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Sample records for identify biochemical pathways

  1. Metabolomic profiling and genomic analysis of wheat aneuploid lines to identify genes controlling biochemical pathways in mature grain.

    PubMed

    Francki, Michael G; Hayton, Sarah; Gummer, Joel P A; Rawlinson, Catherine; Trengove, Robert D

    2016-02-01

    Metabolomics is becoming an increasingly important tool in plant genomics to decipher the function of genes controlling biochemical pathways responsible for trait variation. Although theoretical models can integrate genes and metabolites for trait variation, biological networks require validation using appropriate experimental genetic systems. In this study, we applied an untargeted metabolite analysis to mature grain of wheat homoeologous group 3 ditelosomic lines, selected compounds that showed significant variation between wheat lines Chinese Spring and at least one ditelosomic line, tracked the genes encoding enzymes of their biochemical pathway using the wheat genome survey sequence and determined the genetic components underlying metabolite variation. A total of 412 analytes were resolved in the wheat grain metabolome, and principal component analysis indicated significant differences in metabolite profiles between Chinese Spring and each ditelosomic lines. The grain metabolome identified 55 compounds positively matched against a mass spectral library where the majority showed significant differences between Chinese Spring and at least one ditelosomic line. Trehalose and branched-chain amino acids were selected for detailed investigation, and it was expected that if genes encoding enzymes directly related to their biochemical pathways were located on homoeologous group 3 chromosomes, then corresponding ditelosomic lines would have a significant reduction in metabolites compared with Chinese Spring. Although a proportion showed a reduction, some lines showed significant increases in metabolites, indicating that genes directly and indirectly involved in biosynthetic pathways likely regulate the metabolome. Therefore, this study demonstrated that wheat aneuploid lines are suitable experimental genetic system to validate metabolomics-genomics networks.

  2. Mechanisms of Ovarian Cancer Metastasis: Biochemical Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Kentaro; Nakayama, Naomi; Katagiri, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Kohji

    2012-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. Despite advances in chemotherapy, the five-year survival rate of advanced ovarian cancer patients with peritoneal metastasis remains around 30%. The most significant prognostic factor is stage, and most patients present at an advanced stage with peritoneal dissemination. There is often no clearly identifiable precursor lesion; therefore, the events leading to metastatic disease are poorly understood. This article reviews metastatic suppressor genes, the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and the tumor microenvironment as they relate to ovarian cancer metastasis. Additionally, novel chemotherapeutic agents targeting the metastasis-related biochemical pathways are discussed. PMID:23109879

  3. Biochemical-Pathway Diversity in Archaebacteria

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-30

    characteristic of much or all of the Gram-positive lineage of eubacteria . We have extended the enzymological base of information to include organisms...to compare the biochemical diversitv within the archaebacteria to the biochemical diversity already known or now emerging within the eubacteria . RAI...INALL: In eubacteria aromatic-pathway character states are exceedingly diverse. A given feature will cluster at a hierarchical level ot phylogeny that

  4. "Which Pathway Am I?" Using a Game Approach to Teach Students about Biochemical Pathways

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ooi, Beng Guat; Sanger, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    This game was designed to provide students with an alternative way to learn biochemical pathways through an interactive approach. In this game, students worked in pairs to help each other identify pathways taped to each other's backs by asking simple "yes or no" questions related to these pathways. This exercise was conducted after the traditional…

  5. Biochemical and phylogenetic characterization of a novel diaminopimelate biosynthesis pathway in prokaryotes identifies a diverged form of LL-diaminopimelate aminotransferase.

    PubMed

    Hudson, André O; Gilvarg, Charles; Leustek, Thomas

    2008-05-01

    A variant of the diaminopimelate (DAP)-lysine biosynthesis pathway uses an LL-DAP aminotransferase (DapL, EC 2.6.1.83) to catalyze the direct conversion of L-2,3,4,5-tetrahydrodipicolinate to LL-DAP. Comparative genomic analysis and experimental verification of DapL candidates revealed the existence of two diverged forms of DapL (DapL1 and DapL2). DapL orthologs were identified in eubacteria and archaea. In some species the corresponding dapL gene was found to lie in genomic contiguity with other dap genes, suggestive of a polycistronic structure. The DapL candidate enzymes were found to cluster into two classes sharing approximately 30% amino acid identity. The function of selected enzymes from each class was studied. Both classes were able to functionally complement Escherichia coli dapD and dapE mutants and to catalyze LL-DAP transamination, providing functional evidence for a role in DAP/lysine biosynthesis. In all cases the occurrence of dapL in a species correlated with the absence of genes for dapD and dapE representing the acyl DAP pathway variants, and only in a few cases was dapL coincident with ddh encoding meso-DAP dehydrogenase. The results indicate that the DapL pathway is restricted to specific lineages of eubacteria including the Cyanobacteria, Desulfuromonadales, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Chlamydiae, Spirochaeta, and Chloroflexi and two archaeal groups, the Methanobacteriaceae and Archaeoglobaceae.

  6. Biochemical and Phylogenetic Characterization of a Novel Diaminopimelate Biosynthesis Pathway in Prokaryotes Identifies a Diverged Form of ll-Diaminopimelate Aminotransferase▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, André O.; Gilvarg, Charles; Leustek, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    A variant of the diaminopimelate (DAP)-lysine biosynthesis pathway uses an ll-DAP aminotransferase (DapL, EC 2.6.1.83) to catalyze the direct conversion of l-2,3,4,5-tetrahydrodipicolinate to ll-DAP. Comparative genomic analysis and experimental verification of DapL candidates revealed the existence of two diverged forms of DapL (DapL1 and DapL2). DapL orthologs were identified in eubacteria and archaea. In some species the corresponding dapL gene was found to lie in genomic contiguity with other dap genes, suggestive of a polycistronic structure. The DapL candidate enzymes were found to cluster into two classes sharing approximately 30% amino acid identity. The function of selected enzymes from each class was studied. Both classes were able to functionally complement Escherichia coli dapD and dapE mutants and to catalyze ll-DAP transamination, providing functional evidence for a role in DAP/lysine biosynthesis. In all cases the occurrence of dapL in a species correlated with the absence of genes for dapD and dapE representing the acyl DAP pathway variants, and only in a few cases was dapL coincident with ddh encoding meso-DAP dehydrogenase. The results indicate that the DapL pathway is restricted to specific lineages of eubacteria including the Cyanobacteria, Desulfuromonadales, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Chlamydiae, Spirochaeta, and Chloroflexi and two archaeal groups, the Methanobacteriaceae and Archaeoglobaceae. PMID:18310350

  7. Explorations into Chemical Reactions and Biochemical Pathways.

    PubMed

    Gasteiger, Johann

    2016-12-01

    A brief overview of the work in the research group of the present author on extracting knowledge from chemical reaction data is presented. Methods have been developed to calculate physicochemical effects at the reaction site. It is shown that these physicochemical effects can quite favourably be used to derive equations for the calculation of data on gas phase reactions and on reactions in solution such as aqueous acidity of alcohols or carboxylic acids or the hydrolysis of amides. Furthermore, it is shown that these physicochemical effects are quite effective for assigning reactions into reaction classes that correspond to chemical knowledge. Biochemical reactions constitute a particularly interesting and challenging task for increasing our understanding of living species. The BioPath.Database is a rich source of information on biochemical reactions and has been used for a variety of applications of chemical, biological, or medicinal interests. Thus, it was shown that biochemical reactions can be assigned by the physicochemical effects into classes that correspond to the classification of enzymes by the EC numbers. Furthermore, 3D models of reaction intermediates can be used for searching for novel enzyme inhibitors. It was shown in a combined application of chemoinformatics and bioinformatics that essential pathways of diseases can be uncovered. Furthermore, a study showed that bacterial flavor-forming pathways can be discovered.

  8. Deciphering diatom biochemical pathways via whole-cell proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Nunn, Brook L.; Aker, Jocelyn R.; Shaffer, Scott A.; Tsai, Shannon; Strzepek, Robert F.; Boyd, Philip W.; Freeman, Theodore Larson; Brittnacher, Mitchell; Malmström, Lars; Goodlett, David R.

    2009-01-01

    Diatoms play a critical role in the oceans’ carbon and silicon cycles; however, a mechanistic understanding of the biochemical processes that contribute to their ecological success remains elusive. Completion of the Thalassiosira pseudonana genome provided ‘blueprints’ for the potential biochemical machinery of diatoms, but offers only a limited insight into their biology under various environmental conditions. Using high-throughput shotgun proteomics, we identified a total of 1928 proteins expressed by T. pseudonana cultured under optimal growth conditions, enabling us to analyze this diatom’s primary metabolic and biosynthetic pathways. Of the proteins identified, 70% are involved in cellular metabolism, while 11% are involved in the transport of molecules. We identified all of the enzymes involved in the urea cycle, thereby describing the complete pathway to convert ammonia to urea, along with urea transporters, and the urea-degrading enzyme urease. Although metabolic exchange between these pathways remains ambiguous, their constitutive presence suggests complex intracellular nitrogen recycling. In addition, all C4 related enzymes for carbon fixation have been identified to be in abundance, with high protein sequence coverage. Quantification of mass spectra acquisitions demonstrated that the 20 most abundant proteins included an unexpectedly high expression of clathrin, which is the primary structural protein involved in endocytic transport. This result highlights a previously overlooked mechanism for the inter- and intra-cellular transport of nutrients and macromolecules in diatoms, potentially providing a missing link to organelle communication and metabolite exchange. Our results demonstrate the power of proteomics, and lay the groundwork for future comparative proteomic studies and directed analyses of specifically expressed proteins and biochemical pathways of oceanic diatoms. PMID:19829762

  9. Biochemical Genetic Pathways that Modulate Aging in Multiple Species

    PubMed Central

    Bitto, Alessandro; Wang, Adrienne M.; Bennett, Christopher F.; Kaeberlein, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying biological aging have been extensively studied in the past 20 years with the avail of mainly four model organisms: the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster, and the domestic mouse Mus musculus. Extensive research in these four model organisms has identified a few conserved genetic pathways that affect longevity as well as metabolism and development. Here, we review how the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), sirtuins, adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), and mitochondrial stress-signaling pathways influence aging and life span in the aforementioned models and their possible implications for delaying aging in humans. We also draw some connections between these biochemical pathways and comment on what new developments aging research will likely bring in the near future. PMID:26525455

  10. [Biochemical tests for identifying Pasteurella multocida].

    PubMed

    Karaivanov, L

    1984-01-01

    Studied was the biochemical activity of a total of 168 strains of Pasteurella--73 isolated from birds (48 from cases of acute fowl cholera, and 25--of chronic cholera), and 95 isolated from mammals (3 from lambs, 24 from pigs, 36 from cattle, and 32 from rabbits) with regard to the tests determining the hemolytic activity, production of indol, reduction of nitrates, breakdown of urea, beta galactosidase activity, production of hydrogen sulfide, ornitin-, arginine-, lysine-decarboxylase-, and phosphatase activity, and the fermentation of substrates such as manite, glucose, galactose, saccharose, manose, levulose, dulcite, lactose, maltose, rafinose, trechalose, salicin, melobiose, icelobiose, arabinose, xylose, and sorbite. To differentiate Pasteurella multocida strains isolated from mamals from those isolated from birds the phosphatase activity test on solid media with sodium phenolphtalein diphosphate had to be employed Pasteurella organisms isolated from mammals showed positive phosphatase activity, while those isolated from birds exhibited a negative one. Arabinose and xylose fermentation tests could simultaneously be used. Pasteurellae isolated in cases of acute fowl cholera showed positive reaction for arabinose and a negative one for xylose, while the strains isolated from mammals showed the reverse activity. The strains isolated in cases of chronic fowl cholera were shown to belong to this group.

  11. Identifying Branched Metabolic Pathways by Merging Linear Metabolic Pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Allison P.; Bennett, George N.; Kavraki, Lydia E.

    This paper presents a graph-based algorithm for identifying complex metabolic pathways in multi-genome scale metabolic data. These complex pathways are called branched pathways because they can arrive at a target compound through combinations of pathways that split compounds into smaller ones, work in parallel with many compounds, and join compounds into larger ones. While most previous work has focused on identifying linear metabolic pathways, branched metabolic pathways predominate in metabolic networks. Automatic identification of branched pathways has a number of important applications in areas that require deeper understanding of metabolism, such as metabolic engineering and drug target identification. Our algorithm utilizes explicit atom tracking to identify linear metabolic pathways and then merges them together into branched metabolic pathways. We provide results on two well-characterized metabolic pathways that demonstrate that this new merging approach can efficiently find biologically relevant branched metabolic pathways with complex structures.

  12. Modeling biochemical pathways in the gene ontology

    PubMed Central

    Hill, David P.; D’Eustachio, Peter; Berardini, Tanya Z.; Mungall, Christopher J.; Renedo, Nikolai; Blake, Judith A.

    2016-01-01

    The concept of a biological pathway, an ordered sequence of molecular transformations, is used to collect and represent molecular knowledge for a broad span of organismal biology. Representations of biomedical pathways typically are rich but idiosyncratic presentations of organized knowledge about individual pathways. Meanwhile, biomedical ontologies and associated annotation files are powerful tools that organize molecular information in a logically rigorous form to support computational analysis. The Gene Ontology (GO), representing Molecular Functions, Biological Processes and Cellular Components, incorporates many aspects of biological pathways within its ontological representations. Here we present a methodology for extending and refining the classes in the GO for more comprehensive, consistent and integrated representation of pathways, leveraging knowledge embedded in current pathway representations such as those in the Reactome Knowledgebase and MetaCyc. With carbohydrate metabolic pathways as a use case, we discuss how our representation supports the integration of variant pathway classes into a unified ontological structure that can be used for data comparison and analysis. PMID:27589964

  13. Construction and engineering of large biochemical pathways via DNA assembler

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Zengyi; Zhao, Huimin

    2015-01-01

    Summary DNA assembler enables rapid construction and engineering of biochemical pathways in a one-step fashion by exploitation of the in vivo homologous recombination mechanism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It has many applications in pathway engineering, metabolic engineering, combinatorial biology, and synthetic biology. Here we use two examples including the zeaxanthin biosynthetic pathway and the aureothin biosynthetic gene cluster to describe the key steps in the construction of pathways containing multiple genes using the DNA assembler approach. Methods for construct design, pathway assembly, pathway confirmation, and functional analysis are shown. The protocol for fine genetic modifications such as site-directed mutagenesis for engineering the aureothin gene cluster is also illustrated. PMID:23996442

  14. Inferring biochemical reaction pathways: the case of the gemcitabine pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The representation of a biochemical system as a network is the precursor of any mathematical model of the processes driving the dynamics of that system. Pharmacokinetics uses mathematical models to describe the interactions between drug, and drug metabolites and targets and through the simulation of these models predicts drug levels and/or dynamic behaviors of drug entities in the body. Therefore, the development of computational techniques for inferring the interaction network of the drug entities and its kinetic parameters from observational data is raising great interest in the scientific community of pharmacologists. In fact, the network inference is a set of mathematical procedures deducing the structure of a model from the experimental data associated to the nodes of the network of interactions. In this paper, we deal with the inference of a pharmacokinetic network from the concentrations of the drug and its metabolites observed at discrete time points. Results The method of network inference presented in this paper is inspired by the theory of time-lagged correlation inference with regard to the deduction of the interaction network, and on a maximum likelihood approach with regard to the estimation of the kinetic parameters of the network. Both network inference and parameter estimation have been designed specifically to identify systems of biotransformations, at the biochemical level, from noisy time-resolved experimental data. We use our inference method to deduce the metabolic pathway of the gemcitabine. The inputs to our inference algorithm are the experimental time series of the concentration of gemcitabine and its metabolites. The output is the set of reactions of the metabolic network of the gemcitabine. Conclusions Time-lagged correlation based inference pairs up to a probabilistic model of parameter inference from metabolites time series allows the identification of the microscopic pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of a drug with a

  15. Simulation of Biochemical Pathway Adaptability Using Evolutionary Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Bosl, W J

    2005-01-26

    The systems approach to genomics seeks quantitative and predictive descriptions of cells and organisms. However, both the theoretical and experimental methods necessary for such studies still need to be developed. We are far from understanding even the simplest collective behavior of biomolecules, cells or organisms. A key aspect to all biological problems, including environmental microbiology, evolution of infectious diseases, and the adaptation of cancer cells is the evolvability of genomes. This is particularly important for Genomes to Life missions, which tend to focus on the prospect of engineering microorganisms to achieve desired goals in environmental remediation and climate change mitigation, and energy production. All of these will require quantitative tools for understanding the evolvability of organisms. Laboratory biodefense goals will need quantitative tools for predicting complicated host-pathogen interactions and finding counter-measures. In this project, we seek to develop methods to simulate how external and internal signals cause the genetic apparatus to adapt and organize to produce complex biochemical systems to achieve survival. This project is specifically directed toward building a computational methodology for simulating the adaptability of genomes. This project investigated the feasibility of using a novel quantitative approach to studying the adaptability of genomes and biochemical pathways. This effort was intended to be the preliminary part of a larger, long-term effort between key leaders in computational and systems biology at Harvard University and LLNL, with Dr. Bosl as the lead PI. Scientific goals for the long-term project include the development and testing of new hypotheses to explain the observed adaptability of yeast biochemical pathways when the myosin-II gene is deleted and the development of a novel data-driven evolutionary computation as a way to connect exploratory computational simulation with hypothesis

  16. Dynamic biochemical reaction process analysis and pathway modification predictions.

    PubMed

    Conejeros, R; Vassiliadis, V S

    2000-05-05

    Recently, the area of model predictive modification of biochemical pathways has received attention with the aim to increase the productivity of microbial systems. In this study, we present a generalization of previous work, where, using a sensitivity study over the fermentation as a dynamic system, the optimal selection of reaction steps for modification (amplification or attenuation) is determined. The influence of metabolites in the activity of enzymes has also been considered (through activation or inhibition). We further introduce a new concept in the dynamic modeling of biochemical reaction systems including a generalized continuous superstructure in which two artificial multiplicative terms are included to account for: (a) enzyme overexpression or underexpression (attenuation or amplification) for the whole enzyme pool; and (b) modification of the apparent order of a kinetic expression with respect to the concentration of a metabolite or any subset of metabolites participating in the pathway. This new formulation allows the prediction of the sensitivity of the pathway performance index (objective function) with respect to the concentration of the enzyme, as well as the interaction of the enzyme with other metabolites. Using this framework, a case study for the production of penicillin V is analyzed, obtaining the most sensitive reaction steps (or bottlenecks) and the most significant regulations of the system, due to the effect of concentration of intracellular metabolites on the activity of each enzyme.

  17. Psychiatric disorders biochemical pathways unraveled by human brain proteomics.

    PubMed

    Saia-Cereda, Verônica M; Cassoli, Juliana S; Martins-de-Souza, Daniel; Nascimento, Juliana M

    2017-02-01

    Approximately 25 % of the world population is affected by a mental disorder at some point in their life. Yet, only in the mid-twentieth century a biological cause has been proposed for these diseases. Since then, several studies have been conducted toward a better comprehension of those disorders, and although a strong genetic influence was revealed, the role of these genes in disease mechanism is still unclear. This led most recent studies to focus on the molecular basis of mental disorders. One line of investigation that has risen in the post-genomic era is proteomics, due to its power of revealing proteins and biochemical pathways associated with biological systems. Therefore, this review compiled and analyzed data of differentially expressed proteins, which were found in postmortem brain studies of the three most prevalent psychiatric diseases: schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depressive disorders. Overviewing both the proteomic methods used in postmortem brain studies, the most consistent metabolic pathways found altered in these diseases. We have unraveled those disorders share about 21 % of proteins affected, and though most are related to energy metabolism pathways deregulation, the main differences found are 14-3-3-mediated signaling in schizophrenia, mitochondrial dysfunction in bipolar disorder and oxidative phosphorylation in depression.

  18. Proteomic Assessment of Biochemical Pathways That Are Critical to Nickel-Induced Toxicity Responses in Human Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Yue; Bruno, Maribel; Haykal-Coates, Najwa; Wallace, Kathleen; Andrews, Debora; Swank, Adam; Winnik, Witold; Ross, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms underlying toxicity initiated by nickel, a ubiquitous environmental contaminant and known human carcinogen is necessary for proper assessment of its risks to human and environment. Among a variety of toxic mechanisms, disruption of protein responses and protein response-based biochemical pathways represents a key mechanism through which nickel induces cytotoxicity and carcinogenesis. To identify protein responses and biochemical pathways that are critical to nickel-induced toxicity responses, we measured cytotoxicity and changes in expression and phosphorylation status of 14 critical biochemical pathway regulators in human BEAS-2B cells exposed to four concentrations of nickel using an integrated proteomic approach. A subset of the pathway regulators, including interleukin-6, and JNK, were found to be linearly correlated with cell viability, and may function as molecular determinants of cytotoxic responses of BEAS-2B cells to nickel exposures. In addition, 128 differentially expressed proteins were identified by two dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry. Principal component analysis, hierarchical cluster analyses, and ingenuity signaling pathway analysis (IPA) identified putative nickel toxicity pathways. Some of the proteins and pathways identified have not previously been linked to nickel toxicity. Based on the consistent results obtained from both ELISA and 2-DE proteomic analysis, we propose a core signaling pathway regulating cytotoxic responses of human BEAS-2B cells to nickel exposures, which integrates a small set of proteins involved in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis pathways, apoptosis, protein degradation, and stress responses including inflammation and oxidative stress. PMID:27626938

  19. Characterizing autism spectrum disorders by key biochemical pathways

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Megha; Timmerman, Christina K.; Schwartz, Joshua L.; Pham, Daniel L.; Meffert, Mollie K.

    2015-01-01

    The genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) presents a substantial challenge for diagnosis, classification, research, and treatment. Investigations into the underlying molecular etiology of ASD have often yielded mixed and at times opposing findings. Defining the molecular and biochemical underpinnings of heterogeneity in ASD is crucial to our understanding of the pathophysiological development of the disorder, and has the potential to assist in diagnosis and the rational design of clinical trials. In this review, we propose that genetically diverse forms of ASD may be usefully parsed into entities resulting from converse patterns of growth regulation at the molecular level, which lead to the correlates of general synaptic and neural overgrowth or undergrowth. Abnormal brain growth during development is a characteristic feature that has been observed both in children with autism and in mouse models of autism. We review evidence from syndromic and non-syndromic ASD to suggest that entities currently classified as autism may fundamentally differ by underlying pro- or anti-growth abnormalities in key biochemical pathways, giving rise to either excessive or reduced synaptic connectivity in affected brain regions. We posit that this classification strategy has the potential not only to aid research efforts, but also to ultimately facilitate early diagnosis and direct appropriate therapeutic interventions. PMID:26483618

  20. Characterizing autism spectrum disorders by key biochemical pathways.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Megha; Timmerman, Christina K; Schwartz, Joshua L; Pham, Daniel L; Meffert, Mollie K

    2015-01-01

    The genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) presents a substantial challenge for diagnosis, classification, research, and treatment. Investigations into the underlying molecular etiology of ASD have often yielded mixed and at times opposing findings. Defining the molecular and biochemical underpinnings of heterogeneity in ASD is crucial to our understanding of the pathophysiological development of the disorder, and has the potential to assist in diagnosis and the rational design of clinical trials. In this review, we propose that genetically diverse forms of ASD may be usefully parsed into entities resulting from converse patterns of growth regulation at the molecular level, which lead to the correlates of general synaptic and neural overgrowth or undergrowth. Abnormal brain growth during development is a characteristic feature that has been observed both in children with autism and in mouse models of autism. We review evidence from syndromic and non-syndromic ASD to suggest that entities currently classified as autism may fundamentally differ by underlying pro- or anti-growth abnormalities in key biochemical pathways, giving rise to either excessive or reduced synaptic connectivity in affected brain regions. We posit that this classification strategy has the potential not only to aid research efforts, but also to ultimately facilitate early diagnosis and direct appropriate therapeutic interventions.

  1. Identifying Pathways of Teachers' PCK Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wongsopawiro, Dirk S.; Zwart, Rosanne C.; van Driel, Jan H.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes a method of analysing teacher growth in the context of science education. It focuses on the identification of pathways in the development of secondary school teachers' pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) by the use of the interconnected model of teachers' professional growth (IMTPG).The teachers (n = 12) participated in a…

  2. Unraveling Biochemical Pathways Affected by Mitochondrial Dysfunctions Using Metabolomic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Demine, Stéphane; Reddy, Nagabushana; Renard, Patricia; Raes, Martine; Arnould, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction(s) (MDs) can be defined as alterations in the mitochondria, including mitochondrial uncoupling, mitochondrial depolarization, inhibition of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, mitochondrial network fragmentation, mitochondrial or nuclear DNA mutations and the mitochondrial accumulation of protein aggregates. All these MDs are known to alter the capacity of ATP production and are observed in several pathological states/diseases, including cancer, obesity, muscle and neurological disorders. The induction of MDs can also alter the secretion of several metabolites, reactive oxygen species production and modify several cell-signalling pathways to resolve the mitochondrial dysfunction or ultimately trigger cell death. Many metabolites, such as fatty acids and derived compounds, could be secreted into the blood stream by cells suffering from mitochondrial alterations. In this review, we summarize how a mitochondrial uncoupling can modify metabolites, the signalling pathways and transcription factors involved in this process. We describe how to identify the causes or consequences of mitochondrial dysfunction using metabolomics (liquid and gas chromatography associated with mass spectrometry analysis, NMR spectroscopy) in the obesity and insulin resistance thematic. PMID:25257998

  3. Characterization of changes in gene expression and biochemical pathways at low levels of benzene exposure.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Reuben; Hubbard, Alan E; McHale, Cliona M; Zhang, Luoping; Rappaport, Stephen M; Lan, Qing; Rothman, Nathaniel; Vermeulen, Roel; Guyton, Kathryn Z; Jinot, Jennifer; Sonawane, Babasaheb R; Smith, Martyn T

    2014-01-01

    Benzene, a ubiquitous environmental pollutant, causes acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Recently, through transcriptome profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), we reported dose-dependent effects of benzene exposure on gene expression and biochemical pathways in 83 workers exposed across four airborne concentration ranges (from <1 ppm to >10 ppm) compared with 42 subjects with non-workplace ambient exposure levels. Here, we further characterize these dose-dependent effects with continuous benzene exposure in all 125 study subjects. We estimated air benzene exposure levels in the 42 environmentally-exposed subjects from their unmetabolized urinary benzene levels. We used a novel non-parametric, data-adaptive model selection method to estimate the change with dose in the expression of each gene. We describe non-parametric approaches to model pathway responses and used these to estimate the dose responses of the AML pathway and 4 other pathways of interest. The response patterns of majority of genes as captured by mean estimates of the first and second principal components of the dose-response for the five pathways and the profiles of 6 AML pathway response-representative genes (identified by clustering) exhibited similar apparent supra-linear responses. Responses at or below 0.1 ppm benzene were observed for altered expression of AML pathway genes and CYP2E1. Together, these data show that benzene alters disease-relevant pathways and genes in a dose-dependent manner, with effects apparent at doses as low as 100 ppb in air. Studies with extensive exposure assessment of subjects exposed in the low-dose range between 10 ppb and 1 ppm are needed to confirm these findings.

  4. Characterization of Changes in Gene Expression and Biochemical Pathways at Low Levels of Benzene Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Reuben; Hubbard, Alan E.; McHale, Cliona M.; Zhang, Luoping; Rappaport, Stephen M.; Lan, Qing; Rothman, Nathaniel; Vermeulen, Roel; Guyton, Kathryn Z.; Jinot, Jennifer; Sonawane, Babasaheb R.; Smith, Martyn T.

    2014-01-01

    Benzene, a ubiquitous environmental pollutant, causes acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Recently, through transcriptome profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), we reported dose-dependent effects of benzene exposure on gene expression and biochemical pathways in 83 workers exposed across four airborne concentration ranges (from <1 ppm to >10 ppm) compared with 42 subjects with non-workplace ambient exposure levels. Here, we further characterize these dose-dependent effects with continuous benzene exposure in all 125 study subjects. We estimated air benzene exposure levels in the 42 environmentally-exposed subjects from their unmetabolized urinary benzene levels. We used a novel non-parametric, data-adaptive model selection method to estimate the change with dose in the expression of each gene. We describe non-parametric approaches to model pathway responses and used these to estimate the dose responses of the AML pathway and 4 other pathways of interest. The response patterns of majority of genes as captured by mean estimates of the first and second principal components of the dose-response for the five pathways and the profiles of 6 AML pathway response-representative genes (identified by clustering) exhibited similar apparent supra-linear responses. Responses at or below 0.1 ppm benzene were observed for altered expression of AML pathway genes and CYP2E1. Together, these data show that benzene alters disease-relevant pathways and genes in a dose-dependent manner, with effects apparent at doses as low as 100 ppb in air. Studies with extensive exposure assessment of subjects exposed in the low-dose range between 10 ppb and 1 ppm are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:24786086

  5. BioSM: metabolomics tool for identifying endogenous mammalian biochemical structures in chemical structure space.

    PubMed

    Hamdalla, Mai A; Mandoiu, Ion I; Hill, Dennis W; Rajasekaran, Sanguthevar; Grant, David F

    2013-03-25

    The structural identification of unknown biochemical compounds in complex biofluids continues to be a major challenge in metabolomics research. Using LC/MS, there are currently two major options for solving this problem: searching small biochemical databases, which often do not contain the unknown of interest or searching large chemical databases which include large numbers of nonbiochemical compounds. Searching larger chemical databases (larger chemical space) increases the odds of identifying an unknown biochemical compound, but only if nonbiochemical structures can be eliminated from consideration. In this paper we present BioSM; a cheminformatics tool that uses known endogenous mammalian biochemical compounds (as scaffolds) and graph matching methods to identify endogenous mammalian biochemical structures in chemical structure space. The results of a comprehensive set of empirical experiments suggest that BioSM identifies endogenous mammalian biochemical structures with high accuracy. In a leave-one-out cross validation experiment, BioSM correctly predicted 95% of 1388 Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) compounds as endogenous mammalian biochemicals using 1565 scaffolds. Analysis of two additional biological data sets containing 2330 human metabolites (HMDB) and 2416 plant secondary metabolites (KEGG) resulted in biochemical annotations of 89% and 72% of the compounds, respectively. When a data set of 3895 drugs (DrugBank and USAN) was tested, 48% of these structures were predicted to be biochemical. However, when a set of synthetic chemical compounds (Chembridge and Chemsynthesis databases) were examined, only 29% of the 458,207 structures were predicted to be biochemical. Moreover, BioSM predicted that 34% of 883,199 randomly selected compounds from PubChem were biochemical. We then expanded the scaffold list to 3927 biochemical compounds and reevaluated the above data sets to determine whether scaffold number influenced model performance

  6. A Computational Model for the Identification of Biochemical Pathways in the Krebs Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, Joseph S.; Bailey, Colin G.; Jones-Oliveira, Janet B.; Dixon, David A.; Gull, Dean W.; Chandler, Mary L.

    2003-03-01

    We have applied an algorithmic methodology which provably decomposes any complex network into a complete family of principal subcircuits to study the minimal circuits that describe the Krebs cycle. Every operational behavior that the network is capable of exhibiting can be represented by some combination of these principal subcircuits and this computational decomposition is linearly efficient. We have developed a computational model that can be applied to biochemical reaction systems which accurately renders pathways of such reactions via directed hypergraphs (Petri nets). We have applied the model to the citric acid cycle (Krebs cycle). The Krebs cycle, which oxidizes the acetyl group of acetyl CoA to CO2 and reduces NAD and FAD to NADH and FADH2 is a complex interacting set of nine subreaction networks. The Krebs cycle was selected because of its familiarity to the biological community and because it exhibits enough complexity to be interesting in order to introduce this novel analytic approach. This study validates the algorithmic methodology for the identification of significant biochemical signaling subcircuits, based solely upon the mathematical model and not upon prior biological knowledge. The utility of the algebraic-combinatorial model for identifying the complete set of biochemical subcircuits as a data set is demonstrated for this important metabolic process.

  7. A computational model for the identification of biochemical pathways in the krebs cycle.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Joseph S; Bailey, Colin G; Jones-Oliveira, Janet B; Dixon, David A; Gull, Dean W; Chandler, Mary L

    2003-01-01

    We have applied an algorithmic methodology which provably decomposes any complex network into a complete family of principal subcircuits to study the minimal circuits that describe the Krebs cycle. Every operational behavior that the network is capable of exhibiting can be represented by some combination of these principal subcircuits and this computational decomposition is linearly efficient. We have developed a computational model that can be applied to biochemical reaction systems which accurately renders pathways of such reactions via directed hypergraphs (Petri nets). We have applied the model to the citric acid cycle (Krebs cycle). The Krebs cycle, which oxidizes the acetyl group of acetyl CoA to CO(2) and reduces NAD and FAD to NADH and FADH(2), is a complex interacting set of nine subreaction networks. The Krebs cycle was selected because of its familiarity to the biological community and because it exhibits enough complexity to be interesting in order to introduce this novel analytic approach. This study validates the algorithmic methodology for the identification of significant biochemical signaling subcircuits, based solely upon the mathematical model and not upon prior biological knowledge. The utility of the algebraic-combinatorial model for identifying the complete set of biochemical subcircuits as a data set is demonstrated for this important metabolic process.

  8. Differential pathway network analysis used to identify key pathways associated with pediatric pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun-Bo; Luo, Rong; Yan, Yan; Chen, Yan

    2016-12-01

    We aimed to identify key pathways to further explore the molecular mechanism underlying pediatric pneumonia using differential pathway network which integrated protein-protein interactions (PPI) data and pathway information. PPI data and pathway information were obtained from STRING and Reactome database, respectively. Next, pathway interactions were identified on the basis of constructing gene-gene interactions randomly, and a weight value computed using Spearman correlation coefficient was assigned to each pathway-pathway interaction, thereby to further detect differential pathway interactions. Subsequently, construction of differential pathway network was implemented using Cytoscope, following by network clustering analysis using ClusterONE. Finally, topological analysis for differential pathway network was performed to identify hub pathway which had top 5% degree distribution. Significantly, 901 pathways were identified to construct pathway interactions. After discarding the pathway interactions with weight value < 1.2, a differential pathway network was constructed, which contained 499 interactions and 347 pathways. Topological analysis showed 17 hub pathways (FGFR1 fusion mutants, molecules associated with elastic fibres, FGFR1 mutant receptor activation, and so on) were identified. Significantly, signaling by FGFR1 fusion mutants and FGFR1 mutant receptor activation simultaneously appeared in two clusters. Molecules associated with elastic fibres existed in one cluster. Accordingly, differential pathway network method might serve as a predictive tool to help us to further understand the development of pediatric pneumonia. FGFR1 fusion mutants, FGFR1 mutant receptor activation, and molecules associated with elastic fibres might play important roles in the progression of pediatric pneumonia.

  9. Systematic tracking of dysregulated modules identifies disrupted pathways in narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhenhua; Zhao, Jiali; Tan, Yinyin; Tang, Minglu; Li, Guanzhen

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this work is to identify disrupted pathways in narcolepsy according to systematically tracking the dysregulated modules of reweighted Protein-Protein Interaction (PPI) networks. Here, we performed systematic identification and comparison of modules across normal and narcolepsy conditions by integrating PPI and gene-expression data. Methods: Firstly, normal and narcolepsy PPI network were inferred and reweighted based on Pearson correlation coefficient (PCC). Then, modules in PPI network were explored by clique-merging algorithm and we identified altered modules using a maximum weight bipartite matching and in non-increasing order. Finally, pathways enrichment analyses of genes in altered modules were carried out based on Expression Analysis Systematic Explored (EASE) test to illuminate the biological pathways in narcolepsy. Results: Our analyses revealed that 235 altered modules were identified by comparing modules in normal and narcolepsy PPI network. Pathway functional enrichment analysis of disrupted module genes showed 59 disrupted pathways within threshold P < 0.001. The most significant five disrupted pathways were: oxidative phosphorylation, T cell receptor signaling pathway, cell cycle, Alzheimer’s disease and focal adhesion. Conclusions: We successfully identified disrupted pathways and these pathways might be potential biological processes for treatment and etiology mechanism in narcolepsy. PMID:26309600

  10. Fungal Indole Alkaloid Biosynthesis: Genetic and Biochemical Investigation of Tryptoquialanine Pathway in Penicillium aethiopicum

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xue; Chooi, Yit-Heng; Ames, Brian D.; Wang, Peng; Walsh, Christopher T.; Tang, Yi

    2011-01-01

    Tremorgenic mycotoxins are a group of indole alkaloids which include the quinazoline-containing tryptoquivaline 2 that are capable of eliciting intermittent or sustained tremors in vertebrate animals. The biosynthesis of this group of bioactive compounds, which are characterized by an acetylated quinazoline ring connected to a 6-5-5 imidazoindolone ring system via a 5-membered spirolactone, has remained uncharacterized. Here, we report the identification of a gene cluster (tqa) from P. aethiopicum that is involved in the biosynthesis of tryptoquialanine 1, which is structurally similar to 2. The pathway has been confirmed to go through an intermediate common to the fumiquinazoline pathway, fumiquinazoline F, which originates from a fungal trimodular nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS). By systematically inactivating every biosynthetic gene in the cluster, followed by isolation and characterization of the intermediates, we were able to establish the biosynthetic sequence of the pathway. An unusual oxidative opening of the pyrazinone ring by an FAD-dependent berberine bridge enzyme-like oxidoreductase has been proposed based on genetic knockout studies. Notably, a 2-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB)-utilizing NRPS module has been identified and reconstituted in vitro, along with two putative enzymes of unknown functions that are involved in the synthesis of the unnatural amino acid by genetic analysis. This work provides new genetic and biochemical insights into the biosynthesis of this group of fungal alkaloids, including the tremorgens related to 2. PMID:21299212

  11. Fungal indole alkaloid biosynthesis: genetic and biochemical investigation of the tryptoquialanine pathway in Penicillium aethiopicum.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xue; Chooi, Yit-Heng; Ames, Brian D; Wang, Peng; Walsh, Christopher T; Tang, Yi

    2011-03-02

    Tremorgenic mycotoxins are a group of indole alkaloids which include the quinazoline-containing tryptoquivaline (2) that are capable of eliciting intermittent or sustained tremors in vertebrate animals. The biosynthesis of this group of bioactive compounds, which are characterized by an acetylated quinazoline ring connected to a 6-5-5 imidazoindolone ring system via a 5-membered spirolactone, has remained uncharacterized. Here, we report the identification of a gene cluster (tqa) from P. aethiopicum that is involved in the biosynthesis of tryptoquialanine (1), which is structurally similar to 2. The pathway has been confirmed to go through an intermediate common to the fumiquinazoline pathway, fumiquinazoline F, which originates from a fungal trimodular nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS). By systematically inactivating every biosynthetic gene in the cluster, followed by isolation and characterization of the intermediates, we were able to establish the biosynthetic sequence of the pathway. An unusual oxidative opening of the pyrazinone ring by an FAD-dependent berberine bridge enzyme-like oxidoreductase has been proposed based on genetic knockout studies. Notably, a 2-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB)-utilizing NRPS module has been identified and reconstituted in vitro, along with two putative enzymes of unknown functions that are involved in the synthesis of the unnatural amino acid by genetic analysis. This work provides new genetic and biochemical insights into the biosynthesis of this group of fungal alkaloids, including the tremorgens related to 2.

  12. Integrated Analysis Identifies Interaction Patterns between Small Molecules and Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Li, Weiguo; Chen, Xin; Sun, Jiatong; Chen, Huan; Lv, Sali

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that the downstream proteins in a key pathway can be potential drug targets and that the pathway can play an important role in the action of drugs. So pathways could be considered as targets of small molecules. A link map between small molecules and pathways was constructed using gene expression profile, pathways, and gene expression of cancer cell line intervened by small molecules and then we analysed the topological characteristics of the link map. Three link patterns were identified based on different drug discovery implications for breast, liver, and lung cancer. Furthermore, molecules that significantly targeted the same pathways tended to treat the same diseases. These results can provide a valuable reference for identifying drug candidates and targets in molecularly targeted therapy. PMID:25114931

  13. Widespread flower color convergence in Solanaceae via alternate biochemical pathways.

    PubMed

    Ng, Julienne; Smith, Stacey D

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypic convergence is rampant throughout the tree of life. While recent studies have made significant progress in ascertaining the proximate mechanisms underlying convergent phenotypes, less is known about the frequency and predictability with which convergent phenotypes arise via the same or multiple pathways at the macroevolutionary scale. We investigated the proximate causes and evolutionary patterns of red flower color in the tomato family, Solanaceae, using large-scale data mining and new sequence data to reconstruct a megaphylogeny of 1341 species. We then combined spectral and anatomical data to assess how many times red flowers have evolved, the relative contribution of different pathways to independent origins of red, and whether the underlying pathway is predicted by phylogenetic relatedness. We estimated at least 30 relatively recent origins of red flowers using anthocyanins, carotenoids, or a dual production of both pigments, with significant phylogenetic signal in the use of anthocyanins and dual production, indicating that closely related red-flowered species tend to employ the same mechanism for coloration. Our study is the first to test whether developmental pathways exhibit phylogenetic signal and implies that historical contingency strongly influences the evolution of new phenotypes.

  14. Spatial Control of Biochemical Modification Cascades and Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Alam-Nazki, Aiman; Krishnan, J.

    2015-01-01

    Information transmission in cells occurs through complex networks of proteins and genes and is relayed through cascades of biochemical modifications, which are typically studied through ordinary differential equations. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that spatial factors can strongly influence chemical information transmission in cells. In this article, we systematically disentangle the effects of space in signaling cascades. This is done by examining the effects of localization/compartmentalization and diffusion of enzymes and substrates in multiple variants of chemical modification cascades. This includes situations where the modified form of species at one stage 1) acts as an enzyme for the next stage; 2) acts as a substrate for the next stage; and 3) is involved in phosphotransfer. Our analysis reveals the multiple effects of space in signal transduction cascades. Although in some cases space plays a modulatory effect (itself of interest), in other cases, spatial regulation and control can profoundly affect the nature of information processing as a result of the subtle interplay between the patterns of localization of species, diffusion, and the nature of the modification cascades. Our results provide a platform for disentangling the role of space and spatial control in multiple cellular contexts and a basis for engineering spatial control in signaling cascades through localization/compartmentalization. PMID:26083931

  15. Wound Healing: Biochemical Pathways and in vivo Studies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    of man. Sugars identified in cylinder connective tissue of man, dog or rat were glucose, galactose, mannose, fucose , glucosamine, galactosamine...galactose, mannose, glucosamine, fucose , and sialic acid. The third and largest in molecular size was the complex mixture of glycosaminoglycans composed

  16. The role of log-normal dynamics in the evolution of biochemical pathways.

    PubMed

    Nacher, J C; Ochiai, T; Yamada, T; Kanehisa, M; Akutsu, T

    2006-01-01

    The study of the scale-free topology in non-biological and biological networks and the dynamics that can explain this fascinating property of complex systems have captured the attention of the scientific community in the last years. Here, we analyze the biochemical pathways of three organisms (Methanococcus jannaschii, Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae) which are representatives of the main kingdoms Archaea, Bacteria and Eukaryotes during the course of the biological evolution. We can consider two complementary representations of the biochemical pathways: the enzymes network and the chemical compounds network. In this article, we propose a stochastic model that explains that the scale-free topology with exponent in the vicinity of gamma approximately 3/2 found across these three organisms is governed by the log-normal dynamics in the evolution of the enzymes network. Precisely, the fluctuations of the connectivity degree of enzymes in the biochemical pathways between evolutionary distant organisms follow the same conserved dynamical principle, which in the end is the origin of the stationary scale-free distribution observed among species, from Archaea to Eukaryotes. In particular, the log-normal dynamics guarantees the conservation of the scale-free distribution in evolving networks. Furthermore, the log-normal dynamics also gives a possible explanation for the restricted range of observed exponents gamma in the scale-free networks (i.e., gamma > or = 3/2). Finally, our model is also applied to the chemical compounds network of biochemical pathways and the Internet network.

  17. BN+1 Bayesian network expansion for identifying molecular pathway elements

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, Andrew P; Woolf, Peter

    2010-01-01

    A Bayesian network expansion algorithm called BN+1 was developed to identify undocumented gene interactions in a known pathway using microarray gene expression data. In our recent paper, the BN+1 algorithm has been successfully used to identify key regulators including uspE in the E. coli ROS pathway and biofilm formation.18 In this report, a synthetic network was designed to further evaluate this algorithm. The BN+1 method was found to identify both linear and nonlinear relationships and correctly identify variables near the starting network. Using experimentally derived data, the BN+1 method identifies the gene fdhE as a potentially new ROS regulator. Finally, a range of possible score cutoff methods are explored to identify a set of criteria for selecting BN+1 calls. PMID:21331236

  18. HEMET: mathematical model of biochemical pathways for simulation and prediction of HEpatocyte METabolism.

    PubMed

    De Maria, C; Grassini, D; Vozzi, F; Vinci, B; Landi, A; Ahluwalia, A; Vozzi, G

    2008-10-01

    Many computer studies and models have been developed in order to simulate cell biochemical pathways. The difficulty of integrating all the biochemical reactions that occur in a cell in a single model is the main reason for the poor results in the prediction and simulation of cell behaviour under different chemical and physical stimuli. In this paper we have translated biochemical reactions into differential equations for the development of modular model of metabolism of a hepatocyte cultured in static and standard conditions (in a plastic multiwell placed in an incubator at 37 degrees C with 5% of CO(2)). Using biochemical equations and energetic considerations a set of non-linear differential equations has been derived and implemented in Simulink. This set of equations mimics some of the principal metabolic pathways of biomolecules present in the culture medium. The software platform developed is subdivided into separate modules, each one describing a different metabolic pathway; they constitute a library which can be used for developing new modules and models to project, predict and validate cell behaviour in vitro.

  19. Reverse Pathway Genetic Approach Identifies Epistasis in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Traglia, Michela; Tsang, Kathryn; Bearden, Carrie E.; Rauen, Katherine A.

    2017-01-01

    Although gene-gene interaction, or epistasis, plays a large role in complex traits in model organisms, genome-wide by genome-wide searches for two-way interaction have limited power in human studies. We thus used knowledge of a biological pathway in order to identify a contribution of epistasis to autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) in humans, a reverse-pathway genetic approach. Based on previous observation of increased ASD symptoms in Mendelian disorders of the Ras/MAPK pathway (RASopathies), we showed that common SNPs in RASopathy genes show enrichment for association signal in GWAS (P = 0.02). We then screened genome-wide for interactors with RASopathy gene SNPs and showed strong enrichment in ASD-affected individuals (P < 2.2 x 10−16), with a number of pairwise interactions meeting genome-wide criteria for significance. Finally, we utilized quantitative measures of ASD symptoms in RASopathy-affected individuals to perform modifier mapping via GWAS. One top region overlapped between these independent approaches, and we showed dysregulation of a gene in this region, GPR141, in a RASopathy neural cell line. We thus used orthogonal approaches to provide strong evidence for a contribution of epistasis to ASDs, confirm a role for the Ras/MAPK pathway in idiopathic ASDs, and to identify a convergent candidate gene that may interact with the Ras/MAPK pathway. PMID:28076348

  20. Pathway Analysis Incorporating Protein-Protein Interaction Networks Identified Candidate Pathways for the Seven Common Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Peng-Lin; Yu, Ya-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Pathway analysis has become popular as a secondary analysis strategy for genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Most of the current pathway analysis methods aggregate signals from the main effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes within a pathway without considering the effects of gene-gene interactions. However, gene-gene interactions can also have critical effects on complex diseases. Protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks have been used to define gene pairs for the gene-gene interaction tests. Incorporating the PPI information to define gene pairs for interaction tests within pathways can increase the power for pathway-based association tests. We propose a pathway association test, which aggregates the interaction signals in PPI networks within a pathway, for GWAS with case-control samples. Gene size is properly considered in the test so that genes do not contribute more to the test statistic simply due to their size. Simulation studies were performed to verify that the method is a valid test and can have more power than other pathway association tests in the presence of gene-gene interactions within a pathway under different scenarios. We applied the test to the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium GWAS datasets for seven common diseases. The most significant pathway is the chaperones modulate interferon signaling pathway for Crohn’s disease (p-value = 0.0003). The pathway modulates interferon gamma, which induces the JAK/STAT pathway that is involved in Crohn’s disease. Several other pathways that have functional implications for the seven diseases were also identified. The proposed test based on gene-gene interaction signals in PPI networks can be used as a complementary tool to the current existing pathway analysis methods focusing on main effects of genes. An efficient software implementing the method is freely available at http://puppi.sourceforge.net. PMID:27622767

  1. Identifying Differentially Abundant Metabolic Pathways in Metagenomic Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo; Pop, Mihai

    Enabled by rapid advances in sequencing technology, metagenomic studies aim to characterize entire communities of microbes bypassing the need for culturing individual bacterial members. One major goal of such studies is to identify specific functional adaptations of microbial communities to their habitats. Here we describe a powerful analytical method (MetaPath) that can identify differentially abundant pathways in metagenomic data-sets, relying on a combination of metagenomic sequence data and prior metabolic pathway knowledge. We show that MetaPath outperforms other common approaches when evaluated on simulated datasets. We also demonstrate the power of our methods in analyzing two, publicly available, metagenomic datasets: a comparison of the gut microbiome of obese and lean twins; and a comparison of the gut microbiome of infant and adult subjects. We demonstrate that the subpathways identified by our method provide valuable insights into the biological activities of the microbiome.

  2. Methodologies for the modeling and simulation of biochemical networks, illustrated for signal transduction pathways: a primer.

    PubMed

    ElKalaawy, Nesma; Wassal, Amr

    2015-03-01

    Biochemical networks depict the chemical interactions that take place among elements of living cells. They aim to elucidate how cellular behavior and functional properties of the cell emerge from the relationships between its components, i.e. molecules. Biochemical networks are largely characterized by dynamic behavior, and exhibit high degrees of complexity. Hence, the interest in such networks is growing and they have been the target of several recent modeling efforts. Signal transduction pathways (STPs) constitute a class of biochemical networks that receive, process, and respond to stimuli from the environment, as well as stimuli that are internal to the organism. An STP consists of a chain of intracellular signaling processes that ultimately result in generating different cellular responses. This primer presents the methodologies used for the modeling and simulation of biochemical networks, illustrated for STPs. These methodologies range from qualitative to quantitative, and include structural as well as dynamic analysis techniques. We describe the different methodologies, outline their underlying assumptions, and provide an assessment of their advantages and disadvantages. Moreover, publicly and/or commercially available implementations of these methodologies are listed as appropriate. In particular, this primer aims to provide a clear introduction and comprehensive coverage of biochemical modeling and simulation methodologies for the non-expert, with specific focus on relevant literature of STPs.

  3. Chemical Shifts to Metabolic Pathways: Identifying Metabolic Pathways Directly from a Single 2D NMR Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Abhinav; Rangarajan, Annapoorni; Pal, Debnath; Atreya, Hanudatta S

    2015-12-15

    Identifying cellular processes in terms of metabolic pathways is one of the avowed goals of metabolomics studies. Currently, this is done after relevant metabolites are identified to allow their mapping onto specific pathways. This task is daunting due to the complex nature of cellular processes and the difficulty in establishing the identity of individual metabolites. We propose here a new method: ChemSMP (Chemical Shifts to Metabolic Pathways), which facilitates rapid analysis by identifying the active metabolic pathways directly from chemical shifts obtained from a single two-dimensional (2D) [(13)C-(1)H] correlation NMR spectrum without the need for identification and assignment of individual metabolites. ChemSMP uses a novel indexing and scoring system comprised of a "uniqueness score" and a "coverage score". Our method is demonstrated on metabolic pathways data from the Small Molecule Pathway Database (SMPDB) and chemical shifts from the Human Metabolome Database (HMDB). Benchmarks show that ChemSMP has a positive prediction rate of >90% in the presence of decluttered data and can sustain the same at 60-70% even in the presence of noise, such as deletions of peaks and chemical shift deviations. The method tested on NMR data acquired for a mixture of 20 amino acids shows a success rate of 93% in correct recovery of pathways. When used on data obtained from the cell lysate of an unexplored oncogenic cell line, it revealed active metabolic pathways responsible for regulating energy homeostasis of cancer cells. Our unique tool is thus expected to significantly enhance analysis of NMR-based metabolomics data by reducing existing impediments.

  4. Diversity of bile salts in fish and amphibians: evolution of a complex biochemical pathway.

    PubMed

    Hagey, Lee R; Møller, Peter R; Hofmann, Alan F; Krasowski, Matthew D

    2010-01-01

    Bile salts are the major end metabolites of cholesterol and are also important in lipid and protein digestion, as well as shaping of the gut microflora. Previous studies had demonstrated variation of bile salt structures across vertebrate species. We greatly extend prior surveys of bile salt variation in fish and amphibians, particularly in analysis of the biliary bile salts of Agnatha and Chondrichthyes. While there is significant structural variation of bile salts across all fish orders, bile salt profiles are generally stable within orders of fish and do not correlate with differences in diet. This large data set allowed us to infer evolutionary changes in the bile salt synthetic pathway. The hypothesized ancestral bile salt synthetic pathway, likely exemplified in extant hagfish, is simpler and much shorter than the pathway of most teleost fish and terrestrial vertebrates. Thus, the bile salt synthetic pathway has become longer and more complex throughout vertebrate evolution. Analysis of the evolution of bile salt synthetic pathways provides a rich model system for the molecular evolution of a complex biochemical pathway in vertebrates.

  5. Invariant features of metabolic networks: a data analysis application on scaling properties of biochemical pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliani, Alessandro; Zbilut, Joseph P.; Conti, Filippo; Manetti, Cesare; Miccheli, Alfredo

    2004-06-01

    The network metaphor is currently one of the most common general paradigms in biological sciences: this paradigm spans different scales of definition going from gene regulation to protein-protein interaction studies and metabolic regulation networks. Generally, the networks are defined by the nature of the connected elements (nodes) and their relative relations (edges). In this paper we demonstrate how the same biochemical regulation network can assume different shapes in terms of both constituting elements and intervening relations while remaining recognizable as a specific entity. This behaviour can be explained by the general scaling properties of biological networks and points to regulation pathways as emergent features of biochemical systems posited at a different hierarchical level with respect to the intervening metabolites.

  6. Method to assemble and integrate biochemical pathways into the chloroplast genome of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Noor-Mohammadi, Samaneh; Pourmir, Azadeh; Johannes, Tyler W

    2012-11-01

    Recombinant protein expression in the chloroplasts of green algae has recently become more routine; however, the heterologous expression of multiple proteins or complete biosynthetic pathways remains a significant challenge. Here, we show that a modified DNA Assembler approach can be used to rapidly assemble multiple-gene biosynthetic pathways in yeast and then integrate these assembled pathways at a site-specific location in the chloroplast genome of the microalgal species Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. As a proof of concept, this method was used to successfully integrate and functionally express up to three reporter proteins (AphA6, AadA, and GFP) in the chloroplast of C. reinhardtii. An analysis of the relative gene expression of the engineered strains showed significant differences in the mRNA expression levels of the reporter genes and thus highlights the importance of proper promoter/untranslated region selection when constructing a target pathway. This new method represents a useful genetic tool in the construction and integration of complex biochemical pathways into the chloroplast genome of microalgae and should aid current efforts to engineer algae for biofuels production and other desirable natural products.

  7. Genome-Wide Pathway Analysis Identifies Genetic Pathways Associated with Psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Aterido, Adrià; Julià, Antonio; Ferrándiz, Carlos; Puig, Lluís; Fonseca, Eduardo; Fernández-López, Emilia; Dauden, Esteban; Sánchez-Carazo, José Luís; López-Estebaranz, José Luís; Moreno-Ramírez, David; Vanaclocha, Francisco; Herrera, Enrique; de la Cueva, Pablo; Dand, Nick; Palau, Núria; Alonso, Arnald; López-Lasanta, María; Tortosa, Raül; García-Montero, Andrés; Codó, Laia; Gelpí, Josep Lluís; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Absher, Devin; Capon, Francesca; Myers, Richard M; Barker, Jonathan N; Marsal, Sara

    2016-03-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease with a complex genetic architecture. To date, the psoriasis heritability is only partially explained. However, there is increasing evidence that the missing heritability in psoriasis could be explained by multiple genetic variants of low effect size from common genetic pathways. The objective of this study was to identify new genetic variation associated with psoriasis risk at the pathway level. We genotyped 598,258 single nucleotide polymorphisms in a discovery cohort of 2,281 case-control individuals from Spain. We performed a genome-wide pathway analysis using 1,053 reference biological pathways. A total of 14 genetic pathways (PFDR ≤ 2.55 × 10(-2)) were found to be significantly associated with psoriasis risk. Using an independent validation cohort of 7,353 individuals from the UK, a total of 6 genetic pathways were significantly replicated (PFDR ≤ 3.46 × 10(-2)). We found genetic pathways that had not been previously associated with psoriasis risk such as retinol metabolism (Pcombined = 1.84 × 10(-4)), the transport of inorganic ions and amino acids (Pcombined = 1.57 × 10(-7)), and post-translational protein modification (Pcombined = 1.57 × 10(-7)). In the latter pathway, MGAT5 showed a strong network centrality, and its association with psoriasis risk was further validated in an additional case-control cohort of 3,429 individuals (P < 0.05). These findings provide insights into the biological mechanisms associated with psoriasis susceptibility.

  8. A structured approach for the engineering of biochemical network models, illustrated for signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Breitling, Rainer; Gilbert, David; Heiner, Monika; Orton, Richard

    2008-09-01

    Quantitative models of biochemical networks (signal transduction cascades, metabolic pathways, gene regulatory circuits) are a central component of modern systems biology. Building and managing these complex models is a major challenge that can benefit from the application of formal methods adopted from theoretical computing science. Here we provide a general introduction to the field of formal modelling, which emphasizes the intuitive biochemical basis of the modelling process, but is also accessible for an audience with a background in computing science and/or model engineering. We show how signal transduction cascades can be modelled in a modular fashion, using both a qualitative approach--qualitative Petri nets, and quantitative approaches--continuous Petri nets and ordinary differential equations (ODEs). We review the major elementary building blocks of a cellular signalling model, discuss which critical design decisions have to be made during model building, and present a number of novel computational tools that can help to explore alternative modular models in an easy and intuitive manner. These tools, which are based on Petri net theory, offer convenient ways of composing hierarchical ODE models, and permit a qualitative analysis of their behaviour. We illustrate the central concepts using signal transduction as our main example. The ultimate aim is to introduce a general approach that provides the foundations for a structured formal engineering of large-scale models of biochemical networks.

  9. Oxidation state, bioavailability & biochemical pathway define the fate of carbon in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzyakov, Yakov; Apostel, Carolin; Gunina, Anna; Herrmann, Anke M.; Dippold, Michaela

    2015-04-01

    Numerous experiments under laboratory and field conditions analyzed microbial utilization and mean residence time (MRT) of carbon (C) from plant and microbial residues as well as root exudates in soil. Most of these studies tested the effects of various environmental factors, such as temperature, soil moisture, texture etc. on these parameters. However, only a few studies compared the properties of the substances themselves and there is no conceptual framework based on biochemical pathways. We hypothesize that the fate of C from organic substances in soil strongly depends on the first step of their microbial utilization, specifically, on biochemical pathway and initial C oxidation state, as well as its bioavailability in soils, defined by its hydrophobicity and molecular weight. Here we introduce and evaluate a new conceptual framework based on the following parameters: 1) C oxidation state, 2) molecular weight and hydrophobicity, 3) initial biochemical pathway of a substance class in microbial cells. To assess these parameters, two databases were prepared based on the literature and own studies. The first database included only the studies with 14C or 13C position specific labeled sugars, amino acids, carboxylic acids, phenols and lipids in soil. This database allowed us to analyze microbial utilization and mineralization of organics to CO2 depending on their C oxidation state (OS) and on functional groups. Additionally, we calculated data on the bond electronegativity of all compounds investigated in these studies. The second data base included the results of 14C and 13C studies with uniformly labeled substances of various classes. This database considered the free enthalpie (Delta H) per C unit from a variety of substrates differing in their aromaticity, hydrophobicity/electronegativity and location of the substance on the van Krevelen diagram. In addition, we calculated the hydrophobicity from the electronegativity of the individual bonds and recorded their

  10. MetaMapp: mapping and visualizing metabolomic data by integrating information from biochemical pathways and chemical and mass spectral similarity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) leads to higher rates of pulmonary diseases and infections in children. To study the biochemical changes that may precede lung diseases, metabolomic effects on fetal and maternal lungs and plasma from rats exposed to ETS were compared to filtered air control animals. Genome- reconstructed metabolic pathways may be used to map and interpret dysregulation in metabolic networks. However, mass spectrometry-based non-targeted metabolomics datasets often comprise many metabolites for which links to enzymatic reactions have not yet been reported. Hence, network visualizations that rely on current biochemical databases are incomplete and also fail to visualize novel, structurally unidentified metabolites. Results We present a novel approach to integrate biochemical pathway and chemical relationships to map all detected metabolites in network graphs (MetaMapp) using KEGG reactant pair database, Tanimoto chemical and NIST mass spectral similarity scores. In fetal and maternal lungs, and in maternal blood plasma from pregnant rats exposed to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), 459 unique metabolites comprising 179 structurally identified compounds were detected by gas chromatography time of flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF MS) and BinBase data processing. MetaMapp graphs in Cytoscape showed much clearer metabolic modularity and complete content visualization compared to conventional biochemical mapping approaches. Cytoscape visualization of differential statistics results using these graphs showed that overall, fetal lung metabolism was more impaired than lungs and blood metabolism in dams. Fetuses from ETS-exposed dams expressed lower lipid and nucleotide levels and higher amounts of energy metabolism intermediates than control animals, indicating lower biosynthetic rates of metabolites for cell division, structural proteins and lipids that are critical for in lung development. Conclusions MetaMapp graphs efficiently

  11. Dynamic optimization identifies optimal programmes for pathway regulation in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Bartl, Martin; Kötzing, Martin; Schuster, Stefan; Li, Pu; Kaleta, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    To survive in fluctuating environmental conditions, microorganisms must be able to quickly react to environmental challenges by upregulating the expression of genes encoding metabolic pathways. Here we show that protein abundance and protein synthesis capacity are key factors that determine the optimal strategy for the activation of a metabolic pathway. If protein abundance relative to protein synthesis capacity increases, the strategies shift from the simultaneous activation of all enzymes to the sequential activation of groups of enzymes and finally to a sequential activation of individual enzymes along the pathway. In the case of pathways with large differences in protein abundance, even more complex pathway activation strategies with a delayed activation of low abundance enzymes and an accelerated activation of high abundance enzymes are optimal. We confirm the existence of these pathway activation strategies as well as their dependence on our proposed constraints for a large number of metabolic pathways in several hundred prokaryotes.

  12. Harnessing Intracellular Biochemical Pathways for In Vitro Synthesis of Designer Tellurium Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Ling-Hong; Cui, Ran; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Tu, Jia-Wei; Shi, Yun-Bo; Pang, Dai-Wen

    2015-10-28

    Synthesizing nanomaterials of desired properties is a big challenge, which requires extremely harsh conditions and/or use of toxic materials. More recently developed in vivo methods have brought a different set of problems such as separation and purification of nanomaterials made in vivo. Here, a novel approach that harnesses cellular pathways for in vitro synthesis of high-quality tellurium nanorods with tunable lengths and optical properties is reported. It is first demonstrated that in vivo biochemical pathways could be used to synthesize Te nanorods via the intracellular reduction of TeO3(2-) in living Staphylococcus aureus cells. The pathways to set up a quasi-biological system for Te precursor formation are then utilized, which could further synthesize Te nanorods in vitro. This allows to successfully synthesize in vitro, under routine laboratory conditions, Te nanorods with uniform and tunable lengths, ranging from about 10 to 200 nm, and controllable optical properties with high molar extinction coefficients. The approach here should open new avenues for controllable, facile, and efficient synthesis of designer nanomaterials for diverse industrial and biomedical applications.

  13. Path2Models: large-scale generation of computational models from biochemical pathway maps

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Systems biology projects and omics technologies have led to a growing number of biochemical pathway models and reconstructions. However, the majority of these models are still created de novo, based on literature mining and the manual processing of pathway data. Results To increase the efficiency of model creation, the Path2Models project has automatically generated mathematical models from pathway representations using a suite of freely available software. Data sources include KEGG, BioCarta, MetaCyc and SABIO-RK. Depending on the source data, three types of models are provided: kinetic, logical and constraint-based. Models from over 2 600 organisms are encoded consistently in SBML, and are made freely available through BioModels Database at http://www.ebi.ac.uk/biomodels-main/path2models. Each model contains the list of participants, their interactions, the relevant mathematical constructs, and initial parameter values. Most models are also available as easy-to-understand graphical SBGN maps. Conclusions To date, the project has resulted in more than 140 000 freely available models. Such a resource can tremendously accelerate the development of mathematical models by providing initial starting models for simulation and analysis, which can be subsequently curated and further parameterized. PMID:24180668

  14. Biochemical pathways supporting beta-lactam biosynthesis in the springtail Folsomia candida

    PubMed Central

    Suring, Wouter; Mariën, Janine; Broekman, Rhody; van Straalen, Nico M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recently, an active set of beta-lactam biosynthesis genes was reported in the genome of the arthropod springtail Folsomia candida (Collembola). Evidence was provided that these genes were acquired through horizontal gene transfer. However, successful integration of fungal- or bacterial-derived beta-lactam biosynthesis into the metabolism of an animal requires the beta-lactam precursor L-α-aminoadipic acid and a phosphopantetheinyl transferase for activation of the first enzyme of the pathway, δ-(L-α-aminoadipoyl)-L-cysteinyl-D-valine synthetase (ACVS). In this study, we characterized these supporting pathways and their transcriptional regulation in F. candida. We identified one phosphopantetheinyl transferase and three pathways for L-α-aminoadipic acid production, distinct from the pathways utilized by microorganisms. We found that after heat shock, the phosphopantetheinyl transferase was co-regulated with ACVS, confirming its role in activating ACVS. Two of the three L-α-aminoadipic acid production pathways were downregulated, while PIPOX, an enzyme participating in the pipecolate pathway, was slightly co-regulated with ACVS. This indicates that L-α-aminoadipic acid may not be a limiting factor in beta-lactam biosynthesis in F. candida, in contrast to microorganisms. In conclusion, we show that all components for L-α-aminoadipic acid synthesis are present and transcriptionally active in F. candida. This demonstrates how springtails could have recruited native enzymes to integrate a beta-lactam biosynthesis pathway into their metabolism after horizontal gene transfer. PMID:27793835

  15. Identifying Breeding Priorities for Blueberry Flavor Using Biochemical, Sensory, and Genotype by Environment Analyses.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Jessica L; Guthart, Matthew J; Gezan, Salvador A; Pisaroglo de Carvalho, Melissa; Schwieterman, Michael L; Colquhoun, Thomas A; Bartoshuk, Linda M; Sims, Charles A; Clark, David G; Olmstead, James W

    2015-01-01

    Breeding for a subjective goal such as flavor is challenging, as many blueberry cultivars are grown worldwide, and identifying breeding targets relating to blueberry flavor biochemistry that have a high degree of genetic control and low environmental variability are priorities. A variety of biochemical compounds and physical characters induce the sensory responses of taste, olfaction, and somatosensation, all of which interact to create what is perceived flavor. The goal of this study was to identify the flavor compounds with a larger genetic versus environmental component regulating their expression over an array of cultivars, locations, and years. Over the course of three years, consumer panelists rated overall liking, texture, sweetness, sourness, and flavor intensity of 19 southern highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum hybrids) genotypes in 30 sensory panels. Significant positive correlations to overall liking of blueberry fruit (P<0.001) were found with sweetness (R2 = 0.70), texture (R2 = 0.68), and flavor (R2 = 0.63). Sourness had a significantly negative relationship with overall liking (R2 = 0.55). The relationship between flavor and texture liking was also linear (R2 = 0.73, P<0.0001) demonstrating interaction between olfaction and somatosensation. Partial least squares analysis was used to identify sugars, acids, and volatile compounds contributing to liking and sensory intensities, and revealed strong effects of fructose, pH, and several volatile compounds upon all sensory parameters measured. To assess the feasibility of breeding for flavor components, a three year study was conducted to compare genetic and environmental influences on flavor biochemistry. Panelists could discern genotypic variation in blueberry sensory components, and many of the compounds affecting consumer favor of blueberries, such as fructose, pH, β-caryophyllene oxide and 2-heptanone, were sufficiently genetically controlled that allocating resources for their breeding is

  16. Identifying Breeding Priorities for Blueberry Flavor Using Biochemical, Sensory, and Genotype by Environment Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Jessica L.; Guthart, Matthew J.; Gezan, Salvador A.; Pisaroglo de Carvalho, Melissa; Schwieterman, Michael L.; Colquhoun, Thomas A.; Bartoshuk, Linda M.; Sims, Charles A.; Clark, David G.; Olmstead, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Breeding for a subjective goal such as flavor is challenging, as many blueberry cultivars are grown worldwide, and identifying breeding targets relating to blueberry flavor biochemistry that have a high degree of genetic control and low environmental variability are priorities. A variety of biochemical compounds and physical characters induce the sensory responses of taste, olfaction, and somatosensation, all of which interact to create what is perceived flavor. The goal of this study was to identify the flavor compounds with a larger genetic versus environmental component regulating their expression over an array of cultivars, locations, and years. Over the course of three years, consumer panelists rated overall liking, texture, sweetness, sourness, and flavor intensity of 19 southern highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum hybrids) genotypes in 30 sensory panels. Significant positive correlations to overall liking of blueberry fruit (P<0.001) were found with sweetness (R2 = 0.70), texture (R2 = 0.68), and flavor (R2 = 0.63). Sourness had a significantly negative relationship with overall liking (R2 = 0.55). The relationship between flavor and texture liking was also linear (R2 = 0.73, P<0.0001) demonstrating interaction between olfaction and somatosensation. Partial least squares analysis was used to identify sugars, acids, and volatile compounds contributing to liking and sensory intensities, and revealed strong effects of fructose, pH, and several volatile compounds upon all sensory parameters measured. To assess the feasibility of breeding for flavor components, a three year study was conducted to compare genetic and environmental influences on flavor biochemistry. Panelists could discern genotypic variation in blueberry sensory components, and many of the compounds affecting consumer favor of blueberries, such as fructose, pH, β-caryophyllene oxide and 2-heptanone, were sufficiently genetically controlled that allocating resources for their breeding is

  17. Serum Metabolomic Profiling in Acute Alcoholic Hepatitis Identifies Multiple Dysregulated Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Rachakonda, Vikrant; Gabbert, Charles; Raina, Amit; Bell, Lauren N.; Cooper, Sara; Malik, Shahid; Behari, Jaideep

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives While animal studies have implicated derangements of global energy homeostasis in the pathogenesis of acute alcoholic hepatitis (AAH), the relevance of these findings to the development of human AAH remains unclear. Using global, unbiased serum metabolomics analysis, we sought to characterize alterations in metabolic pathways associated with severe AAH and identify potential biomarkers for disease prognosis. Methods This prospective, case-control study design included 25 patients with severe AAH and 25 ambulatory patients with alcoholic cirrhosis. Serum samples were collected within 24 hours of the index clinical encounter. Global, unbiased metabolomics profiling was performed. Patients were followed for 180 days after enrollment to determine survival. Results Levels of 234 biochemicals were altered in subjects with severe AAH. Random-forest analysis, principal component analysis, and integrated hierarchical clustering methods demonstrated that metabolomics profiles separated the two cohorts with 100% accuracy. Severe AAH was associated with enhanced triglyceride lipolysis, impaired mitochondrial fatty acid beta oxidation, and upregulated omega oxidation. Low levels of multiple lysolipids and related metabolites suggested decreased plasma membrane remodeling in severe AAH. While most measured bile acids were increased in severe AAH, low deoxycholate and glycodeoxycholate levels indicated intestinal dysbiosis. Several changes in substrate utilization for energy homeostasis were identified in severe AAH, including increased glucose consumption by the pentose phosphate pathway, altered tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle activity, and enhanced peptide catabolism. Finally, altered levels of small molecules related to glutathione metabolism and antioxidant vitamin depletion were observed in patients with severe AAH. Univariable logistic regression revealed 15 metabolites associated with 180-day survival in severe AAH. Conclusion Severe AAH is

  18. Biochemical Pathways: An Atlas of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (edited by Gerhard Michal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voige, Reviewed By William H.

    2000-02-01

    feature to the hyperlinks in an electronic document.) The book's index is comprehensive and useful. Entries for "phenylketonuria" and "sickle cell anemia", for example, lead to commendably concise summaries of these hereditary diseases (and the relevant metabolic pathway, in the former case). Looking up a specific molecule, however, is less helpful. The listing for fumarate hydratase, a citric acid cycle enzyme, directs the reader to the chapter on special bacterial metabolism but not to the section on the citric acid cycle itself. Literature references are included at the end of each section and are mainly from the 1990s, but they could be more useful. A long section on heme proteins, for example, concludes with eight citations, but their titles are not included, so it is impossible to determine what topic each one addresses. This book will be most useful to those with a good understanding of the fundamentals of biochemistry. Some of the information it presents could easily confuse less experienced readers. For example, it classifies selenocysteine as a standard amino acid in a figure but not in the accompanying text. In the diagram of anaerobic glycolysis, a double-headed arrow for the hexokinase reaction reinforces the frustratingly common student misperception that the phosphoryl group of glucose-6-phosphate can be used to phosphorylate ADP. Biochemical Pathways compiles a large amount of information in a single source. Its good index and clear, concise text and diagrams should make it a reliable way of gaining insight into many biochemical topics. With a price similar to that of most textbooks, it merits a place in the libraries of individuals and academic departments that teach biochemistry.

  19. Aldehyde Dehydrogenases in Arabidopsis thaliana: Biochemical Requirements, Metabolic Pathways, and Functional Analysis.

    PubMed

    Stiti, Naim; Missihoun, Tagnon D; Kotchoni, Simeon O; Kirch, Hans-Hubert; Bartels, Dorothea

    2011-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) are a family of enzymes which catalyze the oxidation of reactive aldehydes to their corresponding carboxylic acids. Here we summarize molecular genetic and biochemical analyses of selected ArabidopsisALDH genes. Aldehyde molecules are very reactive and are involved in many metabolic processes but when they accumulate in excess they become toxic. Thus activity of aldehyde dehydrogenases is important in regulating the homeostasis of aldehydes. Overexpression of some ALDH genes demonstrated an improved abiotic stress tolerance. Despite the fact that several reports are available describing a role for specific ALDHs, their precise physiological roles are often still unclear. Therefore a number of genetic and biochemical tools have been generated to address the function with an emphasis on stress-related ALDHs. ALDHs exert their functions in different cellular compartments and often in a developmental and tissue specific manner. To investigate substrate specificity, catalytic efficiencies have been determined using a range of substrates varying in carbon chain length and degree of carbon oxidation. Mutational approaches identified amino acid residues critical for coenzyme usage and enzyme activities.

  20. Pathway Analyses Identify Novel Variants in the WNT Signaling Pathway Associated with Tuberculosis in Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xuejiao; Zhou, Juan; Chen, Xuerong; Zhou, Yanhong; Song, Xingbo; Cai, Bei; Zhang, Jingya; Lu, Xiaojun; Ying, Binwu

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains a global public health problem, and its immunopathogenesis is still poorly understood. In this study, 25 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the WNT pathway were evaluated in relation to tuberculosis risk in a Chinese Han discovery set, and 6 candidate susceptible SNPs were further validated in a Chinese Tibetan cohort. Luciferase reporter assay, RT-qPCR and Western blot were used to assess the functionality of the important WNT polymorphisms. Five polymorphisms were associated with tuberculosis susceptibility after Bonferroni correction: SFRP1 rs4736958, CTNNB1 rs9859392, rs9870255 and rs3864004 showed decreased tuberculosis risk; SFRP1 rs7832767 was related to an increased risk (OR = 1.81, 95% CI = 1.30–2.52, p = 0.010). Patients with TT genotype of rs4736958 and rs7832767 correlated with higher CRP concentrations (p = 0.003, <0.001, respectively). Functional assays revealed that mutant alleles of rs9859392 (G), rs9870255 (C) and rs3864004 (A) were associated with significantly decreased transcriptional activity, lower CTNNB1 mRNA expression and p-β-catenin level, which were consistent with their effects of decreasing TB risk. Our results provide evidences that WNT pathway polymorphisms influence tuberculosis susceptibility and host immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, suggesting that these variations may serve as novel markers for identifying the risk of developing tuberculosis. PMID:27334567

  1. Biochemical Modulation of Lipid Pathway in Microalgae Dunaliella sp. for Biodiesel Production

    PubMed Central

    Talebi, Ahmad Farhad; Tohidfar, Masoud; Mousavi Derazmahalleh, Seyedeh Mahsa; Sulaiman, Alawi; Baharuddin, Azhari Samsu; Tabatabaei, Meisam

    2015-01-01

    Exploitation of renewable sources of energy such as algal biodiesel could turn energy supplies problem around. Studies on a locally isolated strain of Dunaliella sp. showed that the mean lipid content in cultures enriched by 200 mg L−1 myoinositol was raised by around 33% (1.5 times higher than the control). Similarly, higher lipid productivity values were achieved in cultures treated by 100 and 200 mg L−1 myoinositol. Fluorometry analyses (microplate fluorescence and flow cytometry) revealed increased oil accumulation in the Nile red-stained algal samples. Moreover, it was predicted that biodiesel produced from myoinositol-treated cells possessed improved oxidative stability, cetane number, and cloud point values. From the genomic point of view, real-time analyses revealed that myoinositol negatively influenced transcript abundance of AccD gene (one of the key genes involved in lipid production pathway) due to feedback inhibition and that its positive effect must have been exerted through other genes. The findings of the current research are not to interprete that myoinositol supplementation could answer all the challenges faced in microalgal biodiesel production but instead to show that “there is a there there” for biochemical modulation strategies, which we achieved, increased algal oil quantity and enhanced resultant biodiesel quality. PMID:26146623

  2. Biochemical pathways generating post-mortem volatile compounds co-detected during forensic ethanol analyses.

    PubMed

    Boumba, Vassiliki A; Ziavrou, Kallirroe S; Vougiouklakis, Theodore

    2008-01-30

    In this contribution are presented the fermentations of the main substrates present in a decaying corpse, namely carbohydrates, amino acids, glycerol and fatty acids, generating the post-mortem volatile compounds that could be detected along with ethanol during the forensic ethanol analysis. The available literature (preferably reviews) on microbial metabolic pathways (enzymes, substrates, conditions) that are implicated in the formation of these volatiles has been reviewed. The microbial formation of the following volatiles is supported by the presented biochemical data: ethanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, 2-propanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, isobutanol, isoamyl alcohol, d-amyl alcohol, acetate, propionate, butyrate, isobutyrate and ethyl esters (mainly ethyl acetate). The extracted information was correlated with the existing forensic literature on the post-mortem detected volatiles. The significance of the microbial produced volatiles on the selection of an appropriate internal standard for the ethanol analysis has been considered. Finally, the possible contribution of the presence of volatiles in the interpretation of ethanol analysis results in post-mortem cases is discussed.

