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Sample records for identify biochemical pathways

  1. Metabolomic profiling identifies biochemical pathways associated with castrate resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Akash K; Vareed, Shaiju K; Basu, Sumanta; Putluri, Vasanta; Putluri, Nagireddy; Panzitt, Katrin; Brennan, Christine A; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Vergara, Ismael A.; Erho, Nicholas; Weigel, Nancy L; Mitsiades, Nicholas; Shojaie, Ali; Palapattu, Ganesh; Michailidis, George; Sreekumar, Arun

    2014-01-01

    Despite recent developments in treatment strategies, castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is still the second leading cause of cancer associated mortality among American men, the biological underpinnings of which are not well understood. To this end, we measured levels of 150 metabolites and examined the rate of utilization of 184 metabolites in metastatic androgen dependent prostate cancer (AD) and CRPC cell lines using a combination of targeted mass spectrometry and metabolic phenotyping. Metabolic data were used to derive biochemical pathways that were enriched in CRPC, using Oncomine Concept Maps (OCM). The enriched pathways were then examined in-silico for their association with treatment failure (i.e., prostate specific antigen (PSA) recurrence or biochemical recurrence) using published clinically annotated gene expression data sets. Our results indicate that a total of 19 metabolites were altered in CRPC compared to AD cell lines. These altered metabolites mapped to a highly interconnected network of biochemical pathways that describe UDP glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) activity. We observed an association with time to treatment failure in an analysis employing genes restricted to this pathway in three independent gene expression data sets. In summary, our studies highlight the value of employing metabolomic strategies in cell lines to derive potentially clinically useful predictive tools. PMID:24359151

  2. Metabolomic profiling identifies biochemical pathways associated with castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Akash K; Vareed, Shaiju K; Basu, Sumanta; Putluri, Vasanta; Putluri, Nagireddy; Panzitt, Katrin; Brennan, Christine A; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Vergara, Ismael A; Erho, Nicholas; Weigel, Nancy L; Mitsiades, Nicholas; Shojaie, Ali; Palapattu, Ganesh; Michailidis, George; Sreekumar, Arun

    2014-02-01

    Despite recent developments in treatment strategies, castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is still the second leading cause of cancer-associated mortality among American men, the biological underpinnings of which are not well understood. To this end, we measured levels of 150 metabolites and examined the rate of utilization of 184 metabolites in metastatic androgen-dependent prostate cancer (AD) and CRPC cell lines using a combination of targeted mass spectrometry and metabolic phenotyping. Metabolic data were used to derive biochemical pathways that were enriched in CRPC, using Oncomine concept maps (OCM). The enriched pathways were then examined in-silico for their association with treatment failure (i.e., prostate specific antigen (PSA) recurrence or biochemical recurrence) using published clinically annotated gene expression data sets. Our results indicate that a total of 19 metabolites were altered in CRPC compared to AD cell lines. These altered metabolites mapped to a highly interconnected network of biochemical pathways that describe UDP glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) activity. We observed an association with time to treatment failure in an analysis employing genes restricted to this pathway in three independent gene expression data sets. In summary, our studies highlight the value of employing metabolomic strategies in cell lines to derive potentially clinically useful predictive tools. PMID:24359151

  3. PreProPath: An Uncertainty-Aware Algorithm for Identifying Predictable Profitable Pathways in Biochemical Networks.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Ehsan; Walker, Mark; Lee, Kyongbum; Hassoun, Soha

    2015-01-01

    Pathway analysis is a powerful approach to enable rational design or redesign of biochemical networks for optimizing metabolic engineering and synthetic biology objectives such as production of desired chemicals or biomolecules from specific nutrients. While experimental methods can be quite successful, computational approaches can enhance discovery and guide experimentation by efficiently exploring very large design spaces. We present a computational algorithm, Predictably Profitable Path (PreProPath), to identify target pathways best suited for engineering modifications. The algorithm utilizes uncertainties about the metabolic networks operating state inherent in the underdetermined linear equations representing the stoichiometric model. Flux Variability Analysis is used to determine the operational flux range. PreProPath identifies a path that is predictable in behavior, exhibiting small flux ranges, and profitable, containing the least restrictive flux-limiting reaction in the network. The algorithm is computationally efficient because it does not require enumeration of pathways. The results of case studies show that PreProPath can efficiently analyze variances in metabolic states and model uncertainties to suggest pathway engineering strategies that have been previously supported by experimental data.

  4. Biochemical pathways in seed oil synthesis.

    PubMed

    Bates, Philip D; Stymne, Sten; Ohlrogge, John

    2013-06-01

    Oil produced in plant seeds is utilized as a major source of calories for human nutrition, as feedstocks for non-food uses such as soaps and polymers, and can serve as a high-energy biofuel. The biochemical pathways leading to oil (triacylglycerol) synthesis in seeds involve multiple subcellular organelles, requiring extensive lipid trafficking. Phosphatidylcholine plays a central role in these pathways as a substrate for acyl modifications and likely as a carrier for the trafficking of acyl groups between organelles and membrane subdomains. Although much has been clarified regarding the enzymes and pathways responsible for acyl-group flux, there are still major gaps in our understanding. These include the identity of several key enzymes, how flux between alternative pathways is controlled and the specialized cell biology leading to biogenesis of oil bodies that store up to 80% of carbon in seeds.

  5. Weighting schemes in metabolic graphs for identifying biochemical routes.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, S; Baloni, P; Vishveshwara, S; Chandra, N

    2014-03-01

    Metabolism forms an integral part of all cells and its study is important to understand the functioning of the system, to understand alterations that occur in disease state and hence for subsequent applications in drug discovery. Reconstruction of genome-scale metabolic graphs from genomics and other molecular or biochemical data is now feasible. Few methods have also been reported for inferring biochemical pathways from these networks. However, given the large scale and complex inter-connections in the networks, the problem of identifying biochemical routes is not trivial and some questions still remain open. In particular, how a given path is altered in perturbed conditions remains a difficult problem, warranting development of improved methods. Here we report a comparison of 6 different weighting schemes to derive node and edge weights for a metabolic graph, weights reflecting various kinetic, thermodynamic parameters as well as abundances inferred from transcriptome data. Using a network of 50 nodes and 107 edges of carbohydrate metabolism, we show that kinetic parameter derived weighting schemes [Formula: see text] fare best. However, these are limited by their extent of availability, highlighting the usefulness of omics data under such conditions. Interestingly, transcriptome derived weights yield paths with best scores, but are inadequate to discriminate the theoretical paths. The method is tested on a system of Escherichia coli stress response. The approach illustrated here is generic in nature and can be used in the analysis for metabolic network from any species and perhaps more importantly for comparing condition-specific networks.

  6. Biochemical Genetic Pathways that Modulate Aging in Multiple Species

    PubMed Central

    Bitto, Alessandro; Wang, Adrienne M.; Bennett, Christopher F.; Kaeberlein, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying biological aging have been extensively studied in the past 20 years with the avail of mainly four model organisms: the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster, and the domestic mouse Mus musculus. Extensive research in these four model organisms has identified a few conserved genetic pathways that affect longevity as well as metabolism and development. Here, we review how the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), sirtuins, adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), and mitochondrial stress-signaling pathways influence aging and life span in the aforementioned models and their possible implications for delaying aging in humans. We also draw some connections between these biochemical pathways and comment on what new developments aging research will likely bring in the near future. PMID:26525455

  7. Rethinking glycolysis: on the biochemical logic of metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Bar-Even, Arren; Flamholz, Avi; Noor, Elad; Milo, Ron

    2012-05-17

    Metabolic pathways may seem arbitrary and unnecessarily complex. In many cases, a chemist might devise a simpler route for the biochemical transformation, so why has nature chosen such complex solutions? In this review, we distill lessons from a century of metabolic research and introduce new observations suggesting that the intricate structure of metabolic pathways can be explained by a small set of biochemical principles. Using glycolysis as an example, we demonstrate how three key biochemical constraints--thermodynamic favorability, availability of enzymatic mechanisms and the physicochemical properties of pathway intermediates--eliminate otherwise plausible metabolic strategies. Considering these constraints, glycolysis contains no unnecessary steps and represents one of the very few pathway structures that meet cellular demands. The analysis presented here can be applied to metabolic engineering efforts for the rational design of pathways that produce a desired product while satisfying biochemical constraints.

  8. Modeling biochemical pathways in the gene ontology.

    PubMed

    Hill, David P; D'Eustachio, Peter; Berardini, Tanya Z; Mungall, Christopher J; Renedo, Nikolai; Blake, Judith A

    2016-01-01

    The concept of a biological pathway, an ordered sequence of molecular transformations, is used to collect and represent molecular knowledge for a broad span of organismal biology. Representations of biomedical pathways typically are rich but idiosyncratic presentations of organized knowledge about individual pathways. Meanwhile, biomedical ontologies and associated annotation files are powerful tools that organize molecular information in a logically rigorous form to support computational analysis. The Gene Ontology (GO), representing Molecular Functions, Biological Processes and Cellular Components, incorporates many aspects of biological pathways within its ontological representations. Here we present a methodology for extending and refining the classes in the GO for more comprehensive, consistent and integrated representation of pathways, leveraging knowledge embedded in current pathway representations such as those in the Reactome Knowledgebase and MetaCyc. With carbohydrate metabolic pathways as a use case, we discuss how our representation supports the integration of variant pathway classes into a unified ontological structure that can be used for data comparison and analysis. PMID:27589964

  9. Modeling biochemical pathways in the gene ontology

    PubMed Central

    Hill, David P.; D’Eustachio, Peter; Berardini, Tanya Z.; Mungall, Christopher J.; Renedo, Nikolai; Blake, Judith A.

    2016-01-01

    The concept of a biological pathway, an ordered sequence of molecular transformations, is used to collect and represent molecular knowledge for a broad span of organismal biology. Representations of biomedical pathways typically are rich but idiosyncratic presentations of organized knowledge about individual pathways. Meanwhile, biomedical ontologies and associated annotation files are powerful tools that organize molecular information in a logically rigorous form to support computational analysis. The Gene Ontology (GO), representing Molecular Functions, Biological Processes and Cellular Components, incorporates many aspects of biological pathways within its ontological representations. Here we present a methodology for extending and refining the classes in the GO for more comprehensive, consistent and integrated representation of pathways, leveraging knowledge embedded in current pathway representations such as those in the Reactome Knowledgebase and MetaCyc. With carbohydrate metabolic pathways as a use case, we discuss how our representation supports the integration of variant pathway classes into a unified ontological structure that can be used for data comparison and analysis. PMID:27589964

  10. Parameter identifiability of power-law biochemical system models.

    PubMed

    Srinath, Sridharan; Gunawan, Rudiyanto

    2010-09-01

    Mathematical modeling has become an integral component in biotechnology, in which these models are frequently used to design and optimize bioprocesses. Canonical models, like power-laws within the Biochemical Systems Theory, offer numerous mathematical and numerical advantages, including built-in flexibility to simulate general nonlinear behavior. The construction of such models relies on the estimation of unknown case-specific model parameters by way of experimental data fitting, also known as inverse modeling. Despite the large number of publications on this topic, this task remains the bottleneck in canonical modeling of biochemical systems. The focus of this paper concerns with the question of identifiability of power-law models from dynamic data, that is, whether the parameter values can be uniquely and accurately identified from time-series data. Existing and newly developed parameter identifiability methods were applied to two power-law models of biochemical systems, and the results pointed to the lack of parametric identifiability as the root cause of the difficulty faced in the inverse modeling. Despite the focus on power-law models, the analyses and conclusions are extendable to other canonical models, and the issue of parameter identifiability is expected to be a common problem in biochemical system modeling. PMID:20197073

  11. Cellular models to investigate biochemical pathways in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Alberio, Tiziana; Lopiano, Leonardo; Fasano, Mauro

    2012-04-01

    Cellular models are instrumental in dissecting a complex pathological process into simpler molecular events. Parkinson's disease is multifactorial and clinically heterogeneous; the aetiology of the sporadic (and most common) form is still unclear and only a few molecular mechanisms have been clarified so far in the neurodegenerative cascade. In such a multifaceted picture, it is particularly important to identify experimental models that simplify the study of the different networks of proteins/genes involved. Cellular models that reproduce some of the features of the neurons that degenerate in Parkinson's disease have contributed to many advances in our comprehension of the pathogenic flow of the disease. In particular, the pivotal biochemical pathways (i.e. apoptosis and oxidative stress, mitochondrial impairment and dysfunctional mitophagy, unfolded protein stress and improper removal of misfolded proteins) have been widely explored in cell lines, challenged with toxic insults or genetically modified. The central role of α-synuclein has generated many models aiming to elucidate its contribution to the dysregulation of various cellular processes. In conclusion, classical cellular models appear to be the correct choice for preliminary studies on the molecular action of new drugs or potential toxins and for understanding the role of single genetic factors. Moreover, the availability of novel cellular systems, such as cybrids or induced pluripotent stem cells, offers the chance to exploit the advantages of an in vitro investigation, although mirroring more closely the cell population being affected.

  12. Inferring biochemical reaction pathways: the case of the gemcitabine pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The representation of a biochemical system as a network is the precursor of any mathematical model of the processes driving the dynamics of that system. Pharmacokinetics uses mathematical models to describe the interactions between drug, and drug metabolites and targets and through the simulation of these models predicts drug levels and/or dynamic behaviors of drug entities in the body. Therefore, the development of computational techniques for inferring the interaction network of the drug entities and its kinetic parameters from observational data is raising great interest in the scientific community of pharmacologists. In fact, the network inference is a set of mathematical procedures deducing the structure of a model from the experimental data associated to the nodes of the network of interactions. In this paper, we deal with the inference of a pharmacokinetic network from the concentrations of the drug and its metabolites observed at discrete time points. Results The method of network inference presented in this paper is inspired by the theory of time-lagged correlation inference with regard to the deduction of the interaction network, and on a maximum likelihood approach with regard to the estimation of the kinetic parameters of the network. Both network inference and parameter estimation have been designed specifically to identify systems of biotransformations, at the biochemical level, from noisy time-resolved experimental data. We use our inference method to deduce the metabolic pathway of the gemcitabine. The inputs to our inference algorithm are the experimental time series of the concentration of gemcitabine and its metabolites. The output is the set of reactions of the metabolic network of the gemcitabine. Conclusions Time-lagged correlation based inference pairs up to a probabilistic model of parameter inference from metabolites time series allows the identification of the microscopic pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of a drug with a

  13. Simulation of Biochemical Pathway Adaptability Using Evolutionary Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Bosl, W J

    2005-01-26

    The systems approach to genomics seeks quantitative and predictive descriptions of cells and organisms. However, both the theoretical and experimental methods necessary for such studies still need to be developed. We are far from understanding even the simplest collective behavior of biomolecules, cells or organisms. A key aspect to all biological problems, including environmental microbiology, evolution of infectious diseases, and the adaptation of cancer cells is the evolvability of genomes. This is particularly important for Genomes to Life missions, which tend to focus on the prospect of engineering microorganisms to achieve desired goals in environmental remediation and climate change mitigation, and energy production. All of these will require quantitative tools for understanding the evolvability of organisms. Laboratory biodefense goals will need quantitative tools for predicting complicated host-pathogen interactions and finding counter-measures. In this project, we seek to develop methods to simulate how external and internal signals cause the genetic apparatus to adapt and organize to produce complex biochemical systems to achieve survival. This project is specifically directed toward building a computational methodology for simulating the adaptability of genomes. This project investigated the feasibility of using a novel quantitative approach to studying the adaptability of genomes and biochemical pathways. This effort was intended to be the preliminary part of a larger, long-term effort between key leaders in computational and systems biology at Harvard University and LLNL, with Dr. Bosl as the lead PI. Scientific goals for the long-term project include the development and testing of new hypotheses to explain the observed adaptability of yeast biochemical pathways when the myosin-II gene is deleted and the development of a novel data-driven evolutionary computation as a way to connect exploratory computational simulation with hypothesis

  14. Genetic and biochemical analysis of the SLN1 pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Fassler, Jan S; West, Ann H

    2010-01-01

    The histidine kinase-based signal transduction pathway was first uncovered in bacteria and is a prominent form of regulation in prokaryotes. However, this type of signal transduction is not unique to prokaryotes; over the last decade two-component signal transduction pathways have been identified and characterized in diverse eukaryotes, from unicellular yeasts to multicellular land plants. A number of small but important differences have been noted in the architecture and function of eukaryotic pathways. Because of the powerful genetic approaches and facile molecular analysis associated with the yeast system, the SLN1 osmotic response pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is particularly useful as a eukaryotic pathway model. This chapter provides an overview of genetic and biochemical methods that have been important in elucidating the stimulus-response events that underlie this pathway and in understanding the details of a eukaryotic His-Asp phosphorelay. PMID:20946854

  15. Proteomic Assessment of Biochemical Pathways That Are Critical to Nickel-Induced Toxicity Responses in Human Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Yue; Bruno, Maribel; Haykal-Coates, Najwa; Wallace, Kathleen; Andrews, Debora; Swank, Adam; Winnik, Witold; Ross, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms underlying toxicity initiated by nickel, a ubiquitous environmental contaminant and known human carcinogen is necessary for proper assessment of its risks to human and environment. Among a variety of toxic mechanisms, disruption of protein responses and protein response-based biochemical pathways represents a key mechanism through which nickel induces cytotoxicity and carcinogenesis. To identify protein responses and biochemical pathways that are critical to nickel-induced toxicity responses, we measured cytotoxicity and changes in expression and phosphorylation status of 14 critical biochemical pathway regulators in human BEAS-2B cells exposed to four concentrations of nickel using an integrated proteomic approach. A subset of the pathway regulators, including interleukin-6, and JNK, were found to be linearly correlated with cell viability, and may function as molecular determinants of cytotoxic responses of BEAS-2B cells to nickel exposures. In addition, 128 differentially expressed proteins were identified by two dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry. Principal component analysis, hierarchical cluster analyses, and ingenuity signaling pathway analysis (IPA) identified putative nickel toxicity pathways. Some of the proteins and pathways identified have not previously been linked to nickel toxicity. Based on the consistent results obtained from both ELISA and 2-DE proteomic analysis, we propose a core signaling pathway regulating cytotoxic responses of human BEAS-2B cells to nickel exposures, which integrates a small set of proteins involved in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis pathways, apoptosis, protein degradation, and stress responses including inflammation and oxidative stress. PMID:27626938

  16. Proteomic Assessment of Biochemical Pathways That Are Critical to Nickel-Induced Toxicity Responses in Human Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Ge, Yue; Bruno, Maribel; Haykal-Coates, Najwa; Wallace, Kathleen; Andrews, Debora; Swank, Adam; Winnik, Witold; Ross, Jeffrey A

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms underlying toxicity initiated by nickel, a ubiquitous environmental contaminant and known human carcinogen is necessary for proper assessment of its risks to human and environment. Among a variety of toxic mechanisms, disruption of protein responses and protein response-based biochemical pathways represents a key mechanism through which nickel induces cytotoxicity and carcinogenesis. To identify protein responses and biochemical pathways that are critical to nickel-induced toxicity responses, we measured cytotoxicity and changes in expression and phosphorylation status of 14 critical biochemical pathway regulators in human BEAS-2B cells exposed to four concentrations of nickel using an integrated proteomic approach. A subset of the pathway regulators, including interleukin-6, and JNK, were found to be linearly correlated with cell viability, and may function as molecular determinants of cytotoxic responses of BEAS-2B cells to nickel exposures. In addition, 128 differentially expressed proteins were identified by two dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry. Principal component analysis, hierarchical cluster analyses, and ingenuity signaling pathway analysis (IPA) identified putative nickel toxicity pathways. Some of the proteins and pathways identified have not previously been linked to nickel toxicity. Based on the consistent results obtained from both ELISA and 2-DE proteomic analysis, we propose a core signaling pathway regulating cytotoxic responses of human BEAS-2B cells to nickel exposures, which integrates a small set of proteins involved in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis pathways, apoptosis, protein degradation, and stress responses including inflammation and oxidative stress. PMID:27626938

  17. Characterizing autism spectrum disorders by key biochemical pathways

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Megha; Timmerman, Christina K.; Schwartz, Joshua L.; Pham, Daniel L.; Meffert, Mollie K.

    2015-01-01

    The genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) presents a substantial challenge for diagnosis, classification, research, and treatment. Investigations into the underlying molecular etiology of ASD have often yielded mixed and at times opposing findings. Defining the molecular and biochemical underpinnings of heterogeneity in ASD is crucial to our understanding of the pathophysiological development of the disorder, and has the potential to assist in diagnosis and the rational design of clinical trials. In this review, we propose that genetically diverse forms of ASD may be usefully parsed into entities resulting from converse patterns of growth regulation at the molecular level, which lead to the correlates of general synaptic and neural overgrowth or undergrowth. Abnormal brain growth during development is a characteristic feature that has been observed both in children with autism and in mouse models of autism. We review evidence from syndromic and non-syndromic ASD to suggest that entities currently classified as autism may fundamentally differ by underlying pro- or anti-growth abnormalities in key biochemical pathways, giving rise to either excessive or reduced synaptic connectivity in affected brain regions. We posit that this classification strategy has the potential not only to aid research efforts, but also to ultimately facilitate early diagnosis and direct appropriate therapeutic interventions. PMID:26483618

  18. Biochemical evidence for Ku-independent backup pathways of NHEJ.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huichen; Perrault, Ange Ronel; Takeda, Yoshihiko; Qin, Wei; Wang, Hongyan; Iliakis, George

    2003-09-15

    Cells of higher eukaryotes process within minutes double strand breaks (DSBs) in their genome using a non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) apparatus that engages DNA-PKcs, Ku, DNA ligase IV, XRCC4 and other as of yet unidentified factors. Although chemical inhibition, or mutation, in any of these factors delays processing, cells ultimately remove the majority of DNA DSBs using an alternative pathway operating with an order of magnitude slower kinetics. This alternative pathway is active in mutants deficient in genes of the RAD52 epistasis group and frequently joins incorrect ends. We proposed, therefore, that it reflects an alternative form of NHEJ that operates as a backup (B-NHEJ) to the DNA-PK-dependent (D-NHEJ) pathway, rather than homology directed repair of DSBs. The present study investigates the role of Ku in the coordination of these pathways using as a model end joining of restriction endonuclease linearized plasmid DNA in whole cell extracts. Efficient, error-free, end joining observed in such in vitro reactions is strongly inhibited by anti-Ku antibodies. The inhibition requires DNA-PKcs, despite the fact that Ku efficiently binds DNA ends in the presence of antibodies, or in the absence of DNA-PKcs. Strong inhibition of DNA end joining is also mediated by wortmannin, an inhibitor of DNA-PKcs, in the presence but not in the absence of Ku, and this inhibition can be rescued by pre-incubating the reaction with double stranded oligonucleotides. The results are compatible with a role of Ku in directing end joining to a DNA-PK dependent pathway, mediated by efficient end binding and productive interactions with DNA-PKcs. On the other hand, efficient end joining is observed in extracts of cells lacking DNA-PKcs, as well as in Ku-depleted extracts in line with the operation of alternative pathways. Extracts depleted of Ku and DNA-PKcs rejoin blunt ends, as well as homologous ends with 3' or 5' protruding single strands with similar efficiency, but addition of Ku

  19. Novel Biochemical Pathways of Endoglin in Vascular Cell Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Bernabeu, Carmelo; Conley, Barbara A.; Vary, Calvin P.H.

    2007-01-01

    The broad role of the transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) signaling pathway in vascular development, homeostasis, and repair is well appreciated. Endoglin is emerging as a novel, complex, and poorly understood regulatory component of the TGFβ receptor complex, whose importance is underscored by its recognition as the site of mutations causing hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) [McAllister et al., 1994]. Extensive analyses of endoglin function in normal developmental mouse models [Bourdeau et al., 1999; Li et al., 1999; Arthur et al., 2000] and in HHT animal models [Bourdeau et al., 2000; Torsney et al., 2003] exemplify the importance of understanding endoglin’s biochemical functions. However, novel mechanisms underlying the regulation of these pathways continue to emerge. These mechanisms include modification of TGFβ receptor signaling at the ligand and receptor activation level, direct effects of endoglin on cell adhesion and migration, and emerging roles for endoglin in the determination of stem cell fate and tissue patterning. The purpose of this review is to highlight the cellular and molecular studies that underscore the central role of endoglin in vascular development and disease. PMID:17975795

  20. Unraveling Biochemical Pathways Affected by Mitochondrial Dysfunctions Using Metabolomic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Demine, Stéphane; Reddy, Nagabushana; Renard, Patricia; Raes, Martine; Arnould, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction(s) (MDs) can be defined as alterations in the mitochondria, including mitochondrial uncoupling, mitochondrial depolarization, inhibition of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, mitochondrial network fragmentation, mitochondrial or nuclear DNA mutations and the mitochondrial accumulation of protein aggregates. All these MDs are known to alter the capacity of ATP production and are observed in several pathological states/diseases, including cancer, obesity, muscle and neurological disorders. The induction of MDs can also alter the secretion of several metabolites, reactive oxygen species production and modify several cell-signalling pathways to resolve the mitochondrial dysfunction or ultimately trigger cell death. Many metabolites, such as fatty acids and derived compounds, could be secreted into the blood stream by cells suffering from mitochondrial alterations. In this review, we summarize how a mitochondrial uncoupling can modify metabolites, the signalling pathways and transcription factors involved in this process. We describe how to identify the causes or consequences of mitochondrial dysfunction using metabolomics (liquid and gas chromatography associated with mass spectrometry analysis, NMR spectroscopy) in the obesity and insulin resistance thematic. PMID:25257998

  1. Characterization of changes in gene expression and biochemical pathways at low levels of benzene exposure.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Reuben; Hubbard, Alan E; McHale, Cliona M; Zhang, Luoping; Rappaport, Stephen M; Lan, Qing; Rothman, Nathaniel; Vermeulen, Roel; Guyton, Kathryn Z; Jinot, Jennifer; Sonawane, Babasaheb R; Smith, Martyn T

    2014-01-01

    Benzene, a ubiquitous environmental pollutant, causes acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Recently, through transcriptome profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), we reported dose-dependent effects of benzene exposure on gene expression and biochemical pathways in 83 workers exposed across four airborne concentration ranges (from <1 ppm to >10 ppm) compared with 42 subjects with non-workplace ambient exposure levels. Here, we further characterize these dose-dependent effects with continuous benzene exposure in all 125 study subjects. We estimated air benzene exposure levels in the 42 environmentally-exposed subjects from their unmetabolized urinary benzene levels. We used a novel non-parametric, data-adaptive model selection method to estimate the change with dose in the expression of each gene. We describe non-parametric approaches to model pathway responses and used these to estimate the dose responses of the AML pathway and 4 other pathways of interest. The response patterns of majority of genes as captured by mean estimates of the first and second principal components of the dose-response for the five pathways and the profiles of 6 AML pathway response-representative genes (identified by clustering) exhibited similar apparent supra-linear responses. Responses at or below 0.1 ppm benzene were observed for altered expression of AML pathway genes and CYP2E1. Together, these data show that benzene alters disease-relevant pathways and genes in a dose-dependent manner, with effects apparent at doses as low as 100 ppb in air. Studies with extensive exposure assessment of subjects exposed in the low-dose range between 10 ppb and 1 ppm are needed to confirm these findings.

  2. Detection of Biochemical Pathways by Probabilistic Matching of Phyletic Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hua; Kristensen, David M.; Coleman, Michael K.; Mushegian, Arcady

    2009-01-01

    A phyletic vector, also known as a phyletic (or phylogenetic) pattern, is a binary representation of the presences and absences of orthologous genes in different genomes. Joint occurrence of two or more genes in many genomes results in closely similar binary vectors representing these genes, and this similarity between gene vectors may be used as a measure of functional association between genes. Better understanding of quantitative properties of gene co-occurrences is needed for systematic studies of gene function and evolution. We used the probabilistic iterative algorithm Psi-square to find groups of similar phyletic vectors. An extended Psi-square algorithm, in which pseudocounts are implemented, shows better sensitivity in identifying proteins with known functional links than our earlier hierarchical clustering approach. At the same time, the specificity of inferring functional associations between genes in prokaryotic genomes is strongly dependent on the pathway: phyletic vectors of the genes involved in energy metabolism and in de novo biosynthesis of the essential precursors tend to be lumped together, whereas cellular modules involved in secretion, motility, assembly of cell surfaces, biosynthesis of some coenzymes, and utilization of secondary carbon sources tend to be identified with much greater specificity. It appears that the network of gene coinheritance in prokaryotes contains a giant connected component that encompasses most biosynthetic subsystems, along with a series of more independent modules involved in cell interaction with the environment. PMID:19390636

  3. A Computational Model for the Identification of Biochemical Pathways in the Krebs Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, Joseph S.; Bailey, Colin G.; Jones-Oliveira, Janet B.; Dixon, David A.; Gull, Dean W.; Chandler, Mary L.

    2003-03-01

    We have applied an algorithmic methodology which provably decomposes any complex network into a complete family of principal subcircuits to study the minimal circuits that describe the Krebs cycle. Every operational behavior that the network is capable of exhibiting can be represented by some combination of these principal subcircuits and this computational decomposition is linearly efficient. We have developed a computational model that can be applied to biochemical reaction systems which accurately renders pathways of such reactions via directed hypergraphs (Petri nets). We have applied the model to the citric acid cycle (Krebs cycle). The Krebs cycle, which oxidizes the acetyl group of acetyl CoA to CO2 and reduces NAD and FAD to NADH and FADH2 is a complex interacting set of nine subreaction networks. The Krebs cycle was selected because of its familiarity to the biological community and because it exhibits enough complexity to be interesting in order to introduce this novel analytic approach. This study validates the algorithmic methodology for the identification of significant biochemical signaling subcircuits, based solely upon the mathematical model and not upon prior biological knowledge. The utility of the algebraic-combinatorial model for identifying the complete set of biochemical subcircuits as a data set is demonstrated for this important metabolic process.

  4. A computational model for the identification of biochemical pathways in the krebs cycle.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Joseph S; Bailey, Colin G; Jones-Oliveira, Janet B; Dixon, David A; Gull, Dean W; Chandler, Mary L

    2003-01-01

    We have applied an algorithmic methodology which provably decomposes any complex network into a complete family of principal subcircuits to study the minimal circuits that describe the Krebs cycle. Every operational behavior that the network is capable of exhibiting can be represented by some combination of these principal subcircuits and this computational decomposition is linearly efficient. We have developed a computational model that can be applied to biochemical reaction systems which accurately renders pathways of such reactions via directed hypergraphs (Petri nets). We have applied the model to the citric acid cycle (Krebs cycle). The Krebs cycle, which oxidizes the acetyl group of acetyl CoA to CO(2) and reduces NAD and FAD to NADH and FADH(2), is a complex interacting set of nine subreaction networks. The Krebs cycle was selected because of its familiarity to the biological community and because it exhibits enough complexity to be interesting in order to introduce this novel analytic approach. This study validates the algorithmic methodology for the identification of significant biochemical signaling subcircuits, based solely upon the mathematical model and not upon prior biological knowledge. The utility of the algebraic-combinatorial model for identifying the complete set of biochemical subcircuits as a data set is demonstrated for this important metabolic process.

  5. Systematic tracking of dysregulated modules identifies disrupted pathways in narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhenhua; Zhao, Jiali; Tan, Yinyin; Tang, Minglu; Li, Guanzhen

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this work is to identify disrupted pathways in narcolepsy according to systematically tracking the dysregulated modules of reweighted Protein-Protein Interaction (PPI) networks. Here, we performed systematic identification and comparison of modules across normal and narcolepsy conditions by integrating PPI and gene-expression data. Methods: Firstly, normal and narcolepsy PPI network were inferred and reweighted based on Pearson correlation coefficient (PCC). Then, modules in PPI network were explored by clique-merging algorithm and we identified altered modules using a maximum weight bipartite matching and in non-increasing order. Finally, pathways enrichment analyses of genes in altered modules were carried out based on Expression Analysis Systematic Explored (EASE) test to illuminate the biological pathways in narcolepsy. Results: Our analyses revealed that 235 altered modules were identified by comparing modules in normal and narcolepsy PPI network. Pathway functional enrichment analysis of disrupted module genes showed 59 disrupted pathways within threshold P < 0.001. The most significant five disrupted pathways were: oxidative phosphorylation, T cell receptor signaling pathway, cell cycle, Alzheimer’s disease and focal adhesion. Conclusions: We successfully identified disrupted pathways and these pathways might be potential biological processes for treatment and etiology mechanism in narcolepsy. PMID:26309600

  6. An efficient algorithm for de novo predictions of biochemical pathways between chemical compounds

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Prediction of biochemical (metabolic) pathways has a wide range of applications, including the optimization of drug candidates, and the elucidation of toxicity mechanisms. Recently, several methods have been developed for pathway prediction to derive a goal compound from a start compound. However, these methods require high computational costs, and cannot perform comprehensive prediction of novel metabolic pathways. Our aim of this study is to develop a de novo prediction method for reconstructions of metabolic pathways and predictions of unknown biosynthetic pathways in the sense that it does not require any initial network such as KEGG metabolic network to be explored. Results We formulated pathway prediction between a start compound and a goal compound as the shortest path search problem in terms of the number of enzyme reactions applied. We propose an efficient search method based on A* algorithm and heuristic techniques utilizing Linear Programming (LP) solution for estimation of the distance to the goal. First, a chemical compound is represented by a feature vector which counts frequencies of substructure occurrences in the structural formula. Second, an enzyme reaction is represented as an operator vector by detecting the structural changes to compounds before and after the reaction. By defining compound vectors as nodes and operator vectors as edges, prediction of the reaction pathway is reduced to the shortest path search problem in the vector space. In experiments on the DDT degradation pathway, we verify that the shortest paths predicted by our method are biologically correct pathways registered in the KEGG database. The results also demonstrate that the LP heuristics can achieve significant reduction in computation time. Furthermore, we apply our method to a secondary metabolite pathway of plant origin, and successfully find a novel biochemical pathway which cannot be predicted by the existing method. For the reconstruction of a known

  7. Widespread flower color convergence in Solanaceae via alternate biochemical pathways.

    PubMed

    Ng, Julienne; Smith, Stacey D

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypic convergence is rampant throughout the tree of life. While recent studies have made significant progress in ascertaining the proximate mechanisms underlying convergent phenotypes, less is known about the frequency and predictability with which convergent phenotypes arise via the same or multiple pathways at the macroevolutionary scale. We investigated the proximate causes and evolutionary patterns of red flower color in the tomato family, Solanaceae, using large-scale data mining and new sequence data to reconstruct a megaphylogeny of 1341 species. We then combined spectral and anatomical data to assess how many times red flowers have evolved, the relative contribution of different pathways to independent origins of red, and whether the underlying pathway is predicted by phylogenetic relatedness. We estimated at least 30 relatively recent origins of red flowers using anthocyanins, carotenoids, or a dual production of both pigments, with significant phylogenetic signal in the use of anthocyanins and dual production, indicating that closely related red-flowered species tend to employ the same mechanism for coloration. Our study is the first to test whether developmental pathways exhibit phylogenetic signal and implies that historical contingency strongly influences the evolution of new phenotypes.

  8. Metabolic PathFinding: inferring relevant pathways in biochemical networks.

    PubMed

    Croes, Didier; Couche, Fabian; Wodak, Shoshana J; van Helden, Jacques

    2005-07-01

    Our knowledge of metabolism can be represented as a network comprising several thousands of nodes (compounds and reactions). Several groups applied graph theory to analyse the topological properties of this network and to infer metabolic pathways by path finding. This is, however, not straightforward, with a major problem caused by traversing irrelevant shortcuts through highly connected nodes, which correspond to pool metabolites and co-factors (e.g. H2O, NADP and H+). In this study, we present a web server implementing two simple approaches, which circumvent this problem, thereby improving the relevance of the inferred pathways. In the simplest approach, the shortest path is computed, while filtering out the selection of highly connected compounds. In the second approach, the shortest path is computed on the weighted metabolic graph where each compound is assigned a weight equal to its connectivity in the network. This approach significantly increases the accuracy of the inferred pathways, enabling the correct inference of relatively long pathways (e.g. with as many as eight intermediate reactions). Available options include the calculation of the k-shortest paths between two specified seed nodes (either compounds or reactions). Multiple requests can be submitted in a queue. Results are returned by email, in textual as well as graphical formats (available in http://www.scmbb.ulb.ac.be/pathfinding/).

  9. Using ILP to Identify Pathway Activation Patterns in Systems Biology

    PubMed Central

    Neaves, Samuel R; Millard, Louise A C; Tsoka, Sophia

    2016-01-01

    We show a logical aggregation method that, combined with propositionalization methods, can construct novel structured biological features from gene expression data. We do this to gain understanding of pathway mechanisms, for instance, those associated with a particular disease. We illustrate this method on the task of distinguishing between two types of lung cancer; Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC) and Adenocarcinoma (AC). We identify pathway activation patterns in pathways previously implicated in the development of cancers. Our method identified a model with comparable predictive performance to the winning algorithm of a recent challenge, while providing biologically relevant explanations that may be useful to a biologist. PMID:27478883

  10. Spatial Control of Biochemical Modification Cascades and Pathways.

    PubMed

    Alam-Nazki, Aiman; Krishnan, J

    2015-06-16

    Information transmission in cells occurs through complex networks of proteins and genes and is relayed through cascades of biochemical modifications, which are typically studied through ordinary differential equations. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that spatial factors can strongly influence chemical information transmission in cells. In this article, we systematically disentangle the effects of space in signaling cascades. This is done by examining the effects of localization/compartmentalization and diffusion of enzymes and substrates in multiple variants of chemical modification cascades. This includes situations where the modified form of species at one stage 1) acts as an enzyme for the next stage; 2) acts as a substrate for the next stage; and 3) is involved in phosphotransfer. Our analysis reveals the multiple effects of space in signal transduction cascades. Although in some cases space plays a modulatory effect (itself of interest), in other cases, spatial regulation and control can profoundly affect the nature of information processing as a result of the subtle interplay between the patterns of localization of species, diffusion, and the nature of the modification cascades. Our results provide a platform for disentangling the role of space and spatial control in multiple cellular contexts and a basis for engineering spatial control in signaling cascades through localization/compartmentalization.

  11. Biochemical pathways analysis of microarray results: regulation of myogenesis in pigs

    PubMed Central

    te Pas, Marinus FW; Hulsegge, Ina; Coster, Albart; Pool, Marco H; Heuven, Henri H; Janss, Luc LG

    2007-01-01

    Background Combining microarray results and biological pathway information will add insight into biological processes. Pathway information is widely available in databases through the internet. Mammalian muscle formation has been previously studied using microarray technology in pigs because these animals are an interesting animal model for muscle formation due to selection for increased muscle mass. Results indicated regulation of the expression of genes involved in proliferation and differentiation of myoblasts, and energy metabolism. The aim of the present study was to analyse microarrays studying myogenesis in pigs. It was necessary to develop methods to search biochemical pathways databases. Results PERL scripts were developed that used the names of the genes on the microarray to search databases. Synonyms of gene names were added to the list by searching the Gene Ontology database. The KEGG database was searched for pathway information using this updated gene list. The KEGG database returned 88 pathways. Most genes were found in a single pathway, but others were found in up to seven pathways. Combining the pathways and the microarray information 21 pathways showed sufficient information content for further analysis. These pathways were related to regulation of several steps in myogenesis and energy metabolism. Pathways regulating myoblast proliferation and muscle fibre formation were described. Furthermore, two networks of pathways describing the formation of the myoblast cytoskeleton and regulation of the energy metabolism during myogenesis were presented. Conclusion Combining microarray results and pathways information available through the internet provide biological insight in how the process of porcine myogenesis is regulated. PMID:17567520

  12. The role of log-normal dynamics in the evolution of biochemical pathways.

    PubMed

    Nacher, J C; Ochiai, T; Yamada, T; Kanehisa, M; Akutsu, T

    2006-01-01

    The study of the scale-free topology in non-biological and biological networks and the dynamics that can explain this fascinating property of complex systems have captured the attention of the scientific community in the last years. Here, we analyze the biochemical pathways of three organisms (Methanococcus jannaschii, Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae) which are representatives of the main kingdoms Archaea, Bacteria and Eukaryotes during the course of the biological evolution. We can consider two complementary representations of the biochemical pathways: the enzymes network and the chemical compounds network. In this article, we propose a stochastic model that explains that the scale-free topology with exponent in the vicinity of gamma approximately 3/2 found across these three organisms is governed by the log-normal dynamics in the evolution of the enzymes network. Precisely, the fluctuations of the connectivity degree of enzymes in the biochemical pathways between evolutionary distant organisms follow the same conserved dynamical principle, which in the end is the origin of the stationary scale-free distribution observed among species, from Archaea to Eukaryotes. In particular, the log-normal dynamics guarantees the conservation of the scale-free distribution in evolving networks. Furthermore, the log-normal dynamics also gives a possible explanation for the restricted range of observed exponents gamma in the scale-free networks (i.e., gamma > or = 3/2). Finally, our model is also applied to the chemical compounds network of biochemical pathways and the Internet network.

  13. Utilizing signature-score to identify oncogenic pathways of cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Tzu-Hung; Chen, Hung-I Harry; Lu, Jo-Yang; Lin, Pei-Ying; Keller, Charles; Comerford, Sarah; Tomlinson, Gail E.; Chen, Yidong

    2013-01-01

    Extracting maximal information from gene signature sets (GSSs) via microarray-based transcriptional profiling involves assigning function to up and down regulated genes. Here we present a novel sample scoring method called Signature-score (S-score) which can be used to quantify the expression pattern of tumor samples from previously identified gene signature sets. A simulation result demonstrated an improved accuracy and robustness by S-score method comparing with other scoring methods. By applying the S-score method to cholangiocarcinoma (CAC), an aggressive hepatic cancer that arises from bile ducts cells, we identified enriched oncogenic pathways in two large CAC data sets. Thirteen pathways were enriched in CAC compared with normal liver and bile duct. Moreover, using S-score, we were able to dissect correlations between CAC-associated oncogenic pathways and Gene Ontology function. Two major oncogenic clusters and associated functions were identified. Cluster 1, which included beta-catenin and Ras, showed a positive correlation with the cell cycle, while cluster 2, which included TGF-beta, cytokeratin 19 and EpCAM was inversely correlated with immune function. We also used S-score to identify pathways that are differentially expressed in CAC and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the more common subtype of liver cancer. Our results demonstrate the utility and effectiveness of S-score in assigning functional roles to tumor-associated gene signature sets and in identifying potential therapeutic targets for specific liver cancer subtypes. PMID:23905013

  14. The biochemical pathways of central nervous system neural degeneration in niacin deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Linshan; Doreswamy, Venkatesh; Prakash, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Neural degeneration is a very complicated process. In spite of all the advancements in the molecular chemistry, there are many unknown aspects of the phenomena of neurodegeneration which need to be put together. It is a common sequela of the conditions of niacin deficiency. Neural degeneration in Pellagra manifests as chromatolysis mainly in pyramidal followed by other neurons and glial cells. However, there is a gross lack of understanding of biochemical mechanisms of neurodegeneration in niacin deficiency states. Because of the necessity of niacin or its amide derivative NAD in a number of biochemical pathways, it is understandable that several of these pathways may be involved in the common outcome of neural degeneration. Here, we highlight five pathways that could be involved in the neuraldegeneration for which evidence has accumulated through several studies. These pathways are: 1) the tryptophan-kyneurenic acid pathway, 2) the mitochondrial ATP generation related pathways, 3) the poly (ADP-ibose) polymerase (PARP) pathway, 4) the BDNF-TRKB Axis abnormalities, 5) the genetic influences of niacin deficiency. PMID:25317166

  15. Pathway Analysis Incorporating Protein-Protein Interaction Networks Identified Candidate Pathways for the Seven Common Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Peng-Lin; Yu, Ya-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Pathway analysis has become popular as a secondary analysis strategy for genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Most of the current pathway analysis methods aggregate signals from the main effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes within a pathway without considering the effects of gene-gene interactions. However, gene-gene interactions can also have critical effects on complex diseases. Protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks have been used to define gene pairs for the gene-gene interaction tests. Incorporating the PPI information to define gene pairs for interaction tests within pathways can increase the power for pathway-based association tests. We propose a pathway association test, which aggregates the interaction signals in PPI networks within a pathway, for GWAS with case-control samples. Gene size is properly considered in the test so that genes do not contribute more to the test statistic simply due to their size. Simulation studies were performed to verify that the method is a valid test and can have more power than other pathway association tests in the presence of gene-gene interactions within a pathway under different scenarios. We applied the test to the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium GWAS datasets for seven common diseases. The most significant pathway is the chaperones modulate interferon signaling pathway for Crohn’s disease (p-value = 0.0003). The pathway modulates interferon gamma, which induces the JAK/STAT pathway that is involved in Crohn’s disease. Several other pathways that have functional implications for the seven diseases were also identified. The proposed test based on gene-gene interaction signals in PPI networks can be used as a complementary tool to the current existing pathway analysis methods focusing on main effects of genes. An efficient software implementing the method is freely available at http://puppi.sourceforge.net. PMID:27622767

  16. Pathway Analysis Incorporating Protein-Protein Interaction Networks Identified Candidate Pathways for the Seven Common Diseases.

    PubMed

    Lin, Peng-Lin; Yu, Ya-Wen; Chung, Ren-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Pathway analysis has become popular as a secondary analysis strategy for genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Most of the current pathway analysis methods aggregate signals from the main effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes within a pathway without considering the effects of gene-gene interactions. However, gene-gene interactions can also have critical effects on complex diseases. Protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks have been used to define gene pairs for the gene-gene interaction tests. Incorporating the PPI information to define gene pairs for interaction tests within pathways can increase the power for pathway-based association tests. We propose a pathway association test, which aggregates the interaction signals in PPI networks within a pathway, for GWAS with case-control samples. Gene size is properly considered in the test so that genes do not contribute more to the test statistic simply due to their size. Simulation studies were performed to verify that the method is a valid test and can have more power than other pathway association tests in the presence of gene-gene interactions within a pathway under different scenarios. We applied the test to the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium GWAS datasets for seven common diseases. The most significant pathway is the chaperones modulate interferon signaling pathway for Crohn's disease (p-value = 0.0003). The pathway modulates interferon gamma, which induces the JAK/STAT pathway that is involved in Crohn's disease. Several other pathways that have functional implications for the seven diseases were also identified. The proposed test based on gene-gene interaction signals in PPI networks can be used as a complementary tool to the current existing pathway analysis methods focusing on main effects of genes. An efficient software implementing the method is freely available at http://puppi.sourceforge.net. PMID:27622767

  17. Degradation of methamidophos by Hyphomicrobium species MAP-1 and the biochemical degradation pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Wen, Yang; Guo, Xinqing; Wang, Guangli; Li, Shunpeng; Jiang, Jiandong

    2010-07-01

    Methamidophos is one of the most widely used organophosphorus insecticides usually detectable in the environment. A facultative methylotroph, Hyphomicrobium sp. MAP-1, capable of high efficiently degrading methamidophos, was isolated from methamidophos-contaminated soil in China. It was found that the addition of methanol significantly promoted the growth of strain MAP-1 and enhanced its degradation of methamidophos. Further, this strain could utilize methamidophos as its sole carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus source for growth and could completely degrade 3,000 mg l(-1) methamidophos in 84 h under optimal conditions (pH 7.0, 30 degrees C). The enzyme responsible for methamidophos degradation was mainly located on the cell inner membrane (90.4%). During methamidophos degradation, three metabolites were detected and identified based on tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. Using this information, a biochemical degradation pathway of methamidophos by Hyphomicrobium sp. MAP-1 was proposed for the first time. Methamidophos is first cleaved at the P-N bond to form O,S-dimethyl hydrogen thiophosphate and NH(3). Subsequently, O,S-dimethyl hydrogen thiophosphate is hydrolyzed at the P-O bond to release -OCH(3) and form S-methyl dihydrogen thiophosphate. O,S-dimethyl hydrogen thiophosphate can also be hydrolyzed at the P-S bond to release -SCH(3) and form methyl dihydrogen phosphate. Finally, S-methyl dihydrogen thiophosphate and methyl dihydrogen phosphate are likely transformed into phosphoric acid. PMID:19960233

  18. Identifying Differentially Abundant Metabolic Pathways in Metagenomic Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo; Pop, Mihai

    Enabled by rapid advances in sequencing technology, metagenomic studies aim to characterize entire communities of microbes bypassing the need for culturing individual bacterial members. One major goal of such studies is to identify specific functional adaptations of microbial communities to their habitats. Here we describe a powerful analytical method (MetaPath) that can identify differentially abundant pathways in metagenomic data-sets, relying on a combination of metagenomic sequence data and prior metabolic pathway knowledge. We show that MetaPath outperforms other common approaches when evaluated on simulated datasets. We also demonstrate the power of our methods in analyzing two, publicly available, metagenomic datasets: a comparison of the gut microbiome of obese and lean twins; and a comparison of the gut microbiome of infant and adult subjects. We demonstrate that the subpathways identified by our method provide valuable insights into the biological activities of the microbiome.

  19. Methodologies for the modeling and simulation of biochemical networks, illustrated for signal transduction pathways: a primer.

    PubMed

    ElKalaawy, Nesma; Wassal, Amr

    2015-03-01

    Biochemical networks depict the chemical interactions that take place among elements of living cells. They aim to elucidate how cellular behavior and functional properties of the cell emerge from the relationships between its components, i.e. molecules. Biochemical networks are largely characterized by dynamic behavior, and exhibit high degrees of complexity. Hence, the interest in such networks is growing and they have been the target of several recent modeling efforts. Signal transduction pathways (STPs) constitute a class of biochemical networks that receive, process, and respond to stimuli from the environment, as well as stimuli that are internal to the organism. An STP consists of a chain of intracellular signaling processes that ultimately result in generating different cellular responses. This primer presents the methodologies used for the modeling and simulation of biochemical networks, illustrated for STPs. These methodologies range from qualitative to quantitative, and include structural as well as dynamic analysis techniques. We describe the different methodologies, outline their underlying assumptions, and provide an assessment of their advantages and disadvantages. Moreover, publicly and/or commercially available implementations of these methodologies are listed as appropriate. In particular, this primer aims to provide a clear introduction and comprehensive coverage of biochemical modeling and simulation methodologies for the non-expert, with specific focus on relevant literature of STPs.

  20. Network Modeling Identifies Patient-specific Pathways in Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Tuncbag, Nurcan; Milani, Pamela; Pokorny, Jenny L.; Johnson, Hannah; Sio, Terence T.; Dalin, Simona; Iyekegbe, Dennis O.; White, Forest M.; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Fraenkel, Ernest

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most aggressive type of malignant human brain tumor. Molecular profiling experiments have revealed that these tumors are extremely heterogeneous. This heterogeneity is one of the principal challenges for developing targeted therapies. We hypothesize that despite the diverse molecular profiles, it might still be possible to identify common signaling changes that could be targeted in some or all tumors. Using a network modeling approach, we reconstruct the altered signaling pathways from tumor-specific phosphoproteomic data and known protein-protein interactions. We then develop a network-based strategy for identifying tumor specific proteins and pathways that were predicted by the models but not directly observed in the experiments. Among these hidden targets, we show that the ERK activator kinase1 (MEK1) displays increased phosphorylation in all tumors. By contrast, protein numb homolog (NUMB) is present only in the subset of the tumors that are the most invasive. Additionally, increased S100A4 is associated with only one of the tumors. Overall, our results demonstrate that despite the heterogeneity of the proteomic data, network models can identify common or tumor specific pathway-level changes. These results represent an important proof of principle that can improve the target selection process for tumor specific treatments. PMID:27354287

  1. Galactosemia: A strategy to identify new biochemical phenotypes and molecular genotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Elsas, L.J.; Langley, S.; Steele, E.; Evinger, J.; Brown, A.; Singh, R.; Fernhoff, P.; Hjelm, L.N.; Dembure, P.P.; Fridovich-Keil, J.L.

    1995-03-01

    We describe a stratagem for identifying new mutations in the galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase (GALT) gene. GALT enzyme activity and isoforms were defined in erythrocytes from probands and their first-degree relatives. If the biochemical phenotypes segregated in an autosomal recesssive pattern, we screened for common mutations by using multiplex PCR and restriction endonuclease digestions. If common mutant alleles were not present, the 11 exons of the GALT gene were amplified by PCR, and variations from the normal nucleotide sequences were identified by SSCP. The suspected region(s) was then analyzed by direct DNA sequencing. We identified 86 mutant GALT alleles that reduced erythrocyte GALT activity. Seventy-five of these GALT genomes had abnormal SSCP patterns, of which 41 were sequenced, yielding 12 new and 21 previously reported, rare mutations. Among the novel group of 12 new mutations, an unusual biochemical phenotype was found in a family whose newborn proband has classical galactosemia. He had inherited two mutations in cis (N314D-E204K) from his father, whose GALT activity was near normal, and an additional GALT mutation in the splice-acceptor site of intron C (IVSC) from his mother. The substitution of a positively charged E204K mutation created a unique isoform-banding pattern. An asymptomatic sister`s GALT genes carries three mutations (E203K-N314D/N314D) with eight distinct isoform bands. Surprisingly, her erythrocytes have normal GALT activity. We conclude that the synergism of pedigree, biochemical, SSCP, and direct GALT gene analyses is an efficient protocol for identifying new mutations and speculate that E203K and N314D codon changes produce intra-allelic complementation when in cis. 40 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Identifying a Rab effector on the macroautophagy pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Cervantes, Serena; Davis, Saralin; Ferro-Novick, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Rab GTPases are key regulators of membrane traffic. The Rab GTPase Ypt1 is essential for endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Golgi traffic, intra-Golgi traffic, and the macroautophagy pathway. To identify effectors on the macroautophagy pathway, known autophagy-related genes (Atg genes) required for macroautophagy were tagged with GFP and screened for mislocalization in the ypt1-2 mutant. At the pre-autophagosomal structure (PAS), the localization of the serine/threonine kinase Atg1 was affected in the ypt1-2 mutant. We then used an in vitro binding assay to determine if Atg1 and Ypt1 physically interact with each other and co-immunoprecipitation experiments were performed to address if Atg1 preferentially interacts with the GTP-bound form of Ypt1.

  3. Chemical Shifts to Metabolic Pathways: Identifying Metabolic Pathways Directly from a Single 2D NMR Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Abhinav; Rangarajan, Annapoorni; Pal, Debnath; Atreya, Hanudatta S

    2015-12-15

    Identifying cellular processes in terms of metabolic pathways is one of the avowed goals of metabolomics studies. Currently, this is done after relevant metabolites are identified to allow their mapping onto specific pathways. This task is daunting due to the complex nature of cellular processes and the difficulty in establishing the identity of individual metabolites. We propose here a new method: ChemSMP (Chemical Shifts to Metabolic Pathways), which facilitates rapid analysis by identifying the active metabolic pathways directly from chemical shifts obtained from a single two-dimensional (2D) [(13)C-(1)H] correlation NMR spectrum without the need for identification and assignment of individual metabolites. ChemSMP uses a novel indexing and scoring system comprised of a "uniqueness score" and a "coverage score". Our method is demonstrated on metabolic pathways data from the Small Molecule Pathway Database (SMPDB) and chemical shifts from the Human Metabolome Database (HMDB). Benchmarks show that ChemSMP has a positive prediction rate of >90% in the presence of decluttered data and can sustain the same at 60-70% even in the presence of noise, such as deletions of peaks and chemical shift deviations. The method tested on NMR data acquired for a mixture of 20 amino acids shows a success rate of 93% in correct recovery of pathways. When used on data obtained from the cell lysate of an unexplored oncogenic cell line, it revealed active metabolic pathways responsible for regulating energy homeostasis of cancer cells. Our unique tool is thus expected to significantly enhance analysis of NMR-based metabolomics data by reducing existing impediments.

  4. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging identifies early biochemical markers of tissue damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varma, Vishal K.; Ohlander, Samuel; Nguyen, Peter; Vendryes, Christopher; Parthiban, Sujeeth; Hamilton, Blake; Wallis, M. Chad; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre; Hannaford, Blake; Lendvay, Thomas; Hotaling, James M.; Walsh, Michael J.

    2014-03-01

    Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging can allow for the rapid imaging of tissue biochemistry in a label-free and non-perturbing fashion. With the rapid adoption of new minimally invasive surgery (MIS) technologies over the last 20 years, adequate skill to safely and effectively use these technologies may not be achieved and risk of undue physical pressure being placed on tissues is a concern. Previous work has demonstrated that a number of histological stains can detect tissue damage, however, this process requires the initiation and progression of a signaling cascade that results in the epitope of interest being expressed. We proposed to identify the early biochemical markers associated with physical tissue damage from applied forces, thus not requiring transcriptional and translational protein synthesis as traditional immunohistochemistry does. To demonstrate that FT-IR can measure biochemical changes in tissues that have undergone physical force, we took ex-vivo lamb's liver that had been freshly excised and applied varying levels of physical pressure (0kPa to 30kPa). Tissues were then formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded, and sectioned on to glass for H and E staining to identify damage and on to an IR slide for FT-IR imaging. Regions of interest containing hepatocytes were identified and average FT-IR spectra were extracted from the damaged and undamaged livers. FT-IR spectra showed clear biochemical changes associated with tissue damage. In addition, chemical changes could be observed proceeding histological changes observed when using conventional staining approaches.

  5. Biodegradation of dimethyl terephthalate by Pasteurella multocida Sa follows an alternative biochemical pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiaxi; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2006-05-01

    Pasteurella multocida Sa, a bacterial strain isolated from mangrove sediment by enrichment technique, was capable of transforming dimethyl terephthalate (DMT). Biodegradation of DMT was shown to take place as a series of sequential steps involving the hydrolysis of two ester linkages between the carboxyl groups of the terephthalate and the methyl side-chain initially to produce mono-methyl terephthalate (MMT) and then terephthalic acid (TA), respectively. However, with ethanol as the carrying solvent, there was a formation of one metabolite previously not observed. The two metabolites were characterized by high performance-liquid chromatography-electron ionization mass spectrometry as MMT and mono-ethyl terephthalate (MET), suggesting the existence of an alternative biochemical pathway in the degradation of DMT by P. multocida Sa. Since the presence of MMT and ethanol in culture inoculated with P. multocida Sa was prerequisites for the formation of MET, biologically mediated trans-esterification was proposed as a mechanism for the novel biochemical process observed.

  6. Molecular Factors and Biochemical Pathways Induced by Febrile Temperature in Intraerythrocytic Plasmodium falciparum Parasites▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Oakley, Miranda S. M.; Kumar, Sanjai; Anantharaman, Vivek; Zheng, Hong; Mahajan, Babita; Haynes, J. David; Moch, J. Kathleen; Fairhurst, Rick; McCutchan, Thomas F.; Aravind, L.

    2007-01-01

    Intermittent episodes of febrile illness are the most benign and recognized symptom of infection with malaria parasites, although the effects on parasite survival and virulence remain unclear. In this study, we identified the molecular factors altered in response to febrile temperature by measuring differential expression levels of individual genes using high-density oligonucleotide microarray technology and by performing biological assays in asexual-stage Plasmodium falciparum parasite cultures incubated at 37°C and 41°C (an elevated temperature that is equivalent to malaria-induced febrile illness in the host). Elevated temperature had a profound influence on expression of individual genes; 336 of approximately 5,300 genes (6.3% of the genome) had altered expression profiles. Of these, 163 genes (49%) were upregulated by twofold or greater, and 173 genes (51%) were downregulated by twofold or greater. In-depth sensitive sequence profile analysis revealed that febrile temperature-induced responses caused significant alterations in the major parasite biologic networks and pathways and that these changes are well coordinated and intricately linked. One of the most notable transcriptional changes occurs in genes encoding proteins containing the predicted Pexel motifs that are exported into the host cytoplasm or inserted into the host cell membrane and are likely to be associated with erythrocyte remodeling and parasite sequestration functions. Using our sensitive computational analysis, we were also able to assign biochemical or biologic functional predictions for at least 100 distinct genes previously annotated as “hypothetical.” We find that cultivation of P. falciparum parasites at 41°C leads to parasite death in a time-dependent manner. The presence of the “crisis forms” and the terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling-positive parasites following heat treatment strongly support the notion that an apoptosis-like cell

  7. Genome-Wide Pathway Analysis Identifies Genetic Pathways Associated with Psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Aterido, Adrià; Julià, Antonio; Ferrándiz, Carlos; Puig, Lluís; Fonseca, Eduardo; Fernández-López, Emilia; Dauden, Esteban; Sánchez-Carazo, José Luís; López-Estebaranz, José Luís; Moreno-Ramírez, David; Vanaclocha, Francisco; Herrera, Enrique; de la Cueva, Pablo; Dand, Nick; Palau, Núria; Alonso, Arnald; López-Lasanta, María; Tortosa, Raül; García-Montero, Andrés; Codó, Laia; Gelpí, Josep Lluís; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Absher, Devin; Capon, Francesca; Myers, Richard M; Barker, Jonathan N; Marsal, Sara

    2016-03-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease with a complex genetic architecture. To date, the psoriasis heritability is only partially explained. However, there is increasing evidence that the missing heritability in psoriasis could be explained by multiple genetic variants of low effect size from common genetic pathways. The objective of this study was to identify new genetic variation associated with psoriasis risk at the pathway level. We genotyped 598,258 single nucleotide polymorphisms in a discovery cohort of 2,281 case-control individuals from Spain. We performed a genome-wide pathway analysis using 1,053 reference biological pathways. A total of 14 genetic pathways (PFDR ≤ 2.55 × 10(-2)) were found to be significantly associated with psoriasis risk. Using an independent validation cohort of 7,353 individuals from the UK, a total of 6 genetic pathways were significantly replicated (PFDR ≤ 3.46 × 10(-2)). We found genetic pathways that had not been previously associated with psoriasis risk such as retinol metabolism (Pcombined = 1.84 × 10(-4)), the transport of inorganic ions and amino acids (Pcombined = 1.57 × 10(-7)), and post-translational protein modification (Pcombined = 1.57 × 10(-7)). In the latter pathway, MGAT5 showed a strong network centrality, and its association with psoriasis risk was further validated in an additional case-control cohort of 3,429 individuals (P < 0.05). These findings provide insights into the biological mechanisms associated with psoriasis susceptibility.

  8. Genome-Wide Pathway Analysis Identifies Genetic Pathways Associated with Psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Aterido, Adrià; Julià, Antonio; Ferrándiz, Carlos; Puig, Lluís; Fonseca, Eduardo; Fernández-López, Emilia; Dauden, Esteban; Sánchez-Carazo, José Luís; López-Estebaranz, José Luís; Moreno-Ramírez, David; Vanaclocha, Francisco; Herrera, Enrique; de la Cueva, Pablo; Dand, Nick; Palau, Núria; Alonso, Arnald; López-Lasanta, María; Tortosa, Raül; García-Montero, Andrés; Codó, Laia; Gelpí, Josep Lluís; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Absher, Devin; Capon, Francesca; Myers, Richard M; Barker, Jonathan N; Marsal, Sara

    2016-03-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease with a complex genetic architecture. To date, the psoriasis heritability is only partially explained. However, there is increasing evidence that the missing heritability in psoriasis could be explained by multiple genetic variants of low effect size from common genetic pathways. The objective of this study was to identify new genetic variation associated with psoriasis risk at the pathway level. We genotyped 598,258 single nucleotide polymorphisms in a discovery cohort of 2,281 case-control individuals from Spain. We performed a genome-wide pathway analysis using 1,053 reference biological pathways. A total of 14 genetic pathways (PFDR ≤ 2.55 × 10(-2)) were found to be significantly associated with psoriasis risk. Using an independent validation cohort of 7,353 individuals from the UK, a total of 6 genetic pathways were significantly replicated (PFDR ≤ 3.46 × 10(-2)). We found genetic pathways that had not been previously associated with psoriasis risk such as retinol metabolism (Pcombined = 1.84 × 10(-4)), the transport of inorganic ions and amino acids (Pcombined = 1.57 × 10(-7)), and post-translational protein modification (Pcombined = 1.57 × 10(-7)). In the latter pathway, MGAT5 showed a strong network centrality, and its association with psoriasis risk was further validated in an additional case-control cohort of 3,429 individuals (P < 0.05). These findings provide insights into the biological mechanisms associated with psoriasis susceptibility. PMID:26743605

  9. Small RNA pathway genes identified by patterns of phylogenetic conservation and divergence

    PubMed Central

    Tabach, Yuval; Billi, Allison C.; Hayes, Gabriel D.; Newman, Martin A.; Zuk, Or; Gabel, Harrison; Kamath, Ravi; Yacoby, Keren; Chapman, Brad; Garcia, Susana M.; Borowsky, Mark; Kim, John K.; Ruvkun, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Genetic and biochemical analyses of RNA interference (RNAi) and microRNA (miRNA) pathways have revealed proteins such as Argonaute/PIWI and Dicer that process and present small RNAs to their targets. Well validated small RNA pathway cofactors, such as the Argonaute/PIWI proteins show distinctive patterns of conservation or divergence in particular animal, plant, fungal, and protist species. We compared 86 divergent eukaryotic genome sequences to discern sets of proteins that show similar phylogenetic profiles with known small RNA cofactors. A large set of additional candidate small RNA cofactors have emerged from functional genomic screens for defects in miRNA- or siRNA-mediated repression in C. elegans and D. melanogaster1,2 and from proteomic analyses of proteins co-purifying with validated small RNA pathway proteins3,4. The phylogenetic profiles of many of these candidate small RNA pathway proteins are similar to those of known small RNA cofactor proteins. We used a Bayesian approach to integrate the phylogenetic profile analysis with predictions from diverse transcriptional coregulation and proteome interaction datasets to assign a probability for each protein for a role in a small RNA pathway. Testing high-confidence candidates from this analysis for defects in RNAi silencing, we found that about half of the predicted small RNA cofactors are required for RNAi silencing. Many of the newly identified small RNA pathway proteins are orthologues of proteins implicated in RNA splicing. In support of a deep connection between the mechanism of RNA splicing and small RNA-mediated gene silencing, the presence of the Argonaute proteins and other small RNA components in the many species analysed strongly correlates with the number of introns in that species. PMID:23364702

  10. Microfluidics meets metabolomics to reveal the impact of Campylobacter jejuni infection on biochemical pathways.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Ninell P; Mercier, Kelly A; McRitchie, Susan; Cavallo, Tammy B; Pathmasiri, Wimal; Stewart, Delisha; Sumner, Susan J

    2016-06-01

    Microfluidic devices that are currently being used in pharmaceutical research also have a significant potential for utilization in investigating exposure to infectious agents. We have established a microfluidic device cultured with Caco-2 cells, and utilized metabolomics to investigate the biochemical responses to the bacterial pathogen Campylobacter jejuni. In the microfluidic devices, Caco-2 cells polarize at day 5, are uniform, have defined brush borders and tight junctions, and form a mucus layer. Metabolomics analysis of cell culture media collected from both Caco-2 cell culture systems demonstrated a more metabolic homogenous biochemical profile in the media collected from microfluidic devices, compared with media collected from transwells. GeneGo pathway mapping indicated that aminoacyl-tRNA biosynthesis was perturbed by fluid flow, suggesting that fluid dynamics and shear stress impacts the cells translational quality control. Both microfluidic device and transwell culturing systems were used to investigate the impact of Campylobacter jejuni infection on biochemical processes. Caco-2 cells cultured in either system were infected at day 5 with C. jejuni 81-176 for 48 h. Metabolomics analysis clearly differentiated C. jejuni 81-176 infected and non-infected medias collected from the microfluidic devices, and demonstrated that C. jejuni 81-176 infection in microfluidic devices impacts branched-chain amino acid metabolism, glycolysis, and gluconeogenesis. In contrast, no distinction was seen in the biochemical profiles of infected versus non-infected media collected from cells cultured in transwells. Microfluidic culturing conditions demonstrated a more metabolically homogenous cell population, and present the opportunity for studying host-pathogen interactions for extended periods of time. PMID:27231016

  11. Oxidation state, bioavailability & biochemical pathway define the fate of carbon in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzyakov, Yakov; Apostel, Carolin; Gunina, Anna; Herrmann, Anke M.; Dippold, Michaela

    2015-04-01

    Numerous experiments under laboratory and field conditions analyzed microbial utilization and mean residence time (MRT) of carbon (C) from plant and microbial residues as well as root exudates in soil. Most of these studies tested the effects of various environmental factors, such as temperature, soil moisture, texture etc. on these parameters. However, only a few studies compared the properties of the substances themselves and there is no conceptual framework based on biochemical pathways. We hypothesize that the fate of C from organic substances in soil strongly depends on the first step of their microbial utilization, specifically, on biochemical pathway and initial C oxidation state, as well as its bioavailability in soils, defined by its hydrophobicity and molecular weight. Here we introduce and evaluate a new conceptual framework based on the following parameters: 1) C oxidation state, 2) molecular weight and hydrophobicity, 3) initial biochemical pathway of a substance class in microbial cells. To assess these parameters, two databases were prepared based on the literature and own studies. The first database included only the studies with 14C or 13C position specific labeled sugars, amino acids, carboxylic acids, phenols and lipids in soil. This database allowed us to analyze microbial utilization and mineralization of organics to CO2 depending on their C oxidation state (OS) and on functional groups. Additionally, we calculated data on the bond electronegativity of all compounds investigated in these studies. The second data base included the results of 14C and 13C studies with uniformly labeled substances of various classes. This database considered the free enthalpie (Delta H) per C unit from a variety of substrates differing in their aromaticity, hydrophobicity/electronegativity and location of the substance on the van Krevelen diagram. In addition, we calculated the hydrophobicity from the electronegativity of the individual bonds and recorded their

  12. Identification of genetic bases of vibrio fluvialis species-specific biochemical pathways and potential virulence factors by comparative genomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xin; Liang, Weili; Wang, Yunduan; Xu, Jialiang; Zhu, Jun; Kan, Biao

    2014-03-01

    Vibrio fluvialis is an important food-borne pathogen that causes diarrheal illness and sometimes extraintestinal infections in humans. In this study, we sequenced the genome of a clinical V. fluvialis strain and determined its phylogenetic relationships with other Vibrio species by comparative genomic analysis. We found that the closest relationship was between V. fluvialis and V. furnissii, followed by those with V. cholerae and V. mimicus. Moreover, based on genome comparisons and gene complementation experiments, we revealed genetic mechanisms of the biochemical tests that differentiate V. fluvialis from closely related species. Importantly, we identified a variety of genes encoding potential virulence factors, including multiple hemolysins, transcriptional regulators, and environmental survival and adaptation apparatuses, and the type VI secretion system, which is indicative of complex regulatory pathways modulating pathogenesis in this organism. The availability of V. fluvialis genome sequences may promote our understanding of pathogenic mechanisms for this emerging pathogen.

  13. MetaMapp: mapping and visualizing metabolomic data by integrating information from biochemical pathways and chemical and mass spectral similarity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) leads to higher rates of pulmonary diseases and infections in children. To study the biochemical changes that may precede lung diseases, metabolomic effects on fetal and maternal lungs and plasma from rats exposed to ETS were compared to filtered air control animals. Genome- reconstructed metabolic pathways may be used to map and interpret dysregulation in metabolic networks. However, mass spectrometry-based non-targeted metabolomics datasets often comprise many metabolites for which links to enzymatic reactions have not yet been reported. Hence, network visualizations that rely on current biochemical databases are incomplete and also fail to visualize novel, structurally unidentified metabolites. Results We present a novel approach to integrate biochemical pathway and chemical relationships to map all detected metabolites in network graphs (MetaMapp) using KEGG reactant pair database, Tanimoto chemical and NIST mass spectral similarity scores. In fetal and maternal lungs, and in maternal blood plasma from pregnant rats exposed to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), 459 unique metabolites comprising 179 structurally identified compounds were detected by gas chromatography time of flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF MS) and BinBase data processing. MetaMapp graphs in Cytoscape showed much clearer metabolic modularity and complete content visualization compared to conventional biochemical mapping approaches. Cytoscape visualization of differential statistics results using these graphs showed that overall, fetal lung metabolism was more impaired than lungs and blood metabolism in dams. Fetuses from ETS-exposed dams expressed lower lipid and nucleotide levels and higher amounts of energy metabolism intermediates than control animals, indicating lower biosynthetic rates of metabolites for cell division, structural proteins and lipids that are critical for in lung development. Conclusions MetaMapp graphs efficiently

  14. Dynamic optimization identifies optimal programmes for pathway regulation in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Bartl, Martin; Kötzing, Martin; Schuster, Stefan; Li, Pu; Kaleta, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    To survive in fluctuating environmental conditions, microorganisms must be able to quickly react to environmental challenges by upregulating the expression of genes encoding metabolic pathways. Here we show that protein abundance and protein synthesis capacity are key factors that determine the optimal strategy for the activation of a metabolic pathway. If protein abundance relative to protein synthesis capacity increases, the strategies shift from the simultaneous activation of all enzymes to the sequential activation of groups of enzymes and finally to a sequential activation of individual enzymes along the pathway. In the case of pathways with large differences in protein abundance, even more complex pathway activation strategies with a delayed activation of low abundance enzymes and an accelerated activation of high abundance enzymes are optimal. We confirm the existence of these pathway activation strategies as well as their dependence on our proposed constraints for a large number of metabolic pathways in several hundred prokaryotes.

  15. Path2Models: large-scale generation of computational models from biochemical pathway maps

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Systems biology projects and omics technologies have led to a growing number of biochemical pathway models and reconstructions. However, the majority of these models are still created de novo, based on literature mining and the manual processing of pathway data. Results To increase the efficiency of model creation, the Path2Models project has automatically generated mathematical models from pathway representations using a suite of freely available software. Data sources include KEGG, BioCarta, MetaCyc and SABIO-RK. Depending on the source data, three types of models are provided: kinetic, logical and constraint-based. Models from over 2 600 organisms are encoded consistently in SBML, and are made freely available through BioModels Database at http://www.ebi.ac.uk/biomodels-main/path2models. Each model contains the list of participants, their interactions, the relevant mathematical constructs, and initial parameter values. Most models are also available as easy-to-understand graphical SBGN maps. Conclusions To date, the project has resulted in more than 140 000 freely available models. Such a resource can tremendously accelerate the development of mathematical models by providing initial starting models for simulation and analysis, which can be subsequently curated and further parameterized. PMID:24180668

  16. Prediction and Biochemical Demonstration of a Catabolic Pathway for the Osmoprotectant Proline Betaine

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ritesh; Zhao, Suwen; Vetting, Matthew W.; Wood, B. McKay; Sakai, Ayano; Cho, Kyuil; Solbiati, José; Almo, Steven C.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.; Jacobson, Matthew P.; Gerlt, John A.; Cronan, John E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Through the use of genetic, enzymatic, metabolomic, and structural analyses, we have discovered the catabolic pathway for proline betaine, an osmoprotectant, in Paracoccus denitrificans and Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Genetic and enzymatic analyses showed that several of the key enzymes of the hydroxyproline betaine degradation pathway also function in proline betaine degradation. Metabolomic analyses detected each of the metabolic intermediates of the pathway. The proline betaine catabolic pathway was repressed by osmotic stress and cold stress, and a regulatory transcription factor was identified. We also report crystal structure complexes of the P. denitrificans HpbD hydroxyproline betaine epimerase/proline betaine racemase with l-proline betaine and cis-hydroxyproline betaine. PMID:24520058

  17. WinBEST-KIT: Windows-based biochemical reaction simulator for metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Tatsuya; Okamoto, Masahiro

    2006-06-01

    We have implemented an efficient, user-friendly biochemical reaction simulator called Web-based BEST-KIT (Biochemical Engineering System analyzing Tool-KIT) for analyzing large-scale nonlinear networks such as metabolic pathways. Users can easily design and analyze an arbitrary reaction scheme through the Internet and an efficient graphical user interface without considering the mathematical equations. The reaction scheme can include several reaction types, which are represented by both the mass action law (mass balance) and approximated velocity functions of enzyme kinetics at steady state, such as Michaelis-Menten, Hill cooperative, Competitive inhibition. However, since all modules in Web-based BEST-KIT have been developed in Java applet style, users cannot optionally make use of original mathematical equations in addition to the prepared equations. In the present study, we have developed a new version of BEST-KIT (for Microsoft Windows called WinBEST-KIT) to allow users to define original mathematical equations and to customize these equations very easily as user-defined reaction symbols. The following powerful system-analytical methods are prepared for system analysis: time-course calculation, parameter scanning, estimation of the values of unknown kinetic parameters based on experimentally observed time-course data of reactants, dynamic response of reactants against virtual external perturbations, and real-time simulation (Virtual Dry Lab). PMID:16960966

  18. Identifying Breeding Priorities for Blueberry Flavor Using Biochemical, Sensory, and Genotype by Environment Analyses.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Jessica L; Guthart, Matthew J; Gezan, Salvador A; Pisaroglo de Carvalho, Melissa; Schwieterman, Michael L; Colquhoun, Thomas A; Bartoshuk, Linda M; Sims, Charles A; Clark, David G; Olmstead, James W

    2015-01-01

    Breeding for a subjective goal such as flavor is challenging, as many blueberry cultivars are grown worldwide, and identifying breeding targets relating to blueberry flavor biochemistry that have a high degree of genetic control and low environmental variability are priorities. A variety of biochemical compounds and physical characters induce the sensory responses of taste, olfaction, and somatosensation, all of which interact to create what is perceived flavor. The goal of this study was to identify the flavor compounds with a larger genetic versus environmental component regulating their expression over an array of cultivars, locations, and years. Over the course of three years, consumer panelists rated overall liking, texture, sweetness, sourness, and flavor intensity of 19 southern highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum hybrids) genotypes in 30 sensory panels. Significant positive correlations to overall liking of blueberry fruit (P<0.001) were found with sweetness (R2 = 0.70), texture (R2 = 0.68), and flavor (R2 = 0.63). Sourness had a significantly negative relationship with overall liking (R2 = 0.55). The relationship between flavor and texture liking was also linear (R2 = 0.73, P<0.0001) demonstrating interaction between olfaction and somatosensation. Partial least squares analysis was used to identify sugars, acids, and volatile compounds contributing to liking and sensory intensities, and revealed strong effects of fructose, pH, and several volatile compounds upon all sensory parameters measured. To assess the feasibility of breeding for flavor components, a three year study was conducted to compare genetic and environmental influences on flavor biochemistry. Panelists could discern genotypic variation in blueberry sensory components, and many of the compounds affecting consumer favor of blueberries, such as fructose, pH, β-caryophyllene oxide and 2-heptanone, were sufficiently genetically controlled that allocating resources for their breeding is

  19. Identifying Breeding Priorities for Blueberry Flavor Using Biochemical, Sensory, and Genotype by Environment Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Jessica L.; Guthart, Matthew J.; Gezan, Salvador A.; Pisaroglo de Carvalho, Melissa; Schwieterman, Michael L.; Colquhoun, Thomas A.; Bartoshuk, Linda M.; Sims, Charles A.; Clark, David G.; Olmstead, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Breeding for a subjective goal such as flavor is challenging, as many blueberry cultivars are grown worldwide, and identifying breeding targets relating to blueberry flavor biochemistry that have a high degree of genetic control and low environmental variability are priorities. A variety of biochemical compounds and physical characters induce the sensory responses of taste, olfaction, and somatosensation, all of which interact to create what is perceived flavor. The goal of this study was to identify the flavor compounds with a larger genetic versus environmental component regulating their expression over an array of cultivars, locations, and years. Over the course of three years, consumer panelists rated overall liking, texture, sweetness, sourness, and flavor intensity of 19 southern highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum hybrids) genotypes in 30 sensory panels. Significant positive correlations to overall liking of blueberry fruit (P<0.001) were found with sweetness (R2 = 0.70), texture (R2 = 0.68), and flavor (R2 = 0.63). Sourness had a significantly negative relationship with overall liking (R2 = 0.55). The relationship between flavor and texture liking was also linear (R2 = 0.73, P<0.0001) demonstrating interaction between olfaction and somatosensation. Partial least squares analysis was used to identify sugars, acids, and volatile compounds contributing to liking and sensory intensities, and revealed strong effects of fructose, pH, and several volatile compounds upon all sensory parameters measured. To assess the feasibility of breeding for flavor components, a three year study was conducted to compare genetic and environmental influences on flavor biochemistry. Panelists could discern genotypic variation in blueberry sensory components, and many of the compounds affecting consumer favor of blueberries, such as fructose, pH, β-caryophyllene oxide and 2-heptanone, were sufficiently genetically controlled that allocating resources for their breeding is

  20. Identifying Breeding Priorities for Blueberry Flavor Using Biochemical, Sensory, and Genotype by Environment Analyses.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Jessica L; Guthart, Matthew J; Gezan, Salvador A; Pisaroglo de Carvalho, Melissa; Schwieterman, Michael L; Colquhoun, Thomas A; Bartoshuk, Linda M; Sims, Charles A; Clark, David G; Olmstead, James W

    2015-01-01

    Breeding for a subjective goal such as flavor is challenging, as many blueberry cultivars are grown worldwide, and identifying breeding targets relating to blueberry flavor biochemistry that have a high degree of genetic control and low environmental variability are priorities. A variety of biochemical compounds and physical characters induce the sensory responses of taste, olfaction, and somatosensation, all of which interact to create what is perceived flavor. The goal of this study was to identify the flavor compounds with a larger genetic versus environmental component regulating their expression over an array of cultivars, locations, and years. Over the course of three years, consumer panelists rated overall liking, texture, sweetness, sourness, and flavor intensity of 19 southern highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum hybrids) genotypes in 30 sensory panels. Significant positive correlations to overall liking of blueberry fruit (P<0.001) were found with sweetness (R2 = 0.70), texture (R2 = 0.68), and flavor (R2 = 0.63). Sourness had a significantly negative relationship with overall liking (R2 = 0.55). The relationship between flavor and texture liking was also linear (R2 = 0.73, P<0.0001) demonstrating interaction between olfaction and somatosensation. Partial least squares analysis was used to identify sugars, acids, and volatile compounds contributing to liking and sensory intensities, and revealed strong effects of fructose, pH, and several volatile compounds upon all sensory parameters measured. To assess the feasibility of breeding for flavor components, a three year study was conducted to compare genetic and environmental influences on flavor biochemistry. Panelists could discern genotypic variation in blueberry sensory components, and many of the compounds affecting consumer favor of blueberries, such as fructose, pH, β-caryophyllene oxide and 2-heptanone, were sufficiently genetically controlled that allocating resources for their breeding is

  1. Serum Metabolomic Profiling in Acute Alcoholic Hepatitis Identifies Multiple Dysregulated Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Rachakonda, Vikrant; Gabbert, Charles; Raina, Amit; Bell, Lauren N.; Cooper, Sara; Malik, Shahid; Behari, Jaideep

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives While animal studies have implicated derangements of global energy homeostasis in the pathogenesis of acute alcoholic hepatitis (AAH), the relevance of these findings to the development of human AAH remains unclear. Using global, unbiased serum metabolomics analysis, we sought to characterize alterations in metabolic pathways associated with severe AAH and identify potential biomarkers for disease prognosis. Methods This prospective, case-control study design included 25 patients with severe AAH and 25 ambulatory patients with alcoholic cirrhosis. Serum samples were collected within 24 hours of the index clinical encounter. Global, unbiased metabolomics profiling was performed. Patients were followed for 180 days after enrollment to determine survival. Results Levels of 234 biochemicals were altered in subjects with severe AAH. Random-forest analysis, principal component analysis, and integrated hierarchical clustering methods demonstrated that metabolomics profiles separated the two cohorts with 100% accuracy. Severe AAH was associated with enhanced triglyceride lipolysis, impaired mitochondrial fatty acid beta oxidation, and upregulated omega oxidation. Low levels of multiple lysolipids and related metabolites suggested decreased plasma membrane remodeling in severe AAH. While most measured bile acids were increased in severe AAH, low deoxycholate and glycodeoxycholate levels indicated intestinal dysbiosis. Several changes in substrate utilization for energy homeostasis were identified in severe AAH, including increased glucose consumption by the pentose phosphate pathway, altered tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle activity, and enhanced peptide catabolism. Finally, altered levels of small molecules related to glutathione metabolism and antioxidant vitamin depletion were observed in patients with severe AAH. Univariable logistic regression revealed 15 metabolites associated with 180-day survival in severe AAH. Conclusion Severe AAH is

  2. Acetoclastic methanogenesis is likely the dominant biochemical pathway of palmitate degradation in the presence of sulfate.

