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Sample records for identifying high-risk individuals

  1. Identifying Individuals at High Risk of Psychosis: Predictive Utility of Support Vector Machine using Structural and Functional MRI Data

    PubMed Central

    Valli, Isabel; Marquand, Andre F.; Mechelli, Andrea; Raffin, Marie; Allen, Paul; Seal, Marc L.; McGuire, Philip

    2016-01-01

    The identification of individuals at high risk of developing psychosis is entirely based on clinical assessment, associated with limited predictive potential. There is, therefore, increasing interest in the development of biological markers that could be used in clinical practice for this purpose. We studied 25 individuals with an at-risk mental state for psychosis and 25 healthy controls using structural MRI, and functional MRI in conjunction with a verbal memory task. Data were analyzed using a standard univariate analysis, and with support vector machine (SVM), a multivariate pattern recognition technique that enables statistical inferences to be made at the level of the individual, yielding results with high translational potential. The application of SVM to structural MRI data permitted the identification of individuals at high risk of psychosis with a sensitivity of 68% and a specificity of 76%, resulting in an accuracy of 72% (p < 0.001). Univariate volumetric between-group differences did not reach statistical significance. By contrast, the univariate fMRI analysis identified between-group differences (p < 0.05 corrected), while the application of SVM to the same data did not. Since SVM is well suited at identifying the pattern of abnormality that distinguishes two groups, whereas univariate methods are more likely to identify regions that individually are most different between two groups, our results suggest the presence of focal functional abnormalities in the context of a diffuse pattern of structural abnormalities in individuals at high clinical risk of psychosis. PMID:27092086

  2. Identifying Individuals at High Risk of Psychosis: Predictive Utility of Support Vector Machine using Structural and Functional MRI Data.

    PubMed

    Valli, Isabel; Marquand, Andre F; Mechelli, Andrea; Raffin, Marie; Allen, Paul; Seal, Marc L; McGuire, Philip

    2016-01-01

    The identification of individuals at high risk of developing psychosis is entirely based on clinical assessment, associated with limited predictive potential. There is, therefore, increasing interest in the development of biological markers that could be used in clinical practice for this purpose. We studied 25 individuals with an at-risk mental state for psychosis and 25 healthy controls using structural MRI, and functional MRI in conjunction with a verbal memory task. Data were analyzed using a standard univariate analysis, and with support vector machine (SVM), a multivariate pattern recognition technique that enables statistical inferences to be made at the level of the individual, yielding results with high translational potential. The application of SVM to structural MRI data permitted the identification of individuals at high risk of psychosis with a sensitivity of 68% and a specificity of 76%, resulting in an accuracy of 72% (p < 0.001). Univariate volumetric between-group differences did not reach statistical significance. By contrast, the univariate fMRI analysis identified between-group differences (p < 0.05 corrected), while the application of SVM to the same data did not. Since SVM is well suited at identifying the pattern of abnormality that distinguishes two groups, whereas univariate methods are more likely to identify regions that individually are most different between two groups, our results suggest the presence of focal functional abnormalities in the context of a diffuse pattern of structural abnormalities in individuals at high clinical risk of psychosis. PMID:27092086

  3. Predictive Value of Glucose Parameters Obtained From Oral Glucose Tolerance Tests in Identifying Individuals at High Risk for the Development of Diabetes in Korean Population.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hae Kyung; Ha, Hee-Sung; Rhee, Marie; Lee, Jin-Hee; Park, Yong-Moon; Kwon, Hyuk-Sang; Yim, Hyeon-Woo; Kang, Moo-Il; Lee, Won-Chul; Son, Ho-Young; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Yoon, Kun-Ho

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies suggest that the future risk for type 2 diabetes is not similar among subjects in the same glucose tolerance category. In this study, we aimed to evaluate simple intuitive indices to identify subjects at high risk for future diabetes development by using 0, 30, 120 minute glucose levels obtained during 75 g OGTTs from participants of a prospective community-based cohort in Korea.Among subjects enrolled at the Chungju Metabolic disease Cohort, those who performed an OGTT between 2007 and 2010 and repeated the test between 2011 and 2014 were recruited after excluding subjects with diabetes at baseline. Subjects were categorized according to their 30 minute glucose (G30) and the difference between 120 and 0 minute glucose (G(120-0)) levels with cutoffs of 9.75 and 2.50 mmol/L, respectively.Among 1126 subjects, 117 (10.39%) developed type 2 diabetes after 4 years. In diabetes nonconverters, increased insulin resistance was accompanied by compensatory insulin secretion, but this was not observed in converters during 4 years of follow-up. Subjects with G(120-0) ≥ 2.50 mmol/L or G30 ≥ 9.75 mmol/L demonstrated lower degrees of insulin secretion, higher degrees of insulin resistance, and ∼6-fold higher risk of developing future diabetes compared to their lower counterparts after adjustment for possible confounding factors. Moreover, subjects with high G(120-0) and high G30 demonstrated 22-fold higher risk for diabetes development compared to subjects with low G(120-0) and low G30.By using the G(120-0) and G30 values obtained during the OGTT, which are less complicated measurements than previously reported methods, we were able to select individuals at risk for future diabetes development. Further studies in different ethnicities are required to validate our results.

  4. Predictive Value of Glucose Parameters Obtained From Oral Glucose Tolerance Tests in Identifying Individuals at High Risk for the Development of Diabetes in Korean Population.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hae Kyung; Ha, Hee-Sung; Rhee, Marie; Lee, Jin-Hee; Park, Yong-Moon; Kwon, Hyuk-Sang; Yim, Hyeon-Woo; Kang, Moo-Il; Lee, Won-Chul; Son, Ho-Young; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Yoon, Kun-Ho

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies suggest that the future risk for type 2 diabetes is not similar among subjects in the same glucose tolerance category. In this study, we aimed to evaluate simple intuitive indices to identify subjects at high risk for future diabetes development by using 0, 30, 120 minute glucose levels obtained during 75 g OGTTs from participants of a prospective community-based cohort in Korea.Among subjects enrolled at the Chungju Metabolic disease Cohort, those who performed an OGTT between 2007 and 2010 and repeated the test between 2011 and 2014 were recruited after excluding subjects with diabetes at baseline. Subjects were categorized according to their 30 minute glucose (G30) and the difference between 120 and 0 minute glucose (G(120-0)) levels with cutoffs of 9.75 and 2.50 mmol/L, respectively.Among 1126 subjects, 117 (10.39%) developed type 2 diabetes after 4 years. In diabetes nonconverters, increased insulin resistance was accompanied by compensatory insulin secretion, but this was not observed in converters during 4 years of follow-up. Subjects with G(120-0) ≥ 2.50 mmol/L or G30 ≥ 9.75 mmol/L demonstrated lower degrees of insulin secretion, higher degrees of insulin resistance, and ∼6-fold higher risk of developing future diabetes compared to their lower counterparts after adjustment for possible confounding factors. Moreover, subjects with high G(120-0) and high G30 demonstrated 22-fold higher risk for diabetes development compared to subjects with low G(120-0) and low G30.By using the G(120-0) and G30 values obtained during the OGTT, which are less complicated measurements than previously reported methods, we were able to select individuals at risk for future diabetes development. Further studies in different ethnicities are required to validate our results. PMID:26962830

  5. Referral outcomes of individuals identified at high risk of cardiovascular disease by community health workers in Bangladesh, Guatemala, Mexico, and South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Levitt, Naomi S.; Puoane, Thandi; Denman, Catalina A.; Abrahams-Gessel, Shafika; Surka, Sam; Mendoza, Carlos; Khanam, Masuma; Alam, Sartaj; Gaziano, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Background We have found that community health workers (CHWs) with appropriate training are able to accurately identify people at high cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in the community who would benefit from the introduction of preventative management, in Bangladesh, Guatemala, Mexico, and South Africa. This paper examines the attendance pattern for those individuals who were so identified and referred to a health care facility for further assessment and management. Design Patient records from the health centres in each site were reviewed for data on diagnoses made and treatment commenced. Reasons for non-attendance were sought from participants who had not attended after being referred. Qualitative data were collected from study coordinators regarding their experiences in obtaining the records and conducting the record reviews. The perspectives of CHWs and community members, who were screened, were also obtained. Results Thirty-seven percent (96/263) of those referred attended follow-up: 36 of 52 (69%) were urgent and 60 of 211 (28.4%) were non-urgent referrals. A diagnosis of hypertension (HTN) was made in 69% of urgent referrals and 37% of non-urgent referrals with treatment instituted in all cases. Reasons for non-attendance included limited self-perception of risk, associated costs, health system obstacles, and lack of trust in CHWs to conduct CVD risk assessments and to refer community members into the health system. Conclusions The existing barriers to referral in the health care systems negatively impact the gains to be had through screening by training CHWs in the use of a simple risk assessment tool. The new diagnoses of HTN and commencement on treatment in those that attended referrals underscores the value of having persons at the highest risk identified in the community setting and referred to a clinic for further evaluation and treatment. PMID:25854780

  6. Identify and Assist the Development of High Risk Preschool Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Marlis

    This speech offers a guide to identifying and teaching high-risk children, those who exhibit a lag in development severe enough to be a handicap in learning. The high-risk children focused on are those whose developmental lag is frequently not recognized until they fail in school. The two major areas of neurodevelopmental learning disorders are in…

  7. Smell identification in individuals at clinical high risk for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Gill, Kelly Elizabeth; Evans, Elizabeth; Kayser, Jürgen; Ben-David, Shelly; Messinger, Julie; Bruder, Gerard; Malaspina, Dolores; Corcoran, Cheryl Mary

    2014-12-15

    Smell identification deficits exist in schizophrenia, and may be associated with its negative symptoms. Less is known about smell identification and its clinical correlates in individuals at clinical high risk (CHR) for schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders. We examined smell identification, symptoms and IQ in 71 clinical high-risk (CHR) subjects and 36 healthy controls. Smell identification was assessed using both the 40-item University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT; Doty, R.L., Shaman, P., Kimmelman, C.P., Dann, M.S., 1984. University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test: a rapid quantitative olfactory function test for the clinic. Laryngoscope 94, 176-178) and its extracted 12-item Brief Smell Identification Test (Goudsmit, N., Coleman, E., Seckinger, R.A., Wolitzky, R., Stanford, A.D., Corcoran, C., Goetz, R.R., Malaspina, D., 2003. A brief smell identification test discriminates between deficit and non-deficit schizophrenia. Psychiatry Research 120, 155-164). Smell identification did not significantly differ between CHR subjects and controls. Among CHR subjects, smell identification did not predict schizophrenia (N=19; 27%) within 2 years, nor was it associated with negative or positive symptoms. This is the third prospective cohort study to examine smell identification in CHR subjects, and overall, findings are inconclusive, similar to what is found for other disorders in adolescents, such as autism spectrum, attention deficit and anxiety disorders. Smell identification deficit may not have clear utility as a marker of emergent schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders.

  8. Identifying Children at High Risk for a Child Maltreatment Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubowitz, Howard; Kim, Jeongeun; Black, Maureen M.; Weisbart, Cindy; Semiatin, Joshua; Magder, Laurence S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To help professionals identify factors that place families at risk for future child maltreatment, to facilitate necessary services and to potentially help prevent abuse and neglect. Method: The data are from a prospective, longitudinal study of 332 low-income families recruited from urban pediatric primary care clinics, followed for…

  9. Establishing a Program for Individuals at High Risk for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cadiz, Fernando; Kuerer, Henry M.; Puga, Julio; Camacho, Jamile; Cunill, Eduardo; Arun, Banu

    2013-01-01

    Our need to create a program for individuals at high risk for breast cancer development led us to research the available data on such programs. In this paper, we summarize our findings and our thinking process as we developed our own program. Breast cancer incidence is increasing worldwide. Even though there are known risk factors for breast cancer development, approximately 60% of patients with breast cancer have no known risk factor, although this situation will probably change with further research, especially in genetics. For patients with risk factors based on personal or family history, different models are available for assessing and quantifying risk. Assignment of risk levels permits tailored screening and risk reduction strategies. Potential benefits of specialized programs for women with high breast cancer risk include more cost -effective interventions as a result of patient stratification on the basis of risk; generation of valuable data to advance science; and differentiation of breast programs from other breast cancer units, which can result in increased revenue that can be directed to further improvements in patient care. Guidelines for care of patients at high risk for breast cancer are available from various groups. However, running a high-risk breast program involves much more than applying a guideline. Each high-risk program needs to be designed by its institution with consideration of local resources and country legislation, especially related to genetic issues. Development of a successful high-risk program includes identifying strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats; developing a promotion plan; choosing a risk assessment tool; defining “high risk”; and planning screening and risk reduction strategies for the specific population served by the program. The information in this article may be useful for other institutions considering creation of programs for patients with high breast cancer risk. PMID:23833688

  10. Targeted screening for colorectal cancer in high-risk individuals.

    PubMed

    Wong, Martin C S; Wong, Sunny H; Ng, Siew C; Wu, Justin C Y; Chan, Francis K L; Sung, Joseph J Y

    2015-12-01

    The idea of targeted screening for colorectal cancer based on risk profiles originates from its benefits to improve detection yield and optimize screening efficiency. Clinically, it allows individuals to be more aware of their own risk and make informed decisions on screening choice. From a public health perspective, the implementation of risk stratification strategies may better justify utilization of colonoscopic resources, and facilitate resource-planning in the formulation of population-based screening programmes. There are several at-risk groups who should receive earlier screening, and colonoscopy is more preferred. This review summarizes the currently recommended CRC screening strategies among subjects with different risk factors, and introduces existing risk scoring systems. Additional genetic, epidemiological, and clinical parameters may be needed to enhance their performance to risk-stratify screening participants. Future research studies should refine these scoring systems, and explore the adaptability, feasibility, acceptability, and user-friendliness of their use in clinical practice among different population groups. PMID:26651255

  11. Targeted sequencing identifies patients with preclinical MDS at high risk of disease progression.

    PubMed

    Cargo, Catherine A; Rowbotham, Nicola; Evans, Paul A; Barrans, Sharon L; Bowen, David T; Crouch, Simon; Jack, Andrew S

    2015-11-19

    The diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) remains problematic due to the subjective nature of morphologic assessment. The reported high frequency of somatic mutations and increased structural variants by array-based cytogenetics have provided potential objective markers of disease; however, this has been complicated by reports of similar abnormalities in the healthy population. We aimed to identify distinguishing features between those with early MDS and reported healthy individuals by characterizing 69 patients who, following a nondiagnostic marrow, developed progressive dysplasia or acute myeloid leukemia. Targeted sequencing and array-based cytogenetics identified a driver mutation and/or structural variant in 91% (63/69) of prediagnostic samples with the mutational spectrum mirroring that in the MDS population. When compared with the reported healthy population, the mutations detected had significantly greater median variant allele fraction (40% vs 9% to 10%), and occurred more commonly with additional mutations (≥2 mutations, 64% vs 8%). Furthermore, mutational analysis identified a high-risk group of patients with a shorter time to disease progression and poorer overall survival. The mutational features in our cohort are distinct from those seen in the healthy population and, even in the absence of definitive disease, can predict outcome. Early detection may allow consideration of intervention in poor-risk patients. PMID:26392596

  12. Alterations in the hippocampus and thalamus in individuals at high risk for psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Harrisberger, Fabienne; Buechler, Roman; Smieskova, Renata; Lenz, Claudia; Walter, Anna; Egloff, Laura; Bendfeldt, Kerstin; Simon, Andor E; Wotruba, Diana; Theodoridou, Anastasia; Rössler, Wulf; Riecher-Rössler, Anita; Lang, Undine E; Heekeren, Karsten; Borgwardt, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Reduction in hippocampal volume is a hallmark of schizophrenia and already present in the clinical high-risk state. Nevertheless, other subcortical structures, such as the thalamus, amygdala and pallidum can differentiate schizophrenia patients from controls. We studied the role of hippocampal and subcortical structures in clinical high-risk individuals from two cohorts. High-resolution T1-weighted structural MRI brain scans of a total of 91 clinical high-risk individuals and 64 healthy controls were collected in two centers. The bilateral volume of the hippocampus, the thalamus, the caudate, the putamen, the pallidum, the amygdala, and the accumbens were automatically segmented using FSL-FIRST. A linear mixed-effects model and a prospective meta-analysis were applied to assess group-related volumetric differences. We report reduced hippocampal and thalamic volumes in clinical high-risk individuals compared to healthy controls. No volumetric alterations were detected for the caudate, the putamen, the pallidum, the amygdala, or the accumbens. Moreover, we found comparable medium effect sizes for group-related comparison of the thalamus in the two analytical methods. These findings underline the relevance of specific alterations in the hippocampal and subcortical volumes in the high-risk state. Further analyses may allow hippocampal and thalamic volumes to be used as biomarkers to predict psychosis. PMID:27738647

  13. Predicting Recidivism Among Adjudicated Delinquents: A Model to Identify High Risk Offenders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grenier, Charles E.; Roundtree, George A.

    1987-01-01

    Studied 100 clients of the East Baton Rouge Parish Family Court to develop predictive model for identifying offenders at high risk for recidivism. Found important predictor variables to be presence of delinquent siblings or friends, school problems, type of offense committed, and gender of delinquent. (Author/NB)

  14. Predicting the Unpredictable? Identifying High-Risk versus Low-Risk Parents with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGaw, Sue; Scully, Tamara; Pritchard, Colin

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: This study set out to identify risk factors affecting parents with intellectual disabilities (IDs) by determining: (i) whether perception of family support differs between parents with IDs, referring professionals, and a specialist parenting service; (ii) whether multivariate familial and demographic factors differentiates "high-risk"…

  15. Sources of HIV-Prevention Information for Individuals at High Risk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sagrestano, Lynda M.; Heiss-Wendt, Renate M.; Mizan, Ainon N.; Kittleson, Mark J.; Sarvela, Paul D.

    2001-01-01

    Identified the best methods of reaching people at high risk with HIV-prevention messages. Data from men who had sex with men, injection drug users, sex workers, HIV-positive people, heterosexuals, migrant workers, and perinatal women indicated that over 70 percent were exposed to HIV-prevention messages, though sources of exposure varied by risk…

  16. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) in HIV-uninfected individuals with high-risk behaviour.

    PubMed

    Nadery, S; Geerlings, S E

    2013-01-01

    The global incidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has decreased by 15% over the past years, but is still too high. Despite current programs to reduce the incidence of HIV infection, further approaches are needed to limit this epidemic. Oral antiretroviral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is currently one of the most discussed possible prevention methods. This literature study demonstrates whether orally antiretroviral chemoprophylaxis in HIV-uninfected individuals with high-risk behaviour reduces the transmission of HIV. We used the PICO method and conducted a search to identify relevant studies. Subjects of the study were HIV-uninfected individuals with high-risk behaviour. Intervention was oral PrEP with tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) alone or plus emtricitabine (FTC) versus placebo. The primary outcome was the HIV incidence among this high-risk group. Secondary outcomes were adherence to PrEP, frequency and type of adverse effects. We identified ten studies from which five randomised control trials (RCTs) were included after screening. The results from three out of five trials showed a reduction, but two trials showed no protection in acquiring HIV infection. There were no significant differences in adverse events. The adherence was different among different groups and affected the outcome of the studies. In conclusion, this prophylaxis might offer protection when used in combination with intense monitoring and guidance in uninfected individuals with a high risk of HIV acquisition. However, there are still many unresolved questions. Drug adherence seems to be a crucial factor in the effectiveness of PrEP. Therefore, individual risk behaviour remains an important determinant for success in the prevention of HIV transmission. PMID:23956310

  17. Effects of policies designed to keep firearms from high-risk individuals.

    PubMed

    Webster, Daniel W; Wintemute, Garen J

    2015-03-18

    This article summarizes and critiques available evidence from studies published between 1999 and August 2014 on the effects of policies designed to keep firearms from high-risk individuals in the United States. Some prohibitions for high-risk individuals (e.g., those under domestic violence restraining orders, violent misdemeanants) and procedures for checking for more types of prohibiting conditions are associated with lower rates of violence. Certain laws intended to prevent prohibited persons from accessing firearms-rigorous permit-to-purchase, comprehensive background checks, strong regulation and oversight of gun dealers, and requiring gun owners to promptly report lost or stolen firearms-are negatively associated with the diversion of guns to criminals. Future research is needed to examine whether these laws curtail nonlethal gun violence and whether the effects of expanding prohibiting conditions for firearm possession are modified by the presence of policies to prevent diversion. PMID:25581152

  18. Effects of policies designed to keep firearms from high-risk individuals.

    PubMed

    Webster, Daniel W; Wintemute, Garen J

    2015-03-18

    This article summarizes and critiques available evidence from studies published between 1999 and August 2014 on the effects of policies designed to keep firearms from high-risk individuals in the United States. Some prohibitions for high-risk individuals (e.g., those under domestic violence restraining orders, violent misdemeanants) and procedures for checking for more types of prohibiting conditions are associated with lower rates of violence. Certain laws intended to prevent prohibited persons from accessing firearms-rigorous permit-to-purchase, comprehensive background checks, strong regulation and oversight of gun dealers, and requiring gun owners to promptly report lost or stolen firearms-are negatively associated with the diversion of guns to criminals. Future research is needed to examine whether these laws curtail nonlethal gun violence and whether the effects of expanding prohibiting conditions for firearm possession are modified by the presence of policies to prevent diversion.

  19. Self-awareness of functional impairment in individuals at clinical high-risk for psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Olvet, Doreen M.; Carrión, Ricardo E.; Auther, Andrea M.; Cornblatt, Barbara A.

    2013-01-01

    Aims A major public health concern associated with schizophrenia is the long-term disability that involves an inability to function independently in the community. An individual’s self-awareness of functional impairment may be a significant factor contributing to long-term disability. In fact, subjective interpretation of one’s illness impacts treatment participation and adherence, and is linked to poor outcomes. However, it remains unclear how illness-related functional impairment is perceived by individuals prior to the onset of psychosis. This study aims to examine the relationship between clinician-based and self-report assessments of functioning, as well as the contribution of clinical symptoms to this relationship in individuals at clinical high-risk for psychosis. Methods The Sheehan Disability Scale, a self-rated instrument, was used to measure disruption in daily functioning in social and role functioning due to symptoms in a sample of 73 treatment-seeking patients at clinical high-risk for psychosis and 50 healthy controls. Results Relative to healthy controls, clinical high-risk patients self-reported significant disruptions in social and role functioning. In addition, a specific relationship emerged in that clinician-rated measures of functioning and depression were related to disability scores. Conclusions These findings suggest that clinical high-risk patients are significantly disturbed by their illness. Self-reported disruption of daily functioning was associated with clinician-rated functioning and depressive symptoms, further highlighting the impact of functional impairments on the level of distress experienced by patients in the early phases of the illness. Intervention strategies that repair functional impairment before the onset of psychosis may prevent long-term disability. PMID:23968457

  20. Prognostic Utility of Anti-EBV Antibody Testing for Defining NPC Risk among Individuals from High-Risk NPC Families

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Kelly J.; Hsu, Wan-Lun; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Chiang, Chun-Ju; Wang, Cheng-Ping; Lou, Pei-Jen; Cheng, Yu-Juen; Gravitt, Patti; Diehl, Scott R.; Goldstein, Alisa M.; Chen, Chien-Jen; Hildesheim, Allan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) infection and a family history of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) are associated with NPC risk. We examined the risk associated with EBV markers and their clinical utility to identify NPC susceptibles within high-risk NPC families. Experimental Design We evaluated antibody titers against viral capsid antigen (VCA) IgA, EBV nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA1) IgA, and DNase among unaffected relatives of NPC cases from 358 multiplex families in Taiwan. Incident NPC cases were identified via linkage to the National Cancer Registry. Clinical examinations of 924 individuals were also done to identify occult, asymptomatic NPC. Baseline EBV serology was used to estimate NPC risk using rate ratios with 95% CI. Associated sensitivity/specificity and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were calculated. Results A total of 2,444 unaffected individuals with 15,519 person-years (6.5 years median follow-up) yielded 14 incident NPC cases (nearly 11 times the general population rate). The absolute rate of NPC among anti-EBV EBNA1 IgA seropositives using a standard positivity cutoff versus an optimized cutoff point defined by ROC analyses was 265/100,000 person-years with a 4.7-fold increased risk of NPC (95% CI: 1.4–16) and 166/100,000 person-years with a 6.6-fold increase (95% CI: 1.5–61), respectively. Sensitivity and specificity using the optimized positivity cutoff points were 85.7% and 51.2%, respectively. It is estimated that active evaluation of 49% of individuals from high-risk NPC families seropositive for this marker could lead to earlier detection of up to 86% of NPC cases. Risks associated with the other three EBV markers were weaker. Conclusions Future efforts are needed to identify susceptibility markers among high-risk NPC families that maximize both sensitivity and specificity. PMID:21447725

  1. Frequent Detection of Pancreatic Lesions in Asymptomatic High-Risk Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Canto, Marcia Irene; Hruban, Ralph H.; Fishman, Elliot K.; Kamel, Ihab R.; Schulick, Richard; Zhang, Zhe; Topazian, Mark; Takahashi, Naoki; Fletcher, Joel; Petersen, Gloria; Klein, Alison P.; Axilbund, Jennifer; Griffin, Constance; Syngal, Sapna; Saltzman, John R.; Mortele, Koenraad J.; Lee, Jeffrey; Tamm, Eric; Vikram, Raghunandan; Bhosale, Priya; Margolis, Daniel; Farrell, James; Goggins, Michael

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS The risk of pancreatic cancer is increased in patients with a strong family history of pancreatic cancer or a predisposing germline mutation. Screening can detect curable, non-invasive pancreatic neoplasms, but the optimal imaging approach is not known. We determined the baseline prevalence and characteristics of pancreatic abnormalities using 3 imaging tests to screen asymptomatic, high-risk individuals (HRI). METHODS We screened 225 asymptomatic adult HRI at 5 academic US medical centers once, using computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS). We compared results in a blinded, independent fashion. RESULTS Ninety-two of 216 HRI (42%) were found to have at least 1 pancreatic mass (84 cystic, 3 solid) or a dilated pancreatic duct (n=5) by any of the imaging modalities. Fifty-one of the 84 HRI with a cyst (60.7%) had multiple lesions, typically small (mean 0.55 cm, range 2–39 mm), in multiple locations. The prevalence of pancreatic lesions increased with age; they were detected in 14% of subjects <50 years old, 34% of subjects 50–59 years old, and 53% of subjects 60–69 years old (P<.0001). CT, MRI, and EUS detected a pancreatic abnormality in 11%, 33.3%, and 42.6% of the HRI, respectively. Among these abnormalities, proven or suspected neoplasms were identified in 85 HRI (82 intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms [IPMN] and 3 pancreatic endocrine tumors). Three of 5 HRI who underwent pancreatic resection had high-grade dysplasia in <3 cm IPMNs and in multiple intraepithelial neoplasias. CONCLUSIONS Screening of asymptomatic HRI frequently detects small pancreatic cysts, including curable, non-invasive high-grade neoplasms. EUS and MRI detect pancreatic lesions better than CT. PMID:22245846

  2. Screening for pancreatic neoplasia in high-risk individuals: who, what, when, how?

    PubMed

    Canto, Marcia Irene

    2005-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a highly lethal disease. Most symptomatic, clinically detected PCs are advanced and not curable. Indeed, the estimated 5-year survival rate is 4%, which is attributable to late diagnosis and low resection rate. Screening of high-risk individuals and early detection of small PCs and precursor lesions might improve the outcome if curative therapy could be offered in the presymptomatic stage. This article summarizes the available published data and preliminary results and discusses the different approaches to screening for pancreatic neoplasia at 2 university-based programs in the United States.

  3. Gender disparities in latent tuberculosis infection in high-risk individuals: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Ting, Wen-Ying; Huang, Shiang-Fen; Lee, Ming-Che; Lin, Yung-Yang; Lee, Yu-Chin; Feng, Jia-Yih; Su, Wei-Juin

    2014-01-01

    Male predominance in active tuberculosis (TB) is widely-reported globally. Gender inequalities in socio-cultural status are frequently regarded as contributing factors for disparities in sex in active TB. The disparities of sex in the prevalence of latent TB infection (LTBI) are less frequently investigated and deserve clarification. In this cross-sectional study conducted in a TB endemic area, we enrolled patients at high-risk for LTBI and progression from LTBI to active TB from 2011 to 2012. Diagnosis of LTBI was made by QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT). Differences in sex in terms of prevalence of LTBI and clinical predictors for LTBI were investigated. Associations among age, smoking status, and sex disparities in LTBI were also analyzed. A total of 1018 high-risk individuals with definite QFT-GIT results were included for analysis, including 534 males and 484 females. The proportion of LTBI was significantly higher in males than in females (32.6% vs. 25.2%, p = 0.010). Differences in the proportion of LTBI between sexes were most prominent in older patients (age ≥ 55 years). In multivariate analysis, independent clinical factors associated with LTBI were age (p = 0.014), smoking (p = 0.048), and fibro-calcified lesions on chest radiogram (p = 0.009). Male sex was not an independent factor for LTBI (p = 0.88). When stratifying patients according to the smoking status, the proportion of LTBI remained comparable between sexes among smokers and non-smokers. In conclusion, although the proportion of LTBI is higher in men, there is no significant disparity in terms of sex in LTBI among high-risk individuals after adjusting for age, smoking status, and other clinical factors. PMID:25369472

  4. Gender Disparities in Latent Tuberculosis Infection in High-Risk Individuals: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Wen-Ying; Huang, Shiang-Fen; Lee, Ming-Che; Lin, Yung-Yang; Lee, Yu-Chin

    2014-01-01

    Male predominance in active tuberculosis (TB) is widely-reported globally. Gender inequalities in socio-cultural status are frequently regarded as contributing factors for disparities in sex in active TB. The disparities of sex in the prevalence of latent TB infection (LTBI) are less frequently investigated and deserve clarification. In this cross-sectional study conducted in a TB endemic area, we enrolled patients at high-risk for LTBI and progression from LTBI to active TB from 2011 to 2012. Diagnosis of LTBI was made by QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT). Differences in sex in terms of prevalence of LTBI and clinical predictors for LTBI were investigated. Associations among age, smoking status, and sex disparities in LTBI were also analyzed. A total of 1018 high-risk individuals with definite QFT-GIT results were included for analysis, including 534 males and 484 females. The proportion of LTBI was significantly higher in males than in females (32.6% vs. 25.2%, p = 0.010). Differences in the proportion of LTBI between sexes were most prominent in older patients (age ≥55 years). In multivariate analysis, independent clinical factors associated with LTBI were age (p = 0.014), smoking (p = 0.048), and fibro-calcified lesions on chest radiogram (p = 0.009). Male sex was not an independent factor for LTBI (p = 0.88). When stratifying patients according to the smoking status, the proportion of LTBI remained comparable between sexes among smokers and non-smokers. In conclusion, although the proportion of LTBI is higher in men, there is no significant disparity in terms of sex in LTBI among high-risk individuals after adjusting for age, smoking status, and other clinical factors. PMID:25369472

  5. Methods and outcomes of screening for pancreatic adenocarcinoma in high-risk individuals.

    PubMed

    Capurso, Gabriele; Signoretti, Marianna; Valente, Roberto; Arnelo, Urban; Lohr, Matthias; Poley, Jan-Werner; Delle Fave, Gianfranco; Del Chiaro, Marco

    2015-07-25

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a lethal neoplasia, for which secondary prevention (i.e., screening) is advisable for high-risk individuals with "familiar pancreatic cancer" and with other specific genetic syndromes (Peutz-Jeghers, p16, BRCA2, PALB and mismatch repair gene mutation carriers). There is limited evidence regarding the accuracy of screening tests, their acceptability, costs and availability, and agreement on whom to treat. Successful target of screening are small resectable PDAC, intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms with high-grade dysplasia and advanced pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia. Both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) are employed for screening, and the overall yield for pre-malignant or malignant pancreatic lesions is of about 20% with EUS and 14% with MRI/magnetic resonance colangiopancreatography. EUS performs better for solid and MRI for cystic lesions. However, only 2% of these detected lesions can be considered a successful target, and there are insufficient data demonstrating that resection of benign or low grade lesions improves survival. Many patients in the published studies therefore seemed to have received an overtreatment by undergoing surgery. It is crucial to better stratify the risk of malignancy individually, and to better define optimal screening intervals and methods either with computerized tools or molecular biomarkers, possibly in large multicentre studies. At the moment, screening should be carefully performed within research protocols at experienced centres, offering involved individuals medical and psychological advice. PMID:26240684

  6. Sex Differences in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder Identified within a High-Risk Infant Cohort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Bryson, Susan E.; Szatmari, Peter; Brian, Jessica; Smith, Isabel M.; Roberts, Wendy; Vaillancourt, Tracy; Roncadin, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Sex differences were examined in 3-year-olds with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) ascertained from a high-risk cohort, and high- and low-risk comparison groups. Participants included 319 high-risk siblings and 129 low-risk controls. Eighty-five siblings were diagnosed with ASD, including 57 of 176 boys (32.4%) and 28 of 143 girls (19.6%), implying…

  7. Cortical thickness reduction in individuals at ultra-high-risk for psychosis.

    PubMed

    Jung, Wi Hoon; Kim, June Sic; Jang, Joon Hwan; Choi, Jung-Seok; Jung, Myung Hun; Park, Ji-Young; Han, Ji Yeon; Choi, Chi-Hoon; Kang, Do-Hyung; Chung, Chun Kee; Kwon, Jun Soo

    2011-07-01

    Although schizophrenia is characterized by gray matter (GM) abnormalities, particularly in the prefrontal and temporal cortices, it is unclear whether cerebral cortical GM is abnormal in individuals at ultra-high-risk (UHR) for psychosis. We addressed this issue by studying cortical thickness in this group with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We measured cortical thickness of 29 individuals with no family history of psychosis at UHR, 31 patients with schizophrenia, and 29 healthy matched control subjects using automated surface-based analysis of structural MRI data. Hemispheric mean and regional cortical thickness were significantly different according to the stage of the disease. Significant cortical differences across these 3 groups were found in the distributed area of cerebral cortices. UHR group showed significant cortical thinning in the prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, inferior parietal cortex, parahippocampal cortex, and superior temporal gyrus compared with healthy control subjects. Significant cortical thinning in schizophrenia group relative to UHR group was found in all the regions described above in addition with posterior cingulate cortex, insular cortex, and precentral cortex. These changes were more pronounced in the schizophrenia group compared with the control subjects. These findings suggest that UHR is associated with cortical thinning in regions that correspond to the structural abnormalities found in schizophrenia. These structural abnormalities might reflect functional decline at the prodromal stage of schizophrenia, and there may be progressive thinning of GM cortex over time. PMID:20026559

  8. Neuropsychological Profiles in Individuals at Clinical High Risk for Psychosis: Relationship to Psychosis and Intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Woodberry, Kristen A.; Seidman, Larry J.; Giuliano, Anthony J.; Verdi, Mary B.; Cook, William L.; McFarlane, William R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Characterizing neuropsychological (NP) functioning of individuals at clinical high risk (CHR) for psychosis may be useful for prediction of psychosis and understanding functional outcome. The degree to which NP impairments are associated with general cognitive ability and/or later emergence of full psychosis in CHR samples requires study with well-matched controls. Methods We assessed NP functioning across eight cognitive domains in a sample of 73 CHR youth, 13 of whom developed psychotic-level symptoms after baseline assessment, and 34 healthy comparison (HC) subjects. Groups were matched on age, sex, ethnicity, handedness, subject and parent grade attainment, and median family income, and were comparable on WRAT-3 Reading, an estimate of premorbid IQ. Profile analysis was used to examine group differences and the role of IQ in profile shape. Results The CHR sample demonstrated a significant difference in overall magnitude of NP impairment but only a small and nearly significant difference in profile shape, primarily due to a large impairment in olfactory identification. Individuals who subsequently developed psychotic-level symptoms demonstrated large impairments in verbal IQ, verbal memory and olfactory identification comparable in magnitude to first episode samples. Conclusions CHR status may be associated with moderate generalized cognitive impairments marked by some degree of selective impairment in olfaction and verbal memory. Impairments were greatest in those who later developed psychotic symptoms. Future study of olfaction in CHR samples may enhance early detection and specification of neurodevelopmental mechanisms of risk. PMID:20692125

  9. Analyzing treatment aggressiveness and identifying high-risk patients in diabetic foot ulcer return to care.

    PubMed

    Remington, Austin C; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; Warstadt, Nicholus M; Finnegan, Micaela A; Shaffer, Robyn; Kwong, Jereen Z; Curtin, Catherine

    2016-07-01

    Rates of diabetes and its associated comorbidities have been increasing in the United States, with diabetic foot ulcer treatment representing a large cost to the patient and healthcare system. These ulcers often result in multiple hospital admissions. This study examined readmissions following inpatient care for a diabetic foot ulcer and identified modifiable factors associated with all-cause 30-day readmissions to the inpatient or emergency department (ED) setting. We hypothesized that patients undergoing aggressive treatment would have lower 30-day readmission rates. We identified patient discharge records containing International Classification of Disease ninth revision codes for both diabetes mellitus and distal foot ulcer in the State Inpatient and Emergency Department databases from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project in Florida and New York, 2011-2012. All-cause 30-day return to care visits (ED or inpatient) were analyzed. Patient demographics and treatment characteristics were evaluated using univariate and multivariable regression models. The cohort included 25,911 discharges, having a mean age of 63 and an average of 3.8 comorbidities. The overall rate of return to care was 30%, and 21% of subjects underwent a toe or midfoot amputation during their index stay. The most common diagnosis codes upon readmission were diabetes mellitus (19%) and infection (13%). Patients with a toe or midfoot amputation procedure were less likely to be readmitted within 30 days (odds ratio: 0.78; 95% confidence interval: 0.73, 0.84). Presence of comorbidities, black and Hispanic ethnicities, and Medicare and Medicaid payer status were also associated with higher odds of readmission following initial hospitalization (p < 0.05). The study suggests that there are many factors that affect readmission rates for diabetic foot ulcer patients. Understanding patients at high-risk for readmission can improve counseling and

  10. Social Cognition in Individuals at Ultra-High Risk for Psychosis: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    van Donkersgoed, R. J. M.; Wunderink, L.; Nieboer, R.; Aleman, A.; Pijnenborg, G. H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Treatment in the ultra-high risk stage for a psychotic episode is critical to the course of symptoms. Markers for the development of psychosis have been studied, to optimize the detection of people at risk of psychosis. One possible marker for the transition to psychosis is social cognition. To estimate effect sizes for social cognition based on a quantitative integration of the published evidence, we conducted a meta-analysis of social cognitive performance in people at ultra high risk (UHR). Methods A literature search (1970-July 2015) was performed in PubMed, PsychINFO, Medline, Embase, and ISI Web of Science, using the search terms ‘social cognition’, ‘theory of mind’, ‘emotion recognition’, ‘attributional style’, ‘social knowledge’, ‘social perception’, ‘empathy’, ‘at risk mental state’, ‘clinical high risk’, ‘psychosis prodrome’, and ‘ultra high risk’. The pooled effect size (Cohen’s D) and the effect sizes for each domain of social cognition were calculated. A random effects model with 95% confidence intervals was used. Results Seventeen studies were included in the analysis. The overall significant effect was of medium magnitude (d = 0.52, 95% Cl = 0.38–0.65). No moderator effects were found for age, gender and sample size. Sub-analyses demonstrated that individuals in the UHR phase show significant moderate deficits in affect recognition and affect discrimination in faces as well as in voices and in verbal Theory of Mind (TOM). Due to an insufficient amount of studies, we did not calculate an effect size for attributional bias and social perception/ knowledge. A majority of studies did not find a correlation between social cognition deficits and transition to psychosis, which may suggest that social cognition in general is not a useful marker for the development of psychosis. However some studies suggest the possible predictive value of verbal TOM and the recognition of specific emotions in faces

  11. How temporary insurance for high-risk individuals may play out under health reform.

    PubMed

    Chollet, Deborah J

    2010-06-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act guarantees that people with health problems will be able to buy private health insurance as of 2014. In the interim, a new federal high-risk program will accept those who are denied private insurance and have not found coverage from any other source. Such sources include a state high-risk pool or, in a handful of states, a designated carrier of last resort. However, restricted eligibility for the federal program suggests that state high-risk pools, in particular, will continue to be critical yet problematic sources of coverage for the next few years.

  12. Identifying high-risk areas of bacillary dysentery and associated meteorological factors in Wuhan, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenjun; Wang, Ligui; Sun, Weige; Hou, Xuexin; Yang, Haiyan; Sun, Lina; Xu, Shuai; Sun, Qiangzheng; Zhang, Jingshan; Song, Hongbin; Lin, Hualiang

    2013-11-21

    Spatial distribution of bacillary dysentery incidence was mapped at the district level in Wuhan, China. And a generalized additive time series model was used to examine the effect of daily weather factors on bacillary dysentery in the high-risk areas, after controlling for potential confounding factors. Central districts were found to be the high-risk areas. The time series analysis found an acute effect of meteorological factors on bacillary dysentery occurrence. A positive association was found for mean temperature (excess risk (ER) for 1°C increase being 0.94% (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.46% to 1.43% on the lag day 2), while a negative effect was observed for relative humidity and rainfall, the ER for 1% increase in relative humidity was -0.21% (95% CI: -0.34% to -0.08%), and the ER for 1 mm increase in rainfall was -0.23% (95% CI: -0.37% to -0.09%). This study suggests that bacillary dysentery prevention and control strategy should consider local weather variations.

  13. Developing interpretable models with optimized set reduction for identifying high risk software components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briand, Lionel C.; Basili, Victor R.; Hetmanski, Christopher J.

    1993-01-01

    Applying equal testing and verification effort to all parts of a software system is not very efficient, especially when resources are limited and scheduling is tight. Therefore, one needs to be able to differentiate low/high fault frequency components so that testing/verification effort can be concentrated where needed. Such a strategy is expected to detect more faults and thus improve the resulting reliability of the overall system. This paper presents the Optimized Set Reduction approach for constructing such models, intended to fulfill specific software engineering needs. Our approach to classification is to measure the software system and build multivariate stochastic models for predicting high risk system components. We present experimental results obtained by classifying Ada components into two classes: is or is not likely to generate faults during system and acceptance test. Also, we evaluate the accuracy of the model and the insights it provides into the error making process.

  14. Assessing individual risk for high-risk colorectal adenoma at first-time screening colonoscopy.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yin; Rosner, Bernard A; Ma, Jing; Tamimi, Rulla M; Chan, Andrew T; Fuchs, Charles S; Wu, Kana; Giovannucci, Edward L

    2015-10-01

    Assessing risk of colorectal adenoma at first-time colonoscopy that are of higher likelihood of developing advanced neoplasia during surveillance could help tailor first-line colorectal cancer screening. We developed prediction models for high-risk colorectal adenoma (at least one adenoma ≥1 cm, or with advanced histology, or ≥3 adenomas) among 4,881 asymptomatic white men and 17,970 women who underwent colonoscopy as their first-time screening for colorectal cancer in two prospective US studies using logistic regressions. C-statistics and Hosmer-Lemeshow tests were used to evaluate discrimination and calibration. Ten-fold cross-validation was used for internal validation. A total of 330 (6.7%) men and 678 (3.8%) women were diagnosed with high-risk adenoma at first-time screening colonoscopy. The model for men included age, family history of colorectal cancer, BMI, smoking, sitting watching TV/VCR, regular aspirin/NSAID use, physical activity, and a joint term of multivitamin and alcohol. For women, the model included age, family history of colorectal cancer, BMI, smoking, alcohol, beef/pork/lamb as main dish, regular aspirin/NSAID, calcium, and oral contraceptive use. The C-statistic of the model for men was 0.67 and 0.60 for women (0.64 and 0.57 in cross-validation). Both models calibrated well. The predicted risk of high-risk adenoma for men in the top decile was 15.4% vs. 1.8% for men in the bottom decile (Odds Ratio [OR] = 9.41), and 6.6% vs. 2.1% for women (OR = 3.48). In summary, we developed and internally validated an absolute risk assessment tool for high-risk colorectal adenoma among the US population that may provide guidance for first-time colorectal cancer screening.

  15. Assessing individual risk for high-risk colorectal adenoma at first-time screening colonoscopy.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yin; Rosner, Bernard A; Ma, Jing; Tamimi, Rulla M; Chan, Andrew T; Fuchs, Charles S; Wu, Kana; Giovannucci, Edward L

    2015-10-01

    Assessing risk of colorectal adenoma at first-time colonoscopy that are of higher likelihood of developing advanced neoplasia during surveillance could help tailor first-line colorectal cancer screening. We developed prediction models for high-risk colorectal adenoma (at least one adenoma ≥1 cm, or with advanced histology, or ≥3 adenomas) among 4,881 asymptomatic white men and 17,970 women who underwent colonoscopy as their first-time screening for colorectal cancer in two prospective US studies using logistic regressions. C-statistics and Hosmer-Lemeshow tests were used to evaluate discrimination and calibration. Ten-fold cross-validation was used for internal validation. A total of 330 (6.7%) men and 678 (3.8%) women were diagnosed with high-risk adenoma at first-time screening colonoscopy. The model for men included age, family history of colorectal cancer, BMI, smoking, sitting watching TV/VCR, regular aspirin/NSAID use, physical activity, and a joint term of multivitamin and alcohol. For women, the model included age, family history of colorectal cancer, BMI, smoking, alcohol, beef/pork/lamb as main dish, regular aspirin/NSAID, calcium, and oral contraceptive use. The C-statistic of the model for men was 0.67 and 0.60 for women (0.64 and 0.57 in cross-validation). Both models calibrated well. The predicted risk of high-risk adenoma for men in the top decile was 15.4% vs. 1.8% for men in the bottom decile (Odds Ratio [OR] = 9.41), and 6.6% vs. 2.1% for women (OR = 3.48). In summary, we developed and internally validated an absolute risk assessment tool for high-risk colorectal adenoma among the US population that may provide guidance for first-time colorectal cancer screening. PMID:25820865

  16. Assessing Individual Risk for High-Risk Colorectal Adenoma at First-Time Screening Colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yin; Rosner, Bernard A.; Ma, Jing; Tamimi, Rulla M.; Chan, Andrew T.; Fuchs, Charles S.

    2015-01-01

    Assessing risk of colorectal adenoma at first-time colonoscopy that are of higher likelihood of developing advanced neoplasia during surveillance could help tailor first-line colorectal cancer screening. We developed prediction models for high-risk colorectal adenoma (at least one adenoma ≥1 cm, or with advanced histology, or ≥3 adenomas) among 4,881 asymptomatic white men and 17,970 women who underwent colonoscopy as their first-time screening for colorectal cancer in two prospective U.S. studies using logistic regressions. C-statistics and Hosmer-Lemeshow tests were used to evaluate discrimination and calibration. Ten-fold cross-validation was used for internal validation. A total of 330 (6.7%) men and 678 (3.8%) women were diagnosed with high-risk adenoma at first-time screening colonoscopy. The model for men included age, family history of colorectal cancer, BMI, smoking, sitting watching TV/VCR, regular aspirin/NSAID use, physical activity, and a joint term of multivitamin and alcohol. For women, the model included age, family history of colorectal cancer, BMI, smoking, alcohol, beef/pork/lamb as main dish, regular aspirin/NSAID, calcium, and oral contraceptive use. The C-statistic of the model for men was 0.67 and 0.60 for women (0.64 and 0.57 in cross-validation). Both models calibrated well. The predicted risk of high-risk adenoma for men in the top decile was 15.4% vs 1.8% for men in the bottom decile (Odds Ratio[OR]=9.41), and 6.6% vs 2.1% for women (OR=3.48). In summary, we developed and internally validated an absolute risk assessment tool for high-risk colorectal adenoma among the U.S. population that may provide guidance for first-time colorectal cancer screening. PMID:25820865

  17. Classifying individuals at high-risk for psychosis based on functional brain activity during working memory processing.

    PubMed

    Bendfeldt, Kerstin; Smieskova, Renata; Koutsouleris, Nikolaos; Klöppel, Stefan; Schmidt, André; Walter, Anna; Harrisberger, Fabienne; Wrege, Johannes; Simon, Andor; Taschler, Bernd; Nichols, Thomas; Riecher-Rössler, Anita; Lang, Undine E; Radue, Ernst-Wilhelm; Borgwardt, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The psychosis high-risk state is accompanied by alterations in functional brain activity during working memory processing. We used binary automatic pattern-classification to discriminate between the at-risk mental state (ARMS), first episode psychosis (FEP) and healthy controls (HCs) based on n-back WM-induced brain activity. Linear support vector machines and leave-one-out-cross-validation were applied to fMRI data of matched ARMS, FEP and HC (19 subjects/group). The HC and ARMS were correctly classified, with an accuracy of 76.2% (sensitivity 89.5%, specificity 63.2%, p = 0.01) using a verbal working memory network mask. Only 50% and 47.4% of individuals were classified correctly for HC vs. FEP (p = 0.46) or ARMS vs. FEP (p = 0.62), respectively. Without mask, accuracy was 65.8% for HC vs. ARMS (p = 0.03) and 65.8% for HC vs. FEP (p = 0.0047), and 57.9% for ARMS vs. FEP (p = 0.18). Regions in the medial frontal, paracingulate, cingulate, inferior frontal and superior frontal gyri, inferior and superior parietal lobules, and precuneus were particularly important for group separation. These results suggest that FEP and HC or FEP and ARMS cannot be accurately separated in small samples under these conditions. However, ARMS can be identified with very high sensitivity in comparison to HC. This might aid classification and help to predict transition in the ARMS. PMID:26640767

  18. Identifying relatively high-risk group of coronary artery calcification based on progression rate: statistical and machine learning methods.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ha-Young; Yoo, Sanghyun; Lee, Jihyun; Kam, Hye Jin; Woo, Kyoung-Gu; Choi, Yoon-Ho; Sung, Jidong; Kang, Mira

    2012-01-01

    Coronary artery calcification (CAC) score is an important predictor of coronary artery disease (CAD), which is the primary cause of death in advanced countries. Early prediction of high-risk of CAC based on progression rate enables people to prevent CAD from developing into severe symptoms and diseases. In this study, we developed various classifiers to identify patients in high risk of CAC using statistical and machine learning methods, and compared them with performance accuracy. For statistical approaches, linear regression based classifier and logistic regression model were developed. For machine learning approaches, we suggested three kinds of ensemble-based classifiers (best, top-k, and voting method) to deal with imbalanced distribution of our data set. Ensemble voting method outperformed all other methods including regression methods as AUC was 0.781. PMID:23366360

  19. Individual Identifiability Predicts Population Identifiability in Forensic Microsatellite Markers.

    PubMed

    Algee-Hewitt, Bridget F B; Edge, Michael D; Kim, Jaehee; Li, Jun Z; Rosenberg, Noah A

    2016-04-01

    Highly polymorphic genetic markers with significant potential for distinguishing individual identity are used as a standard tool in forensic testing [1, 2]. At the same time, population-genetic studies have suggested that genetically diverse markers with high individual identifiability also confer information about genetic ancestry [3-6]. The dual influence of polymorphism levels on ancestry inference and forensic desirability suggests that forensically useful marker sets with high levels of individual identifiability might also possess substantial ancestry information. We study a standard forensic marker set-the 13 CODIS loci used in the United States and elsewhere [2, 7-9]-together with 779 additional microsatellites [10], using direct population structure inference to test whether markers with substantial individual identifiability also produce considerable information about ancestry. Despite having been selected for individual identification and not for ancestry inference [11], the CODIS markers generate nontrivial model-based clustering patterns similar to those of other sets of 13 tetranucleotide microsatellites. Although the CODIS markers have relatively low values of the F(ST) divergence statistic, their high heterozygosities produce greater ancestry inference potential than is possessed by less heterozygous marker sets. More generally, we observe that marker sets with greater individual identifiability also tend toward greater population identifiability. We conclude that population identifiability regularly follows as a byproduct of the use of highly polymorphic forensic markers. Our findings have implications for the design of new forensic marker sets and for evaluations of the extent to which individual characteristics beyond identification might be predicted from current and future forensic data.

  20. Coping Styles of Individuals at Clinical High Risk for Developing Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Jalbrzikowski, Maria; Sugar, Catherine A.; Zinberg, Jamie; Bachman, Peter; Cannon, Tyrone D.; Bearden, Carrie E.

    2012-01-01

    Aim There is a wealth of evidence suggesting that patients with schizophrenia tend to respond to life stressors using less effective coping skills, which are in turn related to poor outcome. However, the contribution of coping strategies to outcome in youth at clinical high risk (CHR) for developing psychosis has not been investigated. Methods This longitudinal study followed CHR youth over a twelve-month period, using the Brief COPE questionnaire. CHR subjects (n=88) were compared at baseline to a healthy control sample (n=53), and then mixed models were used to explore the relationship of coping strategies to clinical and psychosocial outcomes in CHR subjects over time (n=102). Results Cross-sectional analyses revealed that, in comparison to healthy controls, CHR youth reported using more maladaptive coping strategies (p<.001) and fewer adaptive coping strategies (p<.01). Longitudinal analyses within the CHR group showed significant decreases in maladaptive coping and symptom severity over time, with corresponding improvements in social and role functioning. Adaptive coping was associated with better concurrent social functioning and less severe symptomatology (both p<.001). Over time, more maladaptive coping was associated with more severe positive and negative symptoms (both p < .005). Conclusions Youth at-risk for psychosis report using fewer adaptive and more maladaptive coping strategies relative to healthy controls. Over one year follow-up, more adaptive coping styles are associated with less severe clinical symptomatology and better social functioning. These findings suggest that teaching adaptive coping styles may be an important target for intervention in youth at high risk for psychosis. PMID:23164368

  1. Discrimination of SM-identified individuals.

    PubMed

    Wright, Susan

    2006-01-01

    The belief that sadomasochism (SM) is violence or abusive behavior has resulted in harassment, physical attacks, and discrimination against SM-identified individuals. Historically, they were often opposed by self-identified feminists. One reason the women who practiced SM were targeted was the official opposition to sadomasochistic practices promulgated by the National Organization for Women (NOW). Current statistics of incidents of discrimination, harassment and physical attacks against SM-identified individuals and SM groups are compiled by the National Coalition for Sexual Freedom (NCSF). PMID:16803765

  2. Critical assessment of the use of growth monitoring for identifying high risk children in primary health care programmes.

    PubMed Central

    Briend, A.; Bari, A.

    1989-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To see whether change in weight was a more useful index than weight for age in assessing the risk of dying among malnourished children. DESIGN--Prospective cohort study. SETTING--Rural community in Bangladesh being served by international health organisation. PARTICIPANTS--1011 Children aged under 5, of whom 66 died. END POINT--Efficient screening method for identifying malnourished children at risk of dying. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS--Weight was measured every month. Weight for age and monthly change in weight averaged over one and three months were calculated. Sensitivity and specificity curves were used to compare the values of these two variables in identifying children with a high risk of dying. Weight for age was more sensitive than change in weight at all levels of specificity. Changes in weight, however, were independently related to the risk of dying even when intercurrent diseases and low weight for age were taken into account. CONCLUSIONS--For identifying children with a high risk of dying weight for age is a more efficient screening tool than a recent change in weight. Growth monitoring as currently recommended for primary health care programmes in developing countries does not seem to be the most effective approach in identifying children in need of urgent help. PMID:2503147

  3. Prediction of Functional Outcome in Individuals at Clinical High Risk for Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Carrión, Ricardo E.; McLaughlin, Danielle; Goldberg, Terry E.; Auther, Andrea M.; Olsen, Ruth H.; Olvet, Doreen M.; Correll, Christoph U.; Cornblatt, Barbara A.

    2014-01-01

    Importance A major public health concern associated with schizophrenia and psychotic disorders is the long-term disability that involves impaired cognition, lack of social support, and an inability to function independently in the community. A critical goal of early detection and intervention studies in psychosis is therefore to understand the factors leading to this often profound impairment. Objective To develop a predictive model of functional (social and role) outcome in a clinical high-risk sample for psychosis. Design Prospective, naturalistic, longitudinal 3- to 5-year follow-up study. Setting The Recognition and Prevention Program in New York, a research clinic located in the Zucker Hillside Hospital in New York. Participants One hundred one treatment-seeking patients at clinical high risk for psychosis. Ninety-two (91%) were followed up prospectively for a mean (SD) of 3 (1.6) years. Intervention Neurocognitive and clinical assessment. Main Outcomes and Measures The primary outcome variables were social and role functioning at the last follow-up visit. Results Poor social outcome was predicted by reduced processing speed (odds ratio [OR], 1.38; 95% CI, 1.050-1.823; P = .02), impaired social functioning at baseline (OR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.258-2.732; P = .002), and total disorganized symptoms (OR, 5.06; 95% CI, 1.548-16.527; P = .007). Reduced performance on tests for verbal memory (OR, 1.74; 95% CI, 1.169-2.594; P = .006), role functioning at baseline (OR, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.053-1.711; P = .02), and motor disturbances (OR, 1.77; 95% CI, 1.060-2.969; P = .03) predicted role outcome. The areas under the curve for the social and role prediction models were 0.824 (95% CI, 0.736-0.913; P < .001) and 0.77 (95% CI, 0.68-0.87; P < .001), respectively, demonstrating a high discriminative ability. In addition, poor functional outcomes were not entirely dependent on the development of psychosis, because 40.3% and 45.5% of nonconverters at clinical high risk had poor social

  4. The Baby TALK Model: An Innovative Approach to Identifying High-Risk Children and Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villalpando, Aimee Hilado; Leow, Christine; Hornstein, John

    2012-01-01

    This research report examines the Baby TALK model, an innovative early childhood intervention approach used to identify, recruit, and serve young children who are at-risk for developmental delays, mental health needs, and/or school failure, and their families. The report begins with a description of the model. This description is followed by an…

  5. Identifying key parent-reported symptoms for detecting depression in high risk adolescents.

    PubMed

    Thapar, Ajay K; Hood, Kerenza; Collishaw, Stephan; Hammerton, Gemma; Mars, Becky; Sellers, Ruth; Potter, Robert; Craddock, Nick; Thapar, Anita; Rice, Frances

    2016-08-30

    Adolescent offspring of depressed parents are at particularly heightened risk of developing early onset Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) yet are unlikely to access services. We therefore aimed to identify a parsimonious combination of parent-reported symptoms that accurately detected offspring MDD. We used a multi-sample study comprising a development sample of 335 offspring of adults with recurrent MDD assessed on three occasions (mean age 12.4-14.8 years) and an independent validation sub-sample of 807 adolescents from a general population cohort (mean age 13.1 years). Parent ratings of psychiatric symptoms in adolescent offspring were assessed using established questionnaires. The best performing four-item combination of symptoms was identified. Accuracy in detecting concurrent DSM-IV MDD diagnosis, assessed by direct adolescent and parent interviews, was compared to the well-established 13-item short Moods and Feelings Questionnaire (sMFQ) using ROC curve analysis. The combination identified (concentration problems, anhedonia, worrying excessively and feeling unloved) performed equivalently to the sMFQ both in the development dataset and in the validation dataset. We concluded that a combination of four parent-reported mental health items performs equivalently to an established, longer depression questionnaire measure in detecting a diagnosis of adolescent major depressive disorder among offspring of parents with recurrent MDD and needs further evaluation. PMID:27288739

  6. An inexpensive workplace initiative to motivate high-risk individual health improvement.

    PubMed

    Kirchner, Aimee T; Ladd, D Alan; Elshaw, John J; Schlub, James F

    2013-08-01

    Unhealthy lifestyles cost businesses, governmental organizations, and the U.S. military billions of dollars every year, not to mention intangible costs associated with increased mortality. This study implemented a low-cost cognitive-behavioral motivational intervention to effect behavioral change in high-risk civilian employees working for a U.S. military organization, with accompanying improvement in certain health indicators after 120 days compared with a control group. Our analysis of these results led to two conclusions: first, low-cost cognitive-behavioral motivational treatments can improve both behavior and health, and second, tentative results indicate a fully mediated relationship may exist among the cognitive variables of locus of control and self-efficacy, vice the predicted parallel relationship. Overall, we assert that effective implementation of an intervention like the one used in this study might lower the U.S. Air Force's health care bill by as much as $40 million, improve employee efficiency and mission capability, enable healthier lives, and prevent premature death. PMID:23929061

  7. Differential expression of neurogenes among breast cancer subtypes identifies high risk patients

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Nogueira, Patricia; Bragado, Paloma; Almendro, Vanessa; Ametller, Elisabet; Rios, Jose; Choudhury, Sibgat

    2016-01-01

    The nervous system is now recognized to be a relevant component of the tumor microenvironment. Receptors for neuropeptides and neurotransmitters have been identified in breast cancer. However, very little is known about the role of neurogenes in regulating breast cancer progression. Our purpose was to identify neurogenes associated with breast cancer tumorigenesis with a potential to be used as biomarker and/or targets for treatment. We used three databases of human genes: GeneGo, GeneCards and Eugenes to generate a list of 1266 relevant neurogenes. Then we used bioinformatics tools to interrogate two published breast cancer databases SAGE and MicMa (n=96) and generated a list of 7 neurogenes that are differentially express among breast cancer subtypes. The clinical potential was further investigated using the GOBO database (n=1881). We identified 6 neurogenes that are differentially expressed among breast cancer subtypes and whose expression correlates with prognosis. Histamine receptor1 (HRH1), neuropilin2 (NRP2), ephrin-B1 (EFNB1), neural growth factor receptor (NGFR) and amyloid precursor protein (APP) were differentially overexpressed in basal and HER2-enriched tumor samples and syntaxin 1A (STX1A) was overexpressed in HER2-enriched and luminal B tumors. Analysis of HRH1, NRP2, and STX1A expression using the GOBO database showed that their expression significantly correlated with a shorter overall survival (p < 0.0001) and distant metastasis-free survival (p < 0.0001). In contrast, elevated co-expression of NGFR, EFNB1 and APP was associated with longer overall (p < 0.0001) and metastasis-free survival (p < 0.0001). We propose that HRH1, NRP2, and STX1A can be used as prognostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets for basal and HER2-enriched breast cancer subtypes. PMID:26673618

  8. The association between polyunsaturated fatty acid consumption and the transition to psychosis in ultra-high risk individuals.

    PubMed

    Pawełczyk, T; Trafalska, E; Kotlicka-Antczak, M; Pawełczyk, A

    2016-05-01

    PUFA deficiencies in cellular membranes have been observed in ultra-high risk (HR) individuals and in early schizophrenia. It is uncertain whether dietary PUFA consumption can be associated with the risk of transition to psychosis in HR individuals. The aim of the study was to assess PUFA consumption and confirm whether dietary habits are related to the risk of transition to full-threshold psychosis in HR individuals during a 12-month follow-up. PUFA consumption during the previous year was analyzed in 62 h individuals and 33 healthy controls (HC) at the beginning of the follow-up period using a validated Food-Frequency Questionnaire and the Polish Food Composition Tables. Fifteen HR individuals converted into psychosis (C-HR) during the 12-month follow-up. C-HR individuals reported significantly higher consumption of n-6 fatty acids (linoleic acid, LA and arachidonic acid, AA) in comparison with individuals who did not develop psychosis (NC-HR). The C-HR group reported a significantly higher AA/(EPA+DHA) consumption ratio than the NC-HR group. HC reported significantly higher consumption of most n-3 PUFA and lower consumption of all n-6 PUFA than both groups of HR individuals. The results suggest that dietary patterns of PUFA consumption may play a role in the conversion to psychosis of HR individuals. PMID:27154362

  9. Remote Sensing as a Landscape Epidemiologic Tool to Identify Villages at High Risk for Malaria Transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Louisa R.; Rodriquez, Mario H.; Dister, Sheri W.; Rodriquez, Americo D.; Rejmankova, Eliska; Ulloa, Armando; Meza, Rosa A.; Roberts, Donald R.; Paris, Jack F.; Spanner, Michael A.; Washino, Robert K.; Hacker, Carl; Legters, Llewellyn F.

    1994-01-01

    A landscape approach using remote sensing and Geographic Information System (GIS) technologies was developed to discriminate between villages at high and low risk for malaria transmission, as defined by adult Anopheles albimanus abundance. Satellite data for an area in southern Chiapas, Mexico were digitally processed to generate a map of landscape elements. The GIS processes were used to determine the proportion of mapped landscape elements surrounding 40 villages where An. albimanus data had been collected. The relationships between vector abundance and landscape element proportions were investigated using stepwise discriminant analysis and stepwise linear regression. Both analyses indicated that the most important landscape elements in terms of explaining vector abundance were transitional swamp and unmanaged pasture. Discriminant functions generated for these two elements were able to correctly distinguish between villages with high ind low vector abundance, with an overall accuracy of 90%. Regression results found both transitional swamp and unmanaged pasture proportions to be predictive of vector abundance during the mid-to-late wet season. This approach, which integrates remotely sensed data and GIS capabilities to identify villages with high vector-human contact risk, provides a promising tool for malaria surveillance programs that depend on labor-intensive field techniques. This is particularly relevant in areas where the lack of accurate surveillance capabilities may result in no malaria control action when, in fact, directed action is necessary. In general, this landscape approach could be applied to other vector-borne diseases in areas where: 1. the landscape elements critical to vector survival are known and 2. these elements can be detected at remote sensing scales.

  10. Use of multiple sex venues and prevalence of HIV risk behavior: identifying high risk MSM

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Zachary Y.; Pollack, Lance M.; Woods, William J.; Blair, Johnny; Binson, Diane

    2014-01-01

    The National HIV/AIDS Strategy emphasizes the importance of bringing prevention to the most at-risk populations. Interventions targeting all men who have sex with men (MSM) fail in that respect because only a minority engages in behavior that is likely to lead to HIV infection. Previous studies have shown that MSM who seek male sexual partners in more than one venue type (e.g., bathhouse, cruising area, online) are most likely to engage in unprotected anal intercourse (UAI), compared to men who only meet partners in any one of these setting types or who do not use venues. The present study reports differences in prevalence of UAI among MSM by their use of venue sites to meet sexual partners. A probability sample of 459 bathhouse patrons completed exit surveys. In the three months before the current bathhouse visit, 63.5% visited a bathhouse (not including the visit at which they were recruited), 46.7% visited a cruising area, 46.5% used online cruise sites to find sex partners, and 30.9% reported UAI. While UAI was associated with online cruise site use, prevalence of UAI with men met online was relatively low. The odds of UAI among men who used all three venues was significantly higher compared to men using zero [Odds Ratio (OR)=4.4; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.6, 12.1)] one (OR=5.3; 95% CI: 2.2, 12.8) or two venues (OR=4.3; 95% CI: 1.9, 9.6). The findings suggest that prevention would benefit from screening for venue use to help identify men with the greatest behavioral risk. PMID:25245930

  11. Factors contributing to the duration of untreated prodromal positive symptoms in individuals at ultra-high risk for psychosis.

    PubMed

    Chon, Myong-Wuk; Lee, Tae Young; Kim, Sung Nyun; Huh, Min Jung; Park, Hye Youn; Lee, Cho Rong; Shin, Na Young; Kwon, Jun Soo

    2015-03-01

    Individuals at ultra-high risk (UHR) for psychosis experience a considerable delay before appropriate clinical attention is provided. Therefore, we investigated the correlates of this delay by examining clinical, socio-demographic and neuropsychological contributors to the duration of untreated prodromal positive symptoms (DUPP) in them (n=73). The slowly progressive mode of functional decline, defined as a small percentage drop in the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) score within the past year, and male gender, explained a considerable portion of the DUPP in the multivariate regression model (F=9.269, p<0.001). Slower functional decline may be correlated with delayed care during the UHR period.

  12. Contributions of Early Cortical Processing and Reading Ability to Functional Status in Individuals at Clinical High Risk for Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Carrión, Ricardo E.; Cornblatt, Barbara A.; McLaughlin, Danielle; Chang, Jeremy; Auther, Andrea M.; Olsen, Ruth H.; Javitt, Daniel C.

    2015-01-01

    Background There is a growing recognition that individuals at clinical high risk need intervention for functional impairments, along with emerging psychosis, as the majority of clinical high risk (CHR) individuals show persistent deficits in social and role functioning regardless of transition to psychosis. Recent studies have demonstrated reduced reading ability as a potential cause of functional disability in schizophrenia, related to underlying deficits in generation of mismatch negativity (MMN). The present study extends these findings to subjects at CHR. Methods The sample consisted of 34 CHR individuals and 33 healthy comparisons subjects (CNTLs) from the Recognition and Prevention (RAP) Program at the Zucker Hillside Hospital in New York. At baseline, reading measures were collected, along with MMN to pitch, duration, and intensity deviants, and measures of neurocognition, and social and role (academic/work) functioning. Results CHR subjects showed impairments in reading ability, neurocognition, and MMN generation, relative to CNTLs. Lower-amplitude MMN responses were correlated with worse reading ability, slower processing speed, and poorer social and role functioning. However, when entered into a simultaneous regression, only reduced responses to deviance in sound duration and volume predicted poor social and role functioning, respectively. Conclusions Deficits in reading ability exist even prior to illness onset in schizophrenia and may represent a decline in performance from prior abilities. As in schizophrenia, deficits are related to impaired MMN generation, suggesting specific contributions of sensory-level impairment to neurocognitive processes related to social and role function. PMID:25728833

  13. An administrative model for close monitoring and managing high risk individuals.

    PubMed

    Bigelow, D A; Bloom, J D; Williams, M; McFarland, B H

    1999-01-01

    The public expects central government to have immediate knowledge of the condition and circumstances of certain vulnerable or dangerous individuals such as insanity acquittees, and to take action in individual cases to protect the individual and the public. Therefore, such persons conditionally released to community settings require an unusual degree of close monitoring and management. Being immediately aware of the condition and circumstances of its assignees, together with other duties of a board or commission responsible for that monitoring and management, is largely an information management function. The Psychiatric Security Review Board in Oregon is used to illustrate this unique mission, operations, and information management. In this paper, the Psychiatric Security Review Board is described in terms of its core and secondary businesses, together with a model information system that is based on information and information management processes actually employed by the Board.

  14. Computerized and virtual reality cognitive training for individuals at high risk of cognitive decline: systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Coyle, Hannah; Traynor, Victoria; Solowij, Nadia

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of cognitive training, specifically computerized cognitive training (CCT) and virtual reality cognitive training (VRCT), programs for individuals living with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or dementia and therefore at high risk of cognitive decline. After searching a range of academic databases (CINHAL, PSYCinfo, and Web of Science), the studies evaluated (N = 16) were categorized as CCT (N = 10), VRCT (N = 3), and multimodal interventions (N = 3). Effect sizes were calculated, but a meta-analysis was not possible because of the large variability of study design and outcome measures adopted. The cognitive domains of attention, executive function, and memory (visual and verbal) showed the most consistent improvements. The positive effects on psychological outcomes (N = 6) were significant reductions on depressive symptoms (N = 3) and anxiety (N = 2) and improved perceived use of memory strategy (N = 1). Assessments of activities of daily living demonstrated no significant improvements (N = 8). Follow-up studies (N = 5) demonstrated long-term improvements in cognitive and psychological outcomes (N = 3), and the intervention groups showed a plateau effect of cognitive functioning compared with the cognitive decline experienced by control groups (N = 2). CCT and VRCT were moderately effective in long-term improvement of cognition for those at high risk of cognitive decline. Total intervention time did not mediate efficacy. Future research needs to improve study design by including larger samples, longitudinal designs, and a greater range of outcome measures, including functional and quality of life measures, to assess the wider effect of cognitive training on individuals at high risk of cognitive decline.

  15. Identifying Relationships between High-Risk Sexual Behaviors and Screening Positive for Chlamydia and Gonorrhea in School-Wide Screening Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salerno, Jennifer; Darling-Fisher, Cindy; Hawkins, Nicole M.; Fraker, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Background: This article describes a school-wide sexually transmitted infection (STI) screening to identify adolescent high-risk sexual behaviors, STI history/incidence, and presence of chlamydia and gonorrhea, and examines relationships between high-risk behaviors and screening positive for chlamydia and gonorrhea in an alternative high school…

  16. Incorporating Known Genetic Variants Does Not Improve the Accuracy of PSA Testing to Identify High Risk Prostate Cancer on Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Rebecca; Martin, Richard M.; Evans, David M.; Tilling, Kate; Davey Smith, George; Kemp, John P.; Lane, J. Athene; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Neal, David E.; Donovan, Jenny L.; Metcalfe, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing is a widely accepted screening method for prostate cancer, but with low specificity at thresholds giving good sensitivity. Previous research identified four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) principally associated with circulating PSA levels rather than with prostate cancer risk (TERT rs2736098, FGFR2 rs10788160, TBX3 rs11067228, KLK3 rs17632542). Removing the genetic contribution to PSA levels may improve the ability of the remaining biologically-determined variation in PSA to discriminate between high and low risk of progression within men with identified prostate cancer. We investigate whether incorporating information on the PSA-SNPs improves the discrimination achieved by a single PSA threshold in men with raised PSA levels. Materials and Methods Men with PSA between 3-10ng/mL and histologically-confirmed prostate cancer were categorised as high or low risk of progression (Low risk: Gleason score≤6 and stage T1-T2a; High risk: Gleason score 7–10 or stage T2C). We used the combined genetic effect of the four PSA-SNPs to calculate a genetically corrected PSA risk score. We calculated the Area under the Curve (AUC) to determine how well genetically corrected PSA risk scores distinguished men at high risk of progression from low risk men. Results The analysis includes 868 men with prostate cancer (Low risk: 684 (78.8%); High risk: 184 (21.2%)). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves indicate that including the 4 PSA-SNPs does not improve the performance of measured PSA as a screening tool for high/low risk prostate cancer (measured PSA level AU C = 59.5% (95% CI: 54.7,64.2) vs additionally including information from the 4 PSA-SNPs AUC = 59.8% (95% CI: 55.2,64.5) (p-value = 0.40)). Conclusion We demonstrate that genetically correcting PSA for the combined genetic effect of four PSA-SNPs, did not improve discrimination between high and low risk prostate cancer in men with raised PSA levels (3-10ng

  17. Smoking, Methylation at AHRR, and Recidivism Risk in a Community Correction Sample of Individuals at High Risk for Recidivism.

    PubMed

    Gunter, Tracy D; Philibert, Robert A

    2015-10-01

    Individuals supervised by community correction programs have a high rate of tobacco use and high frequency of tobacco dependence. As compared with supervisees without tobacco dependence, probationers and parolees with tobacco dependence were more likely to abuse other substances and report poorer health. In this sample of 374 predominantly felon and repeat offenders, at high risk for recidivism, over 95% of subjects smoked or used other tobacco products, 87% were actively smoking at the time of interview, and 70% met criteria for lifetime tobacco dependence. Seventy-four percent had DNA demethylation, defined as methylation less than 83%, at the aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor (AHRR) residue interrogated by cg0557592 at the time of interview. Seventy-eight percent exhibited four-year recidivism. Demethylation was associated with four-year recidivism in women, but not men. These findings suggest that methylation at cg05575921 serves as a semi-quantitative measure of both recent use and lifetime burden, that community correction populations continue to smoke at high risk, that measurement of methylation may add to the identification of female offenders at risk for recidivism, and that treatments to assist in cessation efforts are desperately needed.

  18. Individuals with a family history of ESRD are a high-risk population for CKD: implications for targeted surveillance and intervention activities.

    PubMed

    McClellan, William M; Satko, Scott G; Gladstone, Elisa; Krisher, Jenna O; Narva, Andrew S; Freedman, Barry I

    2009-03-01

    Activities intended to improve the detection, treatment, and control of chronic kidney disease (CKD) should be incorporated into existing health care systems and targeted to high-risk populations to avoid redundancy and waste of resources. One high-risk population consists of first- or second-degree family members of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), who are 2 to 3 times as likely to have incident ESRD, have high rates of impaired kidney function and undetected and uncontrolled high blood pressure, and are more likely to be obese. These individuals usually are unaware of their underlying CKD and may discount their own risk of ESRD. The ESRD Network 6 Family History Project shows that the ESRD Networks, which constitute a national CKD surveillance system for patients with stage 5 CKD, may be an existing resource that can be used to identify relatives of incident patients with ESRD and provide these families with information about CKD. Nationally available resources have been developed by the National Kidney Disease Education Program for use with these at-risk families. Individuals interested in population-based CKD control activities should be aware of and use these resources. PMID:19231753

  19. South Asian individuals at high risk of type 2 diabetes have lower plasma vitamin C levels than white Europeans.

    PubMed

    Carter, Patrice; Gray, Laura J; Morris, Danielle H; Davies, Melanie J; Khunti, Kamlesh

    2013-01-01

    Individuals of South Asian origin are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes; the relationship between this risk and diet remains to be investigated fully. Furthermore, fruit and vegetable intake remains low throughout the world and previous data suggest that intake is associated with risk of diabetes. The aim of this research study was to compare plasma vitamin C concentrations, measured as a biomarker for fruit and vegetable intake, in South Asian and white European individuals. Participants recruited as part of the Let's Prevent Diabetes Study provided samples for the quantification of plasma vitamin C. We compared vitamin C levels by ethnicity using multiple regression, both unadjusted and adjusted for confounders, including glycaemic status. Mean plasma vitamin C was significantly lower in the South Asian participants compared with white European participants (34.5 (sd 19·8) v. 39·9 (sd 22·1) µmol/l, respectively; P ≤ 0·0001). Significantly fewer South Asian individuals consumed five portions of fruit and vegetables per d, as determined by a plasma vitamin C concentration of ≥ 50 µmol/l (23·2 % (n 58) v. 31·4 % (n 558); P = 0·01). Vitamin C reflects habitual fruit and vegetable consumption; thus results suggest that South Asians have lower fruit and vegetable intake. However, it cannot be excluded that vitamin C is utilised differently. Dietary advice specifically targeting the South Asian population should be developed.

  20. History of childhood physical trauma is related to cognitive decline in individuals with ultra-high risk for psychosis.

    PubMed

    Üçok, Alp; Kaya, Hatice; Uğurpala, Can; Çıkrıkçılı, Uğur; Ergül, Ceylan; Yokuşoğlu, Çağdaş; Bülbül, Öznur; Direk, Nese

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between childhood trauma (CT) and cognitive functioning in individuals with ultra-high risk for psychosis (UHR). Fifty-three individuals at UHR for psychosis were administered a neurocognitive battery that assessed attention, processing speed, verbal learning, memory, working memory, interference inhibition, and sustained attention. The CT was assessed using the short-version Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ). We dichotomized the sample by using cut-off scores for the presence of emotional, physical and sexual trauma, and physical and emotional neglect. Those with a history of physical trauma performed worse on the Digit Span Forward test, Trail making B (time), Stroop test (difference between color and word reading times), and completed categories of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST). Physical trauma scores were correlated with WCST-completed categories, Digit Span Forward and Stroop test scores. Physical neglect scores were negatively correlated with Digit Span Forward Test scores. Most of the significant dose–response relationships between cognitive impairment and different subtypes of CT were found only in men. There was no difference between those with and without other kinds of childhood abuse or neglect in terms of cognitive impairment. Our findings suggest that a history of physical trauma has a negative impact on cognitive function in individuals at UHR for psychosis.

