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Sample records for identify active compounds

  1. Screening of Pharmacologically Active Small Molecule Compounds Identifies Antifungal Agents Against Candida Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Watamoto, Takao; Egusa, Hiroshi; Sawase, Takashi; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2015-01-01

    Candida species have emerged as important and common opportunistic human pathogens, particularly in immunocompromised individuals. The current antifungal therapies either have toxic side effects or are insufficiently effect. The aim of this study is develop new small-molecule antifungal compounds by library screening methods using Candida albicans, and to evaluate their antifungal effects on Candida biofilms and cytotoxic effects on human cells. Wild-type C. albicans strain SC5314 was used in library screening. To identify antifungal compounds, we screened a small-molecule library of 1,280 pharmacologically active compounds (LOPAC1280TM) using an antifungal susceptibility test (AST). To investigate the antifungal effects of the hit compounds, ASTs were conducted using Candida strains in various growth modes, including biofilms. We tested the cytotoxicity of the hit compounds using human gingival fibroblast (hGF) cells to evaluate their clinical safety. Only 35 compounds were identified by screening, which inhibited the metabolic activity of C. albicans by >50%. Of these, 26 compounds had fungistatic effects and nine compounds had fungicidal effects on C. albicans. Five compounds, BAY11-7082, BAY11-7085, sanguinarine chloride hydrate, ellipticine and CV-3988, had strong fungicidal effects and could inhibit the metabolic activity of Candida biofilms. However, BAY11-7082, BAY11-7085, sanguinarine chloride hydrate and ellipticine were cytotoxic to hGF cells at low concentrations. CV-3988 showed no cytotoxicity at a fungicidal concentration. Four of the compounds identified, BAY11-7082, BAY11-7085, sanguinarine chloride hydrate and ellipticine, had toxic effects on Candida strains and hGF cells. In contrast, CV-3988 had fungicidal effects on Candida strains, but low cytotoxic effects on hGF cells. Therefore, this screening reveals agent, CV-3988 that was previously unknown to be antifungal agent, which could be a novel therapies for superficial mucosal candidiasis. PMID

  2. Calcium Imaging of Neuronal Activity in Drosophila Can Identify Anticonvulsive Compounds.

    PubMed

    Streit, Anne K; Fan, Yuen Ngan; Masullo, Laura; Baines, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    Although there are now a number of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) available, approximately one-third of epilepsy patients respond poorly to drug intervention. The reasons for this are complex, but are probably reflective of the increasing number of identified mutations that predispose individuals to this disease. Thus, there is a clear requirement for the development of novel treatments to address this unmet clinical need. The existence of gene mutations that mimic a seizure-like behaviour in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, offers the possibility to exploit the powerful genetics of this insect to identify novel cellular targets to facilitate design of more effective AEDs. In this study we use neuronal expression of GCaMP, a potent calcium reporter, to image neuronal activity using a non-invasive and rapid method. Expression in motoneurons in the isolated CNS of third instar larvae shows waves of calcium-activity that pass between segments of the ventral nerve cord. Time between calcium peaks, in the same neurons, between adjacent segments usually show a temporal separation of greater than 200 ms. Exposure to proconvulsants (picrotoxin or 4-aminopyridine) reduces separation to below 200 ms showing increased synchrony of activity across adjacent segments. Increased synchrony, characteristic of epilepsy, is similarly observed in genetic seizure mutants: bangsenseless1 (bss1) and paralyticK1270T (paraK1270T). Exposure of bss1 to clinically-used antiepileptic drugs (phenytoin or gabapentin) significantly reduces synchrony. In this study we use the measure of synchronicity to evaluate the effectiveness of known and novel anticonvulsive compounds (antipain, isethionate, etopiside rapamycin and dipyramidole) to reduce seizure-like CNS activity. We further show that such compounds also reduce the Drosophila voltage-gated persistent Na+ current (INaP) in an identified motoneuron (aCC). Our combined assays provide a rapid and reliable method to screen unknown compounds

  3. Calcium Imaging of Neuronal Activity in Drosophila Can Identify Anticonvulsive Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Streit, Anne K.; Fan, Yuen Ngan; Masullo, Laura; Baines, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Although there are now a number of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) available, approximately one-third of epilepsy patients respond poorly to drug intervention. The reasons for this are complex, but are probably reflective of the increasing number of identified mutations that predispose individuals to this disease. Thus, there is a clear requirement for the development of novel treatments to address this unmet clinical need. The existence of gene mutations that mimic a seizure-like behaviour in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, offers the possibility to exploit the powerful genetics of this insect to identify novel cellular targets to facilitate design of more effective AEDs. In this study we use neuronal expression of GCaMP, a potent calcium reporter, to image neuronal activity using a non-invasive and rapid method. Expression in motoneurons in the isolated CNS of third instar larvae shows waves of calcium-activity that pass between segments of the ventral nerve cord. Time between calcium peaks, in the same neurons, between adjacent segments usually show a temporal separation of greater than 200 ms. Exposure to proconvulsants (picrotoxin or 4-aminopyridine) reduces separation to below 200 ms showing increased synchrony of activity across adjacent segments. Increased synchrony, characteristic of epilepsy, is similarly observed in genetic seizure mutants: bangsenseless1 (bss1) and paralyticK1270T (paraK1270T). Exposure of bss1 to clinically-used antiepileptic drugs (phenytoin or gabapentin) significantly reduces synchrony. In this study we use the measure of synchronicity to evaluate the effectiveness of known and novel anticonvulsive compounds (antipain, isethionate, etopiside rapamycin and dipyramidole) to reduce seizure-like CNS activity. We further show that such compounds also reduce the Drosophila voltage-gated persistent Na+ current (INaP) in an identified motoneuron (aCC). Our combined assays provide a rapid and reliable method to screen unknown compounds

  4. Yeast-Based High-Throughput Screens to Identify Novel Compounds Active against Brugia malayi

    PubMed Central

    Bilsland, Elizabeth; Bean, Daniel M.; Devaney, Eileen; Oliver, Stephen G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Lymphatic filariasis is caused by the parasitic worms Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi or B. timori, which are transmitted via the bites from infected mosquitoes. Once in the human body, the parasites develop into adult worms in the lymphatic vessels, causing severe damage and swelling of the affected tissues. According to the World Health Organization, over 1.2 billion people in 58 countries are at risk of contracting lymphatic filariasis. Very few drugs are available to treat patients infected with these parasites, and these have low efficacy against the adult stages of the worms, which can live for 7–15 years in the human body. The requirement for annual treatment increases the risk of drug-resistant worms emerging, making it imperative to develop new drugs against these devastating diseases. Methodology/Principal Findings We have developed a yeast-based, high-throughput screening system whereby essential yeast genes are replaced with their filarial or human counterparts. These strains are labeled with different fluorescent proteins to allow the simultaneous monitoring of strains with parasite or human genes in competition, and hence the identification of compounds that inhibit the parasite target without affecting its human ortholog. We constructed yeast strains expressing eight different Brugia malayi drug targets (as well as seven of their human counterparts), and performed medium-throughput drug screens for compounds that specifically inhibit the parasite enzymes. Using the Malaria Box collection (400 compounds), we identified nine filarial specific inhibitors and confirmed the antifilarial activity of five of these using in vitro assays against Brugia pahangi. Conclusions/Significance We were able to functionally complement yeast deletions with eight different Brugia malayi enzymes that represent potential drug targets. We demonstrated that our yeast-based screening platform is efficient in identifying compounds that can discriminate between

  5. Spiperone, identified through compound screening, activates calcium-dependent chloride secretion in the airway

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Lihua; MacDonald, Kelvin; Schwiebert, Erik M.; Zeitlin, Pamela L.; Guggino, William B.

    2009-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the gene producing the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). CFTR functions as a Cl− channel. Its dysfunction limits Cl− secretion and enhances Na+ absorption, leading to viscous mucus in the airway. Ca2+-activated Cl− channels (CaCCs) are coexpressed with CFTR in the airway surface epithelia. Increases in cytosolic Ca2+ activate the epithelial CaCCs, which provides an alternative Cl− secretory pathway in CF. We developed a screening assay and screened a library for compounds that could enhance cytoplasmic Ca2+, activate the CaCC, and increase Cl− secretion. We found that spiperone, a known antipsychotic drug, is a potent intracellular Ca2+ enhancer and demonstrated that it stimulates intracellular Ca2+, not by acting in its well-known role as an antagonist of serotonin 5-HT2 or dopamine D2 receptors, but through a protein tyrosine kinase-coupled phospholipase C-dependent pathway. Spiperone activates CaCCs, which stimulates Cl− secretion in polarized human non-CF and CF airway epithelial cell monolayers in vitro and in CFTR-knockout mice in vivo. In conclusion, we have identified spiperone as a new therapeutic platform for correction of defective Cl− secretion in CF via a pathway independent of CFTR. PMID:18987251

  6. Using C. elegans Forward and Reverse Genetics to Identify New Compounds with Anthelmintic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Mark D.; Mathew, Neal D.; Miller, Angela; Simpson, Mike; Au, Vinci; Garland, Stephanie; Gestin, Marie; Edgley, Mark L.; Flibotte, Stephane; Balgi, Aruna; Chiang, Jennifer; Giaever, Guri; Dean, Pamela; Tung, Audrey; Roberge, Michel; Roskelley, Calvin; Forge, Tom; Nislow, Corey; Moerman, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Background The lack of new anthelmintic agents is of growing concern because it affects human health and our food supply, as both livestock and plants are affected. Two principal factors contribute to this problem. First, nematode resistance to anthelmintic drugs is increasing worldwide and second, many effective nematicides pose environmental hazards. In this paper we address this problem by deploying a high throughput screening platform for anthelmintic drug discovery using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as a surrogate for infectious nematodes. This method offers the possibility of identifying new anthelmintics in a cost-effective and timely manner. Methods/Principal findings Using our high throughput screening platform we have identified 14 new potential anthelmintics by screening more than 26,000 compounds from the Chembridge and Maybridge chemical libraries. Using phylogenetic profiling we identified a subset of the 14 compounds as potential anthelmintics based on the relative sensitivity of C. elegans when compared to yeast and mammalian cells in culture. We showed that a subset of these compounds might employ mechanisms distinct from currently used anthelmintics by testing diverse drug resistant strains of C. elegans. One of these newly identified compounds targets mitochondrial complex II, and we used structural analysis of the target to suggest how differential binding of this compound may account for its different effects in nematodes versus mammalian cells. Conclusions/Significance The challenge of anthelmintic drug discovery is exacerbated by several factors; including, 1) the biochemical similarity between host and parasite genomes, 2) the geographic location of parasitic nematodes and 3) the rapid development of resistance. Accordingly, an approach that can screen large compound collections rapidly is required. C. elegans as a surrogate parasite offers the ability to screen compounds rapidly and, equally importantly, with specificity, thus

  7. Investigating the antiplasmodial activity of primary sulfonamide compounds identified in open source malaria data.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Gillian M; Bua, Silvia; Del Prete, Sonia; Arnold, Megan S J; Capasso, Clemente; Supuran, Claudiu T; Andrews, Katherine T; Poulsen, Sally-Ann

    2017-04-01

    In the past decade there has been a significant reduction in deaths due to malaria, in part due to the success of the gold standard antimalarial treatment - artemisinin combination therapies (ACTs). However the potential threat of ACT failure and the lack of a broadly effective malaria vaccine are driving efforts to discover new chemical entities (NCEs) to target this disease. The primary sulfonamide (PS) moiety is a component of several clinical drugs, including those for treatment of kidney disease, glaucoma and epilepsy, however this chemotype has not yet been exploited for malaria. In this study 31 PS compounds sourced from the GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) Tres Cantos antimalarial set (TCAMS) were investigated for their ability to selectively inhibit the in vitro growth of Plasmodium falciparum asexual stage malaria parasites. Of these, 14 compounds were found to have submicromolar activity (IC50 0.16-0.89 μM) and a modest selectivity index (SI) for the parasite versus human cells (SI > 12 to >43). As the PS moiety is known to inhibit carbonic anhydrase (CA) enzymes from many organisms, the PS compounds were assessed for recombinant P. falciparum CA (PfCA) mediated inhibition of CO2 hydration. The PfCA inhibition activity did not correlate with antiplasmodial potency. Furthermore, no significant difference in IC50 was observed for P. falciparum versus P. knowlesi (P > 0.05), a Plasmodium species that is not known to contain an annotated PfCA gene. Together these data suggest that the asexual intraerythrocytic stage antiplasmodial activity of the PS compounds examined in this study is likely unrelated to PfCA inhibition.

  8. Conserved valproic-acid-induced lipid droplet formation in Dictyostelium and human hepatocytes identifies structurally active compounds.

    PubMed

    Elphick, Lucy M; Pawolleck, Nadine; Guschina, Irina A; Chaieb, Leila; Eikel, Daniel; Nau, Heinz; Harwood, John L; Plant, Nick J; Williams, Robin S B

    2012-03-01

    Lipid droplet formation and subsequent steatosis (the abnormal retention of lipids within a cell) has been reported to contribute to hepatotoxicity and is an adverse effect of many pharmacological agents including the antiepileptic drug valproic acid (VPA). In this study, we have developed a simple model system (Dictyostelium discoideum) to investigate the effects of VPA and related compounds in lipid droplet formation. In mammalian hepatocytes, VPA increases lipid droplet accumulation over a 24-hour period, giving rise to liver cell damage, and we show a similar effect in Dictyostelium following 30 minutes of VPA treatment. Using (3)H-labelled polyunsaturated (arachidonic) or saturated (palmitic) fatty acids, we shown that VPA treatment of Dictyostelium gives rise to an increased accumulation of both types of fatty acids in phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and non-polar lipids in this time period, with a similar trend observed in human hepatocytes (Huh7 cells) labelled with [(3)H]arachidonic acid. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of β-oxidation in Dictyostelium phenocopies fatty acid accumulation, in agreement with data reported in mammalian systems. Using Dictyostelium, we then screened a range of VPA-related compounds to identify those with high and low lipid-accumulation potential, and validated these activities for effects on lipid droplet formation by using human hepatocytes. Structure-activity relationships for these VPA-related compounds suggest that lipid accumulation is independent of VPA-catalysed teratogenicity and inositol depletion. These results suggest that Dictyostelium could provide both a novel model system for the analysis of lipid droplet formation in human hepatocytes and a rapid method for identifying VPA-related compounds that show liver toxicology.

  9. Development and application of a sensitive, phenotypic, high-throughput image-based assay to identify compound activity against Trypanosoma cruzi amastigotes

    PubMed Central

    Sykes, Melissa L.; Avery, Vicky M.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a high content 384-well, image-based assay to estimate the effect of compound treatment on Trypanosoma cruzi amastigotes in 3T3 fibroblasts. In the same well, the effect of compound activity on host cells can also be determined, as an initial indicator of cytotoxicity. This assay has been used to identify active compounds from an in-house library of compounds with either known biological activity or that are FDA approved, and separately, from the Medicines for Malaria Venture Malaria Box collection. Active compounds were screened against T. cruzi trypomastigotes, utilising an assay developed with the viability dye resazurin. Twelve compounds with reconfirmed solid sample activity, with IC50 values of less than 10 μM and selectivity indices to T. cruzi amastigotes over 3T3 host cells of between >22 and 319 times were identified from these libraries. As 3T3 cells are contact inhibited, with limited proliferation in the assay, selective compounds of interest were profiled in a separate assay to estimate the viability of compound treated, replicating HEK293 cells. Selective compounds that were not previously reported in the literature were further profiled by extending the incubation time against amastigote infected 3T3 cells to determine if there were residual amastigotes post-treatment, important for the consideration of the exposure time required for further biological characterisation. The assay development process and the suitability of identified compounds as hit molecules for Chagas disease research are discussed. PMID:27120069

  10. Development and application of a sensitive, phenotypic, high-throughput image-based assay to identify compound activity against Trypanosoma cruzi amastigotes.

    PubMed

    Sykes, Melissa L; Avery, Vicky M

    2015-12-01

    We have developed a high content 384-well, image-based assay to estimate the effect of compound treatment on Trypanosoma cruzi amastigotes in 3T3 fibroblasts. In the same well, the effect of compound activity on host cells can also be determined, as an initial indicator of cytotoxicity. This assay has been used to identify active compounds from an in-house library of compounds with either known biological activity or that are FDA approved, and separately, from the Medicines for Malaria Venture Malaria Box collection. Active compounds were screened against T. cruzi trypomastigotes, utilising an assay developed with the viability dye resazurin. Twelve compounds with reconfirmed solid sample activity, with IC50 values of less than 10 μM and selectivity indices to T. cruzi amastigotes over 3T3 host cells of between >22 and 319 times were identified from these libraries. As 3T3 cells are contact inhibited, with limited proliferation in the assay, selective compounds of interest were profiled in a separate assay to estimate the viability of compound treated, replicating HEK293 cells. Selective compounds that were not previously reported in the literature were further profiled by extending the incubation time against amastigote infected 3T3 cells to determine if there were residual amastigotes post-treatment, important for the consideration of the exposure time required for further biological characterisation. The assay development process and the suitability of identified compounds as hit molecules for Chagas disease research are discussed.

  11. From Drug Screening to Target Deconvolution: a Target-Based Drug Discovery Pipeline Using Leishmania Casein Kinase 1 Isoform 2 To Identify Compounds with Antileishmanial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Durieu, Emilie; Prina, Eric; Leclercq, Olivier; Oumata, Nassima; Gaboriaud-Kolar, Nicolas; Vougogiannopoulou, Konstantina; Aulner, Nathalie; Defontaine, Audrey; No, Joo Hwan; Ruchaud, Sandrine; Skaltsounis, Alexios-Leandros; Galons, Hervé; Späth, Gerald F.; Meijer, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Existing therapies for leishmaniases present significant limitations, such as toxic side effects, and are rendered inefficient by parasite resistance. It is of utmost importance to develop novel drugs targeting Leishmania that take these two limitations into consideration. We thus chose a target-based approach using an exoprotein kinase, Leishmania casein kinase 1.2 (LmCK1.2) that was recently shown to be essential for intracellular parasite survival and infectivity. We developed a four-step pipeline to identify novel selective antileishmanial compounds. In step 1, we screened 5,018 compounds from kinase-biased libraries with Leishmania and mammalian CK1 in order to identify hit compounds and assess their specificity. For step 2, we selected 88 compounds among those with the lowest 50% inhibitory concentration to test their biological activity on host-free parasites using a resazurin reduction assay and on intramacrophagic amastigotes using a high content phenotypic assay. Only 75 compounds showed antileishmanial activity and were retained for step 3 to evaluate their toxicity against mouse macrophages and human cell lines. The four compounds that displayed a selectivity index above 10 were then assessed for their affinity to LmCK1.2 using a target deconvolution strategy in step 4. Finally, we retained two compounds, PP2 and compound 42, for which LmCK1.2 seems to be the primary target. Using this four-step pipeline, we identify from several thousand molecules, two lead compounds with a selective antileishmanial activity. PMID:26902771

  12. Use of thermal desorption gas chromatography-olfactometry/mass spectrometry for the comparison of identified and unidentified odor active compounds emitted from building products containing linseed oil.

    PubMed

    Clausen, P A; Knudsen, H N; Larsen, K; Kofoed-Sørensen, V; Wolkoff, P; Wilkins, C K

    2008-11-14

    The emission of odor active volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a floor oil based on linseed oil, the linseed oil itself and a low-odor linseed oil was investigated by thermal desorption gas chromatography combined with olfactometry and mass spectrometry (TD-GC-O/MS). The oils were applied to filters and conditioned in the micro emission cell, FLEC, for 1-3days at ambient temperature, an air exchange rate of 26.9h(-1) and a 30% relative humidity. These conditions resulted in dynamic headspace concentrations and composition of the odor active VOCs that may be similar to real indoor setting. Emission samples for TD-GC-O/MS analysis from the FLEC were on Tenax TA. Although many volatile VOCs were detected by MS, only the odor active VOCs are reported here. In total, 142 odor active VOCs were detected in the emissions from the oils. About 50 of the odor active VOCs were identified or tentatively identified by GC-MS. While 92 VOCs were detected from the oil used in the floor oil, only 13 were detected in the low-odor linseed oil. The major odor active VOCs were aldehydes and carboxylic acids. Spearmen rank correlation of the GC-O profiles showed that the odor profile of the linseed oil likely influenced the odor profile of the floor oil based on this linseed oil.

  13. Study of Compounds for Activity against Leishmania

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-27

    Comparative Antileishmanial Activity of Selected Compounds Against Leishmania Leishmania donovani and Leishmania Viannia braziliensis 7 IV. Zn vitro...Studies of Oligonucleotides Against Leishmania Leishmania donovani ............................................................ 9 Discussion...for several years in studies to identify new compounds for antileishmanial activity against both visceral (Lelshmania Leishmania donovani ) and

  14. The Development, Validation, and Use of Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship Models of 5-Hydroxytryptamine (2B) Receptor Ligands to Identify Novel Receptor Binders and Putative Valvulopathic Compounds among Common Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Hajjo, Rima; Grulke, Christopher; Golbraikh, Alexander; Setola, Vincent; Huang, Xi-Ping; Roth, Bryan L.; Tropsha, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Some antipsychotic drugs are known to cause valvular heart disease by activating serotonin 5-HT2B receptors. We have developed and validated binary classification QSAR models capable of predicting potential 5-HT2B binders. The classification accuracies of the models to discriminate 5-HT2B actives from the inactives were as high as 80% for the external test set. These models were used to screen in silico 59,000 compounds included in the World Drug Index and 122 compounds were predicted as actives with high confidence. Ten of them were tested in radioligand binding assays and nine were found active suggesting a success rate of 90%. All validated binders were then tested in functional assays and one compound was identified as a true 5-HT2B agonist. We suggest that the QSAR models developed in this study could be used as reliable predictors to flag drug candidates that are likely to cause valvulopathy. PMID:20958049

  15. Screening with a novel cell-based assay for TAZ activators identifies a compound that enhances myogenesis in C2C12 cells and facilitates muscle repair in a muscle injury model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zeyu; Nakagawa, Kentaro; Sarkar, Aradhan; Maruyama, Junichi; Iwasa, Hiroaki; Bao, Yijun; Ishigami-Yuasa, Mari; Ito, Shigeru; Kagechika, Hiroyuki; Hata, Shoji; Nishina, Hiroshi; Abe, Shinya; Kitagawa, Masanobu; Hata, Yutaka

    2014-05-01

    The transcriptional coactivator with a PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) cooperates with various transcriptional factors and plays various roles. Immortalized human mammalian epithelial MCF10A cells form spheres when TAZ is overexpressed and activated. We developed a cell-based assay using sphere formation by TAZ-expressing MCF10A cells as a readout to screen 18,458 chemical compounds for TAZ activators. Fifty compounds were obtained, and 47 were confirmed to activate the TAZ-dependent TEAD-responsive reporter activity in HEK293 cells. We used the derived subset of compounds as a TAZ activator candidate minilibrary and searched for compounds that promote myogenesis in mouse C2C12 myoblast cells. In this study, we focused on one compound, IBS008738. IBS008738 stabilizes TAZ, increases the unphosphorylated TAZ level, enhances the association of MyoD with the myogenin promoter, upregulates MyoD-dependent gene transcription, and competes with myostatin in C2C12 cells. TAZ knockdown verifies that the effect of IBS008738 depends on endogenous TAZ in C2C12 cells. IBS008738 facilitates muscle repair in cardiotoxin-induced muscle injury and prevents dexamethasone-induced muscle atrophy. Thus, this cell-based assay is useful to identify TAZ activators with a variety of cellular outputs. Our findings also support the idea that TAZ is a potential therapeutic target for muscle atrophy.

  16. Screening with a Novel Cell-Based Assay for TAZ Activators Identifies a Compound That Enhances Myogenesis in C2C12 Cells and Facilitates Muscle Repair in a Muscle Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zeyu; Nakagawa, Kentaro; Sarkar, Aradhan; Maruyama, Junichi; Iwasa, Hiroaki; Bao, Yijun; Ishigami-Yuasa, Mari; Ito, Shigeru; Kagechika, Hiroyuki; Hata, Shoji; Nishina, Hiroshi; Abe, Shinya; Kitagawa, Masanobu

    2014-01-01

    The transcriptional coactivator with a PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) cooperates with various transcriptional factors and plays various roles. Immortalized human mammalian epithelial MCF10A cells form spheres when TAZ is overexpressed and activated. We developed a cell-based assay using sphere formation by TAZ-expressing MCF10A cells as a readout to screen 18,458 chemical compounds for TAZ activators. Fifty compounds were obtained, and 47 were confirmed to activate the TAZ-dependent TEAD-responsive reporter activity in HEK293 cells. We used the derived subset of compounds as a TAZ activator candidate minilibrary and searched for compounds that promote myogenesis in mouse C2C12 myoblast cells. In this study, we focused on one compound, IBS008738. IBS008738 stabilizes TAZ, increases the unphosphorylated TAZ level, enhances the association of MyoD with the myogenin promoter, upregulates MyoD-dependent gene transcription, and competes with myostatin in C2C12 cells. TAZ knockdown verifies that the effect of IBS008738 depends on endogenous TAZ in C2C12 cells. IBS008738 facilitates muscle repair in cardiotoxin-induced muscle injury and prevents dexamethasone-induced muscle atrophy. Thus, this cell-based assay is useful to identify TAZ activators with a variety of cellular outputs. Our findings also support the idea that TAZ is a potential therapeutic target for muscle atrophy. PMID:24550007

  17. Screen of FDA-approved drug library identifies maprotiline, an antibiofilm and antivirulence compound with QseC sensor-kinase dependent activity in Francisella novicida.

    PubMed

    Dean, Scott N; van Hoek, Monique L

    2015-01-01

    Development of new therapeutics against Select Agents such as Francisella is critical preparation in the event of bioterrorism. Testing FDA-approved drugs for this purpose may yield new activities unrelated to their intended purpose and may hasten the discovery of new therapeutics. A library of 420 FDA-approved drugs was screened for antibiofilm activity against a model organism for human tularemia, Francisella (F.) novicida, excluding drugs that significantly inhibited growth. The initial screen was based on the 2-component system (TCS) dependent biofilm effect, thus, the QseC dependence of maprotiline anti-biofilm action was demonstrated. By comparing their FDA-approved uses, chemical structures, and other properties of active drugs, toremifene and polycyclic antidepressants maprotiline and chlorpromazine were identified as being highly active against F. novicida biofilm formation. Further down-selection excluded toremifene for its membrane active activity and chlorpromazine for its high antimicrobial activity. The mode of action of maprotiline against F. novicida was sought. It was demonstrated that maprotiline was able to significantly down-regulate the expression of the virulence factor IglC, encoded on the Francisella Pathogenicity Island (FPI), suggesting that maprotiline is exerting an effect on bacterial virulence. Further studies showed that maprotiline significantly rescued F. novicida infected wax worm larvae. In vivo studies demonstrated that maprotiline treatment could prolong time to disease onset and survival in F. novicida infected mice. These results suggest that an FDA-approved drug such as maprotiline has the potential to combat Francisella infection as an antivirulence agent, and may have utility in combination with antibiotics.

  18. Screen of FDA-approved drug library identifies maprotiline, an antibiofilm and antivirulence compound with QseC sensor-kinase dependent activity in Francisella novicida

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Scott N; van Hoek, Monique L

    2015-01-01

    Development of new therapeutics against Select Agents such as Francisella is critical preparation in the event of bioterrorism. Testing FDA-approved drugs for this purpose may yield new activities unrelated to their intended purpose and may hasten the discovery of new therapeutics. A library of 420 FDA-approved drugs was screened for antibiofilm activity against a model organism for human tularemia, Francisella (F.) novicida, excluding drugs that significantly inhibited growth. The initial screen was based on the 2-component system (TCS) dependent biofilm effect, thus, the QseC dependence of maprotiline anti-biofilm action was demonstrated. By comparing their FDA-approved uses, chemical structures, and other properties of active drugs, toremifene and polycyclic antidepressants maprotiline and chlorpromazine were identified as being highly active against F. novicida biofilm formation. Further down-selection excluded toremifene for its membrane active activity and chlorpromazine for its high antimicrobial activity. The mode of action of maprotiline against F. novicida was sought. It was demonstrated that maprotiline was able to significantly down-regulate the expression of the virulence factor IglC, encoded on the Francisella Pathogenicity Island (FPI), suggesting that maprotiline is exerting an effect on bacterial virulence. Further studies showed that maprotiline significantly rescued F. novicida infected wax worm larvae. In vivo studies demonstrated that maprotiline treatment could prolong time to disease onset and survival in F. novicida infected mice. These results suggest that an FDA-approved drug such as maprotiline has the potential to combat Francisella infection as an antivirulence agent, and may have utility in combination with antibiotics. PMID:26155740

  19. A Novel Way To Identify Precursors That Degrade To Perfluorinated Compounds In Activated Sludge Using Ion-Trap Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    EPA Science Inventory

    An increasing number of studies have been conducted to investigate the environmental distribution of perfluorinated alkyl compounds (PFCs), many of which are known to be toxic in laboratory animals. Despite growing public concerns, fate and transport of PFCs are little known. M...

  20. A Novel Way To Identify Precursors That Degrade To Perfluourinated Compounds In Activated Sludge Using Ion-Trap Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    EPA Science Inventory

    An increasing number of studies have been conducted to investigate the environmental distribution of perfluorinated alkyl compounds (PFCs), many of which are known to be toxic in laboratory animals. Despite growing public concerns, the fate and transport of PFCs are little under...

  1. A staining protocol for identifying secondary compounds in Myrtaceae1

    PubMed Central

    Retamales, Hernan A.; Scharaschkin, Tanya

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Here we propose a staining protocol using toluidine blue (TBO) and ruthenium red to reliably identify secondary compounds in the leaves of some species of Myrtaceae. • Methods and Results: Leaves of 10 species representing 10 different genera of Myrtaceae were processed and stained using five different combinations of ruthenium red and TBO. Optimal staining conditions were determined as 1 min of ruthenium red (0.05% aqueous) and 45 s of TBO (0.1% aqueous). Secondary compounds clearly identified under this treatment include mucilage in the mesophyll, polyphenols in the cuticle, lignin in fibers and xylem, tannins and carboxylated polysaccharides in the epidermis, and pectic substances in the primary cell walls. • Conclusions: Potential applications of this protocol include systematic, phytochemical, and ecological investigations in Myrtaceae. It might be applicable to other plant families rich in secondary compounds and could be used as a preliminary screening method for extraction of these elements. PMID:25309840

  2. Zebrafish behavioral profiling identifies multi-target antipsychotic-like compounds

    PubMed Central

    Bruni, Giancarlo; Rennekamp, Andrew J.; Velenich, Andrea; McCarroll, Matthew; Gendelev, Leo; Fertsch, Ethan; Taylor, Jack; Lakhani, Parth; Lensen, Dennis; Evron, Tama; Lorello, Paul J.; Huang, Xi-Ping; Kolczewski, Sabine; Carey, Galen; Caldarone, Barbara J.; Prinssen, Eric; Roth, Bryan L.; Keiser, Michael J.; Peterson, Randall T.; Kokel, David

    2016-01-01

    Many psychiatric drugs act on multiple targets and therefore require screening assays that encompass a wide target space. With sufficiently rich phenotyping, and a large sampling of compounds, it should be possible to identify compounds with desired mechanisms of action based on their behavioral profiles alone. Although zebrafish (Danio rerio) behaviors have been used to rapidly identify neuroactive compounds, it remains unclear exactly what kind of behavioral assays might be necessary to identify multi-target compounds such as antipsychotics. Here, we developed a battery of behavioral assays in larval zebrafish to determine if behavioral profiles could provide sufficient phenotypic resolution to identify and classify psychiatric drugs. Using the antipsychotic drug haloperidol as a test case, we found that behavioral profiles of haloperidol-treated animals could be used to identify previously uncharacterized compounds with desired antipsychotic-like activities and multi-target mechanisms of action. PMID:27239787

  3. IDENTIFYING COMPOUNDS DESPITE CHROMATOGRAPHY LIMITATIONS: ORGANOPHOSPHATES IN TREATED SEWAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Highly concentrated extracts of sewage treatment plant (STP) effluents contain detectable
    levels of dozens of compounds resulting from human activities. Recent concern over use and
    disposal of Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products (PPCPS) (1) has stimulated interest ...

  4. Natural compounds with anti-ageing activity.

    PubMed

    Argyropoulou, Aikaterini; Aligiannis, Nektarios; Trougakos, Ioannis P; Skaltsounis, Alexios-Leandros

    2013-10-11

    Ageing is a complex molecular process driven by diverse molecular pathways and biochemical events that are promoted by both environmental and genetic factors. Specifically, ageing is defined as a time-dependent decline of functional capacity and stress resistance, associated with increased chance of morbidity and mortality. These effects relate to age-related gradual accumulation of stressors that result in increasingly damaged biomolecules which eventually compromise cellular homeostasis. Nevertheless, the findings that genetic or diet interventions can increase lifespan in evolutionarily diverse organisms indicate that mortality can be postponed. Natural compounds represent an extraordinary inventory of high diversity structural scaffolds that can offer promising candidate chemical entities in the major healthcare challenge of increasing health span and/or delaying ageing. Herein, those natural compounds (either pure forms or extracts) that have been found to delay cellular senescence or in vivo ageing will be critically reviewed and summarized according to affected cellular signalling pathways. Moreover, the chemical structures of the identified natural compounds along with the profile of extracts related to their bioactive components will be presented and discussed. Finally, novel potential molecular targets for screening natural compounds for anti-ageing activity, as well as the idea that anti-ageing interventions represent a systemic approach that is also effective against age-related diseases will be discussed.

  5. Biological activity of acetylated phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Fragopoulou, Elizabeth; Nomikos, Tzortzis; Karantonis, Haralabos C; Apostolakis, Constantinos; Pliakis, Emmanuel; Samiotaki, Martina; Panayotou, George; Antonopoulou, Smaragdi

    2007-01-10

    In recent years an effort has been made to isolate and identify biologically active compounds that are included in the Mediterranean diet. The existence of naturally occurring acetylated phenolics, as well as studies with synthetic ones, provide evidence that acetyl groups could be correlated with their biological activity. Platelet activating factor (PAF) is implicated in atherosclerosis, whereas its inhibitors seem to play a protective role against cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to examine the biological activity of resveratrol and tyrosol and their acetylated derivatives as inhibitors of PAF-induced washed rabbit platelet aggregation. Acetylation of resveratrol and tyrosol was performed, and separation was achieved by HPLC. Acetylated derivatives were identified by negative mass spectrometry. The data showed that tyrosol and its monoacetylated derivatives act as PAF inhibitors, whereas diacetylated derivatives induce platelet aggregation. Resveratrol and its mono- and triacetylated derivatives exert similar inhibitory activity, whereas the diacetylated ones are more potent inhibitors. In conclusion, acetylated phenolics exert the same or even higher antithrombotic activity compared to the biological activity of the initial one.

  6. [Organisms producing hypolipidemic compounds with antioxidant activity].

    PubMed

    Puzhevskaia, T O; Grammatikova, N E; Bibikova, M V; Katlinskiĭ, A V

    2009-01-01

    Complex compounds produced by fungal cultures of Lecanicilium and Beauveria with both high hypolipidemic and antioxydant activities were screened. Two fractions of the hypolipipidemic compounds with antioxidant activity of 95 and 75% in a dose of 25 mcg/ml were isolated.

  7. Inferring Genetic Networks and Identifying Compound Mode of Action via Expression Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Timothy S.; di Bernardo, Diego; Lorenz, David; Collins, James J.

    2003-07-01

    The complexity of cellular gene, protein, and metabolite networks can hinder attempts to elucidate their structure and function. To address this problem, we used systematic transcriptional perturbations to construct a first-order model of regulatory interactions in a nine-gene subnetwork of the SOS pathway in Escherichia coli. The model correctly identified the major regulatory genes and the transcriptional targets of mitomycin C activity in the subnetwork. This approach, which is experimentally and computationally scalable, provides a framework for elucidating the functional properties of genetic networks and identifying molecular targets of pharmacological compounds.

  8. Identifying Activity Cliff Generators of PPAR Ligands Using SAS Maps.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Lucio, Oscar; Pérez-Villanueva, Jaime; Castillo, Rafael; Medina-Franco, José L

    2012-12-01

    Structure-activity relationships (SAR) of compound databases play a key role in hit identification and lead optimization. In particular, activity cliffs, defined as a pair of structurally similar molecules that present large changes in potency, provide valuable SAR information. Herein, we introduce the concept of activity cliff generator, defined as a molecular structure that has a high probability to form activity cliffs with molecules tested in the same biological assay. To illustrate this concept, we discuss a case study where Structure-Activity Similarity maps were used to systematically identify and analyze activity cliff generators present in a dataset of 168 compounds tested against three peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) subtypes. Single-target and dual-target activity cliff generators for PPARα and δ were identified. In addition, docking calculations of compounds that were classified as cliff generators helped to suggest a hot spot in the target protein responsible of activity cliffs and to analyze its implication in ligand-enzyme interaction.

  9. Drug Repurposing Screening Identifies Novel Compounds That Effectively Inhibit Toxoplasma gondii Growth

    PubMed Central

    Dittmar, Ashley J.; Drozda, Allison A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The urgent need to develop new antimicrobial therapies has spawned the development of repurposing screens in which well-studied drugs and other types of compounds are tested for potential off-label uses. As a proof-of-principle screen to identify compounds effective against Toxoplasma gondii, we screened a collection of 1,120 compounds for the ability to significantly reduce Toxoplasma replication. A total of 94 compounds blocked parasite replication with 50% inhibitory concentrations of <5 µM. A significant number of these compounds are established inhibitors of dopamine or estrogen signaling. Follow-up experiments with the dopamine receptor inhibitor pimozide revealed that the drug impacted both parasite invasion and replication but did so independently of inhibition of dopamine or other neurotransmitter receptor signaling. Tamoxifen, which is an established inhibitor of the estrogen receptor, also reduced parasite invasion and replication. Even though Toxoplasma can activate the estrogen receptor, tamoxifen inhibits parasite growth independently of this transcription factor. Tamoxifen is also a potent inducer of autophagy, and we find that the drug stimulates recruitment of the autophagy marker light chain 3-green fluorescent protein onto the membrane of the vacuolar compartment in which the parasite resides and replicates. In contrast to other antiparasitic drugs, including pimozide, tamoxifen treatment of infected cells leads to a time-dependent elimination of intracellular parasites. Taken together, these data suggest that tamoxifen restricts Toxoplasma growth by inducing xenophagy or autophagic destruction of this obligate intracellular parasite. IMPORTANCE There is an urgent need to develop new therapies to treat microbial infections, and the repurposing of well-characterized compounds is emerging as one approach to achieving this goal. Using the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii, we screened a library of 1,120 compounds and identified several

  10. Phenolic compounds with IL-6 inhibitory activity from Aster yomena.

    PubMed

    Kim, A Ryun; Jin, Qinglong; Jin, Hong-Guang; Ko, Hae Ju; Woo, Eun-Rhan

    2014-07-01

    A new biflavonoid, named asteryomenin (1), as well as six known phenolic compounds, esculetin (2), 4-O-β-D-glucopyranoside-3-hydroxy methyl benzoate (3), caffeic acid (4), isoquercitrin (5), isorhamnetin-3-O-glucoside (6), and apigenin (7) were isolated from the aerial parts of Aster yomena. The structures of compounds (1-7) were identified based on 1D and 2D NMR, including (1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC, HMBC and NOESY spectroscopic analyses. Compounds 2-7 were isolated from this plant for the first time. For these isolates, the inhibitory activity of IL-6 production in the TNF-α stimulated MG-63 cell was examined. Among these isolates, compounds 4 and 7 appeared to have potent inhibitory activity of IL-6 production in the TNF-α stimulated MG-63 cell, while compounds 1-3 and 5-6 showed moderate activity.

  11. Chemical transformations that yield compounds with distinct activity profiles.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ye; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2011-07-14

    We have systematically searched for chemical changes that generate compounds with distinct biological activity profiles. For this purpose, activity profiles were generated for ∼42000 compounds active against human targets. Unique activity profiles involving multiple target proteins were determined, and all possible matched molecular pairs (MMPs) were identified for compounds representing these profiles. An MMP is defined as a pair of compounds that are distinguished from each other only at a single site such as an R group or ring system. For example, in an MMP, a hydroxyl group might be replaced by a halogen atom or a benzene ring by an amide group. From ∼37500 MMPs, more than 300 nonredundant chemical transformations were isolated that yielded compounds with distinct activity profiles. None of these transformations was found in pairs of compounds with overlapping activity profiles. These transformations were ranked according to the number of MMPs, the number of activity profiles, and the total number of targets that they covered. In many instances, prioritized transformations involved ring systems of varying complexity. All transformations that were found to switch activity profiles are provided to enable further analysis and aid in compound design efforts.

  12. Study of Compounds for Activity against Leishmania

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-10-27

    Mrs. Barbara Harris, Miss Laura A. Lamb, and Miss Shannon Waits. tORZWORD Opinions, interpretations, conclusions and recommendations are those of the...antileishmanial activity against both visceral (Leishmania donovani) and cutaneous (Lebs-Qnia, braziliensis panamensis) leishmaniasis . Among the most promising...active compounds found against visceral leishmaniasis durinq these studies is the 8-aminoquinoline, WR06026. This compound is now undergoing clinical

  13. A Focused Screen Identifies Antifolates with Activity on Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anuradha; Colmenarejo, Gonzalo; Pérez, Esther; Gonzalez, Ruben R.; Torres, Pedro; Calvo, David; Gómez, Ruben M.; Ortega, Fátima; Jiménez, Elena; Gabarro, Raquel C.; Rullás, Joaquín; Ballell, Lluis

    2015-01-01

    Antifolates are widely used to treat several diseases but are not currently used in the first-line treatment of tuberculosis, despite evidence that some of these molecules can target Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) bacilli in vitro. To identify new antifolate candidates for animal-model efficacy studies of tuberculosis, we paired knowledge and tools developed in academia with the infrastructure and chemistry resources of a large pharmaceutical company. Together we curated a focused library of 2508 potential antifolates, which were then tested for activity against live Mtb. We identified 210 primary hits, confirmed the on-target activity of potent compounds, and now report the identification and characterization of 5 hit compounds, representative of 5 different chemical scaffolds. These antifolates have potent activity against Mtb and represent good starting points for improvement that could lead to in vivo efficacy studies. PMID:26771003

  14. High-Throughput Phenotypic Screening of Human Astrocytes to Identify Compounds That Protect Against Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Nasir; Shah, Sonia; Zhao, Jean; Class, Bradley; Aguisanda, Francis; Southall, Noel; Xia, Menghang; McKew, John C.; Rao, Mahendra

    2016-01-01

    Astrocytes are the predominant cell type in the nervous system and play a significant role in maintaining neuronal health and homeostasis. Recently, astrocyte dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Astrocytes are thus an attractive new target for drug discovery for neurological disorders. Using astrocytes differentiated from human embryonic stem cells, we have developed an assay to identify compounds that protect against oxidative stress, a condition associated with many neurodegenerative diseases. This phenotypic oxidative stress assay has been optimized for high-throughput screening in a 1,536-well plate format. From a screen of approximately 4,100 bioactive tool compounds and approved drugs, we identified a set of 22 that acutely protect human astrocytes from the consequences of hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress. Nine of these compounds were also found to be protective of induced pluripotent stem cell-differentiated astrocytes in a related assay. These compounds are thought to confer protection through hormesis, activating stress-response pathways and preconditioning astrocytes to handle subsequent exposure to hydrogen peroxide. In fact, four of these compounds were found to activate the antioxidant response element/nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 pathway, a protective pathway induced by toxic insults. Our results demonstrate the relevancy and utility of using astrocytes differentiated from human stem cells as a disease model for drug discovery and development. Significance Astrocytes play a key role in neurological diseases. Drug discovery efforts that target astrocytes can identify novel therapeutics. Human astrocytes are difficult to obtain and thus are challenging to use for high-throughput screening, which requires large numbers of cells. Using human embryonic stem cell

  15. Differential nuclear staining assay for high-throughput screening to identify cytotoxic compounds.

    PubMed

    Lema, Carolina; Varela-Ramirez, Armando; Aguilera, Renato J

    As large quantities of novel synthetic molecules continue to be generated there is a challenge to identify therapeutic agents with cytotoxic activity. Here we introduce a Differential Nuclear Staining (DNS) assay adapted to live-cell imaging for high throughput screening (HTS) that utilizes two fluorescent DNA intercalators, Hoechst 33342 and Propidium iodide (PI). Since Hoechst can readily cross cell membranes to stain DNA of living and dead cells, it was used to label the total number of cells. In contrast, PI only enters cells with compromised plasma membranes, thus selectively labeling dead cells. The DNS assay was successfully validated by utilizing well known cytotoxic agents with fast or slow cytotoxic activities. The assay was found to be suitable for HTS with Z' factors ranging from 0.86 to 0.60 for 96 and 384-well formats, respectively. Furthermore, besides plate-to-plate reproducibility, assay quality performance was evaluated by determining ratios of signal-to-noise and signal-to-background, as well as coefficient of variation, which resulted in adequate values and validated the assay for HTS initiatives. As proof of concept, eighty structurally diverse compounds from a small molecule library were screened in a 96-well plate format using the DNS assay. Using this DNS assay, six hits with cytotoxic properties were identified and all of them were also successfully identified by using the commercially available MTS assay (CellTiter 96® Cell Proliferation Assay). In addition, the DNS and a flow cytometry assay were used to validate the activity of the cytotoxic compounds. The DNS assay was also used to generate dose-response curves and to obtain CC50 values. The results indicate that the DNS assay is reliable and robust and suitable for primary and secondary screens of compounds with potential cytotoxic activity.

  16. Anti-tumoral activity of native compound morelloflavone in glioma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xianfeng; Ai, Hongyan; Sun, Deke; Wu, Tao; He, Jian; Xu, Zhai; Ding, Li; Wang, Ling

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the anti-tumoral activity of morelloflavone substances with different structures. We also studied the possible link between morelloflavone structure and its function. Various types of chromatographic techniques were used to isolate and screen morelloflavone substances from the extracts of gambogic tree trunk and the morelloflavone structures were identified by analytical techniques such as high resolution mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetism. Anti-tumoral activities of different compounds were investigated and the link between the antitumor activity and the structure of compound was exaimed. Our results showed that the isolated morelloflavone substances demonstrated a certain level of antitumor activity. The compound no. 1 had the strongest effect to inhibit glioma U87 and C6 cells followed by compound no. 2 while compound no. 5 was the weakest among them. We conducted a preliminary analysis on the structure-function relationship through the structure comparison and we concluded that the antitumor effects of morelloflavone substances with different structures were significantly different from each other. Thus, the glucose chain in C4 position of biflavone structure can enhance the antitumor activity of the compound in glioma cells. Additionally, the formation of intramolecular hydrogen bonds in biflavone compounds may also play a role in enhancing the antitumor activity and inhibition rate. PMID:27900007

  17. Professional Development: Identifying Effective Instructional Coaching Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mannino, Gina

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the instructional coaching activities most used by instructional coaches in southeast Texas school districts and to test if there was a relationship between the use of instructional coaching and perceived improvement in the instructional practices of teachers and student achievement. The participants for…

  18. Novel Dual-Reporter Preclinical Screen for Anti-Astrocytoma Agents Identifies Cytostatic and Cytotoxic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Hawes, Jessica J.; Nerva, John D.; Reilly, Karlyne M.

    2009-01-01

    Astrocytoma/glioblastoma is the most common malignant form of brain cancer and is often unresponsive to current pharmacological therapies and surgical interventions. Despite several potential therapeutic agents against astrocytoma and glioblastoma (1), there are currently no effective therapies for astrocytoma, creating a great need for the identification of effective anti-tumor agents. We have developed a novel dual-reporter system in Trp53/Nf1-null astrocytoma cells to simultaneously and rapidly assay cell viability and cell cycle progression as evidenced by activity of the human E2F1 promoter in vitro. The dual-reporter high-throughput assay was used to screen experimental therapeutics for activity in Trp53/Nf1-null astrocytoma. Several compounds were identified demonstrating selectivity for astrocytoma over primary astrocytes. The dual-reporter system described here may be a valuable tool for identifying potential anti-tumor treatments that specifically target astrocytoma. PMID:18664715

  19. Artificial neural network cascade identifies multi-P450 inhibitors in natural compounds

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhangming; Li, Yan; Sun, Lu; Tang, Yun; Liu, Lanru

    2015-01-01

    Substantial evidence has shown that most exogenous substances are metabolized by multiple cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes instead of by merely one P450 isoform. Thus, multi-P450 inhibition leads to greater drug-drug interaction risk than specific P450 inhibition. Herein, we innovatively established an artificial neural network cascade (NNC) model composed of 23 cascaded networks in a ladder-like framework to identify potential multi-P450 inhibitors among natural compounds by integrating 12 molecular descriptors into a P450 inhibition score (PIS). Experimental data reporting in vitro inhibition of five P450 isoforms (CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, and CYP3A4) were obtained for 8,148 compounds from the Cytochrome P450 Inhibitors Database (CPID). The results indicate significant positive correlation between the PIS values and the number of inhibited P450 isoforms (Spearman’s ρ = 0.684, p < 0.0001). Thus, a higher PIS indicates a greater possibility for a chemical to inhibit the enzyme activity of at least three P450 isoforms. Ten-fold cross-validation of the NNC model suggested an accuracy of 78.7% for identifying whether a compound is a multi-P450 inhibitor or not. Using our NNC model, 22.2% of the approximately 160,000 natural compounds in TCM Database@Taiwan were identified as potential multi-P450 inhibitors. Furthermore, chemical similarity calculations suggested that the prevailing parent structures of natural multi-P450 inhibitors were alkaloids. Our findings show that dissection of chemical structure contributes to confident identification of natural multi-P450 inhibitors and provides a feasible method for virtually evaluating multi-P450 inhibition risk for a known structure. PMID:26719820

  20. Glucosidase inhibitory activity and antioxidant activity of flavonoid compound and triterpenoid compound from Agrimonia Pilosa Ledeb

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In Chinese traditional medicine, Agrimonia pilosa Ledeb (APL) exhibits great effect on treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), however its mechanism is still unknown. Considering that T2DM are correlated with postprandial hyperglycemia and oxidative stress, we investigated the α-glucosidase inhibitory activity and the antioxidant activity of flavonoid compound (FC) and triterpenoid compound (TC) from APL. Methods Entire plants of APL were extracted using 95% ethanol and 50% ethanol successively. The resulting extracts were partitioned and isolated by applying liquid chromatography using silica gel column and Sephadex LH 20 column to give FC and TC. The content of total flavonoids in FC and the content of total triterpenoids in TC were determined by using UV spectrophotometry. HPLC analysis was used to identify and quantify the monomeric compound in FC and TC. The α-glucosidase inhibitory activities were determined using the chromogenic method with p-nitrophenyl-α-D-glucopyranoside as substrate. Antioxidant activities were assessed through three kinds of radical scavenging assays (DPPH radical, ABTS radical and hydroxyl radical) & β-carotene-linoleic acid assay. Results The results indicate FC is abundant of quercitrin, and hyperoside, and TC is abundant of 1β, 2β, 3β, 19α-tetrahydroxy-12-en-28-oic acid (265.2 mg/g) and corosolic acid (100.9 mg/g). The FC & the TC have strong α-glucosidase inhibitory activities with IC50 of 8.72 μg/mL and 3.67 μg/mL, respectively. We find that FC show competitive inhibition against α-glucosidase, while the TC exhibits noncompetitive inhibition. Furthermore, The FC exhibits significant radical scavenging activity with the EC50 values of 7.73 μg/mL, 3.64 μg/mL and 5.90 μg/mL on DPPH radical, hydroxyl radical and ABTS radical, respectively. The FC also shows moderate anti-lipid peroxidation activity with the IC50 values of 41.77 μg/mL on inhibiting β-carotene bleaching. Conclusion These results

  1. Identifying Bioaccumulative Halogenated Organic Compounds Using a Nontargeted Analytical Approach: Seabirds as Sentinels

    PubMed Central

    Millow, Christopher J.; Mackintosh, Susan A.; Lewison, Rebecca L.; Dodder, Nathan G.; Hoh, Eunha

    2015-01-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are typically monitored via targeted mass spectrometry, which potentially identifies only a fraction of the contaminants actually present in environmental samples. With new anthropogenic compounds continuously introduced to the environment, novel and proactive approaches that provide a comprehensive alternative to targeted methods are needed in order to more completely characterize the diversity of known and unknown compounds likely to cause adverse effects. Nontargeted mass spectrometry attempts to extensively screen for compounds, providing a feasible approach for identifying contaminants that warrant future monitoring. We employed a nontargeted analytical method using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC/TOF-MS) to characterize halogenated organic compounds (HOCs) in California Black skimmer (Rynchops niger) eggs. Our study identified 111 HOCs; 84 of these compounds were regularly detected via targeted approaches, while 27 were classified as typically unmonitored or unknown. Typically unmonitored compounds of note in bird eggs included tris(4-chlorophenyl)methane (TCPM), tris(4-chlorophenyl)methanol (TCPMOH), triclosan, permethrin, heptachloro-1'-methyl-1,2'-bipyrrole (MBP), as well as four halogenated unknown compounds that could not be identified through database searching or the literature. The presence of these compounds in Black skimmer eggs suggests they are persistent, bioaccumulative, potentially biomagnifying, and maternally transferring. Our results highlight the utility and importance of employing nontargeted analytical tools to assess true contaminant burdens in organisms, as well as to demonstrate the value in using environmental sentinels to proactively identify novel contaminants. PMID:26020245

  2. Cryptic antifungal compounds active by synergism with polyene antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Yoshioka, Mariko; Ihara, Fumio; Nihira, Takuya

    2016-04-01

    The majority of antifungal compounds reported so far target the cell wall or cell membrane of fungi, suggesting that other types of antibiotics cannot exert their activity because they cannot penetrate into the cells. Therefore, if the permeability of the cell membrane could be enhanced, many antibiotics might be found to have antifungal activity. We here used the polyene antibiotic nystatin, which binds to ergosterol and forms pores at the cell membrane, to enhance the cellular permeability. In the presence of nystatin, many culture extracts from entomopathogenic fungi displayed antifungal activity. Among all the active extracts, two active components were purified and identified as helvolic acid and terramide A. Because the minimum inhibitory concentration of either compound was reduced four-fold in the presence of nystatin, it can be concluded that this screening method is useful for detecting novel antifungal activity.

  3. Compounds identified in-flight by ROSETTA-COSIMA before the comet encounter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilchenbach, M.; Fischer, H.; Krüger, H.; Thirkell, L.; Rynö, J.

    2013-09-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is a laboratory surface analyzing technique and, with the COSIMA instrument onboard ROSETTA, it will be applied for the first time to in-situ measurements of cometary grains, once ROSETTA encounters its target comet, 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, in the September 2014. The COmetary Secondary Ion Mass analyzer (COSIMA) onboard ROSETTA will expose metal targets, collect cometary dust grains in the inner coma and analyze these with an optical microscope as well as secondary ion mass spectrometry [1]. The COSIMA instrument has been operated in-flight for commissioning in the first months after launch in March 2004 and on a regular basis during the passive and active spacecraft check-out time intervals up to ROSETTA hibernation from June 2011 onwards. The secondary ion mass spectra background and /or contamination level of the COSIMA metal targets has been identified prior to launch and these had been selected accordingly to avoid masking of single elements or compounds by carrying different metal targets for cometary grain collection. The main compounds identified in-flight are silicon polymers and hydrocarbons. We will discuss the surface analysis results with COSIMA, carried out far off any comet or asteroid in interplanetary space, their time evolution and their potential sources within ROSETTA.

  4. USING AN ACCURATE MASS, TRIPLE QUADRUPOLE MASS SPECTROMETER AND AN ION CORRELATION PROGRAM TO IDENTIFY COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most compounds are not found in mass spectral libraries and must be identified by other means. Often, compound identities can be deduced from the compositions of the ions in their mass spectra and review of the chemical literature. Confirmation is provided by mass spectra and r...

  5. A Virtual Screening Approach For Identifying Plants with Anti H5N1 Neuraminidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Recent outbreaks of highly pathogenic and occasional drug-resistant influenza strains have highlighted the need to develop novel anti-influenza therapeutics. Here, we report computational and experimental efforts to identify influenza neuraminidase inhibitors from among the 3000 natural compounds in the Malaysian-Plants Natural-Product (NADI) database. These 3000 compounds were first docked into the neuraminidase active site. The five plants with the largest number of top predicted ligands were selected for experimental evaluation. Twelve specific compounds isolated from these five plants were shown to inhibit neuraminidase, including two compounds with IC50 values less than 92 μM. Furthermore, four of the 12 isolated compounds had also been identified in the top 100 compounds from the virtual screen. Together, these results suggest an effective new approach for identifying bioactive plant species that will further the identification of new pharmacologically active compounds from diverse natural-product resources. PMID:25555059

  6. High Throughput Screening against the Peroxidase Cascade of African Trypanosomes Identifies Antiparasitic Compounds That Inactivate Tryparedoxin*

    PubMed Central

    Fueller, Florian; Jehle, Britta; Putzker, Kerstin; Lewis, Joe D.; Krauth-Siegel, R. Luise

    2012-01-01

    In African trypanosomes, the detoxification of broad spectrum hydroperoxides relies on a unique cascade composed of trypanothione (T(SH)2), trypanothione reductase, tryparedoxin (Tpx), and nonselenium glutathione peroxidase-type enzymes. All three proteins are essential for Trypanosoma brucei. Here, we subjected the complete system to a high throughput screening approach with nearly 80,000 chemicals. Twelve compounds inhibited the peroxidase system. All but one carried chloroalkyl substituents. The detailed kinetic analysis showed that two compounds weakly inhibited trypanothione reductase, but none of them specifically interacted with the peroxidase. They proved to be time-dependent inhibitors of Tpx-modifying Cys-40, the first cysteine of its active site WCPPC motif. Importantly, gel shift assays verified Tpx as a target in the intact parasites. T(SH)2, present in the in vitro assays and in the cells in high molar excess, did not interfere with Tpx inactivation. The compounds inhibited the proliferation of bloodstream T. brucei with EC50 values down to <1 μm and exerted up to 83-fold lower toxicity toward HeLa cells. Irreversible inhibitors are traditionally regarded as unfavorable. However, a large number of antimicrobials and anticancer therapeutics acts covalently with their target protein. The compounds identified here also interacted with recombinant human thioredoxin, a distant relative of Tpx. This finding might even be exploited for thioredoxin-based anticancer drug development approaches reported recently. The fact that the T(SH)2/Tpx couple occupies a central position within the trypanosomal thiol metabolism and delivers electrons also for the synthesis of DNA precursors renders the parasite-specific oxidoreductase an attractive drug target molecule. PMID:22275351

  7. Identifying developmental vascular disruptor compounds using a predictive signature and alternative toxicity models

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identifying Developmental Vascular Disruptor Compounds Using a Predictive Signature and Alternative Toxicity Models Presenting Author: Tamara Tal Affiliation: U.S. EPA/ORD/ISTD, RTP, NC, USA Chemically induced vascular toxicity during embryonic development can result in a wide...

  8. Novel Anti-Campylobacter Compounds Identified Using High Throughput Screening of a Pre-selected Enriched Small Molecules Library.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anand; Drozd, Mary; Pina-Mimbela, Ruby; Xu, Xiulan; Helmy, Yosra A; Antwi, Janet; Fuchs, James R; Nislow, Corey; Templeton, Jillian; Blackall, Patrick J; Rajashekara, Gireesh

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter is a leading cause of foodborne bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide and infections can be fatal. The emergence of antibiotic-resistant Campylobacter spp. necessitates the development of new antimicrobials. We identified novel anti-Campylobacter small molecule inhibitors using a high throughput growth inhibition assay. To expedite screening, we made use of a "bioactive" library of 4182 compounds that we have previously shown to be active against diverse microbes. Screening for growth inhibition of Campylobacter jejuni, identified 781 compounds that were either bactericidal or bacteriostatic at a concentration of 200 μM. Seventy nine of the bactericidal compounds were prioritized for secondary screening based on their physico-chemical properties. Based on the minimum inhibitory concentration against a diverse range of C. jejuni and a lack of effect on gut microbes, we selected 12 compounds. No resistance was observed to any of these 12 lead compounds when C. jejuni was cultured with lethal or sub-lethal concentrations suggesting that C. jejuni is less likely to develop resistance to these compounds. Top 12 compounds also possessed low cytotoxicity to human intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2 cells) and no hemolytic activity against sheep red blood cells. Next, these 12 compounds were evaluated for ability to clear C. jejuni in vitro. A total of 10 compounds had an anti-C. jejuni effect in Caco-2 cells with some effective even at 25 μM concentrations. These novel 12 compounds belong to five established antimicrobial chemical classes; piperazines, aryl amines, piperidines, sulfonamide, and pyridazinone. Exploitation of analogs of these chemical classes may provide Campylobacter specific drugs that can be applied in both human and animal medicine.

  9. Novel Anti-Campylobacter Compounds Identified Using High Throughput Screening of a Pre-selected Enriched Small Molecules Library

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anand; Drozd, Mary; Pina-Mimbela, Ruby; Xu, Xiulan; Helmy, Yosra A.; Antwi, Janet; Fuchs, James R.; Nislow, Corey; Templeton, Jillian; Blackall, Patrick J.; Rajashekara, Gireesh

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter is a leading cause of foodborne bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide and infections can be fatal. The emergence of antibiotic-resistant Campylobacter spp. necessitates the development of new antimicrobials. We identified novel anti-Campylobacter small molecule inhibitors using a high throughput growth inhibition assay. To expedite screening, we made use of a “bioactive” library of 4182 compounds that we have previously shown to be active against diverse microbes. Screening for growth inhibition of Campylobacter jejuni, identified 781 compounds that were either bactericidal or bacteriostatic at a concentration of 200 μM. Seventy nine of the bactericidal compounds were prioritized for secondary screening based on their physico-chemical properties. Based on the minimum inhibitory concentration against a diverse range of C. jejuni and a lack of effect on gut microbes, we selected 12 compounds. No resistance was observed to any of these 12 lead compounds when C. jejuni was cultured with lethal or sub-lethal concentrations suggesting that C. jejuni is less likely to develop resistance to these compounds. Top 12 compounds also possessed low cytotoxicity to human intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2 cells) and no hemolytic activity against sheep red blood cells. Next, these 12 compounds were evaluated for ability to clear C. jejuni in vitro. A total of 10 compounds had an anti-C. jejuni effect in Caco-2 cells with some effective even at 25 μM concentrations. These novel 12 compounds belong to five established antimicrobial chemical classes; piperazines, aryl amines, piperidines, sulfonamide, and pyridazinone. Exploitation of analogs of these chemical classes may provide Campylobacter specific drugs that can be applied in both human and animal medicine. PMID:27092106

  10. Antimicrobial activity of extractable conifer heartwood compounds toward Phytophthora ramorum.

    PubMed

    Manter, Daniel K; Kelsey, Rick G; Karchesy, Joseph J

    2007-11-01

    Ethyl acetate extracts from heartwood of seven western conifer trees and individual volatile compounds in the extracts were tested for antimicrobial activity against Phytophthora ramorum. Extracts from incense and western redcedar exhibited the strongest activity, followed by yellow-cedar, western juniper, and Port-Orford-cedar with moderate activity, and no activity for Douglas-fir and redwood extracts. Chemical composition of the extracts varied both qualitatively and quantitatively among the species with a total of 37 compounds identified by mass spectrometry. Of the 13 individual heartwood compounds bioassayed, three showed strong activity with a Log(10) EC(50) less than or equal to 1.0 ppm (hinokitiol, thymoquinone, and nootkatin), three expressed moderate activity ranging from 1.0-2.0 ppm (nootkatol, carvacrol, and valencene-11,12-diol), four compounds had weak activity at 2.0-3.0 ppm [alpha-terpineol, valencene-13-ol, (+)-beta-cedrene, (-)-thujopsene], and three had no activity [(+)-cedrol, delta-cadinene, and methyl carvacrol]. All of the most active compounds contained a free hydroxyl group, except thymoquinone. The importance of a free hydroxyl was demonstrated by the tremendous difference in activity between carvacrol (Log(10) EC(50) 1.81 +/- 0.08 ppm) and methyl carvacrol (Log(10) EC(50) >3.0 ppm). A field trial in California, showed that heartwood chips from redcedar placed on the forest floor for 4 months under Umbellularia californica (California bay laurel) with symptoms of P. ramorum leaf blight significantly limited the accumulation of P. ramorum DNA in the litter layer, compared with heartwood chips from redwood.

  11. Compounds active against cell walls of medically important fungi.

    PubMed Central

    Hector, R F

    1993-01-01

    A number of substances that directly or indirectly affect the cell walls of fungi have been identified. Those that actively interfere with the synthesis or degradation of polysaccharide components share the property of being produced by soil microbes as secondary metabolites. Compounds specifically interfering with chitin or beta-glucan synthesis have proven effective in studies of preclinical models of mycoses, though they appear to have a restricted spectrum of coverage. Semisynthetic derivatives of some of the natural products have offered improvements in activity, toxicology, or pharmacokinetic behavior. Compounds which act on the cell wall indirectly or by a secondary mechanism of action, such as the azoles, act against diverse fungi but are usually fungistatic in nature. Overall, these compounds are attractive candidates for further development. PMID:8457977

  12. A HAMP promoter bioassay system for identifying chemical compounds that modulate hepcidin expression.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Hiroshi; Uchiyama, Tatsuki; Sakamoto, Soichiro; Kanda, Junya; Oishi, Shinya; Fujii, Nobutaka; Tomosugi, Naohisa; Kadowaki, Norimitsu; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi

    2015-05-01

    Hepcidin is the central regulator of systemic iron homeostasis; dysregulation of hepcidin expression causes various iron metabolic disorders, including hereditary hemochromatosis and anemia of inflammation. To identify molecules that modulate hepcidin expression, we developed a bioassay system for hepcidin gene (HAMP) promoter activity by stable transfection of Hep3B hepatoma cells with an expression plasmid in which EGFP was linked to a 2.5-kb human HAMP promoter. Interleukin 6, bone morphogenetic protein 6 (BMP-6), and oncostatin M, well-characterized stimulators of the HAMP promoter, strongly enhanced the green fluorescence intensity of these cells. Dorsomorphin, heparin, and cobalt chloride, known inhibitors of hepcidin expression, significantly suppressed green fluorescence intensity, and these inhibitory effects were more prominent when the cells were stimulated with BMP-6. Employing this system, we screened 1,280 biologically active small molecules and found several candidate inhibitors of hepcidin expression. Apomorphine, benzamil, etoposide, CGS-15943, kenpaullone, and rutaecarpine (all at 10 μmol/L) significantly inhibited hepcidin mRNA expression by Hep3B cells without affecting cell viability. CGS-15943 was the strongest suppressor of BMP-6-induced hepcidin-25 secretion in these cells. We conclude that our newly developed hepcidin promoter bioassay system is useful for identifying and evaluating compounds that modulate hepcidin expression.

  13. Sulfonamides identified as plant immune-priming compounds in high-throughput chemical screening increase disease resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Noutoshi, Yoshiteru; Ikeda, Mika; Saito, Tamio; Osada, Hiroyuki; Shirasu, Ken

    2012-01-01

    Plant activators are agrochemicals that protect crops from diseases by activating the plant immune system. To isolate lead compounds for use as practical plant activators, we screened two different chemical libraries composed of various bioactive substances by using an established screening procedure that can selectively identify immune-priming compounds. We identified and characterized a group of sulfonamide compounds – sulfameter, sulfamethoxypyridazine, sulfabenzamide, and sulfachloropyridazine – among the various isolated candidate molecules. These sulfonamide compounds enhanced the avirulent Pseudomonas-induced cell death of Arabidopsis suspension cell cultures and increased disease resistance in Arabidopsis plants against both avirulent and virulent strains of the bacterium. These compounds did not prevent the growth of pathogenic bacteria in minimal liquid media at 200 μM. They also did not induce the expression of defense-related genes in Arabidopsis seedlings, at least not at 24 and 48 h after treatment, suggesting that they do not act as salicylic acid analogs. In addition, although sulfonamides are known to be folate biosynthesis inhibitors, the application of folate did not restore the potentiation effects of the sulfonamides on pathogen-induced cell death. Our data suggest that sulfonamides potentiate Arabidopsis disease resistance by their novel chemical properties. PMID:23118736

  14. Natural products as a resource for biologically active compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Hanke, F.J.

    1986-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate various sources of biologically active natural products in an effort to identify the active pesticidal compounds involved. The study is divided into several parts. Chapter 1 contains a discussion of several new compounds from plant and animal sources. Chapter 2 introduces a new NMR technique. In section 2.1 a new technique for better utilizing the lanthanide relaxation agent Gd(fod)/sub 3/ is presented which allows the predictable removal of resonances without line broadening. Section 2.2 discusses a variation of this technique for use in an aqueous solvent by applying this technique towards identifying the binding sites of metals of biological interest. Section 2.3 presents an unambiguous /sup 13/C NMR assignment of melibiose. Chapter 3 deals with work relating to the molting hormone of most arthropods, 20-hydroxyecdysone. Section 3.1 discusses the use of two-dimensional NMR (2D NMR) to assign the /sup 1/H NMR spectrum of this biologically important compound. Section 3.2 presents a new application for Droplet countercurrent chromatography (DCCC). Chapter 4 presents a basic improvement to the commercial DCCC instrument that is currently being applied to future commercial instruments. Chapter 5 discusses a curious observation of the effects that two previously known compounds, nagilactone C and (-)-epicatechin, have on lettuce and rice and suggest a possible new role for the ubiquitous flavanol (-)-epicatechin in plants.

  15. Identifying inhibitory compounds in lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates using an exometabolomics approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Inhibitors are formed that reduce the fermentation performance of fermenting yeast during the pretreatment process of lignocellulosic biomass. An exometabolomics approach was applied to systematically identify inhibitors in lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates. Results We studied the composition and fermentability of 24 different biomass hydrolysates. To create diversity, the 24 hydrolysates were prepared from six different biomass types, namely sugar cane bagasse, corn stover, wheat straw, barley straw, willow wood chips and oak sawdust, and with four different pretreatment methods, i.e. dilute acid, mild alkaline, alkaline/peracetic acid and concentrated acid. Their composition and that of fermentation samples generated with these hydrolysates were analyzed with two GC-MS methods. Either ethyl acetate extraction or ethyl chloroformate derivatization was used before conducting GC-MS to prevent sugars are overloaded in the chromatograms, which obscure the detection of less abundant compounds. Using multivariate PLS-2CV and nPLS-2CV data analysis models, potential inhibitors were identified through establishing relationship between fermentability and composition of the hydrolysates. These identified compounds were tested for their effects on the growth of the model yeast, Saccharomyces. cerevisiae CEN.PK 113-7D, confirming that the majority of the identified compounds were indeed inhibitors. Conclusion Inhibitory compounds in lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates were successfully identified using a non-targeted systematic approach: metabolomics. The identified inhibitors include both known ones, such as furfural, HMF and vanillin, and novel inhibitors, namely sorbic acid and phenylacetaldehyde. PMID:24655423

  16. A Yeast/Drosophila Screen to Identify New Compounds Overcoming Frataxin Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Seguin, Alexandra; Monnier, Véronique; Palandri, Amandine; Bihel, Frédéric; Rera, Michael; Schmitt, Martine; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Tricoire, Hervé; Lesuisse, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Friedreich's ataxia (FA) is a rare neurodegenerative disease which is very debilitating for the patients who progressively lose their autonomy. The lack of efficient therapeutic treatment of the disease strongly argues for urgent need to search for new active compounds that may stop the progression of the disease or prevent the appearance of the symptoms when the genetic defect is diagnosed early enough. In the present study, we used a yeast strain with a deletion of the frataxin homologue gene as a model of FA cells in a primary screen of two chemical libraries, a fraction of the French National Chemical Library (5500 compounds) and the Prestwick collection (880 compounds). We ran a secondary screen on Drosophila melanogaster flies expressing reduced levels of frataxin during larval development. Half of the compounds selected in yeast appeared to be active in flies in this developmental paradigm, and one of the two compounds with highest activities in this assay partially rescued the heart dilatation phenotype resulting from heart specific depletion of frataxin. The unique complementarity of these two frataxin-deficient models, unicellular and multicellular, appears to be very efficient to select new compounds with improved selectivity, bringing significant perspectives towards improvements in FA therapy. PMID:26523199

  17. Identifying physical activity gender differences among youth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Physical activity (PA) is an important part of a healthy lifestyle and reduces risk of certain chronic diseases. Many youth do not currently meet PA guidelines; evidence suggests that girls are less active than boys are at all ages. PA differences need to be understood, so that gender-specific inter...

