions of known genomic disorders: one a deletion of distal chr22q11.2 and the other a duplication of chr5q35. A 3-Mb deletion of chr19p13.3 that includes a gene associated with conotruncal heart defects was found in a third patient. Two potentially pathogenic CNVs were found in a fourth patient: a large heterozygous deletion of chr6p24 and a smaller duplication of chr9p24. Our findings support a recent consensus statement advocating chromosomal microarray analysis as a first-line diagnostic approach for patients with multiple congenital anomalies. In patients with phenotypes suggestive of the 22q11.2 syndrome spectrum and normal FISH, microarray analysis can uncover the molecular basis of other genomic disorders whose features overlap those of 22q11.2 deletions. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Identification of the first gene (FRG1) from the FSHD region on human chromosome 4q35.

    PubMed

    van Deutekom, J C; Lemmers, R J; Grewal, P K; van Geel, M; Romberg, S; Dauwerse, H G; Wright, T J; Padberg, G W; Hofker, M H; Hewitt, J E; Frants, R R

    1996-05-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an autosomal dominant, neuromuscular disorder characterized by progressive weakness of muscles in the face, shoulder and upper arm. Deletion of integral copies of a 3.3 kb repeated unit from the subtelomeric region on chromosome 4q35 has been shown to be associated with FSHD. These repeated units which are apparently not transcribed, map very close to the 4q telomere and belong to a 3.3 kb repeat family dispersed over heterochromatic regions of the genome. Hence, position effect variegation (PEV), inducing allele-specific transcriptional repression of a gene located more centromeric, has been postulated as the underlying genetic mechanism of FSHD. This hypothesis has directed the search for the FSHD gene to the region centromeric to the repeated units. A CpG island was identified and found to be associated with the 5' untranslated region of a novel human gene, FRG1 (FSHD Region Gene 1). This evolutionary conserved gene is located about 100 kb proximal to the repeated units and belongs to a multigene family with FRG1 related sequences on multiple chromosomes. The mature chromosome 4 FRG1 transcript is 1042 bp in length and contains nine exons which encode a putative protein of 258 amino acid residues. Transcription of FRG1 was detected in several human tissues including placenta, lymphocytes, brain and muscle. To investigate a possible PEV mechanism, allele-specific FRG1 steady-state transcript levels were determined using RNA-based single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. A polymorphic fragment contained within the first exon of FRG1 was amplified from reverse transcribed RNA from lymphocytes and muscle biopsies of patients and controls. No evidence for PEV mediated repression of allelic transcription was obtained in these tissues. However, detection of PEV in FSHD patients may require analysis of more specific cell types at particular developmental stages.

  15. Cytogenetic and molecular delineation of the smallest commonly deleted region of chromosome 5 in malignant myeloid diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Le Beau, M M; Espinosa, R; Neuman, W L; Stock, W; Roulston, D; Larson, R A; Keinanen, M; Westbrook, C A

    1993-01-01

    Loss of a whole chromosome 5 or a deletion of its long arm (5q) is a recurring abnormality in malignant myeloid neoplasms. To determine the location of genes on 5q that may be involved in leukemogenesis, we examined the deleted chromosome 5 homologs in a series of 135 patients with malignant myeloid diseases. By comparing the breakpoints, we identified a small segment of 5q, consisting of band 5q31, that was deleted in each patient. This segment has been termed the critical region. Distal 5q contains a number of genes encoding growth factors, hormone receptors, and proteins involved in signal transduction or transcriptional regulation. These include several genes that are good candidates for a tumor-suppressor gene, as well as the genes encoding five hematopoietic growth factors (CSF2, IL3, IL4, IL5, and IL9). By using fluorescence in situ hybridization, we have refined the localization of these genes to 5q31.1 and have determined the order of these genes and of other markers within 5q31. By hybridizing probes to metaphase cells with overlapping deletions involving 5q31, we have narrowed the critical region to a small segment of 5q31 containing the EGR1 gene. The five hematopoietic growth factor genes and seven other genes are excluded from this region. The EGR1 gene was not deleted in nine other patients with acute myeloid leukemia who did not have abnormalities of chromosome 5. By physical mapping, the minimum size of the critical region was estimated to be 2.8 megabases. This cytogenetic map of 5q31, together with the molecular characterization of the critical region, will facilitate the identification of a putative tumor-suppressor gene in this band. PMID:8516290

  16. The gene for death agonist BID maps to the region of human 22q11.2 duplicated in cat eye syndrome chromosomes and to mouse chromosome 6.

    PubMed

    Footz, T K; Birren, B; Minoshima, S; Asakawa, S; Shimizu, N; Riazi, M A; McDermid, H E

    1998-08-01

    Cat eye syndrome (CES) is associated with a duplication of a segment of human chromosome 22q11.2. Only one gene, ATP6E, has been previously mapped to this duplicated region. We now report the mapping of the human homologue of the apoptotic agonist Bid to human chromosome 22 near locus D22S57 in the CES region. Dosage analysis demonstrated that BID is located just distal to the CES region critical for the majority of malformations associated with the syndrome (CESCR), as previously defined by a single patient with an unusual supernumerary chromosome. However, BID remains a good candidate for involvement in CES-related mental impairment, and its overexpression may subtly add to the phenotype of CES patients. Our mapping of murine Bid confirms that the synteny of the CESCR and the 22q11 deletion syndrome critical region immediately telomeric on human chromosome 22 is not conserved in mice. Bid and adjacent gene Atp6e were found to map to mousechromosome 6, while the region homologous to the DGSCR is known to map to mouse chromosome 16.

  17. Physical mapping in the Cri du Chat region on human chromosome 5

    SciTech Connect

    Church, D.M.; Bengtsson, U.; Niebuhr, E.

    1994-09-01

    The Cri du Chat syndrome is a segmental aneusomy associated with deletions in the short arm of human chromosome 5. More specifically, the cytogenetic band 5p15.2 must be deleted in order to manifest the typical phenotypic signs. We have studied several cell lines from individuals who have chromosomal abnormalities within this cytogenetic band but who do not have typical Cri du Chat syndrome. In fact, several individual studied have no discernible features of this syndrome. Using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis and PCR analysis on somatic cell hybrids we have mapped the breakpoints relative to each other within this band. There is a great degree of phenotypic heterogeneity between several of the patients, even those which share common breakpoints. This heterogeneity makes it very difficult to narrow the region of interest to a very small (<1 Mb) region. In order to more thoroughly analyze this region, we have assembled a yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contig of part of this region. This contig has been analyzed for STS content and covers approximately a 1.5-2.0 Mb region within 5p15.2. In addition, we have constructed a radiation hybrid map of the region. The YACs contained within the minimal contig have been used as hybridization probes to isolate corresponding cosmid clones within the region of interest. These cosmids, in turn, are being utilized to obtain potential exons using exon amplification. Several cosmids within this region have been isolated by STS content and potential exons have been isolated from them. These exons have been used as probes to isolate cDNA clones from the region. It is our hope that isolation of genes throughout the region of interest will allow a better understanding of the etiology of Cri du Chat.

  18. ENU mutation mapped to a distal region of chromosome 11 is a major determinant of bone size.

    PubMed

    Edderkaoui, Bouchra; Kesavan, Chandrasekhar; Baylink, David J; Wergedal, Jon E; Srivastava, Apurva K; Mohan, Subburaman

    2013-12-15

    Using a phenotype driven n-ethyl-nitrosourea (ENU) screen in growth hormone-deficient mice, we have identified a mutant (named 14104) that exhibited a smaller bone size. Phenotype measurements by microcomputed tomography revealed that mutant mice exhibited a 43 and 34% reduction in tissue area and bone area, respectively at the femur middiaphysis. Dynamic histomorphometry revealed a 30 and 15% lower bone formation rate at the periosteal and endosteal surface, respectively. Breaking strength of the femur was reduced by 30% in the mutant mice. To determine if the 14104 locus is involved in a mechanical loading signaling pathway, the skeletal anabolic response to tibia axial loading was evaluated. The increase in trabecular response in the loaded region was severely compromised by the 14014 mutation. To identify the location of mutation, we performed linkage analysis using 62 polymorphic markers in the B6-DBA/2J F2 mice. The genome-wide linkage analysis identified the location of the mutation to a 72 to 83 cM region on chromosome 11 with peak logarithm of the odds scores of 15 for periosteal circumference at marker D11mit338. Sequence analysis revealed no mutation in the coding region of 11 potential candidate genes. Based on these data and published data on the skeletal phenotype of genes in this region, we concluded that the 109-119 Mb region of chromosome 11 harbors a bone size gene that regulates periosteal bone formation. The mutant strain developed in this study provides an important tool to identify a novel mechanosensitive gene that determines bone size during postnatal development.

  19. A novel human phosphoglucomutase (PGM5) maps to the centromeric region of chromosome 9

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Y.H.; Putt, W.; Fox, M.; Ives, J.H.

    1995-11-20

    The phophoglucomutases (PGM1-3) in humans are surrounded by three genes, PGM1, PGM2, and PGM3. These enzymes are central to carbohydrate metabolism. All three isozymes show genetic variation, and PGM1 has achieved prominence as a key marker in genetic linkage mapping and in forensic science. The human PGM genes are assumed to have arisen by gene duplication since their products are broadly similar in structure and function; however, direct proof of their evolutionary relationship is not available because only PGM1 has been cloned. During a search for other members of the PGM family, a novel sequence with homology to PGM1 was identified. Mapping using fluorescence in situ hybridization and somatic cell hybrids locates this gene to the centromeric region of chromosome 9. RT-PCR and Northern analysis indicate that this is an expressed PGM gene with widespread distribution in adult and fetal tissues. We propose that this gene be designated PGM5 and that it represents a novel member of the PGM family. 19 refs., 2 figs.

  20. A Rare Duplication on Chromosome 16p11.2 Is Identified in Patients with Psychosis in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiaojing; Demirci, F. Yesim; Barmada, M. Michael; Richardson, Gale A.; Lopez, Oscar L.; Sweet, Robert A.; Kamboh, M. Ilyas; Feingold, Eleanor

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological and genetic studies suggest that schizophrenia and autism may share genetic links. Besides common single nucleotide polymorphisms, recent data suggest that some rare copy number variants (CNVs) are risk factors for both disorders. Because we have previously found that schizophrenia and psychosis in Alzheimer's disease (AD+P) share some genetic risk, we investigated whether CNVs reported in schizophrenia and autism are also linked to AD+P. We searched for CNVs associated with AD+P in 7 recurrent CNV regions that have been previously identified across autism and schizophrenia, using the Illumina HumanOmni1-Quad BeadChip. A chromosome 16p11.2 duplication CNV (chr16: 29,554,843-30,105,652) was identified in 2 of 440 AD+P subjects, but not in 136 AD subjects without psychosis, or in 593 AD subjects with intermediate psychosis status, or in 855 non-AD individuals. The frequency of this duplication CNV in AD+P (0.46%) was similar to that reported previously in schizophrenia (0.46%). This duplication CNV was further validated using the NanoString nCounter CNV Custom CodeSets. The 16p11.2 duplication has been associated with developmental delay, intellectual disability, behavioral problems, autism, schizophrenia (SCZ), and bipolar disorder. These two AD+P patients had no personal of, nor any identified family history of, SCZ, bipolar disorder and autism. To the best of our knowledge, our case report is the first suggestion that 16p11.2 duplication is also linked to AD+P. Although rare, this CNV may have an important role in the development of psychosis. PMID:25379732

  1. Genetic map of the spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) region on chromosome 12

    SciTech Connect

    Nechiporuk, A.; Frederick, T.; Pulst, S.M.

    1994-09-01

    The autosomal dominant ataxias (SCAs) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by progressive ataxia. At least four gene loci have been identified: SCA1 on chromosome (CHR) 6, SCA2 on CHR12, Machado-Joseph disease on CHR14, and SCA families that are not linked to any of the above loci. In addition, the gene causing dentato-rubro-pallido-luysian atrophy has been identified as an expanded CAG repeat on CHR 12p. As a necessary step in identifying the gene for SCA2, we now identified closer flanking markers. To do this we ordered microsatellite markers in the now identified closer flanking markers. To do this we ordered microsatellite markers in the region and then determined pairwise and multipoint lod scores between the markers and SCA2 in three large pedigrees with SCA. The following order was established with odds > 1,000:1 using six non-SCA pedigrees: D12S101-7.1cM-D12S58-0cM-IGF1-3.6cM-D12S78-1.4cM-D12S317-3.7cM-D12S84-0cM-D12S105-7.2cM-D12S79-7.0cM-PLA2. Using this ordered set of markers we examined linkage to SCA2 in three pedigrees of Italian, Austrian and French-Canadian descent. Pairwise linkage analysis resulted in significant positive lod scores for all markers. The highest pairwise lod score was obtained with D12S84/D12S105 (Z{sub max}=7.98, theta{sub max}=0.05). To further define the location of SCA2, we performed multipoint linkage analysis using the genetic map established above. The highest location score was obtained between D12S317 and D12S84/D12S105. A location of SCA2 between these loci was favored with odds > 100:1. These data likely narrow the SCA2 candidate region to approximately 3.7 cM. The relatively large large number of markers tightly linked to SCA2 will facilitate the assignment of additional SCA pedigrees to CHR12, and will help in the presymptomatic diagnosis of individuals in families with proven linkage to CHR12.

  2. Linkage Disequilibrium Mapping in Domestic Dog Breeds Narrows the Progressive Rod-Cone Degeneration (prcd) Interval and Identifies Ancestral Disease Transmitting Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Orly; Zangerl, Barbara; Pearce-Kelling, Sue; Sidjanin, Duska J.; Kijas, James W.; Felix, Jeanette; Acland, Gregory M; Aguirre, Gustavo D.

    2014-01-01

    Canine progressive rod-cone degeneration (prcd) is a retinal disease previously mapped to a broad, gene-rich centromeric region of canine chromosome 9. As allelic disorders are present in multiple breeds, we used linkage disequilibrium (LD) to narrow the ∼6.4 Mb interval candidate region. Multiple dog breeds, each representing genetically isolated populations, were typed for SNPs and other polymorphisms identified from BACs. The candidate region was initially localized to a 1.5 Mb zero recombination interval between growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (GRB2) and SEC14-like 1 (SEC14L). A fine-scale haplotype of the region was developed which reduced the LD interval to 106 Kb, and identified a conserved haplotype of 98 polymorphisms present in all prcd-affected chromosomes from 14 different dog breeds. The findings strongly suggest that a common ancestor transmitted the prcd disease allele to many of the modern dog breeds, and demonstrate the power of LD approach in the canine model. PMID:16859891

  3. Linkage disequilibrium mapping in domestic dog breeds narrows the progressive rod-cone degeneration interval and identifies ancestral disease-transmitting chromosome.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Orly; Zangerl, Barbara; Pearce-Kelling, Sue; Sidjanin, Duska J; Kijas, James W; Felix, Jeanette; Acland, Gregory M; Aguirre, Gustavo D

    2006-11-01

    Canine progressive rod-cone degeneration (prcd) is a retinal disease previously mapped to a broad, gene-rich centromeric region of canine chromosome 9. As allelic disorders are present in multiple breeds, we used linkage disequilibrium (LD) to narrow the approximately 6.4-Mb interval candidate region. Multiple dog breeds, each representing genetically isolated populations, were typed for SNPs and other polymorphisms identified from BACs. The candidate region was initially localized to a 1.5-Mb zero recombination interval between growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (GRB2) and SEC14-like 1 (SEC14L). A fine-scale haplotype of the region was developed, which reduced the LD interval to 106 kb and identified a conserved haplotype of 98 polymorphisms present in all prcd-affected chromosomes from 14 different dog breeds. The findings strongly suggest that a common ancestor transmitted the prcd disease allele to many of the modern dog breeds and demonstrate the power of the LD approach in the canine model.

  4. Composition and Structure of the Centromeric Region of Rice Chromosome 8W⃞

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianzhong; Yamagata, Harumi; Hayashi-Tsugane, Mika; Hijishita, Saori; Fujisawa, Masaki; Shibata, Michie; Ito, Yukiyo; Nakamura, Mari; Sakaguchi, Miyuki; Yoshihara, Rie; Kobayashi, Harumi; Ito, Kazue; Karasawa, Wataru; Yamamoto, Mayu; Saji, Shoko; Katagiri, Satoshi; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Namiki, Nobukazu; Katayose, Yuichi; Matsumoto, Takashi; Sasaki, Takuji

    2004-01-01

    Understanding the organization of eukaryotic centromeres has both fundamental and applied importance because of their roles in chromosome segregation, karyotypic stability, and artificial chromosome-based cloning and expression vectors. Using clone-by-clone sequencing methodology, we obtained the complete genomic sequence of the centromeric region of rice (Oryza sativa) chromosome 8. Analysis of 1.97 Mb of contiguous nucleotide sequence revealed three large clusters of CentO satellite repeats (68.5 kb of 155-bp repeats) and >220 transposable element (TE)–related sequences; together, these account for ∼60% of this centromeric region. The 155-bp repeats were tandemly arrayed head to tail within the clusters, which had different orientations and were interrupted by TE-related sequences. The individual 155-bp CentO satellite repeats showed frequent transitions and transversions at eight nucleotide positions. The 40 TE elements with highly conserved sequences were mostly gypsy-type retrotransposons. Furthermore, 48 genes, showing high BLAST homology to known proteins or to rice full-length cDNAs, were predicted within the region; some were close to the CentO clusters. We then performed a genome-wide survey of the sequences and organization of CentO and RIRE7 families. Our study provides the complete sequence of a centromeric region from either plants or animals and likely will provide insight into the evolutionary and functional analysis of plant centromeres. PMID:15037733

  5. Mapping of the chromosome 1p36 region surrounding the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2A locus

    SciTech Connect

    Denton, P.; Gere, S.; Wolpert, C.

    1994-09-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is the most common inherited peripheral neuropathy. Although CMT2 is clinically indistinguishable from CMT1, the two forms can be differentiated by pathological and neurophysiological methods. We have established one locus, CMT2A on chromosome 1p36, and have established genetic heterogeneity. This locus maps to the region of the deletions associated with neuroblastoma. We have now identified an additional 11 CMT2 families. Three families are linked to chromosome 1p36 while six families are excluded from this region. Another six families are currently under analysis and collection. To date the CMT2A families represent one third of those CMT2 families examined. We have established a microdissection library of the 1p36 region which is currently being characterized for microsatellite repeats and STSs using standard hybridization techniques and a modified degenerate primer method. In addition, new markers (D1S253, D1S450, D1S489, D1S503, GATA27E04, and GATA4H04) placed in this region are being mapped using critical recombinants in the CEPH reference pedigrees. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) has been used to confirm mapping. A YAC contig is being assembled from the CEPH megabase library using STSs to isolate key YACs which are extended by vectorette end clone and Alu-PCR. These findings suggest that the CMT2 phenotype is secondary to at least two different genes and demonstrates further heterogeneity in the CMT phenotype.

  6. Multicolor chromosome banding (MCB) with YAC/BAC-based probes and region-specific microdissection DNA libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Liehr, T.; Weise, A.; Heller, A.; Starke, H.; Mrasek, K.; Kuechler, A.; Weier, H.-U.G.; Claussen, U.

    2003-06-23

    Multicolor chromosome banding (MCB) allows the delineation of chromosomal regions with a resolution of a few mega base pairs, i.e., slightly below the size of most visible chromosome bands. Based on the hybridization of over lapping region-specific probe libraries, chromosomal subregions are hybridized with probes that fluoresce in distinct wave length intervals, so they can be assigned predefined pseudo-colors during the digital imaging and visualization process. The present study demonstrates how MCB patterns can be produced by region-specific micro dissection derived (mcd) libraries as well as collections of yeast or bacterial artificial chromosomes (YACs and BACs, respectively). We compared the efficiency of an mcd library based approach with the hybridization of collections of locus-specific probes (LSP) for fluorescent banding of three rather differently sized human chromosomes, i.e., chromosomes 2, 13, and 22. The LSP sets were comprised of 107 probes specific for chromosome 2, 82 probes for chromosome 13, and 31 probes for chromosome 22. The results demonstrated a more homogeneous coverage of chromosomes and thus, more desirable banding patterns using the microdissection library-based MCB. This may be related to the observation that chromosomes are difficult to cover completely with YAC and/or BAC clones as single-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments showed. Mcd libraries, on the other hand, provide high complexity probes that work well as region specific paints, but do not readily allow positioning of break points on genetic or physical maps as required for the positional cloning of genes. Thus, combinations of mcd libraries and locus-specific large insert DNA probes appear to be the most efficient tools for high-resolution cytogenetic analyses.

  7. Fluorescent in situ hybridization shows DIPLOSPOROUS located on one of the NOR chromosomes in apomictic dandelions (Taraxacum) in the absence of a large hemizygous chromosomal region.

    PubMed

    Vašut, Radim J; Vijverberg, Kitty; van Dijk, Peter J; de Jong, Hans

    2014-11-01

    Apomixis in dandelions (Taraxacum: Asteraceae) is encoded by two unlinked dominant loci and a third yet undefined genetic factor: diplosporous omission of meiosis (DIPLOSPOROUS, DIP), parthenogenetic embryo development (PARTHENOGENESIS, PAR), and autonomous endosperm formation, respectively. In this study, we determined the chromosomal position of the DIP locus in Taraxacum by using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) that genetically map within 1.2-0.2 cM of DIP. The BACs showed dispersed fluorescent signals, except for S4-BAC 83 that displayed strong unique signals as well. Under stringent blocking of repeats by C0t-DNA fragments, only a few fluorescent foci restricted to defined chromosome regions remained, including one on the nucleolus organizer region (NOR) chromosomes that contains the 45S rDNAs. FISH with S4-BAC 83 alone and optimal blocking showed discrete foci in the middle of the long arm of one of the NOR chromosomes only in triploid and tetraploid diplosporous dandelions, while signals in sexual diploids were lacking. This agrees with the genetic model of a single dose, dominant DIP allele, absent in sexuals. The length of the DIP region is estimated to cover a region of 1-10 Mb. FISH in various accessions of Taraxacum and the apomictic sister species Chondrilla juncea, confirmed the chromosomal position of DIP within Taraxacum but not outside the genus. Our results endorse that, compared to other model apomictic species, expressing either diplospory or apospory, the genome of Taraxacum shows a more similar and less diverged chromosome structure at the DIP locus. The different levels of allele sequence divergence at apomeiosis loci may reflect different terms of asexual reproduction. The association of apomeiosis loci with repetitiveness, dispersed repeats, and retrotransposons commonly observed in apomictic species may imply a functional role of these shared features in apomictic reproduction, as is

  8. Genomewide Linkage Study in 1,176 Affected Sister Pair Families Identifies a Significant Susceptibility Locus for Endometriosis on Chromosome 10q26

    PubMed Central

    Treloar, Susan A.; Wicks, Jacqueline; Nyholt, Dale R.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Bahlo, Melanie; Smith, Vicki; Dawson, Gary; Mackay, Ian J.; Weeks, Daniel E.; Bennett, Simon T.; Carey, Alisoun; Ewen-White, Kelly R.; Duffy, David L.; O’Connor, Daniel T.; Barlow, David H.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Kennedy, Stephen H.

    2005-01-01

    Endometriosis is a common gynecological disease that affects up to 10% of women in their reproductive years. It causes pelvic pain, severe dysmenorrhea, and subfertility. The disease is defined as the presence of tissue resembling endometrium in sites outside the uterus. Its cause remains uncertain despite >50 years of hypothesis-driven research, and thus the therapeutic options are limited. Disease predisposition is inherited as a complex genetic trait, which provides an alternative route to understanding the disease. We seek to identify susceptibility loci, using a positional-cloning approach that starts with linkage analysis to identify genomic regions likely to harbor these genes. We conducted a linkage study of 1,176 families (931 from an Australian group and 245 from a U.K. group), each with at least two members—mainly affected sister pairs—with surgically diagnosed disease. We have identified a region of significant linkage on chromosome 10q26 (maximum LOD score [MLS] of 3.09; genomewide P = .047) and another region of suggestive linkage on chromosome 20p13 (MLS = 2.09). Minor peaks (with MLS > 1.0) were found on chromosomes 2, 6, 7, 8, 12, 14, 15, and 17. This is the first report of linkage to a major locus for endometriosis. The findings will facilitate discovery of novel positional genetic variants that influence the risk of developing this debilitating disease. Greater understanding of the aberrant cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the etiology and pathophysiology of endometriosis should lead to better diagnostic methods and targeted treatments. PMID:16080113

  9. Role of the tau gene region chromosome inversion in progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration, and related disorders.

    PubMed

    Webb, Amy; Miller, Bruce; Bonasera, Stephen; Boxer, Adam; Karydas, Anna; Wilhelmsen, Kirk C

    2008-11-01

    An inverted region on chromosome 17 has been previously linked to many Pick complex diseases. Due to the inversion, an exact causal locus has been difficult to identify, but the microtubule-associated protein tau gene is a likely candidate gene for its involvement in these diseases with tau inclusion. To search for variants that confer susceptibility to 4 tauopathies and clinically related disorders. Genomewide association study. University research laboratory. A total of 231 samples were genotyped from an unrelated white population of patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), corticobasal degeneration (CBD), frontotemporal dementia, and frontotemporal dementia with amyotrophy. Unaffected individuals from the same population were used as controls. The results from an inverted region of chromosome 17 that contains the MAPT gene. Genotypes of cases and controls were compared using a Fisher exact test on a marker-by-marker basis. Haplotypes were determined by visually inspecting genotypes. Comparing any particular disease and controls, the association was constant across the inverted chromosome segment. Significant associations were seen for PSP and PSP combined with CBD. Of the 2 haplotypes seen in the region, H1 was overrepresented in PSP and CBD cases compared with controls. As expected, the markers are highly correlated and the association is seen across the entire region, which makes it difficult to narrow down a disease-causing variant or even a possible candidate gene. However, considering the pathologic abnormalities of these diseases and the involvement of tau mutations seen in familial forms, the MAPT gene represents the most likely cause driving the association.

  10. Nucleolar organizer regions in Sittasomus griseicapillus and Lepidocolaptes angustirostris (Aves, Dendrocolaptidae): Evidence of a chromosome inversion.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Barbosa, Marcelo; da Silva, Rubens Rodrigues; de Sena Correia, Vanessa Carolina; Dos Santos, Luana Pereira; Garnero, Analía Del Valle; Gunski, Ricardo José

    2013-03-01

    Cytogenetic studies in birds are still scarce compared to other vertebrates. Woodcreepers (Dendrocolaptidae) are part of a highly specialized group within the Suboscines of the New World. They are forest birds exclusive to the Neotropical region and similar to woodpeckers, at a comparable evolutionary stage. This paper describes for the first time the karyotypes of the Olivaceous and the Narrow-billed Woodcreeper using conventional staining with Giemsa and silver nitrate staining of the nucleolar organizer regions (Ag-NORs). Metaphases were obtained by fibular bone marrow culture. The chromosome number of the Olivaceous Woodcreeper was 2n = 82 and of the Narrow-billed Woodcreeper, 2n = 82. Ag-NORs in the largest macrochromosome pair and evidence of a chromosome inversion are described herein for the first time for this group.

  11. Nucleolar organizer regions in Sittasomus griseicapillus and Lepidocolaptes angustirostris (Aves, Dendrocolaptidae): Evidence of a chromosome inversion

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira Barbosa, Marcelo; da Silva, Rubens Rodrigues; de Sena Correia, Vanessa Carolina; dos Santos, Luana Pereira; Garnero, Analía del Valle; Gunski, Ricardo José

    2013-01-01

    Cytogenetic studies in birds are still scarce compared to other vertebrates. Woodcreepers (Dendrocolaptidae) are part of a highly specialized group within the Suboscines of the New World. They are forest birds exclusive to the Neotropical region and similar to woodpeckers, at a comparable evolutionary stage. This paper describes for the first time the karyotypes of the Olivaceous and the Narrow-billed Woodcreeper using conventional staining with Giemsa and silver nitrate staining of the nucleolar organizer regions (Ag-NORs). Metaphases were obtained by fibular bone marrow culture. The chromosome number of the Olivaceous Woodcreeper was 2n = 82 and of the Narrow-billed Woodcreeper, 2n = 82. Ag-NORs in the largest macrochromosome pair and evidence of a chromosome inversion are described herein for the first time for this group. PMID:23569410

  12. [Comparative Analysis of DNA Homology in Pericentric Regions of Chromosomes of Wood Mice from Genera Apodemus and Sylvaemus].

    PubMed

    Rubtsov, N B; Karamysheva, T V; Bogdanov, A S; Kartavtseva, I V; Bochkarev, M N; Iwasa, M A

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, an analysis of the DNA homology of the pericentric chromosomal regions and pericentric heterochromatin in distantly related species of wood mice (species from the Apodemus genus, as well as from the Apodemus and Sylvaemus genera) was conducted by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with microdissected DNA probes obtained from the corresponding chromosomal regions of these species. Cross-hybridization of microdissected DNA probes obtained from pericentric C-positive blocks of chromosomes of Sylvaemus species with chromosomes of Apodemus species, as well as DNA probes from pericentric C-positive blocks of chromosomes of Apodemus species with chromosomes of Apodemus and Sylvaemus species, showed that DNA repeats homologous to the pericentric regions in other species represented. dispersed repeats in C-negative chromosomal regions, as well as in several regions bordering pericentric C-positive and C-negative regions in heterochromosomes and autosomes and in distal regions in the long arms of several autosomes. The results indicate that the level of DNA homology in pericentric chromosomal regions decreases with an increase in the differentiation level and a decrease in the kinship between the compared forms and species of wood mice. Most likely, degeneration of the DNA repeats is accompanied by a gradual destruction of repeat clusters and their replacement by new, nonhomologous repeats in almost all pericentric regions (some old repetitive sequences might be "extruded" into interstitial or telomeric regions of chromosomes). These processes, which are observed in some species from Sylvaemus genus in distantly related species of Sylvaemus and Apodemus genera, have almost achieved the final stages.