  3. Molecular and Biochemical Analysis of Chalcone Synthase from Freesia hybrid in Flavonoid Biosynthetic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wei; Meng, Xiangyu; Liang, Lingjie; Jiang, Wangshu; Huang, Yafei; He, Jing; Hu, Haiyan; Almqvist, Jonas; Gao, Xiang; Wang, Li

    2015-01-01

    Chalcone synthase (CHS) catalyzes the first committed step in the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway. In this study, the cDNA (FhCHS1) encoding CHS from Freesia hybrida was successfully isolated and analyzed. Multiple sequence alignments showed that both the conserved CHS active site residues and CHS signature sequence were found in the deduced amino acid sequence of FhCHS1. Meanwhile, crystallographic analysis revealed that protein structure of FhCHS1 is highly similar to that of alfalfa CHS2, and the biochemical analysis results indicated that it has an enzymatic role in naringenin biosynthesis. Moreover, quantitative real-time PCR was performed to detect the transcript levels of FhCHS1 in flowers and different tissues, and patterns of FhCHS1 expression in flowers showed significant correlation to the accumulation patterns of anthocyanin during flower development. To further characterize the functionality of FhCHS1, its ectopic expression in Arabidopsis thaliana tt4 mutants and Petunia hybrida was performed. The results showed that overexpression of FhCHS1 in tt4 mutants fully restored the pigmentation phenotype of the seed coats, cotyledons and hypocotyls, while transgenic petunia expressing FhCHS1 showed flower color alteration from white to pink. In summary, these results suggest that FhCHS1 plays an essential role in the biosynthesis of flavonoid in Freesia hybrida and may be used to modify the components of flavonoids in other plants. PMID:25742495

  4. Biochemical evidence for an alternate pathway in N-linked glycoprotein biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Larkin, Angelyn; Chang, Michelle M.; Whitworth, Garrett E.; Imperiali, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Asparagine-linked glycosylation is a complex protein modification conserved among all three domains of life. Herein we report the in vitro analysis of N-linked glycosylation from the methanogenic archaeon Methanococcus voltae. Using a suite of synthetic and semisynthetic substrates, we show that AglK initiates N-linked glycosylation in M. voltae through the formation of α-linked dolichyl monophosphate N-acetylglucosamine (Dol-P-GlcNAc), which contrasts with the polyprenyl-diphosphate intermediates that feature in both eukaryotes and bacteria. Intriguingly, AglK exhibits high sequence homology to dolichyl-phosphate β-glucosyltransferases, including Alg5 in eukaryotes, suggesting a common evolutionary origin. The combined action of the first two enzymes, AglK and AglC, afforded an α-linked Dol-P-glycan that serves as a competent substrate for the archaeal oligosaccharyl transferase AglB. These studies provide the first biochemical evidence revealing that despite the apparent similarity of the overall pathways, there are actually two general strategies to achieve N-linked glycoproteins across the domains of life. PMID:23624439

  5. Biochemical Modulation of Lipid Pathway in Microalgae Dunaliella sp. for Biodiesel Production.

    PubMed

    Talebi, Ahmad Farhad; Tohidfar, Masoud; Mousavi Derazmahalleh, Seyedeh Mahsa; Sulaiman, Alawi; Baharuddin, Azhari Samsu; Tabatabaei, Meisam

    2015-01-01

    Exploitation of renewable sources of energy such as algal biodiesel could turn energy supplies problem around. Studies on a locally isolated strain of Dunaliella sp. showed that the mean lipid content in cultures enriched by 200 mg L(-1) myoinositol was raised by around 33% (1.5 times higher than the control). Similarly, higher lipid productivity values were achieved in cultures treated by 100 and 200 mg L(-1) myoinositol. Fluorometry analyses (microplate fluorescence and flow cytometry) revealed increased oil accumulation in the Nile red-stained algal samples. Moreover, it was predicted that biodiesel produced from myoinositol-treated cells possessed improved oxidative stability, cetane number, and cloud point values. From the genomic point of view, real-time analyses revealed that myoinositol negatively influenced transcript abundance of AccD gene (one of the key genes involved in lipid production pathway) due to feedback inhibition and that its positive effect must have been exerted through other genes. The findings of the current research are not to interprete that myoinositol supplementation could answer all the challenges faced in microalgal biodiesel production but instead to show that "there is a there there" for biochemical modulation strategies, which we achieved, increased algal oil quantity and enhanced resultant biodiesel quality.

  6. Pathways-Driven Sparse Regression Identifies Pathways and Genes Associated with High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol in Two Asian Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Silver, Matt; Chen, Peng; Li, Ruoying; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Wong, Tien-Yin; Tai, E-Shyong; Teo, Yik-Ying; Montana, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Standard approaches to data analysis in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) ignore any potential functional relationships between gene variants. In contrast gene pathways analysis uses prior information on functional structure within the genome to identify pathways associated with a trait of interest. In a second step, important single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) or genes may be identified within associated pathways. The pathways approach is motivated by the fact that genes do not act alone, but instead have effects that are likely to be mediated through their interaction in gene pathways. Where this is the case, pathways approaches may reveal aspects of a trait's genetic architecture that would otherwise be missed when considering SNPs in isolation. Most pathways methods begin by testing SNPs one at a time, and so fail to capitalise on the potential advantages inherent in a multi-SNP, joint modelling approach. Here, we describe a dual-level, sparse regression model for the simultaneous identification of pathways and genes associated with a quantitative trait. Our method takes account of various factors specific to the joint modelling of pathways with genome-wide data, including widespread correlation between genetic predictors, and the fact that variants may overlap multiple pathways. We use a resampling strategy that exploits finite sample variability to provide robust rankings for pathways and genes. We test our method through simulation, and use it to perform pathways-driven gene selection in a search for pathways and genes associated with variation in serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in two separate GWAS cohorts of Asian adults. By comparing results from both cohorts we identify a number of candidate pathways including those associated with cardiomyopathy, and T cell receptor and PPAR signalling. Highlighted genes include those associated with the L-type calcium channel, adenylate cyclase, integrin, laminin, MAPK signalling and immune

  7. Vascular and Perivascular NO Release and Transport: Biochemical Pathways of NOS1 and NOS3

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kejing; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2007-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) derived from nitric oxide synthase (NOS) is an important paracrine effector that maintains vascular tone. The release of NO mediated by NOS isozymes under various O2 conditions critically determines the NO bioavailability in tissues. Because of experimental difficulties, there has been no direct information on how enzymatic NO production and distribution change around arterioles under various oxygen conditions. In this study, we used computational models based on the analysis of biochemical pathways of enzymatic NO synthesis and the availability of NOS isozymes to quantify the NO production by neuronal NOS (NOS1) and endothelial NOS (NOS3). We compared the catalytic activities of NOS1 and NOS3 and their sensitivities to the concentration of substrate O2. Based on the NO release rates predicted from kinetic models, the geometric distribution of NO sources and mass balance analysis, we predicted the NO concentration profiles around an arteriole under various O2 conditions. The results indicated that NOS1-catalyzed NO production was significantly more sensitive to ambient O2 concentration than that catalyzed by NOS3. Also, the high sensitivity of NOS1 catalytic activity to O2 was associated with significantly reduced NO production and therefore NO concentrations, upon hypoxia. Moreover, the major source determining the distribution of NO was NOS1, which was abundantly expressed in the nerve fibers and mast cells close to arterioles, rather than NOS3, which was expressed in the endothelium. Finally, the perivascular NO concentration predicted by the models under conditions of normoxia was paradoxically at least an order of magnitude lower than a number of experimental measurements, suggesting a higher abundance of NOS1 or NOS3 and/or the existence of other enzymatic or non-enzymatic sources of NO in the microvasculature. PMID:17320763

  8. Biochemical and genomic analysis of the denitrification pathway within the genus Neisseria

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Kenneth R.; Isabella, Vincent M.; Clark, Virginia L.

    2009-01-01

    Since Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Neisseria meningitidis are obligate human pathogens, a comparison with commensal species of the same genus could reveal differences important in pathogenesis. The recent completion of commensal Neisseria genome draft assemblies allowed us to perform a comparison of the genes involved in the catalysis, assembly and regulation of the denitrification pathway, which has been implicated in the virulence of several bacteria. All species contained a highly conserved nitric oxide reductase (NorB) and a nitrite reductase (AniA or NirK) that was highly conserved in the catalytic but divergent in the N-terminal lipid modification and C-terminal glycosylation domains. Only Neisseria mucosa contained a nitrate reductase (Nar), and only Neisseria lactamica, Neisseria cinerea, Neisseria subflava, Neisseria flavescens and Neisseria sicca contained a nitrous oxide reductase (Nos) complex. The regulators of the denitrification genes, FNR, NarQP and NsrR, were highly conserved, except for the GAF domain of NarQ. Biochemical examination of laboratory strains revealed that all of the neisserial species tested except N. mucosa had a two- to fourfold lower nitrite reductase activity than N. gonorrhoeae, while N. meningitidis and most of the commensal Neisseria species had a two- to fourfold higher nitric oxide (NO) reductase activity. For N. meningitidis and most of the commensal Neisseria, there was a greater than fourfold reduction in the NO steady-state level in the presence of nitrite as compared with N. gonorrhoeae. All of the species tested generated an NO steady-state level in the presence of an NO donor that was similar to that of N. gonorrhoeae. The greatest difference between the Neisseria species was the lack of a functional Nos system in the pathogenic species N. gonorrhoeae and N. meningitidis. PMID:19762442

  9. Biochemical and genomic analysis of the denitrification pathway within the genus Neisseria.

    PubMed

    Barth, Kenneth R; Isabella, Vincent M; Clark, Virginia L

    2009-12-01

    Since Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Neisseria meningitidis are obligate human pathogens, a comparison with commensal species of the same genus could reveal differences important in pathogenesis. The recent completion of commensal Neisseria genome draft assemblies allowed us to perform a comparison of the genes involved in the catalysis, assembly and regulation of the denitrification pathway, which has been implicated in the virulence of several bacteria. All species contained a highly conserved nitric oxide reductase (NorB) and a nitrite reductase (AniA or NirK) that was highly conserved in the catalytic but divergent in the N-terminal lipid modification and C-terminal glycosylation domains. Only Neisseria mucosa contained a nitrate reductase (Nar), and only Neisseria lactamica, Neisseria cinerea, Neisseria subflava, Neisseria flavescens and Neisseria sicca contained a nitrous oxide reductase (Nos) complex. The regulators of the denitrification genes, FNR, NarQP and NsrR, were highly conserved, except for the GAF domain of NarQ. Biochemical examination of laboratory strains revealed that all of the neisserial species tested except N. mucosa had a two- to fourfold lower nitrite reductase activity than N. gonorrhoeae, while N. meningitidis and most of the commensal Neisseria species had a two- to fourfold higher nitric oxide (NO) reductase activity. For N. meningitidis and most of the commensal Neisseria, there was a greater than fourfold reduction in the NO steady-state level in the presence of nitrite as compared with N. gonorrhoeae. All of the species tested generated an NO steady-state level in the presence of an NO donor that was similar to that of N. gonorrhoeae. The greatest difference between the Neisseria species was the lack of a functional Nos system in the pathogenic species N. gonorrhoeae and N. meningitidis.

  10. Pathway analysis of bladder cancer genome-wide association study identifies novel pathways involved in bladder cancer development

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Meng; Rothman, Nathaniel; Ye, Yuanqing; Gu, Jian; Scheet, Paul A.; Huang, Maosheng; Chang, David W.; Dinney, Colin P.; Silverman, Debra T.; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Wu, Xifeng

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are designed to identify individual regions associated with cancer risk, but only explain a small fraction of the inherited variability. Alternative approach analyzing genetic variants within biological pathways has been proposed to discover networks of susceptibility genes with additional effects. The gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) may complement and expand traditional GWAS analysis to identify novel genes and pathways associated with bladder cancer risk. We selected three GSEA methods: Gen-Gen, Aligator, and the SNP Ratio Test to evaluate cellular signaling pathways involved in bladder cancer susceptibility in a Texas GWAS population. The candidate genetic polymorphisms from the significant pathway selected by GSEA were validated in an independent NCI GWAS. We identified 18 novel pathways (P < 0.05) significantly associated with bladder cancer risk. Five of the most promising pathways (P ≤ 0.001 in any of the three GSEA methods) among the 18 pathways included two cell cycle pathways and neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and unfolded protein response pathways. We validated the candidate polymorphisms in the NCI GWAS and found variants of RAPGEF1, SKP1, HERPUD1, CACNB2, CACNA1C, CACNA1S, COL4A2, SRC, and CACNA1C were associated with bladder cancer risk. Two CCNE1 variants, rs8102137 and rs997669, from cell cycle pathways showed the strongest associations; the CCNE1 signal at 19q12 has already been reported in previous GWAS. These findings offer additional etiologic insights highlighting the specific genes and pathways associated with bladder cancer development. GSEA may be a complementary tool to GWAS to identify additional loci of cancer susceptibility. PMID:27738493

  11. Identifying dysfunctional crosstalk of pathways in various regions of Alzheimer's disease brains

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a major neurodegenerative disorder leading to amnesia, cognitive impairment and dementia in the elderly. Usually this type of lesions results from dysfunctional protein cooperations in the biological pathways. In addition, AD progression is known to occur in different brain regions with particular features. Thus identification and analysis of crosstalk among dysregulated pathways as well as identification of their clusters in various diseased brain regions are expected to provide deep insights into the pathogenetic mechanism. Results Here we propose a network-based systems biology approach to detect the crosstalks among AD related pathways, as well as their dysfunctions in the six brain regions of AD patients. Through constructing a network of pathways, the relationships among AD pathway and its neighbor pathways are systematically investigated and visually presented by their intersections. We found that the significance degree of pathways related to the fatal disorders and the pathway overlapping strength can indicate the impacts of these neighbored pathways to AD development. Furthermore, the crosstalks among pathways reveal some evidence that the neighbor pathways of AD pathway closely cooperate and play important tasks in the AD progression. Conclusions Our study identifies the common and distinct features of the dysfunctional crosstalk of pathways in various AD brain regions. The global pathway crosstalk network and the clusters of relevant pathways of AD provide evidence of cooperativity among pathways for potential pathogenesis of the neuron complex disease. PMID:20840725

  12. Biochemical and structural characterization of mouse mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase, a newly identified kynurenine aminotransferase-IV

    PubMed Central

    Han, Qian; Robinson, Howard; Cai, Tao; Tagle, Danilo A.; Li, Jianyong

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis Mammalian mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase (mAspAT) is recently reported to have kynurenine aminotransferase (KAT) activity and plays a role in the biosynthesis of kynurenic acid (KYNA) in rat, mouse and human brains. This study concerns the biochemical and structural characterization of mouse mAspAT. In this study, mouse mAspAT cDNA was amplified from mouse brain first stand cDNA and its recombinant protein was expressed in an Escherichia coli expression system. Sixteen keto acids were tested for the co-substrate specificity of mouse mAspAT and fourteen of them were shown to be capable of serving as co-substrates for the enzyme. Structural analysis of mAspAT by macromolecular crystallography revealed that the cofactor binding residues of mAspAT are similar to those of other KATs. The substrate binding residues of mAspAT are slightly different from those of other KATs. Our data provide a biochemical and structural basis towards understanding the overall physiological role of mAspAT in vivo and insight into controlling the levels of endogenous KYNA through modulation of the enzyme in the mouse brain. PMID:20977429

  13. Biochemical and structural characterization of mouse mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase, a newly identified kynurenine aminotransferase-IV.

    PubMed

    Han, Qian; Robinson, Howard; Cai, Tao; Tagle, Danilo A; Li, Jianyong

    2011-10-01

    Mammalian mAspAT (mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase) is recently reported to have KAT (kynurenine aminotransferase) activity and plays a role in the biosynthesis of KYNA (kynurenic acid) in rat, mouse and human brains. This study concerns the biochemical and structural characterization of mouse mAspAT. In this study, mouse mAspAT cDNA was amplified from mouse brain first stand cDNA and its recombinant protein was expressed in an Escherichia coli expression system. Sixteen oxo acids were tested for the co-substrate specificity of mouse mAspAT and 14 of them were shown to be capable of serving as co-substrates for the enzyme. Structural analysis of mAspAT by macromolecular crystallography revealed that the cofactor-binding residues of mAspAT are similar to those of other KATs. The substrate-binding residues of mAspAT are slightly different from those of other KATs. Our results provide a biochemical and structural basis towards understanding the overall physiological role of mAspAT in vivo and insight into controlling the levels of endogenous KYNA through modulation of the enzyme in the mouse brain.

  14. Biochemical and structural characterization of mouse mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase, a newly identified kynurenine aminotransferase-IV

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Q.; Robinson, H.; Cai, T.; Tagle, D. A.; Li, J.

    2011-10-01

    Mammalian mAspAT (mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase) is recently reported to have KAT (kynurenine aminotransferase) activity and plays a role in the biosynthesis of KYNA (kynurenic acid) in rat, mouse and human brains. This study concerns the biochemical and structural characterization of mouse mAspAT. In this study, mouse mAspAT cDNA was amplified from mouse brain first stand cDNA and its recombinant protein was expressed in an Escherichia coli expression system. Sixteen oxo acids were tested for the co-substrate specificity of mouse mAspAT and 14 of them were shown to be capable of serving as co-substrates for the enzyme. Structural analysis of mAspAT by macromolecular crystallography revealed that the cofactor-binding residues of mAspAT are similar to those of other KATs. The substrate-binding residues of mAspAT are slightly different from those of other KATs. Our results provide a biochemical and structural basis towards understanding the overall physiological role of mAspAT in vivo and insight into controlling the levels of endogenous KYNA through modulation of the enzyme in the mouse brain.

  15. Genetically regulated hepatic transcripts and pathways orchestrate haematological, biochemical and body composition traits

    PubMed Central

    Ponsuksili, Siriluck; Trakooljul, Nares; Hadlich, Frieder; Haack, Fiete; Murani, Eduard; Wimmers, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The liver is the central metabolic organ and exhibits fundamental functions in haematological traits. Hepatic expression, haematological, plasma biochemical, and body composition traits were assessed in a porcine model (n = 297) to establish tissue-specific genetic variations that influence the function of immune-metabolism-correlated expression networks. At FDR (false discovery rate) <1%, more than 3,600 transcripts were jointly correlated (r = |0.22–0.48|) with the traits. Functional enrichment analysis demonstrated common links of metabolic and immune traits. To understand how immune and metabolic traits are affected via genetic regulation of gene expression, eQTLs were assessed. 20517 significant (FDR < 5%) eQTLs for 1401 transcripts were identified, among which 443 transcripts were associated with at least one of the examined traits and had cis-eQTL (such as ACO1 (6.52 × 10−7) and SOD1 (6.41 × 10−30). The present study establishes a comprehensive view of hepatic gene activity which links together metabolic and immune traits in a porcine model for medical research. PMID:28000754

  16. Network Analysis Identifies Disease-Specific Pathways for Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Monti, Chiara; Colugnat, Ilaria; Lopiano, Leonardo; Chiò, Adriano; Alberio, Tiziana

    2016-12-21

    Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by the progressive loss of specific neurons in selected regions of the central nervous system. The main clinical manifestation (movement disorders, cognitive impairment, and/or psychiatric disturbances) depends on the neuron population being primarily affected. Parkinson's disease is a common movement disorder, whose etiology remains mostly unknown. Progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra causes an impairment of the motor control. Some of the pathogenetic mechanisms causing the progressive deterioration of these neurons are not specific for Parkinson's disease but are shared by other neurodegenerative diseases, like Alzheimer's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Here, we performed a meta-analysis of the literature of all the quantitative proteomic investigations of neuronal alterations in different models of Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis to distinguish between general and Parkinson's disease-specific pattern of neurodegeneration. Then, we merged proteomics data with genetics information from the DisGeNET database. The comparison of gene and protein information allowed us to identify 25 proteins involved uniquely in Parkinson's disease and we verified the alteration of one of them, i.e., transaldolase 1 (TALDO1), in the substantia nigra of 5 patients. By using open-source bioinformatics tools, we identified the biological processes specifically affected in Parkinson's disease, i.e., proteolysis, mitochondrion organization, and mitophagy. Eventually, we highlighted four cellular component complexes mostly involved in the pathogenesis: the proteasome complex, the protein phosphatase 2A, the chaperonins CCT complex, and the complex III of the respiratory chain.

  17. Identifying Differences Between Biochemical Failure and Cure: Incidence Rates and Predictors

    SciTech Connect

    Vicini, Frank A.; Shah, Chirag; Kestin, Larry; Ghilezan, Mihai; Krauss, Daniel; Ye Hong; Brabbins, Donald; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    2011-11-15

    Background: Patients treated with radiation therapy (RT) for prostate cancer were evaluated to estimate the length of time required to document biochemical cure (BC) after treatment and the variables associated with long-term treatment efficacy. Patients and Methods: 2,100 patients received RT alone for localized prostate carcinoma (external-beam RT, n = 1,504; brachytherapy alone, n = 241; or brachytherapy + pelvic radiation, n = 355). The median external-beam dose was 68.4 Gy, and the median follow-up time was 8.6 years. Biochemical failure (BF) was defined according to the Phoenix definition. Results: Biochemical failure was experienced by 685 patients (32.6%). The median times to BF for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups were 6.0, 5.6, and 4.5 years respectively (p < 0.001). The average annual incidence rates of BF for years 1-5, 5-10,11-15, and 16-20 in low-risk patients were 2.0%, 2.0%, 0.3%, and 0.06% (p < 0.001); for intermediate-risk patients, 4%, 3%, 0.3%, and 0% (p < 0.001); and for high-risk patients, 10.0%, 5.0%, 0.3%, and 0.3% (p < 0.001). After 5 years of treatment, 36.9% of all patients experienced BF. The percentage of total failures occurring during years 1-5, 5-10, 11-15, and 16-20 were 48.7%, 43.5%, 6.5%, and 1.3% for low-risk patients; 64.0%, 32.2%, 3.8%, and 0% for intermediate-risk patients; and 71.9%, 25.9%, 1.1%, and 1.1% for high-risk patients, respectively. Increasing time to nadir was associated with increased time to BF. On multivariate analysis, factors significantly associated with 10-year BC included prostate-specific antigen nadir and time to nadir. Conclusions: The incidence rates for BF did not plateau until later than 10 years after treatment, suggesting that extended follow-up time is required to monitor patients after treatment. Prostate-specific antigen nadir and time to nadir have the strongest association with long-term BC.

  18. Hypericin biosynthesis in Hypericum hookerianum Wight and Arn: investigation on biochemical pathways using metabolite inhibitors and suppression subtractive hybridization.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Padmesh P; Nair, Aswati R

    2014-10-01

    The biochemical pathway to hypericin biosynthesis is presumed to be polyketide synthase (PKS) mediated, but it has not been experimentally validated, and no alternate route (chorismate/o-succinylbenzoate pathway) has been analyzed. We report here our earlier developed auxin inducible culture systems of Hypericum hookerianum as a model, to study the metabolic pathway to hypericin synthesis. Inhibitors of the alternate pathway at varying concentrations showed steady synthesis of total hypericins with means of 2.80±0.22, 18.75±0.01; 16.39±3.75, 29.60±1.90 (mevinolin) 2.53±0.10, 18.12±0.56; 0.14±0.01, 14.28±1.11 (fosmidomycin) and 2.7±0.35, 18.75±0.61; 0.14±0.01, 12.80±1.09 mg g(-1) DW (glyphosate) in the control and auxin-induced shoot and shoot-forming callus cultures, respectively. SSH analysis classified the differentially expressed sequences into protein synthesis (38%), modification (20%), electron transport (9%) and remaining as unclassified (11%) and unknown proteins (22%). Functional annotation of sequences indicates the presence of additional protein components besides PKS activity. Our results demonstrate direct biochemical and molecular evidence of PKS hypothesis of hypericin biosynthesis for the first time.

  19. Meta-dimensional data integration identifies critical pathways for susceptibility, tumorigenesis and progression of endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Runmin; De Vivo, Immaculata; Huang, Sijia; Zhu, Xun; Risch, Harvey; Moore, Jason H.; Yu, Herbert; Garmire, Lana X.

    2016-01-01

    Endometrial Cancer (EC) is one of the most common female cancers. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been investigated to identify genetic polymorphisms that are predictive of EC risks. Here we utilized a meta-dimensional integrative approach to seek genetically susceptible pathways that may be associated with tumorigenesis and progression of EC. We analyzed GWAS data obtained from Connecticut Endometrial Cancer Study (CECS) and identified the top 20 EC susceptible pathways. To further verify the significance of top 20 EC susceptible pathways, we conducted pathway-level multi-omics analyses using EC exome-Seq, RNA-Seq and survival data, all based on The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) samples. We measured the overall consistent rankings of these pathways in all four data types. Some well-studied pathways, such as p53 signaling and cell cycle pathways, show consistently high rankings across different analyses. Additionally, other cell signaling pathways (e.g. IGF-1/mTOR, rac-1 and IL-5 pathway), genetic information processing pathway (e.g. homologous recombination) and metabolism pathway (e.g. sphingolipid metabolism) are also highly associated with EC risks, diagnosis and prognosis. In conclusion, the meta-dimensional integration of EC cohorts has suggested some common pathways that may be associated from predisposition, tumorigenesis to progression. PMID:27409342

  20. Influence of anabolic combinations of an androgen plus an estrogen on biochemical pathways in bovine uterine endometrium and ovary.

    PubMed

    Becker, C; Riedmaier, I; Reiter, M; Tichopad, A; Groot, M J; Stolker, A A M; Pfaffl, M W; Nielen, M F W; Meyer, H H D

    2011-07-01

    The application of anabolic steroids in food producing animals is forbidden in the EU since 1988, but the abuse of such drugs is a potential problem. The existing test systems are based on known compounds and can be eluded by newly emerging substances. The examination of physiological effects of anabolic hormones on different tissues to indirectly detect misuse might overcome this problem. Two studies were conducted with post-pubertal 24-months old Nguni heifers and pre-pubertal female 2-4 weeks old Holstein Friesian calves, respectively. The animals of the accordant treatment groups were administered combinations of estrogenic and androgenic compounds. The measurement of the gene expression pattern was undertaken with RT-qPCR. Target genes of different functional groups (receptors, angiogenesis, steroid synthesis, proliferation, apoptosis, nutrient metabolism and others) have been quantified. Several biochemical pathways were shown to be influenced by anabolic treatment. Both studies identified significant regulations in steroid and growth factor receptors (AR, ERβ, LHR, FSHR, Flt-1, PR, IGF-1R, Alk-6), angiogenic and tissue remodeling factors (VEGFs, FGFs, BMPs, ANGPT-2, MMPs, TIMP-2, CTSB), steroid synthesis (S5A1, HSD17, CYP19A1), proliferation (TNFα, IGF-1, IGFBPs, p53, c-fos; CEBPD, c-kit), apoptosis (CASP3, FasL, p53) and others (C7, INHA, STAR). Several genes were regulated to opposite directions in post-pubertal compared to pre-pubertal animals. PCA for Nguni heifers demonstrated a distinct separation between the control and the treatment group. In conclusion, anabolics modify hormone sensitivity and steroid synthesis, and they induce proliferative effects in the whole reproductive tract (uterus and ovary) as well as anti-angiogenic effects in the ovary. However, the extent will depend on the developmental stage of the animals.

  1. Neuropathological and biochemical criteria to identify acquired Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease among presumed sporadic cases.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Atsushi; Parchi, Piero; Yamada, Masahito; Mohri, Shirou; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki

    2016-06-01

    As an experimental model of acquired Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), we performed transmission studies of sporadic CJD using knock-in mice expressing human prion protein (PrP). In this model, the inoculation of the sporadic CJD strain V2 into animals homozygous for methionine at polymorphic codon 129 (129 M/M) of the PRNP gene produced quite distinctive neuropathological and biochemical features, that is, widespread kuru plaques and intermediate type abnormal PrP (PrP(Sc) ). Interestingly, this distinctive combination of molecular and pathological features has been, to date, observed in acquired CJD but not in sporadic CJD. Assuming that these distinctive phenotypic traits are specific for acquired CJD, we revisited the literature and found two cases showing widespread kuru plaques despite the 129 M/M genotype, in a neurosurgeon and in a patient with a medical history of neurosurgery without dura mater grafting. By Western blot analysis of brain homogenates, we revealed the intermediate type of PrP(Sc) in both cases. Furthermore, transmission properties of brain extracts from these two cases were indistinguishable from those of a subgroup of dura mater graft-associated iatrogenic CJD caused by infection with the sporadic CJD strain V2. These data strongly suggest that the two atypical CJD cases, previously thought to represent sporadic CJD, very likely acquired the disease through exposure to prion-contaminated brain tissues. Thus, we propose that the distinctive combination of 129 M/M genotype, kuru plaques, and intermediate type PrP(Sc) , represents a reliable criterion for the identification of acquired CJD cases among presumed sporadic cases.

  2. Xtalk: a path-based approach for identifying crosstalk between signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Tegge, Allison N.; Sharp, Nicholas; Murali, T. M.

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Cells communicate with their environment via signal transduction pathways. On occasion, the activation of one pathway can produce an effect downstream of another pathway, a phenomenon known as crosstalk. Existing computational methods to discover such pathway pairs rely on simple overlap statistics. Results: We present Xtalk, a path-based approach for identifying pairs of pathways that may crosstalk. Xtalk computes the statistical significance of the average length of multiple short paths that connect receptors in one pathway to the transcription factors in another. By design, Xtalk reports the precise interactions and mechanisms that support the identified crosstalk. We applied Xtalk to signaling pathways in the KEGG and NCI-PID databases. We manually curated a gold standard set of 132 crosstalking pathway pairs and a set of 140 pairs that did not crosstalk, for which Xtalk achieved an area under the receiver operator characteristic curve of 0.65, a 12% improvement over the closest competing approach. The area under the receiver operator characteristic curve varied with the pathway, suggesting that crosstalk should be evaluated on a pathway-by-pathway level. We also analyzed an extended set of 658 pathway pairs in KEGG and to a set of more than 7000 pathway pairs in NCI-PID. For the top-ranking pairs, we found substantial support in the literature (81% for KEGG and 78% for NCI-PID). We provide examples of networks computed by Xtalk that accurately recovered known mechanisms of crosstalk. Availability and implementation: The XTALK software is available at http://bioinformatics.cs.vt.edu/~murali/software. Crosstalk networks are available at http://graphspace.org/graphs?tags=2015-bioinformatics-xtalk. Contact: ategge@vt.edu, murali@cs.vt.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26400040

  3. Method for identifying biochemical and chemical reactions and micromechanical processes using nanomechanical and electronic signal identification

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, J.F.; Siekhaus, W.J.

    1997-04-15

    A scanning probe microscope, such as an atomic force microscope (AFM) or a scanning tunneling microscope (STM), is operated in a stationary mode on a site where an activity of interest occurs to measure and identify characteristic time-varying micromotions caused by biological, chemical, mechanical, electrical, optical, or physical processes. The tip and cantilever assembly of an AFM is used as a micromechanical detector of characteristic micromotions transmitted either directly by a site of interest or indirectly through the surrounding medium. Alternatively, the exponential dependence of the tunneling current on the size of the gap in the STM is used to detect micromechanical movement. The stationary mode of operation can be used to observe dynamic biological processes in real time and in a natural environment, such as polymerase processing of DNA for determining the sequence of a DNA molecule. 6 figs.

  4. Method for identifying biochemical and chemical reactions and micromechanical processes using nanomechanical and electronic signal identification

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F.; Siekhaus, Wigbert J.

    1997-01-01

    A scanning probe microscope, such as an atomic force microscope (AFM) or a scanning tunneling microscope (STM), is operated in a stationary mode on a site where an activity of interest occurs to measure and identify characteristic time-varying micromotions caused by biological, chemical, mechanical, electrical, optical, or physical processes. The tip and cantilever assembly of an AFM is used as a micromechanical detector of characteristic micromotions transmitted either directly by a site of interest or indirectly through the surrounding medium. Alternatively, the exponential dependence of the tunneling current on the size of the gap in the STM is used to detect micromechanical movement. The stationary mode of operation can be used to observe dynamic biological processes in real time and in a natural environment, such as polymerase processing of DNA for determining the sequence of a DNA molecule.

  5. A Biochemical Approach to Understanding the Fanconi Anemia Pathway-Regulated Nucleases in Genome Maintenance for Preventing Bone Marrow Failure and Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    the Fanconi Anemia Pathway- Regulated Nucleases in Genome Maintenance for Preventing Bone Marrow Failure and Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...GRANT NUMBER 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Biochemical Approach to Understanding the Fanconi Anemia Pathway-Regulated Nucleases in Genome Maintenance for...Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Fanconi anemia is the most prevalent inherited BMF syndromes, caused by mutations in

  6. Using soil moisture and spatial yield patterns to identify subsurface flow pathways.

    PubMed

    Gish, T J; Walthall, C L; Daughtry, C S T; Kung, K-J S

    2005-01-01

    Subsurface soil water dynamics can influence crop growth and the fate of surface-applied fertilizers and pesticides. Recently, a method was proposed using only ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and digital elevation maps (DEMs) to identify locations where subsurface water converged into discrete pathways. For this study, the GPR protocol for identifying horizontal subsurface flow pathways was extended to a 3.2-ha field, uncertainty is discussed, and soil moisture and yield patterns are presented as confirming evidence of the extent of the subsurface flow pathways. Observed soil water contents supported the existence of discrete preferential funnel flow processes occurring near the GPR-identified preferential flow pathways. Soil moisture also played a critical role in the formation of corn (Zea mays L.) grain yield patterns with yield spatial patterns being similar for mild and severe drought conditions. A buffer zone protocol was introduced that allowed the impact of subsurface flow pathways on corn grain yield to be quantified. Results indicate that when a GPR-identified subsurface clay layer was within 2 m of the soil surface, there was a beneficial impact on yield during a drought year. Furthermore, the buffer zone analysis demonstrated that corn grain yields decreased as the horizontal distance from the GPR-identified subsurface flow pathways increased during a drought year. Averaged real-time soil moisture contents at 0.1 m also decreased with increasing distance from the GPR-identified flow pathways. This research suggests that subsurface flow pathways exist and influence soil moisture and corn grain yield patterns.

  7. Rapid biochemical test to identify verocytotoxin-positive strains of Escherichia coli serotype O157.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, J S; Hodge, D S; Borczyk, A A

    1990-01-01

    Fluorogenic procedures were used with the substrate 4-methylumbelliferyl-beta-D-glucuronide (MUG) to identify Escherichia coli. Most strains produced beta-glucuronidase and, thus, were MUG positive. A 20-min procedure was developed to detect glucuronidase activity in 1,295 bacterial cultures, representing 23 genera, of strains that were isolated from clinical specimens. Very few organisms other than E. coli were MUG positive. Of 682 E. coli strains that were isolated, 630 (92.4%) were MUG positive. When an additional 188 E. coli serotype O157 isolates were examined, 155 E. coli O157:H7, 10 E. coli O157:H-, and 1 E. coli O157:H (rough) isolate were MUG negative. All 166 cultures were verocytotoxin positive. Of the remaining 22 E. coli O157 isolates, 2 isolates were O157:H-, 1 isolate was O157:H (rough), and 19 isolates were other H types (H6, H16, H19, H25, H42, and H45); these 22 isolates were MUG positive. All 22 cultures were verocytotoxin negative. The rapid MUG procedure can be used to predict verocytotoxin-positive isolates of E. coli O157; that is, there is a very good likelihood that MUG-negative E. coli O157 isolates are verocytotoxin positive. PMID:2229338

  8. The use of functional chemical-protein associations to identify multi-pathway renoprotectants.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jia; Meng, Kexin; Zhang, Rui; Yang, He; Liao, Chang; Zhu, Wenliang; Jiao, Jundong

    2014-01-01

    Typically, most nephropathies can be categorized as complex human diseases in which the cumulative effect of multiple minor genes, combined with environmental and lifestyle factors, determines the disease phenotype. Thus, multi-target drugs would be more likely to facilitate comprehensive renoprotection than single-target agents. In this study, functional chemical-protein association analysis was performed to retrieve multi-target drugs of high pathway wideness from the STITCH 3.1 database. Pathway wideness of a drug evaluated the efficiency of regulation of Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways in quantity. We identified nine experimentally validated renoprotectants that exerted remarkable impact on KEGG pathways by targeting a limited number of proteins. We selected curcumin as an illustrative compound to display the advantage of multi-pathway drugs on renoprotection. We compared curcumin with hemin, an agonist of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), which significantly affects only one KEGG pathway, porphyrin and chlorophyll metabolism (adjusted p = 1.5×10-5). At the same concentration (10 µM), both curcumin and hemin equivalently mitigated oxidative stress in H2O2-treated glomerular mesangial cells. The benefit of using hemin was derived from its agonistic effect on HO-1, providing relief from oxidative stress. Selective inhibition of HO-1 completely blocked the action of hemin but not that of curcumin, suggesting simultaneous multi-pathway intervention by curcumin. Curcumin also increased cellular autophagy levels, enhancing its protective effect; however, hemin had no effects. Based on the fact that the dysregulation of multiple pathways is implicated in the etiology of complex diseases, we proposed a feasible method for identifying multi-pathway drugs from compounds with validated targets. Our efforts will help identify multi-pathway agents capable of providing comprehensive protection against renal injuries.

  9. Beta 3-adrenoceptor in rat aorta: molecular and biochemical characterization and signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Rautureau, Yohann; Toumaniantz, Gilles; Serpillon, Sabrina; Jourdon, Philippe; Trochu, Jean-Noël; Gauthier, Chantal

    2002-09-01

    1. We have previously demonstrated that beta(3)-adrenoceptor (beta(3)-AR) stimulation induces endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation in rat aorta through the activation of an endothelial NO synthase associated with an increase in intracellular cGMP. The aim of the present study was to localise beta(3)-AR to confirm our functional study and to complete the signalling pathway of beta(3)-AR in rat aorta. 2. By RT-PCR, we have detected beta(3)-AR transcripts both in aorta and in freshly isolated endothelial cells. The absence of markers for adipsin or hormone-sensitive lipase in endothelial cells excluded the presence of beta(3)-AR from adipocytes. The localization of beta(3)-AR in aortic endothelial cells was confirmed by immunohistochemistry using a rat beta(3)-AR antibody. 3. To identify the G protein linked to beta(3)-AR, experiments were performed in rat pre-treated with PTX (10 microg kg(-1)), a G(i/0) protein inhibitor. The blockage of G(i/0) protein by PTX was confirmed by the reduction of vasorelaxation induced by UK 14304, a selective alpha(2)-AR agonist. The cumulative concentration-response curve for SR 58611A, a beta(3)-AR agonist, was not significantly modified on aorta rings from PTX pre-treated rats. 4. At the same level of contraction, the relaxations induced by 10 microM SR 58611A were significantly reduced in 30 mM-KCl pre-constricted rings (E(max)=16.7+/-8.4%, n=5), in comparison to phenylephrine (0.3 microM) pre-constricted rings (E(max)=49.11+/-11.0%, n=5, P<0.05). In addition, iberotoxin (0.1 microM), glibenclamide (1 microM) and 4-aminopyridine (1 mM), selective potassium channels blockers of K(Ca), K(ATP), and K(v) respectively, decreased the SR 58611A-mediated relaxation. 5. We conclude that beta(3)-AR is preferentially expressed in rat aortic endothelial cells. Beta(3)-AR-mediated aortic relaxation is independent of G(i/0) proteins stimulation, but results from the activation of several potassium channels, K(Ca), K(ATP), and K(v).

  10. Preferential Activation of the Hedgehog Pathway by Epigenetic Modulations in HPV Negative HNSCC Identified with Meta-Pathway Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fertig, Elana J.; Markovic, Ana; Danilova, Ludmila V.; Gaykalova, Daria A.; Cope, Leslie; Chung, Christine H.; Ochs, Michael F.; Califano, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is largely divided into two groups based on their etiology, human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive and –negative. Global DNA methylation changes are known to drive oncogene and tumor suppressor expression in primary HNSCC of both types. However, significant heterogeneity in DNA methylation within the groups results in different transcriptional profiles and clinical outcomes. We applied a meta-pathway analysis to link gene expression changes to DNA methylation in distinguishing HNSCC subtypes. This approach isolated specific epigenetic changes controlling expression in HPV− HNSCC that distinguish it from HPV+ HNSCC. Analysis of genes identified Hedgehog pathway activation specific to HPV− HNSCC. We confirmed that GLI1, the primary Hedgehog target, showed higher expression in tumors compared to normal samples with HPV− tumors having the highest GLI1 expression, suggesting that increased expression of GLI1 is a potential driver in HPV− HNSCC. Our algorithm for integration of DNA methylation and gene expression can infer biologically significant molecular pathways that may be exploited as therapeutics targets. Our results suggest that therapeutics targeting the Hedgehog pathway may be of benefit in HPV− HNSCC. Similar integrative analysis of high-throughput coupled DNA methylation and expression datasets may yield novel insights into deregulated pathways in other cancers. PMID:24223768

  11. Preferential activation of the hedgehog pathway by epigenetic modulations in HPV negative HNSCC identified with meta-pathway analysis.

    PubMed

    Fertig, Elana J; Markovic, Ana; Danilova, Ludmila V; Gaykalova, Daria A; Cope, Leslie; Chung, Christine H; Ochs, Michael F; Califano, Joseph A

    2013-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is largely divided into two groups based on their etiology, human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive and -negative. Global DNA methylation changes are known to drive oncogene and tumor suppressor expression in primary HNSCC of both types. However, significant heterogeneity in DNA methylation within the groups results in different transcriptional profiles and clinical outcomes. We applied a meta-pathway analysis to link gene expression changes to DNA methylation in distinguishing HNSCC subtypes. This approach isolated specific epigenetic changes controlling expression in HPV- HNSCC that distinguish it from HPV+ HNSCC. Analysis of genes identified Hedgehog pathway activation specific to HPV- HNSCC. We confirmed that GLI1, the primary Hedgehog target, showed higher expression in tumors compared to normal samples with HPV- tumors having the highest GLI1 expression, suggesting that increased expression of GLI1 is a potential driver in HPV- HNSCC. Our algorithm for integration of DNA methylation and gene expression can infer biologically significant molecular pathways that may be exploited as therapeutics targets. Our results suggest that therapeutics targeting the Hedgehog pathway may be of benefit in HPV- HNSCC. Similar integrative analysis of high-throughput coupled DNA methylation and expression datasets may yield novel insights into deregulated pathways in other cancers.

  12. Systematic analysis of microarray datasets to identify Parkinson's disease-associated pathways and genes

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yinling; Wang, Xuefeng

    2017-01-01

    In order to investigate commonly disturbed genes and pathways in various brain regions of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), microarray datasets from previous studies were collected and systematically analyzed. Different normalization methods were applied to microarray datasets from different platforms. A strategy combining gene co-expression networks and clinical information was adopted, using weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) to screen for commonly disturbed genes in different brain regions of patients with PD. Functional enrichment analysis of commonly disturbed genes was performed using the Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery (DAVID). Co-pathway relationships were identified with Pearson's correlation coefficient tests and a hypergeometric distribution-based test. Common genes in pathway pairs were selected out and regarded as risk genes. A total of 17 microarray datasets from 7 platforms were retained for further analysis. Five gene coexpression modules were identified, containing 9,745, 736, 233, 101 and 93 genes, respectively. One module was significantly correlated with PD samples and thus the 736 genes it contained were considered to be candidate PD-associated genes. Functional enrichment analysis demonstrated that these genes were implicated in oxidative phosphorylation and PD. A total of 44 pathway pairs and 52 risk genes were revealed, and a risk gene pathway relationship network was constructed. Eight modules were identified and were revealed to be associated with PD, cancers and metabolism. A number of disturbed pathways and risk genes were unveiled in PD, and these findings may help advance understanding of PD pathogenesis. PMID:28098893

  13. AN INTEGRATED NETWORK APPROACH TO IDENTIFYING BIOLOGICAL PATHWAYS AND ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURE INTERACTIONS IN COMPLEX DISEASES

    PubMed Central

    DARABOS, CHRISTIAN; QIU, JINGYA; MOORE, JASON H.

    2015-01-01

    Complex diseases are the result of intricate interactions between genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors. In previous studies, we used epidemiological and genetic data linking environmental exposure or genetic variants to phenotypic disease to construct Human Phenotype Networks and separately analyze the effects of both environment and genetic factors on disease interactions. To better capture the intricacies of the interactions between environmental exposure and the biological pathways in complex disorders, we integrate both aspects into a single “tripartite” network. Despite extensive research, the mechanisms by which chemical agents disrupt biological pathways are still poorly understood. In this study, we use our integrated network model to identify specific biological pathway candidates possibly disrupted by environmental agents. We conjecture that a higher number of co-occurrences between an environmental substance and biological pathway pair can be associated with a higher likelihood that the substance is involved in disrupting that pathway. We validate our model by demonstrating its ability to detect known arsenic and signal transduction pathway interactions and speculate on candidate cell-cell junction organization pathways disrupted by cadmium. The validation was supported by distinct publications of cell biology and genetic studies that associated environmental exposure to pathway disruption. The integrated network approach is a novel method for detecting the biological effects of environmental exposures. A better understanding of the molecular processes associated with specific environmental exposures will help in developing targeted molecular therapies for patients who have been exposed to the toxicity of environmental chemicals. PMID:26776169

  14. Evidence from Biochemical Pathways in Favor of Unfinished Evolution Rather than Intelligent Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behrman, Edward J.; Marzluf, George A.

    2004-01-01

    An argument is made in favor of imperfect or unfinished evolution based on some metabolic pathways in which it seems that intelligent design would have done better. The case studies noted indicate the absence of highly intelligent design and are not intended as comprehensive collection but as a limited sample of inefficient situations in…

  15. Cartography of Pathway Signal Perturbations Identifies Distinct Molecular Pathomechanisms in Malignant and Chronic Lung Diseases.

    PubMed

    Arakelyan, Arsen; Nersisyan, Lilit; Petrek, Martin; Löffler-Wirth, Henry; Binder, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Lung diseases are described by a wide variety of developmental mechanisms and clinical manifestations. Accurate classification and diagnosis of lung diseases are the bases for development of effective treatments. While extensive studies are conducted toward characterization of various lung diseases at molecular level, no systematic approach has been developed so far. Here we have applied a methodology for pathway-centered mining of high throughput gene expression data to describe a wide range of lung diseases in the light of shared and specific pathway activity profiles. We have applied an algorithm combining a Pathway Signal Flow (PSF) algorithm for estimation of pathway activity deregulation states in lung diseases and malignancies, and a Self Organizing Maps algorithm for classification and clustering of the pathway activity profiles. The analysis results allowed clearly distinguish between cancer and non-cancer lung diseases. Lung cancers were characterized by pathways implicated in cell proliferation, metabolism, while non-malignant lung diseases were characterized by deregulations in pathways involved in immune/inflammatory response and fibrotic tissue remodeling. In contrast to lung malignancies, chronic lung diseases had relatively heterogeneous pathway deregulation profiles. We identified three groups of interstitial lung diseases and showed that the development of characteristic pathological processes, such as fibrosis, can be initiated by deregulations in different signaling pathways. In conclusion, this paper describes the pathobiology of lung diseases from systems viewpoint using pathway centered high-dimensional data mining approach. Our results contribute largely to current understanding of pathological events in lung cancers and non-malignant lung diseases. Moreover, this paper provides new insight into molecular mechanisms of a number of interstitial lung diseases that have been studied to a lesser extent.

  16. Cartography of Pathway Signal Perturbations Identifies Distinct Molecular Pathomechanisms in Malignant and Chronic Lung Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Arakelyan, Arsen; Nersisyan, Lilit; Petrek, Martin; Löffler-Wirth, Henry; Binder, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Lung diseases are described by a wide variety of developmental mechanisms and clinical manifestations. Accurate classification and diagnosis of lung diseases are the bases for development of effective treatments. While extensive studies are conducted toward characterization of various lung diseases at molecular level, no systematic approach has been developed so far. Here we have applied a methodology for pathway-centered mining of high throughput gene expression data to describe a wide range of lung diseases in the light of shared and specific pathway activity profiles. We have applied an algorithm combining a Pathway Signal Flow (PSF) algorithm for estimation of pathway activity deregulation states in lung diseases and malignancies, and a Self Organizing Maps algorithm for classification and clustering of the pathway activity profiles. The analysis results allowed clearly distinguish between cancer and non-cancer lung diseases. Lung cancers were characterized by pathways implicated in cell proliferation, metabolism, while non-malignant lung diseases were characterized by deregulations in pathways involved in immune/inflammatory response and fibrotic tissue remodeling. In contrast to lung malignancies, chronic lung diseases had relatively heterogeneous pathway deregulation profiles. We identified three groups of interstitial lung diseases and showed that the development of characteristic pathological processes, such as fibrosis, can be initiated by deregulations in different signaling pathways. In conclusion, this paper describes the pathobiology of lung diseases from systems viewpoint using pathway centered high-dimensional data mining approach. Our results contribute largely to current understanding of pathological events in lung cancers and non-malignant lung diseases. Moreover, this paper provides new insight into molecular mechanisms of a number of interstitial lung diseases that have been studied to a lesser extent. PMID:27200087

  17. Biochemical and structural characterization of Klebsiella pneumoniae oxamate amidohydrolase in the uric acid degradation pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, Katherine A.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2016-05-25

    HpxW from the ubiquitous pathogenKlebsiella pneumoniaeis involved in a novel uric acid degradation pathway downstream from the formation of oxalurate. Specifically, HpxW is an oxamate amidohydrolase which catalyzes the conversion of oxamate to oxalate and is a member of the Ntn-hydrolase superfamily. HpxW is autoprocessed from an inactive precursor to form a heterodimer, resulting in a 35.5 kDa α subunit and a 20 kDa β subunit. Here, the structure of HpxW is presented and the substrate complex is modeled. In addition, the steady-state kinetics of this enzyme and two active-site variants were characterized. These structural and biochemical studies provide further insight into this class of enzymes and allow a mechanism for catalysis consistent with other members of the Ntn-hydrolase superfamily to be proposed.

  18. PCOSKB: A KnowledgeBase on genes, diseases, ontology terms and biochemical pathways associated with PolyCystic Ovary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Shaini; Barai, Ram Shankar; Bhujbalrao, Rasika; Idicula-Thomas, Susan

    2016-01-04

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the major causes of female subfertility worldwide and ≈ 7-10% of women in reproductive age are affected by it. The affected individuals exhibit varying types and levels of comorbid conditions, along with the classical PCOS symptoms. Extensive studies on PCOS across diverse ethnic populations have resulted in a plethora of information on dysregulated genes, gene polymorphisms and diseases linked to PCOS. However, efforts have not been taken to collate and link these data. Our group, for the first time, has compiled PCOS-related information available through scientific literature; cross-linked it with molecular, biochemical and clinical databases and presented it as a user-friendly, web-based online knowledgebase for the benefit of the scientific and clinical community. Manually curated information on associated genes, single nucleotide polymorphisms, diseases, gene ontology terms and pathways along with supporting reference literature has been collated and included in PCOSKB (http://pcoskb.bicnirrh.res.in).

  19. Steady and transient fluid shear stress stimulate NO release in osteoblasts through distinct biochemical pathways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAllister, T. N.; Frangos, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    Fluid flow has been shown to be a potent stimulus in osteoblasts and osteocytes and may therefore play an important role in load-induced bone remodeling. The objective of this study was to investigate the characteristics of flow-activated pathways. Previously we reported that fluid flow stimulates rapid and continuous release of nitric oxide (NO) in primary rat calvarial osteoblasts. Here we demonstrate that flow-induced NO release is mediated by shear stress and that this response is distinctly biphasic. Transients in shear stress associated with the onset of flow stimulated a burst in NO production (8.2 nmol/mg of protein/h), while steady flow stimulated sustained NO production (2.2 nmol/mg of protein/h). Both G-protein inhibition and calcium chelation abolished the burst phase but had no effect on sustained production. Activation of G-proteins stimulated dose-dependent NO release in static cultures of both calvarial osteoblasts and UMR-106 osteoblast-like cells. Pertussis toxin had no effect on NO release. Calcium ionophore stimulated low levels of NO production within 15 minutes but had no effect on sustained production. Taken together, these data suggest that fluid shear stress stimulates NO release by two distinct pathways: a G-protein and calcium-dependent phase sensitive to flow transients, and a G-protein and calcium-independent pathway stimulated by sustained flow.

  20. Flexible and Versatile Strategy for the Construction of Large Biochemical Pathways.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yongbo; Andersen, Erik; Zhao, Huimin

    2016-01-15

    Synthetic pathways and circuits have been increasingly used for microbial production of fuels and chemicals. Here, we report a flexible and versatile DNA assembly strategy that allows rapid, modular, and reliable construction of biological pathways and circuits from basic genetic parts. This strategy combines the automation-friendly ligase cycling reaction (LCR) method and the high-fidelity in vivo yeast-based DNA assembly method, DNA assembler. Briefly, LCR is used to preassemble basic genetic parts into gene expression cassettes or to preassemble small parts into larger parts to reduce the number of parts, in which many basic genetic parts can be reused. With the help of specially designed unique linkers, all preassembled parts will then be directly assembled using DNA assembler to build the target constructs. As proof of concept, three plasmids with varying sizes of 13.4, 24, and 44 kb were rapidly constructed with fidelities of 100, 88, and 71%, respectively. The yeast strain harboring the constructed 44 kb plasmid was confirmed to be capable of utilizing xylose, cellobiose, and glucose to produce zeaxanthin. This strategy should be generally applicable to any custom-designed pathways, circuits, or plasmids.

  1. Biochemical and Structural Characterization of a Ureidoglycine Aminotransferase in the Klebsiella pneumoniae Uric Acid Catabolic Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    French, Jarrod B.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2010-09-03

    Many plants, fungi, and bacteria catabolize allantoin as a mechanism for nitrogen assimilation. Recent reports have shown that in plants and some bacteria the product of hydrolysis of allantoin by allantoinase is the unstable intermediate ureidoglycine. While this molecule can spontaneously decay, genetic analysis of some bacterial genomes indicates that an aminotransferase may be present in the pathway. Here we present evidence that Klebsiella pneumoniae HpxJ is an aminotransferase that preferentially converts ureidoglycine and an {alpha}-keto acid into oxalurate and the corresponding amino acid. We determined the crystal structure of HpxJ, allowing us to present an explanation for substrate specificity.

  2. A highly efficient single-step, markerless strategy for multi-copy chromosomal integration of large biochemical pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shuobo; Liang, Youyun; Zhang, Mingzi M; Ang, Ee Lui; Zhao, Huimin

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent advances in genome editing capabilities for the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the chromosomal integration of large biochemical pathways for stable industrial production remains challenging. In this work, we developed a simple platform for high-efficiency, single-step, markerless, multi-copy chromosomal integration of full biochemical pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this Di-CRISPR (delta integration CRISPR-Cas) platform based on the Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated systems (Cas), we specifically designed guide RNA sequences to target multiple delta sites in the yeast genome. The generation of double stranded breaks at the delta sites allowed simultaneous integration of multiple copies of linearized donor DNA containing large biochemical pathways. With our newly developed Di-CRISPR platform, we were able to attain highly efficient and markerless integration of large biochemical pathways and achieve an unprecedented 18-copy genomic integration of a 24 kb combined xylose utilization and (R,R)-2,3-butanediol (BDO) production pathway in a single step, thus generating a strain that was able to produce BDO directly from xylose. The simplicity and high efficiency of the Di-CRISPR platform could provide a superior alternative to high copy plasmids and would render this platform an invaluable tool for genome editing and metabolic engineering in S. cerevisiae.

  3. An Integrated Human/Murine Transcriptome and Pathway Approach To Identify Prenatal Treatments For Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Guedj, Faycal; Pennings, Jeroen LA; Massingham, Lauren J.; Wick, Heather C.; Siegel, Ashley E.; Tantravahi, Umadevi; Bianchi, Diana W.

    2016-01-01

    Anatomical and functional brain abnormalities begin during fetal life in Down syndrome (DS). We hypothesize that novel prenatal treatments can be identified by targeting signaling pathways that are consistently perturbed in cell types/tissues obtained from human fetuses with DS and mouse embryos. We analyzed transcriptome data from fetuses with trisomy 21, age and sex-matched euploid controls, and embryonic day 15.5 forebrains from Ts1Cje, Ts65Dn, and Dp16 mice. The new datasets were compared to other publicly available datasets from humans with DS. We used the human Connectivity Map (CMap) database and created a murine adaptation to identify FDA-approved drugs that can rescue affected pathways. USP16 and TTC3 were dysregulated in all affected human cells and two mouse models. DS-associated pathway abnormalities were either the result of gene dosage specific effects or the consequence of a global cell stress response with activation of compensatory mechanisms. CMap analyses identified 56 molecules with high predictive scores to rescue abnormal gene expression in both species. Our novel integrated human/murine systems biology approach identified commonly dysregulated genes and pathways. This can help to prioritize therapeutic molecules on which to further test safety and efficacy. Additional studies in human cells are ongoing prior to pre-clinical prenatal treatment in mice. PMID:27586445

  4. Redox metabolism in Trypanosoma cruzi. Biochemical characterization of dithiol glutaredoxin dependent cellular pathways.

    PubMed

    Márquez, Vanina E; Arias, Diego G; Chiribao, Maria L; Faral-Tello, Paula; Robello, Carlos; Iglesias, Alberto A; Guerrero, Sergio A

    2014-11-01

    In Trypanosoma cruzi, the modification of thiols by glutathionylation-deglutathionylation and its potential relation to protective, regulatory or signaling functions have been scarcely explored. Herein we characterize a dithiolic glutaredoxin (TcrGrx), a redox protein with deglutathionylating activity, having potential functionality to control intracellular homeostasis of protein and non-protein thiols. The catalytic mechanism followed by TcrGrx was found dependent on thiol concentration. Results suggest that TcrGrx operates as a dithiolic or a monothiolic Grx, depending on GSH concentration. TcrGrx functionality to mediate reduction of protein and non-protein disulfides was studied. TcrGrx showed a preference for glutathionylated substrates respect to protein disulfides. From in vivo assays involving TcrGrx overexpressing parasites, we observed the contribution of the protein to increase the general resistance against oxidative damage and intracellular replication of the amastigote stage. Also, studies performed with epimastigotes overexpressing TcrGrx strongly suggest the involvement of the protein in a cellular pathway connecting an apoptotic stimulus and apoptotic-like cell death. Novel information is presented about the participation of this glutaredoxin not only in redox metabolism but also in redox signaling pathways in T. cruzi. The influence of TcrGrx in several parasite physiological processes suggests novel insights about the protein involvement in redox signaling.

  5. Tungsten effects on phosphate-dependent biochemical pathways are species and liver cell line dependent.

    PubMed

    Johnson, David R; Ang, Chooyaw; Bednar, Anthony J; Inouye, Laura S

    2010-08-01

    Tungsten, in the form of tungstate, polymerizes with phosphate, and as extensive polymerization occurs, cellular phosphorylation and dephosphorylation reactions may be disrupted, resulting in negative effects on cellular functions. A series of studies were conducted to evaluate the effect of tungsten on several phosphate-dependent intracellular functions, including energy cycling (ATP), regulation of enzyme activity (cytosolic protein tyrosine kinase [cytPTK] and tyrosine phosphatase), and intracellular secondary messengers (cyclic adenosine monophosphate [cAMP]). Rat noncancerous hepatocyte (Clone-9), rat cancerous hepatocyte (H4IIE), and human cancerous hepatocyte (HepG2) cells were exposed to 1-1000 mg/l tungsten (in the form of sodium tungstate) for 24 h, lysed, and analyzed for the above biochemical parameters. Cellular ATP levels were not significantly affected in any cell line. After 4 h, tungsten significantly decreased cytPTK activity in Clone-9 cells at >or= 18 mg/l, had no effect in H4IIE cells, and significantly increased cytPTK activity by 70% in HepG2 cells at >or= 2 mg/l. CytPTK displayed a slight hormetic response to tungsten after 24-h exposure yet returned to normal after 48-h exposure. Tungsten significantly increased cAMP by over 60% in Clone-9 cells at >or= 100 mg/l, significantly increased cAMP in H4IIE cells at only 100 mg/l, and significantly increased cAMP in HepG2 cells between 1-100 mg/l but at much more modest levels (8-20%). In conclusion, these data indicate that tungsten produces complex results that must be carefully interpreted in the context of their respective animal models, as well as the phenotype of the cell lines (i.e., normal vs. cancerous).

  6. Functional Complementation Analysis (FCA): A Laboratory Exercise Designed and Implemented to Supplement the Teaching of Biochemical Pathways.

    PubMed

    Hudson, André O; Harkness, Taylor C M; Savka, Michael A

    2016-06-24

    Functional complementation assay (FCA) is an in vivo assay that is widely used to elucidate the function/role of genes/enzymes. This technique is very common in biochemistry, genetics and many other disciplines. A comprehensive overview of the technique to supplement the teaching of biochemical pathways pertaining to amino acids, peptidoglycan and the bacterial stringent response is reported in this manuscript. Two cDNAs from the model plant organism Arabidopsis thaliana that are involved in the metabolism of lysine (L,L-diaminopimelate aminotransferase (dapL) and tyrosine aminotransferase (tyrB) involved in the metabolism of tyrosine and phenylalanine are highlighted. In addition, the bacterial peptidoglycan anabolic pathway is highlighted through the analysis of the UDP-N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanyl-D-glutamate-meso-2,6-diaminopimelate ligase (murE) gene from the bacterium Verrucomicrobium spinosum involved in the cross-linking of peptidoglycan. The bacterial stringent response is also reported through the analysis of the rsh (relA/spoT homolog) bifunctional gene responsible for a hyper-mucoid phenotype in the bacterium Novosphingobium sp. Four examples of FCA are presented. The video will focus on three of them, namely lysine, peptidoglycan and the stringent response.

  7. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of the Early and Late Enzymes in the Lignin β-Aryl Ether Cleavage Pathway from Sphingobium sp. SYK-6*

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Jose Henrique; Heins, Richard A.; Gall, Daniel L.; McAndrew, Ryan P.; Deng, Kai; Holland, Keefe C.; Donohue, Timothy J.; Noguera, Daniel R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Sale, Kenneth L.; Ralph, John; Adams, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    There has been great progress in the development of technology for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to sugars and subsequent fermentation to fuels. However, plant lignin remains an untapped source of materials for production of fuels or high value chemicals. Biological cleavage of lignin has been well characterized in fungi, in which enzymes that create free radical intermediates are used to degrade this material. In contrast, a catabolic pathway for the stereospecific cleavage of β-aryl ether units that are found in lignin has been identified in Sphingobium sp. SYK-6 bacteria. β-Aryl ether units are typically abundant in lignin, corresponding to 50–70% of all of the intermonomer linkages. Consequently, a comprehensive understanding of enzymatic β-aryl ether (β-ether) cleavage is important for future efforts to biologically process lignin and its breakdown products. The crystal structures and biochemical characterization of the NAD-dependent dehydrogenases (LigD, LigO, and LigL) and the glutathione-dependent lyase LigG provide new insights into the early and late enzymes in the β-ether degradation pathway. We present detailed information on the cofactor and substrate binding sites and on the catalytic mechanisms of these enzymes, comparing them with other known members of their respective families. Information on the Lig enzymes provides new insight into their catalysis mechanisms and can inform future strategies for using aromatic oligomers derived from plant lignin as a source of valuable aromatic compounds for biofuels and other bioproducts. PMID:26940872

  8. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of the Early and Late Enzymes in the Lignin β-Aryl Ether Cleavage Pathway from Sphingobium sp. SYK-6.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Jose Henrique; Heins, Richard A; Gall, Daniel L; McAndrew, Ryan P; Deng, Kai; Holland, Keefe C; Donohue, Timothy J; Noguera, Daniel R; Simmons, Blake A; Sale, Kenneth L; Ralph, John; Adams, Paul D

    2016-05-06

    There has been great progress in the development of technology for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to sugars and subsequent fermentation to fuels. However, plant lignin remains an untapped source of materials for production of fuels or high value chemicals. Biological cleavage of lignin has been well characterized in fungi, in which enzymes that create free radical intermediates are used to degrade this material. In contrast, a catabolic pathway for the stereospecific cleavage of β-aryl ether units that are found in lignin has been identified in Sphingobium sp. SYK-6 bacteria. β-Aryl ether units are typically abundant in lignin, corresponding to 50-70% of all of the intermonomer linkages. Consequently, a comprehensive understanding of enzymatic β-aryl ether (β-ether) cleavage is important for future efforts to biologically process lignin and its breakdown products. The crystal structures and biochemical characterization of the NAD-dependent dehydrogenases (LigD, LigO, and LigL) and the glutathione-dependent lyase LigG provide new insights into the early and late enzymes in the β-ether degradation pathway. We present detailed information on the cofactor and substrate binding sites and on the catalytic mechanisms of these enzymes, comparing them with other known members of their respective families. Information on the Lig enzymes provides new insight into their catalysis mechanisms and can inform future strategies for using aromatic oligomers derived from plant lignin as a source of valuable aromatic compounds for biofuels and other bioproducts.

  9. Presenilin-Based Genetic Screens in Drosophila melanogaster Identify Novel Notch Pathway Modifiers

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, Matt B.; Parks, Annette L.; Ruddy, David A.; Tiong, Stanley Y. K.; Esengil, Hanife; Phan, Alexander C.; Philandrinos, Panos; Winter, Christopher G.; Chatterjee, Runa; Huppert, Kari; Fisher, William W.; L'Archeveque, Lynn; Mapa, Felipa A.; Woo, Wendy; Ellis, Michael C.; Curtis, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Presenilin is the enzymatic component of γ-secretase, a multisubunit intramembrane protease that processes several transmembrane receptors, such as the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Mutations in human Presenilins lead to altered APP cleavage and early-onset Alzheimer's disease. Presenilins also play an essential role in Notch receptor cleavage and signaling. The Notch pathway is a highly conserved signaling pathway that functions during the development of multicellular organisms, including vertebrates, Drosophila, and C. elegans. Recent studies have shown that Notch signaling is sensitive to perturbations in subcellular trafficking, although the specific mechanisms are largely unknown. To identify genes that regulate Notch pathway function, we have performed two genetic screens in Drosophila for modifiers of Presenilin-dependent Notch phenotypes. We describe here the cloning and identification of 19 modifiers, including nicastrin and several genes with previously undescribed involvement in Notch biology. The predicted functions of these newly identified genes are consistent with extracellular matrix and vesicular trafficking mechanisms in Presenilin and Notch pathway regulation and suggest a novel role for γ-tubulin in the pathway. PMID:16415372

  10. Presenilin-based genetic screens in Drosophila melanogaster identify novel notch pathway modifiers.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Matt B; Parks, Annette L; Ruddy, David A; Tiong, Stanley Y K; Esengil, Hanife; Phan, Alexander C; Philandrinos, Panos; Winter, Christopher G; Chatterjee, Runa; Huppert, Kari; Fisher, William W; L'Archeveque, Lynn; Mapa, Felipa A; Woo, Wendy; Ellis, Michael C; Curtis, Daniel

    2006-04-01

    Presenilin is the enzymatic component of gamma-secretase, a multisubunit intramembrane protease that processes several transmembrane receptors, such as the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Mutations in human Presenilins lead to altered APP cleavage and early-onset Alzheimer's disease. Presenilins also play an essential role in Notch receptor cleavage and signaling. The Notch pathway is a highly conserved signaling pathway that functions during the development of multicellular organisms, including vertebrates, Drosophila, and C. elegans. Recent studies have shown that Notch signaling is sensitive to perturbations in subcellular trafficking, although the specific mechanisms are largely unknown. To identify genes that regulate Notch pathway function, we have performed two genetic screens in Drosophila for modifiers of Presenilin-dependent Notch phenotypes. We describe here the cloning and identification of 19 modifiers, including nicastrin and several genes with previously undescribed involvement in Notch biology. The predicted functions of these newly identified genes are consistent with extracellular matrix and vesicular trafficking mechanisms in Presenilin and Notch pathway regulation and suggest a novel role for gamma-tubulin in the pathway.

  11. Physiological and biochemical characteristics of adrenergic receptors and pathways in brown adipocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horwitz, B. A.

    1975-01-01

    Mechanisms involved in the thermogenic response of brown adipose tissue (BAT) to sympathetic nervous stimulation (e.g., by cold exposure) and to norepinephrine (NE) release are investigated. Three effects appear to play a role in the increased oxygen consumption (and heat production) of the adipocytes: increased membrane permeability, activation of the beta-adrenergic pathway, and enhancement of Na(+)/K(+) membrane pump activity. Increased passive influx of Na(+) and efflux of K(+) due to greater permeability raise the energy demands of the Na/K pump; the pump is also stimulated by increased cyclic AMP synthesis resulting from activation by NE of membrane-bound adenyl cyclase. Studies with inhibitors such as propanolol, phentolamine, and ouabain support this hypothesis.

  12. Biochemical characterization of GDP-L-fucose de novo synthesis pathway in fungus Mortierella alpina

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Yan; Perepelov, Andrei V.; Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Hao; Knirel, Yuriy A.; Wang, Lei; Chen, Wei

    2010-01-22

    Mortierella alpina is a filamentous fungus commonly found in soil, which is able to produce large amount of polyunsaturated fatty acids. L-Fucose is an important sugar found in a diverse range of organisms, playing a variety of biological roles. In this study, we characterized the de novo biosynthetic pathway of GDP-L-fucose (the nucleotide-activated form of L-fucose) in M. alpina. Genes encoding GDP-D-mannose 4,6-dehydratase (GMD) and GDP-keto-6-deoxymannose 3,5-epimerase/4-reductase (GMER) were expressed heterologously in Escherichia coli. The recombinant enzymes were produced as His-tagged fusion proteins. Conversion of GDP-mannose to GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy mannose by GMD and GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy mannose to GDP-L-fucose by GMER were analyzed by capillary electrophoresis, electro-spray ionization-mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The k{sub m} values of GMD for GDP-mannose and GMER for GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy mannose were determined to be 0.77 mM and 1.047 mM, respectively. Both NADH and NADPH may be used by GMER as the coenzyme. The optimum temperature and pH were determined to be 37 {sup o}C and pH 9.0 (GMD) or pH 7.0 (GMER). Divalent cations are not required for GMD and GMER activity, and the activities of both enzymes may be enhanced by DTT. To our knowledge this is the first report on the characterization of GDP-L-fucose biosynthetic pathway in fungi.

  13. A misexpression screen identifies genes that can modulate RAS1 pathway signaling in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, A M; Rubin, G M

    2000-01-01

    Differentiation of the R7 photoreceptor cell is dependent on the Sevenless receptor tyrosine kinase, which activates the RAS1/mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling cascade. Kinase suppressor of Ras (KSR) functions genetically downstream of RAS1 in this signal transduction cascade. Expression of dominant-negative KSR (KDN) in the developing eye blocks RAS pathway signaling, prevents R7 cell differentiation, and causes a rough eye phenotype. To identify genes that modulate RAS signaling, we screened for genes that alter RAS1/KSR signaling efficiency when misexpressed. In this screen, we recovered three known genes, Lk6, misshapen, and Akap200. We also identified seven previously undescribed genes; one encodes a novel rel domain member of the NFAT family, and six encode novel proteins. These genes may represent new components of the RAS pathway or components of other signaling pathways that can modulate signaling by RAS. We discuss the utility of gain-of-function screens in identifying new components of signaling pathways in Drosophila. PMID:11063696

  14. Hydrograph Separations can Identify Contaminant-Specific Pathways for Conservation Targeting in a Tile-Drained Watershed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water quality issues continue to vex agriculture. Understanding contaminant-specific pathways could help clarify effective water quality management strategies in watersheds. Hypothesis: If conducted at nested scales, hydrograph separation techniques can identify contaminant-specific pathways that co...

  15. Evolutionary, computational, and biochemical studies of the salicylaldehyde dehydrogenases in the naphthalene degradation pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Baolei; Jia, Xiaomeng; Hyun Kim, Kyung; Ji Pu, Zhong; Kang, Myung-Suk; Ok Jeon, Che

    2017-01-01

    Salicylaldehyde (SAL) dehydrogenase (SALD) is responsible for the oxidation of SAL to salicylate using nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) as a cofactor in the naphthalene degradation pathway. We report the use of a protein sequence similarity network to make functional inferences about SALDs. Network and phylogenetic analyses indicated that SALDs and the homologues are present in bacteria and fungi. The key residues in SALDs were analyzed by evolutionary methods and a molecular simulation analysis. The results showed that the catalytic residue is most highly conserved, followed by the residues binding NAD+ and then the residues binding SAL. A molecular simulation analysis demonstrated the binding energies of the amino acids to NAD+ and/or SAL and showed that a conformational change is induced by binding. A SALD from Alteromonas naphthalenivorans (SALDan) that undergoes trimeric oligomerization was characterized enzymatically. The results showed that SALDan could catalyze the oxidation of a variety of aromatic aldehydes. Site-directed mutagenesis of selected residues binding NAD+ and/or SAL affected the enzyme’s catalytic efficiency, but did not eliminate catalysis. Finally, the relationships among the evolution, catalytic mechanism, and functions of SALD are discussed. Taken together, this study provides an expanded understanding of the evolution, functions, and catalytic mechanism of SALD. PMID:28233868

  16. Systematic identifiability testing for unambiguous mechanistic modeling – application to JAK-STAT, MAP kinase, and NF-κB signaling pathway models

    PubMed Central

    Quaiser, Tom; Mönnigmann, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Background When creating mechanistic mathematical models for biological signaling processes it is tempting to include as many known biochemical interactions into one large model as possible. For the JAK-STAT, MAP kinase, and NF-κB pathways a lot of biological insight is available, and as a consequence, large mathematical models have emerged. For large models the question arises whether unknown model parameters can uniquely be determined by parameter estimation from measured data. Systematic approaches to answering this question are indispensable since the uniqueness of model parameter values is essential for predictive mechanistic modeling. Results We propose an eigenvalue based method for efficiently testing identifiability of large ordinary differential models and compare this approach to three existing ones. The methods are benchmarked by applying them to models of the signaling pathways mentioned above. In all cases the eigenvalue method proposed here and the orthogonal method find the largest set of identifiable parameters, thus clearly outperforming the other approaches. The identifiability analysis shows that the pathway models are not identifiable, even under the strong assumption that all system state variables are measurable. We demonstrate how the results of the identifiability analysis can be used for model simplification. Conclusion While it has undoubtedly contributed to recent advances in systems biology, mechanistic modeling by itself does not guarantee unambiguous descriptions of biological processes. We show that some recent signal transduction pathway models have reached a level of detail that is not warranted. Rigorous identifiability tests reveal that even if highly idealized experiments could be carried out to measure all state variables of these signaling pathways, some unknown parameters could still not be estimated. The identifiability tests therefore show that the level of detail of the investigated models is too high in principle, not

  17. Cerebral biochemical pathways in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and adjuvant arthritis: a comparative metabolomic study.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Norbert W; Fernandez, Carla; Pellissier, Jean-François; Cozzone, Patrick J; Béraud, Evelyne

    2013-01-01

    Many diseases, including brain disorders, are associated with perturbations of tissue metabolism. However, an often overlooked issue is the impact that inflammations outside the brain may have on brain metabolism. Our main goal was to study similarities and differences between brain metabolite profiles of animals suffering from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and adjuvant arthritis (AA) in Lewis rat models. Our principal objective was the determination of molecular protagonists involved in the metabolism underlying these diseases. EAE was induced by intraplantar injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) and spinal-cord homogenate (SC-H), whereas AA was induced by CFA only. Naive rats served as controls (n = 9 for each group). Two weeks after inoculation, animals were sacrificed, and brains were removed and processed for metabolomic analysis by NMR spectroscopy or for immunohistochemistry. Interestingly, both inflammatory diseases caused similar, though not identical, changes in metabolites involved in regulation of brain cell size and membrane production: among the osmolytes, taurine and the neuronal marker, N-acetylaspartate, were decreased, and the astrocyte marker, myo-inositol, slightly increased in both inoculated groups compared with controls. Also ethanolamine-containing phospholipids, sources of inflammatory agents, and several glycolytic metabolites were increased in both inoculated groups. By contrast, the amino acids, aspartate and isoleucine, were less concentrated in CFA/SC-H and control vs. CFA rats. Our results suggest that inflammatory brain metabolite profiles may indicate the existence of either cerebral (EAE) or extra-cerebral (AA) inflammation. These inflammatory processes may act through distinct pathways that converge toward similar brain metabolic profiles. Our findings open new avenues for future studies aimed at demonstrating whether brain metabolic effects provoked by AA are pain/stress-mediated and/or due to the

  18. Molecular and biochemical characterization of two P450 enzymes in the ecdysteroidogenic pathway of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Warren, James T; Petryk, Anna; Marques, Guillermo; Jarcho, Michael; Parvy, Jean-Philippe; Dauphin-Villemant, Chantal; O'Connor, Michael B; Gilbert, Lawrence I

    2002-08-20

    Five different enzymatic activities, catalyzed by both microsomal and mitochondrial cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYPs), are strongly implicated in the biosynthesis of ecdysone (E) from cholesterol. However, none of these enzymes have been characterized completely. The present data show that the wild-type genes of two members of the Halloween family of embryonic lethals, disembodied (dib) and shadow (sad), code for mitochondrial cytochromes P450 that mediate the last two hydroxylation reactions in the ecdysteroidogenic pathway in Drosophila, namely the C22- and C2-hydroxylases. When sad (CYP315A1) is transfected into Drosophila S2 cells, the cells metabolize 2-deoxyecdysone (2dE) to E and the [3H]ketotriol (2,22-dideoxyecdysone) to 22-deoxyecdysone. In contrast, dib (CYP302A1) is responsible for the conversion of the [3H]ketotriol to [3H]2dE. When cells are transfected with both dib and sad, they metabolize the [3H]ketotriol to [3H]E in high yield. The expression of sad and dib is concentrated within the individual segments of the developing epidermis when there is a surge of ecdysteroid midway through embryogenesis. This result occurs before the ring gland has developed and suggests that the embryonic epidermis is a site of ecdysteroid biosynthesis. This pattern then diminishes, and, during late embryogenesis, expression of both genes is concentrated in the prothoracic gland cells of the developing ring gland. Expression of dib and sad continues to be localized in this endocrine compartment during larval development, being maximal in both the late second and third instar larvae, about the time of the premolt peaks in the ecdysteroid titer.