  1. Temperature diagnostic to identify high risk areas and optimize Legionella pneumophila surveillance in hot water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Bédard, Emilie; Fey, Stéphanie; Charron, Dominique; Lalancette, Cindy; Cantin, Philippe; Dolcé, Patrick; Laferrière, Céline; Déziel, Eric; Prévost, Michèle

    2015-03-15

    Legionella pneumophila is frequently detected in hot water distribution systems and thermal control is a common measure implemented by health care facilities. A risk assessment based on water temperature profiling and temperature distribution within the network is proposed, to guide effective monitoring strategies and allow the identification of high risk areas. Temperature and heat loss at control points (water heater, recirculation, representative points-of-use) were monitored in various sections of five health care facilities hot water distribution systems and results used to develop a temperature-based risk assessment tool. Detailed investigations show that defective return valves in faucets can cause widespread temperature losses because of hot and cold water mixing. Systems in which water temperature coming out of the water heaters was kept consistently above 60 °C and maintained above 55 °C across the network were negative for Legionella by culture or qPCR. For systems not meeting these temperature criteria, risk areas for L. pneumophila were identified using temperature profiling and system's characterization; higher risk was confirmed by more frequent microbiological detection by culture and qPCR. Results confirmed that maintaining sufficiently high temperatures within hot water distribution systems suppressed L. pneumophila culturability. However, the risk remains as shown by the persistence of L. pneumophila by qPCR.

  2. Temperature diagnostic to identify high risk areas and optimize Legionella pneumophila surveillance in hot water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Bédard, Emilie; Fey, Stéphanie; Charron, Dominique; Lalancette, Cindy; Cantin, Philippe; Dolcé, Patrick; Laferrière, Céline; Déziel, Eric; Prévost, Michèle

    2015-03-15

    Legionella pneumophila is frequently detected in hot water distribution systems and thermal control is a common measure implemented by health care facilities. A risk assessment based on water temperature profiling and temperature distribution within the network is proposed, to guide effective monitoring strategies and allow the identification of high risk areas. Temperature and heat loss at control points (water heater, recirculation, representative points-of-use) were monitored in various sections of five health care facilities hot water distribution systems and results used to develop a temperature-based risk assessment tool. Detailed investigations show that defective return valves in faucets can cause widespread temperature losses because of hot and cold water mixing. Systems in which water temperature coming out of the water heaters was kept consistently above 60 °C and maintained above 55 °C across the network were negative for Legionella by culture or qPCR. For systems not meeting these temperature criteria, risk areas for L. pneumophila were identified using temperature profiling and system's characterization; higher risk was confirmed by more frequent microbiological detection by culture and qPCR. Results confirmed that maintaining sufficiently high temperatures within hot water distribution systems suppressed L. pneumophila culturability. However, the risk remains as shown by the persistence of L. pneumophila by qPCR. PMID:25622002

  3. The relationship between default mode network connectivity and social functioning in individuals at familial high-risk for schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Dodell-Feder, David; DeLisi, Lynn E.; Hooker, Christine I.

    2014-01-01

    Unaffected first-degree relatives of individuals with schizophrenia (i.e., those at familial high-risk [FHR]), demonstrate social dysfunction qualitatively similar though less severe than that of their affected relatives. These social difficulties may be the consequence of genetically conferred disruption to aspects of the default mode network (DMN), such as the dMPFC subsystem, which overlaps with the network of brain regions recruited during social cognitive processes. In the present study, we investigate this possibility, testing DMN connectivity and its relationship to social functioning in FHR using resting-state fMRI. Twenty FHR individuals and 17 controls underwent fMRI during a resting-state scan. Hypothesis-driven functional connectivity analyses examined ROI-to-ROI correlations between the DMN’s hubs, and regions of the dMPFC subsystem and MTL subsystem. Connectivity values were examined in relationship to a measure of social functioning and empathy/perspective-taking. Results demonstrate that FHR exhibit reduced connectivity specifically within the dMPFC subsystem of the DMN. Certain ROI-to-ROI correlations predicted aspects of social functioning and empathy/perspective-taking across all participants. Together, the data indicate that disruption to the dMPFC subsystem of the DMN may be associated with familial risk for schizophrenia, and that these intrinsic connections may carry measurable consequences for social functioning. PMID:24768131

  4. The relationship between default mode network connectivity and social functioning in individuals at familial high-risk for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Dodell-Feder, David; Delisi, Lynn E; Hooker, Christine I

    2014-06-01

    Unaffected first-degree relatives of individuals with schizophrenia (i.e., those at familial high-risk [FHR]), demonstrate social dysfunction qualitatively similar though less severe than that of their affected relatives. These social difficulties may be the consequence of genetically conferred disruption to aspects of the default mode network (DMN), such as the dMPFC subsystem, which overlaps with the network of brain regions recruited during social cognitive processes. In the present study, we investigate this possibility, testing DMN connectivity and its relationship to social functioning in FHR using resting-state fMRI. Twenty FHR individuals and 17 controls underwent fMRI during a resting-state scan. Hypothesis-driven functional connectivity analyses examined ROI-to-ROI correlations between the DMN's hubs, and regions of the dMPFC subsystem and MTL subsystem. Connectivity values were examined in relationship to a measure of social functioning and empathy/perspective-taking. Results demonstrate that FHR exhibit reduced connectivity specifically within the dMPFC subsystem of the DMN. Certain ROI-to-ROI correlations predicted aspects of social functioning and empathy/perspective-taking across all participants. Together, the data indicate that disruption to the dMPFC subsystem of the DMN may be associated with familial risk for schizophrenia, and that these intrinsic connections may carry measurable consequences for social functioning.

  5. Breast Density and Benign Breast Disease: Risk Assessment to Identify Women at High Risk of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tice, Jeffrey A.; Miglioretti, Diana L.; Li, Chin-Shang; Vachon, Celine M.; Gard, Charlotte C.; Kerlikowske, Karla

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Women with proliferative breast lesions are candidates for primary prevention, but few risk models incorporate benign findings to assess breast cancer risk. We incorporated benign breast disease (BBD) diagnoses into the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC) risk model, the only breast cancer risk assessment tool that uses breast density. Methods We developed and validated a competing-risk model using 2000 to 2010 SEER data for breast cancer incidence and 2010 vital statistics to adjust for the competing risk of death. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate the relative hazards for age, race/ethnicity, family history of breast cancer, history of breast biopsy, BBD diagnoses, and breast density in the BCSC. Results We included 1,135,977 women age 35 to 74 years undergoing mammography with no history of breast cancer; 17% of the women had a prior breast biopsy. During a mean follow-up of 6.9 years, 17,908 women were diagnosed with invasive breast cancer. The BCSC BBD model slightly overpredicted risk (expected-to-observed ratio, 1.04; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.06) and had modest discriminatory accuracy (area under the receiver operator characteristic curve, 0.665). Among women with proliferative findings, adding BBD to the model increased the proportion of women with an estimated 5-year risk of 3% or higher from 9.3% to 27.8% (P < .001). Conclusion The BCSC BBD model accurately estimates women's risk for breast cancer using breast density and BBD diagnoses. Greater numbers of high-risk women eligible for primary prevention after BBD diagnosis are identified using the BCSC BBD model. PMID:26282663

  6. Altered depth of the olfactory sulcus in ultra high-risk individuals and patients with psychotic disorders.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Tsutomu; Wood, Stephen J; Yung, Alison R; Nelson, Barnaby; Lin, Ashleigh; Yücel, Murat; Phillips, Lisa J; Nakamura, Yumiko; Suzuki, Michio; Brewer, Warrick J; Proffitt, Tina M; McGorry, Patrick D; Velakoulis, Dennis; Pantelis, Christos

    2014-03-01

    A shallow olfactory sulcus has been reported in schizophrenia, possibly reflecting abnormal forebrain development during early gestation. However, it remains unclear whether this anomaly exists prior to the onset of psychosis and/or differs according to illness stage. In the current study, magnetic resonance imaging was used to investigate the length and depth of the olfactory sulcus in 135 ultra high-risk (UHR) individuals [of whom 52 later developed psychosis (UHR-P) and 83 did not (UHR-NP)], 162 patients with first-episode psychosis (FEP), 89 patients with chronic schizophrenia, and 87 healthy controls. While there was no group difference in the length of the sulcus, UHR-P subjects had significantly shallower olfactory sulcus at baseline as compared with UHR-NP and control subjects. The depth of this sulcus became increasingly more superficial as one moved from UHR-P subjects to FEP patients to chronic schizophrenia patients. Finally, the depth of the olfactory sulcus in the UHR-P subjects was negatively correlated with the severity of negative symptoms. These findings suggest that the altered depth of the olfactory sulcus, which exists before psychosis onset, could be predictive of transition to psychosis, but also suggest ongoing changes of the sulcus morphology during the course of the illness.

  7. Neural disruption to theory of mind predicts daily social functioning in individuals at familial high-risk for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Dodell-Feder, David; DeLisi, Lynn E; Hooker, Christine I

    2014-12-01

    Theory-of-mind (ToM) ability is foundational for successful social relationships, and dependent on a neurocognitive system, which includes temporoparietal junction and medial prefrontal cortex. Schizophrenia is associated with ToM impairments, and initial studies demonstrate similar, though more subtle deficits, in unaffected first-degree relatives, indicating that ToM deficits are a potential biomarker for the disorder. Importantly, the social consequences of ToM deficits could create an additional vulnerability factor for individuals at familial high risk (FHR). However, behavioral studies of ToM are inconsistent and virtually nothing is known about the neural basis of ToM in FHR or the relationship between ToM and social functioning. Here, FHR and non-FHR control participants underwent functional MRI scanning while reasoning about a story character's thoughts, emotions or physical appearance. Afterwards, participants completed a 28-day online 'daily-diary' questionnaire in which they reported daily social interactions and degree of ToM reasoning. FHR participants demonstrated less neural activity in bilateral temporoparietal junction when reasoning about thoughts and emotions. Moreover, across all participants, the degree of neural activity during ToM reasoning predicted several aspects of daily social behavior. Results suggest that vulnerability for schizophrenia is associated with neurocognitive deficits in ToM and the degree of deficit is related to day-to-day social functioning.

  8. Neural disruption to theory of mind predicts daily social functioning in individuals at familial high-risk for schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Dodell-Feder, David; DeLisi, Lynn E.

    2014-01-01

    Theory-of-mind (ToM) ability is foundational for successful social relationships, and dependent on a neurocognitive system, which includes temporoparietal junction and medial prefrontal cortex. Schizophrenia is associated with ToM impairments, and initial studies demonstrate similar, though more subtle deficits, in unaffected first-degree relatives, indicating that ToM deficits are a potential biomarker for the disorder. Importantly, the social consequences of ToM deficits could create an additional vulnerability factor for individuals at familial high risk (FHR). However, behavioral studies of ToM are inconsistent and virtually nothing is known about the neural basis of ToM in FHR or the relationship between ToM and social functioning. Here, FHR and non-FHR control participants underwent functional MRI scanning while reasoning about a story character’s thoughts, emotions or physical appearance. Afterwards, participants completed a 28-day online ‘daily-diary’ questionnaire in which they reported daily social interactions and degree of ToM reasoning. FHR participants demonstrated less neural activity in bilateral temporoparietal junction when reasoning about thoughts and emotions. Moreover, across all participants, the degree of neural activity during ToM reasoning predicted several aspects of daily social behavior. Results suggest that vulnerability for schizophrenia is associated with neurocognitive deficits in ToM and the degree of deficit is related to day-to-day social functioning. PMID:24396009

  9. Frontal delta power associated with negative symptoms in ultra-high risk individuals who transitioned to psychosis.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, Suzie; Schäfer, Miriam R; Whitford, Thomas J; Benninger, Franz; Feucht, Martha; Klier, Claudia M; Yuen, Hok Pan; Pantelis, Christos; McGorry, Patrick D; Amminger, G Paul

    2012-07-01

    It has recently been shown that treatment with long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) could decrease the rate of transition to psychosis, and improve psychiatric symptoms and global functioning in people at ultra-high risk (UHR) for psychosis. Previous studies have suggested that resting state brain activity measured with electroencephalography (EEG) may represent an objective biomarker of changes in neural function associated with supplementation with omega-3 PUFAs. It has also been proposed that although resting state EEG cannot, by itself, predict transition to psychosis in UHR individuals, the combination of resting state EEG with negative symptoms may be a valid predictor of transition. The present study investigated whether treatment with omega-3 PUFAs influenced resting state EEG in UHR participants, and whether or not the association of the participants' resting state EEG with their levels of negative symptoms was dependent on their transition status. The brain activity of 73 UHR participants was recorded in the context of a randomized, placebo-controlled trial of the effects of supplementation with omega-3 PUFAs. The UHR participants who subsequently transitioned to psychosis (UHR+) did not differ from those who did not transition (UHR-) in terms of resting state EEG power in any frequency band. However, negative symptom scores were associated with increased delta activity in the frontal region of the UHR+ participants, but not in the UHR- participants. Treatment with omega-3 PUFAs did not induce changes in resting state EEG in either group. The results suggest that decreased frontal delta activity, in combination with high levels of negative symptoms, may be a risk factor for subsequent transition to psychosis in UHR individuals.

  10. Emotion recognition deficits as predictors of transition in individuals at clinical high risk for schizophrenia: a neurodevelopmental perspective

    PubMed Central

    Corcoran, C. M.; Keilp, J. G.; Kayser, J.; Klim, C.; Butler, P. D.; Bruder, G. E.; Gur, R. C.; Javitt, D. C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Schizophrenia is characterized by profound and disabling deficits in the ability to recognize emotion in facial expression and tone of voice. Although these deficits are well documented in established schizophrenia using recently validated tasks, their predictive utility in at-risk populations has not been formally evaluated. Method The Penn Emotion Recognition and Discrimination tasks, and recently developed measures of auditory emotion recognition, were administered to 49 clinical high-risk subjects prospectively followed for 2 years for schizophrenia outcome, and 31 healthy controls, and a developmental cohort of 43 individuals aged 7–26 years. Deficit in emotion recognition in at-risk subjects was compared with deficit in established schizophrenia, and with normal neurocognitive growth curves from childhood to early adulthood. Results Deficits in emotion recognition significantly distinguished at-risk patients who transitioned to schizophrenia. By contrast, more general neurocognitive measures, such as attention vigilance or processing speed, were non-predictive. The best classification model for schizophrenia onset included both face emotion processing and negative symptoms, with accuracy of 96%, and area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve of 0.99. In a parallel developmental study, emotion recognition abilities were found to reach maturity prior to traditional age of risk for schizophrenia, suggesting they may serve as objective markers of early developmental insult. Conclusions Profound deficits in emotion recognition exist in at-risk patients prior to schizophrenia onset. They may serve as an index of early developmental insult, and represent an effective target for early identification and remediation. Future studies investigating emotion recognition deficits at both mechanistic and predictive levels are strongly encouraged. PMID:26040537

  11. An investigation of the factors effecting high-risk individuals' decision-making about prophylactic total gastrectomy and surveillance for hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC).

    PubMed

    Hallowell, Nina; Badger, Shirlene; Richardson, Sue; Caldas, Carlos; Hardwick, Richard H; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C; Lawton, Julia

    2016-10-01

    Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer has an early onset and poor prognosis, therefore, individuals who carry a pathogenic (CDH1) mutation in the E-cadherin gene (CDH1) are offered endoscopic surveillance and advised to undergo prophylactic total gastrectomy (PTG) in their early to mid-twenties. Patients not ready or fit to undergo gastrectomy, or in whom the genetic testing result is unknown or ambiguous, are offered surveillance. Little is known about the factors that influence decisions to undergo or decline PTG, making it difficult to provide optimal support for those facing these decisions. Qualitative interviews were carried out with 35 high-risk individuals from the Familial Gastric Cancer Study in the UK. Twenty-seven had previously undergone PTG and eight had been identified as carrying a pathogenic CDH1 mutation but had declined surgery at the time of interview. The interviews explored the experience of decision-making and factors influencing risk-management decisions. The data suggest that decisions to proceed with PTG are influenced by a number of potentially competing factors: objective risk confirmation by genetic testing and/or receiving a positive biopsy; perceived familial cancer burden and associated risk perceptions; perceptions of post-surgical life; an increasing inability to tolerate endoscopic procedures; a concern that surveillance could miss a cancer developing and individual's life stage. These findings have implications for advising this patient group. PMID:27256430

  12. An investigation of the factors effecting high-risk individuals' decision-making about prophylactic total gastrectomy and surveillance for hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC).

    PubMed

    Hallowell, Nina; Badger, Shirlene; Richardson, Sue; Caldas, Carlos; Hardwick, Richard H; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C; Lawton, Julia

    2016-10-01

    Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer has an early onset and poor prognosis, therefore, individuals who carry a pathogenic (CDH1) mutation in the E-cadherin gene (CDH1) are offered endoscopic surveillance and advised to undergo prophylactic total gastrectomy (PTG) in their early to mid-twenties. Patients not ready or fit to undergo gastrectomy, or in whom the genetic testing result is unknown or ambiguous, are offered surveillance. Little is known about the factors that influence decisions to undergo or decline PTG, making it difficult to provide optimal support for those facing these decisions. Qualitative interviews were carried out with 35 high-risk individuals from the Familial Gastric Cancer Study in the UK. Twenty-seven had previously undergone PTG and eight had been identified as carrying a pathogenic CDH1 mutation but had declined surgery at the time of interview. The interviews explored the experience of decision-making and factors influencing risk-management decisions. The data suggest that decisions to proceed with PTG are influenced by a number of potentially competing factors: objective risk confirmation by genetic testing and/or receiving a positive biopsy; perceived familial cancer burden and associated risk perceptions; perceptions of post-surgical life; an increasing inability to tolerate endoscopic procedures; a concern that surveillance could miss a cancer developing and individual's life stage. These findings have implications for advising this patient group.

  13. Soundwalk approach to identify urban soundscapes individually.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jin Yong; Hong, Joo Young; Lee, Pyoung Jik

    2013-07-01

    This study proposes a soundwalk procedure for evaluating urban soundscapes. Previous studies, which adopted soundwalk methodologies for investigating participants' responses to visual and acoustic environments, were analyzed considering type, evaluation position, measurement, and subjective assessment. An individual soundwalk procedure was then developed based on asking individual subjects to walk and select evaluation positions where they perceived any positive or negative characteristics of the urban soundscape. A case study was performed in urban spaces and the results were compared with those of the group soundwalk to validate the individual soundwalk procedure. Thirty subjects (15 architects and 15 acousticians) participated in the soundwalk. During the soundwalk, the subjects selected a total of 196 positions, and those were classified into 4 groups. It was found that soundscape perceptions were dominated by acoustic comfort, visual images, and openness. It was also revealed that perceived elements of the acoustic environment and visual image differed across classified soundscape groups, and there was a difference between architects and acousticians in terms of how they described their impressions of the soundscape elements. The results show that the individual soundwalk procedure has advantages for measuring diverse subjective responses and for obtaining the perceived elements of the urban soundscape.

  14. Identifying Individual Differences: A Cognitive Styles Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Perry R.; Conti, Gary J.

    2012-01-01

    Although One-Stop Career Centers are mandated to promote client-centered services, patrons are ordinarily funneled through a standard procedure. Adult education principles suggest that these centers should be learner-centered and address individual differences. Therefore, the purpose of the this study was to describe the interaction of the…

  15. Identifying High-Risk Populations of Tuberculosis Using Environmental Factors and GIS Based Multi-Criteria Decision Making Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasam, A. R. Abdul; Shariff, N. M.; Dony, J. F.

    2016-09-01

    Development of an innovative method to enhance the detection of tuberculosis (TB) in Malaysia is the latest agenda of the Ministry of Health. Therefore, a geographical information system (GIS) based index model is proposed as an alternative method for defining potential high-risk areas of local TB cases at Section U19, Shah Alam. It is adopted a spatial multi-criteria decision making (MCDM) method for ranking environmental risk factors of the disease in a standardised five-score scale. Scale 1 and 5 illustrate the lowest and the highest risk of the TB spread respectively, while scale from 3 to 5 is included as a potential risk level. These standardised scale values are then combined with expert normalised weights (0 to 1) to calculate the overall index values and produce a TB ranked map using a GIS overlay analysis and weighted linear combination. It is discovered that 71.43% of the Section is potential as TB high risk areas particularly at urban and densely populated settings. This predictive result is also reliable with the current real cases in 2015 by 76.00% accuracy. A GIS based MCDM method has demonstrated analytical capabilities in targeting high-risk spots and TB surveillance monitoring system of the country, but the result could be strengthened by applying other uncertainty assessment method.

  16. Spotting Cheetahs: Identifying Individuals by Their Footprints

    PubMed Central

    Jewell, Zoe C.; Alibhai, Sky K.; Weise, Florian; Munro, Stuart; Van Vuuren, Marlice; Van Vuuren, Rudie

    2016-01-01

    The cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) is Africa's most endangered large felid and listed as Vulnerable with a declining population trend by the IUCN1. It ranges widely over sub-Saharan Africa and in parts of the Middle East. Cheetah conservationists face two major challenges, conflict with landowners over the killing of domestic livestock, and concern over range contraction. Understanding of the latter remains particularly poor2. Namibia is believed to support the largest number of cheetahs of any range country, around 30%, but estimates range from 2,9053 to 13,5204. The disparity is likely a result of the different techniques used in monitoring. Current techniques, including invasive tagging with VHF or satellite/GPS collars, can be costly and unreliable. The footprint identification technique5 is a new tool accessible to both field scientists and also citizens with smartphones, who could potentially augment data collection. The footprint identification technique analyzes digital images of footprints captured according to a standardized protocol. Images are optimized and measured in data visualization software. Measurements of distances, angles, and areas of the footprint images are analyzed using a robust cross-validated pairwise discriminant analysis based on a customized model. The final output is in the form of a Ward's cluster dendrogram. A user-friendly graphic user interface (GUI) allows the user immediate access and clear interpretation of classification results. The footprint identification technique algorithms are species specific because each species has a unique anatomy. The technique runs in a data visualization software, using its own scripting language (jsl) that can be customized for the footprint anatomy of any species. An initial classification algorithm is built from a training database of footprints from that species, collected from individuals of known identity. An algorithm derived from a cheetah of known identity is then able to classify free

  17. Spotting Cheetahs: Identifying Individuals by Their Footprints.

    PubMed

    Jewell, Zoe C; Alibhai, Sky K; Weise, Florian; Munro, Stuart; Van Vuuren, Marlice; Van Vuuren, Rudie

    2016-05-01

    The cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) is Africa's most endangered large felid and listed as Vulnerable with a declining population trend by the IUCN(1). It ranges widely over sub-Saharan Africa and in parts of the Middle East. Cheetah conservationists face two major challenges, conflict with landowners over the killing of domestic livestock, and concern over range contraction. Understanding of the latter remains particularly poor(2). Namibia is believed to support the largest number of cheetahs of any range country, around 30%, but estimates range from 2,905(3) to 13,520(4). The disparity is likely a result of the different techniques used in monitoring. Current techniques, including invasive tagging with VHF or satellite/GPS collars, can be costly and unreliable. The footprint identification technique(5) is a new tool accessible to both field scientists and also citizens with smartphones, who could potentially augment data collection. The footprint identification technique analyzes digital images of footprints captured according to a standardized protocol. Images are optimized and measured in data visualization software. Measurements of distances, angles, and areas of the footprint images are analyzed using a robust cross-validated pairwise discriminant analysis based on a customized model. The final output is in the form of a Ward's cluster dendrogram. A user-friendly graphic user interface (GUI) allows the user immediate access and clear interpretation of classification results. The footprint identification technique algorithms are species specific because each species has a unique anatomy. The technique runs in a data visualization software, using its own scripting language (jsl) that can be customized for the footprint anatomy of any species. An initial classification algorithm is built from a training database of footprints from that species, collected from individuals of known identity. An algorithm derived from a cheetah of known identity is then able to classify

  18. [The First Step Aiming at the Prevention of Hypertension and Atherosclerosis. Identification of Individuals at High Risk of Hypertension].

    PubMed

    Dohi, Yasuaki

    2015-11-01

    Hypertension is an established risk factor of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Although antihypertensive treatment reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease, it is impossible to identify all hypertensive subjects among the general population and to manage them in medical facilities considering the huge number of people with hypertension. Furthermore, more than half of cardiovascular events occur in individuals with mild hypertension or in those with a lower blood pressure. In this context, primary prevention of hypertension is an important public health problem. We investigated predictive values of several possible risk factors of hypertension in a general normotensive population. Normotensive subjects who visited our hospital for a physical checkup were enrolled and followed up for 4-5 years, with the endpoint being the development of hypertension. Each factor of metabolic syndrome was closely associated with the future onset of hypertension in subjects without hypertension, and the risk of hypertension markedly increased with overlapping metabolic disorders in individuals. Similarly, serum uric acid, the glomerular filtration rate, urinary albumin (even within the normal range), and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity were independent risk factors of hypertension. These factors were also independent determinants of a future increase in the systolic blood pressure. An intensive targeted strategy focused on identified individuals at highest risk of developing hypertension is an attractive approach for the primary prevention of hypertension. [Review]. PMID:26995876

  19. Impact of psychiatric comorbidity in individuals at Ultra High Risk of psychosis - Findings from the Longitudinal Youth at Risk Study (LYRIKS).

    PubMed

    Lim, Jeanette; Rekhi, Gurpreet; Rapisarda, Attilio; Lam, Max; Kraus, Michael; Keefe, Richard S E; Lee, Jimmy

    2015-05-01

    Recent studies have reported a high prevalence of psychiatric comorbidities in Ultra High Risk (UHR) for psychosis populations. This study examined the prevalence of comorbidity and its impact on symptoms, functioning, cognition and transition to psychosis in the Longitudinal Youth at Risk Study (LYRIKS) sample. The Comprehensive Assessment of At-Risk Mental State (CAARMS) was used to identify UHR individuals and 163 participants were included in the study. Comorbid disorders were identified using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR Axis I Disorders. Participants were evaluated on the CAARMS, Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia, Beck Anxiety Inventory, Global Assessment of Functioning and Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia. Clinical, functioning and cognitive characteristics by lifetime and current comorbidity groups were compared using multivariate tests. Independent predictors of comorbidity were identified through logistic regression. Chi-squared tests were used to compare comorbidity rates between those who had developed psychosis at one year and those who had not. We found that 131 UHR participants (80.4%) had a lifetime comorbidity while 82 (50.3%) had a current comorbidity with depressive disorders being the most common. UHR individuals with comorbidity had more severe symptoms, higher distress and lower functioning with no differences in general cognition. Lower functioning was associated with current comorbidity. Eleven participants (6.7%) had developed psychosis after one year and there were no differences in the comorbidity rates between those who developed psychosis and those who did not. Psychiatric comorbidities in the UHR group are associated with adverse clinical outcomes and warrant closer attention. PMID:25818728

  20. A Focus Group Exploration of Automated Case-Finders to Identify High-Risk Heart Failure Patients Within an Urban Safety Net Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Mark E.; Miranda, Derick; Schuman, Greg; Eaton, Christopher; Smith, Andrew; Silver, Brad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Leveraging “big data” as a means of informing cost-effective care holds potential in triaging high-risk heart failure (HF) patients for interventions within hospitals seeking to reduce 30-day readmissions. Objective: Explore provider’s beliefs and perceptions about using an electronic health record (EHR)-based tool that uses unstructured clinical notes to risk-stratify high-risk heart failure patients. Methods: Six providers from an inpatient HF clinic within an urban safety net hospital were recruited to participate in a semistructured focus group. A facilitator led a discussion on the feasibility and value of using an EHR tool driven by unstructured clinical notes to help identify high-risk patients. Data collected from transcripts were analyzed using a thematic analysis that facilitated drawing conclusions clustered around categories and themes. Results: From six categories emerged two themes: (1) challenges of finding valid and accurate results, and (2) strategies used to overcome these challenges. Although employing a tool that uses electronic medical record (EMR) unstructured text as the benchmark by which to identify high-risk patients is efficient, choosing appropriate benchmark groups could be challenging given the multiple causes of readmission. Strategies to mitigate these challenges include establishing clear selection criteria to guide benchmark group composition, and quality outcome goals for the hospital. Conclusion: Prior to implementing into practice an innovative EMR-based case-finder driven by unstructured clinical notes, providers are advised to do the following: (1) define patient quality outcome goals, (2) establish criteria by which to guide benchmark selection, and (3) verify the tool’s validity and reliability. Achieving consensus on these issues would be necessary for this innovative EHR-based tool to effectively improve clinical decision-making and in turn, decrease readmissions for high-risk patients. PMID:27683666

  1. A Focus Group Exploration of Automated Case-Finders to Identify High-Risk Heart Failure Patients Within an Urban Safety Net Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Mark E.; Miranda, Derick; Schuman, Greg; Eaton, Christopher; Smith, Andrew; Silver, Brad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Leveraging “big data” as a means of informing cost-effective care holds potential in triaging high-risk heart failure (HF) patients for interventions within hospitals seeking to reduce 30-day readmissions. Objective: Explore provider’s beliefs and perceptions about using an electronic health record (EHR)-based tool that uses unstructured clinical notes to risk-stratify high-risk heart failure patients. Methods: Six providers from an inpatient HF clinic within an urban safety net hospital were recruited to participate in a semistructured focus group. A facilitator led a discussion on the feasibility and value of using an EHR tool driven by unstructured clinical notes to help identify high-risk patients. Data collected from transcripts were analyzed using a thematic analysis that facilitated drawing conclusions clustered around categories and themes. Results: From six categories emerged two themes: (1) challenges of finding valid and accurate results, and (2) strategies used to overcome these challenges. Although employing a tool that uses electronic medical record (EMR) unstructured text as the benchmark by which to identify high-risk patients is efficient, choosing appropriate benchmark groups could be challenging given the multiple causes of readmission. Strategies to mitigate these challenges include establishing clear selection criteria to guide benchmark group composition, and quality outcome goals for the hospital. Conclusion: Prior to implementing into practice an innovative EMR-based case-finder driven by unstructured clinical notes, providers are advised to do the following: (1) define patient quality outcome goals, (2) establish criteria by which to guide benchmark selection, and (3) verify the tool’s validity and reliability. Achieving consensus on these issues would be necessary for this innovative EHR-based tool to effectively improve clinical decision-making and in turn, decrease readmissions for high-risk patients.

  2. Voxel-Based Morphometry in Individuals at Genetic High Risk for Schizophrenia and Patients with Schizophrenia during Their First Episode of Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Chuan; Zhou, Qian; Wei, Shengnan; Jiang, Xiaowei; Geng, Haiyang; Zhou, Yifang; Tang, Yanqing; Wang, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Background Understanding morphologic changes in vulnerable and early disease state of schizophrenia (SZ) may provide further insight into the development of psychosis. Method Whole brain voxel-based morphometry was performed to identify gray matter (GM) regional differences in 60 individuals with SZ during their first psychotic episode (FE-SZ), 31 individuals at genetic high risk for SZ (GHR-SZ) individuals, and 71 healthy controls. Results Significant differences were found in several regions including the prefrontal cortex, parietal lobe, temporal lobe, hippocampus, occipital lobe, and cerebellum among the three groups (p<0.05, corrected). Compared to the HC group, the FE-SZ group had significantly decreased GM volumes in several regions including the cerebellum, hippocampus, fusiform gyrus, lingual gyrus, supramarginal gyrus, and superior, middle, and inferior temporal gyri and significantly increased GM volumes in the middle frontal gyrus and inferior operculum frontal gyrus (p<0.05). The GHR-SZ group had significant decreases in GM volumes in the supramaginal gyrus, precentral gyrus, and rolandic operculum and significant increases in GM volumes in the cerebellum, fusiform gyrus, middle frontal gyrus, inferior operculum frontal gyrus, and superior, middle, and inferior temporal gyri when compared to the HC group (p<0.05). Compared to the GHR-SZ group, the FE-SZ group had significant decreases in GM volumes in several regions including the cerebellum, fusiform gyrus, supramarginal gyrus, and superior, middle, and inferior temporal gyri (p<0.05). Conclusions The findings herein implicate the involvement of multisensory integration in SZ development and pathophysiology. Additionally, the patterns of observed differences suggest possible indicators of disease, vulnerability, and resiliency in SZ. PMID:27723806

  3. A Prospective Cohort Study of Absconsion Incidents in Forensic Psychiatric Settings: Can We Identify Those at High-Risk?

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, Alexis E.; Jewell, Amelia; Tully, John; Coghlan, Suzanne; Dean, Kimberlie; Fahy, Tom

    2015-01-01

    inpatient verbal aggression and substance use, are strong predictors of absconsion in forensic settings; the absence of these factors may enable clinical teams to identify unnecessarily restricted low-risk individuals. PMID:26401653

  4. 3′UTR shortening identifies high-risk cancers with targeted dysregulation of the ceRNA network

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Wang, Duolin; Xue, Mengzhu; Mi, Xianqiang; Liang, Yanchun; Wang, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA) interactions form a multilayered network that regulates gene expression in various biological pathways. Recent studies have demonstrated novel roles of ceRNA interactions in tumorigenesis, but the dynamics of the ceRNA network in cancer remain unexplored. Here, we examine ceRNA network dynamics in prostate cancer from the perspective of alternative cleavage and polyadenylation (APA) and reveal the principles of such changes. Analysis of exon array data revealed that both shortened and lengthened 3′UTRs are abundant. Consensus clustering with APA data stratified cancers into groups with differing risks of biochemical relapse and revealed that a ceRNA subnetwork enriched with cancer genes was specifically dysregulated in high-risk cancers. The novel connection between 3′UTR shortening and ceRNA network dysregulation was supported by the unusually high number of microRNA response elements (MREs) shared by the dysregulated ceRNA interactions and the significantly altered 3′UTRs. The dysregulation followed a fundamental principle in that ceRNA interactions connecting genes that show opposite trends in expression change are preferentially dysregulated. This targeted dysregulation is responsible for the majority of the observed expression changes in genes with significant ceRNA dysregulation and represents a novel mechanism underlying aberrant oncogenic expression. PMID:24953077

  5. Molecular response assessment by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction after induction therapy in NPM1-mutated patients identifies those at high risk of relapse

    PubMed Central

    Hubmann, Max; Köhnke, Thomas; Hoster, Eva; Schneider, Stephanie; Dufour, Annika; Zellmeier, Evelyn; Fiegl, Michael; Braess, Jan; Bohlander, Stefan K.; Subklewe, Marion; Sauerland, Maria-Cristina; Berdel, Wolfgang E.; Büchner, Thomas; Wörmann, Bernhard; Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Spiekermann, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring minimal residual disease is an important way to identify patients with acute myeloid leukemia at high risk of relapse. In this study we investigated the prognostic potential of minimal residual disease monitoring by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of NPM1 mutations in patients treated in the AMLCG 1999, 2004 and 2008 trials. Minimal residual disease was monitored - in aplasia, after induction therapy, after consolidation therapy, and during follow-up - in 588 samples from 158 patients positive for NPM1 mutations A, B and D (with a sensitivity of 10−6). One hundred and twenty-seven patients (80.4%) achieved complete remission after induction therapy and, of these, 56 patients (44.1%) relapsed. At each checkpoint, minimal residual disease cut-offs were calculated. After induction therapy a cut-off NPM1 mutation ratio of 0.01 was associated with a high hazard ratio of 4.26 and the highest sensitivity of 76% for the prediction of relapse. This was reflected in a cumulative incidence of relapse after 2 years of 77.8% for patients with ratios above the cut-off versus 26.4% for those with ratios below the cut-off. In the favorable subgroup according to European LeukemiaNet, the cut-off after induction therapy also separated the cohort into two prognostic groups with a cumulative incidence of relapse of 76% versus 6% after 2 years. Our data demonstrate that in addition to pre-therapeutic factors, the course of minimal residual disease in an individual is an important prognostic factor and could be included in clinical trials for the guidance of post-remission therapy. The trials from which data were obtained were registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov (#NCT01382147, #NCT00266136) and at the European Leukemia Trial Registry (#LN_AMLINT2004_230). PMID:24816240

  6. Climatic mapping to identify high-risk areas for Cylindrocladium quinqueseptatum leaf blight on eucalypts in mainland South East Asia and around the world.

    PubMed

    Booth, T H; Jovanovic, T; Old, K M; Dudzinski, M J

    2000-06-01

    Cylindrocladium quinqueseptatum is a pathogen on a wide range of hosts. It affects at least 20 species of eucalypts and is an important causal agent of leaf blight of Eucalyptus camaldulensis in central and southern Vietnam. Results from previous studies and observations of broadscale infection patterns in mainland South East Asia were used to derive simple rules (i.e. mean minimum temperature of coldest month > or =16 degrees C and mean annual precipitation > or =1400 mm) to identify locations which are likely to have a high risk of C. quinqueseptatum leaf blight (CqLB). Climatic mapping programs, which include interpolated climatic data estimated for numerous locations, were used to map these high risk areas in Africa, Australia and Latin America as well as in South East Asia. The predicted high-risk areas included several regions where CqLB has already been reported and the maps generated suggested other areas which may be at risk under present climatic conditions given the presence of C. quinqueseptatum and susceptible hosts. Some simple climate change scenarios were also used to suggest areas in mainland South East Asia which may become vulnerable to CqLB over the next 50 years. It is concluded that climatic mapping programs can assist the broadscale evaluation of risk of CqLB infections, although it is recognised that more detailed models and survey information are also needed. PMID:15092931

  7. Suicide Risk Protocols: Addressing the Needs of High Risk Youths Identified through Suicide Prevention Efforts and in Clinical Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heilbron, Nicole; Goldston, David; Walrath, Christine; Rodi, Michael; McKeon, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Several agencies have emphasized the importance of establishing clear protocols or procedures to address the needs of youths who are identified as suicidal through suicide prevention programs or in emergency department settings. What constitutes optimal guidelines for developing and implementing such protocols, however, is unclear. At the request…

  8. Identifying areas of high risk of human exposure to coccidioidomycosis in Texas using serology data from dogs.

    PubMed

    Gautam, R; Srinath, I; Clavijo, A; Szonyi, B; Bani-Yaghoub, M; Park, S; Ivanek, R

    2013-03-01

    Coccidioidomycosis or Valley Fever (VF) is an emerging soil-borne fungal zoonosis affecting humans and animals. Most non-human cases of VF are found in dogs, which we hypothesize may serve as sentinels for estimating the human exposure risk. The objective of this study is to use the spatial and temporal distribution and clusters of dogs seropositive for VF to define the geographic area in Texas where VF is endemic, and thus presents a higher risk of exposure to humans. The included specimens were seropositive dogs tested at a major diagnostic laboratory between 1999 and 2009. Data were aggregated by zip code and smoothed by empirical Bayesian estimation to develop an isopleth map of VF seropositive rates using kriging. Clusters of seropositive dogs were identified using the spatial scan test. Both the isopleth map and the scan test identified an area with a high rate of VF-seropositive dogs in the western and southwestern parts of Texas (relative risk = 31). This location overlapped an area that was previously identified as a potential endemic region based on human surveys. Together, these data suggest that dogs may serve as sentinels for estimating the risk of human exposure to VF.

  9. Individual heterogeneity and identifiability in capture-recapture models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Link, W.A.

    2004-01-01

    Individual heterogeneity in detection probabilities is a far more serious problem for capture-recapture modeling than has previously been recognized. In this note, I illustrate that population size is not an identifiable parameter under the general closed population mark-recapture model Mh. The problem of identifiability is obvious if the population includes individuals with pi = 0, but persists even when it is assumed that individual detection probabilities are bounded away from zero. Identifiability may be attained within parametric families of distributions for pi, but not among parametric families of distributions. Consequently, in the presence of individual heterogeneity in detection probability, capture-recapture analysis is strongly model dependent.

  10. Characterization of individuals at high risk of developing melanoma in Latin America: bases for genetic counseling in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Puig, Susana; Potrony, Miriam; Cuellar, Francisco; Puig-Butille, Joan Anton; Carrera, Cristina; Aguilera, Paula; Nagore, Eduardo; Garcia-Casado, Zaida; Requena, Celia; Kumar, Rajiv; Landman, Gilles; Costa Soares de Sá, Bianca; Gargantini Rezze, Gisele; Facure, Luciana; de Avila, Alexandre Leon Ribeiro; Achatz, Maria Isabel; Carraro, Dirce Maria; Duprat Neto, João Pedreira; Grazziotin, Thais C.; Bonamigo, Renan R.; Rey, Maria Carolina W.; Balestrini, Claudia; Morales, Enrique; Molgo, Montserrat; Bakos, Renato Marchiori; Ashton-Prolla, Patricia; Giugliani, Roberto; Larre Borges, Alejandra; Barquet, Virginia; Pérez, Javiera; Martínez, Miguel; Cabo, Horacio; Cohen Sabban, Emilia; Latorre, Clara; Carlos-Ortega, Blanca; Salas-Alanis, Julio C; Gonzalez, Roger; Olazaran, Zulema; Malvehy, Josep; Badenas, Celia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: CDKN2A is the main high-risk melanoma-susceptibility gene, but it has been poorly assessed in Latin America. We sought to analyze CDKN2A and MC1R in patients from Latin America with familial and sporadic multiple primary melanoma (SMP) and compare the data with those for patients from Spain to establish bases for melanoma genetic counseling in Latin America. Genet Med 18 7, 727–736. Methods: CDKN2A and MC1R were sequenced in 186 Latin American patients from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Mexico, and Uruguay, and in 904 Spanish patients. Clinical and phenotypic data were obtained. Genet Med 18 7, 727–736. Results: Overall, 24 and 14% of melanoma-prone families in Latin America and Spain, respectively, had mutations in CDKN2A. Latin American families had CDKN2A mutations more frequently (P = 0.014) than Spanish ones. Of patients with SMP, 10% of those from Latin America and 8.5% of those from Spain had mutations in CDKN2A (P = 0.623). The most recurrent CDKN2A mutations were c.-34G>T and p.G101W. Latin American patients had fairer hair (P = 0.016) and skin (P < 0.001) and a higher prevalence of MC1R variants (P = 0.003) compared with Spanish patients. Genet Med 18 7, 727–736. Conclusion: The inclusion criteria for genetic counseling of melanoma in Latin America may be the same criteria used in Spain, as suggested in areas with low to medium incidence, SMP with at least two melanomas, or families with at least two cases among first- or second-degree relatives. Genet Med 18 7, 727–736. PMID:26681309

  11. Basal Tumor Cell Isolation and Patient-Derived Xenograft Engraftment Identify High-Risk Clinical Bladder Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Skowron, K. B.; Pitroda, S. P.; Namm, J. P.; Balogun, O.; Beckett, M. A.; Zenner, M. L.; Fayanju, O.; Huang, X.; Fernandez, C.; Zheng, W.; Qiao, G.; Chin, R.; Kron, S. J.; Khodarev, N. N.; Posner, M. C.; Steinberg, G. D.; Weichselbaum, R. R.

    2016-01-01

    Strategies to identify tumors at highest risk for treatment failure are currently under investigation for patients with bladder cancer. We demonstrate that flow cytometric detection of poorly differentiated basal tumor cells (BTCs), as defined by the co-expression of CD90, CD44 and CD49f, directly from patients with early stage tumors (T1-T2 and N0) and patient-derived xenograft (PDX) engraftment in locally advanced tumors (T3-T4 or N+) predict poor prognosis in patients with bladder cancer. Comparative transcriptomic analysis of bladder tumor cells isolated from PDXs indicates unique patterns of gene expression during bladder tumor cell differentiation. We found cell division cycle 25C (CDC25C) overexpression in poorly differentiated BTCs and determined that CDC25C expression predicts adverse survival independent of standard clinical and pathologic features in bladder cancer patients. Taken together, our findings support the utility of BTCs and bladder cancer PDX models in the discovery of novel molecular targets and predictive biomarkers for personalizing oncology care for patients. PMID:27775025

  12. TLR4 down-regulation identifies high risk HPV infection and integration in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Pannone, Giuseppe; Bufo, Pantaleo; Pace, Mirella; Lepore, Silvia; Russo, Giuseppe M; Rubini, Corrado; Franco, Renato; Aquino, Gabriella; Santoro, Angela; Campisi, Giuseppina; Rodolico, Vito; Bucci, Eduardo; Ilardi, Gennaro; Mascolo, Massimo; Merolla, Francesco; Lo Muzio, Lorenzo; Natalicchio, Iole; Colella, Giuseppe; Laurenzana, Ilaria; Trino, Stefania; Leonardi, Rosalia; Bucci, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    TLRs are main actors of the innate immune response against HPV. There are very few studies on the role of TLRs mediated HPV clearance in Head and Neck oncology. Our aim was to evaluate whether TLR4 expression identifies HPV infection and/or HR-HPV integration status in oral and oropharyngeal cancers. By immunohistochemistry we assessed TLR4 levels in OSCC/OPSCC. To detect viral integration or episomic status In situ hybridization for HPV-DNA and Pyro-sequencing techniques have been performed. The relationship between TLR4 expression with HPV infection status has been investigated. ISH HPV positive samples have reported lower levels of TLR4 intensity than negative samples (p = .002). There was no statistical correlation between TLR4 intensity and PCR HPV results (p more than 0.0.5). Point-biserial correlation coefficient revealed significant association between TLR4 expression and HR-HPV integration status (p = .0001) and between TLR4 expression index and HR-HPV infection (p = .001). These data have shown that TLR4 down-regulation is strongly associated to both HPV-16 infection and its integration into the host DNA. PMID:26709642

  13. An empiric risk scoring tool for identifying high-risk heterosexual HIV-1 serodiscordant couples for targeted HIV-1 prevention

    PubMed Central

    KAHLE, Erin M.; HUGHES, James P.; LINGAPPA, Jairam R.; JOHN-STEWART, Grace; CELUM, Connie; NAKKU-JOLOBA, Edith; NJUGUNA, Stella; MUGO, Nelly; BUKUSI, Elizabeth; MANONGI, Rachel; BAETEN, Jared M.

    2012-01-01

    Background and objectives Heterosexual HIV-1 serodiscordant couples are increasingly recognized as an important source of new HIV-1 infections in sub-Saharan Africa. A simple risk assessment tool could be useful for identifying couples at highest risk for HIV-1 transmission. Methods Using data from three prospective studies of HIV-1 serodiscordant couples from seven African countries and standard methods for development of clinical prediction rules, we derived and validated a risk scoring tool developed from multivariate modeling and composed of key predictors for HIV-1 risk that could be measured in standard research and clinical settings. Results The final risk score included age of the HIV-1 uninfected partner, married and/or cohabiting partnership, number of children, unprotected sex, uncircumcised male HIV-1 uninfected partner, and plasma HIV-1 RNA in the HIV-1 infected partner. The maximum risk score was 12, scores ≥5 were associated with an annual HIV-1 incidence of >3%, and couples with a score ≥6 accounted for only 28% of the population but 67% of HIV-1 transmissions. The area under the curve for predictive ability of the score was 0.74 (95% CI 0.70–0.78). Internal and external validation showed similar predictive ability of the risk score, even when plasma viral load was excluded from the risk score. Conclusions A discrete combination of clinical and behavioral characteristics defines highest-risk HIV-1 serodiscordant couples. Discriminating highest-risk couples for HIV-1 prevention programs and clinical trials using a validated risk score could improve research efficiency and maximize the impact of prevention strategies for reducing HIV-1 transmission. PMID:23187945

  14. Derivation of Urine Output Thresholds That Identify a Very High Risk of AKI in Patients with Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Leedahl, David D.; Schramm, Garrett E.; Dierkhising, Ross A.; Bergstralh, Eric J.; Chawla, Lakhmir S.; Kashani, Kianoush B.

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives To promote early detection of AKI, recently proposed pretest probability models combine sub–Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) AKI criteria with baseline AKI risk. The primary objective of this study was to determine sub-KDIGO thresholds that identify patients with septic shock at highest risk for AKI. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This was a retrospective analysis of 390 adult patients admitted to the medical intensive care unit (ICU) of a tertiary, academic medical center with septic shock between January 2008 and December 2010. Hourly urine output was collected from the time of septic shock recognition (hour 0) to hour 96, urine catheter removal, or ICU discharge (whichever occurred first). All available serum creatinine (SCr) measurements were collected until hour 96. The AKI pretest probability model was assessed during the first 12 hours of resuscitation and included the initial episode of oliguria, increase from baseline to peak SCr level, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) III score in a multivariable receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) analysis. The primary outcome was the incidence of stage II or III (stage II+) AKI defined by KDIGO criteria. Secondary outcomes included the need for RRT and 28-day mortality. Results Ninety-eight (25%) patients developed stage II+ AKI after septic shock recognition. APACHE III score and increase in SCr level in the first 12 hours were not statistically associated with stage II+ AKI in multivariable ROC analysis. Consecutive oliguria for 3 hours had fair predictive ability for achieving stage II+ AKI criteria (area under ROC curve, 0.73; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.68 to 0.78), and oliguria for 5 hours demonstrated optimal accuracy (82%; 95% CI, 79% to 86%). Conclusions Three to 5 hours of consecutive oliguria in patients with septic shock may provide a valuable measure of AKI risk. Further validation to support this finding is

  15. Polymorphic variations in the FANCA gene in high-risk non-BRCA1/2 breast cancer individuals from the French Canadian population.

    PubMed

    Litim, Nadhir; Labrie, Yvan; Desjardins, Sylvie; Ouellette, Geneviève; Plourde, Karine; Belleau, Pascal; Durocher, Francine

    2013-02-01

    The majority of genes associated with breast cancer susceptibility, including BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, are involved in DNA repair mechanisms. Moreover, among the genes recently associated with an increased susceptibility to breast cancer, four are Fanconi Anemia (FA) genes: FANCD1/BRCA2, FANCJ/BACH1/BRIP1, FANCN/PALB2 and FANCO/RAD51C. FANCA is implicated in DNA repair and has been shown to interact directly with BRCA1. It has been proposed that the formation of FANCA/G (dependent upon the phosphorylation of FANCA) and FANCB/L sub-complexes altogether with FANCM, represent the initial step for DNA repair activation and subsequent formation of other sub-complexes leading to ubiquitination of FANCD2 and FANCI. As only approximately 25% of inherited breast cancers are attributable to BRCA1/2 mutations, FANCA therefore becomes an attractive candidate for breast cancer susceptibility. We thus analyzed FANCA gene in 97 high-risk French Canadian non-BRCA1/2 breast cancer individuals by direct sequencing as well as in 95 healthy control individuals from the same population. Among a total of 85 sequence variants found in either or both series, 28 are coding variants and 19 of them are missense variations leading to amino acid change. Three of the amino acid changes, namely Thr561Met, Cys625Ser and particularly Ser1088Phe, which has been previously reported to be associated with FA, are predicted to be damaging by the SIFT and PolyPhen softwares. cDNA amplification revealed significant expression of 4 alternative splicing events (insertion of an intronic portion of intron 10, and the skipping of exons 11, 30 and 31). In silico analyzes of relevant genomic variants have been performed in order to identify potential variations involved in the expression of these spliced transcripts. Sequence variants in FANCA could therefore be potential spoilers of the Fanconi-BRCA pathway and as a result, they could in turn have an impact in non-BRCA1/2 breast cancer families.

  16. Examining the relationship between HbA1c and diabetes risk models in a European population indicates a lower threshold to identify 'high risk' is required.

    PubMed

    Gray, Benjamin J; Bracken, Richard M; Turner, Daniel; Morgan, Kerry; Thomas, Michael; Williams, Sally P; Williams, Meurig; Rice, Sam; Stephens, Jeffrey W

    2016-05-01

    This study examined whether changes in HbA1c values are reflected in the risk scores and categories of four validated risk-assessment tools (QDiabetes, Leicester Risk Assessment, Finnish Diabetes Risk Score and Cambridge Risk Score). Retrospective analysis was performed on 651 individuals with no prior diagnosis of cardiovascular disease or diabetes who participated in a UK workplace-based risk-assessment initiative. There were significant positive correlations (p < 0.01) revealed between HbA1c values and predicted risk scores: QDiabetes (r = 0.362), Leicester Risk Assessment (r = 0.315), Finnish Diabetes Risk Score (r = 0.202) and Cambridge Risk Score (r = 0.335). HbA1c values increased within risk prediction categories, and at 'high-risk' categories, median HbA1c values were at least 39 mmol mol(-1) (5.7%) irrespective of gender or risk-assessment model. Overall, an association is present between increases in HbA1c scores and predicted risk of type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, the 'high-risk' median HbA1c values in each of the risk assessments are more akin to the lower American recommendations rather than those suggested by the UK expert group.

  17. HPA-axis function and grey matter volume reductions: imaging the diathesis-stress model in individuals at ultra-high risk of psychosis.

    PubMed

    Valli, I; Crossley, N A; Day, F; Stone, J; Tognin, S; Mondelli, V; Howes, O; Valmaggia, L; Pariante, C; McGuire, P

    2016-01-01

    The onset of psychosis is thought to involve interactions between environmental stressors and the brain, with cortisol as a putative mediator. We examined the relationship between the cortisol stress response and brain structure in subjects at ultra-high risk (UHR) for psychosis. Waking salivary cortisol was measured in 22 individuals at UHR for psychosis and 17 healthy controls. Grey matter volume was assessed using magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T. The relationship between the stress response and grey matter volume was investigated using voxel-based analyses. Our predictions of the topography of cortisol action as a structural brain modulator were informed by measures of brain glucocorticoid and mineralcorticoid receptor distribution obtained from the multimodal neuroanatomical and genetic Allen Brain Atlas. Across all subjects, reduced responsivity of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis was correlated with smaller grey matter volumes in the frontal, parietal and temporal cortex and in the hippocampus. This relationship was particularly marked in the UHR subjects in the right prefrontal, left parahippocampal/fusiform and parietal cortices. The subgroup that subsequently developed psychosis showed a significant blunting of HPA stress response, observed at trend level also in the whole UHR sample. Altered responses to stress in people at high risk of psychosis are related to reductions in grey matter volume in areas implicated in the vulnerability to psychotic disorders. These areas may represent the neural components of a stress vulnerability model.

  18. HPA-axis function and grey matter volume reductions: imaging the diathesis-stress model in individuals at ultra-high risk of psychosis.

    PubMed

    Valli, I; Crossley, N A; Day, F; Stone, J; Tognin, S; Mondelli, V; Howes, O; Valmaggia, L; Pariante, C; McGuire, P

    2016-01-01

    The onset of psychosis is thought to involve interactions between environmental stressors and the brain, with cortisol as a putative mediator. We examined the relationship between the cortisol stress response and brain structure in subjects at ultra-high risk (UHR) for psychosis. Waking salivary cortisol was measured in 22 individuals at UHR for psychosis and 17 healthy controls. Grey matter volume was assessed using magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T. The relationship between the stress response and grey matter volume was investigated using voxel-based analyses. Our predictions of the topography of cortisol action as a structural brain modulator were informed by measures of brain glucocorticoid and mineralcorticoid receptor distribution obtained from the multimodal neuroanatomical and genetic Allen Brain Atlas. Across all subjects, reduced responsivity of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis was correlated with smaller grey matter volumes in the frontal, parietal and temporal cortex and in the hippocampus. This relationship was particularly marked in the UHR subjects in the right prefrontal, left parahippocampal/fusiform and parietal cortices. The subgroup that subsequently developed psychosis showed a significant blunting of HPA stress response, observed at trend level also in the whole UHR sample. Altered responses to stress in people at high risk of psychosis are related to reductions in grey matter volume in areas implicated in the vulnerability to psychotic disorders. These areas may represent the neural components of a stress vulnerability model. PMID:27138796

  19. Decreases in Perceived Maternal Criticism Predict Improvement in Subthreshold Psychotic Symptoms in a Randomized Trial of Family-Focused Therapy for Individuals at Clinical High Risk for Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Mary P.; Miklowitz, David J.; Cannon, Tyrone D.

    2015-01-01

    Perceived criticism (PC) is a measure of how much criticism from 1 family member “gets through” to another. PC ratings have been found to predict the course of psychotic disorders, but questions remain regarding whether psychosocial treatment can effectively decrease PC, and whether reductions in PC predict symptom improvement. In a sample of individuals at high risk for psychosis, we examined a) whether Family Focused Therapy for Clinical High-Risk (FFT-CHR), an 18-session intervention that consists of psychoeducation and training in communication and problem solving, brought about greater reductions in perceived maternal criticism, compared to a 3-session family psychoeducational intervention; and b) whether reductions in PC from baseline to 6-month reassessment predicted decreases in subthreshold positive symptoms of psychosis at 12-month follow-up. This study was conducted within a randomized controlled trial across 8 sites. The perceived criticism scale was completed by 90 families prior to treatment and by 41 families at 6-month reassessment. Evaluators, blind to treatment condition, rated subthreshold symptoms of psychosis at baseline, 6- and 12-month assessments. Perceived maternal criticism decreased from pre- to posttreatment for both treatment groups, and this change in criticism predicted decreases in subthreshold positive symptoms at 12-month follow-up. This study offers evidence that participation in structured family treatment is associated with improvement in perceptions of the family environment. Further, a brief measure of perceived criticism may be useful in predicting the future course of attenuated symptoms of psychosis for CHR youth. PMID:26168262

  20. HPA-axis function and grey matter volume reductions: imaging the diathesis-stress model in individuals at ultra-high risk of psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Valli, I; Crossley, N A; Day, F; Stone, J; Tognin, S; Mondelli, V; Howes, O; Valmaggia, L; Pariante, C; McGuire, P

    2016-01-01

    The onset of psychosis is thought to involve interactions between environmental stressors and the brain, with cortisol as a putative mediator. We examined the relationship between the cortisol stress response and brain structure in subjects at ultra-high risk (UHR) for psychosis. Waking salivary cortisol was measured in 22 individuals at UHR for psychosis and 17 healthy controls. Grey matter volume was assessed using magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T. The relationship between the stress response and grey matter volume was investigated using voxel-based analyses. Our predictions of the topography of cortisol action as a structural brain modulator were informed by measures of brain glucocorticoid and mineralcorticoid receptor distribution obtained from the multimodal neuroanatomical and genetic Allen Brain Atlas. Across all subjects, reduced responsivity of the hypothalamus–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis was correlated with smaller grey matter volumes in the frontal, parietal and temporal cortex and in the hippocampus. This relationship was particularly marked in the UHR subjects in the right prefrontal, left parahippocampal/fusiform and parietal cortices. The subgroup that subsequently developed psychosis showed a significant blunting of HPA stress response, observed at trend level also in the whole UHR sample. Altered responses to stress in people at high risk of psychosis are related to reductions in grey matter volume in areas implicated in the vulnerability to psychotic disorders. These areas may represent the neural components of a stress vulnerability model. PMID:27138796

  1. Decreases in perceived maternal criticism predict improvement in subthreshold psychotic symptoms in a randomized trial of family-focused therapy for individuals at clinical high risk for psychosis.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Mary P; Miklowitz, David J; Cannon, Tyrone D

    2015-12-01

    Perceived criticism (PC) is a measure of how much criticism from 1 family member "gets through" to another. PC ratings have been found to predict the course of psychotic disorders, but questions remain regarding whether psychosocial treatment can effectively decrease PC, and whether reductions in PC predict symptom improvement. In a sample of individuals at high risk for psychosis, we examined a) whether Family Focused Therapy for Clinical High-Risk (FFT-CHR), an 18-session intervention that consists of psychoeducation and training in communication and problem solving, brought about greater reductions in perceived maternal criticism, compared to a 3-session family psychoeducational intervention; and b) whether reductions in PC from baseline to 6-month reassessment predicted decreases in subthreshold positive symptoms of psychosis at 12-month follow-up. This study was conducted within a randomized controlled trial across 8 sites. The perceived criticism scale was completed by 90 families prior to treatment and by 41 families at 6-month reassessment. Evaluators, blind to treatment condition, rated subthreshold symptoms of psychosis at baseline, 6- and 12-month assessments. Perceived maternal criticism decreased from pre- to posttreatment for both treatment groups, and this change in criticism predicted decreases in subthreshold positive symptoms at 12-month follow-up. This study offers evidence that participation in structured family treatment is associated with improvement in perceptions of the family environment. Further, a brief measure of perceived criticism may be useful in predicting the future course of attenuated symptoms of psychosis for CHR youth.

  2. The HAS-BLED Score Identifies Patients with Acute Venous Thromboembolism at High Risk of Major Bleeding Complications during the First Six Months of Anticoagulant Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kooiman, Judith; van Hagen, Nadja; Iglesias del Sol, Antonio; Planken, Erwin V.; Lip, Gregory Y. H.; van der Meer, Felix J. M.; Cannegieter, Suzanne C.; Klok, Frederikus A.; Huisman, Menno V.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The HAS-BLED score enables a risk estimate of major bleeds in patients with atrial fibrillation on vitamin K-antagonists (VKA) treatment, but has not been validated for patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE). We analyzed whether the HAS-BLED score accurately identifies patients at high risk of major bleeds during VKA treatment for acute VTE. Methods Medical records of 537 patients with acute VTE (primary diagnosis pulmonary embolism in 223, deep vein thrombosis in 314) starting VKA treatment between 2006-2007 were searched for items on the HAS-BLED score and the occurrence of major bleeds during the first 180 days of follow-up. The hazard ratio (HR) for the occurrence of major bleeds comparing non-high with high-risk patients as defined by a HAS-BLED score ≥ 3 points was calculated using Cox-regression analysis. Results Major bleeds occurred in 11/537 patients (2.0%, 5.2/100 person years, 95% CI 2.8-9.2). Cumulative incidences of major bleeds were 1.3% (95% CI 0.1-2.5) in the non-high (HAS-BLED < 3) and 9.6% (95%CI 2.2-17.0) in the high-risk group (HAS-BLED ≥ 3), (p <0.0001 by Log-Rank test), with a HR of 8.7 (95% CI 2.7-28.4). Of the items in the HAS-BLED score, abnormal renal function (HR 10.8, 95% CI 1.9-61.7) and a history of bleeding events (HR 10.4, 95% CI 2.5-42.5) were independent predictors of major bleeds during follow-up. Conclusion Acute VTE patients with a HAS-BLED score ≥ 3 points are at increased risk of major bleeding. These results warrant for correction of the potentially reversible risk factors for major bleeding and careful International Normalized Ratio monitoring in acute VTE patients with a high HAS-BLED score. PMID:25905638

  3. THE AVAILABILITY AND USE OF OUT-OF-HOSPITAL PHYSIOLOGIC INFORMATION TO IDENTIFY HIGH-RISK INJURED CHILDREN IN A MULTISITE, POPULATION-BASED COHORT

    PubMed Central

    Newgard, Craig D.; Rudser, Kyle; Atkins, Dianne L.; Berg, Robert; Osmond, Martin H.; Bulger, Eileen M.; Davis, Daniel P.; Schreiber, Martin A.; Warden, Craig; Rea, Thomas D.; Emerson, Scott

    2010-01-01

    Objective The validity of using adult physiologic criteria to triage injured children in the out-of-hospital setting remains unproven. Among children meeting adult field physiologic criteria, we assessed the availability of physiologic information, the incidence of death or prolonged hospitalization, and whether age-specific criteria would improve the specificity of the physiologic triage step. Methods We analyzed a prospective, out-of-hospital cohort of injured children aged ≤14 years collected from December 2005 through February 2007 by 237 emergency medical services (EMS) agencies transporting to 207 acute care hospitals (trauma and nontrauma centers) in 11 sites across the United States and Canada. Inclusion criteria were standard adult physiologic values: systolic blood pressure (SBP) ≤90 mmHg, respiratory rate <10 or >29 breaths/min, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score ≤12, and field intubation attempt. Seven physiologic variables (including age-specific values) and three demographic and mechanism variables were included in the analysis. “High-risk” children included those who died (field or in-hospital) or were hospitalized >2 days. The decision tree was derived and validated using binary recursive partitioning. Results Nine hundred fifty-five children were included in the analysis, of whom 62 (6.5%) died and 117 (12.3%) were hospitalized >2 days. Missing values were common, ranging from 6% (respiratory rate) to 53% (pulse oximetry), and were associated with younger age and high-risk outcome. The final decision rule included four variables (assisted ventilation, GCS score <11, pulse oximetry <95%, and SBP >96 mmHg), which demonstrated improved specificity (71.7% [95% confidence interval (CI) 66.7–76.6%]) at the expense of missing high-risk children (sensitivity 76.5% [95% CI 66.4–86.6%]). Conclusions The incidence of high-risk injured children meeting adult physiologic criteria is relatively low and the findings from this sample do not support using

  4. A Genome-Wide Investigation of MicroRNA Expression Identifies Biologically-Meaningful MicroRNAs That Distinguish between High-Risk and Low-Risk Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms of the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Chen, Y. Ann; Fisher, Kate; McCarthy, Susan; Qu, Xiaotao; Lloyd, Mark C.; Kasprzak, Agnieszka; Fournier, Michelle; Williams, Vonetta L.; Ghia, Kavita M.; Yoder, Sean J.; Hall, Laura; Georgeades, Christina; Olaoye, Funmilayo; Husain, Kazim; Springett, Gregory M.; Chen, Dung-Tsa; Yeatman, Timothy; Centeno, Barbara Ann; Klapman, Jason; Coppola, Domenico; Malafa, Mokenge

    2015-01-01

    Background Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) are pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) precursors. Differentiating between high-risk IPMNs that warrant surgical resection and low-risk IPMNs that can be monitored is a significant clinical problem, and we sought to discover a panel of mi(cro)RNAs that accurately classify IPMN risk status. Methodology/Principal Findings In a discovery phase, genome-wide miRNA expression profiling was performed on 28 surgically-resected, pathologically-confirmed IPMNs (19 high-risk, 9 low-risk) using Taqman MicroRNA Arrays. A validation phase was performed in 21 independent IPMNs (13 high-risk, 8 low-risk). We also explored associations between miRNA expression level and various clinical and pathological factors and examined genes and pathways regulated by the identified miRNAs by integrating data from bioinformatic analyses and microarray analysis of miRNA gene targets. Six miRNAs (miR-100, miR-99b, miR-99a, miR-342-3p, miR-126, miR-130a) were down-regulated in high-risk versus low-risk IPMNs and distinguished between groups (P<10−3, area underneath the curve (AUC) = 87%). The same trend was observed in the validation phase (AUC = 74%). Low miR-99b expression was associated with main pancreatic duct involvement (P = 0.021), and serum albumin levels were positively correlated with miR-99a (r = 0.52, P = 0.004) and miR-100 expression (r = 0.49, P = 0.008). Literature, validated miRNA:target gene interactions, and pathway enrichment analysis supported the candidate miRNAs as tumor suppressors and regulators of PDAC development. Microarray analysis revealed that oncogenic targets of miR-130a (ATG2B, MEOX2), miR-342-3p (DNMT1), and miR-126 (IRS-1) were up-regulated in high- versus low-risk IPMNs (P<0.10). Conclusions This pilot study highlights miRNAs that may aid in preoperative risk stratification of IPMNs and provides novel insights into miRNA-mediated progression to pancreatic malignancy. The miRNAs identified here

  5. Identifying Individual Excellence: The Dependable Strengths Articulation Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boivin-Brown, Allen; Haldane, Jean; Forster, Jerald

    This paper was written to describe the essential tasks of a process known as Dependable Strengths Articulation (DSA) and how career development practitioners can acquire the skills to use the process. DSA, when combined with practices known as Job Magnet, helps participants identify their individual excellence and then use this knowledge to…

  6. Methods of Identifying Individual Guessers from Item Response Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Xiangdong

    2007-01-01

    This article investigates several methods of identifying individual guessers from their response data. Both the posterior probability method and the likelihood ratio method are based on the two-state mixture modeling approach to response times. The accuracy method is based on response accuracy data. Results from the simulation study showed that…

  7. A Radio-genomics Approach for Identifying High Risk Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancers on DCE-MRI: Preliminary Results in Predicting OncotypeDX Risk Scores.

    PubMed

    Wan, Tao; Bloch, B Nicolas; Plecha, Donna; Thompson, CheryI L; Gilmore, Hannah; Jaffe, Carl; Harris, Lyndsay; Madabhushi, Anant

    2016-01-01

    To identify computer extracted imaging features for estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancers on dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)-MRI that are correlated with the low and high OncotypeDX risk categories. We collected 96 ER-positive breast lesions with low (< 18, N = 55) and high (> 30, N = 41) OncotypeDX recurrence scores. Each lesion was quantitatively characterize via 6 shape features, 3 pharmacokinetics, 4 enhancement kinetics, 4 intensity kinetics, 148 textural kinetics, 5 dynamic histogram of oriented gradient (DHoG), and 6 dynamic local binary pattern (DLBP) features. The extracted features were evaluated by a linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifier in terms of their ability to distinguish low and high OncotypeDX risk categories. Classification performance was evaluated by area under the receiver operator characteristic curve (Az). The DHoG and DLBP achieved Az values of 0.84 and 0.80, respectively. The 6 top features identified via feature selection were subsequently combined with the LDA classifier to yield an Az of 0.87. The correlation analysis showed that DHoG (ρ = 0.85, P < 0.001) and DLBP (ρ = 0.83, P < 0.01) were significantly associated with the low and high risk classifications from the OncotypeDX assay. Our results indicated that computer extracted texture features of DCE-MRI were highly correlated with the high and low OncotypeDX risk categories for ER-positive cancers. PMID:26887643

  8. The Community Assessment of Psychic Experience (CAPE) questionnaire as a screening-instrument in the detection of individuals at ultra-high risk for psychosis.

    PubMed

    Mossaheb, Nilufar; Becker, Jana; Schaefer, Miriam R; Klier, Claudia M; Schloegelhofer, Monika; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Amminger, G Paul

    2012-11-01

    Recent findings on intervention options in individuals at ultra-high risk (UHR) for psychosis underline the necessity of a screening tool that facilitates early detection in low-threshold, non-specialized settings. The aim of this study was to examine, whether the Community Assessment of Psychic Experience (CAPE) could be used as a screening tool to detect individuals at an increased risk for developing psychosis in a clinical, help-seeking population. The utility of the CAPE was assessed against the Comprehensive Assessment of At-Risk Mental States (CAARMS). The CAPE is a 42-item self-report questionnaire that proved to be stable, reliable and valid for self reported psychotic-like experiences in the general population. 165 individuals between 13 and 24years of age were assessed for being at UHR for developing psychosis. 50.9% individuals were CAARMS-positive and 49.1% were CAARMS-negative. The ROC-analysis provided two cut-off points: The cut-off value of 3.20 in the positive dimension showed a sensitivity of 67%, a specificity of 73%, a positive predictive value of 72% and a negative predictive value of 68%. The cut-off value of 2.80 in the positive dimension showed a higher sensitivity (83%) and a better negative predictive value (74%), but a lower specificity (49%) and a reduced positive predictive value (63%). Our results show promise that the CAPE is a valid, simple and cost-effective instrument for detecting individuals at UHR in a clinical population. It may represent a useful screening tool for calling clinicians' attention to subjects with psychotic-like experiences.

  9. Development and Validation of a Clinic-Based Prediction Tool to Identify Female Athletes at High Risk for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    PubMed Central

    Myer, Gregory D.; Ford, Kevin R.; Khoury, Jane; Succop, Paul; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Prospective measures of high knee abduction moment (KAM) during landing identify female athletes at high risk for anterior cruciate ligament injury. Laboratory-based measurements demonstrate 90% accuracy in prediction of high KAM. Clinic-based prediction algorithms that employ correlates derived from laboratory-based measurements also demonstrate high accuracy for prediction of high KAM mechanics during landing. Hypotheses Clinic-based measures derived from highly predictive laboratory-based models are valid for the accurate prediction of high KAM status, and simultaneous measurements using laboratory-based and clinic-based techniques highly correlate. Study Design Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 2. Methods One hundred female athletes (basketball, soccer, volleyball players) were tested using laboratory-based measures to confirm the validity of identified laboratory-based correlate variables to clinic-based measures included in a prediction algorithm to determine high KAM status. To analyze selected clinic-based surrogate predictors, another cohort of 20 female athletes was simultaneously tested with both clinic-based and laboratory-based measures. Results The prediction model (odds ratio: 95% confidence interval), derived from laboratory-based surrogates including (1) knee valgus motion (1.59: 1.17-2.16 cm), (2) knee flexion range of motion (0.94: 0.89°-1.00°), (3) body mass (0.98: 0.94-1.03 kg), (4) tibia length (1.55: 1.20-2.07 cm), and (5) quadriceps-to-hamstrings ratio (1.70: 0.48%-6.0%), predicted high KAM status with 84% sensitivity and 67% specificity (P < .001). Clinic-based techniques that used a calibrated physician’s scale, a standard measuring tape, standard camcorder, ImageJ software, and an isokinetic dynamometer showed high correlation (knee valgus motion, r = .87; knee flexion range of motion, r = .95; and tibia length, r = .98) to simultaneous laboratory-based measurements. Body mass and quadriceps-to-hamstrings ratio

  10. Theory of Mind, Emotion Recognition and Social Perception in Individuals at Clinical High Risk for Psychosis: findings from the NAPLS-2 cohort

    PubMed Central

    Barbato, Mariapaola; Liu, Lu; Cadenhead, Kristin S.; Cannon, Tyrone D.; Cornblatt, Barbara A.; McGlashan, Thomas H.; Perkins, Diana O.; Seidman, Larry J.; Tsuang, Ming T.; Walker, Elaine F.; Woods, Scott W.; Bearden, Carrie E.; Mathalon, Daniel H.; Heinssen, Robert; Addington, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Social cognition, the mental operations that underlie social interactions, is a major construct to investigate in schizophrenia. Impairments in social cognition are present before the onset of psychosis, and even in unaffected first-degree relatives, suggesting that social cognition may be a trait marker of the illness. In a large cohort of individuals at clinical high risk for psychosis (CHR) and healthy controls, three domains of social cognition (theory of mind, facial emotion recognition and social perception) were assessed to clarify which domains are impaired in this population. Six-hundred and seventy-five CHR individuals and 264 controls, who were part of the multi-site North American Prodromal Longitudinal Study, completed The Awareness of Social Inference Test, the Penn Emotion Recognition task, the Penn Emotion Differentiation task, and the Relationship Across Domains, measures of theory of mind, facial emotion recognition, and social perception, respectively. Social cognition was not related to positive and negative symptom severity, but was associated with age and IQ. CHR individuals demonstrated poorer performance on all measures of social cognition. However, after controlling for age and IQ, the group differences remained significant for measures of theory of mind and social perception, but not for facial emotion recognition. Theory of mind and social perception are impaired in individuals at CHR for psychosis. Age and IQ seem to play an important role in the arising of deficits in facial affect recognition. Future studies should examine the stability of social cognition deficits over time and their role, if any, in the development of psychosis.

  11. Identifying ontogenetic, environmental and individual components of forest tree growth

    PubMed Central

    Chaubert-Pereira, Florence; Caraglio, Yves; Lavergne, Christian; Guédon, Yann

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims This study aimed to identify and characterize the ontogenetic, environmental and individual components of forest tree growth. In the proposed approach, the tree growth data typically correspond to the retrospective measurement of annual shoot characteristics (e.g. length) along the trunk. Methods Dedicated statistical models (semi-Markov switching linear mixed models) were applied to data sets of Corsican pine and sessile oak. In the semi-Markov switching linear mixed models estimated from these data sets, the underlying semi-Markov chain represents both the succession of growth phases and their lengths, while the linear mixed models represent both the influence of climatic factors and the inter-individual heterogeneity within each growth phase. Key Results On the basis of these integrative statistical models, it is shown that growth phases are not only defined by average growth level but also by growth fluctuation amplitudes in response to climatic factors and inter-individual heterogeneity and that the individual tree status within the population may change between phases. Species plasticity affected the response to climatic factors while tree origin, sampling strategy and silvicultural interventions impacted inter-individual heterogeneity. Conclusions The transposition of the proposed integrative statistical modelling approach to cambial growth in relation to climatic factors and the study of the relationship between apical growth and cambial growth constitute the next steps in this research. PMID:19684021

  12. hERG1 positivity and Glut-1 negativity identifies high-risk TNM stage I and II colorectal cancer patients, regardless of adjuvant chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Muratori, Leonardo; Petroni, Giulia; Antonuzzo, Lorenzo; Boni, Luca; Iorio, Jessica; Lastraioli, Elena; Bartoli, Gianluca; Messerini, Luca; Di Costanzo, Francesco; Arcangeli, Annarosa

    2016-01-01

    Background The identification of early-stage colorectal cancer (CRC) with high risk of progression is one major clinical challenge, mainly due to lack of validated biomarkers. The aims of the present study were to analyze the prognostic impact of three molecular markers belonging to the ion channels and transporters family: the ether-à-go-go-related gene 1 (hERG1) and the calcium-activated KCa3.1 potassium channels, as well as the glucose transporter 1 (Glut-1); and to define the impact of adjuvant chemotherapy in conjunction with the abovementioned biomarkers, in a cohort of radically resected stage I–III CRC patients. Patients and methods The expressions of hERG1, KCa3.1, and Glut-1 were tested by immunohistochemistry on 162 surgical samples of nonmetastatic, stage I–III CRC patients. The median follow-up was 32 months. The association between biological markers, clinicopathological features, and survival outcomes was investigated by evaluating both disease-free survival and overall survival. Results Although no prognostic valence emerged for KCa3.1, evidence of a negative impact of hERG1 expression on survival outcomes was provided. On the contrary, Glut-1 expression had a positive impact. According to the results of the multivariate analysis, patients were stratified in four risk groups, based on TNM stage and hERG1/Glut-1 expression. After adjusting for adjuvant therapy, stage I and II, Glut-1-negative, and hERG1-positive patients showed the worst survival experience. Conclusion This study strongly indicates that the combination of hERG1 positivity and Glut-1 negativity behaves as a prognostic biomarker in radically resected CRC patients. This combination identifies a group of stage I and II CRC patients with a bad prognosis, even worse than that of stage III patients, regardless of adjuvant therapy accomplishment.

  13. Duration of attenuated positive and negative symptoms in individuals at clinical high risk: Associations with risk of conversion to psychosis and functional outcome.

    PubMed

    Carrión, Ricardo E; Demmin, Docia; Auther, Andrea M; McLaughlin, Danielle; Olsen, Ruth; Lencz, Todd; Correll, Christoph U; Cornblatt, Barbara A

    2016-10-01

    Research in individuals at clinical high-risk (CHR) for psychosis has focused on subjects with no more than 12 months of present or worsened attenuated positive symptoms. However, the impact of long duration attenuated positive and/or negative prodromal symptoms on outcomes is unclear. Seventy-six CHR subjects with attenuated positive symptoms and at least moderate severity level negative symptoms rated on the Scale of Prodromal Symptoms (SOPS) were prospectively followed for a mean of 3.0 ± 1.6 years. Social and Role functioning was assessed with the Global Functioning: Social and Role scales. Correlations between attenuated positive and negative symptom duration and severity and conversion to psychosis and functional outcomes were analyzed. The average onset of SOPS rated negative symptoms (M = 53.24 months, SD = 48.90, median = 37.27) was approximately twelve months prior to the emergence of attenuated positive symptom (M = 40.15 months, SD = 40.33, median = 24.77, P < 0.05). More severe positive symptoms (P = 0.004), but not longer duration of positive (P = 0.412) or negative (P = 0.754) symptoms, predicted conversion to psychosis. Neither positive symptom duration (P = 0.181) nor severity (P = 0.469) predicted role or social functioning at study endpoint. Conversely, longer negative symptom duration predicted poor social functioning (P = 0.004). Overall, our findings suggest that the severity of attenuated positive symptoms at baseline may be more important than symptom duration for determining individuals at increased risk of developing psychosis. In contrast, long-standing negative symptoms may be associated with persistent social difficulties and therefore have an important position in the treatment of disability.