    PubMed

    Lv, Lei; Mbadinga, Serge Maurice; Wang, Li-Ying; Liu, Jin-Feng; Gu, Ji-Dong; Mu, Bo-Zhong; Yang, Shi-Zhong

    2015-09-01

    Long chain fatty acids (LCFAs) are important intermediates in the anaerobic degradation of n-alkanes. In order to find out the biochemical processes involved in the degradation of LCFAs, palmitate (a typical LCFA) was used as a substrate, and low-temperature oilfield production fluids were used as a source of microorganisms to establish two anaerobic systems, one with addition of sulfate as exogenous electron acceptor (SP), another without exogenous electron acceptor (MP) and both incubated at room temperature. After more than 2 years of incubation, about 48 and 57.4% of the palmitate were degraded in samples of MP and SP, respectively. Methane production reached 1408 and 1064 μmol for MP and SP, respectively. Clone libraries of archaeal 16S rRNA genes showed that the predominant archaea in the sulfate-amended cultures (SP) was Methanosaeta whereas Methanocalculus dominated the culture without addition of exogenous sulfate (MP). This observation shows that palmitate could be biodegraded into methane through β-oxidation and acetoclastic methanogenesis in the presence of with or without sulfate. The high occurrence of Methanosaeta in the sulfate-amended system indicates that acetoclastic methanogenesis was not inhibited/little affected by the addition of sulfate. Acetoclastic methanogenesis might be the predominant biochemchimcal pathway of methane generation in enrichment cultures amended with sulfate. These results shed light on alternative methanogenic pathways in the presence of sulfate.

  3. Biochemical Pathways: An Atlas of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (edited by Gerhard Michal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voige, Reviewed By William H.

    2000-02-01

    feature to the hyperlinks in an electronic document.) The book's index is comprehensive and useful. Entries for "phenylketonuria" and "sickle cell anemia", for example, lead to commendably concise summaries of these hereditary diseases (and the relevant metabolic pathway, in the former case). Looking up a specific molecule, however, is less helpful. The listing for fumarate hydratase, a citric acid cycle enzyme, directs the reader to the chapter on special bacterial metabolism but not to the section on the citric acid cycle itself. Literature references are included at the end of each section and are mainly from the 1990s, but they could be more useful. A long section on heme proteins, for example, concludes with eight citations, but their titles are not included, so it is impossible to determine what topic each one addresses. This book will be most useful to those with a good understanding of the fundamentals of biochemistry. Some of the information it presents could easily confuse less experienced readers. For example, it classifies selenocysteine as a standard amino acid in a figure but not in the accompanying text. In the diagram of anaerobic glycolysis, a double-headed arrow for the hexokinase reaction reinforces the frustratingly common student misperception that the phosphoryl group of glucose-6-phosphate can be used to phosphorylate ADP. Biochemical Pathways compiles a large amount of information in a single source. Its good index and clear, concise text and diagrams should make it a reliable way of gaining insight into many biochemical topics. With a price similar to that of most textbooks, it merits a place in the libraries of individuals and academic departments that teach biochemistry.

  4. Pathway Analyses Identify Novel Variants in the WNT Signaling Pathway Associated with Tuberculosis in Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xuejiao; Zhou, Juan; Chen, Xuerong; Zhou, Yanhong; Song, Xingbo; Cai, Bei; Zhang, Jingya; Lu, Xiaojun; Ying, Binwu

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains a global public health problem, and its immunopathogenesis is still poorly understood. In this study, 25 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the WNT pathway were evaluated in relation to tuberculosis risk in a Chinese Han discovery set, and 6 candidate susceptible SNPs were further validated in a Chinese Tibetan cohort. Luciferase reporter assay, RT-qPCR and Western blot were used to assess the functionality of the important WNT polymorphisms. Five polymorphisms were associated with tuberculosis susceptibility after Bonferroni correction: SFRP1 rs4736958, CTNNB1 rs9859392, rs9870255 and rs3864004 showed decreased tuberculosis risk; SFRP1 rs7832767 was related to an increased risk (OR = 1.81, 95% CI = 1.30–2.52, p = 0.010). Patients with TT genotype of rs4736958 and rs7832767 correlated with higher CRP concentrations (p = 0.003, <0.001, respectively). Functional assays revealed that mutant alleles of rs9859392 (G), rs9870255 (C) and rs3864004 (A) were associated with significantly decreased transcriptional activity, lower CTNNB1 mRNA expression and p-β-catenin level, which were consistent with their effects of decreasing TB risk. Our results provide evidences that WNT pathway polymorphisms influence tuberculosis susceptibility and host immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, suggesting that these variations may serve as novel markers for identifying the risk of developing tuberculosis. PMID:27334567

  5. A method for integrating and ranking the evidence for biochemical pathways by mining reactions from text

    PubMed Central

    Miwa, Makoto; Ohta, Tomoko; Rak, Rafal; Rowley, Andrew; Kell, Douglas B.; Pyysalo, Sampo; Ananiadou, Sophia

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: To create, verify and maintain pathway models, curators must discover and assess knowledge distributed over the vast body of biological literature. Methods supporting these tasks must understand both the pathway model representations and the natural language in the literature. These methods should identify and order documents by relevance to any given pathway reaction. No existing system has addressed all aspects of this challenge. Method: We present novel methods for associating pathway model reactions with relevant publications. Our approach extracts the reactions directly from the models and then turns them into queries for three text mining-based MEDLINE literature search systems. These queries are executed, and the resulting documents are combined and ranked according to their relevance to the reactions of interest. We manually annotate document-reaction pairs with the relevance of the document to the reaction and use this annotation to study several ranking methods, using various heuristic and machine-learning approaches. Results: Our evaluation shows that the annotated document-reaction pairs can be used to create a rule-based document ranking system, and that machine learning can be used to rank documents by their relevance to pathway reactions. We find that a Support Vector Machine-based system outperforms several baselines and matches the performance of the rule-based system. The success of the query extraction and ranking methods are used to update our existing pathway search system, PathText. Availability: An online demonstration of PathText 2 and the annotated corpus are available for research purposes at http://www.nactem.ac.uk/pathtext2/. Contact: makoto.miwa@manchester.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:23813008

  6. Computationally identifying virulence factors based on KEGG pathways.

    PubMed

    Cui, Weiren; Chen, Lei; Huang, Tao; Gao, Qian; Jiang, Min; Zhang, Ning; Zheng, Lulu; Feng, Kaiyan; Cai, Yudong; Wang, Hongwei

    2013-06-01

    Virulence factors are molecules that play very important roles in enhancing the pathogen's capability in causing diseases. Many efforts were made to investigate the mechanism of virulence factors using in silico methods. In this study, we present a novel computational method to predict virulence factors by integrating protein-protein interactions in a STRING database and biological pathways in the KEGG. Three specific species were studied according to their records in the VFDB. They are Campylobacter jejuni NCTC 11168, Escherichia coli O6 : K15 : H31 536 (UPEC) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. The prediction accuracies reached were 0.9467, 0.9575 and 0.9180, respectively. Metabolism pathways, flagellar assembly and chemotaxis may be of importance for virulence based on the analysis of the optimal feature sets we obtained. We hope this can provide some insight and guidance for related research.

  7. Antiviral Cyclic D,L-α-Peptides: Targeting a General Biochemical Pathway in Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Horne, W. Seth; Wiethoff, Christopher M.; Cui, Chunli; Wilcoxen, Keith M.; Amorin, Manuel; Ghadiri, M. Reza; Nemerow, Glen R.

    2007-01-01

    Diverse virus families have evolved to exploit the acidification of endosomal compartments to gain entry into cells. We describe a supramolecular approach for selectively targeting and inhibiting viral infections through this central biochemical pathway. Using adenovirus as a model non-enveloped virus, we have determined that an eight-residue cyclic D,L-α-peptide, selected from a directed combinatorial library, can specifically prevent the development of low pH in endocytic vesicles, arrest the escape of virions from the endosome, and abrogate adenovirus infection without an apparent adverse effect on cell viability. The likely generality of this approach against other pH-dependent viral infections is supported by the inhibition of type-A influenza virus escape from endosomes in the presence of the same peptide. Our studies suggest that self-assembling cyclic D,L-α-peptides hold considerable potential as a new rational supramolecular approach toward the design and discovery of broad-spectrum antiviral agents. PMID:15993611

  8. Biochemical Modulation of Lipid Pathway in Microalgae Dunaliella sp. for Biodiesel Production

    PubMed Central

    Talebi, Ahmad Farhad; Tohidfar, Masoud; Mousavi Derazmahalleh, Seyedeh Mahsa; Sulaiman, Alawi; Baharuddin, Azhari Samsu; Tabatabaei, Meisam

    2015-01-01

    Exploitation of renewable sources of energy such as algal biodiesel could turn energy supplies problem around. Studies on a locally isolated strain of Dunaliella sp. showed that the mean lipid content in cultures enriched by 200 mg L−1 myoinositol was raised by around 33% (1.5 times higher than the control). Similarly, higher lipid productivity values were achieved in cultures treated by 100 and 200 mg L−1 myoinositol. Fluorometry analyses (microplate fluorescence and flow cytometry) revealed increased oil accumulation in the Nile red-stained algal samples. Moreover, it was predicted that biodiesel produced from myoinositol-treated cells possessed improved oxidative stability, cetane number, and cloud point values. From the genomic point of view, real-time analyses revealed that myoinositol negatively influenced transcript abundance of AccD gene (one of the key genes involved in lipid production pathway) due to feedback inhibition and that its positive effect must have been exerted through other genes. The findings of the current research are not to interprete that myoinositol supplementation could answer all the challenges faced in microalgal biodiesel production but instead to show that “there is a there there” for biochemical modulation strategies, which we achieved, increased algal oil quantity and enhanced resultant biodiesel quality. PMID:26146623

  9. Biochemical Modulation of Lipid Pathway in Microalgae Dunaliella sp. for Biodiesel Production.

    PubMed

    Talebi, Ahmad Farhad; Tohidfar, Masoud; Mousavi Derazmahalleh, Seyedeh Mahsa; Sulaiman, Alawi; Baharuddin, Azhari Samsu; Tabatabaei, Meisam

    2015-01-01

    Exploitation of renewable sources of energy such as algal biodiesel could turn energy supplies problem around. Studies on a locally isolated strain of Dunaliella sp. showed that the mean lipid content in cultures enriched by 200 mg L(-1) myoinositol was raised by around 33% (1.5 times higher than the control). Similarly, higher lipid productivity values were achieved in cultures treated by 100 and 200 mg L(-1) myoinositol. Fluorometry analyses (microplate fluorescence and flow cytometry) revealed increased oil accumulation in the Nile red-stained algal samples. Moreover, it was predicted that biodiesel produced from myoinositol-treated cells possessed improved oxidative stability, cetane number, and cloud point values. From the genomic point of view, real-time analyses revealed that myoinositol negatively influenced transcript abundance of AccD gene (one of the key genes involved in lipid production pathway) due to feedback inhibition and that its positive effect must have been exerted through other genes. The findings of the current research are not to interprete that myoinositol supplementation could answer all the challenges faced in microalgal biodiesel production but instead to show that "there is a there there" for biochemical modulation strategies, which we achieved, increased algal oil quantity and enhanced resultant biodiesel quality.

  10. Molecular and Biochemical Analysis of Chalcone Synthase from Freesia hybrid in Flavonoid Biosynthetic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wei; Meng, Xiangyu; Liang, Lingjie; Jiang, Wangshu; Huang, Yafei; He, Jing; Hu, Haiyan; Almqvist, Jonas; Gao, Xiang; Wang, Li

    2015-01-01

    Chalcone synthase (CHS) catalyzes the first committed step in the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway. In this study, the cDNA (FhCHS1) encoding CHS from Freesia hybrida was successfully isolated and analyzed. Multiple sequence alignments showed that both the conserved CHS active site residues and CHS signature sequence were found in the deduced amino acid sequence of FhCHS1. Meanwhile, crystallographic analysis revealed that protein structure of FhCHS1 is highly similar to that of alfalfa CHS2, and the biochemical analysis results indicated that it has an enzymatic role in naringenin biosynthesis. Moreover, quantitative real-time PCR was performed to detect the transcript levels of FhCHS1 in flowers and different tissues, and patterns of FhCHS1 expression in flowers showed significant correlation to the accumulation patterns of anthocyanin during flower development. To further characterize the functionality of FhCHS1, its ectopic expression in Arabidopsis thaliana tt4 mutants and Petunia hybrida was performed. The results showed that overexpression of FhCHS1 in tt4 mutants fully restored the pigmentation phenotype of the seed coats, cotyledons and hypocotyls, while transgenic petunia expressing FhCHS1 showed flower color alteration from white to pink. In summary, these results suggest that FhCHS1 plays an essential role in the biosynthesis of flavonoid in Freesia hybrida and may be used to modify the components of flavonoids in other plants. PMID:25742495

  11. Biochemical Modulation of Lipid Pathway in Microalgae Dunaliella sp. for Biodiesel Production.

    PubMed

    Talebi, Ahmad Farhad; Tohidfar, Masoud; Mousavi Derazmahalleh, Seyedeh Mahsa; Sulaiman, Alawi; Baharuddin, Azhari Samsu; Tabatabaei, Meisam

    2015-01-01

    Exploitation of renewable sources of energy such as algal biodiesel could turn energy supplies problem around. Studies on a locally isolated strain of Dunaliella sp. showed that the mean lipid content in cultures enriched by 200 mg L(-1) myoinositol was raised by around 33% (1.5 times higher than the control). Similarly, higher lipid productivity values were achieved in cultures treated by 100 and 200 mg L(-1) myoinositol. Fluorometry analyses (microplate fluorescence and flow cytometry) revealed increased oil accumulation in the Nile red-stained algal samples. Moreover, it was predicted that biodiesel produced from myoinositol-treated cells possessed improved oxidative stability, cetane number, and cloud point values. From the genomic point of view, real-time analyses revealed that myoinositol negatively influenced transcript abundance of AccD gene (one of the key genes involved in lipid production pathway) due to feedback inhibition and that its positive effect must have been exerted through other genes. The findings of the current research are not to interprete that myoinositol supplementation could answer all the challenges faced in microalgal biodiesel production but instead to show that "there is a there there" for biochemical modulation strategies, which we achieved, increased algal oil quantity and enhanced resultant biodiesel quality. PMID:26146623

  12. Pathways-Driven Sparse Regression Identifies Pathways and Genes Associated with High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol in Two Asian Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Silver, Matt; Chen, Peng; Li, Ruoying; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Wong, Tien-Yin; Tai, E-Shyong; Teo, Yik-Ying; Montana, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Standard approaches to data analysis in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) ignore any potential functional relationships between gene variants. In contrast gene pathways analysis uses prior information on functional structure within the genome to identify pathways associated with a trait of interest. In a second step, important single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) or genes may be identified within associated pathways. The pathways approach is motivated by the fact that genes do not act alone, but instead have effects that are likely to be mediated through their interaction in gene pathways. Where this is the case, pathways approaches may reveal aspects of a trait's genetic architecture that would otherwise be missed when considering SNPs in isolation. Most pathways methods begin by testing SNPs one at a time, and so fail to capitalise on the potential advantages inherent in a multi-SNP, joint modelling approach. Here, we describe a dual-level, sparse regression model for the simultaneous identification of pathways and genes associated with a quantitative trait. Our method takes account of various factors specific to the joint modelling of pathways with genome-wide data, including widespread correlation between genetic predictors, and the fact that variants may overlap multiple pathways. We use a resampling strategy that exploits finite sample variability to provide robust rankings for pathways and genes. We test our method through simulation, and use it to perform pathways-driven gene selection in a search for pathways and genes associated with variation in serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in two separate GWAS cohorts of Asian adults. By comparing results from both cohorts we identify a number of candidate pathways including those associated with cardiomyopathy, and T cell receptor and PPAR signalling. Highlighted genes include those associated with the L-type calcium channel, adenylate cyclase, integrin, laminin, MAPK signalling and immune

  13. Identifiability and inference of pathway motifs by epistasis analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phenix, Hilary; Perkins, Theodore; Kærn, Mads

    2013-06-01

    The accuracy of genetic network inference is limited by the assumptions used to determine if one hypothetical model is better than another in explaining experimental observations. Most previous work on epistasis analysis—in which one attempts to infer pathway relationships by determining equivalences among traits following mutations—has been based on Boolean or linear models. Here, we delineate the ultimate limits of epistasis-based inference by systematically surveying all two-gene network motifs and use symbolic algebra with arbitrary regulation functions to examine trait equivalences. Our analysis divides the motifs into equivalence classes, where different genetic perturbations result in indistinguishable experimental outcomes. We demonstrate that this partitioning can reveal important information about network architecture, and show, using simulated data, that it greatly improves the accuracy of genetic network inference methods. Because of the minimal assumptions involved, equivalence partitioning has broad applicability for gene network inference.

  14. Identifiability and inference of pathway motifs by epistasis analysis.

    PubMed

    Phenix, Hilary; Perkins, Theodore; Kærn, Mads

    2013-06-01

    The accuracy of genetic network inference is limited by the assumptions used to determine if one hypothetical model is better than another in explaining experimental observations. Most previous work on epistasis analysis-in which one attempts to infer pathway relationships by determining equivalences among traits following mutations-has been based on Boolean or linear models. Here, we delineate the ultimate limits of epistasis-based inference by systematically surveying all two-gene network motifs and use symbolic algebra with arbitrary regulation functions to examine trait equivalences. Our analysis divides the motifs into equivalence classes, where different genetic perturbations result in indistinguishable experimental outcomes. We demonstrate that this partitioning can reveal important information about network architecture, and show, using simulated data, that it greatly improves the accuracy of genetic network inference methods. Because of the minimal assumptions involved, equivalence partitioning has broad applicability for gene network inference. PMID:23822501

  15. Pathway analysis of bladder cancer genome-wide association study identifies novel pathways involved in bladder cancer development

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Meng; Rothman, Nathaniel; Ye, Yuanqing; Gu, Jian; Scheet, Paul A.; Huang, Maosheng; Chang, David W.; Dinney, Colin P.; Silverman, Debra T.; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Wu, Xifeng

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are designed to identify individual regions associated with cancer risk, but only explain a small fraction of the inherited variability. Alternative approach analyzing genetic variants within biological pathways has been proposed to discover networks of susceptibility genes with additional effects. The gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) may complement and expand traditional GWAS analysis to identify novel genes and pathways associated with bladder cancer risk. We selected three GSEA methods: Gen-Gen, Aligator, and the SNP Ratio Test to evaluate cellular signaling pathways involved in bladder cancer susceptibility in a Texas GWAS population. The candidate genetic polymorphisms from the significant pathway selected by GSEA were validated in an independent NCI GWAS. We identified 18 novel pathways (P < 0.05) significantly associated with bladder cancer risk. Five of the most promising pathways (P ≤ 0.001 in any of the three GSEA methods) among the 18 pathways included two cell cycle pathways and neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and unfolded protein response pathways. We validated the candidate polymorphisms in the NCI GWAS and found variants of RAPGEF1, SKP1, HERPUD1, CACNB2, CACNA1C, CACNA1S, COL4A2, SRC, and CACNA1C were associated with bladder cancer risk. Two CCNE1 variants, rs8102137 and rs997669, from cell cycle pathways showed the strongest associations; the CCNE1 signal at 19q12 has already been reported in previous GWAS. These findings offer additional etiologic insights highlighting the specific genes and pathways associated with bladder cancer development. GSEA may be a complementary tool to GWAS to identify additional loci of cancer susceptibility.

  16. Biochemical and genomic analysis of the denitrification pathway within the genus Neisseria.

    PubMed

    Barth, Kenneth R; Isabella, Vincent M; Clark, Virginia L

    2009-12-01

    Since Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Neisseria meningitidis are obligate human pathogens, a comparison with commensal species of the same genus could reveal differences important in pathogenesis. The recent completion of commensal Neisseria genome draft assemblies allowed us to perform a comparison of the genes involved in the catalysis, assembly and regulation of the denitrification pathway, which has been implicated in the virulence of several bacteria. All species contained a highly conserved nitric oxide reductase (NorB) and a nitrite reductase (AniA or NirK) that was highly conserved in the catalytic but divergent in the N-terminal lipid modification and C-terminal glycosylation domains. Only Neisseria mucosa contained a nitrate reductase (Nar), and only Neisseria lactamica, Neisseria cinerea, Neisseria subflava, Neisseria flavescens and Neisseria sicca contained a nitrous oxide reductase (Nos) complex. The regulators of the denitrification genes, FNR, NarQP and NsrR, were highly conserved, except for the GAF domain of NarQ. Biochemical examination of laboratory strains revealed that all of the neisserial species tested except N. mucosa had a two- to fourfold lower nitrite reductase activity than N. gonorrhoeae, while N. meningitidis and most of the commensal Neisseria species had a two- to fourfold higher nitric oxide (NO) reductase activity. For N. meningitidis and most of the commensal Neisseria, there was a greater than fourfold reduction in the NO steady-state level in the presence of nitrite as compared with N. gonorrhoeae. All of the species tested generated an NO steady-state level in the presence of an NO donor that was similar to that of N. gonorrhoeae. The greatest difference between the Neisseria species was the lack of a functional Nos system in the pathogenic species N. gonorrhoeae and N. meningitidis.

  17. Identification of novel components of NAD-utilizing metabolic pathways and prediction of their biochemical functions.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Robson Francisco; Aravind, L

    2012-06-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) is a ubiquitous cofactor participating in numerous redox reactions. It is also a substrate for regulatory modifications of proteins and nucleic acids via the addition of ADP-ribose moieties or removal of acyl groups by transfer to ADP-ribose. In this study, we use in-depth sequence, structure and genomic context analysis to uncover new enzymes and substrate-binding proteins in NAD-utilizing metabolic and macromolecular modification systems. We predict that Escherichia coli YbiA and related families of domains from diverse bacteria, eukaryotes, large DNA viruses and single strand RNA viruses are previously unrecognized components of NAD-utilizing pathways that probably operate on ADP-ribose derivatives. Using contextual analysis we show that some of these proteins potentially act in RNA repair, where NAD is used to remove 2'-3' cyclic phosphodiester linkages. Likewise, we predict that another family of YbiA-related enzymes is likely to comprise a novel NAD-dependent ADP-ribosylation system for proteins, in conjunction with a previously unrecognized ADP-ribosyltransferase. A similar ADP-ribosyltransferase is also coupled with MACRO or ADP-ribosylglycohydrolase domain proteins in other related systems, suggesting that all these novel systems are likely to comprise pairs of ADP-ribosylation and ribosylglycohydrolase enzymes analogous to the DraG-DraT system, and a novel group of bacterial polymorphic toxins. We present evidence that some of these coupled ADP-ribosyltransferases/ribosylglycohydrolases are likely to regulate certain restriction modification enzymes in bacteria. The ADP-ribosyltransferases found in these, the bacterial polymorphic toxin and host-directed toxin systems of bacteria such as Waddlia also throw light on the evolution of this fold and the origin of eukaryotic polyADP-ribosyltransferases and NEURL4-like ARTs, which might be involved in centrosomal assembly. We also infer a novel biosynthetic pathway that

  18. Training signaling pathway maps to biochemical data with constrained fuzzy logic: quantitative analysis of liver cell responses to inflammatory stimuli.

    PubMed

    Morris, Melody K; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Clarke, David C; Sorger, Peter K; Lauffenburger, Douglas A

    2011-03-01

    Predictive understanding of cell signaling network operation based on general prior knowledge but consistent with empirical data in a specific environmental context is a current challenge in computational biology. Recent work has demonstrated that Boolean logic can be used to create context-specific network models by training proteomic pathway maps to dedicated biochemical data; however, the Boolean formalism is restricted to characterizing protein species as either fully active or inactive. To advance beyond this limitation, we propose a novel form of fuzzy logic sufficiently flexible to model quantitative data but also sufficiently simple to efficiently construct models by training pathway maps on dedicated experimental measurements. Our new approach, termed constrained fuzzy logic (cFL), converts a prior knowledge network (obtained from literature or interactome databases) into a computable model that describes graded values of protein activation across multiple pathways. We train a cFL-converted network to experimental data describing hepatocytic protein activation by inflammatory cytokines and demonstrate the application of the resultant trained models for three important purposes: (a) generating experimentally testable biological hypotheses concerning pathway crosstalk, (b) establishing capability for quantitative prediction of protein activity, and (c) prediction and understanding of the cytokine release phenotypic response. Our methodology systematically and quantitatively trains a protein pathway map summarizing curated literature to context-specific biochemical data. This process generates a computable model yielding successful prediction of new test data and offering biological insight into complex datasets that are difficult to fully analyze by intuition alone.

  19. Training Signaling Pathway Maps to Biochemical Data with Constrained Fuzzy Logic: Quantitative Analysis of Liver Cell Responses to Inflammatory Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Melody K.; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Clarke, David C.; Sorger, Peter K.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2011-01-01

    Predictive understanding of cell signaling network operation based on general prior knowledge but consistent with empirical data in a specific environmental context is a current challenge in computational biology. Recent work has demonstrated that Boolean logic can be used to create context-specific network models by training proteomic pathway maps to dedicated biochemical data; however, the Boolean formalism is restricted to characterizing protein species as either fully active or inactive. To advance beyond this limitation, we propose a novel form of fuzzy logic sufficiently flexible to model quantitative data but also sufficiently simple to efficiently construct models by training pathway maps on dedicated experimental measurements. Our new approach, termed constrained fuzzy logic (cFL), converts a prior knowledge network (obtained from literature or interactome databases) into a computable model that describes graded values of protein activation across multiple pathways. We train a cFL-converted network to experimental data describing hepatocytic protein activation by inflammatory cytokines and demonstrate the application of the resultant trained models for three important purposes: (a) generating experimentally testable biological hypotheses concerning pathway crosstalk, (b) establishing capability for quantitative prediction of protein activity, and (c) prediction and understanding of the cytokine release phenotypic response. Our methodology systematically and quantitatively trains a protein pathway map summarizing curated literature to context-specific biochemical data. This process generates a computable model yielding successful prediction of new test data and offering biological insight into complex datasets that are difficult to fully analyze by intuition alone. PMID:21408212

  20. Bioinformatic and Biochemical Characterizations of C–S Bond Formation and Cleavage Enzymes in the Fungus Neurospora crassa Ergothioneine Biosynthetic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ergothioneine is a histidine thiol derivative. Its mycobacterial biosynthetic pathway has five steps (EgtA-E catalysis) with two novel reactions: a mononuclear nonheme iron enzyme (EgtB) catalyzed oxidative C–S bond formation and a PLP-mediated C–S lyase (EgtE) reaction. Our bioinformatic and biochemical analyses indicate that the fungus Neurospora crassa has a more concise ergothioneine biosynthetic pathway because its nonheme iron enzyme, Egt1, makes use of cysteine instead of γ-Glu-Cys as the substrate. Such a change of substrate preference eliminates the competition between ergothioneine and glutathione biosyntheses. In addition, we have identified the N. crassa C–S lyase (NCU11365) and reconstituted its activity in vitro, which makes the future ergothioneine production through metabolic engineering feasible. PMID:25275953

  1. Biochemical and structural characterization of mouse mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase, a newly identified kynurenine aminotransferase-IV

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Q.; Robinson, H.; Cai, T.; Tagle, D. A.; Li, J.

    2011-10-01

    Mammalian mAspAT (mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase) is recently reported to have KAT (kynurenine aminotransferase) activity and plays a role in the biosynthesis of KYNA (kynurenic acid) in rat, mouse and human brains. This study concerns the biochemical and structural characterization of mouse mAspAT. In this study, mouse mAspAT cDNA was amplified from mouse brain first stand cDNA and its recombinant protein was expressed in an Escherichia coli expression system. Sixteen oxo acids were tested for the co-substrate specificity of mouse mAspAT and 14 of them were shown to be capable of serving as co-substrates for the enzyme. Structural analysis of mAspAT by macromolecular crystallography revealed that the cofactor-binding residues of mAspAT are similar to those of other KATs. The substrate-binding residues of mAspAT are slightly different from those of other KATs. Our results provide a biochemical and structural basis towards understanding the overall physiological role of mAspAT in vivo and insight into controlling the levels of endogenous KYNA through modulation of the enzyme in the mouse brain.

  2. Biochemical and structural characterization of mouse mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase, a newly identified kynurenine aminotransferase-IV

    PubMed Central

    Han, Qian; Robinson, Howard; Cai, Tao; Tagle, Danilo A.; Li, Jianyong

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis Mammalian mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase (mAspAT) is recently reported to have kynurenine aminotransferase (KAT) activity and plays a role in the biosynthesis of kynurenic acid (KYNA) in rat, mouse and human brains. This study concerns the biochemical and structural characterization of mouse mAspAT. In this study, mouse mAspAT cDNA was amplified from mouse brain first stand cDNA and its recombinant protein was expressed in an Escherichia coli expression system. Sixteen keto acids were tested for the co-substrate specificity of mouse mAspAT and fourteen of them were shown to be capable of serving as co-substrates for the enzyme. Structural analysis of mAspAT by macromolecular crystallography revealed that the cofactor binding residues of mAspAT are similar to those of other KATs. The substrate binding residues of mAspAT are slightly different from those of other KATs. Our data provide a biochemical and structural basis towards understanding the overall physiological role of mAspAT in vivo and insight into controlling the levels of endogenous KYNA through modulation of the enzyme in the mouse brain. PMID:20977429

  3. Hypericin biosynthesis in Hypericum hookerianum Wight and Arn: investigation on biochemical pathways using metabolite inhibitors and suppression subtractive hybridization.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Padmesh P; Nair, Aswati R

    2014-10-01

    The biochemical pathway to hypericin biosynthesis is presumed to be polyketide synthase (PKS) mediated, but it has not been experimentally validated, and no alternate route (chorismate/o-succinylbenzoate pathway) has been analyzed. We report here our earlier developed auxin inducible culture systems of Hypericum hookerianum as a model, to study the metabolic pathway to hypericin synthesis. Inhibitors of the alternate pathway at varying concentrations showed steady synthesis of total hypericins with means of 2.80±0.22, 18.75±0.01; 16.39±3.75, 29.60±1.90 (mevinolin) 2.53±0.10, 18.12±0.56; 0.14±0.01, 14.28±1.11 (fosmidomycin) and 2.7±0.35, 18.75±0.61; 0.14±0.01, 12.80±1.09 mg g(-1) DW (glyphosate) in the control and auxin-induced shoot and shoot-forming callus cultures, respectively. SSH analysis classified the differentially expressed sequences into protein synthesis (38%), modification (20%), electron transport (9%) and remaining as unclassified (11%) and unknown proteins (22%). Functional annotation of sequences indicates the presence of additional protein components besides PKS activity. Our results demonstrate direct biochemical and molecular evidence of PKS hypothesis of hypericin biosynthesis for the first time.

  4. Identifying Differences Between Biochemical Failure and Cure: Incidence Rates and Predictors

    SciTech Connect

    Vicini, Frank A.; Shah, Chirag; Kestin, Larry; Ghilezan, Mihai; Krauss, Daniel; Ye Hong; Brabbins, Donald; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    2011-11-15

    Background: Patients treated with radiation therapy (RT) for prostate cancer were evaluated to estimate the length of time required to document biochemical cure (BC) after treatment and the variables associated with long-term treatment efficacy. Patients and Methods: 2,100 patients received RT alone for localized prostate carcinoma (external-beam RT, n = 1,504; brachytherapy alone, n = 241; or brachytherapy + pelvic radiation, n = 355). The median external-beam dose was 68.4 Gy, and the median follow-up time was 8.6 years. Biochemical failure (BF) was defined according to the Phoenix definition. Results: Biochemical failure was experienced by 685 patients (32.6%). The median times to BF for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups were 6.0, 5.6, and 4.5 years respectively (p < 0.001). The average annual incidence rates of BF for years 1-5, 5-10,11-15, and 16-20 in low-risk patients were 2.0%, 2.0%, 0.3%, and 0.06% (p < 0.001); for intermediate-risk patients, 4%, 3%, 0.3%, and 0% (p < 0.001); and for high-risk patients, 10.0%, 5.0%, 0.3%, and 0.3% (p < 0.001). After 5 years of treatment, 36.9% of all patients experienced BF. The percentage of total failures occurring during years 1-5, 5-10, 11-15, and 16-20 were 48.7%, 43.5%, 6.5%, and 1.3% for low-risk patients; 64.0%, 32.2%, 3.8%, and 0% for intermediate-risk patients; and 71.9%, 25.9%, 1.1%, and 1.1% for high-risk patients, respectively. Increasing time to nadir was associated with increased time to BF. On multivariate analysis, factors significantly associated with 10-year BC included prostate-specific antigen nadir and time to nadir. Conclusions: The incidence rates for BF did not plateau until later than 10 years after treatment, suggesting that extended follow-up time is required to monitor patients after treatment. Prostate-specific antigen nadir and time to nadir have the strongest association with long-term BC.

  5. Metabolic profiling reveals biochemical pathways and potential biomarkers associated with the pathogenesis of Krabbe disease.

    PubMed

    Weinstock, Nadav I; Wrabetz, Lawrence; Feltri, M Laura; Shin, Daesung

    2016-11-01

    Krabbe disease (KD) is caused by mutations in the galactosylceramidase (GALC) gene, which encodes a lysosomal enzyme that degrades galactolipids, including galactosylceramide and galactosylsphingosine (psychosine). GALC deficiency results in progressive intracellular accumulation of psychosine, which is believed to be the main cause for the demyelinating neurodegeneration in KD pathology. Umbilical cord blood transplantation slows disease progression when performed presymptomatically but carries a significant risk of morbidity and mortality. Accurate presymptomatic diagnosis is therefore critical to facilitate the efficacy of existing transplant approaches and to avoid unnecessary treatment of children who will not develop KD. Unfortunately, current diagnostic criteria, including GALC activity, genetic analysis, and psychosine measurement, are insufficient for secure presymptomatic diagnosis. This study performs a global metabolomic analysis to identify pathogenetic metabolic pathways and novel biomarkers implicated in the authentic mouse model of KD known as twitcher. At a time point before onset of signs of disease, twitcher hindbrains had metabolic profiles similar to WT, with the exception of a decrease in metabolites related to glucose energy metabolism. Many metabolic pathways were altered after early signs of disease in the twitcher, including decreased phospholipid turnover, restricted mitochondrial metabolism of branched-chain amino acids, increased inflammation, and changes in neurotransmitter metabolism and osmolytes. Hypoxanthine, a purine derivative, is increased before signs of disease appear, suggesting its potential as a biomarker for early diagnosis of KD. Additionally, given the early changes in glucose metabolism in the pathogenesis of KD, diagnostic modalities that report metabolic function, such as positron emission tomography, may be useful in KD. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27638595

  6. Identifying Distinct Healthcare Pathways During Episodes of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Exacerbations.

    PubMed

    Kuwornu, John P; Lix, Lisa M; Quail, Jacqueline M; Forget, Evelyn; Muthukumarana, Saman; Wang, Xiaoyun E; Osman, Meric; Teare, Gary F

    2016-03-01

    Healthcare pathways are important to measure because they are expected to affect outcomes. However, they are challenging to define because patients exhibit heterogeneity in their use of healthcare services. The objective of this study was to identify and describe healthcare pathways during episodes of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations. Linked administrative databases from Saskatchewan, Canada were used to identify a cohort of newly diagnosed COPD patients and their episodes of healthcare use for disease exacerbations. Latent class analysis (LCA) was used to classify the cohort into homogeneous pathways using indicators of respiratory-related hospitalizations, emergency department (ED) visits, general and specialist physician visits, and outpatient prescription drug dispensations. Multinomial logistic regression models tested patients' demographic and disease characteristics associated with pathway group membership. The most frequent healthcare contact sequences in each pathway were described. Tests of mean costs across groups were conducted using a model-based approach with χ² statistics. LCA identified 3 distinct pathways for patients with hospital- (n = 963) and ED-initiated (n = 364) episodes. For the former, pathway group 1 members followed complex pathways in which multiple healthcare services were repeatedly used and incurred substantially higher costs than patients in the other pathway groups. For patients with an ED-initiated episode, pathway group 1 members also had higher costs than other groups. Pathway groups differed with respect to patient demographic and disease characteristics. A minority of patients were discharged from ED or hospital, but did not have any follow-up care during the remainder of their episode.Patients who followed complex pathways could benefit from case management interventions to streamline their journeys through the healthcare system. The minority of patients whose pathways were not consistent

  7. Using the attract method to identify core pathways in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Li, J S; Gao, X L; Liu, Y R; Dong, Y

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify core pathways associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) using the attract method. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways were determined using the GSEA-ANOVA method, based on the gene expression data of JIA. Syn-expression groups within core attractor pathways were identified by hierarchical clustering. Correlated sets of genes exhibiting highly similar profiles to the syn-expression groups were identified and each correlated set was subjected to a gene ontology functional enrichment analysis to discover potentially shared biological themes. Based on a false-discovery rate < 0.05, we identified 11 significant pathways were identified as potential attractors. Flag genes or uninformative genes were removed and 5 discriminative pathways: the proteasome, ribosome, protein export, spliceosome, and Parkinson's disease pathways were identified. A final set of syn-expression groups with a consistent trend of relative expression of pathway-related genes was obtained; that is, the proteasome, ribosome, protein export, spliceosome, and Parkinson's disease pathways were composed of 2, 2, 1, 2, and 3 clusters, respectively. Genes in each correlated set shared common roles, and changes at the pathway level were more likely to be real. In light of these, the attract method was able to on expand important context to find distinguishing expression patterns within pathways. This paper predicted that the functional themes involved in protein synthesis (such as proteasome, ribosome, spliceosome) were closely related to the progression of JIA, which might contribute to the detection of therapy target for JIA. PMID:27525947

  8. Neuropathological and biochemical criteria to identify acquired Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease among presumed sporadic cases.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Atsushi; Parchi, Piero; Yamada, Masahito; Mohri, Shirou; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki

    2016-06-01

    As an experimental model of acquired Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), we performed transmission studies of sporadic CJD using knock-in mice expressing human prion protein (PrP). In this model, the inoculation of the sporadic CJD strain V2 into animals homozygous for methionine at polymorphic codon 129 (129 M/M) of the PRNP gene produced quite distinctive neuropathological and biochemical features, that is, widespread kuru plaques and intermediate type abnormal PrP (PrP(Sc) ). Interestingly, this distinctive combination of molecular and pathological features has been, to date, observed in acquired CJD but not in sporadic CJD. Assuming that these distinctive phenotypic traits are specific for acquired CJD, we revisited the literature and found two cases showing widespread kuru plaques despite the 129 M/M genotype, in a neurosurgeon and in a patient with a medical history of neurosurgery without dura mater grafting. By Western blot analysis of brain homogenates, we revealed the intermediate type of PrP(Sc) in both cases. Furthermore, transmission properties of brain extracts from these two cases were indistinguishable from those of a subgroup of dura mater graft-associated iatrogenic CJD caused by infection with the sporadic CJD strain V2. These data strongly suggest that the two atypical CJD cases, previously thought to represent sporadic CJD, very likely acquired the disease through exposure to prion-contaminated brain tissues. Thus, we propose that the distinctive combination of 129 M/M genotype, kuru plaques, and intermediate type PrP(Sc) , represents a reliable criterion for the identification of acquired CJD cases among presumed sporadic cases. PMID:26669818

  9. Neuropathological and biochemical criteria to identify acquired Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease among presumed sporadic cases.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Atsushi; Parchi, Piero; Yamada, Masahito; Mohri, Shirou; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki

    2016-06-01

    As an experimental model of acquired Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), we performed transmission studies of sporadic CJD using knock-in mice expressing human prion protein (PrP). In this model, the inoculation of the sporadic CJD strain V2 into animals homozygous for methionine at polymorphic codon 129 (129 M/M) of the PRNP gene produced quite distinctive neuropathological and biochemical features, that is, widespread kuru plaques and intermediate type abnormal PrP (PrP(Sc) ). Interestingly, this distinctive combination of molecular and pathological features has been, to date, observed in acquired CJD but not in sporadic CJD. Assuming that these distinctive phenotypic traits are specific for acquired CJD, we revisited the literature and found two cases showing widespread kuru plaques despite the 129 M/M genotype, in a neurosurgeon and in a patient with a medical history of neurosurgery without dura mater grafting. By Western blot analysis of brain homogenates, we revealed the intermediate type of PrP(Sc) in both cases. Furthermore, transmission properties of brain extracts from these two cases were indistinguishable from those of a subgroup of dura mater graft-associated iatrogenic CJD caused by infection with the sporadic CJD strain V2. These data strongly suggest that the two atypical CJD cases, previously thought to represent sporadic CJD, very likely acquired the disease through exposure to prion-contaminated brain tissues. Thus, we propose that the distinctive combination of 129 M/M genotype, kuru plaques, and intermediate type PrP(Sc) , represents a reliable criterion for the identification of acquired CJD cases among presumed sporadic cases.

  10. How Can Men Destined for Biochemical Failure After Androgen Deprivation and Radiotherapy Be Identified Earlier?

    SciTech Connect

    D'Ambrosio, David J.; Ruth, Karen; Horwitz, Eric M.; Uzzo, Robert G.; Pollack, Alan; Buyyounouski, Mark K.

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: The significance of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) increases during the recovery of androgen after androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and radiotherapy for prostate cancer is not well understood. This study sought to determine whether the initial PSA increase from undetectable after completion of all treatment predicts for eventual biochemical failure (BF). Methods and Materials: Between July 1992 and March 2004, 163 men with a Gleason score of 8-10 or initial PSA level >20 ng/mL, or Stage T3 prostate cancer were treated with radiotherapy (median dose, 76 Gy) and ADT and achieved an undetectable PSA level. The first detectable PSA level after the cessation of ADT was defined as the PSA sentinel rise (SR). A PSA-SR of >0.25, >0.5, >0.75, and >1.0 ng/mL was studied as predictors of BF (nadir plus 2 ng/mL). Cox proportional hazards models were used for univariate and multivariate analyses for BF adjusting for pretreatment differences in Gleason score, stage, PSA level (continuous), dose (continuous), and ADT duration (<12 vs. {>=}12 months). Results: Of the 163 men, 41 had BF after therapy. The median time to BF was 25 months (range, 4-96). The 5-year BF rate stratified by a PSA-SR of {<=}0.25 vs. >0.25 ng/mL was 28% vs. 43% (p = 0.02), {<=}0.5 vs. >0.5 ng/mL was 30% vs. 56% (p = 0.0003), {<=}0.75 vs. >0.75 ng/mL was 29% vs. 66% (p < 0.0001), and {<=}1.0 vs. >1.0 ng/mL was 29% vs. 75% (p < 0.0001). All four PSA-SRs were independently predictive of BF on multivariate analysis. Conclusion: The PSA-SR predicts for BF. A PSA-SR of >0.5 ng/mL can be used for early identification of men at greater risk of BF.

  11. Expression proteomics identifies biochemical adaptations and defense responses in transgenic plants with perturbed polyamine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Franceschetti, Marina; Perry, Barry; Thompson, Benjamin; Hanfrey, Colin; Michael, Anthony J

    2004-10-22

    Soluble proteins from leaves of transgenic tobacco plants with perturbed polyamine metabolism, caused by S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase overexpression, were analysed by comparative proteomics. A group of proteins was found to be increasingly repressed, in parallel with the degree of polyamine perturbation, in each of the three independent transgenic lines. These were identified as isoforms of chloroplast ribonucleoproteins, known to be involved in chloroplast mRNA stability, processing and translation. Another group of eight proteins strongly induced in the most metabolically perturbed line was identified as multiple, uncharacterised isoforms of the defense protein PR-1, a known marker for systemic acquired resistance.

  12. Transcriptomics profiling of Indian mustard (Brassica juncea) under arsenate stress identifies key candidate genes and regulatory pathways.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Sudhakar; Srivastava, Ashish K; Sablok, Gaurav; Deshpande, Tejaswini U; Suprasanna, Penna

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic (As) is a non-essential element, a groundwater pollutant, whose uptake by plants produces toxic effects. The use of As-contaminated groundwater for irrigation can affect the crop productivity. Realizing the importance of the Brassica juncea as a crop plant in terms of oil-yield, there is a need to unravel mechanistic details of response to As stress and identify key functional genes and pathways. In this research, we studied time-dependent (4-96 h) transcriptome changes in roots and shoots of B. juncea under arsenate [As(V)] stress using Agilent platform. Among the whole transcriptome profiled genes, a total of 1,285 genes showed significant change in expression pattern upon As(V) exposure. The differentially expressed genes were categorized to various signaling pathways including hormones (jasmonate, abscisic acid, auxin, and ethylene) and kinases. Significant effects were also noticed on genes related to sulfur, nitrogen, CHO, and lipid metabolisms along with photosynthesis. Biochemical assays were conducted using specific inhibitors of glutathione and jasmonate biosynthesis, and kinases. The inhibitor studies revealed interconnection among sulfur metabolism, jasmonate, and kinase signaling pathways. In addition, various transposons also constituted a part of the altered transcriptome. Lastly, we profiled a set of key functional up- and down-regulated genes using real-time RT-PCR, which could act as an early indicators of the As stress.

  13. Transcriptomics profiling of Indian mustard (Brassica juncea) under arsenate stress identifies key candidate genes and regulatory pathways

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Sudhakar; Srivastava, Ashish K.; Sablok, Gaurav; Deshpande, Tejaswini U.; Suprasanna, Penna

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic (As) is a non-essential element, a groundwater pollutant, whose uptake by plants produces toxic effects. The use of As-contaminated groundwater for irrigation can affect the crop productivity. Realizing the importance of the Brassica juncea as a crop plant in terms of oil-yield, there is a need to unravel mechanistic details of response to As stress and identify key functional genes and pathways. In this research, we studied time-dependent (4–96 h) transcriptome changes in roots and shoots of B. juncea under arsenate [As(V)] stress using Agilent platform. Among the whole transcriptome profiled genes, a total of 1,285 genes showed significant change in expression pattern upon As(V) exposure. The differentially expressed genes were categorized to various signaling pathways including hormones (jasmonate, abscisic acid, auxin, and ethylene) and kinases. Significant effects were also noticed on genes related to sulfur, nitrogen, CHO, and lipid metabolisms along with photosynthesis. Biochemical assays were conducted using specific inhibitors of glutathione and jasmonate biosynthesis, and kinases. The inhibitor studies revealed interconnection among sulfur metabolism, jasmonate, and kinase signaling pathways. In addition, various transposons also constituted a part of the altered transcriptome. Lastly, we profiled a set of key functional up- and down-regulated genes using real-time RT-PCR, which could act as an early indicators of the As stress. PMID:26347763

  14. Influence maximization in time bounded network identifies transcription factors regulating perturbed pathways

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Kyuri; Jung, Inuk; Moon, Ji Hwan; Kim, Sun

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: To understand the dynamic nature of the biological process, it is crucial to identify perturbed pathways in an altered environment and also to infer regulators that trigger the response. Current time-series analysis methods, however, are not powerful enough to identify perturbed pathways and regulators simultaneously. Widely used methods include methods to determine gene sets such as differentially expressed genes or gene clusters and these genes sets need to be further interpreted in terms of biological pathways using other tools. Most pathway analysis methods are not designed for time series data and they do not consider gene-gene influence on the time dimension. Results: In this article, we propose a novel time-series analysis method TimeTP for determining transcription factors (TFs) regulating pathway perturbation, which narrows the focus to perturbed sub-pathways and utilizes the gene regulatory network and protein–protein interaction network to locate TFs triggering the perturbation. TimeTP first identifies perturbed sub-pathways that propagate the expression changes along the time. Starting points of the perturbed sub-pathways are mapped into the network and the most influential TFs are determined by influence maximization technique. The analysis result is visually summarized in TF-Pathway map in time clock. TimeTP was applied to PIK3CA knock-in dataset and found significant sub-pathways and their regulators relevant to the PIP3 signaling pathway. Availability and Implementation: TimeTP is implemented in Python and available at http://biohealth.snu.ac.kr/software/TimeTP/. Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. Contact: sunkim.bioinfo@snu.ac.kr PMID:27307609

  15. Enriched pathways for major depressive disorder identified from a genome-wide association study.

    PubMed

    Kao, Chung-Feng; Jia, Peilin; Zhao, Zhongming; Kuo, Po-Hsiu

    2012-11-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) has caused a substantial burden of disease worldwide with moderate heritability. Despite efforts through conducting numerous association studies and now, genome-wide association (GWA) studies, the success of identifying susceptibility loci for MDD has been limited, which is partially attributed to the complex nature of depression pathogenesis. A pathway-based analytic strategy to investigate the joint effects of various genes within specific biological pathways has emerged as a powerful tool for complex traits. The present study aimed to identify enriched pathways for depression using a GWA dataset for MDD. For each gene, we estimated its gene-wise p value using combined and minimum p value, separately. Canonical pathways from the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) and BioCarta were used. We employed four pathway-based analytic approaches (gene set enrichment analysis, hypergeometric test, sum-square statistic, sum-statistic). We adjusted for multiple testing using Benjamini & Hochberg's method to report significant pathways. We found 17 significantly enriched pathways for depression, which presented low-to-intermediate crosstalk. The top four pathways were long-term depression (p⩽1×10-5), calcium signalling (p⩽6×10-5), arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (p⩽1.6×10-4) and cell adhesion molecules (p⩽2.2×10-4). In conclusion, our comprehensive pathway analyses identified promising pathways for depression that are related to neurotransmitter and neuronal systems, immune system and inflammatory response, which may be involved in the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying depression. We demonstrated that pathway enrichment analysis is promising to facilitate our understanding of complex traits through a deeper interpretation of GWA data. Application of this comprehensive analytic strategy in upcoming GWA data for depression could validate the findings reported in this study.

  16. Understanding the Biochemical Basis of Temperature-Induced Lipid Pathway Adjustments in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiang; Zheng, Qian; Shen, Wenyun; Cram, Dustin; Fowler, D. Brian; Wei, Yangdou; Zou, Jitao

    2015-01-01

    Glycerolipid biosynthesis in plants proceeds through two major pathways compartmentalized in the chloroplast and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The involvement of glycerolipid pathway interactions in modulating membrane desaturation under temperature stress has been suggested but not fully explored. We profiled glycerolipid changes as well as transcript dynamics under suboptimal temperature conditions in three plant species that are distinctively different in the mode of lipid pathway interactions. In Arabidopsis thaliana, a 16:3 plant, the chloroplast pathway is upregulated in response to low temperature, whereas high temperature promotes the eukaryotic pathway. Operating under a similar mechanistic framework, Atriplex lentiformis at high temperature drastically increases the contribution of the eukaryotic pathway and correspondingly suppresses the prokaryotic pathway, resulting in the switch of lipid profile from 16:3 to 18:3. In wheat (Triticum aestivum), an 18:3 plant, low temperature also influences the channeling of glycerolipids from the ER to chloroplast. Evidence of differential trafficking of diacylglycerol moieties from the ER to chloroplast was uncovered in three plant species as another layer of metabolic adaptation under temperature stress. We propose a model that highlights the predominance and prevalence of lipid pathway interactions in temperature-induced lipid compositional changes. PMID:25564555

  17. RNAi-based biosynthetic pathway screens to identify in vivo functions of non-nucleic acid-based metabolites such as lipids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongjie; Abraham, Nessy; Khan, Liakot A; Gobel, Verena

    2015-05-01

    The field of metabolomics continues to catalog new compounds, but their functional analysis remains technically challenging, and roles beyond metabolism are largely unknown. Unbiased genetic/RNAi screens are powerful tools to identify the in vivo functions of protein-encoding genes, but not of nonproteinaceous compounds such as lipids. They can, however, identify the biosynthetic enzymes of these compounds-findings that are usually dismissed, as these typically synthesize multiple products. Here, we provide a method using follow-on biosynthetic pathway screens to identify the endpoint biosynthetic enzyme and thus the compound through which they act. The approach is based on the principle that all subsequently identified downstream biosynthetic enzymes contribute to the synthesis of at least this one end product. We describe how to systematically target lipid biosynthetic pathways; optimize targeting conditions; take advantage of pathway branchpoints; and validate results by genetic assays and biochemical analyses. This approach extends the power of unbiased genetic/RNAi screens to identify in vivo functions of non-nucleic acid-based metabolites beyond their metabolic roles. It will typically require several months to identify a metabolic end product by biosynthetic pathway screens, but this time will vary widely depending, among other factors, on the end product's location in the pathway, which determines the number of screens required for its identification.

  18. Using soil moisture and spatial yield patterns to identify subsurface flow pathways.

    PubMed

    Gish, T J; Walthall, C L; Daughtry, C S T; Kung, K-J S

    2005-01-01

    Subsurface soil water dynamics can influence crop growth and the fate of surface-applied fertilizers and pesticides. Recently, a method was proposed using only ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and digital elevation maps (DEMs) to identify locations where subsurface water converged into discrete pathways. For this study, the GPR protocol for identifying horizontal subsurface flow pathways was extended to a 3.2-ha field, uncertainty is discussed, and soil moisture and yield patterns are presented as confirming evidence of the extent of the subsurface flow pathways. Observed soil water contents supported the existence of discrete preferential funnel flow processes occurring near the GPR-identified preferential flow pathways. Soil moisture also played a critical role in the formation of corn (Zea mays L.) grain yield patterns with yield spatial patterns being similar for mild and severe drought conditions. A buffer zone protocol was introduced that allowed the impact of subsurface flow pathways on corn grain yield to be quantified. Results indicate that when a GPR-identified subsurface clay layer was within 2 m of the soil surface, there was a beneficial impact on yield during a drought year. Furthermore, the buffer zone analysis demonstrated that corn grain yields decreased as the horizontal distance from the GPR-identified subsurface flow pathways increased during a drought year. Averaged real-time soil moisture contents at 0.1 m also decreased with increasing distance from the GPR-identified flow pathways. This research suggests that subsurface flow pathways exist and influence soil moisture and corn grain yield patterns.

  19. Receptor-Drug Interaction: Europium Employment for Studying the Biochemical Pathway of G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Antonio, Colabufo Nicola; Grazia, Perrone Maria; Marialessandra, Contino; Francesco, Berardi; Roberto, Perrone

    2007-01-01

    In medicinal chemistry field, the biochemical pathways, involved in 7-transmembrane domains G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) activation, are commonly studied to establish the activity of ligands towards GPCRs. The most studied steps are the measurement of activated GTP-α subunit and stimulated intracellular cAMP. At the present, many researchers defined agonist or antagonist activity of potential GPCRs drugs employing [35S]GTPγS or [3H]cAMP as probes. Recently, the corresponding lanthanide labels Eu-GTP and Eu-cAMP as alternative to radiochemicals have been developed because they are highly sensitive, easy to automate, easily synthesized, they display a much longer shelf-life and they can be used in multilabel experiments. In the present review, the receptor-drug interaction by europium employment for studying the biochemical pathway of GPCR activation has been focused. Moreover, comparative studies between lanthanide label probes and the corresponding radiolabeled compounds have been carried out. PMID:18350113

  20. Method for identifying biochemical and chemical reactions and micromechanical processes using nanomechanical and electronic signal identification

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F.; Siekhaus, Wigbert J.

    1997-01-01

    A scanning probe microscope, such as an atomic force microscope (AFM) or a scanning tunneling microscope (STM), is operated in a stationary mode on a site where an activity of interest occurs to measure and identify characteristic time-varying micromotions caused by biological, chemical, mechanical, electrical, optical, or physical processes. The tip and cantilever assembly of an AFM is used as a micromechanical detector of characteristic micromotions transmitted either directly by a site of interest or indirectly through the surrounding medium. Alternatively, the exponential dependence of the tunneling current on the size of the gap in the STM is used to detect micromechanical movement. The stationary mode of operation can be used to observe dynamic biological processes in real time and in a natural environment, such as polymerase processing of DNA for determining the sequence of a DNA molecule.

  1. Method for identifying biochemical and chemical reactions and micromechanical processes using nanomechanical and electronic signal identification

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, J.F.; Siekhaus, W.J.

    1997-04-15

    A scanning probe microscope, such as an atomic force microscope (AFM) or a scanning tunneling microscope (STM), is operated in a stationary mode on a site where an activity of interest occurs to measure and identify characteristic time-varying micromotions caused by biological, chemical, mechanical, electrical, optical, or physical processes. The tip and cantilever assembly of an AFM is used as a micromechanical detector of characteristic micromotions transmitted either directly by a site of interest or indirectly through the surrounding medium. Alternatively, the exponential dependence of the tunneling current on the size of the gap in the STM is used to detect micromechanical movement. The stationary mode of operation can be used to observe dynamic biological processes in real time and in a natural environment, such as polymerase processing of DNA for determining the sequence of a DNA molecule. 6 figs.

  2. Preferential activation of the hedgehog pathway by epigenetic modulations in HPV negative HNSCC identified with meta-pathway analysis.

    PubMed

    Fertig, Elana J; Markovic, Ana; Danilova, Ludmila V; Gaykalova, Daria A; Cope, Leslie; Chung, Christine H; Ochs, Michael F; Califano, Joseph A

    2013-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is largely divided into two groups based on their etiology, human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive and -negative. Global DNA methylation changes are known to drive oncogene and tumor suppressor expression in primary HNSCC of both types. However, significant heterogeneity in DNA methylation within the groups results in different transcriptional profiles and clinical outcomes. We applied a meta-pathway analysis to link gene expression changes to DNA methylation in distinguishing HNSCC subtypes. This approach isolated specific epigenetic changes controlling expression in HPV- HNSCC that distinguish it from HPV+ HNSCC. Analysis of genes identified Hedgehog pathway activation specific to HPV- HNSCC. We confirmed that GLI1, the primary Hedgehog target, showed higher expression in tumors compared to normal samples with HPV- tumors having the highest GLI1 expression, suggesting that increased expression of GLI1 is a potential driver in HPV- HNSCC. Our algorithm for integration of DNA methylation and gene expression can infer biologically significant molecular pathways that may be exploited as therapeutics targets. Our results suggest that therapeutics targeting the Hedgehog pathway may be of benefit in HPV- HNSCC. Similar integrative analysis of high-throughput coupled DNA methylation and expression datasets may yield novel insights into deregulated pathways in other cancers.

  3. Beta 3-adrenoceptor in rat aorta: molecular and biochemical characterization and signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Rautureau, Yohann; Toumaniantz, Gilles; Serpillon, Sabrina; Jourdon, Philippe; Trochu, Jean-Noël; Gauthier, Chantal

    2002-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that β3-adrenoceptor (β3-AR) stimulation induces endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation in rat aorta through the activation of an endothelial NO synthase associated with an increase in intracellular cGMP. The aim of the present study was to localise β3-AR to confirm our functional study and to complete the signalling pathway of β3-AR in rat aorta. By RT–PCR, we have detected β3-AR transcripts both in aorta and in freshly isolated endothelial cells. The absence of markers for adipsin or hormone-sensitive lipase in endothelial cells excluded the presence of β3-AR from adipocytes. The localization of β3-AR in aortic endothelial cells was confirmed by immunohistochemistry using a rat β3-AR antibody. To identify the G protein linked to β3-AR, experiments were performed in rat pre-treated with PTX (10 μg kg−1), a Gi/0 protein inhibitor. The blockage of Gi/0 protein by PTX was confirmed by the reduction of vasorelaxation induced by UK 14304, a selective α2-AR agonist. The cumulative concentration-response curve for SR 58611A, a β3-AR agonist, was not significantly modified on aorta rings from PTX pre-treated rats. At the same level of contraction, the relaxations induced by 10 μM SR 58611A were significantly reduced in 30 mM-KCl pre-constricted rings (Emax=16.7±8.4%, n=5), in comparison to phenylephrine (0.3 μM) pre-constricted rings (Emax=49.11±11.0%, n=5, P<0.05). In addition, iberotoxin (0.1 μM), glibenclamide (1 μM) and 4-aminopyridine (1 mM), selective potassium channels blockers of KCa, KATP, and Kv respectively, decreased the SR 58611A-mediated relaxation. We conclude that β3-AR is preferentially expressed in rat aortic endothelial cells. β3-AR-mediated aortic relaxation is independent of Gi/0 proteins stimulation, but results from the activation of several potassium channels, KCa, KATP, and Kv. PMID:12208771

  4. Evidence from Biochemical Pathways in Favor of Unfinished Evolution Rather than Intelligent Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behrman, Edward J.; Marzluf, George A.

    2004-01-01

    An argument is made in favor of imperfect or unfinished evolution based on some metabolic pathways in which it seems that intelligent design would have done better. The case studies noted indicate the absence of highly intelligent design and are not intended as comprehensive collection but as a limited sample of inefficient situations in…

  5. Cartography of Pathway Signal Perturbations Identifies Distinct Molecular Pathomechanisms in Malignant and Chronic Lung Diseases.

    PubMed

    Arakelyan, Arsen; Nersisyan, Lilit; Petrek, Martin; Löffler-Wirth, Henry; Binder, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Lung diseases are described by a wide variety of developmental mechanisms and clinical manifestations. Accurate classification and diagnosis of lung diseases are the bases for development of effective treatments. While extensive studies are conducted toward characterization of various lung diseases at molecular level, no systematic approach has been developed so far. Here we have applied a methodology for pathway-centered mining of high throughput gene expression data to describe a wide range of lung diseases in the light of shared and specific pathway activity profiles. We have applied an algorithm combining a Pathway Signal Flow (PSF) algorithm for estimation of pathway activity deregulation states in lung diseases and malignancies, and a Self Organizing Maps algorithm for classification and clustering of the pathway activity profiles. The analysis results allowed clearly distinguish between cancer and non-cancer lung diseases. Lung cancers were characterized by pathways implicated in cell proliferation, metabolism, while non-malignant lung diseases were characterized by deregulations in pathways involved in immune/inflammatory response and fibrotic tissue remodeling. In contrast to lung malignancies, chronic lung diseases had relatively heterogeneous pathway deregulation profiles. We identified three groups of interstitial lung diseases and showed that the development of characteristic pathological processes, such as fibrosis, can be initiated by deregulations in different signaling pathways. In conclusion, this paper describes the pathobiology of lung diseases from systems viewpoint using pathway centered high-dimensional data mining approach. Our results contribute largely to current understanding of pathological events in lung cancers and non-malignant lung diseases. Moreover, this paper provides new insight into molecular mechanisms of a number of interstitial lung diseases that have been studied to a lesser extent.

  6. Cartography of Pathway Signal Perturbations Identifies Distinct Molecular Pathomechanisms in Malignant and Chronic Lung Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Arakelyan, Arsen; Nersisyan, Lilit; Petrek, Martin; Löffler-Wirth, Henry; Binder, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Lung diseases are described by a wide variety of developmental mechanisms and clinical manifestations. Accurate classification and diagnosis of lung diseases are the bases for development of effective treatments. While extensive studies are conducted toward characterization of various lung diseases at molecular level, no systematic approach has been developed so far. Here we have applied a methodology for pathway-centered mining of high throughput gene expression data to describe a wide range of lung diseases in the light of shared and specific pathway activity profiles. We have applied an algorithm combining a Pathway Signal Flow (PSF) algorithm for estimation of pathway activity deregulation states in lung diseases and malignancies, and a Self Organizing Maps algorithm for classification and clustering of the pathway activity profiles. The analysis results allowed clearly distinguish between cancer and non-cancer lung diseases. Lung cancers were characterized by pathways implicated in cell proliferation, metabolism, while non-malignant lung diseases were characterized by deregulations in pathways involved in immune/inflammatory response and fibrotic tissue remodeling. In contrast to lung malignancies, chronic lung diseases had relatively heterogeneous pathway deregulation profiles. We identified three groups of interstitial lung diseases and showed that the development of characteristic pathological processes, such as fibrosis, can be initiated by deregulations in different signaling pathways. In conclusion, this paper describes the pathobiology of lung diseases from systems viewpoint using pathway centered high-dimensional data mining approach. Our results contribute largely to current understanding of pathological events in lung cancers and non-malignant lung diseases. Moreover, this paper provides new insight into molecular mechanisms of a number of interstitial lung diseases that have been studied to a lesser extent. PMID:27200087

  7. Biochemical pathways of breath ammonia (NH3) generation in patients with end-stage renal disease undergoing hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, W; Laiho, S; Vaittinen, O; Halonen, L; Ortiz, F; Forsblom, C; Groop, P-H; Lehto, M; Metsälä, M

    2016-01-01

    Breath ammonia (NH3) has been proposed as a potential biomarker in monitoring hemodialysis (HD) adequacy, since a strong correlation between blood urea and mouth-exhaled breath NH3 has been observed in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) undergoing HD. However, the biochemical pathways for breath NH3 generation from blood urea have not been demonstrated. In this study, we show a strong correlation (r s  =  0.77, p  <  0.001) between blood and salivary urea, indicating that salivary urea levels reflect blood urea levels. Salivary urea is in turn strongly correlated to salivary ammonia ([Formula: see text] + NH3) in most of the patients. This confirms that the hydrolysis of urea by urease generates ammonia in the oral cavity. A further strong correlation between salivary ammonia and breath NH3 indicates that salivary ammonia evaporates into gas phase and turns to breath NH3. Therefore, blood urea is a major biochemical source of breath NH3. Since breath NH3 is generated predominantly in the oral cavity, the levels of breath NH3 are influenced significantly by the patient's oral condition including urease activity and salivary pH. Our results agree with previous studies that have shown a connection between salivary urea and breath NH3. PMID:27516572

  8. Genomic and biochemical analysis of lipid biosynthesis in the unicellular rhodophyte Cyanidioschyzon merolae: lack of a plastidic desaturation pathway results in the coupled pathway of galactolipid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Naoki; Moriyama, Takashi

    2007-06-01

    The acyl lipids making up the plastid membranes in plants and algae are highly enriched in polyunsaturated fatty acids and are synthesized by two distinct pathways, known as the prokaryotic and eukaryotic pathways, which are located within the plastids and the endoplasmic reticulum, respectively. Here we report the results of biochemical as well as genomic analyses of lipids and fatty acids in the unicellular rhodophyte Cyanidioschyzon merolae. All of the glycerolipids usually found in photosynthetic algae were found, such as mono- and digalactosyl diacylglycerol, sulfolipid, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylinositol. However, the fatty acid composition was extremely simple. Only palmitic, stearic, oleic, and linoleic acids were found as major acids. In addition, 3-trans-hexadecanoic acid was found as a very minor component in phosphatidylglycerol. Unlike the case for most other photosynthetic eukaryotes, polyenoic fatty acids having three or more double bonds were not detected. These results suggest that polyunsaturated fatty acids are not necessary for photosynthesis in eukaryotes. Genomic analysis suggested that C. merolae lacks acyl lipid desaturases of cyanobacterial origin as well as stearoyl acyl carrier protein desaturase, both of which are major desaturases in plants and green algae. The results of labeling experiments with radioactive acetate showed that the desaturation leading to linoleic acid synthesis occurs on phosphatidylcholine located outside the plastids. Monogalactosyl diacylglycerol is therefore synthesized by the coupled pathway, using plastid-derived palmitic acid and endoplasmic reticulum-derived linoleic acid. These results highlight essential differences in lipid biosynthetic pathways between the red algae and the green lineage, which includes plants and green algae.

  9. Steady and transient fluid shear stress stimulate NO release in osteoblasts through distinct biochemical pathways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAllister, T. N.; Frangos, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    Fluid flow has been shown to be a potent stimulus in osteoblasts and osteocytes and may therefore play an important role in load-induced bone remodeling. The objective of this study was to investigate the characteristics of flow-activated pathways. Previously we reported that fluid flow stimulates rapid and continuous release of nitric oxide (NO) in primary rat calvarial osteoblasts. Here we demonstrate that flow-induced NO release is mediated by shear stress and that this response is distinctly biphasic. Transients in shear stress associated with the onset of flow stimulated a burst in NO production (8.2 nmol/mg of protein/h), while steady flow stimulated sustained NO production (2.2 nmol/mg of protein/h). Both G-protein inhibition and calcium chelation abolished the burst phase but had no effect on sustained production. Activation of G-proteins stimulated dose-dependent NO release in static cultures of both calvarial osteoblasts and UMR-106 osteoblast-like cells. Pertussis toxin had no effect on NO release. Calcium ionophore stimulated low levels of NO production within 15 minutes but had no effect on sustained production. Taken together, these data suggest that fluid shear stress stimulates NO release by two distinct pathways: a G-protein and calcium-dependent phase sensitive to flow transients, and a G-protein and calcium-independent pathway stimulated by sustained flow.

  10. Bacterial cytological profiling rapidly identifies the cellular pathways targeted by antibacterial molecules

    PubMed Central

    Nonejuie, Poochit; Burkart, Michael; Pogliano, Kit; Pogliano, Joe

    2013-01-01

    Identifying the mechanism of action for antibacterial compounds is essential for understanding how bacteria interact with one another and with other cell types and for antibiotic discovery efforts, but determining a compound's mechanism of action remains a serious challenge that limits both basic research and antibacterial discovery programs. Here, we show that bacterial cytological profiling (BCP) is a rapid and powerful approach for identifying the cellular pathway affected by antibacterial molecules. BCP can distinguish between inhibitors that affect different cellular pathways as well as different targets within the same pathway. We use BCP to demonstrate that spirohexenolide A, a spirotetronate that is active against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, rapidly collapses the proton motive force. BCP offers a simple, one-step assay that can be broadly applied, solving the longstanding problem of how to rapidly determine the cellular target of thousands of compounds. PMID:24046367

  11. An Integrated Human/Murine Transcriptome and Pathway Approach To Identify Prenatal Treatments For Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Guedj, Faycal; Pennings, Jeroen LA; Massingham, Lauren J.; Wick, Heather C.; Siegel, Ashley E.; Tantravahi, Umadevi; Bianchi, Diana W.

    2016-01-01

    Anatomical and functional brain abnormalities begin during fetal life in Down syndrome (DS). We hypothesize that novel prenatal treatments can be identified by targeting signaling pathways that are consistently perturbed in cell types/tissues obtained from human fetuses with DS and mouse embryos. We analyzed transcriptome data from fetuses with trisomy 21, age and sex-matched euploid controls, and embryonic day 15.5 forebrains from Ts1Cje, Ts65Dn, and Dp16 mice. The new datasets were compared to other publicly available datasets from humans with DS. We used the human Connectivity Map (CMap) database and created a murine adaptation to identify FDA-approved drugs that can rescue affected pathways. USP16 and TTC3 were dysregulated in all affected human cells and two mouse models. DS-associated pathway abnormalities were either the result of gene dosage specific effects or the consequence of a global cell stress response with activation of compensatory mechanisms. CMap analyses identified 56 molecules with high predictive scores to rescue abnormal gene expression in both species. Our novel integrated human/murine systems biology approach identified commonly dysregulated genes and pathways. This can help to prioritize therapeutic molecules on which to further test safety and efficacy. Additional studies in human cells are ongoing prior to pre-clinical prenatal treatment in mice. PMID:27586445

  12. An Integrated Human/Murine Transcriptome and Pathway Approach To Identify Prenatal Treatments For Down Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Guedj, Faycal; Pennings, Jeroen LA; Massingham, Lauren J; Wick, Heather C; Siegel, Ashley E; Tantravahi, Umadevi; Bianchi, Diana W

    2016-01-01

    Anatomical and functional brain abnormalities begin during fetal life in Down syndrome (DS). We hypothesize that novel prenatal treatments can be identified by targeting signaling pathways that are consistently perturbed in cell types/tissues obtained from human fetuses with DS and mouse embryos. We analyzed transcriptome data from fetuses with trisomy 21, age and sex-matched euploid controls, and embryonic day 15.5 forebrains from Ts1Cje, Ts65Dn, and Dp16 mice. The new datasets were compared to other publicly available datasets from humans with DS. We used the human Connectivity Map (CMap) database and created a murine adaptation to identify FDA-approved drugs that can rescue affected pathways. USP16 and TTC3 were dysregulated in all affected human cells and two mouse models. DS-associated pathway abnormalities were either the result of gene dosage specific effects or the consequence of a global cell stress response with activation of compensatory mechanisms. CMap analyses identified 56 molecules with high predictive scores to rescue abnormal gene expression in both species. Our novel integrated human/murine systems biology approach identified commonly dysregulated genes and pathways. This can help to prioritize therapeutic molecules on which to further test safety and efficacy. Additional studies in human cells are ongoing prior to pre-clinical prenatal treatment in mice. PMID:27586445

  13. A highly efficient single-step, markerless strategy for multi-copy chromosomal integration of large biochemical pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shuobo; Liang, Youyun; Zhang, Mingzi M; Ang, Ee Lui; Zhao, Huimin

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent advances in genome editing capabilities for the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the chromosomal integration of large biochemical pathways for stable industrial production remains challenging. In this work, we developed a simple platform for high-efficiency, single-step, markerless, multi-copy chromosomal integration of full biochemical pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this Di-CRISPR (delta integration CRISPR-Cas) platform based on the Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated systems (Cas), we specifically designed guide RNA sequences to target multiple delta sites in the yeast genome. The generation of double stranded breaks at the delta sites allowed simultaneous integration of multiple copies of linearized donor DNA containing large biochemical pathways. With our newly developed Di-CRISPR platform, we were able to attain highly efficient and markerless integration of large biochemical pathways and achieve an unprecedented 18-copy genomic integration of a 24 kb combined xylose utilization and (R,R)-2,3-butanediol (BDO) production pathway in a single step, thus generating a strain that was able to produce BDO directly from xylose. The simplicity and high efficiency of the Di-CRISPR platform could provide a superior alternative to high copy plasmids and would render this platform an invaluable tool for genome editing and metabolic engineering in S. cerevisiae.

  14. Pollution effects on biochemical pathways determined in the polychaete Hediste diversicolor collected in three Portuguese estuaries.

    PubMed

    Nunes, B; Vidal, D; Barbosa, I; Soares, A M V M; Freitas, R

    2016-09-14

    Biomonitoring is an important tool for the assessment of the quality and functions of ecosystems, providing information about the pollutants present and the direct effects that they exert on organisms. Biomonitoring relies upon the quantification of variables that can be biochemical, genetic, morphological and physiological changes. Such variables are designated as biomarkers, and multiple biomarkers are usually determined simultaneously in order to have a more integrated analysis and information about sublethal early effects of contaminants. In this work, we quantified biomarkers, associated with oxidative stress (glutathione-S-transferases GSTs, and catalase CAT, activities; levels of peroxidative alterations, by the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances assay, TBARS) and neurotoxicity (acetylcholinesterase activity, AChE) in the polychaete Hediste diversicolor. Organisms were collected at three distinct estuaries, Ria de Aveiro (Laranjo and São Jacinto), Douro River (São Paio, Afurada, and Ribeira da Granja), both impacted by human activities, and Minho River (Seixas), which has been used as a reference site. Obtained data showed the occurrence of anti-oxidant responses, in most samples from contaminated sites, which was not followed however by the occurrence of oxidative damage in organisms from Ria de Aveiro. None of the analyzed organisms had significant impairment of cholinesterasic activity, suggesting the absence of a prior exposure to neurotoxic compounds. In fact, organisms collected at Ria de Aveiro had largely increased AChE activity, suggesting an uncommon paradoxical biological response that is further discussed. PMID:27499386

  15. Biochemical and Structural Characterization of a Ureidoglycine Aminotransferase in the Klebsiella pneumoniae Uric Acid Catabolic Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    French, Jarrod B.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2010-09-03

    Many plants, fungi, and bacteria catabolize allantoin as a mechanism for nitrogen assimilation. Recent reports have shown that in plants and some bacteria the product of hydrolysis of allantoin by allantoinase is the unstable intermediate ureidoglycine. While this molecule can spontaneously decay, genetic analysis of some bacterial genomes indicates that an aminotransferase may be present in the pathway. Here we present evidence that Klebsiella pneumoniae HpxJ is an aminotransferase that preferentially converts ureidoglycine and an {alpha}-keto acid into oxalurate and the corresponding amino acid. We determined the crystal structure of HpxJ, allowing us to present an explanation for substrate specificity.

  16. Redox metabolism in Trypanosoma cruzi. Biochemical characterization of dithiol glutaredoxin dependent cellular pathways.

    PubMed

    Márquez, Vanina E; Arias, Diego G; Chiribao, Maria L; Faral-Tello, Paula; Robello, Carlos; Iglesias, Alberto A; Guerrero, Sergio A

    2014-11-01

    In Trypanosoma cruzi, the modification of thiols by glutathionylation-deglutathionylation and its potential relation to protective, regulatory or signaling functions have been scarcely explored. Herein we characterize a dithiolic glutaredoxin (TcrGrx), a redox protein with deglutathionylating activity, having potential functionality to control intracellular homeostasis of protein and non-protein thiols. The catalytic mechanism followed by TcrGrx was found dependent on thiol concentration. Results suggest that TcrGrx operates as a dithiolic or a monothiolic Grx, depending on GSH concentration. TcrGrx functionality to mediate reduction of protein and non-protein disulfides was studied. TcrGrx showed a preference for glutathionylated substrates respect to protein disulfides. From in vivo assays involving TcrGrx overexpressing parasites, we observed the contribution of the protein to increase the general resistance against oxidative damage and intracellular replication of the amastigote stage. Also, studies performed with epimastigotes overexpressing TcrGrx strongly suggest the involvement of the protein in a cellular pathway connecting an apoptotic stimulus and apoptotic-like cell death. Novel information is presented about the participation of this glutaredoxin not only in redox metabolism but also in redox signaling pathways in T. cruzi. The influence of TcrGrx in several parasite physiological processes suggests novel insights about the protein involvement in redox signaling.

  17. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of the Early and Late Enzymes in the Lignin β-Aryl Ether Cleavage Pathway from Sphingobium sp. SYK-6.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Jose Henrique; Heins, Richard A; Gall, Daniel L; McAndrew, Ryan P; Deng, Kai; Holland, Keefe C; Donohue, Timothy J; Noguera, Daniel R; Simmons, Blake A; Sale, Kenneth L; Ralph, John; Adams, Paul D

    2016-05-01

    There has been great progress in the development of technology for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to sugars and subsequent fermentation to fuels. However, plant lignin remains an untapped source of materials for production of fuels or high value chemicals. Biological cleavage of lignin has been well characterized in fungi, in which enzymes that create free radical intermediates are used to degrade this material. In contrast, a catabolic pathway for the stereospecific cleavage of β-aryl ether units that are found in lignin has been identified in Sphingobium sp. SYK-6 bacteria. β-Aryl ether units are typically abundant in lignin, corresponding to 50-70% of all of the intermonomer linkages. Consequently, a comprehensive understanding of enzymatic β-aryl ether (β-ether) cleavage is important for future efforts to biologically process lignin and its breakdown products. The crystal structures and biochemical characterization of the NAD-dependent dehydrogenases (LigD, LigO, and LigL) and the glutathione-dependent lyase LigG provide new insights into the early and late enzymes in the β-ether degradation pathway. We present detailed information on the cofactor and substrate binding sites and on the catalytic mechanisms of these enzymes, comparing them with other known members of their respective families. Information on the Lig enzymes provides new insight into their catalysis mechanisms and can inform future strategies for using aromatic oligomers derived from plant lignin as a source of valuable aromatic compounds for biofuels and other bioproducts. PMID:26940872

  18. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of the Early and Late Enzymes in the Lignin β-Aryl Ether Cleavage Pathway from Sphingobium sp. SYK-6*

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Jose Henrique; Heins, Richard A.; Gall, Daniel L.; McAndrew, Ryan P.; Deng, Kai; Holland, Keefe C.; Donohue, Timothy J.; Noguera, Daniel R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Sale, Kenneth L.; Ralph, John; Adams, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    There has been great progress in the development of technology for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to sugars and subsequent fermentation to fuels. However, plant lignin remains an untapped source of materials for production of fuels or high value chemicals. Biological cleavage of lignin has been well characterized in fungi, in which enzymes that create free radical intermediates are used to degrade this material. In contrast, a catabolic pathway for the stereospecific cleavage of β-aryl ether units that are found in lignin has been identified in Sphingobium sp. SYK-6 bacteria. β-Aryl ether units are typically abundant in lignin, corresponding to 50–70% of all of the intermonomer linkages. Consequently, a comprehensive understanding of enzymatic β-aryl ether (β-ether) cleavage is important for future efforts to biologically process lignin and its breakdown products. The crystal structures and biochemical characterization of the NAD-dependent dehydrogenases (LigD, LigO, and LigL) and the glutathione-dependent lyase LigG provide new insights into the early and late enzymes in the β-ether degradation pathway. We present detailed information on the cofactor and substrate binding sites and on the catalytic mechanisms of these enzymes, comparing them with other known members of their respective families. Information on the Lig enzymes provides new insight into their catalysis mechanisms and can inform future strategies for using aromatic oligomers derived from plant lignin as a source of valuable aromatic compounds for biofuels and other bioproducts. PMID:26940872

  19. Functional Complementation Analysis (FCA): A Laboratory Exercise Designed and Implemented to Supplement the Teaching of Biochemical Pathways.