  19. Molecular and biochemical characterization of two P450 enzymes in the ecdysteroidogenic pathway of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Warren, James T.; Petryk, Anna; Marqués, Guillermo; Jarcho, Michael; Parvy, Jean-Philippe; Dauphin-Villemant, Chantal; O'Connor, Michael B.; Gilbert, Lawrence I.

    2002-01-01

    Five different enzymatic activities, catalyzed by both microsomal and mitochondrial cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYPs), are strongly implicated in the biosynthesis of ecdysone (E) from cholesterol. However, none of these enzymes have been characterized completely. The present data show that the wild-type genes of two members of the Halloween family of embryonic lethals, disembodied (dib) and shadow (sad), code for mitochondrial cytochromes P450 that mediate the last two hydroxylation reactions in the ecdysteroidogenic pathway in Drosophila, namely the C22- and C2-hydroxylases. When sad (CYP315A1) is transfected into Drosophila S2 cells, the cells metabolize 2-deoxyecdysone (2dE) to E and the [3H]ketotriol (2,22-dideoxyecdysone) to 22-deoxyecdysone. In contrast, dib (CYP302A1) is responsible for the conversion of the [3H]ketotriol to [3H]2dE. When cells are transfected with both dib and sad, they metabolize the [3H]ketotriol to [3H]E in high yield. The expression of sad and dib is concentrated within the individual segments of the developing epidermis when there is a surge of ecdysteroid midway through embryogenesis. This result occurs before the ring gland has developed and suggests that the embryonic epidermis is a site of ecdysteroid biosynthesis. This pattern then diminishes, and, during late embryogenesis, expression of both genes is concentrated in the prothoracic gland cells of the developing ring gland. Expression of dib and sad continues to be localized in this endocrine compartment during larval development, being maximal in both the late second and third instar larvae, about the time of the premolt peaks in the ecdysteroid titer. PMID:12177427

  20. Identifying drug effects via pathway alterations using an integer linear programming optimization formulation on phosphoproteomic data.

    PubMed

    Mitsos, Alexander; Melas, Ioannis N; Siminelakis, Paraskeuas; Chairakaki, Aikaterini D; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Alexopoulos, Leonidas G

    2009-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of cell function and drug action is a major endeavor in the pharmaceutical industry. Drug effects are governed by the intrinsic properties of the drug (i.e., selectivity and potency) and the specific signaling transduction network of the host (i.e., normal vs. diseased cells). Here, we describe an unbiased, phosphoproteomic-based approach to identify drug effects by monitoring drug-induced topology alterations. With our proposed method, drug effects are investigated under diverse stimulations of the signaling network. Starting with a generic pathway made of logical gates, we build a cell-type specific map by constraining it to fit 13 key phopshoprotein signals under 55 experimental conditions. Fitting is performed via an Integer Linear Program (ILP) formulation and solution by standard ILP solvers; a procedure that drastically outperforms previous fitting schemes. Then, knowing the cell's topology, we monitor the same key phosphoprotein signals under the presence of drug and we re-optimize the specific map to reveal drug-induced topology alterations. To prove our case, we make a topology for the hepatocytic cell-line HepG2 and we evaluate the effects of 4 drugs: 3 selective inhibitors for the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) and a non-selective drug. We confirm effects easily predictable from the drugs' main target (i.e., EGFR inhibitors blocks the EGFR pathway) but we also uncover unanticipated effects due to either drug promiscuity or the cell's specific topology. An interesting finding is that the selective EGFR inhibitor Gefitinib inhibits signaling downstream the Interleukin-1alpha (IL1alpha) pathway; an effect that cannot be extracted from binding affinity-based approaches. Our method represents an unbiased approach to identify drug effects on small to medium size pathways which is scalable to larger topologies with any type of signaling interventions (small molecules, RNAi, etc). The method can reveal drug effects on

  1. Identifiability and estimation of multiple transmission pathways in cholera and waterborne disease.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, Marisa C; Robertson, Suzanne L; Tien, Joseph H

    2013-05-07

    Cholera and many waterborne diseases exhibit multiple characteristic timescales or pathways of infection, which can be modeled as direct and indirect transmission. A major public health issue for waterborne diseases involves understanding the modes of transmission in order to improve control and prevention strategies. An important epidemiological question is: given data for an outbreak, can we determine the role and relative importance of direct vs. environmental/waterborne routes of transmission? We examine whether parameters for a differential equation model of waterborne disease transmission dynamics can be identified, both in the ideal setting of noise-free data (structural identifiability) and in the more realistic setting in the presence of noise (practical identifiability). We used a differential algebra approach together with several numerical approaches, with a particular emphasis on identifiability of the transmission rates. To examine these issues in a practical public health context, we apply the model to a recent cholera outbreak in Angola (2006). Our results show that the model parameters-including both water and person-to-person transmission routes-are globally structurally identifiable, although they become unidentifiable when the environmental transmission timescale is fast. Even for water dynamics within the identifiable range, when noisy data are considered, only a combination of the water transmission parameters can practically be estimated. This makes the waterborne transmission parameters difficult to estimate, leading to inaccurate estimates of important epidemiological parameters such as the basic reproduction number (R0). However, measurements of pathogen persistence time in environmental water sources or measurements of pathogen concentration in the water can improve model identifiability and allow for more accurate estimation of waterborne transmission pathway parameters as well as R0. Parameter estimates for the Angola outbreak suggest

  2. Knowledge-Assisted Approach to Identify Pathways with Differential Dependencies | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    We have previously developed a statistical method to identify gene sets enriched with condition-specific genetic dependencies. The method constructs gene dependency networks from bootstrapped samples in one condition and computes the divergence between distributions of network likelihood scores from different conditions. It was shown to be capable of sensitive and specific identification of pathways with phenotype-specific dysregulation, i.e., rewiring of dependencies between genes in different conditions.

  3. Transcriptome analysis identifies pathways associated with enhanced maternal performance in QSi5 mice

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Palaniappan; Martin, Ian C; Gardiner-Garden, Margaret; Thomson, Peter C; Taylor, Rosanne M; Ormandy, Christopher J; Moran, Christopher; Williamson, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Background Highly fecund mouse strains provide an ideal model to understand the factors affecting maternal performance. The QSi5 inbred strain of mice was selected for high fecundity and low inter-litter interval, and is very successful at weaning large numbers of offspring when compared to other inbred strains. Results Post-natal pup weight gain was used to estimate mammary gland output and to compare the performance of QSi5 mice to CBA mice. Cumulative litter weights and individual pup weight gain was significantly higher throughout the first eight days of lactation in QSi5 mice compared to CBA mice. Morphometric analysis of mammary glands during pregnancy in QSi5 mice revealed a 150 percent greater ductal side branching compared to CBA mice (P < 0.001). Ontology and pathway classification of transcript profiles from the two strains identified an enrichment of genes involved in a number of pathways, including the MAPK, tight junction, insulin signalling and Wnt signalling. Eleven of these genes, including six genes from the MAPK signalling pathway, were identified as associated with postnatal growth. Further, positive mediators of Wnt signalling, including Wnt4, Csnk2a1 and Smad4, were over-represented in the QSi5 strain profile, while negative regulators, including Dkkl1, Ppp2r1a and Nlk, were under-represented. These findings are consistent with the role of Wnt and MAPK signalling pathway in ductal morphogenesis and lobuloalveolar development suggesting enhanced activity in QSi5 mice. A similar pattern of phenotype concordance was seen amongst 12 genes from the tight junction pathway, but a pattern did not emerge from the insulin signalling genes. Amongst a group of differentially expressed imprinted genes, two maternal imprinted genes that suppress growth induced via the IGF signalling pathway, Grb10 and Igf2r, were under-represented in QSi5 mice. Whereas Peg3 and Plagl1, both paternally imprinted genes that enhance neonatal growth, were over-represented in

  4. A genome-wide RNA interference screen identifies two novel components of the metazoan secretory pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wendler, Franz; Gillingham, Alison K; Sinka, Rita; Rosa-Ferreira, Cláudia; Gordon, David E; Franch-Marro, Xavier; Peden, Andrew A; Vincent, Jean-Paul; Munro, Sean

    2010-01-01

    Genetic screens in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have identified many proteins involved in the secretory pathway, most of which have orthologues in higher eukaryotes. To investigate whether there are additional proteins that are required for secretion in metazoans but are absent from yeast, we used genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) to look for genes required for secretion of recombinant luciferase from Drosophila S2 cells. This identified two novel components of the secretory pathway that are conserved from humans to plants. Gryzun is distantly related to, but distinct from, the Trs130 subunit of the TRAPP complex but is absent from S. cerevisiae. RNAi of human Gryzun (C4orf41) blocks Golgi exit. Kish is a small membrane protein with a previously uncharacterised orthologue in yeast. The screen also identified Drosophila orthologues of almost 60% of the yeast genes essential for secretion. Given this coverage, the small number of novel components suggests that contrary to previous indications the number of essential core components of the secretory pathway is not much greater in metazoans than in yeasts. PMID:19942856

  5. Biochemical Analysis of the Biosynthetic Pathway of an Anticancer Tetracycline SF2575

    PubMed Central

    Pickens, Lauren B.; Kim, Woncheol; Wang, Peng; Zhou, Hui; Watanabe, Kenji; Gomi, Shuichi; Tang, Yi

    2009-01-01

    SF2575 1 is a tetracycline polyketide produced by Streptomyces sp. SF2575 and displays exceptionally potent anticancer activity towards a broad range of cancer cell lines. The structure of SF2575 is characterized by a highly substituted tetracycline aglycon. The modifications include methylation of the C-6 and C-12a hydroxyl groups, acylation of the 4-(S)-hydroxyl with salicylic acid, C-glycosylation of the C-9 of the D-ring with d-olivose and further acylation of the C4′-hydroxyl of d-olivose with the unusual angelic acid. Understanding the biosynthesis of SF2575 can therefore expand the repertoire of enzymes that can modify tetracyclines, and facilitate engineered biosynthesis of SF2575 analogs. In this study, we identified, sequenced and functionally analyzed the ssf biosynthetic gene cluster which contains 40 putative open reading frames. Genes encoding enzymes that can assemble the tetracycline aglycon, as well as installing these unique structural features are found in the gene cluster. Biosynthetic intermediates were isolated from the SF2575 culture extract to suggest the order of pendant groups addition is C-9 glycosylation, C-4 salicylation and O-4′ angelycylation. Using in vitro assays, two enzymes that are responsible for C-4 acylation of salicylic acid were identified. These enzymes include an ATP-dependent salicylyl-CoA ligase SsfL1 and a putative GDSL family acyltransferase SsfX3, both of which were shown to have relaxed substrate specificity towards substituted benzoic acids. Since the salicylic acid moiety is critically important for the anticancer properties of SF2575, verification of the activities of SsfL1 and SsfX3 sets the stage for biosynthetic modification of the C-4 group towards structural-activity relationship studies of SF2575. Using heterologous biosynthesis in Streptomyces lividans, we also determined that biosynthesis of the SF2575 tetracycline aglycon 8 parallels that of oxytetracycline 4 and diverges after the assembly of 4-keto

  6. Identifying low variance pathways for free energy calculations of molecular transformations in solution phase.

    PubMed

    Pham, Tri T; Shirts, Michael R

    2011-07-21

    Improving the efficiency of free energy calculations is important for many biological and materials design applications, such as protein-ligand binding affinities in drug design, partitioning between immiscible liquids, and determining molecular association in soft materials. We show that for any pair potential, moderately accurate estimation of the radial distribution function for a solute molecule is sufficient to accurately estimate the statistical variance of a sampling along a free energy pathway. This allows inexpensive analytical identification of low statistical error free energy pathways. We employ a variety of methods to estimate the radial distribution function (RDF) and find that the computationally cheap two-body "dilute gas" limit performs as well or better than 3D-RISM theory and other approximations for identifying low variance free energy pathways. With a RDF estimate in hand, we can search for pairwise interaction potentials that produce low variance. We give an example of a search minimizing statistical variance of solvation free energy over the entire parameter space of a generalized "soft core" potential. The free energy pathway arising from this optimization procedure has lower curvature in the variance and reduces the total variance by at least 50% compared to the traditional soft core solvation pathway. We also demonstrate that this optimized pathway allows free energies to be estimated with fewer intermediate states due to its low curvature. This free energy variance optimization technique is generalizable to solvation in any homogeneous fluid and for any type of pairwise potential and can be performed in minutes to hours, depending on the method used to estimate g(r).

  7. PCOSKB: A KnowledgeBase on genes, diseases, ontology terms and biochemical pathways associated with PolyCystic Ovary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Shaini; Barai, Ram Shankar; Bhujbalrao, Rasika; Idicula-Thomas, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the major causes of female subfertility worldwide and ≈7–10% of women in reproductive age are affected by it. The affected individuals exhibit varying types and levels of comorbid conditions, along with the classical PCOS symptoms. Extensive studies on PCOS across diverse ethnic populations have resulted in a plethora of information on dysregulated genes, gene polymorphisms and diseases linked to PCOS. However, efforts have not been taken to collate and link these data. Our group, for the first time, has compiled PCOS-related information available through scientific literature; cross-linked it with molecular, biochemical and clinical databases and presented it as a user-friendly, web-based online knowledgebase for the benefit of the scientific and clinical community. Manually curated information on associated genes, single nucleotide polymorphisms, diseases, gene ontology terms and pathways along with supporting reference literature has been collated and included in PCOSKB (http://pcoskb.bicnirrh.res.in). PMID:26578565

  8. Elements of the nitric oxide/cGMP pathway expressed in cerebellar granule cells: biochemical and functional characterisation.

    PubMed

    Jurado, Sandra; Sánchez-Prieto, José; Torres, Magdalena

    2004-11-01

    It is known that the nitric oxide (NO)/cGMP pathway affects neuronal development and the expression of the different proteins is developmentally dependent in several brain areas. However, so far there are no data on the expression of the proteins involved in this signalling system during the development of the cerebellar granule cell, one of the most widely used models of neuronal development. This study was accordingly designed to analyse the developmental regulation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), soluble guanylyl cyclase subunits (alpha1, alpha2 and beta1) and cGMP-dependent protein kinases (cGK I and cGK II) in cerebellar granule cells through real time-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting. We were able to detect guanylyl cyclase subunits and cGK I and cGK II in cerebellar granule cells at every stage of development examined (cells freshly isolated from 7-day-old rat pups, and cells cultured for 7 days or 14 days). Expression levels, nevertheless, varied significantly at each stage. nNOS, alpha2 and beta1 and cGK II levels increased during granule cell development, while alpha1 and cGK I showed an opposite behaviour pattern; the levels of these latter proteins diminished as the cells matured. The functionality of this pathway was assessed by stimulating cells kept in culture for 7 days with DEA/NO or with N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA). Cells responded by increasing intracellular cGMP and activating cGMP-dependent protein kinase activity, which effectively phosphorylated two well-known substrates of this activity, the vasodilator stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) and the cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). In summary, through both functional and biochemical tests, this is the first demonstration of a complete NO/cGMP signalling transduction pathway in cerebellar granule cells. Our results also indicate the developmental regulation of the proteins in this system.

  9. A new screening pathway for identifying asymptomatic patients using dental panoramic radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Tatsuro; Matsumoto, Takuya; Sawagashira, Tsuyoshi; Tagami, Motoki; Katsumata, Akitoshi; Hayashi, Yoshinori; Muramatsu, Chisako; Zhou, Xiangrong; Iida, Yukihiro; Matsuoka, Masato; Katagi, Kiyoji; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2012-03-01

    To identify asymptomatic patients is the challenging task and the essential first step in diagnosis. Findings of dental panoramic radiographs include not only dental conditions but also radiographic signs that are suggestive of possible systemic diseases such as osteoporosis, arteriosclerosis, and maxillary sinusitis. Detection of such signs on panoramic radiographs has a potential to provide supplemental benefits for patients. However, it is not easy for general dental practitioners to pay careful attention to such signs. We addressed the development of a computer-aided detection (CAD) system that detects radiographic signs of pathology on panoramic images, and the design of the framework of new screening pathway by cooperation of dentists and our CAD system. The performance evaluation of our CAD system showed the sensitivity and specificity in the identification of osteoporotic patients were 92.6 % and 100 %, respectively, and those of the maxillary sinus abnormality were 89.6 % and 73.6 %, respectively. The detection rate of carotid artery calcifications that suggests the need for further medical evaluation was approximately 93.6 % with 4.4 false-positives per image. To validate the utility of the new screening pathway, preliminary clinical trials by using our CAD system were conducted. To date, 223 panoramic images were processed and 4 asymptomatic patients with suspected osteoporosis, 7 asymptomatic patients with suspected calcifications, and 40 asymptomatic patients with suspected maxillary sinusitis were detected in our initial trial. It was suggested that our new screening pathway could be useful to identify asymptomatic patients with systemic diseases.

  10. A Biophysical Systems Approach to Identifying the Pathways of Acute and Chronic Doxorubicin Mitochondrial Cardiotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Bernardo L.; Niederer, Steven

    2016-01-01

    The clinical use of the anthracycline doxorubicin is limited by its cardiotoxicity which is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. Redox cycling, mitochondrial DNA damage and electron transport chain inhibition have been identified as potential mechanisms of toxicity. However, the relative roles of each of these proposed mechanisms are still not fully understood. The purpose of this study is to identify which of these pathways independently or in combination are responsible for doxorubicin toxicity. A state of the art mathematical model of the mitochondria including the citric acid cycle, electron transport chain and ROS production and scavenging systems was extended by incorporating a novel representation for mitochondrial DNA damage and repair. In silico experiments were performed to quantify the contributions of each of the toxicity mechanisms to mitochondrial dysfunction during the acute and chronic stages of toxicity. Simulations predict that redox cycling has a minor role in doxorubicin cardiotoxicity. Electron transport chain inhibition is the main pathway for acute toxicity for supratherapeutic doses, being lethal at mitochondrial concentrations higher than 200μM. Direct mitochondrial DNA damage is the principal pathway of chronic cardiotoxicity for therapeutic doses, leading to a progressive and irreversible long term mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:27870850

  11. FamNet: A Framework to Identify Multiplied Modules Driving Pathway Expansion in Plants1

    PubMed Central

    Tohge, Takayuki; Klie, Sebastian; Fernie, Alisdair R.

    2016-01-01

    Gene duplications generate new genes that can acquire similar but often diversified functions. Recent studies of gene coexpression networks have indicated that, not only genes, but also pathways can be multiplied and diversified to perform related functions in different parts of an organism. Identification of such diversified pathways, or modules, is needed to expand our knowledge of biological processes in plants and to understand how biological functions evolve. However, systematic explorations of modules remain scarce, and no user-friendly platform to identify them exists. We have established a statistical framework to identify modules and show that approximately one-third of the genes of a plant’s genome participate in hundreds of multiplied modules. Using this framework as a basis, we implemented a platform that can explore and visualize multiplied modules in coexpression networks of eight plant species. To validate the usefulness of the platform, we identified and functionally characterized pollen- and root-specific cell wall modules that multiplied to confer tip growth in pollen tubes and root hairs, respectively. Furthermore, we identified multiplied modules involved in secondary metabolite synthesis and corroborated them by metabolite profiling of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) tissues. The interactive platform, referred to as FamNet, is available at http://www.gene2function.de/famnet.html. PMID:26754669

  12. Genetic and expression analysis of cattle identifies candidate genes in pathways responding to Trypanosoma congolense infection

    PubMed Central

    Noyes, Harry; Brass, Andy; Obara, Isaiah; Anderson, Susan; Archibald, Alan L.; Bradley, Dan G.; Fisher, Paul; Freeman, Abigail; Gibson, John; Gicheru, Michael; Hall, Laurence; Hanotte, Olivier; Hulme, Helen; McKeever, Declan; Murray, Caitriona; Oh, Sung Jung; Tate, Catriona; Smith, Ken; Tapio, Miika; Wambugu, John; Williams, Diana J.; Agaba, Morris; Kemp, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    African bovine trypanosomiasis caused by Trypanosoma sp., is a major constraint on cattle productivity in sub-Saharan Africa. Some African Bos taurus breeds are highly tolerant of infection, but the potentially more productive Bos indicus zebu breeds are much more susceptible. Zebu cattle are well adapted for plowing and haulage, and increasing their tolerance of trypanosomiasis could have a major impact on crop cultivation as well as dairy and beef production. We used three strategies to obtain short lists of candidate genes within QTL that were previously shown to regulate response to infection. We analyzed the transcriptomes of trypanotolerant N'Dama and susceptible Boran cattle after infection with Trypanosoma congolense. We sequenced EST libraries from these two breeds to identify polymorphisms that might underlie previously identified quantitative trait loci (QTL), and we assessed QTL regions and candidate loci for evidence of selective sweeps. The scan of the EST sequences identified a previously undescribed polymorphism in ARHGAP15 in the Bta2 trypanotolerance QTL. The polymorphism affects gene function in vitro and could contribute to the observed differences in expression of the MAPK pathway in vivo. The expression data showed that TLR and MAPK pathways responded to infection, and the former contained TICAM1, which is within a QTL on Bta7. Genetic analyses showed that selective sweeps had occurred at TICAM1 and ARHGAP15 loci in African taurine cattle, making them strong candidates for the genes underlying the QTL. Candidate QTL genes were identified in other QTL by their expression profile and the pathways in which they participate. PMID:21593421

  13. A chemical proteomic atlas of brain serine hydrolases identifies cell type-specific pathways regulating neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Viader, Andreu; Ogasawara, Daisuke; Joslyn, Christopher M; Sanchez-Alavez, Manuel; Mori, Simone; Nguyen, William; Conti, Bruno; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2016-01-18

    Metabolic specialization among major brain cell types is central to nervous system function and determined in large part by the cellular distribution of enzymes. Serine hydrolases are a diverse enzyme class that plays fundamental roles in CNS metabolism and signaling. Here, we perform an activity-based proteomic analysis of primary mouse neurons, astrocytes, and microglia to furnish a global portrait of the cellular anatomy of serine hydrolases in the brain. We uncover compelling evidence for the cellular compartmentalization of key chemical transmission pathways, including the functional segregation of endocannabinoid (eCB) biosynthetic enzymes diacylglycerol lipase-alpha (DAGLα) and -beta (DAGLβ) to neurons and microglia, respectively. Disruption of DAGLβ perturbed eCB-eicosanoid crosstalk specifically in microglia and suppressed neuroinflammatory events in vivo independently of broader effects on eCB content. Mapping the cellular distribution of metabolic enzymes thus identifies pathways for regulating specialized inflammatory responses in the brain while avoiding global alterations in CNS function.

  14. Health service pathways for patients with chronic leg ulcers: identifying effective pathways for facilitation of evidence based wound care

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic leg ulcers cause long term ill-health for older adults and the condition places a significant burden on health service resources. Although evidence on effective management of the condition is available, a significant evidence-practice gap is known to exist, with many suggested reasons e.g. multiple care providers, costs of care and treatments. This study aimed to identify effective health service pathways of care which facilitated evidence-based management of chronic leg ulcers. Methods A sample of 70 patients presenting with a lower limb leg or foot ulcer at specialist wound clinics in Queensland, Australia were recruited for an observational study and survey. Retrospective data were collected on demographics, health, medical history, treatments, costs and health service pathways in the previous 12 months. Prospective data were collected on health service pathways, pain, functional ability, quality of life, treatments, wound healing and recurrence outcomes for 24 weeks from admission. Results Retrospective data indicated that evidence based guidelines were poorly implemented prior to admission to the study, e.g. only 31% of participants with a lower limb ulcer had an ABPI or duplex assessment in the previous 12 months. On average, participants accessed care 2–3 times/week for 17 weeks from multiple health service providers in the twelve months before admission to the study clinics. Following admission to specialist wound clinics, participants accessed care on average once per week for 12 weeks from a smaller range of providers. The median ulcer duration on admission to the study was 22 weeks (range 2–728 weeks). Following admission to wound clinics, implementation of key indicators of evidence based care increased (p < 0.001) and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis found the median time to healing was 12 weeks (95% CI 9.3–14.7). Implementation of evidence based care was significantly related to improved healing outcomes (p < 0

  15. Carbon and chlorine isotope analysis to identify abiotic degradation pathways of 1,1,1-trichloroethane.

    PubMed

    Palau, Jordi; Shouakar-Stash, Orfan; Hunkeler, Daniel

    2014-12-16

    This study investigates dual C-Cl isotope fractionation during 1,1,1-TCA transformation by heat-activated persulfate (PS), hydrolysis/dehydrohalogenation (HY/DH) and Fe(0). Compound-specific chlorine isotope analysis of 1,1,1-TCA was performed for the first time, and transformation-associated isotope fractionation ε bulk C and ε bulk Cl values were -4.0 ± 0.2‰ and no chlorine isotope fractionation with PS, -1.6 ± 0.2‰ and -4.7 ± 0.1‰ for HY/DH, -7.8 ± 0.4‰ and -5.2 ± 0.2‰ with Fe(0). Distinctly different dual isotope slopes (Δδ13C/Δδ37Cl): ∞ with PS, 0.33 ± 0.04 for HY/DH and 1.5 ± 0.1 with Fe(0) highlight the potential of this approach to identify abiotic degradation pathways of 1,1,1-TCA in the field. The trend observed with PS agreed with a C-H bond oxidation mechanism in the first reaction step. For HY/DH and Fe(0) pathways, different slopes were obtained although both pathways involve cleavage of a C-Cl bond in their initial reaction step. In contrast to the expected larger primary carbon isotope effects relative to chlorine for C-Cl bond cleavage, ε bulk C < ε bulk Cl was observed for HY/DH and in a similar range for reduction by Fe(0), suggesting the contribution of secondary chlorine isotope effects. Therefore, different magnitude of secondary chlorine isotope effects could at least be partly responsible for the distinct slopes between HY/DH and Fe(0) pathways. Following this dual isotope approach, abiotic transformation processes can unambiguously be identified and quantified.

  16. Identifying Significant Features in Cancer Methylation Data Using Gene Pathway Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Hira, Zena M.; Gillies, Duncan F.

    2016-01-01

    In order to provide the most effective therapy for cancer, it is important to be able to diagnose whether a patient’s cancer will respond to a proposed treatment. Methylation profiling could contain information from which such predictions could be made. Currently, hypothesis testing is used to determine whether possible biomarkers for cancer progression produce statistically significant results. However, this approach requires the identification of individual genes, or sets of genes, as candidate hypotheses, and with the increasing size of modern microarrays, this task is becoming progressively harder. Exhaustive testing of small sets of genes is computationally infeasible, and so hypothesis generation depends either on the use of established biological knowledge or on heuristic methods. As an alternative machine learning, methods can be used to identify groups of genes that are acting together within sets of cancer data and associate their behaviors with cancer progression. These methods have the advantage of being multivariate and unbiased but unfortunately also rapidly become computationally infeasible as the number of gene probes and datasets increases. To address this problem, we have investigated a way of utilizing prior knowledge to segment microarray datasets in such a way that machine learning can be used to identify candidate sets of genes for hypothesis testing. A methylation dataset is divided into subsets, where each subset contains only the probes that relate to a known gene pathway. Each of these pathway subsets is used independently for classification. The classification method is AdaBoost with decision trees as weak classifiers. Since each pathway subset contains a relatively small number of gene probes, it is possible to train and test its classification accuracy quickly and determine whether it has valuable diagnostic information. Finally, genes from successful pathway subsets can be combined to create a classifier of high accuracy. PMID

  17. Using Smoke Injection in Drains to Identify Potential Preferential Pathways in a Drained Arable Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, M. H.; Petersen, C. T.; Hansen, S.

    2014-12-01

    Macropores forming a continuous pathway between the soil surface and subsurface drains favour the transport of many contaminants from agricultural fields to surface waters. The smoke injection method presented by Shipitalo and Gibbs (2000) used for demonstrating and quantifying such pathways has been further developed and used on a drained Danish sandy loam. In order to identify the preferential pathways to drains, smoke was injected in three 1.15 m deep tile drains (total drain length 93 m), and smoke emitting macropores (SEMP) at the soil surface were counted and characterized as producing either strong or weak plumes compared to reference plumes from 3 and 6 mm wide tubes. In the two situations investigated in the present study - an early spring and an autumn situation, smoke only penetrated the soil surface layer via earthworm burrows located in a 1.0 m wide belt directly above the drain lines. However, it is known from previous studies that desiccation fractures in a dry summer situation also can contribute to the smoke pattern. The distance between SEMP measured along the drain lines was on average 0.46 m whereas the average spacing between SEMP with strong plumes was 2.3 m. Ponded water was applied in 6 cm wide rings placed above 52 burrows including 17 reference burrows which did not emit smoke. Thirteen pathways in the soil were examined using dye tracer and profile excavation. SEMP with strong plumes marked the entrance of highly efficient transport pathways conducting surface applied water and dye tracer into the drain. However, no single burrow was traced all the way from the surface into the drain, the dye patterns branched off in a network of other macropores. Water infiltration rates were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in SEMP with strong plumes (average rate: 247 mL min-1 n = 19) compared to SEMP with weak plumes (average rate: 87 mL min-1 n = 16) and no plumes (average rate: 56 mL min-1 n = 17). The results suggest that the smoke injection method

  18. Can pathoanatomical pathways of degeneration in lumbar motion segments be identified by clustering MRI findings

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is the gold standard for detailed visualisation of spinal pathological and degenerative processes, but the prevailing view is that such imaging findings have little or no clinical relevance for low back pain. This is because these findings appear to have little association with treatment effects in clinical populations, and mostly a weak association with the presence of pain in the general population. However, almost all research into these associations is based on the examination of individual MRI findings, despite its being very common for multiple MRI findings to coexist. Therefore, this proof-of-concept study investigated the capacity of a multivariable statistical method to identify clusters of MRI findings and for those clusters to be grouped into pathways of vertebral degeneration. Methods This study is a secondary analysis of data from 631 patients, from an outpatient spine clinic, who had been screened for inclusion in a randomised controlled trial. The available data created a total sample pool of 3,155 vertebral motion segments. The mean age of the cohort was 42 years (SD 10.8, range 18–73) and 54% were women. MRI images were quantitatively coded by an experienced musculoskeletal research radiologist using a detailed and standardised research MRI evaluation protocol that has demonstrated high reproducibility. Comprehensive MRI findings descriptive of the disco-vertebral component of lumbar vertebrae were clustered using Latent Class Analysis. Two pairs of researchers, each containing an experienced MRI researcher, then independently categorised the clusters into hypothetical pathoanatomic pathways based on the known histological changes of discovertebral degeneration. Results Twelve clusters of MRI findings were identified, described and grouped into five different hypothetical pathways of degeneration that appear to have face validity. Conclusions This study has shown that Latent Class Analysis can be used

  19. Functional CRISPR screening identifies the ufmylation pathway as a regulator of SQSTM1/p62

    PubMed Central

    DeJesus, Rowena; Moretti, Francesca; McAllister, Gregory; Wang, Zuncai; Bergman, Phil; Liu, Shanming; Frias, Elizabeth; Alford, John; Reece-Hoyes, John S; Lindeman, Alicia; Kelliher, Jennifer; Russ, Carsten; Knehr, Judith; Carbone, Walter; Beibel, Martin; Roma, Guglielmo; Ng, Aylwin; Tallarico, John A; Porter, Jeffery A; Xavier, Ramnik J; Mickanin, Craig; Murphy, Leon O; Hoffman, Gregory R; Nyfeler, Beat

    2016-01-01

    SQSTM1 is an adaptor protein that integrates multiple cellular signaling pathways and whose expression is tightly regulated at the transcriptional and post-translational level. Here, we describe a forward genetic screening paradigm exploiting CRISPR-mediated genome editing coupled to a cell selection step by FACS to identify regulators of SQSTM1. Through systematic comparison of pooled libraries, we show that CRISPR is superior to RNAi in identifying known SQSTM1 modulators. A genome-wide CRISPR screen exposed MTOR signalling and the entire macroautophagy machinery as key regulators of SQSTM1 and identified several novel modulators including HNRNPM, SLC39A14, SRRD, PGK1 and the ufmylation cascade. We show that ufmylation regulates SQSTM1 by eliciting a cell type-specific ER stress response which induces SQSTM1 expression and results in its accumulation in the cytosol. This study validates pooled CRISPR screening as a powerful method to map the repertoire of cellular pathways that regulate the fate of an individual target protein. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17290.001 PMID:27351204

  20. Anthropogenic Molecular Markers: Tools to Identify the Sources and Transport Pathways of Pollutants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Takada, H.; Satoh, F.; Bothner, Michael H.; Tripp, B.W.; Johnson, C.G.; Farrington, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    The activities of modern civilization have released to the oceans a wide variety of both mobilized natural compounds and synthetic compounds not found prior to modern times. Many of these compounds provide a means of identifying sources of inputs and pathways of movement of chemicals through oceanic ecosystems and serve as molecular markers of human activities. A coastal ocean (Tokyo Bay) and a deep ocean (Deep Water Dump Site 106 in the Western North Atlantic Ocean) example are presented. In the deep ocean study, the correlation between potential sewage marker, i.e. linear alkylbenzenes (LABs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) concentrations indicates a contribution of sewage sludge PCBs to the dump site sediments.

  1. Proteome-wide association studies identify biochemical modules associated with a wing-size phenotype in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Hirokazu; Ebhardt, H. Alexander; Vonesch, Sibylle Chantal; Aebersold, Ruedi; Hafen, Ernst

    2016-01-01

    The manner by which genetic diversity within a population generates individual phenotypes is a fundamental question of biology. To advance the understanding of the genotype–phenotype relationships towards the level of biochemical processes, we perform a proteome-wide association study (PWAS) of a complex quantitative phenotype. We quantify the variation of wing imaginal disc proteomes in Drosophila genetic reference panel (DGRP) lines using SWATH mass spectrometry. In spite of the very large genetic variation (1/36 bp) between the lines, proteome variability is surprisingly small, indicating strong molecular resilience of protein expression patterns. Proteins associated with adult wing size form tight co-variation clusters that are enriched in fundamental biochemical processes. Wing size correlates with some basic metabolic functions, positively with glucose metabolism but negatively with mitochondrial respiration and not with ribosome biogenesis. Our study highlights the power of PWAS to filter functional variants from the large genetic variability in natural populations. PMID:27582081

  2. Inside the biochemical pathways of thymidylate synthase perturbed by anticancer drugs: Novel strategies to overcome cancer chemoresistance.

    PubMed

    Taddia, Laura; D'Arca, Domenico; Ferrari, Stefania; Marraccini, Chiara; Severi, Leda; Ponterini, Glauco; Assaraf, Yahuda G; Marverti, Gaetano; Costi, Maria Paola

    2015-11-01

    pathways that are modulated by TS-targeting anticancer drugs starting from the description of the normal functioning of the folate metabolic pathway, through the protein modulation occurring upon drug delivery to cultured tumor cells as well as cancer patients, finally describing how the pathways are modulated by drug resistance development. The data collected are then analyzed using network/netwire connecting methods in order to provide a wider view of the pathways involved and of the importance of such information in identifying additional proteins that could serve as novel druggable targets for efficacious cancer therapy.

  3. Machine learning approach identifies new pathways associated with demyelination in a viral model of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Reiner; Kalkuhl, Arno; Deschl, Ulrich; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis is an experimentally virus-induced inflammatory demyelinating disease of the spinal cord, displaying clinical and pathological similarities to chronic progressive multiple sclerosis. The aim of this study was to identify pathways associated with chronic demyelination using an assumption-free combined microarray and immunohistology approach. Movement control as determined by rotarod assay significantly worsened in Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis -virus-infected SJL/J mice from 42 to 196 days after infection (dpi). In the spinal cords, inflammatory changes were detected 14 to 196 dpi, and demyelination progressively increased from 42 to 196 dpi. Microarray analysis revealed 1001 differentially expressed genes over the study period. The dominating changes as revealed by k-means and functional annotation clustering included up-regulations related to intrathecal antibody production and antigen processing and presentation via major histocompatibility class II molecules. A random forest machine learning algorithm revealed that down-regulated lipid and cholesterol biosynthesis, differentially expressed neurite morphogenesis and up-regulated toll-like receptor-4-induced pathways were intimately associated with demyelination as measured by immunohistology. Conclusively, although transcriptional changes were dominated by the adaptive immune response, the main pathways associated with demyelination included up-regulation of toll-like receptor 4 and down-regulation of cholesterol biosynthesis. Cholesterol biosynthesis is a rate limiting step of myelination and its down-regulation is suggested to be involved in chronic demyelination by an inhibition of remyelination.

  4. Magnetic resonance image features identify glioblastoma phenotypic subtypes with distinct molecular pathway activities

    PubMed Central

    Itakura, Haruka; Achrol, Achal S.; Mitchell, Lex A.; Loya, Joshua J.; Liu, Tiffany; Westbroek, Erick M.; Feroze, Abdullah H.; Rodriguez, Scott; Echegaray, Sebastian; Azad, Tej D.; Yeom, Kristen W.; Napel, Sandy; Rubin, Daniel L.; Chang, Steven D.; Harsh, Griffith R.; Gevaert, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and highly lethal primary malignant brain tumor in adults. There is a dire need for easily accessible, noninvasive biomarkers that can delineate underlying molecular activities and predict response to therapy. To this end, we sought to identify subtypes of GBM, differentiated solely by quantitative MR imaging features, that could be used for better management of GBM patients. Quantitative image features capturing the shape, texture, and edge sharpness of each lesion were extracted from MR images of 121 patients with de novo, solitary, unilateral GBM. Three distinct phenotypic “clusters” emerged in the development cohort using consensus clustering with 10,000 iterations on these image features. These three clusters—pre-multifocal, spherical, and rim-enhancing, names reflecting their image features—were validated in an independent cohort consisting of 144 multi-institution patients with similar tumor characteristics from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Each cluster mapped to a unique set of molecular signaling pathways using pathway activity estimates derived from analysis of TCGA tumor copy number and gene expression data with the PARADIGM algorithm. Distinct pathways, such as c-Kit and FOXA, were enriched in each cluster, indicating differential molecular activities as determined by image features. Each cluster also demonstrated differential probabilities of survival, indicating prognostic importance. Our imaging method offers a noninvasive approach to stratify GBM patients and also provides unique sets of molecular signatures to inform targeted therapy and personalized treatment of GBM. PMID:26333934

  5. Gene Expression Profiling Identifies Molecular Pathways Associated with Collagen VI Deficiency and Provides Novel Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Paco, Sonia; Kalko, Susana G.; Jou, Cristina; Rodríguez, María A.; Corbera, Joan; Muntoni, Francesco; Feng, Lucy; Rivas, Eloy; Torner, Ferran; Gualandi, Francesca; Gomez-Foix, Anna M.; Ferrer, Anna; Ortez, Carlos; Nascimento, Andrés; Colomer, Jaume; Jimenez-Mallebrera, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD), caused by collagen VI deficiency, is a common congenital muscular dystrophy. At present, the role of collagen VI in muscle and the mechanism of disease are not fully understood. To address this we have applied microarrays to analyse the transcriptome of UCMD muscle and compare it to healthy muscle and other muscular dystrophies. We identified 389 genes which are differentially regulated in UCMD relative to controls. In addition, there were 718 genes differentially expressed between UCMD and dystrophin deficient muscle. In contrast, only 29 genes were altered relative to other congenital muscular dystrophies. Changes in gene expression were confirmed by real-time PCR. The set of regulated genes was analysed by Gene Ontology, KEGG pathways and Ingenuity Pathway analysis to reveal the molecular functions and gene networks associated with collagen VI defects. The most significantly regulated pathways were those involved in muscle regeneration, extracellular matrix remodelling and inflammation. We characterised the immune response in UCMD biopsies as being mainly mediated via M2 macrophages and the complement pathway indicating that anti-inflammatory treatment may be beneficial to UCMD as for other dystrophies. We studied the immunolocalisation of ECM components and found that biglycan, a collagen VI interacting proteoglycan, was reduced in the basal lamina of UCMD patients. We propose that biglycan reduction is secondary to collagen VI loss and that it may be contributing towards UCMD pathophysiology. Consequently, strategies aimed at over-expressing biglycan and restore the link between the muscle cell surface and the extracellular matrix should be considered. PMID:24223098

  6. Repurposing Approach Identifies Auranofin with Broad Spectrum Antifungal Activity That Targets Mia40-Erv1 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Thangamani, Shankar; Maland, Matthew; Mohammad, Haroon; Pascuzzi, Pete E.; Avramova, Larisa; Koehler, Carla M.; Hazbun, Tony R.; Seleem, Mohamed N.

    2017-01-01

    Current antifungal therapies have limited effectiveness in treating invasive fungal infections. Furthermore, the development of new antifungal is currently unable to keep pace with the urgent demand for safe and effective new drugs. Auranofin, an FDA-approved drug for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, inhibits growth of a diverse array of clinical isolates of fungi and represents a new antifungal agent with a previously unexploited mechanism of action. In addition to auranofin's potent antifungal activity against planktonic fungi, this drug significantly reduces the metabolic activity of Candida cells encased in a biofilm. Unbiased chemogenomic profiling, using heterozygous S. cerevisiae deletion strains, combined with growth assays revealed three probable targets for auranofin's antifungal activity—mia40, acn9, and coa4. Mia40 is of particular interest given its essential role in oxidation of cysteine rich proteins imported into the mitochondria. Biochemical analysis confirmed auranofin targets the Mia40-Erv1 pathway as the drug inhibited Mia40 from interacting with its substrate, Cmc1, in a dose-dependent manner similar to the control, MB-7. Furthermore, yeast mitochondria overexpressing Erv1 were shown to exhibit resistance to auranofin as an increase in Cmc1 import was observed compared to wild-type yeast. Further in vivo antifungal activity of auranofin was examined in a Caenorhabditis elegans animal model of Cryptococcus neoformans infection. Auranofin significantly reduced the fungal load in infected C. elegans. Collectively, the present study provides valuable evidence that auranofin has significant promise to be repurposed as a novel antifungal agent and may offer a safe, effective, and quick supplement to current approaches for treating fungal infections. PMID:28149831

  7. A Sleeping Beauty forward genetic screen identifies new genes and pathways driving osteosarcoma development and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Moriarity, Branden S; Otto, George M; Rahrmann, Eric P; Rathe, Susan K; Wolf, Natalie K; Weg, Madison T; Manlove, Luke A; LaRue, Rebecca S; Temiz, Nuri A; Molyneux, Sam D; Choi, Kwangmin; Holly, Kevin J; Sarver, Aaron L; Scott, Milcah C; Forster, Colleen L; Modiano, Jaime F; Khanna, Chand; Hewitt, Stephen M; Khokha, Rama; Yang, Yi; Gorlick, Richard; Dyer, Michael A; Largaespada, David A

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcomas are sarcomas of the bone, derived from osteoblasts or their precursors, with a high propensity to metastasize. Osteosarcoma is associated with massive genomic instability, making it problematic to identify driver genes using human tumors or prototypical mouse models, many of which involve loss of Trp53 function. To identify the genes driving osteosarcoma development and metastasis, we performed a Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon-based forward genetic screen in mice with and without somatic loss of Trp53. Common insertion site (CIS) analysis of 119 primary tumors and 134 metastatic nodules identified 232 sites associated with osteosarcoma development and 43 sites associated with metastasis, respectively. Analysis of CIS-associated genes identified numerous known and new osteosarcoma-associated genes enriched in the ErbB, PI3K-AKT-mTOR and MAPK signaling pathways. Lastly, we identified several oncogenes involved in axon guidance, including Sema4d and Sema6d, which we functionally validated as oncogenes in human osteosarcoma. PMID:25961939

  8. Exome sequencing in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis identifies risk genes and pathways

    PubMed Central

    Cirulli, Elizabeth T.; Lasseigne, Brittany N.; Petrovski, Slavé; Sapp, Peter C.; Dion, Patrick A.; Leblond, Claire S.; Couthouis, Julien; Lu, Yi-Fan; Wang, Quanli; Krueger, Brian J.; Ren, Zhong; Keebler, Jonathan; Han, Yujun; Levy, Shawn E.; Boone, Braden E.; Wimbish, Jack R.; Waite, Lindsay L.; Jones, Angela L.; Carulli, John P.; Day-Williams, Aaron G.; Staropoli, John F.; Xin, Winnie W.; Chesi, Alessandra; Raphael, Alya R.; McKenna-Yasek, Diane; Cady, Janet; de Jong, J.M.B. Vianney; Kenna, Kevin P.; Smith, Bradley N.; Topp, Simon; Miller, Jack; Gkazi, Athina; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; van den Berg, Leonard H.; Veldink, Jan; Silani, Vincenzo; Ticozzi, Nicola; Shaw, Christopher E.; Baloh, Robert H.; Appel, Stanley; Simpson, Ericka; Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde; Pulst, Stefan M.; Gibson, Summer; Trojanowski, John Q.; Elman, Lauren; McCluskey, Leo; Grossman, Murray; Shneider, Neil A.; Chung, Wendy K.; Ravits, John M.; Glass, Jonathan D.; Sims, Katherine B.; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.; Maniatis, Tom; Hayes, Sebastian D.; Ordureau, Alban; Swarup, Sharan; Landers, John; Baas, Frank; Allen, Andrew S.; Bedlack, Richard S.; Harper, J. Wade; Gitler, Aaron D.; Rouleau, Guy A.; Brown, Robert; Harms, Matthew B.; Cooper, Gregory M.; Harris, Tim; Myers, Richard M.; Goldstein, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating neurological disease with no effective treatment. Here we report the results of a moderate-scale sequencing study aimed at identifying new genes contributing to predisposition for ALS. We performed whole exome sequencing of 2,874 ALS patients and compared them to 6,405 controls. Several known ALS genes were found to be associated, and the non-canonical IκB kinase family TANK-Binding Kinase 1 (TBK1) was identified as an ALS gene. TBK1 is known to bind to and phosphorylate a number of proteins involved in innate immunity and autophagy, including optineurin (OPTN) and p62 (SQSTM1/sequestosome), both of which have also been implicated in ALS. These observations reveal a key role of the autophagic pathway in ALS and suggest specific targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:25700176

  9. Integrated Metabolomics, Transcriptomics and Proteomics Identifies Metabolic Pathways Affected by Anaplasma phagocytophilum Infection in Tick Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Villar, Margarita; Ayllón, Nieves; Alberdi, Pilar; Moreno, Andrés; Moreno, María; Tobes, Raquel; Mateos-Hernández, Lourdes; Weisheit, Sabine; Bell-Sakyi, Lesley; de la Fuente, José

    2015-01-01

    results support the use of this experimental approach to systematically identify cell pathways and molecular mechanisms involved in tick–pathogen interactions. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002181. PMID:26424601

  10. Integrated Metabolomics, Transcriptomics and Proteomics Identifies Metabolic Pathways Affected by Anaplasma phagocytophilum Infection in Tick Cells.

    PubMed

    Villar, Margarita; Ayllón, Nieves; Alberdi, Pilar; Moreno, Andrés; Moreno, María; Tobes, Raquel; Mateos-Hernández, Lourdes; Weisheit, Sabine; Bell-Sakyi, Lesley; de la Fuente, José

    2015-12-01

    support the use of this experimental approach to systematically identify cell pathways and molecular mechanisms involved in tick-pathogen interactions. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002181.

  11. Combined Gene Expression and RNAi Screening to Identify Alkylation Damage Survival Pathways from Fly to Human.

    PubMed

    Zanotto-Filho, Alfeu; Dashnamoorthy, Ravi; Loranc, Eva; de Souza, Luis H T; Moreira, José C F; Suresh, Uthra; Chen, Yidong; Bishop, Alexander J R

    2016-01-01

    Alkylating agents are a key component of cancer chemotherapy. Several cellular mechanisms are known to be important for its survival, particularly DNA repair and xenobiotic detoxification, yet genomic screens indicate that additional cellular components may be involved. Elucidating these components has value in either identifying key processes that can be modulated to improve chemotherapeutic efficacy or may be altered in some cancers to confer chemoresistance. We therefore set out to reevaluate our prior Drosophila RNAi screening data by comparison to gene expression arrays in order to determine if we could identify any novel processes in alkylation damage survival. We noted a consistent conservation of alkylation survival pathways across platforms and species when the analysis was conducted on a pathway/process level rather than at an individual gene level. Better results were obtained when combining gene lists from two datasets (RNAi screen plus microarray) prior to analysis. In addition to previously identified DNA damage responses (p53 signaling and Nucleotide Excision Repair), DNA-mRNA-protein metabolism (transcription/translation) and proteasome machinery, we also noted a highly conserved cross-species requirement for NRF2, glutathione (GSH)-mediated drug detoxification and Endoplasmic Reticulum stress (ER stress)/Unfolded Protein Responses (UPR) in cells exposed to alkylation. The requirement for GSH, NRF2 and UPR in alkylation survival was validated by metabolomics, protein studies and functional cell assays. From this we conclude that RNAi/gene expression fusion is a valid strategy to rapidly identify key processes that may be extendable to other contexts beyond damage survival.

  12. 2D NMR-based metabolomics uncovers interactions between conserved biochemical pathways in the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Izrayelit, Yevgeniy; Robinette, Steven L; Bose, Neelanjan; von Reuss, Stephan H; Schroeder, Frank C

    2013-02-15

    Ascarosides are small-molecule signals that play a central role in C. elegans biology, including dauer formation, aging, and social behaviors, but many aspects of their biosynthesis remain unknown. Using automated 2D NMR-based comparative metabolomics, we identified ascaroside ethanolamides as shunt metabolites in C. elegans mutants of daf-22, a gene with homology to mammalian 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolases predicted to function in conserved peroxisomal lipid β-oxidation. Two groups of ethanolamides feature β-keto functionalization confirming the predicted role of daf-22 in ascaroside biosynthesis, whereas α-methyl substitution points to unexpected inclusion of methylmalonate at a late stage in the biosynthesis of long-chain fatty acids in C. elegans. We show that ascaroside ethanolamide formation in response to defects in daf-22 and other peroxisomal genes is associated with severe depletion of endocannabinoid pools. These results indicate unexpected interaction between peroxisomal lipid β-oxidation and the biosynthesis of endocannabinoids, which are major regulators of lifespan in C. elegans. Our study demonstrates the utility of unbiased comparative metabolomics for investigating biochemical networks in metazoans.

  13. 2D NMR-based metabolomics uncovers interactions between conserved biochemical pathways in the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Izrayelit, Yevgeniy; Robinette, Steven L.; Bose, Neelanjan; von Reuss, Stephan H.; Schroeder, Frank C.

    2012-01-01

    Ascarosides are small-molecule signals that play a central role in C. elegans biology, including dauer formation, aging, and social behaviors, but many aspects of their biosynthesis remain unknown. Using automated 2D NMR-based comparative metabolomics, we identified ascaroside ethanolamides as shunt metabolites in C. elegans mutants of daf-22, a gene with homology to mammalian 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolases predicted to function in conserved peroxisomal lipid β-oxidation. Two groups of ethanolamides feature β-keto functionalization confirming the predicted role of daf-22 in ascaroside biosynthesis, whereas α-methyl substitution points to unexpected inclusion of methylmalonte at a late stage in the biosynthesis of long-chain fatty acids in C. elegans. We show that ascaroside ethanolamide formation in response to defects in daf-22 and other peroxisomal genes is associated with severe depletion of endocannabinoid pools. These results indicate unexpected interaction between peroxisomal lipid β-oxidation and the biosynthesis of endocannabinoids, which are major regulators of lifespan in C. elegans. Our study demonstrates the utility of unbiased comparative metabolomics for investigating biochemical networks in metazoans. PMID:23163760

  14. A whole-cell phenotypic screening platform for identifying methylerythritol phosphate pathway-selective inhibitors as novel antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Testa, Charles A; Johnson, L Jeffrey

    2012-09-01

    Isoprenoid biosynthesis is essential for survival of all living organisms. More than 50,000 unique isoprenoids occur naturally, with each constructed from two simple five-carbon precursors: isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). Two pathways for the biosynthesis of IPP and DMAPP are found in nature. Humans exclusively use the mevalonate (MVA) pathway, while most bacteria, including all Gram-negative and many Gram-positive species, use the unrelated methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway. Here we report the development of a novel, whole-cell phenotypic screening platform to identify compounds that selectively inhibit the MEP pathway. Strains of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium were engineered to have separately inducible MEP (native) and MVA (nonnative) pathways. These strains, RMC26 and CT31-7d, were then used to differentiate MVA pathway- and MEP pathway-specific perturbation. Compounds that inhibit MEP pathway-dependent bacterial growth but leave MVA-dependent growth unaffected represent MEP pathway-selective antibacterials. This screening platform offers three significant results. First, the compound is antibacterial and is therefore cell permeant, enabling access to the intracellular target. Second, the compound inhibits one or more MEP pathway enzymes. Third, the MVA pathway is unaffected, suggesting selectivity for targeting the bacterial versus host pathway. The cell lines also display increased sensitivity to two reported MEP pathway-specific inhibitors, further biasing the platform toward inhibitors selective for the MEP pathway. We demonstrate development of a robust, high-throughput screening platform that combines phenotypic and target-based screening that can identify MEP pathway-selective antibacterials simply by monitoring optical density as the readout for cell growth/inhibition.

  15. Development and application of biochemical and haematological reference intervals to identify unhealthy green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas).

    PubMed

    Flint, Mark; Morton, John M; Limpus, Colin J; Patterson-Kane, Janet C; Murray, Peter J; Mills, Paul C

    2010-09-01

    Biochemical and haematological reference intervals (RIs) have been reported for sea turtles, but their value for ante-mortem disease diagnosis may be limited due to small sample sizes and outdated statistical analyses. In the present study, 290 green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas) were captured, clinically assessed and blood sampled. Of these, 211 were classified as 'clinically healthy' and 25 as 'clinically unhealthy'. RIs were estimated using data from the healthy turtles and compared with blood values from the unhealthy animals. All of the unhealthy animals had plasma biochemical and haematological values outside one or more RIs (albumin, 48% of unhealthy animals; alkaline phosphatase, 35%; aspartate transaminase, 13%; creatinine, 30%; globulin, 3%; glucose, 34%; lactic dehydrogenase, 26%; phosphorus, 22%; sodium, 13%; thrombocytes, 57%; and monocytes, 5%). Among small immature turtles, those with Chelonibia testudinaria plastron barnacle counts 20 were three times more likely to be unhealthy than those with no barnacles. In addition, small immature and mature turtles were more likely to be unhealthy than large immature turtles.

  16. Transcriptional profiles of drought-responsive genes in modulating transcription signal transduction, and biochemical pathways in tomato

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Pengjuan; Zhang, Junhong; Li, Hanxia; Yang, Changxian; Zhang, Chanjuan; Zhang, Xiaohui; Khurram, Ziaf; Zhang, Yuyang; Wang, Taotao; Fei, Zhangjun; Ye, Zhibiao

    2010-01-01

    To unravel the molecular mechanisms of drought responses in tomato, gene expression profiles of two drought-tolerant lines identified from a population of Solanum pennellii introgression lines, and the recurrent parent S. lycopersicum cv. M82, a drought-sensitive cultivar, were investigated under drought stress using tomato microarrays. Around 400 genes identified were responsive to drought stress only in the drought-tolerant lines. These changes in genes expression are most likely caused by the two inserted chromosome segments of S. pennellii, which possibly contain drought-tolerance quantitative trait loci (QTLs). Among these genes are a number of transcription factors and signalling proteins which could be global regulators involved in the tomato responses to drought stress. Genes involved in organism growth and development processes were also specifically regulated by drought stress, including those controlling cell wall structure, wax biosynthesis, and plant height. Moreover, key enzymes in the pathways of gluconeogenesis (fructose-bisphosphate aldolase), purine and pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthesis (adenylate kinase), tryptophan degradation (aldehyde oxidase), starch degradation (β-amylase), methionine biosynthesis (cystathionine β-lyase), and the removal of superoxide radicals (catalase) were also specifically affected by drought stress. These results indicated that tomato plants could adapt to water-deficit conditions through decreasing energy dissipation, increasing ATP energy provision, and reducing oxidative damage. The drought-responsive genes identified in this study could provide further information for understanding the mechanisms of drought tolerance in tomato. PMID:20643807

  17. Soldier, civilian, criminal: identifying pathways to offending of ex-armed forces personnel in prison

    PubMed Central

    Wainwright, Verity; McDonnell, Sharon; Lennox, Charlotte; Shaw, Jenny; Senior, Jane

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Little is known about why some ex-armed forces personnel become involved in the criminal justice system, however, they represent the largest known occupational group in prison. In-depth interviews were employed to explore possible pathways to offending. Twenty ex-armed forces personnel in prison were recruited from five prisons in England. Data were analysed using a combination of thematic analysis and constant comparison methods rooted in grounded theory. Four predominant themes were identified: experiences of trauma and adversity; belonging; impulsivity and creating a soldier. Participants had experienced a number of traumatic incidents and adversity in their lives, encompassing pre, during and post-service but felt a sense of belonging in the armed forces. Participants demonstrated impulsivity in a number of areas with links to both their service in the armed forces and offending behaviour. The creation of the identity of ‘soldier’ was perceived to impact participants’ lives in a number of ways, including their offending, alcohol use and coping with trauma. The interplay of these themes and their potential impact on participants’ pathways to offending are discussed. PMID:27570440

  18. Exome and genome sequencing of nasopharynx cancer identifies NF-κB pathway activating mutations

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yvonne Y; Chung, Grace T. Y.; Lui, Vivian W. Y.; To, Ka-Fai; Ma, Brigette B. Y.; Chow, Chit; Woo, John K, S.; Yip, Kevin Y.; Seo, Jeongsun; Hui, Edwin P.; Mak, Michael K. F.; Rusan, Maria; Chau, Nicole G.; Or, Yvonne Y. Y.; Law, Marcus H. N.; Law, Peggy P. Y.; Liu, Zoey W. Y.; Ngan, Hoi-Lam; Hau, Pok-Man; Verhoeft, Krista R.; Poon, Peony H. Y.; Yoo, Seong-Keun; Shin, Jong-Yeon; Lee, Sau-Dan; Lun, Samantha W. M.; Jia, Lin; Chan, Anthony W. H.; Chan, Jason Y. K.; Lai, Paul B. S.; Fung, Choi-Yi; Hung, Suet-Ting; Wang, Lin; Chang, Ann Margaret V.; Chiosea, Simion I.; Hedberg, Matthew L.; Tsao, Sai-Wah; van Hasselt, Andrew C.; Chan, Anthony T. C.; Grandis, Jennifer R.; Hammerman, Peter S.; Lo, Kwok-Wai

    2017-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is an aggressive head and neck cancer characterized by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and dense lymphocyte infiltration. The scarcity of NPC genomic data hinders the understanding of NPC biology, disease progression and rational therapy design. Here we performed whole-exome sequencing (WES) on 111 micro-dissected EBV-positive NPCs, with 15 cases subjected to further whole-genome sequencing (WGS), to determine its mutational landscape. We identified enrichment for genomic aberrations of multiple negative regulators of the NF-κB pathway, including CYLD, TRAF3, NFKBIA and NLRC5, in a total of 41% of cases. Functional analysis confirmed inactivating CYLD mutations as drivers for NPC cell growth. The EBV oncoprotein latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) functions to constitutively activate NF-κB signalling, and we observed mutual exclusivity among tumours with somatic NF-κB pathway aberrations and LMP1-overexpression, suggesting that NF-κB activation is selected for by both somatic and viral events during NPC pathogenesis. PMID:28098136

  19. Characterization of single disseminated prostate cancer cells reveals tumor cell heterogeneity and identifies dormancy associated pathways

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Ilsa; Lakely, Bryce; Coleman, Roger; Larson, Sandy; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio A.; Xia, Jing; Gulati, Roman; Nelson, Peter S.; Montgomery, Bruce; Lange, Paul; Snyder, Linda A.; Vessella, Robert L.; Morrissey, Colm

    2014-01-01

    Cancer dormancy refers to the prolonged clinical disease-free time between removal of the primary tumor and recurrence, which is common in prostate cancer (PCa), breast cancer, esophageal cancer, and other cancers. PCa disseminated tumor cells (DTC) are detected in both patients with no evidence of disease (NED) and advanced disease (ADV). However, the molecular and cellular nature of DTC is unknown. We performed a first-in-field study of single DTC transcriptomic analyses in cancer patients to identify a molecular signature associated with cancer dormancy. We profiled eighty-five individual EpCAM+/CD45− cells from the bone marrow of PCa patients with NED or ADV. We analyzed 44 DTC with high prostate-epithelial signatures, and eliminated 41 cells with high erythroid signatures and low prostate epithelial signatures. DTC were clustered into 3 groups: NED, ADV_1, and ADV_2, in which the ADV_1 group presented a distinct gene expression pattern associated with the p38 stress activated kinase pathway. Additionally, DTC from the NED group were enriched for a tumor dormancy signature associated with head and neck squamous carcinoma and breast cancer. This study provides the first clinical evidence of the p38 pathway as a potential biomarker for early recurrence and an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:25301725

  20. A chemical proteomic atlas of brain serine hydrolases identifies cell type-specific pathways regulating neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Viader, Andreu; Ogasawara, Daisuke; Joslyn, Christopher M; Sanchez-Alavez, Manuel; Mori, Simone; Nguyen, William; Conti, Bruno; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic specialization among major brain cell types is central to nervous system function and determined in large part by the cellular distribution of enzymes. Serine hydrolases are a diverse enzyme class that plays fundamental roles in CNS metabolism and signaling. Here, we perform an activity-based proteomic analysis of primary mouse neurons, astrocytes, and microglia to furnish a global portrait of the cellular anatomy of serine hydrolases in the brain. We uncover compelling evidence for the cellular compartmentalization of key chemical transmission pathways, including the functional segregation of endocannabinoid (eCB) biosynthetic enzymes diacylglycerol lipase-alpha (DAGLα) and –beta (DAGLβ) to neurons and microglia, respectively. Disruption of DAGLβ perturbed eCB-eicosanoid crosstalk specifically in microglia and suppressed neuroinflammatory events in vivo independently of broader effects on eCB content. Mapping the cellular distribution of metabolic enzymes thus identifies pathways for regulating specialized inflammatory responses in the brain while avoiding global alterations in CNS function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12345.001 PMID:26779719

  1. Epigenomic annotation of noncoding mutations identifies mutated pathways in primary liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lowdon, Rebecca F.

    2017-01-01

    Evidence that noncoding mutation can result in cancer driver events is mounting. However, it is more difficult to assign molecular biological consequences to noncoding mutations than to coding mutations, and a typical cancer genome contains many more noncoding mutations than protein-coding mutations. Accordingly, parsing functional noncoding mutation signal from noise remains an important challenge. Here we use an empirical approach to identify putatively functional noncoding somatic single nucleotide variants (SNVs) from liver cancer genomes. Annotation of candidate variants by publicly available epigenome datasets finds that 40.5% of SNVs fall in regulatory elements. When assigned to specific regulatory elements, we find that the distribution of regulatory element mutation mirrors that of nonsynonymous coding mutation, where few regulatory elements are recurrently mutated in a patient population but many are singly mutated. We find potential gain-of-binding site events among candidate SNVs, suggesting a mechanism of action for these variants. When aggregating noncoding somatic mutation in promoters, we find that genes in the ERBB signaling and MAPK signaling pathways are significantly enriched for promoter mutations. Altogether, our results suggest that functional somatic SNVs in cancer are sporadic, but occasionally occur in regulatory elements and may affect phenotype by creating binding sites for transcriptional regulators. Accordingly, we propose that noncoding mutation should be formally accounted for when determining gene- and pathway-mutation burden in cancer. PMID:28333948

  2. Soldier, civilian, criminal: identifying pathways to offending of ex-armed forces personnel in prison.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, Verity; McDonnell, Sharon; Lennox, Charlotte; Shaw, Jenny; Senior, Jane

    2016-09-13

    Little is known about why some ex-armed forces personnel become involved in the criminal justice system, however, they represent the largest known occupational group in prison. In-depth interviews were employed to explore possible pathways to offending. Twenty ex-armed forces personnel in prison were recruited from five prisons in England. Data were analysed using a combination of thematic analysis and constant comparison methods rooted in grounded theory. Four predominant themes were identified: experiences of trauma and adversity; belonging; impulsivity and creating a soldier. Participants had experienced a number of traumatic incidents and adversity in their lives, encompassing pre, during and post-service but felt a sense of belonging in the armed forces. Participants demonstrated impulsivity in a number of areas with links to both their service in the armed forces and offending behaviour. The creation of the identity of 'soldier' was perceived to impact participants' lives in a number of ways, including their offending, alcohol use and coping with trauma. The interplay of these themes and their potential impact on participants' pathways to offending are discussed.

  3. Exome sequencing in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis identifies risk genes and pathways.

    PubMed

    Cirulli, Elizabeth T; Lasseigne, Brittany N; Petrovski, Slavé; Sapp, Peter C; Dion, Patrick A; Leblond, Claire S; Couthouis, Julien; Lu, Yi-Fan; Wang, Quanli; Krueger, Brian J; Ren, Zhong; Keebler, Jonathan; Han, Yujun; Levy, Shawn E; Boone, Braden E; Wimbish, Jack R; Waite, Lindsay L; Jones, Angela L; Carulli, John P; Day-Williams, Aaron G; Staropoli, John F; Xin, Winnie W; Chesi, Alessandra; Raphael, Alya R; McKenna-Yasek, Diane; Cady, Janet; Vianney de Jong, J M B; Kenna, Kevin P; Smith, Bradley N; Topp, Simon; Miller, Jack; Gkazi, Athina; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; van den Berg, Leonard H; Veldink, Jan; Silani, Vincenzo; Ticozzi, Nicola; Shaw, Christopher E; Baloh, Robert H; Appel, Stanley; Simpson, Ericka; Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde; Pulst, Stefan M; Gibson, Summer; Trojanowski, John Q; Elman, Lauren; McCluskey, Leo; Grossman, Murray; Shneider, Neil A; Chung, Wendy K; Ravits, John M; Glass, Jonathan D; Sims, Katherine B; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M; Maniatis, Tom; Hayes, Sebastian D; Ordureau, Alban; Swarup, Sharan; Landers, John; Baas, Frank; Allen, Andrew S; Bedlack, Richard S; Harper, J Wade; Gitler, Aaron D; Rouleau, Guy A; Brown, Robert; Harms, Matthew B; Cooper, Gregory M; Harris, Tim; Myers, Richard M; Goldstein, David B

    2015-03-27

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating neurological disease with no effective treatment. We report the results of a moderate-scale sequencing study aimed at increasing the number of genes known to contribute to predisposition for ALS. We performed whole-exome sequencing of 2869 ALS patients and 6405 controls. Several known ALS genes were found to be associated, and TBK1 (the gene encoding TANK-binding kinase 1) was identified as an ALS gene. TBK1 is known to bind to and phosphorylate a number of proteins involved in innate immunity and autophagy, including optineurin (OPTN) and p62 (SQSTM1/sequestosome), both of which have also been implicated in ALS. These observations reveal a key role of the autophagic pathway in ALS and suggest specific targets for therapeutic intervention.

  4. Axon regeneration pathways identified by systematic genetic screening in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lizhen; Wang, Zhiping; Ghosh-Roy, Anindya; Hubert, Thomas; Yan, Dong; O'Rourke, Sean; Bowerman, Bruce; Wu, Zilu; Jin, Yishi; Chisholm, Andrew D

    2011-09-22

    The mechanisms underlying the ability of axons to regrow after injury remain poorly explored at the molecular genetic level. We used a laser injury model in Caenorhabditis elegans mechanosensory neurons to screen 654 conserved genes for regulators of axonal regrowth. We uncover several functional clusters of genes that promote or repress regrowth, including genes classically known to affect axon guidance, membrane excitability, neurotransmission, and synaptic vesicle endocytosis. The conserved Arf Guanine nucleotide Exchange Factor (GEF), EFA-6, acts as an intrinsic inhibitor of regrowth. By combining genetics and in vivo imaging, we show that EFA-6 inhibits regrowth via microtubule dynamics, independent of its Arf GEF activity. Among newly identified regrowth inhibitors, only loss of function in EFA-6 partially bypasses the requirement for DLK-1 kinase. Identification of these pathways significantly expands our understanding of the genetic basis of axonal injury responses and repair.

  5. Identifying host pathogenic pathways in bovine digital dermatitis by RNA-Seq analysis.

    PubMed

    Scholey, R A; Evans, N J; Blowey, R W; Massey, J P; Murray, R D; Smith, R F; Ollier, W E; Carter, S D

    2013-09-01

    Digital dermatitis is a painful foot disease compromising welfare in dairy cattle. The disease has a complex multibacterial aetiology, but little is known about its pathogenesis. In this study, gene expression in skin biopsies from five bovine digital dermatitis lesions and five healthy bovine feet was compared using RNA-Seq technology. Differential gene expression was determined after mapping transcripts to the Btau 4.0 genome. Pathway analysis identified gene networks involving differentially expressed transcripts. Bovine digital dermatitis lesions had increased expression of mRNA for α2-macroglobulin-like 1, a protein potentially involved in bacterial immune evasion and bacterial survival. There was increased expression of keratin 6A and interleukin 1β mRNA in bovine digital dermatitis lesions, but reduced expression of most other keratin and keratin-associated genes. There was little evidence of local immune reactions to the bacterial infection present in lesions.

  6. Metabolomics Identifies Novel Hnf1α-Dependent Physiological Pathways in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bonzo, Jessica A.; Patterson, Andrew D.; Krausz, Kristopher W.; Gonzalez, Frank J.

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the HNF1A gene cause maturity-onset diabetes of the young type 3, one of the most common genetic causes of non-insulin-dependent (type 2) diabetes mellitus. Although the whole-body Hnf1a-null mouse recapitulates the low insulin levels and high blood glucose observed in human maturity-onset diabetes of the young type 3 patients, these mice also suffer from Laron dwarfism and aminoaciduria, suggesting a role for hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α (Hnf1α) in pathophysiologies distinct from non-insulin-dependent (type 2) diabetes mellitus. In an effort to identify pathways associated with inactivation of Hnf1α, an ultraperformance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry-based metabolomics study was conducted on urine samples from wild-type and Hnf1a-null mice. An increase in phenylalanine metabolites is in agreement with the known regulation of the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene by Hnf1α. This metabolomic approach also identified urinary biomarkers for three tissue-specific dysfunctions previously unassociated with Hnf1α function. 1) Elevated indolelactate coupled to decreased xanthurenic acid also indicated defects in the indole and kynurenine pathways of tryptophan metabolism, respectively. 2) An increase in the neutral amino acid proline in the urine of Hnf1a-null mice correlated with loss of renal apical membrane transporters of the Slc6a family. 3) Further investigation into the mechanism of aldosterone increase revealed an overactive adrenal gland in Hnf1a-null mice possibly due to inhibition of negative feedback regulation. Although the phenotype of the Hnf1a-null mouse is complex, metabolomics has opened the door to investigation of several physiological systems in which Hnf1α may be a critical regulatory component. PMID:20943816

  7. Metabolomics identifies novel Hnf1alpha-dependent physiological pathways in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bonzo, Jessica A; Patterson, Andrew D; Krausz, Kristopher W; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2010-12-01

    Mutations in the HNF1A gene cause maturity-onset diabetes of the young type 3, one of the most common genetic causes of non-insulin-dependent (type 2) diabetes mellitus. Although the whole-body Hnf1a-null mouse recapitulates the low insulin levels and high blood glucose observed in human maturity-onset diabetes of the young type 3 patients, these mice also suffer from Laron dwarfism and aminoaciduria, suggesting a role for hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α (Hnf1α) in pathophysiologies distinct from non-insulin-dependent (type 2) diabetes mellitus. In an effort to identify pathways associated with inactivation of Hnf1α, an ultraperformance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry-based metabolomics study was conducted on urine samples from wild-type and Hnf1a-null mice. An increase in phenylalanine metabolites is in agreement with the known regulation of the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene by Hnf1α. This metabolomic approach also identified urinary biomarkers for three tissue-specific dysfunctions previously unassociated with Hnf1α function. 1) Elevated indolelactate coupled to decreased xanthurenic acid also indicated defects in the indole and kynurenine pathways of tryptophan metabolism, respectively. 2) An increase in the neutral amino acid proline in the urine of Hnf1a-null mice correlated with loss of renal apical membrane transporters of the Slc6a family. 3) Further investigation into the mechanism of aldosterone increase revealed an overactive adrenal gland in Hnf1a-null mice possibly due to inhibition of negative feedback regulation. Although the phenotype of the Hnf1a-null mouse is complex, metabolomics has opened the door to investigation of several physiological systems in which Hnf1α may be a critical regulatory component.

  8. Nontargeted metabolomics reveals biochemical pathways altered in response to captivity and food limitation in the freshwater mussel Amblema plicata.

    PubMed

    Roznere, Ieva; Watters, G Thomas; Wolfe, Barbara A; Daly, Marymegan

    2014-12-01

    Effective conservation of freshwater mussels (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Unionidae), one of the most endangered groups of animals in North America, is compromised by limited knowledge of their health. We address this gap in knowledge by characterizing the metabolic profile of Amblema plicata in the wild and in response to captivity and food limitation. Eight mussels brought into captivity from the wild were isolated for 18 days without a food source. Hemolymph samples were taken prior to, and 9 and 18 days after the start of the experiment; these samples were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. We detected and identified 71 biochemicals in the hemolymph of freshwater mussels; of these, 49 showed significant changes during captivity and/or food limitation (p<0.05). Fasting resulted in severe metabolite depletion. Captive (but fed) mussels experienced changes similar to (albeit less severe than) fasting mussels, suggesting that mussels may experience nutritional deficiency under common captive conditions. A. plicata responded to food limitation stress by preferentially using energy reserves for maintenance rather than growth. Carbohydrate and energy metabolism exhibited down-regulation in captive, food-limited, and wild mussels. Lipid metabolism was up-regulated in captive/food-limited mussels and unchanged in wild mussels. Amino acid metabolism was up-regulated in wild mussels and down-regulated in captive/food-limited mussels. Nucleotide metabolism was up-regulated in the wild mussels, down-regulated in food-limited mussels, and unchanged in captive mussels. The different responses between treatment groups suggest potential for nucleotide metabolism as a biomarker of health status for freshwater mussels.

  9. Long-term recovery from hippocampal-related behavioral and biochemical abnormalities induced by noise exposure during brain development. Evaluation of auditory pathway integrity.

    PubMed

    Uran, S L; Gómez-Casati, M E; Guelman, L R

    2014-10-01

    Sound is an important part of man's contact with the environment and has served as critical means for survival throughout his evolution. As a result of exposure to noise, physiological functions such as those involving structures of the auditory and non-auditory systems might be damaged. We have previously reported that noise-exposed developing rats elicited hippocampal-related histological, biochemical and behavioral changes. However, no data about the time lapse of these changes were reported. Moreover, measurements of auditory pathway function were not performed in exposed animals. Therefore, with the present work, we aim to test the onset and the persistence of the different extra-auditory abnormalities observed in noise-exposed rats and to evaluate auditory pathway integrity. Male Wistar rats of 15 days were exposed to moderate noise levels (95-97 dB SPL, 2 h a day) during one day (acute noise exposure, ANE) or during 15 days (sub-acute noise exposure, SANE). Hippocampal biochemical determinations as well as short (ST) and long term (LT) behavioral assessments were performed. In addition, histological and functional evaluations of the auditory pathway were carried out in exposed animals. Our results show that hippocampal-related behavioral and biochemical changes (impairments in habituation, recognition and associative memories as well as distortion of anxiety-related behavior, decreases in reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and increases in antioxidant enzymes activities) induced by noise exposure were almost completely restored by PND 90. In addition, auditory evaluation shows that increased cochlear thresholds observed in exposed rats were re-established at PND 90, although with a remarkable supra-threshold amplitude reduction. These data suggest that noise-induced hippocampal and auditory-related alterations are mostly transient and that the effects of noise on the hippocampus might be, at least in part, mediated by the damage on the auditory pathway

  10. Molecular mechanisms of the non-coenzyme action of thiamin in brain: biochemical, structural and pathway analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mkrtchyan, Garik; Aleshin, Vasily; Parkhomenko, Yulia; Kaehne, Thilo; Luigi Di Salvo, Martino; Parroni, Alessia; Contestabile, Roberto; Vovk, Andrey; Bettendorff, Lucien; Bunik, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Thiamin (vitamin B1) is a pharmacological agent boosting central metabolism through the action of the coenzyme thiamin diphosphate (ThDP). However, positive effects, including improved cognition, of high thiamin doses in neurodegeneration may be observed without increased ThDP or ThDP-dependent enzymes in brain. Here, we determine protein partners and metabolic pathways where thiamin acts beyond its coenzyme role. Malate dehydrogenase, glutamate dehydrogenase and pyridoxal kinase were identified as abundant proteins binding to thiamin- or thiazolium-modified sorbents. Kinetic studies, supported by structural analysis, revealed allosteric regulation of these proteins by thiamin and/or its derivatives. Thiamin triphosphate and adenylated thiamin triphosphate activate glutamate dehydrogenase. Thiamin and ThDP regulate malate dehydrogenase isoforms and pyridoxal kinase. Thiamin regulation of enzymes related to malate-aspartate shuttle may impact on malate/citrate exchange, responsible for exporting acetyl residues from mitochondria. Indeed, bioinformatic analyses found an association between thiamin- and thiazolium-binding proteins and the term acetylation. Our interdisciplinary study shows that thiamin is not only a coenzyme for acetyl-CoA production, but also an allosteric regulator of acetyl-CoA metabolism including regulatory acetylation of proteins and acetylcholine biosynthesis. Moreover, thiamin action in neurodegeneration may also involve neurodegeneration-related 14-3-3, DJ-1 and β-amyloid precursor proteins identified among the thiamin- and/or thiazolium-binding proteins. PMID:26212886

  11. Significant Deregulated Pathways in Diabetes Type II Complications Identified through Expression Based Network Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukil, Sanchaita; Sinha, Meenakshee; Varshney, Lavneesh; Agrawal, Shipra

    Type 2 Diabetes is a complex multifactorial disease, which alters several signaling cascades giving rise to serious complications. It is one of the major risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. The present research work describes an integrated functional network biology approach to identify pathways that get transcriptionally altered and lead to complex complications thereby amplifying the phenotypic effect of the impaired disease state. We have identified two sub-network modules, which could be activated under abnormal circumstances in diabetes. Present work describes key proteins such as P85A and SRC serving as important nodes to mediate alternate signaling routes during diseased condition. P85A has been shown to be an important link between stress responsive MAPK and CVD markers involved in fibrosis. MAPK8 has been shown to interact with P85A and further activate CTGF through VEGF signaling. We have traced a novel and unique route correlating inflammation and fibrosis by considering P85A as a key mediator of signals. The next sub-network module shows SRC as a junction for various signaling processes, which results in interaction between NF-kB and beta catenin to cause cell death. The powerful interaction between these important genes in response to transcriptionally altered lipid metabolism and impaired inflammatory response via SRC causes apoptosis of cells. The crosstalk between inflammation, lipid homeostasis and stress, and their serious effects downstream have been explained in the present analyses.