  18. Antileishmanial Activity of Compounds Isolated from Sassafras albidum.

    PubMed

    Pulivarthi, Divya; Steinberg, Kelly Marie; Monzote, Lianet; Piñón, Abel; Setzer, William N

    2015-07-01

    Leishmaniasis is a neglected tropical disease caused by Leishmania parasitic protozoa, which currently lacks efficient treatment. Natural products have shown promise as a potential source for antiprotozoal drugs. This work focuses on the antileishmanial potential of Sassafras albidum (Lauraceae) bark extract. The crude bark extract of S. albidum showed excellent antileishmanial activity with an IC50 value less than 12.5 μg/mL against promastigotes of L. amazonensis. The chloroform stem bark extract of S. albidum was subjected to preparative column chromatography. Five compounds were isolated, purified by recrystallization, and identified as sesamin, spinescin, β-sitosterol, hexatriacontanal, and 1-triacontanol. Antileishmanial and cytotoxic screening were performed on these compounds. Sesamin exhibited the best activity against L. amazonensis with an IC50 of 15.8 μg/mL and was not cytotoxic to mouse macrophage cells (CC50 > 100 μg/mL).

  19. ION COMPOSITION ELUCIDATION (ICE): A HIGH RESOLUTION MASS SPECTROMETRIC TECHNIQUE FOR IDENTIFYING COMPOUNDS IN COMPLEX MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    When tentatively identifying compounds in complex mixtures using mass spectral libraries, multiple matches or no plausible matches due to a high level of chemical noise or interferences can occur. Worse yet, most analytes are not in the libraries. In each case, Ion Composition El...

  20. Using High Throughput Screens to Identify Lead Compounds for Alzheimer’s Disease Therapeutics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-11-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES The original document contains color images. 14 . ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION...26  Figure 2.3. Selection rules to identify compounds hits in the AB-GFP fusion assay...profile in days of AB42 and mutants as determined by thioflavin T fluorescence

  1. IDENTIFYING COMPOUNDS USING SOURCE CID ON AN ORTHOGONAL ACCELERATION TIME-OF-FLIGHT MASS SPECTROMETER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exact mass libraries of ESI and APCI mass spectra are not commercially available In-house libraries are dependent on CID parameters and are instrument specific. The ability to identify compounds without reliance on mass spectral libraries is therefore more crucial for liquid sam...

  2. A NEW MASS SPECTROMETRIC TECHNIQUE FOR IDENTIFYING TRACE-LEVEL ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN COMPLEX MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory



    Most organic compounds are not found in mass spectral libraries and cannot be easily identified from low resolution mass spectra. Ion Composition Elucidation (ICE) utilizes selected ion recording with a double focusing mass spectrometer in a new way to determine exact mas...

  3. Identifying Diverse Means for Assessing Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlman, Dana J.; Pearson, Phil

    2012-01-01

    Physical inactivity is of concern for the majority of age groups within the United States. Limited engagement in physical activity (PA) has been linked with an increased risk for a host of health problems, including but not limited to heart disease, diabetes and cancer. Benefits of PA are widely documented and accepted yet many people, especially…

  4. Identifying anthropogenic uranium compounds using soft X-ray near-edge absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, Jesse D.; Bowden, Mark; Tom Resch, C.; Eiden, Gregory C.; Pemmaraju, C. D.; Prendergast, David; Duffin, Andrew M.

    2017-01-01

    Uranium ores mined for industrial use are typically acid-leached to produce yellowcake and then converted into uranium halides for enrichment and purification. These anthropogenic chemical forms of uranium are distinct from their mineral counterparts. The purpose of this study is to use soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy to characterize several common anthropogenic uranium compounds important to the nuclear fuel cycle. Non-destructive chemical analyses of these compounds is important for process and environmental monitoring and X-ray absorption techniques have several advantages in this regard, including element-specificity, chemical sensitivity, and high spectral resolution. Oxygen K-edge spectra were collected for uranyl nitrate, uranyl fluoride, and uranyl chloride, and fluorine K-edge spectra were collected for uranyl fluoride and uranium tetrafluoride. Interpretation of the data is aided by comparisons to calculated spectra. These compounds have unique spectral signatures that can be used to identify unknown samples.

  5. Automated microwave double resonance spectroscopy: A tool to identify and characterize chemical compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Drumel, Marie-Aline; McCarthy, Michael C.; Patterson, David; McGuire, Brett A.; Crabtree, Kyle N.

    2016-03-01

    Owing to its unparalleled structural specificity, rotational spectroscopy is a powerful technique to unambiguously identify and characterize volatile, polar molecules. We present here a new experimental approach, automated microwave double resonance (AMDOR) spectroscopy, to rapidly determine the rotational constants of these compounds without a priori knowledge of elemental composition or molecular structure. This task is achieved by rapidly acquiring the classical (frequency vs. intensity) broadband spectrum of a molecule using chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave (FTMW) spectroscopy and subsequently analyzing it in near real-time using complementary cavity FTMW detection and double resonance. AMDOR measurements provide a unique "barcode" for each compound from which rotational constants can be extracted. To illustrate the power of this approach, AMDOR spectra of three aroma compounds — trans-cinnamaldehyde, α-, and β-ionone — have been recorded and analyzed. The prospects to extend this approach to mixture characterization and purity assessment are described.

  6. Automated Microwave Double Resonance Spectroscopy: a Tool to Identify and Characterize Chemical Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Drumel, Marie-Aline; McCarthy, Michael C.; Patterson, David; McGuire, Brett A.; Crabtree, Kyle N.

    2016-06-01

    Owing to its unparalleled structural specificity, rotational spectroscopy is a powerful technique to unambiguously identify and characterize volatile, polar molecules. We present here a new experimental approach, automated microwave double resonance (AMDOR) spectroscopy, to rapidly determine the rotational constants of these compounds without any a priori knowledge of elemental composition or molecular structure. This task is achieved by rapidly acquiring the classical (frequency vs. intensity) broadband spectrum of a molecule using chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave (FTMW) spectroscopy, and subsequently analyzing it in near-real time using complementary cavity FTMW detection and double resonance. AMDOR measurements provide a unique ``barcode'' for each compound from which rotational constants can be extracted. To illustrate the power of this approach, AMDOR spectra of three aroma compounds --- trans-cinnamaldehyde, α- and β-ionone --- have been recorded and analyzed. The prospects to extend this approach to mixture characterization and purity assessment are described.

  7. Profiling of the Tox21 Chemical Collection for Mitochondrial Function to Identify Compounds that Acutely Decrease Mitochondrial Membrane Potential

    PubMed Central

    Attene-Ramos, Matias S.; Huang, Ruili; Michael, Sam; Witt, Kristine L.; Richard, Ann; Tice, Raymond R.; Simeonov, Anton; Austin, Christopher P.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of disorders including cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. Understanding whether different environmental chemicals and druglike molecules impact mitochondrial function represents an initial step in predicting exposure-related toxicity and defining a possible role for such compounds in the onset of various diseases. Objectives: We sought to identify individual chemicals and general structural features associated with changes in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). Methods: We used a multiplexed [two end points in one screen; MMP and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content] quantitative high throughput screening (qHTS) approach combined with informatics tools to screen the Tox21 library of 10,000 compounds (~ 8,300 unique chemicals) at 15 concentrations each in triplicate to identify chemicals and structural features that are associated with changes in MMP in HepG2 cells. Results: Approximately 11% of the compounds (913 unique compounds) decreased MMP after 1 hr of treatment without affecting cell viability (ATP content). In addition, 309 compounds decreased MMP over a concentration range that also produced measurable cytotoxicity [half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) in MMP assay/IC50 in viability assay ≤ 3; p < 0.05]. More than 11% of the structural clusters that constitute the Tox21 library (76 of 651 clusters) were significantly enriched for compounds that decreased the MMP. Conclusions: Our multiplexed qHTS approach allowed us to generate a robust and reliable data set to evaluate the ability of thousands of drugs and environmental compounds to decrease MMP. The use of structure-based clustering analysis allowed us to identify molecular features that are likely responsible for the observed activity. Citation: Attene-Ramos MS, Huang R, Michael S, Witt KL, Richard A, Tice RR, Simeonov A, Austin CP, Xia M. 2015. Profiling of the Tox

  8. Effectively identifying compound-protein interactions by learning from positive and unlabeled examples.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhanzhan; Zhou, Shuigeng; Wang, Yang; Liu, Hui; Guan, Jihong; Chen, Yi-Ping Phoebe

    2016-05-18

    Prediction of compound-protein interactions (CPIs) is to find new compound-protein pairs where a protein is targeted by at least a compound, which is a crucial step in new drug design. Currently, a number of machine learning based methods have been developed to predict new CPIs in the literature. However, as there is not yet any publicly available set of validated negative CPIs, most existing machine learning based approaches use the unknown interactions (not validated CPIs) selected randomly as the negative examples to train classifiers for predicting new CPIs. Obviously, this is not quite reasonable and unavoidably impacts the CPI prediction performance. In this paper, we simply take the unknown CPIs as unlabeled examples, and propose a new method called PUCPI (the abbreviation of PU learning for Compound-Protein Interaction identification) that employs biased-SVM (Support Vector Machine) to predict CPIs using only positive and unlabeled examples. PU learning is a class of learning methods that leans from positive and unlabeled (PU) samples. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work that identifies CPIs using only positive and unlabeled examples. We first collect known CPIs as positive examples and then randomly select compound-protein pairs not in the positive set as unlabeled examples. For each CPI/compound-protein pair, we extract protein domains as protein features and compound substructures as chemical features, then take the tensor product of the corresponding compound features and protein features as the feature vector of the CPI/compound-protein pair. After that, biased-SVM is employed to train classifiers on different datasets of CPIs and compound-protein pairs. Experiments over various datasets show that our method outperforms six typical classifiers, including random forest, L1- and L2-regularized logistic regression, naive Bayes, SVM and k-nearest neighbor (kNN), and three types of existing CPI prediction models. Source code, datasets and

  9. Histone markers identify the mode of action for compounds positive in the TK6 micronucleus assay.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Jennifer R; Dickinson, Donna A; Moss, Jocelyn; Schuler, Maik J; Spellman, Richard A; Heard, Pamela L

    2015-01-01

    The in vitro micronucleus assay with TK6 cells is frequently used as part of the genotoxicity testing battery for pharmaceuticals. Consequently, follow-up testing strategies are needed for positive compounds to determine their mode of action, which would then allow for deployment of appropriate in vivo follow-up strategies. We have chosen 3 micronucleus positive compounds, the clastogen etoposide, the aneugen noscapine and the cytotoxicant tunicamycin to evaluate different approaches to determine their aneugenic or clastogenic properties. Each of the three compounds were evaluated following 4 and 24h of continuous treatment by flow cytometry for micronucleus induction, the aneugenicity markers phosphorylated-histone 3 (p-H3) and polyploidy, the clastogenicity marker γH2AX and the apoptosis marker cleaved caspase 3. They were further evaluated by Western blot for mono-ubiquitinated and γH2AX. Results show that the clastogen etoposide produced a dose related increase in γH2AX and mono-ubiquitinated H2AX and a dose related decrease in p-H3 positive mitotic cells. Conversely, the aneugen produced increases in p-H3 and polyploidy with no significant increases seen in mono-ubiquitinated H2AX or γH2AX. Lastly, the cytotoxicant tunicamycin induced neither an increase in p-H3 nor γH2AX. All three compounds produced dose-related increases in cleaved caspase 3. The results from this study provide evidence that adding clastogenicity and aneugenicity markers to the in vitro micronucleus assay in TK6 cells could help to identify the mode of action of positive compounds. The combination of endpoints suggested here needs to be further evaluated by a broader set of test compounds.

  10. Large-scale neurochemical metabolomics analysis identifies multiple compounds associated with methamphetamine exposure

    PubMed Central

    Adkins, Daniel E.; Vunck, Sarah A.; Batman, Angela M.; Vann, Robert E.; Clark, Shaunna L.; Beardsley, Patrick M.; van den Oord, Edwin J. C. G.

    2012-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) is an illegal stimulant drug of abuse with serious negative health consequences. The neurochemical effects of MA have been partially characterized, with a traditional focus on classical neurotransmitter systems. However, these directions have not yet led to novel drug treatments for MA abuse or toxicity. As an alternative approach, we describe here the first application of metabolomics to investigate the neurochemical consequences of MA exposure in the rodent brain. We examined single exposures at 3 mg/kg and repeated exposures at 3 mg/kg over 5 days in eight common inbred mouse strains. Brain tissue samples were assayed using high-throughput gas and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry, yielding quantitative data on >300 unique metabolites. Association testing and false discovery rate control yielded several metabolome-wide significant associations with acute MA exposure, including compounds such as lactate (p = 4.4 × 10−5, q = 0.013), tryptophan (p = 7.0 × 10−4, q = 0.035) and 2-hydroxyglutarate (p = 1.1 × 10−4, q = 0.022). Secondary analyses of MA-induced increase in locomotor activity showed associations with energy metabolites such as succinate (p = 3.8 × 10−7). Associations specific to repeated (5 day) MA exposure included phosphocholine (p = 4.0 × 10−4, q = 0.087) and ergothioneine (p = 3.0 × 10−4, q = 0.087). Our data appear to confirm and extend existing models of MA action in the brain, whereby an initial increase in energy metabolism, coupled with an increase in behavioral locomotion, gives way to disruption of mitochondria and phospholipid pathways and increased endogenous antioxidant response. Our study demonstrates the power of comprehensive MS-based metabolomics to identify drug-induced changes to brain metabolism and to develop neurochemical models of drug effects. PMID:23554582

  11. Ionic surface active compounds in atmospheric aerosols.

    PubMed

    Sukhapan, Jariya; Brimblecombe, Peter

    2002-04-27

    Surfactants in the atmosphere have several potential roles in atmospheric chemistry. They can form films on aqueous surfaces, which lowers the surface tension and possibly delays water evaporation and gaseous transportation across the aqueous interface. They can also increase the solubility of organic compounds in the aqueous phase. Recently, the decrease of surface tension in cloud growing droplets has been suggested as relevant to increases in the number of droplets of smaller size, potentially enhancing cloud albedo. Natural surfactants in the lung aid gas transfer and influence the dissolution rate of aerosol particles, so surfactants in atmospheric aerosols, once inhaled, may interact with pulmonary surfactants. Ambient aerosols were collected from the edge of Norwich, a small city in a largely agricultural region of England, and analysed for surfactants. Methylene blue, a conventional dye for detecting anionic surfactants, has been used as a colorimetric agent. The concentration of surfactants expressed as methylene blue active substances (MBAS) is in the range of 6-170 pmol m(-3)(air). A negative correlation with chloride aerosol indicates that these surfactants are probably not the well-known surfactants derived from marine spray. A more positive correlation with aerosol nitrate and gaseous NOx supports an association with more polluted inland air masses. The surfactants found in aerosols seem to be relatively strong acids, compared with weaker acids such as the long-chain carboxylic acids previously proposed as atmospheric surfactants. Surfactants from the oxidation of organic materials (perhaps vegetation- or soil-derived) seem a likely source of these substances in the atmosphere.

  12. Gradient measurement technique to identify phase transitions in nano-dispersed liquid crystalline compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardhasaradhi, P.; Madhav, B. T. P.; Venugopala Rao, M.; Manepalli, R. K. N. R.; Pisipati, V. G. K. M.

    2016-09-01

    Characterization and phase transitions in pure and 0.5% BaTiO3 nano-dispersed liquid crystalline (LC) N-(p-n-heptyloxybenzylidene)-p-n-nonyloxy aniline, 7O.O9, com-pounds are carried out using a polarizing microscope attached with hot stage and camera. We observed that when any of these images are distorted, different local structures suffer from various degradations in a gradient magnitude. So, we examined the pixel-wise gradient magnitude similarity between the reference and distorted images combined with a novel pooling strategy - the standard deviation of the GMS map - to determine the overall phase transition variations. In this regard, MATLAB software is used for gradient measurement technique to identify the phase transitions and transition temperature of the pure and nano-dispersed LC compounds. The image analysis of this method proposed is in good agreement with the standard methods like polarizing microscope (POM) and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). 0.5% BaTiO3 nano-dispersed 7O.O9 compound induces cholesteric phase quenching the nematic phase, which the pure compound exhibits.

  13. From Leaf Metabolome to In Vivo Testing: Identifying Antifeedant Compounds for Ecological Studies of Marsupial Diets.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Karen J; Yin, Baofa; Singh, Inder Pal; Saraf, Isha; Choudhary, Alka; Au, Jessie; Tucker, David J; Foley, William J

    2015-06-01

    Identifying specific plant secondary metabolites that influence feeding behavior can be challenging, but a solid understanding of animal preferences can guide efforts. Common brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) predominantly eat Eucalyptus species belonging to the subgenus Symphyomyrtus, and avoid eating those belonging to the Monocalyptus subgenus (also called subgenus Eucalyptus). Using an unbiased (1)H NMR metabolomics approach, a previous study identified unsubstituted B ring flavanones in most species of monocalypts examined, whereas these compounds were absent from symphyomyrtles. We hypothesised that unsubstituted B ring flavanones act as feeding deterrents for common brushtail possums. In the current study, we tested this hypothesis by comparing how much possums ate of a basal diet, with diets containing one of four structurally related compounds; pinocembrin, flavanone (unsubstituted B ring flavanones), chrysin (the flavone analogue of pinocembrin), and naringenin (a flavanone with B ring substitution). We found that pinocembrin and flavanone deterred feeding relative to the basal diet, but that chrysin and naringenin did not at equivalent concentrations. Thus, unsubstituted B-ring flavanones may explain why brushtail possums avoid eating monocalypt species. Furthermore, small differences in the structure of secondary compounds can have a large impact on antifeedant properties. These results demonstrate that metabolomics can be a valuable tool for ecologists seeking to understand herbivore feeding preferences.

  14. Quinolone Amides as Antitrypanosomal Lead Compounds with In Vivo Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hiltensperger, Georg; Hecht, Nina; Kaiser, Marcel; Rybak, Jens-Christoph; Hoerst, Alexander; Dannenbauer, Nicole; Müller-Buschbaum, Klaus; Bruhn, Heike; Esch, Harald; Lehmann, Leane; Meinel, Lorenz

    2016-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is a major tropical disease for which few drugs for treatment are available, driving the need for novel active compounds. Recently, morpholino-substituted benzyl amides of the fluoroquinolone-type antibiotics were identified to be compounds highly active against Trypanosoma brucei brucei. Since the lead compound GHQ168 was challenged by poor water solubility in previous trials, the aim of this study was to introduce structural variations to GHQ168 as well as to formulate GHQ168 with the ultimate goal to increase its aqueous solubility while maintaining its in vitro antitrypanosomal activity. The pharmacokinetic parameters of spray-dried GHQ168 and the newly synthesized compounds GHQ242 and GHQ243 in mice were characterized by elimination half-lives ranging from 1.5 to 3.5 h after intraperitoneal administration (4 mice/compound), moderate to strong human serum albumin binding for GHQ168 (80%) and GHQ243 (45%), and very high human serum albumin binding (>99%) for GHQ242. For the lead compound, GHQ168, the apparent clearance was 112 ml/h and the apparent volume of distribution was 14 liters/kg of body weight (BW). Mice infected with T. b. rhodesiense (STIB900) were treated in a stringent study scheme (2 daily applications between days 3 and 6 postinfection). Exposure to spray-dried GHQ168 in contrast to the control treatment resulted in mean survival durations of 17 versus 9 days, respectively, a difference that was statistically significant. Results that were statistically insignificantly different were obtained between the control and the GHQ242 and GHQ243 treatments. Therefore, GHQ168 was further profiled in an early-treatment scheme (2 daily applications at days 1 to 4 postinfection), and the results were compared with those obtained with a control treatment. The result was statistically significant mean survival times exceeding 32 days (end of the observation period) versus 7 days for the GHQ168 and control treatments

  15. Synthesis of New Sulfated and Glucuronated Metabolites of Dietary Phenolic Compounds Identified in Human Biological Samples.

    PubMed

    Almeida, A Filipa; Santos, Cláudia N; Ventura, M Rita

    2017-02-23

    (Poly)phenols are a large group of dietary compounds present in fruits and vegetables; their consumption is associated with health beneficial effects. After ingestion, (poly)phenols suffer extensive metabolization, and the identification of their metabolites is an emerging area, because these metabolites are considered the effective bioactive molecules in the human organism. However, a lack of commercially available standards has hampered the study of metabolite bioactivity and the exact structural confirmation in biological samples. New (poly)phenol metabolites previously identified in human samples after the intake of berry juice were chemically synthesized. Efficient chemical reactions were performed with moderate to excellent yields and selectivities. These new compounds could be used as standard chemicals for confirmation of the structure of metabolites in biological samples and will also allow mechanistic studies in cellular models.

  16. HPLC-based metabolomics to identify cytotoxic compounds from Plectranthus amboinicus (Lour.) Spreng against human breast cancer MCF-7Cells.

    PubMed

    Yulianto, Wahid; Andarwulan, Nuri; Giriwono, Puspo Edi; Pamungkas, Joko

    2016-12-15

    The objective of this study was to identify the active compounds in Plectranthus amboinicus (Lour.) Spreng which play a role to inhibit viability of breast cancer MCF-7 cells using HPLC-based metabolomics approach. Five fractions of the plant extract were observed including ethanol, hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate and water fraction. There were 45 HPLC chromatograms resulted from 5 fractions with 3 replications and 3 wavelengths detection. The chromatograms were compared to the data of IC50 from MTT assay of each fraction against human breast cancer MCF-7 cells using metabolomics. The OPLS analysis result promptly pointed towards a chloroform fraction at retention time of 40.16-41.28min that has the greatest contribution to the cytotoxic activity. The data of mass spectra indicated that an abietane diterpene namely 7-acetoxy-6-hydroxyroyleanone was the main compound that contributed to the cytotoxic activity. This metabolomics application method can be used as a quick preliminary guideline to uncover the most dominant compound related to the bioactivity.

  17. Study of the volatile compounds and odor-active compounds of dry-cured Iberian ham extracted by SPME.

    PubMed

    del Pulgar, José Sánchez; García, Carmen; Reina, Raquel; Carrapiso, Ana I

    2013-06-01

    The volatile compounds and the most odor-active compounds of dry-cured Iberian ham were investigated by extracting them using a solid phase microextraction technique with a 2 cm Carboxen/PDMS/DVB fiber. The detection frequency method was applied to estimate the potential contribution of each compound to the odor of hams. Twenty-one volatile compounds were tentatively identified for the first time in dry-cured ham by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and eight in dry-cured Iberian ham. Gas chromatography-olfactometry allowed the identification for the first time of six compounds not previously reported as odorants of Iberian ham, and also two odorants were newly identified in dry-cured ham. According to the detection frequency method, the most odor active compounds found were 3-methylbutanoic acid (dirty sock-like smelling), hexanal (cut grass-like odor), 3-methylbutanal (sweaty and bitter almond-like odor), 2-methyl-3-furanthiol (toasted nuts-like odor) and 1-octen-3-one (mushroom-like odor).

  18. Extremely Randomized Machine Learning Methods for Compound Activity Prediction.

    PubMed

    Czarnecki, Wojciech M; Podlewska, Sabina; Bojarski, Andrzej J

    2015-11-09

    Speed, a relatively low requirement for computational resources and high effectiveness of the evaluation of the bioactivity of compounds have caused a rapid growth of interest in the application of machine learning methods to virtual screening tasks. However, due to the growth of the amount of data also in cheminformatics and related fields, the aim of research has shifted not only towards the development of algorithms of high predictive power but also towards the simplification of previously existing methods to obtain results more quickly. In the study, we tested two approaches belonging to the group of so-called 'extremely randomized methods'-Extreme Entropy Machine and Extremely Randomized Trees-for their ability to properly identify compounds that have activity towards particular protein targets. These methods were compared with their 'non-extreme' competitors, i.e., Support Vector Machine and Random Forest. The extreme approaches were not only found out to improve the efficiency of the classification of bioactive compounds, but they were also proved to be less computationally complex, requiring fewer steps to perform an optimization procedure.

  19. Composition and topology of activity cliff clusters formed by bioactive compounds.

    PubMed

    Stumpfe, Dagmar; Dimova, Dilyana; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2014-02-24

    The assessment of activity cliffs has thus far mostly focused on compound pairs, although the majority of activity cliffs are not formed in isolation but in a coordinated manner involving multiple active compounds and cliffs. However, the composition of coordinated activity cliff configurations and their topologies are unknown. Therefore, we have identified all activity cliff configurations formed by currently available bioactive compounds and analyzed them in network representations where activity cliff configurations occur as clusters. The composition, topology, frequency of occurrence, and target distribution of activity cliff clusters have been determined. A limited number of large cliff clusters with unique topologies were identified that were centers of activity cliff formation. These clusters originated from a small number of target sets. However, most clusters were of small to moderate size. Three basic topologies were sufficient to describe recurrent activity cliff cluster motifs/topologies. For example, frequently occurring clusters with star topology determined the scale-free character of the global activity cliff network and represented a characteristic activity cliff configuration. Large clusters with complex topology were often found to contain different combinations of basic topologies. Our study provides a first view of activity cliff configurations formed by currently available bioactive compounds and of the recurrent topologies of activity cliff clusters. Activity cliff clusters of defined topology can be selected, and from compounds forming the clusters, SAR information can be obtained. The SAR information of activity cliff clusters sharing a/one specific activity and topology can be compared.

  20. Phenotype-driven chemical screening in zebrafish for compounds that inhibit collective cell migration identifies multiple pathways potentially involved in metastatic invasion.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, Viviana E; Varshney, Gaurav K; Lee, Minnkyong; Bupp, Sujata; Xu, Lisha; Shinn, Paul; Crawford, Nigel P; Inglese, James; Burgess, Shawn M

    2015-06-01

    In the last decade, high-throughput chemical screening has become the dominant approach for discovering novel compounds with therapeutic properties. Automated screening using in vitro or cultured cell assays have yielded thousands of candidate drugs for a variety of biological targets, but these approaches have not resulted in an increase in drug discovery despite major increases in expenditures. In contrast, phenotype-driven screens have shown a much stronger success rate, which is why we developed an in vivo assay using transgenic zebrafish with a GFP-marked migrating posterior lateral line primordium (PLLp) to identify compounds that influence collective cell migration. We then conducted a high-throughput screen using a compound library of 2160 annotated bioactive synthetic compounds and 800 natural products to identify molecules that block normal PLLp migration. We identified 165 compounds that interfere with primordium migration without overt toxicity in vivo. Selected compounds were confirmed in their migration-blocking activity by using additional assays for cell migration. We then proved the screen to be successful in identifying anti-metastatic compounds active in vivo by performing orthotopic tumor implantation assays in mice. We demonstrated that the Src inhibitor SU6656, identified in our screen, can be used to suppress the metastatic capacity of a highly aggressive mammary tumor cell line. Finally, we used CRISPR/Cas9-targeted mutagenesis in zebrafish to genetically validate predicted targets of compounds. This approach demonstrates that the migrating PLLp in zebrafish can be used for large-scale, high-throughput screening for compounds that inhibit collective cell migration and, potentially, anti-metastatic compounds.

  1. Screening Active Compounds from Garcinia Species Native to China Reveals Novel Compounds Targeting the STAT/JAK Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Xu, Linfeng; Lao, Yuanzhi; Zhao, Yanhui; Qin, Jian; Fu, Wenwei; Zhang, Yingjia; Xu, Hongxi

    2015-01-01

    Natural compounds from medicinal plants are important resources for drug development. In a panel of human tumor cells, we screened a library of the natural products from Garcinia species which have anticancer potential to identify new potential therapeutic leads and discovered that caged xanthones were highly effective at suppressing multiple cancer cell lines. Their anticancer activities mainly depended on apoptosis pathways. For compounds in sensitive cancer line, their mechanisms of mode of action were evaluated. 33-Hydroxyepigambogic acid and 35-hydroxyepigambogic acid exhibited about 1 μM IC50 values against JAK2/JAK3 kinases and less than 1 μM IC50 values against NCI-H1650 cell which autocrined IL-6. Thus these two compounds provided a new antitumor molecular scaffold. Our report describes 33-hydroxyepigambogic acid and 35-hydroxyepigambogic acid that inhibited NCI-H1650 cell growth by suppressing constitutive STAT3 activation via direct inhibition of JAK kinase activity.

  2. [Coordination compounds of Pd(II) with potential antitumor activity].

    PubMed

    González Vílchez, F; García Basallote, M; Benítez Ordóñez, J; Vilaplana Serrano, R

    1982-01-01

    The first results about the anti-neoplastic activity of Pd(II) ion coordinative compounds with complexones of the ethylenediamine-tetraacetic acid type are described. The assays employing Ehrlich ascites cancer of the mouse show that the presence of substitutes in the ethylenediamine skeleton originates important changes of the activity of such compounds.

  3. High-Throughput Screening Using a Whole-Cell Virus Replication Reporter Gene Assay to Identify Inhibitory Compounds against Rift Valley Fever Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Koushikul; Baudin, Maria; Eriksson, Jonas; Öberg, Christopher; Habjan, Matthias; Weber, Friedemann; Överby, Anna K; Ahlm, Clas; Evander, Magnus

    2016-04-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is an emerging virus that causes serious illness in humans and livestock. There are no approved vaccines or treatments for humans. The purpose of the study was to identify inhibitory compounds of RVFV infection without any preconceived idea of the mechanism of action. A whole-cell-based high-throughput drug screening assay was developed to screen 28,437 small chemical compounds targeting RVFV infection. To accomplish both speed and robustness, a replication-competent NSs-deleted RVFV expressing a fluorescent reporter gene was developed. Inhibition of fluorescence intensity was quantified by spectrophotometry and related to virus infection in human lung epithelial cells (A549). Cell toxicity was assessed by the Resazurin cell viability assay. After primary screening, 641 compounds were identified that inhibited RVFV infection by ≥80%, with ≥50% cell viability at 50 µM concentration. These compounds were subjected to a second screening regarding dose-response profiles, and 63 compounds with ≥60% inhibition of RVFV infection at 3.12 µM compound concentration and ≥50% cell viability at 25 µM were considered hits. Of these, six compounds with high inhibitory activity were identified. In conclusion, the high-throughput assay could efficiently and safely identify several promising compounds that inhibited RVFV infection.

  4. Identifying anthropogenic uranium compounds using soft X-ray near-edge absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Jesse D.; Bowden, Mark; Tom Resch, C.; Eiden, Gregory C.; Pemmaraju, C. D.; Prendergast, David; Duffin, Andrew M.

    2017-01-01

    Uranium ores mined for industrial use are typically acid-leached to produce yellowcake and then converted into uranium halides for enrichment and purification. These anthropogenic chemical forms of uranium are distinct from their mineral counterparts. The purpose of this study is to use soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy to characterize several common anthropogenic uranium compounds important to the nuclear fuel cycle. Chemical analyses of these compounds are important for process and environmental monitoring. X-ray absorption techniques have several advantages in this regard, including element-specificity, chemical sensitivity, and high spectral resolution. Oxygen K-edge spectra were collected for uranyl nitrate, uranyl fluoride, and uranyl chloride, and fluorine K-edge spectra were collected for uranyl fluoride and uranium tetrafluoride. Interpretation of the data is aided by comparisons to calculated spectra. The effect of hydration state on the sample, a potential complication in interpreting oxygen K-edge spectra, is discussed. These compounds have unique spectral signatures that can be used to identify unknown samples.

  5. Identification of new compounds with high activity against stationary phase Borrelia burgdorferi from the NCI compound collection

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jie; Shi, Wanliang; Zhang, Shuo; Zhang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease is the leading tick-borne disease in the USA. Whereas the majority of Lyme disease patients with early disease can be cured with standard treatment, some patients suffer from chronic fatigue and joint and muscular pain despite treatment, a syndrome called posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome. Although the cause is unclear, ineffective killing of Borrelia burgdorferi persisters by current Lyme disease antibiotics is one possible explanation. We took advantage of our recently developed high-throughput viability assay and screened the National Cancer Institute compound library collection consisting of 2526 compounds against stationary phase B. burgdorferi. We identified the top 30 new active hits, including the top six anthracycline antibiotics daunomycin 3-oxime, dimethyldaunomycin, daunomycin, NSC299187, NSC363998 and nogalamycin, along with other compounds, including prodigiosin, mitomycin, nanaomycin and dactinomycin, as having excellent activity against B. burgdorferi stationary phase culture. The anthracycline or anthraquinone compounds, which are known to have both anti-cancer and antibacterial activities, also had high activity against growing B. burgdorferi with low minimum inhibitory concentration. Future studies on the structure–activity relationship and mechanisms of action of anthracyclines/anthraquinones are warranted. In addition, drug combination studies with the anthracycline class of compounds and the current Lyme antibiotics to eradicate B. burgdorferi persisters in vitro and in animal models are needed to determine if they improve the treatment of Lyme disease. PMID:26954881

  6. Identification of new compounds with high activity against stationary phase Borrelia burgdorferi from the NCI compound collection.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jie; Shi, Wanliang; Zhang, Shuo; Zhang, Ying

    2015-06-03

    Lyme disease is the leading tick-borne disease in the USA. Whereas the majority of Lyme disease patients with early disease can be cured with standard treatment, some patients suffer from chronic fatigue and joint and muscular pain despite treatment, a syndrome called posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome. Although the cause is unclear, ineffective killing of Borrelia burgdorferi persisters by current Lyme disease antibiotics is one possible explanation. We took advantage of our recently developed high-throughput viability assay and screened the National Cancer Institute compound library collection consisting of 2526 compounds against stationary phase B. burgdorferi. We identified the top 30 new active hits, including the top six anthracycline antibiotics daunomycin 3-oxime, dimethyldaunomycin, daunomycin, NSC299187, NSC363998 and nogalamycin, along with other compounds, including prodigiosin, mitomycin, nanaomycin and dactinomycin, as having excellent activity against B. burgdorferi stationary phase culture. The anthracycline or anthraquinone compounds, which are known to have both anti-cancer and antibacterial activities, also had high activity against growing B. burgdorferi with low minimum inhibitory concentration. Future studies on the structure-activity relationship and mechanisms of action of anthracyclines/anthraquinones are warranted. In addition, drug combination studies with the anthracycline class of compounds and the current Lyme antibiotics to eradicate B. burgdorferi persisters in vitro and in animal models are needed to determine if they improve the treatment of Lyme disease.

  7. Nematicidal activity of natural ester compounds and their analogues against pine wood nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus.

    PubMed

    Seo, Seon-Mi; Kim, Junheon; Koh, Sang-Hyun; Ahn, Young-Joon; Park, Il-Kwon

    2014-09-17

    In this study, we evaluated the nematicidal activity of natural ester compounds against the pine wood nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, to identify candidates for the development of novel, safe nematicides. We also tested the nematicidal activity of synthesized analogues of these ester compounds to determine the structure-activity relationship. Among 28 ester compounds tested, isobutyl 2-methylbutanoate, 3-methylbutyl 2-methylbutanoate, 3-methylbutyl tiglate, 3-methyl-2-butenyl 2-methylbutanoate, and pentyl 2-methylbutanoate showed strong nematicidal activity against the pine wood nematode at a 1 mg/mL concentration. The other ester compounds showed weak nematicidal activity. The LC50 values of 3-methylbutyl tiglate, isobutyl 2-methylbutanoate, 3-methylbutyl 2-methylbutanoate, 3-methyl-2-butenyl 2-methylbutanoate, and pentyl 2-methylbutanoate were 0.0218, 0.0284, 0.0326, 0.0402, and 0.0480 mg/mL, respectively. The ester compounds described herein merit further study as potential nematicides for pine wood nematode control.

  8. Analogue Experiments Identify Possible Precursor Compounds for Chlorohydrocarbons Detected in SAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, K.; Summons, R. E.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Freissinet, C.; Glavin, D. P.; Martin, M. G.; Team, M.

    2013-12-01

    Since landing at Gale Crater on August 6, 2012, the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite, aboard the Curiosity Rover, has conducted multiple analyses of scooped and drilled samples and has identified a suite of chlorohydrocarbons including chloromethane, dichloromethane, trichloromethane, chloromethylpropene, and chlorobenzene (Glavin et al., 2013; Leshin et al., 2013). These compounds were identified after samples were pyrolysed at temperatures up to ~835°C through a combination of Evolved Gas Analysis (EGA) and Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (GCMS). Since these chlorinated species were well above the background levels determined by empty cup blanks analyzed prior to solid sample analyses, thermal degradation of oxychlorine phases, such as perchlorate, present in the Martian soil, are the most likely source of chlorine needed to generate these chlorohydrocarbons. Laboratory analogue experiments show that terrestrial organics internal to SAM, such as N-methyl-N(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA), a derivatization agent, can react with perchlorates to produce all of the chlorohydrocarbons detected by SAM. However, in pyrolysis-trap-GCMS laboratory experiments with MTBSTFA, C4 compounds are the predominant chlorohydrocarbon observed, whereas on SAM the C1 chlorohydrocarbons dominate (Glavin et al., 2013). This, in addition to the previous identification of chloromethane and dichloromethane by the 1976 Viking missions (Biemann et al., 1977), suggest that there could be another, possibly Martian, source of organic carbon contributing to the formation of the C1 chlorohydrocarbons, or other components of the solid samples analyzed by SAM are having a catalytic effect on chlorohydrocarbon generation. Laboratory analogue experiments investigated a suite of organic compounds that have the potential to accumulate on Mars (Benner et al., 2000) and thus serve as sources of carbon for the formation of chlorohydrocarbons detected by the SAM and

  9. E-prescribing errors identified in a compounding pharmacy: a quality-improvement project.

    PubMed

    Reed-Kane, Dana; Kittell, Katrina; Adkins, Jacquelyn; Flocks, Sarah; Nguyen, Thu

    2014-01-01

    Errors during the prescribing process can cause problems for patients. When the pharmacist intercepts a prescribing error, it can cause a delay, as the patient may not receive the medication until the problem is resolved. Electronic prescriptions are purported to reduce prescribing errors. However, studies have shown that electronic prescriptions can be prone to certain types of errors. Compounding pharmacies may present an additional obstacle for e-prescribing, as the prescribed medications are not commercially available and may not be listed in the e-prescribing software. The objectives of this study were to estimate the electronic prescription error rate in a compounding pharmacy, determine the most common error types, list the most common interventions pharmacists made, and estimate how long it took to resolve these errors. The study design was quality improvement with descriptive data. During the four weeks of data collection, the pharmacists were trained to complete a standardized data collection form when they identified an electronic prescription error. Percentages were calculated for new prescriptions, electronic prescriptions with errors, error types, and error resolution methods. In the four-week period of the study, there were 982 new prescriptions, 111 of which were electronic prescriptions. Of those 111 electronic prescriptions, 70 had errors. The electronic prescriptions error rate was 63%. The most common type of error was wrong entry field (70.3%). For this project, wrong entry field was defined to mean that the drug name was in the wrong field (81%) or that multiple entries were in the wrong field (7%). Pharmacists usually used their own judgment to resolve an error (67%). Many e-prescription errors were identified in this compounding pharmacy. When prescription errors happen, workflow and patient care are disrupted. Our goal is to discuss these findings with Surescripts and e-prescribing software companies to seek systems-based solutions.

  10. High-throughput screening in niche-based assay identifies compounds to target preleukemic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gerby, Bastien; Veiga, Diogo F.T.; Krosl, Jana; Nourreddine, Sami; Ouellette, Julianne; Haman, André; Lavoie, Geneviève; Fares, Iman; Tremblay, Mathieu; Litalien, Véronique; Ottoni, Elizabeth; Geoffrion, Dominique; Maddox, Paul S.; Chagraoui, Jalila; Hébert, Josée; Sauvageau, Guy; Kwok, Benjamin H.; Roux, Philippe P.

    2016-01-01

    Current chemotherapies for T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) efficiently reduce tumor mass. Nonetheless, disease relapse attributed to survival of preleukemic stem cells (pre-LSCs) is associated with poor prognosis. Herein, we provide direct evidence that pre-LSCs are much less chemosensitive to existing chemotherapy drugs than leukemic blasts because of a distinctive lower proliferative state. Improving therapies for T-ALL requires the development of strategies to target pre-LSCs that are absolutely dependent on their microenvironment. Therefore, we designed a robust protocol for high-throughput screening of compounds that target primary pre-LSCs maintained in a niche-like environment, on stromal cells that were engineered for optimal NOTCH1 activation. The multiparametric readout takes into account the intrinsic complexity of primary cells in order to specifically monitor pre-LSCs, which were induced here by the SCL/TAL1 and LMO1 oncogenes. We screened a targeted library of compounds and determined that the estrogen derivative 2-methoxyestradiol (2-ME2) disrupted both cell-autonomous and non–cell-autonomous pathways. Specifically, 2-ME2 abrogated pre-LSC viability and self-renewal activity in vivo by inhibiting translation of MYC, a downstream effector of NOTCH1, and preventing SCL/TAL1 activity. In contrast, normal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells remained functional. These results illustrate how recapitulating tissue-like properties of primary cells in high-throughput screening is a promising avenue for innovation in cancer chemotherapy. PMID:27797342

  11. Capture Compound Mass Spectrometry - A Powerful Tool to Identify Novel c-di-GMP Effector Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Laventie, Benoît-Joseph; Nesper, Jutta; Ahrné, Erik; Glatter, Timo; Schmidt, Alexander; Jenal, Urs

    2015-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made during the last decade towards the identification and characterization of enzymes involved in the synthesis (diguanylate cyclases) and degradation (phosphodiesterases) of the second messenger c-di-GMP. In contrast, little information is available regarding the molecular mechanisms and cellular components through which this signaling molecule regulates a diverse range of cellular processes. Most of the known effector proteins belong to the PilZ family or are degenerated diguanylate cyclases or phosphodiesterases that have given up on catalysis and have adopted effector function. Thus, to better define the cellular c-di-GMP network in a wide range of bacteria experimental methods are required to identify and validate novel effectors for which reliable in silico predictions fail. We have recently developed a novel Capture Compound Mass Spectrometry (CCMS) based technology as a powerful tool to biochemically identify and characterize c-di-GMP binding proteins. This technique has previously been reported to be applicable to a wide range of organisms1. Here we give a detailed description of the protocol that we utilize to probe such signaling components. As an example, we use Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen in which c-di-GMP plays a critical role in virulence and biofilm control. CCMS identified 74% (38/51) of the known or predicted components of the c-di-GMP network. This study explains the CCMS procedure in detail, and establishes it as a powerful and versatile tool to identify novel components involved in small molecule signaling. PMID:25867682

  12. Comparative Inhibition Study of Compounds Identified in the Methanolic Extract of Apamarga Kshara Against Trichomonas vaginalis Carbamate Kinase (TvCK): An Enzoinformatics Approach.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Sibhghatulla; Aaqil, Hamida; Rizvi, Syed Mohd Danish; Shakil, Shazi; Abuzenadah, Adel M; Gupta, Pragya; Saxena, Soumya; Tiwari, Rohit Kr; Kumar, Ajai

    2016-12-01

    In the present study, we have identified ten compounds, namely dodecanol acid, myristic acid, neophytadiene, palmitic acid, heptadecanoic acid, linoleic acid, elaidic acid, 3-7-dimethyl acid, stearic acid and methyl eicos acid, of the methanolic extract of Apamarga Kshara by GC-MS analysis. Apamarga Kshara has been reported to be active against cervical erosion. Major causal organism for cervical erosion is Trichomonas vaginalis. However, there is a paucity of information about the mechanism of action and inhibitory effect of the biologically active natural compounds presented in A. Kshara against this organism (T. vaginalis). Therefore, present investigation was conducted to observe possible interactions of these compounds on T. vaginalis carbamate kinase using molecular docking software 'AutoDock 4.2.' Identification of the amino acid residues crucial for the interaction between T. vaginalis carbamate kinase and these natural compounds is of due scientific interest. The study will aid in efficacious and safe clinical use of the above-mentioned compounds.

  13. Screening of Panamanian Plant Extracts for Pesticidal Properties and HPLC-Based Identification of Active Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Guldbrandsen, Niels; De Mieri, Maria; Gupta, Mahabir; Seiser, Tobias; Wiebe, Christine; Dickhaut, Joachim; Reingruber, Rüdiger; Sorgenfrei, Oliver; Hamburger, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    A library of 600 taxonomically diverse Panamanian plant extracts was screened for fungicidal, insecticidal, and herbicidal activities. A total of 19 active extracts were submitted to HPLC-based activity profiling, and extracts of Bocconia frutescens, Miconia affinis, Myrcia splendens, Combretum aff. laxum, and Erythroxylum macrophyllum were selected for the isolation of compounds. Chelerythrine (2), macarpine (3), dihydrosanguinarine (5), and arjunolic acid (8) showed moderate-to-good fungicidal activity. Myricetin-3-O-(6’’-O-galloyl)-β-galactopyranoside (13) showed moderate insecticidal activity, but no compound with herbicidal activity was identified. PMID:26839818

  14. Fractionation of Phenolic Compounds Extracted from Propolis and Their Activity in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Petelinc, Tanja; Polak, Tomaž; Demšar, Lea; Jamnik, Polona

    2013-01-01

    We have here investigated the activities of Slovenian propolis extracts in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and identified the phenolic compounds that appear to contribute to these activities. We correlated changes in intracellular oxidation and cellular metabolic energy in these yeasts with the individual fractions of the propolis extracts obtained following solid-phase extraction. The most effective fraction was further investigated according to its phenolic compounds. PMID:23409133

  15. Identifying source correlation parameters for hydrocarbon wastes using compound-specific isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Hough, Rupert L; Whittaker, Martin; Fallick, Anthony E; Preston, Tom; Farmer, John G; Pollard, Simon J T

    2006-10-01

    A preliminary evaluation of compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) as a novel, alternative method for identifying source correlation compounds in soils contaminated with residual heavy or weathered petroleum wastes is presented. Oil-contaminated soil microcosms were established using soil (sandy-loam, non-carbonaceous cley) amended with ballast-, crude- or No.6 fuel oil. Microcosms were periodically sampled over 256 days and delta(13)C values (which express the ratio of (13)C to (12)C) determined at each time point for five n-alkanes and the isoprenoid norpristane using gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS). Although some temporal variation was observed, no significant temporal shifts in the delta(13)C values for the five n-alkanes were measured in all three oils. Isoprenoid isotope ratios (delta(13)C) appeared to be least affected by biotransformation, especially in the No.6 fuel oil. The research suggests that the delta(13)C of isoprenoids such as norpristane, may be of use as source correlation parameters.

  16. Feasibility of Active Machine Learning for Multiclass Compound Classification.

    PubMed

    Lang, Tobias; Flachsenberg, Florian; von Luxburg, Ulrike; Rarey, Matthias

    2016-01-25

    A common task in the hit-to-lead process is classifying sets of compounds into multiple, usually structural classes, which build the groundwork for subsequent SAR studies. Machine learning techniques can be used to automate this process by learning classification models from training compounds of each class. Gathering class information for compounds can be cost-intensive as the required data needs to be provided by human experts or experiments. This paper studies whether active machine learning can be used to reduce the required number of training compounds. Active learning is a machine learning method which processes class label data in an iterative fashion. It has gained much attention in a broad range of application areas. In this paper, an active learning method for multiclass compound classification is proposed. This method selects informative training compounds so as to optimally support the learning progress. The combination with human feedback leads to a semiautomated interactive multiclass classification procedure. This method was investigated empirically on 15 compound classification tasks containing 86-2870 compounds in 3-38 classes. The empirical results show that active learning can solve these classification tasks using 10-80% of the data which would be necessary for standard learning techniques.

  17. Biological activities of lignin hydrolysate-related compounds.

    PubMed

    Lee, Siseon; Monnappa, Ajay Kalanjana; Mitchell, Robert J

    2012-05-01

    Lignin hydrolysates contain many different chemical species, including ferulic acid, coumaric acid, vanillic acid, vanillin, syringaldehyde and furfural. From the perspective of biofuels, these compounds are problematic and can cause downstream loss of product if not removed prior to beginning the fermentative process. In contrast, a search for these compounds within the literature turns up many papers where the same compounds have beneficial properties pertaining to human health, including as antioxidants and in cancer prevention, or are involved in bacterial cell-to-cell signaling. Consequently, this article reviews the dual nature of these and other compounds found in lignin hydrolysates, highlighting both their detrimental and beneficial activities.

  18. Gametocytocidal Screen Identifies Novel Chemical Classes with Plasmodium falciparum Transmission Blocking Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Natalie G.; Sullivan, David J.; Mlambo, Godfree; Dimopoulos, George; Tripathi, Abhai K.

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of transmission blocking compounds is an important intervention strategy necessary to eliminate and eradicate malaria. To date only a small number of drugs that inhibit gametocyte development and thereby transmission from the mosquito to the human host exist. This limitation is largely due to a lack of screening assays easily adaptable to high throughput because of multiple incubation steps or the requirement for high gametocytemia. Here we report the discovery of new compounds with gametocytocidal activity using a simple and robust SYBR Green I- based DNA assay. Our assay utilizes the exflagellation step in male gametocytes and a background suppressor, which masks the staining of dead cells to achieve healthy signal to noise ratio by increasing signal of viable parasites and subtracting signal from dead parasites. By determining the contribution of exflagellation to fluorescent signal and using appropriate cutoff values, we were able to screen for gametocytocidal compounds. After assay validation and optimization, we screened an FDA approved drug library of approximately 1500 compounds, as well as the 400 compound MMV malaria box and identified 44 gametocytocidal compounds with sub to low micromolar IC50s. Major classes of compounds with gametocytocidal activity included quaternary ammonium compounds with structural similarity to choline, acridine-like compounds similar to quinacrine and pyronaridine, as well as antidepressant, antineoplastic, and anthelminthic compounds. Top drug candidates showed near complete transmission blocking in membrane feeding assays. This assay is simple, reproducible and demonstrated robust Z-factor values at low gametocytemia levels, making it amenable to HTS for identification of novel and potent gametocytocidal compounds. PMID:25157792

  19. Thin-layer chromatographic (TLC) separations and bioassays of plant extracts to identify antimicrobial compounds.

    PubMed

    Kagan, Isabelle A; Flythe, Michael D

    2014-03-27

    A common screen for plant antimicrobial compounds consists of separating plant extracts by paper or thin-layer chromatography (PC or TLC), exposing the chromatograms to microbial suspensions (e.g. fungi or bacteria in broth or agar), allowing time for the microbes to grow in a humid environment, and visualizing zones with no microbial growth. The effectiveness of this screening method, known as bioautography, depends on both the quality of the chromatographic separation and the care taken with microbial culture conditions. This paper describes standard protocols for TLC and contact bioautography with a novel application to amino acid-fermenting bacteria. The extract is separated on flexible (aluminum-backed) silica TLC plates, and bands are visualized under ultraviolet (UV) light. Zones are cut out and incubated face down onto agar inoculated with the test microorganism. Inhibitory bands are visualized by staining the agar plates with tetrazolium red. The method is applied to the separation of red clover (Trifolium pratense cv. Kenland) phenolic compounds and their screening for activity against Clostridium sticklandii, a hyper ammonia-producing bacterium (HAB) that is native to the bovine rumen. The TLC methods apply to many types of plant extracts and other bacterial species (aerobic or anaerobic), as well as fungi, can be used as test organisms if culture conditions are modified to fit the growth requirements of the species.

  20. [Antibacterial activity of natural compounds - essential oils].

    PubMed

    Hassan, Sherif T S; Majerová, Michaela; Šudomová, Miroslava; Berchová, Kateřina

    2015-12-01

    Since the problem of bacterial resistance has become a serious problem worldwide, it was necessary to search for new active substances that can overcome the problem and enhance the treatment efficacy of bacterial infections. Numerous plant-derived essential oils exhibited significant antibacterial activities. This review aimed to summarize the most promising essential oils that exhibited remarkable antibacterial activities against various bacterial infections, including staphylococcal infections, Helicobacter pylori infections, skin infections, tuberculosis infection and dental bacterial infection. The synergy effect of essential oils in combination with antibiotics, as well as their role in the treatment of bacterial infections have been discussed. Essential oils can be used as models for further studies in vivo and clinical trials.

  1. Characterization of nitrated phenolic compounds for their anti-oxidant, pro-oxidant, and nitration activities.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yusuke; Nomoto, Maki; Oda, Momoko; Mochizuki, Keisuke; Nakano, Yuki; Ishii, Yuji; Ito, Rie; Saito, Koichi; Umemura, Takashi; Nishikawa, Akiyoshi; Nakazawa, Hiroyuki

    2011-09-01

    Coffee is one of the most widely consumed beverages worldwide. Evidence of the health benefits and the important contribution of coffee brew to the intake of anti-oxidants in the diet has increased coffee consumption. Chlorogenic acid (ChA) and caffeic acid (CaA) are the major phenolic compounds in coffee. However, phenolic compounds, which are generally effective anti-oxidants, can become pro-oxidants in the presence of Cu(2+) to induce DNA damage under certain conditions. On the other hand, sodium nitrite (NaNO(2)) is widely used as a food additive to preserve and tinge color on cured meat and fish. It is possible that phenolic compounds react with NaNO(2) under acidic conditions, such as gastric juice. In this study, we identified compounds produced by the reaction between ChA or CaA in coffee and NaNO(2) in artificial gastric juice. The identified phenolic compounds and nitrated phenolic compounds were assessed for their anti-oxidant, pro-oxidant, and nitration activities by performing an in vitro assay. The nitrated phenolic compounds seemed to show increased anti-oxidant activity and decreased pro-oxidant activity. However, one nitrated CaA compound that has a furoxan ring showed the ability to release NO(2)(-) in the neutral condition.

  2. High-content screen using zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos identifies a novel kinase activator and inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Geldenhuys, Werner J; Bergeron, Sadie A; Mullins, Jackie E; Aljammal, Rowaa; Gaasch, Briah L; Chen, Wei-Chi; Yun, June; Hazlehurst, Lori A

    2017-02-28

    In this report we utilized zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos in a phenotypical high-content screen (HCS) to identify novel leads in a cancer drug discovery program. We initially validated our HCS model using the flavin adenosine dinucleotide (FAD) containing endoplasmic reticulum (ER) enzyme, endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductase (ERO1) inhibitor EN460. EN460 showed a dose response effect on the embryos with a dose of 10μM being significantly lethal during early embryonic development. The HCS campaign which employed a small library identified a promising lead compound, a naphthyl-benzoic acid derivative coined compound 1 which had significant dosage and temporally dependent effects on notochord and muscle development in zebrafish embryos. Screening a 369 kinase member panel we show that compound 1 is a PIM3 kinase inhibitor (IC50=4.078μM) and surprisingly a DAPK1 kinase agonist/activator (EC50=39.525μM). To our knowledge this is the first example of a small molecule activating DAPK1 kinase. We provide a putative model for increased phosphate transfer in the ATP binding domain when compound 1 is virtually docked with DAPK1. Our data indicate that observable phenotypical changes can be used in future zebrafish screens to identify compounds acting via similar molecular signaling pathways.

  3. Novel Plant Immune-Priming Compounds Identified via High-Throughput Chemical Screening Target Salicylic Acid Glucosyltransferases in Arabidopsis[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Noutoshi, Yoshiteru; Okazaki, Masateru; Kida, Tatsuya; Nishina, Yuta; Morishita, Yoshihiko; Ogawa, Takumi; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Shibata, Daisuke; Jikumaru, Yusuke; Hanada, Atsushi; Kamiya, Yuji

    2012-01-01

    Plant activators are compounds, such as analogs of the defense hormone salicylic acid (SA), that protect plants from pathogens by activating the plant immune system. Although some plant activators have been widely used in agriculture, the molecular mechanisms of immune induction are largely unknown. Using a newly established high-throughput screening procedure that screens for compounds that specifically potentiate pathogen-activated cell death in Arabidopsis thaliana cultured suspension cells, we identified five compounds that prime the immune response. These compounds enhanced disease resistance against pathogenic Pseudomonas bacteria in Arabidopsis plants. Pretreatments increased the accumulation of endogenous SA, but reduced its metabolite, SA-O-β-d-glucoside. Inducing compounds inhibited two SA glucosyltransferases (SAGTs) in vitro. Double knockout plants that lack both SAGTs consistently exhibited enhanced disease resistance. Our results demonstrate that manipulation of the active free SA pool via SA-inactivating enzymes can be a useful strategy for fortifying plant disease resistance and may identify useful crop protectants. PMID:22960909

  4. Hemagglutinating activity in phytopathogenic bacteria surface compounds.

    PubMed

    Serra, M T; Castresana, M C; Tejerina, G

    1987-01-01

    Extracellular components of plant pathogenic bacteria were obtained from their culture medium as well as from the whole cells by using NaCl 1 M, pH 6.0; 20% sucrose dissolved in 0.03 M Tris buffer, pH 8.0; or 0.05 M Na2EDTA. All the extracts from Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora, Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola, Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli, Pseudomonas solanacearum, and Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica, were assayed for hemagglutinating activity on sheep, rabbit and chicken red blood cells (RBCs). The only active extracts were those obtained by NaCl treatment. They agglutinated sheep and rabbit erythrocytes. Extracts from E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica gave rise to the high agglutination titer on rabbit RBCs. These extracts had the lowest polysaccharide/protein ratio. E. carotovora subsp. carotovora extracts showed only a low titer (18.5 units). The agglutinating activity present in NaCl extracts of the bacteria tested was inhibited by different carbohydrates to various extent. Extracts from E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica appeared to be the most sensitive ones while those of E. carotovora subsp. carotovora least sensitive to the presence of sugar. It is suggested that hemagglutinins observed in plant pathogenic bacteria and those in plant host are similar and that both may, in some way, be involved in the plant-parasite relationship.

  5. Antioxidant Activity of Marine Algal Polyphenolic Compounds: A Mechanistic Approach.

    PubMed

    Fernando, I P Shanura; Kim, Misook; Son, Kwang-Tae; Jeong, Yoonhwa; Jeon, You-Jin

    2016-07-01

    Polyphenolic compounds isolated from marine algae exhibit a broad spectrum of beneficial biological properties, including antioxidant, anticancer, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and antidiabetic activities, along with several other bioactivities centered on their antioxidant properties. Consequently, polyphenolic compounds are increasingly being investigated for their potential use in food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical applications. The antioxidant activities of these compounds have been explored widely through experimental studies. Nonetheless, a theoretical understanding of the structural and electronic properties could broaden research perspectives, leading to the identification and synthesis of efficient structural analogs with prophylactic uses. This review briefly summarizes the current state of knowledge regarding antioxidant polyphenolic compounds in marine algae with an attempt to describe the structure-activity relationship.

  6. [Antioxidant and antibacterial activities of dimeric phenol compounds].

    PubMed

    Ogata, Masahiro

    2008-08-01

    We studied the antioxidant and antibacterial activities of monomeric and dimeric phenol compounds. Dimeric compounds had higher antioxidant activities than monomeric compounds. Electron spin resonance spin-trapping experiments showed that phenol compounds with an allyl substituent on their aromatic rings directly scavenged superoxide, and that only eugenol trapped hydroxyl radicals. We developed a generation system of the hydroxyl radical without using any metals by adding L-DOPA and DMPO to PBS or MiliQ water in vitro. We found that eugenol trapped hydroxyl radicals directly and is metabolized to a dimer. On the other hand, dipropofol, a dimer of propofol, has strong antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria. However, it lacks solubility in water and this property is assumed to limit its efficacy. We tried to improve the solubility and found a new solubilization method of dipropofol in water with the addition of a monosaccharide or ascorbic acid.

  7. Phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity of kernels and shells of Mexican pecan (Carya illinoinensis).

    PubMed

    de la Rosa, Laura A; Alvarez-Parrilla, Emilio; Shahidi, Fereidoon

    2011-01-12

    The phenolic composition and antioxidant activity of pecan kernels and shells cultivated in three regions of the state of Chihuahua, Mexico, were analyzed. High concentrations of total extractable phenolics, flavonoids, and proanthocyanidins were found in kernels, and 5-20-fold higher concentrations were found in shells. Their concentrations were significantly affected by the growing region. Antioxidant activity was evaluated by ORAC, DPPH•, HO•, and ABTS•-- scavenging (TAC) methods. Antioxidant activity was strongly correlated with the concentrations of phenolic compounds. A strong correlation existed among the results obtained using these four methods. Five individual phenolic compounds were positively identified and quantified in kernels: ellagic, gallic, protocatechuic, and p-hydroxybenzoic acids and catechin. Only ellagic and gallic acids could be identified in shells. Seven phenolic compounds were tentatively identified in kernels by means of MS and UV spectral comparison, namely, protocatechuic aldehyde, (epi)gallocatechin, one gallic acid-glucose conjugate, three ellagic acid derivatives, and valoneic acid dilactone.

  8. Refractory Organic Compounds in Enceladus' Ice Grains and Hydrothermal Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postberg, F.; Khawaja, N.; Hsu, H. W.; Sekine, Y.; Shibuya, T.

    2015-12-01

    Cassini's Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) generates time-of-flight mass spectra of individual grains impinging on the instruments target-plate. Following the analysis of salt rich ice grains emitted by Enceladus that indicated a salt-water ocean in contact with the moon's rocky core [1,2] a recent CDA analysis of nano-phase silica particles pointed at hydrothermal activity at the moon's rock/water interface [3]. The results imply temperatures above 80 - 90°C and alkaline pH values around 10 reminiscent of alkaline hydrothermal vents on Earth like the Lost City Hydrothermal Field. In this context the compositional analysis of organic components in CDA mass spectra of the ejected ice grains is of particular relevance. A multitude of volatile organic species has already been identified in the gas component of the plume [4]. As expected, we find more complex organic molecules in ice grains than in the gas indicating aromatic species, amines, and carbonyl group species. The composition of organic-bearing ice grains displays a great diversity indicating a variety of different organic species in varying concentrations. Recent spatially resolved CDA in situ measurements inside Enceladus' plume indicate that these organic compounds are especially frequent in 'young' ice grains that have just been ejected by high velocity jets. We investigate the implications of our findings with respect to ice grain formation at the water surface and inside the icy vents. We constrain the generation of organic compounds at the rock/water interface in the light of hydrothermal activity and the potential for the formation of life precursor molecules in Enceladus' ocean. Ref:[1] Postberg et al., Nature 459, 1098-1101 (2009). [2] Postberg et al., Nature 474, 620-622 (2011). [3]. Hsu, Postberg, Sekine et al., Nature, 519, 207-210 (2015). [4] Waite et al., Nature 460, 487-490 (2009).

  9. Synthesis and Assay of SIRT1-Activating Compounds.

    PubMed

    Dai, H; Ellis, J L; Sinclair, D A; Hubbard, B P

    2016-01-01

    The NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase SIRT1 plays key roles in numerous cellular processes including DNA repair, gene transcription, cell differentiation, and metabolism. Overexpression of SIRT1 protects against a number of age-related diseases including diabetes, cancer, and Alzheimer's disease. Moreover, overexpression of SIRT1 in the murine brain extends lifespan. A number of small-molecule sirtuin-activating compounds (STACs) that increase SIRT1 activity in vitro and in cells have been developed. While the mechanism for how these compounds act on SIRT1 was once controversial, it is becoming increasingly clear that they directly interact with SIRT1 and enhance its activity through an allosteric mechanism. Here, we present detailed chemical syntheses for four STACs, each from a distinct structural class. Also, we provide a general protocol for purifying active SIRT1 enzyme and outline two complementary enzymatic assays for characterizing the effects of STACs and similar compounds on SIRT1 activity.

  10. Synthesis and Assay of SIRT1-Activating Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Dai, H.; Ellis, J.L.; Sinclair, D.A.; Hubbard, B.P.

    2016-01-01

    The NAD+-dependent deacetylase SIRT1 plays key roles in numerous cellular processes including DNA repair, gene transcription, cell differentiation, and metabolism. Over-expression of SIRT1 protects against a number of age-related diseases including diabetes, cancer, and Alzheimer's disease. Moreover, overexpression of SIRT1 in the murine brain extends lifespan. A number of small-molecule sirtuin-activating compounds (STACs) that increase SIRT1 activity in vitro and in cells have been developed. While the mechanism for how these compounds act on SIRT1 was once controversial, it is becoming increasingly clear that they directly interact with SIRT1 and enhance its activity through an allosteric mechanism. Here, we present detailed chemical syntheses for four STACs, each from a distinct structural class. Also, we provide a general protocol for purifying active SIRT1 enzyme and outline two complementary enzymatic assays for characterizing the effects of STACs and similar compounds on SIRT1 activity. PMID:27423864

  11. Concentration evolution of pharmaceutically active compounds in raw urban and industrial wastewater.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Muñoz, Dolores; Martín, Julia; Santos, Juan Luis; Aparicio, Irene; Alonso, Esteban

    2014-09-01

    The distribution of pharmaceutically active compounds in the environment has been reported in several works in which wastewater treatment plants have been identified as the main source of these compounds to the environment. The concentrations of these compounds in influent wastewater can vary widely not only during the day but also along the year, because of the seasonal-consumption patterns of some pharmaceuticals. However, only few studies have attempted to assess the hourly variability of the concentrations of pharmaceutically active compounds in wastewater. In this work, the distribution and seasonal and hourly variability of twenty-one pharmaceuticals, belonging to seven therapeutic groups, have been investigated in urban and industrial wastewater. The highest concentrations of pharmaceutically active compounds, except salicylic acid, were found in urban wastewater, especially in the case of anti-inflammatory drugs and caffeine. The highest concentrations of salicylic acid were measured in industrial wastewater, reaching concentration levels up to 3295μgL(-)(1). The studied pharmaceutically active compounds showed different distribution patterns during winter and summer periods. Temporal variability of pharmaceutically active compounds during a 24-h period showed a distribution in concordance with their consumption and excretion patterns, in the case of urban wastewater, and with the schedule of industrial activities, in the case of industrial wastewater.

  12. Activity Profile of an FDA-Approved Compound Library against Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Panic, Gordana; Vargas, Mireille; Scandale, Ivan; Keiser, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Background As plans to expand mass drug treatment campaigns to fight schistosomiasis form, worries about reliance on praziquantel as the sole available treatment motivate the investigation for novel antischistosomal compounds. Drug repurposing might be an inexpensive and effective source of novel antischistosomal leads. Methodology 1600 FDA approved compounds were first assayed against Schistosoma mansoni schistosomula at a concentration of 10 µM. Active compounds identified from this screen were advanced to the adult worm screen at 33.33 µM, followed by hit characterization. Leads with complementary pharmacokinetic and toxicity profiles were then selected for in vivo studies. Principal Findings The in vitro screen identified 121 and 36 compounds active against the schistosomula and adult stage, respectively. Further, in vitro characterization and comparison with already available pharmacokinetic and toxicity data identified 11 in vivo candidates. Doramectin (10 mg/kg) and clofazimine (400 mg/kg) were found to be active in vivo with worm burden reductions of 60.1% and 82.7%, respectively. Conclusions/Significance The work presented here expands the knowledge of antischistosomal properties of already approved compounds and underscores variations observed between target-based and phenotypic approaches and among laboratories. The two in vivo-active drugs identified in this study, doramectin and clofazimine are widely available and present as novel drug classes as starting points for further investigation. PMID:26230921

  13. Phenolic Compounds and Antioxidant Activity of Phalaenopsis Orchid Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Minh, Truong Ngoc; Khang, Do Tan; Tuyen, Phung Thi; Minh, Luong The; Anh, La Hoang; Quan, Nguyen Van; Ha, Pham Thi Thu; Quan, Nguyen Thanh; Toan, Nguyen Phu; Elzaawely, Abdelnaser Abdelghany; Xuan, Tran Dang

    2016-01-01

    Phalaenopsis spp. is the most commercially and economically important orchid, but their plant parts are often left unused, which has caused environmental problems. To date, reports on phytochemical analyses were most available on endangered and medicinal orchids. The present study was conducted to determine the total phenolics, total flavonoids, and antioxidant activity of ethanol extracts prepared from leaves and roots of six commercial hybrid Phalaenopsis spp. Leaf extracts of “Chian Xen Queen” contained the highest total phenolics with a value of 11.52 ± 0.43 mg gallic acid equivalent per g dry weight and the highest total flavonoids (4.98 ± 0.27 mg rutin equivalent per g dry weight). The antioxidant activity of root extracts evaluated by DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) free radical scavenging assay and β-carotene bleaching method was higher than those of the leaf extracts. Eleven phenolic compounds were identified, namely, protocatechuic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, caffeic acid, syringic acid, vanillin, ferulic acid, sinapic acid, p-coumaric acid, benzoic acid, and ellagic acid. Ferulic, p-coumaric and sinapic acids were concentrated largely in the roots. The results suggested that the root extracts from hybrid Phalaenopsis spp. could be a potential source of natural antioxidants. This study also helps to reduce the amount of this orchid waste in industrial production, as its roots can be exploited for pharmaceutical purposes. PMID:27649250

  14. Different phenolic compounds activate distinct human bitter taste receptors.

    PubMed

    Soares, Susana; Kohl, Susann; Thalmann, Sophie; Mateus, Nuno; Meyerhof, Wolfgang; De Freitas, Victor

    2013-02-20

    Bitterness is a major sensory attribute of several common foods and beverages rich in polyphenol compounds. These compounds are reported as very important for health as chemopreventive compounds, but they are also known to taste bitter. In this work, the activation of the human bitter taste receptors, TAS2Rs, by six polyphenol compounds was analyzed. The compounds chosen are present in a wide range of plant-derived foods and beverages, namely, red wine, beer, tea, and chocolate. Pentagalloylglucose (PGG) is a hydrolyzable tannin, (-)-epicatechin is a precursor of condensed tannins, procyanidin dimer B3 and trimer C2 belong to the condensed tannins, and malvidin-3-glucoside and cyanidin-3-glucoside are anthocyanins. The results show that the different compounds activate different combinations of the ~25 TAS2Rs. (-)-Epicatechin activated three receptors, TAS2R4, TAS2R5, and TAS2R39, whereas only two receptors, TAS2R5 and TAS2R39, responded to PGG. In contrast, malvidin-3-glucoside and procyanidin trimer stimulated only one receptor, TAS2R7 and TAS2R5, respectively. Notably, tannins are the first natural agonists found for TAS2R5 that display high potency only toward this receptor. The catechol and/or galloyl groups appear to be important structural determinants that mediate the interaction of these polyphenolic compounds with TAS2R5. Overall, the EC(50) values obtained for the different compounds vary 100-fold, with the lowest values for PGG and malvidin-3-glucoside compounds, suggesting that they could be significant polyphenols responsible for the bitterness of fruits, vegetables, and derived products even if they are present in very low concentrations.