  14. Who is that? Brain networks and mechanisms for identifying individuals

    PubMed Central

    Perrodin, Catherine; Kayser, Christoph; Abel, Taylor J.; Logothetis, Nikos K.; Petkov, Christopher I.

    2015-01-01

    Social animals can identify conspecifics by many forms of sensory input. However, whether the neuronal computations that support our ability to identify individuals rely on modality-independent convergence or involve ongoing synergistic interactions along the multiple sensory streams remains controversial. Direct neuronal measurements at relevant brain sites could address such questions, but this requires better bridging the work in humans and animal models. We overview recent studies in nonhuman primates on voice- and face-identity sensitive pathways and evaluate the correspondences to relevant findings in humans. This synthesis provides insights into converging sensory streams in the primate anterior temporal lobe for identity processing. Furthermore, we advance a model and suggest how alternative neuronal mechanisms could be tested. PMID:26454482

  15. A new protocol for screening adults presenting with their own medical problems at the Emergency Department to identify children at high risk for maltreatment.

    PubMed

    Diderich, Hester M; Fekkes, Minne; Verkerk, Paul H; Pannebakker, Fieke D; Velderman, Mariska Klein; Sorensen, Peggy J G; Baeten, Paul; Oudesluys-Murphy, Anne Marie

    2013-12-01

    Identifying child abuse and neglect solely on the grounds of child characteristics leaves many children undetected. We developed a new approach (Hague protocol) based on characteristics of parents who attend the Emergency Department (ED) because they have the following problems: (1) intimate partner violence, (2) substance abuse, or (3) suicide attempt or other serious psychiatric problems. The goal of this protocol is to enable the Reporting Center for Child Abuse and Neglect (RCCAN) to rapidly assess family problems and offer voluntary community based support to these parents. The aim of this study is to assess whether this protocol for screening adults presenting for care in the Emergency Department can identify children at high risk for maltreatment. A before and after study was conducted at 9 EDs in 3 regions in the Netherlands (one intervention region and 2 control regions). During the period January 2006 to November 2007, prior to the introduction of the Hague protocol, from a total of 385,626 patients attending the ED in the intervention region 4 parents (1 per 100,000) were referred to the RCCAN. In the period after introduction of the protocol (December 2007 to December 2011), the number rose to 565 parents from a total of 885,301 patients attending the ED (64 per 100,000). In the control region, where the protocol was not implemented, these figures were 2 per 163,628 (1 per 100,000) and 10 per 371,616 (3 per 100,000) respectively (OR=28.0 (95 CI 4.6-170.7)). At assessment, child abuse was confirmed in 91% of referred cases. The protocol has a high positive predictive value of 91% and can substantially increase the detection rate of child abuse in an ED setting. Parental characteristics are strong predictors of child abuse. Implementing guidelines to detect child abuse based on parental characteristics of parents attending the adult section of the ED can increase the detection rate of child abuse and neglect allowing appropriate aid to be initiated for

  16. Urban mockingbirds quickly learn to identify individual humans.

    PubMed

    Levey, Douglas J; Londoño, Gustavo A; Ungvari-Martin, Judit; Hiersoux, Monique R; Jankowski, Jill E; Poulsen, John R; Stracey, Christine M; Robinson, Scott K

    2009-06-01

    Practically all animals are affected by humans, especially in urban areas. Although most species respond negatively to urbanization, some thrive in human-dominated settings. A central question in urban ecology is why some species adapt well to the presence of humans and others do not. We show that Northern Mockingbirds (Mimus polyglottos) nesting on the campus of a large university rapidly learn to assess the level of threat posed by different humans, and to respond accordingly. In a controlled experiment, we found that as the same human approached and threatened a nest on 4 successive days, mockingbirds flushed from their nest at increasingly greater distances from that human. A different human approaching and threatening the nest identically on the fifth day elicited the same response as the first human on the first day. Likewise, alarm calls and attack flights increased from days 1-4 with the first human, and decreased on day 5 with the second human. These results demonstrate a remarkable ability of a passerine bird to distinguish one human from thousands of others. Also, mockingbirds learned to identify individual humans extraordinarily quickly: after only 2 30-s exposures of the human at the nest. More generally, the varying responses of mockingbirds to intruders suggests behavioral flexibility and a keen awareness of different levels of threat posed by individuals of another species: traits that may predispose mockingbirds and other species of urban wildlife to successful exploitation of human-dominated environments.

  17. Influenza vaccination status of healthcare workers and the extent of their domestic contact with individuals at high risk for influenza-related complications.

    PubMed

    Ong, A K; Srimanunthiphol, J; Frankel, R I

    2000-11-01

    Many healthcare workers have frequent household contact with persons at high risk for influenza-related complications. Educating healthcare workers about the risk of domestic transmission of influenza may improve their acceptance of influenza vaccination. Concerns regarding vaccine efficacy and safety also need to be addressed.

  18. Pretreatment biopsy analysis of DAB2IP identifies subpopulation of high-risk prostate cancer patients with worse survival following radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Corbin; Tumati, Vasu; Kapur, Payal; Yan, Jingsheng; Xie, Xian-Jin; Hannan, Raquibul; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong; Kim, Dong Wook Nathan; Saha, Debabrata

    2015-12-01

    Decreased expression of tumor suppressor DAB2IP is linked to aggressive cancer and radiation resistance in several malignancies, but clinical survival data is largely unknown. We hypothesized that pretreatment DAB2IP reduction would predict worse prostate cancer-specific survival (PCSS). Immunohistochemistry of pretreatment biopsies was scored by an expert genitourinary pathologist. Other endpoints analyzed include freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF), castration resistance-free survival (CRFS), and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS). Seventy-nine patients with NCCN-defined high-risk prostate cancer treated with radiotherapy from 2005 to 2012 at our institution were evaluated. Twenty-eight percent (22/79) of pretreatment biopsies revealed DAB2IP-reduction. The median follow up times were 4.8 years and 5.3 years for patients in the DAB2IP-reduced group and DAB2IP-retained group, respectively. Patients with reduced DAB2IP demonstrated worse outcome compared to patients retaining DAB2IP, including FFBF (4-year: 34 vs. 92%; P < 0.0001), CRFS (4-year: 58 vs. 96%; P = 0.0039), DMFS (4-year: 58 vs. 100%; P = 0.0006), and PCSS (5-year: 83 vs. 100%; P = 0.0102). Univariate analysis showed T stage, N stage, and Gleason score were statistically significant variables. Pretreatment tumor DAB2IP status remained significant in multivariable analyses. This study suggests that about one-fourth of men with high-risk prostate cancer have decreased tumor expression of DAB2IP. This subpopulation with reduced DAB2IP has a suboptimal response and worse malignancy-specific survival following radiation therapy and androgen deprivation. DAB2IP loss may be a genetic explanation for the observed differences in aggressive tumor characteristics and radiation resistance. Further study into improving treatment response and survival in this subpopulation is warranted.

  19. An Overview. High Risk Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    This report provides an overview of efforts undertaken by the U.S. General Accounting Office (GAO) in 1990 to review and report on federal program areas its work identified as high risk because of vulnerabilities to waste, fraud, abuse, and mismanagement. It reviews the current status of efforts to address these concerns. The six categories of…

  20. Identifying Behavioral Measures of Stress in Individuals with Aphasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laures-Gore, Jacqueline S.; DuBay, Michaela F.; Duff, Melissa C.; Buchanan, Tony W.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To develop valid indicators of stress in individuals with aphasia (IWA) by examining the relationship between certain language variables (error frequency [EF] and word productivity [WP]) and cortisol reactivity. Method: Fourteen IWA and 10 controls participated in a speaking task. Salivary cortisol was collected pre- and posttask. WP and…

  1. Identifying individual sperm whales acoustically using self-organizing maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioup, Juliette W.; Ioup, George E.

    2005-09-01

    The Littoral Acoustic Demonstration Center (LADC) is a consortium at Stennis Space Center comprising the University of New Orleans, the University of Southern Mississippi, the Naval Research Laboratory, and the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. LADC deployed three Environmental Acoustic Recording System (EARS) buoys in the northern Gulf of Mexico during the summer of 2001 to study ambient noise and marine mammals. Each LADC EARS was an autonomous, self-recording buoy capable of 36 days of continuous recording of a single channel at an 11.7-kHz sampling rate (bandwidth to 5859 Hz). The hydrophone selected for this analysis was approximately 50 m from the bottom in a water depth of 800 m on the continental slope off the Mississippi River delta. This paper contains recent analysis results for sperm whale codas recorded during a 3-min period. Results are presented for the identification of individual sperm whales from their codas, using the acoustic properties of the clicks within each coda. The recorded time series, the Fourier transform magnitude, and the wavelet transform coefficients are each used separately with a self-organizing map procedure for 43 codas. All show the codas as coming from four or five individual whales. [Research supported by ONR.

  2. Intrinsic susceptibility MRI identifies tumors with ALKF1174L mutation in genetically-engineered murine models of high-risk neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Jamin, Yann; Glass, Laura; Hallsworth, Albert; George, Rani; Koh, Dow-Mu; Pearson, Andrew D J; Chesler, Louis; Robinson, Simon P

    2014-01-01

    The early identification of children presenting ALK(F1174L)-mutated neuroblastoma, which are associated with resistance to the promising ALK inhibitor crizotinib and a marked poorer prognosis, has become a clinical priority. In comparing the radiology of the novel Th-ALK(F1174L)/Th-MYCN and the well-established Th-MYCN genetically-engineered murine models of neuroblastoma using MRI, we have identified a marked ALK(F1174L)-driven vascular phenotype. We demonstrate that quantitation of the transverse relaxation rate R2* (s(-1)) using intrinsic susceptibility-MRI under baseline conditions and during hyperoxia, can robustly discriminate this differential vascular phenotype, and identify MYCN-driven tumors harboring the ALK(F1174L) mutation with high specificity and selectivity. Intrinsic susceptibility-MRI could thus potentially provide a non-invasive and clinically-exploitable method to help identifying children with MYCN-driven neuroblastoma harboring the ALK(F1174L) mutation at the time of diagnosis. PMID:24667968

  3. Identifying High-Risk Neighborhoods Using Electronic Medical Records: A Population-Based Approach for Targeting Diabetes Prevention and Treatment Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Gakidou, Emmanuela; Roth, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Background Increasing attention is being paid to the marked disparities in diabetes prevalence and health outcomes in the United States. There is a need to identify the small-area geographic variation in diabetes risk and related outcomes, a task that current health surveillance methods, which often rely on a self-reported diagnosis of diabetes, are not detailed enough to achieve. Broad adoption of electronic health records (EHR) and routine centralized reporting of patient-level data offers a new way to examine diabetes risk and highlight hotspots for intervention. Methods and Findings We examined small-area geographic variation in hemoglobin A1c (HgbA1C) levels in three counties though a retrospective observational analysis of the complete population of diabetic patients receiving at least two ambulatory care visits for diabetes in three counties (two urban, one rural) in Minnesota in 2013, with clinical performance measures re-aggregated to patient home zip code area. Patient level performance measures included HgbA1c, blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and smoking. Diabetes care was provided to 63,053 patients out of a total population of 1.48 million people aged 18–74. Within each zip code area, on average 4.1% of the population received care for diabetes. There was significant and largely consistent geographic variation in the proportion of patients within their zip code area of residence attaining HgbA1C <8.0%, ranging from 59–90% of patients within each zip code area (interquartile range (IQR) 72.0%-78.1%). Attainment of performance measures for a zip code area were correlated with household income, educational attainment and insurance coverage for the same zip code area (all p < .001). Conclusions We identified small geographic areas with the least effective control of diabetes. Centrally-aggregated EHR provides a new means of identifying and targeting at-risk neighborhoods for community-based interventions. PMID:27463641

  4. [High altitude medicine is a concern also for Swedish primary care. Knowledge needed to identify high risk patients and provide appropriate advice].

    PubMed

    Kiwanuka, Olivia

    2015-05-26

    With the increasing amount of people traveling to high altitude regions, the number of people at risk of acquiring altitude illness increases. Altitude illness entails three syndromes; acute mountain sickness, high-altitude cerebral edema, and high-altitude pulmonary edema. These syndromes are potentially lethal acquired medical conditions that in most cases are preventable. Health care providers need to inform travelers of the risks associated with mountaineering and the prophylactic measures available as well as identify underlying conditions that require specific considerations. This article provides a summary of the pathophysiology, symptoms and treatment of altitude illness and aims to be an orientation for general practitioners.

  5. Adaptive dosing approaches to the individualization of 13-cis-retinoic acid (isotretinoin) treatment for children with high-risk neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Veal, Gareth J.; Errington, Julie; Rowbotham, Sophie E.; Illingworth, Nicola A.; Malik, Ghada; Cole, Michael; Daly, Ann K.; Pearson, Andrew D.J.; Boddy, Alan V.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the feasibility of adaptive dosing and the impact of pharmacogenetic variation on 13-cisRA disposition in high-risk neuroblastoma patients. Experimental Design 13cisRA (160mg/m2 or 5.33mg/kg/day) was administered to 103 patients ≤21 years and plasma concentrations of 13-cisRA and 4-oxo-13-cisRA quantitated on day 14 of treatment. 71 patients were recruited to a dose adjustment group, targeting a 13-cisRA Cmax of 2μM, with dose increases of 25-50% implemented for patients with Cmax values <2μM. A population pharmacokinetic model was applied and polymorphisms in relevant cytochrome P450 genes analyzed. Results 13-cisRA Cmax values ranged from 0.42–11.2μM, with 34/103 (33%) patients failing to achieve a Cmax >2μM. Dose increases carried out in 20 patients in the dose adjustment study group led to concentrations >2μM in 18 patients (90%). 8/11 (73%) patients <12kg, receiving a dose of 5.33mg/kg, failed to achieve a Cmax ≥2μM. Significantly lower Cmax values were observed for patients treated with 5.33mg/kg versus 160mg/m2 (1.9±1.2 versus 3.1±2.0μM; mean±SD; P=0.023). Cmax was higher in patients who swallowed 13-cisRA capsules as compared to receiving the drug extracted from capsules (4.0±2.2 versus 2.6±1.8μM; P=0.0012). The target Cmax was achieved by 93% (25/27) versus 55% (42/76) of patients in these two groups respectively. No clear relationships were found between genetic variants and 13-cisRA pharmacokinetic parameters. Conclusions Dosing regimen and method of administration have a marked influence on 13-cisRA plasma concentrations. Body weight-based dosing should not be implemented for children <12kg and pharmacological data support higher doses for children unable to swallow 13-cisRA capsules. PMID:23087409

  6. Asbestos Surveillance Program Aachen (ASPA): initial results from baseline screening for lung cancer in asbestos-exposed high-risk individuals using low-dose multidetector-row CT.

    PubMed

    Das, Marco; Mühlenbruch, Georg; Mahnken, Andreas H; Hering, K G; Sirbu, H; Zschiesche, W; Knoll, Lars; Felten, Michael K; Kraus, Thomas; Günther, Rolf W; Wildberger, Joachim E

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of lung cancer in a high-risk asbestos-exposed cohort using low-dose MDCT. Of a population of 5,389 former power-plant workers, 316 were characterized as individuals at highest risk for lung cancer according to a lung-cancer risk model including age, asbestos exposure and smoking habits. Of these 316, 187 (mean age: 66.6 years) individuals were included in a prospective trial. Mean asbestos exposure time was 29.65 years and 89% were smokers. Screening was performed on a 16-slice MDCT (Siemens) with low-dose technique (10/20 mAs(eff.); 1 mm/0.5 mm increment). In addition to soft copy PACS reading analysis on a workstation with a dedicated lung analysis software (LungCARE; Siemens) was performed. One strongly suspicious mass and eight cases of histologically proven lung cancer were found plus 491 additional pulmonary nodules (average volume: 40.72 ml, average diameter 4.62 mm). Asbestos-related changes (pleural plaques, fibrosis) were visible in 80 individuals. Lung cancer screening in this high-risk cohort showed a prevalence of lung cancer of 4.28% (8/187) at baseline screening with an additional large number of indeterminate pulmonary nodules. Low-dose MDCT proved to be feasible in this highly selected population.

  7. A support vector machine designed to identify breasts at high risk using multi-probe generated REIS signals: a preliminary assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gur, David; Zheng, Bin; Lederman, Dror; Dhurjaty, Sreeram; Sumkin, Jules; Zuley, Margarita

    2010-02-01

    A new resonance-frequency based electronic impedance spectroscopy (REIS) system with multi-probes, including one central probe and six external probes that are designed to contact the breast skin in a circular form with a radius of 60 millimeters to the central ("nipple") probe, has been assembled and installed in our breast imaging facility. We are conducting a prospective clinical study to test the performance of this REIS system in identifying younger women (< 50 years old) at higher risk for having or developing breast cancer. In this preliminary analysis, we selected a subset of 100 examinations. Among these, 50 examinations were recommended for a biopsy due to detection of a highly suspicious breast lesion and 50 were determined negative during mammography screening. REIS output signal sweeps that we used to compute an initial feature included both amplitude and phase information representing differences between corresponding (matched) EIS signal values acquired from the left and right breasts. A genetic algorithm was applied to reduce the feature set and optimize a support vector machine (SVM) to classify the REIS examinations into "biopsy recommended" and "non-biopsy" recommended groups. Using the leave-one-case-out testing method, the classification performance as measured by the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.816 +/- 0.042. This pilot analysis suggests that the new multi-probe-based REIS system could potentially be used as a risk stratification tool to identify pre-screened young women who are at higher risk of having or developing breast cancer.

  8. Usefulness of a single item in a mail survey to identify persons with possible dementia: a new strategy for finding high-risk elders.

    PubMed

    Brody, Kathleen K; Maslow, Katie; Perrin, Nancy A; Crooks, Valerie; DellaPenna, Richard; Kuang, Daniel

    2005-04-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the characteristics of elderly persons who responded positively to a question about "severe memory problems" on a mailed health questionnaire yet were missed by the existing health risk algorithm to identify vulnerable elderly persons. A total of 324,471 respondents aged 65 and older completed a primary care health status questionnaire that gathered clinical information to quickly identify members with functional impairment, multiple chronic diseases, and higher medical care needs. The respondents were part of a large, integrated, not-for-profit managed care organization that implemented a model of care for elders using a uniform risk identification method across eight regions. Respondents with severe memory problems were compared to general respondents by morbidity, geriatric syndromes, functional impairments, service utilization, sensory impairments, sociodemographic characteristics, and activities of daily living. Of the respondents, 13,902 persons (4.3%) reported severe memory problems; the existing health risk algorithm missed 47.1% of these. When severe memory problems were included in the risk algorithm, identification increased from 11% to 13%, and risk prevalence by age groups ranged from 4.4% to 40.5%; one third had severe memory problems, a finding that was fairly consistent within age groups (28.4% to 36.5%). A question about severe memory problems should be incorporated into population risk-identification techniques. While false-negative rates are unknown, the false-positive rate of a self-report mail survey appears to be minimal. Persons reporting severe memory problems clearly have multiple comorbidities, higher prevalence of geriatric syndromes, and greater functional and sensory impairments. PMID:15815155

  9. Interventions for Youth at High Risk for Bipolar Disorder and Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Robert K.; Strawn, Jeffrey R.; Chang, Kiki D.; DelBello, Melissa P.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis Increasing evidence from retrospective and prospective studies is beginning to validate criteria to identify individuals at high risk for developing bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. In parallel, intervention trials are evaluating the efficacy and tolerability of pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches for the treatment of sub-threshold and possibly prodromal presentations in these high-risk populations with the ultimate objective of mitigating illness progression. This article reviews current evidence for candidate interventions for high-risk individuals in an effort to guide future research in this rapidly emerging field. PMID:23040899

  10. Can we identify patients with high risk of osteoarthritis progression who will respond to treatment? A focus on epidemiology and phenotype of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Bruyère, Olivier; Cooper, Cyrus; Arden, Nigel; Branco, Jaime; Brandi, Maria Luisa; Herrero-Beaumont, Gabriel; Berenbaum, Francis; Dennison, Elaine; Devogelaer, Jean-Pierre; Hochberg, Marc; Kanis, John; Laslop, Andrea; McAlindon, Tim; Reiter, Susanne; Richette, Pascal; Rizzoli, René; Reginster, Jean-Yves

    2015-03-01

    Osteoarthritis is a syndrome affecting a variety of patient profiles. A European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis and the European Union Geriatric Medicine Society working meeting explored the possibility of identifying different patient profiles in osteoarthritis. The risk factors for the development of osteoarthritis include systemic factors (e.g., age, sex, obesity, genetics, race, and bone density) and local biomechanical factors (e.g., obesity, sport, joint injury, and muscle weakness); most also predict disease progression, particularly joint injury, malalignment, and synovitis/effusion. The characterization of patient profiles should help to better orientate research, facilitate trial design, and define which patients are the most likely to benefit from treatment. There are a number of profile candidates. Generalized, polyarticular osteoarthritis and local, monoarticular osteoarthritis appear to be two different profiles; the former is a feature of osteoarthritis co-morbid with inflammation or the metabolic syndrome, while the latter is more typical of post-trauma osteoarthritis, especially in cases with severe malalignment. Other biomechanical factors may also define profiles, such as joint malalignment, loss of meniscal function, and ligament injury. Early- and late-stage osteoarthritis appear as separate profiles, notably in terms of treatment response. Finally, there is evidence that there are two separate profiles related to lesions in the subchondral bone, which may determine benefit from bone-active treatments. Decisions on appropriate therapy should be made considering clinical presentation, underlying pathophysiology, and stage of disease. Identification of patient profiles may lead to more personalized healthcare, with more targeted treatment for osteoarthritis.

  11. Comparison of the performance of HbA1c and fasting plasma glucose in identifying dysglycaemic status in Chinese high-risk subjects.

    PubMed

    Du, Ting-Ting; Yin, Ping; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Zhang, Dan; Shi, Wei; Yu, Xue-Feng

    2013-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the performance of HbA1c and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) in identifying dysglycaemic status among Chinese participants. Fasting plasma glucose and HbA1c were measured in 2318 subjects with at least one risk factor for diabetes but without being previously diagnosed with diabetes. Using HbA1c to diagnose diabetes resulted in the same classification as FPG for 90.5% of the study participants, with 21.0% (n = 487) classified as having diabetes by both FPG and HbA1c and 69.5% (n = 1610) classified as not having diabetes by both FPG and HbA1c. The kappa (κ) coefficient of the FPG criterion with the HbA1c criterion for diabetes was 0.75 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.72-0.78). The overlap index regarding diabetes diagnosed by FPG or HbA1c was 68.8%. Of 1610 subjects with FPG < 126 mg/dL and HbA1c < 6.5%, 220 (13.7%) had FPG ≥ 100 mg/dL and HbA1c < 5.7%, whereas 277 (17.2%) had FPG < 100 mg/dL and HbA1c ≥ 5.7%. The κ coefficient of the FPG criterion with the HbA1c criterion for prediabetes was 0.30 (95% CI 0.25-0.35). The overlap index between subjects diagnosed as having prediabetes by FPG of 100-125 mg/dL (impaired fasting glucose (IFG)) or HbA1c of 5.7-6.4% (increased HbA1c (IGH)) was 35.9%. The HbA1c criterion demonstrates reasonable concordance with the FPG criterion for diabetes. Hence, HbA1c and FPG can be used for the diagnosis of diabetes. However, the IGH shows limited overlap with IFG for prediabetes. Introduction of the IGH criterion in addition to IFG for the screening of prediabetes could lead to the identification of more people with this condition.

  12. Distribution of influenza vaccine to high-risk groups.

    PubMed

    Ompad, Danielle C; Galea, Sandro; Vlahov, David

    2006-01-01

    Vaccine distribution programs have historically targeted individuals at high risk of complications due to influenza. Despite recommendations from the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, vaccination coverage among high-risk populations has been generally low. This review systematically summarizes the recent literature evaluating programs in different settings, from within medical settings to venue-based and community-based approaches, in an effort to identify successful program components. The published literature was identified by using the MEDLINE database from 1990 to 2006 covering studies that reported on interventions or programs aimed at vaccinating high-risk populations. The authors reviewed 56 studies. In the United States, the Healthy People 2010 goals included 90% vaccination coverage for adults aged > or = 65 years and 60% for high-risk adults aged 18-64 years. Only a handful of the studies reviewed managed to meet those goals. Interventions that increased vaccination coverage to Healthy People 2010 goals included advertising, provider and patient mailings, registry-based telephone calls, patient and staff education, standing orders coupled with standardized forms, targeting of syringe exchange customers, and visiting nurses. Few studies evaluated the impact of vaccination programs by race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status. Few studies targeted individuals outside of the health-care and social services sectors. Given the growing disparities in health and health-care access, understanding the way in which interventions can remedy disparities is crucial.

  13. Associations of the Inflammatory Marker YKL-40 with Measures of Obesity and Dyslipidaemia in Individuals at High Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Stine B.; Gjesing, Anette P.; Rathcke, Camilla N.; Ekstrøm, Claus T.; Eiberg, Hans; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Vestergaard, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Circulating levels of the inflammatory marker YKL-40 are elevated in cardiovascular disease and obesity-related type 2 diabetes (T2D), and serum YKL-40 levels are related to elements of dyslipidaemia. Objective We aimed to investigate the associations between serum YKL-40 and obesity-related traits in a Danish sample of non-diabetic relatives to T2D patients and, furthermore, to estimate the heritability of YKL-40. Research Design and Methods 324 non-diabetic individuals with family relation to a T2D patient were included in the study. The participants underwent oral- and intravenous glucose tolerance tests for estimation of glucose tolerance and surrogate measures of insulin sensitivity. Anthropometric measures were retrieved and biochemical measures of the plasma lipid profile and serum YKL-40 levels were obtained. Association-analyses between serum YKL-40 and obesity-related traits and estimates of the narrow sense heritability of YKL-40 were based on a polygenic variance component model. Results Fasting serum levels of YKL-40 were positively associated with waist-hip-ratio (p<0.001) and fasting plasma triglyceride levels (p<0.001). None of the insulin sensitivity indexes were significantly associated with YKL-40. According to the AE model, the familiality-estimate h2 of YKL-40 was 0.45 (SE 0.13). When the ACE-model was applied, the heritability-estimate h2 of YKL-40 did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions Our results suggest a role of serum YKL-40 in obesity-related low grade inflammation, but do not indicate that YKL-40 is directly involved in the development of T2D. PMID:26197239

  14. The Effectiveness of a Worksite Lifestyle Intervention Program on High-Risk Individuals as Potential Candidates for Bariatric Surgery: My Unlimited Potential (MyUP).

    PubMed

    Osondu, Chukwuemeka U; Aneni, Ehimen C; Shaharyar, Sameer; Roberson, Lara; Rouseff, Maribeth; Das, Sankalp; Spatz, Erica; Younus, Adnan; Guzman, Henry; Brown, Doris; Santiago-Charles, Joann; Ochoa, Teresa; Mora, Joseph; Gilliam, Cynthia; Lehn, Virginia; Sherriff, Shoshana; Tran, Thinh; Gonzalez, Anthony; Virani, Salim; Feldman, Theodore; Agatston, Arthur S; Nasir, Khurram

    2016-10-01

    This is a single-arm, pre and post effectiveness study that evaluated the impact of a comprehensive workplace lifestyle program on severe obesity among high cardiovascular disease risk individuals in a large, diverse employee population. Employees of Baptist Health South Florida were considered eligible to participate if they had 2 or more of the following cardiometabolic risk factors: total cholesterol ≥200 mg/dL, systolic blood pressure ≥140 mmHg or diastolic blood pressure ≥90 mmHg, hemoglobin A1c ≥6.5%, body mass index ≥30kg/m(2). Participants received a personalized diet plan and physical activity intervention, and were followed for 1 year. Data on anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, blood glucose, and other biochemical measures were collected. Participants' body mass index was calculated and their eligibility for bariatric surgery (BS) also assessed. A total of 297 persons participated in the program; 160 participants completed all procedures through 12 months of follow-up. At baseline, 34% (n = 100) of all participants were eligible for BS. In an intention-to-treat analysis, 27% (n = 27) of BS eligible participants at baseline became ineligible after 12 months. Considering program completers only, 46% of BS eligible participants at baseline became ineligible. Irrespective of BS eligibility at 12 months, mean values of cardiometabolic risk factors among program completers improved after the follow-up period. Workplace wellness programs provide an important option for weight loss that can obviate the need for BS, reduce cardiovascular disease risk, and potentially reduce costs. However, in designing future worksite lifestyle interventions, measures should be taken to improve participation and retention rates in such programs.

  15. The Effectiveness of a Worksite Lifestyle Intervention Program on High-Risk Individuals as Potential Candidates for Bariatric Surgery: My Unlimited Potential (MyUP).

    PubMed

    Osondu, Chukwuemeka U; Aneni, Ehimen C; Shaharyar, Sameer; Roberson, Lara; Rouseff, Maribeth; Das, Sankalp; Spatz, Erica; Younus, Adnan; Guzman, Henry; Brown, Doris; Santiago-Charles, Joann; Ochoa, Teresa; Mora, Joseph; Gilliam, Cynthia; Lehn, Virginia; Sherriff, Shoshana; Tran, Thinh; Gonzalez, Anthony; Virani, Salim; Feldman, Theodore; Agatston, Arthur S; Nasir, Khurram

    2016-10-01

    This is a single-arm, pre and post effectiveness study that evaluated the impact of a comprehensive workplace lifestyle program on severe obesity among high cardiovascular disease risk individuals in a large, diverse employee population. Employees of Baptist Health South Florida were considered eligible to participate if they had 2 or more of the following cardiometabolic risk factors: total cholesterol ≥200 mg/dL, systolic blood pressure ≥140 mmHg or diastolic blood pressure ≥90 mmHg, hemoglobin A1c ≥6.5%, body mass index ≥30kg/m(2). Participants received a personalized diet plan and physical activity intervention, and were followed for 1 year. Data on anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, blood glucose, and other biochemical measures were collected. Participants' body mass index was calculated and their eligibility for bariatric surgery (BS) also assessed. A total of 297 persons participated in the program; 160 participants completed all procedures through 12 months of follow-up. At baseline, 34% (n = 100) of all participants were eligible for BS. In an intention-to-treat analysis, 27% (n = 27) of BS eligible participants at baseline became ineligible after 12 months. Considering program completers only, 46% of BS eligible participants at baseline became ineligible. Irrespective of BS eligibility at 12 months, mean values of cardiometabolic risk factors among program completers improved after the follow-up period. Workplace wellness programs provide an important option for weight loss that can obviate the need for BS, reduce cardiovascular disease risk, and potentially reduce costs. However, in designing future worksite lifestyle interventions, measures should be taken to improve participation and retention rates in such programs. PMID:26760281

  16. Diagnosis and Management of High Risk Group for Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Hyuk; Kim, Nayoung

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is associated with high morbidity and mortality worldwide. To reduce the socioeconomic burden related to gastric cancer, it is very important to identify and manage high risk group for gastric cancer. In this review, we describe the general risk factors for gastric cancer and define high risk group for gastric cancer. We discuss strategies for the effective management of patients for the prevention and early detection of gastric cancer. Atrophic gastritis (AG) and intestinal metaplasia (IM) are the most significant risk factors for gastric cancer. Therefore, the accurate selection of individuals with AG and IM may be a key strategy for the prevention and/or early detection of gastric cancer. Although endoscopic evaluation using enhanced technologies such as narrow band imaging-magnification, the serum pepsinogen test, Helicobacter pylori serology, and trefoil factor 3 have been evaluated, a gold standard method to accurately select individuals with AG and IM has not emerged. In terms of managing patients at high risk of gastric cancer, it remains uncertain whether H. pylori eradication reverses and/or prevents the progression of AG and IM. Although endoscopic surveillance in high risk patients is expected to be beneficial, further prospective studies in large populations are needed to determine the optimal surveillance interval. PMID:25547086

  17. Diagnosis and management of high risk group for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hyuk; Kim, Nayoung

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is associated with high morbidity and mortality worldwide. To reduce the socioeconomic burden related to gastric cancer, it is very important to identify and manage high risk group for gastric cancer. In this review, we describe the general risk factors for gastric cancer and define high risk group for gastric cancer. We discuss strategies for the effective management of patients for the prevention and early detection of gastric cancer. Atrophic gastritis (AG) and intestinal metaplasia (IM) are the most significant risk factors for gastric cancer. Therefore, the accurate selection of individuals with AG and IM may be a key strategy for the prevention and/or early detection of gastric cancer. Although endoscopic evaluation using enhanced technologies such as narrow band imaging-magnification, the serum pepsinogen test, Helicobacter pylori serology, and trefoil factor 3 have been evaluated, a gold standard method to accurately select individuals with AG and IM has not emerged. In terms of managing patients at high risk of gastric cancer, it remains uncertain whether H. pylori eradication reverses and/or prevents the progression of AG and IM. Although endoscopic surveillance in high risk patients is expected to be beneficial, further prospective studies in large populations are needed to determine the optimal surveillance interval.

  18. A QUALITATIVE RESEARCH STUDY OF THE EVOLUTION OF SYMPTOMS IN INDIVIDUALS IDENTIFIED AS PRODROMAL TO PSYCHOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Corcoran, Cheryl; Davidson, Larry; Sills-Shahar, Rachel; Nickou, Connie; Malaspina, Dolores; Miller, Tandy; McGlashan, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Because schizophrenia is difficult to treat and exacts large personal and societal costs, there is an effort underway to identify adolescents and young adults at high risk for psychosis. Theory-derived criteria of subthreshold positive symptoms identify a “prodromal” or clinically at-risk population who have conversion rates to psychosis of 40 to 50% within one to two years. However, further characterization of the psychosis prodrome by qualitative research methods could increase the predictive value of the “prodromal” designation. We conducted open-ended interviews with 20 parents of prodromal adolescents that focused on changes observed. The narratives fell into two thematically distinct subgroups, identified as “declining” and “never normal.” The prodromal adolescents described as “declining” had a higher subsequent rate of conversion to psychosis than did the “never normal” group. Although preliminary, these results suggest that a trajectory of change in personality, relationships, and behavior from an essentially normal baseline may be consistent with increased risk for psychosis among prodromal adolescents. PMID:14686457

  19. Using Medicare data to identify individuals who are electricity dependent to improve disaster preparedness and response.

    PubMed

    DeSalvo, Karen; Lurie, Nicole; Finne, Kristen; Worrall, Chris; Bogdanov, Alina; Dinkler, Ayame; Babcock, Sarah; Kelman, Jeffrey

    2014-07-01

    During a disaster or prolonged power outage, individuals who use electricity-dependent medical equipment are often unable to operate it and seek care in acute care settings or local shelters. Public health officials often report that they do not have proactive and systematic ways to rapidly identify and assist these individuals. In June 2013, we piloted a first-in-the-nation emergency preparedness drill in which we used Medicare claims data to identify individuals with electricity-dependent durable medical equipment during a disaster and securely disclosed it to a local health department. We found that Medicare claims data were 93% accurate in identifying individuals using a home oxygen concentrator or ventilator. The drill findings suggest that claims data can be useful in improving preparedness and response for electricity-dependent populations.

  20. Identifying functional reorganization of spelling networks: an individual peak probability comparison approach

    PubMed Central

    Purcell, Jeremy J.; Rapp, Brenda

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has shown that damage to the neural substrates of orthographic processing can lead to functional reorganization during reading (Tsapkini et al., 2011); in this research we ask if the same is true for spelling. To examine the functional reorganization of spelling networks we present a novel three-stage Individual Peak Probability Comparison (IPPC) analysis approach for comparing the activation patterns obtained during fMRI of spelling in a single brain-damaged individual with dysgraphia to those obtained in a set of non-impaired control participants. The first analysis stage characterizes the convergence in activations across non-impaired control participants by applying a technique typically used for characterizing activations across studies: Activation Likelihood Estimate (ALE) (Turkeltaub et al., 2002). This method was used to identify locations that have a high likelihood of yielding activation peaks in the non-impaired participants. The second stage provides a characterization of the degree to which the brain-damaged individual's activations correspond to the group pattern identified in Stage 1. This involves performing a Mahalanobis distance statistics analysis (Tsapkini et al., 2011) that compares each of a control group's peak activation locations to the nearest peak generated by the brain-damaged individual. The third stage evaluates the extent to which the brain-damaged individual's peaks are atypical relative to the range of individual variation among the control participants. This IPPC analysis allows for a quantifiable, statistically sound method for comparing an individual's activation pattern to the patterns observed in a control group and, thus, provides a valuable tool for identifying functional reorganization in a brain-damaged individual with impaired spelling. Furthermore, this approach can be applied more generally to compare any individual's activation pattern with that of a set of other individuals. PMID:24399981

  1. PedMine – A simulated annealing algorithm to identify maximally unrelated individuals in population isolates

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Julie A.; Sandefur, Conner I.

    2010-01-01

    Summary In family-based genetic studies, it is often useful to identify a subset of unrelated individuals. When such studies are conducted in population isolates, however, most if not all individuals are often detectably related to each other. To identify a set of maximally unrelated (or equivalently, minimally related) individuals, we have implemented simulated annealing, a general-purpose algorithm for solving difficult combinatorial optimization problems. We illustrate our method on data from a genetic study in the Old Order Amish of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, a population isolate derived from a modest number of founders. Given one or more pedigrees, our program automatically and rapidly extracts a fixed number of maximally unrelated individuals. PMID:18321883

  2. Identifying individual competency in emerging areas of practice: an applied approach.

    PubMed

    Gebbie, Kristine; Merrill, Jacqueline; Hwang, Inseon; Gupta, Meera; Btoush, Rula; Wagner, Monte

    2002-09-01

    Competency designation is important for any discipline to define individual performance expectations. Although public health (PH) agencies have always responded to emergencies, individual expectations have not been specified. The authors identified individual competencies necessary for organizations to meet performance standards. In the first stage, a Delphi survey served to identify competencies needed by staff to respond to any emergency, including bio-terrorism, yielding competency sets for four levels of workers. In the second stage, focus groups were used to assess the competencies with public health agencies. This feedback validated the Delphi-identified competencies as accurate and necessary for emergency response. The authors demonstrate the feasibility of using these methods to arrive at statements of value to PH practice at a reasonable investment of resources.

  3. Retroviral RNA identified in the cerebrospinal fluids and brains of individuals with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Håkan; Bachmann, Silke; Schröder, Johannes; McArthur, Justin; Torrey, E. Fuller; Yolken, Robert H.

    2001-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a serious brain disease of uncertain etiology. A role for retroviruses in the etiopathogenesis of some cases of schizophrenia has been postulated on the basis of clinical and epidemiological observations. We found sequences homologous to retroviral pol genes in the cell-free cerebrospinal fluids (CSFs) of 10 of 35 (29%) individuals with recent-onset schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. Retroviral sequences also were identified in the CSFs of 1 of 20 individuals with chronic schizophrenia. However, retroviral sequences were not identified in any of the CSFs obtained from 22 individuals with noninflammatory neurological diseases or from 30 individuals without evidence of neurological or psychiatric diseases (χ2 = 19.25, P < 0.001). The nucleotide sequences identified in the CSFs of the individuals with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder were related to those of the human endogenous retroviral (HERV)-W family of endogenous retroviruses and to other retroviruses in the murine leukemia virus genus. Transcription of RNA homologous to members of the HERV-W family of retroviruses also was found to be up-regulated differentially in the frontal cortex regions of brains obtained postmortem from individuals with schizophrenia, as compared with corresponding tissue from individuals without psychiatric diseases. The transcriptional activation of certain retroviral elements within the central nervous system may be associated with the development of schizophrenia in at least some individuals. The further characterization of retroviral elements within the central nervous system of individuals with schizophrenia might lead to improved methods for the diagnosis and management of this disorder. PMID:11296294

  4. Identified ambivalence: When cognitive conflicts can help individuals overcome cognitive traps.

    PubMed

    Guarana, Cristiano L; Hernandez, Morela

    2016-07-01

    In this article we investigate the functional effects of ambivalence on decision-making processes. We build on the misattribution literature and recent work on ambivalence to propose that individuals who properly identify the causes of their ambivalence (i.e., identified ambivalence) can systematically process relevant situational cues to make more effective decisions. The results of 4 studies demonstrate that individuals experiencing identified ambivalence are less influenced by cognitive biases (i.e., the framing effect, availability bias, and conjunction bias) than individuals experiencing no ambivalence or felt ambivalence. Notably, we find that contextual awareness accounts for the effect of identified ambivalence on decision effectiveness. We then investigate the role of trait self-control as a specific contingency in our model; our results indicate that identified ambivalence leads to effective decisions when individuals are low in trait self-control. Taken together, we advance theory and offer robust, consistent empirical evidence that explains why and how ambivalence can result in functional outcomes. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26963080

  5. Identified ambivalence: When cognitive conflicts can help individuals overcome cognitive traps.

    PubMed

    Guarana, Cristiano L; Hernandez, Morela

    2016-07-01

    In this article we investigate the functional effects of ambivalence on decision-making processes. We build on the misattribution literature and recent work on ambivalence to propose that individuals who properly identify the causes of their ambivalence (i.e., identified ambivalence) can systematically process relevant situational cues to make more effective decisions. The results of 4 studies demonstrate that individuals experiencing identified ambivalence are less influenced by cognitive biases (i.e., the framing effect, availability bias, and conjunction bias) than individuals experiencing no ambivalence or felt ambivalence. Notably, we find that contextual awareness accounts for the effect of identified ambivalence on decision effectiveness. We then investigate the role of trait self-control as a specific contingency in our model; our results indicate that identified ambivalence leads to effective decisions when individuals are low in trait self-control. Taken together, we advance theory and offer robust, consistent empirical evidence that explains why and how ambivalence can result in functional outcomes. (PsycINFO Database Record

  6. Guaranteed Student Loans: GAO High Risk Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comptroller General of the U.S., Washington, DC.

    As part of a larger program to identify and analyze federal programs at high risk for waste, fraud, abuse and mismanagement, this publication presents an evaluation of the Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP), formerly the Guaranteed Student Loan Program. The analysis argues that the program has not been successful in protecting the…

  7. Identifying real and perceived barriers to therapeutic education programs for individuals with inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bain, Lorna; Sangrar, Ruheena; Bornstein, Carolyn; Lukmanji, Sara; Hapuhennedige, Sandani; Thorne, Carter; Beattie, Karen A

    2016-09-01

    Therapeutic Education Programs (TEPs) grounded in self-management principles have been shown to improve quality of life of patients with chronic conditions and reduce patient-related healthcare costs. Though these programs are becoming more readily available, patients often experience barriers in participating. This study sought to identify barriers faced by inflammatory arthritis (IA) patients in attending a TEP and understand how patients overcame perceived barriers. A mixed-method study design was used. Questionnaires were distributed to individuals with IA who were invited to attend a TEP between 2010 and 2013. Respondents were those that chose not to attend (group A), individuals who attended ≤4 of 10 sessions (group B), individuals who attended ≥5 of 10 sessions prior to May 2013 (group C), and individuals who attended ≥5 of 10 sessions from June 2013 to November 2013 (group D). Individuals in group D were also invited to participate in focus groups to discuss how they had overcome perceived barriers. Real barriers identified by individuals in groups A and B included time, distance, and cost associated with attendance. Individuals who overcame perceived barriers (groups C and D) discussed strategies they used to do so. Aspects of the overall program experience and access to clinic and program also contributed to patients being able to overcome barriers. Time, distance, and cost are external barriers that prevented individuals from utilizing self-management education opportunities. These barriers were overcome if and when individuals had resources available to them. Readiness for behavior change also influenced commitment to participate in the program.

  8. The Human Genome Project and Eugenics: Identifying the Impact on Individuals with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuna, Jason

    2001-01-01

    This article explores the impact of the mapping work of the Human Genome Project on individuals with mental retardation and the negative effects of genetic testing. The potential to identify disabilities and the concept of eugenics are discussed, along with ethical issues surrounding potential genetic therapies. (Contains references.) (CR)

  9. Meeting the Needs of All Students: How Student Teachers Identify Individualization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Derek L.; Lubig, Joe; Smith, Markisha

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative phenomenological study was to examine how 64 student teachers at one mid-sized rural Midwestern university identified their students' needs and perceived the ways in which they met their students' individual needs. The authors used constant comparison methods and focused coding to examine, verify, and draw…

  10. Hyperactive ENaC identifies hypertensive individuals amenable to amiloride therapy.

    PubMed

    Carter, A R; Zhou, Z H; Calhoun, D A; Bubien, J K

    2001-11-01

    Pathophysiological features of both primary aldosteronism and pseudohyperaldosteronism are hyperactive amiloride-sensitive epithelial Na(+) channels (ENaC) and refractory hypertension. Peripheral blood lymphocytes express ENaC, which functions and is regulated similarly to ENaC expressed by renal principal cells. Thus it was hypothesized that individuals with either of these hypertensive etiologies could be identified by assessment of the function and regulation of peripheral blood lymphocyte ENaC, by whole cell patch clamp. We also tested the hypothesis that specific inhibition of hyperactive ENaC with amiloride could ameliorate the hypertension. To test these hypotheses, we solicited blood samples from normotensive, controlled hypertensive, and refractory hypertensive individuals. Lymphocytes were examined electrophysiologically to determine whether ENaC was hyperactive. All positive findings were from refractory hypertensive individuals. Nine refractory hypertensive patients had amiloride added to their hypertensive therapy. Amiloride normalized the blood pressure of four subjects. These individuals all had hyperactive ENaC. Amiloride had no effect on individuals with normal ENaC. These findings suggest that whole-cell patch clamp of peripheral blood lymphocytes can be used to identify accurately and rapidly hypertensive individuals who will respond to amiloride therapy. PMID:11600403

  11. Real-Time Detection Method And System For Identifying Individual Aerosol Particles

    DOEpatents

    Gard, Eric Evan; Fergenson, David Philip

    2005-10-25

    A method and system of identifying individual aerosol particles in real time. Sample aerosol particles are compared against and identified with substantially matching known particle types by producing positive and negative test spectra of an individual aerosol particle using a bipolar single particle mass spectrometer. Each test spectrum is compared to spectra of the same respective polarity in a database of predetermined positive and negative spectra for known particle types and a set of substantially matching spectra is obtained. Finally the identity of the individual aerosol particle is determined from the set of substantially matching spectra by determining a best matching one of the known particle types having both a substantially matching positive spectrum and a substantially matching negative spectrum associated with the best matching known particle type.

  12. Teamwork in high-risk environments analogous to space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanki, Barbara G.

    1990-01-01

    Mountaineering expeditions combine a number of factors which make them potentially good analogs to the planetary exploration facet of long-duration space missions. A study of mountain climbing teams was conducted in order to evaluate the usefulness of the environment as a space analog and to specifically identify the factors and issues surrounding teamwork and 'successful' team performance in two mountaineering environments. This paper focuses on social/organizational factors, including team size and structure, leadership styles and authority structure which were found in the sample of 22 climb teams (122 individuals). The second major issue discussed is the construction of a valid performance measure in this high-risk environment.

  13. Distribution patterns of individually identifiable West Indian manatees (Trichechus manatus) in Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reid, J.P.; Rathbun, G.B.; Wilcox, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    Photographs of distinctively scarred manatees (Trichechus manatus) were taken at aggregation sites throughout Florida and assembled into a catalog for identifying individuals. Resightings of known manatees in different years or at different locations enabled us to document site fidelity and long-distance movements. Of the 891 individuals included in the catalog as of August 1986, 470 (53%) were resighted at least once. We documented 219 cases of seasonal returns to specific aggregation sites and 98 instances of movements between areas. Movements in excess of 820 km were documented for individuals on the east coast of Florida. Rapid movements south during early winter, as well as northerly spring movements, verify a seasonal migration pattern for many individuals along Florida's east coast. The wide-ranging migratory habits of manatees in Florida must be considered if meaningful management strategies are to be developed and implemented.

  14. Analysis of 589,306 genomes identifies individuals resilient to severe Mendelian childhood diseases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong; Shi, Lisong; Hakenberg, Jörg; Naughton, Brian; Sklar, Pamela; Zhang, Jianguo; Zhou, Hanlin; Tian, Lifeng; Prakash, Om; Lemire, Mathieu; Sleiman, Patrick; Cheng, Wei-Yi; Chen, Wanting; Shah, Hardik; Shen, Yulan; Fromer, Menachem; Omberg, Larsson; Deardorff, Matthew A; Zackai, Elaine; Bobe, Jason R; Levin, Elissa; Hudson, Thomas J; Groop, Leif; Wang, Jun; Hakonarson, Hakon; Wojcicki, Anne; Diaz, George A; Edelmann, Lisa; Schadt, Eric E; Friend, Stephen H

    2016-05-01

    Genetic studies of human disease have traditionally focused on the detection of disease-causing mutations in afflicted individuals. Here we describe a complementary approach that seeks to identify healthy individuals resilient to highly penetrant forms of genetic childhood disorders. A comprehensive screen of 874 genes in 589,306 genomes led to the identification of 13 adults harboring mutations for 8 severe Mendelian conditions, with no reported clinical manifestation of the indicated disease. Our findings demonstrate the promise of broadening genetic studies to systematically search for well individuals who are buffering the effects of rare, highly penetrant, deleterious mutations. They also indicate that incomplete penetrance for Mendelian diseases is likely more common than previously believed. The identification of resilient individuals may provide a first step toward uncovering protective genetic variants that could help elucidate the mechanisms of Mendelian diseases and new therapeutic strategies. PMID:27065010

  15. Identifying Core Affect in Individuals from fMRI Responses to Dynamic Naturalistic Audiovisual Stimuli.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jongwan; Wang, Jing; Wedell, Douglas H; Shinkareva, Svetlana V

    2016-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that affective states elicited by viewing pictures varying in valence and arousal are identifiable from whole brain activation patterns observed with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Identification of affective states from more naturalistic stimuli has clinical relevance, but the feasibility of identifying these states on an individual trial basis from fMRI data elicited by dynamic multimodal stimuli is unclear. The goal of this study was to determine whether affective states can be similarly identified when participants view dynamic naturalistic audiovisual stimuli. Eleven participants viewed 5s audiovisual clips in a passive viewing task in the scanner. Valence and arousal for individual trials were identified both within and across participants based on distributed patterns of activity in areas selectively responsive to audiovisual naturalistic stimuli while controlling for lower level features of the stimuli. In addition, the brain regions identified by searchlight analyses to represent valence and arousal were consistent with previously identified regions associated with emotion processing. These findings extend previous results on the distributed representation of affect to multimodal dynamic stimuli. PMID:27598534

  16. Identifying Core Affect in Individuals from fMRI Responses to Dynamic Naturalistic Audiovisual Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jongwan; Wang, Jing; Wedell, Douglas H.

    2016-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that affective states elicited by viewing pictures varying in valence and arousal are identifiable from whole brain activation patterns observed with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Identification of affective states from more naturalistic stimuli has clinical relevance, but the feasibility of identifying these states on an individual trial basis from fMRI data elicited by dynamic multimodal stimuli is unclear. The goal of this study was to determine whether affective states can be similarly identified when participants view dynamic naturalistic audiovisual stimuli. Eleven participants viewed 5s audiovisual clips in a passive viewing task in the scanner. Valence and arousal for individual trials were identified both within and across participants based on distributed patterns of activity in areas selectively responsive to audiovisual naturalistic stimuli while controlling for lower level features of the stimuli. In addition, the brain regions identified by searchlight analyses to represent valence and arousal were consistent with previously identified regions associated with emotion processing. These findings extend previous results on the distributed representation of affect to multimodal dynamic stimuli. PMID:27598534

  17. Pigeons identify individual humans but show no sign of recognizing them in photographs.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, Lars; Adam, Ruth; Unver, Emre; Güntürkün, Onur

    2010-01-01

    Photographs, especially of humans, are widely used as stimuli in behavioural research with pigeons. Despite their abundant use, it is not clear to what extent pigeons perceive photographs as representing three-dimensional objects. To address this question, we trained 16 pigeons to identify individual, real-life humans. This discrimination depended primarily on visual cues from the heads of the persons. Subsequently, the pigeons were shown photographs of these individuals to test for transfer to a two-dimensional representation. Successful identification of a three-dimensional person did not facilitate learning of the corresponding photographs. These results demonstrate limitations of cross-recognition of complex objects and their photographs in pigeons.

  18. Identifying Shared Brain Networks in Individuals by Decoupling Functional and Anatomical Variability.

    PubMed

    Langs, Georg; Wang, Danhong; Golland, Polina; Mueller, Sophia; Pan, Ruiqi; Sabuncu, Mert R; Sun, Wei; Li, Kuncheng; Liu, Hesheng

    2016-10-01

    The connectivity architecture of the human brain varies across individuals. Mapping functional anatomy at the individual level is challenging, but critical for basic neuroscience research and clinical intervention. Using resting-state functional connectivity, we parcellated functional systems in an "embedding space" based on functional characteristics common across the population, while simultaneously accounting for individual variability in the cortical distribution of functional units. The functional connectivity patterns observed in resting-state data were mapped in the embedding space and the maps were aligned across individuals. A clustering algorithm was performed on the aligned embedding maps and the resulting clusters were transformed back to the unique anatomical space of each individual. This novel approach identified functional systems that were reproducible within subjects, but were distributed across different anatomical locations in different subjects. Using this approach for intersubject alignment improved the predictability of individual differences in language laterality when compared with anatomical alignment alone. Our results further revealed that the strength of association between function and macroanatomy varied across the cortex, which was strong in unimodal sensorimotor networks, but weak in association networks.

  19. Identifying Shared Brain Networks in Individuals by Decoupling Functional and Anatomical Variability.

    PubMed

    Langs, Georg; Wang, Danhong; Golland, Polina; Mueller, Sophia; Pan, Ruiqi; Sabuncu, Mert R; Sun, Wei; Li, Kuncheng; Liu, Hesheng

    2016-10-01

    The connectivity architecture of the human brain varies across individuals. Mapping functional anatomy at the individual level is challenging, but critical for basic neuroscience research and clinical intervention. Using resting-state functional connectivity, we parcellated functional systems in an "embedding space" based on functional characteristics common across the population, while simultaneously accounting for individual variability in the cortical distribution of functional units. The functional connectivity patterns observed in resting-state data were mapped in the embedding space and the maps were aligned across individuals. A clustering algorithm was performed on the aligned embedding maps and the resulting clusters were transformed back to the unique anatomical space of each individual. This novel approach identified functional systems that were reproducible within subjects, but were distributed across different anatomical locations in different subjects. Using this approach for intersubject alignment improved the predictability of individual differences in language laterality when compared with anatomical alignment alone. Our results further revealed that the strength of association between function and macroanatomy varied across the cortex, which was strong in unimodal sensorimotor networks, but weak in association networks. PMID:26334050

  20. High-risk human papillomavirus infection involving multiple anatomic sites of the female lower genital tract: a multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction-based study.

    PubMed

    Hui, Yiang; Manna, Pradip; Ou, Joyce J; Kerley, Spencer; Zhang, Cunxian; Sung, C James; Lawrence, W Dwayne; Quddus, M Ruhul

    2015-09-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus infection usually is seen at one anatomic site in an individual. Rarely, infection at multiple anatomic sites of the female lower genital tract in the same individual is encountered either simultaneously and/or at a later date. The current study identifies the various subtypes of high-risk human papillomavirus infection in these scenarios and analyzes the potential significance of these findings. High-risk human papillomavirus infection involving 22 anatomic sites from 7 individuals was identified after institutional review board approval. Residual paraffin-embedded tissue samples were retrieved, and all 15 high-risk human papillomavirus were identified and viral load quantified using multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction-based method. Multiple high-risk human papillomavirus subtypes were identified in 32% of the samples and as many as 5 different subtypes of high-risk human papillomavirus infection in a single anatomic site. In general, each anatomic site has unique combination of viral subtypes, although one individual showed overlapping subtypes in the vagina, cervix, and vulvar samples. Higher viral load and rare subtypes are more frequent in younger patients and in dysplasia compared with carcinoma. Follow-up ranging from 3 to 84 months revealed persistent high-risk human papillomavirus infection in 60% of cases.

  1. Daily changes of individual gait patterns identified by means of support vector machines.

    PubMed

    Horst, F; Kramer, F; Schäfer, B; Eekhoff, A; Hegen, P; Nigg, B M; Schöllhorn, W I

    2016-09-01

    Despite the common knowledge about the individual character of human gait patterns and about their non-repeatability, little is known about their stability, their interactions and their changes over time. Variations of gait patterns are typically described as random deviations around a stable mean curve derived from groups, which appear due to noise or experimental insufficiencies. The purpose of this study is to examine the nature of intrinsic inter-session variability in more detail by proving separable characteristics of gait patterns between individuals as well as within individuals in repeated measurement sessions. Eight healthy subjects performed 15 gait trials at a self-selected speed on eight days within two weeks. For each trial, the time-continuous ground reaction forces and lower body kinematics were quantified. A total of 960 gait patterns were analysed by means of support vector machines and the coefficient of multiple correlation. The results emphasise the remarkable amount of individual characteristics in human gait. Support vector machines results showed an error-free assignment of gait patterns to the corresponding individual. Thus, differences in gait patterns between individuals seem to be persistent over two weeks. Within the range of individual gait patterns, day specific characteristics could be distinguished by classification rates of 97.3% and 59.5% for the eight-day classification of lower body joint angles and ground reaction forces, respectively. Hence, gait patterns can be assumed not to be constant over time and rather exhibit discernible daily changes within previously stated good repeatability. Advantages for more individual and situational diagnoses or therapy are identified.

  2. Identification of discriminant proteins through antibody profiling, methods and apparatus for identifying an individual

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Vicki S; Lacey, Jeffrey A; Gentillon, Cynthia A; Apel, William A

    2015-03-03

    A method for determining a plurality of proteins for discriminating and positively identifying an individual based from a biological sample. The method may include profiling a biological sample from a plurality of individuals against a protein array including a plurality of proteins. The protein array may include proteins attached to a support in a preselected pattern such that locations of the proteins are known. The biological sample may be contacted with the protein array such that a portion of antibodies in the biological sample reacts with and binds to the proteins forming immune complexes. A statistical analysis method, such as discriminant analysis, may be performed to determine discriminating proteins for distinguishing individuals. Proteins of interest may be used to form a protein array. Such a protein array may be used, for example, to compare a forensic sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source.

  3. Identification of discriminant proteins through antibody profiling, methods and apparatus for identifying an individual

    DOEpatents

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S; Lacey, Jeffrey A.; Gentillon, Cynthia A.

    2016-08-09

    A method for determining a plurality of proteins for discriminating and positively identifying an individual based from a biological sample. The method may include profiling a biological sample from a plurality of individuals against a protein array including a plurality of proteins. The protein array may include proteins attached to a support in a preselected pattern such that locations of the proteins are known. The biological sample may be contacted with the protein array such that a portion of antibodies in the biological sample reacts with and binds to the proteins forming immune complexes. A statistical analysis method, such as discriminant analysis, may be performed to determine discriminating proteins for distinguishing individuals. Proteins of interest may be used to form a protein array. Such a protein array may be used, for example, to compare a forensic sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source.

  4. SNP-microarrays can accurately identify the presence of an individual in complex forensic DNA mixtures.

    PubMed

    Voskoboinik, Lev; Ayers, Sheri B; LeFebvre, Aaron K; Darvasi, Ariel

    2015-05-01

    Common forensic and mass disaster scenarios present DNA evidence that comprises a mixture of several contributors. Identifying the presence of an individual in such mixtures has proven difficult. In the current study, we evaluate the practical usefulness of currently available "off-the-shelf" SNP microarrays for such purposes. We found that a set of 3000 SNPs specifically selected for this purpose can accurately identify the presence of an individual in complex DNA mixtures of various compositions. For example, individuals contributing as little as 5% to a complex DNA mixture can be robustly identified even if the starting DNA amount was as little as 5.0ng and had undergone whole-genome amplification (WGA) prior to SNP analysis. The work presented in this study represents proof-of-principle that our previously proposed approach, can work with real "forensic-type" samples. Furthermore, in the absence of a low-density focused forensic SNP microarray, the use of standard, currently available high-density SNP microarrays can be similarly used and even increase statistical power due to the larger amount of available information.

  5. An examination of the Clinical Impairment Assessment among women at high risk for eating disorder onset

    PubMed Central

    Vannucci, Anna; Kass, Andrea E.; Sinton, Meghan M.; Aspen, Vandana; Weisman, Hannah; Bailey, Jakki O.; Wilfley, Denise E.; Taylor, C. Barr

    2013-01-01

    Identifying measures that reliably and validly assess clinical impairment has important implications for eating disorder (ED) diagnosis and treatment. The current study examined the psychometric properties of the Clinical Impairment Assessment (CIA) in women at high risk for ED onset. Participants were 543 women (20.6 ± 2.0 years) who were classified into one of three ED categories: clinical ED, high risk for ED onset, and low risk control. Among high risk women, the CIA demonstrated high internal consistency (α = 0.93) and good convergent validity with disordered eating attitudes (rs = 0.27–0.68, ps < 0.001). Examination of the CIA’s discriminant validity revealed that CIA global scores were highest among women with a clinical ED (17.7 ± 10.7) followed by high risk women (10.6 ± 8.5) and low risk controls (3.0 ± 3.3), respectively (p < 0.001). High risk women reporting behavioral indices of ED psychopathology (objective and/or subjective binge episodes, purging behaviors, driven exercise, and ED treatment history) had higher CIA global scores than those without such indices (ps < 0.05), suggesting good criterion validity. These data establish the first norms for the CIA in a United States sample. The CIA is psychometrically sound among high risk women, and heightened levels of impairment among these individuals as compared to low risk women verify the relevance of early intervention efforts. PMID:22516320

  6. Identifying Effective Methods for Teaching Sex Education to Individuals With Intellectual Disabilities: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Schaafsma, Dilana; Kok, Gerjo; Stoffelen, Joke M. T.; Curfs, Leopold M. G.

    2015-01-01

    Sex education for individuals with intellectual disabilities is important. However, our knowledge about effective methods for teaching sex education to this population is limited. We report the results of a systematic review identifying methods for sex education programs aimed at individuals with intellectual disabilities. In all, 20 articles were included that met the criteria set in terms of topic—the effectiveness of sex education programs—and population of interest—individuals with intellectual disabilities. In these articles, methods for increasing knowledge and for improving skills and attitudes were reported. However, the studies revealed that generalization of skills to real-life situations was often not achieved. There are indications that the maintenance of knowledge and skills still needs extra attention. Moreover, detailed descriptions of the program materials, program goals, and methods used in the programs were often lacking in the reports. Although there is some evidence for methods that may improve knowledge, attitudes, and skills with regard to sex education aimed at individuals with intellectual disabilities, due to the lack of detailed descriptions provided it is unclear under which conditions these methods work. We therefore suggest that authors provide additional detail about methods in future publications or in online supplements. PMID:25085114

  7. Individual Human Brain Areas Can Be Identified from Their Characteristic Spectral Activation Fingerprints

    PubMed Central

    Keitel, Anne; Gross, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    The human brain can be parcellated into diverse anatomical areas. We investigated whether rhythmic brain activity in these areas is characteristic and can be used for automatic classification. To this end, resting-state MEG data of 22 healthy adults was analysed. Power spectra of 1-s long data segments for atlas-defined brain areas were clustered into spectral profiles (“fingerprints”), using k-means and Gaussian mixture (GM) modelling. We demonstrate that individual areas can be identified from these spectral profiles with high accuracy. Our results suggest that each brain area engages in different spectral modes that are characteristic for individual areas. Clustering of brain areas according to similarity of spectral profiles reveals well-known brain networks. Furthermore, we demonstrate task-specific modulations of auditory spectral profiles during auditory processing. These findings have important implications for the classification of regional spectral activity and allow for novel approaches in neuroimaging and neurostimulation in health and disease. PMID:27355236

  8. Individual Human Brain Areas Can Be Identified from Their Characteristic Spectral Activation Fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Keitel, Anne; Gross, Joachim

    2016-06-01

    The human brain can be parcellated into diverse anatomical areas. We investigated whether rhythmic brain activity in these areas is characteristic and can be used for automatic classification. To this end, resting-state MEG data of 22 healthy adults was analysed. Power spectra of 1-s long data segments for atlas-defined brain areas were clustered into spectral profiles ("fingerprints"), using k-means and Gaussian mixture (GM) modelling. We demonstrate that individual areas can be identified from these spectral profiles with high accuracy. Our results suggest that each brain area engages in different spectral modes that are characteristic for individual areas. Clustering of brain areas according to similarity of spectral profiles reveals well-known brain networks. Furthermore, we demonstrate task-specific modulations of auditory spectral profiles during auditory processing. These findings have important implications for the classification of regional spectral activity and allow for novel approaches in neuroimaging and neurostimulation in health and disease. PMID:27355236

  9. Analyses to help identify individuals from a historical mass grave in Kassel, Germany.

    PubMed

    v Grumbkow, Philipp; Zipp, Anna; Grosskopf, Birgit; Fueldner, Kai; Hummel, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    In 2008, the skeletal remains of more than 60 human individuals were found in a mass grave on the grounds of the University of Kassel, Germany. There was no evidence helping to identify them or throwing light on the cause of their death. Mainly due to 14C age determination and initial hints on age and sex distribution, historians hypothesized that they had been soldiers of Napoleon's army who died in an epidemic in the winter of 1813/14. To test this assumption, morphological and molecular analyses were carried out on a sample. The morphological analyses comprised an age and sex determination as well as a macro- and micro-morphological inspection for pathological deviations after the commingled bones had been assembled as individuals. The molecular investigations aimed to identify the geographic origin of the remains. For this, mitochondrial and Y-chromosomal haplotypings were carried out. The results point to a group of mainly young men, some of them suffering from systemic inflammation of the periosteum. Others revealed severe aberrations in bone microstructure. The greatest similarities revealed by Y-haplogroup and -haplotype distribution were to populations that live in what are now the Benelux countries. All aspects support the thesis that these were soldiers of the Napoleonic army. PMID:22338792

  10. Whole-genome sequencing of individuals from a founder population identifies candidate genes for asthma.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Catarina D; Mohajeri, Kiana; Malig, Maika; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Nelson, Benjamin; Du, Gaixin; Patterson, Kristen M; Eng, Celeste; Torgerson, Dara G; Hu, Donglei; Herman, Catherine; Chong, Jessica X; Ko, Arthur; O'Roak, Brian J; Krumm, Niklas; Vives, Laura; Lee, Choli; Roth, Lindsey A; Rodriguez-Cintron, William; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose; Brigino-Buenaventura, Emerita; Davis, Adam; Meade, Kelley; LeNoir, Michael A; Thyne, Shannon; Jackson, Daniel J; Gern, James E; Lemanske, Robert F; Shendure, Jay; Abney, Mark; Burchard, Esteban G; Ober, Carole; Eichler, Evan E

    2014-01-01

    Asthma is a complex genetic disease caused by a combination of genetic and environmental risk factors. We sought to test classes of genetic variants largely missed by genome-wide association studies (GWAS), including copy number variants (CNVs) and low-frequency variants, by performing whole-genome sequencing (WGS) on 16 individuals from asthma-enriched and asthma-depleted families. The samples were obtained from an extended 13-generation Hutterite pedigree with reduced genetic heterogeneity due to a small founding gene pool and reduced environmental heterogeneity as a result of a communal lifestyle. We sequenced each individual to an average depth of 13-fold, generated a comprehensive catalog of genetic variants, and tested the most severe mutations for association with asthma. We identified and validated 1960 CNVs, 19 nonsense or splice-site single nucleotide variants (SNVs), and 18 insertions or deletions that were out of frame. As follow-up, we performed targeted sequencing of 16 genes in 837 cases and 540 controls of Puerto Rican ancestry and found that controls carry a significantly higher burden of mutations in IL27RA (2.0% of controls; 0.23% of cases; nominal p = 0.004; Bonferroni p = 0.21). We also genotyped 593 CNVs in 1199 Hutterite individuals. We identified a nominally significant association (p = 0.03; Odds ratio (OR) = 3.13) between a 6 kbp deletion in an intron of NEDD4L and increased risk of asthma. We genotyped this deletion in an additional 4787 non-Hutterite individuals (nominal p = 0.056; OR = 1.69). NEDD4L is expressed in bronchial epithelial cells, and conditional knockout of this gene in the lung in mice leads to severe inflammation and mucus accumulation. Our study represents one of the early instances of applying WGS to complex disease with a large environmental component and demonstrates how WGS can identify risk variants, including CNVs and low-frequency variants, largely untested in GWAS. PMID:25116239

  11. Whole-genome sequencing of individuals from a founder population identifies candidate genes for asthma.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Catarina D; Mohajeri, Kiana; Malig, Maika; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Nelson, Benjamin; Du, Gaixin; Patterson, Kristen M; Eng, Celeste; Torgerson, Dara G; Hu, Donglei; Herman, Catherine; Chong, Jessica X; Ko, Arthur; O'Roak, Brian J; Krumm, Niklas; Vives, Laura; Lee, Choli; Roth, Lindsey A; Rodriguez-Cintron, William; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose; Brigino-Buenaventura, Emerita; Davis, Adam; Meade, Kelley; LeNoir, Michael A; Thyne, Shannon; Jackson, Daniel J; Gern, James E; Lemanske, Robert F; Shendure, Jay; Abney, Mark; Burchard, Esteban G; Ober, Carole; Eichler, Evan E

    2014-01-01

    Asthma is a complex genetic disease caused by a combination of genetic and environmental risk factors. We sought to test classes of genetic variants largely missed by genome-wide association studies (GWAS), including copy number variants (CNVs) and low-frequency variants, by performing whole-genome sequencing (WGS) on 16 individuals from asthma-enriched and asthma-depleted families. The samples were obtained from an extended 13-generation Hutterite pedigree with reduced genetic heterogeneity due to a small founding gene pool and reduced environmental heterogeneity as a result of a communal lifestyle. We sequenced each individual to an average depth of 13-fold, generated a comprehensive catalog of genetic variants, and tested the most severe mutations for association with asthma. We identified and validated 1960 CNVs, 19 nonsense or splice-site single nucleotide variants (SNVs), and 18 insertions or deletions that were out of frame. As follow-up, we performed targeted sequencing of 16 genes in 837 cases and 540 controls of Puerto Rican ancestry and found that controls carry a significantly higher burden of mutations in IL27RA (2.0% of controls; 0.23% of cases; nominal p = 0.004; Bonferroni p = 0.21). We also genotyped 593 CNVs in 1199 Hutterite individuals. We identified a nominally significant association (p = 0.03; Odds ratio (OR) = 3.13) between a 6 kbp deletion in an intron of NEDD4L and increased risk of asthma. We genotyped this deletion in an additional 4787 non-Hutterite individuals (nominal p = 0.056; OR = 1.69). NEDD4L is expressed in bronchial epithelial cells, and conditional knockout of this gene in the lung in mice leads to severe inflammation and mucus accumulation. Our study represents one of the early instances of applying WGS to complex disease with a large environmental component and demonstrates how WGS can identify risk variants, including CNVs and low-frequency variants, largely untested in GWAS.

  12. Whole-Genome Sequencing of Individuals from a Founder Population Identifies Candidate Genes for Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Catarina D.; Mohajeri, Kiana; Malig, Maika; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Nelson, Benjamin; Du, Gaixin; Patterson, Kristen M.; Eng, Celeste; Torgerson, Dara G.; Hu, Donglei; Herman, Catherine; Chong, Jessica X.; Ko, Arthur; O'Roak, Brian J.; Krumm, Niklas; Vives, Laura; Lee, Choli; Roth, Lindsey A.; Rodriguez-Cintron, William; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose; Brigino-Buenaventura, Emerita; Davis, Adam; Meade, Kelley; LeNoir, Michael A.; Thyne, Shannon; Jackson, Daniel J.; Gern, James E.; Lemanske, Robert F.; Shendure, Jay; Abney, Mark; Burchard, Esteban G.; Ober, Carole; Eichler, Evan E.

    2014-01-01

    Asthma is a complex genetic disease caused by a combination of genetic and environmental risk factors. We sought to test classes of genetic variants largely missed by genome-wide association studies (GWAS), including copy number variants (CNVs) and low-frequency variants, by performing whole-genome sequencing (WGS) on 16 individuals from asthma-enriched and asthma-depleted families. The samples were obtained from an extended 13-generation Hutterite pedigree with reduced genetic heterogeneity due to a small founding gene pool and reduced environmental heterogeneity as a result of a communal lifestyle. We sequenced each individual to an average depth of 13-fold, generated a comprehensive catalog of genetic variants, and tested the most severe mutations for association with asthma. We identified and validated 1960 CNVs, 19 nonsense or splice-site single nucleotide variants (SNVs), and 18 insertions or deletions that were out of frame. As follow-up, we performed targeted sequencing of 16 genes in 837 cases and 540 controls of Puerto Rican ancestry and found that controls carry a significantly higher burden of mutations in IL27RA (2.0% of controls; 0.23% of cases; nominal p = 0.004; Bonferroni p = 0.21). We also genotyped 593 CNVs in 1199 Hutterite individuals. We identified a nominally significant association (p = 0.03; Odds ratio (OR) = 3.13) between a 6 kbp deletion in an intron of NEDD4L and increased risk of asthma. We genotyped this deletion in an additional 4787 non-Hutterite individuals (nominal p = 0.056; OR = 1.69). NEDD4L is expressed in bronchial epithelial cells, and conditional knockout of this gene in the lung in mice leads to severe inflammation and mucus accumulation. Our study represents one of the early instances of applying WGS to complex disease with a large environmental component and demonstrates how WGS can identify risk variants, including CNVs and low-frequency variants, largely untested in GWAS. PMID:25116239

  13. Host Protein Biomarkers Identify Active Tuberculosis in HIV Uninfected and Co-infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Achkar, Jacqueline M.; Cortes, Laetitia; Croteau, Pascal; Yanofsky, Corey; Mentinova, Marija; Rajotte, Isabelle; Schirm, Michael; Zhou, Yiyong; Junqueira-Kipnis, Ana Paula; Kasprowicz, Victoria O.; Larsen, Michelle; Allard, René; Hunter, Joanna; Paramithiotis, Eustache

    2015-01-01

    Biomarkers for active tuberculosis (TB) are urgently needed to improve rapid TB diagnosis. The objective of this study was to identify serum protein expression changes associated with TB but not latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (LTBI), uninfected states, or respiratory diseases other than TB (ORD). Serum samples from 209 HIV uninfected (HIV−) and co-infected (HIV+) individuals were studied. In the discovery phase samples were analyzed via liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry, and in the verification phase biologically independent samples were analyzed via a multiplex multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (MRM-MS) assay. Compared to LTBI and ORD, host proteins were significantly differentially expressed in TB, and involved in the immune response, tissue repair, and lipid metabolism. Biomarker panels whose composition differed according to HIV status, and consisted of 8 host proteins in HIV− individuals (CD14, SEPP1, SELL, TNXB, LUM, PEPD, QSOX1, COMP, APOC1), or 10 host proteins in HIV+ individuals (CD14, SEPP1, PGLYRP2, PFN1, VASN, CPN2, TAGLN2, IGFBP6), respectively, distinguished TB from ORD with excellent accuracy (AUC = 0.96 for HIV− TB, 0.95 for HIV+ TB). These results warrant validation in larger studies but provide promise that host protein biomarkers could be the basis for a rapid, blood-based test for TB. PMID:26501113

  14. Host Protein Biomarkers Identify Active Tuberculosis in HIV Uninfected and Co-infected Individuals.

    PubMed

    Achkar, Jacqueline M; Cortes, Laetitia; Croteau, Pascal; Yanofsky, Corey; Mentinova, Marija; Rajotte, Isabelle; Schirm, Michael; Zhou, Yiyong; Junqueira-Kipnis, Ana Paula; Kasprowicz, Victoria O; Larsen, Michelle; Allard, René; Hunter, Joanna; Paramithiotis, Eustache

    2015-09-01

    Biomarkers for active tuberculosis (TB) are urgently needed to improve rapid TB diagnosis. The objective of this study was to identify serum protein expression changes associated with TB but not latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (LTBI), uninfected states, or respiratory diseases other than TB (ORD). Serum samples from 209 HIV uninfected (HIV(-)) and co-infected (HIV(+)) individuals were studied. In the discovery phase samples were analyzed via liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry, and in the verification phase biologically independent samples were analyzed via a multiplex multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (MRM-MS) assay. Compared to LTBI and ORD, host proteins were significantly differentially expressed in TB, and involved in the immune response, tissue repair, and lipid metabolism. Biomarker panels whose composition differed according to HIV status, and consisted of 8 host proteins in HIV(-) individuals (CD14, SEPP1, SELL, TNXB, LUM, PEPD, QSOX1, COMP, APOC1), or 10 host proteins in HIV(+) individuals (CD14, SEPP1, PGLYRP2, PFN1, VASN, CPN2, TAGLN2, IGFBP6), respectively, distinguished TB from ORD with excellent accuracy (AUC = 0.96 for HIV(-) TB, 0.95 for HIV(+) TB). These results warrant validation in larger studies but provide promise that host protein biomarkers could be the basis for a rapid, blood-based test for TB. PMID:26501113

  15. Perceptions of high risk sports.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, D M

    1997-10-01

    High risk sports were rated as to risk, appeal, and likelihood of participation by 282 men and 162 women. Ascending order of perceived risk was skiing, scuba diving, bungee jumping, rock climbing, motorcycle racing, hang gliding, cliff jumping, and skydiving. Profile analysis showed stated likelihood of participation to be directly related to appeal and inversely related to perceived risk.

  16. Identifying At-Risk Individuals for Insomnia Using the Ford Insomnia Response to Stress Test

    PubMed Central

    Kalmbach, David A.; Pillai, Vivek; Arnedt, J. Todd; Drake, Christopher L.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: A primary focus of the National Institute of Mental Health's current strategic plan is “predicting” who is at risk for disease. As such, the current investigation examined the utility of premorbid sleep reactivity in identifying a specific and manageable population at elevated risk for future insomnia. Methods: A community-based sample of adults (n = 2,892; 59.3% female; 47.9 ± 13.3 y old) with no lifetime history of insomnia or depression completed web-based surveys across three annual assessments. Participants reported parental history of insomnia, demographic characteristics, sleep reactivity on the Ford Insomnia in Response to Stress Test (FIRST), and insomnia symptoms. DSM-IV diagnostic criteria were used to determine insomnia classification. Results: Baseline FIRST scores were used to predict incident insomnia at 1-y follow-up. Two clinically meaningful FIRST cutoff values were identified: FIRST ≥ 16 (sensitivity 77%; specificity 50%; odds ratio [OR] = 2.88, P < 0.001); and FIRST ≥ 18 (sensitivity 62%; specificity 67%; OR = 3.32, P < 0.001). Notably, both FIRST cut-points outperformed known maternal (OR = 1.49–1.59, P < 0.01) and paternal history (P = NS) in predicting insomnia onset, even after controlling for stress exposure and demographic characteristics. Of the incident cases, insomniacs with highly reactive sleep systems reported longer sleep onset latencies (FIRST ≥ 16: 65 min; FIRST ≥ 18: 68 min) than participants with nonreactive insomnia (FIRST < 16: 37 min; FIRST < 18: 44 min); these groups did not differ on any other sleep parameters. Conclusions: The current study established a cost- and time-effective strategy for identifying individuals at elevated risk for insomnia based on trait sleep reactivity. The FIRST accurately identifies a focused target population in which the psychobiological processes complicit in insomnia onset and progression can be better investigated, thus improving future preventive efforts

  17. Microspectroscopic imaging and characterization of individually identified ice nucleating particles from a case field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knopf, D. A.; Alpert, P. A.; Wang, B.; O'Brien, R. E.; Kelly, S. T.; Laskin, A.; Gilles, M. K.; Moffet, R. C.