  12. Rare Copy Number Variants Identified Suggest the Regulating Pathways in Hypertension-Related Left Ventricular Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Christian R.; Majid, Fadhlina; Danuri, Norlaila; Basir, Fashieha; Thiruvahindrapuram, Bhooma; Scherer, Stephen W.; Yusoff, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and a powerful predictor of adverse cardiovascular outcomes in the hypertensive patients. It has complex multifactorial and polygenic basis for its pathogenesis. We hypothesized that rare copy number variants (CNVs) contribute to the LVH pathogenesis in hypertensive patients. Copy number variants (CNV) were identified in 258 hypertensive patients, 95 of whom had LVH, after genotyping with a high resolution SNP array. Following stringent filtering criteria, we identified 208 rare, or private CNVs that were only present in our patients with hypertension related LVH. Preliminary findings from Gene Ontology and pathway analysis of this study confirmed the involvement of the genes known to be functionally involved in cardiac development and phenotypes, in line with previously reported transcriptomic studies. Network enrichment analyses suggested that the gene-set was, directly or indirectly, involved in the transcription factors regulating the “foetal cardiac gene programme” which triggered the hypertrophic cascade, confirming previous reports. These findings suggest that multiple, individually rare copy number variants altering genes may contribute to the pathogenesis of hypertension-related LVH. In summary, we have provided further supporting evidence that rare CNV could potentially impact this common and complex disease susceptibility with lower heritability. PMID:26930585

  13. Genetic and biochemical dissection of a HisKA domain identifies residues required exclusively for kinase and phosphatase activities.

    PubMed

    Willett, Jonathan W; Kirby, John R

    2012-01-01

    Two-component signal transduction systems, composed of histidine kinases (HK) and response regulators (RR), allow bacteria to respond to diverse environmental stimuli. The HK can control both phosphorylation and subsequent dephosphorylation of its cognate RR. The majority of HKs utilize the HisKA subfamily of dimerization and histidine phosphotransfer (DHp) domains, which contain the phospho-accepting histidine and directly contact the RR. Extensive genetics, biochemistry, and structural biology on several prototypical TCS systems including NtrB-NtrC and EnvZ-OmpR have provided a solid basis for understanding the function of HK-RR signaling. Recently, work on NarX, a HisKA_3 subfamily protein, indicated that two residues in the highly conserved region of the DHp domain are responsible for phosphatase activity. In this study we have carried out both genetic and biochemical analyses on Myxococcus xanthus CrdS, a member of the HisKA subfamily of bacterial HKs. CrdS is required for the regulation of spore formation in response to environmental stress. Following alanine-scanning mutagenesis of the α1 helix of the DHp domain of CrdS, we determined the role for each mutant protein for both kinase and phosphatase activity. Our results indicate that the conserved acidic residue (E372) immediately adjacent to the site of autophosphorylation (H371) is specifically required for kinase activity but not for phosphatase activity. Conversely, we found that the conserved Thr/Asn residue (N375) was required for phosphatase activity but not for kinase activity. We extended our biochemical analyses to two CrdS homologs from M. xanthus, HK1190 and HK4262, as well as Thermotoga maritima HK853. The results were similar for each HisKA family protein where the conserved acidic residue is required for kinase activity while the conserved Thr/Asn residue is required for phosphatase activity. These data are consistent with conserved mechanisms for kinase and phosphatase activities in the

  14. An Integrative Framework for Bayesian Variable Selection with Informative Priors for Identifying Genes and Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ander, Bradley P.; Zhang, Xiaoshuai; Xue, Fuzhong; Sharp, Frank R.; Yang, Xiaowei

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of genetic or genomic markers plays a central role in the development of personalized medicine. A notable challenge exists when dealing with the high dimensionality of the data sets, as thousands of genes or millions of genetic variants are collected on a relatively small number of subjects. Traditional gene-wise selection methods using univariate analyses face difficulty to incorporate correlational, structural, or functional structures amongst the molecular measures. For microarray gene expression data, we first summarize solutions in dealing with ‘large p, small n’ problems, and then propose an integrative Bayesian variable selection (iBVS) framework for simultaneously identifying causal or marker genes and regulatory pathways. A novel partial least squares (PLS) g-prior for iBVS is developed to allow the incorporation of prior knowledge on gene-gene interactions or functional relationships. From the point view of systems biology, iBVS enables user to directly target the joint effects of multiple genes and pathways in a hierarchical modeling diagram to predict disease status or phenotype. The estimated posterior selection probabilities offer probabilitic and biological interpretations. Both simulated data and a set of microarray data in predicting stroke status are used in validating the performance of iBVS in a Probit model with binary outcomes. iBVS offers a general framework for effective discovery of various molecular biomarkers by combining data-based statistics and knowledge-based priors. Guidelines on making posterior inferences, determining Bayesian significance levels, and improving computational efficiencies are also discussed. PMID:23844055

  15. Genome-Wide Chromatin Landscape Transitions Identify Novel Pathways in Early Commitment to Osteoblast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Bethtrice; Varticovski, Lyuba; Baek, Songjoon; Hager, Gordon L.

    2016-01-01

    Bone continuously undergoes remodeling by a tightly regulated process that involves osteoblast differentiation from Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC). However, commitment of MSC to osteoblastic lineage is a poorly understood process. Chromatin organization functions as a molecular gatekeeper of DNA functions. Detection of sites that are hypersensitive to Dnase I has been used for detailed examination of changes in response to hormones and differentiation cues. To investigate the early steps in commitment of MSC to osteoblasts, we used a model human temperature-sensitive cell line, hFOB. When shifted to non-permissive temperature, these cells undergo "spontaneous" differentiation that takes several weeks, a process that is greatly accelerated by osteogenic induction media. We performed Dnase I hypersensitivity assays combined with deep sequencing to identify genome-wide potential regulatory events in cells undergoing early steps of commitment to osteoblasts. Massive reorganization of chromatin occurred within hours of differentiation. Whereas ~30% of unique DHS sites were located in the promoters, the majority was outside of the promoters, designated as enhancers. Many of them were at novel genomic sites and need to be confirmed experimentally. We developed a novel method for identification of cellular networks based solely on DHS enhancers signature correlated to gene expression. The analysis of enhancers that were unique to differentiating cells led to identification of bone developmental program encompassing 147 genes that directly or indirectly participate in osteogenesis. Identification of these pathways provided an unprecedented view of genomic regulation during early steps of differentiation and changes related to WNT, AP-1 and other pathways may have therapeutic implications. PMID:26890492

  16. Identifying components of the NF-kappaB pathway in the beneficial Euprymna scolopes-Vibrio fischeri light organ symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Goodson, Michael S; Kojadinovic, Mila; Troll, Joshua V; Scheetz, Todd E; Casavant, Thomas L; Soares, M Bento; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J

    2005-11-01

    The Toll/NF-kappaB pathway is a common, evolutionarily conserved innate immune pathway that modulates the responses of animal cells to microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs). Because MAMPs have been implicated as critical elements in the signaling of symbiont-induced development, an expressed sequence tag library from the juvenile light organ of Euprymna scolopes was used to identify members of the Toll/NF-kappaB pathway. Full-length transcripts were identified by using 5' and 3' RACE PCR. Seven transcripts critical for MAMP-induced triggering of the Toll/NF-kappaB phosphorylation cascade have been identified, including receptors, signal transducers, and a transcription factor. Further investigations should elucidate the role of the Toll/NF-kappaB pathway in the initiation of the beneficial symbiosis between E. scolopes and Vibrio fischeri.

  17. Analysis of biochemical compounds and differentially expressed genes of the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway in variegated peach flowers.

    PubMed

    Hassani, D; Liu, H L; Chen, Y N; Wan, Z B; Zhuge, Q; Li, S X

    2015-10-28

    Variegated plants are highly valuable in the floricultural market, yet the genetic mechanism underlying this attractive phenomenon has not been completely elucidated. In this study, we identified and measured different compounds in pink and white flower petals of peach (Prunus persica) by high-performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry analyses. No cyanidin-based or pelargonidin-based compounds were detected in white petals, but high levels of these compounds were found in pink petals. Additionally, we sequenced and analyzed the expression of six key structural genes in the anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway (CHI, CHS, DFR, F3'H, ANS, and UFGT) in both white and pink petals. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed all six genes to be expressed at greatly reduced levels in white flower petals, relative to pink. No allelic variations were found in the transcribed sequences. However, alignment of transcribed and genomic sequences of the ANS gene detected alternative splicing, resulting in transcripts of 1.071 and 942 bp. Only the longer transcript was observed in white flower petals. Since ANS is the key intermediate enzyme catalyzing the colorless leucopelargonidin and leucocyanidin to substrates required for completion of anthocyanin biosynthesis, the ANS gene is implicated in flower color variegation and should be explored in future studies. This article, together with a previous transcriptome study, elucidates the mechanism underlying peach flower color variegation in terms of the key structural genes involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis.

  18. An evidence-based knowledgebase of metastasis suppressors to identify key pathways relevant to cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Min; Li, Zhe; Qu, Hong

    2015-10-21

    Metastasis suppressor genes (MS genes) are genes that play important roles in inhibiting the process of cancer metastasis without preventing growth of the primary tumor. Identification of these genes and understanding their functions are critical for investigation of cancer metastasis. Recent studies on cancer metastasis have identified many new susceptibility MS genes. However, the comprehensive illustration of diverse cellular processes regulated by metastasis suppressors during the metastasis cascade is lacking. Thus, the relationship between MS genes and cancer risk is still unclear. To unveil the cellular complexity of MS genes, we have constructed MSGene (http://MSGene.bioinfo-minzhao.org/), the first literature-based gene resource for exploring human MS genes. In total, we manually curated 194 experimentally verified MS genes and mapped to 1448 homologous genes from 17 model species. Follow-up functional analyses associated 194 human MS genes with epithelium/tissue morphogenesis and epithelia cell proliferation. In addition, pathway analysis highlights the prominent role of MS genes in activation of platelets and coagulation system in tumor metastatic cascade. Moreover, global mutation pattern of MS genes across multiple cancers may reveal common cancer metastasis mechanisms. All these results illustrate the importance of MSGene to our understanding on cell development and cancer metastasis.

  19. A model for genetic and epigenetic regulatory networks identifies rare pathways for transcription factor induced pluripotency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artyomov, Maxim; Meissner, Alex; Chakraborty, Arup

    2010-03-01

    Most cells in an organism have the same DNA. Yet, different cell types express different proteins and carry out different functions. This is because of epigenetic differences; i.e., DNA in different cell types is packaged distinctly, making it hard to express certain genes while facilitating the expression of others. During development, upon receipt of appropriate cues, pluripotent embryonic stem cells differentiate into diverse cell types that make up the organism (e.g., a human). There has long been an effort to make this process go backward -- i.e., reprogram a differentiated cell (e.g., a skin cell) to pluripotent status. Recently, this has been achieved by transfecting certain transcription factors into differentiated cells. This method does not use embryonic material and promises the development of patient-specific regenerative medicine, but it is inefficient. The mechanisms that make reprogramming rare, or even possible, are poorly understood. We have developed the first computational model of transcription factor-induced reprogramming. Results obtained from the model are consistent with diverse observations, and identify the rare pathways that allow reprogramming to occur. If validated, our model could be further developed to design optimal strategies for reprogramming and shed light on basic questions in biology.

  20. An evidence-based knowledgebase of metastasis suppressors to identify key pathways relevant to cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Min; Li, Zhe; Qu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis suppressor genes (MS genes) are genes that play important roles in inhibiting the process of cancer metastasis without preventing growth of the primary tumor. Identification of these genes and understanding their functions are critical for investigation of cancer metastasis. Recent studies on cancer metastasis have identified many new susceptibility MS genes. However, the comprehensive illustration of diverse cellular processes regulated by metastasis suppressors during the metastasis cascade is lacking. Thus, the relationship between MS genes and cancer risk is still unclear. To unveil the cellular complexity of MS genes, we have constructed MSGene (http://MSGene.bioinfo-minzhao.org/), the first literature-based gene resource for exploring human MS genes. In total, we manually curated 194 experimentally verified MS genes and mapped to 1448 homologous genes from 17 model species. Follow-up functional analyses associated 194 human MS genes with epithelium/tissue morphogenesis and epithelia cell proliferation. In addition, pathway analysis highlights the prominent role of MS genes in activation of platelets and coagulation system in tumor metastatic cascade. Moreover, global mutation pattern of MS genes across multiple cancers may reveal common cancer metastasis mechanisms. All these results illustrate the importance of MSGene to our understanding on cell development and cancer metastasis. PMID:26486520

  1. Urine metabolomic analysis identifies potential biomarkers and pathogenic pathways in kidney cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoungmi; Taylor, Sandra L; Ganti, Sheila; Guo, Lining; Osier, Michael V; Weiss, Robert H

    2011-05-01

    Kidney cancer is the seventh most common cancer in the Western world, its incidence is increasing, and it is frequently metastatic at presentation, at which stage patient survival statistics are grim. In addition, there are no useful biofluid markers for this disease, such that diagnosis is dependent on imaging techniques that are not generally used for screening. In the present study, we use metabolomics techniques to identify metabolites in kidney cancer patients' urine, which appear at different levels (when normalized to account for urine volume and concentration) from the same metabolites in nonkidney cancer patients. We found that quinolinate, 4-hydroxybenzoate, and gentisate are differentially expressed at a false discovery rate of 0.26, and these metabolites are involved in common pathways of specific amino acid and energetic metabolism, consistent with high tumor protein breakdown and utilization, and the Warburg effect. When added to four different (three kidney cancer-derived and one "normal") cell lines, several of the significantly altered metabolites, quinolinate, α-ketoglutarate, and gentisate, showed increased or unchanged cell proliferation that was cell line-dependent. Further evaluation of the global metabolomics analysis, as well as confirmation of the specific potential biomarkers using a larger sample size, will lead to new avenues of kidney cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  2. What is a clinical pathway? Refinement of an operational definition to identify clinical pathway studies for a Cochrane systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lawal, Adegboyega K; Rotter, Thomas; Kinsman, Leigh; Machotta, Andreas; Ronellenfitsch, Ulrich; Scott, Shannon D; Goodridge, Donna; Plishka, Christopher; Groot, Gary

    2016-02-23

    Clinical pathways (CPWs) are a common component in the quest to improve the quality of health. CPWs are used to reduce variation, improve quality of care, and maximize the outcomes for specific groups of patients. An ongoing challenge is the operationalization of a definition of CPW in healthcare. This may be attributable to both the differences in definition and a lack of conceptualization in the field of clinical pathways. This correspondence article describes a process of refinement of an operational definition for CPW research and proposes an operational definition for the future syntheses of CPWs literature. Following the approach proposed by Kinsman et al. (BMC Medicine 8(1):31, 2010) and Wieland et al. (Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine 17(2):50, 2011), we used a four-stage process to generate a five criteria checklist for the definition of CPWs. We refined the operational definition, through consensus, merging two of the checklist's criteria, leading to a more inclusive criterion for accommodating CPW studies conducted in various healthcare settings. The following four criteria for CPW operational definition, derived from the refinement process described above, are (1) the intervention was a structured multidisciplinary plan of care; (2) the intervention was used to translate guidelines or evidence into local structures; (3) the intervention detailed the steps in a course of treatment or care in a plan, pathway, algorithm, guideline, protocol or other 'inventory of actions' (i.e. the intervention had time-frames or criteria-based progression); and (4) the intervention aimed to standardize care for a specific population. An intervention meeting all four criteria was considered to be a CPW. The development of operational definitions for complex interventions is a useful approach to appraise and synthesize evidence for policy development and quality improvement.

  3. A Powerful Procedure for Pathway-Based Meta-analysis Using Summary Statistics Identifies 43 Pathways Associated with Type II Diabetes in European Populations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Han; Wheeler, William; Hyland, Paula L.; Yang, Yifan; Shi, Jianxin; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Yu, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Meta-analysis of multiple genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has become an effective approach for detecting single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) associations with complex traits. However, it is difficult to integrate the readily accessible SNP-level summary statistics from a meta-analysis into more powerful multi-marker testing procedures, which generally require individual-level genetic data. We developed a general procedure called Summary based Adaptive Rank Truncated Product (sARTP) for conducting gene and pathway meta-analysis that uses only SNP-level summary statistics in combination with genotype correlation estimated from a panel of individual-level genetic data. We demonstrated the validity and power advantage of sARTP through empirical and simulated data. We conducted a comprehensive pathway-based meta-analysis with sARTP on type 2 diabetes (T2D) by integrating SNP-level summary statistics from two large studies consisting of 19,809 T2D cases and 111,181 controls with European ancestry. Among 4,713 candidate pathways from which genes in neighborhoods of 170 GWAS established T2D loci were excluded, we detected 43 T2D globally significant pathways (with Bonferroni corrected p-values < 0.05), which included the insulin signaling pathway and T2D pathway defined by KEGG, as well as the pathways defined according to specific gene expression patterns on pancreatic adenocarcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, and bladder carcinoma. Using summary data from 8 eastern Asian T2D GWAS with 6,952 cases and 11,865 controls, we showed 7 out of the 43 pathways identified in European populations remained to be significant in eastern Asians at the false discovery rate of 0.1. We created an R package and a web-based tool for sARTP with the capability to analyze pathways with thousands of genes and tens of thousands of SNPs. PMID:27362418

  4. A Functional Genome-Wide In Vivo Screen Identifies New Regulators of Signalling Pathways during Early Xenopus Embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Siwei; Li, Jingjing; Lea, Robert; Amaya, Enrique; Dorey, Karel

    2013-01-01

    Embryonic development requires exquisite regulation of several essential processes, such as patterning of tissues and organs, cell fate decisions, and morphogenesis. Intriguingly, these diverse processes are controlled by only a handful of signalling pathways, and mis-regulation in one or more of these pathways may result in a variety of congenital defects and diseases. Consequently, investigating how these signalling pathways are regulated at the molecular level is essential to understanding the mechanisms underlying vertebrate embryogenesis, as well as developing treatments for human diseases. Here, we designed and performed a large-scale gain-of-function screen in Xenopus embryos aimed at identifying new regulators of MAPK/Erk, PI3K/Akt, BMP, and TGF-β/Nodal signalling pathways. Our gain-of-function screen is based on the identification of gene products that alter the phosphorylation state of key signalling molecules, which report the activation state of the pathways. In total, we have identified 20 new molecules that regulate the activity of one or more signalling pathways during early Xenopus development. This is the first time that such a functional screen has been performed, and the findings pave the way toward a more comprehensive understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating the activity of important signalling pathways under normal and pathological conditions. PMID:24244509

  5. Genome-Wide Expression Profiling Identifies Type 1 Interferon Response Pathways in Active Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.; Zhang, Mingzi M.; Wong, Hazel E. E.; Sahiratmadja, Edhyana; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Alisjahbana, Bachti; van Crevel, Reinout; Marzuki, Sangkot; Seielstad, Mark; van de Vosse, Esther; Hibberd, Martin L.

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB), caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb), remains the leading cause of mortality from a single infectious agent. Each year around 9 million individuals newly develop active TB disease, and over 2 billion individuals are latently infected with M.tb worldwide, thus being at risk of developing TB reactivation disease later in life. The underlying mechanisms and pathways of protection against TB in humans, as well as the dynamics of the host response to M.tb infection, are incompletely understood. We carried out whole-genome expression profiling on a cohort of TB patients longitudinally sampled along 3 time-points: during active infection, during treatment, and after completion of curative treatment. We identified molecular signatures involving the upregulation of type-1 interferon (α/β) mediated signaling and chronic inflammation during active TB disease in an Indonesian population, in line with results from two recent studies in ethnically and epidemiologically different populations in Europe and South Africa. Expression profiles were captured in neutrophil-depleted blood samples, indicating a major contribution of lymphocytes and myeloid cells. Expression of type-1 interferon (α/β) genes mediated was also upregulated in the lungs of M.tb infected mice and in infected human macrophages. In patients, the regulated gene expression-signature normalized during treatment, including the type-1 interferon mediated signaling and a concurrent opposite regulation of interferon-gamma. Further analysis revealed IL15RA, UBE2L6 and GBP4 as molecules involved in the type-I interferon response in all three experimental models. Our data is highly suggestive that the innate immune type-I interferon signaling cascade could be used as a quantitative tool for monitoring active TB disease, and provide evidence that components of the patient’s blood gene expression signature bear similarities to the pulmonary and macrophage response to mycobacterial infection

  6. Identifying alternate pathways for climate change to impact inland recreational fishers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, Len M.; Fenichel, Eli P.; Fulton, David C.; Mendelsohn, Robert; Smith, Jordan W.; Tunney, Tyler D.; Lynch, Abigail J.; Paukert, Craig P.; Whitney, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Fisheries and human dimensions literature suggests that climate change influences inland recreational fishers in North America through three major pathways. The most widely recognized pathway suggests that climate change impacts habitat and fish populations (e.g., water temperature impacting fish survival) and cascades to impact fishers. Climate change also impacts recreational fishers by influencing environmental conditions that directly affect fishers (e.g., increased temperatures in northern climates resulting in extended open water fishing seasons and increased fishing effort). The final pathway occurs from climate change mitigation and adaptation efforts (e.g., refined energy policies result in higher fuel costs, making distant trips more expensive). To address limitations of past research (e.g., assessing climate change impacts for only one pathway at a time and not accounting for climate variability, extreme weather events, or heterogeneity among fishers), we encourage researchers to refocus their efforts to understand and document climate change impacts to inland fishers.

  7. Gene Network Inference and Biochemical Assessment Delineates GPCR Pathways and CREB Targets in Small Intestinal Neuroendocrine Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Drozdov, Ignat; Svejda, Bernhard; Gustafsson, Bjorn I.; Mane, Shrikant; Pfragner, Roswitha; Kidd, Mark; Modlin, Irvin M.

    2011-01-01

    Small intestinal (SI) neuroendocrine tumors (NET) are increasing in incidence, however little is known about their biology. High throughput techniques such as inference of gene regulatory networks from microarray experiments can objectively define signaling machinery in this disease. Genome-wide co-expression analysis was used to infer gene relevance network in SI-NETs. The network was confirmed to be non-random, scale-free, and highly modular. Functional analysis of gene co-expression modules revealed processes including ‘Nervous system development’, ‘Immune response’, and ‘Cell-cycle’. Importantly, gene network topology and differential expression analysis identified over-expression of the GPCR signaling regulators, the cAMP synthetase, ADCY2, and the protein kinase A, PRKAR1A. Seven CREB response element (CRE) transcripts associated with proliferation and secretion: BEX1, BICD1, CHGB, CPE, GABRB3, SCG2 and SCG3 as well as ADCY2 and PRKAR1A were measured in an independent SI dataset (n = 10 NETs; n = 8 normal preparations). All were up-regulated (p<0.035) with the exception of SCG3 which was not differently expressed. Forskolin (a direct cAMP activator, 10−5 M) significantly stimulated transcription of pCREB and 3/7 CREB targets, isoproterenol (a selective ß-adrenergic receptor agonist and cAMP activator, 10−5 M) stimulated pCREB and 4/7 targets while BIM-53061 (a dopamine D2 and Serotonin [5-HT2] receptor agonist, 10−6 M) stimulated 100% of targets as well as pCREB; CRE transcription correlated with the levels of cAMP accumulation and PKA activity; BIM-53061 stimulated the highest levels of cAMP and PKA (2.8-fold and 2.5-fold vs. 1.8–2-fold for isoproterenol and forskolin). Gene network inference and graph topology analysis in SI NETs suggests that SI NETs express neural GPCRs that activate different CRE targets associated with proliferation and secretion. In vitro studies, in a model NET cell system, confirmed that transcriptional

  8. Combinatorial high-throughput experimental and bioinformatic approach identifies molecular pathways linked with the sensitivity to anticancer target drugs

    PubMed Central

    Venkova, Larisa; Aliper, Alexander; Suntsova, Maria; Kholodenko, Roman; Shepelin, Denis; Borisov, Nicolas; Malakhova, Galina; Vasilov, Raif; Roumiantsev, Sergey; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Buzdin, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Effective choice of anticancer drugs is important problem of modern medicine. We developed a method termed OncoFinder for the analysis of new type of biomarkers reflecting activation of intracellular signaling and metabolic molecular pathways. These biomarkers may be linked with the sensitivity to anticancer drugs. In this study, we compared the experimental data obtained in our laboratory and in the Genomics of Drug Sensitivity in Cancer (GDS) project for testing response to anticancer drugs and transcriptomes of various human cell lines. The microarray-based profiling of transcriptomes was performed for the cell lines before the addition of drugs to the medium, and experimental growth inhibition curves were built for each drug, featuring characteristic IC50 values. We assayed here four target drugs - Pazopanib, Sorafenib, Sunitinib and Temsirolimus, and 238 different cell lines, of which 11 were profiled in our laboratory and 227 - in GDS project. Using the OncoFinder-processed transcriptomic data on ∼600 molecular pathways, we identified pathways showing significant correlation between pathway activation strength (PAS) and IC50 values for these drugs. Correlations reflect relationships between response to drug and pathway activation features. We intersected the results and found molecular pathways significantly correlated in both our assay and GDS project. For most of these pathways, we generated molecular models of their interaction with known molecular target(s) of the respective drugs. For the first time, our study uncovered mechanisms underlying cancer cell response to drugs at the high-throughput molecular interactomic level. PMID:26317900

  9. Gene-set meta-analysis of lung cancer identifies pathway related to systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Sohns, Melanie; Friedrichs, Stefanie; Hung, Rayjean J.; Fehringer, Gord; McLaughlin, John; Amos, Christopher I.; Brennan, Paul; Risch, Angela; Brüske, Irene; Caporaso, Neil E.; Landi, Maria Teresa; Christiani, David C.; Wei, Yongyue; Bickeböller, Heike

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Gene-set analysis (GSA) is an approach using the results of single-marker genome-wide association studies when investigating pathways as a whole with respect to the genetic basis of a disease. Methods We performed a meta-analysis of seven GSAs for lung cancer, applying the method META-GSA. Overall, the information taken from 11,365 cases and 22,505 controls from within the TRICL/ILCCO consortia was used to investigate a total of 234 pathways from the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database. Results META-GSA reveals the systemic lupus erythematosus KEGG pathway hsa05322, driven by the gene region 6p21-22, as also implicated in lung cancer (p = 0.0306). This gene region is known to be associated with squamous cell lung carcinoma. The most important genes driving the significance of this pathway belong to the genomic areas HIST1-H4L, -1BN, -2BN, -H2AK, -H4K and C2/C4A/C4B. Within these areas, the markers most significantly associated with LC are rs13194781 (located within HIST12BN) and rs1270942 (located between C2 and C4A). Conclusions We have discovered a pathway currently marked as specific to systemic lupus erythematosus as being significantly implicated in lung cancer. The gene region 6p21-22 in this pathway appears to be more extensively associated with lung cancer than previously assumed. Given wide-stretched linkage disequilibrium to the area APOM/BAG6/MSH5, there is currently simply not enough information or evidence to conclude whether the potential pleiotropy of lung cancer and systemic lupus erythematosus is spurious, biological, or mediated. Further research into this pathway and gene region will be necessary. PMID:28273134

  10. Set-reset flip-flop memory based on enzyme reactions: toward memory systems controlled by biochemical pathways.

    PubMed

    Pita, Marcos; Strack, Guinevere; MacVittie, Kevin; Zhou, Jian; Katz, Evgeny

    2009-12-10

    The enzyme-based set-reset flip-flop memory system was designed with the core part composed of horseradish peroxidase and diaphorase biocatalyzing oxidation and reduction of redox species (2,6-dichloroindophenol or ferrocyanide). The biocatalytic redox reactions were activated by H(2)O(2) and NADH produced in situ by different enzymatic reactions allowing transformation of various biochemical signals (glucose, lactate, d-glucose-6-phosphate, ethanol) into reduced or oxidized states of the redox species. The current redox state of the system, controlled by the set and reset signals, was read out by optical and electrochemical means. The multiwell setup with the flip-flop units separately activated by various set/reset signals allowed encoding of complex information. For illustrative purposes, the words "Clarkson" and then "University" were encoded using ASCII character codes. The present flip-flop system will allow additional functions of enzyme-based biocomputing systems, thus enhancing the performance of multisignal biosensors and actuators controlled by logically processed biochemical signals. The integrated enzyme logic systems and flip-flop memories associated with signal-responsive chemical actuators are envisaged as basic elements of future implantable biomedical devices controlled by immediate physiological conditions.

  11. Identifying pathways and processes affecting nitrate and orthophosphate inputs to streams in agricultural watersheds.

    PubMed

    Tesoriero, Anthony J; Duff, John H; Wolock, David M; Spahr, Norman E; Almendinger, James E

    2009-01-01

    Understanding nutrient pathways to streams will improve nutrient management strategies and estimates of the time lag between when changes in land use practices occur and when water quality effects that result from these changes are observed. Nitrate and orthophosphate (OP) concentrations in several environmental compartments were examined in watersheds having a range of base flow index (BFI) values across the continental United States to determine the dominant pathways for water and nutrient inputs to streams. Estimates of the proportion of stream nitrate that was derived from groundwater increased as BFI increased. Nitrate concentration gradients between groundwater and surface water further supported the groundwater source of nitrate in these high BFI streams. However, nitrate concentrations in stream-bed pore water in all settings were typically lower than stream or upland groundwater concentrations, suggesting that nitrate discharge to streams was not uniform through the bed. Rather, preferential pathways (e.g., springs, seeps) may allow high nitrate groundwater to bypass sites of high biogeochemical transformation. Rapid pathway compartments (e.g., overland flow, tile drains) had OP concentrations that were typically higher than in streams and were important OP conveyers in most of these watersheds. In contrast to nitrate, the proportion of stream OP that is derived from ground water did not systematically increase as BFI increased. While typically not the dominant source of OP, groundwater discharge was an important pathway of OP transport to streams when BFI values were very high and when geochemical conditions favored OP mobility in groundwater.

  12. Integrated pathway-based approach identifies association between genomic regions at CTCF and CACNB2 and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Juraeva, Dilafruz; Haenisch, Britta; Zapatka, Marc; Frank, Josef; Witt, Stephanie H; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Treutlein, Jens; Strohmaier, Jana; Meier, Sandra; Degenhardt, Franziska; Giegling, Ina; Ripke, Stephan; Leber, Markus; Lange, Christoph; Schulze, Thomas G; Mössner, Rainald; Nenadic, Igor; Sauer, Heinrich; Rujescu, Dan; Maier, Wolfgang; Børglum, Anders; Ophoff, Roel; Cichon, Sven; Nöthen, Markus M; Rietschel, Marcella; Mattheisen, Manuel; Brors, Benedikt

    2014-06-01

    In the present study, an integrated hierarchical approach was applied to: (1) identify pathways associated with susceptibility to schizophrenia; (2) detect genes that may be potentially affected in these pathways since they contain an associated polymorphism; and (3) annotate the functional consequences of such single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the affected genes or their regulatory regions. The Global Test was applied to detect schizophrenia-associated pathways using discovery and replication datasets comprising 5,040 and 5,082 individuals of European ancestry, respectively. Information concerning functional gene-sets was retrieved from the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes, Gene Ontology, and the Molecular Signatures Database. Fourteen of the gene-sets or pathways identified in the discovery dataset were confirmed in the replication dataset. These include functional processes involved in transcriptional regulation and gene expression, synapse organization, cell adhesion, and apoptosis. For two genes, i.e. CTCF and CACNB2, evidence for association with schizophrenia was available (at the gene-level) in both the discovery study and published data from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium schizophrenia study. Furthermore, these genes mapped to four of the 14 presently identified pathways. Several of the SNPs assigned to CTCF and CACNB2 have potential functional consequences, and a gene in close proximity to CACNB2, i.e. ARL5B, was identified as a potential gene of interest. Application of the present hierarchical approach thus allowed: (1) identification of novel biological gene-sets or pathways with potential involvement in the etiology of schizophrenia, as well as replication of these findings in an independent cohort; (2) detection of genes of interest for future follow-up studies; and (3) the highlighting of novel genes in previously reported candidate regions for schizophrenia.

  13. Integrated Pathway-Based Approach Identifies Association between Genomic Regions at CTCF and CACNB2 and Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Zapatka, Marc; Frank, Josef; Witt, Stephanie H.; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Treutlein, Jens; Strohmaier, Jana; Meier, Sandra; Degenhardt, Franziska; Giegling, Ina; Ripke, Stephan; Leber, Markus; Lange, Christoph; Schulze, Thomas G.; Mössner, Rainald; Nenadic, Igor; Sauer, Heinrich; Rujescu, Dan; Maier, Wolfgang; Børglum, Anders; Ophoff, Roel; Cichon, Sven; Nöthen, Markus M.; Rietschel, Marcella; Mattheisen, Manuel; Brors, Benedikt

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, an integrated hierarchical approach was applied to: (1) identify pathways associated with susceptibility to schizophrenia; (2) detect genes that may be potentially affected in these pathways since they contain an associated polymorphism; and (3) annotate the functional consequences of such single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the affected genes or their regulatory regions. The Global Test was applied to detect schizophrenia-associated pathways using discovery and replication datasets comprising 5,040 and 5,082 individuals of European ancestry, respectively. Information concerning functional gene-sets was retrieved from the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes, Gene Ontology, and the Molecular Signatures Database. Fourteen of the gene-sets or pathways identified in the discovery dataset were confirmed in the replication dataset. These include functional processes involved in transcriptional regulation and gene expression, synapse organization, cell adhesion, and apoptosis. For two genes, i.e. CTCF and CACNB2, evidence for association with schizophrenia was available (at the gene-level) in both the discovery study and published data from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium schizophrenia study. Furthermore, these genes mapped to four of the 14 presently identified pathways. Several of the SNPs assigned to CTCF and CACNB2 have potential functional consequences, and a gene in close proximity to CACNB2, i.e. ARL5B, was identified as a potential gene of interest. Application of the present hierarchical approach thus allowed: (1) identification of novel biological gene-sets or pathways with potential involvement in the etiology of schizophrenia, as well as replication of these findings in an independent cohort; (2) detection of genes of interest for future follow-up studies; and (3) the highlighting of novel genes in previously reported candidate regions for schizophrenia. PMID:24901509

  14. Major carcinogenic pathways identified by gene expression analysis of peritoneal mesotheliomas following chemical treatment in F344 rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was performed to characterize the gene expression profile and to identify the major carcinogenic pathways involved in rat peritoneal mesothelioma (RPM) formation following treatment of Fischer 344 rats with o-nitrotoluene (o-NT) or bromochloracetic acid (BCA). Oligo a...

  15. Structural and Biochemical Studies of the C-Terminal Domain of Mouse Peptide-N-glycanase Identify it as a Mannose-Binding Module

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou,X.; Zhao, G.; Truglio, J.; Wang, L.; Li, G.; Lennarz, W.; Schindelin, H.

    2006-01-01

    The inability of certain N-linked glycoproteins to adopt their native conformation in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) leads to their retrotranslocation into the cytosol and subsequent degradation by the proteasome. In this pathway the cytosolic peptide-N-glycanase (PNGase) cleaves the N-linked glycan chains off denatured glycoproteins. PNGase is highly conserved in eukaryotes and plays an important role in ER-associated protein degradation. In higher eukaryotes, PNGase has an N-terminal and a C-terminal extension in addition to its central catalytic domain, which is structurally and functionally related to transglutaminases. Although the N-terminal domain of PNGase is involved in protein-protein interactions, the function of the C-terminal domain has not previously been characterized. Here, we describe biophysical, biochemical, and crystallographic studies of the mouse PNGase C-terminal domain, including visualization of a complex between this domain and mannopentaose. These studies demonstrate that the C-terminal domain binds to the mannose moieties of N-linked oligosaccharide chains, and we further show that it enhances the activity of the mouse PNGase core domain, presumably by increasing the affinity of mouse PNGase for the glycan chains of misfolded glycoproteins.

  16. Modification of the biochemical pathways of plants induced by ozone: what are the varied routes to change?

    PubMed

    Heath, Robert L

    2008-10-01

    When plants are observed under a low dose of ozone, some physiological and metabolic shifts occur. Barring extreme injury such as tissue damage or stomata closure, most of these disruptive changes are likely to have been initiated at the level of gene expression. The belief is oxidative products formed in ozone exposed leaves, e.g. hydrogen peroxide, are responsible for much of the biochemical adjustments. The first line of defense is a range of antioxidants, such as ascorbate and glutathione, but if this defense is overwhelmed, subsequent actions occur, similar to systemic acquired resistance or general wounding. Yet there are seemingly unrelated metabolic responses which are also triggered, such as early senescence. We discuss here the current understanding of gene control and signal transduction/control in order to increase our comprehension of how ozone alters the basic metabolism of plants and how plants counteract or cope with ozone.

  17. Pesticide transport pathways from a sloped Litchi orchard to an adjacent tropical stream as identified by hydrograph separation.

    PubMed

    Duffner, Andreas; Ingwersen, Joachim; Hugenschmidt, Cindy; Streck, Thilo

    2012-01-01

    This study was performed to identify the transport pathways of pesticides from a sloped litchi ( Sonn.) orchard to a nearby stream based on a three-component hydrograph separation (baseflow, interflow, surface runoff). Dissolved silica and electrical conductivity were chosen as representative tracers. During the study period (30 d), 0.4 and 0.01% of the applied mass of atrazine and chlorpyrifos, respectively, were detected in the stream after 151 mm of rainfall. Baseflow (80-96%) was the dominant hydrological flow component, followed by interflow (3-18%) and surface runoff (1-7%). Despite its small contribution to total discharge, surface runoff was the dominant atrazine transport pathway during the first days after application because pesticide concentrations in the surface runoff flow component declined quickly within several days. Preferential transport with interflow became the dominant pathway of atrazine. Because chlorpyrifos was detected in the stream water only twice, it was not included in the hydrograph separation. A feature of the surface runoff pathway was the coincidence of pesticide and discharge peaks. In contrast, peak concentrations of pesticides transported by interflow occurred during the hydrograph recession phases. Stormflow generation and pesticide transport depended on antecedent rainfall. The combination of high-resolution pesticide concentration measurements with a three-component hydrograph separation has been shown to be a suitable method to identify pesticide transport pathways under tropical conditions.

  18. Pubertal Effects on Adjustment in Girls: Moving from Demonstrating Effects to Identifying Pathways

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graber, Julia A.; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne; Warren, Michelle P.

    2006-01-01

    The present investigation examines mediated pathways from pubertal development to changes in depressive affect and aggression. Participants were 100 white girls who were between the ages of 10 and 14 (M=12.13, SD=0.80); girls were from well-educated, middle-to upper-middle class families, and attended private schools in a major northeastern urban…

  19. Rapamycin regulates biochemical metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Tucci, Paola; Porta, Giovanni; Agostini, Massimiliano; Antonov, Alexey; Garabadgiu, Alexander Vasilievich; Melino, Gerry; Willis, Anne E

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase is a master regulator of protein synthesis that couples nutrient sensing to cell growth, and deregulation of this pathway is associated with tumorigenesis. p53, and its less investigated family member p73, have been shown to interact closely with mTOR pathways through the transcriptional regulation of different target genes. To investigate the metabolic changes that occur upon inhibition of the mTOR pathway and the role of p73 in this response primary mouse embryonic fibroblast from control and TAp73−/− were treated with the macrocyclic lactone rapamycin. Extensive gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) analysis were used to obtain a rapamycin-dependent global metabolome profile from control or TAp73−/− cells. In total 289 metabolites involved in selective pathways were identified; 39 biochemical metabolites were found to be significantly altered, many of which are known to be associated with the cellular stress response. PMID:23839040

  20. Identifying pathways and processes affecting nitrate and orthophosphate inputs to streams in agricultural watersheds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tesoriero, A.J.; Duff, J.H.; Wolock, D.M.; Spahr, N.E.; Almendinger, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding nutrient pathways to streams will improve nutrient management strategies and estimates of the time lag between when changes in land use practices occur and when water quality effects that result from these changes are observed. Nitrate and orthophosphate (OP) concentrations in several environmental compartments were examined in watersheds having a range of base flow index (BFI) values across the continental United States to determine the dominant pathways for water and nutrient inputs to streams. Estimates of the proportion of stream nitrate that was derived from groundwater increased as BFI increased. Nitrate concentration gradients between groundwater and surface water further supported the groundwater source of nitrate in these high BFI streams. However, nitrate concentrations in stream-bed pore water in all settings were typically lower than stream or upland groundwater concentrations, suggesting that nitrate discharge to streams was not uniform through the bed. Rather, preferential pathways (e.g., springs, seeps) may allow high nitrate groundwater to bypass sites of high biogeochemical transformation. Rapid pathway compartments (e.g., overland flow, tile drains) had OP concentrations that were typically higher than in streams and were important OP conveyers in most of these watersheds. In contrast to nitrate, the proportion of stream OP that is derived from ground water did not systematically increase as BFI increased. While typically not the dominant source of OP, groundwater discharge was an important pathway of OP transport to streams when BFI values were very high and when geochemical conditions favored OP mobility in groundwater. Copyright ?? 2009 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  1. International genome-wide meta-analysis identifies new primary biliary cirrhosis risk loci and targetable pathogenic pathways.

    PubMed

    Cordell, Heather J; Han, Younghun; Mells, George F; Li, Yafang; Hirschfield, Gideon M; Greene, Casey S; Xie, Gang; Juran, Brian D; Zhu, Dakai; Qian, David C; Floyd, James A B; Morley, Katherine I; Prati, Daniele; Lleo, Ana; Cusi, Daniele; Gershwin, M Eric; Anderson, Carl A; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N; Invernizzi, Pietro; Seldin, Michael F; Sandford, Richard N; Amos, Christopher I; Siminovitch, Katherine A

    2015-09-22

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a classical autoimmune liver disease for which effective immunomodulatory therapy is lacking. Here we perform meta-analyses of discovery data sets from genome-wide association studies of European subjects (n=2,764 cases and 10,475 controls) followed by validation genotyping in an independent cohort (n=3,716 cases and 4,261 controls). We discover and validate six previously unknown risk loci for PBC (Pcombined<5 × 10(-8)) and used pathway analysis to identify JAK-STAT/IL12/IL27 signalling and cytokine-cytokine pathways, for which relevant therapies exist.

  2. International genome-wide meta-analysis identifies new primary biliary cirrhosis risk loci and targetable pathogenic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Cordell, Heather J.; Han, Younghun; Mells, George F.; Li, Yafang; Hirschfield, Gideon M.; Greene, Casey S.; Xie, Gang; Juran, Brian D.; Zhu, Dakai; Qian, David C.; Floyd, James A. B.; Morley, Katherine I.; Prati, Daniele; Lleo, Ana; Cusi, Daniele; Schlicht, Erik M; Lammert, Craig; Atkinson, Elizabeth J; Chan, Landon L; de Andrade, Mariza; Balschun, Tobias; Mason, Andrew L; Myers, Robert P; Zhang, Jinyi; Milkiewicz, Piotr; Qu, Jia; Odin, Joseph A; Luketic, Velimir A; Bacon, Bruce R; Bodenheimer Jr, Henry C; Liakina, Valentina; Vincent, Catherine; Levy, Cynthia; Gregersen, Peter K; Almasio, Piero L; Alvaro, Domenico; Andreone, Pietro; Andriulli, Angelo; Barlassina, Cristina; Battezzati, Pier Maria; Benedetti, Antonio; Bernuzzi, Francesca; Bianchi, Ilaria; Bragazzi, Maria Consiglia; Brunetto, Maurizia; Bruno, Savino; Casella, Giovanni; Coco, Barbara; Colli, Agostino; Colombo, Massimo; Colombo, Silvia; Cursaro, Carmela; Crocè, Lory Saveria; Crosignani, Andrea; Donato, Maria Francesca; Elia, Gianfranco; Fabris, Luca; Ferrari, Carlo; Floreani, Annarosa; Foglieni, Barbara; Fontana, Rosanna; Galli, Andrea; Lazzari, Roberta; Macaluso, Fabio; Malinverno, Federica; Marra, Fabio; Marzioni, Marco; Mattalia, Alberto; Montanari, Renzo; Morini, Lorenzo; Morisco, Filomena; Hani S, Mousa; Muratori, Luigi; Muratori, Paolo; Niro, Grazia A; Palmieri, Vincenzo O; Picciotto, Antonio; Podda, Mauro; Portincasa, Piero; Ronca, Vincenzo; Rosina, Floriano; Rossi, Sonia; Sogno, Ilaria; Spinzi, Giancarlo; Spreafico, Marta; Strazzabosco, Mario; Tarallo, Sonia; Tarocchi, Mirko; Tiribelli, Claudio; Toniutto, Pierluigi; Vinci, Maria; Zuin, Massimo; Ch'ng, Chin Lye; Rahman, Mesbah; Yapp, Tom; Sturgess, Richard; Healey, Christopher; Czajkowski, Marek; Gunasekera, Anton; Gyawali, Pranab; Premchand, Purushothaman; Kapur, Kapil; Marley, Richard; Foster, Graham; Watson, Alan; Dias, Aruna; Subhani, Javaid; Harvey, Rory; McCorry, Roger; Ramanaden, David; Gasem, Jaber; Evans, Richard; Mathialahan, Thiriloganathan; Shorrock, Christopher; Lipscomb, George; Southern, Paul; Tibble, Jeremy; Gorard, David; Palegwala, Altaf; Jones, Susan; Carbone, Marco; Dawwas, Mohamed; Alexander, Graeme; Dolwani, Sunil; Prince, Martin; Foxton, Matthew; Elphick, David; Mitchison, Harriet; Gooding, Ian; Karmo, Mazn; Saksena, Sushma; Mendall, Mike; Patel, Minesh; Ede, Roland; Austin, Andrew; Sayer, Joanna; Hankey, Lorraine; Hovell, Christopher; Fisher, Neil; Carter, Martyn; Koss, Konrad; Piotrowicz, Andrzej; Grimley, Charles; Neal, David; Lim, Guan; Levi, Sass; Ala, Aftab; Broad, Andrea; Saeed, Athar; Wood, Gordon; Brown, Jonathan; Wilkinson, Mark; Gordon, Harriet; Ramage, John; Ridpath, Jo; Ngatchu, Theodore; Grover, Bob; Shaukat, Syed; Shidrawi, Ray; Abouda, George; Ali, Faiz; Rees, Ian; Salam, Imroz; Narain, Mark; Brown, Ashley; Taylor-Robinson, Simon; Williams, Simon; Grellier, Leonie; Banim, Paul; Das, Debashis; Chilton, Andrew; Heneghan, Michael; Curtis, Howard; Gess, Markus; Drake, Ian; Aldersley, Mark; Davies, Mervyn; Jones, Rebecca; McNair, Alastair; Srirajaskanthan, Raj; Pitcher, Maxton; Sen, Sambit; Bird, George; Barnardo, Adrian; Kitchen, Paul; Yoong, Kevin; Chirag, Oza; Sivaramakrishnan, Nurani; MacFaul, George; Jones, David; Shah, Amir; Evans, Chris; Saha, Subrata; Pollock, Katharine; Bramley, Peter; Mukhopadhya, Ashis; Fraser, Andrew; Mills, Peter; Shallcross, Christopher; Campbell, Stewart; Bathgate, Andrew; Shepherd, Alan; Dillon, John; Rushbrook, Simon; Przemioslo, Robert; Macdonald, Christopher; Metcalf, Jane; Shmueli, Udi; Davis, Andrew; Naqvi, Asifabbas; Lee, Tom; Ryder, Stephen D; Collier, Jane; Klass, Howard; Ninkovic, Mary; Cramp, Matthew; Sharer, Nicholas; Aspinall, Richard; Goggin, Patrick; Ghosh, Deb; Douds, Andrew; Hoeroldt, Barbara; Booth, Jonathan; Williams, Earl; Hussaini, Hyder; Stableforth, William; Ayres, Reuben; Thorburn, Douglas; Marshall, Eileen; Burroughs, Andrew; Mann, Steven; Lombard, Martin; Richardson, Paul; Patanwala, Imran; Maltby, Julia; Brookes, Matthew; Mathew, Ray; Vyas, Samir; Singhal, Saket; Gleeson, Dermot; Misra, Sharat; Butterworth, Jeff; George, Keith; Harding, Tim; Douglass, Andrew; Panter, Simon; Shearman, Jeremy; Bray, Gary; Butcher, Graham; Forton, Daniel; Mclindon, John; Cowan, Matthew; Whatley, Gregory; Mandal, Aditya; Gupta, Hemant; Sanghi, Pradeep; Jain, Sanjiv; Pereira, Steve; Prasad, Geeta; Watts, Gill; Wright, Mark; Neuberger, James; Gordon, Fiona; Unitt, Esther; Grant, Allister; Delahooke, Toby; Higham, Andrew; Brind, Alison; Cox, Mark; Ramakrishnan, Subramaniam; King, Alistair; Collins, Carole; Whalley, Simon; Li, Andy; Fraser, Jocelyn; Bell, Andrew; Wong, Voi Shim; Singhal, Amit; Gee, Ian; Ang, Yeng; Ransford, Rupert; Gotto, James; Millson, Charles; Bowles, Jane; Thomas, Caradog; Harrison, Melanie; Galaska, Roman; Kendall, Jennie; Whiteman, Jessica; Lawlor, Caroline; Gray, Catherine; Elliott, Keith; Mulvaney-Jones, Caroline; Hobson, Lucie; Van Duyvenvoorde, Greta; Loftus, Alison; Seward, Katie; Penn, Ruth; Maiden, Jane; Damant, Rose; Hails, Janeane; Cloudsdale, Rebecca; Silvestre, Valeria; Glenn, Sue; Dungca, Eleanor; Wheatley, Natalie; Doyle, Helen; Kent, Melanie; Hamilton, Caroline; Braim, Delyth; Wooldridge, Helen; Abrahams, Rachel; Paton, Alison; Lancaster, Nicola; Gibbins, Andrew; Hogben, Karen; Desousa, Phillipa; Muscariu, Florin; Musselwhite, Janine; McKay, Alexandra; Tan, LaiTing; Foale, Carole; Brighton, Jacqueline; Flahive, Kerry; Nambela, Estelle; Townshend, Paula; Ford, Chris; Holder, Sophie; Palmer, Caroline; Featherstone, James; Nasseri, Mariam; Sadeghian, Joy; Williams, Bronwen; Thomas, Carol; Rolls, Sally-Ann; Hynes, Abigail; Duggan, Claire; Jones, Sarah; Crossey, Mary; Stansfield, Glynis; MacNicol, Carolyn; Wilkins, Joy; Wilhelmsen, Elva; Raymode, Parizade; Lee, Hye-Jeong; Durant, Emma; Bishop, Rebecca; Ncube, Noma; Tripoli, Sherill; Casey, Rebecca; Cowley, Caroline; Miller, Richard; Houghton, Kathryn; Ducker, Samantha; Wright, Fiona; Bird, Bridget; Baxter, Gwen; Keggans, Janie; Hughes, Maggie; Grieve, Emma; Young, Karin; Williams, D; Ocker, Kate; Hines, Frances; Martin, Kirsty; Innes, Caron; Valliani, Talal; Fairlamb, Helen; Thornthwaite, Sarah; Eastick, Anne; Tanqueray, Elizabeth; Morrison, Jennifer; Holbrook, Becky; Browning, Julie; Walker, Kirsten; Congreave, Susan; Verheyden, Juliette; Slininger, Susan; Stafford, Lizzie; O'Donnell, Denise; Ainsworth, Mark; Lord, Susan; Kent, Linda; March, Linda; Dickson, Christine; Simpson, Diane; Longhurst, Beverley; Hayes, Maria; Shpuza, Ervin; White, Nikki; Besley, Sarah; Pearson, Sallyanne; Wright, Alice; Jones, Linda; Gunter, Emma; Dewhurst, Hannah; Fouracres, Anna; Farrington, Liz; Graves, Lyn; Marriott, Suzie; Leoni, Marina; Tyrer, David; Martin, Kate; Dali-kemmery, Lola; Lambourne, Victoria; Green, Marie; Sirdefield, Dawn; Amor, Kelly; Colley, Julie; Shinder, Bal; Jones, Jayne; Mills, Marisa; Carnahan, Mandy; Taylor, Natalie; Boulton, Kerenza; Tregonning, Julie; Brown, Carly; Clifford, Gayle; Archer, Emily; Hamilton, Maria; Curtis, Janette; Shewan, Tracey; Walsh, Sue; Warner, Karen; Netherton, Kimberley; Mupudzi, Mcdonald; Gunson, Bridget; Gitahi, Jane; Gocher, Denise; Batham, Sally; Pateman, Hilary; Desmennu, Senayon; Conder, Jill; Clement, Darren; Gallagher, Susan; Orpe, Jacky; Chan, PuiChing; Currie, Lynn; O'Donohoe, Lynn; Oblak, Metod; Morgan, Lisa; Quinn, Marie; Amey, Isobel; Baird, Yolanda; Cotterill, Donna; Cumlat, Lourdes; Winter, Louise; Greer, Sandra; Spurdle, Katie; Allison, Joanna; Dyer, Simon; Sweeting, Helen; Kordula, Jean; Gershwin, M. Eric; Anderson, Carl A.; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N.; Invernizzi, Pietro; Seldin, Michael F.; Sandford, Richard N.; Amos, Christopher I.; Siminovitch, Katherine A.

    2015-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a classical autoimmune liver disease for which effective immunomodulatory therapy is lacking. Here we perform meta-analyses of discovery data sets from genome-wide association studies of European subjects (n=2,764 cases and 10,475 controls) followed by validation genotyping in an independent cohort (n=3,716 cases and 4,261 controls). We discover and validate six previously unknown risk loci for PBC (Pcombined<5 × 10−8) and used pathway analysis to identify JAK-STAT/IL12/IL27 signalling and cytokine–cytokine pathways, for which relevant therapies exist. PMID:26394269

  3. Identifying hypothalamic pathways controlling food intake, body weight, and glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Elmquist, Joel K; Coppari, Roberto; Balthasar, Nina; Ichinose, Masumi; Lowell, Bradford B

    2005-12-05

    The past decade has greatly increased our understanding and appreciation of the ability of the central nervous system (CNS) to regulate food intake and body weight. This was spearheaded by the discovery of key molecules regulating body weight homeostasis. It is now also apparent that the CNS, especially the hypothalamus, plays a primary role in directly regulating glucose homeostasis, independently of effects on body weight. These discoveries are important given the increasing incidences of obesity and type II diabetes in Western societies. In this article, we will highlight recent data from genetically modified mice. These data and other models have helped to dissect the CNS pathways regulating body weight and glucose homeostasis. Finally, although these studies have been illustrative, they also underscore our relative lack of knowledge and highlight the need for more definitive approaches to unravel the functional significance of these pathways.

  4. Grafting of Beads into Developing Chicken Embryo Limbs to Identify Signal Transduction Pathways Affecting Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Rabeea H; Sweetman, Dylan

    2016-01-17

    Using chicken embryos it is possible to test directly the effects of either growth factors or specific inhibitors of signaling pathways on gene expression and activation of signal transduction pathways. This technique allows the delivery of signaling molecules at precisely defined developmental stages for specific times. After this embryos can be harvested and gene expression examined, for example by in situ hybridization, or activation of signal transduction pathways observed with immunostaining. In this video heparin beads soaked in FGF18 or AG 1-X2 beads soaked in U0126, a MEK inhibitor, are grafted into the limb bud in ovo. This shows that FGF18 induces expression of MyoD and ERK phosphorylation and both endogenous and FGF18 induced MyoD expression is inhibited by U0126. Beads soaked in a retinoic acid antagonist can potentiate premature MyoD induction by FGF18. This approach can be used with a wide range of different growth factors and inhibitors and is easily adapted to other tissues in the developing embryo.

  5. Non-host disease resistance response in pea (Pisum sativum) pods: Biochemical function of DRR206 and phytoalexin pathway localization.

    PubMed

    Seneviratne, Herana Kamal; Dalisay, Doralyn S; Kim, Kye-Won; Moinuddin, Syed G A; Yang, Hong; Hartshorn, Christopher M; Davin, Laurence B; Lewis, Norman G

    2015-05-01

    Continually exposed to potential pathogens, vascular plants have evolved intricate defense mechanisms to recognize encroaching threats and defend themselves. They do so by inducing a set of defense responses that can help defeat and/or limit effects of invading pathogens, of which the non-host disease resistance response is the most common. In this regard, pea (Pisum sativum) pod tissue, when exposed to Fusarium solani f. sp. phaseoli spores, undergoes an inducible transcriptional activation of pathogenesis-related genes, and also produces (+)-pisatin, its major phytoalexin. One of the inducible pathogenesis-related genes is Disease Resistance Response-206 (DRR206), whose role in vivo was unknown. DRR206 is, however, related to the dirigent protein (DP) family. In this study, its biochemical function was investigated in planta, with the metabolite associated with its gene induction being pinoresinol monoglucoside. Interestingly, both pinoresinol monoglucoside and (+)-pisatin were co-localized in pea pod endocarp epidermal cells, as demonstrated using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry imaging. In addition, endocarp epidermal cells are also the site for both chalcone synthase and DRR206 gene expression. Taken together, these data indicate that both (+)-pisatin and pinoresinol monoglucoside function in the overall phytoalexin responses.

  6. Solid-Phase Enrichment and Analysis of Azide-Labeled Natural Products: Fishing Downstream of Biochemical Pathways.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Alexander J; Wesche, Frank; Adihou, Hélène; Bode, Helge B

    2016-01-11

    Many methods have been devised over the decades to trace precursors of specific molecules in cellular environments as, for example, in biosynthesis studies. The advent of click chemistry has facilitated the powerful combination of tracing and at the same time sieving the highly complex metabolome for compounds derived from simple or complex starting materials, especially when the click reaction takes place on a solid support. While the principle of solid-phase click reactions has already been successfully applied for selective protein and peptide enrichment, the successful enrichment of much smaller primary and secondary metabolites, showing great structural diversity and undergoing many different biosynthetic steps, has seen only little development. For bacterial secondary metabolism, a far broader tolerance for "clickable" precursors was observed than in ribosomal proteinogenesis, thus making this method a surprisingly valuable tool for the tracking and discovery of compounds within the cellular biochemical network. The implementation of this method has led to the identification of several new compounds from the bacterial genera Photorhabdus and Xenorhabdus, clearly proving its power.

  7. Identification of Biochemical Pathways Associated with Lead Tolerance and Detoxification in Chrysopogon zizanioides L. Nash (Vetiver) by Metabolic Profiling.

    PubMed

    Pidatala, Venkataramana R; Li, Kefeng; Sarkar, Dibyendu; Ramakrishna, Wusirika; Datta, Rupali

    2016-03-01

    Lead (Pb) is a major urban pollutant, due to deteriorating lead-based paint in houses built before 1978. Phytoremediation is an inexpensive and effective technique for remediation of Pb-contaminated homes. Vetiver (Chrysopogon zizanioides), a noninvasive, fast-growing grass with high biomass, can tolerate and accumulate large quantities of Pb in its tissues. Lead is known to induce phytochelatins and antioxidative enzymes in vetiver; however, the overall impact of Pb stress on metabolic pathways of vetiver is unknown. In the current study, vetiver plants were treated with different concentrations of Pb in a hydroponic setup. Metabolites were extracted and analyzed using LC/MS/MS. Multivariate analysis of metabolites in both root and shoot tissue showed tremendous induction in key metabolic pathways including sugar metabolism, amino acid metabolism, and an increase in production of osmoprotectants, such as betaine and polyols, and metal-chelating organic acids. The data obtained provide a comprehensive insight into the overall stress response mechanisms in vetiver.

  8. Oxygen and hydrogen peroxide in the early evolution of life on earth: in silico comparative analysis of biochemical pathways.

    PubMed

    Slesak, Ireneusz; Slesak, Halina; Kruk, Jerzy

    2012-08-01

    In the Universe, oxygen is the third most widespread element, while on Earth it is the most abundant one. Moreover, oxygen is a major constituent of all biopolymers fundamental to living organisms. Besides O(2), reactive oxygen species (ROS), among them hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), are also important reactants in the present aerobic metabolism. According to a widely accepted hypothesis, aerobic metabolism and many other reactions/pathways involving O(2) appeared after the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis. In this study, the hypothesis was formulated that the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA) was at least able to tolerate O(2) and detoxify ROS in a primordial environment. A comparative analysis was carried out of a number of the O(2)-and H(2)O(2)-involving metabolic reactions that occur in strict anaerobes, facultative anaerobes, and aerobes. The results indicate that the most likely LUCA possessed O(2)-and H(2)O(2)-involving pathways, mainly reactions to remove ROS, and had, at least in part, the components of aerobic respiration. Based on this, the presence of a low, but significant, quantity of H(2)O(2) and O(2) should be taken into account in theoretical models of the early Archean atmosphere and oceans and the evolution of life. It is suggested that the early metabolism involving O(2)/H(2)O(2) was a key adaptation of LUCA to already existing weakly oxic zones in Earth's primordial environment.

  9. Computational biophysical, biochemical, and evolutionary signature of human R-spondin family proteins, the member of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ashish Ranjan; Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Lee, Sang-Soo; Sharma, Garima; Yoon, Jeong Kyo; George Priya Doss, C; Song, Dong-Keun; Nam, Ju-Suk

    2014-01-01

    In human, Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway plays a significant role in cell growth, cell development, and disease pathogenesis. Four human (Rspo)s are known to activate canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Presently, (Rspo)s serve as therapeutic target for several human diseases. Henceforth, basic understanding about the molecular properties of (Rspo)s is essential. We approached this issue by interpreting the biochemical and biophysical properties along with molecular evolution of (Rspo)s thorough computational algorithm methods. Our analysis shows that signal peptide length is roughly similar in (Rspo)s family along with similarity in aa distribution pattern. In Rspo3, four N-glycosylation sites were noted. All members are hydrophilic in nature and showed alike GRAVY values, approximately. Conversely, Rspo3 contains the maximum positively charged residues while Rspo4 includes the lowest. Four highly aligned blocks were recorded through Gblocks. Phylogenetic analysis shows Rspo4 is being rooted with Rspo2 and similarly Rspo3 and Rspo1 have the common point of origin. Through phylogenomics study, we developed a phylogenetic tree of sixty proteins (n = 60) with the orthologs and paralogs seed sequences. Protein-protein network was also illustrated. Results demonstrated in our study may help the future researchers to unfold significant physiological and therapeutic properties of (Rspo)s in various disease models.

  10. IDENTIFYING MUTATION SPECIFIC CANCER PATHWAYS USING A STRUCTURALLY RESOLVED PROTEIN INTERACTION NETWORK

    PubMed Central

    ENGIN, H. BILLUR; HOFREE, MATAN; CARTER, HANNAH

    2014-01-01

    Here we present a method for extracting candidate cancer pathways from tumor ‘omics data while explicitly accounting for diverse consequences of mutations for protein interactions. Disease-causing mutations are frequently observed at either core or interface residues mediating protein interactions. Mutations at core residues frequently destabilize protein structure while mutations at interface residues can specifically affect the binding energies of protein-protein interactions. As a result, mutations in a protein may result in distinct interaction profiles and thus have different phenotypic consequences. We describe a protein structure-guided pipeline for extracting interacting protein sets specific to a particular mutation. Of 59 cancer genes with 3D co-complexed structures in the Protein Data Bank, 43 showed evidence of mutations with different functional consequences. Literature survey reciprocated functional predictions specific to distinct mutations on APC, ATRX, BRCA1, CBL and HRAS. Our analysis suggests that accounting for mutation-specific perturbations to cancer pathways will be essential for personalized cancer therapy. PMID:25592571

  11. Oxygen and Hydrogen Peroxide in the Early Evolution of Life on Earth: In silico Comparative Analysis of Biochemical Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ślesak, Halina; Kruk, Jerzy

    2012-01-01

    Abstract In the Universe, oxygen is the third most widespread element, while on Earth it is the most abundant one. Moreover, oxygen is a major constituent of all biopolymers fundamental to living organisms. Besides O2, reactive oxygen species (ROS), among them hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), are also important reactants in the present aerobic metabolism. According to a widely accepted hypothesis, aerobic metabolism and many other reactions/pathways involving O2 appeared after the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis. In this study, the hypothesis was formulated that the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA) was at least able to tolerate O2 and detoxify ROS in a primordial environment. A comparative analysis was carried out of a number of the O2-and H2O2-involving metabolic reactions that occur in strict anaerobes, facultative anaerobes, and aerobes. The results indicate that the most likely LUCA possessed O2-and H2O2-involving pathways, mainly reactions to remove ROS, and had, at least in part, the components of aerobic respiration. Based on this, the presence of a low, but significant, quantity of H2O2 and O2 should be taken into account in theoretical models of the early Archean atmosphere and oceans and the evolution of life. It is suggested that the early metabolism involving O2/H2O2 was a key adaptation of LUCA to already existing weakly oxic zones in Earth's primordial environment. Key Words: Hydrogen peroxide—Oxygen—Origin of life—Photosynthesis—Superoxide dismutase—Superoxide reductase. Astrobiology 12, 775–784. PMID:22970865

  12. A coactivator trap identifies NONO (p54nrb) as a component of the cAMP-signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Amelio, Antonio L; Miraglia, Loren J; Conkright, Juliana J; Mercer, Becky A; Batalov, Serge; Cavett, Valerie; Orth, Anthony P; Busby, Jennifer; Hogenesch, John B; Conkright, Michael D

    2007-12-18

    Signal transduction pathways often use a transcriptional component to mediate adaptive cellular responses. Coactivator proteins function prominently in these pathways as the conduit to the basic transcriptional machinery. Here we present a high-throughput cell-based screening strategy, termed the "coactivator trap," to study the functional interactions of coactivators with transcription factors. We applied this strategy to the cAMP signaling pathway, which utilizes two families of coactivators, the cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) binding protein (CBP)/p300 family and the recently identified transducers of regulated CREB activity family (TORCs1-3). In addition to identifying numerous known interactions of these coactivators, this analysis identified NONO (p54(nrb)) as a TORC-interacting protein. RNA interference experiments demonstrate that NONO is necessary for cAMP-dependent activation of CREB target genes in vivo. Furthermore, TORC2 and NONO complex on cAMP-responsive promoters, and NONO acts as a bridge between the CREB/TORC complex and RNA polymerase II. These data demonstrate the utility of the coactivator trap by identification of a component of cAMP-mediated transcription.

  13. Probing the coagulation pathway with aptamers identifies combinations that synergistically inhibit blood clot formation.

    PubMed

    Bompiani, Kristin M; Lohrmann, Jens L; Pitoc, George A; Frederiksen, James W; Mackensen, George B; Sullenger, Bruce A

    2014-08-14

    Coordinated enzymatic reactions regulate blood clot generation. To explore the contributions of various coagulation enzymes in this process, we utilized a panel of aptamers against factors VIIa, IXa, Xa, and prothrombin. Each aptamer dose-dependently inhibited clot formation, yet none was able to completely impede this process in highly procoagulant settings. However, several combinations of two aptamers synergistically impaired clot formation. One extremely potent aptamer combination was able to maintain human blood fluidity even during extracorporeal circulation, a highly procoagulant setting encountered during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. Moreover, this aptamer cocktail could be rapidly reversed with antidotes to restore normal hemostasis, indicating that even highly potent aptamer combinations can be rapidly controlled. These studies highlight the potential utility of using sets of aptamers to probe the functions of proteins in molecular pathways for research and therapeutic ends.

  14. A Pilot Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Potential Metabolic Pathways Involved in Tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    Gilles, Annick; Van Camp, Guy; Van de Heyning, Paul; Fransen, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Tinnitus, the perception of an auditory phantom sound in the form of ringing, buzzing, roaring, or hissing in the absence of an external sound source, is perceived by ~15% of the population and 2.5% experiences a severely bothersome tinnitus. The contribution of genes on the development of tinnitus is still under debate. The current manuscript reports a pilot Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS) into tinnitus, in a small cohort of 167 independent tinnitus subjects, and 749 non-tinnitus controls, who were collected as part of a cross-sectional study. After genotyping, imputation, and quality checking, the association between the tinnitus phenotype and 4,000,000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was tested followed by gene set enrichment analysis. None of the SNPs reached the threshold for genome-wide significance (p < 5.0e–8), with the most significant SNPs, situated outside coding genes, reaching a p-value of 3.4e–7. By using the Genetic Analysis of Complex Traits (GACT) software, the percentage of the variance explained by all SNPs in the GWAS was estimated to be 3.2%, indicating that additive genetic effects explain only a small fraction of the tinnitus phenotype. Despite the lack of genome-wide significant SNPs, which is, at least in part, due to the limited sample size of the current study, evidence was found for a genetic involvement in tinnitus. Gene set enrichment analysis showed several metabolic pathways to be significantly enriched with SNPs having a low p-value in the GWAS. These pathways are involved in oxidative stress, endoplasmatic reticulum (ER) stress, and serotonin reception mediated signaling. These results are a promising basis for further research into the genetic basis of tinnitus, including GWAS with larger sample sizes and considering tinnitus subtypes for which a greater genetic contribution is more likely. PMID:28303087

  15. High-Throughput Screen in Cryptococcus neoformans Identifies a Novel Molecular Scaffold That Inhibits Cell Wall Integrity Pathway Signaling

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is one of the most important human fungal pathogens; however, no new therapies have been developed in over 50 years. Fungicidal activity is crucially important for an effective anticryptococal agent and, therefore, we screened 361,675 molecules against C. neoformans using an adenylate kinase release assay that specifically detects fungicidal activity. A set of secondary assays narrowed the set of hits to molecules that interfere with fungal cell wall integrity and identified three benzothioureas with low in vitro mammalian toxicity and good in vitro anticryptococcal (minimum inhibitory concentration = 4 μg/mL). This scaffold inhibits signaling through the cell wall integrity MAP kinase cascade. Structure–activity studies indicate that the thiocarbonyl moiety is crucial for activity. Genetic and biochemical data suggest that benzothioureas inhibit signaling upstream of the kinase cascade. Thus, the benzothioureas appear to be a promising new scaffold for further exploration in the search for new anticryptococcal agents. PMID:26807437

  16. A genomewide overexpression screen identifies genes involved in the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway in the human protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Koushik, Amrita B; Welter, Brenda H; Rock, Michelle L; Temesvari, Lesly A

    2014-03-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a protozoan parasite that causes amoebic dysentery and liver abscess. E. histolytica relies on motility, phagocytosis, host cell adhesion, and proteolysis of extracellular matrix for virulence. In eukaryotic cells, these processes are mediated in part by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling. Thus, PI3K may be critical for virulence. We utilized a functional genomics approach to identify genes whose products may operate in the PI3K pathway in E. histolytica. We treated a population of trophozoites that were overexpressing genes from a cDNA library with a near-lethal dose of the PI3K inhibitor wortmannin. This screen was based on the rationale that survivors would be overexpressing gene products that directly or indirectly function in the PI3K pathway. We sequenced the overexpressed genes in survivors and identified a cDNA encoding a Rap GTPase, a protein previously shown to participate in the PI3K pathway. This supports the validity of our approach. Genes encoding a coactosin-like protein, EhCoactosin, and a serine-rich E. histolytica protein (SREHP) were also identified. Cells overexpressing EhCoactosin or SREHP were also less sensitive to a second PI3K inhibitor, LY294002. This corroborates the link between these proteins and PI3K. Finally, a mutant cell line with an increased level of phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphosphate, the product of PI3K activity, exhibited increased expression of SREHP and EhCoactosin. This further supports the functional connection between these proteins and PI3K in E. histolytica. To our knowledge, this is the first forward-genetics screen adapted to reveal genes participating in a signal transduction pathway in this pathogen.

  17. Whole-exome sequencing in obsessive-compulsive disorder identifies rare mutations in immunological and neurodevelopmental pathways.

    PubMed

    Cappi, C; Brentani, H; Lima, L; Sanders, S J; Zai, G; Diniz, B J; Reis, V N S; Hounie, A G; Conceição do Rosário, M; Mariani, D; Requena, G L; Puga, R; Souza-Duran, F L; Shavitt, R G; Pauls, D L; Miguel, E C; Fernandez, T V

    2016-03-29

    Studies of rare genetic variation have identified molecular pathways conferring risk for developmental neuropsychiatric disorders. To date, no published whole-exome sequencing studies have been reported in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). We sequenced all the genome coding regions in 20 sporadic OCD cases and their unaffected parents to identify rare de novo (DN) single-nucleotide variants (SNVs). The primary aim of this pilot study was to determine whether DN variation contributes to OCD risk. To this aim, we evaluated whether there is an elevated rate of DN mutations in OCD, which would justify this approach toward gene discovery in larger studies of the disorder. Furthermore, to explore functional molecular correlations among genes with nonsynonymous DN SNVs in OCD probands, a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was generated based on databases of direct molecular interactions. We applied Degree-Aware Disease Gene Prioritization (DADA) to rank the PPI network genes based on their relatedness to a set of OCD candidate genes from two OCD genome-wide association studies (Stewart et al., 2013; Mattheisen et al., 2014). In addition, we performed a pathway analysis with genes from the PPI network. The rate of DN SNVs in OCD was 2.51 × 10(-8) per base per generation, significantly higher than a previous estimated rate in unaffected subjects using the same sequencing platform and analytic pipeline. Several genes harboring DN SNVs in OCD were highly interconnected in the PPI network and ranked high in the DADA analysis. Nearly all the DN SNVs in this study are in genes expressed in the human brain, and a pathway analysis revealed enrichment in immunological and central nervous system functioning and development. The results of this pilot study indicate that further investigation of DN variation in larger OCD cohorts is warranted to identify specific risk genes and to confirm our preliminary finding with regard to PPI network enrichment for particular

  18. Whole-exome sequencing in obsessive-compulsive disorder identifies rare mutations in immunological and neurodevelopmental pathways

    PubMed Central

    Cappi, C; Brentani, H; Lima, L; Sanders, S J; Zai, G; Diniz, B J; Reis, V N S; Hounie, A G; Conceição do Rosário, M; Mariani, D; Requena, G L; Puga, R; Souza-Duran, F L; Shavitt, R G; Pauls, D L; Miguel, E C; Fernandez, T V

    2016-01-01

    Studies of rare genetic variation have identified molecular pathways conferring risk for developmental neuropsychiatric disorders. To date, no published whole-exome sequencing studies have been reported in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). We sequenced all the genome coding regions in 20 sporadic OCD cases and their unaffected parents to identify rare de novo (DN) single-nucleotide variants (SNVs). The primary aim of this pilot study was to determine whether DN variation contributes to OCD risk. To this aim, we evaluated whether there is an elevated rate of DN mutations in OCD, which would justify this approach toward gene discovery in larger studies of the disorder. Furthermore, to explore functional molecular correlations among genes with nonsynonymous DN SNVs in OCD probands, a protein–protein interaction (PPI) network was generated based on databases of direct molecular interactions. We applied Degree-Aware Disease Gene Prioritization (DADA) to rank the PPI network genes based on their relatedness to a set of OCD candidate genes from two OCD genome-wide association studies (Stewart et al., 2013; Mattheisen et al., 2014). In addition, we performed a pathway analysis with genes from the PPI network. The rate of DN SNVs in OCD was 2.51 × 10−8 per base per generation, significantly higher than a previous estimated rate in unaffected subjects using the same sequencing platform and analytic pipeline. Several genes harboring DN SNVs in OCD were highly interconnected in the PPI network and ranked high in the DADA analysis. Nearly all the DN SNVs in this study are in genes expressed in the human brain, and a pathway analysis revealed enrichment in immunological and central nervous system functioning and development. The results of this pilot study indicate that further investigation of DN variation in larger OCD cohorts is warranted to identify specific risk genes and to confirm our preliminary finding with regard to PPI network enrichment for particular

  19. Deep sequencing and in silico analyses identify MYB-regulated gene networks and signaling pathways in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Azim, Shafquat; Zubair, Haseeb; Srivastava, Sanjeev K.; Bhardwaj, Arun; Zubair, Asif; Ahmad, Aamir; Singh, Seema; Khushman, Moh’d.; Singh, Ajay P.

    2016-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that the transcription factor MYB can modulate several cancer-associated phenotypes in pancreatic cancer. In order to understand the molecular basis of these MYB-associated changes, we conducted deep-sequencing of transcriptome of MYB-overexpressing and -silenced pancreatic cancer cells, followed by in silico pathway analysis. We identified significant modulation of 774 genes upon MYB-silencing (p < 0.05) that were assigned to 25 gene networks by in silico analysis. Further analyses placed genes in our RNA sequencing-generated dataset to several canonical signalling pathways, such as cell-cycle control, DNA-damage and -repair responses, p53 and HIF1α. Importantly, we observed downregulation of the pancreatic adenocarcinoma signaling pathway in MYB-silenced pancreatic cancer cells exhibiting suppression of EGFR and NF-κB. Decreased expression of EGFR and RELA was validated by both qPCR and immunoblotting and they were both shown to be under direct transcriptional control of MYB. These observations were further confirmed in a converse approach wherein MYB was overexpressed ectopically in a MYB-null pancreatic cancer cell line. Our findings thus suggest that MYB potentially regulates growth and genomic stability of pancreatic cancer cells via targeting complex gene networks and signaling pathways. Further in-depth functional studies are warranted to fully understand MYB signaling in pancreatic cancer. PMID:27354262

  20. Genetic approach identifies distinct asthma pathways in overweight vs normal weight children.

    PubMed

    Butsch Kovacic, M; Martin, L J; Biagini Myers, J M; He, H; Lindsey, M; Mersha, T B; Khurana Hershey, G K

    2015-08-01

    The pathogenesis of asthma in the context of excess body weight may be distinct from asthma that develops in normal weight children. The study's objective was to explore the biology of asthma in the context of obesity and normal weight status using genetic methodologies. Associations between asthma and SNPs in 49 genes were assessed, as well as, interactions between SNPs and overweight status in child participants of the Greater Cincinnati Pediatric Clinic Repository. Asthma was significantly associated with weight (OR = 1.38; P = 0.037). The number of genes and the magnitude of their associations with asthma were notably greater when considering overweight children alone vs normal weight and overweight children together. When considering weight, distinct sets of asthma-associated genes were observed, many times with opposing effects. We demonstrated that the underlying heterogeneity of asthma is likely due in part to distinct pathogenetic pathways that depend on preceding/comorbid overweight and/or allergy. It is therefore important to consider both obesity and asthma when conducting studies of asthma.