  15. Studying a Drug-like, RNA-Focused Small Molecule Library Identifies Compounds That Inhibit RNA Toxicity in Myotonic Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Rzuczek, Suzanne G.; Southern, Mark R.; Disney, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    There are many RNA targets in the transcriptome to which small molecule chemical probes and lead therapeutics are desired. However, identifying compounds that bind and modulate RNA function in cellulo is difficult. Although rational design approaches have been developed, they are still in their infancies and leave many RNAs “undruggable”. In an effort to develop a small molecule library that is biased for binding RNA, we computationally identified “drug-like” compounds from screening collections that have favorable properties for binding RNA and for suitability as lead drugs. As proof-of-concept, this collection was screened for binding to and modulating the cellular dysfunction of the expanded repeating RNA (r(CUG)exp) that causes myotonic dystrophy type 1. Hit compounds bind the target in cellulo, as determined by the target identification approach Competitive Chemical Cross-Linking and Isolation by Pull-down (C-ChemCLIP), and selectively improve several disease-associated defects. The best compounds identified from our 320-member library are more potent in cellulo than compounds identified by high-throughput screening (HTS) campaigns against this RNA. Furthermore, the compound collection has a higher hit rate (9% compared to 0.01–3%), and the bioactive compounds identified are not charged; thus, RNA can be “drugged” with compounds that have favorable pharmacological properties. Finally, this RNA-focused small molecule library may serve as a useful starting point to identify lead “drug-like” chemical probes that affect the biological (dys)function of other RNA targets by direct target engagement. PMID:26414664

  16. Studying a Drug-like, RNA-Focused Small Molecule Library Identifies Compounds That Inhibit RNA Toxicity in Myotonic Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Rzuczek, Suzanne G; Southern, Mark R; Disney, Matthew D

    2015-12-18

    There are many RNA targets in the transcriptome to which small molecule chemical probes and lead therapeutics are desired. However, identifying compounds that bind and modulate RNA function in cellulo is difficult. Although rational design approaches have been developed, they are still in their infancies and leave many RNAs "undruggable". In an effort to develop a small molecule library that is biased for binding RNA, we computationally identified "drug-like" compounds from screening collections that have favorable properties for binding RNA and for suitability as lead drugs. As proof-of-concept, this collection was screened for binding to and modulating the cellular dysfunction of the expanded repeating RNA (r(CUG)(exp)) that causes myotonic dystrophy type 1. Hit compounds bind the target in cellulo, as determined by the target identification approach Competitive Chemical Cross-Linking and Isolation by Pull-down (C-ChemCLIP), and selectively improve several disease-associated defects. The best compounds identified from our 320-member library are more potent in cellulo than compounds identified by high-throughput screening (HTS) campaigns against this RNA. Furthermore, the compound collection has a higher hit rate (9% compared to 0.01-3%), and the bioactive compounds identified are not charged; thus, RNA can be "drugged" with compounds that have favorable pharmacological properties. Finally, this RNA-focused small molecule library may serve as a useful starting point to identify lead "drug-like" chemical probes that affect the biological (dys)function of other RNA targets by direct target engagement.

  17. Isolation and anticomplement activity of compounds from Dendropanax morbifera.

    PubMed

    Park, Bo-Young; Min, Byung-Sun; Oh, Sei-Ryang; Kim, Jung-Hee; Kim, Tae-Jin; Kim, Dong-Hee; Bae, Ki-Hwan; Lee, Hyeong-Kyu

    2004-02-01

    Dendropanax morbifera Leveille (Araliaceae) is used in Korea for a variety of disease, such as migraine headache and dysmenorrhea. A new polyacetylene (1) and six known compounds (2-7) were isolated from the leaves of this plant by conventional chromatographic techniques. The structure of the new polyacetylene (1) was determined as (9Z,16S)-16-hydroxy-9,17-octadecadiene-12,14-diynoic acid by spectroscopic means including 2D NMR, which comprised the determination of a chiral by modified Mosher's ester method. Compounds 1-7 were investigated in vitro for their anticomplement activity against the classical pathway of the complement system. Of these, compound 1 showed significant anticomplement activity with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of 56.98 microM, whereas compounds 2-7 were inactive.

  18. Endophytic fungi with antitumor activities: Their occurrence and anticancer compounds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ling; Zhang, Qiao-Yan; Jia, Min; Ming, Qian-Liang; Yue, Wei; Rahman, Khalid; Qin, Lu-Ping; Han, Ting

    2016-05-01

    Plant endophytic fungi have been recognized as an important and novel resource of natural bioactive products, especially in anticancer application. This review mainly deals with the research progress on the production of anticancer compounds by endophytic fungi between 1990 and 2013. Anticancer activity is generally associated with the cytotoxicity of the compounds present in the endophytic fungi. All strains of endophytes producing antitumor chemicals were classified taxonomically and the genera of Pestalotiopsis and Aspergillus as well as the taxol producing endophytes were focused on. Classification of endophytic fungi producing antitumor compounds has received more attention from mycologists, and it can also lead to the discovery of novel compounds with antitumor activity due to phylogenetic relationships. In this review, the structures of the anticancer compounds isolated from the newly reported endophytes between 2010 and 2013 are discussed including strategies for the efficient production of the desired compounds. The purpose of this review is to provide new directions in endophytic fungi research including integrated information relating to its anticancer compounds.

  19. Identification of orthologous target pairs with shared active compounds and comparison of organism-specific activity patterns.

    PubMed

    Dimova, Dilyana; Stumpfe, Dagmar; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2015-11-01

    A systematic search for active small molecules shared by orthologous targets was carried out, leading to the identification of 803 compound-based orthologous target pairs covering a total of 938 orthologues, 358 unique targets and 98 organisms. Many orthologous target pairs were found to have substantial compound coverage, enabling the introduction of an orthologous target pairs classification including 'organism cliffs' and 'potency-retaining' pairs. A total of 158 orthologous target pairs involving human orthologues were identified, which were typically associated with drug discovery-relevant targets, organism combinations and compound data. Orthologous target pairs with human orthologues included 83 potency-retaining orthologous target pairs covering a variety of targets and organisms. On the basis of these orthologous target pairs, the compound search was further extended and 1149 potent compounds were identified that only had reported activities for non-human orthologues of 48 therapeutic targets, but not their human counterparts, hence providing a large pool of candidate compounds for further evaluation. The complete set of orthologous target pairs identified in our analysis, the orthologous target pairs classification including associated data and all candidate compounds are made freely available.

  20. Antioxidant Activity of Phenolic Compounds from Fava Bean Sprouts.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Koharu; Hosoya, Takahiro; Kawarazaki, Kai; Izawa, Norihiko; Kumazawa, Shigenori

    2016-06-01

    Fava beans are eaten all over the world and recently, marketing for their sprouts began in Japan. Fava bean sprouts contain more polyphenols and l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA) than the bean itself. Our antioxidant screening program has shown that fava bean sprouts also possess a higher antioxidant activity than other commercially available sprouts and mature beans. However, the individual constituents of fava bean sprouts are not entirely known. In the present study, we investigated the phenolic compounds of fava bean sprouts and their antioxidant activity. Air-dried fava bean sprouts were treated with 80% methanol and the extract was partitioned in water with chloroform and ethyl acetate. HPLC analysis had shown that the ethyl acetate-soluble parts contained phenolic compounds, separated by preparative HPLC to yield 5 compounds (1-5). Structural analysis using NMR and MS revealed that the compounds isolated were kaempferol glycosides. All isolated compounds had an α-rhamnose at the C-7 position with different sugars attached at the C-3 position. Compounds 1-5 had β-galactose, β-glucose, α-rhamnose, 6-acetyl-β-galactose and 6-acetyl-β-glucose, respectively, at the C-3 position. The amount of l-DOPA in fava bean sprouts was determined by the quantitative (1) H NMR technique. The l-DOPA content was 550.45 mg ± 11.34 /100 g of the raw sprouts. The antioxidant activities of compounds 2-5 and l-DOPA were evaluated using the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl scavenging assay. l-DOPA showed high antioxidant activity, but the isolated kaempferol glycosides showed weak activity. Therefore, it can be suggested that l-DOPA contributed to the antioxidant activity of fava bean sprouts.

  1. A simple and predictive phenotypic High Content Imaging assay for Plasmodium falciparum mature gametocytes to identify malaria transmission blocking compounds

    PubMed Central

    Lucantoni, Leonardo; Silvestrini, Francesco; Signore, Michele; Siciliano, Giulia; Eldering, Maarten; Dechering, Koen J.; Avery, Vicky M.; Alano, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum gametocytes, specifically the mature stages, are the only malaria parasite stage in humans transmissible to the mosquito vector. Anti-malarial drugs capable of killing these forms are considered essential for the eradication of malaria and tools allowing the screening of large compound libraries with high predictive power are needed to identify new candidates. As gametocytes are not a replicative stage it is difficult to apply the same drug screening methods used for asexual stages. Here we propose an assay, based on high content imaging, combining “classic” gametocyte viability readout based on gametocyte counts with a functional viability readout, based on gametocyte activation and the discrimination of the typical gamete spherical morphology. This simple and rapid assay has been miniaturized to a 384-well format using acridine orange staining of wild type P. falciparum 3D7A sexual forms, and was validated by screening reference antimalarial drugs and the MMV Malaria Box. The assay demonstrated excellent robustness and ability to identify quality hits with high likelihood of confirmation of transmission reducing activity in subsequent mosquito membrane feeding assays. PMID:26553647

  2. A computationally identified compound antagonizes excess FGF-23 signaling in renal tubules and a mouse model of hypophosphatemia

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Zhousheng; Riccardi, Demian; Velazquez, Hector A.; Chin, Ai L.; Yates, Charles R.; Carrick, Jesse D.; Smith, Jeremy C.; Baudry, Jerome; Quarles, L. Darryl

    2016-11-22

    Fibroblast growth factor–23 (FGF-23) interacts with a binary receptor complex composed of α-Klotho (α-KL) and FGF receptors (FGFRs) to regulate phosphate and vitamin D metabolism in the kidney. Excess FGF-23 production, which causes hypophosphatemia, is genetically inherited or occurs with chronic kidney disease. Among other symptoms, hypophosphatemia causes vitamin D deficiency and the bone-softening disorder rickets. Current therapeutics that target the receptor complex have limited utility clinically. In this paper, using a computationally driven, structure-based, ensemble docking and virtual high-throughput screening approach, we identified four novel compounds predicted to selectively inhibit FGF-23–induced activation of the FGFR/α-KL complex. Additional modeling and functional analysis found that Zinc13407541 bound to FGF-23 and disrupted its interaction with the FGFR1/α-KL complex; experiments in a heterologous cell expression system showed that Zinc13407541 selectivity inhibited α-KL–dependent FGF-23 signaling. Zinc13407541 also inhibited FGF-23 signaling in isolated renal tubules ex vivo and partially reversed the hypophosphatemic effects of excess FGF-23 in a mouse model. Finally, these chemical probes provide a platform to develop lead compounds to treat disorders caused by excess FGF-23.

  3. A computationally identified compound antagonizes excess FGF-23 signaling in renal tubules and a mouse model of hypophosphatemia

    DOE PAGES

    Xiao, Zhousheng; Riccardi, Demian; Velazquez, Hector A.; ...

    2016-11-22

    Fibroblast growth factor–23 (FGF-23) interacts with a binary receptor complex composed of α-Klotho (α-KL) and FGF receptors (FGFRs) to regulate phosphate and vitamin D metabolism in the kidney. Excess FGF-23 production, which causes hypophosphatemia, is genetically inherited or occurs with chronic kidney disease. Among other symptoms, hypophosphatemia causes vitamin D deficiency and the bone-softening disorder rickets. Current therapeutics that target the receptor complex have limited utility clinically. In this paper, using a computationally driven, structure-based, ensemble docking and virtual high-throughput screening approach, we identified four novel compounds predicted to selectively inhibit FGF-23–induced activation of the FGFR/α-KL complex. Additional modeling andmore » functional analysis found that Zinc13407541 bound to FGF-23 and disrupted its interaction with the FGFR1/α-KL complex; experiments in a heterologous cell expression system showed that Zinc13407541 selectivity inhibited α-KL–dependent FGF-23 signaling. Zinc13407541 also inhibited FGF-23 signaling in isolated renal tubules ex vivo and partially reversed the hypophosphatemic effects of excess FGF-23 in a mouse model. Finally, these chemical probes provide a platform to develop lead compounds to treat disorders caused by excess FGF-23.« less

  4. A computationally identified compound antagonizes excess FGF-23 signaling in renal tubules and a mouse model of hypophosphatemia.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhousheng; Riccardi, Demian; Velazquez, Hector A; Chin, Ai L; Yates, Charles R; Carrick, Jesse D; Smith, Jeremy C; Baudry, Jerome; Quarles, L Darryl

    2016-11-22

    Fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23) interacts with a binary receptor complex composed of α-Klotho (α-KL) and FGF receptors (FGFRs) to regulate phosphate and vitamin D metabolism in the kidney. Excess FGF-23 production, which causes hypophosphatemia, is genetically inherited or occurs with chronic kidney disease. Among other symptoms, hypophosphatemia causes vitamin D deficiency and the bone-softening disorder rickets. Current therapeutics that target the receptor complex have limited utility clinically. Using a computationally driven, structure-based, ensemble docking and virtual high-throughput screening approach, we identified four novel compounds predicted to selectively inhibit FGF-23-induced activation of the FGFR/α-KL complex. Additional modeling and functional analysis found that Zinc13407541 bound to FGF-23 and disrupted its interaction with the FGFR1/α-KL complex; experiments in a heterologous cell expression system showed that Zinc13407541 selectivity inhibited α-KL-dependent FGF-23 signaling. Zinc13407541 also inhibited FGF-23 signaling in isolated renal tubules ex vivo and partially reversed the hypophosphatemic effects of excess FGF-23 in a mouse model. These chemical probes provide a platform to develop lead compounds to treat disorders caused by excess FGF-23.

  5. Nematicidal Activity of Cassia and Cinnamon Oil Compounds and Related Compounds toward Bursaphelenchus xylophilus (Nematoda: Parasitaphelenchidae)

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Jeong-Ok; Lee, Sang-Myung; Moon, Yil-Seong; Lee, Sang-Gil; Ahn, Young-Joon

    2007-01-01

    The nematicidal activity of two cassia, Cinnamomum cassia, oils (Especial and true), four cinnamon, Cinnamomum zey-lanicum, oils (technical, #500, bark and green leaf), and their compounds (e.g., trans-cinnamaldehyde and trans-cinnamic acid) toward adult Bursaphelenchus xylophilus was examined by a direct contact bioassay. Results were compared with those of 34 related compounds. As judged by 24-hour LC50 values, two cassia oils (0.084–0.085 mg/ml) and four cinnamon oils (0.064–0.113 mg/ml) were toxic toward adult B. xylophilus. Of 45 test compounds, trans-cinnamaldehyde (0.061 mg/ml) was the most active nematicide, followed by ethyl cinnamate, α-methyl-trans-cinnamaldehyde, methyl cinnamate and allyl cinnamate (0.114–0.195 mg/ml). Potent nematicidal activity was also observed with 4-methoxycinnamonitrile, trans-4-methoxycinnamaldehyde, trans-2-methoxy-cinnamaldehyde, ethyl α-cyanocinnamate, cinnamonitrile and cinnamyl bromide (0.224–0.502 mg/ml). Structure-activity relationships indicate that structural characteristics, such as types of functional groups, saturation and carbon skeleton, appear to play a role in determining the toxicities to adult B. xylophilus. Cassia and cinnamon oils and test compounds described merit further study as potential nematicides or leads for the control of pine wilt disease caused by B. xylophilus. PMID:19259472

  6. Cdc25B Dual-Specificity Phosphatase Inhibitors Identified in a High-Throughput Screen of the NIH Compound Library

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Caleb A.; Tierno, Marni Brisson; Shun, Tong Ying; Shinde, Sunita N.; Paquette, William D.; Brummond, Kay M.; Wipf, Peter; Lazo, John S.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The University of Pittsburgh Molecular Library Screening Center (Pittsburgh, PA) conducted a screen with the National Institutes of Health compound library for inhibitors of in vitro cell division cycle 25 protein (Cdc25) B activity during the pilot phase of the Molecular Library Screening Center Network. Seventy-nine (0.12%) of the 65,239 compounds screened at 10 μM met the active criterion of ≥50% inhibition of Cdc25B activity, and 25 (31.6%) of these were confirmed as Cdc25B inhibitors with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values <50 μM. Thirteen of the Cdc25B inhibitors were represented by singleton chemical structures, and 12 were divided among four clusters of related structures. Thirteen (52%) of the Cdc25B inhibitor hits were quinone-based structures. The Cdc25B inhibitors were further characterized in a series of in vitro secondary assays to confirm their activity, to determine their phosphatase selectivity against two other dual-specificity phosphatases, mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase (MKP)-1 and MKP-3, and to examine if the mechanism of Cdc25B inhibition involved oxidation and inactivation. Nine Cdc25B inhibitors did not appear to affect Cdc25B through a mechanism involving oxidation because they did not generate detectable amounts of H2O2 in the presence of dithiothreitol, and their Cdc25B IC50 values were not significantly affected by exchanging the dithiothreitol for β-mercaptoethanol or reduced glutathione or by adding catalase to the assay. Six of the nonoxidative hits were selective for Cdc25B inhibition versus MKP-1 and MKP-3, but only the two bisfuran-containing hits, PubChem substance identifiers 4258795 and 4260465, significantly inhibited the growth of human MBA-MD-435 breast and PC-3 prostate cancer cell lines. To confirm the structure and biological activity of 4260465, the compound was resynthesized along with two analogs. Neither of the substitutions to the two analogs was tolerated, and only the

  7. Biological activities of phenolic compounds present in virgin olive oil.

    PubMed

    Cicerale, Sara; Lucas, Lisa; Keast, Russell

    2010-02-02

    The Mediterranean diet is associated with a lower incidence of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease, neurodegenerative diseases and certain types of cancer. The apparent health benefits have been partially ascribed to the dietary consumption of virgin olive oil by Mediterranean populations. Much research has focused on the biologically active phenolic compounds naturally present in virgin olive oils to aid in explaining reduced mortality and morbidity experienced by people consuming a traditional Mediterranean diet. Studies (human, animal, in vivo and in vitro) have demonstrated that olive oil phenolic compounds have positive effects on certain physiological parameters, such as plasma lipoproteins, oxidative damage, inflammatory markers, platelet and cellular function, antimicrobial activity and bone health. This paper summarizes current knowledge on the bioavailability and biological activities of olive oil phenolic compounds.

  8. Bactericidal activity of glutaraldehyde-like compounds from olive products.

    PubMed

    Medina, Eduardo; Brenes, Manuel; García, Aranzazu; Romero, Concepción; de Castro, Antonio

    2009-12-01

    The bactericidal effects of several olive compounds (nonenal, oleuropein, tyrosol, the dialdehydic form of decarboxymethyl elenolic acid either free [EDA] or linked to tyrosol [TyEDA] or to hydroxytyrosol [HyEDA]), other food phenolic compounds (catechin, epicatechin, eugenol, thymol, carvacrol, and carnosic acid), and commercial disinfectants (glutaraldehyde [GTA] and ortho-phthalaldehyde [OPA]), were tested against strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, and Escherichia coli. It was found that the bactericidal activities of olive GTA-like compounds (EDA, HyEDA, and TyEDA) were greater than those exerted by several food phenolic substances. Surprisingly, these olive antimicrobials were as active as the synthetic biocides GTA and OPA against the four bacteria studied. Thus, it has been proposed that the bactericidal activity of the main olive antimicrobials is primarily due to their dialdehydic structure, which is similar to that of the commercial biocides GTA and OPA. Our results clearly reveal that olive GTA-like compounds possess a strong bactericidal activity even greater than that of other food phenolic compounds or synthetic biocides.

  9. Aspartate and glutamate mimetic structures in biologically active compounds.

    PubMed

    Stefanic, Peter; Dolenc, Marija Sollner

    2004-04-01

    Glutamate and aspartate are frequently recognized as key structural elements for the biological activity of natural peptides and synthetic compounds. The acidic side-chain functionality of both the amino acids provides the basis for the ionic interaction and subsequent molecular recognition by specific receptor sites that results in the regulation of physiological or pathophysiological processes in the organism. In the development of new biologically active compounds that possess the ability to modulate these processes, compounds offering the same type of interactions are being designed. Thus, using a peptidomimetic design approach, glutamate and aspartate mimetics are incorporated into the structure of final biologically active compounds. This review covers different bioisosteric replacements of carboxylic acid alone, as well as mimetics of the whole amino acid structure. Amino acid analogs presented include those with different distances between anionic moieties, and analogs with additional functional groups that result in conformational restriction or alternative interaction sites. The article also provides an overview of different cyclic structures, including various cycloalkane, bicyclic and heterocyclic analogs, that lead to conformational restriction. Higher di- and tripeptide mimetics in which carboxylic acid functionality is incorporated into larger molecules are also reviewed. In addition to the mimetic structures presented, emphasis in this article is placed on their steric and electronic properties. These mimetics constitute a useful pool of fragments in the design of new biologically active compounds, particularly in the field of RGD mimetics and excitatory amino acid agonists and antagonists.

  10. Terpenoid bioactive compound from Streptomyces rochei (M32): taxonomy, fermentation and biological activities.

    PubMed

    Pazhanimurugan, Raasaiyah; Radhakrishnan, Manikkam; Shanmugasundaram, Thangavel; Gopikrishnan, Venugopal; Balagurunathan, Ramasamy

    2016-10-01

    The present study emphasized the production of biologically active terpenoid compound from Streptomyces rochei M32, which was isolated from Western Ghats ecosystem, South India. The presence of resistant genes like mecA, vanA of Staphylococcus aureus and bla SHV, bla TEM of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was confirmed by molecular studies. The isolated compound from Streptomyces rochei M32 inhibited wide range of standard and clinical drug resistant pathogens and enteric pathogens. The rice bran supplemented basal medium influenced the active compound production on 8th day of fermentation and yielded 1875 mg of crude extract from 10 g of rice bran substrate. Purification and characterization of crude ethyl acetate extract was achieved by preparative thin layer chromatography. The active fraction was identified as terpenoid class compound by chemical screening. Based on the results of spectral studies (NMR, LC-MS, FTIR, etc.), the active compound was tentatively identified as 1, 19-bis (3-hydroxyazetidin-1-yl) nonadeca-5, 14-diene-1, 8, 12, 19-tetraone with molecular weight 462.41 g/mol. Minimum inhibitory concentration value ranges between 7.6 and 31.2 µg/mL against test organisms was observed. The cytotoxicity results on cervical cancer (HeLa) cell line showed IC50 value of 2.034 µg/mL. The corresponding compound is not previously reported from any microbial resources.

  11. Characteristic aroma-active compounds of Korean perilla (Perilla frutescens Britton) leaf.

    PubMed

    Seo, Won Ho; Baek, Hyung Hee

    2009-12-23

    Aroma-active compounds from Korean perilla (Perilla frutescens Britton) leaf were extracted by solvent-assisted flavor evaporation (SAFE), liquid-liquid continuous extraction (LLCE), and hydrodistillation (HD) and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O). Thirty-three volatile compounds were identified by GC-MS. 1-(3-Furyl)-4-methyl-1-pentanone (perilla ketone) was found to be the most abundant volatile compound, followed in order by (Z)-3-hexenol and 1-octen-3-ol. Perilla ketone comprised 81% (93 ppm), 84% (120 ppm), and 95% (490 ppm) of the volatile compounds obtained from SAFE, LLCE, and HD, respectively. Thirteen aroma-active compounds were detected by GC-O. Perilla ketone, 1-(3-furyl)-4-methyl-3-penten-1-one (egoma ketone), and 1-(3-furyl)-4-methyl-2-penten-1-one (isoegoma ketone) were considered to be the characteristic aroma-active compounds of Korean perilla leaf. Perilla ketone, (Z)-3-hexenal (green), egoma ketone, and isoegoma ketone were the most intense aroma-active compounds in Korean perilla leaf. Other relatively intense odorants included (Z)-3-hexenol (green), (E)-2-hexenal (green), benzaldehyde (almond), 1-octen-3-one (metallic), 1-octen-3-ol (mushroom), phenylacetaldehyde (honeysuckle), linalool (lemon), and beta-caryophyllene (woody).

  12. Identifying Associations between Student Achievement and Parental Involvement Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waddle, Ann R.

    2011-01-01

    The revision and renewal of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 will likely expand its parental involvement component to engage educators, parents, and community partners in supporting public education for children. This revisions call for best practices, but current literature fails to identify specific activities associated…

  13. Targeting aphA : a new high-throughput screening assay identifies compounds that reduce prime virulence factors of Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Bolger, Galina; Roy, Sambit; Zapol'skii, Viktor A; Kaufmann, Dieter E; Schnürch, Michael; Mihovilovic, Marko D; Nandy, Ranjan K; Tegge, Werner

    2016-07-01

    A high-throughput screening (HTS) assay was developed for identifying compounds with inhibitory effect on aphA, one of the key regulators positively controlling Vibrio cholerae pathogenesis. An inhibitory effect on aphA was expected to lead to attenuation in the secretion of the major pathogenicity factors of V. cholerae, cholera toxin and toxin co-regulated pilus. The plasmid construct pAKSB was developed with a kanamycin resistance (KmR) gene under the control of the aphA -like promoter for conferring a KmR phenotype under aphA -expressing conditions. The HTS assay was performed to identify compounds with inhibitory effect on the growth of O139 V. cholerae MO10 carrying the construct pAKSB in growth medium containing Km (30 g ml-1), but not in its absence. Of 20 338 compounds screened, six compounds were identified to inhibit the pAKSB-induced KmR phenotype and these compounds caused transcriptional inhibition of aphA in V. cholerae O139 strain MO10 as well as variant V. cholerae O1 El Tor strain NM06-058. Of the three most active substances, compound 53760866 showed lowest half-maximal cytotoxicity in a eukaryotic cell viability assay and was characterized further. Compound 53760866 caused reduction in cholera toxin secretion and expression of TcpA in vitro. The in vitro virulence attenuation corroborated well in a suckling mouse model in vivo, which showed reduction of colonization by V. cholerae NM06-058 when co-administered with 53760866. The screening method and the compounds may lead to new preventive strategies for cholera by reducing the pathogenicity of V. cholerae .

  14. Emodin is identified as the active component of ether extracts from Rhizoma Polygoni Cuspidati, for anti-MRSA activity.

    PubMed

    Cao, Feng; Peng, Wei; Li, Xiaoli; Liu, Ming; Li, Bin; Qin, Rongxin; Jiang, Weiwei; Cen, Yanyan; Pan, Xichun; Yan, Zifei; Xiao, Kangkang; Zhou, Hong

    2015-06-01

    This study investigated the anti-methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (anti-MRSA) activity and chemical compositions of ether extracts from Rhizoma Polygoni Cuspidati (ET-RPC). Significant anti-MRSA activities of ET-RPC against MRSA252 and MRSA clinical strains were tested in in vitro antibacterial experiments, such as inhibition zone diameter test, minimal inhibitory concentration test, and dynamic bacterial growth assay. Subsequently, 7 major compounds of ET-RPC were purified and identified as polydatin, resveratrol-4-O-d-(6'-galloyl)-glucopyranoside, resveratrol, torachryson-8-O-glucoside, emodin-8-O-glucoside, 6-hydroxy-emodin, and emodin using liquid chromatography - electrospray ionization - tandem mass spectrometry. After investigation of anti-MRSA activities of the 7 major compounds, only emodin had significant anti-MRSA activity. Further, transmission electron microscopy was used to observe morphological changes in the cell wall of MRSA252, and the result revealed that emodin could damage the integrity of cell wall, leading to loss of intracellular components. In summary, our results showed ET-RPC could significantly inhibit bacterial growth of MRSA strains. Emodin was identified as the major compound with anti-MRSA activity; this activity was related to destruction of the integrity of the cell wall and cell membrane.

  15. Novel Polyfluorinated Compounds Identified Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry Downstream of Manufacturing Facilities near Decatur, Alabama

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concern over persistence, bioaccumulation, and toxicity has led to international regulation and phase-outs of certain perfluorinated compounds and little is known about their replacement products. High resolution mass spectrometry was used to investigate the occurrence and identi...

  16. Effect of vanadium compounds on acid phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Vescina, C M; Sálice, V C; Cortizo, A M; Etcheverry, S B

    1996-01-01

    The direct effect of different vanadium compounds on acid phosphatase (ACP) activity was investigated. Vanadate and vanadyl but not pervanadate inhibited the wheat germ ACP activity. These vanadium derivatives did not alter the fibroblast Swiss 3T3 soluble fraction ACP activity. Using inhibitors of tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases), the wheat germ ACP was partially characterized as a PTPase. This study suggests that the inhibitory ability of different vanadium derivatives to modulate ACP activity seems to depend on the geometry around the vanadium atom more than on the oxidation state. Our results indicate a correlation between the PTPase activity and the sensitivity to vanadate and vanadyl cation.

  17. Identifying new small molecule anti-invasive compounds for glioma treatment

    PubMed Central

    Munson, Jennifer; Bonner, Michael; Fried, Levi; Hofmekler, Jonathan; Arbiser, Jack; Bellamkonda, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma is a disease with poor survival rates after diagnosis. Treatment of the disease involves debulking of the tumor, which is limited by the degree of invasiveness of the disease. Therefore, a treatment to halt the invasion of glioma is desirable for clinical implementation. There have been several candidate compounds targeting specific aspects of invasion, including cell adhesions, matrix degradation, and cytoskeletal rearrangement, but they have failed clinically for a variety of reasons. New targets against glioma invasion include upstream mediators of these classical targets in an effort to better inhibit invasion with more specificity for cancer. Included in these treatments is a new class of compounds inhibiting the generation of reactive oxygen species by targeting the NADPH oxidases. These compounds stand to inhibit multiple pathways, including nuclear factor kappa B and Akt. By conducting a screen of compounds thought to inhibit these pathways, a new compound to halt invasion was found that may have a beneficial effect against glioma, based on recent publications. Further, there are still limitations to the treatment of glioblastoma regardless of the discovery of new targets and compounds that should be addressed to better the therapies against this deadly cancer. PMID:24067366

  18. Byrsonima fagifolia Niedenzu Apolar Compounds with Antitubercular Activity

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, C. T.; Sannomiya, M.; Pavan, F. R.; Leite, S. R. A.; Sato, D. N.; Franzblau, S. G.; Sacramento, L. V. S.; Vilegas, W.; Leite, C. Q. F.

    2011-01-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of the chloroform extract of Byrsonima fagifolia leaves led to the isolation of active antitubercular compounds alkane dotriacontane (Minimal Inhibitory Concentration—MIC, 62.5 μg mL−1), triterpenoids as bassic acid (MIC = 2.5 μg mL−1), α-amyrin acetate (MIC = 62.5 μg mL−1), a mixture of lupeol, α- and β-amyrin (MIC = 31.5 μg mL−1) and a mixture of lupeol, and acetates of α- and β-amyrin (MIC = 31.5 μg mL−1). The antimycobacterial activity was determined by the Microplate Alamar Blue Assay (MABA) and the structures of promising compounds were determined by spectroscopic analysis. This investigation constitutes the first report of a chemical and antitubercular study of apolar compounds from B. fagifolia Niedenzu (IK). PMID:19091782

  19. [Biological activity of selenorganic compounds at heavy metal salts intoxication].

    PubMed

    Rusetskaya, N Y; Borodulin, V B

    2015-01-01

    Possible mechanisms of the antitoxic action of organoselenium compounds in heavy metal poisoning have been considered. Heavy metal toxicity associated with intensification of free radical oxidation, suppression of the antioxidant system, damage to macromolecules, mitochondria and the genetic material can cause apoptotic cell death or the development of carcinogenesis. Organic selenium compounds are effective antioxidants during heavy metal poisoning; they exhibit higher bioavailability in mammals than inorganic ones and they are able to activate antioxidant defense, bind heavy metal ions and reactive oxygen species formed during metal-induced oxidative stress. One of promising organoselenium compounds is diacetophenonyl selenide (DAPS-25), which is characterized by antioxidant and antitoxic activity, under conditions including heavy metal intoxication.

  20. Identifying Sources of Volatile Organic Compounds and Aldehydes in a High Performance Building

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz, Anna C.; Russell, Marion; Lee, Wen-Yee; Apte, Michael; Maddalena, Randy

    2010-09-20

    The developers of the Paharpur Business Center (PBC) and Software Technology Incubator Park in New Delhi, India offer an environmentally sustainable building with a strong emphasis on energy conservation, waste minimization and superior indoor air quality (IAQ). To achieve the IAQ goal, the building utilizes a series of air cleaning technologies for treating the air entering the building. These technologies include an initial water wash followed by ultraviolet light treatment and biolfiltration using a greenhouse located on the roof and numerous plants distributed throughout the building. Even with the extensive treatment of makeup air and room air in the PBC, a recent study found that the concentrations of common volatile organic compounds and aldehydes appear to rise incrementally as the air passes through the building from the supply to the exhaust. This finding highlights the need to consider the minimization of chemical sources in buildings in combination with the use of advanced air cleaning technologies when seeking to achieve superior IAQ. The goal of this project was to identify potential source materials for indoor chemicals in the PBC. Samples of building materials, including wood paneling (polished and unpolished), drywall, and plastic from a hydroponic drum that was part of the air cleaning system, were collected from the building for testing. All materials were collected from the PBC building and shipped to the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for testing. The materials were pre-conditioned for two different time periods before measuring material and chemical specific emission factors for a range of VOCs and Aldehydes. Of the six materials tested, we found that the highest emitter of formaldehyde was new plywood paneling. Although polish and paint contribute to some VOC emissions, the main influence of the polish was in altering the capacity of the surface to accumulate formaldehyde. Neither the new nor aged polish contributed

  1. Effects of polyhydroxy compounds on beetle antifreeze protein activity

    PubMed Central

    Amornwittawat, Natapol; Wang, Sen; Banatlao, Joseph; Chung, Melody; Velasco, Efrain; Duman, John G.; Wen, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) noncolligatively depress the nonequilibrium freezing point of a solution and produce a difference between the melting and freezing points termed thermal hysteresis (TH). Some low-molecular-mass solutes can affect the TH values. The TH enhancement effects of selected polyhydroxy compounds including polyols and carbohydrates on an AFP from the beetle Dendroides canadensis were systematically investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The number of hydroxyl groups dominates the molar enhancement effectiveness of polyhydroxy compounds having one to five hydroxyl groups. However, the above rule does not apply for polyhydroxy compounds having more than five hydroxyl groups. The most efficient polyhydroxy enhancer identified is trehalose. In a combination of enhancers the strongest enhancer plays the major role in determining the TH enhancement. Mechanistic insights into identification of highly efficient AFP enhancers are discussed. PMID:19038370

  2. Anti-Salmonella Activity of Volatile Compounds of Vietnam Coriander.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Ken-Ichi; Chavasiri, Warinthorn; Kubo, Isao

    2015-07-01

    Essential oil derived from the fresh leaves of Polygonum odoratum Lour was tested for their effects on a foodborne bacterium Salmonella choleraesuis subsp. choleraesuis ATCC 35640 using a broth dilution method. This essential oil showed a significant antibacterial activity against S. choleraesuis at the concentration of 200 µg/mL. Twenty-five volatile compounds were characterized from this essential oil by GC-MS, and aldehyde compounds were found abundant and accounted for more than three-fourths of the essential oil. Among the compounds characterized, dodecanal (C12 ) was the most abundant (55.5%), followed by decanal (C10 ) (11.6%). Both alkanals were effective against S. choleraesuis with the minimum growth inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) values of 100 µg/mL. The most potent antibacterial activity against this bacterium was found with two minor compounds, dodecanol (lauryl alcohol) and 2E-dodecenal, both with each MBC of 6.25 µg/mL. Their primary antibacterial action against S. choleraesuis provably comes from their ability to function as nonionic surface-active agents (surfactants), disrupting the native function of integral membrane proteins nonspecifically. Thus, the antibacterial activity is mediated by biophysical processes. In the case of 2E-alkenals, a biochemical mechanism is also somewhat involved, depending on their alkyl chain length.

  3. CETSA screening identifies known and novel thymidylate synthase inhibitors and slow intracellular activation of 5-fluorouracil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almqvist, Helena; Axelsson, Hanna; Jafari, Rozbeh; Dan, Chen; Mateus, André; Haraldsson, Martin; Larsson, Andreas; Molina, Daniel Martinez; Artursson, Per; Lundbäck, Thomas; Nordlund, Pär

    2016-03-01

    Target engagement is a critical factor for therapeutic efficacy. Assessment of compound binding to native target proteins in live cells is therefore highly desirable in all stages of drug discovery. We report here the first compound library screen based on biophysical measurements of intracellular target binding, exemplified by human thymidylate synthase (TS). The screen selected accurately for all the tested known drugs acting on TS. We also identified TS inhibitors with novel chemistry and marketed drugs that were not previously known to target TS, including the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor decitabine. By following the cellular uptake and enzymatic conversion of known drugs we correlated the appearance of active metabolites over time with intracellular target engagement. These data distinguished a much slower activation of 5-fluorouracil when compared with nucleoside-based drugs. The approach establishes efficient means to associate drug uptake and activation with target binding during drug discovery.

  4. CETSA screening identifies known and novel thymidylate synthase inhibitors and slow intracellular activation of 5-fluorouracil

    PubMed Central

    Almqvist, Helena; Axelsson, Hanna; Jafari, Rozbeh; Dan, Chen; Mateus, André; Haraldsson, Martin; Larsson, Andreas; Molina, Daniel Martinez; Artursson, Per; Lundbäck, Thomas; Nordlund, Pär

    2016-01-01

    Target engagement is a critical factor for therapeutic efficacy. Assessment of compound binding to native target proteins in live cells is therefore highly desirable in all stages of drug discovery. We report here the first compound library screen based on biophysical measurements of intracellular target binding, exemplified by human thymidylate synthase (TS). The screen selected accurately for all the tested known drugs acting on TS. We also identified TS inhibitors with novel chemistry and marketed drugs that were not previously known to target TS, including the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor decitabine. By following the cellular uptake and enzymatic conversion of known drugs we correlated the appearance of active metabolites over time with intracellular target engagement. These data distinguished a much slower activation of 5-fluorouracil when compared with nucleoside-based drugs. The approach establishes efficient means to associate drug uptake and activation with target binding during drug discovery. PMID:27010513

  5. Noxious compounds activate TRPA1 ion channels through covalent modification of cysteines.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, Lindsey J; Dubin, Adrienne E; Evans, Michael J; Marr, Felix; Schultz, Peter G; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2007-02-01

    The nervous system senses peripheral damage through nociceptive neurons that transmit a pain signal. TRPA1 is a member of the Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) family of ion channels and is expressed in nociceptive neurons. TRPA1 is activated by a variety of noxious stimuli, including cold temperatures, pungent natural compounds, and environmental irritants. How such diverse stimuli activate TRPA1 is not known. We observed that most compounds known to activate TRPA1 are able to covalently bind cysteine residues. Here we use click chemistry to show that derivatives of two such compounds, mustard oil and cinnamaldehyde, covalently bind mouse TRPA1. Structurally unrelated cysteine-modifying agents such as iodoacetamide (IA) and (2-aminoethyl)methanethiosulphonate (MTSEA) also bind and activate TRPA1. We identified by mass spectrometry fourteen cytosolic TRPA1 cysteines labelled by IA, three of which are required for normal channel function. In excised patches, reactive compounds activated TRPA1 currents that were maintained at least 10 min after washout of the compound in calcium-free solutions. Finally, activation of TRPA1 by disulphide-bond-forming MTSEA is blocked by the reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT). Collectively, our data indicate that covalent modification of reactive cysteines within TRPA1 can cause channel activation, rapidly signalling potential tissue damage through the pain pathway.

  6. Antibacterial activity of phenolic compounds against the phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa.

    PubMed

    Maddox, Christina E; Laur, Lisa M; Tian, Li

    2010-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a pathogenic bacterium that causes diseases in many crop species, which leads to considerable economic loss. Phenolic compounds (a group of secondary metabolites) are widely distributed in plants and have shown to possess antimicrobial properties. The anti-Xylella activity of 12 phenolic compounds, representing phenolic acid, coumarin, stilbene and flavonoid, was evaluated using an in vitro agar dilution assay. Overall, these phenolic compounds were effective in inhibiting X. fastidiosa growth, as indicated by low minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs). In addition, phenolic compounds with different structural features exhibited different anti-Xylella capacities. Particularly, catechol, caffeic acid and resveratrol showed strong anti-Xylella activities. Differential response to phenolic compounds was observed among X. fastidiosa strains isolated from grape and almond. Elucidation of secondary metabolite-based host resistance to X. fastidiosa will have broad implication in combating X. fastidiosa-caused plant diseases. It will facilitate future production of plants with improved disease resistance properties through genetic engineering or traditional breeding approaches and will significantly improve crop yield.

  7. Callicarpenal and Intermedeol: Two Natural Arthropod Feeding Deterrent and Repellent Compounds Identified from the Southern Folk Remedy Plant, Callicarpa americana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In previous studies on the American beautyberry (Callicarpa americana), it was demonstrated that callicarpenal and intermedeol were responsible for the arthropod repellent and feeding deterrent activity of this folk remedy. Both compounds showed significant bite-deterring activity against Aedes aeg...

  8. Antipoliovirus Activity of the Organic Extract of Eupatorium buniifolium: Isolation of Euparin as an Active Compound

    PubMed Central

    Visintini Jaime, María Florencia; Campos, Rodolfo H.; Martino, Virginia S.; Cavallaro, Lucía V.; Muschietti, Liliana V.

    2013-01-01

    The antiviral activity of the organic extract (OE) of Eupatorium buniifolium against poliovirus type 1 was determined by in vitro assays with an effective concentration 50 (EC50) of 23.3 ± 3.3 µg/mL. Bioassay-guided fractionation of the OE allowed the isolation of an active principle that was identified by spectroscopic methods (1H- and 13C-NMR, EI-MS, UV, and IR spectroscopy) as the benzofuran euparin. The plaque reduction assay in Vero cells was used to assess the antiviral activity of euparin against poliovirus types 1, 2, and 3 with EC50 values of 0.47, 0.12, and 0.15 µg/mL, respectively. Moreover, this compound showed high selectivity indexes of 284.9, 1068, and 854.7, respectively. In order to identify the mechanism by which euparin exerts its antiviral activity, the virucidal effect, the pretreatment of Vero cells, and the time of action on one viral replication cycle were evaluated. Results obtained demonstrated that euparin exerts its effect during the early events of the replication cycle, from the virus adsorption to cells up to the first twenty minutes after infection. This is the first report on the presence of euparin in E. buniifolium and its antiviral activity. PMID:23956770

  9. Natural compounds with aromatase inhibitory activity: an update.

    PubMed

    Balunas, Marcy J; Kinghorn, A Douglas

    2010-08-01

    Several synthetic aromatase inhibitors are currently in clinical use for the treatment of postmenopausal women with hormone-receptor positive breast cancer. However, these treatments may lead to untoward side effects and so the search for new aromatase inhibitors continues, especially those for which the activity is promoter-specific, targeting the breast-specific promoters I.3 and II. Recently, numerous natural compounds have been found to inhibit aromatase in noncellular, cellular, and IN VIVO studies. These investigations, covering the last two years, as well as additional studies that have focused on the evaluation of natural compounds as promoter-specific aromatase inhibitors or as aromatase inducers, are described in this review.

  10. Machine learning models identify molecules active against the Ebola virus in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ekins, Sean; Freundlich, Joel S.; Clark, Alex M.; Anantpadma, Manu; Davey, Robert A.; Madrid, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The search for small molecule inhibitors of Ebola virus (EBOV) has led to several high throughput screens over the past 3 years. These have identified a range of FDA-approved active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) with anti-EBOV activity in vitro and several of which are also active in a mouse infection model. There are millions of additional commercially-available molecules that could be screened for potential activities as anti-EBOV compounds. One way to prioritize compounds for testing is to generate computational models based on the high throughput screening data and then virtually screen compound libraries. In the current study, we have generated Bayesian machine learning models with viral pseudotype entry assay and the EBOV replication assay data. We have validated the models internally and externally. We have also used these models to computationally score the MicroSource library of drugs to select those likely to be potential inhibitors. Three of the highest scoring molecules that were not in the model training sets, quinacrine, pyronaridine and tilorone, were tested in vitro and had EC 50 values of 350, 420 and 230 nM, respectively. Pyronaridine is a component of a combination therapy for malaria that was recently approved by the European Medicines Agency, which may make it more readily accessible for clinical testing. Like other known antimalarial drugs active against EBOV, it shares the 4-aminoquinoline scaffold. Tilorone, is an investigational antiviral agent that has shown a broad array of biological activities including cell growth inhibition in cancer cells, antifibrotic properties, α7 nicotinic receptor agonist activity, radioprotective activity and activation of hypoxia inducible factor-1. Quinacrine is an antimalarial but also has use as an anthelmintic. Our results suggest data sets with less than 1,000 molecules can produce validated machine learning models that can in turn be utilized to identify novel EBOV inhibitors in vitro. PMID:26834994

  11. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as a tool to predict chemical activity on mammalian development and identify mechanisms influencing toxicological outcome

    PubMed Central

    Harlow, Philippa H.; Perry, Simon J.; Widdison, Stephanie; Daniels, Shannon; Bondo, Eddie; Lamberth, Clemens; Currie, Richard A.; Flemming, Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether a C. elegans bioassay could predict mammalian developmental activity, we selected diverse compounds known and known not to elicit such activity and measured their effect on C. elegans egg viability. 89% of compounds that reduced C. elegans egg viability also had mammalian developmental activity. Conversely only 25% of compounds found not to reduce egg viability in C. elegans were also inactive in mammals. We conclude that the C. elegans egg viability assay is an accurate positive predictor, but an inaccurate negative predictor, of mammalian developmental activity. We then evaluated C. elegans as a tool to identify mechanisms affecting toxicological outcomes among related compounds. The difference in developmental activity of structurally related fungicides in C. elegans correlated with their rate of metabolism. Knockdown of the cytochrome P450s cyp-35A3 and cyp-35A4 increased the toxicity to C. elegans of the least developmentally active compounds to the level of the most developmentally active. This indicated that these P450s were involved in the greater rate of metabolism of the less toxic of these compounds. We conclude that C. elegans based approaches can predict mammalian developmental activity and can yield plausible hypotheses for factors affecting the biological potency of compounds in mammals. PMID:26987796

  12. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as a tool to predict chemical activity on mammalian development and identify mechanisms influencing toxicological outcome.

    PubMed

    Harlow, Philippa H; Perry, Simon J; Widdison, Stephanie; Daniels, Shannon; Bondo, Eddie; Lamberth, Clemens; Currie, Richard A; Flemming, Anthony J

    2016-03-18

    To determine whether a C. elegans bioassay could predict mammalian developmental activity, we selected diverse compounds known and known not to elicit such activity and measured their effect on C. elegans egg viability. 89% of compounds that reduced C. elegans egg viability also had mammalian developmental activity. Conversely only 25% of compounds found not to reduce egg viability in C. elegans were also inactive in mammals. We conclude that the C. elegans egg viability assay is an accurate positive predictor, but an inaccurate negative predictor, of mammalian developmental activity. We then evaluated C. elegans as a tool to identify mechanisms affecting toxicological outcomes among related compounds. The difference in developmental activity of structurally related fungicides in C. elegans correlated with their rate of metabolism. Knockdown of the cytochrome P450s cyp-35A3 and cyp-35A4 increased the toxicity to C. elegans of the least developmentally active compounds to the level of the most developmentally active. This indicated that these P450s were involved in the greater rate of metabolism of the less toxic of these compounds. We conclude that C. elegans based approaches can predict mammalian developmental activity and can yield plausible hypotheses for factors affecting the biological potency of compounds in mammals.

  13. Phenotypic Approaches to Identify Inhibitors of B Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Suzie; Wiener, Jake; Rao, Navin L.; Milla, Marcos E.; DiSepio, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    An EPIC label-free phenotypic platform was developed to explore B cell receptor (BCR) and CD40R-mediated B cell activation. The phenotypic assay measured the association of RL non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma B cells expressing lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) to intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1)-coated EPIC plates. Anti-IgM (immunoglobulin M) mediated BCR activation elicited a response that was blocked by LFA-1/ICAM-1 specific inhibitors and a panel of Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitors. LFA-1/ICAM-1 association was further increased on coapplication of anti-IgM and mega CD40L when compared to individual application of either. Anti-IgM, mega CD40L, or the combination of both displayed distinct kinetic profiles that were inhibited by treatment with a BTK inhibitor. We also established a FLIPR-based assay to measure B cell activation in Ramos Burkitt’s lymphoma B cells and an RL cell line. Anti-IgM-mediated BCR activation elicited a robust calcium response that was inhibited by a panel of BTK inhibitors. Conversely, CD40R activation did not elicit a calcium response in the FLIPR assay. Compared to the FLIPR, the EPIC assay has the propensity to identify inhibitors of both BCR and CD40R-mediated B cell activation and may provide more pharmacological depth or novel mechanisms of action for inhibition of B cell activation. PMID:25948491

  14. Thin-layer chromatographic (TLC) separations and bioassays of plant extracts to identify antimicrobial compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A common screen for plant antimicrobial compounds consists of separating plant extracts by paper or thin-layer chromatography (PC or TLC), exposing the chromatograms to microbial suspensions (e.g. fungal spores in nutrient solution or bacteria in liquefied agar), allowing time for the microbes to gr...

  15. Antioxidant activity and bioactive compounds of tea seed (Camellia oleifera Abel.) oil.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chia-Pu; Yen, Gow-Chin

    2006-02-08

    The oil of tea seed (Camellia oleifera Abel.) is used extensively in China as cooking oil. The objectives of this study were to investigate the antioxidant activity of tea seed oil and its active compounds. Of the five solvent extracts, methanol extract of tea seed oil exhibited the highest yield and the strongest antioxidant activity as determined by DPPH scavenging activity and Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC). Two peaks separated from the methanol extract by HPLC contributed the most significant antioxidant activity. These two peaks were further identified as sesamin and a novel compound: 2,5-bis-benzo[1,3]dioxol-5-yl-tetrahydro-furo [3,4-d][1,3]dioxine (named compound B) by UV absorption and characterized by MS, IR, 1H NMR, and 13C NMR techniques. Sesamin and compound B decreased H2O2-mediated formation of reactive oxygen species in red blood cells (RBCs), inhibited RBCs hemolysis induced by AAPH, and increased the lag time of conjugated dienes formation in human low-density lipoprotein. The results indicate that both compounds isolated from tea seed oil exhibit remarkable antioxidant activity. Apart from the traditional pharmacological effects of Camellia oleifera, the oil of tea seed may also act as a prophylactic agent to prevent free radical related diseases.

  16. USE OF BIOASSAY-DIRECTED CHEMICAL ANALYSIS FOR IDENTIFYING MUTAGENIC COMPOUNDS IN URBAN AIR AND COMBUSTION EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioassay-directed chemical analysis fractionation has been used for 30 years to identify mutagenic classes of compounds in complex mixtures. Most studies have used the Salmonella (Ames) mutagenicity assay, and we have recently applied this methodology to two standard reference sa...

  17. Parallel synthesis and biological evaluation of 837 analogues of procaspase-activating compound 1 (PAC-1).

    PubMed

    Hsu, Danny C; Roth, Howard S; West, Diana C; Botham, Rachel C; Novotny, Chris J; Schmid, Steven C; Hergenrother, Paul J

    2012-01-09

    Procaspase-Activating Compound 1 (PAC-1) is an ortho-hydroxy N-acyl hydrazone that enhances the enzymatic activity of procaspase-3 in vitro and induces apoptosis in cancer cells. An analogue of PAC-1, called S-PAC-1, was evaluated in a veterinary clinical trial in pet dogs with lymphoma and found to have considerable potential as an anticancer agent. With the goal of identifying more potent compounds in this promising class of experimental therapeutics, a combinatorial library based on PAC-1 was created, and the compounds were evaluated for their ability to induce death of cancer cells in culture. For library construction, 31 hydrazides were condensed in parallel with 27 aldehydes to create 837 PAC-1 analogues, with an average purity of 91%. The compounds were evaluated for their ability to induce apoptosis in cancer cells, and through this work, six compounds were discovered to be substantially more potent than PAC-1 and S-PAC-1. These six hits were further evaluated for their ability to relieve zinc-mediated inhibition of procaspase-3 in vitro. In general, the newly identified hit compounds are two- to four-fold more potent than PAC-1 and S-PAC-1 in cell culture, and thus have promise as experimental therapeutics for treatment of the many cancers that have elevated expression levels of procaspase-3.

  18. Synthesis and antitumor activity of natural compound aloe emodin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Thimmegowda, Naraganahalli R; Park, Chanmi; Shwetha, Bettaswamigowda; Sakchaisri, Krisada; Liu, Kangdong; Hwang, Joonsung; Lee, Sangku; Jeong, Sook J; Soung, Nak K; Jang, Jae H; Ryoo, In-Ja; Ahn, Jong S; Erikson, Raymond L; Kim, Bo Y

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we have synthesized novel water soluble derivatives of natural compound aloe emodin 4(a-j) by coupling with various amino acid esters and substituted aromatic amines, in an attempt to improve the anticancer activity and to explore the structure-activity relationships. The structures of the compounds were determined by (1) H NMR and mass spectroscopy. Cell growth inhibition assays revealed that the aloe emodin derivatives 4d, 4f, and 4i effectively decreased the growth of HepG2 (human liver cancer cells) and NCI-H460 (human lung cancer cells) and some of the derivatives exhibited comparable antitumor activity against HeLa (Human epithelial carcinoma cells) and PC3 (prostate cancer cells) cell lines compared to that of the parent aloe emodin at low micromolar concentrations.

  19. Antioxidant activity of compounds from the medicinal herb Aster tataricus.

    PubMed

    Ng, T B; Liu, Fang; Lu, Yanhua; Cheng, C H K; Wang, Zhengtao

    2003-10-01

    A number of compounds were isolated from the medicinal plant Aster tataricus including shionone, epifriedelinol, quercetin, kaempferol, scopoletin, emodin, aurantiamide acetate and 1,7-dihydroxy-6-methyl-anthraquinone. The compounds were compared with regard to their ability in inhibiting hemolysis of rat erythrocytes induced by 2'-2' azobis (2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride, lipid peroxidation using the FeSO(4)-ascorbic acid system, and generation of superoxide radicals using a phenazine methosulfate-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide system. The effects on the Fe-bleomycin-induced DNA damage reflected pro-oxidant activity. Quercetin and kaempferol were most potent in inhibiting hemolysis, lipid peroxidation and superoxide radical generation. Scopoletin and emodin were similar to quercetin and kaempferol in inhibiting superoxide radical generation and second to them in inhibiting lipid peroxidation. Aurantiamide acetate exhibited some inhibitory activity toward superoxide radical generation. 1,7-dihydroxy-6-methyl-anthraquinone exerted an inhibitory activity only on superoxide radical generation. Shionone and epifriedelinol did not display any antioxidant activity. Quercetin and kaempferol, but not the remaining compounds, exhibited some pro-oxidant activity.

  20. Aqua mediated synthesis of bio-active compounds.

    PubMed

    Panda, Siva S

    2013-05-01

    Recently the aqueous medium has attracted the interest of organic chemists, and many. Moreover, in the past 20 years, the drug-discovery process has undergone extraordinary changes, and high-throughput biological screening of potential drug candidates has led to an ever-increasing demand for novel drug-like compounds. Noteworthy advantages were observed during the course of study on aqua mediated synthesis of compounds of medicinal importance. The established advantages of water as a solvent for reactions are, water is the most abundant and available resource on the planet and many biochemical processes occur in aqueous medium. This review will focus on describing new developments in the application of water in medicinal chemistry for the synthesis of bio-active compounds possessing various biological properties.

  1. Essential requirement of cytochrome c release for caspase activation by procaspase-activating compound defined by cellular models

    PubMed Central

    Seervi, M; Joseph, J; Sobhan, P K; Bhavya, B C; Santhoshkumar, T R

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial cytochrome c (cyt. c) release and caspase activation are often impaired in tumors with Bcl-2 overexpression or Bax and Bak-defective status. Direct triggering of cell death downstream of Bax and Bak is an attractive strategy to kill such cancers. Small molecule compounds capable of direct caspase activation appear to be the best mode for killing such tumors. However, there is no precise model to screen such compounds. The currently employed cell-free systems possess the inherent drawback of lacking cellular contents and organelles that operate in integrating cell death signaling. We have developed highly refined cell-based approaches to validate direct caspase activation in cancer cells. Using this approach, we show that PAC-1 (first procaspase-activating compound), the first direct activator of procaspases identified in a cell-free system, in fact requires mitochondrial cyt. c release for triggering caspase activation similar to other antitumor agents. It can induce significant caspase activation and cell death in the absence of Bax and Bak, and in cells overexpressing Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. This study for the first time defines precise criteria for the validation of direct caspase-activating compounds using specialized cellular models that is expected to accelerate the discovery of potential direct caspase activators. PMID:21900958

  2. Hybrid energy storage systems utilizing redox active organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Xu, Wu; Li, Liyu; Yang, Zhenguo

    2015-09-08

    Redox flow batteries (RFB) have attracted considerable interest due to their ability to store large amounts of power and energy. Non-aqueous energy storage systems that utilize at least some aspects of RFB systems are attractive because they can offer an expansion of the operating potential window, which can improve on the system energy and power densities. One example of such systems has a separator separating first and second electrodes. The first electrode includes a first current collector and volume containing a first active material. The second electrode includes a second current collector and volume containing a second active material. During operation, the first source provides a flow of first active material to the first volume. The first active material includes a redox active organic compound dissolved in a non-aqueous, liquid electrolyte and the second active material includes a redox active metal.

  3. Identification of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) From Photochemical Activity in Snow Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kos, G.; Ariya, P. A.

    2004-05-01

    The occurrence of VOCs in snow has been observed and can be related to anthropogenic emissions and biological activity. Photochemistry and microorganisms play a major role in the transformation of compounds in different compartments of the global ecosystem. Studies so far focused on the determination of single analytes or a class of compounds - mainly of anthropogenic origin (e.g. halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons) - that were considered important with regard to health and environmental concerns. Broader studies that describe a range of different compounds with different functionalities are relatively rare, especially for those of biological origin. The presented study investigated the formation of VOCs in snow samples and their connection with microbiological activity. The main aim was to pre-concentrate, identify and quantify volatile organic compounds. Snow samples were collected in an urban environment (Montreal, Canada) with sterilized containers. Samples were transferred into a heated reaction flask, where the sample was melted. A two-trap system was employed for pre-concentration: The first trap was used for water removal. The second trap was used for the collection of expected analytes by removing volatiles from the circulating air. Circulation was maintained with a pump at atmospheric pressure. Adsorption to glass walls of the reaction flask was prevented with halocarbon wax coating. Different sterilization methods were employed to suppress microbiological activity in order to collect background data and identify compounds of biological origin. VOC concentration and compound identification was performed with gas chromatography and mass spectrometric detection (GC-MS) by taking a sample with a gas-tight syringe through a septum-port. The sample was directly injected into the GC system. Compounds were identified by their respective mass spectra and included aldehydes and alcohols.

  4. Historical trends in organochlorine compounds in river basins identified using sediment cores from reservoirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Metre, P.C.; Callender, E.; Fuller, C.C.

    1997-01-01

    This study used chemical analyses of dated sediment cores from reservoirs to define historical trends in water quality in the influent river basins. This work applies techniques from paleolimnology to reservoirs, and in the process, highlights differences between sediment-core interpretations for reservoirs and natural lakes. Sediment cores were collected from six reservoirs in the central and southeastern United States, sectioned, and analyzed for 137Cs and organochlorine compounds. 137Cs analyses were used to demonstrate limited post-depositional mixing, to indicate sediment deposition dates, and to estimate sediment focusing factors. Relative lack of mixing, high sedimentation rates, and high focusing factors distinguish reservoir sediment cores from cores collected in natural lakes. Temporal trends in concentrations of PCBs, total DDT (DDT + DDD + DDE), and chlordane reflect historical use and regulation of these compounds and differences in land use between reservoir drainages. PCB and total DDT core burdens, normalized for sediment focusing, greatly exceed reported cumulative regional atmospheric fallout of PCBs and total DDT estimated using cores from peat hogs and natural lakes, indicating the dominance of fluvial inputs of both groups of compounds to the reservoirs.This study used chemical analyses of dated sediment cores from reservoirs to define historical trends in water quality in the influent river basins. This work applies techniques from paleolimnology to reservoirs, and in the process, highlights differences between sediment-core interpretations for reservoirs and natural lakes. Sediment cores were collected from six reservoirs in the central and southeastern United States, sectioned, and analyzed for 137Cs and organochlorine compounds. 137Cs analyses were used to demonstrate limited post-depositional mixing, to indicate sediment deposition dates, and to estimate sediment focusing factors. Relative lack of mixing, high sedimentation rates, and high

  5. Large-scale chemical similarity networks for target profiling of compounds identified in cell-based chemical screens.

    PubMed

    Lo, Yu-Chen; Senese, Silvia; Li, Chien-Ming; Hu, Qiyang; Huang, Yong; Damoiseaux, Robert; Torres, Jorge Z

    2015-03-01

    Target identification is one of the most critical steps following cell-based phenotypic chemical screens aimed at identifying compounds with potential uses in cell biology and for developing novel disease therapies. Current in silico target identification methods, including chemical similarity database searches, are limited to single or sequential ligand analysis that have limited capabilities for accurate deconvolution of a large number of compounds with diverse chemical structures. Here, we present CSNAP (Chemical Similarity Network Analysis Pulldown), a new computational target identification method that utilizes chemical similarity networks for large-scale chemotype (consensus chemical pattern) recognition and drug target profiling. Our benchmark study showed that CSNAP can achieve an overall higher accuracy (>80%) of target prediction with respect to representative chemotypes in large (>200) compound sets, in comparison to the SEA approach (60-70%). Additionally, CSNAP is capable of integrating with biological knowledge-based databases (Uniprot, GO) and high-throughput biology platforms (proteomic, genetic, etc) for system-wise drug target validation. To demonstrate the utility of the CSNAP approach, we combined CSNAP's target prediction with experimental ligand evaluation to identify the major mitotic targets of hit compounds from a cell-based chemical screen and we highlight novel compounds targeting microtubules, an important cancer therapeutic target. The CSNAP method is freely available and can be accessed from the CSNAP web server (http://services.mbi.ucla.edu/CSNAP/).

  6. Anti-allergic inflammatory activities of compounds of amomi fructus.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyun Gyu; Je, In-Gyu; Kim, Geum Jin; Choi, Hyukjae; Kim, Sang Hyun; Kim, Jeong Ah; Lee, Kim Seung Ho

    2015-04-01

    Activity-guided isolation of compounds from the fruits of Amomum xanthioides resulted in the purification of fourteen phenolic compounds, 4-hydroxy-benzaldehyde (1), 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde (2), 3,5-dimethoxy-4-methylbenzaldehyde (3), syringic aldehyde (4), benzoic acid (5), 3,4-dihydroxy benzoic acid (6), vanillic acid (7), 3-hydroxy-2-methoxybenzoic acid (8), o-vanillic acid (9), phenylacetic acid (10), tyrosol (11), pyrocatechol (12), 1,2,4,5-tetramethoxybenzene (13), and 3,3',5,5'-tetramethoxybiphenyl-4,4'-diol (14). To evaluate the anti-allergic inflammatory activities of these compounds, we examined the inhibitory effects of the isolates (1-14) on histamine release and on the expressions of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-ca and interleukin (IL)-6 genes by using human mast cells. Of the tested compounds, 9, 11, and 13 suppressed histamine release from mast cells, and all isolates attenuated the expressions of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α and IL-6 genes in human mast cells.

  7. Whole-organism screening for gluconeogenesis identifies activators of fasting metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Gut, Philipp; Baeza-Raja, Bernat; Andersson, Olov; Hasenkamp, Laura; Hsiao, Joseph; Hesselson, Daniel; Akassoglou, Katerina; Verdin, Eric; Hirschey, Matthew D.; Stainier, Didier Y.R.

    2012-01-01

    Improving the control of energy homeostasis can lower cardiovascular risk in metabolically compromised individuals. To identify new regulators of whole-body energy control, we conducted a high-throughput screen in transgenic reporter zebrafish for small molecules that modulate the expression of the fasting-inducible gluconeogenic gene pck1. We show that this in vivo strategy identified several drugs that impact gluconeogenesis in humans, as well as metabolically uncharacterized compounds. Most notably, we find that the Translocator Protein (TSPO) ligands PK 11195 and Ro5-4864 are glucose lowering agents despite a strong inductive effect on pck1 expression. We show that these drugs are activators of a fasting-like energy state, and importantly that they protect high-fat diet induced obese mice from hepatosteatosis and glucose intolerance, two pathological manifestations of metabolic dysregulation. Thus, using a whole-organism screening strategy, this study has identified new small molecule activators of fasting metabolism. PMID:23201900

  8. Antimicrobial active herbal compounds against Acinetobacter baumannii and other pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Vishvanath; Roy, Ranita; Tiwari, Monalisa

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens cause a number of lethal diseases. Opportunistic bacterial pathogens grouped into ESKAPE pathogens that are linked to the high degree of morbidity, mortality and increased costs as described by Infectious Disease Society of America. Acinetobacter baumannii is one of the ESKAPE pathogens which cause respiratory infection, pneumonia and urinary tract infections. The prevalence of this pathogen increases gradually in the clinical setup where it can grow on artificial surfaces, utilize ethanol as a carbon source and resists desiccation. Carbapenems, a β-lactam, are the most commonly prescribed drugs against A. baumannii. The high level of acquired and intrinsic carbapenem resistance mechanisms acquired by these bacteria makes their eradication difficult. The pharmaceutical industry has no solution to this problem. Hence, it is an urgent requirement to find a suitable alternative to carbapenem, a commonly prescribed drug for Acinetobacter infection. In order to do this, here we have made an effort to review the active compounds of plants that have potent antibacterial activity against many bacteria including carbapenem resistant strain of A. baumannii. We have also briefly highlighted the separation and identification methods used for these active compounds. This review will help researchers involved in the screening of herbal active compounds that might act as a replacement for carbapenem. PMID:26150810

  9. Cancer Stem Cells: The Potential Targets of Chinese Medicines and Their Active Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Ming; Tan, Hor Yue; Li, Sha; Cheung, Fan; Wang, Ning; Nagamatsu, Tadashi; Feng, Yibin

    2016-01-01

    The pivotal role of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in the initiation and progression of malignancies has been rigorously validated, and the specific methods for identifying and isolating the CSCs from the parental cancer population have also been rapidly developed in recent years. This review aims to provide an overview of recent research progress of Chinese medicines (CMs) and their active compounds in inhibiting tumor progression by targeting CSCs. A great deal of CMs and their active compounds, such as Antrodia camphorate, berberine, resveratrol, and curcumin have been shown to regress CSCs, in terms of reversing drug resistance, inducing cell death and inhibiting cell proliferation as well as metastasis. Furthermore, one of the active compounds in coptis, berbamine may inhibit tumor progression by modulating microRNAs to regulate CSCs. The underlying molecular mechanisms and related signaling pathways involved in these processes were also discussed and concluded in this paper. Overall, the use of CMs and their active compounds may be a promising therapeutic strategy to eradicate cancer by targeting CSCs. However, further studies are needed to clarify the potential of clinical application of CMs and their active compounds as complementary and alternative therapy in this field. PMID:27338343

  10. Selective CB2 receptor agonists. Part 2: Structure-activity relationship studies and optimization of proline-based compounds.

    PubMed

    Riether, Doris; Zindell, Renee; Wu, Lifen; Betageri, Raj; Jenkins, James E; Khor, Someina; Berry, Angela K; Hickey, Eugene R; Ermann, Monika; Albrecht, Claudia; Ceci, Angelo; Gemkow, Mark J; Nagaraja, Nelamangala V; Romig, Helmut; Sauer, Achim; Thomson, David S

    2015-02-01

    Through a ligand-based pharmacophore model (S)-proline based compounds were identified as potent cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2) agonists with high selectivity over the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1). Structure-activity relationship investigations for this compound class lead to oxo-proline compounds 21 and 22 which combine an impressive CB1 selectivity profile with good pharmacokinetic properties. In a streptozotocin induced diabetic neuropathy model, 22 demonstrated a dose-dependent reversal of mechanical hyperalgesia.

  11. A community computational challenge to predict the activity of pairs of compounds

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Mukesh; Yang, Jichen; Karan, Charles; Menden, Michael P; Costello, James C; Tang, Hao; Xiao, Guanghua; Li, Yajuan; Allen, Jeffrey; Zhong, Rui; Chen, Beibei; Kim, Minsoo; Wang, Tao; Heiser, Laura M; Realubit, Ronald; Mattioli, Michela; Alvarez, Mariano J; Shen, Yao; Gallahan, Daniel; Singer, Dinah; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Xie, Yang; Stolovitzky, Gustavo; Califano, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Recent therapeutic successes have renewed interest in drug combinations, but experimental screening approaches are costly and often identify only small numbers of synergistic combinations. The DREAM consortium launched an open challenge to foster the development of in silico methods to computationally rank 91 compound pairs, from the most synergistic to the most antagonistic, based on gene-expression profiles of human B cells treated with individual compounds at multiple time points and concentrations. Using scoring metrics based on experimental dose-response curves, we assessed 32 methods (31 community-generated approaches and SynGen), four of which performed significantly better than random guessing. We highlight similarities between the methods. Although the accuracy of predictions was not optimal, we find that computational prediction of compound-pair activity is possible, and that community challenges can be useful to advance the field of in silico compound-synergy prediction. PMID:25419740

  12. New compound with DNA Topo I inhibitory activity purified from Penicillium oxalicum HSY05.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bing; Wang, Hai-Feng; Zhang, Li-Hua; Liu, Fang; He, Feng-Jun; Bai, Jiao; Hua, Hui-Ming; Chen, Gang; Pei, Yue-Hu

    2015-01-01

    Strain HSY05 was isolated from sea sediment collected from the South China Sea and was later identified as Penicillium oxalicum by 16S rDNA sequence analysis. Various chromatographic processes led to the isolation and purification of two metabolites from the fermentation culture of HSY05, including one new compound, 2,2',4,4'-tetrahyoxy-8'-methyl-6-methoxy-acyl-ethyl-diphenylmethanone (1), and a known compound secalonic acid D (SAD, 2), as characterised by UV, IR, 1D, 2D-NMR and MS data. The inhibitory activities against topoisomerase I of these two compounds were evaluated. The result showed that in addition to the known topo I inhibitor SAD (2), compound 1 also exhibited a moderate inhibitory effect.

  13. Synthesis and Structure activity relationships of EGCG Analogues, A Recently Identified Hsp90 Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Khandelwal, Anuj; Hall, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the principal polyphenol isolated from green tea, was recently shown to inhibit Hsp90, however structure-activity relationships for this natural product have not yet been produced. Herein, we report the synthesis and biological evaluation of EGCG analogues to establish structure-activity relationships between EGCG and Hsp90. All four rings as well as the linker connecting the C- and the D-rings were systematically investigated, which led to the discovery of compounds that inhibit Hs90 and display improvement in efficacy over EGCG. Anti-proliferative activity of all the analogues was determined against MCF-7 and SKBr3 cell lines and Hsp90 inhibitory activity of four most potent analogues was further evaluated by western blot analyses and degradation of Hsp90-dependent client proteins. Prenyl substituted aryl ester of 3,5-dihydroxychroman-3-ol ring system was identified as novel scaffold that exhibit Hsp90 inhibitory activity. PMID:23834230

  14. Cooked garlic and antioxidant activity: Correlation with organosulfur compound composition.

    PubMed

    Locatelli, D A; Nazareno, M A; Fusari, C M; Camargo, A B

    2017-04-01

    The antioxidant properties and the main beneficial organosulphur compounds of home-cooked garlic samples were studied in order to establish relationships between them. Antioxidant activity was tested by free radical scavenging against 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH) and 2,2'-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzo-thiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS(+)), Fe(III) reducing ability (FRAP) and linoleic acid co-oxidation initiated by soybean lipoxygenase in a micelle system. DPPH, ABTS and FRAP assays showed the highest activity for raw garlic samples, while β-carotene bleaching assay yielded the highest activity for stir-fried garlic. Pure organosulphur compounds tested by DPPH, FRAP and β-carotene bleaching assays showed that allicin had an antiradical action mechanism, as well as iron reducing capacity; while antioxidant activity was the main mechanism for ajoenes and 2-VD. To our knowledge, this study is the first demonstration that home-cooked garlic retains its antioxidant activity, and, at the same time, elucidates the mechanisms involved in this activity.