  13. Identification of a short region on chromosome 6 affecting direct calving ease in Piedmontese cattle breed.

    PubMed

    Bongiorni, Silvia; Mancini, Giordano; Chillemi, Giovanni; Pariset, Lorraine; Valentini, Alessio

    2012-01-01

    Calving in cattle is affected by calf morphology and by dam characteristics. It is described by two different traits: maternal calving ease, which is the ability to generate dams with good physiological predisposition to calving, and direct calving ease, which is the ability to generate calves that are easily born. The aim of this study was to identify regions of cattle genome harboring genes possibly affecting direct calving ease in the Piedmontese cattle breed. A population of 323 bulls scored for direct calving ease (EBV) was analyzed by a medium-density SNP marker panel (54,001 SNPs) to perform a genome-wide scan. The strongest signal was detected on chromosome 6 between 37.8 and 38.7 Mb where 13 SNPs associated to direct calving ease were found. Three genes are located in this region: LAP3, encoding for a leucine aminopeptidase involved in the oxytocin hydrolysis; NCAPG, encoding for a non-SMC condensin I complex, which has been associated in cattle with fetal growth and carcass size; and LCORL, which has been associated to height in humans and cattle. To further confirm the results of the genome-wide scan we genotyped additional SNPs within these genes and analyzed their association with direct calving ease. The results of this additional analysis fully confirmed the findings of the GWAS and particularly indicated LAP3 as the most probable gene involved. Linkage Disequilibrium (LD) analysis showed high correlation between SNPs located within LAP3 and LCORL indicating a possible selection signature due either to increased fitness or breeders' selection for the trait.

  14. Fine structure mapping of a gene-rich region of wheat carrying Ph1, a suppressor of crossing over between homoeologous chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Sidhu, Gaganpreet K.; Rustgi, Sachin; Shafqat, Mustafa N.; von Wettstein, Diter; Gill, Kulvinder S.

    2008-01-01

    The wheat gene-rich region (GRR) 5L0.5 contains many important genes, including Ph1, the principal regulator of chromosome pairing. Comparative marker analysis identified 32 genes for the GRR controlling important agronomic traits. Detailed characterization of this region was accomplished by first physically localizing 213 wheat group 5L-specific markers, using group 5 nulli-tetrasomics, three Ph1 gene deletion/insertion mutants, and nine terminal deletion lines with their breakpoints around the 5L0.5 region. The Ph1 gene was localized to a much smaller region within the GRR (Ph1 gene region). Of the 61 markers that mapped in the four subregions of the GRR, 9 mapped in the Ph1 gene region. High stringency sequence comparison (e < 1 ×10−25) of 157 group 5L-specific wheat ESTs identified orthologs for 80% sequences in rice and 71% in Arabidopsis. Rice orthologs were present on all rice chromosomes, although most (34%) were on rice chromosome 9 (R9). No single collinear region was identified in Arabidopsis even for a smaller region, such as the Ph1 gene region. Seven of the nine Ph1 gene region markers mapped within a 450-kb region on R9 with the same gene order. Detailed domain/motif analysis of the 91 putative genes present in the 450-kb region identified 26 candidates for the Ph1 gene, including genes involved in chromatin reorganization, microtubule attachment, acetyltransferases, methyltransferases, DNA binding, and meiosis/anther specific proteins. Five of these genes shared common domains/motifs with the meiosis specific genes Zip1, Scp1, Cor1, RAD50, RAD51, and RAD57. Wheat and Arabidopsis homologs for these rice genes were identified. PMID:18398005

  15. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of a novel gene DGCR8 located in the DiGeorge syndrome chromosomal region.

    PubMed

    Shiohama, Aiko; Sasaki, Takashi; Noda, Setsuko; Minoshima, Shinsei; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi

    2003-04-25

    We have identified and cloned a novel gene (DGCR8) from the human chromosome 22q11.2. This gene is located in the DiGeorge syndrome chromosomal region (DGCR). It consists of 14 exons spanning over 35kb and produces transcripts with ORF of 2322bp, encoding a protein of 773 amino acids. We also isolated a mouse ortholog Dgcr8 and found it has 95.3% identity with human DGCR8 at the amino acid sequence level. Northern blot analysis of human and mouse tissues from adult and fetus showed rather ubiquitous expression. However, the in situ hybridization of mouse embryos revealed that mouse Dgcr8 transcripts are localized in neuroepithelium of primary brain, limb bud, vessels, thymus, and around the palate during the developmental stages of embryos. The expression profile of Dgcr8 in developing mouse embryos is consistent with the clinical phenotypes including congenital heart defects and palate clefts associated with DiGeorge syndrome (DGS)/conotruncal anomaly face syndrome (CAFS)/velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), which are caused by monoallelic microdeletion of chromosome 22q11.2.

  16. Assembly and analysis of cosmid contigs in the CEA-gene family region of human chromosome 19.

    PubMed Central

    Tynan, K; Olsen, A; Trask, B; de Jong, P; Thompson, J; Zimmermann, W; Carrano, A; Mohrenweiser, H

    1992-01-01

    The carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-like genes are members of a large gene family which is part of the immunoglobulin superfamily. The CEA family is divided into two major subgroups, the CEA-subgroup and the pregnancy-specific glycoprotein (PSG)-subgroup. In the course of an effort to develop a set of overlapping cosmids spanning human chromosome 19, we identified 245 cosmids in a human chromosome 19 cosmid library (6-7X redundant) by hybridization with an IgC-like domain fragment of the CEA gene. A fluorescence-based restriction enzyme digest fingerprinting strategy was used to assemble 212 probe-positive cosmids, along with 115 additional cosmids from a collection of approximately 8,000 randomly selected cosmids, into five contigs. Two of the contigs contain CEA-subgroup genes while the remaining three contigs contain PSG-subgroup genes. These five contigs range in size from 100 kb to over 300 kb and span an estimated 1 Mb. The CEA-like gene family was determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization to map in the q13.1-q13.2 region of human chromosome 19. Analysis of the two CEA-subgroup contigs provided verification of the contig assembly strategy and insight into the organization of 9 CEA-subgroup genes. PMID:1579453

  17. Interchromosomal core duplicons drive both evolutionary instability and disease susceptibility of the Chromosome 8p23.1 region

    PubMed Central

    Mohajeri, Kiana; Cantsilieris, Stuart; Huddleston, John; Nelson, Bradley J.; Coe, Bradley P.; Campbell, Catarina D.; Baker, Carl; Harshman, Lana; Munson, Katherine M.; Kronenberg, Zev N.; Kremitzki, Milinn; Raja, Archana; Catacchio, Claudia Rita; Graves, Tina A.; Wilson, Richard K.; Ventura, Mario; Eichler, Evan E.

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent rearrangements of Chromosome 8p23.1 are associated with congenital heart defects and developmental delay. The complexity of this region has led to inconsistencies in the current reference assembly, confounding studies of genetic variation. Using comparative sequence-based approaches, we generated a high-quality 6.3-Mbp alternate reference assembly of an inverted Chromosome 8p23.1 haplotype. Comparison with nonhuman primates reveals a 746-kbp duplicative transposition and two separate inversion events that arose in the last million years of human evolution. The breakpoints associated with these rearrangements map to an ape-specific interchromosomal core duplicon that clusters at sites of evolutionary inversion (P = 7.8 × 10−5). Refinement of microdeletion breakpoints identifies a subgroup of patients that map to the same interchromosomal core involved in the evolutionary formation of the duplication blocks. Our results define a higher-order genomic instability element that has shaped the structure of specific chromosomes during primate evolution contributing to rearrangements associated with inversion and disease. PMID:27803192

  18. Co-regulation analysis of closely linked genes identifies a highly recurrent gain on chromosome 17q25.3 in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bermudo, Raquel; Abia, David; Ferrer, Berta; Nayach, Iracema; Benguria, Alberto; Zaballos, Ángel; del Rey, Javier; Miró, Rosa; Campo, Elías; Martínez-A, Carlos; Ortiz, Ángel R; Fernández, Pedro L; Thomson, Timothy M

    2008-01-01

    Background Transcriptional profiling of prostate cancer (PC) has unveiled new markers of neoplasia and allowed insights into mechanisms underlying this disease. Genomewide analyses have also identified new chromosomal abnormalities associated with PC. The combination of both classes of data for the same sample cohort might provide better criteria for identifying relevant factors involved in neoplasia. Here we describe transcriptional signatures identifying distinct normal and tumoral prostate tissue compartments, and the inference and demonstration of a new, highly recurrent copy number gain on chromosome 17q25.3. Methods We have applied transcriptional profiling to tumoral and non-tumoral prostate samples with relatively homogeneous epithelial representations as well as pure stromal tissue from peripheral prostate and cultured cell lines, followed by quantitative RT-PCR validations and immunohistochemical analysis. In addition, we have performed in silico colocalization analysis of co-regulated genes and validation by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Results The transcriptomic analysis has allowed us to identify signatures corresponding to non-tumoral luminal and tumoral epithelium, basal epithelial cells, and prostate stromal tissue. In addition, in silico analysis of co-regulated expression of physically linked genes has allowed us to predict the occurrence of a copy number gain at chromosomal region 17q25.3. This computational inference was validated by fluorescent in situ hybridization, which showed gains in this region in over 65% of primary and metastatic tumoral samples. Conclusion Our approach permits to directly link gene copy number variations with transcript co-regulation in association with neoplastic states. Therefore, transcriptomic studies of carefully selected samples can unveil new diagnostic markers and transcriptional signatures highly specific of PC, and lead to the discovery of novel genomic abnormalities that may provide additional

  19. Augmenting Chinese hamster genome assembly by identifying regions of high confidence.

    PubMed

    Vishwanathan, Nandita; Bandyopadhyay, Arpan A; Fu, Hsu-Yuan; Sharma, Mohit; Johnson, Kathryn C; Mudge, Joann; Ramaraj, Thiruvarangan; Onsongo, Getiria; Silverstein, Kevin A T; Jacob, Nitya M; Le, Huong; Karypis, George; Hu, Wei-Shou

    2016-09-01

    Chinese hamster Ovary (CHO) cell lines are the dominant industrial workhorses for therapeutic recombinant protein production. The availability of genome sequence of Chinese hamster and CHO cells will spur further genome and RNA sequencing of producing cell lines. However, the mammalian genomes assembled using shot-gun sequencing data still contain regions of uncertain quality due to assembly errors. Identifying high confidence regions in the assembled genome will facilitate its use for cell engineering and genome engineering. We assembled two independent drafts of Chinese hamster genome by de novo assembly from shotgun sequencing reads and by re-scaffolding and gap-filling the draft genome from NCBI for improved scaffold lengths and gap fractions. We then used the two independent assemblies to identify high confidence regions using two different approaches. First, the two independent assemblies were compared at the sequence level to identify their consensus regions as "high confidence regions" which accounts for at least 78 % of the assembled genome. Further, a genome wide comparison of the Chinese hamster scaffolds with mouse chromosomes revealed scaffolds with large blocks of collinearity, which were also compiled as high-quality scaffolds. Genome scale collinearity was complemented with EST based synteny which also revealed conserved gene order compared to mouse. As cell line sequencing becomes more commonly practiced, the approaches reported here are useful for assessing the quality of assembly and potentially facilitate the engineering of cell lines. Copyright © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Analysis of tandem gene copies in maize chromosomal regions reconstructed from long sequence reads.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jiaqiang; Feng, Yaping; Kumar, Dibyendu; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Tingting; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Messing, Joachim

    2016-07-19

    Haplotype variation not only involves SNPs but also insertions and deletions, in particular gene copy number variations. However, comparisons of individual genomes have been difficult because traditional sequencing methods give too short reads to unambiguously reconstruct chromosomal regions containing repetitive DNA sequences. An example of such a case is the protein gene family in maize that acts as a sink for reduced nitrogen in the seed. Previously, 41-48 gene copies of the alpha zein gene family that spread over six loci spanning between 30- and 500-kb chromosomal regions have been described in two Iowa Stiff Stalk (SS) inbreds. Analyses of those regions were possible because of overlapping BAC clones, generated by an expensive and labor-intensive approach. Here we used single-molecule real-time (Pacific Biosciences) shotgun sequencing to assemble the six chromosomal regions from the Non-Stiff Stalk maize inbred W22 from a single DNA sequence dataset. To validate the reconstructed regions, we developed an optical map (BioNano genome map; BioNano Genomics) of W22 and found agreement between the two datasets. Using the sequences of full-length cDNAs from W22, we found that the error rate of PacBio sequencing seemed to be less than 0.1% after autocorrection and assembly. Expressed genes, some with premature stop codons, are interspersed with nonexpressed genes, giving rise to genotype-specific expression differences. Alignment of these regions with those from the previous analyzed regions of SS lines exhibits in part dramatic differences between these two heterotic groups.

  1. Strategies for identifying statistically significant dense regions in microarray data.

    PubMed

    Yip, Andy M; Ng, Michael K; Wu, Edmond H; Chan, Tony F

    2007-01-01

    We propose and study the notion of dense regions for the analysis of categorized gene expression data and present some searching algorithms for discovering them. The algorithms can be applied to any categorical data matrices derived from gene expression level matrices. We demonstrate that dense regions are simple but useful and statistically significant patterns that can be used to 1) identify genes and/or samples of interest and 2) eliminate genes and/or samples corresponding to outliers, noise, or abnormalities. Some theoretical studies on the properties of the dense regions are presented which allow us to characterize dense regions into several classes and to derive tailor-made algorithms for different classes of regions. Moreover, an empirical simulation study on the distribution of the size of dense regions is carried out which is then used to assess the significance of dense regions and to derive effective pruning methods to speed up the searching algorithms. Real microarray data sets are employed to test our methods. Comparisons with six other well-known clustering algorithms using synthetic and real data are also conducted which confirm the superiority of our methods in discovering dense regions. The DRIFT code and a tutorial are available as supplemental material, which can be found on the Computer Society Digital Library at http://computer.org/tcbb/archives.htm.

  2. Metabolic and Molecular Changes of the Phenylpropanoid Pathway in Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) Lines Carrying Different Solanum pennellii Wild Chromosomal Regions

    PubMed Central

    Rigano, Maria Manuela; Raiola, Assunta; Docimo, Teresa; Ruggieri, Valentino; Calafiore, Roberta; Vitaglione, Paola; Ferracane, Rosalia; Frusciante, Luigi; Barone, Amalia

    2016-01-01

    Solanum lycopersicum represents an important dietary source of bioactive compounds including the antioxidants flavonoids and phenolic acids. We previously identified two genotypes (IL7-3 and IL12-4) carrying loci from the wild species Solanum pennellii, which increased antioxidants in the fruit. Successively, these lines were crossed and two genotypes carrying both introgressions at the homozygous condition (DHO88 and DHO88-SL) were selected. The amount of total antioxidant compounds was increased in DHOs compared to both ILs and the control genotype M82. In order to understand the genetic mechanisms underlying the positive interaction between the two wild regions pyramided in DHO genotypes, detailed analyses of the metabolites accumulated in the fruit were carried out by colorimetric methods and LC/MS/MS. These analyses evidenced a lower content of flavonoids in DHOs and in ILs, compared to M82. By contrast, in the DHOs the relative content of phenolic acids increased, particularly the fraction of hexoses, thus evidencing a redirection of the phenylpropanoid flux toward the biosynthesis of phenolic acid glycosides in these genotypes. In addition, the line DHO88 exhibited a lower content of free phenolic acids compared to M82. Interestingly, the two DHOs analyzed differ in the size of the wild region on chromosome 12. Genes mapping in the introgression regions were further investigated. Several genes of the phenylpropanoid biosynthetic pathway were identified, such as one 4-coumarate:CoA ligase and two UDP-glycosyltransferases in the region 12-4 and one chalcone isomerase and one UDP-glycosyltransferase in the region 7-3. Transcriptomic analyses demonstrated a different expression of the detected genes in the ILs and in the DHOs compared to M82. These analyses, combined with biochemical analyses, suggested a central role of the 4-coumarate:CoA ligase in redirecting the phenylpropanoid pathways toward the biosynthesis of phenolic acids in the pyramided lines

  3. A genome-wide association study of chronic otitis media with effusion and recurrent otitis media identifies a novel susceptibility locus on chromosome 2.

    PubMed

    Allen, E Kaitlynn; Chen, Wei-Min; Weeks, Daniel E; Chen, Fang; Hou, Xuanlin; Mattos, José L; Mychaleckyj, Josyf C; Segade, Fernando; Casselbrant, Margaretha L; Mandel, Ellen M; Ferrell, Robert E; Rich, Stephen S; Daly, Kathleen A; Sale, Michèle M

    2013-12-01

    Chronic otitis media with effusion (COME) and recurrent otitis media (ROM) have been shown to be heritable, but candidate gene and linkage studies to date have been equivocal. Our aim was to identify genetic susceptibility factors using a genome-wide association study (GWAS). We genotyped 602 subjects from 143 families with 373 COME/ROM subjects using the Illumina Human CNV370-Duo DNA Bead Chip (324,748 SNPs). We carried out the GWAS scan and imputed SNPs at the regions with the most significant associations. Replication genotyping in an independent family-based sample was conducted for 53 SNPs: the 41 most significant SNPs with P < 10(-4) and 12 imputed SNPs with P < 10(-4) on chromosome 15 (near the strongest signal). We replicated the association of rs10497394 (GWAS discovery P = 1.30 × 10(-5)) on chromosome 2 in the independent otitis media population (P = 4.7 × 10(-5); meta-analysis P = 1.52 × 10(-8)). Three additional SNPs had replication P values < 0.10. Two were on chromosome 15q26.1 including rs1110060, the strongest association with COME/ROM in the primary GWAS (P = 3.4 ×10(-7)) in KIF7 intron 7 (P = 0.072), and rs10775247, a non-synonymous SNP in TICRR exon 2 (P = 0.075). The third SNP rs386057 was on chromosome 5 in TPPP intron 1 (P = 0.045). We have performed the first GWAS of COME/ROM and have identified a SNP rs10497394 on chromosome 2 is significantly associated with COME/ROM susceptibility. This SNP is within a 537 kb intergenic region, bordered by CDCA7 and SP3. The genomic and functional significance of this newly identified locus in COME/ROM pathogenesis requires additional investigation.

  4. Identifying Ionized Regions in Noisy Redshifted 21 cm Data Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malloy, Matthew; Lidz, Adam

    2013-04-01

    One of the most promising approaches for studying reionization is to use the redshifted 21 cm line. Early generations of redshifted 21 cm surveys will not, however, have the sensitivity to make detailed maps of the reionization process, and will instead focus on statistical measurements. Here, we show that it may nonetheless be possible to directly identify ionized regions in upcoming data sets by applying suitable filters to the noisy data. The locations of prominent minima in the filtered data correspond well with the positions of ionized regions. In particular, we corrupt semi-numeric simulations of the redshifted 21 cm signal during reionization with thermal noise at the level expected for a 500 antenna tile version of the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), and mimic the degrading effects of foreground cleaning. Using a matched filter technique, we find that the MWA should be able to directly identify ionized regions despite the large thermal noise. In a plausible fiducial model in which ~20% of the volume of the universe is neutral at z ~ 7, we find that a 500-tile MWA may directly identify as many as ~150 ionized regions in a 6 MHz portion of its survey volume and roughly determine the size of each of these regions. This may, in turn, allow interesting multi-wavelength follow-up observations, comparing galaxy properties inside and outside of ionized regions. We discuss how the optimal configuration of radio antenna tiles for detecting ionized regions with a matched filter technique differs from the optimal design for measuring power spectra. These considerations have potentially important implications for the design of future redshifted 21 cm surveys.

  5. Assembling the Setaria italica L. Beauv. genome into nine chromosomes and insights into regions affecting growth and drought tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Kevin J.; Lu, Mei-Yeh Jade; Yang, Kai-Jung; Li, Mengyun; Teng, Yuchuan; Chen, Shihmay; Ku, Maurice S. B.; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2016-01-01

    The diploid C4 plant foxtail millet (Setaria italica L. Beauv.) is an important crop in many parts of Africa and Asia for the vast consumption of its grain and ability to grow in harsh environments, but remains understudied in terms of complete genomic architecture. To date, there have been only two genome assembly and annotation efforts with neither assembly reaching over 86% of the estimated genome size. We have combined de novo assembly with custom reference-guided improvements on a popular cultivar of foxtail millet and have achieved a genome assembly of 477 Mbp in length, which represents over 97% of the estimated 490 Mbp. The assembly anchors over 98% of the predicted genes to the nine assembled nuclear chromosomes and contains more functional annotation gene models than previous assemblies. Our annotation has identified a large number of unique gene ontology terms related to metabolic activities, a region of chromosome 9 with several growth factor proteins, and regions syntenic with pearl millet or maize genomic regions that have been previously shown to affect growth. The new assembly and annotation for this important species can be used for detailed investigation and future innovations in growth for millet and other grains. PMID:27734962

  6. YAC contigs of the Rab1 and wobbler (wr) spinal muscular atrophy gene region on proximal mouse chromosome 11 and of the homologous region on human chromosome 2p

    SciTech Connect

    Wedemeyer, N.; Lengeling, A.; Ronsiek, M.

    1996-03-05

    Despite rapid progress in the physical characterization of murine and human genomes, little molecular information is available on certain regions, e.g., proximal mouse chromosome 11 (Chr 11) and human chromosome 2p (Chr2p). We have localized the wobbler spinal atrophy gene wr to proximal mouse Chr 11, tightly linked to Rab1, a gene coding for a small GTP-binding protein, and Glns-ps1, an intronless pseudogene of the glutamine synthetase gene. We have not used these markers to construct a 1.3-Mb yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contig of the Rab1 region on mouse Chr 11. Four YAC clones isolated from two independent YAC libraries were characterized by rare-cutting analysis, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and sequence-tagged site (STS) isolation and mapping. Rab1 and Glns-ps1 were found to be only 200 kb apart. A potential CpG island near a methylated NarI site and a trapped exon, ETG1.1, were found over 250 kb from Rab1. Two overlapping YACs were identified that contained a 150-kb region of human Chr 2p, comprising the RAB1 locus, AHY1.1, and the human homologue of ETG1.1, indicating a high degree of conservation of this region in the two species. We mapped AHY1.1 and thus human RAB1 on Chr 2p13.4-p14 using somatic cell hybrids and a radiation hybrid panel, thus extending a known region of conserved synteny between mouse Chr 11 and human Chr 2p. Recently, the gene LMGMD2B for a human recessive neuromuscular disease, limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B, has been mapped to 2p13-p16. The conservation between the mouse Rab1 and human RAB1 regions will be helpful in identifying candidate genes for the wobbler spinal muscular atrophy and in clarifying a possible relationship between wr and LMGMD2B. 33 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Evidence for linkage of a candidate chromosome 1 region to human systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, B P; Cantor, R M; Kalunian, K C; Chen, C J; Badsha, H; Singh, R; Wallace, D J; Kitridou, R C; Chen, S L; Shen, N; Song, Y W; Isenberg, D A; Yu, C L; Hahn, B H; Rotter, J I

    1997-01-01

    Genetic susceptibility confers significant risk for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The MHC region and other polymorphic loci have been associated with SLE. Because more compelling evidence for an involvement of a genetic locus includes linkage, we tested a candidate region homologous to a murine SLE susceptibility region in 52 SLE-affected sibpairs from three ethnic groups. We analyzed seven microsatellite markers from the human chromosome 1q31-q42 region corresponding to the telomeric end of mouse chromosome 1, the region where specific manifestations of murine lupus, including glomerulonephritis and IgG antichromatin, have been mapped. Comparing the mean allele sharing in affected sibpairs of each of these seven markers to their expected values of 0.50, only the five markers located at 1q41-q42 showed evidence for linkage (P = 0.0005-0.08). Serum levels of IgG antichromatin also showed evidence for linkage to two of these five markers (P = 0.04), suggesting that this phenotype is conserved between mice and humans. Compared to the expected random distribution, the trend of increased sharing of haplotypes was observed in affected sibpairs from three ethnic groups (P < 0.01). We concluded that this candidate 1q41-q42 region probably contains a susceptibility gene(s) that confers risk for SLE in multiple ethnic groups. PMID:9045876

  8. Genomic structure and evolution of the ancestral chromosome fusion site in 2q13-2q14.1 and paralogous regions on other human chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yuxin; Linardopoulou, Elena; Friedman, Cynthia; Williams, Eleanor; Trask, Barbara J

    2002-11-01

    Human chromosome 2 was formed by the head-to-head fusion of two ancestral chromosomes that remained separate in other primates. Sequences that once resided near the ends of the ancestral chromosomes are now interstitially located in 2q13-2q14.1. Portions of these sequences had duplicated to other locations prior to the fusion. Here we present analyses of the genomic structure and evolutionary history of >600 kb surrounding the fusion site and closely related sequences on other human chromosomes. Sequence blocks that closely flank the inverted arrays of degenerate telomere repeats marking the fusion site are duplicated at many, primarily subtelomeric, locations. In addition, large portions of a 168-kb centromere-proximal block are duplicated at 9pter, 9p11.2, and 9q13, with 98%-99% average sequence identity. A 67-kb block on the distal side of the fusion site is highly homologous to sequences at 22qter. A third ~100-kb segment is 96% identical to a region in 2q11.2. By integrating data on the extent and similarity of these paralogous blocks, including the presence of phylogenetically informative repetitive elements, with observations of their chromosomal distribution in nonhuman primates, we infer the order of the duplications that led to their current arrangement. Several of these duplicated blocks may be associated with breakpoints of inversions that occurred during primate evolution and of recurrent chromosome rearrangements in humans.

  9. Analysis of the chromosome X exome in patients with autism spectrum disorders identified novel candidate genes, including TMLHE

    PubMed Central

    Nava, C; Lamari, F; Héron, D; Mignot, C; Rastetter, A; Keren, B; Cohen, D; Faudet, A; Bouteiller, D; Gilleron, M; Jacquette, A; Whalen, S; Afenjar, A; Périsse, D; Laurent, C; Dupuits, C; Gautier, C; Gérard, M; Huguet, G; Caillet, S; Leheup, B; Leboyer, M; Gillberg, C; Delorme, R; Bourgeron, T; Brice, A; Depienne, C

    2012-01-01

    The striking excess of affected males in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) suggests that genes located on chromosome X contribute to the etiology of these disorders. To identify new X-linked genes associated with ASD, we analyzed the entire chromosome X exome by next-generation sequencing in 12 unrelated families with two affected males. Thirty-six possibly deleterious variants in 33 candidate genes were found, including PHF8 and HUWE1, previously implicated in intellectual disability (ID). A nonsense mutation in TMLHE, which encodes the ɛ-N-trimethyllysine hydroxylase catalyzing the first step of carnitine biosynthesis, was identified in two brothers with autism and ID. By screening the TMLHE coding sequence in 501 male patients with ASD, we identified two additional missense substitutions not found in controls and not reported in databases. Functional analyses confirmed that the mutations were associated with a loss-of-function and led to an increase in trimethyllysine, the precursor of carnitine biosynthesis, in the plasma of patients. This study supports the hypothesis that rare variants on the X chromosome are involved in the etiology of ASD and contribute to the sex-ratio disequilibrium. PMID:23092983

  10. Analysis of the chromosome X exome in patients with autism spectrum disorders identified novel candidate genes, including TMLHE.

    PubMed

    Nava, C; Lamari, F; Héron, D; Mignot, C; Rastetter, A; Keren, B; Cohen, D; Faudet, A; Bouteiller, D; Gilleron, M; Jacquette, A; Whalen, S; Afenjar, A; Périsse, D; Laurent, C; Dupuits, C; Gautier, C; Gérard, M; Huguet, G; Caillet, S; Leheup, B; Leboyer, M; Gillberg, C; Delorme, R; Bourgeron, T; Brice, A; Depienne, C

    2012-10-23

    The striking excess of affected males in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) suggests that genes located on chromosome X contribute to the etiology of these disorders. To identify new X-linked genes associated with ASD, we analyzed the entire chromosome X exome by next-generation sequencing in 12 unrelated families with two affected males. Thirty-six possibly deleterious variants in 33 candidate genes were found, including PHF8 and HUWE1, previously implicated in intellectual disability (ID). A nonsense mutation in TMLHE, which encodes the ɛ-N-trimethyllysine hydroxylase catalyzing the first step of carnitine biosynthesis, was identified in two brothers with autism and ID. By screening the TMLHE coding sequence in 501 male patients with ASD, we identified two additional missense substitutions not found in controls and not reported in databases. Functional analyses confirmed that the mutations were associated with a loss-of-function and led to an increase in trimethyllysine, the precursor of carnitine biosynthesis, in the plasma of patients. This study supports the hypothesis that rare variants on the X chromosome are involved in the etiology of ASD and contribute to the sex-ratio disequilibrium.