  1. Proteome and Acetylome Analysis Identifies Novel Pathways and Targets Regulated by Perifosine in Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xiao; Hua, Zhongyan; Dong, Yudi; Zhan, Yue; Zhang, Xiaowen; Tian, Wei; Liu, Zhihui; Thiele, Carol J.; Li, Zhijie

    2017-01-01

    Perifosine, an Akt inhibitor, has been shown to be effective in controlling neuroblastoma tumor growth. However, studies indicate that in addition to the ability to inhibit Akt, other mechanisms contribute to perifosine’s anti-tumor activity. To gain insight into perifosine anti-tumor activity in neuroblastoma we have studied changes in the proteome and acetylome after perifosine treatment in SK-N-AS neuroblastoma cells using SILAC labeling, affinity enrichment, high-resolution and LC-MS/MS analysis. Bioinformatic analysis indicates that, a total of 5,880 proteins and 3,415 lysine acetylation sites were quantified in SK-N-AS cells and 216 differentially expressed proteins and 115 differentially expressed lysine acetylation sites were obtained. These differentially expressed proteins and lysine acetylated proteins were involved in a number of different biological functions, metabolic pathways and pathophysiological processes. This study details the impact of perifosine on proteome and lysine acetylome in SK-N-AS cells and expands our understanding of the mechanisms of perifosine action in neuroblastoma. PMID:28165023

  2. Induced mouse chromosomal rearrangements as tools for identifying critical developmental genes and pathways.

    PubMed

    Culiat, C T; Carver, E A; Walkowicz, M; Rinchik, E M; Cacheiro, N L; Russell, L B; Generoso, W M; Stubbs, L

    1997-01-01

    Due to the rapid advances that have been made in molecular and genetic technology during the past decade, the genes associated with a large number of human hereditary diseases have been isolated and analyzed in detail. These cloned genes provide new tools for research geared toward a better understanding of normal human development, and also of the many ways that basic, essential morphologic pathways can be disturbed. Chromosomal rearrangements, especially deletions and translocations, have been especially beneficial in the mapping and isolation of human disease genes because of their visibility on both the cytogenetic and molecular levels. However, these useful types of mutations occur with low frequency in the human population. Chromosomal rearrangements can be induced relatively easily in mice, and several large, independent collections of translocation and deletion mutants have been generated in the course of risk-assessment and mutagenesis studies over the past several decades. Combined with new molecular technologies, these collections of mutant animals provide a means of gaining ready access to genes associated with developmental defects including craniofacial abnormalities, hydrocephaly, skeletal deformities, and complex neurologic disorders. As an illustration of this approach, we briefly review our progress in the study of three mutations associated with defects in palate development, juvenile growth, fitness and sterility, and neurologic development in mice, respectively.

  3. Proteome and Acetylome Analysis Identifies Novel Pathways and Targets Regulated by Perifosine in Neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiao; Hua, Zhongyan; Dong, Yudi; Zhan, Yue; Zhang, Xiaowen; Tian, Wei; Liu, Zhihui; Thiele, Carol J; Li, Zhijie

    2017-02-06

    Perifosine, an Akt inhibitor, has been shown to be effective in controlling neuroblastoma tumor growth. However, studies indicate that in addition to the ability to inhibit Akt, other mechanisms contribute to perifosine's anti-tumor activity. To gain insight into perifosine anti-tumor activity in neuroblastoma we have studied changes in the proteome and acetylome after perifosine treatment in SK-N-AS neuroblastoma cells using SILAC labeling, affinity enrichment, high-resolution and LC-MS/MS analysis. Bioinformatic analysis indicates that, a total of 5,880 proteins and 3,415 lysine acetylation sites were quantified in SK-N-AS cells and 216 differentially expressed proteins and 115 differentially expressed lysine acetylation sites were obtained. These differentially expressed proteins and lysine acetylated proteins were involved in a number of different biological functions, metabolic pathways and pathophysiological processes. This study details the impact of perifosine on proteome and lysine acetylome in SK-N-AS cells and expands our understanding of the mechanisms of perifosine action in neuroblastoma.

  4. Adolescents Can Know Best: Using concept mapping to identify factors and pathways driving adolescent sexuality in Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Bayer, Angela M.; Cabrera, Lilia Z.; Gilman, Robert H.; Hindin, Michelle J.; Tsui, Amy O.

    2011-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to identify and describe individual- and environmental-level factors that Peruvian adolescents perceive to be related to adolescent sexuality. A series of concept mapping sessions were carried out from January-March 2006 with 63 15–17 year olds from a low-income community near Lima in order for adolescents to (1) brainstorm items that they thought were related to sexuality (2) sort, group and rate items to score their importance for sexuality-related outcomes, and (3) create pathways from the groups of items to engaging in sex. Brainstorming resulted in 61 items, which participants grouped into 11 clusters. The highest rated clusters were personal values, respect and confidence in relationships, future achievements and parent-child communication. The pathway of decision-making about having sex primarily contained items rated as only moderately important. This study identified important understudied factors, new perspectives on previously-recognized factors, and possible pathways to sexual behavior. These interesting, provocative findings underscore the importance of directly integrating adolescent voices into future sexual and reproductive health research, policies and programs that target this population. PMID:20382462

  5. Label-free quantitative proteomics of the lysine acetylome in mitochondria identifies substrates of SIRT3 in metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Rardin, Matthew J; Newman, John C; Held, Jason M; Cusack, Michael P; Sorensen, Dylan J; Li, Biao; Schilling, Birgit; Mooney, Sean D; Kahn, C Ronald; Verdin, Eric; Gibson, Bradford W

    2013-04-16

    Large-scale proteomic approaches have identified numerous mitochondrial acetylated proteins; however in most cases, their regulation by acetyltransferases and deacetylases remains unclear. Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) is an NAD(+)-dependent mitochondrial protein deacetylase that has been shown to regulate a limited number of enzymes in key metabolic pathways. Here, we use a rigorous label-free quantitative MS approach (called MS1 Filtering) to analyze changes in lysine acetylation from mouse liver mitochondria in the absence of SIRT3. Among 483 proteins, a total of 2,187 unique sites of lysine acetylation were identified after affinity enrichment. MS1 Filtering revealed that lysine acetylation of 283 sites in 136 proteins was significantly increased in the absence of SIRT3 (at least twofold). A subset of these sites was independently validated using selected reaction monitoring MS. These data show that SIRT3 regulates acetylation on multiple proteins, often at multiple sites, across several metabolic pathways including fatty acid oxidation, ketogenesis, amino acid catabolism, and the urea and tricarboxylic acid cycles, as well as mitochondrial regulatory proteins. The widespread modification of key metabolic pathways greatly expands the number of known substrates and sites that are targeted by SIRT3 and establishes SIRT3 as a global regulator of mitochondrial protein acetylation with the capability of coordinating cellular responses to nutrient status and energy homeostasis.

  6. Cohesion group approach for evolutionary analysis of aspartokinase, an enzyme that feeds a branched network of many biochemical pathways.

    PubMed

    Lo, Chien-Chi; Bonner, Carol A; Xie, Gary; D'Souza, Mark; Jensen, Roy A

    2009-12-01

    Aspartokinase (Ask) exists within a variable network that supports the synthesis of 9 amino acids and a number of other important metabolites. Lysine, isoleucine, aromatic amino acids, and dipicolinate may arise from the ASK network or from alternative pathways. Ask proteins were subjected to cohesion group analysis, a methodology that sorts a given protein assemblage into groups in which evolutionary continuity is assured. Two subhomology divisions, ASK(alpha) and ASK(beta), have been recognized. The ASK(alpha) subhomology division is the most ancient, being widely distributed throughout the Archaea and Eukarya and in some Bacteria. Within an indel region of about 75 amino acids near the N terminus, ASK(beta) sequences differ from ASK(alpha) sequences by the possession of a proposed ancient deletion. ASK(beta) sequences are present in most Bacteria and usually exhibit an in-frame internal translational start site that can generate a small Ask subunit that is identical to the C-terminal portion of the larger subunit of a heterodimeric unit. Particularly novel are ask genes embedded in gene contexts that imply specialization for ectoine (osmotic agent) or aromatic amino acids. The cohesion group approach is well suited for the easy recognition of relatively recent lateral gene transfer (LGT) events, and many examples of these are described. Given the current density of genome representation for Proteobacteria, it is possible to reconstruct more ancient landmark LGT events. Thus, a plausible scenario in which the three well-studied and iconic Ask homologs of Escherichia coli are not within the vertical genealogy of Gammaproteobacteria, but rather originated via LGT from a Bacteroidetes donor, is supported.

  7. Cohesion Group Approach for Evolutionary Analysis of Aspartokinase, an Enzyme That Feeds a Branched Network of Many Biochemical Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Chien-Chi; Bonner, Carol A.; Xie, Gary; D'Souza, Mark; Jensen, Roy A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Aspartokinase (Ask) exists within a variable network that supports the synthesis of 9 amino acids and a number of other important metabolites. Lysine, isoleucine, aromatic amino acids, and dipicolinate may arise from the ASK network or from alternative pathways. Ask proteins were subjected to cohesion group analysis, a methodology that sorts a given protein assemblage into groups in which evolutionary continuity is assured. Two subhomology divisions, ASKα and ASKβ, have been recognized. The ASKα subhomology division is the most ancient, being widely distributed throughout the Archaea and Eukarya and in some Bacteria. Within an indel region of about 75 amino acids near the N terminus, ASKβ sequences differ from ASKα sequences by the possession of a proposed ancient deletion. ASKβ sequences are present in most Bacteria and usually exhibit an in-frame internal translational start site that can generate a small Ask subunit that is identical to the C-terminal portion of the larger subunit of a heterodimeric unit. Particularly novel are ask genes embedded in gene contexts that imply specialization for ectoine (osmotic agent) or aromatic amino acids. The cohesion group approach is well suited for the easy recognition of relatively recent lateral gene transfer (LGT) events, and many examples of these are described. Given the current density of genome representation for Proteobacteria, it is possible to reconstruct more ancient landmark LGT events. Thus, a plausible scenario in which the three well-studied and iconic Ask homologs of Escherichia coli are not within the vertical genealogy of Gammaproteobacteria, but rather originated via LGT from a Bacteroidetes donor, is supported. PMID:19946135

  8. Temporal expression profiling identifies pathways mediating effect of causal variant on phenotype.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Saumya; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Raharja-Liu, Pandu; Lin, Gen; Steinmetz, Lars M; Gagneur, Julien; Sinha, Himanshu

    2015-06-01

    -specific transcriptional dynamics of mediating genes. Applications in higher eukaryotes can be valuable for inferring causal molecular pathways underlying complex dynamic processes, such as development, physiology and disease progression.

  9. Tumor necrosis factor and its targets in the inflammatory cytokine pathway are identified as putative transcriptomic biomarkers for escitalopram response.

    PubMed

    Powell, Timothy R; Schalkwyk, Leonard C; Heffernan, Andrew L; Breen, Gerome; Lawrence, Timothy; Price, Tom; Farmer, Anne E; Aitchison, Katherine J; Craig, Ian W; Danese, Andrea; Lewis, Cathryn; McGuffin, Peter; Uher, Rudolf; Tansey, Katherine E; D'Souza, Ursula M

    2013-09-01

    Converging evidence suggests that the activation of the inflammatory cytokine pathway is important in the pathophysiology of unipolar depression. Antidepressants have anti-inflammatory properties and evidence suggests that inter-individual variability in response to antidepressants may reflect genetic differences in the inflammatory cytokine pathway. In particular, protein levels of Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) and the SNPs rs1126757 in interleukin-11 (IL11), and rs7801617 in interleukin-6 (IL6), have previously been implicated in the clinical response to the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressant escitalopram. This study investigated the transcription of TNF, IL11 and IL6 as well as genes in the wider inflammatory cytokine pathway both at baseline and after escitalopram treatment in depressed patients who were either clinical "responders" (n=25) or "non-responders" (n=21). Samples were obtained as a subset of the Genome-Based Therapeutic Drugs for Depression (GENDEP) project and response status is based on changes in the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scores over a 12 wk treatment period. Binary logistic regressions revealed significant expression differences at baseline between responders and non-responders in TNF, and after escitalopram treatment in TNF and IL11. Differences in IL11 after treatment were found to be driven by drug-induced allele-specific expression differences relating to rs1126757. Top hits in the wider inflammatory cytokine pathway at both baseline and after escitalopram treatment were found to be targets of TNF. The current study adds substantial support for the role of the inflammatory cytokine pathway in mediating response to the SSRI escitalopram, and is the first to identify TNF and its targets as putative transcriptomic predictors of clinical response.

  10. Meta-analyses identify 13 novel loci associated with age at menopause and highlights DNA repair and immune pathways

    PubMed Central

    Stolk, Lisette; Perry, John RB; Chasman, Daniel I; He, Chunyan; Mangino, Massimo; Sulem, Patrick; Barbalic, Maja; Broer, Linda; Byrne, Enda M; Ernst, Florian; Esko, Tõnu; Franceschini, Nora; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Kraft, Peter; McArdle, Patick F; Porcu, Eleonora; Shin, So-Youn; Smith, Albert V; van Wingerden, Sophie; Zhai, Guangju; Zhuang, Wei V; Albrecht, Eva; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Aspelund, Thor; Bandinelli, Stefania; Lauc, Lovorka Barac; Beckmann, Jacques S; Boban, Mladen; Boerwinkle, Eric; Broekmans, Frank J; Burri, Andrea; Campbell, Harry; Chanock, Stephen J; Chen, Constance; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Corre, Tanguy; Coviello, Andrea D; d’Adamo, Pio; Davies, Gail; de Faire, Ulf; de Geus, Eco JC; Deary, Ian J; Dedoussis, George VZ; Deloukas, Panagiotis; Ebrahim, Shah; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Emilsson, Valur; Eriksson, Johan G; Fauser, Bart CJM; Ferreli, Liana; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fischer, Krista; Folsom, Aaron R; Garcia, Melissa E; Gasparini, Paolo; Gieger, Christian; Glazer, Nicole; Grobbee, Diederick E; Hall, Per; Haller, Toomas; Hankinson, Susan E; Hass, Merli; Hayward, Caroline; Heath, Andrew C; Hofman, Albert; Ingelsson, Erik; Janssens, A Cecile JW; Johnson, Andrew D; Karasik, David; Kardia, Sharon LR; Keyzer, Jules; Kiel, Douglas P; Kolcic, Ivana; Kutalik, Zoltán; Lahti, Jari; Lai, Sandra; Laisk, Triin; Laven, Joop SE; Lawlor, Debbie A; Liu, Jianjun; Lopez, Lorna M; Louwers, Yvonne V; Magnusson, Patrik KE; Marongiu, Mara; Martin, Nicholas G; Klaric, Irena Martinovic; Masciullo, Corrado; McKnight, Barbara; Medland, Sarah E; Melzer, David; Mooser, Vincent; Navarro, Pau; Newman, Anne B; Nyholt, Dale R; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Palotie, Aarno; Paré, Guillaume; Parker, Alex N; Pedersen, Nancy L; Peeters, Petra HM; Pistis, Giorgio; Plump, Andrew S; Polasek, Ozren; Pop, Victor JM; Psaty, Bruce M; Räikkönen, Katri; Rehnberg, Emil; Rotter, Jerome I; Rudan, Igor; Sala, Cinzia; Salumets, Andres; Scuteri, Angelo; Singleton, Andrew; Smith, Jennifer A; Snieder, Harold; Soranzo, Nicole; Stacey, Simon N; Starr, John M; Stathopoulou, Maria G; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stolk, Ronald P; Styrkarsdottir, Unnur; Sun, Yan V; Tenesa, Albert; Thorand, Barbara; Toniolo, Daniela; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Tsui, Kim; Ulivi, Sheila; van Dam, Rob M; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; van Gils, Carla H; van Nierop, Peter; Vink, Jacqueline M; Visscher, Peter M; Voorhuis, Marlies; Waeber, Gérard; Wallaschofski, Henri; Wichmann, H Erich; Widen, Elisabeth; Gent, Colette JM Wijnands-van; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilson, James F; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce HR; Wright, Alan F; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Zemunik, Tatijana; Zgaga, Lina; Zillikens, M. Carola; Zygmunt, Marek; Arnold, Alice M; Boomsma, Dorret I; Buring, Julie E.; Crisponi, Laura; Demerath, Ellen W; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Harris, Tamara B; Hu, Frank B; Hunter, David J; Launer, Lenore J; Metspalu, Andres; Montgomery, Grant W; Oostra, Ben A; Ridker, Paul M; Sanna, Serena; Schlessinger, David; Spector, Tim D; Stefansson, Kari; Streeten, Elizabeth A; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Uda, Manuela; Uitterlinden, André G; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Völzke, Henry; Murray, Anna; Murabito, Joanne M; Visser, Jenny A; Lunetta, Kathryn L

    2011-01-01

    To identify novel loci for age at natural menopause, we performed a meta-analysis of 22 genome-wide association studies in 38,968 women of European descent, with replication in up to 14,435 women. In addition to four known loci, we identified 13 new age at natural menopause loci (P < 5 × 10−8). The new loci included genes implicated in DNA repair (EXO1, HELQ, UIMC1, FAM175A, FANCI, TLK1, POLG, PRIM1) and immune function (IL11, NLRP11, BAT2). Gene-set enrichment pathway analyses using the full GWAS dataset identified exodeoxyribonuclease, NFκB signalling and mitochondrial dysfunction as biological processes related to timing of menopause. PMID:22267201

  11. Use of a bovine genome array to identify new biological pathways for beef marbling in Hanwoo (Korean Cattle)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Marbling (intramuscular fat) is a valuable trait that impacts on meat quality and an important factor determining price of beef in the Korean beef market. Animals that are destined for this high marbling market are fed a high concentrate ration for approximately 30 months in the Korean finishing farms. However, this feeding strategy leads to inefficiencies and excessive fat production. This study aimed to identify candidate genes and pathways associated with intramuscular fat deposition on highly divergent marbling phenotypes in adult Hanwoo cattle. Results Bovine genome array analysis was conducted to detect differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in m. longissimus with divergent marbling phenotype (marbling score 2 to 7). Three data-processing methods (MAS5.0, GCRMA and RMA) were used to test for differential expression (DE). Statistical analysis identified 21 significant transcripts from at least two data-processing methods (P < 0.01). All 21 differentially expressed genes were validated by real-time PCR. Results showed a high concordance in the gene expression fold change between the microarrays and the real time PCR data. Gene Ontology (GO) and pathway analysis demonstrated that some genes (ADAMTS4, CYP51A and SQLE) over expressed in high marbled animals are involved in a protein catabolic process and a cholesterol biosynthesis process. In addition, pathway analysis also revealed that ADAMTS4 is activated by three regulators (IL-17A, TNFα and TGFβ1). QRT-PCR was used to investigate gene expression of these regulators in muscle with divergent intramuscular fat contents. The results demonstrate that ADAMTS4 and TGFβ1 are associated with increasing marbling fat. An ADAMTS4/TGFβ1 pathway seems to be associated with the phenotypic differences between high and low marbled groups. Conclusions Marbling differences are possibly a function of complex signaling pathway interactions between muscle and fat. These results suggest that ADAMTS4, which is involved

  12. Analysis of genomic aberrations and gene expression profiling identifies novel lesions and pathways in myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Rice, K L; Lin, X; Wolniak, K; Ebert, B L; Berkofsky-Fessler, W; Buzzai, M; Sun, Y; Xi, C; Elkin, P; Levine, R; Golub, T; Gilliland, D G; Crispino, J D; Licht, J D; Zhang, W

    2011-01-01

    Polycythemia vera (PV), essential thrombocythemia and primary myelofibrosis, are myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) with distinct clinical features and are associated with the JAK2V617F mutation. To identify genomic anomalies involved in the pathogenesis of these disorders, we profiled 87 MPN patients using Affymetrix 250K single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays. Aberrations affecting chr9 were the most frequently observed and included 9pLOH (n=16), trisomy 9 (n=6) and amplifications of 9p13.3–23.3 (n=1), 9q33.1–34.13 (n=1) and 9q34.13 (n=6). Patients with trisomy 9 were associated with elevated JAK2V617F mutant allele burden, suggesting that gain of chr9 represents an alternative mechanism for increasing JAK2V617F dosage. Gene expression profiling of patients with and without chr9 abnormalities (+9, 9pLOH), identified genes potentially involved in disease pathogenesis including JAK2, STAT5B and MAPK14. We also observed recurrent gains of 1p36.31–36.33 (n=6), 17q21.2–q21.31 (n=5) and 17q25.1–25.3 (n=5) and deletions affecting 18p11.31–11.32 (n=8). Combined SNP and gene expression analysis identified aberrations affecting components of a non-canonical PRC2 complex (EZH1, SUZ12 and JARID2) and genes comprising a ‘HSC signature' (MLLT3, SMARCA2 and PBX1). We show that NFIB, which is amplified in 7/87 MPN patients and upregulated in PV CD34+ cells, protects cells from apoptosis induced by cytokine withdrawal. PMID:22829077

  13. Integrated Genomics Identifies Five Medulloblastoma Subtypes with Distinct Genetic Profiles, Pathway Signatures and Clinicopathological Features

    PubMed Central

    Kool, Marcel; Koster, Jan; Bunt, Jens; Hasselt, Nancy E.; Lakeman, Arjan; van Sluis, Peter; Troost, Dirk; Meeteren, Netteke Schouten-van; Caron, Huib N.; Cloos, Jacqueline; Mršić, Alan; Ylstra, Bauke; Grajkowska, Wieslawa; Hartmann, Wolfgang; Pietsch, Torsten; Ellison, David; Clifford, Steven C.; Versteeg, Rogier

    2008-01-01

    Background Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor in children. Despite recent improvements in cure rates, prediction of disease outcome remains a major challenge and survivors suffer from serious therapy-related side-effects. Recent data showed that patients with WNT-activated tumors have a favorable prognosis, suggesting that these patients could be treated less intensively, thereby reducing the side-effects. This illustrates the potential benefits of a robust classification of medulloblastoma patients and a detailed knowledge of associated biological mechanisms. Methods and Findings To get a better insight into the molecular biology of medulloblastoma we established mRNA expression profiles of 62 medulloblastomas and analyzed 52 of them also by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) arrays. Five molecular subtypes were identified, characterized by WNT signaling (A; 9 cases), SHH signaling (B; 15 cases), expression of neuronal differentiation genes (C and D; 16 and 11 cases, respectively) or photoreceptor genes (D and E; both 11 cases). Mutations in β-catenin were identified in all 9 type A tumors, but not in any other tumor. PTCH1 mutations were exclusively identified in type B tumors. CGH analysis identified several fully or partly subtype-specific chromosomal aberrations. Monosomy of chromosome 6 occurred only in type A tumors, loss of 9q mostly occurred in type B tumors, whereas chromosome 17 aberrations, most common in medulloblastoma, were strongly associated with type C or D tumors. Loss of the inactivated X-chromosome was highly specific for female cases of type C, D and E tumors. Gene expression levels faithfully reflected the chromosomal copy number changes. Clinicopathological features significantly different between the 5 subtypes included metastatic disease and age at diagnosis and histology. Metastatic disease at diagnosis was significantly associated with subtypes C and D and most strongly with subtype E. Patients below 3 yrs of

  14. Heterologous Production of the Marine Myxobacterial Antibiotic Haliangicin and Its Unnatural Analogues Generated by Engineering of the Biochemical Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yuwei; Feng, Zhiyang; Tomura, Tomohiko; Suzuki, Akira; Miyano, Seishi; Tsuge, Takashi; Mori, Hitoshi; Suh, Joo-Won; Iizuka, Takashi; Fudou, Ryosuke; Ojika, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Despite their fastidious nature, marine myxobacteria have considerable genetic potential to produce novel secondary metabolites. The marine myxobacterium Haliangium ochraceum SMP-2 produces the antifungal polyketide haliangicin (1), but its productivity is unsatisfactory. The biosynthetic gene cluster hli (47.8 kbp) associated with 1 was identified and heterologously expressed in Myxococcus xanthus to permit the production of 1 with high efficiency (tenfold greater amount and threefold faster in growth speed compared with the original producer), as well as the generation of bioactive unnatural analogues of 1 through gene manipulation. A unique acyl-CoA dehydrogenase was found to catalyse an unusual γ,δ-dehydrogenation of the diketide starter unit, leading to the formation of the terminal alkene moiety of 1. Biological evaluation of the analogues obtained through this study revealed that their bioactivities (anti-oomycete and cytotoxic activities) can be modified by manipulating the vinyl epoxide at the terminus opposite the β-methoxyacrylate pharmacophore. PMID:26915413

  15. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of the Salicylyl-acyltranferase SsfX3 from a Tetracycline Biosynthetic Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Pickens, Lauren B.; Sawaya, Michael R.; Rasool, Huma; Pashkov, Inna; Yeates, Todd O.; Tang, Yi

    2012-03-14

    SsfX3 is a GDSL family acyltransferase that transfers salicylate to the C-4 hydroxyl of a tetracycline intermediate in the penultimate step during biosynthesis of the anticancer natural product SF2575. The C-4 salicylate takes the place of the more common C-4 dimethylamine functionality, making SsfX3 the first acyltransferase identified to act on a tetracycline substrate. The crystal structure of SsfX3 was determined at 2.5 {angstrom}, revealing two distinct domains as follows: an N-terminal {beta}-sandwich domain that resembles a carbohydrate-binding module, and a C-terminal catalytic domain that contains the atypical {alpha}/{beta}-hydrolase fold found in the GDSL hydrolase family of enzymes. The active site lies at one end of a large open binding pocket, which is spatially defined by structural elements from both the N- and C-terminal domains. Mutational analysis in the putative substrate binding pocket identified residues from both domains that are important for binding the acyl donor and acceptor. Furthermore, removal of the N-terminal carbohydrate-binding module-like domain rendered the stand-alone {alpha}/{beta}-hydrolase domain inactive. The additional noncatalytic module is therefore proposed to be required to define the binding pocket and provide sufficient interactions with the spatially extended tetracyclic substrate. SsfX3 was also demonstrated to accept a variety of non-native acyl groups. This relaxed substrate specificity toward the acyl donor allowed the chemoenzymatic biosynthesis of C-4-modified analogs of the immediate precursor to the bioactive SF2575; these were used to assay the structure activity relationships at the C-4 position.

  16. Identifying Key Proteins in Hg Methylation Pathways of Desulfovibrio by Global Proteomics, Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, Anne O.; Miller, Susan M.; Wall, Judy; Lipton, Mary

    2016-06-18

    Elemental mercury, Hg(0) is a contaminant at many DOE sites, especially at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) where the spread of spilled Hg and its effects on microbial populations have been monitored for decades. To explore the microbial interactions with Hg, we have devised a global proteomic approach capable of directly detecting Hg-adducts of proteins. This technique developed in the facultative anaerobe, Escherichia coli, allows us to identify the proteins most vulnerable to acute exposure to organomercurials phenyl- and ethyl-mercury (as surrogates for the highly neurotoxic methyl-Hg) (Polacco, et al, 2011). We have found >300 such proteins in all metabolic functional groups and cellular compartments; most are highly conserved and can serve as markers for acute Hg exposure (Zink, et al. 2016, in preparation). We have also discovered that acute Hg exposure severely disrupts thiol, iron and redox homeostases, and electrolyte balance (LaVoie, et al., 2015) Thus, we proposed to bring these techniques to bear on the central problem of identifying the cellular proteins involved in bacterial uptake and methylation of mercury and its release from the cell.

  17. General enzymatic screens identify three new nucleotidases in Escherichia coli. Biochemical characterization of SurE, YfbR, and YjjG.

    PubMed

    Proudfoot, Michael; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Brown, Greg; Rao, Narayana N; Kitagawa, Masanari; Mori, Hirotada; Savchenko, Alexei; Yakunin, Alexander F

    2004-12-24

    To find proteins with nucleotidase activity in Escherichia coli, purified unknown proteins were screened for the presence of phosphatase activity using the general phosphatase substrate p-nitrophenyl phosphate. Proteins exhibiting catalytic activity were then assayed for nucleotidase activity against various nucleotides. These screens identified the presence of nucleotidase activity in three uncharacterized E. coli proteins, SurE, YfbR, and YjjG, that belong to different enzyme superfamilies: SurE-like family, HD domain family (YfbR), and haloacid dehalogenase (HAD)-like superfamily (YjjG). The phosphatase activity of these proteins had a neutral pH optimum (pH 7.0-8.0) and was strictly dependent on the presence of divalent metal cations (SurE: Mn(2+) > Co(2+) > Ni(2+) > Mg(2+); YfbR: Co(2+) > Mn(2+) > Cu(2+); YjjG: Mg(2+) > Mn(2+) > Co(2+)). Further biochemical characterization of SurE revealed that it has a broad substrate specificity and can dephosphorylate various ribo- and deoxyribonucleoside 5'-monophosphates and ribonucleoside 3'-monophosphates with highest affinity to 3'-AMP. SurE also hydrolyzed polyphosphate (exopolyphosphatase activity) with the preference for short-chain-length substrates (P(20-25)). YfbR was strictly specific to deoxyribonucleoside 5'-monophosphates, whereas YjjG showed narrow specificity to 5'-dTMP, 5'-dUMP, and 5'-UMP. The three enzymes also exhibited different sensitivities to inhibition by various nucleoside di- and triphosphates: YfbR was equally sensitive to both di- and triphosphates, SurE was inhibited only by triphosphates, and YjjG was insensitive to these effectors. The differences in their sensitivities to nucleotides and their varied substrate specificities suggest that these enzymes play unique functions in the intracellular nucleotide metabolism in E. coli.

  18. Exploring critical pathways for urban water management to identify robust strategies under deep uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Urich, Christian; Rauch, Wolfgang

    2014-12-01

    Long-term projections for key drivers needed in urban water infrastructure planning such as climate change, population growth, and socio-economic changes are deeply uncertain. Traditional planning approaches heavily rely on these projections, which, if a projection stays unfulfilled, can lead to problematic infrastructure decisions causing high operational costs and/or lock-in effects. New approaches based on exploratory modelling take a fundamentally different view. Aim of these is, to identify an adaptation strategy that performs well under many future scenarios, instead of optimising a strategy for a handful. However, a modelling tool to support strategic planning to test the implication of adaptation strategies under deeply uncertain conditions for urban water management does not exist yet. This paper presents a first step towards a new generation of such strategic planning tools, by combing innovative modelling tools, which coevolve the urban environment and urban water infrastructure under many different future scenarios, with robust decision making. The developed approach is applied to the city of Innsbruck, Austria, which is spatially explicitly evolved 20 years into the future under 1000 scenarios to test the robustness of different adaptation strategies. Key findings of this paper show that: (1) Such an approach can be used to successfully identify parameter ranges of key drivers in which a desired performance criterion is not fulfilled, which is an important indicator for the robustness of an adaptation strategy; and (2) Analysis of the rich dataset gives new insights into the adaptive responses of agents to key drivers in the urban system by modifying a strategy.

  19. Gain-of-function assays in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) to identify signaling pathways that induce and regulate limb regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jangwoo; Aguilar, Cristian; Gardiner, David

    2013-01-01

    The adult salamander has been studied as a model for regeneration of complex tissues for many decades. Only recently with the development of gain-of-function assays for regeneration, has it been possible to screen for and assay the function of the multitude of signaling factors that have been identified in studies of embryonic development and tumorigenesis. Given the conservation of function of these regulatory pathways controlling growth and pattern formation, it is now possible to use the functional assays in the salamander to test the ability of endogenous as well as small-molecule signaling factors to induce a regenerative response.

  20. Finding novel distinctions between the sAPPα-mediated anabolic biochemical pathways in Autism Spectrum Disorder and Fragile X Syndrome plasma and brain tissue

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Balmiki; Sokol, Deborah K.; Maloney, Bryan; Lahiri, Debomoy K.

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and Fragile X syndrome (FXS) are developmental disorders. No validated blood-based biomarkers exist for either, which impedes bench-to-bedside approaches. Amyloid-β (Aβ) precursor protein (APP) and metabolites are usually associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). APP cleavage by α-secretase produces potentially neurotrophic secreted APPα (sAPPα) and the P3 peptide fragment. β-site APP cleaving enzyme (BACE1) cleavage produces secreted APPβ (sAPPβ) and intact Aβ. Excess Aβ is potentially neurotoxic and can lead to atrophy of brain regions such as amygdala in AD. By contrast, amygdala is enlarged in ASD but not FXS. We previously reported elevated levels of sAPPα in ASD and FXS vs. controls. We now report elevated plasma Aβ and total APP levels in FXS compared to both ASD and typically developing controls, and elevated levels of sAPPα in ASD and FXS vs. controls. By contrast, plasma and brain sAPPβ and Aβ were lower in ASD vs. controls but elevated in FXS plasma vs. controls. We also detected age-dependent increase in an α-secretase in ASD brains. We report a novel mechanistic difference in APP pathways between ASD (processing) and FXS (expression) leading to distinct APP metabolite profiles in these two disorders. These novel, distinctive biochemical differences between ASD and FXS pave the way for blood-based biomarkers for ASD and FXS. PMID:27212113

  1. A New Modified ortho Cleavage Pathway of 3-Chlorocatechol Degradation by Rhodococcus opacus 1CP: Genetic and Biochemical Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Moiseeva, Olga V.; Solyanikova, Inna P.; Kaschabek, Stefan R.; Gröning, Janosch; Thiel, Monika; Golovleva, Ludmila A.; Schlömann, Michael

    2002-01-01

    The 4-chloro- and 2,4-dichlorophenol-degrading strain Rhodococcus opacus 1CP has previously been shown to acquire, during prolonged adaptation, the ability to mineralize 2-chlorophenol. In addition, homogeneous chlorocatechol 1,2-dioxygenase from 2-chlorophenol-grown biomass has shown relatively high activity towards 3-chlorocatechol. Based on sequences of the N terminus and tryptic peptides of this enzyme, degenerate PCR primers were now designed and used for cloning of the respective gene from genomic DNA of strain 1CP. A 9.5-kb fragment containing nine open reading frames was obtained on pROP1. Besides other genes, a gene cluster consisting of four chlorocatechol catabolic genes was identified. As judged by sequence similarity and correspondence of predicted N termini with those of purified enzymes, the open reading frames correspond to genes for a second chlorocatechol 1,2-dioxygenase (ClcA2), a second chloromuconate cycloisomerase (ClcB2), a second dienelactone hydrolase (ClcD2), and a muconolactone isomerase-related enzyme (ClcF). All enzymes of this new cluster are only distantly related to the known chlorocatechol enzymes and appear to represent new evolutionary lines of these activities. UV overlay spectra as well as high-pressure liquid chromatography analyses confirmed that 2-chloro-cis,cis-muconate is transformed by ClcB2 to 5-chloromuconolactone, which during turnover by ClcF gives cis-dienelactone as the sole product. cis-Dienelactone was further hydrolyzed by ClcD2 to maleylacetate. ClcF, despite its sequence similarity to muconolactone isomerases, no longer showed muconolactone-isomerizing activity and thus represents an enzyme dedicated to its new function as a 5-chloromuconolactone dehalogenase. Thus, during 3-chlorocatechol degradation by R. opacus 1CP, dechlorination is catalyzed by a muconolactone isomerase-related enzyme rather than by a specialized chloromuconate cycloisomerase. PMID:12218013

  2. A systems biology approach to identify intelligence quotient score-related genomic regions, and pathways relevant to potential therapeutic treatments

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Min; Kong, Lei; Qu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Although the intelligence quotient (IQ) is the most popular intelligence test in the world, little is known about the underlying biological mechanisms that lead to the differences in human. To improve our understanding of cognitive processes and identify potential biomarkers, we conducted a comprehensive investigation of 158 IQ-related genes selected from the literature. A genomic distribution analysis demonstrated that IQ-related genes were enriched in seven regions of chromosome 7 and the X chromosome. In addition, these genes were enriched in target lists of seven transcription factors and sixteen microRNAs. Using a network-based approach, we further reconstructed an IQ-related pathway from known human pathway interaction data. Based on this reconstructed pathway, we incorporated enriched drugs and described the importance of dopamine and norepinephrine systems in IQ-related biological process. These findings not only reveal several testable genes and processes related to IQ scores, but also have potential therapeutic implications for IQ-related mental disorders. PMID:24566931

  3. Quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis identifies activation of the RET and IGF-1R/IR signaling pathways in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    DeNardo, Bradley D; Holloway, Michael P; Ji, Qinqin; Nguyen, Kevin T; Cheng, Yan; Valentine, Marcus B; Salomon, Arthur; Altura, Rachel A

    2013-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is an embryonal tumor of childhood with a heterogenous clinical presentation that reflects differences in activation of complex biological signaling pathways. Protein phosphorylation is a key component of cellular signal transduction and plays a critical role in processes that control cancer cell growth and survival. We used shotgun LC/MS to compare phosphorylation between a human MYCN amplified neuroblastoma cell line (NB10), modeling a resistant tumor, and a human neural precursor cell line (NPC), modeling a normal baseline neural crest cell. 2181 unique phosphorylation sites representing 1171 proteins and 2598 phosphopeptides were found. Protein kinases accounted for 6% of the proteome, with a predominance of tyrosine kinases, supporting their prominent role in oncogenic signaling pathways. Highly abundant receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) phosphopeptides in the NB10 cell line relative to the NPC cell line included RET, insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor/insulin receptor (IGF-1R/IR), and fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1). Multiple phosphorylated peptides from downstream mediators of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR and RAS pathways were also highly abundant in NB10 relative to NPC. Our analysis highlights the importance of RET, IGF-1R/IR and FGFR1 as RTKs in neuroblastoma and suggests a methodology that can be used to identify potential novel biological therapeutic targets. Furthermore, application of this previously unexploited technology in the clinic opens the possibility of providing a new wide-scale molecular signature to assess disease progression and prognosis.

  4. Proteomic Approaches Identify Members of Cofilin Pathway Involved in Oral Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Polachini, Giovana M.; Sobral, Lays M.; Mercante, Ana M. C.; Paes-Leme, Adriana F.; Xavier, Flávia C. A.; Henrique, Tiago; Guimarães, Douglas M.; Vidotto, Alessandra; Fukuyama, Erica E.; Góis-Filho, José F.; Cury, Patricia M.; Curioni, Otávio A.; Michaluart Jr, Pedro; Silva, Adriana M. A.; Wünsch-Filho, Victor; Nunes, Fabio D.; Leopoldino, Andréia M.; Tajara, Eloiza H.

    2012-01-01

    The prediction of tumor behavior for patients with oral carcinomas remains a challenge for clinicians. The presence of lymph node metastasis is the most important prognostic factor but it is limited in predicting local relapse or survival. This highlights the need for identifying biomarkers that may effectively contribute to prediction of recurrence and tumor spread. In this study, we used one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry and immunodetection methods to analyze protein expression in oral squamous cell carcinomas. Using a refinement for classifying oral carcinomas in regard to prognosis, we analyzed small but lymph node metastasis-positive versus large, lymph node metastasis-negative tumors in order to contribute to the molecular characterization of subgroups with risk of dissemination. Specific protein patterns favoring metastasis were observed in the “more-aggressive” group defined by the present study. This group displayed upregulation of proteins involved in migration, adhesion, angiogenesis, cell cycle regulation, anti-apoptosis and epithelial to mesenchymal transition, whereas the “less-aggressive” group was engaged in keratinocyte differentiation, epidermis development, inflammation and immune response. Besides the identification of several proteins not yet described as deregulated in oral carcinomas, the present study demonstrated for the first time the role of cofilin-1 in modulating cell invasion in oral carcinomas. PMID:23227181

  5. Alternate dissociation pathways identified in charge-reduced protein complex ions.

    PubMed

    Pagel, Kevin; Hyung, Suk-Joon; Ruotolo, Brandon T; Robinson, Carol V

    2010-06-15

    Tandem mass spectrometry (MS) of large protein complexes has proven to be capable of assessing the stoichiometry, connectivity, and structural details of multiprotein assemblies. While the utility of tandem MS is without question, a deeper understanding of the mechanism of protein complex dissociation will undoubtedly drive the technology into new areas of enhanced utility and information content. We present here the systematic analysis of the charge state dependent decay of the noncovalently associated complex of human transthyretin, generated by collision-induced dissociation (CID). A crown ether based charge reduction approach was applied to generate intact transthyretin tetramers with charge states ranging from 15+ to 7+. These nine charge states were subsequently analyzed by means of tandem MS and ion mobility spectrometry. Three different charge-dependent mechanistic regimes were identified: (1) common asymmetric dissociation involving ejection of unfolded monomers, (2) expulsion of folded monomers from the intact tetramer, and (3) release of C-terminal peptide fragments from the intact complex. Taken together, the results presented highlight the potential of charge state modulation as a method for directing the course of gas-phase dissociation and unfolding of protein complexes.

  6. Soluble Signals from Cells Identified at the Cell Wall Establish a Developmental Pathway in Carrot.

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, P. F.; Valentine, T. A.; Forsberg, L. S.; Pennell, R. I.

    1997-01-01

    Cells in a plant differentiate according to their positions and use cell-cell communication to assess these positions. Similarly, single cells in suspension cultures can develop into somatic embryos, and cell-cell communication is thought to control this process. The monoclonal antibody JIM8 labels an epitope on cells in specific positions in plants. JIM8 also labels certain cells in carrot embryogenic suspension cultures. We have used JIM8 and secondary antibodies coupled to paramagnetic beads to label and immunomagnetically sort single cells in a carrot embryogenic suspension culture into pure populations. Cells in the JIM8(+) population develop into somatic embryos, whereas cells in the JIM8(-) population do not form somatic embryos. However, certain cells in JIM8(+) cultures (state B cells) undergo asymmetric divisions, resulting in daughter cells (state C cells) that do not label with JIM8 and that sort to JIM8(-) cultures. State C cells are competent to form somatic embryos, and we show here that a conditioned growth medium from a culture of JIM8(+) cells allows state C cells in a JIM8(-) culture to go on and develop into somatic embryos. JIM8 labels cells in suspension cultures at the cell wall. Therefore, a cell with a role in cell-cell communication and early cell fate selection can be identified by an epitope in its cell wall. PMID:12237357

  7. Identifying precursors and aqueous organic aerosol formation pathways during the SOAS campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sareen, Neha; Carlton, Annmarie G.; Surratt, Jason D.; Gold, Avram; Lee, Ben; Lopez-Hilfiker, Felipe D.; Mohr, Claudia; Thornton, Joel A.; Zhang, Zhenfa; Lim, Yong B.; Turpin, Barbara J.

    2016-11-01

    Aqueous multiphase chemistry in the atmosphere can lead to rapid transformation of organic compounds, forming highly oxidized, low-volatility organic aerosol and, in some cases, light-absorbing (brown) carbon. Because liquid water is globally abundant, this chemistry could substantially impact climate, air quality, and health. Gas-phase precursors released from biogenic and anthropogenic sources are oxidized and fragmented, forming water-soluble gases that can undergo reactions in the aqueous phase (in clouds, fogs, and wet aerosols), leading to the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOAAQ). Recent studies have highlighted the role of certain precursors like glyoxal, methylglyoxal, glycolaldehyde, acetic acid, acetone, and epoxides in the formation of SOAAQ. The goal of this work is to identify additional precursors and products that may be atmospherically important. In this study, ambient mixtures of water-soluble gases were scrubbed from the atmosphere into water at Brent, Alabama, during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS). Hydroxyl (OH⚫) radical oxidation experiments were conducted with the aqueous mixtures collected from SOAS to better understand the formation of SOA through gas-phase followed by aqueous-phase chemistry. Total aqueous-phase organic carbon concentrations for these mixtures ranged from 92 to 179 µM-C, relevant for cloud and fog waters. Aqueous OH-reactive compounds were primarily observed as odd ions in the positive ion mode by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Ultra high-resolution Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) spectra and tandem MS (MS-MS) fragmentation of these ions were consistent with the presence of carbonyls and tetrols. Products were observed in the negative ion mode and included pyruvate and oxalate, which were confirmed by ion chromatography. Pyruvate and oxalate have been found in the particle phase in many locations (as salts and complexes). Thus

  8. Altered Transmission of HOX and Apoptotic SNPs Identify a Potential Common Pathway for Clubfoot

    PubMed Central

    Ester, Audrey R.; Weymouth, Katelyn S.; Burt, Amber; Wise, Carol; Scott, Allison; Gurnett, Christina A; Dobbs, Matthew B.; Blanton, Susan H.; Hecht, Jacqueline T.

    2009-01-01

    Clubfoot is a common birth defect that affects 135,000 newborns each year worldwide. It is characterized by equinus deformity of one or both feet and hypoplastic calf muscles. Despite numerous study approaches, the cause(s) remains poorly understood although a multifactorial etiology is generally accepted. We considered the HOXA and HOXD gene clusters and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP3) as candidate genes because of their important roles in limb and muscle morphogenesis. Twenty SNPs from the HOXA and HOXD gene clusters and 12 SNPs in IGFBP3 were genotyped in a sample composed of nonHispanic white and Hispanic multiplex and simplex families (discovery samples) and a second sample of nonHispanic white simplex trios (validation sample). Four SNPs (rs6668, rs2428431, rs3801776 and rs3779456) in the HOXA cluster demonstrated altered transmission in the discovery sample, but only rs3801776, located in the HOXA basal promoter region, showed altered transmission in both the discovery and validation samples (p=0.004 and p=0.028). Interestingly, HOXA9 is expressed in muscle during development. A SNP in IGFBP3, rs13223993, also showed altered transmission (p=0.003) in the discovery sample. Gene-gene interactions were identified between variants in HOXA, HOXD and IGFBP3 and with previously associated SNPs in mitochondrial-mediated apoptotic genes. The most significant interactions were found between CASP3 SNPS and variants in HOXA, HOXD and IGFBP3. These results suggest a biologic model for clubfoot in which perturbation of HOX and apoptotic genes together affect muscle and limb development, which may cause the downstream failure of limb rotation into a plantar grade position. PMID:19938081

  9. Dissecting the gene network of dietary restriction to identify evolutionarily conserved pathways and new functional genes.

    PubMed

    Wuttke, Daniel; Connor, Richard; Vora, Chintan; Craig, Thomas; Li, Yang; Wood, Shona; Vasieva, Olga; Shmookler Reis, Robert; Tang, Fusheng; de Magalhães, João Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR), limiting nutrient intake from diet without causing malnutrition, delays the aging process and extends lifespan in multiple organisms. The conserved life-extending effect of DR suggests the involvement of fundamental mechanisms, although these remain a subject of debate. To help decipher the life-extending mechanisms of DR, we first compiled a list of genes that if genetically altered disrupt or prevent the life-extending effects of DR. We called these DR-essential genes and identified more than 100 in model organisms such as yeast, worms, flies, and mice. In order for other researchers to benefit from this first curated list of genes essential for DR, we established an online database called GenDR (http://genomics.senescence.info/diet/). To dissect the interactions of DR-essential genes and discover the underlying lifespan-extending mechanisms, we then used a variety of network and systems biology approaches to analyze the gene network of DR. We show that DR-essential genes are more conserved at the molecular level and have more molecular interactions than expected by chance. Furthermore, we employed a guilt-by-association method to predict novel DR-essential genes. In budding yeast, we predicted nine genes related to vacuolar functions; we show experimentally that mutations deleting eight of those genes prevent the life-extending effects of DR. Three of these mutants (OPT2, FRE6, and RCR2) had extended lifespan under ad libitum, indicating that the lack of further longevity under DR is not caused by a general compromise of fitness. These results demonstrate how network analyses of DR using GenDR can be used to make phenotypically relevant predictions. Moreover, gene-regulatory circuits reveal that the DR-induced transcriptional signature in yeast involves nutrient-sensing, stress responses and meiotic transcription factors. Finally, comparing the influence of gene expression changes during DR on the interactomes of multiple organisms led

  10. Using Ambystoma mexicanum (Mexican Axolotl) Embryos, Chemical Genetics, and Microarray Analysis to Identify Signaling Pathways Associated with Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ponomareva, Larissa V.; Athippozhy, Antony; Thorson, Jon S.; Voss, S. Randal

    2015-01-01

    Amphibian vertebrates are important models in regenerative biology because they present exceptional regenerative capabilities throughout life. However, it takes considerable effort to rear amphibians to juvenile and adult stages for regeneration studies and the relatively large sizes that frogs and salamanders achieve during development make them difficult to use in chemical screens. Here we introduce a new tail regeneration model using late stage Mexican axolotl embryos. We show that axolotl embryos completely regenerate amputated tails in 7 days before they exhaust their yolk supply and begin to feed. Further, we show that axolotl embryos can be efficiently reared in microtiter plates to achieve moderate throughput screening of soluble chemicals to investigate toxicity and identify molecules that alter regenerative outcome. As proof of principle, we identified integration 1 / wingless (Wnt), transforming growth factor beta (Tgf-β), and fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) pathway antagonists that completely block tail regeneration and additional chemicals that significantly affected tail outgrowth. Furthermore, we used microarray analysis to show that inhibition of Wnt signaling broadly affects transcription of genes associated with Wnt, Fgf, Tgf-β, epidermal growth factor (Egf), Notch, nerve growth factor (Ngf), homeotic gene (Hox), rat sarcoma/mitogen-activated protein kinase (Ras/Mapk), myelocytomatosis viral oncogene (Myc), tumor protein 53 (p53), and retinoic acid (RA) pathways. Punctuated changes in the expression of genes known to regulate vertebrate development were observed; this suggests the tail regeneration transcriptional program is hierarchically structured and temporally ordered. Our study establishes the axolotl as a chemical screening model to investigate signaling pathways associated with tissue regeneration. PMID:26092703

  11. Using Ambystoma mexicanum (Mexican axolotl) embryos, chemical genetics, and microarray analysis to identify signaling pathways associated with tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ponomareva, Larissa V; Athippozhy, Antony; Thorson, Jon S; Voss, S Randal

    2015-12-01

    Amphibian vertebrates are important models in regenerative biology because they present exceptional regenerative capabilities throughout life. However, it takes considerable effort to rear amphibians to juvenile and adult stages for regeneration studies, and the relatively large sizes that frogs and salamanders achieve during development make them difficult to use in chemical screens. Here, we introduce a new tail regeneration model using late stage Mexican axolotl embryos. We show that axolotl embryos completely regenerate amputated tails in 7days before they exhaust their yolk supply and begin to feed. Further, we show that axolotl embryos can be efficiently reared in microtiter plates to achieve moderate throughput screening of soluble chemicals to investigate toxicity and identify molecules that alter regenerative outcome. As proof of principle, we identified integration 1 / wingless (Wnt), transforming growth factor beta (Tgf-β), and fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) pathway antagonists that completely block tail regeneration and additional chemicals that significantly affected tail outgrowth. Furthermore, we used microarray analysis to show that inhibition of Wnt signaling broadly affects transcription of genes associated with Wnt, Fgf, Tgf-β, epidermal growth factor (Egf), Notch, nerve growth factor (Ngf), homeotic gene (Hox), rat sarcoma/mitogen-activated protein kinase (Ras/Mapk), myelocytomatosis viral oncogene (Myc), tumor protein 53 (p53), and retinoic acid (RA) pathways. Punctuated changes in the expression of genes known to regulate vertebrate development were observed; this suggests the tail regeneration transcriptional program is hierarchically structured and temporally ordered. Our study establishes the axolotl as a chemical screening model to investigate signaling pathways associated with tissue regeneration.

  12. Label-free quantitative urinary proteomics identifies the arginase pathway as a new player in congenital obstructive nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, Chrystelle; Caubet, Cécile; Gonzalez-de-Peredo, Anne; Breuil, Benjamin; Bouyssié, David; Stella, Alexandre; Garrigues, Luc; Le Gall, Caroline; Raevel, Anthony; Massoubre, Angelique; Klein, Julie; Decramer, Stéphane; Sabourdy, Frédérique; Bandin, Flavio; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Monsarrat, Bernard; Schanstra, Joost-Peter; Bascands, Jean-Loup

    2014-12-01

    Obstructive nephropathy is a frequently encountered situation in newborns. In previous studies, the urinary peptidome has been analyzed for the identification of clinically useful biomarkers of obstructive nephropathy. However, the urinary proteome has not been explored yet and should allow additional insight into the pathophysiology of the disease. We have analyzed the urinary proteome of newborns (n = 5/group) with obstructive nephropathy using label free quantitative nanoLC-MS/MS allowing the identification and quantification of 970 urinary proteins. We next focused on proteins exclusively regulated in severe obstructive nephropathy and identified Arginase 1 as a potential candidate molecule involved in the development of obstructive nephropathy, located at the crossroad of pro- and antifibrotic pathways. The reduced urinary abundance of Arginase 1 in obstructive nephropathy was verified in independent clinical samples using both Western blot and MRM analysis. These data were confirmed in situ in kidneys obtained from a mouse obstructive nephropathy model. In addition, we also observed increased expression of Arginase 2 and increased total arginase activity in obstructed mouse kidneys. mRNA expression analysis of the related arginase pathways indicated that the pro-fibrotic arginase-related pathway is activated during obstructive nephropathy. Taken together we have identified a new actor in the development of obstructive nephropathy in newborns using quantitative urinary proteomics and shown its involvement in an in vivo model of disease. The present study demonstrates the relevance of such a quantitative urinary proteomics approach with clinical samples for a better understanding of the pathophysiology and for the discovery of potential therapeutic targets.

  13. Label-free Quantitative Urinary Proteomics Identifies the Arginase Pathway as a New Player in Congenital Obstructive Nephropathy*

    PubMed Central

    Lacroix, Chrystelle; Caubet, Cécile; Gonzalez-de-Peredo, Anne; Breuil, Benjamin; Bouyssié, David; Stella, Alexandre; Garrigues, Luc; Le Gall, Caroline; Raevel, Anthony; Massoubre, Angelique; Klein, Julie; Decramer, Stéphane; Sabourdy, Frédérique; Bandin, Flavio; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Monsarrat, Bernard; Schanstra, Joost-Peter; Bascands, Jean-Loup

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive nephropathy is a frequently encountered situation in newborns. In previous studies, the urinary peptidome has been analyzed for the identification of clinically useful biomarkers of obstructive nephropathy. However, the urinary proteome has not been explored yet and should allow additional insight into the pathophysiology of the disease. We have analyzed the urinary proteome of newborns (n = 5/group) with obstructive nephropathy using label free quantitative nanoLC-MS/MS allowing the identification and quantification of 970 urinary proteins. We next focused on proteins exclusively regulated in severe obstructive nephropathy and identified Arginase 1 as a potential candidate molecule involved in the development of obstructive nephropathy, located at the crossroad of pro- and antifibrotic pathways. The reduced urinary abundance of Arginase 1 in obstructive nephropathy was verified in independent clinical samples using both Western blot and MRM analysis. These data were confirmed in situ in kidneys obtained from a mouse obstructive nephropathy model. In addition, we also observed increased expression of Arginase 2 and increased total arginase activity in obstructed mouse kidneys. mRNA expression analysis of the related arginase pathways indicated that the pro-fibrotic arginase-related pathway is activated during obstructive nephropathy. Taken together we have identified a new actor in the development of obstructive nephropathy in newborns using quantitative urinary proteomics and shown its involvement in an in vivo model of disease. The present study demonstrates the relevance of such a quantitative urinary proteomics approach with clinical samples for a better understanding of the pathophysiology and for the discovery of potential therapeutic targets. PMID:25205225

  14. Single nucleotide polymorphism microarray analysis in cortisol-secreting adrenocortical adenomas identifies new candidate genes and pathways.

    PubMed

    Ronchi, Cristina L; Leich, Ellen; Sbiera, Silviu; Weismann, Dirk; Rosenwald, Andreas; Allolio, Bruno; Fassnacht, Martin

    2012-03-01

    The genetic mechanisms underlying adrenocortical tumor development are still largely unknown. We used high-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism microarrays (Affymetrix SNP 6.0) to detect copy number alterations (CNAs) and copy-neutral losses of heterozygosity (cnLOH) in 15 cortisol-secreting adrenocortical adenomas with matched blood samples. We focused on microalterations aiming to discover new candidate genes involved in early tumorigenesis and/or autonomous cortisol secretion. We identified 962 CNAs with a median of 18 CNAs per sample. Half of them involved noncoding regions, 89% were less than 100 kb, and 28% were found in at least two samples. The most frequently gained regions were 5p15.33, 6q16.1, 7p22.3-22.2, 8q24.3, 9q34.2-34.3, 11p15.5, 11q11, 12q12, 16q24.3, 20p11.1-20q21.11, and Xq28 (≥20% of cases), most of them being identified in the same three adenomas. These regions contained among others genes like NOTCH1, CYP11B2, HRAS, and IGF2. Recurrent losses were less common and smaller than gains, being mostly localized at 1p, 6q, and 11q. Pathway analysis revealed that Notch signaling was the most frequently altered. We identified 46 recurrent CNAs that each affected a single gene (31 gains and 15 losses), including genes involved in steroidogenesis (CYP11B1) or tumorigenesis (CTNNB1, EPHA7, SGK1, STIL, FHIT). Finally, 20 small cnLOH in four cases affecting 15 known genes were found. Our findings provide the first high-resolution genome-wide view of chromosomal changes in cortisol-secreting adenomas and identify novel candidate genes, such as HRAS, EPHA7, and SGK1. Furthermore, they implicate that the Notch1 signaling pathway might be involved in the molecular pathogenesis of adrenocortical tumors.

  15. Mutation profiling of adenoid cystic carcinomas from multiple anatomical sites identifies mutations in the RAS pathway, but no KIT mutations

    PubMed Central

    Wetterskog, Daniel; Wilkerson, Paul M; Rodrigues, Daniel N; Lambros, Maryou B; Fritchie, Karen; Andersson, Mattias K; Natrajan, Rachael; Gauthier, Arnaud; Di Palma, Silvana; Shousha, Sami; Gatalica, Zoran; Töpfer, Chantal; Vukovic, Vesna; A’Hern, Roger; Weigelt, Britta; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Stenman, Göran; Rubin, Brian P; Reis-Filho, Jorge S

    2016-01-01

    Aims The majority of adenoid cystic carcinomas (AdCCs), regardless of anatomical site, harbour the MYB–NFIB fusion gene. The aim of this study was to characterize the repertoire of somatic genetic events affecting known cancer genes in AdCCs. Methods and results DNA was extracted from 13 microdissected breast AdCCs, and subjected to a mutation survey using the Sequenom OncoCarta Panel v1.0. Genes found to be mutated in any of the breast AdCCs and genes related to the same canonical molecular pathways, as well as KIT, a proto-oncogene whose protein product is expressed in AdCCs, were sequenced in an additional 68 AdCCs from various anatomical sites by Sanger sequencing. Using the Sequenom MassARRAY platform and Sanger sequencing, mutations in BRAF and HRAS were identified in three and one cases, respectively (breast, and head and neck). KIT, which has previously been reported to be mutated in AdCCs, was also investigated, but no mutations were identified. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that mutations in genes pertaining to the canonical RAS pathway are found in a minority of AdCCs, and that activating KIT mutations are either absent or remarkably rare in these cancers, and unlikely to constitute a driver and therapeutic target for patients with AdCC. PMID:23398044

  16. A high-throughput small molecule screen identifies synergism between DNA methylation and Aurora kinase pathways for X reactivation.

    PubMed

    Lessing, Derek; Dial, Thomas O; Wei, Chunyao; Payer, Bernhard; Carrette, Lieselot L G; Kesner, Barry; Szanto, Attila; Jadhav, Ajit; Maloney, David J; Simeonov, Anton; Theriault, Jimmy; Hasaka, Thomas; Bedalov, Antonio; Bartolomei, Marisa S; Lee, Jeannie T

    2016-12-13

    X-chromosome inactivation is a mechanism of dosage compensation in which one of the two X chromosomes in female mammals is transcriptionally silenced. Once established, silencing of the inactive X (Xi) is robust and difficult to reverse pharmacologically. However, the Xi is a reservoir of >1,000 functional genes that could be potentially tapped to treat X-linked disease. To identify compounds that could reactivate the Xi, here we screened ∼367,000 small molecules in an automated high-content screen using an Xi-linked GFP reporter in mouse fibroblasts. Given the robust nature of silencing, we sensitized the screen by "priming" cells with the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5azadC). Compounds that elicited GFP activity include VX680, MLN8237, and 5azadC, which are known to target the Aurora kinase and DNA methylation pathways. We demonstrate that the combinations of VX680 and 5azadC, as well as MLN8237 and 5azadC, synergistically up-regulate genes on the Xi. Thus, our work identifies a synergism between the DNA methylation and Aurora kinase pathways as being one of interest for possible pharmacological reactivation of the Xi.

  17. Comparative transcriptome profiling of the injured zebrafish and mouse hearts identifies miRNA-dependent repair pathways

    PubMed Central

    Crippa, Stefania; Nemir, Mohamed; Ounzain, Samir; Ibberson, Mark; Berthonneche, Corinne; Sarre, Alexandre; Boisset, Gaëlle; Maison, Damien; Harshman, Keith; Xenarios, Ioannis; Diviani, Dario; Schorderet, Daniel; Pedrazzini, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Aims The adult mammalian heart has poor regenerative capacity. In contrast, the zebrafish heart retains a robust capacity for regeneration into adulthood. These distinct responses are consequences of a differential utilization of evolutionary-conserved gene regulatory networks in the damaged heart. To systematically identify miRNA-dependent networks controlling cardiac repair following injury, we performed comparative gene and miRNA profiling of the cardiac transcriptome in adult mice and zebrafish. Methods and results Using an integrated approach, we show that 45 miRNA-dependent networks, involved in critical biological pathways, are differentially modulated in the injured zebrafish vs. mouse hearts. We study, more particularly, the miR-26a-dependent response. Therefore, miR-26a is down-regulated in the fish heart after injury, whereas its expression remains constant in the mouse heart. Targets of miR-26a involve activators of the cell cycle and Ezh2, a component of the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2). Importantly, PRC2 exerts repressive functions on negative regulators of the cell cycle. In cultured neonatal cardiomyocytes, inhibition of miR-26a stimulates, therefore, cardiomyocyte proliferation. Accordingly, miR-26a knockdown prolongs the proliferative window of cardiomyocytes in the post-natal mouse heart. Conclusions This novel strategy identifies a series of miRNAs and associated pathways, in particular miR-26a, which represent attractive therapeutic targets for inducing repair in the injured heart. PMID:26857418

  18. Multiscale mutation clustering algorithm identifies pan-cancer mutational clusters associated with pathway-level changes in gene expression.

    PubMed

    Poole, William; Leinonen, Kalle; Shmulevich, Ilya; Knijnenburg, Theo A; Bernard, Brady

    2017-02-01

    Cancer researchers have long recognized that somatic mutations are not uniformly distributed within genes. However, most approaches for identifying cancer mutations focus on either the entire-gene or single amino-acid level. We have bridged these two methodologies with a multiscale mutation clustering algorithm that identifies variable length mutation clusters in cancer genes. We ran our algorithm on 539 genes using the combined mutation data in 23 cancer types from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and identified 1295 mutation clusters. The resulting mutation clusters cover a wide range of scales and often overlap with many kinds of protein features including structured domains, phosphorylation sites, and known single nucleotide variants. We statistically associated these multiscale clusters with gene expression and drug response data to illuminate the functional and clinical consequences of mutations in our clusters. Interestingly, we find multiple clusters within individual genes that have differential functional associations: these include PTEN, FUBP1, and CDH1. This methodology has potential implications in identifying protein regions for drug targets, understanding the biological underpinnings of cancer, and personalizing cancer treatments. Toward this end, we have made the mutation clusters and the clustering algorithm available to the public. Clusters and pathway associations can be interactively browsed at m2c.systemsbiology.net. The multiscale mutation clustering algorithm is available at https://github.com/IlyaLab/M2C.

  19. Multiscale mutation clustering algorithm identifies pan-cancer mutational clusters associated with pathway-level changes in gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Poole, William; Leinonen, Kalle; Shmulevich, Ilya

    2017-01-01

    Cancer researchers have long recognized that somatic mutations are not uniformly distributed within genes. However, most approaches for identifying cancer mutations focus on either the entire-gene or single amino-acid level. We have bridged these two methodologies with a multiscale mutation clustering algorithm that identifies variable length mutation clusters in cancer genes. We ran our algorithm on 539 genes using the combined mutation data in 23 cancer types from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and identified 1295 mutation clusters. The resulting mutation clusters cover a wide range of scales and often overlap with many kinds of protein features including structured domains, phosphorylation sites, and known single nucleotide variants. We statistically associated these multiscale clusters with gene expression and drug response data to illuminate the functional and clinical consequences of mutations in our clusters. Interestingly, we find multiple clusters within individual genes that have differential functional associations: these include PTEN, FUBP1, and CDH1. This methodology has potential implications in identifying protein regions for drug targets, understanding the biological underpinnings of cancer, and personalizing cancer treatments. Toward this end, we have made the mutation clusters and the clustering algorithm available to the public. Clusters and pathway associations can be interactively browsed at m2c.systemsbiology.net. The multiscale mutation clustering algorithm is available at https://github.com/IlyaLab/M2C. PMID:28170390

  20. A Pathway Closely Related to the d-Tagatose Pathway of Gram-Negative Enterobacteria Identified in the Gram-Positive Bacterium Bacillus licheniformis

    PubMed Central

    Van der Heiden, Edwige; Lebrun, Sarah; Freichels, Régine; Brans, Alain; Vastenavond, Christian M.; Galleni, Moreno; Joris, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    We report the first identification of a gene cluster involved in d-tagatose catabolism in Bacillus licheniformis. The pathway is closely related to the d-tagatose pathway of the Gram-negative bacterium Klebsiella oxytoca, in contrast to the d-tagatose 6-phosphate pathway described in the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:23524682

  1. Transcriptomic Analysis in a Drosophila Model Identifies Previously Implicated and Novel Pathways in the Therapeutic Mechanism in Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Priyanka; Mohammad, Farhan; Sharma, Abhay

    2011-01-01

    We have taken advantage of a newly described Drosophila model to gain insights into the potential mechanism of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), a group of drugs that are widely used in the treatment of several neurological and psychiatric conditions besides epilepsy. In the recently described Drosophila model that is inspired by pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) induced kindling epileptogenesis in rodents, chronic PTZ treatment for 7 days causes a decreased climbing speed and an altered CNS transcriptome, with the latter mimicking gene expression alterations reported in epileptogenesis. In the model, an increased climbing speed is further observed 7 days after withdrawal from chronic PTZ. We used this post-PTZ withdrawal regime to identify potential AED mechanism. In this regime, treatment with each of the five AEDs tested, namely, ethosuximide, gabapentin, vigabatrin, sodium valproate, and levetiracetam, resulted in rescuing of the altered climbing behavior. The AEDs also normalized PTZ withdrawal induced transcriptomic perturbation in fly heads; whereas AED untreated flies showed a large number of up- and down-regulated genes which were enriched in several processes including gene expression and cell communication, the AED treated flies showed differential expression of only a small number of genes that did not enrich gene expression and cell communication processes. Gene expression and cell communication related upregulated genes in AED untreated flies overrepresented several pathways – spliceosome, RNA degradation, and ribosome in the former category, and inositol phosphate metabolism, phosphatidylinositol signaling, endocytosis, and hedgehog signaling in the latter. Transcriptome remodeling effect of AEDs was overall confirmed by microarray clustering that clearly separated the profiles of AED treated and untreated flies. Besides being consistent with previously implicated pathways, our results provide evidence for a role of other pathways in psychiatric drug

  2. Functional genomics identifies five distinct molecular subtypes with clinical relevance and pathways for growth control in epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Tuan Zea; Miow, Qing Hao; Huang, Ruby Yun-Ju; Wong, Meng Kang; Ye, Jieru; Lau, Jieying Amelia; Wu, Meng Chu; Bin Abdul Hadi, Luqman Hakim; Soong, Richie; Choolani, Mahesh; Davidson, Ben; Nesland, Jahn M; Wang, Ling-Zhi; Matsumura, Noriomi; Mandai, Masaki; Konishi, Ikuo; Goh, Boon-Cher; Chang, Jeffrey T; Thiery, Jean Paul; Mori, Seiichi

    2013-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is hallmarked by a high degree of heterogeneity. To address this heterogeneity, a classification scheme was developed based on gene expression patterns of 1538 tumours. Five, biologically distinct subgroups — Epi-A, Epi-B, Mes, Stem-A and Stem-B — exhibited significantly distinct clinicopathological characteristics, deregulated pathways and patient prognoses, and were validated using independent datasets. To identify subtype-specific molecular targets, ovarian cancer cell lines representing these molecular subtypes were screened against a genome-wide shRNA library. Focusing on the poor-prognosis Stem-A subtype, we found that two genes involved in tubulin processing, TUBGCP4 and NAT10, were essential for cell growth, an observation supported by a pathway analysis that also predicted involvement of microtubule-related processes. Furthermore, we observed that Stem-A cell lines were indeed more sensitive to inhibitors of tubulin polymerization, vincristine and vinorelbine, than the other subtypes. This subtyping offers new insights into the development of novel diagnostic and personalized treatment for EOC patients. PMID:23666744

  3. What makes the lac-pathway switch: identifying the fluctuations that trigger phenotype switching in gene regulatory systems.

    PubMed

    Bhogale, Prasanna M; Sorg, Robin A; Veening, Jan-Willem; Berg, Johannes

    2014-10-01

    Multistable gene regulatory systems sustain different levels of gene expression under identical external conditions. Such multistability is used to encode phenotypic states in processes including nutrient uptake and persistence in bacteria, fate selection in viral infection, cell-cycle control and development. Stochastic switching between different phenotypes can occur as the result of random fluctuations in molecular copy numbers of mRNA and proteins arising in transcription, translation, transport and binding. However, which component of a pathway triggers such a transition is generally not known. By linking single-cell experiments on the lactose-uptake pathway in E. coli to molecular simulations, we devise a general method to pinpoint the particular fluctuation driving phenotype switching and apply this method to the transition between the uninduced and induced states of the lac-genes. We find that the transition to the induced state is not caused only by the single event of lac-repressor unbinding, but depends crucially on the time period over which the repressor remains unbound from the lac-operon. We confirm this notion in strains with a high expression level of the lac-repressor (leading to shorter periods over which the lac-operon remains unbound), which show a reduced switching rate. Our techniques apply to multistable gene regulatory systems in general and allow to identify the molecular mechanisms behind stochastic transitions in gene regulatory circuits.

  4. Neuronal Expression of the Human Neuropeptide S Receptor NPSR1 Identifies NPS-Induced Calcium Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Erdmann, Frank; Kügler, Sebastian; Blaesse, Peter; Lange, Maren D.; Skryabin, Boris V.; Pape, Hans-Christian; Jüngling, Kay

    2015-01-01

    The neuropeptide S (NPS) system was discovered as a novel neurotransmitter system a decade ago and has since been identified as a key player in the modulation of fear and anxiety. Genetic variations of the human NPS receptor (NPSR1) have been associated with pathologies like panic disorders. However, details on the molecular fundamentals of NPSR1 activity in neurons remained elusive. We expressed NPSR1 in primary hippocampal cultures. Using single-cell calcium imaging we found that NPSR1 stimulation induced calcium mobilization from the endoplasmic reticulum via activation of IP3 and ryanodine receptors. Store-operated calcium channels were activated in a downstream process mediating entry of extracellular calcium. We provide the first detailed analysis of NPSR1 activity and the underlying intracellular pathways with respect to calcium mobilization in neurons. PMID:25714705

  5. Pathway-based analysis of GWAs data identifies association of sex determination genes with susceptibility to testicular germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Koster, Roelof; Mitra, Nandita; D'Andrea, Kurt; Vardhanabhuti, Saran; Chung, Charles C; Wang, Zhaoming; Loren Erickson, R; Vaughn, David J; Litchfield, Kevin; Rahman, Nazneen; Greene, Mark H; McGlynn, Katherine A; Turnbull, Clare; Chanock, Stephen J; Nathanson, Katherine L; Kanetsky, Peter A

    2014-11-15

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies of testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT) have identified 18 susceptibility loci, some containing genes encoding proteins important in male germ cell development. Deletions of one of these genes, DMRT1, lead to male-to-female sex reversal and are associated with development of gonadoblastoma. To further explore genetic association with TGCT, we undertook a pathway-based analysis of SNP marker associations in the Penn GWAs (349 TGCT cases and 919 controls). We analyzed a custom-built sex determination gene set consisting of 32 genes using three different methods of pathway-based analysis. The sex determination gene set ranked highly compared with canonical gene sets, and it was associated with TGCT (FDRG = 2.28 × 10(-5), FDRM = 0.014 and FDRI = 0.008 for Gene Set Analysis-SNP (GSA-SNP), Meta-Analysis Gene Set Enrichment of Variant Associations (MAGENTA) and Improved Gene Set Enrichment Analysis for Genome-wide Association Study (i-GSEA4GWAS) analysis, respectively). The association remained after removal of DMRT1 from the gene set (FDRG = 0.0002, FDRM = 0.055 and FDRI = 0.009). Using data from the NCI GWA scan (582 TGCT cases and 1056 controls) and UK scan (986 TGCT cases and 4946 controls), we replicated these findings (NCI: FDRG = 0.006, FDRM = 0.014, FDRI = 0.033, and UK: FDRG = 1.04 × 10(-6), FDRM = 0.016, FDRI = 0.025). After removal of DMRT1 from the gene set, the sex determination gene set remains associated with TGCT in the NCI (FDRG = 0.039, FDRM = 0.050 and FDRI = 0.055) and UK scans (FDRG = 3.00 × 10(-5), FDRM = 0.056 and FDRI = 0.044). With the exception of DMRT1, genes in the sex determination gene set have not previously been identified as TGCT susceptibility loci in these GWA scans, demonstrating the complementary nature of a pathway-based approach for genome-wide analysis of TGCT.

  6. A Candidate-Pathway Approach to Identify Gene-Environment Interactions: Analyses of Colon Cancer Risk and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Sharafeldin, Noha; Slattery, Martha L.; Liu, Qi; Franco-Villalobos, Conrado; Caan, Bette J.; Potter, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Genetic association studies have traditionally focused on associations between individual single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and disease. Standard analysis ignores interactions between multiple SNPs and environmental exposures explaining a small portion of disease heritability: the often-cited issue of “missing heritability.” Methods: We present a novel three-step analytic framework for modeling gene-environment interactions (GEIs) between an angiogenesis candidate-gene pathway and three lifestyle exposures (dietary protein, smoking, and alcohol consumption) on colon cancer risk and survival. Logic regression was used to summarize the gene-pathway effects, and GEIs were modeled using logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards models. We analyzed data from 1541 colon cancer case patients and 1934 control subjects in the Diet, Activity and Lifestyle as a Risk Factor for Colon Cancer Study. Results: We identified five statistically significant GEIs for colon cancer risk. For risk interaction, odds ratios (ORINT) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were FLT1(rs678714) and BMP4(rs17563) and smoking (ORINT = 1.64, 95% CI = 1.11 to 2.41 and ORINT = 1.60, 95% CI = 1.10 to 2.32, respectively); FLT1(rs2387632 OR rs9513070) and protein intake (ORINT = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.03 to 2.77); KDR(rs6838752) and TLR2(rs3804099) and alcohol (ORINT = 1.53, 95% CI = 1.10 to 2.13 and ORINT = 1.59, 95% CI = 1.05 to 2.38, respectively). Three GEIs between TNF, BMP1, and BMPR2 genes and the three exposures were statistically significant at the 5% level in relation to colon cancer survival but not after multiple-testing adjustment. Conclusions: Adopting a comprehensive biologically informed candidate-pathway approach identified GEI effects on colon cancer. Findings may have important implications for public health and personalized medicine targeting prevention and therapeutic strategies. Findings from this study need to be validated in other studies. PMID:26072521

  7. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Microarray Analysis in Cortisol-Secreting Adrenocortical Adenomas Identifies New Candidate Genes and Pathways1 2

    PubMed Central

    Ronchi, Cristina L; Leich, Ellen; Sbiera, Silviu; Weismann, Dirk; Rosenwald, Andreas; Allolio, Bruno; Fassnacht, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The genetic mechanisms underlying adrenocortical tumor development are still largely unknown. We used high-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism microarrays (Affymetrix SNP 6.0) to detect copy number alterations (CNAs) and copy-neutral losses of heterozygosity (cnLOH) in 15 cortisol-secreting adrenocortical adenomas with matched blood samples. We focused on microalterations aiming to discover new candidate genes involved in early tumorigenesis and/or autonomous cortisol secretion. We identified 962 CNAs with a median of 18 CNAs per sample. Half of them involved noncoding regions, 89% were less than 100 kb, and 28% were found in at least two samples. The most frequently gained regions were 5p15.33, 6q16.1, 7p22.3-22.2, 8q24.3, 9q34.2-34.3, 11p15.5, 11q11, 12q12, 16q24.3, 20p11.1-20q21.11, and Xq28 (≥20% of cases), most of them being identified in the same three adenomas. These regions contained among others genes like NOTCH1, CYP11B2, HRAS, and IGF2. Recurrent losses were less common and smaller than gains, being mostly localized at 1p, 6q, and 11q. Pathway analysis revealed that Notch signaling was the most frequently altered. We identified 46 recurrent CNAs that each affected a single gene (31 gains and 15 losses), including genes involved in steroidogenesis (CYP11B1) or tumorigenesis (CTNNB1, EPHA7, SGK1, STIL, FHIT). Finally, 20 small cnLOH in four cases affecting 15 known genes were found. Our findings provide the first high-resolution genome-wide view of chromosomal changes in cortisol-secreting adenomas and identify novel candidate genes, such as HRAS, EPHA7, and SGK1. Furthermore, they implicate that the Notch1 signaling pathway might be involved in the molecular pathogenesis of adrenocortical tumors. PMID:22496620

  8. Systems-Based Analysis of the Sarcocystis neurona Genome Identifies Pathways That Contribute to a Heteroxenous Life Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Blazejewski, Tomasz; Nursimulu, Nirvana; Pszenny, Viviana; Dangoudoubiyam, Sriveny; Namasivayam, Sivaranjani; Chiasson, Melissa A.; Chessman, Kyle; Tonkin, Michelle; Swapna, Lakshmipuram S.; Hung, Stacy S.; Bridgers, Joshua; Ricklefs, Stacy M.; Boulanger, Martin J.; Dubey, Jitender P.; Porcella, Stephen F.; Kissinger, Jessica C.; Howe, Daniel K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sarcocystis neurona is a member of the coccidia, a clade of single-celled parasites of medical and veterinary importance including Eimeria, Sarcocystis, Neospora, and Toxoplasma. Unlike Eimeria, a single-host enteric pathogen, Sarcocystis, Neospora, and Toxoplasma are two-host parasites that infect and produce infectious tissue cysts in a wide range of intermediate hosts. As a genus, Sarcocystis is one of the most successful protozoan parasites; all vertebrates, including birds, reptiles, fish, and mammals are hosts to at least one Sarcocystis species. Here we sequenced Sarcocystis neurona, the causal agent of fatal equine protozoal myeloencephalitis. The S. neurona genome is 127 Mbp, more than twice the size of other sequenced coccidian genomes. Comparative analyses identified conservation of the invasion machinery among the coccidia. However, many dense-granule and rhoptry kinase genes, responsible for altering host effector pathways in Toxoplasma and Neospora, are absent from S. neurona. Further, S. neurona has a divergent repertoire of SRS proteins, previously implicated in tissue cyst formation in Toxoplasma. Systems-based analyses identified a series of metabolic innovations, including the ability to exploit alternative sources of energy. Finally, we present an S. neurona model detailing conserved molecular innovations that promote the transition from a purely enteric lifestyle (Eimeria) to a heteroxenous parasite capable of infecting a wide range of intermediate hosts. PMID:25670772

  9. Integrated analysis of somatic mutations and focal copy-number changes identifies key genes and pathways in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Guichard, Cécile; Amaddeo, Giuliana; Imbeaud, Sandrine; Ladeiro, Yannick; Pelletier, Laura; Maad, Ichrafe Ben; Calderaro, Julien; Bioulac-Sage, Paulette; Letexier, Mélanie; Degos, Françoise; Clément, Bruno; Balabaud, Charles; Chevet, Eric; Laurent, Alexis; Couchy, Gabrielle; Letouzé, Eric; Calvo, Fabien; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary liver malignancy. High-resolution copy number analysis of 125 tumors of which 24 were subjected to whole-exome sequencing identified 135 homozygous deletions and 994 somatic gene mutations with predicted functional consequences. We identified new recurrent alterations in 6 genes (ARID1A, RPS6KA3, NFE2L2, IRF2, CDH8 and PROKR2) not previously described in HCC. Functional analyses demonstrated tumor suppressor properties for IRF2 whose inactivation, exclusively found in hepatitis B virus related tumors, leads to impaired TP53 function. Alternatively, inactivation of proteins involved in chromatin remodeling was frequent and predominant in alcohol related tumors. Moreover, activation of the oxidative stress metabolism and inactivation of RPS6KA3 were new pathways associated with WNT/β-catenin activation, thereby suggesting a cooperative effect in tumorigenesis. This study shows the dramatic somatic genetic diversity in HCC, it reveals interactions between oncogene and tumor suppressor gene mutations markedly related to specific risk factors. PMID:22561517

  10. Mutations in PRDM5 in Brittle Cornea Syndrome Identify a Pathway Regulating Extracellular Matrix Development and Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Burkitt Wright, Emma M.M.; Spencer, Helen L.; Daly, Sarah B.; Manson, Forbes D.C.; Zeef, Leo A.H.; Urquhart, Jill; Zoppi, Nicoletta; Bonshek, Richard; Tosounidis, Ioannis; Mohan, Meyyammai; Madden, Colm; Dodds, Annabel; Chandler, Kate E.; Banka, Siddharth; Au, Leon; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Khan, Naz; Biesecker, Leslie G.; Wilson, Meredith; Rohrbach, Marianne; Colombi, Marina; Giunta, Cecilia; Black, Graeme C.M.