    2014-09-01

    The effect of anthropogenic and biogenic organic particles on atmospheric glaciation processes is poorly understood. We use an optical microscopy setup to identify the ice nuclei (IN) active in immersion freezing (IMF) and deposition ice nucleation within a large population of particles collected on a substrate from an ambient environment in central California dominated by urban and marine aerosols. Multimodal microspectroscopy methods are applied to characterize the physicochemical properties and mixing state of the individual IN and particle populations to identify particle-type classes. The temperature onsets of water uptake occurred between 235 and 257 K at subsaturated conditions, and the onsets of IMF proceeded at subsaturated and saturated conditions for 235-247 K, relevant for ice nucleation in mixed-phase clouds. Particles also took up water and nucleated ice between 226 and 235 K and acted as deposition IN with onset temperatures below 226 K, a temperature range relevant to cirrus cloud formation. The identified IN belong to the most common particle-type classes observed in the field samples: organic coated sea salt and Na-rich, secondary, and refractory carbonaceous particles. Based on these observations, we suggest that the IN are not always particles with unique chemical composition and exceptional ice nucleation propensity; rather, they are common particles in the ambient particle population. The results suggest that particle-type abundance and total particle surface area are also crucial factors, in addition to particle-type ice nucleation efficiency, in determining ice formation within the particle population.

  18. Identifying individual differences of fluoxetine response in juvenile rhesus monkeys by metabolite profiling

    PubMed Central

    He, Y; Hogrefe, C E; Grapov, D; Palazoglu, M; Fiehn, O; Turck, C W; Golub, M S

    2014-01-01

    Fluoxetine is the only psychopharmacological agent approved for depression by the US Food and Drug Administration for children and is commonly used therapeutically in a variety of neurodevelopmental disorders. Therapeutic response shows high individual variability, and severe side effects have been observed. In the current study we set out to identify biomarkers of response to fluoxetine as well as biomarkers that correlate with impulsivity, a measure of reward delay behavior and potential side effect of the drug, in juvenile male rhesus monkeys. The study group was also genotyped for polymorphisms of monoamine oxidase A (MAOA), a gene that has been associated with psychiatric disorders. We used peripheral metabolite profiling of blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from animals treated daily with fluoxetine or vehicle for one year. Fluoxetine response metabolite profiles and metabolite/reward delay behavior associations were evaluated using multivariate analysis. Our analyses identified a set of plasma and CSF metabolites that distinguish fluoxetine- from vehicle-treated animals and metabolites that correlate with impulsivity. Some metabolites displayed an interaction between fluoxetine and MAOA genotype. The identified metabolite biomarkers belong to pathways that have important functions in central nervous system physiology. Biomarkers of response to fluoxetine in the normally functioning brain of juvenile nonhuman primates may aid in finding predictors of response to treatment in young psychiatric populations and in progress toward the realization of a precision medicine approach in the area of neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:25369145

  19. Prevalence of High-Risk Human Papillomavirus Among Older Women

    PubMed Central

    Lindau, Stacy Tessler; Drum, Melinda L.; Gaumer, Elyzabeth; Surawska, Hanna; Jordan, Jeanne A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To estimate the prevalence, genotypes, and individual-level correlates of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) among women aged 57–85. Methods Community-residing women (n=1550), aged 57–85, were drawn from a nationally-representative probability sample. In-home interviews and biomeasures, including a self-collected vaginal specimen, were obtained between 2005 and 2006. Specimens were analyzed for high-risk HPV DNA using probe hybridization and signal amplification (hc2); of 1,028 specimens provided, 1,010 were adequate for analysis. All samples testing positive were analyzed for HPV DNA by L1 consensus polymerase chain reaction followed by type-specific hybridization. Results The overall population-based weighted estimate of high-risk HPV prevalence by hc2 was 6.0% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 4.5 to 7.9). Current marital and smoking status, frequency of sexual activity, history of cancer, and hysterectomy were associated with high-risk HPV positivity. Among high-risk HPV+ women, 63% had multiple type infections. HPV 16 or 18 was present in 17.4% of all high-risk HPV+ women. The most common high-risk genotypes among high-risk HPV+ women were HPV 61 (19.1%), 31 (13.1%), 52 (12.9%), 58 (12.5%), 83 (12.3%), 66(12.0%), 51 (11.7%), 45 (11.2%), 56 (10.3%), 53 (10.2%), 16 (9.7%), and 62 (9.2%). Being married and having an intact uterus were independently associated with lower prevalence of high-risk HPV. Among unmarried women, current sexual activity and smoking were independently and positively associated with high-risk HPV infection. Conclusions In this nationally representative population, nearly 1 in 16 women aged 57–85 were found to have high-risk HPV and prevalence was stable across older age groups. PMID:18978096

  20. Platelet-Related Variants Identified by Exomechip Meta-analysis in 157,293 Individuals.

    PubMed

    Eicher, John D; Chami, Nathalie; Kacprowski, Tim; Nomura, Akihiro; Chen, Ming-Huei; Yanek, Lisa R; Tajuddin, Salman M; Schick, Ursula M; Slater, Andrew J; Pankratz, Nathan; Polfus, Linda; Schurmann, Claudia; Giri, Ayush; Brody, Jennifer A; Lange, Leslie A; Manichaikul, Ani; Hill, W David; Pazoki, Raha; Elliot, Paul; Evangelou, Evangelos; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Gao, He; Vergnaud, Anne-Claire; Mathias, Rasika A; Becker, Diane M; Becker, Lewis C; Burt, Amber; Crosslin, David R; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Nikus, Kjell; Hernesniemi, Jussi; Kähönen, Mika; Raitoharju, Emma; Mononen, Nina; Raitakari, Olli T; Lehtimäki, Terho; Cushman, Mary; Zakai, Neil A; Nickerson, Deborah A; Raffield, Laura M; Quarells, Rakale; Willer, Cristen J; Peloso, Gina M; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Liu, Dajiang J; Deloukas, Panos; Samani, Nilesh J; Schunkert, Heribert; Erdmann, Jeanette; Fornage, Myriam; Richard, Melissa; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Rioux, John D; Dube, Marie-Pierre; de Denus, Simon; Lu, Yingchang; Bottinger, Erwin P; Loos, Ruth J F; Smith, Albert Vernon; Harris, Tamara B; Launer, Lenore J; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Velez Edwards, Digna R; Torstenson, Eric S; Liu, Yongmei; Tracy, Russell P; Rotter, Jerome I; Rich, Stephen S; Highland, Heather M; Boerwinkle, Eric; Li, Jin; Lange, Ethan; Wilson, James G; Mihailov, Evelin; Mägi, Reedik; Hirschhorn, Joel; Metspalu, Andres; Esko, Tõnu; Vacchi-Suzzi, Caterina; Nalls, Mike A; Zonderman, Alan B; Evans, Michele K; Engström, Gunnar; Orho-Melander, Marju; Melander, Olle; O'Donoghue, Michelle L; Waterworth, Dawn M; Wallentin, Lars; White, Harvey D; Floyd, James S; Bartz, Traci M; Rice, Kenneth M; Psaty, Bruce M; Starr, J M; Liewald, David C M; Hayward, Caroline; Deary, Ian J; Greinacher, Andreas; Völker, Uwe; Thiele, Thomas; Völzke, Henry; van Rooij, Frank J A; Uitterlinden, André G; Franco, Oscar H; Dehghan, Abbas; Edwards, Todd L; Ganesh, Santhi K; Kathiresan, Sekar; Faraday, Nauder; Auer, Paul L; Reiner, Alex P; Lettre, Guillaume; Johnson, Andrew D

    2016-07-01

    Platelet production, maintenance, and clearance are tightly controlled processes indicative of platelets' important roles in hemostasis and thrombosis. Platelets are common targets for primary and secondary prevention of several conditions. They are monitored clinically by complete blood counts, specifically with measurements of platelet count (PLT) and mean platelet volume (MPV). Identifying genetic effects on PLT and MPV can provide mechanistic insights into platelet biology and their role in disease. Therefore, we formed the Blood Cell Consortium (BCX) to perform a large-scale meta-analysis of Exomechip association results for PLT and MPV in 157,293 and 57,617 individuals, respectively. Using the low-frequency/rare coding variant-enriched Exomechip genotyping array, we sought to identify genetic variants associated with PLT and MPV. In addition to confirming 47 known PLT and 20 known MPV associations, we identified 32 PLT and 18 MPV associations not previously observed in the literature across the allele frequency spectrum, including rare large effect (FCER1A), low-frequency (IQGAP2, MAP1A, LY75), and common (ZMIZ2, SMG6, PEAR1, ARFGAP3/PACSIN2) variants. Several variants associated with PLT/MPV (PEAR1, MRVI1, PTGES3) were also associated with platelet reactivity. In concurrent BCX analyses, there was overlap of platelet-associated variants with red (MAP1A, TMPRSS6, ZMIZ2) and white (PEAR1, ZMIZ2, LY75) blood cell traits, suggesting common regulatory pathways with shared genetic architecture among these hematopoietic lineages. Our large-scale Exomechip analyses identified previously undocumented associations with platelet traits and further indicate that several complex quantitative hematological, lipid, and cardiovascular traits share genetic factors.

  1. Platelet-Related Variants Identified by Exomechip Meta-analysis in 157,293 Individuals.

    PubMed

    Eicher, John D; Chami, Nathalie; Kacprowski, Tim; Nomura, Akihiro; Chen, Ming-Huei; Yanek, Lisa R; Tajuddin, Salman M; Schick, Ursula M; Slater, Andrew J; Pankratz, Nathan; Polfus, Linda; Schurmann, Claudia; Giri, Ayush; Brody, Jennifer A; Lange, Leslie A; Manichaikul, Ani; Hill, W David; Pazoki, Raha; Elliot, Paul; Evangelou, Evangelos; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Gao, He; Vergnaud, Anne-Claire; Mathias, Rasika A; Becker, Diane M; Becker, Lewis C; Burt, Amber; Crosslin, David R; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Nikus, Kjell; Hernesniemi, Jussi; Kähönen, Mika; Raitoharju, Emma; Mononen, Nina; Raitakari, Olli T; Lehtimäki, Terho; Cushman, Mary; Zakai, Neil A; Nickerson, Deborah A; Raffield, Laura M; Quarells, Rakale; Willer, Cristen J; Peloso, Gina M; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Liu, Dajiang J; Deloukas, Panos; Samani, Nilesh J; Schunkert, Heribert; Erdmann, Jeanette; Fornage, Myriam; Richard, Melissa; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Rioux, John D; Dube, Marie-Pierre; de Denus, Simon; Lu, Yingchang; Bottinger, Erwin P; Loos, Ruth J F; Smith, Albert Vernon; Harris, Tamara B; Launer, Lenore J; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Velez Edwards, Digna R; Torstenson, Eric S; Liu, Yongmei; Tracy, Russell P; Rotter, Jerome I; Rich, Stephen S; Highland, Heather M; Boerwinkle, Eric; Li, Jin; Lange, Ethan; Wilson, James G; Mihailov, Evelin; Mägi, Reedik; Hirschhorn, Joel; Metspalu, Andres; Esko, Tõnu; Vacchi-Suzzi, Caterina; Nalls, Mike A; Zonderman, Alan B; Evans, Michele K; Engström, Gunnar; Orho-Melander, Marju; Melander, Olle; O'Donoghue, Michelle L; Waterworth, Dawn M; Wallentin, Lars; White, Harvey D; Floyd, James S; Bartz, Traci M; Rice, Kenneth M; Psaty, Bruce M; Starr, J M; Liewald, David C M; Hayward, Caroline; Deary, Ian J; Greinacher, Andreas; Völker, Uwe; Thiele, Thomas; Völzke, Henry; van Rooij, Frank J A; Uitterlinden, André G; Franco, Oscar H; Dehghan, Abbas; Edwards, Todd L; Ganesh, Santhi K; Kathiresan, Sekar; Faraday, Nauder; Auer, Paul L; Reiner, Alex P; Lettre, Guillaume; Johnson, Andrew D

    2016-07-01

    Platelet production, maintenance, and clearance are tightly controlled processes indicative of platelets' important roles in hemostasis and thrombosis. Platelets are common targets for primary and secondary prevention of several conditions. They are monitored clinically by complete blood counts, specifically with measurements of platelet count (PLT) and mean platelet volume (MPV). Identifying genetic effects on PLT and MPV can provide mechanistic insights into platelet biology and their role in disease. Therefore, we formed the Blood Cell Consortium (BCX) to perform a large-scale meta-analysis of Exomechip association results for PLT and MPV in 157,293 and 57,617 individuals, respectively. Using the low-frequency/rare coding variant-enriched Exomechip genotyping array, we sought to identify genetic variants associated with PLT and MPV. In addition to confirming 47 known PLT and 20 known MPV associations, we identified 32 PLT and 18 MPV associations not previously observed in the literature across the allele frequency spectrum, including rare large effect (FCER1A), low-frequency (IQGAP2, MAP1A, LY75), and common (ZMIZ2, SMG6, PEAR1, ARFGAP3/PACSIN2) variants. Several variants associated with PLT/MPV (PEAR1, MRVI1, PTGES3) were also associated with platelet reactivity. In concurrent BCX analyses, there was overlap of platelet-associated variants with red (MAP1A, TMPRSS6, ZMIZ2) and white (PEAR1, ZMIZ2, LY75) blood cell traits, suggesting common regulatory pathways with shared genetic architecture among these hematopoietic lineages. Our large-scale Exomechip analyses identified previously undocumented associations with platelet traits and further indicate that several complex quantitative hematological, lipid, and cardiovascular traits share genetic factors. PMID:27346686

  2. Real-time detection method and system for identifying individual aerosol particles

    DOEpatents

    Gard, Eric E.; Coffee, Keith R.; Frank, Matthias; Tobias, Herbert J.; Fergenson, David P.; Madden, Norm; Riot, Vincent J.; Steele, Paul T.; Woods, Bruce W.

    2007-08-21

    An improved method and system of identifying individual aerosol particles in real time. Sample aerosol particles are collimated, tracked, and screened to determine which ones qualify for mass spectrometric analysis based on predetermined qualification or selection criteria. Screening techniques include one or more of determining particle size, shape, symmetry, and fluorescence. Only qualifying particles passing all screening criteria are subject to desorption/ionization and single particle mass spectrometry to produce corresponding test spectra, which is used to determine the identities of each of the qualifying aerosol particles by comparing the test spectra against predetermined spectra for known particle types. In this manner, activation cycling of a particle ablation laser of a single particle mass spectrometer is reduced.

  3. Identifying and Tracking Individual Updraft Cores using Cluster Analysis: A TWP-ICE case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Tao, W.; Collis, S. M.; Varble, A.

    2013-12-01

    Cumulus parameterizations in GCMs depend strongly on the vertical velocity structures of convective updraft cores, or plumes. There hasn't been an accurate way of identifying these cores. The majority of previous studies treat the updraft as a single grid column entity, thus missing many intrinsic characteristics, e.g., the size, strength and spatial orientation of an individual core, its life cycle, and the time variations of the entrainment/detrainment rates associated with its life cycle. In this study, we attempt to apply an innovative algorithm based on the centroid-based k-means cluster analysis to improve our understanding of convection and its associated updraft cores. Both 3-D Doppler radar retrievals and cloud-resolving model simulations of a TWP-ICE campaign case during the monsoon period will be used to test and improve this algorithm. This will provide for more in-depth comparisons between CRM simulations and observations that were not possible previously using the traditional piecewise analysis with each updraft column. The first step is to identify the strongest cores (maximum velocity >10 m/s), since they are well defined and produce definite answers when the cluster analysis algorithm is applied. The preliminary results show that the radar retrieved updraft cores are smaller in size and with the maximum velocity located uniformly at higher levels compared with model simulations. Overall, the model simulations produce much stronger cores compared with the radar retrievals. Within the model simulations, the bulk microphysical scheme simulation produces stronger cores than the spectral bin microphysical scheme. Planned researches include using high temporal-resolution simulations to further track the life cycle of individual updraft cores and study their characteristics.

  4. Becoming pure: identifying generational classes of admixed individuals within lesser and greater scaup populations.

    PubMed

    Lavretsky, Philip; Peters, Jeffrey L; Winker, Kevin; Bahn, Volker; Kulikova, Irina; Zhuravlev, Yuri N; Wilson, Robert E; Barger, Chris; Gurney, Kirsty; McCracken, Kevin G

    2016-02-01

    Estimating the frequency of hybridization is important to understand its evolutionary consequences and its effects on conservation efforts. In this study, we examined the extent of hybridization in two sister species of ducks that hybridize. We used mitochondrial control region sequences and 3589 double-digest restriction-associated DNA sequences (ddRADseq) to identify admixture between wild lesser scaup (Aythya affinis) and greater scaup (A. marila). Among 111 individuals, we found one introgressed mitochondrial DNA haplotype in lesser scaup and four in greater scaup. Likewise, based on the site-frequency spectrum from autosomal DNA, gene flow was asymmetrical, with higher rates from lesser into greater scaup. However, using ddRADseq nuclear DNA, all individuals were assigned to their respective species with >0.95 posterior assignment probability. To examine the power for detecting admixture, we simulated a breeding experiment in which empirical data were used to create F1 hybrids and nine generations (F2-F10) of backcrossing. F1 hybrids and F2, F3 and most F4 backcrosses were clearly distinguishable from pure individuals, but evidence of admixed histories was effectively lost after the fourth generation. Thus, we conclude that low interspecific assignment probabilities (0.011-0.043) for two lesser and nineteen greater scaup were consistent with admixed histories beyond the F3 generation. These results indicate that the propensity of these species to hybridize in the wild is low and largely asymmetric. When applied to species-specific cases, our approach offers powerful utility for examining concerns of hybridization in conservation efforts, especially for determining the generational time until admixed histories are effectively lost through backcrossing. PMID:26833858

  5. Becoming pure: identifying generational classes of admixed individuals within lesser and greater scaup populations.

    PubMed

    Lavretsky, Philip; Peters, Jeffrey L; Winker, Kevin; Bahn, Volker; Kulikova, Irina; Zhuravlev, Yuri N; Wilson, Robert E; Barger, Chris; Gurney, Kirsty; McCracken, Kevin G

    2016-02-01

    Estimating the frequency of hybridization is important to understand its evolutionary consequences and its effects on conservation efforts. In this study, we examined the extent of hybridization in two sister species of ducks that hybridize. We used mitochondrial control region sequences and 3589 double-digest restriction-associated DNA sequences (ddRADseq) to identify admixture between wild lesser scaup (Aythya affinis) and greater scaup (A. marila). Among 111 individuals, we found one introgressed mitochondrial DNA haplotype in lesser scaup and four in greater scaup. Likewise, based on the site-frequency spectrum from autosomal DNA, gene flow was asymmetrical, with higher rates from lesser into greater scaup. However, using ddRADseq nuclear DNA, all individuals were assigned to their respective species with >0.95 posterior assignment probability. To examine the power for detecting admixture, we simulated a breeding experiment in which empirical data were used to create F1 hybrids and nine generations (F2-F10) of backcrossing. F1 hybrids and F2, F3 and most F4 backcrosses were clearly distinguishable from pure individuals, but evidence of admixed histories was effectively lost after the fourth generation. Thus, we conclude that low interspecific assignment probabilities (0.011-0.043) for two lesser and nineteen greater scaup were consistent with admixed histories beyond the F3 generation. These results indicate that the propensity of these species to hybridize in the wild is low and largely asymmetric. When applied to species-specific cases, our approach offers powerful utility for examining concerns of hybridization in conservation efforts, especially for determining the generational time until admixed histories are effectively lost through backcrossing.

  6. Increased inflammatory markers identified in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of individuals with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Fillman, S G; Cloonan, N; Catts, V S; Miller, L C; Wong, J; McCrossin, T; Cairns, M; Weickert, C S

    2013-02-01

    Upregulation of the immune response may be involved in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia with changes occurring in both peripheral blood and brain tissue. To date, microarray technology has provided a limited view of specific inflammatory transcripts in brain perhaps due to sensitivity issues. Here we used SOLiD Next Generation Sequencing to quantify neuroimmune mRNA expression levels in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of 20 individuals with schizophrenia and their matched controls. We detected 798 differentially regulated transcripts present in people with schizophrenia compared with controls. Ingenuity pathway analysis identified the inflammatory response as a key change. Using quantitative real-time PCR we confirmed the changes in candidate cytokines and immune modulators, including interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, IL-1β and SERPINA3. The density of major histocompatibility complex-II-positive cells morphologically resembling microglia was significantly increased in schizophrenia and correlated with IL-1β expression. A group of individuals, most of whom had schizophrenia, were found to have increased inflammatory mRNA expression. In summary, we have demonstrated changes in an inflammatory response pathway that are present in ∼40% of people diagnosed with schizophrenia. This suggests that therapies aimed at immune system attenuation in schizophrenia may be of direct benefit in the brain. PMID:22869038

  7. Simulating Future Changes in Spatio-temporal Precipitation by Identifying and Characterizing Individual Rainstorm Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, W.; Stein, M.; Wang, J.; Kotamarthi, V. R.; Moyer, E. J.

    2015-12-01

    A growing body of literature suggests that human-induced climate change may cause significant changes in precipitation patterns, which could in turn influence future flood levels and frequencies and water supply and management practices. Although climate models produce full three-dimensional simulations of precipitation, analyses of model precipitation have focused either on time-averaged distributions or on individual timeseries with no spatial information. We describe here a new approach based on identifying and characterizing individual rainstorms in either data or model output. Our approach enables us to readily characterize important spatio-temporal aspects of rainstorms including initiation location, intensity (mean and patterns), spatial extent, duration, and trajectory. We apply this technique to high-resolution precipitation over the continental U.S. both from radar-based observations (NCEP Stage IV QPE product, 1-hourly, 4 km spatial resolution) and from model runs with dynamical downscaling (WRF regional climate model, 3-hourly, 12 km spatial resolution). In the model studies we investigate the changes in storm characteristics under a business-as-usual warming scenario to 2100 (RCP 8.5). We find that in these model runs, rainstorm intensity increases as expected with rising temperatures (approximately 7%/K, following increased atmospheric moisture content), while total precipitation increases by a lesser amount (3%/K), consistent with other studies. We identify for the first time the necessary compensating mechanism: in these model runs, individual precipitation events become smaller. Other aspects are approximately unchanged in the warmer climate. Because these spatio-temporal changes in rainfall patterns would impact regional hydrology, it is important that they be accurately incorporated into any impacts assessment. For this purpose we have developed a methodology for producing scenarios of future precipitation that combine observational data and

  8. Micro-Spectroscopic Chemical Imaging of Individual Identified Marine Biogenic and Ambient Organic Ice Nuclei (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knopf, D. A.; Alpert, P. A.; Wang, B.; OBrien, R. E.; Moffet, R. C.; Aller, J. Y.; Laskin, A.; Gilles, M.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric ice formation represents one of the least understood atmospheric processes with important implications for the hydrological cycle and climate. Current freezing descriptions assume that ice active sites on the particle surface initiate ice nucleation, however, the nature of these sites remains elusive. Here, we present a new experimental method that allows us to relate physical and chemical properties of individual particles with observed water uptake and ice nucleation ability using a combination of micro-spectroscopic and optical single particle analytical techniques. We apply this method to field-collected particles and particles generated via bursting of bubbles produced by glass frit aeration and plunging water impingement jets in a mesocosm containing artificial sea water and bacteria and/or phytoplankton. The most efficient ice nuclei (IN) within a particle population are identified and characterized. Single particle characterization is achieved by computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. A vapor controlled cooling-stage coupled to an optical microscope is used to determine the onsets of water uptake, immersion freezing, and deposition ice nucleation of the individual particles as a function of temperature (T) as low as 200 K and relative humidity (RH) up to water saturation. In addition, we perform CCSEM/EDX to obtain on a single particle level the elemental composition of the entire particle population. Thus, we can determine if the IN are exceptional in nature or belong to a major particle type class with respect to composition and size. We find that ambient and sea spray particles are coated by organic material and can induce ice formation under tropospheric relevant conditions. Micro-spectroscopic single particle analysis of the investigated particle samples invokes a potential

  9. Autonomic dysfunction in subjects at high risk for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Liepelt-Scarfone, Inga; Pilotto, Andrea; Müller, Katharina; Bormann, Christian; Gauss, Katharina; Wurster, Isabel; Streffer, Johannes; Berg, Daniela

    2015-12-01

    Aim of this project was to evaluate autonomic dysfunction in subjects proposed to be at high risk to develop Parkinson's disease (PD) compared to control subjects and PD patients at different disease stages. Combinations of substantia nigra hyperechogenicity (SN+) assessed by transcranial ultrasound (TCS), hyposmia, lifetime prevalence of depression and mild PD-specific motor signs were used to identify subjects at high risk for motor Parkinson's disease (HR-PD). Supine and standing blood pressure (BP), hearth rate (HR), orthostatic, urinary, sexual and bowel symptoms were evaluated in HR-PD, healthy control subjects and PD patients, divided into mild and advanced stages. The study group consisted of 113 PD patients (mild PD n = 71, advanced PD, n = 42), 40 HR-PD individuals and 50 controls. Compared to controls, HR-PD subjects complained more often about urinary (p = 0.002) and bowel dysfunction (p = 0.001) and had a higher diastolic BP drop after standing (p = 0.01). The cumulative number of autonomic symptoms differentiated PD as well as HR-PD significantly from controls (p < 0.001). Advanced PD patients presented often and severe orthostatic symptoms, not significantly different from mild PD after concomitant medication correction. Our results support the presence of urinary and bowel dysfunction in subjects at high risk for motor PD. Presence and severity of orthostatic symptoms was higher during stages and increase in advanced stages, at least partly due to increase in dopaminergic and conflicting medication. Understanding the progression of non-motor aspects in PD might offer the possibility to use them as targets for disease-modifying therapies.

  10. Risk assessment tools for identifying individuals at risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Buijsse, Brian; Simmons, Rebecca K; Griffin, Simon J; Schulze, Matthias B

    2011-01-01

    Trials have demonstrated the preventability of type 2 diabetes through lifestyle modifications or drugs in people with impaired glucose tolerance. However, alternative ways of identifying people at risk of developing diabetes are required. Multivariate risk scores have been developed for this purpose. This article examines the evidence for performance of diabetes risk scores in adults by 1) systematically reviewing the literature on available scores and 2) their validation in external populations; and 3) exploring methodological issues surrounding the development, validation, and comparison of risk scores. Risk scores show overall good discriminatory ability in populations for whom they were developed. However, discriminatory performance is more heterogeneous and generally weaker in external populations, which suggests that risk scores may need to be validated within the population in which they are intended to be used. Whether risk scores enable accurate estimation of absolute risk remains unknown; thus, care is needed when using scores to communicate absolute diabetes risk to individuals. Several risk scores predict diabetes risk based on routine noninvasive measures or on data from questionnaires. Biochemical measures, in particular fasting plasma glucose, can improve prediction of such models. On the other hand, usefulness of genetic profiling currently appears limited.

  11. Detection of high risk HPV and Chlamydia trachomatis in vaginal and cervical samples collected with flocked nylon and wrapped rayon dual swabs transported in dry tubes.

    PubMed

    Krech, T; Castriciano, S; Jang, D; Smieja, M; Enders, G; Chernesky, M

    2009-12-01

    A dual collection device containing flocked and wrapped rayon swabs was used to collect vaginal and cervical samples from 494 women. The swabs were separated into individual tubes and sent to the laboratory in a dry state, where they were hydrated and tested for high risk HPV DNA [Digene-Qiagen hybrid capture 2] and Chlamydia trachomatis using in-house real-time PCR. The flocked swabs identified more high risk HPV and C. trachomatis infections from both sampling sites.

  12. Four Individually Identified Paired Dopamine Neurons Signal Reward in Larval Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Rohwedder, Astrid; Wenz, Nana L; Stehle, Bernhard; Huser, Annina; Yamagata, Nobuhiro; Zlatic, Marta; Truman, James W; Tanimoto, Hiromu; Saumweber, Timo; Gerber, Bertram; Thum, Andreas S

    2016-03-01

    Dopaminergic neurons serve multiple functions, including reinforcement processing during associative learning [1-12]. It is thus warranted to understand which dopaminergic neurons mediate which function. We study larval Drosophila, in which only approximately 120 of a total of 10,000 neurons are dopaminergic, as judged by the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme of dopamine biosynthesis [5, 13]. Dopaminergic neurons mediating reinforcement in insect olfactory learning target the mushroom bodies, a higher-order "cortical" brain region [1-5, 11, 12, 14, 15]. We discover four previously undescribed paired neurons, the primary protocerebral anterior medial (pPAM) neurons. These neurons are TH positive and subdivide the medial lobe of the mushroom body into four distinct subunits. These pPAM neurons are acutely necessary for odor-sugar reward learning and require intact TH function in this process. However, they are dispensable for aversive learning and innate behavior toward the odors and sugars employed. Optogenetical activation of pPAM neurons is sufficient as a reward. Thus, the pPAM neurons convey a likely dopaminergic reward signal. In contrast, DL1 cluster neurons convey a corresponding punishment signal [5], suggesting a cellular division of labor to convey dopaminergic reward and punishment signals. On the level of individually identified neurons, this uncovers an organizational principle shared with adult Drosophila and mammals [1-4, 7, 9, 10] (but see [6]). The numerical simplicity and connectomic tractability of the larval nervous system [16-19] now offers a prospect for studying circuit principles of dopamine function at unprecedented resolution. PMID:26877086

  13. 75 FR 42487 - Supplementary Identifying Information of Previously-Designated Individual, Foreign Narcotics...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-21

    ... Central Intelligence Agency, the Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Administrator of the... Individual, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act AGENCY: Office of Foreign Assets Control,...

  14. Youth-caregiver Agreement on Clinical High-risk Symptoms of Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Golembo-Smith, Shana; Bachman, Peter; Senturk, Damla; Cannon, Tyrone D.; Bearden, Carrie E.

    2014-01-01

    Early identification of individuals who will go on to develop schizophrenia is a difficult endeavor. The variety of symptoms experienced by clinical high-risk youth make it difficult to identify who will eventually develop schizophrenia in the future. Efforts are being made, therefore, to more accurately identify at-risk individuals and factors that predict conversion to psychosis. As in most assessments of children and adolescents, however, both youth and parental report of symptomatology and resulting dysfunction are important to assess. The goals of the current study were to assess the extent of cross-informant agreement on the Structured Interview for Prodromal Symptoms (SIPS), a widely-used tool employed to determine clinical high-risk status. A total of 84 youth-caregiver pairs participated. Youth and caregiver raters displayed moderate overall agreement on SIPS-rated symptoms. Both youth and caregiver ratings of youth symptomatology contributed significantly to predicting conversion to psychosis. In addition, youth age and quality of youth-caregiver relationships appear to be related to cross-informant symptom ratings. Despite differences on individual SIPS domains, the majority of dyads agreed on youth clinical high-risk status. Results highlight the potential clinical utility of using caregiver informants to determine youth psychosis risk. PMID:24092494

  15. Absorption in Music: Development of a Scale to Identify Individuals with Strong Emotional Responses to Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandstrom, Gillian M.; Russo, Frank A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the rise in research investigating music and emotion over the last decade, there are no validated measures of individual differences in emotional responses to music. We created the Absorption in Music Scale (AIMS), a 34-item measure of individuals' ability and willingness to allow music to draw them into an emotional experience. It was…

  16. Disqualified in the Human Race: A Close Reading of the Autobiographies of Individuals Identified as Autistic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashby, Christine E.; Causton-Theoharis, Julie N.

    2009-01-01

    Much can be learned about the experience of autism by listening to the voices of individuals so labelled. They describe their understanding of competence, living in a culture where autism is considered deviant, deficient and outside the range of 'normal' human experience. This paper utilises autobiographical accounts written by individuals who…

  17. Postural-Stability Tests That Identify Individuals With Chronic Ankle Instability

    PubMed Central

    Linens, Shelley W.; Ross, Scott E.; Arnold, Brent L.; Gayle, Richard; Pidcoe, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Context: Chronic ankle instability (CAI) is characterized by repeated ankle sprains, which have been linked to postural instability. Therefore, it is important for clinicians to identify individuals with CAI who can benefit from rehabilitation. Objective: To assess the likelihood that CAI participants will exhibit impaired postural stability and that healthy control participants will exhibit better test performance values. Design: Case-control study. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: People with CAI (n = 17, age = 23 ± 4 years, height = 168 ± 9 cm, weight = 68 ± 12 kg) who reported ankle “giving-way” sensations and healthy volunteers (n = 17, age = 23 ± 3 years, height = 168 ± 8 cm, weight = 66 ± 12 kg). Intervention(s): Participants performed 7 balance tests: Balance Error Scoring System (BESS), time in balance, foot lift, single-legged stance on a force plate, Star Excursion Balance Test, side hop, and figure-of-8 hop. Main Outcome Measure(s): Balance was quantified with errors (score) for the BESS, length of time balancing (seconds) for time-in-balance test, frequency of foot lifts (score) for foot-lift test, velocity (cm/s) for all center-of-pressure velocity measures, excursion (cm) for center-of-pressure excursion measures, area (cm2) for 95% confidence ellipse center-of-pressure area and center-of-pressure rectangular area, time (seconds) for anterior-posterior and medial-lateral time-to-boundary (TTB) measures, distance reached (cm) for Star Excursion Balance Test, and time (seconds) to complete side-hop and figure-of-8 hop tests. We calculated area-under-the-curve values and cutoff scores and used the odds ratio to determine if those with and without CAI could be distinguished using cutoff scores. Results: We found significant area-under-the-curve values for 4 static noninstrumented measures, 3 force-plate measures, and 3 functional measures. Significant cutoff scores were noted for the time-in-balance test (≤25.89 seconds

  18. Stabilization of high-risk plaques

    PubMed Central

    Takata, Kohei; Zhang, Bo; Miura, Shin-ichiro; Saku, Keijiro

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases (ASCVDs) is increasing globally and they have become the leading cause of death in most countries. Numerous experimental and clinical studies have been conducted to identify major risk factors and effective control strategies for ASCVDs. The development of imaging modalities with the ability to determine the plaque composition enables us to further identify high-risk plaque and evaluate the effectiveness of different treatment strategies. While intensive lipid-lowering by statins can stabilize or even regress plaque by various mechanisms, such as the reduction of lipid accumulation in a necrotic lipid core, the reduction of inflammation, and improvement of endothelial function, there are still considerable residual risks that need to be understood. We reviewed important findings regarding plaque vulnerability and some encouraging emerging approaches for plaque stabilization. PMID:27500090

  19. Characterizing and Reaching High-Risk Drinkers Using Audience Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Howard B.; Kirby, Susan D.; Donodeo, Fred

    2010-01-01

    Background Market or audience segmentation is widely used in social marketing efforts to help planners identify segments of a population to target for tailored program interventions. Market-based segments are typically defined by behaviors, attitudes, knowledge, opinions, or lifestyles. They are more helpful to health communication and marketing planning than epidemiologically-defined groups because market-based segments are similar in respect to how they behave or might react to marketing and communication efforts. However, market segmentation has rarely been used in alcohol research. As an illustration of its utility, we employed commercial data that describes the sociodemographic characteristics of high-risk drinkers as an audience segment; where they tend to live, lifestyles, interests, consumer behaviors, alcohol consumption behaviors, other health-related behaviors, and cultural values. Such information can be extremely valuable in targeting and planning public health campaigns, targeted mailings, prevention interventions and research efforts. Methods We describe the results of a segmentation analysis of those individuals who self-report consuming five or more drinks per drinking episode at least twice in the last 30-days. The study used the proprietary PRIZM™ audience segmentation database merged with Center for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) database. The top ten of the 66 PRIZM™ audience segments for this risky drinking pattern are described. For five of these segments we provide additional in-depth details about consumer behavior and the estimates of the market areas where these risky drinkers reside. Results The top ten audience segments (PRIZM clusters) most likely to engage in high-risk drinking are described. The cluster with the highest concentration of binge drinking behavior is referred to as the “Cyber Millenials.” This cluster is characterized as “the nation's tech-savvy singles

  20. Enhanced understanding of predator-prey relationships using molecular methods to identify predator species, individual and sex.

    PubMed

    Mumma, Matthew A; Soulliere, Colleen E; Mahoney, Shane P; Waits, Lisette P

    2014-01-01

    Predator species identification is an important step in understanding predator-prey interactions, but predator identifications using kill site observations are often unreliable. We used molecular tools to analyse predator saliva, scat and hair from caribou calf kills in Newfoundland, Canada to identify the predator species, individual and sex. We sampled DNA from 32 carcasses using cotton swabs to collect predator saliva. We used fragment length analysis and sequencing of mitochondrial DNA to distinguish between coyote, black bear, Canada lynx and red fox and used nuclear DNA microsatellite analysis to identify individuals. We compared predator species detected using molecular tools to those assigned via field observations at each kill. We identified a predator species at 94% of carcasses using molecular methods, while observational methods assigned a predator species to 62.5% of kills. Molecular methods attributed 66.7% of kills to coyote and 33.3% to black bear, while observations assigned 40%, 45%, 10% and 5% to coyote, bear, lynx and fox, respectively. Individual identification was successful at 70% of kills where a predator species was identified. Only one individual was identified at each kill, but some individuals were found at multiple kills. Predator sex was predominantly male. We demonstrate the first large-scale evaluation of predator species, individual and sex identification using molecular techniques to extract DNA from swabs of wild prey carcasses. Our results indicate that kill site swabs (i) can be highly successful in identifying the predator species and individual responsible; and (ii) serve to inform and complement traditional methods. PMID:23957886

  1. 49 CFR 1007.4 - Procedures for identifying the individual making the request.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... require reasonable identification of the person making the request to insure that information is given and... presenting either: (i) One piece of identification containing a photograph and signature, such as a driver's... pieces of identification bearing the individual's name and signature, one of which shows the...

  2. Using Administrative Health Data to Identify Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: A Comparison of Algorithms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, E.; Balogh, R.; Cobigo, V.; Ouellette-Kuntz, H.; Wilton, A. S.; Lunsky, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) experience high rates of physical and mental health problems; yet their health care is often inadequate. Information about their characteristics and health services needs is critical for planning efficient and equitable services. A logical source of such information is…

  3. Identifying Empirically Supported Treatments for Phobic Avoidance in Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennett, Heather K.; Hagopian, Louis P.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature regarding the treatment of phobic avoidance in individuals with intellectual disabilities. Criteria for classifying interventions as empirically supported, developed by the American Psychological Association (APA) Division 12 Task Force on Promotion and Dissemination of Psychological Procedures, were used. For…

  4. Identifying Individual Differences among Doctoral Candidates: A Framework for Understanding Problematic Candidature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantwell, Robert H.; Scevak, Jill J.; Bourke, Sid; Holbrook, Allyson

    2012-01-01

    Understanding how candidates cope with the demands of PhD candidature is important for institutions, supervisors and candidates. Individual differences in affective and metacognitive disposition were explored in 263 PhD candidates from two Australian universities. Several questionnaires relating to affective and metacognitive beliefs were…

  5. Conceptualizing Masculinity in Female-to-Male Trans-Identified Individuals: A Qualitative Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vegter, Vanessa

    2013-01-01

    A non-normative gender identity raises questions concerning widely accepted theories of gender that prevail in Western society. These theories are founded upon dichotomous models of gender identity that are posited as having a direct relationship to binary biological sex. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore how individuals who…

  6. Identifying and Assessing Substance Abuse Problems with Deaf, Deafened, and Hard of Hearing Individuals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guthmann, Debra

    This report provides an overview of chemical dependency, communication barriers, and assessment/treatment considerations for individuals who are deaf or have hearing impairments and have drug or alcohol problems. Following a discussion of the pattern of substance abuse, risk factors, and signs and symptoms, the report describes a model treatment…

  7. p53 Expression Helps Identify High Risk Oral Tongue Pre- malignant Lesions and Correlates with Patterns of Invasive Tumour Front and Tumour Depth in Oral Tongue Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cases.

    PubMed

    Viveka, Thangaraj Soundara; Shyamsundar, Vidyarani; Krishnamurthy, Arvind; Ramani, Pratibha; Ramshankar, Vijayalakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC) is the most common oral cancer subtype with a maximum propensity for regional spread. Our objective was to study if p53 expression might have any correlation with aggressive patterns of invasion within oral tongue cancers as well as with the histologically identified degree of oral tongue dysplasia. p53 immunoexpression was studied using immunohistochemistry in early staged OTSCCs (n=155), oral tongue dysplasias, (n=29) and oral tongue normal specimens (n=10) and evaluated for correlations with histological and clinicopathological parameters. Our study (n=194) showed a pattern of p53 expression increasing with different grades of tongue dysplasia to different grades of invasive OTSCC (p=0.000). Among the OTSCC tumours, positive p53 expression was seen in 43.2% (67/155) and a higher p53 labelling index was significantly associated with increased Bryne's grade of the tumour invasive front (p=0.039) and increased tumour depth (p=0.018). Among the OTSCC patients with tobacco habits, (n=91), a higher p53 labelling index was significantly associated with increased risk of local recurrence (p=0.025) and with lymphovascular space involvement (p=0.014). Evaluation of p53 through varying degrees of dysplasia to oral tongue cancer indicates that p53 expression is linked to aggressive features of oral tongue cancers and tongue precancers entailing a closer monitoring in positive cases. Among the OTSCCs, p53 expression is associated with tumour aggressiveness correlating with increased grading of invasive tumour front and tumour depth.

  8. Meta-analysis of 375,000 individuals identifies 38 susceptibility loci for migraine.

    PubMed

    Gormley, Padhraig; Anttila, Verneri; Winsvold, Bendik S; Palta, Priit; Esko, Tonu; Pers, Tune H; Farh, Kai-How; Cuenca-Leon, Ester; Muona, Mikko; Furlotte, Nicholas A; Kurth, Tobias; Ingason, Andres; McMahon, George; Ligthart, Lannie; Terwindt, Gisela M; Kallela, Mikko; Freilinger, Tobias M; Ran, Caroline; Gordon, Scott G; Stam, Anine H; Steinberg, Stacy; Borck, Guntram; Koiranen, Markku; Quaye, Lydia; Adams, Hieab H H; Lehtimäki, Terho; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Wedenoja, Juho; Hinds, David A; Buring, Julie E; Schürks, Markus; Ridker, Paul M; Hrafnsdottir, Maria Gudlaug; Stefansson, Hreinn; Ring, Susan M; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Färkkilä, Markus; Artto, Ville; Kaunisto, Mari; Vepsäläinen, Salli; Malik, Rainer; Heath, Andrew C; Madden, Pamela A F; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Kurki, Mitja I; Kals, Mart; Mägi, Reedik; Pärn, Kalle; Hämäläinen, Eija; Huang, Hailiang; Byrnes, Andrea E; Franke, Lude; Huang, Jie; Stergiakouli, Evie; Lee, Phil H; Sandor, Cynthia; Webber, Caleb; Cader, Zameel; Muller-Myhsok, Bertram; Schreiber, Stefan; Meitinger, Thomas; Eriksson, Johan G; Salomaa, Veikko; Heikkilä, Kauko; Loehrer, Elizabeth; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hofman, Albert; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Cherkas, Lynn; Pedersen, Linda M; Stubhaug, Audun; Nielsen, Christopher S; Männikkö, Minna; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Göbel, Hartmut; Esserlind, Ann-Louise; Christensen, Anne Francke; Hansen, Thomas Folkmann; Werge, Thomas; Kaprio, Jaakko; Aromaa, Arpo J; Raitakari, Olli; Ikram, M Arfan; Spector, Tim; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Metspalu, Andres; Kubisch, Christian; Strachan, David P; Ferrari, Michel D; Belin, Andrea C; Dichgans, Martin; Wessman, Maija; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Zwart, John-Anker; Boomsma, Dorret I; Smith, George Davey; Stefansson, Kari; Eriksson, Nicholas; Daly, Mark J; Neale, Benjamin M; Olesen, Jes; Chasman, Daniel I; Nyholt, Dale R; Palotie, Aarno

    2016-08-01

    Migraine is a debilitating neurological disorder affecting around one in seven people worldwide, but its molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. There is some debate about whether migraine is a disease of vascular dysfunction or a result of neuronal dysfunction with secondary vascular changes. Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have thus far identified 13 independent loci associated with migraine. To identify new susceptibility loci, we carried out a genetic study of migraine on 59,674 affected subjects and 316,078 controls from 22 GWA studies. We identified 44 independent single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) significantly associated with migraine risk (P < 5 × 10(-8)) that mapped to 38 distinct genomic loci, including 28 loci not previously reported and a locus that to our knowledge is the first to be identified on chromosome X. In subsequent computational analyses, the identified loci showed enrichment for genes expressed in vascular and smooth muscle tissues, consistent with a predominant theory of migraine that highlights vascular etiologies. PMID:27322543

  9. An exploration of the communication preferences regarding genetic testing in individuals from families with identified breast/ovarian cancer mutations.

    PubMed

    Ratnayake, Paboda; Wakefield, Claire E; Meiser, Bettina; Suthers, Graeme; Price, Melanie A; Duffy, Jessica; Tucker, Kathy

    2011-03-01

    The responsibility for informing at-risk relatives of the availability of genetic testing for breast/ovarian cancer gene (BRCA1 or BRCA2) mutations currently falls on the probands. This study explored the support needs of individuals from families with identified BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations when communicating about genetic risk and genetic testing with at-risk family members. Thirty-nine semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with individuals from families with identified BRCA mutations. Interview responses were cross-tabulated by sample characteristics using the qualitative research analysis software NVivo8. The development of educational materials, which individuals could use when communicating the risks of carrying a BRCA gene mutation with their relatives, was identified as a specific need. Many participants expressed a preference for a staged approach, where relatives are notified of their increased risk and the availability of genetic testing risk either face-to-face or via a letter, with additional educational sources, including brief written information or access to a website, made available for those wishing to access more in-depth information. This research identified a need for the development of educational/informational resources to support individuals with identified breast/ovarian cancer mutations to communicate with their at-risk relatives about genetic risk and genetic testing availability.

  10. 77 FR 58911 - Additional Identifying Information for One (1) Individual Designated Pursuant to Executive Order...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-24

    ... Threaten to Disrupt the Middle East Peace Process'' (the ``Order''). DATES: The addition by the Director of... sanctions on persons who threaten to disrupt the Middle East peace process. The President identified in the... Middle East peace ] process; or (2) assist in, sponsor, or provide financial, material, or...

  11. Description of a Practitioner Model for Identifying Preferred Stimuli with Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karsten, Amanda M.; Carr, James E.; Lepper, Tracy L.

    2011-01-01

    The rich technology of stimulus preference assessment (SPA) is a product of 40 years of experimental research. Basic principles of reinforcement and a modest empirical literature suggest that high-preference stimuli identified via SPA may enhance treatment efficacy and decrease problem behavior more effectively than less-preferred stimuli. SPAs…

  12. A meta-analysis of 120 246 individuals identifies 18 new loci for fibrinogen concentration.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Paul S; Chasman, Daniel I; Sabater-Lleal, Maria; Chen, Ming-Huei; Huffman, Jennifer E; Steri, Maristella; Tang, Weihong; Teumer, Alexander; Marioni, Riccardo E; Grossmann, Vera; Hottenga, Jouke J; Trompet, Stella; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Zhao, Jing Hua; Brody, Jennifer A; Kleber, Marcus E; Guo, Xiuqing; Wang, Jie Jin; Auer, Paul L; Attia, John R; Yanek, Lisa R; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Lahti, Jari; Venturini, Cristina; Tanaka, Toshiko; Bielak, Lawrence F; Joshi, Peter K; Rocanin-Arjo, Ares; Kolcic, Ivana; Navarro, Pau; Rose, Lynda M; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Riess, Helene; Mazur, Johanna; Basu, Saonli; Goel, Anuj; Yang, Qiong; Ghanbari, Mohsen; Willemsen, Gonneke; Rumley, Ann; Fiorillo, Edoardo; de Craen, Anton J M; Grotevendt, Anne; Scott, Robert; Taylor, Kent D; Delgado, Graciela E; Yao, Jie; Kifley, Annette; Kooperberg, Charles; Qayyum, Rehan; Lopez, Lorna M; Berentzen, Tina L; Räikkönen, Katri; Mangino, Massimo; Bandinelli, Stefania; Peyser, Patricia A; Wild, Sarah; Trégouët, David-Alexandre; Wright, Alan F; Marten, Jonathan; Zemunik, Tatijana; Morrison, Alanna C; Sennblad, Bengt; Tofler, Geoffrey; de Maat, Moniek P M; de Geus, Eco J C; Lowe, Gordon D; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Sattar, Naveed; Binder, Harald; Völker, Uwe; Waldenberger, Melanie; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Mcknight, Barbara; Huang, Jie; Jenny, Nancy S; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Qi, Lihong; Mcevoy, Mark G; Becker, Diane M; Starr, John M; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Hysi, Pirro G; Hernandez, Dena G; Jhun, Min A; Campbell, Harry; Hamsten, Anders; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Mcardle, Wendy L; Slagboom, P Eline; Zeller, Tanja; Koenig, Wolfgang; Psaty, Bruce M; Haritunians, Talin; Liu, Jingmin; Palotie, Aarno; Uitterlinden, André G; Stott, David J; Hofman, Albert; Franco, Oscar H; Polasek, Ozren; Rudan, Igor; Morange, Pierre-Emmanuel; Wilson, James F; Kardia, Sharon L R; Ferrucci, Luigi; Spector, Tim D; Eriksson, Johan G; Hansen, Torben; Deary, Ian J; Becker, Lewis C; Scott, Rodney J; Mitchell, Paul; März, Winfried; Wareham, Nick J; Peters, Annette; Greinacher, Andreas; Wild, Philipp S; Jukema, J Wouter; Boomsma, Dorret I; Hayward, Caroline; Cucca, Francesco; Tracy, Russell; Watkins, Hugh; Reiner, Alex P; Folsom, Aaron R; Ridker, Paul M; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Smith, Nicholas L; Strachan, David P; Dehghan, Abbas

    2016-01-15

    Genome-wide association studies have previously identified 23 genetic loci associated with circulating fibrinogen concentration. These studies used HapMap imputation and did not examine the X-chromosome. 1000 Genomes imputation provides better coverage of uncommon variants, and includes indels. We conducted a genome-wide association analysis of 34 studies imputed to the 1000 Genomes Project reference panel and including ∼120 000 participants of European ancestry (95 806 participants with data on the X-chromosome). Approximately 10.7 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms and 1.2 million indels were examined. We identified 41 genome-wide significant fibrinogen loci; of which, 18 were newly identified. There were no genome-wide significant signals on the X-chromosome. The lead variants of five significant loci were indels. We further identified six additional independent signals, including three rare variants, at two previously characterized loci: FGB and IRF1. Together the 41 loci explain 3% of the variance in plasma fibrinogen concentration.

  13. Environmental effects and individual body condition drive seasonal fecundity of rabbits: identifying acute and lagged processes.

    PubMed

    Wells, Konstans; O'Hara, Robert B; Cooke, Brian D; Mutze, Greg J; Prowse, Thomas A A; Fordham, Damien A

    2016-07-01

    The reproduction of many species is determined by seasonally-driven resource supply. But it is difficult to quantify whether the fecundity is sensitive to short- or long-term exposure to environmental conditions such as rainfall that drive resource supply. Using 25 years of data on individual fecundity of European female rabbits, Oryctolagus cuniculus, from semiarid Australia, we investigate the role of individual body condition, rainfall and temperature as drivers of seasonal and long-term and population-level changes in fecundity (breeding probability, ovulation rate, embryo survival). We built distributed lag models in a hierarchical Bayesian framework to account for both immediate and time-lagged effects of climate and other environmental drivers, and possible shifts in reproduction over consecutive seasons. We show that rainfall during summer, when rabbits typically breed only rarely, increased breeding probability immediately and with time lags of up to 10 weeks. However, an earlier onset of the yearly breeding period did not result in more overall reproductive output. Better body condition was associated with an earlier onset of breeding and higher embryo survival. Breeding probability in the main breeding season declined with increased breeding activity in the preceding season and only individuals in good body condition were able to breed late in the season. Higher temperatures reduce breeding success across seasons. We conclude that a better understanding of seasonal dynamics and plasticity (and their interplay) in reproduction will provide crucial insights into how lagomorphs are likely to respond and potentially adapt to the influence of future climate and other environmental change. PMID:27028444

  14. Individual variability in human blood metabolites identifies age-related differences

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Itsuo; Takada, Junko; Kondoh, Hiroshi; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Metabolites present in human blood document individual physiological states influenced by genetic, epigenetic, and lifestyle factors. Using high-resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), we performed nontargeted, quantitative metabolomics analysis in blood of 15 young (29 ± 4 y of age) and 15 elderly (81 ± 7 y of age) individuals. Coefficients of variation (CV = SD/mean) were obtained for 126 blood metabolites of all 30 donors. Fifty-five RBC-enriched metabolites, for which metabolomics studies have been scarce, are highlighted here. We found 14 blood compounds that show remarkable age-related increases or decreases; they include 1,5-anhydroglucitol, dimethyl-guanosine, acetyl-carnosine, carnosine, ophthalmic acid, UDP-acetyl-glucosamine, N-acetyl-arginine, N6-acetyl-lysine, pantothenate, citrulline, leucine, isoleucine, NAD+, and NADP+. Six of them are RBC-enriched, suggesting that RBC metabolomics is highly valuable for human aging research. Age differences are partly explained by a decrease in antioxidant production or increasing inefficiency of urea metabolism among the elderly. Pearson’s coefficients demonstrated that some age-related compounds are correlated, suggesting that aging affects them concomitantly. Although our CV values are mostly consistent with those CVs previously published, we here report previously unidentified CVs of 51 blood compounds. Compounds having moderate to high CV values (0.4–2.5) are often modified. Compounds having low CV values, such as ATP and glutathione, may be related to various diseases because their concentrations are strictly controlled, and changes in them would compromise health. Thus, human blood is a rich source of information about individual metabolic differences. PMID:27036001

  15. Identifying individual chemical bonds in single-molecule chemical reaction products using nc-AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickenburg, Sebastian; de Oteyza, Dimas G.; Chen, Yen-Chia; Riss, Alexander; Tsai, Hsin-Zon; Pedramrazi, Zahra; Bradley, Aaron J.; Ugeda, Miguel M.; Gorman, Patrick; Etkin, Grisha; Mowbray, Duncan J.; Perez, Alejandro; Rubio, Angel; Crommie, Michael F.; Fischer, Felix R.

    2014-03-01

    Determining reaction pathways and products is an integral part of chemical synthesis. Ensemble measurements are commonly used, but identifying products of complex reactions at surfaces presents a significant challenge. Here we present a non-contact AFM (nc-AFM) study to directly address this issue. We followed the change of the chemical structures, from reactants to products of enediyne cyclization reactions on metal surfaces. Thermal annealing of enediynes induced a series of cyclization cascades leading to radical species and the formation of dimers. Atomically resolved nc-AFM images reveal the precise chemical structure and the formation of chemical bonds between single molecular units. With the support of DFT calculations, we identified the underlying chemical pathways and barriers, demonstrating the potential of this atomically resolved AFM technique to study unknown reaction products in surface chemistry at the single-molecule level.

  16. An apparatus to manipulate and identify individual Ba ions from bulk liquid Xe.

    PubMed

    Twelker, K; Kravitz, S; Montero Díez, M; Gratta, G; Fairbank, W; Albert, J B; Auty, D J; Barbeau, P S; Beck, D; Benitez-Medina, C; Breidenbach, M; Brunner, T; Cao, G F; Chambers, C; Cleveland, B; Coon, M; Craycraft, A; Daniels, T; Daugherty, S J; Davis, C G; DeVoe, R; Delaquis, S; Didberidze, T; Dilling, J; Dolinski, M J; Dunford, M; Fabris, L; Farine, J; Feldmeier, W; Fierlinger, P; Fudenberg, D; Giroux, G; Gornea, R; Graham, K; Hall, C; Heffner, M; Herrin, S; Hughes, M; Jiang, X S; Johnson, T N; Johnston, S; Karelin, A; Kaufman, L J; Killick, R; Koffas, T; Krücken, R; Kuchenkov, A; Kumar, K S; Leonard, D S; Leonard, F; Licciardi, C; Lin, Y H; MacLellan, R; Marino, M G; Mong, B; Moore, D; Odian, A; Ostrovskiy, I; Ouellet, C; Piepke, A; Pocar, A; Retiere, F; Rowson, P C; Rozo, M P; Schubert, A; Sinclair, D; Smith, E; Stekhanov, V; Tarka, M; Tolba, T; Tosi, D; Vuilleumier, J-L; Walton, J; Walton, T; Weber, M; Wen, L J; Wichoski, U; Yang, L; Yen, Y-R; Zhao, Y B

    2014-09-01

    We describe a system to transport and identify barium ions produced in liquid xenon, as part of R&D towards the second phase of a double beta decay experiment, nEXO. The goal is to identify the Ba ion resulting from an extremely rare nuclear decay of the isotope (136)Xe, hence providing a confirmation of the occurrence of the decay. This is achieved through Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RIS). In the test setup described here, Ba ions can be produced in liquid xenon or vacuum and collected on a clean substrate. This substrate is then removed to an analysis chamber under vacuum, where laser-induced thermal desorption and RIS are used with time-of-flight mass spectroscopy for positive identification of the barium decay product. PMID:25273779

  17. An apparatus to manipulate and identify individual Ba ions from bulk liquid Xe.

    PubMed

    Twelker, K; Kravitz, S; Montero Díez, M; Gratta, G; Fairbank, W; Albert, J B; Auty, D J; Barbeau, P S; Beck, D; Benitez-Medina, C; Breidenbach, M; Brunner, T; Cao, G F; Chambers, C; Cleveland, B; Coon, M; Craycraft, A; Daniels, T; Daugherty, S J; Davis, C G; DeVoe, R; Delaquis, S; Didberidze, T; Dilling, J; Dolinski, M J; Dunford, M; Fabris, L; Farine, J; Feldmeier, W; Fierlinger, P; Fudenberg, D; Giroux, G; Gornea, R; Graham, K; Hall, C; Heffner, M; Herrin, S; Hughes, M; Jiang, X S; Johnson, T N; Johnston, S; Karelin, A; Kaufman, L J; Killick, R; Koffas, T; Krücken, R; Kuchenkov, A; Kumar, K S; Leonard, D S; Leonard, F; Licciardi, C; Lin, Y H; MacLellan, R; Marino, M G; Mong, B; Moore, D; Odian, A; Ostrovskiy, I; Ouellet, C; Piepke, A; Pocar, A; Retiere, F; Rowson, P C; Rozo, M P; Schubert, A; Sinclair, D; Smith, E; Stekhanov, V; Tarka, M; Tolba, T; Tosi, D; Vuilleumier, J-L; Walton, J; Walton, T; Weber, M; Wen, L J; Wichoski, U; Yang, L; Yen, Y-R; Zhao, Y B

    2014-09-01

    We describe a system to transport and identify barium ions produced in liquid xenon, as part of R&D towards the second phase of a double beta decay experiment, nEXO. The goal is to identify the Ba ion resulting from an extremely rare nuclear decay of the isotope (136)Xe, hence providing a confirmation of the occurrence of the decay. This is achieved through Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RIS). In the test setup described here, Ba ions can be produced in liquid xenon or vacuum and collected on a clean substrate. This substrate is then removed to an analysis chamber under vacuum, where laser-induced thermal desorption and RIS are used with time-of-flight mass spectroscopy for positive identification of the barium decay product.

  18. MICA∗078: A novel allele identified in a Moroccan individual affected by celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Piancatelli, Daniela; Oumhani, Khadija; Benelbarhdadi, Imane; Del Beato, Tiziana; Colanardi, Alessia; Sebastiani, Pierluigi; Tessitore, Alessandra; El Aouad, Rajae; Essaid, Abdellah

    2015-06-01

    A novel MICA allele, MICA(∗)078, has been identified during HLA/MICA high resolution typing of Moroccan patients with celiac disease. MICA(∗)078 shows an uncommon variation at a highly conserved nucleotide position (nt 493, G → A), resulting in one amino acid change at codon 142 (V → I) of MICA gene (compared to MICA(∗)002:01), located in the α2-domain, in which V142 is the common residue.

  19. GWAS of 126,559 individuals identifies genetic variants associated with educational attainment.

    PubMed

    Rietveld, Cornelius A; Medland, Sarah E; Derringer, Jaime; Yang, Jian; Esko, Tõnu; Martin, Nicolas W; Westra, Harm-Jan; Shakhbazov, Konstantin; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Agrawal, Arpana; Albrecht, Eva; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Amin, Najaf; Barnard, John; Baumeister, Sebastian E; Benke, Kelly S; Bielak, Lawrence F; Boatman, Jeffrey A; Boyle, Patricia A; Davies, Gail; de Leeuw, Christiaan; Eklund, Niina; Evans, Daniel S; Ferhmann, Rudolf; Fischer, Krista; Gieger, Christian; Gjessing, Håkon K; Hägg, Sara; Harris, Jennifer R; Hayward, Caroline; Holzapfel, Christina; Ibrahim-Verbaas, Carla A; Ingelsson, Erik; Jacobsson, Bo; Joshi, Peter K; Jugessur, Astanand; Kaakinen, Marika; Kanoni, Stavroula; Karjalainen, Juha; Kolcic, Ivana; Kristiansson, Kati; Kutalik, Zoltán; Lahti, Jari; Lee, Sang H; Lin, Peng; Lind, Penelope A; Liu, Yongmei; Lohman, Kurt; Loitfelder, Marisa; McMahon, George; Vidal, Pedro Marques; Meirelles, Osorio; Milani, Lili; Myhre, Ronny; Nuotio, Marja-Liisa; Oldmeadow, Christopher J; Petrovic, Katja E; Peyrot, Wouter J; Polasek, Ozren; Quaye, Lydia; Reinmaa, Eva; Rice, John P; Rizzi, Thais S; Schmidt, Helena; Schmidt, Reinhold; Smith, Albert V; Smith, Jennifer A; Tanaka, Toshiko; Terracciano, Antonio; van der Loos, Matthijs J H M; Vitart, Veronique; Völzke, Henry; Wellmann, Jürgen; Yu, Lei; Zhao, Wei; Allik, Jüri; Attia, John R; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bastardot, François; Beauchamp, Jonathan; Bennett, David A; Berger, Klaus; Bierut, Laura J; Boomsma, Dorret I; Bültmann, Ute; Campbell, Harry; Chabris, Christopher F; Cherkas, Lynn; Chung, Mina K; Cucca, Francesco; de Andrade, Mariza; De Jager, Philip L; De Neve, Jan-Emmanuel; Deary, Ian J; Dedoussis, George V; Deloukas, Panos; Dimitriou, Maria; Eiríksdóttir, Guðny; Elderson, Martin F; Eriksson, Johan G; Evans, David M; Faul, Jessica D; Ferrucci, Luigi; Garcia, Melissa E; Grönberg, Henrik; Guðnason, Vilmundur; Hall, Per; Harris, Juliette M; Harris, Tamara B; Hastie, Nicholas D; Heath, Andrew C; Hernandez, Dena G; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hofman, Adriaan; Holle, Rolf; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Iacono, William G; Illig, Thomas; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kähönen, Mika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kirkpatrick, Robert M; Kowgier, Matthew; Latvala, Antti; Launer, Lenore J; Lawlor, Debbie A; Lehtimäki, Terho; Li, Jingmei; Lichtenstein, Paul; Lichtner, Peter; Liewald, David C; Madden, Pamela A; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Mäkinen, Tomi E; Masala, Marco; McGue, Matt; Metspalu, Andres; Mielck, Andreas; Miller, Michael B; Montgomery, Grant W; Mukherjee, Sutapa; Nyholt, Dale R; Oostra, Ben A; Palmer, Lyle J; Palotie, Aarno; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Perola, Markus; Peyser, Patricia A; Preisig, Martin; Räikkönen, Katri; Raitakari, Olli T; Realo, Anu; Ring, Susan M; Ripatti, Samuli; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Rustichini, Aldo; Salomaa, Veikko; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Schlessinger, David; Scott, Rodney J; Snieder, Harold; St Pourcain, Beate; Starr, John M; Sul, Jae Hoon; Surakka, Ida; Svento, Rauli; Teumer, Alexander; Tiemeier, Henning; van Rooij, Frank J A; Van Wagoner, David R; Vartiainen, Erkki; Viikari, Jorma; Vollenweider, Peter; Vonk, Judith M; Waeber, Gérard; Weir, David R; Wichmann, H-Erich; Widen, Elisabeth; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilson, James F; Wright, Alan F; Conley, Dalton; Davey-Smith, George; Franke, Lude; Groenen, Patrick J F; Hofman, Albert; Johannesson, Magnus; Kardia, Sharon L R; Krueger, Robert F; Laibson, David; Martin, Nicholas G; Meyer, Michelle N; Posthuma, Danielle; Thurik, A Roy; Timpson, Nicholas J; Uitterlinden, André G; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Visscher, Peter M; Benjamin, Daniel J; Cesarini, David; Koellinger, Philipp D

    2013-06-21

    A genome-wide association study (GWAS) of educational attainment was conducted in a discovery sample of 101,069 individuals and a replication sample of 25,490. Three independent single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are genome-wide significant (rs9320913, rs11584700, rs4851266), and all three replicate. Estimated effects sizes are small (coefficient of determination R(2) ≈ 0.02%), approximately 1 month of schooling per allele. A linear polygenic score from all measured SNPs accounts for ≈2% of the variance in both educational attainment and cognitive function. Genes in the region of the loci have previously been associated with health, cognitive, and central nervous system phenotypes, and bioinformatics analyses suggest the involvement of the anterior caudate nucleus. These findings provide promising candidate SNPs for follow-up work, and our effect size estimates can anchor power analyses in social-science genetics.

  20. GWAS of 126,559 Individuals Identifies Genetic Variants Associated with Educational Attainment

    PubMed Central

    Rietveld, Cornelius A.; Medland, Sarah E.; Derringer, Jaime; Yang, Jian; Esko, Tõnu; Martin, Nicolas W.; Westra, Harm-Jan; Shakhbazov, Konstantin; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Agrawal, Arpana; Albrecht, Eva; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Amin, Najaf; Barnard, John; Baumeister, Sebastian E.; Benke, Kelly S.; Bielak, Lawrence F.; Boatman, Jeffrey A.; Boyle, Patricia A.; Davies, Gail; de Leeuw, Christiaan; Eklund, Niina; Evans, Daniel S.; Ferhmann, Rudolf; Fischer, Krista; Gieger, Christian; Gjessing, Håkon K.; Hägg, Sara; Harris, Jennifer R.; Hayward, Caroline; Holzapfel, Christina; Ibrahim-Verbaas, Carla A.; Ingelsson, Erik; Jacobsson, Bo; Joshi, Peter K.; Jugessur, Astanand; Kaakinen, Marika; Kanoni, Stavroula; Karjalainen, Juha; Kolcic, Ivana; Kristiansson, Kati; Kutalik, Zoltán; Lahti, Jari; Lee, Sang H.; Lin, Peng; Lind, Penelope A.; Liu, Yongmei; Lohman, Kurt; Loitfelder, Marisa; McMahon, George; Vidal, Pedro Marques; Meirelles, Osorio; Milani, Lili; Myhre, Ronny; Nuotio, Marja-Liisa; Oldmeadow, Christopher J.; Petrovic, Katja E.; Peyrot, Wouter J.; Polašek, Ozren; Quaye, Lydia; Reinmaa, Eva; Rice, John P.; Rizzi, Thais S.; Schmidt, Helena; Schmidt, Reinhold; Smith, Albert V.; Smith, Jennifer A.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Terracciano, Antonio; van der Loos, Matthijs J.H.M.; Vitart, Veronique; Völzke, Henry; Wellmann, Jürgen; Yu, Lei; Zhao, Wei; Allik, Jüri; Attia, John R.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bastardot, François; Beauchamp, Jonathan; Bennett, David A.; Berger, Klaus; Bierut, Laura J.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Bültmann, Ute; Campbell, Harry; Chabris, Christopher F.; Cherkas, Lynn; Chung, Mina K.; Cucca, Francesco; de Andrade, Mariza; De Jager, Philip L.; De Neve, Jan-Emmanuel; Deary, Ian J.; Dedoussis, George V.; Deloukas, Panos; Dimitriou, Maria; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Elderson, Martin F.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Evans, David M.; Faul, Jessica D.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Garcia, Melissa E.; Grönberg, Henrik; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hall, Per; Harris, Juliette M.; Harris, Tamara B.; Hastie, Nicholas D.; Heath, Andrew C.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hofman, Adriaan; Holle, Rolf; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Iacono, William G.; Illig, Thomas; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kähönen, Mika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kirkpatrick, Robert M.; Kowgier, Matthew; Latvala, Antti; Launer, Lenore J.; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Lehtimäki, Terho; Li, Jingmei; Lichtenstein, Paul; Lichtner, Peter; Liewald, David C.; Madden, Pamela A.; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Mäkinen, Tomi E.; Masala, Marco; McGue, Matt; Metspalu, Andres; Mielck, Andreas; Miller, Michael B.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mukherjee, Sutapa; Nyholt, Dale R.; Oostra, Ben A.; Palmer, Lyle J.; Palotie, Aarno; Penninx, Brenda; Perola, Markus; Peyser, Patricia A.; Preisig, Martin; Räikkönen, Katri; Raitakari, Olli T.; Realo, Anu; Ring, Susan M.; Ripatti, Samuli; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Rustichini, Aldo; Salomaa, Veikko; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Schlessinger, David; Scott, Rodney J.; Snieder, Harold; Pourcain, Beate St; Starr, John M.; Sul, Jae Hoon; Surakka, Ida; Svento, Rauli; Teumer, Alexander; Tiemeier, Henning; Rooij, Frank JAan; Van Wagoner, David R.; Vartiainen, Erkki; Viikari, Jorma; Vollenweider, Peter; Vonk, Judith M.; Waeber, Gérard; Weir, David R.; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Widen, Elisabeth; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilson, James F.; Wright, Alan F.; Conley, Dalton; Davey-Smith, George; Franke, Lude; Groenen, Patrick J. F.; Hofman, Albert; Johannesson, Magnus; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Krueger, Robert F.; Laibson, David; Martin, Nicholas G.; Meyer, Michelle N.; Posthuma, Danielle; Thurik, A. Roy; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Uitterlinden, André G.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Visscher, Peter M.; Benjamin, Daniel J.; Cesarini, David; Koellinger, Philipp D.

    2013-01-01

    A genome-wide association study of educational attainment was conducted in a discovery sample of 101,069 individuals and a replication sample of 25,490. Three independent SNPs are genome-wide significant (rs9320913, rs11584700, rs4851266), and all three replicate. Estimated effects sizes are small (R2 ≈ 0.02%), approximately 1 month of schooling per allele. A linear polygenic score from all measured SNPs accounts for ≈ 2% of the variance in both educational attainment and cognitive function. Genes in the region of the loci have previously been associated with health, cognitive, and central nervous system phenotypes, and bioinformatics analyses suggest the involvement of the anterior caudate nucleus. These findings provide promising candidate SNPs for follow-up work, and our effect size estimates can anchor power analyses in social-science genetics. PMID:23722424

  1. Using focus groups to identify asthma care and education issues for elderly urban-dwelling minority individuals.

    PubMed

    Cortes, Tara; Lee, Albert; Boal, Jeremy; Mion, Lorraine; Butler, Arlene

    2004-08-01

    A growing number of older adults are afflicted with asthma; these older asthmatic individuals suffer more deleterious consequences as compared with younger asthmatic individuals. Asthma is a chronic condition requiring the person's ability to self-manage symptoms. Few educational programs have focused on older asthmatic adults' learning needs and even fewer on those of older minority individuals with this disease. Three focus groups were conducted in East Harlem. Each group consisted of 6 to 10 participants. All focus groups were led by the same co-leaders and were conducted using the same semistructured format. Discussions were audio-taped and transcribed. Transcriptions were reviewed by two independent raters who determined major themes and concerns. Comparisons were made and discrepancies resolved through discussion and consensus with the team of investigators. In this pilot study, there were important similarities in the themes identified by participants in the 3 focus groups. Older individuals with asthma, their unlicensed caregivers, and health professionals all identified the following as important in the care of older adults who are asthmatic: (1) the negative impact of asthma on the individual's quality of life, (2) high cost of medications, (3) nonadherence to the medical regimen, and (4) difficulty that these individuals have in accessing the health care system. PMID:15343555

  2. Genome-wide analysis of over 106 000 individuals identifies 9 neuroticism-associated loci

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D J; Escott-Price, V; Davies, G; Bailey, M E S; Colodro-Conde, L; Ward, J; Vedernikov, A; Marioni, R; Cullen, B; Lyall, D; Hagenaars, S P; Liewald, D C M; Luciano, M; Gale, C R; Ritchie, S J; Hayward, C; Nicholl, B; Bulik-Sullivan, B; Adams, M; Couvy-Duchesne, B; Graham, N; Mackay, D; Evans, J; Smith, B H; Porteous, D J; Medland, S E; Martin, N G; Holmans, P; McIntosh, A M; Pell, J P; Deary, I J; O'Donovan, M C

    2016-01-01

    Neuroticism is a personality trait of fundamental importance for psychological well-being and public health. It is strongly associated with major depressive disorder (MDD) and several other psychiatric conditions. Although neuroticism is heritable, attempts to identify the alleles involved in previous studies have been limited by relatively small sample sizes. Here we report a combined meta-analysis of genome-wide association study (GWAS) of neuroticism that includes 91 370 participants from the UK Biobank cohort, 6659 participants from the Generation Scotland: Scottish Family Health Study (GS:SFHS) and 8687 participants from a QIMR (Queensland Institute of Medical Research) Berghofer Medical Research Institute (QIMR) cohort. All participants were assessed using the same neuroticism instrument, the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised (EPQ-R-S) Short Form's Neuroticism scale. We found a single-nucleotide polymorphism-based heritability estimate for neuroticism of ∼15% (s.e.=0.7%). Meta-analysis identified nine novel loci associated with neuroticism. The strongest evidence for association was at a locus on chromosome 8 (P=1.5 × 10−15) spanning 4 Mb and containing at least 36 genes. Other associated loci included interesting candidate genes on chromosome 1 (GRIK3 (glutamate receptor ionotropic kainate 3)), chromosome 4 (KLHL2 (Kelch-like protein 2)), chromosome 17 (CRHR1 (corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1) and MAPT (microtubule-associated protein Tau)) and on chromosome 18 (CELF4 (CUGBP elav-like family member 4)). We found no evidence for genetic differences in the common allelic architecture of neuroticism by sex. By comparing our findings with those of the Psychiatric Genetics Consortia, we identified a strong genetic correlation between neuroticism and MDD and a less strong but significant genetic correlation with schizophrenia, although not with bipolar disorder. Polygenic risk scores derived from the primary UK Biobank sample captured

  3. Genome-wide analysis of over 106 000 individuals identifies 9 neuroticism-associated loci.

    PubMed

    Smith, D J; Escott-Price, V; Davies, G; Bailey, M E S; Colodro-Conde, L; Ward, J; Vedernikov, A; Marioni, R; Cullen, B; Lyall, D; Hagenaars, S P; Liewald, D C M; Luciano, M; Gale, C R; Ritchie, S J; Hayward, C; Nicholl, B; Bulik-Sullivan, B; Adams, M; Couvy-Duchesne, B; Graham, N; Mackay, D; Evans, J; Smith, B H; Porteous, D J; Medland, S E; Martin, N G; Holmans, P; McIntosh, A M; Pell, J P; Deary, I J; O'Donovan, M C

    2016-06-01

    Neuroticism is a personality trait of fundamental importance for psychological well-being and public health. It is strongly associated with major depressive disorder (MDD) and several other psychiatric conditions. Although neuroticism is heritable, attempts to identify the alleles involved in previous studies have been limited by relatively small sample sizes. Here we report a combined meta-analysis of genome-wide association study (GWAS) of neuroticism that includes 91 370 participants from the UK Biobank cohort, 6659 participants from the Generation Scotland: Scottish Family Health Study (GS:SFHS) and 8687 participants from a QIMR (Queensland Institute of Medical Research) Berghofer Medical Research Institute (QIMR) cohort. All participants were assessed using the same neuroticism instrument, the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised (EPQ-R-S) Short Form's Neuroticism scale. We found a single-nucleotide polymorphism-based heritability estimate for neuroticism of ∼15% (s.e.=0.7%). Meta-analysis identified nine novel loci associated with neuroticism. The strongest evidence for association was at a locus on chromosome 8 (P=1.5 × 10(-15)) spanning 4 Mb and containing at least 36 genes. Other associated loci included interesting candidate genes on chromosome 1 (GRIK3 (glutamate receptor ionotropic kainate 3)), chromosome 4 (KLHL2 (Kelch-like protein 2)), chromosome 17 (CRHR1 (corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1) and MAPT (microtubule-associated protein Tau)) and on chromosome 18 (CELF4 (CUGBP elav-like family member 4)). We found no evidence for genetic differences in the common allelic architecture of neuroticism by sex. By comparing our findings with those of the Psychiatric Genetics Consortia, we identified a strong genetic correlation between neuroticism and MDD and a less strong but significant genetic correlation with schizophrenia, although not with bipolar disorder. Polygenic risk scores derived from the primary UK Biobank sample captured

  4. A novel approach to identifying the elemental composition of individual residue particles retained in single snow crystals.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chang-Jin; Hwang, Kyung-Chul; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2013-01-01

    This study was carried out to describe the chemical characteristics of individual residual particles in hexagonal snow crystals, which can provide a clue to the aerosol removal mechanism during snowfall. In the present study, to collect snow crystal individually and to identify the elemental composition of individual residues retained in a hexagonal crystal, an orchestration of the replication technique and micro-particle induced X-ray emission (micro-PIXE) analysis was carried out. Information concerning the elemental compositions and their abundance in the snow crystals showed a severe crystal-to-crystal fluctuation. The residues retained in the hexagonal snow crystals were dominated primarily by mineral components, such as silica and calcium. Based on the elemental mask and the spectrum of micro-PIXE, it was possible to presume the chemical inner-structure as well as the elemental mixing state in and/or on the individual residues retained in single snow crystals.