  11. Chromosomal protein HMG-14 gene maps to the Down syndrome region of human chromosome 21 and is overexpressed in mouse trisomy 16

    SciTech Connect

    Pash, J.; Popescu, N.; Matocha, M.; Rapoport, S.; Bustin, M. )

    1990-05-01

    The gene for human high-mobility-group (HMG) chromosomal protein HMG-14 is located in region 21q22.3, a region associated with the pathogenesis of Down syndrome, one of the most prevalent human birth defects. The expression of this gene is analyzed in mouse embryos that are trisomic in chromosome 16 and are considered to be an animal model for Down syndrome. RNA blot-hybridization analysis and detailed analysis of HMG-14 protein levels indicate that mouse trisomy 16 embryos have approximately 1.5 times more HMG-14 mRNA and protein than their normal littermates, suggesting a direct gene dosage effect. The HMG-14 gene may be an additional marker for the Down syndrome. Chromosomal protein HMG-14 is a nucleosomal binding protein that may confer distinct properties to the chromatin structure of transcriptionally active genes and therefore may be a contributing factor in the etiology of the syndrome.

  12. A 4-Mb deletion in the region Xq27.3-q28 is associated with non-random inactivation of the non-mutant X chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, J.T.R.; Han, L.P.; Michalickova, K.

    1994-09-01

    A girl with severe Hunter disease was found to have a submicroscopic deletion distrupting the IDS locus in the region Xq27.3-q28 together with non-random inactivation of the non-mutant X chromosome. Southern analysis of DNA from the parents and from hamster-patient somatic cell hybrids containing only the mutant X chromosome revealed that the deletion represented a de novo mutation involving the paternal X chromosome. Methylation-sensitive RFLP analysis of DNA from maternal fibroblasts and lymphocytes showed methylation patterns consistent with random X-inactivation, indicating that the non-random X-inactivation in the patient was not inherited and was likely a direct result of the Xq27.3-q28 deletion. A 15 kb EcoRI junction fragment, identified in patient DNA using IDS cDNA probes, was cloned from a size-selected patient DNA library. Clones containing the deletion junction were restriction mapped and fragments were subcloned and used to isolate normal sequence on either side of the deletion from normal X chromosome libraries. Comparison of the sequences from normal and mutant X chromosome clones straddling the deletion breakpoint showed that the mutation had occurred by recombination between Alu repeats. Screening of YAC contigs containing normal X chromosome sequence from the region of the mutation, using probes from either side of the deletion breakpoint, showed that the deletion was approximately 4 Mb in size. Probing of mutant DNA with 16 STSs distributed throughout the region of the deletion confirmed that the mutation is a simple deletion with no complex rearrangements of islands of retained DNA. A search for sequences at Xq27.3-q28 involved in X chromosome inactivation is in progress.

  13. Physical map and functional studies of the juxtacentromeric region of chromosome 13

    SciTech Connect

    Dupont, J.M.; Dode, C.; Piccolo, F.

    1994-09-01

    The structure of the juxtacentromeric region of chromosome 13 has been analyzed in order to investigate a putative position effect of the centromeric heterochromatin and to provide a physical landmark needed in the positional cloning of the autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy gene (SCARMD1). A genomic fragment corresponding to the insertion of a L1 sequence in juxtacentromeric block of satellite 3 has been cloned after PCR amplification of a somatic hybrid containing human chromosome 13 only. The sequence defines a new family of satellite 3 DNA and belongs to the heterochromatin region of chromosome 13. Human satellite 2 and 3 sequences are methylated in every cell except in the germ cell line and extra-embryonic tissues. In ICF syndrome, the alteration of the chromatin structure is associated with a deficit or complete absence of methylation of satellite 2 and 3 sequences. Cloning junctional euchromatic sequences immediately adjacent to heterochromatin will help to characterize the methylation pattern of non-satellite heterochromatized sequences in normal cells and methylation-deficient patients.

  14. A 15 Mb large paracentric chromosome 21 inversion identified in Czech population through a pair of flanking duplications.

    PubMed

    Drabova, Jana; Trkova, Marie; Hancarova, Miroslava; Novotna, Drahuse; Hejtmankova, Michaela; Havlovicova, Marketa; Sedlacek, Zdenek

    2014-01-01

    Inversions are balanced structural chromosome rearrangements, which can influence gene expression and the risk of unbalanced chromosome constitution in offspring. Many examples of inversion polymorphisms exist in human, affecting both heterochromatic regions and euchromatin. We describe a novel, 15 Mb long paracentric inversion, inv(21)(q21.1q22.11), affecting more than a third of human 21q. Despite of its length, the inversion cannot be detected using karyotyping due to similar band patterns on the normal and inverted chromosomes, and is therefore likely to escape attention. Its identification was aided by the repeated observation of the same pair of 150 kb long duplications present in cis on chromosome 21 in three Czech families subjected to microarray analysis. The finding prompted us to hypothesise that this co-occurrence of two remote duplications could be associated with an inversion of the intervening segment, and this speculation turned out to be right. The inversion was confirmed in a series of FISH experiments which also showed that the second copy of each of the duplications was always located at the opposite end of the inversion. The presence of the same pair of duplications in additional individuals reported in public databases indicates that the inversion may also be present in other populations. Three out of the total of about 4000 chromosomes 21 examined in our sample carried the duplications and were inverted, corresponding to carrier frequency of about 1/660. Although the breakpoints affect protein-coding genes, the occurrence of the inversion in normal parents and siblings of our patients and the occurrence of the duplications in unaffected controls in databases indicate that this rare variant is rather non-pathogenic. The inverted segment carried an identical shared haplotype in the three families studied. The haplotypes, however, diverged very rapidly in the flanking regions, possibly pointing to an ancient founder event at the origin of the

  15. Lymphocyte Activation Dynamics Is Shaped by Hereditary Components at Chromosome Region 17q12-q21

    PubMed Central

    Carreras-Sureda, Amado; Rubio-Moscardo, Fanny; Olvera, Alex; Argilaguet, Jordi; Kiefer, Kerstin; Mothe, Beatriz; Meyerhans, Andreas; Brander, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in the chromosome region 17q12-q21 are risk factors for asthma. Particularly, there are cis-regulatory haplotypes within this region that regulate differentially the expression levels of ORMDL3, GSDMB and ZPBP2 genes. Remarkably, ORMDL3 has been shown to modulate lymphocyte activation parameters in a heterologous expression system. In this context, it has been shown that Th2 and Th17 cytokine production is affected by SNPs in this region. Therefore, we aim to assess the impact of hereditary components within region 17q12-q21 on the activation profile of human T lymphocytes, focusing on the haplotype formed by allelic variants of SNPs rs7216389 and rs12936231. We measured calcium influx and activation markers, as well as the proliferation rate upon T cell activation. Haplotype-dependent differences in mRNA expression levels of IL-2 and INF-γ were observed at early times after activation. In addition, the allelic variants of these SNPs impacted on the extent of calcium influx in resting lymphocytes and altered proliferation rates in a dose dependent manner. As a result, the asthma risk haplotype carriers showed a lower threshold of saturation during activation. Finally, we confirmed differences in activation marker expression by flow cytometry using phytohemagglutinin, a strong polyclonal stimulus. Altogether, our data suggest that the genetic component of pro-inflammatory pathologies present in this chromosome region could be explained by different T lymphocyte activation dynamics depending on individual allelic heredity. PMID:27835674

  16. Cytogenetic mapping with centromeric bacterial artificial chromosomes contigs shows that this recombination-poor region comprises more than half of barley chromosome 3H.

    PubMed

    Aliyeva-Schnorr, Lala; Beier, Sebastian; Karafiátová, Miroslava; Schmutzer, Thomas; Scholz, Uwe; Doležel, Jaroslav; Stein, Nils; Houben, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Genetic maps are based on the frequency of recombination and often show different positions of molecular markers in comparison to physical maps, particularly in the centromere that is generally poor in meiotic recombinations. To decipher the position and order of DNA sequences genetically mapped to the centromere of barley (Hordeum vulgare) chromosome 3H, fluorescence in situ hybridization with mitotic metaphase and meiotic pachytene chromosomes was performed with 70 genomic single-copy probes derived from 65 fingerprinted bacterial artificial chromosomes (BAC) contigs genetically assigned to this recombination cold spot. The total physical distribution of the centromeric 5.5 cM bin of 3H comprises 58% of the mitotic metaphase chromosome length. Mitotic and meiotic chromatin of this recombination-poor region is preferentially marked by a heterochromatin-typical histone mark (H3K9me2), while recombination enriched subterminal chromosome regions are enriched in euchromatin-typical histone marks (H3K4me2, H3K4me3, H3K27me3) suggesting that the meiotic recombination rate could be influenced by the chromatin landscape. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Cytokinesis breaks dicentric chromosomes preferentially at pericentromeric regions and telomere fusions.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Virginia; Barinova, Natalja; Onishi, Masayuki; Pobiega, Sabrina; Pringle, John R; Dubrana, Karine; Marcand, Stéphane

    2015-02-01

    Dicentric chromosomes are unstable products of erroneous DNA repair events that can lead to further genome rearrangements and extended gene copy number variations. During mitosis, they form anaphase bridges, resulting in chromosome breakage by an unknown mechanism. In budding yeast, dicentrics generated by telomere fusion break at the fusion, a process that restores the parental karyotype and protects cells from rare accidental telomere fusion. Here, we observed that dicentrics lacking telomere fusion preferentially break within a 25- to 30-kb-long region next to the centromeres. In all cases, dicentric breakage requires anaphase exit, ruling out stretching by the elongated mitotic spindle as the cause of breakage. Instead, breakage requires cytokinesis. In the presence of dicentrics, the cytokinetic septa pinch the nucleus, suggesting that dicentrics are severed after actomyosin ring contraction. At this time, centromeres and spindle pole bodies relocate to the bud neck, explaining how cytokinesis can sever dicentrics near centromeres.

  18. Premature Myocardial Infarction Novel Susceptibility Locus on Chromosome 1P34-36 Identified by Genomewide Linkage Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qing; Rao, Shaoqi; Shen, Gong-Qing; Li, Lin; Moliterno, David J.; Newby, L. Kristin; Rogers, William J.; Cannata, Ruth; Zirzow, Erich; Elston, Robert C.; Topol, Eric J.

    2004-01-01

    The most frequent causes of death and disability in the Western world are atherosclerotic coronary artery disease (CAD) and acute myocardial infarction (MI). This common disease is thought to have a polygenic basis with a complex interaction with environmental factors. Here, we report results of a genomewide search for susceptibility genes for MI in a well-characterized U.S. cohort consisting of 1,613 individuals in 428 multiplex families with familial premature CAD and MI: 712 with MI, 974 with CAD, and average age of onset of 44.4±9.7 years. Genotyping was performed at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Mammalian Genotyping Facility through use of 408 markers that span the entire human genome every 10 cM. Linkage analysis was performed with the modified Haseman-Elston regression model through use of the SIBPAL program. Three genomewide scans were conducted: single-point, multipoint, and multipoint performed on of white pedigrees only (92% of the cohort). One novel significant susceptibility locus was detected for MI on chromosomal region 1p34-36, with a multipoint allele-sharing P value of <10−12 (LOD=11.68). Validation by use of a permutation test yielded a pointwise empirical P value of .00011 at this locus, which corresponds to a genomewide significance of P<.05. For the less restrictive phenotype of CAD, no genetic locus was detected, suggesting that CAD and MI may not share all susceptibility genes. The present study thus identifies a novel genetic-susceptibility locus for MI and provides a framework for the ultimate cloning of a gene for the complex disease MI. PMID:14732905

  19. Exclusion of candidate genes from the chromosome 1q juvenile glaucoma region and mapping of the peripheral cannabis receptor gene (CNR2) to chromosome 1

    SciTech Connect

    Sunden, S.L.F.; Nichols, B.E.; Alward, W.L.M.

    1994-09-01

    Juvenile onset primary open angle glaucoma has been mapped by linkage to 1q21-q31. Several candidate genes were evaluated in the same family used to identify the primary linkage. Atrionatriuretic peptide receptor A (NPR1) and laminin C1 (LAMC1) have been previously mapped to this region and could putatively play a role in the pathogenesis of glaucoma. A third gene, the peripheral cannabis receptor (CNR2) was not initially mapped in humans but was a candidate because of the relief that cannabis affords some patients with primary open angle glaucoma. Microsatellites associated with NPR1 and LAMC1 revealed multiple recombinations in affected members of this pedigree. CNR2 was shown to be on chromosome 1 by PCR amplification of a 150 bp fragment of the 3{prime} untranslated region in monochromosomal somatic cell hybrids (NIGMS panel No. 2). These primers also revealed a two allele single strand conformation polymorphism which showed multiple recombinants with juvenile onset primary open angle glaucoma in large pedigrees, segregating this disorder. The marker was then mapped to 1p34-p36 by linkage, with the most likely location between liver alkaline phosphatase (ALPL) and alpha-L-1 fucosidase (FUCA1).

  20. A Meiotic Drive Element in the Maize Pathogen Fusarium verticillioides Is Located Within a 102 kb Region of Chromosome V

    PubMed Central

    Pyle, Jay; Patel, Tejas; Merrill, Brianna; Nsokoshi, Chabu; McCall, Morgan; Proctor, Robert H.; Brown, Daren W.; Hammond, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    Fusarium verticillioides is an agriculturally important fungus because of its association with maize and its propensity to contaminate grain with toxic compounds. Some isolates of the fungus harbor a meiotic drive element known as Spore killer (SkK) that causes nearly all surviving meiotic progeny from an SkK × Spore killer-susceptible (SkS) cross to inherit the SkK allele. SkK has been mapped to chromosome V but the genetic element responsible for meiotic drive has yet to be identified. In this study, we used cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence markers to genotype individual progeny from an SkK × SkS mapping population. We also sequenced the genomes of three progeny from the mapping population to determine their single nucleotide polymorphisms. These techniques allowed us to refine the location of SkK to a contiguous 102 kb interval of chromosome V, herein referred to as the Sk region. Relative to SkS genotypes, SkK genotypes have one extra gene within this region for a total of 42 genes. The additional gene in SkK genotypes, herein named SKC1 for Spore Killer Candidate 1, is the most highly expressed gene from the Sk region during early stages of sexual development. The Sk region also has three hyper-variable regions, the longest of which includes SKC1. The possibility that SKC1, or another gene from the Sk region, is an essential component of meiotic drive and spore killing is discussed. PMID:27317777

  1. Fine Mapping of Candidate Regions for Bipolar Disorder Provides Strong Evidence for Susceptibility Loci on Chromosomes 7q

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Haiyan; Cheng, Rong; Juo, Suh-Hang; Liu, Jianjun; Loth, Jo Ellen; Endicott, Jean; Gilliam, Conrad; Baron, Miron

    2010-01-01

    Genomewide scans of bipolar disorder (BP) have not produced consistent linkage findings. Follow-up studies using enlarged samples and enhanced marker density can bolster or refute claims of linkage and pave the way to gene discovery. We conducted linkage and association analyses, using a ~3-cM density map of 10 candidate regions, in a large BP pedigree sample (865 individuals from 56 pedigrees). The candidate regions were identified in a previous 10-cM genome-wide scan using a subset of this sample (373 individuals from 40 pedigrees). The present sample consists of the expanded original pedigrees (‘core’ pedigrees) and 16 additional pedigrees. We obtained experiment-wide significant linkage on chromosome 7q34 (LOD score 3.53, p<0.001), substantially stronger than that observed in the genome-wide scan. Support for linkage was sustained on chromosomes 2p13, 4q31, 8q13, 13q32, 14q21 and 17q11, though at a more modest level. Family-based association analysis was consistent with the linkage results at all regions with linkage evidence, except 4q an 8q, but the results fell short of statistical significance. Three of the previously implicated regions – 9q31, 10q21 and 10q24 – showed substantial reduction in evidence of linkage. Our results strongly support 7q34 as a region harboring susceptibility locus for BP. Somewhat lesser, yet notable support was obtained for 2p13, 4q31, 8q13, 13q32, 14q21 and 17q11. These regions could be considered prime candidates for future gene finding efforts. PMID:21302345

  2. Patterns of association in the human metaphase complement: ring analysis and estimation of associativity of specific chromosome regions.

    PubMed

    Rodman, T C; Flehinger, B J; Squire, R D

    1978-02-23

    The pattern of metaphase chromosome association in the human complement was studied by two methods of statistical analysis of interchromosomal distances. Those methods included ring analysis in which a characteristic position of the centromere of each chromosome relative to the center of a two dimensional representation of a metaphase complement was defined, and estimation of the capacity for associativity of each of three regions of each chromosome: the centromere (c) and the ends of each arm (p, q). The following information was obtained: 1. In general, the distance from the center is directly related to chromosome size. 2. The most notable deviation from that size-related progression is displayed by the X chromosomes. The markedly peripheral position of the X is characteristic of both X's of the female and the single X of the male. 3. The relative associativity of each chromosome of the complement is, in general, inversely related to size with an additional preferential capacity of associativity displayed by the acrocentric chromosomes. Analyses of the different inter-regional classes established that the supplementary associativity factor of the acrocentric chromosomes was inherent in their pericentromeric and p-arm regions and excluded the ends of the q arms from participation in that factor. 4. Those analyses demonstrated that the specific morphology or 'geometry' of the acrocentric chromosomes contributes little to their high relative associativity. In addition to the tendency for the c/p regions of the acrocentric chromosomes to associate with each other, presumably because of their common function in nucleolar organization, those regions also displayed a propensity to associate with the distal regions of the arms of other chromosomes. A molecular basis for that propensity other than that of ribosomal DNA is postulated to be that of other fractions of highly reiterated DNA sequences. 5. Analysis of the relative associativities of each of the three regions

  3. Reciprocal Microduplication of the Williams-Beuren Syndrome Chromosome Region in a 9-Year-Old Omani Boy.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Shruthi; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Yesodharan, Dhanya; Venkatesan, Vettriselvi; Koshy, Teena; Paul, Solomon F D; Perumal, Venkatachalam

    2016-05-01

    Microdeletions of the 7q11.23 Williams-Beuren syndrome chromosome region (WBSCR) are reported with a frequency of 1 in 10,000, whereas microduplications of the region, although expected to occur at the same frequency, are not widely reported. We evaluated a 9-year old Omani boy for idiopathic intellectual disability using genetic methods, including multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA), for detection of microdeletions (P064-B3). MLPA analysis revealed that the boy has a rare microduplication of the WBSCR. Prominent clinical features include global developmental delay with pronounced speech delay, dysmorphic facies, and autistic features. Microduplications, in general, are reported at a lesser frequency, perhaps owing to their milder phenotype. Complete genetic assessment in children with idiopathic intellectual disability would help in identifying rare conditions such as duplication of the WBSCR. © American Society for Clinical Pathology, 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. High resolution genetic and physical mapping of the I-3 region of tomato chromosome 7 reveals almost continuous microsynteny with grape chromosome 12 but interspersed microsynteny with duplications on Arabidopsis chromosomes 1, 2 and 3.

    PubMed

    Lim, G T T; Wang, G-P; Hemming, M N; McGrath, D J; Jones, D A

    2008-12-01

    The tomato I-3 gene introgressed from the Lycopersicon pennellii accession LA716 confers resistance to race 3 of the fusarium wilt pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici. We have improved the high-resolution map of the I-3 region of tomato chromosome 7 with the development and mapping of 31 new PCR-based markers. Recombinants recovered from L. esculentum cv. M82 x IL7-2 F2 and (IL7-2 x IL7-4) x M82 TC1F2 mapping populations, together with recombinants recovered from a previous M82 x IL7-3 F2 mapping population, were used to position these markers. A significantly higher recombination frequency was observed in the (IL7-2 x IL7-4) x M82 TC1F2 mapping population based on a reconstituted L. pennellii chromosome 7 compared to the other two mapping populations based on smaller segments of L. pennellii chromosome 7. A BAC contig consisting of L. esculentum cv. Heinz 1706 BACs covering the I-3 region has also been established. The new high-resolution map places the I-3 gene within a 0.38 cM interval between the molecular markers RGA332 and bP23/gPT with an estimated physical size of 50-60 kb. The I-3 region was found to display almost continuous microsynteny with grape chromosome 12 but interspersed microsynteny with Arabidopsis thaliana chromosomes 1, 2 and 3. An S-receptor-like kinase gene family present in the I-3 region of tomato chromosome 7 was found to be present in the microsyntenous region of grape chromosome 12 but was absent altogether from the A. thaliana genome.

  5. Fine Mapping of a GWAS-Derived Obesity Candidate Region on Chromosome 16p11.2

    PubMed Central

    Jarick, Ivonne; Pütter, Carolin; Göbel, Maria; Horn, Lucie; Struve, Christoph; Haas, Katharina; Knoll, Nadja; Grallert, Harald; Illig, Thomas; Reinehr, Thomas; Wang, Hai-Jun; Hebebrand, Johannes; Hinney, Anke

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified 97 chromosomal loci associated with increased body mass index in population-based studies on adults. One of these SNPs, rs7359397, tags a large region (approx. 1MB) with high linkage disequilibrium (r²>0.7), which comprises five genes (SH2B1, APOBR, sulfotransferases: SULT1A1 and SULT1A2, TUFM). We had previously described a rare mutation in SH2B1 solely identified in extremely obese individuals but not in lean controls. Methods The coding regions of the genes APOBR, SULT1A1, SULT1A2, and TUFM were screened for mutations (dHPLC, SSCP, Sanger re-sequencing) in 95 extremely obese children and adolescents. Detected non-synonymous variants were genotyped (TaqMan SNP Genotyping, MALDI TOF, PCR-RFLP) in independent large study groups (up to 3,210 extremely obese/overweight cases, 485 lean controls and 615 obesity trios). In silico tools were used for the prediction of potential functional effects of detected variants. Results Except for TUFM we detected non-synonymous variants in all screened genes. Two polymorphisms rs180743 (APOBR p.Pro428Ala) and rs3833080 (APOBR p.Gly369_Asp370del9) showed nominal association to (extreme) obesity (uncorrected p = 0.003 and p = 0.002, respectively). In silico analyses predicted a functional implication for rs180743 (APOBR p.Pro428Ala). Both APOBR variants are located in the repetitive region with unknown function. Conclusion Variants in APOBR contributed as strongly as variants in SH2B1 to the association with extreme obesity in the chromosomal region chr16p11.2. In silico analyses implied no functional effect of several of the detected variants. Further in vitro or in vivo analyses on the functional implications of the obesity associated variants are warranted. PMID:25955518

  6. Long-Read Single Molecule Sequencing to Resolve Tandem Gene Copies: The Mst77Y Region on the Drosophila melanogaster Y Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Krsticevic, Flavia J.; Schrago, Carlos G.; Carvalho, A. Bernardo

    2015-01-01

    The autosomal gene Mst77F of Drosophila melanogaster is essential for male fertility. In 2010, Krsticevic et al. (Genetics 184: 295−307) found 18 Y-linked copies of Mst77F (“Mst77Y”), which collectively account for 20% of the functional Mst77F-like mRNA. The Mst77Y genes were severely misassembled in the then-available genome assembly and were identified by cloning and sequencing polymerase chain reaction products. The genomic structure of the Mst77Y region and the possible existence of additional copies remained unknown. The recent publication of two long-read assemblies of D. melanogaster prompted us to reinvestigate this challenging region of the Y chromosome. We found that the Illumina Synthetic Long Reads assembly failed in the Mst77Y region, most likely because of its tandem duplication structure. The PacBio MHAP assembly of the Mst77Y region seems to be very accurate, as revealed by comparisons with the previously found Mst77Y genes, a bacterial artificial chromosome sequence, and Illumina reads of the same strain. We found that the Mst77Y region spans 96 kb and originated from a 3.4-kb transposition from chromosome 3L to the Y chromosome, followed by tandem duplications inside the Y chromosome and invasion of transposable elements, which account for 48% of its length. Twelve of the 18 Mst77Y genes found in 2010 were confirmed in the PacBio assembly, the remaining six being polymerase chain reaction−induced artifacts. There are several identical copies of some Mst77Y genes, coincidentally bringing the total copy number to 18. Besides providing a detailed picture of the Mst77Y region, our results highlight the utility of PacBio technology in assembling difficult genomic regions such as tandemly repeated genes. PMID:25858959

  7. Long-Read Single Molecule Sequencing to Resolve Tandem Gene Copies: The Mst77Y Region on the Drosophila melanogaster Y Chromosome.

    PubMed

    Krsticevic, Flavia J; Schrago, Carlos G; Carvalho, A Bernardo

    2015-04-09

    The autosomal gene Mst77F of Drosophila melanogaster is essential for male fertility. In 2010, Krsticevic et al. (Genetics 184: 295-307) found 18 Y-linked copies of Mst77F ("Mst77Y"), which collectively account for 20% of the functional Mst77F-like mRNA. The Mst77Y genes were severely misassembled in the then-available genome assembly and were identified by cloning and sequencing polymerase chain reaction products. The genomic structure of the Mst77Y region and the possible existence of additional copies remained unknown. The recent publication of two long-read assemblies of D. melanogaster prompted us to reinvestigate this challenging region of the Y chromosome. We found that the Illumina Synthetic Long Reads assembly failed in the Mst77Y region, most likely because of its tandem duplication structure. The PacBio MHAP assembly of the Mst77Y region seems to be very accurate, as revealed by comparisons with the previously found Mst77Y genes, a bacterial artificial chromosome sequence, and Illumina reads of the same strain. We found that the Mst77Y region spans 96 kb and originated from a 3.4-kb transposition from chromosome 3L to the Y chromosome, followed by tandem duplications inside the Y chromosome and invasion of transposable elements, which account for 48% of its length. Twelve of the 18 Mst77Y genes found in 2010 were confirmed in the PacBio assembly, the remaining six being polymerase chain reaction-induced artifacts. There are several identical copies of some Mst77Y genes, coincidentally bringing the total copy number to 18. Besides providing a detailed picture of the Mst77Y region, our results highlight the utility of PacBio technology in assembling difficult genomic regions such as tandemly repeated genes.

  8. Mapping of jog locus to the region between D6Mit104 and D6Mit336 on mouse chromosome 6.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao-yang; Chen, Zi-yan; Kanou, Yasuhiko; Takagishi, Yoshiko; Hayashi, Yoshitaka; Ohno, Tamio; Murata, Yoshiharu; Oda, Sen-ichi

    2007-10-01

    The joggle mouse is a recessive ataxic mutant carrying an unknown mutation in a C3H/He (C3H)-derived chromosomal segment. Taking advantage of the mouse genome database, we selected 127 DNA microsatellite markers showing heterozygosity between C3H and C57BL/6J (B6) and a first round of screening for the joggle mutation was performed on B6-jog/+ partial congenic mice (N4). We identified 4 chromosomal regions in which 13 microsatellite markers show heterozygosity between C3H and B6. Then, we analyzed the genotype of these 4 chromosomal regions in mice that showed the joggle phenotype and mapped the jog locus between markers D6Mit104 (111.4 Mb) and D6Mit336 (125.1 Mb) (an interval of 13.7 Mb) on chromosome 6. By using a partial congenic strain together with the mouse genome database, we successfully mapped the chromosomal localization of the jog locus much more efficiently than by conventional linkage analysis.

  9. Transgenic mouse model of hemifacial microsomia: Cloning and characterization of insertional mutation region on chromosome 10

    SciTech Connect

    Naora, Hiroyuki; Otani, Hiroki; Tanaka, Osamu

    1994-10-01

    The 643 transgenic mouse line carries an autosomal dominant insertional mutation that results in hemifacial microsomia (HFM), including microtia and/or abnormal biting. In this paper, we characterize the transgene integration site in transgenic mice and preintegration site of wildtype mice. The locus, designated Hfm (hemifacial microsomia-associated locus), was mapped to chromosome 10, B1-3, by chromosome in situ hybridization. We cloned the transgene insertion site from the transgenic DNA library. By using the 5{prime} and 3{prime} flanking sequences, the preintegration region was isolated. The analysis of these regions showed that a deletion of at least 23 kb DNA occurred in association with the transgene integration. Evolutionarily conserved regions were detected within and beside the deleted region. The result of mating between hemizygotes suggests that the phenotype of the homozygote is lethality in the prenatal period. These results suggests that the Hfm locus is necessary for prenatal development and that this strain is a useful animal model for investigating the genetic predisposition to HFM in humans.