    2011-01-01

    Extreme corneal fragility and thinning, which have a high risk of catastrophic spontaneous rupture, are the cardinal features of brittle cornea syndrome (BCS), an autosomal-recessive generalized connective tissue disorder. Enucleation is frequently the only management option for this condition, resulting in blindness and psychosocial distress. Even when the cornea remains grossly intact, visual function could also be impaired by a high degree of myopia and keratoconus. Deafness is another common feature and results in combined sensory deprivation. Using autozygosity mapping, we identified mutations in PRDM5 in families with BCS. We demonstrate that regulation of expression of extracellular matrix components, particularly fibrillar collagens, by PRDM5 is a key molecular mechanism that underlies corneal fragility in BCS and controls normal corneal development and maintenance. ZNF469, encoding a zinc finger protein of hitherto undefined function, has been identified as a quantitative trait locus for central corneal thickness, and mutations in this gene have been demonstrated in Tunisian Jewish and Palestinian kindreds with BCS. We show that ZNF469 and PRDM5, two genes that when mutated cause BCS, participate in the same regulatory pathway. PMID:21664999

  11. Mutations in PRDM5 in brittle cornea syndrome identify a pathway regulating extracellular matrix development and maintenance.

    PubMed

    Burkitt Wright, Emma M M; Spencer, Helen L; Daly, Sarah B; Manson, Forbes D C; Zeef, Leo A H; Urquhart, Jill; Zoppi, Nicoletta; Bonshek, Richard; Tosounidis, Ioannis; Mohan, Meyyammai; Madden, Colm; Dodds, Annabel; Chandler, Kate E; Banka, Siddharth; Au, Leon; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Khan, Naz; Biesecker, Leslie G; Wilson, Meredith; Rohrbach, Marianne; Colombi, Marina; Giunta, Cecilia; Black, Graeme C M

    2011-06-10

    Extreme corneal fragility and thinning, which have a high risk of catastrophic spontaneous rupture, are the cardinal features of brittle cornea syndrome (BCS), an autosomal-recessive generalized connective tissue disorder. Enucleation is frequently the only management option for this condition, resulting in blindness and psychosocial distress. Even when the cornea remains grossly intact, visual function could also be impaired by a high degree of myopia and keratoconus. Deafness is another common feature and results in combined sensory deprivation. Using autozygosity mapping, we identified mutations in PRDM5 in families with BCS. We demonstrate that regulation of expression of extracellular matrix components, particularly fibrillar collagens, by PRDM5 is a key molecular mechanism that underlies corneal fragility in BCS and controls normal corneal development and maintenance. ZNF469, encoding a zinc finger protein of hitherto undefined function, has been identified as a quantitative trait locus for central corneal thickness, and mutations in this gene have been demonstrated in Tunisian Jewish and Palestinian kindreds with BCS. We show that ZNF469 and PRDM5, two genes that when mutated cause BCS, participate in the same regulatory pathway.

  12. Whole Blood Transcriptomics and Urinary Metabolomics to Define Adaptive Biochemical Pathways of High-Intensity Exercise in 50-60 Year Old Masters Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Kamalika; Edgett, Brittany A.; Burrows, Harrison W.; Castro, Cecilia; Griffin, Julian L.; Schwertani, Adel Giaid; Gurd, Brendon J.; Funk, Colin D.

    2014-01-01

    Exercise is beneficial for a variety of age-related disorders. However, the molecular mechanisms mediating the beneficial adaptations to exercise in older adults are not well understood. The aim of the current study was to utilize a dual approach to characterize the genetic and metabolic adaptive pathways altered by exercise in veteran athletes and age-matched untrained individuals. Two groups of 50–60 year old males: competitive cyclists (athletes, n = 9; VO2peak 59.1±5.2 ml·kg−1·min−1; peak aerobic power 383±39 W) and untrained, minimally active individuals (controls, n = 8; VO2peak 35.9±9.7 ml·kg−1·min−1; peak aerobic power 230±57 W) were examined. All participants completed an acute bout of submaximal endurance exercise, and blood and urine samples pre- and post-exercise were analyzed for gene expression and metabolic changes utilizing genome-wide DNA microarray analysis and NMR spectroscopy-based metabolomics, respectively. Our results indicate distinct differences in gene and metabolite expression involving energy metabolism, lipids, insulin signaling and cardiovascular function between the two groups. These findings may lead to new insights into beneficial signaling pathways of healthy aging and help identify surrogate markers for monitoring exercise and training load. PMID:24643011

  13. Structural and logical analysis of a comprehensive hedgehog signaling pathway to identify alternative drug targets for glioma, colon and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Saikat; Pradhan, Rachana N; Sarkar, Ram Rup

    2013-01-01

    Hedgehog is an evolutionarily conserved developmental pathway, widely implicated in controlling various cellular responses such as cellular proliferation and stem cell renewal in human and other organisms, through external stimuli. Aberrant activation of this pathway in human adult stem cell line may cause different types of cancers. Hence, targeting this pathway in cancer therapy has become indispensable, but the non availability of detailed molecular interactions, complex regulations by extra- and intra-cellular proteins and cross talks with other pathways pose a serious challenge to get a coherent understanding of this signaling pathway for making therapeutic strategy. This motivated us to perform a computational study of the pathway and to identify probable drug targets. In this work, from available databases and literature, we reconstructed a complete hedgehog pathway which reports the largest number of molecules and interactions to date. Using recently developed computational techniques, we further performed structural and logical analysis of this pathway. In structural analysis, the connectivity and centrality parameters were calculated to identify the important proteins from the network. To capture the regulations of the molecules, we developed a master Boolean model of all the interactions between the proteins and created different cancer scenarios, such as Glioma, Colon and Pancreatic. We performed perturbation analysis on these cancer conditions to identify the important and minimal combinations of proteins that can be used as drug targets. From our study we observed the under expressions of various oncoproteins in Hedgehog pathway while perturbing at a time the combinations of the proteins GLI1, GLI2 and SMO in Glioma; SMO, HFU, ULK3 and RAS in Colon cancer; SMO, HFU, ULK3, RAS and ERK12 in Pancreatic cancer. This reconstructed Hedgehog signaling pathway and the computational analysis for identifying new combinatory drug targets will be useful for

  14. Structural and Logical Analysis of a Comprehensive Hedgehog Signaling Pathway to Identify Alternative Drug Targets for Glioma, Colon and Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Saikat; Pradhan, Rachana N.; Sarkar, Ram Rup

    2013-01-01

    Hedgehog is an evolutionarily conserved developmental pathway, widely implicated in controlling various cellular responses such as cellular proliferation and stem cell renewal in human and other organisms, through external stimuli. Aberrant activation of this pathway in human adult stem cell line may cause different types of cancers. Hence, targeting this pathway in cancer therapy has become indispensable, but the non availability of detailed molecular interactions, complex regulations by extra- and intra-cellular proteins and cross talks with other pathways pose a serious challenge to get a coherent understanding of this signaling pathway for making therapeutic strategy. This motivated us to perform a computational study of the pathway and to identify probable drug targets. In this work, from available databases and literature, we reconstructed a complete hedgehog pathway which reports the largest number of molecules and interactions to date. Using recently developed computational techniques, we further performed structural and logical analysis of this pathway. In structural analysis, the connectivity and centrality parameters were calculated to identify the important proteins from the network. To capture the regulations of the molecules, we developed a master Boolean model of all the interactions between the proteins and created different cancer scenarios, such as Glioma, Colon and Pancreatic. We performed perturbation analysis on these cancer conditions to identify the important and minimal combinations of proteins that can be used as drug targets. From our study we observed the under expressions of various oncoproteins in Hedgehog pathway while perturbing at a time the combinations of the proteins GLI1, GLI2 and SMO in Glioma; SMO, HFU, ULK3 and RAS in Colon cancer; SMO, HFU, ULK3, RAS and ERK12 in Pancreatic cancer. This reconstructed Hedgehog signaling pathway and the computational analysis for identifying new combinatory drug targets will be useful for

  15. Development of a pluripotent stem cell derived neuronal model to identify chemically induced pathway perturbations in relation to neurotoxicity: Effects of CREB pathway inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Pistollato, Francesca; Louisse, Jochem; Scelfo, Bibiana; Mennecozzi, Milena; Accordi, Benedetta; Basso, Giuseppe; Gaspar, John Antonydas; Zagoura, Dimitra; Barilari, Manuela; Palosaari, Taina; Sachinidis, Agapios; Bremer-Hoffmann, Susanne

    2014-10-15

    According to the advocated paradigm shift in toxicology, acquisition of knowledge on the mechanisms underlying the toxicity of chemicals, such as perturbations of biological pathways, is of primary interest. Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), such as human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), offer a unique opportunity to derive physiologically relevant human cell types to measure molecular and cellular effects of such pathway modulations. Here we compared the neuronal differentiation propensity of hESCs and hiPSCs with the aim to develop novel hiPSC-based tools for measuring pathway perturbation in relation to molecular and cellular effects in vitro. Among other fundamental pathways, also, the cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB) pathway was activated in our neuronal models and gave us the opportunity to study time-dependent effects elicited by chemical perturbations of the CREB pathway in relation to cellular effects. We show that the inhibition of the CREB pathway, using 2-naphthol-AS-E-phosphate (KG-501), induced an inhibition of neurite outgrowth and synaptogenesis, as well as a decrease of MAP2{sup +} neuronal cells. These data indicate that a CREB pathway inhibition can be related to molecular and cellular effects that may be relevant for neurotoxicity testing, and, thus, qualify the use of our hiPSC-derived neuronal model for studying chemical-induced neurotoxicity resulting from pathway perturbations. - Highlights: • HESCs derived neuronal cells serve as benchmark for iPSC based neuronal toxicity test development. • Comparisons between hESCs and hiPSCs demonstrated variability of the epigenetic state • CREB pathway modulation have been explored in relation to the neurotoxicant exposure KG-501 • hiPSC might be promising tools to translate theoretical AoPs into toxicological in vitro tests.

  16. Five components of the ethylene-response pathway identified in a screen for weak ethylene-insensitive mutants in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Jose M; Stepanova, Anna N; Solano, Roberto; Wisman, Ellen; Ferrari, Simone; Ausubel, Frederick M; Ecker, Joseph R

    2003-03-04

    Five ethylene-insensitive loci (wei1-wei5) were identified by using a low-dose screen for "weak" ethylene-insensitive mutants. wei1, wei2, and wei3 seedlings showed hormone insensitivity only in roots, whereas wei4 and wei5 displayed insensitivity in both roots and hypocotyls. The genes corresponding to wei1, wei4, and wei5 were isolated using a positional cloning approach. The wei1 mutant harbored a recessive mutation in TIR1, which encodes a component of the SCF protein ubiquitin ligase involved in the auxin response. wei4, a dominant mutant, resulted from a mutation in the ethylene receptor ERS, whereas wei5, a semidominant mutant, was caused by a mutation in the EIN3-related transcription factor gene EIL1. The simultaneous loss of functional WEI5EIL1 and EIN3 nearly completely abolished the ethylene response in etiolated seedlings, and adult plants were highly susceptible to infection by the necrotrophic fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Moreover, wei5eil1 ein3 double mutants were able to fully suppress constitutive signaling caused by ctr1, suggesting a synergistic interaction among these gene products. Unlike previously known root ethylene-insensitive mutants, wei2 and wei3 were not affected in their response to auxin and showed a normal response to gravity. Genetic mapping studies indicate that wei2 and wei3 correspond to previously unidentified ethylene pathway genes that may control cell-elongation processes functioning at the intersection of the ethylene and auxin response pathways.

  17. Genome-wide coexpression of steroid receptors in the mouse brain: Identifying signaling pathways and functionally coordinated regions

    PubMed Central

    Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P. F.; Grefhorst, Aldo; van Weert, Lisa T. C. M.; Mol, Isabel M.; Sips, Hetty C. M.; van den Heuvel, José K.; Datson, Nicole A.; Visser, Jenny A.; Meijer, Onno C.

    2016-01-01

    Steroid receptors are pleiotropic transcription factors that coordinate adaptation to different physiological states. An important target organ is the brain, but even though their effects are well studied in specific regions, brain-wide steroid receptor targets and mediators remain largely unknown due to the complexity of the brain. Here, we tested the idea that novel aspects of steroid action can be identified through spatial correlation of steroid receptors with genome-wide mRNA expression across different regions in the mouse brain. First, we observed significant coexpression of six nuclear receptors (NRs) [androgen receptor (Ar), estrogen receptor alpha (Esr1), estrogen receptor beta (Esr2), glucocorticoid receptor (Gr), mineralocorticoid receptor (Mr), and progesterone receptor (Pgr)] with sets of steroid target genes that were identified in single brain regions. These coexpression relationships were also present in distinct other brain regions, suggestive of as yet unidentified coordinate regulation of brain regions by, for example, glucocorticoids and estrogens. Second, coexpression of a set of 62 known NR coregulators and the six steroid receptors in 12 nonoverlapping mouse brain regions revealed selective downstream pathways, such as Pak6 as a mediator for the effects of Ar and Gr on dopaminergic transmission. Third, Magel2 and Irs4 were identified and validated as strongly responsive targets to the estrogen diethylstilbestrol in the mouse hypothalamus. The brain- and genome-wide correlations of mRNA expression levels of six steroid receptors that we provide constitute a rich resource for further predictions and understanding of brain modulation by steroid hormones. PMID:26811448

  18. Pathway-based Genome-Wide Association Analysis Identified the Importance of EphrinA-EphR pathway for Femoral Neck Bone Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuan; Xiong, Dong-Hai; Guo, Yan-Fang; Pan, Feng; Zhou, Qi; Zhang, Feng; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2009-01-01

    Femoral neck (FN) bone geometry is an important predictor of bone strength with high heritability. Previous studies have revealed certain candidate genes for FN bone geometry. However, the majority of the underlying genetic factors remain to be discovered. In this study, pathway-based genome-wide association analysis was performed to explore the joint effects of genes within biological pathways on FN bone geometry variations in a cohort of 1,000 unrelated U.S. whites. Nominal significant associations (nominal p value < 0.05) were observed between 76 pathways and a key FN bone geometry variable - section modulus (Z), biomechanically indicative of bone strength subject to bending. Among them, EphrinA-EphR pathway was most significantly associated with FN Z even after multiple testing adjustments (pFWER value = 0.035). The association of EphrinA-EphR pathway with FN Z was also observed in an independent sample from Framingham Osteoporosis Study. Overall, these results suggest the significant genetic contribution of EphrinA-EphR pathway to femoral neck bone geometry. PMID:19786129

  19. Construction and analysis of biochemical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binns, Michael; Theodoropoulos, Constantinos

    2012-09-01

    Bioprocesses are being implemented for a range of different applications including the production of fuels, chemicals and drugs. Hence, it is becoming increasingly important to understand and model how they function and how they can be modified or designed to give the optimal performance. Here we discuss the construction and analysis of biochemical networks which are the first logical steps towards this goal. The construction of a reaction network is possible through reconstruction: extracting information from literature and from databases. This can be supplemented by reaction prediction methods which can identify steps which are missing from the current knowledge base. Analysis of biochemical systems generally requires some experimental input but can be used to identify important reactions and targets for enhancing the performance of the organism involved. Metabolic flux, pathway and metabolic control analysis can be used to determine the limits, capabilities and potential targets for enhancement respectively.

  20. Transcriptional analysis of murine macrophages infected with different Toxoplasma strains identifies novel regulation of host signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Melo, Mariane B; Nguyen, Quynh P; Cordeiro, Cynthia; Hassan, Musa A; Yang, Ninghan; McKell, Renée; Rosowski, Emily E; Julien, Lindsay; Butty, Vincent; Dardé, Marie-Laure; Ajzenberg, Daniel; Fitzgerald, Katherine; Young, Lucy H; Saeij, Jeroen P J

    2013-01-01

    Most isolates of Toxoplasma from Europe and North America fall into one of three genetically distinct clonal lineages, the type I, II and III lineages. However, in South America these strains are rarely isolated and instead a great variety of other strains are found. T. gondii strains differ widely in a number of phenotypes in mice, such as virulence, persistence, oral infectivity, migratory capacity, induction of cytokine expression and modulation of host gene expression. The outcome of toxoplasmosis in patients is also variable and we hypothesize that, besides host and environmental factors, the genotype of the parasite strain plays a major role. The molecular basis for these differences in pathogenesis, especially in strains other than the clonal lineages, remains largely unexplored. Macrophages play an essential role in the early immune response against T. gondii and are also the cell type preferentially infected in vivo. To determine if non-canonical Toxoplasma strains have unique interactions with the host cell, we infected murine macrophages with 29 different Toxoplasma strains, representing global diversity, and used RNA-sequencing to determine host and parasite transcriptomes. We identified large differences between strains in the expression level of known parasite effectors and large chromosomal structural variation in some strains. We also identified novel strain-specifically regulated host pathways, including the regulation of the type I interferon response by some atypical strains. IFNβ production by infected cells was associated with parasite killing, independent of interferon gamma activation, and dependent on endosomal Toll-like receptors in macrophages and the cytoplasmic receptor retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 (RIG-I) in fibroblasts.

  1. Transcriptional Analysis of Murine Macrophages Infected with Different Toxoplasma Strains Identifies Novel Regulation of Host Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Mariane B.; Nguyen, Quynh P.; Cordeiro, Cynthia; Hassan, Musa A.; Yang, Ninghan; McKell, Renée; Rosowski, Emily E.; Julien, Lindsay; Butty, Vincent; Dardé, Marie-Laure; Ajzenberg, Daniel; Fitzgerald, Katherine; Young, Lucy H.; Saeij, Jeroen P. J.

    2013-01-01

    Most isolates of Toxoplasma from Europe and North America fall into one of three genetically distinct clonal lineages, the type I, II and III lineages. However, in South America these strains are rarely isolated and instead a great variety of other strains are found. T. gondii strains differ widely in a number of phenotypes in mice, such as virulence, persistence, oral infectivity, migratory capacity, induction of cytokine expression and modulation of host gene expression. The outcome of toxoplasmosis in patients is also variable and we hypothesize that, besides host and environmental factors, the genotype of the parasite strain plays a major role. The molecular basis for these differences in pathogenesis, especially in strains other than the clonal lineages, remains largely unexplored. Macrophages play an essential role in the early immune response against T. gondii and are also the cell type preferentially infected in vivo. To determine if non-canonical Toxoplasma strains have unique interactions with the host cell, we infected murine macrophages with 29 different Toxoplasma strains, representing global diversity, and used RNA-sequencing to determine host and parasite transcriptomes. We identified large differences between strains in the expression level of known parasite effectors and large chromosomal structural variation in some strains. We also identified novel strain-specifically regulated host pathways, including the regulation of the type I interferon response by some atypical strains. IFNβ production by infected cells was associated with parasite killing, independent of interferon gamma activation, and dependent on endosomal Toll-like receptors in macrophages and the cytoplasmic receptor retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 (RIG-I) in fibroblasts. PMID:24367253

  2. Quantitative Proteomic Analyses Identify ABA-Related Proteins and Signal Pathways in Maize Leaves under Drought Conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yulong; Wang, Yankai; Yang, Hao; Wang, Wei; Wu, Jianyu; Hu, Xiuli

    2016-01-01

    Drought stress is one of major factors resulting in maize yield loss. The roles of abscisic acid (ABA) have been widely studied in crops in response to drought stress. However, more attention is needed to identify key ABA-related proteins and also gain deeper molecular insights about drought stress in maize. Based on this need, the physiology and proteomics of the ABA-deficient maize mutant vp5 and its wild-type Vp5 under drought stress were examined and analyzed. Malondialdehyde content increased and quantum efficiency of photosystem II decreased under drought stress in both genotypes. However, the magnitude of the increase or decrease was significantly higher in vp5 than in Vp5. A total of 7051 proteins with overlapping expression patterns among three replicates in the two genotypes were identified by Multiplex run iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry methods, of which the expression of only 150 proteins (130 in Vp5, 27 in vp5) showed changes of at least 1.5-fold under drought stress. Among the 150 proteins, 67 and 60 proteins were up-regulated and down-regulated by drought stress in an ABA-dependent way, respectively. ABA was found to play active roles in regulating signaling pathways related to photosynthesis, oxidative phosphorylation (mainly related to ATP synthesis), and glutathione metabolism (involved in antioxidative reaction) in the maize response to drought stress. Our results provide an extensive dataset of ABA-dependent, drought-regulated proteins in maize plants, which may help to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of ABA-enhanced tolerance to drought stress in maize.

  3. Quantitative Proteomic Analyses Identify ABA-Related Proteins and Signal Pathways in Maize Leaves under Drought Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yulong; Wang, Yankai; Yang, Hao; Wang, Wei; Wu, Jianyu; Hu, Xiuli

    2016-01-01

    Drought stress is one of major factors resulting in maize yield loss. The roles of abscisic acid (ABA) have been widely studied in crops in response to drought stress. However, more attention is needed to identify key ABA-related proteins and also gain deeper molecular insights about drought stress in maize. Based on this need, the physiology and proteomics of the ABA-deficient maize mutant vp5 and its wild-type Vp5 under drought stress were examined and analyzed. Malondialdehyde content increased and quantum efficiency of photosystem II decreased under drought stress in both genotypes. However, the magnitude of the increase or decrease was significantly higher in vp5 than in Vp5. A total of 7051 proteins with overlapping expression patterns among three replicates in the two genotypes were identified by Multiplex run iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry methods, of which the expression of only 150 proteins (130 in Vp5, 27 in vp5) showed changes of at least 1.5-fold under drought stress. Among the 150 proteins, 67 and 60 proteins were up-regulated and down-regulated by drought stress in an ABA-dependent way, respectively. ABA was found to play active roles in regulating signaling pathways related to photosynthesis, oxidative phosphorylation (mainly related to ATP synthesis), and glutathione metabolism (involved in antioxidative reaction) in the maize response to drought stress. Our results provide an extensive dataset of ABA-dependent, drought-regulated proteins in maize plants, which may help to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of ABA-enhanced tolerance to drought stress in maize. PMID:28008332

  4. Eimeria falciformis infection of the mouse caecum identifies opposing roles of IFNγ-regulated host pathways for the parasite development.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Manuela; Heitlinger, Emanuel; Spork, Simone; Mollenkopf, Hans-Joachim; Lucius, Richard; Gupta, Nishith

    2014-07-01

    Intracellular parasites reprogram host functions for their survival and reproduction. The extent and relevance of parasite-mediated host responses in vivo remains poorly studied, however. We utilized Eimeria falciformis, a parasite infecting the mouse intestinal epithelium, to identify and validate host determinants of parasite infection. Most prominent mouse genes induced during the onset of asexual and sexual growth of parasite comprise interferon γ (IFNγ)-regulated factors, e.g., immunity-related GTPases (IRGA6/B6/D/M2/M3), guanylate-binding proteins (GBP2/3/5/6/8), chemokines (CxCL9-11), and several enzymes of the kynurenine pathway including indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1). These results indicated a multifarious innate defense (tryptophan catabolism, IRG, GBP, and chemokine signaling), and a consequential adaptive immune response (chemokine-cytokine signaling and lymphocyte recruitment). The inflammation- and immunity-associated transcripts were increased during the course of infection, following influx of B cells, T cells, and macrophages to the parasitized caecum tissue. Consistently, parasite growth was enhanced in animals inhibited for CxCr3, a major receptor for CxCL9-11 present on immune cells. Interestingly, despite a prominent induction, mouse IRGB6 failed to bind and disrupt the parasitophorous vacuole, implying an immune evasion by E. falciformis. Furthermore, oocyst output was impaired in IFNγ-R(-/-) and IDO1(-/-) mice, both of which suggest a subversion of IFNγ signaling by the parasite to promote its growth.

  5. Suppressors of cdc25p overexpression identify two pathways that influence the G2/M checkpoint in fission yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, K C; Humphrey, T; Enoch, T

    1998-01-01

    Checkpoints maintain the order of cell-cycle events. At G2/M, a checkpoint blocks mitosis in response to damaged or unreplicated DNA. There are significant differences in the checkpoint responses to damaged DNA and unreplicated DNA, although many of the same genes are involved in both responses. To identify new genes that function specifically in the DNA replication checkpoint pathway, we searched for high-copy suppressors of overproducer of Cdc25p (OPcdc25(+)), which lacks a DNA replication checkpoint. Two classes of suppressors were isolated. One class includes a new gene encoding a putative DEAD box helicase, suppressor of uncontrolled mitosis (sum3(+)). This gene negatively regulates the cell-cycle response to stress when overexpressed and restores the checkpoint response by a mechanism that is independent of Cdc2p tyrosine phosphorylation. The second class includes chk1(+) and the two Schizosaccharomyces pombe 14-3-3 genes, rad24(+) and rad25(+), which appear to suppress the checkpoint defect by inhibiting Cdc25p. We show that rad24Delta mutants are defective in the checkpoint response to the DNA replication inhibitor hydroxyurea at 37 degrees and that cds1Delta rad24Delta mutants, like cds1Delta chk1Delta mutants, are entirely checkpoint deficient at 29 degrees. These results suggest that chk1(+) and rad24(+) may function redundantly with cds1(+) in the checkpoint response to unreplicated DNA. PMID:9832516

  6. Mutations in TLR/MYD88 pathway identify a subset of young chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients with favorable outcome.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Trillos, Alejandra; Pinyol, Magda; Navarro, Alba; Aymerich, Marta; Jares, Pedro; Juan, Manel; Rozman, María; Colomer, Dolors; Delgado, Julio; Giné, Eva; González-Díaz, Marcos; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M; Colado, Enrique; Rayón, Consolación; Payer, Angel R; Terol, Maria José; Navarro, Blanca; Quesada, Victor; Puente, Xosé S; Rozman, Ciril; López-Otín, Carlos; Campo, Elías; López-Guillermo, Armando; Villamor, Neus

    2014-06-12

    Mutations in Toll-like receptor (TLR) and myeloid differentiation primary response 88 (MYD88) genes have been found in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) at low frequency. We analyzed the incidence, clinicobiological characteristics, and outcome of patients with TLR/MYD88 mutations in 587 CLL patients. Twenty-three patients (3.9%) had mutations, 19 in MYD88 (one with concurrent IRAK1 mutation), 2 TLR2 (one with concomitant TLR6 mutation), 1 IRAK1, and 1 TLR5. No mutations were found in IRAK2 and IRAK4. TLR/MYD88-mutated CLL overexpressed genes of the nuclear factor κB pathway. Patients with TLR/MYD88 mutations were significantly younger (83% age ≤50 years) than those with no mutations. TLR/MYD88 mutations were the most frequent in young patients. Patients with mutated TLR/MYD88 CLL had a higher frequency of mutated IGHV and low expression of CD38 and ZAP-70. Overall survival (OS) was better in TLR/MYD88-mutated than unmutated patients in the whole series (10-year OS, 100% vs 62%; P = .002), and in the subset of patients age ≤50 years (100% vs 70%; P = .02). In addition, relative OS of TLR/MYD88-mutated patients was similar to that in the age- and gender-matched population. In summary, TLR/MYD88 mutations identify a population of young CLL patients with favorable outcome.

  7. First quantitative high-throughput screen in zebrafish identifies novel pathways for increasing pancreatic β-cell mass.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangliang; Rajpurohit, Surendra K; Delaspre, Fabien; Walker, Steven L; White, David T; Ceasrine, Alexis; Kuruvilla, Rejji; Li, Ruo-Jing; Shim, Joong S; Liu, Jun O; Parsons, Michael J; Mumm, Jeff S

    2015-07-28

    Whole-organism chemical screening can circumvent bottlenecks that impede drug discovery. However, in vivo screens have not attained throughput capacities possible with in vitro assays. We therefore developed a method enabling in vivo high-throughput screening (HTS) in zebrafish, termed automated reporter quantification in vivo (ARQiv). In this study, ARQiv was combined with robotics to fully actualize whole-organism HTS (ARQiv-HTS). In a primary screen, this platform quantified cell-specific fluorescent reporters in >500,000 transgenic zebrafish larvae to identify FDA-approved (Federal Drug Administration) drugs that increased the number of insulin-producing β cells in the pancreas. 24 drugs were confirmed as inducers of endocrine differentiation and/or stimulators of β-cell proliferation. Further, we discovered novel roles for NF-κB signaling in regulating endocrine differentiation and for serotonergic signaling in selectively stimulating β-cell proliferation. These studies demonstrate the power of ARQiv-HTS for drug discovery and provide unique insights into signaling pathways controlling β-cell mass, potential therapeutic targets for treating diabetes.

  8. Selective αv integrin depletion identifies a core, targetable molecular pathway that regulates fibrosis across solid organs

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Neil C; Arnold, Thomas D; Katamura, Yoshio; Giacomini, Marilyn M; Rodriguez, Juan D; McCarty, Joseph H; Pellicoro, Antonella; Raschperger, Elisabeth; Betsholtz, Christer; Ruminski, Peter G; Griggs, David W; Prinsen, Michael J; Maher, Jacquelyn J; Iredale, John P; Lacy-Hulbert, Adam; Adams, Ralf H; Sheppard, Dean

    2013-01-01

    Myofibroblasts are the major source of extracellular matrix components that accumulate during tissue fibrosis, and hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are the major source of myofibroblasts in the liver. To date, robust systems to genetically manipulate these cells have not existed. We report that Pdgfrb-Cre inactivates genes in murine HSCs with high efficiency. We used this system to delete the αv integrin subunit because of the suggested role of multiple αv integrins as central mediators of fibrosis in multiple organs. Depletion of the αv integrin subunit in HSCs protected mice from CCl4-induced hepatic fibrosis, whereas global loss of αvβ3, αvβ5 or αvβ6 or conditional loss of αvβ8 on HSCs did not. Pdgfrb-Cre effectively targeted myofibroblasts in multiple organs, and depletion of αv integrins using this system was also protective in models of pulmonary and renal fibrosis. Critically, pharmacological blockade of αv integrins by a novel small molecule (CWHM 12) attenuated both liver and lung fibrosis, even when administered after fibrosis was established. These data identify a core pathway that regulates fibrosis, and suggest that pharmacological targeting of all αv integrins may have clinical utility in the treatment of patients with a broad range of fibrotic diseases. PMID:24216753

  9. Identifying early pathways of risk and resilience: The codevelopment of internalizing and externalizing symptoms and the role of harsh parenting.

    PubMed

    Wiggins, Jillian Lee; Mitchell, Colter; Hyde, Luke W; Monk, Christopher S

    2015-11-01

    Psychological disorders co-occur often in children, but little has been done to document the types of conjoint pathways internalizing and externalizing symptoms may take from the crucial early period of toddlerhood or how harsh parenting may overlap with early symptom codevelopment. To examine symptom codevelopment trajectories, we identified latent classes of individuals based on internalizing and externalizing symptoms across ages 3-9 and found three symptom codevelopment classes: normative symptoms (low), severe-decreasing symptoms (initially high but rapidly declining), and severe symptoms (high) trajectories. Next, joint models examined how parenting trajectories overlapped with internalizing and externalizing symptom trajectories. These trajectory classes demonstrated that, normatively, harsh parenting increased after toddlerhood, but the severe symptoms class was characterized by a higher level and a steeper increase in harsh parenting and the severe-decreasing class by high, stable harsh parenting. In addition, a transactional model examined the bidirectional relationships among internalizing and externalizing symptoms and harsh parenting because they may cascade over time in this early period. Harsh parenting uniquely contributed to externalizing symptoms, controlling for internalizing symptoms, but not vice versa. In addition, internalizing symptoms appeared to be a mechanism by which externalizing symptoms increase. Results highlight the importance of accounting for both internalizing and externalizing symptoms from an early age to understand risk for developing psychopathology and the role harsh parenting plays in influencing these trajectories.

  10. Identifying opportunities for sexually transmitted infection prevention: analysis of critical points in the care pathways of patients with gonorrhoea.

    PubMed

    Abu-Rajab, K; Scoular, A; Church, S; Connell, J; Winter, A; Hart, G

    2009-03-01

    We applied the principles of Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) to systematically analyse the care pathway of patients diagnosed with gonorrhoea to identify potential intervention opportunities for preventive action. Data were collected on individuals with culture-positive gonococcal infection during 27 February 2003 to 08 January 2004. Qualitative data were gathered within individual semi-structured interviews. Two hundred and twenty-three gonorrhoea patient episodes were evaluated. The median interval between presentation and treatment was significantly longer in females and men having sex with men (MSM), compared with heterosexual men (P = 0.002). Females were significantly more likely to be in regular relationships at the timepoint of perceived infection acquisition than heterosexuals or MSM (P < 0.0001). Four major themes emerged from the interviews: life-stage and infection risk, determinants of risk perception around sexual encounters, attitudes to preventing re-infection and condom use. These informed three potential 'critical control points': health-related attitudes/behaviours preceding infection; access to appropriate care and optimizing health promotion to prevent further infection.

  11. First quantitative high-throughput screen in zebrafish identifies novel pathways for increasing pancreatic β-cell mass

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangliang; Rajpurohit, Surendra K; Delaspre, Fabien; Walker, Steven L; White, David T; Ceasrine, Alexis; Kuruvilla, Rejji; Li, Ruo-jing; Shim, Joong S; Liu, Jun O; Parsons, Michael J; Mumm, Jeff S

    2015-01-01

    Whole-organism chemical screening can circumvent bottlenecks that impede drug discovery. However, in vivo screens have not attained throughput capacities possible with in vitro assays. We therefore developed a method enabling in vivo high-throughput screening (HTS) in zebrafish, termed automated reporter quantification in vivo (ARQiv). In this study, ARQiv was combined with robotics to fully actualize whole-organism HTS (ARQiv-HTS). In a primary screen, this platform quantified cell-specific fluorescent reporters in >500,000 transgenic zebrafish larvae to identify FDA-approved (Federal Drug Administration) drugs that increased the number of insulin-producing β cells in the pancreas. 24 drugs were confirmed as inducers of endocrine differentiation and/or stimulators of β-cell proliferation. Further, we discovered novel roles for NF-κB signaling in regulating endocrine differentiation and for serotonergic signaling in selectively stimulating β-cell proliferation. These studies demonstrate the power of ARQiv-HTS for drug discovery and provide unique insights into signaling pathways controlling β-cell mass, potential therapeutic targets for treating diabetes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08261.001 PMID:26218223

  12. The combination of transcriptomics and informatics identifies pathways targeted by miR-204 during neurogenesis and axon guidance

    PubMed Central

    Conte, Ivan; Merella, Stefania; Garcia-Manteiga, Jose Manuel; Migliore, Chiara; Lazarevic, Dejan; Carrella, Sabrina; Marco-Ferreres, Raquel; Avellino, Raffaella; Davidson, Nathan Paul; Emmett, Warren; Sanges, Remo; Bockett, Nicholas; Van Heel, David; Meroni, Germana; Bovolenta, Paola; Stupka, Elia; Banfi, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    Vertebrate organogenesis is critically sensitive to gene dosage and even subtle variations in the expression levels of key genes may result in a variety of tissue anomalies. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are fundamental regulators of gene expression and their role in vertebrate tissue patterning is just beginning to be elucidated. To gain further insight into this issue, we analysed the transcriptomic consequences of manipulating the expression of miR-204 in the Medaka fish model system. We used RNA-Seq and an innovative bioinformatics approach, which combines conventional differential expression analysis with the behavior expected by miR-204 targets after its overexpression and knockdown. With this approach combined with a correlative analysis of the putative targets, we identified a wider set of miR-204 target genes belonging to different pathways. Together, these approaches confirmed that miR-204 has a key role in eye development and further highlighted its putative function in neural differentiation processes, including axon guidance as supported by in vivo functional studies. Together, our results demonstrate the advantage of integrating next-generation sequencing and bioinformatics approaches to investigate miRNA biology and provide new important information on the role of miRNAs in the control of axon guidance and more broadly in nervous system development. PMID:24895435

  13. MicroRNA regulatory pathway analysis identifies miR-142-5p as a negative regulator of TGF-β pathway via targeting SMAD3

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Hong-Mei; Li, Qiubai; Chen, Zhichao; Guo, An-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNAs with functions of posttranscriptional regulation. The abnormally expressed miRNAs have been shown to be crucial contributors and may serve as biomarkers in many diseases. However, determining the biological function of miRNAs is an ongoing challenge. By combining miRNA targets prediction, miRNA and mRNA expression profiles in TCGA cancers, and pathway data, we performed a miRNA-pathway regulation inference by Fisher's exact test for enrichment analysis. Then we constructed a database to show the cancer related miRNA-pathway regulatory network (http://bioinfo.life.hust.edu.cn/miR_path). As one of the miRNAs targeting many cancer related pathways, miR-142-5p potentially regulates the maximum number of genes in TGF-β signaling pathway. We experimentally confirmed that miR-142-5p directly targeted and suppressed SMAD3, a key component in TGF-β signaling. Ectopic overexpression of miR-142-5p significantly promoted tumor cell proliferation and inhibited apoptosis, while silencing of miR-142-5p inhibited the tumor cell proliferation and promoted apoptosis in vitro. These findings indicate that miR-142-5p plays as a negative regulator in TGF-β pathway by targeting SMAD3 and suppresses TGF-β-induced growth inhibition in cancer cells. Our study proved the feasibility of miRNA regulatory pathway analysis and shed light on combining bioinformatics with experiments in the research of complex diseases. PMID:27683030

  14. HUWE1 interacts with BRCA1 and promotes its degradation in the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway (Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, v. 444 issue 3)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaozhen; Lu, Guang; Li, Li; Yi, Juan; Yan, Kaowen; Wang, Yaqing; Zhu, Baili; Kuang, Jingyu; Lin, Ming; Zhang, Sha; Shao, Genze

    2014-02-14

    Highlights: • The 2000–2634 aa region of HUWE1 mediates the interaction with BRCA1 degron. • HUWE1 promotes the degradation of BRCA1 through the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway. • HUWE1 expression is inversely correlated with BRCA1 in breast cancer cells. • RNAi inhibition of HUWE1 confers increased resistance of MCF-10F cells to IR and MMC. - Abstract: The cellular BRCA1 protein level is essential for its tumor suppression activity and is tightly regulated through multiple mechanisms including ubiquitn–proteasome system. E3 ligases are involved to promote BRCA1 for ubiquitination and degradation. Here, we identified HUWE1/Mule/ARF-BP1 as a novel BRCA1-interacting protein involved in the control of BRCA1 protein level. HUWE1binds BRCA1 through its N-terminus degron domain. Depletion of HUWE1 by siRNA-mediated interference significantly increases BRCA1 protein levels and prolongs the half-life of BRCA1. Moreover, exogenous expression of HUWE1 promotes BRCA1 degradation through the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway, which could explain an inverse correlation between HUWE1 and BRCA1 levels in MCF10F, MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Consistent with a functional role for HUWE1 in regulating BRCA1-mediated cellular response to DNA damage, depletion of HUWE1 by siRNA confers increased resistance to ionizing radiation and mitomycin. These data indicate that HUWE1 is a critical negative regulator of BRCA1 and suggest a new molecular mechanism for breast cancer pathogenesis.

  15. HUWE1 interacts with BRCA1 and promotes its degradation in the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway (Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, v. 444, isse 4)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaozhen; Lu, Guang; Li, Li; Yi, Juan; Yan, Kaowen; Wang, Yaqing; Zhu, Baili; Kuang, Jingyu; Lin, Ming; Zhang, Sha; Shao, Genze

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • The 2000–2634aa region of HUWE1 mediates the interaction with BRCA1 degron. • HUWE1 promotes the degradation of BRCA1 through the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway. • HUWE1 expression is inversely correlated with BRCA1 in breast cancer cells. • RNAi inhibition of HUWE1 confers increased resistance of MCF-10F cells to IR and MMC. - Abstract: The cellular BRCA1 protein level is essential for its tumor suppression activity and is tightly regulated through multiple mechanisms including ubiquitn–proteasome system. E3 ligases are involved to promote BRCA1 for ubiquitination and degradation. Here, we identified HUWE1/Mule/ARF-BP1 as a novel BRCA1-interacting protein involved in the control of BRCA1 protein level. HUWE1 binds BRCA1 through its N-terminus degron domain. Depletion of HUWE1 by siRNA-mediated interference significantly increases BRCA1 protein levels and prolongs the half-life of BRCA1. Moreover, exogenous expression of HUWE1 promotes BRCA1 degradation through the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway, which could explain an inverse correlation between HUWE1 and BRCA1 levels in MCF10F, MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Consistent with a functional role for HUWE1 in regulating BRCA1-mediated cellular response to DNA damage, depletion of HUWE1 by siRNA confers increased resistance to ionizing radiation and mitomycin. These data indicate that HUWE1 is a critical negative regulator of BRCA1 and suggest a new molecular mechanism for breast cancer pathogenesis.

  16. Subpathway-GMir: identifying miRNA-mediated metabolic subpathways by integrating condition-specific genes, microRNAs, and pathway topologies.

    PubMed

    Feng, Li; Xu, Yanjun; Zhang, Yunpeng; Sun, Zeguo; Han, Junwei; Zhang, Chunlong; Yang, Haixiu; Shang, Desi; Su, Fei; Shi, Xinrui; Li, Shang; Li, Chunquan; Li, Xia

    2015-11-17

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate disease-relevant metabolic pathways. However, most current pathway identification methods fail to consider miRNAs in addition to genes when analyzing pathways. We developed a powerful method called Subpathway-GMir to construct miRNA-regulated metabolic pathways and to identify miRNA-mediated subpathways by considering condition-specific genes, miRNAs, and pathway topologies. We used Subpathway-GMir to analyze two liver hepatocellular carcinomas (LIHC), one stomach adenocarcinoma (STAD), and one type 2 diabetes (T2D) data sets. Results indicate that Subpathway-GMir is more effective in identifying phenotype-associated metabolic pathways than other methods and our results are reproducible and robust. Subpathway-GMir provides a flexible platform for identifying abnormal metabolic subpathways mediated by miRNAs, and may help to clarify the roles that miRNAs play in a variety of diseases. The Subpathway-GMir method has been implemented as a freely available R package.

  17. Analysis of TETRAKETIDE α-PYRONE REDUCTASE Function in Arabidopsis thaliana Reveals a Previously Unknown, but Conserved, Biochemical Pathway in Sporopollenin Monomer Biosynthesis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Grienenberger, Etienne; Kim, Sung Soo; Lallemand, Benjamin; Geoffroy, Pierrette; Heintz, Dimitri; Souza, Clarice de Azevedo; Heitz, Thierry; Douglas, Carl J.; Legrand, Michel

    2010-01-01

    The precise structure of the sporopollenin polymer that is the major constituent of exine, the outer pollen wall, remains poorly understood. Recently, characterization of Arabidopsis thaliana genes and corresponding enzymes involved in exine formation has demonstrated the role of fatty acid derivatives as precursors of sporopollenin building units. Fatty acyl-CoA esters synthesized by ACYL-COA SYNTHETASE5 (ACOS5) are condensed with malonyl-CoA by POLYKETIDE SYNTHASE A (PKSA) and PKSB to yield α-pyrone polyketides required for exine formation. Here, we show that two closely related genes encoding oxidoreductases are specifically and transiently expressed in tapetal cells during microspore development in Arabidopsis anthers. Mutants compromised in expression of the reductases displayed a range of pollen exine layer defects, depending on the mutant allele. Phylogenetic studies indicated that the two reductases belong to a large reductase/dehydrogenase gene family and cluster in two distinct clades with putative orthologs from several angiosperm lineages and the moss Physcomitrella patens. Recombinant proteins produced in bacteria reduced the carbonyl function of tetraketide α-pyrone compounds synthesized by PKSA/B, and the proteins were therefore named TETRAKETIDE α-PYRONE REDUCTASE1 (TKPR1) and TKPR2 (previously called DRL1 and CCRL6, respectively). TKPR activities, together with those of ACOS5 and PKSA/B, identify a conserved biosynthetic pathway leading to hydroxylated α-pyrone compounds that were previously unknown to be sporopollenin precursors. PMID:21193572

  18. Characterization of a novel β-cypermethrin-degrading Aspergillus niger YAT strain and the biochemical degradation pathway of β-cypermethrin.

    PubMed

    Deng, Weiqin; Lin, Derong; Yao, Kai; Yuan, Huaiyu; Wang, Zhilong; Li, Jianlong; Zou, Likou; Han, Xinfeng; Zhou, Kang; He, Li; Hu, Xinjie; Liu, Shuliang

    2015-10-01

    Aspergillus niger YAT strain was obtained from Chinese brick tea (Collection number: CGMCC 10,568) and identified on the basis of morphological characteristics and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence. The strain could degrade 54.83 % of β-cypermethrin (β-CY; 50 mg L(-1)) in 7 days and 100 % of 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA; 100 mg L(-1)) in 22 h. The half-lives of β-CY and 3-PBA range from 3.573 to 11.748 days and from 5.635 to 12.160 h, respectively. The degradation of β-CY and 3-PBA was further described using first-order kinetic models. The pathway and mechanism of β-CY degraded by YAT were investigated by analyzing the degraded metabolites through high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Relevant enzymatic activities and substrate utilization were also investigated. β-CY degradation products were analyzed. Results indicated that YAT strain transformed β-CY into 3-PBA. 3-PBA was then gradually transformed into permethric acid, protocatechuic acid, 3-hydroxy-5-phenoxy benzoic acid, gallic acid, and phenol gradually. The YAT strain can also effectively degrade these metabolites. The results indicated that YAT strain has potential applications in bioremediation of pyrethroid insecticide (PI)-contaminated environments and fermented food.

  19. A comparative analysis of transcriptomic, biochemical, and physiological responses to elevated ozone identifies species-specific mechanisms of resilience in legume crops

    PubMed Central

    Yendrek, Craig R.; Koester, Robert P.

    2015-01-01

    Current concentrations of tropospheric ozone ([O3]) pollution negatively impact plant metabolism, which can result in decreased crop yields. Interspecific variation in the physiological response of plants to elevated [O3] exists; however, the underlying cellular responses explaining species-specific differences are largely unknown. Here, a physiological screen has been performed on multiple varieties of legume species. Three varieties of garden pea (Pisum sativum L.) were resilient to elevated [O3]. Garden pea showed no change in photosynthetic capacity or leaf longevity when exposed to elevated [O3], in contrast to varieties of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) and common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). Global transcriptomic and targeted biochemical analyses were then done to examine the mechanistic differences in legume responses to elevated [O3]. In all three species, there was an O3-mediated reduction in specific leaf weight and total non-structural carbohydrate content, as well as increased abundance of respiration-related transcripts. Differences specific to garden pea included a pronounced increase in the abundance of GLUTATHIONE REDUCTASE transcript, as well as greater contents of foliar glutathione, apoplastic ascorbate, and sucrose in elevated [O3]. These results suggest that garden pea may have had greater capacity for detoxification, which prevented net losses in CO2 fixation in an elevated [O3] environment. PMID:26324463

  20. A comparative analysis of transcriptomic, biochemical, and physiological responses to elevated ozone identifies species-specific mechanisms of resilience in legume crops.

    PubMed

    Yendrek, Craig R; Koester, Robert P; Ainsworth, Elizabeth A

    2015-12-01

    Current concentrations of tropospheric ozone ([O3]) pollution negatively impact plant metabolism, which can result in decreased crop yields. Interspecific variation in the physiological response of plants to elevated [O3] exists; however, the underlying cellular responses explaining species-specific differences are largely unknown. Here, a physiological screen has been performed on multiple varieties of legume species. Three varieties of garden pea (Pisum sativum L.) were resilient to elevated [O3]. Garden pea showed no change in photosynthetic capacity or leaf longevity when exposed to elevated [O3], in contrast to varieties of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) and common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). Global transcriptomic and targeted biochemical analyses were then done to examine the mechanistic differences in legume responses to elevated [O3]. In all three species, there was an O3-mediated reduction in specific leaf weight and total non-structural carbohydrate content, as well as increased abundance of respiration-related transcripts. Differences specific to garden pea included a pronounced increase in the abundance of GLUTATHIONE REDUCTASE transcript, as well as greater contents of foliar glutathione, apoplastic ascorbate, and sucrose in elevated [O3]. These results suggest that garden pea may have had greater capacity for detoxification, which prevented net losses in CO2 fixation in an elevated [O3] environment.

  1. Loss of Niemann-Pick C1 or C2 protein results in similar biochemical changes suggesting that these proteins function in a common lysosomal pathway.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Sayali S; Jadot, Michel; Sohar, Istvan; Sleat, David E; Stock, Ann M; Lobel, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Niemann-Pick Type C (NPC) disease is a lysosomal storage disorder characterized by accumulation of unesterified cholesterol and other lipids in the endolysosomal system. NPC disease results from a defect in either of two distinct cholesterol-binding proteins: a transmembrane protein, NPC1, and a small soluble protein, NPC2. NPC1 and NPC2 are thought to function closely in the export of lysosomal cholesterol with both proteins binding cholesterol in vitro but they may have unrelated lysosomal roles. To investigate this possibility, we compared biochemical consequences of the loss of either protein. Analyses of lysosome-enriched subcellular fractions from brain and liver revealed similar decreases in buoyant densities of lysosomes from NPC1 or NPC2 deficient mice compared to controls. The subcellular distribution of both proteins was similar and paralleled a lysosomal marker. In liver, absence of either NPC1 or NPC2 resulted in similar alterations in the carbohydrate processing of the lysosomal protease, tripeptidyl peptidase I. These results highlight biochemical alterations in the lysosomal system of the NPC-mutant mice that appear secondary to lipid storage. In addition, the similarity in biochemical phenotypes resulting from either NPC1 or NPC2 deficiency supports models in which the function of these two proteins within lysosomes are linked closely.

  2. PROFILING GENE EXPRESSION IN HUMAN H295R ADRENOCORTICAL CARCINOMA CELLS AND RAT TESTES TO IDENTIFY PATHWAYS OF TOXICITY FOR CONAZOLE FUNGICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Profiling Gene Expression in Human H295R Adrenocortical Carcinoma Cells and Rat Testes to Identify Pathways of Toxicity for Conazole Fungicides
    Ren1, H., Schmid1, J., Retief2, J., Turpaz2, Y.,Zhang3, X.,Jones3, P., Newsted3, J.,Giesy3, J., Wolf1, D.,Wood1, C., Bao1, W., Dix1, ...

  3. New variants including ARG1 polymorphisms associated with C-reactive protein levels identified by genome-wide association and pathway analysis.

    PubMed

    Vinayagamoorthy, Nadimuthu; Hu, Hae-Jin; Yim, Seon-Hee; Jung, Seung-Hyun; Jo, Jaeseong; Jee, Sun Ha; Chung, Yeun-Jun

    2014-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a general marker of systemic inflammation and cardiovascular disease (CVD). The genetic contribution to differences in CRP levels remains to be explained, especially in non-European populations. Thus, the aim of this study was to identify genetic loci associated with CRP levels in Korean population. We performed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) using SNPs from 8,529 Korean individuals (7,626 for stage 1 and 903 for stage 2). We also performed pathway analysis. We identified a new genetic locus associated with CRP levels upstream of ARG1 gene (top significant SNP: rs9375813, Pmeta = 2.85×10(-8)), which encodes a key enzyme of the urea cycle counteract the effects of nitric oxide, in addition to known CRP (rs7553007, Pmeta = 1.72×10(-16)) and HNF1A loci (rs2259816, Pmeta = 2.90×10(-10)). When we evaluated the associations between the CRP-related SNPs with cardiovascular disease phenotypes, rs9375813 (ARG1) showed a marginal association with hypertension (P = 0.0440). To identify more variants and pathways, we performed pathway analysis and identified six candidate pathways comprised of genes related to inflammatory processes and CVDs (CRP, HNF1A, PCSK6, CD36, and ABCA1). In addition to the previously reported loci (CRP, HNF1A, and IL6) in diverse ethnic groups, we identified novel variants in the ARG1 locus associated with CRP levels in Korean population and a number of interesting genes related to inflammatory processes and CVD through pathway analysis.

  4. New Variants Including ARG1 Polymorphisms Associated with C-Reactive Protein Levels Identified by Genome-Wide Association and Pathway Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Seon-Hee; Jung, Seung-Hyun; Jo, Jaeseong; Jee, Sun Ha; Chung, Yeun-Jun

    2014-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a general marker of systemic inflammation and cardiovascular disease (CVD). The genetic contribution to differences in CRP levels remains to be explained, especially in non-European populations. Thus, the aim of this study was to identify genetic loci associated with CRP levels in Korean population. We performed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) using SNPs from 8,529 Korean individuals (7,626 for stage 1 and 903 for stage 2). We also performed pathway analysis. We identified a new genetic locus associated with CRP levels upstream of ARG1 gene (top significant SNP: rs9375813, Pmeta = 2.85×10−8), which encodes a key enzyme of the urea cycle counteract the effects of nitric oxide, in addition to known CRP (rs7553007, Pmeta = 1.72×10−16) and HNF1A loci (rs2259816, Pmeta = 2.90×10−10). When we evaluated the associations between the CRP-related SNPs with cardiovascular disease phenotypes, rs9375813 (ARG1) showed a marginal association with hypertension (P = 0.0440). To identify more variants and pathways, we performed pathway analysis and identified six candidate pathways comprised of genes related to inflammatory processes and CVDs (CRP, HNF1A, PCSK6, CD36, and ABCA1). In addition to the previously reported loci (CRP, HNF1A, and IL6) in diverse ethnic groups, we identified novel variants in the ARG1 locus associated with CRP levels in Korean population and a number of interesting genes related to inflammatory processes and CVD through pathway analysis. PMID:24763700

  5. Identifying developmental toxicity pathways for a subset of ToxCast chemicals using human embryonic stem cells and metabolomics

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinstreuer, N.C.; Smith, A.M.; West, P.R.; Conard, K.R.; Fontaine, B.R.; Weir-Hauptman, A.M.; Palmer, J.A.; Knudsen, T.B.; Dix, D.J.; Donley, E.L.R.; Cezar, G.G.

    2011-11-15

    Metabolomics analysis was performed on the supernatant of human embryonic stem (hES) cell cultures exposed to a blinded subset of 11 chemicals selected from the chemical library of EPA's ToxCast Trade-Mark-Sign chemical screening and prioritization research project. Metabolites from hES cultures were evaluated for known and novel signatures that may be indicative of developmental toxicity. Significant fold changes in endogenous metabolites were detected for 83 putatively annotated mass features in response to the subset of ToxCast chemicals. The annotations were mapped to specific human metabolic pathways. This revealed strong effects on pathways for nicotinate and nicotinamide metabolism, pantothenate and CoA biosynthesis, glutathione metabolism, and arginine and proline metabolism pathways. Predictivity for adverse outcomes in mammalian prenatal developmental toxicity studies used ToxRefDB and other sources of information, including Stemina Biomarker Discovery's predictive DevTox Registered-Sign model trained on 23 pharmaceutical agents of known developmental toxicity and differing potency. The model initially predicted developmental toxicity from the blinded ToxCast compounds in concordance with animal data with 73% accuracy. Retraining the model with data from the unblinded test compounds at one concentration level increased the predictive accuracy for the remaining concentrations to 83%. These preliminary results on a 11-chemical subset of the ToxCast chemical library indicate that metabolomics analysis of the hES secretome provides information valuable for predictive modeling and mechanistic understanding of mammalian developmental toxicity. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We tested 11 environmental compounds in a hESC metabolomics platform. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significant changes in secreted small molecule metabolites were observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Perturbed mass features map to pathways critical for normal development and

  6. Morphoproteomics Identifies the EZH2 and SIRT1 Pathways as Potential Blocks to Differentiation in Yolk Sac Tumor of the Ovary and Provides Therapeutic Options: a Case Study.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Yumi A; Assylbekova, Binara; Zhao, Bihong; Nugent, Elizabeth; Brown, Robert E

    2017-01-01

    Yolk sac tumor of the ovary is a rare but highly malignant and aggressive germ cell tumor. The objective of this case study of an ovarian yolk sac tumor was to identify putative pathways that are known to pose a block in differentiation, both in early embryogenesis and in tumorigenesis, that might be amenable to low toxicity therapies designed to promote differentiation to a more benign state and prevent recurrent disease in such tumors. The enhancer of Zeste homolog 2 (EZH2), a histone methyl transferase, and silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1 (SIRT1), a NAD+ histone deacetylase, are two such pathways.

  7. A Canonical Correlation Analysis of AIDS Restriction Genes and Metabolic Pathways Identifies Purine Metabolism as a Key Cooperator

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hanhui; Yuan, Jinjin; Wang, Zhengwu; Huang, Aiqiong; Liu, Xiaolong; Han, Xiao; Chen, Yahong

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus causes a severe disease in humans, referred to as immune deficiency syndrome. Studies on the interaction between host genetic factors and the virus have revealed dozens of genes that impact diverse processes in the AIDS disease. To resolve more genetic factors related to AIDS, a canonical correlation analysis was used to determine the correlation between AIDS restriction and metabolic pathway gene expression. The results show that HIV-1 postentry cellular viral cofactors from AIDS restriction genes are coexpressed in human transcriptome microarray datasets. Further, the purine metabolism pathway comprises novel host factors that are coexpressed with AIDS restriction genes. Using a canonical correlation analysis for expression is a reliable approach to exploring the mechanism underlying AIDS. PMID:27462363

  8. Native fluorescence spectroscopy of blood plasma of rats with experimental diabetes: identifying fingerprints of glucose-related metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Shirshin, Evgeny; Cherkasova, Olga; Tikhonova, Tatiana; Berlovskaya, Elena; Priezzhev, Alexander; Fadeev, Victor

    2015-05-01

    We present the results of a native fluorescence spectroscopy study of blood plasma of rats with experimental diabetes. It was shown that the fluorescence emission band shape at 320 nm excitation is the most indicative of hyperglycemia in the blood plasma samples. We provide the interpretation of this fact based on the changes in reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate concentration due to glucose-related metabolic pathways and protein fluorescent cross-linking formation following nonenzymatic glycation.

  9. Native fluorescence spectroscopy of blood plasma of rats with experimental diabetes: identifying fingerprints of glucose-related metabolic pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirshin, Evgeny; Cherkasova, Olga; Tikhonova, Tatiana; Berlovskaya, Elena; Priezzhev, Alexander; Fadeev, Victor

    2015-05-01

    We present the results of a native fluorescence spectroscopy study of blood plasma of rats with experimental diabetes. It was shown that the fluorescence emission band shape at 320 nm excitation is the most indicative of hyperglycemia in the blood plasma samples. We provide the interpretation of this fact based on the changes in reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate concentration due to glucose-related metabolic pathways and protein fluorescent cross-linking formation following nonenzymatic glycation.

  10. Superresolution Imaging Identifies That Conventional Trafficking Pathways Are Not Essential for Endoplasmic Reticulum to Outer Mitochondrial Membrane Protein Transport.

    PubMed

    Salka, Kyle; Bhuvanendran, Shivaprasad; Wilson, Kassandra; Bozidis, Petros; Mehta, Mansi; Rainey, Kristin; Sesaki, Hiromi; Patterson, George H; Jaiswal, Jyoti K; Colberg-Poley, Anamaris M

    2017-12-01

    Most nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins traffic from the cytosol to mitochondria. Some of these proteins localize at mitochondria-associated membranes (MAM), where mitochondria are closely apposed with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We have previously shown that the human cytomegalovirus signal-anchored protein known as viral mitochondria-localized inhibitor of apoptosis (vMIA) traffics from the ER to mitochondria and clusters at the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM). Here, we have examined the host pathways by which vMIA traffics from the ER to mitochondria and clusters at the OMM. By disruption of phosphofurin acidic cluster sorting protein 2 (PACS-2), mitofusins (Mfn1/2), and dynamin related protein 1 (Drp1), we find these conventional pathways for ER to the mitochondria trafficking are dispensable for vMIA trafficking to OMM. Instead, mutations in vMIA that change its hydrophobicity alter its trafficking to mitochondria. Superresolution imaging showed that PACS-2- and Mfn-mediated membrane apposition or hydrophobic interactions alter vMIA's ability to organize in nanoscale clusters at the OMM. This shows that signal-anchored MAM proteins can make use of hydrophobic interactions independently of conventional ER-mitochondria pathways to traffic from the ER to mitochondria. Further, vMIA hydrophobic interactions and ER-mitochondria contacts facilitate proper organization of vMIA on the OMM.

  11. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of Rm3, a Subclass B3 Metallo-β-Lactamase Identified from a Functional Metagenomic Study

    PubMed Central

    Salimraj, Ramya; Zhang, Lihong; Hinchliffe, Philip; Wellington, Elizabeth M. H.; Brem, Jürgen; Schofield, Christopher J.; Gaze, William H.

    2016-01-01

    β-Lactamase production increasingly threatens the effectiveness of β-lactams, which remain a mainstay of antimicrobial chemotherapy. New activities emerge through both mutation of previously known β-lactamases and mobilization from environmental reservoirs. The spread of metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) represents a particular challenge because of their typically broad-spectrum activities encompassing carbapenems, in addition to other β-lactam classes. Increasingly, genomic and metagenomic studies have revealed the distribution of putative MBLs in the environment, but in most cases their activity against clinically relevant β-lactams and, hence, the extent to which they can be considered a resistance reservoir remain uncharacterized. Here we characterize the product of one such gene, blaRm3, identified through functional metagenomic sampling of an environment with high levels of biocide exposure. blaRm3 encodes a subclass B3 MBL that, when expressed in a recombinant Escherichia coli strain, is exported to the bacterial periplasm and hydrolyzes clinically used penicillins, cephalosporins, and carbapenems with an efficiency limited by high Km values. An Rm3 crystal structure reveals the MBL superfamily αβ/βα fold, which more closely resembles that in mobilized B3 MBLs (AIM-1 and SMB-1) than other chromosomal enzymes (L1 or FEZ-1). A binuclear zinc site sits in a deep channel that is in part defined by a relatively extended N terminus. Structural comparisons suggest that the steric constraints imposed by the N terminus may limit its affinity for β-lactams. Sequence comparisons identify Rm3-like MBLs in numerous other environmental samples and species. Our data suggest that Rm3-like enzymes represent a distinct group of B3 MBLs with a wide distribution and can be considered an environmental reservoir of determinants of β-lactam resistance. PMID:27431213

  12. Three-dimensional pharmacophore design and biochemical screening identifies substituted 1,2,4-triazoles as inhibitors of the annexin A2-S100A10 protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Tummala R K; Li, Chan; Fischer, Peter M; Dekker, Lodewijk V

    2012-08-01

    Protein interactions are increasingly appreciated as targets in small-molecule drug discovery. The interaction between the adapter protein S100A10 and its binding partner annexin A2 is a potentially important drug target. To obtain small-molecule starting points for inhibitors of this interaction, a three-dimensional pharmacophore model was constructed from the X-ray crystal structure of the complex between S100A10 and annexin A2. The pharmacophore model represents the favourable hydrophobic and hydrogen bond interactions between the two partners, as well as spatial and receptor site constraints (excluded volume spheres). Using this pharmacophore model, UNITY flex searches were carried out on a 3D library of 0.7 million commercially available compounds. This resulted in 568 hit compounds. Subsequently, GOLD docking studies were performed on these hits, and a set of 190 compounds were purchased and tested biochemically for inhibition of the protein interaction. Three compounds of similar chemical structure were identified as genuine inhibitors of the binding of annexin A2 to S100A10. The binding modes predicted by GOLD were in good agreement with their UNITY-generated conformations. We synthesised a series of analogues revealing areas critical for binding. Thus computational predictions and biochemical screening can be used successfully to derive novel chemical classes of protein-protein interaction blockers.

  13. Studies toward the Unique Pederin Family Member Psymberin: Structure Activity Relationships, Biochemical Studies and Genetics Identify the Mode of Action of Psymberin

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Cheng-Yang; Feng, Yu; Cardenas, Eduardo R.; Williams, Noelle; Floreancig, Paul E.; De Brabander, Jef K.; Roth, Michael G.

    2012-01-01

    Psymberin is the only member of the pederin natural product family that contains a dihydroisocoumarin side chain. Structural modifications of psymberin uncoupled inhibition of protein translation from cytotoxicity, suggesting that psymberin has more than one bioactivity. A forward genetic screen in Caenorhabditis elegans was conducted to identify the molecular target(s) of psymberin. Multiple independent psymberin-resistant mutants were isolated, each containing the same point mutation in a gene encoding a ribosomal protein. However, a psymberin-resistant mutant strain bearing this mutation was not cross-resistant to the pederin family member mycalamide A, which binds to the archaeal form of the same protein. Thus, two pederin family members likely differ in how they bind the same molecular target. The accumulation of psymberin in cells was sensitive to the stereochemistry of the amide side chain at C4 or C8 and the presence of the dihydroisocoumarin side chain. The observation that psymberin diastereomers or dihydroisocoumarin-truncated analogs lose all cytotoxic activity while retaining the ability to inhibit protein translation in a cell-free in vitro assay can be explained in the context of these differential cell uptake issues. Finally, we also demonstrate that the blistering activity associated with pederin and other members of the family is not due to their protein synthesis inhibiting activity. Unlike pederin and mycalamide, psymberin does not display irritant or blistering activity. PMID:23088155

  14. Studies toward the unique pederin family member psymberin: structure-activity relationships, biochemical studies, and genetics identify the mode-of-action of psymberin.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cheng-Yang; Feng, Yu; Cardenas, Eduardo R; Williams, Noelle; Floreancig, Paul E; De Brabander, Jef K; Roth, Michael G

    2012-11-21

    Psymberin is the only member of the pederin natural product family that contains a dihydroisocoumarin side chain. Structural modifications of psymberin uncoupled inhibition of protein translation from cytotoxicity, suggesting that psymberin has more than one bioactivity. A forward genetic screen in Caenorhabditis elegans was conducted to identify the molecular target(s) of psymberin. Multiple independent psymberin-resistant mutants were isolated, each containing the same point mutation in a gene encoding a ribosomal protein. However, a psymberin-resistant mutant strain bearing this mutation was not cross-resistant to the pederin family member mycalamide A, which binds to the archaeal form of the same protein. Thus, two pederin family members likely differ in how they bind the same molecular target. The accumulation of psymberin in cells was sensitive to the stereochemistry of the amide side chain at C4 or C8 and the presence of the dihydroisocoumarin side chain. The observation that psymberin diastereomers or dihydroisocoumarin-truncated analogs lose all cytotoxic activity while retaining the ability to inhibit protein translation in a cell-free in vitro assay can be explained in the context of these differential cell uptake issues. Finally, we also demonstrate that the blistering activity associated with pederin and other members of the family is not due to their protein synthesis inhibiting activity. Unlike pederin and mycalamide, psymberin does not display irritant or blistering activity.

  15. Whole Genome Pathway Analysis Identifies an Association of Cadmium Response Gene Loss with Copy Number Variation in Mutant p53 Bearing Uterine Endometrial Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Stupack, Dwayne G

    2016-01-01

    Background Massive chromosomal aberrations are a signature of advanced cancer, although the factors promoting the pervasive incidence of these copy number alterations (CNAs) are poorly understood. Gatekeeper mutations, such as p53, contribute to aneuploidy, yet p53 mutant tumors do not always display CNAs. Uterine Corpus Endometrial Carcinoma (UCEC) offers a unique system to begin to evaluate why some cancers acquire high CNAs while others evolve another route to oncogenesis, since about half of p53 mutant UCEC tumors have a relatively flat CNA landscape and half have 20–90% of their genome altered in copy number. Methods We extracted copy number information from 68 UCEC genomes mutant in p53 by the GISTIC2 algorithm. GO term pathway analysis, via GOrilla, was used to identify suppressed pathways. Genes within these pathways were mapped for focal or wide distribution. Deletion hotspots were evaluated for temporal incidence. Results Multiple pathways contributed to the development of pervasive CNAs, including developmental, metabolic, immunological, cell adhesion and cadmium response pathways. Surprisingly, cadmium response pathway genes are predicted as the earliest loss events within these tumors: in particular, the metallothionein genes involved in heavy metal sequestration. Loss of cadmium response genes were associated with copy number changes and poorer prognosis, contrasting with 'copy number flat' tumors which instead exhibited substantive mutation. Conclusion Metallothioneins are lost early in the development of high CNA endometrial cancer, providing a potential mechanism and biological rationale for increased incidence of endometrial cancer with cadmium exposure. Developmental and metabolic pathways are altered later in tumor progression. PMID:27391266

  16. Transcript profiling of Paoenia ostii during artificial chilling induced dormancy release identifies activation of GA pathway and carbohydrate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gai, Shupeng; Zhang, Yuxi; Liu, Chunying; Zhang, Yang; Zheng, Guosheng

    2013-01-01

    Endo-dormant flower buds must pass through a period of chilling to reinitiate growth and subsequent flowering, which is a major obstacle to the forcing culture of tree peony in winter. Customized cDNA microarray (8×15 K element) was used to investigate gene expression profiling in tree peony 'Feng Dan Bai' buds during 24 d chilling treatment at 0-4°C. According to the morphological changes after the whole plants were transferred to green house, endo-dormancy was released after 18 d chilling treatment, and prolonged chilling treatment increased bud break rate. Pearson correlation hierarchical clustering of sample groups was highly consistent with the dormancy transitions revealed by morphological changes. Totally 3,174 significantly differentially-expressed genes (P<0.05) were observed through endo-dormancy release process, of which the number of up-regulated (1,611) and that of down-regulated (1,563) was almost the same. Functional annotation of differentially-expressed genes revealed that cellular process, metabolic process, response to stimulus, regulation of biological process and development process were well-represented. Hierarchical clustering indicated that activation of genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism (Glycolysis, Citrate cycle and Pentose phosphate pathway), energy metabolism and cell growth. Based on the results of GO analysis, totally 51 probes presented in the microarray were associated with GA response and GA signaling pathway, and 22 of them were differently expressed. The expression profiles also revealed that the genes of GA biosynthesis, signaling and response involved in endo-dormancy release. We hypothesized that activation of GA pathway played a central role in the regulation of dormancy release in tree peony.

  17. Novel spinal pathways identified by neuronal c-Fos expression after urethrogenital reflex activation in female guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Yuan, S Y; Vilimas, P I; Zagorodnyuk, V P; Gibbins, I L

    2015-03-12

    Pudendal nerve-spinal pathways are involved in urethrogenital sensation, pain and sexual activity. However, details of these pathways and their modulation are unclear. We examined spinal pathways activated by the urethrogenital reflex (UGR) and visualized by c-Fos immunoreactivity in reflexly activated neurons within spinal cord. In anesthetized female guinea pigs, a balloon was inserted into the urethra and inflated with short-repeat or long-continuous distension to activate the UGR. A second balloon recorded reflex contractions of the vagina and uterus. Two control groups had either no balloon or a vaginal balloon (VB) only. Ninety minutes after UGR activation, c-Fos immunoreactivity in L3 and S2 spinal segments was examined. Reflex activated c-Fos immunoreactivity also was investigated in some animals with acute spinal transections at either L4 or T12 levels. There was no significant difference in spinal c-Fos expression between the control groups. Short-repeat distension reliably induced a UGR and a two- to threefold increase in c-Fos-expressing neurons throughout dorsal, intermediate and lateral spinal gray matter at S2 and about twofold increase in superficial dorsal horn at L3. T12 transection had little effect on c-Fos expression at either spinal level. However, after L4 transection, UGR generation was associated with a four- to sixfold increase in c-Fos-expressing neurons in lateral horn (LH) and central canal areas at S2, and but only 20-30% increase at L3. Thus, UGR activates preganglionic neurons projecting to pelvic viscera in both sacral and lumbar spinal cord. The reflex also must activate ascending and descending spinal inhibitory circuits that suppress c-Fos-expression in neurons at both sacral and lumbar spinal levels.

  18. Utilising conservative tracers and spatial surveys to identify controls on pathways and DOC exports in an Arctic catchment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lessels, J. S.; Tetzlaff, D.; Dinsmore, K. J.; Street, L. E.; Dean, J.; Washbourne, I. J.; Billett, M. F.; Baxter, R.; Subke, J. A.; Wookey, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is typically the predominant form of carbon exported from headwater streams, it therefore represents a major carbon export from Arctic catchments. The projected deepening of thaw depth in permafrost regions, due to an increase in air temperature, may have a significant effect on the amount of DOC exported from these systems. However, quantification of the impacts of climate driven changes on DOC export are still highly uncertain. Understanding the processes controlling DOC export is therefore crucial in predicting the potential impact of projected environmental changes. The controls of DOC production and transport are heavily influenced by soil and vegetation, which are highly variable across the landscape. To completely understand these systems information regarding spatial variability of plants, soils and thaw depths must be taken into account. In this study sub-weekly sampling of DOC was undertaken throughout 2014 in a headwater (<1 km2) catchment in the Northwest Territories, Canada. Spatial surveys of soil properties, active thaw depth and normalised difference vegetation index (NDVI) were collected and used in conjunction with conservative stable water isotopes tracers and major ions to understand sources, flow pathways and timing of DOC exports from the catchment. Stable isotope tracers act as fingerprints of water allowing sources and pathways to be assessed. Observations reveal changing DOC concentrations throughout the season as the active layer deepens and the connectivity of the soils to the stream network throughout the catchment increases. Linking the DOC data with the conservative tracer response improves the identification of carbon pathways and fluxes from the soils; preliminary analysis indicates DOC is being delivered via deeper more mineral soils later in the season. The results indicate that the active layer depth has a strong influence on the amount of DOC exported from the system, independent of the amount of

  19. Evaluation of microbial triglyceride oil purification requirements for the CelTherm process: an efficient biochemical pathway to renewable fuels and chemicals.

    PubMed

    Linnen, Michael; Seames, Wayne; Kubatova, Alena; Menon, Suresh; Alisala, Kashinatham; Hash, Sara

    2014-10-01

    CelTherm is a biochemical process to produce renewable fuels and chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass. The present study's objective was to determine the level of treatment/purity of the microbial triacylglyceride oil (TAG) necessary to facilitate fuel production. After a unique microbe aerobically synthesizes TAG from biomass-derived sugars, the microbes were harvested and dried then crude TAG was chemically extracted from the residual biomass. Some TAGs were further purified to hydrotreating process requirements. Both grades were then noncatalytically cracked into a petroleum-like intermediate characterized by gas chromatography. Experiments were repeated using refined soybean oil for comparison to previous studies. The products from crude microbial TAG cracking were then further refined into a jet fuel product. Fuel tests indicate that this jet fuel corresponds to specifications for JP-8 military turbine fuel. It was thus concluded that the crude microbial TAG is a suitable feedstock with no further purification required, demonstrating CelTherm's commercial potential.

  20. Identifying viable regulatory and innovation pathways for regenerative medicine: a case study of cultured red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Mittra, J; Tait, J; Mastroeni, M; Turner, M L; Mountford, J C; Bruce, K

    2015-01-25

    The creation of red blood cells for the blood transfusion markets represents a highly innovative application of regenerative medicine with a medium term (5-10 year) prospect for first clinical studies. This article describes a case study analysis of a project to derive red blood cells from human embryonic stem cells, including the systemic challenges arising from (i) the selection of appropriate and viable regulatory protocols and (ii) technological constraints related to stem cell manufacture and scale up to clinical Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) standard. The method used for case study analysis (Analysis of Life Science Innovation Systems (ALSIS)) is also innovative, demonstrating a new approach to social and natural science collaboration to foresight product development pathways. Issues arising along the development pathway include cell manufacture and scale-up challenges, affected by regulatory demands emerging from the innovation ecosystem (preclinical testing and clinical trials). Our discussion reflects on the efforts being made by regulators to adapt the current pharmaceuticals-based regulatory model to an allogeneic regenerative medicine product and the broader lessons from this case study for successful innovation and translation of regenerative medicine therapies, including the role of methodological and regulatory innovation in future development in the field.