  5. Identifying homogenous subgroups for individual patient meta-analysis based on Rough Set Theory.

    PubMed

    Gil-Herrera, Eleazar; Tsalatsanis, Athanasios; Kumar, Ambuj; Mhaskar, Rahul; Miladinovic, Branko; Yalcin, Ali; Djulbegovic, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Failure to detect and manage heterogeneity between clinical trials included in meta-analysis may lead to misinterpretation of summary effect estimates. This may ultimately compromise the validity of the results of the meta-analysis. Typically, when heterogeneity between trials is detected, researchers use sensitivity or subgroup analysis to manage it. However, both methods fail to explain why heterogeneity existed in the first place. Here we propose a novel methodology that relies on Rough Set Theory (RST) to detect, explain, and manage the sources of heterogeneity applicable to meta-analysis performed on individual patient data (IPD). The method exploits the RST relations of discernibility and indiscernibility to create homogeneous groups of patients. We applied our methodology on a dataset of 1,111 patients enrolled in 9 randomized controlled trials studying the effect of two transplantation procedures in the management of hematologic malignancies. Our method was able to create three subgroups of patients with remarkably low statistical heterogeneity values (16.8%, 0% and 0% respectively). The proposed methodology has the potential to automatize and standardize the process of detecting and managing heterogeneity in IPD meta-analysis. Future work involves investigating the applications of the proposed methodology in analyzing treatment effects in patients belonging to different risk groups, which will ultimately assist in personalized healthcare decision making.

  6. Identifying individual changes in performance with composite quality indicators while accounting for regression to the mean.

    PubMed

    Gajewski, Byron J; Dunton, Nancy

    2013-04-01

    Almost a decade ago Morton and Torgerson indicated that perceived medical benefits could be due to "regression to the mean." Despite this caution, the regression to the mean "effects on the identification of changes in institutional performance do not seem to have been considered previously in any depth" (Jones and Spiegelhalter). As a response, Jones and Spiegelhalter provide a methodology to adjust for regression to the mean when modeling recent changes in institutional performance for one-variable quality indicators. Therefore, in our view, Jones and Spiegelhalter provide a breakthrough methodology for performance measures. At the same time, in the interests of parsimony, it is useful to aggregate individual quality indicators into a composite score. Our question is, can we develop and demonstrate a methodology that extends the "regression to the mean" literature to allow for composite quality indicators? Using a latent variable modeling approach, we extend the methodology to the composite indicator case. We demonstrate the approach on 4 indicators collected by the National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators. A simulation study further demonstrates its "proof of concept." PMID:23035127

  7. JK null alleles identified from Japanese individuals with Jk(a−b−) phenotype.

    PubMed

    Onodera, T; Sasaki, K; Tsuneyama, H; Isa, K; Ogasawara, K; Satake, M; Tadokoro, K; Uchikawa, M

    2014-05-01

    The Kidd blood group system consists of three common phenotypes: Jk(a+b−), Jk(a−b+) and Jk(a+b+), and one rare phenotype, Jk(a−b−). Jka/Jkb polymorphism is associated with c.838G>A (p.Asp280Asn) in exon 9 of the JK (SLC14A1) gene, and the corresponding alleles are named JK*01 and JK*02. The rare phenotype Jk(a−b−) was first found in a Filipina of Spanish and Chinese ancestry, and to date, several JK null alleles responsible for the Jk(a−b−) phenotype have been reported. We report seven novel JK null alleles, 4 with a JK*01 background and 3 with a JK*02 background, identified from Jk(a−b−) Japanese. PMID:24877238

  8. Neurophysiology for Detection of High Risk for Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a complex and often disabling disorder that is characterized by a wide range of social, emotional, and cognitive deficits. Increasing research suggests that the greatest social and cognitive therapeutic impact comes from early identification. The present study applied a well-established neurophysiological paradigm in the schizophrenia literature, mismatch negativity (MMN), to college students identified as high risk (HR) for psychosis to investigate MMN as a potential biomarker for the onset of psychosis. The hypothesis was that HR would exhibit attenuated MMN amplitudes compared to controls, as has been established in individuals with chronic schizophrenia. Participants (N = 121) were separated into Group 1 (controls) (n1 = 72) and Group 2 (HR) (n2 = 49) based on the established cutoff score of the 16-item Prodromal Questionnaire. Participants then completed a time based MMN paradigm during which brain activity was recorded with EEG. For all electrode locations, controls demonstrated significantly more negative amplitudes than HR (Cz: F(1,119) = 8.09, p = .005; Fz: F(1, 119) = 5.74, p = .018; Pz: F(1,119) = 5.88, p = .017). Results suggested that MMN may assist in identifying those who appear high-functioning but may be at risk for later development of psychosis or cognitive and psychological difficulties associated with psychosis. PMID:27579180

  9. Neurophysiology for Detection of High Risk for Psychosis.

    PubMed

    Pantlin, Lara N; Davalos, Deana

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a complex and often disabling disorder that is characterized by a wide range of social, emotional, and cognitive deficits. Increasing research suggests that the greatest social and cognitive therapeutic impact comes from early identification. The present study applied a well-established neurophysiological paradigm in the schizophrenia literature, mismatch negativity (MMN), to college students identified as high risk (HR) for psychosis to investigate MMN as a potential biomarker for the onset of psychosis. The hypothesis was that HR would exhibit attenuated MMN amplitudes compared to controls, as has been established in individuals with chronic schizophrenia. Participants (N = 121) were separated into Group 1 (controls) (n 1 = 72) and Group 2 (HR) (n 2 = 49) based on the established cutoff score of the 16-item Prodromal Questionnaire. Participants then completed a time based MMN paradigm during which brain activity was recorded with EEG. For all electrode locations, controls demonstrated significantly more negative amplitudes than HR (Cz: F(1,119) = 8.09, p = .005; Fz: F(1, 119) = 5.74, p = .018; Pz: F(1,119) = 5.88, p = .017). Results suggested that MMN may assist in identifying those who appear high-functioning but may be at risk for later development of psychosis or cognitive and psychological difficulties associated with psychosis. PMID:27579180

  10. Is routine hospital episode data sufficient for identifying individuals with chronic kidney disease? A comparison study with laboratory data.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Lynn M; Denadai, Lucas; Black, Corri; Fluck, Nicholas; Prescott, Gordon; Simpson, William; Wilde, Katie; Marks, Angharad

    2016-06-01

    Internationally, investment in the availability of routine health care data for improving health, health surveillance and health care is increasing. We assessed the validity of hospital episode data for identifying individuals with chronic kidney disease compared to biochemistry data in a large population-based cohort, the Grampian Laboratory Outcomes, Morbidity and Mortality Study-II (n = 70,435). Grampian Laboratory Outcomes, Morbidity and Mortality Study-II links hospital episode data to biochemistry data for all adults in a health region with impaired kidney function and random samples of individuals with normal and unmeasured kidney function in 2003. We compared identification of individuals with chronic kidney disease by hospital episode data (based on International Classification of Diseases-10 codes) to the reference standard of biochemistry data (at least two estimated glomerular filtration rates <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) at least 90 days apart). Hospital episode data, compared to biochemistry data, identified a lower prevalence of chronic kidney disease and had low sensitivity (<10%) but high specificity (>97%). Using routine health care data from multiple sources offers the best opportunity to identify individuals with chronic kidney disease.

  11. Utility of an abbreviated questionnaire to identify individuals with ADHD at risk for functional impairments

    PubMed Central

    Biederman, Joseph; Petty, Carter R.; Fried, Ronna; Doyle, Alysa E.; Mick, Eric; Aleardi, Megan; Monuteaux, Michael C.; Seidman, Larry J.; Spencer, Thomas; Faneuil, Alicia R.; Holmes, Lauren; Faraone, Stephen V.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To discern whether a subset of items from the 99-item Current Behavior Scale (CBS) of behaviorally defined executive function deficits (EFDs) in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) can identify a group at risk for poor outcome. Methods Subjects were 200 adults with ADHD participating in a family study of ADHD in adults. Factor analysis was used to reduce the number of items in the 99-item CBS. Results The one factor solution provided 8 items with factor loadings above 0.70. This abbreviated set of items was highly correlated with the 99-item CBS (0.91) and was similarly related to functional outcomes compared to the 99-item CBS (average correlation of 0.30 versus 0.32). Conclusion For adults with ADHD, a set of 8 empirically derived from the CBS similarly correlated with negative outcomes compared to the 99-item CBS, raising the possibility of utilization as a mechanism for identification of EFDs in adults with ADHD. PMID:17335849

  12. Resilience among High Risk Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntyre, Kevin; And Others

    This report focuses on children who are at risk for abusing alcohol and other drugs. It notes that the concept of risk factors is only one component necessary to understanding the range of youth drug-related behaviors. A second component, protective factors, is identified and defined as those aspects of a person's biology, psychology, and…

  13. Intervening to Improve Communication between Parents, Teachers, and Primary Care Providers of Children with ADHD or at High Risk for ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolraich, Mark L.; Bickman, Leonard; Lambert, E. Warren; Simmons, Tonya; Doffing, Melissa A.

    2005-01-01

    This study examines interventions designed to improve communication between individuals who take care of children with ADHD. A teacher rating of 6,171 elementary school children identifies 1,573 children with ADHD or with high risk for ADHD. Parent interviews and information from teachers are collected on 243 children who are randomized into…

  14. Diversity of the causal genes in hearing impaired Algerian individuals identified by whole exome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Ammar-Khodja, Fatima; Bonnet, Crystel; Dahmani, Malika; Ouhab, Sofiane; Lefèvre, Gaelle M; Ibrahim, Hassina; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Weil, Dominique; Louha, Malek; Petit, Christine

    2015-01-01

    The genetic heterogeneity of congenital hearing disorders makes molecular diagnosis expensive and time-consuming using conventional techniques such as Sanger sequencing of DNA. In order to design an appropriate strategy of molecular diagnosis in the Algerian population, we explored the diversity of the involved mutations by studying 65 families affected by autosomal recessive forms of nonsyndromic hearing impairment (DFNB forms), which are the most prevalent early onset forms. We first carried out a systematic screening for mutations in GJB2 and the recurrent p.(Arg34*) mutation in TMC1, which were found in 31 (47.7%) families and 1 (1.5%) family, respectively. We then performed whole exome sequencing in nine of the remaining families, and identified the causative mutations in all the patients analyzed, either in the homozygous state (eight families) or in the compound heterozygous state (one family): (c.709C>T: p.(Arg237*)) and (c.2122C>T: p.(Arg708*)) in OTOF, (c.1334T>G: p.(Leu445Trp)) in SLC26A4, (c.764T>A: p.(Met255Lys)) in GIPC3, (c.518T>A: p.(Cys173Ser)) in LHFPL5, (c.5336T>C: p.(Leu1779Pro)) in MYO15A, (c.1807G>T: p.(Val603Phe)) in OTOA, (c.6080dup: p.(Asn2027Lys*9)) in PTPRQ, and (c.6017del: p.(Gly2006Alafs*13); c.7188_7189ins14: p.(Val2397Leufs*2)) in GPR98. Notably, 7 of these 10 mutations affecting 8 different genes had not been reported previously. These results highlight for the first time the genetic heterogeneity of the early onset forms of nonsyndromic deafness in Algerian families. PMID:26029705

  15. Identification of High Risk Students from Matriculation Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandusky, Sam T.

    A study was conducted at Sacramento City College (California) to determine the possibility of identifying high-risk students from information available from applications, assessment results, transcripts, and college enrollment data. Fall 1985 grade point averages (GPA) and progress percentages were used for high or low risk determination. Study…

  16. ORGANOPHOSPHATE PESTICIDE EXPOSURES - WHERE ARE THE HIGH RISK CHILDREN?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methods to identify children at high-risk for organophosphate (OP) pesticide exposure are difficult to develop because biological markers reflect only recent "snapshots" of exposure due to the short half-life of OP compounds (generally about 24 hours). We conducted a series of p...

  17. High risk factors of pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Camara, Soriba Naby; Yin, Tao; Yang, Ming; Li, Xiang; Gong, Qiong; Zhou, Jing; Zhao, Gang; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Aroun, Tajoo; Kuete, Martin; Ramdany, Sonam; Camara, Alpha Kabinet; Diallo, Aissatou Taran; Feng, Zhen; Ning, Xin; Xiong, Jiong-Xin; Tao, Jing; Qin, Qi; Zhou, Wei; Cui, Jing; Huang, Min; Guo, Yao; Gou, Shan-Miao; Wang, Bo; Liu, Tao; Olivier, Ohoya Etsaka Terence; Conde, Tenin; Cisse, Mohamed; Magassouba, Aboubacar Sidiki; Ballah, Sneha; Keita, Naby Laye Moussa; Souare, Ibrahima Sory; Toure, Aboubacar; Traore, Sadamoudou; Balde, Abdoulaye Korse; Keita, Namory; Camara, Naby Daouda; Emmanuel, Dusabe; Wu, He-Shui; Wang, Chun-You

    2016-06-01

    Over the past decades, cancer has become one of the toughest challenges for health professionals. The epidemiologists are increasingly directing their research efforts on various malignant tumor worldwide. Of note, incidence of cancers is on the rise more quickly in developed countries. Indeed, great endeavors have to be made in the control of the life-threatening disease. As we know it, pancreatic cancer (PC) is a malignant disease with the worst prognosis. While little is known about the etiology of the PC and measures to prevent the condition, so far, a number of risk factors have been identified. Genetic factors, pre-malignant lesions, predisposing diseases and exogenous factors have been found to be linked to PC. Genetic susceptibility was observed in 10% of PC cases, including inherited PC syndromes and familial PC. However, in the remaining 90%, their PC might be caused by genetic factors in combination with environmental factors. Nonetheless, the exact mechanism of the two kinds of factors, endogenous and exogenous, working together to cause PC remains poorly understood. The fact that most pancreatic neoplasms are diagnosed at an incurable stage of the disease highlights the need to identify risk factors and to understand their contribution to carcinogenesis. This article reviews the high risk factors contributing to the development of PC, to provide information for clinicians and epidemiologists.

  18. High risk factors of pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Camara, Soriba Naby; Yin, Tao; Yang, Ming; Li, Xiang; Gong, Qiong; Zhou, Jing; Zhao, Gang; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Aroun, Tajoo; Kuete, Martin; Ramdany, Sonam; Camara, Alpha Kabinet; Diallo, Aissatou Taran; Feng, Zhen; Ning, Xin; Xiong, Jiong-Xin; Tao, Jing; Qin, Qi; Zhou, Wei; Cui, Jing; Huang, Min; Guo, Yao; Gou, Shan-Miao; Wang, Bo; Liu, Tao; Olivier, Ohoya Etsaka Terence; Conde, Tenin; Cisse, Mohamed; Magassouba, Aboubacar Sidiki; Ballah, Sneha; Keita, Naby Laye Moussa; Souare, Ibrahima Sory; Toure, Aboubacar; Traore, Sadamoudou; Balde, Abdoulaye Korse; Keita, Namory; Camara, Naby Daouda; Emmanuel, Dusabe; Wu, He-Shui; Wang, Chun-You

    2016-06-01

    Over the past decades, cancer has become one of the toughest challenges for health professionals. The epidemiologists are increasingly directing their research efforts on various malignant tumor worldwide. Of note, incidence of cancers is on the rise more quickly in developed countries. Indeed, great endeavors have to be made in the control of the life-threatening disease. As we know it, pancreatic cancer (PC) is a malignant disease with the worst prognosis. While little is known about the etiology of the PC and measures to prevent the condition, so far, a number of risk factors have been identified. Genetic factors, pre-malignant lesions, predisposing diseases and exogenous factors have been found to be linked to PC. Genetic susceptibility was observed in 10% of PC cases, including inherited PC syndromes and familial PC. However, in the remaining 90%, their PC might be caused by genetic factors in combination with environmental factors. Nonetheless, the exact mechanism of the two kinds of factors, endogenous and exogenous, working together to cause PC remains poorly understood. The fact that most pancreatic neoplasms are diagnosed at an incurable stage of the disease highlights the need to identify risk factors and to understand their contribution to carcinogenesis. This article reviews the high risk factors contributing to the development of PC, to provide information for clinicians and epidemiologists. PMID:27376795

  19. Genetic/familial high-risk assessment: breast and ovarian, version 1.2014.

    PubMed

    Daly, Mary B; Pilarski, Robert; Axilbund, Jennifer E; Buys, Saundra S; Crawford, Beth; Friedman, Susan; Garber, Judy E; Horton, Carolyn; Kaklamani, Virginia; Klein, Catherine; Kohlmann, Wendy; Kurian, Allison; Litton, Jennifer; Madlensky, Lisa; Marcom, P Kelly; Merajver, Sofia D; Offit, Kenneth; Pal, Tuya; Pasche, Boris; Reiser, Gwen; Shannon, Kristen Mahoney; Swisher, Elizabeth; Voian, Nicoleta C; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Whelan, Alison; Wiesner, Georgia L; Dwyer, Mary A; Kumar, Rashmi

    2014-09-01

    During the past few years, several genetic aberrations that may contribute to increased risks for development of breast and/or ovarian cancers have been identified. The NCCN Guidelines for Genetic/Familial High-Risk Assessment: Breast and Ovarian focus specifically on the assessment of genetic mutations in BRCA1/BRCA2, TP53, and PTEN, and recommend approaches to genetic testing/counseling and management strategies in individuals with these mutations. This portion of the NCCN Guidelines includes recommendations regarding diagnostic criteria and management of patients with Cowden Syndrome/PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome. PMID:25190698

  20. Improved system identification using artificial neural networks and analysis of individual differences in responses of an identified neuron.

    PubMed

    Costalago Meruelo, Alicia; Simpson, David M; Veres, Sandor M; Newland, Philip L

    2016-03-01

    Mathematical modelling is used routinely to understand the coding properties and dynamics of responses of neurons and neural networks. Here we analyse the effectiveness of Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) as a modelling tool for motor neuron responses. We used ANNs to model the synaptic responses of an identified motor neuron, the fast extensor motor neuron, of the desert locust in response to displacement of a sensory organ, the femoral chordotonal organ, which monitors movements of the tibia relative to the femur of the leg. The aim of the study was threefold: first to determine the potential value of ANNs as tools to model and investigate neural networks, second to understand the generalisation properties of ANNs across individuals and to different input signals and third, to understand individual differences in responses of an identified neuron. A metaheuristic algorithm was developed to design the ANN architectures. The performance of the models generated by the ANNs was compared with those generated through previous mathematical models of the same neuron. The results suggest that ANNs are significantly better than LNL and Wiener models in predicting specific neural responses to Gaussian White Noise, but not significantly different when tested with sinusoidal inputs. They are also able to predict responses of the same neuron in different individuals irrespective of which animal was used to develop the model, although notable differences between some individuals were evident.

  1. Pancreatic Cancer Screening of High-Risk Individuals in Arkansas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Pancreatic Neoplasms; Peutz-Jegher's Syndrome; BRCA1 Gene Mutation; BRCA2 Gene Mutation; Ataxia Telangiectasia; Familial Atypical Mole-Malignant Melanoma Syndrome; Colorectal Neoplasms, Hereditary Nonpolyposis; Hereditary Pancreatitis

  2. We Happy Few: Using Structured Population Models to Identify the Decisive Events in the Lives of Exceptional Individuals.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Robin E; Ellner, Stephen P

    2016-08-01

    In any population, some individuals make it big: they are among the few that produce many offspring, grow to large size, and so on. What distinguishes the lives of these happy few? We present three approaches for identifying what factors distinguish those "lucky" individuals who come to dominate reproduction in a population without fixed differences between individuals (genotype, site quality, etc.): comparing life-history trajectories for lucky and unlucky individuals and calculating the elasticity of the probability of becoming lucky to perturbations in demographic rates at a given size or a given age. As examples we consider published size-structured integral projection models for the tropical tree Dacrydium elatum and the semiarid shrub Artemisia ordosica and an age-size-structured matrix model for the tropical tree Cedrela ordosica. We find that good fortune (e.g., rapid growth) when small and young matters much more than good fortune when older and larger. Becoming lucky is primarily a matter of surviving while others die. For species with more variable growth (such as Cedrela and Ordosica), it is also a matter of growing fast. We focus on reproductive skew, but our methods are broadly applicable and can be used to investigate how individuals come to be exceptional in any aspect. PMID:27420793

  3. Psychological characteristics in high-risk MSM in China

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Men who have sex with men (MSM) have become a high-risk group of HIV infection in China. To date, little is known regarding the behavioral, social and psychological characteristics in Chinese MSM, which makes the implementation of preventive and therapeutic strategies for this high-risk subpopulation of people extremely difficult. Methods A total of 714 questionnaires were retrieved from the database of a Chinese government-sponsored National Key Research Project titled "Risk Analysis and Strategic Prevention of HIV Transmission from MSM to the General Population in China". The respondents were categorized into a high-risk group and a control group. Their behavioral, social and psychological characteristics were comparatively analyzed. Results Of the 714 MSM analyzed, 59 (8.26%) had high-risk homosexual behaviors. This sub-group of MSM had a higher in-marriage rate, a higher monthly income, heavier alcohol consumption and more serious problems with sexual abuse in childhood, intentional suicide attempts and mistaken assumption on condom's role in protecting HIV infection, as compared with the control group (P < 0.05). In contrast, the two groups did not differ significantly the sexual orientation, level of education, types of profession, drug use, condom use and experience of social stigma and discrimination (P > 0.05). A vast majority of the individuals in both behavior categories expressed support of legally protected gay clubs as well as gay marriage legislation in China. There was a strong correlation between high-risk behaviors and sexual abuse in childhood, alcohol drinking, income level and a mistaken belief in perfect HIV protection through the use of condoms. Conclusions MSM with and without high-risk homosexual behaviors have different social and psychological characteristics, which should be taken into account when implementing behavioral and therapeutic interventions aimed at preventing HIV/AIDS transmission among MSM as well as from MSM to

  4. Lived experiences of self-care among older, home-dwelling individuals identified to be at risk of undernutrition

    PubMed Central

    Tomstad, Solveig T; Söderhamn, Ulrika; Espnes, Geir Arild; Söderhamn, Olle

    2012-01-01

    Introduction In a society where most older people live in their own homes, it may be expected of older individuals to exercise their potential to take care of themselves in daily life. Nutrition is a central aspect of self-care, and groups of older, home-dwelling people are at risk of undernutrition. Aim The aim of this study was to describe the lived experiences of self-care and features that influence health and self-care among older, home-dwelling individuals identified to be at risk of undernutrition. Methods Qualitative interviews were performed with eleven home-dwelling individuals who had been identified as being at risk of undernutrition. The interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed with a descriptive phenomenological method. Findings Self-care as a lived experience among older, home-dwelling individuals identified to be at risk of undernutrition is about being aware of food choices and making decisions about taking healthy steps or not. In the presence of health problems, the appetite often decreases. Being able to take care of oneself in daily life is important, as is receiving help when needing it. Working at being physically and socially active and engaged may stimulate the appetite. Having company at meals is important and missed when living alone. Being present and taking each day by day, as well as considering oneself in the light of past time and previous experiences and looking ahead, is central, even when having fears for the future and the end of life. Conclusion Health care professionals should be aware of these findings in order to support self-care in older people, and they should pay attention to the social aspects at meals. PMID:23271914

  5. High risk groups in oil shale workforce

    SciTech Connect

    Gratt, L.B.; Perry, B.W.; Marine, W.M.; Savitz, D.A.

    1984-04-01

    The workforce risks of a hypothetical one million barrels-per-day oil shale industry were estimated. The risks for the different workforce segments were compared and high risk groups were identified. Accidents and injuries were statistically described by rates for fatalities, for accidents with days lost from work, and for accidents with no days lost from work. Workforce diseases analyzed were cancers, silicosia, pneumoconiosis, chronic bronchitis, chronic airway obstruction, and high frequency hearing loss. A comparison of the workforce groups under different risk measures (occurrence, fatality, and life-loss expectancy) was performed. The miners represented the group with the largest fatality and the most serious accident rate, although the estimated rates were below the average industry-wide underground mining experience. Lung disease from inhalation exposure of about the nuisance dust threshold limit value presents a significant risk for future concerns. If future environmental dust exposure is at the 100 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/ alpha-quartz level, safety improvements in the mining sector are of prime importance to reduce the oil shale worker's life-loss expectancy. 11 references, 1 figure, 11 tables.

  6. An Automated Method for Identifying Individuals with a Lung Nodule Can Be Feasibly Implemented Across Health Systems

    PubMed Central

    Farjah, Farhood; Halgrim, Scott; Buist, Diana S.M.; Gould, Michael K.; Zeliadt, Steven B.; Loggers, Elizabeth T.; Carrell, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The incidence of incidentally detected lung nodules is rapidly rising, but little is known about their management or associated patient outcomes. One barrier to studying lung nodule care is the inability to efficiently and reliably identify the cohort of interest (i.e. cases). Investigators at Kaiser Permanente Southern California (KPSC) recently developed an automated method to identify individuals with an incidentally discovered lung nodule, but the feasibility of implementing this method across other health systems is unknown. Methods: A random sample of Group Health (GH) members who had a computed tomography in 2012 underwent chart review to determine if a lung nodule was documented in the radiology report. A previously developed natural language processing (NLP) algorithm was implemented at our site using only knowledge of the key words, qualifiers, excluding terms, and the logic linking these parameters. Results: Among 499 subjects, 156 (31%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 27–36%) had an incidentally detected lung nodule. NLP identified 189 (38%, 95% CI 33–42%) individuals with a nodule. The accuracy of NLP at GH was similar to its accuracy at KPSC: sensitivity 90% (95% CI 85–95%) and specificity 86% (95% CI 82–89%) versus sensitivity 96% (95% CI 88–100%) and specificity 86% (95% CI 75–94%). Conclusion: Automated methods designed to identify individuals with an incidentally detected lung nodule can feasibly and independently be implemented across health systems. Use of these methods will likely facilitate the efficient conduct of multi-site studies evaluating practice patterns and associated outcomes. PMID:27668266

  7. An Automated Method for Identifying Individuals with a Lung Nodule Can Be Feasibly Implemented Across Health Systems

    PubMed Central

    Farjah, Farhood; Halgrim, Scott; Buist, Diana S.M.; Gould, Michael K.; Zeliadt, Steven B.; Loggers, Elizabeth T.; Carrell, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The incidence of incidentally detected lung nodules is rapidly rising, but little is known about their management or associated patient outcomes. One barrier to studying lung nodule care is the inability to efficiently and reliably identify the cohort of interest (i.e. cases). Investigators at Kaiser Permanente Southern California (KPSC) recently developed an automated method to identify individuals with an incidentally discovered lung nodule, but the feasibility of implementing this method across other health systems is unknown. Methods: A random sample of Group Health (GH) members who had a computed tomography in 2012 underwent chart review to determine if a lung nodule was documented in the radiology report. A previously developed natural language processing (NLP) algorithm was implemented at our site using only knowledge of the key words, qualifiers, excluding terms, and the logic linking these parameters. Results: Among 499 subjects, 156 (31%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 27–36%) had an incidentally detected lung nodule. NLP identified 189 (38%, 95% CI 33–42%) individuals with a nodule. The accuracy of NLP at GH was similar to its accuracy at KPSC: sensitivity 90% (95% CI 85–95%) and specificity 86% (95% CI 82–89%) versus sensitivity 96% (95% CI 88–100%) and specificity 86% (95% CI 75–94%). Conclusion: Automated methods designed to identify individuals with an incidentally detected lung nodule can feasibly and independently be implemented across health systems. Use of these methods will likely facilitate the efficient conduct of multi-site studies evaluating practice patterns and associated outcomes.

  8. Identifying uranium particles using fission tracks and microsampling individual particles for analysis using thermal ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Esaka, Fumitaka; Suzuki, Daisuke; Magara, Masaaki

    2015-03-01

    The analysis of isotope ratios in individual particles found in the environment is important to clarify the origins of the particles. In particular, the analysis of uranium particles in environmental samples from nuclear facilities is useful for detecting undeclared nuclear activities related to the production of nuclear weapons. Thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) combined with a fission track technique is an efficient method for determining the isotope ratios of individual uranium particles, but has a drawback called "particle-mixing". When some uranium particles are measured as a single particle and an average isotope ratio for the particles is obtained, it is called "particle mixing". This may lead to erroneous conclusions in terms of the particle sources that are identified. In the present study, microsampling using a scanning electron microscope was added to the fission track-TIMS procedure. The analysis of a mixture of SRM 950a and CRM U100 reference materials containing uranium particles indicated that particle mixing was almost completely avoided using the proposed technique. The performance of the proposed method was sufficient for obtaining reliable data for the sources of individual particles to be identified reliably. PMID:25680068

  9. Identifying uranium particles using fission tracks and microsampling individual particles for analysis using thermal ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Esaka, Fumitaka; Suzuki, Daisuke; Magara, Masaaki

    2015-03-01

    The analysis of isotope ratios in individual particles found in the environment is important to clarify the origins of the particles. In particular, the analysis of uranium particles in environmental samples from nuclear facilities is useful for detecting undeclared nuclear activities related to the production of nuclear weapons. Thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) combined with a fission track technique is an efficient method for determining the isotope ratios of individual uranium particles, but has a drawback called "particle-mixing". When some uranium particles are measured as a single particle and an average isotope ratio for the particles is obtained, it is called "particle mixing". This may lead to erroneous conclusions in terms of the particle sources that are identified. In the present study, microsampling using a scanning electron microscope was added to the fission track-TIMS procedure. The analysis of a mixture of SRM 950a and CRM U100 reference materials containing uranium particles indicated that particle mixing was almost completely avoided using the proposed technique. The performance of the proposed method was sufficient for obtaining reliable data for the sources of individual particles to be identified reliably.

  10. The individual-cell-based cryo-chip for the cryopreservation, manipulation and observation of spatially identifiable cells. I: Methodology

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cryopreservation is the only widely applicable method of storing vital cells for nearly unlimited periods of time. Successful cryopreservation is essential for reproductive medicine, stem cell research, cord blood storage and related biomedical areas. The methods currently used to retrieve a specific cell or a group of individual cells with specific biological properties after cryopreservation are quite complicated and inefficient. Results The present study suggests a new approach in cryopreservation, utilizing the Individual Cell-based Cryo-Chip (i3C). The i3C is made of materials having appropriate durability for cryopreservation conditions. The core of this approach is an array of picowells, each picowell designed to maintain an individual cell during the severe conditions of the freezing - thawing cycle and accompanying treatments. More than 97% of cells were found to retain their position in the picowells throughout the entire freezing - thawing cycle and medium exchange. Thus the comparison between pre-freezing and post-thawing data can be achieved at an individual cell resolution. The intactness of cells undergoing slow freezing and thawing, while residing in the i3C, was found to be similar to that obtained with micro-vials. However, in a fast freezing protocol, the i3C was found to be far superior. Conclusions The results of the present study offer new opportunities for cryopreservation. Using the present methodology, the cryopreservation of individual identifiable cells, and their observation and retrieval, at an individual cell resolution become possible for the first time. This approach facilitates the correlation between cell characteristics before and after the freezing - thawing cycle. Thus, it is expected to significantly enhance current cryopreservation procedures for successful regenerative and reproductive medicine. PMID:20609216

  11. Potential and Limitations of Satellite Data to Identify Deaths of Individual Trees in a Central American Tropical Rain Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, R. Q.; Kellner, J. R.; Peart, D. R.

    2005-12-01

    Logistical constraints on sample size and spatial scale limit individual-based field research on tropical trees. With remote sensing data, we may escape these limitations if fates of individuals can be tracked rigorously. We assessed the potential of readily available, commercial satellite data (QuickBird, 0.7 m pixels) obtained in 2003, to track the fate of individual crowns (> 40 m height) in tropical rain forest at La Selva, Costa Rica. The positions and shapes of these crowns in 1997 had been established using small-footprint LiDAR data with field verification. We focused first on a subset (n=180) of trees monitored in the field over the period 1997-2003. For the 60% of those trees whose crown positions and shapes could be tracked with confidence in the satellite image, we correctly recorded all 3 actual deaths. But we also incorrectly assigned 4 additional deaths to living individuals, due to the abundance of dark pixels in their crown areas. For the 40% of field-monitored trees for which our tracking in the satellite data was less confident (due to lack of image clarity), we correctly identified the one real death event, but incorrectly assigned 6 additional deaths to living trees. Thus, for the field-monitored trees, we grossly overestimated mortality in the satellite image (by 350%). Although currently available high resolution satellite imagery was not adequate for reliable monitoring of individuals, even for the largest forest trees, time series satellite data, rather than time series LiDAR to satellite data, might provide unbiased estimates of overall tree mortality rates if errors compensate. Satellite data may be also be useful as a labor and time saving complement to fieldwork on individual forest trees.

  12. State High-Risk Pools: An Update on the Minnesota Comprehensive Health Association

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Donna; Burke, Courtney E.

    2011-01-01

    State health insurance high-risk pools are a key component of the US health care system's safety net, because they provide health insurance to the “uninsurable.” In 2007, 34 states had individual high-risk pools, which covered more than 200 000 people at a total cost of $1.8 billion. We examine the experience of the largest and oldest pool in the nation, the Minnesota Comprehensive Health Association, to document key issues facing state high-risk pools in enrollment and financing. We also considered the role and future of high-risk pools in light of national health care finance reform. PMID:21228286

  13. State high-risk pools: an update on the Minnesota Comprehensive Health Association.

    PubMed

    Blewett, Lynn A; Spencer, Donna; Burke, Courtney E

    2011-02-01

    State health insurance high-risk pools are a key component of the US health care system's safety net, because they provide health insurance to the "uninsurable." In 2007, 34 states had individual high-risk pools, which covered more than 200 000 people at a total cost of $1.8 billion. We examine the experience of the largest and oldest pool in the nation, the Minnesota Comprehensive Health Association, to document key issues facing state high-risk pools in enrollment and financing. We also considered the role and future of high-risk pools in light of national health care finance reform. PMID:21228286

  14. Metaproteomics of saliva identifies human protein markers specific for individuals with periodontitis and dental caries compared to orally healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    Damgaard, Christian; Jensen, Lars J.; Holmstrup, Palle

    2016-01-01

    Background The composition of the salivary microbiota has been reported to differentiate between patients with periodontitis, dental caries and orally healthy individuals. To identify characteristics of diseased and healthy saliva we thus wanted to compare saliva metaproteomes from patients with periodontitis and dental caries to healthy individuals. Methods Stimulated saliva samples were collected from 10 patients with periodontitis, 10 patients with dental caries and 10 orally healthy individuals. The proteins in the saliva samples were subjected to denaturing buffer and digested enzymatically with LysC and trypsin. The resulting peptide mixtures were cleaned up by solid-phase extraction and separated online with 2 h gradients by nano-scale C18 reversed-phase chromatography connected to a mass spectrometer through an electrospray source. The eluting peptides were analyzed on a tandem mass spectrometer operated in data-dependent acquisition mode. Results We identified a total of 35,664 unique peptides from 4,161 different proteins, of which 1,946 and 2,090 were of bacterial and human origin, respectively. The human protein profiles displayed significant overexpression of the complement system and inflammatory markers in periodontitis and dental caries compared to healthy controls. Bacterial proteome profiles and functional annotation were very similar in health and disease. Conclusions Overexpression of proteins related to the complement system and inflammation seems to correlate with oral disease status. Similar bacterial proteomes in healthy and diseased individuals suggests that the salivary microbiota predominantly thrives in a planktonic state expressing no disease-associated characteristics of metabolic activity.

  15. Metaproteomics of saliva identifies human protein markers specific for individuals with periodontitis and dental caries compared to orally healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    Damgaard, Christian; Jensen, Lars J.; Holmstrup, Palle

    2016-01-01

    Background The composition of the salivary microbiota has been reported to differentiate between patients with periodontitis, dental caries and orally healthy individuals. To identify characteristics of diseased and healthy saliva we thus wanted to compare saliva metaproteomes from patients with periodontitis and dental caries to healthy individuals. Methods Stimulated saliva samples were collected from 10 patients with periodontitis, 10 patients with dental caries and 10 orally healthy individuals. The proteins in the saliva samples were subjected to denaturing buffer and digested enzymatically with LysC and trypsin. The resulting peptide mixtures were cleaned up by solid-phase extraction and separated online with 2 h gradients by nano-scale C18 reversed-phase chromatography connected to a mass spectrometer through an electrospray source. The eluting peptides were analyzed on a tandem mass spectrometer operated in data-dependent acquisition mode. Results We identified a total of 35,664 unique peptides from 4,161 different proteins, of which 1,946 and 2,090 were of bacterial and human origin, respectively. The human protein profiles displayed significant overexpression of the complement system and inflammatory markers in periodontitis and dental caries compared to healthy controls. Bacterial proteome profiles and functional annotation were very similar in health and disease. Conclusions Overexpression of proteins related to the complement system and inflammation seems to correlate with oral disease status. Similar bacterial proteomes in healthy and diseased individuals suggests that the salivary microbiota predominantly thrives in a planktonic state expressing no disease-associated characteristics of metabolic activity. PMID:27672500

  16. The development and application of a multiplex short tandem repeat (STR) system for identifying subspecies, individuals and sex in tigers.

    PubMed

    Zou, Zheng-Ting; Uphyrkina, Olga V; Fomenko, Pavel; Luo, Shu-Jin

    2015-07-01

    Poaching and trans-boundary trafficking of tigers and body parts are threatening the world's last remaining wild tigers. Development of an efficient molecular genetic assay for tracing the origins of confiscated specimens will assist in law enforcement and wildlife forensics for this iconic flagship species. We developed a multiplex genotyping system "tigrisPlex" to simultaneously assess 22 short tandem repeat (STR, or microsatellite) loci and a gender-identifying SRY gene, all amplified in 4 reactions using as little as 1 ng of template DNA. With DNA samples used for between-run calibration, the system generates STR genotypes that are directly compatible with voucher tiger subspecies genetic profiles, hence making it possible to identify subspecies via bi-parentally inherited markers. We applied "tigrisPlex" to 12 confiscated specimens from Russia and identified 6 individuals (3 females and 3 males), each represented by duplicated samples and all designated as Amur tigers (Panthera tigris altaica) with high confidence. This STR multiplex system can serve as an effective and versatile approach for genetic profiling of both wild and captive tigers as well as confiscated tiger products, fulfilling various conservation needs for identifying the origins of tiger samples.

  17. The development and application of a multiplex short tandem repeat (STR) system for identifying subspecies, individuals and sex in tigers.

    PubMed

    Zou, Zheng-Ting; Uphyrkina, Olga V; Fomenko, Pavel; Luo, Shu-Jin

    2015-07-01

    Poaching and trans-boundary trafficking of tigers and body parts are threatening the world's last remaining wild tigers. Development of an efficient molecular genetic assay for tracing the origins of confiscated specimens will assist in law enforcement and wildlife forensics for this iconic flagship species. We developed a multiplex genotyping system "tigrisPlex" to simultaneously assess 22 short tandem repeat (STR, or microsatellite) loci and a gender-identifying SRY gene, all amplified in 4 reactions using as little as 1 ng of template DNA. With DNA samples used for between-run calibration, the system generates STR genotypes that are directly compatible with voucher tiger subspecies genetic profiles, hence making it possible to identify subspecies via bi-parentally inherited markers. We applied "tigrisPlex" to 12 confiscated specimens from Russia and identified 6 individuals (3 females and 3 males), each represented by duplicated samples and all designated as Amur tigers (Panthera tigris altaica) with high confidence. This STR multiplex system can serve as an effective and versatile approach for genetic profiling of both wild and captive tigers as well as confiscated tiger products, fulfilling various conservation needs for identifying the origins of tiger samples. PMID:25950598

  18. Clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of tailored intensive liaison between primary and secondary care to identify individuals at risk of a first psychotic illness (the LEGs study): a cluster-randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Jesus; Jin, Huajie; Russo, Debra A; Stochl, Jan; Painter, Michelle; Shelley, Gill; Jackson, Erica; Crane, Carolyn; Graffy, Jonathan P; Croudace, Tim J; Byford, Sarah; Jones, Peter B

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background General practitioners are usually the first health professionals to be contacted by people with early signs of psychosis. We aimed to assess whether increased liaison between primary and secondary care improves the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of detection of people with, or at high risk of developing, a first psychotic illness. Methods Our Liaison and Education in General Practices (LEGs) study was a cluster-randomised controlled trial of primary care practices (clusters) in Cambridgeshire and Peterborough, UK. Consenting practices were randomly allocated (1:1) to a 2 year low-intensity intervention (a postal campaign, consisting of biannual guidelines to help identify and refer individuals with early signs of psychosis) or a high-intensity intervention, which additionally included a specialist mental health professional who liaised with every practice and a theory-based educational package. Practices were not masked to group allocation. Practices that did not consent to be randomly assigned comprised a practice-as-usual (PAU) group. The primary outcome was number of referrals of patients at high risk of developing psychosis to the early intervention service per practice site. New referrals were assessed clinically and stratified into those who met criteria for high risk or first-episode psychotic illness (FEP; together: psychosis true positives), and those who did not fulfil such criteria for psychosis (false positives). Referrals from PAU practices were also analysed. We assessed cost-effectiveness with decision analytic modelling in terms of the incremental cost per additional true positive identified. The trial is registered at the ISRCTN registry, number ISRCTN70185866. Findings Between Dec 22, 2009, and Sept 7, 2010, 54 of 104 eligible practices provided consent and between Feb 16, 2010, and Feb 11, 2011, these practices were randomly allocated to interventions (28 to low intensity and 26 to high intensity); the remaining

  19. Genomic analysis of high-risk smoldering multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    López-Corral, Lucía; Mateos, María Victoria; Corchete, Luis A.; Sarasquete, María Eugenia; de la Rubia, Javier; de Arriba, Felipe; Lahuerta, Juan-José; García-Sanz, Ramón; San Miguel, Jesús F.; Gutiérrez, Norma C.

    2012-01-01

    Smoldering myeloma is an asymptomatic plasma cell dyscrasia with a heterogeneous propensity to progress to active myeloma. In order to investigate the biology of smoldering myeloma patients with high risk of progression, we analyzed the genomic characteristics by FISH, SNP-arrays and gene expression profile of a group of patients with high-risk smoldering myeloma included in a multicenter randomized trial. Chromosomal abnormalities detected by FISH and SNP-arrays at diagnosis were not associated to risk of progression to symptomatic myeloma. However, the overexpression of four SNORD genes (SNORD25, SNORD27, SNORD30 and SNORD31) was correlated with shorter time to progression (P<0.03). When plasma cells from high-risk smoldering patients who progressed to symptomatic myeloma were sequentially analyzed, newly acquired lesions together with an increase in the proportion of plasma cells carrying a given abnormality were observed. These findings suggest that gene expression profiling is a valuable technique to identify smoldering myeloma patients with high risk of progression. (Clinical Trials NCT00443235) PMID:22331267

  20. High-Risk Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bhojwani, Deepa; Howard, Scott C.; Pui, Ching-Hon

    2009-01-01

    Although most children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are cured, certain subsets have a high risk of relapse. Relapse risk can be predicted by early response to therapy, clinical and pharmacogenetic features of the host, and genetic characteristics of leukemic cells. Though early treatment response can be assessed by the peripheral blast cell count after 1 week of single-agent glucocorticoid treatment or percent of bone marrow blasts by morphology after 1 or 2 weeks of multiagent induction treatment, determination of minimal residual disease by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or flow cytometry after 2 to 6 weeks of induction is the most precise and useful measure. Augmented therapy has improved outcome for the poor responders to initial treatment. Infants with mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL)–rearranged ALL comprise a very poor-risk group wherein further intensification of chemotherapy causes significant toxicity. Hybrid protocols incorporating drugs effective for acute myeloid leukemia could improve survival, a strategy being tested in international trials. Studies on the biology of MLL-induced leukemogenesis have prompted the development of novel targeted agents, currently under evaluation in clinical trials. Short-term outcomes of patients with Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)–positive ALL have improved significantly by adding tyrosine kinase inhibitors to standard chemotherapy regimens. New agents and methods to overcome resistance are under investigation, and allogeneic stem cell transplantation is recommended for certain subsets of patients, for example those with Ph+ and T-cell ALL with poor early response. Genome-wide interrogation of leukemic cell genetic abnormalities and germline genetic variations promise to identify new molecular targets for therapy. PMID:19778845

  1. A panel of microsatellites to individually identify leopards and its application to leopard monitoring in human dominated landscapes

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Leopards are the most widely distributed of the large cats, ranging from Africa to the Russian Far East. Because of habitat fragmentation, high human population densities and the inherent adaptability of this species, they now occupy landscapes close to human settlements. As a result, they are the most common species involved in human wildlife conflict in India, necessitating their monitoring. However, their elusive nature makes such monitoring difficult. Recent advances in DNA methods along with non-invasive sampling techniques can be used to monitor populations and individuals across large landscapes including human dominated ones. In this paper, we describe a DNA-based method for leopard individual identification where we used fecal DNA samples to obtain genetic material. Further, we apply our methods to non-invasive samples collected in a human-dominated landscape to estimate the minimum number of leopards in this human-leopard conflict area in Western India. Results In this study, 25 of the 29 tested cross-specific microsatellite markers showed positive amplification in 37 wild-caught leopards. These loci revealed varied levels of polymorphism (four-12 alleles) and heterozygosity (0.05-0.79). Combining data on amplification success (including non-invasive samples) and locus specific polymorphisms, we showed that eight loci provide a sibling probability of identity of 0.0005, suggesting that this panel can be used to discriminate individuals in the wild. When this microsatellite panel was applied to fecal samples collected from a human-dominated landscape, we identified 7 individuals, with a sibling probability of identity of 0.001. Amplification success of field collected scats was up to 72%, and genotype error ranged from 0-7.4%. Conclusion Our results demonstrated that the selected panel of eight microsatellite loci can conclusively identify leopards from various kinds of biological samples. Our methods can be used to monitor leopards over small

  2. A Twelve-SNP Genetic Risk Score Identifies Individuals at Increased Risk for Future Atrial Fibrillation and Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J. Gustav; Sjögren, Marketa; Lubitz, Steven A.; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Louie, Judy Z.; Catanese, Joseph J.; Engström, Gunnar; Devlin, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Atrial fibrillation (AF) is prevalent and there is a clinical need for biomarkers to identify individuals at higher risk for AF. Fixed throughout a life course and assayable early in life, genetic biomarkers may meet this need. Here, we investigate whether multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) together as an AF genetic risk score (AF-GRS) can improve prediction of one's risk for AF. Methods In 27,471 participants of the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study, a prospective, community-based cohort, we used Cox models that adjusted for established AF risk factors to assess the association of AF-GRS with incident AF and ischemic stroke. Median follow-up was 14.4 years for incident AF and 14.5 years for ischemic stroke. The AF-GRS comprised 12 SNPs that had been previously shown to be associated with AF at genome-wide significance. Results During follow-up, 2,160 participants experienced a first AF event and 1,495 had a first ischemic stroke event. Participants in the top AF-GRS quintile were at increased risk for incident AF (HR = 2.00; 95%CI = 1.73 to 2.31; P=2.7×10−21) and ischemic stroke (HR = 1.23; 95%CI = 1.04 to 1.46; P=0.02) when compared with the bottom quintile. Addition of the AF-GRS to established AF risk factors modestly improved both discrimination and reclassification (P<0.0001 for both). Conclusions An AF-GRS can identify 20% of individuals who are at approximately two-fold increased risk for incident AF and at 23% increased risk for ischemic stroke. Targeting diagnostic or therapeutic interventions to this subset may prove clinically useful. PMID:25123217

  3. Analyzing the Role of Community and Individual Factors in Food Insecurity: Identifying Diverse Barriers Across Clustered Community Members.

    PubMed

    Jablonski, Becca B R; McFadden, Dawn Thilmany; Colpaart, Ashley

    2016-10-01

    This paper uses the results from a community food security assessment survey of 684 residents and three focus groups in Pueblo County, Colorado to examine the question: what community and individual factors contribute to or alleviate food insecurity, and are these factors consistent throughout a sub-county population. Importantly, we use a technique called cluster analysis to endogenously determine the key factors pertinent to food access and fruit and vegetable consumption. Our results show significant heterogeneity among sub-population clusters in terms of the community and individual factors that would make it easier to get access to fruits and vegetables. We find two distinct clusters of food insecure populations: the first was significantly less likely to identify increased access to fruits and vegetables proximate to where they live or work as a way to improve their household's healthy food consumption despite being significantly less likely to utilize a personal vehicle to get to the store; the second group did not report significant challenges with access, rather with affordability. We conclude that though interventions focused on improving the local food retail environment may be important for some subsamples of the food insecure population, it is unclear that proximity to a store with healthy food will support enhanced food security for all. We recommend that future research recognizes that determinants of food insecurity may vary within county or zip code level regions, and that multiple interventions that target sub-population clusters may elicit better improvements in access to and consumption of fruits and vegetables.

  4. The Subjective Experience of Youths at Clinical High Risk for Psychosis: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Ben-David, Shelly; Birnbaum, Michael; Eilenberg, Mara; DeVylder, Jordan; Gill, Kelly; Schienle, Jessica; Azimov, Neyra; Lukens, Ellen P.; Davidson, Larry; Corcoran, Cheryl Mary

    2015-01-01

    Objective Understanding the experience of individuals across stages of schizophrenia is important for development of services to promote recovery. As yet, little is known about the experience of individuals who exhibit prodromal symptoms of schizophrenia. Methods Audiotaped interviews were conducted with 27 participants at clinical high risk (CHR) for psychosis (15 males; 12 females; mean age 21; ethnically diverse). Phenomenological qualitative research techniques of coding, consensus, and comparison were used. Results Emergent themes differed by gender. Themes for males were feeling abnormal or “broken”; focus on going “crazy”; fantasy and escapism; and alienation and despair, with a desire for relationships. Themes for females were psychotic illness in family members; personal trauma; struggle with intimate relationships; and career and personal development. Conclusions The finding of relative social engagement and future-orientation of females identified as at risk for psychosis is novel, and has implications for outreach and treatment. PMID:25179420

  5. Determination of high-risk cargo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Leo A.; Smith, Douglas E.; Khan, Siraj M.

    1994-10-01

    The approach and methodology used in the determination of the type of cargo containing concealments of commercial quantities of narcotics such as cocaine and heroin is described. This high-risk cargo enters the United States through border crossings at land, seaports and airports. The volume and variety of cargos make it a complex and challenging task for the U.S. Customs Service.

  6. Micronutrient requirements of high-risk infants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Micronutrient requirements are well-established for healthy full-term infants. However, few such recommendations exist for high-risk infants, including full-term infants with a variety of medical disorders or very preterm infants. Key micronutrients considered in this review are calcium, phosphorus,...

  7. Creating Profiles of High Risk Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higbee, Jeanne L.; Dwinell, Patricia L.

    Measures used at the Division of Developmental Studies at the University of Georgia in constructing a student profile (specifically, of high-risk college freshmen) are discussed. The areas measured concern: goals; learning styles; career exploration; stress and academic anxiety; developmental tasks; and locus of control. The goals checklist…

  8. A Meta-Analysis Identifies New Loci Associated with Body Mass index in Individuals of African Ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Monda, Keri L.; Chen, Gary K.; Taylor, Kira C.; Palmer, Cameron; Edwards, Todd L.; Lange, Leslie A.; Ng, Maggie C.Y.; Adeyemo, Adebowale A.; Allison, Matthew A.; Bielak, Lawrence F.; Chen, Guanji; Graff, Mariaelisa; Irvin, Marguerite R.; Rhie, Suhn K.; Li, Guo; Liu, Yongmei; Liu, Youfang; Lu, Yingchang; Nalls, Michael A.; Sun, Yan V.; Wojczynski, Mary K.; Yanek, Lisa R.; Aldrich, Melinda C.; Ademola, Adeyinka; Amos, Christopher I.; Bandera, Elisa V.; Bock, Cathryn H.; Britton, Angela; Broeckel, Ulrich; Cai, Quiyin; Caporaso, Neil E.; Carlson, Chris; Carpten, John; Casey, Graham; Chen, Wei-Min; Chen, Fang; Chen, Yii-Der I.; Chiang, Charleston W.K.; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Demerath, Ellen; Deming-Halverson, Sandra L.; Driver, Ryan W.; Dubbert, Patricia; Feitosa, Mary F.; Freedman, Barry I.; Gillanders, Elizabeth M.; Gottesman, Omri; Guo, Xiuqing; Haritunians, Talin; Harris, Tamara; Harris, Curtis C.; Hennis, Anselm JM; Hernandez, Dena G.; McNeill, Lorna H.; Howard, Timothy D.; Howard, Barbara V.; Howard, Virginia J.; Johnson, Karen C.; Kang, Sun J.; Keating, Brendan J.; Kolb, Suzanne; Kuller, Lewis H.; Kutlar, Abdullah; Langefeld, Carl D.; Lettre, Guillaume; Lohman, Kurt; Lotay, Vaneet; Lyon, Helen; Manson, JoAnn E.; Maixner, William; Meng, Yan A.; Monroe, Kristine R.; Morhason-Bello, Imran; Murphy, Adam B.; Mychaleckyj, Josyf C.; Nadukuru, Rajiv; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Nayak, Uma; N’Diaye, Amidou; Nemesure, Barbara; Wu, Suh-Yuh; Leske, M. Cristina; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Neuhouser, Marian; Nyante, Sarah; Ochs-Balcom, Heather; Ogunniyi, Adesola; Ogundiran, Temidayo O.; Ojengbede, Oladosu; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Palmer, Julie R.; Ruiz-Narvaez, Edward A.; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Press, Michael F.; Rampersaud, Evandine; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L.; Salako, Babatunde; Schadt, Eric E.; Schwartz, Ann G.; Shriner, Daniel A.; Siscovick, David; Smith, Shad B.; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; Spitz, Margaret R.; Sucheston, Lara; Taylor, Herman; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Tucker, Margaret A.; Van Den Berg, David J.; Velez Edwards, Digna R.; Wang, Zhaoming; Wiencke, John K.; Winkler, Thomas W.; Witte, John S.; Wrensch, Margaret; Wu, Xifeng; Yang, James J.; Levin, Albert M.; Young, Taylor R.; Zakai, Neil A.; Cushman, Mary; Zanetti, Krista A.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Zhao, Wei; Zheng, Yonglan; Zhou, Jie; Ziegler, Regina G.; Zmuda, Joseph M.; Fernandes, Jyotika K.; Gilkeson, Gary S.; Kamen, Diane L.; Hunt, Kelly J.; Spruill, Ida J.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Ambs, Stefan; Arnett, Donna K.; Atwood, Larry; Becker, Diane M.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Bernstein, Leslie; Blot, William J.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Bowden, Donald W.; Burke, Gregory; Chanock, Stephen J.; Cooper, Richard S.; Ding, Jingzhong; Duggan, David; Evans, Michele K.; Fox, Caroline; Garvey, W. Timothy; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Grant, Struan F.A.; Hsing, Ann; Chu, Lisa; Hu, Jennifer J.; Huo, Dezheng; Ingles, Sue A.; John, Esther M.; Jordan, Joanne M.; Kabagambe, Edmond K.; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Kittles, Rick A.; Goodman, Phyllis J.; Klein, Eric A.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Le Marchand, Loic; Liu, Simin; McKnight, Barbara; Millikan, Robert C.; Mosley, Thomas H.; Padhukasahasram, Badri; Williams, L. Keoki; Patel, Sanjay R.; Peters, Ulrike; Pettaway, Curtis A.; Peyser, Patricia A.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Redline, Susan; Rotimi, Charles N.; Rybicki, Benjamin A.; Sale, Michèle M.; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Signorello, Lisa B.; Singleton, Andrew B.; Stanford, Janet L.; Strom, Sara S.; Thun, Michael J.; Vitolins, Mara; Zheng, Wei; Moore, Jason H.; Williams, Scott M.; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Zonderman, Alan B.; Kooperberg, Charles; Papanicolaou, George; Henderson, Brian E.; Reiner, Alex P.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Loos, Ruth JF; North, Kari E.; Haiman, Christopher A.

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 36 loci associated with body mass index (BMI), predominantly in populations of European ancestry. We conducted a meta-analysis to examine the association of >3.2 million SNPs with BMI in 39,144 men and women of African ancestry, and followed up the most significant associations in an additional 32,268 individuals of African ancestry. We identified one novel locus at 5q33 (GALNT10, rs7708584, p=3.4×10−11) and another at 7p15 when combined with data from the Giant consortium (MIR148A/NFE2L3, rs10261878, p=1.2×10−10). We also found suggestive evidence of an association at a third locus at 6q16 in the African ancestry sample (KLHL32, rs974417, p=6.9×10−8). Thirty-two of the 36 previously established BMI variants displayed directionally consistent effect estimates in our GWAS (binomial p=9.7×10−7), of which five reached genome-wide significance. These findings provide strong support for shared BMI loci across populations as well as for the utility of studying ancestrally diverse populations. PMID:23583978

  9. A meta-analysis identifies new loci associated with body mass index in individuals of African ancestry.

    PubMed

    Monda, Keri L; Chen, Gary K; Taylor, Kira C; Palmer, Cameron; Edwards, Todd L; Lange, Leslie A; Ng, Maggie C Y; Adeyemo, Adebowale A; Allison, Matthew A; Bielak, Lawrence F; Chen, Guanjie; Graff, Mariaelisa; Irvin, Marguerite R; Rhie, Suhn K; Li, Guo; Liu, Yongmei; Liu, Youfang; Lu, Yingchang; Nalls, Michael A; Sun, Yan V; Wojczynski, Mary K; Yanek, Lisa R; Aldrich, Melinda C; Ademola, Adeyinka; Amos, Christopher I; Bandera, Elisa V; Bock, Cathryn H; Britton, Angela; Broeckel, Ulrich; Cai, Quiyin; Caporaso, Neil E; Carlson, Chris S; Carpten, John; Casey, Graham; Chen, Wei-Min; Chen, Fang; Chen, Yii-Der I; Chiang, Charleston W K; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Demerath, Ellen; Deming-Halverson, Sandra L; Driver, Ryan W; Dubbert, Patricia; Feitosa, Mary F; Feng, Ye; Freedman, Barry I; Gillanders, Elizabeth M; Gottesman, Omri; Guo, Xiuqing; Haritunians, Talin; Harris, Tamara; Harris, Curtis C; Hennis, Anselm J M; Hernandez, Dena G; McNeill, Lorna H; Howard, Timothy D; Howard, Barbara V; Howard, Virginia J; Johnson, Karen C; Kang, Sun J; Keating, Brendan J; Kolb, Suzanne; Kuller, Lewis H; Kutlar, Abdullah; Langefeld, Carl D; Lettre, Guillaume; Lohman, Kurt; Lotay, Vaneet; Lyon, Helen; Manson, Joann E; Maixner, William; Meng, Yan A; Monroe, Kristine R; Morhason-Bello, Imran; Murphy, Adam B; Mychaleckyj, Josyf C; Nadukuru, Rajiv; Nathanson, Katherine L; Nayak, Uma; N'diaye, Amidou; Nemesure, Barbara; Wu, Suh-Yuh; Leske, M Cristina; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Neuhouser, Marian; Nyante, Sarah; Ochs-Balcom, Heather; Ogunniyi, Adesola; Ogundiran, Temidayo O; Ojengbede, Oladosu; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Palmer, Julie R; Ruiz-Narvaez, Edward A; Palmer, Nicholette D; Press, Michael F; Rampersaud, Evandine; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L; Salako, Babatunde; Schadt, Eric E; Schwartz, Ann G; Shriner, Daniel A; Siscovick, David; Smith, Shad B; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Speliotes, Elizabeth K; Spitz, Margaret R; Sucheston, Lara; Taylor, Herman; Tayo, Bamidele O; Tucker, Margaret A; Van Den Berg, David J; Edwards, Digna R Velez; Wang, Zhaoming; Wiencke, John K; Winkler, Thomas W; Witte, John S; Wrensch, Margaret; Wu, Xifeng; Yang, James J; Levin, Albert M; Young, Taylor R; Zakai, Neil A; Cushman, Mary; Zanetti, Krista A; Zhao, Jing Hua; Zhao, Wei; Zheng, Yonglan; Zhou, Jie; Ziegler, Regina G; Zmuda, Joseph M; Fernandes, Jyotika K; Gilkeson, Gary S; Kamen, Diane L; Hunt, Kelly J; Spruill, Ida J; Ambrosone, Christine B; Ambs, Stefan; Arnett, Donna K; Atwood, Larry; Becker, Diane M; Berndt, Sonja I; Bernstein, Leslie; Blot, William J; Borecki, Ingrid B; Bottinger, Erwin P; Bowden, Donald W; Burke, Gregory; Chanock, Stephen J; Cooper, Richard S; Ding, Jingzhong; Duggan, David; Evans, Michele K; Fox, Caroline; Garvey, W Timothy; Bradfield, Jonathan P; Hakonarson, Hakon; Grant, Struan F A; Hsing, Ann; Chu, Lisa; Hu, Jennifer J; Huo, Dezheng; Ingles, Sue A; John, Esther M; Jordan, Joanne M; Kabagambe, Edmond K; Kardia, Sharon L R; Kittles, Rick A; Goodman, Phyllis J; Klein, Eric A; Kolonel, Laurence N; Le Marchand, Loic; Liu, Simin; McKnight, Barbara; Millikan, Robert C; Mosley, Thomas H; Padhukasahasram, Badri; Williams, L Keoki; Patel, Sanjay R; Peters, Ulrike; Pettaway, Curtis A; Peyser, Patricia A; Psaty, Bruce M; Redline, Susan; Rotimi, Charles N; Rybicki, Benjamin A; Sale, Michèle M; Schreiner, Pamela J; Signorello, Lisa B; Singleton, Andrew B; Stanford, Janet L; Strom, Sara S; Thun, Michael J; Vitolins, Mara; Zheng, Wei; Moore, Jason H; Williams, Scott M; Ketkar, Shamika; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Zonderman, Alan B; Kooperberg, Charles; Papanicolaou, George J; Henderson, Brian E; Reiner, Alex P; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Loos, Ruth J F; North, Kari E; Haiman, Christopher A

    2013-06-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 36 loci associated with body mass index (BMI), predominantly in populations of European ancestry. We conducted a meta-analysis to examine the association of >3.2 million SNPs with BMI in 39,144 men and women of African ancestry and followed up the most significant associations in an additional 32,268 individuals of African ancestry. We identified one new locus at 5q33 (GALNT10, rs7708584, P = 3.4 × 10(-11)) and another at 7p15 when we included data from the GIANT consortium (MIR148A-NFE2L3, rs10261878, P = 1.2 × 10(-10)). We also found suggestive evidence of an association at a third locus at 6q16 in the African-ancestry sample (KLHL32, rs974417, P = 6.9 × 10(-8)). Thirty-two of the 36 previously established BMI variants showed directionally consistent effect estimates in our GWAS (binomial P = 9.7 × 10(-7)), five of which reached genome-wide significance. These findings provide strong support for shared BMI loci across populations, as well as for the utility of studying ancestrally diverse populations.

  10. Micro-Spectroscopic Imaging and Characterization of Individually Identified Ice Nucleating Particles from a Case Field Study

    SciTech Connect

    Knopf, Daniel A.; Alpert, Peter A.; Wang, Bingbing; O'Brien, Rachel E.; Kelly, Stephen T.; Laskin, Alexander; Gilles, Mary K.; Moffet, Ryan C.

    2014-09-03

    The effect of anthropogenic and biogenic organic particles on atmospheric glaciation processes is poorly understood. We use an optical microscopy (OM) setup to identify the location of ice nuclei (IN) active in immersion freezing and deposition ice nucleation for temperatures of 200-273 K within a large population of particles sampled from an ambient environment. Applying multi-modal micro-spectroscopy methods we characterize the physicochemical properties of individual IN in particle populations collected in central California. Chemical composition and mixing state analysis of particle populations are performed to identify characteristic particle-type classes. All particle-types contained organic material. Particles in these samples take up water at subsaturated conditions, induce immersion freezing at subsaturated and saturated conditions above 226 K, and act as deposition IN below 226 K. The identified IN belong to the most common particle-type classes observed in the field samples: organic coated sea salt, Na-rich, and secondary and refractory carbonaceous particles. Based on these observations, we suggest that the IN are not always particles with unique chemical composition and exceptional ice nucleation propensity; rather, they are common particles in the ambient particle population. Thus, particle composition and morphology alone are insufficient to assess their potential to act as IN. The results suggest that particle-type abundance is also a crucial factor in determining the ice nucleation efficiency of specific IN types. These findings emphasize that ubiquitous organic particles can induce ice nucleation under atmospherically relevant conditions and that they may play an important role in atmospheric glaciation processes.

  11. Spectrum of mutations associated with methionine adenosyltransferase I/III deficiency among individuals identified during newborn screening in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Masayoshi; Tanaka, Toju; Furujo, Mahoko

    2013-12-01

    Methionine adenosyltransferase I/III deficiency (MAT I/III deficiency) is an inborn error of metabolism that results in isolated persistent hypermethioninemia. Definitive diagnosis is now possible by molecular analyses of the MAT1A gene. Based on newborn screening (NBS) data collected between 2001 and 2012 in Hokkaido, Japan, the estimated incidence of MAT I/III deficiency was 1 in 107,850. 24 patients (13 males, 11 females) from 11 prefectures in Japan were referred to our laboratory for genetic diagnosis of MAT I/III deficiency. They were all found between 1992 and 2012 by the NBS program in each region. In these 24 individuals, we identified 12 distinct mutations; 14 patients were heterozygous for an R264H mutation; R264H caused an autosomal dominant and clinically benign phenotype in each case. The mutations in the other 10 patients showed autosomal recessive inheritance and included eight novel MAT1A mutations. Putative amino acid substitutions at R356 were observed with six alleles (three R356P, two R356Q, and one R356L). MAT I/III deficiency is not always benign because three of our cases involved brain demyelination or neurological complications. DNA testing early in life is recommended to prevent potential detrimental neurological manifestations.

  12. Monoallelic and Biallelic Variants in EMC1 Identified in Individuals with Global Developmental Delay, Hypotonia, Scoliosis, and Cerebellar Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Harel, Tamar; Yesil, Gozde; Bayram, Yavuz; Coban-Akdemir, Zeynep; Charng, Wu-Lin; Karaca, Ender; Al Asmari, Ali; Eldomery, Mohammad K; Hunter, Jill V; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Pehlivan, Davut; El-Hattab, Ayman W; Saleh, Mohammed A; LeDuc, Charles A; Muzny, Donna; Boerwinkle, Eric; Gibbs, Richard A; Chung, Wendy K; Yang, Yaping; Belmont, John W; Lupski, James R

    2016-03-01

    The paradigm of a single gene associated with one specific phenotype and mode of inheritance has been repeatedly challenged. Genotype-phenotype correlations can often be traced to different mutation types, localization of the variants in distinct protein domains, or the trigger of or escape from nonsense-mediated decay. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified homozygous variants in EMC1 that segregated with a phenotype of developmental delay, hypotonia, scoliosis, and cerebellar atrophy in three families. In addition, a de novo heterozygous EMC1 variant was seen in an individual with a similar clinical and MRI imaging phenotype. EMC1 encodes a member of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-membrane protein complex (EMC), an evolutionarily conserved complex that has been proposed to have multiple roles in ER-associated degradation, ER-mitochondria tethering, and proper assembly of multi-pass transmembrane proteins. Perturbations of protein folding and organelle crosstalk have been implicated in neurodegenerative processes including cerebellar atrophy. We propose EMC1 as a gene in which either biallelic or monoallelic variants might lead to a syndrome including intellectual disability and preferential degeneration of the cerebellum. PMID:26942288

  13. The effectiveness of indigestible markers for identifying individual animal feces and their prevalence of use in North American zoos.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Grace; Margulis, Susan W; Santymire, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    Techniques for analyzing hormone metabolites in animal excreta have created many opportunities for noninvasive monitoring of health, reproduction, and welfare in zoo animals, but can be difficult to implement when individual samples are not readily identifiable in animal groups. A common approach to this problem is to feed animals an indigestible marker that subsequently appears in feces, but there has been little systematic research on the use of such "fecal markers." First, we used an online survey to assess the prevalence of fecal marker use in North American zoological institutions. Second, we conducted a series of experimental tests utilizing commonly employed fecal markers in a variety of typical zoo taxa to determine the: (1) effectiveness of several markers to accurately distinguish samples in a variety of species, (2) minimum quantity of marker needed for detection, and (3) length of time between ingestion and detection in the feces. The majority of the 45 institutions that completed the survey reported using fecal markers with their collections. The survey also revealed that the most frequently used markers are seeds/grains and food colorants, with the former generally used in Carnivora and the latter in Primates. Our experimental data confirmed the success of these taxa/marker combinations and also revealed that food colorants function as markers in a variety of avian, reptilian, and mammalian species. Our data describe successful fecal markers for a wide variety of zoo taxa and should, therefore, be useful for zoological managers and researchers needing to employ fecal markers in future investigations.

  14. Monoallelic and Biallelic Variants in EMC1 Identified in Individuals with Global Developmental Delay, Hypotonia, Scoliosis, and Cerebellar Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Harel, Tamar; Yesil, Gozde; Bayram, Yavuz; Coban-Akdemir, Zeynep; Charng, Wu-Lin; Karaca, Ender; Al Asmari, Ali; Eldomery, Mohammad K.; Hunter, Jill V.; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Pehlivan, Davut; El-Hattab, Ayman W.; Saleh, Mohammed A.; LeDuc, Charles A.; Muzny, Donna; Boerwinkle, Eric; Gibbs, Richard A.; Chung, Wendy K.; Yang, Yaping; Belmont, John W.; Lupski, James R.

    2016-01-01

    The paradigm of a single gene associated with one specific phenotype and mode of inheritance has been repeatedly challenged. Genotype-phenotype correlations can often be traced to different mutation types, localization of the variants in distinct protein domains, or the trigger of or escape from nonsense-mediated decay. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified homozygous variants in EMC1 that segregated with a phenotype of developmental delay, hypotonia, scoliosis, and cerebellar atrophy in three families. In addition, a de novo heterozygous EMC1 variant was seen in an individual with a similar clinical and MRI imaging phenotype. EMC1 encodes a member of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-membrane protein complex (EMC), an evolutionarily conserved complex that has been proposed to have multiple roles in ER-associated degradation, ER-mitochondria tethering, and proper assembly of multi-pass transmembrane proteins. Perturbations of protein folding and organelle crosstalk have been implicated in neurodegenerative processes including cerebellar atrophy. We propose EMC1 as a gene in which either biallelic or monoallelic variants might lead to a syndrome including intellectual disability and preferential degeneration of the cerebellum. PMID:26942288

  15. One size does not fit all: HIV testing preferences differ among high-risk groups in Northern Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Ostermann, Jan; Njau, Bernard; Mtuy, Tara; Brown, Derek S.; Mühlbacher, Axel; Thielman, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    In order to maximize the effectiveness of “Seek, Test, and Treat” strategies for curbing the HIV epidemic, new approaches are needed to increase the uptake of HIV testing services, particularly among high-risk groups. Low HIV testing rates among such groups suggests that current testing services may not align well with the testing preferences of these populations. Female bar workers and male mountain porters have been identified as two important high-risk groups in the Kilimanjaro Region of Tanzania. We used conventional survey methods and a Discrete Choice Experiment (DCE), a preference elicitation method increasingly applied by economists and policy makers to inform health policy and services, to analyze trade-offs made by individuals and quantify preferences for HIV testing services. Compared to 486 randomly selected community members, 162 female bar workers and 194 male Kilimanjaro porters reported 2 to 3 times as many lifetime sexual partners (p<0.001), but similar numbers of lifetime HIV tests (median 1–2 across all groups). Bivariate descriptive statistics were used to analyze differences in survey responses across groups. For the DCE, participants’ stated choices across 11,178 hypothetical HIV testing scenarios (322 female and 299 male participants × 9 choice tasks × 2 alternatives) were analyzed using gender-specific mixed logit models. Direct assessments and the DCE data demonstrated that barworkers were less likely to prefer home testing and were more concerned about disclosure issues compared with their community counterparts. Male porters preferred testing in venues where antiretroviral therapy was readily available. Both high-risk groups were less averse to traveling longer distances to test compared to their community counterparts. These results expose systematic differences in HIV testing preferences across high-risk populations compared to their community peers. Tailoring testing options to the preferences of high-risk populations should

  16. High-risk consumers' perceptions of preimplantation genetic diagnosis for hereditary cancers: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Pal, Tuya; Murphy, Devin; Vadaparampil, Susan T; Kumar, Ambuj

    2012-02-01

    Individuals carrying deleterious germline mutations placing them at increased risk for hereditary cancer syndromes (high-risk consumers) often have a great deal of fear and concern over transmitting mutations to their offspring, particularly conditions which are autosomal dominant. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is a procedure that can detect certain germline cancer predisposing mutations present in embryos. The objective of this review was to assess high-risk consumers' knowledge and perceptions of PGD for hereditary cancers. A systematic literature review was conducted through PubMed, Wiley Interscience, PsychInfo, and Cochrane Library databases to identify all articles assessing consumer knowledge and attitudes of PGD for hereditary cancer syndromes. We assessed heterogeneity and the robustness of findings through additional analyses according to study location, hereditary cancer type, and sample size. Thirteen articles remained eligible after the application of specific criteria. Results show a general low level of knowledge about PGD for hereditary cancers, moderate rates of acceptability among high-risk groups, and high levels of need for information about PGD. Individuals in specific risk groups such as those with a personal or family history of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) syndrome or familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) may benefit from educational information from healthcare professionals about the use of PGD.

  17. Humoral immunity in tuberculin skin test anergy and its role in high-risk persons exposed to active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Encinales, Liliana; Zuñiga, Joaquin; Granados-Montiel, Julio; Yunis, Maria; Granados, Julio; Almeciga, Ingrid; Clavijo, Olga; Awad, Carlos; Collazos, Vilma; Vargas-Rojas, María Inés; Bañales-Mendez, José Luis; Vazquez-Castañeda, Lilia; Stern, Joel N; Romero, Viviana; Fridkis-Hareli, Masha; Frindkis-Hareli, Masha; Terreros, Daniel; Fernandez-Viña, Marcelo; Yunis, Edmond J

    2010-02-01

    The most common test to identify latent tuberculosis is the tuberculin skin test that detects T cell responses of delayed type hypersensitivity type IV. Since it produces false negative reactions in active tuberculosis or in high-risk persons exposed to tuberculosis patients as shown in this report, we studied antibody profiles to explain the anergy of such responses in high-risk individuals without active infection. Our results showed that humoral immunity against tuberculin, regardless of the result of the tuberculin skin test is important for protection from active tuberculosis and that the presence of high antibody titers is a more reliable indicator of infection latency suggesting that latency can be based on the levels of antibodies together with in vitro proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in the presence of the purified protein derivative. Importantly, anti-tuberculin IgG antibody levels mediate the anergy described herein, which could also prevent reactivation of disease in high-risk individuals with high antibody titers. Such anti-tuberculin IgG antibodies were also found associated with blocking and/or stimulation of in vitro cultures of PBMC with tuberculin. In this regard, future studies need to establish if immune responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis can generate a broad spectrum of reactions either toward Th1 responses favoring stimulation by cytokines or by antibodies and those toward diminished responses by Th2 cytokines or blocking by antibodies; possibly involving mechanisms of antibody dependent protection from Mtb by different subclasses of IgG.

  18. High-risk acute myelogenous leukemia: treatment today ... and tomorrow.

    PubMed

    Schiller, Gary J

    2013-01-01

    High-risk acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) constitutes a distinct subset of disease based on clinical and biological characteristics and comprises a significant percentage of all cases of adult AML. Biologic features such as distinct clonal cytogenetic and molecular abnormalities identify a subgroup of AML patients characterized by poor response to induction chemotherapy and poor long-term survival after treatment with consolidation chemotherapy. Clinical variables that predict for poor response include AML relapsed after less than 1 year of remission and AML characterized by resistance to conventional agents. We review here our understanding of the defining biologic subtypes of AML and discuss how adequate initial evaluation can be used to inform the choice of treatment. By defining high-risk biologic and clinical variables, a strong case can be made for treating patients with investigational agents, with treatment directed at distinct cytogenetic or molecular abnormalities. Allogeneic transplantation is the only form of therapy available outside of the setting of a clinical trial that may offer a chance for long-term survival for patients with high-risk AML.

  19. Brain structure in people at ultra-high risk of psychosis, patients with first-episode schizophrenia, and healthy controls: a VBM study.

    PubMed

    Nenadic, Igor; Dietzek, Maren; Schönfeld, Nils; Lorenz, Carsten; Gussew, Alexander; Reichenbach, Jürgen R; Sauer, Heinrich; Gaser, Christian; Smesny, Stefan

    2015-02-01

    Early intervention research in schizophrenia has suggested that brain structural alterations might be present in subjects at high risk of developing psychosis. The heterogeneity of regional effects of these changes, which is established in schizophrenia, however, has not been explored in prodromal or high-risk populations. We used high-resolution MRI and voxel-based morphometry (VBM8) to analyze grey matter differences in 43 ultra high-risk subjects for psychosis (meeting ARMS criteria, identified through CAARMS interviews), 24 antipsychotic-naïve first-episode schizophrenia patients and 49 healthy controls (groups matched for age and gender). Compared to healthy controls, resp., first-episode schizophrenia patients had reduced regional grey matter in left prefrontal, insula, right parietal and left temporal cortices, while the high-risk group showed reductions in right middle temporal and left anterior frontal cortices. When dividing the ultra-high-risk group in those with a genetic risk vs. those with attenuated psychotic symptoms, the former showed left anterior frontal, right caudate, as well as a smaller right hippocampus, and amygdala reduction, while the latter subgroup showed right middle temporal cortical reductions (each compared to healthy controls). Our findings in a clinical psychosis high-risk cohort demonstrate variability of brain structural changes according to subgroup and background of elevated risk, suggesting frontal and possibly also hippocampal/amygdala changes in individuals with genetic susceptibility. Heterogeneity of structural brain changes (as seen in schizophrenia) appears evident even at high-risk stage, prior to potential onset of psychosis.