    PubMed

    Hudson, André O; Harkness, Taylor C M; Savka, Michael A

    2016-06-24

    Functional complementation assay (FCA) is an in vivo assay that is widely used to elucidate the function/role of genes/enzymes. This technique is very common in biochemistry, genetics and many other disciplines. A comprehensive overview of the technique to supplement the teaching of biochemical pathways pertaining to amino acids, peptidoglycan and the bacterial stringent response is reported in this manuscript. Two cDNAs from the model plant organism Arabidopsis thaliana that are involved in the metabolism of lysine (L,L-diaminopimelate aminotransferase (dapL) and tyrosine aminotransferase (tyrB) involved in the metabolism of tyrosine and phenylalanine are highlighted. In addition, the bacterial peptidoglycan anabolic pathway is highlighted through the analysis of the UDP-N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanyl-D-glutamate-meso-2,6-diaminopimelate ligase (murE) gene from the bacterium Verrucomicrobium spinosum involved in the cross-linking of peptidoglycan. The bacterial stringent response is also reported through the analysis of the rsh (relA/spoT homolog) bifunctional gene responsible for a hyper-mucoid phenotype in the bacterium Novosphingobium sp. Four examples of FCA are presented. The video will focus on three of them, namely lysine, peptidoglycan and the stringent response.

  20. Correlation analyses of clinical and molecular findings identify candidate biological pathways in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Clinicians have long appreciated the distinct phenotype of systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (SJIA) compared to polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (POLY). We hypothesized that gene expression profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from children with each disease would reveal distinct biological pathways when analyzed for significant associations with elevations in two markers of JIA activity, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and number of affected joints (joint count, JC). Methods PBMC RNA from SJIA and POLY patients was profiled by kinetic PCR to analyze expression of 181 genes, selected for relevance to immune response pathways. Pearson correlation and Student's t-test analyses were performed to identify transcripts significantly associated with clinical parameters (ESR and JC) in SJIA or POLY samples. These transcripts were used to find related biological pathways. Results Combining Pearson and t-test analyses, we found 91 ESR-related and 92 JC-related genes in SJIA. For POLY, 20 ESR-related and 0 JC-related genes were found. Using Ingenuity Systems Pathways Analysis, we identified SJIA ESR-related and JC-related pathways. The two sets of pathways are strongly correlated. In contrast, there is a weaker correlation between SJIA and POLY ESR-related pathways. Notably, distinct biological processes were found to correlate with JC in samples from the earlier systemic plus arthritic phase (SAF) of SJIA compared to samples from the later arthritis-predominant phase (AF). Within the SJIA SAF group, IL-10 expression was related to JC, whereas lack of IL-4 appeared to characterize the chronic arthritis (AF) subgroup. Conclusions The strong correlation between pathways implicated in elevations of both ESR and JC in SJIA argues that the systemic and arthritic components of the disease are related mechanistically. Inflammatory pathways in SJIA are distinct from those in POLY course JIA, consistent with differences in clinically

  1. Cell-Based Assay for Identifying the Modulators of Antioxidant Response Element Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jinghua; Shukla, Sunita J; Xia, Menghang

    2016-01-01

    The antioxidant response element (ARE) signaling pathway plays an important role in the amelioration of cellular oxidative stress. Thus, assays that detect this pathway can be useful for identifying chemicals that induce or inhibit oxidative stress signaling. The focus of this chapter is to describe a cell-based ARE assay in a quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) format to test a large collection of compounds that induce nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2)/ARE signaling. The assay is described through cell handling, assay preparation, and instrument usage. PMID:27518623

  2. Physiological and biochemical characteristics of adrenergic receptors and pathways in brown adipocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horwitz, B. A.

    1975-01-01

    Mechanisms involved in the thermogenic response of brown adipose tissue (BAT) to sympathetic nervous stimulation (e.g., by cold exposure) and to norepinephrine (NE) release are investigated. Three effects appear to play a role in the increased oxygen consumption (and heat production) of the adipocytes: increased membrane permeability, activation of the beta-adrenergic pathway, and enhancement of Na(+)/K(+) membrane pump activity. Increased passive influx of Na(+) and efflux of K(+) due to greater permeability raise the energy demands of the Na/K pump; the pump is also stimulated by increased cyclic AMP synthesis resulting from activation by NE of membrane-bound adenyl cyclase. Studies with inhibitors such as propanolol, phentolamine, and ouabain support this hypothesis.

  3. Biochemical characterization of GDP-L-fucose de novo synthesis pathway in fungus Mortierella alpina

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Yan; Perepelov, Andrei V.; Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Hao; Knirel, Yuriy A.; Wang, Lei; Chen, Wei

    2010-01-22

    Mortierella alpina is a filamentous fungus commonly found in soil, which is able to produce large amount of polyunsaturated fatty acids. L-Fucose is an important sugar found in a diverse range of organisms, playing a variety of biological roles. In this study, we characterized the de novo biosynthetic pathway of GDP-L-fucose (the nucleotide-activated form of L-fucose) in M. alpina. Genes encoding GDP-D-mannose 4,6-dehydratase (GMD) and GDP-keto-6-deoxymannose 3,5-epimerase/4-reductase (GMER) were expressed heterologously in Escherichia coli. The recombinant enzymes were produced as His-tagged fusion proteins. Conversion of GDP-mannose to GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy mannose by GMD and GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy mannose to GDP-L-fucose by GMER were analyzed by capillary electrophoresis, electro-spray ionization-mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The k{sub m} values of GMD for GDP-mannose and GMER for GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy mannose were determined to be 0.77 mM and 1.047 mM, respectively. Both NADH and NADPH may be used by GMER as the coenzyme. The optimum temperature and pH were determined to be 37 {sup o}C and pH 9.0 (GMD) or pH 7.0 (GMER). Divalent cations are not required for GMD and GMER activity, and the activities of both enzymes may be enhanced by DTT. To our knowledge this is the first report on the characterization of GDP-L-fucose biosynthetic pathway in fungi.

  4. Comparative biochemical and immunological studies of the glycine betaine synthesis pathway in diverse families of dicotyledons.

    PubMed

    Weretilnyk, E A; Bednarek, S; McCue, K F; Rhodes, D; Hanson, A D

    1989-06-01

    Members of the Chenopodiaceae can accumulate high levels (>100 μmol·(g DW)(-1)) of glycine betaine (betaine) in leaves when salinized. Chenopodiaceae synthesize betaine by a two-step oxidation of choline (choline→betaine aldehyde→ betaine), with the second step catalyzed by betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH, EC 1.2.1.8). High betaine levels have also been reported in leaves of species from several distantly-related families of dicotyledons, raising the question of whether the same betaine-synthesis pathway is used in all cases.Fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry showed that betaine levels of >100 μmol·(g DW)(-1) are present in Lycium ferocissimum Miers (Solanaceae), Helianthus annuus L. (Asteraceae), Convolvulus arvensis L. (Convolvulaceae), and Amaranthus caudatus L. (Amaranthaceae), that salinization promotes betaine accumulation in these plants, and that they can convert supplied choline to betaine aldehyde and betaine. Nicotiana tabacum L. and Lycopersicon lycopersicum (L.) Karst. ex Farw. (Solanaceae), Lactuca sativa L. (Asteraceae) and Ipomoea purpurea L. (Convolvulaceae) also contained betaine, but at a low level (0.1-0.5 μmol·(g DW)(-1). Betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase activity assays, immunotitration and immunoblotting demonstrated that the betaine-accumulating species have a BADH enzyme recognized by antibodies raised against BADH from Spinacia oleracea L. (Chenopodiaceae), and that the Mr of the BADH monomer is in all cases close to 63 000. These data indicate that the choline→betaine aldehyde→betaine pathway may have evolved by vertical descent from an early angiosperm ancestor, and might be widespread (albeit not always strongly expressed) among flowering plants. Consistent with these suggestions, Magnolia x soulangiana was found to have a low level of betaine, and to express a protein of Mr 63 000 which cross-reacted with antibodies to BADH from Spinacia oleracea. PMID:24212901

  5. Meta-Analysis of Placental Transcriptome Data Identifies a Novel Molecular Pathway Related to Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    van Uitert, Miranda; Moerland, Perry D.; Enquobahrie, Daniel A.; Laivuori, Hannele; van der Post, Joris A. M.; Ris-Stalpers, Carrie; Afink, Gijs B.

    2015-01-01

    Studies using the placental transcriptome to identify key molecules relevant for preeclampsia are hampered by a relatively small sample size. In addition, they use a variety of bioinformatics and statistical methods, making comparison of findings challenging. To generate a more robust preeclampsia gene expression signature, we performed a meta-analysis on the original data of 11 placenta RNA microarray experiments, representing 139 normotensive and 116 preeclamptic pregnancies. Microarray data were pre-processed and analyzed using standardized bioinformatics and statistical procedures and the effect sizes were combined using an inverse-variance random-effects model. Interactions between genes in the resulting gene expression signature were identified by pathway analysis (Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, Gene Set Enrichment Analysis, Graphite) and protein-protein associations (STRING). This approach has resulted in a comprehensive list of differentially expressed genes that led to a 388-gene meta-signature of preeclamptic placenta. Pathway analysis highlights the involvement of the previously identified hypoxia/HIF1A pathway in the establishment of the preeclamptic gene expression profile, while analysis of protein interaction networks indicates CREBBP/EP300 as a novel element central to the preeclamptic placental transcriptome. In addition, there is an apparent high incidence of preeclampsia in women carrying a child with a mutation in CREBBP/EP300 (Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome). The 388-gene preeclampsia meta-signature offers a vital starting point for further studies into the relevance of these genes (in particular CREBBP/EP300) and their concomitant pathways as biomarkers or functional molecules in preeclampsia. This will result in a better understanding of the molecular basis of this disease and opens up the opportunity to develop rational therapies targeting the placental dysfunction causal to preeclampsia. PMID:26171964

  6. Identifying drug effects via pathway alterations using an integer linear programming optimization formulation on phosphoproteomic data.

    PubMed

    Mitsos, Alexander; Melas, Ioannis N; Siminelakis, Paraskeuas; Chairakaki, Aikaterini D; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Alexopoulos, Leonidas G

    2009-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of cell function and drug action is a major endeavor in the pharmaceutical industry. Drug effects are governed by the intrinsic properties of the drug (i.e., selectivity and potency) and the specific signaling transduction network of the host (i.e., normal vs. diseased cells). Here, we describe an unbiased, phosphoproteomic-based approach to identify drug effects by monitoring drug-induced topology alterations. With our proposed method, drug effects are investigated under diverse stimulations of the signaling network. Starting with a generic pathway made of logical gates, we build a cell-type specific map by constraining it to fit 13 key phopshoprotein signals under 55 experimental conditions. Fitting is performed via an Integer Linear Program (ILP) formulation and solution by standard ILP solvers; a procedure that drastically outperforms previous fitting schemes. Then, knowing the cell's topology, we monitor the same key phosphoprotein signals under the presence of drug and we re-optimize the specific map to reveal drug-induced topology alterations. To prove our case, we make a topology for the hepatocytic cell-line HepG2 and we evaluate the effects of 4 drugs: 3 selective inhibitors for the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) and a non-selective drug. We confirm effects easily predictable from the drugs' main target (i.e., EGFR inhibitors blocks the EGFR pathway) but we also uncover unanticipated effects due to either drug promiscuity or the cell's specific topology. An interesting finding is that the selective EGFR inhibitor Gefitinib inhibits signaling downstream the Interleukin-1alpha (IL1alpha) pathway; an effect that cannot be extracted from binding affinity-based approaches. Our method represents an unbiased approach to identify drug effects on small to medium size pathways which is scalable to larger topologies with any type of signaling interventions (small molecules, RNAi, etc). The method can reveal drug effects on

  7. A genome-wide approach identifies that the aspartate metabolism pathway contributes to asparaginase sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shih-Hsiang; Yang, Wenjian; Fan, Yiping; Stocco, Gabriele; Crews, Kristine R.; Yang, Jun J.; Paugh, Steven W.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Evans, William E.; Relling, Mary V.

    2011-01-01

    Asparaginase is an important component of treatment for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The basis for interindividual differences in asparaginase sensitivity remains unclear. To comprehensively identify genetic variants important in the cytotoxicity of asparaginase, we employed a genome-wide association approach using the HapMap lymphoblastoid cell lines (87 CEU trio members) and 54 primary ALL leukemic blast samples at diagnosis. Asparaginase sensitivity was assessed as the drug concentration necessary to inhibit 50% of growth (IC50). In CEU lines, we tested 2,390,203 SNP genotypes at the individual SNP (p < 0.001) and the gene level (p < 0.05) and identified 329 SNPs representing 94 genes that were associated with asparaginase IC50. The aspartate metabolism pathway was the most over-represented among 199 pathways evaluated (p = 8.1 × 10−3), with primary involvement of ADSL and DARS genes. We validated that SNPs in the aspartate metabolism pathway were also associated with asparaginase sensitivity in primary ALL leukemic blast samples (p = 5.5 × 10−5). Our genome-wide interrogation of CEU cell lines and primary ALL blasts revealed that inherited genomic interindividual variation in a plausible candidate pathway can contribute to asparaginase sensitivity. PMID:21072045

  8. Molecular and biochemical characterization of two P450 enzymes in the ecdysteroidogenic pathway of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Warren, James T; Petryk, Anna; Marques, Guillermo; Jarcho, Michael; Parvy, Jean-Philippe; Dauphin-Villemant, Chantal; O'Connor, Michael B; Gilbert, Lawrence I

    2002-08-20

    Five different enzymatic activities, catalyzed by both microsomal and mitochondrial cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYPs), are strongly implicated in the biosynthesis of ecdysone (E) from cholesterol. However, none of these enzymes have been characterized completely. The present data show that the wild-type genes of two members of the Halloween family of embryonic lethals, disembodied (dib) and shadow (sad), code for mitochondrial cytochromes P450 that mediate the last two hydroxylation reactions in the ecdysteroidogenic pathway in Drosophila, namely the C22- and C2-hydroxylases. When sad (CYP315A1) is transfected into Drosophila S2 cells, the cells metabolize 2-deoxyecdysone (2dE) to E and the [3H]ketotriol (2,22-dideoxyecdysone) to 22-deoxyecdysone. In contrast, dib (CYP302A1) is responsible for the conversion of the [3H]ketotriol to [3H]2dE. When cells are transfected with both dib and sad, they metabolize the [3H]ketotriol to [3H]E in high yield. The expression of sad and dib is concentrated within the individual segments of the developing epidermis when there is a surge of ecdysteroid midway through embryogenesis. This result occurs before the ring gland has developed and suggests that the embryonic epidermis is a site of ecdysteroid biosynthesis. This pattern then diminishes, and, during late embryogenesis, expression of both genes is concentrated in the prothoracic gland cells of the developing ring gland. Expression of dib and sad continues to be localized in this endocrine compartment during larval development, being maximal in both the late second and third instar larvae, about the time of the premolt peaks in the ecdysteroid titer. PMID:12177427

  9. Molecular and biochemical characterization of two P450 enzymes in the ecdysteroidogenic pathway of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Warren, James T; Petryk, Anna; Marques, Guillermo; Jarcho, Michael; Parvy, Jean-Philippe; Dauphin-Villemant, Chantal; O'Connor, Michael B; Gilbert, Lawrence I

    2002-08-20

    Five different enzymatic activities, catalyzed by both microsomal and mitochondrial cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYPs), are strongly implicated in the biosynthesis of ecdysone (E) from cholesterol. However, none of these enzymes have been characterized completely. The present data show that the wild-type genes of two members of the Halloween family of embryonic lethals, disembodied (dib) and shadow (sad), code for mitochondrial cytochromes P450 that mediate the last two hydroxylation reactions in the ecdysteroidogenic pathway in Drosophila, namely the C22- and C2-hydroxylases. When sad (CYP315A1) is transfected into Drosophila S2 cells, the cells metabolize 2-deoxyecdysone (2dE) to E and the [3H]ketotriol (2,22-dideoxyecdysone) to 22-deoxyecdysone. In contrast, dib (CYP302A1) is responsible for the conversion of the [3H]ketotriol to [3H]2dE. When cells are transfected with both dib and sad, they metabolize the [3H]ketotriol to [3H]E in high yield. The expression of sad and dib is concentrated within the individual segments of the developing epidermis when there is a surge of ecdysteroid midway through embryogenesis. This result occurs before the ring gland has developed and suggests that the embryonic epidermis is a site of ecdysteroid biosynthesis. This pattern then diminishes, and, during late embryogenesis, expression of both genes is concentrated in the prothoracic gland cells of the developing ring gland. Expression of dib and sad continues to be localized in this endocrine compartment during larval development, being maximal in both the late second and third instar larvae, about the time of the premolt peaks in the ecdysteroid titer.

  10. Knowledge-Assisted Approach to Identify Pathways with Differential Dependencies | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    We have previously developed a statistical method to identify gene sets enriched with condition-specific genetic dependencies. The method constructs gene dependency networks from bootstrapped samples in one condition and computes the divergence between distributions of network likelihood scores from different conditions. It was shown to be capable of sensitive and specific identification of pathways with phenotype-specific dysregulation, i.e., rewiring of dependencies between genes in different conditions.

  11. Identifying low variance pathways for free energy calculations of molecular transformations in solution phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Tri T.; Shirts, Michael R.

    2011-07-01

    Improving the efficiency of free energy calculations is important for many biological and materials design applications, such as protein-ligand binding affinities in drug design, partitioning between immiscible liquids, and determining molecular association in soft materials. We show that for any pair potential, moderately accurate estimation of the radial distribution function for a solute molecule is sufficient to accurately estimate the statistical variance of a sampling along a free energy pathway. This allows inexpensive analytical identification of low statistical error free energy pathways. We employ a variety of methods to estimate the radial distribution function (RDF) and find that the computationally cheap two-body "dilute gas" limit performs as well or better than 3D-RISM theory and other approximations for identifying low variance free energy pathways. With a RDF estimate in hand, we can search for pairwise interaction potentials that produce low variance. We give an example of a search minimizing statistical variance of solvation free energy over the entire parameter space of a generalized "soft core" potential. The free energy pathway arising from this optimization procedure has lower curvature in the variance and reduces the total variance by at least 50% compared to the traditional soft core solvation pathway. We also demonstrate that this optimized pathway allows free energies to be estimated with fewer intermediate states due to its low curvature. This free energy variance optimization technique is generalizable to solvation in any homogeneous fluid and for any type of pairwise potential and can be performed in minutes to hours, depending on the method used to estimate g(r).

  12. Biochemical Analysis of the Biosynthetic Pathway of an Anticancer Tetracycline SF2575

    PubMed Central

    Pickens, Lauren B.; Kim, Woncheol; Wang, Peng; Zhou, Hui; Watanabe, Kenji; Gomi, Shuichi; Tang, Yi

    2009-01-01

    SF2575 1 is a tetracycline polyketide produced by Streptomyces sp. SF2575 and displays exceptionally potent anticancer activity towards a broad range of cancer cell lines. The structure of SF2575 is characterized by a highly substituted tetracycline aglycon. The modifications include methylation of the C-6 and C-12a hydroxyl groups, acylation of the 4-(S)-hydroxyl with salicylic acid, C-glycosylation of the C-9 of the D-ring with d-olivose and further acylation of the C4′-hydroxyl of d-olivose with the unusual angelic acid. Understanding the biosynthesis of SF2575 can therefore expand the repertoire of enzymes that can modify tetracyclines, and facilitate engineered biosynthesis of SF2575 analogs. In this study, we identified, sequenced and functionally analyzed the ssf biosynthetic gene cluster which contains 40 putative open reading frames. Genes encoding enzymes that can assemble the tetracycline aglycon, as well as installing these unique structural features are found in the gene cluster. Biosynthetic intermediates were isolated from the SF2575 culture extract to suggest the order of pendant groups addition is C-9 glycosylation, C-4 salicylation and O-4′ angelycylation. Using in vitro assays, two enzymes that are responsible for C-4 acylation of salicylic acid were identified. These enzymes include an ATP-dependent salicylyl-CoA ligase SsfL1 and a putative GDSL family acyltransferase SsfX3, both of which were shown to have relaxed substrate specificity towards substituted benzoic acids. Since the salicylic acid moiety is critically important for the anticancer properties of SF2575, verification of the activities of SsfL1 and SsfX3 sets the stage for biosynthetic modification of the C-4 group towards structural-activity relationship studies of SF2575. Using heterologous biosynthesis in Streptomyces lividans, we also determined that biosynthesis of the SF2575 tetracycline aglycon 8 parallels that of oxytetracycline 4 and diverges after the assembly of 4-keto

  13. Gene Expression in Relation to Exhaled Nitric Oxide Identifies Novel Asthma Phenotypes with Unique Biomolecular Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Modena, Brian D.; Tedrow, John R.; Milosevic, Jadranka; Bleecker, Eugene R.; Meyers, Deborah A.; Wu, Wei; Bar-Joseph, Ziv; Erzurum, Serpil C.; Gaston, Benjamin M.; Busse, William W.; Jarjour, Nizar N.; Kaminski, Naftali

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Although asthma is recognized as a heterogeneous disease associated with clinical phenotypes, the molecular basis of these phenotypes remains poorly understood. Although genomic studies have successfully broadened our understanding in diseases such as cancer, they have not been widely used in asthma studies. Objectives To link gene expression patterns to clinical asthma phenotypes. Methods We used a microarray platform to analyze bronchial airway epithelial cell gene expression in relation to the asthma biomarker fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) in 155 subjects with asthma and healthy control subjects from the Severe Asthma Research Program (SARP). Measurements and Main Results We first identified a diverse set of 549 genes whose expression correlated with FeNO. We used k-means to cluster the patient samples according to the expression of these genes, identifying five asthma clusters/phenotypes with distinct clinical, physiological, cellular, and gene transcription characteristics—termed “subject clusters” (SCs). To then investigate differences in gene expression between SCs, a total of 1,384 genes were identified that highly differentiated the SCs at an unadjusted P value < 10−6. Hierarchical clustering of these 1,384 genes identified nine gene clusters or “biclusters,” whose coexpression suggested biological characteristics unique to each SC. Although genes related to type 2 inflammation were present, novel pathways, including those related to neuronal function, WNT pathways, and actin cytoskeleton, were noted. Conclusions These findings show that bronchial epithelial cell gene expression, as related to the asthma biomarker FeNO, can identify distinct asthma phenotypes, while also suggesting the presence of underlying novel gene pathways relevant to these phenotypes. PMID:25338189

  14. Systematic enrichment analysis of gene expression profiling studies identifies consensus pathways implicated in colorectal cancer development

    PubMed Central

    Lascorz, Jesús; Hemminki, Kari; Försti, Asta

    2011-01-01

    Background: A large number of gene expression profiling (GEP) studies on colorectal carcinogenesis have been performed but no reliable gene signature has been identified so far due to the lack of reproducibility in the reported genes. There is growing evidence that functionally related genes, rather than individual genes, contribute to the etiology of complex traits. We used, as a novel approach, pathway enrichment tools to define functionally related genes that are consistently up- or down-regulated in colorectal carcinogenesis. Materials and Methods: We started the analysis with 242 unique annotated genes that had been reported by any of three recent meta-analyses covering GEP studies on genes differentially expressed in carcinoma vs normal mucosa. Most of these genes (218, 91.9%) had been reported in at least three GEP studies. These 242 genes were submitted to bioinformatic analysis using a total of nine tools to detect enrichment of Gene Ontology (GO) categories or Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways. As a final consistency criterion the pathway categories had to be enriched by several tools to be taken into consideration. Results: Our pathway-based enrichment analysis identified the categories of ribosomal protein constituents, extracellular matrix receptor interaction, carbonic anhydrase isozymes, and a general category related to inflammation and cellular response as significantly and consistently overrepresented entities. Conclusions: We triaged the genes covered by the published GEP literature on colorectal carcinogenesis and subjected them to multiple enrichment tools in order to identify the consistently enriched gene categories. These turned out to have known functional relationships to cancer development and thus deserve further investigation. PMID:21483658

  15. PCOSKB: A KnowledgeBase on genes, diseases, ontology terms and biochemical pathways associated with PolyCystic Ovary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Shaini; Barai, Ram Shankar; Bhujbalrao, Rasika; Idicula-Thomas, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the major causes of female subfertility worldwide and ≈7–10% of women in reproductive age are affected by it. The affected individuals exhibit varying types and levels of comorbid conditions, along with the classical PCOS symptoms. Extensive studies on PCOS across diverse ethnic populations have resulted in a plethora of information on dysregulated genes, gene polymorphisms and diseases linked to PCOS. However, efforts have not been taken to collate and link these data. Our group, for the first time, has compiled PCOS-related information available through scientific literature; cross-linked it with molecular, biochemical and clinical databases and presented it as a user-friendly, web-based online knowledgebase for the benefit of the scientific and clinical community. Manually curated information on associated genes, single nucleotide polymorphisms, diseases, gene ontology terms and pathways along with supporting reference literature has been collated and included in PCOSKB (http://pcoskb.bicnirrh.res.in). PMID:26578565

  16. Metabolic profiling of chickpea-Fusarium interaction identifies differential modulation of disease resistance pathways.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Yashwant; Dholakia, Bhushan B; Panigrahi, Priyabrata; Kadoo, Narendra Y; Giri, Ashok P; Gupta, Vidya S

    2015-08-01

    Chickpea is the third most widely grown legume in the world and mainly used as a vegetarian source of human dietary protein. Fusarium wilt, caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceri (Foc), is one of the major threats to global chickpea production. Host resistance is the best way to protect crops from diseases; however, in spite of using various approaches, the mechanism of Foc resistance in chickpea remains largely obscure. In the present study, non-targeted metabolic profiling at several time points of resistant and susceptible chickpea cultivars using high-resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was applied to better understand the mechanistic basis of wilt resistance or susceptibility. Multivariate analysis of the data (OPLS-DA) revealed discriminating metabolites in chickpea root tissue after Foc inoculation such as flavonoids, isoflavonoids, alkaloids, amino acids and sugars. Foc inoculated resistant plants had more flavonoids and isoflavonoids along with their malonyl conjugates. Many antifungal metabolites that were induced after Foc infection viz., aurantion-obstine β-glucosides and querecitin were elevated in resistant cultivar. Overall, diverse genetic and biochemical mechanisms were operational in the resistant cultivar for Foc defense as compared to the susceptible plant. The resistant chickpea plants employed the above-mentioned metabolic pathways as potential defense strategy against Foc.

  17. Sample Level Enrichment Analysis of KEGG Pathways Identifies Clinically Relevant Subtypes of Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Wanggou, Siyi; Feng, Chengyuan; Xie, Yuanyang; Ye, Linrong; Wang, Feiyifan; Li, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    Background: Glioblastoma is the most lethal primary brain tumor in adults. Aberrant signal transduction pathways, associated with the progression of glioblastoma, have been identified recently and may offer a potential gene therapy strategy. Methods and Findings: We first used the sample level enrichment analysis to transfer gene expression profile of TCGA dataset into pathway enrichment z-score matrix. Then, we classified glioblastoma into five subtypes (Cluster A to Cluster E) by the consensus clustering and silhouette analysis. Principle component analysis showed the five subtype could be separated by first three principle components. Integrative omics data showed that mesenchymal subtype was rich in Cluster A, neural subtype was centered in Cluster D and proneural subtype was gathered in Cluster E, while Cluster E showed a high percentage of G-CIMP subtype. Additionally, according to analyze the overall survival and progression free survival of each subtype by Kaplan-Merie analysis and Cox hazard proportion model, we identified Cluster D and Cluster E received a better prognosis. Conclusions: We report a clinically relevant classification of glioblastoma based on sample level KEGG pathway enrichment profile and this novel classification system provided new insights into the heterogeneity of glioblastoma, and may be used as an important clinical tool to predict the prognosis.

  18. A new screening pathway for identifying asymptomatic patients using dental panoramic radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Tatsuro; Matsumoto, Takuya; Sawagashira, Tsuyoshi; Tagami, Motoki; Katsumata, Akitoshi; Hayashi, Yoshinori; Muramatsu, Chisako; Zhou, Xiangrong; Iida, Yukihiro; Matsuoka, Masato; Katagi, Kiyoji; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2012-03-01

    To identify asymptomatic patients is the challenging task and the essential first step in diagnosis. Findings of dental panoramic radiographs include not only dental conditions but also radiographic signs that are suggestive of possible systemic diseases such as osteoporosis, arteriosclerosis, and maxillary sinusitis. Detection of such signs on panoramic radiographs has a potential to provide supplemental benefits for patients. However, it is not easy for general dental practitioners to pay careful attention to such signs. We addressed the development of a computer-aided detection (CAD) system that detects radiographic signs of pathology on panoramic images, and the design of the framework of new screening pathway by cooperation of dentists and our CAD system. The performance evaluation of our CAD system showed the sensitivity and specificity in the identification of osteoporotic patients were 92.6 % and 100 %, respectively, and those of the maxillary sinus abnormality were 89.6 % and 73.6 %, respectively. The detection rate of carotid artery calcifications that suggests the need for further medical evaluation was approximately 93.6 % with 4.4 false-positives per image. To validate the utility of the new screening pathway, preliminary clinical trials by using our CAD system were conducted. To date, 223 panoramic images were processed and 4 asymptomatic patients with suspected osteoporosis, 7 asymptomatic patients with suspected calcifications, and 40 asymptomatic patients with suspected maxillary sinusitis were detected in our initial trial. It was suggested that our new screening pathway could be useful to identify asymptomatic patients with systemic diseases.

  19. Whole-Animal Chemical Screen Identifies Colistin as a New Immunomodulator That Targets Conserved Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yun; Cao, Xiou

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to take advantage of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to perform a whole-animal chemical screen to identify potential immune activators that may confer protection against bacterial infections. We identified 45 marketed drugs, out of 1,120 studied compounds, that are capable of activating a conserved p38/PMK-1 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway required for innate immunity. One of these drugs, the last-resort antibiotic colistin, protected against infections by the Gram-negative pathogens Yersinia pestis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa but not by the Gram-positive pathogens Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus. Protection was independent of the antibacterial activity of colistin, since the drug was administered prophylactically prior to the infections and it was also effective against antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Immune activation by colistin is mediated not only by the p38/PMK-1 pathway but also by the conserved FOXO transcription factor DAF-16 and the transcription factor SKN-1. Furthermore, p38/PMK-1 was found to be required in the intestine for immune activation by colistin. Enhanced p38/PMK-1-mediated immune responses by colistin did not reduce the bacterial burden, indicating that the pathway plays a role in the development of host tolerance to infections by Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:25118236

  20. FamNet: A Framework to Identify Multiplied Modules Driving Pathway Expansion in Plants.

    PubMed

    Ruprecht, Colin; Mendrinna, Amelie; Tohge, Takayuki; Sampathkumar, Arun; Klie, Sebastian; Fernie, Alisdair R; Nikoloski, Zoran; Persson, Staffan; Mutwil, Marek

    2016-03-01

    Gene duplications generate new genes that can acquire similar but often diversified functions. Recent studies of gene coexpression networks have indicated that, not only genes, but also pathways can be multiplied and diversified to perform related functions in different parts of an organism. Identification of such diversified pathways, or modules, is needed to expand our knowledge of biological processes in plants and to understand how biological functions evolve. However, systematic explorations of modules remain scarce, and no user-friendly platform to identify them exists. We have established a statistical framework to identify modules and show that approximately one-third of the genes of a plant's genome participate in hundreds of multiplied modules. Using this framework as a basis, we implemented a platform that can explore and visualize multiplied modules in coexpression networks of eight plant species. To validate the usefulness of the platform, we identified and functionally characterized pollen- and root-specific cell wall modules that multiplied to confer tip growth in pollen tubes and root hairs, respectively. Furthermore, we identified multiplied modules involved in secondary metabolite synthesis and corroborated them by metabolite profiling of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) tissues. The interactive platform, referred to as FamNet, is available at http://www.gene2function.de/famnet.html. PMID:26754669

  1. GFRA2 Identifies Cardiac Progenitors and Mediates Cardiomyocyte Differentiation in a RET-Independent Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hidekazu; Saba, Rie; Kokkinopoulos, Ioannis; Hashimoto, Masakazu; Yamaguchi, Osamu; Nowotschin, Sonja; Shiraishi, Manabu; Ruchaya, Prashant; Miller, Duncan; Harmer, Stephen; Poliandri, Ariel; Kogaki, Shigetoyo; Sakata, Yasushi; Dunkel, Leo; Tinker, Andrew; Hadjantonakis, Anna-Katerina; Sawa, Yoshiki; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Ozono, Keiichi; Suzuki, Ken; Yashiro, Kenta

    2016-07-26

    A surface marker that distinctly identifies cardiac progenitors (CPs) is essential for the robust isolation of these cells, circumventing the necessity of genetic modification. Here, we demonstrate that a Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchor containing neurotrophic factor receptor, Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor receptor alpha 2 (Gfra2), specifically marks CPs. GFRA2 expression facilitates the isolation of CPs by fluorescence activated cell sorting from differentiating mouse and human pluripotent stem cells. Gfra2 mutants reveal an important role for GFRA2 in cardiomyocyte differentiation and development both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, the cardiac GFRA2 signaling pathway is distinct from the canonical pathway dependent on the RET tyrosine kinase and its established ligands. Collectively, our findings establish a platform for investigating the biology of CPs as a foundation for future development of CP transplantation for treating heart failure. PMID:27396331

  2. Identifying Significant Features in Cancer Methylation Data Using Gene Pathway Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Hira, Zena M; Gillies, Duncan F

    2016-01-01

    In order to provide the most effective therapy for cancer, it is important to be able to diagnose whether a patient's cancer will respond to a proposed treatment. Methylation profiling could contain information from which such predictions could be made. Currently, hypothesis testing is used to determine whether possible biomarkers for cancer progression produce statistically significant results. However, this approach requires the identification of individual genes, or sets of genes, as candidate hypotheses, and with the increasing size of modern microarrays, this task is becoming progressively harder. Exhaustive testing of small sets of genes is computationally infeasible, and so hypothesis generation depends either on the use of established biological knowledge or on heuristic methods. As an alternative machine learning, methods can be used to identify groups of genes that are acting together within sets of cancer data and associate their behaviors with cancer progression. These methods have the advantage of being multivariate and unbiased but unfortunately also rapidly become computationally infeasible as the number of gene probes and datasets increases. To address this problem, we have investigated a way of utilizing prior knowledge to segment microarray datasets in such a way that machine learning can be used to identify candidate sets of genes for hypothesis testing. A methylation dataset is divided into subsets, where each subset contains only the probes that relate to a known gene pathway. Each of these pathway subsets is used independently for classification. The classification method is AdaBoost with decision trees as weak classifiers. Since each pathway subset contains a relatively small number of gene probes, it is possible to train and test its classification accuracy quickly and determine whether it has valuable diagnostic information. Finally, genes from successful pathway subsets can be combined to create a classifier of high accuracy. PMID:27688706

  3. Carbon and chlorine isotope analysis to identify abiotic degradation pathways of 1,1,1-trichloroethane.

    PubMed

    Palau, Jordi; Shouakar-Stash, Orfan; Hunkeler, Daniel

    2014-12-16

    This study investigates dual C-Cl isotope fractionation during 1,1,1-TCA transformation by heat-activated persulfate (PS), hydrolysis/dehydrohalogenation (HY/DH) and Fe(0). Compound-specific chlorine isotope analysis of 1,1,1-TCA was performed for the first time, and transformation-associated isotope fractionation ε bulk C and ε bulk Cl values were -4.0 ± 0.2‰ and no chlorine isotope fractionation with PS, -1.6 ± 0.2‰ and -4.7 ± 0.1‰ for HY/DH, -7.8 ± 0.4‰ and -5.2 ± 0.2‰ with Fe(0). Distinctly different dual isotope slopes (Δδ13C/Δδ37Cl): ∞ with PS, 0.33 ± 0.04 for HY/DH and 1.5 ± 0.1 with Fe(0) highlight the potential of this approach to identify abiotic degradation pathways of 1,1,1-TCA in the field. The trend observed with PS agreed with a C-H bond oxidation mechanism in the first reaction step. For HY/DH and Fe(0) pathways, different slopes were obtained although both pathways involve cleavage of a C-Cl bond in their initial reaction step. In contrast to the expected larger primary carbon isotope effects relative to chlorine for C-Cl bond cleavage, ε bulk C < ε bulk Cl was observed for HY/DH and in a similar range for reduction by Fe(0), suggesting the contribution of secondary chlorine isotope effects. Therefore, different magnitude of secondary chlorine isotope effects could at least be partly responsible for the distinct slopes between HY/DH and Fe(0) pathways. Following this dual isotope approach, abiotic transformation processes can unambiguously be identified and quantified.

  4. Identifying Significant Features in Cancer Methylation Data Using Gene Pathway Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Hira, Zena M.; Gillies, Duncan F.

    2016-01-01

    In order to provide the most effective therapy for cancer, it is important to be able to diagnose whether a patient’s cancer will respond to a proposed treatment. Methylation profiling could contain information from which such predictions could be made. Currently, hypothesis testing is used to determine whether possible biomarkers for cancer progression produce statistically significant results. However, this approach requires the identification of individual genes, or sets of genes, as candidate hypotheses, and with the increasing size of modern microarrays, this task is becoming progressively harder. Exhaustive testing of small sets of genes is computationally infeasible, and so hypothesis generation depends either on the use of established biological knowledge or on heuristic methods. As an alternative machine learning, methods can be used to identify groups of genes that are acting together within sets of cancer data and associate their behaviors with cancer progression. These methods have the advantage of being multivariate and unbiased but unfortunately also rapidly become computationally infeasible as the number of gene probes and datasets increases. To address this problem, we have investigated a way of utilizing prior knowledge to segment microarray datasets in such a way that machine learning can be used to identify candidate sets of genes for hypothesis testing. A methylation dataset is divided into subsets, where each subset contains only the probes that relate to a known gene pathway. Each of these pathway subsets is used independently for classification. The classification method is AdaBoost with decision trees as weak classifiers. Since each pathway subset contains a relatively small number of gene probes, it is possible to train and test its classification accuracy quickly and determine whether it has valuable diagnostic information. Finally, genes from successful pathway subsets can be combined to create a classifier of high accuracy. PMID

  5. Identifying Significant Features in Cancer Methylation Data Using Gene Pathway Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Hira, Zena M.; Gillies, Duncan F.

    2016-01-01

    In order to provide the most effective therapy for cancer, it is important to be able to diagnose whether a patient’s cancer will respond to a proposed treatment. Methylation profiling could contain information from which such predictions could be made. Currently, hypothesis testing is used to determine whether possible biomarkers for cancer progression produce statistically significant results. However, this approach requires the identification of individual genes, or sets of genes, as candidate hypotheses, and with the increasing size of modern microarrays, this task is becoming progressively harder. Exhaustive testing of small sets of genes is computationally infeasible, and so hypothesis generation depends either on the use of established biological knowledge or on heuristic methods. As an alternative machine learning, methods can be used to identify groups of genes that are acting together within sets of cancer data and associate their behaviors with cancer progression. These methods have the advantage of being multivariate and unbiased but unfortunately also rapidly become computationally infeasible as the number of gene probes and datasets increases. To address this problem, we have investigated a way of utilizing prior knowledge to segment microarray datasets in such a way that machine learning can be used to identify candidate sets of genes for hypothesis testing. A methylation dataset is divided into subsets, where each subset contains only the probes that relate to a known gene pathway. Each of these pathway subsets is used independently for classification. The classification method is AdaBoost with decision trees as weak classifiers. Since each pathway subset contains a relatively small number of gene probes, it is possible to train and test its classification accuracy quickly and determine whether it has valuable diagnostic information. Finally, genes from successful pathway subsets can be combined to create a classifier of high accuracy.

  6. Using Smoke Injection in Drains to Identify Potential Preferential Pathways in a Drained Arable Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, M. H.; Petersen, C. T.; Hansen, S.

    2014-12-01

    Macropores forming a continuous pathway between the soil surface and subsurface drains favour the transport of many contaminants from agricultural fields to surface waters. The smoke injection method presented by Shipitalo and Gibbs (2000) used for demonstrating and quantifying such pathways has been further developed and used on a drained Danish sandy loam. In order to identify the preferential pathways to drains, smoke was injected in three 1.15 m deep tile drains (total drain length 93 m), and smoke emitting macropores (SEMP) at the soil surface were counted and characterized as producing either strong or weak plumes compared to reference plumes from 3 and 6 mm wide tubes. In the two situations investigated in the present study - an early spring and an autumn situation, smoke only penetrated the soil surface layer via earthworm burrows located in a 1.0 m wide belt directly above the drain lines. However, it is known from previous studies that desiccation fractures in a dry summer situation also can contribute to the smoke pattern. The distance between SEMP measured along the drain lines was on average 0.46 m whereas the average spacing between SEMP with strong plumes was 2.3 m. Ponded water was applied in 6 cm wide rings placed above 52 burrows including 17 reference burrows which did not emit smoke. Thirteen pathways in the soil were examined using dye tracer and profile excavation. SEMP with strong plumes marked the entrance of highly efficient transport pathways conducting surface applied water and dye tracer into the drain. However, no single burrow was traced all the way from the surface into the drain, the dye patterns branched off in a network of other macropores. Water infiltration rates were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in SEMP with strong plumes (average rate: 247 mL min-1 n = 19) compared to SEMP with weak plumes (average rate: 87 mL min-1 n = 16) and no plumes (average rate: 56 mL min-1 n = 17). The results suggest that the smoke injection method

  7. Functional CRISPR screening identifies the ufmylation pathway as a regulator of SQSTM1/p62

    PubMed Central

    DeJesus, Rowena; Moretti, Francesca; McAllister, Gregory; Wang, Zuncai; Bergman, Phil; Liu, Shanming; Frias, Elizabeth; Alford, John; Reece-Hoyes, John S; Lindeman, Alicia; Kelliher, Jennifer; Russ, Carsten; Knehr, Judith; Carbone, Walter; Beibel, Martin; Roma, Guglielmo; Ng, Aylwin; Tallarico, John A; Porter, Jeffery A; Xavier, Ramnik J; Mickanin, Craig; Murphy, Leon O; Hoffman, Gregory R; Nyfeler, Beat

    2016-01-01

    SQSTM1 is an adaptor protein that integrates multiple cellular signaling pathways and whose expression is tightly regulated at the transcriptional and post-translational level. Here, we describe a forward genetic screening paradigm exploiting CRISPR-mediated genome editing coupled to a cell selection step by FACS to identify regulators of SQSTM1. Through systematic comparison of pooled libraries, we show that CRISPR is superior to RNAi in identifying known SQSTM1 modulators. A genome-wide CRISPR screen exposed MTOR signalling and the entire macroautophagy machinery as key regulators of SQSTM1 and identified several novel modulators including HNRNPM, SLC39A14, SRRD, PGK1 and the ufmylation cascade. We show that ufmylation regulates SQSTM1 by eliciting a cell type-specific ER stress response which induces SQSTM1 expression and results in its accumulation in the cytosol. This study validates pooled CRISPR screening as a powerful method to map the repertoire of cellular pathways that regulate the fate of an individual target protein. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17290.001 PMID:27351204

  8. Anthropogenic Molecular Markers: Tools to Identify the Sources and Transport Pathways of Pollutants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Takada, H.; Satoh, F.; Bothner, Michael H.; Tripp, B.W.; Johnson, C.G.; Farrington, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    The activities of modern civilization have released to the oceans a wide variety of both mobilized natural compounds and synthetic compounds not found prior to modern times. Many of these compounds provide a means of identifying sources of inputs and pathways of movement of chemicals through oceanic ecosystems and serve as molecular markers of human activities. A coastal ocean (Tokyo Bay) and a deep ocean (Deep Water Dump Site 106 in the Western North Atlantic Ocean) example are presented. In the deep ocean study, the correlation between potential sewage marker, i.e. linear alkylbenzenes (LABs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) concentrations indicates a contribution of sewage sludge PCBs to the dump site sediments.

  9. Pan-cancer network analysis identifies combinations of rare somatic mutations across pathways and protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Leiserson, Mark D M; Vandin, Fabio; Wu, Hsin-Ta; Dobson, Jason R; Eldridge, Jonathan V; Thomas, Jacob L; Papoutsaki, Alexandra; Kim, Younhun; Niu, Beifang; McLellan, Michael; Lawrence, Michael S; Gonzalez-Perez, Abel; Tamborero, David; Cheng, Yuwei; Ryslik, Gregory A; Lopez-Bigas, Nuria; Getz, Gad; Ding, Li; Raphael, Benjamin J

    2015-02-01

    Cancers exhibit extensive mutational heterogeneity, and the resulting long-tail phenomenon complicates the discovery of genes and pathways that are significantly mutated in cancer. We perform a pan-cancer analysis of mutated networks in 3,281 samples from 12 cancer types from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) using HotNet2, a new algorithm to find mutated subnetworks that overcomes the limitations of existing single-gene, pathway and network approaches. We identify 16 significantly mutated subnetworks that comprise well-known cancer signaling pathways as well as subnetworks with less characterized roles in cancer, including cohesin, condensin and others. Many of these subnetworks exhibit co-occurring mutations across samples. These subnetworks contain dozens of genes with rare somatic mutations across multiple cancers; many of these genes have additional evidence supporting a role in cancer. By illuminating these rare combinations of mutations, pan-cancer network analyses provide a roadmap to investigate new diagnostic and therapeutic opportunities across cancer types.

  10. Inside the biochemical pathways of thymidylate synthase perturbed by anticancer drugs: Novel strategies to overcome cancer chemoresistance.

    PubMed

    Taddia, Laura; D'Arca, Domenico; Ferrari, Stefania; Marraccini, Chiara; Severi, Leda; Ponterini, Glauco; Assaraf, Yahuda G; Marverti, Gaetano; Costi, Maria Paola

    2015-11-01

    pathways that are modulated by TS-targeting anticancer drugs starting from the description of the normal functioning of the folate metabolic pathway, through the protein modulation occurring upon drug delivery to cultured tumor cells as well as cancer patients, finally describing how the pathways are modulated by drug resistance development. The data collected are then analyzed using network/netwire connecting methods in order to provide a wider view of the pathways involved and of the importance of such information in identifying additional proteins that could serve as novel druggable targets for efficacious cancer therapy.

  11. Modulation of nitrergic signalling pathway by American ginseng attenuates chronic unpredictable stress-induced cognitive impairment, neuroinflammation, and biochemical alterations.

    PubMed

    Rinwa, Puneet; Kumar, Anil

    2014-02-01

    Prolonged stress causes extensive loss of neurons leading to deficits in cognitive performance. Increasing evidence indicates that accumulation of intercellular messenger, nitric oxide (NO), plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of memory disorders. American ginseng (AG) is known to show protection in different animal models of neurological diseases; however, its exact mechanism of action is not clearly understood. Therefore, the current study was designed to investigate the interaction of AG against chronic unpredictable stress (CUS)-associated behavioral and biochemical alterations and the probable role of nitrergic pathway in this effect. Male Laca mice were exposed to a series of stressors along with drug/vehicle treatment daily for 28 days. CUS paradigm caused significant impairment in both acquisition and retention memory as measured in Morris water maze and elevated plus maze task. This was coupled with alterations in oxidative stress markers, mitochondrial enzyme complex activities, pro-inflammatory cytokine (TNF-α), and acetylcholinesterase levels in the hippocampus as compared with naïve group. Besides, there was a marked increase in serum corticosterone levels. AG (100, 200 mg/kg; p.o.) treatment significantly improved cognitive impairment; reduced TNF-α, acetylcholinesterase, and corticosterone levels; and attenuated oxidative-nitrergic stress. Furthermore, pre-treatment of L-arginine (100 mg/kg; i.p.), a nitric oxide donor, with subeffective dose of AG (100 mg/kg; p.o.) reversed its protective effects. However, L-NAME (10 mg/kg, i.p.), a non-specific NO synthase inhibitor, potentiated the effects of AG. Our findings suggest that modulation of nitrergic signalling cascade is involved in the protective effects of AG against CUS-induced cognitive dysfunction, oxidative stress, and neuroinflammation.

  12. Gene Expression Profiling Identifies Molecular Pathways Associated with Collagen VI Deficiency and Provides Novel Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Paco, Sonia; Kalko, Susana G.; Jou, Cristina; Rodríguez, María A.; Corbera, Joan; Muntoni, Francesco; Feng, Lucy; Rivas, Eloy; Torner, Ferran; Gualandi, Francesca; Gomez-Foix, Anna M.; Ferrer, Anna; Ortez, Carlos; Nascimento, Andrés; Colomer, Jaume; Jimenez-Mallebrera, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD), caused by collagen VI deficiency, is a common congenital muscular dystrophy. At present, the role of collagen VI in muscle and the mechanism of disease are not fully understood. To address this we have applied microarrays to analyse the transcriptome of UCMD muscle and compare it to healthy muscle and other muscular dystrophies. We identified 389 genes which are differentially regulated in UCMD relative to controls. In addition, there were 718 genes differentially expressed between UCMD and dystrophin deficient muscle. In contrast, only 29 genes were altered relative to other congenital muscular dystrophies. Changes in gene expression were confirmed by real-time PCR. The set of regulated genes was analysed by Gene Ontology, KEGG pathways and Ingenuity Pathway analysis to reveal the molecular functions and gene networks associated with collagen VI defects. The most significantly regulated pathways were those involved in muscle regeneration, extracellular matrix remodelling and inflammation. We characterised the immune response in UCMD biopsies as being mainly mediated via M2 macrophages and the complement pathway indicating that anti-inflammatory treatment may be beneficial to UCMD as for other dystrophies. We studied the immunolocalisation of ECM components and found that biglycan, a collagen VI interacting proteoglycan, was reduced in the basal lamina of UCMD patients. We propose that biglycan reduction is secondary to collagen VI loss and that it may be contributing towards UCMD pathophysiology. Consequently, strategies aimed at over-expressing biglycan and restore the link between the muscle cell surface and the extracellular matrix should be considered. PMID:24223098

  13. Identifying Work Setting Profile Factors From the Career Pathway Evaluation Program

    PubMed Central

    Sogol, Elliott M.; Brown, Lawrence M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To describe the work factors associated with 28 different career areas as reported by pharmacists who responded to the American Pharmacists Association (APhA) Career Pathway Evaluation Program for Pharmacy Professionals, 2012 Pharmacist Profile Survey Methods. Data from the 1,119 completed survey instruments from the 2012 Pharmacist Profile Survey were analyzed. Exploratory factor analysis was used to identify the underlying factors that best represented respondents’ work setting profiles. Results. Eleven underlying factors were identified for the respondents’ work setting profiles: patient care, application of clinical knowledge, innovation, stress, research, managerial responsibility, work schedule flexibility, job position flexibility, self-actualization, geographic location, and continuity of coworker relationships. Findings revealed variation for these underlying factors among career categories. Conclusion. Variation among pharmacist career types exists. The profiles constructed in this study describe the characteristics of various career paths and can be helpful for decisions regarding educational, experiential, residency, and certification training in pharmacist careers. PMID:24249856

  14. Exome sequencing in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis identifies risk genes and pathways

    PubMed Central

    Cirulli, Elizabeth T.; Lasseigne, Brittany N.; Petrovski, Slavé; Sapp, Peter C.; Dion, Patrick A.; Leblond, Claire S.; Couthouis, Julien; Lu, Yi-Fan; Wang, Quanli; Krueger, Brian J.; Ren, Zhong; Keebler, Jonathan; Han, Yujun; Levy, Shawn E.; Boone, Braden E.; Wimbish, Jack R.; Waite, Lindsay L.; Jones, Angela L.; Carulli, John P.; Day-Williams, Aaron G.; Staropoli, John F.; Xin, Winnie W.; Chesi, Alessandra; Raphael, Alya R.; McKenna-Yasek, Diane; Cady, Janet; de Jong, J.M.B. Vianney; Kenna, Kevin P.; Smith, Bradley N.; Topp, Simon; Miller, Jack; Gkazi, Athina; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; van den Berg, Leonard H.; Veldink, Jan; Silani, Vincenzo; Ticozzi, Nicola; Shaw, Christopher E.; Baloh, Robert H.; Appel, Stanley; Simpson, Ericka; Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde; Pulst, Stefan M.; Gibson, Summer; Trojanowski, John Q.; Elman, Lauren; McCluskey, Leo; Grossman, Murray; Shneider, Neil A.; Chung, Wendy K.; Ravits, John M.; Glass, Jonathan D.; Sims, Katherine B.; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.; Maniatis, Tom; Hayes, Sebastian D.; Ordureau, Alban; Swarup, Sharan; Landers, John; Baas, Frank; Allen, Andrew S.; Bedlack, Richard S.; Harper, J. Wade; Gitler, Aaron D.; Rouleau, Guy A.; Brown, Robert; Harms, Matthew B.; Cooper, Gregory M.; Harris, Tim; Myers, Richard M.; Goldstein, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating neurological disease with no effective treatment. Here we report the results of a moderate-scale sequencing study aimed at identifying new genes contributing to predisposition for ALS. We performed whole exome sequencing of 2,874 ALS patients and compared them to 6,405 controls. Several known ALS genes were found to be associated, and the non-canonical IκB kinase family TANK-Binding Kinase 1 (TBK1) was identified as an ALS gene. TBK1 is known to bind to and phosphorylate a number of proteins involved in innate immunity and autophagy, including optineurin (OPTN) and p62 (SQSTM1/sequestosome), both of which have also been implicated in ALS. These observations reveal a key role of the autophagic pathway in ALS and suggest specific targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:25700176

  15. Comprehensive profiling analysis of actively resorbing osteoclasts identifies critical signaling pathways regulated by bone substrate

    PubMed Central

    Purdue, P. Edward; Crotti, Tania N.; Shen, Zhenxin; Swantek, Jennifer; Li, Jun; Hill, Jonathan; Hanidu, Adedayo; Dimock, Janice; Nabozny, Gerald; Goldring, Steven R.; McHugh, Kevin P.

    2014-01-01

    As the only cells capable of efficiently resorbing bone, osteoclasts are central mediators of both normal bone remodeling and pathologies associates with excessive bone resorption. However, despite the clear evidence of interplay between osteoclasts and the bone surface in vivo, the role of the bone substrate in regulating osteoclast differentiation and activation at a molecular level has not been fully defined. Here, we present the first comprehensive expression profiles of osteoclasts differentiated on authentic resorbable bone substrates. This analysis has identified numerous critical pathways coordinately regulated by osteoclastogenic cytokines and bone substrate, including the transition from proliferation to differentiation, and sphingosine-1-phosphate signaling. Whilst, as expected, much of this program is dependent upon integrin beta 3, the pre-eminent mediator of osteoclast-bone interaction, a surprisingly significant portion of the bone substrate regulated expression signature is independent of this receptor. Together, these findings identify an important hitherto underappreciated role for bone substrate in osteoclastogenesis. PMID:25534583

  16. A Sleeping Beauty forward genetic screen identifies new genes and pathways driving osteosarcoma development and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Moriarity, Branden S; Otto, George M; Rahrmann, Eric P; Rathe, Susan K; Wolf, Natalie K; Weg, Madison T; Manlove, Luke A; LaRue, Rebecca S; Temiz, Nuri A; Molyneux, Sam D; Choi, Kwangmin; Holly, Kevin J; Sarver, Aaron L; Scott, Milcah C; Forster, Colleen L; Modiano, Jaime F; Khanna, Chand; Hewitt, Stephen M; Khokha, Rama; Yang, Yi; Gorlick, Richard; Dyer, Michael A; Largaespada, David A

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcomas are sarcomas of the bone, derived from osteoblasts or their precursors, with a high propensity to metastasize. Osteosarcoma is associated with massive genomic instability, making it problematic to identify driver genes using human tumors or prototypical mouse models, many of which involve loss of Trp53 function. To identify the genes driving osteosarcoma development and metastasis, we performed a Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon-based forward genetic screen in mice with and without somatic loss of Trp53. Common insertion site (CIS) analysis of 119 primary tumors and 134 metastatic nodules identified 232 sites associated with osteosarcoma development and 43 sites associated with metastasis, respectively. Analysis of CIS-associated genes identified numerous known and new osteosarcoma-associated genes enriched in the ErbB, PI3K-AKT-mTOR and MAPK signaling pathways. Lastly, we identified several oncogenes involved in axon guidance, including Sema4d and Sema6d, which we functionally validated as oncogenes in human osteosarcoma. PMID:25961939

  17. A Sleeping Beauty forward genetic screen identifies new genes and pathways driving osteosarcoma development and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Moriarity, Branden S; Otto, George M; Rahrmann, Eric P; Rathe, Susan K; Wolf, Natalie K; Weg, Madison T; Manlove, Luke A; LaRue, Rebecca S; Temiz, Nuri A; Molyneux, Sam D; Choi, Kwangmin; Holly, Kevin J; Sarver, Aaron L; Scott, Milcah C; Forster, Colleen L; Modiano, Jaime F; Khanna, Chand; Hewitt, Stephen M; Khokha, Rama; Yang, Yi; Gorlick, Richard; Dyer, Michael A; Largaespada, David A

    2015-06-01

    Osteosarcomas are sarcomas of the bone, derived from osteoblasts or their precursors, with a high propensity to metastasize. Osteosarcoma is associated with massive genomic instability, making it problematic to identify driver genes using human tumors or prototypical mouse models, many of which involve loss of Trp53 function. To identify the genes driving osteosarcoma development and metastasis, we performed a Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon-based forward genetic screen in mice with and without somatic loss of Trp53. Common insertion site (CIS) analysis of 119 primary tumors and 134 metastatic nodules identified 232 sites associated with osteosarcoma development and 43 sites associated with metastasis, respectively. Analysis of CIS-associated genes identified numerous known and new osteosarcoma-associated genes enriched in the ErbB, PI3K-AKT-mTOR and MAPK signaling pathways. Lastly, we identified several oncogenes involved in axon guidance, including Sema4d and Sema6d, which we functionally validated as oncogenes in human osteosarcoma. PMID:25961939

  18. Integrated Metabolomics, Transcriptomics and Proteomics Identifies Metabolic Pathways Affected by Anaplasma phagocytophilum Infection in Tick Cells.

    PubMed

    Villar, Margarita; Ayllón, Nieves; Alberdi, Pilar; Moreno, Andrés; Moreno, María; Tobes, Raquel; Mateos-Hernández, Lourdes; Weisheit, Sabine; Bell-Sakyi, Lesley; de la Fuente, José

    2015-12-01

    support the use of this experimental approach to systematically identify cell pathways and molecular mechanisms involved in tick-pathogen interactions. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002181.

  19. Combined Gene Expression and RNAi Screening to Identify Alkylation Damage Survival Pathways from Fly to Human

    PubMed Central

    Zanotto-Filho, Alfeu; Dashnamoorthy, Ravi; Loranc, Eva; de Souza, Luis H. T.; Moreira, José C. F.; Suresh, Uthra; Chen, Yidong

    2016-01-01

    Alkylating agents are a key component of cancer chemotherapy. Several cellular mechanisms are known to be important for its survival, particularly DNA repair and xenobiotic detoxification, yet genomic screens indicate that additional cellular components may be involved. Elucidating these components has value in either identifying key processes that can be modulated to improve chemotherapeutic efficacy or may be altered in some cancers to confer chemoresistance. We therefore set out to reevaluate our prior Drosophila RNAi screening data by comparison to gene expression arrays in order to determine if we could identify any novel processes in alkylation damage survival. We noted a consistent conservation of alkylation survival pathways across platforms and species when the analysis was conducted on a pathway/process level rather than at an individual gene level. Better results were obtained when combining gene lists from two datasets (RNAi screen plus microarray) prior to analysis. In addition to previously identified DNA damage responses (p53 signaling and Nucleotide Excision Repair), DNA-mRNA-protein metabolism (transcription/translation) and proteasome machinery, we also noted a highly conserved cross-species requirement for NRF2, glutathione (GSH)-mediated drug detoxification and Endoplasmic Reticulum stress (ER stress)/Unfolded Protein Responses (UPR) in cells exposed to alkylation. The requirement for GSH, NRF2 and UPR in alkylation survival was validated by metabolomics, protein studies and functional cell assays. From this we conclude that RNAi/gene expression fusion is a valid strategy to rapidly identify key processes that may be extendable to other contexts beyond damage survival. PMID:27100653

  20. Combined Gene Expression and RNAi Screening to Identify Alkylation Damage Survival Pathways from Fly to Human.

    PubMed

    Zanotto-Filho, Alfeu; Dashnamoorthy, Ravi; Loranc, Eva; de Souza, Luis H T; Moreira, José C F; Suresh, Uthra; Chen, Yidong; Bishop, Alexander J R

    2016-01-01

    Alkylating agents are a key component of cancer chemotherapy. Several cellular mechanisms are known to be important for its survival, particularly DNA repair and xenobiotic detoxification, yet genomic screens indicate that additional cellular components may be involved. Elucidating these components has value in either identifying key processes that can be modulated to improve chemotherapeutic efficacy or may be altered in some cancers to confer chemoresistance. We therefore set out to reevaluate our prior Drosophila RNAi screening data by comparison to gene expression arrays in order to determine if we could identify any novel processes in alkylation damage survival. We noted a consistent conservation of alkylation survival pathways across platforms and species when the analysis was conducted on a pathway/process level rather than at an individual gene level. Better results were obtained when combining gene lists from two datasets (RNAi screen plus microarray) prior to analysis. In addition to previously identified DNA damage responses (p53 signaling and Nucleotide Excision Repair), DNA-mRNA-protein metabolism (transcription/translation) and proteasome machinery, we also noted a highly conserved cross-species requirement for NRF2, glutathione (GSH)-mediated drug detoxification and Endoplasmic Reticulum stress (ER stress)/Unfolded Protein Responses (UPR) in cells exposed to alkylation. The requirement for GSH, NRF2 and UPR in alkylation survival was validated by metabolomics, protein studies and functional cell assays. From this we conclude that RNAi/gene expression fusion is a valid strategy to rapidly identify key processes that may be extendable to other contexts beyond damage survival. PMID:27100653

  1. Proteome-wide association studies identify biochemical modules associated with a wing-size phenotype in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Okada, Hirokazu; Ebhardt, H Alexander; Vonesch, Sibylle Chantal; Aebersold, Ruedi; Hafen, Ernst

    2016-09-01

    The manner by which genetic diversity within a population generates individual phenotypes is a fundamental question of biology. To advance the understanding of the genotype-phenotype relationships towards the level of biochemical processes, we perform a proteome-wide association study (PWAS) of a complex quantitative phenotype. We quantify the variation of wing imaginal disc proteomes in Drosophila genetic reference panel (DGRP) lines using SWATH mass spectrometry. In spite of the very large genetic variation (1/36 bp) between the lines, proteome variability is surprisingly small, indicating strong molecular resilience of protein expression patterns. Proteins associated with adult wing size form tight co-variation clusters that are enriched in fundamental biochemical processes. Wing size correlates with some basic metabolic functions, positively with glucose metabolism but negatively with mitochondrial respiration and not with ribosome biogenesis. Our study highlights the power of PWAS to filter functional variants from the large genetic variability in natural populations.

  2. Proteome-wide association studies identify biochemical modules associated with a wing-size phenotype in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Hirokazu; Ebhardt, H. Alexander; Vonesch, Sibylle Chantal; Aebersold, Ruedi; Hafen, Ernst

    2016-01-01

    The manner by which genetic diversity within a population generates individual phenotypes is a fundamental question of biology. To advance the understanding of the genotype–phenotype relationships towards the level of biochemical processes, we perform a proteome-wide association study (PWAS) of a complex quantitative phenotype. We quantify the variation of wing imaginal disc proteomes in Drosophila genetic reference panel (DGRP) lines using SWATH mass spectrometry. In spite of the very large genetic variation (1/36 bp) between the lines, proteome variability is surprisingly small, indicating strong molecular resilience of protein expression patterns. Proteins associated with adult wing size form tight co-variation clusters that are enriched in fundamental biochemical processes. Wing size correlates with some basic metabolic functions, positively with glucose metabolism but negatively with mitochondrial respiration and not with ribosome biogenesis. Our study highlights the power of PWAS to filter functional variants from the large genetic variability in natural populations. PMID:27582081

  3. Proteome-wide association studies identify biochemical modules associated with a wing-size phenotype in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Okada, Hirokazu; Ebhardt, H Alexander; Vonesch, Sibylle Chantal; Aebersold, Ruedi; Hafen, Ernst

    2016-01-01

    The manner by which genetic diversity within a population generates individual phenotypes is a fundamental question of biology. To advance the understanding of the genotype-phenotype relationships towards the level of biochemical processes, we perform a proteome-wide association study (PWAS) of a complex quantitative phenotype. We quantify the variation of wing imaginal disc proteomes in Drosophila genetic reference panel (DGRP) lines using SWATH mass spectrometry. In spite of the very large genetic variation (1/36 bp) between the lines, proteome variability is surprisingly small, indicating strong molecular resilience of protein expression patterns. Proteins associated with adult wing size form tight co-variation clusters that are enriched in fundamental biochemical processes. Wing size correlates with some basic metabolic functions, positively with glucose metabolism but negatively with mitochondrial respiration and not with ribosome biogenesis. Our study highlights the power of PWAS to filter functional variants from the large genetic variability in natural populations. PMID:27582081

  4. A Whole-Cell Phenotypic Screening Platform for Identifying Methylerythritol Phosphate Pathway-Selective Inhibitors as Novel Antibacterial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, L. Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Isoprenoid biosynthesis is essential for survival of all living organisms. More than 50,000 unique isoprenoids occur naturally, with each constructed from two simple five-carbon precursors: isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). Two pathways for the biosynthesis of IPP and DMAPP are found in nature. Humans exclusively use the mevalonate (MVA) pathway, while most bacteria, including all Gram-negative and many Gram-positive species, use the unrelated methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway. Here we report the development of a novel, whole-cell phenotypic screening platform to identify compounds that selectively inhibit the MEP pathway. Strains of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium were engineered to have separately inducible MEP (native) and MVA (nonnative) pathways. These strains, RMC26 and CT31-7d, were then used to differentiate MVA pathway- and MEP pathway-specific perturbation. Compounds that inhibit MEP pathway-dependent bacterial growth but leave MVA-dependent growth unaffected represent MEP pathway-selective antibacterials. This screening platform offers three significant results. First, the compound is antibacterial and is therefore cell permeant, enabling access to the intracellular target. Second, the compound inhibits one or more MEP pathway enzymes. Third, the MVA pathway is unaffected, suggesting selectivity for targeting the bacterial versus host pathway. The cell lines also display increased sensitivity to two reported MEP pathway-specific inhibitors, further biasing the platform toward inhibitors selective for the MEP pathway. We demonstrate development of a robust, high-throughput screening platform that combines phenotypic and target-based screening that can identify MEP pathway-selective antibacterials simply by monitoring optical density as the readout for cell growth/inhibition. PMID:22777049

  5. A Genome-Wide Screen with Nicotinamide to Identify Sirtuin-Dependent Pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Choy, John S.; Qadri, Bayan; Henry, Leah; Shroff, Kunal; Bifarin, Olatomiwa; Basrai, Munira A.

    2015-01-01

    Sirtuins are evolutionarily conserved NAD-dependent deacetylases that catalyze the cleavage of NAD+ into nicotinamide (NAM), which can act as a pan-sirtuin inhibitor in unicellular and multicellular organisms. Sirtuins regulate processes such as transcription, DNA damage repair, chromosome segregation, and longevity extension in yeast and metazoans. The founding member of the evolutionarily conserved sirtuin family, SIR2, was first identified in budding yeast. Subsequent studies led to the identification of four yeast SIR2 homologs HST1, HST2, HST3, and HST4. Understanding the downstream physiological consequences of inhibiting sirtuins can be challenging since most studies focus on single or double deletions of sirtuins, and mating defects in SIR2 deletions hamper genome-wide screens. This represents an important gap in our knowledge of how sirtuins function in highly complex biological processes such as aging, metabolism, and chromosome segregation. In this report, we used a genome-wide screen to explore sirtuin-dependent processes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by identifying deletion mutants that are sensitive to NAM. We identified 55 genes in total, 36 of which have not been previously reported to be dependent on sirtuins. We find that genome stability pathways are particularly vulnerable to loss of sirtuin activity. Here, we provide evidence that defects in sister chromatid cohesion renders cells sensitive to growth in the presence of NAM. The results of our screen provide a broad view of the biological pathways sensitive to inhibition of sirtuins, and advance our understanding of the function of sirtuins and NAD+ biology. PMID:26646153

  6. A Genome-Wide Screen with Nicotinamide to Identify Sirtuin-Dependent Pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Choy, John S; Qadri, Bayan; Henry, Leah; Shroff, Kunal; Bifarin, Olatomiwa; Basrai, Munira A

    2016-02-01

    Sirtuins are evolutionarily conserved NAD-dependent deacetylases that catalyze the cleavage of NAD(+) into nicotinamide (NAM), which can act as a pan-sirtuin inhibitor in unicellular and multicellular organisms. Sirtuins regulate processes such as transcription, DNA damage repair, chromosome segregation, and longevity extension in yeast and metazoans. The founding member of the evolutionarily conserved sirtuin family, SIR2, was first identified in budding yeast. Subsequent studies led to the identification of four yeast SIR2 homologs HST1, HST2, HST3, and HST4. Understanding the downstream physiological consequences of inhibiting sirtuins can be challenging since most studies focus on single or double deletions of sirtuins, and mating defects in SIR2 deletions hamper genome-wide screens. This represents an important gap in our knowledge of how sirtuins function in highly complex biological processes such as aging, metabolism, and chromosome segregation. In this report, we used a genome-wide screen to explore sirtuin-dependent processes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by identifying deletion mutants that are sensitive to NAM. We identified 55 genes in total, 36 of which have not been previously reported to be dependent on sirtuins. We find that genome stability pathways are particularly vulnerable to loss of sirtuin activity. Here, we provide evidence that defects in sister chromatid cohesion renders cells sensitive to growth in the presence of NAM. The results of our screen provide a broad view of the biological pathways sensitive to inhibition of sirtuins, and advance our understanding of the function of sirtuins and NAD(+) biology. PMID:26646153

  7. Identification of Biochemically Distinct Properties of the Small Ubiquitin-related Modifier (SUMO) Conjugation Pathway in Plasmodium falciparum*

    PubMed Central

    Reiter, Katherine; Mukhopadhyay, Debaditya; Zhang, Hong; Boucher, Lauren E.; Kumar, Nirbhay; Bosch, Jürgen; Matunis, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Small ubiquitin-related modifiers (SUMOs) are post-translationally conjugated to other proteins and are thereby essential regulators of a wide range of cellular processes. Sumoylation, and enzymes of the sumoylation pathway, are conserved in the malaria causing parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. However, the specific functions of sumoylation in P. falciparum, and the degree of functional conservation between enzymes of the human and P. falciparum sumoylation pathways, have not been characterized. Here, we demonstrate that sumoylation levels peak during midstages of the intra-erythrocyte developmental cycle, concomitant with hemoglobin consumption and elevated oxidative stress. In vitro studies revealed that P. falciparum E1- and E2-conjugating enzymes interact effectively to recognize and modify RanGAP1, a model mammalian SUMO substrate. However, in heterologous reactions, P. falciparum E1 and E2 enzymes failed to interact with cognate human E2 and E1 partners, respectively, to modify RanGAP1. Structural analysis, binding studies, and functional assays revealed divergent amino acid residues within the E1-E2 binding interface that define organism-specific enzyme interactions. Our studies identify sumoylation as a potentially important regulator of oxidative stress response during the P. falciparum intra-erythrocyte developmental cycle, and define E1 and E2 interactions as a promising target for development of parasite-specific inhibitors of sumoylation and parasite replication. PMID:23943616

  8. A chemical proteomic atlas of brain serine hydrolases identifies cell type-specific pathways regulating neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Viader, Andreu; Ogasawara, Daisuke; Joslyn, Christopher M; Sanchez-Alavez, Manuel; Mori, Simone; Nguyen, William; Conti, Bruno; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic specialization among major brain cell types is central to nervous system function and determined in large part by the cellular distribution of enzymes. Serine hydrolases are a diverse enzyme class that plays fundamental roles in CNS metabolism and signaling. Here, we perform an activity-based proteomic analysis of primary mouse neurons, astrocytes, and microglia to furnish a global portrait of the cellular anatomy of serine hydrolases in the brain. We uncover compelling evidence for the cellular compartmentalization of key chemical transmission pathways, including the functional segregation of endocannabinoid (eCB) biosynthetic enzymes diacylglycerol lipase-alpha (DAGLα) and –beta (DAGLβ) to neurons and microglia, respectively. Disruption of DAGLβ perturbed eCB-eicosanoid crosstalk specifically in microglia and suppressed neuroinflammatory events in vivo independently of broader effects on eCB content. Mapping the cellular distribution of metabolic enzymes thus identifies pathways for regulating specialized inflammatory responses in the brain while avoiding global alterations in CNS function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12345.001 PMID:26779719

  9. Characterization of single disseminated prostate cancer cells reveals tumor cell heterogeneity and identifies dormancy associated pathways.

    PubMed

    Chéry, Lisly; Lam, Hung-Ming; Coleman, Ilsa; Lakely, Bryce; Coleman, Roger; Larson, Sandy; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio A; Xia, Jing; Gulati, Roman; Nelson, Peter S; Montgomery, Bruce; Lange, Paul; Snyder, Linda A; Vessella, Robert L; Morrissey, Colm

    2014-10-30

    Cancer dormancy refers to the prolonged clinical disease-free time between removal of the primary tumor and recurrence, which is common in prostate cancer (PCa), breast cancer, esophageal cancer, and other cancers. PCa disseminated tumor cells (DTC) are detected in both patients with no evidence of disease (NED) and advanced disease (ADV). However, the molecular and cellular nature of DTC is unknown. We performed a first-in-field study of single DTC transcriptomic analyses in cancer patients to identify a molecular signature associated with cancer dormancy. We profiled eighty-five individual EpCAM⁺/CD45⁻ cells from the bone marrow of PCa patients with NED or ADV. We analyzed 44 DTC with high prostate-epithelial signatures, and eliminated 41 cells with high erythroid signatures and low prostate epithelial signatures. DTC were clustered into 3 groups: NED, ADV_1, and ADV_2, in which the ADV_1 group presented a distinct gene expression pattern associated with the p38 stress activated kinase pathway. Additionally, DTC from the NED group were enriched for a tumor dormancy signature associated with head and neck squamous carcinoma and breast cancer. This study provides the first clinical evidence of the p38 pathway as a potential biomarker for early recurrence and an attractive target for therapeutic intervention.

  10. MMTV insertional mutagenesis identifies genes, gene families and pathways involved in mammary cancer.

    PubMed

    Theodorou, Vassiliki; Kimm, Melanie A; Boer, Mandy; Wessels, Lodewyk; Theelen, Wendy; Jonkers, Jos; Hilkens, John

    2007-06-01

    We performed a high-throughput retroviral insertional mutagenesis screen in mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV)-induced mammary tumors and identified 33 common insertion sites, of which 17 genes were previously not known to be associated with mammary cancer and 13 had not previously been linked to cancer in general. Although members of the Wnt and fibroblast growth factors (Fgf) families were frequently tagged, our exhaustive screening for MMTV insertion sites uncovered a new repertoire of candidate breast cancer oncogenes. We validated one of these genes, Rspo3, as an oncogene by overexpression in a p53-deficient mammary epithelial cell line. The human orthologs of the candidate oncogenes were frequently deregulated in human breast cancers and associated with several tumor parameters. Computational analysis of all MMTV-tagged genes uncovered specific gene families not previously associated with cancer and showed a significant overrepresentation of protein domains and signaling pathways mainly associated with development and growth factor signaling. Comparison of all tagged genes in MMTV and Moloney murine leukemia virus-induced malignancies showed that both viruses target mostly different genes that act predominantly in distinct pathways.

  11. Soldier, civilian, criminal: identifying pathways to offending of ex-armed forces personnel in prison

    PubMed Central

    Wainwright, Verity; McDonnell, Sharon; Lennox, Charlotte; Shaw, Jenny; Senior, Jane

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Little is known about why some ex-armed forces personnel become involved in the criminal justice system, however, they represent the largest known occupational group in prison. In-depth interviews were employed to explore possible pathways to offending. Twenty ex-armed forces personnel in prison were recruited from five prisons in England. Data were analysed using a combination of thematic analysis and constant comparison methods rooted in grounded theory. Four predominant themes were identified: experiences of trauma and adversity; belonging; impulsivity and creating a soldier. Participants had experienced a number of traumatic incidents and adversity in their lives, encompassing pre, during and post-service but felt a sense of belonging in the armed forces. Participants demonstrated impulsivity in a number of areas with links to both their service in the armed forces and offending behaviour. The creation of the identity of ‘soldier’ was perceived to impact participants’ lives in a number of ways, including their offending, alcohol use and coping with trauma. The interplay of these themes and their potential impact on participants’ pathways to offending are discussed. PMID:27570440

  12. Identifying environmental health priorities for a whole nation: the use of principal environmental exposure pathways in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Hertzman, C; Torres, E; Subida, R; Martins, J

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to establishing environmental health priorities for a large society, based upon the concept of principal environmental exposure pathways (PEEPs). Principal environmental exposure pathways extend the concept of a causal pathway backward from health outcome to exposure, then to the industrial, transportation, commercial, or living conditions that gave rise to the pollution of interest. In the Philippines, where the method was developed and used, five PEEPs were identified: an urban air-pollution pathway; a community water-supply pathway; an urban solid-waste pathway; a rural "point-source" pathway; and a pathway whereby fertilizers and pesticides affect food, worker health, and rural water supplies. Characterizing the PEEPs involved pinpointing the populations at risk necessary to estimate the burden of morbidity and mortality related to each as well as identifying the health outcomes that were experienced by those exposed along each pathway or that they could be expected to experience; determining where adequate health-outcome information was available or absent; where exposure sources were or were not adequately identified; where there were significant gaps in agency responsibilities; where new data flows were needed; and where things could have been improved by improving inter-agency cooperation. The most important success of the PEEP method was to reduce the "problem of everything" in a complex country of 65 million people to a small and manageable number of priority environmental exposures.

  13. Identifying host pathogenic pathways in bovine digital dermatitis by RNA-Seq analysis.

    PubMed

    Scholey, R A; Evans, N J; Blowey, R W; Massey, J P; Murray, R D; Smith, R F; Ollier, W E; Carter, S D

    2013-09-01

    Digital dermatitis is a painful foot disease compromising welfare in dairy cattle. The disease has a complex multibacterial aetiology, but little is known about its pathogenesis. In this study, gene expression in skin biopsies from five bovine digital dermatitis lesions and five healthy bovine feet was compared using RNA-Seq technology. Differential gene expression was determined after mapping transcripts to the Btau 4.0 genome. Pathway analysis identified gene networks involving differentially expressed transcripts. Bovine digital dermatitis lesions had increased expression of mRNA for α2-macroglobulin-like 1, a protein potentially involved in bacterial immune evasion and bacterial survival. There was increased expression of keratin 6A and interleukin 1β mRNA in bovine digital dermatitis lesions, but reduced expression of most other keratin and keratin-associated genes. There was little evidence of local immune reactions to the bacterial infection present in lesions.