  10. Chromosome protein framework from proteome analysis of isolated human metaphase chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Kiichi; Uchiyama, Susumu

    2007-01-01

    We have presented a structural model of the chromosome based on its constituent proteins. Development of a method of mass isolation for intact human metaphase chromosomes and proteome analysis by mass spectrometry of the isolated chromosomal proteins enabled us to develop a four-layer structural model of human metaphase chromosomes. The model consists of four layers, each with different chromosomal protein sets, i.e., chromosome coating proteins (CCPs), chromosome peripheral proteins (CPPs), chromosome structural proteins (CSPs), and chromosome fibrous proteins (CFPs). More than 200 identified proteins have been classified and assigned to the four layers with each layer occupying a distinct region of the chromosome. CCPs are localized at the most outer regions of the chromosomes and they attach to the regions tentatively and occasionally. CCPs include mostly mitochondrial and cytoplasmic proteins, e.g., 70 kDa heat shock protein 9B and Hsp60. CPPs are also localized at the peripheral regions of the chromosomes, but as the essential part of the chromosomes. CPPs include nucleolin, lamin A/C, fibrillarin, etc. CSPs are the primary chromosomal structure proteins, and include topoisomerase IIalpha, condensin subunits, histones, etc. CFPs have a fibrous nature, e.g., beta-actin, vimentin, myosin II, tublin, etc. A data set of these proteins, which we developed, contains essential chromosome proteins with classified information based on this four-layer model and presents useful leads for further studies on chromosomal structure and function.

  11. Comprehensive multi-stage linkage analyses identify a locus for adult height on chromosome 3p in a healthy Caucasian population.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Justine A; Scurrah, Katrina J; Duncan, Anna E; Lamantia, Angela; Byrnes, Graham B; Harrap, Stephen B

    2007-04-01

    There have been a number of genome-wide linkage studies for adult height in recent years. These studies have yielded few well-replicated loci, and none have been further confirmed by the identification of associated gene variants. The inconsistent results may be attributable to the fact that few studies have combined accurate phenotype measures with informative statistical modelling in healthy populations. We have performed a multi-stage genome-wide linkage analysis for height in 275 adult sibling pairs drawn randomly from the Victorian Family Heart Study (VFHS), a healthy population-based Caucasian cohort. Height was carefully measured in a standardised fashion on regularly calibrated equipment. Following genome-wide identification of a peak Z-score of 3.14 on chromosome 3 at 69 cM, we performed a fine-mapping analysis of this region in an extended sample of 392 two-generation families. We used a number of variance components models that incorporated assortative mating and shared environment effects, and we observed a peak LOD score of approximately 3.5 at 78 cM in four of the five models tested. We also demonstrated that the most prevalent model in the literature gave the worst fit, and the lowest LOD score (2.9) demonstrating the importance of appropriate modelling. The region identified in this study replicates the results of other genome-wide scans of height and bone-related phenotypes, strongly suggesting the presence of a gene important in bone growth on chromosome 3p. Association analyses of relevant candidate genes should identify the genetic variants responsible for the chromosome 3p linkage signal in our population.

  12. IL3 variant on chromosomal region 5q31-33 and protection from recurrent malaria attacks.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Christian G; Calixto Fernandes, Maria H; Intemann, Christopher D; Kreuels, Benno; Kobbe, Robin; Kreuzberg, Christina; Ayim, Matilda; Ruether, Andreas; Loag, Wibke; Ehmen, Christa; Adjei, Samuel; Adjei, Ohene; Horstmann, Rolf D; May, Jürgen

    2011-03-15

    Using segregation analyses, control of malaria parasites has previously been linked to a major gene within the chromosomal region 5q31-33, but also to complex genetic factors in which effects are under substantial age-dependent influence. However, the responsible gene variants have not yet been identified for this chromosomal region. In order to perform association analyses of 5q31-33 locus candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 1015 children were recruited at the age of 3 months and followed monthly until the age of 2 years in an area holoendemic for Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Ghana. Quantitative (incidence rates of malaria episodes) and qualitative phenotypes (i.e. 'more than one malaria episode' or 'not more than one malaria episode') were used in population- and family-based analyses. The strongest signal was observed for the interleukin 3 gene (IL3) SNP rs40401 (P = 3.4 × 10(-7), P(c)= 1.4 × 10(-4)). The IL3 genotypes rs40401(CT) and rs40401(TT) were found to exert a protective effect of 25% [incidence rate ratio (IRR) 0.75, P = 4.1 × 10(-5)] and 33% (IRR 0.67, P = 3.2 × 10(-8)), respectively, against malaria attacks. The association was confirmed in transmission disequilibrium tests (TDT, qTDT). The results could argue for a role of IL3 in the pathophysiology of falciparum malaria.

  13. Fine-Scale Heterogeneity in Crossover Rate in the garnet-scalloped Region of the Drosophila melanogaster X Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Nadia D.; Stone, Eric A.; Aquadro, Charles F.; Clark, Andrew G.

    2013-01-01

    Homologous recombination affects myriad aspects of genome evolution, from standing levels of nucleotide diversity to the efficacy of natural selection. Rates of crossing over show marked variability at all scales surveyed, including species-, population-, and individual-level differences. Even within genomes, crossovers are nonrandomly distributed in a wide diversity of taxa. Although intra- and intergenomic heterogeneities in crossover distribution have been documented in Drosophila, the scale and degree of crossover rate heterogeneity remain unclear. In addition, the genetic features mediating this heterogeneity are unknown. Here we quantify fine-scale heterogeneity in crossover distribution in a 2.1-Mb region of the Drosophila melanogaster X chromosome by localizing crossover breakpoints in 2500 individuals, each containing a single crossover in this specific X chromosome region. We show 90-fold variation in rates of crossing over at a 5-kb scale, place this variation in the context of several aspects of genome evolution, and identify several genetic features associated with crossover rates. Our results shed new light on the scale and magnitude of crossover rate heterogeneity in D. melanogaster and highlight potential features mediating this heterogeneity. PMID:23410829

  14. High-resolution physical mapping of a 250-kb region of human chromosome 11q24 by genomic sequence sampling (GSS)

    SciTech Connect

    Selleri, L.; Smith, M.W.; Holmsen, A.L.

    1995-04-10

    A physical map of the region of human chromosome 11q24 containing the FLI1 gene, disrupted by the t(11;22) translocation in Ewing sarcoma and primitive neuroectodermal tumors, was analyzed by genomic sequence sampling. Using a 4- to 5-fold coverage chromosome 11-specific library, 22 region-specific cosmid clones were identified by phenol emulsion reassociation hybridization, with a 245-kb yeast artificial chromosome clone containing the FLI1 gene, and by directed {open_quotes}walking{close_quotes} techniques. Cosmid contigs were constructed by individual clone fingerprinting using restriction enzyme digestion and assembly with the Genome Reconstruction and AsseMbly (GRAM) computer algorithm. The relative orientation and spacing of cosmid contigs with respect to the chromosome were determined by the structural analysis of cosmid clones and by direct visual in situ hybridization mapping. Each cosmid clone in the contig was subjected to {open_quotes}one-pass{close_quotes} end sequencing, and the resulting ordered sequence fragments represent {approximately}5% of the complete DNA sequence, making the entire region accessible by PCR amplification. The sequence samples were analyzed for putative exons, repetitive DNAs, and simple sequence repeats using a variety of computer algorithms. Based upon the computer predictions, Southern and Northern blot experiments led to the independent identification and localization of the FLI1 gene as well as a previously unknown gene located in this region of chromosome 11q24. This approach to high-resolution physical analysis of human chromosomes allows the assembly of detailed sequence-based maps. 62 refs., 7 figs.

  15. The IL-9 receptor gene (IL9R): Genomic structure, chromosomal localization in the pseudoautosomal region of the long arm of sex chromosomes, and identification of IL9R pseudogenes at 9qter, 10pter, 16pter, 18pter

    SciTech Connect

    Kermouni, A.; Godelaine, D.; Lurquin, C.; Szikora, J.P.

    1995-09-20

    Cosmids containing the human IL-9 receptor (R) gene (IL9R) have been isolated from a genomic library using the IL9R cDNA as a probe. We have shown that the human IL9R gene is composed of 11 exons and 10 introns, stretching over {approx} 17 kb, and is located within the pseudoautosomal region of the Xq and Yq chromosome, in the vicinity of the telomere. Analysis of the 5` flanking region revealed multiple transcription initiation sites as well as potential binding motifs for AP1, AP2, AP3, Sp1, and NF-kB, although this region lacks a TATA box. Using the human IL9R cosmid as a probe to perform fluorescence in situ hybridization, additional signals were identified in the subtelomeric regions of chromosomes 9q, 10p, 16p, and 18p. IL9R homologs located on chromosomes 9 and 18 were partially characterized, while those located on chromosomes 16 and 10 were completely sequenced. Although they are similiar to the IL9R gene ({approx} 90% identity), none of these copies encodes a functional receptor: none of them contains sequences homologous to the 5` flanking region or exon 1 of the IL9R gene, and the remaining ORFs have been inactivated by various point mutations and deletions. Taken together, our results indicate that the IL9R gene is located at Xq28 and Yq12, in the long arm pseudoautosomal region, and that four IL9R pseudogenes are located on 9q34, 10p15, 16p13.3 and 18p11.3, probably dispersed as the result of translocations during evolution. 42 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Induced mouse chromosomal rearrangements as tools for identifying critical developmental genes and pathways.

    PubMed

    Culiat, C T; Carver, E A; Walkowicz, M; Rinchik, E M; Cacheiro, N L; Russell, L B; Generoso, W M; Stubbs, L

    1997-01-01

    Due to the rapid advances that have been made in molecular and genetic technology during the past decade, the genes associated with a large number of human hereditary diseases have been isolated and analyzed in detail. These cloned genes provide new tools for research geared toward a better understanding of normal human development, and also of the many ways that basic, essential morphologic pathways can be disturbed. Chromosomal rearrangements, especially deletions and translocations, have been especially beneficial in the mapping and isolation of human disease genes because of their visibility on both the cytogenetic and molecular levels. However, these useful types of mutations occur with low frequency in the human population. Chromosomal rearrangements can be induced relatively easily in mice, and several large, independent collections of translocation and deletion mutants have been generated in the course of risk-assessment and mutagenesis studies over the past several decades. Combined with new molecular technologies, these collections of mutant animals provide a means of gaining ready access to genes associated with developmental defects including craniofacial abnormalities, hydrocephaly, skeletal deformities, and complex neurologic disorders. As an illustration of this approach, we briefly review our progress in the study of three mutations associated with defects in palate development, juvenile growth, fitness and sterility, and neurologic development in mice, respectively.

  17. Specific features in linear and spatial organizations of pericentromeric heterochromatin regions in polytene chromosomes of the closely related species Drosophila virilis and D. kanekoi (Diptera: Drosophilidae).

    PubMed

    Wasserlauf, Irina; Usov, Konstantin; Artemov, Gleb; Anan'ina, Tatyana; Stegniy, Vladimir

    2015-06-01

    Heterochromatin plays an important role in the spatial arrangement and evolution of the eukaryotic genetic apparatus. The closely related species Drosophila virilis (phyla virilis) and D. kanekoi (phyla montana) differ in the amount of heterochromatin along the chromosomes as well as by the presence of the metacentric chromosome 2, which emerged as a result of a pericentric inversion during speciation, in the D. kanekoi karyotype. The purpose of this study was to establish if chromosome rearrangements have any influence on the linear redistribution of centromeric heterochromatin in polytene chromosomes and the spatial organization of chromosomes in the nuclei of nurse cell. We have microdissected the chromocenter of D. virilis salivary gland polytene chromosomes; obtained a DNA library of this region (DvirIII); and hybridized (FISH) DvirIII to the salivary gland and nurse cell polytene chromosomes of D. virilis and D. kanekoi. We demonstrated that DvirIII localizes to the pericentromeric heterochromatin regions of all chromosomes and peritelomeric region of chromosome 5 in both species. Unlike D. virilis, the DvirIII signal in D. kanekoi chromosomes is detectable in the telomeric region of chromosome 2. We have also conducted a 3D FISH of DvirIII probe to the D. virilis and D. kanekoi nurse cell chromosomes. In particular, the DvirIII signal in D. virilis was observed in the local chromocenter at one pole of the nucleus, while the signal belonging to the telomeric region of chromosome 5 was detectable at the other pole. In contrast, in D. kanekoi there exist two separate DvirIII-positive regions. One of these regions belongs to the pericentromeric region of chromosome 2 and the other, to pericentromeric regions of the remaining chromosomes. These results suggest that chromosome rearrangements play an important role in the redistribution of heterochromatin DNA sequences in the genome, representing a speciation mechanism, which, in general, could also affect the

  18. Genome-Wide Analysis in Three Fusarium Pathogens Identifies Rapidly Evolving Chromosomes and Genes Associated with Pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Sperschneider, Jana; Gardiner, Donald M; Thatcher, Louise F; Lyons, Rebecca; Singh, Karam B; Manners, John M; Taylor, Jennifer M

    2015-05-19

    Pathogens and hosts are in an ongoing arms race and genes involved in host-pathogen interactions are likely to undergo diversifying selection. Fusarium plant pathogens have evolved diverse infection strategies, but how they interact with their hosts in the biotrophic infection stage remains puzzling. To address this, we analyzed the genomes of three Fusarium plant pathogens for genes that are under diversifying selection. We found a two-speed genome structure both on the chromosome and gene group level. Diversifying selection acts strongly on the dispensable chromosomes in Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici and on distinct core chromosome regions in Fusarium graminearum, all of which have associations with virulence. Members of two gene groups evolve rapidly, namely those that encode proteins with an N-terminal [SG]-P-C-[KR]-P sequence motif and proteins that are conserved predominantly in pathogens. Specifically, 29 F. graminearum genes are rapidly evolving, in planta induced and encode secreted proteins, strongly pointing toward effector function. In summary, diversifying selection in Fusarium is strongly reflected as genomic footprints and can be used to predict a small gene set likely to be involved in host-pathogen interactions for experimental verification.

  19. Genome-Wide Analysis in Three Fusarium Pathogens Identifies Rapidly Evolving Chromosomes and Genes Associated with Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Sperschneider, Jana; Gardiner, Donald M.; Thatcher, Louise F.; Lyons, Rebecca; Singh, Karam B.; Manners, John M.; Taylor, Jennifer M.

    2015-01-01

    Pathogens and hosts are in an ongoing arms race and genes involved in host–pathogen interactions are likely to undergo diversifying selection. Fusarium plant pathogens have evolved diverse infection strategies, but how they interact with their hosts in the biotrophic infection stage remains puzzling. To address this, we analyzed the genomes of three Fusarium plant pathogens for genes that are under diversifying selection. We found a two-speed genome structure both on the chromosome and gene group level. Diversifying selection acts strongly on the dispensable chromosomes in Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici and on distinct core chromosome regions in Fusarium graminearum, all of which have associations with virulence. Members of two gene groups evolve rapidly, namely those that encode proteins with an N-terminal [SG]-P-C-[KR]-P sequence motif and proteins that are conserved predominantly in pathogens. Specifically, 29 F. graminearum genes are rapidly evolving, in planta induced and encode secreted proteins, strongly pointing toward effector function. In summary, diversifying selection in Fusarium is strongly reflected as genomic footprints and can be used to predict a small gene set likely to be involved in host–pathogen interactions for experimental verification. PMID:25994930

  20. The gene for cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS) maps to the subtelomeric region on human chromosome 21q and to proximal mouse chromosome 17.

    PubMed Central

    Münke, M; Kraus, J P; Ohura, T; Francke, U

    1988-01-01

    The human gene for cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS), the enzyme deficient in classical homocystinuria, has been assigned to the subtelomeric region of band 21q22.3 by in situ hybridization of a rat cDNA probe to structurally rearranged chromosomes 21. The homologous locus in the mouse (Cbs) was mapped to the proximal half of mouse chromosome 17 by Southern analysis of Chinese hamster X mouse somatic cell hybrid DNA. Thus, CBS/Cbs and the gene for alpha A-crystalline (CRYA1/Crya-1 or Acry-1) form a conserved linkage group on human (HSA) chromosome region 21q22.3 and mouse (MMU) chromosome 17 region A-C. Features of Down syndrome (DS) caused by three copies of these genes should not be present in mice trisomic for MMU 16 that have been proposed as animal models for DS. Mice partially trisomic for MMU 16 or MMU 17 should allow gene-specific dissection of the trisomy 21 phenotype. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:2894761

  1. A distinct type of heterochromatin at the telomeric region of the Drosophila melanogaster Y chromosome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sidney H; Nan, Ruth; Accardo, Maria C; Sentmanat, Monica; Dimitri, Patrizio; Elgin, Sarah C R

    2014-01-01

    Heterochromatin assembly and its associated phenotype, position effect variegation (PEV), provide an informative system to study chromatin structure and genome packaging. In the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, the Y chromosome is entirely heterochromatic in all cell types except the male germline; as such, Y chromosome dosage is a potent modifier of PEV. However, neither Y heterochromatin composition, nor its assembly, has been carefully studied. Here, we report the mapping and characterization of eight reporter lines that show male-specific PEV. In all eight cases, the reporter insertion sites lie in the telomeric transposon array (HeT-A and TART-B2 homologous repeats) of the Y chromosome short arm (Ys). Investigations of the impact on the PEV phenotype of mutations in known heterochromatin proteins (i.e., modifiers of PEV) show that this Ys telomeric region is a unique heterochromatin domain: it displays sensitivity to mutations in HP1a, EGG and SU(VAR)3-9, but no sensitivity to Su(z)2 mutations. It appears that the endo-siRNA pathway plays a major targeting role for this domain. Interestingly, an ectopic copy of 1360 is sufficient to induce a piRNA targeting mechanism to further enhance silencing of a reporter cytologically localized to the Ys telomere. These results demonstrate the diversity of heterochromatin domains, and the corresponding variation in potential targeting mechanisms.

  2. Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus C-terminal LANA concentrates at pericentromeric and peri-telomeric regions of a subset of mitotic chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley-Clarke, Brenna; Ballestas, Mary E.; Komatsu, Takashi; Kaye, Kenneth M. . E-mail: kkaye@rics.bwh.harvard.edu

    2007-01-20

    The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) tethers KSHV terminal repeat (TR) DNA to mitotic chromosomes to efficiently segregate episomes to progeny nuclei. LANA contains N- and C-terminal chromosome binding regions. We now show that C-terminal LANA preferentially concentrates to paired dots at pericentromeric and peri-telomeric regions of a subset of mitotic chromosomes through residues 996-1139. Deletions within C-terminal LANA abolished both self-association and chromosome binding, consistent with a requirement for self-association to bind chromosomes. A deletion abolishing TR DNA binding did not affect chromosome targeting, indicating LANA's localization is not due to binding its recognition sequence in chromosomal DNA. LANA distributed similarly on human and non-human mitotic chromosomes. These results are consistent with C-terminal LANA interacting with a cell factor that concentrates at pericentromeric and peri-telomeric regions of mitotic chromosomes.

  3. Marker development for the EPM1 region of human chromosome 21, q22.3

    SciTech Connect

    Warrington, I.A.; O`Connor, K.; Hebert, S.

    1994-09-01

    New STSs have been developed for a 0.9 Mb region of chromosome 21 that is not represented in existing YAC libraries using an efficient method that is generally applicable to any region of the genome. The region, 21q22.3, is of particular interest because the gene for progressive myoclonic epilepsy of the Unverricht-Lundborg type (EPM1) maps to this region. Until recently there were only three probes for the 1.3 Mb surrounding the EPM1 gene (D21S141,LJ112, LB2T). This very limited number of probes is problematic for obtaining clone coverage and for confirming map position of newly developed markers in the EPM1 region. To develop new markers, a somatic cell hybrid containing chromosome 21 as its only human complement (GMO8854) was digested with NOT1 and hybridized with D21S141. The fragment hybridizing with D21S141 was excised, amplified by Alu-PCR and the amplification products were cloned and sequenced. Of the fifteen clones sequenced, four were duplicates and one consisted entirely of repeat sequences. STSs were developed for the remaining ten unique clones. To determine the map position of the new STSs, quantitive PCR was used in conjunction with whole genome radiation hybrid (RH) mapping. Quantitative PCR confirmed that the STSs mapped to appropriately sized PFGE fragments and whole genome RH mapping showed that the makers were linked and gave order and distance information. Three of the new STSs are in the EPM1 region, providing additional starting points for obtaining clone coverage and gene isolation. This combination of techniques for developing markers and confirming map position is an effective approach for obtaining probes and has general applicability for regions of the genome not represented in YAC or cosmid libraries.

  4. A Transgenomic Cytogenetic Sorghum (Sorghum propinquum) Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization Map of Maize (Zea mays L.) Pachytene Chromosome 9, Evidence for Regions of Genome Hyperexpansion

    PubMed Central

    Amarillo, F. Ina E.; Bass, Hank W.

    2007-01-01

    A cytogenetic FISH map of maize pachytene-stage chromosome 9 was produced with 32 maize marker-selected sorghum BACs as probes. The genetically mapped markers used are distributed along the linkage maps at an average spacing of 5 cM. Each locus was mapped by means of multicolor direct FISH with a fluorescently labeled probe mix containing a whole-chromosome paint, a single sorghum BAC clone, and the centromeric sequence, CentC. A maize-chromosome-addition line of oat was used for bright unambiguous identification of the maize 9 fiber within pachytene chromosome spreads. The locations of the sorghum BAC–FISH signals were determined, and each new cytogenetic locus was assigned a centiMcClintock position on the short (9S) or long (9L) arm. Nearly all of the markers appeared in the same order on linkage and cytogenetic maps but at different relative positions on the two. The CentC FISH signal was localized between cdo17 (at 9L.03) and tda66 (at 9S.03). Several regions of genome hyperexpansion on maize chromosome 9 were found by comparative analysis of relative marker spacing in maize and sorghum. This transgenomic cytogenetic FISH map creates anchors between various maps of maize and sorghum and creates additional tools and information for understanding the structure and evolution of the maize genome. PMID:17947405

  5. Admixture mapping identifies introgressed genomic regions in North American canids.

    PubMed

    vonHoldt, Bridgett M; Kays, Roland; Pollinger, John P; Wayne, Robert K

    2016-06-01

    Hybrid zones typically contain novel gene combinations that can be tested by natural selection in a unique genetic context. Parental haplotypes that increase fitness can introgress beyond the hybrid zone, into the range of parental species. We used the Affymetrix canine SNP genotyping array to identify genomic regions tagged by multiple ancestry informative markers that are more frequent in an admixed population than expected. We surveyed a hybrid zone formed in the last 100 years as coyotes expanded their range into eastern North America. Concomitant with expansion, coyotes hybridized with wolves and some populations became more wolflike, such that coyotes in the northeast have the largest body size of any coyote population. Using a set of 3102 ancestry informative markers, we identified 60 differentially introgressed regions in 44 canines across this admixture zone. These regions are characterized by an excess of exogenous ancestry and, in northeastern coyotes, are enriched for genes affecting body size and skeletal proportions. Further, introgressed wolf-derived alleles have penetrated into Southern US coyote populations. Because no wolves currently exist in this area, these alleles are unlikely to have originated from recent hybridization. Instead, they probably originated from intraspecific gene flow or ancient admixture. We show that grey wolf and coyote admixture has far-reaching effects and, in addition to phenotypically transforming admixed populations, allows for the differential movement of alleles from different parental species to be tested in new genomic backgrounds.

  6. Saudi Arabian Y-Chromosome diversity and its relationship with nearby regions.

    PubMed

    Abu-Amero, Khaled K; Hellani, Ali; González, Ana M; Larruga, Jose M; Cabrera, Vicente M; Underhill, Peter A

    2009-09-22

    Human origins and migration models proposing the Horn of Africa as a prehistoric exit route to Asia have stimulated molecular genetic studies in the region using uniparental loci. However, from a Y-chromosome perspective, Saudi Arabia, the largest country of the region, has not yet been surveyed. To address this gap, a sample of 157 Saudi males was analyzed at high resolution using 67 Y-chromosome binary markers. In addition, haplotypic diversity for its most prominent J1-M267 lineage was estimated using a set of 17 Y-specific STR loci. Saudi Arabia differentiates from other Arabian Peninsula countries by a higher presence of J2-M172 lineages. It is significantly different from Yemen mainly due to a comparative reduction of sub-Saharan Africa E1-M123 and Levantine J1-M267 male lineages. Around 14% of the Saudi Arabia Y-chromosome pool is typical of African biogeographic ancestry, 17% arrived to the area from the East across Iran, while the remainder 69% could be considered of direct or indirect Levantine ascription. Interestingly, basal E-M96* (n = 2) and J-M304* (n = 3) lineages have been detected, for the first time, in the Arabian Peninsula. Coalescence time for the most prominent J1-M267 haplogroup in Saudi Arabia (11.6 +/- 1.9 ky) is similar to that obtained previously for Yemen (11.3 +/- 2) but significantly older that those estimated for Qatar (7.3 +/- 1.8) and UAE (6.8 +/- 1.5). The Y-chromosome genetic structure of the Arabian Peninsula seems to be mainly modulated by geography. The data confirm that this area has mainly been a recipient of gene flow from its African and Asian surrounding areas, probably mainly since the last Glacial maximum onwards. Although rare deep rooting lineages for Y-chromosome haplogroups E and J have been detected, the presence of more basal clades supportive of the southern exit route of modern humans to Eurasian, were not found.

  7. Regional assignment of the human homebox-containing gene EN1 to chromosome 2q13-q21

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, A.; Muenke, M. ); Logan, C. ); Joyner, A.L. Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Toronto )

    1993-01-01

    The human homeobox-containing genes EN1 and EN2 are closely related to the Drosophila pattern formation gene engrailed (en), which may be important in brain development, as shown by gene expression studies during mouse embryogenesis. Here, we have refined the localization of EN1 to human chromosome 2q13-q21 using a mapping panel of rodent/human cell hybrids containing different regions of chromosome 2 and a lymphoblastoid cell line with an interstitial deletion, del(2) (q21-q23.2). This regional assignment of EN1 increases to 22 the number of currently known genes on human chromosome 2q that have homologs on the proximal region of mouse chromosome 1. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Physical map of the centromeric region of human chromosome 7: relationship between two distinct alpha satellite arrays.

    PubMed Central

    Wevrick, R; Willard, H F

    1991-01-01

    A long-range physical map of the centromeric region of human chromosome 7 has been constructed in order to define the region containing sequences with potential involvement in centromere function. The map is centered around alpha satellite DNA, a family of tandemly repeated DNA forming arrays of hundreds to thousands of kilobasepairs at the primary constriction of every human chromosome. Two distinct alpha satellite arrays (the loci D7Z1 and D7Z2) have previously been localized to chromosome 7. Detailed one- and two- locus maps of the chromosome 7 centromere have been constructed. Our data indicate that D7Z1 and D7Z2 arrays are not interspersed with each other but are both present on a common Mlu I restriction fragment estimated to be 3500 kb and 5500 kb on two different chromosome 7's investigated. These long-range maps, combined with previous measurements of the D7Z1 and D7Z2 array lengths, are used to construct a consensus map of the centromere of chromosome 7. The analysis used to construct the map provides, by extension, a framework for analysis of the structure of DNA in the centromeric regions of other human and mammalian chromosomes. Images PMID:2041770

  9. Genetic and radiation hybrid mapping of the hyperekplexia region on chromosome 5q

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, S.G.; O'Connell, P. ); Dixon, M.J. ); Nigro, M.A. ); Kelts, K.A. ); Markand, O.N. ); Shiang, R.; Wasmuth, J.J. ); Terry, J.C.

    1992-12-01

    Hyperekplexia, or startle disease (STHE), is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder characterized by muscular rigidity of central nervous system origin, particularly in the neonatal period, and by an exaggerated startle response to sudden, unexpected acoustic or tactile stimuli. STHE responds dramatically to the benzodiazepine drug clonazepam, which acts at gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA-A) receptors. The STHE locus (STHE) was recently assigned to chromosome 5q, on the basis of tight linkage to the colony-stimulating factor 1-receptor (CSF1-R) locus in a single large family. The authors performed linkage analysis in the original and three additional STHE pedigrees with eight chromosome 5q microsatellite markers and placed several of the most closely linked markers on an existing radiation hybrid (RH) map of the region. The results provide strong evidence for genetic locus homogeneity and assign STHE to a 5.9-cM interval defined by CSF1-R and D5S379, which are separated by an RH map distance of 74 centirays (roughly 2.2-3.7 Mb). Two polymorphic markers (D5S119 and D5S209) lie within this region, but they could not be ordered with respect to STHE. RH mapping eliminated the candidate genes GABRA1 and GABRG2, which encode GABA-A receptor components, by showing that they are telomeric to the target region. 45 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Subtelomeric regions of yeast chromosomes contain a 36 base-pair tandemly repeated sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, H; Haber, J E

    1984-01-01

    We have determined the nucleotide sequence of a region of DNA derived from the end of one chromosome of the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Inspection of the sequence reveals the presence of 12 tandem direct repeats, each 36 nucleotides long and having nearly identical sequence. Each 36 base-pair repeat can be further subdivided into three tandem sub-repeats of a similar 12 base-pair sequence. Analysis of total genomic yeast DNA from several strains by Southern hybridization suggests that the number of tandem 36 base-pair repeat units may vary from approximately 8 to 25 among different telomeric regions. Differences in the number of repeats may have arisen by unequal crossing over between them. Furthermore, the finding that the pattern of bases at multiple variable positions within the repeat unit is not random suggests that these regions may undergo gene conversion events that render them homogeneous. Images PMID:6091055

  11. Trace Species Identified in Saturn's Northern Storm Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjoraker, Gordon L.; Hesman, B. E.; Achterberg, R. K.