  20. Viral metagenomics applied to blood donors and recipients at high risk for blood-borne infections

    PubMed Central

    Sauvage, Virginie; Laperche, Syria; Cheval, Justine; Muth, Erika; Dubois, Myriam; Boizeau, Laure; Hébert, Charles; Lionnet, François; Lefrère, Jean-Jacques; Eloit, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Background Characterisation of human-associated viral communities is essential for epidemiological surveillance and to be able to anticipate new potential threats for blood transfusion safety. In high-resource countries, the risk of blood-borne agent transmission of well-known viruses (HBV, HCV, HIV and HTLV) is currently considered to be under control. However, other unknown or unsuspected viruses may be transmitted to recipients by blood-derived products. To investigate this, the virome of plasma from individuals at high risk for parenterally and sexually transmitted infections was analysed by high throughput sequencing (HTS). Materials and methods Purified nucleic acids from two pools of 50 samples from recipients of multiple transfusions, and three pools containing seven plasma samples from either HBV−, HCV− or HIV-infected blood donors, were submitted to HTS. Results Sequences from resident anelloviruses and HPgV were evidenced in all pools. HBV and HCV sequences were detected in pools containing 3.8×103 IU/mL of HBV-DNA and 1.7×105 IU/mL of HCV-RNA, respectively, whereas no HIV sequence was found in a pool of 150 copies/mL of HIV-RNA. This suggests a lack of sensitivity in HTS performance in detecting low levels of virus. In addition, this study identified other issues, including laboratory contaminants and the uncertainty of taxonomic assignment of short sequence. No sequence suggestive of a new viral species was identified. Discussion This study did not identify any new blood-borne virus in high-risk individuals. However, rare and/or viruses present at very low titre could have escaped our protocol. Our results demonstrate the positive contribution of HTS in the detection of viral sequences in blood donations. PMID:27136432

  1. Genome-Wide Association Analyses in 128,266 Individuals Identifies New Morningness and Sleep Duration Loci

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Samuel E.; Tyrrell, Jessica; Tuke, Marcus A.; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Hu, Youna; Teder-Laving, Maris; Hayward, Caroline; Roenneberg, Till; Del Greco, Fabiola; Hicks, Andrew A.; Shin, Chol; Metspalu, Andres; Byrne, Enda M.; Gehrman, Philip R.; Tiemeier, Henning; Allebrandt, Karla V.; Murray, Anna; Hinds, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Disrupted circadian rhythms and reduced sleep duration are associated with several human diseases, particularly obesity and type 2 diabetes, but until recently, little was known about the genetic factors influencing these heritable traits. We performed genome-wide association studies of self-reported chronotype (morning/evening person) and self-reported sleep duration in 128,266 white British individuals from the UK Biobank study. Sixteen variants were associated with chronotype (P<5x10-8), including variants near the known circadian rhythm genes RGS16 (1.21 odds of morningness, 95% CI [1.15, 1.27], P = 3x10-12) and PER2 (1.09 odds of morningness, 95% CI [1.06, 1.12], P = 4x10-10). The PER2 signal has previously been associated with iris function. We sought replication using self-reported data from 89,283 23andMe participants; thirteen of the chronotype signals remained associated at P<5x10-8 on meta-analysis and eleven of these reached P<0.05 in the same direction in the 23andMe study. We also replicated 9 additional variants identified when the 23andMe study was used as a discovery GWAS of chronotype (all P<0.05 and meta-analysis P<5x10-8). For sleep duration, we replicated one known signal in PAX8 (2.6 minutes per allele, 95% CI [1.9, 3.2], P = 5.7x10-16) and identified and replicated two novel associations at VRK2 (2.0 minutes per allele, 95% CI [1.3, 2.7], P = 1.2x10-9; and 1.6 minutes per allele, 95% CI [1.1, 2.2], P = 7.6x10-9). Although we found genetic correlation between chronotype and BMI (rG = 0.056, P = 0.05); undersleeping and BMI (rG = 0.147, P = 1x10-5) and oversleeping and BMI (rG = 0.097, P = 0.04), Mendelian Randomisation analyses, with limited power, provided no consistent evidence of causal associations between BMI or type 2 diabetes and chronotype or sleep duration. Our study brings the total number of loci associated with chronotype to 22 and with sleep duration to three, and provides new insights into the biology of sleep and circadian

  2. Sources of individual variability: miRNAs that predispose to neuropathic pain identified using genome-wide sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We carried out a genome-wide study, using microRNA sequencing (miRNA-seq), aimed at identifying miRNAs in primary sensory neurons that are associated with neuropathic pain. Such scans usually yield long lists of transcripts regulated by nerve injury, but not necessarily related to pain. To overcome this we tried a novel search strategy: identification of transcripts regulated differentially by nerve injury in rat lines very similar except for a contrasting pain phenotype. Dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) L4 and 5 in the two lines were excised 3 days after spinal nerve ligation surgery (SNL) and small RNAs were extracted and sequenced. Results We identified 284 mature miRNA species expressed in rat DRGs, including several not previously reported, and 3340 unique small RNA sequences. Baseline expression of miRNA was nearly identical in the two rat lines, consistent with their shared genetic background. In both lines many miRNAs were nominally up- or down-regulated following SNL, but the change was similar across lines. Only 3 miRNAs that were expressed abundantly (rno-miR-30d-5p, rno-miR-125b-5p) or at moderate levels (rno-miR-379-5p) were differentially regulated. This makes them prime candidates as novel PNS determinants of neuropathic pain. The first two are known miRNA regulators of the expression of Tnf, Bdnf and Stat3, gene products intimately associated with neuropathic pain phenotype. A few non-miRNA, small noncoding RNAs (sncRNAs) were also differentially regulated. Conclusions Despite its genome-wide coverage, our search strategy yielded a remarkably short list of neuropathic pain-related miRNAs. As 2 of the 3 are validated regulators of important pro-nociceptive compounds, it is likely that they contribute to the orchestration of gene expression changes that determine individual variability in pain phenotype. Further research is required to determine whether some of the other known or predicted gene targets of these miRNAs, or of the differentially

  3. Genome-Wide Association Analyses in 128,266 Individuals Identifies New Morningness and Sleep Duration Loci.

    PubMed

    Jones, Samuel E; Tyrrell, Jessica; Wood, Andrew R; Beaumont, Robin N; Ruth, Katherine S; Tuke, Marcus A; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Hu, Youna; Teder-Laving, Maris; Hayward, Caroline; Roenneberg, Till; Wilson, James F; Del Greco, Fabiola; Hicks, Andrew A; Shin, Chol; Yun, Chang-Ho; Lee, Seung Ku; Metspalu, Andres; Byrne, Enda M; Gehrman, Philip R; Tiemeier, Henning; Allebrandt, Karla V; Freathy, Rachel M; Murray, Anna; Hinds, David A; Frayling, Timothy M; Weedon, Michael N

    2016-08-01

    Disrupted circadian rhythms and reduced sleep duration are associated with several human diseases, particularly obesity and type 2 diabetes, but until recently, little was known about the genetic factors influencing these heritable traits. We performed genome-wide association studies of self-reported chronotype (morning/evening person) and self-reported sleep duration in 128,266 white British individuals from the UK Biobank study. Sixteen variants were associated with chronotype (P<5x10-8), including variants near the known circadian rhythm genes RGS16 (1.21 odds of morningness, 95% CI [1.15, 1.27], P = 3x10-12) and PER2 (1.09 odds of morningness, 95% CI [1.06, 1.12], P = 4x10-10). The PER2 signal has previously been associated with iris function. We sought replication using self-reported data from 89,283 23andMe participants; thirteen of the chronotype signals remained associated at P<5x10-8 on meta-analysis and eleven of these reached P<0.05 in the same direction in the 23andMe study. We also replicated 9 additional variants identified when the 23andMe study was used as a discovery GWAS of chronotype (all P<0.05 and meta-analysis P<5x10-8). For sleep duration, we replicated one known signal in PAX8 (2.6 minutes per allele, 95% CI [1.9, 3.2], P = 5.7x10-16) and identified and replicated two novel associations at VRK2 (2.0 minutes per allele, 95% CI [1.3, 2.7], P = 1.2x10-9; and 1.6 minutes per allele, 95% CI [1.1, 2.2], P = 7.6x10-9). Although we found genetic correlation between chronotype and BMI (rG = 0.056, P = 0.05); undersleeping and BMI (rG = 0.147, P = 1x10-5) and oversleeping and BMI (rG = 0.097, P = 0.04), Mendelian Randomisation analyses, with limited power, provided no consistent evidence of causal associations between BMI or type 2 diabetes and chronotype or sleep duration. Our study brings the total number of loci associated with chronotype to 22 and with sleep duration to three, and provides new insights into the biology of sleep and circadian

  4. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in high-risk premalignant oral lesions.

    PubMed

    Sudbø, Jon; Ristimäki, Ari; Sondresen, Jan Erik; Kildal, Wanja; Boysen, Morten; Koppang, Hanna S; Reith, Albrecht; Risberg, Björn; Nesland, Jahn M; Bryne, Magne

    2003-07-01

    Emerging data indicate a link between genetic instability and up-regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). To see if individuals at high risk of oral cancer are candidates for treatment with selective COX-2 inhibitors (coxibs), levels of COX-2 expression in healthy, premalignant and cancerous oral mucosa were compared with the occurrence of DNA ploidy status as a genetic risk marker of oral cancer. COX-2 gene product was evaluated immunohistochemically in 30 healthy persons, in 22 patients with dysplastic lesions without previous or concomitant carcinomas, and in 29 patients with oral carcinomas. The immunohistochemical findings were verified by western blotting. COX-2 expression was correlated to DNA content as a genetic risk marker of oral cancer. COX-2 was up-regulated from healthy to premalignant to cancerous oral mucosa. Thus, COX-2 expression was found in 1 case of healthy oral mucosa (3%). All specimens from healthy mucosa had a normal DNA content. In patients with premalignancies. In 29 patients with oral carcinomas, cyclooxygenase-2 expression was observed in 26 (88%), and aneuploidy was observed in 25 cases (94%, P=0.04). Notably, of 22 patients with dysplastic lesions, COX-2 was exclusively expressed in a subgroup of nine patients (41%) identified to be at high risk of cancer by the aberrant DNA content of their lesions. Seven of these patients were followed for 5 years or more. An oral carcinoma developed in six of them (85%; P=0.02). These findings emphasize the need to determine whether coxibs can reduce the risk of oral cancer in patients with high-risk precancerous lesions. PMID:12747975

  5. Reciprocal social behavior in youths with psychotic illness and those at clinical high risk

    PubMed Central

    Jalbrzikowski, Maria; Krasileva, Kate E.; Marvin, Sarah; Zinberg, Jamie; Andaya, Angielette; Bachman, Peter; Cannon, Tyrone D.; Bearden, Carrie E.

    2015-01-01

    Youths at clinical high risk (CHR) for psychosis typically exhibit significant social dysfunction. However, the specific social behaviors associated with psychosis risk have not been well characterized. We administer the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS), a measure of autistic traits that examines reciprocal social behavior, to the parents of 117 adolescents (61 CHR individuals, 20 age-matched adolescents with a psychotic disorder [AOP], and 36 healthy controls) participating in a longitudinal study of psychosis risk. AOP and CHR individuals have significantly elevated SRS scores relative to healthy controls, indicating more severe social deficits. Mean scores for AOP and CHR youths are typical of scores obtained in individuals with high functioning autism (Constantino & Gruber, 2005). SRS scores are significantly associated with concurrent real-world social functioning in both clinical groups. Finally, baseline SRS scores significantly predict social functioning at follow-up (an average of 7.2 months later) in CHR individuals, over and above baseline social functioning measures ( p < .009). These findings provide novel information regarding impairments in domains critical for adolescent social development, because CHR individuals and those with overt psychosis show marked deficits in reciprocal social behavior. Further, the SRS predicts subsequent real-world social functioning in CHR youth, suggesting that this measure may be useful for identifying targets of treatment in psychosocial interventions. PMID:24229557

  6. Predicting, Monitoring, and Managing Hypercalcemia Secondary to 13-Cis-Retinoic Acid Therapy in Children With High-risk Neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Suet Ching; Murphy, Dermot; Sastry, Jairam; Shaikh, Mohamad G

    2015-08-01

    13-cis-retinoic acid is an established component of treatment for children with high-risk neuroblastoma. However, significant hypercalcemia is increasingly recognized as a potentially life-threatening dosage-related side effect. We present 2 patients with significant hypercalcemia secondary to 13-cis-retinoic acid and their management, and identified the predictive factors for susceptibility to hypercalcemia. Assessing glomerular filtration rate and concomitant medication help predict individual susceptibility to hypercalcemia. Calcium levels should be monitored at days 1, 7, and 14 of each course of retinoic acid. An algorithm for the management of hypercalcemia during the affected and subsequent cycles of retinoid therapy is proposed.

  7. Embedded CMs work with high-risk patients.

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    Care managers embedded in primary care clinics work with patients with high-risk diagnoses and multiple visits to the emergency department or hospital. Patients are identified though risk assessments, suggestions from inpatient case management, and requests from primary care clinicians. Care managers call patients before their clinic visits, look for gaps in care and find out patients' questions and concerns, sharing the information with the treating clinicians. Care managers follow patients for four weeks after their visit, helping them meet their health care goals and follow their treatment plan.

  8. An Unusual BRCA Mutation Distribution in a High Risk Cancer Genetics Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Nelson-Moseke, Anna C.; Jeter, Joanne M.; Cui, Haiyan; Roe, Denise J.; Chambers, Setsuko K.; Laukaitis, Christina M.

    2012-01-01

    The Database of Individuals at High Risk for Breast, Ovarian, or Other Hereditary Cancers at the Arizona Cancer Center in Tucson, Arizona, assesses cancer risk factors and outcomes in patients with a family history of cancer or a known genetic mutation. We analyzed the subset of clinic probands who carry deleterious BRCA gene mutations to identify factors that could explain why mutations in BRCA2 out number those in BRCA1. Medical, family, social, ethnic and genetic mutation histories were collected from consenting patients’ electronic medical records. Differences between BRCA1 and BRCA2 probands from this database were analyzed for statistical significance and compared to published analyses.. A significantly higher proportion of our clinic probands carry mutations in BRCA2 than BRCA1, compared with previous reports of mutation prevalence. This also holds true for the Hispanic sub-group. Probands with BRCA2 mutations were significantly more likely than their BRCA1 counterparts to present to the high risk clinic without adiagnosis of cancer. Other differences between the groups were not significant. Six previously unreported BRCA2 mutations appear in our clinic population. The increased proportion of probands carrying deleterious BRCA2 mutations is likely multifactorial, but may reflect aspects of Southern Arizona’s unique ethnic heritage. PMID:23179792

  9. Direct and indirect associations between internalized homonegativity and high-risk sex.

    PubMed

    Smolenski, Derek J; Stigler, Melissa H; Ross, Michael W; Rosser, B R Simon

    2011-08-01

    Recent meta-analytic work has endorsed a lack of any meaningful, direct relationship between internalized homonegativity (IH) and high-risk sex. It may not be possible to observe a direct association, however, if heterogeneity in response to IH is considered. This investigation used data from 1,669 men who have sex with men who completed an online survey of sexual behavior in 2005 to consider two potential intermediate variables (compulsive sexual behavior [CSB] and the frequency of sexual partnering) that could increase (CSB) and decrease (frequency of sexual partnering) the probability of having unprotected anal sexual intercourse. We used Mplus (Version 5.1) to estimate confirmatory factor analysis and structural models. Statistical mediation models identified indirect associations through both CSB (positive association) and the number of male sexual partners (negative association). The different directions of association, when combined, cancelled out one another. This contributed to the observed lack of association between IH and high-risk sexual behavior. Future work on risk behavior that incorporates IH will need to consider heterogeneity in how individuals respond to the construct and how these different processes are associated with risk behavior.

  10. Projection of human immunodeficiency virus among high-risk groups in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Md Nazrul Islam; Shitan, Mahendran

    2013-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) presents a serious healthcare threat to young individuals in Malaysia and worldwide. This study aimed to identify trends in HIV-related risk behaviors among recognized high-risk groups and to estimate HIV transmission up to the year 2015. Data and necessary information were obtained from the Ministry of Health Malaysia, published reports from the World Health Organization and United Nations Program on HIV/AIDS, and other articles. The Estimation and Projection Package was used to estimate HIV transmission. The results of the present study revealed that within the high-risk groups, intravenous drug users (IDUs) had the highest prevalence rate of HIV transmission, followed by patients with sexually transmitted infections (STIs), female sex workers (SWs), and men who have sex with men (MSM). Within these at-risk populations, patients with STIs have the highest prevalence of HIV, followed by IDUs, MSM, and SWs. If the transmission rate continues to increase, the situation will worsen; therefore, there is an urgent need for a comprehensive prevention program to control HIV transmission in Malaysia. PMID:24047742

  11. Counseling the high-risk adolescent.

    PubMed

    Busen, N H

    1992-01-01

    Interviewing and counseling high-risk adolescents provides a challenge to nurse practitioners. The problems of poverty, substance abuse, mental illness, and low self-esteem overlay other characteristics of risk, making assessment and management of the adolescent's problems complex and difficult. Survey data, obtained in this study on adolescent risk-taking, suggest that violence, aggression, and thrill-seeking behaviors are increasingly common. The finding is supported by current national statistics on adolescents. A case study is used to show the process of gathering information on home and educational settings that can provide insight into family dysfunction and specific problem behaviors.

  12. Strategies for screening for pancreatic adenocarcinoma in high-risk patients.

    PubMed

    Canto, Marcia Irene

    2007-08-01

    Identification of high-risk individuals, genetic counseling, and informed consent are important components of a screening program for familial pancreatic cancer. Screening high-risk individuals with imaging tests, such endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and computed tomography (CT), can lead to the detection and treatment of predominantly asymptomatic early pancreatic neoplasms, as well as extra-pancreatic tumors. These pancreatic neoplasms consist of resectable, mostly branch-type non-invasive intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs). EUS can visualize these very early IPMNs as focal duct ectasias or cysts. EUS features of chronic pancreatitis are highly prevalent in high-risk individuals and these directly correlate with multifocal lobulocentric parenchymal atrophy due to multifocal pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN). No one molecular marker is ready for "prime time" screening of high-risk individuals. Translational studies are underway to discover novel biomarkers for IPMNs, PanIN-3 lesions, or microinvasive adenocarcinoma, which are likely to be cured by timely intervention. Long-term, multi-prospective studies are needed to determine if screening for early pancreatic neoplasia and timely intervention results in decreased pancreatic cancer incidence and mortality in high-risk individuals.

  13. Reentry Programming for High-Risk Offenders: Insights From Participants.

    PubMed

    Bender, Kimberly A; Cobbina, Jennifer E; McGarrell, Edmund F

    2016-10-01

    The mass increase in imprisonment of the last two decades has led to an increasing number of adults released from prison. Scholarly accounts of prisoner reentry have demonstrated that incarcerated individuals face barriers on release from prison and that intervention programs are necessary to assist their transition to the community. Here, we build from the insights of previous research by examining how high-risk offenders perceive a reentry program. Using a qualitative approach, our findings suggest that procedural and substantive justice affect their satisfaction and involvement with the program. This study highlights the importance of providing employment opportunities, social support, and fair and respectful delivery of services to assist incarcerated individuals transitioning to the community.

  14. Treatment of high-risk neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Sung, Ki Woong

    2012-04-01

    Although high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (HDCT/autoSCT) have improved the prognosis for patients with high-risk neuroblastoma (NB), event-free survival rates remain in the range of 30 to 40%, which is unsatisfactory. To further improve outcomes, several clinical trials, including tandem HDCT/autoSCT, high-dose (131)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine treatment, and immunotherapy with NB specific antibody, have been undertaken and pilot studies have reported encouraging results. Nonetheless, about half of high-risk NB patients still experience treatment failure and have no realistic chance for cure with conventional treatment options alone after relapse. Therefore, a new modality of treatment is warranted for these patients. In recent years, several groups of investigators have examined the feasibility and effectiveness of reduced-intensity allogeneic stem cell transplantation (RI alloSCT) for the treatment of relapsed/progressed NB. Although a graft-versus-tumor effect has not yet been convincingly demonstrated in the setting of relapsed NB, the strategy of employing RI alloSCT has provided hope that treatment-related mortality will be reduced and a therapeutic benefit will emerge. However, alloSCT for NB is still investigational and there remain many issues to be elucidated in many areas. At present, alloSCT is reserved for specific clinical trials testing the immunomodulatory effect against NB.

  15. Attitudinal and Behavioral Characteristics Predict High Risk Sexual Activity in Rural Tanzanian Youth

    PubMed Central

    Aichele, Stephen R.; Borgerhoff Mulder, Monique; James, Susan; Grimm, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of HIV infection in rural African youth remains high despite widespread knowledge of the disease within the region and increasing funds allocated to programs aimed at its prevention and treatment. This suggests that program efficacy requires a more nuanced understanding of the profiles of the most at-risk individuals. To evaluate the explanatory power of novel psychographic variables in relation to high-risk sexual behaviors, we conducted a survey to assess the effects of psychographic factors, both behavioral and attitudinal, controlling for standard predictors in 546 youth (12–26 years of age) across 8 villages in northern Tanzania. Indicators of high-risk sexual behavior included HIV testing, sexual history (i.e., virgin/non-virgin), age of first sexual activity, condom use, and number of lifetime sexual partners. Predictors in the statistical models included standard demographic variables, patterns of media consumption, HIV awareness, and six new psychographic features identified via factor analyses: personal vanity, family-building values, ambition for higher education, town recreation, perceived parental strictness, and spending preferences. In a series of hierarchical regression analyses, we find that models including psychographic factors contribute significant additional explanatory information when compared to models including only demographic and other conventional predictors. We propose that the psychographic approach used here, in so far as it identifies individual characteristics, aspirations, aspects of personal life style and spending preferences, can be used to target appropriate communities of youth within villages for leading and receiving outreach, and to build communities of like-minded youth who support new patterns of sexual behavior. PMID:24927421

  16. Efficacy and safety of once daily low molecular weight heparin (tinzaparin sodium) in high risk pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ní Ainle, Fionnuala; Wong, Audris; Appleby, Niamh; Byrne, Brigitte; Regan, Carmen; Hassan, Tayyaba; Milner, Marie; Sullivan, Ann O; White, Barry; O'Donnell, James

    2008-10-01

    Low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) is widely regarded as the anticoagulant treatment of choice for the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism during pregnancy. However, previous studies have demonstrated that the pharmacokinetic profiles of LMWH vary significantly with increasing gestation. Consequently, it remains unclear whether LMWH regimens recommended for use in nonpregnant individuals can be safely extrapolated to pregnant women. The aims of this study were to assess the safety and the efficacy of tinzaparin sodium (Innohep) administered only once daily during pregnancy. A systematic retrospective review identified a cohort of 37 high-risk pregnancies which had been managed using tinzaparin 175 IU/kg once daily. In 26 cases, the index pregnancy had been complicated by development of an acute venous thromboembolism (17 deep vein thrombosis and nine pulmonary embolism). For each individual, case notes were examined and data extracted using a predetermined questionnaire. No episodes of recurrent venous thromboembolism were identified amongst this cohort of pregnancies managed using once daily LMWH administration. However, two unusual thrombotic complications were observed, including a parietal infarct in one patient, and a postpartum cerebral venous thrombosis in another. Once daily tinzaparin was well tolerated, with no cases of heparin-induced thrombocytopaenia, symptomatic osteoporosis, or foetal malformations. Tinzaparin dose modification based upon peak anti-Xa levels occurred in 45% of the cases examined. The present study is the largest study to have examined the clinical efficacy of once daily LMWH for use in pregnant women at high risk of venous thromboembolism. Our data support the safety and efficacy of antenatal tinzaparin at a dose of 175 IU/kg. In order to determine whether this once daily regimen provides equivalent (or indeed greater) thromboprophylaxis to twice daily LMWH regimens during pregnancy will require highly powered direct

  17. Attitudinal and behavioral characteristics predict high risk sexual activity in rural Tanzanian youth.

    PubMed

    Aichele, Stephen R; Borgerhoff Mulder, Monique; James, Susan; Grimm, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of HIV infection in rural African youth remains high despite widespread knowledge of the disease within the region and increasing funds allocated to programs aimed at its prevention and treatment. This suggests that program efficacy requires a more nuanced understanding of the profiles of the most at-risk individuals. To evaluate the explanatory power of novel psychographic variables in relation to high-risk sexual behaviors, we conducted a survey to assess the effects of psychographic factors, both behavioral and attitudinal, controlling for standard predictors in 546 youth (12-26 years of age) across 8 villages in northern Tanzania. Indicators of high-risk sexual behavior included HIV testing, sexual history (i.e., virgin/non-virgin), age of first sexual activity, condom use, and number of lifetime sexual partners. Predictors in the statistical models included standard demographic variables, patterns of media consumption, HIV awareness, and six new psychographic features identified via factor analyses: personal vanity, family-building values, ambition for higher education, town recreation, perceived parental strictness, and spending preferences. In a series of hierarchical regression analyses, we find that models including psychographic factors contribute significant additional explanatory information when compared to models including only demographic and other conventional predictors. We propose that the psychographic approach used here, in so far as it identifies individual characteristics, aspirations, aspects of personal life style and spending preferences, can be used to target appropriate communities of youth within villages for leading and receiving outreach, and to build communities of like-minded youth who support new patterns of sexual behavior.

  18. Current clinical practice gaps in the treatment of intermediate- and high-risk non-muscleinvasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) with emphasis on the use of bacillus Calmette- Guérin (BCG): results of an international individual patient data survey (IPDS)

    PubMed Central

    Witjes, J Alfred; Palou, Joan; Soloway, Mark; Lamm, Donald; Kamat, Ashish M; Brausi, Maurizio; Persad, Raj; Buckley, Roger; Colombel, Marc; Böhle, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To examine the management of intermediate- and high-risk non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC), particularly with regard to the use of bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) therapy, in North America and Europe. To compare NMIBC management practices to European Association of Urology (EAU) and American Urological Association (AUA) guideline recommendations for the management of intermediate- and high-risk NMIBC. Patients and Methods In all, 102 urologists from Europe and North America participated in this retrospective on-line chart review, which was conducted between 1 April 2011 and 30 April 2012. Participants selected the charts of the first 10 intermediate- (defined as multiple or recurrent low-grade tumours) or high-risk (defined as any T1 and/or high-grade/G3 tumours and/or carcinoma in situ) patients who underwent transurethral resection of bladder tumour in 2009. Physicians retrospectively reviewed the charts and completed an on-line survey consisting of questions related to diagnosis, planned treatment, treatment status and follow-up. In all, 971 patients (197 intermediate-risk; 774 high-risk) were included in the analysis; frequency counts and associated percentages were used to analyse treatment variables. Results In all, 47% of intermediate-risk patients received EAU or AUA guideline-recommended intravesical therapy: intravesical chemotherapy, BCG induction therapy or BCG induction plus maintenance. Of the high-risk patients, 50% received maintenance BCG as recommended by the EAU and the AUA; although not recommended for high-risk NMIBC, 12.5% received intravesical chemotherapy. Of patients prescribed maintenance BCG, 93% were scheduled for at least 1 year of therapy. Notably, only 15% discontinued BCG maintenance and, of these discontinuations, 65% were due to reasons unrelated to BCG-associated adverse events. Conclusions There is significant non-adherence to EAU and AUA guideline recommendations for BCG use in intermediate- and high-risk

  19. Use of dietary supplements among women at high risk of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) tested for cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Alamian, Arsham; Rouleau, Isabelle; Simard, Jacques; Dorval, Michel

    2006-01-01

    Although use of dietary supplements among women with breast cancer is high, use among women at high risk of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) is unknown. This study assesses the prevalence of use of dietary supplements and identifies characteristics associated with use among women at high risk of HBOC who underwent genetic testing for cancer susceptibility. Participants were 303 women who underwent BRCA1/2 testing as part of Interdisciplinary Health Research International Team on Breast Cancer Susceptibility. Dietary supplements use was measured 12 mo post-disclosure. Potential determinants of use included personal cancer history, test result, psychological distress, cancer genetics knowledge, and health-related behaviors. Globally, 51% of participants used at least one dietary supplement. Calcium (26%), multivitamins (17%), vitamins D (14%), E (12%), and C (10%) were most frequently reported. Women > or = 50 yr were more likely to be using dietary supplements (P < 0.0001). Women with an inconclusive test result were more likely to use mineral supplements than noncarriers [odds ratio (OR) = 2.6; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.3-5.3]. Cigarette smoking was negatively associated with use of vitamin supplements (OR = 0.3; 95% CI = 0.1-0.7). Use of dietary supplements among women at high risk of HBOC who underwent BRCA1/2 testing is as frequent as use among patients with other types of tumors or use among individuals from the general population.

  20. Refining Neurobehavioral Assessment of the High-Risk Infant Using the NICU Network Neurobehavioral Scale.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Mary C; Miller, Robin J; Fontaine, Lynne Andreozzi; Lester, Barry

    2012-01-01

    Nurses caring for high-risk infants use advanced assessment skills to identify the nature of infant instability and to assure timely intervention. The NICU Network Neurobehavioral Scale (NNNS) is a comprehensive assessment of neurological integrity and behavioral function of infants at risk. Research evidence supports its validity and reliability for clinical and research use. The NNNS offers nurses a neurobehavioral assessment especially suited to high-risk and premature infants.

  1. A meta-analysis of 87,040 individuals identifies 23 new susceptibility loci for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Al Olama, Ali Amin; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Berndt, Sonja I; Conti, David V; Schumacher, Fredrick; Han, Ying; Benlloch, Sara; Hazelett, Dennis J; Wang, Zhaoming; Saunders, Ed; Leongamornlert, Daniel; Lindstrom, Sara; Jugurnauth-Little, Sara; Dadaev, Tokhir; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Stram, Daniel O; Rand, Kristin; Wan, Peggy; Stram, Alex; Sheng, Xin; Pooler, Loreall C; Park, Karen; Xia, Lucy; Tyrer, Jonathan; Kolonel, Laurence N; Le Marchand, Loic; Hoover, Robert N; Machiela, Mitchell J; Yeager, Merideth; Burdette, Laurie; Chung, Charles C; Hutchinson, Amy; Yu, Kai; Goh, Chee; Ahmed, Mahbubl; Govindasami, Koveela; Guy, Michelle; Tammela, Teuvo L J; Auvinen, Anssi; Wahlfors, Tiina; Schleutker, Johanna; Visakorpi, Tapio; Leinonen, Katri A; Xu, Jianfeng; Aly, Markus; Donovan, Jenny; Travis, Ruth C; Key, Tim J; Siddiq, Afshan; Canzian, Federico; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Takahashi, Atsushi; Kubo, Michiaki; Pharoah, Paul; Pashayan, Nora; Weischer, Maren; Nordestgaard, Borge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Klarskov, Peter; Røder, Martin Andreas; Iversen, Peter; Thibodeau, Stephen N; McDonnell, Shannon K; Schaid, Daniel J; Stanford, Janet L; Kolb, Suzanne; Holt, Sarah; Knudsen, Beatrice; Coll, Antonio Hurtado; Gapstur, Susan M; Diver, W Ryan; Stevens, Victoria L; Maier, Christiane; Luedeke, Manuel; Herkommer, Kathleen; Rinckleb, Antje E; Strom, Sara S; Pettaway, Curtis; Yeboah, Edward D; Tettey, Yao; Biritwum, Richard B; Adjei, Andrew A; Tay, Evelyn; Truelove, Ann; Niwa, Shelley; Chokkalingam, Anand P; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Cybulski, Cezary; Wokołorczyk, Dominika; Kluźniak, Wojciech; Park, Jong; Sellers, Thomas; Lin, Hui-Yi; Isaacs, William B; Partin, Alan W; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Stegmaier, Christa; Chen, Constance; Giovannucci, Edward L; Ma, Jing; Stampfer, Meir; Penney, Kathryn L; Mucci, Lorelei; John, Esther M; Ingles, Sue A; Kittles, Rick A; Murphy, Adam B; Pandha, Hardev; Michael, Agnieszka; Kierzek, Andrzej M; Blot, William; Signorello, Lisa B; Zheng, Wei; Albanes, Demetrius; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie; Nemesure, Barbara; Carpten, John; Leske, Cristina; Wu, Suh-Yuh; Hennis, Anselm; Kibel, Adam S; Rybicki, Benjamin A; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Hsing, Ann W; Chu, Lisa; Goodman, Phyllis J; Klein, Eric A; Zheng, S Lilly; Batra, Jyotsna; Clements, Judith; Spurdle, Amanda; Teixeira, Manuel R; Paulo, Paula; Maia, Sofia; Slavov, Chavdar; Kaneva, Radka; Mitev, Vanio; Witte, John S; Casey, Graham; Gillanders, Elizabeth M; Seminara, Daniella; Riboli, Elio; Hamdy, Freddie C; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Li, Qiyuan; Freedman, Matthew L; Hunter, David J; Muir, Kenneth; Gronberg, Henrik; Neal, David E; Southey, Melissa; Giles, Graham G; Severi, Gianluca; Cook, Michael B; Nakagawa, Hidewaki; Wiklund, Fredrik; Kraft, Peter; Chanock, Stephen J; Henderson, Brian E; Easton, Douglas F; Eeles, Rosalind A; Haiman, Christopher A

    2014-10-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 76 variants associated with prostate cancer risk predominantly in populations of European ancestry. To identify additional susceptibility loci for this common cancer, we conducted a meta-analysis of > 10 million SNPs in 43,303 prostate cancer cases and 43,737 controls from studies in populations of European, African, Japanese and Latino ancestry. Twenty-three new susceptibility loci were identified at association P < 5 × 10(-8); 15 variants were identified among men of European ancestry, 7 were identified in multi-ancestry analyses and 1 was associated with early-onset prostate cancer. These 23 variants, in combination with known prostate cancer risk variants, explain 33% of the familial risk for this disease in European-ancestry populations. These findings provide new regions for investigation into the pathogenesis of prostate cancer and demonstrate the usefulness of combining ancestrally diverse populations to discover risk loci for disease.

  2. A meta-analysis of 87,040 individuals identifies 23 new susceptibility loci for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Al Olama, Ali Amin; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Berndt, Sonja I; Conti, David V; Schumacher, Fredrick; Han, Ying; Benlloch, Sara; Hazelett, Dennis J; Wang, Zhaoming; Saunders, Ed; Leongamornlert, Daniel; Lindstrom, Sara; Jugurnauth-Little, Sara; Dadaev, Tokhir; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Stram, Daniel O; Rand, Kristin; Wan, Peggy; Stram, Alex; Sheng, Xin; Pooler, Loreall C; Park, Karen; Xia, Lucy; Tyrer, Jonathan; Kolonel, Laurence N; Le Marchand, Loic; Hoover, Robert N; Machiela, Mitchell J; Yeager, Merideth; Burdette, Laurie; Chung, Charles C; Hutchinson, Amy; Yu, Kai; Goh, Chee; Ahmed, Mahbubl; Govindasami, Koveela; Guy, Michelle; Tammela, Teuvo L J; Auvinen, Anssi; Wahlfors, Tiina; Schleutker, Johanna; Visakorpi, Tapio; Leinonen, Katri A; Xu, Jianfeng; Aly, Markus; Donovan, Jenny; Travis, Ruth C; Key, Tim J; Siddiq, Afshan; Canzian, Federico; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Takahashi, Atsushi; Kubo, Michiaki; Pharoah, Paul; Pashayan, Nora; Weischer, Maren; Nordestgaard, Borge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Klarskov, Peter; Røder, Martin Andreas; Iversen, Peter; Thibodeau, Stephen N; McDonnell, Shannon K; Schaid, Daniel J; Stanford, Janet L; Kolb, Suzanne; Holt, Sarah; Knudsen, Beatrice; Coll, Antonio Hurtado; Gapstur, Susan M; Diver, W Ryan; Stevens, Victoria L; Maier, Christiane; Luedeke, Manuel; Herkommer, Kathleen; Rinckleb, Antje E; Strom, Sara S; Pettaway, Curtis; Yeboah, Edward D; Tettey, Yao; Biritwum, Richard B; Adjei, Andrew A; Tay, Evelyn; Truelove, Ann; Niwa, Shelley; Chokkalingam, Anand P; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Cybulski, Cezary; Wokołorczyk, Dominika; Kluźniak, Wojciech; Park, Jong; Sellers, Thomas; Lin, Hui-Yi; Isaacs, William B; Partin, Alan W; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Stegmaier, Christa; Chen, Constance; Giovannucci, Edward L; Ma, Jing; Stampfer, Meir; Penney, Kathryn L; Mucci, Lorelei; John, Esther M; Ingles, Sue A; Kittles, Rick A; Murphy, Adam B; Pandha, Hardev; Michael, Agnieszka; Kierzek, Andrzej M; Blot, William; Signorello, Lisa B; Zheng, Wei; Albanes, Demetrius; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie; Nemesure, Barbara; Carpten, John; Leske, Cristina; Wu, Suh-Yuh; Hennis, Anselm; Kibel, Adam S; Rybicki, Benjamin A; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Hsing, Ann W; Chu, Lisa; Goodman, Phyllis J; Klein, Eric A; Zheng, S Lilly; Batra, Jyotsna; Clements, Judith; Spurdle, Amanda; Teixeira, Manuel R; Paulo, Paula; Maia, Sofia; Slavov, Chavdar; Kaneva, Radka; Mitev, Vanio; Witte, John S; Casey, Graham; Gillanders, Elizabeth M; Seminara, Daniella; Riboli, Elio; Hamdy, Freddie C; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Li, Qiyuan; Freedman, Matthew L; Hunter, David J; Muir, Kenneth; Gronberg, Henrik; Neal, David E; Southey, Melissa; Giles, Graham G; Severi, Gianluca; Cook, Michael B; Nakagawa, Hidewaki; Wiklund, Fredrik; Kraft, Peter; Chanock, Stephen J; Henderson, Brian E; Easton, Douglas F; Eeles, Rosalind A; Haiman, Christopher A

    2014-10-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 76 variants associated with prostate cancer risk predominantly in populations of European ancestry. To identify additional susceptibility loci for this common cancer, we conducted a meta-analysis of > 10 million SNPs in 43,303 prostate cancer cases and 43,737 controls from studies in populations of European, African, Japanese and Latino ancestry. Twenty-three new susceptibility loci were identified at association P < 5 × 10(-8); 15 variants were identified among men of European ancestry, 7 were identified in multi-ancestry analyses and 1 was associated with early-onset prostate cancer. These 23 variants, in combination with known prostate cancer risk variants, explain 33% of the familial risk for this disease in European-ancestry populations. These findings provide new regions for investigation into the pathogenesis of prostate cancer and demonstrate the usefulness of combining ancestrally diverse populations to discover risk loci for disease. PMID:25217961

  3. Great expectations: different high-risk activities satisfy different motives.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Matthew; Woodman, Tim; Hardy, Lew

    2013-09-01

    Research on people's motives for engaging in high-risk activities has typically been viewed through the single-focused lens of sensation seeking. We provide evidence that comprehensively challenges that view. First, we develop and confirm the structure of a 3-factor measure of motives: the Sensation Seeking, Emotion Regulation, and Agency Scale (SEAS; Study 1). We then use the SEAS to provide evidence of differential motives for 2 high-risk activities: skydiving and mountaineering. The motive for skydiving is strongly associated with sensation seeking; the motive for mountaineering is strongly associated with emotion regulation and agency but not with sensation seeking (Study 2). We also show that these conclusions cannot be drawn from existing measures of personality and sensation seeking (Study 3). Finally, individuals who are motivated by emotion regulation and agency needs also have greater expectations regarding their emotion regulation and agency. It is these greater expectations that most successfully discriminate mountaineers from skydivers and control participants (Study 4). It is concluded that researchers should no longer consider risk takers as a homogenous sensation-seeking group and that they should consider risk taking as a potential model of human endeavor. The SEAS can be used as a measure of motives for behavior whenever sensation seeking, agency, or emotion regulation is thought to be at the core of such motives, and the results are discussed in the context of encouraging personality researchers to consider the specific spontaneous behaviors that motivate different people.

  4. Relating Science and Religion: An Ontology of Taxonomies and Development of a Research Tool for Identifying Individual Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yasri, Pratchayapong; Arthur, Shagufta; Smith, Mike U.; Mancy, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how individuals view the relationship between science and religion shows promise for explaining a range of aspects of teaching and learning in science. Several taxonomies, consisting of different views by which people relate science and religion, can be found in the philosophical literature. However, most of the science education…

  5. Analyzing Learner Characteristics, Undergraduate Experience and Individual Teamwork Knowledge, Skills and Abilities: Toward Identifying Themes to Promote Higher Workforce Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frederick, Consuelo V.

    2009-01-01

    With the world amidst globalization and economic flux affecting business, industry, and communities the need to work together becomes increasingly important. Higher education serves an important role in developing the individual teaming capabilities of the workforce. This environment is the time and place--opportunity for student personnel to…

  6. 10 CFR 1008.4 - Procedures for identifying the individual making a request for access to or amendment of records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) Such an individual shall establish his personal identity in the same manner required in either... establish his identity by: (1) Including with his request, if submitted by mail, a photocopy of two... address and date of birth; or (3) Providing such other proof of identity as the Privacy Act Officer...

  7. 10 CFR 1008.4 - Procedures for identifying the individual making a request for access to or amendment of records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) Such an individual shall establish his personal identity in the same manner required in either... establish his identity by: (1) Including with his request, if submitted by mail, a photocopy of two... address and date of birth; or (3) Providing such other proof of identity as the Privacy Act Officer...

  8. New dimensions in the care of high risk pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, P

    1989-01-01

    In June 1989, the past president of the Philippine Nurses Association spoke at the annual convention of the Maternal Child Nurses Association at the Children's Medical Center in Quezon City. She addressed maternal health and high risk pregnancies in the Philippines. The maternal mortality rate was 90/100,000 live births each year. It was 4-5 times higher among remote tribes such as the Muslims of Sulu than the national rate. 54% of maternal deaths were attributed to pregnancy complications especially eclampsia (28%). About 2 million women experienced pregnancy annually and almost 1 million had anemia or were malnourished. 20% of these 1 million women gave birth to low birth weight infants who were at high risk of death from infections. About 574,000 out of 1.4 million infants born annually were unwanted. 63% of pregnant women each year did not want any children. Nurses can play an important role to reduce suffering and death among mothers and infants if they practice good health teaching. For example, they can inform mothers about child spacing and birth limiting. They can also identify high risk pregnancies and refer them to other health professionals to manage them. In September 1987, the Philippines Department of Health sponsored a conference on maternal health. Participants made 6 resolutions. The 1st resolution was to consider maternal mortality an indicator of Health for All by year 2000. They also resolved to declare 1988-97 the Decade of Safe Motherhood which included the creation of a multisectoral task force under the Department of Health. The speaker concluded by encouraging Philippine nurses to resist the temptation to work abroad to make more money and instead stay in the Philippines to care for their own people.

  9. The Phenomenological Critique and Self-disturbance: Implications for Ultra-High Risk (“Prodrome”) Research

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Barnaby; Yung, Alison R.; Bechdolf, Andreas; McGorry, Patrick D.

    2008-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed widespread interest in the early phase of schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders. Strategies have been introduced to attempt to identify individuals in the prepsychotic or prodromal phase. The most widely used of these approaches is the ultra-high risk (UHR) approach, which combines known trait and state risk factors for psychotic disorder. However, researchers guided by phenomenological theory have argued that modern psychiatry's neglect of subjective experience has compromised researchers’ understanding of psychotic disorder and has thereby limited efforts at prospective and early identification. Phenomenological research indicates that disturbance of the basic sense of self may be a core marker of psychotic vulnerability, particularly of schizophrenia spectrum disorders. It is argued that identifying self-disturbance in the UHR population may provide a means of further “closing in” on individuals truly at high risk of psychotic disorder, thus supplementing the UHR identification approach. This would be of practical value in the sense of reducing inclusion of “false-positive” cases in UHR samples and of theoretical value in the sense of shedding light on core features of psychotic pathology. The strong explanatory power and empirical findings to date invite further research into the role of self-disturbance as a phenotypic vulnerability marker for psychotic disorder. PMID:17702990

  10. A meta-analysis of 87,040 individuals identifies 23 new susceptibility loci for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Al Olama, Ali Amin; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Berndt, Sonja I.; Conti, David V.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Han, Ying; Benlloch, Sara; Hazelett, Dennis J.; Wang, Zhaoming; Saunders, Ed; Leongamornlert, Daniel; Lindstrom, Sara; Jugurnauth-Little, Sara; Dadaev, Tokhir; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Stram, Daniel O.; Rand, Kristin; Wan, Peggy; Stram, Alex; Sheng, Xin; Pooler, Loreall C.; Park, Karen; Xia, Lucy; Tyrer, Jonathan; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Le Marchand, Loic; Hoover, Robert N.; Machiela, Mitchell J.; Yeager, Merideth; Burdette, Laurie; Chung, Charles C.; Hutchinson, Amy; Yu, Kai; Goh, Chee; Ahmed, Mahbubl; Govindasami, Koveela; Guy, Michelle; Tammela, Teuvo L.J.; Auvinen, Anssi; Wahlfors, Tiina; Schleutker, Johanna; Visakorpi, Tapio; Leinonen, Katri A.; Xu, Jianfeng; Aly, Markus; Donovan, Jenny; Travis, Ruth C.; Key, Tim J.; Siddiq, Afshan; Canzian, Federico; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Takahashi, Atsushi; Kubo, Michiaki; Pharoah, Paul; Pashayan, Nora; Weischer, Maren; Nordestgaard, Borge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Klarskov, Peter; Røder, Martin Andreas; Iversen, Peter; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; McDonnell, Shannon K; Schaid, Daniel J; Stanford, Janet L.; Kolb, Suzanne; Holt, Sarah; Knudsen, Beatrice; Coll, Antonio Hurtado; Gapstur, Susan M.; Diver, W. Ryan; Stevens, Victoria L.; Maier, Christiane; Luedeke, Manuel; Herkommer, Kathleen; Rinckleb, Antje E.; Strom, Sara S.; Pettaway, Curtis; Yeboah, Edward D.; Tettey, Yao; Biritwum, Richard B.; Adjei, Andrew A.; Tay, Evelyn; Truelove, Ann; Niwa, Shelley; Chokkalingam, Anand P.; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Cybulski, Cezary; Wokołorczyk, Dominika; Kluźniak, Wojciech; Park, Jong; Sellers, Thomas; Lin, Hui-Yi; Isaacs, William B.; Partin, Alan W.; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Stegmaier, Christa; Chen, Constance; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Ma, Jing; Stampfer, Meir; Penney, Kathryn L.; Mucci, Lorelei; John, Esther M.; Ingles, Sue A.; Kittles, Rick A.; Murphy, Adam B.; Pandha, Hardev; Michael, Agnieszka; Kierzek, Andrzej M.; Blot, William; Signorello, Lisa B.; Zheng, Wei; Albanes, Demetrius; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie; Nemesure, Barbara; Carpten, John; Leske, Cristina; Wu, Suh-Yuh; Hennis, Anselm; Kibel, Adam S.; Rybicki, Benjamin A.; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Hsing, Ann W.; Chu, Lisa; Goodman, Phyllis J.; Klein, Eric A; Zheng, S. Lilly; Batra, Jyotsna; Clements, Judith; Spurdle, Amanda; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Paulo, Paula; Maia, Sofia; Slavov, Chavdar; Kaneva, Radka; Mitev, Vanio; Witte, John S.; Casey, Graham; Gillanders, Elizabeth M.; Seminara, Daniella; Riboli, Elio; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Li, Qiyuan; Freedman, Matthew L.; Hunter, David J.; Muir, Kenneth; Gronberg, Henrik; Neal, David E.; Southey, Melissa; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Cook, Michael B.; Nakagawa, Hidewaki; Wiklund, Fredrik; Kraft, Peter; Chanock, Stephen J.; Henderson, Brian E.; Easton, Douglas F.; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Haiman, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 76 variants associated with prostate cancer risk predominantly in populations of European ancestry. To identify additional susceptibility loci for this common cancer, we conducted a meta-analysis of >10 million SNPs in 43,303prostate cancer cases and 43,737 controls from studies in populations of European, African, Japanese and Latino ancestry. Twenty-three novel susceptibility loci were revealed at P<5×10-8; 15 variants were identified among men of European ancestry, 7 from multiethnic analyses and one was associated with early-onset prostate cancer. These 23 variants, in combination with the known prostate cancer risk variants, explain 33% of the familial risk of the disease in European ancestry populations. These findings provide new regions for investigation into the pathogenesis of prostate cancer and demonstrate the utility of combining ancestrally diverse populations to discover risk loci for disease. PMID:25217961

  11. Dating Violence among High-Risk Young Women: A Systematic Review Using Quantitative and Qualitative Methods

    PubMed Central

    Joly, Lauren E.; Connolly, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Our systematic review identified 21 quantitative articles and eight qualitative articles addressing dating violence among high risk young women. The groups of high-risk young women in this review include street-involved, justice-involved, pregnant or parenting, involved with Child Protective Services, and youth diagnosed with a mental health issue. Our meta-analysis of the quantitative articles indicated that 34% (CI = 0.24–0.45) of high-risk young women report that they have been victims of physical dating violence and 45% (CI = 0.31–0.61) of these young women report perpetrating physical dating violence. Significant moderator variables included questionnaire and timeframe. Meta-synthesis of the qualitative studies revealed that high-risk young women report perpetrating dating violence to gain power and respect, whereas women report becoming victims of dating violence due to increased vulnerability. PMID:26840336

  12. SY 04-1 CVD RISK PREDICTION IN HIGH-RISK VERSUS LOW-RISK POPULATIONS.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeon Chang

    2016-09-01

    Disease risk prediction models have been developed to assess the impact of multiple risk factors and to estimate an individual's absolute disease risk. Accurate disease prediction is essential for personalized prevention, because the benefits, risks, and costs of alternative strategies must be weighed to choose the best preventive strategy for individual patients. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) prediction is the earliest example of individual risk predictions. Since the Framingham study reported a CVD risk prediction method in 1976, an increasing number of risk assessment tools have been developed to CVD risk in various settings. The Framingham study results are fundamental evidence for the prediction of CVD risk. However, the clinical utility of a disease prediction model can be population-specific because the baseline disease risk, subtype distribution of the disease, and level of exposure to risk factors differ by region and ethnicity.It has been proved that CVD prediction models which were developed in high-risk populations, such as the Framingham Risk Score, overestimate an individual's disease risk when applied to a low-risk population without re-calibration. Thus countries of relatively low CVD risk are trying to re-calibrate the existing CVD prediction models or to develop a new prediction model analyzing their own population data. However, even the re-calibrated or newly-developed CVD prediction models are often of little clinical value in a low-risk population. A good example is the CVD prediction in the Korean population. Compared to Western populations, the Korean population has much lower incidence of coronary heart disease. Therefore, the vast majority of individuals fall into the low-risk group when their disease risk is assessed with a prediction model. Even a well-validated prediction model may not identify high-risk individuals who merit aggressive preventive treatment.A few alternative approaches have been suggested for CVD risk prediction in a low

  13. Genome-wide association analysis of more than 120,000 individuals identifies 15 new susceptibility loci for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Michailidou, Kyriaki; Beesley, Jonathan; Lindstrom, Sara; Canisius, Sander; Dennis, Joe; Lush, Michael J; Maranian, Mel J; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Shah, Mitul; Perkins, Barbara J; Czene, Kamila; Eriksson, Mikael; Darabi, Hatef; Brand, Judith S; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Flyger, Henrik; Nielsen, Sune F; Rahman, Nazneen; Turnbull, Clare; Fletcher, Olivia; Peto, Julian; Gibson, Lorna; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Rudolph, Anja; Eilber, Ursula; Behrens, Sabine; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Khan, Sofia; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; Ahsan, Habibul; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Whittemore, Alice S; John, Esther M; Malone, Kathleen E; Gammon, Marilie D; Santella, Regina M; Ursin, Giske; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel F; Casey, Graham; Hunter, David J; Gapstur, Susan M; Gaudet, Mia M; Diver, W Ryan; Haiman, Christopher A; Schumacher, Fredrick; Henderson, Brian E; Le Marchand, Loic; Berg, Christine D; Chanock, Stephen J; Figueroa, Jonine; Hoover, Robert N; Lambrechts, Diether; Neven, Patrick; Wildiers, Hans; van Limbergen, Erik; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Verhoef, Senno; Cornelissen, Sten; Couch, Fergus J; Olson, Janet E; Hallberg, Emily; Vachon, Celine; Waisfisz, Quinten; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Adank, Muriel A; van der Luijt, Rob B; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Jianjun; Humphreys, Keith; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K; Yoo, Keun-Young; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Tajima, Kazuo; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Mulot, Claire; Sanchez, Marie; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Surowy, Harald; Sohn, Christof; Wu, Anna H; Tseng, Chiu-chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O; González-Neira, Anna; Benitez, Javier; Zamora, M Pilar; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm W R; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Teo, Soo Hwang; Yip, Cheng Har; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Tan, Gie-Hooi; Hooning, Maartje J; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Martens, John W M; Collée, J Margriet; Blot, William; Signorello, Lisa B; Cai, Qiuyin; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Tsimiklis, Helen; Apicella, Carmel; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Hou, Ming-Feng; Kristensen, Vessela N; Nord, Silje; Alnaes, Grethe I Grenaker; Giles, Graham G; Milne, Roger L; McLean, Catriona; Canzian, Federico; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Peeters, Petra; Lund, Eiliv; Sund, Malin; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Gunter, Marc J; Palli, Domenico; Mortensen, Lotte Maxild; Dossus, Laure; Huerta, Jose-Maria; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Sutter, Christian; Yang, Rongxi; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Chia, Kee Seng; Chan, Ching Wan; Fasching, Peter A; Hein, Alexander; Beckmann, Matthias W; Haeberle, Lothar; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Brinton, Louise; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Zheng, Wei; Halverson, Sandra L; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Goldberg, Mark S; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Brüning, Thomas; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Bernard, Loris; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Dörk, Thilo; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline; Van Asperen, Christi J; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Huzarski, Tomasz; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Slager, Susan; Toland, Amanda E; Ambrosone, Christine B; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Kabisch, Maria; Torres, Diana; Neuhausen, Susan L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Ahmed, Shahana; Healey, Catherine S; Tessier, Daniel C; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M Rosario; Álvarez, Nuria; Herrero, Daniel; Simard, Jacques; Pharoah, Paul P D P; Kraft, Peter; Dunning, Alison M; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F

    2015-04-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and large-scale replication studies have identified common variants in 79 loci associated with breast cancer, explaining ∼14% of the familial risk of the disease. To identify new susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 GWAS, comprising 15,748 breast cancer cases and 18,084 controls together with 46,785 cases and 42,892 controls from 41 studies genotyped on a 211,155-marker custom array (iCOGS). Analyses were restricted to women of European ancestry. We generated genotypes for more than 11 million SNPs by imputation using the 1000 Genomes Project reference panel, and we identified 15 new loci associated with breast cancer at P < 5 × 10(-8). Combining association analysis with ChIP-seq chromatin binding data in mammary cell lines and ChIA-PET chromatin interaction data from ENCODE, we identified likely target genes in two regions: SETBP1 at 18q12.3 and RNF115 and PDZK1 at 1q21.1. One association appears to be driven by an amino acid substitution encoded in EXO1. PMID:25751625

  14. Genome-wide association analysis of more than 120,000 individuals identifies 15 new susceptibility loci for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Michailidou, Kyriaki; Beesley, Jonathan; Lindstrom, Sara; Canisius, Sander; Dennis, Joe; Lush, Michael J; Maranian, Mel J; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Shah, Mitul; Perkins, Barbara J; Czene, Kamila; Eriksson, Mikael; Darabi, Hatef; Brand, Judith S; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Flyger, Henrik; Nielsen, Sune F; Rahman, Nazneen; Turnbull, Clare; Fletcher, Olivia; Peto, Julian; Gibson, Lorna; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Rudolph, Anja; Eilber, Ursula; Behrens, Sabine; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Khan, Sofia; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; Ahsan, Habibul; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Whittemore, Alice S; John, Esther M; Malone, Kathleen E; Gammon, Marilie D; Santella, Regina M; Ursin, Giske; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel F; Casey, Graham; Hunter, David J; Gapstur, Susan M; Gaudet, Mia M; Diver, W Ryan; Haiman, Christopher A; Schumacher, Fredrick; Henderson, Brian E; Le Marchand, Loic; Berg, Christine D; Chanock, Stephen J; Figueroa, Jonine; Hoover, Robert N; Lambrechts, Diether; Neven, Patrick; Wildiers, Hans; van Limbergen, Erik; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Verhoef, Senno; Cornelissen, Sten; Couch, Fergus J; Olson, Janet E; Hallberg, Emily; Vachon, Celine; Waisfisz, Quinten; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Adank, Muriel A; van der Luijt, Rob B; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Jianjun; Humphreys, Keith; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K; Yoo, Keun-Young; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Tajima, Kazuo; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Mulot, Claire; Sanchez, Marie; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Surowy, Harald; Sohn, Christof; Wu, Anna H; Tseng, Chiu-chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O; González-Neira, Anna; Benitez, Javier; Zamora, M Pilar; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm W R; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Teo, Soo Hwang; Yip, Cheng Har; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Tan, Gie-Hooi; Hooning, Maartje J; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Martens, John W M; Collée, J Margriet; Blot, William; Signorello, Lisa B; Cai, Qiuyin; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Tsimiklis, Helen; Apicella, Carmel; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Hou, Ming-Feng; Kristensen, Vessela N; Nord, Silje; Alnaes, Grethe I Grenaker; Giles, Graham G; Milne, Roger L; McLean, Catriona; Canzian, Federico; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Peeters, Petra; Lund, Eiliv; Sund, Malin; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Gunter, Marc J; Palli, Domenico; Mortensen, Lotte Maxild; Dossus, Laure; Huerta, Jose-Maria; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Sutter, Christian; Yang, Rongxi; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Chia, Kee Seng; Chan, Ching Wan; Fasching, Peter A; Hein, Alexander; Beckmann, Matthias W; Haeberle, Lothar; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Brinton, Louise; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Zheng, Wei; Halverson, Sandra L; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Goldberg, Mark S; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Brüning, Thomas; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Bernard, Loris; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Dörk, Thilo; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline; Van Asperen, Christi J; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Huzarski, Tomasz; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Slager, Susan; Toland, Amanda E; Ambrosone, Christine B; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Kabisch, Maria; Torres, Diana; Neuhausen, Susan L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Ahmed, Shahana; Healey, Catherine S; Tessier, Daniel C; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M Rosario; Álvarez, Nuria; Herrero, Daniel; Simard, Jacques; Pharoah, Paul P D P; Kraft, Peter; Dunning, Alison M; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F

    2015-04-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and large-scale replication studies have identified common variants in 79 loci associated with breast cancer, explaining ∼14% of the familial risk of the disease. To identify new susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 GWAS, comprising 15,748 breast cancer cases and 18,084 controls together with 46,785 cases and 42,892 controls from 41 studies genotyped on a 211,155-marker custom array (iCOGS). Analyses were restricted to women of European ancestry. We generated genotypes for more than 11 million SNPs by imputation using the 1000 Genomes Project reference panel, and we identified 15 new loci associated with breast cancer at P < 5 × 10(-8). Combining association analysis with ChIP-seq chromatin binding data in mammary cell lines and ChIA-PET chromatin interaction data from ENCODE, we identified likely target genes in two regions: SETBP1 at 18q12.3 and RNF115 and PDZK1 at 1q21.1. One association appears to be driven by an amino acid substitution encoded in EXO1.

  15. Genome-wide association analysis of more than 120,000 individuals identifies 15 new susceptibility loci for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Michailidou, Kyriaki; Beesley, Jonathan; Lindstrom, Sara; Canisius, Sander; Dennis, Joe; Lush, Michael; Maranian, Mel J; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Shah, Mitul; Perkins, Barbara J; Czene, Kamila; Eriksson, Mikael; Darabi, Hatef; Brand, Judith S; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Flyger, Henrik; Nielsen, Sune F; Rahman, Nazneen; Turnbull, Clare; Fletcher, Olivia; Peto, Julian; Gibson, Lorna; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Rudolph, Anja; Eilber, Ursula; Behrens, Sabine; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Khan, Sofia; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; Ahsan, Habibul; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Whittemore, Alice S; John, Esther M; Malone, Kathleen E; Gammon, Marilie D; Santella, Regina M; Ursin, Giske; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel F; Casey, Graham; Hunter, David J; Gapstur, Susan M; Gaudet, Mia M; Diver, W Ryan; Haiman, Christopher A; Schumacher, Fredrick; Henderson, Brian E; Le Marchand, Loic; Berg, Christine D; Chanock, Stephen; Figueroa, Jonine; Hoover, Robert N; Lambrechts, Diether; Neven, Patrick; Wildiers, Hans; van Limbergen, Erik; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Verhoef, Senno; Cornelissen, Sten; Couch, Fergus J; Olson, Janet E; Hallberg, Emily; Vachon, Celine; Waisfisz, Quinten; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Adank, Muriel A; van der Luijt, Rob B; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Jianjun; Humphreys, Keith; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K; Yoo, Keun-Young; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Tajima, Kazuo; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Mulot, Claire; Sanchez, Marie; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Surowy, Harald; Sohn, Christof; Wu, Anna H; Tseng, Chiu-chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O; González-Neira, Anna; Benitez, Javier; Zamora, M Pilar; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm WR; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Teo, Soo Hwang; Yip, Cheng Har; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; TAN, Gie-Hooi; Hooning, Maartje J; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Martens, John WM; Collée, J Margriet; Blot, William; Signorello, Lisa B; Cai, Qiuyin; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Tsimiklis, Helen; Apicella, Carmel; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Hou, Ming-Feng; Kristensen, Vessela N; Nord, Silje; Alnaes, Grethe I Grenaker; Giles, Graham G; Milne, Roger L; McLean, Catriona; Canzian, Federico; Trichopoulos, Dmitrios; Peeters, Petra; Lund, Eiliv; Sund, Malin; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Gunter, Marc J; Palli, Domenico; Mortensen, Lotte Maxild; Dossus, Laure; Huerta, Jose-Maria; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Sutter, Christian; Yang, Rongxi; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Chia, Kee Seng; Chan, Ching Wan; Fasching, Peter A; Hein, Alexander; Beckmann, Matthias W; Haeberle, Lothar; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Brinton, Louise; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Zheng, Wei; Halverson, Sandra L; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Goldberg, Mark S; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Brüning, Thomas; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Bernard, Loris; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Dörk, Thilo; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert AEM; Seynaeve, Caroline; Van Asperen, Christi J; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Huzarski, Tomasz; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Slager, Susan; Toland, Amanda E; Ambrosone, Christine B; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Kabisch, Maria; Torres, Diana; Neuhausen, Susan L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Ahmed, Shahana; Healey, Catherine S; Tessier, Daniel C; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M Rosario; Álvarez, Nuria; Herrero, Daniel; Simard, Jacques; Pharoah, Paul PDP; Kraft, Peter; Dunning, Alison M; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F

    2015-01-01

    Genome wide association studies (GWAS) and large scale replication studies have identified common variants in 79 loci associated with breast cancer, explaining ~14% of the familial risk of the disease. To identify new susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 GWAS comprising of 15,748 breast cancer cases and 18,084 controls, and 46,785 cases and 42,892 controls from 41 studies genotyped on a 200K custom array (iCOGS). Analyses were restricted to women of European ancestry. Genotypes for more than 11M SNPs were generated by imputation using the 1000 Genomes Project reference panel. We identified 15 novel loci associated with breast cancer at P<5×10−8. Combining association analysis with ChIP-Seq data in mammary cell lines and ChIA-PET chromatin interaction data in ENCODE, we identified likely target genes in two regions: SETBP1 on 18q12.3 and RNF115 and PDZK1 on 1q21.1. One association appears to be driven by an amino-acid substitution in EXO1. PMID:25751625

  16. The National Cross-Site Evaluation of High-Risk Youth Programs: Findings on Designing and Implementing Effective Prevention Programs for Youth at High Risk. Monograph Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermann, Jack; Sambrano, Soledad; Springer, J. Fred; Nister, Mary; Sale, Elizabeth; Brounstein, Paul J.; Cordray, David; Shadish, Will; Kasim, Rafa; Pan, Wei

    This document summarizes findings from the Center for Substance Abuse Prevention's National Cross-Site Evaluation of High-Risk Youth Programs, which identified characteristics associated with strong substance abuse prevention outcomes in 48 prevention programs. It provides concrete guidance regarding what elements of design and implementation are…

  17. The National Cross-Site Evaluation of High-Risk Youth Programs: Understanding Risk, Protection, and Substance Use among High-Risk Youth. Monograph Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Springer, J. Fred; Sambrano, Soledad; Sale, Elizabeth; Kasim, Rafa; Hermann, Jack

    This document summarizes findings from the Center for Substance Abuse Prevention's National Cross-Site Evaluation of High-Risk Youth Programs, which identified characteristics associated with strong substance abuse prevention outcomes in 48 prevention programs. Major findings include: as youth age, levels of risk and protection shift considerably,…

  18. Survival of high-risk pediatric neuroblastoma patients in a developing country.

    PubMed

    Easton, Joseph C; Gomez, Sergio; Asdahl, Peter H; Conner, J Michael; Fynn, Alcira B; Ruiz, Claudia; Ojha, Rohit P

    2016-09-01

    Little information is available about survival of high-risk pediatric neuroblastoma patients in developing countries. We aimed to assess survival among high-risk pediatric neuroblastoma patients in La Plata, Argentina. Individuals eligible for our cohort were aged <20 yr when diagnosed with high-risk neuroblastoma and received cancer-directed therapy including stem cell transplantation at Hospital de Niños Sor Maria Ludovica between February 1999 and February 2015. We estimated overall survival probabilities using an extended Kaplan-Meier approach. Our study population comprised 39 high-risk neuroblastoma patients, of whom 39% were aged >4 yr at diagnosis, 54% were male, and 62% had adrenal neuroblastoma. We observed 18 deaths, and the median survival time of our study population was 1.7 yr. The five-yr overall survival probability was 24% (95% CL: 10%, 41%). In contrast, five-yr survival of high-risk neuroblastoma patients ranges between 23% and 76% in developed countries. Survival among high-risk neuroblastoma patients is generally poor regardless of geographic location, but our results illustrate dramatically worse survival for patients in a developing country. We speculate that the observed survival differences could be attenuated or eliminated with improvements in treatment and supportive care, but addressing these issues will require creative solutions because of resource limitations. PMID:27235336

  19. Survival of high-risk pediatric neuroblastoma patients in a developing country.

    PubMed

    Easton, Joseph C; Gomez, Sergio; Asdahl, Peter H; Conner, J Michael; Fynn, Alcira B; Ruiz, Claudia; Ojha, Rohit P

    2016-09-01

    Little information is available about survival of high-risk pediatric neuroblastoma patients in developing countries. We aimed to assess survival among high-risk pediatric neuroblastoma patients in La Plata, Argentina. Individuals eligible for our cohort were aged <20 yr when diagnosed with high-risk neuroblastoma and received cancer-directed therapy including stem cell transplantation at Hospital de Niños Sor Maria Ludovica between February 1999 and February 2015. We estimated overall survival probabilities using an extended Kaplan-Meier approach. Our study population comprised 39 high-risk neuroblastoma patients, of whom 39% were aged >4 yr at diagnosis, 54% were male, and 62% had adrenal neuroblastoma. We observed 18 deaths, and the median survival time of our study population was 1.7 yr. The five-yr overall survival probability was 24% (95% CL: 10%, 41%). In contrast, five-yr survival of high-risk neuroblastoma patients ranges between 23% and 76% in developed countries. Survival among high-risk neuroblastoma patients is generally poor regardless of geographic location, but our results illustrate dramatically worse survival for patients in a developing country. We speculate that the observed survival differences could be attenuated or eliminated with improvements in treatment and supportive care, but addressing these issues will require creative solutions because of resource limitations.

  20. High-density genotyping of immune-related loci identifies new SLE risk variants in individuals with Asian ancestry.

    PubMed

    Sun, Celi; Molineros, Julio E; Looger, Loren L; Zhou, Xu-Jie; Kim, Kwangwoo; Okada, Yukinori; Ma, Jianyang; Qi, Yuan-Yuan; Kim-Howard, Xana; Motghare, Prasenjeet; Bhattarai, Krishna; Adler, Adam; Bang, So-Young; Lee, Hye-Soon; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Kang, Young Mo; Suh, Chang-Hee; Chung, Won Tae; Park, Yong-Beom; Choe, Jung-Yoon; Shim, Seung Cheol; Kochi, Yuta; Suzuki, Akari; Kubo, Michiaki; Sumida, Takayuki; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Lee, Shin-Seok; Kim, Young Jin; Han, Bok-Ghee; Dozmorov, Mikhail; Kaufman, Kenneth M; Wren, Jonathan D; Harley, John B; Shen, Nan; Chua, Kek Heng; Zhang, Hong; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Nath, Swapan K

    2016-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has a strong but incompletely understood genetic architecture. We conducted an association study with replication in 4,478 SLE cases and 12,656 controls from six East Asian cohorts to identify new SLE susceptibility loci and better localize known loci. We identified ten new loci and confirmed 20 known loci with genome-wide significance. Among the new loci, the most significant locus was GTF2IRD1-GTF2I at 7q11.23 (rs73366469, Pmeta = 3.75 × 10(-117), odds ratio (OR) = 2.38), followed by DEF6, IL12B, TCF7, TERT, CD226, PCNXL3, RASGRP1, SYNGR1 and SIGLEC6. We identified the most likely functional variants at each locus by analyzing epigenetic marks and gene expression data. Ten candidate variants are known to alter gene expression in cis or in trans. Enrichment analysis highlights the importance of these loci in B cell and T cell biology. The new loci, together with previously known loci, increase the explained heritability of SLE to 24%. The new loci share functional and ontological characteristics with previously reported loci and are possible drug targets for SLE therapeutics.

  1. Cancer Research Repository for Individuals With Cancer Diagnosis and High Risk Individuals.

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-12

    Pancreatic Cancer; Thyroid Cancer; Lung Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Thymus Cancer; Colon Cancer; Rectal Cancer; GIST; Anal Cancer; Bile Duct Cancer; Duodenal Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Liver Cancer; Small Intestine Cancer; Peritoneal Surface Malignancies; Familial Adenomatous Polyposis; Lynch Syndrome; Bladder Cancer; Kidney Cancer; Penile Cancer; Prostate Cancer; Testicular Cancer; Ureter Cancer; Urethral Cancer; Hypopharyngeal Cancer; Laryngeal Cancer; Lip Cancer; Oral Cavity Cancer; Nasopharyngeal Cancer; Oropharyngeal Cancer; Paranasal Sinus Cancer; Nasal Cavity Cancer; Salivary Gland Cancer; Skin Cancer; CNS Tumor; CNS Cancer; Mesothelioma

  2. A 1-year lifestyle intervention for weight loss in individuals with type 2 diabetes reduces high C-reactive protein levels and identifies metabolic predictors of change

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OBJECTIVE: We examined whether a 1-year intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) for weight loss reduced elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels in obese individuals with diabetes and identified metabolic and fitness predictors of hs-CRP change. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Look A...

  3. High-density genotyping of immune-related loci identifies new SLE risk variants in individuals with Asian ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Celi; Molineros, Julio E.; Looger, Loren L.; Zhou, Xu-jie; Kim, Kwangwoo; Okada, Yukinori; Ma, Jianyang; Qi, Yuan-yuan; Kim-Howard, Xana; Motghare, Prasenjeet; Bhattarai, Krishna; Adler, Adam; Bang, So-Young; Lee, Hye-Soon; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Kang, Young Mo; Suh, Chang-Hee; Chung, Won Tae; Park, Yong-Beom; Choe, Jung-Yoon; Shim, Seung Cheol; Kochi, Yuta; Suzuki, Akari; Kubo, Michiaki; Sumida, Takayuki; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Lee, Shin-Seok; Kim, Young Jin; Han, Bok-Ghee; Dozmorov, Mikhail; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Wren, Jonathan D.; Harley, John B.; Shen, Nan; Chua, Kek Heng; Zhang, Hong; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Nath, Swapan K.

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has a strong but incompletely understood genetic architecture. We conducted an association study with replication in 4,492 SLE cases and 12,675 controls from six East-Asian cohorts, to identify novel and better localize known SLE susceptibility loci. We identified 10 novel loci as well as 20 known loci with genome-wide significance. Among the novel loci, the most significant was GTF2IRD1-GTF2I at 7q11.23 (rs73366469, Pmeta=3.75×10−117, OR=2.38), followed by DEF6, IL12B, TCF7, TERT, CD226, PCNXL3, RASGRP1, SYNGR1 and SIGLEC6. We localized the most likely functional variants for each locus by analyzing epigenetic marks and gene regulation data. Ten putative variants are known to alter cis- or trans-gene expression. Enrichment analysis highlights the importance of these loci in B- and T-cell biology. Together with previously known loci, the explained heritability of SLE increases to 24%. Novel loci share functional and ontological characteristics with previously reported loci, and are possible drug targets for SLE therapeutics. PMID:26808113

  4. High risk groups in an oil shale workforce

    SciTech Connect

    Gratt, L.B.; Marine, W.M.; Perry, B.W.; Savitz, D.A.

    1984-04-01

    The workforce risks of a hypothetical one million barrels-per-day oil shale industry were estimated. The risks for the different workforce segments were compared and high risk groups were identified. Accidents and injuries were statistically described by rates for fatalities, for accidents with days lost from work, and for accidents with no days lost from work. Workforce diseases analyzed were cancers, silicosis, pneumoconiosis, chronic bronchitis, chronic airway obstruction, and high frequency hearing loss. A comparison of the workforce groups under different risk measures (occurrence, fatality, and life-loss expectancy) was performed. The miners represented the group with the largest fatality and the most serious accident rate, although the estimated rates were below the average industry-wide underground mining experience. Lung disease from inhalation exposure of about the nuisance dust threshold limit value presents a significant risk for future concerns.

  5. Prenatal diagnosis of osteochondrodysplasias in high risk pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gordienko IYu; Grechanina EYa; Sopko, N I; Tarapurova, E N; Mikchailets, L P

    1996-05-01

    We collected data on 39 prenatally diagnosed osteochondrodysplasias. We detected 30 (76.9%) cases in the first and second trimesters, including 18 (46.2%) with two twins before the 24th week of gestation. Of 39 cases 11 (28.2%) had osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type II. Verification of the prenatal diagnosis was attempted in 26 cases on the basis of the data obtained from ultrasonographs, radiographs, external examination, and autopsy protocols. The prenatal diagnosis was confirmed in 19 (73%) fetuses. In 13 cases verification was not possible because one or several investigations could not be performed. Counselling followed all identified cases with osteochondrodysplasia. We present the pedigree of two families indicating the possibility of early prenatal diagnosis of achondrogenesis type I and metatropic dysplasia. We propose indications for ultrasonographic anatomical screening with subsequent phenotype analysis in high risk pregnancy to provide for the prenatal detection of malformations and hereditary diseases. PMID:8723093

  6. The Psychosis High-Risk State

    PubMed Central

    Fusar-Poli, Paolo; Borgwardt, Stefan; Bechdolf, Andreas; Addington, Jean; Riecher-Rössler, Anita; Schultze-Lutter, Frauke; Keshavan, Matcheri; Wood, Stephen; Ruhrmann, Stephan; Seidman, Larry J.; Valmaggia, Lucia; Cannon, Tyrone; Velthorst, Eva; De Haan, Lieuwe; Cornblatt, Barbara; Bonoldi, Ilaria; Birchwood, Max; McGlashan, Thomas; Carpenter, William; McGorry, Patrick; Klosterkötter, Joachim; McGuire, Philip; Yung, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Context During the past 2 decades, a major transition in the clinical characterization of psychotic disorders has occurred. The construct of a clinical high-risk (HR) state for psychosis has evolved to capture the prepsychotic phase, describing people presenting with potentially prodromal symptoms. The importance of this HR state has been increasingly recognized to such an extent that a new syndrome is being considered as a diagnostic category in the DSM-5. Objective To reframe the HR state in a comprehensive state-of-the-art review on the progress that has been made while also recognizing the challenges that remain. Data Sources Available HR research of the past 20 years from PubMed, books, meetings, abstracts, and international conferences. Study Selection and Data Extraction Critical review of HR studies addressing historical development, inclusion criteria, epidemiologic research, transition criteria, outcomes, clinical and functional characteristics, neurocognition, neuroimaging, predictors of psychosis development, treatment trials, socioeconomic aspects, nosography, and future challenges in the field. Data Synthesis Relevant articles retrieved in the literature search were discussed by a large group of leading worldwide experts in the field. The core results are presented after consensus and are summarized in illustrative tables and figures. Conclusions The relatively new field of HR research in psychosis is exciting. It has the potential to shed light on the development of major psychotic disorders and to alter their course. It also provides a rationale for service provision to those in need of help who could not previously access it and the possibility of changing trajectories for those with vulnerability to psychotic illnesses. PMID:23165428

  7. Community-Based HIV and Health Testing for High-Risk Adolescents and Youth.

    PubMed

    Reif, Lindsey K; Rivera, Vanessa; Louis, Bianca; Bertrand, Rachel; Peck, Mireille; Anglade, Benedict; Seo, Grace; Abrams, Elaine J; Pape, Jean W; Fitzgerald, Daniel W; McNairy, Margaret L

    2016-08-01

    Adolescents account for 40% of new HIV infections, and HIV testing strategies to increase uptake of testing are needed. A community-based adolescent and youth HIV and health testing campaign was conducted in seven slum neighborhoods of Port-au-Prince, Haiti, from December 2014 to September 2015. Community health workers provided community sensitization and recruited 10- to 24-year-olds to test for HIV, syphilis, gonorrhea/chlamydia, and to screen for tuberculosis (TB) and pregnancy. HIV-infected individuals were escorted to the GHESKIO HIV clinic for same-day enrollment in care. Among 3425 individuals eligible for testing, 3348 (98%) accepted an HIV test. HIV prevalence was 2.65% (n = 89). Median age was 19 [interquartile range (IQR) 17-20]; 73% were female. HIV prevalence was 0.6-7.4% across slum neighborhoods. All HIV-infected individuals enrolled in care the same day as testing; median CD4 was 529 cells/μL [IQR 363-761]. Syphilis prevalence was 2.60% (65/2536) and gonorrhea/chlamydia prevalence was 6.25% (96/1536). Among 168 (5%) individuals who reported TB symptoms, 7.7% (13/168) had microbiologically confirmed disease. One hundred twenty-nine females (5% of all females) were pregnant. This community-based testing campaign identified an adolescent and youth population with an HIV prevalence six times higher than the estimated national adolescent HIV prevalence (0.4%) in Haiti, including perinatally infected adolescents. This type of community-based campaign for HIV testing within a package of services can serve as a model for other resource-poor settings to identify high-risk adolescents and youth, and curb the global HIV epidemic among adolescents. PMID:27509237

  8. Comparison of methods to identify aberrant expression patterns in individual patients: augmenting our toolkit for precision medicine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Patient-specific aberrant expression patterns in conjunction with functional screening assays can guide elucidation of the cancer genome architecture and identification of therapeutic targets. Since most statistical methods for expression analysis are focused on differences between experimental groups, the performance of approaches for patient-specific expression analyses are currently less well characterized. A comparison of methods for the identification of genes that are dysregulated relative to a single sample in a given set of experimental samples, to our knowledge, has not been performed. Methods We systematically evaluated several methods including variations on the nearest neighbor based outlying degree method, as well as the Zscore and a robust variant for their suitability to detect patient-specific events. The methods were assessed using both simulations and expression data from a cohort of pediatric acute B lymphoblastic leukemia patients. Results We first assessed power and false discovery rates using simulations and found that even under optimal conditions, high effect sizes (>4 unit differences) were necessary to have acceptable power for any method (>0.9) though high false discovery rates (>0.1) were pervasive across simulation conditions. Next we introduced a technical factor into the simulation and found that performance was reduced for all methods and that using weights with the outlying degree could provide performance gains depending on the number of samples and genes affected by the technical factor. In our use case that highlights the integration of functional assays and aberrant expression in a patient cohort (the identification of gene dysregulation events associated with the targets from a siRNA screen), we demonstrated that both the outlying degree and the Zscore can successfully identify genes dysregulated in one patient sample. However, only the outlying degree can identify genes dysregulated across several patient samples

  9. Genome-wide association analysis identifies novel loci for chronotype in 100,420 individuals from the UK Biobank

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Jacqueline M.; Vlasac, Irma; Anderson, Simon G.; Kyle, Simon D.; Dixon, William G.; Bechtold, David A.; Gill, Shubhroz; Little, Max A.; Luik, Annemarie; Loudon, Andrew; Emsley, Richard; Scheer, Frank A. J. L.; Lawlor, Deborah A.; Redline, Susan; Ray, David W.; Rutter, Martin K.; Saxena, Richa

    2016-01-01

    Our sleep timing preference, or chronotype, is a manifestation of our internal biological clock. Variation in chronotype has been linked to sleep disorders, cognitive and physical performance, and chronic disease. Here we perform a genome-wide association study of self-reported chronotype within the UK Biobank cohort (n=100,420). We identify 12 new genetic loci that implicate known components of the circadian clock machinery and point to previously unstudied genetic variants and candidate genes that might modulate core circadian rhythms or light-sensing pathways. Pathway analyses highlight central nervous and ocular systems and fear-response-related processes. Genetic correlation analysis suggests chronotype shares underlying genetic pathways with schizophrenia, educational attainment and possibly BMI. Further, Mendelian randomization suggests that evening chronotype relates to higher educational attainment. These results not only expand our knowledge of the circadian system in humans but also expose the influence of circadian characteristics over human health and life-history variables such as educational attainment. PMID:26955885

  10. GWAS of 89,283 individuals identifies genetic variants associated with self-reporting of being a morning person

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Youna; Shmygelska, Alena; Tran, David; Eriksson, Nicholas; Tung, Joyce Y.; Hinds, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are a nearly universal feature of living organisms and affect almost every biological process. Our innate preference for mornings or evenings is determined by the phase of our circadian rhythms. We conduct a genome-wide association analysis of self-reported morningness, followed by analyses of biological pathways and related phenotypes. We identify 15 significantly associated loci, including seven near established circadian genes (rs12736689 near RGS16, P=7.0 × 10−18; rs9479402 near VIP, P=3.9 × 10−11; rs55694368 near PER2, P=2.6 × 10−9; rs35833281 near HCRTR2, P=3.7 × 10−9; rs11545787 near RASD1, P=1.4 × 10−8; rs11121022 near PER3, P=2.0 × 10−8; rs9565309 near FBXL3, P=3.5 × 10−8. Circadian and phototransduction pathways are enriched in our results. Morningness is associated with insomnia and other sleep phenotypes; and is associated with body mass index and depression but we did not find evidence for a causal relationship in our Mendelian randomization analysis. Our findings reinforce current understanding of circadian biology and will guide future studies. PMID:26835600

  11. GWAS of 89,283 individuals identifies genetic variants associated with self-reporting of being a morning person.

    PubMed

    Hu, Youna; Shmygelska, Alena; Tran, David; Eriksson, Nicholas; Tung, Joyce Y; Hinds, David A

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are a nearly universal feature of living organisms and affect almost every biological process. Our innate preference for mornings or evenings is determined by the phase of our circadian rhythms. We conduct a genome-wide association analysis of self-reported morningness, followed by analyses of biological pathways and related phenotypes. We identify 15 significantly associated loci, including seven near established circadian genes (rs12736689 near RGS16, P=7.0 × 10(-18); rs9479402 near VIP, P=3.9 × 10(-11); rs55694368 near PER2, P=2.6 × 10(-9); rs35833281 near HCRTR2, P=3.7 × 10(-9); rs11545787 near RASD1, P=1.4 × 10(-8); rs11121022 near PER3, P=2.0 × 10(-8); rs9565309 near FBXL3, P=3.5 × 10(-8). Circadian and phototransduction pathways are enriched in our results. Morningness is associated with insomnia and other sleep phenotypes; and is associated with body mass index and depression but we did not find evidence for a causal relationship in our Mendelian randomization analysis. Our findings reinforce current understanding of circadian biology and will guide future studies. PMID:26835600

  12. Maternal and foetal outcome of 206 high risk pregnancy cases in border guard hospital, dhaka.

    PubMed

    Shapla, N R; Islam, M A; Shahida, S M; Parveen, Z; Lipe, Y S

    2015-04-01

    This observational study was carried out to identify the various types of high risk pregnancy and to determine the maternal and foetal outcome. The study was carried out on 206 pregnant high risk women in the Gynecology and Obstetrics department of Border Guard Hospital, Dhaka from January 2012 to December 2012. During mentioned period among 598 pregnant women 206 high risk pregnancy cases were randomly selected. Pregnant women (gestational age from 34 weeks upto 40 weeks) having medical condition and pregnancy related high risk factors were included and uncomplicated pregnancy, pregnancy before 37 weeks, post dated pregnancy were excluded from this study. Data was collected from semi structured history sheet and data analysis done by percentage. High risk pregnant women were grouped into three. Group A and Group B includes pregnant women having medical condition before and during pregnancy respectively. Group C consists of pregnant women had pregnancy related high risk issues. Among 206 high risk pregnancy cases majority 47.57% women had medical condition during pregnancy, 31.55% patient had medical condition before pregnancy. Among them majority 30.58% of the patient suffered from pregnancy induced hypertension, 15.04% patients suffered from gestational Diabetes Mellitus and premature rupture of membranes were 12.13%. In this study majority 43.68% of high risk pregnant patients were in age group of 30-35 years, 19.90% pregnant women were in age group of >35 years and 19.40% were in age group of upto 20 years. Among study groups maximum 65.04% of the patients were multiparous. Among 206 study population 60.19% high risk pregnant women were at term at the time of delivery and 39.8% women delivered their babies preterm. Caesarean section was done in 69.41% of high risk pregnant women. After delivery majority 77.66% women had no complication, only 10.19%, 8.25%, 2.91% and 0.97% high risk pregnant women suffered from fever, UTI, abdominal wound infection and post

  13. Social Ecological Model of Illness Management in High-Risk Youths with Type 1 Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naar-King, Sylvie; Podolski, Cheryl-Lynn; Ellis, Deborah A.; Frey, Maureen A.; Templin, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    In this study, the authors tested a social ecological model of illness management in high-risk, urban adolescents with Type 1 diabetes. It was hypothesized that management behaviors would be associated with individual adolescent characteristics as well as family, peer, and provider relationships. Questionnaires were collected from 96 adolescents…

  14. Weight-Related Issues and High-Risk Sexual Behaviors among College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenberg, Marla E.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; Lust, Katherine D.