  14. Exome sequencing in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis identifies risk genes and pathways.

    PubMed

    Cirulli, Elizabeth T; Lasseigne, Brittany N; Petrovski, Slavé; Sapp, Peter C; Dion, Patrick A; Leblond, Claire S; Couthouis, Julien; Lu, Yi-Fan; Wang, Quanli; Krueger, Brian J; Ren, Zhong; Keebler, Jonathan; Han, Yujun; Levy, Shawn E; Boone, Braden E; Wimbish, Jack R; Waite, Lindsay L; Jones, Angela L; Carulli, John P; Day-Williams, Aaron G; Staropoli, John F; Xin, Winnie W; Chesi, Alessandra; Raphael, Alya R; McKenna-Yasek, Diane; Cady, Janet; Vianney de Jong, J M B; Kenna, Kevin P; Smith, Bradley N; Topp, Simon; Miller, Jack; Gkazi, Athina; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; van den Berg, Leonard H; Veldink, Jan; Silani, Vincenzo; Ticozzi, Nicola; Shaw, Christopher E; Baloh, Robert H; Appel, Stanley; Simpson, Ericka; Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde; Pulst, Stefan M; Gibson, Summer; Trojanowski, John Q; Elman, Lauren; McCluskey, Leo; Grossman, Murray; Shneider, Neil A; Chung, Wendy K; Ravits, John M; Glass, Jonathan D; Sims, Katherine B; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M; Maniatis, Tom; Hayes, Sebastian D; Ordureau, Alban; Swarup, Sharan; Landers, John; Baas, Frank; Allen, Andrew S; Bedlack, Richard S; Harper, J Wade; Gitler, Aaron D; Rouleau, Guy A; Brown, Robert; Harms, Matthew B; Cooper, Gregory M; Harris, Tim; Myers, Richard M; Goldstein, David B

    2015-03-27

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating neurological disease with no effective treatment. We report the results of a moderate-scale sequencing study aimed at increasing the number of genes known to contribute to predisposition for ALS. We performed whole-exome sequencing of 2869 ALS patients and 6405 controls. Several known ALS genes were found to be associated, and TBK1 (the gene encoding TANK-binding kinase 1) was identified as an ALS gene. TBK1 is known to bind to and phosphorylate a number of proteins involved in innate immunity and autophagy, including optineurin (OPTN) and p62 (SQSTM1/sequestosome), both of which have also been implicated in ALS. These observations reveal a key role of the autophagic pathway in ALS and suggest specific targets for therapeutic intervention.

  15. Metabolomics Identifies Novel Hnf1α-Dependent Physiological Pathways in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bonzo, Jessica A.; Patterson, Andrew D.; Krausz, Kristopher W.; Gonzalez, Frank J.

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the HNF1A gene cause maturity-onset diabetes of the young type 3, one of the most common genetic causes of non-insulin-dependent (type 2) diabetes mellitus. Although the whole-body Hnf1a-null mouse recapitulates the low insulin levels and high blood glucose observed in human maturity-onset diabetes of the young type 3 patients, these mice also suffer from Laron dwarfism and aminoaciduria, suggesting a role for hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α (Hnf1α) in pathophysiologies distinct from non-insulin-dependent (type 2) diabetes mellitus. In an effort to identify pathways associated with inactivation of Hnf1α, an ultraperformance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry-based metabolomics study was conducted on urine samples from wild-type and Hnf1a-null mice. An increase in phenylalanine metabolites is in agreement with the known regulation of the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene by Hnf1α. This metabolomic approach also identified urinary biomarkers for three tissue-specific dysfunctions previously unassociated with Hnf1α function. 1) Elevated indolelactate coupled to decreased xanthurenic acid also indicated defects in the indole and kynurenine pathways of tryptophan metabolism, respectively. 2) An increase in the neutral amino acid proline in the urine of Hnf1a-null mice correlated with loss of renal apical membrane transporters of the Slc6a family. 3) Further investigation into the mechanism of aldosterone increase revealed an overactive adrenal gland in Hnf1a-null mice possibly due to inhibition of negative feedback regulation. Although the phenotype of the Hnf1a-null mouse is complex, metabolomics has opened the door to investigation of several physiological systems in which Hnf1α may be a critical regulatory component. PMID:20943816

  16. Integrated Genomics Identifies Convergence of Ankylosing Spondylitis with Global Immune Mediated Disease Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Mohammed; Codner, Dianne; Mahmud Hasan, S M; Scherer, Stephen W; O’Rielly, Darren D; Rahman, Proton

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis(AS), a highly heritable complex inflammatory arthritis. Although, a handful of non-HLA risk loci have been identified, capturing the unexplained genetic contribution to AS pathogenesis remains a challenge attributed to additive, pleiotropic and epistatic-interactions at the molecular level. Here, we developed multiple integrated genomic approaches to quantify molecular convergence of non-HLA loci with global immune mediated diseases. We show that non-HLA genes are significantly sensitive to deleterious mutation accumulation in the general population compared with tolerant genes. Human developmental proteomics (prenatal to adult) analysis revealed that proteins encoded by non-HLA AS risk loci are 2-fold more expressed in adult hematopoietic cells.Enrichment analysis revealed AS risk genes overlap with a significant number of immune related pathways (p < 0.0001 to 9.8 × 10-12). Protein-protein interaction analysis revealed non-shared AS risk genes are highly clustered seeds that significantly converge (empirical; p < 0.01 to 1.6 × 10-4) into networks of global immune mediated disease risk loci. We have also provided initial evidence for the involvement of STAT2/3 in AS pathogenesis. Collectively, these findings highlight molecular insight on non-HLA AS risk loci that are not exclusively connected with overlapping immune mediated diseases; rather a component of common pathophysiological pathways with other immune mediated diseases. This information will be pivotal to fully explain AS pathogenesis and identify new therapeutic targets. PMID:25980808

  17. Development and application of biochemical and haematological reference intervals to identify unhealthy green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas).

    PubMed

    Flint, Mark; Morton, John M; Limpus, Colin J; Patterson-Kane, Janet C; Murray, Peter J; Mills, Paul C

    2010-09-01

    Biochemical and haematological reference intervals (RIs) have been reported for sea turtles, but their value for ante-mortem disease diagnosis may be limited due to small sample sizes and outdated statistical analyses. In the present study, 290 green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas) were captured, clinically assessed and blood sampled. Of these, 211 were classified as 'clinically healthy' and 25 as 'clinically unhealthy'. RIs were estimated using data from the healthy turtles and compared with blood values from the unhealthy animals. All of the unhealthy animals had plasma biochemical and haematological values outside one or more RIs (albumin, 48% of unhealthy animals; alkaline phosphatase, 35%; aspartate transaminase, 13%; creatinine, 30%; globulin, 3%; glucose, 34%; lactic dehydrogenase, 26%; phosphorus, 22%; sodium, 13%; thrombocytes, 57%; and monocytes, 5%). Among small immature turtles, those with Chelonibia testudinaria plastron barnacle counts 20 were three times more likely to be unhealthy than those with no barnacles. In addition, small immature and mature turtles were more likely to be unhealthy than large immature turtles.

  18. Nontargeted metabolomics reveals biochemical pathways altered in response to captivity and food limitation in the freshwater mussel Amblema plicata.

    PubMed

    Roznere, Ieva; Watters, G Thomas; Wolfe, Barbara A; Daly, Marymegan

    2014-12-01

    Effective conservation of freshwater mussels (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Unionidae), one of the most endangered groups of animals in North America, is compromised by limited knowledge of their health. We address this gap in knowledge by characterizing the metabolic profile of Amblema plicata in the wild and in response to captivity and food limitation. Eight mussels brought into captivity from the wild were isolated for 18 days without a food source. Hemolymph samples were taken prior to, and 9 and 18 days after the start of the experiment; these samples were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. We detected and identified 71 biochemicals in the hemolymph of freshwater mussels; of these, 49 showed significant changes during captivity and/or food limitation (p<0.05). Fasting resulted in severe metabolite depletion. Captive (but fed) mussels experienced changes similar to (albeit less severe than) fasting mussels, suggesting that mussels may experience nutritional deficiency under common captive conditions. A. plicata responded to food limitation stress by preferentially using energy reserves for maintenance rather than growth. Carbohydrate and energy metabolism exhibited down-regulation in captive, food-limited, and wild mussels. Lipid metabolism was up-regulated in captive/food-limited mussels and unchanged in wild mussels. Amino acid metabolism was up-regulated in wild mussels and down-regulated in captive/food-limited mussels. Nucleotide metabolism was up-regulated in the wild mussels, down-regulated in food-limited mussels, and unchanged in captive mussels. The different responses between treatment groups suggest potential for nucleotide metabolism as a biomarker of health status for freshwater mussels.

  19. Biochemical and pharmacological assessment of MAP-kinase signaling along pain pathways in experimental rodent models: a potential tool for the discovery of novel antinociceptive therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Edelmayer, Rebecca M; Brederson, Jill-Desiree; Jarvis, Michael F; Bitner, Robert S

    2014-02-01

    Injury to the peripheral or central nervous system can induce changes within the nervous tissues that promote a state of sensitization that may underlie conditions of pathological chronic pain. A key biochemical event in the initiation and maintenance of peripheral and central neuronal sensitization associated with chronic pain is the phosphorylation and subsequent activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and immediate early gene transcription factors, in particular cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB). In this commentary we review the preclinical data that describe anatomical and mechanistic aspects of nociceptive-induced signaling along nociceptive pathways including peripheral cutaneous axons, the dorsal root ganglia, spinal cord dorsal horn and cerebral cortex. In addition to the regional manifestation of nociceptive signaling, investigations have attempted to elucidate the cellular origin of biochemical nociceptive processing in which communication, i.e. cross-talk between neurons and glia is viewed as an essential component of pathogenic pain development. Here, we outline a research strategy by which nociceptive-induced cellular signaling in experimental pain models, specifically MAPK and CREB phosphorylation can be utilized to provide mechanistic insight into drug-target interaction along the nociceptive pathways. We describe a series of studies using nociceptive inflammatory and neuropathic pain models to investigate the effects of known pain therapeutics on nociceptive-induced biochemical signaling and present this as a complementary research strategy for assessing antinociceptive activity useful in the preclinical development of novel pain therapeutics.

  20. Converging mediators from immune and trophic pathways to identify Parkinson disease dementia

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Christopher T.; Snyder, Noelle L.; Chen, Kewei; Walker, Douglas G.; Davis, Kathryn J.; Belden, Christine; Caviness, John N.; Driver-Dunckley, Erika; Adler, Charles H.; Sabbagh, Marwan N.; Shill, Holly A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify a panel of peripheral inflammatory/immune mediators that could discriminate Parkinson disease with dementia (PDD) from Parkinson disease (PD) without dementia. Methods: Plasma samples from 52 patients with PD and 22 patients with PDD were prepared from freshly collected blood following an institutional review board–approved protocol. A total of 160 proteins were measured using a multiplex antibody array. Plasma α-synuclein levels were analyzed by an electrochemiluminescence immunoassay. The main objective of the statistical analyses was to identify PDD discriminants using the plasma protein profile alone or in combination with age. Results: The PD and PDD groups differed significantly in cognitive measurements (Mini-Mental State Examination, Auditory Verbal Learning Test-A7, and Clinical Dementia Rating) and age. The age-adjusted levels of thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-AA were significantly different between disease groups. The levels of plasma α-synuclein significantly correlated with 26 proteins; among them, PDGF-BB, TARC, PDGF-AA, and epidermal growth factor were the highest. Linear discriminant analysis with leave-one-out cross-validation identified a 14-protein panel with age as discriminants of PDD (96% sensitivity, 89% specificity, area under the curve = 0.9615). Conclusions: We showed that multiple proteins that are mediators of growth/trophic and immune response-related pathways had discriminatory power for identifying PDD in patients with PD. Validation of this discovery-based study in longitudinal population-based studies is warranted. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that a 14-protein panel plasma assay combined with age has a sensitivity of 96% and a specificity of 89% for PDD. PMID:26848485

  1. Comparative interactomics analysis of different ALS-associated proteins identifies converging molecular pathways.

    PubMed

    Blokhuis, Anna M; Koppers, Max; Groen, Ewout J N; van den Heuvel, Dianne M A; Dini Modigliani, Stefano; Anink, Jasper J; Fumoto, Katsumi; van Diggelen, Femke; Snelting, Anne; Sodaar, Peter; Verheijen, Bert M; Demmers, Jeroen A A; Veldink, Jan H; Aronica, Eleonora; Bozzoni, Irene; den Hertog, Jeroen; van den Berg, Leonard H; Pasterkamp, R Jeroen

    2016-08-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating neurological disease with no effective treatment available. An increasing number of genetic causes of ALS are being identified, but how these genetic defects lead to motor neuron degeneration and to which extent they affect common cellular pathways remains incompletely understood. To address these questions, we performed an interactomic analysis to identify binding partners of wild-type (WT) and ALS-associated mutant versions of ATXN2, C9orf72, FUS, OPTN, TDP-43 and UBQLN2 in neuronal cells. This analysis identified several known but also many novel binding partners of these proteins. Interactomes of WT and mutant ALS proteins were very similar except for OPTN and UBQLN2, in which mutations caused loss or gain of protein interactions. Several of the identified interactomes showed a high degree of overlap: shared binding partners of ATXN2, FUS and TDP-43 had roles in RNA metabolism; OPTN- and UBQLN2-interacting proteins were related to protein degradation and protein transport, and C9orf72 interactors function in mitochondria. To confirm that this overlap is important for ALS pathogenesis, we studied fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), one of the common interactors of ATXN2, FUS and TDP-43, in more detail in in vitro and in vivo model systems for FUS ALS. FMRP localized to mutant FUS-containing aggregates in spinal motor neurons and bound endogenous FUS in a direct and RNA-sensitive manner. Furthermore, defects in synaptic FMRP mRNA target expression, neuromuscular junction integrity, and motor behavior caused by mutant FUS in zebrafish embryos, could be rescued by exogenous FMRP expression. Together, these results show that interactomics analysis can provide crucial insight into ALS disease mechanisms and they link FMRP to motor neuron dysfunction caused by FUS mutations.

  2. Molecular mechanisms of the non-coenzyme action of thiamin in brain: biochemical, structural and pathway analysis.

    PubMed

    Mkrtchyan, Garik; Aleshin, Vasily; Parkhomenko, Yulia; Kaehne, Thilo; Di Salvo, Martino Luigi; Parroni, Alessia; Contestabile, Roberto; Vovk, Andrey; Bettendorff, Lucien; Bunik, Victoria

    2015-07-27

    Thiamin (vitamin B1) is a pharmacological agent boosting central metabolism through the action of the coenzyme thiamin diphosphate (ThDP). However, positive effects, including improved cognition, of high thiamin doses in neurodegeneration may be observed without increased ThDP or ThDP-dependent enzymes in brain. Here, we determine protein partners and metabolic pathways where thiamin acts beyond its coenzyme role. Malate dehydrogenase, glutamate dehydrogenase and pyridoxal kinase were identified as abundant proteins binding to thiamin- or thiazolium-modified sorbents. Kinetic studies, supported by structural analysis, revealed allosteric regulation of these proteins by thiamin and/or its derivatives. Thiamin triphosphate and adenylated thiamin triphosphate activate glutamate dehydrogenase. Thiamin and ThDP regulate malate dehydrogenase isoforms and pyridoxal kinase. Thiamin regulation of enzymes related to malate-aspartate shuttle may impact on malate/citrate exchange, responsible for exporting acetyl residues from mitochondria. Indeed, bioinformatic analyses found an association between thiamin- and thiazolium-binding proteins and the term acetylation. Our interdisciplinary study shows that thiamin is not only a coenzyme for acetyl-CoA production, but also an allosteric regulator of acetyl-CoA metabolism including regulatory acetylation of proteins and acetylcholine biosynthesis. Moreover, thiamin action in neurodegeneration may also involve neurodegeneration-related 14-3-3, DJ-1 and β-amyloid precursor proteins identified among the thiamin- and/or thiazolium-binding proteins.

  3. Molecular mechanisms of the non-coenzyme action of thiamin in brain: biochemical, structural and pathway analysis.

    PubMed

    Mkrtchyan, Garik; Aleshin, Vasily; Parkhomenko, Yulia; Kaehne, Thilo; Di Salvo, Martino Luigi; Parroni, Alessia; Contestabile, Roberto; Vovk, Andrey; Bettendorff, Lucien; Bunik, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Thiamin (vitamin B1) is a pharmacological agent boosting central metabolism through the action of the coenzyme thiamin diphosphate (ThDP). However, positive effects, including improved cognition, of high thiamin doses in neurodegeneration may be observed without increased ThDP or ThDP-dependent enzymes in brain. Here, we determine protein partners and metabolic pathways where thiamin acts beyond its coenzyme role. Malate dehydrogenase, glutamate dehydrogenase and pyridoxal kinase were identified as abundant proteins binding to thiamin- or thiazolium-modified sorbents. Kinetic studies, supported by structural analysis, revealed allosteric regulation of these proteins by thiamin and/or its derivatives. Thiamin triphosphate and adenylated thiamin triphosphate activate glutamate dehydrogenase. Thiamin and ThDP regulate malate dehydrogenase isoforms and pyridoxal kinase. Thiamin regulation of enzymes related to malate-aspartate shuttle may impact on malate/citrate exchange, responsible for exporting acetyl residues from mitochondria. Indeed, bioinformatic analyses found an association between thiamin- and thiazolium-binding proteins and the term acetylation. Our interdisciplinary study shows that thiamin is not only a coenzyme for acetyl-CoA production, but also an allosteric regulator of acetyl-CoA metabolism including regulatory acetylation of proteins and acetylcholine biosynthesis. Moreover, thiamin action in neurodegeneration may also involve neurodegeneration-related 14-3-3, DJ-1 and β-amyloid precursor proteins identified among the thiamin- and/or thiazolium-binding proteins. PMID:26212886

  4. Molecular mechanisms of the non-coenzyme action of thiamin in brain: biochemical, structural and pathway analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mkrtchyan, Garik; Aleshin, Vasily; Parkhomenko, Yulia; Kaehne, Thilo; Luigi Di Salvo, Martino; Parroni, Alessia; Contestabile, Roberto; Vovk, Andrey; Bettendorff, Lucien; Bunik, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Thiamin (vitamin B1) is a pharmacological agent boosting central metabolism through the action of the coenzyme thiamin diphosphate (ThDP). However, positive effects, including improved cognition, of high thiamin doses in neurodegeneration may be observed without increased ThDP or ThDP-dependent enzymes in brain. Here, we determine protein partners and metabolic pathways where thiamin acts beyond its coenzyme role. Malate dehydrogenase, glutamate dehydrogenase and pyridoxal kinase were identified as abundant proteins binding to thiamin- or thiazolium-modified sorbents. Kinetic studies, supported by structural analysis, revealed allosteric regulation of these proteins by thiamin and/or its derivatives. Thiamin triphosphate and adenylated thiamin triphosphate activate glutamate dehydrogenase. Thiamin and ThDP regulate malate dehydrogenase isoforms and pyridoxal kinase. Thiamin regulation of enzymes related to malate-aspartate shuttle may impact on malate/citrate exchange, responsible for exporting acetyl residues from mitochondria. Indeed, bioinformatic analyses found an association between thiamin- and thiazolium-binding proteins and the term acetylation. Our interdisciplinary study shows that thiamin is not only a coenzyme for acetyl-CoA production, but also an allosteric regulator of acetyl-CoA metabolism including regulatory acetylation of proteins and acetylcholine biosynthesis. Moreover, thiamin action in neurodegeneration may also involve neurodegeneration-related 14-3-3, DJ-1 and β-amyloid precursor proteins identified among the thiamin- and/or thiazolium-binding proteins. PMID:26212886

  5. Identifying specific profiles in patients with different degrees of painful knee osteoarthritis based on serological biochemical and mechanistic pain biomarkers: a diagnostic approach based on cluster analysis.

    PubMed

    Egsgaard, Line Lindhardt; Eskehave, Thomas Navndrup; Bay-Jensen, Anne C; Hoeck, Hans Christian; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Biochemical and pain biomarkers can be applied to patients with painful osteoarthritis profiles and may provide more details compared with conventional clinical tools. The aim of this study was to identify an optimal combination of biochemical and pain biomarkers for classification of patients with different degrees of knee pain and joint damage. Such profiling may provide new diagnostic and therapeutic options. A total of 216 patients with different degrees of knee pain (maximal pain during the last 24 hours rated on a visual analog scale [VAS]) (VAS 0-100) and 64 controls (VAS 0-9) were recruited. Patients were separated into 3 groups: VAS 10 to 39 (N = 81), VAS 40 to 69 (N = 70), and VAS 70 to 100 (N = 65). Pressure pain thresholds, temporal summation to pressure stimuli, and conditioning pain modulation were measured from the peripatellar and extrasegmental sites. Biochemical markers indicative for autoinflammation and immunity (VICM, CRP, and CRPM), synovial inflammation (CIIIM), cartilage loss (CIIM), and bone degradation (CIM) were analyzed. WOMAC, Lequesne, and pain catastrophizing scores were collected. Principal component analysis was applied to select the optimal variable subset, and cluster analysis was applied to this subset to create distinctly different knee pain profiles. Four distinct knee pain profiles were identified: profile A (N = 27), profile B (N = 59), profile C (N = 85), and profile D (N = 41). Each knee pain profile had a unique combination of biochemical markers, pain biomarkers, physical impairments, and psychological factors that may provide the basis for mechanism-based diagnosis, individualized treatment, and selection of patients for clinical trials evaluating analgesic compounds. These results introduce a new profiling for knee OA and should be regarded as preliminary.

  6. Significant Deregulated Pathways in Diabetes Type II Complications Identified through Expression Based Network Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukil, Sanchaita; Sinha, Meenakshee; Varshney, Lavneesh; Agrawal, Shipra

    Type 2 Diabetes is a complex multifactorial disease, which alters several signaling cascades giving rise to serious complications. It is one of the major risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. The present research work describes an integrated functional network biology approach to identify pathways that get transcriptionally altered and lead to complex complications thereby amplifying the phenotypic effect of the impaired disease state. We have identified two sub-network modules, which could be activated under abnormal circumstances in diabetes. Present work describes key proteins such as P85A and SRC serving as important nodes to mediate alternate signaling routes during diseased condition. P85A has been shown to be an important link between stress responsive MAPK and CVD markers involved in fibrosis. MAPK8 has been shown to interact with P85A and further activate CTGF through VEGF signaling. We have traced a novel and unique route correlating inflammation and fibrosis by considering P85A as a key mediator of signals. The next sub-network module shows SRC as a junction for various signaling processes, which results in interaction between NF-kB and beta catenin to cause cell death. The powerful interaction between these important genes in response to transcriptionally altered lipid metabolism and impaired inflammatory response via SRC causes apoptosis of cells. The crosstalk between inflammation, lipid homeostasis and stress, and their serious effects downstream have been explained in the present analyses.

  7. Differential methylation hybridization profiling identifies involvement of STAT1-mediated pathways in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ju Hee; Kang, Han-Sung; Kim, Tae Woo; Kim, Sun Jung

    2011-10-01

    Many cancer-related genes are regulated by an epigenetic mechanism through modification of the methylation status of CpG sites at the promoter. This study was carried out at a genome-wide scale to mine genes in which the methylation of CpG sites is altered in breast cancer tissues. Differential methylation hybridization analysis was conducted using a chromosomal DNA mixture of ten normal and cancer tissue sets. A CpG microarray harboring 237,220 CpG sites of the whole genome was interrogated and the resulting methylation level differences, as well as the RNA expression differences, between the normal and cancer sets for selected genes were verified in breast cell lines by methylation-specific PCR and real-time PCR analyses. As a result, we identified and verified novel genes that were hypermethylated in breast cancer, such as NRN1, CA5B and RPIA. Pathway analysis of the genes with altered methylation patterns identified the involvement of a differentiation-related network of genes whose activity may be heavily regulated by STAT1 in breast tumorigenesis. Our results suggest that epigenetic dysregulation of cellular processes relevant to STAT1-dependent cellular differentiation may be intimately involved in breast carcinogenesis. These findings lend credence to the possibility of using tumor-specific alterations in methylation patterns as biomarkers in estimating prognosis and assessing treatment options for breast cancer. PMID:21674123

  8. Rare Copy Number Variants Identified Suggest the Regulating Pathways in Hypertension-Related Left Ventricular Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Christian R.; Majid, Fadhlina; Danuri, Norlaila; Basir, Fashieha; Thiruvahindrapuram, Bhooma; Scherer, Stephen W.; Yusoff, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and a powerful predictor of adverse cardiovascular outcomes in the hypertensive patients. It has complex multifactorial and polygenic basis for its pathogenesis. We hypothesized that rare copy number variants (CNVs) contribute to the LVH pathogenesis in hypertensive patients. Copy number variants (CNV) were identified in 258 hypertensive patients, 95 of whom had LVH, after genotyping with a high resolution SNP array. Following stringent filtering criteria, we identified 208 rare, or private CNVs that were only present in our patients with hypertension related LVH. Preliminary findings from Gene Ontology and pathway analysis of this study confirmed the involvement of the genes known to be functionally involved in cardiac development and phenotypes, in line with previously reported transcriptomic studies. Network enrichment analyses suggested that the gene-set was, directly or indirectly, involved in the transcription factors regulating the “foetal cardiac gene programme” which triggered the hypertrophic cascade, confirming previous reports. These findings suggest that multiple, individually rare copy number variants altering genes may contribute to the pathogenesis of hypertension-related LVH. In summary, we have provided further supporting evidence that rare CNV could potentially impact this common and complex disease susceptibility with lower heritability. PMID:26930585

  9. Functional signaling pathway analysis of lung adenocarcinomas identifies novel therapeutic targets for KRAS mutant tumors.

    PubMed

    Baldelli, Elisa; Bellezza, Guido; Haura, Eric B; Crinó, Lucio; Cress, W Douglas; Deng, Jianghong; Ludovini, Vienna; Sidoni, Angelo; Schabath, Matthew B; Puma, Francesco; Vannucci, Jacopo; Siggillino, Annamaria; Liotta, Lance A; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Pierobon, Mariaelena

    2015-10-20

    Little is known about the complex signaling architecture of KRAS and the interconnected RAS-driven protein-protein interactions, especially as it occurs in human clinical specimens. This study explored the activated and interconnected signaling network of KRAS mutant lung adenocarcinomas (AD) to identify novel therapeutic targets.Thirty-four KRAS mutant (MT) and twenty-four KRAS wild-type (WT) frozen biospecimens were obtained from surgically treated lung ADs. Samples were subjected to Laser Capture Microdissection and Reverse Phase Protein Microarray analysis to explore the expression/activation levels of 150 signaling proteins along with co-activation concordance mapping. An independent set of 90 non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) was used to validate selected findings by immunohistochemistry (IHC).Compared to KRAS WT tumors, the signaling architecture of KRAS MT ADs revealed significant interactions between KRAS downstream substrates, the AKT/mTOR pathway, and a number of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases (RTK). Approximately one-third of the KRAS MT tumors had ERK activation greater than the WT counterpart (p<0.01). Notably 18% of the KRAS MT tumors had elevated activation of the Estrogen Receptor alpha (ER-α) (p=0.02).This finding was verified in an independent population by IHC (p=0.03).KRAS MT lung ADs appear to have a more intricate RAS linked signaling network than WT tumors with linkage to many RTKs and to the AKT-mTOR pathway. Combination therapy targeting different nodes of this network may be necessary to treat this group of patients. In addition, for patients with KRAS MT tumors and activation of the ER-α, anti-estrogen therapy may have important clinical implications. PMID:26468985

  10. Genome-Wide Chromatin Landscape Transitions Identify Novel Pathways in Early Commitment to Osteoblast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Bethtrice; Varticovski, Lyuba; Baek, Songjoon; Hager, Gordon L.

    2016-01-01

    Bone continuously undergoes remodeling by a tightly regulated process that involves osteoblast differentiation from Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC). However, commitment of MSC to osteoblastic lineage is a poorly understood process. Chromatin organization functions as a molecular gatekeeper of DNA functions. Detection of sites that are hypersensitive to Dnase I has been used for detailed examination of changes in response to hormones and differentiation cues. To investigate the early steps in commitment of MSC to osteoblasts, we used a model human temperature-sensitive cell line, hFOB. When shifted to non-permissive temperature, these cells undergo "spontaneous" differentiation that takes several weeks, a process that is greatly accelerated by osteogenic induction media. We performed Dnase I hypersensitivity assays combined with deep sequencing to identify genome-wide potential regulatory events in cells undergoing early steps of commitment to osteoblasts. Massive reorganization of chromatin occurred within hours of differentiation. Whereas ~30% of unique DHS sites were located in the promoters, the majority was outside of the promoters, designated as enhancers. Many of them were at novel genomic sites and need to be confirmed experimentally. We developed a novel method for identification of cellular networks based solely on DHS enhancers signature correlated to gene expression. The analysis of enhancers that were unique to differentiating cells led to identification of bone developmental program encompassing 147 genes that directly or indirectly participate in osteogenesis. Identification of these pathways provided an unprecedented view of genomic regulation during early steps of differentiation and changes related to WNT, AP-1 and other pathways may have therapeutic implications. PMID:26890492

  11. Pathway-Based Genome-Wide Association Analysis Identified the Importance of Regulation-of-Autophagy Pathway for Ultradistal Radius BMD

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lishu; Guo, Yan-Fang; Liu, Yao-Zhong; Liu, Yong-Jun; Xiong, Dong-Hai; Liu, Xiao-Gang; Wang, Liang; Yang, Tie-Lin; Lei, Shu-Feng; Guo, Yan; Yan, Han; Pei, Yu-Fang; Zhang, Feng; Papasian, Christopher J; Recker, Robert R; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2010-01-01

    Wrist fracture is not only one of the most common osteoporotic fractures but also a predictor of future fractures at other sites. Wrist bone mineral density (BMD) is an important determinant of wrist fracture risk, with high heritability. Specific genes underlying wrist BMD variation are largely unknown. Most published genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have focused only on a few top-ranking single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)/genes and considered each of the identified SNPs/genes independently. To identify biologic pathways important to wrist BMD variation, we used a novel pathway-based analysis approach in our GWAS of wrist ultradistal radius (UD) BMD, examining approximately 500,000 SNPs genome-wide from 984 unrelated whites. A total of 963 biologic pathways/gene sets were analyzed. We identified the regulation-of-autophagy (ROA) pathway that achieved the most significant result (p = .005, qfdr = 0.043, pfwer = 0.016) for association with UD BMD. The ROA pathway also showed significant association with arm BMD in the Framingham Heart Study sample containing 2187 subjects, which further confirmed our findings in the discovery cohort. Earlier studies indicated that during endochondral ossification, autophagy occurs prior to apoptosis of hypertrophic chondrocytes, and it also has been shown that some genes in the ROA pathway (e.g., INFG) may play important roles in osteoblastogenesis or osteoclastogenesis. Our study supports the potential role of the ROA pathway in human wrist BMD variation and osteoporosis. Further functional evaluation of this pathway to determine the mechanism by which it regulates wrist BMD should be pursued to provide new insights into the pathogenesis of wrist osteoporosis. © 2010 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:20200951

  12. Analysis of biochemical compounds and differentially expressed genes of the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway in variegated peach flowers.

    PubMed

    Hassani, D; Liu, H L; Chen, Y N; Wan, Z B; Zhuge, Q; Li, S X

    2015-10-28

    Variegated plants are highly valuable in the floricultural market, yet the genetic mechanism underlying this attractive phenomenon has not been completely elucidated. In this study, we identified and measured different compounds in pink and white flower petals of peach (Prunus persica) by high-performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry analyses. No cyanidin-based or pelargonidin-based compounds were detected in white petals, but high levels of these compounds were found in pink petals. Additionally, we sequenced and analyzed the expression of six key structural genes in the anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway (CHI, CHS, DFR, F3'H, ANS, and UFGT) in both white and pink petals. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed all six genes to be expressed at greatly reduced levels in white flower petals, relative to pink. No allelic variations were found in the transcribed sequences. However, alignment of transcribed and genomic sequences of the ANS gene detected alternative splicing, resulting in transcripts of 1.071 and 942 bp. Only the longer transcript was observed in white flower petals. Since ANS is the key intermediate enzyme catalyzing the colorless leucopelargonidin and leucocyanidin to substrates required for completion of anthocyanin biosynthesis, the ANS gene is implicated in flower color variegation and should be explored in future studies. This article, together with a previous transcriptome study, elucidates the mechanism underlying peach flower color variegation in terms of the key structural genes involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis.

  13. Analysis of biochemical compounds and differentially expressed genes of the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway in variegated peach flowers.

    PubMed

    Hassani, D; Liu, H L; Chen, Y N; Wan, Z B; Zhuge, Q; Li, S X

    2015-01-01

    Variegated plants are highly valuable in the floricultural market, yet the genetic mechanism underlying this attractive phenomenon has not been completely elucidated. In this study, we identified and measured different compounds in pink and white flower petals of peach (Prunus persica) by high-performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry analyses. No cyanidin-based or pelargonidin-based compounds were detected in white petals, but high levels of these compounds were found in pink petals. Additionally, we sequenced and analyzed the expression of six key structural genes in the anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway (CHI, CHS, DFR, F3'H, ANS, and UFGT) in both white and pink petals. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed all six genes to be expressed at greatly reduced levels in white flower petals, relative to pink. No allelic variations were found in the transcribed sequences. However, alignment of transcribed and genomic sequences of the ANS gene detected alternative splicing, resulting in transcripts of 1.071 and 942 bp. Only the longer transcript was observed in white flower petals. Since ANS is the key intermediate enzyme catalyzing the colorless leucopelargonidin and leucocyanidin to substrates required for completion of anthocyanin biosynthesis, the ANS gene is implicated in flower color variegation and should be explored in future studies. This article, together with a previous transcriptome study, elucidates the mechanism underlying peach flower color variegation in terms of the key structural genes involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis. PMID:26535657

  14. ICSNPathway: identify candidate causal SNPs and pathways from genome-wide association study by one analytical framework.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kunlin; Chang, Suhua; Cui, Sijia; Guo, Liyuan; Zhang, Liuyan; Wang, Jing

    2011-07-01

    Genome-wide association study (GWAS) is widely utilized to identify genes involved in human complex disease or some other trait. One key challenge for GWAS data interpretation is to identify causal SNPs and provide profound evidence on how they affect the trait. Currently, researches are focusing on identification of candidate causal variants from the most significant SNPs of GWAS, while there is lack of support on biological mechanisms as represented by pathways. Although pathway-based analysis (PBA) has been designed to identify disease-related pathways by analyzing the full list of SNPs from GWAS, it does not emphasize on interpreting causal SNPs. To our knowledge, so far there is no web server available to solve the challenge for GWAS data interpretation within one analytical framework. ICSNPathway is developed to identify candidate causal SNPs and their corresponding candidate causal pathways from GWAS by integrating linkage disequilibrium (LD) analysis, functional SNP annotation and PBA. ICSNPathway provides a feasible solution to bridge the gap between GWAS and disease mechanism study by generating hypothesis of SNP → gene → pathway(s). The ICSNPathway server is freely available at http://icsnpathway.psych.ac.cn/. PMID:21622953

  15. A model for genetic and epigenetic regulatory networks identifies rare pathways for transcription factor induced pluripotency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artyomov, Maxim; Meissner, Alex; Chakraborty, Arup

    2010-03-01

    Most cells in an organism have the same DNA. Yet, different cell types express different proteins and carry out different functions. This is because of epigenetic differences; i.e., DNA in different cell types is packaged distinctly, making it hard to express certain genes while facilitating the expression of others. During development, upon receipt of appropriate cues, pluripotent embryonic stem cells differentiate into diverse cell types that make up the organism (e.g., a human). There has long been an effort to make this process go backward -- i.e., reprogram a differentiated cell (e.g., a skin cell) to pluripotent status. Recently, this has been achieved by transfecting certain transcription factors into differentiated cells. This method does not use embryonic material and promises the development of patient-specific regenerative medicine, but it is inefficient. The mechanisms that make reprogramming rare, or even possible, are poorly understood. We have developed the first computational model of transcription factor-induced reprogramming. Results obtained from the model are consistent with diverse observations, and identify the rare pathways that allow reprogramming to occur. If validated, our model could be further developed to design optimal strategies for reprogramming and shed light on basic questions in biology.

  16. An evidence-based knowledgebase of metastasis suppressors to identify key pathways relevant to cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Min; Li, Zhe; Qu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis suppressor genes (MS genes) are genes that play important roles in inhibiting the process of cancer metastasis without preventing growth of the primary tumor. Identification of these genes and understanding their functions are critical for investigation of cancer metastasis. Recent studies on cancer metastasis have identified many new susceptibility MS genes. However, the comprehensive illustration of diverse cellular processes regulated by metastasis suppressors during the metastasis cascade is lacking. Thus, the relationship between MS genes and cancer risk is still unclear. To unveil the cellular complexity of MS genes, we have constructed MSGene (http://MSGene.bioinfo-minzhao.org/), the first literature-based gene resource for exploring human MS genes. In total, we manually curated 194 experimentally verified MS genes and mapped to 1448 homologous genes from 17 model species. Follow-up functional analyses associated 194 human MS genes with epithelium/tissue morphogenesis and epithelia cell proliferation. In addition, pathway analysis highlights the prominent role of MS genes in activation of platelets and coagulation system in tumor metastatic cascade. Moreover, global mutation pattern of MS genes across multiple cancers may reveal common cancer metastasis mechanisms. All these results illustrate the importance of MSGene to our understanding on cell development and cancer metastasis. PMID:26486520

  17. Morphoproteomics Identifies Etiopathogenetic Correlates of HHV-8-Associated Kaposi's Sarcoma and Provides Pathways with Therapeutic Options: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Salihi, Suhair Al; Buryanek, Jamie; Rios, Adan A; Brown, Robert E

    2016-09-01

    A morphoproteomic analysis was performed to identify the proteins and corresponding molecular pathways activated for a case of non-HIV Kaposi's sarcoma. This analysis provides insight into the biology of the tumor and identifies etiopathogenetic correlates of HHV-8-Associated Kaposi's sarcoma that are useful in formulating therapeutic alternatives. PMID:27650622

  18. What is a clinical pathway? Refinement of an operational definition to identify clinical pathway studies for a Cochrane systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lawal, Adegboyega K; Rotter, Thomas; Kinsman, Leigh; Machotta, Andreas; Ronellenfitsch, Ulrich; Scott, Shannon D; Goodridge, Donna; Plishka, Christopher; Groot, Gary

    2016-02-23

    Clinical pathways (CPWs) are a common component in the quest to improve the quality of health. CPWs are used to reduce variation, improve quality of care, and maximize the outcomes for specific groups of patients. An ongoing challenge is the operationalization of a definition of CPW in healthcare. This may be attributable to both the differences in definition and a lack of conceptualization in the field of clinical pathways. This correspondence article describes a process of refinement of an operational definition for CPW research and proposes an operational definition for the future syntheses of CPWs literature. Following the approach proposed by Kinsman et al. (BMC Medicine 8(1):31, 2010) and Wieland et al. (Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine 17(2):50, 2011), we used a four-stage process to generate a five criteria checklist for the definition of CPWs. We refined the operational definition, through consensus, merging two of the checklist's criteria, leading to a more inclusive criterion for accommodating CPW studies conducted in various healthcare settings. The following four criteria for CPW operational definition, derived from the refinement process described above, are (1) the intervention was a structured multidisciplinary plan of care; (2) the intervention was used to translate guidelines or evidence into local structures; (3) the intervention detailed the steps in a course of treatment or care in a plan, pathway, algorithm, guideline, protocol or other 'inventory of actions' (i.e. the intervention had time-frames or criteria-based progression); and (4) the intervention aimed to standardize care for a specific population. An intervention meeting all four criteria was considered to be a CPW. The development of operational definitions for complex interventions is a useful approach to appraise and synthesize evidence for policy development and quality improvement.

  19. A Powerful Procedure for Pathway-Based Meta-analysis Using Summary Statistics Identifies 43 Pathways Associated with Type II Diabetes in European Populations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Han; Wheeler, William; Hyland, Paula L.; Yang, Yifan; Shi, Jianxin; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Yu, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Meta-analysis of multiple genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has become an effective approach for detecting single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) associations with complex traits. However, it is difficult to integrate the readily accessible SNP-level summary statistics from a meta-analysis into more powerful multi-marker testing procedures, which generally require individual-level genetic data. We developed a general procedure called Summary based Adaptive Rank Truncated Product (sARTP) for conducting gene and pathway meta-analysis that uses only SNP-level summary statistics in combination with genotype correlation estimated from a panel of individual-level genetic data. We demonstrated the validity and power advantage of sARTP through empirical and simulated data. We conducted a comprehensive pathway-based meta-analysis with sARTP on type 2 diabetes (T2D) by integrating SNP-level summary statistics from two large studies consisting of 19,809 T2D cases and 111,181 controls with European ancestry. Among 4,713 candidate pathways from which genes in neighborhoods of 170 GWAS established T2D loci were excluded, we detected 43 T2D globally significant pathways (with Bonferroni corrected p-values < 0.05), which included the insulin signaling pathway and T2D pathway defined by KEGG, as well as the pathways defined according to specific gene expression patterns on pancreatic adenocarcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, and bladder carcinoma. Using summary data from 8 eastern Asian T2D GWAS with 6,952 cases and 11,865 controls, we showed 7 out of the 43 pathways identified in European populations remained to be significant in eastern Asians at the false discovery rate of 0.1. We created an R package and a web-based tool for sARTP with the capability to analyze pathways with thousands of genes and tens of thousands of SNPs. PMID:27362418

  20. A Powerful Procedure for Pathway-Based Meta-analysis Using Summary Statistics Identifies 43 Pathways Associated with Type II Diabetes in European Populations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Han; Wheeler, William; Hyland, Paula L; Yang, Yifan; Shi, Jianxin; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Yu, Kai

    2016-06-01

    Meta-analysis of multiple genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has become an effective approach for detecting single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) associations with complex traits. However, it is difficult to integrate the readily accessible SNP-level summary statistics from a meta-analysis into more powerful multi-marker testing procedures, which generally require individual-level genetic data. We developed a general procedure called Summary based Adaptive Rank Truncated Product (sARTP) for conducting gene and pathway meta-analysis that uses only SNP-level summary statistics in combination with genotype correlation estimated from a panel of individual-level genetic data. We demonstrated the validity and power advantage of sARTP through empirical and simulated data. We conducted a comprehensive pathway-based meta-analysis with sARTP on type 2 diabetes (T2D) by integrating SNP-level summary statistics from two large studies consisting of 19,809 T2D cases and 111,181 controls with European ancestry. Among 4,713 candidate pathways from which genes in neighborhoods of 170 GWAS established T2D loci were excluded, we detected 43 T2D globally significant pathways (with Bonferroni corrected p-values < 0.05), which included the insulin signaling pathway and T2D pathway defined by KEGG, as well as the pathways defined according to specific gene expression patterns on pancreatic adenocarcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, and bladder carcinoma. Using summary data from 8 eastern Asian T2D GWAS with 6,952 cases and 11,865 controls, we showed 7 out of the 43 pathways identified in European populations remained to be significant in eastern Asians at the false discovery rate of 0.1. We created an R package and a web-based tool for sARTP with the capability to analyze pathways with thousands of genes and tens of thousands of SNPs.

  1. M. truncatula histidine-containing phosphotransfer protein: structural and biochemical insights into cytokinin transduction pathway in plants

    PubMed Central

    Ruszkowski, M.; Brzezinski, K.; Jedrzejczak, R.; Dauter, M.; Dauter, Z.; Sikorski, M.; Jaskolski, M.

    2013-01-01

    Histidine-containing phosphotransfer proteins (HPts) take part in hormone signal transduction in higher plants. The overall pathway of this process is reminiscent of the two-component system initially identified in prokaryotes. HPts function in histidine-aspartate phosphorelays where they mediate the signal from sensory kinases (usually membrane proteins) to response regulators in the nucleus. Here we report the crystal structure of an HPt protein from Medicago truncatula (MtHPt1) determined at 1.45 Å resolution and refined to an R factor of 16.7% using low-temperature synchrotron-radiation X-ray diffraction data. There is one MtHPt1 molecule in the asymmetric unit of the crystal lattice with P212121 symmetry. The protein fold consists of six α-helices, four of which form a C-terminal helix bundle. The coiled-coil structure of the bundle is stabilized by a network of S-aromatic interactions involving highly conserved sulfur-containing residues. The structure reveals a solvent-exposed side chain of His79, which is the phosphorylation site, as demonstrated by autoradiography combined with site-directed mutation. It is surrounded by highly conserved residues present in all plant HPts. These residues form a putative docking interface for either the receiver domain of the sensory kinase, or for the response regulator. The biological activity of MtHPt1 was tested by autoradiography. It demonstrated phosphorylation by the intracellular kinase domain of the cytokinin receptor MtCRE1. Complex formation between MtHPt1 and the intracellular fragment of MtCRE1 was confirmed by thermophoresis, with a dissociation constant Kd of 14 μM. PMID:23721763

  2. Genomic Profiling Identifies Novel Mutations and SNPs in ABCD1 Gene: A Molecular, Biochemical and Clinical Analysis of X-ALD Cases in India

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Neeraj; Taneja, Krishna Kant; Kalra, Veena; Behari, Madhuri; Aneja, Satinder; Bansal, Surendra Kumar

    2011-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) affects the nervous system white matter and adrenal cortex secondary to mutations in the ABCD1 gene that encode the peroxisomal membrane protein. We conducted a genomic and protein expression study of susceptibility gene with its clinical and biochemical analysis. To the best of our knowledge this is the first preliminary comprehensive study in Indian population that identified novel mutations and SNPs in a relatively large group. We screened 17 Indian indigenous X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy cases and 70 controls for mutations and SNPs in the exonic regions (including flanking regions) of ABCD1 gene by direct sequencing with ABI automated sequencer along with Western blot analysis of its endogenous protein, ALDP, levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Single germ line mutation was identified in each index case in ABCD1 gene. We detected 4 novel mutations (2 missense and 2 deletion/insertion) and 3 novel single nucleotide polymorphisms. We observed a variable protein expression in different patients. These findings were further extended to biochemical and clinical observations as it occurs with great clinical expression variability. This is the first major study in this population that presents a different molecular genetic spectrum as compared to Caucasian population due to geographical distributions of ethnicity of patients. It enhances our knowledge of the causative mutations of X-ALD that grants holistic base to develop effective medicine against X-ALD. PMID:21966424

  3. Genomic profiling identifies novel mutations and SNPs in ABCD1 gene: a molecular, biochemical and clinical analysis of X-ALD cases in India.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Neeraj; Taneja, Krishna Kant; Kalra, Veena; Behari, Madhuri; Aneja, Satinder; Bansal, Surendra Kumar

    2011-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) affects the nervous system white matter and adrenal cortex secondary to mutations in the ABCD1 gene that encode the peroxisomal membrane protein. We conducted a genomic and protein expression study of susceptibility gene with its clinical and biochemical analysis. To the best of our knowledge this is the first preliminary comprehensive study in Indian population that identified novel mutations and SNPs in a relatively large group. We screened 17 Indian indigenous X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy cases and 70 controls for mutations and SNPs in the exonic regions (including flanking regions) of ABCD1 gene by direct sequencing with ABI automated sequencer along with Western blot analysis of its endogenous protein, ALDP, levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Single germ line mutation was identified in each index case in ABCD1 gene. We detected 4 novel mutations (2 missense and 2 deletion/insertion) and 3 novel single nucleotide polymorphisms. We observed a variable protein expression in different patients. These findings were further extended to biochemical and clinical observations as it occurs with great clinical expression variability. This is the first major study in this population that presents a different molecular genetic spectrum as compared to Caucasian population due to geographical distributions of ethnicity of patients. It enhances our knowledge of the causative mutations of X-ALD that grants holistic base to develop effective medicine against X-ALD.

  4. Dual pathways to endochondral osteoblasts: a novel chondrocyte-derived osteoprogenitor cell identified in hypertrophic cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung; Gebhardt, Matthias; Golovchenko, Svitlana; Perez-Branguli, Francesc; Hattori, Takako; Hartmann, Christine; Zhou, Xin; deCrombrugghe, Benoit; Stock, Michael; Schneider, Holm; von der Mark, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    According to the general understanding, the chondrocyte lineage terminates with the elimination of late hypertrophic cells by apoptosis in the growth plate. However, recent cell tracking studies have shown that murine hypertrophic chondrocytes can survive beyond “terminal” differentiation and give rise to a progeny of osteoblasts participating in endochondral bone formation. The question how chondrocytes convert into osteoblasts, however, remained open. Following the cell fate of hypertrophic chondrocytes by genetic lineage tracing using BACCol10;Cre induced YFP-reporter gene expression we show that a progeny of Col10Cre-reporter labelled osteoprogenitor cells and osteoblasts appears in the primary spongiosa and participates – depending on the developmental stage – substantially in trabecular, endosteal, and cortical bone formation. YFP+ trabecular and endosteal cells isolated by FACS expressed Col1a1, osteocalcin and runx2, thus confirming their osteogenic phenotype. In searching for transitory cells between hypertrophic chondrocytes and trabecular osteoblasts we identified by confocal microscopy a novel, small YFP+Osx+ cell type with mitotic activity in the lower hypertrophic zone at the chondro-osseous junction. When isolated from growth plates by fractional enzymatic digestion, these cells termed CDOP (chondrocyte-derived osteoprogenitor) cells expressed bone typical genes and differentiated into osteoblasts in vitro. We propose the Col10Cre-labeled CDOP cells mark the initiation point of a second pathway giving rise to endochondral osteoblasts, alternative to perichondrium derived osteoprogenitor cells. These findings add to current concepts of chondrocyte-osteocyte lineages and give new insight into the complex cartilage-bone transition process in the growth plate. PMID:25882555

  5. An integrative data mining approach to identifying adverse outcome pathway signatures.

    PubMed

    Oki, Noffisat O; Edwards, Stephen W

    2016-03-28

    The Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) framework is a tool for making biological connections and summarizing key information across different levels of biological organization to connect biological perturbations at the molecular level to adverse outcomes for an individual or population. Computational approaches to explore and determine these connections can accelerate the assembly of AOPs. By leveraging the wealth of publicly available data covering chemical effects on biological systems, computationally-predicted AOPs (cpAOPs) were assembled via data mining of high-throughput screening (HTS) in vitro data, in vivo data and other disease phenotype information. Frequent Itemset Mining (FIM) was used to find associations between the gene targets of ToxCast HTS assays and disease data from Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD) by using the chemicals as the common aggregators between datasets. The method was also used to map gene expression data to disease data from CTD. A cpAOP network was defined by considering genes and diseases as nodes and FIM associations as edges. This network contained 18,283 gene to disease associations for the ToxCast data and 110,253 for CTD gene expression. Two case studies show the value of the cpAOP network by extracting subnetworks focused either on fatty liver disease or the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AHR). The subnetwork surrounding fatty liver disease included many genes known to play a role in this disease. When querying the cpAOP network with the AHR gene, an interesting subnetwork including glaucoma was identified. While substantial literature exists to support the potential for AHR ligands to elicit glaucoma, it was not explicitly captured in the public annotation information in CTD. The subnetwork from this analysis suggests a cpAOP that includes changes in CYP1B1 expression, which has been previously established in the literature as a primary cause of glaucoma. These case studies highlight the value in integrating multiple data

  6. CSF Proteomics Identifies Specific and Shared Pathways for Multiple Sclerosis Clinical Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Avsar, Timucin; Durası, İlknur Melis; Uygunoğlu, Uğur; Tütüncü, Melih; Demirci, Nuri Onat; Saip, Sabahattin; Sezerman, O. Uğur; Siva, Aksel; Tahir Turanlı, Eda

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an immune-mediated, neuro-inflammatory, demyelinating and neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system (CNS) with a heterogeneous clinical presentation and course. There is a remarkable phenotypic heterogeneity in MS, and the molecular mechanisms underlying it remain unknown. We aimed to investigate further the etiopathogenesis related molecular pathways in subclinical types of MS using proteomic and bioinformatics approaches in cerebrospinal fluids of patients with clinically isolated syndrome, relapsing remitting MS and progressive MS (n=179). Comparison of disease groups with controls revealed a total of 151 proteins that are differentially expressed in clinically different MS subtypes. KEGG analysis using PANOGA tool revealed the disease related pathways including aldosterone-regulated sodium reabsorption (p=8.02x10-5) which is important in the immune cell migration, renin-angiotensin (p=6.88x10-5) system that induces Th17 dependent immunity, notch signaling (p=1.83x10-10) pathway indicating the activated remyelination and vitamin digestion and absorption pathways (p=1.73x10-5). An emerging theme from our studies is that whilst all MS clinical forms share common biological pathways, there are also clinical subtypes specific and pathophysiology related pathways which may have further therapeutic implications. PMID:25942430

  7. Combinatorial high-throughput experimental and bioinformatic approach identifies molecular pathways linked with the sensitivity to anticancer target drugs

    PubMed Central

    Venkova, Larisa; Aliper, Alexander; Suntsova, Maria; Kholodenko, Roman; Shepelin, Denis; Borisov, Nicolas; Malakhova, Galina; Vasilov, Raif; Roumiantsev, Sergey; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Buzdin, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Effective choice of anticancer drugs is important problem of modern medicine. We developed a method termed OncoFinder for the analysis of new type of biomarkers reflecting activation of intracellular signaling and metabolic molecular pathways. These biomarkers may be linked with the sensitivity to anticancer drugs. In this study, we compared the experimental data obtained in our laboratory and in the Genomics of Drug Sensitivity in Cancer (GDS) project for testing response to anticancer drugs and transcriptomes of various human cell lines. The microarray-based profiling of transcriptomes was performed for the cell lines before the addition of drugs to the medium, and experimental growth inhibition curves were built for each drug, featuring characteristic IC50 values. We assayed here four target drugs - Pazopanib, Sorafenib, Sunitinib and Temsirolimus, and 238 different cell lines, of which 11 were profiled in our laboratory and 227 - in GDS project. Using the OncoFinder-processed transcriptomic data on ∼600 molecular pathways, we identified pathways showing significant correlation between pathway activation strength (PAS) and IC50 values for these drugs. Correlations reflect relationships between response to drug and pathway activation features. We intersected the results and found molecular pathways significantly correlated in both our assay and GDS project. For most of these pathways, we generated molecular models of their interaction with known molecular target(s) of the respective drugs. For the first time, our study uncovered mechanisms underlying cancer cell response to drugs at the high-throughput molecular interactomic level. PMID:26317900

  8. Combinatorial high-throughput experimental and bioinformatic approach identifies molecular pathways linked with the sensitivity to anticancer target drugs.

    PubMed

    Venkova, Larisa; Aliper, Alexander; Suntsova, Maria; Kholodenko, Roman; Shepelin, Denis; Borisov, Nicolas; Malakhova, Galina; Vasilov, Raif; Roumiantsev, Sergey; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Buzdin, Anton

    2015-09-29

    Effective choice of anticancer drugs is important problem of modern medicine. We developed a method termed OncoFinder for the analysis of new type of biomarkers reflecting activation of intracellular signaling and metabolic molecular pathways. These biomarkers may be linked with the sensitivity to anticancer drugs. In this study, we compared the experimental data obtained in our laboratory and in the Genomics of Drug Sensitivity in Cancer (GDS) project for testing response to anticancer drugs and transcriptomes of various human cell lines. The microarray-based profiling of transcriptomes was performed for the cell lines before the addition of drugs to the medium, and experimental growth inhibition curves were built for each drug, featuring characteristic IC50 values. We assayed here four target drugs - Pazopanib, Sorafenib, Sunitinib and Temsirolimus, and 238 different cell lines, of which 11 were profiled in our laboratory and 227 - in GDS project. Using the OncoFinder-processed transcriptomic data on ~600 molecular pathways, we identified pathways showing significant correlation between pathway activation strength (PAS) and IC50 values for these drugs. Correlations reflect relationships between response to drug and pathway activation features. We intersected the results and found molecular pathways significantly correlated in both our assay and GDS project. For most of these pathways, we generated molecular models of their interaction with known molecular target(s) of the respective drugs. For the first time, our study uncovered mechanisms underlying cancer cell response to drugs at the high-throughput molecular interactomic level. PMID:26317900

  9. Gene Network Inference and Biochemical Assessment Delineates GPCR Pathways and CREB Targets in Small Intestinal Neuroendocrine Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Drozdov, Ignat; Svejda, Bernhard; Gustafsson, Bjorn I.; Mane, Shrikant; Pfragner, Roswitha; Kidd, Mark; Modlin, Irvin M.

    2011-01-01

    Small intestinal (SI) neuroendocrine tumors (NET) are increasing in incidence, however little is known about their biology. High throughput techniques such as inference of gene regulatory networks from microarray experiments can objectively define signaling machinery in this disease. Genome-wide co-expression analysis was used to infer gene relevance network in SI-NETs. The network was confirmed to be non-random, scale-free, and highly modular. Functional analysis of gene co-expression modules revealed processes including ‘Nervous system development’, ‘Immune response’, and ‘Cell-cycle’. Importantly, gene network topology and differential expression analysis identified over-expression of the GPCR signaling regulators, the cAMP synthetase, ADCY2, and the protein kinase A, PRKAR1A. Seven CREB response element (CRE) transcripts associated with proliferation and secretion: BEX1, BICD1, CHGB, CPE, GABRB3, SCG2 and SCG3 as well as ADCY2 and PRKAR1A were measured in an independent SI dataset (n = 10 NETs; n = 8 normal preparations). All were up-regulated (p<0.035) with the exception of SCG3 which was not differently expressed. Forskolin (a direct cAMP activator, 10−5 M) significantly stimulated transcription of pCREB and 3/7 CREB targets, isoproterenol (a selective ß-adrenergic receptor agonist and cAMP activator, 10−5 M) stimulated pCREB and 4/7 targets while BIM-53061 (a dopamine D2 and Serotonin [5-HT2] receptor agonist, 10−6 M) stimulated 100% of targets as well as pCREB; CRE transcription correlated with the levels of cAMP accumulation and PKA activity; BIM-53061 stimulated the highest levels of cAMP and PKA (2.8-fold and 2.5-fold vs. 1.8–2-fold for isoproterenol and forskolin). Gene network inference and graph topology analysis in SI NETs suggests that SI NETs express neural GPCRs that activate different CRE targets associated with proliferation and secretion. In vitro studies, in a model NET cell system, confirmed that transcriptional

  10. Gene network inference and biochemical assessment delineates GPCR pathways and CREB targets in small intestinal neuroendocrine neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Drozdov, Ignat; Svejda, Bernhard; Gustafsson, Bjorn I; Mane, Shrikant; Pfragner, Roswitha; Kidd, Mark; Modlin, Irvin M

    2011-01-01

    Small intestinal (SI) neuroendocrine tumors (NET) are increasing in incidence, however little is known about their biology. High throughput techniques such as inference of gene regulatory networks from microarray experiments can objectively define signaling machinery in this disease. Genome-wide co-expression analysis was used to infer gene relevance network in SI-NETs. The network was confirmed to be non-random, scale-free, and highly modular. Functional analysis of gene co-expression modules revealed processes including 'Nervous system development', 'Immune response', and 'Cell-cycle'. Importantly, gene network topology and differential expression analysis identified over-expression of the GPCR signaling regulators, the cAMP synthetase, ADCY2, and the protein kinase A, PRKAR1A. Seven CREB response element (CRE) transcripts associated with proliferation and secretion: BEX1, BICD1, CHGB, CPE, GABRB3, SCG2 and SCG3 as well as ADCY2 and PRKAR1A were measured in an independent SI dataset (n = 10 NETs; n = 8 normal preparations). All were up-regulated (p<0.035) with the exception of SCG3 which was not differently expressed. Forskolin (a direct cAMP activator, 10(-5) M) significantly stimulated transcription of pCREB and 3/7 CREB targets, isoproterenol (a selective ß-adrenergic receptor agonist and cAMP activator, 10(-5) M) stimulated pCREB and 4/7 targets while BIM-53061 (a dopamine D(2) and Serotonin [5-HT(2)] receptor agonist, 10(-6) M) stimulated 100% of targets as well as pCREB; CRE transcription correlated with the levels of cAMP accumulation and PKA activity; BIM-53061 stimulated the highest levels of cAMP and PKA (2.8-fold and 2.5-fold vs. 1.8-2-fold for isoproterenol and forskolin). Gene network inference and graph topology analysis in SI NETs suggests that SI NETs express neural GPCRs that activate different CRE targets associated with proliferation and secretion. In vitro studies, in a model NET cell system, confirmed that transcriptional effects are

  11. Gene network inference and biochemical assessment delineates GPCR pathways and CREB targets in small intestinal neuroendocrine neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Drozdov, Ignat; Svejda, Bernhard; Gustafsson, Bjorn I; Mane, Shrikant; Pfragner, Roswitha; Kidd, Mark; Modlin, Irvin M

    2011-01-01

    Small intestinal (SI) neuroendocrine tumors (NET) are increasing in incidence, however little is known about their biology. High throughput techniques such as inference of gene regulatory networks from microarray experiments can objectively define signaling machinery in this disease. Genome-wide co-expression analysis was used to infer gene relevance network in SI-NETs. The network was confirmed to be non-random, scale-free, and highly modular. Functional analysis of gene co-expression modules revealed processes including 'Nervous system development', 'Immune response', and 'Cell-cycle'. Importantly, gene network topology and differential expression analysis identified over-expression of the GPCR signaling regulators, the cAMP synthetase, ADCY2, and the protein kinase A, PRKAR1A. Seven CREB response element (CRE) transcripts associated with proliferation and secretion: BEX1, BICD1, CHGB, CPE, GABRB3, SCG2 and SCG3 as well as ADCY2 and PRKAR1A were measured in an independent SI dataset (n = 10 NETs; n = 8 normal preparations). All were up-regulated (p<0.035) with the exception of SCG3 which was not differently expressed. Forskolin (a direct cAMP activator, 10(-5) M) significantly stimulated transcription of pCREB and 3/7 CREB targets, isoproterenol (a selective ß-adrenergic receptor agonist and cAMP activator, 10(-5) M) stimulated pCREB and 4/7 targets while BIM-53061 (a dopamine D(2) and Serotonin [5-HT(2)] receptor agonist, 10(-6) M) stimulated 100% of targets as well as pCREB; CRE transcription correlated with the levels of cAMP accumulation and PKA activity; BIM-53061 stimulated the highest levels of cAMP and PKA (2.8-fold and 2.5-fold vs. 1.8-2-fold for isoproterenol and forskolin). Gene network inference and graph topology analysis in SI NETs suggests that SI NETs express neural GPCRs that activate different CRE targets associated with proliferation and secretion. In vitro studies, in a model NET cell system, confirmed that transcriptional effects are

  12. Identifying pathways and processes affecting nitrate and orthophosphate inputs to streams in agricultural watersheds.

    PubMed

    Tesoriero, Anthony J; Duff, John H; Wolock, David M; Spahr, Norman E; Almendinger, James E

    2009-01-01

    Understanding nutrient pathways to streams will improve nutrient management strategies and estimates of the time lag between when changes in land use practices occur and when water quality effects that result from these changes are observed. Nitrate and orthophosphate (OP) concentrations in several environmental compartments were examined in watersheds having a range of base flow index (BFI) values across the continental United States to determine the dominant pathways for water and nutrient inputs to streams. Estimates of the proportion of stream nitrate that was derived from groundwater increased as BFI increased. Nitrate concentration gradients between groundwater and surface water further supported the groundwater source of nitrate in these high BFI streams. However, nitrate concentrations in stream-bed pore water in all settings were typically lower than stream or upland groundwater concentrations, suggesting that nitrate discharge to streams was not uniform through the bed. Rather, preferential pathways (e.g., springs, seeps) may allow high nitrate groundwater to bypass sites of high biogeochemical transformation. Rapid pathway compartments (e.g., overland flow, tile drains) had OP concentrations that were typically higher than in streams and were important OP conveyers in most of these watersheds. In contrast to nitrate, the proportion of stream OP that is derived from ground water did not systematically increase as BFI increased. While typically not the dominant source of OP, groundwater discharge was an important pathway of OP transport to streams when BFI values were very high and when geochemical conditions favored OP mobility in groundwater.

  13. Integrated pathway-based approach identifies association between genomic regions at CTCF and CACNB2 and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Juraeva, Dilafruz; Haenisch, Britta; Zapatka, Marc; Frank, Josef; Witt, Stephanie H; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Treutlein, Jens; Strohmaier, Jana; Meier, Sandra; Degenhardt, Franziska; Giegling, Ina; Ripke, Stephan; Leber, Markus; Lange, Christoph; Schulze, Thomas G; Mössner, Rainald; Nenadic, Igor; Sauer, Heinrich; Rujescu, Dan; Maier, Wolfgang; Børglum, Anders; Ophoff, Roel; Cichon, Sven; Nöthen, Markus M; Rietschel, Marcella; Mattheisen, Manuel; Brors, Benedikt

    2014-06-01

    In the present study, an integrated hierarchical approach was applied to: (1) identify pathways associated with susceptibility to schizophrenia; (2) detect genes that may be potentially affected in these pathways since they contain an associated polymorphism; and (3) annotate the functional consequences of such single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the affected genes or their regulatory regions. The Global Test was applied to detect schizophrenia-associated pathways using discovery and replication datasets comprising 5,040 and 5,082 individuals of European ancestry, respectively. Information concerning functional gene-sets was retrieved from the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes, Gene Ontology, and the Molecular Signatures Database. Fourteen of the gene-sets or pathways identified in the discovery dataset were confirmed in the replication dataset. These include functional processes involved in transcriptional regulation and gene expression, synapse organization, cell adhesion, and apoptosis. For two genes, i.e. CTCF and CACNB2, evidence for association with schizophrenia was available (at the gene-level) in both the discovery study and published data from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium schizophrenia study. Furthermore, these genes mapped to four of the 14 presently identified pathways. Several of the SNPs assigned to CTCF and CACNB2 have potential functional consequences, and a gene in close proximity to CACNB2, i.e. ARL5B, was identified as a potential gene of interest. Application of the present hierarchical approach thus allowed: (1) identification of novel biological gene-sets or pathways with potential involvement in the etiology of schizophrenia, as well as replication of these findings in an independent cohort; (2) detection of genes of interest for future follow-up studies; and (3) the highlighting of novel genes in previously reported candidate regions for schizophrenia.

  14. Major carcinogenic pathways identified by gene expression analysis of peritoneal mesotheliomas following chemical treatment in F344 rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was performed to characterize the gene expression profile and to identify the major carcinogenic pathways involved in rat peritoneal mesothelioma (RPM) formation following treatment of Fischer 344 rats with o-nitrotoluene (o-NT) or bromochloracetic acid (BCA). Oligo a...

  15. Pesticide transport pathways from a sloped Litchi orchard to an adjacent tropical stream as identified by hydrograph separation.

    PubMed

    Duffner, Andreas; Ingwersen, Joachim; Hugenschmidt, Cindy; Streck, Thilo

    2012-01-01

    This study was performed to identify the transport pathways of pesticides from a sloped litchi ( Sonn.) orchard to a nearby stream based on a three-component hydrograph separation (baseflow, interflow, surface runoff). Dissolved silica and electrical conductivity were chosen as representative tracers. During the study period (30 d), 0.4 and 0.01% of the applied mass of atrazine and chlorpyrifos, respectively, were detected in the stream after 151 mm of rainfall. Baseflow (80-96%) was the dominant hydrological flow component, followed by interflow (3-18%) and surface runoff (1-7%). Despite its small contribution to total discharge, surface runoff was the dominant atrazine transport pathway during the first days after application because pesticide concentrations in the surface runoff flow component declined quickly within several days. Preferential transport with interflow became the dominant pathway of atrazine. Because chlorpyrifos was detected in the stream water only twice, it was not included in the hydrograph separation. A feature of the surface runoff pathway was the coincidence of pesticide and discharge peaks. In contrast, peak concentrations of pesticides transported by interflow occurred during the hydrograph recession phases. Stormflow generation and pesticide transport depended on antecedent rainfall. The combination of high-resolution pesticide concentration measurements with a three-component hydrograph separation has been shown to be a suitable method to identify pesticide transport pathways under tropical conditions. PMID:22751076

  16. Temporal retinal transcriptome and systems biology analysis identifies key pathways and hub genes in Staphylococcus aureus endophthalmitis

    PubMed Central

    Rajamani, Deepa; Singh, Pawan Kumar; Rottmann, Bruce G.; Singh, Natasha; Bhasin, Manoj K.; Kumar, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial endophthalmitis remains a devastating inflammatory condition associated with permanent vision loss. Hence, assessing the host response in this disease may provide new targets for intervention. Using a mouse model of Staphylococcus aureus (SA) endophthalmitis and performing retinal transcriptome analysis, we discovered progressive changes in the expression of 1,234 genes. Gene ontology (GO) and pathway analyses revealed the major pathways impacted in endophthalmitis includes: metabolism, inflammatory/immune, antimicrobial, cell trafficking, and lipid biosynthesis. Among the immune/inflammation pathways, JAK/Stat and IL-17A signaling were the most significantly affected. Interactive network-based analyses identified 13 focus hub genes (IL-6, IL-1β, CXCL2, STAT3, NUPR1, Jun, CSF1, CYR61, CEBPB, IGF-1, EGFR1, SPP1, and TGM2) within these important pathways. The expression of hub genes confirmed by qRT-PCR, ELISA (IL-6, IL-1β, and CXCL2), and Western blot or immunostaining (CEBP, STAT3, NUPR1, and IGF1) showed strong correlation with transcriptome data. Since TLR2 plays an important role in SA endophthalmitis, counter regulation analysis of TLR2 ligand pretreated retina or the use of retinas from TLR2 knockout mice showed the down-regulation of inflammatory regulatory genes. Collectively, our study provides, for the first time, a comprehensive analysis of the transcriptomic response and identifies key pathways regulating retinal innate responses in staphylococcal endophthalmitis. PMID:26865111

  17. Pubertal Effects on Adjustment in Girls: Moving from Demonstrating Effects to Identifying Pathways

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graber, Julia A.; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne; Warren, Michelle P.

    2006-01-01

    The present investigation examines mediated pathways from pubertal development to changes in depressive affect and aggression. Participants were 100 white girls who were between the ages of 10 and 14 (M=12.13, SD=0.80); girls were from well-educated, middle-to upper-middle class families, and attended private schools in a major northeastern urban…

  18. Distinct endocytic pathways identified in tobacco pollen tubes using charged nanogold.

    PubMed

    Moscatelli, Alessandra; Ciampolini, Fabrizio; Rodighiero, Simona; Onelli, Elisabetta; Cresti, Mauro; Santo, Nadia; Idilli, Aurora

    2007-11-01

    In an attempt to dissect endocytosis in Nicotiana tabacum L. pollen tubes, two different probes--positively or negatively charged nanogold--were employed. The destiny of internalized plasma membrane domains, carrying negatively or positively charged residues, was followed at the ultrastructural level and revealed distinct endocytic pathways. Time-course experiments and electron microscopy showed internalization of subapical plasma-membrane domains that were mainly recycled to the secretory pathway through the Golgi apparatus and a second mainly degradative pathway involving plasma membrane retrieval at the tip. In vivo time-lapse experiments using FM4-64 combined with quantitative analysis confirmed the existence of distinct internalization regions. Ikarugamycin, an inhibitor of clathrin-dependent endocytosis, allowed us to further dissect the endocytic process: electron microscopy and time-lapse studies suggested that clathrin-dependent endocytosis occurs in the tip and subapical regions, because recycling of positively charged nanogold to the Golgi bodies and the consignment of negatively charged nanogold to vacuoles were affected. However, intact positively charged-nanogold transport to vacuoles supports the idea that an endocytic pathway that does not require clathrin is also present in pollen tubes.

  19. Identifying pathways and processes affecting nitrate and orthophosphate inputs to streams in agricultural watersheds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tesoriero, A.J.; Duff, J.H.; Wolock, D.M.; Spahr, N.E.; Almendinger, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding nutrient pathways to streams will improve nutrient management strategies and estimates of the time lag between when changes in land use practices occur and when water quality effects that result from these changes are observed. Nitrate and orthophosphate (OP) concentrations in several environmental compartments were examined in watersheds having a range of base flow index (BFI) values across the continental United States to determine the dominant pathways for water and nutrient inputs to streams. Estimates of the proportion of stream nitrate that was derived from groundwater increased as BFI increased. Nitrate concentration gradients between groundwater and surface water further supported the groundwater source of nitrate in these high BFI streams. However, nitrate concentrations in stream-bed pore water in all settings were typically lower than stream or upland groundwater concentrations, suggesting that nitrate discharge to streams was not uniform through the bed. Rather, preferential pathways (e.g., springs, seeps) may allow high nitrate groundwater to bypass sites of high biogeochemical transformation. Rapid pathway compartments (e.g., overland flow, tile drains) had OP concentrations that were typically higher than in streams and were important OP conveyers in most of these watersheds. In contrast to nitrate, the proportion of stream OP that is derived from ground water did not systematically increase as BFI increased. While typically not the dominant source of OP, groundwater discharge was an important pathway of OP transport to streams when BFI values were very high and when geochemical conditions favored OP mobility in groundwater. Copyright ?? 2009 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  20. Structural and Biochemical Studies of the C-Terminal Domain of Mouse Peptide-N-glycanase Identify it as a Mannose-Binding Module

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou,X.; Zhao, G.; Truglio, J.; Wang, L.; Li, G.; Lennarz, W.; Schindelin, H.

    2006-01-01

    The inability of certain N-linked glycoproteins to adopt their native conformation in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) leads to their retrotranslocation into the cytosol and subsequent degradation by the proteasome. In this pathway the cytosolic peptide-N-glycanase (PNGase) cleaves the N-linked glycan chains off denatured glycoproteins. PNGase is highly conserved in eukaryotes and plays an important role in ER-associated protein degradation. In higher eukaryotes, PNGase has an N-terminal and a C-terminal extension in addition to its central catalytic domain, which is structurally and functionally related to transglutaminases. Although the N-terminal domain of PNGase is involved in protein-protein interactions, the function of the C-terminal domain has not previously been characterized. Here, we describe biophysical, biochemical, and crystallographic studies of the mouse PNGase C-terminal domain, including visualization of a complex between this domain and mannopentaose. These studies demonstrate that the C-terminal domain binds to the mannose moieties of N-linked oligosaccharide chains, and we further show that it enhances the activity of the mouse PNGase core domain, presumably by increasing the affinity of mouse PNGase for the glycan chains of misfolded glycoproteins.

  1. International genome-wide meta-analysis identifies new primary biliary cirrhosis risk loci and targetable pathogenic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Cordell, Heather J.; Han, Younghun; Mells, George F.; Li, Yafang; Hirschfield, Gideon M.; Greene, Casey S.; Xie, Gang; Juran, Brian D.; Zhu, Dakai; Qian, David C.; Floyd, James A. B.; Morley, Katherine I.; Prati, Daniele; Lleo, Ana; Cusi, Daniele; Schlicht, Erik M; Lammert, Craig; Atkinson, Elizabeth J; Chan, Landon L; de Andrade, Mariza; Balschun, Tobias; Mason, Andrew L; Myers, Robert P; Zhang, Jinyi; Milkiewicz, Piotr; Qu, Jia; Odin, Joseph A; Luketic, Velimir A; Bacon, Bruce R; Bodenheimer Jr, Henry C; Liakina, Valentina; Vincent, Catherine; Levy, Cynthia; Gregersen, Peter K; Almasio, Piero L; Alvaro, Domenico; Andreone, Pietro; Andriulli, Angelo; Barlassina, Cristina; Battezzati, Pier Maria; Benedetti, Antonio; Bernuzzi, Francesca; Bianchi, Ilaria; Bragazzi, Maria Consiglia; Brunetto, Maurizia; Bruno, Savino; Casella, Giovanni; Coco, Barbara; Colli, Agostino; Colombo, Massimo; Colombo, Silvia; Cursaro, Carmela; Crocè, Lory Saveria; Crosignani, Andrea; Donato, Maria Francesca; Elia, Gianfranco; Fabris, Luca; Ferrari, Carlo; Floreani, Annarosa; Foglieni, Barbara; Fontana, Rosanna; Galli, Andrea; Lazzari, Roberta; Macaluso, Fabio; Malinverno, Federica; Marra, Fabio; Marzioni, Marco; Mattalia, Alberto; Montanari, Renzo; Morini, Lorenzo; Morisco, Filomena; Hani S, Mousa; Muratori, Luigi; Muratori, Paolo; Niro, Grazia A; Palmieri, Vincenzo O; Picciotto, Antonio; Podda, Mauro; Portincasa, Piero; Ronca, Vincenzo; Rosina, Floriano; Rossi, Sonia; Sogno, Ilaria; Spinzi, Giancarlo; Spreafico, Marta; Strazzabosco, Mario; Tarallo, Sonia; Tarocchi, Mirko; Tiribelli, Claudio; Toniutto, Pierluigi; Vinci, Maria; Zuin, Massimo; Ch'ng, Chin Lye; Rahman, Mesbah; Yapp, Tom; Sturgess, Richard; Healey, Christopher; Czajkowski, Marek; Gunasekera, Anton; Gyawali, Pranab; Premchand, Purushothaman; Kapur, Kapil; Marley, Richard; Foster, Graham; Watson, Alan; Dias, Aruna; Subhani, Javaid; Harvey, Rory; McCorry, Roger; Ramanaden, David; Gasem, Jaber; Evans, Richard; Mathialahan, Thiriloganathan; Shorrock, Christopher; Lipscomb, George; Southern, Paul; Tibble, Jeremy; Gorard, David; Palegwala, Altaf; Jones, Susan; Carbone, Marco; Dawwas, Mohamed; Alexander, Graeme; Dolwani, Sunil; Prince, Martin; Foxton, Matthew; Elphick, David; Mitchison, Harriet; Gooding, Ian; Karmo, Mazn; Saksena, Sushma; Mendall, Mike; Patel, Minesh; Ede, Roland; Austin, Andrew; Sayer, Joanna; Hankey, Lorraine; Hovell, Christopher; Fisher, Neil; Carter, Martyn; Koss, Konrad; Piotrowicz, Andrzej; Grimley, Charles; Neal, David; Lim, Guan; Levi, Sass; Ala, Aftab; Broad, Andrea; Saeed, Athar; Wood, Gordon; Brown, Jonathan; Wilkinson, Mark; Gordon, Harriet; Ramage, John; Ridpath, Jo; Ngatchu, Theodore; Grover, Bob; Shaukat, Syed; Shidrawi, Ray; Abouda, George; Ali, Faiz; Rees, Ian; Salam, Imroz; Narain, Mark; Brown, Ashley; Taylor-Robinson, Simon; Williams, Simon; Grellier, Leonie; Banim, Paul; Das, Debashis; Chilton, Andrew; Heneghan, Michael; Curtis, Howard; Gess, Markus; Drake, Ian; Aldersley, Mark; Davies, Mervyn; Jones, Rebecca; McNair, Alastair; Srirajaskanthan, Raj; Pitcher, Maxton; Sen, Sambit; Bird, George; Barnardo, Adrian; Kitchen, Paul; Yoong, Kevin; Chirag, Oza; Sivaramakrishnan, Nurani; MacFaul, George; Jones, David; Shah, Amir; Evans, Chris; Saha, Subrata; Pollock, Katharine; Bramley, Peter; Mukhopadhya, Ashis; Fraser, Andrew; Mills, Peter; Shallcross, Christopher; Campbell, Stewart; Bathgate, Andrew; Shepherd, Alan; Dillon, John; Rushbrook, Simon; Przemioslo, Robert; Macdonald, Christopher; Metcalf, Jane; Shmueli, Udi; Davis, Andrew; Naqvi, Asifabbas; Lee, Tom; Ryder, Stephen D; Collier, Jane; Klass, Howard; Ninkovic, Mary; Cramp, Matthew; Sharer, Nicholas; Aspinall, Richard; Goggin, Patrick; Ghosh, Deb; Douds, Andrew; Hoeroldt, Barbara; Booth, Jonathan; Williams, Earl; Hussaini, Hyder; Stableforth, William; Ayres, Reuben; Thorburn, Douglas; Marshall, Eileen; Burroughs, Andrew; Mann, Steven; Lombard, Martin; Richardson, Paul; Patanwala, Imran; Maltby, Julia; Brookes, Matthew; Mathew, Ray; Vyas, Samir; Singhal, Saket; Gleeson, Dermot; Misra, Sharat; Butterworth, Jeff; George, Keith; Harding, Tim; Douglass, Andrew; Panter, Simon; Shearman, Jeremy; Bray, Gary; Butcher, Graham; Forton, Daniel; Mclindon, John; Cowan, Matthew; Whatley, Gregory; Mandal, Aditya; Gupta, Hemant; Sanghi, Pradeep; Jain, Sanjiv; Pereira, Steve; Prasad, Geeta; Watts, Gill; Wright, Mark; Neuberger, James; Gordon, Fiona; Unitt, Esther; Grant, Allister; Delahooke, Toby; Higham, Andrew; Brind, Alison; Cox, Mark; Ramakrishnan, Subramaniam; King, Alistair; Collins, Carole; Whalley, Simon; Li, Andy; Fraser, Jocelyn; Bell, Andrew; Wong, Voi Shim; Singhal, Amit; Gee, Ian; Ang, Yeng; Ransford, Rupert; Gotto, James; Millson, Charles; Bowles, Jane; Thomas, Caradog; Harrison, Melanie; Galaska, Roman; Kendall, Jennie; Whiteman, Jessica; Lawlor, Caroline; Gray, Catherine; Elliott, Keith; Mulvaney-Jones, Caroline; Hobson, Lucie; Van Duyvenvoorde, Greta; Loftus, Alison; Seward, Katie; Penn, Ruth; Maiden, Jane; Damant, Rose; Hails, Janeane; Cloudsdale, Rebecca; Silvestre, Valeria; Glenn, Sue; Dungca, Eleanor; Wheatley, Natalie; Doyle, Helen; Kent, Melanie; Hamilton, Caroline; Braim, Delyth; Wooldridge, Helen; Abrahams, Rachel; Paton, Alison; Lancaster, Nicola; Gibbins, Andrew; Hogben, Karen; Desousa, Phillipa; Muscariu, Florin; Musselwhite, Janine; McKay, Alexandra; Tan, LaiTing; Foale, Carole; Brighton, Jacqueline; Flahive, Kerry; Nambela, Estelle; Townshend, Paula; Ford, Chris; Holder, Sophie; Palmer, Caroline; Featherstone, James; Nasseri, Mariam; Sadeghian, Joy; Williams, Bronwen; Thomas, Carol; Rolls, Sally-Ann; Hynes, Abigail; Duggan, Claire; Jones, Sarah; Crossey, Mary; Stansfield, Glynis; MacNicol, Carolyn; Wilkins, Joy; Wilhelmsen, Elva; Raymode, Parizade; Lee, Hye-Jeong; Durant, Emma; Bishop, Rebecca; Ncube, Noma; Tripoli, Sherill; Casey, Rebecca; Cowley, Caroline; Miller, Richard; Houghton, Kathryn; Ducker, Samantha; Wright, Fiona; Bird, Bridget; Baxter, Gwen; Keggans, Janie; Hughes, Maggie; Grieve, Emma; Young, Karin; Williams, D; Ocker, Kate; Hines, Frances; Martin, Kirsty; Innes, Caron; Valliani, Talal; Fairlamb, Helen; Thornthwaite, Sarah; Eastick, Anne; Tanqueray, Elizabeth; Morrison, Jennifer; Holbrook, Becky; Browning, Julie; Walker, Kirsten; Congreave, Susan; Verheyden, Juliette; Slininger, Susan; Stafford, Lizzie; O'Donnell, Denise; Ainsworth, Mark; Lord, Susan; Kent, Linda; March, Linda; Dickson, Christine; Simpson, Diane; Longhurst, Beverley; Hayes, Maria; Shpuza, Ervin; White, Nikki; Besley, Sarah; Pearson, Sallyanne; Wright, Alice; Jones, Linda; Gunter, Emma; Dewhurst, Hannah; Fouracres, Anna; Farrington, Liz; Graves, Lyn; Marriott, Suzie; Leoni, Marina; Tyrer, David; Martin, Kate; Dali-kemmery, Lola; Lambourne, Victoria; Green, Marie; Sirdefield, Dawn; Amor, Kelly; Colley, Julie; Shinder, Bal; Jones, Jayne; Mills, Marisa; Carnahan, Mandy; Taylor, Natalie; Boulton, Kerenza; Tregonning, Julie; Brown, Carly; Clifford, Gayle; Archer, Emily; Hamilton, Maria; Curtis, Janette; Shewan, Tracey; Walsh, Sue; Warner, Karen; Netherton, Kimberley; Mupudzi, Mcdonald; Gunson, Bridget; Gitahi, Jane; Gocher, Denise; Batham, Sally; Pateman, Hilary; Desmennu, Senayon; Conder, Jill; Clement, Darren; Gallagher, Susan; Orpe, Jacky; Chan, PuiChing; Currie, Lynn; O'Donohoe, Lynn; Oblak, Metod; Morgan, Lisa; Quinn, Marie; Amey, Isobel; Baird, Yolanda; Cotterill, Donna; Cumlat, Lourdes; Winter, Louise; Greer, Sandra; Spurdle, Katie; Allison, Joanna; Dyer, Simon; Sweeting, Helen; Kordula, Jean; Gershwin, M. Eric; Anderson, Carl A.; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N.; Invernizzi, Pietro; Seldin, Michael F.; Sandford, Richard N.; Amos, Christopher I.; Siminovitch, Katherine A.