  15. Chemical Constituents Identified from Fruit Body of Cordyceps bassiana and Their Anti-Inflammatory Activity.

    PubMed

    Suh, Wonse; Nam, Gyeongsug; Yang, Woo Seok; Sung, Gi-Ho; Shim, Sang Hee; Cho, Jae Youl

    2017-03-01

    Cordyceps bassiana is one of Cordyceps species with anti-oxidative, anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic, anti-obesity, anti-angiogenic, and anti-nociceptive activities. This mushroom has recently demonstrated to have an ability to reduce 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene-induced atopic dermatitis symptoms in NC/Nga mice. In this study, we further examined phytochemical properties of this mushroom by column chromatography and HPLC analysis. By chromatographic separation and spectroscopic analysis, 8 compounds, such as 1,9-dimethylguanine (1), adenosine (2), uridine (3), nicotinamide (4), 3-methyluracil (5), 1,7-dimethylxanthine (6), nudifloric acid (7), and mannitol (8) were identified from 6 different fractions and 4 more subfractions. Through evaluation of their anti-inflammatory activities using reporter gene assay and mRNA analysis, compound 1 was found to block luciferase activity induced by NF-κB and AP-1, suppress the mRNA levels of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Therefore, our data strongly suggests that compound 1 acts as one of major principles in Cordyceps bassiana with anti-inflammatory and anti-atopic dermatitis activities.

  16. Chemical Constituents Identified from Fruit Body of Cordyceps bassiana and Their Anti-Inflammatory Activity

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Wonse; Nam, Gyeongsug; Yang, Woo Seok; Sung, Gi-Ho; Shim, Sang Hee; Cho, Jae Youl

    2017-01-01

    Cordyceps bassiana is one of Cordyceps species with anti-oxidative, anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic, anti-obesity, anti-angiogenic, and anti-nociceptive activities. This mushroom has recently demonstrated to have an ability to reduce 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene-induced atopic dermatitis symptoms in NC/Nga mice. In this study, we further examined phytochemical properties of this mushroom by column chromatography and HPLC analysis. By chromatographic separation and spectroscopic analysis, 8 compounds, such as 1,9-dimethylguanine (1), adenosine (2), uridine (3), nicotinamide (4), 3-methyluracil (5), 1,7-dimethylxanthine (6), nudifloric acid (7), and mannitol (8) were identified from 6 different fractions and 4 more subfractions. Through evaluation of their anti-inflammatory activities using reporter gene assay and mRNA analysis, compound 1 was found to block luciferase activity induced by NF-κB and AP-1, suppress the mRNA levels of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Therefore, our data strongly suggests that compound 1 acts as one of major principles in Cordyceps bassiana with anti-inflammatory and anti-atopic dermatitis activities. PMID:27530115

  17. Analysis of Indonesian Spice Essential Oil Compounds That Inhibit Locomotor Activity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Muchtaridi; Diantini, Adjeng; Subarnas, Anas

    2011-01-01

    Some fragrance components of spices used for cooking are known to have an effect on human behavior. The aim of this investigation was to examine the effect of the essential oils of basil (Ocimum formacitratum L.) leaves, lemongrass (Cymbopogon citrates L.) herbs, ki lemo (Litsea cubeba L.) bark, and laja gowah (Alpinia malaccencis Roxb.) rhizomes on locomotor activity in mice and identify the active component(s) that might be responsible for the activity. The effect of the essential oils was studied by a wheel cage method and the active compounds of the essential oils were identified by GC/MS analysis. The essential oils were administered by inhalation at doses of 0.1, 0.3, and 0.5 mL/cage. The results showed that the four essential oils had inhibitory effects on locomotor activity in mice. Inhalation of the essential oils of basil leaves, lemongrass herbs, ki lemo bark, and laja gowah rhizomes showed the highest inhibitory activity at doses of 0.5 (57.64%), 0.1 (55.72%), 0.5 (60.75%), and 0.1 mL/cage (47.09%), respectively. The major volatile compounds 1,8-cineole, α-terpineol, 4-terpineol, citronelol, citronelal, and methyl cinnamate were identified in blood plasma of mice after inhalation of the four oils. These compounds had a significant inhibitory effect on locomotion after inhalation. The volatile compounds of essential oils identified in the blood plasma may correlate with the locomotor-inhibiting properties of the oil when administered by inhalation.

  18. Apatite formation: why it may not work as planned, and how to conclusively identify apatite compounds.

    PubMed

    Drouet, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Calcium phosphate apatites are inorganic compounds encountered in many different mineralized tissues. Bone mineral, for example, is constituted of nanocrystalline nonstoichiometric apatite, and the production of "analogs" through a variety of methods is frequently reported. In another context, the ability of solid surfaces to favor the nucleation and growth of "bone-like" apatite upon immersion in supersaturated fluids such as SFB is commonly used as one evaluation index of the "bioactivity" of such surfaces. Yet, the compounds or deposits obtained are not always thoroughly characterized, and their apatitic nature is sometimes not firmly assessed by appropriate physicochemical analyses. Of particular importance are the "actual" conditions in which the precipitation takes place. The precipitation of a white solid does not automatically indicate the formation of a "bone-like carbonate apatite layer" as is sometimes too hastily concluded: "all that glitters is not gold." The identification of an apatite phase should be carefully demonstrated by appropriate characterization, preferably using complementary techniques. This review considers the fundamentals of calcium phosphate apatite characterization discussing several techniques: electron microscopy/EDX, XRD, FTIR/Raman spectroscopies, chemical analyses, and solid state NMR. It also underlines frequent problems that should be kept in mind when making "bone-like apatites."

  19. Apatite Formation: Why It May Not Work as Planned, and How to Conclusively Identify Apatite Compounds

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Calcium phosphate apatites are inorganic compounds encountered in many different mineralized tissues. Bone mineral, for example, is constituted of nanocrystalline nonstoichiometric apatite, and the production of “analogs” through a variety of methods is frequently reported. In another context, the ability of solid surfaces to favor the nucleation and growth of “bone-like” apatite upon immersion in supersaturated fluids such as SFB is commonly used as one evaluation index of the “bioactivity” of such surfaces. Yet, the compounds or deposits obtained are not always thoroughly characterized, and their apatitic nature is sometimes not firmly assessed by appropriate physicochemical analyses. Of particular importance are the “actual” conditions in which the precipitation takes place. The precipitation of a white solid does not automatically indicate the formation of a “bone-like carbonate apatite layer” as is sometimes too hastily concluded: “all that glitters is not gold.” The identification of an apatite phase should be carefully demonstrated by appropriate characterization, preferably using complementary techniques. This review considers the fundamentals of calcium phosphate apatite characterization discussing several techniques: electron microscopy/EDX, XRD, FTIR/Raman spectroscopies, chemical analyses, and solid state NMR. It also underlines frequent problems that should be kept in mind when making “bone-like apatites.” PMID:23984373

  20. Bioactive Compound Contents and Antioxidant Activity in Aronia (Aronia melanocarpa) Leaves Collected at Different Growth Stages

    PubMed Central

    Thi, Nhuan Do; Hwang, Eun-Sun

    2014-01-01

    The bioactive compounds and antioxidant activity of aronia leaves at different stages of maturity were identified and evaluated. Young and old leaves were approximately 2 months of age and 4 months of age, respectively. The young leaves contained more polyphenols and flavonoids than the old leaves. Three phenolic compounds (i.e., chlorogenic acid, p-coumaric acid, and rutin) were detected by HPLC. Antioxidant activity was measured using 2,2-di-phenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical, 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) radical, and superoxide anion radical scavenging assays. The reducing power of aronia leaf extracts increased in a concentration-dependent manner (0~100 μg/mL). The antioxidant activity of the 80% ethanol extract was greater than that of distilled water extract. The high phenolic compound content indicated that these compounds contribute to antioxidant activity. The overall results indicate that aronia leaves contain bioactive compounds, and that younger aronia leaves may be more favorable for extracting antioxidative ingredients because they contain more polyphenols. PMID:25320718

  1. Bioactive Compound Contents and Antioxidant Activity in Aronia (Aronia melanocarpa) Leaves Collected at Different Growth Stages.

    PubMed

    Thi, Nhuan Do; Hwang, Eun-Sun

    2014-09-01

    The bioactive compounds and antioxidant activity of aronia leaves at different stages of maturity were identified and evaluated. Young and old leaves were approximately 2 months of age and 4 months of age, respectively. The young leaves contained more polyphenols and flavonoids than the old leaves. Three phenolic compounds (i.e., chlorogenic acid, p-coumaric acid, and rutin) were detected by HPLC. Antioxidant activity was measured using 2,2-di-phenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical, 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) radical, and superoxide anion radical scavenging assays. The reducing power of aronia leaf extracts increased in a concentration-dependent manner (0~100 μg/mL). The antioxidant activity of the 80% ethanol extract was greater than that of distilled water extract. The high phenolic compound content indicated that these compounds contribute to antioxidant activity. The overall results indicate that aronia leaves contain bioactive compounds, and that younger aronia leaves may be more favorable for extracting antioxidative ingredients because they contain more polyphenols.

  2. Using fragmentation trees and mass spectral trees for identifying unknown compounds in metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Vaniya, Arpana

    2015-01-01

    Identification of unknown metabolites is the bottleneck in advancing metabolomics, leaving interpretation of metabolomics results ambiguous. The chemical diversity of metabolism is vast, making structure identification arduous and time consuming. Currently, comprehensive analysis of mass spectra in metabolomics is limited to library matching, but tandem mass spectral libraries are small compared to the large number of compounds found in the biosphere, including xenobiotics. Resolving this bottleneck requires richer data acquisition and better computational tools. Multi-stage mass spectrometry (MSn) trees show promise to aid in this regard. Fragmentation trees explore the fragmentation process, generate fragmentation rules and aid in sub-structure identification, while mass spectral trees delineate the dependencies in multi-stage MS of collision-induced dissociations. This review covers advancements over the past 10 years as a tool for metabolite identification, including algorithms, software and databases used to build and to implement fragmentation trees and mass spectral annotations. PMID:26213431

  3. Compounded bioidentical hormone therapy: identifying use trends and knowledge gaps among US women

    PubMed Central

    Pinkerton, JoAnn V.; Santoro, Nanette

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Two surveys (Harris and Rose surveys) were conducted to quantify the use of compounded hormone therapy (CHT; or bioidentical hormone therapy) among perimenopausal and postmenopausal women in the United States, to assess women's knowledge of CHT versus Food and Drug Administration (FDA)–approved hormone therapy, and to gather information on menopausal experience. Methods: The Harris survey was administered to 801 women aged 45 to 60 years who had experienced at least one menopausal symptom. The Rose survey was administered to 2,044 women aged 40 years or older who were ever users of hormone therapy. Women were queried about menopausal symptoms, hormone therapy use, and knowledge of CHT. Findings from the Rose survey were extrapolated using US Census Bureau data and prescription claims for FDA-approved hormone therapy to estimate the prevalence of CHT use. Results: According to extrapolations using Rose data, up to 2.5 million US women aged 40 years or older may use CHT annually, accounting for 28% to 68% of hormone therapy prescriptions. Harris data showed that 86% of women surveyed were unaware that CHT products are not FDA-approved. The Rose survey asked a subset of 1,771 women whether their hormone therapy had been personalized based on hormone levels; 21% (378) answered “yes” whereas 27% (476) did not know. In both surveys, most hormone therapy users stated that their physician had recommended the treatment. Conclusions: We estimate that 1 million to 2.5 million US women aged 40 years or older use CHT. The data suggest that many women are unaware that compounded hormones have not been evaluated or approved by the FDA. Providers have an educational opportunity to ensure that women considering hormone therapy understand the risks and benefits of inadequately regulated CHT. PMID:25692877

  4. The OPTX Project. V. Identifying Distant Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trouille, L.; Barger, A. J.; Tremonti, C.

    2011-11-01

    The Baldwin, Phillips, and Terlevich emission-line ratio diagnostic ([O III]/Hβ versus [N II]/Hα, hereafter BPT diagram) efficiently separates galaxies whose signal is dominated by star formation (BPT-SF) from those dominated by active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity (BPT-AGN). Yet this BPT diagram is limited to z < 0.5, the redshift at which [N II]λ6584 leaves the optical spectral window. Using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), we construct a new diagnostic, or TBT diagram, that is based on rest-frame g - z color, [Ne III]λ3869, and [O II]λλ3726 + 3729 and can be used for galaxies out to z < 1.4. The TBT diagram identifies 98.7% of the SDSS BPT-AGN as TBT-AGN and 97% of the SDSS BPT-SF as TBT-SF. Furthermore, it identifies 97% of the OPTX Chandra X-ray-selected AGNs as TBT-AGN. This is in contrast to the BPT diagram, which misidentifies 20% of X-ray-selected AGNs as BPT-SF. We use the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey North and Lockman Hole galaxy samples, with their accompanying deep Chandra imaging, to perform X-ray and infrared stacking analyses to further validate our TBT-AGN and TBT-SF selections; that is, we verify the dominance of AGN activity in the former and star formation activity in the latter. Finally, we address the inclusion of the majority of the BPT-comp (sources lying between the BPT-SF and BPT-AGN regimes) in our TBT-AGN regime. We find that the stacked BPT-comp source is X-ray hard (langΓeffrang = 1.0+0.4 -0.4) and has a high X-ray luminosity to total infrared luminosity ratio. This suggests that, on average, the X-ray signal in BPT-comp is dominated by obscured or low accretion rate AGN activity rather than by star formation, supporting their inclusion in the TBT-AGN regime. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  5. Imidazolium compounds are active against all stages of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Faral-Tello, Paula; Liang, Mary; Mahler, Graciela; Wipf, Peter; Robello, Carlos

    2014-03-01

    Imidazolium salts are best known for their applications in organic synthesis as room-temperature ionic liquids, or as precursors of stable carbenes, but they also show important biological properties such as anti-oxidative effects, induction of mitochondrial membrane permeabilisation and inhibition of the infection cycle of Plasmodium falciparum. For these reasons, and since chemotherapy for Chagas disease is inefficient, the aim of this study was to test the use of imidazolium compounds against the kinetoplastid haemoflagellate aetiological agent for this disease, namely Trypanosoma cruzi. The results show that five of the tested compounds are more effective than the reference drug benznidazole against the epimastigote and trypomastigote forms of T. cruzi. Moreover, intracellular amastigotes were also affected by the compounds, which showed lower toxicity in host cells. Transmission electron microscopy analysis demonstrated that the tested agents induced alterations of the kinetoplast and particularly of the mitochondria, leading to extraordinary swelling of the organelle. These results further demonstrate that the test agents with the best profile are those bearing symmetrical bulky substituents at N(1) and N(3), displaying promising activity against all forms of T. cruzi, interesting selectivity indexes and exceptional activity at low doses. Accordingly, these agents represent promising candidates for the treatment of Chagas disease.

  6. Factors affecting antibacterial activity of hop compounds and their derivatives.

    PubMed

    Simpson, W J; Smith, A R

    1992-04-01

    The antibacterial effect of weak acids derived from the hop plant (Humulus lupulus L.) increased with decreasing pH. Analysis of the minimum inhibitory concentration of such compounds against Lactobacillus brevis IFO 3960 over pH 4-7 suggests that undissociated molecules were mainly responsible for inhibition of bacterial growth. The antibacterial activity of trans-isohumulone was ca 20 times greater than that of humulone, 11 times greater than that of colupulone and nine times greater than that of trans-humulinic acid when the degree of ionization was taken into account. Monovalent cations (K+, Na+, NH4+, Rb+, Li+) stimulated antibacterial activity of trans-isohumulone but the effect was smaller than that observed with H+. The response to divalent cations varied: Ca2+ had little effect on antibacterial activity, whereas Mg2+ reduced activity. Lipid materials and beta-cyclodextrin also antagonized the antibacterial action of trans-isohumulone.

  7. Platelet anti-aggregation activities of compounds from Cinnamomum cassia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Young; Koo, Yean Kyoung; Koo, Ja Yong; Ngoc, Tran Minh; Kang, Sam Sik; Bae, KiHwan; Kim, Yeong Sik; Yun-Choi, Hye Sook

    2010-10-01

    Cinnamomum cassia is a well-known traditional medicine for improvement of blood circulation. An extract of this plant showed both platelet anti-aggregation and blood anti-coagulation effects in preliminary testing. Among the 13 compounds obtained from this plant, eugenol (2), amygdalactone (4), cinnamic alcohol (5), 2-hydroxycinnamaldehyde (7), 2-methoxycinnamaldehyde (8), and coniferaldehyde (9) showed 1.5-73-fold greater inhibitory effects than acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) on arachidonic acid (AA)-induced aggregation (50% inhibitory concentration [IC₅₀] = 3.8, 5.16, 31.2, 40.0, 16.9, and 0.82 μM, respectively, vs. 60.3 μM) and 6.3-730-fold stronger effect than ASA on U46619 (a thromboxane A₂ mimic)-induced aggregation (IC₅₀ = 3.51, 33.9, 31.0, 51.3, 14.6, and 0.44 μM, respectively, vs. 321 μM). The other compounds, coumarin (3), cinnamaldehyde (6), cinnamic acid (10), icariside DC (11), and dihydrocinnacasside (12), also inhibited (2.5 to four times greater than ASA) U46619-induced aggregation. In addition, compounds 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9 were 1.3-87 times more effective than ASA against epinephrine-induced aggregation (IC₅₀ = 1.86, 1.10, 37.7, 25.0, 16.8, 15.3, and 0.57 μM, respectively, vs. 50.0 μM). However, the 13 compounds were only very mildly effective against blood coagulation, if at all. In conclusion, compounds 2, 4, 8, and 9 showed stronger inhibitory potencies than others on AA-, U46619-, and epinephrine-induced platelet aggregation. Eugenol (2) and coniferaldehyde (9) were the two of the most active anti-platelet constituents of C. cassia.

  8. Natural Product Compounds with Aromatase Inhibitory Activity: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Balunas, Marcy J.; Kinghorn, A. Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Several synthetic aromatase inhibitors are currently in clinical use for the treatment of postmenopausal women with hormone-receptor positive breast cancer. However, these treatments may lead to untoward side effects and so a search for new aromatase inhibitors continues, especially those for which the activity is promoter-specific, targeting the breast-specific promoters I.3 and II. Recently, numerous natural product compounds have been found to inhibit aromatase in non-cellular, cellular, and in vivo studies. These investigations, covering the last two years, as well as additional studies that have focused on the evaluation of natural product compounds as promoter-specific aromatase inhibitors or as aromatase inducers, are described in this review. PMID:20635310

  9. High-Content Imaging Assays for Identifying Compounds that Generate Superoxide and Impair Mitochondrial Membrane Potential in Adherent Eukaryotic Cells.

    PubMed

    Billis, Puja; Will, Yvonne; Nadanaciva, Sashi

    2014-02-19

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are constantly produced in cells as a result of aerobic metabolism. When there is an excessive production of ROS and the cell's antioxidant defenses are overwhelmed, oxidative stress occurs. The superoxide anion is a type of ROS that is produced primarily in mitochondria but is also generated in other regions of the cell including peroxisomes, endoplasmic reticulum, plasma membrane, and cytosol. Here, a high-content imaging assay using the dye dihydroethidium is described for identifying compounds that generate superoxide in eukaryotic cells. A high-content imaging assay using the fluorescent dye tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester is also described to identify compounds that impair mitochondrial membrane potential in eukaryotic cells. The purpose of performing both assays is to identify compounds that (1) generate superoxide at lower concentrations than they impair mitochondrial membrane potential, (2) impair mitochondrial membrane potential at lower concentrations than they generate superoxide, (3) generate superoxide and impair mitochondrial function at similar concentrations, and (4) do not generate superoxide or impair mitochondrial membrane potential during the duration of the assays.

  10. Pharmacologically active compounds in the environment and their chirality.

    PubMed

    Kasprzyk-Hordern, Barbara

    2010-11-01

    Pharmacologically active compounds including both legally used pharmaceuticals and illicit drugs are potent environmental contaminants. Extensive research has been undertaken over the recent years to understand their environmental fate and toxicity. The one very important phenomenon that has been overlooked by environmental researchers studying the fate of pharmacologically active compounds in the environment is their chirality. Chiral drugs can exist in the form of enantiomers, which have similar physicochemical properties but differ in their biological properties such as distribution, metabolism and excretion, as these processes (due to stereospecific interactions of enantiomers with biological systems) usually favour one enantiomer over the other. Additionally, due to different pharmacological activity, enantiomers of chiral drugs can differ in toxicity. Furthermore, degradation of chiral drugs during wastewater treatment and in the environment can be stereoselective and can lead to chiral products of varied toxicity. The distribution of different enantiomers of the same chiral drug in the aquatic environment and biota can also be stereoselective. Biological processes can lead to stereoselective enrichment or depletion of the enantiomeric composition of chiral drugs. As a result the very same drug might reveal different activity and toxicity and this will depend on its origin and exposure to several factors governing its fate in the environment. In this critical review a discussion of the importance of chirality of pharmacologically active compounds in the environmental context is undertaken and suggestions for directions in further research are made. Several groups of chiral drugs of major environmental relevance are discussed and their pharmacological action and disposition in the body is also outlined as it is a key factor in developing a full understanding of their environmental occurrence, fate and toxicity. This review will be of interest to environmental

  11. Screening for antiviral activities of isolated compounds from essential oils.

    PubMed

    Astani, Akram; Reichling, Jürgen; Schnitzler, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Essential oil of star anise as well as phenylpropanoids and sesquiterpenes, for example, trans-anethole, eugenol, β-eudesmol, farnesol, β-caryophyllene and β-caryophyllene oxide, which are present in many essential oils, were examined for their antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) in vitro. Antiviral activity was analyzed by plaque reduction assays and mode of antiviral action was determined by addition of the drugs to uninfected cells, to the virus prior to infection or to herpesvirus-infected cells. Star anise oil reduced viral infectivity by >99%, phenylpropanoids inhibited HSV infectivity by about 60-80% and sesquiterpenes suppressed herpes virus infection by 40-98%. Both, star anise essential oil and all isolated compounds exhibited anti-HSV-1 activity by direct inactivation of free virus particles in viral suspension assays. All tested drugs interacted in a dose-dependent manner with herpesvirus particles, thereby inactivating viral infectivity. Star anise oil, rich in trans-anethole, revealed a high selectivity index of 160 against HSV, whereas among the isolated compounds only β-caryophyllene displayed a high selectivity index of 140. The presence of β-caryophyllene in many essential oils might contribute strongly to their antiviral ability. These results indicate that phenylpropanoids and sesquiterpenes present in essential oils contribute to their antiviral activity against HSV.

  12. High-throughput cell-based compound screen identifies pinosylvin methyl ether and tanshinone IIA as inhibitors of castration-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ketola, Kirsi; Viitala, Miro; Kohonen, Pekka; Fey, Vidal; Culig, Zoran; Kallioniemi, Olli; Iljin, Kristiina

    2016-01-01

    Current treatment options for castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) are limited. In this study, a high-throughput screen of 4910 drugs and drug-like molecules was performed to identify antiproliferative compounds in androgen ablated prostate cancer cells. The effect of compounds on cell viability was compared in androgen ablated LNCaP prostate cancer cells and in LNCaP cells grown in presence of androgens as well as in two non-malignant prostate epithelial cells (RWPE-1 and EP156T). Validation experiments of cancer specific anti-proliferative compounds indicated pinosylvin methyl ether (PSME) and tanshinone IIA as potent inhibitors of androgen ablated LNCaP cell proliferation. PSME is a stilbene compound with no previously described anti-neoplastic activity whereas tanshinone IIA is currently used in cardiovascular disorders and proposed as a cancer drug. To gain insights into growth inhibitory mechanisms in CRPC, genome-wide gene expression analysis was performed in PSME- and tanshinone IIA-exposed cells. Both compounds altered the expression of genes involved in cell cycle and steroid and cholesterol biosynthesis in androgen ablated LNCaP cells. Decrease in androgen signalling was confirmed by reduced expression of androgen receptor and prostate specific antigen in PSME- or tanshinone IIA-exposed cells. Taken together, this systematic screen identified a novel anti-proliferative agent, PSME, for CRPC. Moreover, our screen confirmed tanshinone IIA as well as several other compounds as potential prostate cancer growth inhibitors also in androgen ablated prostate cancer cells. These results provide valuable starting points for preclinical and clinical studies for CRPC treatment. PMID:27891324

  13. A Fluorescence-Based Thermal Shift Assay Identifies Inhibitors of Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase Kinase 4

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, Sankar N.; Luan, Chi-Hao; Mishra, Rama K.; Xu, Li; Scheidt, Karl A.; Anderson, Wayne F.; Bergan, Raymond C.

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second highest cause of cancer death in United States males. If the metastatic movement of PCa cells could be inhibited, then mortality from PCa could be greatly reduced. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4 (MAP2K4) has previously been shown to activate pro-invasion signaling pathways in human PCa. Recognizing that MAP2K4 represents a novel and validated therapeutic target, we sought to develop and characterize an efficient process for the identification of small molecules that target MAP2K4. Using a fluorescence-based thermal shift assay (FTS) assay, we first evaluated an 80 compound library of known kinase inhibitors, thereby identifying 8 hits that thermally stabilized MAP2K4 in a concentration dependent manner. We then developed an in vitro MAP2K4 kinase assay employing the biologically relevant downstream substrates, JNK1 and p38 MAPK, to evaluate kinase inhibitory function. In this manner, we validated the performance of our initial FTS screen. We next applied this approach to a 2000 compound chemically diverse library, identified 7 hits, and confirmed them in the in vitro kinase assay. Finally, by coupling our structure-activity relationship data to MAP2K4's crystal structure, we constructed a model for ligand binding. It predicts binding of our identified inhibitory compounds to the ATP binding pocket. Herein we report the creation of a robust inhibitor-screening platform with the ability to inform the discovery and design of new and potent MAP2K4 inhibitors. PMID:24339940

  14. Phenolic Compounds of Pomegranate Byproducts (Outer Skin, Mesocarp, Divider Membrane) and Their Antioxidant Activities.

    PubMed

    Ambigaipalan, Priyatharini; de Camargo, Adriano Costa; Shahidi, Fereidoon

    2016-08-31

    Pomegranate peel was separated into outer leathery skin (PS), mesocarp (PM), and divider membrane (PD), and its phenolic compounds were extracted as free (F), esterified (E), and insoluble-bound (B) forms for the first time. The total phenolic content followed the order PD > PM > PS. ABTS(•+), DPPH, and hydroxyl radical scavenging activities and metal chelation were evaluated. In addition, pomegranate peel extracts showed inhibitory effects against α-glucosidase activity, lipase activity, and cupric ion-induced LDL-cholesterol oxidation as well as peroxyl and hydroxyl radical-induced DNA scission. Seventy-nine phenolic compounds were identified using HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS(n) mainly in the form of insoluble-bound. Thirty compounds were identified for the first time. Gallic acid was the major phenolic compound in pomegranate peel, whereas kaempferol 3-O-glucoside was the major flavonoid. Moreover, ellagic acid and monogalloyl-hexoside were the major hydrolyzable tannins, whereas the dominant proanthocyanidin was procyanidin dimers. Proanthocyanidins were detected for the first time.

  15. Antibiofilm Activity, Compound Characterization, and Acute Toxicity of Extract from a Novel Bacterial Species of Paenibacillus

    PubMed Central

    Alasil, Saad Musbah; Omar, Rahmat; Yusof, Mohd Yasim

    2014-01-01

    The effectiveness of many antimicrobial agents is currently decreasing; therefore, it is important to search for alternative therapeutics. Our study was carried out to assess the in vitro antibiofilm activity using microtiter plate assay, to characterize the bioactive compounds using Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography-Diode Array Detection and Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and to test the oral acute toxicity on Sprague Dawley rats of extract derived from a novel bacterial species of Paenibacillus strain 139SI. Our results indicate that the crude extract and its three identified compounds exhibit strong antibiofilm activity against a broad range of clinically important pathogens. Three potential compounds were identified including an amino acid antibiotic C8H20N3O4P (MW 253.237), phospholipase A2 inhibitor C21H36O5 (MW 368.512), and an antibacterial agent C14H11N3O2 (MW 253.260). The acute toxicity test indicates that the mortality rate among all rats was low and that the biochemical parameters, hematological profile, and histopathology examination of liver and kidneys showed no significant differences between experimental groups (P > 0.05). Overall, our findings suggest that the extract and its purified compounds derived from novel Paenibacillus sp. are nontoxic exhibiting strong antibiofilm activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens that can be useful towards new therapeutic management of biofilm-associated infections. PMID:24790603

  16. Antifungal activity of schinol and a new biphenyl compound isolated from Schinus terebinthifolius against the pathogenic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to isolate and identify the antifungal compounds from the extracts of Schinus terebinthifolius (Anacardiaceae) against clinical isolates of the pathogenic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. Methods The hexane and dichlomethane fractions from leaves and stems of S. terebinthifolius were fractionated using several chromatography techniques to afford four compounds. Results The compounds isolated from S. terebinthifolius were identified as schinol (1), a new biphenyl compound, namely, 4'-ethyl-4-methyl-2,2',6,6'-tetrahydroxy[1,1'-biphenyl]-4,4'-dicarboxylate (2), quercetin (3), and kaempferol (4). Compounds 1 and 2 were active against different strains of P. brasiliensis, showing a minimal inhibitory concentration value against the isolate Pb B339 of 15.6 μg/ml. The isolate Pb 1578 was more sensitive to compound 1 with a MIC value of 7.5 μg/ml. Schinol presented synergistic effect only when combined with itraconazole. The compounds isolated from S. terebinthifolius were not able to inhibit cell wall synthesis or assembly using the sorbitol assay. Conclusion This work reveals for the first time the occurrence of compound 2 and discloses activity of compounds 1 and 2 against several clinical isolates of P. brasiliensis. These results justify further studies to clarify the mechanisms of action of these compounds. PMID:20939907

  17. Estrogenic and dioxin-like compounds in sediment from Zierikzee harbour identified with CALUX assay-directed fractionation combined with one and two dimensional gas chromatography analyses.

    PubMed

    Houtman, Corine J; Booij, Petra; Jover, Eric; Pascual del Rio, David; Swart, Kees; van Velzen, Martin; Vreuls, Rene; Legler, Juliette; Brouwer, Abraham; Lamoree, Marja H

    2006-12-01

    The identity of compounds responsible for estrogenic and dioxin-like activities in sediment from the harbour of the small town Zierikzee in Zeeland, The Netherlands, was investigated using a bioassay directed fractionation approach with the in vitro estrogen and dioxin responsive reporter gene assays ER- and DR-CALUX. For identification of compounds exhibiting activity in the bioassays, either one or two-dimensional GC in combination with quadrupole (MSD), ion trap (ITD) or time-of-flight mass spectrometric detection (ToF-MS) was used, depending on the biological and chemical characteristics and the complexity of the fractions. The natural estrogenic hormone 17-beta-estradiol and its metabolite estrone were identified with GC-ITD as the main contributors to the estrogenic activity. After successive rounds of fractionation, the dioxin-like activity could be explained by the presence of various polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons identified with GC-MSD and two-dimensional comprehensive GC x GC-ToF-MS. Some estrogenic activity of a relatively non-polar nature remained unidentified.

  18. Flavonoids, Antioxidant Activity and Aroma Compounds Analysis from Different Kinds of Tartary Buckwheat Tea

    PubMed Central

    Peng, L. X.; Zou, L.; Wang, J. B.; Zhao, J. L.; Xiang, D. B.; Zhao, G.

    2015-01-01

    The rutin, quercetin concentrations, antioxidant activity, and aroma compounds in different commercial tartary buckwheat tea were analyzed in our study. Results revealed that the materials and the processing protocol affected the chemical composition and activity of tartary buckwheat tea. Rutin and quercetin concentrations, antioxidant activity were significantly different in various kinds of tartary buckwheat tea, where the whole bran tea and the whole plant tea had the lower rutin, but higher quercetin concentrations and higher antioxidant activity. The whole embryo tea had the converse results. There was strong correlation between quercetin concentration and antioxidant activity (r>0.98, P<0.05). Meanwhile, Twenty eight different aroma compounds in tartary buckwheat tea were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Those compounds were mainly composed of pyrazine, aldehydes, fatty acids and ketones. The main type of aroma compounds in different tartary buckwheat tea were similar, but their relative contents were different. The implications to the quality control of buckwheat tea were extensively discussed. PMID:26997692

  19. A Substrate Pharmacophore for the Human Organic Cation/Carnitine Transporter Identifies Compounds Associated with Rhabdomyolysis

    PubMed Central

    Ekins, Sean; Diao, Lei; Polli, James E.

    2012-01-01

    The human Organic Cation/Carnitine Transporter (hOCTN2), is a high affinity cation/carnitine transporter expressed widely in human tissues and is physiologically important for the homeostasis of L-carnitine. The objective of this study was to elucidate the substrate requirements of this transporter via computational modelling based on published in vitro data. Nine published substrates of hOCTN2 were used to create a common features pharmacophore that was validated by mapping other known OCTN2 substrates. The pharmacophore was used to search a drug database and retrieved molecules that were then used as search queries in PubMed for instances of a side effect (rhabdomyolysis) associated with interference with L-carnitine transport. The substrate pharmacophore was comprised of two hydrogen bond acceptors, a positive ionizable feature and ten excluded volumes. The substrate pharmacophore also mapped 6 out of 7 known substrate molecules used as a test set. After searching a database of ~800 known drugs, thirty drugs were predicted to map to the substrate pharmacophore with L-carnitine shape restriction. At least 16 of these molecules had case reports documenting an association with rhabdomyolysis and represent a set for prioritizing for future testing as OCTN2 substrates or inhibitors. This computational OCTN2 substrate pharmacophore derived from published data partially overlaps a previous OCTN2 inhibitor pharmacophore and is also able to select compounds that demonstrate rhabdomyolysis, further confirming the possible linkage between this side effect and hOCTN2. PMID:22339151

  20. Structure-activity relationships for a series of quinoline-based compounds active against replicating and nonreplicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Lilienkampf, Annamaria; Mao, Jialin; Wan, Baojie; Wang, Yuehong; Franzblau, Scott G; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2009-04-09

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains as a global pandemic that is aggravated by a lack of health care, the spread of HIV, and the emergence of multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) and extensively drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB) strains. New anti-TB drugs are urgently required to shorten the long 6-12 month treatment regimen and to battle drug-resistant Mtb strains. We have identified several potent quinoline-based anti-TB compounds, bearing an isoxazole containing side-chain. The most potent compounds, 7g and 13, exhibited submicromolar activity against the replicating bacteria (R-TB), with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 0.77 and 0.95 microM, respectively. In general, these compounds also had micromolar activity against the nonreplicating persistent bacteria (NRP-TB) and did not show toxicity on Vero cells up to 128 microM concentration. Compounds 7g and 13 were shown to retain their anti-TB activity against rifampin, isoniazid, and streptomycin resistant Mtb strains. The results suggest that quinoline-isoxazole-based anti-TB compounds are promising leads for new TB drug development.

  1. How to Identify Success Among Networks That Promote Active Living

    PubMed Central

    Litt, Jill; Varda, Danielle; Reed, Hannah; Retrum, Jessica; Tabak, Rachel; Gustat, Jeanette; Tompkins, Nancy O’Hara

    2017-01-01

    Objectives We evaluated organization- and network-level factors that influence organizations’ perceived success. This is important for managing interorganizational networks, which can mobilize communities to address complex health issues such as physical activity, and for achieving change. Methods In 2011, we used structured interview and network survey data from 22 states in the United States to estimate multilevel random-intercept models to understand organization- and network-level factors that explain perceived network success. Results A total of 53 of 59 “whole networks” met the criteria for inclusion in the analysis (89.8%). Coordinators identified 559 organizations, with 3 to 12 organizations from each network taking the online survey (response rate: 69.7%; range: 33%–100%). Occupying a leadership position (P < .01), the amount of time with the network (P < .05), and support from community leaders (P < .05) emerged as correlates of perceived success. Conclusions Organizations’ perceptions of success can influence decisions about continuing involvement and investment in networks designed to promote environment and policy change for active living. Understanding these factors can help leaders manage complex networks that involve diverse memberships, varied interests, and competing community-level priorities. PMID:26378863

  2. Novel Antiproliferative Chimeric Compounds with Marked Histone Deacetylase Inhibitory Activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Given our interest in finding potential antitumor agents and in view of the multifactorial mechanistic nature of cancer, in the present work, taking advantage of the multifunctional ligands approach, new chimeric molecules were designed and synthesized by combining in single chemical entities structural features of SAHA, targeting histone deacetylases (HDACs), with substituted stilbene or terphenyl derivatives previously obtained by us and endowed with antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic activity. The new chimeric derivatives were characterized with respect to their cytotoxic activity and their effects on cell cycle progression on different tumor cell lines, as well as their HDACs inhibition. Among the other, trans-6 showed the most interesting biological profile, as it exhibited a strong pro-apoptotic activity in tumor cell lines in comparison with both of its parent compounds and a marked HDAC inhibition. PMID:25221651

  3. Quantitative high-throughput screening: A titration-based approach that efficiently identifies biological activities in large chemical libraries

    PubMed Central

    Inglese, James; Auld, Douglas S.; Jadhav, Ajit; Johnson, Ronald L.; Simeonov, Anton; Yasgar, Adam; Zheng, Wei; Austin, Christopher P.

    2006-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) of chemical compounds to identify modulators of molecular targets is a mainstay of pharmaceutical development. Increasingly, HTS is being used to identify chemical probes of gene, pathway, and cell functions, with the ultimate goal of comprehensively delineating relationships between chemical structures and biological activities. Achieving this goal will require methodologies that efficiently generate pharmacological data from the primary screen and reliably profile the range of biological activities associated with large chemical libraries. Traditional HTS, which tests compounds at a single concentration, is not suited to this task, because HTS is burdened by frequent false positives and false negatives and requires extensive follow-up testing. We have developed a paradigm, quantitative HTS (qHTS), tested with the enzyme pyruvate kinase, to generate concentration–response curves for >60,000 compounds in a single experiment. We show that this method is precise, refractory to variations in sample preparation, and identifies compounds with a wide range of activities. Concentration–response curves were classified to rapidly identify pyruvate kinase activators and inhibitors with a variety of potencies and efficacies and elucidate structure–activity relationships directly from the primary screen. Comparison of qHTS with traditional single-concentration HTS revealed a high prevalence of false negatives in the single-point screen. This study demonstrates the feasibility of qHTS for accurately profiling every compound in large chemical libraries (>105 compounds). qHTS produces rich data sets that can be immediately mined for reliable biological activities, thereby providing a platform for chemical genomics and accelerating the identification of leads for drug discovery. PMID:16864780

  4. Endophytic fungal compounds active against Cryptococcus neoformans and C. gattii.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Cristiane B; de Oliveira, Djalma M; Hughes, Alice Fs; Kohlhoff, Markus; LA Vieira, Mariana; Martins Vaz, Aline B; Ferreira, Mariana C; Carvalho, Camila R; Rosa, Luiz H; Rosa, Carlos A; Alves, Tânia Ma; Zani, Carlos L; Johann, Susana; Cota, Betania B

    2015-07-01

    Infections with Cryptococcus are invasive mycoses associated with significant morbidity and mortality, mainly in immunosuppressed patients. Several drugs have been introduced to combat these opportunistic infections. However, resistance of this organism to antifungal drugs has increased, causing difficulties in the treatment. The goal of this work was to evaluate the antifungal activity of ethanol extracts from endophytic fungi isolated from plants collected from different Brazilian ecosystems and to perform the fractionation of the most promising extract. Four-hundred fungal extracts were investigated by microdilution broth assays against Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii at a concentration of 500 μg ml(-1). Among them, the extract of Mycosphaerella sp. UFMGCB 2032, an endophytic fungus isolated from the plant Eugenia bimarginata DC. (Myrtaceae) exhibited outstanding antifungal activity against C. neoformans and C. gattii, with MIC values of 31.2 μg ml(-1) and 7.8 μg ml(-1), respectively. The fractionation of this extract using liquid-liquid partitioning and semi-preparative HPLC afforded two eicosanoic acids with antifungal activity, compound 1, (2S,3R,4R)-(E)-2-amino-3,4-dihydroxy-2-(hydroxymethyl)-14-oxoeicos-6,12-dienoic acid with MIC values ranging from 1.3-2.50 μg ml(-1), and compound 2, known as myriocin, with MIC values of 0.5 μg ml(-1) against C. neoformans and C. gattii. These compounds are reported for the first time in the Mycosphaerella genus.

  5. Laboratory Infrared Spectroscopy to Identify New Compounds on Icy Moon Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wray, James J.; Young, Cindy L.; Hand, Kevin P.; Poston, Michael J.; Carlson, Robert W.; Clark, Roger N.; Spencer, John R.; Jennings, Donald E.

    2014-11-01

    We are exploring the value of mid-infrared spectroscopy for identifying non-H2O constituents of icy moon surfaces. Recently we reported evidence for a new emissivity feature identified on Iapetus using Cassini’s Composite Infrared Spectrometer [1]. This 11.7 μm feature is consistent with emissivity minima (transparency features) of very fine-grained silicates. Its position and shape may be diagnostic of silicate type, but most lab data at these wavelengths have been acquired using coarser grains and/or at Earth surface pressures and temperatures. Infrared spectra can change substantially under low-temperature, vacuum conditions [e.g., 2,3].We prepared sieved (<0.4 mm) and very fine-grained (few μm) powders of six different silicates and measured their VNIR (0.35-2.5 μm) reflectance spectra under ambient air, and mid-IR (1.2-20 μm) spectra in a purged N2 glovebox. All silicates exhibited mid-IR transparency features (and loss of other features) in micronized form that were not observed for the coarser grain sizes. Muscovite, a phyllosilicate mineral possibly similar to those tentatively identified on Europa [4], provided the closest match to Iapetus in the mid-IR--although clear VNIR features of muscovite have not been identified on Iapetus [5]--and therefore we measured muscovite across the same wavelength range under Iapetus-like conditions (T=125 K, P<3x10^-8 torr). We will report on our ongoing analysis and plans for additional future measurements in JPL’s Icy Worlds Simulation Lab. [1] Young, C.L., et al. (2014), Workshop on the Habitability of Icy Worlds, Abstract #4038.[2] Logan, L.M., et al. (1973), J. Geophys. Res., 78(23), 4983-5003.[3] Donaldson Hanna, K.L., et al. (2012), J. Geophys. Res., 117, E00H05.[4] Shirley, J.H., et al. (2013), AGU Fall Meeting, Abstract #P54A-07.[5] Clark, R.N., et al. (2012), Icarus, 218, 831-860.

  6. Laccase Catalyzed Synthesis of Iodinated Phenolic Compounds with Antifungal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ihssen, Julian; Schubert, Mark; Thöny-Meyer, Linda; Richter, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Iodine is a well known antimicrobial compound. Laccase, an oxidoreductase which couples the one electron oxidation of diverse phenolic and non-phenolic substrates to the reduction of oxygen to water, is capable of oxidizing unreactive iodide to reactive iodine. We have shown previously that laccase-iodide treatment of spruce wood results in a wash-out resistant antimicrobial surface. In this study, we investigated whether phenolic compounds such as vanillin, which resembles sub-structures of softwood lignin, can be directly iodinated by reacting with laccase and iodide, resulting in compounds with antifungal activity. HPLC-MS analysis showed that vanillin was converted to iodovanillin by laccase catalysis at an excess of potassium iodide. No conversion of vanillin occurred in the absence of enzyme. The addition of redox mediators in catalytic concentrations increased the rate of iodide oxidation ten-fold and the yield of iodovanillin by 50%. Iodinated phenolic products were also detected when o-vanillin, ethyl vanillin, acetovanillone and methyl vanillate were incubated with laccase and iodide. At an increased educt concentration of 0.1 M an almost one to one molar ratio of iodide to vanillin could be used without compromising conversion rate, and the insoluble iodovanillin product could be recovered by simple centrifugation. The novel enzymatic synthesis procedure fulfills key criteria of green chemistry. Biocatalytically produced iodovanillin and iodo-ethyl vanillin had significant growth inhibitory effects on several wood degrading fungal species. For Trametes versicolor, a species causing white rot of wood, almost complete growth inhibition and a partial biocidal effect was observed on agar plates. Enzymatic tests indicated that the iodinated compounds acted as enzyme responsive, antimicrobial materials. PMID:24594755

  7. Large-scale assessment of activity landscape feature probabilities of bioactive compounds.

    PubMed

    Kayastha, Shilva; Dimova, Dilyana; Iyer, Preeti; Vogt, Martin; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2014-02-24

    Activity landscape representations integrate pairwise compound similarity and potency relationships and provide direct access to characteristic structure-activity relationship features in compound data sets. Because pairwise compound comparisons provide the foundation of activity landscape design, the assessment of specific landscape features such as activity cliffs has generally been confined to the level of compound pairs. A conditional probability-based approach has been applied herein to assign most probable activity landscape features to individual compounds. For example, for a given data set compound, it was determined if it would preferentially engage in the formation of activity cliffs or other landscape features. In a large-scale effort, we have determined conditional activity landscape feature probabilities for more than 160,000 compounds with well-defined activity annotations contained in 427 different target-based data sets. These landscape feature probabilities provide a detailed view of how different activity landscape features are distributed over currently available bioactive compounds.

  8. Catalytic activities of zeolite compounds for decomposing aqueous ozone.

    PubMed

    Kusuda, Ai; Kitayama, Mikito; Ohta, Yoshio

    2013-12-01

    The advanced oxidation process (AOP), chemical oxidation using aqueous ozone in the presence of appropriate catalysts to generate highly reactive oxygen species, offers an attractive option for removing poorly biodegradable pollutants. Using the commercial zeolite powders with various Si/Al ratios and crystal structures, their catalytic activities for decomposing aqueous ozone were evaluated by continuously flowing ozone to water containing the zeolite powders. The hydrophilic zeolites (low Si/Al ratio) with alkali cations in the crystal structures were found to possess high catalytic activity for decomposing aqueous ozone. The hydrophobic zeolite compounds (high Si/Al ratio) were found to absorb ozone very well, but to have no catalytic activity for decomposing aqueous ozone. Their catalytic activities were also evaluated by using the fixed bed column method. When alkali cations were removed by acid rinsing or substituted by alkali-earth cations, the catalytic activities was significantly deteriorated. These results suggest that the metal cations on the crystal surface of the hydrophilic zeolite would play a key role for catalytic activity for decomposing aqueous ozone.

  9. Identification of major phenolic compounds of Chinese water chestnut and their antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    You, Yanli; Duan, Xuewu; Wei, Xiaoyi; Su, Xinguo; Zhao, Mouming; Sun, Jian; Ruenroengklin, Neungnapa; Jiang, Yueming

    2007-04-25

    Chinese water chestnut (CWC) is one of the most popular foods among Asian people due to its special taste and medical function. Experiments were conducted to test the antioxidant activity and then determine the major phenolic compound components present in CWC. CWC phenolic extract strongly inhibited linoleic acid oxidation and exhibited a dose-dependent free-radical scavenging activity against alpha,alpha-diphenyl-beta-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals, superoxide anions and hydroxyl radicals, which was superior to ascorbic acid and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), two commercial used antioxidants. Furthermore, the CWC extract was found to have a relatively higher reducing power, compared with BHT. The major phenolic compounds present in CWC tissues were extracted, purified and identified by high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC) as (-)-gallocatechin gallate, (-)-epicatechin gallate and (+)-catechin gallate. This study suggests that CWC tissues exhibit great potential for antioxidant activity and may be useful for their nutritional and medicinal functions.

  10. Evaluation of leishmanicidal and trypanocidal activities of phenolic compounds from Calea uniflora Less.

    PubMed

    Lima, Tamires C; Souza, Rafaela J; Santos, Alan D C; Moraes, Milene H; Biondo, Nicole E; Barison, Andersson; Steindel, Mário; Biavatti, Maique W

    2016-01-01

    The phytochemical study of Calea uniflora led to the isolation of nine phenolic compounds identified as noreugenin (1), ethyl caffeate (2), a mixture of butein (3) + orobol (4), α-hydroxy-butein (5), caffeic acid (6), butein 4'-O-glucopyranosyl (7), quercetin 3-O-glucopyranosyl (8) and 3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid (9). The chemical identity of the isolates was established on the basis of NMR and physical data. The chemical shifts of 5 and 7 have been reassigned and all the isolates were tested against Leishmania amazonensis and Trypanosoma cruzi amastigotes. None of the metabolites showed promising leishmanicidal activity. However, 2 and the mixture of 3 and 4 demonstrated interesting trypanocidal effect with IC50 values of 18.27 and 26.53 μM, respectively. Besides, these compounds did not present cytotoxic effect towards THP-1 cells, and compound 2 was 3.5-fold more selective than the mixture of 3+4.

  11. Protein Folding Activity of the Ribosome (PFAR) –– A Target for Antiprion Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Debapriya; Sanyal, Suparna

    2014-01-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative diseases affecting mammals. Prions are misfolded amyloid aggregates of the prion protein (PrP), which form when the alpha helical, soluble form of PrP converts to an aggregation-prone, beta sheet form. Thus, prions originate as protein folding problems. The discovery of yeast prion(s) and the development of a red-/white-colony based assay facilitated safe and high-throughput screening of antiprion compounds. With this assay three antiprion compounds; 6-aminophenanthridine (6AP), guanabenz acetate (GA), and imiquimod (IQ) have been identified. Biochemical and genetic studies reveal that these compounds target ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and inhibit specifically the protein folding activity of the ribosome (PFAR). The domain V of the 23S/25S/28S rRNA of the large ribosomal subunit constitutes the active site for PFAR. 6AP and GA inhibit PFAR by competition with the protein substrates for the common binding sites on the domain V rRNA. PFAR inhibition by these antiprion compounds opens up new possibilities for understanding prion formation, propagation and the role of the ribosome therein. In this review, we summarize and analyze the correlation between PFAR and prion processes using the antiprion compounds as tools. PMID:25341659

  12. Anti-inflammatory activity of different agave plants and the compound cantalasaponin-1.

    PubMed

    Monterrosas-Brisson, Nayeli; Ocampo, Martha L Arenas; Jiménez-Ferrer, Enrique; Jiménez-Aparicio, Antonio R; Zamilpa, Alejandro; Gonzalez-Cortazar, Manases; Tortoriello, Jaime; Herrera-Ruiz, Maribel

    2013-07-10

    Species of the agave genus, such as Agave tequilana, Agave angustifolia and Agave americana are used in Mexican traditional medicine to treat inflammation-associated conditions. These plants' leaves contain saponin compounds which show anti-inflammatory properties in different models. The goal of this investigation was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory capacity of these plants, identify which is the most active, and isolate the active compound by a bio-directed fractionation using the ear edema induced in mice with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) technique. A dose of 6 mg/ear of acetone extract from the three agave species induced anti-inflammatory effects, however, the one from A. americana proved to be the most active. Different fractions of this species showed biological activity. Finally the F5 fraction at 2.0 mg/ear induced an inhibition of 85.6%. We identified one compound in this fraction as (25R)-5α-spirostan-3β,6α,23α-triol-3,6-di-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (cantalasaponin-1) through 1H- and 13C-NMR spectral analysis and two dimensional experiments like DEPT NMR, COSY, HSQC and HMBC. This steroidal glycoside showed a dose dependent effect of up to 90% of ear edema inhibition at the highest dose of 1.5 mg/ear.

  13. Bioactive compounds and antioxidant activity of wolfberry infusion

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yujing; Rukeya, Japaer; Tao, Wenyang; Sun, Peilong; Ye, Xingqian

    2017-01-01

    An infusion of the wolfberry (Lycium barbarum L.) is a traditional Asian herbal tea. This is the most commonly consumed form of dried wolfberry worldwide, yet little scientific information on wolfberry infusions is available. We investigated the effects of making infusions with hot water on the color, the content of bioactive compounds (polysaccharides, polyphenols, flavonoids and carotenoids) and the antioxidant ability of wolfberry infusions. The contents of bioactive compounds and the antioxidant activity of a wolfberry infusion increased with increased infusion temperature and time. Total polysaccharides content (TPOC), total polyphenols (TPC), total flavonoids (TFC) and total carotenoids contents (TCC) were important for determining the antioxidant capacity of wolfberry infusions with the contribution to antioxidant activity in the order TPC > TFC > TCC > TPOC. Hierarchical cluster analysis indicated preparation conditions of 100 °C for 1~3 h, 90 °C for 2~3 h and 80 °C for 2.5~3 h were equivalent as regards the value of TPC, TPOC, TFC, TCC, FRAP, DPPH and ABTS. The results of this study suggest the length of time of making a wolfberry infusion in actual real life practice is too short and different dietary habits associated with the intake of wolfberry infusion might provide the same bioactive nutrients. PMID:28102295

  14. Bioactive compounds and antioxidant activity of wolfberry infusion.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yujing; Rukeya, Japaer; Tao, Wenyang; Sun, Peilong; Ye, Xingqian

    2017-01-19

    An infusion of the wolfberry (Lycium barbarum L.) is a traditional Asian herbal tea. This is the most commonly consumed form of dried wolfberry worldwide, yet little scientific information on wolfberry infusions is available. We investigated the effects of making infusions with hot water on the color, the content of bioactive compounds (polysaccharides, polyphenols, flavonoids and carotenoids) and the antioxidant ability of wolfberry infusions. The contents of bioactive compounds and the antioxidant activity of a wolfberry infusion increased with increased infusion temperature and time. Total polysaccharides content (TPOC), total polyphenols (TPC), total flavonoids (TFC) and total carotenoids contents (TCC) were important for determining the antioxidant capacity of wolfberry infusions with the contribution to antioxidant activity in the order TPC > TFC > TCC > TPOC. Hierarchical cluster analysis indicated preparation conditions of 100 °C for 1~3 h, 90 °C for 2~3 h and 80 °C for 2.5~3 h were equivalent as regards the value of TPC, TPOC, TFC, TCC, FRAP, DPPH and ABTS. The results of this study suggest the length of time of making a wolfberry infusion in actual real life practice is too short and different dietary habits associated with the intake of wolfberry infusion might provide the same bioactive nutrients.

  15. Influence of plasma-activated compounds on melanogenesis and tyrosinase activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Anser; Ashraf, Zaman; Kumar, Naresh; Rafiq, Muhammad; Jabeen, Farukh; Park, Ji Hoon; Choi, Ki Hong; Lee, Seunghyun; Seo, Sung-Yum; Choi, Eun Ha; Attri, Pankaj

    2016-03-01

    Many organic chemists around the world synthesize medicinal compounds or extract multiple compounds from plants in order to increase the activity and quality of medicines. In this work, we synthesized new eugenol derivatives (ED) and then treated them with an N2 feeding gas atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) to increase their utility. We studied the tyrosinase-inhibition activity (activity test) and structural changes (circular dichroism) of tyrosinase with ED and plasma activated eugenol derivatives (PAED) in a cell-free environment. Later, we used docking studies to determine the possible interaction sites of ED and PAED compounds with tyrosinase enzyme. Moreover, we studied the possible effect of ED and PAED on melanin synthesis and its mechanism in melanoma (B16F10) cells. Additionally, we investigated the structural changes that occurred in activated ED after plasma treatment using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Hence, this study provides a new perspective on PAED for the field of plasma medicine.

  16. Influence of plasma-activated compounds on melanogenesis and tyrosinase activity.

    PubMed

    Ali, Anser; Ashraf, Zaman; Kumar, Naresh; Rafiq, Muhammad; Jabeen, Farukh; Park, Ji Hoon; Choi, Ki Hong; Lee, SeungHyun; Seo, Sung-Yum; Choi, Eun Ha; Attri, Pankaj

    2016-03-02

    Many organic chemists around the world synthesize medicinal compounds or extract multiple compounds from plants in order to increase the activity and quality of medicines. In this work, we synthesized new eugenol derivatives (ED) and then treated them with an N2 feeding gas atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) to increase their utility. We studied the tyrosinase-inhibition activity (activity test) and structural changes (circular dichroism) of tyrosinase with ED and plasma activated eugenol derivatives (PAED) in a cell-free environment. Later, we used docking studies to determine the possible interaction sites of ED and PAED compounds with tyrosinase enzyme. Moreover, we studied the possible effect of ED and PAED on melanin synthesis and its mechanism in melanoma (B16F10) cells. Additionally, we investigated the structural changes that occurred in activated ED after plasma treatment using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Hence, this study provides a new perspective on PAED for the field of plasma medicine.

  17. Influence of plasma-activated compounds on melanogenesis and tyrosinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Anser; Ashraf, Zaman; Kumar, Naresh; Rafiq, Muhammad; Jabeen, Farukh; Park, Ji Hoon; Choi, Ki Hong; Lee, SeungHyun; Seo, Sung-Yum; Choi, Eun Ha; Attri, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Many organic chemists around the world synthesize medicinal compounds or extract multiple compounds from plants in order to increase the activity and quality of medicines. In this work, we synthesized new eugenol derivatives (ED) and then treated them with an N2 feeding gas atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) to increase their utility. We studied the tyrosinase-inhibition activity (activity test) and structural changes (circular dichroism) of tyrosinase with ED and plasma activated eugenol derivatives (PAED) in a cell-free environment. Later, we used docking studies to determine the possible interaction sites of ED and PAED compounds with tyrosinase enzyme. Moreover, we studied the possible effect of ED and PAED on melanin synthesis and its mechanism in melanoma (B16F10) cells. Additionally, we investigated the structural changes that occurred in activated ED after plasma treatment using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Hence, this study provides a new perspective on PAED for the field of plasma medicine. PMID:26931617

  18. A novel dicyclodextrinyl ditelluride compound with antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Ren, X; Xue, Y; Zhang, K; Liu, J; Luo, G; Zheng, J; Mu, Y; Shen, J

    2001-11-02

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) primarily arise from products of normal metabolic activities and are thought to be the etiology of many diseases. A novel dicyclodextrinyl ditelluride (2-TeCD) compound was designed to be a functional mimic of the glutathione peroxidase that normally removes ROS. 2-TeCD exhibited highly catalytic efficiency and good water solubility. Antioxidant activity was studied by using ferrous sulfate/ascorbate-induced mitochondria damage model system. 2-TeCD protected the mitochondria against oxidative damage in a dose-dependent manner and exhibited also great antioxidant ability in comparison with 2-phenyl-1,2-benziososelenazol-3(2H)-one. The mimic may result in better clinical therapies for the treatment of ROS-mediated diseases.

  19. The Malaria Parasite's Lactate Transporter PfFNT Is the Target of Antiplasmodial Compounds Identified in Whole Cell Phenotypic Screens

    PubMed Central

    Hapuarachchi, Sanduni V.; McConville, Malcolm J.; Martin, Rowena E.; Lehane, Adele M.

    2017-01-01

    In this study the ‘Malaria Box’ chemical library comprising 400 compounds with antiplasmodial activity was screened for compounds that perturb the internal pH of the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. Fifteen compounds induced an acidification of the parasite cytosol. Two of these did so by inhibiting the parasite’s formate nitrite transporter (PfFNT), which mediates the H+-coupled efflux from the parasite of lactate generated by glycolysis. Both compounds were shown to inhibit lactate transport across the parasite plasma membrane, and the transport of lactate by PfFNT expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. PfFNT inhibition caused accumulation of lactate in parasitised erythrocytes, and swelling of both the parasite and parasitised erythrocyte. Long-term exposure of parasites to one of the inhibitors gave rise to resistant parasites with a mutant form of PfFNT that showed reduced inhibitor sensitivity. This study provides the first evidence that PfFNT is a druggable antimalarial target. PMID:28178359

  20. Tracking heavy water (D2O) incorporation for identifying and sorting active microbial cells.

    PubMed

    Berry, David; Mader, Esther; Lee, Tae Kwon; Woebken, Dagmar; Wang, Yun; Zhu, Di; Palatinszky, Marton; Schintlmeister, Arno; Schmid, Markus C; Hanson, Buck T; Shterzer, Naama; Mizrahi, Itzhak; Rauch, Isabella; Decker, Thomas; Bocklitz, Thomas; Popp, Jürgen; Gibson, Christopher M; Fowler, Patrick W; Huang, Wei E; Wagner, Michael

    2015-01-13

    Microbial communities are essential to the function of virtually all ecosystems and eukaryotes, including humans. However, it is still a major challenge to identify microbial cells active under natural conditions in complex systems. In this study, we developed a new method to identify and sort active microbes on the single-cell level in complex samples using stable isotope probing with heavy water (D2O) combined with Raman microspectroscopy. Incorporation of D2O-derived D into the biomass of autotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria and archaea could be unambiguously detected via C-D signature peaks in single-cell Raman spectra, and the obtained labeling pattern was confirmed by nanoscale-resolution secondary ion MS. In fast-growing Escherichia coli cells, label detection was already possible after 20 min. For functional analyses of microbial communities, the detection of D incorporation from D2O in individual microbial cells via Raman microspectroscopy can be directly combined with FISH for the identification of active microbes. Applying this approach to mouse cecal microbiota revealed that the host-compound foragers Akkermansia muciniphila and Bacteroides acidifaciens exhibited distinctive response patterns to amendments of mucin and sugars. By Raman-based cell sorting of active (deuterated) cells with optical tweezers and subsequent multiple displacement amplification and DNA sequencing, novel cecal microbes stimulated by mucin and/or glucosamine were identified, demonstrating the potential of the nondestructive D2O-Raman approach for targeted sorting of microbial cells with defined functional properties for single-cell genomics.

  1. Compounds Released from Biomass Deconstruction: Understanding Their Effect on Cellulose Enzyme Hydrolysis and Their Biological Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djioleu, Angele Mezindjou

    The effect of compounds produced during biomass pretreatment on cellulolytic enzyme was investigated. Liquid prehydrolyzates were prepared by pretreating switchgrass using 24 combinations of temperature, time, and sulfuric acid concentration based on a full factorial design. Temperature was varied from 140°C to 180°C; time ranged from 10 to 40 min; and the sulfuric acid concentrations were 0.5% or 1% (v/v). Identified products in the prehydrolyzates included xylose, glucose, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), furfural, acetic acid, formic acid, and phenolic compounds at concentration ranging from 0 to 21.4 g/L. Pretreatment conditions significantly affected the concentrations of compounds detected in prehydrolyzates. When assayed in the presence of switchgrass prehydrolyzates against model substrates, activities of cellulase, betaglucosidase, and exoglucanase, were significantly reduced by at least 16%, 31.8%, and 57.8%, respectively, as compared to the control. A strong positive correlation between inhibition of betaglucosidase and concentration of glucose, acetic acid, and furans in prehydrolyzate was established. Exoglucanase inhibition correlated with the presence of phenolic compounds and acetic acid. The prehydrolyzate, prepared at 160°C, 30 min, and 1% acid, was fractionated by centrifugal partition chromatography (CPC) into six fractions; the inhibition effect of these fractions on betaglucosidase and exoglucanase was determined. The initial hydrolysis rate of cellobiose by betaglucosidase was significantly reduced by the CPC sugar-rich fraction; however, exoglucanase was deactivated by the CPC phenolic-rich fraction. Finally, biological activities of water-extracted compounds from sweetgum bark and their effect on cellulase was investigated. It was determined that 12% of solid content of the bark extract could be accounted by phenolic compounds with gallic acid identified as the most concentrated phytochemical. Sweetgum bark extract inhibited Staphylococcus

  2. Systematic Repurposing Screening in Xenograft Models Identifies Approved Drugs with Novel Anti-Cancer Activity

    PubMed Central

    Roix, Jeffrey J.; Harrison, S. D.; Rainbolt, Elizabeth A.; Meshaw, Kathryn R.; McMurry, Avery S.; Cheung, Peter; Saha, Saurabh

    2014-01-01

    Approved drugs target approximately 400 different mechanisms of action, of which as few as 60 are currently used as anti-cancer therapies. Given that on average it takes 10–15 years for a new cancer therapeutic to be approved, and the recent success of drug repurposing for agents such as thalidomide, we hypothesized that effective, safe cancer treatments may be found by testing approved drugs in new therapeutic settings. Here, we report in-vivo testing of a broad compound collection in cancer xenograft models. Using 182 compounds that target 125 unique target mechanisms, we identified 3 drugs that displayed reproducible activity in combination with the chemotherapeutic temozolomide. Candidate drugs appear effective at dose equivalents that exceed current prescription levels, suggesting that additional pre-clinical efforts will be needed before these drugs can be tested for efficacy in clinical trials. In total, we suggest drug repurposing is a relatively resource-intensive method that can identify approved medicines with a narrow margin of anti-cancer activity. PMID:25093583

  3. Prediction of cloud condensation nuclei activity for organic compounds using functional group contribution methods

    DOE PAGES

    Petters, M. D.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Ziemann, P. J.

    2016-01-19

    A wealth of recent laboratory and field experiments demonstrate that organic aerosol composition evolves with time in the atmosphere, leading to changes in the influence of the organic fraction to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectra. There is a need for tools that can realistically represent the evolution of CCN activity to better predict indirect effects of organic aerosol on clouds and climate. This work describes a model to predict the CCN activity of organic compounds from functional group composition. Following previous methods in the literature, we test the ability of semi-empirical group contribution methods in Köhler theory to predict themore » effective hygroscopicity parameter, kappa. However, in our approach we also account for liquid–liquid phase boundaries to simulate phase-limited activation behavior. Model evaluation against a selected database of published laboratory measurements demonstrates that kappa can be predicted within a factor of 2. Simulation of homologous series is used to identify the relative effectiveness of different functional groups in increasing the CCN activity of weakly functionalized organic compounds. Hydroxyl, carboxyl, aldehyde, hydroperoxide, carbonyl, and ether moieties promote CCN activity while methylene and nitrate moieties inhibit CCN activity. The model can be incorporated into scale-bridging test beds such as the Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A) to evaluate the evolution of kappa for a complex mix of organic compounds and to develop suitable parameterizations of CCN evolution for larger-scale models.« less

  4. Prediction of cloud condensation nuclei activity for organic compounds using functional group contribution methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petters, M. D.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Ziemann, P. J.

    2016-01-01

    A wealth of recent laboratory and field experiments demonstrate that organic aerosol composition evolves with time in the atmosphere, leading to changes in the influence of the organic fraction to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectra. There is a need for tools that can realistically represent the evolution of CCN activity to better predict indirect effects of organic aerosol on clouds and climate. This work describes a model to predict the CCN activity of organic compounds from functional group composition. Following previous methods in the literature, we test the ability of semi-empirical group contribution methods in Köhler theory to predict the effective hygroscopicity parameter, kappa. However, in our approach we also account for liquid-liquid phase boundaries to simulate phase-limited activation behavior. Model evaluation against a selected database of published laboratory measurements demonstrates that kappa can be predicted within a factor of 2. Simulation of homologous series is used to identify the relative effectiveness of different functional groups in increasing the CCN activity of weakly functionalized organic compounds. Hydroxyl, carboxyl, aldehyde, hydroperoxide, carbonyl, and ether moieties promote CCN activity while methylene and nitrate moieties inhibit CCN activity. The model can be incorporated into scale-bridging test beds such as the Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A) to evaluate the evolution of kappa for a complex mix of organic compounds and to develop suitable parameterizations of CCN evolution for larger-scale models.

  5. Identification of phenolic compounds by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in seventeen species of wild mushrooms in Central Mexico and determination of their antioxidant activity and bioactive compounds.

    PubMed

    Yahia, Elhadi M; Gutiérrez-Orozco, Fabiola; Moreno-Pérez, Marco A

    2017-07-01

    Wild mushrooms are important for the diet of some communities in Mexico. However, limited information exists on their chemical composition, contribution to the diet, and health effects. We characterized seventeen wild mushroom species growing in the state of Queretaro in Central Mexico. Most species analyzed were edible, but also included nonedible, medicinal, poisonous and toxic specimens. Whole mushrooms (caps and stipes) were characterized for water content, color, and total content of phenolic compounds, flavonoids and anthocyanins. In vitro antioxidant capacity was measured by FRAP and DPPH assays. Phenolic compounds were identified and quantified by HPLC-mass spectrometry. All species analyzed were found to possess antioxidant activity in vitro and a wide range of phenolic and organic compounds were identified. Our results add to the limited information available on the composition and potential nutritional and health value of wild mushrooms. Further analyses of their bioactivities are warranted.

  6. Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis produces methylamine, a volatile compound active against Burkholderia cepacia complex strains.

    PubMed

    Sannino, Filomena; Parrilli, Ermenegilda; Apuzzo, Gennaro Antonio; de Pascale, Donatella; Tedesco, Pietro; Maida, Isabel; Perrin, Elena; Fondi, Marco; Fani, Renato; Marino, Gennaro; Tutino, Maria Luisa

    2017-03-25

    The Antarctic marine bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125 has been reported to produce several Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), which are able to inhibit the growth of Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) strains, opportunistic pathogens responsible for the infection of immune-compromised patients. However, no specific antibacterial VOCs have been identified to date. The purpose of the present study was to identify specific VOCs that contribute to Bcc inhibition by the Antarctic strain. When grown on defined medium containing D-gluconate and L-glutamate as carbon, nitrogen and energy sources, P. haloplanktis TAC125 is unable to inhibit the growth of Bcc strains. However, single addition of several amino acids to the defined medium restores the P. haloplanktis TAC125 inhibition ability. With the aim of identifying specific volatile compound/s responsible for Bcc inhibition, we set up an apparatus for VOC capture, accumulation, and storage. P. haloplanktis TAC125 was grown in an automatic fermenter which was connected to a cooling system to condense VOCs present in the exhaust air outlet. Upon addition of methionine to the growth medium, the VOC methylamine was produced by P. haloplanktis TAC125. Methylamine was found to inhibit the growth of several Bcc strains in a dose-dependent way. Although it was reported that P. haloplanktis TAC125 produces VOCs endowed with antimicrobial activity, this is the first demonstration that methylamine probably contributes to the anti-Bcc activity of P. haloplanktis TAC125 VOCs.