    2011-01-01

    The massive storm at 40degN on Saturn that began in December 2010 has produced significant and lasting effects in the northern hemisphere on temperature and species abundances [I}. The northern storm region was observed at 0.5/cm spectral resolution in March 2011 by Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS). Temperatures in the stratosphere as high as 190 K were derived from CIRS spectra in warm regions referred to as "beacons". Other longitudes exhibit cold temperatures in the upper troposphere. These unusual conditions allow us to identify rare species such as C4H2, C3H4, and CO2 in the stratosphere, as well as to measure changes in the abundance of phosphine (PH3) in the troposphere. Phosphine is a disequilibrium species whose abundance is a tracer of upwelling from the deep atmosphere.

  12. A complex rearrangement on chromosome 22 affecting both homologues; haplo-insufficiency of the Cat eye syndrome region may have no clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Kriek, Marjolein; Szuhai, Karoly; Kant, Sarina G; White, Stefan J; Dauwerse, Hans; Fiegler, Heike; Carter, Nigel P; Knijnenburg, Jeroen; den Dunnen, Johan T; Tanke, Hans J; Breuning, Martijn H; Rosenberg, Carla

    2006-08-01

    The presence of highly homologous sequences, known as low copy repeats, predisposes for unequal recombination within the 22q11 region. This can lead to genomic imbalances associated with several known genetic disorders. We report here a developmentally delayed patient carrying different rearrangements on both chromosome 22 homologues, including a previously unreported rearrangement within the 22q11 region. One homologue carries a deletion of the proximal part of chromosome band 22q11. To our knowledge, a 'pure' deletion of this region has not been described previously. Four copies of this 22q11 region, however, are associated with Cat eye syndrome (CES). While the phenotypic impact of this deletion is unclear, familial investigation revealed five normal relatives carrying this deletion, suggesting that haplo-insufficiency of the CES region has little clinical relevance. The other chromosome 22 homologue carries a duplication of the Velocardiofacial/DiGeorge syndrome (VCFS/DGS) region. In addition, a previously undescribed deletion of 22q12.1, located in a relatively gene-poor region, was identified. As the clinical features of patients suffering from a duplication of the VCFS/DGS region have proven to be extremely variable, it is impossible to postulate as to the contribution of the 22q12.1 deletion to the phenotype of the patient. Additional patients with a deletion within this region are needed to establish the consequences of this copy number alteration. This study highlights the value of using different genomic approaches to unravel chromosomal alterations in order to study their phenotypic impact.

  13. Comparative analysis of chicken chromosome 28 provides new clues to the evolutionary fragility of gene-rich vertebrate regions

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Laurie; Yang, Shan; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; Baggott, Dan; Christensen, Mari; Hamilton, Aaron; Crooijmans, Richard; Groenen, Martien; Lucas, Susan; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Stubbs, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    The chicken genome draft sequence has provided a valuable resource for studies of an important agricultural and experimental model species and an important data set for comparative analysis. However, some of the most gene-rich segments are missing from chicken genome draft assemblies, limiting the analysis of a substantial number of genes and preventing a closer look at regions that are especially prone to syntenic rearrangements. To facilitate the functional and evolutionary analysis of one especially gene-rich, rearrangement-prone genomic region, we analyzed sequence from BAC clones spanning chicken microchromosome GGA28; as a complement we also analyzed a gene-sparse, stable region from GGA11. In these two regions we documented the conservation and lineage-specific gain and loss of protein-coding genes and precisely mapped the locations of 31 major human-chicken syntenic breakpoints. Altogether, we identified 72 lineage-specific genes, many of which are found at or near syntenic breaks, implicating evolutionary breakpoint regions as major sites of genetic innovation and change. Twenty-two of the 31 breakpoint regions have been reused repeatedly as rearrangement breakpoints in vertebrate evolution. Compared with stable GC-matched regions, GGA28 is highly enriched in CpG islands, as are break-prone intervals identified elsewhere in the chicken genome; evolutionary breakpoints are further enriched in GC content and CpG islands, highlighting a potential role for these features in genome instability. These data support the hypothesis that chromosome rearrangements have not occurred randomly over the course of vertebrate evolution but are focused preferentially within “fragile” regions with unusual DNA sequence characteristics. PMID:17921355

  14. RNA sequencing of esophageal adenocarcinomas identifies novel fusion transcripts, including NPC1-MELK, arising from a complex chromosomal rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhixiong; Cheng, Yulan; Abraham, John M; Yan, Rong; Liu, Xi; Chen, Wei; Ibrahim, Sariat; Schroth, Gary P; Ke, Xiquan; He, Yulong; Meltzer, Stephen J

    2017-06-22

    Studies of chromosomal rearrangements and fusion transcripts have elucidated mechanisms of tumorigenesis and led to targeted cancer therapies. This study was aimed at identifying novel fusion transcripts in esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). To identify new fusion transcripts associated with EAC, targeted RNA sequencing and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) verification were performed in 40 EACs and matched nonmalignant specimens from the same patients. Genomic PCR and Sanger sequencing were performed to find the breakpoint of fusion genes. Five novel in-frame fusion transcripts were identified and verified in 40 EACs and in a validation cohort of 15 additional EACs (55 patients in all): fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2)-GRB2-associated binding protein 2 (GAB2) in 2 of 55 or 3.6%, Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1)-maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK) in 2 of 55 or 3.6%, ubiquitin-specific peptidase 54 (USP54)-calcium/calmodulin dependent protein kinase II γ (CAMK2G) in 2 of 55 or 3.6%, megakaryoblastic leukemia (translocation) 1 (MKL1)-fibulin 1 (FBLN1) in 1 of 55 or 1.8%, and CCR4-NOT transcription complex subunit 2 (CNOT2)-chromosome 12 open reading frame 49 (C12orf49) in 1 of 55 or 1.8%. A genomic analysis indicated that NPC1-MELK arose from a complex interchromosomal translocation event involving chromosomes 18, 3, and 9 with 3 rearrangement points, and this was consistent with chromoplexy. These data indicate that fusion transcripts occur at a stable frequency in EAC. Furthermore, our results indicate that chromoplexy is an underlying mechanism that generates fusion transcripts in EAC. These and other fusion transcripts merit further study as diagnostic markers and potential therapeutic targets in EAC. Cancer 2017. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  15. Array-based molecular karyotyping in fetal brain malformations: Identification of novel candidate genes and chromosomal regions.

    PubMed

    Krutzke, Sophia K; Engels, Hartmut; Hofmann, Andrea; Schumann, Madita M; Cremer, Kirsten; Zink, Alexander M; Hilger, Alina; Ludwig, Michael; Gembruch, Ulrich; Reutter, Heiko; Merz, Waltraut M

    2016-01-01

    For the majority of congenital brain malformations, the underlying cause remains unknown. Recent studies have implicated rare copy number variations (CNVs) in their etiology. Here, we used array-based molecular karyotyping to search for causative CNVs in 33 fetuses of terminated pregnancies with prenatally detected brain malformations and additional extracerebral anomalies. In 11 fetuses, we identified 15 CNVs (0.08 Mb to 29.59 Mb), comprising four duplications and eleven deletions. All larger CNVs (> 5 Mb) had also been detected by prenatal conventional karyotyping. None of these CNVs was present in our 1307 healthy in-house controls (frequency < 0.0008). Among these CNVs, we prioritized six chromosomal regions (1q25.1, 5q35.1, 6q25.3-qter, 11p14.3, 15q11.2-q13.1, 18q21.1) due to their previous association with human brain malformations or owing to the presence of a single gene expressed in human brain. Prioritized genes within these regions were UBTD2, SKA1, SVIP, and, most convincingly, GPR52. However, re-sequencing of GPR52 in 100 samples from fetuses with brain malformations or patients with intellectual disability and brain malformations revealed no disease-causing mutation. Our study suggests chromosomal regions 1q25.1, 5q35.1, 6q25.3-qter, 11p14.3, 15q11.2-q13.1, and 18q21.1 to be involved in human brain development. Within three of these regions, we suggest UBTD2, GPR52, and SKA1 as possible candidate genes. Because the overall detection rate of array-based molecular karyotyping was slightly higher (23%) than that of conventional prenatal karyotyping (20%), we suggest it's use for prenatal diagnostic testing in fetuses with nonisolated brain malformations. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Close but Distinct Regions of Human Herpesvirus 8 Latency-Associated Nuclear Antigen 1 Are Responsible for Nuclear Targeting and Binding to Human Mitotic Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Piolot, Tristan; Tramier, Marc; Coppey, Maité; Nicolas, Jean-Claude; Marechal, Vincent

    2001-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 is associated with all forms of Kaposi's sarcoma, AIDS-associated body cavity-based lymphomas, and some forms of multicentric Castleman's disease. Herpesvirus 8, like other gammaherpesviruses, can establish a latent infection in which viral genomes are stably maintained as multiple episomes. The latent nuclear antigen (LANA or LNAI) may play an essential role in the stable maintenance of latent episomes, notably by interacting concomitantly with the viral genomes and the metaphase chromosomes, thus ensuring an efficient transmission of the neoduplicated episomes to the daughter cells. To identify the regions responsible for its nuclear and subnuclear localization in interphase and mitotic cells, LNAI and various truncated forms were fused to a variant of green fluorescent protein. This enabled their localization and chromosome binding activity to be studied by low-light-level fluorescence microscopy in living HeLa cells. The results demonstrate that nuclear localization of LNAI is due to a unique signal, which maps between amino acids 24 and 30. Interestingly, this nuclear localization signal closely resembles those identified in EBNA1 from Epstein-Barr virus and herpesvirus papio. A region encompassing amino acids 5 to 22 was further proved to mediate the specific interaction of LNA1 with chromatin during interphase and the chromosomes during mitosis. The presence of putative phosphorylation sites in the chromosome binding sites of LNA1 and EBNA1 suggests that their activity may be regulated by specific cellular kinases. PMID:11264383

  17. Transcriptionally Active Regions Are the Preferred Targets for Chromosomal HPV Integration in Cervical Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, Irene Kraus; Sandve, Geir Kjetil; Schmitz, Martina; Dürst, Matthias; Hovig, Eivind

    2015-01-01

    Integration of human papillomavirus (HPV) into the host genome is regarded as a determining event in cervical carcinogenesis. However, the exact mechanism for integration, and the role of integration in stimulating cancer progression, is not fully characterized. Although integration sites are reported to appear randomly distributed over all chromosomes, fragile sites, translocation break points and transcriptionally active regions have all been suggested as being preferred sites for integration. In addition, more recent studies have reported integration events occurring within or surrounding essential cancer-related genes, raising the question whether these may reflect key events in the molecular genesis of HPV induced carcinomas. In a search for possible common denominators of the integration sites, we utilized the chromosomal coordinates of 121 viral-cellular fusion transcripts, and examined for statistical overrepresentation of integration sites with various features of ENCODE chromatin information data, using the Genomic HyperBrowser. We find that integration sites coincide with DNA that is transcriptionally active in mucosal epithelium, as judged by the relationship of integration sites to DNase hypersensitivity and H3K4me3 methylation data. Finding an association between integration and transcription is highly informative with regard to the spatio-temporal characteristics of the integration process. These results suggest that integration is an early event in carcinogenesis, more than a late product of chromosomal instability. If the viral integrations were more likely to occur in destabilized regions of the DNA, a completely random distribution of the integration sites would be expected. As a by-product of integration in actively transcribing DNA, a tendency of integration in or close to genes is likely to be observed. This increases the possibility of viral signals to modulate the expression of these genes, potentially contributing to the progression towards

  18. Microhomology-mediated microduplication in the y chromosomal azoospermia factor a region in a male with mild asthenozoospermia.

    PubMed

    Katsumi, Momori; Ishikawa, Hiromichi; Tanaka, Yoko; Saito, Kazuki; Kobori, Yoshitomo; Okada, Hiroshi; Saito, Hidekazu; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Matsubara, Yoichi; Ogata, Tsutomu; Fukami, Maki; Miyado, Mami

    2014-01-01

    Y chromosomal azoospermia factor (AZF) regions AZFa, AZFb and AZFc represent hotspots for copy number variations (CNVs) in the human genome; yet the number of reports of AZFa-linked duplications remains limited. Nonallelic homologous recombination has been proposed as the underlying mechanism of CNVs in AZF regions. In this study, we identified a hitherto unreported microduplication in the AZFa region in a Japanese male individual. The 629,812-bp duplication contained 22 of 46 exons of USP9Y, encoding the putative fine tuner of spermatogenesis, together with all exons of 3 other genes/pseudogenes. The breakpoints of the duplication resided in the DNA/TcMar-Tigger repeat and nonrepeat sequences, respectively, and were associated with a 2-bp microhomology, but not with short nucleotide stretches. The breakpoint-flanking regions were not enriched with GC content, palindromes, or noncanonical DNA structures. Semen analysis of the individual revealed a normal sperm concentration and mildly reduced sperm motility. The paternal DNA sample of the individual was not available for genetic analysis. The results indicate that CNVs in AZF regions can be generated by microhomology-mediated break-induced replication in the absence of known rearrangement-inducing DNA features. AZFa-linked microduplications likely permit production of a normal amount of sperm, although the precise clinical consequences of these CNVs await further investigation.

  19. Levels and Patterns of Nucleotide Variation in Domestication QTL Regions on Rice Chromosome 3 Suggest Lineage-Specific Selection

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xianfa; Molina, Jeanmaire; Hernandez, Ryan; Reynolds, Andy; Boyko, Adam R.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Purugganan, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Oryza sativa or Asian cultivated rice is one of the major cereal grass species domesticated for human food use during the Neolithic. Domestication of this species from the wild grass Oryza rufipogon was accompanied by changes in several traits, including seed shattering, percent seed set, tillering, grain weight, and flowering time. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping has identified three genomic regions in chromosome 3 that appear to be associated with these traits. We would like to study whether these regions show signatures of selection and whether the same genetic basis underlies the domestication of different rice varieties. Fragments of 88 genes spanning these three genomic regions were sequenced from multiple accessions of two major varietal groups in O. sativa—indica and tropical japonica—as well as the ancestral wild rice species O. rufipogon. In tropical japonica, the levels of nucleotide variation in these three QTL regions are significantly lower compared to genome-wide levels, and coalescent simulations based on a complex demographic model of rice domestication indicate that these patterns are consistent with selection. In contrast, there is no significant reduction in nucleotide diversity in the homologous regions in indica rice. These results suggest that there are differences in the genetic and selective basis for domestication between these two Asian rice varietal groups. PMID:21674010

  20. High-resolution physical mapping in Pennisetum squamulatum reveals extensive chromosomal heteromorphism of the genomic region associated with apomixis.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Yukio; Conner, Joann A; Goel, Shailendra; Morishige, Daryl T; Mullet, John E; Hanna, Wayne W; Ozias-Akins, Peggy

    2004-04-01

    Gametophytic apomixis is asexual reproduction as a consequence of parthenogenetic development of a chromosomally unreduced egg. The trait leads to the production of embryos with a maternal genotype, i.e. progeny are clones of the maternal plant. The application of the trait in agriculture could be a tremendous tool for crop improvement through conventional and nonconventional breeding methods. Unfortunately, there are no major crops that reproduce by apomixis, and interspecific hybridization with wild relatives has not yet resulted in commercially viable germplasm. Pennisetum squamulatum is an aposporous apomict from which the gene(s) for apomixis has been transferred to sexual pearl millet by backcrossing. Twelve molecular markers that are linked with apomixis coexist in a tight linkage block called the apospory-specific genomic region (ASGR), and several of these markers have been shown to be hemizygous in the polyploid genome of P. squamulatum. High resolution genetic mapping of these markers has not been possible because of low recombination in this region of the genome. We now show the physical arrangement of bacterial artificial chromosomes containing apomixis-linked molecular markers by high resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization on pachytene chromosomes. The size of the ASGR, currently defined as the entire hemizygous region that hybridizes with apomixis-linked bacterial artificial chromosomes, was estimated on pachytene and mitotic chromosomes to be approximately 50 Mbp (a quarter of the chromosome). The ASGR includes highly repetitive sequences from an Opie-2-like retrotransposon family that are particularly abundant in this region of the genome.

  1. The use of the power density for identifying reconnection regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamrin, M.; Andersson, L.; Vaivads, A.; Pitkänen, T.; Gunell, H.

    2015-10-01

    In the vicinity of magnetic reconnection, magnetic energy is transferred into kinetic energy. A reconnection region hence corresponds to a load, and it should manifest itself as large and positive values of the power density, E·J ≫ 0, where E is the electric field and J the current density. In this article we analyze Cluster plasma sheet data from 2001-2004 to investigate the use of the power density for identifying possible magnetic reconnection events from large sets of observed data. From theoretical arguments we show that an event with E·J≳20 pW/m3 in the Earth's magnetotail observed by the Cluster instruments (X <- 10RE and |Y|≲10RE) is likely to be associated with reconnection. The power density can be used as a primary indicator of potential reconnection regions, but selected events must be reviewed separately to confirm any possible reconnection signatures by looking for other signatures such as Hall electric and magnetic fields and reconnection jets. The power density can be computed from multispacecraft data, and we argue that the power density can be used as a tool for identifying possible reconnection events from large sets of data, e.g., from the Cluster and the Magnetospheric Multiscale missions.

  2. Identifying Infection Sources and Regions in Large Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wuqiong; Tay, Wee Peng; Leng, Mei

    2013-06-01

    Identifying the infection sources in a network, including the index cases that introduce a contagious disease into a population network, the servers that inject a computer virus into a computer network, or the individuals who started a rumor in a social network, plays a critical role in limiting the damage caused by the infection through timely quarantine of the sources. We consider the problem of estimating the infection sources and the infection regions (subsets of nodes infected by each source) in a network, based only on knowledge of which nodes are infected and their connections, and when the number of sources is unknown a priori. We derive estimators for the infection sources and their infection regions based on approximations of the infection sequences count. We prove that if there are at most two infection sources in a geometric tree, our estimator identifies the true source or sources with probability going to one as the number of infected nodes increases. When there are more than two infection sources, and when the maximum possible number of infection sources is known, we propose an algorithm with quadratic complexity to estimate the actual number and identities of the infection sources. Simulations on various kinds of networks, including tree networks, small-world networks and real world power grid networks, and tests on two real data sets are provided to verify the performance of our estimators.

  3. Physical and transcriptional map of a 3-Mb region of mouse chromosome 1 containing the gene for the neural tube defect mutant loop-tail (Lp).

    PubMed

    Eddleston, J; Murdoch, J N; Copp, A J; Stanier, P

    1999-03-01

    The Lp mouse mutant provides a model for the severe human neural tube defect (NTD), cranio-rachischisis. To identify the Lp gene, a positional cloning approach has been adopted. Previously, linkage analysis in a large intraspecific backcross was used to map the Lp locus to distal mouse chromosome 1. Here we report a detailed physical map of this region. The interval surrounding Lp has been cloned in a yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contig consisting of 63 clones spanning approximately 3.2 Mb. Fifty sequence tagged sites (STSs) have been used to construct the contig and establish marker order across the interval. Based on the high level of conserved synteny between distal mouse chromosome 1 and human 1q21-q24, many of these STSs were designed from expressed sequences identified by cross-screening human and mouse databases of expressed sequence tags. Added to other known genes in the region, a total of 29 genes were located and ordered within the contig. Seven novel polymorphisms were identified within the region, allowing refinement of the genetic map and a reduction in the size of the physical interval containing the Lp gene. The Lp interval, between D1Mit113 and Tagln2, can be spanned by two nonchimeric overlapping YACs that define a physical distance of approximately 1 Mb. Within this region, 10 potential candidate genes have been mapped. The materials and genes described here will provide a resource for the identification and further study of the mutated Lp gene that causes this severe neural tube defect and will provide candidates for other defects known to map to the homologous region on human chromosome 1q.

  4. Simple Model for Identifying Critical Regions in Atrial Fibrillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Kim; Manani, Kishan A.; Peters, Nicholas S.

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common abnormal heart rhythm and the single biggest cause of stroke. Ablation, destroying regions of the atria, is applied largely empirically and can be curative but with a disappointing clinical success rate. We design a simple model of activation wave front propagation on an anisotropic structure mimicking the branching network of heart muscle cells. This integration of phenomenological dynamics and pertinent structure shows how AF emerges spontaneously when the transverse cell-to-cell coupling decreases, as occurs with age, beyond a threshold value. We identify critical regions responsible for the initiation and maintenance of AF, the ablation of which terminates AF. The simplicity of the model allows us to calculate analytically the risk of arrhythmia and express the threshold value of transversal cell-to-cell coupling as a function of the model parameters. This threshold value decreases with increasing refractory period by reducing the number of critical regions which can initiate and sustain microreentrant circuits. These biologically testable predictions might inform ablation therapies and arrhythmic risk assessment.

  5. Identifying regions vulnerable to habitat degradation under future irrigation scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrado, Marta; Sabater, Sergi; Acuña, Vicenç

    2016-11-01

    The loss and degradation of natural habitats is a primary cause of biodiversity decline. The increasing impacts of climate and land use change affect water availability, ultimately decreasing agricultural production. Areas devoted to irrigation have been increased to compensate this reduction, causing habitat and biodiversity losses, especially in regions undergoing severe water stress. These effects might intensify under global change, probably contributing to a decrease in habitat quality. We selected four European river basins across a gradient of water scarcity and irrigation agriculture. The habitat quality in the basins was assessed as a function of habitat suitability and threats under current and future global change scenarios of irrigation. Results revealed that the most threatened regions under future scenarios of global change were among those suffering of water scarcity and with bigger areas devoted to irrigation. Loss of habitat quality reached 10% in terrestrial and 25% in aquatic ecosystems under climate change scenarios involving drier conditions. The aquatic habitats were the most degraded in all scenarios, since they were affected by threats from both the terrestrial and the aquatic parts of the basin. By identifying in advance the regions most vulnerable to habitat and biodiversity loss, our approach can assist decision makers in deciding the conservation actions to be prioritized for mitigation and adaptation to the effects of climate change, particularly front the development of irrigation plans.

  6. Simple Model for Identifying Critical Regions in Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Nicholas S.

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common abnormal heart rhythm and the single biggest cause of stroke. Ablation, destroying regions of the atria, is applied largely empirically and can be curative but with a disappointing clinical success rate. We design a simple model of activation wave front propagation on an anisotropic structure mimicking the branching network of heart muscle cells. This integration of phenomenological dynamics and pertinent structure shows how AF emerges spontaneously when the transverse cell-to-cell coupling decreases, as occurs with age, beyond a threshold value. We identify critical regions responsible for the initiation and maintenance of AF, the ablation of which terminates AF. The simplicity of the model allows us to calculate analytically the risk of arrhythmia and express the threshold value of transversal cell-to-cell coupling as a function of the model parameters. This threshold value decreases with increasing refractory period by reducing the number of critical regions which can initiate and sustain microreentrant circuits. These biologically testable predictions might inform ablation therapies and arrhythmic risk assessment. PMID:25635565

  7. Genomic Structure and Evolution of the Ancestral Chromosome Fusion Site in 2q13–2q14.1 and Paralogous Regions on Other Human Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yuxin; Linardopoulou, Elena; Friedman, Cynthia; Williams, Eleanor; Trask, Barbara J.

    2002-01-01

    Human chromosome 2 was formed by the head-to-head fusion of two ancestral chromosomes that remained separate in other primates. Sequences that once resided near the ends of the ancestral chromosomes are now interstitially located in 2q13–2q14.1. Portions of these sequences had duplicated to other locations prior to the fusion. Here we present analyses of the genomic structure and evolutionary history of >600 kb surrounding the fusion site and closely related sequences on other human chromosomes. Sequence blocks that closely flank the inverted arrays of degenerate telomere repeats marking the fusion site are duplicated at many, primarily subtelomeric, locations. In addition, large portions of a 168-kb centromere-proximal block are duplicated at 9pter, 9p11.2, and 9q13, with 98%–99% average sequence identity. A 67-kb block on the distal side of the fusion site is highly homologous to sequences at 22qter. A third ∼100-kb segment is 96% identical to a region in 2q11.2. By integrating data on the extent and similarity of these paralogous blocks, including the presence of phylogenetically informative repetitive elements, with observations of their chromosomal distribution in nonhuman primates, we infer the order of the duplications that led to their current arrangement. Several of these duplicated blocks may be associated with breakpoints of inversions that occurred during primate evolution and of recurrent chromosome rearrangements in humans. [Supplemental material is available online at http://www.genome.org. The following individuals kindly provided reagents, samples, or unpublished information as indicated in the paper: T. Newman, C. Harris, and J. Young.] PMID:12421751

  8. The FSHD region on human chromosome 4q35 contains potential coding regions among pseudogenes and a high density of repeat elements.

    PubMed

    van Geel, M; Heather, L J; Lyle, R; Hewitt, J E; Frants, R R; de Jong, P J

    1999-10-01

    The distal end of chromosome 4q contains the locus involved in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD1). Specific genomic deletions within a tandem DNA repeat (D4Z4) are associated with the disease status, but no causal genes have yet been discovered. In a systematic search for genes, a 161-kb stretch of genomic DNA proximal to D4Z4 was sequenced, analyzed for homologies, and subjected to gene prediction programs. A major fraction (45%) of the subtelomeric region is composed of repeat sequences attributable mainly to LINE-1 elements. Apart from the previously identified FRG1 and TUB4q sequences, several additional potential coding regions were identified by analyzing the sequence with exon prediction programs. So far, we have been unable to demonstrate transcripts by RT-PCR or cDNA library hybridization. However, several retrotransposed pseudogenes were identified. The high density of pseudogenes and repeat elements is consistent with the subtelomeric location of this region and explains why previous transcript identification studies have been problematic.

  9. Affected Kindred Analysis of Human X Chromosome Exomes to Identify Novel X-Linked Intellectual Disability Genes

    PubMed Central

    Niranjan, Tejasvi S.; Skinner, Cindy; May, Melanie; Turner, Tychele; Rose, Rebecca; Stevenson, Roger; Schwartz, Charles E.; Wang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    X-linked Intellectual Disability (XLID) is a group of genetically heterogeneous disorders caused by mutations in genes on the X chromosome. Deleterious mutations in ~10% of X chromosome genes are implicated in causing XLID disorders in ~50% of known and suspected XLID families. The remaining XLID genes are expected to be rare and even private to individual families. To systematically identify these XLID genes, we sequenced the X chromosome exome (X-exome) in 56 well-established XLID families (a single affected male from 30 families and two affected males from 26 families) using an Agilent SureSelect X-exome kit and the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. To enrich for disease-causing mutations, we first utilized variant filters based on dbSNP, the male-restricted portions of the 1000 Genomes Project, or the Exome Variant Server datasets. However, these databases present limitations as automatic filters for enrichment of XLID genes. We therefore developed and optimized a strategy that uses a cohort of affected male kindred pairs and an additional small cohort of affected unrelated males to enrich for potentially pathological variants and to remove neutral variants. This strategy, which we refer to as Affected Kindred/Cross-Cohort Analysis, achieves a substantial enrichment for potentially pathological variants in known XLID genes compared to variant filters from public reference databases, and it has identified novel XLID candidate genes. We conclude that Affected Kindred/Cross-Cohort Analysis can effectively enrich for disease-causing genes in rare, Mendelian disorders, and that public reference databases can be used effectively, but cautiously, as automatic filters for X-linked disorders. PMID:25679214

  10. Affected kindred analysis of human X chromosome exomes to identify novel X-linked intellectual disability genes.

    PubMed

    Niranjan, Tejasvi S; Skinner, Cindy; May, Melanie; Turner, Tychele; Rose, Rebecca; Stevenson, Roger; Schwartz, Charles E; Wang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    X-linked Intellectual Disability (XLID) is a group of genetically heterogeneous disorders caused by mutations in genes on the X chromosome. Deleterious mutations in ~10% of X chromosome genes are implicated in causing XLID disorders in ~50% of known and suspected XLID families. The remaining XLID genes are expected to be rare and even private to individual families. To systematically identify these XLID genes, we sequenced the X chromosome exome (X-exome) in 56 well-established XLID families (a single affected male from 30 families and two affected males from 26 families) using an Agilent SureSelect X-exome kit and the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. To enrich for disease-causing mutations, we first utilized variant filters based on dbSNP, the male-restricted portions of the 1000 Genomes Project, or the Exome Variant Server datasets. However, these databases present limitations as automatic filters for enrichment of XLID genes. We therefore developed and optimized a strategy that uses a cohort of affected male kindred pairs and an additional small cohort of affected unrelated males to enrich for potentially pathological variants and to remove neutral variants. This strategy, which we refer to as Affected Kindred/Cross-Cohort Analysis, achieves a substantial enrichment for potentially pathological variants in known XLID genes compared to variant filters from public reference databases, and it has identified novel XLID candidate genes. We conclude that Affected Kindred/Cross-Cohort Analysis can effectively enrich for disease-causing genes in rare, Mendelian disorders, and that public reference databases can be used effectively, but cautiously, as automatic filters for X-linked disorders.

  11. High-density marker profiling confirms ancestral genomes of Avena species and identifies D-genome chromosomes of hexaploid oat.