    2015-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a classical autoimmune liver disease for which effective immunomodulatory therapy is lacking. Here we perform meta-analyses of discovery data sets from genome-wide association studies of European subjects (n=2,764 cases and 10,475 controls) followed by validation genotyping in an independent cohort (n=3,716 cases and 4,261 controls). We discover and validate six previously unknown risk loci for PBC (Pcombined<5 × 10−8) and used pathway analysis to identify JAK-STAT/IL12/IL27 signalling and cytokine–cytokine pathways, for which relevant therapies exist. PMID:26394269

  2. International genome-wide meta-analysis identifies new primary biliary cirrhosis risk loci and targetable pathogenic pathways.

    PubMed

    Cordell, Heather J; Han, Younghun; Mells, George F; Li, Yafang; Hirschfield, Gideon M; Greene, Casey S; Xie, Gang; Juran, Brian D; Zhu, Dakai; Qian, David C; Floyd, James A B; Morley, Katherine I; Prati, Daniele; Lleo, Ana; Cusi, Daniele; Gershwin, M Eric; Anderson, Carl A; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N; Invernizzi, Pietro; Seldin, Michael F; Sandford, Richard N; Amos, Christopher I; Siminovitch, Katherine A

    2015-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a classical autoimmune liver disease for which effective immunomodulatory therapy is lacking. Here we perform meta-analyses of discovery data sets from genome-wide association studies of European subjects (n=2,764 cases and 10,475 controls) followed by validation genotyping in an independent cohort (n=3,716 cases and 4,261 controls). We discover and validate six previously unknown risk loci for PBC (Pcombined<5 × 10(-8)) and used pathway analysis to identify JAK-STAT/IL12/IL27 signalling and cytokine-cytokine pathways, for which relevant therapies exist. PMID:26394269

  3. International genome-wide meta-analysis identifies new primary biliary cirrhosis risk loci and targetable pathogenic pathways.

    PubMed

    Cordell, Heather J; Han, Younghun; Mells, George F; Li, Yafang; Hirschfield, Gideon M; Greene, Casey S; Xie, Gang; Juran, Brian D; Zhu, Dakai; Qian, David C; Floyd, James A B; Morley, Katherine I; Prati, Daniele; Lleo, Ana; Cusi, Daniele; Gershwin, M Eric; Anderson, Carl A; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N; Invernizzi, Pietro; Seldin, Michael F; Sandford, Richard N; Amos, Christopher I; Siminovitch, Katherine A

    2015-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a classical autoimmune liver disease for which effective immunomodulatory therapy is lacking. Here we perform meta-analyses of discovery data sets from genome-wide association studies of European subjects (n=2,764 cases and 10,475 controls) followed by validation genotyping in an independent cohort (n=3,716 cases and 4,261 controls). We discover and validate six previously unknown risk loci for PBC (Pcombined<5 × 10(-8)) and used pathway analysis to identify JAK-STAT/IL12/IL27 signalling and cytokine-cytokine pathways, for which relevant therapies exist.

  4. Structural and biochemical characterization of Chlamydia trachomatis hypothetical protein CT263 supports that menaquinone synthesis occurs through the futalosine pathway.

    PubMed

    Barta, Michael L; Thomas, Keisha; Yuan, Hongling; Lovell, Scott; Battaile, Kevin P; Schramm, Vern L; Hefty, P Scott

    2014-11-14

    The obligate intracellular human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis is the etiological agent of blinding trachoma and sexually transmitted disease. Genomic sequencing of Chlamydia indicated this medically important bacterium was not exclusively dependent on the host cell for energy. In order for the electron transport chain to function, electron shuttling between membrane-embedded complexes requires lipid-soluble quinones (e.g. menaquionone or ubiquinone). The sources or biosynthetic pathways required to obtain these electron carriers within C. trachomatis are poorly understood. The 1.58Å crystal structure of C. trachomatis hypothetical protein CT263 presented here supports a role in quinone biosynthesis. Although CT263 lacks sequence-based functional annotation, the crystal structure of CT263 displays striking structural similarity to 5'-methylthioadenosine nucleosidase (MTAN) enzymes. Although CT263 lacks the active site-associated dimer interface found in prototypical MTANs, co-crystal structures with product (adenine) or substrate (5'-methylthioadenosine) indicate that the canonical active site residues are conserved. Enzymatic characterization of CT263 indicates that the futalosine pathway intermediate 6-amino-6-deoxyfutalosine (kcat/Km = 1.8 × 10(3) M(-1) s(-1)), but not the prototypical MTAN substrates (e.g. S-adenosylhomocysteine and 5'-methylthioadenosine), is hydrolyzed. Bioinformatic analyses of the chlamydial proteome also support the futalosine pathway toward the synthesis of menaquinone in Chlamydiaceae. This report provides the first experimental support for quinone synthesis in Chlamydia. Menaquinone synthesis provides another target for agents to combat C. trachomatis infection. PMID:25253688

  5. Genomic analysis identifies new drivers and progression pathways in skin basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bonilla, Ximena; Parmentier, Laurent; King, Bryan; Bezrukov, Fedor; Kaya, Gürkan; Zoete, Vincent; Seplyarskiy, Vladimir B; Sharpe, Hayley J; McKee, Thomas; Letourneau, Audrey; Ribaux, Pascale G; Popadin, Konstantin; Basset-Seguin, Nicole; Ben Chaabene, Rouaa; Santoni, Federico A; Andrianova, Maria A; Guipponi, Michel; Garieri, Marco; Verdan, Carole; Grosdemange, Kerstin; Sumara, Olga; Eilers, Martin; Aifantis, Iannis; Michielin, Olivier; de Sauvage, Frederic J; Antonarakis, Stylianos E; Nikolaev, Sergey I

    2016-04-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) of the skin is the most common malignant neoplasm in humans. BCC is primarily driven by the Sonic Hedgehog (Hh) pathway. However, its phenotypic variation remains unexplained. Our genetic profiling of 293 BCCs found the highest mutation rate in cancer (65 mutations/Mb). Eighty-five percent of the BCCs harbored mutations in Hh pathway genes (PTCH1, 73% or SMO, 20% (P = 6.6 × 10(-8)) and SUFU, 8%) and in TP53 (61%). However, 85% of the BCCs also harbored additional driver mutations in other cancer-related genes. We observed recurrent mutations in MYCN (30%), PPP6C (15%), STK19 (10%), LATS1 (8%), ERBB2 (4%), PIK3CA (2%), and NRAS, KRAS or HRAS (2%), and loss-of-function and deleterious missense mutations were present in PTPN14 (23%), RB1 (8%) and FBXW7 (5%). Consistent with the mutational profiles, N-Myc and Hippo-YAP pathway target genes were upregulated. Functional analysis of the mutations in MYCN, PTPN14 and LATS1 suggested their potential relevance in BCC tumorigenesis. PMID:26950094

  6. Genome-wide association study identifies TH1 pathway genes associated with lung function in asthmatic patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xingnan; Hawkins, Gregory A.; Ampleford, Elizabeth J.; Moore, Wendy C.; Li, Huashi; Hastie, Annette T.; Howard, Timothy D.; Boushey, Homer A.; Busse, William W.; Calhoun, William J.; Castro, Mario; Erzurum, Serpil C.; Israel, Elliot; Lemanske, Robert F.; Szefler, Stanley J.; Wasserman, Stephen I.; Wenzel, Sally E.; Peters, Stephen P.; Meyers, Deborah A.; Bleecker, Eugene R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies in general populations of European descent have identified 28 loci for lung function. Objective We sought to identify novel lung function loci specifically for asthma and to confirm lung function loci identified in general populations. Methods Genome-wide association studies of lung function (percent predicted FEV1 [ppFEV1], percent predicted forced vital capacity, and FEV1/forced vital capacity ratio) were performed in 4 white populations of European descent (n = 1544), followed by meta-analyses. Results Seven of 28 previously identified lung function loci (HHIP, FAM13A, THSD4, GSTCD, NOTCH4-AGER, RARB, and ZNF323) identified in general populations were confirmed at single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) levels (P < .05). Four of 32 loci (IL12A, IL12RB1, STAT4, and IRF2) associated with ppFEV1 (P < 10−4) belong to the TH1 or IL-12 cytokine family pathway. By using a linear additive model, these 4 TH1 pathway SNPs cumulatively explained 2.9% to 7.8% of the variance in ppFEV1 values in 4 populations (P = 3 × 10−11). Genetic scores of these 4 SNPs were associated with ppFEV1 values (P = 2 × 10−7) and the American Thoracic Society severe asthma classification (P = .005) in the Severe Asthma Research Program population. TH2 pathway genes (IL13, TSLP, IL33, and IL1RL1) conferring asthma susceptibility were not associated with lung function. Conclusion Genes involved in airway structure/remodeling are associated with lung function in both general populations and asthmatic subjects. TH1 pathway genes involved in anti-virus/bacterial infection and inflammation modify lung function in asthmatic subjects. Genes associated with lung function that might affect asthma severity are distinct from those genes associated with asthma susceptibility. PMID:23541324

  7. Solid-Phase Enrichment and Analysis of Azide-Labeled Natural Products: Fishing Downstream of Biochemical Pathways.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Alexander J; Wesche, Frank; Adihou, Hélène; Bode, Helge B

    2016-01-11

    Many methods have been devised over the decades to trace precursors of specific molecules in cellular environments as, for example, in biosynthesis studies. The advent of click chemistry has facilitated the powerful combination of tracing and at the same time sieving the highly complex metabolome for compounds derived from simple or complex starting materials, especially when the click reaction takes place on a solid support. While the principle of solid-phase click reactions has already been successfully applied for selective protein and peptide enrichment, the successful enrichment of much smaller primary and secondary metabolites, showing great structural diversity and undergoing many different biosynthetic steps, has seen only little development. For bacterial secondary metabolism, a far broader tolerance for "clickable" precursors was observed than in ribosomal proteinogenesis, thus making this method a surprisingly valuable tool for the tracking and discovery of compounds within the cellular biochemical network. The implementation of this method has led to the identification of several new compounds from the bacterial genera Photorhabdus and Xenorhabdus, clearly proving its power.

  8. Non-host disease resistance response in pea (Pisum sativum) pods: Biochemical function of DRR206 and phytoalexin pathway localization.

    PubMed

    Seneviratne, Herana Kamal; Dalisay, Doralyn S; Kim, Kye-Won; Moinuddin, Syed G A; Yang, Hong; Hartshorn, Christopher M; Davin, Laurence B; Lewis, Norman G

    2015-05-01

    Continually exposed to potential pathogens, vascular plants have evolved intricate defense mechanisms to recognize encroaching threats and defend themselves. They do so by inducing a set of defense responses that can help defeat and/or limit effects of invading pathogens, of which the non-host disease resistance response is the most common. In this regard, pea (Pisum sativum) pod tissue, when exposed to Fusarium solani f. sp. phaseoli spores, undergoes an inducible transcriptional activation of pathogenesis-related genes, and also produces (+)-pisatin, its major phytoalexin. One of the inducible pathogenesis-related genes is Disease Resistance Response-206 (DRR206), whose role in vivo was unknown. DRR206 is, however, related to the dirigent protein (DP) family. In this study, its biochemical function was investigated in planta, with the metabolite associated with its gene induction being pinoresinol monoglucoside. Interestingly, both pinoresinol monoglucoside and (+)-pisatin were co-localized in pea pod endocarp epidermal cells, as demonstrated using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry imaging. In addition, endocarp epidermal cells are also the site for both chalcone synthase and DRR206 gene expression. Taken together, these data indicate that both (+)-pisatin and pinoresinol monoglucoside function in the overall phytoalexin responses.

  9. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of Chlamydia trachomatis Hypothetical Protein CT263 Supports That Menaquinone Synthesis Occurs through the Futalosine Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Barta, Michael L.; Thomas, Keisha; Yuan, Hongling; Lovell, Scott; Battaile, Kevin P.; Schramm, Vern L.; Hefty, P. Scott

    2014-01-01

    The obligate intracellular human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis is the etiological agent of blinding trachoma and sexually transmitted disease. Genomic sequencing of Chlamydia indicated this medically important bacterium was not exclusively dependent on the host cell for energy. In order for the electron transport chain to function, electron shuttling between membrane-embedded complexes requires lipid-soluble quinones (e.g. menaquionone or ubiquinone). The sources or biosynthetic pathways required to obtain these electron carriers within C. trachomatis are poorly understood. The 1.58Å crystal structure of C. trachomatis hypothetical protein CT263 presented here supports a role in quinone biosynthesis. Although CT263 lacks sequence-based functional annotation, the crystal structure of CT263 displays striking structural similarity to 5′-methylthioadenosine nucleosidase (MTAN) enzymes. Although CT263 lacks the active site-associated dimer interface found in prototypical MTANs, co-crystal structures with product (adenine) or substrate (5′-methylthioadenosine) indicate that the canonical active site residues are conserved. Enzymatic characterization of CT263 indicates that the futalosine pathway intermediate 6-amino-6-deoxyfutalosine (kcat/Km = 1.8 × 103 m−1 s−1), but not the prototypical MTAN substrates (e.g. S-adenosylhomocysteine and 5′-methylthioadenosine), is hydrolyzed. Bioinformatic analyses of the chlamydial proteome also support the futalosine pathway toward the synthesis of menaquinone in Chlamydiaceae. This report provides the first experimental support for quinone synthesis in Chlamydia. Menaquinone synthesis provides another target for agents to combat C. trachomatis infection. PMID:25253688

  10. Transcriptome profiling identifies genes and pathways deregulated upon floxuridine treatment in colorectal cancer cells harboring GOF mutant p53.

    PubMed

    Datta, Arindam; Dey, Sanjib; Das, Pijush; Alam, Sk Kayum; Roychoudhury, Susanta

    2016-06-01

    Mutation in TP53 is a common genetic alteration in human cancers. Certain tumor associated p53 missense mutants acquire gain-of-function (GOF) properties and confer oncogenic phenotypes including enhanced chemoresistance. The colorectal cancers (CRC) harboring mutant p53 are generally aggressive in nature and difficult to treat. To identify a potential gene expression signature of GOF mutant p53-driven acquired chemoresistance in CRC, we performed transcriptome profiling of floxuridine (FUdR) treated SW480 cells expressing mutant p53(R273H) (GEO#: GSE77533). We obtained several genes differentially regulated between FUdR treated and untreated cells. Further, functional characterization and pathway analysis revealed significant enrichment of crucial biological processes and pathways upon FUdR treatment in SW480 cells. Our data suggest that in response to chemotherapeutics treatment, cancer cells with GOF mutant p53 can modulate key cellular pathways to withstand the cytotoxic effect of the drugs. The genes and pathways identified in the present study can be further validated and targeted for better chemotherapy response in colorectal cancer patients harboring mutant p53. PMID:27114909

  11. Transcriptome profiling identifies genes and pathways deregulated upon floxuridine treatment in colorectal cancer cells harboring GOF mutant p53.

    PubMed

    Datta, Arindam; Dey, Sanjib; Das, Pijush; Alam, Sk Kayum; Roychoudhury, Susanta

    2016-06-01

    Mutation in TP53 is a common genetic alteration in human cancers. Certain tumor associated p53 missense mutants acquire gain-of-function (GOF) properties and confer oncogenic phenotypes including enhanced chemoresistance. The colorectal cancers (CRC) harboring mutant p53 are generally aggressive in nature and difficult to treat. To identify a potential gene expression signature of GOF mutant p53-driven acquired chemoresistance in CRC, we performed transcriptome profiling of floxuridine (FUdR) treated SW480 cells expressing mutant p53(R273H) (GEO#: GSE77533). We obtained several genes differentially regulated between FUdR treated and untreated cells. Further, functional characterization and pathway analysis revealed significant enrichment of crucial biological processes and pathways upon FUdR treatment in SW480 cells. Our data suggest that in response to chemotherapeutics treatment, cancer cells with GOF mutant p53 can modulate key cellular pathways to withstand the cytotoxic effect of the drugs. The genes and pathways identified in the present study can be further validated and targeted for better chemotherapy response in colorectal cancer patients harboring mutant p53.

  12. Multi-SNP Analysis of GWAS Data Identifies Pathways Associated with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qing-Rong; Braun, Rosemary; Hu, Ying; Yan, Chunhua; Brunt, Elizabeth M.; Meerzaman, Daoud

    2013-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common liver disease; the histological spectrum of which ranges from steatosis to steatohepatitis. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) often leads to cirrhosis and development of hepatocellular carcinoma. To better understand pathogenesis of NAFLD, we performed the pathway of distinction analysis (PoDA) on a genome-wide association study dataset of 250 non-Hispanic white female adult patients with NAFLD, who were enrolled in the NASH Clinical Research Network (CRN) Database Study, to investigate whether biologic process variation measured through genomic variation of genes within these pathways was related to the development of steatohepatitis or cirrhosis. Pathways such as Recycling of eIF2:GDP, biosynthesis of steroids, Terpenoid biosynthesis and Cholesterol biosynthesis were found to be significantly associated with NASH. SNP variants in Terpenoid synthesis, Cholesterol biosynthesis and biosynthesis of steroids were associated with lobular inflammation and cytologic ballooning while those in Terpenoid synthesis were also associated with fibrosis and cirrhosis. These were also related to the NAFLD activity score (NAS) which is derived from the histological severity of steatosis, inflammation and ballooning degeneration. Eukaryotic protein translation and recycling of eIF2:GDP related SNP variants were associated with ballooning, steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. Il2 signaling events mediated by PI3K, Mitotic metaphase/anaphase transition, and Prostanoid ligand receptors were also significantly associated with cirrhosis. Taken together, the results provide evidence for additional ways, beyond the effects of single SNPs, by which genetic factors might contribute to the susceptibility to develop a particular phenotype of NAFLD and then progress to cirrhosis. Further studies are warranted to explain potential important genetic roles of these biological processes in NAFLD. PMID:23894275

  13. Identification of Biochemical Pathways Associated with Lead Tolerance and Detoxification in Chrysopogon zizanioides L. Nash (Vetiver) by Metabolic Profiling.

    PubMed

    Pidatala, Venkataramana R; Li, Kefeng; Sarkar, Dibyendu; Ramakrishna, Wusirika; Datta, Rupali

    2016-03-01

    Lead (Pb) is a major urban pollutant, due to deteriorating lead-based paint in houses built before 1978. Phytoremediation is an inexpensive and effective technique for remediation of Pb-contaminated homes. Vetiver (Chrysopogon zizanioides), a noninvasive, fast-growing grass with high biomass, can tolerate and accumulate large quantities of Pb in its tissues. Lead is known to induce phytochelatins and antioxidative enzymes in vetiver; however, the overall impact of Pb stress on metabolic pathways of vetiver is unknown. In the current study, vetiver plants were treated with different concentrations of Pb in a hydroponic setup. Metabolites were extracted and analyzed using LC/MS/MS. Multivariate analysis of metabolites in both root and shoot tissue showed tremendous induction in key metabolic pathways including sugar metabolism, amino acid metabolism, and an increase in production of osmoprotectants, such as betaine and polyols, and metal-chelating organic acids. The data obtained provide a comprehensive insight into the overall stress response mechanisms in vetiver. PMID:26843403

  14. Identification of Biochemical Pathways Associated with Lead Tolerance and Detoxification in Chrysopogon zizanioides L. Nash (Vetiver) by Metabolic Profiling.

    PubMed

    Pidatala, Venkataramana R; Li, Kefeng; Sarkar, Dibyendu; Ramakrishna, Wusirika; Datta, Rupali

    2016-03-01

    Lead (Pb) is a major urban pollutant, due to deteriorating lead-based paint in houses built before 1978. Phytoremediation is an inexpensive and effective technique for remediation of Pb-contaminated homes. Vetiver (Chrysopogon zizanioides), a noninvasive, fast-growing grass with high biomass, can tolerate and accumulate large quantities of Pb in its tissues. Lead is known to induce phytochelatins and antioxidative enzymes in vetiver; however, the overall impact of Pb stress on metabolic pathways of vetiver is unknown. In the current study, vetiver plants were treated with different concentrations of Pb in a hydroponic setup. Metabolites were extracted and analyzed using LC/MS/MS. Multivariate analysis of metabolites in both root and shoot tissue showed tremendous induction in key metabolic pathways including sugar metabolism, amino acid metabolism, and an increase in production of osmoprotectants, such as betaine and polyols, and metal-chelating organic acids. The data obtained provide a comprehensive insight into the overall stress response mechanisms in vetiver.

  15. Computational biophysical, biochemical, and evolutionary signature of human R-spondin family proteins, the member of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ashish Ranjan; Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Lee, Sang-Soo; Sharma, Garima; Yoon, Jeong Kyo; George Priya Doss, C; Song, Dong-Keun; Nam, Ju-Suk

    2014-01-01

    In human, Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway plays a significant role in cell growth, cell development, and disease pathogenesis. Four human (Rspo)s are known to activate canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Presently, (Rspo)s serve as therapeutic target for several human diseases. Henceforth, basic understanding about the molecular properties of (Rspo)s is essential. We approached this issue by interpreting the biochemical and biophysical properties along with molecular evolution of (Rspo)s thorough computational algorithm methods. Our analysis shows that signal peptide length is roughly similar in (Rspo)s family along with similarity in aa distribution pattern. In Rspo3, four N-glycosylation sites were noted. All members are hydrophilic in nature and showed alike GRAVY values, approximately. Conversely, Rspo3 contains the maximum positively charged residues while Rspo4 includes the lowest. Four highly aligned blocks were recorded through Gblocks. Phylogenetic analysis shows Rspo4 is being rooted with Rspo2 and similarly Rspo3 and Rspo1 have the common point of origin. Through phylogenomics study, we developed a phylogenetic tree of sixty proteins (n = 60) with the orthologs and paralogs seed sequences. Protein-protein network was also illustrated. Results demonstrated in our study may help the future researchers to unfold significant physiological and therapeutic properties of (Rspo)s in various disease models.

  16. Kinetic properties of a MNB/DYRK1A mutant suitable for the elucidation of biochemical pathways.

    PubMed

    Adayev, Tatyana; Chen-Hwang, Mo-Chou; Murakami, Noriko; Wegiel, Jerzy; Hwang, Yu-Wen

    2006-10-01

    Minibrain kinase/dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation regulated kinase 1A (MNB/DYRK1A) is a proline/arginine-directed serine/threonine kinase implicated in the learning deficits of Down syndrome. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the major tea polyphenolic compound, is a potent MNB/DYRK1A inhibitor. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of EGCG inhibition of MNB/DYRK1A using a combination of genetic and biochemical approaches. In the testing system using MNB/DYRK1A-promoted Gli 1-dependent transcription as the readout, NIH3T3 cells expressing EGCG resistant MNB/DYRK1A mutant R21 were found to acquire EGCG resistance for a wide range of drug concentrations. Mutant R21 harbors a single K465R substitution, which produces a 3-fold gain in the EGCG resistance in vitro. However, the gain in the EGCG resistance alone cannot fully interpret the effectiveness of mutant R21 in suppressing EGCG in cultured cells. Kinetic analysis suggests that EGCG functions as a noncompetitive inhibitor against ATP. Interestingly, the K465R mutation changes the mode of EGCG inhibition on MNB/DYRK1A so that it becomes a competitive inhibitor against ATP. This competitive mode of EGCG inhibition coupled with high intracellular ATP concentrations and an elevated EGCG resistance are likely to be the basis for the resistant property of mutant R21 in cultured cells. The K465R mutation apparently transforms the intramolecular interactions required for MNB/DYRK1A catalysis. This mutant would also be valuable for the elucidation of the mechanisms of MNB/DYRK1A-catalyzed reaction. PMID:17002300

  17. Probing the coagulation pathway with aptamers identifies combinations that synergistically inhibit blood clot formation.

    PubMed

    Bompiani, Kristin M; Lohrmann, Jens L; Pitoc, George A; Frederiksen, James W; Mackensen, George B; Sullenger, Bruce A

    2014-08-14

    Coordinated enzymatic reactions regulate blood clot generation. To explore the contributions of various coagulation enzymes in this process, we utilized a panel of aptamers against factors VIIa, IXa, Xa, and prothrombin. Each aptamer dose-dependently inhibited clot formation, yet none was able to completely impede this process in highly procoagulant settings. However, several combinations of two aptamers synergistically impaired clot formation. One extremely potent aptamer combination was able to maintain human blood fluidity even during extracorporeal circulation, a highly procoagulant setting encountered during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. Moreover, this aptamer cocktail could be rapidly reversed with antidotes to restore normal hemostasis, indicating that even highly potent aptamer combinations can be rapidly controlled. These studies highlight the potential utility of using sets of aptamers to probe the functions of proteins in molecular pathways for research and therapeutic ends.

  18. High-Throughput Screen in Cryptococcus neoformans Identifies a Novel Molecular Scaffold That Inhibits Cell Wall Integrity Pathway Signaling

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is one of the most important human fungal pathogens; however, no new therapies have been developed in over 50 years. Fungicidal activity is crucially important for an effective anticryptococal agent and, therefore, we screened 361,675 molecules against C. neoformans using an adenylate kinase release assay that specifically detects fungicidal activity. A set of secondary assays narrowed the set of hits to molecules that interfere with fungal cell wall integrity and identified three benzothioureas with low in vitro mammalian toxicity and good in vitro anticryptococcal (minimum inhibitory concentration = 4 μg/mL). This scaffold inhibits signaling through the cell wall integrity MAP kinase cascade. Structure–activity studies indicate that the thiocarbonyl moiety is crucial for activity. Genetic and biochemical data suggest that benzothioureas inhibit signaling upstream of the kinase cascade. Thus, the benzothioureas appear to be a promising new scaffold for further exploration in the search for new anticryptococcal agents. PMID:26807437

  19. A genomewide overexpression screen identifies genes involved in the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway in the human protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Koushik, Amrita B; Welter, Brenda H; Rock, Michelle L; Temesvari, Lesly A

    2014-03-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a protozoan parasite that causes amoebic dysentery and liver abscess. E. histolytica relies on motility, phagocytosis, host cell adhesion, and proteolysis of extracellular matrix for virulence. In eukaryotic cells, these processes are mediated in part by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling. Thus, PI3K may be critical for virulence. We utilized a functional genomics approach to identify genes whose products may operate in the PI3K pathway in E. histolytica. We treated a population of trophozoites that were overexpressing genes from a cDNA library with a near-lethal dose of the PI3K inhibitor wortmannin. This screen was based on the rationale that survivors would be overexpressing gene products that directly or indirectly function in the PI3K pathway. We sequenced the overexpressed genes in survivors and identified a cDNA encoding a Rap GTPase, a protein previously shown to participate in the PI3K pathway. This supports the validity of our approach. Genes encoding a coactosin-like protein, EhCoactosin, and a serine-rich E. histolytica protein (SREHP) were also identified. Cells overexpressing EhCoactosin or SREHP were also less sensitive to a second PI3K inhibitor, LY294002. This corroborates the link between these proteins and PI3K. Finally, a mutant cell line with an increased level of phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphosphate, the product of PI3K activity, exhibited increased expression of SREHP and EhCoactosin. This further supports the functional connection between these proteins and PI3K in E. histolytica. To our knowledge, this is the first forward-genetics screen adapted to reveal genes participating in a signal transduction pathway in this pathogen.

  20. Whole-exome sequencing in obsessive-compulsive disorder identifies rare mutations in immunological and neurodevelopmental pathways

    PubMed Central

    Cappi, C; Brentani, H; Lima, L; Sanders, S J; Zai, G; Diniz, B J; Reis, V N S; Hounie, A G; Conceição do Rosário, M; Mariani, D; Requena, G L; Puga, R; Souza-Duran, F L; Shavitt, R G; Pauls, D L; Miguel, E C; Fernandez, T V

    2016-01-01

    Studies of rare genetic variation have identified molecular pathways conferring risk for developmental neuropsychiatric disorders. To date, no published whole-exome sequencing studies have been reported in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). We sequenced all the genome coding regions in 20 sporadic OCD cases and their unaffected parents to identify rare de novo (DN) single-nucleotide variants (SNVs). The primary aim of this pilot study was to determine whether DN variation contributes to OCD risk. To this aim, we evaluated whether there is an elevated rate of DN mutations in OCD, which would justify this approach toward gene discovery in larger studies of the disorder. Furthermore, to explore functional molecular correlations among genes with nonsynonymous DN SNVs in OCD probands, a protein–protein interaction (PPI) network was generated based on databases of direct molecular interactions. We applied Degree-Aware Disease Gene Prioritization (DADA) to rank the PPI network genes based on their relatedness to a set of OCD candidate genes from two OCD genome-wide association studies (Stewart et al., 2013; Mattheisen et al., 2014). In addition, we performed a pathway analysis with genes from the PPI network. The rate of DN SNVs in OCD was 2.51 × 10−8 per base per generation, significantly higher than a previous estimated rate in unaffected subjects using the same sequencing platform and analytic pipeline. Several genes harboring DN SNVs in OCD were highly interconnected in the PPI network and ranked high in the DADA analysis. Nearly all the DN SNVs in this study are in genes expressed in the human brain, and a pathway analysis revealed enrichment in immunological and central nervous system functioning and development. The results of this pilot study indicate that further investigation of DN variation in larger OCD cohorts is warranted to identify specific risk genes and to confirm our preliminary finding with regard to PPI network enrichment for particular

  1. Whole-exome sequencing in obsessive-compulsive disorder identifies rare mutations in immunological and neurodevelopmental pathways.

    PubMed

    Cappi, C; Brentani, H; Lima, L; Sanders, S J; Zai, G; Diniz, B J; Reis, V N S; Hounie, A G; Conceição do Rosário, M; Mariani, D; Requena, G L; Puga, R; Souza-Duran, F L; Shavitt, R G; Pauls, D L; Miguel, E C; Fernandez, T V

    2016-01-01

    Studies of rare genetic variation have identified molecular pathways conferring risk for developmental neuropsychiatric disorders. To date, no published whole-exome sequencing studies have been reported in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). We sequenced all the genome coding regions in 20 sporadic OCD cases and their unaffected parents to identify rare de novo (DN) single-nucleotide variants (SNVs). The primary aim of this pilot study was to determine whether DN variation contributes to OCD risk. To this aim, we evaluated whether there is an elevated rate of DN mutations in OCD, which would justify this approach toward gene discovery in larger studies of the disorder. Furthermore, to explore functional molecular correlations among genes with nonsynonymous DN SNVs in OCD probands, a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was generated based on databases of direct molecular interactions. We applied Degree-Aware Disease Gene Prioritization (DADA) to rank the PPI network genes based on their relatedness to a set of OCD candidate genes from two OCD genome-wide association studies (Stewart et al., 2013; Mattheisen et al., 2014). In addition, we performed a pathway analysis with genes from the PPI network. The rate of DN SNVs in OCD was 2.51 × 10(-8) per base per generation, significantly higher than a previous estimated rate in unaffected subjects using the same sequencing platform and analytic pipeline. Several genes harboring DN SNVs in OCD were highly interconnected in the PPI network and ranked high in the DADA analysis. Nearly all the DN SNVs in this study are in genes expressed in the human brain, and a pathway analysis revealed enrichment in immunological and central nervous system functioning and development. The results of this pilot study indicate that further investigation of DN variation in larger OCD cohorts is warranted to identify specific risk genes and to confirm our preliminary finding with regard to PPI network enrichment for particular

  2. Deep sequencing and in silico analyses identify MYB-regulated gene networks and signaling pathways in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Azim, Shafquat; Zubair, Haseeb; Srivastava, Sanjeev K.; Bhardwaj, Arun; Zubair, Asif; Ahmad, Aamir; Singh, Seema; Khushman, Moh’d.; Singh, Ajay P.

    2016-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that the transcription factor MYB can modulate several cancer-associated phenotypes in pancreatic cancer. In order to understand the molecular basis of these MYB-associated changes, we conducted deep-sequencing of transcriptome of MYB-overexpressing and -silenced pancreatic cancer cells, followed by in silico pathway analysis. We identified significant modulation of 774 genes upon MYB-silencing (p < 0.05) that were assigned to 25 gene networks by in silico analysis. Further analyses placed genes in our RNA sequencing-generated dataset to several canonical signalling pathways, such as cell-cycle control, DNA-damage and -repair responses, p53 and HIF1α. Importantly, we observed downregulation of the pancreatic adenocarcinoma signaling pathway in MYB-silenced pancreatic cancer cells exhibiting suppression of EGFR and NF-κB. Decreased expression of EGFR and RELA was validated by both qPCR and immunoblotting and they were both shown to be under direct transcriptional control of MYB. These observations were further confirmed in a converse approach wherein MYB was overexpressed ectopically in a MYB-null pancreatic cancer cell line. Our findings thus suggest that MYB potentially regulates growth and genomic stability of pancreatic cancer cells via targeting complex gene networks and signaling pathways. Further in-depth functional studies are warranted to fully understand MYB signaling in pancreatic cancer. PMID:27354262

  3. Deep sequencing and in silico analyses identify MYB-regulated gene networks and signaling pathways in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Azim, Shafquat; Zubair, Haseeb; Srivastava, Sanjeev K; Bhardwaj, Arun; Zubair, Asif; Ahmad, Aamir; Singh, Seema; Khushman, Moh'd; Singh, Ajay P

    2016-06-29

    We have recently demonstrated that the transcription factor MYB can modulate several cancer-associated phenotypes in pancreatic cancer. In order to understand the molecular basis of these MYB-associated changes, we conducted deep-sequencing of transcriptome of MYB-overexpressing and -silenced pancreatic cancer cells, followed by in silico pathway analysis. We identified significant modulation of 774 genes upon MYB-silencing (p < 0.05) that were assigned to 25 gene networks by in silico analysis. Further analyses placed genes in our RNA sequencing-generated dataset to several canonical signalling pathways, such as cell-cycle control, DNA-damage and -repair responses, p53 and HIF1α. Importantly, we observed downregulation of the pancreatic adenocarcinoma signaling pathway in MYB-silenced pancreatic cancer cells exhibiting suppression of EGFR and NF-κB. Decreased expression of EGFR and RELA was validated by both qPCR and immunoblotting and they were both shown to be under direct transcriptional control of MYB. These observations were further confirmed in a converse approach wherein MYB was overexpressed ectopically in a MYB-null pancreatic cancer cell line. Our findings thus suggest that MYB potentially regulates growth and genomic stability of pancreatic cancer cells via targeting complex gene networks and signaling pathways. Further in-depth functional studies are warranted to fully understand MYB signaling in pancreatic cancer.

  4. Integrative Analysis of Metabolomics and Transcriptomics Data: A Unified Model Framework to Identify Underlying System Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Brink-Jensen, Kasper; Bak, Søren; Jørgensen, Kirsten; Ekstrøm, Claus Thorn

    2013-01-01

    The abundance of high-dimensional measurements in the form of gene expression and mass spectroscopy calls for models to elucidate the underlying biological system. For widely studied organisms like yeast, it is possible to incorporate prior knowledge from a variety of databases, an approach used in several recent studies. However if such information is not available for a particular organism these methods fall short. In this paper we propose a statistical method that is applicable to a dataset consisting of Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy (LC-MS) and gene expression (DNA microarray) measurements from the same samples, to identify genes controlling the production of metabolites. Due to the high dimensionality of both LC-MS and DNA microarray data, dimension reduction and variable selection are key elements of the analysis. Our proposed approach starts by identifying the basis functions (“building blocks”) that constitute the output from a mass spectrometry experiment. Subsequently, the weights of these basis functions are related to the observations from the corresponding gene expression data in order to identify which genes are associated with specific patterns seen in the metabolite data. The modeling framework is extremely flexible as well as computationally fast and can accommodate treatment effects and other variables related to the experimental design. We demonstrate that within the proposed framework, genes regulating the production of specific metabolites can be identified correctly unless the variation in the noise is more than twice that of the signal. PMID:24086255

  5. Molecular and Biochemical Characterization of the 5-Nitroanthranilic Acid Degradation Pathway in Bradyrhizobium sp. Strain JS329 ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Yi; Spain, Jim C.

    2011-01-01

    Biodegradation pathways of synthetic nitroaromatic compounds and anilines are well documented, but little is known about those of nitroanilines. We previously reported that the initial step in 5-nitroanthranilic acid (5NAA) degradation by Bradyrhizobium sp. strain JS329 is a hydrolytic deamination to form 5-nitrosalicylic acid (5NSA), followed by ring fission catalyzed by 5NSA dioxygenase. The mechanism of release of the nitro group was unknown. In this study, we subcloned, sequenced, and expressed the genes encoding 5NAA deaminase (5NAA aminohydrolase, NaaA), 5NSA dioxygenase (NaaB) and lactonase (NaaC), the key genes responsible for 5NAA degradation. Sequence analysis and enzyme characterization revealed that NaaA is a hydrolytic metalloenzyme with a narrow substrate range. The nitro group is spontaneously eliminated as nitrite concomitant with the formation of a lactone from the ring fission product of 5NSA dioxygenation. The elimination of the nitro group during lactone formation is a previously unreported mechanism for denitration of nitro aliphatic compounds. PMID:21498645

  6. Label-free quantitative proteomics of the lysine acetylome in mitochondria identifies substrates of SIRT3 in metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Rardin, Matthew J; Newman, John C; Held, Jason M; Cusack, Michael P; Sorensen, Dylan J; Li, Biao; Schilling, Birgit; Mooney, Sean D; Kahn, C Ronald; Verdin, Eric; Gibson, Bradford W

    2013-04-16

    Large-scale proteomic approaches have identified numerous mitochondrial acetylated proteins; however in most cases, their regulation by acetyltransferases and deacetylases remains unclear. Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) is an NAD(+)-dependent mitochondrial protein deacetylase that has been shown to regulate a limited number of enzymes in key metabolic pathways. Here, we use a rigorous label-free quantitative MS approach (called MS1 Filtering) to analyze changes in lysine acetylation from mouse liver mitochondria in the absence of SIRT3. Among 483 proteins, a total of 2,187 unique sites of lysine acetylation were identified after affinity enrichment. MS1 Filtering revealed that lysine acetylation of 283 sites in 136 proteins was significantly increased in the absence of SIRT3 (at least twofold). A subset of these sites was independently validated using selected reaction monitoring MS. These data show that SIRT3 regulates acetylation on multiple proteins, often at multiple sites, across several metabolic pathways including fatty acid oxidation, ketogenesis, amino acid catabolism, and the urea and tricarboxylic acid cycles, as well as mitochondrial regulatory proteins. The widespread modification of key metabolic pathways greatly expands the number of known substrates and sites that are targeted by SIRT3 and establishes SIRT3 as a global regulator of mitochondrial protein acetylation with the capability of coordinating cellular responses to nutrient status and energy homeostasis.

  7. Adolescents Can Know Best: Using concept mapping to identify factors and pathways driving adolescent sexuality in Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Bayer, Angela M.; Cabrera, Lilia Z.; Gilman, Robert H.; Hindin, Michelle J.; Tsui, Amy O.

    2011-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to identify and describe individual- and environmental-level factors that Peruvian adolescents perceive to be related to adolescent sexuality. A series of concept mapping sessions were carried out from January-March 2006 with 63 15–17 year olds from a low-income community near Lima in order for adolescents to (1) brainstorm items that they thought were related to sexuality (2) sort, group and rate items to score their importance for sexuality-related outcomes, and (3) create pathways from the groups of items to engaging in sex. Brainstorming resulted in 61 items, which participants grouped into 11 clusters. The highest rated clusters were personal values, respect and confidence in relationships, future achievements and parent-child communication. The pathway of decision-making about having sex primarily contained items rated as only moderately important. This study identified important understudied factors, new perspectives on previously-recognized factors, and possible pathways to sexual behavior. These interesting, provocative findings underscore the importance of directly integrating adolescent voices into future sexual and reproductive health research, policies and programs that target this population. PMID:20382462

  8. Genetic Approach Identifies Distinct Asthma Pathways In Overweight vs. Normal Weight Children

    PubMed Central

    Kovacic, Melinda Butsch; Martin, Lisa J.; Myers, Jocelyn M. Biagini; He, Hua; Lindsey, Mark; Mersha, Tesfaye B.; Ji, Hong; Hershey, Gurjit K. Khurana

    2015-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of asthma in the context of excess body weight may be distinct from asthma that develops in normal weight children. The study’s objective was to explore the biology of asthma in the context of obesity and normal weight status using genetic methodologies. Methods SNP associations with asthma and interactions between SNPs and overweight status in 49 genes were assessed in child-participants of the Greater Cincinnati Pediatric Clinic Repository. Results Asthma was significantly associated with weight (OR=1.38; p=0.037). The number of genes and the magnitude of their associations with asthma were notably greater when considering overweight children alone versus normal weight and overweight children together. When considering weight, distinct sets of asthma-associated genes were observed, many times with opposing effects. Conclusions We demonstrated that the underlying heterogeneity of asthma is likely due in part to distinct pathogenetic pathways that depend on preceding/co-morbid overweight and/or allergy. It is therefore important to consider both obesity and asthma when conducting studies of asthma. PMID:26009928

  9. Genetic approach identifies distinct asthma pathways in overweight vs normal weight children.

    PubMed

    Butsch Kovacic, M; Martin, L J; Biagini Myers, J M; He, H; Lindsey, M; Mersha, T B; Khurana Hershey, G K

    2015-08-01

    The pathogenesis of asthma in the context of excess body weight may be distinct from asthma that develops in normal weight children. The study's objective was to explore the biology of asthma in the context of obesity and normal weight status using genetic methodologies. Associations between asthma and SNPs in 49 genes were assessed, as well as, interactions between SNPs and overweight status in child participants of the Greater Cincinnati Pediatric Clinic Repository. Asthma was significantly associated with weight (OR = 1.38; P = 0.037). The number of genes and the magnitude of their associations with asthma were notably greater when considering overweight children alone vs normal weight and overweight children together. When considering weight, distinct sets of asthma-associated genes were observed, many times with opposing effects. We demonstrated that the underlying heterogeneity of asthma is likely due in part to distinct pathogenetic pathways that depend on preceding/comorbid overweight and/or allergy. It is therefore important to consider both obesity and asthma when conducting studies of asthma.

  10. How metal films de-wet substrates : identifying the kinetic pathways and energetic driving forces.

    SciTech Connect

    Thurmer, Konrad; Schmid, Andreas; Sato, Yu; Hamilton, John C.; Saa, Angela; McCarty, Kevin F.; de la Figuera, Juan; Bartelt, Norman Charles

    2008-10-01

    We study how single-crystal chromium films of uniform thickness on W(110) substrates are converted to arrays of three-dimensional (3D) Cr islands during annealing. We use low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM) to directly observe a kinetic pathway that produces trenches that expose the wetting layer. Adjacent film steps move simultaneously uphill and downhill relative to the staircase of atomic steps on the substrate. This step motion thickens the film regions where steps advance. Where film steps retract, the film thins, eventually exposing the stable wetting layer. Since our analysis shows that thick Cr films have a lattice constant close to bulk Cr, we propose that surface and interface stress provide a possible driving force for the observed morphological instability. Atomistic simulations and analytic elastic models show that surface and interface stress can cause a dependence of film energy on thickness that leads to an instability to simultaneous thinning and thickening. We observe that de-wetting is also initiated at bunches of substrate steps in two other systems, Ag/W(110) and Ag/Ru(0001). We additionally describe how Cr films are converted into patterns of unidirectional stripes as the trenches that expose the wetting layer lengthen along the W[001] direction. Finally, we observe how 3D Cr islands form directly during film growth at elevated temperature. The Cr mesas (wedges) form as Cr film steps advance down the staircase of substrate steps, another example of the critical role that substrate steps play in 3D island formation.

  11. Integrated genome-wide association, coexpression network, and expression single nucleotide polymorphism analysis identifies novel pathway in allergic rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Allergic rhinitis is a common disease whose genetic basis is incompletely explained. We report an integrated genomic analysis of allergic rhinitis. Methods We performed genome wide association studies (GWAS) of allergic rhinitis in 5633 ethnically diverse North American subjects. Next, we profiled gene expression in disease-relevant tissue (peripheral blood CD4+ lymphocytes) collected from subjects who had been genotyped. We then integrated the GWAS and gene expression data using expression single nucleotide (eSNP), coexpression network, and pathway approaches to identify the biologic relevance of our GWAS. Results GWAS revealed ethnicity-specific findings, with 4 genome-wide significant loci among Latinos and 1 genome-wide significant locus in the GWAS meta-analysis across ethnic groups. To identify biologic context for these results, we constructed a coexpression network to define modules of genes with similar patterns of CD4+ gene expression (coexpression modules) that could serve as constructs of broader gene expression. 6 of the 22 GWAS loci with P-value ≤ 1x10−6 tagged one particular coexpression module (4.0-fold enrichment, P-value 0.0029), and this module also had the greatest enrichment (3.4-fold enrichment, P-value 2.6 × 10−24) for allergic rhinitis-associated eSNPs (genetic variants associated with both gene expression and allergic rhinitis). The integrated GWAS, coexpression network, and eSNP results therefore supported this coexpression module as an allergic rhinitis module. Pathway analysis revealed that the module was enriched for mitochondrial pathways (8.6-fold enrichment, P-value 4.5 × 10−72). Conclusions Our results highlight mitochondrial pathways as a target for further investigation of allergic rhinitis mechanism and treatment. Our integrated approach can be applied to provide biologic context for GWAS of other diseases. PMID:25085501

  12. Meta-analyses identify 13 novel loci associated with age at menopause and highlights DNA repair and immune pathways

    PubMed Central

    Stolk, Lisette; Perry, John RB; Chasman, Daniel I; He, Chunyan; Mangino, Massimo; Sulem, Patrick; Barbalic, Maja; Broer, Linda; Byrne, Enda M; Ernst, Florian; Esko, Tõnu; Franceschini, Nora; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Kraft, Peter; McArdle, Patick F; Porcu, Eleonora; Shin, So-Youn; Smith, Albert V; van Wingerden, Sophie; Zhai, Guangju; Zhuang, Wei V; Albrecht, Eva; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Aspelund, Thor; Bandinelli, Stefania; Lauc, Lovorka Barac; Beckmann, Jacques S; Boban, Mladen; Boerwinkle, Eric; Broekmans, Frank J; Burri, Andrea; Campbell, Harry; Chanock, Stephen J; Chen, Constance; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Corre, Tanguy; Coviello, Andrea D; d’Adamo, Pio; Davies, Gail; de Faire, Ulf; de Geus, Eco JC; Deary, Ian J; Dedoussis, George VZ; Deloukas, Panagiotis; Ebrahim, Shah; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Emilsson, Valur; Eriksson, Johan G; Fauser, Bart CJM; Ferreli, Liana; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fischer, Krista; Folsom, Aaron R; Garcia, Melissa E; Gasparini, Paolo; Gieger, Christian; Glazer, Nicole; Grobbee, Diederick E; Hall, Per; Haller, Toomas; Hankinson, Susan E; Hass, Merli; Hayward, Caroline; Heath, Andrew C; Hofman, Albert; Ingelsson, Erik; Janssens, A Cecile JW; Johnson, Andrew D; Karasik, David; Kardia, Sharon LR; Keyzer, Jules; Kiel, Douglas P; Kolcic, Ivana; Kutalik, Zoltán; Lahti, Jari; Lai, Sandra; Laisk, Triin; Laven, Joop SE; Lawlor, Debbie A; Liu, Jianjun; Lopez, Lorna M; Louwers, Yvonne V; Magnusson, Patrik KE; Marongiu, Mara; Martin, Nicholas G; Klaric, Irena Martinovic; Masciullo, Corrado; McKnight, Barbara; Medland, Sarah E; Melzer, David; Mooser, Vincent; Navarro, Pau; Newman, Anne B; Nyholt, Dale R; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Palotie, Aarno; Paré, Guillaume; Parker, Alex N; Pedersen, Nancy L; Peeters, Petra HM; Pistis, Giorgio; Plump, Andrew S; Polasek, Ozren; Pop, Victor JM; Psaty, Bruce M; Räikkönen, Katri; Rehnberg, Emil; Rotter, Jerome I; Rudan, Igor; Sala, Cinzia; Salumets, Andres; Scuteri, Angelo; Singleton, Andrew; Smith, Jennifer A; Snieder, Harold; Soranzo, Nicole; Stacey, Simon N; Starr, John M; Stathopoulou, Maria G; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stolk, Ronald P; Styrkarsdottir, Unnur; Sun, Yan V; Tenesa, Albert; Thorand, Barbara; Toniolo, Daniela; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Tsui, Kim; Ulivi, Sheila; van Dam, Rob M; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; van Gils, Carla H; van Nierop, Peter; Vink, Jacqueline M; Visscher, Peter M; Voorhuis, Marlies; Waeber, Gérard; Wallaschofski, Henri; Wichmann, H Erich; Widen, Elisabeth; Gent, Colette JM Wijnands-van; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilson, James F; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce HR; Wright, Alan F; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Zemunik, Tatijana; Zgaga, Lina; Zillikens, M. Carola; Zygmunt, Marek; Arnold, Alice M; Boomsma, Dorret I; Buring, Julie E.; Crisponi, Laura; Demerath, Ellen W; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Harris, Tamara B; Hu, Frank B; Hunter, David J; Launer, Lenore J; Metspalu, Andres; Montgomery, Grant W; Oostra, Ben A; Ridker, Paul M; Sanna, Serena; Schlessinger, David; Spector, Tim D; Stefansson, Kari; Streeten, Elizabeth A; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Uda, Manuela; Uitterlinden, André G; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Völzke, Henry; Murray, Anna; Murabito, Joanne M; Visser, Jenny A; Lunetta, Kathryn L

    2011-01-01

    To identify novel loci for age at natural menopause, we performed a meta-analysis of 22 genome-wide association studies in 38,968 women of European descent, with replication in up to 14,435 women. In addition to four known loci, we identified 13 new age at natural menopause loci (P < 5 × 10−8). The new loci included genes implicated in DNA repair (EXO1, HELQ, UIMC1, FAM175A, FANCI, TLK1, POLG, PRIM1) and immune function (IL11, NLRP11, BAT2). Gene-set enrichment pathway analyses using the full GWAS dataset identified exodeoxyribonuclease, NFκB signalling and mitochondrial dysfunction as biological processes related to timing of menopause. PMID:22267201

  13. Use of a bovine genome array to identify new biological pathways for beef marbling in Hanwoo (Korean Cattle)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Marbling (intramuscular fat) is a valuable trait that impacts on meat quality and an important factor determining price of beef in the Korean beef market. Animals that are destined for this high marbling market are fed a high concentrate ration for approximately 30 months in the Korean finishing farms. However, this feeding strategy leads to inefficiencies and excessive fat production. This study aimed to identify candidate genes and pathways associated with intramuscular fat deposition on highly divergent marbling phenotypes in adult Hanwoo cattle. Results Bovine genome array analysis was conducted to detect differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in m. longissimus with divergent marbling phenotype (marbling score 2 to 7). Three data-processing methods (MAS5.0, GCRMA and RMA) were used to test for differential expression (DE). Statistical analysis identified 21 significant transcripts from at least two data-processing methods (P < 0.01). All 21 differentially expressed genes were validated by real-time PCR. Results showed a high concordance in the gene expression fold change between the microarrays and the real time PCR data. Gene Ontology (GO) and pathway analysis demonstrated that some genes (ADAMTS4, CYP51A and SQLE) over expressed in high marbled animals are involved in a protein catabolic process and a cholesterol biosynthesis process. In addition, pathway analysis also revealed that ADAMTS4 is activated by three regulators (IL-17A, TNFα and TGFβ1). QRT-PCR was used to investigate gene expression of these regulators in muscle with divergent intramuscular fat contents. The results demonstrate that ADAMTS4 and TGFβ1 are associated with increasing marbling fat. An ADAMTS4/TGFβ1 pathway seems to be associated with the phenotypic differences between high and low marbled groups. Conclusions Marbling differences are possibly a function of complex signaling pathway interactions between muscle and fat. These results suggest that ADAMTS4, which is involved

  14. Analysis of genomic aberrations and gene expression profiling identifies novel lesions and pathways in myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Rice, K L; Lin, X; Wolniak, K; Ebert, B L; Berkofsky-Fessler, W; Buzzai, M; Sun, Y; Xi, C; Elkin, P; Levine, R; Golub, T; Gilliland, D G; Crispino, J D; Licht, J D; Zhang, W

    2011-01-01

    Polycythemia vera (PV), essential thrombocythemia and primary myelofibrosis, are myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) with distinct clinical features and are associated with the JAK2V617F mutation. To identify genomic anomalies involved in the pathogenesis of these disorders, we profiled 87 MPN patients using Affymetrix 250K single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays. Aberrations affecting chr9 were the most frequently observed and included 9pLOH (n=16), trisomy 9 (n=6) and amplifications of 9p13.3–23.3 (n=1), 9q33.1–34.13 (n=1) and 9q34.13 (n=6). Patients with trisomy 9 were associated with elevated JAK2V617F mutant allele burden, suggesting that gain of chr9 represents an alternative mechanism for increasing JAK2V617F dosage. Gene expression profiling of patients with and without chr9 abnormalities (+9, 9pLOH), identified genes potentially involved in disease pathogenesis including JAK2, STAT5B and MAPK14. We also observed recurrent gains of 1p36.31–36.33 (n=6), 17q21.2–q21.31 (n=5) and 17q25.1–25.3 (n=5) and deletions affecting 18p11.31–11.32 (n=8). Combined SNP and gene expression analysis identified aberrations affecting components of a non-canonical PRC2 complex (EZH1, SUZ12 and JARID2) and genes comprising a ‘HSC signature' (MLLT3, SMARCA2 and PBX1). We show that NFIB, which is amplified in 7/87 MPN patients and upregulated in PV CD34+ cells, protects cells from apoptosis induced by cytokine withdrawal. PMID:22829077

  15. Analysis of genomic aberrations and gene expression profiling identifies novel lesions and pathways in myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Rice, K L; Lin, X; Wolniak, K; Ebert, B L; Berkofsky-Fessler, W; Buzzai, M; Sun, Y; Xi, C; Elkin, P; Levine, R; Golub, T; Gilliland, D G; Crispino, J D; Licht, J D; Zhang, W

    2011-11-01

    Polycythemia vera (PV), essential thrombocythemia and primary myelofibrosis, are myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) with distinct clinical features and are associated with the JAK2V617F mutation. To identify genomic anomalies involved in the pathogenesis of these disorders, we profiled 87 MPN patients using Affymetrix 250K single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays. Aberrations affecting chr9 were the most frequently observed and included 9pLOH (n=16), trisomy 9 (n=6) and amplifications of 9p13.3-23.3 (n=1), 9q33.1-34.13 (n=1) and 9q34.13 (n=6). Patients with trisomy 9 were associated with elevated JAK2V617F mutant allele burden, suggesting that gain of chr9 represents an alternative mechanism for increasing JAK2V617F dosage. Gene expression profiling of patients with and without chr9 abnormalities (+9, 9pLOH), identified genes potentially involved in disease pathogenesis including JAK2, STAT5B and MAPK14. We also observed recurrent gains of 1p36.31-36.33 (n=6), 17q21.2-q21.31 (n=5) and 17q25.1-25.3 (n=5) and deletions affecting 18p11.31-11.32 (n=8). Combined SNP and gene expression analysis identified aberrations affecting components of a non-canonical PRC2 complex (EZH1, SUZ12 and JARID2) and genes comprising a 'HSC signature' (MLLT3, SMARCA2 and PBX1). We show that NFIB, which is amplified in 7/87 MPN patients and upregulated in PV CD34+ cells, protects cells from apoptosis induced by cytokine withdrawal.

  16. Enhanced Sequential Search Methodology for Identifying Cost-Optimal Building Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Horowitz, S.; Christensen, C.; Brandemuehl, M.; Krarti, M.

    2008-06-01

    The BEopt software is a building energy optimization tool that generates a cost-optimal path of building designs from a reference building up to zero-net energy. It employs a sequential search methodology to account for complex energy interactions between building efficiency measures. Enhancement strategies to this search methodology are developed to increase accuracy (ability to identify the true cost-optimal curve) and speed (number of required energy simulations). A test suite of optimizations is used to gauge the effectiveness of each strategy. Combinations of strategies are assembled into packages, ranging from conservative to aggressive, with so up to 71% fewer required simulations are required.

  17. Integrated Genomics Identifies Five Medulloblastoma Subtypes with Distinct Genetic Profiles, Pathway Signatures and Clinicopathological Features

    PubMed Central

    Kool, Marcel; Koster, Jan; Bunt, Jens; Hasselt, Nancy E.; Lakeman, Arjan; van Sluis, Peter; Troost, Dirk; Meeteren, Netteke Schouten-van; Caron, Huib N.; Cloos, Jacqueline; Mršić, Alan; Ylstra, Bauke; Grajkowska, Wieslawa; Hartmann, Wolfgang; Pietsch, Torsten; Ellison, David; Clifford, Steven C.; Versteeg, Rogier

    2008-01-01

    Background Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor in children. Despite recent improvements in cure rates, prediction of disease outcome remains a major challenge and survivors suffer from serious therapy-related side-effects. Recent data showed that patients with WNT-activated tumors have a favorable prognosis, suggesting that these patients could be treated less intensively, thereby reducing the side-effects. This illustrates the potential benefits of a robust classification of medulloblastoma patients and a detailed knowledge of associated biological mechanisms. Methods and Findings To get a better insight into the molecular biology of medulloblastoma we established mRNA expression profiles of 62 medulloblastomas and analyzed 52 of them also by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) arrays. Five molecular subtypes were identified, characterized by WNT signaling (A; 9 cases), SHH signaling (B; 15 cases), expression of neuronal differentiation genes (C and D; 16 and 11 cases, respectively) or photoreceptor genes (D and E; both 11 cases). Mutations in β-catenin were identified in all 9 type A tumors, but not in any other tumor. PTCH1 mutations were exclusively identified in type B tumors. CGH analysis identified several fully or partly subtype-specific chromosomal aberrations. Monosomy of chromosome 6 occurred only in type A tumors, loss of 9q mostly occurred in type B tumors, whereas chromosome 17 aberrations, most common in medulloblastoma, were strongly associated with type C or D tumors. Loss of the inactivated X-chromosome was highly specific for female cases of type C, D and E tumors. Gene expression levels faithfully reflected the chromosomal copy number changes. Clinicopathological features significantly different between the 5 subtypes included metastatic disease and age at diagnosis and histology. Metastatic disease at diagnosis was significantly associated with subtypes C and D and most strongly with subtype E. Patients below 3 yrs of

  18. Abiogenic hydrocarbon isotopic signatures in granitic rocks: Identifying pathways of formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Joanna; Salvi, Stefano; Longstaffe, Fred J.

    2013-12-01

    The stability and isotopic composition of hydrocarbons formed in the mantle are controversial subjects. Knowing the range in isotopic compositions of abiogenically-derived hydrocarbons is important for recognising biological signatures in ancient and extra-terrestrial materials. In an effort to enhance this database, stable isotope results are reported here for hydrocarbon-bearing fluid inclusions hosted in two peralkaline igneous complexes from Lovozero, Russia and Strange Lake, Canada. Based on the distribution of isotopic compositions, we propose three pathways for abiogenically-generated hydrocarbons. Type-1 (δ13CCH4 > δ13CCO2 and δ13CC2 +) represents mantle-derived hydrocarbons generated in equilibrium with hyperagpaitic magmas in the upper mantle, and suggests that mantle CH4 and C2H6δ13C and δ2H could have values of ~ - 5.3 and ~ - 112‰, and ~ - 10.8 and - 162‰, respectively. Type-2 (δ13CCO2 > δ13CCH4 > δ13CC2 +) represents Fischer-Tropsch-type hydrocarbon generation in quartz-bearing peralkaline rocks with CO2 as the initial magmatic gas phase. For Type-2, δ13CCO2 values are ~ - 2‰, whereas δ13CCH4 and δ2HCH4 values range from - 32 to - 20‰ and - 170 and - 160‰, respectively. The δ13CC2H6 values are slightly lower than associated δ13CCH4 values. Type-3 (δ13CCO2 > δ13CCH4 < δ13CC2 +) represents an overprint of Type-2, formed during low temperature alteration of quartz-bearing peralkaline rocks. Here, δ13CCO2 values are variable, - 14.0 to - 9.5‰, δ13CCH4 values range from - 30.8 to - 20.8‰ while δ13CC2H6 values are higher than associated δ13CCH4 values. Both Type-2 and Type-3 isotopic compositions mimic patterns normally considered to be thermogenic in origin, thus demonstrating that isotopic data alone cannot be used reliably to distinguish between hydrocarbons of abiogenic versus biogenic origin.

  19. Heterologous Production of the Marine Myxobacterial Antibiotic Haliangicin and Its Unnatural Analogues Generated by Engineering of the Biochemical Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yuwei; Feng, Zhiyang; Tomura, Tomohiko; Suzuki, Akira; Miyano, Seishi; Tsuge, Takashi; Mori, Hitoshi; Suh, Joo-Won; Iizuka, Takashi; Fudou, Ryosuke; Ojika, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Despite their fastidious nature, marine myxobacteria have considerable genetic potential to produce novel secondary metabolites. The marine myxobacterium Haliangium ochraceum SMP-2 produces the antifungal polyketide haliangicin (1), but its productivity is unsatisfactory. The biosynthetic gene cluster hli (47.8 kbp) associated with 1 was identified and heterologously expressed in Myxococcus xanthus to permit the production of 1 with high efficiency (tenfold greater amount and threefold faster in growth speed compared with the original producer), as well as the generation of bioactive unnatural analogues of 1 through gene manipulation. A unique acyl-CoA dehydrogenase was found to catalyse an unusual γ,δ-dehydrogenation of the diketide starter unit, leading to the formation of the terminal alkene moiety of 1. Biological evaluation of the analogues obtained through this study revealed that their bioactivities (anti-oomycete and cytotoxic activities) can be modified by manipulating the vinyl epoxide at the terminus opposite the β-methoxyacrylate pharmacophore. PMID:26915413

  20. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of the Salicylyl-acyltranferase SsfX3 from a Tetracycline Biosynthetic Pathway*♦

    PubMed Central

    Pickens, Lauren B.; Sawaya, Michael R.; Rasool, Huma; Pashkov, Inna; Yeates, Todd O.; Tang, Yi

    2011-01-01

    SsfX3 is a GDSL family acyltransferase that transfers salicylate to the C-4 hydroxyl of a tetracycline intermediate in the penultimate step during biosynthesis of the anticancer natural product SF2575. The C-4 salicylate takes the place of the more common C-4 dimethylamine functionality, making SsfX3 the first acyltransferase identified to act on a tetracycline substrate. The crystal structure of SsfX3 was determined at 2.5 Å, revealing two distinct domains as follows: an N-terminal β-sandwich domain that resembles a carbohydrate-binding module, and a C-terminal catalytic domain that contains the atypical α/β-hydrolase fold found in the GDSL hydrolase family of enzymes. The active site lies at one end of a large open binding pocket, which is spatially defined by structural elements from both the N- and C-terminal domains. Mutational analysis in the putative substrate binding pocket identified residues from both domains that are important for binding the acyl donor and acceptor. Furthermore, removal of the N-terminal carbohydrate-binding module-like domain rendered the stand-alone α/β-hydrolase domain inactive. The additional noncatalytic module is therefore proposed to be required to define the binding pocket and provide sufficient interactions with the spatially extended tetracyclic substrate. SsfX3 was also demonstrated to accept a variety of non-native acyl groups. This relaxed substrate specificity toward the acyl donor allowed the chemoenzymatic biosynthesis of C-4-modified analogs of the immediate precursor to the bioactive SF2575; these were used to assay the structure activity relationships at the C-4 position. PMID:21965680

  1. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of the Salicylyl-acyltranferase SsfX3 from a Tetracycline Biosynthetic Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Pickens, Lauren B.; Sawaya, Michael R.; Rasool, Huma; Pashkov, Inna; Yeates, Todd O.; Tang, Yi

    2012-03-14

    SsfX3 is a GDSL family acyltransferase that transfers salicylate to the C-4 hydroxyl of a tetracycline intermediate in the penultimate step during biosynthesis of the anticancer natural product SF2575. The C-4 salicylate takes the place of the more common C-4 dimethylamine functionality, making SsfX3 the first acyltransferase identified to act on a tetracycline substrate. The crystal structure of SsfX3 was determined at 2.5 {angstrom}, revealing two distinct domains as follows: an N-terminal {beta}-sandwich domain that resembles a carbohydrate-binding module, and a C-terminal catalytic domain that contains the atypical {alpha}/{beta}-hydrolase fold found in the GDSL hydrolase family of enzymes. The active site lies at one end of a large open binding pocket, which is spatially defined by structural elements from both the N- and C-terminal domains. Mutational analysis in the putative substrate binding pocket identified residues from both domains that are important for binding the acyl donor and acceptor. Furthermore, removal of the N-terminal carbohydrate-binding module-like domain rendered the stand-alone {alpha}/{beta}-hydrolase domain inactive. The additional noncatalytic module is therefore proposed to be required to define the binding pocket and provide sufficient interactions with the spatially extended tetracyclic substrate. SsfX3 was also demonstrated to accept a variety of non-native acyl groups. This relaxed substrate specificity toward the acyl donor allowed the chemoenzymatic biosynthesis of C-4-modified analogs of the immediate precursor to the bioactive SF2575; these were used to assay the structure activity relationships at the C-4 position.

  2. Exploring critical pathways for urban water management to identify robust strategies under deep uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Urich, Christian; Rauch, Wolfgang

    2014-12-01

    Long-term projections for key drivers needed in urban water infrastructure planning such as climate change, population growth, and socio-economic changes are deeply uncertain. Traditional planning approaches heavily rely on these projections, which, if a projection stays unfulfilled, can lead to problematic infrastructure decisions causing high operational costs and/or lock-in effects. New approaches based on exploratory modelling take a fundamentally different view. Aim of these is, to identify an adaptation strategy that performs well under many future scenarios, instead of optimising a strategy for a handful. However, a modelling tool to support strategic planning to test the implication of adaptation strategies under deeply uncertain conditions for urban water management does not exist yet. This paper presents a first step towards a new generation of such strategic planning tools, by combing innovative modelling tools, which coevolve the urban environment and urban water infrastructure under many different future scenarios, with robust decision making. The developed approach is applied to the city of Innsbruck, Austria, which is spatially explicitly evolved 20 years into the future under 1000 scenarios to test the robustness of different adaptation strategies. Key findings of this paper show that: (1) Such an approach can be used to successfully identify parameter ranges of key drivers in which a desired performance criterion is not fulfilled, which is an important indicator for the robustness of an adaptation strategy; and (2) Analysis of the rich dataset gives new insights into the adaptive responses of agents to key drivers in the urban system by modifying a strategy.

  3. Gain-of-function assays in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) to identify signaling pathways that induce and regulate limb regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jangwoo; Aguilar, Cristian; Gardiner, David

    2013-01-01

    The adult salamander has been studied as a model for regeneration of complex tissues for many decades. Only recently with the development of gain-of-function assays for regeneration, has it been possible to screen for and assay the function of the multitude of signaling factors that have been identified in studies of embryonic development and tumorigenesis. Given the conservation of function of these regulatory pathways controlling growth and pattern formation, it is now possible to use the functional assays in the salamander to test the ability of endogenous as well as small-molecule signaling factors to induce a regenerative response.

  4. Gain-of-function assays in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) to identify signaling pathways that induce and regulate limb regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jangwoo; Aguilar, Cristian; Gardiner, David

    2013-01-01

    The adult salamander has been studied as a model for regeneration of complex tissues for many decades. Only recently with the development of gain-of-function assays for regeneration, has it been possible to screen for and assay the function of the multitude of signaling factors that have been identified in studies of embryonic development and tumorigenesis. Given the conservation of function of these regulatory pathways controlling growth and pattern formation, it is now possible to use the functional assays in the salamander to test the ability of endogenous as well as small-molecule signaling factors to induce a regenerative response. PMID:24029949

  5. Finding novel distinctions between the sAPPα-mediated anabolic biochemical pathways in Autism Spectrum Disorder and Fragile X Syndrome plasma and brain tissue

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Balmiki; Sokol, Deborah K.; Maloney, Bryan; Lahiri, Debomoy K.

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and Fragile X syndrome (FXS) are developmental disorders. No validated blood-based biomarkers exist for either, which impedes bench-to-bedside approaches. Amyloid-β (Aβ) precursor protein (APP) and metabolites are usually associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). APP cleavage by α-secretase produces potentially neurotrophic secreted APPα (sAPPα) and the P3 peptide fragment. β-site APP cleaving enzyme (BACE1) cleavage produces secreted APPβ (sAPPβ) and intact Aβ. Excess Aβ is potentially neurotoxic and can lead to atrophy of brain regions such as amygdala in AD. By contrast, amygdala is enlarged in ASD but not FXS. We previously reported elevated levels of sAPPα in ASD and FXS vs. controls. We now report elevated plasma Aβ and total APP levels in FXS compared to both ASD and typically developing controls, and elevated levels of sAPPα in ASD and FXS vs. controls. By contrast, plasma and brain sAPPβ and Aβ were lower in ASD vs. controls but elevated in FXS plasma vs. controls. We also detected age-dependent increase in an α-secretase in ASD brains. We report a novel mechanistic difference in APP pathways between ASD (processing) and FXS (expression) leading to distinct APP metabolite profiles in these two disorders. These novel, distinctive biochemical differences between ASD and FXS pave the way for blood-based biomarkers for ASD and FXS. PMID:27212113

  6. The Robustness of Pathway Analysis in Identifying Potential Drug Targets in Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Dalby, Andrew; Bailey, Ian

    2014-01-01

    The identification of genes responsible for causing cancers from gene expression data has had varied success. Often the genes identified depend on the methods used for detecting expression patterns, or on the ways that the data had been normalized and filtered. The use of gene set enrichment analysis is one way to introduce biological information in order to improve the detection of differentially expressed genes and pathways. In this paper we show that the use of network models while still subject to the problems of normalization is a more robust method for detecting pathways that are differentially overrepresented in lung cancer data. Such differences may provide opportunities for novel therapeutics. In addition, we present evidence that non-small cell lung carcinoma is not a series of homogeneous diseases; rather that there is a heterogeny within the genotype which defies phenotype classification. This diversity helps to explain the lack of progress in developing therapies against non-small cell carcinoma and suggests that drug development may consider multiple pathways as treatment targets.

  7. Using End-Member Mixing Analysis to Identify Transport Pathways in Agricultural Watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essaid, H.

    2013-12-01

    Concentrations of naturally occurring solutes were monitored in six agricultural watersheds as part of the Agricultural Chemical Sources, Transport and Fate study of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Assessment Program. The watersheds, located in Indiana (IN), Iowa (IA), Maryland (MD), Nebraska (NE), Mississippi (MS) and Washington (WA), ranged in size from 5 to 1300 square kilometers, and agricultural land use accounted for 60 - 98% of the watershed area. Concentrations of chloride, calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, fluoride, sulfate and silica in stream water were analyzed using principal components analysis (PCA) to identify the dominant processes controlling stream water chemistry. Concentrations measured in wells, streambed piezometers, unsaturated zone lysimeters, overland flow, and tile drains were then used to project the chemistry of these flow compartments/components onto the stream chemistry PCA transformation. This facilitated the identification of end members explaining observed stream chemistry, and the source of the water for these end members. The majority of the variance in stream chemistry could be explained by the mixing of three end-members: 94% for Leary Weber Ditch, IN; 84% for South Fork Iowa River, IA; 91% for Morgan Creek, MD; 81% for Maple Creek, NE; 92% for Tommie Bayou, MS; and, 97% for DR2, WA. The chemistry of overland flow and tile drainage was also contained within the end member concentrations. The end members were generally represented by two groundwater components and a very low solute concentration component (precipitation or irrigation water) that diluted the groundwater signal. Generally, one groundwater component represented recently recharged water that resembled the concentration of water in the deepest unsaturated zone lysimeters, and the other groundwater component was representative of regional groundwater conditions. Compared to regional groundwater, the recent groundwater component had lower

  8. Identifying improvements to complex pathways: evidence synthesis and stakeholder engagement in infant congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Crowe, Sonya; Knowles, Rachel; Wray, Jo; Tregay, Jenifer; Ridout, Deborah A; Utley, Martin; Franklin, Rodney; Bull, Catherine L; Brown, Katherine L

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Many infants die in the year following discharge from hospital after surgical or catheter intervention for congenital heart disease (3–5% of discharged infants). There is considerable variability in the provision of care and support in this period, and some families experience barriers to care. We aimed to identify ways to improve discharge and postdischarge care for this patient group. Design A systematic evidence synthesis aligned with a process of eliciting the perspectives of families and professionals from community, primary, secondary and tertiary care. Setting UK. Results A set of evidence-informed recommendations for improving the discharge and postdischarge care of infants following intervention for congenital heart disease was produced. These address known challenges with current care processes and, recognising current resource constraints, are targeted at patient groups based on the number of patients affected and the level and nature of their risk of adverse 1-year outcome. The recommendations include: structured discharge documentation, discharging certain high-risk patients via their local hospital, enhanced surveillance for patients with certain (high-risk) cardiac diagnoses and an early warning tool for parents and community health professionals. Conclusions Our recommendations set out a comprehensive, system-wide approach for improving discharge and postdischarge services. This approach could be used to address challenges in delivering care for other patient populations that can fall through gaps between sectors and organisations. PMID:27266768

  9. Proteomic Approaches Identify Members of Cofilin Pathway Involved in Oral Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Polachini, Giovana M.; Sobral, Lays M.; Mercante, Ana M. C.; Paes-Leme, Adriana F.; Xavier, Flávia C. A.; Henrique, Tiago; Guimarães, Douglas M.; Vidotto, Alessandra; Fukuyama, Erica E.; Góis-Filho, José F.; Cury, Patricia M.; Curioni, Otávio A.; Michaluart Jr, Pedro; Silva, Adriana M. A.; Wünsch-Filho, Victor; Nunes, Fabio D.; Leopoldino, Andréia M.; Tajara, Eloiza H.

    2012-01-01

    The prediction of tumor behavior for patients with oral carcinomas remains a challenge for clinicians. The presence of lymph node metastasis is the most important prognostic factor but it is limited in predicting local relapse or survival. This highlights the need for identifying biomarkers that may effectively contribute to prediction of recurrence and tumor spread. In this study, we used one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry and immunodetection methods to analyze protein expression in oral squamous cell carcinomas. Using a refinement for classifying oral carcinomas in regard to prognosis, we analyzed small but lymph node metastasis-positive versus large, lymph node metastasis-negative tumors in order to contribute to the molecular characterization of subgroups with risk of dissemination. Specific protein patterns favoring metastasis were observed in the “more-aggressive” group defined by the present study. This group displayed upregulation of proteins involved in migration, adhesion, angiogenesis, cell cycle regulation, anti-apoptosis and epithelial to mesenchymal transition, whereas the “less-aggressive” group was engaged in keratinocyte differentiation, epidermis development, inflammation and immune response. Besides the identification of several proteins not yet described as deregulated in oral carcinomas, the present study demonstrated for the first time the role of cofilin-1 in modulating cell invasion in oral carcinomas. PMID:23227181

  10. Alternate dissociation pathways identified in charge-reduced protein complex ions.

    PubMed

    Pagel, Kevin; Hyung, Suk-Joon; Ruotolo, Brandon T; Robinson, Carol V

    2010-06-15

    Tandem mass spectrometry (MS) of large protein complexes has proven to be capable of assessing the stoichiometry, connectivity, and structural details of multiprotein assemblies. While the utility of tandem MS is without question, a deeper understanding of the mechanism of protein complex dissociation will undoubtedly drive the technology into new areas of enhanced utility and information content. We present here the systematic analysis of the charge state dependent decay of the noncovalently associated complex of human transthyretin, generated by collision-induced dissociation (CID). A crown ether based charge reduction approach was applied to generate intact transthyretin tetramers with charge states ranging from 15+ to 7+. These nine charge states were subsequently analyzed by means of tandem MS and ion mobility spectrometry. Three different charge-dependent mechanistic regimes were identified: (1) common asymmetric dissociation involving ejection of unfolded monomers, (2) expulsion of folded monomers from the intact tetramer, and (3) release of C-terminal peptide fragments from the intact complex. Taken together, the results presented highlight the potential of charge state modulation as a method for directing the course of gas-phase dissociation and unfolding of protein complexes.