  7. Selection, Analysis and Improvement of Anti-Angiogenesis Compounds Identified by an Anti-HIF-1α Screening and Validation System

    PubMed Central

    Madu, Chikezie; Li, Liyuan; Lu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    ' anti-HIF-1α activities including measurement of their effects on HIF-1α downstream VEGF gene expression and angiogenic ability of breast cancer cells. Moreover, we demonstrated that we could further improve the compound's potency of anti-HIF-1α and anti-angiogenesis by modifying the identified lead to synthesize a superior (novel) drug. PMID:27877208

  8. [Estrogenic activity of ultraviolet absorbers and the related compounds].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hisashi; Adachi, Shinichi; Suzuki, Yasuhiko

    2005-08-01

    The estrogenic activities of ultraviolet absorbers and their related compounds were investigated using MCF-7 cell proliferation assay. Nine of 33 chemicals (benzophenone, 2,4-dihydroxybenzophenone, 2,2',4,4'-tetrahydroxybenzophenone, 2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone, 2,2'-dihydroxy-4,4'-dimethoxybenzophenone, 4-hydroxybenzophenone, 3-(4-methylbenzylidene) camphor, ethyl 2-cyano-3,3-diphenylacrylate (etocrylene) and 2-ethylhexyl-2-cyano-3,3-diphenylacrylate (octocrylene)) were positive compared with the vehicle control. Benzhydrol, ethyl cinnamate and 2,2'-dihydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone were weakly active. When each xenoestrogen was added to the cells along with ICI 182780, an estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist, the cell growth was reduced according to its doses. Therefore, the cell proliferation was suggested to generate through ER. Most of these chemicals were also positive using CHOOSER assay, a new method of testing estrogenic activity of xenoestrogen. Each xenoestrogen was also confirmed to bind to ERalpha and ERbeta using a human ER competitive binding assay against 17beta-estradiol. The concentration order of the strength of its inhibitory effect using both ERalpha and ERbeta was similar to that of MCF-7 cell proliferation assay, except for benzyl 4-hydroxybenzoate (B4HB). B4HB showed a stronger activity on CHOOSER assay and the competitive binding assay using both ERalpha and ERbeta, although there was no activity observed on MCF-7 cell proliferation assay. Our findings were to detect the estrogenic activity of etocrylene and octocrylene in vitro, in addition to confirming the activities of some ultraviolet absorbers as previously reported.

  9. Rapid, Semiquantitative Assay To Discriminate among Compounds with Activity against Replicating or Nonreplicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Julia; Ling, Yan; Quezada, Landys Lopez; Glasheen, Jou; Ballinger, Elaine; Somersan-Karakaya, Selin; Warrier, Thulasi; Warren, J. David; Nathan, Carl

    2015-01-01

    The search for drugs that can kill replicating and nonreplicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis faces practical bottlenecks. Measurement of CFU and discrimination of bacteriostatic from bactericidal activity are costly in compounds, supplies, labor, and time. Testing compounds against M. tuberculosis under conditions that prevent the replication of M. tuberculosis often involves a second phase of the test in which conditions are altered to permit the replication of bacteria that survived the first phase. False-positive determinations of activity against nonreplicating M. tuberculosis may arise from carryover of compounds from the nonreplicating stage of the assay that act in the replicating stage. We mitigate these problems by carrying out a 96-well microplate liquid MIC assay and then transferring an aliquot of each well to a second set of plates in which each well contains agar supplemented with activated charcoal. After 7 to 10 days—about 2 weeks sooner than required to count CFU—fluorometry reveals whether M. tuberculosis bacilli in each well have replicated extensively enough to reduce a resazurin dye added for the final hour. This charcoal agar resazurin assay (CARA) distinguishes between bacterial biomasses in any two wells that differ by 2 to 3 log10 CFU. The CARA thus serves as a pretest and semiquantitative surrogate for longer, more laborious, and expensive CFU-based assays, helps distinguish bactericidal from bacteriostatic activity, and identifies compounds that are active under replicating conditions, nonreplicating conditions, or both. Results for 14 antimycobacterial compounds, including tuberculosis (TB) drugs, revealed that PA-824 (pretomanid) and TMC207 (bedaquiline) are largely bacteriostatic. PMID:26239979

  10. Combined Rational Design and a High Throughput Screening Platform for Identifying Chemical Inhibitors of a Ras-activating Enzyme*

    PubMed Central

    Evelyn, Chris R.; Biesiada, Jacek; Duan, Xin; Tang, Hong; Shang, Xun; Papoian, Ruben; Seibel, William L.; Nelson, Sandra; Meller, Jaroslaw; Zheng, Yi

    2015-01-01

    The Ras family small GTPases regulate multiple cellular processes, including cell growth, survival, movement, and gene expression, and are intimately involved in cancer pathogenesis. Activation of these small GTPases is catalyzed by a special class of enzymes, termed guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Herein, we developed a small molecule screening platform for identifying lead hits targeting a Ras GEF enzyme, SOS1. We employed an ensemble structure-based virtual screening approach in combination with a multiple tier high throughput experimental screen utilizing two complementary fluorescent guanine nucleotide exchange assays to identify small molecule inhibitors of GEF catalytic activity toward Ras. From a library of 350,000 compounds, we selected a set of 418 candidate compounds predicted to disrupt the GEF-Ras interaction, of which dual wavelength GDP dissociation and GTP-loading experimental screening identified two chemically distinct small molecule inhibitors. Subsequent biochemical validations indicate that they are capable of dose-dependently inhibiting GEF catalytic activity, binding to SOS1 with micromolar affinity, and disrupting GEF-Ras interaction. Mutagenesis studies in conjunction with structure-activity relationship studies mapped both compounds to different sites in the catalytic pocket, and both inhibited Ras signaling in cells. The unique screening platform established here for targeting Ras GEF enzymes could be broadly useful for identifying lead inhibitors for a variety of small GTPase-activating GEF reactions. PMID:25825487

  11. Combined rational design and a high throughput screening platform for identifying chemical inhibitors of a Ras-activating enzyme.

    PubMed

    Evelyn, Chris R; Biesiada, Jacek; Duan, Xin; Tang, Hong; Shang, Xun; Papoian, Ruben; Seibel, William L; Nelson, Sandra; Meller, Jaroslaw; Zheng, Yi

    2015-05-15

    The Ras family small GTPases regulate multiple cellular processes, including cell growth, survival, movement, and gene expression, and are intimately involved in cancer pathogenesis. Activation of these small GTPases is catalyzed by a special class of enzymes, termed guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Herein, we developed a small molecule screening platform for identifying lead hits targeting a Ras GEF enzyme, SOS1. We employed an ensemble structure-based virtual screening approach in combination with a multiple tier high throughput experimental screen utilizing two complementary fluorescent guanine nucleotide exchange assays to identify small molecule inhibitors of GEF catalytic activity toward Ras. From a library of 350,000 compounds, we selected a set of 418 candidate compounds predicted to disrupt the GEF-Ras interaction, of which dual wavelength GDP dissociation and GTP-loading experimental screening identified two chemically distinct small molecule inhibitors. Subsequent biochemical validations indicate that they are capable of dose-dependently inhibiting GEF catalytic activity, binding to SOS1 with micromolar affinity, and disrupting GEF-Ras interaction. Mutagenesis studies in conjunction with structure-activity relationship studies mapped both compounds to different sites in the catalytic pocket, and both inhibited Ras signaling in cells. The unique screening platform established here for targeting Ras GEF enzymes could be broadly useful for identifying lead inhibitors for a variety of small GTPase-activating GEF reactions.

  12. Biological Activities of Phenolic Compounds of Extra Virgin Olive Oil.

    PubMed

    Servili, Maurizio; Sordini, Beatrice; Esposto, Sonia; Urbani, Stefania; Veneziani, Gianluca; Di Maio, Ilona; Selvaggini, Roberto; Taticchi, Agnese

    2013-12-20

    Over the last few decades, multiple biological properties, providing antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, chemopreventive and anti-cancer benefits, as well as the characteristic pungent and bitter taste, have been attributed to Extra Virgin Olive Oil (EVOO) phenols. In particular, growing efforts have been devoted to the study of the antioxidants of EVOO, due to their importance from health, biological and sensory points of view. Hydrophilic and lipophilic phenols represent the main antioxidants of EVOO, and they include a large variety of compounds. Among them, the most concentrated phenols are lignans and secoiridoids, with the latter found exclusively in the Oleaceae family, of which the drupe is the only edible fruit. In recent years, therefore, we have tackled the study of the main properties of phenols, including the relationships between their biological activity and the related chemical structure. This review, in fact, focuses on the phenolic compounds of EVOO, and, in particular, on their biological properties, sensory aspects and antioxidant capacity, with a particular emphasis on the extension of the product shelf-life.

  13. Biological Activities of Phenolic Compounds of Extra Virgin Olive Oil

    PubMed Central

    Servili, Maurizio; Sordini, Beatrice; Esposto, Sonia; Urbani, Stefania; Veneziani, Gianluca; Maio, Ilona Di; Selvaggini, Roberto; Taticchi, Agnese

    2013-01-01

    Over the last few decades, multiple biological properties, providing antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, chemopreventive and anti-cancer benefits, as well as the characteristic pungent and bitter taste, have been attributed to Extra Virgin Olive Oil (EVOO) phenols. In particular, growing efforts have been devoted to the study of the antioxidants of EVOO, due to their importance from health, biological and sensory points of view. Hydrophilic and lipophilic phenols represent the main antioxidants of EVOO, and they include a large variety of compounds. Among them, the most concentrated phenols are lignans and secoiridoids, with the latter found exclusively in the Oleaceae family, of which the drupe is the only edible fruit. In recent years, therefore, we have tackled the study of the main properties of phenols, including the relationships between their biological activity and the related chemical structure. This review, in fact, focuses on the phenolic compounds of EVOO, and, in particular, on their biological properties, sensory aspects and antioxidant capacity, with a particular emphasis on the extension of the product shelf-life. PMID:26784660

  14. Antioxidant activities and phenolic compounds of date plum persimmon ( Diospyros lotus L.) fruits.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hui; Cheng, Ni; Zhou, Juan; Wang, Bini; Deng, Jianjun; Cao, Wei

    2014-05-01

    In the present study, phenolic compounds are extracted from the date plum persimmon fruits using water, methanol and acetone as solvents. Antioxidant activities of the phenolic extracts are measured using four different tests, namely, DPPH, hydroxyl radical scavenging activities, chelating and reducing power assays. All the extracts show dose dependent DPPH radical scavenging activity, reducing and chelating powers and moreover, they are well correlated with the total phenolic and total flavonoid substances, suggesting direct contribution of phenolic compounds to these activities. In further, the extracts are identified and quantified by HPLC-ECD. Results show that gallic acid is the most abundant phenolic compound, with amounts ranging between 45.49and 287.47 μg/g dry sample. Myricetin is the dominant flavonoid in all extracts. Its level varied from 2.75 μg/g dry sample in acetone extract to 5.28 μg/g dry sample in water extract. On the basis of the results obtained, the date plum persimmon fruits phenolic extract is a potential source of natural antioxidants owing to its significant antioxidant activities.

  15. A review of QSAR studies to discover new drug-like compounds actives against leishmaniasis and trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Garit, Juan Alberto; Abad, Concepción; Rodríguez-Borges, J Enrique; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Torrens, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    The neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) affect more than one billion people (one-sixth of the world's population) and occur primarily in undeveloped countries in sub-Saharan Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Available drugs for these diseases are decades old and present an important number of limitations, especially high toxicity and, more recently, the emergence of drug resistance. In the last decade several Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) studies have been developed in order to identify new organic compounds with activity against the parasites responsible for these diseases, which are reviewed in this paper. The topics summarized in this work are: 1) QSAR studies to identify new organic compounds actives against Chaga's disease; 2) Development of QSAR studies to discover new antileishmanial drusg; 3) Computational studies to identify new drug-like compounds against human African trypanosomiasis. Each topic include the general characteristics, epidemiology and chemotherapy of the disease as well as the main QSAR approaches to discovery/identification of new actives compounds for the corresponding neglected disease. The last section is devoted to a new approach know as multi-target QSAR models developed for antiparasitic drugs specifically those actives against trypanosomatid parasites. At present, as a result of these QSAR studies several promising compounds, active against these parasites, are been indentify. However, more efforts will be required in the future to develop more selective (specific) useful drugs.

  16. Exome Sequencing Identifies Compound Heterozygous Mutations in SCN5A Associated with Congenital Complete Heart Block in the Thai Population

    PubMed Central

    Thongnak, Chuphong; Tangviriyapaiboon, Duangkamol; Silvilairat, Suchaya; Puangpetch, Apichaya; Pasomsub, Ekawat

    2016-01-01

    Background. Congenital heart block is characterized by blockage of electrical impulses from the atrioventricular node (AV node) to the ventricles. This blockage can be caused by ion channel impairment that is the result of genetic variation. This study aimed to investigate the possible causative variants in a Thai family with complete heart block by using whole exome sequencing. Methods. Genomic DNA was collected from a family consisting of five family members in three generations in which one of three children in generation III had complete heart block. Whole exome sequencing was performed on one complete heart block affected child and one unaffected sibling. Bioinformatics was used to identify annotated and filtered variants. Candidate variants were validated and the segregation analysis of other family members was performed. Results. This study identified compound heterozygous variants, c.101G>A and c.3832G>A, in the SCN5A gene and c.28730C>T in the TTN gene. Conclusions. Compound heterozygous variants in the SCN5A gene were found in the complete heart block affected child but these two variants were found only in the this affected sibling and were not found in other unaffected family members. Hence, these variants in the SCN5A gene were the most possible disease-causing variants in this family. PMID:28018021

  17. Antibacterial Activity of Alanine-Derived Gemini Quaternary Ammonium Compounds.

    PubMed

    Piecuch, Agata; Obłąk, Ewa; Guz-Regner, Katarzyna

    The antibacterial activity of alanine-derived gemini quaternary ammonium salts (chlorides and bromides) with various spacer and alkyl chain lengths was investigated. The studied compounds exhibited a strong bactericidal effect, especially bromides with 10 and 12 carbon alkyl chains and 3 carbon spacer groups (TMPAL-10 Br and TMPAL-12 Br), with a short contact time. Both salts dislodged biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus epidermidis, and were lethal to adherent cells of S. epidermidis. Bromide with 2 carbon spacer groups and 12 carbon alkyl chains (TMEAL-12 Br) effectively reduced microbial adhesion by coating polystyrene and silicone surfaces. The results obtained suggest that, after further studies, gemini QAS might be considered as antimicrobial agents in medicine or industry.

  18. Irreversible adsorption of phenolic compounds by activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, T.M.; King, C.J.

    1988-12-01

    Studies were undertaken to determine the reasons why phenolic sorbates can be difficult to remove and recover from activated carbons. The chemical properties of the sorbate and the adsorbent surface, and the influences of changes in the adsorption and desorption conditions were investigated. Comparison of isotherms established after different contact times or at different temperatures indicated that phenolic compounds react on carbon surfaces. The reaction rate is a strong function of temperature. Regeneration of carbons by leaching with acetone recovered at least as much phenol as did regeneration with other solvents or with displacers. The physiochemical properties of adsorbents influences irreversible uptakes. Sorbates differed markedly in their tendencies to undergo irreversible adsorption. 64 refs., 47 figs., 32 tabs.

  19. [The release of biologically active compounds from peat peloids].

    PubMed

    Babaskin, D V

    2011-01-01

    This work had the objective to study kinetics of the release of flavonoides from peat peloid compositions containing extracts of medicinal herbs in model systems.The key parameters of the process are defined. The rate of liberation of flavonoides is shown to depend on their initial concentration in the compositions being used. The influence of the flavonoide composition of the tested extracts and dimethylsulfoxide on the release of biologically active compounds contained in the starting material in the model environment is estimated. The possibility of the layer-by-layer deposition of the compositions and peat peloids in order to increase the efficacy of flavonoide release from the starting composition and to ensure more rational utilization of the extracts of medicinal plants is demonstrated.

  20. Propolis volatile compounds: chemical diversity and biological activity: a review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Propolis is a sticky material collected by bees from plants, and used in the hive as building material and defensive substance. It has been popular as a remedy in Europe since ancient times. Nowadays, propolis use in over-the-counter preparations, “bio”-cosmetics and functional foods, etc., increases. Volatile compounds are found in low concentrations in propolis, but their aroma and significant biological activity make them important for propolis characterisation. Propolis is a plant-derived product: its chemical composition depends on the local flora at the site of collection, thus it offers a significant chemical diversity. The role of propolis volatiles in identification of its plant origin is discussed. The available data about chemical composition of propolis volatiles from different geographic regions are reviewed, demonstrating significant chemical variability. The contribution of volatiles and their constituents to the biological activities of propolis is considered. Future perspectives in research on propolis volatiles are outlined, especially in studying activities other than antimicrobial. PMID:24812573

  1. A high-content EMT screen identifies multiple receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors with activity on TGFβ receptor.

    PubMed

    Lotz-Jenne, Carina; Lüthi, Urs; Ackerknecht, Sabine; Lehembre, François; Fink, Tobias; Stritt, Manuel; Wirth, Matthias; Pavan, Simona; Bill, Ruben; Regenass, Urs; Christofori, Gerhard; Meyer-Schaller, Nathalie

    2016-05-03

    An epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) enables epithelial tumor cells to break out of the primary tumor mass and to metastasize. Understanding the molecular mechanisms driving EMT in more detail will provide important tools to interfere with the metastatic process. To identify pharmacological modulators and druggable targets of EMT, we have established a novel multi-parameter, high-content, microscopy-based assay and screened chemical compounds with activities against known targets. Out of 3423 compounds, we have identified 19 drugs that block transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ)-induced EMT in normal murine mammary gland epithelial cells (NMuMG). The active compounds include inhibitors against TGFβ receptors (TGFBR), Rho-associated protein kinases (ROCK), myosin II, SRC kinase and uridine analogues. Among the EMT-repressing compounds, we identified a group of inhibitors targeting multiple receptor tyrosine kinases, and biochemical profiling of these multi-kinase inhibitors reveals TGFBR as a thus far unknown target of their inhibitory spectrum. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of a multi-parameter, high-content microscopy screen to identify modulators and druggable targets of EMT. Moreover, the newly discovered "off-target" effects of several receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors have important consequences for in vitro and in vivo studies and might beneficially contribute to the therapeutic effects observed in vivo.

  2. Antioxidative activities and active compounds of extracts from Catalpa plant leaves.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongyu; Hu, Gege; Dong, Juane; Wei, Qin; Shao, Hongbo; Lei, Ming

    2014-01-01

    In order to screen the Catalpa plant with high antioxidant activity and confirm the corresponding active fractions from Catalpa ovata G. Don, C. fargesii Bur., and C. bungei C. A. Mey., total flavonoid contents and antioxidant activities of the extracts/fractions of Catalpa plant leaves were determined. The determined total flavonoid content and antioxidant activity were used as assessment criteria. Those compounds with antioxidant activity were isolated with silica gel column chromatography and ODS column chromatography. Our results showed that the total flavonoid content in C. bungei C. A. Mey. (30.07 mg/g · DW) was the highest, followed by those in C. fargesii Bur. (25.55 mg/g · DW) and C. ovata G. Don (24.96 mg/g · DW). According to the determination results of total flavonoid content and antioxidant activity in 3 clones of leaves of C. bungei C. A. Mey., the total flavonoid content and antioxidant activity in crude extracts from C. bungei C. A. Mey. 6 (CA6) leaves were the highest. Moreover, the results showed that the total flavonoid content and antioxidant activities of ethyl acetate (EA) fraction in ethanol crude extracts in CA6 leaves were the highest, followed by n-butanol, petroleum ether (PE), and water fractions. Two flavonoid compounds with antioxidant activity were firstly isolated based on EA fraction. The two compounds were luteolin (1) and apigenin (2), respectively.

  3. Antioxidative Activities and Active Compounds of Extracts from Catalpa Plant Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hongyu; Hu, Gege; Dong, Juane; Wei, Qin; Shao, Hongbo; Lei, Ming

    2014-01-01

    In order to screen the Catalpa plant with high antioxidant activity and confirm the corresponding active fractions from Catalpa ovata G. Don, C. fargesii Bur., and C. bungei C. A. Mey., total flavonoid contents and antioxidant activities of the extracts/fractions of Catalpa plant leaves were determined. The determined total flavonoid content and antioxidant activity were used as assessment criteria. Those compounds with antioxidant activity were isolated with silica gel column chromatography and ODS column chromatography. Our results showed that the total flavonoid content in C. bungei C. A. Mey. (30.07 mg/g·DW) was the highest, followed by those in C. fargesii Bur. (25.55 mg/g·DW) and C. ovata G. Don (24.96 mg/g·DW). According to the determination results of total flavonoid content and antioxidant activity in 3 clones of leaves of C. bungei C. A. Mey., the total flavonoid content and antioxidant activity in crude extracts from C. bungei C. A. Mey. 6 (CA6) leaves were the highest. Moreover, the results showed that the total flavonoid content and antioxidant activities of ethyl acetate (EA) fraction in ethanol crude extracts in CA6 leaves were the highest, followed by n-butanol, petroleum ether (PE), and water fractions. Two flavonoid compounds with antioxidant activity were firstly isolated based on EA fraction. The two compounds were luteolin (1) and apigenin (2), respectively. PMID:25431795

  4. Data-Driven Derivation of an "Informer Compound Set" for Improved Selection of Active Compounds in High-Throughput Screening.

    PubMed

    Paricharak, Shardul; IJzerman, Adriaan P; Jenkins, Jeremy L; Bender, Andreas; Nigsch, Florian

    2016-09-26

    Despite the usefulness of high-throughput screening (HTS) in drug discovery, for some systems, low assay throughput or high screening cost can prohibit the screening of large numbers of compounds. In such cases, iterative cycles of screening involving active learning (AL) are employed, creating the need for smaller "informer sets" that can be routinely screened to build predictive models for selecting compounds from the screening collection for follow-up screens. Here, we present a data-driven derivation of an informer compound set with improved predictivity of active compounds in HTS, and we validate its benefit over randomly selected training sets on 46 PubChem assays comprising at least 300,000 compounds and covering a wide range of assay biology. The informer compound set showed improvement in BEDROC(α = 100), PRAUC, and ROCAUC values averaged over all assays of 0.024, 0.014, and 0.016, respectively, compared to randomly selected training sets, all with paired t-test p-values <10(-15). A per-assay assessment showed that the BEDROC(α = 100), which is of particular relevance for early retrieval of actives, improved for 38 out of 46 assays, increasing the success rate of smaller follow-up screens. Overall, we showed that an informer set derived from historical HTS activity data can be employed for routine small-scale exploratory screening in an assay-agnostic fashion. This approach led to a consistent improvement in hit rates in follow-up screens without compromising scaffold retrieval. The informer set is adjustable in size depending on the number of compounds one intends to screen, as performance gains are realized for sets with more than 3,000 compounds, and this set is therefore applicable to a variety of situations. Finally, our results indicate that random sampling may not adequately cover descriptor space, drawing attention to the importance of the composition of the training set for predicting actives.

  5. Phenolic Profiles and Contribution of Individual Compounds to Antioxidant Activity of Apple Powders.

    PubMed

    Raudone, Lina; Raudonis, Raimondas; Liaudanskas, Mindaugas; Viskelis, Jonas; Pukalskas, Audrius; Janulis, Valdimaras

    2016-05-01

    Apples (Malus domestica L.) are the most common source of phenolic compounds in northern European diet. Besides pectins, dietary fibers, vitamins, and oligosaccharides they contain phenolic compounds of different classes. Apple powders are convenient functional forms retaining significant amounts of phenolic antioxidants. In this study reducing and radical scavenging profiles of freeze-dried powders of "Aldas,ˮ "Auksis,ˮ "Connel Red,ˮ "Ligol,ˮ "Lodel,ˮ and "Rajkaˮ were determined and phenolic constituents were identified using ultra high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole and time-of-flight mass spectrometers. A negative ionization mode was applied and seventeen compounds: phenolic acids (coumaroylquinic, chlorogenic), flavonoids (quercetin derivatives), and procyanidin derivatives (B1, B2, and C1) were identified in all tested apple samples. Total values of Trolox equivalents varied from 7.72 ± 0.32 up to 20.02 ± 0.52 and from 11.10 ± 0.57 up to 21.42 ± 0.75 μmol/g of dry weight of apple powder in FRAP (ferric reducing antioxidant power) and ABTS (2,2-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) postcolumn assays, respectively. The greatest Trolox equivalent values were determined for apples of "Aldasˮ cultivar. Chlorogenic acid and procyanidin C1 were the most significant contributors to total reducing and radical scavenging activity in all apple cultivars tested, therefore they could be considered as markers of antioxidant activity.

  6. Compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzumura, Akitoshi; Watanabe, Masaki; Nagasako, Naoyuki; Asahi, Ryoji

    2014-06-01

    Recently, Cu-based chalcogenides such as Cu3SbSe4, Cu2Se, and Cu2SnSe3 have attracted much attention because of their high thermoelectric performance and their common feature of very low thermal conductivity. However, for practical use, materials without toxic elements such as selenium are preferable. In this paper, we report Se-free Cu3SbS4 thermoelectric material and improvement of its figure of merit ( ZT) by chemical substitutions. Substitutions of 3 at.% Ag for Cu and 2 at.% Ge for Sb lead to significant reductions in the thermal conductivity by 37% and 22%, respectively. These substitutions do not sacrifice the power factor, thus resulting in enhancement of the ZT value. The sensitivity of the thermal conductivity to chemical substitutions in these compounds is discussed in terms of the calculated phonon dispersion and previously proposed models for Cu-based chalcogenides. To improve the power factor, we optimize the hole carrier concentration by substitution of Ge for Sb, achieving a power factor of 16 μW/cm K2 at 573 K, which is better than the best reported for Se-based Cu3SbSe4 compounds.

  7. Allergy-Inducing Chromium Compounds Trigger Potent Innate Immune Stimulation Via ROS-Dependent Inflammasome Activation.

    PubMed

    Adam, Christian; Wohlfarth, Jonas; Haußmann, Maike; Sennefelder, Helga; Rodin, Annette; Maler, Mareike; Martin, Stefan F; Goebeler, Matthias; Schmidt, Marc

    2017-02-01

    Chromium allergy is a common occupational skin disease mediated by chromium (VI)-specific T cells that induce delayed-type hypersensitivity in sensitized individuals. Additionally, chromium (VI) can act as an irritant. Both responses critically require innate immune activation, but if and how chromium (VI) elicits this signal is currently unclear. Using human monocytes, primary human keratinocytes, and murine dendritic cells we show that chromium (VI) compounds fail to trigger direct proinflammatory activation but potently induce processing and secretion of IL-1β. IL-1β release required priming by phorbol-ester or toll-like receptor stimulation and was prevented by inhibition of K(+) efflux, NLRP3 depletion or caspase-1 inhibition, identifying chromium (VI) as a hapten activator of the NLRP3 inflammasome. Inflammasome activation was initiated by mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production triggered by chromium (VI), as indicated by sensitivity to treatment with the ROS scavenger N-acetyl cysteine and a coinciding failure of K(+) efflux, caspase-1, or NLRP3 inhibition to prevent mitochondrial reactive oxygen species accumulation. IL-1β release further correlated with cytotoxicity that was secondary to reactive oxygen species, K(+) efflux, and NLRP3 activation. Trivalent chromium was unable to induce mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production, inflammasome activation, and cytotoxicity, suggesting that oxidation state-specific differences in mitochondrial reactivity may determine inflammasome activation and allergic/irritant capacity of different chromium compounds.

  8. Phenolic compounds and biological activity of Kitaibelia vitifolia.

    PubMed

    Mašković, Pavle; Solujić, Slavica; Mihailović, Vladimir; Mladenović, Milan; Cvijović, Milica; Mladenović, Jelena; Aćamović-Đoković, Gordana; Kurćubić, Vladimir

    2011-12-01

    This study was aimed at evaluating the antioxidant activity and efficacy of the ethanolic extract of the endemic plant species Kitaibelia vitifolia in inhibiting the growth of selected fungi and bacteria. Antimicrobial activity was tested using the broth dilution procedure for determination of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). MICs were determined for eight selected indicator strains. The highest susceptibility to K. vitifolia ethanolic extract among the bacteria tested was exhibited by Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, and Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC 13883 (MIC=15.62 μg/mL), followed by Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Proteus mirabilis ATCC 14153 (MIC=31.25 μg/mL), and Proteus vulgaris ATCC 13315 (MIC=62.50 μg/mL). Of the fungi, Candida albicans ATCC 10231 (MIC=15.62 μg/mL) showed the highest susceptibility, and Aspergillus niger ATCC 16404 (MIC=31.25 μg/mL) had the lowest. Results showed that K. vitifolia extract possesses antioxidant activity, with total antioxidant capacity of 75.45±0.68 μg of ascorbic acid/g and 50% inhibition concentration values of 47.45±0.55 μg/mL for 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl free radical scavenging activity, 35.35±0.68 μg/mL for inhibitory activity against lipid peroxidation, 95.25±0.52 μg/mL for hydroxyl radical scavenging activity, and 31.50±0.35 μg/mL for metal chelating activity. Total phenolics, flavonoids, condensed tannins, and gallotannins were 85.25±0.69 mg of gallic acid (GA)/g, 45.32±0.55 mg of rutin/g, 54.25±0.75 mg of GA/g, and 41.74±0.55 mg of GA/g, respectively. The phenolic composition of K. vitifolia extract was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Rosmarinic acid was found to be the dominant phenolic compound of the extract.

  9. Platinum (II) Compounds With Antitumor Activity Studied by Molecular Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Georgieva, Ivelina; Nikolov, George St.

    1998-01-01

    A series of Pt(ll) complexes with antitumor properties: [1,2-bis(2,6-dichloro-4-hydroxyphenyl)ethylenediamine]PtL2 (meso-1-PtL2) and [erythro-1-(2,6-dichloro-4-hydroxyphenyl)-2-(2-halo-4-hydroxyphenyl)ethylenediamine]PtL2, [2L=2Cl−,2I−,SO42−; halo = F (erythro-8-PtL2),halo = Cl (erythro-9-PtL2)] has been modelled by molecular mechanics (MM). The MM calculations were carried out for different isomers and ligand conformations meso-δ, meso-λ, d,l-δ, d,I-λ. The compounds with the lowest MM energies have the same geometries as those obtained by X-ray analysis. The calculated MMX energy orders: meso-1-PtL2 < erythro-9-PtL2 < erythro-8-PtL2 for L=I−, Cl− and SO42− are reverse to the known antitumor activity order - the lowest energy complex (the most stable one)is the one with the highest estrogen activity (meso-1-PtL2). The type of the leaving group (L) does not alter the energy order, which is in agreement with the biological experiments that show a slight dependence of the estrogen properties on the leaving group type. PMID:18475828

  10. Platinum (II) Compounds With Antitumor Activity Studied by Molecular Mechanics.

    PubMed

    Trendafilova, N; Georgieva, I; Nikolov, G S

    1998-01-01

    A SERIES OF PT(LL) COMPLEXES WITH ANTITUMOR PROPERTIES: [1,2-bis(2,6-dichloro-4-hydroxyphenyl)ethylenediamine]PtL(2) (meso-1-PtL(2)) and [erythro-1-(2,6-dichloro-4-hydroxyphenyl)-2-(2-halo-4-hydroxyphenyl)ethylenediamine]PtL(2), [2L=2Cl-,2I-,SO(4) (2)-; halo = F (erythro-8-PtL(2)),halo = Cl (erythro-9-PtL(2))] has been modelled by molecular mechanics (MM). The MM calculations were carried out for different isomers and ligand conformations meso-delta, meso-lambda, d,l-delta, d,I-lambda. The compounds with the lowest MM energies have the same geometries as those obtained by X-ray analysis. The calculated MMX energy orders: meso-1-PtL(2) < erythro-9-PtL(2) < erythro-8-PtL(2) for L=I-, Cl- and SO(4) (2-) are reverse to the known antitumor activity order - the lowest energy complex (the most stable one)is the one with the highest estrogen activity (meso-1-PtL(2)). The type of the leaving group (L) does not alter the energy order, which is in agreement with the biological experiments that show a slight dependence of the estrogen properties on the leaving group type.

  11. Computational Method for the Systematic Identification of Analog Series and Key Compounds Representing Series and Their Biological Activity Profiles.

    PubMed

    Stumpfe, Dagmar; Dimova, Dilyana; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2016-08-25

    A computational methodology is introduced for detecting all unique series of analogs in large compound data sets, regardless of chemical relationships between analogs. No prior knowledge of core structures or R-groups is required, which are automatically determined. The approach is based upon the generation of retrosynthetic matched molecular pairs and analog networks from which distinct series are isolated. The methodology was applied to systematically extract more than 17 000 distinct series from the ChEMBL database. For comparison, analog series were also isolated from screening compounds and drugs. Known biological activities were mapped to series from ChEMBL, and in more than 13 000 of these series, key compounds were identified that represented substitution sites of all analogs within a series and its complete activity profile. The analog series, key compounds, and activity profiles are made freely available as a resource for medicinal chemistry applications.

  12. Clinically relevant enhancement of human sperm motility using compounds with reported phosphodiesterase inhibitor activity

    PubMed Central

    Tardif, Steve; Madamidola, Oladipo A.; Brown, Sean G.; Frame, Lorna; Lefièvre, Linda; Wyatt, Paul G.; Barratt, Christopher L.R.; Martins Da Silva, Sarah J.

    2014-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Can we identify compound(s) with reported phosphodiesterase inhibitor (PDEI) activity that could be added to human spermatozoa in vitro to enhance their motility without compromising other sperm functions? SUMMARY ANSWER We have identified several compounds that produce robust and effective stimulation of sperm motility and, importantly, have a positive response on patient samples. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY For >20 years, the use of non-selective PDEIs, such as pentoxifylline, has been known to influence the motility of human spermatozoa; however, conflicting results have been obtained. It is now clear that human sperm express several different phosphodiesterases and these are compartmentalized at different regions of the cells. By using type-specific PDEIs, differential modulation of sperm motility may be achieved without adversely affecting other functions such as the acrosome reaction (AR). STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION This was a basic medical research study examining sperm samples from normozoospermic donors and subfertile patients attending the Assisted Conception Unit (ACU), Ninewells Hospital Dundee for diagnostic semen analysis, IVF and ICSI. Phase 1 screened 43 commercially available compounds with reported PDEI activity to identify lead compounds that stimulate sperm motility. Samples were exposed (20 min) to three concentrations (1, 10 and 100 µM) of compound, and selected candidates (n = 6) progressed to Phase 2, which provided a more comprehensive assessment using a battery of in vitro sperm function tests. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS All healthy donors and subfertile patients were recruited at the Medical Research Institute, University of Dundee and ACU, Ninewells Hospital Dundee (ethical approval 08/S1402/6). In Phase 1, poor motility cells recovered from the 40% interface of the discontinuous density gradient were used as surrogates for patient samples. Pooled samples from three to four different donors were utilized in

  13. Acaricidal Activity of Eugenol Based Compounds against Scabies Mites

    PubMed Central

    Pasay, Cielo; Mounsey, Kate; Stevenson, Graeme; Davis, Rohan; Arlian, Larry; Morgan, Marjorie; Vyszenski-Moher, DiAnn; Andrews, Kathy; McCarthy, James

    2010-01-01

    Backgound Human scabies is a debilitating skin disease caused by the “itch mite” Sarcoptes scabiei. Ordinary scabies is commonly treated with topical creams such as permethrin, while crusted scabies is treated with topical creams in combination with oral ivermectin. Recent reports of acaricide tolerance in scabies endemic communities in Northern Australia have prompted efforts to better understand resistance mechanisms and to identify potential new acaricides. In this study, we screened three essential oils and four pure compounds based on eugenol for acaricidal properties. Methodology/Principal Findings Contact bioassays were performed using live permethrin-sensitive S. scabiei var suis mites harvested from pigs and permethrin-resistant S. scabiei var canis mites harvested from rabbits. Results of bioassays showed that clove oil was highly toxic against scabies mites. Nutmeg oil had moderate toxicity and ylang ylang oil was the least toxic. Eugenol, a major component of clove oil and its analogues –acetyleugenol and isoeugenol, demonstrated levels of toxicity comparable to benzyl benzoate, the positive control acaricide, killing mites within an hour of contact. Conclusions The acaricidal properties demonstrated by eugenol and its analogues show promise as leads for future development of alternative topical acaricides to treat scabies. PMID:20711455

  14. Characterization of aroma-active compounds in three Chinese Moutai liquors by gas chromatography-olfactometry, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and sensory evaluation.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yunwei; Chen, Xiaomei; Xiao, Zuobing; Ma, Ning; Zhu, Jiancai

    2017-04-01

    The aroma-active compounds in three Chinese Moutai liquors, aged 1 year, 15 years and 30 years were investigated in this study. The aroma compounds were analysed by gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). A total of 79 aroma compounds were identified. Aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA) was further employed to identify the aroma-active compounds. A total of 35 aroma-active compounds with flavour dilution (FD) values ≧ 64 simultaneously in three Chinese Moutai liquors were quantitated. Among them, ethyl acetate, ethyl lactate and acetic acid appeared with the highest concentrations. They were all >1000 mg/L. Then, the relationships between the aroma-active compounds and seven sensory attributes were studied.

  15. Sparse activity of identified dentate granule cells during spatial exploration

    PubMed Central

    Diamantaki, Maria; Frey, Markus; Berens, Philipp; Preston-Ferrer, Patricia; Burgalossi, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    In the dentate gyrus – a key component of spatial memory circuits – granule cells (GCs) are known to be morphologically diverse and to display heterogeneous activity profiles during behavior. To resolve structure–function relationships, we juxtacellularly recorded and labeled single GCs in freely moving rats. We found that the vast majority of neurons were silent during exploration. Most active GCs displayed a characteristic spike waveform, fired at low rates and showed spatial activity. Primary dendritic parameters were sufficient for classifying neurons as active or silent with high accuracy. Our data thus support a sparse coding scheme in the dentate gyrus and provide a possible link between structural and functional heterogeneity among the GC population. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20252.001 PMID:27692065

  16. Identifying healthcare activities using a real-time location system.

    PubMed

    Cagle, Rick; Darling, Erika; Kim, Bo

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses human resource allocation in a Veterans Health Administration audiology clinic as a model for clinics facing similar challenges in maximizing quality, safety, and effectiveness of care. A framework is proposed combining automatic identification technology with simulation and visualization software, asserting a relationship between location of staff within the facility and clinical activity, focusing healthcare staff on high-value activities to deliver safe, quality care. This enables "what-if" analyses of potential resource allocation scenarios, correlating location information from radiofrequency identification tags worn by clinicians and technicians in the clinic as part of a real-time location system, then inferring probable activity from the data. Once the baseline "as-is" can be established, the model will be refined to supply predictive analyses of resource allocation and management. Simulations of activities in specialized spaces saves time managing resources, which means more time can be spent on patient safety and increased satisfaction.

  17. Identification, characterization and HPLC quantification of process-related impurities in Trelagliptin succinate bulk drug: Six identified as new compounds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Sun, Lili; Zou, Liang; Hui, Wenkai; Liu, Lei; Zou, Qiaogen; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2016-09-05

    A sensitive, selective and stability indicating reversed-phase LC method was developed for the determination of process related impurities of Trelagliptin succinate in bulk drug. Six impurities were identified by LC-MS. Further, their structures were characterized and confirmed utilizing LC-MS/MS, IR and NMR spectral data. The most probable mechanisms for the formation of these impurities were also discussed. To the best of our knowledge, six structures among these impurities are new compounds and have not been reported previously. The superior separation was achieved on an InertSustain C18 (250mm×4.6mm, 5μm) column in a gradient mixture of acetonitrile and 20mmol potassium dihydrogen phosphate with 0.25% triethylamine (pH adjusted to 3.5 with phosphate acid). The method was validated as per regulatory guidelines to demonstrate system suitability, specificity, sensitivity, linearity, robustness, and stability.

  18. Polypharmacology directed compound data mining: identification of promiscuous chemotypes with different activity profiles and comparison to approved drugs.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ye; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2010-12-27

    Increasing evidence that many pharmaceutically relevant compounds elicit their effects through binding to multiple targets, so-called polypharmacology, is beginning to change conventional drug discovery and design strategies. In light of this paradigm shift, we have mined publicly available compound and bioactivity data for promiscuous chemotypes. For this purpose, a hierarchy of active compounds, atomic property based scaffolds, and unique molecular topologies were generated, and activity annotations were analyzed using this framework. Starting from ∼35 000 compounds active against human targets with at least 1 μM potency, 33 chemotypes with distinct topology were identified that represented molecules active against at least 3 different target families. Network representations were utilized to study scaffold-target family relationships and activity profiles of scaffolds corresponding to promiscuous chemotypes. A subset of promiscuous chemotypes displayed a significant enrichment in drugs over bioactive compounds. A total of 190 drugs were identified that had on average only 2 known target annotations but belonged to the 7 most promiscuous chemotypes that were active against 8-15 target families. These drugs should be attractive candidates for polypharmacological profiling.

  19. Characterization of the most aroma-active compounds in cherry tomato by application of the aroma extract dilution analysis.

    PubMed

    Selli, Serkan; Kelebek, Hasim; Ayseli, Mehmet Turan; Tokbas, Habip

    2014-12-15

    Aroma and aroma-active compounds of cherry tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum) was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-olfactometry (GC-MS-O). According to sensory analysis, the aromatic extract obtained by liquid-liquid extraction was representative of tomato odour. A total of 49 aroma compounds were identified and quantified in fresh cherry tomato. Aldehydes were qualitatively and quantitatively the most dominant volatiles in cherry tomato, followed by alcohols. Aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA) was used for the determination of aroma-active compounds of tomato sample. A total of 21 aroma-active compounds were detected in aromatic extract of fresh tomato, of which 18 were identified. On the basis of the flavour dilution (FD) factor, the most powerful aroma-active compounds identified in the extract were (Z)-3-hexenal (FD=1024) and (E)-2-hexenal (FD=256), which were described as the strong green-grassy and green-leafy odour, respectively. The major organic acid and sugar found were citric acid and fructose, respectively.

  20. MEG identifies dorsal medial brain activations during sleep.

    PubMed

    Ioannides, Andreas A; Kostopoulos, George K; Liu, Lichan; Fenwick, Peter B C

    2009-01-15

    All sleep stages contain epochs with high-amplitude electrophysiological phasic events, alternating with quieter "core periods." High-amplitude and core state properties cannot be disentangled with PET and fMRI. Here from high temporal resolution magnetoencephalography data, regional changes in neuronal activity were extracted during core periods in different frequency bands for each sleep stage and waking. We found that gamma-band activity increases in precuneus during light sleep (stages 1/2) and in the left dorso-medial prefrontal cortex (L-DMPFC) during deep sleep (stages 3/4). The L-DMPFC activated area expands laterally during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, into a volume of about 5 cm(3) bounded by regions attributed to Theory of Mind (ToM) and default systems, both involved in introspection. Gamma band activity in this area was higher during REM sleep than other sleep stages and active wakefulness. There is a tantalizing correspondence between increased wide-band activity (dominated by low frequencies) in early non-REM (NREM) sleep stages and increases in gamma-band activity in late NREM and REM periods that we attribute to a lateral disinhibition mechanism. The results provide a description of regional electrophysiological changes in awake state, light and deep sleep, and REM sleep. These changes are most pronounced in the L-DMPFC and the other areas around the dorsal midline that are close to, but do not overlap with areas of the default and ToM systems, suggesting that the DMPFC, particularly in the left hemisphere, plays an important role in late NREM stages, in REM and possibly in dreaming.

  1. In silico inhibition of GABARAP activity using antiepileptic medicinal derived compounds

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Shilu; Faheem, Muhammad; Al-Malki, Abdulrahman L; Kumosani, Taha A; Qadri, Ishtiaq

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological disorder affecting more than 50 million people worldwide. It can be controlled by antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) but more than 30% patients are still resistant to AEDs. To overcome this problem, researchers are trying to develop novel approaches to treat epilepsy including the use of herbal medicines. The γ-amino butyric acid type-A receptor associated protein (GABARAP) is ubiquitin-like modifier implicated in the intracellular trafficking of GABAAR. An in silico mutation was created at 116 amino acid position G116A, and an in silico study was carried out to identify the potential binding inhibitors (with antiepileptic properties) against the active sites of GABARAP. Five different plant derived compounds namely (a) Aconitine (b) Berberine (c) Montanine (d) Raubasine (e) Safranal were selected, and their quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) have been conducted to search the inhibitory activity of the selected compounds. The results have shown maximum number of hydrogen bond (H-bond) interactions of Raubasine with highest interaction energy among all of the five compounds. So, Raubasine could be the best fit ligand of GABARAP but in vitro, and in vivo studies are necessary for further confirmation. PMID:26124559

  2. Antifungal properties of ethanolic extract and its active compounds from Calocedrus macrolepis var. formosana (Florin) heartwood.

    PubMed

    Yen, Tsair-Bor; Chang, Hui-Ting; Hsieh, Chun-Chun; Chang, Shang-Tzen

    2008-07-01

    The ethanolic extract of Calocedrus macrolepis var. formosana heartwood was screened for antifungal compounds by agar dilution assay and liquid chromatography. Two compounds, beta-thujaplicin and gamma-thujaplicin, responsible for the antifungal property of C. macrolepis var. formosana heartwood were isolated by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and identified by 1H NMR and 13C NMR. The antifungal activities of these two compounds were further evaluated against total 15 fungi, including wood decay fungi, tree pathogenic fungi and molds. The hexane soluble fraction showed the strongest antifungal activities among all fractions. beta-Thujaplicin and gamma-thujaplicin exhibited not only very strong antifungal activity, but also broad antifungal spectrum. The MIC values of beta-thujaplicin and gamma-thujaplicin were in the range of 5.0-50.0 microg/ml. In addition, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was carried out to study the structural change of fungal hyphae induced by beta-thujaplicin. Strong cell wall shrinkage indicated the fungicidal effect could be attributed to the combined actions of metal chelating and cytoplasm leakage. It also suggests that the role of metal chelating is indispensable in the design of environmental-friendly fungicides.

  3. Discovery and Preliminary Structure–Activity Relationship of Arylpiperazines as Novel, Brain-Penetrant Antiprion Compounds

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and kuru in humans, BSE in cattle, and scrapie in sheep are fatal neurodegenerative disorders. Such illnesses are caused by the conversion and accumulation of a misfolded pathogenic isoform (termed PrPSc) of a normally benign, host cellular protein, denoted PrPC. We employed high-throughput screening enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays to evaluate compounds for their ability to reduce the level of PrPSc in Rocky Mountain Laboratory prion-infected mouse neuroblastoma cells (ScN2a-cl3). Arylpiperazines were among the active compounds identified, but the initial hits suffered from low potency and poor drug-likeness. The best of those hits, such as 1, 7, 13, and 19, displayed moderate antiprion activity with EC50 values in the micromolar range. Key analogues were designed and synthesized on the basis of the structure–activity relationship, with analogues 41, 44, 46, and 47 found to have submicromolar potency. Analogues 41 and 44 were able to penetrate the blood–brain barrier and achieved excellent drug concentrations in the brains of mice after oral dosing. These compounds represent good starting points for further lead optimization in our pursuit of potential drug candidates for the treatment of prion diseases. PMID:23847718

  4. Using perturbations to identify the brain circuits underlying active vision.

    PubMed

    Wurtz, Robert H

    2015-09-19

    The visual and oculomotor systems in the brain have been studied extensively in the primate. Together, they can be regarded as a single brain system that underlies active vision--the normal vision that begins with visual processing in the retina and extends through the brain to the generation of eye movement by the brainstem. The system is probably one of the most thoroughly studied brain systems in the primate, and it offers an ideal opportunity to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of the series of perturbation techniques that have been used to study it. The perturbations have been critical in moving from correlations between neuronal activity and behaviour closer to a causal relation between neuronal activity and behaviour. The same perturbation techniques have also been used to tease out neuronal circuits that are related to active vision that in turn are driving behaviour. The evolution of perturbation techniques includes ablation of both cortical and subcortical targets, punctate chemical lesions, reversible inactivations, electrical stimulation, and finally the expanding optogenetic techniques. The evolution of perturbation techniques has supported progressively stronger conclusions about what neuronal circuits in the brain underlie active vision and how the circuits themselves might be organized.

  5. Tetrandrine identified in a small molecule screen to activate mesenchymal stem cells for enhanced immunomodulation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zijiang; Concannon, John; Ng, Kelvin S.; Seyb, Kathleen; Mortensen, Luke J.; Ranganath, Sudhir; Gu, Fangqi; Levy, Oren; Tong, Zhixiang; Martyn, Keir; Zhao, Weian; Lin, Charles P.; Glicksman, Marcie A.; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    Pre-treatment or priming of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) prior to transplantation can significantly augment the immunosuppressive effect of MSC-based therapies. In this study, we screened a library of 1402 FDA-approved bioactive compounds to prime MSC. We identified tetrandrine as a potential hit that activates the secretion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a potent immunosuppressive agent, by MSC. Tetrandrine increased MSC PGE2 secretion through the NF-κB/COX-2 signaling pathway. When co-cultured with mouse macrophages (RAW264.7), tetrandrine-primed MSC attenuated the level of TNF-α secreted by RAW264.7. Furthermore, systemic transplantation of primed MSC into a mouse ear skin inflammation model significantly reduced the level of TNF-α in the inflamed ear, compared to unprimed cells. Screening of small molecules to pre-condition cells prior to transplantation represents a promising strategy to boost the therapeutic potential of cell therapy. PMID:27457881

  6. Tetrandrine identified in a small molecule screen to activate mesenchymal stem cells for enhanced immunomodulation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zijiang; Concannon, John; Ng, Kelvin S; Seyb, Kathleen; Mortensen, Luke J; Ranganath, Sudhir; Gu, Fangqi; Levy, Oren; Tong, Zhixiang; Martyn, Keir; Zhao, Weian; Lin, Charles P; Glicksman, Marcie A; Karp, Jeffrey M

    2016-07-26

    Pre-treatment or priming of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) prior to transplantation can significantly augment the immunosuppressive effect of MSC-based therapies. In this study, we screened a library of 1402 FDA-approved bioactive compounds to prime MSC. We identified tetrandrine as a potential hit that activates the secretion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a potent immunosuppressive agent, by MSC. Tetrandrine increased MSC PGE2 secretion through the NF-κB/COX-2 signaling pathway. When co-cultured with mouse macrophages (RAW264.7), tetrandrine-primed MSC attenuated the level of TNF-α secreted by RAW264.7. Furthermore, systemic transplantation of primed MSC into a mouse ear skin inflammation model significantly reduced the level of TNF-α in the inflamed ear, compared to unprimed cells. Screening of small molecules to pre-condition cells prior to transplantation represents a promising strategy to boost the therapeutic potential of cell therapy.

  7. Cytochrome P450-mediated activation of the fragrance compound geraniol forms potent contact allergens

    SciTech Connect

    Hagvall, Lina; Baron, Jens Malte; Boerje, Anna; Weidolf, Lars; Merk, Hans; Karlberg, Ann-Therese

    2008-12-01

    Contact sensitization is caused by low molecular weight compounds which penetrate the skin and bind to protein. In many cases, these compounds are activated to reactive species, either by autoxidation on exposure to air or by metabolic activation in the skin. Geraniol, a widely used fragrance chemical, is considered to be a weak allergen, although its chemical structure does not indicate it to be a contact sensitizer. We have shown that geraniol autoxidizes and forms allergenic oxidation products. In the literature, it is suggested but not shown that geraniol could be metabolically activated to geranial. Previously, a skin-like CYP cocktail consisting of cutaneous CYP isoenzymes, was developed as a model system to study cutaneous metabolism. In the present study, we used this system to investigate CYP-mediated activation of geraniol. In incubations with the skin-like CYP cocktail, geranial, neral, 2,3-epoxygeraniol, 6,7-epoxygeraniol and 6,7-epoxygeranial were identified. Geranial was the main metabolite formed followed by 6,7-epoxygeraniol. The allergenic activities of the identified metabolites were determined in the murine local lymph node assay (LLNA). Geranial, neral and 6,7-epoxygeraniol were shown to be moderate sensitizers, and 6,7-epoxygeranial a strong sensitizer. Of the isoenzymes studied, CYP2B6, CYP1A1 and CYP3A5 showed high activities. It is likely that CYP1A1 and CYP3A5 are mainly responsible for the metabolic activation of geraniol in the skin, as they are expressed constitutively at significantly higher levels than CYP2B6. Thus, geraniol is activated through both autoxidation and metabolism. The allergens geranial and neral are formed via both oxidation mechanisms, thereby playing a large role in the sensitization to geraniol.

  8. Persistence of biologically active compounds in aquatic systems: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Boelter, A.M.; Fernandez, J.D.; Meyer, J.S.; Sanchez, D.A.; Bergman, H.L.

    1986-11-01

    Waters collected from two study sites were tested for persistence of biologically active compounds as the waters percolated through experimental media. At the first site, the Paraho Lysimeter in Anvil Points, Colorado, two leachate samples (early and late flow in Spring 1983) were collected from each of four piles of processed oil shale overlain by different thicknesses of soil. Although water quality differed among samples, six of eight lysimeter leachates tested were acutely toxic to an aquatic invertebrate, Daphnia magna, and five were acutely toxic to fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Water collected from a modified in situ (MIS) retort was percolated through columns containing three different types of soil. Raw leachate from the MIS spent shale was acutely toxic to an aquatic invertebrate, Ceriodaphnia dubia. The toxicity of samples from nine pore volumes of retort water percolating through a column containing a sandy soil increased with successive pore volumes, but leachate toxicity never equaled the toxicity of the retort water. In contrast, the first pore volumes of retort water or reconstituted water leached through a sandy loam soil were more toxic than the retort water; however, the second pore volumes of leachates were not toxic. First pore volume leachates of retort water percolating through a sandy clay loam soil were much less toxic than the retort water; second pore volume leachates were not toxic.

  9. Activation of HIV-1 with Nanoparticle-Packaged Small-Molecule Protein Phosphatase-1-Targeting Compound

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kahli A.; Lin, Xionghao; Bolshakov, Oleg; Griffin, James; Niu, Xiaomei; Kovalskyy, Dmytro; Ivanov, Andrey; Jerebtsova, Marina; Taylor, Robert E.; Akala, Emmanuel; Nekhai, Sergei

    2015-01-01

    Complete eradication of HIV-1 infection is impeded by the existence of latent HIV-1 reservoirs in which the integrated HIV-1 provirus is transcriptionally inactive. Activation of HIV-1 transcription requires the viral Tat protein and host cell factors, including protein phosphatase-1 (PP1). We previously developed a library of small compounds that targeted PP1 and identified a compound, SMAPP1, which induced HIV-1 transcription. However, this compound has a limited bioavailability in vivo and may not be able to reach HIV-1-infected cells and induce HIV-1 transcription in patients. We packaged SMAPP1 in polymeric polyethylene glycol polymethyl methacrylate nanoparticles and analyzed its release and the effect on HIV-1 transcription in a cell culture. SMAPP1 was efficiently packaged in the nanoparticles and released during a 120-hr period. Treatment of the HIV-1-infected cells with the SMAPP1-loaded nanoparticles induced HIV-1 transcription. Thus, nanoparticles loaded with HIV-1-targeting compounds might be useful for future anti-HIV-1 therapeutics. PMID:26839837

  10. Antioxidant compounds, antioxidant activity and phenolic content in peel from three tropical fruits from Yucatan, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Moo-Huchin, Víctor M; Moo-Huchin, Mariela I; Estrada-León, Raciel J; Cuevas-Glory, Luis; Estrada-Mota, Iván A; Ortiz-Vázquez, Elizabeth; Betancur-Ancona, David; Sauri-Duch, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the antioxidant compounds, antioxidant activity and content of individual phenolic compounds of freeze-dried peel from three tropical fruits grown in Yucatan, México: purple star apple (Chrysophyllum cainito L.), yellow cashew and red cashew (Anacardium occidentale). The freeze-dried peels were good source of antioxidant compounds. ABTS and DPPH values in the peel from each fruit were 3050.95-3322.31 μM Trolox/100g dry weight (DW) or 890.19-970.01 mg of vitamin C/100 g DW, and 1579.04-1680.90 μM Trolox/100 g DW or 340.18-362.18 mg of vitamin C/100 g DW, respectively. Six phenolic compounds were identified in the peel from the tropical fruits studied: ferulic, caffeic, sinapic, gallic, ellagic and myricetin. This study demonstrated that freeze-dried peels from purple star apple, yellow cashew and red cashew, could serve as potential sources of antioxidants for use in food and pharmaceutical industries.

  11. Occurrence, fate, and ecosystem implications of endocrine active compounds in select rivers of Minnesota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Writer, J.; Keefe, S.; Barber, L. B.; Brown, G.; Schoenfuss, H.; Kiesling, R.; Gray, J. L.

    2009-12-01

    Select endocrine active compounds (EACs) were measured in four rivers in southern Minnesota. Additionally, caged and wild fish were assessed for indication of endocrine disruption using plasma vitellogenin and histopathology. Low concentrations of EACs were identified in all rivers, as was elevated plasma vitellogenin in caged and wild fish, indicating potential endocrine disruption. To evaluate the persistence of these compounds in small rivers, a tracer study was performed on one of the rivers (Redwood River) using Lagrangian sampling coupled with hydrologic modeling incorporating transient storage. Mass exchange (transient storage, sorption) and degradation were approximated as pseudo first order processes, and in-stream removal rates were then computed by comparing conservative tracer concentrations to organic compound concentrations. Production of estrone and 4-nonylphenol in the studied reach as a result of biochemical transformation from their parent compounds (17β-estradiol and alkylphenolpolyethoxylates, respectively) was quantified. The distance required for 17β-estradiol and nonylphenol to undergo a 50% reduction in concentration was >2 km and >10 km, respectively. These results indicate that EACs are transported several kilometers downstream from discharge sources and therefore have the potential of adversely impacting the lotic ecosystem over these distances.

  12. Bioactive Compounds and Antioxidant Activity in Different Types of Berries

    PubMed Central

    Skrovankova, Sona; Sumczynski, Daniela; Mlcek, Jiri; Jurikova, Tunde; Sochor, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Berries, especially members of several families, such as Rosaceae (strawberry, raspberry, blackberry), and Ericaceae (blueberry, cranberry), belong to the best dietary sources of bioactive compounds (BAC). They have delicious taste and flavor, have economic importance, and because of the antioxidant properties of BAC, they are of great interest also for nutritionists and food technologists due to the opportunity to use BAC as functional foods ingredients. The bioactive compounds in berries contain mainly phenolic compounds (phenolic acids, flavonoids, such as anthocyanins and flavonols, and tannins) and ascorbic acid. These compounds, either individually or combined, are responsible for various health benefits of berries, such as prevention of inflammation disorders, cardiovascular diseases, or protective effects to lower the risk of various cancers. In this review bioactive compounds of commonly consumed berries are described, as well as the factors influencing their antioxidant capacity and their health benefits. PMID:26501271

  13. Bioactive Compounds and Antioxidant Activity in Different Types of Berries.

    PubMed

    Skrovankova, Sona; Sumczynski, Daniela; Mlcek, Jiri; Jurikova, Tunde; Sochor, Jiri

    2015-10-16

    Berries, especially members of several families, such as Rosaceae (strawberry, raspberry, blackberry), and Ericaceae (blueberry, cranberry), belong to the best dietary sources of bioactive compounds (BAC). They have delicious taste and flavor, have economic importance, and because of the antioxidant properties of BAC, they are of great interest also for nutritionists and food technologists due to the opportunity to use BAC as functional foods ingredients. The bioactive compounds in berries contain mainly phenolic compounds (phenolic acids, flavonoids, such as anthocyanins and flavonols, and tannins) and ascorbic acid. These compounds, either individually or combined, are responsible for various health benefits of berries, such as prevention of inflammation disorders, cardiovascular diseases, or protective effects to lower the risk of various cancers. In this review bioactive compounds of commonly consumed berries are described, as well as the factors influencing their antioxidant capacity and their health benefits.

  14. JV Task 86 - Identifying the Source of Benzene in Indoor Air Using Different Compound Classes from TO-15 Data

    SciTech Connect

    Steven B. Hawthorne

    2007-04-15

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) data that had already been collected using EPA method TO-15 at four different sites under regulatory scrutiny (a school, strip mall, apartment complex, and business/residential neighborhood) were evaluated to determine whether the source of indoor air benzene was outdoor air or vapor intrusion from contaminated soil. Both the use of tracer organics characteristic of different sources and principal component statistical analysis demonstrated that the source of indoor air at virtually all indoor sampling locations was a result of outdoor air, and not contaminated soil in and near the indoor air-sampling locations. These results show that proposed remediation activities to remove benzene-contaminated soil are highly unlikely to reduce indoor air benzene concentrations. A manuscript describing these results is presently being prepared for submission to a peer-reviewed journal.

  15. Caatinga plants: Natural and semi-synthetic compounds potentially active against Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Patrícia de Brum; Silva, Nícolas Luiz Feijó; da Silva, Gloria Narjara Santos; Silva, Denise Brentan; Lopes, Norberto Peporine; Gnoatto, Simone Cristina Baggio; da Silva, Márcia Vanusa; Macedo, Alexandre José; Bastida, Jaume; Tasca, Tiana

    2016-05-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis causes trichomoniasis; the most common but overlooked non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. The treatment is based at 5'-nitroimidazoles, however, failure are related to resistance of T. vaginalis to chemotherapy. Caatinga is a uniquely Brazilian region representing a biome with type desert vegetation and plants present diverse biological activity, however, with few studies. The aim of this study was to investigate the activity against T. vaginalis of different plants from Caatinga and identify the compounds responsible by the activity. A bioguided fractionation of Manilkara rufula was performed and four major compounds were identified: caproate of α-amyrin (1b), acetate of β-amyrin (2a), caproate of β-amyrin (2b), and acetate of lupeol (3a). In addition, six derivatives of α-amyrin (1), β-amyrin (2) and lupeol (3) were synthesized and tested against the parasite. Ursolic acid (5) reduced about 98% of parasite viability after 2h of incubation and drastic ultrastructural alterations were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Moreover, 5 presented high cytotoxicity to HMVII and HeLa cell line and low cytotoxicity against Vero line at 50 μM (MIC against the parasite). Metronidazole effect against T. vaginalis resistant isolate was improved when in association with 5.

  16. Volatile compounds of Lamiaceae exhibit a synergistic antibacterial activity with streptomycin

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Sthéfane G.; Alves, Lucas F.; Pinto, Maria Eduarda A.; Oliveira, Graziela T.; Siqueira, Ezequias P.; Ribeiro, Rosy I. M. A.; Ferreira, Jaqueline M. S.; Lima, Luciana A. R. S.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial infections cause thousands of deaths in the world every year. In most cases, infections are more serious because the patient is already weakened, and often, the bacteria are already resistant to the antibiotics used. Counterparting this negative scenario, the interest in medicinal plants as an alternative to the synthetic antimicrobial drugs is blossoming worldwide. In the present work, we identified the volatile compounds of ethanol extracts of Melissa officinalis, Mentha sp., Ocimum basilicum, Plectranthus barbatus, and Rosmarinus officinalis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Also was evaluated antimicrobial activity of ethanol extracts against 6 bacteria of clinical interest, and was tested the interaction of these extracts with a commercial antibiotic streptomycin. Phytol was a compound identified in all extracts by GC/MS, being majoritary component in Plectranthus barbatus and Rosmarinus officinalis. The Gram-positive bacteria were more sensitive to ethanol extracts, and Plectranthus barbatus and Rosmarinus officinalis were the most active extracts. Ethanol extracts exhibited a synergetic effect with streptomycin. These results encourage additional studies, in order to evaluate the possibilities of using ethanol extracts of Lamiaceae family as natural source for antibacterial activity. PMID:25763039

  17. Phenolic Compounds from Olea europaea L. Possess Antioxidant Activity and Inhibit Carbohydrate Metabolizing Enzymes In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Dekdouk, Nadia; Malafronte, Nicola; Russo, Daniela; Faraone, Immacolata; De Tommasi, Nunziatina; Ameddah, Souad; Severino, Lorella; Milella, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Phenolic composition and biological activities of fruit extracts from Italian and Algerian Olea europaea L. cultivars were studied. Total phenolic and tannin contents were quantified in the extracts. Moreover 14 different phenolic compounds were identified, and their profiles showed remarkable quantitative differences among analysed extracts. Moreover antioxidant and enzymatic inhibition activities were studied. Three complementary assays were used to measure their antioxidant activities and consequently Relative Antioxidant Capacity Index (RACI) was used to compare and easily describe obtained results. Results showed that Chemlal, between Algerian cultivars, and Coratina, among Italian ones, had the highest RACI values. On the other hand all extracts and the most abundant phenolics were tested for their efficiency to inhibit α-amylase and α-glucosidase enzymes. Leccino, among all analysed cultivars, and luteolin, among identified phenolic compounds, were found to be the best inhibitors of α-amylase and α-glucosidase enzymes. Results demonstrated that Olea europaea fruit extracts can represent an important natural source with high antioxidant potential and significant α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibitory effects. PMID:26557862

  18. Virtual Screening of compounds from Tabernaemontana divaricata for potential anti-bacterial activity

    PubMed Central

    Gogoi, Rashmi Rekha; Gogoi, Dhrubajyoti; Bezbaruah, Rajib Lochan

    2014-01-01

    Virtual Screening and Molecular Docking analysis for Tabernaemontana divaricata derived 66 Law Molecular Weight Compounds (LMW) was conducted and to identified and predicted novel molecules as a inhibitor of Streptococcus pneumonia. The investigation has revealed several compounds with optimum binding towards Penicillin-binding proteins, Sialidases, Aspartate betasemialdehide dehydrogenase cell membrane protein of Streptococcus pneumonia. Docking results were computed in term of binding energy, ligand efficiency and number of hydrogen bonding. Apparicine (-5.14), 5-Hydroxyvoaphylline (-4.78), Voacangine (-4.7), 19-Hydroxycoronaridine (-4.44) and Coronaridine (-4.72) are identified as most suitable to bind with N-acetylglucosamine-1- phosphate uridyltransferase receptor. Ervaticine (-6.33), Ibogamine (-6.15), Methylvoaphylline (-5.74) and Coronaridine hydroxyindolenine (-5.32) has showed novel binding against the penicillin-binding proteins. Ervaticine (-6.42), 5-oxo-11-hydroxy voaphylline (-6.18), Conolobine B (-6.02) has found optimum binding against the active site of NanB sialidase of Streptococcus pneumonia. The compounds 3S-Cyanocoronaridine (-6.71), 19-Epivoacristine (-5.48) and Ervaticine(-5.45) interacting with aspartate beta-semialdehide and found suitable with least docking score. PMID:24748755

  19. Annotated compound data for modulators of detergent-solubilised or lipid-reconstituted respiratory type II NADH dehydrogenase activity obtained by compound library screening

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Elyse A.; Cook, Gregory M.; Heikal, Adam

    2015-01-01

    The energy-generating membrane protein NADH dehydrogenase (NDH-2), a proposed antibacterial drug target (see “Inhibitors of type II NADH:menaquinone oxidoreductase represent a class of antitubercular drugs” Weinstein et al. 2005 [1]), was screened for modulators of activity in either detergent-solublised or lipid reconstituted (proteolipsome) form. Here we present an annotated list of compounds identified in a small-scale screen against NDH-2. The dataset contains information regarding the libraries screened, the identities of hit compounds and the physicochemical properties governing solubility and permeability. The implications of these data for future antibiotic discovery are discussed in our associated report, “Comparison of lipid and detergent enzyme environments for identifying inhibitors of membrane-bound energy-transducing proteins” [2]. PMID:26862571

  20. Annotated compound data for modulators of detergent-solubilised or lipid-reconstituted respiratory type II NADH dehydrogenase activity obtained by compound library screening.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Elyse A; Cook, Gregory M; Heikal, Adam

    2016-03-01

    The energy-generating membrane protein NADH dehydrogenase (NDH-2), a proposed antibacterial drug target (see "Inhibitors of type II NADH:menaquinone oxidoreductase represent a class of antitubercular drugs" Weinstein et al. 2005 [1]), was screened for modulators of activity in either detergent-solublised or lipid reconstituted (proteolipsome) form. Here we present an annotated list of compounds identified in a small-scale screen against NDH-2. The dataset contains information regarding the libraries screened, the identities of hit compounds and the physicochemical properties governing solubility and permeability. The implications of these data for future antibiotic discovery are discussed in our associated report, "Comparison of lipid and detergent enzyme environments for identifying inhibitors of membrane-bound energy-transducing proteins" [2].

  1. ION COMPOSITION ELUCIDATION (ICE): A HIGH RESOLUTION MASS SPECTROMETRIC TOOL FOR IDENTIFYING ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN COMPLEX EXTRACTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory


    Unidentified Organic Compounds. For target analytes, standards are purchased, extraction and clean-up procedures are optimized, and mass spectra and retention times for the chromatographic separation are obtained for comparison to the target compounds in environmental sample ...

  2. A review on antifungal activity of mushroom (basidiomycetes) extracts and isolated compounds.

    PubMed

    Alves, Maria José; Ferreira, Isabel C F R; Dias, Joana; Teixeira, Vânia; Martins, Anabela; Pintado, Manuela

    2013-01-01

    The present review reports the antifungal activity of mushroom extracts and isolated compounds including high (e.g. peptides and proteins) and low (e.g. sesquiterpenes and other terpenes, steroids, organic acids, acylcyclopentenediones and quinolines) molecular weight compounds. Most of the studies available on literature focused on screening of antifungal activity of mushroom extracts, rather than of isolated compounds. Data indicate that mushroom extracts are mainly tested against different Candida species, while mushroom compounds are mostly tested upon other fungi. Therefore, the potential of these compounds might be more useful in food industry than in clinics. Oudemansiella canarii and Agaricus bisporus methanolic extracts proved to be the most active mushroom extracts against Candida spp. Grifolin, isolated from Albatrellus dispansus, seemed to be the most active compound against phytopathogenic fungi. Further studies should be performed in order to better understand the mechanism of action of this and other antifungal compounds as well as safety issues.

  3. Inhibition of tyrosinase activity by polyphenol compounds from Flemingia philippinensis roots.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Curtis-Long, Marcus J; Lee, Byong Won; Yuk, Heung Joo; Kim, Dae Wook; Tan, Xue Fei; Park, Ki Hun

    2014-02-01

    Flemingia philippinensis is used as a foodstuff or medicinal plant in the tropical regions of China. The methanol (95%) extract of the roots of this plant showed potent tyrosinase inhibition (80% inhibition at 30μg/ml). Activity-guided isolation yielded six polyphenols that inhibited both the monophenolase (IC50=1.01-18.4μM) and diphenolase (IC50=5.22-84.1μM) actions of tyrosinase. Compounds 1-6 emerged to be three new polyphenols and three known flavanones, flemichin D, lupinifolin and khonklonginol H. The new compounds (1-3) were identified as dihydrochalcones which we named fleminchalcones (A-C), respectively. The most potent inhibitor, dihydrochalcone (3) showed significant inhibitions against both the monophenolase (IC50=1.28μM) and diphenolase (IC50=5.22μM) activities of tyrosinase. Flavanone (4) possessing a resorcinol group also inhibited monophenolase (IC50=1.79μM) and diphenolase (IC50=7.48μM) significantly. In kinetic studies, all isolated compounds behaved as competitive inhibitors. Fleminchalcone A was found to have simple reversible slow-binding inhibition against monophenolase.