    PubMed

    Yan, Honghai; Bekele, Wubishet A; Wight, Charlene P; Peng, Yuanying; Langdon, Tim; Latta, Robert G; Fu, Yong-Bi; Diederichsen, Axel; Howarth, Catherine J; Jellen, Eric N; Boyle, Brian; Wei, Yuming; Tinker, Nicholas A

    2016-11-01

    Genome analysis of 27 oat species identifies ancestral groups, delineates the D genome, and identifies ancestral origin of 21 mapped chromosomes in hexaploid oat. We investigated genomic relationships among 27 species of the genus Avena using high-density genetic markers revealed by genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS). Two methods of GBS analysis were used: one based on tag-level haplotypes that were previously mapped in cultivated hexaploid oat (A. sativa), and one intended to sample and enumerate tag-level haplotypes originating from all species under investigation. Qualitatively, both methods gave similar predictions regarding the clustering of species and shared ancestral genomes. Furthermore, results were consistent with previous phylogenies of the genus obtained with conventional approaches, supporting the robustness of whole genome GBS analysis. Evidence is presented to justify the final and definitive classification of the tetraploids A. insularis, A. maroccana (=A. magna), and A. murphyi as containing D-plus-C genomes, and not A-plus-C genomes, as is most often specified in past literature. Through electronic painting of the 21 chromosome representations in the hexaploid oat consensus map, we show how the relative frequency of matches between mapped hexaploid-derived haplotypes and AC (DC)-genome tetraploids vs. A- and C-genome diploids can accurately reveal the genome origin of all hexaploid chromosomes, including the approximate positions of inter-genome translocations. Evidence is provided that supports the continued classification of a diverged B genome in AB tetraploids, and it is confirmed that no extant A-genome diploids, including A. canariensis, are similar enough to the D genome of tetraploid and hexaploid oat to warrant consideration as a D-genome diploid.

  12. Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis. Final progress report, 1 March 1991--28 February 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, F.T.

    1994-04-01

    The objectives of this grant proposal include (1) development of a chromosome microdissection and PCR-mediated microcloning technology, (2) application of this microtechnology to the construction of region-specific libraries for human genome analysis. During this grant period, the authors have successfully developed this microtechnology and have applied it to the construction of microdissection libraries for the following chromosome regions: a whole chromosome 21 (21E), 2 region-specific libraries for the long arm of chromosome 2, 2q35-q37 (2Q1) and 2q33-q35 (2Q2), and 4 region-specific libraries for the entire short arm of chromosome 2, 2p23-p25 (2P1), 2p21-p23 (2P2), 2p14-p16 (wP3) and 2p11-p13 (2P4). In addition, 20--40 unique sequence microclones have been isolated and characterized for genomic studies. These region-specific libraries and the single-copy microclones from the library have been used as valuable resources for (1) isolating microsatellite probes in linkage analysis to further refine the disease locus; (2) isolating corresponding clones with large inserts, e.g. YAC, BAC, P1, cosmid and phage, to facilitate construction of contigs for high resolution physical mapping; and (3) isolating region-specific cDNA clones for use as candidate genes. These libraries are being deposited in the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) for general distribution.

  13. Identification of human chromosome region 3p14. 2-21. 3-specific YAC clones using Alu-PCR products from a radiation hybrid

    SciTech Connect

    Siden, T.S.; Drumheller, T.; Smith, S.E.; Smith, D.I. ); Kumlien, J.; Lehrach, H. ); Roehme, D. )

    1994-03-01

    Deletion of DNA sequences from at least three different regions on the short arm of human chromosome 3 (3p13-14, 3p21 and 3p25) are frequently observed during the development of many solid tumors, including lung cancers and renal cell carcinomas. In order to physically characterize the 3p21 region, the authors previously identified a radiation fusion hybrid that contained about 20 megabases of DNA from chromosome region 3p14.2p21.3. In this study total Alu-PCR products from this hybrid were used as a probe to isolate 86 yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) clones from a 620-kb average insert YAC library (ICRF). Sixty-nine Alu-PCR markers, generated from the YACs, and seven PCR primers were used to screen for overlaps between individual clones. Seven contigs were identified encompassing 32 YAC clones. Based on previous information about localization of the PCR primers, the three largest contigs could be assigned to smaller subregions between 3p14.2 and 3p21.3. By this work a large proportion of the 3p14.21.3 region is covered with large-insert YAC clones.

  14. Characterization of the breakpoint regions of a pericentric inversion on chromosome 6

    SciTech Connect

    Gastier, J.M.; Brody, T.; Charfat, O.

    1994-09-01

    We are attempting to clone the breakpoints of a pericentric inversion [inv(6)(p23q23.1)] which segregates in a three generation family. Phenotypic abnormalities associated with this chromosome anomaly include senori-neural hearing loss, eye (anterior segment) abnormalities, dental anomalies, and mild mental retardation. The breakpoints have been microdissected and a small insert library was created. More than 100 sequence tagged sites (STSs) have been developed from these clones for screening of the CEPH mega-YAC library. This work will yield a high density physical map of the breakpoint regions for further characterization of the loci. YACs from the region are being screened by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to obtain a YAC which crosses the breakpoint as an initial step in defining the molecular basis of the disease phenotype. Progress towards cloning of the breakpoints will be described.

  15. Linking of the human immunoglobulin VK and JKCK regions by chromosomal walking.

    PubMed

    Klobeck, H G; Zimmer, F J; Combriato, G; Zachau, H G

    1987-12-10

    The linking of the human VK and JKCK gene regions (abbreviations in ref. 1) by chromosomal walking is reported. Hybridization experiments with the DNA of a somatic cell hybrid containing the region between JKCK and the telomer show that none of the major VK gene clusters is located downstream of CK. The distance between the VK and JK genes was found to be 23 kb. The JK proximal VK gene is the B3 gene which is the only representative of subgroup IV in the genome. This gene and the neighbouring B2 gene (accompanying paper) are arranged in opposite orientation to JKCK and can therefore rearrange only by an inversion mechanism. This finding is used, together with previous data, to delineate the rearrangement processes in the Burkitt lymphoma derived cell line BL21 as comprising an inversion in the first and a deletion in the second step.

  16. Characterization of a gene from the EDM1-PSACH region of human chromosome 19p

    SciTech Connect

    Lennon, G.G.; Giorgi, D.; Martin, J.R.

    1994-09-01

    Genetic linkage mapping has indicated that both multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (EDM1), a dominantly inherited chondrodysplasia, and pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH), a skeletal disorder associated with dwarfism, map to a 2-3 Mb region of human chromosome 19p. We have isolated a partial cDNA from this region using hybrid selection, and report on progress towards the characterization of the genomic structure and transcription of the corresponding gene. Sequence analysis of the cDNA to date indicates that this gene is likely to be expressed within extracellular matrix tissues. Defects in this gene or neighboring gene family members may therefore lead to EDM1, PSACH, or other connective tissue and skeletal disorders.

  17. Genome-Based Identification of Chromosomal Regions Specific for Salmonella spp.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen-Wester, Imke; Hensel, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Acquisition of genomic elements by horizontal gene transfer represents an important mechanism in the evolution of bacterial species. Pathogenicity islands are a subset of horizontally acquired elements present in various pathogens. These elements are frequently located adjacent to tRNA genes. We performed a comparative genome analysis of Salmonella enterica serovars Typhi and Typhimurium and Escherichia coli and scanned tRNA loci for the presence of species-specific, horizontally acquired genomic elements. A large number of species-specific elements were identified. Here, we describe the characteristics of four large chromosomal insertions at tRNA genes of Salmonella spp. The tRNA-associated elements harbor various genes previously identified as single virulence genes, indicating that these genes have been acquired with large chromosomal insertions. Southern blot analyses confirmed that the tRNA-associated elements are specific to Salmonella and also indicated a heterogeneous distribution within the salmonellae. Systematic scanning for insertions at tRNA genes thus represents a tool for the identification of novel pathogenicity islands. PMID:11953370

  18. The sequence organization of Yp/proximal Xq homologous regions of the human sex chromosomes is highly conserved.

    PubMed

    Sargent, C A; Briggs, H; Chalmers, I J; Lambson, B; Walker, E; Affara, N A

    1996-03-01

    Detailed deletion analysis of patients with breakpoints in Yp has allowed the definition of two distinct intervals on the Y chromosome short arm outside the pseudoautosomal region that are homologous to Xq2l.3. Detailed YAC contigs have been developed over these regions on both the X and Y chromosomes, and the relative order of markers has been compared to assess whether rearrangements on either sex chromosome have occurred since the transposition events creating these patterns of homology. On the X chromosome, the region forms almost one contiguous block of homology, whereas on the Y chromosome, there has been one major rearrangement leading to the two separate Yp-Xq2l blocks of homology. The rearrangement breakpoint has been mapped. Within these separate X-Y homologous blocks on Yp, the order of loci homologous to X has been conserved to a high degree between the sex chromosomes. With the exception of the amelogenin gene (proximal Yp block), all the XY homologous sequences in the two Yp blocks have homolognes in Xq2l.3, with the former having its X counterpart in Xp22.2. This suggests an independent evolutionary event leading to the formation of the amelogenin X-Y homology.

  19. The sequence organization of Yp/proximal Xq homologous regions of the human sex chromosomes is highly conserved

    SciTech Connect

    Sargent, C.A.; Briggs, H.; Chalmers, I.J.

    1996-03-01

    Detailed deletion analysis of patients with breakpoints in Yp has allowed the definition of two distinct intervals on the Y chromosome short arm outside the pseudoautosomal region that are homologous to Xq21.3. Detailed YAC contigs have been developed over these regions on both the X and Y chromosomes, and the relative order of markers has been compared to assess whether rearrangements on either sex chromosome have occurred since the transposition events creating these patterns of homology. On the X chromosome, the region forms almost one contiguous block of homology, whereas on the Y chromosome, there has been one major rearrangement leading to the two separate Yp-Xq21 blocks of homology. The rearrangement breakpoint has been mapped. Within these separate X-Y homologous blocks on Yp, the order of loci homologous to X has been conserved to a high degree between the sex chromosomes. With the exception of the amelogenin gene (proximal Yp block), all the X-Y homologous sequences in the two Yp blocks have homologues in Xq21.3, with the former having its X counterpart in Xp22.2. This suggests an independent evolutionary event leading to the formation of the amelogenin X-Y homology. 45 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Comparative transcription map of the wobbler critical region on mouse chromosome 11 and the homologous region on human chromosome 2p13-14

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Sonja; Resch, Karin; Thiel, Cora; Ulbrich, Michael; Platzer, Matthias; Jockusch, Harald; Schmitt-John, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Background To support the positional cloning of the mouse mutation wobbler (wr) the corresponding regions on human Chr2p13-14 and mouse Chr11 were analyzed in detail and compared with respect to gene content, order, and orientation. Results The gene content of the investigated regions was highly conserved between the two species: 20 orthologous genes were identified on our BAC/YAC contig comprising 4.5 Mb between REL/Rel and RAB1A/Rab1a. Exceptions were pseudogenes ELP and PX19 whose mouse counterparts were not located within the analyzed region. Two independently isolated genomic clones indicate an inversion between man and mouse with the inverted segment being identical to the wobbler critical interval. We investigated the wobbler critical region by extensive STS/EST mapping and genomic sequencing. Additionally, the full-length cDNA sequences of four newly mapped genes as well as the previously mapped gene Otx1 were established and subjected to mutation analysis. Our data indicate that all genes in the wr critical region have been identified. Conclusion Unexpectedly, neither mutation analysis of cDNAs nor levels of mRNAs indicated which of the candidate genes might be affected by the wr mutation. The possibility arises that there might be hitherto unknown effects of mutations, in addition to structural changes of the mRNA or regulatory abnormalities. PMID:12174196

  1. A melanocyte-specific gene, Pmel 17, maps near the silver coat color locus on mouse chromosome 10 and is in a syntenic region on human chromosome 12

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, B.S.; Chintamaneni, C.; Kobayashi, Y.; Kim, K.K. ); Kozak, C.A. ); Copeland, N.G.; Gilbert, D.J.; Jenkins, N. ); Barton, D.; Francke, U. )

    1991-10-15

    Melanocytes preferentially express an mRNA species, Pmel 17, whose protein product cross-reacts with anti-tyrosinase antibodies and whose expression correlates with the melanin content. The authors have now analyzed the deduced protein structure and mapped its chromosomal location in mouse and human. The amino acid sequence deduced from the nucleotide sequence of the Pmel 17 cDNA showed that the protein is composed of 645 amino acids with a molecular weight of 68,600. The Pmel 17 protein contains a putative leader sequence and a potential membrane anchor segment, which indicates that this may be a membrane-associated protein in melanocytes. The deduced protein contains five potential N-glycosylation sites and relatively high levels of serine and threonine. Three repeats of a 26-amino acid motif appear in the middle of the molecule. The human Pmel 17 gene, designated D12S53E, maps to chromosome 12, region 12pter-q21; and the mouse homologue, designated D12S53Eh, maps to the distal region of mouse chromosome 10, a region also known to carry the coat color locus si (silver).

  2. Physical map-based sizes of the centromeric regions of Arabidopsis thaliana chromosomes 1, 2, and 3.

    PubMed

    Hosouchi, Tsutomu; Kumekawa, Norikazu; Tsuruoka, Hisano; Kotani, Hirokazu

    2002-08-31

    The sizes of the centromeric regions of Arabidopsis thaliana chromosomes 1, 2, and 3 were determined by construction of their physical maps on the basis of restriction analysis. As the reported centromeric regions contain large gaps in the middle due to highly repetitive sequences, appropriate probes for Southern hybridization were prepared from the sequences reported for the flanking regions and from the sequences of BAC and YAC clones newly isolated in this work, and restriction analysis was performed using DNA of a hypomethylated strain (ddm1). The sizes of the genetically defined centromeric regions were deduced to be 9 megabases (Mb), 4.2 Mb and 4.1 Mb, respectively (chromosome 1, from markers T22C23-t7 to T3P8-sp6; chromosome 2, from F5J15-sp6 to T15D9; chromosome 3, from T9G9-sp6 to T15M14; G. P. Copenhaver et al. Science, 286, 2468-2479, 1999). By combining the sizes of the centromeric regions previously estimated for chromosomes 4 and 5 and the sequence data reported for the A. thaliana genome, the total genome size of A. thaliana was estimated to be approximately 146.0 Mb.

  3. Identifying Unstable Regions of Proteins Involved in Misfolding Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guest, Will; Cashman, Neil; Plotkin, Steven

    2009-05-01

    Protein misfolding is a necessary step in the pathogenesis of many diseases, including Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (fALS). Identifying unstable structural elements in their causative proteins elucidates the early events of misfolding and presents targets for inhibition of the disease process. An algorithm was developed to calculate the Gibbs free energy of unfolding for all sequence-contiguous regions of a protein using three methods to parameterize energy changes: a modified G=o model, changes in solvent-accessible surface area, and all-atoms molecular dynamics. The entropic effects of disulfide bonds and post-translational modifications are treated analytically. It incorporates a novel method for finding local dielectric constants inside a protein to accurately handle charge effects. We have predicted the unstable parts of prion protein and superoxide dismutase 1, the proteins involved in CJD and fALS respectively, and have used these regions as epitopes to prepare antibodies that are specific to the misfolded conformation and show promise as therapeutic agents.

  4. Evolution of sex chromosomes ZW of Schistosoma mansoni inferred from chromosome paint and BAC mapping analyses.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Hirohisa; Hirai, Yuriko; LoVerde, Philip T

    2012-12-01

    Chromosomes of schistosome parasites among digenetic flukes have a unique evolution because they exhibit the sex chromosomes ZW, which are not found in the other groups of flukes that are hermaphrodites. We conducted molecular cytogenetic analyses for investigating the sex chromosome evolution using chromosome paint analysis and BAC clones mapping. To carry this out, we developed a technique for making paint probes of genomic DNA from a single scraped chromosome segment using a chromosome microdissection system, and a FISH mapping technique for BAC clones. Paint probes clearly identified each of the 8 pairs of chromosomes by a different fluorochrome color. Combination analysis of chromosome paint analysis with Z/W probes and chromosome mapping with 93 BAC clones revealed that the W chromosome of Schistosoma mansoni has evolved by at least four inversion events and heterochromatinization. Nine of 93 BAC clones hybridized with both the Z and W chromosomes, but the locations were different between Z and W chromosomes. The homologous regions were estimated to have moved from the original Z chromosome to the differentiated W chromosome by three inversions events that occurred before W heterohcromatinization. An inversion that was observed in the heterochromatic region of the W chromosome likely occurred after W heterochromatinization. These inversions and heterochromatinization are hypothesized to be the key factors that promoted the evolution of the W chromosome of S. mansoni. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of inversion polymorphism on the neutral nucleotide variability of linked chromosomal regions in Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, A; Barbadilla, A; Ruiz, A

    2000-01-01

    Recombination is a main factor determining nucleotide variability in different regions of the genome. Chromosomal inversions, which are ubiquitous in the genus Drosophila, are known to reduce and redistribute recombination, and thus their specific effect on nucleotide variation may be of major importance as an explanatory factor for levels of DNA variation. Here, we use the coalescent approach to study this effect. First, we develop analytical expressions to predict nucleotide variability in old inversion polymorphisms that have reached mutation-drift-flux equilibrium. The effects on nucleotide variability of a new arrangement appearing in the population and reaching a stable polymorphism are then studied by computer simulation. We show that inversions modulate nucleotide variability in a complex way. The establishment of an inversion polymorphism involves a partial selective sweep that eliminates part of the variability in the population. This is followed by a slow convergence to the equilibrium values. During this convergence, regions close to the breakpoints exhibit much lower variability than central regions. However, at equilibrium, regions close to the breakpoints have higher levels of variability and differentiation between arrangements than regions in the middle of the inverted segment. The implications of these findings for overall variability levels during the evolution of Drosophila species are discussed. PMID:10835391

  6. Chromosome X-wide association study identifies Loci for fasting insulin and height and evidence for incomplete dosage compensation.

    PubMed

    Tukiainen, Taru; Pirinen, Matti; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Ladenvall, Claes; Kettunen, Johannes; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Perola, Markus; Sinisalo, Juha; Vlachopoulou, Efthymia; Eriksson, Johan G; Groop, Leif; Jula, Antti; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Raitakari, Olli T; Salomaa, Veikko; Ripatti, Samuli

    2014-02-01

    The X chromosome (chrX) represents one potential source for the "missing heritability" for complex phenotypes, which thus far has remained underanalyzed in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Here we demonstrate the benefits of including chrX in GWAS by assessing the contribution of 404,862 chrX SNPs to levels of twelve commonly studied cardiometabolic and anthropometric traits in 19,697 Finnish and Swedish individuals with replication data on 5,032 additional Finns. By using a linear mixed model, we estimate that on average 2.6% of the additive genetic variance in these twelve traits is attributable to chrX, this being in proportion to the number of SNPs in the chromosome. In a chrX-wide association analysis, we identify three novel loci: two for height (rs182838724 near FGF16/ATRX/MAGT1, joint P-value = 2.71×10(-9), and rs1751138 near ITM2A, P-value = 3.03×10(-10)) and one for fasting insulin (rs139163435 in Xq23, P-value = 5.18×10(-9)). Further, we find that effect sizes for variants near ITM2A, a gene implicated in cartilage development, show evidence for a lack of dosage compensation. This observation is further supported by a sex-difference in ITM2A expression in whole blood (P-value = 0.00251), and is also in agreement with a previous report showing ITM2A escapes from X chromosome inactivation (XCI) in the majority of women. Hence, our results show one of the first links between phenotypic variation in a population sample and an XCI-escaping locus and pinpoint ITM2A as a potential contributor to the sexual dimorphism in height. In conclusion, our study provides a clear motivation for including chrX in large-scale genetic studies of complex diseases and traits.

  7. Different genetic components in the Ethiopian population, identified by mtDNA and Y-chromosome polymorphisms.

    PubMed Central

    Passarino, G; Semino, O; Quintana-Murci, L; Excoffier, L; Hammer, M; Santachiara-Benerecetti, A S

    1998-01-01

    Seventy-seven Ethiopians were investigated for mtDNA and Y chromosome-specific variations, in order to (1) define the different maternal and paternal components of the Ethiopian gene pool, (2) infer the origins of these maternal and paternal lineages and estimate their relative contributions, and (3) obtain information about ancient populations living in Ethiopia. The mtDNA was studied for the RFLPs relative to the six classical enzymes (HpaI, BamHI, HaeII, MspI, AvaII, and HincII) that identify the African haplogroup L and the Caucasoid haplogroups I and T. The sample was also examined at restriction sites that define the other Caucasoid haplogroups (H, U, V, W, X, J, and K) and for the simultaneous presence of the DdeI10394 and AluI10397 sites, which defines the Asian haplogroup M. Four polymorphic systems were examined on the Y chromosome: the TaqI/12f2 and the 49a,f RFLPs, the Y Alu polymorphic element (DYS287), and the sY81-A/G (DYS271) polymorphism. For comparison, the last two Y polymorphisms were also examined in 87 Senegalese previously classified for the two TaqI RFLPs. Results from these markers led to the hypothesis that the Ethiopian population (1) experienced Caucasoid gene flow mainly through males, (2) contains African components ascribable to Bantu migrations and to an in situ differentiation process from an ancestral African gene pool, and (3) exhibits some Y-chromosome affinities with the Tsumkwe San (a very ancient African group). Our finding of a high (20%) frequency of the "Asian" DdeI10394AluI10397 (++) mtDNA haplotype in Ethiopia is discussed in terms of the "out of Africa" model. PMID:9463310

  8. Molecular topography of the secondary constriction region (qh) of human chromosome 9 with an unusual euchromatic band

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, R.S.; Luk, S.; Brennan, J.P.; Mathews, T.; Conte, R.A.; Macera, M.J. )

    1993-05-01

    Heterochromatin confined to pericentromeric (c) and secondary constriction (qh) regions plays a major role in morphological variation of chromosome 9, because of its size and affinity for pericentric inversion. Consequently, pairing at pachytene may lead to some disturbances between homologous chromosomes having such extreme variations and may result in abnormalities involving bands adjacent to the qh region. The authors encountered such a case, where a G-positive band has originated de nova, suggesting a maternal origin from the chromosome 9 that has had a complete pericentric inversion. In previously reported cases, the presence of an extra G-positive band within the 9qh region has been familial, and in the majority of those cases it was not associated with any clinical consequences. Therefore, this anomaly has been referred to as a [open quotes]rare[close quotes] variant. The qh region consists of a mixture of various tandemly repeated DNA sequences, and routine banding techniques have failed to characterize the origin of this extra genetic material. By the chromosome in situ suppression hybridization technique using whole chromosome paint, the probe annealed with the extra G-band, suggesting a euchromatic origin from chromosome 9, presumably band p12. By the fluorescence in situ hybridization technique using alpha- and beta-satellite probes, the dicentric nature was further revealed, supporting the concept of unequal crossing-over during maternal meiosis I, which could account for a duplication of the h region. The G-positive band most likely became genetically inert when it was sandwiched between two blocks of heterochromatin, resulting in a phenotypically normal child. Therefore, an earlier hypothesis, suggesting its origin from heterochromatin through so-called euchromatinization, is refuted here. If the proband's progeny inherit this chromosome, it shall be envisaged as a rare familial variant whose clinical consequences remain obscure. 52 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Further evidence for a relationship between the 5p15 chromosome region and the oculoauriculovertebral anomaly.

    PubMed

    Ala-Mello, Sirpa; Siggberg, Linda; Knuutila, Sakari; von Koskull, Harriet; Taskinen, Mervi; Peippo, Maarit

    2008-10-01

    The oculoauriculovertebral anomaly (OAV) or Goldenhar syndrome is a malformation complex that has been described in several chromosomal rearrangements. Among them a deletion of the terminal 5p has recurred in seven previous patients. We wish to report on an additional such patient in order to reinforce the significance of this genomic region in the cause of at least a subgroup of OAV cases. Future studies, particularly in the OAV patients with a lateral facial cleft, might define one genetic background of the disorder. Our patient had a complex translocation chromosome 45,XX, inv(2) (q32q37)mat, dic(5;21) (p15.3;q22.3)dn, resulting in a terminal 5p deletion, a terminal deletion of 21q demonstrated by FISH studies, and a duplication of 21q22.11-q22.12 documented by molecular karyotyping. In addition to OAV she developed myelodysplasia treated with bone marrow transplantation. We discuss her clinical findings with reference to her karyotype findings and review the patients with OAV and a terminal deletion of 5p. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Genetic linkage mapping of multiple epiphyseal dysplasia to the pericentromeric region of chromosome 19

    SciTech Connect

    Oehlmann, R.; Summerville, G.P.; Yeh, G.; Weaver, E.J.; Jimenez, S.A.; Knowlton, R.G. )

    1994-01-01

    Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED) is an inherited chondrodystrophy that results in deformity of articular surfaces and in subsequent degenerative joint disease. The disease is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait with high penetrance. An MED mutation has been mapped by genetic linkage analysis of DNA polymorphisms in a single large pedigree. Close linkage of MED to 130 tested chromosomal markers was ruled out by discordant inheritance patterns. However, strong evidence for linkage of MED to markers in the pericentromeric region of chromosome 19 was obtained. The most closely linked marker was D19S215, with a maximum LOD score of 6.37 at [theta] = .05. Multipoint linkage analysis indicated that MED is located between D19S212 and D19S215, a map interval of 1.7 cM. Discovery of the map location of MED in this family will facilitate identification of the mutant gene. The closely linked DNA polymorphisms will also provide the means to determine whether other inherited chondrodystrophies have underlying defects in the same gene. 29 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Gene Content and Function of the Ancestral Chromosome Fusion Site in Human Chromosome 2q13–2q14.1 and Paralogous Regions

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yuxin; Newman, Tera; Linardopoulou, Elena; Trask, Barbara J.

    2002-01-01

    Various portions of the region surrounding the site where two ancestral chromosomes fused to form human chromosome 2 are duplicated elsewhere in the human genome, primarily in subtelomeric and pericentromeric locations. At least 24 potentially functional genes and 16 pseudogenes reside in the 614-kb of sequence surrounding the fusion site and paralogous segments on other chromosomes. By comparing the sequences of genomic copies and transcripts, we show that at least 18 of the genes in these paralogous regions are transcriptionally active. Among these genes are new members of the cobalamin synthetase W domain (CBWD) and forkhead domain FOXD4 gene families. Copies of RPL23A and SNRPA1 on chromosome 2 are retrotransposed-processed pseudogenes that were included in segmental duplications; we find 53 RPL23A pseudogenes in the human genome and map the functional copy of SNRPA1 to 15qter. The draft sequence of the human genome also provides new information on the location and intron–exon structure of functional copies of other 2q-fusion genes (PGM5, retina-specific F379, helicase CHLR1, and acrosin). This study illustrates that the duplication and rearrangement of subtelomeric and pericentromeric regions have functional relevance to human biology; these processes can change gene dosage and/or generate genes with new functions. [Supplemental material is available online at http://www.genome.org. Sequence data reported in this paper have been deposited in GenBank and assigned the following accession nos.: AF452722, AF452723, and AF452724.] PMID:12421752

  12. Construction of a 2.8-megabase yeast artificial chromosome contig and cloning of the human methylthioadenosine phosphorylase gene from the tumor suppressor region on 9p21

    SciTech Connect

    Olopade, O.I.; Pomykala, H.M.; Hagos, F.

    1995-07-03

    Many human malignant cells lack methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP) enzyme activity. The gene (MTAP) encoding this enzyme was previously mapped to the short arm of chromosome 9, band p21-22, a region that is frequently deleted in multiple tumor types. To clone candidate tumor suppressor genes from the deleted region on 9p21-22, we have constructed a long-range physical map of 2.8 megabases for 9p21 by using overlapping yeast artificial chromosome and cosmid clones. This map includes the type I IFN gene cluster, the recently identified candidate tumor suppressor genes CDKN2 (p16{sup INK4A}) and CDKN2B (p15{sup INK4B}), and several CpG islands. In addition, we have identified other transcription units within the yeast artificial chromosome contig. Sequence analysis of a 2.5-kb cDNA clone isolated from a CpG island that maps between the IFN genes and CDKN2 reveals a predicted open reading frame of 283 amino acids followed by 1302 nucleotides of 3{prime} untranslated sequence. This gene is evolutionarily conserved and shows significant amino acid homologies to mouse and human purine nucleoside phosphorylases and to a hypothetical 25.8-kDa protein in the pet gene (coding for cytochrome bc{sub 1} complex) region of Rhodospirillum rubrum. The location, expression pattern, and nucleotide sequences of this gene suggest that it codes for the MTAP enzyme. 35 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Physical mapping of the chromosome 7 breakpoint region in an SLOS patient with t(7;20)X(q32.1;q13.2)

    SciTech Connect

    Alley, T.L.; Wallace, M.R.; Scherer, S.W.

    1997-01-31

    Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by multiple congenital anomalies and mental retardation. SLOS has an associated defect in cholesterol biosynthesis, but the molecular genetic basis of this condition has not yet been elucidated. Previously our group reported a patient with a de novo balanced translocation [t(7;20)(q32.1;q13.2)] fitting the clinical and biochemical profile of SLOS. Employing fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), a 1.8 Mb chromosome 7-specific yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) was identified which spanned the translocation breakpoint in the reported patient. The following is an update of the on-going pursuit to physically and genetically map the region further, as well as the establishment of candidate genes in the 7q32.1 breakpoint region. 11 refs., 1 fig.