  11. Genetic Ablation of Vitamin D Activation Pathway Reverses Biochemical and Skeletal Anomalies in Fgf-23-Null Animals

    PubMed Central

    Sitara, Despina; Razzaque, Mohammed S.; St-Arnaud, René; Huang, Wei; Taguchi, Takashi; Erben, Reinhold G.; Lanske, Beate

    2006-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23) is one of the circulating phosphaturic factors associated with renal phosphate wasting. Fgf-23−/− animals show extremely high serum levels of phosphate and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, along with abnormal bone mineralization and soft tissue calcifications. To determine the role of vitamin D in mediating altered phosphate homeostasis and skeletogenesis in the Fgf-23−/− mice, we generated mice lacking both the Fgf-23 and 1α-hydroxylase genes (Fgf-23−/−/1α(OH)ase−/−). In the current study, we have identified the cellular source of Fgf-23 in adult mice. In addition, loss of vitamin D activities from Fgf-23−/− mice reverses the severe hyperphosphatemia to hypophosphatemia, attributable to increased urinary phosphate wasting in Fgf-23−/−/1α(OH)ase−/− mice, possibly as a consequence of decreased expression of NaPi2a. Ablation of vitamin D from Fgf-23−/− mice resulted in further reduction of total bone mineral content and bone mineral density and reversed ectopic calcification of skeleton and soft tissues, suggesting that abnormal mineral ion homeostasis and impaired skeletogenesis in Fgf-23−/− mice are mediated through enhanced vitamin D activities. In conclusion, using genetic manipulation studies, we have provided evidence for an in vivo inverse correlation between Fgf-23 and vitamin D activities and for the severe skeletal and soft tissue abnormalities of Fgf-23−/− mice being mediated through vitamin D. PMID:17148678

  12. Filaggrin-stratified transcriptomic analysis of pediatric skin identifies mechanistic pathways in patients with atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Christian; Kroboth, Karin; Schurch, Nicholas J.; Sandilands, Aileen; Sherstnev, Alexander; O'Regan, Grainne M.; Watson, Rosemarie M.; Irwin McLean, W.H.; Barton, Geoffrey J.; Irvine, Alan D.; Brown, Sara J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Atopic dermatitis (AD; eczema) is characterized by a widespread abnormality in cutaneous barrier function and propensity to inflammation. Filaggrin is a multifunctional protein and plays a key role in skin barrier formation. Loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding filaggrin (FLG) are a highly significant risk factor for atopic disease, but the molecular mechanisms leading to dermatitis remain unclear. Objective We sought to interrogate tissue-specific variations in the expressed genome in the skin of children with AD and to investigate underlying pathomechanisms in atopic skin. Methods We applied single-molecule direct RNA sequencing to analyze the whole transcriptome using minimal tissue samples. Uninvolved skin biopsy specimens from 26 pediatric patients with AD were compared with site-matched samples from 10 nonatopic teenage control subjects. Cases and control subjects were screened for FLG genotype to stratify the data set. Results Two thousand four hundred thirty differentially expressed genes (false discovery rate, P < .05) were identified, of which 211 were significantly upregulated and 490 downregulated by greater than 2-fold. Gene ontology terms for “extracellular space” and “defense response” were enriched, whereas “lipid metabolic processes” were downregulated. The subset of FLG wild-type cases showed dysregulation of genes involved with lipid metabolism, whereas filaggrin haploinsufficiency affected global gene expression and was characterized by a type 1 interferon–mediated stress response. Conclusion These analyses demonstrate the importance of extracellular space and lipid metabolism in atopic skin pathology independent of FLG genotype, whereas an aberrant defense response is seen in subjects with FLG mutations. Genotype stratification of the large data set has facilitated functional interpretation and might guide future therapy development. PMID:24880632

  13. Novel Host Proteins and Signaling Pathways in Enteropathogenic E. coli Pathogenesis Identified by Global Phosphoproteome Analysis*

    PubMed Central

    Scholz, Roland; Imami, Koshi; Scott, Nichollas E.; Trimble, William S.; Foster, Leonard J.; Finlay, B. Brett

    2015-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) uses a type III secretion system (T3SS) to directly translocate effector proteins into host cells where they play a pivotal role in subverting host cell signaling needed for disease. However, our knowledge of how EPEC affects host protein phosphorylation is limited to a few individual protein studies. We employed a quantitative proteomics approach to globally map alterations in the host phosphoproteome during EPEC infection. By characterizing host phosphorylation events at various time points throughout infection, we examined how EPEC dynamically impacts the host phosphoproteome over time. This experimental setup also enabled identification of T3SS-dependent and -independent changes in host phosphorylation. Specifically, T3SS-regulated events affected various cellular processes that are known EPEC targets, including cytoskeletal organization, immune signaling, and intracellular trafficking. However, the involvement of phosphorylation in these events has thus far been poorly studied. We confirmed the MAPK family as an established key host player, showed its central role in signal transduction during EPEC infection, and extended the repertoire of known signaling hubs with previously unrecognized proteins, including TPD52, CIN85, EPHA2, and HSP27. We identified altered phosphorylation of known EPEC targets, such as cofilin, where the involvement of phosphorylation has so far been undefined, thus providing novel mechanistic insights into the roles of these proteins in EPEC infection. An overlap of regulated proteins, especially those that are cytoskeleton-associated, was observed when compared with the phosphoproteome of Shigella-infected cells. We determined the biological relevance of the phosphorylation of a novel protein in EPEC pathogenesis, septin-9 (SEPT9). Both siRNA knockdown and a phosphorylation-impaired SEPT9 mutant decreased bacterial adherence and EPEC-mediated cell death. In contrast, a phosphorylation

  14. Gene expression signature-based chemical genomic prediction identifies a novel class of HSP90 pathway modulators.

    PubMed

    Hieronymus, Haley; Lamb, Justin; Ross, Kenneth N; Peng, Xiao P; Clement, Cristina; Rodina, Anna; Nieto, Maria; Du, Jinyan; Stegmaier, Kimberly; Raj, Srilakshmi M; Maloney, Katherine N; Clardy, Jon; Hahn, William C; Chiosis, Gabriela; Golub, Todd R

    2006-10-01

    Although androgen receptor (AR)-mediated signaling is central to prostate cancer, the ability to modulate AR signaling states is limited. Here we establish a chemical genomic approach for discovery and target prediction of modulators of cancer phenotypes, as exemplified by AR signaling. We first identify AR activation inhibitors, including a group of structurally related compounds comprising celastrol, gedunin, and derivatives. To develop an in silico approach for target pathway identification, we apply a gene expression-based analysis that classifies HSP90 inhibitors as having similar activity to celastrol and gedunin. Validating this prediction, we demonstrate that celastrol and gedunin inhibit HSP90 activity and HSP90 clients, including AR. Broadly, this work identifies new modes of HSP90 modulation through a gene expression-based strategy. PMID:17010675

  15. Dissecting the Gene Network of Dietary Restriction to Identify Evolutionarily Conserved Pathways and New Functional Genes

    PubMed Central

    Wuttke, Daniel; Connor, Richard; Vora, Chintan; Craig, Thomas; Li, Yang; Wood, Shona; Vasieva, Olga; Shmookler Reis, Robert; Tang, Fusheng; de Magalhães, João Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR), limiting nutrient intake from diet without causing malnutrition, delays the aging process and extends lifespan in multiple organisms. The conserved life-extending effect of DR suggests the involvement of fundamental mechanisms, although these remain a subject of debate. To help decipher the life-extending mechanisms of DR, we first compiled a list of genes that if genetically altered disrupt or prevent the life-extending effects of DR. We called these DR–essential genes and identified more than 100 in model organisms such as yeast, worms, flies, and mice. In order for other researchers to benefit from this first curated list of genes essential for DR, we established an online database called GenDR (http://genomics.senescence.info/diet/). To dissect the interactions of DR–essential genes and discover the underlying lifespan-extending mechanisms, we then used a variety of network and systems biology approaches to analyze the gene network of DR. We show that DR–essential genes are more conserved at the molecular level and have more molecular interactions than expected by chance. Furthermore, we employed a guilt-by-association method to predict novel DR–essential genes. In budding yeast, we predicted nine genes related to vacuolar functions; we show experimentally that mutations deleting eight of those genes prevent the life-extending effects of DR. Three of these mutants (OPT2, FRE6, and RCR2) had extended lifespan under ad libitum, indicating that the lack of further longevity under DR is not caused by a general compromise of fitness. These results demonstrate how network analyses of DR using GenDR can be used to make phenotypically relevant predictions. Moreover, gene-regulatory circuits reveal that the DR–induced transcriptional signature in yeast involves nutrient-sensing, stress responses and meiotic transcription factors. Finally, comparing the influence of gene expression changes during DR on the interactomes of multiple

  16. Dissecting the gene network of dietary restriction to identify evolutionarily conserved pathways and new functional genes.

    PubMed

    Wuttke, Daniel; Connor, Richard; Vora, Chintan; Craig, Thomas; Li, Yang; Wood, Shona; Vasieva, Olga; Shmookler Reis, Robert; Tang, Fusheng; de Magalhães, João Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR), limiting nutrient intake from diet without causing malnutrition, delays the aging process and extends lifespan in multiple organisms. The conserved life-extending effect of DR suggests the involvement of fundamental mechanisms, although these remain a subject of debate. To help decipher the life-extending mechanisms of DR, we first compiled a list of genes that if genetically altered disrupt or prevent the life-extending effects of DR. We called these DR-essential genes and identified more than 100 in model organisms such as yeast, worms, flies, and mice. In order for other researchers to benefit from this first curated list of genes essential for DR, we established an online database called GenDR (http://genomics.senescence.info/diet/). To dissect the interactions of DR-essential genes and discover the underlying lifespan-extending mechanisms, we then used a variety of network and systems biology approaches to analyze the gene network of DR. We show that DR-essential genes are more conserved at the molecular level and have more molecular interactions than expected by chance. Furthermore, we employed a guilt-by-association method to predict novel DR-essential genes. In budding yeast, we predicted nine genes related to vacuolar functions; we show experimentally that mutations deleting eight of those genes prevent the life-extending effects of DR. Three of these mutants (OPT2, FRE6, and RCR2) had extended lifespan under ad libitum, indicating that the lack of further longevity under DR is not caused by a general compromise of fitness. These results demonstrate how network analyses of DR using GenDR can be used to make phenotypically relevant predictions. Moreover, gene-regulatory circuits reveal that the DR-induced transcriptional signature in yeast involves nutrient-sensing, stress responses and meiotic transcription factors. Finally, comparing the influence of gene expression changes during DR on the interactomes of multiple organisms led

  17. Label-free Quantitative Urinary Proteomics Identifies the Arginase Pathway as a New Player in Congenital Obstructive Nephropathy*

    PubMed Central

    Lacroix, Chrystelle; Caubet, Cécile; Gonzalez-de-Peredo, Anne; Breuil, Benjamin; Bouyssié, David; Stella, Alexandre; Garrigues, Luc; Le Gall, Caroline; Raevel, Anthony; Massoubre, Angelique; Klein, Julie; Decramer, Stéphane; Sabourdy, Frédérique; Bandin, Flavio; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Monsarrat, Bernard; Schanstra, Joost-Peter; Bascands, Jean-Loup

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive nephropathy is a frequently encountered situation in newborns. In previous studies, the urinary peptidome has been analyzed for the identification of clinically useful biomarkers of obstructive nephropathy. However, the urinary proteome has not been explored yet and should allow additional insight into the pathophysiology of the disease. We have analyzed the urinary proteome of newborns (n = 5/group) with obstructive nephropathy using label free quantitative nanoLC-MS/MS allowing the identification and quantification of 970 urinary proteins. We next focused on proteins exclusively regulated in severe obstructive nephropathy and identified Arginase 1 as a potential candidate molecule involved in the development of obstructive nephropathy, located at the crossroad of pro- and antifibrotic pathways. The reduced urinary abundance of Arginase 1 in obstructive nephropathy was verified in independent clinical samples using both Western blot and MRM analysis. These data were confirmed in situ in kidneys obtained from a mouse obstructive nephropathy model. In addition, we also observed increased expression of Arginase 2 and increased total arginase activity in obstructed mouse kidneys. mRNA expression analysis of the related arginase pathways indicated that the pro-fibrotic arginase-related pathway is activated during obstructive nephropathy. Taken together we have identified a new actor in the development of obstructive nephropathy in newborns using quantitative urinary proteomics and shown its involvement in an in vivo model of disease. The present study demonstrates the relevance of such a quantitative urinary proteomics approach with clinical samples for a better understanding of the pathophysiology and for the discovery of potential therapeutic targets. PMID:25205225

  18. Using Ambystoma mexicanum (Mexican axolotl) embryos, chemical genetics, and microarray analysis to identify signaling pathways associated with tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ponomareva, Larissa V; Athippozhy, Antony; Thorson, Jon S; Voss, S Randal

    2015-12-01

    Amphibian vertebrates are important models in regenerative biology because they present exceptional regenerative capabilities throughout life. However, it takes considerable effort to rear amphibians to juvenile and adult stages for regeneration studies, and the relatively large sizes that frogs and salamanders achieve during development make them difficult to use in chemical screens. Here, we introduce a new tail regeneration model using late stage Mexican axolotl embryos. We show that axolotl embryos completely regenerate amputated tails in 7days before they exhaust their yolk supply and begin to feed. Further, we show that axolotl embryos can be efficiently reared in microtiter plates to achieve moderate throughput screening of soluble chemicals to investigate toxicity and identify molecules that alter regenerative outcome. As proof of principle, we identified integration 1 / wingless (Wnt), transforming growth factor beta (Tgf-β), and fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) pathway antagonists that completely block tail regeneration and additional chemicals that significantly affected tail outgrowth. Furthermore, we used microarray analysis to show that inhibition of Wnt signaling broadly affects transcription of genes associated with Wnt, Fgf, Tgf-β, epidermal growth factor (Egf), Notch, nerve growth factor (Ngf), homeotic gene (Hox), rat sarcoma/mitogen-activated protein kinase (Ras/Mapk), myelocytomatosis viral oncogene (Myc), tumor protein 53 (p53), and retinoic acid (RA) pathways. Punctuated changes in the expression of genes known to regulate vertebrate development were observed; this suggests the tail regeneration transcriptional program is hierarchically structured and temporally ordered. Our study establishes the axolotl as a chemical screening model to investigate signaling pathways associated with tissue regeneration.

  19. Using Ambystoma mexicanum (Mexican axolotl) embryos, chemical genetics, and microarray analysis to identify signaling pathways associated with tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ponomareva, Larissa V; Athippozhy, Antony; Thorson, Jon S; Voss, S Randal

    2015-12-01

    Amphibian vertebrates are important models in regenerative biology because they present exceptional regenerative capabilities throughout life. However, it takes considerable effort to rear amphibians to juvenile and adult stages for regeneration studies, and the relatively large sizes that frogs and salamanders achieve during development make them difficult to use in chemical screens. Here, we introduce a new tail regeneration model using late stage Mexican axolotl embryos. We show that axolotl embryos completely regenerate amputated tails in 7days before they exhaust their yolk supply and begin to feed. Further, we show that axolotl embryos can be efficiently reared in microtiter plates to achieve moderate throughput screening of soluble chemicals to investigate toxicity and identify molecules that alter regenerative outcome. As proof of principle, we identified integration 1 / wingless (Wnt), transforming growth factor beta (Tgf-β), and fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) pathway antagonists that completely block tail regeneration and additional chemicals that significantly affected tail outgrowth. Furthermore, we used microarray analysis to show that inhibition of Wnt signaling broadly affects transcription of genes associated with Wnt, Fgf, Tgf-β, epidermal growth factor (Egf), Notch, nerve growth factor (Ngf), homeotic gene (Hox), rat sarcoma/mitogen-activated protein kinase (Ras/Mapk), myelocytomatosis viral oncogene (Myc), tumor protein 53 (p53), and retinoic acid (RA) pathways. Punctuated changes in the expression of genes known to regulate vertebrate development were observed; this suggests the tail regeneration transcriptional program is hierarchically structured and temporally ordered. Our study establishes the axolotl as a chemical screening model to investigate signaling pathways associated with tissue regeneration. PMID:26092703

  20. A high throughput screening strategy to identify protein-protein interaction inhibitors that block the Fanconi anemia DNA repair pathway

    PubMed Central

    Voter, Andrew F.; Manthei, Kelly A.

    2016-01-01

    Induction of the Fanconi anemia (FA) DNA repair pathway is a common mechanism by which tumors evolve resistance to DNA crosslinking chemotherapies. Proper execution of the FA pathway requires interaction between the FA complementation group M protein (FANCM) and the RecQ-mediated genome instability protein (RMI) complex, and mutations that disrupt FANCM/RMI interactions sensitize cells to DNA crosslinking agents. Inhibitors that block FANCM/RMI complex formation could be useful therapeutics for re-sensitizing tumors that have acquired chemotherapeutic resistance. To identify such inhibitors, we have developed and validated high-throughput fluorescence polarization and proximity assays that are sensitive to inhibitors that disrupt interactions between the RMI complex and its binding site on FANCM (a peptide referred to as MM2). A pilot screen of 74,807 small molecules was performed using the fluorescence polarization assay. Hits from the primary screen were further tested using the proximity assay and an orthogonal proximity assay was used to assess inhibitor selectivity. Direct physical interaction between the RMI complex and the most selective inhibitor identified through the screening process was measured by surface plasmon resonance and isothermal titration calorimetry. Observation of direct binding by this small molecule validates the screening protocol. PMID:26962873

  1. Adaptative biochemical pathways and regulatory networks in Klebsiella oxytoca BAS-10 producing a biotechnologically relevant exopolysaccharide during Fe(III)-citrate fermentation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A bacterial strain previously isolated from pyrite mine drainage and named BAS-10 was tentatively identified as Klebsiella oxytoca. Unlikely other enterobacteria, BAS-10 is able to grow on Fe(III)-citrate as sole carbon and energy source, yielding acetic acid and CO2 coupled with Fe(III) reduction to Fe(II) and showing unusual physiological characteristics. In fact, under this growth condition, BAS-10 produces an exopolysaccharide (EPS) having a high rhamnose content and metal-binding properties, whose biotechnological applications were proven as very relevant. Results Further phylogenetic analysis, based on 16S rDNA sequence, definitively confirmed that BAS-10 belongs to K. oxytoca species. In order to rationalize the biochemical peculiarities of this unusual enterobacteriun, combined 2D-Differential Gel Electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) analysis and mass spectrometry procedures were used to investigate its proteomic changes: i) under aerobic or anaerobic cultivation with Fe(III)-citrate as sole carbon source; ii) under anaerobic cultivations using Na(I)-citrate or Fe(III)-citrate as sole carbon source. Combining data from these differential studies peculiar levels of outer membrane proteins, key regulatory factors of carbon and nitrogen metabolism and enzymes involved in TCA cycle and sugar biosynthesis or required for citrate fermentation and stress response during anaerobic growth on Fe(III)-citrate were revealed. The protein differential regulation seems to ensure efficient cell growth coupled with EPS production by adapting metabolic and biochemical processes in order to face iron toxicity and to optimize energy production. Conclusion Differential proteomics provided insights on the molecular mechanisms necessary for anaeorobic utilization of Fe(III)-citrate in a biotechnologically promising enterobacteriun, also revealing genes that can be targeted for the rational design of high-yielding EPS producer strains. PMID:23176641

  2. A Pathway Closely Related to the d-Tagatose Pathway of Gram-Negative Enterobacteria Identified in the Gram-Positive Bacterium Bacillus licheniformis

    PubMed Central

    Van der Heiden, Edwige; Lebrun, Sarah; Freichels, Régine; Brans, Alain; Vastenavond, Christian M.; Galleni, Moreno; Joris, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    We report the first identification of a gene cluster involved in d-tagatose catabolism in Bacillus licheniformis. The pathway is closely related to the d-tagatose pathway of the Gram-negative bacterium Klebsiella oxytoca, in contrast to the d-tagatose 6-phosphate pathway described in the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:23524682

  3. A pathway-based approach for identifying biomarkers of tumor progression to trastuzumab-resistant breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Nam, Seungyoon; Chang, Hae Ryung; Jung, Hae Rim; Gim, Youme; Kim, Nam Youl; Grailhe, Regis; Seo, Haeng Ran; Park, Hee Seo; Balch, Curt; Lee, Jinhyuk; Park, Inhae; Jung, So Youn; Jeong, Kyung-Chae; Powis, Garth; Liang, Han; Lee, Eun Sook; Ro, Jungsil; Kim, Yon Hui

    2015-01-28

    Although trastuzumab is a successful targeted therapy for breast cancer patients with tumors expressing HER2 (ERBB2), many patients eventually progress to drug resistance. Here, we identified subpathways differentially expressed between trastuzumab-resistant vs. -sensitive breast cancer cells, in conjunction with additional transcriptomic preclinical and clinical gene datasets, to rigorously identify overexpressed, resistance-associated genes. From this approach, we identified 32 genes reproducibly upregulated in trastuzumab resistance. 25 genes were upregulated in drug-resistant JIMT-1 cells, which also downregulated HER2 protein by >80% in the presence of trastuzumab. 24 genes were downregulated in trastuzumab-sensitive SKBR3 cells. Trastuzumab sensitivity was restored by siRNA knockdown of these genes in the resistant cells, and overexpression of 5 of the 25 genes was found in at least one of five refractory HER2 + breast cancer. In summary, our rigorous computational approach, followed by experimental validation, significantly implicate ATF4, CHEK2, ENAH, ICOSLG, and RAD51 as potential biomarkers of trastuzumab resistance. These results provide further proof-of-concept of our methodology for successfully identifying potential biomarkers and druggable signal pathways involved in tumor progression to drug resistance.

  4. Forward genetic screen for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor formation identifies new genes and genetic pathways driving tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rahrmann, Eric P; Watson, Adrienne L; Keng, Vincent W; Choi, Kwangmin; Moriarity, Branden S; Beckmann, Dominic A; Wolf, Natalie; Sarver, Aaron; Collins, Margaret H; Moertel, Christopher L; Wallace, Margaret R; Gel, Bernat; Serra, Eduard; Ratner, Nancy; Largaespada, David A

    2013-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are sarcomas of Schwann cell-lineage origin that occur sporadically or in association with the inherited syndrome, Neurofibromatosis Type 1. To identify genetic drivers of MPNST development, we utilized the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon-based somatic mutagenesis system in mice with somatic loss of tumor protein p53 (Trp53) function and/or overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Common insertion site (CIS) analysis of 269 neurofibromas and 106 MPNSTs identified 695 and 87 sites with a statistically significant number of recurrent transposon insertions, respectively. Comparison to human data sets revealed novel and known driver genes for MPNST formation at these sites. Pairwise co-occurrence analysis of CIS-associated genes identified many cooperating mutations that are enriched for in Wnt/CTNNB1, PI3K/Akt/mTor, and growth factor receptor signaling pathways. Lastly, we identified several novel proto-oncogenes including forkhead box R2 (Foxr2), which we functionally validated as a proto-oncogene involved in MPNST maintenance. PMID:23685747

  5. Biochemical characterization and selective inhibition of β-carotene cis-trans isomerase D27 and carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase CCD8 on the strigolactone biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Peter J; Newgas, Sophie A; Descombes, Flora; Shepherd, Sarah A; Thompson, Andrew J; Bugg, Timothy D H

    2015-10-01

    The first three enzymatic steps of the strigolactone biosynthetic pathway catalysed by β-carotene cis-trans isomerase Dwarf27 (D27) from Oryza sativa and carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases CCD7 and CCD8 from Arabidopsis thaliana have been reconstituted in vitro, and kinetic assays have been developed for each enzyme, in order to develop selective enzyme inhibitors. Recombinant OsD27 shows a UV-visible λmax at 422 nm and is inactivated by silver(I) acetate, consistent with the presence of an iron-sulfur cluster that is used in catalysis. OsD27 and AtCCD7 are not inhibited by hydroxamic acids that cause shoot branching in planta, but OsD27 is partially inhibited by terpene-like hydroxamic acids. The reaction catalysed by AtCCD8 is shown to be a two-step kinetic mechanism using pre-steady-state kinetic analysis. Kinetic evidence is presented for acid-base catalysis in the CCD8 catalytic cycle and the existence of an essential cysteine residue in the CCD8 active site. AtCCD8 is inhibited in a time-dependent fashion by hydroxamic acids D2, D4, D5 and D6 (> 95% inhibition at 100 μm) that cause a shoot branching phenotype in A. thaliana, and selective inhibition of CCD8 is observed using hydroxamic acids D13H and D15 (82%, 71% inhibition at 10 μm). The enzyme inhibition data imply that the biochemical basis of the shoot branching phenotype is due to inhibition of CCD8.

  6. Biochemical characterization and selective inhibition of β-carotene cis-trans isomerase D27 and carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase CCD8 on the strigolactone biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Peter J; Newgas, Sophie A; Descombes, Flora; Shepherd, Sarah A; Thompson, Andrew J; Bugg, Timothy D H

    2015-10-01

    The first three enzymatic steps of the strigolactone biosynthetic pathway catalysed by β-carotene cis-trans isomerase Dwarf27 (D27) from Oryza sativa and carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases CCD7 and CCD8 from Arabidopsis thaliana have been reconstituted in vitro, and kinetic assays have been developed for each enzyme, in order to develop selective enzyme inhibitors. Recombinant OsD27 shows a UV-visible λmax at 422 nm and is inactivated by silver(I) acetate, consistent with the presence of an iron-sulfur cluster that is used in catalysis. OsD27 and AtCCD7 are not inhibited by hydroxamic acids that cause shoot branching in planta, but OsD27 is partially inhibited by terpene-like hydroxamic acids. The reaction catalysed by AtCCD8 is shown to be a two-step kinetic mechanism using pre-steady-state kinetic analysis. Kinetic evidence is presented for acid-base catalysis in the CCD8 catalytic cycle and the existence of an essential cysteine residue in the CCD8 active site. AtCCD8 is inhibited in a time-dependent fashion by hydroxamic acids D2, D4, D5 and D6 (> 95% inhibition at 100 μm) that cause a shoot branching phenotype in A. thaliana, and selective inhibition of CCD8 is observed using hydroxamic acids D13H and D15 (82%, 71% inhibition at 10 μm). The enzyme inhibition data imply that the biochemical basis of the shoot branching phenotype is due to inhibition of CCD8. PMID:26257333

  7. What makes the lac-pathway switch: identifying the fluctuations that trigger phenotype switching in gene regulatory systems.

    PubMed

    Bhogale, Prasanna M; Sorg, Robin A; Veening, Jan-Willem; Berg, Johannes

    2014-10-01

    Multistable gene regulatory systems sustain different levels of gene expression under identical external conditions. Such multistability is used to encode phenotypic states in processes including nutrient uptake and persistence in bacteria, fate selection in viral infection, cell-cycle control and development. Stochastic switching between different phenotypes can occur as the result of random fluctuations in molecular copy numbers of mRNA and proteins arising in transcription, translation, transport and binding. However, which component of a pathway triggers such a transition is generally not known. By linking single-cell experiments on the lactose-uptake pathway in E. coli to molecular simulations, we devise a general method to pinpoint the particular fluctuation driving phenotype switching and apply this method to the transition between the uninduced and induced states of the lac-genes. We find that the transition to the induced state is not caused only by the single event of lac-repressor unbinding, but depends crucially on the time period over which the repressor remains unbound from the lac-operon. We confirm this notion in strains with a high expression level of the lac-repressor (leading to shorter periods over which the lac-operon remains unbound), which show a reduced switching rate. Our techniques apply to multistable gene regulatory systems in general and allow to identify the molecular mechanisms behind stochastic transitions in gene regulatory circuits. PMID:25245949

  8. A Sulfite Respiration Pathway from Thermus thermophilus and the Key Role of Newly Identified Cytochrome c550 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Robin, Sylvain; Arese, Marzia; Forte, Elena; Sarti, Paolo; Giuffrè, Alessandro; Soulimane, Tewfik

    2011-01-01

    Sulfite, produced for instance during amino acid metabolism, is a very reactive and toxic compound. Various detoxification mechanisms exist, but sulfite oxidoreductases (SORs) are one of the major actors in sulfite remediation in bacteria and animals. Here we describe the existence of an operon in the extreme thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus HB8 encoding both a SOR and a diheme c-type cytochrome. The in vitro analysis clearly showed that the newly identified cytochrome c550 acts as an acceptor of the electrons generated by the SOR enzyme during the oxidation of sulfite. The electrons are then rapidly shuttled via cytochrome c552 to the terminal ba3- and caa3-type oxidases, thereby unveiling a novel electron transfer pathway, linking sulfite oxidation to oxygen reduction in T. thermophilus: sulfite → SORHB8 → cytochrome c550 → cytochrome c552 → ba3 oxidase/caa3 oxidase → O2. The description of the complete pathway reveals that electrons generated during sulfite oxidation by the SOR are funneled into the respiratory chain, participating in the energy production of T. thermophilus. PMID:21665981

  9. Long-term consequences of pubertal timing for youth depression: Identifying personal and contextual pathways of risk

    PubMed Central

    RUDOLPH, KAREN D.; TROOP-GORDON, WENDY; LAMBERT, SHARON F.; NATSUAKI, MISAKI N.

    2015-01-01

    This research explored sex differences in the pathways linking pubertal timing to depression across 4 years. A sample of 167 youth (M age = 12.41 years, SD = 1.19) and their caregivers completed measures of puberty and semistructured interviews of interpersonal stress and youth depression. Youth reported on psychological (negative self-focus, anxious arousal) and social–behavioral (coping) characteristics; parents reported on youths’ social–behavioral characteristics (withdrawal/social problems) and deviant peer affiliations. Early maturation predicted stable high trajectories of depression in girls; although early maturing boys showed low initial levels of depression, they did not differ from girls by the final wave of the study. Latent growth curve analyses identified several psychological, social–behavioral, and interpersonal pathways accounting for the contribution of pubertal timing to initial and enduring risk for depression in girls as well as emerging risk for depression in boys. These findings provide novel insight into multilevel processes accounting for sex differences in depression across the adolescent transition. PMID:25422971

  10. Functional genomics identifies five distinct molecular subtypes with clinical relevance and pathways for growth control in epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Tuan Zea; Miow, Qing Hao; Huang, Ruby Yun-Ju; Wong, Meng Kang; Ye, Jieru; Lau, Jieying Amelia; Wu, Meng Chu; Bin Abdul Hadi, Luqman Hakim; Soong, Richie; Choolani, Mahesh; Davidson, Ben; Nesland, Jahn M; Wang, Ling-Zhi; Matsumura, Noriomi; Mandai, Masaki; Konishi, Ikuo; Goh, Boon-Cher; Chang, Jeffrey T; Thiery, Jean Paul; Mori, Seiichi

    2013-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is hallmarked by a high degree of heterogeneity. To address this heterogeneity, a classification scheme was developed based on gene expression patterns of 1538 tumours. Five, biologically distinct subgroups — Epi-A, Epi-B, Mes, Stem-A and Stem-B — exhibited significantly distinct clinicopathological characteristics, deregulated pathways and patient prognoses, and were validated using independent datasets. To identify subtype-specific molecular targets, ovarian cancer cell lines representing these molecular subtypes were screened against a genome-wide shRNA library. Focusing on the poor-prognosis Stem-A subtype, we found that two genes involved in tubulin processing, TUBGCP4 and NAT10, were essential for cell growth, an observation supported by a pathway analysis that also predicted involvement of microtubule-related processes. Furthermore, we observed that Stem-A cell lines were indeed more sensitive to inhibitors of tubulin polymerization, vincristine and vinorelbine, than the other subtypes. This subtyping offers new insights into the development of novel diagnostic and personalized treatment for EOC patients. PMID:23666744

  11. Neuronal Expression of the Human Neuropeptide S Receptor NPSR1 Identifies NPS-Induced Calcium Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Erdmann, Frank; Kügler, Sebastian; Blaesse, Peter; Lange, Maren D.; Skryabin, Boris V.; Pape, Hans-Christian; Jüngling, Kay

    2015-01-01

    The neuropeptide S (NPS) system was discovered as a novel neurotransmitter system a decade ago and has since been identified as a key player in the modulation of fear and anxiety. Genetic variations of the human NPS receptor (NPSR1) have been associated with pathologies like panic disorders. However, details on the molecular fundamentals of NPSR1 activity in neurons remained elusive. We expressed NPSR1 in primary hippocampal cultures. Using single-cell calcium imaging we found that NPSR1 stimulation induced calcium mobilization from the endoplasmic reticulum via activation of IP3 and ryanodine receptors. Store-operated calcium channels were activated in a downstream process mediating entry of extracellular calcium. We provide the first detailed analysis of NPSR1 activity and the underlying intracellular pathways with respect to calcium mobilization in neurons. PMID:25714705

  12. Pathway-Centric Integrative Analysis Identifies RRM2 as a Prognostic Marker in Breast Cancer Associated with Poor Survival and Tamoxifen Resistance123

    PubMed Central

    Putluri, Nagireddy; Maity, Suman; Kommangani, Ramakrishna; Creighton, Chad J.; Putluri, Vasanta; Chen, Fengju; Nanda, Sarmishta; Bhowmik, Salil Kumar; Terunuma, Atsushi; Dorsey, Tiffany; Nardone, Agostina; Fu, Xiaoyong; Shaw, Chad; Sarkar, Tapasree Roy; Schiff, Rachel; Lydon, John P.; O’Malley, Bert W.; Ambs, Stefan; Das, Gokul M.; Michailidis, George; Sreekumar, Arun

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer (BCa) molecular subtypes include luminal A, luminal B, normal-like, HER-2–enriched, and basal-like tumors, among which luminal B and basal-like cancers are highly aggressive. Biochemical pathways associated with patient survival or treatment response in these more aggressive subtypes are not well understood. With the limited availability of pathologically verified clinical specimens, cell line models are routinely used for pathway-centric studies. We measured the metabolome of luminal and basal-like BCa cell lines using mass spectrometry, linked metabolites to biochemical pathways using Gene Set Analysis, and developed a novel rank-based method to select pathways on the basis of their enrichment in patient-derived omics data sets and prognostic relevance. Key mediators of the pathway were then characterized for their role in disease progression. Pyrimidine metabolism was altered in luminal versus basal BCa, whereas the combined expression of its associated genes or expression of one key gene, ribonucleotide reductase subunit M2 (RRM2) alone, associated significantly with decreased survival across all BCa subtypes, as well as in luminal patients resistant to tamoxifen. Increased RRM2 expression in tamoxifen-resistant patients was verified using tissue microarrays, whereas the metabolic products of RRM2 were higher in tamoxifen-resistant cells and in xenograft tumors. Both genetic and pharmacological inhibition of this key enzyme in tamoxifen-resistant cells significantly decreased proliferation, reduced expression of cell cycle genes, and sensitized the cells to tamoxifen treatment. Our study suggests for evaluating RRM2-associated metabolites as noninvasive markers for tamoxifen resistance and its pharmacological inhibition as a novel approach to overcome tamoxifen resistance in BCa. PMID:25016594

  13. Pathway-centric integrative analysis identifies RRM2 as a prognostic marker in breast cancer associated with poor survival and tamoxifen resistance.

    PubMed

    Putluri, Nagireddy; Maity, Suman; Kommagani, Ramakrishna; Kommangani, Ramakrishna; Creighton, Chad J; Putluri, Vasanta; Chen, Fengju; Nanda, Sarmishta; Bhowmik, Salil Kumar; Terunuma, Atsushi; Dorsey, Tiffany; Nardone, Agostina; Fu, Xiaoyong; Shaw, Chad; Sarkar, Tapasree Roy; Schiff, Rachel; Lydon, John P; O'Malley, Bert W; Ambs, Stefan; Das, Gokul M; Michailidis, George; Sreekumar, Arun

    2014-05-01

    Breast cancer (BCa) molecular subtypes include luminal A, luminal B, normal-like, HER-2-enriched, and basal-like tumors, among which luminal B and basal-like cancers are highly aggressive. Biochemical pathways associated with patient survival or treatment response in these more aggressive subtypes are not well understood. With the limited availability of pathologically verified clinical specimens, cell line models are routinely used for pathway-centric studies. We measured the metabolome of luminal and basal-like BCa cell lines using mass spectrometry, linked metabolites to biochemical pathways using Gene Set Analysis, and developed a novel rank-based method to select pathways on the basis of their enrichment in patient-derived omics data sets and prognostic relevance. Key mediators of the pathway were then characterized for their role in disease progression. Pyrimidine metabolism was altered in luminal versus basal BCa, whereas the combined expression of its associated genes or expression of one key gene, ribonucleotide reductase subunit M2 (RRM2) alone, associated significantly with decreased survival across all BCa subtypes, as well as in luminal patients resistant to tamoxifen. Increased RRM2 expression in tamoxifen-resistant patients was verified using tissue microarrays, whereas the metabolic products of RRM2 were higher in tamoxifen-resistant cells and in xenograft tumors. Both genetic and pharmacological inhibition of this key enzyme in tamoxifen-resistant cells significantly decreased proliferation, reduced expression of cell cycle genes, and sensitized the cells to tamoxifen treatment. Our study suggests for evaluating RRM2-associated metabolites as noninvasive markers for tamoxifen resistance and its pharmacological inhibition as a novel approach to overcome tamoxifen resistance in BCa. PMID:25016594

  14. Systems-Based Analysis of the Sarcocystis neurona Genome Identifies Pathways That Contribute to a Heteroxenous Life Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Blazejewski, Tomasz; Nursimulu, Nirvana; Pszenny, Viviana; Dangoudoubiyam, Sriveny; Namasivayam, Sivaranjani; Chiasson, Melissa A.; Chessman, Kyle; Tonkin, Michelle; Swapna, Lakshmipuram S.; Hung, Stacy S.; Bridgers, Joshua; Ricklefs, Stacy M.; Boulanger, Martin J.; Dubey, Jitender P.; Porcella, Stephen F.; Kissinger, Jessica C.; Howe, Daniel K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sarcocystis neurona is a member of the coccidia, a clade of single-celled parasites of medical and veterinary importance including Eimeria, Sarcocystis, Neospora, and Toxoplasma. Unlike Eimeria, a single-host enteric pathogen, Sarcocystis, Neospora, and Toxoplasma are two-host parasites that infect and produce infectious tissue cysts in a wide range of intermediate hosts. As a genus, Sarcocystis is one of the most successful protozoan parasites; all vertebrates, including birds, reptiles, fish, and mammals are hosts to at least one Sarcocystis species. Here we sequenced Sarcocystis neurona, the causal agent of fatal equine protozoal myeloencephalitis. The S. neurona genome is 127 Mbp, more than twice the size of other sequenced coccidian genomes. Comparative analyses identified conservation of the invasion machinery among the coccidia. However, many dense-granule and rhoptry kinase genes, responsible for altering host effector pathways in Toxoplasma and Neospora, are absent from S. neurona. Further, S. neurona has a divergent repertoire of SRS proteins, previously implicated in tissue cyst formation in Toxoplasma. Systems-based analyses identified a series of metabolic innovations, including the ability to exploit alternative sources of energy. Finally, we present an S. neurona model detailing conserved molecular innovations that promote the transition from a purely enteric lifestyle (Eimeria) to a heteroxenous parasite capable of infecting a wide range of intermediate hosts. PMID:25670772

  15. Development of a pluripotent stem cell derived neuronal model to identify chemically induced pathway perturbations in relation to neurotoxicity: Effects of CREB pathway inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Pistollato, Francesca; Louisse, Jochem; Scelfo, Bibiana; Mennecozzi, Milena; Accordi, Benedetta; Basso, Giuseppe; Gaspar, John Antonydas; Zagoura, Dimitra; Barilari, Manuela; Palosaari, Taina; Sachinidis, Agapios; Bremer-Hoffmann, Susanne

    2014-10-15

    According to the advocated paradigm shift in toxicology, acquisition of knowledge on the mechanisms underlying the toxicity of chemicals, such as perturbations of biological pathways, is of primary interest. Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), such as human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), offer a unique opportunity to derive physiologically relevant human cell types to measure molecular and cellular effects of such pathway modulations. Here we compared the neuronal differentiation propensity of hESCs and hiPSCs with the aim to develop novel hiPSC-based tools for measuring pathway perturbation in relation to molecular and cellular effects in vitro. Among other fundamental pathways, also, the cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB) pathway was activated in our neuronal models and gave us the opportunity to study time-dependent effects elicited by chemical perturbations of the CREB pathway in relation to cellular effects. We show that the inhibition of the CREB pathway, using 2-naphthol-AS-E-phosphate (KG-501), induced an inhibition of neurite outgrowth and synaptogenesis, as well as a decrease of MAP2{sup +} neuronal cells. These data indicate that a CREB pathway inhibition can be related to molecular and cellular effects that may be relevant for neurotoxicity testing, and, thus, qualify the use of our hiPSC-derived neuronal model for studying chemical-induced neurotoxicity resulting from pathway perturbations. - Highlights: • HESCs derived neuronal cells serve as benchmark for iPSC based neuronal toxicity test development. • Comparisons between hESCs and hiPSCs demonstrated variability of the epigenetic state • CREB pathway modulation have been explored in relation to the neurotoxicant exposure KG-501 • hiPSC might be promising tools to translate theoretical AoPs into toxicological in vitro tests.

  16. An automated RNA-Seq analysis pipeline to identify and visualize differentially expressed genes and pathways in CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun; Le, Huong; Goudar, Chetan T

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in RNA-Seq based comparative transcriptomics have opened up a unique opportunity to understand the mechanisms of different phenotypes in bioprocessing-related cell lines including Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. However, simple and powerful tools are needed to translate large data sets into biologically relevant information that can be leveraged for genetic engineering and cell culture medium and process development. While tools exist to perform specific tasks associated with transcriptomics analysis, integrated end to end solutions that span the entire spectrum of raw data processing to visualization of gene expression changes on canonical pathways are rare. Additionally, these are not automated and require substantial user intervention. To address this gap, we have developed an automated RNA-Seq analysis pipeline in R which leverages the latest public domain statistical advances in transcriptomics data analysis. This pipeline reads RNA-Seq gene count data, identifies differentially expressed genes and differentially expressed pathways, and provides multiple intuitive visualizations as outputs. By using two publicly available CHO RNA-Seq datasets, we have demonstrated the utility of this pipeline. Subsequently, this pipeline was used to demonstrate transcriptomic similarity between laboratory- and pilot-scale bioreactors, helping make a case for the suitability of the lab-scale bioreactor as a scaled-down model. Automated end to end RNA-Seq data analysis approaches such as the one presented in this study will shorten the time required from acquiring sequencing data to biological interpretation of the results and can help accelerate the adoption of RNA-Seq analysis and thus mechanism-driven approaches for cell line and bioprocess optimization.

  17. A Kinetic-Model-Based Approach to Identify Malfunctioning Components in Signal Transduction Pathways from Artificial Clinical Data.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianhua; Ribaudo, Nicholas; Huang, Zuyi Jacky

    2015-01-01

    Detection of malfunctioning reactions or molecules from clinical data is essential for disease treatments. In order to find an alternative to the existing oversimplistic mathematical models, a kinetic model is developed in this work to infer the malfunctioning reactions/molecules by quantifying the similarity between the clinical profile and the output profiles predicted from the model in which certain reactions/molecules malfunction. The new approach was tested in IL-6 and TNF-α/NF-κB signaling pathway, for four abnormal conditions including up/downregulation of single reaction rate constants and up/downregulation of single molecules. Since limited quantitative clinical data were available, the IL-6 ODE model was used to generate artificial clinical data for the abnormal steady-state value shown in two key molecules: nuclear STAT3 and SOCS3. Similarly, the TNF-α/NF-κB model was used to obtain the data in which abnormal oscillation dynamic was shown in the profile of NF-κB. The results show that the approach developed in this study was able to successfully identify the malfunctioning reactions and molecules from the clinical data. It was also found that this new approach was noise-robust and that it managed to reveal unique solution for the faulty components in a network. PMID:26697484

  18. A Kinetic-Model-Based Approach to Identify Malfunctioning Components in Signal Transduction Pathways from Artificial Clinical Data

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xianhua; Ribaudo, Nicholas; Huang, Zuyi (Jacky)

    2015-01-01

    Detection of malfunctioning reactions or molecules from clinical data is essential for disease treatments. In order to find an alternative to the existing oversimplistic mathematical models, a kinetic model is developed in this work to infer the malfunctioning reactions/molecules by quantifying the similarity between the clinical profile and the output profiles predicted from the model in which certain reactions/molecules malfunction. The new approach was tested in IL-6 and TNF-α/NF-κB signaling pathway, for four abnormal conditions including up/downregulation of single reaction rate constants and up/downregulation of single molecules. Since limited quantitative clinical data were available, the IL-6 ODE model was used to generate artificial clinical data for the abnormal steady-state value shown in two key molecules: nuclear STAT3 and SOCS3. Similarly, the TNF-α/NF-κB model was used to obtain the data in which abnormal oscillation dynamic was shown in the profile of NF-κB. The results show that the approach developed in this study was able to successfully identify the malfunctioning reactions and molecules from the clinical data. It was also found that this new approach was noise-robust and that it managed to reveal unique solution for the faulty components in a network. PMID:26697484

  19. First quantitative high-throughput screen in zebrafish identifies novel pathways for increasing pancreatic β-cell mass

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangliang; Rajpurohit, Surendra K; Delaspre, Fabien; Walker, Steven L; White, David T; Ceasrine, Alexis; Kuruvilla, Rejji; Li, Ruo-jing; Shim, Joong S; Liu, Jun O; Parsons, Michael J; Mumm, Jeff S

    2015-01-01

    Whole-organism chemical screening can circumvent bottlenecks that impede drug discovery. However, in vivo screens have not attained throughput capacities possible with in vitro assays. We therefore developed a method enabling in vivo high-throughput screening (HTS) in zebrafish, termed automated reporter quantification in vivo (ARQiv). In this study, ARQiv was combined with robotics to fully actualize whole-organism HTS (ARQiv-HTS). In a primary screen, this platform quantified cell-specific fluorescent reporters in >500,000 transgenic zebrafish larvae to identify FDA-approved (Federal Drug Administration) drugs that increased the number of insulin-producing β cells in the pancreas. 24 drugs were confirmed as inducers of endocrine differentiation and/or stimulators of β-cell proliferation. Further, we discovered novel roles for NF-κB signaling in regulating endocrine differentiation and for serotonergic signaling in selectively stimulating β-cell proliferation. These studies demonstrate the power of ARQiv-HTS for drug discovery and provide unique insights into signaling pathways controlling β-cell mass, potential therapeutic targets for treating diabetes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08261.001 PMID:26218223

  20. Gene expression profiling and candidate gene resequencing identifies pathways and mutations important for malignant transformation caused by leukemogenic fusion genes.

    PubMed

    Novak, Rachel L; Harper, David P; Caudell, David; Slape, Christopher; Beachy, Sarah H; Aplan, Peter D

    2012-12-01

    NUP98-HOXD13 (NHD13) and CALM-AF10 (CA10) are oncogenic fusion proteins produced by recurrent chromosomal translocations in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Transgenic mice that express these fusions develop AML with a long latency and incomplete penetrance, suggesting that collaborating genetic events are required for leukemic transformation. We employed genetic techniques to identify both preleukemic abnormalities in healthy transgenic mice as well as collaborating events leading to leukemic transformation. Candidate gene resequencing revealed that 6 of 27 (22%) CA10 AMLs spontaneously acquired a Ras pathway mutation and 8 of 27 (30%) acquired an Flt3 mutation. Two CA10 AMLs acquired an Flt3 internal-tandem duplication, demonstrating that these mutations can be acquired in murine as well as human AML. Gene expression profiles revealed a marked upregulation of Hox genes, particularly Hoxa5, Hoxa9, and Hoxa10 in both NHD13 and CA10 mice. Furthermore, mir196b, which is embedded within the Hoxa locus, was overexpressed in both CA10 and NHD13 samples. In contrast, the Hox cofactors Meis1 and Pbx3 were differentially expressed; Meis1 was increased in CA10 AMLs but not NHD13 AMLs, whereas Pbx3 was consistently increased in NHD13 but not CA10 AMLs. Silencing of Pbx3 in NHD13 cells led to decreased proliferation, increased apoptosis, and decreased colony formation in vitro, suggesting a previously unexpected role for Pbx3 in leukemic transformation.

  1. Mutations in TLR/MYD88 pathway identify a subset of young chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients with favorable outcome.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Trillos, Alejandra; Pinyol, Magda; Navarro, Alba; Aymerich, Marta; Jares, Pedro; Juan, Manel; Rozman, María; Colomer, Dolors; Delgado, Julio; Giné, Eva; González-Díaz, Marcos; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M; Colado, Enrique; Rayón, Consolación; Payer, Angel R; Terol, Maria José; Navarro, Blanca; Quesada, Victor; Puente, Xosé S; Rozman, Ciril; López-Otín, Carlos; Campo, Elías; López-Guillermo, Armando; Villamor, Neus

    2014-06-12

    Mutations in Toll-like receptor (TLR) and myeloid differentiation primary response 88 (MYD88) genes have been found in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) at low frequency. We analyzed the incidence, clinicobiological characteristics, and outcome of patients with TLR/MYD88 mutations in 587 CLL patients. Twenty-three patients (3.9%) had mutations, 19 in MYD88 (one with concurrent IRAK1 mutation), 2 TLR2 (one with concomitant TLR6 mutation), 1 IRAK1, and 1 TLR5. No mutations were found in IRAK2 and IRAK4. TLR/MYD88-mutated CLL overexpressed genes of the nuclear factor κB pathway. Patients with TLR/MYD88 mutations were significantly younger (83% age ≤50 years) than those with no mutations. TLR/MYD88 mutations were the most frequent in young patients. Patients with mutated TLR/MYD88 CLL had a higher frequency of mutated IGHV and low expression of CD38 and ZAP-70. Overall survival (OS) was better in TLR/MYD88-mutated than unmutated patients in the whole series (10-year OS, 100% vs 62%; P = .002), and in the subset of patients age ≤50 years (100% vs 70%; P = .02). In addition, relative OS of TLR/MYD88-mutated patients was similar to that in the age- and gender-matched population. In summary, TLR/MYD88 mutations identify a population of young CLL patients with favorable outcome. PMID:24782504

  2. Identifying early pathways of risk and resilience: The codevelopment of internalizing and externalizing symptoms and the role of harsh parenting.

    PubMed

    Wiggins, Jillian Lee; Mitchell, Colter; Hyde, Luke W; Monk, Christopher S

    2015-11-01

    Psychological disorders co-occur often in children, but little has been done to document the types of conjoint pathways internalizing and externalizing symptoms may take from the crucial early period of toddlerhood or how harsh parenting may overlap with early symptom codevelopment. To examine symptom codevelopment trajectories, we identified latent classes of individuals based on internalizing and externalizing symptoms across ages 3-9 and found three symptom codevelopment classes: normative symptoms (low), severe-decreasing symptoms (initially high but rapidly declining), and severe symptoms (high) trajectories. Next, joint models examined how parenting trajectories overlapped with internalizing and externalizing symptom trajectories. These trajectory classes demonstrated that, normatively, harsh parenting increased after toddlerhood, but the severe symptoms class was characterized by a higher level and a steeper increase in harsh parenting and the severe-decreasing class by high, stable harsh parenting. In addition, a transactional model examined the bidirectional relationships among internalizing and externalizing symptoms and harsh parenting because they may cascade over time in this early period. Harsh parenting uniquely contributed to externalizing symptoms, controlling for internalizing symptoms, but not vice versa. In addition, internalizing symptoms appeared to be a mechanism by which externalizing symptoms increase. Results highlight the importance of accounting for both internalizing and externalizing symptoms from an early age to understand risk for developing psychopathology and the role harsh parenting plays in influencing these trajectories.

  3. Mutations in TLR/MYD88 pathway identify a subset of young chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients with favorable outcome.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Trillos, Alejandra; Pinyol, Magda; Navarro, Alba; Aymerich, Marta; Jares, Pedro; Juan, Manel; Rozman, María; Colomer, Dolors; Delgado, Julio; Giné, Eva; González-Díaz, Marcos; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M; Colado, Enrique; Rayón, Consolación; Payer, Angel R; Terol, Maria José; Navarro, Blanca; Quesada, Victor; Puente, Xosé S; Rozman, Ciril; López-Otín, Carlos; Campo, Elías; López-Guillermo, Armando; Villamor, Neus

    2014-06-12

    Mutations in Toll-like receptor (TLR) and myeloid differentiation primary response 88 (MYD88) genes have been found in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) at low frequency. We analyzed the incidence, clinicobiological characteristics, and outcome of patients with TLR/MYD88 mutations in 587 CLL patients. Twenty-three patients (3.9%) had mutations, 19 in MYD88 (one with concurrent IRAK1 mutation), 2 TLR2 (one with concomitant TLR6 mutation), 1 IRAK1, and 1 TLR5. No mutations were found in IRAK2 and IRAK4. TLR/MYD88-mutated CLL overexpressed genes of the nuclear factor κB pathway. Patients with TLR/MYD88 mutations were significantly younger (83% age ≤50 years) than those with no mutations. TLR/MYD88 mutations were the most frequent in young patients. Patients with mutated TLR/MYD88 CLL had a higher frequency of mutated IGHV and low expression of CD38 and ZAP-70. Overall survival (OS) was better in TLR/MYD88-mutated than unmutated patients in the whole series (10-year OS, 100% vs 62%; P = .002), and in the subset of patients age ≤50 years (100% vs 70%; P = .02). In addition, relative OS of TLR/MYD88-mutated patients was similar to that in the age- and gender-matched population. In summary, TLR/MYD88 mutations identify a population of young CLL patients with favorable outcome.

  4. Construction and analysis of biochemical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binns, Michael; Theodoropoulos, Constantinos

    2012-09-01

    Bioprocesses are being implemented for a range of different applications including the production of fuels, chemicals and drugs. Hence, it is becoming increasingly important to understand and model how they function and how they can be modified or designed to give the optimal performance. Here we discuss the construction and analysis of biochemical networks which are the first logical steps towards this goal. The construction of a reaction network is possible through reconstruction: extracting information from literature and from databases. This can be supplemented by reaction prediction methods which can identify steps which are missing from the current knowledge base. Analysis of biochemical systems generally requires some experimental input but can be used to identify important reactions and targets for enhancing the performance of the organism involved. Metabolic flux, pathway and metabolic control analysis can be used to determine the limits, capabilities and potential targets for enhancement respectively.

  5. HUWE1 interacts with BRCA1 and promotes its degradation in the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway (Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, v. 444, isse 4)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaozhen; Lu, Guang; Li, Li; Yi, Juan; Yan, Kaowen; Wang, Yaqing; Zhu, Baili; Kuang, Jingyu; Lin, Ming; Zhang, Sha; Shao, Genze

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • The 2000–2634aa region of HUWE1 mediates the interaction with BRCA1 degron. • HUWE1 promotes the degradation of BRCA1 through the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway. • HUWE1 expression is inversely correlated with BRCA1 in breast cancer cells. • RNAi inhibition of HUWE1 confers increased resistance of MCF-10F cells to IR and MMC. - Abstract: The cellular BRCA1 protein level is essential for its tumor suppression activity and is tightly regulated through multiple mechanisms including ubiquitn–proteasome system. E3 ligases are involved to promote BRCA1 for ubiquitination and degradation. Here, we identified HUWE1/Mule/ARF-BP1 as a novel BRCA1-interacting protein involved in the control of BRCA1 protein level. HUWE1 binds BRCA1 through its N-terminus degron domain. Depletion of HUWE1 by siRNA-mediated interference significantly increases BRCA1 protein levels and prolongs the half-life of BRCA1. Moreover, exogenous expression of HUWE1 promotes BRCA1 degradation through the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway, which could explain an inverse correlation between HUWE1 and BRCA1 levels in MCF10F, MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Consistent with a functional role for HUWE1 in regulating BRCA1-mediated cellular response to DNA damage, depletion of HUWE1 by siRNA confers increased resistance to ionizing radiation and mitomycin. These data indicate that HUWE1 is a critical negative regulator of BRCA1 and suggest a new molecular mechanism for breast cancer pathogenesis.

  6. HUWE1 interacts with BRCA1 and promotes its degradation in the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway (Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, v. 444 issue 3)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaozhen; Lu, Guang; Li, Li; Yi, Juan; Yan, Kaowen; Wang, Yaqing; Zhu, Baili; Kuang, Jingyu; Lin, Ming; Zhang, Sha; Shao, Genze

    2014-02-14

    Highlights: • The 2000–2634 aa region of HUWE1 mediates the interaction with BRCA1 degron. • HUWE1 promotes the degradation of BRCA1 through the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway. • HUWE1 expression is inversely correlated with BRCA1 in breast cancer cells. • RNAi inhibition of HUWE1 confers increased resistance of MCF-10F cells to IR and MMC. - Abstract: The cellular BRCA1 protein level is essential for its tumor suppression activity and is tightly regulated through multiple mechanisms including ubiquitn–proteasome system. E3 ligases are involved to promote BRCA1 for ubiquitination and degradation. Here, we identified HUWE1/Mule/ARF-BP1 as a novel BRCA1-interacting protein involved in the control of BRCA1 protein level. HUWE1binds BRCA1 through its N-terminus degron domain. Depletion of HUWE1 by siRNA-mediated interference significantly increases BRCA1 protein levels and prolongs the half-life of BRCA1. Moreover, exogenous expression of HUWE1 promotes BRCA1 degradation through the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway, which could explain an inverse correlation between HUWE1 and BRCA1 levels in MCF10F, MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Consistent with a functional role for HUWE1 in regulating BRCA1-mediated cellular response to DNA damage, depletion of HUWE1 by siRNA confers increased resistance to ionizing radiation and mitomycin. These data indicate that HUWE1 is a critical negative regulator of BRCA1 and suggest a new molecular mechanism for breast cancer pathogenesis.

  7. Identifying putative candidate genes and pathways involved in immune responses to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Differences in gene expression were compared between RNAs from lungs of high (HR) and low (LR) PRRSV burden pigs using the swine protein-annotated long oligonucleotide microarray, the Pigoligoarray. Pathway analyses were carried out to determine biological processes, pathways and networks that diffe...

  8. Characterization of a novel β-cypermethrin-degrading Aspergillus niger YAT strain and the biochemical degradation pathway of β-cypermethrin.

    PubMed

    Deng, Weiqin; Lin, Derong; Yao, Kai; Yuan, Huaiyu; Wang, Zhilong; Li, Jianlong; Zou, Likou; Han, Xinfeng; Zhou, Kang; He, Li; Hu, Xinjie; Liu, Shuliang

    2015-10-01

    Aspergillus niger YAT strain was obtained from Chinese brick tea (Collection number: CGMCC 10,568) and identified on the basis of morphological characteristics and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence. The strain could degrade 54.83 % of β-cypermethrin (β-CY; 50 mg L(-1)) in 7 days and 100 % of 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA; 100 mg L(-1)) in 22 h. The half-lives of β-CY and 3-PBA range from 3.573 to 11.748 days and from 5.635 to 12.160 h, respectively. The degradation of β-CY and 3-PBA was further described using first-order kinetic models. The pathway and mechanism of β-CY degraded by YAT were investigated by analyzing the degraded metabolites through high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Relevant enzymatic activities and substrate utilization were also investigated. β-CY degradation products were analyzed. Results indicated that YAT strain transformed β-CY into 3-PBA. 3-PBA was then gradually transformed into permethric acid, protocatechuic acid, 3-hydroxy-5-phenoxy benzoic acid, gallic acid, and phenol gradually. The YAT strain can also effectively degrade these metabolites. The results indicated that YAT strain has potential applications in bioremediation of pyrethroid insecticide (PI)-contaminated environments and fermented food. PMID:26022858

  9. Characterization of a novel β-cypermethrin-degrading Aspergillus niger YAT strain and the biochemical degradation pathway of β-cypermethrin.

    PubMed

    Deng, Weiqin; Lin, Derong; Yao, Kai; Yuan, Huaiyu; Wang, Zhilong; Li, Jianlong; Zou, Likou; Han, Xinfeng; Zhou, Kang; He, Li; Hu, Xinjie; Liu, Shuliang

    2015-10-01

    Aspergillus niger YAT strain was obtained from Chinese brick tea (Collection number: CGMCC 10,568) and identified on the basis of morphological characteristics and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence. The strain could degrade 54.83 % of β-cypermethrin (β-CY; 50 mg L(-1)) in 7 days and 100 % of 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA; 100 mg L(-1)) in 22 h. The half-lives of β-CY and 3-PBA range from 3.573 to 11.748 days and from 5.635 to 12.160 h, respectively. The degradation of β-CY and 3-PBA was further described using first-order kinetic models. The pathway and mechanism of β-CY degraded by YAT were investigated by analyzing the degraded metabolites through high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Relevant enzymatic activities and substrate utilization were also investigated. β-CY degradation products were analyzed. Results indicated that YAT strain transformed β-CY into 3-PBA. 3-PBA was then gradually transformed into permethric acid, protocatechuic acid, 3-hydroxy-5-phenoxy benzoic acid, gallic acid, and phenol gradually. The YAT strain can also effectively degrade these metabolites. The results indicated that YAT strain has potential applications in bioremediation of pyrethroid insecticide (PI)-contaminated environments and fermented food.

  10. A comparative analysis of transcriptomic, biochemical, and physiological responses to elevated ozone identifies species-specific mechanisms of resilience in legume crops

    PubMed Central

    Yendrek, Craig R.; Koester, Robert P.

    2015-01-01

    Current concentrations of tropospheric ozone ([O3]) pollution negatively impact plant metabolism, which can result in decreased crop yields. Interspecific variation in the physiological response of plants to elevated [O3] exists; however, the underlying cellular responses explaining species-specific differences are largely unknown. Here, a physiological screen has been performed on multiple varieties of legume species. Three varieties of garden pea (Pisum sativum L.) were resilient to elevated [O3]. Garden pea showed no change in photosynthetic capacity or leaf longevity when exposed to elevated [O3], in contrast to varieties of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) and common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). Global transcriptomic and targeted biochemical analyses were then done to examine the mechanistic differences in legume responses to elevated [O3]. In all three species, there was an O3-mediated reduction in specific leaf weight and total non-structural carbohydrate content, as well as increased abundance of respiration-related transcripts. Differences specific to garden pea included a pronounced increase in the abundance of GLUTATHIONE REDUCTASE transcript, as well as greater contents of foliar glutathione, apoplastic ascorbate, and sucrose in elevated [O3]. These results suggest that garden pea may have had greater capacity for detoxification, which prevented net losses in CO2 fixation in an elevated [O3] environment. PMID:26324463

  11. A comparative analysis of transcriptomic, biochemical, and physiological responses to elevated ozone identifies species-specific mechanisms of resilience in legume crops.

    PubMed

    Yendrek, Craig R; Koester, Robert P; Ainsworth, Elizabeth A

    2015-12-01

    Current concentrations of tropospheric ozone ([O3]) pollution negatively impact plant metabolism, which can result in decreased crop yields. Interspecific variation in the physiological response of plants to elevated [O3] exists; however, the underlying cellular responses explaining species-specific differences are largely unknown. Here, a physiological screen has been performed on multiple varieties of legume species. Three varieties of garden pea (Pisum sativum L.) were resilient to elevated [O3]. Garden pea showed no change in photosynthetic capacity or leaf longevity when exposed to elevated [O3], in contrast to varieties of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) and common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). Global transcriptomic and targeted biochemical analyses were then done to examine the mechanistic differences in legume responses to elevated [O3]. In all three species, there was an O3-mediated reduction in specific leaf weight and total non-structural carbohydrate content, as well as increased abundance of respiration-related transcripts. Differences specific to garden pea included a pronounced increase in the abundance of GLUTATHIONE REDUCTASE transcript, as well as greater contents of foliar glutathione, apoplastic ascorbate, and sucrose in elevated [O3]. These results suggest that garden pea may have had greater capacity for detoxification, which prevented net losses in CO2 fixation in an elevated [O3] environment.

  12. Transcriptome Analysis in Prenatal IGF1-Deficient Mice Identifies Molecular Pathways and Target Genes Involved in Distal Lung Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Porras, Isabel; López, Icíar Paula; De Las Rivas, Javier; Pichel, José García

    2013-01-01

    Background Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 (IGF1) is a multifunctional regulator of somatic growth and development throughout evolution. IGF1 signaling through IGF type 1 receptor (IGF1R) controls cell proliferation, survival and differentiation in multiple cell types. IGF1 deficiency in mice disrupts lung morphogenesis, causing altered prenatal pulmonary alveologenesis. Nevertheless, little is known about the cellular and molecular basis of IGF1 activity during lung development. Methods/Principal Findings Prenatal Igf1−/− mutant mice with a C57Bl/6J genetic background displayed severe disproportional lung hypoplasia, leading to lethal neonatal respiratory distress. Immuno-histological analysis of their lungs showed a thickened mesenchyme, alterations in extracellular matrix deposition, thinner smooth muscles and dilated blood vessels, which indicated immature and delayed distal pulmonary organogenesis. Transcriptomic analysis of Igf1−/− E18.5 lungs using RNA microarrays identified deregulated genes related to vascularization, morphogenesis and cellular growth, and to MAP-kinase, Wnt and cell-adhesion pathways. Up-regulation of immunity-related genes was verified by an increase in inflammatory markers. Increased expression of Nfib and reduced expression of Klf2, Egr1 and Ctgf regulatory proteins as well as activation of ERK2 MAP-kinase were corroborated by Western blot. Among IGF-system genes only IGFBP2 revealed a reduction in mRNA expression in mutant lungs. Immuno-staining patterns for IGF1R and IGF2, similar in both genotypes, correlated to alterations found in specific cell compartments of Igf1−/− lungs. IGF1 addition to Igf1−/− embryonic lungs cultured ex vivo increased airway septa remodeling and distal epithelium maturation, processes accompanied by up-regulation of Nfib and Klf2 transcription factors and Cyr61 matricellular protein. Conclusions/Significance We demonstrated the functional tissue specific implication of IGF1 on fetal lung

  13. Proteomic profiling of naïve multiple myeloma patient plasma cells identifies pathways associated with favourable response to bortezomib-based treatment regimens.

    PubMed

    Dytfeld, Dominik; Rosebeck, Shaun; Kandarpa, Malathi; Mayampurath, Anoop; Mellacheruvu, Dattatreya; Alonge, Mattina M; Ngoka, Lambert; Jasielec, Jagoda; Richardson, Paul G; Volchenboum, Samuel; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I; Sreekumar, Arun; Jakubowiak, Andrzej J

    2015-07-01

    Toward our goal of personalized medicine, we comprehensively profiled pre-treatment malignant plasma cells from multiple myeloma patients and prospectively identified pathways predictive of favourable response to bortezomib-based treatment regimens. We utilized two complementary quantitative proteomics platforms to identify differentially-regulated proteins indicative of at least a very good partial response (VGPR) or complete response/near complete response (CR/nCR) to two treatment regimens containing either bortezomib, liposomal doxorubicin and dexamethasone (VDD), or lenalidomide, bortezomib and dexamethasone (RVD). Our results suggest enrichment of 'universal response' pathways that are common to both treatment regimens and are probable predictors of favourable response to bortezomib, including a subset of endoplasmic reticulum stress pathways. The data also implicate pathways unique to each regimen that may predict sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents, such as mitochondrial dysfunction, and immunomodulatory drugs, which was associated with acute phase response signalling. Overall, we identified patterns of tumour characteristics that may predict response to bortezomib-based regimens and their components. These results provide a rationale for further evaluation of the protein profiles identified herein for targeted selection of anti-myeloma therapy to increase the likelihood of improved treatment outcome of patients with newly-diagnosed myeloma. PMID:25824111

  14. PROFILING GENE EXPRESSION IN HUMAN H295R ADRENOCORTICAL CARCINOMA CELLS AND RAT TESTES TO IDENTIFY PATHWAYS OF TOXICITY FOR CONAZOLE FUNGICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Profiling Gene Expression in Human H295R Adrenocortical Carcinoma Cells and Rat Testes to Identify Pathways of Toxicity for Conazole Fungicides
    Ren1, H., Schmid1, J., Retief2, J., Turpaz2, Y.,Zhang3, X.,Jones3, P., Newsted3, J.,Giesy3, J., Wolf1, D.,Wood1, C., Bao1, W., Dix1, ...

  15. Proteomic profiling of naïve multiple myeloma patient plasma cells identifies pathways associated with favourable response to bortezomib-based treatment regimens.

    PubMed

    Dytfeld, Dominik; Rosebeck, Shaun; Kandarpa, Malathi; Mayampurath, Anoop; Mellacheruvu, Dattatreya; Alonge, Mattina M; Ngoka, Lambert; Jasielec, Jagoda; Richardson, Paul G; Volchenboum, Samuel; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I; Sreekumar, Arun; Jakubowiak, Andrzej J

    2015-07-01

    Toward our goal of personalized medicine, we comprehensively profiled pre-treatment malignant plasma cells from multiple myeloma patients and prospectively identified pathways predictive of favourable response to bortezomib-based treatment regimens. We utilized two complementary quantitative proteomics platforms to identify differentially-regulated proteins indicative of at least a very good partial response (VGPR) or complete response/near complete response (CR/nCR) to two treatment regimens containing either bortezomib, liposomal doxorubicin and dexamethasone (VDD), or lenalidomide, bortezomib and dexamethasone (RVD). Our results suggest enrichment of 'universal response' pathways that are common to both treatment regimens and are probable predictors of favourable response to bortezomib, including a subset of endoplasmic reticulum stress pathways. The data also implicate pathways unique to each regimen that may predict sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents, such as mitochondrial dysfunction, and immunomodulatory drugs, which was associated with acute phase response signalling. Overall, we identified patterns of tumour characteristics that may predict response to bortezomib-based regimens and their components. These results provide a rationale for further evaluation of the protein profiles identified herein for targeted selection of anti-myeloma therapy to increase the likelihood of improved treatment outcome of patients with newly-diagnosed myeloma.

  16. Mutant alpha-galactosidase A enzymes identified in Fabry disease patients with residual enzyme activity: biochemical characterization and restoration of normal intracellular processing by 1-deoxygalactonojirimycin.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Satoshi; Chang, Hui-Hwa; Kawasaki, Kunito; Yasuda, Kayo; Wu, Hui-Li; Garman, Scott C; Fan, Jian-Qiang

    2007-09-01

    Fabry disease is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by the deficiency of alpha-Gal A (alpha-galactosidase A) activity. In order to understand the molecular mechanism underlying alpha-Gal A deficiency in Fabry disease patients with residual enzyme activity, enzymes with different missense mutations were purified from transfected COS-7 cells and the biochemical properties were characterized. The mutant enzymes detected in variant patients (A20P, E66Q, M72V, I91T, R112H, F113L, N215S, Q279E, M296I, M296V and R301Q), and those found mostly in mild classic patients (A97V, A156V, L166V and R356W) appeared to have normal K(m) and V(max) values. The degradation of all mutants (except E59K) was partially inhibited by treatment with kifunensine, a selective inhibitor of ER (endoplasmic reticulum) alpha-mannosidase I. Metabolic labelling and subcellular fractionation studies in COS-7 cells expressing the L166V and R301Q alpha-Gal A mutants indicated that the mutant protein was retained in the ER and degraded without processing. Addition of DGJ (1-deoxygalactonojirimycin) to the culture medium of COS-7 cells transfected with a large set of missense mutant alpha-Gal A cDNAs effectively increased both enzyme activity and protein yield. DGJ was capable of normalizing intracellular processing of mutant alpha-Gal A found in both classic (L166V) and variant (R301Q) Fabry disease patients. In addition, the residual enzyme activity in fibroblasts or lymphoblasts from both classic and variant hemizygous Fabry disease patients carrying a variety of missense mutations could be substantially increased by cultivation of the cells with DGJ. These results indicate that a large proportion of mutant enzymes in patients with residual enzyme activity are kinetically active. Excessive degradation in the ER could be responsible for the deficiency of enzyme activity in vivo, and the DGJ approach may be broadly applicable to Fabry disease patients with missense mutations.

  17. Mutant α-galactosidase A enzymes identified in Fabry disease patients with residual enzyme activity: biochemical characterization and restoration of normal intracellular processing by 1-deoxygalactonojirimycin

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Satoshi; Chang, Hui-Hwa; Kawasaki, Kunito; Yasuda, Kayo; Wu, Hui-Li; Garman, Scott C.; Fan, Jian-Qiang

    2007-01-01

    Fabry disease is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by the deficiency of α-Gal A (α-galactosidase A) activity. In order to understand the molecular mechanism underlying α-Gal A deficiency in Fabry disease patients with residual enzyme activity, enzymes with different missense mutations were purified from transfected COS-7 cells and the biochemical properties were characterized. The mutant enzymes detected in variant patients (A20P, E66Q, M72V, I91T, R112H, F113L, N215S, Q279E, M296I, M296V and R301Q), and those found mostly in mild classic patients (A97V, A156V, L166V and R356W) appeared to have normal Km and Vmax values. The degradation of all mutants (except E59K) was partially inhibited by treatment with kifunensine, a selective inhibitor of ER (endoplasmic reticulum) α-mannosidase I. Metabolic labelling and subcellular fractionation studies in COS-7 cells expressing the L166V and R301Q α-Gal A mutants indicated that the mutant protein was retained in the ER and degraded without processing. Addition of DGJ (1-deoxygalactonojirimycin) to the culture medium of COS-7 cells transfected with a large set of missense mutant α-Gal A cDNAs effectively increased both enzyme activity and protein yield. DGJ was capable of normalizing intracellular processing of mutant α-Gal A found in both classic (L166V) and variant (R301Q) Fabry disease patients. In addition, the residual enzyme activity in fibroblasts or lymphoblasts from both classic and variant hemizygous Fabry disease patients carrying a variety of missense mutations could be substantially increased by cultivation of the cells with DGJ. These results indicate that a large proportion of mutant enzymes in patients with residual enzyme activity are kinetically active. Excessive degradation in the ER could be responsible for the deficiency of enzyme activity in vivo, and the DGJ approach may be broadly applicable to Fabry disease patients with missense mutations. PMID:17555407

  18. Identifying developmental toxicity pathways for a subset of ToxCast chemicals using human embryonic stem cells and metabolomics

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinstreuer, N.C.; Smith, A.M.; West, P.R.; Conard, K.R.; Fontaine, B.R.; Weir-Hauptman, A.M.; Palmer, J.A.; Knudsen, T.B.; Dix, D.J.; Donley, E.L.R.; Cezar, G.G.

    2011-11-15

    Metabolomics analysis was performed on the supernatant of human embryonic stem (hES) cell cultures exposed to a blinded subset of 11 chemicals selected from the chemical library of EPA's ToxCast Trade-Mark-Sign chemical screening and prioritization research project. Metabolites from hES cultures were evaluated for known and novel signatures that may be indicative of developmental toxicity. Significant fold changes in endogenous metabolites were detected for 83 putatively annotated mass features in response to the subset of ToxCast chemicals. The annotations were mapped to specific human metabolic pathways. This revealed strong effects on pathways for nicotinate and nicotinamide metabolism, pantothenate and CoA biosynthesis, glutathione metabolism, and arginine and proline metabolism pathways. Predictivity for adverse outcomes in mammalian prenatal developmental toxicity studies used ToxRefDB and other sources of information, including Stemina Biomarker Discovery's predictive DevTox Registered-Sign model trained on 23 pharmaceutical agents of known developmental toxicity and differing potency. The model initially predicted developmental toxicity from the blinded ToxCast compounds in concordance with animal data with 73% accuracy. Retraining the model with data from the unblinded test compounds at one concentration level increased the predictive accuracy for the remaining concentrations to 83%. These preliminary results on a 11-chemical subset of the ToxCast chemical library indicate that metabolomics analysis of the hES secretome provides information valuable for predictive modeling and mechanistic understanding of mammalian developmental toxicity. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We tested 11 environmental compounds in a hESC metabolomics platform. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significant changes in secreted small molecule metabolites were observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Perturbed mass features map to pathways critical for normal development and

  19. Screening of the Human Kinome Identifies MSK1/2-CREB1 as an Essential Pathway Mediating Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Lytic Replication during Primary Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Fan; Sawant, Tanvee Vinod; Lan, Ke; Lu, Chun; Jung, Jae U.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Viruses often hijack cellular pathways to facilitate infection and replication. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is an oncogenic gammaherpesvirus etiologically associated with Kaposi's sarcoma, a vascular tumor of endothelial cells. Despite intensive studies, cellular pathways mediating KSHV infection and replication are still not well defined. Using an antibody array approach, we examined cellular proteins phosphorylated during primary KSHV infection of primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Enrichment analysis identified integrin/mitogen-activated protein kinase (integrin/MAPK), insulin/epidermal growth factor receptor (insulin/EGFR), and JAK/STAT as the activated networks during primary KSHV infection. The transcriptional factor CREB1 (cyclic AMP [cAMP]-responsive element-binding protein 1) had the strongest increase in phosphorylation. While knockdown of CREB1 had no effect on KSHV entry and trafficking, it drastically reduced the expression of lytic transcripts and proteins and the production of infectious virions. Chemical activation of CREB1 significantly enhanced viral lytic replication. In contrast, CREB1 neither influenced the expression of the latent gene LANA nor affected KSHV infectivity. Mechanistically, CREB1 was not activated through the classic cAMP/protein kinase A (cAMP/PKA) pathway or via the AKT, MK2, and RSK pathways. Rather, CREB1 was activated by the mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinases 1 and 2 (MSK1/2). Consequently, chemical inhibition or knockdown of MSKs significantly inhibited the KSHV lytic replication program; however, it had a minimal effect on LANA expression and KSHV infectivity. Together, these results identify the MSK1/2-CREB1 proteins as novel essential effectors of KSHV lytic replication during primary infection. The differential effect of the MSK1/2-CREB1 pathway on the expression of viral latent and lytic genes might control the robustness of viral lytic replication, and therefore the

  20. A Canonical Correlation Analysis of AIDS Restriction Genes and Metabolic Pathways Identifies Purine Metabolism as a Key Cooperator

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hanhui; Yuan, Jinjin; Wang, Zhengwu; Huang, Aiqiong; Liu, Xiaolong; Han, Xiao; Chen, Yahong

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus causes a severe disease in humans, referred to as immune deficiency syndrome. Studies on the interaction between host genetic factors and the virus have revealed dozens of genes that impact diverse processes in the AIDS disease. To resolve more genetic factors related to AIDS, a canonical correlation analysis was used to determine the correlation between AIDS restriction and metabolic pathway gene expression. The results show that HIV-1 postentry cellular viral cofactors from AIDS restriction genes are coexpressed in human transcriptome microarray datasets. Further, the purine metabolism pathway comprises novel host factors that are coexpressed with AIDS restriction genes. Using a canonical correlation analysis for expression is a reliable approach to exploring the mechanism underlying AIDS. PMID:27462363

  1. Native fluorescence spectroscopy of blood plasma of rats with experimental diabetes: identifying fingerprints of glucose-related metabolic pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirshin, Evgeny; Cherkasova, Olga; Tikhonova, Tatiana; Berlovskaya, Elena; Priezzhev, Alexander; Fadeev, Victor

    2015-05-01

    We present the results of a native fluorescence spectroscopy study of blood plasma of rats with experimental diabetes. It was shown that the fluorescence emission band shape at 320 nm excitation is the most indicative of hyperglycemia in the blood plasma samples. We provide the interpretation of this fact based on the changes in reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate concentration due to glucose-related metabolic pathways and protein fluorescent cross-linking formation following nonenzymatic glycation.

  2. Genomic and Molecular Characterization of Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor Identifies the IGF1R Pathway as a Primary Target for Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jilong; Ylipää, Antti; Sun, Yan; Zheng, Hong; Chen, Kexin; Nykter, Matti; Trent, Jonathan; Ratner, Nancy; Lev, Dina C.; Zhang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) is a rare sarcoma that lacks effective therapeutic strategies. We gain insight into the most recurrent genetically altered pathways with the purpose of scanning possible therapeutic targets. Experimental design We performed a microarray based-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) profiling of two cohorts of primary MPNST tissue samples including 25 patients treated at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and 26 patients from Tianjin Cancer Hospital. IHC and cell biology detection and validation were performed on human MPNST tissues and cell lines. Results Genomic characterization of 51 MPNST tissue samples identified several frequently amplified regions harboring 2,599 genes and regions of deletion including 4,901 genes. At the pathway level, we identified a significant enrichment of copy number–altering events in the insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) pathway, including frequent amplifications of the IGF1R gene itself. To validate the IGF1R pathway as a potential target in MPNSTs, we first confirmed that high IGF1R protein correlated with worse tumor-free survival in an independent set of samples using immunohistochemistry. Two MPNST cell lines (ST88-14 and STS26T) were used to determine the effect of attenuating IGF1R. Inhibition of IGF1R in ST88-14 cells using small interfering RNAs or an IGF1R inhibitor, MK-0646, led to significant decreases in cell proliferation, invasion, and migration accompanied by attenuation of the PI3K/AKT and MAPK pathways. Conclusion These integrated genomic and molecular studies provide evidence that the IGF1R pathway is a potential therapeutic target for patients with MPNST. PMID:22042973

  3. Use of RNA-seq to identify cardiac genes and gene pathways differentially expressed between dogs with and without dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Friedenberg, Steven G; Chdid, Lhoucine; Keene, Bruce; Sherry, Barbara; Motsinger-Reif, Alison; Meurs, Kathryn M

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify cardiac tissue genes and gene pathways differentially expressed between dogs with and without dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). ANIMALS 8 dogs with and 5 dogs without DCM. PROCEDURES Following euthanasia, samples of left ventricular myocardium were collected from each dog. Total RNA was extracted from tissue samples, and RNA sequencing was performed on each sample. Samples from dogs with and without DCM were grouped to identify genes that were differentially regulated between the 2 populations. Overrepresentation analysis was performed on upregulated and downregulated gene sets to identify altered molecular pathways in dogs with DCM. RESULTS Genes involved in cellular energy metabolism, especially metabolism of carbohydrates and fats, were significantly downregulated in dogs with DCM. Expression of cardiac structural proteins was also altered in affected dogs. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that RNA sequencing may provide important insights into the pathogenesis of DCM in dogs and highlight pathways that should be explored to identify causative mutations and develop novel therapeutic interventions. PMID:27347821

  4. Whole Genome Pathway Analysis Identifies an Association of Cadmium Response Gene Loss with Copy Number Variation in Mutant p53 Bearing Uterine Endometrial Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Stupack, Dwayne G

    2016-01-01

    Background Massive chromosomal aberrations are a signature of advanced cancer, although the factors promoting the pervasive incidence of these copy number alterations (CNAs) are poorly understood. Gatekeeper mutations, such as p53, contribute to aneuploidy, yet p53 mutant tumors do not always display CNAs. Uterine Corpus Endometrial Carcinoma (UCEC) offers a unique system to begin to evaluate why some cancers acquire high CNAs while others evolve another route to oncogenesis, since about half of p53 mutant UCEC tumors have a relatively flat CNA landscape and half have 20–90% of their genome altered in copy number. Methods We extracted copy number information from 68 UCEC genomes mutant in p53 by the GISTIC2 algorithm. GO term pathway analysis, via GOrilla, was used to identify suppressed pathways. Genes within these pathways were mapped for focal or wide distribution. Deletion hotspots were evaluated for temporal incidence. Results Multiple pathways contributed to the development of pervasive CNAs, including developmental, metabolic, immunological, cell adhesion and cadmium response pathways. Surprisingly, cadmium response pathway genes are predicted as the earliest loss events within these tumors: in particular, the metallothionein genes involved in heavy metal sequestration. Loss of cadmium response genes were associated with copy number changes and poorer prognosis, contrasting with 'copy number flat' tumors which instead exhibited substantive mutation. Conclusion Metallothioneins are lost early in the development of high CNA endometrial cancer, providing a potential mechanism and biological rationale for increased incidence of endometrial cancer with cadmium exposure. Developmental and metabolic pathways are altered later in tumor progression. PMID:27391266

  5. A genome-wide RNAi screen for Wnt/beta-catenin pathway components identifies unexpected roles for TCF transcription factors in cancer.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wei; Dodge, Michael; Gundapaneni, Deepika; Michnoff, Carolyn; Roth, Michael; Lum, Lawrence

    2008-07-15

    The Wnt family of secreted proteins coordinate cell fate decision-making in a broad range of developmental and homeostatic contexts. Corruption of Wnt signal transduction pathways frequently results in degenerative diseases and cancer. We have used an iterative genome-wide screening strategy that employs multiple nonredundant RNAi reagents to identify mammalian genes that participate in Wnt/beta-catenin pathway response. Among the genes that were assigned high confidence scores are two members of the TCF/LEF family of DNA-binding proteins that control the transcriptional output of the pathway. Surprisingly, we found that the presumed cancer-promoting gene TCF7L2 functions instead as a transcriptional repressor that restricts colorectal cancer (CRC) cell growth. Mutations in TCF7L2 identified from cancer genome sequencing efforts abolish its ability to function as a transcriptional regulator and result in increased CRC cell growth. We describe a growth-promoting transcriptional program that is likely activated in CRC tumors with compromised TCF7L2 function. Taken together, the results from our screen and studies focused on members of the TCF/LEF gene family refine our understanding of how aberrant Wnt pathway activation sustains CRC growth.