  4. GC-MS analysis of bio-active compounds in methanolic extract of Lactuca runcinata DC

    PubMed Central

    Kanthal, Lakshmi Kanta; Dey, Akalanka; Satyavathi, K.; Bhojaraju, P.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The presence of phytochemical constitutes has been reported from species of the Compositae (Asteraceae). Hitherto no reports exist on the phytochemical components and biological activity of Lactuca runcinata DC. Objective: The present study was designed to determine the bioactive compounds in the whole plant methanol extract of Lactuca runcinata. Materials and Methods: Phytochemical screening of the entire herb of Lactuca runcinata DC revealed the presence of some bio-active components. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of the whole plant methanol extract of Lactuca runcinata was performed on a GC-MS equipment (Thermo Scientific Co.) Thermo GC-TRACE ultra ver.: 5.0, Thermo MS DSQ II. Results: The phytochemical tests showed the presence of alkaloids, cardiac glycosides, flavonoids, phenols, phlobatannin, reducing sugars, saponins, steroids, tannins, terpenoids, volatile oils, carbohydrates, and protein/amino acids in methanolic extract of L. runcinata. The GC-MS analysis has shown the presence of different phytochemical compounds in the methanolic extract of Lactuca runcinata. A total of 21 compounds were identified representing 84.49% of total methanolic extract composition. Conclusion: From the results, it is evident that Lactuca runcinata contains various phytocomponents and is recommended as a plant of phytopharmaceutical importance. PMID:24497744

  5. Chromatin profiling of Drosophila CNS subpopulations identifies active transcriptional enhancers.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Joseph C; McKay, Daniel J; Lieb, Jason D; Crews, Stephen T

    2016-10-15

    One of the key issues in studying transcriptional regulation during development is how to employ genome-wide assays that reveals sites of open chromatin and transcription factor binding to efficiently identify biologically relevant genes and enhancers. Analysis of Drosophila CNS midline cell development provides a useful system for studying transcriptional regulation at the genomic level due to a large, well-characterized set of midline-expressed genes and in vivo validated enhancers. In this study, FAIRE-seq on FACS-purified midline cells was performed and the midline FAIRE data were compared with whole-embryo FAIRE data. We find that regions of the genome with a strong midline FAIRE peak and weak whole-embryo FAIRE peak overlap with known midline enhancers and provide a useful predictive tool for enhancer identification. In a complementary analysis, we compared a large dataset of fragments that drive midline expression in vivo with the FAIRE data. Midline enhancer fragments with a midline FAIRE peak tend to be near midline-expressed genes, whereas midline enhancers without a midline FAIRE peak were often distant from midline-expressed genes and unlikely to drive midline transcription in vivo.

  6. Computational modeling of serum-binding proteins and clearance in extrapolations across life stages and species for endocrine active compounds.

    PubMed

    Teeguarden, Justin G; Barton, Hugh A

    2004-06-01

    One measure of the potency of compounds that lead to the effects through ligand-dependent gene transcription is the relative affinity for the critical receptor. Endocrine active compounds that are presumed to act principally through binding to the estrogen receptor (e.g., estradiol, genistein, bisphenol A, and octylphenol) comprise one class of such compounds. For making simple comparisons, receptor-binding affinity has been equated to in vivo potency, which consequently defines the dose-response characteristics for the compound. Direct extrapolation of in vitro estimated affinities to the corresponding in vivo system and to specific species or life stages (e.g., neonatal, pregnancy) can be misleading. Accurate comparison of the potency of endocrine active compounds requires characterization of biochemical and pharmacokinetic factors that affect their free concentration. Quantitative in vitro and in vivo models were developed for integrating pharmacokinetics factors (e.g., serum protein and receptor-binding affinities, clearance) that affect potency. Data for parameterizing these models for several estrogenic compounds were evaluated and the models exercised. While simulations of adult human or rat sera were generally successful, difficulties in describing early life stages were identified. Exogenous compounds were predicted to be largely ineffective at competing estradiol off serum-binding proteins, suggesting this was unlikely to be physiologically significant. Discrepancies were identified between relative potencies based upon modeling in vitro receptor-binding activity versus in vivo activity in the presence of clearance and serum-binding proteins. The examples illustrate the utility of this approach for integrating available experimental data from in vitro and in vivo studies to estimate the relative potency of these compounds.

  7. Screening of an FDA-approved compound library identifies four small-molecule inhibitors of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus replication in cell culture.

    PubMed

    de Wilde, Adriaan H; Jochmans, Dirk; Posthuma, Clara C; Zevenhoven-Dobbe, Jessika C; van Nieuwkoop, Stefan; Bestebroer, Theo M; van den Hoogen, Bernadette G; Neyts, Johan; Snijder, Eric J

    2014-08-01

    Coronaviruses can cause respiratory and enteric disease in a wide variety of human and animal hosts. The 2003 outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) first demonstrated the potentially lethal consequences of zoonotic coronavirus infections in humans. In 2012, a similar previously unknown coronavirus emerged, Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), thus far causing over 650 laboratory-confirmed infections, with an unexplained steep rise in the number of cases being recorded over recent months. The human MERS fatality rate of ∼ 30% is alarmingly high, even though many deaths were associated with underlying medical conditions. Registered therapeutics for the treatment of coronavirus infections are not available. Moreover, the pace of drug development and registration for human use is generally incompatible with strategies to combat emerging infectious diseases. Therefore, we have screened a library of 348 FDA-approved drugs for anti-MERS-CoV activity in cell culture. If such compounds proved sufficiently potent, their efficacy might be directly assessed in MERS patients. We identified four compounds (chloroquine, chlorpromazine, loperamide, and lopinavir) inhibiting MERS-CoV replication in the low-micromolar range (50% effective concentrations [EC(50)s], 3 to 8 μM). Moreover, these compounds also inhibit the replication of SARS coronavirus and human coronavirus 229E. Although their protective activity (alone or in combination) remains to be assessed in animal models, our findings may offer a starting point for treatment of patients infected with zoonotic coronaviruses like MERS-CoV. Although they may not necessarily reduce viral replication to very low levels, a moderate viral load reduction may create a window during which to mount a protective immune response.

  8. Basophil Activation Test identifies the patients with Chronic Spontaneous Urticaria suffering the most active disease

    PubMed Central

    Curto‐Barredo, Laia; Yelamos, Jose; Gimeno, Ramon; Mojal, Sergi; Pujol, Ramon M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction The basophil activation test showing CD63 up regulation could be a specific and sensitive in vitro complementary text to the in vivo autologous serum skin test for the activity assessment of the patients suffering autoimmune chronic spontaneous urticaria. The aim of this study is to define the basophil activation test as a useful tool in clinical practice in order to identify those patients with more active disease. Methods We screened 139 patients (96 women) diagnosed of chronic spontaneous urticaria using simultaneously autologous serum skin test and basophil activation test and their relationship with disease activity. Results Positive autologous serum skin test was found in 56.8%; from them, 31.6% were basophil activation test positive. Negative autologous serum skin test result was found in the 43.2% of the sample that showed negative CD63 expression results in all cases, except one. Patients with positive autologous serum skin test and positive CD63 by basophil activation test showed significant higher Urticaria Activity Score of 7 days (P = 0.004) and of 3 weeks (P = 0.001) than patients with positive autologous serum skin test and negative CD63 (mean ± standard deviation [SD] 26.57 ± 10.56 versus 18.40 ± 12.05 for the Urticaria Activity Score of 7 days and 56.47 ± 23.78 versus 39.88 ± 25.44 for the Urticaria Activity Score of 3 weeks). Conclusions The CD63 expression on basophils appears as a reliable in vitro marker, useful in clinical practice in combination with autologous serum skin test to define chronic spontaneous urticaria patients with the highest urticaria activity that impairs a normal life. PMID:27980778

  9. Human Health Relevance of Pharmaceutically Active Compounds in Drinking Water.

    PubMed

    Khan, Usman; Nicell, Jim

    2015-05-01

    In Canada, as many as 20 pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) have been detected in samples of treated drinking water. The presence of these PhACs in drinking water raises important questions as to the human health risk posed by their potential appearance in drinking water supplies and the extent to which they indicate that other PhACs are present but have not been detected using current analytical methods. Therefore, the goal of the current investigation was to conduct a screening-level assessment of the human health risks posed by the aquatic release of an evaluation set of 335 selected PhACs. Predicted and measured concentrations were used to estimate the exposure of Canadians to each PhAC in the evaluation set. Risk evaluations based on measurements could only be performed for 17 PhACs and, of these, all were found to pose a negligible risk to human health when considered individually. The same approach to risk evaluation, but based on predicted rather than measured environmental concentrations, suggested that 322 PhACs of the evaluation set, when considered individually, are expected to pose a negligible risk to human health due to their potential presence in drinking waters. However, the following 14 PhACs should be prioritized for further study: triiodothyronine, thyroxine, ramipril and its metabolite ramiprilat, candesartan, lisinopril, atorvastatin, lorazepam, fentanyl, atenolol, metformin, enalaprilat, morphine, and irbesartan. Finally, the currently available monitoring data for PhACs in Canadian surface and drinking waters was found to be lacking, irrespective of whether their suitability was assessed based on risk posed, predicted exposure concentrations, or potency.

  10. SYNTHESIZING ORGANIC COMPOUNDS USING LIGHT-ACTIVATED TIO2

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-value organic compounds have been synthesized successfully from linear and cyclic hydrocarbons, by photocatalytic oxidation using a semiconductor material, titanium dioxide (TiO2). Various hydrocarbons were partially oxgenated in both liquid and gaseous phase reactors usi...

  11. Acquisition of Compound Words in Chinese-English Bilingual Children: Decomposition and Cross-Language Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Chenxi; Wang, Min; Perfetti, Charles A.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated compound processing and cross-language activation in a group of Chinese-English bilingual children, and they were divided into four groups based on the language proficiency levels in their two languages. A lexical decision task was designed using compound words in both languages. The compound words in one language contained…

  12. Discovery of a novel activator of 5-lipoxygenase from an anacardic acid derived compound collection

    PubMed Central

    Wisastra, Rosalina; Kok, Petra A.M; Eleftheriadis, Nikolaos; Baumgartner, Matthew P.; Camacho, Carlos J.; Haisma, Hidde J.; Dekker, Frank J.

    2013-01-01

    Lipoxygenases (LOXs) and cyclooxygenases (COXs) metabolize poly-unsaturated fatty acids into inflammatory signaling molecules. Modulation of the activity of these enzymes may provide new approaches for therapy of inflammatory diseases. In this study, we screened novel anacardic acid derivatives as modulators of human 5-LOX and COX-2 activity. Interestingly, a novel salicylate derivative 23a was identified as a surprisingly potent activator of human 5-LOX. This compound showed both non-competitive activation towards the human 5-LOX activator adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and non-essential mixed type activation against the substrate linoleic acid, while having no effect on the conversion of the substrate arachidonic acid. The kinetic analysis demonstrated a non-essential activation of the linoleic acid conversion with a KA of 8.65 μM, αKA of 0.38 μM and a β value of 1.76. It is also of interest that a comparable derivative 23d showed a mixed type inhibition for linoleic acid conversion. These observations indicate the presence of an allosteric binding site in human 5-LOX distinct from the ATP binding site. The activatory and inhibitory behavior of 23a and 23d on the conversion of linoleic compared to arachidonic acid are rationalized by docking studies, which suggest that the activator 23a stabilizes linoleic acid, whereas the larger inhibitor 23d blocks the enzyme active site. PMID:24231650

  13. Inhibitors of VIM-2 by screening pharmacologically active and click-chemistry compound libraries.

    PubMed

    Minond, Dmitriy; Saldanha, S Adrian; Subramaniam, Prem; Spaargaren, Michael; Spicer, Timothy; Fotsing, Joseph R; Weide, Timo; Fokin, Valery V; Sharpless, K Barry; Galleni, Moreno; Bebrone, Carine; Lassaux, Patricia; Hodder, Peter

    2009-07-15

    VIM-2 is an Ambler class B metallo-beta-lactamase (MBL) capable of hydrolyzing a broad-spectrum of beta-lactam antibiotics. Although the discovery and development of MBL inhibitors continue to be an area of active research, an array of potent, small molecule inhibitors is yet to be fully characterized for VIM-2. In the presented research, a compound library screening approach was used to identify and characterize VIM-2 inhibitors from a library of pharmacologically active compounds as well as a focused 'click' chemistry library. The four most potent VIM-2 inhibitors resulting from a VIM-2 screen were characterized by kinetic studies in order to determine K(i) and mechanism of enzyme inhibition. As a result, two previously described pharmacologic agents, mitoxantrone (1,4-dihydroxy-5,8-bis([2-([2-hydroxyethyl]amino)ethyl]amino)-9,10-anthracenedione) and 4-chloromercuribenzoic acid (pCMB) were found to be active, the former as a non-competitive inhibitor (K(i)=K(i)(')=1.5+/-0.2microM) and the latter as a slowly reversible or irreversible inhibitor. Additionally, two novel sulfonyl-triazole analogs from the click library were identified as potent, competitive VIM-2 inhibitors: N-((4-((but-3-ynyloxy)methyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazol-5-yl)methyl)-4-iodobenzenesulfonamide (1, K(i)=0.41+/-0.03microM) and 4-iodo-N-((4-(methoxymethyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazol-5-yl)methyl)benzenesulfonamide (2, K(i)=1.4+/-0.10microM). Mitoxantrone and pCMB were also found to potentiate imipenem efficacy in MIC and synergy assays employing Escherichia coli. Taken together, all four compounds represent useful chemical probes to further investigate mechanisms of VIM-2 inhibition in biochemical and microbiology-based assays.

  14. Identifying active methane-oxidizers in thawed Arctic permafrost by proteomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, C. M.; Stackhouse, B. T.; Chourey, K.; Hettich, R. L.; Vishnivetskaya, T. A.; Pfiffner, S. M.; Layton, A. C.; Mykytczuk, N. C.; Whyte, L.; Onstott, T. C.

    2012-12-01

    The rate of CH4 release from thawing permafrost in the Arctic has been regarded as one of the determining factors on future global climate. It is uncertain how indigenous microorganisms would interact with such changing environmental conditions and hence their impact on the fate of carbon compounds that are sequestered in the cryosol. Multitudinous studies of pristine surface cryosol (top 5 cm) and microcosm experiments have provided growing evidence of effective methanotrophy. Cryosol samples corresponding to active layer were sampled from a sparsely vegetated, ice-wedge polygon at the McGill Arctic Research Station at Axel Heiberg Island, Nunavut, Canada (N79°24, W90°45) before the onset of annual thaw. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene indicated the occurrence of methanotroph-containing bacterial families as minor components (~5%) in pristine cryosol including Bradyrhizobiaceae, Methylobacteriaceae and Methylocystaceae within alpha-Proteobacteria, and Methylacidiphilaceae within Verrucomicrobia. The potential of methanotrophy is supported by preliminary analysis of metagenome data, which indicated putative methane monooxygenase gene sequences relating to Bradyrhizobium sp. and Pseudonocardia sp. are present. Proteome profiling in general yielded minute traces of proteins, which likely hints at dormant nature of the soil microbial consortia. The lack of specific protein database for permafrost posted additional challenge to protein identification. Only 35 proteins could be identified in the pristine cryosol and of which 60% belonged to Shewanella sp. Most of the identified proteins are known to be involved in energy metabolism or post-translational modification of proteins. Microcosms amended with sodium acetate exhibited a net methane consumption of ~65 ngC-CH4 per gram (fresh weight) of soil over 16 days of aerobic incubation at room temperature. The pH in microcosm materials remained acidic (decreased from initial 4.7 to 4.5). Protein extraction and

  15. Imperanene, a novel phenolic compound with platelet aggregation inhibitory activity from Imperata cylindrica.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, K; Shibuya, M; Ohizumi, Y

    1995-01-01

    Imperanene, a novel phenolic compound [1] has been isolated from Imperata cylindrica. Its structure was elucidated by spectroscopic evidence. Imperanene showed platelet aggregation inhibitory activity.

  16. Compositions comprising a polypeptide having cellulolytic enhancing activity and a bicycle compound and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Feng; Sweeney, Matthew; Quinlan, Jason

    2015-06-16

    The present invention relates to compositions comprising: a polypeptide having cellulolytic enhancing activity and a bicyclic compound. The present invention also relates to methods of using the compositions.

  17. Compositions comprising a polypeptide having cellulolytic enhancing activity and a bicyclic compound and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Quinlan, Jason; Xu, Feng; Sweeney, Matthew

    2016-10-04

    The present invention relates to compositions comprising: a polypeptide having cellulolytic enhancing activity and a bicyclic compound. The present invention also relates to methods of using the compositions.

  18. Compositions comprising a polypeptide having cellulolytic enhancing activity and a quinone compound and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Quinlan, Jason; Xu, Feng; Sweeney, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    The present invention relates to compositions comprising: a polypeptide having cellulolytic enhancing activity and a quinone compound. The present invention also relates to methods of using the compositions.

  19. Compositions comprising a polypeptide having cellulolytic enhancing activity and a heterocyclic compound and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Feng; Sweeney, Matthew; Quinlan, Jason

    2016-08-02

    The present invention relates to compositions comprising: a polypeptide having cellulolytic enhancing activity and a heterocyclic compound. The present invention also relates to methods of using the compositions.

  20. Compositions comprising a polypeptide having cellulolytic enhancing activity and a dioxy compound and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Sweeney, Matthew; Xu, Feng; Quinlan, Jason

    2016-07-19

    The present invention relates to compositions comprising: a polypeptide having cellulolytic enhancing activity and a dioxy compound. The present invention also relates to methods of using the compositions.

  1. Antiproliferative activity of New Zealand propolis and phenolic compounds vs human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Catchpole, Owen; Mitchell, Kevin; Bloor, Stephen; Davis, Paul; Suddes, Amanda

    2015-10-01

    New Zealand propolis is a "European" type propolis obtained by honey bees mainly from exudates of poplar. European type propolis is known to have anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties and this activity has been attributed to some of the main constituents such as chrysin and CAPE (caffeic acid phenethyl ester). As part of our studies on how New Zealand propolis might benefit gastro-intestinal health, we carried out in vitro bioactivity-guided fractionation of "Bio30™" propolis using both anti-inflammatory (TNF-α, COX-1, COX-2) and anti-colon cancer (DLD-1 colon cancer cell viability) assays; and determined the phenolic compounds responsible for the activity. The New Zealand wax-free Bio30™ propolis tincture solids had very high levels of the dihydroflavonoids pinocembrin and pinobanksin-3-O-acetate, and high levels of the dimethylallyl, benzyl and 3-methyl-3-butenyl caffeates relative to CAPE. The DLD-1 assays identified strong anti-proliferative activity associated with these components as well as chrysin, galangin and CAPE and a number of lesser known or lower concentration compounds including benzyl ferulate, benzyl isoferulate, pinostrobin, 5-phenylpenta-2,4-dienoic acid and tectochrysin. The phenolic compounds pinocembrin, pinobanksin-3-O-acetate, tectochrysin, dimethylallyl caffeate, 3-methyl-3-butenyl caffeate, benzyl ferulate and benzyl isoferulate also showed good broad spectrum activity in anti-proliferative assays against three other gastro-intestinal cancer cell lines; HCT-116 colon carcinoma, KYSE-30 oesophageal squamous cancer, and NCI-N87 gastric carcinoma. Activity is also observed in anti-inflammatory assays although it appears to be limited to one of the first cytokines in the inflammatory cascade, TNF-α.

  2. A Dual Read-Out Assay to Evaluate the Potency of Compounds Active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Ollinger, Juliane; Bailey, Mai Ann; Moraski, Garrett C.; Casey, Allen; Florio, Stephanie; Alling, Torey; Miller, Marvin J.; Parish, Tanya

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a serious global health problem caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis. There is an urgent need for discovery and development of new treatments, but this can only be accomplished through rapid and reproducible M. tuberculosis assays designed to identify potent inhibitors. We developed an automated 96-well assay utilizing a recombinant strain of M. tuberculosis expressing a far-red fluorescent reporter to determine the activity of novel compounds; this allowed us to measure growth by monitoring both optical density and fluorescence. We determined that optical density and fluorescence were correlated with cell number during logarithmic phase growth. Fluorescence was stably maintained without antibiotic selection over 5 days, during which time cells remained actively growing. We optimized parameters for the assay, with the final format being 5 days’ growth in 96-well plates in the presence of 2% w/v DMSO. We confirmed reproducibility using rifampicin and other antibiotics. The dual detection method allows for a reproducible calculation of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), at the same time detecting artefacts such as fluorescence quenching or compound precipitation. We used our assay to confirm anti-tubercular activity and establish the structure activity relationship (SAR) around the imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine-3-carboxamides, a promising series of M. tuberculosis inhibitors. PMID:23593234

  3. Identification of Tetraazacyclic Compounds as Novel Potent Inhibitors Antagonizing RORγt Activity and Suppressing Th17 Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Qingfeng; Zhao, Mei; Yu, Bolan; Bai, Chuan; Huang, Zhaofeng

    2015-01-01

    CD4+ T-helper cells that produce interleukin-17 (Th17 cells) are characterized as pathological T-helper cells in autoimmune diseases. Differentiation of human and mouse Th17 cells requires a key transcription regulator, retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor γt (RORγt), which is a potential therapeutic target for autoimmune diseases. To develop a therapeutic agent for Th17-mediated autoimmune diseases, we have established a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay for candidate screening, in which the luciferase activity in RORγt-LBD positive and negative Jurkat cells were analyzed to evaluate induction of RORγt activity by compounds. This technique was applied to screen a commercially-available drug-like chemical compound library (Enamine) which contains 20155 compounds. The screening identified 17 compounds that can inhibit RORγt function in the HTS screen system. Of these, three tetraazacyclic compounds can potently inhibit RORγt activity, and suppress Th17 differentiation and IL-17 production. These three candidate compounds could significantly attenuate the expression of the Il17a by 65%- 90%, and inhibit IL-17A secretion by 47%, 63%, and 74%, respectively. These compounds also exhibited a potent anti-RORγt activity, with EC50 values of 0.25 μM, 0.67 μM and 2.6 μM, respectively. Our data demonstrated the feasibility of targeting the RORγt to inhibit Th17 cell differentiation and function with these tetraazacyclic compounds, and the potential to improve the structure of these compounds for autoimmune diseases therapeutics. PMID:26368822

  4. Phenolic Compounds from Halimodendron halodendron (Pall.) Voss and Their Antimicrobial and Antioxidant Activities

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jihua; Lou, Jingfeng; Luo, Chao; Zhou, Ligang; Wang, Mingan; Wang, Lan

    2012-01-01

    Halimodendron halodendron has been used as forage in northwestern China for a long time. Its young leaves and flowers are edible and favored by indigenous people. In this study, eleven phenolic compounds were bioassay-guided and isolated from the aerial parts of H. halodendron for the first time. They were identified by means of physicochemical and spectrometric analysis as quercetin (1), 3,5,7,8,4′-pentahydroxy-3′-methoxy flavone (2), 3-O-methylquercetin (3), 3,3′-di-O-methylquercetin (4), 3,3′-di-O-methylquercetin-7-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (5), isorhamentin-3-O-β-d-rutinoside (6), 8-O-methylretusin (7), 8-O-methylretusin-7-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (8), salicylic acid (9), p-hydroxybenzoic acid (ferulic acid) (10), and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy cinnamic acid (11). They were sorted as flavonols (1–6), soflavones (7 and 8), and phenolic acids (9–11). Among the compounds, flanools 1–4 revealed a strong antibacterial activity with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of 50–150 μg/mL, and median inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 26.8–125.1 μg/mL. The two isoflavones (7 and 8) showed moderate inhibitory activity on the test bacteria. Three phenolic acids (9, 10 and 11) showed strong antibacterial activity with IC50 values of 28.1–149.7 μg/mL. Antifungal activities of the compounds were similar to their antibacterial activities. All these phenolic compounds showed significant antimicrobial activity with a broad spectrum as well as antioxidant activity based on 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging and β-carotene-linoleic acid bleaching assays. In general, the flavonol aglycones with relatively low polarity exhibited stronger activities than the glycosides. The results suggest the potential of this plant as a source of functional food ingredients and provide support data for its utilization as forage as well. PMID:23109858

  5. Development of a QPatch automated electrophysiology assay for identifying KCa3.1 inhibitors and activators.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, David Paul; Yu, Weifeng; Brown, Brandon M; Løjkner, Lars Damgaard; Wulff, Heike

    2013-01-01

    The intermediate-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel KCa3.1 (also known as KCNN4, IK1, or the Gárdos channel) plays an important role in the activation of T and B cells, mast cells, macrophages, and microglia by regulating membrane potential, cellular volume, and calcium signaling. KCa3.1 is further involved in the proliferation of dedifferentiated vascular smooth muscle cells and fibroblast and endothelium-derived hyperpolarization responses in the vascular endothelium. Accordingly, KCa3.1 inhibitors are therapeutically interesting as immunosuppressants and for the treatment of a wide range of fibroproliferative disorders, whereas KCa3.1 activators constitute a potential new class of endothelial function preserving antihypertensives. Here, we report the development of QPatch assays for both KCa3.1 inhibitors and activators. During assay optimization, the Ca(2+) sensitivity of KCa3.1 was studied using varying intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations. A free Ca(2+) concentration of 1 μM was chosen to optimally test inhibitors. To identify activators, which generally act as positive gating modulators, a lower Ca(2+) concentration (∼200 nM) was used. The QPatch results were benchmarked against manual patch-clamp electrophysiology by determining the potency of several commonly used KCa3.1 inhibitors (TRAM-34, NS6180, ChTX) and activators (EBIO, riluzole, SKA-31). Collectively, our results demonstrate that the QPatch provides a comparable but much faster approach to study compound interactions with KCa3.1 channels in a robust and reliable assay.

  6. SARANEA: a freely available program to mine structure-activity and structure-selectivity relationship information in compound data sets.

    PubMed

    Lounkine, Eugen; Wawer, Mathias; Wassermann, Anne Mai; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    We introduce SARANEA, an open-source Java application for interactive exploration of structure-activity relationship (SAR) and structure-selectivity relationship (SSR) information in compound sets of any source. SARANEA integrates various SAR and SSR analysis functions and utilizes a network-like similarity graph data structure for visualization. The program enables the systematic detection of activity and selectivity cliffs and corresponding key compounds across multiple targets. Advanced SAR analysis functions implemented in SARANEA include, among others, layered chemical neighborhood graphs, cliff indices, selectivity trees, editing functions for molecular networks and pathways, bioactivity summaries of key compounds, and markers for bioactive compounds having potential side effects. We report the application of SARANEA to identify SAR and SSR determinants in different sets of serine protease inhibitors. It is found that key compounds can influence SARs and SSRs in rather different ways. Such compounds and their SAR/SSR characteristics can be systematically identified and explored using SARANEA. The program and source code are made freely available under the GNU General Public License.

  7. Medicinal plants and their isolated compounds showing anti-Trichomonas vaginalis- activity.

    PubMed

    Mehriardestani, Mozhgan; Aliahmadi, Atousa; Toliat, Tayebeh; Rahimi, Roja

    2017-04-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a major of non-viral sexually-transmitted infection and an important cause of serious obstetrical and gynecological complications. Treatment options for trichomoniasis are limited to nitroimidazole compounds. The increasing resistance and allergic reactions to nitroimidazole and recurrent trichomoniasis make it essential to identify and develop new drugs against trichomoniasis. Medicinal plants are an important source for discovery of new medications. This review discusses the anti-trichomonas effects of medicinal plants and their chemical constituents to find better options against this pathogenic protozoon. Electronic databases were searched to collect all data from the year 2000 through September 2015 for in vitro, in vivo and clinical studies on the effect of medicinal plants on T. vaginalis. A total of 95 in vitro and clinical studies were identified. Only four human studies were found in this review. The Asteracea, Lamiaceae and Myrtaceae families contained the greatest number of plants with anti-trichomonas activity. Persea americana, Ocimum basilicum and Verbascum thapsus were the most efficacious against T. vaginalis. Plant metabolites containing alkaloids, isoflavonoid glucosides, essential oils, lipids, saponins and sesquiterpene lactones were found to possess anti-trichomonas properties. Assessing the structure-activity of highly-potent anti-trichomonas phytochemicals is suggested for finding natural, semisynthetic and synthetic anti-trichomonas compounds. Further clinical studies are necessary for confirmation of natural anti-trichomonas substances and completion of their safety profiles.

  8. Computational drugs repositioning identifies inhibitors of oncogenic PI3K/AKT/P70S6K-dependent pathways among FDA-approved compounds

    PubMed Central

    Carrella, Diego; Manni, Isabella; Tumaini, Barbara; Dattilo, Rosanna; Papaccio, Federica; Mutarelli, Margherita; Sirci, Francesco; Amoreo, Carla A.; Mottolese, Marcella; Iezzi, Manuela; Ciolli, Laura; Aria, Valentina; Bosotti, Roberta; Isacchi, Antonella; Loreni, Fabrizio; Bardelli, Alberto; Avvedimento, Vittorio E.; di Bernardo, Diego; Cardone, Luca

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of inhibitors for oncogenic signalling pathways remains a key focus in modern oncology, based on personalized and targeted therapeutics. Computational drug repurposing via the analysis of FDA-approved drug network is becoming a very effective approach to identify therapeutic opportunities in cancer and other human diseases. Given that gene expression signatures can be associated with specific oncogenic mutations, we tested whether a “reverse” oncogene-specific signature might assist in the computational repositioning of inhibitors of oncogenic pathways. As a proof of principle, we focused on oncogenic PI3K-dependent signalling, a molecular pathway frequently driving cancer progression as well as raising resistance to anticancer-targeted therapies. We show that implementation of “reverse” oncogenic PI3K-dependent transcriptional signatures combined with interrogation of drug networks identified inhibitors of PI3K-dependent signalling among FDA-approved compounds. This led to repositioning of Niclosamide (Niclo) and Pyrvinium Pamoate (PP), two anthelmintic drugs, as inhibitors of oncogenic PI3K-dependent signalling. Niclo inhibited phosphorylation of P70S6K, while PP inhibited phosphorylation of AKT and P70S6K, which are downstream targets of PI3K. Anthelmintics inhibited oncogenic PI3K-dependent gene expression and showed a cytostatic effect in vitro and in mouse mammary gland. Lastly, PP inhibited the growth of breast cancer cells harbouring PI3K mutations. Our data indicate that drug repositioning by network analysis of oncogene-specific transcriptional signatures is an efficient strategy for identifying oncogenic pathway inhibitors among FDA-approved compounds. We propose that PP and Niclo should be further investigated as potential therapeutics for the treatment of tumors or diseases carrying the constitutive activation of the PI3K/P70S6K signalling axis. PMID:27542212

  9. Gene expression profiling in Ishikawa cells: A fingerprint for estrogen active compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Boehme, Kathleen; Simon, Stephanie

    2009-04-01

    Several anthropogenous and naturally occurring substances, referred to as estrogen active compounds (EACs), are able to interfere with hormone and in particular estrogen receptor signaling. EACs can either cause adverse health effects in humans and wildlife populations or have beneficial effects on estrogen-dependent diseases. The aim of this study was to examine global gene expression profiles in estrogen receptor (ER)-proficient Ishikawa plus and ER-deficient Ishikawa minus endometrial cancer cells treated with selected well-known EACs (Diethylstilbestrol, Genistein, Zearalenone, Resveratrol, Bisphenol A and o,p'-DDT). We also investigated the effect of the pure antiestrogen ICI 182,780 (ICI) on the expression patterns caused by these compounds. Transcript levels were quantified 24 h after compound treatment using Illumina BeadChip Arrays. We identified 87 genes with similar expression changes in response to all EAC treatments in Ishikawa plus. ICI lowered the magnitude or reversed the expression of these genes, indicating ER dependent regulation. Apart from estrogenic gene regulation, Bisphenol A, o,p'-DDT, Zearalenone, Genistein and Resveratrol displayed similarities to ICI in their expression patterns, suggesting mixed estrogenic/antiestrogenic properties. In particular, the predominant antiestrogenic expression response of Resveratrol could be clearly distinguished from the other test compounds, indicating a distinct mechanism of action. Divergent gene expression patterns of the phytoestrogens, as well as weaker estrogenic gene expression regulation determined for the anthropogenous chemicals Bisphenol A and o,p'-DDT, warrants a careful assessment of potential detrimental and/or beneficial effects of EACs. The characteristic expression fingerprints and the identified subset of putative marker genes can be used for screening chemicals with an unknown mode of action and for predicting their potential to exert endocrine disrupting effects.

  10. Whole Genome Sequencing Identifies Novel Compound Heterozygous Lysosomal Trafficking Regulator Gene Mutations Associated with Autosomal Recessive Chediak-Higashi Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yaqiong; Zhang, Li; Wang, Senfen; Chen, Feng; Gu, Yang; Hong, Enyu; Yu, Yongbo; Ni, Xin; Guo, Yongli; Shi, Tieliu; Xu, Zigang

    2017-01-01

    Chediak–Higashi syndrome (CHS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by varying degrees of oculocutaneous albinism, recurrent infections, and a mild bleeding tendency, with late neurologic dysfunction. This syndrome is molecularly characterized by pathognomonic mutations in the LYST (lysosomal trafficking regulator). Using whole genome sequencing (WGS) we attempted to identify novel mutations of CHS based on a family of CHS with atypical symptoms. The two patients demonstrated a phenotypic constellation including partial oculocutaneous albinism, frequency upper respiratory infection or a marginal intelligence, without bleeding tendency and severe immunodeficiency. WGS revealed two compound LYST mutations including a maternally inherited chr1:235969126G > A (rs80338652) and a novel paternally inherited chr1: 235915327A > AT, associated with autosomal recessive CHS. These two variants fall in the coding regions of LYST, resulting in premature truncation of LYST due to R1104X/N2535KfsX2 induced incomplete translation. Notably, the heterozygous carriers (i.e. parents) were unaffected. Our finding also reveals decreased plasma serotonin levels in patients with CHS compared with unaffected individuals for the first time. The present study contributes to improved understanding of the causes of this disease and provides new ideas for possible treatments. PMID:28145517

  11. Low cost whole-organism screening of compounds for anthelmintic activity.

    PubMed

    Preston, Sarah; Jabbar, Abdul; Nowell, Cameron; Joachim, Anja; Ruttkowski, Bärbel; Baell, Jonathan; Cardno, Tony; Korhonen, Pasi K; Piedrafita, David; Ansell, Brendan R E; Jex, Aaron R; Hofmann, Andreas; Gasser, Robin B

    2015-04-01

    Due to major problems with drug resistance in parasitic nematodes of animals, there is a substantial need and excellent opportunities to develop new anthelmintics via genomic-guided and/or repurposing approaches. In the present study, we established a practical and cost-effective whole-organism assay for the in vitro-screening of compounds for activity against parasitic stages of the nematode Haemonchus contortus (barber's pole worm). The assay is based on the use of exsheathed L3 (xL3) and L4 stages of H. contortus of small ruminants (sheep and goats). Using this assay, we screened a panel of 522 well-curated kinase inhibitors (GlaxoSmithKline, USA; code: PKIS2) for activity against H. contortus by measuring the inhibition of larval motility using an automated image analysis system. We identified two chemicals within the compound classes biphenyl amides and pyrazolo[1,5-α]pyridines, which reproducibly inhibit both xL3 and L4 motility and development, with IC50s of 14-47 μM. Given that these inhibitors were designed as anti-inflammatory drugs for use in humans and fit the Lipinski rule-of-five (including bioavailability), they show promise for hit-to-lead optimisation and repurposing for use against parasitic nematodes. The screening assay established here has significant advantages over conventional methods, particularly in terms of ease of use, throughput, time and cost. Although not yet fully automated, the current assay is readily suited to the screening of hundreds to thousands of compounds for subsequent hit-to-lead optimisation. The current assay is highly adaptable to many parasites of socioeconomic importance, including those causing neglected tropical diseases. This aspect is of major relevance, given the urgent need to deliver the goals of the London Declaration (http://unitingtocombatntds.org/resource/london-declaration) through the rapid and efficient repurposing of compounds in public-private partnerships.

  12. HPLC-Analysis of Polyphenolic Compounds in Gardenia jasminoides and Determination of Antioxidant Activity by Using Free Radical Scavenging Assays

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Riaz; Saha, Moni Rani; Subhan, Nusrat; Hossain, Hemayet; Jahan, Ismet Ara; Akter, Raushanara; Alam, Ashraful

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Gardenia jasminoides is a traditional medicinal plant rich in anti-inflammatory flavonoids and phenolic compounds and used for the treatment of inflammatory diseases and pain. In this present study, antioxidant potential of Gardenia jasminoides leaves extract was evaluated by using various antioxidant assays. Methods: Various antioxidant assays such as 1, 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging assay, reducing power and total antioxidant capacity expressed as equivalent to ascorbic acid were employed. Moreover, phenolic compounds were detected by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with diode-array detection. Results: The methanol extract showed significant free radical scavenging activities in DPPH radical scavenging antioxidant assays compared to the reference antioxidant ascorbic acid. Total antioxidant activity was increased in a dose dependent manner. The extract also showed strong reducing power. The total phenolic content was determined as 190.97 mg/g of gallic acid equivalent. HPLC coupled with diode-array detection was used to identify and quantify the phenolic compounds in the extracts. Gallic acid, (+)-catechin, rutin hydrate and quercetin have been identified in the plant extracts. Among the phenolic compounds, catechin and rutin hydrate are present predominantly in the extract. The accuracy and precision of the presented method were corroborated by low intra- and inter-day variations in quantitative results in leaves extract. Conclusion: These results suggest that phenolic compounds and flavonoids might contribute to high antioxidant activities of Gardenia jasminoides leaves. PMID:24754012

  13. Antibiotic discovery throughout the Small World Initiative: A molecular strategy to identify biosynthetic gene clusters involved in antagonistic activity.

    PubMed

    Davis, Elizabeth; Sloan, Tyler; Aurelius, Krista; Barbour, Angela; Bodey, Elijah; Clark, Brigette; Dennis, Celeste; Drown, Rachel; Fleming, Megan; Humbert, Allison; Glasgo, Elizabeth; Kerns, Trent; Lingro, Kelly; McMillin, MacKenzie; Meyer, Aaron; Pope, Breanna; Stalevicz, April; Steffen, Brittney; Steindl, Austin; Williams, Carolyn; Wimberley, Carmen; Zenas, Robert; Butela, Kristen; Wildschutte, Hans

    2017-01-22

    The emergence of bacterial pathogens resistant to all known antibiotics is a global health crisis. Adding to this problem is that major pharmaceutical companies have shifted away from antibiotic discovery due to low profitability. As a result, the pipeline of new antibiotics is essentially dry and many bacteria now resist the effects of most commonly used drugs. To address this global health concern, citizen science through the Small World Initiative (SWI) was formed in 2012. As part of SWI, students isolate bacteria from their local environments, characterize the strains, and assay for antibiotic production. During the 2015 fall semester at Bowling Green State University, students isolated 77 soil-derived bacteria and genetically characterized strains using the 16S rRNA gene, identified strains exhibiting antagonistic activity, and performed an expanded SWI workflow using transposon mutagenesis to identify a biosynthetic gene cluster involved in toxigenic compound production. We identified one mutant with loss of antagonistic activity and through subsequent whole-genome sequencing and linker-mediated PCR identified a 24.9 kb biosynthetic gene locus likely involved in inhibitory activity in that mutant. Further assessment against human pathogens demonstrated the inhibition of Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the presence of this compound, thus supporting our molecular strategy as an effective research pipeline for SWI antibiotic discovery and genetic characterization.

  14. The influence of interactions among phenolic compounds on the antiradical activity of chokeberries (Aronia melanocarpa).

    PubMed

    Jakobek, Lidija; Seruga, Marijan; Krivak, Petra

    2011-06-01

    In the present work, interactions between phenolic compounds from chokeberries and their influence on the antiradical activity was studied. Three fractions were isolated from chokeberries containing different classes of phenolic compounds. The first fraction contained a major part of phenolic acids and flavonols, the second anthocyanins, and the third insoluble phenols and proanthocyanidins. The phenolic compound content was determined using high-performance liquid chromatography, and the antiradical activity using the DPPH test. In order to evaluate the effects of interactions between phenolic compounds on the antiradical activity, the antiradical activity of individual phenolic fractions was compared with that obtained by mixing phenolic fractions. Phenolic mixtures showed the decrease in the antiradical activity in comparison with the individual phenolic fractions. These results suggest the existence of complex interactions among phenolic compounds that caused the decrease of the antiradical activity. Interactions among chokeberry phenols promoted a negative synergism.

  15. Effects of active hexose correlated compound on the seasonal variations of immune competence in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Takanari, Jun; Hirayama, Yosuke; Homma, Kohei; Miura, Takehito; Nishioka, Hiroshi; Maeda, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of active hexose correlated compound intake on the immune competence in healthy volunteers. Thirty-four subjects were randomized to receive placebo or active hexose correlated compound at 1.0 g/d for 4 weeks in early winter. Natural killer cell activity was significantly increased in both groups during the study period, the natural killer cell number, however, was not altered in the active hexose correlated compound group while placebo group showed remarkable decline. In addition, the score of immunological vigor, an index of total immune competence, was maintained in the active hexose correlated compound group although that of placebo group lowered during the test period. These results suggested that the continuous active hexose correlated compound intake maintained the immune competence against the seasonal change.

  16. Volatile flavor compounds, total polyphenolic contents and antioxidant activities of a China gingko wine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Xie, Kelin; Zhuang, Haining; Ye, Ran; Fang, Zhongxiang; Feng, Tao

    2015-09-01

    The volatile compounds in gingko wine, a novel functional wine, were extracted by head-space solid phase micro-extraction (SPME) and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) coupled with odor activity value (OAV) and relative odor contribution (ROC) analyses. In addition, the total polyphenolic content of gingko wine was determined using the Folin-Ciocalteu reagent, and its antioxidant capacity was evaluated by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) assays. Fifty-eight compounds were tentatively identified, including 13 esters, 10 alcohols, 11 acids, 12 carbonyl compounds, 2 lactones, 2 phenols, and 8 hydrocarbons. Ethyl hexanoate, ethyl pentanoate, nonanal, ethyl butyrate and ethyl heptanoate were the major contributors to the gingko wine aroma based on the results of OAV and ROC. The total phenols content of the gingko wine was 456 mg/L gallic acid equivalents, and its antioxidant capacity was higher than those of typical Chinese liquors analyzed in this paper.

  17. Methanobactin: a copper binding compound having antibiotic and antioxidant activity isolated from methanotrophic bacteria

    DOEpatents

    DiSpirito, Alan A.; Zahn, James A.; Graham, David W.; Kim, Hyung J.; Alterman, Michail; Larive, Cynthia

    2007-04-03

    A means and method for treating bacterial infection, providing antioxidant activity, and chelating copper using a copper binding compound produced by methanotrophic bacteria is described. The compound, known as methanobactin, is the first of a new class of antibiotics having gram-positive activity. Methanobactin has been sequenced, and its structural formula determined.

  18. Comparative transcriptome analysis of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) leaves to identify aroma compound-related genes expressed in different cultivated regions.

    PubMed

    Lei, Bo; Zhao, Xue-Hua; Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Jie; Ren, Wei; Ren, Zhu; Chen, Yi; Zhao, Hui-Na; Pan, Wen-Jie; Chen, Wei; Li, Hong-Xun; Deng, Wen-Ya; Ding, Fu-Zhang; Lu, Kun

    2013-01-01

    To identify genes that are differentially expressed in tobacco in response to environmental changes and to decipher the mechanisms by which aromatic carotenoids are formed in tobacco, an Agilent Tobacco Gene Expression microarray was adapted for transcriptome comparison of tobacco leaves derived from three cultivated regions of China, Kaiyang (KY), Weining (WN) and Tianzhu (TZ). A total of 1,005 genes were differentially expressed between leaves derived from KY and TZ, 733 between KY and WN, and 517 between TZ and WN. Genes that were upregulated in leaves from WN and TZ tended to be involved in secondary metabolism pathways, and included several carotenoid pathway genes, e.g., NtPYS, NtPDS, and NtLCYE, whereas those that were down-regulated tended to be involved in the response to temperature and light. The expression of 10 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) was evaluated by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and found to be consistent with the microarray data. Gene Ontology and MapMan analyses indicate that the genes that were differentially expressed among the three cultivated regions were associated with the light reaction of photosystem II, response to stimuli, and secondary metabolism. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis showed that leaves derived from KY had the lowest levels of lutein, β-carotene, and neoxanthin, whereas the total carotenoid content in leaves from TZ was greatest, a finding that could well be explained by the expression patterns of DEGs in the carotenoid pathway. These results may help elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying environmental adaptation and accumulation of aroma compounds in tobacco.

  19. Evaluation of Natural Compounds for Antimicrobial Activity in the Introductory Microbiology Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finer, Kim R.

    1997-01-01

    Presents an experiment that provides students with an opportunity to investigate folk medicine and herbal cures and their accompanying claims. Involves isolating some active compounds from plant materials and demonstrating their antibacterial activity. (JRH)

  20. Evaluation of antimicrobial activity of extracts of Tibouchina candolleana (melastomataceae), isolated compounds and semi-synthetic derivatives against endodontic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Fernanda M.; de Souza, Maria Gorete; Crotti, Antônio E. Miller; Martins, Carlos H. G.; Ambrósio, Sérgio R.; Veneziani, Rodrigo C. S.; e Silva, Márcio L. Andrade; Cunha, Wilson R.

    2012-01-01

    This work describes the phytochemical study of the extracts from aerial parts of Tibouchina candolleana as well as the evaluation of the antimicrobial activity of extracts, isolated compounds, and semi-synthetic derivatives of ursolic acid against endodontic bacteria. HRGC analysis of the n-hexane extract of T. candolleana allowed identification of β-amyrin, α-amyrin, and β-sitosterol as major constituents. The triterpenes ursolic acid and oleanolic acid were isolated from the methylene chloride extract and identified. In addition, the flavonoids luteolin and genistein were isolated from the ethanol extract and identified. The antimicrobial activity was investigated via determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) using the broth microdilution method. Amongst the isolated compounds, ursolic acid was the most effective against the selected endodontic bacteria. As for the semi-synthetic ursolic acid derivatives, only the methyl ester derivative potentiated the activity against Bacteroides fragilis. PMID:24031892

  1. Ovicidal and adulticidal activities of Cinnamomum zeylanicum bark essential oil compounds and related compounds against Pediculus humanus capitis (Anoplura: Pediculicidae).

    PubMed

    Yang, Young-Cheol; Lee, Hoi-Seon; Lee, Si Hyeock; Clark, J Marshall; Ahn, Young-Joon

    2005-12-01

    The toxicity of cinnamon, Cinnamomum zeylanicum, bark essential oil compounds against eggs and adult females of human head louse, Pediculus humanus capitis, was examined using direct contact and vapour phase toxicity bioassays and compared with the lethal activity of their related compounds, benzyl alcohol, cinnamic acid, cinnamyl acetate, 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde and salicylaldehyde, as well as two widely used pediculicides, d-phenothrin and pyrethrum. In a filter-paper contact toxicity bioassay with female lice at 0.25 mg/cm(2), benzaldehyde was 29- and 27-fold more toxic than pyrethrum and d-phenothrin, respectively, as judged by median lethal time (LT(50)) values. Salicylaldehyde was nine and eight times more active than pyrethrum and d-phenothrin, respectively. Pediculicidal activity of linalool was comparable with that of d-phenothrin and pyrethrum. Cinnamomum bark essential oil was slightly less effective than either d-phenothrin or pyrethrum. Benzyl alcohol and (E)-cinnamaldehyde exhibited moderate pediculicidal activity. After 24h of exposure, no hatching was observed with 0.063 mg/cm(2) salicylaldehyde, 0.125 mg/cm(2) benzaldehyde, 0.5mg/cm(2)Cinnamomum bark essential oil, 1.0 mg/cm(2) (E)-cinnamaldehyde, and 1.0 mg/cm(2) benzyl cinnamate. Little or no ovicidal activity was observed with d-phenothrin or pyrethrum. In vapour phase toxicity tests with female lice, benzaldehyde and salicylaldehyde were much more effective in closed containers than in open ones, indicating that the mode of delivery of these compounds was largely due to action in the vapour phase. Neither d-phenothrin nor pyrethrum exhibited fumigant toxicity. Cinnamomum bark essential oil and test compounds described merit further study as potential pediculicides or ovicides for the control of P. h. capitis.

  2. Chemical reactivity and biological activity of chalcones and other α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds.

    PubMed

    Maydt, Daniela; De Spirt, Silke; Muschelknautz, Christian; Stahl, Wilhelm; Müller, Thomas J J

    2013-08-01

    Abstract 1. Chalcones are structural analogues of benzalacetophenone (BAP). Several derivatives have been identified in plants and anticarcinogenic and anti-inflammatory properties were attributed to the compounds, probably related to their direct antioxidant activity or stimulatory effects on the expression of endogenous defence enzymes like hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1). HO-1 expression is triggered by the Nrf2-Keap1 signalling pathway, initiated by the addition of chalcones to thiol groups of Keap1 via Michael-type reaction. 2. The present study used a model system estimating the reactivity of different synthetic chalcones and other α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds with thiols and compared the chemical reactivity with the biological activity, measured by HO-1 expression in human dermal fibroblasts. 3. Chemical reactivity with the thiol group of N-acetylcysteine was determined with 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) and followed chemical principles of structure-reactivity relationship. Most reactive were sulforaphane, dimethylfumarate, chalcone 3 ((2E)-1-phenyl-3-pyrimidin-2-ylprop-2-en-1-one) and chalcone 7 (1,3-diphenylprop-2-yn-1-one). This result demonstrates that α,β-unsaturated carbonyl derivatives react with thiols differently. All compounds were also biologically active; however, expression of HO-1 was not only related to the chemical reactivity but also to the lipophilicity of the molecules which likely affected transmembrane uptake. Most efficient inducers of HO-1 expression were BAP, 4-hydroxynonenal and chalcone 1 (4-[(1E)-3-oxo-3-phenylprop-1-en-1-yl]benzonitrile), chalcone 5 ((2E)-1-phenyl-3-[4-(trifluoromethyl)-phenyl]prop-2-en-1-one) and chalcone 7.

  3. A novel approach for identification of biologically active phenolic compounds in complex matrices using hybrid quadrupole-orbitrap mass spectrometer: A promising tool for testing antimicrobial activity of hops.

    PubMed

    Dušek, Martin; Jandovská, Vladimíra; Čermák, Pavel; Mikyška, Alexandr; Olšovská, Jana

    2016-08-15

    The phenolic compounds, secondary metabolites of hops represent a large family of compounds that could be subsequently divided into smaller groups based on the similarities between their chemical structures. The antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral properties of hops are well known, but there is a lack of information about antimicrobial activities of individual hop compounds. This study was carried out with an objective to identify compounds present in hops that have potential antibacterial activity. In the first stage of experiment, the active compounds with potential anti-microbial activity had to be extracted from hop cones. Therefore, minced hop cones were applied on solid growth medium inoculated with Staphylococcus aureus. The active substances that migrated into the medium created an inhibition zone. In the second stage of experiment, the inhibition zones were cut out from Petri dishes, active compounds were extracted from these zones and consequently analyzed using LC-HRMS. These complex assays were developed and optimized. The data were acquired by using a quadrupole-orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometer by targeted-MS2 experiment in both ionization modes. The MS method has been developed as a screening method with a subsequent fragmentation of compound of interest on the base of inclusion mass list. The unknown compounds extracted from inhibition zones have been identified either by searching against a database or their structure has been elucidated on the basis of their fragmentation spectra. On the basis of this experiment the list of active compounds with potential anti-microbial activities was enhanced.

  4. The removal of endocrine disrupting compounds, pharmaceutically activated compounds and cyanobacterial toxins during drinking water preparation using activated carbon--a review.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Luis F; Charles, Philippe; Glucina, Karl; Morlay, Catherine

    2012-10-01

    This paper provides a review of recent scientific research on the removal by activated carbon (AC) in drinking water (DW) treatment of 1) two classes of currently unregulated trace level contaminants with potential chronic toxicity-pharmaceutically activate compounds (PhACs) and endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs); 2) cyanobacterial toxins (CyBTs), which are a group of highly toxic and regulated compounds (as microcystin-LR); and 3) the above mentioned compounds by the hybrid system powdered AC/membrane filtration. The influence of solute and AC properties, as well as the competitive effect from background natural organic matter on the adsorption of such trace contaminants, are also considered. In addition, a number of adsorption isotherm parameters reported for PhACs, EDCs and CyBTs are presented herein. AC adsorption has proven to be an effective removal process for such trace contaminants without generating transformation products. This process appears to be a crucial step in order to minimize PhACs, EDCs and CyBTs in finished DW, hence calling for further studies on AC adsorption removal of these compounds. Finally, a priority chart of PhACs and EDCs warranting further study for the removal by AC adsorption is proposed based on the compounds' structural characteristics and their low removal by AC compared to the other compounds.

  5. Selective growth-inhibiting effects of compounds identified in Tabebuia impetiginosa inner bark on human intestinal bacteria.

    PubMed

    Park, Byeoung-Soo; Kim, Jun-Ran; Lee, Sung-Eun; Kim, Kyoung Soon; Takeoka, Gary R; Ahn, Young-Joon; Kim, Jeong-Han

    2005-02-23

    The growth-inhibiting activity of anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid and lapachol identified in the inner bark of taheebo, Tabebuia impetiginosa, toward 10 human intestinal bacteria was evaluated by using a paper disk diffusion bioassay and compared to those of seven lapachol congeners (1,4-naphthoquinone, naphthazarin, menadione, lawsone, plumbagin, juglone, and dichlone) as well as two commercially available antibiotics, chloramphenicol and tetracycline. Anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid exhibited very strong growth inhibition of Clostridium paraputrificum at 1 microg/disk while 100 microg/disk of lapachol was needed for moderate growth inhibition of the same organism. These two isolates exhibited weak inhibition of Clostridium perfringens and Escherichia coli at 100 microg/disk while no adverse effects were observed on the growth of Bifidobacterium adolescentis, Bifidobacterium bifidum, Bifidobacterium infantis, Lactobacillus acidophilus, and Lactobacillus casei at 1000 microg/disk. Structure-activity relationships indicate that a methyl group in the C-2 position of 1,4-naphthoquinone derivatives might play an important role in antibacterial activity.

  6. Leishmanicidal and cytotoxic activities of extracts and naturally-occurring compounds from two Lauraceae species.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Suárez, Jeysson; Coy-Barrera, Ericsson; Cuca, Luis Enrique; Delgado, Gabriela

    2011-02-01

    The in vitro leishmanicidal effects of ethanolic extracts and fifteen naturally-occurring compounds (five lignans, eight neolignans, a diterpene and a dihydrochalcone), obtained from Pleurothyrium cinereum and Ocotea macrophylla, were evaluated on promastigotes of Leishmania panamensis and L. braziliensis. In addition, in order to determine the selective action on Leishmania species as a safety principle, in vitro cytotoxicity on J774 cells was also evaluated for test compounds and extracts. One extract and seven compounds showed activity against Leishmania parasites at different levels. Dihydroflavokawin B (8) was found to be the most potent antileishmanial compound on both parasites, whilst (+)-otobaphenol (14), was found to be the most selective compound on L. panamensis.

  7. Chemometric tools for identification of volatile aroma-active compounds in oregano.

    PubMed

    Bansleben, Anne-Christin; Schellenberg, Ingo; Einax, Jürgen W; Schaefer, Kristin; Ulrich, Detlef; Bansleben, David

    2009-11-01

    One of the purposes of chemical analysis is to find quick and efficient methods to answer complex analytical questions in the life sciences. New analytical methods, in particular, produce a flood of data which are often very badly arranged. An effective way to overcome this problem is to apply chemometric methods. As part of the following investigations, three brands of oregano were analysed to identify their volatile aroma-active compounds. Two techniques were applied--gas chromatograpy-olfactometry (GC-O) and human sensory evaluation. Aroma-impact compounds could be identified in the main brands of oregano with the aid of chemometric methods (principal-components analysis, hierarchical cluster analysis, linear discriminant analysis, partial least-squares regression). Therefore, it is possible to reduce the analysis of sensory and olfactometry to relevant attributes. This makes classifying new species easier, much faster, and less expensive and is the premise for quick and more economic identification of new potential genotypes for oregano plant breeding. A comprehensive list of oregano key odourants, determined by GC-O and human sensory evaluation using different methods of supervised and unsupervised pattern cognition, has not previously been published.

  8. Antibacterial activity of extracellular compounds produced by a Pseudomonas strain against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria is a world health problem. Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains, is one of the most important human pathogens associated with hospital and community-acquired infections. The aim of this work was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa-derived compound against MRSA strains. Methods Thirty clinical MRSA strains were isolated, and three standard MRSA strains were evaluated. The extracellular compounds were purified by vacuum liquid chromatography. Evaluation of antibacterial activity was performed by agar diffusion technique, determination of the minimal inhibitory concentration, curve of growth and viability and scanning electron microscopy. Interaction of an extracellular compound with silver nanoparticle was studied to evaluate antibacterial effect. Results The F3 (ethyl acetate) and F3d (dichloromethane- ethyl acetate) fractions demonstrated antibacterial activity against the MRSA strains. Phenazine-1-carboxamide was identified and purified from the F3d fraction and demonstrated slight antibacterial activity against MRSA, and synergic effect when combined with silver nanoparticles produced by Fusarium oxysporum. Organohalogen compound was purified from this fraction showing high antibacterial effect. Using scanning electron microscopy, we show that the F3d fraction caused morphological changes to the cell wall of the MRSA strains. Conclusions These results suggest that P. aeruginosa-produced compounds such as phenazines have inhibitory effects against MRSA and may be a good alternative treatment to control infections caused by MRSA. PMID:23773484

  9. Integrated compound profiling screens identify the mitochondrial electron transport chain as the molecular target of the natural products manassantin, sesquicillin, and arctigenin.

    PubMed

    Lai, Kevin; Selinger, Douglas W; Solomon, Jonathan M; Wu, Hua; Schmitt, Esther; Serluca, Fabrizio C; Curtis, Daniel; Benson, John D

    2013-01-18

    Phenotypic compound screens can be used to identify novel targets in signaling pathways and disease processes, but the usefulness of these screens depends on the ability to quickly determine the target and mechanism of action of the molecules identified as hits. One fast route to discovering the mechanism of action of a compound is to profile its properties and to match this profile with those of compounds of known mechanism of action. In this work, the Novartis collection of over 12,000 pure natural products was screened for effects on early zebrafish development. The largest phenotypic class of hits, which caused developmental arrest without necrosis, contained known electron transport chain inhibitors and many compounds of unknown mechanism of action. High-throughput transcriptional profiling revealed that these compounds are mechanistically related to one another. Metabolic and biochemical assays confirmed that all of the molecules that induced developmental arrest without necrosis inhibited the electron transport chain. These experiments demonstrate that the electron transport chain is the target of the natural products manassantin, sesquicillin, and arctigenin. The overlap between the zebrafish and transcriptional profiling screens was not perfect, indicating that multiple profiling screens are necessary to fully characterize molecules of unknown function. Together, zebrafish screening and transcriptional profiling represent sensitive and scalable approaches for identifying bioactive compounds and elucidating their mechanism of action.

  10. [Activity of digestive enzymes during intraperitoneal intake of metal compounds].

    PubMed

    Zdol'nik, T D

    2001-01-01

    Digestive function was studied when three compounds from Group VIB of the Mendeleev periodic system of elements were intraperitoneally administered during 100 days. Potassium bichromate, ammonium molybdate in a dose of 0.2 mg/kg and sodium tungstate in a dose of 5.0 mg/kg (in terms of metal) were found to have a resorptive effect on pancreatic function and a local effect on the small intestinal mucosa.

  11. Bioactive compounds and antioxidant activity analysis of Malaysian pineapple cultivars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiet, Chong Hang; Zulkifli, Razauden Mohamed; Hidayat, Topik; Yaakob, Harisun

    2014-03-01

    Pineapple industry is one of the important agricultural sectors in Malaysia with 76 cultivars planted throughout the country. This study aims to generate useful nutritional information as well as evaluating antioxidant properties of different pineapple commercial cultivars in Malaysia. The bioactive compound content and antioxidant capacity of `Josapine', `Morris' and `Sarawak' pineapple (Ananas comosus) were studied. The pineapple varieties were collected at commercial maturity stage (20-40% yellowish of fruit peel) and the edible portion of the fruit was used as sample for evaluation. The bioactive compound of the fruit extracts were evaluated by total phenolic and tannin content assay while the antioxidant capacity was determined by ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP). From the results obtained, total phenolic and tannin content was highest for `Josapine' followed by `Morris' and `Sarawak'. With respect to FRAP, `Josapine' showed highest reducing capacity, followed by `Morris' and then `Sarawak' having the least value. The bioactive compounds content are positively correlated with the antioxidant capacities of the pineapple extracts. This result indicates that the total phenolics and tannin content present in the pineapples may contribute to the antioxidant capacity of the pineapples.

  12. Radiosensitization of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhi in presence of active compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacroix, M.; Chiasson, F.; Borsa, J.; Ouattara, B.

    2004-09-01

    The radiosensitization of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhi in ground beef was evaluated in the presence of 18 active compounds. Medium fat ground beef (23% fat) was inoculated with E. coli or S. typhi and each active compound was added separately at various concentrations. For E. coli, the most efficient compounds were trans-cinnamaldehyde, thymol and thyme. For S. typhi, the most efficient compounds was trans-cinnamaldehyde, carvacrol and thymol. The addition of tetrasodium pyrophosphate, carvacrol and ascorbic acid had no effect on the irradiation sensitivity of E. coli. For S. typhi, only ascorbic acid had no effect.

  13. Identifying unknown minerals and compounds from X-ray diffraction patterns using the Johnson and Vand FORTRAN 4 computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyte, F. T.

    1976-01-01

    Automated computer identification of minerals and compounds from unknown samples is provided along with detailed instructions and worked examples for use in graduate level courses in mineralogy and X-ray analysis applications.

  14. Odor-active compounds in cooked rice cultivars from Camargue (France) analyzed by GC-O and GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Maraval, Isabelle; Mestres, Christian; Pernin, Karine; Ribeyre, Fabienne; Boulanger, Renaud; Guichard, Elisabeth; Gunata, Ziya

    2008-07-09

    Volatile compounds of cooked rice from scented (Aychade, Fidji) and nonscented (Ruille) cultivars grown in the Camargue area in France were compared to that of a marketed Asian scented one (Thai) by gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). GC-O analyses of the organic extracts resulted in the perception of 40 odorous compounds. Only two compounds, oct-1-en-3-one and 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline, were almost always perceived. Hierarchical cluster analysis showed that most of the difference between rice odors was linked to quantitative differences with only 11 compounds being specific to some of the rice. Sixty compounds were identified and quantified by GC-MS, including a few new odor-active components. Principal component analysis enabled us to differentiate scented cultivars from a nonscented one, and scented rice cultivars from Camargue from a Thai sample. Calculated odor-active values evidenced that the Thai sample odor differed from that of scented Camargue cultivars because of the degradation of lipids and of cinnamic acid compounds.

  15. Antibacterial and antifungal activity of sulfur-containing compounds from Petiveria alliacea L.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seokwon; Kubec, Roman; Musah, Rabi A

    2006-03-08

    A total of 18 organosulfur compounds originating from Petiveria alliacea L. roots have been tested for their antibacterial and antifungal activities. These represent compounds occurring in fresh homogenates as well as those present in various macerates, extracts and other preparations made from Petiveria alliacea. Of the compounds assayed, the thiosulfinates, trisulfides and benzylsulfinic acid were observed to be the most active, with the benzyl-containing thiosulfinates exhibiting the broadest spectrum of antimicrobial activity. The effect of plant sample preparation conditions on the antimicrobial activity of the extract is discussed.

  16. Adenosine Monophosphate (AMP)-Activated Protein Kinase: A New Target for Nutraceutical Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Marín-Aguilar, Fabiola; Pavillard, Luis E.; Giampieri, Francesca; Bullón, Pedro; Cordero, Mario D.

    2017-01-01

    Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an important energy sensor which is activated by increases in adenosine monophosphate (AMP)/adenosine triphosphate (ATP) ratio and/or adenosine diphosphate (ADP)/ATP ratio, and increases different metabolic pathways such as fatty acid oxidation, glucose transport and mitochondrial biogenesis. In this sense, AMPK maintains cellular energy homeostasis by induction of catabolism and inhibition of ATP-consuming biosynthetic pathways to preserve ATP levels. Several studies indicate a reduction of AMPK sensitivity to cellular stress during aging and this could impair the downstream signaling and the maintenance of the cellular energy balance and the stress resistance. However, several diseases have been related with an AMPK dysfunction. Alterations in AMPK signaling decrease mitochondrial biogenesis, increase cellular stress and induce inflammation, which are typical events of the aging process and have been associated to several pathological processes. In this sense, in the last few years AMPK has been identified as a very interesting target and different nutraceutical compounds are being studied for an interesting potential effect on AMPK induction. In this review, we will evaluate the interaction of the different nutraceutical compounds to induce the AMPK phosphorylation and the applications in diseases such as cancer, type II diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases or cardiovascular diseases. PMID:28146060

  17. Biologically active vitamin B12 compounds in foods for preventing deficiency among vegetarians and elderly subjects.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Fumio; Yabuta, Yukinori; Tanioka, Yuri; Bito, Tomohiro

    2013-07-17

    The usual dietary sources of vitamin B12 are animal-source based foods, including meat, milk, eggs, fish, and shellfish, although a few plant-based foods such as certain types of dried lavers (nori) and mushrooms contain substantial and considerable amounts of vitamin B12, respectively. Unexpectedly, detailed characterization of vitamin B12 compounds in foods reveals the presence of various corrinoids that are inactive in humans. The majority of edible blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) and certain edible shellfish predominately contain an inactive corrinoid known as pseudovitamin B12. Various factors affect the bioactivity of vitamin B12 in foods. For example, vitamin B12 is partially degraded and loses its biological activity during cooking and storage of foods. The intrinsic factor-mediated gastrointestinal absorption system in humans has evolved to selectively absorb active vitamin B12 from naturally occurring vitamin B12 compounds, including its degradation products and inactive corrinoids that are present in daily meal foods. The objective of this review is to present up-to-date information on various factors that can affect the bioactivity of vitamin B12 in foods. To prevent vitamin B12 deficiency in high-risk populations such as vegetarians and elderly subjects, it is necessary to identify plant-source foods that contain high levels of bioactive vitamin B12 and, in conjunction, to prepare the use of crystalline vitamin B12-fortified foods.

  18. Walnut (Juglans regia L.) leaves: phenolic compounds, antibacterial activity and antioxidant potential of different cultivars.

    PubMed

    Pereira, José Alberto; Oliveira, Ivo; Sousa, Anabela; Valentão, Patrícia; Andrade, Paula B; Ferreira, Isabel C F R; Ferreres, Federico; Bento, Albino; Seabra, Rosa; Estevinho, Letícia

    2007-11-01

    Different cultivars of walnut (Juglans regia L.) leaves (Cv. Lara, Franquette, Mayette, Marbot, Mellanaise and Parisienne) grown in Portugal, were investigated in what concerns phenolic compounds and antimicrobial and antioxidant properties. Phenolics analysis was performed by reversed-phase HPLC/DAD and 10 compounds were identified and quantified: 3- and 5-caffeoylquinic acids, 3- and 4-p-coumaroylquinic acids, p-coumaric acid, quercetin 3-galactoside, quercetin 3-pentoside derivative, quercetin 3-arabinoside, quercetin 3-xyloside and quercetin 3-rhamnoside. The antimicrobial capacity was screened against Gram positive (Bacillus cereus, B. subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram negative bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae) and fungi (Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans). Walnut leaves selectively inhibited the growth of Gram positive bacteria, being B. cereus the most susceptible one (MIC 0.1mg/mL). Gram negative bacteria and fungi were resistant to the extracts at 100mg/mL. Lara walnut leaves were also submitted to antibacterial assays using 18 clinical isolates of Staphylococcus sp. Antioxidant activity was accessed by the reducing power assay, the scavenging effect on DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) radicals and beta-carotene linoleate model system. In a general way, all of the studied walnut leaves cultivars presented high antioxidant activity (EC(50) values lower than 1mg/mL), being Cv. Lara the most effective one.

  19. A Rapid Screening Analysis of Antioxidant Compounds in Native Australian Food Plants Using Multiplexed Detection with Active Flow Technology Columns.

    PubMed

    Rupesinghe, Emmanuel Janaka Rochana; Jones, Andrew; Shalliker, Ross Andrew; Pravadali-Cekic, Sercan

    2016-01-20

    Conventional techniques for identifying antioxidant and phenolic compounds in native Australian food plants are laborious and time-consuming. Here, we present a multiplexed detection technique that reduces analysis time without compromising separation performance. This technique is achieved using Active Flow Technology-Parallel Segmented Flow (AFT-PSF) columns. Extracts from cinnamon myrtle (Backhousia myrtifolia) and lemon myrtle (Backhousia citriodora) leaves were analysed via multiplexed detection using an AFT-PSF column with underivatised UV-VIS, mass spectroscopy (MS), and the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH(•)) derivatisation for antioxidants as detection methods. A number of antioxidant compounds were detected in the extracts of each leaf extract.

  20. Asymmetric bioreduction of activated alkenes to industrially relevant optically active compounds

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Christoph K.; Tasnádi, Gábor; Clay, Dorina; Hall, Mélanie; Faber, Kurt

    2012-01-01

    Ene-reductases from the ‘Old Yellow Enzyme’ family of flavoproteins catalyze the asymmetric reduction of various α,β-unsaturated compounds at the expense of a nicotinamide cofactor. They have been applied to the synthesis of valuable enantiopure products, including chiral building blocks with broad industrial applications, terpenoids, amino acid derivatives and fragrances. The combination of these highly stereoselective biocatalysts with a cofactor recycling system has allowed the development of cost-effective methods for the generation of optically active molecules, which is strengthened by the availability of stereo-complementary enzyme homologues. PMID:22498437

  1. Larvicidal activity of medicinal plant extracts and lignan identified in Phryma leptostachya var. asiatica roots against housefly (Musca domestica L.).

    PubMed

    Seo, Seon-Mi; Park, Il-Kwon

    2012-05-01

    Medicinal plant extracts from 27 plant species in 20 families were tested for their larvicidal activity against housefly, Musca domestica (L.). Responses varied with plant material and concentration. Among plant species tested, Phryma leptostachya var. asiatica showed 100% larvicidal activity against M. domestica at 10 mg/g concentration. Larvicidal activities of Atractylodes japonica, Saussurea lappa, Asiasarum sieboldi, and Gleditsia japonica var. koraiensis were 89.3%, 85.3%, 93.3%, and 96.6% at 10 mg/g concentration, respectively. Extracts of Prunus persica, Curcuma longa, and Paeonia moutan produced moderate activity. Larvicidal activity of other plant extracts was less than 50%. Among test plant species, P. leptostachya var. asiatica showed the most potent larvicidal activity. The active constituent of P. leptostachya var. asiatica roots was identified as the leptostachyol acetate by spectroscopic analysis. The LC(50) values of leptostachyol acetate against M. domestica larvae were 0.039 mg/g. Naturally occurring medicinal plant extracts and P. leptostachya var. asiatica root-derived compounds merit further study as potential housefly larval control agents or lead compounds.

  2. Antimalarial activity of compounds interfering with Plasmodium falciparum phospholipid metabolism: comparison between mono- and bisquaternary ammonium salts.

    PubMed

    Calas, M; Ancelin, M L; Cordina, G; Portefaix, P; Piquet, G; Vidal-Sailhan, V; Vial, H

    2000-02-10

    On the basis of a previous structure-activity relationship study, we identified some essential parameters, e.g. electronegativity and lipophilicity, required for polar head analogues to inhibit Plasmodium falciparum phospholipid metabolism, leading to parasite death. To improve the in vitro antimalarial activity, 36 cationic choline analogues consisting of mono-, bis-, and triquaternary ammonium salts with distinct substituents of increasing lipophilicity were synthesized. For monoquaternary ammonium salts, an increase in the lipophilicity around nitrogen was beneficial for antimalarial activity: IC(50) decreased by 1 order of magnitude from trimethyl to tripropyl substituents. Irrespective of the polar head substitution (methyl, ethyl, hydroxyethyl, pyrrolidinium), increasing the alkyl chain length from 6 to 12 methylene groups always led to increased activity. The highest activity was obtained for the N,N,N-tripropyl-N-dodecyl substitution of nitrogen (IC(50) 33 nM). Beyond 12 methylene groups, the antimalarial activities of the compounds decreased slightly. The structural requirements for bisquaternary ammonium salts in antimalarial activity were very similar to those of monoquaternary ammonium salts, i.e. polar head steric hindrance and lipophilicity around nitrogen (methyl, hydroxyethyl, ethyl, pyrrolidinium, etc.). In contrast, with bisquaternary ammonium salts, increasing the lipophilicity of the alkyl chain between the two nitrogen atoms (from 5 to 21 methylene groups) constantly and dramatically increased the activity. Most of these duplicated molecules had activity around 1 nM, and the most lipophilic compound synthesized exhibited an IC(50) as low as 3 pM (21 methylene groups). Globally, this oriented synthesis produced 28 compounds out of 36 with an IC(50) lower than 1 microM, and 9 of them had an IC(50) in the nanomolar range, with 1 compound in the picomolar range. This indicates that developing a pharmacological model for antimalarial compounds

  3. Comparison of predicted and derived measures of volatile organic compounds inside four relocatable classrooms due to identified interior finish sources

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, Alfred T.; Shendell, Derek G.; Fisk, William J.; Apte, Michael G.