  14. A Study for the Feature Selection to Identify GIEMSA-Stained Human Chromosomes Based on Artificial Neural Network

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    neural network (ANN) has been adopted for the human chromosome classification. It is important to select optimum features for training neural network...Many studies for computer-based chromosome analysis have shown that it is possible to classify chromosomes into 24 subgroups. In addition, artificial

  15. The chromosomal association/dissociation of the chromatin insulator protein Cp190 of Drosophila melanogaster is mediated by the BTB/POZ domain and two acidic regions

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chromatin insulators or boundary elements are a class of functional elements in the eukaryotic genome. They regulate gene transcription by interfering with promoter-enhancer communication. The Cp190 protein of Drosophila melanogaster is essential to the function of at least three-types of chromatin insulator complexes organized by Su(Hw), CTCF and BEAF32. Results We mapped functional regions of Cp190 in vivo and identified three domains that are essential for the insulator function and for the viability of flies: the BTB/POZ domain, an aspartic acid-rich (D-rich) region and a C-terminal glutamic acid-rich (E-rich) region. Other domains including the centrosomal targeting domain and the zinc fingers are dispensable. The N-terminal CP190BTB-D fragment containing the BTB/POZ domain and the D-rich region is sufficient to mediate association with all three types of insulator complexes. The fragment however is not sufficient for insulator activity or viability. The Cp190 and CP190BTB-D are regulated differently in cells treated with heat-shock. The Cp190 dissociated from chromosomes during heat-shock, indicating that dissociation of Cp190 with chromosomes can be regulated. In contrast, the CP190BTB-D fragment didn't dissociate from chromosomes in the same heat-shocked condition, suggesting that the deleted C-terminal regions have a role in regulating the dissociation of Cp190 with chromosomes. Conclusions The N-terminal fragment of Cp190 containing the BTB/POZ domain and the D-rich region mediates association of Cp190 with all three types of insulator complexes and that the E-rich region of Cp190 is required for dissociation of Cp190 from chromosomes during heat-shock. The heat-shock-induced dissociation is strong evidence indicating that dissociation of the essential insulator protein Cp190 from chromosomes is regulated. Our results provide a mechanism through which activities of an insulator can be modulated by internal and external cues. PMID:21194420

  16. The chromosomal association/dissociation of the chromatin insulator protein Cp190 of Drosophila melanogaster is mediated by the BTB/POZ domain and two acidic regions.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Daniel; Sheehan, Brian; South, Heather; Akbari, Omar; Pai, Chi-Yun

    2010-12-31

    Chromatin insulators or boundary elements are a class of functional elements in the eukaryotic genome. They regulate gene transcription by interfering with promoter-enhancer communication. The Cp190 protein of Drosophila melanogaster is essential to the function of at least three-types of chromatin insulator complexes organized by Su(Hw), CTCF and BEAF32. We mapped functional regions of Cp190 in vivo and identified three domains that are essential for the insulator function and for the viability of flies: the BTB/POZ domain, an aspartic acid-rich (D-rich) region and a C-terminal glutamic acid-rich (E-rich) region. Other domains including the centrosomal targeting domain and the zinc fingers are dispensable. The N-terminal CP190BTB-D fragment containing the BTB/POZ domain and the D-rich region is sufficient to mediate association with all three types of insulator complexes. The fragment however is not sufficient for insulator activity or viability. The Cp190 and CP190BTB-D are regulated differently in cells treated with heat-shock. The Cp190 dissociated from chromosomes during heat-shock, indicating that dissociation of Cp190 with chromosomes can be regulated. In contrast, the CP190BTB-D fragment didn't dissociate from chromosomes in the same heat-shocked condition, suggesting that the deleted C-terminal regions have a role in regulating the dissociation of Cp190 with chromosomes. The N-terminal fragment of Cp190 containing the BTB/POZ domain and the D-rich region mediates association of Cp190 with all three types of insulator complexes and that the E-rich region of Cp190 is required for dissociation of Cp190 from chromosomes during heat-shock. The heat-shock-induced dissociation is strong evidence indicating that dissociation of the essential insulator protein Cp190 from chromosomes is regulated. Our results provide a mechanism through which activities of an insulator can be modulated by internal and external cues.

  17. Characterization of satellite CentC repeats from heterochromatic regions on the long arm of maize B-chromosome.

    PubMed

    Peng, Shu-Fen; Cheng, Ya-Ming

    2011-02-01

    The B-chromosome of maize contains an A-chromosome centromere-specific satellite CentC repeat in its centromere region (CENB) and at multiple locations in its distal heterochromatic regions (BDHs). Because CentC is highly repetitive, it is a challenge to study CentC sequences within individual centromeres or chromosome regions. The combined structure of CentC and a BDH-specific CL-repeat has allowed us to isolate CentC sequences from BDHs. In the study described herein, we have used a PCR method to amplify 13 CL-CentC variant products that were specifically mapped to A-centromeres (CENAs), the CENB, and BDHs via the tertiary trisomes and hypoploids of five B-10L translocations. Cloning and sequence analyses of these CL-CentC products have revealed a local CentC homogenization within the three CentC-containing regions. Phylogenetic analysis has indicated that the CentC sequences of BDHs are more closely related to those of CENAs in comparison to that of the CENB. Furthermore, the CentC monomers that are within the CENB are more diverse than those within BDHs and CENAs. These results shed light on the evolution of CentC repeats on the B-chromosome and provide a better understanding of B-chromosome evolution.

  18. A region of euchromatin coincides with an extensive tandem repeat on the mouse (Mus musculus) inactive X chromosome.

    PubMed

    Darrow, Emily M; Seberg, Andrew P; Das, Sunny; Figueroa, Debbie M; Sun, Zhuo; Moseley, Shawn C; Chadwick, Brian P

    2014-09-01

    Euchromatic features are largely absent from the human inactive X chromosome (Xi), with the exception of several large tandem repeats that can be detected as euchromatin bands at metaphase. Despite residing megabases apart, these tandem repeats make frequent inactive X-specific interactions. The mouse homologue has been reported for at least one of the tandem repeats, but whether the mouse Xi is also characterized by distinct bands of euchromatin remains unknown. We examined the mouse Xi for the presence of euchromatin bands by examining the pattern of histone H3 dimethylated at lysine 4 and detected two major signals. The first band resides in the subtelomeric region of band XF5 and may correspond to the pseudoautosomal region. The second band localizes to XE3 and coincides with an extensive complex repeat composed of a large tandem and inverted repeat segment as well as several large short interspersed nuclear element (SINE)-rich tandem repeats. Fluorescence in situ hybridization reveals that sequences with homology to the repeat region are scattered along the length of the Y chromosome. Immunofluorescence analysis of histone H3 trimethylated at lysine 9 on metaphase chromosomes indicates that the repeat region corresponds to a band of constitutive heterochromatin on the male X and female active X chromosomes, whereas the euchromatin signal appears to be female specific. These data suggest that the band of euchromatin observed at XE3 is unique to the mouse Xi, comparable to the chromatin arrangement of several large tandem repeats located on the human X chromosome.

  19. The human c-ros gene (ROS) is located at chromosome region 6q16----6q22.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, L; Louie, E; Tsujimoto, Y; Balduzzi, P C; Huebner, K; Croce, C M

    1986-09-01

    The human homolog, c-ros, of the transforming gene, v-ros, of the avian sarcoma virus, UR2, has been isolated from a human genomic library. A single-copy fragment from the human c-ros genomic clone has been used to map the human c-ros homolog (ROS) to human chromosome region 6q16----6q22 by somatic cell hybrid analysis and chromosomal in situ hybridization. Thus, the c-ros gene joins the c-myb oncogene, which is distal to the c-ros gene on the long arm of human chromosome 6, as a candidate for involvement in chromosome 6q deletions and rearrangements seen in various malignancies.

  20. Framework for a physical map of the human 22q13 region using bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs)

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, H.; Kim, Ung-Jin; Slepak, T.

    1996-04-01

    Detailed physical maps of entire chromosomes based on combined genetic, cytogenetic, and structural information are essential components for positional cloning and genomic sequencing. Despite the wealth of genetic information of the known diseases in the chromosome 22q13 region, the construction of a detailed physical map of the terminal region is difficult due to the sparsity of the genetic markers. We present here a map of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) contigs that cover a number of genetic loci in the 22q13 region. One hundred thirty-six BACs with an average insert size of 140 kb are assembled into 35 contigs defined by 64 markers in 22q13-qter. Twenty-three anonymous markers are now linked to the previously mapped genetic anchor points. 55 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Investigation of the Chromosome Regions with Significant Affinity for the Nuclear Envelope in Fruit Fly – A Model Based Approach

    PubMed Central

    Kinney, Nicholas Allen; Sharakhov, Igor V.; Onufriev, Alexey V.

    2014-01-01

    Three dimensional nuclear architecture is important for genome function, but is still poorly understood. In particular, little is known about the role of the “boundary conditions” – points of attachment between chromosomes and the nuclear envelope. We describe a method for modeling the 3D organization of the interphase nucleus, and its application to analysis of chromosome-nuclear envelope (Chr-NE) attachments of polytene (giant) chromosomes in Drosophila melanogaster salivary glands. The model represents chromosomes as self-avoiding polymer chains confined within the nucleus; parameters of the model are taken directly from experiment, no fitting parameters are introduced. Methods are developed to objectively quantify chromosome territories and intertwining, which are discussed in the context of corresponding experimental observations. In particular, a mathematically rigorous definition of a territory based on convex hull is proposed. The self-avoiding polymer model is used to re-analyze previous experimental data; the analysis suggests 33 additional Chr-NE attachments in addition to the 15 already explored Chr-NE attachments. Most of these new Chr-NE attachments correspond to intercalary heterochromatin – gene poor, dark staining, late replicating regions of the genome; however, three correspond to euchromatin – gene rich, light staining, early replicating regions of the genome. The analysis also suggests 5 regions of anti-contact, characterized by aversion for the NE, only two of these correspond to euchromatin. This composition of chromatin suggests that heterochromatin may not be necessary or sufficient for the formation of a Chr-NE attachment. To the extent that the proposed model represents reality, the confinement of the polytene chromosomes in a spherical nucleus alone does not favor the positioning of specific chromosome regions at the NE as seen in experiment; consequently, the 15 experimentally known Chr-NE attachment positions do not appear to

  2. Investigation of the chromosome regions with significant affinity for the nuclear envelope in fruit fly--a model based approach.

    PubMed

    Kinney, Nicholas Allen; Sharakhov, Igor V; Onufriev, Alexey V

    2014-01-01

    Three dimensional nuclear architecture is important for genome function, but is still poorly understood. In particular, little is known about the role of the "boundary conditions"--points of attachment between chromosomes and the nuclear envelope. We describe a method for modeling the 3D organization of the interphase nucleus, and its application to analysis of chromosome-nuclear envelope (Chr-NE) attachments of polytene (giant) chromosomes in Drosophila melanogaster salivary glands. The model represents chromosomes as self-avoiding polymer chains confined within the nucleus; parameters of the model are taken directly from experiment, no fitting parameters are introduced. Methods are developed to objectively quantify chromosome territories and intertwining, which are discussed in the context of corresponding experimental observations. In particular, a mathematically rigorous definition of a territory based on convex hull is proposed. The self-avoiding polymer model is used to re-analyze previous experimental data; the analysis suggests 33 additional Chr-NE attachments in addition to the 15 already explored Chr-NE attachments. Most of these new Chr-NE attachments correspond to intercalary heterochromatin--gene poor, dark staining, late replicating regions of the genome; however, three correspond to euchromatin--gene rich, light staining, early replicating regions of the genome. The analysis also suggests 5 regions of anti-contact, characterized by aversion for the NE, only two of these correspond to euchromatin. This composition of chromatin suggests that heterochromatin may not be necessary or sufficient for the formation of a Chr-NE attachment. To the extent that the proposed model represents reality, the confinement of the polytene chromosomes in a spherical nucleus alone does not favor the positioning of specific chromosome regions at the NE as seen in experiment; consequently, the 15 experimentally known Chr-NE attachment positions do not appear to arise due to

  3. Strong regional heterogeneity in base composition evolution on the Drosophila X chromosome.

    PubMed

    Ko, Wen-Ya; Piao, Shengfu; Akashi, Hiroshi

    2006-09-01

    Fluctuations in base composition appear to be prevalent in Drosophila and mammal genome evolution, but their timescale, genomic breadth, and causes remain obscure. Here, we study base composition evolution within the X chromosomes of Drosophila melanogaster and five of its close relatives. Substitutions were inferred on six extant and two ancestral lineages for 14 near-telomeric and 9 nontelomeric genes. GC content evolution is highly variable both within the genome and within the phylogenetic tree. In the lineages leading to D. yakuba and D. orena, GC content at silent sites has increased rapidly near telomeres, but has decreased in more proximal (nontelomeric) regions. D. orena shows a 17-fold excess of GC-increasing vs. AT-increasing synonymous changes within a small (approximately 130-kb) region close to the telomeric end. Base composition changes within introns are consistent with changes in mutation patterns, but stronger GC elevation at synonymous sites suggests contributions of natural selection or biased gene conversion. The Drosophila yakuba lineage shows a less extreme elevation of GC content distributed over a wider genetic region (approximately 1.2 Mb). A lack of change in GC content for most introns within this region suggests a role of natural selection in localized base composition fluctuations.

  4. Mouse genome-wide association study identifies polymorphisms on chromosomes 4, 11 and 15 for age-related cardiac fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiaoli; Berndt, Annerose; Sundberg, Beth A.; Silva, Kathleen A.; Kennedy, Victoria E.; Cario, Clinton L; Richardson, Matthew A.; Chase, Thomas H.; Schofield, Paul N.; Uitto, Jouni; Sundberg, John P.

    2017-01-01

    Dystrophic cardiac calcinosis (DCC), also called epicardial and myocardial fibrosis and mineralization, has been detected in mice of a number of laboratory inbred strains, most commonly C3H/HeJ and DBA/2J. In previous mouse breeding studies between these DCC susceptible and the DCC resistant strain C57BL/6J, 4 genetic loci harboring genes involved in DCC inheritance were identified and subsequently termed Dyscal loci 1 through 4. Here we report susceptibility to cardiac fibrosis, a sub-phenotype of DCC, at 12 and 20 months of age and close to natural death in a survey of 28 inbred mouse strains. Eight strains showed cardiac fibrosis with highest frequency and severity in the moribund mice. Using genotype and phenotype information of the 28 investigated strains we performed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and identified the most significant associations on chromosome (Chr) 15 at 72 million base pairs (Mb) (P < 10−13) and Chr 4 at 122 Mb (P < 10−11) and 134 Mb (P < 10−7). At the Chr 15 locus Col22a1 and Kcnk9 were identified. Both have been reported to be morphologically and functionally important in the heart muscle. The strongest Chr 4 associations were located approximate 6 Mb away from the Dyscal 2 quantitative trait locus peak within the boundaries of the Extl1 gene and in close proximity to the Trim63 and Cap1 genes. In addition, a single nucleotide polymorphism association was found on chromosome 11. This study provides evidence for more than the previously reported 4 genetic loci determining cardiac fibrosis and DCC. The study also highlights the power of GWAS in the mouse for dissecting complex genetic traits. PMID:27126641

  5. Identifying genomic regions for fine-mapping using genome scan meta-analysis (GSMA) to identify the minimum regions of maximum significance (MRMS) across populations

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Margaret E; Goldstein, Toby H; Maher, Brion S; Marazita, Mary L

    2005-01-01

    In order to detect linkage of the simulated complex disease Kofendrerd Personality Disorder across studies from multiple populations, we performed a genome scan meta-analysis (GSMA). Using the 7-cM microsatellite map, nonparametric multipoint linkage analyses were performed separately on each of the four simulated populations independently to determine p-values. The genome of each population was divided into 20-cM bin regions, and each bin was rank-ordered based on the most significant linkage p-value for that population in that region. The bin ranks were then averaged across all four studies to determine the most significant 20-cM regions over all studies. Statistical significance of the averaged bin ranks was determined from a normal distribution of randomly assigned rank averages. To narrow the region of interest for fine-mapping, the meta-analysis was repeated two additional times, with each of the 20-cM bins offset by 7 cM and 13 cM, respectively, creating regions of overlap with the original method. The 6–7 cM shared regions, where the highest averaged 20-cM bins from each of the three offsets overlap, designated the minimum region of maximum significance (MRMS). Application of the GSMA-MRMS method revealed genome wide significance (p-values refer to the average rank assigned to the bin) at regions including or adjacent to all of the simulated disease loci: chromosome 1 (p < 0.0001 for 160–167 cM, including D1), chromosome 3 (p-value < 0.0000001 for 287–294 cM, including D2), chromosome 5 (p-value < 0.001 for 0–7 cM, including D3), and chromosome 9 (p-value < 0.05 for 7–14 cM, the region adjacent to D4). This GSMA analysis approach demonstrates the power of linkage meta-analysis to detect multiple genes simultaneously for a complex disorder. The MRMS method enhances this powerful tool to focus on more localized regions of linkage. PMID:16451653

  6. Identifying genomic regions for fine-mapping using genome scan meta-analysis (GSMA) to identify the minimum regions of maximum significance (MRMS) across populations.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Margaret E; Goldstein, Toby H; Maher, Brion S; Marazita, Mary L

    2005-12-30

    In order to detect linkage of the simulated complex disease Kofendrerd Personality Disorder across studies from multiple populations, we performed a genome scan meta-analysis (GSMA). Using the 7-cM microsatellite map, nonparametric multipoint linkage analyses were performed separately on each of the four simulated populations independently to determine p-values. The genome of each population was divided into 20-cM bin regions, and each bin was rank-ordered based on the most significant linkage p-value for that population in that region. The bin ranks were then averaged across all four studies to determine the most significant 20-cM regions over all studies. Statistical significance of the averaged bin ranks was determined from a normal distribution of randomly assigned rank averages. To narrow the region of interest for fine-mapping, the meta-analysis was repeated two additional times, with each of the 20-cM bins offset by 7 cM and 13 cM, respectively, creating regions of overlap with the original method. The 6-7 cM shared regions, where the highest averaged 20-cM bins from each of the three offsets overlap, designated the minimum region of maximum significance (MRMS). Application of the GSMA-MRMS method revealed genome wide significance (p-values refer to the average rank assigned to the bin) at regions including or adjacent to all of the simulated disease loci: chromosome 1 (p < 0.0001 for 160-167 cM, including D1), chromosome 3 (p-value < 0.0000001 for 287-294 cM, including D2), chromosome 5 (p-value < 0.001 for 0-7 cM, including D3), and chromosome 9 (p-value < 0.05 for 7-14 cM, the region adjacent to D4). This GSMA analysis approach demonstrates the power of linkage meta-analysis to detect multiple genes simultaneously for a complex disorder. The MRMS method enhances this powerful tool to focus on more localized regions of linkage.

  7. Yeast artificial chromosome and radiation hybrid map of loci in chromosome band 8p22, a common region of allelic loss in multiple human cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Bookstein, R.; Levy, A.; MacGrogan, D.

    1994-11-15

    Polymorphic alleles at loci such as LPL (lipoprotein lipase) and MSR (macrophage scavenger receptor) in chromosome band 8p22 are frequently lost during the genesis of several types of human cancer, including colorectal, non-small cell lung, hepatocellular, and prostatic carcinomas. A physical map of 31 published or novel probes and sequence-tagged sites in this genetic region was constructed using a radiation hybrid panel and the CEPH (Centre d`Etude du Polymorphisme Humain) yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) library. Thirty-six overlapping YACs defined a physical order for the following polymorphic markers: tel-D8S26-D8S511-D8S549-MSR-D8S254-D8S233-D8S261-D8S21-LPL-D8S2580 cen. These maps unify small consensus regions of allelic loss on chromosome 8p defined by restriction fragment length polymorphisms with more informative PCR-based polymorphisms and widely available YAC mapping resources. 31 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  8. Variability in the heterochromatin regions of the chromosomes and chromosomal anomalies in children with autism: identification of genetic markers of autistic spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Vorsanova, S G; Yurov, I Yu; Demidova, I A; Voinova-Ulas, V Yu; Kravets, V S; Solov'ev, I V; Gorbachevskaya, N L; Yurov, Yu B

    2007-07-01

    Cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic analysis of children with autism (90 subjects) and their mothers (18 subjects) is presented. Anomalies and fragility were found in chromosome X in four cases of autism: mos 47,XXX[98]/46, XX[2]; 46,XY,r(22)(p11q13); 46,XY,inv(2)(p11.2q13),16qh-; and 46,Y,fra(X)(q27.3),16qh-. C staining and quantitative fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) were used to demonstrate a significant increase in the frequency of variations in the heterochromatin regions of chromosomes in children with autism as compared with a control group (48% and 16% respectively). Pericentric chromosome inversion 9phqh was not characteristic of patients with autism, while variation in heterochromatin regions 1phqh, 9qh+, and 16qh-were found significantly more frequently in children with autism. These data provide the basis for discussing the possible role of the gene position effect in the pathogenesis of autism and the possible search for biological markers of autistic disorders.

  9. A putative polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase/Williams-Beuren syndrome chromosome region 17 (WBSCR17) regulates lamellipodium formation and macropinocytosis.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Yoshiaki; Nakamura, Naosuke; Oki, Sayoko; Wakabayashi, Masaki; Ishihama, Yasushi; Miyake, Ayumi; Itoh, Nobuyuki; Kurosaka, Akira

    2012-09-14

    We previously identified a novel polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase (GalNAc-T) gene, which is designated Williams-Beuren syndrome chromosome region 17 (WBSCR17) because it is located in the chromosomal flanking region of the Williams-Beuren syndrome deletion. Recent genome-scale analysis of HEK293T cells treated with a high concentration of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) demonstrated that WBSCR17 was one of the up-regulated genes possibly involved in endocytosis (Lau, K. S., Khan, S., and Dennis, J. W. (2008) Genome-scale identification of UDP-GlcNAc-dependent pathways. Proteomics 8, 3294-3302). To assess its roles, we first expressed recombinant WBSCR17 in COS7 cells and demonstrated that it was N-glycosylated and localized mainly in the Golgi apparatus, as is the case for the other GalNAc-Ts. Assay of recombinant WBSCR17 expressed in insect cells showed very low activity toward typical mucin peptide substrates. We then suppressed the expression of endogenous WBSCR17 in HEK293T cells using siRNAs and observed phenotypic changes of the knockdown cells with reduced lamellipodium formation, altered O-glycan profiles, and unusual accumulation of glycoconjugates in the late endosomes/lysosomes. Analyses of endocytic pathways revealed that macropinocytosis, but neither clathrin- nor caveolin-dependent endocytosis, was elevated in the knockdown cells. This was further supported by the findings that the overexpression of recombinant WBSCR17 stimulated lamellipodium formation, altered O-glycosylation, and inhibited macropinocytosis. WBSCR17 therefore plays important roles in lamellipodium formation and the regulation of macropinocytosis as well as lysosomes. Our study suggests that a subset of O-glycosylation produced by WBSCR17 controls dynamic membrane trafficking, probably between the cell surface and the late endosomes through macropinocytosis, in response to the nutrient concentration as exemplified by environmental GlcNAc.

  10. Localization of a human receptor tyrosine kinase (ETK1) to chromosome region 3p11. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Wicks, I.P.; Boyd, A.W. ); Lapsys, N.M.; Baker, E.; Sutherland, G.R. ); Campbell, L.J. )

    1994-01-01

    The authors have recently described a human receptor tyrosine kinase (hek) that is expressed by some pre-B and thymic T cell lines, but is not detectable on normal adult human tissues. Gene cloning studies established that hek is a new member of the EPH family of receptor tyrosine kinases. The expression of hek may normally be developmentally regulated and inappropriate expression may contribute to oncogenesis. In the present study, they have used Southern blot analysis of somatic cell hybrids and fluorescence in situ hybridization to localize the hek gene to human chromosome region 3p11.2. Karyotype analysis of the cell lines that over-express hek showed no cytogenetically visible abnormality involving the hek locus. 29 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  11. Refined linkage map of chromosome 7 in the region of the cystic fibrosis gene

    PubMed Central

    Lathrop, G. M.; Farrall, M.; O'Connell, P.; Wainwright, B.; Leppert, M.; Nakamura, Y.; Lench, N.; Kruyer, H.; Dean, M.; Park, M.; Woude, G. Vande; Lalouel, J.-M.; Williamson, R.; White, R.

    1988-01-01

    The genetic map in the region of human chromosome 7 that harbors the gene for cystic fibrosis (CF) has been refined by multilocus linkage studies in an expanded database including a large set of normal families. Six loci known to be linked to CF were examined: MET, an oncogene; COL1A2, collagen; TCRB, T-cell-receptor beta polypeptide; and three arbitrary loci—D7S8, D7S13, and D7S16—defined by probes pJ3.11, pB79a, and p7C22, respectively. The gene order with greatest statistical support is COL1A2-D7S13-D7S16-MET-D7S8-TCRB. Linkage analysis in families segregating for CF suggested that the most likely location of the CF gene on this map is between MET and D7S8. PMID:2892400

  12. Population data of Y-chromosomal STRs in Russian males of the Primorye region population.

    PubMed

    Lessig, Rüdiger; Edelmann, Jeanett; Kleemann, Werner J; Kozhemyako, Valeri

    2006-05-25

    Data of eight Y-chromosomal STRs, the so called "minimal core set", were obtained from 152 unrelated males of the Primorye region of Russia. The allelic frequencies correspond to other European populations. The background is a settlement of males from the European part of Russia, Ukraine and other states which were included in the former western part of the Soviet Union. On the other hand the distribution of the most frequent haplotypes differs to the Ukraine and Russian population. The most frequent haplotype was obtained five times in the population corresponding to 3.3%. The haplotype data reported here have been included into the Y-STR database maintained at the Institute of Legal Medicine, Humboldt-University, Berlin.

  13. Genomic evolution and polymorphism: segmental duplications and haplotypes at 108 regions on 21 chromosomes.

    PubMed

    McLure, Craig A; Hinchliffe, Peter; Lester, Susan; Williamson, Joseph F; Millman, John A; Keating, Peter J; Stewart, Brent J; Dawkins, Roger L

    2013-07-01

    We describe here extensive, previously unknown, genomic polymorphism in 120 regions, covering 19 autosomes and both sex chromosomes. Each contains duplication within multigene clusters. Of these, 108 are extremely polymorphic with multiple haplotypes. We used the genomic matching technique (GMT), previously used to characterise the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and regulators of complement activation (RCA). This genome-wide extension of this technique enables the examination of many underlying cis, trans and epistatic interactions responsible for phenotypic differences especially in relation to individuality, evolution and disease susceptibility. The extent of the diversity could not have been predicted and suggests a new model of primate evolution based on conservation of polymorphism rather than de novo mutation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. High resolution SNP array genomic profiling of peripheral T cell lymphomas, not otherwise specified, identifies a subgroup with chromosomal aberrations affecting the REL locus.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Sylvia; Gesk, Stefan; Scholtysik, René; Kreuz, Markus; Bug, Stefanie; Vater, Inga; Döring, Claudia; Cogliatti, Sergio; Parrens, Marie; Merlio, Jean-Philippe; Kwiecinska, Anna; Porwit, Anna; Piccaluga, Pier Paolo; Pileri, Stefano; Hoefler, Gerald; Küppers, Ralf; Siebert, Reiner; Hansmann, Martin-Leo

    2010-02-01

    Little is known about genomic aberrations in peripheral T cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified (PTCL NOS). We studied 47 PTCL NOS by 250k GeneChip single nucleotide polymorphism arrays and detected genomic imbalances in 22 of the cases. Recurrent gains and losses were identified, including gains of chromosome regions 1q32-43, 2p15-16, 7, 8q24, 11q14-25, 17q11-21 and 21q11-21 (> or = 5 cases each) as well as losses of chromosome regions 1p35-36, 5q33, 6p22, 6q16, 6q21-22, 8p21-23, 9p21, 10p11-12, 10q11-22, 10q25-26, 13q14, 15q24, 16q22, 16q24, 17p11, 17p13 and Xp22 (> or = 4 cases each). Genomic imbalances affected several regions containing members of nuclear factor-kappaB signalling and genes involved in cell cycle control. Gains of 2p15-16 were confirmed in each of three cases analysed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and were associated with breakpoints at the REL locus in two of these cases. Three additional cases with gains of the REL locus were detected by FISH among 18 further PTCL NOS. Five of 27 PTCL NOS investigated showed nuclear expression of the REL protein by immunohistochemistry, partly associated with genomic gains of the REL locus. Therefore, in a subgroup of PTCL NOS gains/rearrangements of REL and expression of REL protein may be of pathogenetic relevance.

  15. A gene responsible for profound congenital nonsyndromal recessive deafness maps to the pericentromeric region of chromosome 17

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, T.B.; Liang, Y.; Asher, J.H. Jr.