    2005-01-01

    Individuals with high body mass index (BMI), negative body image, and unhealthy weight control behaviors may be more likely to engage in high-risk sexual behaviors than others. Researchers have not fully investigated these relationships in a sample of college students. The authors collected data regarding several weight-related issues and…

  15. Core Competencies and the Prevention of High-Risk Sexual Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, Vignetta Eugenia; Blum, Robert Wm.

    2008-01-01

    Adolescent sexual risk-taking behavior has numerous individual, family, community, and societal consequences. In an effort to contribute to the research and propose new directions, this chapter applies the core competencies framework to the prevention of high-risk sexual behavior. It describes the magnitude of the problem, summarizes explanatory…

  16. Does Vitamin D Supplementation Enhance Musculoskeletal Performance in Individuals Identified as Vitamin D Deficient through Blood Spot Testing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Kellie A.

    This thesis investigated possible changes in performance after one month of vitamin D supplementation in individuals found to be vitamin D deficient or insufficient through blood spot testing. Thirty-two males, ages 18-32, participated. Each subject visited the lab three times in one-month, completing four performance tests each session, including an isometric mid-thigh pull and a vertical jump on a force plate, a isometric 90-degree elbow flexion test using a load cell, and a psychomotor vigilance test on a palm pilot. The initial lab included blood spot tests to find vitamin D levels. In a single blind manner, 16 subjects were assigned vitamin D and 16 the placebo. Repeated measures ANOVA analysis did not reveal any main effects for time (F=2.626, p=0.364), treatment (vitamin D3 vs placebo; F=1.282, p=0.999), or interaction effects for treatment by time (F=0.304, p=0.999) for maximum force production during an isometric mid-thigh pull. Repeated measures ANOVA analysis did not reveal any main effects for time (F=1.323, p=0.999), treatment (vitamin D3 vs placebo; F=0.510, p=0.999), or interaction effects for treatment by time (F= 1.625, p=0.860) for rate of force production during a vertical jump. Repeated measures ANOVA analysis did not reveal any main effects for time (F=0.194, p=0.999), treatment (vitamin D3 vs placebo; F=2.452, p=0.513), or interaction effects for treatment by time (F= 1.179, p=0.999) for maximal force production during a 90-degree isometric elbow flexion. Repeated measures ANOVA analysis did not reveal any main effects for time (F=1.710, p=0.804), treatment (vitamin D3 vs placebo; F=1.471, p=0.94), or interaction effects for treatment by time (F= 0.293, p=0.999) for mean reaction time to random stimuli during the psychomotor vigilance test. Repeated measures ANOVA analysis did not reveal any main effects for time (F=0.530, p=0.999), treatment (vitamin D3 vs placebo; F=0.141, p=0.999), or interaction effects for treatment by time (F=0.784 p=0

  17. Next-generation personalised medicine for high-risk paediatric cancer patients - The INFORM pilot study.

    PubMed

    Worst, Barbara C; van Tilburg, Cornelis M; Balasubramanian, Gnana Prakash; Fiesel, Petra; Witt, Ruth; Freitag, Angelika; Boudalil, Miream; Previti, Christopher; Wolf, Stephan; Schmidt, Sabine; Chotewutmontri, Sasithorn; Bewerunge-Hudler, Melanie; Schick, Matthias; Schlesner, Matthias; Hutter, Barbara; Taylor, Lenka; Borst, Tobias; Sutter, Christian; Bartram, Claus R; Milde, Till; Pfaff, Elke; Kulozik, Andreas E; von Stackelberg, Arend; Meisel, Roland; Borkhardt, Arndt; Reinhardt, Dirk; Klusmann, Jan-Henning; Fleischhack, Gudrun; Tippelt, Stephan; Dirksen, Uta; Jürgens, Heribert; Kramm, Christof M; von Bueren, Andre O; Westermann, Frank; Fischer, Matthias; Burkhardt, Birgit; Wößmann, Wilhelm; Nathrath, Michaela; Bielack, Stefan S; Frühwald, Michael C; Fulda, Simone; Klingebiel, Thomas; Koscielniak, Ewa; Schwab, Matthias; Tremmel, Roman; Driever, Pablo Hernáiz; Schulte, Johannes H; Brors, Benedikt; von Deimling, Andreas; Lichter, Peter; Eggert, Angelika; Capper, David; Pfister, Stefan M; Jones, David T W; Witt, Olaf

    2016-09-01

    The 'Individualized Therapy for Relapsed Malignancies in Childhood' (INFORM) precision medicine study is a nationwide German program for children with high-risk relapsed/refractory malignancies, which aims to identify therapeutic targets on an individualised basis. In a pilot phase, reported here, we developed the logistical and analytical pipelines necessary for rapid and comprehensive molecular profiling in a clinical setting. Fifty-seven patients from 20 centers were prospectively recruited. Malignancies investigated included sarcomas (n = 25), brain tumours (n = 23), and others (n = 9). Whole-exome, low-coverage whole-genome, and RNA sequencing were complemented with methylation and expression microarray analyses. Alterations were assessed for potential targetability according to a customised prioritisation algorithm and subsequently discussed in an interdisciplinary molecular tumour board. Next-generation sequencing data were generated for 52 patients, with the full analysis possible in 46 of 52. Turnaround time from sample receipt until first report averaged 28 d. Twenty-six patients (50%) harbored a potentially druggable alteration with a prioritisation score of 'intermediate' or higher (level 4 of 7). Common targets included receptor tyrosine kinases, phosphoinositide 3-kinase-mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, and cell cycle control. Ten patients received a targeted therapy based on these findings, with responses observed in some previously treatment-refractory tumours. Comparative primary relapse analysis revealed substantial tumour evolution as well as one case of unsuspected secondary malignancy, highlighting the importance of re-biopsy at relapse. This study demonstrates the feasibility of comprehensive, real-time molecular profiling for high-risk paediatric cancer patients. This extended proof-of-concept, with examples of treatment consequences, expands upon previous personalised oncology endeavors

  18. Next-generation personalised medicine for high-risk paediatric cancer patients - The INFORM pilot study.

    PubMed

    Worst, Barbara C; van Tilburg, Cornelis M; Balasubramanian, Gnana Prakash; Fiesel, Petra; Witt, Ruth; Freitag, Angelika; Boudalil, Miream; Previti, Christopher; Wolf, Stephan; Schmidt, Sabine; Chotewutmontri, Sasithorn; Bewerunge-Hudler, Melanie; Schick, Matthias; Schlesner, Matthias; Hutter, Barbara; Taylor, Lenka; Borst, Tobias; Sutter, Christian; Bartram, Claus R; Milde, Till; Pfaff, Elke; Kulozik, Andreas E; von Stackelberg, Arend; Meisel, Roland; Borkhardt, Arndt; Reinhardt, Dirk; Klusmann, Jan-Henning; Fleischhack, Gudrun; Tippelt, Stephan; Dirksen, Uta; Jürgens, Heribert; Kramm, Christof M; von Bueren, Andre O; Westermann, Frank; Fischer, Matthias; Burkhardt, Birgit; Wößmann, Wilhelm; Nathrath, Michaela; Bielack, Stefan S; Frühwald, Michael C; Fulda, Simone; Klingebiel, Thomas; Koscielniak, Ewa; Schwab, Matthias; Tremmel, Roman; Driever, Pablo Hernáiz; Schulte, Johannes H; Brors, Benedikt; von Deimling, Andreas; Lichter, Peter; Eggert, Angelika; Capper, David; Pfister, Stefan M; Jones, David T W; Witt, Olaf

    2016-09-01

    The 'Individualized Therapy for Relapsed Malignancies in Childhood' (INFORM) precision medicine study is a nationwide German program for children with high-risk relapsed/refractory malignancies, which aims to identify therapeutic targets on an individualised basis. In a pilot phase, reported here, we developed the logistical and analytical pipelines necessary for rapid and comprehensive molecular profiling in a clinical setting. Fifty-seven patients from 20 centers were prospectively recruited. Malignancies investigated included sarcomas (n = 25), brain tumours (n = 23), and others (n = 9). Whole-exome, low-coverage whole-genome, and RNA sequencing were complemented with methylation and expression microarray analyses. Alterations were assessed for potential targetability according to a customised prioritisation algorithm and subsequently discussed in an interdisciplinary molecular tumour board. Next-generation sequencing data were generated for 52 patients, with the full analysis possible in 46 of 52. Turnaround time from sample receipt until first report averaged 28 d. Twenty-six patients (50%) harbored a potentially druggable alteration with a prioritisation score of 'intermediate' or higher (level 4 of 7). Common targets included receptor tyrosine kinases, phosphoinositide 3-kinase-mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, and cell cycle control. Ten patients received a targeted therapy based on these findings, with responses observed in some previously treatment-refractory tumours. Comparative primary relapse analysis revealed substantial tumour evolution as well as one case of unsuspected secondary malignancy, highlighting the importance of re-biopsy at relapse. This study demonstrates the feasibility of comprehensive, real-time molecular profiling for high-risk paediatric cancer patients. This extended proof-of-concept, with examples of treatment consequences, expands upon previous personalised oncology endeavors

  19. Overexpression of ANXA1 in Penile Carcinomas Positive for High-Risk HPVs

    PubMed Central

    Calmon, Marilia Freitas; Mota, Mânlio Tasso de Oliveira; Babeto, Érica; Candido, Natália Maria; Girol, Ana Paula; Mendiburu, Carlos Fabian; Bonilha, Jane Lopes; Silvestre, Rodrigo Vellasco Duarte; Rosa, Bruno Miziara; Thomé, Jorge Alberto; Medeiros, Gustavo Hernandez Américo; Soares, Fernando Augusto; Guimarães, Gustavo Cardoso; de Arruda, José Germano Ferraz; Oliani, Sonia Maria; Villa, Luisa Lina; Vassallo, José; Rahal, Paula

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of penile cancer varies between populations but is rare in developed nations. Penile cancer is associated with a number of established risk factors and associated diseases including phimosis with chronic inflammation, human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, poor hygiene and smoking. The objective of this study was to identify genes related to this type of cancer. The detection of HPV was analyzed in 47 penile squamous cell carcinoma samples. HPV DNA was detected in 48.9% of penile squamous cell carcinoma cases. High-risk HPV were present in 42.5% of cases and low-risk HPV were detected in 10.6% of penile squamous cell carcinomas. The RaSH approach identified differential expression of Annexin A1 (ANXA1), p16, RPL6, PBEF1 and KIAA1033 in high-risk HPV positive penile carcinoma; ANXA1 and p16 were overexpressed in penile squamous cells positive for high-risk HPVs compared to normal penile samples by qPCR. ANXA1 and p16 proteins were significantly more expressed in the cells from high-risk HPV-positive penile carcinoma as compared to HPV-negative tumors (p<0.0001) independently of the subtype of the carcinoma. Overexpression of ANXA1 might be mediated by HPV E6 in penile squamous cell carcinoma of patients with high-risk HPVs, suggesting that this gene plays an important role in penile cancer. PMID:23341933

  20. Overexpression of ANXA1 in penile carcinomas positive for high-risk HPVs.

    PubMed

    Calmon, Marilia Freitas; Mota, Mânlio Tasso de Oliveira; Babeto, Érica; Candido, Natália Maria; Girol, Ana Paula; Mendiburu, Carlos Fabian; Bonilha, Jane Lopes; Silvestre, Rodrigo Vellasco Duarte; Rosa, Bruno Miziara; Thomé, Jorge Alberto; Medeiros, Gustavo Hernandez Américo; Soares, Fernando Augusto; Guimarães, Gustavo Cardoso; de Arruda, José Germano Ferraz; Oliani, Sonia Maria; Villa, Luisa Lina; Vassallo, José; Rahal, Paula

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of penile cancer varies between populations but is rare in developed nations. Penile cancer is associated with a number of established risk factors and associated diseases including phimosis with chronic inflammation, human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, poor hygiene and smoking. The objective of this study was to identify genes related to this type of cancer. The detection of HPV was analyzed in 47 penile squamous cell carcinoma samples. HPV DNA was detected in 48.9% of penile squamous cell carcinoma cases. High-risk HPV were present in 42.5% of cases and low-risk HPV were detected in 10.6% of penile squamous cell carcinomas. The RaSH approach identified differential expression of Annexin A1 (ANXA1), p16, RPL6, PBEF1 and KIAA1033 in high-risk HPV positive penile carcinoma; ANXA1 and p16 were overexpressed in penile squamous cells positive for high-risk HPVs compared to normal penile samples by qPCR. ANXA1 and p16 proteins were significantly more expressed in the cells from high-risk HPV-positive penile carcinoma as compared to HPV-negative tumors (p<0.0001) independently of the subtype of the carcinoma. Overexpression of ANXA1 might be mediated by HPV E6 in penile squamous cell carcinoma of patients with high-risk HPVs, suggesting that this gene plays an important role in penile cancer. PMID:23341933

  1. Engaging high-risk populations in community-level fitness promotion: ROCK! Richmond.

    PubMed

    Yancey, Antronette K; Jordan, Audrey; Bradford, Judith; Voas, Jeanette; Eller, Theresa J; Buzzard, Marilyn; Welch, Michael; McCarthy, William J

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether ROCK! Richmond, a healthy nutrition and physical activity promotion initiative of the Richmond (Virginia) City Department of Public Health was effectively recruiting the high-risk individuals for whom this lifestyle change intervention was intended. The effectiveness of recruitment, participant demographic and health status characteristics were compared with those of respondents to a random sample survey conducted 18 months earlier. Relatively high-risk residents were recruited. ROCK! Richmond participants were disproportionately African American and female, had significantly higher body mass indices (BMIs), and were more likely to report a family history of chronic disease. However, their employment, education, and income levels were higher than those of the citywide sample. Certain high-risk segments of the population were successfully reached and involved in community fitness activities. Different recruitment methods may need to be used to recruit more from among the lowest socioeconomic strata.

  2. Identifying Individual Risk Factors and Documenting the Pattern of Heat-Related Illness through Analyses of Hospitalization and Patterns of Household Cooling

    PubMed Central

    Schmeltz, Michael T.; Sembajwe, Grace; Marcotullio, Peter J.; Grassman, Jean A.; Himmelstein, David U.; Woolhandler, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Background As climate change increases the frequency and intensity of extreme heat events researchers and public health officials must work towards understanding the causes and outcomes of heat-related morbidity and mortality. While there have been many studies on both heat-related illness (HRI), there are fewer on heat-related morbidity than on heat-related mortality. Objective To identify individual and environmental risk factors for hospitalizations and document patterns of household cooling. Methods We performed a pooled cross-sectional analysis of secondary U.S. data, the Nationwide Inpatient Sample. Risk ratios were calculated from multivariable models to identify risk factors for hospitalizations. Hierarchical modeling was also employed to identify relationships between individual and hospital level predictors of hospitalizations. Patterns of air conditioning use were analyzed among the vulnerable populations identified. Results Hospitalizations due to HRI increased over the study period compared to all other hospitalizations. Populations at elevated risk for HRI hospitalization were blacks, males and all age groups above the age of 40. Those living in zip-codes in the lowest income quartile and the uninsured were also at an increased risk. Hospitalizations for HRI in rural and small urban clusters were elevated, compared to urban areas. Conclusions Risk factors for HRI include age greater than 40, male gender and hospitalization in rural areas or small urban clusters. Our analysis also revealed an increasing pattern of HRI hospitalizations over time and decreased association between common comorbidities and heat illnesses which may be indicative of underreporting. PMID:25742021

  3. Language Deficits in Children at High Risk for Drug Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Najam, Najma; Tarter, Ralph E.; Kirisci, Levent

    1997-01-01

    Compared the language capacities of children at high risk for substance abuse to low-risk children to uncover focal areas of deficit. Results indicate that high-risk subjects' performance was significantly poorer on several measures of language ability. Findings suggest that poor language mediation increases the risk for substance abuse. (RJM)

  4. 15 CFR 14.14 - High risk special award conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false High risk special award conditions. 14.14 Section 14.14 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce UNIFORM...-PROFIT, AND COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Pre-Award Requirements § 14.14 High risk special award...

  5. 40 CFR 35.6790 - High risk recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... described in 40 CFR 31.12. Requirements for Administering a Superfund State Contract (SSC) ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false High risk recipients. 35.6790 Section... Actions Other Administrative Requirements for Cooperative Agreements § 35.6790 High risk recipients....

  6. Combined blockade of VEGFR-3 and VLA-1 markedly promotes high-risk corneal transplant survival.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Grimaldo, Sammy; Yuen, Don; Chen, Lu

    2011-08-01

    PURPOSE. High-risk corneal transplantation refers to grafting performed on inflamed and highly vascularized host beds. It represents a clinical dilemma because the rejection rate can be as high as 90%, irrespective of current treatment modalities. This study was conducted to investigate whether combined blockade of VEGFR-3 (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3) and VLA-1 (very late antigen-1) promotes high-risk transplant survival and how it correlates with corneal lymphangiogenesis and hemangiogenesis before and after transplantation. METHODS. High-risk corneal transplantation was performed between normal C57BL/6 (donor) and inflamed BALB/c (recipient) mice. The recipients were randomized to receive intraperitoneal injections of VEGFR-3 and VLA-1-neutralizing antibodies or their controls twice a week for up to 8 weeks after transplantation. Corneal grafts were evaluated by ophthalmic slit-lamp biomicroscopy and analyzed by Kaplan-Meier survival curve. Additionally, whole-mount corneas before and after transplantation were examined by immunofluorescent microscopic assays, and the correlation between lymphatic or blood vessel distribution and transplant outcome was analyzed. RESULTS. The combined blockade markedly promotes 90% survival of high-risk transplants. This strategy specifically modified host beds by selective inhibition of lymphangiogenesis but not hemangiogenesis. A strong correlation was also identified between high-risk transplant rejection and severe lymphatic invasion reaching the donor-graft border. CONCLUSIONS. These novel findings not only provide a new and potentially powerful strategy to promote high-risk transplant survival, they also confirm a critical role of high-degree lymphangiogenesis in mediating high-risk transplant rejection. Results from this study may also shed new light on our understanding and management of other lymphatic- and immune-related diseases in general. PMID:21715348

  7. Antecedents of Compliance in 2-Year-Olds From a High-Risk Sample.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Martha Farrell; Crichton, Leslie

    In order to identify antecedents of infant's compliance with mothers' directions on how to solve four tasks (graded in terms of stressfulness to the infant), 194 high-risk mothers and their 2-year-old children were observed on videotape and assessed with a six-point rating scale. Data collected prenatally and postnatally at 3, 6, 12 and 18 months…

  8. Comparing Criteria for Attachment Disorders: Establishing Reliability and Validity in High-Risk Samples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boris, Neil W.; Hinshaw-Fuselier, Sarah S.; Smyke, Anna T.; Scheeringa, Michael S.; Heller, Sherryl S.; Zeanah, Charles H.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether published subtypes of attachment disorder can be reliably identified by trained clinicians reviewing data from high-risk populations and to investigate the relationship between disorder classification and standardized measures of attachment behavior. Method: Twenty or more children aged 18 to 48 months and their…

  9. Promising Urinary Protein Biomarkers for the Early Detection of Hepatocellular Carcinoma among High-Risk Hepatitis C Virus Egyptian Patients.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, Moemen Ak; Haj-Ahmad, Yousef

    2012-01-01

    Hepatocellular Carcinoma is a major healthcare problem, representing the third most common cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. There are 130 million Hepatitis C virus infected patients worldwide who are at a high-risk for developing Hepatocellular Carcinoma. Due to the fact that reliable parameters and/or tools for the early detection of Hepatocellular Carcinoma among high-risk individuals are severely lacking, Hepatocellular Carcinoma patients are always diagnosed at a late stage where surgical solutions or effective treatment are not possible. Urine was collected from 106 Hepatitis C infected patients patients, 32 of whom had already developed Hepatocellular Carcinoma and 74 patients who were diagnosed as Hepatocellular Carcinoma -free at the time of initial sample collection. In addition to these patients, urine samples were also collected from 12 healthy control individuals. Total urinary proteins were isolated from the urine samples and LC-MS/MS was used to identify potential protein HCC biomarker candidates. This was followed by validating relative expression levels of proteins present in urine among all the patients using quantitative real time-PCR. This approach revealed that significant over-expression of three proteins: DJ-1, Chromatin Assembly Factor-1 (CAF-1) and Heat Shock Protein 60 (HSP60), was a characteristic event among Hepatocellular Carcinoma - post Hepatitis C virus infected patients. As a single-based Hepatocellular Carcinoma biomarker, CAF-1 over-expression identified Hepatocellular Carcinoma among Hepatitis C virus infected patients with a specificity of 90%, sensitivity of 66% and with an overall diagnostic accuracy of 78%. Moreover, the CAF-1/HSP60 tandem identified Hepatocellular Carcinoma among Hepatitis C virus infected patients with a specificity of 92%, sensitivity of 61% and with an overall diagnostic accuracy of 77%. PMID:23074380

  10. Decontamination of High-risk Animal and Zoonotic Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Menrath, Andrea; Tomuzia, Katharina; Braeunig, Juliane; Appel, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    Preparedness for the decontamination of affected environments, premises, facilities, and products is one prerequisite for an immediate response to an animal disease outbreak. Various information sources provide recommendations on how to proceed in an outbreak situation to eliminate biological contaminants and to stop the spread of the disease. In order to facilitate the identification of the right decontamination strategy, we present an overview of relevant references for a collection of pathogenic agents. The choice of pathogens is based on a survey of lists containing highly pathogenic agents and/or biological agents considered to be potential vehicles for deliberate contamination of food, feed, or farm animals. European legislation and guidelines from national and international institutions were screened to find decontamination protocols for each of the agents. Identified recommendations were evaluated with regard to their area of application, which could be facilities and equipment, wastes, food, and other animal products. The requirements of a disinfectant for large-scale incidents were gathered, and important characteristics (eg, inactivating spectrum, temperature range, toxicity to environment) of the main recommended disinfectants were summarized to assist in the choice of a suitable and efficient approach in a crisis situation induced by a specific high-risk animal or zoonotic pathogen. The literature search revealed numerous relevant recommendations but also legal gaps for certain diseases, such as Q fever or brucellosis, and legal difficulties for the use of recommended disinfectants. A lack of information about effective disinfectants was identified for some agents. PMID:23971795

  11. Keeping High Risk Students in School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaser, Roberta E.; Kley, Raymond C.

    Ohio's Occupational Work Adjustment (OWA) program is a one- to two-year ungraded vocational program for fourteen- and fifteen-year-olds who have been identified as potential dropouts from the regular educational program. Begun on a pilot basis in 1967, OWA served over 80,000 students in 499 programs during the 1981-82 school year. The goal of OWA,…

  12. Comment on the article by Vázquez and Márquez-Garcia. High-risk vs. low-risk for thrombo-embolic events: who are in the intermediate-risk group? What should be done then?

    PubMed

    Benchimol-Barbosa, Paulo Roberto; Barbosa-Filho, José

    2008-03-14

    Although high risk and low risk profile for thrombo-embolic events have been extensively and intensively investigated in multi-centre trials and described in detail in atrial fibrillation guidelines, the management of those at otherwise intermediate risk is still a 'no-one's zone'. Individual risk profile is mandatory to identify those who will benefit of anti-coagulation therapy and large-scale clinical trials are still awaited to define efficacy and efficiency profile in intermediate-risk group.

  13. Molecular Characterization of High-Risk Human Papillomavirus in Women in Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina Faso.

    PubMed

    Traore, Ina Marie Angèle; Zohoncon, Théodora Mahoukèdè; Dembele, Adama; Djigma, Florencia W; Obiri-Yeboah, Dorcas; Traore, Germain; Bambara, Moussa; Ouedraogo, Charlemagne; Traore, Yves; Simpore, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is found in over 99% of cervical cancers. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of HPV in a population of women in Bobo-Dioulasso and to identify the high-risk types present in these women. From May to June, 2015, 181 women who came for consultation at the Souro Sanou University Hospital of Bobo-Dioulasso have been included in this study. Uterine endocervical swabs have been taken in these women. DNA obtained by extraction from the samples thus collected was used to determine the prevalence of high-risk human papillomavirus genotypes through real-time PCR. The age of the women ranged from 20 to 56 years with a mean of 35.3 ± 8.1 years. The prevalence of infection by high-risk HPV types was 25.4% (46/181). The most common high-risk HPV genotypes were HPV 39 (18.5%), HPV 52 (16.7%), HPV 18 (14.8%), and HPV 35 (13.0%). HPV 16 which is included in the HPV vaccines was not found in the population studied. This type of study which is the first one in Bobo-Dioulasso has showed a high prevalence of genotypes HPV 39, HPV 52, and HPV 35 which are not yet covered by a vaccine. PMID:27525275

  14. Molecular Characterization of High-Risk Human Papillomavirus in Women in Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Traore, Ina Marie Angèle; Dembele, Adama; Obiri-Yeboah, Dorcas; Traore, Germain; Bambara, Moussa; Ouedraogo, Charlemagne; Traore, Yves

    2016-01-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is found in over 99% of cervical cancers. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of HPV in a population of women in Bobo-Dioulasso and to identify the high-risk types present in these women. From May to June, 2015, 181 women who came for consultation at the Souro Sanou University Hospital of Bobo-Dioulasso have been included in this study. Uterine endocervical swabs have been taken in these women. DNA obtained by extraction from the samples thus collected was used to determine the prevalence of high-risk human papillomavirus genotypes through real-time PCR. The age of the women ranged from 20 to 56 years with a mean of 35.3 ± 8.1 years. The prevalence of infection by high-risk HPV types was 25.4% (46/181). The most common high-risk HPV genotypes were HPV 39 (18.5%), HPV 52 (16.7%), HPV 18 (14.8%), and HPV 35 (13.0%). HPV 16 which is included in the HPV vaccines was not found in the population studied. This type of study which is the first one in Bobo-Dioulasso has showed a high prevalence of genotypes HPV 39, HPV 52, and HPV 35 which are not yet covered by a vaccine. PMID:27525275

  15. Immunocombination therapy for high-risk neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kroesen, Michiel; Lindau, Dennis; Hoogerbrugge, Peter; Adema, Gosse J

    2012-02-01

    Neuroblastoma (NBL) is an aggressive malignancy of the sympathetic nervous system. Advanced-stage NBLs prove fatal in approximately 50% of patients within 5 years. Therefore, new treatment modalities are urgently needed. Immunotherapy is a treatment modality that can be combined with established forms of treatment. Administration of monoclonal antibodies or dendritic cell-based therapies alone can lead to favorable clinical outcomes in individual cancer patients; for example patients with melanoma, lymphoma and NBL. However, clinical benefit is still limited to a minority of patients, and further improvements are clearly needed. In this article, we review the most commonly used approaches to treat patients with NBL and highlight the prerequisites and opportunities of cell-based immunotherapy, involving both innate and adaptive immune-effector cells. Furthermore, we discuss the potential of the combined application of immunotherapy and novel tumor-targeted therapies for the treatment of both cancer in general and NBL in particular.

  16. Interpersonal sensitivity and functioning impairment in youth at ultra-high risk for psychosis.

    PubMed

    Masillo, A; Valmaggia, L R; Saba, R; Brandizzi, M; Lindau, J F; Solfanelli, A; Curto, M; Narilli, F; Telesforo, L; Kotzalidis, G D; Di Pietro, D; D'Alema, M; Girardi, P; Fiori Nastro, P

    2016-01-01

    A personality trait that often elicits poor and uneasy interpersonal relationships is interpersonal sensitivity. The aim of the present study was to explore the relationship between interpersonal sensitivity and psychosocial functioning in individuals at ultra-high risk for psychosis as compared to help-seeking individuals who screened negative for an ultra-high risk of psychosis. A total sample of 147 adolescents and young adult who were help seeking for emerging mental health problems participated in the study. The sample was divided into two groups: 39 individuals who met criteria for an ultra-high-risk mental state (UHR), and 108 (NS). The whole sample completed the Interpersonal Sensitivity Measure (IPSM) and the Global Functioning: Social and Role Scale (GF:SS; GF:RS). Mediation analysis was used to explore whether attenuated negative symptoms mediated the relationship between interpersonal sensitivity and social functioning. Individuals with UHR state showed higher IPSM scores and lower GF:SS and GF:RS scores than NS participants. A statistically negative significant correlation between two IPSM subscales (Interpersonal Awareness and Timidity) and GF:SS was found in both groups. Our results also suggest that the relationship between the aforementioned aspects of interpersonal sensitivity and social functioning was not mediated by negative prodromal symptoms. This study suggests that some aspects of interpersonal sensitivity were associated with low level of social functioning. Assessing and treating interpersonal sensitivity may be a promising therapeutic target to improve social functioning in young help-seeking individuals.

  17. High Risk Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: To Transplant or Not to Transplant?

    PubMed Central

    Pulsipher, Michael A.; Peters, Christina; Pui, Ching-Hon

    2010-01-01

    Because survival with both chemotherapy and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) approaches to high risk pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) generally improves through the years, regular comparisons of outcomes with either approach for a given indication are needed to decide when HSCT is indicated. Improvements in risk classification are allowing clinicians to identify patients at high risk for relapse early in their course of therapy. Whether patients defined as high risk by new methods will benefit from HSCT requires careful testing. Standardization and improvement of transplant approaches has led to equivalent survival outcomes with matched sibling and well-matched unrelated donors, however, survival using mismatched and haploidentical donors is generally worse. Trials comparing chemotherapy and HSCT must obtain sufficient data about therapy and stratify the analysis to assess the outcomes of best-chemotherapy with best-HSCT approaches. PMID:21195303

  18. An Association of Human Papillomaviruses Low Risk and High Risk Subtypes with Skin Tag

    PubMed Central

    Pezeshkpoor, Fakhrozaman; Jafarian, Amir Hossein; Ghazvini, Kiarash; Yazdanpanah, Mohammad Javad; Sadeghian, Ali; Esmaili, Habiballah; Karrabi, Maryam; Rohani, Fatemeh; Joushan, Bahareh

    2012-01-01

    Objective(s) Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are related to the genesis of various benign lesions and some malignant tumors, but no clear relationship has been identified so far between the subtypes of HPV and skin tag. Materials and Methods The present case-control study was designed to detect the existence of low risk and high risk HPV types in lesions of 50 patients with skin tag (case group) and normal skin around the melanocytic nevus of 30 patients (control group), using PCR. Results All of the samples were negative for HPV subtypes, except two samples in control group which were positive for high risk HPV. There was no significant relationship between the HPV subtypes and skin tag. Conclusion There is no association between skin tag and low risk and high risk human papillomaviruses. PMID:23493098

  19. Coordinating perioperative care for the 'high risk' general surgical patient using risk prediction scoring.

    PubMed

    Hafiz, Shaziz; Lees, Nicholas Peter

    2016-01-01

    Identifying 'high risk' (> 5% mortality score) emergency general surgical patients early, allows appropriate perioperative care to be allocated by securing critical care beds and ensuring the presence of senior surgeons and senior anesthetists intraoperatively. Scoring systems can be used to predict perioperative risk and coordinate resources perioperatively. Currently it is unclear which estimate of risk correlates with current resource deployment. A retrospective study was undertaken assessing the relationship between deployment of perioperative resources: senior surgeon, senior anesthetist and critical care bed. The study concluded that almost all high risk patients with high POSSUM mortality and morbidity scores had a consultant senior surgeon present intraoperatively. Critically unwell patients with higher operative severity and perioperative morbidity scores received higher care (HDU/ICU) beds postoperatively, ensuring that they received appropriate care if their condition deteriorated. Therefore POSSUM scoring should be used perioperatively in emergency cases to coordinate appropriate perioperative care for high risk general surgical patients. PMID:26901929

  20. Identifying Differentiation Stage of Individual Primary Hematopoietic Cells from Mouse Bone Marrow by Multivariate Analysis of TOF-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Data

    PubMed Central

    Frisz, Jessica F.; Choi, Ji Sun; Wilson, Robert L.; Harley, Brendan A. C.; Kraft, Mary L.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to self-renew and differentiate into multiple types of blood and immune cells renders hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) valuable for clinical treatment of hematopoietic pathologies and as models of stem cell differentiation for tissue engineering applications. To study directed HSC differentiation and identify the conditions that recreate the native bone marrow environment, combinatorial biomaterials that exhibit lateral variations in chemical and mechanical properties are employed. New experimental approaches are needed to facilitate correlating cell differentiation stage with location in the culture system. We demonstrate that multivariate analysis of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) data can be used to identify the differentiation state of individual hematopoietic cells (HCs) isolated from mouse bone marrow. Here, we identify primary HCs from three distinct stages of B cell lymphopoiesis at the single cell level: HSPCs, common lymphoid progenitors, and mature B cells. The differentiation state of individual HCs in a test set could be identified with a partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) model that was constructed with calibration spectra from HCs of known differentiation status. The lowest error of identification was obtained when the intra-population spectral variation between the cells in the calibration and test sets was minimized. This approach complements the traditional methods that are used to identify HC differentiation stage. Further, the ability to gather mass spectrometry data from single HSCs cultured on graded biomaterial substrates may provide significant new insight into how HSPCs respond to extrinsic cues as well as the molecular changes that occur during cell differentiation. PMID:22507202

  1. The Art of Athlete Leadership: Identifying High-Quality Athlete Leadership at the Individual and Team Level Through Social Network Analysis.

    PubMed

    Fransen, Katrien; Van Puyenbroeck, Stef; Loughead, Todd M; Vanbeselaere, Norbert; De Cuyper, Bert; Vande Broek, Gert; Boen, Filip

    2015-06-01

    This research aimed to introduce social network analysis as a novel technique in sports teams to identify the attributes of high-quality athlete leadership, both at the individual and at the team level. Study 1 included 25 sports teams (N = 308 athletes) and focused on athletes' general leadership quality. Study 2 comprised 21 sports teams (N = 267 athletes) and focused on athletes' specific leadership quality as a task, motivational, social, and external leader. The extent to which athletes felt connected with their leader proved to be most predictive for athletes' perceptions of that leader's quality on each leadership role. Also at the team level, teams with higher athlete leadership quality were more strongly connected. We conclude that social network analysis constitutes a valuable tool to provide more insight in the attributes of high-quality leadership both at the individual and at the team level.

  2. Pneumococcal vaccination in a remote population of high-risk Alaska Natives.

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, M; Chamblee, C; Campbell, H G; Bulkow, L R; Taylor, G E; Lanier, A P; Berner, J; Spika, J S; Williams, W W; Middaugh, J P

    1993-01-01

    In response to an increasing prevalence of serious pneumococcal disease among adult Alaska Natives of northwest Alaska, a 3-year program was begun in 1987 to identify residents of that remote region who were at high risk for developing invasive pneumococcal disease, to determine their pneumococcal vaccination status, and to deliver vaccine to at least 80 percent of those at risk. After reviewing public health nursing and Indian Health Service data bases, the authors identified 1,337 persons, 20 percent of the 6,692 residents of the region, at high risk for invasive pneumococcal infection, defined either by having a specific chronic disease or by age criteria. Cardiovascular disease and alcoholism were the two most common chronic diseases. Only 30 percent of those determined to be at high risk had received one or more doses of pneumococcal vaccine previously. Half of those persons had received their most recent vaccination 6 or more years earlier. The program used both customary and innovative methods to deliver 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine to 1,046 of those at high risk (78 percent), including 388 persons who were revaccinated. At the completion of the project, 1,123 persons, 84 percent of those at high risk, had received at least 1 dose. They included 1,088 persons, 81 percent of those at high risk, with vaccination within the previous 5 years as a result of the project, compared with a 15-percent rate prior to the vaccination phase of the project. The program demonstrated that high levels of vaccination against pneumococcal disease, exceeding Year 2000 objectives of 60 percent, are attainable in a remote rural Alaskan population. PMID:8341777

  3. Application and Validation of Case-Finding Algorithms for Identifying Individuals with Human Immunodeficiency Virus from Administrative Data in British Columbia, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Nosyk, Bohdan; Colley, Guillaume; Yip, Benita; Chan, Keith; Heath, Katherine; Lima, Viviane D.; Gilbert, Mark; Hogg, Robert S.; Harrigan, P. Richard; Montaner, Julio S. G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To define a population-level cohort of individuals infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in the province of British Columbia from available registries and administrative datasets using a validated case-finding algorithm. Methods Individuals were identified for possible cohort inclusion from the BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS (CfE) drug treatment program (antiretroviral therapy) and laboratory testing datasets (plasma viral load (pVL) and CD4 diagnostic test results), the BC Centre for Disease Control (CDC) provincial HIV surveillance database (positive HIV tests), as well as databases held by the BC Ministry of Health (MoH); the Discharge Abstract Database (hospitalizations), the Medical Services Plan (physician billing) and PharmaNet databases (additional HIV-related medications). A validated case-finding algorithm was applied to distinguish true HIV cases from those likely to have been misclassified. The sensitivity of the algorithms was assessed as the proportion of confirmed cases (those with records in the CfE, CDC and MoH databases) positively identified by each algorithm. A priori hypotheses were generated and tested to verify excluded cases. Results A total of 25,673 individuals were identified as having at least one HIV-related health record. Among 9,454 unconfirmed cases, the selected case-finding algorithm identified 849 individuals believed to be HIV-positive. The sensitivity of this algorithm among confirmed cases was 88%. Those excluded from the cohort were more likely to be female (44.4% vs. 22.5%; p<0.01), had a lower mortality rate (2.18 per 100 person years (100PY) vs. 3.14/100PY; p<0.01), and had lower median rates of health service utilization (days of medications dispensed: 9745/100PY vs. 10266/100PY; p<0.01; days of inpatient care: 29/100PY vs. 98/100PY; p<0.01; physician billings: 602/100PY vs. 2,056/100PY; p<0.01). Conclusions The application of validated case-finding algorithms and subsequent hypothesis

  4. Using risk to target HPV vaccines in high-risk, low-resource organizations.

    PubMed

    Small, Stephanie L; Sampselle, Carolyn M; Martyn, Kristy K; Dempsey, Amanda F

    2013-05-01

    Organizations in developed countries with limited financial resources may find it difficult to determine whether it is preferable to use these resources for HPV vaccination, management of HPV-related diseases, or a "hybrid" strategy, such as vaccinating only the highest risk individuals. We determined the organizational costs and clinical impacts of three different organizational approaches to female HPV vaccination in a low-resource setting, including vaccinating everyone, vaccinating no one, or vaccinating only those considered high-risk. To determine patients at highest risk, HPV risk factors were identified using information routinely gathered at the annual preventive maintenance visit. The three vaccination strategies were then compared using a decision tree analysis. The three strategies demonstrated very little difference in cost. However, the least expensive strategy was to vaccinate no one. In contrast, the strategy with the best clinical outcomes was for the organization to vaccinate everyone. Organizations with limited resources must decide how to best allocate these funds to provide the greatest clinical benefits. This study showed little difference in costs but improved clinical outcomes when using the universal HPV vaccination strategy. Thus, the improvement in clinical outcomes when vaccinating everyone may be worth the relatively small increase in cost of vaccinating everyone.

  5. Dealing with premature menopause in women at high-risk for hereditary genital and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Nappi, Rossella E; Cassani, Chiara; Rossi, Margherita; Zanellini, Francesca; Spinillo, Arsenio

    2016-10-01

    Risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy is the mainstay of ovarian cancer prevention in BRCA mutation carriers. However, premature menopause exerts many short and long-term consequences on the individual health that are preventable with a tailored approach. Even though our level of knowledge on BRCA1 and -2 mutation carriers is still in its infancy, the basic principles governing the management of menopausal symptomatology and the prevention of diseases should be applied, including the use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT), approximately until the age of 50. Indeed, short-term HRT significantly ameliorate quality of life and symptoms associated to vulvo-vaginal atrophy, without displaying an adverse effect on oncologic outcomes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers without a personal history of breast cancer. Premature menopause affects significantly also bone health, cardiovascular parameters and cognition. A standard of care is required in order to identify those women at higher risk of developing chronic conditions at midlife and beyond. Appropriate counseling on both hormonal and non-hormonal treatments is an essential part of a shared decision on the most effective management of women at high-risk for hereditary genital and breast cancer. PMID:26928421

  6. Automated analysis of free speech predicts psychosis onset in high-risk youths

    PubMed Central

    Bedi, Gillinder; Carrillo, Facundo; Cecchi, Guillermo A; Slezak, Diego Fernández; Sigman, Mariano; Mota, Natália B; Ribeiro, Sidarta; Javitt, Daniel C; Copelli, Mauro; Corcoran, Cheryl M

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Psychiatry lacks the objective clinical tests routinely used in other specializations. Novel computerized methods to characterize complex behaviors such as speech could be used to identify and predict psychiatric illness in individuals. AIMS: In this proof-of-principle study, our aim was to test automated speech analyses combined with Machine Learning to predict later psychosis onset in youths at clinical high-risk (CHR) for psychosis. Methods: Thirty-four CHR youths (11 females) had baseline interviews and were assessed quarterly for up to 2.5 years; five transitioned to psychosis. Using automated analysis, transcripts of interviews were evaluated for semantic and syntactic features predicting later psychosis onset. Speech features were fed into a convex hull classification algorithm with leave-one-subject-out cross-validation to assess their predictive value for psychosis outcome. The canonical correlation between the speech features and prodromal symptom ratings was computed. Results: Derived speech features included a Latent Semantic Analysis measure of semantic coherence and two syntactic markers of speech complexity: maximum phrase length and use of determiners (e.g., which). These speech features predicted later psychosis development with 100% accuracy, outperforming classification from clinical interviews. Speech features were significantly correlated with prodromal symptoms. Conclusions: Findings support the utility of automated speech analysis to measure subtle, clinically relevant mental state changes in emergent psychosis. Recent developments in computer science, including natural language processing, could provide the foundation for future development of objective clinical tests for psychiatry. PMID:27336038

  7. Alternative effector-function profiling identifies broad HIV-specific T-cell responses in highly HIV-exposed individuals who remain uninfected.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Riol, Marta; Llano, Anuska; Ibarrondo, Javier; Zamarreño, Jennifer; Yusim, Karina; Bach, Vanessa; Mothe, Beatriz; Perez-Alvarez, Susana; Fernandez, Marco A; Requena, Gerard; Meulbroek, Michael; Pujol, Ferran; Leon, Agathe; Cobarsi, Patricia; Korber, Bette T; Clotet, Bonaventura; Ganoza, Carmela; Sanchez, Jorge; Coll, Josep; Brander, Christian

    2015-03-15

    The characterization of host immune responses to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in HIV controllers and individuals with high exposure but seronegativity to HIV (HESN) is needed to guide the development of effective preventive and therapeutic vaccine candidates. However, several technical hurdles severely limit the definition of an effective virus-specific T-cell response. By using a toggle-peptide approach, which takes HIV sequence diversity into account, and a novel, boosted cytokine staining/flow cytometry strategy, we here describe new patterns of T-cell responses to HIV that would be missed by standard assays. Importantly, this approach also allows detection of broad and strong virus-specific T-cell responses in HESN individuals that are characterized by a T-helper type 1 cytokine-like effector profile and produce cytokines that have been associated with potential control of HIV infection, including interleukin 10, interleukin 13, and interleukin 22. These results establish a novel approach to improve the current understanding of HIV-specific T-cell immunity and identify cellular immune responses and individual cytokines as potential markers of relative HIV resistance. As such, the findings also help develop similar strategies for more-comprehensive assessments of host immune responses to other human infections and immune-mediated disorders. PMID:25249264

  8. Alternative Effector-Function Profiling Identifies Broad HIV-Specific T-Cell Responses in Highly HIV-Exposed Individuals Who Remain Uninfected

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Riol, Marta; Llano, Anuska; Ibarrondo, Javier; Zamarreño, Jennifer; Yusim, Karina; Bach, Vanessa; Mothe, Beatriz; Perez-Alvarez, Susana; Fernandez, Marco A.; Requena, Gerard; Meulbroek, Michael; Pujol, Ferran; Leon, Agathe; Cobarsi, Patricia; Korber, Bette T.; Clotet, Bonaventura; Ganoza, Carmela; Sanchez, Jorge; Coll, Josep; Brander, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The characterization of host immune responses to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in HIV controllers and individuals with high exposure but seronegativity to HIV (HESN) is needed to guide the development of effective preventive and therapeutic vaccine candidates. However, several technical hurdles severely limit the definition of an effective virus-specific T-cell response. By using a toggle-peptide approach, which takes HIV sequence diversity into account, and a novel, boosted cytokine staining/flow cytometry strategy, we here describe new patterns of T-cell responses to HIV that would be missed by standard assays. Importantly, this approach also allows detection of broad and strong virus-specific T-cell responses in HESN individuals that are characterized by a T-helper type 1 cytokine–like effector profile and produce cytokines that have been associated with potential control of HIV infection, including interleukin 10, interleukin 13, and interleukin 22. These results establish a novel approach to improve the current understanding of HIV-specific T-cell immunity and identify cellular immune responses and individual cytokines as potential markers of relative HIV resistance. As such, the findings also help develop similar strategies for more-comprehensive assessments of host immune responses to other human infections and immune-mediated disorders. PMID:25249264

  9. Alternative effector-function profiling identifies broad HIV-specific T-cell responses in highly HIV-exposed individuals who remain uninfected.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Riol, Marta; Llano, Anuska; Ibarrondo, Javier; Zamarreño, Jennifer; Yusim, Karina; Bach, Vanessa; Mothe, Beatriz; Perez-Alvarez, Susana; Fernandez, Marco A; Requena, Gerard; Meulbroek, Michael; Pujol, Ferran; Leon, Agathe; Cobarsi, Patricia; Korber, Bette T; Clotet, Bonaventura; Ganoza, Carmela; Sanchez, Jorge; Coll, Josep; Brander, Christian

    2015-03-15

    The characterization of host immune responses to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in HIV controllers and individuals with high exposure but seronegativity to HIV (HESN) is needed to guide the development of effective preventive and therapeutic vaccine candidates. However, several technical hurdles severely limit the definition of an effective virus-specific T-cell response. By using a toggle-peptide approach, which takes HIV sequence diversity into account, and a novel, boosted cytokine staining/flow cytometry strategy, we here describe new patterns of T-cell responses to HIV that would be missed by standard assays. Importantly, this approach also allows detection of broad and strong virus-specific T-cell responses in HESN individuals that are characterized by a T-helper type 1 cytokine-like effector profile and produce cytokines that have been associated with potential control of HIV infection, including interleukin 10, interleukin 13, and interleukin 22. These results establish a novel approach to improve the current understanding of HIV-specific T-cell immunity and identify cellular immune responses and individual cytokines as potential markers of relative HIV resistance. As such, the findings also help develop similar strategies for more-comprehensive assessments of host immune responses to other human infections and immune-mediated disorders.

  10. Treating Patients with High-Risk Smoldering Myeloma

    Cancer.gov

    In this phase III clinical trial, patients with smoldering myeloma classified as high risk for progression will be randomly assigned to undergo standard observation or six 4-week courses of treatment with the drug lenalidomide.

  11. [Anesthesiological management of the high-risk surgical patient].

    PubMed

    Bertoldi, G; Avalle, M

    1980-03-01

    Evaluation of the anaesthesiological risk in surgical patients is described and an account is given of results obtained with an association of ketamin and NLA II in 57 high-risk patients subjected to general surgical management.

  12. High-risk food consumption and food safety practices in a Canadian community.

    PubMed

    Nesbitt, Andrea; Majowicz, Shannon; Finley, Rita; Marshall, Barbara; Pollari, Frank; Sargeant, Jan; Ribble, Carl; Wilson, Jeff; Sittler, Nancy

    2009-12-01

    Understanding consumers' high-risk food consumption patterns and food handling in the home is critical in reducing foodborne illness. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of unsafe food practices of individuals in a Canadian-based population, specifically, high-risk food consumption and home food safety practices. During November 2005 to March 2006, a sample of 2,332 randomly selected residents of the Waterloo Region (Ontario, Canada) participated in a telephone survey of food consumption and food safety. Questions covered consumption of high-risk foods, hand washing practices, safe food handling knowledge, source of food safety education, meat thawing and cooking practices, cross-contamination after raw food preparation, and refrigeration temperatures. Certain high-risk food behaviors were common among respondents and were associated with demographic characteristics. In general, unsafe practices increased with increasing total annual household income level. Males were more likely to report engaging in risky practices than were females. Specific high-risk behaviors of public health concern were reported by elderly individuals (e.g., consuming undercooked eggs), children (e.g., consuming chicken nuggets), and rural residents (e.g., drinking unpasteurized milk). Respondents appeared to know proper food safety practices, but did not put them into practice. Thus, educational programs emphasizing specific practices to improve food safety should be directed to targeted audiences, and they should stress the importance of consumer behavior in the safety of foods prepared at home. Further investigation of consumer perceptions is needed to design such programs to effectively increase the implementation of safe food practices by consumers.

  13. Contemporary therapeutic options for children with high risk neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Sterba, J

    2002-01-01

    Despite the use of aggressive chemotherapy, stage 4 high risk neuroblastoma still has a very poor prognosis, which is estimated at 25%. Therefore, novel treatment approaches are needed. Increasing number of reports has been concerned with the use of novel treatment modalities. Literature regarding intensive induction, local therapy, myeloablative therapy and immunotherapy and biotherapy was reviewed in order to draw conclusions and recommendations for the management of children with high risk neuroblastic tumors.

  14. Mutational analysis of the breast cancer susceptibility gene BRIP1 /BACH1/FANCJ in high-risk non-BRCA1/BRCA2 breast cancer families.

    PubMed

    Guénard, Frédéric; Labrie, Yvan; Ouellette, Geneviève; Joly Beauparlant, Charles; Simard, Jacques; Durocher, Francine

    2008-01-01

    The BRIP1 gene encodes a helicase interacting with BRCA1, which contributes to BRCA1-associated DNA repair function. Germ-line BRIP1 mutations affecting the helicase domain activity have been identified in early onset breast cancer patients. In addition, BRIP1 was recently identified as deficient in Fanconi anemia (FA) complementation group J. Given the growing evidence now linking BRCA1, BRCA2, and the FA pathway, as well as the involvement of FA proteins (BRCA2/FANCD1 and PALB2/FANCN) in breast cancer susceptibility, we sought to evaluate the contribution of FANCJ gene alterations regarding breast cancer susceptibility among our cohort of 96 breast cancer individuals from high-risk non-BRCA1/2 French Canadian families. No deleterious mutation, exon deletion, or retention of intronic portions could be identified. However, extensive analysis of the promoter and whole exonic and flanking intronic regions of FANCJ led to the identification of 42 variants, including 22 novel variants not previously reported, four of which were located in the promoter region. Transcription factors analysis revealed a potential involvement of FANCJ promoter variants in regulation of FANCJ expression, and reporter gene assays were performed. The allelic frequency was assessed in a cohort of 73 unaffected French Canadian individuals, and haplotype analysis and tagging single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) identification were also performed. Although our study unlikely involves FANCJ as a high-risk predisposition gene in non-BRCA1/2 high-risk French Canadian families, the possible association of FANCJ missense variants with phenotypes associated with FA, such as childhood cancer, cannot be excluded.

  15. Survival after partial and radical nephrectomy for high-risk disease: A propensity-matched comparison

    PubMed Central

    Maurice, Matthew J.; Zhu, Hui; Kim, Simon; Abouassaly, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Increasingly, partial nephrectomy has been applied to high-risk disease without evidence that its survival benefits can be extrapolated to this entity. We aimed to compare overall survival after partial vs. radical nephrectomy in patients with high-risk renal cell carcinoma. Methods: Using the National Cancer Data Base, we identified patients who underwent partial or radical nephrectomy for high-risk disease between 2003 and 2006. High-risk disease was defined as the presence of adverse pathological features within the primary tumour, namely high-grade or unfavourable histology, T3 stage, or both. After matching the partial and radical nephrectomy groups based on propensity scores, 1680, 276, and 76 patients with high-grade or unfavourable histology, T3 stage, or both adverse pathologic features, respectively, were available for analysis. Five-year overall survival was compared after partial vs. radical nephrectomy for each high-risk cohort using the Kaplan-Meier and log rank tests. Results: Partial nephrectomy was associated with a statistically significant improvement in five-year overall survival compared to radical nephrectomy for small tumours (median size 3.0 cm; interquartile range 2.1–4.5 cm) with high-grade or unfavourable histology (87% vs. 81%; p<0.01) or with pT3a stage (82% vs. 71%; p<0.01). For patients concomitantly harbouring both adverse pathologic features, no difference in survival was detected (p=0.21). Conclusions: Partial nephrectomy is associated with survival benefits in patients with adverse pathologic features, suggesting that renal preservation is not only safe, but also potentially beneficial for high-risk disease. Due to inherent selection bias associated with partial nephrectomy use, prospective validation of these findings is needed.

  16. Understanding the Importance of Gene and Environment in the Etiology and Prevention of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in High-Risk Populations

    PubMed Central

    Samsom, Marsha; Trivedi, Tushar; Orekoya, Olubunmi; Vyas, Shraddha

    2016-01-01

    Current literature focuses on the complications and treatment of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) while clustering environmental and genetic factors to explain the disease. Interventions proposed to reduce diabetes prevalence should focus predominantly on initiating active rapports of family members and promoting a more communication-oriented preventative approach between diabetics and non-diabetics. Due to varying risks in T2DM by race and ethnicity, these populations should follow race-appropriate guidelines to prevent further T2DM occurrence and complications. The review consists of information related to the genetic component of T2DM to help identify high-risk groups and focuses on the environmental aspect of the disease to help consider appropriate techniques to reduce disease burden. Genetic factors play important roles in the pathogenesis of diabetes and thus are an essential element of understanding the cause of the disease and possible methods of prevention. Focusing on high-risk groups with T2DM could have profound effects on the current health care situation. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology of diabetes in the United States and propose methods of preventing and delaying the development of T2DM in high-risk individuals. PMID:27376154

  17. The genetic landscape of high-risk neuroblastoma | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Abstract: Neuroblastoma is a malignancy of the developing sympathetic nervous system that often presents with widespread metastatic disease, resulting in survival rates of less than 50%. To determine the spectrum of somatic mutation in high-risk neuroblastoma, we studied 240 affected individuals (cases) using a combination of whole-exome, genome and transcriptome sequencing as part of the Therapeutically Applicable Research to Generate Effective Treatments (TARGET) initiative.

  18. Social Contexts of Remission from DSM-5 Alcohol Use Disorder in a High-Risk Sample

    PubMed Central

    McCutcheon, Vivia V.; Kramer, John R.; Edenberg, Howard J.; Nurnberger, John I; Kuperman, Samuel; Schuckit, Marc A.; Heath, Andrew C.; Bucholz, Kathleen K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Measures of social context, such as marriage and religious participation, are associated with remission from alcohol use disorders (AUD) in population-based and treatment samples, but whether these associations hold among individuals at high familial risk for AUD is unknown. This study tests associations of measures of social context and treatment with different types of remission from DSM-5 AUD in a high-risk sample. Methods Subjects were 686 relatives of probands (85.7% first-degree) who participated in a high-risk family study of alcohol dependence. All subjects met criteria for AUD at baseline and were re-interviewed 5 years later. Follow-up status was categorized as persistent AUD, high-risk drinking, remitted low-risk drinking, and abstinence. Social context measures were defined as stable or changing from baseline to follow-up, and their bivariate and multivariate associations with follow-up status were tested. Results At follow-up, 62.8% of subjects had persistent AUD, 6.4% were high-risk drinkers, 22.2% were remitted low-risk drinkers, and 8.6% were abstinent. Birth of first child during the interval was the only measure of social context associated with remitted low-risk drinking and was significant for women only. Abstinent remission was characterized by being stably separated or divorced for women, new marriage for both sexes, experiencing low levels of family support and high levels of friend support, and receiving treatment. High-risk drinkers were more likely than individuals with persistent AUD to have a stable number of children and to have been recently unemployed. Conclusions The social contexts accompanying different types of remission in this high-risk sample resemble those found in population-based and clinical samples. Low-risk drinkers resemble natural remitters from population-based samples who change their drinking habits with life transitions. Abstainers resemble clinical samples in marital context, support from friends, and

  19. Building an evidence-based multitiered system of supports for high-risk youth and communities.

    PubMed

    Kingston, Beverly E; Mihalic, Sharon F; Sigel, Eric J

    2016-03-01

    The mental, emotional and behavioral health problems of high-risk youth and youth living in high-risk communities are not inevitable and can be prevented. A shift from the nation's focus on treating disease and illness after it occurs to a concentrated effort on preventing the root causes of these problems is needed. Prevention science suggests a comprehensive multitiered approach that provides evidence-based prevention supports for children and youth at each developmental stage and across multiple social contexts is likely to result in the greatest health impact and return on investment. However, actually implementing this approach at a neighborhood level has remained a challenge and an ongoing research gap especially in high-risk communities. This article describes a process and provides a case study example for implementing a comprehensive, multitiered approach in a high-risk community. This includes assessing and prioritizing the specific needs of individuals and communities; selecting evidence-based programs based upon assessed needs; and creating a continuum of programs to improve the health and well-being of youth across developmental age spans, social contexts, and levels of risk. Operational details and challenges for organizing and implementing this comprehensive approach are also described. We estimate that the collective impact of a multitiered evidence-based approach, implemented with fidelity, could conservatively result in a 30 to 40% reduction in problem behaviors. (PsycINFO Database Record

  20. [Prophylaxis of venous thromboembolic disease in high-risk orthopedic surgery].

    PubMed

    Meza Reyes, Gilberto Eduardo; Esquivel Gómez, Ricardo; Martínez del Campo Sánchez, Antonio; Espinosa-Larrañaga, Francisco; Martínez Guzmán, Miguel Ángel Enrique; Torres González, Rubén; de la Fuente Zuno, Juan Carlos; Méndez Huerta, Juan Vicente; Villalobos Garduño, Enrique; Cymet Ramírez, José; Ibarra Hirales, Efrén; Díaz Borjón, Efraín; Aguilera Zepeda, José Manuel; Valles Figueroa, Juan Francisco; Majluf-Cruz, Abraham

    2012-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a worldwide public health problem, with an annual incidence of 1-2 cases/1,000 individuals in the general population and a 1-5% associated mortality. Orthopedic surgery is a major surgical risk factor for VTE, but the problem is more important for patients with hip and knee joint replacement, multiple traumatisms, severe damage to the spine, or large fractures. Thromboprophylaxis is defined as the strategy and actions necessary to diminish the risk of VTE in high-risk orthopedic surgery. Antithrombotics may prevent VTE. At the end of this paper, we describe a proposal of thromboprophylaxis actions for patients requiring high-risk orthopedic surgery, based on the opinion of specialists in Orthopedics and Traumatology who work with high-risk orthopedic surgery patients. A search for evidence about this kind of surgery was performed and a 100-item inquiring instrument was done in order to know the opinions of the participants. Then, recommendations and considerations were built. In conclusion, this document reviews the problem of VTE in high-risk orthopedic surgery patients and describes the position of the Colegio Mexicano de Ortopedia y Traumatología related to VTE prevention in this setting.

  1. Improving overall survival and overcoming adverse prognosis in the treatment of cytogenetically high-risk multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Mateos, María-Victoria; Gutierrez, Norma C.; Rajkumar, S. Vincent; San Miguel, Jesús F.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a heterogeneous disease with certain genetic features [eg, t(4;14), del17p] associated with worse outcome. The introduction of thalidomide, lenalidomide, and bortezomib has dramatically improved the outlook for patients with MM, but their relative benefit (or harm) for different genetic patient subgroups remains unclear. Unfortunately, the small number of patients in each subgroup frequently limits the analysis of high-risk patients enrolled in clinical trials. Strategies that result in survival of high-risk genetic subgroups approximating that of patients lacking high-risk features are said to overcome the poor prognostic impact of these high-risk features. This outcome has been difficult to achieve, and studies in this regard have so far been limited by inadequate sample size. In contrast, strategies that compare the survival of high-risk genetic subgroups randomized to different treatment arms can identify approaches that improve survival. This type of analysis is clinically useful, even if the absolute gains do not improve outcomes to levels seen in patients without high-risk cytogenetics. Reviewing available data in high-risk MM from this perspective, it appears that bortezomib has frequently been associated with improved survival, whereas thalidomide maintenance has sometimes been associated with a shorter survival. PMID:23165477

  2. Personal, Family, and Social Functioning among Older Couples Concordant and Discordant for High-Risk Alcohol Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Moos, Rudolf H.; Schutte, Kathleen K.; Brennan, Penny L.; Moos, Bernice S.

    2010-01-01

    Aims This study compares the personal, family, and social functioning of older husbands and wives concordant or discordant for high-risk alcohol consumption and identifies predictors of changes in concordance and high-risk consumption. Design, Participants, Measurements Three groups of couples were identified at baseline and followed 10 years later: (1) concordant couples in which husbands and wives engaged in low-risk alcohol consumption (N = 54), (2) concordant couples in which husbands and wives engaged in high-risk alcohol consumption (N = 38), and (3) discordant couples in which one partner engaged in high-risk alcohol consumption and the other partner did not (N = 75). At each follow-up, husbands and wives completed an inventory that assessed their personal, family, and social functioning. Findings Compared to the low-risk concordant group, husbands and wives in the high-risk concordant group were more likely to rely on tension-reduction coping, reported more friend approval of drinking, and were less involved in religious activities; however, they did not differ in the quality of the spousal relationship. The frequency of alcohol consumption declined among husbands in discordant couples, but not among husbands in concordant couples. Predictors of high-risk drinking included tension-reduction coping, friend approval of drinking, and, for husbands, their wives’ level of drinking. Conclusions High-risk and discordant alcohol consumption do not seem to be linked to decrements in family functioning among older couples in long-term stable marriages. The predictors of heavy alcohol consumption among older husbands and wives identify points of intervention that may help to reduce their high-risk drinking. PMID:20883458

  3. Identifying risk factors for progression to critical care admission and death among individuals with acute pancreatitis: a record linkage analysis of Scottish healthcare databases

    PubMed Central

    Mole, Damian J; Gungabissoon, Usha; Johnston, Philip; Cochrane, Lynda; Hopkins, Leanne; Wyper, Grant M A; Skouras, Christos; Dibben, Chris; Sullivan, Frank; Morris, Andrew; Ward, Hester J T; Lawton, Andrew M; Donnan, Peter T

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Acute pancreatitis (AP) can initiate systemic complications that require support in critical care (CC). Our objective was to use the unified national health record to define the epidemiology of AP in Scotland, with a specific focus on deterministic and prognostic factors for CC admission in AP. Setting Health boards in Scotland (n=4). Participants We included all individuals in a retrospective observational cohort with at least one episode of AP (ICD10 code K85) occurring in Scotland from 1 April 2009 to 31 March 2012. 3340 individuals were coded as AP. Methods Data from 16 sources, spanning general practice, community prescribing, Accident and Emergency attendances, hospital in-patient, CC and mortality registries, were linked by a unique patient identifier in a national safe haven. Logistic regression and gamma models were used to define independent predictive factors for severe AP (sAP) requiring CC admission or leading to death. Results 2053 individuals (61.5% (95% CI 59.8% to 63.2%)) met the definition for true AP (tAP). 368 patients (17.9% of tAP (95% CI 16.2% to 19.6%)) were admitted to CC. Predictors of sAP were pre-existing angina or hypertension, hypocalcaemia and age 30–39 years, if type 2 diabetes mellitus was present. The risk of sAP was lower in patients with multiple previous episodes of AP. In-hospital mortality in tAP was 5.0% (95% CI 4.1% to 5.9%) overall and 21.7% (95% CI 19.9% to 23.5%) in those with tAP necessitating CC admission. Conclusions National record-linkage analysis of routinely collected data constitutes a powerful resource to model CC admission and prognosticate death during AP. Mortality in patients with AP who require CC admission remains high. PMID:27311912

  4. Identifying the Barriers to Early Diagnosis and Treatment in Underserved Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and Their Families: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Elder, Jennifer Harrison; Brasher, Susan; Alexander, Beverly

    2016-06-01

    Clinical accounts indicate that disparities exist among families of children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), and that these disparities impede timely diagnosis and intervention. Furthermore, families living in rural areas are more likely to have reduced access to proper care and use alternative, unproven, and potentially harmful treatments. The purpose of this project was to begin addressing these needs by engaging providers and families of children with ASD living in rural and typically underserved areas. The investigators established a Community Advisory Board (CAB) of ASD professionals (e.g., community-based healthcare and service providers, director of a center for disabilities, psychologist, autism researcher, and special education professional). Next, they conducted four focus groups comprised of a total of 35 major stakeholders (e.g., individuals with ASD, parents of individuals with ASD, community-based healthcare and service providers, school teachers) to determine potential resources, barriers to early diagnosis/treatment, and alternative treatment use in children with ASD. Focus group sessions were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed by three trained independent coders. Community participants identified several barriers to early diagnosis and intervention, as well as a variety of alternative treatments used in children with ASD. Thematic analysis of focus group transcripts showed several overarching themes regarding barriers to early diagnosis and treatment. Findings from this study have implications for practice and future research. PMID:27070190

  5. Identifying the Barriers to Early Diagnosis and Treatment in Underserved Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and Their Families: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Elder, Jennifer Harrison; Brasher, Susan; Alexander, Beverly

    2016-06-01

    Clinical accounts indicate that disparities exist among families of children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), and that these disparities impede timely diagnosis and intervention. Furthermore, families living in rural areas are more likely to have reduced access to proper care and use alternative, unproven, and potentially harmful treatments. The purpose of this project was to begin addressing these needs by engaging providers and families of children with ASD living in rural and typically underserved areas. The investigators established a Community Advisory Board (CAB) of ASD professionals (e.g., community-based healthcare and service providers, director of a center for disabilities, psychologist, autism researcher, and special education professional). Next, they conducted four focus groups comprised of a total of 35 major stakeholders (e.g., individuals with ASD, parents of individuals with ASD, community-based healthcare and service providers, school teachers) to determine potential resources, barriers to early diagnosis/treatment, and alternative treatment use in children with ASD. Focus group sessions were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed by three trained independent coders. Community participants identified several barriers to early diagnosis and intervention, as well as a variety of alternative treatments used in children with ASD. Thematic analysis of focus group transcripts showed several overarching themes regarding barriers to early diagnosis and treatment. Findings from this study have implications for practice and future research.

  6. Movement Recognition Technology as a Method of Assessing Spontaneous General Movements in High Risk Infants

    PubMed Central

    Marcroft, Claire; Khan, Aftab; Embleton, Nicholas D.; Trenell, Michael; Plötz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Preterm birth is associated with increased risks of neurological and motor impairments such as cerebral palsy. The risks are highest in those born at the lowest gestations. Early identification of those most at risk is challenging meaning that a critical window of opportunity to improve outcomes through therapy-based interventions may be missed. Clinically, the assessment of spontaneous general movements is an important tool, which can be used for the prediction of movement impairments in high risk infants. Movement recognition aims to capture and analyze relevant limb movements through computerized approaches focusing on continuous, objective, and quantitative assessment. Different methods of recording and analyzing infant movements have recently been explored in high risk infants. These range from camera-based solutions to body-worn miniaturized movement sensors used to record continuous time-series data that represent the dynamics of limb movements. Various machine learning methods have been developed and applied to the analysis of the recorded movement data. This analysis has focused on the detection and classification of atypical spontaneous general movements. This article aims to identify recent translational studies using movement recognition technology as a method of assessing movement in high risk infants. The application of this technology within pediatric practice represents a growing area of inter-disciplinary collaboration, which may lead to a greater understanding of the development of the nervous system in infants at high risk of motor impairment. PMID:25620954

  7. Genomic strategy identifies a missense mutation in WD-repeat domain 65 (WDR65) in an individual with Van der Woude syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rorick, Nicholas K; Kinoshita, Akira; Weirather, Jason L; Peyrard-Janvid, Myriam; de Lima, Renata L L Ferreira; Dunnwald, Martine; Shanske, Alan L; Moretti-Ferreira, Danilo; Koillinen, Hannele; Kere, Juha; Mansilla, Maria A; Murray, Jeffrey C; Goudy, Steve L; Schutte, Brian C

    2011-06-01

    Genetic variation in the transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 6 (IRF6) causes and contributes risk for oral clefting disorders. We hypothesized that genes regulated by IRF6 are also involved in oral clefting disorders. We used five criteria to identify potential IRF6 target genes; differential gene expression in skin taken from wild-type and Irf6-deficient murine embryos, localization to the Van der Woude syndrome 2 (VWS2) locus at 1p36-1p32, overlapping expression with Irf6, presence of a conserved predicted-binding site in the promoter region, and a mutant murine phenotype that was similar to the Irf6 mutant mouse. Previously, we observed altered expression for 573 genes; 13 were located in the murine region syntenic to the VWS2 locus. Two of these genes, Wdr65 and Stratifin, met 4 of 5 criteria. Wdr65 was a novel gene that encoded a predicted protein of 1,250 amino acids with two WD domains. As potential targets for Irf6 regulation, we hypothesized that disease-causing mutations will be found in WDR65 and Stratifin in individuals with VWS or VWS-like syndromes. We identified a potentially etiologic missense mutation in WDR65 in a person with VWS who does not have an exonic mutation in IRF6. The expression and mutation data were consistent with the hypothesis that WDR65 was a novel gene involved in oral clefting. PMID:21574244

  8. Comparison of methods trial for high-risk HPV.

    PubMed

    Kurtycz, Daniel F I; Smith, Michele; He, Rong; Miyazaki, Kayo; Shalkham, John

    2010-02-01

    In efforts to improve service, we compared the performance of four methods of HPV detection: Invader HPV (Hologic), Hybrid Capture 2 (Qiagen), Inform HPV detection (Ventana), and standard PCR.Using blinded/de-identified cervical samples in Preservcyt (Hologic), we compared Ventana's Inform HPV Test, against Hologic's HPV Invader and PCR. In a separate evaluation, we compared Inform versus Invader versus hc2. Ventana employs in situ hybridization; Hologic's technology uses three specifically designed oligonucleotides and a fluorescent signal for detection. Qiagen's hc2 method incorporates enzyme-linked antibody detection of RNA-DNA hybrids. PCR testing was provided by Access Genetics (Minneapolis, MN). The United States Food and Drug Administration recently approved the Third Wave/Hologic Invader HPV high-risk test (rebranded as Cervista HPV HR Test).In this small study, involving a few hundred tests, Third Wave, Qiagen, and PCR tests were comparable. Kappa statistics comparing Third Wave to PCR and Third Wave to Qiagen were 0.88 and 0.74, respectively. Ventana's method did not correlate well with any of the other methods with Kappa's ranging from a low of 0.25 versus Qiagen to 0.31 versus PCR. Kappa statistics measure correlation and not accuracy of measurement.Although we felt that the specificity of our original HPV method, Ventana Inform was satisfactory and lowered our subsequent colposcopy rate, worries about its lower sensitivity caused us to look at other techniques. Other methods, PCR, hc2, and Invader, appeared comparable with one another in our series. We chose to implement the Third Wave test in our laboratory.

  9. Are MAO-A deficiency states in the general population and in putative high-risk populations highly uncommon?

    PubMed

    Murphy, D L; Sims, K; Eisenhofer, G; Greenberg, B D; George, T; Berlin, F; Zametkin, A; Ernst, M; Breakefield, X O

    1998-01-01

    Lack of monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) due to either Xp chromosomal deletions or alterations in the coding sequence of the gene for this enzyme are associated with marked changes in monoamine metabolism and appear to be associated with variable cognitive deficits and behavioral changes in humans and in transgenic mice. In mice, some of the most marked behavioral changes are ameliorated by pharmacologically-induced reductions in serotonin synthesis during early development, raising the question of possible therapeutic interventions in humans with MAO deficiency states. At the present time, only one multi-generational family and a few other individuals with marked MAO-A deficiency states have been identified and studied in detail. Although MAO deficiency states associated with Xp chromosomal deletions were identified by distinct symptoms (including blindness in infancy) produced by the contiguous Norrie disease gene, the primarily behavioral phenotype of individuals with the MAO mutation is less obvious. This paper reports a sequential research design and preliminary results from screening several hundred volunteers in the general population and from putative high-risk groups for possible MAO deficiency states. These preliminary results suggest that marked MAO deficiency states are very rare.