    2003-06-01

    Indoor exposures to toxic and odorous volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are of general concern. Recently, VOCs in portable or relocatable classrooms (RCs) have received particular attention. However, very little was known about indoor environmental quality (IEQ) and the sources, composition, and indoor concentrations of VOCs in RCs. This project task focused on developing and demonstrating a process for selecting interior finish materials for RCs that have relatively low impacts with respect to their emissions of toxic and odorous VOCs. This task was part of a larger project to demonstrate the potential for simultaneous improvements in IEQ and energy efficiency in four new RCs equipped both with a continuously ventilating advanced heating, ventilating, and air conditioning system (HVAC) and a standard HVAC system. These HVACs were operated on alternate weeks. One RC per pair was constructed with standard interior finish materials, and the other included alternate interior materials identified in our prior laboratory study to have low VOC emissions. The RCs were sited in side-by-side pairs at two elementary schools in distinct northern California climate zones. Classroom VOC emission rates (mg hr{sup -1}) and concentrations were predicted based on VOC emission factors ({micro}g m{sup -2} hr{sup -1}) measured for individual materials in the laboratory, the quantities of installed materials and design ventilation rates. Predicted emission rates were compared to values derived from classroom measurements of VOC concentrations and ventilation rates made at pre-occupancy, eight weeks, and 27 weeks. Predicted concentrations were compared to measured integrated VOC indoor minus outdoor concentrations during school hours in the fall cooling season with the advanced HVAC operated. These measured concentrations also were compared between standard and material-modified RCs. Our combined laboratory and field process proved effective by correctly predicting that IEQ impacts of

  4. Volatile Organic Compounds Identified in Post-Flight Air Analysis of the Multipurpose Logistics Module from International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, B.; Wheeler, R.

    Bioregenerative systems involve storing and processing waste along with atmospheric management. The MPLM, Multipurpose Logistics Module, is a reusable logistics carrier and primary delivery system used to resupply the International Space Station (ISS) and return Station cargo that requires a pressurized environment. The cylindrical module is approximately 6.4 meters long, 4.6 meters in diameter, and weighs almost 4,082kg. The module provides storage and additional workspace for up to two astronauts when docked to the ISS. It can carry up to 9,072 kg of supplies, science experiments, spare parts and other logistical components for ISS. There is concern for a potentially hazardous condition caused by contamination of the atmosphere in the MPLM upon return from orbit. This would be largely due to unforeseen spills or container leakage. This has led to the need for special care in handling the returned module prior to processing the module for its next flight. Prior to opening the MPLM, atmospheric samples are analyzed for trace volatile organic compounds, VOC's. It is noted that our analyses also reflect the atmosphere in the ISS on that day of closure. With the re turn of STS-108, 12th ISS Flight (UF1), the analysis showed 24 PPM of methane. This corresponds to the high levels on space station during a time period when the air filtration system was shut off. Chemical characterization of atmospheres on the ISS and MPLM provide useful information for concerns with plant growth experiments on ISS. Work with closed plant growth chambers show potential for VOC's to accumulate to toxic levels for plants. The ethylene levels for 4 MPLM analyses over the course on one year were measured at, 0.070, 0.017, 0.012 and 0.007 PPM. Phytochemical such as ethylene are detected with natural plant physiological events such as flowering and as a result of plant damage or from decaying food. A build up of VOC's may contribute to phytotoxic effects for the plant growth experiments or

  5. Production of anthraquinones, phenolic compounds and biological activities from hairy root cultures of Polygonum multiflorum Thunb.

    PubMed

    Thiruvengadam, Muthu; Praveen, Nagella; Kim, Eun-Hye; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Chung, Ill-Min

    2014-05-01

    Polygonum multiflorum Thunb. is a highly important medicinal plant producing anthraquinones (emodin and physcion) and phenolic compounds which has pharmaceutical use. In vitro seedling explants such as roots, internodals, nodals and leaves were inoculated with A. rhizogenes strain KCTC 2703. Transformed roots were induced from internodals and leaf explants. Six transgenic clones of hairy roots were established and confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) using rolC specific primers. Hairy roots cultured using MS liquid medium supplemented with 30 g/l sucrose showed highest accumulation of biomass (99.05 g/l FW [fresh weight] and 10.95 g/l DW [dry weight]) and highest production of anthraquinones content (emodin 211.32 μg/g DW and physcion 353.23 μg/g DW) were observed at 20 days. Nearly 9.5-fold increment of biomass was evident in suspension cultures at 20 days of culture and hairy root biomass produced in suspension cultures possessed 3.7- and 3.5-fold higher content of emodin and physcion, respectively, when compared with the untransformed control roots. MS basal liquid medium was superior for the growth of hairy roots and production of anthraquinones compared with other culture media evaluated (SH, B5 and N6), with MS-basal liquid medium supplemented with 30 g/l sucrose was optimal for secondary metabolite production. A total of 23 polyphenolic compounds were identified and quantified from P. multiflorum untransformed and hairy roots, which includes hydroxybenzoic acids, hydroxycinnamic acids, flavonols and other groups of phenolic compounds. The ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) analysis of the phenolic compounds profile revealed that pyrogallol, hesperidin, naringenin and formononetin were higher in hairy roots compared to untransformed roots. The total phenolics, flavonoids content, antioxidant and antimicrobial activity was high in hairy roots compared to untransformed roots. This is the first

  6. Anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities of extracts and compounds from the mushroom Inonotus obliquus.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lishuai; Chen, Haixia; Dong, Peng; Lu, Xueming

    2013-08-15

    Mushroom Inonotus obliquus (I. obliquus) has been used as functional food and traditional Chinese herbs for long time. An efficient method for bioassay-guided preparative isolation was used for identifying the anti-inflammatory and anticancer constituents in I. obliquus. The petroleum ether and ethyl acetate fractions were found to have significant inhibition effects on NO production and NF-κB luciferase activity in macrophage RAW 264.7 cells and cytotoxicity against human prostatic carcinoma cell PC3 and breast carcinoma cell MDA-MB-231. Six main constituents were isolated from these two fractions and they were identified as lanosterol (1), 3β-hydroxy-8,24-dien-21-al (2), ergosterol (3), inotodiol (4), ergosterol peroxide (5) and trametenolic acid (6). Compound ergosterol, ergosterol peroxide and trametenolic acid showed anti-inflammatory activities and ergosterol peroxide and trametenolic acid showed obviously cytotoxicity on human prostatic carcinoma cell PC3 and breast carcinoma MDA-MB-231 cell. The results obtained in this work might contribute to understanding the biological activity of mushroom I. obliquus for food and drug application.

  7. Multiple microbial activities for volatile organic compounds reduction by biofiltration.

    PubMed

    Civilini, Marcello

    2006-07-01

    In the northeast of Italy, high volatile organic carbon (VOC) emissions originate from small-medium companies producing furniture. In these conditions it is difficult to propose a single, efficient, and economic system to reduce pollution. Among the various choices, the biofiltration method could be a good solution, because microbial populations possess multiple VOC degradation potentials used to oxidize these compounds to CO2. Starting from the air emissions of a typical industrial wood-painting plant, a series of experiments studied in vitro microbial degradation of each individual VOC. Isolated strains were then added to a laboratory-scale biofiltration apparatus filled with an organic matrix, and the different VOC behavior demonstrated the potential of single and/or synergic microbial removal actions. When a single substrate was fed, the removal efficiency of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa inoculated reactor was 1.1, 1.17, and 0.33 g m(-3) hr(-1), respectively, for xylene, toluene, and ethoxy propyl acetate. A VOC mixture composed of butyl acetate, ethyl acetate, diacetin alcohol, ethoxy propanol acetate, methyl ethyl ketone, methyl isobutyl ketone, toluene, and xylene was then fed into a 2-m(3) reactor treating 100 m3 hr(-1) of contaminated air. The reactor was filled with the same mixture of organic matrix, enriched with all of the isolated strains together. During reactor study, different VOC loading rates were used, and the behavior was evaluated continuously. After a short acclimation period, the removal efficiency was > 65% at VOC load of 150-200 g m(-3) hr(-1). Quantification of removal efficiencies and VOC speciation confirmed the relationship among removal efficiencies, compound biodegradability, and the dynamic transport of each mixture component within the organic matrix. Samples of the fixed bed were withdrawn at different intervals and the heterogeneous microbial community evaluated for both total and differential compound counts.

  8. Review on Natural Coumarin Lead Compounds for Their Pharmacological Activity

    PubMed Central

    Venugopala, K. N.; Rashmi, V.; Odhav, B.

    2013-01-01

    Coumarin (2H-1-benzopyran-2-one) is a plant-derived natural product known for its pharmacological properties such as anti-inflammatory, anticoagulant, antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, anticancer, antihypertensive, antitubercular, anticonvulsant, antiadipogenic, antihyperglycemic, antioxidant, and neuroprotective properties. Dietary exposure to benzopyrones is significant as these compounds are found in vegetables, fruits, seeds, nuts, coffee, tea, and wine. In view of the established low toxicity, relative cheapness, presence in the diet, and occurrence in various herbal remedies of coumarins, it appears prudent to evaluate their properties and applications further. PMID:23586066

  9. Review on natural coumarin lead compounds for their pharmacological activity.

    PubMed

    Venugopala, K N; Rashmi, V; Odhav, B

    2013-01-01

    Coumarin (2H-1-benzopyran-2-one) is a plant-derived natural product known for its pharmacological properties such as anti-inflammatory, anticoagulant, antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, anticancer, antihypertensive, antitubercular, anticonvulsant, antiadipogenic, antihyperglycemic, antioxidant, and neuroprotective properties. Dietary exposure to benzopyrones is significant as these compounds are found in vegetables, fruits, seeds, nuts, coffee, tea, and wine. In view of the established low toxicity, relative cheapness, presence in the diet, and occurrence in various herbal remedies of coumarins, it appears prudent to evaluate their properties and applications further.

  10. Determination of phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity in leaves from wild Rubus L. species.

    PubMed

    Oszmiański, Jan; Wojdyło, Aneta; Nowicka, Paulina; Teleszko, Mirosława; Cebulak, Tomasz; Wolanin, Mateusz

    2015-03-18

    Twenty-six different wild blackberry leaf samples were harvested from various localities throughout southeastern Poland. Leaf samples were assessed regarding their phenolic compound profiles and contents by LC/MS QTOF, and their antioxidant activity by ABTS and FRAP. Thirty-three phenolic compounds were detected (15 flavonols, 13 hydroxycinnamic acids, three ellagic acid derivatives and two flavones). Ellagic acid derivatives were the predominant compounds in the analyzed leaves, especially sanguiin H-6, ellagitannins, lambertianin C, and casuarinin. The content of phenolic compounds was significantly correlated with the antioxidant activity of the analyzed samples. The highest level of phenolic compounds was measured for R. perrobustus, R. wimmerianus, R. pedemontanus and R. grabowskii. The study showed that wild blackberry leaves can be considered a good source of antioxidant compounds. There is clear potential for the utilization of blackberry leaves as a food additive, medicinal source or herbal tea.

  11. Rapid screening and quantitative determination of bioactive compounds from fruit extracts of Myristica species and their in vitro antiproliferative activity.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Renu; Mahar, Rohit; Hasanain, Mohammad; Shukla, Sanjeev K; Sarkar, Jayanta; Rameshkumar, K B; Kumar, Brijesh

    2016-11-15

    Efficient and sensitive LC-MS/MS methods have been developed for the rapid screening and determination of bioactive compounds in different fruit parts of four Myristica species, viz., Myristica beddomeii, Myristica fragrans, Myristica fatua and Myristica malabarica. Twenty-one compounds were identified and characterized on the basis of their accurate mass and MS/MS fragmentation pattern using HPLC-QTOF-MS/MS and NMR analysis. Quantitative determination of five major bioactive compounds was performed using multiple-reaction monitoring mode with continuous polarity switching by UHPLC-QqQLIT-MS/MS. Moreover, in vitro antiproliferative activity of these Myristica species was evaluated against five human cancer cell lines A549, DLD-1, DU145, FaDu and MCF-7 using SRB assay. Seventeen phytoconstituents were identified and reported for the first time from M. beddomeii and sixteen from M. fatua. Quantification result showed highest total content of five major bioactive compounds in mace of M. fragrans. Evaluation of in vitro antiproliferative activity revealed potent activity in all investigated species except M. fragrans.

  12. Thiazole compounds with activity against Cryptococcus gattii and Cryptococcus neoformans in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pereira de Sá, Nívea; Lino, Cleudiomar Inácio; Fonseca, Nayara Cristina; Borelli, Beatriz Martins; Ramos, Jonas Pereira; Souza-Fagundes, Elaine Maria; Rosa, Carlos Augusto; Santos, Daniel Assis; Barbosa de Oliveira, Renata; Johann, Susana

    2015-09-18

    Human cryptococcosis can occur as a primary or opportunistic infection and develop as an acute, subacute, or chronic, systemic infection involving different host organs. We evaluated the antifungal activity of thirteen compounds against Cryptococcus gattii and Cryptococcus neoformans in vitro, by assessing the toxicity of the compounds showing the greatest antifungal activity in VERO cells and murine macrophages. From these results, four compounds were considered promising for further studies because they displayed low cytotoxicity and significant antifungal activity. The heterocyclic compounds 1b, 1c, 1d, and 1m have antifungal activity levels between that of amphotericin B and fluconazole in vitro. The death curve of Cryptococcus spp. treated with these four compounds was similar to the curve obtained for amphotericin B, in that we observed a significant reduction in cell viability within the first 24 h of treatment. Additionally, we found that there was no effect when these compounds were combined with amphotericin and fluconazole, except for 1c, which antagonized the effect of amphotericin B against C. gattii, also reflected in the reduction of the post-antifungal effect (PAFE); however, this interaction did not alter the ergosterol content. The results shown in this paper reveal the discovery of novel thiazole compounds, which are easy to synthesize, and with potentially exhibit antifungal activity, and display low cytotoxicity in normal mammalian cells. These compounds can be used as prototypes for the design of new antifungal drugs against C. gattii and C. neoformans.

  13. The adsorption of pharmaceutically active compounds from aqueous solutions onto activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Rakić, Vesna; Rac, Vladislav; Krmar, Marija; Otman, Otman; Auroux, Aline

    2015-01-23

    In this study, the adsorption of pharmaceutically active compounds - salicylic acid, acetylsalicylic acid, atenolol and diclofenac-Na onto activated carbons has been studied. Three different commercial activated carbons, possessing ∼650, 900 or 1500m(2)g(-1) surface areas were used as solid adsorbents. These materials were fully characterized - their textural, surface features and points of zero charge have been determined. The adsorption was studied from aqueous solutions at 303K using batch adsorption experiments and titration microcalorimetry, which was employed in order to obtain the heats evolved as a result of adsorption. The maximal adsorption capacities of investigated solids for all target pharmaceuticals are in the range of 10(-4)molg(-1). The obtained maximal retention capacities are correlated with the textural properties of applied activated carbon. The roles of acid/base features of activated carbons and of molecular structures of adsorbate molecules have been discussed. The obtained results enabled to estimate the possibility to use the activated carbons in the removal of pharmaceuticals by adsorption.

  14. In vitro neuroprotective activities of compounds from Angelica shikokiana Makino.

    PubMed

    Mira, Amira; Yamashita, Shuntaro; Katakura, Yoshinori; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi

    2015-03-16

    Angelica shikokiana is widely marketed in Japan as a dietary food supplement. With a focus on neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, the aerial part was extracted and through bio-guided fractionation, fifteen compounds [α-glutinol, β-amyrin, kaempferol, luteolin, quercetin, kaempferol-3-O-glucoside, kaempferol-3-O-rutinoside, methyl chlorogenate, chlorogenic acid, hyuganin E, 5-(hydroxymethyl)-2-furaldehyde, β-sitosterol-3-O-glucoside, adenosine (isolated for the first time from A. shikokiana), isoepoxypteryxin and isopteryxin] were isolated. Isolated compounds were evaluated for in vitro neuroprotection using acetylcholine esterase inhibitory, protection against hydrogen peroxide and amyloid β peptide (Aβ25-35)-induced neurotoxicity in neuro-2A cells, scavenging of hydroxyl radicals and intracellular reactive oxygen species and thioflavin T assays. Quercetin showed the strongest AChE inhibition (IC50 value = 35.5 µM) through binding to His-440 and Tyr-70 residues at the catalytic and anionic sites of acetylcholine esterase, respectively. Chlorogenic acid, its methyl ester, quercetin and luteolin could significantly protect neuro-2A cells against H2O2-induced neurotoxicity and scavenge hydroxyl radical and intracellular reactive oxygen species. Kaempferol-3-O-rutinoiside, hyuganin E and isoepoxypteryxin significantly decreased Aβ25-35-induced neurotoxicity and Th-T fluorescence. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report about neuroprotection of hyuganin E and isoepoxypteryxin against Aβ25-35-induced neurotoxicity.

  15. Two new phenolic compounds and antitumor activities of asparinin A from Asparagus officinalis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-Mei; Cai, Jin-Long; Wang, Le; Wang, Wen-Xiang; Ai, Hong-Lian; Mao, Zi-Chao

    2017-02-01

    Two new phenolic acid compounds, asparoffin C (1) and asparoffin D (2), together with four known compounds, asparenyol (3), gobicusin B (4), 1-methoxy-2-hydroxy-4-[5-(4-hydroxyphenoxy)-3-penten-1-ynyl] phenol (5), and asparinin A (6), have been isolated from the stems of Asparagus officinalis. The structures were established by extensive spectroscopic methods (MS and 1D and 2D NMR). Compound 6 has obvious antitumor activities both in vitro and in vivo.

  16. Effect of polyphenolic compounds on the growth and cellulolytic activity of a strain of Trichoderma viride

    SciTech Connect

    Arrieta-Escobar, A.; Belin, J.M.

    1982-04-01

    Polyphenolic compounds are often regarded as inhibitors of microorganism growth. However, polyphenolic compounds can also induce stimulating effects on the growth, respiration, fermentation and excretion of amino acids. Depending on the concentration of polyphenolic compounds in the medium, opposed effects (inhibition, stimulation) can be observed. The purpose of this article is to study the effects of condensed tannins and some monomers on the growth and cellulolytic activity of Trichoderma viride. (Refs. 30).

  17. Antioxidant Activity of Novel Fused Heterocyclic Compounds Derived from Tetrahydropyrimidine Derivative.

    PubMed

    Salem, Marwa Sayed; Farhat, Mahmoud; Errayes, Asma Omar; Madkour, Hassan Mohamed Fawzy

    2015-01-01

    6-(Benzo[d][1,3]dioxol-5-yl)-4-oxo-2-thioxo-1,2,3,4-tetrahydropyrimidine-5-carbonitrile has been utilized for synthesis of the fused heterocyclic compounds namely thiazolopyrimidines, tetrazolopyrimidine, pyrimidoquinazoline, pyrimidothiazolopyrimidine, pyrimidothiazolotriazine and pyrrolothiazolopyrimidine derivatives. The newly synthesized compounds were characterized by IR, (1)H-NMR, (13)C-NMR, and mass spectral data. Antioxidant activities of all synthesized compounds were investigated.

  18. Antibacterial active compounds from Hypericum ascyron L. induce bacterial cell death through apoptosis pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiu-Mei; Luo, Xue-Gang; Si, Chuan-Ling; Wang, Nan; Zhou, Hao; He, Jun-Fang; Zhang, Tong-Cun

    2015-01-01

    Hypericum ascyron L. has been used as a traditional medicine for the treatment of wounds, swelling, headache, nausea and abscesses in China for thousands of years. However, modern pharmacological studies are still necessary to provide a scientific basis to substantiate their traditional use. In this study, the mechanism underlying the antimicrobial effect of the antibacterial activity compounds from H. ascyron L. was investigated. Bioguided fractionation of the extract from H. ascyron L. afforded antibacterial activity fraction 8. The results of cup plate analysis and MTT assay showed that the MIC and MBC of fraction 8 is 5 mg/mL. Furthermore, using Annexin V-FITC/PI, TUNEL labeling and DNA gel electrophoresis, we found that cell death with apoptosis features similar to those in eucaryon could be induced in bacteria strains after exposure to the antibacterial activity compounds from H. ascyron L. at moderate concentration. In addition, we further found fraction 8 could disrupt the cell membrane potential indicate that fraction 8 exerts pro-apoptotic effects through a membrane-mediated apoptosis pathway. Finally, quercetin and kaempferol 3-O-β-(2″-acetyl)-galactopyranoside, were identified from fraction 8 by means of Mass spectrometry and Nuclear magnetic resonance. To our best knowledge, this study is the first to show that Kaempferol 3-O-β-(2″-acetyl)-galactopyranoside coupled with quercetin had significant antibacterial activity via apoptosis pathway, and it is also the first report that Kaempferol 3-O-β-(2″-acetyl)-galactopyranoside was found in clusiacea. Our data might provide a rational base for the use of H. ascyron L. in clinical, and throw light on the development of novel antibacterial drugs.

  19. Quantitative High-Throughput Screening Identifies 8-Hydroxyquinolines as Cell-Active Histone Demethylase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Akane; Rose, Nathan R.; Ng, Stanley S.; Quinn, Amy M.; Rai, Ganesha; Mott, Bryan T.; Beswick, Paul; Klose, Robert J.; Oppermann, Udo; Jadhav, Ajit; Heightman, Tom D.; Maloney, David J.; Schofield, Christopher J.; Simeonov, Anton

    2010-01-01

    Background Small molecule modulators of epigenetic processes are currently sought as basic probes for biochemical mechanisms, and as starting points for development of therapeutic agents. Nε-Methylation of lysine residues on histone tails is one of a number of post-translational modifications that together enable transcriptional regulation. Histone lysine demethylases antagonize the action of histone methyltransferases in a site- and methylation state-specific manner. Nε-Methyllysine demethylases that use 2-oxoglutarate as co-factor are associated with diverse human diseases, including cancer, inflammation and X-linked mental retardation; they are proposed as targets for the therapeutic modulation of transcription. There are few reports on the identification of templates that are amenable to development as potent inhibitors in vivo and large diverse collections have yet to be exploited for the discovery of demethylase inhibitors. Principal Findings High-throughput screening of a ∼236,000-member collection of diverse molecules arrayed as dilution series was used to identify inhibitors of the JMJD2 (KDM4) family of 2-oxoglutarate-dependent histone demethylases. Initial screening hits were prioritized by a combination of cheminformatics, counterscreening using a coupled assay enzyme, and orthogonal confirmatory detection of inhibition by mass spectrometric assays. Follow-up studies were carried out on one of the series identified, 8-hydroxyquinolines, which were shown by crystallographic analyses to inhibit by binding to the active site Fe(II) and to modulate demethylation at the H3K9 locus in a cell-based assay. Conclusions These studies demonstrate that diverse compound screening can yield novel inhibitors of 2OG dependent histone demethylases and provide starting points for the development of potent and selective agents to interrogate epigenetic regulation. PMID:21124847

  20. A High-Throughput Screen with Isogenic PTEN+/+ and PTEN−/− Cells Identifies CID1340132 as a Novel Compound That Induces Apoptosis in PTEN and PIK3CA Mutant Human Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui-Fang; Keeton, Adam; Vitolo, Michele; Maddox, Clinton; Rasmussen, Lynn; Hobrath, Judith; White, E. Lucille; Park, Ben Ho; Piazza, Gary A.; Kim, Jung-Sik; Waldman, Todd

    2013-01-01

    The PTEN tumor suppressor gene is one of the most commonly mutated genes in human cancer. Because inactivation of PTEN is a somatic event, PTEN mutations represent an important genetic difference between cancer cells and normal cells and therefore a potential anticancer drug target. However, it remains a substantial challenge to identify compounds that target loss-of-function events such as mutations of tumor suppressors. In an effort to identify small molecules that preferentially kill cells with mutations of PTEN, the authors developed and implemented a high-throughput, paired cell-based screen composed of parental HCT116 cells and their PTEN gene-targeted derivatives. From 138 758 compounds tested, two hits were identified, and one, N′-[(1-benzyl-1H-indol-3-yl)methylene]benzenesulfonohydrazide (CID1340132), was further studied using a variety of cell-based models, including HCT116, MCF10A, and HEC1A cells with targeted deletion of either their PTEN or PIK3CA genes. Preferential killing of PTEN and PIK3CA mutant cells was accompanied by DNA damage, inhibition of DNA synthesis, and apoptosis. taken together, these data validate a cell-based screening approach for identifying lead compounds that target cells with specific tumor suppressor gene mutations and describe a novel compound with preferential killing activity toward PTEN and PIK3CA mutant cells. PMID:21335596

  1. A high-throughput screen with isogenic PTEN+/+ and PTEN-/- cells identifies CID1340132 as a novel compound that induces apoptosis in PTEN and PIK3CA mutant human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui-Fang; Keeton, Adam; Vitolo, Michele; Maddox, Clinton; Rasmussen, Lynn; Hobrath, Judith; White, E Lucille; Park, Ben Ho; Piazza, Gary A; Kim, Jung-Sik; Waldman, Todd

    2011-04-01

    The PTEN tumor suppressor gene is one of the most commonly mutated genes in human cancer. Because inactivation of PTEN is a somatic event, PTEN mutations represent an important genetic difference between cancer cells and normal cells and therefore a potential anticancer drug target. However, it remains a substantial challenge to identify compounds that target loss-of-function events such as mutations of tumor suppressors. In an effort to identify small molecules that preferentially kill cells with mutations of PTEN, the authors developed and implemented a high-throughput, paired cell-based screen composed of parental HCT116 cells and their PTEN gene-targeted derivatives. From 138 758 compounds tested, two hits were identified, and one, N'-[(1-benzyl-1H-indol-3-yl)methylene]benzenesulfonohydrazide (CID1340132), was further studied using a variety of cell-based models, including HCT116, MCF10A, and HEC1A cells with targeted deletion of either their PTEN or PIK3CA genes. Preferential killing of PTEN and PIK3CA mutant cells was accompanied by DNA damage, inhibition of DNA synthesis, and apoptosis. Taken together, these data validate a cell-based screening approach for identifying lead compounds that target cells with specific tumor suppressor gene mutations and describe a novel compound with preferential killing activity toward PTEN and PIK3CA mutant cells.

  2. Derivatives of Procaspase-Activating Compound 1 (PAC-1) and Anticancer Activities

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Howard S.; Hergenrother, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    PAC-1 induces the activation of procaspase-3 in vitro and in cell culture by chelation of inhibitory labile zinc ions via its ortho-hydroxy-N-acylhydrazone moiety. First reported in 2006, PAC-1 has shown promise in cell culture and animal models of cancer, and a Phase I clinical trial in cancer patients began in March 2015 (NCT02355535). Because of the considerable interest in this compound and a well-defined structure-activity relationship, over 1000 PAC-1 derivatives have been synthesized in an effort to vary pharmacological properties such as potency and pharmacokinetics. This article provides a comprehensive examination of all PAC-1 derivatives reported to date. A survey of PAC-1 derivative libraries is provided, with an in-depth discussion of four derivatives on which extensive studies have been performed. PMID:26630918

  3. Derivatives of Procaspase-Activating Compound 1 (PAC-1) and their Anticancer Activities.

    PubMed

    Roth, Howard S; Hergenrother, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    PAC-1 induces the activation of procaspase-3 in vitro and in cell culture by chelation of inhibitory labile zinc ions via its ortho-hydroxy-N-acylhydrazone moiety. First reported in 2006, PAC-1 has shown promise in cell culture and animal models of cancer, and a Phase I clinical trial in cancer patients began in March 2015 (NCT02355535). Because of the considerable interest in this compound and a well-defined structure-activity relationship, over 1000 PAC-1 derivatives have been synthesized in an effort to vary pharmacological properties such as potency and pharmacokinetics. This article provides a comprehensive examination of all PAC-1 derivatives reported to date. A survey of PAC-1 derivative libraries is provided, with an indepth discussion of four derivatives on which extensive studies have been performed.

  4. Identification of Compounds with Anti-Proliferative Activity against Trypanosoma brucei brucei Strain 427 by a Whole Cell Viability Based HTS Campaign

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Marcel; Chatelain, Eric; Moawad, Sarah R.; Ganame, Danny; Ioset, Jean-Robert; Avery, Vicky M.

    2012-01-01

    Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT) is caused by two trypanosome sub-species, Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and Trypanosoma brucei gambiense. Drugs available for the treatment of HAT have significant issues related to difficult administration regimes and limited efficacy across species and disease stages. Hence, there is considerable need to find new alternative and less toxic drugs. An approach to identify starting points for new drug candidates is high throughput screening (HTS) of large compound library collections. We describe the application of an Alamar Blue based, 384-well HTS assay to screen a library of 87,296 compounds against the related trypanosome subspecies, Trypanosoma brucei brucei bloodstream form lister 427. Primary hits identified against T.b. brucei were retested and the IC50 value compounds were estimated for T.b. brucei and a mammalian cell line HEK293, to determine a selectivity index for each compound. The screening campaign identified 205 compounds with greater than 10 times selectivity against T.b. brucei. Cluster analysis of these compounds, taking into account chemical and structural properties required for drug-like compounds, afforded a panel of eight compounds for further biological analysis. These compounds had IC50 values ranging from 0.22 µM to 4 µM with associated selectivity indices ranging from 19 to greater than 345. Further testing against T.b. rhodesiense led to the selection of 6 compounds from 5 new chemical classes with activity against the causative species of HAT, which can be considered potential candidates for HAT early drug discovery. Structure activity relationship (SAR) mining revealed components of those hit compound structures that may be important for biological activity. Four of these compounds have undergone further testing to 1) determine whether they are cidal or static in vitro at the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), and 2) estimate the time to kill. PMID:23209849

  5. Volatile profiles of Italian monovarietal extra virgin olive oils via HS-SPME-GC-MS: newly identified compounds, flavors molecular markers, and terpenic profile.

    PubMed

    Cecchi, Teresa; Alfei, Barbara

    2013-12-01

    This study aims to contribute to the knowledge of the commercial, sensory, and analytical characteristics of extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) from Italy (Marche region), renowned since ancient times. Headspace solid-phase micro-extraction (HS-SPME) was applied for the very first time to the sampling of volatile compounds of eleven typical Italian monocultivar EVOOs. Forty-eight compounds were characterised by GC-MS, some of them were only occasionally found in other EVOOs and some other were never detected before in any EVOO. Compounds belonging mainly to alcohols, esters, aldehydes, ketones and hydrocarbons chemical classes characterised the volatile profiles. The main volatile compounds detected in the EVOOs were the C6 compounds derived from polyunsaturated fatty acids, through the lipoxygenase pathway, in different proportion according to the specific cultivar. The results suggest that genetic factors strongly influence volatile formation and terpene hydrocarbons are claimed to be suitable markers of the geographic origin and genotype of the EVOO. Correlations among sensory attributes evaluated by a panel test and the presence of specific volatile compounds were highlighted for the very first time. The significance of the presence of some newly identified volatile compounds was discussed.

  6. Design of an activity landscape view taking compound-based feature probabilities into account.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bijun; Vogt, Martin; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2014-09-01

    Activity landscapes (ALs) of compound data sets are rationalized as graphical representations that integrate similarity and potency relationships between active compounds. ALs enable the visualization of structure-activity relationship (SAR) information and are thus computational tools of interest for medicinal chemistry. For AL generation, similarity and potency relationships are typically evaluated in a pairwise manner and major AL features are assessed at the level of compound pairs. In this study, we add a conditional probability formalism to AL design that makes it possible to quantify the probability of individual compounds to contribute to characteristic AL features. Making this information graphically accessible in a molecular network-based AL representation is shown to further increase AL information content and helps to quickly focus on SAR-informative compound subsets. This feature probability-based AL variant extends the current spectrum of AL representations for medicinal chemistry applications.

  7. Synthesis, antimicrobial activity of Schiff base compounds of cinnamaldehyde and amino acids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Yuan, Haijian; Li, Shujun; Li, Zhuo; Jiang, Mingyue

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to synthesize hydrophilic cinnamaldehyde Schiff base compounds and investigate those bioactivity. A total of 24 Schiff base compounds were synthesized using a simple approach with 3 cinnamaldehyde derivates and 8 amino acids as raw materials. The structures of synthesized compounds were confirmed using FTIR, (1)HNMR, HRMS purity and melting point. The antimicrobial activities of new compounds were evaluated with fluconazole and ciprofloxacin as the control against Aspergillus niger, Penicillium citrinum, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Findings show that major compounds exhibited significant bioactivity. Results from the structure-activity relationship suggest that both -p-Cl on benzene ring of cinnamaldehyde and the number of -COOK of amino acid salts significantly contributed to antimicrobial activity.

  8. Design of an activity landscape view taking compound-based feature probabilities into account

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bijun; Vogt, Martin; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2014-09-01

    Activity landscapes (ALs) of compound data sets are rationalized as graphical representations that integrate similarity and potency relationships between active compounds. ALs enable the visualization of structure-activity relationship (SAR) information and are thus computational tools of interest for medicinal chemistry. For AL generation, similarity and potency relationships are typically evaluated in a pairwise manner and major AL features are assessed at the level of compound pairs. In this study, we add a conditional probability formalism to AL design that makes it possible to quantify the probability of individual compounds to contribute to characteristic AL features. Making this information graphically accessible in a molecular network-based AL representation is shown to further increase AL information content and helps to quickly focus on SAR-informative compound subsets. This feature probability-based AL variant extends the current spectrum of AL representations for medicinal chemistry applications.

  9. Design, synthesis and cytotoxic activities of novel hybrid compounds between 2-phenylbenzofuran and imidazole.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Dong; Wan, Wei-Chao; Deng, Xiao-Yan; Li, Yan; Yang, Li-Juan; Li, Liang; Zhang, Hong-Bin

    2012-04-15

    A series of novel hybrid compounds between 2-phenylbenzofuran and imidazole have been prepared and evaluated in vitro against a panel of human tumor cell lines. The results suggest that substitution of the imidazolyl-3-position with a naphthylacyl or bromophenacyl group, were vital for modulating cytotoxic activity. In particular, hybrid compound 15 was found to be the most potent compound against 4 strains human tumor cell lines and more active than cisplatin (DDP), and exhibited cytotoxic activity selectively against liver carcinoma (SMMC-7721).

  10. Novel R-plasmid conjugal transfer inhibitory and antibacterial activities of phenolic compounds from Mallotus philippensis (Lam.) Mull. Arg.

    PubMed

    Oyedemi, Blessing O M; Shinde, Vaibhav; Shinde, Kamlesh; Kakalou, Dionysia; Stapleton, Paul D; Gibbons, Simon

    2016-06-01

    Antimicrobial resistance severely limits the therapeutic options for many clinically important bacteria. In Gram-negative bacteria, multidrug resistance is commonly facilitated by plasmids that have the ability to accumulate and transfer refractory genes amongst bacterial populations. The aim of this study was to isolate and identify bioactive compounds from the medicinal plant Mallotus philippensis (Lam.) Mull. Arg. with both direct antibacterial properties and the capacity to inhibit plasmid conjugal transfer. A chloroform-soluble extract of M. philippensis was subjected to bioassay-guided fractionation using chromatographic and spectrometric techniques that led to the isolation of the known compounds rottlerin [5,7-dihydroxy-2,2-dimethyl-6-(2,4,6-trihydroxy-3-methyl-5-acetylbenzyl)-8-cinnamoyl-1,2-chromene] and the red compound (8-cinnamoyl-5,7-dihydroxy-2,2,6-trimethylchromene). Both compounds were characterised and elucidated using one-dimensional and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Rottlerin and the red compound showed potent activities against a panel of clinically relevant Gram-positive bacteria, including meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). No significant direct activities were observed against Gram-negative bacteria. However, both rottlerin and the red compound strongly inhibited conjugal transfer of the plasmids pKM101, TP114, pUB307 and R6K amongst Escherichia coli at a subinhibitory concentration of 100mg/L. Interestingly, despite the planar nature of the compounds, binding to plasmid DNA could not be demonstrated by a DNA electrophoretic mobility shift assay. These results show that rottlerin and the red compound are potential candidates for antibacterial drug lead development. Further studies are needed to elucidate the mode of inhibition of the conjugal transfer of plasmids.

  11. Isolation and purification of antialgal compounds from the red alga Gracilaria lemaneiformis for activity against common harmful red tide microalgae.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ying-Ying; Meng, Kun; Su, Zhen-Xia; Guo, Gan-Lin; Pu, Yin-Fang; Wang, Chang-Hai

    2017-02-01

    Seven antialgal compounds (1-7) were successfully isolated from the red alga Gracilaria lemaneiformis through a combination of silica gel column chromatography and repeated preparative thin-layer chromatography. On the basis of the spectral data, the compounds were identified as gossonorol (1), 7,10-epoxy-ar-bisabol-11-ol (2), glycerol monopalmitate (3), stigmasterol (4), 15-hydroxymethyl-2, 6, 10, 18, 22, 26, 30-heptamethyl-14-methylene-17-hentriacontene (5), 4-hydroxyphenethyl alcohol (6), and margaric acid (7). These seven compounds were isolated from G. lemaneiformis for the first time, while the compounds 4, 6, and 7 were isolated from marine macroalgae for the first time. Furthermore, a quantitative relationship between the inhibition of algal growth and the concentration of each antialgal compound was determined and important parameters for future practical HAB control, e.g., EC50-96h, were also obtained. The results indicated that isolated compounds 1-7 possess selective antialgal activity against the growth of several red tide microalgae (including Amphidinium carterae, Heterosigma akashiwo, Karenia mikimitoi, Phaeocystis globsa, Prorocentrum donghaiense, and Skeletonema costatum). Their antialgal activity against test red tide microalgae has not been previously reported. Furthermore, the EC50-96h of one or more of the compounds towards the tested red microalgae was not only significantly less than 10 μg/mL but also was smaller than that of the characteristic antialgal agent potassium dichromate. The study demonstrates that compounds 1-7 possess significant application potential as antialgal agents against several harmful red tide microalgae.

  12. A glimpse on biological activities of tellurium compounds.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Rodrigo L O R; Gouvea, Iuri E; Juliano, Luiz

    2009-09-01

    Tellurium is a rare element which has been regarded as a toxic, non-essential trace element and its biological role is not clearly established to date. Besides of that, the biological effects of elemental tellurium and some of its inorganic and organic derivatives have been studied, leading to a set of interesting and promising applications. As an example, it can be highlighted the uses of alkali-metal tellurites and tellurates in microbiology, the antioxidant effects of organotellurides and diorganoditellurides and the immunomodulatory effects of the non-toxic inorganic tellurane, named AS-101, and the plethora of its uses. Inasmuch, the nascent applications of organic telluranes (organotelluranes) as protease inhibitors and its applications in disease models are the most recent contribution to the scenario of the biological effects and applications of tellurium and its compounds discussed in this manuscript.

  13. In vitro screen of a small molecule inhibitor drug library identifies multiple compounds that synergize with oncolytic myxoma virus against human brain tumor-initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Brienne A.; Zemp, Franz J.; Pisklakova, Alexandra; Narendran, Aru; McFadden, Grant; Lun, Xueqing; Kenchappa, Rajappa S.; Kurz, Ebba U.; Forsyth, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Brain tumor-initiating cells (BTICs) are stem-like cells hypothesized to form a disease reservoir that mediates tumor recurrence in high-grade gliomas. Oncolytic virotherapy uses replication-competent viruses to target and kill malignant cells and has been evaluated in clinic for glioma therapy with limited results. Myxoma virus (MyxV) is a safe and highly effective oncolytic virus (OV) in conventional glioma models but, as seen with other OVs, is only modestly effective for patient-derived BTICs. The objective of this study was to determine whether MyxV treatment against human BTICs could be improved by combining chemotherapeutics and virotherapy. Methods A 73-compound library of drug candidates in clinical use or preclinical development was screened to identify compounds that sensitize human BTICs to MyxV treatment in vitro, and synergy was evaluated mathematically in lead compounds using Chou-Talalay analyses. The effects of combination therapy on viral gene expression and viral replication were also assessed. Results Eleven compounds that enhance MyxV efficacy were identified, and 6 were shown to synergize with the virus using Chou-Talalay analyses. Four of the synergistic compounds were shown to significantly increase viral gene expression, indicating a potential mechanism for synergy. Three highly synergistic compounds (axitinib, a VEGFR inhibitor; rofecoxib, a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor; and pemetrexed, a folate anti-metabolite) belong to classes of compounds that have not been previously shown to synergize with oncolytic viruses in vitro. Conclusions This study has identified multiple novel drug candidates that synergistically improve MyxV efficacy in a preclinical BTIC glioma model. PMID:25605818

  14. An Antifungal Combination Matrix Identifies a Rich Pool of Adjuvant Molecules that Enhance Drug Activity Against Diverse Fungal Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Nicole; Spitzer, Michaela; Yu, Tennison; Cerone, Robert P.; Averette, Anna K.; Bahn, Yong-Sun; Heitman, Joseph; Sheppard, Donald C.; Tyers, Mike; Wright, Gerard D.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY There is an urgent need to identify new treatments for fungal infections. By combining sub-lethal concentrations of the known antifungals fluconazole, caspofungin, amphotericin B, terbinafine, benomyl and cyprodinil with ~3600 compounds in diverse fungal species, we generated a deep reservoir of chemical-chemical interactions termed the Antifungal Combinations Matrix (ACM). Follow-up susceptibility testing against a fluconazole resistant isolate of C. albicans unveiled ACM combinations capable of potentiating fluconazole in this clinical strain. We used chemical genetics to elucidate the mode-of-action of the antimycobacterial drug clofazimine, a compound with unreported antifungal activity that synergized with several antifungals. Clofazimine induces a cell membrane stress for which the Pkc1 signaling pathway is required for tolerance. Further tests against additional fungal pathogens, including Aspergillus fumigatus, highlighted that clofazimine exhibits efficacy as a combination agent against multiple fungi. Thus, the ACM is a rich reservoir of chemical combinations with therapeutic potential against diverse fungal pathogens. PMID:26549450

  15. Case study: Comparison of biological active compounds in milk from organic and conventional dairy herds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conflicting reports of the quantities of biologically active compounds present in milk from organic grass-fed and conventional herds show that more research is required, especially as these compounds are linked to human health benefits and can improve the health value consumers place on dairy produc...

  16. Total Synthesis of Aspergillomarasmine A and Related Compounds: A Sulfamidate Approach Enables Exploration of Structure-Activity Relationships.

    PubMed

    Albu, Silvia A; Koteva, Kalinka; King, Andrew M; Al-Karmi, Salma; Wright, Gerard D; Capretta, Alfredo

    2016-10-10

    The fungal secondary metabolite aspergillomarasmine A (AMA) has recently been identified as an inhibitor of metallo-β-lactamases NDM-1 and VIM-2. Described herein is an efficient and practical route to AMA and its related compounds by a sulfamidate approach. In addition, a series of derivatives has been prepared and tested for biological activity in an effort to explore preliminary structure activity relationships. While it was determined that natural LLL isomer of AMA remains the most effective inactivator of NDM-1 enzyme activity both in vitro and in cells, the structure is highly tolerant of the changes in the stereochemistry at positions 3, 6, and 9.

  17. The Compositional HJ-Biplot-A New Approach to Identifying the Links among Bioactive Compounds of Tomatoes.

    PubMed

    Hernández Suárez, Marcos; Molina Pérez, Daniel; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Elena M; Díaz Romero, Carlos; Espinosa Borreguero, Francisco; Galindo-Villardón, Purificación

    2016-11-02

    Tomatoes have been described as a functional food because of their particular composition of different bioactive compounds. In this study, the proximate composition, minerals and trace elements, and antioxidant compounds were determined in two tomato cultivars (Mariana and Dunkan) that were grown in Gran Canaria (Spain) either conventionally or hydroponically. Although compositional data of this type require being subjected to the specific statistical techniques of compositional analysis, this approach has not usually been considered in this context. In the present case, a compositional Mann-Whitney U test of the data showed significant differences for each factor (cultivar and cultivation system) in several of the compositional variables studied. For the differences between cultivars, these parameters were the protein, Mg, lycopene, ascorbic acid, citric acid, and fumaric acid contents. For the differences between cultivation systems, they were mainly those of the mineral and trace elements group. Although one-year data are insufficient to make clear relationship among compounds because more repetitions in several localities and years are necessary, the compositional HJ-biplot (in which the links provide estimates of the linear relationship among variables) results agreed with other scientific results about linear relationship among some compounds analyzed.

  18. The Compositional HJ-Biplot—A New Approach to Identifying the Links among Bioactive Compounds of Tomatoes

    PubMed Central

    Hernández Suárez, Marcos; Molina Pérez, Daniel; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Elena M.; Díaz Romero, Carlos; Espinosa Borreguero, Francisco; Galindo-Villardón, Purificación

    2016-01-01

    Tomatoes have been described as a functional food because of their particular composition of different bioactive compounds. In this study, the proximate composition, minerals and trace elements, and antioxidant compounds were determined in two tomato cultivars (Mariana and Dunkan) that were grown in Gran Canaria (Spain) either conventionally or hydroponically. Although compositional data of this type require being subjected to the specific statistical techniques of compositional analysis, this approach has not usually been considered in this context. In the present case, a compositional Mann–Whitney U test of the data showed significant differences for each factor (cultivar and cultivation system) in several of the compositional variables studied. For the differences between cultivars, these parameters were the protein, Mg, lycopene, ascorbic acid, citric acid, and fumaric acid contents. For the differences between cultivation systems, they were mainly those of the mineral and trace elements group. Although one-year data are insufficient to make clear relationship among compounds because more repetitions in several localities and years are necessary, the compositional HJ-biplot (in which the links provide estimates of the linear relationship among variables) results agreed with other scientific results about linear relationship among some compounds analyzed. PMID:27827839

  19. Antiviral activity and mode of action of propolis extracts and selected compounds.

    PubMed

    Schnitzler, Paul; Neuner, Annett; Nolkemper, Silke; Zundel, Christine; Nowack, Hans; Sensch, Karl Heinz; Reichling, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    Aqueous and ethanol extracts of propolis were analysed phytochemically and examined for their antiviral activity in vitro. Different polyphenols, flavonoids and phenylcarboxylic acids were identified as major constituents. The antiviral effect of propolis extracts and selected constituents, e.g. caffeic acid (1), p-coumaric acid (2), benzoic acid (3), galangin (4), pinocembrin (5) and chrysin (6) against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) was analysed in cell culture. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of aqueous and ethanol propolis extracts for HSV-1 plaque formation was determined at 0.0004% and 0.000035%, respectively. Both propolis extracts exhibited high levels of antiviral activity against HSV-1 in viral suspension tests, plaque formation was significantly reduced by >98%. In order to determine the mode of antiviral action of propolis, the extracts were added at different times during the viral infection cycle. Both propolis extracts exhibited high anti-HSV-1 activity when the viruses were pretreated with these drugs prior to infection. Among the analysed compounds, only galangin and chrysin displayed some antiviral activity. However, the extracts containing many different components exhibited significantly higher antiherpetic effects as well as higher selectivity indices than single isolated constituents. Propolis extracts might be suitable for topical application against herpes infection.

  20. Using Indices of Fidelity to Intervention Core Components to Identify Program Active Ingredients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abry, Tashia; Hulleman, Chris S.; Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E.

    2015-01-01

    Identifying the active ingredients of an intervention--intervention-specific components serving as key levers of change--is crucial for unpacking the intervention black box. Measures of intervention fidelity can be used to identify specific active ingredients, yet such applications are rare. We illustrate how fidelity measures can be used to…

  1. A modified reverse one-hybrid screen identifies transcriptional activation in Phyochrome-Interacting Factor 3

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transcriptional activation domains (TAD) are difficult to predict and identify, since they are not conserved and have little consensus. Here, we describe a yeast-based screening method that is able to identify individual amino acid residues involved in transcriptional activation in a high throughput...

  2. Update on project determining biologically active compounds in milk

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The added health value of raw and pasteurized milk from organic and grass-fed herds is strongly debated because of limited, and often conflicting, scientific data. The Dairy & Functional Foods Research Unit, USDA-ARS-NAA, Wyndmoor, PA has an ongoing project to identify and compare the levels of bio...

  3. Screening of the 'Pathogen Box' identifies an approved pesticide with major anthelmintic activity against the barber's pole worm.

    PubMed

    Preston, Sarah; Jiao, Yaqing; Jabbar, Abdul; McGee, Sean L; Laleu, Benoît; Willis, Paul; Wells, Timothy N C; Gasser, Robin B

    2016-12-01

    There is a substantial need to develop new medicines against parasitic diseases via public-private partnerships. Based on high throughput phenotypic screens of largely protozoal pathogens and bacteria, the Medicines for Malaria Venture (MMV) has recently assembled an open-access 'Pathogen Box' containing 400 well-curated chemical compounds. In the present study, we tested these compounds for activity against parasitic stages of the nematode Haemonchus contortus (barber's pole worm). In an optimised, whole-organism screening assay, using exsheathed third-stage (xL3) and fourth-stage (L4) larvae, we measured the inhibition of larval motility, growth and development of H. contortus. We also studied the effect of the 'hit' compound on mitochondrial function by measuring oxygen consumption. Among the 400 Pathogen Box compounds, we identified one chemical, called tolfenpyrad (compound identification code: MMV688934) that reproducibly inhibits xL3 motility as well as L4 motility, growth and development, with IC50 values ranging between 0.02 and 3 μM. An assessment of mitochondrial function showed that xL3s treated with tolfenpyrad consumed significantly less oxygen than untreated xL3s, which was consistent with specific inhibition of complex I of the respiratory electron transport chain in arthropods. Given that tolfenpyrad was developed as a pesticide and has already been tested for absorption, distribution, excretion, biotransformation, toxicity and metabolism, it shows considerable promise for hit-to-lead optimisation and/or repurposing for use against H. contortus and other parasitic nematodes. Future work should assess its activity against hookworms and other pathogens that cause neglected tropical diseases.

  4. Plant compounds enhance the assay sensitivity for detection of active Bacillus cereus toxin.

    PubMed

    Rasooly, Reuven; Hernlem, Bradley; He, Xiaohua; Friedman, Mendel

    2015-03-11

    Bacillus cereus is an important food pathogen, producing emetic and diarrheal syndromes, the latter mediated by enterotoxins. The ability to sensitively trace and identify this active toxin is important for food safety. This study evaluated a nonradioactive, sensitive, in vitro cell-based assay, based on B. cereus toxin inhibition of green fluorescent protein (GFP) synthesis in transduced monkey kidney Vero cells, combined with plant extracts or plant compounds that reduce viable count of B. cereus in food. The assay exhibited a dose dependent GFP inhibition response with ~25% inhibition at 50 ng/mL toxin evaluated in culture media or soy milk, rice milk or infant formula, products associated with food poisonings outbreak. The plant extracts of green tea or bitter almond and the plant compounds epicatechin or carvacrol were found to amplify the assay response to ~90% inhibition at the 50 ng/mL toxin concentration greatly increasing the sensitivity of this assay. Additional studies showed that the test formulations also inhibited the growth of the B. cereus bacteria, likely through cell membrane disruption. The results suggest that the improved highly sensitive assay for the toxin and the rapid inactivation of the pathogen producing the toxin have the potential to enhance food safety.

  5. Plant Compounds Enhance the Assay Sensitivity for Detection of Active Bacillus cereus Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Rasooly, Reuven; Hernlem, Bradley; He, Xiaohua; Friedman, Mendel

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is an important food pathogen, producing emetic and diarrheal syndromes, the latter mediated by enterotoxins. The ability to sensitively trace and identify this active toxin is important for food safety. This study evaluated a nonradioactive, sensitive, in vitro cell-based assay, based on B. cereus toxin inhibition of green fluorescent protein (GFP) synthesis in transduced monkey kidney Vero cells, combined with plant extracts or plant compounds that reduce viable count of B. cereus in food. The assay exhibited a dose dependent GFP inhibition response with ~25% inhibition at 50 ng/mL toxin evaluated in culture media or soy milk, rice milk or infant formula, products associated with food poisonings outbreak. The plant extracts of green tea or bitter almond and the plant compounds epicatechin or carvacrol were found to amplify the assay response to ~90% inhibition at the 50 ng/mL toxin concentration greatly increasing the sensitivity of this assay. Additional studies showed that the test formulations also inhibited the growth of the B. cereus bacteria, likely through cell membrane disruption. The results suggest that the improved highly sensitive assay for the toxin and the rapid inactivation of the pathogen producing the toxin have the potential to enhance food safety. PMID:25767986

  6. Isolation and Antimicrobial Activity of Flavonoid Compounds from Mahagony Seeds (Swietenia macrophylla, King)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mursiti, S.; Supartono

    2017-02-01

    Flavonoid is one of the secondary metabolites compounds in mahogany seeds. Mahogany seeds can be used as an antimicrobial. This study aims to determine the antimicrobial activity of flavonoid compounds from mahogany seeds against Escherichia coli (E.coli) and Bacillus cereus (B.cereus). Isolation of flavonoid compounds done step by step. First, the maceration using n-hexane, then with methanol. The methanol extract was dissolved in ethyl acetate and aquadest, then separated. Ethyl acetate extract evaporated Flavonoid compounds were. The testing of antimicrobial activity of flavonoid compounds using the absorption method. The results showed that the antimicrobial activity of flavonoid compounds from mahogany seeds shows the inhibitory activity and provide clear zone against bacteria E.coli with value Inhibitory Regional Diameter 18.50 mm respectively, and 14.50 mm to the bacteria. Based on the results of the study, it can be concluded that flavonoid compounds from mahogany seeds have antimicrobial activity against E.coli and B.cereus.

  7. Synergistic anti-Campylobacter jejuni activity of fluoroquinolone and macrolide antibiotics with phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Oh, Euna; Jeon, Byeonghwa

    2015-01-01

    The increasing resistance of Campylobacter to clinically important antibiotics, such as fluoroquinolones and macrolides, is a serious public health problem. The objective of this study is to investigate synergistic anti-Campylobacter jejuni activity of fluoroquinolones and macrolides in combination with phenolic compounds. Synergistic antimicrobial activity was measured by performing a checkerboard assay with ciprofloxacin and erythromycin in the presence of 21 phenolic compounds. Membrane permeability changes in C. jejuni by phenolic compounds were determined by measuring the level of intracellular uptake of 1-N-phenylnaphthylamine (NPN). Antibiotic accumulation assays were performed to evaluate the level of ciprofloxacin accumulation in C. jejuni. Six phenolic compounds, including p-coumaric acid, sinapic acid, caffeic acid, vanillic acid, gallic acid, and taxifolin, significantly increased the susceptibility to ciprofloxacin and erythromycin in several human and poultry isolates. The synergistic antimicrobial effect was also observed in ciprofloxacin- and erythromycin-resistant C. jejuni strains. The phenolic compounds also substantially increased membrane permeability and antibiotic accumulation in C. jejuni. Interestingly, some phenolic compounds, such as gallic acid and taxifolin, significantly reduced the expression of the CmeABC multidrug efflux pump. Phenolic compounds increased the NPN accumulation in the cmeB mutant, indicating phenolic compounds may affect the membrane permeability. In this study, we successfully demonstrated that combinational treatment of C. jejuni with antibiotics and phenolic compounds synergistically inhibits C. jejuni by impacting both antimicrobial influx and efflux.

  8. INT-dehydrogenase activity test for assessing anaerobic biodegradability of organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Hongwei, Yang; Zhanpeng, Jiang; Shaoqi, Shi; Tang, W Z

    2002-11-01

    This study assessed anaerobic biodegradability of organic compounds from microorganism activity. Dehydrogenase activity can be a good parameter characterizing the microorganism activity. A modified method of 2-(p-iodophenyl-3-(p-nitrophenyl)-5-pheny tetrazolium chloride-dehydrogenase activity determination was proposed in anaerobic biodegradability assessment. Cubic spline curves were adopted to link the data points. This curve was integrated twice to calculate areas. The microorganism activity index in anaerobic biodegradability assessment was calculated by standardizing the integral. According to the results of the activity index, 14 kinds of organic compounds were classified into readily, partially, and poorly biodegradable under anaerobic conditions, respectively. As a result, some conclusions for anaerobic biodegradability of organic compounds were reached, based on the activity index value.

  9. Food Compounds Activating Thermosensitive TRP Channels in Asian Herbal and Medicinal Foods.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Tatsuo; Terada, Yuko

    2015-01-01

    There are several thermosensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels including capsaicin receptor, TRPV1. Food components activating TRPV1 inhibit body fat deposition through sympathetic nerve stimulation. TRPA1 is another pungency sensor for pungent compounds and is mainly coexpressed with TRPV1 in sensory nerve endings. Therefore, TRPA1 activation is expected to have an anti-obesity effect similar to TRPV1 activation. We have searched for agonists for TRPV1 and TRPA1 in vitro from Asian spices by the use of TRPV1- and TRPA1-expressing cells. Further, we performed food component addition tests to high-fat and high-sucrose diets in mice. We found capsiate, capsiconiate, capsainol from hot and sweet peppers, several piperine analogs from black pepper, gingeriols and shogaols from ginger, and sanshools and hydroxysanshools from sansho (Japanese pepper) to be TRPV1 agonists. We also identified several sulfides from garlic and durian, hydroxy fatty acids from royal jelly, miogadial and miogatrial from mioga (Zingiber mioga), piperine analogs from black pepper, and acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA) from galangal (Alpinia galanga) as TRPA1 agonists. Piperine addition to diets diminished visceral fats and increased the uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) in interscapular brown adipose tissue (IBAT), and black pepper extract showed stronger effects than piperine. Cinnamaldehyde and ACA as TRPA1 agonists inhibited fat deposition and increased UCP1. We found that several agonists of TRPV1 and TRPA1 and some agonists of TRPV1 and TRPA1 inhibit visceral fat deposition in mice. The effects of such compounds on humans remain to be clarified, but we expect that they will be helpful in the prevention of obesity.

  10. Identification of aroma active compounds of cereal coffee brew and its roasted ingredients.

    PubMed

    Majcher, Małgorzata A; Klensporf-Pawlik, Dorota; Dziadas, Mariusz; Jeleń, Henryk H

    2013-03-20

    Cereal coffee is a coffee substitute made mainly from roasted cereals such as barley and rye (60-70%), chicory (15-20%), and sugar beets (6-10%). It is perceived by consumers as a healthy, caffeine free, non-irritating beverage suitable for those who cannot drink regular coffee made from coffee beans. In presented studies, typical Polish cereal coffee brew has been subjected to the key odorants analysis with the application of gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) and aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA). In the analyzed cereal coffee extract, 30 aroma-active volatiles have been identified with FD factors ranging from 16 to 4096. This approach was also used for characterization of key odorants in ingredients used for the cereal coffee production. Comparing the main odors detected in GC-O analysis of roasted cereals brew to the odor notes of cereal coffee brew, it was evident that the aroma of cereal coffee brew is mainly influenced by roasted barley. Flavor compound identification and quantitation has been performed with application of comprehensive multidimentional gas chromatography and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC-ToFMS). The results of the quantitative measurements followed by calculation of the odor activity values (OAV) revealed 17 aroma active compounds of the cereal coffee brew with OAV ranging from 12.5 and 2000. The most potent odorant was 2-furfurylthiol followed by the 3-mercapto-3-methylbutyl formate, 3-isobutyl-2-methoxypyrazine and 2-ethyl-3,5-dimethylpyrazine, 2-thenylthiol, 2,3-butanedione, 2-methoxy phenol and 2-methoxy-4-vinyl phenol, 3(sec-butyl)-2-methoxypyrazine, 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline, 3-(methylthio)-propanal, 2,3-pentanedione, 4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3-(2H)-furanone, (E,E)-2,4-decadienal, (Z)-4-heptenal, phenylacetaldehyde, and 1-octen-3-one.

  11. EPI-001, A Compound Active against Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer, Targets Transactivation Unit 5 of the Androgen Receptor.

    PubMed

    De Mol, Eva; Fenwick, R Bryn; Phang, Christopher T W; Buzón, Victor; Szulc, Elzbieta; de la Fuente, Alex; Escobedo, Albert; García, Jesús; Bertoncini, Carlos W; Estébanez-Perpiñá, Eva; McEwan, Iain J; Riera, Antoni; Salvatella, Xavier

    2016-09-16

    Castration-resistant prostate cancer is the lethal condition suffered by prostate cancer patients that become refractory to androgen deprivation therapy. EPI-001 is a recently identified compound active against this condition that modulates the activity of the androgen receptor, a nuclear receptor that is essential for disease progression. The mechanism by which this compound exerts its inhibitory activity is however not yet fully understood. Here we show, by using high resolution solution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, that EPI-001 selectively interacts with a partially folded region of the transactivation domain of the androgen receptor, known as transactivation unit 5, that is key for the ability of prostate cells to proliferate in the absence of androgens, a distinctive feature of castration-resistant prostate cancer. Our results can contribute to the development of more potent and less toxic novel androgen receptor antagonists for treating this disease.

  12. EPI-001, a compound active against castration-resistant prostate cancer, targets transactivation unit 5 of the androgen receptor

    PubMed Central

    De Mol, Eva; Fenwick, R. Bryn; Phang, Christopher T. W.; Buzón, Victor; Szulc, Elzbieta; de la Fuente, Alex; Escobedo, Albert; García, Jesús; Bertoncini, Carlos W.; Estébanez-Perpiñá, Eva; McEwan, Iain J.; Riera, Antoni; Salvatella, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Castration-resistant prostate cancer is the lethal condition suffered by prostate cancer patients that become refractory to androgen deprivation therapy. EPI-001 is a recently identified compound active against this condition that modulates the activity of the androgen receptor, a nuclear receptor that is essential for disease progression. The mechanism by which this compound exerts its inhibitory activity is however not yet fully understood. Here we show, by using high resolution solution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, that EPI-001 selectively interacts with a partially folded region of the transactivation domain of the androgen receptor, known as transactivation unit 5, that is key for the ability of prostate cells to proliferate in the absence of androgens, a distinctive feature of castration-resistant prostate cancer. Our results can contribute to the development of more potent and less toxic novel androgen receptor antagonists for treating this disease. PMID:27356095

  13. Isolation and Chemical Structural Characterisation of a Compound with Antioxidant Activity from the Roots of Senna italica

    PubMed Central

    Mokgotho, Matlou Phineas; Gololo, Stanley Sechene; Masoko, Peter; Shai, Leshwene Jeremiah; Bagla, Victor Patrick; Eloff, Jacobus Nicolaas

    2013-01-01

    Senna italica, a member of the Fabaceae family (subfamily Caesalpiniaceae), is widely used in South African traditional medicine to treat a number of disease conditions. Aqueous extracts of the plant are mainly used to treat sexually transmitted infections and intestinal complications. The roots of S. italica were ground to a fine powder and sequentially extracted with n-hexane, dichloromethane, acetone, and methanol using serial exhaustive extraction (SEE) method. Thin layer chromatography was used to analyse the phytochemical composition of the extracts and DPPH radical scavenging method to detect the presence of antioxidant compounds. The bioassay guided fractionation of the acetone fraction afforded an antioxidant compound with free radical scavenging activity. The isolated compound was subsequently identified as 3,4′,5-trihydroxystilbene (resveratrol). This study represents the first report of the stilbene resveratrol in S. italica. PMID:23843877

  14. Screening the active compounds of Phellodendri Amurensis cortex for treating prostate cancer by high-throughput chinmedomics

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xian-Na; Zhang, Aihua; Wang, Meijia; Sun, Hui; Liu, Zhidong; Qiu, Shi; Zhang, Tianlei; Wang, Xijun

    2017-01-01

    Screening the active compounds of herbal medicines is of importance to modern drug discovery. In this work, an integrative strategy was established to discover the effective compounds and their therapeutic targets using Phellodendri Amurensis cortex (PAC) aimed at inhibiting prostate cancer as a case study. We found that PAC could be inhibited the growth of xenograft tumours of prostate cancer. Global constituents and serum metabolites were analysed by UPLC-MS based on the established chinmedomics analysis method, a total of 54 peaks in the spectrum of PAC were characterised in vitro and 38 peaks were characterised in vivo. Among the 38 compounds characterised in vivo, 29 prototype components were absorbed in serum and nine metabolites were identified in vivo. Thirty-four metabolic biomarkers were related to prostate cancer, and PAC could observably reverse these metabolic biomarkers to their normal level and regulate the disturbed metabolic profile to a healthy state. A chinmedomics approach showed that ten absorbed constituents, as effective compounds, were associated with the therapeutic effect of PAC. In combination with bioactivity assays, the action targets were also predicted and discovered. As an illustrative case study, the strategy was successfully applied to high-throughput screening of active compounds from herbal medicine. PMID:28383015

  15. Phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity of red wine made from grapes treated with different fungicides.

    PubMed

    Mulero, J; Martínez, G; Oliva, J; Cermeño, S; Cayuela, J M; Zafrilla, P; Martínez-Cachá, A; Barba, A

    2015-08-01

    The effect of treating grapes with six fungicides, applied under critical agricultural practices (CAP) on levels of phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity of red wines of Monastrell variety was studied. Vinifications were performed through addition of active dry yeast (ADY). Measurement of phenolic compounds was made with HPLC-DAD. Determination of antioxidant activity was through reaction of the wine sample with the DPPH radical. The wine prepared from grapes treated with quinoxyfen shows a greater increase of phenolic compounds than the control wine. In contrast, the wine obtained from grapes treated with trifloxystrobin showed lower total concentration of phenolic compounds, including stilbenes, whilst treatments with kresoxim-methyl, fluquinconazole, and famoxadone slightly reduced their content. Hence, the use of these last four fungicides could cause a decrease in possible health benefits to consumers. Antioxidant activity hardly varied in the assays with quinoxyfen, fluquinconazole and famoxadone, and decreased in the other wines.

  16. The phenolic compounds of olive oil: structure, biological activity and beneficial effects on human health.

    PubMed

    Tripoli, Elisa; Giammanco, Marco; Tabacchi, Garden; Di Majo, Danila; Giammanco, Santo; La Guardia, Maurizio

    2005-06-01

    The Mediterranean diet is rich in vegetables, cereals, fruit, fish, milk, wine and olive oil and has salutary biological functions. Epidemiological studies have shown a lower incidence of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular diseases and certain kinds of cancer in the Mediterranean area. Olive oil is the main source of fat, and the Mediterranean diet's healthy effects can in particular be attributed not only to the high relationship between unsaturated and saturated fatty acids in olive oil but also to the antioxidant property of its phenolic compounds. The main phenolic compounds, hydroxytyrosol and oleuropein, which give extra-virgin olive oil its bitter, pungent taste, have powerful antioxidant activity both in vivo and in vitro. The present review focuses on recent works analysing the relationship between the structure of olive oil polyphenolic compounds and their antioxidant activity. These compounds' possible beneficial effects are due to their antioxidant activity, which is related to the development of atherosclerosis and cancer, and to anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial activity.

  17. Antimicrobial activity of crude fractions and morel compounds from wild edible mushrooms of North western Himalaya.

    PubMed

    Shameem, Nowsheen; Kamili, Azra N; Ahmad, Mushtaq; Masoodi, F A; Parray, Javid A

    2017-04-01

    The antimicrobial properties of morel compounds from wild edible mushrooms (Morchella esculenta and Verpa bohemica) from Kashmir valley was investigated against different clinical pathogens. The butanol crude fraction of most popular or true morel M. esculenta showed highest 19 mm IZD against E.coli while as same fraction of Verpa bohemica exhibited 15 mm IZD against same strain. The ethyl acetate and butanol crude fractions of both morels also exhibited good antifungal activity with highest IZD shown against A. fumigates. The three morel compounds showed quite impressive anti bacterial and fungal activities. The Cpd 3 showed highest inhibitory activity almost equivalent to the synthetic antibiotics used as control. The MIC/MBC values revealed the efficiency of isolated compounds against the pathogenic strains. In the current study significant inhibitory activity of morel compounds have been obtained paying the way for their local use from ancient times.

  18. Identification of B. anthracis N(5)-carboxyaminoimidazole ribonucleotide mutase (PurE) active site binding compounds via fragment library screening.

    PubMed

    Lei, Hao; Jones, Christopher; Zhu, Tian; Patel, Kavankumar; Wolf, Nina M; Fung, Leslie W-M; Lee, Hyun; Johnson, Michael E

    2016-02-15

    The de novo purine biosynthesis pathway is an attractive target for antibacterial drug design, and PurE from this pathway has been identified to be crucial for Bacillus anthracis survival in serum. In this study we adopted a fragment-based hit discovery approach, using three screening methods-saturation transfer difference nucleus magnetic resonance (STD-NMR), water-ligand observed via gradient spectroscopy (WaterLOGSY) NMR, and surface plasmon resonance (SPR), against B. anthracis PurE (BaPurE) to identify active site binding fragments by initially testing 352 compounds in a Zenobia fragment library. Competition STD NMR with the BaPurE product effectively eliminated non-active site binding hits from the primary hits, selecting active site binders only. Binding affinities (dissociation constant, KD) of these compounds varied between 234 and 301μM. Based on test results from the Zenobia compounds, we subsequently developed and applied a streamlined fragment screening strategy to screen a much larger library consisting of 3000 computationally pre-selected fragments. Thirteen final fragment hits were confirmed to exhibit binding affinities varying from 14μM to 700μM, which were categorized into five different basic scaffolds. All thirteen fragment hits have ligand efficiencies higher than 0.30. We demonstrated that at least two fragments from two different scaffolds exhibit inhibitory activity against the BaPurE enzyme.