  1. Patient-Based Transcriptome-Wide Analysis Identify Interferon and Ubiquination Pathways as Potential Predictors of Influenza A Disease Severity

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Long Truong; Tolfvenstam, Thomas; Ooi, Eng Eong; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Naim, Ahmand Nazri Mohamed; Ho, Eliza Xin Pei; Ong, Swee Hoe; Wertheim, Heiman F.; Fox, Annette; Van Vinh Nguyen, Chau; Nghiem, Ngoc My; Ha, Tuan Manh; Thi Ngoc Tran, Anh; Tambayah, Paul; Lin, Raymond; Sangsajja, Chariya; Manosuthi, Weerawat; Chuchottaworn, Chareon; Sansayunh, Piamlarp; Chotpitayasunondh, Tawee; Suntarattiwong, Piyarat; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya; Puthavathana, Pilaipan; de Jong, Menno D.; Farrar, Jeremy; van Doorn, H. Rogier; Hibberd, Martin Lloyd

    2014-01-01

    Background The influenza A virus is an RNA virus that is responsible for seasonal epidemics worldwide with up to five million cases of severe illness and 500,000 deaths annually according to the World Health Organization estimates. The factors associated with severe diseases are not well defined, but more severe disease is more often seen among persons aged >65 years, infants, pregnant women, and individuals of any age with underlying health conditions. Methodology/Principal Findings Using gene expression microarrays, the transcriptomic profiles of influenza-infected patients with severe (N = 11), moderate (N = 40) and mild (N = 83) symptoms were compared with the febrile patients of unknown etiology (N = 73). We found that influenza-infected patients, regardless of their clinical outcomes, had a stronger induction of antiviral and cytokine responses and a stronger attenuation of NK and T cell responses in comparison with those with unknown etiology. More importantly, we found that both interferon and ubiquitination signaling were strongly attenuated in patients with the most severe outcomes in comparison with those with moderate and mild outcomes, suggesting the protective roles of these pathways in disease pathogenesis. Conclusion/Significances The attenuation of interferon and ubiquitination pathways may associate with the clinical outcomes of influenza patients. PMID:25365328

  2. Label-Free LC-MS/MS Proteomic Analysis of Cerebrospinal Fluid Identifies Protein/Pathway Alterations and Candidate Biomarkers for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Collins, Mahlon A; An, Jiyan; Hood, Brian L; Conrads, Thomas P; Bowser, Robert P

    2015-11-06

    Analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) proteome has proven valuable to the study of neurodegenerative disorders. To identify new protein/pathway alterations and candidate biomarkers for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), we performed comparative proteomic profiling of CSF from sporadic ALS (sALS), healthy control (HC), and other neurological disease (OND) subjects using label-free liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). A total of 1712 CSF proteins were detected and relatively quantified by spectral counting. Levels of several proteins with diverse biological functions were significantly altered in sALS samples. Enrichment analysis was used to link these alterations to biological pathways, which were predominantly related to inflammation, neuronal activity, and extracellular matrix regulation. We then used our CSF proteomic profiles to create a support vector machines classifier capable of discriminating training set ALS from non-ALS (HC and OND) samples. Four classifier proteins, WD repeat-containing protein 63, amyloid-like protein 1, SPARC-like protein 1, and cell adhesion molecule 3, were identified by feature selection and externally validated. The resultant classifier distinguished ALS from non-ALS samples with 83% sensitivity and 100% specificity in an independent test set. Collectively, our results illustrate the utility of CSF proteomic profiling for identifying ALS protein/pathway alterations and candidate disease biomarkers.

  3. Integration of gene expression data with network-based analysis to identify signaling and metabolic pathways regulated during the development of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Olex, Amy L; Turkett, William H; Fetrow, Jacquelyn S; Loeser, Richard F

    2014-05-25

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by remodeling and degradation of joint tissues. Microarray studies have led to a better understanding of the molecular changes that occur in tissues affected by conditions such as OA; however, such analyses are limited to the identification of a list of genes with altered transcript expression, usually at a single time point during disease progression. While these lists have identified many novel genes that are altered during the disease process, they are unable to identify perturbed relationships between genes and gene products. In this work, we have integrated a time course gene expression dataset with network analysis to gain a better systems level understanding of the early events that occur during the development of OA in a mouse model. The subnetworks that were enriched at one or more of the time points examined (2, 4, 8, and 16 weeks after induction of OA) contained genes from several pathways proposed to be important to the OA process, including the extracellular matrix-receptor interaction and the focal adhesion pathways and the Wnt, Hedgehog and TGF-β signaling pathways. The genes within the subnetworks were most active at the 2 and 4 week time points and included genes not previously studied in the OA process. A unique pathway, riboflavin metabolism, was active at the 4 week time point. These results suggest that the incorporation of network-type analyses along with time series microarray data will lead to advancements in our understanding of complex diseases such as OA at a systems level, and may provide novel insights into the pathways and processes involved in disease pathogenesis.

  4. A lin-45 raf enhancer screen identifies eor-1, eor-2 and unusual alleles of Ras pathway genes in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Rocheleau, Christian E; Howard, Robyn M; Goldman, Alissa P; Volk, Mandy L; Girard, Laura J; Sundaram, Meera V

    2002-05-01

    In Caenorhabditis elegans, the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK signal transduction pathway controls multiple processes including excretory system development, P12 fate specification, and vulval cell fate specification. To identify positive regulators of Ras signaling, we conducted a genetic screen for mutations that enhance the excretory system and egg-laying defects of hypomorphic lin-45 raf mutants. This screen identified unusual alleles of several known Ras pathway genes, including a mutation removing the second SH3 domain of the sem-5/Grb2 adaptor, a temperature-sensitive mutation in the helical hairpin of let-341/Sos, a gain-of-function mutation affecting a potential phosphorylation site of the lin-1 Ets domain transcription factor, a dominant-negative allele of ksr-1, and hypomorphic alleles of sur-6/PP2A-B, sur-2/Mediator, and lin-25. In addition, this screen identified multiple alleles of two newly identified genes, eor-1 and eor-2, that play a relatively weak role in vulval fate specification but positively regulate Ras signaling during excretory system development and P12 fate specification. The spectrum of identified mutations argues strongly for the specificity of the enhancer screen and for a close involvement of eor-1 and eor-2 in Ras signaling.

  5. Method for identifying subsurface fluid migration and drainage pathways in and among oil and gas reservoirs using 3-D and 4-D seismic imaging

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, R.N.; Boulanger, A.; Bagdonas, E.P.; Xu, L.; He, W.

    1996-12-17

    The invention utilizes 3-D and 4-D seismic surveys as a means of deriving information useful in petroleum exploration and reservoir management. The methods use both single seismic surveys (3-D) and multiple seismic surveys separated in time (4-D) of a region of interest to determine large scale migration pathways within sedimentary basins, and fine scale drainage structure and oil-water-gas regions within individual petroleum producing reservoirs. Such structure is identified using pattern recognition tools which define the regions of interest. The 4-D seismic data sets may be used for data completion for large scale structure where time intervals between surveys do not allow for dynamic evolution. The 4-D seismic data sets also may be used to find variations over time of small scale structure within individual reservoirs which may be used to identify petroleum drainage pathways, oil-water-gas regions and, hence, attractive drilling targets. After spatial orientation, and amplitude and frequency matching of the multiple seismic data sets, High Amplitude Event (HAE) regions consistent with the presence of petroleum are identified using seismic attribute analysis. High Amplitude Regions are grown and interconnected to establish plumbing networks on the large scale and reservoir structure on the small scale. Small scale variations over time between seismic surveys within individual reservoirs are identified and used to identify drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum to be recovered. The location of such drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum may be used to site wells. 22 figs.

  6. Method for identifying subsurface fluid migration and drainage pathways in and among oil and gas reservoirs using 3-D and 4-D seismic imaging

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Roger N.; Boulanger, Albert; Bagdonas, Edward P.; Xu, Liqing; He, Wei

    1996-01-01

    The invention utilizes 3-D and 4-D seismic surveys as a means of deriving information useful in petroleum exploration and reservoir management. The methods use both single seismic surveys (3-D) and multiple seismic surveys separated in time (4-D) of a region of interest to determine large scale migration pathways within sedimentary basins, and fine scale drainage structure and oil-water-gas regions within individual petroleum producing reservoirs. Such structure is identified using pattern recognition tools which define the regions of interest. The 4-D seismic data sets may be used for data completion for large scale structure where time intervals between surveys do not allow for dynamic evolution. The 4-D seismic data sets also may be used to find variations over time of small scale structure within individual reservoirs which may be used to identify petroleum drainage pathways, oil-water-gas regions and, hence, attractive drilling targets. After spatial orientation, and amplitude and frequency matching of the multiple seismic data sets, High Amplitude Event (HAE) regions consistent with the presence of petroleum are identified using seismic attribute analysis. High Amplitude Regions are grown and interconnected to establish plumbing networks on the large scale and reservoir structure on the small scale. Small scale variations over time between seismic surveys within individual reservoirs are identified and used to identify drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum to be recovered. The location of such drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum may be used to site wells.

  7. Computational drugs repositioning identifies inhibitors of oncogenic PI3K/AKT/P70S6K-dependent pathways among FDA-approved compounds

    PubMed Central

    Carrella, Diego; Manni, Isabella; Tumaini, Barbara; Dattilo, Rosanna; Papaccio, Federica; Mutarelli, Margherita; Sirci, Francesco; Amoreo, Carla A.; Mottolese, Marcella; Iezzi, Manuela; Ciolli, Laura; Aria, Valentina; Bosotti, Roberta; Isacchi, Antonella; Loreni, Fabrizio; Bardelli, Alberto; Avvedimento, Vittorio E.; di Bernardo, Diego; Cardone, Luca

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of inhibitors for oncogenic signalling pathways remains a key focus in modern oncology, based on personalized and targeted therapeutics. Computational drug repurposing via the analysis of FDA-approved drug network is becoming a very effective approach to identify therapeutic opportunities in cancer and other human diseases. Given that gene expression signatures can be associated with specific oncogenic mutations, we tested whether a “reverse” oncogene-specific signature might assist in the computational repositioning of inhibitors of oncogenic pathways. As a proof of principle, we focused on oncogenic PI3K-dependent signalling, a molecular pathway frequently driving cancer progression as well as raising resistance to anticancer-targeted therapies. We show that implementation of “reverse” oncogenic PI3K-dependent transcriptional signatures combined with interrogation of drug networks identified inhibitors of PI3K-dependent signalling among FDA-approved compounds. This led to repositioning of Niclosamide (Niclo) and Pyrvinium Pamoate (PP), two anthelmintic drugs, as inhibitors of oncogenic PI3K-dependent signalling. Niclo inhibited phosphorylation of P70S6K, while PP inhibited phosphorylation of AKT and P70S6K, which are downstream targets of PI3K. Anthelmintics inhibited oncogenic PI3K-dependent gene expression and showed a cytostatic effect in vitro and in mouse mammary gland. Lastly, PP inhibited the growth of breast cancer cells harbouring PI3K mutations. Our data indicate that drug repositioning by network analysis of oncogene-specific transcriptional signatures is an efficient strategy for identifying oncogenic pathway inhibitors among FDA-approved compounds. We propose that PP and Niclo should be further investigated as potential therapeutics for the treatment of tumors or diseases carrying the constitutive activation of the PI3K/P70S6K signalling axis. PMID:27542212

  8. A Functional Genetic Screen Identifies the Phosphoinositide 3-kinase Pathway as a Determinant of Resistance to Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor Inhibitors in FGFR Mutant Urothelial Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liqin; Šuštić, Tonći; Leite de Oliveira, Rodrigo; Lieftink, Cor; Halonen, Pasi; van de Ven, Marieke; Beijersbergen, Roderick L; van den Heuvel, Michel M; Bernards, René; van der Heijden, Michiel S

    2017-01-17

    Activating mutations and translocations of the FGFR3 gene are commonly seen in urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC) of the bladder and urinary tract. Several fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) inhibitors are currently in clinical development and response rates appear promising for advanced UCC. A common problem with targeted therapeutics is intrinsic or acquired resistance of the cancer cells. To find potential drug targets that can act synergistically with FGFR inhibition, we performed a synthetic lethality screen for the FGFR inhibitor AZD4547 using a short hairpin RNA library targeting the human kinome in the UCC cell line RT112 (FGFR3-TACC3 translocation). We identified multiple members of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway and found that inhibition of PIK3CA acts synergistically with FGFR inhibitors. The PI3K inhibitor BKM120 acted synergistically with inhibition of FGFR in multiple UCC and lung cancer cell lines having FGFR mutations. Consistently, we observed an elevated PI3K-protein kinase B pathway activity resulting from epidermal growth factor receptor or Erb-B2 receptor tyrosine kinase 3 reactivation caused by FGFR inhibition as the underlying molecular mechanism of the synergy. Our data show that feedback pathways activated by FGFR inhibition converge on the PI3K pathway. These findings provide a strong rationale to test FGFR inhibitors in combination with PI3K inhibitors in cancers harboring genetic activation of FGFR genes.

  9. Integrated Proteomic and Transcriptomic-Based Approaches to Identifying Signature Biomarkers and Pathways for Elucidation of Daoy and UW228 Subtypes.

    PubMed

    Higdon, Roger; Kala, Jessie; Wilkins, Devan; Yan, Julia Fangfei; Sethi, Manveen K; Lin, Liang; Liu, Siqi; Montague, Elizabeth; Janko, Imre; Choiniere, John; Kolker, Natali; Hancock, William S; Kolker, Eugene; Fanayan, Susan

    2017-02-03

    Medulloblastoma (MB) is the most common malignant pediatric brain tumor. Patient survival has remained largely the same for the past 20 years, with therapies causing significant health, cognitive, behavioral and developmental complications for those who survive the tumor. In this study, we profiled the total transcriptome and proteome of two established MB cell lines, Daoy and UW228, using high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) and label-free nano-LC-MS/MS-based quantitative proteomics, coupled with advanced pathway analysis. While Daoy has been suggested to belong to the sonic hedgehog (SHH) subtype, the exact UW228 subtype is not yet clearly established. Thus, a goal of this study was to identify protein markers and pathways that would help elucidate their subtype classification. A number of differentially expressed genes and proteins, including a number of adhesion, cytoskeletal and signaling molecules, were observed between the two cell lines. While several cancer-associated genes/proteins exhibited similar expression across the two cell lines, upregulation of a number of signature proteins and enrichment of key components of SHH and WNT signaling pathways were uniquely observed in Daoy and UW228, respectively. The novel information on differentially expressed genes/proteins and enriched pathways provide insights into the biology of MB, which could help elucidate their subtype classification.

  10. Integrative analyses of miRNA and proteomics identify potential biological pathways associated with onset of pulmonary fibrosis in the bleomycin rat model

    SciTech Connect

    Fukunaga, Satoki; Kakehashi, Anna; Sumida, Kayo; Kushida, Masahiko; Asano, Hiroyuki; Gi, Min; Wanibuchi, Hideki

    2015-08-01

    To determine miRNAs and their predicted target proteins regulatory networks which are potentially involved in onset of pulmonary fibrosis in the bleomycin rat model, we conducted integrative miRNA microarray and iTRAQ-coupled LC-MS/MS proteomic analyses, and evaluated the significance of altered biological functions and pathways. We observed that alterations of miRNAs and proteins are associated with the early phase of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis, and identified potential target pairs by using ingenuity pathway analysis. Using the data set of these alterations, it was demonstrated that those miRNAs, in association with their predicted target proteins, are potentially involved in canonical pathways reflective of initial epithelial injury and fibrogenic processes, and biofunctions related to induction of cellular development, movement, growth, and proliferation. Prediction of activated functions suggested that lung cells acquire proliferative, migratory, and invasive capabilities, and resistance to cell death especially in the very early phase of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. The present study will provide new insights for understanding the molecular pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. - Highlights: • We analyzed bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in the rat. • Integrative analyses of miRNA microarray and proteomics were conducted. • We determined the alterations of miRNAs and their potential target proteins. • The alterations may control biological functions and pathways in pulmonary fibrosis. • Our result may provide new insights of pulmonary fibrosis.

  11. Integrated Proteomic and Transcriptomic-Based Approaches to Identifying Signature Biomarkers and Pathways for Elucidation of Daoy and UW228 Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Higdon, Roger; Kala, Jessie; Wilkins, Devan; Yan, Julia Fangfei; Sethi, Manveen K.; Lin, Liang; Liu, Siqi; Montague, Elizabeth; Janko, Imre; Choiniere, John; Kolker, Natali; Hancock, William S.; Kolker, Eugene; Fanayan, Susan

    2017-01-01

    Medulloblastoma (MB) is the most common malignant pediatric brain tumor. Patient survival has remained largely the same for the past 20 years, with therapies causing significant health, cognitive, behavioral and developmental complications for those who survive the tumor. In this study, we profiled the total transcriptome and proteome of two established MB cell lines, Daoy and UW228, using high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) and label-free nano-LC-MS/MS-based quantitative proteomics, coupled with advanced pathway analysis. While Daoy has been suggested to belong to the sonic hedgehog (SHH) subtype, the exact UW228 subtype is not yet clearly established. Thus, a goal of this study was to identify protein markers and pathways that would help elucidate their subtype classification. A number of differentially expressed genes and proteins, including a number of adhesion, cytoskeletal and signaling molecules, were observed between the two cell lines. While several cancer-associated genes/proteins exhibited similar expression across the two cell lines, upregulation of a number of signature proteins and enrichment of key components of SHH and WNT signaling pathways were uniquely observed in Daoy and UW228, respectively. The novel information on differentially expressed genes/proteins and enriched pathways provide insights into the biology of MB, which could help elucidate their subtype classification. PMID:28248256

  12. Mutations in NMNAT1 cause Leber congenital amaurosis and identify a new disease pathway for retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Koenekoop, Robert K.; Wang, Hui; Majewski, Jacek; Wang, Xia; Lopez, Irma; Ren, Huanan; Chen, Yiyun; Li, Yumei; Fishman, Gerald A.; Genead, Mohammed; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Solanki, Naimesh; Traboulsi, Elias I.; Cheng, Jingliang; Logan, Clare V.; McKibbin, Martin; Hayward, Bruce E.; Parry, David A.; Johnson, Colin A.; Nageeb, Mohammed; Poulter, James A.; Mohamed, Moin D.; Jafri, Hussain; Rashid, Yasmin; Taylor, Graham R.; Keser, Vafa; Mardon, Graeme; Xu, Huidan; Inglehearn, Chris F.; Fu, Qing; Toomes, Carmel; Chen, Rui

    2013-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is a blinding retinal disease that presents within the first year after birth. Using exome sequencing, we identified mutations in the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) synthase gene NMNAT1 encoding nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 1 in eight families with LCA, including the family in which LCA was originally linked to the LCA9 locus. Notably, all individuals with NMNAT1 mutations also have macular colobomas, which are severe degenerative entities of the central retina (fovea) devoid of tissue and photoreceptors. Functional assays of the proteins encoded by the mutant alleles identified in our study showed that the mutations reduce the enzymatic activity of NMNAT1 in NAD biosynthesis and affect protein folding. Of note, recent characterization of the slow Wallerian degeneration (Wlds) mouse model, in which prolonged axonal survival after injury is observed, identified NMNAT1 as a neuroprotective protein when ectopically expressed. Our findings identify a new disease mechanism underlying LCA and provide the first link between endogenous NMNAT1 dysfunction and a human nervous system disorder. PMID:22842230

  13. Biochemical characterization of a multi-drug resistant HIV-1 subtype AG reverse transcriptase: antagonism of AZT discrimination and excision pathways and sensitivity to RNase H inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Anna; Corona, Angela; Spöring, Imke; Jordan, Mareike; Buchholz, Bernd; Maccioni, Elias; Di Santo, Roberto; Bodem, Jochen; Tramontano, Enzo; Wöhrl, Birgitta M.

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed a multi-drug resistant (MR) HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT), subcloned from a patient-derived subtype CRF02_AG, harboring 45 amino acid exchanges, amongst them four thymidine analog mutations (TAMs) relevant for high-level AZT (azidothymidine) resistance by AZTMP excision (M41L, D67N, T215Y, K219E) as well as four substitutions of the AZTTP discrimination pathway (A62V, V75I, F116Y and Q151M). In addition, K65R, known to antagonize AZTMP excision in HIV-1 subtype B was present. Although MR-RT harbored the most significant amino acid exchanges T215Y and Q151M of each pathway, it exclusively used AZTTP discrimination, indicating that the two mechanisms are mutually exclusive and that the Q151M pathway is obviously preferred since it confers resistance to most nucleoside inhibitors. A derivative was created, additionally harboring the TAM K70R and the reversions M151Q as well as R65K since K65R antagonizes excision. MR-R65K-K70R-M151Q was competent of AZTMP excision, whereas other combinations thereof with only one or two exchanges still promoted discrimination. To tackle the multi-drug resistance problem, we tested if the MR-RTs could still be inhibited by RNase H inhibitors. All MR-RTs exhibited similar sensitivity toward RNase H inhibitors belonging to different inhibitor classes, indicating the importance of developing RNase H inhibitors further as anti-HIV drugs. PMID:26850643

  14. Stromal transcriptional profiles reveal hierarchies of anatomical site, serum response and disease and identify disease specific pathways.

    PubMed

    Filer, Andrew; Antczak, Philipp; Parsonage, Greg N; Legault, Holly M; O'Toole, Margot; Pearson, Mark J; Thomas, Andrew M; Scheel-Toellner, Dagmar; Raza, Karim; Buckley, Christopher D; Falciani, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Synovial fibroblasts in persistent inflammatory arthritis have been suggested to have parallels with cancer growth and wound healing, both of which involve a stereotypical serum response programme. We tested the hypothesis that a serum response programme can be used to classify diseased tissues, and investigated the serum response programme in fibroblasts from multiple anatomical sites and two diseases. To test our hypothesis we utilized a bioinformatics approach to explore a publicly available microarray dataset including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), osteoarthritis (OA) and normal synovial tissue, then extended those findings in a new microarray dataset representing matched synovial, bone marrow and skin fibroblasts cultured from RA and OA patients undergoing arthroplasty. The classical fibroblast serum response programme discretely classified RA, OA and normal synovial tissues. Analysis of low and high serum treated fibroblast microarray data revealed a hierarchy of control, with anatomical site the most powerful classifier followed by response to serum and then disease. In contrast to skin and bone marrow fibroblasts, exposure of synovial fibroblasts to serum led to convergence of RA and OA expression profiles. Pathway analysis revealed three inter-linked gene networks characterising OA synovial fibroblasts: Cell remodelling through insulin-like growth factors, differentiation and angiogenesis through _3 integrin, and regulation of apoptosis through CD44. We have demonstrated that Fibroblast serum response signatures define disease at the tissue level, and that an OA specific, serum dependent repression of genes involved in cell adhesion, extracellular matrix remodelling and apoptosis is a critical discriminator between cultured OA and RA synovial fibroblasts.

  15. MANORAA (Mapping Analogous Nuclei Onto Residue And Affinity) for identifying protein–ligand fragment interaction, pathways and SNPs

    PubMed Central

    Tanramluk, Duangrudee; Narupiyakul, Lalita; Akavipat, Ruj; Gong, Sungsam; Charoensawan, Varodom

    2016-01-01

    Protein–ligand interaction analysis is an important step of drug design and protein engineering in order to predict the binding affinity and selectivity between ligands to the target proteins. To date, there are more than 100 000 structures available in the Protein Data Bank (PDB), of which ∼30% are protein–ligand (MW below 1000 Da) complexes. We have developed the integrative web server MANORAA (Mapping Analogous Nuclei Onto Residue And Affinity) with the aim of providing a user-friendly web interface to assist structural study and design of protein–ligand interactions. In brief, the server allows the users to input the chemical fragments and present all the unique molecular interactions to the target proteins with available three-dimensional structures in the PDB. The users can also link the ligands of interest to assess possible off-target proteins, human variants and pathway information using our all-in-one integrated tools. Taken together, we envisage that the server will facilitate and improve the study of protein–ligand interactions by allowing observation and comparison of ligand interactions with multiple proteins at the same time. (http://manoraa.org). PMID:27131358

  16. Pharmacological inhibition of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase/visfatin enzymatic activity identifies a new inflammatory pathway linked to NAD.

    PubMed

    Busso, Nathalie; Karababa, Mahir; Nobile, Massimo; Rolaz, Aline; Van Gool, Frédéric; Galli, Mara; Leo, Oberdan; So, Alexander; De Smedt, Thibaut

    2008-05-21

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), also known as visfatin, is the rate-limiting enzyme in the salvage pathway of NAD biosynthesis from nicotinamide. Since its expression is upregulated during inflammation, NAMPT represents a novel clinical biomarker in acute lung injury, rheumatoid arthritis, and Crohn's disease. However, its role in disease progression remains unknown. We report here that NAMPT is a key player in inflammatory arthritis. Increased expression of NAMPT was confirmed in mice with collagen-induced arthritis, both in serum and in the arthritic paw. Importantly, a specific competitive inhibitor of NAMPT effectively reduced arthritis severity with comparable activity to etanercept, and decreased pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion in affected joints. Moreover, NAMPT inhibition reduced intracellular NAD concentration in inflammatory cells and circulating TNFalpha levels during endotoxemia in mice. In vitro pharmacological inhibition of NAMPT reduced the intracellular concentration of NAD and pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion by inflammatory cells. Thus, NAMPT links NAD metabolism to inflammatory cytokine secretion by leukocytes, and its inhibition might therefore have therapeutic efficacy in immune-mediated inflammatory disorders.

  17. Gene Co-Expression Network Analysis for Identifying Modules and Functionally Enriched Pathways in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Riquelme Medina, Ignacio; Lubovac-Pilav, Zelmina

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a complex disease, caused by the autoimmune destruction of the insulin producing pancreatic beta cells, resulting in the body’s inability to produce insulin. While great efforts have been put into understanding the genetic and environmental factors that contribute to the etiology of the disease, the exact molecular mechanisms are still largely unknown. T1D is a heterogeneous disease, and previous research in this field is mainly focused on the analysis of single genes, or using traditional gene expression profiling, which generally does not reveal the functional context of a gene associated with a complex disorder. However, network-based analysis does take into account the interactions between the diabetes specific genes or proteins and contributes to new knowledge about disease modules, which in turn can be used for identification of potential new biomarkers for T1D. In this study, we analyzed public microarray data of T1D patients and healthy controls by applying a systems biology approach that combines network-based Weighted Gene Co-Expression Network Analysis (WGCNA) with functional enrichment analysis. Novel co-expression gene network modules associated with T1D were elucidated, which in turn provided a basis for the identification of potential pathways and biomarker genes that may be involved in development of T1D. PMID:27257970

  18. Mouse Models as Tools to Identify Genetic Pathways for Retinal Degeneration, as Exemplified by Leber's Congenital Amaurosis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA) is an inherited retinal degenerative disease characterized by severe loss of vision in the first year of life. In addition to early vision loss, a variety of other eye-related abnormalities including roving eye movements, deep-set eyes, and sensitivity to bright light also occur with this disease. Many animal models of LCA are available and the study them has led to a better understanding of the pathology of the disease, and has led to the development of therapeutic strategies aimed at curing or slowing down LCA. Mouse models, with their well-developed genetics and similarity to human physiology and anatomy, serve as powerful tools with which to investigate the etiology of human LCA. Such mice provide reproducible, experimental systems for elucidating pathways of normal development, function, designing strategies and testing compounds for translational research and gene-based therapies aimed at delaying the diseases progression. In this chapter, I describe tools used in the discovery and evaluation of mouse models of LCA including a Phoenix Image-Guided Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and a Diagnosys Espion Visual Electrophysiology System. Three mouse models are described, the rd3 mouse model for LCA12 and LCA1, the rd12 mouse model for LCA2, and the rd16 mouse model for LCA10.

  19. Developing an easy-to-apply model for identifying relevant pathogen pathways into surface waters used for recreational purposes.

    PubMed

    Tondera, Katharina; Klaer, Kassandra; Roder, Silke; Brueckner, Ira; Strathmann, Martin; Kistemann, Thomas; Schreiber, Christiane; Pinnekamp, Johannes

    2016-10-01

    Swimming in inner-city surface waters is popular in the warm season, but can have negative consequences such as gastro-intestinal, ear and skin infections. The pathogens causing these infections commonly enter surface waters via several point source discharges such as the effluents from wastewater treatment plants and sewer overflows, as well as through diffuse non-point sources such as surface runoff. Nonetheless, the recreational use of surface waters is attractive for residents. In order to save financial and organizational resources, local authorities need to estimate the most relevant pathways of pathogens into surface waters. In particular, when detailed data on a local scale are missing, this is quite difficult to achieve. For this reason, we have developed an easy-to-apply model using the example of Escherichia coli and intestinal enterococci as a first approach to the local situation, where missing data can be replaced by data from literature. The model was developed based on a case study of a river arm monitored in western Germany and will be generalized for future applications. Although the limits of the EU Bathing Water Directive are already fulfilled during dry weather days, we showed that the effluent of wastewater treatment plants and overland flow had the most relevant impact on the microbial surface water quality. On rainy weather days, combined sewer overflows are responsible for the highest microbial pollution loads. The results obtained in this study can help decision makers to focus on reducing the relevant pathogen sources within a catchment area.

  20. Kinome Screen Identifies PFKFB3 and Glucose Metabolism as Important Regulators of the Insulin/Insulin-like Growth Factor (IGF)-1 Signaling Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Trefely, Sophie; Khoo, Poh-Sim; Krycer, James R.; Chaudhuri, Rima; Fazakerley, Daniel J.; Parker, Benjamin L.; Sultani, Ghazal; Lee, James; Stephan, Jean-Philippe; Torres, Eric; Jung, Kenneth; Kuijl, Coenraad; James, David E.; Junutula, Jagath R.; Stöckli, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    The insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 signaling pathway (ISP) plays a fundamental role in long term health in a range of organisms. Protein kinases including Akt and ERK are intimately involved in the ISP. To identify other kinases that may participate in this pathway or intersect with it in a regulatory manner, we performed a whole kinome (779 kinases) siRNA screen for positive or negative regulators of the ISP, using GLUT4 translocation to the cell surface as an output for pathway activity. We identified PFKFB3, a positive regulator of glycolysis that is highly expressed in cancer cells and adipocytes, as a positive ISP regulator. Pharmacological inhibition of PFKFB3 suppressed insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, GLUT4 translocation, and Akt signaling in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. In contrast, overexpression of PFKFB3 in HEK293 cells potentiated insulin-dependent phosphorylation of Akt and Akt substrates. Furthermore, pharmacological modulation of glycolysis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes affected Akt phosphorylation. These data add to an emerging body of evidence that metabolism plays a central role in regulating numerous biological processes including the ISP. Our findings have important implications for diseases such as type 2 diabetes and cancer that are characterized by marked disruption of both metabolism and growth factor signaling. PMID:26342081

  1. Identifying Resistance Mechanisms against Five Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors Targeting the ERBB/RAS Pathway in 45 Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Szász, A. Marcell; Sztupinszki, Zsófia; Likó, István; Szendrői, Attila; Schäfer, Reinhold; Győrffy, Balázs

    2013-01-01

    Because of the low overall response rates of 10–47% to targeted cancer therapeutics, there is an increasing need for predictive biomarkers. We aimed to identify genes predicting response to five already approved tyrosine kinase inhibitors. We tested 45 cancer cell lines for sensitivity to sunitinib, erlotinib, lapatinib, sorafenib and gefitinib at the clinically administered doses. A resistance matrix was determined, and gene expression profiles of the subsets of resistant vs. sensitive cell lines were compared. Triplicate gene expression signatures were obtained from the caArray project. Significance analysis of microarrays and rank products were applied for feature selection. Ninety-five genes were also measured by RT-PCR. In case of four sunitinib resistance associated genes, the results were validated in clinical samples by immunohistochemistry. A list of 63 top genes associated with resistance against the five tyrosine kinase inhibitors was identified. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis confirmed 45 of 63 genes identified by microarray analysis. Only two genes (ANXA3 and RAB25) were related to sensitivity against more than three inhibitors. The immunohistochemical analysis of sunitinib-treated metastatic renal cell carcinomas confirmed the correlation between RAB17, LGALS8, and EPCAM and overall survival. In summary, we determined predictive biomarkers for five tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and validated sunitinib resistance biomarkers by immunohistochemistry in an independent patient cohort. PMID:23555683

  2. Extreme Outlier Analysis Identifies Occult Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway Mutations in Patients With Low-Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Grisham, Rachel N.; Sylvester, Brooke E.; Won, Helen; McDermott, Gregory; DeLair, Deborah; Ramirez, Ricardo; Yao, Zhan; Shen, Ronglai; Dao, Fanny; Bogomolniy, Faina; Makker, Vicky; Sala, Evis; Soumerai, Tara E.; Hyman, David M.; Socci, Nicholas D.; Viale, Agnes; Gershenson, David M.; Farley, John; Levine, Douglas A.; Rosen, Neal; Berger, Michael F.; Spriggs, David R.; Aghajanian, Carol A.; Solit, David B.; Iyer, Gopa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose No effective systemic therapy exists for patients with metastatic low-grade serous (LGS) ovarian cancers. BRAF and KRAS mutations are common in serous borderline (SB) and LGS ovarian cancers, and MEK inhibition has been shown to induce tumor regression in a minority of patients; however, no correlation has been observed between mutation status and clinical response. With the goal of identifying biomarkers of sensitivity to MEK inhibitor treatment, we performed an outlier analysis of a patient who experienced a complete, durable, and ongoing (> 5 years) response to selumetinib, a non-ATP competitive MEK inhibitor. Patients and Methods Next-generation sequencing was used to analyze this patient's tumor as well as an additional 28 SB/LGS tumors. Functional characterization of an identified novel alteration of interest was performed. Results Analysis of the extraordinary responder's tumor identified a 15-nucleotide deletion in the negative regulatory helix of the MAP2K1 gene encoding for MEK1. Functional characterization demonstrated that this mutant induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway activation, promoted anchorage-independent growth and tumor formation in mice, and retained sensitivity to selumetinib. Analysis of additional LGS/SB tumors identified mutations predicted to induce extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway activation in 82% (23 of 28), including two patients with BRAF fusions, one of whom achieved an ongoing complete response to MEK inhibitor–based combination therapy. Conclusion Alterations affecting the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway are present in the majority of patients with LGS ovarian cancer. Next-generation sequencing analysis revealed deletions and fusions that are not detected by older sequencing approaches. These findings, coupled with the observation that a subset of patients with recurrent LGS ovarian cancer experienced dramatic and durable responses to MEK inhibitor therapy, support additional

  3. Systems analysis of primary Sjögren's syndrome pathogenesis in salivary glands identifies shared pathways in human and a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) is a chronic autoimmune disease with complex etiopathogenesis. Despite extensive studies to understand the disease process utilizing human and mouse models, the intersection between these species remains elusive. To address this gap, we utilized a novel systems biology approach to identify disease-related gene modules and signaling pathways that overlap between humans and mice. Methods Parotid gland tissues were harvested from 24 pSS and 16 non-pSS sicca patients and 25 controls. For mouse studies, salivary glands were harvested from C57BL/6.NOD-Aec1Aec2 mice at various times during development of pSS-like disease. RNA was analyzed with Affymetrix HG U133+2.0 arrays for human samples and with MOE430+2.0 arrays for mouse samples. The images were processed with Affymetrix software. Weighted-gene co-expression network analysis was used to identify disease-related and functional pathways. Results Nineteen co-expression modules were identified in human parotid tissue, of which four were significantly upregulated and three were downregulated in pSS patients compared with non-pSS sicca patients and controls. Notably, one of the human disease-related modules was highly preserved in the mouse model, and was enriched with genes involved in immune and inflammatory responses. Further comparison between these two species led to the identification of genes associated with leukocyte recruitment and germinal center formation. Conclusion Our systems biology analysis of genome-wide expression data from salivary gland tissue of pSS patients and from a pSS mouse model identified common dysregulated biological pathways and molecular targets underlying critical molecular alterations in pSS pathogenesis. PMID:23116360

  4. Single-cell RNA-seq identifies a PD-1(hi) ILC progenitor and defines its development pathway.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yong; Tsang, Jason C H; Wang, Cui; Clare, Simon; Wang, Juexuan; Chen, Xi; Brandt, Cordelia; Kane, Leanne; Campos, Lia S; Lu, Liming; Belz, Gabrielle T; McKenzie, Andrew N J; Teichmann, Sarah A; Dougan, Gordon; Liu, Pentao

    2016-11-03

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) functionally resemble T lymphocytes in cytotoxicity and cytokine production but lack antigen-specific receptors, and they are important regulators of immune responses and tissue homeostasis. ILCs are generated from common lymphoid progenitors, which are subsequently committed to innate lymphoid lineages in the α-lymphoid progenitor, early innate lymphoid progenitor, common helper innate lymphoid progenitor and innate lymphoid cell progenitor compartments. ILCs consist of conventional natural killer cells and helper-like cells (ILC1, ILC2 and ILC3). Despite recent advances, the cellular heterogeneity, developmental trajectory and signalling dependence of ILC progenitors are not fully understood. Here, using single-cell RNA-sequencing (scRNA-seq) of mouse bone marrow progenitors, we reveal ILC precursor subsets, delineate distinct ILC development stages and pathways, and report that high expression of programmed death 1 (PD-1(hi)) marked a committed ILC progenitor that was essentially identical to an innate lymphoid cell progenitor. Our data defined PD-1(hi)IL-25R(hi) as an early checkpoint in ILC2 development, which was abolished by deficiency in the zinc-finger protein Bcl11b but restored by IL-25R overexpression. Similar to T lymphocytes, PD-1 was upregulated on activated ILCs. Administration of a PD-1 antibody depleted PD-1(hi) ILCs and reduced cytokine levels in an influenza infection model in mice, and blocked papain-induced acute lung inflammation. These results provide a perspective for exploring PD-1 and its ligand (PD-L1) in immunotherapy, and allow effective manipulation of the immune system for disease prevention and therapy.

  5. Massive analysis of cDNA Ends (MACE) and miRNA expression profiling identifies proatherogenic pathways in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Zawada, Adam M; Rogacev, Kyrill S; Müller, Sören; Rotter, Björn; Winter, Peter; Fliser, Danilo; Heine, Gunnar H

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic dysregulation contributes to the high cardiovascular disease burden in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Although microRNAs (miRNAs) are central epigenetic regulators, which substantially affect the development and progression of cardiovascular disease (CVD), no data on miRNA dysregulation in CKD-associated CVD are available until now. We now performed high-throughput miRNA sequencing of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from ten clinically stable hemodialysis (HD) patients and ten healthy controls, which allowed us to identify 182 differentially expressed miRNAs (e.g., miR-21, miR-26b, miR-146b, miR-155). To test biological relevance, we aimed to connect miRNA dysregulation to differential gene expression. Genome-wide gene expression profiling by MACE (Massive Analysis of cDNA Ends) identified 80 genes to be differentially expressed between HD patients and controls, which could be linked to cardiovascular disease (e.g., KLF6, DUSP6, KLF4), to infection / immune disease (e.g., ZFP36, SOCS3, JUND), and to distinct proatherogenic pathways such as the Toll-like receptor signaling pathway (e.g., IL1B, MYD88, TICAM2), the MAPK signaling pathway (e.g., DUSP1, FOS, HSPA1A), and the chemokine signaling pathway (e.g., RHOA, PAK1, CXCL5). Formal interaction network analysis proved biological relevance of miRNA dysregulation, as 68 differentially expressed miRNAs could be connected to 47 reciprocally expressed target genes. Our study is the first comprehensive miRNA analysis in CKD that links dysregulated miRNA expression with differential expression of genes connected to inflammation and CVD. After recent animal data suggested that targeting miRNAs is beneficial in experimental CVD, our data may now spur further research in the field of CKD-associated human CVD.

  6. Massive analysis of cDNA Ends (MACE) and miRNA expression profiling identifies proatherogenic pathways in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Zawada, Adam M; Rogacev, Kyrill S; Müller, Sören; Rotter, Björn; Winter, Peter; Fliser, Danilo; Heine, Gunnar H

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic dysregulation contributes to the high cardiovascular disease burden in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Although microRNAs (miRNAs) are central epigenetic regulators, which substantially affect the development and progression of cardiovascular disease (CVD), no data on miRNA dysregulation in CKD-associated CVD are available until now. We now performed high-throughput miRNA sequencing of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from ten clinically stable hemodialysis (HD) patients and ten healthy controls, which allowed us to identify 182 differentially expressed miRNAs (e.g., miR-21, miR-26b, miR-146b, miR-155). To test biological relevance, we aimed to connect miRNA dysregulation to differential gene expression. Genome-wide gene expression profiling by MACE (Massive Analysis of cDNA Ends) identified 80 genes to be differentially expressed between HD patients and controls, which could be linked to cardiovascular disease (e.g., KLF6, DUSP6, KLF4), to infection / immune disease (e.g., ZFP36, SOCS3, JUND), and to distinct proatherogenic pathways such as the Toll-like receptor signaling pathway (e.g., IL1B, MYD88, TICAM2), the MAPK signaling pathway (e.g., DUSP1, FOS, HSPA1A), and the chemokine signaling pathway (e.g., RHOA, PAK1, CXCL5). Formal interaction network analysis proved biological relevance of miRNA dysregulation, as 68 differentially expressed miRNAs could be connected to 47 reciprocally expressed target genes. Our study is the first comprehensive miRNA analysis in CKD that links dysregulated miRNA expression with differential expression of genes connected to inflammation and CVD. After recent animal data suggested that targeting miRNAs is beneficial in experimental CVD, our data may now spur further research in the field of CKD-associated human CVD. PMID:24184689

  7. Metabolic Engineering of Light and Dark Biochemical Pathways in Wild-Type and Mutant Strains of Synechocystis PCC 6803 for Maximal, 24-Hour Production of Hydrogen Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Ely, Roger L.; Chaplen, Frank W.R.

    2014-03-11

    This project used the cyanobacterial species Synechocystis PCC 6803 to pursue two lines of inquiry, with each line addressing one of the two main factors affecting hydrogen (H2) production in Synechocystis PCC 6803: NADPH availability and O2 sensitivity. H2 production in Synechocystis PCC 6803 requires a very high NADPH:NADP+ ratio, that is, the NADP pool must be highly reduced, which can be problematic because several metabolic pathways potentially can act to raise or lower NADPH levels. Also, though the [NiFe]-hydrogenase in PCC 6803 is constitutively expressed, it is reversibly inactivated at very low O2 concentrations. Largely because of this O2 sensitivity and the requirement for high NADPH levels, a major portion of overall H2 production occurs under anoxic conditions in the dark, supported by breakdown of glycogen or other organic substrates accumulated during photosynthesis. Also, other factors, such as N or S limitation, pH changes, presence of other substances, or deletion of particular respiratory components, can affect light or dark H2 production. Therefore, in the first line of inquiry, under a number of culture conditions with wild type (WT) Synechocystis PCC 6803 cells and a mutant with impaired type I NADPH-dehydrogenase (NDH-1) function, we used H2 production profiling and metabolic flux analysis, with and without specific inhibitors, to examine systematically the pathways involved in light and dark H2 production. Results from this work provided rational bases for metabolic engineering to maximize photobiological H2 production on a 24-hour basis. In the second line of inquiry, we used site-directed mutagenesis to create mutants with hydrogenase enzymes exhibiting greater O2 tolerance. The research addressed the following four tasks: 1. Evaluate the effects of various culture conditions (N, S, or P limitation; light/dark; pH; exogenous organic carbon) on H2 production profiles of WT cells and an NDH-1 mutant; 2. Conduct metabolic flux analyses for

  8. Multigene pathway-based analyses identify nasopharyngeal carcinoma risk associations for cumulative adverse effects of TERT-CLPTM1L and DNA double-strand breaks repair.

    PubMed

    Yee Ko, Josephine Mun; Dai, Wei; Wun Wong, Elibe Hiu; Kwong, Dora; Tong Ng, Wai; Lee, Anne; Kai Cheong Ngan, Roger; Chung Yau, Chun; Tung, Stewart; Li Lung, Maria

    2014-10-01

    The genetic etiology of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and mechanisms for inherited susceptibility remain unclear. To examine genetic risk factors for NPC, we hypothesized that heritable risk is attributable to cumulative effects of multiple common low-risk variants. With the premise that individual SNPs only confer subtle effects for cancer risk, a multigenic pathway-based approach was used to systematically examine associations between NPC genetic susceptibility with SNPs in genes in DNA repair pathways and from previously identified cancer genome-wide association study analyses. This case-control study covers 161 genes/loci and focuses on pathway-based analyses in 2,349 Hong Kong individuals, allowing stratification according to NPC familial status for meaningful association analysis. Three SNPs (rs401681, rs6774494 and rs3757318) corresponding to TERT/CLPTM1L (OR 95% CI = 0.77, 0.68-0.88), MDS1-EVI1 (OR 95% CI=0.79 0.69-0.89) and CCDC170 (OR 95% CI = 0.76, 0.66-0.86) conferred modest protective effects individually for NPC risk by the logistic regression analysis after multiple testing adjustment (p(Bonferroni)  < 0.05). Stratification of NPC according to familial status identified rs2380165 in BLM (OR 95% CI = 1.49, 1.20-1.86, p(Bonferroni)  < 0.05) association with family history-positive NPC (FH+ NPC) patients. Multiple SNPs pathway-based analysis revealed that the combined gene dosage effects for increasing numbers of unfavorable genotypes in TERT-CLPTM1L and double-strand break repair (DSBR) conferred elevated risk in FH+ and sporadic NPC patients (ORs per allele, 95% CIs = 1.37, 1.22-1.55, p(Bonferroni)  = 5.00 × 10(-6); 1.17, 1.09-1.26, p(Bonferroni)  = 4.58 × 10(-4) , respectively, in TERT/NHEJ pathways). Our data suggested cumulative increased NPC risk associations with TERT-CLPTM1L and DSBR pathways contribute to genetic susceptibility to NPC and have potential translational relevance for patient stratification and therapeutics.

  9. Secretome Analysis Identifies Novel Signal Peptide Peptidase-Like 3 (SPPL3) Substrates and Reveals a Role of SPPL3 in Multiple Golgi Glycosylation Pathways*

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Peer-Hendrik; Voss, Matthias; Haug-Kröper, Martina; Schröder, Bernd; Schepers, Ute; Bräse, Stefan; Haass, Christian; Lichtenthaler, Stefan F.; Fluhrer, Regina

    2015-01-01

    Signal peptide peptidase-like 3 (SPPL3) is a Golgi-resident intramembrane-cleaving protease that is highly conserved among multicellular eukaryotes pointing to pivotal physiological functions in the Golgi network which are only beginning to emerge. Recently, SPPL3 was shown to control protein N-glycosylation, when the key branching enzyme N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V (GnT-V) and other medial/trans Golgi glycosyltransferases were identified as first physiological SPPL3 substrates. SPPL3-mediated endoproteolysis releases the catalytic ectodomains of these enzymes from their type II membrane anchors. Protein glycosylation is a multistep process involving numerous type II membrane-bound enzymes, but it remains unclear whether only few of them are SPPL3 substrates or whether SPPL3 cleaves many of them and thereby controls protein glycosylation at multiple levels. Therefore, to systematically identify SPPL3 substrates we used Sppl3-deficient and SPPL3-overexpression cell culture models and analyzed them for changes in secreted membrane protein ectodomains using the proteomics “secretome protein enrichment with click sugars (SPECS)” method. SPECS analysis identified numerous additional new SPPL3 candidate glycoprotein substrates, several of which were biochemically validated as SPPL3 substrates. All novel SPPL3 substrates adopt a type II topology. The majority localizes to the Golgi network and is implicated in Golgi functions. Importantly, most of the novel SPPL3 substrates catalyze the modification of N-linked glycans. Others contribute to O-glycan and in particular glycosaminoglycan biosynthesis, suggesting that SPPL3 function is not restricted to N-glycosylation, but also functions in other forms of protein glycosylation. Hence, SPPL3 emerges as a crucial player of Golgi function and the newly identified SPPL3 substrates will be instrumental to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the physiological function of SPPL3 in the Golgi network and in vivo

  10. Seasonal induction of alternative principal pathway for rose flower scent

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Hiroshi; Ohnishi, Toshiyuki; Tomida, Kensuke; Ishida, Haruka; Kanda, Momoyo; Sakai, Miwa; Yoshimura, Jin; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Ishikawa, Takamasa; Dohra, Hideo; Watanabe, Naoharu

    2016-01-01

    Ecological adaptations to seasonal changes are often observed in the phenotypic traits of plants and animals, and these adaptations are usually expressed through the production of different biochemical end products. In this study, ecological adaptations are observed in a biochemical pathway without alteration of the end products. We present an alternative principal pathway to the characteristic floral scent compound 2-phenylethanol (2PE) in roses. The new pathway is seasonally induced in summer as a heat adaptation that uses rose phenylpyruvate decarboxylase (RyPPDC) as a novel enzyme. RyPPDC transcript levels and the resulting production of 2PE are increased time-dependently under high temperatures. The novel summer pathway produces levels of 2PE that are several orders of magnitude higher than those produced by the previously known pathway. Our results indicate that the alternative principal pathway identified here is a seasonal adaptation for managing the weakened volatility of summer roses. PMID:26831950

  11. Suppression of Canine Dendritic Cell Activation/Maturation and Inflammatory Cytokine Release by Mesenchymal Stem Cells Occurs Through Multiple Distinct Biochemical Pathways.

    PubMed

    Wheat, William H; Chow, Lyndah; Kurihara, Jade N; Regan, Daniel P; Coy, Jonathan W; Webb, Tracy L; Dow, Steven W

    2017-02-15

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) represent a readily accessible source of cells with potent immune modulatory activity. MSC can suppress ongoing inflammatory responses by suppressing T cell function, while fewer studies have examined the impact of MSC on dendritic cell (DC) function. The dog spontaneous disease model represents an important animal model with which to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of cellular therapy with MSC. This study evaluated the effects of canine MSC on the activation and maturation of canine monocyte-derived DC, as well as mechanisms underlying these effects. Adipose-derived canine MSC were cocultured with canine DC, and the MSC effects on DC maturation and activation were assessed by flow cytometry, cytokine ELISA, and confocal microscopy. We found that canine MSC significantly suppressed lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated upregulation of DC activation markers such as major histocompatibility class II (MHCII), CD86, and CD40. Furthermore, pretreatment of MSC with interferon gamma (IFNγ) augmented this suppressive activity. IFNγ-activated MSC also significantly reduced LPS-elicited DC secretion of tumor necrosis factor alpha without reducing secretion of interleukin-10. The suppressive effect of IFNγ-treated MSC on LPS-induced DC activation was mediated by soluble factors secreted by both MSC and DC. Pathways of DC functional suppression included programmed death ligand-1 expression and secretion of nitrous oxide, prostaglandin E2, and adenosine by activated MSC. Coculture of DC with IFNγ-treated MSC maintained DC in an immature state and prolonged DC antigen uptake during LPS maturation stimulus. Taken together, canine MSC are capable of potently suppressing DC function in a potentially inflammatory microenvironment through several separate immunological pathways and confirm the potential for immune therapy with MSC in canine immune-mediated disease models.

  12. Global transcriptome analysis identifies regulated transcripts and pathways activated during oogenesis and early embryogenesis in Atlantic cod.

    PubMed

    Kleppe, Lene; Edvardsen, Rolf Brudvik; Furmanek, Tomasz; Taranger, Geir Lasse; Wargelius, Anna

    2014-07-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying oogenesis and maternally controlled embryogenesis in fish are not fully understood, especially in marine species. Our aim was to study the egg and embryo transcriptome during oogenesis and early embryogenesis in Atlantic cod. Follicles from oogenesis stages (pre-, early-, and late-vitellogenic), ovulated eggs, and two embryonic stages (blastula, gastrula) were collected from broodstock fish and fertilized eggs. Gene expression profiles were measured in a 44 K oligo microarray consisting of 23,000 cod genes. Hundreds of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified in the follicle stages investigated, implicating a continuous accumulation and degradation of polyadenylated transcripts throughout oogenesis. Very few DEGs were identified from ovulated egg to blastula, showing a more stable maternal RNA pool in early embryonic stages. The highest induction of expression was observed between blastula and gastrula, signifying the onset of zygotic transcription. During early vitellogenesis, several of the most upregulated genes are linked to nervous system signaling, suggesting increasing requirements for ovarian synaptic signaling to stimulate the rapid growth of oocytes. Highly upregulated genes during late vitellogenesis are linked to protein processing, fat metabolism, osmoregulation, and arrested meiosis. One of the genes with the highest upregulation in the ovulated egg is involved in oxidative phosphorylation, reflecting increased energy requirements during fertilization and the first rapid cell divisions of early embryogenesis. In conclusion, this study provides a large-scale presentation of the Atlantic cod's maternally controlled transcriptome in ovarian follicles through oogenesis, ovulated eggs, and early embryos.

  13. Pheochromocytoma-paraganglioma: Biochemical and genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Cano Megías, Marta; Rodriguez Puyol, Diego; Fernández Rodríguez, Loreto; Sención Martinez, Gloria Lisette; Martínez Miguel, Patricia

    Pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas are tumours derived from neural crest cells, which can be diagnosed by biochemical measurement of metanephrine and methoxytyramine. Advances in genetic research have identified many genes involved in the pathogenesis of these tumours, suggesting that up to 35-45% may have an underlying germline mutation. These genes have a singular transcriptional signature and can be grouped into 2 clusters (or groups): cluster 1 (VHL and SHDx), involved in angiogenesis and hypoxia pathways; and cluster 2 (MEN2 and NF1), linked to the kinase signalling pathway. In turn, these genes are associated with a characteristic biochemical phenotype (noradrenergic and adrenergic), and clinical features (location, biological behaviour, age of presentation, etc.) in a large number of cases. Early diagnosis of these tumours, accompanied by a correct genetic diagnosis, should eventually become a priority to enable better treatment, early detection of complications, proper screening of family members and related tumours, as well as an improvement in the overall prognosis of these patients.

  14. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent nitric oxide synthase activity in the CNS of Aplysia californica: biochemical characterization and link to cGMP pathways.

    PubMed

    Bodnárová, Michaela; Martásek, Pavel; Moroz, Leonid L

    2005-04-01

    We characterized enzymatic activity of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in the central nervous system of Aplysia californica, a popular experimental model in cellular and system neuroscience, and provided biochemical evidence for NO-cGMP signaling in molluscs. Aplysia NOS (ApNOS) activity, determined as citrulline formation, revealed its calcium-/calmodulin-(Ca/CaM) and NADPH dependence and it was inhibited by 50% with 5mM of W7 hydrochloride (a potent Ca/CaM-dependent phosphodiesterase inhibitor). A representative set of inhibitors for mammalian NOS isoforms also suppressed NOS activity in Aplysia. Specifically, the ApNOS was inhibited by 65-92% with 500 microM of L-NAME (a competitive NOS inhibitor) whereas d-NAME at the same concentration had no effect. S-Ethylisothiourea hydrobromide (5mM), a selective inhibitor of all NOS isoforms, suppressed ApNOS by 85%, l-N6-(1-iminoethyl)lysine dihydrochloride (L-NIL, 5mM), an iNOS inhibitor, by 78% and L-thiocitrulline (5mM) (an inhibitor of nNOS and iNOS) by greater than 95%. Polyclonal antibodies raised against rat nNOS hybridized with a putative purified ApNOS (160 kDa protein) from partially purified central nervous system homogenates in Western blot studies. Consistent with other studies, the activity of soluble guanylyl cyclase was stimulated as a result of NO interaction with its heme prosthetic group. The basal levels of cGMP were estimated by radioimmunoassay to be 44.47 fmol/microg of protein. Incubation of Aplysia CNS with the NO donors DEA/NONOate (diethylammonium (Z)-1-(N,N-diethylamino) diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate - 1mM) or S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (1mM) and simultaneous phosphodiesterase inhibition with 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (1mM) prior to the assay showed a 26-80 fold increase in basal cGMP levels. Addition of ODQ (1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a] quinoxaline-1-one - 1mM), a selective inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase, completely abolished this effect. This confirms that NO may indeed function as a

  15. Large-scale association analyses identify new loci influencing glycemic traits and provide insight into the underlying biological pathways.

    PubMed

    Scott, Robert A; Lagou, Vasiliki; Welch, Ryan P; Wheeler, Eleanor; Montasser, May E; Luan, Jian'an; Mägi, Reedik; Strawbridge, Rona J; Rehnberg, Emil; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Yengo, Loïc; Lecoeur, Cecile; Shungin, Dmitry; Sanna, Serena; Sidore, Carlo; Johnson, Paul C D; Jukema, J Wouter; Johnson, Toby; Mahajan, Anubha; Verweij, Niek; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Shah, Sonia; Smith, Albert V; Sennblad, Bengt; Gieger, Christian; Salo, Perttu; Perola, Markus; Timpson, Nicholas J; Evans, David M; Pourcain, Beate St; Wu, Ying; Andrews, Jeanette S; Hui, Jennie; Bielak, Lawrence F; Zhao, Wei; Horikoshi, Momoko; Navarro, Pau; Isaacs, Aaron; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Stirrups, Kathleen; Vitart, Veronique; Hayward, Caroline; Esko, Tõnu; Mihailov, Evelin; Fraser, Ross M; Fall, Tove; Voight, Benjamin F; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Chen, Han; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Morris, Andrew P; Rayner, Nigel W; Robertson, Neil; Rybin, Denis; Liu, Ching-Ti; Beckmann, Jacques S; Willems, Sara M; Chines, Peter S; Jackson, Anne U; Kang, Hyun Min; Stringham, Heather M; Song, Kijoung; Tanaka, Toshiko; Peden, John F; Goel, Anuj; Hicks, Andrew A; An, Ping; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Folkersen, Lasse; Marullo, Letizia; Jansen, Hanneke; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Pankow, James S; North, Kari E; Forouhi, Nita G; Loos, Ruth J F; Edkins, Sarah; Varga, Tibor V; Hallmans, Göran; Oksa, Heikki; Antonella, Mulas; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Trompet, Stella; Ford, Ian; Bakker, Stephan J L; Kong, Augustine; Kumari, Meena; Gigante, Bruna; Herder, Christian; Munroe, Patricia B; Caulfield, Mark; Antti, Jula; Mangino, Massimo; Small, Kerrin; Miljkovic, Iva; Liu, Yongmei; Atalay, Mustafa; Kiess, Wieland; James, Alan L; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Palmer, Colin N A; Doney, Alex S F; Willemsen, Gonneke; Smit, Johannes H; Campbell, Susan; Polasek, Ozren; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Hercberg, Serge; Dimitriou, Maria; Bolton, Jennifer L; Fowkes, Gerard R; Kovacs, Peter; Lindström, Jaana; Zemunik, Tatijana; Bandinelli, Stefania; Wild, Sarah H; Basart, Hanneke V; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Grallert, Harald; Maerz, Winfried; Kleber, Marcus E; Boehm, Bernhard O; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P; Province, Michael A; Borecki, Ingrid B; Hastie, Nicholas D; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Watkins, Hugh; Farrall, Martin; Stumvoll, Michael; Ferrucci, Luigi; Waterworth, Dawn M; Bergman, Richard N; Collins, Francis S; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Watanabe, Richard M; de Geus, Eco J C; Penninx, Brenda W; Hofman, Albert; Oostra, Ben A; Psaty, Bruce M; Vollenweider, Peter; Wilson, James F; Wright, Alan F; Hovingh, G Kees; Metspalu, Andres; Uusitupa, Matti; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Kaprio, Jaakko; Price, Jackie F; Dedoussis, George V; Deloukas, Panos; Meneton, Pierre; Lind, Lars; Boehnke, Michael; Shuldiner, Alan R; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Morris, Andrew D; Toenjes, Anke; Peyser, Patricia A; Beilby, John P; Körner, Antje; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Bornstein, Stefan R; Schwarz, Peter E H; Lakka, Timo A; Rauramaa, Rainer; Adair, Linda S; Smith, George Davey; Spector, Tim D; Illig, Thomas; de Faire, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kivimaki, Mika; Hingorani, Aroon; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Saaristo, Timo E; Boomsma, Dorret I; Stefansson, Kari; van der Harst, Pim; Dupuis, Josée; Pedersen, Nancy L; Sattar, Naveed; Harris, Tamara B; Cucca, Francesco; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Mohlke, Karen L; Balkau, Beverley; Froguel, Philippe; Pouta, Anneli; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Wareham, Nicholas J; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; McCarthy, Mark I; Franks, Paul W; Meigs, James B; Teslovich, Tanya M; Florez, Jose C; Langenberg, Claudia; Ingelsson, Erik; Prokopenko, Inga; Barroso, Inês

    2012-09-01

    Through genome-wide association meta-analyses of up to 133,010 individuals of European ancestry without diabetes, including individuals newly genotyped using the Metabochip, we have increased the number of confirmed loci influencing glycemic traits to 53, of which 33 also increase type 2 diabetes risk (q < 0.05). Loci influencing fasting insulin concentration showed association with lipid levels and fat distribution, suggesting impact on insulin resistance. Gene-based analyses identified further biologically plausible loci, suggesting that additional loci beyond those reaching genome-wide significance are likely to represent real associations. This conclusion is supported by an excess of directionally consistent and nominally significant signals between discovery and follow-up studies. Functional analysis of these newly discovered loci will further improve our understanding of glycemic control.

  16. Large-scale association analyses identify new loci influencing glycemic traits and provide insight into the underlying biological pathways

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Robert A; Lagou, Vasiliki; Welch, Ryan P; Wheeler, Eleanor; Montasser, May E; Luan, Jian’an; Mägi, Reedik; Strawbridge, Rona J; Rehnberg, Emil; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Yengo, Loïc; Lecoeur, Cecile; Shungin, Dmitry; Sanna, Serena; Sidore, Carlo; Johnson, Paul C D; Jukema, J Wouter; Johnson, Toby; Mahajan, Anubha; Verweij, Niek; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Shah, Sonia; Smith, Albert V; Sennblad, Bengt; Gieger, Christian; Salo, Perttu; Perola, Markus; Timpson, Nicholas J; Evans, David M; Pourcain, Beate St; Wu, Ying; Andrews, Jeanette S; Hui, Jennie; Bielak, Lawrence F; Zhao, Wei; Horikoshi, Momoko; Navarro, Pau; Isaacs, Aaron; O’Connell, Jeffrey R; Stirrups, Kathleen; Vitart, Veronique; Hayward, Caroline; Esko, Tönu; Mihailov, Evelin; Fraser, Ross M; Fall, Tove; Voight, Benjamin F; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Chen, Han; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Morris, Andrew P; Rayner, Nigel W; Robertson, Neil; Rybin, Denis; Liu, Ching-Ti; Beckmann, Jacques S; Willems, Sara M; Chines, Peter S; Jackson, Anne U; Kang, Hyun Min; Stringham, Heather M; Song, Kijoung; Tanaka, Toshiko; Peden, John F; Goel, Anuj; Hicks, Andrew A; An, Ping; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Folkersen, Lasse; Marullo, Letizia; Jansen, Hanneke; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Pankow, James S; North, Kari E; Forouhi, Nita G; Loos, Ruth J F; Edkins, Sarah; Varga, Tibor V; Hallmans, Göran; Oksa, Heikki; Antonella, Mulas; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Trompet, Stella; Ford, Ian; Bakker, Stephan J L; Kong, Augustine; Kumari, Meena; Gigante, Bruna; Herder, Christian; Munroe, Patricia B; Caulfield, Mark; Antti, Jula; Mangino, Massimo; Small, Kerrin; Miljkovic, Iva; Liu, Yongmei; Atalay, Mustafa; Kiess, Wieland; James, Alan L; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Palmer, Colin N A; Doney, Alex S F; Willemsen, Gonneke; Smit, Johannes H; Campbell, Susan; Polasek, Ozren; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Hercberg, Serge; Dimitriou, Maria; Bolton, Jennifer L; Fowkes, Gerard R; Kovacs, Peter; Lindström, Jaana; Zemunik, Tatijana; Bandinelli, Stefania; Wild, Sarah H; Basart, Hanneke V; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Grallert, Harald; Maerz, Winfried; Kleber, Marcus E; Boehm, Bernhard O; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P; Province, Michael A; Borecki, Ingrid B; Hastie, Nicholas D; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Watkins, Hugh; Farrall, Martin; Stumvoll, Michael; Ferrucci, Luigi; Waterworth, Dawn M; Bergman, Richard N; Collins, Francis S; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Watanabe, Richard M; de Geus, Eco J C; Penninx, Brenda W; Hofman, Albert; Oostra, Ben A; Psaty, Bruce M; Vollenweider, Peter; Wilson, James F; Wright, Alan F; Hovingh, G Kees; Metspalu, Andres; Uusitupa, Matti; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Kaprio, Jaakko; Price, Jackie F; Dedoussis, George V; Deloukas, Panos; Meneton, Pierre; Lind, Lars; Boehnke, Michael; Shuldiner, Alan R; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Morris, Andrew D; Toenjes, Anke; Peyser, Patricia A; Beilby, John P; Körner, Antje; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Bornstein, Stefan R; Schwarz, Peter E H; Lakka, Timo A; Rauramaa, Rainer; Adair, Linda S; Smith, George Davey; Spector, Tim D; Illig, Thomas; de Faire, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kivimaki, Mika; Hingorani, Aroon; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Saaristo, Timo E; Boomsma, Dorret I; Stefansson, Kari; van der Harst, Pim; Dupuis, Josée; Pedersen, Nancy L; Sattar, Naveed; Harris, Tamara B; Cucca, Francesco; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Mohlke, Karen L; Balkau, Beverley; Froguel, Philippe; Pouta, Anneli; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Wareham, Nicholas J; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; McCarthy, Mark I; Franks, Paul W; Meigs, James B; Teslovich, Tanya M; Florez, Jose C; Langenberg, Claudia; Ingelsson, Erik; Prokopenko, Inga; Barroso, Inês

    2012-01-01

    Through genome-wide association meta-analyses of up to 133,010 individuals of European ancestry without diabetes, including individuals newly genotyped using the Metabochip, we have raised the number of confirmed loci influencing glycemic traits to 53, of which 33 also increase type 2 diabetes risk (q < 0.05). Loci influencing fasting insulin showed association with lipid levels and fat distribution, suggesting impact on insulin resistance. Gene-based analyses identified further biologically plausible loci, suggesting that additional loci beyond those reaching genome-wide significance are likely to represent real associations. This conclusion is supported by an excess of directionally consistent and nominally significant signals between discovery and follow-up studies. Functional follow-up of these newly discovered loci will further improve our understanding of glycemic control. PMID:22885924

  17. Global transcriptome analysis identifies regulated transcripts and pathways activated during oogenesis and early embryogenesis in atlantic cod

    PubMed Central

    Kleppe, Lene; Edvardsen, Rolf Brudvik; Furmanek, Tomasz; Taranger, Geir Lasse; Wargelius, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying oogenesis and maternally controlled embryogenesis in fish are not fully understood, especially in marine species. Our aim was to study the egg and embryo transcriptome during oogenesis and early embryogenesis in Atlantic cod. Follicles from oogenesis stages (pre-, early-, and late-vitellogenic), ovulated eggs, and two embryonic stages (blastula, gastrula) were collected from broodstock fish and fertilized eggs. Gene expression profiles were measured in a 44 K oligo microarray consisting of 23,000 cod genes. Hundreds of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified in the follicle stages investigated, implicating a continuous accumulation and degradation of polyadenylated transcripts throughout oogenesis. Very few DEGs were identified from ovulated egg to blastula, showing a more stable maternal RNA pool in early embryonic stages. The highest induction of expression was observed between blastula and gastrula, signifying the onset of zygotic transcription. During early vitellogenesis, several of the most upregulated genes are linked to nervous system signaling, suggesting increasing requirements for ovarian synaptic signaling to stimulate the rapid growth of oocytes. Highly upregulated genes during late vitellogenesis are linked to protein processing, fat metabolism, osmoregulation, and arrested meiosis. One of the genes with the highest upregulation in the ovulated egg is involved in oxidative phosphorylation, reflecting increased energy requirements during fertilization and the first rapid cell divisions of early embryogenesis. In conclusion, this study provides a large-scale presentation of the Atlantic cod's maternally controlled transcriptome in ovarian follicles through oogenesis, ovulated eggs, and early embryos. Mol. Reprod. Dev. 81: 619–635, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24687555

  18. Analysis of the Protein Kinase A-Regulated Proteome of Cryptococcus neoformans Identifies a Role for the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway in Capsule Formation

    PubMed Central

    Geddes, J. M. H.; Caza, M.; Croll, D.; Stoynov, N.; Foster, L. J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The opportunistic fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans causes life-threatening meningitis in immunocompromised individuals. The expression of virulence factors, including capsule and melanin, is in part regulated by the cyclic-AMP/protein kinase A (cAMP/PKA) signal transduction pathway. In this study, we investigated the influence of PKA on the composition of the intracellular proteome to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the regulation that underpins virulence. Through quantitative proteomics, enrichment and bioinformatic analyses, and an interactome study, we uncovered a pattern of PKA regulation for proteins associated with translation, the proteasome, metabolism, amino acid biosynthesis, and virulence-related functions. PKA regulation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in C. neoformans showed a striking parallel with connections between PKA and protein degradation in chronic neurodegenerative disorders and other human diseases. Further investigation of proteasome function with the inhibitor bortezomib revealed an impact on capsule production as well as hypersusceptibility for strains with altered expression or activity of PKA. Parallel studies with tunicamycin also linked endoplasmic reticulum stress with capsule production and PKA. Taken together, the data suggest a model whereby expression of PKA regulatory and catalytic subunits and the activation of PKA influence proteostasis and the function of the endoplasmic reticulum to control the elaboration of the polysaccharide capsule. Overall, this study revealed both broad and conserved influences of the cAMP/PKA pathway on the proteome and identified proteostasis as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of cryptococcosis. PMID:26758180

  19. RNA sequencing identifies upregulated kyphoscoliosis peptidase and phosphatidic acid signaling pathways in muscle hypertrophy generated by transgenic expression of myostatin propeptide.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yuanxin; Yang, Jinzeng; Xu, Zhong; Jing, Lu; Zhao, Shuhong; Li, Xinyun

    2015-04-09

    Myostatin (MSTN), a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, plays a crucial negative role in muscle growth. MSTN mutations or inhibitions can dramatically increase muscle mass in most mammal species. Previously, we generated a transgenic mouse model of muscle hypertrophy via the transgenic expression of the MSTN N-terminal propeptide cDNA under the control of the skeletal muscle-specific MLC1 promoter. Here, we compare the mRNA profiles between transgenic mice and wild-type littermate controls with a high-throughput RNA sequencing method. The results show that 132 genes were significantly differentially expressed between transgenic mice and wild-type control mice; 97 of these genes were up-regulated, and 35 genes were down-regulated in the skeletal muscle. Several genes that had not been reported to be involved in muscle hypertrophy were identified, including up-regulated myosin binding protein H (mybph), and zinc metallopeptidase STE24 (Zmpste24). In addition, kyphoscoliosis peptidase (Ky), which plays a vital role in muscle growth, was also up-regulated in the transgenic mice. Interestingly, a pathway analysis based on grouping the differentially expressed genes uncovered that cardiomyopathy-related pathways and phosphatidic acid (PA) pathways (Dgki, Dgkz, Plcd4) were up-regulated. Increased PA signaling may increase mTOR signaling, resulting in skeletal muscle growth. The findings of the RNA sequencing analysis help to understand the molecular mechanisms of muscle hypertrophy caused by MSTN inhibition.

  20. Large-Scale microRNA Expression Profiling Identifies Putative Retinal miRNA-mRNA Signaling Pathways Underlying Form-Deprivation Myopia in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Vaz, Candida; Tanavde, Vivek M.; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Zauscher, Stefan; Gonzalez, Pedro; Young, Terri L.

    2016-01-01

    Development of myopia is associated with large-scale changes in ocular tissue gene expression. Although differential expression of coding genes underlying development of myopia has been a subject of intense investigation, the role of non-coding genes such as microRNAs in the development of myopia is largely unknown. In this study, we explored myopia-associated miRNA expression profiles in the retina and sclera of C57Bl/6J mice with experimentally induced myopia using microarray technology. We found a total of 53 differentially expressed miRNAs in the retina and no differences in miRNA expression in the sclera of C57BL/6J mice after 10 days of visual form deprivation, which induced -6.93 ± 2.44 D (p < 0.000001, n = 12) of myopia. We also identified their putative mRNA targets among mRNAs found to be differentially expressed in myopic retina and potential signaling pathways involved in the development of form-deprivation myopia using miRNA-mRNA interaction network analysis. Analysis of myopia-associated signaling pathways revealed that myopic response to visual form deprivation in the retina is regulated by a small number of highly integrated signaling pathways. Our findings highlighted that changes in microRNA expression are involved in the regulation of refractive eye development and predicted how they may be involved in the development of myopia by regulating retinal gene expression. PMID:27622715

  1. RNA Sequencing Identifies Upregulated Kyphoscoliosis Peptidase and Phosphatidic Acid Signaling Pathways in Muscle Hypertrophy Generated by Transgenic Expression of Myostatin Propeptide

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Yuanxin; Yang, Jinzeng; Xu, Zhong; Jing, Lu; Zhao, Shuhong; Li, Xinyun

    2015-01-01

    Myostatin (MSTN), a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, plays a crucial negative role in muscle growth. MSTN mutations or inhibitions can dramatically increase muscle mass in most mammal species. Previously, we generated a transgenic mouse model of muscle hypertrophy via the transgenic expression of the MSTN N-terminal propeptide cDNA under the control of the skeletal muscle-specific MLC1 promoter. Here, we compare the mRNA profiles between transgenic mice and wild-type littermate controls with a high-throughput RNA sequencing method. The results show that 132 genes were significantly differentially expressed between transgenic mice and wild-type control mice; 97 of these genes were up-regulated, and 35 genes were down-regulated in the skeletal muscle. Several genes that had not been reported to be involved in muscle hypertrophy were identified, including up-regulated myosin binding protein H (mybph), and zinc metallopeptidase STE24 (Zmpste24). In addition, kyphoscoliosis peptidase (Ky), which plays a vital role in muscle growth, was also up-regulated in the transgenic mice. Interestingly, a pathway analysis based on grouping the differentially expressed genes uncovered that cardiomyopathy-related pathways and phosphatidic acid (PA) pathways (Dgki, Dgkz, Plcd4) were up-regulated. Increased PA signaling may increase mTOR signaling, resulting in skeletal muscle growth. The findings of the RNA sequencing analysis help to understand the molecular mechanisms of muscle hypertrophy caused by MSTN inhibition. PMID:25860951

  2. Constitutive activation of the shh-ptc1 pathway by a patched1 mutation identified in BCC.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Elizabeth A; Heidtman, Keely J; Donoghue, Daniel J

    2005-01-27

    Mutations in the transmembrane receptor patched1 (ptc1) are responsible for the majority of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) cases. Many of these mutations, including ptc1-Q688X, result in premature truncation of the ptc1 protein. ptc1-Q688X has been identified in patients with both BCC and nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, an inheritable disorder causing a predisposition to cancer susceptibility. Here we describe a mechanism by which ptc1-Q688X causes constitutive cellular signaling. Cells expressing ptc1-Q688X demonstrate an increase in cell cycle progression and induce cell transformation. The ptc1-Q688X mutant enhances Gli1 activity, a downstream reporter of sonic hedgehog (shh)-ptc1 signaling, independent of shh stimulation. In contrast to wild-type ptc1, ptc1-Q688X fails to associate with endogenous cyclin B1. Expression of nuclear-targeted cyclin B1 derivatives promotes Gli1-dependent transcription, which correlates temporally with cyclin B1-cdk1 kinase activity. Coexpression of wild-type ptc1 with a nuclear-targeted cyclin B1 derivative, mutated to mimic constitutive phosphorylation, dramatically decreases Gli1 activity. In addition, the coexpression of this constitutively nuclear cyclin B1 derivative with ptc1-Q688X substantially enhances foci formation. These studies therefore describe a molecular mechanism for the aberrant activity of ptc1-Q688X that includes the premature activation of the transcription factor Gli1.

  3. Gene network analysis identifies rumen epithelial cell proliferation, differentiation and metabolic pathways perturbed by diet and correlated with methane production

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Ruidong; McNally, Jody; Rowe, Suzanne; Jonker, Arjan; Pinares-Patino, Cesar S.; Oddy, V. Hutton; Vercoe, Phil E.; McEwan, John C.; Dalrymple, Brian P.

    2016-01-01

    Ruminants obtain nutrients from microbial fermentation of plant material, primarily in their rumen, a multilayered forestomach. How the different layers of the rumen wall respond to diet and influence microbial fermentation, and how these process are regulated, is not well understood. Gene expression correlation networks were constructed from full thickness rumen wall transcriptomes of 24 sheep fed two different amounts and qualities of a forage and measured for methane production. The network contained two major negatively correlated gene sub-networks predominantly representing the epithelial and muscle layers of the rumen wall. Within the epithelium sub-network gene clusters representing lipid/oxo-acid metabolism, general metabolism and proliferating and differentiating cells were identified. The expression of cell cycle and metabolic genes was positively correlated with dry matter intake, ruminal short chain fatty acid concentrations and methane production. A weak correlation between lipid/oxo-acid metabolism genes and methane yield was observed. Feed consumption level explained the majority of gene expression variation, particularly for the cell cycle genes. Many known stratified epithelium transcription factors had significantly enriched targets in the epithelial gene clusters. The expression patterns of the transcription factors and their targets in proliferating and differentiating skin is mirrored in the rumen, suggesting conservation of regulatory systems. PMID:27966600

  4. Genome-wide screen identifies a novel p97/CDC-48-dependent pathway regulating ER-stress-induced gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Marza, Esther; Taouji, Saïd; Barroso, Kim; Raymond, Anne-Aurélie; Guignard, Léo; Bonneu, Marc; Pallares-Lupon, Néstor; Dupuy, Jean-William; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E; Rosenbaum, Jean; Palladino, Francesca; Dupuy, Denis; Chevet, Eric

    2015-03-01

    The accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) activates the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR(ER)) to restore ER homeostasis. The AAA(+) ATPase p97/CDC-48 plays key roles in ER stress by promoting both ER protein degradation and transcription of UPR(ER) genes. Although the mechanisms associated with protein degradation are now well established, the molecular events involved in the regulation of gene transcription by p97/CDC-48 remain unclear. Using a reporter-based genome-wide RNAi screen in combination with quantitative proteomic analysis in Caenorhabditis elegans, we have identified RUVB-2, a AAA(+) ATPase, as a novel repressor of a subset of UPR(ER) genes. We show that degradation of RUVB-2 by CDC-48 enhances expression of ER stress response genes through an XBP1-dependent mechanism. The functional interplay between CDC-48 and RUVB-2 in controlling transcription of select UPR(ER) genes appears conserved in human cells. Together, these results describe a novel role for p97/CDC-48, whereby its role in protein degradation is integrated with its role in regulating expression of ER stress response genes.

  5. Translational research in brain metastasis is identifying molecular pathways that may lead to the development of new therapeutic strategies

    PubMed Central

    Gril, Brunilde; Evans, Lynda; Palmieri, Diane; Steeg, Patricia S.