  10. Thromboembolism Prophylaxis in Hip Arthroplasty: Routine and High Risk Patients.

    PubMed

    Nam, Denis; Nunley, Ryan M; Johnson, Staci R; Keeney, James A; Clohisy, John C; Barrack, Robert L

    2015-12-01

    This study's purpose was to present the use of a risk stratification protocol in which "routine" risk patients receive a mobile compression device with aspirin and "high" risk patients receive warfarin for thromboprophylaxis after hip arthroplasty. 1859 hip arthroplasty patients were prospectively enrolled (1402 routine risk--75.4%, 457 high risk--24.6%). The cumulative rate of venous thromboembolism events was 0.5% in the routine versus 0.5% in the high-risk cohort within 6weeks postoperatively (P=1.00). Patients in the routine risk cohort had a lower rate of major bleeding (0.5% versus 2.0%, P=0.006) and wound complications (0.2% versus 1.2%, P=0.01). Use of our risk stratification protocol allowed the avoidance of more aggressive anticoagulation in 75% of patients while achieving a low overall incidence of symptomatic VTE. PMID:26182980

  11. Notification of workers at high risk: an emerging public health problem.

    PubMed Central

    Schulte, P A; Ringen, K

    1984-01-01

    During the last two decades, an increasing number of epidemiologic studies have found cohorts of workers to be at high risk of work-related chronic diseases, especially cancers. These studies frequently have led to the broad recognition of occupational hazards and eventually to the prevention of exposures to such hazards. Generally, however, the individual cohort members found to be at high risk have not been notified of study results, and programs of medical intervention or of palliative services directed at these individual workers have not been developed. Recently, the issue of whether or not workers have a right to be notified more directly about known health hazards to which they may have been exposed has emerged as a major, unresolved question in public health policy. Issues of concern include the criteria that should guide notifications; whom, when, and how to notify; and who should pay for notification and follow-up services. This commentary discusses the scientific, ethical, economic, and institutional aspects of worker notification, and describes three new demonstration projects that have provided notification and intervention for workers at high risk of bladder, colon, and lung cancer. PMID:6711724

  12. A Cost Analysis of a Pancreatic Cancer Screening Protocol in High-Risk Populations

    PubMed Central

    Bruenderman, Elizabeth; Martin, Robert CG

    2016-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer is the 4th leading cause of cancer death in the U.S. A screening protocol is needed to catch early stage, resectable disease. This study suggests a protocol for high-risk individuals and assesses the cost in the context of the Affordable Care Act. Methods Medicare and national average pricing were used for cost analysis of a protocol using MRI/MRCP biannually in high-risk groups. Results: ‘ Costs per year of life added’ based on Medicare and national average costs, respectively, are: $638.62 and $2542.37 for Peutz-Jehgers Syndrome, $945.33 and $3763.44 for Hereditary Pancreatitis, $1141.77 and $4545.45 for Familial Pancreatic Cancer and p16-Leiden mutations, and $356.42 and $1418.92 for new-onset diabetes over age 50 with weight loss or smoking. Conclusion A screening program using MRI/MRCP is affordable in high-risk populations. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force must reevaluate its pancreatic cancer screening guidelines to make screening more cost-effective for the individual. PMID:26003200

  13. Thought Disorder in Offspring of Schizophrenic Parents: Findings From the New York High-Risk Project

    PubMed Central

    Gooding, Diane C.; Coleman, Michael J.; Roberts, Simone A.; Shenton, Martha E.; Levy, Deborah L.; Erlenmeyer-Kimling, L.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of the present analyses was to examine the hypothesis that mild forms of thought disorder (TD) may serve as an indicator of genetic liability for schizophrenia. A subset of 232 subjects drawn from the New York High-Risk Project was used to compare individuals at high risk for schizophrenia (ie, offspring of parents with schizophrenia; n = 63) with 2 groups of individuals at low risk for schizophrenia (ie, offspring of parents with affective disorder [n = 52] and offspring of psychiatrically normal parents [n = 117]). Subjects were administered the Rorschach Inkblot Test, and their responses were assessed according to the Thought Disorder Index (TDI). The high-risk offspring displayed significantly more TD than the other 2 groups, as shown by significantly higher TDI scores. Moreover, they had more deviant verbalizations, according to their significantly higher scores on a composite Idiosyncratic Verbalizations score. As expected, the offspring who developed psychosis produced more TD in adolescence than those who did not develop psychosis. In the sample as a whole, TD scores during late adolescence/early adulthood were positively associated with schizotypal features during mid-adulthood. These findings support the assertion that the presence of TD serves as an endophenotypic marker of a schizophrenia diathesis. PMID:20554785

  14. Telomerase activation by genomic rearrangements in high-risk neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Peifer, Martin; Hertwig, Falk; Roels, Frederik; Dreidax, Daniel; Gartlgruber, Moritz; Menon, Roopika; Krämer, Andrea; Roncaioli, Justin L.; Sand, Frederik; Heuckmann, Johannes M.; Ikram, Fakhera; Schmidt, Rene; Ackermann, Sandra; Engesser, Anne; Kahlert, Yvonne; Vogel, Wenzel; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Thierry-Mieg, Jean; Thierry-Mieg, Danielle; Mariappan, Aruljothi; Heynck, Stefanie; Mariotti, Erika; Henrich, Kai-Oliver; Glöckner, Christian; Bosco, Graziella; Leuschner, Ivo; Schweiger, Michal R.; Savelyeva, Larissa; Watkins, Simon C.; Shao, Chunxuan; Bell, Emma; Höfer, Thomas; Achter, Viktor; Lang, Ulrich; Theissen, Jessica; Volland, Ruth; Saadati, Maral; Eggert, Angelika; de Wilde, Bram; Berthold, Frank; Peng, Zhiyu; Zhao, Chen; Shi, Leming; Ortmann, Monika; Büttner, Reinhard; Perner, Sven; Hero, Barbara; Schramm, Alexander; Schulte, Johannes H.; Herrmann, Carl; O’Sullivan, Roderick J.; Westermann, Frank; Thomas, Roman K.; Fischer, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a malignant paediatric tumour of the sympathetic nervous system1. Roughly half of these tumours regress spontaneously or are cured by limited therapy. By contrast, high-risk neuroblastomas have an unfavourable clinical course despite intensive multimodal treatment, and their molecular basis has remained largely elusive2–4. Here we have performed whole-genome sequencing of 56 neuroblastomas (high-risk, n = 39; low-risk, n = 17) and discovered recurrent genomic rearrangements affecting a chromosomal region at 5p15.33 proximal of the telomerase reverse transcriptase gene (TERT). These rearrangements occurred only in high-risk neuroblastomas (12/39, 31%) in a mutually exclusive fashion with MYCN amplifications and ATRX mutations, which are known genetic events in this tumour type1,2,5. In an extended case series (n = 217), TERT rearrangements defined a subgroup of high-risk tumours with particularly poor outcome. Despite a large structural diversity of these rearrangements, they all induced massive transcriptional upregulation of TERT. In the remaining high-risk tumours, TERT expression was also elevated in MYCN-amplified tumours, whereas alternative lengthening of telomeres was present in neuroblastomas without TERT or MYCN alterations, suggesting that telomere lengthening represents a central mechanism defining this subtype. The 5p15.33 rearrangements juxtapose the TERT coding sequence to strong enhancer elements, resulting in massive chromatin remodelling and DNA methylation of the affected region. Supporting a functional role of TERT, neuroblastoma cell lines bearing rearrangements or amplified MYCN exhibited both upregulated TERT expression and enzymatic telomerase activity. In summary, our findings show that remodelling of the genomic context abrogates transcriptional silencing of TERT in high-risk neuroblastoma and places telomerase activation in the centre of transformation in a large fraction of these tumours. PMID:26466568

  15. High-risk neuroblastoma: a therapy in evolution.

    PubMed

    Fong, Abraham; Park, Julie R

    2009-11-01

    High-risk neuroblastoma remains a therapeutic challenge for pediatric oncologists. It is becoming increasingly evident that conventional chemotherapeutics are approaching or perhaps have already attained their maximum therapeutic potential. The focus of this review is to summarize current therapies and bring to light some of the novel strategies for treating high-risk neuroblastoma. These rationally designed therapies include molecular- and immune-targeted agents in an attempt to exploit the biology of the neuroblastoma cell. These novel therapies are likely to pose a whole new set of challenges and questions and emphasize the need for continued enrollment of patients in therapeutic studies.

  16. High-risk oral human papillomavirus load in the US population, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Anil K; Graubard, Barry I; Pickard, Robert K L; Xiao, Weihong; Gillison, Maura L

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the association of demographic and behavioral factors with oral human papillomavirus (HPV) load for 18 high-risk types among 211 individuals with prevalent high-risk HPV within the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2009-2010. Factors independently associated with HPV load above the median included older age (odds ratio, 1.04 per year increase [95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.07]; P = .004) and intensity of current smoking (P for trend <.001). A marginally greater percentage of men than women had an HPV load above the median (55.7% vs 32.8%; P = .069), and HPV load increased marginally with increasing alcohol use (P for trend = .062). In conclusion, older age and current smoking are associated with a high oral load of high-risk HPV types among individuals with a prevalent infection.

  17. The influence of number of high risk factors on clinical outcomes in patients with early-stage cervical cancer after radical hysterectomy and adjuvant chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Soyi; Lee, Seok-Ho; Park, Chan-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prognosis according to the number of high risk factors in patients with high risk factors after radical hysterectomy and adjuvant chemoradiation therapy for early stage cervical cancer. Methods Clinicopathological variables and clinical outcomes of patients with FIGO (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics) stage IB1 to IIA cervical cancer who had one or more high risk factors after radical hysterectomy and adjuvant chemoradiation therapy were retrospectively analyzed. Patients were divided into two groups according to the number of high risk factors (group 1, single high risk factor; group 2, two or more high risk factors). Results A total of 93 patients were enrolled in the present study. Forty nine out of 93 (52.7%) patients had a single high risk factor, and 44 (47.3%) had two or more high risk factors. Statistically significant differences in stage and stromal invasion were observed between group 1 and group 2. However, age, histology, tumor size, and lymphovascular space invasion did not differ significantly between the groups. Distant recurrence occurred more frequently in group 2, and the probability of recurrence and death was higher in group 2. Conclusion Patients with two or more high risk factors had worse prognosis in early stage cervical cancer. For these patients, consideration of new strategies to improve survival may be worthwhile. Conduct of further clinical trials is warranted for development of adjuvant treatment strategies individualized to each risk group. PMID:27200308

  18. Why a national high-risk insurance pool is not a workable alternative to the marketplace.

    PubMed

    Hall, Jean P

    2014-12-01

    The Pre-Existing Condition Insurance Plan (PCIP) was a national high-risk pool established under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) to provide coverage for individuals with preexisting conditions who had been uninsured for at least six months. It was intended to be a temporary program: PCIPs opened in 2010 and closed in April 2014. At that point, those with preexisting conditions could shop for health insurance in the marketplaces, where plans are prevented from using applicants' health status to deny coverage or charge more. This issue brief draws on the PCIP experience to outline why national high-risk pools, which continue to be proposed as policy alternatives to ACA coverage expansions, are expensive to enrollees as well as their administrators and ultimately unsustainable. The key lesson--and the principle on which the ACA is built--is that insurance works best when risk is evenly spread across a broad population.

  19. Why a national high-risk insurance pool is not a workable alternative to the marketplace.

    PubMed

    Hall, Jean P

    2014-12-01

    The Pre-Existing Condition Insurance Plan (PCIP) was a national high-risk pool established under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) to provide coverage for individuals with preexisting conditions who had been uninsured for at least six months. It was intended to be a temporary program: PCIPs opened in 2010 and closed in April 2014. At that point, those with preexisting conditions could shop for health insurance in the marketplaces, where plans are prevented from using applicants' health status to deny coverage or charge more. This issue brief draws on the PCIP experience to outline why national high-risk pools, which continue to be proposed as policy alternatives to ACA coverage expansions, are expensive to enrollees as well as their administrators and ultimately unsustainable. The key lesson--and the principle on which the ACA is built--is that insurance works best when risk is evenly spread across a broad population. PMID:25532232

  20. Pittsburgh as a High Risk Population: The Potential Savings of a Personalized Dental Care Plan.

    PubMed

    Ng, Andrew J; Vieira, Alexandre R

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Little evidence exists for the current standard of two annual preventative care visits. The purpose of this study was investigate this claim by modeling the potential savings of implementing a personalized care plan for high risk individuals in the Pittsburgh region. Methods. Using radiographs from 39 patients in the University of Pittsburgh Dental Registry and DNA Repository database, two models were created to analyse the direct savings of implementing a more aggressive preventative treatment plan and to view the longitudinal cost of increased annual yearly visits. Results. There is a significant decrease (p < 0.001) between original and modeled treatment cost when treatment severity is reduced. In addition, there is a significant decrease in adult lifetime treatment cost (p < 0.001) for up to four annual visits. Conclusions. Patients in high risk populations may see significant cost benefits in treatment cost when a personalized care plan, or higher annual preventative care visits, is implemented. PMID:27006657

  1. Expression of individual mutations and haplotypes in the galactocerebrosidase gene identified by the newborn screening program in New York State and in confirmed cases of Krabbe's disease.

    PubMed

    Saavedra-Matiz, Carlos A; Luzi, Paola; Nichols, Matthew; Orsini, Joseph J; Caggana, Michele; Wenger, David A

    2016-11-01

    Newborn screening (NBS) for Krabbe's disease (KD) has been instituted in several states, and New York State has had the longest experience. After an initial screening of dried blood spots, samples from individuals with galactocerebrosidase (GALC) values below a given cutoff level were subjected to additional testing, including sequencing of the GALC gene. This resulted in the identification of mutations that had previously been found in confirmed KD patients and of variants that had never previously been reported. Some individuals had variants considered to be polymorphisms, alone or on the same allele as another mutation. To help with counseling of families on the risk for a newborn to develop KD, expression studies were conducted with these variants identified by NBS. GALC activity was measured in COS1 cells for 140 constructs and compared with mutations that had previously been seen in confirmed cases of KD. When a polymorphism was present on the same allele as the variant, expressed activity was measured with and without the polymorphism. In some cases the presence of the polymorphism greatly lowered the measured GALC activity, possibly making it disease causing. Although it is not possible to predict conclusively whether a variant is severe and will result in infantile KD if two such variants are present or whether a variant is mild and will result in late-onset disease, some variants clearly are not disease causing. This is the largest expression study of GALC variants/mutations found in NBS and confirmed KD cases. This work will be helpful for counseling families of screen-positive newborns found to have low GALC activity. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27638593

  2. Salmonella enterica Infections in the United States and Assessment of Coefficients of Variation: A Novel Approach to Identify Epidemiologic Characteristics of Individual Serotypes, 1996–2011

    PubMed Central

    Boore, Amy L.; Hoekstra, R. Michael; Iwamoto, Martha; Fields, Patricia I.; Bishop, Richard D.; Swerdlow, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite control efforts, salmonellosis continues to cause an estimated 1.2 million infections in the United States (US) annually. We describe the incidence of salmonellosis in the US and introduce a novel approach to examine the epidemiologic similarities and differences of individual serotypes. Methods Cases of salmonellosis in humans reported to the laboratory-based National Salmonella Surveillance System during 1996–2011 from US states were included. Coefficients of variation were used to describe distribution of incidence rates of common Salmonella serotypes by geographic region, age group and sex of patient, and month of sample isolation. Results During 1996–2011, more than 600,000 Salmonella isolates from humans were reported, with an average annual incidence of 13.1 cases/100,000 persons. The annual reported rate of Salmonella infections did not decrease during the study period. The top five most commonly reported serotypes, Typhimurium, Enteritidis, Newport, Heidelberg, and Javiana, accounted for 62% of fully serotyped isolates. Coefficients of variation showed the most geographically concentrated serotypes were often clustered in Gulf Coast states and were also more frequently found to be increasing in incidence. Serotypes clustered in particular months, age groups, and sex were also identified and described. Conclusions Although overall incidence rates of Salmonella did not change over time, trends and epidemiological factors differed remarkably by serotype. A better understanding of Salmonella, facilitated by this comprehensive description of overall trends and unique characteristics of individual serotypes, will assist in responding to this disease and in planning and implementing prevention activities. PMID:26701276

  3. Exploring Factors Associated with Recent HIV Testing among Heterosexuals at High Risk for HIV Infection Recruited with Venue-based Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Gwadz, Marya; Cleland, Charles M.; Jenness, Samuel M.; Silverman, Elizabeth; Hagan, Holly; Ritchie, Amanda S.; Leonard, Noelle R.; McCright-Gill, Talaya; Martinez, Belkis; Swain, Quentin; Kutnick, Alexandra; Sherpa, Dawa

    2016-01-01

    Annual HIV testing is recommended for high-risk populations in the United States, to identify HIV infections early and provide timely linkage to treatment. However, heterosexuals at high risk for HIV, due to their residence in urban areas of high poverty and elevated HIV prevalence, test for HIV less frequently than other risk groups, and late diagnosis of HIV is common. Yet the factors impeding HIV testing in this group, which is predominantly African American/Black and Latino/Hispanic, are poorly understood. The present study addresses this gap. Using a systematic community-based sampling method, venue-based sampling (VBS), we estimate rates of lifetime and recent (past year) HIV testing among high-risk heterosexuals (HRH), and explore a set of putative multi-level barriers to and facilitators of recent testing, by gender. Participants were 338 HRH African American/Black and Latino/Hispanic adults recruited using VBS, who completed a computerized structured assessment battery guided by the Theory of Triadic Influence, comprised of reliable/valid measures on socio-demographic characteristics, HIV testing history, and multi-level barriers to HIV testing. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with HIV testing within the past year. Most HRH had tested at least once (94%), and more than half had tested within the past year (58%), but only 37% tested annually. In both men and women, the odds of recent testing were similar and associated with structural factors (better access to testing) and sexually transmitted infection (STI) testing and diagnosis. Thus VBS identified serious gaps in rates of annual HIV testing among HRH. Improvements in access to high-quality HIV testing and leveraging of STI testing are needed to increase the proportion of HRH testing annually for HIV. Such improvements could increase early detection of HIV, improve the long-term health of individuals, and reduce HIV transmission by increasing rates of viral

  4. Contraceptive use and distribution of high-risk births in Nigeria: a sub-national analysis

    PubMed Central

    Akinyemi, Akanni; Adedini, Sunday; Hounton, Sennen; Akinlo, Ambrose; Adedeji, Olanike; Adonri, Osarenti; Friedman, Howard; Shiferaw, Solomon; Maïga, Abdoulaye; Amouzou, Agbessi; Barros, Aluisio J. D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Family planning expansion has been identified as an impetus to harnessing Nigeria's demographic dividend. However, there is a need for data to address pockets of inequality and to better understand cultural and social factors affecting contraceptive use and health benefits. This paper contributes to addressing these needs by providing evidence on the trends and sub-national patterns of modern contraceptive prevalence in Nigeria and the association between contraceptive use and high-risk births in Nigeria. Design The study utilised women's data from the last three Demographic and Health Surveys (2003, 2008, and 2013) in Nigeria. The analysis involved descriptive, bivariate, and multivariate analyses. The multivariate analyses were performed to examine the relationship between high-risk births and contraceptive use. Associations were examined using Poisson regression. Results Findings showed that respondents in avoidable high-risk birth categories were less likely to use contraceptives compared to those at no risk [rate ratio 0.82, confidence interval: 0.76–0.89, p<0.001]. Education and wealth index consistently predicted significant differences in contraceptive use across the models. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that women in the high-risk birth categories were significantly less likely to use a modern method of contraception relative to those categorised as having no risk. However, there are huge sub-national variations at regional and state levels in contraceptive prevalence and subsequent high-risk births. These results further strengthen evidence-based justification for increased investments in family planning programmes at the state and regional levels, particularly regions and states with high unmet needs for family planning. PMID:26562145

  5. Rates of fetal alcohol exposure among newborns in a high-risk obstetric unit.

    PubMed

    Goh, Y Ingrid; Hutson, Janine R; Lum, Lisa; Roukema, Henry; Gareri, Joey; Lynn, Hazel; Koren, Gideon

    2010-01-01

    Meconium fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) are sensitive and specific biomarkers for prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) in pregnancy. We recently reported a 2.5% rate of FAEE positive meconium in a general population sample of infants born in the region of Grey-Bruce, Ontario. Women in this region with high-risk pregnancies are transferred to a tertiary care facility in London, Ontario. The objective of this study was to determine, in a population-based sample, whether high-risk pregnancies are associated with an increased risk of in utero alcohol exposure. Grey-Bruce residents transferred to the high-risk obstetric unit of St. Joseph's Health Care in London, Ontario were identified and consented to this anonymous prevalence study. Meconium was collected and analyzed for FAEE using gas chromatography with mass spectrometry. The prevalence of FAEE positive meconium was compared with the population-based prevalence in the Grey-Bruce. Fifty meconium specimens were collected from August 1, 2006 to July 31, 2007. Fifteen (30%) specimens tested positive for FAEE. The results indicate that infants born in the high-risk obstetric unit had a 12-fold higher risk of screening positive for second and third trimester alcohol exposure compared with infants born in the general population of Grey-Bruce (relative risk=12.04, 95% confidence interval=6.40-22.65, P<.0001). These results suggest that the high-risk pregnancies should be screened for PAE and followed-up for potential diagnosis of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. PMID:20584588

  6. Haptoglobin phenotype is not a predictor of recurrence free survival in high-risk primary breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Gast, Marie-Christine W; van Tinteren, Harm; Bontenbal, Marijke; van Hoesel, René QGCM; Nooij, Marianne A; Rodenhuis, Sjoerd; Span, Paul N; Tjan-Heijnen, Vivianne CG; de Vries, Elisabeth GE; Harris, Nathan; Twisk, Jos WR; Schellens, Jan HM; Beijnen, Jos H

    2008-01-01

    Background Better breast cancer prognostication may improve selection of patients for adjuvant therapy. We conducted a retrospective follow-up study in which we investigated sera of high-risk primary breast cancer patients, to search for proteins predictive of recurrence free survival. Methods Two sample sets of high-risk primary breast cancer patients participating in a randomised national trial investigating the effectiveness of high-dose chemotherapy were analysed. Sera in set I (n = 63) were analysed by surface enhanced laser desorption ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF MS) for biomarker finding. Initial results were validated by analysis of sample set II (n = 371), using one-dimensional gel-electrophoresis. Results In sample set I, the expression of a peak at mass-to-charge ratio 9198 (relative intensity ≤ 20 or > 20), identified as haptoglobin (Hp) alpha-1 chain, was strongly associated with recurrence free survival (global Log-rank test; p = 0.0014). Haptoglobin is present in three distinct phenotypes (Hp 1-1, Hp 2-1, and Hp 2-2), of which only individuals with phenotype Hp 1-1 or Hp 2-1 express the haptoglobin alpha-1 chain. As the expression of the haptoglobin alpha-1 chain, determined by SELDI-TOF MS, corresponds to the phenotype, initial results were validated by haptoglobin phenotyping of the independent sample set II by native one-dimensional gel-electrophoresis. With the Hp 1-1 phenotype as the reference category, the univariate hazard ratio for recurrence was 0.87 (95% CI: 0.56 – 1.34, p = 0.5221) and 1.03 (95% CI: 0.65 – 1.64, p = 0.8966) for the Hp 2-1 and Hp 2-2 phenotypes, respectively, in sample set II. Conclusion In contrast to our initial results, the haptoglobin phenotype was not identified as a predictor of recurrence free survival in high-risk primary breast cancer in our validation set. Our initial observation in the discovery set was probably the result of a type I error (i.e. false positive). This study

  7. Psychiatric Symptoms and Community Violence among High-Risk Patients: A Test of the Relationship at the Weekly Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skeem, Jennifer L.; Schubert, Carol; Odgers, Candice; Mulvey, Edward P.; Gardner, William; Lidz, Charles

    2006-01-01

    Given the availability of violence risk assessment tools, clinicians are now better able to identify high-risk patients. Once these patients have been identified, clinicians must monitor risk state and intervene when necessary to prevent harm. Clinical practice is dominated by the assumption that increases in psychiatric symptoms elevate risk of…

  8. Post-Transplant Outcomes in High-Risk Compared with Non-High-Risk Multiple Myeloma: A CIBMTR Analysis.

    PubMed

    Scott, Emma C; Hari, Parameswaran; Sharma, Manish; Le-Rademacher, Jennifer; Huang, Jiaxing; Vogl, Dan; Abidi, Muneer; Beitinjaneh, Amer; Fung, Henry; Ganguly, Siddhartha; Hildebrandt, Gerhard; Holmberg, Leona; Kalaycio, Matt; Kumar, Shaji; Kyle, Robert; Lazarus, Hillard; Lee, Cindy; Maziarz, Richard T; Meehan, Kenneth; Mikhael, Joseph; Nishihori, Taiga; Ramanathan, Muthalagu; Usmani, Saad; Tay, Jason; Vesole, David; Wirk, Baldeep; Yared, Jean; Savani, Bipin N; Gasparetto, Cristina; Krishnan, Amrita; Mark, Tomer; Nieto, Yago; D'Souza, Anita

    2016-10-01

    Conventional cytogenetics and interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) identify high-risk multiple myeloma (HRM) populations characterized by poor outcomes. We analyzed these differences among HRM versus non-HRM populations after upfront autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (autoHCT). Between 2008 and 2012, 715 patients with multiple myeloma identified by FISH and/or cytogenetic data with upfront autoHCT were identified in the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research database. HRM was defined as del17p, t(4;14), t(14;16), hypodiploidy (<45 chromosomes excluding -Y) or chromosome 1 p and 1q abnormalities; all others were non-HRM. Among 125 HRM patients (17.5%), induction with bortezomib and immunomodulatory agents (imids) was higher compared with non-HRM (56% versus 43%, P < .001) with similar pretransplant complete response (CR) rates (14% versus 16%, P .1). At day 100 post-transplant, at least a very good partial response was 59% in HRM and 61% in non-HRM (P = .6). More HRM patients received post-transplant therapy with bortezomib and imids (26% versus 12%, P = .004). Three-year post-transplant progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) rates in HRM versus non-HRM were 37% versus 49% (P < .001) and 72% versus 85% (P < .001), respectively. At 3 years, PFS for HRM patients with and without post-transplant therapy was 46% (95% confidence interval [CI], 33 to 59) versus 14% (95% CI, 4 to 29) and in non-HRM patients with and without post-transplant therapy 55% (95% CI, 49 to 62) versus 39% (95% CI, 32 to 47); rates of OS for HRM patients with and without post-transplant therapy were 81% (95% CI, 70 to 90) versus 48% (95% CI, 30 to 65) compared with 88% (95% CI, 84 to 92) and 79% (95% CI, 73 to 85) in non-HRM patients with and without post-transplant therapy, respectively. Among patients receiving post-transplant therapy, there was no difference in OS between HRM and non-HRM (P = .08). In addition to

  9. Post-Transplant Outcomes in High-Risk Compared with Non-High-Risk Multiple Myeloma: A CIBMTR Analysis.

    PubMed

    Scott, Emma C; Hari, Parameswaran; Sharma, Manish; Le-Rademacher, Jennifer; Huang, Jiaxing; Vogl, Dan; Abidi, Muneer; Beitinjaneh, Amer; Fung, Henry; Ganguly, Siddhartha; Hildebrandt, Gerhard; Holmberg, Leona; Kalaycio, Matt; Kumar, Shaji; Kyle, Robert; Lazarus, Hillard; Lee, Cindy; Maziarz, Richard T; Meehan, Kenneth; Mikhael, Joseph; Nishihori, Taiga; Ramanathan, Muthalagu; Usmani, Saad; Tay, Jason; Vesole, David; Wirk, Baldeep; Yared, Jean; Savani, Bipin N; Gasparetto, Cristina; Krishnan, Amrita; Mark, Tomer; Nieto, Yago; D'Souza, Anita

    2016-10-01

    Conventional cytogenetics and interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) identify high-risk multiple myeloma (HRM) populations characterized by poor outcomes. We analyzed these differences among HRM versus non-HRM populations after upfront autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (autoHCT). Between 2008 and 2012, 715 patients with multiple myeloma identified by FISH and/or cytogenetic data with upfront autoHCT were identified in the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research database. HRM was defined as del17p, t(4;14), t(14;16), hypodiploidy (<45 chromosomes excluding -Y) or chromosome 1 p and 1q abnormalities; all others were non-HRM. Among 125 HRM patients (17.5%), induction with bortezomib and immunomodulatory agents (imids) was higher compared with non-HRM (56% versus 43%, P < .001) with similar pretransplant complete response (CR) rates (14% versus 16%, P .1). At day 100 post-transplant, at least a very good partial response was 59% in HRM and 61% in non-HRM (P = .6). More HRM patients received post-transplant therapy with bortezomib and imids (26% versus 12%, P = .004). Three-year post-transplant progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) rates in HRM versus non-HRM were 37% versus 49% (P < .001) and 72% versus 85% (P < .001), respectively. At 3 years, PFS for HRM patients with and without post-transplant therapy was 46% (95% confidence interval [CI], 33 to 59) versus 14% (95% CI, 4 to 29) and in non-HRM patients with and without post-transplant therapy 55% (95% CI, 49 to 62) versus 39% (95% CI, 32 to 47); rates of OS for HRM patients with and without post-transplant therapy were 81% (95% CI, 70 to 90) versus 48% (95% CI, 30 to 65) compared with 88% (95% CI, 84 to 92) and 79% (95% CI, 73 to 85) in non-HRM patients with and without post-transplant therapy, respectively. Among patients receiving post-transplant therapy, there was no difference in OS between HRM and non-HRM (P = .08). In addition to

  10. Individual and combined diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound diagnosis, ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration and polymerase chain reaction in identifying tuberculous lymph nodes in the neck.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Wook; Jung, Soo Jin; Ha, Tae Kwun; Park, Ha Kyoung

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of, both individually and in combination, ultrasound (US) diagnosis, US-guided fine-needle aspiration (US-FNA) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in diagnosing tuberculous lymph nodes in the neck (i.e., tuberculous cervical lymph nodes [TCLs]). Eighty-two patients who underwent US diagnosis, US-FNA and PCR for clinical suspicion of TCLs were enrolled. Of the 82 patients, 31 were confirmed as having TCLs. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values and accuracy of US diagnosis, US-FNA and PCR were 93.5%, 76.5%, 70.7%, 95.1% and 82.9%; 64.5%, 98.0%, 95.2%, 82.0% and 85.4%; and 100%, 96.1%, 93.9%, 100% and 97.6%, respectively. The diagnostic values of PCR alone and in combination with US-FNA were found to be higher than those of other methods. No US feature with high sensitivity and specificity was identified.

  11. The High-Risk (Disturbed and Disturbing) College Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollingsworth, Kathy R.; Dunkle, John H.; Douce, Louise

    2009-01-01

    The disturbed and disturbing college student causes the most vexing concerns for student affairs administrators. The Assessment-Intervention of Student Problems (AISP) model offers a useful and easily understood framework for dealing with the various challenges of this high-risk student population. This chapter focuses on changes that have…

  12. Prediction of Violence Perpetration Among High-Risk Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sussman, Steve; Skara, Silvana; Weiner, Michelle D.; Dent, Clyde W.

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To prospectively examine demographic background, personality, perceived environment, and behavior as violence perpetration predictors in emerging adulthood among high-risk adolescents using problem-behavior theory as a conceptual perspective. Methods: Self-report questionnaires were administered 5 years apart to 676 participants.…

  13. Early Identification of Educationally High Potential and High Risk Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keogh, Barbara K.; Smith, Carol E.

    Early identification of educationally high potential and high risk children was investigated by following the same 49 children from kindergarten entrance through grade five of a regular school program. Kindergarten predictive measures were the Bender Gestalt Test and teachers' evaluations; follow-up measures were yearly standard achievement test…

  14. High Risk Drinking among Non-Affiliated College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Margaret; Finneran, John; Droppa, Marj

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the high risk drinking practices of unaffiliated college students who are not involved in formal athletics, fraternities, or sororities. Using a qualitative research design, the investigators interviewed students at a northeast public college in fall 2010 to learn about unaffiliated students' drinking experiences and…

  15. Intervening with High-Risk Families via Infant Daycare.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramey, Craig T.; Farran, Dale C.

    A longitudinal study was conducted at the Frank Porter Graham Center NC to explore the use of educational day care and related services as a mechanism for preparing socially disadvantaged children for success in later public schooling. Infant children of mothers who met a criterion score on a high risk index were randomly assigned to either an…

  16. Troubled Relationships: High-Risk Latina Adolescents and Nonresident Fathers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Vera; Corona, Rosalie

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study explored 18 high-risk adolescent Latinas' perceptions of their relationships with nonresident fathers. A number of interrelated factors--early childhood memories, mothers' interpretations, and fathers' behaviors--shaped girls' perceptions, which in turn, influenced how they interacted with fathers. Some girls struggled to…

  17. Staying Alive! Training High-Risk Teams for Self Correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slack, Kelley; Noe, Raymond; Weaver, Sallie

    2011-01-01

    Research examining teams working in high-risk operations has been lacking. The present symposium showcases research on team training that helps to optimize team performance in environments characterized by life or death situations arising spontaneously after long periods of mundane activity by pulling experts from diverse areas of industry: space flight, health care, and medical simulation.

  18. Cumulative Experiences of Violence among High-Risk Urban Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Catherine A.; Boris, Neil W.; Heller, Sherryl Scott; Clum, Gretchen A.; Rice, Janet C.; Zeanah, Charles H.

    2008-01-01

    This study examines type-specific and cumulative experiences of violence among a vulnerable population of youth. Sixty high-risk, shelter-dwelling, urban youth were interviewed regarding their history of childhood maltreatment, exposure to community violence (ECV), and experience with intimate partner violence (IPV). Results show a high prevalence…

  19. Explorations in High-Risk Stimulation: Two Modalities in Mothering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gochman, Eva R. Grubler; Aisenstein, Clara

    An exploratory study of high-risk mothers' interactions with their infants studied modalities of stimulation; vestibular and auditory. It was hypothesized that stimulation would be lower for non-paranoid than for paranoid types, and than for control mothers. Mothers recruited from inner city gynecological clinics were screened for probable…

  20. Prospective screening for deep vein thrombosis in high risk patients.

    PubMed

    Barnes, R W

    1977-08-01

    In 257 patients undergoing total hip replacement, gastric bypass for morbid obesity, major abdominal surgery, and major leg amputation, Doppler ultrasonic screening revealed only five instances of deep vein thrombosis. The present study suggests that Doppler screening of high risk patients is a useful alternative to routine anticoagulant prophylaxis of venous thromboembolic disease.

  1. [USA approval of high-risk medical device].

    PubMed

    Chang, Yongheng

    2013-03-01

    During the practice of supervision and management of medical device in different countries, the strict regulatory and needs of the program by the regulations is to be determined by the risk level of the medical equipment. This paper briefly describes the regulatory requirements of the United States to enter the market for high-risk medical device. PMID:23777072

  2. Biochemical profile and outcome in normal and high risk subjects.

    PubMed

    Vijayalaxmi, K G; Urooj, Asna

    2009-07-01

    The present study was carried out to assess the biochemical profile and outcome of pregnancy and study the adverse consequences if any, among normal and high risk pregnant women. The study group included 182 normal and 168 high risk cases attending to private and Government Hospitals in Bangalore. The high risk groups were: Pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH), gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), Adolescents and anemic cases. Lipid peroxidation was enhanced in PIH and GDM groups (5.56 nmol/ml and 3.98 nmol/ml) MDA values as compared to other groups. Vitamin E levels were significantly (p< 0.05) lower in PIH group (0.38 mg/dl) as compared to other groups. Caesarean as a mode of delivery indicating more number of complications were higher among GDM (61.9%) followed by PIH group. Incidences of low birth weight were observed more in PIH group. The study revealed occurrence of oxidative stress and adverse outcome among high risk pregnancy groups. PMID:23105848

  3. Simplified Berlin Questionnaire for Screening of High Risk for Obstructive Sleep Apnea Among Thai Male Healthcare Workers.

    PubMed

    Arunsurat, Itthiphat; Luengyosluechakul, Swita; Prateephoungrat, Krittin; Siripaupradist, Pittayapoom; Khemtong, Sukanya; Jamcharoensup, Kunranan; Thanapatkaiporn, Narin; Limpawattana, Panita; Laohasiriwong, Supawan; Pinitsoontorn, Somdej; Boonjaraspinyo, Sirintip; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak

    2016-09-01

    Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is a common disease associated with major cardiovascular diseases. Male subjects are more at higher risk for OSA than female subjects. The Berlin questionnaire is a beneficial screening tool for OSA and has 14 items. The Berlin questionnaire may need some adjustment for Thai or Asian populations. We aimed to find items that should be asked in the Berlin questionnaire to identify high risk for obstructive sleep apnea among Thai male healthcare workers. This study was performed in Thai male healthcare workers over the age of 35 and currently working at the Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University. The Thai version of the Berlin questionnaire was randomly distributed. A study population of 273 subjects was required to provide a confidence value of 95%. An item analysis of the Berlin questionnaire was evaluated as independent factors for being high risk of OSA by using a multivariate logistic regression analysis. Of the 273 distributed questionnaires, 135 subjects returned then (49.5% response rate). Of those, 41 (30.4%) were identified as being at high risk of OSA. Only three items of the Berlin questionnaire, including frequent snoring, high body mass index and hypertension, were independently associated with being at high risk for OSA. In conclusion, the Berlin questionnaire can be shortened to identify high risk for OSA by itself; not polysomnography. PMID:27627967

  4. Simplified Berlin Questionnaire for Screening of High Risk for Obstructive Sleep Apnea Among Thai Male Healthcare Workers.

    PubMed

    Arunsurat, Itthiphat; Luengyosluechakul, Swita; Prateephoungrat, Krittin; Siripaupradist, Pittayapoom; Khemtong, Sukanya; Jamcharoensup, Kunranan; Thanapatkaiporn, Narin; Limpawattana, Panita; Laohasiriwong, Supawan; Pinitsoontorn, Somdej; Boonjaraspinyo, Sirintip; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak

    2016-09-01

    Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is a common disease associated with major cardiovascular diseases. Male subjects are more at higher risk for OSA than female subjects. The Berlin questionnaire is a beneficial screening tool for OSA and has 14 items. The Berlin questionnaire may need some adjustment for Thai or Asian populations. We aimed to find items that should be asked in the Berlin questionnaire to identify high risk for obstructive sleep apnea among Thai male healthcare workers. This study was performed in Thai male healthcare workers over the age of 35 and currently working at the Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University. The Thai version of the Berlin questionnaire was randomly distributed. A study population of 273 subjects was required to provide a confidence value of 95%. An item analysis of the Berlin questionnaire was evaluated as independent factors for being high risk of OSA by using a multivariate logistic regression analysis. Of the 273 distributed questionnaires, 135 subjects returned then (49.5% response rate). Of those, 41 (30.4%) were identified as being at high risk of OSA. Only three items of the Berlin questionnaire, including frequent snoring, high body mass index and hypertension, were independently associated with being at high risk for OSA. In conclusion, the Berlin questionnaire can be shortened to identify high risk for OSA by itself; not polysomnography.

  5. Female seafarers adopt the high risk lifestyle of male seafarers

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, H. L.; Jensen, J.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the mortality of women in an occupation known to have a high mortality among men. METHODS: A total of 6788 female seafarers of all job categories who had been employed on Danish merchant ships, passenger ships, and privately owned ferries between 1986 and 1993, were followed up until the end of 1993. RESULTS: Standardised mortality ratio (SMR) was 1.20 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.89 to 1.58) for all causes of death and job categories together. For women in traditionally male jobs, SMR was 2.82 (1.41- 5.05), whereas galley and catering staff had SMRs close to the general female population. The high mortality among women in traditional male jobs could be explained by a high risk of fatal accidents including occupational accidents. In the whole cohort, there were fewer deaths from natural causes than expected but an excess risk of death due to lung cancer, heart diseases, and non-natural deaths. CONCLUSION: The increased mortality could primarily be explained by an excess risk of fatal accidents and suicide. Especially, female seafarers entering traditional male jobs had a high risk of fatal accidents, not only at sea but also ashore. An excess risk of dying of lung cancer and heart diseases probably reflects a high tobacco consumption. Female seafarers are probably influenced by their occupation towards hazardous behaviour and a high risk lifestyle but people with a high risk lifestyle may also be attracted by or forced into high risk jobs such as traditional male jobs at sea.   PMID:9536163

  6. Effect of Exposure to Suicidal Behavior on Suicide Attempt in a High-Risk Sample of Offspring of Depressed Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Ainsley K.; Galfalvy, Hanga; Everett, Benjamin; Currier, Dianne; Zelazny, Jamie; Oquendo, Maria A.; Melhem, Nadine M.; Kolko, David; Harkavy-Friedman, Jill M.; Birmaher, Boris; Stanley, Barbara; Mann, J. John; Brent, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Exposure to suicidal behavior in peers and relatives is thought to increase risk for suicidal behavior in vulnerable individuals, possibly as a result of imitation or modeling. This study examines exposure to suicidal behavior and likelihood of suicide attempt in a high-risk cohort of offspring of a depressed parent. Method: A total of…

  7. Blunted HPA Axis Activity in Suicide Attempters Compared to those at High Risk for Suicidal Behavior.

    PubMed

    Melhem, Nadine M; Keilp, John G; Porta, Giovanna; Oquendo, Maria A; Burke, Ainsley; Stanley, Barbara; Cooper, Thomas B; Mann, J John; Brent, David A

    2016-05-01

    Studies looking at the relationship of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis to suicidal behavior and its risk factors, such as depression, childhood abuse, and impulsive aggression, report inconsistent results. These studies also do not always differentiate between subjects who go on to attempt suicide, suicidal subjects who never attempted suicide, and non-suicidal subjects with psychiatric disorders. In this study, we examined cortisol responses to an experimental stressor, the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), in 208 offspring of parents with mood disorder. Offspring suicide attempters showed lower total cortisol output (β=-0.47, 95% CI (-0.83, -0.11), p=0.01) compared with offspring with suicide-related behavior (SRB) but never attempted, non-suicidal offspring, and a healthy control group. The result remained significant even after controlling for sex, age, race, ethnicity, site, socio-economic status, and hour of the day when the TSST was conducted. Suicide attempters also showed lower baseline cortisol before the TSST (β=-0.45, 95% CI (-0.74, -0.17), p=0.002). However, there were no significant differences between the groups on cortisol reactivity to stress (β=4.5, 95% CI (-12.9, 22), p=0.61). Although subjects with suicide attempt and SRB have similar clinical and psychosocial characteristics, this is the first study to differentiate them biologically on HPA axis indices. Blunted HPA axis activity may increase risk for suicide attempt among individuals with psychopathology by reducing their ability to respond adaptively to ongoing stressors. These results may help better identify subjects at high risk for suicidal behavior for targeted prevention and intervention efforts.

  8. [Parent-child-interaction based diagnostic in high risk families with infants and toddlers].

    PubMed

    Alpermann, Mechthild; Koch, Gabriele

    2007-01-01

    This article deals with methods and instruments used to identify high risk parents and early developing risks of infants and young children during the pre- and postnatal period in order to develop early intervention strategies based on early diagnosis in the context of parent-child-relationship. The specific experiences of our research approaches, funded by the German ministry of education and research (BMBF) from 2003 to 2007 at the University of Applied Sciences in Potsdam in cooperation with the parent counselling centre "Vom Säugling zum Kleinkind" are reflected. An interaction and communication focused strategy was developed to help to identify early development risks and resources in the parent-infant-relationship at the age of 0-3 years. After testing the diagnostical approach of this social-emotional development screening (SEE-0-3) in a current evaluation study on a high-risk-population, it was integrated as one module of early diagnosis into the early intervention program "STEEP--Steps toward effective and enjoyable parenting" which is based on the attachment theory. Using a concrete case it will first be discussed which kind of approaches to becoming parents with high risk factors can be developed on the basis of attachment reflecting acting and second which possibilities an interaction and video based concept could offer in the field of early diagnosis and intervention with families of infants and young children.

  9. Periodontal pocket as a potential reservoir of high risk human papilloma virus: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Dayakar, Manjunath Mundoor; Shipilova, Anna; Gupta, Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Human papilloma viruses (HPVs) are small DNA viruses that have been identified in periodontal pocket as well as gingival sulcus. High risk HPVs are also associated with a subset of head and neck carcinomas. HPV detection in periodontium has previously involved DNA detection. This study attempts to: (a) Detect the presence or absence of high risk HPV in marginal periodontiun by identifying E6/E7 messenger RNA (mRNA) in cells from samples obtained by periodontal pocket scraping. (b) Detect the percentage of HPV E6/E7 mRNA in cells of pocket scrapings, which is responsible for producing oncoproteins E6 and E7. Materials and Methods: Pocket scrapings from the periodontal pockets of eight subjects with generalized chronic periodontitis were taken the detection of presence or absence of E6, E7 mRNA was performed using in situ hybridization and flow cytometry. Results: HPV E6/E7 mRNA was detected in four of the eight samples. Conclusion: Presence of high risk human papillomaviruses in periodontal pockets patients of diagnosed with chronic periodontitis, not suffering from head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in the present day could link periodontitis to HPV related squamous cell carcinoma. Prevalence studies are needed detecting the presence of HPV in marginal periodontium as well as prospective studies of HPV positive periodontitis patients are required to explore this possible link. PMID:27143823

  10. An Educational System to Help Students Assess Website Features and Identify High-Risk Websites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kajiyama, Tomoko; Echizen, Isao

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to propose an effective educational system to help students assess Web site risk by providing an environment in which students can better understand a Web site's features and determine the risks of accessing the Web site for themselves. Design/methodology/approach: The authors have enhanced a prototype…

  11. Exploring physical exposures and identifying high-risk work tasks within the floor layer trade

    PubMed Central

    McGaha, Jamie; Miller, Kim; Descatha, Alexis; Welch, Laurie; Buchholz, Bryan; Evanoff, Bradley; Dale, Ann Marie

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Floor layers have high rates of musculoskeletal disorders yet few studies have examined their work exposures. This study used observational methods to describe physical exposures within floor laying tasks. Methods We analyzed 45 videos from 32 floor layers using Multimedia-Video Task Analysis software to determine the time in task, forces, postures, and repetitive hand movements for installation of four common flooring materials. We used the WISHA checklists to define exposure thresholds. Results Most workers (91%) met the caution threshold for one or more exposures. Workers showed high exposures in multiple body parts with variability in exposures across tasks and for different materials. Prolonged exposures were seen for kneeling, poor neck and low back postures, and intermittent but frequent hand grip forces. Conclusions Floor layers experience prolonged awkward postures and high force physical exposures in multiple body parts, which probably contribute to their high rates of musculoskeletal disorders. PMID:24274895

  12. Identifying infants at high-risk for second-hand smoke exposure

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, S. S.; Berkman, L.

    2013-01-01

    Background To examine the social determinants of infant smoke exposure and whether these associations vary by mothers’ smoking status and number of children in the household. Methods There were 135 278 mothers from 28 states who participated in the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System from 2000 to 2003. Results Overall 9.9% of mothers reported that her infant was in the same room as someone smoking for 1 or more hours per day. Among smoking households, infants with 1 or 2+ siblings were 25% and 59% more likely to be exposed to 1+ hours of second-hand smoke daily, respectively, than infants with no siblings. Conclusion Infants only a few months old are being exposed to second-hand smoke, particularly infants whose mother smokes and infants with siblings, indicating the importance of surveillance even for this young age group. PMID:23551113

  13. Is screening for pharyngeal Chlamydia trachomatis warranted in high-risk groups?

    PubMed

    Tipple, C; Hill, S C; Smith, A

    2010-11-01

    A recent survey reported that 36% of UK genitourinary medicine clinics offer testing for pharyngeal Chlamydia trachomatis (CT). Screening at this site is targeted at high-risk groups attending our centre, including female sex workers (FSWs) and male sex workers (MSWs). A total of 2406 patients were screened between November 2006 and October 2007. A retrospective case-note review was performed for positive cases. The prevalence of pharyngeal CT was 1.9% in both men and women. The mean number of sexual partners reported in the preceding three months was 168 and 56 for FSWs and MSWs, respectively. Lack of consistent condom use and high numbers of sexual partners identify this population as potential core transmitters of infection. While the British Association of Sexual Health and HIV (BASHH) guidelines do not recommend routine screening for pharyngeal CT, there may be a role in selected high-risk populations.

  14. Is screening for pharyngeal Chlamydia trachomatis warranted in high-risk groups?

    PubMed

    Tipple, C; Hill, S C; Smith, A

    2010-11-01

    A recent survey reported that 36% of UK genitourinary medicine clinics offer testing for pharyngeal Chlamydia trachomatis (CT). Screening at this site is targeted at high-risk groups attending our centre, including female sex workers (FSWs) and male sex workers (MSWs). A total of 2406 patients were screened between November 2006 and October 2007. A retrospective case-note review was performed for positive cases. The prevalence of pharyngeal CT was 1.9% in both men and women. The mean number of sexual partners reported in the preceding three months was 168 and 56 for FSWs and MSWs, respectively. Lack of consistent condom use and high numbers of sexual partners identify this population as potential core transmitters of infection. While the British Association of Sexual Health and HIV (BASHH) guidelines do not recommend routine screening for pharyngeal CT, there may be a role in selected high-risk populations. PMID:21187360

  15. [Research progress in roles of high-risk human papillomavirus E2 protein].

    PubMed

    Wu, En-Qi; Tang, Yuan-Yu

    2014-03-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is the principal cause of various cancers including cervical cancer, anal cancer, vulvar cancer, and some head and neck cancers. In the viral life cycle, by interacting with both viral and host DNA and proteins, the HPV E2 protein plays a pivotal role in viral transcriptional regulation and DNA replication, and it is also associated with modification of various cellular processes, including host gene transcription, RNA processing, apoptosis, ubiquitination, and intracellular trafficking, to create a convenient environment for a replicative cycle of the virus and contribute to the HPV pathogenesis. Elucidating the roles of E2 protein throughout the viral life cycle will improve our understanding of the viral life cycle and pathogenesis and help us identify novel antiviral agents with therapeutic potential. This article reviews the research progress in the structure, roles, and activity of high-risk HPV E2 protein, particularly that of HPV-16.

  16. Surveillance of Anaemia: Mapping and Grading the High Risk Territories and Populations

    PubMed Central

    Amirapu, Pallavi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Surveillance of anaemia is an ongoing process for assessing iron status and anaemia prevalence among individuals and the communities they live in. Measuring blood haemoglobin levels is the commonest method espoused worldwide for screening individuals and populations for anaemia and iron deficiency. World Health Organization (WHO) proposed a classification of public health significance of anaemia in populations on the basis of prevalence estimated from blood levels of haemoglobin. India falls under “Severe public health problem” category. An attempt has been made to categorise “Severe public health problem” into grades of severity that will help in prioritising the states and districts for targeted action. Aim To adapt the “WHO Classification of anaemia as a problem of public health significance” and to use the same to identify and map high risk population groups in the southern states of India. Materials and Methods The category of ’Severe Public Health Problem’ has been graded based on prevalence of anaemia. Secondary data published in the District Level Household and Facility Survey - 4 is analysed for five states and 1 UT (Union Territory) of southern part of India. Choropleth Mapping was done to visually depict the intensity of anaemia problem across the geographic territories. Results Children from 6 months to 59 months were having highest prevalence of both, anaemia (68%) and severe anaemia (10%). This was followed by pregnant women aged 15 to 49 years and Girl Child 6 to 9 years. Four of the Southern states of India including Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Telangana and Tamil Nadu fall in the Grade 2 SPHP (Severe Public Health Problem) Conclusion The sixteen districts fall under Grade 3 Severe Public Health Problem in the states of Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka and Telangana, require special focus for identifying and addressing the determinants of such high prevalence of Anaemia. These populations and territories require priority in the

  17. Social cognition in children at familial high-risk of developing an eating disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Radha; Barona, Manuela; Treasure, Janet; Micali, Nadia

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Diagnosis of an eating disorder (ED) has been associated with differences in social cognition. To date research investigating social cognition and ED has mainly employed patient and recovered samples. It is therefore unclear whether differences in social cognition are present prior to onset of ED, potentially contributing to development, or whether differences observed are a consequence of the disorder. We aimed to further explore whether individuals at high-risk for ED present social cognition characteristics previously found in ED groups. Methods: Our sample was drawn from a population-based cohort, the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). Data on maternal ED behaviors over the lifetime were collected through in-depth clinical interviews (n = 1128) conducted using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM disorders (SCID), and were used to categorize mothers according to ED behaviors over the lifetime: Restricting and Excessive Exercising (n = 58), Purging (n = 70), Binge-eating (n = 72), Binging and Purging (n = 66), no ED (n = 862). High-risk status of children was determined using these maternal lifetime behavioral phenotypes. Children at high-risk (maternal ED exposure) were compared to children at low-risk (born to mothers with no ED) on three measures of social cognition: the Social Communication Disorders Checklist (SCDC) (n = 922), the faces subtest of the Diagnostic Analysis of Non-Verbal Accuracy (DANVA) (n = 722), and the Emotional Triangles Task (n = 750). Results: Children at high-risk for ED showed poorer performance on measures of social cognition compared to children at low-risk. Maternal lifetime binge-eating, and maternal lifetime binging and purging were associated with poorer social communication in children (OR: 2.4, 95% CI: 1.0, 5.7, p = 0.05; and OR: 2.7, 95% CI: 1.1, 6.5, p = 0.03 respectively). Maternal binging and purging was also found to be associated with differential facial emotion processing and

  18. Validation of the High-Risk Pregnancy Stress Scale in a sample of hospitalized Greek high-risk pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Gourounti, Kleanthi; Karpathiotaki, Natassa; Karapanou, Vassiliki; Antzaklis, Panos; Daskalakis, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the authors in this study was to determine the psychometric properties of the Greek adaptation of the High-Risk Pregnancy Stress Scale (HRPSS) in a sample of high-risk hospitalized pregnant women. The sample consisted of 133 high-risk pregnant women with gestational age from 9 to 37 weeks. Data were collected between February and June of 2014. HRPSS was "forward-backward" translated from English to Greek. Principal axis factoring with promax rotation was used to test the factor structure of the HRPSS. Measures of state anxiety (STAI) and depressive symptoms (EPDS) were used to assess the convergent validity of the HRPSS. Exploratory factor analysis suggested three factors: concerns of pregnancy, movement restriction, and isolation and restriction of external activities. Construct validity was confirmed by computing correlations between the HRPSS and constructions of anxiety and depressive symptoms. Internal consistency reliability was satisfactory (α = 0.813). The original factor structure of the HRPSS was only partly replicated. The results of the exploratory factor analysis suggested that a three-factor solution instead of a two-factor solution would be the most adequate. The HRPSS is an appropriate measure for assessing the levels of concerns regarding pregnancy outcome, movement restriction, isolation, and external activity restrictions in Greek high-risk pregnant women.

  19. Comparison of risk assessment strategies for not-high-risk pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Hobohm, Lukas; Hellenkamp, Kristian; Hasenfuß, Gerd; Münzel, Thomas; Konstantinides, Stavros; Lankeit, Mareike

    2016-04-01

    We compared the prognostic performance of the 2014 European Society of Cardiology (ESC) risk stratification algorithm with the previous 2008 ESC algorithm, the Bova score and the modified FAST score (based on a positive heart-type fatty acid-binding protein (H-FABP) test, syncope and tachycardia, modified using high-sensitivity troponin T instead of H-FABP) in 388 normotensive pulmonary embolism patients included in a single-centre cohort study.Overall, 25 patients (6.4%) had an adverse 30-day outcome. Regardless of the score or algorithm used, the rate of an adverse outcome was highest in the intermediate-high-risk classes, while all patients classified as low-risk had a favourable outcome (no pulmonary embolism-related deaths, 0-1.4% adverse outcome). The area under the curve for predicting an adverse outcome was higher for the 2014 ESC algorithm (0.76, 95% CI 0.68-0.84) compared with the 2008 ESC algorithm (0.65, 95% CI 0.56-0.73) and highest for the modified FAST score (0.82, 95% CI 0.75-0.89). Patients classified as intermediate-high-risk by the 2014 ESC algorithm had a 8.9-fold increased risk for an adverse outcome (3.2-24.2, p<0.001 compared with intermediate-low- and low-risk patients), while the highest OR was observed for a modified FAST score ≥3 points (OR 15.9, 95% CI 5.3-47.6, p<0.001).The 2014 ESC algorithm improves risk stratification of not-high-risk pulmonary embolism compared with the 2008 ESC algorithm. All scores and algorithms accurately identified low-risk patients, while the modified FAST score appears more suitable to identify intermediate-high-risk patients. PMID:26743479

  20. Late onset variants in Fabry disease: Results in high risk population screenings in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Serebrinsky, G.; Calvo, M.; Fernandez, S.; Saito, S.; Ohno, K.; Wallace, E.; Warnock, D.; Sakuraba, H.; Politei, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Screening for Fabry disease (FD) in high risk populations yields a significant number of individuals with novel, ultra rare genetic variants in the GLA gene, largely without classic manifestations of FD. These variants often have significant residual α-galactosidase A activity. The establishment of the pathogenic character of previously unknown or rare variants is challenging but necessary to guide therapeutic decisions. Objectives To present 2 cases of non-classical presentations of FD with renal involvement as well as to discuss the importance of high risk population screenings for FD. Results Our patients with non-classical variants were diagnosed through FD screenings in dialysis units. However, organ damage was not limited to kidneys, since LVH, vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia and cornea verticillata were also present. Lyso-Gb3 concentrations in plasma were in the pathologic range, compatible with late onset FD. Structural studies and in silico analysis of p.(Cys174Gly) and p.(Arg363His), employing different tools, suggest that enzyme destabilization and possibly aggregation could play a role in organ damage. Conclusions Screening programs for FD in high risk populations are important as FD is a treatable multisystemic disease which is frequently overlooked in patients who present without classical manifestations. PMID:26937405

  1. Laryngostroboscopic, acoustic, and environmental characteristics of high-risk vocal performers.

    PubMed

    Hoffman-Ruddy, B; Lehman, J; Crandell, C; Ingram, D; Sapienza, C

    2001-12-01

    Vocal performance often requires excessively high vocal demand. In particular "high-risk" performers, a group of individuals who use their voices at their maximum effort level, are often exposed to unique vocal abuse characteristics which include high environmental and performance demands and inconsistencies of cast performance. Three categories of high-risk performers were studied: musical theater, choral ensemble, and street theater. Musical theater performers produce a Broadway, West End "belting" style voice. Street theater performers use a high-energy pitch varying dialogue in order to imitate a desired character voice. Choral ensemble performance requires group cohesion and blending of four-part harmony. The melodies require sustained vocal durations within each of the respective registers. For each of these studied groups vocal tasks of sustained production of /i/ and /a/ were subjected to analysis. Acoustic measures included fundamental frequency, standard deviation of fundamental frequency, jitter percent, shimmer percent, and noise-to-harmonic ratio. Laryngostroboscopic parameters were assessed during sustained /i/. Environmental acoustic sound field measurements were made using an A weighting and linear weighting sound pressure level. These weightings were used to describe noise levels and vocal output, respectively, within the performance environments. Results of the analysis suggest that high-risk performers are a unique performance type defined by distinctive, acoustic, laryngostroboscopic, and environmental characteristics. PMID:11792030

  2. microRNA expression profiling on individual breast cancer patients identifies novel panel of circulating microRNA for early detection.

    PubMed

    Hamam, Rimi; Ali, Arwa M; Alsaleh, Khalid A; Kassem, Moustapha; Alfayez, Musaed; Aldahmash, Abdullah; Alajez, Nehad M

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most common cancer type and the second cause of cancer-related death among women. Therefore, better understanding of breast cancer tumor biology and the identification of novel biomarkers is essential for the early diagnosis and for better disease stratification and management choices. Herein we developed a novel approach which relies on the isolation of circulating microRNAs through an enrichment step using speed-vacuum concentration which resulted in 5-fold increase in microRNA abundance. Global miRNA microarray expression profiling performed on individual samples from 23 BC and 9 normals identified 18 up-regulated miRNAs in BC patients (p(corr) < 0.05). Nine miRNAs (hsa-miR-4270, hsa-miR-1225-5p, hsa-miR-188-5p, hsa-miR-1202, hsa-miR-4281, hsa-miR-1207-5p, hsa-miR-642b-3p, hsa-miR-1290, and hsa-miR-3141) were subsequently validated using qRT-PCR in a cohort of 46 BC and 14 controls. The expression of those microRNAs was overall higher in patients with stage I, II, and III, compared to stage IV, with potential utilization for early detection. The expression of this microRNA panel was slightly higher in the HER2 and TN compared to patients with luminal subtype. Therefore, we developed a novel approach which led to the identification of a novel microRNA panel which was upregulated in BC patients with potential utilization in disease diagnosis and stratification. PMID:27180809

  3. Size-exclusion chromatography as a stand-alone methodology identifies novel markers in mass spectrometry analyses of plasma-derived vesicles from healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    de Menezes-Neto, Armando; Sáez, María José Fidalgo; Lozano-Ramos, Inés; Segui-Barber, Joan; Martin-Jaular, Lorena; Ullate, Josep M Estanyol; Fernandez-Becerra, Carmen; Borrás, Francesc E; Del Portillo, Hernando A

    2015-01-01

    Plasma-derived vesicles hold a promising potential for use in biomedical applications. Two major challenges, however, hinder their implementation into translational tools: (a) the incomplete characterization of the protein composition of plasma-derived vesicles, in the size range of exosomes, as mass spectrometric analysis of plasma sub-components is recognizably troublesome and (b) the limited reach of vesicle-based studies in settings where the infrastructural demand of ultracentrifugation, the most widely used isolation/purification methodology, is not available. In this study, we have addressed both challenges by carrying-out mass spectrometry (MS) analyses of plasma-derived vesicles, in the size range of exosomes, from healthy donors obtained by 2 alternative methodologies: size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) on sepharose columns and Exo-Spin™. No exosome markers, as opposed to the most abundant plasma proteins, were detected by Exo-Spin™. In contrast, exosomal markers were present in the early fractions of SEC where the most abundant plasma proteins have been largely excluded. Noticeably, after a cross-comparative analysis of all published studies using MS to characterize plasma-derived exosomes from healthy individuals, we also observed a paucity of "classical exosome markers." Independent of the isolation method, however, we consistently identified 2 proteins, CD5 antigen-like (CD5L) and galectin-3-binding protein (LGALS3BP), whose presence was validated by a bead-exosome FACS assay. Altogether, our results support the use of SEC as a stand-alone methodology to obtain preparations of extracellular vesicles, in the size range of exosomes, from plasma and suggest the use of CD5L and LGALS3BP as more suitable markers of plasma-derived vesicles in MS.

  4. Protein electrophoresis, immunoelectrophoresis and immunofixation electrophoresis as predictors for high-risk phenotype in familial Waldenström macroglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    McMaster, Mary L; Csako, Gyorgy

    2008-03-01

    Protein electrophoresis is used for the detection, evaluation and follow-up of monoclonal gammopathy (MG) conditions such as Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM). Immunofixation electrophoresis (IFE) is currently the most common method for isotyping of monoclonal gammopathy because of its superior sensitivity relative to immunoelectrophoresis (IEP). We designed a study to evaluate the clinicobiological relevance of small monoclonal bands detected by serum protein electrophoresis, IEP, and IFE. Serum protein electrophoresis, IEP, and IFE were used to evaluate possible monoclonal gammopathy in 46 members (29 relatives and 17 nonbloodline spouses) from 3 families with multiple cases of WM. IFE identified small monoclonal bands initially missed by IEP in 5 individuals (2 blood relatives, 3 spouses) among 46 study participants. All bands were IgM type. Twenty-three individuals, including the 2 blood relatives and 2 of 3 spouses with monoclonal gammopathy, were then followed for a median of 17 years (range, 13-25). The monoclonal gammopathy progressed in the 2 relatives but disappeared in the spouses, and new IgM MG developed in 2 additional relatives with a prior history of IgM polyclonal gammopathy. Small monoclonal bands detected by IFE in a familial context may be biologically meaningful, both as phenotypic biomarkers and possibly as predictors of high risk for WM. Polyclonal IgM may also be a marker of genetic susceptibility in WM families. Larger studies are needed to confirm these observations.

  5. Applying the lessons of high risk industries to health care.

    PubMed

    Hudson, P

    2003-12-01

    High risk industries such as commercial aviation and the oil and gas industry have achieved exemplary safety performance. This paper reviews how they have managed to do that. The primary reasons are the positive attitudes towards safety and the operation of effective formal safety management systems. The safety culture provides an important explanation of why such organisations perform well. An evolutionary model of safety culture is provided in which there is a range of cultures from the pathological through the reactive to the calculative. Later, the proactive culture can evolve towards the generative organisation, an alternative description of the high reliability organisation. The current status of health care is reviewed, arguing that it has a much higher level of accidents and has a reactive culture, lagging behind both high risk industries studied in both attitude and systematic management of patient risks. PMID:14645741

  6. Applying the lessons of high risk industries to health care

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, P

    2003-01-01

    High risk industries such as commercial aviation and the oil and gas industry have achieved exemplary safety performance. This paper reviews how they have managed to do that. The primary reasons are the positive attitudes towards safety and the operation of effective formal safety management systems. The safety culture provides an important explanation of why such organisations perform well. An evolutionary model of safety culture is provided in which there is a range of cultures from the pathological through the reactive to the calculative. Later, the proactive culture can evolve towards the generative organisation, an alternative description of the high reliability organisation. The current status of health care is reviewed, arguing that it has a much higher level of accidents and has a reactive culture, lagging behind both high risk industries studied in both attitude and systematic management of patient risks. PMID:14645741

  7. [Artificial circulation in high-risk percutaneous coronary interventions].

    PubMed

    Bazylev, V V; Evdokimov, M E; Pantiukhina, M A; Morozov, Z A

    2016-01-01

    In their everyday practical clinical work cardiovascular surgeons sometimes have to deal with patients at extremely high risk of both percutaneous coronary interventions (PCIs) and direct myocardial revascularization. A method of choice in such situations may become a PCI supported by artificial circulation (AC), for which foreign and Russian authors propose using systems of prolonged extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). The present work was aimed at sharing our experience with using standard systems of AC and their modifications (mini-circuit systems) for performing high-risk PCIs. Between October 2011 and November 2014, PCIs supported by artificial circulation were performed in a total of ten patients. All had extremely high risk of PCI due to coronary artery lesions [subocclusion of the trunk of the left coronary artery (LCA) combined with occlusion or significant stenosis of the right coronary artery (RCA)], concomitant pathology (obesity, diabetes mellitus, age, etc.) or critical state (circulatory arrest, resuscitating measures). Three patients during PCI developed ventricular fibrillation and one patient suffered an episode of asystole. All cardiac arrhythmias after restoration of the coronary blood flow disappeared spontaneously on the background of extracorporeal support. The only lethal outcome was registered during emergency PCI in a female patient admitted to the roentgen-operating room in the state of clinical death, on the background of continuing resuscitation measures. The presented methods of assisted circulation based on the standard AC systems and modification thereof (mini-circuit system) proved efficient. They make it possible to perform high-risk PCIs, including in clinics having neither appropriate equipment nor experience in ECMO. PMID:27626258

  8. High-risk energy plans yield low rewards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwynne, Peter

    2009-10-01

    Scientists have complained that a new research body run by the US Department of Energy (DOE) is suffering from management problems and is rejecting funding proposals without stating why. The DOE's Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) - created in 2007 - is designed to fund high-risk, high-payoff research and development projects in energy. However, the agency, which received its first budget in April, has so far turned down almost 95% of proposals after the first round.

  9. Bivariate Trajectories of Substance Use and Antisocial Behavior: Associations with Emerging Adult Outcomes in a High-Risk Sample

    PubMed Central

    Trim, Ryan S.; Worley, Matthew J.; Wall, Tamara L.; Hopfer, Christian J.; Crowley, Thomas J.; Hewitt, John K.; Brown, Sandra A.

    2015-01-01

    Substance use and antisocial behavior are complex, interrelated behaviors. The current study identified model trajectory classes defined by concurrent substance use and antisocial behavior and examined trajectory associations with emerging adult outcomes. Participants from a high-risk sample of youth (n=536; 73% male) completed interviews at baseline (mean age= 16.1 years) and followup (mean age= 22.6 years). Latent class growth analyses identified five trajectory classes based on alcohol/drug use (AOD) and antisocial behavior (ASB): Dual Chronic, Increasing AOD/Persistent ASB, Persistent AOD/Adolescent ASB, Decreasing Drugs/Persistent ASB, and Resolved. Many individuals (56%) exhibited elevated/increasing AOD, and most (91%) reported ASB decreases. Those associated with the Dual Chronic class had the highest rates of substance dependence, antisocial personality disorder (ASPD), and negative psychosocial outcomes. There were no differences in adult role attainment across classes. Conjoint examination of these behaviors provides greater detail regarding clinical course and can inform secondary prevention and intervention efforts. PMID:26889401

  10. Delivering asthma education to special high risk groups.

    PubMed

    FitzGerald, J M; Turner, M O

    1997-12-01

    Patients at high risk from their asthma and therefore worthy of more focused asthma education are those at risk of fatal and near fatal asthma(NFA). In recent years the characteristics of these patients have been better defined. The most important risk factor appears to be a prior history of NFA. Other important features include prior emergency room visits or hospitalization for asthma. Excess use of beta-agonists, especially in the absence of inhaled corticosteroids, also confers increased risk. High risk groups also share similar psychosocial barriers as well as economic deprivation. The benefits of asthma education in these groups have been assessed in a number of studies. In general, asthma education has been shown to have an impact on these patients. Greater effects have been achieved where there has been consistent follow-up by the same physician. Patients require frequent reinforcement of their asthma management, especially regarding their response to acute exacerbations. A sub-group of patients with more severe asthma appear to have a problem perceiving dyspnoea and may therefore benefit from peak flow monitoring but the problem of compliance with this intervention is significant. Behaviour modification plays an important role as does ensuring the patient has adequate resources to purchase medications especially the more expensive anti-inflammatory therapy. Future studies should focus on optimizing the potential benefits of educating high risk patients as they are not only those at greatest risk of death but also consume a disproportionate amount of health care resources.

  11. The high-risk myocardial infarction database initiative.

    PubMed

    Dickstein, Kenneth; Bebchuk, Judith; Wittes, Janet

    2012-01-01

    Coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction represent a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Four randomized, controlled, double-blind clinical trials--VALIANT, EPHESUS, OPTIMAAL, and CAPRICORN evaluated pharmacologic intervention in a total of 28,771 high-risk patients following acute MI complicated with signs of heart failure or evidence of left ventricular dysfunction. The demographic profiles of the 4 study cohorts were similar. The High-Risk MI Database Initiative constructed a common database by merging the data captured by these 4 large trials. The merged data set did not contain the randomized study treatment, so no comparisons could be made between the agents investigated. A total of more than 17,600 subjects experienced a cardiovascular end point. Approximately 5100 deaths occurred, and more than 15,700 subjects experienced a hospitalization. The primary objectives of this initiative were to use this large database to define more precisely the prognostic profile of this high-risk population, to perform rigorous, adequately-sized, subset analyses, to provide epidemiologic information and event rate estimation based on baseline demographics. The methodological challenges and limitations of such an analyses are discussed. It is proposed that some thoughtful foresight and planning could enable us to use the large number of clinical events that accrue during randomized clinical trials to address questions of scientific and clinical interest. PMID:22226005

  12. The National Cross-Site Evaluation of High-Risk Youth Programs. Preventing Substance Abuse: Major Findings from the National Cross-Site Evaluation of High-Risk Youth Programs. Monograph Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Springer, J. Fred; Sambrano, Soledad; Sale, Elizabeth; Kasim, Rafa; Herman, Jack

    This multiple-site study assessed 48 prevention programs for high-risk youth funded by the Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, identifying program characteristics associated with strong substance abuse prevention outcomes. Data analysis indicated that substance abuse programs reduced rates of substance use, and the positive effects of program…

  13. Perinatal mortality in rural India with special reference to high risk pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Misra, P K; Thakur, S; Kumar, A; Tandon, S

    1993-02-01

    One-thousand-and-sixty-five pregnant mothers among a rural population of 30,000 in Uttar Pradesh were followed for 1 year. A still birth rate of 26.1 and perinatal mortality rate of 121.1 per thousand births were registered. Early neonatal mortality rate was found to be 97.4 per thousand live births. Twenty per cent of the women were identified with high risk factors. Inadequate or no antenatal care, bad obstetric history, and prolonged labour attributed to 13, 20, and 27 per cent of the risk, respectively, with a respective relative risk of 2.23, 3.1, and 4.09 times. These three factors were found to be the major and significant contributors to high perinatal mortality amongst the 'high risk' group. Selective extension of comprehensive M.C.H. Care to this group using the high risk approach is expected to lower perinatal mortality in rural community where M.C.H. services are far from optimum. PMID:8445688

  14. Dynamics of high-risk nonvaccine human papillomavirus types after actual vaccination scheme.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Raúl; Vargas-De-León, Cruz; Cabrera, Augusto; Miramontes, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been identified as the main etiological factor in the developing of cervical cancer (CC). This finding has propitiated the development of vaccines that help to prevent the HPVs 16 and 18 infection. Both genotypes are associated with 70% of CC worldwide. In the present study, we aimed to determine the emergence of high-risk nonvaccine HPV after actual vaccination scheme to estimate the impact of the current HPV vaccines. A SIR-type model was used to study the HPV dynamics after vaccination. According to the results, our model indicates that the application of the vaccine reduces infection by target or vaccine genotypes as expected. However, numerical simulations of the model suggest the presence of the phenomenon called vaccine-induced pathogen strain replacement. Here, we report the following replacement mechanism: if the effectiveness of cross-protective immunity is not larger than the effectiveness of the vaccine, then the high-risk nonvaccine genotypes emerge. In this scenario, further studies of infection dispersion by HPV are necessary to ascertain the real impact of the current vaccines, primarily because of the different high-risk HPV types that are found in CC.

  15. Oncologic Outcome of Radical Prostatectomy as Monotherapy for Men with High-risk Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Junya; Miyake, Hideaki; Inoue, Taka-aki; Ogawa, Takayoshi; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Fujisawa, Masato

    2016-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to review our experience with radical prostatectomy (RP) as monotherapy for men with high-risk prostate cancer (PCa). Patients and Methods This study included 382 consecutive patients who were diagnosed with high-risk PCa according to the D'Amico definition and subsequently underwent RP without neoadjuvant therapy. Biochemical recurrence (BR) was defined as a serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level ≥ 0.2 ng/ml on two consecutive measurements, and none of the patients received any adjuvant therapies until their serum PSA levels reached ≥ 0.4 ng/ml. Results The median preoperative serum PSA level in these 382 patients was 15.9 ng/ml. Pathological stages ≥ pT2c and Gleason scores ≥ 8 were observed in 288 and 194 patients, respectively. During the observation period (median, 48.0 months), BR occurred in 134 patients, and the 5-year BR-free survival rate was 60.1%; however, no patient died of cancer progression. Multivariate analysis identified capsular invasion, seminal vesicle invasion, and surgical margin status as independent predictors of BR. Conclusions Comparatively favorable cancer control could be achieved using RP as monotherapy for men with high-risk PCa; however, RP alone may be insufficient for patients with capsular invasion, seminal vesicle invasion, and/or surgical margin positivity. PMID:27390578

  16. Effectiveness of Palivizumab in Preventing RSV Hospitalization in High Risk Children: A Real-World Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Rawlinson, William; Snelling, Thomas L.; Jaffe, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Infection with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the major causes globally of childhood respiratory morbidity and hospitalization. Palivizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody, has been recommended for high risk infants to prevent severe RSV-associated respiratory illness. This recommendation is based on evidence of efficacy when used under clinical trial conditions. However the real-world effectiveness of palivizumab outside of clinical trials among different patient populations is not well established. We performed a systematic review focusing on postlicensure observational studies of the protective effect of palivizumab prophylaxis for reducing RSV-associated hospitalizations in infants and children at high risk of severe infection. We searched studies published in English between 1 January 1999 and August 2013 and identified 420 articles, of which 20 met the inclusion criteria. This review supports the recommended use of palivizumab for reducing RSV-associated hospitalization rates in premature infants born at gestational age < 33 weeks and in children with chronic lung and heart diseases. Data are limited to allow commenting on the protective effect of palivizumab among other high risk children, including those with Down syndrome, cystic fibrosis, and haematological malignancy, indicating further research is warranted in these groups. PMID:25548575

  17. Upgrade of high-risk breast lesions detected on mammography in the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Menes, Tehillah S.; Rosenberg, Robert; Balch, Steven; Jaffer, Shabnam; Kerlikowske, Karla; Miglioretti, Diana L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Upgrade rates of high-risk breast lesions after screening mammography were examined. Study design The Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium registry was used to identify all BI-RADS 4 assessments followed by needle biopsies with high-risk lesions. Follow-up was performed for all women. Results High-risk lesions were found in 957 needle biopsies, with excision documented in 53%. Most (N=685) were atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH), 173 were lobular neoplasia, and 99 were papillary lesions. Upgrade to cancer varied with type of lesion (18% in ADH, 10% in lobular neoplasia and 2% in papillary). In premenopausal women with ADH, upgrade was associated with family history. Cancers associated with ADH were mostly (82%) ductal carcinoma in situ, those associated with lobular neoplasia were mostly (56%) invasive. During further 2 years of follow-up, cancer was documented in 1% of women with follow-up surgery and in 3% with no surgery. Conclusion Despite low rates of surgery, low rates of cancer were documented during follow-up. Benign papillary lesions diagnosed on BI-RADS 4 mammograms among asymptomatic women do not justify surgical excision. PMID:24112677

  18. Genome-Wide Association Study with Targeted and Non-targeted NMR Metabolomics Identifies 15 Novel Loci of Urinary Human Metabolic Individuality

    PubMed Central

    Raffler, Johannes; Friedrich, Nele; Arnold, Matthias; Kacprowski, Tim; Rueedi, Rico; Altmaier, Elisabeth; Bergmann, Sven; Budde, Kathrin; Gieger, Christian; Homuth, Georg; Pietzner, Maik; Römisch-Margl, Werner; Strauch, Konstantin; Völzke, Henry; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wallaschofski, Henri; Nauck, Matthias; Völker, Uwe; Kastenmüller, Gabi; Suhre, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies with metabolic traits (mGWAS) uncovered many genetic variants that influence human metabolism. These genetically influenced metabotypes (GIMs) contribute to our metabolic individuality, our capacity to respond to environmental challenges, and our susceptibility to specific diseases. While metabolic homeostasis in blood is a well investigated topic in large mGWAS with over 150 known loci, metabolic detoxification through urinary excretion has only been addressed by few small mGWAS with only 11 associated loci so far. Here we report the largest mGWAS to date, combining targeted and non-targeted 1H NMR analysis of urine samples from 3,861 participants of the SHIP-0 cohort and 1,691 subjects of the KORA F4 cohort. We identified and replicated 22 loci with significant associations with urinary traits, 15 of which are new (HIBCH, CPS1, AGXT, XYLB, TKT, ETNPPL, SLC6A19, DMGDH, SLC36A2, GLDC, SLC6A13, ACSM3, SLC5A11, PNMT, SLC13A3). Two-thirds of the urinary loci also have a metabolite association in blood. For all but one of the 6 loci where significant associations target the same metabolite in blood and urine, the genetic effects have the same direction in both fluids. In contrast, for the SLC5A11 locus, we found increased levels of myo-inositol in urine whereas mGWAS in blood reported decreased levels for the same genetic variant. This might indicate less effective re-absorption of myo-inositol in the kidneys of carriers. In summary, our study more than doubles the number of known loci that influence urinary phenotypes. It thus allows novel insights into the relationship between blood homeostasis and its regulation through excretion. The newly discovered loci also include variants previously linked to chronic kidney disease (CPS1, SLC6A13), pulmonary hypertension (CPS1), and ischemic stroke (XYLB). By establishing connections from gene to disease via metabolic traits our results provide novel hypotheses about molecular mechanisms

  19. A Population-based Screening of Type 2 Diabetes in High-risk Population of Yasuj, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Yazdanpanah, Behrouz; Yazdanpanah, Behzad; Mobasheri, Ali

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Complications associated with diabetes can be prevented by early diagnostics. A high-risk population was screened for diabetes, and the prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes mellitus (DM) and impaired fasting glucose (IFG) were used for examining the impacts of lifestyle, social and anthropometric features, and other risk factors. The target population comprised 30-65 years old residents from the western suburbs of Yasuj. Homes were approached, and a standard questionnaire was used for collecting information on sex, blood pressure, weight, height, and BMI for each participant. The high-risk participants were recognized according to the National Diabetes Prevention and Control Committee criteria and were introduced to an assigned laboratory. Blood samples were collected after 12-hour fasting for the measurement of total cholesterol, triglycerides and fasting glucose levels. The statistical analysis was pe