  19. Iron-Targeting Antitumor Activity of Gallium Compounds and Novel Insights Into Triapine®-Metal Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Antholine, William E.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Despite advances made in the treatment of cancer, a significant number of patients succumb to this disease every year. Hence, there is a great need to develop new anticancer agents. Recent Advances: Emerging data show that malignant cells have a greater requirement for iron than normal cells do and that proteins involved in iron import, export, and storage may be altered in cancer cells. Therefore, strategies to perturb these iron-dependent steps in malignant cells hold promise for the treatment of cancer. Recent studies show that gallium compounds and metal-thiosemicarbazone complexes inhibit tumor cell growth by targeting iron homeostasis, including iron-dependent ribonucleotide reductase. Chemical similarities of gallium(III) with iron(III) enable the former to mimic the latter and interpose itself in critical iron-dependent steps in cellular proliferation. Newer gallium compounds have emerged with additional mechanisms of action. In clinical trials, the first-generation-compound gallium nitrate has exhibited activity against bladder cancer and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, while the thiosemicarbazone Triapine® has demonstrated activity against other tumors. Critical Issues: Novel gallium compounds with greater cytotoxicity and a broader spectrum of antineoplastic activity than gallium nitrate should continue to be developed. Future Directions: The antineoplastic activity and toxicity of the existing novel gallium compounds and thiosemicarbazone-metal complexes should be tested in animal tumor models and advanced to Phase I and II clinical trials. Future research should identify biologic markers that predict tumor sensitivity to gallium compounds. This will help direct gallium-based therapy to cancer patients who are most likely to benefit from it. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 00, 000–000. PMID:22900955

  20. A Quantum Chemical and Statistical Study of Cytotoxic Activity of Compounds Isolated from Curcuma zedoaria

    PubMed Central

    Hamdi, Omer Abdalla Ahmed; Anouar, El Hassane; Shilpi, Jamil A.; Trabolsy, Zuhra Bashir Khalifa Al; Zain, Sharifuddin Bin Md; Zakaria, Nur Shahidatul Shida; Zulkefeli, Mohd; Weber, Jean-Frédéric F.; Malek, Sri Nurestri A.; Rahman, Syarifah Nur Syed Abdul; Awang, Khalijah

    2015-01-01

    A series of 21 compounds isolated from Curcuma zedoaria was subjected to cytotoxicity test against MCF7; Ca Ski; PC3 and HT-29 cancer cell lines; and a normal HUVEC cell line. To rationalize the structure–activity relationships of the isolated compounds; a set of electronic; steric and hydrophobic descriptors were calculated using density functional theory (DFT) method. Statistical analyses were carried out using simple and multiple linear regressions (SLR; MLR); principal component analysis (PCA); and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA). SLR analyses showed that the cytotoxicity of the isolated compounds against a given cell line depend on certain descriptors; and the corresponding correlation coefficients (R2) vary from 0%–55%. MLR results revealed that the best models can be achieved with a limited number of specific descriptors applicable for compounds having a similar basic skeleton. Based on PCA; HCA and MLR analyses; active compounds were classified into subgroups; which was in agreement with the cell based cytotoxicity assay. PMID:25923077

  1. Extraction, chemical characterization and biological activity determination of broccoli health promoting compounds.

    PubMed

    Ares, Ana M; Nozal, María J; Bernal, José

    2013-10-25

    Broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. Italica) contains substantial amount of health-promoting compounds such as vitamins, glucosinolates, phenolic compounds, and dietary essential minerals; thus, it benefits health beyond providing just basic nutrition, and consumption of broccoli has been increasing over the years. This review gives an overview on the extraction and separation techniques, as well as the biological activity of some of the above mentioned compounds which have been published in the period January 2008 to January 2013. The work has been distributed according to the different families of health promoting compounds discussing the extraction procedures and the analytical techniques employed for their characterization. Finally, information about the different biological activities of these compounds has been also provided.

  2. Chemical Diversity and Antimicrobial Activity of Volatile Compounds from Zanthoxylum zanthoxyloides Lam. according to Compound Classes, Plant Organs and Senegalese Sample Locations.

    PubMed

    Tine, Yoro; Diop, Abdoulaye; Diatta, William; Desjobert, Jean-Marie; Boye, Cheikh Saad Bouh; Costa, Jean; Wélé, Alassane; Paolini, Julien

    2017-01-01

    The chemical diversity of Zanthoxylum zanthoxyloides growing wild in Senegal was studied according to volatile compound classes, plant organs and sample locations. The composition of fruit essential oil was investigated using an original targeted approach based on the combination of gas chromatography (GC) and liquid chromatography (LC) both coupled with mass spectrometry (MS). The volatile composition of Z. zanthoxyloides fruits exhibited relative high amounts of hydrocarbon monoterpenes (24.3 - 55.8%) and non-terpenic oxygenated compounds (34.5 - 63.1%). The main components were (E)-β-ocimene (12.1 - 39%), octyl acetate (11.6 - 21.8%) and decanol (9.7 - 15.4%). The GC and GC/MS profiling of fruit essential oils showed a chemical variability according to geographical locations of plant material. The LC/MS/MS analysis of fruit oils allowed the detection of seven coumarins in trace content. The chemical composition of fruit essential oils was compared with volatile fractions of leaves and barks (root and trunk) from the same plant station. Hexadecanoic acid, germacrene D and decanal were identified as the major constituents of leaves whereas the barks (root and trunk) were dominated by pellitorine (85.8% and 57%, respectively), an atypic linear compound with amide group. The fruit essential oil exhibited interesting antimicrobial activities against Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans, particularly the alcohol fraction of the oil.

  3. Pulmonary metabolism of foreign compounds: Its role in metabolic activation

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, G.M. )

    1990-04-01

    The lung has the potential of metabolizing many foreign chemicals to a vast array of metabolites with different pharmacological and toxicological properties. Because many chemicals require metabolic activation in order to exert their toxicity, the cellular distribution of the drug-metabolizing enzymes in a heterogeneous tissue, such as the lung, and the balance of metabolic activation and deactivation pathways in any particular cell are key factors in determining the cellular specificity of many pulmonary toxins. Environmental factors such as air pollution, cigarette smoking, and diet markedly affect the pulmonary metabolism of some chemicals and, thereby, possibly affect their toxicity.

  4. Three new resin glycosides compounds from Argyreia acuta and their α-glucosidase inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Yan, You-Shao; Cui, Hong-Hua; Yin, Yong-Qin; Pan, Jie-Tao; Yu, Bang-Wei

    2017-03-01

    Three new phenolic compounds, acutacoside C (1), acutacoside D (2) and acutacoside E (3) were isolated from the aerial part of Argyreia acuta. The oligosaccharide chain was composed of two glucoses and three rhamnoses, and the aglycone was (11S)-hydroxyhexadecanoic acid (jalapinolic acid). The core of the three compounds was operculinic acid B, which was rare in resin glycosides. Their structures were established by a combination of spectroscopic and chemical methods. Compounds 1-3 have been evaluated for inhibitory activity against α-glucosidase, which all showed weak inhibitory activities.

  5. Establishment and Validation of Whole-Cell Based Fluorescence Assays to Identify Anti-Mycobacterial Compounds Using the Acanthamoeba castellanii - Mycobacterium marinum Host-Pathogen System

    PubMed Central

    Kicka, Sébastien; Trofimov, Valentin; Harrison, Christopher; Ouertatani-Sakouhi, Hajer; McKinney, John; Scapozza, Leonardo; Hilbi, Hubert; Cosson, Pierre; Soldati, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis is considered to be one of the world’s deadliest disease with 2 million deaths each year. The need for new antitubercular drugs is further exacerbated by the emergence of drug-resistance strains. Despite multiple recent efforts, the majority of the hits discovered by traditional target-based screening showed low efficiency in vivo. Therefore, there is heightened demand for whole-cell based approaches directly using host-pathogen systems. The phenotypic host-pathogen assay described here is based on the monitoring of GFP-expressing Mycobacterium marinum during infection of the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii. The assay showed straight-forward medium-throughput scalability, robustness and ease of manipulation, demonstrating its qualities as an efficient compound screening system. Validation with a series of known antitubercular compounds highlighted the advantages of the assay in comparison to previously published macrophage-Mycobacterium tuberculosis-based screening systems. Combination with secondary growth assays based on either GFP-expressing D. discoideum or M. marinum allowed us to further fine-tune compound characterization by distinguishing and quantifying growth inhibition, cytotoxic properties and antibiotic activities of the compounds. The simple and relatively low cost system described here is most suitable to detect anti-infective compounds, whether they present antibiotic activities or not, in which case they might exert anti-virulence or host defense boosting activities, both of which are largely overlooked by classical screening approaches. PMID:24498207

  6. Molecular modeling and snake venom phospholipase A2 inhibition by phenolic compounds: Structure-activity relationship.

    PubMed

    Alam, Md Iqbal; Alam, Mohammed A; Alam, Ozair; Nargotra, Amit; Taneja, Subhash Chandra; Koul, Surrinder

    2016-05-23

    In our earlier study, we have reported that a phenolic compound 2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde from Janakia arayalpatra root extract was active against Viper and Cobra envenomations. Based on the structure of this natural product, libraries of synthetic structurally variant phenolic compounds were studied through molecular docking on the venom protein. To validate the activity of eight selected compounds, we have tested them in in vivo and in vitro models. The compound 21 (2-hydroxy-3-methoxy benzaldehyde), 22 (2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde) and 35 (2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylalcohol) were found to be active against venom-induced pathophysiological changes. The compounds 20, 15 and 35 displayed maximum anti-hemorrhagic, anti-lethal and PLA2 inhibitory activity respectively. In terms of SAR, the presence of a formyl group in conjunction with a phenolic group was seen as a significant contributor towards increasing the antivenom activity. The above observations confirmed the anti-venom activity of the phenolic compounds which needs to be further investigated for the development of new anti-snake venom leads.

  7. Prediction of compounds in different local structure-activity relationship environments using emerging chemical patterns.

    PubMed

    Namasivayam, Vigneshwaran; Gupta-Ostermann, Disha; Balfer, Jenny; Heikamp, Kathrin; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2014-05-27

    Active compounds can participate in different local structure-activity relationship (SAR) environments and introduce different degrees of local SAR discontinuity, depending on their structural and potency relationships in data sets. Such SAR features have thus far mostly been analyzed using descriptive approaches, in particular, on the basis of activity landscape modeling. However, compounds in different local SAR environments have not yet been predicted. Herein, we adapt the emerging chemical patterns (ECP) method, a machine learning approach for compound classification, to systematically predict compounds with different local SAR characteristics. ECP analysis is shown to accurately assign many compounds to different local SAR environments across a variety of activity classes covering the entire range of observed local SARs. Control calculations using random forests and multiclass support vector machines were carried out and a variety of statistical performance measures were applied. In all instances, ECP calculations yielded comparable or better performance than controls. The approach presented herein can be applied to predict compounds that complement local SARs or prioritize compounds with different SAR characteristics.

  8. Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of volatile compounds of Tamarix boveana (Tamaricaceae).

    PubMed

    Saïdana, D; Mahjoub, M A; Boussaada, O; Chriaa, J; Chéraif, I; Daami, M; Mighri, Z; Helal, A N

    2008-01-01

    The chemical composition of the Tamarix boveana volatile oils obtained from the whole aerial part, flowers, leaves and stems by steam distillation was analysed using gas chromatograph (GC)-flame ionization detectors (FID) and GC-MS. Sixty-two components were identified. Hexadecanoic acid (18.14%), docosane (13.34%), germacrene D (7.68%), fenchyl acetate (7.34%), Benzyl benzoate (4.11%) were found to be the major components in the whole aerial parts. This composition differed according to the tested part: 2.4 Nonadienal was the main compound in the flowers (12.13%) while germacrene D was the major component in leaves (31.43%) and hexadecanoic acid in the stems (13.94%). To evaluate in vitro antimicrobial activity, all volatile oils were tested against six Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and four fungi. The T. boveana volatile oils exhibited an interesting antibacterial activity against all strains tested except Pseudomonas aeruginosa but no antifungal activity was detected.

  9. High throughput screening for compounds that alter muscle cell glycosylation identifies new role for N-glycans in regulating sarcolemmal protein abundance and laminin binding.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Paula V; Pang, Mabel; Marshall, Jamie L; Kung, Raymond; Nelson, Stanley F; Stalnaker, Stephanie H; Wells, Lance; Crosbie-Watson, Rachelle H; Baum, Linda G

    2012-06-29

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is an X-linked disorder characterized by loss of dystrophin, a cytoskeletal protein that connects the actin cytoskeleton in skeletal muscle cells to extracellular matrix. Dystrophin binds to the cytoplasmic domain of the transmembrane glycoprotein β-dystroglycan (β-DG), which associates with cell surface α-dystroglycan (α-DG) that binds laminin in the extracellular matrix. β-DG can also associate with utrophin, and this differential association correlates with specific glycosylation changes on α-DG. Genetic modification of α-DG glycosylation can promote utrophin binding and rescue dystrophic phenotypes in mouse dystrophy models. We used high throughput screening with the plant lectin Wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA) to identify compounds that altered muscle cell surface glycosylation, with the goal of finding compounds that increase abundance of α-DG and associated sarcolemmal glycoproteins, increase utrophin usage, and increase laminin binding. We identified one compound, lobeline, from the Prestwick library of Food and Drug Administration-approved compounds that fulfilled these criteria, increasing WFA binding to C2C12 cells and to primary muscle cells from wild type and mdx mice. WFA binding and enhancement by lobeline required complex N-glycans but not O-mannose glycans that bind laminin. However, inhibiting complex N-glycan processing reduced laminin binding to muscle cell glycoproteins, although O-mannosylation was intact. Glycan analysis demonstrated a general increase in N-glycans on lobeline-treated cells rather than specific alterations in cell surface glycosylation, consistent with increased abundance of multiple sarcolemmal glycoproteins. This demonstrates the feasibility of high throughput screening with plant lectins to identify compounds that alter muscle cell glycosylation and identifies a novel role for N-glycans in regulating muscle cell function.

  10. High Throughput Screening for Compounds That Alter Muscle Cell Glycosylation Identifies New Role for N-Glycans in Regulating Sarcolemmal Protein Abundance and Laminin Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Paula V.; Pang, Mabel; Marshall, Jamie L.; Kung, Raymond; Nelson, Stanley F.; Stalnaker, Stephanie H.; Wells, Lance; Crosbie-Watson, Rachelle H.; Baum, Linda G.

    2012-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is an X-linked disorder characterized by loss of dystrophin, a cytoskeletal protein that connects the actin cytoskeleton in skeletal muscle cells to extracellular matrix. Dystrophin binds to the cytoplasmic domain of the transmembrane glycoprotein β-dystroglycan (β-DG), which associates with cell surface α-dystroglycan (α-DG) that binds laminin in the extracellular matrix. β-DG can also associate with utrophin, and this differential association correlates with specific glycosylation changes on α-DG. Genetic modification of α-DG glycosylation can promote utrophin binding and rescue dystrophic phenotypes in mouse dystrophy models. We used high throughput screening with the plant lectin Wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA) to identify compounds that altered muscle cell surface glycosylation, with the goal of finding compounds that increase abundance of α-DG and associated sarcolemmal glycoproteins, increase utrophin usage, and increase laminin binding. We identified one compound, lobeline, from the Prestwick library of Food and Drug Administration-approved compounds that fulfilled these criteria, increasing WFA binding to C2C12 cells and to primary muscle cells from wild type and mdx mice. WFA binding and enhancement by lobeline required complex N-glycans but not O-mannose glycans that bind laminin. However, inhibiting complex N-glycan processing reduced laminin binding to muscle cell glycoproteins, although O-mannosylation was intact. Glycan analysis demonstrated a general increase in N-glycans on lobeline-treated cells rather than specific alterations in cell surface glycosylation, consistent with increased abundance of multiple sarcolemmal glycoproteins. This demonstrates the feasibility of high throughput screening with plant lectins to identify compounds that alter muscle cell glycosylation and identifies a novel role for N-glycans in regulating muscle cell function. PMID:22570487

  11. Phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity of olive leaf extracts.

    PubMed

    Kontogianni, Vassiliki G; Gerothanassis, Ioannis P

    2012-01-01

    The total phenolic content and antioxidant activities of olive leaf extracts were determined. Plant material was extracted with methanol and fractionated with solvents of increasing polarity, giving certain extracts. The qualitative changes in the composition of the extracts were determined after the storage of leaves for 22 h at 37°C, before the extraction. Total polyphenol contents in extracts were determined by the Folin-Ciocalteu procedure. They were also analysed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Their antioxidant activities were evaluated using the diphenyl picrylhydrazyl method and the β-carotene linoleate model assay. Moreover, the effects of different crude olive leaf extracts on the oxidative stability of sunflower oil at 40°C and sunflower oil-in-water emulsions (10% o/w) at 37°C, at a final concentration of crude extract 200 mg kg(-1) oil, were tested and compared with butylated hydroxyl toluene.

  12. Global emissions and models of photochemically active compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J.E.; Atherton, C.S.; Graedel, T.E.

    1993-05-20

    Anthropogenic emissions from industrial activity, fossil fuel combustion, and biomass burning are now known to be large enough (relative to natural sources) to perturb the chemistry of vast regions of the troposphere. A goal of the IGAC Global Emissions Inventory Activity (GEIA) is to provide authoritative and reliable emissions inventories on a 1{degree} {times} 1{degree} grid. When combined with atmospheric photochemical models, these high quality emissions inventories may be used to predict the concentrations of major photochemical products. Comparison of model results with measurements of pertinent species allows us to understand whether there are major shortcomings in our understanding of tropospheric photochemistry, the budgets and transport of trace species, and their effects in the atmosphere. Through this activity, we are building the capability to make confident predictions of the future consequences of anthropogenic emissions. This paper compares IGAC recommended emissions inventories for reactive nitrogen and sulfur dioxide to those that have been in use previously. We also present results from the three-dimensional LLNL atmospheric chemistry model that show how emissions of anthropogenic nitrogen oxides might potentially affect tropospheric ozone and OH concentrations and how emissions of anthropogenic sulfur increase sulfate aerosol loadings.

  13. Solubility Prediction of Active Pharmaceutical Compounds with the UNIFAC Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouar, Abderrahim; Benmessaoud, Ibtissem; Koutchoukali, Ouahiba; Koutchoukali, Mohamed Salah

    2016-03-01

    The crystallization from solution of an active pharmaceutical ingredient requires the knowledge of the solubility in the entire temperature range investigated during the process. However, during the development of a new active ingredient, these data are missing. Its experimental determination is possible, but tedious. UNIFAC Group contribution method Fredenslund et al. (Vapor-liquid equilibria using UNIFAC: a group contribution method, 1977; AIChE J 21:1086, 1975) can be used to predict this physical property. Several modifications on this model have been proposed since its development in 1977, modified UNIFAC of Dortmund Weidlich et al. (Ind Eng Chem Res 26:1372, 1987), Gmehling et al. (Ind Eng Chem Res 32:178, 1993), Pharma-modified UNIFAC Diedrichs et al. (Evaluation und Erweiterung thermodynamischer Modelle zur Vorhersage von Wirkstofflöslichkeiten, PhD Thesis, 2010), KT-UNIFAC Kang et al. (Ind Eng Chem Res 41:3260, 2002), ldots In this study, we used UNIFAC model by considering the linear temperature dependence of interaction parameters as in Pharma-modified UNIFAC and structural groups as defined by KT-UNIFAC first-order model. More than 100 binary datasets were involved in the estimation of interaction parameters. These new parameters were then used to calculate activity coefficient and solubility of some molecules in various solvents at different temperatures. The model gives better results than those from the original UNIFAC and shows good agreement between the experimental solubility and the calculated one.

  14. Modulation of aromatase activity by diet polyphenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Rosário; Azevedo, Isabel; Calhau, Conceição

    2006-05-17

    Estrogens are involved in physiological actions related to reproduction, body fat distribution, and maintenance of bone mass and are also related to the pathogenesis of estrogen-dependent cancers. The aim of this work was to study the effect of polyphenols on estrogen synthesis. The effect of polyphenols and polyphenolic-rich beverages on aromatase activity was tested in JAR cells (a choriocarcinoma cell line) through the tritiated water release assay. Some of the tested polyphenols inhibited estrogen production, chrysin being the most potent. Additionally, we observed that red wine, alcohol-free red wine, green tea, and black tea (200 microL/mL) significantly decreased aromatase activity. No effect on aromatase expression, as assessed by western blotting and RT-PCR, has been detected after 24 h of treatment with any of the flavonoids under study. In conclusion, polyphenols are able to modulate aromatase activity and, consequently, estrogen synthesis. The knowledge of such interference may help to clarify some of the biological properties attributed to polyphenols and may be useful in prevention/treatment of estrogen-dependent disorders.

  15. Screening SIRT1 Activators from Medicinal Plants as Bioactive Compounds against Oxidative Damage in Mitochondrial Function

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Liang, Xinying; Chen, Yaqi; Zhao, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    Sirtuin type 1 (SIRT1) belongs to the family of NAD+ dependent histone deacetylases and plays a critical role in cellular metabolism and response to oxidative stress. Traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs), as an important part of natural products, have been reported to exert protective effect against oxidative stress in mitochondria. In this study, we screened SIRT1 activators from TCMs and investigated their activities against mitochondrial damage. 19 activators were found in total by in vitro SIRT1 activity assay. Among those active compounds, four compounds, ginsenoside Rb2, ginsenoside F1, ginsenoside Rc, and schisandrin A, were further studied to validate the SIRT1-activation effects by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and confirm their activities against oxidative damage in H9c2 cardiomyocytes exposed to tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP). The results showed that those compounds enhanced the deacetylated activity of SIRT1, increased ATP content, and inhibited intracellular ROS formation as well as regulating the activity of Mn-SOD. These SIRT1 activators also showed moderate protective effects on mitochondrial function in t-BHP cells by recovering oxygen consumption and increasing mitochondrial DNA content. Our results suggested that those compounds from TCMs attenuated oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial damage in cardiomyocytes through activation of SIRT1. PMID:26981165

  16. Antiprotozoal and Antimycobacterial Activities of Pure Compounds from Aristolochia elegans Rhizomes

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Arellanes, Adelina; León-Díaz, Rosalba; Meckes, Mariana; Tapia, Amparo; Molina-Salinas, Gloria María; Luna-Herrera, Julieta; Yépez-Mulia, Lilián

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed the antimycobacterial activity of the hexane extract of rhizomes from Aristolochia elegans. Some compounds of this extract were purified and tested against a group of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains. We also evaluated their antiprotozoal activities. The hexane extract was active against M. tuberculosis H37Rv at a MIC = 100 μg mL−1; the pure compounds eupomatenoid-1, fargesin, and (8R,8′R,9R)-cubebin were active against M. tuberculosis H37Rv (MIC = 50 μg mL−1), while fargesin presented activity against three monoresistant strains of M. tuberculosis H37Rv and a MDR clinical isolate of M. tuberculosis (MIC < 50 μg mL−1). Both the extract and eupomatenoid-1 were very active against E. histolytica and G. lamblia (IC50 < 0.624 μg mL−1); in contrast, fargesin and (8R,8′R,9R)-cubebin were moderately active (IC50 < 275 μg mL−1). In this context, two compounds responsible for the antimycobacterial presented by A. elegans are fargesin and cubebin, although others may exert this activity also. In addition to the antimycobacterial activity, the hexane extract has important activity against E. histolytica and G. lamblia, and eupomatenoid-1 is one of the compounds responsible for the antiparasite activity. PMID:22454670

  17. Compound 19e, a Novel Glucokinase Activator, Protects against Cytokine-Induced Beta-Cell Apoptosis in INS-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Yoon Sin; Seo, Eunhui; Park, Kaapjoo; Jun, Hee-Sook

    2017-01-01

    Previously, compound 19e, a novel heteroaryl-containing benzamide derivative, was identified as a potent glucokinase activator (GKA) and showed a glucose-lowering effect in diabetic mice. In this study, the anti-apoptotic actions of 19e were evaluated in INS-1 pancreatic beta-cells co-treated with TNF-α and IL-1β to induce cell death. Compound 19e protected INS-1 cells from cytokine-induced cell death, and the effect was similar to treatment with another GKA or exendin-4. Compound 19e reduced annexin-V stained cells and the expression of cleaved caspase-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase protein, as well as upregulated the expression of B-cell lymphoma-2 protein. Compound 19e inhibited apoptotic signaling via induction of the ATP content, and the effect was correlated with the downregulation of nuclear factor-κB p65 and inducible nitric oxide synthase. Further, 19e increased NAD-dependent protein deacetylase sirtuin-1 (SIRT1) deacetylase activity, and the anti-apoptotic effect of 19e was attenuated by SIRT1 inhibitor or SIRT1 siRNA treatment. Our results demonstrate that the novel GKA, 19e, prevents cytokine-induced beta-cell apoptosis via SIRT1 activation and has potential as a therapeutic drug for the preservation of pancreatic beta-cells.

  18. In vitro antitrypanosomal activity of some phenolic compounds from propolis and lactones from Fijian Kawa (Piper methysticum).

    PubMed

    Otoguro, Kazuhiko; Iwatsuki, Masato; Ishiyama, Aki; Namatame, Miyuki; Nishihara-Tsukashima, Aki; Kiyohara, Hiroaki; Hashimoto, Toshihiro; Asakawa, Yoshinori; Omura, Satoshi; Yamada, Haruki

    2012-07-01

    During our search to discover new antitrypanosomal compounds, eight known plant compounds (three phenolic compounds and five kawa lactones) were evaluated for in vitro activity against Trypanosoma brucei brucei. Among them, we found two phenolic compounds and three kawa lactones possessing an α-pyrone influenced antitrypanosomal property. In particular, β-phenethyl caffeate, farnesyl caffeate and dihydrokawain exhibited high or moderate selective and potent antitrypanosomal activity in vitro. We detail here the antitrypanosomal activity and cytotoxicities of the compounds, in comparison with two commonly used antitrypanosomal drugs (eflornithine and suramin). Our findings represent the first report of the promising trypanocidal activity of these compounds.

  19. Apple peels, from seven cultivars, have lipase-inhibitory activity and contain numerous ursenoic acids as identified by LC-ESI-QTOF-HRMS.

    PubMed

    McGhie, Tony K; Hudault, Sébastien; Lunken, Rona C M; Christeller, John T

    2012-01-11

    Apple peel contains numerous phytochemicals, many of which show bioactivity. This study investigated the identity of triterpenoid compounds contained in ethanolic extracts of peel from seven apple cultivars. Using HPLC-ESI-QTOF-HRMS, accurate mass information was obtained for 43 compounds, and chemical identity was inferred from the calculated elemental composition, fragment masses, ms/ms, and a limited set of authentic standards. Compounds were identified as triterpene acids and tentatively identified as ursenoic (or oleanoic) acid derivatives containing hydroxyl, oxo, and coumaroyloxy groups. These apple skin extracts exhibited lipase-inhibitory activity, which may be linked to the ursenoic acid content. Furthermore, both triterpene content and lipase-inhibitory activity varied by cultivar.

  20. Wild Bitter Melon Leaf Extract Inhibits Porphyromonas gingivalis-Induced Inflammation: Identification of Active Compounds through Bioassay-Guided Isolation.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tzung-Hsun; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Ying, How-Ting; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Shen, Chien-Chang; Lin, Yin-Ku; Tsai, Po-Jung

    2016-04-06

    Porphyromonas gingivalis has been identified as one of the major periodontal pathogens. Activity-directed fractionation and purification processes were employed to identify the anti-inflammatory active compounds using heat-killed P. gingivalis-stimulated human monocytic THP-1 cells in vitro. Five major fractions were collected from the ethanol/ethyl acetate extract of wild bitter melon (Momordica charantia Linn. var. abbreviata Ser.) leaves and evaluated for their anti-inflammatory activity against P. gingivalis. Among the test fractions, Fraction 5 effectively decreased heat-killed P. gingivalis-induced interleukin (IL)-8 and was subjected to separation and purification by using chromatographic techniques. Two cucurbitane triterpenoids were isolated from the active fraction and identified as 5β,19-epoxycucurbita-6,23-diene-3β,19,25-triol (1) and 3β,7β,25-trihydroxycucurbita-5,23-dien-19-al (2) by comparing spectral data. Treatments of both compounds in vitro potently suppressed P. gingivalis-induced IL-8, IL-6, and IL-1β levels and the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in THP-1 cells. Both compounds effectively inhibited the mRNA levels of IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 in P. gingivalis-stimulated gingival tissue of mice. These findings imply that 5β,19-epoxycucurbita-6,23-diene-3β,19,25-triol and 3β,7β,25-trihydroxycucurbita-5,23-dien-19-al could be used for the development of novel therapeutic approaches against P. gingivalis infections.

  1. Enzyme activity in the flesh fly Parasarcophaga dux Thomson influenced by dill compounds, myristicin and apiol.

    PubMed

    Khalaf, Abdel-Fattah A

    2004-04-01

    The newly emerged adults of Parasarcophaga dux were treated topically with various doses of myristicin and apiol isolated from roots of dill plant, Anethum graveolus. The compounds toxicity and the dehydrogenase activities of the treated stage and its subsequent developmental stages were studied. The results indicated that apiol more toxic than myristicin. The spectrophotometric evaluation exhibited changes in dehydrogenase activities after treatments. Compounds increased the activities of both alpha-GPDH and MDH in first half of metamorphosis (immature stages). But, the level of ME activities of the various stages was obviously decreased.

  2. Cell extraction combined with off-line HPLC for screening active compounds from Coptis chinensis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Cheng; Wu, Xiao-Dan; Yu, Ya-Ming; Duan, Hongquan; Zhou, Jing; Xu, Liang

    2016-04-01

    Cell membrane chromatography is a useful tool for screening active compounds from natural products. As the reason of separation mechanism, traditional cell membrane chromatography could not be used for screening the active compounds absorbed through the cell membrane and influencing the cell signal transduction pathway. In this work, we establish a new method named cell extraction combined with off-line HPLC for screening the compounds penetrating the cell membrane. This is the first time 3 T3-L1 adipocyte culture has been combined with HPLC technology. Compared with other cell membrane chromatography methods, there is good resolution and no further analysis by other chromatographic steps is required. On co-incubating crude extracts of Coptis chinensis with cells and analyzing the compounds extracted by the cells, active compounds such as berberine were detected. Glucose consumption tests showed that berberine could increase glucose consumption by insulin-resistant 3 T3-L1 adipocytes. The levels of intracellular berberine correlated with its activity. The results indicate that the developed method could be an alternative method for screening active compounds from natural products.

  3. Comparison of antioxidant activity of compounds isolated from guava leaves and a stability study of the most active compound.

    PubMed

    Nantitanon, W; Okonogi, S

    2012-02-01

    In the present study, quercetin (QT), morin (MR), and quercetin-3-O-glucopyranoside (QG) isolated from guava leaves were comparatively tested for antioxidant activity using DPPH, ABTS, and FRAP methods. QT was the most active among them. The free radical scavenging activity of QT was approximately four times higher than MR and two times higher than QG. The reducing power of QT was eight times higher than MR and two times higher than QG. A mixture of QT with MR or QG showed interesting combination effect. The synergistic antioxidant activity was obtained when QT was mixed with MR whereas the antagonistic effect was found when mixed with QG. The stability study of QT in liquid preparations indicated that the decomposition reaction rate of QT could be explained by a kinetic model assuming a first-order chemical reaction. The aqueous solution of QT was rapidly decomposed with t1/2 of approximately five days whereas QT entrapped in chitosan nanoparticles was five times longer. It was concluded that QT was the most active antioxidant from guava leaves. Entrapment of QT in chitosan nanoparticles could significantly enhance its stability.

  4. Pomegranate Ellagitannin-Derived Compounds Exhibit Anti-proliferative and Anti-aromatase Activity in Breast Cancer Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Lynn S.; Zhang, Yanjun; Seeram, Navindra P.; Heber, David; Chen, Shiuan

    2009-01-01

    Estrogen stimulates the proliferation of breast cancer cells and the growth of estrogen-responsive tumors. The aromatase enzyme, which converts androgen to estrogen, plays a key role in breast carcinogenesis. The pomegranate fruit, a rich source of ellagitannins (ETs), has attracted recent attention due to its anti-cancer and anti-atherosclerotic properties. On consumption, pomegranate ETs hydrolyze, releasing ellagic acid (EA) which is then converted to 3,8-dihydroxy-6H-dibenzo[b,d]pyran-6-one (‘urolithin’) derivatives by gut microflora. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anti-aromatase activity and inhibition of testosterone-induced breast cancer cell proliferation by ellagitannin (ET)-derived compounds isolated from pomegranates. A panel of ten ET-derived compounds including EA, gallagic acid (GA), and urolithins A and B (and their acetylated, methylated and sulfated analogs prepared in our laboratory) were examined for ability to inhibit aromatase activity and testosterone-induced breast cancer cell proliferation. Using a microsomal aromatase assay, we screened the panel of ET-derived compounds and identified six with anti-aromatase activity. Among these, urolithin B (UB) was shown to most effectively inhibit aromatase activity in a live-cell assay. Kinetic analysis of UB demonstrated mixed inhibition, suggesting more than one inhibitory mechanism. Proliferation assays also determined that UB significantly inhibited testosterone-induced MCF-7aro cell proliferation. The remaining test compounds also exhibited anti-proliferative activity, but to a lesser degree than UB. These studies suggest that pomegranate ET-derived compounds have potential for the prevention of estrogen-responsive breast cancers. PMID:20051378

  5. Antioxidant activity and phytochemical compounds of snake fruit (Salacca Zalacca)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suica-Bunghez, I. R.; Teodorescu, S.; Dulama, I. D.; Voinea, O. C.; imionescu, S.; Ion, R. M.

    2016-06-01

    Snake fruit (Salacca zalacca) is a palm tree species, which is found in Malaysia and Indonesia. This study was conducted to investigate and compare the composition, total phenolic, flavonoid, tanins and monoterpenoids contents in the core and shell fruits. Concentration values of extracts were obtained from standard curves obtained. Antioxidant activity was determined using DPPH method. For all methods it was used the UV-VIS Specord M40, using different wavelength. The infrared spectral analysis was carried out to caracterized the type of functional group existent in snake fruit parts (shell and core).

  6. Activated phosphors having matrices of yttrium-transition metal compound

    DOEpatents

    De Kalb, E.L.; Fassel, V.A.

    1975-07-01

    A method is described for preparing a phosphor composition containing a lanthanide activator element with a host matrix having a transition element as a major component. The host matrix is composed of certain rare earth phosphates or vanadates such as YPO$sub 4$ with a portion of the rare earth replaced with one or more of the transition elements. On x-ray or other electromagnetic excitation, trace lanthanide impurities or additives within the phosphor are spectrometrically determined from their characteristic luminescence. (auth)

  7. Chemistry and cancer preventing activities of ginseng saponins and some related triterpenoid compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, S

    2001-01-01

    More than 25 dammarane-type tetracyclic triterpenoid saponins have been isolated from ginseng, the root and rhizome of Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer (Araliaceae). The genuine sapogenins of those saponins, 20(S)-protopanaxa-diol and -triol, were identified as 20(S) 12beta-hydroxy-and 20(S) 6alpha,12beta-dihydroxy-dammarenediol-II, respectively. There are two types of preparations from ginseng: white ginseng prepared by drying after peelling off and red ginseng prepared by steaming and drying. Some partly deglycosylated saponins such as ginsenoside Rh-1, Rh-2, and Rg-3 are obtained from red ginseng as artifacts produced during steaming. Several workers studied the metabolic transformation by human intestinal bacteria after oral administration of ginsenoside Rb-1 and Rb-2 and found that the stepwise deglyco-sylation yielded compound K and finally 20(S)-protopanaxadiol. Ginsenoside Rg-1 was converted into 20(S)-protopanaxatriol via ginsenoside Rh-1. Yun et al. in Korea conducted the epidemiological case-control studies of ginseng and suggested its cancer preventing activities. Kitagawa et al. demonstrated in vitro that ginsenosides, especially 20(R)-ginsenoside Rg-3, specifically inhibited cancer cell invasion and metastasis. Azuma et al. found that ginsenoside Rb-2 inhibited tumor angiogenesis, and Kikuchi et al. reported that ginsenoside Rh-2 inhibited the human ovarian cancer growth in nude mice. Recently, ginsenoside Rg-3 was produced as an anti-angiogenic anti-cancer drug in China. The aforementioned reports suggest that less glycosylated protopanaxadiol derivatives are effective in cancer prevention. Apart from Ginseng tetracyclic triterpenoid saponins, some oleanane-type pentacyclic triterpenoid compounds showed the anti-carcinogenic activity in the two-stage anti-cancer-promotion experiments in vitro and in vivo. PMID:11748374

  8. How to acquire new biological activities in old compounds by computer prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poroikov, V. V.; Filimonov, D. A.

    2002-11-01

    Due to the directed way of testing chemical compounds' in drug research and development many projects fail because serious adverse effects and toxicity are discovered too late, and many existing prospective activities remain unstudied. Evaluation of the general biological potential of molecules is possible using a computer program PASS that predicts more than 780 pharmacological effects, mechanisms of action, mutagenicity, carcinogenicity, etc. on the basis of structural formulae of compounds, with average accuracy ˜85%. PASS applications to both databases of available samples included hundreds of thousands compounds, and small collections of compounds synthesized by separate medicinal chemists are described. It is shown that 880 compounds from Prestwick chemical library represent a very diverse pharmacological space. New activities can be found in existing compounds by prediction. Therefore, on this basis, the selection of compounds with required and without unwanted properties is possible. Even when PASS cannot predict very new activities, it may recognize some unwanted actions at the early stage of R&D, providing the medicinal chemist with the means to increase the efficiency of projects.

  9. Steroid-Derived Naphthoquinoline Asphaltene Model Compounds: Hydriodic Acid Is the Active Catalyst in I2-Promoted Multicomponent Cyclocondensation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Matthias; Scott, David E; Scherer, Alexander; Hampel, Frank; Hamilton, Robin J; Gray, Murray R; Tykwinski, Rik R; Stryker, Jeffrey M

    2015-12-04

    A multicomponent cyclocondensation reaction between 2-aminoanthracene, aromatic aldehydes, and 5-α-cholestan-3-one has been used to synthesize model asphaltene compounds. The active catalyst for this reaction has been identified as hydriodic acid, which is formed in situ from the reaction of iodine with water, while iodine is not a catalyst under anhydrous conditions. The products, which contain a tetrahydro[4]helicene moiety, are optically active, and the stereochemical characteristics have been examined by VT-NMR and VT-CD spectroscopies, as well as X-ray crystallography.

  10. Elucidation of the Mode of Action of a New Antibacterial Compound Active against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Gerits, Evelien; Blommaert, Eline; Lippell, Anna; O’Neill, Alex J.; Weytjens, Bram; De Maeyer, Dries; Fierro, Ana Carolina; Marchal, Kathleen; Marchand, Arnaud; Chaltin, Patrick; Spincemaille, Pieter; De Brucker, Katrijn; Thevissen, Karin; Cammue, Bruno P. A.; Swings, Toon; Liebens, Veerle; Fauvart, Maarten; Verstraeten, Natalie; Michiels, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Nosocomial and community-acquired infections caused by multidrug resistant bacteria represent a major human health problem. Thus, there is an urgent need for the development of antibiotics with new modes of action. In this study, we investigated the antibacterial characteristics and mode of action of a new antimicrobial compound, SPI031 (N-alkylated 3, 6-dihalogenocarbazol 1-(sec-butylamino)-3-(3,6-dichloro-9H-carbazol-9-yl)propan-2-ol), which was previously identified in our group. This compound exhibits broad-spectrum antibacterial activity, including activity against the human pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We found that SPI031 has rapid bactericidal activity (7-log reduction within 30 min at 4x MIC) and that the frequency of resistance development against SPI031 is low. To elucidate the mode of action of SPI031, we performed a macromolecular synthesis assay, which showed that SPI031 causes non-specific inhibition of macromolecular biosynthesis pathways. Liposome leakage and membrane permeability studies revealed that SPI031 rapidly exerts membrane damage, which is likely the primary cause of its antibacterial activity. These findings were supported by a mutational analysis of SPI031-resistant mutants, a transcriptome analysis and the identification of transposon mutants with altered sensitivity to the compound. In conclusion, our results show that SPI031 exerts its antimicrobial activity by causing membrane damage, making it an interesting starting point for the development of new antibacterial therapies. PMID:27167126

  11. Compound Library Screening Identified Cardiac Glycoside Digitoxin as an Effective Growth Inhibitor of Gefitinib-Resistant Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer via Downregulation of α-Tubulin and Inhibition of Microtubule Formation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-Ze; Chen, Xi; Fan, Xing-Xing; He, Jian-Xing; Huang, Jun; Xiao, Da-Kai; Zhou, Yan-Ling; Zheng, Sen-You; Xu, Jia-Hui; Yao, Xiao-Jun; Liu, Liang; Leung, Elaine Lai-Han

    2016-03-18

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) dominates over 85% of all lung cancer cases. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activating mutation is a common situation in NSCLC. In the clinic, molecular-targeting with Gefitinib as a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) for EGFR downstream signaling is initially effective. However, drug resistance frequently happens due to additional mutation on EGFR, such as substitution from threonine to methionine at amino acid position 790 (T790M). In this study, we screened a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) compound library consisting of 800 single compounds in TKI-resistance NSCLC H1975 cells, which contains substitutions from leucine to arginine at amino acid 858 (L858R) and T790M mutation on EGFR. Attractively, among these compounds there are 24 compounds CC50 of which was less than 2.5 μM were identified. We have further investigated the mechanism of the most effective one, Digitoxin. It showed a significantly cytotoxic effect in H1975 cells by causing G2 phase arrest, also remarkably activated 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Moreover, we first proved that Digitoxin suppressed microtubule formation through decreasing α-tubulin. Therefore, it confirmed that Digitoxin effectively depressed the growth of TKI-resistance NSCLC H1975 cells by inhibiting microtubule polymerization and inducing cell cycle arrest.

  12. Active Compounds of Rhubarb Root and Rhizome in Animal Model Experiments of Focal Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ai-ju; Song, Liang; Li, Yan; Zhang, Xiao-guang; Chen, Zi-xian; Huang, Li-bo; Zhang, Hong-feng; Zheng, Guo-qing

    2015-01-01

    Rhubarb root and rhizome (RRR) has been clinically used for stroke at least 2000 years and is still used in modern times in both China and elsewhere worldwide. The objective of present study was to evaluate the efficacy of active compounds of RRR (ACRRR) for experimental ischemic stroke. Studies of ACRRR in animal models of ischemic stroke were identified from 5 databases until April 2014. Study quality for each included article was evaluated according to the CAMARADES 10-item checklist. Outcome measures were neurological deficit score and infarct size. All the data were analyzed using RevMan 5.1 software. As a result, 20 studies were identified describing procedures involving 577 animals. The quality score of studies ranges from 2 to 6, and the median was 3.4. Six studies showed significant effects of ACRRR for improving infarct size compared with model group (P < 0.01). Six studies indicated significant effects of ACRRR for improving the neurological deficit scores according to Zea longa criterion or eight-point criterion (P < 0.01). In conclusion, these findings demonstrated a possible efficacy of ACRRR that have potential neuroprotective effect for experimental ischemic stroke. However, these apparently positive findings should be interpreted with caution because of the methodological flaws. PMID:26495006

  13. Anti-prion activity of a panel of aromatic chemical compounds: in vitro and in silico approaches.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Natalia C; Marques, Icaro A; Conceição, Wesley A; Macedo, Bruno; Machado, Clarice S; Mascarello, Alessandra; Chiaradia-Delatorre, Louise Domeneghini; Yunes, Rosendo Augusto; Nunes, Ricardo José; Hughson, Andrew G; Raymond, Lynne D; Pascutti, Pedro G; Caughey, Byron; Cordeiro, Yraima

    2014-01-01

    The prion protein (PrP) is implicated in the Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSEs), which comprise a group of fatal neurodegenerative diseases affecting humans and other mammals. Conversion of cellular PrP (PrP(C)) into the scrapie form (PrP(Sc)) is the hallmark of TSEs. Once formed, PrP(Sc) aggregates and catalyzes PrP(C) misfolding into new PrP(Sc) molecules. Although many compounds have been shown to inhibit the conversion process, so far there is no effective therapy for TSEs. Besides, most of the previously evaluated compounds failed in vivo due to poor pharmacokinetic profiles. In this work we propose a combined in vitro/in silico approach to screen for active anti-prion compounds presenting acceptable drugability and pharmacokinetic parameters. A diverse panel of aromatic compounds was screened in neuroblastoma cells persistently infected with PrP(Sc) (ScN2a) for their ability to inhibit PK-resistant PrP (PrP(Res)) accumulation. From ∼200 compounds, 47 were effective in decreasing the accumulation of PrP(Res) in ScN2a cells. Pharmacokinetic and physicochemical properties were predicted in silico, allowing us to obtain estimates of relative blood brain barrier permeation and mutagenicity. MTT reduction assays showed that most of the active compounds were non cytotoxic. Compounds that cleared PrP(Res) from ScN2a cells, were non-toxic in the MTT assay, and presented a good pharmacokinetic profile were investigated for their ability to inhibit aggregation of an amyloidogenic PrP peptide fragment (PrP(109-149)). Molecular docking results provided structural models and binding affinities for the interaction between PrP and the most promising compounds. In summary, using this combined in vitro/in silico approach we have identified new small organic anti-scrapie compounds that decrease the accumulation of PrP(Res) in ScN2a cells, inhibit the aggregation of a PrP peptide, and possess pharmacokinetic characteristics that support their drugability. These

  14. Anti-Prion Activity of a Panel of Aromatic Chemical Compounds: In Vitro and In Silico Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Natalia C.; Marques, Icaro A.; Conceição, Wesley A.; Macedo, Bruno; Machado, Clarice S.; Mascarello, Alessandra; Chiaradia-Delatorre, Louise Domeneghini; Yunes, Rosendo Augusto; Nunes, Ricardo José; Hughson, Andrew G.; Raymond, Lynne D.; Pascutti, Pedro G.; Caughey, Byron; Cordeiro, Yraima

    2014-01-01

    The prion protein (PrP) is implicated in the Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSEs), which comprise a group of fatal neurodegenerative diseases affecting humans and other mammals. Conversion of cellular PrP (PrPC) into the scrapie form (PrPSc) is the hallmark of TSEs. Once formed, PrPSc aggregates and catalyzes PrPC misfolding into new PrPSc molecules. Although many compounds have been shown to inhibit the conversion process, so far there is no effective therapy for TSEs. Besides, most of the previously evaluated compounds failed in vivo due to poor pharmacokinetic profiles. In this work we propose a combined in vitro/in silico approach to screen for active anti-prion compounds presenting acceptable drugability and pharmacokinetic parameters. A diverse panel of aromatic compounds was screened in neuroblastoma cells persistently infected with PrPSc (ScN2a) for their ability to inhibit PK-resistant PrP (PrPRes) accumulation. From ∼200 compounds, 47 were effective in decreasing the accumulation of PrPRes in ScN2a cells. Pharmacokinetic and physicochemical properties were predicted in silico, allowing us to obtain estimates of relative blood brain barrier permeation and mutagenicity. MTT reduction assays showed that most of the active compounds were non cytotoxic. Compounds that cleared PrPRes from ScN2a cells, were non-toxic in the MTT assay, and presented a good pharmacokinetic profile were investigated for their ability to inhibit aggregation of an amyloidogenic PrP peptide fragment (PrP109–149). Molecular docking results provided structural models and binding affinities for the interaction between PrP and the most promising compounds. In summary, using this combined in vitro/in silico approach we have identified new small organic anti-scrapie compounds that decrease the accumulation of PrPRes in ScN2a cells, inhibit the aggregation of a PrP peptide, and possess pharmacokinetic characteristics that support their drugability. These compounds are

  15. Competitive adsorption of furfural and phenolic compounds onto activated carbon in fixed bed column.

    PubMed

    Sulaymon, Abbas H; Ahmed, Kawther W

    2008-01-15

    For a multicomponent competitive adsorption of furfural and phenolic compounds, a mathematical model was builtto describe the mass transfer kinetics in a fixed bed column with activated carbon. The effects of competitive adsorption equilibrium constant, axial dispersion, external mass transfer, and intraparticle diffusion resistance on the breakthrough curve were studied for weakly adsorbed compound (furfural) and strongly adsorbed compounds (parachlorophenol and phenol). Experiments were carried out to remove the furfural and phenolic compound from aqueous solution. The equilibrium data and intraparticle diffusion coefficients obtained from separate experiments in a batch adsorber, by fitting the experimental data with theoretical model. The results show that the mathematical model includes external mass transfer and pore diffusion using nonlinear isotherms and provides a good description of the adsorption process for furfural and phenolic compounds in a fixed bed adsorber.

  16. Compounds from Polyphaga plancyi and their inhibitory activities against JAK3 and DDR1 kinases.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hong-Jie; Yan, Yong-Ming; Tu, Zheng-Chao; Luo, Jin-Feng; Liang, Rui; Yang, Tong-Hua; Cheng, Yong-Xian; Wang, Shu-Mei

    2016-10-01

    Plancyamides A (1) and B (3), plancypyrazine A (2), and plancyols A (4) and B (5), five new compounds (1-5), and three known ones (6-8), were isolated from the whole bodies of Polyphaga plancyi Bolivar. Their structures were elucidated by a combination of spectroscopic analyses including 1D and 2D NMR, and HRESIMS. Among them, compound 3 is racemic, chiral HPLC separation afforded its respective enantiomers. The absolute configuration of 1 was assigned by computational methods. Biological evaluation of all the compounds with exception of 7 and 8 discloses that compounds 2 and 4 could inhibit JAK3 kinase with IC50 values of 12.6 and 5.0μM, respectively. In addition, compound 4 exhibit inhibitory activity towards DDR1 kinase with IC50 value of 4.87μM.

  17. Overcoming Chloroquine Resistance in Malaria: Design, Synthesis, and Structure-Activity Relationships of Novel Hybrid Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Boudhar, Aicha; Ng, Xiao Wei; Loh, Chiew Yee; Chia, Wan Ni; Tan, Zhi Ming; Nosten, Francois

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to antimalarial therapies, including artemisinin, has emerged as a significant challenge. Reversal of acquired resistance can be achieved using agents that resensitize resistant parasites to a previously efficacious therapy. Building on our initial work describing novel chemoreversal agents (CRAs) that resensitize resistant parasites to chloroquine (CQ), we herein report new hybrid single agents as an innovative strategy in the battle against resistant malaria. Synthetically linking a CRA scaffold to chloroquine produces hybrid compounds with restored potency toward a range of resistant malaria parasites. A preferred compound, compound 35, showed broad activity and good potency against seven strains resistant to chloroquine and artemisinin. Assessment of aqueous solubility, membrane permeability, and in vitro toxicity in a hepatocyte line and a cardiomyocyte line indicates that compound 35 has a good therapeutic window and favorable drug-like properties. This study provides initial support for CQ-CRA hybrid compounds as a potential treatment for resistant malaria. PMID:26953199

  18. Phenolic compounds from the leaf extract of artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) and their antimicrobial activities.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xianfeng; Zhang, Hongxun; Lo, Raymond

    2004-12-01

    A preliminary antimicrobial disk assay of chloroform, ethyl acetate, and n-butanol extracts of artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) leaf extracts showed that the n-butanol fraction exhibited the most significant antimicrobial activities against seven bacteria species, four yeasts, and four molds. Eight phenolic compounds were isolated from the n-butanol soluble fraction of artichoke leaf extracts. On the basis of high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, tandem mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques, the structures of the isolated compounds were determined as the four caffeoylquinic acid derivatives, chlorogenic acid (1), cynarin (2), 3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid (3), and 4,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid (4), and the four flavonoids, luteolin-7-rutinoside (5), cynaroside (6), apigenin-7-rutinoside (7), and apigenin-7-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (8), respectively. The isolated compounds were examined for their antimicrobial activities on the above microorganisms, indicating that all eight phenolic compounds showed activity against most of the tested organisms. Among them, chlorogenic acid, cynarin, luteolin-7-rutinoside, and cynaroside exhibited a relatively higher activity than other compounds; in addition, they were more effective against fungi than bacteria. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of these compounds were between 50 and 200 microg/mL.

  19. Functional Brain Activation Differences in Stuttering Identified with a Rapid fMRI Sequence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loucks, Torrey; Kraft, Shelly Jo; Choo, Ai Leen; Sharma, Harish; Ambrose, Nicoline G.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether brain activity related to the presence of stuttering can be identified with rapid functional MRI (fMRI) sequences that involved overt and covert speech processing tasks. The long-term goal is to develop sensitive fMRI approaches with developmentally appropriate tasks to identify deviant speech…

  20. Identifying and Activating Receptive Vocabulary by an Online Vocabulary Survey and an Online Writing Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Ivy Chuhui; Kawai, Goh

    2016-01-01

    Seeking to identify and activate the Receptive Vocabulary (RV) of English Language Learners (ELLs), we designed (1) an online five category multiple-choice vocabulary survey that more quickly measures vocabulary knowledge, and (2) an online creative writing task where ELLs chose RV items identified in step (1). While RV items of highly proficient…

  1. Combining a Ru(II) "Building Block" and Rapid Screening Approach to Identify DNA Structure-Selective "Light Switch" Compounds.

    PubMed

    Wachter, Erin; Moyá, Diego; Glazer, Edith C

    2017-02-13

    A chemically reactive Ru(II) "building block", able to undergo condensation reactions with substituted diamines, was utilized to create a small library of luminescent "light switch" dipyrido-[3,2-a:2',3'-c] phenazine (dppz) complexes. The impact of substituent identity, position, and the number of substituents on the light switch effect was investigated. An unbiased, parallel screening approach was used to evaluate the selectivity of the compounds for a variety of different biomolecules, including protein, nucleosides, single stranded DNA, duplex DNA, triplex DNA, and G-quadruplex DNA. Combining these two approaches allowed for the identification of hit molecules that showed different selectivities for biologically relevant DNA structures, particularly triplex and quadruplex DNA.

  2. Using wearable cameras to categorise type and context of accelerometer-identified episodes of physical activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Accelerometers can identify certain physical activity behaviours, but not the context in which they take place. This study investigates the feasibility of wearable cameras to objectively categorise the behaviour type and context of participants’ accelerometer-identified episodes of activity. Methods Adults were given an Actical hip-mounted accelerometer and a SenseCam wearable camera (worn via lanyard). The onboard clocks on both devices were time-synchronised. Participants engaged in free-living activities for 3 days. Actical data were cleaned and episodes of sedentary, lifestyle-light, lifestyle-moderate, and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) were identified. Actical episodes were categorised according to their social and environmental context and Physical Activity (PA) compendium category as identified from time-matched SenseCam images. Results There were 212 days considered from 49 participants from whom SenseCam images and associated Actical data were captured. Using SenseCam images, behaviour type and context attributes were annotated for 386 (out of 3017) randomly selected episodes (such as walking/transportation, social/not-social, domestic/leisure). Across the episodes, 12 categories that aligned with the PA Compendium were identified, and 114 subcategory types were identified. Nineteen percent of episodes could not have their behaviour type and context categorized; 59% were outdoors versus 39% indoors; 33% of episodes were recorded as leisure time activities, with 33% transport, 18% domestic, and 15% occupational. 33% of the randomly selected episodes contained direct social interaction and 22% were in social situations where the participant wasn’t involved in direct engagement. Conclusion Wearable camera images offer an objective method to capture a spectrum of activity behaviour types and context across 81% of accelerometer-identified episodes of activity. Wearable cameras represent the best objective method currently

  3. The structure-activity relationship of various YO compounds, novel plasmin inhibitors, in the apoptosis induction.

    PubMed

    Enomoto, Riyo; Sugahara, Chiyoko; Komai, Tomoe; Suzuki, Chie; Kinoshita, Noriko; Hosoda, Akiko; Yoshikawa, Asa; Tsuda, Yuko; Okada, Yoshio; Lee, Eibai

    2004-11-01

    We have previously reported that YO-2, a selective plasmin inhibitor, induces thymocyte apoptosis. To elucidate the mechanism of YO-2-induced apoptosis, other YO compounds with different plasmin inhibitory action were tested for the pro-apoptotic activity in this study. The treatment of rat thymocytes with the YO compounds which had the hydrophobic but not the hydrophilic moiety at the C-terminal increased DNA fragmentation, the number of condensed nuclei and caspase-3-like activity. All pro-apoptotic YO compounds not only were potent plasmin inhibitors but also had the hydrophobic C-terminal as the common structure. Therefore, the target molecule of the YO compounds may be located not on the cell surface but rather inside the cells.

  4. Relationship between electronic properties and drug activity of seven quinoxaline compounds: A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behzadi, Hadi; Roonasi, Payman; Assle taghipour, Khatoon; van der Spoel, David; Manzetti, Sergio

    2015-07-01

    The quantum chemical calculations at the DFT/B3LYP level of theory were carried out on seven quinoxaline compounds, which have been synthesized as anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis agents. Three conformers were optimized for each compound and the lowest energy structure was found and used in further calculations. The electronic properties including EHOMO, ELUMO and related parameters as well as electron density around oxygen and nitrogen atoms were calculated for each compound. The relationship between the calculated electronic parameters and biological activity of the studied compounds were investigated. Six similar quinoxaline derivatives with possible more drug activity were suggested based on the calculated electronic descriptors. A mechanism was proposed and discussed based on the calculated electronic parameters and bond dissociation energies.

  5. Multivariate analysis of PRISMA optimized TLC image for predicting antioxidant activity and identification of contributing compounds from Pereskia bleo.

    PubMed

    Sharif, K M; Rahman, M M; Azmir, J; Khatib, A; Sabina, E; Shamsudin, S H; Zaidul, I S M

    2015-12-01

    Multivariate analysis of thin-layer chromatography (TLC) images was modeled to predict antioxidant activity of Pereskia bleo leaves and to identify the contributing compounds of the activity. TLC was developed in optimized mobile phase using the 'PRISMA' optimization method and the image was then converted to wavelet signals and imported for multivariate analysis. An orthogonal partial least square (OPLS) model was developed consisting of a wavelet-converted TLC image and 2,2-diphynyl-picrylhydrazyl free radical scavenging activity of 24 different preparations of P. bleo as the x- and y-variables, respectively. The quality of the constructed OPLS model (1 + 1 + 0) with one predictive and one orthogonal component was evaluated by internal and external validity tests. The validated model was then used to identify the contributing spot from the TLC plate that was then analyzed by GC-MS after trimethylsilyl derivatization. Glycerol and amine compounds were mainly found to contribute to the antioxidant activity of the sample. An alternative method to predict the antioxidant activity of a new sample of P. bleo leaves has been developed.

  6. [Antibacterial activity of polyphenolic compounds isolated from plants of Geraniaceae and Rosaceae families].

    PubMed

    Nikitina, V S; Kuz'mina, L Iu; Melent'ev, A I; Shendel', G V

    2007-01-01

    Polyphenolic compounds present in extracts of plants belonging to the families Geraniaceae (blood-red cranesbill, wood cranesbill, meadow cranesbill, and alfilaria) and Rosaceae (red raspberry, European dewberry, and tormentil) have been tested for their activity against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria of the genera Azotobacter, Bacillus, and Pseudomonas. The bacteriostatic activity exhibited some species-related features and depended on the polarity of the extracting agent. The bacteriostatic activity of plant-derived phenolic compounds correlated with their antioxidant potential. The plants of the families Geraniaceae and Rosaceae offer promise as a source of raw material for isolation of polyphenolic compounds exhibiting bactericidal activity, including against opportunistic pathogens (B. cereus, E. coli, P. aeruginosa, and S. aureus strains).

  7. SYNTHESIS AND BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY OF SULFUR COMPOUNDS SHOWING STRUCTURAL ANALOGY WITH COMBRETASTATIN A-4

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Edson dos A.; Prado, Paulo C.; de Carvalho, Wanderley R.; de Lima, Ricardo V.; Beatriz e, Adilson; de Lima, Dênis P.; Hamel, Ernest; Dyba, Marzena A.; Albuquerque, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    We extended our previous exploration of sulfur bridges as bioisosteric replacements for atoms forming the bridge between the aromatic rings of combretastatin A-4. Employing coupling reactions between 5-iodo-1,2,3-trimethoxybenzene and substituted thiols, followed by oxidation to sulfones with m-CPBA, different locations for attaching the sulfur atom to ring A through the synthesis of nine compounds were examined. Antitubulin activity was performed with electrophoretically homogenous bovine brain tubulin, and activity occurred with the 1,2,3-trimethoxy-4-[(4-methoxyphenyl)thio]benzene (12), while the other compounds were inactive. The compounds were also tested for leishmanicidal activity using promastigote forms of Leishmania braziliensis (MHOM/BR175/M2904), and the greatest activity was observed with 1,2,3-trimethoxy-4-(phenylthio)benzene (10) and 1,2,3-trimethoxy-4-[(4-methoxyphenyl) sulfinyl]benzene (15). PMID:23766547

  8. SYNTHESIS AND BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY OF SULFUR COMPOUNDS SHOWING STRUCTURAL ANALOGY WITH COMBRETASTATIN A-4.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Edson Dos A; Prado, Paulo C; de Carvalho, Wanderley R; de Lima, Ricardo V; Beatriz E, Adilson; de Lima, Dênis P; Hamel, Ernest; Dyba, Marzena A; Albuquerque, Sergio

    2013-02-01

    We extended our previous exploration of sulfur bridges as bioisosteric replacements for atoms forming the bridge between the aromatic rings of combretastatin A-4. Employing coupling reactions between 5-iodo-1,2,3-trimethoxybenzene and substituted thiols, followed by oxidation to sulfones with m-CPBA, different locations for attaching the sulfur atom to ring A through the synthesis of nine compounds were examined. Antitubulin activity was performed with electrophoretically homogenous bovine brain tubulin, and activity occurred with the 1,2,3-trimethoxy-4-[(4-methoxyphenyl)thio]benzene (12), while the other compounds were inactive. The compounds were also tested for leishmanicidal activity using promastigote forms of Leishmania braziliensis (MHOM/BR175/M2904), and the greatest activity was observed with 1,2,3-trimethoxy-4-(phenylthio)benzene (10) and 1,2,3-trimethoxy-4-[(4-methoxyphenyl) sulfinyl]benzene (15).

  9. An expedient synthesis and screening for antiacetylcholinesterase activity of piperidine embedded novel pentacyclic cage compounds.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Raju Suresh; Almansour, Abdulrahman I; Arumugam, Natarajan; Osman, Hasnah; Ali, Mohamed Ashraf; Basiri, Alireza; Kia, Yalda

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to synthesize and evaluate diazapentacyclic analogs for their acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory activity. The pentacyclic analogs were synthesized by one-pot three-component domino reactions in a microwave synthesizer. Most of the compounds exhibited moderate to good AChE inhibitory activity, compound 5i showed potent inhibitory activity with IC50 1.12 ± 0.01 µM and this may provide a new lead for developing potential inhibitors for Alzheimer's disease.

  10. Lignans, bacteriocides and organochlorine compounds activate the human pregnane X receptor (PXR)

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Miriam N. . E-mail: miriam.jacobs@jrc.it; Nolan, Gail T.; Hood, Steven R.

    2005-12-01

    The pregnane X receptor (PXR) mediates the induction of enzymes involved in steroid metabolism and xenobiotic detoxification. The receptor is expressed in liver and intestinal tissues and is activated by a wide range of compounds. The ability of a diverse range of dietary compounds to activate PXR-mediated transcription was assayed in HuH7 cells following transient transfection with human PXR (hPXR). The compounds investigated included phytochemicals such as lignans and phytoestrogens, organochlorine dietary contaminants such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and triclosan and selected steroid, drug and herbal compounds. The hPXR activation at the top concentrations tested (10 {mu}M) relative to the positive control 10 {mu}M rifampicin ranged from 1.3% (trans-resveratrol) to 152% (ICI 182780). Hydroxylated compounds were marginally more potent than the parent compounds (tamoxifen activation was 74.6% whereas 4 hydroxytamoxifen activation was 84.2%) or significantly greater (vitamin D{sub 3} activation was 1.6%, while hydroxylated vitamin D{sub 3} activation was 55.6%). Enterolactone, the metabolite of common dietary lignans, was a medium activator of PXR (35.6%), compared to the lower activation of a parent lignan, secoisolariciresinol (20%). Two non-hydroxylated PCB congeners (PCB 118 and 153), which present a larger fraction of the PCB contamination of fatty foods, activated hPXR by 26.6% and 17%, respectively. The pesticide trans-nonachlor activation was 53.8%, while the widely used bacteriocide triclosan was a medium activator of hPXR at 46.2%. The responsiveness of PXR to activation by lignan metabolites suggests that dietary intake of these compounds may affect the metabolism of drugs that are CYP3A substrates. Additionally, the evidence that organochlorine chemicals, particularly the ubiquitous triclosan, activate hPXR suggests that these environmental chemicals may, in part, exhibit their endocrine disruptor activities by altering PXR-regulated steroid

  11. Enhanced photo-activated luminescence for screening polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs) and other related chlorinated compounds

    DOEpatents

    Tuan Vodinh.

    1993-12-21

    The presence of polychlorinated biphenyls and other chlorinated compounds in a sample is determined by treating the sample with a photo-activator and then exposing the treated sample to a UV light source. The UV light produces a photo-product complex, which is subsequently excited with UV light to cause luminescence of the complex. The luminescence is detected and characteristics of the luminescence spectra are used to determine the presence of chlorinated compounds and also the quantity of the chlorine in the compounds. 14 figures.

  12. Enhanced photo-activated luminescence for screening polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs) and other related chlorinated compounds

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    1993-01-01

    The presence of polychlorinated biphenyls and other chlorinated compounds in a sample is determined by treating the sample with a photo-activator and then exposing the treated sample to a UV light source. The UV light produces a photo-product complex, which is subsequently excited with UV light to cause luminescence of the complex. The luminescence is detected and characteristics of the luminescence spectra are used to determine the presence of chlorinated compounds and also the quantity of the chlorine in the compounds.

  13. Enhanced photo-activated luminescence for screening polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs) and other related chlorinated compounds

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1994-06-07

    The presence of polychlorinated biphenyls and other chlorinated compounds in a sample is determined by treating the sample with a photo-activator and then exposing the treated sample to a UV light source. The UV light produces a photo-product complex, which is subsequently excited with UV light to cause luminescence of the complex. The luminescence is detected and characteristics of the luminescence spectra are used to determine the presence of chlorinated compounds and also the quantity of the chlorine in the compounds. 14 figs.

  14. Enhanced photo-activated luminescence for screening polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs) and other related chlorinated compounds

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    1994-01-01

    The presence of polychlorinated biphenyls and other chlorinated compounds in a sample is determined by treating the sample with a photo-activator and then exposing the treated sample to a UV light source. The UV light produces a photo-product complex, which is subsequently excited with UV light to cause luminescence of the complex. The luminescence is detected and characteristics of the luminescence spectra are used to determine the presence of chlorinated compounds and also the quantity of the chlorine in the compounds

  15. Bis-Acridines as Lead Antiparasitic Agents: Structure-Activity Analysis of a Discrete Compound Library In Vitro▿

    PubMed Central

    Caffrey, Conor R.; Steverding, Dietmar; Swenerton, Ryan K.; Kelly, Ben; Walshe, Deirdre; Debnath, Anjan; Zhou, Yuan-Min; Doyle, Patricia S.; Fafarman, Aaron T.; Zorn, Julie A.; Land, Kirkwood M.; Beauchene, Jessica; Schreiber, Kimberly; Moll, Heidrun; Ponte-Sucre, Alicia; Schirmeister, Tanja; Saravanamuthu, Ahilan; Fairlamb, Alan H.; Cohen, Fred E.; McKerrow, James H.; Weisman, Jennifer L.; May, Barnaby C. H.

    2007-01-01

    Parasitic diseases are of enormous public health significance in developing countries—a situation compounded by the toxicity of and resistance to many current chemotherapeutics. We investigated a focused library of 18 structurally diverse bis-acridine compounds for in vitro bioactivity against seven protozoan and one helminth parasite species and compared the bioactivities and the cytotoxicities of these compounds toward various mammalian cell lines. Structure-activity relationships demonstrated the influence of both the bis-acridine linker structure and the terminal acridine heterocycle on potency and cytotoxicity. The bioactivity of polyamine-linked acridines required a minimum linker length of approximately 10 Å. Increasing linker length resulted in bioactivity against most parasites but also cytotoxicity toward mammalian cells. N alkylation, but less so N acylation, of the polyamine linker ameliorated cytotoxicity while retaining bioactivity with 50% effective concentration (EC50) values similar to or better than those measured for standard drugs. Substitution of the polyamine for either an alkyl or a polyether linker maintained bioactivity and further alleviated cytotoxicity. Polyamine-linked compounds in which the terminal acridine heterocycle had been replaced with an aza-acridine also maintained acceptable therapeutic indices. The most potent compounds recorded low- to mid-nanomolar EC50 values against Plasmodium falciparum and Trypanosoma brucei; otherwise, low-micromolar potencies were measured. Importantly, the bioactivity of the library was independent of P. falciparum resistance to chloroquine. Compound bioactivity was a function of neither the potential to bis-intercalate DNA nor the inhibition of trypanothione reductase, an important drug target in trypanosomatid parasites. Our approach illustrates the usefulness of screening focused compound libraries against multiple parasite targets. Some of the bis-acridines identified here may represent

  16. Removal of Metabolic Liabilities Enables Development of Derivatives of Procaspase-Activating Compound 1 (PAC-1) with Improved Pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Roth, Howard S; Botham, Rachel C; Schmid, Steven C; Fan, Timothy M; Dirikolu, Levent; Hergenrother, Paul J

    2015-05-14

    Procaspase-activating compound 1 (PAC-1) is an o-hydroxy-N-acylhydrazone that induces apoptosis in cancer cells by chelation of labile inhibitory zinc from procaspase-3. PAC-1 has been assessed in a wide variety of cell culture experiments and in vivo models of cancer, with promising results, and a phase 1 clinical trial in cancer patients has been initiated (NCT02355535). For certain applications, however, the in vivo half-life of PAC-1 could be limiting. Thus, with the goal of developing a compound with enhanced metabolic stability, a series of PAC-1 analogues were designed containing modifications that systematically block sites of metabolic vulnerability. Evaluation of the library of compounds identified four potentially superior candidates with comparable anticancer activity in cell culture, enhanced metabolic stability in liver microsomes, and improved tolerability in mice. In head-to-head experiments with PAC-1, pharmacokinetic evaluation in mice demonstrated extended elimination half-lives and greater area under the curve values for each of the four compounds, suggesting them as promising candidates for further development.

  17. [Biosynthesis of biologically active low-molecular weight compounds by fungi of the genus Penicillium (review)].

    PubMed

    Kozlovskii, A G; Antipova, T V; Zhelifonova, V P

    2015-01-01

    The recent data on exometabolite biosynthesis in fungi of the genus Penicillium is summarized. The study of creative species, as well as those isolated from extreme ecotopes, resulted in the identification of a number of novel, biologically active compounds. Alkaloid biosynthesis has been shown to begin on.the first day of fungus cultivation and to proceed throughout the cultivation period. Idiophase kinetics was observed for the biosynthesis of polyketide metabolites. The mechanisms of regulation of biosynthesis of promising bioactive compounds are discussed.

  18. Structure-activity of antifungal compounds inspired by aminobisabolenes from the sponge Halichondria sp.

    PubMed

    Jamison, Matthew T; Macho, Jocelyn; Molinski, Tadeusz F

    2016-11-01

    Structure-activity relationships of the antifungal aminobisabolene natural product, 1 isolated from Halichondria sp., and synthetic analogs were explored, in parallel with the antidermatophytic allylamine, Terbinafine®, against a panel of pathogenic fungi: Candida spp., Cryptococcus spp. and Trichophyton rubrum. Interpretation of the results suggest different modes of action in antifungal activity for the two classes of compounds.

  19. HCS Campaign to Identify Selective Inhibitors of IL-6-Induced STAT3 Pathway Activation in Head and Neck Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Malabika; Hua, Yun; Camarco, Daniel P.; Shun, Tong Ying; Lazo, John S.; Wilson, Gabriela Mustata; Resnick, Lynn O.; LaPorte, Matthew G.; Wipf, Peter; Huryn, Donna M.; Grandis, Jennifer R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Signal transducer and activator of transcription factor 3 (STAT3) is hyperactivated in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). Cumulative evidence indicates that IL-6 production by HNSCC cells and/or stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment activates STAT3 and contributes to tumor progression and drug resistance. A library of 94,491 compounds from the Molecular Library Screening Center Network (MLSCN) was screened for the ability to inhibit interleukin-6 (IL-6)-induced pSTAT3 activation. For contractual reasons, the primary high-content screening (HCS) campaign was conducted over several months in 3 distinct phases; 1,068 (1.1%) primary HCS actives remained after cytotoxic or fluorescent outliers were eliminated. One thousand one hundred eighty-seven compounds were cherry-picked for confirmation; actives identified in the primary HCS and compounds selected by a structural similarity search of the remaining MLSCN library using hits identified in phases I and II of the screen. Actives