  6. Expression-based network biology identifies alteration in key regulatory pathways of type 2 diabetes and associated risk/complications.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Urmi; Ukil, Sanchaita; Dimitrova, Nevenka; Agrawal, Shipra

    2009-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is a multifactorial and genetically heterogeneous disease which leads to impaired glucose homeostasis and insulin resistance. The advanced form of disease causes acute cardiovascular, renal, neurological and microvascular complications. Thus there is a constant need to discover new and efficient treatment against the disease by seeking to uncover various novel alternate signalling mechanisms that can lead to diabetes and its associated complications. The present study allows detection of molecular targets by unravelling their role in altered biological pathways during diabetes and its associated risk factors and complications. We have used an integrated functional networks concept by merging co-expression network and interaction network to detect the transcriptionally altered pathways and regulations involved in the disease. Our analysis reports four novel significant networks which could lead to the development of diabetes and other associated dysfunctions. (a) The first network illustrates the up regulation of TGFBRII facilitating oxidative stress and causing the expression of early transcription genes via MAPK pathway leading to cardiovascular and kidney related complications. (b) The second network demonstrates novel interactions between GAPDH and inflammatory and proliferation candidate genes i.e., SUMO4 and EGFR indicating a new link between obesity and diabetes. (c) The third network portrays unique interactions PTPN1 with EGFR and CAV1 which could lead to an impaired vascular function in diabetic nephropathy condition. (d) Lastly, from our fourth network we have inferred that the interaction of beta-catenin with CDH5 and TGFBR1 through Smad molecules could contribute to endothelial dysfunction. A probability of emergence of kidney complication might be suggested in T2D condition. An experimental investigation on this aspect may further provide more decisive observation in drug target identification and better understanding of

  7. Novel spinal pathways identified by neuronal c-Fos expression after urethrogenital reflex activation in female guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Yuan, S Y; Vilimas, P I; Zagorodnyuk, V P; Gibbins, I L

    2015-03-12

    Pudendal nerve-spinal pathways are involved in urethrogenital sensation, pain and sexual activity. However, details of these pathways and their modulation are unclear. We examined spinal pathways activated by the urethrogenital reflex (UGR) and visualized by c-Fos immunoreactivity in reflexly activated neurons within spinal cord. In anesthetized female guinea pigs, a balloon was inserted into the urethra and inflated with short-repeat or long-continuous distension to activate the UGR. A second balloon recorded reflex contractions of the vagina and uterus. Two control groups had either no balloon or a vaginal balloon (VB) only. Ninety minutes after UGR activation, c-Fos immunoreactivity in L3 and S2 spinal segments was examined. Reflex activated c-Fos immunoreactivity also was investigated in some animals with acute spinal transections at either L4 or T12 levels. There was no significant difference in spinal c-Fos expression between the control groups. Short-repeat distension reliably induced a UGR and a two- to threefold increase in c-Fos-expressing neurons throughout dorsal, intermediate and lateral spinal gray matter at S2 and about twofold increase in superficial dorsal horn at L3. T12 transection had little effect on c-Fos expression at either spinal level. However, after L4 transection, UGR generation was associated with a four- to sixfold increase in c-Fos-expressing neurons in lateral horn (LH) and central canal areas at S2, and but only 20-30% increase at L3. Thus, UGR activates preganglionic neurons projecting to pelvic viscera in both sacral and lumbar spinal cord. The reflex also must activate ascending and descending spinal inhibitory circuits that suppress c-Fos-expression in neurons at both sacral and lumbar spinal levels.

  8. Utilising conservative tracers and spatial surveys to identify controls on pathways and DOC exports in an Arctic catchment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lessels, J. S.; Tetzlaff, D.; Dinsmore, K. J.; Street, L. E.; Dean, J.; Washbourne, I. J.; Billett, M. F.; Baxter, R.; Subke, J. A.; Wookey, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is typically the predominant form of carbon exported from headwater streams, it therefore represents a major carbon export from Arctic catchments. The projected deepening of thaw depth in permafrost regions, due to an increase in air temperature, may have a significant effect on the amount of DOC exported from these systems. However, quantification of the impacts of climate driven changes on DOC export are still highly uncertain. Understanding the processes controlling DOC export is therefore crucial in predicting the potential impact of projected environmental changes. The controls of DOC production and transport are heavily influenced by soil and vegetation, which are highly variable across the landscape. To completely understand these systems information regarding spatial variability of plants, soils and thaw depths must be taken into account. In this study sub-weekly sampling of DOC was undertaken throughout 2014 in a headwater (<1 km2) catchment in the Northwest Territories, Canada. Spatial surveys of soil properties, active thaw depth and normalised difference vegetation index (NDVI) were collected and used in conjunction with conservative stable water isotopes tracers and major ions to understand sources, flow pathways and timing of DOC exports from the catchment. Stable isotope tracers act as fingerprints of water allowing sources and pathways to be assessed. Observations reveal changing DOC concentrations throughout the season as the active layer deepens and the connectivity of the soils to the stream network throughout the catchment increases. Linking the DOC data with the conservative tracer response improves the identification of carbon pathways and fluxes from the soils; preliminary analysis indicates DOC is being delivered via deeper more mineral soils later in the season. The results indicate that the active layer depth has a strong influence on the amount of DOC exported from the system, independent of the amount of

  9. Pyrococcus furiosus flagella: biochemical and transcriptional analyses identify the newly detected flaB0 gene to encode the major flagellin

    PubMed Central

    Näther-Schindler, Daniela J.; Schopf, Simone; Bellack, Annett; Rachel, Reinhard; Wirth, Reinhard

    2014-01-01

    We have described previously that the flagella of the Euryarchaeon Pyrococcus furiosus are multifunctional cell appendages used for swimming, adhesion to surfaces and formation of cell-cell connections. Here, we characterize these organelles with respect to their biochemistry and transcription. Flagella were purified by shearing from cells followed by CsCl-gradient centrifugation and were found to consist mainly of a ca. 30 kDa glycoprotein. Polymerization studies of denatured flagella resulted in an ATP-independent formation of flagella-like filaments. The N-terminal sequence of the main flagellin was determined by Edman degradation, but none of the genes in the complete genome code for a protein with that N-terminus. Therefore, we resequenced the respective region of the genome, thereby discovering that the published genome sequence is not correct. A total of 771 bp are missing in the data base, resulting in the correction of the previously unusual N-terminal sequence of flagellin FlaB1 and in the identification of a third flagellin. To keep in line with the earlier nomenclature we call this flaB0. Very interestingly, the previously not identified flaB0 codes for the major flagellin. Transcriptional analyses of the revised flagellar operon identified various different cotranscripts encoding only a single protein in case of FlaB0 and FlaJ or up to five proteins (FlaB0-FlaD). Analysing the RNA of cells from different growth phases, we found that the length and number of detected cotranscript increased over time suggesting that the flagellar operon is transcribed mostly in late exponential and stationary growth phase. PMID:25566211

  10. Biochemical and histological characterization of antigens preferentially expressed on the surface and cytoplasm of breast carcinoma cells identified by monoclonal antibodies against the human milk fat globule.

    PubMed

    Peterson, J A; Zava, D T; Duwe, A K; Blank, E W; Battifora, H; Ceriani, R L

    1990-06-01

    The preparation of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the human milk fat globule membrane with preferential binding to breast carcinoma cells is described. Using BALB/c mouse myeloma cells; inter-specific, intra-strain, and inter-strain hybridomas were isolated that identified three different components of the human milk fat globule of approximately 46,000, and 70,000 daltons and a mucin-like glycoprotein complex (NPGP) ranging from 400,000 to over a million daltons, respectively. Three MAbs (BrE1, BrE2, BrE3) identified the latter component which consists of at least three different size molecules for which the aforementioned MAb's have different binding specificities. MAbs, BrE2 and BrE3, bound to normal breast epithelial cells but to a lesser extent than to tumors and only at the apical surface facing the lumen, while they bound breast carcinomas strongly, and often in the cytoplasm as well as on the surface. Higher concentrations of BrE3 were required to stain normal breast compared to breast tumors. BrE1 also stained breast carcinomas both on the surface and cytoplasmically but did not stain normal breast tissue. The MAb, Mc13, as well as the previously reported MAb McR2, both against the 70,000 dalton component, did not significantly stain either normal or cancerous breast tissue in histological sections but did bind significantly to cultured breast epithelial cells and to the milk fat globule membrane. The MAbs, Mc8 and Mc3, reported previously to be against the 46,000 dalton component, stained histologically only malignant breast tissue but only weakly; however, they bound strongly to intact breast carcinoma cells and breast cell membrane preparations with a radioimmunobinding assay. These MAbs should be useful in characterizing the surface of breast epithelial cells, studying surface alterations in malignancy, and possibly in breast cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  11. Three-dimensional pharmacophore design and biochemical screening identifies substituted 1,2,4-triazoles as inhibitors of the annexin A2-S100A10 protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Tummala R K; Li, Chan; Fischer, Peter M; Dekker, Lodewijk V

    2012-08-01

    Protein interactions are increasingly appreciated as targets in small-molecule drug discovery. The interaction between the adapter protein S100A10 and its binding partner annexin A2 is a potentially important drug target. To obtain small-molecule starting points for inhibitors of this interaction, a three-dimensional pharmacophore model was constructed from the X-ray crystal structure of the complex between S100A10 and annexin A2. The pharmacophore model represents the favourable hydrophobic and hydrogen bond interactions between the two partners, as well as spatial and receptor site constraints (excluded volume spheres). Using this pharmacophore model, UNITY flex searches were carried out on a 3D library of 0.7 million commercially available compounds. This resulted in 568 hit compounds. Subsequently, GOLD docking studies were performed on these hits, and a set of 190 compounds were purchased and tested biochemically for inhibition of the protein interaction. Three compounds of similar chemical structure were identified as genuine inhibitors of the binding of annexin A2 to S100A10. The binding modes predicted by GOLD were in good agreement with their UNITY-generated conformations. We synthesised a series of analogues revealing areas critical for binding. Thus computational predictions and biochemical screening can be used successfully to derive novel chemical classes of protein-protein interaction blockers.

  12. Identifying viable regulatory and innovation pathways for regenerative medicine: a case study of cultured red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Mittra, J; Tait, J; Mastroeni, M; Turner, M L; Mountford, J C; Bruce, K

    2015-01-25

    The creation of red blood cells for the blood transfusion markets represents a highly innovative application of regenerative medicine with a medium term (5-10 year) prospect for first clinical studies. This article describes a case study analysis of a project to derive red blood cells from human embryonic stem cells, including the systemic challenges arising from (i) the selection of appropriate and viable regulatory protocols and (ii) technological constraints related to stem cell manufacture and scale up to clinical Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) standard. The method used for case study analysis (Analysis of Life Science Innovation Systems (ALSIS)) is also innovative, demonstrating a new approach to social and natural science collaboration to foresight product development pathways. Issues arising along the development pathway include cell manufacture and scale-up challenges, affected by regulatory demands emerging from the innovation ecosystem (preclinical testing and clinical trials). Our discussion reflects on the efforts being made by regulators to adapt the current pharmaceuticals-based regulatory model to an allogeneic regenerative medicine product and the broader lessons from this case study for successful innovation and translation of regenerative medicine therapies, including the role of methodological and regulatory innovation in future development in the field.

  13. Patient-Based Transcriptome-Wide Analysis Identify Interferon and Ubiquination Pathways as Potential Predictors of Influenza A Disease Severity

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Long Truong; Tolfvenstam, Thomas; Ooi, Eng Eong; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Naim, Ahmand Nazri Mohamed; Ho, Eliza Xin Pei; Ong, Swee Hoe; Wertheim, Heiman F.; Fox, Annette; Van Vinh Nguyen, Chau; Nghiem, Ngoc My; Ha, Tuan Manh; Thi Ngoc Tran, Anh; Tambayah, Paul; Lin, Raymond; Sangsajja, Chariya; Manosuthi, Weerawat; Chuchottaworn, Chareon; Sansayunh, Piamlarp; Chotpitayasunondh, Tawee; Suntarattiwong, Piyarat; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya; Puthavathana, Pilaipan; de Jong, Menno D.; Farrar, Jeremy; van Doorn, H. Rogier; Hibberd, Martin Lloyd

    2014-01-01

    Background The influenza A virus is an RNA virus that is responsible for seasonal epidemics worldwide with up to five million cases of severe illness and 500,000 deaths annually according to the World Health Organization estimates. The factors associated with severe diseases are not well defined, but more severe disease is more often seen among persons aged >65 years, infants, pregnant women, and individuals of any age with underlying health conditions. Methodology/Principal Findings Using gene expression microarrays, the transcriptomic profiles of influenza-infected patients with severe (N = 11), moderate (N = 40) and mild (N = 83) symptoms were compared with the febrile patients of unknown etiology (N = 73). We found that influenza-infected patients, regardless of their clinical outcomes, had a stronger induction of antiviral and cytokine responses and a stronger attenuation of NK and T cell responses in comparison with those with unknown etiology. More importantly, we found that both interferon and ubiquitination signaling were strongly attenuated in patients with the most severe outcomes in comparison with those with moderate and mild outcomes, suggesting the protective roles of these pathways in disease pathogenesis. Conclusion/Significances The attenuation of interferon and ubiquitination pathways may associate with the clinical outcomes of influenza patients. PMID:25365328

  14. Evaluation of microbial triglyceride oil purification requirements for the CelTherm process: an efficient biochemical pathway to renewable fuels and chemicals.

    PubMed

    Linnen, Michael; Seames, Wayne; Kubatova, Alena; Menon, Suresh; Alisala, Kashinatham; Hash, Sara

    2014-10-01

    CelTherm is a biochemical process to produce renewable fuels and chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass. The present study's objective was to determine the level of treatment/purity of the microbial triacylglyceride oil (TAG) necessary to facilitate fuel production. After a unique microbe aerobically synthesizes TAG from biomass-derived sugars, the microbes were harvested and dried then crude TAG was chemically extracted from the residual biomass. Some TAGs were further purified to hydrotreating process requirements. Both grades were then noncatalytically cracked into a petroleum-like intermediate characterized by gas chromatography. Experiments were repeated using refined soybean oil for comparison to previous studies. The products from crude microbial TAG cracking were then further refined into a jet fuel product. Fuel tests indicate that this jet fuel corresponds to specifications for JP-8 military turbine fuel. It was thus concluded that the crude microbial TAG is a suitable feedstock with no further purification required, demonstrating CelTherm's commercial potential. PMID:24781206

  15. Label-Free LC-MS/MS Proteomic Analysis of Cerebrospinal Fluid Identifies Protein/Pathway Alterations and Candidate Biomarkers for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Collins, Mahlon A; An, Jiyan; Hood, Brian L; Conrads, Thomas P; Bowser, Robert P

    2015-11-01

    Analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) proteome has proven valuable to the study of neurodegenerative disorders. To identify new protein/pathway alterations and candidate biomarkers for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), we performed comparative proteomic profiling of CSF from sporadic ALS (sALS), healthy control (HC), and other neurological disease (OND) subjects using label-free liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). A total of 1712 CSF proteins were detected and relatively quantified by spectral counting. Levels of several proteins with diverse biological functions were significantly altered in sALS samples. Enrichment analysis was used to link these alterations to biological pathways, which were predominantly related to inflammation, neuronal activity, and extracellular matrix regulation. We then used our CSF proteomic profiles to create a support vector machines classifier capable of discriminating training set ALS from non-ALS (HC and OND) samples. Four classifier proteins, WD repeat-containing protein 63, amyloid-like protein 1, SPARC-like protein 1, and cell adhesion molecule 3, were identified by feature selection and externally validated. The resultant classifier distinguished ALS from non-ALS samples with 83% sensitivity and 100% specificity in an independent test set. Collectively, our results illustrate the utility of CSF proteomic profiling for identifying ALS protein/pathway alterations and candidate disease biomarkers.

  16. Integration of gene expression data with network-based analysis to identify signaling and metabolic pathways regulated during the development of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Olex, Amy L; Turkett, William H; Fetrow, Jacquelyn S; Loeser, Richard F

    2014-05-25

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by remodeling and degradation of joint tissues. Microarray studies have led to a better understanding of the molecular changes that occur in tissues affected by conditions such as OA; however, such analyses are limited to the identification of a list of genes with altered transcript expression, usually at a single time point during disease progression. While these lists have identified many novel genes that are altered during the disease process, they are unable to identify perturbed relationships between genes and gene products. In this work, we have integrated a time course gene expression dataset with network analysis to gain a better systems level understanding of the early events that occur during the development of OA in a mouse model. The subnetworks that were enriched at one or more of the time points examined (2, 4, 8, and 16 weeks after induction of OA) contained genes from several pathways proposed to be important to the OA process, including the extracellular matrix-receptor interaction and the focal adhesion pathways and the Wnt, Hedgehog and TGF-β signaling pathways. The genes within the subnetworks were most active at the 2 and 4 week time points and included genes not previously studied in the OA process. A unique pathway, riboflavin metabolism, was active at the 4 week time point. These results suggest that the incorporation of network-type analyses along with time series microarray data will lead to advancements in our understanding of complex diseases such as OA at a systems level, and may provide novel insights into the pathways and processes involved in disease pathogenesis.

  17. A lin-45 raf enhancer screen identifies eor-1, eor-2 and unusual alleles of Ras pathway genes in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed Central

    Rocheleau, Christian E; Howard, Robyn M; Goldman, Alissa P; Volk, Mandy L; Girard, Laura J; Sundaram, Meera V

    2002-01-01

    In Caenorhabditis elegans, the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK signal transduction pathway controls multiple processes including excretory system development, P12 fate specification, and vulval cell fate specification. To identify positive regulators of Ras signaling, we conducted a genetic screen for mutations that enhance the excretory system and egg-laying defects of hypomorphic lin-45 raf mutants. This screen identified unusual alleles of several known Ras pathway genes, including a mutation removing the second SH3 domain of the sem-5/Grb2 adaptor, a temperature-sensitive mutation in the helical hairpin of let-341/Sos, a gain-of-function mutation affecting a potential phosphorylation site of the lin-1 Ets domain transcription factor, a dominant-negative allele of ksr-1, and hypomorphic alleles of sur-6/PP2A-B, sur-2/Mediator, and lin-25. In addition, this screen identified multiple alleles of two newly identified genes, eor-1 and eor-2, that play a relatively weak role in vulval fate specification but positively regulate Ras signaling during excretory system development and P12 fate specification. The spectrum of identified mutations argues strongly for the specificity of the enhancer screen and for a close involvement of eor-1 and eor-2 in Ras signaling. PMID:12019228

  18. Method for identifying subsurface fluid migration and drainage pathways in and among oil and gas reservoirs using 3-D and 4-D seismic imaging

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Roger N.; Boulanger, Albert; Bagdonas, Edward P.; Xu, Liqing; He, Wei

    1996-01-01

    The invention utilizes 3-D and 4-D seismic surveys as a means of deriving information useful in petroleum exploration and reservoir management. The methods use both single seismic surveys (3-D) and multiple seismic surveys separated in time (4-D) of a region of interest to determine large scale migration pathways within sedimentary basins, and fine scale drainage structure and oil-water-gas regions within individual petroleum producing reservoirs. Such structure is identified using pattern recognition tools which define the regions of interest. The 4-D seismic data sets may be used for data completion for large scale structure where time intervals between surveys do not allow for dynamic evolution. The 4-D seismic data sets also may be used to find variations over time of small scale structure within individual reservoirs which may be used to identify petroleum drainage pathways, oil-water-gas regions and, hence, attractive drilling targets. After spatial orientation, and amplitude and frequency matching of the multiple seismic data sets, High Amplitude Event (HAE) regions consistent with the presence of petroleum are identified using seismic attribute analysis. High Amplitude Regions are grown and interconnected to establish plumbing networks on the large scale and reservoir structure on the small scale. Small scale variations over time between seismic surveys within individual reservoirs are identified and used to identify drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum to be recovered. The location of such drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum may be used to site wells.

  19. Method for identifying subsurface fluid migration and drainage pathways in and among oil and gas reservoirs using 3-D and 4-D seismic imaging

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, R.N.; Boulanger, A.; Bagdonas, E.P.; Xu, L.; He, W.

    1996-12-17

    The invention utilizes 3-D and 4-D seismic surveys as a means of deriving information useful in petroleum exploration and reservoir management. The methods use both single seismic surveys (3-D) and multiple seismic surveys separated in time (4-D) of a region of interest to determine large scale migration pathways within sedimentary basins, and fine scale drainage structure and oil-water-gas regions within individual petroleum producing reservoirs. Such structure is identified using pattern recognition tools which define the regions of interest. The 4-D seismic data sets may be used for data completion for large scale structure where time intervals between surveys do not allow for dynamic evolution. The 4-D seismic data sets also may be used to find variations over time of small scale structure within individual reservoirs which may be used to identify petroleum drainage pathways, oil-water-gas regions and, hence, attractive drilling targets. After spatial orientation, and amplitude and frequency matching of the multiple seismic data sets, High Amplitude Event (HAE) regions consistent with the presence of petroleum are identified using seismic attribute analysis. High Amplitude Regions are grown and interconnected to establish plumbing networks on the large scale and reservoir structure on the small scale. Small scale variations over time between seismic surveys within individual reservoirs are identified and used to identify drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum to be recovered. The location of such drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum may be used to site wells. 22 figs.

  20. Intestinal Epithelial Cell-Intrinsic Deletion of Setd7 Identifies Role for Developmental Pathways in Immunity to Helminth Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chenery, Alistair L.; Redpath, Stephen A.; Braam, Mitchell J.; Perona-Wright, Georgia

    2016-01-01

    The intestine is a common site for a variety of pathogenic infections. Helminth infections continue to be major causes of disease worldwide, and are a significant burden on health care systems. Lysine methyltransferases are part of a family of novel attractive targets for drug discovery. SETD7 is a member of the Suppressor of variegation 3-9-Enhancer of zeste-Trithorax (SET) domain-containing family of lysine methyltransferases, and has been shown to methylate and alter the function of a wide variety of proteins in vitro. A few of these putative methylation targets have been shown to be important in resistance against pathogens. We therefore sought to study the role of SETD7 during parasitic infections. We find that Setd7-/- mice display increased resistance to infection with the helminth Trichuris muris but not Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri. Resistance to T. muris relies on an appropriate type 2 immune response that in turn prompts intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) to alter differentiation and proliferation kinetics. Here we show that SETD7 does not affect immune cell responses during infection. Instead, we found that IEC-specific deletion of Setd7 renders mice resistant to T. muris by controlling IEC turnover, an important aspect of anti-helminth immune responses. We further show that SETD7 controls IEC turnover by modulating developmental signaling pathways such as Hippo/YAP and Wnt/β-Catenin. We show that the Hippo pathway specifically is relevant during T. muris infection as verteporfin (a YAP inhibitor) treated mice became susceptible to T. muris. We conclude that SETD7 plays an important role in IEC biology during infection. PMID:27598373

  1. Intestinal Epithelial Cell-Intrinsic Deletion of Setd7 Identifies Role for Developmental Pathways in Immunity to Helminth Infection.

    PubMed

    Oudhoff, Menno J; Antignano, Frann; Chenery, Alistair L; Burrows, Kyle; Redpath, Stephen A; Braam, Mitchell J; Perona-Wright, Georgia; Zaph, Colby

    2016-09-01

    The intestine is a common site for a variety of pathogenic infections. Helminth infections continue to be major causes of disease worldwide, and are a significant burden on health care systems. Lysine methyltransferases are part of a family of novel attractive targets for drug discovery. SETD7 is a member of the Suppressor of variegation 3-9-Enhancer of zeste-Trithorax (SET) domain-containing family of lysine methyltransferases, and has been shown to methylate and alter the function of a wide variety of proteins in vitro. A few of these putative methylation targets have been shown to be important in resistance against pathogens. We therefore sought to study the role of SETD7 during parasitic infections. We find that Setd7-/- mice display increased resistance to infection with the helminth Trichuris muris but not Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri. Resistance to T. muris relies on an appropriate type 2 immune response that in turn prompts intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) to alter differentiation and proliferation kinetics. Here we show that SETD7 does not affect immune cell responses during infection. Instead, we found that IEC-specific deletion of Setd7 renders mice resistant to T. muris by controlling IEC turnover, an important aspect of anti-helminth immune responses. We further show that SETD7 controls IEC turnover by modulating developmental signaling pathways such as Hippo/YAP and Wnt/β-Catenin. We show that the Hippo pathway specifically is relevant during T. muris infection as verteporfin (a YAP inhibitor) treated mice became susceptible to T. muris. We conclude that SETD7 plays an important role in IEC biology during infection. PMID:27598373

  2. Integrative analyses of miRNA and proteomics identify potential biological pathways associated with onset of pulmonary fibrosis in the bleomycin rat model

    SciTech Connect

    Fukunaga, Satoki; Kakehashi, Anna; Sumida, Kayo; Kushida, Masahiko; Asano, Hiroyuki; Gi, Min; Wanibuchi, Hideki

    2015-08-01

    To determine miRNAs and their predicted target proteins regulatory networks which are potentially involved in onset of pulmonary fibrosis in the bleomycin rat model, we conducted integrative miRNA microarray and iTRAQ-coupled LC-MS/MS proteomic analyses, and evaluated the significance of altered biological functions and pathways. We observed that alterations of miRNAs and proteins are associated with the early phase of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis, and identified potential target pairs by using ingenuity pathway analysis. Using the data set of these alterations, it was demonstrated that those miRNAs, in association with their predicted target proteins, are potentially involved in canonical pathways reflective of initial epithelial injury and fibrogenic processes, and biofunctions related to induction of cellular development, movement, growth, and proliferation. Prediction of activated functions suggested that lung cells acquire proliferative, migratory, and invasive capabilities, and resistance to cell death especially in the very early phase of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. The present study will provide new insights for understanding the molecular pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. - Highlights: • We analyzed bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in the rat. • Integrative analyses of miRNA microarray and proteomics were conducted. • We determined the alterations of miRNAs and their potential target proteins. • The alterations may control biological functions and pathways in pulmonary fibrosis. • Our result may provide new insights of pulmonary fibrosis.

  3. Proteomic analysis of beta-catenin activation in mouse liver by DIGE analysis identifies glucose metabolism as a new target of the Wnt pathway.

    PubMed

    Chafey, Philippe; Finzi, Laetitia; Boisgard, Raphael; Caüzac, Michèle; Clary, Guillem; Broussard, Cédric; Pégorier, Jean-Paul; Guillonneau, François; Mayeux, Patrick; Camoin, Luc; Tavitian, Bertrand; Colnot, Sabine; Perret, Christine

    2009-08-01

    The Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway has been increasingly implicated in liver development and physiology. Aberrant activation of this pathway is one of the major genetic events observed during the process of human HCC development. To gain insight into the mechanism underlying beta-catenin action in the liver, we conducted a quantitative differential proteomic analysis using 2-D DIGE combined with MS, in mice with liver-specific deletion of Apc resulting in acute activation of beta-catenin signaling (Apc(KOliv) mice). We identified 94 protein spots showing differential expression between mutant Apc(KOliv) and control mice, corresponding to 56 individual proteins. Most of the proteins identified were associated with metabolic pathways, such as ammonia and glucose metabolism. Our analysis showed an increase in lactate dehydrogenase activity together with a downregulation of two mitochondrial ATPase subunits (ATP5a1 and ATP5b). These observations indicate that beta-catenin signaling may induce a shift in the glucose metabolism from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis, known as the "Warburg effect". Imaging with (18)F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography suggests that the specific metabolic reprogramming induced by beta-catenin in the liver does not imply the first step of glycolysis. This observation may explain why some HCCs are difficult to assess by fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography imaging.

  4. MANORAA (Mapping Analogous Nuclei Onto Residue And Affinity) for identifying protein–ligand fragment interaction, pathways and SNPs

    PubMed Central

    Tanramluk, Duangrudee; Narupiyakul, Lalita; Akavipat, Ruj; Gong, Sungsam; Charoensawan, Varodom

    2016-01-01

    Protein–ligand interaction analysis is an important step of drug design and protein engineering in order to predict the binding affinity and selectivity between ligands to the target proteins. To date, there are more than 100 000 structures available in the Protein Data Bank (PDB), of which ∼30% are protein–ligand (MW below 1000 Da) complexes. We have developed the integrative web server MANORAA (Mapping Analogous Nuclei Onto Residue And Affinity) with the aim of providing a user-friendly web interface to assist structural study and design of protein–ligand interactions. In brief, the server allows the users to input the chemical fragments and present all the unique molecular interactions to the target proteins with available three-dimensional structures in the PDB. The users can also link the ligands of interest to assess possible off-target proteins, human variants and pathway information using our all-in-one integrated tools. Taken together, we envisage that the server will facilitate and improve the study of protein–ligand interactions by allowing observation and comparison of ligand interactions with multiple proteins at the same time. (http://manoraa.org). PMID:27131358

  5. Stromal Transcriptional Profiles Reveal Hierarchies of Anatomical Site, Serum Response and Disease and Identify Disease Specific Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Parsonage, Greg N.; Legault, Holly M.; O’Toole, Margot; Pearson, Mark J.; Thomas, Andrew M.; Scheel-Toellner, Dagmar; Raza, Karim; Buckley, Christopher D.; Falciani, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Synovial fibroblasts in persistent inflammatory arthritis have been suggested to have parallels with cancer growth and wound healing, both of which involve a stereotypical serum response programme. We tested the hypothesis that a serum response programme can be used to classify diseased tissues, and investigated the serum response programme in fibroblasts from multiple anatomical sites and two diseases. To test our hypothesis we utilized a bioinformatics approach to explore a publicly available microarray dataset including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), osteoarthritis (OA) and normal synovial tissue, then extended those findings in a new microarray dataset representing matched synovial, bone marrow and skin fibroblasts cultured from RA and OA patients undergoing arthroplasty. The classical fibroblast serum response programme discretely classified RA, OA and normal synovial tissues. Analysis of low and high serum treated fibroblast microarray data revealed a hierarchy of control, with anatomical site the most powerful classifier followed by response to serum and then disease. In contrast to skin and bone marrow fibroblasts, exposure of synovial fibroblasts to serum led to convergence of RA and OA expression profiles. Pathway analysis revealed three inter-linked gene networks characterising OA synovial fibroblasts: Cell remodelling through insulin-like growth factors, differentiation and angiogenesis through _3 integrin, and regulation of apoptosis through CD44. We have demonstrated that Fibroblast serum response signatures define disease at the tissue level, and that an OA specific, serum dependent repression of genes involved in cell adhesion, extracellular matrix remodelling and apoptosis is a critical discriminator between cultured OA and RA synovial fibroblasts. PMID:25807374

  6. Mouse Models as Tools to Identify Genetic Pathways for Retinal Degeneration, as Exemplified by Leber's Congenital Amaurosis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA) is an inherited retinal degenerative disease characterized by severe loss of vision in the first year of life. In addition to early vision loss, a variety of other eye-related abnormalities including roving eye movements, deep-set eyes, and sensitivity to bright light also occur with this disease. Many animal models of LCA are available and the study them has led to a better understanding of the pathology of the disease, and has led to the development of therapeutic strategies aimed at curing or slowing down LCA. Mouse models, with their well-developed genetics and similarity to human physiology and anatomy, serve as powerful tools with which to investigate the etiology of human LCA. Such mice provide reproducible, experimental systems for elucidating pathways of normal development, function, designing strategies and testing compounds for translational research and gene-based therapies aimed at delaying the diseases progression. In this chapter, I describe tools used in the discovery and evaluation of mouse models of LCA including a Phoenix Image-Guided Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and a Diagnosys Espion Visual Electrophysiology System. Three mouse models are described, the rd3 mouse model for LCA12 and LCA1, the rd12 mouse model for LCA2, and the rd16 mouse model for LCA10.

  7. Gene Co-Expression Network Analysis for Identifying Modules and Functionally Enriched Pathways in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Riquelme Medina, Ignacio; Lubovac-Pilav, Zelmina

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a complex disease, caused by the autoimmune destruction of the insulin producing pancreatic beta cells, resulting in the body’s inability to produce insulin. While great efforts have been put into understanding the genetic and environmental factors that contribute to the etiology of the disease, the exact molecular mechanisms are still largely unknown. T1D is a heterogeneous disease, and previous research in this field is mainly focused on the analysis of single genes, or using traditional gene expression profiling, which generally does not reveal the functional context of a gene associated with a complex disorder. However, network-based analysis does take into account the interactions between the diabetes specific genes or proteins and contributes to new knowledge about disease modules, which in turn can be used for identification of potential new biomarkers for T1D. In this study, we analyzed public microarray data of T1D patients and healthy controls by applying a systems biology approach that combines network-based Weighted Gene Co-Expression Network Analysis (WGCNA) with functional enrichment analysis. Novel co-expression gene network modules associated with T1D were elucidated, which in turn provided a basis for the identification of potential pathways and biomarker genes that may be involved in development of T1D. PMID:27257970

  8. Specific inhibitors for identifying pathways for methane production from carbon monoxide by a nonadapted anaerobic mixed culture.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Silvia Sancho; Cimpoia, Ruxandra; Bruant, Guillaume; Guiot, Serge R

    2014-06-01

    Specific inhibitors such as 2-bromoethanesulfonate (BES) and vancomycin were employed in activity batch tests to decipher metabolic pathways that are preferentially used by a mixed anaerobic consortium (sludge from an anaerobic digester) to transform carbon monoxide (CO) into methane (CH4). We first evaluated the inhibitory effect of both BES and vancomycin on the microbial community, as well as the efficiency and stability of vancomycin at 35 °C, over time. The activity tests with CO2-H2, CO, glucose, acetate, formate, propionate, butyrate, methanol, and ethanol showed that vancomycin does not inhibit some Gram-negative bacteria, and 50 mmol/L BES effectively blocks CH4 production in the sludge. However, when sludge was incubated with propionate, butyrate, methanol, or ethanol as the sole energy and carbon source, methanogenesis was only partially inhibited by BES. Separate tests showed that 0.07 mmol/L vancomycin is enough to maintain its inhibitory efficiency and stability in the population for at least 32 days at 35 °C. Using the inhibitors above, it was demonstrated that CO conversion to CH4 is an indirect, 2-step process, in which the CO is converted first to acetate and subsequently to CH4. PMID:24896194

  9. Gene Co-Expression Network Analysis for Identifying Modules and Functionally Enriched Pathways in Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Riquelme Medina, Ignacio; Lubovac-Pilav, Zelmina

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a complex disease, caused by the autoimmune destruction of the insulin producing pancreatic beta cells, resulting in the body's inability to produce insulin. While great efforts have been put into understanding the genetic and environmental factors that contribute to the etiology of the disease, the exact molecular mechanisms are still largely unknown. T1D is a heterogeneous disease, and previous research in this field is mainly focused on the analysis of single genes, or using traditional gene expression profiling, which generally does not reveal the functional context of a gene associated with a complex disorder. However, network-based analysis does take into account the interactions between the diabetes specific genes or proteins and contributes to new knowledge about disease modules, which in turn can be used for identification of potential new biomarkers for T1D. In this study, we analyzed public microarray data of T1D patients and healthy controls by applying a systems biology approach that combines network-based Weighted Gene Co-Expression Network Analysis (WGCNA) with functional enrichment analysis. Novel co-expression gene network modules associated with T1D were elucidated, which in turn provided a basis for the identification of potential pathways and biomarker genes that may be involved in development of T1D. PMID:27257970

  10. Biochemical characterization of a multi-drug resistant HIV-1 subtype AG reverse transcriptase: antagonism of AZT discrimination and excision pathways and sensitivity to RNase H inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Anna; Corona, Angela; Spöring, Imke; Jordan, Mareike; Buchholz, Bernd; Maccioni, Elias; Di Santo, Roberto; Bodem, Jochen; Tramontano, Enzo; Wöhrl, Birgitta M.

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed a multi-drug resistant (MR) HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT), subcloned from a patient-derived subtype CRF02_AG, harboring 45 amino acid exchanges, amongst them four thymidine analog mutations (TAMs) relevant for high-level AZT (azidothymidine) resistance by AZTMP excision (M41L, D67N, T215Y, K219E) as well as four substitutions of the AZTTP discrimination pathway (A62V, V75I, F116Y and Q151M). In addition, K65R, known to antagonize AZTMP excision in HIV-1 subtype B was present. Although MR-RT harbored the most significant amino acid exchanges T215Y and Q151M of each pathway, it exclusively used AZTTP discrimination, indicating that the two mechanisms are mutually exclusive and that the Q151M pathway is obviously preferred since it confers resistance to most nucleoside inhibitors. A derivative was created, additionally harboring the TAM K70R and the reversions M151Q as well as R65K since K65R antagonizes excision. MR-R65K-K70R-M151Q was competent of AZTMP excision, whereas other combinations thereof with only one or two exchanges still promoted discrimination. To tackle the multi-drug resistance problem, we tested if the MR-RTs could still be inhibited by RNase H inhibitors. All MR-RTs exhibited similar sensitivity toward RNase H inhibitors belonging to different inhibitor classes, indicating the importance of developing RNase H inhibitors further as anti-HIV drugs. PMID:26850643

  11. Biochemical characterization of a multi-drug resistant HIV-1 subtype AG reverse transcriptase: antagonism of AZT discrimination and excision pathways and sensitivity to RNase H inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Anna; Corona, Angela; Spöring, Imke; Jordan, Mareike; Buchholz, Bernd; Maccioni, Elias; Di Santo, Roberto; Bodem, Jochen; Tramontano, Enzo; Wöhrl, Birgitta M

    2016-03-18

    We analyzed a multi-drug resistant (MR) HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT), subcloned from a patient-derived subtype CRF02_AG, harboring 45 amino acid exchanges, amongst them four thymidine analog mutations (TAMs) relevant for high-level AZT (azidothymidine) resistance by AZTMP excision (M41L, D67N, T215Y, K219E) as well as four substitutions of the AZTTP discrimination pathway (A62V, V75I, F116Y and Q151M). In addition, K65R, known to antagonize AZTMP excision in HIV-1 subtype B was present. Although MR-RT harbored the most significant amino acid exchanges T215Y and Q151M of each pathway, it exclusively used AZTTP discrimination, indicating that the two mechanisms are mutually exclusive and that the Q151M pathway is obviously preferred since it confers resistance to most nucleoside inhibitors. A derivative was created, additionally harboring the TAM K70R and the reversions M151Q as well as R65K since K65R antagonizes excision. MR-R65K-K70R-M151Q was competent of AZTMP excision, whereas other combinations thereof with only one or two exchanges still promoted discrimination. To tackle the multi-drug resistance problem, we tested if the MR-RTs could still be inhibited by RNase H inhibitors. All MR-RTs exhibited similar sensitivity toward RNase H inhibitors belonging to different inhibitor classes, indicating the importance of developing RNase H inhibitors further as anti-HIV drugs. PMID:26850643

  12. Seasonal induction of alternative principal pathway for rose flower scent

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Hiroshi; Ohnishi, Toshiyuki; Tomida, Kensuke; Ishida, Haruka; Kanda, Momoyo; Sakai, Miwa; Yoshimura, Jin; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Ishikawa, Takamasa; Dohra, Hideo; Watanabe, Naoharu

    2016-01-01

    Ecological adaptations to seasonal changes are often observed in the phenotypic traits of plants and animals, and these adaptations are usually expressed through the production of different biochemical end products. In this study, ecological adaptations are observed in a biochemical pathway without alteration of the end products. We present an alternative principal pathway to the characteristic floral scent compound 2-phenylethanol (2PE) in roses. The new pathway is seasonally induced in summer as a heat adaptation that uses rose phenylpyruvate decarboxylase (RyPPDC) as a novel enzyme. RyPPDC transcript levels and the resulting production of 2PE are increased time-dependently under high temperatures. The novel summer pathway produces levels of 2PE that are several orders of magnitude higher than those produced by the previously known pathway. Our results indicate that the alternative principal pathway identified here is a seasonal adaptation for managing the weakened volatility of summer roses. PMID:26831950

  13. Structure/Function Analysis of a Type III Polyketide Synthase in the Brown Alga Ectocarpus siliculosus Reveals a Biochemical Pathway in Phlorotannin Monomer Biosynthesis[W

    PubMed Central

    Meslet-Cladière, Laurence; Delage, Ludovic; Leroux, Cédric J.-J.; Goulitquer, Sophie; Leblanc, Catherine; Creis, Emeline; Gall, Erwan Ar; Stiger-Pouvreau, Valérie; Czjzek, Mirjam; Potin, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Brown algal phlorotannins are structural analogs of condensed tannins in terrestrial plants and, like plant phenols, they have numerous biological functions. Despite their importance in brown algae, phlorotannin biosynthetic pathways have been poorly characterized at the molecular level. We found that a predicted type III polyketide synthase in the genome of the brown alga Ectocarpus siliculosus, PKS1, catalyzes a major step in the biosynthetic pathway of phlorotannins (i.e., the synthesis of phloroglucinol monomers from malonyl-CoA). The crystal structure of PKS1 at 2.85-Å resolution provided a good quality electron density map showing a modified Cys residue, likely connected to a long chain acyl group. An additional pocket not found in other known type III PKSs contains a reaction product that might correspond to a phloroglucinol precursor. In vivo, we also found a positive correlation between the phloroglucinol content and the PKS III gene expression level in cells of a strain of Ectocarpus adapted to freshwater during its reacclimation to seawater. The evolution of the type III PKS gene family in Stramenopiles suggests a lateral gene transfer event from an actinobacterium. PMID:23983220

  14. Gene expression profiling in treatment-naive schizophrenia patients identifies abnormalities in biological pathways involving AKT1 that are corrected by antipsychotic medication.

    PubMed

    Kumarasinghe, Nishantha; Beveridge, Natalie J; Gardiner, Erin; Scott, Rodney J; Yasawardene, Surangi; Perera, Antoinette; Mendis, Jayan; Suriyakumara, Kanishka; Schall, Ulrich; Tooney, Paul A

    2013-08-01

    Distinct gene expression profiles can be detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in patients with schizophrenia; however, little is known about the effects of antipsychotic medication. This study compared gene expression profiles in PMBCs from treatment-naive patients with schizophrenia before and after antipsychotic drug treatment. PBMCs were obtained from 10 treatment-naive schizophrenia patients before and 6 wk after initiating antipsychotic drug treatment and compared to PMBCs collected from 11 healthy community volunteers. Genome-wide expression profiling was conducted using Illumina HumanHT-12 expression bead arrays and analysed using significance analysis of microarrays. This analysis identified 624 genes with altered expression (208 up-regulated, 416 down-regulated) prior to antipsychotic treatment (p < 0.05) including schizophrenia-associated genes AKT1, DISC1 and DGCR6. After 6-8 wk treatment of patients with risperidone or risperidone in combination with haloperidol, only 106 genes were altered, suggesting that the treatment corrected the expression of a large proportion of genes back to control levels. However, 67 genes continued to show the same directional change in expression after treatment. Ingenuity® pathway analysis and gene set enrichment analysis implicated dysregulation of biological functions and pathways related to inflammation and immunity in patients with schizophrenia. A number of the top canonical pathways dysregulated in treatment-naive patients signal through AKT1 that was up-regulated. After treatment, AKT1 returned to control levels and less dysregulation of these canonical pathways was observed. This study supports immune dysfunction and pathways involving AKT1 in the aetiopathophysiology of schizophrenia and their response to antipsychotic medication.

  15. Noncanonical PAR3 activation by factor Xa identifies a novel pathway for Tie2 activation and stabilization of vascular integrity

    PubMed Central

    Stavenuiter, Fabian

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial barrier protective effects of activated protein C (APC) require the endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR), protease-activated receptor (PAR) 1, and PAR3. In contrast, PAR1 and PAR3 activation by thrombin results in barrier disruption. Noncanonical PAR1 and PAR3 activation by APC vs canonical activation by thrombin provides an explanation for the functional selectivity of these proteases. Here we found that factor Xa (FXa) activated PAR1 at canonical Arg41 similar to thrombin but cleaved PAR3 at noncanonical Arg41 similar to APC. This unique PAR1-PAR3 activation profile permitted the identification of noncanonical PAR3 activation as a novel activation pathway for barrier protective tunica intima endothelial receptor tyrosine kinase 2 (Tie2). APC, FXa, and the noncanonical PAR3 tethered-ligand peptide induced prolonged activation of Tie2, whereas thrombin and the canonical PAR3 tethered-ligand peptide did not. Tie2 activation by FXa required PAR3 and EPCR. FXa and the noncanonical PAR3 tethered-ligand peptide induced Tie2- and PAR3-dependent upregulation of tight-junction-associated protein zona occludens 1 (ZO-1), translocation of ZO-1 to cell-cell borders, and the formation of typical ZO-1 honeycomb patterns that are indicative of tight-junction stabilization. These data provide intriguing novel insights into the diversification of functional selectivity of protease signaling achievable by canonical and noncanonical PAR activation, such as the activation of vascular-protective Tie2 by noncanonical PAR3 activation. PMID:25320242

  16. A genome-wide association study of the maize hypersensitive defense response identifies genes that cluster in related pathways.

    PubMed

    Olukolu, Bode A; Wang, Guan-Feng; Vontimitta, Vijay; Venkata, Bala P; Marla, Sandeep; Ji, Jiabing; Gachomo, Emma; Chu, Kevin; Negeri, Adisu; Benson, Jacqueline; Nelson, Rebecca; Bradbury, Peter; Nielsen, Dahlia; Holland, James B; Balint-Kurti, Peter J; Johal, Gurmukh

    2014-08-01

    Much remains unknown of molecular events controlling the plant hypersensitive defense response (HR), a rapid localized cell death that limits pathogen spread and is mediated by resistance (R-) genes. Genetic control of the HR is hard to quantify due to its microscopic and rapid nature. Natural modifiers of the ectopic HR phenotype induced by an aberrant auto-active R-gene (Rp1-D21), were mapped in a population of 3,381 recombinant inbred lines from the maize nested association mapping population. Joint linkage analysis was conducted to identify 32 additive but no epistatic quantitative trait loci (QTL) using a linkage map based on more than 7000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Genome-wide association (GWA) analysis of 26.5 million SNPs was conducted after adjusting for background QTL. GWA identified associated SNPs that colocalized with 44 candidate genes. Thirty-six of these genes colocalized within 23 of the 32 QTL identified by joint linkage analysis. The candidate genes included genes predicted to be in involved programmed cell death, defense response, ubiquitination, redox homeostasis, autophagy, calcium signalling, lignin biosynthesis and cell wall modification. Twelve of the candidate genes showed significant differential expression between isogenic lines differing for the presence of Rp1-D21. Low but significant correlations between HR-related traits and several previously-measured disease resistance traits suggested that the genetic control of these traits was substantially, though not entirely, independent. This study provides the first system-wide analysis of natural variation that modulates the HR response in plants.

  17. A Genome-Wide Association Study of the Maize Hypersensitive Defense Response Identifies Genes That Cluster in Related Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Venkata, Bala P.; Marla, Sandeep; Ji, Jiabing; Gachomo, Emma; Chu, Kevin; Negeri, Adisu; Benson, Jacqueline; Nelson, Rebecca; Bradbury, Peter; Nielsen, Dahlia; Holland, James B.; Balint-Kurti, Peter J.; Johal, Gurmukh

    2014-01-01

    Much remains unknown of molecular events controlling the plant hypersensitive defense response (HR), a rapid localized cell death that limits pathogen spread and is mediated by resistance (R-) genes. Genetic control of the HR is hard to quantify due to its microscopic and rapid nature. Natural modifiers of the ectopic HR phenotype induced by an aberrant auto-active R-gene (Rp1-D21), were mapped in a population of 3,381 recombinant inbred lines from the maize nested association mapping population. Joint linkage analysis was conducted to identify 32 additive but no epistatic quantitative trait loci (QTL) using a linkage map based on more than 7000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Genome-wide association (GWA) analysis of 26.5 million SNPs was conducted after adjusting for background QTL. GWA identified associated SNPs that colocalized with 44 candidate genes. Thirty-six of these genes colocalized within 23 of the 32 QTL identified by joint linkage analysis. The candidate genes included genes predicted to be in involved programmed cell death, defense response, ubiquitination, redox homeostasis, autophagy, calcium signalling, lignin biosynthesis and cell wall modification. Twelve of the candidate genes showed significant differential expression between isogenic lines differing for the presence of Rp1-D21. Low but significant correlations between HR-related traits and several previously-measured disease resistance traits suggested that the genetic control of these traits was substantially, though not entirely, independent. This study provides the first system-wide analysis of natural variation that modulates the HR response in plants. PMID:25166276

  18. Secretome Analysis Identifies Novel Signal Peptide Peptidase-Like 3 (SPPL3) Substrates and Reveals a Role of SPPL3 in Multiple Golgi Glycosylation Pathways*

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Peer-Hendrik; Voss, Matthias; Haug-Kröper, Martina; Schröder, Bernd; Schepers, Ute; Bräse, Stefan; Haass, Christian; Lichtenthaler, Stefan F.; Fluhrer, Regina

    2015-01-01

    Signal peptide peptidase-like 3 (SPPL3) is a Golgi-resident intramembrane-cleaving protease that is highly conserved among multicellular eukaryotes pointing to pivotal physiological functions in the Golgi network which are only beginning to emerge. Recently, SPPL3 was shown to control protein N-glycosylation, when the key branching enzyme N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V (GnT-V) and other medial/trans Golgi glycosyltransferases were identified as first physiological SPPL3 substrates. SPPL3-mediated endoproteolysis releases the catalytic ectodomains of these enzymes from their type II membrane anchors. Protein glycosylation is a multistep process involving numerous type II membrane-bound enzymes, but it remains unclear whether only few of them are SPPL3 substrates or whether SPPL3 cleaves many of them and thereby controls protein glycosylation at multiple levels. Therefore, to systematically identify SPPL3 substrates we used Sppl3-deficient and SPPL3-overexpression cell culture models and analyzed them for changes in secreted membrane protein ectodomains using the proteomics “secretome protein enrichment with click sugars (SPECS)” method. SPECS analysis identified numerous additional new SPPL3 candidate glycoprotein substrates, several of which were biochemically validated as SPPL3 substrates. All novel SPPL3 substrates adopt a type II topology. The majority localizes to the Golgi network and is implicated in Golgi functions. Importantly, most of the novel SPPL3 substrates catalyze the modification of N-linked glycans. Others contribute to O-glycan and in particular glycosaminoglycan biosynthesis, suggesting that SPPL3 function is not restricted to N-glycosylation, but also functions in other forms of protein glycosylation. Hence, SPPL3 emerges as a crucial player of Golgi function and the newly identified SPPL3 substrates will be instrumental to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the physiological function of SPPL3 in the Golgi network and in vivo

  19. Metabolic Engineering of Light and Dark Biochemical Pathways in Wild-Type and Mutant Strains of Synechocystis PCC 6803 for Maximal, 24-Hour Production of Hydrogen Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Ely, Roger L.; Chaplen, Frank W.R.

    2014-03-11

    This project used the cyanobacterial species Synechocystis PCC 6803 to pursue two lines of inquiry, with each line addressing one of the two main factors affecting hydrogen (H2) production in Synechocystis PCC 6803: NADPH availability and O2 sensitivity. H2 production in Synechocystis PCC 6803 requires a very high NADPH:NADP+ ratio, that is, the NADP pool must be highly reduced, which can be problematic because several metabolic pathways potentially can act to raise or lower NADPH levels. Also, though the [NiFe]-hydrogenase in PCC 6803 is constitutively expressed, it is reversibly inactivated at very low O2 concentrations. Largely because of this O2 sensitivity and the requirement for high NADPH levels, a major portion of overall H2 production occurs under anoxic conditions in the dark, supported by breakdown of glycogen or other organic substrates accumulated during photosynthesis. Also, other factors, such as N or S limitation, pH changes, presence of other substances, or deletion of particular respiratory components, can affect light or dark H2 production. Therefore, in the first line of inquiry, under a number of culture conditions with wild type (WT) Synechocystis PCC 6803 cells and a mutant with impaired type I NADPH-dehydrogenase (NDH-1) function, we used H2 production profiling and metabolic flux analysis, with and without specific inhibitors, to examine systematically the pathways involved in light and dark H2 production. Results from this work provided rational bases for metabolic engineering to maximize photobiological H2 production on a 24-hour basis. In the second line of inquiry, we used site-directed mutagenesis to create mutants with hydrogenase enzymes exhibiting greater O2 tolerance. The research addressed the following four tasks: 1. Evaluate the effects of various culture conditions (N, S, or P limitation; light/dark; pH; exogenous organic carbon) on H2 production profiles of WT cells and an NDH-1 mutant; 2. Conduct metabolic flux analyses for

  20. Cell-type deconvolution with immune pathways identifies gene networks of host defense and immunopathology in leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Inkeles, Megan S.; Teles, Rosane M.B.; Pouldar, Delila; Andrade, Priscila R.; Madigan, Cressida A.; Ambrose, Mike; Sarno, Euzenir N.; Rea, Thomas H.; Ochoa, Maria T.; Iruela-Arispe, M. Luisa; Swindell, William R.; Ottenhoff, Tom H.M.; Geluk, Annemieke; Bloom, Barry R.

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptome profiles derived from the site of human disease have led to the identification of genes that contribute to pathogenesis, yet the complex mixture of cell types in these lesions has been an obstacle for defining specific mechanisms. Leprosy provides an outstanding model to study host defense and pathogenesis in a human infectious disease, given its clinical spectrum, which interrelates with the host immunologic and pathologic responses. Here, we investigated gene expression profiles derived from skin lesions for each clinical subtype of leprosy, analyzing gene coexpression modules by cell-type deconvolution. In lesions from tuberculoid leprosy patients, those with the self-limited form of the disease, dendritic cells were linked with MMP12 as part of a tissue remodeling network that contributes to granuloma formation. In lesions from lepromatous leprosy patients, those with disseminated disease, macrophages were linked with a gene network that programs phagocytosis. In erythema nodosum leprosum, neutrophil and endothelial cell gene networks were identified as part of the vasculitis that results in tissue injury. The present integrated computational approach provides a systems approach toward identifying cell-defined functional networks that contribute to host defense and immunopathology at the site of human infectious disease. PMID:27699251

  1. Cell-type deconvolution with immune pathways identifies gene networks of host defense and immunopathology in leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Inkeles, Megan S.; Teles, Rosane M.B.; Pouldar, Delila; Andrade, Priscila R.; Madigan, Cressida A.; Ambrose, Mike; Sarno, Euzenir N.; Rea, Thomas H.; Ochoa, Maria T.; Iruela-Arispe, M. Luisa; Swindell, William R.; Ottenhoff, Tom H.M.; Geluk, Annemieke; Bloom, Barry R.

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptome profiles derived from the site of human disease have led to the identification of genes that contribute to pathogenesis, yet the complex mixture of cell types in these lesions has been an obstacle for defining specific mechanisms. Leprosy provides an outstanding model to study host defense and pathogenesis in a human infectious disease, given its clinical spectrum, which interrelates with the host immunologic and pathologic responses. Here, we investigated gene expression profiles derived from skin lesions for each clinical subtype of leprosy, analyzing gene coexpression modules by cell-type deconvolution. In lesions from tuberculoid leprosy patients, those with the self-limited form of the disease, dendritic cells were linked with MMP12 as part of a tissue remodeling network that contributes to granuloma formation. In lesions from lepromatous leprosy patients, those with disseminated disease, macrophages were linked with a gene network that programs phagocytosis. In erythema nodosum leprosum, neutrophil and endothelial cell gene networks were identified as part of the vasculitis that results in tissue injury. The present integrated computational approach provides a systems approach toward identifying cell-defined functional networks that contribute to host defense and immunopathology at the site of human infectious disease.

  2. Biochemical and functional characterization of phosphoserine aminotransferase from Entamoeba histolytica, which possesses both phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated serine metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Ali, Vahab; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2006-01-01

    The enteric protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica is a unicellular eukaryote that possesses both phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated serine metabolic pathways. In the present study, we described enzymological and functional characterization of phosphoserine aminotransferase (PSAT) from E. histolytica. E. histolytica PSAT (EhPSAT) showed maximum activity for the forward reaction at basic pH, dissimilar to mammalian PSAT, which showed sharp neutral optimum pH. EhPSAT activity was significantly inhibited by substrate analogs, O-phospho-d-serine, O-phospho-l-threonine, and O-acetylserine, suggesting possible regulation of the amoebic PSAT by these metabolic intermediates. Fractionation of the whole parasite lysate and rEhPSAT by anion exchange chromatography verified that EhPSAT represents a dominant PSAT activity. EhPSAT showed a close kinship to PSAT from bacteroides based on amino acid alignment and phylogenetic analyses, suggesting that E. histolytica gained this gene from bacteroides by lateral gene transfer. Comparisons of kinetic properties of recombinant PSAT from E. histolytica and Arabidopsis thaliana showed that EhPSAT possesses significantly higher affinity toward glutamate than the A. thaliana counterpart, which may be explained by significant differences in the isoelectric point and the substitution of arginine, which is involved the binding to the gamma-carboxylate moiety of glutamate, in Escherichia coli PSAT, to serine or threonine in E. histolytica or A. thaliana PSAT, respectively. Heterologous expression of EhPSAT successfully rescued growth defect of a serine-auxotrophic E. coli strain KL282, where serC was deleted, confirming its in vivo role in serine biosynthesis. Together with our previous demonstration of phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase, the present study reinforces physiological significance of the phosphorylated pathway in amoeba.

  3. Large-scale association analyses identify new loci influencing glycemic traits and provide insight into the underlying biological pathways

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Robert A; Lagou, Vasiliki; Welch, Ryan P; Wheeler, Eleanor; Montasser, May E; Luan, Jian’an; Mägi, Reedik; Strawbridge, Rona J; Rehnberg, Emil; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Yengo, Loïc; Lecoeur, Cecile; Shungin, Dmitry; Sanna, Serena; Sidore, Carlo; Johnson, Paul C D; Jukema, J Wouter; Johnson, Toby; Mahajan, Anubha; Verweij, Niek; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Shah, Sonia; Smith, Albert V; Sennblad, Bengt; Gieger, Christian; Salo, Perttu; Perola, Markus; Timpson, Nicholas J; Evans, David M; Pourcain, Beate St; Wu, Ying; Andrews, Jeanette S; Hui, Jennie; Bielak, Lawrence F; Zhao, Wei; Horikoshi, Momoko; Navarro, Pau; Isaacs, Aaron; O’Connell, Jeffrey R; Stirrups, Kathleen; Vitart, Veronique; Hayward, Caroline; Esko, Tönu; Mihailov, Evelin; Fraser, Ross M; Fall, Tove; Voight, Benjamin F; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Chen, Han; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Morris, Andrew P; Rayner, Nigel W; Robertson, Neil; Rybin, Denis; Liu, Ching-Ti; Beckmann, Jacques S; Willems, Sara M; Chines, Peter S; Jackson, Anne U; Kang, Hyun Min; Stringham, Heather M; Song, Kijoung; Tanaka, Toshiko; Peden, John F; Goel, Anuj; Hicks, Andrew A; An, Ping; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Folkersen, Lasse; Marullo, Letizia; Jansen, Hanneke; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Pankow, James S; North, Kari E; Forouhi, Nita G; Loos, Ruth J F; Edkins, Sarah; Varga, Tibor V; Hallmans, Göran; Oksa, Heikki; Antonella, Mulas; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Trompet, Stella; Ford, Ian; Bakker, Stephan J L; Kong, Augustine; Kumari, Meena; Gigante, Bruna; Herder, Christian; Munroe, Patricia B; Caulfield, Mark; Antti, Jula; Mangino, Massimo; Small, Kerrin; Miljkovic, Iva; Liu, Yongmei; Atalay, Mustafa; Kiess, Wieland; James, Alan L; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Palmer, Colin N A; Doney, Alex S F; Willemsen, Gonneke; Smit, Johannes H; Campbell, Susan; Polasek, Ozren; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Hercberg, Serge; Dimitriou, Maria; Bolton, Jennifer L; Fowkes, Gerard R; Kovacs, Peter; Lindström, Jaana; Zemunik, Tatijana; Bandinelli, Stefania; Wild, Sarah H; Basart, Hanneke V; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Grallert, Harald; Maerz, Winfried; Kleber, Marcus E; Boehm, Bernhard O; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P; Province, Michael A; Borecki, Ingrid B; Hastie, Nicholas D; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Watkins, Hugh; Farrall, Martin; Stumvoll, Michael; Ferrucci, Luigi; Waterworth, Dawn M; Bergman, Richard N; Collins, Francis S; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Watanabe, Richard M; de Geus, Eco J C; Penninx, Brenda W; Hofman, Albert; Oostra, Ben A; Psaty, Bruce M; Vollenweider, Peter; Wilson, James F; Wright, Alan F; Hovingh, G Kees; Metspalu, Andres; Uusitupa, Matti; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Kaprio, Jaakko; Price, Jackie F; Dedoussis, George V; Deloukas, Panos; Meneton, Pierre; Lind, Lars; Boehnke, Michael; Shuldiner, Alan R; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Morris, Andrew D; Toenjes, Anke; Peyser, Patricia A; Beilby, John P; Körner, Antje; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Bornstein, Stefan R; Schwarz, Peter E H; Lakka, Timo A; Rauramaa, Rainer; Adair, Linda S; Smith, George Davey; Spector, Tim D; Illig, Thomas; de Faire, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kivimaki, Mika; Hingorani, Aroon; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Saaristo, Timo E; Boomsma, Dorret I; Stefansson, Kari; van der Harst, Pim; Dupuis, Josée; Pedersen, Nancy L; Sattar, Naveed; Harris, Tamara B; Cucca, Francesco; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Mohlke, Karen L; Balkau, Beverley; Froguel, Philippe; Pouta, Anneli; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Wareham, Nicholas J; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; McCarthy, Mark I; Franks, Paul W; Meigs, James B; Teslovich, Tanya M; Florez, Jose C; Langenberg, Claudia; Ingelsson, Erik; Prokopenko, Inga; Barroso, Inês

    2012-01-01

    Through genome-wide association meta-analyses of up to 133,010 individuals of European ancestry without diabetes, including individuals newly genotyped using the Metabochip, we have raised the number of confirmed loci influencing glycemic traits to 53, of which 33 also increase type 2 diabetes risk (q < 0.05). Loci influencing fasting insulin showed association with lipid levels and fat distribution, suggesting impact on insulin resistance. Gene-based analyses identified further biologically plausible loci, suggesting that additional loci beyond those reaching genome-wide significance are likely to represent real associations. This conclusion is supported by an excess of directionally consistent and nominally significant signals between discovery and follow-up studies. Functional follow-up of these newly discovered loci will further improve our understanding of glycemic control. PMID:22885924

  4. Large-scale association analyses identify new loci influencing glycemic traits and provide insight into the underlying biological pathways.

    PubMed

    Scott, Robert A; Lagou, Vasiliki; Welch, Ryan P; Wheeler, Eleanor; Montasser, May E; Luan, Jian'an; Mägi, Reedik; Strawbridge, Rona J; Rehnberg, Emil; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Yengo, Loïc; Lecoeur, Cecile; Shungin, Dmitry; Sanna, Serena; Sidore, Carlo; Johnson, Paul C D; Jukema, J Wouter; Johnson, Toby; Mahajan, Anubha; Verweij, Niek; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Shah, Sonia; Smith, Albert V; Sennblad, Bengt; Gieger, Christian; Salo, Perttu; Perola, Markus; Timpson, Nicholas J; Evans, David M; Pourcain, Beate St; Wu, Ying; Andrews, Jeanette S; Hui, Jennie; Bielak, Lawrence F; Zhao, Wei; Horikoshi, Momoko; Navarro, Pau; Isaacs, Aaron; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Stirrups, Kathleen; Vitart, Veronique; Hayward, Caroline; Esko, Tõnu; Mihailov, Evelin; Fraser, Ross M; Fall, Tove; Voight, Benjamin F; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Chen, Han; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Morris, Andrew P; Rayner, Nigel W; Robertson, Neil; Rybin, Denis; Liu, Ching-Ti; Beckmann, Jacques S; Willems, Sara M; Chines, Peter S; Jackson, Anne U; Kang, Hyun Min; Stringham, Heather M; Song, Kijoung; Tanaka, Toshiko; Peden, John F; Goel, Anuj; Hicks, Andrew A; An, Ping; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Folkersen, Lasse; Marullo, Letizia; Jansen, Hanneke; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Pankow, James S; North, Kari E; Forouhi, Nita G; Loos, Ruth J F; Edkins, Sarah; Varga, Tibor V; Hallmans, Göran; Oksa, Heikki; Antonella, Mulas; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Trompet, Stella; Ford, Ian; Bakker, Stephan J L; Kong, Augustine; Kumari, Meena; Gigante, Bruna; Herder, Christian; Munroe, Patricia B; Caulfield, Mark; Antti, Jula; Mangino, Massimo; Small, Kerrin; Miljkovic, Iva; Liu, Yongmei; Atalay, Mustafa; Kiess, Wieland; James, Alan L; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Palmer, Colin N A; Doney, Alex S F; Willemsen, Gonneke; Smit, Johannes H; Campbell, Susan; Polasek, Ozren; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Hercberg, Serge; Dimitriou, Maria; Bolton, Jennifer L; Fowkes, Gerard R; Kovacs, Peter; Lindström, Jaana; Zemunik, Tatijana; Bandinelli, Stefania; Wild, Sarah H; Basart, Hanneke V; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Grallert, Harald; Maerz, Winfried; Kleber, Marcus E; Boehm, Bernhard O; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P; Province, Michael A; Borecki, Ingrid B; Hastie, Nicholas D; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Watkins, Hugh; Farrall, Martin; Stumvoll, Michael; Ferrucci, Luigi; Waterworth, Dawn M; Bergman, Richard N; Collins, Francis S; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Watanabe, Richard M; de Geus, Eco J C; Penninx, Brenda W; Hofman, Albert; Oostra, Ben A; Psaty, Bruce M; Vollenweider, Peter; Wilson, James F; Wright, Alan F; Hovingh, G Kees; Metspalu, Andres; Uusitupa, Matti; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Kaprio, Jaakko; Price, Jackie F; Dedoussis, George V; Deloukas, Panos; Meneton, Pierre; Lind, Lars; Boehnke, Michael; Shuldiner, Alan R; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Morris, Andrew D; Toenjes, Anke; Peyser, Patricia A; Beilby, John P; Körner, Antje; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Bornstein, Stefan R; Schwarz, Peter E H; Lakka, Timo A; Rauramaa, Rainer; Adair, Linda S; Smith, George Davey; Spector, Tim D; Illig, Thomas; de Faire, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kivimaki, Mika; Hingorani, Aroon; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Saaristo, Timo E; Boomsma, Dorret I; Stefansson, Kari; van der Harst, Pim; Dupuis, Josée; Pedersen, Nancy L; Sattar, Naveed; Harris, Tamara B; Cucca, Francesco; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Mohlke, Karen L; Balkau, Beverley; Froguel, Philippe; Pouta, Anneli; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Wareham, Nicholas J; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; McCarthy, Mark I; Franks, Paul W; Meigs, James B; Teslovich, Tanya M; Florez, Jose C; Langenberg, Claudia; Ingelsson, Erik; Prokopenko, Inga; Barroso, Inês

    2012-09-01

    Through genome-wide association meta-analyses of up to 133,010 individuals of European ancestry without diabetes, including individuals newly genotyped using the Metabochip, we have increased the number of confirmed loci influencing glycemic traits to 53, of which 33 also increase type 2 diabetes risk (q < 0.05). Loci influencing fasting insulin concentration showed association with lipid levels and fat distribution, suggesting impact on insulin resistance. Gene-based analyses identified further biologically plausible loci, suggesting that additional loci beyond those reaching genome-wide significance are likely to represent real associations. This conclusion is supported by an excess of directionally consistent and nominally significant signals between discovery and follow-up studies. Functional analysis of these newly discovered loci will further improve our understanding of glycemic control. PMID:22885924

  5. Global transcriptome analysis identifies regulated transcripts and pathways activated during oogenesis and early embryogenesis in atlantic cod

    PubMed Central

    Kleppe, Lene; Edvardsen, Rolf Brudvik; Furmanek, Tomasz; Taranger, Geir Lasse; Wargelius, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying oogenesis and maternally controlled embryogenesis in fish are not fully understood, especially in marine species. Our aim was to study the egg and embryo transcriptome during oogenesis and early embryogenesis in Atlantic cod. Follicles from oogenesis stages (pre-, early-, and late-vitellogenic), ovulated eggs, and two embryonic stages (blastula, gastrula) were collected from broodstock fish and fertilized eggs. Gene expression profiles were measured in a 44 K oligo microarray consisting of 23,000 cod genes. Hundreds of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified in the follicle stages investigated, implicating a continuous accumulation and degradation of polyadenylated transcripts throughout oogenesis. Very few DEGs were identified from ovulated egg to blastula, showing a more stable maternal RNA pool in early embryonic stages. The highest induction of expression was observed between blastula and gastrula, signifying the onset of zygotic transcription. During early vitellogenesis, several of the most upregulated genes are linked to nervous system signaling, suggesting increasing requirements for ovarian synaptic signaling to stimulate the rapid growth of oocytes. Highly upregulated genes during late vitellogenesis are linked to protein processing, fat metabolism, osmoregulation, and arrested meiosis. One of the genes with the highest upregulation in the ovulated egg is involved in oxidative phosphorylation, reflecting increased energy requirements during fertilization and the first rapid cell divisions of early embryogenesis. In conclusion, this study provides a large-scale presentation of the Atlantic cod's maternally controlled transcriptome in ovarian follicles through oogenesis, ovulated eggs, and early embryos. Mol. Reprod. Dev. 81: 619–635, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24687555

  6. Combined transcriptome and proteome analysis identifies pathways and markers associated with the establishment of rapeseed microspore-derived embryo development.

    PubMed

    Joosen, Ronny; Cordewener, Jan; Supena, Ence Darmo Jaya; Vorst, Oscar; Lammers, Michiel; Maliepaard, Chris; Zeilmaker, Tieme; Miki, Brian; America, Twan; Custers, Jan; Boutilier, Kim

    2007-05-01

    Microspore-derived embryo (MDE) cultures are used as a model system to study plant cell totipotency and as an in vitro system to study embryo development. We characterized and compared the transcriptome and proteome of rapeseed (Brassica napus) MDEs from the few-celled stage to the globular/heart stage using two MDE culture systems: conventional cultures in which MDEs initially develop as unorganized clusters that usually lack a suspensor, and a novel suspensor-bearing embryo culture system in which the embryo proper originates from the distal cell of a suspensor-like structure and undergoes the same ordered cell divisions as the zygotic embryo. Improved histodifferentiation of suspensor-bearing MDEs suggests a new role for the suspensor in driving embryo cell identity and patterning. An MDE culture cDNA array and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and protein sequencing were used to compile global and specific expression profiles for the two types of MDE cultures. Analysis of the identities of 220 candidate embryo markers, as well as the identities of 32 sequenced embryo up-regulated protein spots, indicate general roles for protein synthesis, glycolysis, and ascorbate metabolism in the establishment of MDE development. A collection of 135 robust markers for the transition to MDE development was identified, a number of which may be coregulated at the gene and protein expression level. Comparison of the expression profiles of preglobular-stage conventional MDEs and suspensor-bearing MDEs identified genes whose differential expression may reflect improved histodifferentiation of suspensor-bearing embryos. This collection of early embryo-expressed genes and proteins serves as a starting point for future marker development and gene function studies aimed at understanding the molecular regulation of cell totipotency and early embryo development in plants.

  7. Combined transcriptome and proteome analysis identifies pathways and markers associated with the establishment of rapeseed microspore-derived embryo development.

    PubMed

    Joosen, Ronny; Cordewener, Jan; Supena, Ence Darmo Jaya; Vorst, Oscar; Lammers, Michiel; Maliepaard, Chris; Zeilmaker, Tieme; Miki, Brian; America, Twan; Custers, Jan; Boutilier, Kim

    2007-05-01

    Microspore-derived embryo (MDE) cultures are used as a model system to study plant cell totipotency and as an in vitro system to study embryo development. We characterized and compared the transcriptome and proteome of rapeseed (Brassica napus) MDEs from the few-celled stage to the globular/heart stage using two MDE culture systems: conventional cultures in which MDEs initially develop as unorganized clusters that usually lack a suspensor, and a novel suspensor-bearing embryo culture system in which the embryo proper originates from the distal cell of a suspensor-like structure and undergoes the same ordered cell divisions as the zygotic embryo. Improved histodifferentiation of suspensor-bearing MDEs suggests a new role for the suspensor in driving embryo cell identity and patterning. An MDE culture cDNA array and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and protein sequencing were used to compile global and specific expression profiles for the two types of MDE cultures. Analysis of the identities of 220 candidate embryo markers, as well as the identities of 32 sequenced embryo up-regulated protein spots, indicate general roles for protein synthesis, glycolysis, and ascorbate metabolism in the establishment of MDE development. A collection of 135 robust markers for the transition to MDE development was identified, a number of which may be coregulated at the gene and protein expression level. Comparison of the expression profiles of preglobular-stage conventional MDEs and suspensor-bearing MDEs identified genes whose differential expression may reflect improved histodifferentiation of suspensor-bearing embryos. This collection of early embryo-expressed genes and proteins serves as a starting point for future marker development and gene function studies aimed at understanding the molecular regulation of cell totipotency and early embryo development in plants. PMID:17384159

  8. Transcript profiles at different growth stages and tap-root zones identify correlated developmental and metabolic pathways of sugar beet.

    PubMed

    Bellin, Diana; Schulz, Britta; Soerensen, Thomas Rosleff; Salamini, Francesco; Schneider, Katharina

    2007-01-01

    Field-grown sugar beets were analysed for morphological characters, sucrose content, and reproducible transcript profiles by macroarray analyses with 11,520 unique sugar-beet cDNA targets in two different years. Seasonal differences were partly compensated by expressing sampling dates as thermal time. During early beet development the number of cambial rings, root length, and sucrose concentration had already achieved >40% of their final values. Sucrose levels rose from 10% to 17% over the thermal time of 1300-1400 degrees Cd with only small changes later when lower concentrations were restricted to the exterior zone at the minimum of the spatial sucrose gradient through the beet. The number of leaves and root diameter followed the same temporal growth pattern, but mass increased until beet maturity at around 2000 degrees Cd. Cluster analysis identified 543 transcripts with reproducible preferential expression between 1300-1400 degrees Cd, and 170 showing the highest transcript levels later. In maturing beets, 373 transcripts were over-represented in the inner zone and 148 in the outer zone. During early development, genes involved in cytoskeletal reorganization and transport processes showed the highest transcript levels. Cell wall biogenesis-, defence-, stress-, and degradation-related transcripts were identified in all samples, and associated with pathogen attack during late development and in the outer zone. Candidates with potential roles in carbohydrate metabolism appeared to serve anaplerotic functions by converting excess intermediates to sucrose production. Transcripts preferentially occurring in sucrose-accumulating young beet cells and newly generated peripheral cells of mature beets are discussed as potential breeding targets to improve sink strength and growth.

  9. Analysis of the Protein Kinase A-Regulated Proteome of Cryptococcus neoformans Identifies a Role for the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway in Capsule Formation

    PubMed Central

    Geddes, J. M. H.; Caza, M.; Croll, D.; Stoynov, N.; Foster, L. J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The opportunistic fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans causes life-threatening meningitis in immunocompromised individuals. The expression of virulence factors, including capsule and melanin, is in part regulated by the cyclic-AMP/protein kinase A (cAMP/PKA) signal transduction pathway. In this study, we investigated the influence of PKA on the composition of the intracellular proteome to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the regulation that underpins virulence. Through quantitative proteomics, enrichment and bioinformatic analyses, and an interactome study, we uncovered a pattern of PKA regulation for proteins associated with translation, the proteasome, metabolism, amino acid biosynthesis, and virulence-related functions. PKA regulation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in C. neoformans showed a striking parallel with connections between PKA and protein degradation in chronic neurodegenerative disorders and other human diseases. Further investigation of proteasome function with the inhibitor bortezomib revealed an impact on capsule production as well as hypersusceptibility for strains with altered expression or activity of PKA. Parallel studies with tunicamycin also linked endoplasmic reticulum stress with capsule production and PKA. Taken together, the data suggest a model whereby expression of PKA regulatory and catalytic subunits and the activation of PKA influence proteostasis and the function of the endoplasmic reticulum to control the elaboration of the polysaccharide capsule. Overall, this study revealed both broad and conserved influences of the cAMP/PKA pathway on the proteome and identified proteostasis as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of cryptococcosis. PMID:26758180

  10. RNA Sequencing Identifies Upregulated Kyphoscoliosis Peptidase and Phosphatidic Acid Signaling Pathways in Muscle Hypertrophy Generated by Transgenic Expression of Myostatin Propeptide

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Yuanxin; Yang, Jinzeng; Xu, Zhong; Jing, Lu; Zhao, Shuhong; Li, Xinyun

    2015-01-01

    Myostatin (MSTN), a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, plays a crucial negative role in muscle growth. MSTN mutations or inhibitions can dramatically increase muscle mass in most mammal species. Previously, we generated a transgenic mouse model of muscle hypertrophy via the transgenic expression of the MSTN N-terminal propeptide cDNA under the control of the skeletal muscle-specific MLC1 promoter. Here, we compare the mRNA profiles between transgenic mice and wild-type littermate controls with a high-throughput RNA sequencing method. The results show that 132 genes were significantly differentially expressed between transgenic mice and wild-type control mice; 97 of these genes were up-regulated, and 35 genes were down-regulated in the skeletal muscle. Several genes that had not been reported to be involved in muscle hypertrophy were identified, including up-regulated myosin binding protein H (mybph), and zinc metallopeptidase STE24 (Zmpste24). In addition, kyphoscoliosis peptidase (Ky), which plays a vital role in muscle growth, was also up-regulated in the transgenic mice. Interestingly, a pathway analysis based on grouping the differentially expressed genes uncovered that cardiomyopathy-related pathways and phosphatidic acid (PA) pathways (Dgki, Dgkz, Plcd4) were up-regulated. Increased PA signaling may increase mTOR signaling, resulting in skeletal muscle growth. The findings of the RNA sequencing analysis help to understand the molecular mechanisms of muscle hypertrophy caused by MSTN inhibition. PMID:25860951

  11. Quantitation of Aristolochic Acids in Corn, Wheat Grain, and Soil Samples Collected in Serbia: Identifying a Novel Exposure Pathway in the Etiology of Balkan Endemic Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Chan, Wan; Pavlović, Nikola M; Li, Weiwei; Chan, Chi-Kong; Liu, Jingjing; Deng, Kailin; Wang, Yinan; Milosavljević, Biljana; Kostić, Emina N

    2016-07-27

    While to date investigations provided convincing evidence on the role of aristolochic acids (AAs) in the etiology of Balkan endemic nephropathy (BEN) and upper urothelial cancer (UUC), the exposure pathways by which AAs enter human bodies to cause BEN and UUC remain obscure. The goal of this study is to test the hypothesis that environmental pollution by AAs and root uptake of AAs in the polluted soil may be one of the pathways by which AAs enter the human food chain. The hypothesis driving this study was that the decay of Aristolochia clematitis L., a AA-containing herbaceous plant that is found growing widespread in the endemic regions, could release free AAs to the soil, which could be taken up by food crops growing nearby, thereby transferring this potent human nephrotoxin and carcinogen into their edible parts. Using the highly sensitive and selective high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with fluorescence detection method, we identified and quantitated in this study for the first time AAs in corn, wheat grain, and soil samples collected from the endemic village Kutles in Serbia. Our results provide the first direct evidence that food crops and soil in the Balkans are contaminated with AAs. It is possible that the presence of AAs in edible parts of crops originating from the AA-contaminated soil could be one of the major pathways by which humans become exposed to AAs. PMID:27362729

  12. Large-Scale microRNA Expression Profiling Identifies Putative Retinal miRNA-mRNA Signaling Pathways Underlying Form-Deprivation Myopia in Mice.