    2010-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) or brain metastasis is an emerging area of interest in organ-specific metastasis research. Lung and breast cancers are the most common types of primary tumors to develop brain metastases. This disease complication contributes significantly to the morbidity and mortality of both of these common cancers; as such, brain metastasis is designated an unmet medical need by the US Food and Drug Administration. Recently, an increase in incidence of CNS disease has been noted in the literature for breast cancer, while it has been an ongoing major complication from lung cancer. Progress in treating brain metastases has been hampered by a lack of model systems, a lack of human tissue samples, and the exclusion of brain metastatic patients from many clinical trials. While each of those is significant, the major impediment to effectively treating brain metastatic disease is the blood–brain barrier (BBB). This barrier excludes most chemotherapeutics from the brain and creates a sanctuary site for metastatic tumors. Recent findings on the biology of this disease and translational leads identified by molecular studies are discussed in this article. PMID:20303257

  6. Gene expression profiling of precursor T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma identifies oncogenic pathways that are potential therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ying-Wei; Aplan, Peter D.

    2007-01-01

    We compared the gene expression pattern of thymic tumors from precursor T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma/leukemia (pre-T LBL) that arose in transgenic mice which over-expressed SCL, LMO1, or NUP98-HOXD13 (NHD13) with that of thymocytes from normal littermates. Only two genes, Ccl8 and Mrpl38, were consistently more than 4-fold over-expressed in pre-T LBL from all three genotypes analyzed, and a single gene, Prss16 was consistently under-expressed. However, we identified a number of genes, such as Cfl1, Tcra, Tcrb, Pbx3, Eif4a, Eif4b, and Cox8b that were over or under-expressed in pre-T LBL that arose in specific transgenic lines. Similar to the situation seen with human pre-T LBL, the SCL/LMO1 leukemias displayed an expression profile consistent with mature, late cortical thymocytes, whereas the NHD13 leukemias displayed an expression profile more consistent with immature thymocytes. We evaluated two of the most differentially regulated genes as potential therapeutic targets. Cfl1 was specifically over-expressed in SCL-LMO1 tumors; inactivation of Cfl1 using Okadaic acid resulted in suppression of leukemic cell growth. Overexpression of Ccl8 was a consistent finding in all 3 transgenic lines, and an antagonist for the Ccl8 receptor induced death of leukemic cell lines, suggesting a novel therapeutic approach. PMID:17429429

  7. Fenugreek Seed Powder Nullified Aluminium Chloride Induced Memory Loss, Biochemical Changes, Aβ Burden and Apoptosis via Regulating Akt/GSK3β Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Prema, Asokan; Thenmozhi, Arokiasamy Justin; Manivasagam, Thamilarasan; Akbar, Mohammed D.; Akbar, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia that mainly affects the cognitive functions of the aged populations. Trigonella foenum-graecum (L.) (fenugreek), a traditionally well utilized medicinal plant ubiquitously used as one of the main food additive worldwide, is known to have numerous beneficial health effects. Fenugreek seed extract could be able to inhibit the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), a key enzyme involved in the pathogenesis of AD, and further shown to have anti-parkinsonic effect. The present study was aimed to explore the neuroprotective effect of fenugreek seed powder (FSP) against aluminium chloride (AlCl3) induced experimental AD model. Administration of germinated FSP (2.5, 5 and 10% mixed with ground standard rat feed) protected AlCl3 induced memory and learning impairments, Al overload, AChE hyperactivity, amyloid β (Aβ) burden and apoptosis via activating Akt/GSK3β pathway. Our present data could confirm the neuroprotective effect of fenugreek seeds. Further these results could lead a possible therapeutics for the management of neurodegenerative diseases including AD in future. PMID:27893738

  8. Pathway-specific profiling identifies the NF-kappa B-dependent tumor necrosis factor alpha-regulated genes in epidermal keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Banno, Tomohiro; Gazel, Alix; Blumenberg, Miroslav

    2005-05-13

    Identification of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) as the key agent in inflammatory disorders led to new therapies specifically targeting TNF alpha and avoiding many side effects of earlier anti-inflammatory drugs. However, because of the wide spectrum of systems affected by TNF alpha, drugs targeting TNF alpha have a potential risk of delaying wound healing, secondary infections, and cancer. Indeed, increased risks of tuberculosis and carcinogenesis have been reported as side effects after anti-TNF alpha therapy. TNF alpha regulates many processes (e.g. immune response, cell cycle, and apoptosis) through several signal transduction pathways that convey the TNF alpha signals to the nucleus. Hypothesizing that specific TNF alpha-dependent pathways control specific processes and that inhibition of a specific pathway may yield even more precisely targeted therapies, we used oligonucleotide microarrays and parthenolide, an NF-kappa B-specific inhibitor, to identify the NF-kappa B-dependent set of the TNF alpha-regulated genes in human epidermal keratinocytes. Expression of approximately 40% of all TNF alpha-regulated genes depends on NF-kappa B; 17% are regulated early (1-4 h post-treatment), and 23% are regulated late (24-48 h). Cytokines and apoptosis-related and cornification proteins belong to the "early" NF-kappa B-dependent group, and antigen presentation proteins belong to the "late" group, whereas most cell cycle, RNA-processing, and metabolic enzymes are not NF-kappa B-dependent. Therefore, inflammation, immunomodulation, apoptosis, and differentiation are on the NF-kappa B pathway, and cell cycle, metabolism, and RNA processing are not. Most early genes contain consensus NF-kappaB binding sites in their promoter DNA and are, presumably, directly regulated by NF-kappa B, except, curiously, the cornification markers. Using siRNA silencing, we identified cFLIP/CFLAR as an essential NF-kappa B-dependent antiapoptotic gene. The results confirm our

  9. A System Biology Approach to Identify Regulatory Pathways Underlying the Neuroendocrine Control of Female Puberty in Rats and Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Lomniczi, Alejandro; Wright, Hollis; Castellano, Juan Manuel; Sonmez, Kemal; Ojeda, Sergio R.

    2014-01-01

    Puberty is a major developmental milestone controlled by the interaction of genetic factors and environmental cues of mostly metabolic and circadian nature. An increased pulsatile release of the decapeptide gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) from hypothalamic neurosecretory neurons is required for both the initiation and progression of the pubertal process. This increase is brought about by coordinated changes that occur in neuronal and glial networks associated with GnRH neurons. These changes ultimately result in increased neuronal and glial stimulatory inputs to the GnRH neuronal network and a reduction of transsynaptic inhibitory influences. While some of the major players controlling pubertal GnRH secretion have been identified using gene-centric approaches, much less is known about the system-wide control of the overall process. Because the pubertal activation of GnRH release involves a diversity of cellular phenotypes, and a myriad of intracellular and cell-to-cell signaling molecules, it appears that the overall process is controlled by a highly coordinated and interactive regulatory system involving hundreds, if not thousands, of gene products. In this article we will discuss emerging evidence suggesting that these genes are arranged as functionally connected networks organized, both internally and across sub-networks, in a hierarchical fashion. According to this concept, the core of these networks is composed of transcriptional regulators that, by directing expression of downstream subordinate genes, provide both stability and coordination to the cellular networks involved in initiating the pubertal process. The integrative response of these gene networks to external inputs is postulated to be coordinated by epigenetic mechanisms. PMID:23998662

  10. A system biology approach to identify regulatory pathways underlying the neuroendocrine control of female puberty in rats and nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Lomniczi, Alejandro; Wright, Hollis; Castellano, Juan Manuel; Sonmez, Kemal; Ojeda, Sergio R

    2013-07-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Puberty and Adolescence". Puberty is a major developmental milestone controlled by the interaction of genetic factors and environmental cues of mostly metabolic and circadian nature. An increased pulsatile release of the decapeptide gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) from hypothalamic neurosecretory neurons is required for both the initiation and progression of the pubertal process. This increase is brought about by coordinated changes that occur in neuronal and glial networks associated with GnRH neurons. These changes ultimately result in increased neuronal and glial stimulatory inputs to the GnRH neuronal network and a reduction of transsynaptic inhibitory influences. While some of the major players controlling pubertal GnRH secretion have been identified using gene-centric approaches, much less is known about the system-wide control of the overall process. Because the pubertal activation of GnRH release involves a diversity of cellular phenotypes, and a myriad of intracellular and cell-to-cell signaling molecules, it appears that the overall process is controlled by a highly coordinated and interactive regulatory system involving hundreds, if not thousands, of gene products. In this article we will discuss emerging evidence suggesting that these genes are arranged as functionally connected networks organized, both internally and across sub-networks, in a hierarchical fashion. According to this concept, the core of these networks is composed of transcriptional regulators that, by directing expression of downstream subordinate genes, provide both stability and coordination to the cellular networks involved in initiating the pubertal process. The integrative response of these gene networks to external inputs is postulated to be coordinated by epigenetic mechanisms.

  11. TU-CD-BRB-10: 18F-FDG PET Image-Derived Tumor Features Highlight Altered Pathways Identified by Trancriptomic Analysis in Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Tixier, F; Cheze-Le-Rest, C; Dufour, X; Hatt, M; Visvikis, D; Valette, G; Potard, G; Corcos, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Several quantitative features can be extracted from 18F-FDG PET images, such as standardized uptake values (SUVs), metabolic tumor volume (MTV), shape characterization (SC) or intra-tumor radiotracer heterogeneity quantification (HQ). Some of these features calculated from baseline 18F-FDG PET images have shown a prognostic and predictive clinical value. It has been hypothesized that these features highlight underlying tumor patho-physiological processes at smaller scales. The objective of this study was to investigate the ability of recovering alterations of signaling pathways from FDG PET image-derived features. Methods: 52 patients were prospectively recruited from two medical centers (Brest and Poitiers). All patients underwent an FDG PET scan for staging and biopsies of both healthy and primary tumor tissues. Biopsies went through a transcriptomic analysis performed in four spates on 4×44k chips (Agilent™). Primary tumors were delineated in the PET images using the Fuzzy Locally Adaptive Bayesian algorithm and characterized using 10 features including SUVs, SC and HQ. A module network algorithm followed by functional annotation was exploited in order to link PET features with signaling pathways alterations. Results: Several PET-derived features were found to discriminate differentially expressed genes between tumor and healthy tissue (fold-change >2, p<0.01) into 30 co-regulated groups (p<0.05). Functional annotations applied to these groups of genes highlighted associations with well-known pathways involved in cancer processes, such as cell proliferation and apoptosis, as well as with more specific ones such as unsaturated fatty acids. Conclusion: Quantitative features extracted from baseline 18F-FDG PET images usually exploited only for diagnosis and staging, were identified in this work as being related to specific altered pathways and may show promise as tools for personalizing treatment decisions.

  12. Putative pathway of sex pheromone biosynthesis and degradation by expression patterns of genes identified from female pheromone gland and adult antenna of Sesamia inferens (Walker).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ya-Nan; Xia, Yi-Han; Zhu, Jia-Yao; Li, Sheng-Yun; Dong, Shuang-Lin

    2014-05-01

    The general pathway of biosynthesis and degradation for Type-I sex pheromones in moths is well established, but some genes involved in this pathway remain to be characterized. The purple stem borer, Sesamia inferens, employs a pheromone blend containing components with three different terminal functional groups (Z11-16:OAc, Z11-16:OH, and Z11-16:Ald) of Type-I sex pheromones. Thus, it provides a good model to study the diversity of genes involved in pheromone biosynthesis and degradation pathways. By analyzing previously obtained transcriptomic data of the sex pheromone glands and antennae, we identified 73 novel genes that are possibly related to pheromone biosynthesis (46 genes) or degradation (27 genes). Gene expression patterns and phylogenetic analysis revealed that one desaturase (SinfDes4), one fatty acid reductase (SinfFAR2), and one fatty acid xtransport protein (SinfFATP1) genes were predominantly expressed in pheromone glands, and clustered with genes involved in pheromone synthesis in other moth species. Ten genes including five carboxylesterases (SinfCXE10, 13, 14, 18, and 20), three aldehyde oxidases (SinfAOX1, 2 and 3), and two alcohol dehydrogenases (SinfAD1 and 3) were expressed specifically or predominantly in antennae, and could be candidate genes involved in pheromone degradation. SinfAD1 and 3 are the first reported alcohol dehydrogenase genes with antennae-biased expression. Based on these results we propose a pathway involving these potential enzyme-encoding gene candidates in sex pheromone biosynthesis and degradation in S. inferens. This study provides robust background information for further elucidation of the genetic basis of sex pheromone biosynthesis and degradation, and ultimately provides potential targets to disrupt sexual communication in S. inferens for control purposes.

  13. Lesions from patients with sporadic cerebral cavernous malformations harbor somatic mutations in the CCM genes: evidence for a common biochemical pathway for CCM pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, David A.; Shi, Changbin; Shenkar, Robert; Gallione, Carol J.; Akers, Amy L.; Li, Stephanie; De Castro, Nicholas; Berg, Michel J.; Corcoran, David L.; Awad, Issam A.; Marchuk, Douglas A.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are vascular lesions affecting the central nervous system. CCM occurs either sporadically or in an inherited, autosomal dominant manner. Constitutional (germline) mutations in any of three genes, KRIT1, CCM2 and PDCD10, can cause the inherited form. Analysis of CCM lesions from inherited cases revealed biallelic somatic mutations, indicating that CCM follows a Knudsonian two-hit mutation mechanism. It is still unknown, however, if the sporadic cases of CCM also follow this genetic mechanism. We extracted DNA from 11 surgically excised lesions from sporadic CCM patients, and sequenced the three CCM genes in each specimen using a next-generation sequencing approach. Four sporadic CCM lesion samples (36%) were found to contain novel somatic mutations. Three of the lesions contained a single somatic mutation, and one lesion contained two biallelic somatic mutations. Herein, we also describe evidence of somatic mosaicism in a patient presenting with over 130 CCM lesions localized to one hemisphere of the brain. Finally, in a lesion regrowth sample, we found that the regrown CCM lesion contained the same somatic mutation as the original lesion. Together, these data bolster the idea that all forms of CCM have a genetic underpinning of the two-hit mutation mechanism in the known CCM genes. Recent studies have found aberrant Rho kinase activation in inherited CCM pathogenesis, and we present evidence that this pathway is activated in sporadic CCM patients. These results suggest that all CCM patients, including those with the more common sporadic form, are potentially amenable to the same therapy. PMID:24698976

  14. Lesions from patients with sporadic cerebral cavernous malformations harbor somatic mutations in the CCM genes: evidence for a common biochemical pathway for CCM pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    McDonald, David A; Shi, Changbin; Shenkar, Robert; Gallione, Carol J; Akers, Amy L; Li, Stephanie; De Castro, Nicholas; Berg, Michel J; Corcoran, David L; Awad, Issam A; Marchuk, Douglas A

    2014-08-15

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are vascular lesions affecting the central nervous system. CCM occurs either sporadically or in an inherited, autosomal dominant manner. Constitutional (germline) mutations in any of three genes, KRIT1, CCM2 and PDCD10, can cause the inherited form. Analysis of CCM lesions from inherited cases revealed biallelic somatic mutations, indicating that CCM follows a Knudsonian two-hit mutation mechanism. It is still unknown, however, if the sporadic cases of CCM also follow this genetic mechanism. We extracted DNA from 11 surgically excised lesions from sporadic CCM patients, and sequenced the three CCM genes in each specimen using a next-generation sequencing approach. Four sporadic CCM lesion samples (36%) were found to contain novel somatic mutations. Three of the lesions contained a single somatic mutation, and one lesion contained two biallelic somatic mutations. Herein, we also describe evidence of somatic mosaicism in a patient presenting with over 130 CCM lesions localized to one hemisphere of the brain. Finally, in a lesion regrowth sample, we found that the regrown CCM lesion contained the same somatic mutation as the original lesion. Together, these data bolster the idea that all forms of CCM have a genetic underpinning of the two-hit mutation mechanism in the known CCM genes. Recent studies have found aberrant Rho kinase activation in inherited CCM pathogenesis, and we present evidence that this pathway is activated in sporadic CCM patients. These results suggest that all CCM patients, including those with the more common sporadic form, are potentially amenable to the same therapy.

  15. System-based proteomic and metabonomic analysis of the Df(16)A+/− mouse identifies potential miR-185 targets and molecular pathway alterations

    PubMed Central

    Wesseling, H; Xu, B; Want, E J; Holmes, E; Guest, P C; Karayiorgou, M; Gogos, J A; Bahn, S

    2017-01-01

    Deletions on chromosome 22q11.2 are a strong genetic risk factor for development of schizophrenia and cognitive dysfunction. We employed shotgun liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC-MS) proteomic and metabonomic profiling approaches on prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampal (HPC) tissue from Df(16)A+/− mice, a model of the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Proteomic results were compared with previous transcriptomic profiling studies of the same brain regions. The aim was to investigate how the combined effect of the 22q11.2 deletion and the corresponding miRNA dysregulation affects the cell biology at the systems level. The proteomic brain profiling analysis revealed PFC and HPC changes in various molecular pathways associated with chromatin remodelling and RNA transcription, indicative of an epigenetic component of the 22q11.2DS. Further, alterations in glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, mitochondrial function and lipid biosynthesis were identified. Metabonomic profiling substantiated the proteomic findings by identifying changes in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS)-related pathways, such as changes in ceramide phosphoethanolamines, sphingomyelin, carnitines, tyrosine derivates and panthothenic acid. The proteomic findings were confirmed using selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry, validating decreased levels of several proteins encoded on 22q11.2, increased levels of the computationally predicted putative miR-185 targets UDP-N-acetylglucosamine-peptide N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase 110 kDa subunit (OGT1) and kinesin heavy chain isoform 5A and alterations in the non-miR-185 targets serine/threonine-protein phosphatase 2B catalytic subunit gamma isoform, neurofilament light chain and vesicular glutamate transporter 1. Furthermore, alterations in the proteins associated with mammalian target of rapamycin signalling were detected in the PFC and with glutamatergic signalling in the hippocampus. Based on the proteomic and metabonomic findings, we were

  16. CSGene: a literature-based database for cell senescence genes and its application to identify critical cell aging pathways and associated diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, M; Chen, L; Qu, H

    2016-01-01

    Cell senescence is a cellular process in which normal diploid cells cease to replicate and is a major driving force for human cancers and aging-associated diseases. Recent studies on cell senescence have identified many new genetic components and pathways that control cell aging. However, there is no comprehensive resource for cell senescence that integrates various genetic studies and relationships with cell senescence, and the risk associated with complex diseases such as cancer is still unexplored. We have developed the first literature-based gene resource for exploring cell senescence genes, CSGene. We complied 504 experimentally verified genes from public data resources and published literature. Pathway analyses highlighted the prominent roles of cell senescence genes in the control of rRNA gene transcription and unusual rDNA repeat that constitute a center for the stability of the whole genome. We also found a strong association of cell senescence with HIV-1 infection and viral carcinogenesis that are mainly related to promoter/enhancer binding and chromatin modification processes. Moreover, pan-cancer mutation and network analysis also identified common cell aging mechanisms in cancers and uncovered a highly modular network structure. These results highlight the utility of CSGene for elucidating the complex cellular events of cell senescence. PMID:26775705

  17. A High-Throughput Screening Strategy to Identify Protein-Protein Interaction Inhibitors That Block the Fanconi Anemia DNA Repair Pathway.

    PubMed

    Voter, Andrew F; Manthei, Kelly A; Keck, James L

    2016-07-01

    Induction of the Fanconi anemia (FA) DNA repair pathway is a common mechanism by which tumors evolve resistance to DNA crosslinking chemotherapies. Proper execution of the FA pathway requires interaction between the FA complementation group M protein (FANCM) and the RecQ-mediated genome instability protein (RMI) complex, and mutations that disrupt FANCM/RMI interactions sensitize cells to DNA crosslinking agents. Inhibitors that block FANCM/RMI complex formation could be useful therapeutics for resensitizing tumors that have acquired chemotherapeutic resistance. To identify such inhibitors, we have developed and validated high-throughput fluorescence polarization and proximity assays that are sensitive to inhibitors that disrupt interactions between the RMI complex and its binding site on FANCM (a peptide referred to as MM2). A pilot screen of 74,807 small molecules was performed using the fluorescence polarization assay. Hits from the primary screen were further tested using the proximity assay, and an orthogonal proximity assay was used to assess inhibitor selectivity. Direct physical interaction between the RMI complex and the most selective inhibitor identified through the screening process was measured by surface plasmon resonance and isothermal titration calorimetry. Observation of direct binding by this small molecule validates the screening protocol.

  18. Expression of genes associated with cholesterol and lipid metabolism identified as a novel pathway in the early pathogenesis of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis-infection in cattle.

    PubMed

    Thirunavukkarasu, Shyamala; Plain, Karren M; de Silva, Kumudika; Begg, Douglas; Whittington, Richard J; Purdie, Auriol C

    2014-08-15

    Johne's disease (JD) is a chronic disease affecting ruminants and other species caused by the pathogenic mycobacterium, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). MAP has developed a multitude of mechanisms to persist within the host, and these in turn are counteracted by the host through various immune pathways. Identifying and characterising the different strategies employed by MAP to alter the host immune system in its favour, and thereby persist intracellularly, could hold the key to developing strategies to fight this disease. In this study we analysed a subset of bovine microarray data derived from early time points after experimental infection with MAP. A specifically developed integrated approach was used to identify and validate host genes involved in cholesterol homeostasis (24DHCR, LDLR, SCD-1), calcium homeostasis and anti-bacterial defence mechanisms, (CD38, GIMAP6) which were downregulated in response to MAP exposure. A trend for upregulation of granulysin gene expression in MAP-exposed cattle in comparison to unexposed cattle was also observed. From these analyses, a model of potential pathogen-host interactions involving these novel pathways was developed which indicates an important role for host lipids in mycobacterial survival and persistence.

  19. The use of conditional probability functions and potential source contribution functions to identify source regions and advection pathways of hydrocarbon emissions in Houston, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yulong; Berkowitz, Carl M.

    In this study, we demonstrate the utility of conditional probability functions (CPFs), potential source contribution functions (PSCFs), and hierarchical clustering analysis (HAC) to identify the source region and transport pathways of hydrocarbons measured at five photochemical assessment monitoring stations (PAMS) near the Houston Ship Channel from June to October 2003. In contrast to scatter plots, which only show the pair-wise correlation of species, commonality in CPF figures shows both correlation and information on the source region of the species in question. In this study, we use over 50 hourly volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations and surface wind observations to show that VOCs with similar CPF patterns likely have common transport pathways. This was established with the multivariate technique, which uses the hierarchical clustering analysis to define clusters of VOCs having similar CPF patterns. This method revealed that alkenes, and in particular those with geometric isomers such as cis-/ trans-2-butene and cis-/ trans-2-pentene, have similar CPF patterns and hence, a common area of origin. The alkane isomers often show CPF patterns among themselves, and similarly, aromatic compounds often show similar patterns. We also show how calculated trajectory information can be used in the PSCF analysis to produce a graphic picture that identifies specific geographic areas associated with a given VOC (or other pollutant). The use of these techniques in the chemically and meteorologically complex environment of Houston, Texas, suggests its further utility in other areas with relatively simpler conditions.

  20. Transcriptome Analysis of Peripheral Blood in Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy Patients Identifies TNFR1 and TLR Pathways in the IVIg Response.

    PubMed

    Richard, Alexandra; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Debs, Rabab; Reach, Pauline; Tahiri, Khadija; Carpentier, Wassila; Gueguen, Justine; Guillemot, Vincent; Labeyrie, Céline; Adams, David; Viala, Karine; Cohen Aubart, Fleur

    2016-05-01

    We have studied the response to intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg) by a transcriptomic approach in 11 chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) patients (CIDP duration = 6 [0.83-6.5] years). RNA was extracted from cells in whole blood collected before and 3 weeks after IVIg treatment, and hybridized on Illumina chips. After RNA quality controls, gene expression was analyzed using statistical tests fitted for microarrays (R software, limma package), and a pathway analysis was performed using DAVID software. We identified 52 genes with expression that varied significantly after IVIg (fold change [FC] > 1.2, P < 0.001, false discovery rate [FDR] <0.05). Among these 52 genes, 7 were related to immunity, 3 were related to the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α receptor 1 (TNFR1) pathway (inhibitor of caspase-activated DNase (ICAD): FC = 1.8, P = 1.7E-7, FDR = 0.004; p21 protein-activated kinase 2 [PAK2]: FC = 1.66, P = 2.6E-5, FDR = 0.03; TNF-α-induced protein 8-like protein 1 [TNFAIP8L1]: P = 1.00E-05, FDR = 0.026), and 2 were related to Toll-like receptors (TLRs), especially TLRs 7 and 9, and were implicated in autoimmunity. These genes were UNC93B1 (FC = 1.6, P = 2E-5, FDR = 0.03), which transports TLRs 7 and 9 to the endolysosomes, and RNF216 (FC = 1.5, P = 1E-05, FDR = 0.03), which promotes TLR 9 degradation. Pathway analysis showed that the TNFR1 pathway was significantly lessened by IVIg (enrichment score = 24, Fischer exact test = 0.003). TNF-α gene expression was higher in responder patients than in nonresponders; however, it decreased after IVIg in responders (P = 0.04), but remained stable in nonresponders. Our data suggest the actions of IVIg on the TNFR1 pathway and an original mechanism involving innate immunity through TLRs in CIDP pathophysiology and the response to IVIg. We conclude that responder patients have stronger inflammatory activity that is

  1. Transcriptome Analysis of Peripheral Blood in Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy Patients Identifies TNFR1 and TLR Pathways in the IVIg Response

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Alexandra; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Debs, Rabab; Reach, Pauline; Tahiri, Khadija; Carpentier, Wassila; Gueguen, Justine; Guillemot, Vincent; Labeyrie, Céline; Adams, David; Viala, Karine; Cohen Aubart, Fleur

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We have studied the response to intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg) by a transcriptomic approach in 11 chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) patients (CIDP duration = 6 [0.83–6.5] years). RNA was extracted from cells in whole blood collected before and 3 weeks after IVIg treatment, and hybridized on Illumina chips. After RNA quality controls, gene expression was analyzed using statistical tests fitted for microarrays (R software, limma package), and a pathway analysis was performed using DAVID software. We identified 52 genes with expression that varied significantly after IVIg (fold change [FC] > 1.2, P < 0.001, false discovery rate [FDR] <0.05). Among these 52 genes, 7 were related to immunity, 3 were related to the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α receptor 1 (TNFR1) pathway (inhibitor of caspase-activated DNase (ICAD): FC = 1.8, P = 1.7E-7, FDR = 0.004; p21 protein-activated kinase 2 [PAK2]: FC = 1.66, P = 2.6E-5, FDR = 0.03; TNF-α-induced protein 8-like protein 1 [TNFAIP8L1]: P = 1.00E-05, FDR = 0.026), and 2 were related to Toll-like receptors (TLRs), especially TLRs 7 and 9, and were implicated in autoimmunity. These genes were UNC93B1 (FC = 1.6, P = 2E-5, FDR = 0.03), which transports TLRs 7 and 9 to the endolysosomes, and RNF216 (FC = 1.5, P = 1E-05, FDR = 0.03), which promotes TLR 9 degradation. Pathway analysis showed that the TNFR1 pathway was significantly lessened by IVIg (enrichment score = 24, Fischer exact test = 0.003). TNF-α gene expression was higher in responder patients than in nonresponders; however, it decreased after IVIg in responders (P = 0.04), but remained stable in nonresponders. Our data suggest the actions of IVIg on the TNFR1 pathway and an original mechanism involving innate immunity through TLRs in CIDP pathophysiology and the response to IVIg. We conclude that responder patients have stronger inflammatory activity

  2. Genome-Wide DNA Methylation Analysis of Chinese Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Identified Hypomethylation in Genes Related to the Type I Interferon Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Kit San; Chung, Brian Hon-Yin; Choufani, Sanaa; Mok, Mo Yin; Wong, Wai Lap; Mak, Christopher Chun Yu; Yang, Wanling; Lee, Pamela Pui Wah; Wong, Wilfred Hing Sang; Chen, Yi-an; Grafodatskaya, Daria; Wong, Raymond Woon Sing; Lau, Chak Sing; Chan, Daniel Tak Mao; Weksberg, Rosanna; Lau, Yu-Lung

    2017-01-01

    Background Epigenetic variants have been shown in recent studies to be important contributors to the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Here, we report a 2-step study of discovery followed by replication to identify DNA methylation alterations associated with SLE in a Chinese population. Using a genome-wide DNA methylation microarray, the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip, we compared the methylation levels of CpG sites in DNA extracted from white blood cells from 12 female Chinese SLE patients and 10 healthy female controls. Results We identified 36 CpG sites with differential loss of DNA methylation and 8 CpG sites with differential gain of DNA methylation, representing 25 genes and 7 genes, respectively. Surprisingly, 42% of the hypomethylated CpG sites were located in CpG shores, which indicated the functional importance of the loss of DNA methylation. Microarray results were replicated in another cohort of 100 SLE patients and 100 healthy controls by performing bisulfite pyrosequencing of four hypomethylated genes, MX1, IFI44L, NLRC5 and PLSCR1. In addition, loss of DNA methylation in these genes was associated with an increase in mRNA expression. Gene ontology analysis revealed that the hypomethylated genes identified in the microarray study were overrepresented in the type I interferon pathway, which has long been implicated in the pathogenesis of SLE. Conclusion Our epigenetic findings further support the importance of the type I interferon pathway in SLE pathogenesis. Moreover, we showed that the DNA methylation signatures of SLE can be defined in unfractionated white blood cells. PMID:28085900

  3. Comprehensive siRNA-based screening of human and mouse TLR pathways identifies species-specific preferences in signaling protein use

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jing; Li, Ning; Oh, Kyu-Seon; Dutta, Bhaskar; Vayttaden, Sharat J.; Lin, Bin; Ebert, Thomas S.; De Nardo, Dominic; Davis, Joie; Bagirzadeh, Rustam; Lounsbury, Nicolas W.; Pasare, Chandrashekhar; Latz, Eicke; Hornung, Veit; Fraser, Iain D. C.

    2017-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a major class of pattern recognition receptors, which mediate the response of innate immune cells to microbial stimuli. To systematically determine the roles of gene products in canonical TLR signaling pathways, we conducted an RNA interference (RNAi)-based screen in human and mouse macrophages. We observed a pattern of conserved signaling module dependencies across species, but found notable species-specific requirements at the level of individual gene products. Among these, we identified unexpected differences in interleukin 1 receptor-associated kinase (IRAK) protein use between the human and mouse TLR pathways. Whereas TLR signaling in mouse macrophages depended primarily on IRAK4 and IRAK2, with little or no role for IRAK1, TLR signaling and proinflammatory cytokine production in human macrophages were highly dependent on IRAK1 and were less affected by perturbations of IRAK4 or IRAK2. The differential sensitivity of human and mouse cells to the loss of IRAK4 was reflected in the inability of the IRAK4 orthologs to rescue signaling in IRAK4-deficient macrophages from the other species, and in a mouse-specific requirement for the kinase activity of IRAK4 in TLR responses in macrophages. Our study also identified a critical role for IRAK1 in TLR signaling in humans, which could potentially explain the association of IRAK1 with several autoimmune diseases. Furthermore, we demonstrated how systematic screening can be used to identify important characteristics of innate immune responses across species and more optimal therapeutic targets for regulating human TLR-dependent outputs. PMID:26732763

  4. Genomic and Immunological Tumor Profiling Identifies Targetable Pathways and Extensive CD8+/PDL1+ Immune Infiltration in Inflammatory Breast Cancer Tumors.

    PubMed

    Hamm, Christopher A; Moran, Diarmuid; Rao, Kakuturu; Trusk, Patricia B; Pry, Karen; Sausen, Mark; Jones, Siân; Velculescu, Victor E; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Bacus, Sarah

    2016-07-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is a rare and aggressive form of breast cancer that remains poorly understood at the molecular level. Comprehensive tumor profiling was performed to understand clinically actionable alterations in IBC. Targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) and IHC were performed to identify activated pathways in IBC tumor tissues. siRNA studies examined the impact of IBC genomic variants in cellular models. IBC tumor tissues were further characterized for immune infiltration and immune checkpoint expression by IHC. Genomic analysis identified recurrent alterations in core biologic pathways, including activating and targetable variants in HER/PI3K/mTOR signaling. High rates of activating HER3 point mutations were discovered in IBC tumors. Cell line studies confirmed a role for mutant HER3 in IBC cell proliferation. Immunologic analysis revealed a subset of IBC tumors associated with high CD8(+)/PD-L1(+) lymphocyte infiltration. Immune infiltration positively correlated with an NGS-based estimate of neoantigen exposure derived from the somatic mutation rate and mutant allele frequency, iScore. Additionally, DNA mismatch repair alterations, which may contribute to higher iScores, occurred at greater frequency in tumors with higher immune infiltration. Our study identifies genomic alterations that mechanistically contribute to oncogenic signaling in IBC and provides a genetic basis for the selection of clinically relevant targeted and combination therapeutic strategies. Furthermore, an NGS-based estimate of neoantigen exposure developed in this study (iScore) may be a useful biomarker to predict immune infiltration in IBC and other cancers. The iScore may be associated with greater levels of response to immunotherapies, such as PD-L1/PD-1-targeted therapies. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(7); 1746-56. ©2016 AACR.

  5. De novo transcriptome assembly and characterization of nine tissues of Lonicera japonica to identify potential candidate genes involved in chlorogenic acid, luteolosides, and secoiridoid biosynthesis pathways.

    PubMed

    Rai, Amit; Kamochi, Hidetaka; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Nakamura, Michimi; Takahashi, Hiroki; Hatada, Tomoki; Saito, Kazuki; Yamazaki, Mami

    2017-01-01

    Lonicera japonica is one of the most important medicinal plants with applications in traditional Chinese and Japanese medicine for thousands of years. Extensive studies on the constituents of L. japonica extracts have revealed an accumulation of pharmaceutically active metabolite classes, such as chlorogenic acid, luteolin and other flavonoids, and secoiridoids, which impart characteristic medicinal properties. Despite being a rich source of pharmaceutically active metabolites, little is known about the biosynthetic enzymes involved, and their expression profile across different tissues of L. japonica. In this study, we performed de novo transcriptome assembly for L. japonica, representing transcripts from nine different tissues. A total of 22 Gbps clean RNA-seq reads from nine tissues of L. japonica were used, resulting in 243,185 unigenes, with 99,938 unigenes annotated based on a homology search using blastx against the NCBI-nr protein database. Unsupervised principal component analysis and correlation studies using transcript expression data from all nine tissues of L. japonica showed relationships between tissues, explaining their association at different developmental stages. Homologs for all genes associated with chlorogenic acid, luteolin, and secoiridoid biosynthesis pathways were identified in the L. japonica transcriptome assembly. Expression of unigenes associated with chlorogenic acid was enriched in stems and leaf-2, unigenes from luteolin were enriched in stems and flowers, while unigenes from secoiridoid metabolic pathways were enriched in leaf-1 and shoot apex. Our results showed that different tissues of L. japonica are enriched with sets of unigenes associated with specific pharmaceutically important metabolic pathways and, therefore, possess unique medicinal properties. The present study will serve as a resource for future attempts for functional characterization of enzyme coding genes within key metabolic processes.

  6. Large-Scale Functional RNAi Screen in C. elegans Identifies TGF-β and Notch Signaling Pathways as Modifiers of CACNA1A

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Maria da Conceição; Morais, Sara; Sequeiros, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Variants in CACNA1A that encodes the pore-forming α1-subunit of human voltage-gated Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) Ca2+ channels cause several autosomal-dominant neurologic disorders, including familial hemiplegic migraine type 1, episodic ataxia type 2, and spinocerebellar ataxia type 6. To identify modifiers of incoordination in movement disorders, we performed a large-scale functional RNAi screen, using the Caenorhabditis elegans strain CB55, which carries a truncating mutation in the unc-2 gene, the worm ortholog for the human CACNA1A. The screen was carried out by the feeding method in 96-well liquid culture format, using the ORFeome v1.1 feeding library, and time-lapse imaging of worms in liquid culture was used to assess changes in thrashing behavior. We looked for genes that, when silenced, either ameliorated the slow and uncoordinated phenotype of unc-2, or interacted to produce a more severe phenotype. Of the 350 putative hits from the primary screen, 37 genes consistently showed reproducible results. At least 75% of these are specifically expressed in the C. elegans neurons. Functional network analysis and gene ontology revealed overrepresentation of genes involved in development, growth, locomotion, signal transduction, and vesicle-mediated transport. We have expanded the functional network of genes involved in neurodegeneration leading to cerebellar ataxia related to unc-2/CACNA1A, further confirming the involvement of the transforming growth factor β pathway and adding a novel signaling cascade, the Notch pathway. PMID:27005779

  7. Oxygen-dependent copper toxicity: targets in the chlorophyll biosynthesis pathway identified in the copper efflux ATPase CopA deficient mutant.

    PubMed

    Liotenberg, Sylviane; Steunou, Anne-Soisig; Durand, Anne; Bourbon, Marie-Line; Bollivar, David; Hansson, Mats; Astier, Chantal; Ouchane, Soufian

    2015-06-01

    Characterization of a copA(-) mutant in the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rubrivivax gelatinosus under low oxygen or anaerobic conditions, as well as in the human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae identified HemN as a copper toxicity target enzyme in the porphyrin synthesis pathway. Heme synthesis is, however, unaffected by copper under high oxygen tension because of the aerobic coproporphyrinogen III oxidase HemF. Nevertheless, in the copA(-) mutant under aerobiosis, we show that the chlorophyll biosynthesis pathway is affected by excess copper resulting in a substantial decrease of the photosystem. Analyses of pigments and enzyme activity showed that under low copper concentrations, the mutant accumulated protochlorophyllide, suggesting that the protochlorophyllide reductase activity is affected by excess copper. Increase of copper concentration led to a complete lack of chlorophyll synthesis as a result of the loss of Mg-chelatase activity. Both enzymes are widely distributed from bacteria to plants; both are [4Fe-4S] proteins and oxygen sensitive; our data demonstrate their in vivo susceptibility to copper in the presence of oxygen. Additionally, our study provides the understanding of molecular mechanisms that may contribute to chlorosis in plants when exposed to metals. The role of copper efflux systems and the impact of copper on heme and chlorophyll biosynthesis in phototrophs are addressed.

  8. Midbrain Gene Screening Identifies a New Mesoaccumbal Glutamatergic Pathway and a Marker for Dopamine Cells Neuroprotected in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Viereckel, Thomas; Dumas, Sylvie; Smith-Anttila, Casey J. A.; Vlcek, Bianca; Bimpisidis, Zisis; Lagerström, Malin C.; Konradsson-Geuken, Åsa; Wallén-Mackenzie, Åsa

    2016-01-01

    The ventral tegmental area (VTA) and substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) of the midbrain are associated with Parkinson’s disease (PD), schizophrenia, mood disorders and addiction. Based on the recently unraveled heterogeneity within the VTA and SNc, where glutamate, GABA and co-releasing neurons have been found to co-exist with the classical dopamine neurons, there is a compelling need for identification of gene expression patterns that represent this heterogeneity and that are of value for development of human therapies. Here, several unique gene expression patterns were identified in the mouse midbrain of which NeuroD6 and Grp were expressed within different dopaminergic subpopulations of the VTA, and TrpV1 within a small heterogeneous population. Optogenetics-coupled in vivo amperometry revealed a previously unknown glutamatergic mesoaccumbal pathway characterized by TrpV1-Cre-expression. Human GRP was strongly detected in non-melanized dopaminergic neurons within the SNc of both control and PD brains, suggesting GRP as a marker for neuroprotected neurons in PD. This study thus unravels markers for distinct subpopulations of neurons within the mouse and human midbrain, defines unique anatomical subregions within the VTA and exposes an entirely new glutamatergic pathway. Finally, both TRPV1 and GRP are implied in midbrain physiology of importance to neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:27762319

  9. Hyperoxia-Induced Protein Alterations in Renal Rat Tissue: A Quantitative Proteomic Approach to Identify Hyperoxia-Induced Effects in Cellular Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hinkelbein, Jochen; Böhm, Lennert; Spelten, Oliver; Sander, David; Soltész, Stefan; Braunecker, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. In renal tissue as well as in other organs, supranormal oxygen pressure may lead to deleterious consequences on a cellular level. Additionally, hyperoxia-induced effect in cells and related free radicals may potentially contribute to renal failure. The aim of this study was to analyze time-dependent alterations of rat kidney protein expression after short-term normobaric hyperoxia using proteomics and bioinformatic approaches. Material and Methods. N = 36 Wistar rats were randomized into six different groups: three groups with normobaric hyperoxia (exposure to 100% oxygen for 3 h) and three groups with normobaric normoxia (NN; room air). After hyperoxia exposure, kidneys were removed immediately, after 3 days and after 7 days. Kidney lysates were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by peptide mass fingerprinting using tandem mass spectrometry. Statistical analysis was performed with DeCyder 2D software (p < 0.01). Biological functions of differential regulated proteins were studied using functional network analysis (Ingenuity Pathways Analysis and PathwayStudio). Results. Expression of 14 proteins was significantly altered (p < 0.01): eight proteins (MEP1A_RAT, RSSA_RAT, F16P1_RAT, STML2_RAT, BPNT1_RAT, LGMN_RAT, ATPA_RAT, and VDAC1_RAT) were downregulated and six proteins (MTUS1_RAT, F16P1_RAT, ACTG_RAT, ACTB_RAT, 2ABA_RAT, and RAB1A_RAT) were upregulated. Bioinformatic analyses revealed an association of regulated proteins with inflammation. Conclusions. Significant alterations in renal protein expression could be demonstrated for up to 7 days even after short-term hyperoxia. The identified proteins indicate an association with inflammation signaling cascades. MEP1A and VDAC1 could be promising candidates to identify hyperoxic injury in kidney cells. PMID:26106253

  10. Identifying quantitative operation principles in metabolic pathways: a systematic method for searching feasible enzyme activity patterns leading to cellular adaptive responses

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Optimization methods allow designing changes in a system so that specific goals are attained. These techniques are fundamental for metabolic engineering. However, they are not directly applicable for investigating the evolution of metabolic adaptation to environmental changes. Although biological systems have evolved by natural selection and result in well-adapted systems, we can hardly expect that actual metabolic processes are at the theoretical optimum that could result from an optimization analysis. More likely, natural systems are to be found in a feasible region compatible with global physiological requirements. Results We first present a new method for globally optimizing nonlinear models of metabolic pathways that are based on the Generalized Mass Action (GMA) representation. The optimization task is posed as a nonconvex nonlinear programming (NLP) problem that is solved by an outer-approximation algorithm. This method relies on solving iteratively reduced NLP slave subproblems and mixed-integer linear programming (MILP) master problems that provide valid upper and lower bounds, respectively, on the global solution to the original NLP. The capabilities of this method are illustrated through its application to the anaerobic fermentation pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We next introduce a method to identify the feasibility parametric regions that allow a system to meet a set of physiological constraints that can be represented in mathematical terms through algebraic equations. This technique is based on applying the outer-approximation based algorithm iteratively over a reduced search space in order to identify regions that contain feasible solutions to the problem and discard others in which no feasible solution exists. As an example, we characterize the feasible enzyme activity changes that are compatible with an appropriate adaptive response of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to heat shock Conclusion Our results show the utility of the

  11. Stepwise analysis of MIR9 loci identifies miR-9-5p to be involved in Oestrogen regulated pathways in breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Barbano, Raffaela; Pasculli, Barbara; Rendina, Michelina; Fontana, Andrea; Fusilli, Caterina; Copetti, Massimiliano; Castellana, Stefano; Valori, Vanna Maria; Morritti, Maria; Graziano, Paolo; Luigi, Ciuffreda; Coco, Michelina; Picardo, Francesco; Mazza, Tommaso; Evron, Ella; Murgo, Roberto; Maiello, Evaristo; Esteller, Manel; Fazio, Vito Michele; Parrella, Paola

    2017-01-01

    miR-9 was initially identified as an epigenetically regulated miRNA in tumours, but inconsistent findings have been reported so far. We analysed the expression of miR-9-5p, miR-9-3p, pri-miRs and MIR9 promoters methylation status in 131 breast cancer cases and 12 normal breast tissues (NBTs). The expression of both mature miRs was increased in tumours as compared to NBTs (P < 0.001) and negatively correlated with ER protein expression (P = 0.005 and P = 0.003, for miR-9-3p and miR-9-5p respectively). In addition, miR-9-5p showed a significant negative correlation with PgR (P = 0.002). Consistently, miR-9-5p and miR-9 3p were differentially expressed in the breast cancer subgroups identified by ER and PgR expression and HER2 amplification. No significant correlation between promoter methylation and pri-miRNAs expressions was found either in tumours or in NBTs. In the Luminal breast cancer subtype the expression of miR-9-5p was associated with a worse prognosis in both univariable and multivariable analyses. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis exploring the putative interactions among miR-9-5p/miR-9-3p, ER and PgR upstream and downstream regulators suggested a regulatory loop by which miR-9-5p but not miR-9-3p is induced by steroid hormone receptor and acts within hormone-receptor regulated pathways. PMID:28345661

  12. An algorithm for efficient identification of branched metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Heath, Allison P; Bennett, George N; Kavraki, Lydia E

    2011-11-01

    This article presents a new graph-based algorithm for identifying branched metabolic pathways in multi-genome scale metabolic data. The term branched is used to refer to metabolic pathways between compounds that consist of multiple pathways that interact biochemically. A branched pathway may produce a target compound through a combination of linear pathways that split compounds into smaller ones, work in parallel with many compounds, and join compounds into larger ones. While branched metabolic pathways predominate in metabolic networks, most previous work has focused on identifying linear metabolic pathways. The ability to automatically identify branched pathways is important in applications that require a deeper understanding of metabolism, such as metabolic engineering and drug target identification. The algorithm presented in this article utilizes explicit atom tracking to identify linear metabolic pathways and then merges them together into branched metabolic pathways. We provide results on several well-characterized metabolic pathways that demonstrate that the new merging approach can efficiently find biologically relevant branched metabolic pathways.

  13. Biochemical-Pathway Diversity in Archabacteria

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-28

    KCl was present in the buffer. Chorismate mutase . The enzyme is very active but possesses a rather low affinity for chorismate . Each of the three...the enzymological similarities include the curious properties of chorismate mutase and the lack of detectable DAHP synthase. These results support

  14. Whole-exome sequencing identifies multiple loss-of-function mutations of NF-κB pathway regulators in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hong; Dai, Wei; Cheung, Arthur Kwok Leung; Ko, Josephine Mun Yee; Kan, Rebecca; Wong, Bonnie Wing Yan; Leong, Merrin Man Long; Deng, Mingdan; Kwok, Tommy Chin Tung; Chan, Jimmy Yu-Wai; Kwong, Dora Lai-Wan; Lee, Anne Wing-Mui; Ng, Wai Tong; Ngan, Roger Kai Cheong; Yau, Chun Chung; Tung, Stewart; Lee, Victor Ho-fun; Lam, Ka-On; Kwan, Chung Kong; Li, Wing Sum; Yau, Stephen; Chan, Kwok-Wah; Lung, Maria Li

    2016-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is an epithelial malignancy with a unique geographical distribution. The genomic abnormalities leading to NPC pathogenesis remain unclear. In total, 135 NPC tumors were examined to characterize the mutational landscape using whole-exome sequencing and targeted resequencing. An APOBEC cytidine deaminase mutagenesis signature was revealed in the somatic mutations. Noticeably, multiple loss-of-function mutations were identified in several NF-κB signaling negative regulators NFKBIA, CYLD, and TNFAIP3. Functional studies confirmed that inhibition of NFKBIA had a significant impact on NF-κB activity and NPC cell growth. The identified loss-of-function mutations in NFKBIA leading to protein truncation contributed to the altered NF-κB activity, which is critical for NPC tumorigenesis. In addition, somatic mutations were found in several cancer-relevant pathways, including cell cycle-phase transition, cell death, EBV infection, and viral carcinogenesis. These data provide an enhanced road map for understanding the molecular basis underlying NPC. PMID:27647909

  15. Shared gene expression patterns in mesenchymal progenitors derived from lung and epidermis in pulmonary arterial hypertension: identifying key pathways in pulmonary vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Gaskill, Christa; Marriott, Shennea; Pratap, Sidd; Menon, Swapna; Hedges, Lora K.; Fessel, Joshua P.; Kropski, Jonathan A.; Ames, DeWayne; Wheeler, Lisa; Loyd, James E.; Hemnes, Anna R.; Roop, Dennis R.; Klemm, Dwight J.; Austin, Eric D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rapid access to lung-derived cells from stable subjects is a major challenge in the pulmonary hypertension field, given the relative contraindication of lung biopsy. In these studies, we sought to demonstrate the importance of evaluating a cell type that actively participates in disease processes, as well as the potential to translate these findings to vascular beds in other nonlung tissues, in this instance perivascular skin mesenchymal cells (MCs). We utilized posttransplant or autopsy lung explant–derived cells (ABCG2-expressing mesenchymal progenitor cells [MPCs], fibroblasts) and skin-derived MCs to test the hypothesis that perivascular ABCG2 MPCs derived from pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) patient lung and skin would express a gene profile reflective of ongoing vascular dysfunction. By analyzing the genetic signatures and pathways associated with abnormal ABCG2 lung MPC phenotypes during PAH and evaluating them in lung- and skin-derived MCs, we have identified potential predictor genes for detection of PAH as well as a targetable mechanism to restore MPCs and microvascular function. These studies are the first to explore the utility of expanding the study of ABCG2 MPC regulation of the pulmonary microvasculature to the epidermis, in order to identify potential markers for adult lung vascular disease, such as PAH. PMID:28090290

  16. Shared gene expression patterns in mesenchymal progenitors derived from lung and epidermis in pulmonary arterial hypertension: identifying key pathways in pulmonary vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Gaskill, Christa; Marriott, Shennea; Pratap, Sidd; Menon, Swapna; Hedges, Lora K; Fessel, Joshua P; Kropski, Jonathan A; Ames, DeWayne; Wheeler, Lisa; Loyd, James E; Hemnes, Anna R; Roop, Dennis R; Klemm, Dwight J; Austin, Eric D; Majka, Susan M

    2016-12-01

    Rapid access to lung-derived cells from stable subjects is a major challenge in the pulmonary hypertension field, given the relative contraindication of lung biopsy. In these studies, we sought to demonstrate the importance of evaluating a cell type that actively participates in disease processes, as well as the potential to translate these findings to vascular beds in other nonlung tissues, in this instance perivascular skin mesenchymal cells (MCs). We utilized posttransplant or autopsy lung explant-derived cells (ABCG2-expressing mesenchymal progenitor cells [MPCs], fibroblasts) and skin-derived MCs to test the hypothesis that perivascular ABCG2 MPCs derived from pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) patient lung and skin would express a gene profile reflective of ongoing vascular dysfunction. By analyzing the genetic signatures and pathways associated with abnormal ABCG2 lung MPC phenotypes during PAH and evaluating them in lung- and skin-derived MCs, we have identified potential predictor genes for detection of PAH as well as a targetable mechanism to restore MPCs and microvascular function. These studies are the first to explore the utility of expanding the study of ABCG2 MPC regulation of the pulmonary microvasculature to the epidermis, in order to identify potential markers for adult lung vascular disease, such as PAH.

  17. Integrated Genomics Identifies miR-32/MCL-1 Pathway as a Critical Driver of Melanomagenesis: Implications for miR-Replacement and Combination Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Prasun J.; Mishra, Pravin J.; Merlino, Glenn

    2016-01-01

    Aims Cutaneous malignant melanoma is among the deadliest human cancers, broadly resistant to most clinical therapies. A majority of patients with BRAFV600E melanomas respond well to inhibitors such as vemurafenib, but all ultimately relapse. Moreover, there are no viable treatment options available for other non-BRAF melanoma subtypes in the clinic. A key to improving treatment options lies in a better understanding of mechanisms underlying melanoma progression, which are complex and heterogeneous. Methods In this study we integrated gene and microRNA (miRNA) expression data from genetically engineered mouse models of highly and poorly malignant melanocytic tumors, as well as available human melanoma databases, and discovered an important role for a pathway centered on a tumor suppressor miRNA, miR-32. Results Malignant tumors frequently exhibited poor expression of miR-32, whose targets include NRAS, PI3K and notably, MCL-1. Accordingly, MCL-1 was often highly expressed in melanomas, and when knocked down diminished oncogenic potential. Forced MCL-1 overexpression transformed immortalized primary mouse melanocytes, but only when also expressing activating mutations in BRAF, CRAF or PI3K. Importantly, both miR-32 replacement therapy and the MCL-1-specific antagonist sabutoclax demonstrated single-agent efficacy, and acted synergistically in combination with vemurafenib in preclinical melanoma models. Conclusions We here identify miR-32/MCL-1 pathway members as key early genetic events driving melanoma progression, and suggest that their inhibition may be an effective anti-melanoma strategy irrespective of NRAS, BRAF, and PTEN status. PMID:27846237

  18. Genome wide transcriptomic analysis identifies pathways affected by the infusion of Clostridium perfringens culture supernatant in the duodenum of broilers in situ.

    PubMed

    Athanasiadou, S; Russell, K M; Kaiser, P; Kanellos, T; Burgess, S T G; Mitchell, M; Clutton, E; Naylor, S W; Low, C J; Hutchings, M R; Sparks, N

    2015-06-01

    ) infusion resulted in histological and gene expression changes consistent with necrotic enteritis in the duodenum of broilers. In the absence of live bacteria, crude culture supernatant resulted in early immunomodulation, inflammation, and cell death in the duodenum. The pathways identified here can be targeted for the development of new drugs, vaccines, and novel therapies for necrotic enteritis in broilers.

  19. Genomic and Biochemical Analysis of the Diaminopimelate and Lysine Biosynthesis Pathway in Verrucomicrobium spinosum: Identification and Partial Characterization of L,L-Diaminopimelate Aminotransferase and UDP-N-Acetylmuramoylalanyl-D-glutamyl-2,6-meso-Diaminopimelate Ligase.

    PubMed

    Nachar, Victoria R; Savka, Francisco C; McGroty, Sean E; Donovan, Katherine A; North, Rachel A; Dobson, Renwick C J; Buckley, Larry J; Hudson, André O

    2012-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Verrucomicrobium spinosum has attracted interest in recent years following the sequencing and annotation of its genome. Comparative genomic analysis of V. spinosum using diaminopimelate/lysine metabolic genes from Chlamydia trachomatis suggests that V. spinosum employs the L,L-diaminopimelate aminotransferase (DapL) pathway for diaminopimelate/lysine biosynthesis. The open reading frame corresponding to the putative dapL ortholog was cloned and the recombinant enzyme was shown to possess L,L-diaminopimelate aminotransferase activity in vitro. In vivo analysis using functional complementation confirmed that the dapL ortholog was able to functionally complement an E. coli mutant that confers auxotrophy for diaminopimelate and lysine. In addition to its role in lysine biosynthesis, the intermediate diaminopimelate has an integral role in peptidoglycan biosynthesis. To this end, the UDP-N-acetylmuramoylalanyl-d-glutamyl-2,6-meso-diaminopimelate ligase ortholog was also identified, cloned, and was shown to possess meso-diaminopimelate ligase activity in vivo. The L,L-diaminopimelate aminotransferase pathway has been experimentally confirmed in several bacteria, some of which are deemed pathogenic to animals. Since animals, and particularly humans, lack the genetic machinery for the synthesis of diaminopimelate/lysine de novo, the enzymes involved in this pathway are attractive targets for development of antibiotics. Whether dapL is an essential gene in any bacteria is currently not known. V. spinosum is an excellent candidate to investigate the essentiality of dapL, since the bacterium employs the DapL pathway for lysine and cell wall biosynthesis, is non-pathogenic to humans, facile to grow, and can be genetically manipulated.

  20. Genomic and Biochemical Analysis of the Diaminopimelate and Lysine Biosynthesis Pathway in Verrucomicrobium spinosum: Identification and Partial Characterization of L,L-Diaminopimelate Aminotransferase and UDP-N-Acetylmuramoylalanyl-D-glutamyl-2,6-meso-Diaminopimelate Ligase

    PubMed Central

    Nachar, Victoria R.; Savka, Francisco C.; McGroty, Sean E.; Donovan, Katherine A.; North, Rachel A.; Dobson, Renwick C. J.; Buckley, Larry J.; Hudson, André O.

    2012-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Verrucomicrobium spinosum has attracted interest in recent years following the sequencing and annotation of its genome. Comparative genomic analysis of V. spinosum using diaminopimelate/lysine metabolic genes from Chlamydia trachomatis suggests that V. spinosum employs the L,L-diaminopimelate aminotransferase (DapL) pathway for diaminopimelate/lysine biosynthesis. The open reading frame corresponding to the putative dapL ortholog was cloned and the recombinant enzyme was shown to possess L,L-diaminopimelate aminotransferase activity in vitro. In vivo analysis using functional complementation confirmed that the dapL ortholog was able to functionally complement an E. coli mutant that confers auxotrophy for diaminopimelate and lysine. In addition to its role in lysine biosynthesis, the intermediate diaminopimelate has an integral role in peptidoglycan biosynthesis. To this end, the UDP-N-acetylmuramoylalanyl-d-glutamyl-2,6-meso-diaminopimelate ligase ortholog was also identified, cloned, and was shown to possess meso-diaminopimelate ligase activity in vivo. The L,L-diaminopimelate aminotransferase pathway has been experimentally confirmed in several bacteria, some of which are deemed pathogenic to animals. Since animals, and particularly humans, lack the genetic machinery for the synthesis of diaminopimelate/lysine de novo, the enzymes involved in this pathway are attractive targets for development of antibiotics. Whether dapL is an essential gene in any bacteria is currently not known. V. spinosum is an excellent candidate to investigate the essentiality of dapL, since the bacterium employs the DapL pathway for lysine and cell wall biosynthesis, is non-pathogenic to humans, facile to grow, and can be genetically manipulated. PMID:22783236

  1. A Fluorescent Live Imaging Screening Assay Based on Translocation Criteria Identifies Novel Cytoplasmic Proteins Implicated in G Protein-coupled Receptor Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Lecat, Sandra; Matthes, Hans W D; Pepperkok, Rainer; Simpson, Jeremy C; Galzi, Jean-Luc

    2015-05-01

    Several cytoplasmic proteins that are involved in G protein-coupled receptor signaling cascades are known to translocate to the plasma membrane upon receptor activation, such as beta-arrestin2. Based on this example and in order to identify new cytoplasmic proteins implicated in the ON-and-OFF cycle of G protein-coupled receptor, a live-imaging screen of fluorescently labeled cytoplasmic proteins was performed using translocation criteria. The screening of 193 fluorescently tagged human proteins identified eight proteins that responded to activation of the tachykinin NK2 receptor by a change in their intracellular localization. Previously we have presented the functional characterization of one of these proteins, REDD1, that translocates to the plasma membrane. Here we report the results of the entire screening. The process of cell activation was recorded on videos at different time points and all the videos can be visualized on a dedicated website. The proteins BAIAP3 and BIN1, partially translocated to the plasma membrane upon activation of NK2 receptors. Proteins ARHGAP12 and PKM2 translocated toward membrane blebs. Three proteins that associate with the cytoskeleton were of particular interest : PLEKHH2 rearranged from individual dots located near the cell-substrate adhesion surface into lines of dots. The speriolin-like protein, SPATC1L, redistributed to cell-cell junctions. The Chloride intracellular Channel protein, CLIC2, translocated from actin-enriched plasma membrane bundles to cell-cell junctions upon activation of NK2 receptors. CLIC2, and one of its close paralogs, CLIC4, were further shown to respond with the same translocation pattern to muscarinic M3 and lysophosphatidic LPA receptors. This screen allowed us to identify potential actors in signaling pathways downstream of G protein-coupled receptors and could be scaled-up for high-content screening.

  2. Systematic Review of Micro-RNA Expression in Pre-Eclampsia Identifies a Number of Common Pathways Associated with the Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh, Adam M.; Currie, Gemma; Delles, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Background Pre-eclampsia (PE) is a complex, multi-systemic condition of pregnancy which greatly impacts maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. MicroRNAs (miRs) are differentially expressed in PE and may be important in helping to understand the condition and its pathogenesis. Methods Case-control studies investigating expression of miRs in PE were collected through a systematic literature search. Data was extracted and compared from 58 studies to identify the most promising miRs associated with PE pathogenesis and identify areas of methodology which could account for often conflicting results. Results Some of the most frequently differentially expressed miRs in PE include miR-210, miR-223 and miR-126/126* which associate strongly with the etiological domains of hypoxia, immunology and angiogenesis. Members of the miR-515 family belonging to the imprinted chromosome 19 miR cluster with putative roles in trophoblast invasion were also found to be differentially expressed. Certain miRs appear to associate with more severe forms of PE such as miR-210 and the immune-related miR-181a and miR-15 families. Patterns of miR expression may help pinpoint key pathways (e.g. IL-6/miR-223/STAT3) and aid in untangling the heterogeneous nature of PE. The detectable presence of many PE-associated miRs in antenatal circulatory samples suggests their usefulness as predictive biomarkers. Further progress in ascertaining the clinical value of miRs and in understanding how they might contribute to pathogenesis is predicated upon resolving current methodological challenges in studies. These include differences in diagnostic criteria, cohort characteristics, sampling technique, RNA isolation and platform-dependent variation in miR profiling. Conclusion Reviewing studies of PE-associated miRs has revealed their potential as informants of underlying target genes and pathways relating to PE pathogenesis. However, the incongruity in results across current studies hampers their

  3. Pitfalls in the interpretation of common biochemical tests

    PubMed Central

    Ayling, R.

    2000-01-01

    This review considers some of the more common problems in the interpretation of the results of biochemical tests and, where possible, highlights ways in which errors can be identified or avoided.


Keywords: biochemical tests PMID:10684320

  4. PDGF, TGF-beta, and FGF signaling is important for differentiation and growth of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs): transcriptional profiling can identify markers and signaling pathways important in differentiation of MSCs into adipogenic, chondrogenic, and osteogenic lineages.

    PubMed

    Ng, Felicia; Boucher, Shayne; Koh, Susie; Sastry, Konduru S R; Chase, Lucas; Lakshmipathy, Uma; Choong, Cleo; Yang, Zheng; Vemuri, Mohan C; Rao, Mahendra S; Tanavde, Vivek

    2008-07-15

    We compared the transcriptomes of marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) with differentiated adipocytes, osteocytes, and chondrocytes derived from these MSCs. Using global gene-expression profiling arrays to detect RNA transcripts, we have identified markers that are specific for MSCs and their differentiated progeny. Further, we have also identified pathways that MSCs use to differentiate into adipogenic, chondrogenic, and osteogenic lineages. We identified activin-mediated transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta signaling, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) signaling and fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling as the key pathways involved in MSC differentiation. The differentiation of MSCs into these lineages is affected when these pathways are perturbed by inhibitors of cell surface receptor function. Since growth and differentiation are tightly linked processes, we also examined the importance of these 3 pathways in MSC growth. These 3 pathways were necessary and sufficient for MSC growth. Inhibiting any of these pathways slowed MSC growth, whereas a combination of TGF-beta, PDGF, and beta-FGF was sufficient to grow MSCs in a serum-free medium up to 5 passages. Thus, this study illustrates it is possible to predict signaling pathways active in cellular differentiation and growth using microarray data and experimentally verify these predictions.

  5. Integrated analysis of oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma identifies key variants and pathways linked to risk habits, HPV, clinical parameters and tumor recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Neeraja; Gupta, Saurabh; Palve, Vinayak; Varghese, Linu; Pattnaik, Swetansu; Jain, Prach; Khyriem, Costerwell; Hariharan, Arun; Dhas, Kunal; Nair, Jayalakshmi; Pareek, Manisha; Prasad, Venkatesh; Siddappa, Gangotri; Suresh, Amritha; Kekatpure, Vikram; Kuriakose, Moni; Panda, Binay

    2015-01-01

    Oral tongue squamous cell carcinomas (OTSCC) are a homogeneous group of tumors characterized by aggressive behavior, early spread to lymph nodes and a higher rate of regional failure. Additionally, the incidence of OTSCC among younger population (<50yrs) is on the rise; many of whom lack the typical associated risk factors of alcohol and/or tobacco exposure. We present data on single nucleotide variations (SNVs), indels, regions with loss of heterozygosity (LOH), and copy number variations (CNVs) from fifty-paired oral tongue primary tumors and link the significant somatic variants with clinical parameters, epidemiological factors including human papilloma virus (HPV) infection and tumor recurrence. Apart from the frequent somatic variants harbored in TP53, CASP8, RASA1, NOTCH and CDKN2A genes, significant amplifications and/or deletions were detected in chromosomes 6-9, and 11 in the tumors. Variants in CASP8 and CDKN2A were mutually exclusive. CDKN2A, PIK3CA, RASA1 and DMD variants were exclusively linked to smoking, chewing, HPV infection and tumor stage. We also performed a whole-genome gene expression study that identified matrix metalloproteases to be highly expressed in tumors and linked pathways involving arachidonic acid and NF-k-B to habits and distant metastasis, respectively. Functional knockdown studies in cell lines demonstrated the role of CASP8 in a HPV-negative OTSCC cell line. Finally, we identified a 38-gene minimal signature that predicts tumor recurrence using an ensemble machine-learning method. Taken together, this study links molecular signatures to various clinical and epidemiological factors in a homogeneous tumor population with a relatively high HPV prevalence. PMID:26834999

  6. The use of genome-wide eQTL associations in lymphoblastoid cell lines to identify novel genetic pathways involved in complex traits.

    PubMed

    Min, Josine L; Taylor, Jennifer M; Richards, J Brent; Watts, Tim; Pettersson, Fredrik H; Broxholme, John; Ahmadi, Kourosh R; Surdulescu, Gabriela L; Lowy, Ernesto; Gieger, Christian; Newton-Cheh, Chris; Perola, Markus; Soranzo, Nicole; Surakka, Ida; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Morris, Andrew P; Cardon, Lon R; Spector, Tim D; Zondervan, Krina T

    2011-01-01

    The integrated analysis of genotypic and expression data for association with complex traits could identify novel genetic pathways involved in complex traits. We profiled 19,573 expression probes in Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from 299 twins and correlated these with 44 quantitative traits (QTs). For 939 expressed probes correlating with more than one QT, we investigated the presence of eQTL associations in three datasets of 57 CEU HapMap founders and 86 unrelated twins. Genome-wide association analysis of these probes with 2.2 m SNPs revealed 131 potential eQTLs (1,989 eQTL SNPs) overlapping between the HapMap datasets, five of which were in cis (58 eQTL SNPs). We then tested 535 SNPs tagging the eQTL SNPs, for association with the relevant QT in 2,905 twins. We identified nine potential SNP-QT associations (P<0.01) but none significantly replicated in five large consortia of 1,097-16,129 subjects. We also failed to replicate previous reported eQTL associations with body mass index, plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides levels derived from lymphocytes, adipose and liver tissue. Our results and additional power calculations suggest that proponents may have been overoptimistic in the power of LCLs in eQTL approaches to elucidate regulatory genetic effects on complex traits using the small datasets generated to date. Nevertheless, larger tissue-specific expression data sets relevant to specific traits are becoming available, and should enable the adoption of similar integrated analyses in the near future.

  7. Network analysis of gene expression in peripheral blood identifies mTOR and NF-κB pathways involved in antipsychotic-induced extrapyramidal symptoms.

    PubMed

    Mas, S; Gassó, P; Parellada, E; Bernardo, M; Lafuente, A

    2015-10-01

    To identify the candidate genes for pharmacogenetic studies of antipsychotic (AP)-induced extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS), we propose a systems biology analytical approach, based on protein-protein interaction network construction and functional annotation analysis, of changes in gene expression (Human Genome U219 Array Plate) induced by treatment with risperidone or paliperidone in peripheral blood. 12 AP-naïve patients with first-episode psychosis participated in the present study. Our analysis revealed that, in response to AP treatment, constructed networks were enriched for different biological processes in patients without EPS (ubiquitination, protein folding and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) metabolism) compared with those presenting EPS (insulin receptor signaling, lipid modification, regulation of autophagy and immune response). Moreover, the observed differences also involved specific pathways, such as anaphase promoting complex /cdc20, prefoldin/CCT/triC and ATP synthesis in no-EPS patients, and mammalian target of rapamycin and NF-κB kinases in patients with EPS. Our results showing different patterns of gene expression in EPS patients, offer new and valuable markers for pharmacogenetic studies.

  8. eIF5A1/RhoGDIα pathway: a novel therapeutic target for treatment of spinal cord injury identified by a proteomics approach

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Shang, Fei-Fei; Xu, Yang; Belegu, Visar; Xia, Lei; Zhao, Wei; Liu, Ran; Wang, Wei; Liu, Jin; Li, Chen-Yun; Wang, Ting-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is frequently accompanied by a degree of spontaneous functional recovery. The underlying mechanisms through which such recovery is generated remain elusive. In this study, we observed a significant spontaneous motor function recovery 14 to 28 days after spinal cord transection (SCT) in rats. Using a comparative proteomics approach, caudal to the injury, we detected difference in 20 proteins. Two of these proteins, are eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A1 (eIF5A1) that is involved in cell survival and proliferation, and Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor alpha (RhoGDIα), a member of Rho GDI family that is involved in cytoskeletal reorganization. After confirming the changes in expression levels of these two proteins following SCT, we showed that in vivo eIF5A1 up-regulation and down-regulation significantly increased and decreased, respectively, motor function recovery. In vitro, eIF5A1 overexpression in primary neurons increased cell survival and elongated neurite length while eIF5A1 knockdown reversed these results. We found that RhoGDIα up-regulation and down-regulation rescues the effect of eIF5A1 down-regulation and up-regulation both in vivo and in vitro. Therefore, we have identified eIF5A1/RhoGDIα pathway as a new therapeutic target for treatment of spinal cord injured patients. PMID:26593060

  9. Identifying early pathways of risk and resilience: The co-development of internalizing and externalizing symptoms and the role of harsh parenting

    PubMed Central

    Wiggins, Jillian Lee; Mitchell, Colter; Hyde, Luke W.; Monk, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    Psychological disorders co-occur often in children, but little has been done to document the types of conjoint pathways internalizing and externalizing symptoms may take from the crucial early period of toddlerhood or how harsh parenting may overlap with early symptom co-development. To examine symptom co-development trajectories, we identified latent classes of individuals based on internalizing and externalizing symptoms across ages 3–9 and found three symptom co-development classes: normative symptoms (low), severe-decreasing symptoms (initially high but rapidly declining) and severe symptoms (high) trajectories. Next, joint models examined how parenting trajectories overlapped with internalizing and externalizing symptom trajectories. These trajectory classes demonstrated that, normatively, harsh parenting increased after toddlerhood, but the severe symptoms class was characterized by a higher level and steeper increase in harsh parenting and the severe-decreasing class by high, stable harsh parenting. Additionally, a transactional model examined the bi-directional relationships among internalizing and externalizing symptoms and harsh parenting as they may cascade over time in this early period. Harsh parenting uniquely contributed to externalizing symptoms, controlling for internalizing symptoms, but not vice versa. Also, internalizing symptoms appeared to be a mechanism by which externalizing symptoms increase. Results highlight the importance accounting for both internalizing and externalizing symptoms from an early age to understand risk for developing psychopathology and the role harsh parenting plays in influencing these trajectories. PMID:26439075

  10. Inference of Longevity-Related Genes from a Robust Coexpression Network of Seed Maturation Identifies Regulators Linking Seed Storability to Biotic Defense-Related Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Righetti, Karima; Vu, Joseph Ly; Pelletier, Sandra; Vu, Benoit Ly; Glaab, Enrico; Lalanne, David; Pasha, Asher; Patel, Rohan V.; Provart, Nicholas J.; Verdier, Jerome; Leprince, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Seed longevity, the maintenance of viability during storage, is a crucial factor for preservation of genetic resources and ensuring proper seedling establishment and high crop yield. We used a systems biology approach to identify key genes regulating the acquisition of longevity during seed maturation of Medicago truncatula. Using 104 transcriptomes from seed developmental time courses obtained in five growth environments, we generated a robust, stable coexpression network (MatNet), thereby capturing the conserved backbone of maturation. Using a trait-based gene significance measure, a coexpression module related to the acquisition of longevity was inferred from MatNet. Comparative analysis of the maturation processes in M. truncatula and Arabidopsis thaliana seeds and mining Arabidopsis interaction databases revealed conserved connectivity for 87% of longevity module nodes between both species. Arabidopsis mutant screening for longevity and maturation phenotypes demonstrated high predictive power of the longevity cross-species network. Overrepresentation analysis of the network nodes indicated biological functions related to defense, light, and auxin. Characterization of defense-related wrky3 and nf-x1-like1 (nfxl1) transcription factor mutants demonstrated that these genes regulate some of the network nodes and exhibit impaired acquisition of longevity during maturation. These data suggest that seed longevity evolved by co-opting existing genetic pathways regulating the activation of defense against pathogens. PMID:26410298

  11. Integrated RNA-Seq and sRNA-Seq Analysis Identifies Chilling and Freezing Responsive Key Molecular Players and Pathways in Tea Plant (Camellia sinensis)

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Chao; Zhao, Lei; Wang, Yu; Shen, Jiazhi; Zhang, Yinfei; Jia, Sisi; Li, Yusheng; Ding, Zhaotang

    2015-01-01

    Tea [Camellia sinensis (L) O. Kuntze, Theaceae] is one of the most popular non-alcoholic beverages worldwide. Cold stress is one of the most severe abiotic stresses that limit tea plants’ growth, survival and geographical distribution. However, the genetic regulatory network and signaling pathways involved in cold stress responses in tea plants remain unearthed. Using RNA-Seq, DGE and sRNA-Seq technologies, we performed an integrative analysis of miRNA and mRNA expression profiling and their regulatory network of tea plants under chilling (4℃) and freezing (-5℃) stress. Differentially expressed (DE) miRNA and mRNA profiles were obtained based on fold change analysis, miRNAs and target mRNAs were found to show both coherent and incoherent relationships in the regulatory network. Furthermore, we compared several key pathways (e.g., ‘Photosynthesis’), GO terms (e.g., ‘response to karrikin’) and transcriptional factors (TFs, e.g., DREB1b/CBF1) which were identified as involved in the early chilling and/or freezing response of tea plants. Intriguingly, we found that karrikins, a new group of plant growth regulators, and β-primeverosidase (BPR), a key enzyme functionally relevant with the formation of tea aroma might play an important role in both early chilling and freezing response of tea plants. Quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis further confirmed the results from RNA-Seq and sRNA-Seq analysis. This is the first study to simultaneously profile the expression patterns of both miRNAs and mRNAs on a genome-wide scale to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of early responses of tea plants to cold stress. In addition to gaining a deeper insight into the cold resistant characteristics of tea plants, we provide a good case study to analyse mRNA/miRNA expression and profiling of non-model plant species using next-generation sequencing technology. PMID:25901577

  12. Serum Biochemical Phenotypes in the Domestic Dog.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Mei; Hadox, Erin; Szladovits, Balazs; Garden, Oliver A

    2016-01-01

    The serum or plasma biochemical profile is essential in the diagnosis and monitoring of systemic disease in veterinary medicine, but current reference intervals typically take no account of breed-specific differences. Breed-specific hematological phenotypes have been documented in the domestic dog, but little has been published on serum biochemical phenotypes in this species. Serum biochemical profiles of dogs in which all measurements fell within the existing reference intervals were retrieved from a large veterinary database. Serum biochemical profiles from 3045 dogs were retrieved, of which 1495 had an accompanying normal glucose concentration. Sixty pure breeds plus a mixed breed control group were represented by at least 10 individuals. All analytes, except for sodium, chloride and glucose, showed variation with age. Total protein, globulin, potassium, chloride, creatinine, cholesterol, total bilirubin, ALT, CK, amylase, and lipase varied between sexes. Neutering status significantly impacted all analytes except albumin, sodium, calcium, urea, and glucose. Principal component analysis of serum biochemical data revealed 36 pure breeds with distinctive phenotypes. Furthermore, comparative analysis identified 23 breeds with significant differences from the mixed breed group in all biochemical analytes except urea and glucose. Eighteen breeds were identified by both principal component and comparative analysis. Tentative reference intervals were generated for breeds with a distinctive phenotype identified by comparative analysis and represented by at least 120 individuals. This is the first large-scale analysis of breed-specific serum biochemical phenotypes in the domestic dog and highlights potential genetic components of biochemical traits in this species.

  13. Serum Biochemical Phenotypes in the Domestic Dog

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu-Mei; Hadox, Erin; Szladovits, Balazs; Garden, Oliver A.

    2016-01-01

    The serum or plasma biochemical profile is essential in the diagnosis and monitoring of systemic disease in veterinary medicine, but current reference intervals typically take no account of breed-specific differences. Breed-specific hematological phenotypes have been documented in the domestic dog, but little has been published on serum biochemical phenotypes in this species. Serum biochemical profiles of dogs in which all measurements fell within the existing reference intervals were retrieved from a large veterinary database. Serum biochemical profiles from 3045 dogs were retrieved, of which 1495 had an accompanying normal glucose concentration. Sixty pure breeds plus a mixed breed control group were represented by at least 10 individuals. All analytes, except for sodium, chloride and glucose, showed variation with age. Total protein, globulin, potassium, chloride, creatinine, cholesterol, total bilirubin, ALT, CK, amylase, and lipase varied between sexes. Neutering status significantly impacted all analytes except albumin, sodium, calcium, urea, and glucose. Principal component analysis of serum biochemical data revealed 36 pure breeds with distinctive phenotypes. Furthermore, comparative analysis identified 23 breeds with significant differences from the mixed breed group in all biochemical analytes except urea and glucose. Eighteen breeds were identified by both principal component and comparative analysis. Tentative reference intervals were generated for breeds with a distinctive phenotype identified by comparative analysis and represented by at least 120 individuals. This is the first large-scale analysis of breed-specific serum biochemical phenotypes in the domestic dog and highlights potential genetic components of biochemical traits in this species. PMID:26919479

  14. Multilayer OMIC Data in Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma Identifies the STAT3 Pathway as a Potential Therapeutic Target in RET(M918T) Tumors.

    PubMed

    Mancikova, Veronika; Montero-Conde, Cristina; Perales-Paton, Javier; Fernandez, Agustin; Santacana, María; Jodkowska, Karolina; Inglada-Pérez, Lucia; Castelblanco, Esmeralda; Borrego, Salud; Encinas, Mario; Matias-Guiu, Xavier; Fraga, Mario; Robledo, Mercedes

    2017-03-01

    Purpose: Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a rare disease with few genetic drivers, and the etiology specific to each known susceptibility mutation remains unknown. Exploiting multilayer genomic data, we focused our