    1994-09-01

    Autosomal recessive deafness is the most common form of human hereditary hearing loss. Two percent of the 2,185 residents of Bengkala, Bali, Indonesia have profound congenital neurosensory nonsyndromal hereditary deafness due to a fully penetrant autosomal recessive mutation (NARD1). Families, identified through children with profound congenital deafness having hearing parents, give the expected 25% deaf progeny when corrected for ascertainment bias. Congenitally deaf individuals from Bengkala show no response to pure tone audiological examination. Obligate heterozygotes for autosomal recessive deafness in Bengkala have normal or borderline normal hearing. A chromosomal location for NARD1 was assigned directly using a linkage strategy that combines allele-frequency dependent homozygosity mapping (AHM) followed by an analysis of historical recombinants to position NARD1 relative to flanking markers. Thirteen deaf Bengkala villagers of hearing parents were typed initially for 148 STRPs distributed across the human genome and a cluster of tightly linked 17p markers with a significantly higher number of homozygotes than expected under Hardy-Weinberg and linkage equilibrium were identified. NARD1 maps closest to STRPs for D17S261 (Mfd41) and D17S805 (AFM234ta1) that are 3.2 cM apart. Recombinant genotypes for the flanking markers, D17S122 (VAW409) and D17S783 (AFM026vh7), in individuals homozygous for NARD1 place NARD1 in a 5.3 cM interval of the pericentromeric region of chromosome 17 on a refined 17p-17q12 genetic map.

  16. Localisation of the gene for achondroplasia to the telomeric region of chromosome 4p

    SciTech Connect

    Stoilov, I.; Velinov, M.; Kilpatrick, M.W.

    1994-09-01

    Achondroplasia (ACH), the most common type of genetic dwarfism, is characterized by a variety of skeletal anomalies including disproportionate short stature and rhizomelic shortening of the extremities. The disorder is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait, with a prevalence of 1-15 per 100,000 live births. The etiology of ACH remains unknown, although evidence points to a defect in the maturation of the chondrocytes in the growth plate of the cartilage. To determine the location of the gene responsible for ACH, a panel of 14 families with a total of 43 meioses was genotyped for 40 polymorphic markers for loci randomly distributed throughout the genome. The first significant positive Lod score was obtained for the locus D4S127 (Zmax=3.65 at {theta}=0.03). A series of 20 markers for chromosome 4p16.3 loci were then used to determine the most likely position of the ACH gene. Two additional loci, D4S412 and IDUA, showed strong linkage to the disease (Zmax=3.34 at {theta}=0.03 and Zmax=3.35 at {theta}=0.0, respectively). Multipoint analysis and direct counting of recombinants places the ACH gene in a 2.5 cM region between the marker D4S43 and the chromosome 4p telomere. No evidence was found for genetic heterogeneity. The ACH region contains a number of genes, including that for the fibroblast growth factor receptor FGFR3, which are being evaluated as candidates for the ACH gene. This identification of tightly linked polymorphic markers, as well as being the first step in the characterization of the ACH gene, offers the possibility of DNA based prenatal diagnosis of this disorder.

  17. "Replicated" genome wide association for dependence on illegal substances: genomic regions identified by overlapping clusters of nominally positive SNPs.

    PubMed

    Drgon, Tomas; Johnson, Catherine A; Nino, Michelle; Drgonova, Jana; Walther, Donna M; Uhl, George R

    2011-03-01

    Declaring "replication" from results of genome wide association (GWA) studies is straightforward when major gene effects provide genome-wide significance for association of the same allele of the same SNP in each of multiple independent samples. However, such unambiguous replication may be unlikely when phenotypes display polygenic genetic architecture, allelic heterogeneity, locus heterogeneity, and when different samples display linkage disequilibria with different fine structures. We seek chromosomal regions that are tagged by clustered SNPs that display nominally significant association in each of several independent samples. This approach provides one "nontemplate" approach to identifying overall replication of groups of GWA results in the face of difficult genetic architectures. We apply this strategy to 1 million (1M) SNP Affymetrix and Illumina GWA results for dependence on illegal substances. This approach provides high confidence in rejecting the null hypothesis that chance alone accounts for the extent to which clustered, nominally significant SNPs from samples of the same racial/ethnic background identify the same chromosomal regions. There is more modest confidence in: (a) identification of individual chromosomal regions and genes and (b) overlap between results from samples of different racial/ethnic backgrounds. The strong overlap identified among the samples with similar racial/ethnic backgrounds, together with prior work that identified overlapping results in samples of different racial/ethnic backgrounds, support contributions to individual differences in vulnerability to addictions that come from both relatively older allelic variants that are common in many current human populations and newer allelic variants that are common in fewer current human populations.

  18. [Comparative Analysis of DNA Sequences of Regions of X-Chromosome Attachment to the Nuclear Envelope of Nurse Cells Anopheles messeae Fall].

    PubMed

    Artemov, G N; Vasil'eva, O Yu; Stegniy, V N

    2015-07-01

    Polytene chromosomes of ovarian nurse cells of Anopheles mosquitoes form strong contacts with the nuclear envelope. The presence of contacts, their position at nurse cell chromosomes, and their morphological features are species-specific in malaria mosquitoes. It is important to determine the nature of these interspecies differences in the nuclear architecture, both to understand the function of the nucleus and to assess the role of the spatial organization of chromosomes in evolution. Using dot-blot hybridization, we compared DNA sequences of the clone library from the X-chromosome attachment region to the nuclear envelope of ovarian nurse cells of Anopheles messeae with DNA-probes: (1) of the X-chromosome attachment region of An. atroparvus, (2) of the 3R chromosome attachment region ofAn. messeae, and (3) of the chromosome 2 pericentromeric region of An. messeae, without expressed contacts with the nuclear envelope. It has been shown that the chromosome attachment regions have a significantly higher number of homologous DNA sequences as compared with the pericentromeric region of chromosome 2. Sequences that are common for attachment regions are largely potentially able to participate in the formation of chromatin loop domains and to interact with some nucleus frameworks, according to the analysis in the ChrClass program. The obtained results support the important role of DNA in the formation of strong chromosomal attachments to the nuclear envelope in nurse cells of Anopheles mosquitoes.

  19. Terminal microdeletions of 13q34 chromosome region in patients with intellectual disability: Delineation of an emerging new microdeletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Reinstein, Eyal; Liberman, Meytal; Feingold-Zadok, Michal; Tenne, Tamar; Graham, John M

    2016-05-01

    The increasing use of chromosomal microarray studies in patients with intellectual disability has led to the description of new microdeletion and microduplication syndromes. We report terminal microdeletions in 13q34 chromosome region in 5 adult patients of two unrelated families. Patients harboring 13q34 microdeletions display common clinical features, including intellectual disability, obesity, and mild facial dysmorphism. These individuals can become fairly self-sufficient, however they do not live independently, and require community and social support. Further systematic analysis of the genes comprised in the deleted region will allow the identification of genes whose haploinsufficiency is expected to lead to disease manifestations, in particular intellectual disability.

  20. Evolution of the vertebrate genome as reflected in paralogous chromosomal regions in man and the house mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Lundin, L.G. )

    1993-04-01

    Gene constellations on several human chromosomes are interpreted as indications of large regional duplications that took place during evolution of the vertebrate genome. Four groups of paralogous chromosomal regions in man and the house mouse are suggested and are believed to be conserved remnants of the two or three rounds of tetraploidization that are likely to have occurred during evolution of the vertebrates. The phenomenon of differential silencing of genes is described. The importance of conservation of linkage of particular genes is discussed in relation to genetic regulation and cell differentiation. 120 refs., 5 tabs.

  1. Identification of region-specific yeast artificial chromosomes using pools of Alu element-mediated polymerase chain reaction probes labeled via linear amplification.

    PubMed

    Cole, C G; Patel, K; Shipley, J; Sheer, D; Bobrow, M; Bentley, D R; Dunham, I

    1992-12-01

    The ability to identify large numbers of yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) specific to any given genomic region rapidly and efficiently enhances both the construction of clone maps and the isolation of region-specific landmarks (e.g., polymorphic markers). We describe a method of preparing region-specific single-stranded hybridization probes from Alu element-mediated polymerase chain reaction (Alu-PCR) products of somatic cell hybrids for YAC library screening. Pools of up to 50 cloned Alu-PCR products from an irradiation-reduced hybrid containing 22q11.2-q13.1 were labeled to high specific activity by linear amplification using a single vector primer. The resulting single-stranded probes were extensively competed to remove repetitive sequences, while retaining the full complexity of the probe. Extensive coverage of the region by YACs using multiple probe pools was demonstrated as many YACs were detected more than once. In situ analysis using chosen YACs confirmed that the clones were specific for the region. Thus, this pooled probe approach constitutes a rapid method to identify large numbers of YACs relevant to a large chromosomal region.

  2. Molecular mapping of k2 Mdh1-n y20, an unstable chromosomal region in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.].

    PubMed

    Xu, Min; Palmer, Reid G

    2005-11-01

    In the soybean genome, a chromosomal region covering three tightly linked genes, k2, Mdh1-n, and y20, was found very unstable. It was suspected that the instability of the k2 Mdh1-n y20 chromosomal region was caused by a non-autonomous transposable element residing adjacent to or in this region. In this study, we located and mapped this region with simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers on the soybean integrated map using five mapping populations. The k2 Mdh1-n y20 chromosomal region was located on molecular linkage group H. The integrated map from five mapping populations consisted of 13 loci in the order Satt541, Satt469, Sat_122, Satt279, Satt253, Satt314, Mdh1-n,y20, k2, Satt302, Satt142, Satt181, and Satt434. The k2 Mdh1-n y20 chromosomal region was very close to Satt314, Satt253, and Satt279. The genetic distance between the Mdh1-n gene and Satt314 was less than 1 cM. The results of the mapping study were consistent with the results from previous studies that the Mdh1-n mutation in T261 (k2 Mdh1-n) and the Mdh1-n y20 mutation in T317 (Mdh1-n y20) were caused by deletions. In addition, another putative deletion was found in the genome of T261 which covered three SSR markers (Satt314, Satt253, and Satt279).

  3. Human chromosome 21 orthologous region on mouse chromosome 17 is a major determinant of Down syndrome-related developmental cognitive deficits.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Meng, Kai; Jiang, Xiaoling; Liu, Chunhong; Pao, Annie; Belichenko, Pavel V; Kleschevnikov, Alexander M; Josselyn, Sheena; Liang, Ping; Ye, Ping; Mobley, William C; Yu, Y Eugene

    2014-02-01

    Trisomy 21 (Down syndrome, DS) is the most common genetic cause of developmental cognitive deficits, and the so-called Down syndrome critical region (DSCR) has been proposed as a major determinant of this phenotype. The regions on human chromosome 21 (Hsa21) are syntenically conserved on mouse chromosome 10 (Mmu10), Mmu16 and Mmu17. DSCR is conserved between the Cbr1 and Fam3b genes on Mmu16. Ts65Dn mice carry three copies of ∼100 Hsa21 gene orthologs on Mmu16 and exhibited impairments in the Morris water maze and hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). Converting the Cbr1-Fam3b region back to two copies in Ts65Dn mice rescued these phenotypes. In this study, we performed similar conversion of the Cbr1-Fam3b region in Dp(16)1Yey/+ mice that is triplicated for all ∼115 Hsa21 gene orthologs on Mmu16, which also resulted in the restoration of the wild-type phenotypes in the Morris water maze and hippocampal LTP. However, converting the Cbr1-Fam3b region back to two copies in a complete model, Dp(10)1Yey/+;Dp(16)1Yey/+;Dp(17)1Yey/+, failed to yield the similar phenotypic restorations. But, surprisingly, converting both the Cbr1-Fam3b region and the Hsa21 orthologous region on Mmu17 back to two copies in the complete model did completely restore these phenotypes to the wild-type levels. Our results demonstrated that the Hsa21 orthologous region on Mmu17 is a major determinant of DS-related developmental cognitive deficits. Therefore, the inclusion of the three copies of this Hsa21 orthologous region in mouse models is necessary for unraveling the mechanism underlying DS-associated developmental cognitive deficits and for developing effective interventions for this clinical manifestation.

  4. Male-specific region of the Y chromosome and cardiovascular risk: phylogenetic analysis and gene expression studies.

    PubMed

    Bloomer, Lisa D S; Nelson, Christopher P; Eales, James; Denniff, Matthew; Christofidou, Paraskevi; Debiec, Radoslaw; Moore, Jasbir; Zukowska-Szczechowska, Ewa; Goodall, Alison H; Thompson, John; Samani, Nilesh J; Charchar, Fadi J; Tomaszewski, Maciej

    2013-07-01

    Haplogroup I of male-specific region of the human Y chromosome is associated with 50% increased risk of coronary artery disease. It is not clear to what extent conventional cardiovascular risk factors and genes of the male-specific region may explain this association. A total of 1988 biologically unrelated men from 4 white European populations were genotyped using 11 Y chromosome single nucleotide polymorphisms and classified into 13 most common European haplogroups. Approximately 75% to 93% of the haplotypic variation of the Y chromosome in all cohorts was attributable to I, R1a, and R1b1b2 lineages. None of traditional cardiovascular risk factors, including body mass index, blood pressures, lipids, glucose, C-reactive protein, creatinine, and insulin resistance, was associated with haplogroup I of the Y chromosome in the joint inverse variance meta-analysis. Fourteen of 15 ubiquitous single-copy genes of the male-specific region were expressed in human macrophages. When compared with men with other haplogroups, carriers of haplogroup I had ≈ 0.61- and 0.64-fold lower expression of ubiquitously transcribed tetratricopeptide repeat, Y-linked gene (UTY) and protein kinase, Y-linked, pseudogene (PRKY) in macrophages (P=0.0001 and P=0.002, respectively). Coronary artery disease predisposing haplogroup I of the Y chromosome is associated with downregulation of UTY and PRKY genes in macrophages but not with conventional cardiovascular risk factors.

  5. Isolation and identification of a novel tandemly repeated DNA sequence in the centromeric region of human chromosome 8.

    PubMed

    Lin, C C; Sasi, R; Lee, C; Fan, Y S; Court, D

    1993-05-01

    EcoRI subclones, designated as 50E1 and 50E4, were independently obtained from a cosmid clone previously mapped to the centromeric region of human chromosome 8. Southern blot hybridization analyses suggested that both subclones contain repetitive DNA sequences different from the chromosome 8 specific alphoid DNA. DNA sequence analysis of the 704 bp insert of 50E1 and the 1,962 bp insert of 50E4 revealed that both inserts contained tandemly repeated units of approximately 220 bp. Fluorescence in situ hybridization studies confirmed these two subclones to be specifically located on the centromeric region of chromosome 8. A 220 bp consensus sequence, derived from nine monomeric repeats, showed no significant homology to alphoid consensus sequences or to other currently known human centromeric DNA sequence. Furthermore, no significant homology was found with any other DNA sequence deposited in the EMBL or GenBank databases, indicating that this chromosome 8 specific repetitive DNA sequence is novel. From slot blot experiments it was estimated that 0.013% of the human genome comprises 1,750 of these monomeric repeats, residing on the centromeric region of chromosome 8 in tandem array(s).

  6. Yeast artificial chromosome cloning in the glycerol kinase and adrenal hypoplasia congenita region of Xp21

    SciTech Connect

    Worley, K.C.; Ellison, K.A.; Zhang, Y.H.; Wang, D.F.; Mason, J.; Roth, E.J.; Adams, V.; Fogt, D.D.; Zhu, X.M.; Towbin, J.A.

    1993-05-01

    The adrenal hypoplasia congenita (AHC) and glycerol kinase (GK) loci are telomeric to the Duchenne muscular dystrophy locus in Xp21. The authors developed a pair of yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contigs spanning at least 1.2 Mb and encompassing the region from the telomeric end of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) locus to beyond YHX39 (DXS727), including the genes for AHC and GK. The centromeric contig consists of 13 YACs reaching more than 600 kb from DMD through GK. The telomeric contig group consists of 8 YACs containing more than 600 kb including the markers YHX39 (DXS727) and QST-59 (DXS319). Patient deletion breakpoints in the region of the two YAC contigs define at least eight intervals, and seven deletion breakpoints are contained within these contigs. In addition to the probes developed from YAC ends, they have mapped eight Alu-PCR probes amplified from a radiation-reduced somatic cell hybrid, two anonymous DNA probes, and one Alu-PCR product amplified from a cosmid end, for a total of 26 new markers within this region of 2 Mb or less. One YAC in the centromeric contig contains an insert encompassing the minimum interval for GK deficiency defined by patient deletion breakpoints, and this clone includes all or part of the GK gene. 33 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Forensic analysis of polymorphism and regional stratification of Y-chromosomal microsatellites in Belarus.

    PubMed

    Rebała, Krzysztof; Tsybovsky, Iosif S; Bogacheva, Anna V; Kotova, Svetlana A; Mikulich, Alexei I; Szczerkowska, Zofia

    2011-01-01

    Nine loci defining minimal haplotypes and four other Y-chromosomal short tandem repeats (Y-STRs) DYS437, DYS438, DYS439 and GATA H4.1 were analysed in 414 unrelated males residing in four regions of Belarus. Haplotypes of 328 males were further extended by 7 additional Y-STRs: DYS388, DYS426, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS460 and DYS635. The 13-locus haplotype diversity was 0.9978 and discrimination capacity was 78.7%, indicating presence of identical haplotypes among unrelated males. Seven additional Y-STRs enabled almost complete discrimination of undifferentiated 13-locus haplotypes, increasing haplotype diversity to 0.9998 and discrimination capacity to 97.9%. Analysis of molecular variance of minimal haplotypes excluded the use of a Y-STR database for Belarusians residing in northeastern Poland as representative for the Belarusian population in forensic practice, and revealed regional stratification within the country. However, four additional markers (DYS437, DYS438, DYS439 and GATA H4.1) were shown to eliminate the observed geographical substructure among Belarusian males. The results imply that in case of minimal and PowerPlex Y haplotypes, a separate frequency database should be used for northern Belarus to estimate Y-STR profile frequencies in forensic casework. In case of Yfiler haplotypes, regional stratification within Belarus may be neglected.

  8. Deletion and duplication within the p11.2 region of chromosome 17

    SciTech Connect

    McCorquodale, D.J.; McCorquodale, M.; Bereziouk, O.

    1994-09-01

    A 7 1/2-year-old male patient presented with mild mental retardation, speech delay, hyperactivity, behavioral problems, mild facial hypoplasia, short broad hands, digital anomalies, and self-injurious behavior. Chromosomes obtained from peripheral blood cells revealed a deletion of 17p11.2 in about 40% of the metaphases examined, suggesting that the patient had Smith-Magenis Syndrome. A similar pattern of mosaicism in peripheral blood cells, but not in fibroblasts in which all cells displayed the deletion, has been previously reported. Since some cases of Smith-Magenis Syndrome have a deletion that extends into the region associated with Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) Syndrome, we examined interphase cells with a CMT1A-specific probe by the method of fluorescence in situ hybridization. The CMT1A region was not deleted, but about 40% of the cells gave signals indicating a duplication of the CMT1A region. The patient has not presented neuropathies associated with CMT at this time. Future tracking of the patient should be informative.

  9. Direct selection of expressed sequences within a 1-Mb region flanking BRCA1 on human chromosome 17q21

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne-Lawrence, S.; Welcsh, P.L.; Spillman, M.

    1995-01-01

    Direct selection of genes within the interval of chromosome 17q21 containing BRCA1 was performed. YAC and cosmid contigs spanning the BRCA1 region were used to select cDNA clones from pools of cDNAs derived from human placenta, HeLa cells, activated T cells, and fetal head. A minimum set of 48 fragments of nonoverlapping cDNAs that unequivocally mapped within a 1-Mb region was identified, although it is not yet known how many of these are derived from the same transcript. DNA sequence analyses revealed that 4 of these cDNAs were derived from known genes (EDH17B2, glucose-6-phosphatase, IAI.3B, and E1AF), 1 is a member of a previously described gene family (EMG-17), and 7 share substantial identity with previously described genes from human or other species. The remainder showed no significant homology to known genes. Limited PCR-based expression profiles of a set of 13 of the genes were performed, and all gave positive results with at least some cDNA sources supporting the contention that they truly represent transcribed sequences. A comparison between genes obtained from this region by direct selection with those obtained by direct screening or exon trapping revealed that over 90% of the genes identified by exon trapping were represented in the selected material and that at least two additional genes that appear to represent low abundance transcripts with restricted expression profiles were identified by selection but not by other means. 39 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Towards the cloning of imprinted genes in the Prader-Willi/Angelman region of chromosome 15q11-q13

    SciTech Connect

    Nakao, M.; Sutcliffe, J.S.; Beaudet, A.L.

    1994-09-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) are distinct clinical phenotypes resulting from paternal and maternal deficiencies respectively in human chromosome 15q11-q13. The data suggest the presence of oppositely imprinted genes in the region, and the gene for small nuclear ribonucleoprotein-associated polypeptide N (SNRPN) has been identified as a candidate gene for PWS. Previous strategies for positional cloning identified a number of transcripts from the PWS/AS region, and two of them, PAR-5 (D15S226E) and PAR-1 (D15S227E), are paternally expressed in cultured human cells from patients deleted for 15q11-q13 as is SNRPN. Cosmid contig maps have been developed from the following YACs (contained loci in parentheses): 307A12 (D15S13), 457B4 (SNRPN), 132D4 (D15S10), A229A2, and 378A12 (D15S113), to facilitate molecular studies of PWS and AS. Exon trapping has been employed to isolate putative exons from these overlapping cosmids. Two trapped fragments from the D15S113 region and one fragment from the SNRPN region has been isolated. Sequence information is available for all of the fragments. In addition to imprinting analysis in cultured human cells, we have developed a method to detect imprinting in mouse and human using a GC-clamped denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis strategy, in combination with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The imprinting analyses of putative exons are in progress to investigate their possible candidacy for involvement in PWS or AS phenotypes.

  11. Use of haplotypes to identify regions harbouring lethal recessive variants in pigs.

    PubMed

    Howard, David M; Pong-Wong, Ricardo; Knap, Pieter W; Woolliams, John A

    2017-07-14

    Lethal recessive genetic variants are maintained at relatively low frequencies in a population in the heterozygous state, but by definition are fatal and therefore unobserved in the homozygous state. Since haplotypes allow the tagging of rare and untyped genetic variants, they have potential for studying lethal recessive variants. In this study, we used a large commercial population to identify putative lethal recessive haplotypes that impact either the total number born (TNB) or the number born alive (NBA) as a proportion of the total number born (NBA/TNB). We also compared the use of haplotypes with a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-by-SNP approach and examined the benefits of using additional haplotypes imputed from low-density genotype data for the detection of lethal recessive variants. Candidate haplotypes were identified using population-wide haplotype frequencies and within-family analyses. These candidate haplotypes were subsequently assessed for putative lethal recessive effects on TNB and NBA/TNB by comparing carrier-to-carrier matings with carrier-to-non-carrier matings. Using both medium-density and imputed low-density genotype data six regions were identified as containing putative lethal recessive haplotypes that had an effect on TNB. It is likely that these regions were related to at least four putative lethal recessive variants, each located on a different chromosome. Evidence for putative lethal recessive effects on TNB was found on chromosomes 1, 6, 10 and 14 using haplotypes. Using haplotypes from individuals genotyped only at medium-density or a SNP-by-SNP approach did not detect any lethal recessive effects. No lethal recessive haplotypes or SNPs were detected that had an effect on NBA/TNB. We show that the use of haplotypes from combining medium-density and imputed low-density genotype data is superior for the identification of lethal recessive variants compared to both a SNP-by-SNP approach and to the use of only medium-density data. We

  12. Identification of four novel human genes amplified and overexpressed in breast carcinoma and localized to the q11-q21.3 region of chromosome 17

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasetto, C.; Regnier, C.; Basset, P.

    1995-08-10

    We have performed differential screening of a human metastatic lymph node cDNA library to identify genes possibly involved during breast cancer progression. We have identified four novel genes overexpressed in malignant tissues. They were all located between q11 and q21.3, a region known to contain the c-erbB-2 oncogene and the BRCA1 breast carcinomas, and overexpression of three of them was dependent on gene amplification in breast cancer cell lines. These findings further support the concept that human chromosome 17 specifically carries genes possibly involved in breast cancer progression. 61 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Integrated mapping analysis of the Werner syndrome region of chromosome 8.

    PubMed

    Oshima, J; Yu, C E; Boehnke, M; Weber, J L; Edelhoff, S; Wagner, M J; Wells, D E; Wood, S; Disteche, C M; Martin, G M

    1994-09-01

    The Werner syndrome locus (WRN) is located at 8p11-p12. To facilitate eventual cloning of the WRN gene, a 10,000-rad radiation-reduced hybrid (RH) cell panel was generated to map genetic markers, sequence-tagged sites (STSs), and genes in this region. A hamster cell line carrying an intact human chromosome 8 was fused with another hamster cell line. Two sets of hybrid cell panels from 2 separate fusions were generated; each panel consisted of 50 independent clones; 33 and 34 cell lines from the 2 fusions retained human chromsome material as determined by inter-Alu PCR. The combined panel was genotyped for 52 markers spanning the entire chromosome, including 10 genes, 29 anonymous polymorphic loci, and 13 STSs. Seventeen of these markers have not been previously described. Markers near the centromere were retained at a higher frequency than more distal markers. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was also used to localize and order a subset of the markers. A RH map of the WRN region was constructed using a maximum likelihood method, giving the following most likely order: D8S131-D8S339 (GSR)-D8S124-D8S278-D8S259-(D8S71)-D8S283- D8S87-D8S105-D8S135 (FGFR1)-D8S135PB-D8S255-ANK1. A genetic map of 15 short tandem repeat polymorphic loci in the WRN region was also constructed. The marker orders from the genetic and RH maps were consistent. In addition, an integrated map of 24 loci in the WRN region was generated using information from both genetic and RH mapping methods. A 1000:1 framework map for 6 loci (LPL-D8S136-D8S137-D8S87-FGFR1-ANK1) was determined by genetic mapping, and the resulting locus order was fixed during analysis of the RH genotype data. The resulting integrated map contained more markers than could confidently be ordered by either genetic or RH mapping alone.

  14. A genome-wide study of inherited deletions identified two regions associated with non-syndromic isolated oral clefts

    PubMed Central

    Younkin, Samuel G; Scharpf, Robert B; Schwender, Holger; Parker, Margaret M; Scott, Alan F; Marazita, Mary L; Beaty, Terri H; Ruczinski, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Background DNA copy number variants play an important part in the development of common birth defects such as oral clefts. Individual patients with multiple birth defects (including oral clefts) have been shown to carry small and large chromosomal deletions. Methods We investigated the role of polymorphic copy number deletions by comparing transmission rates of deletions from parents to offspring in case-parent trios of European ancestry ascertained through a cleft proband with trios ascertained through a normal offspring. DNA copy numbers in trios were called using the joint hidden Markov model in the freely available PennCNV software (www.openbioinformatics.org/penncnv). All statistical analyses were performed using Bioconductor tools (www.bioconductor.org) in the open source environment R. Results We identified a 67 kilo-base (kb) region in the gene MGAM on chromosome 7q34, and a 206 kb region overlapping genes ADAM3A and ADAM5 on chromosome 8p11, where deletions are more frequently transmitted to cleft offspring than control offspring. Conclusions These genes or nearby regulatory elements may be involved in the etiology of oral clefts. PMID:25776870

  15. Genetic linkage studies in familial partial epilepsy: Exclusion of the human chromosome regions syntenic to the El-1 mouse locus

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes-Cendes, I.; Mulley, J.C.; Andermann, E.

    1994-09-01

    Recently, six families with a familial form of partial epilepsy were described. All pedigrees showed autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance. Affected individuals present with predominantly nocturnal seizures with frontal lobe semiology. In 1959, a genetic mouse model for partial epilepsy, the El mouse, was reported. In the El mouse, a major seizure susceptibility gene, El-1, segregates in an autosomal dominant fashion and has been localized to a region distal to the centromere of mouse chromosome 9. Comparative genetic maps between man and mouse have been used for prediction of localization of several human disease genes. Because the region of mouse chromosome 9 that is the most likely to contain the El-1 locus is syntenic to regions on human chromosomes 3q21-p22, 3q21-q23.3, 6q12 and 15q24, we adopted the candidate gene approach as an initial linkage strategy. Twenty-two polymorphic microsatellite markers covering these regions were used for genotyping individuals in the three larger families ascertained, two of which are Australian and one French-Canadian. Negative two-point lod scores were obtained separately for each family. The analysis of all three families combined significantly excludes the candidate regions on chromosomes 3, 6 and 15.

  16. Follow-Up Association Studies of Chromosome Region 9q and Nonsyndromic Cleft Lip/Palate

    PubMed Central

    Letra, Ariadne; Menezes, Renato; Govil, Manika; Fonseca, Renata F.; McHenry, Toby; Granjeiro, José M.; Castilla, Eduardo E.; Orioli, Iêda M.; Marazita, Mary L.; Vieira, Alexandre R.

    2010-01-01

    Cleft lip/palate comprises a large fraction of all human birth defects, and is notable for its significant lifelong morbidity and complex etiology. Several studies have shown that genetic factors appear to play a significant role in the etiology of cleft lip/palate. Human chromosomal region 9q21 has been suggested in previous reports to contain putative cleft loci. Moreover, a specific region (9q22.3-34.1) was suggested to present a ∼45% probability of harboring a cleft susceptibility gene. Fine mapping of fifty SNPs across the 9q22.3-34.11 region was performed to test for association with cleft lip/palate in families from United States, Spain, Turkey, Guatemala, and China. We performed family-based analysis and found evidence of association of cleft lip/palate with STOM (rs306796) in Guatemalan families (P=0.004) and in all multiplex families pooled together (