    PubMed

    Tkatchenko, Andrei V; Luo, Xiaoyan; Tkatchenko, Tatiana V; Vaz, Candida; Tanavde, Vivek M; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Zauscher, Stefan; Gonzalez, Pedro; Young, Terri L

    2016-01-01

    Development of myopia is associated with large-scale changes in ocular tissue gene expression. Although differential expression of coding genes underlying development of myopia has been a subject of intense investigation, the role of non-coding genes such as microRNAs in the development of myopia is largely unknown. In this study, we explored myopia-associated miRNA expression profiles in the retina and sclera of C57Bl/6J mice with experimentally induced myopia using microarray technology. We found a total of 53 differentially expressed miRNAs in the retina and no differences in miRNA expression in the sclera of C57BL/6J mice after 10 days of visual form deprivation, which induced -6.93 ± 2.44 D (p < 0.000001, n = 12) of myopia. We also identified their putative mRNA targets among mRNAs found to be differentially expressed in myopic retina and potential signaling pathways involved in the development of form-deprivation myopia using miRNA-mRNA interaction network analysis. Analysis of myopia-associated signaling pathways revealed that myopic response to visual form deprivation in the retina is regulated by a small number of highly integrated signaling pathways. Our findings highlighted that changes in microRNA expression are involved in the regulation of refractive eye development and predicted how they may be involved in the development of myopia by regulating retinal gene expression. PMID:27622715

  13. RNA sequencing identifies upregulated kyphoscoliosis peptidase and phosphatidic acid signaling pathways in muscle hypertrophy generated by transgenic expression of myostatin propeptide.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yuanxin; Yang, Jinzeng; Xu, Zhong; Jing, Lu; Zhao, Shuhong; Li, Xinyun

    2015-01-01

    Myostatin (MSTN), a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, plays a crucial negative role in muscle growth. MSTN mutations or inhibitions can dramatically increase muscle mass in most mammal species. Previously, we generated a transgenic mouse model of muscle hypertrophy via the transgenic expression of the MSTN N-terminal propeptide cDNA under the control of the skeletal muscle-specific MLC1 promoter. Here, we compare the mRNA profiles between transgenic mice and wild-type littermate controls with a high-throughput RNA sequencing method. The results show that 132 genes were significantly differentially expressed between transgenic mice and wild-type control mice; 97 of these genes were up-regulated, and 35 genes were down-regulated in the skeletal muscle. Several genes that had not been reported to be involved in muscle hypertrophy were identified, including up-regulated myosin binding protein H (mybph), and zinc metallopeptidase STE24 (Zmpste24). In addition, kyphoscoliosis peptidase (Ky), which plays a vital role in muscle growth, was also up-regulated in the transgenic mice. Interestingly, a pathway analysis based on grouping the differentially expressed genes uncovered that cardiomyopathy-related pathways and phosphatidic acid (PA) pathways (Dgki, Dgkz, Plcd4) were up-regulated. Increased PA signaling may increase mTOR signaling, resulting in skeletal muscle growth. The findings of the RNA sequencing analysis help to understand the molecular mechanisms of muscle hypertrophy caused by MSTN inhibition. PMID:25860951

  14. Large-Scale microRNA Expression Profiling Identifies Putative Retinal miRNA-mRNA Signaling Pathways Underlying Form-Deprivation Myopia in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Vaz, Candida; Tanavde, Vivek M.; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Zauscher, Stefan; Gonzalez, Pedro; Young, Terri L.

    2016-01-01

    Development of myopia is associated with large-scale changes in ocular tissue gene expression. Although differential expression of coding genes underlying development of myopia has been a subject of intense investigation, the role of non-coding genes such as microRNAs in the development of myopia is largely unknown. In this study, we explored myopia-associated miRNA expression profiles in the retina and sclera of C57Bl/6J mice with experimentally induced myopia using microarray technology. We found a total of 53 differentially expressed miRNAs in the retina and no differences in miRNA expression in the sclera of C57BL/6J mice after 10 days of visual form deprivation, which induced -6.93 ± 2.44 D (p < 0.000001, n = 12) of myopia. We also identified their putative mRNA targets among mRNAs found to be differentially expressed in myopic retina and potential signaling pathways involved in the development of form-deprivation myopia using miRNA-mRNA interaction network analysis. Analysis of myopia-associated signaling pathways revealed that myopic response to visual form deprivation in the retina is regulated by a small number of highly integrated signaling pathways. Our findings highlighted that changes in microRNA expression are involved in the regulation of refractive eye development and predicted how they may be involved in the development of myopia by regulating retinal gene expression. PMID:27622715

  15. Ion permeation in the NanC porin from Escherichia coli: free energy calculations along pathways identified by coarse-grain simulations.

    PubMed

    Dreyer, Jens; Strodel, Paul; Ippoliti, Emiliano; Finnerty, Justin; Eisenberg, Bob; Carloni, Paolo

    2013-10-31

    Using the X-ray structure of a recently discovered bacterial protein, the N-acetylneuraminic acid-inducible channel (NanC), we investigate computationally K(+) and Cl(-) ions' permeation. We identify ion permeation pathways that are likely to be populated using coarse-grain Monte Carlo simulations. Next, we use these pathways as reaction coordinates for umbrella sampling-based free energy simulations. We find distinct tubelike pathways connecting specific binding sites for K(+) and, more pronounced, for Cl(-) ions. Both ions permeate the porin preserving almost all of their first hydration shell. The calculated free energy barriers are G(#) ≈ 4 kJ/mol and G(#) ≈ 8 kJ/mol for Cl(-) and K(+), respectively. Within the approximations associated with these values, discussed in detail in this work, we suggest that the porin is slightly selective for Cl(-) versus K(+). Our suggestion is consistent with the experimentally observed weak Cl(-) over K(+) selectivity. A rationale for the latter is suggested by a comparison with previous calculations on strongly anion selective porins.

  16. RNA sequencing identifies upregulated kyphoscoliosis peptidase and phosphatidic acid signaling pathways in muscle hypertrophy generated by transgenic expression of myostatin propeptide.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yuanxin; Yang, Jinzeng; Xu, Zhong; Jing, Lu; Zhao, Shuhong; Li, Xinyun

    2015-04-09

    Myostatin (MSTN), a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, plays a crucial negative role in muscle growth. MSTN mutations or inhibitions can dramatically increase muscle mass in most mammal species. Previously, we generated a transgenic mouse model of muscle hypertrophy via the transgenic expression of the MSTN N-terminal propeptide cDNA under the control of the skeletal muscle-specific MLC1 promoter. Here, we compare the mRNA profiles between transgenic mice and wild-type littermate controls with a high-throughput RNA sequencing method. The results show that 132 genes were significantly differentially expressed between transgenic mice and wild-type control mice; 97 of these genes were up-regulated, and 35 genes were down-regulated in the skeletal muscle. Several genes that had not been reported to be involved in muscle hypertrophy were identified, including up-regulated myosin binding protein H (mybph), and zinc metallopeptidase STE24 (Zmpste24). In addition, kyphoscoliosis peptidase (Ky), which plays a vital role in muscle growth, was also up-regulated in the transgenic mice. Interestingly, a pathway analysis based on grouping the differentially expressed genes uncovered that cardiomyopathy-related pathways and phosphatidic acid (PA) pathways (Dgki, Dgkz, Plcd4) were up-regulated. Increased PA signaling may increase mTOR signaling, resulting in skeletal muscle growth. The findings of the RNA sequencing analysis help to understand the molecular mechanisms of muscle hypertrophy caused by MSTN inhibition.

  17. Arachidonic acid pathway members PLA2G7, HPGD, EPHX2, and CYP4F8 identified as putative novel therapeutic targets in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Vainio, Paula; Gupta, Santosh; Ketola, Kirsi; Mirtti, Tuomas; Mpindi, John-Patrick; Kohonen, Pekka; Fey, Vidal; Perälä, Merja; Smit, Frank; Verhaegh, Gerald; Schalken, Jack; Alanen, Kalle A; Kallioniemi, Olli; Iljin, Kristiina

    2011-02-01

    The arachidonic acid and prostaglandin pathway has been implicated in prostate carcinogenesis, but comprehensive studies of the individual members in this key pathway are lacking. Here, we first conducted a systematic bioinformatic study of the expression of 36 arachidonic acid pathway genes across 9783 human tissue samples. The results showed that the PLA2G7, HPGD, EPHX2, and CYP4F8 genes are highly expressed in prostate cancer. Functional studies using RNA interference in prostate cancer cells indicated that all four genes are also essential for cell growth and survival. Clinical validation confirmed high PLA2G7 expression, especially in ERG oncogene-positive prostate cancers, and its silencing sensitized ERG-positive prostate cancer cells to oxidative stress. HPGD was highly expressed in androgen receptor (AR)-overexpressing advanced tumors, as well as in metastatic prostate cancers. EPHX2 mRNA correlated with AR in primary prostate cancers, and its inhibition in vitro reduced AR signaling and potentiated the effect of antiandrogen flutamide in cultured prostate cancer cells. In summary, we identified four novel putative therapeutic targets with biomarker potential for different subtypes of prostate cancer. In addition, our results indicate that inhibition of these enzymes may be particularly powerful when combined with other treatments, such as androgen deprivation or induction of oxidative stress. PMID:21281786

  18. Genome-wide screen identifies a novel p97/CDC-48-dependent pathway regulating ER-stress-induced gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Marza, Esther; Taouji, Saïd; Barroso, Kim; Raymond, Anne-Aurélie; Guignard, Léo; Bonneu, Marc; Pallares-Lupon, Néstor; Dupuy, Jean-William; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E; Rosenbaum, Jean; Palladino, Francesca; Dupuy, Denis; Chevet, Eric

    2015-03-01

    The accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) activates the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR(ER)) to restore ER homeostasis. The AAA(+) ATPase p97/CDC-48 plays key roles in ER stress by promoting both ER protein degradation and transcription of UPR(ER) genes. Although the mechanisms associated with protein degradation are now well established, the molecular events involved in the regulation of gene transcription by p97/CDC-48 remain unclear. Using a reporter-based genome-wide RNAi screen in combination with quantitative proteomic analysis in Caenorhabditis elegans, we have identified RUVB-2, a AAA(+) ATPase, as a novel repressor of a subset of UPR(ER) genes. We show that degradation of RUVB-2 by CDC-48 enhances expression of ER stress response genes through an XBP1-dependent mechanism. The functional interplay between CDC-48 and RUVB-2 in controlling transcription of select UPR(ER) genes appears conserved in human cells. Together, these results describe a novel role for p97/CDC-48, whereby its role in protein degradation is integrated with its role in regulating expression of ER stress response genes.

  19. Time-resolved Studies of IsdG Protein Identify Molecular Signposts along the Non-canonical Heme Oxygenase Pathway.

    PubMed

    Streit, Bennett R; Kant, Ravi; Tokmina-Lukaszewska, Monika; Celis, Arianna I; Machovina, Melodie M; Skaar, Eric P; Bothner, Brian; DuBois, Jennifer L

    2016-01-01

    IsdGs are heme monooxygenases that break open the tetrapyrrole, releasing the iron, and thereby allowing bacteria expressing this protein to use heme as a nutritional iron source. Little is currently known about the mechanism by which IsdGs degrade heme, although the products differ from those generated by canonical heme oxygenases. A synthesis of time-resolved techniques, including in proteo mass spectrometry and conventional and stopped-flow UV/visible spectroscopy, was used in conjunction with analytical methods to define the reaction steps mediated by IsdG from Staphylococcus aureus and their time scales. An apparent meso-hydroxyheme (forming with k = 0.6 min(-1), pH 7.4, 10 mm ascorbate, 10 μm IsdG-heme, 22 °C) was identified as a likely common intermediate with the canonical heme oxygenases. Unlike heme oxygenases, this intermediate does not form with added H2O2 nor does it convert to verdoheme and CO. Rather, the next observable intermediates (k = 0.16 min(-1)) were a set of formyloxobilin isomers, similar to the mycobilin products of the IsdG homolog from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MhuD). These converted in separate fast and slow phases to β-/δ-staphylobilin isomers and formaldehyde (CH2O). Controlled release of this unusual C1 product may support IsdG's dual role as both an oxygenase and a sensor of heme availability in S. aureus. PMID:26534961

  20. Ultrastructure of synaptic contacts between identified neurons of the auditory pathway in Gryllus bimaculatus DeGeer.

    PubMed

    Hirtz, R; Wiese, K

    1997-09-29

    The synaptic contacts between the auditory sensory cells and identified auditory interneurons ON1 and AN2 have been examined at the ultrastructural level by selective electron-dense labeling of two interneurons or of one interneuron and the sensory fibers in the same preparation. The experiments have provided the following information. The auditory afferent fibers have a monosynaptic connection with the lateral inhibitors ON1 and the ascending interneuron AN2, allowing direct activation of these interneurons. Furthermore, our work proves that the paired, lateral, inhibitor ON1 neurons have direct output synapses onto each other. The results also show that the auditory afferent axons, themselves, receive synaptic inputs just before entering the central auditory neuropil. The effects of current injection into the ON1 neuron during auditory processing indicate that these synaptic inputs onto the afferents originate, in part, from the lateral branches of the ipsilateral ON1 neuron and that they have inhibitory function. The significance of these results for auditory processing and a future perspective for electron microscopic analysis of neuropil are discussed.

  1. Genome-wide screen identifies a novel p97/CDC-48-dependent pathway regulating ER-stress-induced gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Marza, Esther; Taouji, Saïd; Barroso, Kim; Raymond, Anne-Aurélie; Guignard, Léo; Bonneu, Marc; Pallares-Lupon, Néstor; Dupuy, Jean-William; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E; Rosenbaum, Jean; Palladino, Francesca; Dupuy, Denis; Chevet, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) activates the Unfolded Protein Response (UPRER) to restore ER homeostasis. The AAA+ ATPase p97/CDC-48 plays key roles in ER stress by promoting both ER protein degradation and transcription of UPRER genes. Although the mechanisms associated with protein degradation are now well established, the molecular events involved in the regulation of gene transcription by p97/CDC-48 remain unclear. Using a reporter-based genome-wide RNAi screen in combination with quantitative proteomic analysis in Caenorhabditis elegans, we have identified RUVB-2, a AAA+ ATPase, as a novel repressor of a subset of UPRER genes. We show that degradation of RUVB-2 by CDC-48 enhances expression of ER stress response genes through an XBP1-dependent mechanism. The functional interplay between CDC-48 and RUVB-2 in controlling transcription of select UPRER genes appears conserved in human cells. Together, these results describe a novel role for p97/CDC-48, whereby its role in protein degradation is integrated with its role in regulating expression of ER stress response genes. PMID:25652260

  2. Genome-wide screen identifies a novel p97/CDC-48-dependent pathway regulating ER-stress-induced gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Marza, Esther; Taouji, Saïd; Barroso, Kim; Raymond, Anne-Aurélie; Guignard, Léo; Bonneu, Marc; Pallares-Lupon, Néstor; Dupuy, Jean-William; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E; Rosenbaum, Jean; Palladino, Francesca; Dupuy, Denis; Chevet, Eric

    2015-03-01

    The accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) activates the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR(ER)) to restore ER homeostasis. The AAA(+) ATPase p97/CDC-48 plays key roles in ER stress by promoting both ER protein degradation and transcription of UPR(ER) genes. Although the mechanisms associated with protein degradation are now well established, the molecular events involved in the regulation of gene transcription by p97/CDC-48 remain unclear. Using a reporter-based genome-wide RNAi screen in combination with quantitative proteomic analysis in Caenorhabditis elegans, we have identified RUVB-2, a AAA(+) ATPase, as a novel repressor of a subset of UPR(ER) genes. We show that degradation of RUVB-2 by CDC-48 enhances expression of ER stress response genes through an XBP1-dependent mechanism. The functional interplay between CDC-48 and RUVB-2 in controlling transcription of select UPR(ER) genes appears conserved in human cells. Together, these results describe a novel role for p97/CDC-48, whereby its role in protein degradation is integrated with its role in regulating expression of ER stress response genes. PMID:25652260

  3. Ordering events of biochemical evolution.

    PubMed

    Cunchillos, C; Lecointre, G

    2007-05-01

    Metabolic pathways exhibit structures resulting from an evolutionary process. Pathways have been inherited through time with modification, from the earliest periods of life. It is possible to compare the structure of pathways as done in comparative anatomy, i.e. for inferring ancestral pathways or parts of it (ancestral enzymatic functions), using standard phylogenetic reconstruction. Thus a phylogenetic tree of pathways provides a relative ordering of the rise of enzymatic functions. It even becomes possible to order the birth of each complete pathway in time. This particular "DNA-free" conceptual approach to evolutionary biochemistry is reviewed, gathering all the justifications given for it. Then, the method of assigning a given pathway to a time span of biochemical development is revisited. The previous method used an implicit "clock" of metabolic development that is difficult to justify. We develop a new clock-free approach, using functional biochemical arguments. Results of the two methods are not significantly different; our method is just more precise. This suggests that the clock assumed in the first method does not provoke any important artefact in describing the development of biochemical evolution. It is just unnecessary to postulate it. As a result, most of the amino acid metabolic pathways develop forwards, confirming former models of amino acid catabolism evolution, but not those for amino acid anabolism. The order of appearance of sectors of universal cellular metabolism is: (1) amino acid catabolism, (2) amino acid anabolism and closure of the urea cycle, (3) glycolysis and glycogenesis, (4) closure of the pentose-phosphate cycle, (5) closure of the Krebs cycle and fatty acids metabolism, (6) closure of the Calvin cycle.

  4. Putative pathway of sex pheromone biosynthesis and degradation by expression patterns of genes identified from female pheromone gland and adult antenna of Sesamia inferens (Walker).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ya-Nan; Xia, Yi-Han; Zhu, Jia-Yao; Li, Sheng-Yun; Dong, Shuang-Lin

    2014-05-01

    The general pathway of biosynthesis and degradation for Type-I sex pheromones in moths is well established, but some genes involved in this pathway remain to be characterized. The purple stem borer, Sesamia inferens, employs a pheromone blend containing components with three different terminal functional groups (Z11-16:OAc, Z11-16:OH, and Z11-16:Ald) of Type-I sex pheromones. Thus, it provides a good model to study the diversity of genes involved in pheromone biosynthesis and degradation pathways. By analyzing previously obtained transcriptomic data of the sex pheromone glands and antennae, we identified 73 novel genes that are possibly related to pheromone biosynthesis (46 genes) or degradation (27 genes). Gene expression patterns and phylogenetic analysis revealed that one desaturase (SinfDes4), one fatty acid reductase (SinfFAR2), and one fatty acid xtransport protein (SinfFATP1) genes were predominantly expressed in pheromone glands, and clustered with genes involved in pheromone synthesis in other moth species. Ten genes including five carboxylesterases (SinfCXE10, 13, 14, 18, and 20), three aldehyde oxidases (SinfAOX1, 2 and 3), and two alcohol dehydrogenases (SinfAD1 and 3) were expressed specifically or predominantly in antennae, and could be candidate genes involved in pheromone degradation. SinfAD1 and 3 are the first reported alcohol dehydrogenase genes with antennae-biased expression. Based on these results we propose a pathway involving these potential enzyme-encoding gene candidates in sex pheromone biosynthesis and degradation in S. inferens. This study provides robust background information for further elucidation of the genetic basis of sex pheromone biosynthesis and degradation, and ultimately provides potential targets to disrupt sexual communication in S. inferens for control purposes. PMID:24817326

  5. A High-Throughput Screening Strategy to Identify Protein-Protein Interaction Inhibitors That Block the Fanconi Anemia DNA Repair Pathway.

    PubMed

    Voter, Andrew F; Manthei, Kelly A; Keck, James L

    2016-07-01

    Induction of the Fanconi anemia (FA) DNA repair pathway is a common mechanism by which tumors evolve resistance to DNA crosslinking chemotherapies. Proper execution of the FA pathway requires interaction between the FA complementation group M protein (FANCM) and the RecQ-mediated genome instability protein (RMI) complex, and mutations that disrupt FANCM/RMI interactions sensitize cells to DNA crosslinking agents. Inhibitors that block FANCM/RMI complex formation could be useful therapeutics for resensitizing tumors that have acquired chemotherapeutic resistance. To identify such inhibitors, we have developed and validated high-throughput fluorescence polarization and proximity assays that are sensitive to inhibitors that disrupt interactions between the RMI complex and its binding site on FANCM (a peptide referred to as MM2). A pilot screen of 74,807 small molecules was performed using the fluorescence polarization assay. Hits from the primary screen were further tested using the proximity assay, and an orthogonal proximity assay was used to assess inhibitor selectivity. Direct physical interaction between the RMI complex and the most selective inhibitor identified through the screening process was measured by surface plasmon resonance and isothermal titration calorimetry. Observation of direct binding by this small molecule validates the screening protocol.

  6. Transcriptome Analysis of Peripheral Blood in Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy Patients Identifies TNFR1 and TLR Pathways in the IVIg Response

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Alexandra; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Debs, Rabab; Reach, Pauline; Tahiri, Khadija; Carpentier, Wassila; Gueguen, Justine; Guillemot, Vincent; Labeyrie, Céline; Adams, David; Viala, Karine; Cohen Aubart, Fleur

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We have studied the response to intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg) by a transcriptomic approach in 11 chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) patients (CIDP duration = 6 [0.83–6.5] years). RNA was extracted from cells in whole blood collected before and 3 weeks after IVIg treatment, and hybridized on Illumina chips. After RNA quality controls, gene expression was analyzed using statistical tests fitted for microarrays (R software, limma package), and a pathway analysis was performed using DAVID software. We identified 52 genes with expression that varied significantly after IVIg (fold change [FC] > 1.2, P < 0.001, false discovery rate [FDR] <0.05). Among these 52 genes, 7 were related to immunity, 3 were related to the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α receptor 1 (TNFR1) pathway (inhibitor of caspase-activated DNase (ICAD): FC = 1.8, P = 1.7E-7, FDR = 0.004; p21 protein-activated kinase 2 [PAK2]: FC = 1.66, P = 2.6E-5, FDR = 0.03; TNF-α-induced protein 8-like protein 1 [TNFAIP8L1]: P = 1.00E-05, FDR = 0.026), and 2 were related to Toll-like receptors (TLRs), especially TLRs 7 and 9, and were implicated in autoimmunity. These genes were UNC93B1 (FC = 1.6, P = 2E-5, FDR = 0.03), which transports TLRs 7 and 9 to the endolysosomes, and RNF216 (FC = 1.5, P = 1E-05, FDR = 0.03), which promotes TLR 9 degradation. Pathway analysis showed that the TNFR1 pathway was significantly lessened by IVIg (enrichment score = 24, Fischer exact test = 0.003). TNF-α gene expression was higher in responder patients than in nonresponders; however, it decreased after IVIg in responders (P = 0.04), but remained stable in nonresponders. Our data suggest the actions of IVIg on the TNFR1 pathway and an original mechanism involving innate immunity through TLRs in CIDP pathophysiology and the response to IVIg. We conclude that responder patients have stronger inflammatory activity

  7. Transcriptome Analysis of Peripheral Blood in Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy Patients Identifies TNFR1 and TLR Pathways in the IVIg Response.

    PubMed

    Richard, Alexandra; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Debs, Rabab; Reach, Pauline; Tahiri, Khadija; Carpentier, Wassila; Gueguen, Justine; Guillemot, Vincent; Labeyrie, Céline; Adams, David; Viala, Karine; Cohen Aubart, Fleur

    2016-05-01

    We have studied the response to intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg) by a transcriptomic approach in 11 chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) patients (CIDP duration = 6 [0.83-6.5] years). RNA was extracted from cells in whole blood collected before and 3 weeks after IVIg treatment, and hybridized on Illumina chips. After RNA quality controls, gene expression was analyzed using statistical tests fitted for microarrays (R software, limma package), and a pathway analysis was performed using DAVID software. We identified 52 genes with expression that varied significantly after IVIg (fold change [FC] > 1.2, P < 0.001, false discovery rate [FDR] <0.05). Among these 52 genes, 7 were related to immunity, 3 were related to the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α receptor 1 (TNFR1) pathway (inhibitor of caspase-activated DNase (ICAD): FC = 1.8, P = 1.7E-7, FDR = 0.004; p21 protein-activated kinase 2 [PAK2]: FC = 1.66, P = 2.6E-5, FDR = 0.03; TNF-α-induced protein 8-like protein 1 [TNFAIP8L1]: P = 1.00E-05, FDR = 0.026), and 2 were related to Toll-like receptors (TLRs), especially TLRs 7 and 9, and were implicated in autoimmunity. These genes were UNC93B1 (FC = 1.6, P = 2E-5, FDR = 0.03), which transports TLRs 7 and 9 to the endolysosomes, and RNF216 (FC = 1.5, P = 1E-05, FDR = 0.03), which promotes TLR 9 degradation. Pathway analysis showed that the TNFR1 pathway was significantly lessened by IVIg (enrichment score = 24, Fischer exact test = 0.003). TNF-α gene expression was higher in responder patients than in nonresponders; however, it decreased after IVIg in responders (P = 0.04), but remained stable in nonresponders. Our data suggest the actions of IVIg on the TNFR1 pathway and an original mechanism involving innate immunity through TLRs in CIDP pathophysiology and the response to IVIg. We conclude that responder patients have stronger inflammatory activity that is

  8. Robust Selection Algorithm (RSA) for Multi-Omic Biomarker Discovery; Integration with Functional Network Analysis to Identify miRNA Regulated Pathways in Multiple Cancers.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Vasudha; Seviour, Elena G; Moss, Tyler J; Mills, Gordon B; Azencott, Robert; Ram, Prahlad T

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play a crucial role in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis by regulating the expression of their target genes. As such, the dysregulation of miRNA expression has been frequently linked to cancer. With rapidly accumulating molecular data linked to patient outcome, the need for identification of robust multi-omic molecular markers is critical in order to provide clinical impact. While previous bioinformatic tools have been developed to identify potential biomarkers in cancer, these methods do not allow for rapid classification of oncogenes versus tumor suppressors taking into account robust differential expression, cutoffs, p-values and non-normality of the data. Here, we propose a methodology, Robust Selection Algorithm (RSA) that addresses these important problems in big data omics analysis. The robustness of the survival analysis is ensured by identification of optimal cutoff values of omics expression, strengthened by p-value computed through intensive random resampling taking into account any non-normality in the data and integration into multi-omic functional networks. Here we have analyzed pan-cancer miRNA patient data to identify functional pathways involved in cancer progression that are associated with selected miRNA identified by RSA. Our approach demonstrates the way in which existing survival analysis techniques can be integrated with a functional network analysis framework to efficiently identify promising biomarkers and novel therapeutic candidates across diseases.

  9. Genomic and Immunological Tumor Profiling Identifies Targetable Pathways and Extensive CD8+/PDL1+ Immune Infiltration in Inflammatory Breast Cancer Tumors.

    PubMed

    Hamm, Christopher A; Moran, Diarmuid; Rao, Kakuturu; Trusk, Patricia B; Pry, Karen; Sausen, Mark; Jones, Siân; Velculescu, Victor E; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Bacus, Sarah

    2016-07-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is a rare and aggressive form of breast cancer that remains poorly understood at the molecular level. Comprehensive tumor profiling was performed to understand clinically actionable alterations in IBC. Targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) and IHC were performed to identify activated pathways in IBC tumor tissues. siRNA studies examined the impact of IBC genomic variants in cellular models. IBC tumor tissues were further characterized for immune infiltration and immune checkpoint expression by IHC. Genomic analysis identified recurrent alterations in core biologic pathways, including activating and targetable variants in HER/PI3K/mTOR signaling. High rates of activating HER3 point mutations were discovered in IBC tumors. Cell line studies confirmed a role for mutant HER3 in IBC cell proliferation. Immunologic analysis revealed a subset of IBC tumors associated with high CD8(+)/PD-L1(+) lymphocyte infiltration. Immune infiltration positively correlated with an NGS-based estimate of neoantigen exposure derived from the somatic mutation rate and mutant allele frequency, iScore. Additionally, DNA mismatch repair alterations, which may contribute to higher iScores, occurred at greater frequency in tumors with higher immune infiltration. Our study identifies genomic alterations that mechanistically contribute to oncogenic signaling in IBC and provides a genetic basis for the selection of clinically relevant targeted and combination therapeutic strategies. Furthermore, an NGS-based estimate of neoantigen exposure developed in this study (iScore) may be a useful biomarker to predict immune infiltration in IBC and other cancers. The iScore may be associated with greater levels of response to immunotherapies, such as PD-L1/PD-1-targeted therapies. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(7); 1746-56. ©2016 AACR.

  10. A program impact pathway analysis identifies critical steps in the implementation and utilization of a behavior change communication intervention promoting infant and child feeding practices in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Avula, Rasmi; Menon, Purnima; Saha, Kuntal K; Bhuiyan, Mahbubul Islam; Chowdhury, Anita S; Siraj, Saiqa; Haque, Raisul; Jalal, Chowdhury S B; Afsana, Kaosar; Frongillo, Edward A

    2013-12-01

    Mapping pathways of how interventions are implemented and utilized enables contextually grounded interpretation of results, differentiates poor design from poor implementation, and identifies factors that might influence the utilization of interventions. Few studies in nutrition have comprehensively examined the steps of implementation and utilization in behavior change communication (BCC) interventions, thus limiting the interpretation of variable impacts of BCC interventions. A program impact pathway (PIP) analysis was used to study a BCC intervention implemented in Bangladesh to improve infant and young child feeding (IYCF) practices. The PIP was developed through an iterative process with the program implementation team; the PIP then guided the choice of methods and tools. Using mixed methods, we reviewed the content of training materials for implementation staff, measured their IYCF knowledge (n = 100), observed their communication with mothers (n = 37), and examined factors influencing promotion of IYCF practices and their trial and adoption by mothers (n = 64). Implementation staff demonstrated good knowledge and maintained fidelity to the intervention to a large extent. Mothers identified them as their primary sources of information, and a majority of mothers tried recommended IYCF practices. Key facilitators included family support and availability of resources, whereas lack of time, maternal and family perceptions of age-appropriate feeding, and lack of resources were salient barriers to adopting recommended practices. Using a PIP analysis identified critical issues pertaining to implementation (e.g., the role of paid and volunteer staff) and utilization (e.g., resource and time constraints that require complementary interventions) and the need for further research and programmatic attention. PMID:24068790

  11. 40 CFR 158.2010 - Biochemical pesticides data requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Biochemical pesticides data...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2010 Biochemical pesticides... required to support registration of biochemical pesticides. Sections 158.2080 through 158.2084 identify...

  12. Transcriptional Profiling of Cultured, Embryonic Epicardial Cells Identifies Novel Genes and Signaling Pathways Regulated by TGFβR3 In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    DeLaughter, Daniel M.; Clark, Cynthia R.; Christodoulou, Danos C.; Seidman, Christine E.; Baldwin, H. Scott; Seidman, J. G.; Barnett, Joey V.

    2016-01-01

    The epicardium plays an important role in coronary vessel formation and Tgfbr3-/- mice exhibit failed coronary vessel development associated with decreased epicardial cell invasion. Immortalized Tgfbr3-/- epicardial cells display the same defects. Tgfbr3+/+ and Tgfbr3-/- cells incubated for 72 hours with VEH or ligands known to promote invasion via TGFβR3 (TGFβ1, TGFβ2, BMP2), for 72 hours were harvested for RNA-seq analysis. We selected for genes >2-fold differentially expressed between Tgfbr3+/+ and Tgfbr3-/- cells when incubated with VEH (604), TGFβ1 (515), TGFβ2 (553), or BMP2 (632). Gene Ontology (GO) analysis of these genes identified dysregulated biological processes consistent with the defects observed in Tgfbr3-/- cells, including those associated with extracellular matrix interaction. GO and Gene Regulatory Network (GRN) analysis identified distinct expression profiles between TGFβ1-TGFβ2 and VEH-BMP2 incubated cells, consistent with the differential response of epicardial cells to these ligands in vitro. Despite the differences observed between Tgfbr3+/+ and Tgfbr3-/- cells after TGFβ and BMP ligand addition, GRNs constructed from these gene lists identified NF-ĸB as a key nodal point for all ligands examined. Tgfbr3-/- cells exhibited decreased expression of genes known to be activated by NF-ĸB signaling. NF-ĸB activity was stimulated in Tgfbr3+/+ epicardial cells after TGFβ2 or BMP2 incubation, while Tgfbr3-/- cells failed to activate NF-ĸB in response to these ligands. Tgfbr3+/+ epicardial cells incubated with an inhibitor of NF-ĸB signaling no longer invaded into a collagen gel in response to TGFβ2 or BMP2. These data suggest that NF-ĸB signaling is dysregulated in Tgfbr3-/- epicardial cells and that NF-ĸB signaling is required for epicardial cell invasion in vitro. Our approach successfully identified a signaling pathway important in epicardial cell behavior downstream of TGFβR3. Overall, the genes and signaling pathways identified

  13. Oxygen-dependent copper toxicity: targets in the chlorophyll biosynthesis pathway identified in the copper efflux ATPase CopA deficient mutant.

    PubMed

    Liotenberg, Sylviane; Steunou, Anne-Soisig; Durand, Anne; Bourbon, Marie-Line; Bollivar, David; Hansson, Mats; Astier, Chantal; Ouchane, Soufian

    2015-06-01

    Characterization of a copA(-) mutant in the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rubrivivax gelatinosus under low oxygen or anaerobic conditions, as well as in the human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae identified HemN as a copper toxicity target enzyme in the porphyrin synthesis pathway. Heme synthesis is, however, unaffected by copper under high oxygen tension because of the aerobic coproporphyrinogen III oxidase HemF. Nevertheless, in the copA(-) mutant under aerobiosis, we show that the chlorophyll biosynthesis pathway is affected by excess copper resulting in a substantial decrease of the photosystem. Analyses of pigments and enzyme activity showed that under low copper concentrations, the mutant accumulated protochlorophyllide, suggesting that the protochlorophyllide reductase activity is affected by excess copper. Increase of copper concentration led to a complete lack of chlorophyll synthesis as a result of the loss of Mg-chelatase activity. Both enzymes are widely distributed from bacteria to plants; both are [4Fe-4S] proteins and oxygen sensitive; our data demonstrate their in vivo susceptibility to copper in the presence of oxygen. Additionally, our study provides the understanding of molecular mechanisms that may contribute to chlorosis in plants when exposed to metals. The role of copper efflux systems and the impact of copper on heme and chlorophyll biosynthesis in phototrophs are addressed.

  14. Midbrain Gene Screening Identifies a New Mesoaccumbal Glutamatergic Pathway and a Marker for Dopamine Cells Neuroprotected in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Viereckel, Thomas; Dumas, Sylvie; Smith-Anttila, Casey J. A.; Vlcek, Bianca; Bimpisidis, Zisis; Lagerström, Malin C.; Konradsson-Geuken, Åsa; Wallén-Mackenzie, Åsa

    2016-01-01

    The ventral tegmental area (VTA) and substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) of the midbrain are associated with Parkinson’s disease (PD), schizophrenia, mood disorders and addiction. Based on the recently unraveled heterogeneity within the VTA and SNc, where glutamate, GABA and co-releasing neurons have been found to co-exist with the classical dopamine neurons, there is a compelling need for identification of gene expression patterns that represent this heterogeneity and that are of value for development of human therapies. Here, several unique gene expression patterns were identified in the mouse midbrain of which NeuroD6 and Grp were expressed within different dopaminergic subpopulations of the VTA, and TrpV1 within a small heterogeneous population. Optogenetics-coupled in vivo amperometry revealed a previously unknown glutamatergic mesoaccumbal pathway characterized by TrpV1-Cre-expression. Human GRP was strongly detected in non-melanized dopaminergic neurons within the SNc of both control and PD brains, suggesting GRP as a marker for neuroprotected neurons in PD. This study thus unravels markers for distinct subpopulations of neurons within the mouse and human midbrain, defines unique anatomical subregions within the VTA and exposes an entirely new glutamatergic pathway. Finally, both TRPV1 and GRP are implied in midbrain physiology of importance to neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:27762319

  15. Using β-Lactamase and NanoLuc Luciferase Reporter Gene Assays to Identify Inhibitors of the HIF-1 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Khuc, Thai; Hsu, Chia-Wen Amy; Sakamuru, Srilatha; Xia, Menghang

    2016-01-01

    The hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) is a transcriptional factor involved in the regulation of oxygen within cellular environments. In hypoxic tissues or those with inadequate oxygen concentrations, activation of the HIF-1 transcription factor allows for subsequent activation of target gene expression implicated in cell survival. As a result, cells proliferate through formation of new blood vessels and expansion of vascular systems, providing necessary nourishment needed of cells. HIF-1 is also involved in the complex pathophysiology associated with cancer cells. Solid tumors are able to thrive in hypoxic environments by overactivating these target genes in order to grow and metastasize. Therefore, it is of high importance to identify modulators of the HIF-1 signaling pathway for possible development of anticancer drugs and to better understand how environmental chemicals cause cancer. Using a quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) approach, we are able to screen large chemical libraries to profile potential small molecule modulators of the HIF-1 signaling pathway in a 1536-well format. This chapter describes two orthogonal cell based assays; one utilizing a β-lactamase reporter gene incorporated into human ME-180 cervical cancer cells, and the other using a NanoLuc luciferase reporter system in human HCT116 colon cancer cells. Cell viability assays for each cell line are also conducted respectively. The data from this screening platform can be used as a gateway to study mode of action (MOA) of selected compounds and drug classes. PMID:27518620

  16. Using β-Lactamase and NanoLuc Luciferase Reporter Gene Assays to Identify Inhibitors of the HIF-1 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Khuc, Thai; Hsu, Chia-Wen Amy; Sakamuru, Srilatha; Xia, Menghang

    2016-01-01

    The hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) is a transcriptional factor involved in the regulation of oxygen within cellular environments. In hypoxic tissues or those with inadequate oxygen concentrations, activation of the HIF-1 transcription factor allows for subsequent activation of target gene expression implicated in cell survival. As a result, cells proliferate through formation of new blood vessels and expansion of vascular systems, providing necessary nourishment needed of cells. HIF-1 is also involved in the complex pathophysiology associated with cancer cells. Solid tumors are able to thrive in hypoxic environments by overactivating these target genes in order to grow and metastasize. Therefore, it is of high importance to identify modulators of the HIF-1 signaling pathway for possible development of anticancer drugs and to better understand how environmental chemicals cause cancer. Using a quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) approach, we are able to screen large chemical libraries to profile potential small molecule modulators of the HIF-1 signaling pathway in a 1536-well format. This chapter describes two orthogonal cell based assays; one utilizing a β-lactamase reporter gene incorporated into human ME-180 cervical cancer cells, and the other using a NanoLuc luciferase reporter system in human HCT116 colon cancer cells. Cell viability assays for each cell line are also conducted respectively. The data from this screening platform can be used as a gateway to study mode of action (MOA) of selected compounds and drug classes.

  17. High Throughput Sequencing Identifies MicroRNAs Mediating α-Synuclein Toxicity by Targeting Neuroactive-Ligand Receptor Interaction Pathway in Early Stage of Drosophila Parkinson's Disease Model

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Yan; Liang, Xijun; Liu, Lin; Zhang, Dongdong; Wan, Chao; Gan, Zhenji; Yuan, Liudi

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a prevalent neurodegenerative disorder with pathological features including death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and intraneuronal accumulations of Lewy bodies. As the main component of Lewy bodies, α-synuclein is implicated in PD pathogenesis by aggregation into insoluble filaments. However, the detailed mechanisms underlying α-synuclein induced neurotoxicity in PD are still elusive. MicroRNAs are ~20nt small RNA molecules that fine-tune gene expression at posttranscriptional level. A plethora of miRNAs have been found to be dysregulated in the brain and blood cells of PD patients. Nevertheless, the detailed mechanisms and their in vivo functions in PD still need further investigation. By using Drosophila PD model expressing α-synuclein A30P, we examined brain miRNA expression with high-throughput small RNA sequencing technology. We found that five miRNAs (dme-miR-133-3p, dme-miR-137-3p, dme-miR-13b-3p, dme-miR-932-5p, dme-miR-1008-5p) were upregulated in PD flies. Among them, miR-13b, miR-133, miR-137 are brain enriched and highly conserved from Drosophila to humans. KEGG pathway analysis using DIANA miR-Path demonstrated that neuroactive-ligand receptor interaction pathway was most likely affected by these miRNAs. Interestingly, miR-137 was predicted to regulate most of the identified targets in this pathway, including dopamine receptor (DopR, D2R), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor (GABA-B-R1, GABA-B-R3) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor (Nmdar2). The validation experiments showed that the expression of miR-137 and its targets was negatively correlated in PD flies. Further experiments using luciferase reporter assay confirmed that miR-137 could act on specific sites in 3’ UTR region of D2R, Nmdar2 and GABA-B-R3, which downregulated significantly in PD flies. Collectively, our findings indicate that α-synuclein could induce the dysregulation of miRNAs, which target neuroactive ligand

  18. An algorithm for efficient identification of branched metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Heath, Allison P; Bennett, George N; Kavraki, Lydia E

    2011-11-01

    This article presents a new graph-based algorithm for identifying branched metabolic pathways in multi-genome scale metabolic data. The term branched is used to refer to metabolic pathways between compounds that consist of multiple pathways that interact biochemically. A branched pathway may produce a target compound through a combination of linear pathways that split compounds into smaller ones, work in parallel with many compounds, and join compounds into larger ones. While branched metabolic pathways predominate in metabolic networks, most previous work has focused on identifying linear metabolic pathways. The ability to automatically identify branched pathways is important in applications that require a deeper understanding of metabolism, such as metabolic engineering and drug target identification. The algorithm presented in this article utilizes explicit atom tracking to identify linear metabolic pathways and then merges them together into branched metabolic pathways. We provide results on several well-characterized metabolic pathways that demonstrate that the new merging approach can efficiently find biologically relevant branched metabolic pathways.

  19. A system for identifying post-invasion functions of invasion genes: requirements for the Mxi-Spa type III secretion pathway of Shigella flexneri in intercellular dissemination.

    PubMed

    Schuch, R; Sandlin, R C; Maurelli, A T

    1999-11-01

    Invasion and intercellular spread are hallmarks of Shigella pathogenicity. Invasion of the eukaryotic cell cytosol requires a type III secretion system (Mxi-Spa) and its cognate set of secreted Ipa invasins. Once intracellular, the IcsA protein directs a form of actin-based motility that helps to drive intracellular bacterial movement, formation of cellular protrusions and cell-to-cell spread. Work in our laboratory has focused on identifying additional factors required for this intercellular form of dissemination. In this study, we sought to identify novel contributions of the type III secretion pathway to post-invasion-specific processes, distinct from its previously characterized roles in invasion. Studies of post-invasion Ipa and Mxi-Spa functions are complicated by an absolute requirement for these virulence proteins in invasion. To circumvent this problem, we developed a system called TIER (for test of intracellular expression requirements), whereby specific ipa, mxi or spa loci are transiently expressed before infection of tissue culture cell monolayers (thus supporting invasion), but then repressed after invasion in the intracellular environment. Such invasive type III secretion mutants (called TIER mutants) were severely restricted in their ability to spread intercellularly and form plaques in confluent tissue culture cell monolayers. Intercellular spread defects were associated with the repression of most type III pathway components examined, including structural (MxiM and Spa33), secreted effector (IpaB, IpaC and IpaD) and regulatory elements (VirF and VirB). A kinetic analysis of bacterial growth in L2 cell monolayers showed that each of the TIER mutants was defective with respect to long-term intracellular proliferation and viability. Examination of TIER mutant-infected monolayers by electron microscopy revealed that the type III pathway was required for a late step in intercellular spread - bacterial escape from protrusion-derived, double

  20. Employing gene set top scoring pairs to identify deregulated pathway-signatures in dilated cardiomyopathy from integrated microarray gene expression data.

    PubMed

    Tan, Aik Choon

    2012-01-01

    It is well accepted that a set of genes must act in concert to drive various cellular processes. However, under different biological phenotypes, not all the members of a gene set will participate in a biological process. Hence, it is useful to construct a discriminative classifier by focusing on the core members (subset) of a highly informative gene set. Such analyses can reveal which of those subsets from the same gene set correspond to different biological phenotypes. In this study, we propose Gene Set Top Scoring Pairs (GSTSP) approach that exploits the simple yet powerful relative expression reversal concept at the gene set levels to achieve these goals. To illustrate the usefulness of GSTSP, we applied this method to five different human heart failure gene expression data sets. We take advantage of the direct data integration feature in the GSTSP approach to combine two data sets, identify a discriminative gene set from >190 predefined gene sets, and evaluate the predictive power of the GSTSP classifier derived from this informative gene set on three independent test sets (79.31% in test accuracy). The discriminative gene pairs identified in this study may provide new biological understanding on the disturbed pathways that are involved in the development of heart failure. GSTSP methodology is general in purpose and is applicable to a variety of phenotypic classification problems using gene expression data.

  1. ReactionFlow: an interactive visualization tool for causality analysis in biological pathways

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Molecular and systems biologists are tasked with the comprehension and analysis of incredibly complex networks of biochemical interactions, called pathways, that occur within a cell. Through interviews with domain experts, we identified four common tasks that require an understanding of the causality within pathways, that is, the downstream and upstream relationships between proteins and biochemical reactions, including: visualizing downstream consequences of perturbing a protein; finding the shortest path between two proteins; detecting feedback loops within the pathway; and identifying common downstream elements from two or more proteins. Results We introduce ReactionFlow, a visual analytics application for pathway analysis that emphasizes the structural and causal relationships amongst proteins, complexes, and biochemical reactions within a given pathway. To support the identified causality analysis tasks, user interactions allow an analyst to filter, cluster, and select pathway components across linked views. Animation is used to highlight the flow of activity through a pathway. Conclusions We evaluated ReactionFlow by providing our application to two domain experts who have significant experience with biomolecular pathways, after which we conducted a series of in-depth interviews focused on each of the four causality analysis tasks. Their feedback leads us to believe that our techniques could be useful to researchers who must be able to understand and analyze the complex nature of biological pathways. ReactionFlow is available at https://github.com/CreativeCodingLab/ReactionFlow. PMID:26361502

  2. Using chemical kinetics to model biochemical pathways.

    PubMed

    Le Novère, Nicolas; Endler, Lukas

    2013-01-01

    Chemical kinetics is the study of the rate of reactions transforming some chemical entities into other chemical entities. Over the twentieth century it has become one of the cornerstones of biochemistry. When in the second half of the century basic knowledge of cellular processes became sufficient to understand quantitatively metabolic networks, chemical kinetics associated with systems theory led to the development of what would become an important branch of systems biology. In this chapter we introduce basic concepts of chemical and enzyme kinetics, and show how the temporal evolution of a reaction system can be described by ordinary differential equations. Finally we present a method to apply this type of approach to model any regulatory network.

  3. Setbacks in blood substitutes research and development: a biochemical perspective.

    PubMed

    Alayash, Abdu I

    2010-06-01

    Recent setbacks in using Hb-based technology to develop oxygen carriers or blood substitutes may spur new and fundamentally different approaches for the development of a new generation of hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOCs). This article briefly details some underlying mechanisms that may have been responsible for the adverse-event profile associated with HBOCs, with a focus on the contribution of the author's laboratory toward identifying some of these biochemical pathways and some ways and means to control them. It is hoped that this will aid in the development of a safe and effective second generation of HBOCs.

  4. Genomic and Biochemical Analysis of the Diaminopimelate and Lysine Biosynthesis Pathway in Verrucomicrobium spinosum: Identification and Partial Characterization of L,L-Diaminopimelate Aminotransferase and UDP-N-Acetylmuramoylalanyl-D-glutamyl-2,6-meso-Diaminopimelate Ligase

    PubMed Central

    Nachar, Victoria R.; Savka, Francisco C.; McGroty, Sean E.; Donovan, Katherine A.; North, Rachel A.; Dobson, Renwick C. J.; Buckley, Larry J.; Hudson, André O.

    2012-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Verrucomicrobium spinosum has attracted interest in recent years following the sequencing and annotation of its genome. Comparative genomic analysis of V. spinosum using diaminopimelate/lysine metabolic genes from Chlamydia trachomatis suggests that V. spinosum employs the L,L-diaminopimelate aminotransferase (DapL) pathway for diaminopimelate/lysine biosynthesis. The open reading frame corresponding to the putative dapL ortholog was cloned and the recombinant enzyme was shown to possess L,L-diaminopimelate aminotransferase activity in vitro. In vivo analysis using functional complementation confirmed that the dapL ortholog was able to functionally complement an E. coli mutant that confers auxotrophy for diaminopimelate and lysine. In addition to its role in lysine biosynthesis, the intermediate diaminopimelate has an integral role in peptidoglycan biosynthesis. To this end, the UDP-N-acetylmuramoylalanyl-d-glutamyl-2,6-meso-diaminopimelate ligase ortholog was also identified, cloned, and was shown to possess meso-diaminopimelate ligase activity in vivo. The L,L-diaminopimelate aminotransferase pathway has been experimentally confirmed in several bacteria, some of which are deemed pathogenic to animals. Since animals, and particularly humans, lack the genetic machinery for the synthesis of diaminopimelate/lysine de novo, the enzymes involved in this pathway are attractive targets for development of antibiotics. Whether dapL is an essential gene in any bacteria is currently not known. V. spinosum is an excellent candidate to investigate the essentiality of dapL, since the bacterium employs the DapL pathway for lysine and cell wall biosynthesis, is non-pathogenic to humans, facile to grow, and can be genetically manipulated. PMID:22783236

  5. Systematic Review of Micro-RNA Expression in Pre-Eclampsia Identifies a Number of Common Pathways Associated with the Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh, Adam M.; Currie, Gemma; Delles, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Background Pre-eclampsia (PE) is a complex, multi-systemic condition of pregnancy which greatly impacts maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. MicroRNAs (miRs) are differentially expressed in PE and may be important in helping to understand the condition and its pathogenesis. Methods Case-control studies investigating expression of miRs in PE were collected through a systematic literature search. Data was extracted and compared from 58 studies to identify the most promising miRs associated with PE pathogenesis and identify areas of methodology which could account for often conflicting results. Results Some of the most frequently differentially expressed miRs in PE include miR-210, miR-223 and miR-126/126* which associate strongly with the etiological domains of hypoxia, immunology and angiogenesis. Members of the miR-515 family belonging to the imprinted chromosome 19 miR cluster with putative roles in trophoblast invasion were also found to be differentially expressed. Certain miRs appear to associate with more severe forms of PE such as miR-210 and the immune-related miR-181a and miR-15 families. Patterns of miR expression may help pinpoint key pathways (e.g. IL-6/miR-223/STAT3) and aid in untangling the heterogeneous nature of PE. The detectable presence of many PE-associated miRs in antenatal circulatory samples suggests their usefulness as predictive biomarkers. Further progress in ascertaining the clinical value of miRs and in understanding how they might contribute to pathogenesis is predicated upon resolving current methodological challenges in studies. These include differences in diagnostic criteria, cohort characteristics, sampling technique, RNA isolation and platform-dependent variation in miR profiling. Conclusion Reviewing studies of PE-associated miRs has revealed their potential as informants of underlying target genes and pathways relating to PE pathogenesis. However, the incongruity in results across current studies hampers their

  6. Next-generation sequencing of salivary high-grade neuroendocrine carcinomas identifies alterations in RB1 and the mTOR pathway.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Bella; Duncavage, Eric J; Martinez, David; Lewis, James S; Chernock, Rebecca D

    2014-12-01

    Salivary gland high-grade neuroendocrine carcinomas are rare, aggressive tumors that are morphologically and immunohistochemically similar to cutaneous high-grade neuroendocrine (Merkel cell) carcinomas. The majority of Merkel cell carcinomas harbor Merkel cell polyomavirus, while the virus is rare or absent in salivary high-grade neuroendocrine carcinomas. Inactivation of retinoblastoma 1 (RB1) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of both virus-positive and -negative Merkel cell carcinomas but by different mechanisms. In virus-positive tumors, a portion of the viral genome, the large T antigen, may inactivate RB1, and in virus-negative Merkel cell carcinomas truncating mutations in the RB1 gene have been identified. The molecular genetics of salivary high-grade neuroendocrine carcinomas are not well understood. Here, we performed targeted next-generation sequencing of 151 cancer-related genes on 4 four Merkel cell polyomavirus-negative primary salivary gland high-grade neuroendocrine carcinoma cases. Somatic mutations were predominantly found within tumor suppressor genes [TP53 (3 cases), PTEN (2 cases), RB1 (1 case)]. Truncating RB1 mutations, as seen in virus-negative Merkel cell carcinomas, were not identified. However, 3 of 4 cases had RB1 deletions by copy number variation analysis. The 4th case had loss of heterozygosity for RB1. Fluorescence in situ hybridization confirmed RB1 deletions in 2 of 3 cases, and the absence of RB1 deletion in the 4th case that had loss of heterozygosity. All 4 cases showed loss of RB1 protein expression by immunohistochemistry, indicating that RB1 inactivation is important. However, the mechanism of RB1 inactivation appears different than that seen in Merkel cell carcinomas. In addition, copy number variation consistent with activation of the PI3KCA/AKT/mTOR pathway was also observed in all 4 cases. The mTOR pathway may be a potential therapeutic target in these tumors as mTOR inhibitors are currently used to treat other

  7. Genome-wide association study for colorectal cancer identifies risk polymorphisms in German familial cases and implicates MAPK signalling pathways in disease susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Lascorz, Jesús; Försti, Asta; Chen, Bowang; Buch, Stephan; Steinke, Verena; Rahner, Nils; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Morak, Monika; Schackert, Hans K; Görgens, Heike; Schulmann, Karsten; Goecke, Timm; Kloor, Matthias; Engel, Cristoph; Büttner, Reinhard; Kunkel, Nelli; Weires, Marianne; Hoffmeister, Michael; Pardini, Barbara; Naccarati, Alessio; Vodickova, Ludmila; Novotny, Jan; Schreiber, Stefan; Krawczak, Michael; Bröring, Clemens D; Völzke, Henry; Schafmayer, Clemens; Vodicka, Pavel; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Brenner, Hermann; Burwinkel, Barbara; Propping, Peter; Hampe, Jochen; Hemminki, Kari

    2010-09-01

    Genetic susceptibility accounts for approximately 35% of all colorectal cancer (CRC). Ten common low-risk variants contributing to CRC risk have been identified through genome-wide association studies (GWASs). In our GWAS, 610 664 genotyped single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) passed the quality control filtering in 371 German familial CRC patients and 1263 controls, and replication studies were conducted in four additional case-control sets (4915 cases and 5607 controls). Known risk loci at 8q24.21 and 11q23 were confirmed, and a previously unreported association, rs12701937, located between the genes GLI3 (GLI family zinc finger 3) and INHBA (inhibin, beta A) [P = 1.1 x 10(-3), odds ratio (OR) 1.14, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.05-1.23, dominant model in the combined cohort], was identified. The association was stronger in familial cases compared with unselected cases (P = 2.0 x 10(-4), OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.16-1.60, dominant model). Two other unreported SNPs, rs6038071, 40 kb upstream of CSNK2A1 (casein kinase 2, alpha 1 polypeptide) and an intronic marker in MYO3A (myosin IIIA), rs11014993, associated with CRC only in the familial CRC cases (P = 2.5 x 10(-3), recessive model, and P = 2.7 x 10(-4), dominant model). Three software tools successfully pointed to the overrepresentation of genes related to the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathways among the 1340 most strongly associated markers from the GWAS (allelic P value < 10(-3)). The risk of CRC increased significantly with an increasing number of risk alleles in seven genes involved in MAPK signalling events (P(trend) = 2.2 x 10(-16), OR(per allele) = 1.34, 95% CI 1.11-1.61).

  8. Selection of an antibody library identifies a pathway to induce immunity by targeting CD36 on steady-state CD8 alpha+ dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Tagliani, Elisa; Guermonprez, Pierre; Sepúlveda, Jorge; López-Bravo, María; Ardavín, Carlos; Amigorena, Sebastian; Benvenuti, Federica; Burrone, Oscar R

    2008-03-01

    Improvement of the strategy to target tumor Ags to dendritic cells (DCs) for immunotherapy requires the identification of the most appropriate ligand/receptor pairing. We screened a library of Ab fragments on mouse DCs to isolate new potential Abs capable of inducing protective immune responses. The screening identified a high-affinity Ab against CD36, a multi-ligand scavenger receptor primarily expressed by the CD8alpha+ subset of conventional DCs. The Ab variable regions were genetically linked to the model Ag OVA and tested in Ag presentation assays in vitro and in vivo. Anti-CD36-OVA was capable of delivering exogenous Ags to the MHC class I and MHC class II processing pathways. In vivo, immunization with anti-CD36-OVA induced robust activation of naive CD4+ and CD8+ Ag-specific T lymphocytes and the differentiation of primed CD8+ T cells into long-term effector CTLs. Vaccination with anti-CD36-OVA elicited humoral and cell-mediated protection from the growth of an Ag-specific tumor. Notably, the relative efficacy of targeting CD11c/CD8alpha+ via CD36 or DEC205 was qualitatively different. Anti-DEC205-OVA was more efficient than anti-CD36-OVA in inducing early events of naive CD8+ T cell activation. In contrast, long-term persistence of effector CTLs was stronger following immunization with anti-CD36-OVA and did not require the addition of exogenous maturation stimuli. The results identify CD36 as a novel potential target for immunotherapy and indicate that the outcome of the immune responses vary by targeting different receptors on CD8alpha+ DCs.

  9. RNA-sequencing of Cercospora beticola DMI-sensitive and -resistant isolates after treatment with tetraconazole identifies common and contrasting pathway induction.

    PubMed

    Bolton, Melvin D; Ebert, Malaika K; Faino, Luigi; Rivera-Varas, Viviana; de Jonge, Ronnie; Van de Peer, Yves; Thomma, Bart P H J; Secor, Gary A

    2016-07-01

    Cercospora beticola causes Cercospora leaf spot of sugar beet. Cercospora leaf spot management measures often include application of the sterol demethylation inhibitor (DMI) class of fungicides. The reliance on DMIs and the consequent selection pressures imposed by their widespread use has led to the emergence of resistance in C. beticola populations. Insight into the molecular basis of tetraconazole resistance may lead to molecular tools to identify DMI-resistant strains for fungicide resistance management programs. Previous work has shown that expression of the gene encoding the DMI target enzyme (CYP51) is generally higher and inducible in DMI-resistant C. beticola field strains. In this study, we extended the molecular basis of DMI resistance in this pathosystem by profiling the transcriptional response of two C. beticola strains contrasting for resistance to tetraconazole. A majority of the genes in the ergosterol biosynthesis pathway were induced to similar levels in both strains with the exception of CbCyp51, which was induced several-fold higher in the DMI-resistant strain. In contrast, a secondary metabolite gene cluster was induced in the resistance strain, but repressed in the sensitive strain. Genes encoding proteins with various cell membrane fortification processes were induced in the resistance strain. Site-directed and ectopic mutants of candidate DMI-resistance genes all resulted in significantly higher EC50 values than the wild-type strain, suggesting that the cell wall and/or membrane modified as a result of the transformation process increased resistance to tetraconazole. Taken together, this study identifies important cell membrane components and provides insight into the molecular events underlying DMI resistance in C. beticola. PMID:27112724

  10. Integrated analysis of oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma identifies key variants and pathways linked to risk habits, HPV, clinical parameters and tumor recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Neeraja; Gupta, Saurabh; Palve, Vinayak; Varghese, Linu; Pattnaik, Swetansu; Jain, Prach; Khyriem, Costerwell; Hariharan, Arun; Dhas, Kunal; Nair, Jayalakshmi; Pareek, Manisha; Prasad, Venkatesh; Siddappa, Gangotri; Suresh, Amritha; Kekatpure, Vikram; Kuriakose, Moni; Panda, Binay

    2015-01-01

    Oral tongue squamous cell carcinomas (OTSCC) are a homogeneous group of tumors characterized by aggressive behavior, early spread to lymph nodes and a higher rate of regional failure. Additionally, the incidence of OTSCC among younger population (<50yrs) is on the rise; many of whom lack the typical associated risk factors of alcohol and/or tobacco exposure. We present data on single nucleotide variations (SNVs), indels, regions with loss of heterozygosity (LOH), and copy number variations (CNVs) from fifty-paired oral tongue primary tumors and link the significant somatic variants with clinical parameters, epidemiological factors including human papilloma virus (HPV) infection and tumor recurrence. Apart from the frequent somatic variants harbored in TP53, CASP8, RASA1, NOTCH and CDKN2A genes, significant amplifications and/or deletions were detected in chromosomes 6-9, and 11 in the tumors. Variants in CASP8 and CDKN2A were mutually exclusive. CDKN2A, PIK3CA, RASA1 and DMD variants were exclusively linked to smoking, chewing, HPV infection and tumor stage. We also performed a whole-genome gene expression study that identified matrix metalloproteases to be highly expressed in tumors and linked pathways involving arachidonic acid and NF-k-B to habits and distant metastasis, respectively. Functional knockdown studies in cell lines demonstrated the role of CASP8 in a HPV-negative OTSCC cell line. Finally, we identified a 38-gene minimal signature that predicts tumor recurrence using an ensemble machine-learning method. Taken together, this study links molecular signatures to various clinical and epidemiological factors in a homogeneous tumor population with a relatively high HPV prevalence. PMID:26834999

  11. Inference of Longevity-Related Genes from a Robust Coexpression Network of Seed Maturation Identifies Regulators Linking Seed Storability to Biotic Defense-Related Pathways.

    PubMed

    Righetti, Karima; Vu, Joseph Ly; Pelletier, Sandra; Vu, Benoit Ly; Glaab, Enrico; Lalanne, David; Pasha, Asher; Patel, Rohan V; Provart, Nicholas J; Verdier, Jerome; Leprince, Olivier; Buitink, Julia

    2015-10-01

    Seed longevity, the maintenance of viability during storage, is a crucial factor for preservation of genetic resources and ensuring proper seedling establishment and high crop yield. We used a systems biology approach to identify key genes regulating the acquisition of longevity during seed maturation of Medicago truncatula. Using 104 transcriptomes from seed developmental time courses obtained in five growth environments, we generated a robust, stable coexpression network (MatNet), thereby capturing the conserved backbone of maturation. Using a trait-based gene significance measure, a coexpression module related to the acquisition of longevity was inferred from MatNet. Comparative analysis of the maturation processes in M. truncatula and Arabidopsis thaliana seeds and mining Arabidopsis interaction databases revealed conserved connectivity for 87% of longevity module nodes between both species. Arabidopsis mutant screening for longevity and maturation phenotypes demonstrated high predictive power of the longevity cross-species network. Overrepresentation analysis of the network nodes indicated biological functions related to defense, light, and auxin. Characterization of defense-related wrky3 and nf-x1-like1 (nfxl1) transcription factor mutants demonstrated that these genes regulate some of the network nodes and exhibit impaired acquisition of longevity during maturation. These data suggest that seed longevity evolved by co-opting existing genetic pathways regulating the activation of defense against pathogens. PMID:26410298

  12. Identifying early pathways of risk and resilience: The co-development of internalizing and externalizing symptoms and the role of harsh parenting

    PubMed Central

    Wiggins, Jillian Lee; Mitchell, Colter; Hyde, Luke W.; Monk, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    Psychological disorders co-occur often in children, but little has been done to document the types of conjoint pathways internalizing and externalizing symptoms may take from the crucial early period of toddlerhood or how harsh parenting may overlap with early symptom co-development. To examine symptom co-development trajectories, we identified latent classes of individuals based on internalizing and externalizing symptoms across ages 3–9 and found three symptom co-development classes: normative symptoms (low), severe-decreasing symptoms (initially high but rapidly declining) and severe symptoms (high) trajectories. Next, joint models examined how parenting trajectories overlapped with internalizing and externalizing symptom trajectories. These trajectory classes demonstrated that, normatively, harsh parenting increased after toddlerhood, but the severe symptoms class was characterized by a higher level and steeper increase in harsh parenting and the severe-decreasing class by high, stable harsh parenting. Additionally, a transactional model examined the bi-directional relationships among internalizing and externalizing symptoms and harsh parenting as they may cascade over time in this early period. Harsh parenting uniquely contributed to externalizing symptoms, controlling for internalizing symptoms, but not vice versa. Also, internalizing symptoms appeared to be a mechanism by which externalizing symptoms increase. Results highlight the importance accounting for both internalizing and externalizing symptoms from an early age to understand risk for developing psychopathology and the role harsh parenting plays in influencing these trajectories. PMID:26439075

  13. Inference of Longevity-Related Genes from a Robust Coexpression Network of Seed Maturation Identifies Regulators Linking Seed Storability to Biotic Defense-Related Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Righetti, Karima; Vu, Joseph Ly; Pelletier, Sandra; Vu, Benoit Ly; Glaab, Enrico; Lalanne, David; Pasha, Asher; Patel, Rohan V.; Provart, Nicholas J.; Verdier, Jerome; Leprince, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Seed longevity, the maintenance of viability during storage, is a crucial factor for preservation of genetic resources and ensuring proper seedling establishment and high crop yield. We used a systems biology approach to identify key genes regulating the acquisition of longevity during seed maturation of Medicago truncatula. Using 104 transcriptomes from seed developmental time courses obtained in five growth environments, we generated a robust, stable coexpression network (MatNet), thereby capturing the conserved backbone of maturation. Using a trait-based gene significance measure, a coexpression module related to the acquisition of longevity was inferred from MatNet. Comparative analysis of the maturation processes in M. truncatula and Arabidopsis thaliana seeds and mining Arabidopsis interaction databases revealed conserved connectivity for 87% of longevity module nodes between both species. Arabidopsis mutant screening for longevity and maturation phenotypes demonstrated high predictive power of the longevity cross-species network. Overrepresentation analysis of the network nodes indicated biological functions related to defense, light, and auxin. Characterization of defense-related wrky3 and nf-x1-like1 (nfxl1) transcription factor mutants demonstrated that these genes regulate some of the network nodes and exhibit impaired acquisition of longevity during maturation. These data suggest that seed longevity evolved by co-opting existing genetic pathways regulating the activation of defense against pathogens. PMID:26410298

  14. Integrated RNA-Seq and sRNA-Seq Analysis Identifies Chilling and Freezing Responsive Key Molecular Players and Pathways in Tea Plant (Camellia sinensis)

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Chao; Zhao, Lei; Wang, Yu; Shen, Jiazhi; Zhang, Yinfei; Jia, Sisi; Li, Yusheng; Ding, Zhaotang

    2015-01-01

    Tea [Camellia sinensis (L) O. Kuntze, Theaceae] is one of the most popular non-alcoholic beverages worldwide. Cold stress is one of the most severe abiotic stresses that limit tea plants’ growth, survival and geographical distribution. However, the genetic regulatory network and signaling pathways involved in cold stress responses in tea plants remain unearthed. Using RNA-Seq, DGE and sRNA-Seq technologies, we performed an integrative analysis of miRNA and mRNA expression profiling and their regulatory network of tea plants under chilling (4℃) and freezing (-5℃) stress. Differentially expressed (DE) miRNA and mRNA profiles were obtained based on fold change analysis, miRNAs and target mRNAs were found to show both coherent and incoherent relationships in the regulatory network. Furthermore, we compared several key pathways (e.g., ‘Photosynthesis’), GO terms (e.g., ‘response to karrikin’) and transcriptional factors (TFs, e.g., DREB1b/CBF1) which were identified as involved in the early chilling and/or freezing response of tea plants. Intriguingly, we found that karrikins, a new group of plant growth regulators, and β-primeverosidase (BPR), a key enzyme functionally relevant with the formation of tea aroma might play an important role in both early chilling and freezing response of tea plants. Quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis further confirmed the results from RNA-Seq and sRNA-Seq analysis. This is the first study to simultaneously profile the expression patterns of both miRNAs and mRNAs on a genome-wide scale to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of early responses of tea plants to cold stress. In addition to gaining a deeper insight into the cold resistant characteristics of tea plants, we provide a good case study to analyse mRNA/miRNA expression and profiling of non-model plant species using next-generation sequencing technology. PMID:25901577

  15. Integrated RNA-Seq and sRNA-Seq Analysis Identifies Chilling and Freezing Responsive Key Molecular Players and Pathways in Tea Plant (Camellia sinensis).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chao; Zhao, Lei; Wang, Yu; Shen, Jiazhi; Zhang, Yinfei; Jia, Sisi; Li, Yusheng; Ding, Zhaotang

    2015-01-01

    Tea [Camellia sinensis (L) O. Kuntze, Theaceae] is one of the most popular non-alcoholic beverages worldwide. Cold stress is one of the most severe abiotic stresses that limit tea plants' growth, survival and geographical distribution. However, the genetic regulatory network and signaling pathways involved in cold stress responses in tea plants remain unearthed. Using RNA-Seq, DGE and sRNA-Seq technologies, we performed an integrative analysis of miRNA and mRNA expression profiling and their regulatory network of tea plants under chilling (4℃) and freezing (-5℃) stress. Differentially expressed (DE) miRNA and mRNA profiles were obtained based on fold change analysis, miRNAs and target mRNAs were found to show both coherent and incoherent relationships in the regulatory network. Furthermore, we compared several key pathways (e.g., 'Photosynthesis'), GO terms (e.g., 'response to karrikin') and transcriptional factors (TFs, e.g., DREB1b/CBF1) which were identified as involved in the early chilling and/or freezing response of tea plants. Intriguingly, we found that karrikins, a new group of plant growth regulators, and β-primeverosidase (BPR), a key enzyme functionally relevant with the formation of tea aroma might play an important role in both early chilling and freezing response of tea plants. Quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis further confirmed the results from RNA-Seq and sRNA-Seq analysis. This is the first study to simultaneously profile the expression patterns of both miRNAs and mRNAs on a genome-wide scale to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of early responses of tea plants to cold stress. In addition to gaining a deeper insight into the cold resistant characteristics of tea plants, we provide a good case study to analyse mRNA/miRNA expression and profiling of non-model plant species using next-generation sequencing technology.

  16. The Formation and Aerosol Uptake of Isoprene Nitrooxyhydroxyepoxide (INHE), a Newly Identified Product from the RO2 + HO2 Pathway of Isoprene NO3 Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwantes, R.; Teng, A.; Nguyen, T.; Coggon, M. M.; Zhang, X.; Schilling-Fahnestock, K.; Crounse, J.; St Clair, J. M.; Seinfeld, J.; Wennberg, P. O.

    2014-12-01

    Isoprene (C5H8) reacts with the nitrate radical (NO3) during the night to produce a peroxy nitrate radical (RO2). This RO2 can react with nitrogen oxides (i.e., NO, NO2, or NO3) and other RO2 radicals to form isoprene nitrates or with the hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) to form nitrooxyhydroperoxide (INP). Both model and field studies have found that in the ambient atmosphere much of the RO2 radical reacts with HO2. More specifically, during the 2013 SOAS field campaign, INP was one of the main species that increased at sunset suggesting the RO2 + HO2 pathway from NO3 oxidation is important in the southeastern US and similar areas. However, chamber studies so far have been run under conditions that optimize RO2 + NO3 reactions and/or RO2 + RO2 reactions. In this work, we present a new way to run NO3 oxidation chamber experiments that optimize for the RO2 + HO2 pathway creating a more atmospherically relevant product distribution. The gas phase formation of INP and subsequent oxidation products were monitored using a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS). Because isoprene nitrates formed from NO3 oxidation react slowly with ozone (O3) and NO3, many of these nitrates will remain in the atmosphere until the sun rises and hydroxyl radical (OH) begins to form. Results from these chamber experiments suggest that OH will react with INP to form nitrooxyhydroxyepoxide (INHE), a newly identified product from INP. We suspect INHE could be important for Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) production due to its similarity to isoprene epoxydiol (IEPOX), a product from isoprene OH oxidation that has been shown to be a significant SOA precursor. We studied the uptake of INHE onto various seed types, and found that as expected INHE rapidly partitions to highly acidic seed aerosol due to an acid catalyzed ring opening. A time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (ToF-AMS) was used to understand the chemical composition of the aerosol produced from the various seed types.

  17. Serum Biochemical Phenotypes in the Domestic Dog.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Mei; Hadox, Erin; Szladovits, Balazs; Garden, Oliver A

    2016-01-01

    The serum or plasma biochemical profile is essential in the diagnosis and monitoring of systemic disease in veterinary medicine, but current reference intervals typically take no account of breed-specific differences. Breed-specific hematological phenotypes have been documented in the domestic dog, but little has been published on serum biochemical phenotypes in this species. Serum biochemical profiles of dogs in which all measurements fell within the existing reference intervals were retrieved from a large veterinary database. Serum biochemical profiles from 3045 dogs were retrieved, of which 1495 had an accompanying normal glucose concentration. Sixty pure breeds plus a mixed breed control group were represented by at least 10 individuals. All analytes, except for sodium, chloride and glucose, showed variation with age. Total protein, globulin, potassium, chloride, creatinine, cholesterol, total bilirubin, ALT, CK, amylase, and lipase varied between sexes. Neutering status significantly impacted all analytes except albumin, sodium, calcium, urea, and glucose. Principal component analysis of serum biochemical data revealed 36 pure breeds with distinctive phenotypes. Furthermore, comparative analysis identified 23 breeds with significant differences from the mixed breed group in all biochemical analytes except urea and glucose. Eighteen breeds were identified by both principal component and comparative analysis. Tentative reference intervals were generated for breeds with a distinctive phenotype identified by comparative analysis and represented by at least 120 individuals. This is the first large-scale analysis of breed-specific serum biochemical phenotypes in the domestic dog and highlights potential genetic components of biochemical traits in this species. PMID:26919479

  18. Serum Biochemical Phenotypes in the Domestic Dog

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu-Mei; Hadox, Erin; Szladovits, Balazs; Garden, Oliver A.

    2016-01-01

    The serum or plasma biochemical profile is essential in the diagnosis and monitoring of systemic disease in veterinary medicine, but current reference intervals typically take no account of breed-specific differences. Breed-specific hematological phenotypes have been documented in the domestic dog, but little has been published on serum biochemical phenotypes in this species. Serum biochemical profiles of dogs in which all measurements fell within the existing reference intervals were retrieved from a large veterinary database. Serum biochemical profiles from 3045 dogs were retrieved, of which 1495 had an accompanying normal glucose concentration. Sixty pure breeds plus a mixed breed control group were represented by at least 10 individuals. All analytes, except for sodium, chloride and glucose, showed variation with age. Total protein, globulin, potassium, chloride, creatinine, cholesterol, total bilirubin, ALT, CK, amylase, and lipase varied between sexes. Neutering status significantly impacted all analytes except albumin, sodium, calcium, urea, and glucose. Principal component analysis of serum biochemical data revealed 36 pure breeds with distinctive phenotypes. Furthermore, comparative analysis identified 23 breeds with significant differences from the mixed breed group in all biochemical analytes except urea and glucose. Eighteen breeds were identified by both principal component and comparative analysis. Tentative reference intervals were generated for breeds with a distinctive phenotype identified by comparative analysis and represented by at least 120 individuals. This is the first large-scale analysis of breed-specific serum biochemical phenotypes in the domestic dog and highlights potential genetic components of biochemical traits in this species. PMID:26919479

  19. Simulation studies in biochemical signaling and enzyme reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelatury, Sudarshan R.; Vagula, Mary C.

    2014-06-01

    Biochemical pathways characterize various biochemical reaction schemes that involve a set of species and the manner in which they are connected. Determination of schematics that represent these pathways is an important task in understanding metabolism and signal transduction. Examples of these Pathways are: DNA and protein synthesis, and production of several macro-molecules essential for cell survival. A sustained feedback mechanism arises in gene expression and production of mRNA that lead to protein synthesis if the protein so synthesized serves as a transcription factor and becomes a repressor of the gene expression. The cellular regulations are carried out through biochemical networks consisting of reactions and regulatory proteins. Systems biology is a relatively new area that attempts to describe the biochemical pathways analytically and develop reliable mathematical models for the pathways. A complete understanding of chemical reaction kinetics is prohibitively hard thanks to the nonlinear and highly complex mechanisms that regulate protein formation, but attempting to numerically solve some of the governing differential equations seems to offer significant insight about their biochemical picture. To validate these models, one can perform simple experiments in the lab. This paper introduces fundamental ideas in biochemical signaling and attempts to take first steps into the understanding of biochemical oscillations. Initially, the two-pool model of calcium is used to describe the dynamics behind the oscillations. Later we present some elementary results showing biochemical oscillations arising from solving differential equations of Elowitz and Leibler using MATLAB software.

  20. The use of body surface potential map for identifying sites of accessory pathway in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Y Z; Hsu, K L; Chiang, F T; Lo, H M; Tseng, C D; Lin, J L

    1998-07-01

    The body surface potential map (BSPM) may reflect regional myocardial electrical activity. This technique can thus provide information regarding the excitation of ventricles. This study is an attempt to evaluate the usefulness of BSPM in determining the sites of the atrioventricular (AV) accessory pathway (AP) in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White (W-P-W) syndrome. The BSPMs were obtained from 40 consecutive patients with W-P-W syndrome in a fasting state, using the heart potential map system designed by Toyama et al. Unipolar electrocardiograms were recorded simultaneously from 87 lead points on the chest surface, including 59 lead points on the anterior chest and 28 on the back. Wilson's central terminal was used as a voltage reference and BSPMs in an isopotential distribution pattern were made every millisecond throughout ventricular activation from these unipolar ECGs with the use of a microcomputer system. All patients underwent an electrophysiologic study (EPS) at cardiac catheterization. We analyzed the potential distribution during ventricular depolarization and compared the results between EPS and BSPM findings. The following results were obtained: (1) seven types of BSPM pattern were identified in accordance with the sites of the AV AP confirmed by EPS; (2) the location of the potential minimum of ventricular depolarization and the direction of the excitation wavefront during early ventricular depolarization, the reversal pattern of ventricular potential distribution, the epicardial right ventricular breakthrough and the dynamic change of ventricular potential distribution were useful for the detection of the ventricular pre-excitation site; (3) epicardial right ventricular breakthrough occurred in nearly all patients with left ventricular free wall accessory AV connections; (4) the abnormal early reversal pattern of ventricular potential distribution did not occur in patients with left ventricular AV connections but did appear in most patients with

  1. Soya bean Gα proteins with distinct biochemical properties exhibit differential ability to complement Saccharomyces cerevisiae gpa1 mutant.

    PubMed

    Roy Choudhury, Swarup; Wang, Yuqi; Pandey, Sona

    2014-07-01

    Signalling pathways mediated by heterotrimeric G-proteins are common to all eukaryotes. Plants have a limited number of each of the G-protein subunits, with the most elaborate G-protein network discovered so far in soya bean (Glycine max, also known as soybean) which has four Gα, four Gβ and ten Gγ proteins. Biochemical characterization of Gα proteins from plants suggests significant variation in their properties compared with the well-characterized non-plant proteins. Furthermore, the four soya bean Gα (GmGα) proteins exhibit distinct biochemical activities among themselves, but the extent to which such biochemical differences contribute to their in vivo function is also not known. We used the yeast gpa1 mutant which displays constitutive signalling and growth arrest in the pheromone-response pathway as an in vivo model to evaluate the effect of distinct biochemical activities of GmGα proteins. We showed that specific GmGα proteins can be activated during pheromone-dependent receptor-mediated signalling in yeast and they display different strengths towards complementation of yeast gpa1 phenotypes. We also identified amino acids that are responsible for differential complementation abilities of specific Gα proteins. These data establish that specific plant Gα proteins are functional in the receptor-mediated pheromone-response pathway in yeast and that the subtle biochemical differences in their activity are physiologically relevant.

  2. A combined remote sensing and modeling based approach to identify sustainable pathways for urban and peri-urban agriculture in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wattenbach, M.; Delgado, J. M.; Roessner, S.; Bochow, M.; Güntner, A.; Kropp, J.; Cantu Ros, A. G.; Hattermann, F.; Kolbe, T.; Sodoudi, S.; Cubasch, U. Ulrich; Zeitz, J.; Ross, L.; Böckel, K.; Fang, C.; Bo, L.; Pan, G.

    2012-04-01

    As the world's biggest economy, China is becoming the biggest consumer of resources globally. Given this trend, the over-proportional fast increase in urbanization presents China with fundamental problems. Among the most urgent ones is the increasing loss of agricultural land as urbanization takes place in the most productive regions along the coast. The latter is being responsible for a shift in agriculture production towards climatically less favorable areas. At the same time, the loss of green areas in and around growing cities is increasing the effect of the urban heat island. The perception of the potential risks related to this phenomenon, in the context of climate change, has led the Shanghai city administration to increase its urban-greening efforts, expanding the per capita area of green from 1m2 in 1990 to 12.5m2 in 2008. In this context, this paper aims at identifying the influence of urban and peri-urban agriculture (UPA) on the sustainability of the urban regions of Shanghai and Nanjing. In particular, it focuses on the effects of UPA on the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, soil nutrients and water balances, local climate and the structure and functions of the urbanized areas. We propose an interdisciplinary framework combining remote sensing, model simulations and GHG field observations and targeted at identifying "win-win" strategies for sustainable planning pathways showing high potentials for UPA. The framework is based on spatial scenario modeling, automatic classification of urban structure types and on a prototype of a high-quality spatial database consisting of a 3D city model. Dynamic boundary conditions for climate and urban development are provided by state of the art models. These approaches meet the needs of stakeholders and planners in China. A special emphasis is put on interdependencies between small holder farming in the urban and peri-urban zone and climate change adaptation and mitigation strategies focusing on improved management of

  3. A Genome-Wide RNAi Screen Identifies FOXO4 as a Metastasis-Suppressor through Counteracting PI3K/AKT Signal Pathway in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Su, Bing; Gao, Lingqiu; Baranowski, Catherine; Gillard, Bryan; Wang, Jianmin; Ransom, Ryan; Ko, Hyun-Kyung; Gelman, Irwin H.

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the PI3K/AKT signal pathway is a known driving force for the progression to castration-recurrent prostate cancer (CR-CaP), which constitutes the major lethal phenotype of CaP. Here, we identify using a genomic shRNA screen the PI3K/AKT-inactivating downstream target, FOXO4, as a potential CaP metastasis suppressor. FOXO4 protein levels inversely correlate with the invasive potential of a panel of human CaP cell lines, with decreased mRNA levels correlating with increased incidence of clinical metastasis. Knockdown (KD) of FOXO4 in human LNCaP cells causes increased invasion in vitro and lymph node (LN) metastasis in vivo without affecting indices of proliferation or apoptosis. Increased Matrigel invasiveness was found by KD of FOXO1 but not FOXO3. Comparison of differentially expressed genes affected by FOXO4-KD in LNCaP cells in culture, in primary tumors and in LN metastases identified a panel of upregulated genes, including PIP, CAMK2N1, PLA2G16 and PGC, which, if knocked down by siRNA, could decrease the increased invasiveness associated with FOXO4 deficiency. Although only some of these genes encode FOXO promoter binding sites, they are all RUNX2-inducible, and RUNX2 binding to the PIP promoter is increased in FOXO4-KD cells. Indeed, the forced expression of FOXO4 reversed the increased invasiveness of LNCaP/shFOXO4 cells; the forced expression of FOXO4 did not alter RUNX2 protein levels, yet it decreased RUNX2 binding to the PIP promoter, resulting in PIP downregulation. Finally, there was a correlation between FOXO4, but not FOXO1 or FOXO3, downregu